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Sample records for repair proteins including

  1. Protein damage and repair controlling seed vigor and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogé, Laurent; Broyart, Caroline; Collet, Boris; Godin, Béatrice; Jallet, Denis; Bourdais, Gildas; Job, Dominique; Grappin, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The formation of abnormal isoaspartyl residues derived from aspartyl or asparaginyl residues is a major source of spontaneous protein misfolding in cells. The repair enzyme protein L: -isoaspartyl methyltransferase (PIMT) counteracts such damage by catalyzing the conversion of abnormal isoaspartyl residues to their normal aspartyl forms. Thus, this enzyme contributes to the survival of many organisms, including plants. Analysis of the accumulation of isoaspartyl-containing proteins and its modulation by the PIMT repair pathway, using germination tests, immunodetection, enzymatic assays, and HPLC analysis, gives new insights in understanding controlling mechanisms of seed longevity and vigor.

  2. X-ray repair cross complementing protein 1 in base excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanssen-Bauer, Audun; Solvang-Garten, Karin; Akbari, Mansour

    2012-01-01

    X-ray Repair Cross Complementing protein 1 (XRCC1) acts as a scaffolding protein in the converging base excision repair (BER) and single strand break repair (SSBR) pathways. XRCC1 also interacts with itself and rapidly accumulates at sites of DNA damage. XRCC1 can thus mediate the assembly of large...

  3. Transected sciatic nerve repair by diode laser protein soldering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekrazad, Reza; Mortezai, Omid; Pedram, MirSepehr; Kalhori, Katayoun Am; Joharchi, Khojasteh; Mansoori, Korosh; Ebrahimi, Roja; Mashhadiabbas, Fatemeh

    2017-08-01

    Despite advances in microsurgical techniques, repair of peripheral nerve injuries (PNI) is still a major challenge in regenerative medicine. The standard treatment for PNI includes suturing and anasthomosis of the transected nerve. The objective of this study was to compare neurorraphy (nerve repair) using standard suturingto diode laser protein soldering on the functional recovery of transected sciatic nerves. Thirty adult male Fischer-344 Wistar rats were randomly assigned to 3 groups: 1. The control group, no repair, 2. the standard of care suture group, and 3. The laser/protein solder group. For all three groups, the sciatic nerve was transected and the repair was done immediately. For the suture repair group, 10.0 prolene suture was used and for the laser/protein solder group a diode laser (500mW output power) in combination with bovine serum albumen and indocyanine green dye was used. Behavioral assessment by sciatic functional index was done on all rats biweekly. At 12weeks post-surgery, EMG recordings were done on all the rats and the rats were euthanized for histological evaluation of the sciatic nerves. The one-way ANOVA test was used for statistical analysis. The average time required to perform the surgery was significantly shorter for the laser-assisted nerve repair group compared to the suture group. The EMG evaluation revealed no difference between the two groups. Based on the sciatic function index the laser group was significantly better than the suture group after 12weeks (pneurorraphy using standard suturing methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. DNA repair by the Ada protein of E. coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karran, P.; Hall, J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the Ada protein of E. coli which exemplifies the highly specialized nature of the enzymes which have evolved to repair DNA. According to the authors, this protein exhibits not only novel mechanistic features but also provides an apparently unique example of a strategy for controlling gene expression in E. coli. They report that knowledge of the properties and mode of action of the Ada protein has afforded insight into how human cells are affected by alkylating agents, including those used in chemotherapy

  5. Interobserver variability in the evaluation of mismatch repair protein immunostaining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Louise Laurberg; Ladelund, Steen; Holck, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    Immunohistochemical staining for mismatch repair proteins has during recent years been established as a routine analysis in many pathology laboratories with the aim to identify tumors linked to the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome. Despite widespread application, data on reliabi......Immunohistochemical staining for mismatch repair proteins has during recent years been established as a routine analysis in many pathology laboratories with the aim to identify tumors linked to the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome. Despite widespread application, data...... on reliability are lacking. We therefore evaluated interobserver variability among 6 pathologists, 3 experienced gastrointestinal pathologists and 3 residents. In total, 225 immunohistochemically stained colorectal cancers were evaluated as having normal, weak, loss of, or nonevaluable mismatch repair protein...... variability was considerable, though experienced pathologists and residents reached the same level of consensus. Because results from immunohistochemical mismatch repair protein stainings are used for decisions on mutation analysis and as an aid in the interpretation of gene variants of unknown significance...

  6. A novel method for monitoring functional lesion-specific recruitment of repair proteins in live cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodrick, Jordan; Gupta, Suhani; Khatkar, Pooja; Dave, Kalpana; Levashova, Darya; Choudhury, Sujata; Elias, Hadi; Saha, Tapas; Mueller, Susette; Roy, Rabindra

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A method of monitoring lesion-specific recruitment of proteins in vivo is described. • Recruitment of repair enzymes to abasic sites is monitored by co-localization. • Repair protein recruitment is consistent with known protein–protein relationships. • Cells demonstrated complete repair of abasic sites by 90 min. - Abstract: DNA–protein relationships have been studied by numerous methods, but a particular gap in methodology lies in the study of DNA adduct-specific interactions with proteins in vivo, which particularly affects the field of DNA repair. Using the repair of a well-characterized and ubiquitous adduct, the abasic (AP) site, as a model, we have developed a comprehensive method of monitoring DNA lesion-specific recruitment of proteins in vivo over time. We utilized a surrogate system in which a Cy3-labeled plasmid containing a single AP-site was transfected into cells, and the interaction of the labeled DNA with BER enzymes, including APE1, Polβ, LIG1, and FEN1, was monitored by immunofluorescent staining of the enzymes by Alexafluor-488-conjugated secondary antibody. The recruitment of enzymes was characterized by quantification of Cy3-Alexafluor-488 co-localization. To validate the microscopy-based method, repair of the transfected AP-site DNA was also quantified at various time points post-transfection using a real time PCR-based method. Notably, the recruitment time kinetics for each enzyme were consistent with AP-site repair time kinetics. This microscopy-based methodology is reliable in detecting the recruitment of proteins to specific DNA substrates and can be extended to study other in vivo DNA–protein relationships in any DNA sequence and in the context of any DNA structure in transfectable proliferating or quiescent cells. The method may be applied to a variety of disciplines of nucleic acid transaction pathways, including repair, replication, transcription, and recombination

  7. A novel method for monitoring functional lesion-specific recruitment of repair proteins in live cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodrick, Jordan; Gupta, Suhani; Khatkar, Pooja; Dave, Kalpana; Levashova, Darya; Choudhury, Sujata; Elias, Hadi; Saha, Tapas; Mueller, Susette; Roy, Rabindra, E-mail: rr228@georgetown.edu

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • A method of monitoring lesion-specific recruitment of proteins in vivo is described. • Recruitment of repair enzymes to abasic sites is monitored by co-localization. • Repair protein recruitment is consistent with known protein–protein relationships. • Cells demonstrated complete repair of abasic sites by 90 min. - Abstract: DNA–protein relationships have been studied by numerous methods, but a particular gap in methodology lies in the study of DNA adduct-specific interactions with proteins in vivo, which particularly affects the field of DNA repair. Using the repair of a well-characterized and ubiquitous adduct, the abasic (AP) site, as a model, we have developed a comprehensive method of monitoring DNA lesion-specific recruitment of proteins in vivo over time. We utilized a surrogate system in which a Cy3-labeled plasmid containing a single AP-site was transfected into cells, and the interaction of the labeled DNA with BER enzymes, including APE1, Polβ, LIG1, and FEN1, was monitored by immunofluorescent staining of the enzymes by Alexafluor-488-conjugated secondary antibody. The recruitment of enzymes was characterized by quantification of Cy3-Alexafluor-488 co-localization. To validate the microscopy-based method, repair of the transfected AP-site DNA was also quantified at various time points post-transfection using a real time PCR-based method. Notably, the recruitment time kinetics for each enzyme were consistent with AP-site repair time kinetics. This microscopy-based methodology is reliable in detecting the recruitment of proteins to specific DNA substrates and can be extended to study other in vivo DNA–protein relationships in any DNA sequence and in the context of any DNA structure in transfectable proliferating or quiescent cells. The method may be applied to a variety of disciplines of nucleic acid transaction pathways, including repair, replication, transcription, and recombination.

  8. Human mismatch repair protein hMutLα is required to repair short slipped-DNAs of trinucleotide repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Gagan B; Slean, Meghan M; Simard, Jodie P; Pearson, Christopher E

    2012-12-07

    Mismatch repair (MMR) is required for proper maintenance of the genome by protecting against mutations. The mismatch repair system has also been implicated as a driver of certain mutations, including disease-associated trinucleotide repeat instability. We recently revealed a requirement of hMutSβ in the repair of short slip-outs containing a single CTG repeat unit (1). The involvement of other MMR proteins in short trinucleotide repeat slip-out repair is unknown. Here we show that hMutLα is required for the highly efficient in vitro repair of single CTG repeat slip-outs, to the same degree as hMutSβ. HEK293T cell extracts, deficient in hMLH1, are unable to process single-repeat slip-outs, but are functional when complemented with hMutLα. The MMR-deficient hMLH1 mutant, T117M, which has a point mutation proximal to the ATP-binding domain, is defective in slip-out repair, further supporting a requirement for hMLH1 in the processing of short slip-outs and possibly the involvement of hMHL1 ATPase activity. Extracts of hPMS2-deficient HEC-1-A cells, which express hMLH1, hMLH3, and hPMS1, are only functional when complemented with hMutLα, indicating that neither hMutLβ nor hMutLγ is sufficient to repair short slip-outs. The resolution of clustered short slip-outs, which are poorly repaired, was partially dependent upon a functional hMutLα. The joint involvement of hMutSβ and hMutLα suggests that repeat instability may be the result of aberrant outcomes of repair attempts.

  9. HYDROGEL-BASED NANOCOMPOSITES OF THERAPEUTIC PROTEINS FOR TISSUE REPAIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Suwei; Segura, Tatiana

    2014-05-01

    The ability to design artificial extracellular matrices as cell instructive scaffolds has opened the door to technologies capable of studying cell fates in vitro and to guide tissue repair in vivo . One main component of the design of artificial extracellular matrices is the incorporation of protein-based biochemical cues to guide cell phenotypes and multicellular organizations. However, promoting the long-term bioactivity, controlling the bioavailability and understanding how the physical presentations of these proteins impacts cellular fates are among the challenges of the field. Nanotechnolgy has advanced to meet the challenges of protein therapeutics. For example, the approaches to incorporating proteins into tissue repairing scaffolds have ranged from bulk encapsulations to smart nanodepots that protect proteins from degradations and allow opportunities for controlled release.

  10. Repair of traumatized mammalian hair cells via sea anemone repair proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Pei-Ciao; Smith, Karen Müller; Watson, Glen M

    2016-08-01

    Mammalian hair cells possess only a limited ability to repair damage after trauma. In contrast, sea anemones show a marked capability to repair damaged hair bundles by means of secreted repair proteins (RPs). Previously, it was found that recovery of traumatized hair cells in blind cavefish was enhanced by anemone-derived RPs; therefore, the ability of anemone RPs to assist recovery of damaged hair cells in mammals was tested here. After a 1 h incubation in RP-enriched culture media, uptake of FM1-43 by experimentally traumatized murine cochlear hair cells was restored to levels comparable to those exhibited by healthy controls. In addition, RP-treated explants had significantly more normally structured hair bundles than time-matched traumatized control explants. Collectively, these results indicate that anemone-derived RPs assist in restoring normal function and structure of experimentally traumatized hair cells of the mouse cochlea. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. A review of the reliability analysis of LPRS including the components repairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, L.F.S. de; Fleming, P.V.; Frutuoso e Melo, P.F.F.; Tayt-Sohn, L.C.

    1983-01-01

    The reliability analysis of low pressure recirculation system in its long-term recicurlation phase before 24hs is presented. The possibility of repairing the components out of the containment is included. A general revision of analysis of the short-term recirculation phase is done. (author) [pt

  12. Upper tract urothelial carcinomas: frequency of association with mismatch repair protein loss and lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Holly L; McKenney, Jesse K; Heald, Brandie; Stephenson, Andrew; Campbell, Steven C; Plesec, Thomas; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Increased risk for upper tract urothelial carcinoma is described in patients with Lynch syndrome, caused by germline mutations in mismatch repair genes. We aimed to identify the frequency of mismatch repair protein loss in upper tract urothelial carcinoma and its potential for identifying an association with Lynch syndrome. We queried our database to identify upper tract urothelial carcinomas. Patients were cross-referenced for history of colorectal carcinoma or other common Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasms to enrich for potential Lynch syndrome cases. Tumor histopathologic characteristics were reviewed and each case was analyzed for loss of mismatch repair proteins, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2, by immunohistochemistry. Of 444 patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma, a subset of 215 (encompassing 30 with upper tract urothelial carcinoma and another common Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasm) was analyzed for loss of mismatch repair protein expression. Of 30 patients with Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasms, six had documented Lynch syndrome, including two with Muir-Torre syndrome. Mismatch repair protein loss was identified in 7% of total upper tract urothelial carcinomas and 30% of patients with Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasms (including all patients with Lynch syndrome/Muir-Torre syndrome). Of patients without history of Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasms, 5 of 184 (2.7%) had loss of mismatch repair protein expression. Twelve cases with mismatch repair protein loss demonstrated loss of MSH2 and MSH6, and 2 had isolated loss of MSH6. MLH1 and PMS2 expression were consistently retained. Although increased intratumoral lymphocytes, inverted growth, pushing tumor-stromal interface, and lack of nuclear pleomorphism were more commonly seen in cases with mismatch repair protein loss, only intratumoral lymphocytes and presence of pushing borders were statistically significant. MLH1 and PMS2 testing appear to have little utility in upper tract urothelial

  13. Sporadic colorectal polyps and mismatch repair proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Molaei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancers often arise from benign polyps. Adenomatous polyps and serrated polyps progress step by step to adenocarcinoma and change into malignant cancers. Genetic and epigenetic changes have correlation with specific stages of polyp-adenocarcinoma progression and colorectal cancer histopathological changes. Aims: In this study we used immunohistochemistry (IHC staining in sporadic colorectal polyps to assay functional status of MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 proteins, to track genetic/epigenetic roles of this issue in our patients. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study we assessed all patients who were admitted with sporadic colorectal polyps and underwent polypectomy in endoscopy department during 2004-2008. Result: IHC results were abnormal in 6.8% cases for MLH1, in 4.5% cases for MSH2, in 3% for MSH6, and in 4.8% for PMS2. In all cases with abnormal PMS2, MLH1 was also reported as abnormal. Same results were reported for abnormal MSH2, which is accompanied with abnormal MSH6 in all cases (P values < 0.001. There is no significant difference between IHC staining results, gender, dysplasia grade, adenomatous type, and invasion. On the other hand, there was significant difference between IHC staining results, polyp location, and mean age of patients. The same significant difference was between adenomatous polyps and serrated adenoma polyps by MLH1 and PMS2 (P values < 0.05. Conclusion: According to our findings, maybe MMR dysfunction is the cause of sporadic colorectal polyps in younger age and its increasing risk of dysplasia progression and malignancy progression is only in serrated adenoma. Sporadic polyps in left colon had a higher risk to progress to malignancies, and abnormal IHC staining for MLH1 and PMS2 in serrated polyps is much more than in other adenomatous polyps.

  14. New paradigms in the repair of oxidative damage in human genome: mechanisms ensuring repair of mutagenic base lesions during replication and involvement of accessory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Arijit; Yang, Chunying; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L

    2015-05-01

    Oxidized bases in the mammalian genome, which are invariably mutagenic due to their mispairing property, are continuously induced by endogenous reactive oxygen species and more abundantly after oxidative stress. Unlike bulky base adducts induced by UV and other environmental mutagens in the genome that block replicative DNA polymerases, oxidatively damaged bases such as 5-hydroxyuracil, produced by oxidative deamination of cytosine in the template strand, do not block replicative polymerases and thus need to be repaired prior to replication to prevent mutation. Following up our earlier studies, which showed that the Nei endonuclease VIII like 1 (NEIL1) DNA glycosylase, one of the five base excision repair (BER)-initiating enzymes in mammalian cells, has enhanced expression during the S-phase and higher affinity for replication fork-mimicking single-stranded (ss) DNA substrates, we recently provided direct experimental evidence for NEIL1's role in replicating template strand repair. The key requirement for this event, which we named as the 'cow-catcher' mechanism of pre-replicative BER, is NEIL1's non-productive binding (substrate binding without product formation) to the lesion base in ss DNA template to stall DNA synthesis, causing fork regression. Repair of the lesion in reannealed duplex is then carried out by NEIL1 in association with the DNA replication proteins. NEIL1 (and other BER-initiating enzymes) also interact with several accessory and non-canonical proteins including the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U and Y-box-binding protein 1 as well as high mobility group box 1 protein, whose precise roles in BER are still obscure. In this review, we have discussed the recent advances in our understanding of oxidative genome damage repair pathways with particular focus on the pre-replicative template strand repair and the role of scaffold factors like X-ray repairs cross-complementing protein 1 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 and other accessory

  15. Laser-activated protein solder for peripheral nerve repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trickett, Rodney I.; Lauto, Antonio; Dawes, Judith M.; Owen, Earl R.

    1995-05-01

    A 100 micrometers core optical fiber-coupled 75 mW diode laser operating at a wavelength of 800 nm has been used in conjunction with a protein solder to stripe weld severed rat tibial nerves, reducing the long operating time required for microsurgical nerve repair. Welding is produced by selective laser denaturation of the albumin based solder which contains the dye indocyanine green. Operating time for laser soldering was 10 +/- 5 min. (n equals 20) compared to 23 +/- 9 min. (n equals 10) for microsuturing. The laser solder technique resulted in patent welds with a tensile strength of 15 +/- 5 g, while microsutured nerves had a tensile strength of 40 +/- 10 g. Histopathology of the laser soldered nerves, conducted immediately after surgery, displayed solder adhesion to the outer membrane with minimal damage to the inner axons of the nerves. An in vivo study is under way comparing laser solder repaired tibial nerves to conventional microsuture repair. At the time of submission 15 laser soldered nerves and 7 sutured nerves were characterized at 3 months and showed successful regeneration with compound muscle action potentials of 27 +/- 8 mV and 29 +/- 8 mW respectively. A faster, less damaging and long lasting laser based anastomotic technique is presented.

  16. Protein synthesis and sublethal damage repair in synchronized CHO cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yezzi, M.J.; Tobias, C.A.; Blakely, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that the split dose survival response to x-rays of asynchronous CHO-TSH1 cells is reduced if the cells are held at 40 0 C,a temperature that inhibits protein synthesis, for 2 hours before the first dose and during a 2-hour interval between doses. In conjunction with the survival experiments on asynchronous cells, the authors also examined the DNA rejoining ability in split dose studies with and without inhibition of protein synthesis. The results of these experiments suggest that inhibition of protein synthesis affects a pool of proteins that are necessary for the correct expression of the DNA, although they do not appear to be involved in rejoining DNA breaks. They have extended this work to the study of cells synchronized in G1 phase (2 hour post-mitosis) and S phase (10 hour post-mitosis). Autoradiographic analyses, using 3H-TdR pulse labeling, demonstrated that a delay in the progression of each synchronized cell population occurs after inhibition of protein synthesis. Data are reported on the effects of inhibition of protein synthesis on the ability of G1 and S phase cells to repair sublethal damage

  17. Laser-activated protein bands for peripheral nerve repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauto, Antonio; Trickett, Rodney I.; Malik, Richard; Dawes, Judith M.; Owen, Earl R.

    1996-01-01

    A 100 micrometer core optical fiber-coupled 75 mW diode laser operating at a wavelength of 800 nm has been used in conjunction with a protein solder to stripe weld severed rat tibial nerves, reducing the long operating time required for microsurgical nerve repair. Welding is produced by selective laser denaturation of the protein based solder which contains the dye indocyanine green. Operating time for laser soldering was 10 plus or minus 5 min. (n equals 24) compared to 23 plus or minus 9 min (n equals 13) for microsuturing. The laser solder technique resulted in patent welds with a tensile strength of 15 plus or minus 5 g, while microsutured nerves had a tensile strength of 40 plus or minus 10 g. Histopathology of the laser soldered nerves, conducted immediately after surgery, displayed solder adhesion to the outer membrane with minimal damage to the inner axons of the nerves. An in vivo study, with a total of fifty-seven adult male wistar rats, compared laser solder repaired tibial nerves to conventional microsuture repair. Twenty-four laser soldered nerves and thirteen sutured nerves were characterized at three months and showed successful regeneration with average compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) of 2.4 plus or minus 0.7 mV and 2.7 plus or minus 0.8 mV respectively. Histopathology of the in vivo study, confirmed the comparable regeneration of axons in laser and suture operated nerves. A faster, less damaging and long lasting laser based anastomotic technique is presented.

  18. Homology modeling, molecular docking and DNA binding studies of nucleotide excision repair UvrC protein from M. tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parulekar, Rishikesh S; Barage, Sagar H; Jalkute, Chidambar B; Dhanavade, Maruti J; Fandilolu, Prayagraj M; Sonawane, Kailas D

    2013-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a Gram positive, acid-fast bacteria belonging to genus Mycobacterium, is the leading causative agent of most cases of tuberculosis. The pathogenicity of the bacteria is enhanced by its developed DNA repair mechanism which consists of machineries such as nucleotide excision repair. Nucleotide excision repair consists of excinuclease protein UvrABC endonuclease, multi-enzymatic complex which carries out repair of damaged DNA in sequential manner. UvrC protein is a part of this complex and thus helps to repair the damaged DNA of M. tuberculosis. Hence, structural bioinformatics study of UvrC protein from M. tuberculosis was carried out using homology modeling and molecular docking techniques. Assessment of the reliability of the homology model was carried out by predicting its secondary structure along with its model validation. The predicted structure was docked with the ATP and the interacting amino acid residues of UvrC protein with the ATP were found to be TRP539, PHE89, GLU536, ILE402 and ARG575. The binding of UvrC protein with the DNA showed two different domains. The residues from domain I of the protein VAL526, THR524 and LEU521 interact with the DNA whereas, amino acids interacting from the domain II of the UvrC protein included ARG597, GLU595, GLY594 and GLY592 residues. This predicted model could be useful to design new inhibitors of UvrC enzyme to prevent pathogenesis of Mycobacterium and so the tuberculosis.

  19. Two familial ALS proteins function in prevention/repair of transcription-associated DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Sarah J; Mordes, Daniel A; Cameron, Lisa A; Neuberg, Donna S; Landini, Serena; Eggan, Kevin; Livingston, David M

    2016-11-29

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive motor neuron dysfunction disease that leads to paralysis and death. There is currently no established molecular pathogenesis pathway. Multiple proteins involved in RNA processing are linked to ALS, including FUS and TDP43, and we propose a disease mechanism in which loss of function of at least one of these proteins leads to an accumulation of transcription-associated DNA damage contributing to motor neuron cell death and progressive neurological symptoms. In support of this hypothesis, we find that FUS or TDP43 depletion leads to increased sensitivity to a transcription-arresting agent due to increased DNA damage. Thus, these proteins normally contribute to the prevention or repair of transcription-associated DNA damage. In addition, both FUS and TDP43 colocalize with active RNA polymerase II at sites of DNA damage along with the DNA damage repair protein, BRCA1, and FUS and TDP43 participate in the prevention or repair of R loop-associated DNA damage, a manifestation of aberrant transcription and/or RNA processing. Gaining a better understanding of the role(s) that FUS and TDP43 play in transcription-associated DNA damage could shed light on the mechanisms underlying ALS pathogenesis.

  20. Modulation of Wound Healing and Scar Formation by MG53 Protein-mediated Cell Membrane Repair*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haichang; Duann, Pu; Lin, Pei-Hui; Zhao, Li; Fan, Zhaobo; Tan, Tao; Zhou, Xinyu; Sun, Mingzhai; Fu, Minghuan; Orange, Matthew; Sermersheim, Matthew; Ma, Hanley; He, Duofen; Steinberg, Steven M.; Higgins, Robert; Zhu, Hua; John, Elizabeth; Zeng, Chunyu; Guan, Jianjun; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-01-01

    Cell membrane repair is an important aspect of physiology, and disruption of this process can result in pathophysiology in a number of different tissues, including wound healing, chronic ulcer and scarring. We have previously identified a novel tripartite motif family protein, MG53, as an essential component of the cell membrane repair machinery. Here we report the functional role of MG53 in the modulation of wound healing and scarring. Although MG53 is absent from keratinocytes and fibroblasts, remarkable defects in skin architecture and collagen overproduction are observed in mg53−/− mice, and these animals display delayed wound healing and abnormal scarring. Recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein, encapsulated in a hydrogel formulation, facilitates wound healing and prevents scarring in rodent models of dermal injuries. An in vitro study shows that rhMG53 protects against acute injury to keratinocytes and facilitates the migration of fibroblasts in response to scratch wounding. During fibrotic remodeling, rhMG53 interferes with TGF-β-dependent activation of myofibroblast differentiation. The resulting down-regulation of α smooth muscle actin and extracellular matrix proteins contributes to reduced scarring. Overall, these studies establish a trifunctional role for MG53 as a facilitator of rapid injury repair, a mediator of cell migration, and a modulator of myofibroblast differentiation during wound healing. Targeting the functional interaction between MG53 and TGF-β signaling may present a potentially effective means for promoting scarless wound healing. PMID:26306047

  1. 14-3-3 checkpoint regulatory proteins interact specifically with DNA repair protein human exonuclease 1 (hEXO1) via a semi-conserved motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sofie Dabros; Keijzers, Guido; Rampakakis, Emmanouil

    2012-01-01

    Human exonuclease 1 (hEXO1) acts directly in diverse DNA processing events, including replication, mismatch repair (MMR), and double strand break repair (DSBR), and it was also recently described to function as damage sensor and apoptosis inducer following DNA damage. In contrast, 14-3-3 proteins...... are specifically induced by replication inhibition leading to protein ubiquitination and degradation. We demonstrate direct and robust interaction between hEXO1 and six of the seven 14-3-3 isoforms in vitro, suggestive of a novel protein interaction network between DNA repair and cell cycle control. Binding...... and most likely a second unidentified binding motif. 14-3-3 associations do not appear to directly influence hEXO1 in vitro nuclease activity or in vitro DNA replication initiation. Moreover, specific phosphorylation variants, including hEXO1 S746A, are efficiently imported to the nucleus; to associate...

  2. DNA-repair protein hHR23a alters its protein structure upon binding proteasomal subunit S5a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Kylie J.; Lech, Patrycja J.; Goh, Amanda M.; Wang, Qinghua; Howley, Peter M.

    2003-01-01

    The Rad23 family of proteins, including the human homologs hHR23a and hHR23b, stimulates nucleotide excision repair and has been shown to provide a novel link between proteasome-mediated protein degradation and DNA repair. In this work, we illustrate how the proteasomal subunit S5a regulates hHR23a protein structure. By using NMR spectroscopy, we have elucidated the structure and dynamic properties of the 40-kDa hHR23a protein and show it to contain four structured domains connected by flexible linker regions. In addition, we reveal that these domains interact in an intramolecular fashion, and by using residual dipolar coupling data in combination with chemical shift perturbation analysis, we present the hHR23a structure. By itself, hHR23a adopts a closed conformation defined by the interaction of an N-terminal ubiquitin-like domain with two ubiquitin-associated domains. Interestingly, binding of the proteasomal subunit S5a disrupts the hHR23a interdomain interactions and thereby causes it to adopt an opened conformation. PMID:14557549

  3. Functions and Dynamics of DNA Repair Proteins in Mitosis and Meiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Uringa

    2005-01-01

    textabstractMy PhD project encompassed studies on the functions of several different proteins, all involved in DNA repair, in somatic and germ-line cells. Hr6b and Rad18Sc are involved in a DNA repair mechanism called ‘Replicative Damage Bypass’ (RDB), and function as ubiquitin conjugating

  4. DNA mismatch repair protein deficient non-neoplastic colonic crypts: a novel indicator of Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Rish K; Dudley, Beth; Karloski, Eve; Brand, Randall E; O'Callaghan, Neil; Rosty, Christophe; Buchanan, Daniel D; Jenkins, Mark A; Thibodeau, Stephen N; French, Amy J; Lindor, Noralane M; Pai, Reetesh K

    2018-06-08

    Lynch syndrome is the most common form of hereditary colorectal carcinoma. However, establishing the diagnosis of Lynch syndrome is challenging, and ancillary studies that distinguish between sporadic DNA mismatch repair (MMR) protein deficiency and Lynch syndrome are needed, particularly when germline mutation studies are inconclusive. The aim of this study was to determine if MMR protein-deficient non-neoplastic intestinal crypts can help distinguish between patients with and without Lynch syndrome. We evaluated the expression of MMR proteins in non-neoplastic intestinal mucosa obtained from colorectal surgical resection specimens from patients with Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal carcinoma (n = 52) and patients with colorectal carcinoma without evidence of Lynch syndrome (n = 70), including sporadic MMR protein-deficient colorectal carcinoma (n = 30), MMR protein proficient colorectal carcinoma (n = 30), and "Lynch-like" syndrome (n = 10). MMR protein-deficient non-neoplastic colonic crypts were identified in 19 of 122 (16%) patients. MMR protein-deficient colonic crypts were identified in 18 of 52 (35%) patients with Lynch syndrome compared to only 1 of 70 (1%) patients without Lynch syndrome (p Lynch-like" syndrome and harbored two MSH2-deficient non-neoplastic colonic crypts. MMR protein-deficient non-neoplastic colonic crypts were not identified in patients with sporadic MMR protein-deficient or MMR protein proficient colorectal carcinoma. Our findings suggest that MMR protein-deficient colonic crypts are a novel indicator of Lynch syndrome, and evaluation for MMR protein-deficient crypts may be a helpful addition to Lynch syndrome diagnostics.

  5. Intensive Care Management of Thoracic Aortic Surgical Patients, Including Thoracic and Infradiaphragmatic Endovascular Repair (EVAR/TEVAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Sheela Pai

    2015-12-01

    The patient with thoracic aortic disease can present for open or endovascular repair. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has emerged as a minimally invasive option for a multitude of aortic pathology, including dissections, aneurysms, traumatic injuries, and ulcers. Postoperative management of these patients depends on the extent of procedure, whether it was open or endovascular, and, finally, on the preoperative comorbidities present. While procedural success has catapulted TEVAR to popularity, midterm results have been mixed. Additionally, periprocedural complications such as paraplegia and renal failure remain a significant morbidity in these patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Laser-activated solid protein bands for peripheral nerve repair: an vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauto, A; Trickett, R; Malik, R; Dawes, J M; Owen, E R

    1997-01-01

    Severed tibial nerves in rats were repaired using a novel technique, utilizing a semiconductor diode-laser-activated protein solder applied longitudinally across the join. Welding was produced by selective laser denaturation of solid solder bands containing the dye indocyanine green. An in vivo study, using 48 adult male Wistar rats, compared conventional microsuture-repaired tibial nerves with laser solder-repaired nerves. Nerve repairs were characterised immediately after surgery and after 3 months. Successful regeneration with average compound muscle action potentials of 2.5 +/- 0.5 mV and 2.7 +/- 0.3 mV (mean and standard deviation) was demonstrated for the laser-soldered nerves and the sutured nerves, respectively. Histopathology confirmed comparable regeneration of axons in laser- and suture-operated nerves. The laser-based nerve repair technique was easier and faster than microsuture repair, minimising manipulation damage to the nerve.

  7. Modulation of wound healing and scar formation by MG53 protein-mediated cell membrane repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haichang; Duann, Pu; Lin, Pei-Hui; Zhao, Li; Fan, Zhaobo; Tan, Tao; Zhou, Xinyu; Sun, Mingzhai; Fu, Minghuan; Orange, Matthew; Sermersheim, Matthew; Ma, Hanley; He, Duofen; Steinberg, Steven M; Higgins, Robert; Zhu, Hua; John, Elizabeth; Zeng, Chunyu; Guan, Jianjun; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-10-02

    Cell membrane repair is an important aspect of physiology, and disruption of this process can result in pathophysiology in a number of different tissues, including wound healing, chronic ulcer and scarring. We have previously identified a novel tripartite motif family protein, MG53, as an essential component of the cell membrane repair machinery. Here we report the functional role of MG53 in the modulation of wound healing and scarring. Although MG53 is absent from keratinocytes and fibroblasts, remarkable defects in skin architecture and collagen overproduction are observed in mg53(-/-) mice, and these animals display delayed wound healing and abnormal scarring. Recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein, encapsulated in a hydrogel formulation, facilitates wound healing and prevents scarring in rodent models of dermal injuries. An in vitro study shows that rhMG53 protects against acute injury to keratinocytes and facilitates the migration of fibroblasts in response to scratch wounding. During fibrotic remodeling, rhMG53 interferes with TGF-β-dependent activation of myofibroblast differentiation. The resulting down-regulation of α smooth muscle actin and extracellular matrix proteins contributes to reduced scarring. Overall, these studies establish a trifunctional role for MG53 as a facilitator of rapid injury repair, a mediator of cell migration, and a modulator of myofibroblast differentiation during wound healing. Targeting the functional interaction between MG53 and TGF-β signaling may present a potentially effective means for promoting scarless wound healing. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Regulation of homologous recombination repair protein Rad51 by Ku70

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Liqing; Liu Qiang; Wang Yan; Xu Chang; Cao Jia; Fu Yue; Chen Fenghua; Fan Feiyue

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore the regulative effect of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ)protein Ku70 on homologous recombination repair protein Rad51, and to investigate the synergistic mechanism of homologous recombination repair in combination with NHEJ. Methods: Observed Rad51 protein expression after transfect Ku70 small interfering RNA or Ku70 plasmid DNA into tumor cells using Western blot. Results: Expression of Rad51 was obviously reduced after pretreated with Ku70 small interfering RNA. And with the increasing expression of Ku70 protein after transfection of Ku70 plasmid DNA PGCsi3.0-hKu70 into tumor cell lines, the Rad51 protein expression was increased. Conclusion: Ku70 protein has regulating effect on gene expression of Rad51, and it might participate in the collaboration between homologous recombination repair and NHEJ. (authors)

  9. Immunohistochemical analysis of oxidative stress and DNA repair proteins in normal mammary and breast cancer tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, Carol D; Thorngren, Daniel L; Nardulli, Ann M

    2010-01-01

    During the course of normal cellular metabolism, oxygen is consumed and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced. If not effectively dissipated, ROS can accumulate and damage resident proteins, lipids, and DNA. Enzymes involved in redox regulation and DNA repair dissipate ROS and repair the resulting damage in order to preserve a functional cellular environment. Because increased ROS accumulation and/or unrepaired DNA damage can lead to initiation and progression of cancer and we had identified a number of oxidative stress and DNA repair proteins that influence estrogen responsiveness of MCF-7 breast cancer cells, it seemed possible that these proteins might be differentially expressed in normal mammary tissue, benign hyperplasia (BH), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive breast cancer (IBC). Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of a number of oxidative stress proteins, DNA repair proteins, and damage markers in 60 human mammary tissues which were classified as BH, DCIS or IBC. The relative mean intensity was determined for each tissue section and ANOVA was used to detect statistical differences in the relative expression of BH, DCIS and IBC compared to normal mammary tissue. We found that a number of these proteins were overexpressed and that the cellular localization was altered in human breast cancer tissue. Our studies suggest that oxidative stress and DNA repair proteins not only protect normal cells from the damaging effects of ROS, but may also promote survival of mammary tumor cells

  10. WHERE MULTIFUNCTIONAL DNA REPAIR PROTEINS MEET: MAPPING THE INTERACTION DOMAINS BETWEEN XPG AND WRN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangaraj, K.; Cooper, P.K.; Trego, K.S.

    2009-01-01

    The rapid recognition and repair of DNA damage is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity and cellular survival. Multiple complex and interconnected DNA damage responses exist within cells to preserve the human genome, and these repair pathways are carried out by a specifi c interplay of protein-protein interactions. Thus a failure in the coordination of these processes, perhaps brought about by a breakdown in any one multifunctional repair protein, can lead to genomic instability, developmental and immunological abnormalities, cancer and premature aging. This study demonstrates a novel interaction between two such repair proteins, Xeroderma pigmentosum group G protein (XPG) and Werner syndrome helicase (WRN), that are both highly pleiotropic and associated with inherited genetic disorders when mutated. XPG is a structure-specifi c endonuclease required for the repair of UV-damaged DNA by nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mutations in XPG result in the diseases Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS). A loss of XPG incision activity results in XP, whereas a loss of non-enzymatic function(s) of XPG causes CS. WRN is a multifunctional protein involved in double-strand break repair (DSBR), and consists of 3’–5’ DNA-dependent helicase, 3’–5’ exonuclease, and single-strand DNA annealing activities. Nonfunctional WRN protein leads to Werner syndrome, a premature aging disorder with increased cancer incidence. Far Western analysis was used to map the interacting domains between XPG and WRN by denaturing gel electrophoresis, which separated purifi ed full length and recombinant XPG and WRN deletion constructs, based primarily upon the length of each polypeptide. Specifi c interacting domains were visualized when probed with the secondary protein of interest which was then detected by traditional Western analysis using the antibody of the secondary protein. The interaction between XPG and WRN was mapped to the C-terminal region of

  11. Complex relationship between mismatch repair proteins and MBD4 during immunoglobulin class switch recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigera, Fernando; Bellacosa, Alfonso; Kenter, Amy L

    2013-01-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) safeguards against genomic instability and is required for efficient Ig class switch recombination (CSR). Methyl CpG binding domain protein 4 (MBD4) binds to MutL homologue 1 (MLH1) and controls the post-transcriptional level of several MMR proteins, including MutS homologue 2 (MSH2). We show that in WT B cells activated for CSR, MBD4 is induced and interacts with MMR proteins, thereby implying a role for MBD4 in CSR. However, CSR is in the normal range in Mbd4 deficient mice deleted for exons 2-5 despite concomitant reduction of MSH2. We show by comparison in Msh2(+/-) B cells that a two-fold reduction of MSH2 and MBD4 proteins is correlated with impaired CSR. It is therefore surprising that CSR occurs at normal frequencies in the Mbd4 deficient B cells where MSH2 is reduced. We find that a variant Mbd4 transcript spanning exons 1,6-8 is expressed in Mbd4 deficient B cells. This transcript can be ectopically expressed and produces a truncated MBD4 peptide. Thus, the 3' end of the Mbd4 locus is not silent in Mbd4 deficient B cells and may contribute to CSR. Our findings highlight a complex relationship between MBD4 and MMR proteins in B cells and a potential reconsideration of their role in CSR.

  12. Delayed peripheral nerve repair: methods, including surgical 'cross-bridging' to promote nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Tessa; Eva, Placheta; Borschel, Gregory H

    2015-10-01

    Despite the capacity of Schwann cells to support peripheral nerve regeneration, functional recovery after nerve injuries is frequently poor, especially for proximal injuries that require regenerating axons to grow over long distances to reinnervate distal targets. Nerve transfers, where small fascicles from an adjacent intact nerve are coapted to the nerve stump of a nearby denervated muscle, allow for functional return but at the expense of reduced numbers of innervating nerves. A 1-hour period of 20 Hz electrical nerve stimulation via electrodes proximal to an injury site accelerates axon outgrowth to hasten target reinnervation in rats and humans, even after delayed surgery. A novel strategy of enticing donor axons from an otherwise intact nerve to grow through small nerve grafts (cross-bridges) into a denervated nerve stump, promotes improved axon regeneration after delayed nerve repair. The efficacy of this technique has been demonstrated in a rat model and is now in clinical use in patients undergoing cross-face nerve grafting for facial paralysis. In conclusion, brief electrical stimulation, combined with the surgical technique of promoting the regeneration of some donor axons to 'protect' chronically denervated Schwann cells, improves nerve regeneration and, in turn, functional outcomes in the management of peripheral nerve injuries.

  13. Delayed peripheral nerve repair: methods, including surgical ′cross-bridging′ to promote nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the capacity of Schwann cells to support peripheral nerve regeneration, functional recovery after nerve injuries is frequently poor, especially for proximal injuries that require regenerating axons to grow over long distances to reinnervate distal targets. Nerve transfers, where small fascicles from an adjacent intact nerve are coapted to the nerve stump of a nearby denervated muscle, allow for functional return but at the expense of reduced numbers of innervating nerves. A 1-hour period of 20 Hz electrical nerve stimulation via electrodes proximal to an injury site accelerates axon outgrowth to hasten target reinnervation in rats and humans, even after delayed surgery. A novel strategy of enticing donor axons from an otherwise intact nerve to grow through small nerve grafts (cross-bridges into a denervated nerve stump, promotes improved axon regeneration after delayed nerve repair. The efficacy of this technique has been demonstrated in a rat model and is now in clinical use in patients undergoing cross-face nerve grafting for facial paralysis. In conclusion, brief electrical stimulation, combined with the surgical technique of promoting the regeneration of some donor axons to ′protect′ chronically denervated Schwann cells, improves nerve regeneration and, in turn, functional outcomes in the management of peripheral nerve injuries.

  14. Differential repair of etheno-DNA adducts by bacterial and human AlkB proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdżalik, Daria; Domańska, Anna; Prorok, Paulina; Kosicki, Konrad; van den Born, Erwin; Falnes, Pål Ø; Rizzo, Carmelo J; Guengerich, F Peter; Tudek, Barbara

    2015-06-01

    AlkB proteins are evolutionary conserved Fe(II)/2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases, which remove alkyl and highly promutagenic etheno(ɛ)-DNA adducts, but their substrate specificity has not been fully determined. We developed a novel assay for the repair of ɛ-adducts by AlkB enzymes using oligodeoxynucleotides with a single lesion and specific DNA glycosylases and AP-endonuclease for identification of the repair products. We compared the repair of three ɛ-adducts, 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine (ɛA), 3,N(4)-ethenocytosine (ɛC) and 1,N(2)-ethenoguanine (1,N(2)-ɛG) by nine bacterial and two human AlkBs, representing four different structural groups defined on the basis of conserved amino acids in the nucleotide recognition lid, engaged in the enzyme binding to the substrate. Two bacterial AlkB proteins, MT-2B (from Mycobacterium tuberculosis) and SC-2B (Streptomyces coelicolor) did not repair these lesions in either double-stranded (ds) or single-stranded (ss) DNA. Three proteins, RE-2A (Rhizobium etli), SA-2B (Streptomyces avermitilis), and XC-2B (Xanthomonas campestris) efficiently removed all three lesions from the DNA substrates. Interestingly, XC-2B and RE-2A are the first AlkB proteins shown to be specialized for ɛ-adducts, since they do not repair methylated bases. Three other proteins, EcAlkB (Escherichia coli), SA-1A, and XC-1B removed ɛA and ɛC from ds and ssDNA but were inactive toward 1,N(2)-ɛG. SC-1A repaired only ɛA with the preference for dsDNA. The human enzyme ALKBH2 repaired all three ɛ-adducts in dsDNA, while only ɛA and ɛC in ssDNA and repair was less efficient in ssDNA. ALKBH3 repaired only ɛC in ssDNA. Altogether, we have shown for the first time that some AlkB proteins, namely ALKBH2, RE-2A, SA-2B and XC-2B can repair 1,N(2)-ɛG and that ALKBH3 removes only ɛC from ssDNA. Our results also suggest that the nucleotide recognition lid is not the sole determinant of the substrate specificity of AlkB proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B

  15. Direct Involvement of Retinoblastoma Family Proteins in DNA Repair by Non-homologous End-Joining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Cook

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Deficiencies in DNA double-strand break (DSB repair lead to genetic instability, a recognized cause of cancer initiation and evolution. We report that the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB1 is required for DNA DSB repair by canonical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ. Support of cNHEJ involves a mechanism independent of RB1’s cell-cycle function and depends on its amino terminal domain with which it binds to NHEJ components XRCC5 and XRCC6. Cells with engineered loss of RB family function as well as cancer-derived cells with mutational RB1 loss show substantially reduced levels of cNHEJ. RB1 variants disabled for the interaction with XRCC5 and XRCC6, including a cancer-associated variant, are unable to support cNHEJ despite being able to confer cell-cycle control. Our data identify RB1 loss as a candidate driver of structural genomic instability and a causative factor for cancer somatic heterogeneity and evolution.

  16. Functional Analysis of Homologous Recombination Repair Proteins HerA and NurA in the Thermophile Sulfolobus islandicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Qihong

    A number of DNA lesions are generated in each cell every day, among which double-stranded breaks (DSBs) constitute one of the most detrimental types of DNA damage. DSBs lead to genome instability, cell death, or even tumorigenesis in human, if not repaired timely. Two main pathways are known...... in the S/G2 phase of the cell cycle are preferentially repaired by HRR pathway, while NHEJ is the favorate pathway to repair DSBs in the G1 phase. Bacteria encode multiple pathways for DSB repair, including RecBCD, the primary HR pathway, SbcC-SbcD, and one backup system, RecFOR. In eukaryotes, the HRR...... pathway is mediated by Mre11-Rad50, homologs of bacterial SbcD-SbcC. However, numerous proteins and multiple layers of regulation exist to ensure these repair pathways are accurate and restricted to the appropriate cellular contexts, making many important mechanistic details poorly understood...

  17. Differential role of base excision repair proteins in mediating cisplatin cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Akshada; Floyd, Ashley M; Dangeti, Mohan; Lei, Wen; Sobol, Robert W; Patrick, Steve M

    2017-03-01

    Interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) are covalent lesions formed by cisplatin. The mechanism for the processing and removal of ICLs by DNA repair proteins involves nucleotide excision repair (NER), homologous recombination (HR) and fanconi anemia (FA) pathways. In this report, we monitored the processing of a flanking uracil adjacent to a cisplatin ICL by the proteins involved in the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Using a combination of extracts, purified proteins, inhibitors, functional assays and cell culture studies, we determined the specific BER proteins required for processing a DNA substrate with a uracil adjacent to a cisplatin ICL. Uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG) is the primary glycosylase responsible for the removal of uracils adjacent to cisplatin ICLs, whereas other uracil glycosylases can process uracils in the context of undamaged DNA. Repair of the uracil adjacent to cisplatin ICLs proceeds through the classical BER pathway, highlighting the importance of specific proteins in this redundant pathway. Removal of uracil is followed by the generation of an abasic site and subsequent cleavage by AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). Inhibition of either the repair or redox domain of APE1 gives rise to cisplatin resistance. Inhibition of the lyase domain of Polymerase β (Polβ) does not influence cisplatin cytotoxicity. In addition, lack of XRCC1 leads to increased DNA damage and results in increased cisplatin cytotoxicity. Our results indicate that BER activation at cisplatin ICLs influences crosslink repair and modulates cisplatin cytotoxicity via specific UNG, APE1 and Polβ polymerase functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Germline PMS2 mutation screened by mismatch repair protein immunohistochemistry of colorectal cancer in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Kokichi; Nakajima, Takeshi; Sekine, Shigeki; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Saito, Shinya; Takahashi, Masahiro; Ushiama, Mineko; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Yoshida, Teruhiko

    2016-11-01

    Germline PMS2 gene mutations were detected by RT-PCR/direct sequencing of total RNA extracted from puromycin-treated peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analyses of Japanese patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) fulfilling either the revised Bethesda Guidelines or being an age at disease onset of younger than 70 years, and screened by mismatch repair protein immunohistochemistry of formalin-fixed paraffin embedded sections. Of the 501 subjects examined, 7 (1.40%) showed the downregulated expression of the PMS2 protein alone and were referred to the genetic counseling clinic. Germline PMS2 mutations were detected in 6 (85.7%), including 3 nonsense and 1 frameshift mutations by RT-PCR/direct sequencing and 2 genomic deletions by MLPA. No mutations were identified in the other MMR genes (i.e. MSH2, MLH1 and MSH6). The prevalence of the downregulated expression of the PMS2 protein alone was 1.40% among the subjects examined and IHC results predicted the presence of PMS2 germline mutations. RT-PCR from puromycin-treated PBL and MLPA may be employed as the first screening step to detect PMS2 mutations without pseudogene interference, followed by the long-range PCR/nested PCR validation using genomic DNA. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  19. Clustering of double strand break-containing chromosome domains is not inhibited by inactivation of major repair proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krawczyk, P. M.; Stap, C.; Van Oven, C.; Hoebe, R.; Aten, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    For efficient repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) cells rely on a process that involves the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 complex, which may help to protect non-repaired DNA ends from separating until they can be rejoined by DNA repair proteins. It has been observed that as a secondary effect, this process can lead to unintended clustering of multiple, initially separate, DSB-containing chromosome domains. This work demonstrates that neither inactivation of the major repair proteins XRCC3 and the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) nor inhibition of DNA-PK by vanillin influences the aggregation of DSB-containing chromosome domains. (authors)

  20. Protein phosphatase 5 is necessary for ATR-mediated DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Yoonsung; Cheong, Hyang-Min; Lee, Jung-Hee; Song, Peter I.; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Sang-Yong; Jun, Jae Yeoul; You, Ho Jin

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Serine/threonine protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) has been shown to participate in ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)- and ATR (ATM- and Rad3-related)-mediated checkpoint pathways, which plays an important role in the DNA damage response and maintenance of genomic stability. → However, it is not clear exactly how PP5 participates in this process. → Our results indicate that PP5 is more closely related with ATR-mediated pathway than ATM-mediated pathway in DNA damage repair. -- Abstract: Several recent studies have shown that protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) participates in cell cycle arrest after DNA damage, but its roles in DNA repair have not yet been fully characterized. We investigated the roles of PP5 in the repair of ultraviolet (UV)- and neocarzinostatin (NCS)-induced DNA damage. The results of comet assays revealed different repair patterns in UV- and NCS-exposed U2OS-PS cells. PP5 is only essential for Rad3-related (ATR)-mediated DNA repair. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of 53BP1 and BRCA1, important mediators of DNA damage repair, and substrates of ATR and ATM decreased in U2OS-PS cells exposed to UV radiation. In contrast, the cell cycle arrest proteins p53, CHK1, and CHK2 were normally phosphorylated in U2OS and U2OS-PS cells exposed to UV radiation or treated with NCS. In view of these results, we suggest that PP5 plays a crucial role in ATR-mediated repair of UV-induced DNA damage.

  1. The recombination protein RAD52 cooperates with the excision repair protein OGG1 for the repair of oxidative lesions in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Maynard, Scott; Hashiguchi, Kazunari

    2009-01-01

    number of protein interactions have been identified for OGG1, while very few appear to have functional consequences. We report here that OGG1 interacts with the recombination protein RAD52 in vitro and in vivo. This interaction has reciprocal functional consequences as OGG1 inhibits RAD52 catalytic...... knockdown, and mouse cells lacking the protein via gene knockout showed increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. Moreover, cells depleted of RAD52 show higher accumulation of oxidized bases in their genome than cells with normal levels of RAD52. Our results indicate that RAD52 cooperates with OGG1...... to repair oxidative DNA damage and enhances the cellular resistance to oxidative stress. Our observations suggest a coordinated action between these proteins that may be relevant when oxidative lesions positioned close to strand breaks impose a hindrance to RAD52 catalytic activities....

  2. RYBP Is a K63-Ubiquitin-Chain-Binding Protein that Inhibits Homologous Recombination Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A.M. Ali

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Ring1-YY1-binding protein (RYBP is a member of the non-canonical polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1, and like other PRC1 members, it is best described as a transcriptional regulator. However, several PRC1 members were recently shown to function in DNA repair. Here, we report that RYBP preferentially binds K63-ubiquitin chains via its Npl4 zinc finger (NZF domain. Since K63-linked ubiquitin chains are assembled at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs, we examined the contribution of RYBP to DSB repair. Surprisingly, we find that RYBP is K48 polyubiquitylated by RNF8 and rapidly removed from chromatin upon DNA damage by the VCP/p97 segregase. High expression of RYBP competitively inhibits recruitment of BRCA1 repair complex to DSBs, reducing DNA end resection and homologous recombination (HR repair. Moreover, breast cancer cell lines expressing high endogenous RYBP levels show increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents and poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibition. These data suggest that RYBP negatively regulates HR repair by competing for K63-ubiquitin chain binding. : Ali et al. find that RYBP binds K63-linked ubiquitin chains and is removed from DNA damage sites. This K63-ubiquitin binding allows RYBP to hinder the recruitment of BRCA1 and Rad51 to DNA double-strand breaks, thus inhibiting homologous recombination repair. Accordingly, cancer cells expressing high RYBP are more sensitive to DNA-damaging therapies. Keywords: DNA damage response, homologous recombination, ubiquitylation, RYBP, polycomb proteins, double-strand break repair, chromatin, histone modification

  3. Analysis of ionizing radiation-induced foci of DNA damage repair proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veelen, Lieneke R. van; Cervelli, Tiziana; Rakt, Mandy W.M.M. van de; Theil, Arjan F.; Essers, Jeroen; Kanaar, Roland

    2005-01-01

    Repair of DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination requires an extensive set of proteins. Among these proteins are Rad51 and Mre11, which are known to re-localize to sites of DNA damage into nuclear foci. Ionizing radiation-induced foci can be visualized by immuno-staining. Published data show a large variation in the number of foci-positive cells and number of foci per nucleus for specific DNA repair proteins. The experiments described here demonstrate that the time after induction of DNA damage influenced not only the number of foci-positive cells, but also the size of the individual foci. The dose of ionizing radiation influenced both the number of foci-positive cells and the number of foci per nucleus. Furthermore, ionizing radiation-induced foci formation depended on the cell cycle stage of the cells and the protein of interest that was investigated. Rad51 and Mre11 foci seemed to be mutually exclusive, though a small subset of cells did show co-localization of these proteins, which suggests a possible cooperation between the proteins at a specific moment during DNA repair

  4. Viral interference with DNA repair by targeting of the single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Pubali; DeJesus, Rowena; Gjoerup, Ole; Schaffhausen, Brian S

    2013-10-01

    Correct repair of damaged DNA is critical for genomic integrity. Deficiencies in DNA repair are linked with human cancer. Here we report a novel mechanism by which a virus manipulates DNA damage responses. Infection with murine polyomavirus sensitizes cells to DNA damage by UV and etoposide. Polyomavirus large T antigen (LT) alone is sufficient to sensitize cells 100 fold to UV and other kinds of DNA damage. This results in activated stress responses and apoptosis. Genetic analysis shows that LT sensitizes via the binding of its origin-binding domain (OBD) to the single-stranded DNA binding protein replication protein A (RPA). Overexpression of RPA protects cells expressing OBD from damage, and knockdown of RPA mimics the LT phenotype. LT prevents recruitment of RPA to nuclear foci after DNA damage. This leads to failure to recruit repair proteins such as Rad51 or Rad9, explaining why LT prevents repair of double strand DNA breaks by homologous recombination. A targeted intervention directed at RPA based on this viral mechanism could be useful in circumventing the resistance of cancer cells to therapy.

  5. Function of heterochromatin protein 1 during DNA repair

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bártová, Eva; Malyšková, Barbora; Komůrková, Denisa; Legartová, Soňa; Suchánková, Jana; Krejčí, Jana; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 254, č. 3 (2017), s. 1233-1240 ISSN 0033-183X R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP302/12/G157; GA MŠk 7F14369 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : double-strand breaks * damage response * HP1 protein Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 2.870, year: 2016

  6. Rtt107/Esc4 binds silent chromatin and DNA repair proteins using different BRCT motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jockusch Rebecca A

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background By screening a plasmid library for proteins that could cause silencing when targeted to the HMR locus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we previously reported the identification of Rtt107/Esc4 based on its ability to establish silent chromatin. In this study we aimed to determine the mechanism of Rtt107/Esc4 targeted silencing and also learn more about its biological functions. Results Targeted silencing by Rtt107/Esc4 was dependent on the SIR genes, which encode obligatory structural and enzymatic components of yeast silent chromatin. Based on its sequence, Rtt107/Esc4 was predicted to contain six BRCT motifs. This motif, originally identified in the human breast tumor suppressor gene BRCA1, is a protein interaction domain. The targeted silencing activity of Rtt107/Esc4 resided within the C-terminal two BRCT motifs, and this region of the protein bound to Sir3 in two-hybrid tests. Deletion of RTT107/ESC4 caused sensitivity to the DNA damaging agent MMS as well as to hydroxyurea. A two-hybrid screen showed that the N-terminal BRCT motifs of Rtt107/Esc4 bound to Slx4, a protein previously shown to be involved in DNA repair and required for viability in a strain lacking the DNA helicase Sgs1. Like SLX genes, RTT107ESC4 interacted genetically with SGS1; esc4Δ sgs1Δ mutants were viable, but exhibited a slow-growth phenotype and also a synergistic DNA repair defect. Conclusion Rtt107/Esc4 binds to the silencing protein Sir3 and the DNA repair protein Slx4 via different BRCT motifs, thus providing a bridge linking silent chromatin to DNA repair enzymes.

  7. The DNA-dependent protein kinase: a multifunctional protein kinase with roles in DNA double strand break repair and mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jette, Nicholas; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and the Ku70/80 heterodimer. Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in elucidating the role of DNA-PK in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major pathway for repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in human cells and recently, additional roles for DNA-PK have been reported. In this review, we will describe the biochemistry, structure and function of DNA-PK, its roles in DNA double strand break repair and its newly described roles in mitosis and other cellular processes. PMID:25550082

  8. A unified pathogenesis for kidney diseases, including genetic diseases and cancers, by the protein-homeostasis-system hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-Yil

    2017-06-01

    Every cell of an organism is separated and protected by a cell membrane. It is proposed that harmony between intercellular communication and the health of an organism is controlled by a system, designated the protein-homeostasis-system (PHS). Kidneys consist of a variety of types of renal cells, each with its own characteristic cell-receptor interactions and producing characteristic proteins. A functional union of these renal cells can be determined by various renal function tests, and harmonious intercellular communication is essential for the healthy state of the host. Injury to a kind of renal cells can impair renal function and induce an imbalance in total body health. Every acute or chronic renal disease has unknown etiologic substances that are responsible for renal cell injury at the molecular level. The immune/repair system of the host should control the etiologic substances acting against renal cells; if this system fails, the disease progresses to end stage renal disease. Each renal disease has its characteristic pathologic lesions where immune cells and immune proteins, such as immunoglobulins and complements, are infiltrated. These immune cells and immune proteins may control the etiologic substances involved in renal pathologic lesions. Also, genetic renal diseases and cancers may originate from a protein deficiency or malfunctioning protein under the PHS. A unified pathogenesis for renal diseases, including acute glomerulonephritis, idiopathic nephrotic syndrome, immunoglobulin A nephropathy, genetic renal diseases such as Alport syndrome, and malignancies such as Wilms tumor and renal cell carcinoma, is proposed using the PHS hypothesis.

  9. Correction of the DNA repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum group E by injection of a DNA damage binding protein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Keeney; A.P.M. Eker (André); T. Brody; W. Vermeulen (Wim); D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); S. Linn

    1994-01-01

    textabstractCells from a subset of patients with the DNA-repair-defective disease xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group E (XP-E) are known to lack a DNA damage-binding (DDB) activity. Purified human DDB protein was injected into XP-E cells to test whether the DNA-repair defect in these cells

  10. The DNA-dependent protein kinase: a multifunctional protein kinase with roles in DNA double strand break repair and mitosis

    OpenAIRE

    Jette, Nicholas; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and the Ku70/80 heterodimer. Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in elucidating the role of DNA-PK in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major pathway for repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in human cells and recently, additional roles for DNA-PK have been reported. In this review, we will describe the biochemi...

  11. Structure-function relationships governing activity and stability of a DNA alkylation damage repair thermostable protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perugino, Giuseppe; Miggiano, Riccardo; Serpe, Mario; Vettone, Antonella; Valenti, Anna; Lahiri, Samarpita; Rossi, Franca; Rossi, Mosè; Rizzi, Menico; Ciaramella, Maria

    2015-10-15

    Alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferases repair alkylated DNA bases, which are among the most common DNA lesions, and are evolutionary conserved, from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes. The human ortholog, hAGT, is involved in resistance to alkylating chemotherapy drugs. We report here on the alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferase, SsOGT, from an archaeal species living at high temperature, a condition that enhances the harmful effect of DNA alkylation. The exceptionally high stability of SsOGT gave us the unique opportunity to perform structural and biochemical analysis of a protein of this class in its post-reaction form. This analysis, along with those performed on SsOGT in its ligand-free and DNA-bound forms, provides insights in the structure-function relationships of the protein before, during and after DNA repair, suggesting a molecular basis for DNA recognition, catalytic activity and protein post-reaction fate, and giving hints on the mechanism of alkylation-induced inactivation of this class of proteins. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Phenotypic Analysis of ATM Protein Kinase in DNA Double-Strand Break Formation and Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mian, Elisabeth; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) encodes a serine/threonine protein kinase, which is involved in various regulatory processes in mammalian cells. Its best-known role is apical activation of the DNA damage response following generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). When DSBs appear, sensor and mediator proteins are recruited, activating transducers such as ATM, which in turn relay a widespread signal to a multitude of downstream effectors. ATM mutation causes Ataxia telangiectasia (AT), whereby the disease phenotype shows differing characteristics depending on the underlying ATM mutation. However, all phenotypes share progressive neurodegeneration and marked predisposition to malignancies at the organismal level and sensitivity to ionizing radiation and chromosome aberrations at the cellular level. Expression and localization of the ATM protein can be determined via western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy; however, detection of subtle alterations such as resulting from amino acid exchanges rather than truncating mutations requires functional testing. Previous studies on the role of ATM in DSB repair, which connects with radiosensitivity and chromosomal stability, gave at first sight contradictory results. To systematically explore the effects of clinically relevant ATM mutations on DSB repair, we engaged a series of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from AT patients and controls. To examine DSB repair both in a quantitative and qualitative manners, we used an EGFP-based assay comprising different substrates for distinct DSB repair mechanisms. In this way, we demonstrated that particular signaling defects caused by individual ATM mutations led to specific DSB repair phenotypes. To explore the impact of ATM on carcinogenic chromosomal aberrations, we monitored chromosomal breakage at a breakpoint cluster region hotspot within the MLL gene that has been associated with therapy-related leukemia. PCR-based MLL-breakage analysis of HeLa cells

  13. Suppression of DNA-dependent protein kinase sensitize cells to radiation without affecting DSB repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, Ann-Sofie, E-mail: ann-sofie.gustafsson@bms.uu.se; Abramenkovs, Andris; Stenerlöw, Bo

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • We reduced the level of DNA-PKcs with siRNA and examined cells after γ-irradiation. • Low DNA-PKcs levels lead to radiosensitivity but did not affect repair of DSB. • Low DNA-PKcs levels may block progression of mitosis. • DNA-PKcs role in mitotic progression is independent of its role in DSB repair. • We suggest different mechanisms by which loss of DNA-PKcs function sensitize cells. - Abstract: Efficient and correct repair of DNA double-strand break (DSB) is critical for cell survival. Defects in the DNA repair may lead to cell death, genomic instability and development of cancer. The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is an essential component of the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) which is the major DSB repair pathway in mammalian cells. In the present study, by using siRNA against DNA-PKcs in four human cell lines, we examined how low levels of DNA-PKcs affected cellular response to ionizing radiation. Decrease of DNA-PKcs levels by 80–95%, induced by siRNA treatment, lead to extreme radiosensitivity, similar to that seen in cells completely lacking DNA-PKcs and low levels of DNA-PKcs promoted cell accumulation in G2/M phase after irradiation and blocked progression of mitosis. Surprisingly, low levels of DNA-PKcs did not affect the repair capacity and the removal of 53BP1 or γ-H2AX foci and rejoining of DSB appeared normal. This was in strong contrast to cells completely lacking DNA-PKcs and cells treated with the DNA-PKcs inhibitor NU7441, in which DSB repair were severely compromised. This suggests that there are different mechanisms by which loss of DNA-PKcs functions can sensitize cells to ionizing radiation. Further, foci of phosphorylated DNA-PKcs (T2609 and S2056) co-localized with DSB and this was independent of the amount of DNA-PKcs but foci of DNA-PKcs was only seen in siRNA-treated cells. Our study emphasizes on the critical role of DNA-PKcs for maintaining survival after radiation exposure

  14. Suppression of DNA-dependent protein kinase sensitize cells to radiation without affecting DSB repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, Ann-Sofie; Abramenkovs, Andris; Stenerlöw, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We reduced the level of DNA-PKcs with siRNA and examined cells after γ-irradiation. • Low DNA-PKcs levels lead to radiosensitivity but did not affect repair of DSB. • Low DNA-PKcs levels may block progression of mitosis. • DNA-PKcs role in mitotic progression is independent of its role in DSB repair. • We suggest different mechanisms by which loss of DNA-PKcs function sensitize cells. - Abstract: Efficient and correct repair of DNA double-strand break (DSB) is critical for cell survival. Defects in the DNA repair may lead to cell death, genomic instability and development of cancer. The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is an essential component of the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) which is the major DSB repair pathway in mammalian cells. In the present study, by using siRNA against DNA-PKcs in four human cell lines, we examined how low levels of DNA-PKcs affected cellular response to ionizing radiation. Decrease of DNA-PKcs levels by 80–95%, induced by siRNA treatment, lead to extreme radiosensitivity, similar to that seen in cells completely lacking DNA-PKcs and low levels of DNA-PKcs promoted cell accumulation in G2/M phase after irradiation and blocked progression of mitosis. Surprisingly, low levels of DNA-PKcs did not affect the repair capacity and the removal of 53BP1 or γ-H2AX foci and rejoining of DSB appeared normal. This was in strong contrast to cells completely lacking DNA-PKcs and cells treated with the DNA-PKcs inhibitor NU7441, in which DSB repair were severely compromised. This suggests that there are different mechanisms by which loss of DNA-PKcs functions can sensitize cells to ionizing radiation. Further, foci of phosphorylated DNA-PKcs (T2609 and S2056) co-localized with DSB and this was independent of the amount of DNA-PKcs but foci of DNA-PKcs was only seen in siRNA-treated cells. Our study emphasizes on the critical role of DNA-PKcs for maintaining survival after radiation exposure

  15. Role of UV-inducible proteins in repair of various wild-type Escherichia coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedliakova, M.; Slezarikova, V.; Brozmanova, J.; Masek, F.; Bayerova, V.

    1980-01-01

    3 wild-type strains of E. coli, namely K12 AB2497, B/r WP2 and 15 555-7, proficient in excision and post-replication repair, differ markedly in their UV resistance. To elucidate this difference, the influence was investigated of induction by application of inducing fluence (IF) before lethal fluence (LF) on repair processes after LF. In cells distinguished by low UV resistance (E. coli 15 555-7; E. coli B/r WP2), dimer excision was less complete in cultures irradiated with IF + LF than in cultures irradiated with LF only. The highly resistant E. coli K12 AB2497 performed complete excision both after IF + LF or after LF alone. All 3 types of cell survived better after IF + LF than after LF only. Because, in most strains so far investigated, the application of IF reduced dimer excision and increased survival, dimer excision per se does not appear important for survival. We conclude that the rate and completeness of dimer excision can serve as a measure of efficiency of the excision system whose action is necessary for repair of another lesion. Cells of all investigated strains could not resume DNA replication and died progressively when irradiated with LF and post-incubated with chloramphenicol (LF CAP + ). Thus, it appears that inducible proteins are necessary for repair in all wild-type E. coli cells given with potentially lethal doses of UV irradiation. (orig.)

  16. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein B1 protein impairs DNA repair mediated through the inhibition of DNA-dependent protein kinase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwanaga, Kentaro; Sueoka, Naoko; Sato, Akemi; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Sueoka, Eisaburo

    2005-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein B1, an RNA binding protein, is overexpressed from the early stage of lung cancers; it is evident even in bronchial dysplasia, a premalignant lesion. We evaluated the proteins bound with hnRNP B1 and found that hnRNP B1 interacted with DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) complex, and recombinant hnRNP B1 protein dose-dependently inhibited DNA-PK activity in vitro. To test the effect of hnRNP B1 on DNA repair, we performed comet assay after irradiation, using normal human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells treated with siRNA for hnRNP A2/B1: reduction of hnRNP B1 treated with siRNA for hnRNP A2/B1 induced faster DNA repair in normal HBE cells. Considering these results, we assume that overexpression of hnRNP B1 occurring in the early stage of carcinogenesis inhibits DNA-PK activity, resulting in subsequent accumulation of erroneous rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks, causing tumor progression

  17. Decreased UV light resistance of spores of Bacillus subtilis strains deficient in pyrimidine dimer repair and small, acid-soluble spore proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, B.; Setlow, P.

    1988-01-01

    Loss of small, acid-soluble spore protein alpha reduced spore UV resistance 30- to 50-fold in Bacillus subtilis strains deficient in pyrimidine dimer repair, but gave only a 5- to 8-fold reduction in UV resistance in repair-proficient strains. However, both repair-proficient and -deficient spores lacking this protein had identical heat and gamma-radiation resistance

  18. Trichomonas vaginalis Repair of Iron Centres Proteins: The Different Role of Two Paralogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobre, Lígia S; Meloni, Dionigia; Teixeira, Miguel; Viscogliosi, Eric; Saraiva, Lígia M

    2016-06-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis, the causative parasite of one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases is, so far, the only protozoan encoding two putative Repair of Iron Centres (RIC) proteins. Homologs of these proteins have been shown to protect bacteria from the chemical stress imposed by mammalian immunity. In this work, the biochemical and functional characterisation of the T. vaginalis RICs revealed that the two proteins have different properties. Expression of ric1 is induced by nitrosative stress but not by hydrogen peroxide, while ric2 transcription remained unaltered under similar conditions. T. vaginalis RIC1 contains a di-iron centre, but RIC2 apparently does not. Only RIC1 resembles bacterial RICs on spectroscopic profiling and repairing ability of oxidatively-damaged iron-sulfur clusters. Unexpectedly, RIC2 was found to bind DNA plasmid and T. vaginalis genomic DNA, a function proposed to be related with its leucine zipper domain. The two proteins also differ in their cellular localization: RIC1 is expressed in the cytoplasm only, and RIC2 occurs both in the nucleus and cytoplasm. Therefore, we concluded that the two RIC paralogs have different roles in T. vaginalis, with RIC2 showing an unprecedented DNA binding ability when compared with all other until now studied RICs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Peritumoral granulomatous reaction in endometrial carcinoma: association with DNA mismatch repair protein deficiency, particularly loss of PMS2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Colin J R; Pearn, Amy; Pachter, Nicholas; Tan, Adeline

    2018-04-30

    The observation of peritumoral granulomatous reactions (PGRs) in two endometrial carcinomas (ECs) with a PMS2-deficient/MLH1-intact expression pattern led us to investigate whether PGRs in EC were specifically associated with DNA mismatch repair (MMR) protein deficiency, particularly PMS2 loss. Hysterectomy specimens from 22 MMR protein-intact and 54 MMR protein-deficient ECs were reviewed with specific attention to the presence of a PGR and a tumour-associated lymphoid reaction [including tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and stromal lymphoid infiltrates]. The MMR protein-deficient ECs included 22 cases with combined MLH1/PMS2 loss, 11 with combined MSH2/MSH6 loss, 11 with isolated MSH6 loss, and 10 with PMS2 loss but intact MLH1 staining (including the two 'index' cases). Overall, PGRs were identified in seven of 54 (13%) MMR protein-deficient ECs, five of which showed a PMS2-deficient/MLH1-intact immunophenotype; three of these patients had germline PMS2 mutations and one additional patient had a germline MSH6 mutation. None of the MMR protein-intact tumours showed a PGR. Although five of the seven PGR-positive ECs had a high-grade histological component, six were stage I. Most ECs with PGRs also showed TILs and stromal lymphoid reactions, similarly to MMR protein-deficient ECs in general. MMR protein-deficient ECs, particularly those with PMS2 loss, occasionally show PGRs in addition to stromal lymphoid infiltrates and TILs. Therefore, PGRs could be considered to constitute a histological prompt for consideration of Lynch syndrome. The potential prognostic significance of PGRs in EC requires further study. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Mycobacterial UvrD1 is a Ku-dependent DNA helicase that plays a role in multiple DNA repair events, including double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Krishna Murari; Stephanou, Nicolas C; Gao, Feng; Glickman, Michael S; Shuman, Stewart

    2007-05-18

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other bacterial pathogens have a Ku-dependent nonhomologous end joining pathway of DNA double-strand break repair. Here we identify mycobacterial UvrD1 as a novel interaction partner for Ku in a genome-wide yeast two-hybrid screen. UvrD1 per se is a vigorous DNA-dependent ATPase but a feeble DNA helicase. Ku stimulates UvrD1 to catalyze ATP-dependent unwinding of 3'-tailed DNAs. UvrD1, Ku, and DNA form a stable ternary complex in the absence of ATP. The Ku binding determinants are located in the distinctive C-terminal segment of UvrD1. A second mycobacterial paralog, UvrD2, is a vigorous Ku-independent DNA helicase. Ablation of UvrD1 sensitizes Mycobacterium smegmatis to killing by ultraviolet and ionizing radiation and to a single chromosomal break generated by I-SceI endonuclease. The physical and functional interactions of bacterial Ku and UvrD1 highlight the potential for cross-talk between components of nonhomologous end joining and nucleotide excision repair pathways.

  1. Genetic Variability in DNA Repair Proteins in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Blasiak

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD is complex and involves interactions between environmental and genetic factors, with oxidative stress playing an important role inducing damage in biomolecules, including DNA. Therefore, genetic variability in the components of DNA repair systems may influence the ability of the cell to cope with oxidative stress and in this way contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD. However, few reports have been published on this subject so far. We demonstrated that the c.977C>G polymorphism (rs1052133 in the hOGG1 gene and the c.972G>C polymorphism (rs3219489 in the MUTYH gene, the products of which play important roles in the repair of oxidatively damaged DNA, might be associated with the risk of AMD. Oxidative stress may promote misincorporation of uracil into DNA, where it is targeted by several DNA glycosylases. We observed that the g.4235T>C (rs2337395 and c.−32A>G (rs3087404 polymorphisms in two genes encoding such glycosylases, UNG and SMUG1, respectively, could be associated with the occurrence of AMD. Polymorphisms in some other DNA repair genes, including XPD (ERCC2, XRCC1 and ERCC6 (CSB have also been reported to be associated with AMD. These data confirm the importance of the cellular reaction to DNA damage, and this may be influenced by variability in DNA repair genes, in AMD pathogenesis.

  2. Anastomotic Strictures after Esophageal Atresia Repair: Incidence, Investigations, and Management, Including Treatment of Refractory and Recurrent Strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Tambucci

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Improved surgical techniques, as well as preoperative and postoperative care, have dramatically changed survival of children with esophageal atresia (EA over the last decades. Nowadays, we are increasingly seeing EA patients experiencing significant short- and long-term gastrointestinal morbidities. Anastomotic stricture (AS is the most common complication following operative repair. An esophageal stricture is defined as an intrinsic luminal narrowing in a clinically symptomatic patient, but no symptoms are sensitive or specific enough to diagnose an AS. This review aims to provide a comprehensive view of AS in EA children. Given the lack of evidence-based data, we critically analyzed significant studies on children and adults, including comments on benign strictures with other etiologies. Despite there is no consensus about the goal of the luminal diameter based on the patient’s age, esophageal contrast study, and/or endoscopy are recommended to assess the degree of the narrowing. A high variability in incidence of ASs is reported in literature, depending on different definitions of AS and on a great number of pre-, intra-, and postoperative risk factor influencing the anastomosis outcome. The presence of a long gap between the two esophageal ends, with consequent anastomotic tension, is determinant for stricture formation and its response to treatment. The cornerstone of treatment is endoscopic dilation, whose primary aims are to achieve symptom relief, allow age-appropriate capacity for oral feeding, and reduce the risk of pulmonary aspiration. No clear advantage of either balloon or bougie dilator has been demonstrated; therefore, the choice is based on operator experience and comfort with the equipment. Retrospective evidences suggest that selective dilatations (performed only in symptomatic patients results in significantly less number of dilatation sessions than routine dilations (performed to prevent symptoms with equal long

  3. Mismatch repair proteins, meiosis, and mice: understanding the complexities of mammalian meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetlanov, Anton; Cohen, Paula E

    2004-05-15

    Mammalian meiosis differs from that seen in lower eukaryotes in several respects, not least of which is the added complexity of dealing with chromosomal interactions across a much larger genome (12 MB over 16 chromosome pairs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae compared to 2500 MB over 19 autosome pairs in Mus musculus). Thus, the recombination machinery, while being highly conserved through eukaryotes, has evolved to accommodate such issues to preserve genome integrity and to ensure propagation of the species. One group of highly conserved meiotic regulators is the DNA mismatch repair protein family that, as their name implies, were first identified as proteins that act to repair DNA mismatches that arise primarily during DNA replication. Their function in ensuring chromosomal integrity has also translated into a critical role for this family in meiotic recombination in most sexually reproducing organisms. In mice, targeted deletion of certain family members results in severe consequences for meiotic progression and infertility. This review will focus on the studies involving these mutant mouse models, with occasional comparison to the function of these proteins in other organisms.

  4. A novel small molecule inhibitor of the DNA repair protein Ku70/80.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weterings, Eric; Gallegos, Alfred C; Dominick, Lauren N; Cooke, Laurence S; Bartels, Trace N; Vagner, Josef; Matsunaga, Terry O; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2016-07-01

    Non-Homologous End-Joining (NHEJ) is the predominant pathway for the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in human cells. The NHEJ pathway is frequently upregulated in several solid cancers as a compensatory mechanism for a separate DSB repair defect or for innate genomic instability, making this pathway a powerful target for synthetic lethality approaches. In addition, NHEJ reduces the efficacy of cancer treatment modalities which rely on the introduction of DSBs, like radiation therapy or genotoxic chemotherapy. Consequently, inhibition of the NHEJ pathway can modulate a radiation- or chemo-refractory disease presentation. The Ku70/80 heterodimer protein plays a pivotal role in the NHEJ process. It possesses a ring-shaped structure with high affinity for DSBs and serves as the first responder and central scaffold around which the rest of the repair complex is assembled. Because of this central position, the Ku70/80 dimer is a logical target for the disruption of the entire NHEJ pathway. Surprisingly, specific inhibitors of the Ku70/80 heterodimer are currently not available. We here describe an in silico, pocket-based drug discovery methodology utilizing the crystal structure of the Ku70/80 heterodimer. We identified a novel putative small molecule binding pocket and selected several potential inhibitors by computational screening. Subsequent biological screening resulted in the first identification of a compound with confirmed Ku-inhibitory activity in the low micro-molar range, capable of disrupting the binding of Ku70/80 to DNA substrates and impairing Ku-dependent activation of another NHEJ factor, the DNA-PKCS kinase. Importantly, this compound synergistically sensitized human cell lines to radiation treatment, indicating a clear potential to diminish DSB repair. The chemical scaffold we here describe can be utilized as a lead-generating platform for the design and development of a novel class of anti-cancer agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All

  5. Postexercise Dietary Protein Strategies to Maximize Skeletal Muscle Repair and Remodeling in Masters Endurance Athletes: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, Thomas M; Reaburn, Peter R; Phillips, Stuart M; Jenkins, David G

    2016-04-01

    Participation rates of masters athletes in endurance events such as long-distance triathlon and running continue to increase. Given the physical and metabolic demands of endurance training, recovery practices influence the quality of successive training sessions and, consequently, adaptations to training. Research has suggested that, after muscle-damaging endurance exercise, masters athletes experience slower recovery rates in comparison with younger, similarly trained athletes. Given that these discrepancies in recovery rates are not observed after non-muscle-damaging exercise, it is suggested that masters athletes have impairments of the protein remodeling mechanisms within skeletal muscle. The importance of postexercise protein feeding for endurance athletes is increasingly being acknowledged, and its role in creating a positive net muscle protein balance postexercise is well known. The potential benefits of postexercise protein feeding include elevating muscle protein synthesis and satellite cell activity for muscle repair and remodeling, as well as facilitating muscle glycogen resynthesis. Despite extensive investigation into age-related anabolic resistance in sedentary aging populations, little is known about how anabolic resistance affects postexercise muscle protein synthesis and thus muscle remodeling in aging athletes. Despite evidence suggesting that physical training can attenuate but not eliminate age-related anabolic resistance, masters athletes are currently recommended to consume the same postexercise dietary protein dose (approximately 20 g or 0.25 g/kg/meal) as younger athletes. Given the slower recovery rates of masters athletes after muscle-damaging exercise, which may be due to impaired muscle remodeling mechanisms, masters athletes may benefit from higher doses of postexercise dietary protein, with particular attention directed to the leucine content of the postexercise bolus.

  6. Alterations in the nuclear matrix protein mass correlate with heat-induced inhibition of DNA single-strand-break repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warters, R.L.; Brizgys, L.M.; Lyons, B.W.

    1987-01-01

    The total protein mass co-isolating with the nuclear matrix or nucleoid from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells was observed to increase in heated cells as a function of increasing exposure temperature between 43 0 C and 45 0 C or of exposure time at any temperature. The sedimentation distance of the CHO cell nucleoid in sucrose gradients increased with increasing exposure time at 45 0 C. Both these nuclear alterations correlated in a log-linear manner with heat-induced inhibition of DNA strand break repair. A two-fold threshold increase in nuclear matrix protein mass preceded any substantial inhibition of repair of DNA single-strand breaks. When preheated cells were incubated at 37 0 C the nuclear matrix protein mass and nucleoid sedimentation recovered with a half-time of about 5 h, while DNA single-strand-break repair recovered with a half-time of about 2 h. When preheated cells were placed at 41 0 C a further increase was observed in the nuclear matrix protein mass and the half-time of DNA strand break repair, while nucleoid sedimentation recovered toward control values. These results implicate alterations in the protein mass of the nuclear matrix in heat-induced inhibition of repair of DNA single-strand breaks. (author)

  7. Formation and repair of DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs) in newly replicated DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, S.; Friedman, L.R.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1987-01-01

    DPCs preferentially involve proteins of the nuclear matrix, the site of replication and transcription. To elucidate the relationship with replication, the formation and repair of DPCs has been studied in newly replicated DNA. Log-phase V79 cells were pulsed with /sup 3/H-TdR (10-20 μCi/ml) for 30-90 sec at 22 0 followed by up to a 60 min chase at 37 0 . Irradiation (0-100 Gy) immediately after the pulse increases the labeled DNA in DPCs with a dose-dependence that is unaffected by the initial level of labeled DPC or by chase time. When cells are irradiated before the pulse, DNA synthesis is inhibited; however, release of pulse-labeled DPCs appears normal. The data suggest that during replication, DNA is cross-linked to (matrix) protein, contributing to background DPCs

  8. Replication Protein A (RPA) deficiency activates the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seok-Won; Jung, Jin Ki; Kim, Jung Min

    2016-09-01

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway regulates DNA inter-strand crosslink (ICL) repair. Despite our greater understanding of the role of FA in ICL repair, its function in the preventing spontaneous genome instability is not well understood. Here, we show that depletion of replication protein A (RPA) activates the FA pathway. RPA1 deficiency increases chromatin recruitment of FA core complex, leading to FANCD2 monoubiquitination (FANCD2-Ub) and foci formation in the absence of DNA damaging agents. Importantly, ATR depletion, but not ATM, abolished RPA1 depletion-induced FANCD2-Ub, suggesting that ATR activation mediated FANCD2-Ub. Interestingly, we found that depletion of hSSB1/2-INTS3, a single-stranded DNA-binding protein complex, induces FANCD2-Ub, like RPA1 depletion. More interestingly, depletion of either RPA1 or INTS3 caused increased accumulation of DNA damage in FA pathway deficient cell lines. Taken together, these results indicate that RPA deficiency induces activation of the FA pathway in an ATR-dependent manner, which may play a role in the genome maintenance.

  9. Nuclear translocation contributes to regulation of DNA excision repair activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Nina Østergaard; Andersen, Sofie Dabros; Lützen, Anne

    2009-01-01

    for regulation of nuclear import that is necessary for proper localization of the repair proteins. This review summarizes the current knowledge on nuclear import mechanisms of DNA excision repair proteins and provides a model that categorizes the import by different mechanisms, including classical nuclear import......DNA mutations are circumvented by dedicated specialized excision repair systems, such as the base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mismatch repair (MMR) pathways. Although the individual repair pathways have distinct roles in suppressing changes in the nuclear DNA......, it is evident that proteins from the different DNA repair pathways interact [Y. Wang, D. Cortez, P. Yazdi, N. Neff, S.J. Elledge, J. Qin, BASC, a super complex of BRCA1-associated proteins involved in the recognition and repair of aberrant DNA structures, Genes Dev. 14 (2000) 927-939; M. Christmann, M...

  10. C-Terminal Fluorescent Labeling Impairs Functionality of DNA Mismatch Repair Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieger, Angela; Plotz, Guido; Hinrichsen, Inga; Passmann, Sandra; Adam, Ronja; Zeuzem, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The human DNA mismatch repair (MMR) process is crucial to maintain the integrity of the genome and requires many different proteins which interact perfectly and coordinated. Germline mutations in MMR genes are responsible for the development of the hereditary form of colorectal cancer called Lynch syndrome. Various mutations mainly in two MMR proteins, MLH1 and MSH2, have been identified so far, whereas 55% are detected within MLH1, the essential component of the heterodimer MutLα (MLH1 and PMS2). Most of those MLH1 variants are pathogenic but the relevance of missense mutations often remains unclear. Many different recombinant systems are applied to filter out disease-associated proteins whereby fluorescent tagged proteins are frequently used. However, dye labeling might have deleterious effects on MutLα's functionality. Therefore, we analyzed the consequences of N- and C-terminal fluorescent labeling on expression level, cellular localization and MMR activity of MutLα. Besides significant influence of GFP- or Red-fusion on protein expression we detected incorrect shuttling of single expressed C-terminal GFP-tagged PMS2 into the nucleus and found that C-terminal dye labeling impaired MMR function of MutLα. In contrast, N-terminal tagged MutLαs retained correct functionality and can be recommended both for the analysis of cellular localization and MMR efficiency. PMID:22348133

  11. C-terminal fluorescent labeling impairs functionality of DNA mismatch repair proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Brieger

    Full Text Available The human DNA mismatch repair (MMR process is crucial to maintain the integrity of the genome and requires many different proteins which interact perfectly and coordinated. Germline mutations in MMR genes are responsible for the development of the hereditary form of colorectal cancer called Lynch syndrome. Various mutations mainly in two MMR proteins, MLH1 and MSH2, have been identified so far, whereas 55% are detected within MLH1, the essential component of the heterodimer MutLα (MLH1 and PMS2. Most of those MLH1 variants are pathogenic but the relevance of missense mutations often remains unclear. Many different recombinant systems are applied to filter out disease-associated proteins whereby fluorescent tagged proteins are frequently used. However, dye labeling might have deleterious effects on MutLα's functionality. Therefore, we analyzed the consequences of N- and C-terminal fluorescent labeling on expression level, cellular localization and MMR activity of MutLα. Besides significant influence of GFP- or Red-fusion on protein expression we detected incorrect shuttling of single expressed C-terminal GFP-tagged PMS2 into the nucleus and found that C-terminal dye labeling impaired MMR function of MutLα. In contrast, N-terminal tagged MutLαs retained correct functionality and can be recommended both for the analysis of cellular localization and MMR efficiency.

  12. Elevated levels of the mismatch repair protein PMS2 are associated with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Alixanna M; Woodruff, R D; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Clodfelter, Jill E; Scarpinato, Karin Drotschmann

    2007-02-01

    Defects in mismatch repair (MMR) proteins have been identified in various types of cancer. However, an association with prostate cancer has been controversial. Defective MMR results in genome instability with detrimental consequences that significantly contribute to tumorigenesis. This study determined alterations in key MMR protein levels in prostate cancer with the goal to identify prognostic markers. Prostatectomy samples were immunohistochemically stained and the relative presence or absence of key proteins MSH2, MLH1, and PMS2 determined. Cancer tissue of distinct grades was compared with the normal surrounding tissue. Microsatellite instability (MSI) in altered tissues was determined according to NCI guidelines. In contrast to reports that associate a lack of individual MMR proteins with tumorigenesis, a significant increase in PMS2 levels was identified in PIN lesions and prostate cancer tissue. This elevation in PMS2 was independent of changes in levels in its heterodimeric partner, MLH1. Prostate tumors with elevated levels of PMS2 were genetically unstable, which was corrected by MLH1 co-elevation. This is the first documentation of detrimental consequences associated with the increase in a MMR protein in human cancer. This study recognizes PMS2 elevation as a prognostic marker in pre-neoplastic and prostate cancer lesions. This result has significant implications for future diagnostic and treatment measures. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Cell and protein compatible 3D bioprinting of mechanically strong constructs for bone repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawkins, M J; Mistry, P; Shakesheff, K M; Yang, J; Brown, B N; Bonassar, L J

    2015-01-01

    Rapid prototyping of bone tissue engineering constructs often utilizes elevated temperatures, organic solvents and/or UV light for materials processing. These harsh conditions may prevent the incorporation of cells and therapeutic proteins in the fabrication processes. Here we developed a method for using bioprinting to produce constructs from a thermoresponsive microparticulate material based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) at ambient conditions. These constructs could be engineered with yield stresses of up to 1.22 MPa and Young’s moduli of up to 57.3 MPa which are within the range of properties of human cancellous bone. Further study showed that protein-releasing microspheres could be incorporated into the bioprinted constructs. The release of the model protein lysozyme from bioprinted constructs was sustainted for a period of 15 days and a high degree of protein activity could be measured up to day 9. This work suggests that bioprinting is a viable route to the production of mechanically strong constructs for bone repair under mild conditions which allow the inclusion of viable cells and active proteins. (paper)

  14. Identification of genes and proteins involved in excision repair of human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeijmakers, J.H.J.; Westerveld, A.; Van Duin, M.; Vermeulen, W.; Odijk, H.; De Wit, J.; Bootsma, D.

    1986-01-01

    The autosomal, recessive disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by extreme sensitivity of the skin to sun exposure and prediposition to skin cancer. The basic defect in most XP patients is thought to reside in an inefficient removal of UV-induced lesions in the DNA by excision repair. The biochemical complexity of this process is amply illustrated by the fact that so far nine complementary groups within this syndrome have been identified. Despite extensive research, none of these genes or proteins involved have been isolated. Using a microinjection assay system the authors identified components in crude cell extracts that transiently correct the defect in (injected) fibroblasts of all excision-deficient XP complementation groups, as indicated by temporary restoration of UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis. This correction is complementation group specific, since it is only found when extracts from complementing XP cells are injected. After incubation of extracts with proteinase K the XP-A and KP-G correcting activities were lost, indicating that the complementation is due to proteins. The XP-A correcting protein was found to precipitate between 30 and 60% ammonium sulfate saturation. Furthermore this protein binds to DEAE-cellulose and to (UV-irradiated) double-strand (ds) DNA attached to cellulose. The latter affinity chromatography step allows a considerable purification, since less than 1% of the proteins applied to such columns is retained. It has to be established whether the XP-A correcting proteins binds by itself or via other proteins to the UV-irradiated DNA and whether it also binds to nonirradiated (ds or ss) DNA. Similar experiments with the XP-G correcting protein are in progress

  15. Structural zinc(II thiolate complexes relevant to the modeling of Ada repair protein: Application toward alkylation reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed M. Ibrahim

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The TtZn(II-bound perchlorate complex [TtZn–OClO3] 1 (Ttxyly = hydrotris[N-xylyl-thioimidazolyl]borate was used for the synthesis of zinc(II-bound ethanthiothiol complex [TtZn–SCH2CH3] 2 and its hydrogen-bond containing analog Tt–ZnSCH2CH2–NH(COOC(CH33 3. These thiolate complexes were examined as structural models for the active sites of Ada repair protein toward methylation reactions. The Zn[S3O] coordination sphere in complex 1 includes three thione donors from the ligand Ttixyl and one oxygen donor from the perchlorate coligand in ideally tetrahedral arrangement around the zinc center. The average Zn(1–S(thione bond length is 2.344 Å, and the Zn(1–O(1 bond length is 1.917 Å.

  16. The TAL effector PthA4 interacts with nuclear factors involved in RNA-dependent processes including a HMG protein that selectively binds poly(U RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Antonio de Souza

    Full Text Available Plant pathogenic bacteria utilize an array of effector proteins to cause disease. Among them, transcriptional activator-like (TAL effectors are unusual in the sense that they modulate transcription in the host. Although target genes and DNA specificity of TAL effectors have been elucidated, how TAL proteins control host transcription is poorly understood. Previously, we showed that the Xanthomonas citri TAL effectors, PthAs 2 and 3, preferentially targeted a citrus protein complex associated with transcription control and DNA repair. To extend our knowledge on the mode of action of PthAs, we have identified new protein targets of the PthA4 variant, required to elicit canker on citrus. Here we show that all the PthA4-interacting proteins are DNA and/or RNA-binding factors implicated in chromatin remodeling and repair, gene regulation and mRNA stabilization/modification. The majority of these proteins, including a structural maintenance of chromosomes protein (CsSMC, a translin-associated factor X (CsTRAX, a VirE2-interacting protein (CsVIP2, a high mobility group (CsHMG and two poly(A-binding proteins (CsPABP1 and 2, interacted with each other, suggesting that they assemble into a multiprotein complex. CsHMG was shown to bind DNA and to interact with the invariable leucine-rich repeat region of PthAs. Surprisingly, both CsHMG and PthA4 interacted with PABP1 and 2 and showed selective binding to poly(U RNA, a property that is novel among HMGs and TAL effectors. Given that homologs of CsHMG, CsPABP1, CsPABP2, CsSMC and CsTRAX in other organisms assemble into protein complexes to regulate mRNA stability and translation, we suggest a novel role of TAL effectors in mRNA processing and translational control.

  17. Differential expression of SOS genes in an E. coli mutant producing unstable lexA protein enhances excision repair but inhibits mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, K.R.; Ganesan, A.K.; Mount, D.W.; Stanford Univ., CA)

    1986-01-01

    The SOS response is displayed following treatments which damage DNA or inhibit DNA replication. Two associated activities include enhanced capacity for DNA repair resulting from derepression of the recA, uvrA, uvrB and uvrD genes and increased mutagenesis due to derepression of recA, umuC and umuD. These changes are the consequence of the derepression of at least seventeen unlinked operons negatively regulated by LexA repressor. Following treatments that induce the SOS response, a signal molecule interacts with RecA protein, converting it to an activated form. Activated RecA protein facilitates the proteolytic cleavage of LexA repressor, which results in derepression of the regulon. The cell then enters a new physiological state during which time DNA repair processes are augmented. The lexA41 mutant of E. coli is a uv-resistant derivative of another mutant, lexA3, which produces a repressor that is not cleaved following inducing treatments. The resultant protein is unstable. Lac operon fusions to most of the genes in the SOS regulon were used to show that the various damage-inducible genes were derepressed to different extents. uvrA, B, and D were almost fully derepressed. Consistent with this finding, the rate of removal of T4 endonuclease V-sensitive sites was more rapid in the uv-irradiated lexA41 mutant than in normal cells, suggesting a more active excision repair system. We propose that the instability of the LexA41 protein reduces the intracellular concentration of repressor to a level that allows a high level of excision repair. The additional observation that SOS mutagenesis was only weakly induced in a lexA41 uvrA - mutant implies that the mutant protein partially represses one or more genes whose products promote SOS mutagenesis. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  18. DNA-binding polarity of human replication protein A positions nucleases in nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laat, W L; Appeldoorn, E; Sugasawa, K; Weterings, E; Jaspers, N G; Hoeijmakers, J H

    1998-08-15

    The human single-stranded DNA-binding replication A protein (RPA) is involved in various DNA-processing events. By comparing the affinity of hRPA for artificial DNA hairpin structures with 3'- or 5'-protruding single-stranded arms, we found that hRPA binds ssDNA with a defined polarity; a strong ssDNA interaction domain of hRPA is positioned at the 5' side of its binding region, a weak ssDNA-binding domain resides at the 3' side. Polarity appears crucial for positioning of the excision repair nucleases XPG and ERCC1-XPF on the DNA. With the 3'-oriented side of hRPA facing a duplex ssDNA junction, hRPA interacts with and stimulates ERCC1-XPF, whereas the 5'-oriented side of hRPA at a DNA junction allows stable binding of XPG to hRPA. Our data pinpoint hRPA to the undamaged strand during nucleotide excision repair. Polarity of hRPA on ssDNA is likely to contribute to the directionality of other hRPA-dependent processes as well.

  19. Dentofacial morphology in adolescent or early adult patients with cleft lip and palate after a treatment regimen that included vomer flap surgery and pushback palatal repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friede, H; Lilja, J

    1994-06-01

    Dentofacial morphology was evaluated in 94 adolescent or early adult patients born with unilateral or bilateral cleft lip and palate. As well as lip closure, the primary treatment included vomer flap surgery and pushback palatal repair. Roentgencephalometric measurements as well as classification of the patients into different classes of dentofacial deformity indicated development of bimaxillary retrognathia with severe midfacial deficiency in about a quarter of the cases. Our results were similar to those reported by other teams who used similar surgical regimen.

  20. APE1, the DNA base excision repair protein, regulates the removal of platinum adducts in sensory neuronal cultures by NER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun-Suk; Guo, Chunlu; Thompson, Eric L.; Jiang, Yanlin; Kelley, Mark R.; Vasko, Michael R.; Lee, Suk-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is one of the major side effects of treatment with the anticancer drug, cisplatin. One proposed mechanism for this neurotoxicity is the formation of platinum adducts in sensory neurons that could contribute to DNA damage. Although this damage is largely repaired by nuclear excision repair (NER), our previous findings suggest that augmenting the base excision repair pathway (BER) by overexpressing the repair protein APE1 protects sensory neurons from cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity. The question remains whether APE1 contributes to the ability of the NER pathway to repair platinum-damage in neuronal cells. To examine this, we manipulated APE1 expression in sensory neuronal cultures and measured Pt-removal after exposure to cisplatin. When neuronal cultures were treated with increasing concentrations of cisplatin for two or three hours, there was a concentration-dependent increase in Pt-damage that peaked at four hours and returned to near baseline levels after 24 h. In cultures where APE1 expression was reduced by ∼80% using siRNA directed at APE1, there was a significant inhibition of Pt-removal over eight hours which was reversed by overexpressing APE1 using a lentiviral construct for human wtAPE1. Overexpressing a mutant APE1 (C65 APE1), which only has DNA repair activity, but not its other significant redox-signaling function, mimicked the effects of wtAPE1. Overexpressing DNA repair activity mutant APE1 (226 + 177APE1), with only redox activity was ineffective suggesting it is the DNA repair function of APE1 and not its redox-signaling, that restores the Pt-damage removal. Together, these data provide the first evidence that a critical BER enzyme, APE1, helps regulate the NER pathway in the repair of cisplatin damage in sensory neurons

  1. APE1, the DNA base excision repair protein, regulates the removal of platinum adducts in sensory neuronal cultures by NER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Suk [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Guo, Chunlu; Thompson, Eric L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Jiang, Yanlin [Department of Pediatrics and Herman B Wells Center for Pediatric Research, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Kelley, Mark R. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Department of Pediatrics and Herman B Wells Center for Pediatric Research, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Vasko, Michael R. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Lee, Suk-Hee, E-mail: slee@iu.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Peripheral neuropathy is one of the major side effects of treatment with the anticancer drug, cisplatin. One proposed mechanism for this neurotoxicity is the formation of platinum adducts in sensory neurons that could contribute to DNA damage. Although this damage is largely repaired by nuclear excision repair (NER), our previous findings suggest that augmenting the base excision repair pathway (BER) by overexpressing the repair protein APE1 protects sensory neurons from cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity. The question remains whether APE1 contributes to the ability of the NER pathway to repair platinum-damage in neuronal cells. To examine this, we manipulated APE1 expression in sensory neuronal cultures and measured Pt-removal after exposure to cisplatin. When neuronal cultures were treated with increasing concentrations of cisplatin for two or three hours, there was a concentration-dependent increase in Pt-damage that peaked at four hours and returned to near baseline levels after 24 h. In cultures where APE1 expression was reduced by ∼80% using siRNA directed at APE1, there was a significant inhibition of Pt-removal over eight hours which was reversed by overexpressing APE1 using a lentiviral construct for human wtAPE1. Overexpressing a mutant APE1 (C65 APE1), which only has DNA repair activity, but not its other significant redox-signaling function, mimicked the effects of wtAPE1. Overexpressing DNA repair activity mutant APE1 (226 + 177APE1), with only redox activity was ineffective suggesting it is the DNA repair function of APE1 and not its redox-signaling, that restores the Pt-damage removal. Together, these data provide the first evidence that a critical BER enzyme, APE1, helps regulate the NER pathway in the repair of cisplatin damage in sensory neurons.

  2. Methods for quantitative evaluation of dynamics of repair proteins within irradiated cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hable, V. [Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik LRT2, UniBw-Muenchen, 85577 Neubiberg (Germany)]. E-mail: volker.hable@unibw.de; Dollinger, G. [Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik LRT2, UniBw-Muenchen, 85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Greubel, C. [Physik Department E12, TU-Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Hauptner, A. [Physik Department E12, TU-Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Kruecken, R. [Physik Department E12, TU-Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Dietzel, S. [Department Biologie II, LMU-Muenchen, 82152 Martinsried (Germany); Cremer, T. [Department Biologie II, LMU-Muenchen, 82152 Martinsried (Germany); Drexler, G.A. [Strahlenbiologisches Institut, LMU-Muenchen, 80336 Munich (Germany); Friedl, A.A. [Strahlenbiologisches Institut, LMU-Muenchen, 80336 Munich (Germany); Loewe, R. [Strahlenbiologisches Institut, LMU-Muenchen, 80336 Munich (Germany)

    2006-04-15

    Living HeLa cells are irradiated well directed with single 100 MeV oxygen ions by the superconducting ion microprobe SNAKE, the Superconducting Nanoscope for Applied Nuclear (=Kern-) Physics Experiments, at the Munich 14 MV tandem accelerator. Various proteins, which are involved directly or indirectly in repair processes, accumulate as clusters (so called foci) at DNA-double strand breaks (DSBs) induced by the ions. The spatiotemporal dynamics of these foci built by the phosphorylated histone {gamma}-H2AX are studied. For this purpose cells are irradiated in line patterns. The {gamma}-H2AX is made visible under the fluorescence microscope using immunofluorescence techniques. Quantitative analysis methods are developed to evaluate the data of the microscopic images in order to analyze movement of the foci and their changing size.

  3. KIN17, XPC, DNA-PKCS and XRCC4 proteins in the cellular response to DNA damages. Relations between nucleotide excision repair and non-homologous end joining in a human syn-genic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despras, Emmanuelle

    2006-01-01

    The response to genotoxic stress involves many cellular factors in a complex network of mechanisms that aim to preserve the genetic integrity of the organism. These mechanisms enclose the detection and repair of DNA lesions, the regulation of transcription and replication and, eventually, the setting of cell death. Among the nuclear proteins involved in this response, kin17 proteins are zinc-finger proteins conserved through evolution and activated by ultraviolet (UV) or ionizing radiations (IR). We showed that human kin17 protein (HSAkin17) is found in the cell under a soluble form and a form tightly anchored to nuclear structures. A fraction of HSAkin17 protein is directly associated with chromatin. HSAkin17 protein is recruited to nuclear structures 24 hours after treatment with various agents inducing DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) and/or replication forks blockage. Moreover, the reduction of total HSAkin17 protein level sensitizes RKO cells to IR. We also present evidence for the involvement of HSAkin17 protein in DNA replication. This hypothesis was further confirmed by the biochemical demonstration of its belonging to the replication complex. HSAkin17 protein could link DNA replication and DNA repair, a defect in the HSAkin17 pathway leading to an increased radiosensitivity. In a second part, we studied the interactions between two DNA repair mechanisms: nucleotide excision repair (NER) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). NER repairs a wide variety of lesions inducing a distortion of the DNA double helix including UV-induced pyrimidine dimers. NHEJ allows the repair of DSB by direct joining of DNA ends. We used a syn-genic model for DNA repair defects based on RNA interference developed in the laboratory. Epstein-Barr virus-derived vectors (pEBV) allow long-term expression of siRNA and specific extinction of the targeted gene. The reduction of the expression of genes involved in NER (XPA and XPC) or NHEJ (DNA-PKcs and XRCC4) leads to the expected

  4. Photosensitized UVA-Induced Cross-Linking between Human DNA Repair and Replication Proteins and DNA Revealed by Proteomic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Long wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UVA, 320–400 nm) interacts with chromophores present in human cells to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that damage both DNA and proteins. ROS levels are amplified, and the damaging effects of UVA are exacerbated if the cells are irradiated in the presence of UVA photosensitizers such as 6-thioguanine (6-TG), a strong UVA chromophore that is extensively incorporated into the DNA of dividing cells, or the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin. Both DNA-embedded 6-TG and ciprofloxacin combine synergistically with UVA to generate high levels of ROS. Importantly, the extensive protein damage induced by these photosensitizer+UVA combinations inhibits DNA repair. DNA is maintained in intimate contact with the proteins that effect its replication, transcription, and repair, and DNA–protein cross-links (DPCs) are a recognized reaction product of ROS. Cross-linking of DNA metabolizing proteins would compromise these processes by introducing physical blocks and by depleting active proteins. We describe a sensitive and statistically rigorous method to analyze DPCs in cultured human cells. Application of this proteomics-based analysis to cells treated with 6-TG+UVA and ciprofloxacin+UVA identified proteins involved in DNA repair, replication, and gene expression among those most vulnerable to cross-linking under oxidative conditions. PMID:27654267

  5. Functional implications of the p.Cys680Arg mutation in the MLH1 mismatch repair protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dominguez-Valentin, Mev; Drost, Mark; Therkildsen, Christina

    2014-01-01

    >C missense mutation in exon 18 of the human MLH1 gene and biochemically characterization of the p.Cys680Arg mutant MLH1 protein to implicate it in the pathogenicity of the Lynch syndrome (LS). We show that the mutation is deficient in DNA mismatch repair and, therefore, contributing to LS in the carriers....

  6. Kaempferol induces DNA damage and inhibits DNA repair associated protein expressions in human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lung-Yuan; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chou, Yu-Cheng; Shih, Yung-Luen; Bau, Da-Tian; Chen, Jaw-Chyun; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-01-01

    Numerous evidences have shown that plant flavonoids (naturally occurring substances) have been reported to have chemopreventive activities and protect against experimental carcinogenesis. Kaempferol, one of the flavonoids, is widely distributed in fruits and vegetables, and may have cancer chemopreventive properties. However, the precise underlying mechanism regarding induced DNA damage and suppressed DNA repair system are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether kaempferol induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair associated protein expression in human leukemia HL-60 cells in vitro. Percentages of viable cells were measured via a flow cytometry assay. DNA damage was examined by Comet assay and DAPI staining. DNA fragmentation (ladder) was examined by DNA gel electrophoresis. The changes of protein levels associated with DNA repair were examined by Western blotting. Results showed that kaempferol dose-dependently decreased the viable cells. Comet assay indicated that kaempferol induced DNA damage (Comet tail) in a dose-dependent manner and DAPI staining also showed increased doses of kaempferol which led to increased DNA condensation, these effects are all of dose-dependent manners. Western blotting indicated that kaempferol-decreased protein expression associated with DNA repair system, such as phosphate-ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (p-ATM), phosphate-ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related (p-ATR), 14-3-3 proteins sigma (14-3-3σ), DNA-dependent serine/threonine protein kinase (DNA-PK), O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), p53 and MDC1 protein expressions, but increased the protein expression of p-p53 and p-H2AX. Protein translocation was examined by confocal laser microscopy, and we found that kaempferol increased the levels of p-H2AX and p-p53 in HL-60 cells. Taken together, in the present study, we found that kaempferol induced DNA damage and suppressed DNA repair and inhibited DNA repair associated protein expression in HL-60

  7. Surgical intervention after transvaginal Prolift mesh repair: retrospective single-center study including 524 patients with 3 years' median follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Landsheere, Laurent; Ismail, Sharif; Lucot, Jean-Philippe; Deken, Valérie; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Cosson, Michel

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the nature and rate of surgical intervention after transvaginal Prolift mesh repair for pelvic organ prolapse. This was a retrospective study of all patients who underwent Prolift mesh repair between January 2005 and January 2009. Patient data were obtained from medical records, and patients were telephoned to check if they had surgery in other hospitals. A total of 600 consecutive patients were identified. Of these, 524 patients (87.3%) were included in the study, with a median follow-up duration of 38 months (range, 15-63). Global reoperation rate was 11.6%. Indications of intervention were surgery for urinary incontinence (6.9%), mesh-related complications (3.6%), or prolapse recurrence (3%). The global reoperation rate after transvaginal Prolift mesh repair was 11.6%, with urinary incontinence surgery being the most common indication. Rates of mesh complications and prolapse recurrence are relatively low in an experienced team. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification of Pathways in Liver Repair Potentially Targeted by Secretory Proteins from Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Winkler

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The beneficial impact of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC on both acute and chronic liver diseases has been confirmed, although the molecular mechanisms behind it remain elusive. We aim to identify factors secreted by undifferentiated and hepatocytic differentiated MSC in vitro in order to delineate liver repair pathways potentially targeted by MSC. Methods: Secreted factors were determined by protein arrays and related pathways identified by biomathematical analyses. Results: MSC from adipose tissue and bone marrow expressed a similar pattern of surface markers. After hepatocytic differentiation, CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1, ICAM-1 increased and CD166 (activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule, ALCAM decreased. MSC secreted different factors before and after differentiation. These comprised cytokines involved in innate immunity and growth factors regulating liver regeneration. Pathway analysis revealed cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions, chemokine signalling pathways, the complement and coagulation cascades as well as the Januskinase-signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STAT and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (NOD-like receptor signalling pathways as relevant networks. Relationships to transforming growth factor β (TGF-β and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF1-α signalling seemed also relevant. Conclusion: MSC secreted proteins, which differed depending on cell source and degree of differentiation. The factors might address inflammatory and growth factor pathways as well as chemo-attraction and innate immunity. Since these are prone to dysregulation in most liver diseases, MSC release hepatotropic factors, potentially supporting liver regeneration.

  9. Dynamics of the DNA repair proteins WRN and BLM in the nucleoplasm and nucleoli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendtsen, Kristian Moss; Jensen, Martin Borch; May, Alfred; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Trusina, Ala; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Jensen, Mogens H

    2014-11-01

    We have investigated the mobility of two EGFP-tagged DNA repair proteins, WRN and BLM. In particular, we focused on the dynamics in two locations, the nucleoli and the nucleoplasm. We found that both WRN and BLM use a "DNA-scanning" mechanism, with rapid binding-unbinding to DNA resulting in effective diffusion. In the nucleoplasm WRN and BLM have effective diffusion coefficients of 1.62 and 1.34 μm(2)/s, respectively. Likewise, the dynamics in the nucleoli are also best described by effective diffusion, but with diffusion coefficients a factor of ten lower than in the nucleoplasm. From this large reduction in diffusion coefficient we were able to classify WRN and BLM as DNA damage scanners. In addition to WRN and BLM we also classified other DNA damage proteins and found they all fall into one of two categories. Either they are scanners, similar to WRN and BLM, with very low diffusion coefficients, suggesting a scanning mechanism, or they are almost freely diffusing, suggesting that they interact with DNA only after initiation of a DNA damage response.

  10. Chitinase-like proteins as regulators of innate immunity and tissue repair: helpful lessons for asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Tara E

    2018-02-19

    Chitinases and chitinase-like proteins (CLPs) belong to the glycoside hydrolase family 18 of proteins. Chitinases are expressed in mammals and lower organisms, facilitate chitin degradation, and hence act as host-defence enzymes. Gene duplication and loss-of-function mutations of enzymatically active chitinases have resulted in the expression of a diverse range of CLPs across different species. CLPs are genes that are increasingly associated with inflammation and tissue remodelling not only in mammals but also across distant species. While the focus has remained on understanding the functions and expression patterns of CLPs during disease in humans, studies in mouse and lower organisms have revealed important and overlapping roles of the CLP family during physiology, host defence and pathology. This review will summarise recent insights into the regulatory functions of CLPs on innate immune pathways and discuss how these effects are not only important for host defence and tissue injury/repair after pathogen invasion, but also how they have extensive implications for pathological processes involved in diseases such as asthma. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  11. Determination of processed animal proteins, including meat and bone meal, in animal feed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gizzi, G.; Holst, von C.; Baeten, V.; Berben, G.; Raamsdonk, van L.W.D.

    2004-01-01

    The presence of processed animal proteins (PAP), including meat and bone meal (MBM) from various species, in animal feed was investigated. It was demonstrated that microscopy is the most reliable method for enforcing the current total MBM ban in the European Uion (EU). It was shown that near

  12. Structure of the human gene encoding the protein repair L-isoaspartyl (D-aspartyl) O-methyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVry, C G; Tsai, W; Clarke, S

    1996-11-15

    The protein L-isoaspartyl/D-aspartyl O-methyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.77) catalyzes the first step in the repair of proteins damaged in the aging process by isomerization or racemization reactions at aspartyl and asparaginyl residues. A single gene has been localized to human chromosome 6 and multiple transcripts arising through alternative splicing have been identified. Restriction enzyme mapping, subcloning, and DNA sequence analysis of three overlapping clones from a human genomic library in bacteriophage P1 indicate that the gene spans approximately 60 kb and is composed of 8 exons interrupted by 7 introns. Analysis of intron/exon splice junctions reveals that all of the donor and acceptor splice sites are in agreement with the mammalian consensus splicing sequence. Determination of transcription initiation sites by primer extension analysis of poly(A)+ mRNA from human brain identifies multiple start sites, with a major site 159 nucleotides upstream from the ATG start codon. Sequence analysis of the 5'-untranslated region demonstrates several potential cis-acting DNA elements including SP1, ETF, AP1, AP2, ARE, XRE, CREB, MED-1, and half-palindromic ERE motifs. The promoter of this methyltransferase gene lacks an identifiable TATA box but is characterized by a CpG island which begins approximately 723 nucleotides upstream of the major transcriptional start site and extends through exon 1 and into the first intron. These features are characteristic of housekeeping genes and are consistent with the wide tissue distribution observed for this methyltransferase activity.

  13. Repair process and a repaired component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, III, Herbert Chidsey; Simpson, Stanley F.

    2018-02-20

    Matrix composite component repair processes are disclosed. The matrix composite repair process includes applying a repair material to a matrix composite component, securing the repair material to the matrix composite component with an external securing mechanism and curing the repair material to bond the repair material to the matrix composite component during the securing by the external securing mechanism. The matrix composite component is selected from the group consisting of a ceramic matrix composite, a polymer matrix composite, and a metal matrix composite. In another embodiment, the repair process includes applying a partially-cured repair material to a matrix composite component, and curing the repair material to bond the repair material to the matrix composite component, an external securing mechanism securing the repair material throughout a curing period, In another embodiment, the external securing mechanism is consumed or decomposed during the repair process.

  14. Fibrinogen-Related Proteins in Tissue Repair: How a Unique Domain with a Common Structure Controls Diverse Aspects of Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuliani-Alvarez, Lorena; Midwood, Kim S

    2015-05-01

    Significance: Fibrinogen-related proteins (FRePs) comprise an intriguing collection of extracellular molecules, each containing a conserved fibrinogen-like globe (FBG). This group includes the eponymous fibrinogen as well as the tenascin, angiopoietin, and ficolin families. Many of these proteins are upregulated during tissue repair and exhibit diverse roles during wound healing. Recent Advances: An increasing body of evidence highlights the specific expression of a number of FRePs following tissue injury and infection. Upon induction, each FReP uses its FBG domain to mediate quite distinct effects that contribute to different stages of tissue repair, such as driving coagulation, pathogen detection, inflammation, angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling. Critical Issues: Despite a high degree of homology among FRePs, each contains unique sequences that enable their diversification of function. Comparative analysis of the structure and function of FRePs and precise mapping of regions that interact with a variety of ligands has started to reveal the underlying molecular mechanisms by which these proteins play very different roles using their common domain. Future Directions: Fibrinogen has long been used in the clinic as a synthetic matrix serving as a scaffold or a delivery system to aid tissue repair. Novel therapeutic strategies are now emerging that harness the use of other FRePs to improve wound healing outcomes. As we learn more about the underlying mechanisms by which each FReP contributes to the repair response, specific blockade, or indeed potentiation, of their function offers real potential to enable regulation of distinct processes during pathological wound healing.

  15. Alpha-phellandrene-induced DNA damage and affect DNA repair protein expression in WEHI-3 murine leukemia cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jen-Jyh; Wu, Chih-Chung; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Weng, Shu-Wen; Ma, Yi-Shih; Huang, Yi-Ping; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-11-01

    Although there are few reports regarding α-phellandrene (α-PA), a natural compound from Schinus molle L. essential oil, there is no report to show that α-PA induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair associated protein expression. Herein, we investigated the effects of α-PA on DNA damage and repair associated protein expression in murine leukemia cells. Flow cytometric assay was used to measure the effects of α-PA on total cell viability and the results indicated that α-PA induced cell death. Comet assay and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride staining were used for measuring DNA damage and condensation, respectively, and the results indicated that α-PA induced DNA damage and condensation in a concentration-dependent manner. DNA gel electrophoresis was used to examine the DNA damage and the results showed that α-PA induced DNA damage in WEHI-3 cells. Western blotting assay was used to measure the changes of DNA damage and repair associated protein expression and the results indicated that α-PA increased p-p53, p-H2A.X, 14-3-3-σ, and MDC1 protein expression but inhibited the protein of p53, MGMT, DNA-PK, and BRCA-1. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. SIRT6 stabilizes DNA-dependent protein kinase at chromatin for DNA double-strand break repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCord, Ronald A; Michishita, Eriko; Hong, Tao

    2009-01-01

    -PKcs) to chromatin in response to DNA damage and stabilizes DNA-PKcs at chromatin adjacent to an induced site-specific DSB. Abrogation of these SIRT6 activities leads to impaired resolution of DSBs. Together, these findings elucidate a mechanism whereby regulation of dynamic interaction of a DNA repair factor......-dependent protein kinase) and promotes DNA DSB repair. In response to DSBs, SIRT6 associates dynamically with chromatin and is necessary for an acute decrease in global cellular acetylation levels on histone H3 Lysine 9. Moreover, SIRT6 is required for mobilization of the DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA......, and SIRT6 knockout cells exhibit genomic instability and DNA damage hypersensitivity. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these defects are not fully understood. Here, we show that SIRT6 forms a macromolecular complex with the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair factor DNA-PK (DNA...

  17. Programmed Death Ligand 1 Expression Among 700 Consecutive Endometrial Cancers: Strong Association With Mismatch Repair Protein Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zaibo; Joehlin-Price, Amy S; Rhoades, Jennifer; Ayoola-Adeola, Martins; Miller, Karin; Parwani, Anil V; Backes, Floor J; Felix, Ashley S; Suarez, Adrian A

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to determine the prevalence of programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression in endometrial carcinoma (EC) and determine clinical and pathological associations. Immunohistochemistry for PD-L1 was performed on sections of a triple-core tissue microarray of 700 ECs. Positive PD-L1 expression, defined as 1% of cells staining positive, was evaluated in tumor and stromal compartments. Using age-adjusted logistic regression, we estimated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for associations between PD-L1 expression (overall and by staining compartment) with clinical and tumor characteristics. Kaplan-Meier plots and log-rank tests were used to evaluate associations between PD-L1 expression and EC-specific survival. PD-L1 expression was observed in 100 cases (14.3%), including 27 (3.9%) with expression in tumor cells only, 35 (5.0%) with expression in both tumor cells and stroma, and 38 (5.4%) with expression in stroma only. Expression was observed in ECs of different histologic types. Tumors characterized by loss of mismatch repair proteins were significantly associated with tumoral PD-L1 expression (P < 0.0001), but not with stromal PD-L1 expression. Both tumoral and stromal PD-L1 expressions were associated with high-grade endometrioid histology, nonendometrioid histology, and lymphovascular space invasion. We observed no significant associations between PD-L1 expression and EC-specific survival. PD-L1 is expressed in a significant proportion of EC and is associated with mismatch repair deficiency, potentially representing a mechanism of tumor immune evasion and a therapeutic target in EC.

  18. My journey to DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Tomas

    2013-02-01

    I completed my medical studies at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm but have always been devoted to basic research. My longstanding interest is to understand fundamental DNA repair mechanisms in the fields of cancer therapy, inherited human genetic disorders and ancient DNA. I initially measured DNA decay, including rates of base loss and cytosine deamination. I have discovered several important DNA repair proteins and determined their mechanisms of action. The discovery of uracil-DNA glycosylase defined a new category of repair enzymes with each specialized for different types of DNA damage. The base excision repair pathway was first reconstituted with human proteins in my group. Cell-free analysis for mammalian nucleotide excision repair of DNA was also developed in my laboratory. I found multiple distinct DNA ligases in mammalian cells, and led the first genetic and biochemical work on DNA ligases I, III and IV. I discovered the mammalian exonucleases DNase III (TREX1) and IV (FEN1). Interestingly, expression of TREX1 was altered in some human autoimmune diseases. I also showed that the mutagenic DNA adduct O(6)-methylguanine (O(6)mG) is repaired without removing the guanine from DNA, identifying a surprising mechanism by which the methyl group is transferred to a residue in the repair protein itself. A further novel process of DNA repair discovered by my research group is the action of AlkB as an iron-dependent enzyme carrying out oxidative demethylation. Copyright © 2013. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Interdependence of DNA mismatch repair proteins MLH1 and MSH2 in apoptosis in human colorectal carcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassen, Samar; Ali, Akhtar A; Kilaparty, Surya P; Al-Anbaky, Qudes A; Majeed, Waqar; Boman, Bruce M; Fields, Jeremy Z; Ali, Nawab

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system consists of a number of proteins that play important roles in repair of base pair mismatch mutations and in maintenance of genomic integrity. A defect in this system can cause genetic instability, which can lead to carcinogenesis. For instance, a germline mutation in one of the mismatch repair proteins, especially MLH1 or MSH2, is responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer. These MMR proteins also play an important role in the induction of apoptosis. Accordingly, altered expression of or a defect in MLH1 or MSH2 may confer resistance to anti-cancer drugs used in chemotherapy. We hypothesized that the ability of these two MMR proteins to regulate apoptosis are interdependent. Moreover, a defect in either one may confer resistance to chemotherapy by an inability to trigger apoptosis. To this end, we studied three cell lines-SW480, LoVo, and HTC116. These cell lines were selected based on their differential expression of MLH1 and MSH2 proteins. SW480 expresses both MLH1 and MSH2; LoVo expresses only MLH1 but not MSH2; HCT116 expresses only MSH2 but not MLH1 protein. MTT assays, a measure of cytotoxicity, showed that there were different cytotoxic effects of an anti-cancer drug, etoposide, on these cell lines, effects that were correlated with the MMR status of the cells. Cells that are deficient in MLH1 protein (HCT116 cells) were resistant to the drug. Cells that express both MLH1 and MSH2 proteins (SW480 cells) showed caspase-3 cleavage, an indicator of apoptosis. Cells that lack MLH1 (HCT116 cells) did not show any caspase-3 cleavage. Expression of full-length MLH1 protein was decreased in MMR proficient (SW480) cells during apoptosis; it remained unchanged in cells that lack MSH2 (LoVo cells). The expression of MSH2 protein remained unchanged during apoptosis both in MMR proficient (SW480) and deficient (HCT116) cells. Studies on translocation of MLH1 protein from nucleus to cytosolic fraction, an

  20. Nephrin regulates lamellipodia formation by assembling a protein complex that includes Ship2, filamin and lamellipodin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudan Venkatareddy

    Full Text Available Actin dynamics has emerged at the forefront of podocyte biology. Slit diaphragm junctional adhesion protein Nephrin is necessary for development of the podocyte morphology and transduces phosphorylation-dependent signals that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics. The present study extends our understanding of Nephrin function by showing in cultured podocytes that Nephrin activation induced actin dynamics is necessary for lamellipodia formation. Upon activation Nephrin recruits and regulates a protein complex that includes Ship2 (SH2 domain containing 5' inositol phosphatase, Filamin and Lamellipodin, proteins important in regulation of actin and focal adhesion dynamics, as well as lamellipodia formation. Using the previously described CD16-Nephrin clustering system, Nephrin ligation or activation resulted in phosphorylation of the actin crosslinking protein Filamin in a p21 activated kinase dependent manner. Nephrin activation in cell culture results in formation of lamellipodia, a process that requires specialized actin dynamics at the leading edge of the cell along with focal adhesion turnover. In the CD16-Nephrin clustering model, Nephrin ligation resulted in abnormal morphology of actin tails in human podocytes when Ship2, Filamin or Lamellipodin were individually knocked down. We also observed decreased lamellipodia formation and cell migration in these knock down cells. These data provide evidence that Nephrin not only initiates actin polymerization but also assembles a protein complex that is necessary to regulate the architecture of the generated actin filament network and focal adhesion dynamics.

  1. Turbine repair process, repaired coating, and repaired turbine component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rupak; Delvaux, John McConnell; Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-11-03

    A turbine repair process, a repaired coating, and a repaired turbine component are disclosed. The turbine repair process includes providing a turbine component having a higher-pressure region and a lower-pressure region, introducing particles into the higher-pressure region, and at least partially repairing an opening between the higher-pressure region and the lower-pressure region with at least one of the particles to form a repaired turbine component. The repaired coating includes a silicon material, a ceramic matrix composite material, and a repaired region having the silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material. The repaired turbine component a ceramic matrix composite layer and a repaired region having silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material.

  2. Stripped-down DNA repair in a highly reduced parasite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fast Naomi M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Encephalitozoon cuniculi is a member of a distinctive group of single-celled parasitic eukaryotes called microsporidia, which are closely related to fungi. Some of these organisms, including E. cuniculi, also have uniquely small genomes that are within the prokaryotic range. Thus, E. cuniculi has undergone a massive genome reduction which has resulted in a loss of genes from diverse biological pathways, including those that act in DNA repair. DNA repair is essential to any living cell. A loss of these mechanisms invariably results in accumulation of mutations and/or cell death. Six major pathways of DNA repair in eukaryotes include: non-homologous end joining (NHEJ, homologous recombination repair (HRR, mismatch repair (MMR, nucleotide excision repair (NER, base excision repair (BER and methyltransferase repair. DNA polymerases are also critical players in DNA repair processes. Given the close relationship between microsporidia and fungi, the repair mechanisms present in E. cuniculi were compared to those of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ascertain how the process of genome reduction has affected the DNA repair pathways. Results E. cuniculi lacks 16 (plus another 6 potential absences of the 56 DNA repair genes sought via BLASTP and PSI-BLAST searches. Six of 14 DNA polymerases or polymerase subunits are also absent in E. cuniculi. All of these genes are relatively well conserved within eukaryotes. The absence of genes is not distributed equally among the different repair pathways; some pathways lack only one protein, while there is a striking absence of many proteins that are components of both double strand break repair pathways. All specialized repair polymerases are also absent. Conclusion Given the large number of DNA repair genes that are absent from the double strand break repair pathways, E. cuniculi is a prime candidate for the study of double strand break repair with minimal machinery. Strikingly, all of the

  3. Study of Anti-Fatigue Effect in Rats of Ferrous Chelates Including Hairtail Protein Hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saibo Huang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability of ferrous chelates including hairtail protein hydrolysates to prevent and reduce fatigue was studied in rats. After hydrolysis of hairtail surimi with papain, the hairtail protein hydrolysates (HPH were separated into three groups by range of relative molecular weight using ultrafiltration membrane separation. Hairtail proteins were then chelated with ferrous ions, and the antioxidant activity, the amino acid composition and chelation rate of the three kinds of ferrous chelates including hairtail protein hydrolysates (Fe-HPH were determined. Among the three groups, the Fe-HPH chelate showing the best conditions was selected for the anti-fatigue animal experiment. For it, experimental rats were randomly divided into seven groups. Group A was designated as the negative control group given distilled water. Group B, the positive control group, was given glutathione. Groups C, D and E were designated as the Fe-HPH chelate treatment groups and given low, medium, and high doses, respectively. Group F was designated as HPH hydrolysate treatment group, and Group G was designated as FeCl2 treatment group. The different diets were orally administered to rats for 20 days. After that time, rats were subjected to forced swimming training after 1 h of gavage. Rats given Fe-FPH chelate had higher haemoglobin regeneration efficiency (HRE, longer exhaustive swimming time and higher SOD activity. Additionally, Fe-FPH chelate was found to significantly decrease the malondialdehyde content, visibly enhance the GSH-Px activity in liver and reduce blood lactic acid of rats. Fe-HPH chelate revealed an anti-fatigue effect, similar to or better than the positive control substance and superior to HPH or Fe when provided alone.

  4. Post-irradiation replication and repair in UV-irradiated cells of Proteus mirabilis depends on protein synthesis and a functioning rec+ gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofemeister, J.

    1977-01-01

    The amount of and the molecular weight of newly synthesized DNA (piDNA) as well as its repair after UV irradiation in excision-proficient strains of P.mirabilis and E.coli K12 have been compared. A fraction of post-replication repair (PRR) in P.mirabilis is found to be dependent on de novo protein synthesis after UV irradiation. Pre-irradiation by UV and pre-treatment with nalidixic acid increase the efficiency of post-irradiation replication and PRR even in the presence of chloramphenicol. An inducible repair function in P.mirabilis is supposed to stimulate post-irradiation replication and repair. (author)

  5. Post-irradiation replication and repair in uv-irradiated cells of Proteus mirabilis depends on protein synthesis and a functioning rec/sup +/ gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofemeister, J [Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Gatersleben. Zentralinstitut fuer Genetik und Kulturpflanzenforschung

    1977-02-28

    The amount of and the molecular weight of newly synthesized DNA (piDNA) as well as its repair after uv irradiation in excision-proficient strains of P.mirabilis and E.coli K12 have been compared. A fraction of post-replication repair (PRR) in P.mirabilis is found to be dependent on de novo protein synthesis after uv irradiation. Pre-irradiation by uv and pre-treatment with nalidixic acid increase the efficiency of post-irradiation replication and PRR even in the presence of chloramphenicol. An inducible repair function in P.mirabilis is supposed to stimulate post-irradiation replication and repair.

  6. Phage T4 endonuclease V stimulates DNA repair replication in isolated nuclei from ultraviolet-irradiated human cells, including xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.A.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1978-01-01

    The repair mode of DNA replication has been demonstrated in isolated nuclei from uv-irradiated human cells. Nuclei are incubated in a mixture containing [ 3 H]thymidine triphosphate and bromodeoxyuridine triphosphate in a 1:5 ratio. The 3 H at the density of parental DNA in alkaline CsCl density gradients is then a measure of repair. In nuclei prepared from WI38 cells 30 min after irradiation, repair replication is uv-dependent and proceeds at approximately the in vivo rate for 5 min. Repair replication is reduced in irradiated nuclei or in nuclei prepared immediately after irradiation. It is Mg 2+ -dependent and stimulated by added ATP and deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates. No repair replication is observed in nuclei from xeroderma pigmentosum (complementation group A) cells. However, upon addition of coliphage T4 endonuclease V, which specifically nicks DNA containing pyrimidine dimers, repair replication is observed in nuclei from irradiated xeroderma pigmentosum cells and is stimulated in WI38 nuclei. The reaction then persists for an hour and is dependent upon added ATP and deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates. The repair label is in stretches of roughly 35 nucleotides, as it is in intact cells. Added pancreatic DNase does not promote uv-dependent repair synthesis. Our results support the view that xeroderma pigmentosum (group A) cells are defective in the incision step of the DNA excision repair pathway, and demonstrate the utility of this system for probing DNA repair mechanisms

  7. Contribution of transcription-coupled DNA repair to MMS-induced mutagenesis in E. coli strains deficient in functional AlkB protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrzesiński, Michał; Nieminuszczy, Jadwiga; Sikora, Anna; Mielecki, Damian; Chojnacka, Aleksandra; Kozłowski, Marek; Krwawicz, Joanna; Grzesiuk, Elzbieta

    2010-06-01

    In Escherichia coli the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) induces defense systems (adaptive and SOS responses), DNA repair pathways, and mutagenesis. We have previously found that AlkB protein induced as part of the adaptive (Ada) response protects cells from the genotoxic and mutagenic activity of MMS. AlkB is a non-heme iron (II), alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase that oxidatively demethylates 1meA and 3meC lesions in DNA, with recovery of A and C. Here, we studied the impact of transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR) on MMS-induced mutagenesis in E. coli strain deficient in functional AlkB protein. Measuring the decline in the frequency of MMS-induced argE3-->Arg(+) revertants under transient amino acid starvation (conditions for TCR induction), we have found a less effective TCR in the BS87 (alkB(-)) strain in comparison with the AB1157 (alkB(+)) counterpart. Mutation in the mfd gene encoding the transcription-repair coupling factor Mfd, resulted in weaker TCR in MMS-treated and starved AB1157 mfd-1 cells in comparison to AB1157 mfd(+), and no repair in BS87 mfd(-) cells. Determination of specificity of Arg(+) revertants allowed to conclude that MMS-induced 1meA and 3meC lesions, unrepaired in bacteria deficient in AlkB, are the source of mutations. These include AT-->TA transversions by supL suppressor formation (1meA) and GC-->AT transitions by supB or supE(oc) formation (3meC). The repair of these lesions is partly Mfd-dependent in the AB1157 mfd-1 and totally Mfd-dependent in the BS87 mfd-1 strain. The nucleotide sequence of the mfd-1 allele shows that the mutated Mfd-1 protein, deprived of the C-terminal translocase domain, is unable to initiate TCR. It strongly enhances the SOS response in the alkB(-)mfd(-) bacteria but not in the alkB(+)mfd(-) counterpart. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Phosphorylation-dependent signaling controls degradation of DNA mismatch repair protein PMS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichsen, Inga; Weßbecher, Isabel M; Huhn, Meik; Passmann, Sandra; Zeuzem, Stefan; Plotz, Guido; Biondi, Ricardo M; Brieger, Angela

    2017-12-01

    MutLα, a heterodimer consisting of MLH1 and PMS2, plays an important role in DNA mismatch repair and has been shown to be additionally involved in several other important cellular mechanisms. Previous work indicated that AKT could modulate PMS2 stability by phosphorylation. Still, the mechanisms of regulation of MutLα remain unclear. The stability of MutLα subunits was investigated by transiently overexpression of wild type and mutant forms of MLH1 and PMS2 using immunoblotting for measuring the protein levels after treatment. We found that treatment with the cell-permeable serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor, Calyculin, leads to degradation of PMS2 when MLH1 or its C-terminal domain is missing or if amino acids of MLH1 essential for PMS2 interaction are mutated. In addition, we discovered that the C-terminal tail of PMS2 is relevant for this Calyculin-dependent degradation. A direct involvement of AKT, which was previously described to be responsible for PMS2 degradation, could not be detected. The multi-kinase inhibitor Sorafenib, in contrast, was able to avoid the degradation of PMS2 which postulates that cellular phosphorylation is involved in this process. Together, we show that pharmacologically induced phosphorylation by Calyculin can induce the selective proteasome-dependent degradation of PMS2 but not of MLH1 and that the PMS2 degradation could be blocked by Sorafenib treatment. Curiously, the C-terminal Lynch Syndrome-variants MLH1 L749P and MLH1 Y750X make PMS2 prone to Calyculin induced degradation. Therefore, we conclude that the specific degradation of PMS2 may represent a new mechanism to regulate MutLα. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Protein energy-malnutrition: does the in vitro zinc sulfate supplementation improve chromosomal damage repair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Gisel; González, Horacio F; Varea, Ana; Seoane, Analía I

    2014-12-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) is originated by a cellular imbalance between nutrient/energy supply and body's demand. Induction of genetic damage by PEM was reported. The purpose of this study was to determine the genetic effect of the in vitro zinc sulfate (ZnSO4) supplementation of cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes from children with PEM. Twenty-four samples from 12 children were analyzed. Anthropometric and biochemical diagnosis was made. For the anthropometric assessment, height-for-age index, weight-for-age index, and weight-for-height index were calculated (WHO, 2005). Micronutrient status was evaluated. A survey for assessed previous exposure to potentially genotoxic agents was applied. Results were statistically evaluated using paired sample t test and χ (2) test. Each sample was fractionated and cultured in two separate flasks to performed two treatments. One was added with 180 μg/dl of ZnSO4 (PEMs/ZnSO4) and the other remains non-supplemented (PEMs). Cytotoxic effects and chromosomal damage were assessed using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (CBMN). All participants have at least one type of malnutrition and none have anemia, nor iron, folate, vitamin A, and zinc deficiency. All PEMs/ZnSO4 samples have a significant reduction in the micronucleus (MNi) frequency compared with PEMs (t = 6.25685; p < 0.001). Nuclear division index (NDI) increase in PEMs/ZnSO4 (t = -17.4226; p < 0.001). Nucleoplasmic bridge (NPBs) frequency was four times smaller in PEMs/ZnSO4 (χ (2) = 40.82; p < 0.001). No nuclear buds (NBuds) were observed. Cytotoxic effects and chromosomal damage observed in children suffering from PEM can be repaired in vitro with zinc sulfate supplementation.

  10. The Fanconi anemia group A protein modulates homologous repair of DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun-Gui; Herceg, Zdenko; Nakanishi, Koji; Demuth, Ilja; Piccoli, Colette; Michelon, Jocelyne; Hildebrand, Gabriele; Jasin, Maria; Digweed, Martin; Wang, Zhao-Qi

    2005-10-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) cells exhibit hypersensitivity to DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) and high levels of chromosome instability. FA gene products have been shown to functionally or physically interact with BRCA1, RAD51 and the MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex, suggesting that the FA complex may be involved in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Here, we have investigated specifically the function of the FA group A protein (FANCA) in the repair of DSBs in mammalian cells. We show that the targeted deletion of Fanca exons 37-39 generates a null for Fanca in mice and abolishes ubiquitination of Fancd2, the downstream effector of the FA complex. Cells lacking Fanca exhibit increased chromosomal aberrations and attenuated accumulation of Brca1 and Rad51 foci in response to DNA damage. The absence of Fanca greatly reduces gene-targeting efficiency in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and compromises the survival of fibroblast cells in response to ICL agent treatment. Fanca-null cells exhibit compromised homology-directed repair (HDR) of DSBs, particularly affecting the single-strand annealing pathway. These data identify the Fanca protein as an integral component in the early step of HDR of DSBs and thereby minimizing the genomic instability.

  11. The role of Slr0151, a tetratricopeptide repeat protein from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, during Photosystem II assembly and repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eRast

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The assembly and repair of photosystem II (PSII is facilitated by a variety of assembly factors. Among those, the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR protein Slr0151 from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (hereafter Synechocystis has previously been assigned a repair function under high light conditions (Yang et al., 2014, J. Integr. Plant Biol. 56, 1136-50. Here, we show that inactivation of Slr0151 affects thylakoid membrane ultrastructure even under normal light conditions. Moreover, the level and localization of Slr0151 are affected in a variety of PSII-related mutants. In particular, the data suggest a close functional relationship between Slr0151 and Sll0933, which interacts with Ycf48 during PSII assembly and is homologous to PAM68 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed a punctate distribution of Slr0151 within several different membrane types in Synechocystis cells.

  12. Functional capacity of XRCC1 protein variants identified in DNA repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cell lines and the human population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berquist, Brian R; Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Fan, Jinshui

    2010-01-01

    XRCC1 operates as a scaffold protein in base excision repair, a pathway that copes with base and sugar damage in DNA. Studies using recombinant XRCC1 proteins revealed that: a C389Y substitution, responsible for the repair defects of the EM-C11 CHO cell line, caused protein instability; a V86R...... mutation abolished the interaction with POLbeta, but did not disrupt the interactions with PARP-1, LIG3alpha and PCNA; and an E98K substitution, identified in EM-C12, reduced protein integrity, marginally destabilized the POLbeta interaction, and slightly enhanced DNA binding. Two rare (P161L and Y576S...

  13. Relationship among mismatch repair deficiency, CDX2 loss, p53 and E-cadherin in colon carcinoma and suitability of using a double panel of mismatch repair proteins by immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayar, Ilyas; Akbas, Emin Murat; Isik, Arda; Gokce, Aysun; Peker, Kemal; Demirtas, Levent; Gürbüzel, Mehmet

    2015-09-01

    Biomarkers such as mismatch repair proteins, CDX2, p53, and E-cadherin are blamed for colon cancers, but the relationships of these biomarkers with each other and with pathological risk factors in colon carcinoma are still not clear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of these biomarkers with each other by using immunohistochemical staining and to compare their expression with pathological risk factors for colonic adenocarcinoma. We also aimed to study the usability of a double panel of mismatch repair proteins. One hundred and eleven cases with colonic adenocarcinoma were examined. There was a statistically significant relationship between tumor histological differentiation and perineural invasion, vascular invasion, mismatch repair deficiency, p53, CDX2, and E-cadherin (p < 0.05). PMS2 and MSH6 loss covered 100% of cases with mismatch repair deficiency. Mismatch repair deficiency was correlated with CDX2 loss and E-cadherin expression (p < 0.05). It was also observed that cases with PMS2 loss covered all the cases with CDX2 loss. In conclusion, this double panel may be used instead of a quadruple panel for detecting mismatch repair deficiency. Association of CDX2 and PMS2 in the present study is necessary to conduct further genetic and pathological studies focusing on these two markers together.

  14. Protein folding includes oligomerization – examples from the endoplasmic reticulum and cytosol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christis, C.; Lubsen, N.H.; Braakman, I.

    2008-01-01

    A correct three-dimensional structure is a prerequisite for protein functionality, and therefore for life. Thus, it is not surprising that our cells are packed with proteins that assist protein folding, the process in which the native three-dimensional structure is formed. In general, plasma

  15. Expression of DNA mismatch repair proteins MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 in recurrent glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Andreas M; Doukas, Alexander; Hugo, Heinz-Herrmann; Hedderich, Jürgen; Hattermann, Kirsten; Maximilian Mehdorn, H; Held-Feindt, Janka

    2015-02-01

    Methylated O6-methylguanin-DNA-methytransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation is associated with survival in patients with glioblastoma. Current evidence suggests that further mismatch repair genes play a pivotal role in the tumor response to treatment. Candidate genes are MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6. Formerly, we found evidence of prognostic impact of MLH1 and MSH6 immunohistochemical expression in a small series of patients with initial glioblastoma. Two hundred and eleven patients were included who underwent macroscopically total removal of primary glioblastoma and at least one re-craniotomy for recurrence. Immunohistochemical staining was performed on paraffin-embedded specimens of initial tumors with specific antibodies against MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6. RESULTS were compared to the Ki67 proliferation index and patient survival. Additionally, fresh frozen samples from 16 paired initial and recurrent specimens were examined using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with specific primers against MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6. RESULTS were compared to MGMT status and survival. (1) Immunohistochemical expression of MSH6 was significantly associated with the Ki67 proliferation index (PMLH1, MLH2, and MSH6 over treatment combined with lacking MGMT methylation. In another two patients, decreased MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 expression was observed in combination with MGMT promoter methylation. Our data indicate that there may be glioblastoma patient subgroups characterized by MMR-expression changes beyond MGMT promoter methylation. The immunohistochemical expression of MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 in initial glioblastoma is not associated with patient survival.

  16. Ultraviolet-induced movement of the human DNA repair protein, xeroderma pigmentosum type G, in the nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, M.S.; Knauf, J.A.; Pendergrass, S.H.

    1996-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum type G (XPG) is a human genetic disease exhibiting extreme sensitivity to sunlight. XPG patients are defective XPG endonuclease, which is an enzyme essential for DNA repair of the major kinds of solar ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damages. Here we describe a novel dynamics of this protein within the cell nucleus after UV irradiation of human cells. USing confocal microscopy, we have localized the immunofluorescent, antigenic signal of XPG protein to foci throughout the cell nucleus. Our biochemical studies also established that XPG protein forms a tight association with nuclear structure(s). In human skin fibroblast cells, the number of XPG foci decreased within 2 h after UV irradiation, whereas total nuclear XPG fluorescence intensity remained constant, suggesting redistribution of XPG from a limited number of nuclear foci to the nucleus overall. Within 8 h after UV, most XPG antigenic signal was found as foci. Using β-galactosidase-XPG fusion constructs (β-gal-XPG) transfected into HeLa cells, we have identified a single region of XPG that is evidently responsible both for foci formation and for the UV dynamic response. The fusion protein carrying the C terminus of XPG (amino acids 1146-1185) localized β-gal specific antigenic signal to foci and to the nucleolus regions. After UV irradiation, antigenic β-gal translocated reversibly from the subnuclear structures to the whole nucleus with kinetics very similar to the movements of XPG protein. These findings lead us to propose a model in which distribution of XPG protein may regulate the rate of DNA repair within transcriptionally active and inactive compartments of the cell nucleus. 50 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  17. Nuclear translocation of mismatch repair proteins MSH2 and MSH6 as a response of cells to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christmann, M; Kaina, B

    2000-11-17

    Mammalian mismatch repair has been implicated in mismatch correction, the prevention of mutagenesis and cancer, and the induction of genotoxicity and apoptosis. Here, we show that treatment of cells specifically with agents inducing O(6)-methylguanine in DNA, such as N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, elevates the level of MSH2 and MSH6 and increases GT mismatch binding activity in the nucleus. This inducible response occurs immediately after alkylation, is long-lasting and dose-dependent, and results from translocation of the preformed MutSalpha complex (composed of MSH2 and MSH6) from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. It is not caused by an increase in MSH2 gene activity. Cells expressing the DNA repair protein O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), thus having the ability to repair O(6)-methylguanine, showed no translocation of MutSalpha, whereas inhibition of MGMT by O(6)-benzylguanine provoked the translocation. The results demonstrate that O(6)-methylguanine lesions are involved in triggering nuclear accumulation of MSH2 and MSH6. The finding that treatment of cells with O(6)-methylguanine-generating mutagens results in an increase of MutSalpha and GT binding activity in the nucleus indicates a novel type of genotoxic stress response.

  18. A role for the malignant brain tumour (MBT domain protein LIN-61 in DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas M Johnson

    Full Text Available Malignant brain tumour (MBT domain proteins are transcriptional repressors that function within Polycomb complexes. Some MBT genes are tumour suppressors, but how they prevent tumourigenesis is unknown. The Caenorhabditis elegans MBT protein LIN-61 is a member of the synMuvB chromatin-remodelling proteins that control vulval development. Here we report a new role for LIN-61: it protects the genome by promoting homologous recombination (HR for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. lin-61 mutants manifest numerous problems associated with defective HR in germ and somatic cells but remain proficient in meiotic recombination. They are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation and interstrand crosslinks but not UV light. Using a novel reporter system that monitors repair of a defined DSB in C. elegans somatic cells, we show that LIN-61 contributes to HR. The involvement of this MBT protein in HR raises the possibility that MBT-deficient tumours may also have defective DSB repair.

  19. Induction of the early response protein EGR-1 in human tumour cells after ionizing radiation is correlated with a reduction of repair of lethal lesions and an increase of repair of sublethal lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, Nicolaas A. P.; ten Cate, Rosemarie; van Bree, Chris; Haveman, Jaap

    2004-01-01

    The role of EGR-1 in potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) was studied. Induction of the early response protein EGR-1 and survival after ionizing radiation of two human tumour cell lines after culturing for 48 h in serum-deprived medium was investigated. The glioblastoma cell line (Gli-6) and a

  20. Biological significance of facilitated diffusion in protein-DNA interactions. Applications to T4 endonuclease V-initiated DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowd, D.R.; Lloyd, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    Facilitated diffusion along nontarget DNA is employed by numerous DNA-interactive proteins to locate specific targets. Until now, the biological significance of DNA scanning has remained elusive. T4 endonuclease V is a DNA repair enzyme which scans nontarget DNA and processively incises DNA at the site of pyrimidine dimers which are produced by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light. In this study we tested the hypothesis that there exists a direct correlation between the degree of processivity of wild type and mutant endonuclease V molecules and the degree of enhanced UV resistance which is conferred to repair-deficient Eshcerichia coli. This was accomplished by first creating a series of endonuclease V mutants whose in vitro catalytic activities were shown to be very similar to that of the wild type enzyme. However, when the mechanisms by which these enzymes search nontarget DNA for its substrate were analyzed in vitro and in vivo, the mutants displayed varying degrees of nontarget DNA scanning ranging from being nearly as processive as wild type to randomly incising dimers within the DNA population. The ability of these altered endonuclease V molecules to enhance UV survival in DNA repair-deficient E. coli then was assessed. The degree of enhanced UV survival was directly correlated with the level of facilitated diffusion. This is the first conclusive evidence directly relating a reduction of in vivo facilitated diffusion with a change in an observed phenotype. These results support the assertion that the mechanisms which DNA-interactive proteins employ in locating their target sites are of biological significance

  1. A damage-responsive DNA binding protein regulates transcription of the yeast DNA repair gene PHR1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastian, J.; Sancar, G.B.

    1991-01-01

    The PHR1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes the DNA repair enzyme photolyase. Transcription of PHR1 increases in response to treatment of cells with 254-nm radiation and chemical agents that damage DNA. The authors here the identification of a damage-responsive DNA binding protein, termed photolyase regulatory protein (PRP), and its cognate binding site, termed the PHR1 transcription after DNA damage. PRP activity, monitored by electrophoretic-mobility-shift assay, was detected in cells during normal growth but disappeared within 30 min after irradiation. Copper-phenanthroline footprinting of PRP-DNA complexes revealed that PRP protects a 39-base-pair region of PHR1 5' flanking sequence beginning 40 base pairs upstream from the coding sequence. Thus these observations establish that PRP is a damage-responsive repressor of PHR1 transcription

  2. The MCM-binding protein ETG1 aids sister chromatid cohesion required for postreplicative homologous recombination repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Takahashi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The DNA replication process represents a source of DNA stress that causes potentially spontaneous genome damage. This effect might be strengthened by mutations in crucial replication factors, requiring the activation of DNA damage checkpoints to enable DNA repair before anaphase onset. Here, we demonstrate that depletion of the evolutionarily conserved minichromosome maintenance helicase-binding protein ETG1 of Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in a stringent late G2 cell cycle arrest. This arrest correlated with a partial loss of sister chromatid cohesion. The lack-of-cohesion phenotype was intensified in plants without functional CTF18, a replication fork factor needed for cohesion establishment. The synergistic effect of the etg1 and ctf18 mutants on sister chromatid cohesion strengthened the impact on plant growth of the replication stress caused by ETG1 deficiency because of inefficient DNA repair. We conclude that the ETG1 replication factor is required for efficient cohesion and that cohesion establishment is essential for proper development of plants suffering from endogenous DNA stress. Cohesion defects observed upon knockdown of its human counterpart suggest an equally important developmental role for the orthologous mammalian ETG1 protein.

  3. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the human mismatch repair protein MutSβ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, Quincy; Orans, Jillian; Hast, Michael A.; Iyer, Ravi R.; Changela, Anita; Modrich, Paul L.; Beese, Lorena S.

    2011-01-01

    Human MutSβ is a 232 kDa heterodimer (MSH2–MSH3) involved in the lesion-recognition step of mismatch repair. Here, the overexpression, purification, biochemical characterization and cocrystallization of MutSβ with a duplex DNA substrate are reported. MutSβ is a eukaryotic mismatch repair protein that preferentially targets extrahelical unpaired nucleotides and shares partial functional redundancy with MutSα (MSH2–MSH6). Although mismatch recognition by MutSα has been shown to involve a conserved Phe-X-Glu motif, little is known about the lesion-binding mechanism of MutSβ. Combined MSH3/MSH6 deficiency triggers a strong predisposition to cancer in mice and defects in msh2 and msh6 account for roughly half of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer mutations. These three MutS homologs are also believed to play a role in trinucleotide repeat instability, which is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative disorders. The baculovirus overexpression and purification of recombinant human MutSβ and three truncation mutants are presented here. Binding assays with heteroduplex DNA were carried out for biochemical characterization. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the protein bound to a heteroduplex DNA substrate are also reported

  4. Sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement for furcal perforation repair: a protein leakage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Shahriar; Rahimi, Saeed; Hasan, Maryam; Shiezadeh, Vahab; Abdolrahimi, Majid

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the sealing ability of gray mineral trioxide aggregate (GMTA), white MTA (WMTA), and both white and gray Portland cement as furcation perforation repair materials. A total of 120 human mandibular first molars were used. After root canal obturation and preparation of furcal perforations the specimens were randomly divided into four groups of 25 teeth each. In groups A, B, C, and D furcation perforations were filled with WMTA, GMTA, white Portland cement, and type II Portland cement, respectively. Ten teeth were used as positive controls with no filling materials in the perforations and 10 teeth with complete coverage with two layers of nail varnish were used as negative controls. A protein leakage model utilizing 22% bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used for evaluation. Leakage was noted when color conversion of the protein reagent was observed. The controls behaved as expected. Leakage was found in the samples from group A (WMTA), group B (GMTA), and in the two other groups (white and gray Portland cement). There were no statistically significant differences between GMTA and WMTA or white and gray Portland cement, but significant differences were observed between the MTA groups and the Portland cement groups. It was concluded that Portland cements have better sealing ability than MTA, and can be recommended for repair of furcation perforation if the present results are supported by other in vivo and in vitro studies.

  5. Monitoring of the spatial and temporal dynamics of BER/SSBR pathway proteins, including MYH, UNG2, MPG, NTH1 and NEIL1-3, during DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bj Rås, Karine Ø; Sousa, Mirta M L; Sharma, Animesh; Fonseca, Davi M; S Gaard, Caroline K; Bj Rås, Magnar; Otterlei, Marit

    2017-08-21

    Base lesions in DNA can stall the replication machinery or induce mutations if bypassed. Consequently, lesions must be repaired before replication or in a post-replicative process to maintain genomic stability. Base excision repair (BER) is the main pathway for repair of base lesions and is known to be associated with DNA replication, but how BER is organized during replication is unclear. Here we coupled the iPOND (isolation of proteins on nascent DNA) technique with targeted mass-spectrometry analysis, which enabled us to detect all proteins required for BER on nascent DNA and to monitor their spatiotemporal orchestration at replication forks. We demonstrate that XRCC1 and other BER/single-strand break repair (SSBR) proteins are enriched in replisomes in unstressed cells, supporting a cellular capacity of post-replicative BER/SSBR. Importantly, we identify for the first time the DNA glycosylases MYH, UNG2, MPG, NTH1, NEIL1, 2 and 3 on nascent DNA. Our findings suggest that a broad spectrum of DNA base lesions are recognized and repaired by BER in a post-replicative process. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. The 70 kDa heat shock protein assists during the repair of chilling injury in the insect, Pyrrhocoris apterus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimír Kostál

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Pyrrhocoris apterus (Insecta: Heteroptera adults attain high levels of cold tolerance during their overwintering diapause. Non-diapause reproducing adults, however, lack the capacity to express a whole array of cold-tolerance adaptations and show relatively low survival when exposed to sub-zero temperatures. We assessed the competence of non-diapause males of P. apterus for responding to heat- and cold-stresses by up-regulation of 70 kDa heat shock proteins (Hsps and the role of Hsps during repair of heat- and cold-induced injury. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The fragments of P. apterus homologues of Hsp70 inducible (PaHsp70 and cognate forms (PaHsc70 were cloned and sequenced. The abundance of mRNA transcripts for the inducible form (qPCR and corresponding protein (Western blotting were significantly up-regulated in response to high and low temperature stimuli. In the cognate form, mRNA was slightly up-regulated in response to both stressors but very low or no up-regulation of protein was apparent after heat- or cold-stress, respectively. Injection of 695 bp-long Pahsp70 dsRNA (RNAi caused drastic suppression of the heat- and cold-stress-induced Pahsp70 mRNA response and the up-regulation of corresponding protein was practically eliminated. Our RNAi predictably prevented recovery from heat shock and, in addition, negatively influenced repair of chilling injuries caused by cold stress. Cold tolerance increased when the insects were first exposed to a mild heat shock, in order to trigger the up-regulation of PaHsp70, and subsequently exposed to cold stress. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that accumulation of PaHsp70 belongs to a complex cold tolerance adaptation in the insect Pyrrhocoris apterus.

  7. Phosphorylation states of cell cycle and DNA repair proteins can be altered by the nsSNPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savas, Sevtap; Ozcelik, Hilmi

    2005-01-01

    Phosphorylation is a reversible post-translational modification that affects the intrinsic properties of proteins, such as structure and function. Non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) result in the substitution of the encoded amino acids and thus are likely to alter the phosphorylation motifs in the proteins. In this study, we used the web-based NetPhos tool to predict candidate nsSNPs that either introduce or remove putative phosphorylation sites in proteins that act in DNA repair and cell cycle pathways. Our results demonstrated that a total of 15 nsSNPs (16.9%) were likely to alter the putative phosphorylation patterns of 14 proteins. Three of these SNPs (CDKN1A-S31R, OGG1-S326C, and XRCC3-T241M) have already found to be associated with altered cancer risk. We believe that this set of nsSNPs constitutes an excellent resource for further molecular and genetic analyses. The novel systematic approach used in this study will accelerate the understanding of how naturally occurring human SNPs may alter protein function through the modification of phosphorylation mechanisms and contribute to disease susceptibility

  8. Role of DNA Repair Factor Xeroderma Pigmentosum Protein Group C in Response to Replication Stress As Revealed by DNA Fragile Site Affinity Chromatography and Quantitative Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresova, Lucie; Vesela, Eva; Chamrad, Ivo; Voller, Jiri; Yamada, Masayuki; Furst, Tomas; Lenobel, Rene; Chroma, Katarina; Gursky, Jan; Krizova, Katerina; Mistrik, Martin; Bartek, Jiri

    2016-12-02

    Replication stress (RS) fuels genomic instability and cancer development and may contribute to aging, raising the need to identify factors involved in cellular responses to such stress. Here, we present a strategy for identification of factors affecting the maintenance of common fragile sites (CFSs), which are genomic loci that are particularly sensitive to RS and suffer from increased breakage and rearrangements in tumors. A DNA probe designed to match the high flexibility island sequence typical for the commonly expressed CFS (FRA16D) was used as specific DNA affinity bait. Proteins significantly enriched at the FRA16D fragment under normal and replication stress conditions were identified using stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture-based quantitative mass spectrometry. The identified proteins interacting with the FRA16D fragment included some known CFS stabilizers, thereby validating this screening approach. Among the hits from our screen so far not implicated in CFS maintenance, we chose Xeroderma pigmentosum protein group C (XPC) for further characterization. XPC is a key factor in the DNA repair pathway known as global genomic nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER), a mechanism whose several components were enriched at the FRA16D fragment in our screen. Functional experiments revealed defective checkpoint signaling and escape of DNA replication intermediates into mitosis and the next generation of XPC-depleted cells exposed to RS. Overall, our results provide insights into an unexpected biological role of XPC in response to replication stress and document the power of proteomics-based screening strategies to elucidate mechanisms of pathophysiological significance.

  9. Down-regulation of DNA mismatch repair proteins in human and murine tumor spheroids: implications for multicellular resistance to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Giulio; Green, Shane K; Bocci, Guido; Man, Shan; Emmenegger, Urban; Ebos, John M L; Weinerman, Adina; Shaked, Yuval; Kerbel, Robert S

    2005-10-01

    Similar to other anticancer agents, intrinsic or acquired resistance to DNA-damaging chemotherapeutics is a major obstacle for cancer therapy. Current strategies aimed at overcoming this problem are mostly based on the premise that tumor cells acquire heritable genetic mutations that contribute to drug resistance. Here, we present evidence for an epigenetic, tumor cell adhesion-mediated, and reversible form of drug resistance that is associated with a reduction of DNA mismatch repair proteins PMS2 and/or MLH1 as well as other members of this DNA repair process. Growth of human breast cancer, human melanoma, and murine EMT-6 breast cancer cell lines as multicellular spheroids in vitro, which is associated with increased resistance to many chemotherapeutic drugs, including alkylating agents, is shown to lead to a reproducible down-regulation of PMS2, MLH1, or, in some cases, both as well as MHS6, MSH3, and MSH2. The observed down-regulation is in part reversible by treatment of tumor spheroids with the DNA-demethylating agent, 5-azacytidine. Thus, treatment of EMT-6 mouse mammary carcinoma spheroids with 5-azacytidine resulted in reduced and/or disrupted cell-cell adhesion, which in turn sensitized tumor spheroids to cisplatin-mediated killing in vitro. Our results suggest that antiadhesive agents might sensitize tumor spheroids to alkylating agents in part by reversing or preventing reduced DNA mismatch repair activity and that the chemosensitization properties of 5-azacytidine may conceivably reflect its role as a potential antiadhesive agent as well as reversal agent for MLH1 gene silencing in human tumors.

  10. DNA Mismatch Repair and Oxidative DNA Damage: Implications for Cancer Biology and Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridge, Gemma; Rashid, Sukaina; Martin, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    Many components of the cell, including lipids, proteins and both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, are vulnerable to deleterious modifications caused by reactive oxygen species. If not repaired, oxidative DNA damage can lead to disease-causing mutations, such as in cancer. Base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair are the two DNA repair pathways believed to orchestrate the removal of oxidative lesions. However, recent findings suggest that the mismatch repair pathway may also be important for the response to oxidative DNA damage. This is particularly relevant in cancer where mismatch repair genes are frequently mutated or epigenetically silenced. In this review we explore how the regulation of oxidative DNA damage by mismatch repair proteins may impact on carcinogenesis. We discuss recent studies that identify potential new treatments for mismatch repair deficient tumours, which exploit this non-canonical role of mismatch repair using synthetic lethal targeting

  11. DNA Mismatch Repair and Oxidative DNA Damage: Implications for Cancer Biology and Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridge, Gemma; Rashid, Sukaina; Martin, Sarah A., E-mail: sarah.martin@qmul.ac.uk [Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-05

    Many components of the cell, including lipids, proteins and both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, are vulnerable to deleterious modifications caused by reactive oxygen species. If not repaired, oxidative DNA damage can lead to disease-causing mutations, such as in cancer. Base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair are the two DNA repair pathways believed to orchestrate the removal of oxidative lesions. However, recent findings suggest that the mismatch repair pathway may also be important for the response to oxidative DNA damage. This is particularly relevant in cancer where mismatch repair genes are frequently mutated or epigenetically silenced. In this review we explore how the regulation of oxidative DNA damage by mismatch repair proteins may impact on carcinogenesis. We discuss recent studies that identify potential new treatments for mismatch repair deficient tumours, which exploit this non-canonical role of mismatch repair using synthetic lethal targeting.

  12. Expression of DNA repair proteins MSH2, MLH1 and MGMT in human benign and malignant thyroid lesions: An immunohistochemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaginis, Constantinos; Michailidi, Christina; Stolakis, Vasileios; Alexandrou, Paraskevi; Tsourouflis, Gerasimos; Klijanienko, Jerzy; Delladetsima, Ioanna; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background DNA repair is a major defense mechanism, which contributes to the maintenance of genetic sequence, and minimizes cell death, mutation rates, replication errors, DNA damage persistence and genomic instability. Alterations in the expression levels of proteins participating in DNA repair mechanisms have been associated with several aspects of cancer biology. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of DNA repair proteins MSH2, MLH1 and MGMT in benign and malignant thyroid lesions. Material/Methods MSH2, MLH1 and MGMT protein expression was assessed immunohistochemically on paraffin-embedded thyroid tissues from 90 patients with benign and malignant lesions. Results The expression levels of MLH1 was significantly upregulated in cases with malignant compared to those with benign thyroid lesions (p=0.038). The expression levels of MGMT was significantly downregulated in malignant compared to benign thyroid lesions (p=0.001). Similar associations for both MLH1 and MGMT between cases with papillary carcinoma and hyperplastic nodules were also noted (p=0.014 and p=0.026, respectively). In the subgroup of malignant thyroid lesions, MSH2 downregulation was significantly associated with larger tumor size (p=0.031), while MLH1 upregulation was significantly associated with the presence of lymphatic and vascular invasion (p=0.006 and p=0.002, respectively). Conclusions Alterations in the mismatch repair proteins MSH2 and MLH1 and the direct repair protein MGMT may result from tumor development and/or progression. Further studies are recommended to draw definite conclusions on the clinical significance of DNA repair proteins in thyroid neoplasia. PMID:21358597

  13. Role of protein synthesis in the repair of sublethal x-ray damage in a mutant Chinese hamster ovary cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yezzi, M.J.

    1985-04-01

    A temperature-sensitive mutant for protein synthesis, CHO-TSH1, has been compared to the wild-type cell, CHO-sC1, in single- and split-radiation-dose schemes. When the exponentially growing TS mutant and the wild-type cells were treated at 40 0 C for up to 2 hrs prior to graded doses of x rays, the survival curves were identical and were the same as those obtained without heat treatment. If the cultures were incubated at 40 0 C for 2 hrs before a first dose and maintained at 40 0 C during a 2 hr dose fractionation interval, repair of radiation damage was reduced in the mutant compared to the wild type. These observations implied that a pool of proteins was involved in the repair of sublethal x-ray damage. However, if repair was measured by the alkaline-unwinding technique under the same time and temperature schemes, no difference in the kientics of DNA strand rejoining was observed. Misrepair processes may permit restoration of DNA strand integrity but not allow functional repair. The effect of diminished repair under conditions of inhibition of protein synthesis was found to be cell-cycle dependent in survival studies with synchronized mutant cell populations. Repair was found to be almost completely eliminated if the temperature sequence described above was applied in the middle of the DNA synthetic phase. Treatment of cell populations in the middle of G 1 -phase yielded repair inhibition comparable to that observed with the asynchronous cells. Splitdose experiments were done using pre-incubation with cycloheximide to chemically inhibit protein synthesis. WT cells and TS cells were treated with cycloheximide at 35 0 C for 2 hrs before a first dose and during a 2 hr dose fractionation interval. 23 figs., 7 tabs

  14. Role of protein synthesis in the repair of sublethal x-ray damage in a mutant Chinese hamster ovary cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yezzi, M.J.

    1985-04-01

    A temperature-sensitive mutant for protein synthesis, CHO-TSH1, has been compared to the wild-type cell, CHO-sC1, in single- and split-radiation-dose schemes. When the exponentially growing TS mutant and the wild-type cells were treated at 40/sub 0/C for up to 2 hrs prior to graded doses of x rays, the survival curves were identical and were the same as those obtained without heat treatment. If the cultures were incubated at 40/sup 0/C for 2 hrs before a first dose and maintained at 40/sup 0/C during a 2 hr dose fractionation interval, repair of radiation damage was reduced in the mutant compared to the wild type. These observations implied that a pool of proteins was involved in the repair of sublethal x-ray damage. However, if repair was measured by the alkaline-unwinding technique under the same time and temperature schemes, no difference in the kientics of DNA strand rejoining was observed. Misrepair processes may permit restoration of DNA strand integrity but not allow functional repair. The effect of diminished repair under conditions of inhibition of protein synthesis was found to be cell-cycle dependent in survival studies with synchronized mutant cell populations. Repair was found to be almost completely eliminated if the temperature sequence described above was applied in the middle of the DNA synthetic phase. Treatment of cell populations in the middle of G/sub 1/-phase yielded repair inhibition comparable to that observed with the asynchronous cells. Splitdose experiments were done using pre-incubation with cycloheximide to chemically inhibit protein synthesis. WT cells and TS cells were treated with cycloheximide at 35/sup 0/C for 2 hrs before a first dose and during a 2 hr dose fractionation interval. 23 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Recruitment kinetics of DNA repair proteins Mdc1 and Rad52 but not 53BP1 depend on damage complexity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Hable

    Full Text Available The recruitment kinetics of double-strand break (DSB signaling and repair proteins Mdc1, 53BP1 and Rad52 into radiation-induced foci was studied by live-cell fluorescence microscopy after ion microirradiation. To investigate the influence of damage density and complexity on recruitment kinetics, which cannot be done by UV laser irradiation used in former studies, we utilized 43 MeV carbon ions with high linear energy transfer per ion (LET = 370 keV/µm to create a large fraction of clustered DSBs, thus forming complex DNA damage, and 20 MeV protons with low LET (LET = 2.6 keV/µm to create mainly isolated DSBs. Kinetics for all three proteins was characterized by a time lag period T(0 after irradiation, during which no foci are formed. Subsequently, the proteins accumulate into foci with characteristic mean recruitment times τ(1. Mdc1 accumulates faster (T(0 = 17 ± 2 s, τ(1 = 98 ± 11 s than 53BP1 (T(0 = 77 ± 7 s, τ(1 = 310 ± 60 s after high LET irradiation. However, recruitment of Mdc1 slows down (T(0 = 73 ± 16 s, τ(1 = 1050 ± 270 s after low LET irradiation. The recruitment kinetics of Rad52 is slower than that of Mdc1, but exhibits the same dependence on LET. In contrast, the mean recruitment time τ(1 of 53BP1 remains almost constant when varying LET. Comparison to literature data on Mdc1 recruitment after UV laser irradiation shows that this rather resembles recruitment after high than low LET ionizing radiation. So this work shows that damage quality has a large influence on repair processes and has to be considered when comparing different studies.

  16. Involvement of Werner syndrome protein in MUTYH-mediated repair of oxidative DNA damage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kanagaraj, R.; Parasuraman, P.; Mihaljevic, B.; van Loon, B.; Burdová, Kamila; König, C.; Furrer, A.; Bohr, V.A.; Hübscher, U.; Janscak, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 17 (2012), s. 8449-8459 ISSN 0305-1048 Grant - others:Swiss National Science Foundation(CH) 31003A-129747/1; Swiss National Science Foundation(CH) 3100-109312/2; Oncosuisse(CH) KLS-02344-02-2009; NIH(US) Z01-AG000726-17 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : DNA repair * oxidative stress * MUTYH * WRN * Pol lambda Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 8.278, year: 2012

  17. Duplex Interrogation by a Direct DNA Repair Protein in Search of Base Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chengqi; Chen, Baoen; Qi, Bo; Zhang, Wen; Jia, Guifang; Zhang, Liang; Li, Charles J.; Dinner, Aaron R.; Yang, Cai-Guang; He, Chuan

    2012-01-01

    ALKBH2 is a direct DNA repair dioxygenase guarding mammalian genome against N1-methyladenine, N3-methylcytosine, and 1,N6-ethenoadenine damage. A prerequisite for repair is to identify these lesions in the genome. Here we present crystal structures of ALKBH2 bound to different duplex DNAs. Together with computational and biochemical analyses, our results suggest that DNA interrogation by ALKBH2 displays two novel features: i) ALKBH2 probes base-pair stability and detects base pairs with reduced stability; ii) ALKBH2 does not have nor need a “damage-checking site”, which is critical for preventing spurious base-cleavage for several glycosylases. The demethylation mechanism of ALKBH2 insures that only cognate lesions are oxidized and reversed to normal bases, and that a flipped, non-substrate base remains intact in the active site. Overall, the combination of duplex interrogation and oxidation chemistry allows ALKBH2 to detect and process diverse lesions efficiently and correctly. PMID:22659876

  18. DNA repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimyo, Mitsuoki

    1995-01-01

    Fission yeast S. pombe is assumed to be a good model for cloning of human DNA repair genes, because human gene is normally expressed in S. pombe and has a very similar protein sequence to yeast protein. We have tried to elucidate the DNA repair mechanisms of S. pombe as a model system for those of mammals. (J.P.N.)

  19. A Protein Diet Score, Including Plant and Animal Protein, Investigating the Association with HbA1c and eGFR—The PREVIEW Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkilä, Vera; Raitakari, Olli T.; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; Dragsted, Lars O.; Poppitt, Sally D.; Silvestre, Marta P.; Feskens, Edith J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Higher-protein diets have been advocated for body-weight regulation for the past few decades. However, the potential health risks of these diets are still uncertain. We aimed to develop a protein score based on the quantity and source of protein, and to examine the association of the score with glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Analyses were based on three population studies included in the PREVIEW project (PREVention of diabetes through lifestyle Intervention and population studies in Europe and around the World): NQplus, Lifelines, and the Young Finns Study. Cross-sectional data from food-frequency questionnaires (n = 76,777 subjects) were used to develop a protein score consisting of two components: 1) percentage of energy from total protein, and 2) plant to animal protein ratio. An inverse association between protein score and HbA1c (slope −0.02 ± 0.01 mmol/mol, p < 0.001) was seen in Lifelines. We found a positive association between the protein score and eGFR in Lifelines (slope 0.17 ± 0.02 mL/min/1.73 m2, p < 0.0001). Protein scoring might be a useful tool to assess both the effect of quantity and source of protein on health parameters. Further studies are needed to validate this newly developed protein score. PMID:28714926

  20. Developing Master Keys to Brain Pathology, Cancer and Aging from the Structural Biology of Proteins Controlling Reactive Oxygen Species and DNA Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J. Jefferson P.; Fan, Li; Tainer, John A.

    2007-01-01

    This review is focused on proteins with key roles in pathways controlling either reactive oxygen species or DNA damage responses, both of which are essential for preserving the nervous system. An imbalance of reactive oxygen species or inappropriate DNA damage response likely causes mutational or cytotoxic outcomes, which may lead to cancer and/or aging phenotypes. Moreover, individuals with hereditary disorders in proteins of these cellular pathways have significant neurological abnormalities. Mutations in a superoxide dismutase, which removes oxygen free radicals, may cause the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Additionally, DNA repair disorders that affect the brain to varying extents include ataxia-telangiectasia-like disorder, Cockayne syndrome or Werner syndrome. Here, we highlight recent advances gained through structural biochemistry studies on enzymes linked to these disorders and other related enzymes acting within the same cellular pathways. We describe the current understanding of how these vital proteins coordinate chemical steps and integrate cellular signaling and response events. Significantly, these structural studies may provide a set of master keys to developing a unified understanding of the survival mechanisms utilized after insults by reactive oxygen species and genotoxic agents, and also provide a basis for developing an informed intervention in brain tumor and neurodegenerative disease progression. PMID:17174478

  1. Roles of Rad51 protein in homologous recombination in mammalian cells: relation with repair, replication and cell cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, S.

    2001-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a fundamental process, allowing a faithful repair. In mammalian, MmRAD51, which is the homologue of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ScRAD51 key protein for HR, is an essential gene. This work is based on the characterisation of viable hyper and hypo-recombinant cell lines specifically affected in the Rad51 pathway. By expressing wild type and dominant negative forms of MmRad51, we demonstrated that Rad51 pathway participates to the repair by HR to induced DNA damages. However, inhibition of the Rad 51 pathway does not affect cell viability, spontaneously or after irradiation, whereas, radiation induced HR is inhibited. In the presence of DNA damages during late S and G2/M phase, inhibition of Rad51 pathway induced chromosomal aberrations, leading to a transient arrest in mitosis. This arrest is associated with an increased of cell death. However, a fraction of cells can escape from this transient arrest by forming tetraploid cells, associated with an absence of chromalid separation. Thus, in response to impaired Rad51 pathway, mitotic checkpoints seems to play an essential role. In line with this, we showed that the essential function of Rad51 is p53-dependent, which is in agreement with the role of p53 in tetraploidy inhibition. Our results suggest that the Rad51 protein could participate to the control of mitotic checkpoints and thus to the maintenance of genetic stability. This function could involve other Rad51 partners such as the tumour suppressors BRCA1, BRCA2 and p53. (author) [fr

  2. Honey can repairing damage of liver tissue due to protein energy malnutrition through induction of endogenous stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Heru Prasetyo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was to evaluate effect of honey in repairing damage of liver tissue due to energy protein malnutrition and in mobilization of endogenous stem cells. Materials and Methods: Male mice model of degenerative liver was obtained through food fasting but still have drinking water for 5 days. It caused energy protein malnutrition and damage of liver tissue. The administration of 50% (v/v honey was performed for 10 consecutive days, while the positive control group was fasted and not given honey and the negative control not fasted and without honey. Observations of regeneration the liver tissue based on histologically examination, observation of Hsp70 expression, and homing signal based on vascular endothelial growth factor-1 (VEGF-1 expression using immunohistochemistry technique. Observation on expression of CD34 and CD45 as the marker of auto mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells using flow cytometry technique. Results: There is regeneration of the liver tissue due to protein energy malnutrition, decrease of Hsp70 expression, increase of VEGF-1 expression, and high expression of CD34 and CD45. Conclusion: Honey can improve the liver tissue based on: (1 Mobilization of endogenous stem cells (CD34 and CD45; (2 Hsp70 and VEGF-1 expressions as regeneration marker of improvement, and (3 regeneration histologically of liver tissue.

  3. Honey can repairing damage of liver tissue due to protein energy malnutrition through induction of endogenous stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyo, R Heru; Hestianah, Eka Pramyrtha

    2017-06-01

    This study was to evaluate effect of honey in repairing damage of liver tissue due to energy protein malnutrition and in mobilization of endogenous stem cells. Male mice model of degenerative liver was obtained through food fasting but still have drinking water for 5 days. It caused energy protein malnutrition and damage of liver tissue. The administration of 50% (v/v) honey was performed for 10 consecutive days, while the positive control group was fasted and not given honey and the negative control not fasted and without honey. Observations of regeneration the liver tissue based on histologically examination, observation of Hsp70 expression, and homing signal based on vascular endothelial growth factor-1 (VEGF-1) expression using immunohistochemistry technique. Observation on expression of CD34 and CD45 as the marker of auto mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells using flow cytometry technique. There is regeneration of the liver tissue due to protein energy malnutrition, decrease of Hsp70 expression, increase of VEGF-1 expression, and high expression of CD34 and CD45. Honey can improve the liver tissue based on: (1) Mobilization of endogenous stem cells (CD34 and CD45); (2) Hsp70 and VEGF-1 expressions as regeneration marker of improvement, and (3) regeneration histologically of liver tissue.

  4. Expression of DNA mismatch repair proteins in transformed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: relationship to smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nandi, S; Yu, J; Reinert, Line

    2006-01-01

    leukemia (CLL/SLL), that have transformed to diffuse-large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We correlated the presence or absence of DNA-mismatch repair enzymes by immunostaining as well as the p53 status to smoking history. Of all patients (n = 30), 37% showed negative immunostaining of MLH1, 16% showed negative...... for either MLH1 or MSH2 was 2.2 times higher in smokers than non-smokers (relative risk = 2.2041, 95% confidence interval: 0.89714, 5.41491). No direct correlation was found between smoking and the mutations in the p53 gene. These results suggest that cigarette smoking may play a role in the development...

  5. Targeting abnormal DNA double strand break repair in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rassool, Feyruz V.; Tomkinson, Alan E.

    2010-01-01

    A major challenge in cancer treatment is the development of therapies that target cancer cells with little or no toxicity to normal tissues and cells. Alterations in DNA double strand break (DSB) repair in cancer cells include both elevated and reduced levels of key repair proteins and changes in the relative contributions of the various DSB repair pathways. These differences can result in increased sensitivity to DSB-inducing agents and increased genomic instability. The development of agent...

  6. ANTIFREEZE PROTEINS IN PLANTS: AN OVERVIEW WITH AN INSIGHT INTO THE DETECTION TECHNIQUES INCLUDING NANOBIOTECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavana Sharma

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Antifreeze proteins (AFPs are a class of polypeptides which enables various organisms to survive subzero temperatures and have been found in vertebrates, invertebrates, plants, fungi and lichens. AFPs possess the characteristic thermal hysteresis (TH and ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI properties which allow them to adsorb the surface of ice crystals and inhibit their growth and recrystallization. AFPs are also known as ice restructuring proteins due to their ability to modify ice crystal morphology which leads to formation of hexagonal shape ice crystals in the presence of AFPs and disc shape AFPs in its absence. AFPs have various applications in medical, agricultural, industrial and biotechnological field. This review provides an overview of the AFPs, their TH and IRI properties and potential biotechnological applications of AFPs. Various conventional detection methods like Capillary assay and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC with their advantages and disadvantages are discussed in detail along with the commonly used Splat assay and Nanoliter osmometer. Moreover, a novel, high-throughput and efficient nanobiotechnological method for AFP detection is also discussed. The method is based on colorimetric detection of freeze-labile gold nanoparticles and can provide an alternative to overcome the limitations of conventional methods by providing quick and easy way to screen AFPs in multiple systems simultaneously

  7. Health effects of an increased protein intake on kidney function and colorectal cancer risk factors, including the role of animal and plant protein sources – the PREVIEW project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Grith

    intake, including the role of animal and plant protein in pre-diabetic, overweight or obese individuals on health outcomes: markers of kidney function and putative risk factors for colorectal cancer as well as insulin sensitivity and kidney function in healthy individuals. The thesis is based on PREVIEW......, especially plant protein, on insulin sensitivity and kidney function. In paper II, the aim of the study was to assess the effect after one year of a higher protein intake on kidney function, measured by in creatinine clearance. This was investigated in pre-diabetic older adults based on a sub-group of 310...... pre-diabetic individuals included in the PREVIEW RCT. We found that a higher protein intake was associated with a significant increase in urea to creatinine ratio and serum urea after one year. There were no associations between increased protein intake and creatinine clearance, estimated glomerular...

  8. Role of protein synthesis in the repair of sublethal x-ray damage in a mutant Chinese hamster ovary cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yezzi, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    A temperature-sensitive mutant for protein synthesis, CHO-TSH1, was compared to the wild-type cell, CHO-SC1, in single- and split-radiation-dose schemes. When the cultures were incubated at 40 0 C for 2 hrs before a first dose and maintained at 40 0 C during a 2 hr dose fractionation interval, repair of radiation damage was reduced in the mutant compared to the wild type. These observations implied that a pool of proteins was involved in the repair of sublethal X-ray damage. The effect of diminished repair under conditions of inhibition of protein synthesis was found to be cell-cycle dependent in survival studies with synchronized mutant cell populations. Repair was found to be almost completely eliminated if the temperature sequence described above was applied in the middle of the DNA synthetic phase. Distinct perturbations in the cell-cycle progression were noted following heat alone or heat with radiation. A delay in the progression of synchronized G 1 -phase and S-phase cells was demonstrated autoradiographically after inhibition of protein synthesis. In addition, treated S-phase cells showed a transient increase in the percent labelled cells after the cells were returned to their normal growth temperature of 35 0 C. This observation was suggestive of an unusual pattern of DNA synthesis during the recovery period. Split-dose experiments were done using incubation with cycloheximide to chemically inhibit protein synthesis. Both the chemical and thermal inhibition of protein synthesis substantiate its necessity for the repair of sublethal damage

  9. The mismatch repair protein MLH1 marks a subset of strongly interfering crossovers in tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lhuissier, F.G.P.; Offenberg, H.H.; Wittich, P.E.; Vischer, N.O.E.; Heyting, C.

    2007-01-01

    In most eukaryotes, the prospective chromosomal positions of meiotic crossovers are marked during meiotic prophase by protein complexes called late recombination nodules (LNs). In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), a cytological recombination map has been constructed based on LN positions. We

  10. HRR25, a putative protein kinase from budding yeast: Association with repair of damaged DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoekstra, M.F.; Ou, A.C.; DeMaggio, A.J.; Burbee, D.G.; Liskay, R.M.; Heffron, F.

    1991-01-01

    In simple eukaryotes, protein kinases regulate mitotic and meiotic cell cycles, the response to polypeptide pheromones, and the initiation of nuclear DNA synthesis. The protein HRR25 from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was defined by the mutation hrr25-1. This mutation resulted in sensitivity to continuous expression of the HO double-strand endonuclease, to methyl methanesulfonate, and to x-irradiation. Homozygotes of hrr25-1 were unable to sporulate and disruption and deletion of HRR25 interfered with mitotic and meiotic cell division. Sequence analysis revealed two distinctive regions in the protein. The NH 2 -terminus of HRR25 contains the hallmark features of protein kinases, whereas the COOH-terminus is rich in proline and glutamine. Mutations in HRR25 at conserved residues found in all protein kinases inactivated the gene, and these mutants exhibited the hrr25 null phenotypes. Taken together, the hrr25 mutant phenotypes and the features of the gene product indicate that HRR25 is a distinctive member of the protein kinase superfamily

  11. In normal human fibroblasts variation in DSB repair capacity cannot be ascribed to radiation-induced changes in the localisation, expression or activity of major NHEJ proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasten-Pisula, Ulla; Vronskaja, Svetlana; Overgaard, Jens

    2008-01-01

    in the activity of the DNA-PK complex induced upon irradiation. CONCLUSIONS: For normal human fibroblasts, the level or activity of NHEJ proteins measured prior to or after irradiation cannot be used to predict the DSB repair capacity or cellular radiosensitivity. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Mar......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to test whether for normal human fibroblasts the variation in double-strand break (DSB) repair capacity results from radiation-induced differences in localisation, expression or activity of major non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) proteins....... MATERIALS AND METHODS: Experiments were performed with 11 normal human fibroblast strains AF01-11. NHEJ proteins were determined by Western blot and DNA-PK activity by pulldown-assay. RESULTS: The four NHEJ proteins tested (Ku70, Ku80, XRCC4 and DNA-PKcs) were found to be localised almost exclusively...

  12. p44 and p34 subunits of the BTF2/TFIIH transcription factor have homologies with SSL1, a yeast protein involved in DNA repair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Humbert; H. van Vuuren; Y. Lutz; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc); V. Moncollin

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe human BTF2 (TFIIH) transcription factor is a multisubunit protein involved in transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II (B) as well as in DNA repair. In addition to the previously characterized p62 and p89/ERCC3 subunits, we have cloned two other subunits of BTF2, p44 and p34.

  13. DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Zeeland, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    In this chapter a series of DNA repair pathways are discussed which are available to the cell to cope with the problem of DNA damaged by chemical or physical agents. In the case of microorganisms our knowledge about the precise mechanism of each DNA repair pathway and the regulation of it has been improved considerably when mutants deficient in these repair mechanisms became available. In the case of mammalian cells in culture, until recently there were very little repair deficient mutants available, because in almost all mammalian cells in culture at least the diploid number of chromosomes is present. Therefore the frequency of repair deficient mutants in such populations is very low. Nevertheless because replica plating techniques are improving some mutants from Chinese hamsters ovary cells and L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells are now available. In the case of human cells, cultures obtained from patients with certain genetic diseases are available. A number of cells appear to be sensitive to some chemical or physical mutagens. These include cells from patients suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum, Ataxia telangiectasia, Fanconi's anemia, Cockayne's syndrome. However, only in the case of xeroderma pigmentosum cells, has the sensitivity to ultraviolet light been clearly correlated with a deficiency in excision repair of pyrimidine dimers. Furthermore the work with strains obtained from biopsies from man is difficult because these cells generally have low cloning efficiencies and also have a limited lifespan in vitro. It is therefore very important that more repair deficient mutants will become available from established cell lines from human or animal origin

  14. MMS2, Encoding a ubiquitin-conjugating-enzyme-like protein, is a member of the yeast error-free postreplication repair pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broomfield, S.; Chow, B.L.; Xiao, W.

    1998-01-01

    Among the three Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA repair epistasis groups, the RAD6 group is the most complicated and least characterized, primarily because it consists of two separate repair pathways: an error-free postreplication repair pathway, and a mutagenesis pathway. The rad6 and rad18 mutants are defective in both pathways, and the rev3 mutant affects only the mutagenesis pathway, but a yeast gene that is involved only in error-free postreplication repair has not been reported. We cloned the MMS2 gene from a yeast genomic library by functional complementation of the mms2-1 mutant [Prakash, L. and Prakash, S. (1977) Genetics 86, 33-55]. MMS2 encodes a 137-amino acid, 15.2-kDa protein with significant sequence homology to a conserved family of ubiquitin-conjugating (Ubc) proteins. However, Mms2 does not appear to possess Ubc activity. Genetic analyses indicate that the mms2 mutation is hypostatic to rad6 and rad18 but is synergistic with the rev3 mutation, and the mms2 mutant is proficient in UV-induced mutagenesis. These phenotypes are reminiscent of a pol30-46 mutant known to be impaired in postreplication repair. The mms2 mutant also displayed a REV3-dependent mutator phenotype, strongly suggesting that the MMS2 gene functions in the error-free postreplication repair pathway, parallel to the REV3 mutagenesis pathway. Furthermore, with respect to UV sensitivity, mms2 was found to be hypostatic to the rad6 delta 1-9 mutation, which results in the absence of the first nine amino acids of Rad6. On the basis of these collective results, we propose that the mms2 null mutation and two other allele-specific mutations, rad6 delta 1-9 and pol30-46, define the error-free mode of DNA postreplication repair, and that these mutations may enhance both spontaneous and DNA damage-induced mutagenesis

  15. HHR23A, a human homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad23, regulates xeroderma pigmentosum C protein and is required for nucleotide excision repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Hui-Chuan; Hsieh, Yi-Hsuan; Huang, Yu-Hsin; Shen, Fan-Ching; Tsai, Han-Ni; Tsai, Jui-He; Lai, Yu-Ting; Wang, Yu-Ting; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Huang, Wenya

    2005-01-01

    HHR23A and hHR23B are the human homologs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad23. hHR23B is associated with the nucleotide excision repair (NER) factor xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) protein and is required for global genome repair. The function of hHR23A is not yet clear. In this study, the potential function of the hHR23A protein was investigated using RNA interference techniques. The hHR23A knock-down (KD) construct diminished the RNA level of hHR23A protein by approximately 60%, and it did not interfere with expression of the hHR23B gene. Based on Southwestern immunoblot and host-cell reactivation assays, hHR23A KD cells were found to be deficient in DNA repair activity against the DNA damage caused by UVC irradiation. In these hHR23A KD cells, the XPC gene was not normally induced by UVC irradiation, indicating that the hHR23A protein is involved in NER through regulation of the DNA damage recognition protein XPC. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that hHR23A was associated with a small portion of hHR23B and the majority of p53 protein, indicating that hHR23A regulates the function of XPC by its association with the NER activator p53

  16. Distinct kinetics of DNA repair protein accumulation at DNA lesions and cell cycle-dependent formation of gammaH2AX- and NBS1-positive repair foci

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Suchánková, Jana; Kozubek, Stanislav; Legartová, Soňa; Sehnalová, Petra; Kuntzinger, T.; Bártová, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 12 (2015), s. 440-454 ISSN 0248-4900 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G157; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-07822S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Cell cycle * DNA repair * Interphase Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.552, year: 2015

  17. The DNA Repair Repertoire of Mycobacterium smegmatis FenA Includes the Incision of DNA 5' Flaps and the Removal of 5' Adenylylated Products of Aborted Nick Ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uson, Maria Loressa; Ghosh, Shreya; Shuman, Stewart

    2017-09-01

    We characterize Mycobacterium smegmatis FenA as a manganese-dependent 5'-flap endonuclease homologous to the 5'-exonuclease of DNA polymerase I. FenA incises a nicked 5' flap between the first and second nucleotides of the duplex segment to yield a 1-nucleotide gapped DNA, which is then further resected in dinucleotide steps. Initial FenA cleavage at a Y-flap or nick occurs between the first and second nucleotides of the duplex. However, when the template 3' single strand is eliminated to create a 5'-tailed duplex, FenA incision shifts to between the second and third nucleotides. A double-flap substrate with a mobile junction (mimicking limited strand displacement synthesis during gap repair) is preferentially incised as the 1-nucleotide 3'-flap isomer, with the scissile phosphodiester shifted by one nucleotide versus a static double flap. FenA efficiently removes the 5' App(dN) terminus of an aborted nick ligation reaction intermediate, thereby highlighting FenA as an agent of repair of such lesions, which are formed under a variety of circumstances by bacterial NAD + -dependent DNA ligases and especially by mycobacterial DNA ligases D and C. IMPORTANCE Structure-specific DNA endonucleases are implicated in bacterial DNA replication, repair, and recombination, yet there is scant knowledge of the roster and catalytic repertoire of such nucleases in Mycobacteria This study identifies M. smegmatis FenA as a stand-alone endonuclease homologous to the 5'-exonuclease domain of mycobacterial DNA polymerase 1. FenA incises 5' flaps, 5' nicks, and 5' App(dN) intermediates of aborted nick ligation. The isolated N-terminal domain of M. smegmatis Pol1 is also shown to be a flap endonuclease. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Mismatch repair protein deficient endometrioid adenocarcinomas, metastasizing to adrenal gland and lymph nodes: Unusual cases with diagnostic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat Rekhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, certain endometrial carcinomas have been found to be associated with mismatch repair (MMR protein defects/deficiency. A 39-year-old female presented with cough, decreased appetite and significant weight loss since 2 months. Earlier, she had undergone total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAH-BSO for endometrioid adenocarcinoma. Imaging disclosed an 8 cm-sized adrenal mass that was surgically excised. Histopathology of the adrenal tumor, endocervical tumor, and endometrial biopsy revealed Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO Grade II to III endometrioid adenocarcinoma. By immunohistochemistry, tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin 7, epithelial membrane antigen, PAX8, MLH1 and PMS2 while negative for estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR, MSH2 and MSH6. She underwent adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy. A 34-year-old lady presented with vaginal bleeding since 9 months. She underwent TAH-BSO, reported as FIGO Grade III endometrioid adenocarcinoma. By immunohistochemistry, tumor cells were negative for ER, PR, MLH1, and PMS2 while positive for MSH2 and MSH6. She underwent adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, she developed multiple nodal and pericardial metastases and succumbed to the disease within a year post-diagnosis. Certain high-grade endometrioid adenocarcinomas occurring in younger women are MMR protein deficient and display an aggressive clinical course. Adrenal metastasis in endometrial carcinomas is rare.

  19. Functional analysis of rare variants in mismatch repair proteins augments results from computation-based predictive methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Sanjeevani; Huwe, Peter J.; Sikder, Rahmat; Shah, Manali; Browne, Amanda J.; Lesh, Randy; Nicolas, Emmanuelle; Deshpande, Sanat; Hall, Michael J.; Dunbrack, Roland L.; Golemis, Erica A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cancer-predisposing Lynch Syndrome (LS) arises from germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes, predominantly MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2. A major challenge for clinical diagnosis of LS is the frequent identification of variants of uncertain significance (VUS) in these genes, as it is often difficult to determine variant pathogenicity, particularly for missense variants. Generic programs such as SIFT and PolyPhen-2, and MMR gene-specific programs such as PON-MMR and MAPP-MMR, are often used to predict deleterious or neutral effects of VUS in MMR genes. We evaluated the performance of multiple predictive programs in the context of functional biologic data for 15 VUS in MLH1, MSH2, and PMS2. Using cell line models, we characterized VUS predicted to range from neutral to pathogenic on mRNA and protein expression, basal cellular viability, viability following treatment with a panel of DNA-damaging agents, and functionality in DNA damage response (DDR) signaling, benchmarking to wild-type MMR proteins. Our results suggest that the MMR gene-specific classifiers do not always align with the experimental phenotypes related to DDR. Our study highlights the importance of complementary experimental and computational assessment to develop future predictors for the assessment of VUS. PMID:28494185

  20. Selenoglutathione Diselenide: Unique Redox Reactions in the GPx-Like Catalytic Cycle and Repairing of Disulfide Bonds in Scrambled Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimodaira, Shingo; Asano, Yuki; Arai, Kenta; Iwaoka, Michio

    2017-10-24

    Selenoglutathione (GSeH) is a selenium analogue of naturally abundant glutathione (GSH). In this study, this water-soluble small tripeptide was synthesized in a high yield (up to 98%) as an oxidized diselenide form, i.e., GSeSeG (1), by liquid-phase peptide synthesis (LPPS). Obtained 1 was applied to the investigation of the glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-like catalytic cycle. The important intermediates, i.e., GSe - and GSeSG, besides GSeO 2 H were characterized by 77 Se NMR spectroscopy. Thiol exchange of GSeSG with various thiols, such as cysteine and dithiothreitol, was found to promote the conversion to GSe - significantly. In addition, disproportionation of GSeSR to 1 and RSSR, which would be initiated by heterolytic cleavage of the Se-S bond and catalyzed by the generated selenolate, was observed. On the basis of these redox behaviors, it was proposed that the heterolytic cleavage of the Se-S bond can be facilitated by the interaction between the Se atom and an amino or aromatic group, which is present at the GPx active site. On the other hand, when a catalytic amount of 1 was reacted with scrambled 4S species of RNase A in the presence of NADPH and glutathione reductase, native protein was efficiently regenerated, suggesting a potential use of 1 to repair misfolded proteins through reduction of the non-native SS bonds.

  1. YfiD from E.coli as a Pfl repair protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolenko, Petr; Doberenz, C.; Beyer, L.; Sawers, G.; Stubbs, M. T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 1 (2013), s. 30 ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussions in Structural Molecular Biology /11./. 14.03.2013-16.03.2013, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0029 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : YfiD protein * E. coli Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  2. Radiation affects binding of Fpg repair protein to an abasic site containing DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gillard, N.; Běgusová, Marie; Castaing, B.; Spotheim-Maurizot, M.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 162, č. 5 (2004), s. 566-571 ISSN 0033-7587 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1048103 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : ionizing radiation * DNA * protein komplex Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.208, year: 2003

  3. Mechanism of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 in repairing hematopoietic injury in mice exposed to γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shuibing; Hu Peizhen; Hou Ying; Li Xubo; Tian Qiong; Shi Mei

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mechanism of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) in repairing hematopoietic injury in mice irradiated with γ-ray. To prepare SRY gene probe and study the effect of rhBMP-2 in repairing hematopoietic injury in mice by in situ hybridization. Methods: Twenty-two BALB/c female mice were randomly divided into the irradiated group and BMP treated group, respectively. Bone marrow cells of normal male mice were transplanted into 22 female mice post-irradiation to 8.5 Gy of 60 Co γ rays. The left femurs of the survived female mice were re-irradiated with 9 Gy 14 days later. Mice in BMP treated group were given rhBMP-2 20 mg/kg while those in control group were treated with 0.9% saline by intraperitoneal injection every day for 6 days. These mice were killed 14 days later and paraffin sections of femurs were made. The SRY gene was detected with in situ hybridization. Results: There were more positive blots in the left femurs of the mice in irradiated group than those in BMP treated group (T=155.0, P 0.05). The number of positive blots in the left femurs of the mice in BMPtreated group was significantly less than those in the right femurs of the mice in two groups (T=155.0, 55.0, P<0.05). Conclusions: No donor cell of male mice was detected in the left femurs of BMP treated group, suggesting that rhBMP-2 promoted the restoration of residuary bone marrow cells. Thus, rhBMP-2 promotes the proliferation or differentiation of residuary mesenchymal stem cells, improves hematopoietic microenvironment and accelerates the hematopoietic restoration. (authors)

  4. Fanconi anemia (FA) binding protein FAAP20 stabilizes FA complementation group A (FANCA) and participates in interstrand cross-link repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Justin Wai Chung; Wang, Yucai; Fong, Ka Wing; Huen, Michael Shing Yan; Li, Lei; Chen, Junjie

    2012-01-01

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway participates in interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair and the maintenance of genomic stability. The FA core complex consists of eight FA proteins and two Fanconi anemia-associated proteins (FAAP24 and FAAP100). The FA core complex has ubiquitin ligase activity responsible for monoubiquitination of the FANCI-FANCD2 (ID) complex, which in turn initiates a cascade of biochemical events that allow processing and removal of cross-linked DNA and thereby promotes cell survival following DNA damage. Here, we report the identification of a unique component of the FA core complex, namely, FAAP20, which contains a RAD18-like ubiquitin-binding zinc-finger domain. Our data suggest that FAAP20 promotes the functional integrity of the FA core complex via its direct interaction with the FA gene product, FANCA. Indeed, somatic knockout cells devoid of FAAP20 displayed the hallmarks of FA cells, including hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents, chromosome aberrations, and reduced FANCD2 monoubiquitination. Taking these data together, our study indicates that FAAP20 is an important player involved in the FA pathway. PMID:22396592

  5. Fanconi anemia (FA) binding protein FAAP20 stabilizes FA complementation group A (FANCA) and participates in interstrand cross-link repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Justin Wai Chung; Wang, Yucai; Fong, Ka Wing; Huen, Michael Shing Yan; Li, Lei; Chen, Junjie

    2012-03-20

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway participates in interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair and the maintenance of genomic stability. The FA core complex consists of eight FA proteins and two Fanconi anemia-associated proteins (FAAP24 and FAAP100). The FA core complex has ubiquitin ligase activity responsible for monoubiquitination of the FANCI-FANCD2 (ID) complex, which in turn initiates a cascade of biochemical events that allow processing and removal of cross-linked DNA and thereby promotes cell survival following DNA damage. Here, we report the identification of a unique component of the FA core complex, namely, FAAP20, which contains a RAD18-like ubiquitin-binding zinc-finger domain. Our data suggest that FAAP20 promotes the functional integrity of the FA core complex via its direct interaction with the FA gene product, FANCA. Indeed, somatic knockout cells devoid of FAAP20 displayed the hallmarks of FA cells, including hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents, chromosome aberrations, and reduced FANCD2 monoubiquitination. Taking these data together, our study indicates that FAAP20 is an important player involved in the FA pathway.

  6. Nuclear localization of human DNA mismatch repair protein exonuclease 1 (hEXO1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Nina Østergaard; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Vinther, Lena

    2007-01-01

    interaction with hMLH1 and we show that defective nuclear localization of hEXO1 mutant proteins could be rescued by hMLH1 or hMSH2. Both hEXO1 and hMLH1 form complexes with the nuclear import factors importin beta/alpha1,3,7 whereas hMSH2 specifically recognizes importin beta/alpha3. Taken together, we infer...... that hEXO1, hMLH1 and hMSH2 form complexes and are imported to the nucleus together, and that redundant NLS import signals in the proteins may safeguard nuclear import and thereby MMR activity....

  7. ZP Domain Proteins in the Abalone Egg Coat Include a Paralog of VERL under Positive Selection That Binds Lysin and 18-kDa Sperm Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagaard, Jan E.; Vacquier, Victor D.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Swanson, Willie J.

    2010-01-01

    Identifying fertilization molecules is key to our understanding of reproductive biology, yet only a few examples of interacting sperm and egg proteins are known. One of the best characterized comes from the invertebrate archeogastropod abalone (Haliotis spp.), where sperm lysin mediates passage through the protective egg vitelline envelope (VE) by binding to the VE protein vitelline envelope receptor for lysin (VERL). Rapid adaptive divergence of abalone lysin and VERL are an example of positive selection on interacting fertilization proteins contributing to reproductive isolation. Previously, we characterized a subset of the abalone VE proteins that share a structural feature, the zona pellucida (ZP) domain, which is common to VERL and the egg envelopes of vertebrates. Here, we use additional expressed sequence tag sequencing and shotgun proteomics to characterize this family of proteins in the abalone egg VE. We expand 3-fold the number of known ZP domain proteins present within the VE (now 30 in total) and identify a paralog of VERL (vitelline envelope zona pellucida domain protein [VEZP] 14) that contains a putative lysin-binding motif. We find that, like VERL, the divergence of VEZP14 among abalone species is driven by positive selection on the lysin-binding motif alone and that these paralogous egg VE proteins bind a similar set of sperm proteins including a rapidly evolving 18-kDa paralog of lysin, which may mediate sperm–egg fusion. This work identifies an egg coat paralog of VERL under positive selection and the candidate sperm proteins with which it may interact during abalone fertilization. PMID:19767347

  8. Post-translational protein modifications in type 1 diabetes: a role for the repair enzyme protein-L-isoaspartate (D-aspartate) O-methyltransferase?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wägner, A M; Cloos, P; Bergholdt, R

    2007-01-01

    that recognises and repairs isomerised Asn and Asp residues in proteins. The aim of this study was to assess the role of PIMT in the development of type 1 diabetes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Immunohistochemical analysis of 59 normal human tissues was performed with a monoclonal PIMT antibody. CGP3466B, which induces...... expression of Pcmt1, was tested on MIN6 and INS1 cells, to assess its effect on Pcmt1 mRNA and PIMT levels (RT-PCR and western blot) and apoptosis. Forty-five diabetes-prone BioBreeding (BB) Ottawa Karlsburg (OK) rats were randomised to receive 0, 14 or 500 microg/kg (denoted as the control, low......-dose and high-dose group, respectively) of CGP3466B from week 5 to week 20. RESULTS: A high level of PIMT protein was detected in beta cells. CGP3466B induced a two- to threefold increase in Pcmt1 mRNA levels and reduced apoptosis by 10% in MIN6 cells. No significant effect was seen on cytokine...

  9. CRISPRCasFinder, an update of CRISRFinder, includes a portable version, enhanced performance and integrates search for Cas proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvin, David; Bernheim, Aude; Toffano-Nioche, Claire; Touchon, Marie; Michalik, Juraj; Néron, Bertrand; C Rocha, Eduardo P; Vergnaud, Gilles; Gautheret, Daniel; Pourcel, Christine

    2018-05-22

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) arrays and their associated (Cas) proteins confer bacteria and archaea adaptive immunity against exogenous mobile genetic elements, such as phages or plasmids. CRISPRCasFinder allows the identification of both CRISPR arrays and Cas proteins. The program includes: (i) an improved CRISPR array detection tool facilitating expert validation based on a rating system, (ii) prediction of CRISPR orientation and (iii) a Cas protein detection and typing tool updated to match the latest classification scheme of these systems. CRISPRCasFinder can either be used online or as a standalone tool compatible with Linux operating system. All third-party software packages employed by the program are freely available. CRISPRCasFinder is available at https://crisprcas.i2bc.paris-saclay.fr.

  10. The role of bone marrow-derived cells in bone fracture repair in a green fluorescent protein chimeric mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Rei; Migita, Makoto; Hanawa, Hideki; Ito, Hiromoto; Orimo, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the role of bone marrow cells in bone fracture repair using green fluorescent protein (GFP) chimeric model mice. First, the chimeric model mice were created: bone marrow cells from GFP-transgenic C57BL/6 mice were injected into the tail veins of recipient wild-type C57BL/6 mice that had been irradiated with a lethal dose of 10 Gy from a cesium source. Next, bone fracture models were created from these mice: closed transverse fractures of the left femur were produced using a specially designed device. One, three, and five weeks later, fracture lesions were extirpated for histological and immunohistochemical analyses. In the specimens collected 3 and 5 weeks after operation, we confirmed calluses showing intramembranous ossification peripheral to the fracture site. The calluses consisted of GFP- and osteocalcin-positive cells at the same site, although the femur consisted of only osteocalcin-positive cells. We suggest that bone marrow cells migrated outside of the bone marrow and differentiated into osteoblasts to make up the calluses

  11. The RSF1 histone-remodelling factor facilitates DNA double-strand break repair by recruiting centromeric and Fanconi Anaemia proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Pessina

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available ATM is a central regulator of the cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. Here we identify a biochemical interaction between ATM and RSF1 and we characterise the role of RSF1 in this response. The ATM-RSF1 interaction is dependent upon both DSBs and ATM kinase activity. Together with SNF2H/SMARCA5, RSF1 forms the RSF chromatin-remodelling complex. Although RSF1 is specific to the RSF complex, SNF2H/SMARCA5 is a catalytic subunit of several other chromatin-remodelling complexes. Although not required for checkpoint signalling, RSF1 is required for efficient repair of DSBs via both end-joining and homology-directed repair. Specifically, the ATM-dependent recruitment to sites of DSBs of the histone fold proteins CENPS/MHF1 and CENPX/MHF2, previously identified at centromeres, is RSF1-dependent. In turn these proteins recruit and regulate the mono-ubiquitination of the Fanconi Anaemia proteins FANCD2 and FANCI. We propose that by depositing CENPS/MHF1 and CENPX/MHF2, the RSF complex either directly or indirectly contributes to the reorganisation of chromatin around DSBs that is required for efficient DNA repair.

  12. Hoechst 33258 dye generates DNA-protein cross-links during ultraviolet light-induced photolysis of bromodeoxyuridine in replicated and repaired DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Xicang; Morgan, W.F.; Cleaver, J.E.

    1986-08-01

    Substitution of bromodeoxyuridine for thymidine in the DNA of mammalian cells sensitizes them to a range of wavelengths of ultraviolet light. Cells are also sensitized to photochemical reactions involving dyes such as Hoechst 33258, which is used to produce differential staining of chromatids according to their bromodeoxyuridine content. Irradiation with 313 nm light of human and hamster cells containing bromodeoxyuridine in their DNA produced single-strand breaks but no DNA-protein cross-links. Irradiation with 360 nm light in the presence of Hoechst 33258 produced extensive DNA-protein cross-linkage as well as single-strand breaks. These cross-links were observed in DNA containing bromodeoxyuridine incorporated by either semiconservative or repair replication. When the protein was removed with proteinase K, bromodeoxyuridine in repair patches after irradiation by doses of ultraviolet (254 nm) light as low as 0.26 J/m/sup 2/ could readily be detected. Hoechst 33258-mediated photolysis, therefore, provides a sensitive new technique for measuring repair replication after ultraviolet light irradiation.

  13. Differentiation and injury-repair signals modulate the interaction of E2F and pRB proteins with novel target genes in keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wing Y; Andrews, Joseph; Carter, David E; Dagnino, Lina

    2006-08-01

    E2F transcription factors are central to epidermal morphogenesis and regeneration after injury. The precise nature of E2F target genes involved in epidermal formation and repair has yet to be determined. Identification of these genes is essential to understand how E2F proteins regulate fundamental aspects of epidermal homeostasis and transformation. We have conducted a genome-wide screen using CpG island microarray analysis to identify novel promoters bound by E2F3 and E2F5 in human keratinocytes. We further characterized several of these genes, and determined that multiple E2F and retinoblastoma (pRb) family proteins associate with them in exponentially proliferating cells. We also assessed the effect on E2F and pRb binding to those genes in response to differentiation induced by bone morphogenetic protein-6 (BMP-6), or to activation of repair mechanisms induced by transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). These studies demonstrate promoter- and cytokine-specific changes in binding profiles of E2F and/or pRb family proteins. For example, E2F1, 3, 4 and p107 were recruited to the N-myc promoter in cells treated with BMP-6, whereas E2F1, 3, 4, 5, p107 and p130 were bound to this promoter in the presence of TGF-beta. Functionally, these different interactions resulted in transcriptional repression by BMP-6 and TGF-beta of the N-myc gene, via mechanisms that involved E2F binding to the promoter and association with pRb-family proteins. Thus, multiple combinations of E2F and pRb family proteins may associate with and transcriptionally regulate a given target promoter in response to differentiation and injury-repair stimuli in epidermal keratinocytes.

  14. Affinity purification and partial characterization of a yeast multiprotein complex for nucleotide excision repair using histidine-tagged Rad14 protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, K.; Talamantez, J.; Huang, W.; Reed, S.H.; Wang, Z.; Chen, L.; Feaver, W.J.; Friedberg, E.C.; Tomkinson, A.E.

    1998-01-01

    The nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway of eukaryotes involves approximately 30 polypeptides. Reconstitution of this pathway with purified components is consistent with the sequential assembly of NER proteins at the DNA lesion. However, recent studies have suggested that NER proteins may be pre-assembled in a high molecular weight complex in the absence of DNA damage. To examine this model further, we have constructed a histidine-tagged version of the yeast DNA damage recognition protein Rad14. Affinity purification of this protein from yeast nuclear extracts resulted in the co-purification of Rad1, Rad7, Rad10, Rad16, Rad23, RPA, RPB1, and TFIIH proteins, whereas none of these proteins bound to the affinity resin in the absence of recombinant Rad14. Furthermore, many of the co-purifying proteins were present in approximately equimolar amounts. Co-elution of these proteins was also observed when the nuclear extract was fractionated by gel filtration, indicating that the NER proteins were associated in a complex with a molecular mass of >1000 kDa prior to affinity chromatography. The affinity purified NER complex catalyzed the incision of UV-irradiated DNA in an ATP-dependent reaction. We conclude that active high molecular weight complexes of NER proteins exist in undamaged yeast cells

  15. Photosystem II repair and plant immunity: Lessons learned from Arabidopsis mutant lacking the THYLAKOID LUMEN PROTEIN 18.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sari eJärvi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chloroplasts play an important role in the cellular sensing of abiotic and biotic stress. Signals originating from photosynthetic light reactions, in the form of redox and pH changes, accumulation of reactive oxygen and electrophile species or stromal metabolites are of key importance in chloroplast retrograde signaling. These signals initiate plant acclimation responses to both abiotic and biotic stresses. To reveal the molecular responses activated by rapid fluctuations in growth light intensity, gene expression analysis was performed with Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and the tlp18.3 mutant plants, the latter showing a stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light conditions (Biochem. J, 406, 415-425. Expression pattern of genes encoding components of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain did not differ between fluctuating and constant light conditions, neither in wild type nor in tlp18.3 plants, and the composition of the thylakoid membrane protein complexes likewise remained unchanged. Nevertheless, the fluctuating light conditions repressed in wild-type plants a broad spectrum of genes involved in immune responses, which likely resulted from shade-avoidance responses and their intermixing with hormonal signaling. On the contrary, in the tlp18.3 mutant plants there was an imperfect repression of defense-related transcripts upon growth under fluctuating light, possibly by signals originating from minor malfunction of the photosystem II (PSII repair cycle, which directly or indirectly modulated the transcript abundances of genes related to light perception via phytochromes. Consequently, a strong allocation of resources to defense reactions in the tlp18.3 mutant plants presumably results in the stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light.

  16. Effect of laser wavelength and protein solder concentration on acute tissue repair using laser welding: initial results in a canine ureter model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, E J; Poppas, D P

    1997-01-01

    Successful tissue approximation can be performed using low power laser energy combined with human albumin solder. In vitro studies were undertaken to investigate the acute repair strengths achieved using different laser wavelengths. Furthermore, we evaluated the change in repair strength with that resulted from changes in protein solder concentration. Intraluminal bursting pressure following ureterotomy repair was measured for the following laser wavelengths: 532, 808, 1,320, 2,100, and 10,600 nm. The tissue absorption characteristics of the 808-nm diode and the KTP-532-nm lasers required the addition of the exogenous chromophores indocyanine green and fluorescein, respectively. A 40% human albumin solder was incorporated in the repair of a 1.0-cm longitudinal defect in the canine ureter. Following determination of an optimal welding wavelength, human albumin solder of varying concentrations (25%, 38%, 45%, and 50%) were prepared and tested. The 1,320-nm YAG laser achieved the highest acute bursting pressure and was the most effective in this model. Of the concentrations of albumin tested, 50% human albumin yielded the greatest bursting pressures. We conclude that of the laser wavelengths evaluated, the 1,320-nm YAG achieves the strongest tissue weld in the acute ex vivo dog ureter model. In addition, when this laser system is used, the acute strength of a photothermal weld appears to be directly proportional to the concentration of human albumin solder in the range of 25 to 50%.

  17. Chloroacetaldehyde-induced mutagenesis in Escherichia coli: The role of AlkB protein in repair of 3,N4-ethenocytosine and 3,N4-α-hydroxyethanocytosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciejewska, Agnieszka M.; Ruszel, Karol P.; Nieminuszczy, Jadwiga; Lewicka, Joanna; Sokolowska, Beata; Grzesiuk, Elzbieta; Kusmierek, Jaroslaw T.

    2010-01-01

    Etheno (ε) adducts are formed in reaction of DNA bases with various environmental carcinogens and endogenously created products of lipid peroxidation. Chloroacetaldehyde (CAA), a metabolite of carcinogen vinyl chloride, is routinely used to generate ε-adducts. We studied the role of AlkB, along with AlkA and Mug proteins, all engaged in repair of ε-adducts, in CAA-induced mutagenesis. The test system used involved pIF102 and pIF104 plasmids bearing the lactose operon of CC102 or CC104 origin (Cupples and Miller (1989) ) which allowed to monitor Lac + revertants, the latter arose by GC → AT or GC → TA substitutions, respectively, as a result of modification of guanine and cytosine. The plasmids were CAA-damaged in vitro and replicated in Escherichia coli of various genetic backgrounds. To modify the levels of AlkA and AlkB proteins, mutagenesis was studied in E. coli cells induced or not in adaptive response. Formation of εC proceeds via a relatively stable intermediate, 3,N 4 -α-hydroxyethanocytosine (HEC), which allowed to compare repair of both adducts. The results indicate that all three genes, alkA, alkB and mug, are engaged in alleviation of CAA-induced mutagenesis. The frequency of mutation was higher in AlkA-, AlkB- and Mug-deficient strains in comparison to alkA + , alkB + , and mug + controls. Considering the levels of CAA-induced Lac + revertants in strains harboring the pIF plasmids and induced or not in adaptive response, we conclude that AlkB protein is engaged in the repair of εC and HEC in vivo. Using the modified TTCTT 5-mers as substrates, we confirmed in vitro that AlkB protein repairs εC and HEC although far less efficiently than the reference adduct 3-methylcytosine. The pH optimum for repair of HEC and εC is significantly different from that for 3-methylcytosine. We propose that the protonated form of adduct interact in active site of AlkB protein.

  18. Role of Cell Cycle Regulation and MLH1, A Key DNA Mismatch Repair Protein, In Adaptive Survival Responses. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Boothman

    1999-08-11

    Due to several interesting findings on both adaptive survival responses (ASRs) and DNA mismatch repair (MMR), this grant was separated into two discrete Specific Aim sets (each with their own discrete hypotheses). The described experiments were simultaneously performed.

  19. The Rev1 interacting region (RIR) motif in the scaffold protein XRCC1 mediates a low-affinity interaction with polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase (PNKP) during DNA single-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, Claire; Mani, Rajam S; Fanta, Mesfin; Hoch, Nicolas; Weinfeld, Michael; Caldecott, Keith W

    2017-09-29

    The scaffold protein X-ray repair cross-complementing 1 (XRCC1) interacts with multiple enzymes involved in DNA base excision repair and single-strand break repair (SSBR) and is important for genetic integrity and normal neurological function. One of the most important interactions of XRCC1 is that with polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase (PNKP), a dual-function DNA kinase/phosphatase that processes damaged DNA termini and that, if mutated, results in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia 4 (AOA4) and microcephaly with early-onset seizures and developmental delay (MCSZ). XRCC1 and PNKP interact via a high-affinity phosphorylation-dependent interaction site in XRCC1 and a forkhead-associated domain in PNKP. Here, we identified using biochemical and biophysical approaches a second PNKP interaction site in XRCC1 that binds PNKP with lower affinity and independently of XRCC1 phosphorylation. However, this interaction nevertheless stimulated PNKP activity and promoted SSBR and cell survival. The low-affinity interaction site required the highly conserved Rev1-interacting region (RIR) motif in XRCC1 and included three critical and evolutionarily invariant phenylalanine residues. We propose a bipartite interaction model in which the previously identified high-affinity interaction acts as a molecular tether, holding XRCC1 and PNKP together and thereby promoting the low-affinity interaction identified here, which then stimulates PNKP directly. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. BioInfra.Prot: A comprehensive proteomics workflow including data standardization, protein inference, expression analysis and data publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turewicz, Michael; Kohl, Michael; Ahrens, Maike; Mayer, Gerhard; Uszkoreit, Julian; Naboulsi, Wael; Bracht, Thilo; Megger, Dominik A; Sitek, Barbara; Marcus, Katrin; Eisenacher, Martin

    2017-11-10

    The analysis of high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomics data must address the specific challenges of this technology. To this end, the comprehensive proteomics workflow offered by the de.NBI service center BioInfra.Prot provides indispensable components for the computational and statistical analysis of this kind of data. These components include tools and methods for spectrum identification and protein inference, protein quantification, expression analysis as well as data standardization and data publication. All particular methods of the workflow which address these tasks are state-of-the-art or cutting edge. As has been shown in previous publications, each of these methods is adequate to solve its specific task and gives competitive results. However, the methods included in the workflow are continuously reviewed, updated and improved to adapt to new scientific developments. All of these particular components and methods are available as stand-alone BioInfra.Prot services or as a complete workflow. Since BioInfra.Prot provides manifold fast communication channels to get access to all components of the workflow (e.g., via the BioInfra.Prot ticket system: bioinfraprot@rub.de) users can easily benefit from this service and get support by experts. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Repair of rat cranial bone defect by using bone morphogenetic protein-2-related peptide combined with microspheres composed of polylactic acid/polyglycolic acid copolymer and chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jingfeng; Jin, Lin; Zhu, Shaobo; Wang, Mingbo; Xu, Shuyun

    2015-01-01

    The effects of the transplanted bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) -related peptide P24 and rhBMP 2 combined with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)/chitosan (CS) microspheres were investigated in promoting the repair of rat cranial bone defect. Forty white rats were selected and equally divided into four groups (group A: 1 μg of rhBMP 2 /PLGA/CS composite; group B: 3 mg of P24/PLGA/CS composite; group C: 0.5 μg of rhBMP 2 + 1.5 mg of P24/PLGA/CS composite; group D: blank PLGA/CS material), and rat cranial bone defect models with a diameter of 5 mm were established. The materials were transplanted to the cranial bone defects. The animals were sacrificed on weeks 6 and 12 post-operation. Radiographic examinations (x-ray imaging and 3D CT scanning) and histological evaluations were performed. The repaired areas of cranial bone defects were measured, and the osteogenetic abilities of various materials were compared. Cranial histology, imaging, and repaired area measurements showed that the osteogenetic effects at two time points (weeks 6 and 12) in group C were better than those in groups A and B. The effects in groups A and B were similar. Group D achieved the worst repair effect of cranial bone defects, where a large number of fibrous connective tissues were observed. The PLGA/CS composite microspheres loaded with rhBMP 2 and P24 had optimal concrescence and could mutually increase their osteogenesis capability. rhBMP 2 + P24/PLGA/CS composite is a novel material for bone defect repair with stable activity to induce bone formation. (paper)

  2. DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, R.

    1978-01-01

    Some topics discussed are as follows: difficulty in extrapolating data from E. coli to mammalian systems; mutations caused by UV-induced changes in DNA; mutants deficient in excision repair; other postreplication mechanisms; kinds of excision repair systems; detection of repair by biochemical or biophysical means; human mutants deficient in repair; mutagenic effects of UV on XP cells; and detection of UV-repair defects among XP individuals

  3. Clinicopathological characteristics of patients with upper urinary tract urothelial cancer with loss of immunohistochemical expression of the DNA mismatch repair proteins in universal screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urakami, Shinji; Inoshita, Naoko; Oka, Suguru; Miyama, Yu; Nomura, Sachio; Arai, Masami; Sakaguchi, Kazushige; Kurosawa, Kazuhiro; Okaneya, Toshikazu

    2018-02-01

    To assess the detection rate of putative Lynch syndrome-associated upper urinary tract urothelial cancer among all upper urinary tract urothelial cancers and to examine its clinicopathological characteristics. A total of 143 patients with upper urinary tract urothelial cancer who had received total nephroureterectomy were immunohistochemically stained for the expression of mismatch repair proteins MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and MSH6. For all suspected mismatch repair-deficient cases, MMR genetic testing was recommended and clinicopathological features were examined. Loss of mismatch repair proteins was found in seven patients (5%) who were thus categorized as putative Lynch syndrome-associated upper urinary tract urothelial cancer. Five of these patients showed dual loss of MSH2/MSH6. Two patients were confirmed to be MSH2 germline mutation carriers. Histologically, all seven tumors were low-grade atypical urothelial carcinoma and showed its unique histological features, such as an inverted papilloma-like growth pattern and a villous to papillary structure with mild stratification of tumor cells. Six tumors had no invasion of the muscularis propria. No recurrence or cancer-related deaths were reported in these seven patients. Just three patients met the revised Amsterdam criteria. This is the first report that universally examined mismatch repair immunohistochemical screening for upper urinary tract urothelial cancers. The prevalence (5%) of putative Lynch syndrome-associated upper urinary tract urothelial cancers is much higher than we had expected. We ascertained that putative Lynch syndrome-associated upper urinary tract urothelial cancers were clinically in the early stage and histologically classified into low-grade malignancy with its characteristic pathological features. The clinicopathological characteristics that we found in the present study could become additional possible markers in the diagnosis of Lynch syndrome-associated upper urinary tract urothelial cancers

  4. Nrf1 CNC-bZIP protein promotes cell survival and nucleotide excision repair through maintaining glutathione homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Weinong; Ming, Mei; Zhao, Rui; Pi, Jingbo; Wu, Chunli; He, Yu-Ying

    2012-05-25

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States. Its major environmental risk factor is UVB radiation in sunlight. In response to UVB damage, epidermal keratinocytes activate a specific repair pathway, i.e. nucleotide excision repair, to remove UVB-induced DNA lesions. However, the regulation of UVB response is not fully understood. Here we show that the long isoform of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 1 (Nrf1, also called NFE2L1), a cytoprotective transcription factor critical for the expression of multiple antioxidant response element-dependent genes, plays an important role in the response of keratinocytes to UVB. Nrf1 loss sensitized keratinocytes to UVB-induced apoptosis by up-regulating the expression of the proapoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bik through reducing glutathione levels. Knocking down Bik reduced UVB-induced apoptosis in Nrf1-inhibited cells. In UVB-irradiated surviving cells, however, disruption of Nrf1 impaired nucleotide excision repair through suppressing the transcription of xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC), a factor essential for initiating the global genome nucleotide excision repair by recognizing the DNA lesion and recruiting downstream factors. Nrf1 enhanced XPC expression by increasing glutathione availability but was independent of the transcription repressor of XPC. Adding XPC or glutathione restored the DNA repair capacity in Nrf1-inhibited cells. Finally, we demonstrate that Nrf1 levels are significantly reduced by UVB radiation in mouse skin and are lower in human skin tumors than in normal skin. These results indicate a novel role of Nrf1 in UVB-induced DNA damage repair and suggest Nrf1 as a tumor suppressor in the skin.

  5. The PCNA-associated protein PARI negatively regulates homologous recombination via the inhibition of DNA repair synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burkovics, Peter; Dome, Lili; Juhasz, Szilvia

    2016-01-01

    to inhibit homologous recombination (HR) events. Here, we describe a biochemical mechanism in which PARI functions as an HR regulator after replication fork stalling and during double-strand break repair. In our reconstituted biochemical system, we show that PARI inhibits DNA repair synthesis during...... recombination events in a PCNA interaction-dependent way but independently of its UvrD-like helicase domain. In accordance, we demonstrate that PARI inhibits HR in vivo, and its knockdown suppresses the UV sensitivity of RAD18-depleted cells. Our data reveal a novel human regulatory mechanism that limits...

  6. Recombinational repair: workshop summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard-Flanders, P.

    1983-01-01

    Recombinational repair may or may not be synonymous with postreplication repair. Considerable progress has been made in the study of the relevant enzymes, particularly those from bacteria. In this workshop we focus on the recombination enzyme RecA protein. What structural changes take place in the protein and in DNA during repair. How does homologous pairing take place. How is ATP hydrolysis coupled to the stand exchange reaction and the formation of heteroduplx DNA. Turning to another enzyme needed for certain kinds of bacterial recombination, we will ask whether the purified recB protein and recC protein complement each other and are sufficient for exonuclease V activity. In higher cells, we would like to know whether sister exchanges, which occur in bacteria after uv irradiation, are also seen in animal cells

  7. Vascular endothelial growth factor/bone morphogenetic protein-2 bone marrow combined modification of the mesenchymal stem cells to repair the avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-Wei; Cui, Da-Ping; Zhao, De-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) combined with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) was used to repair avascular necrosis of the femoral head, which can maintain the osteogenic phenotype of seed cells, and effectively secrete VEGF and BMP-2, and effectively promote blood vessel regeneration and contribute to formation and revascularization of tissue engineered bone tissues. To observe the therapeutic effect on the treatment of avascular necrosis of the femoral head by using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) modified by VEGF-165 and BMP-2 in vitro. The models were avascular necrosis of femoral head of rabbits on right leg. There groups were single core decompression group, core decompression + BMSCs group, core decompression + VEGF-165/BMP-2 transfect BMSCs group. Necrotic bone was cleared out under arthroscope. Arthroscopic observation demonstrated that necrotic bone was cleared out in each group, and fresh blood flowed out. Histomorphology determination showed that blood vessel number and new bone area in the repair region were significantly greater at various time points following transplantation in the core decompression + VEGF-165/BMP-2 transfect BMSCs group compared with single core decompression group and core decompression + BMSCs group (P < 0.05). These suggested that VEGF-165/BMP-2 gene transfection strengthened osteogenic effects of BMSCs, elevated number and quality of new bones and accelerated the repair of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. PMID:26629044

  8. Serum proteins reflecting inflammation, injury and repair as biomarkers of disease activity in ANCA-associated vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monach, Paul A; Warner, Roscoe L; Tomasson, Gunnar; Specks, Ulrich; Stone, John H; Ding, Linna; Fervenza, Fernando C; Fessler, Barri J; Hoffman, Gary S; Iklé, David; Kallenberg, Cees GM; Krischer, Jeffrey; Langford, Carol A; Mueller, Mark; Seo, Philip; St. Clair, E William; Spiera, Robert; Tchao, Nadia; Ytterberg, Steven R; Johnson, Kent J; Merkel, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify circulating proteins that distinguish between active anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) and remission in a manner complementary to markers of systemic inflammation. Methods Twenty-eight serum proteins representing diverse aspects of the biology of AAV were measured before and 6 months after treatment in a large clinical trial of AAV. Subjects (n=186) enrolled in the Rituximab in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis (RAVE) trial were studied. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were available for comparison. The primary outcome was the ability of markers to distinguish severe AAV (Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score for Wegener’s granulomatosis (BVAS/WG)≥3 at screening) from remission (BVAS/WG=0 at month 6), using areas under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). Results All subjects had severe active vasculitis (median BVAS/WG=8) at screening. In the 137 subjects in remission at month 6, 24 of the 28 markers showed significant declines. ROC analysis indicated that levels of CXCL13 (BCA-1), matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) best discriminated active AAV from remission (AUC>0.8) and from healthy controls (AUC>0.9). Correlations among these markers and with ESR or CRP were low. Conclusions Many markers are elevated in severe active AAV and decline with treatment, but CXCL13, MMP-3 and TIMP-1 distinguish active AAV from remission better than the other markers studied, including ESR and CRP. These proteins are particularly promising candidates for future studies to address unmet needs in the assessment of patients with AAV. PMID:22975753

  9. Dynamic interaction of TTDA with TFIIH is stabilized by nucleotide excision repair in living cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Giglia-Mari (Giuseppina); C. Miquel (Catherine); A.F. Theil (Arjan); P.O. Mari (Pierre-Olivier); D. Hoogstraten (Deborah); J.M.Y. Ng (Jessica); C. Dinant (Christoffel); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); W. Vermeulen (Wim)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractTranscription/repair factor IIH (TFIIH) is essential for RNA polymerase II transcription and nucleotide excision repair (NER). This multi-subunit complex consists of ten polypeptides, including the recently identified small 8-kDa trichothiodystrophy group A (TTDA)/ hTFB5 protein.

  10. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M.; Chen, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population

  11. In vivo effects of UV radiation on multiple endpoints and expression profiles of DNA repair and heat shock protein (Hsp) genes in the cycloid copepod Paracyclopina nana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Eun-Ji; Han, Jeonghoon [Department of Biological Science, College of Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yeonjung; Kumar, K. Suresh; Shin, Kyung-Hoon [Department of Marine Sciences and Convergent Technology, College of Science and Technology, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Su-Jae [Department of Life Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Heum Gi, E-mail: hgpark@gwnu.ac.kr [Department of Marine Resource Development, College of Life Sciences, Gangneung-Wonju National University, Gangneung 210-702 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Seong, E-mail: jslee2@skku.edu [Department of Biological Science, College of Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • UV-B radiation induced a significant reduction of the re-brooding rate of ovigerous females. • A dose-dependent decrease in food ingestion and the rate of assimilation to the body upon UV radiation. • Expression of base excision repair-associated and hsp chaperoning genes was significantly increased upon UV radiation in P. nana. - Abstract: To evaluate the effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on energy acquisition and consumption, the copepod Paracyclopina nana was irradiated with several doses (0–3 kJ/m{sup 2}) of UV. After UV radiation, we measured the re-brooding success, growth pattern of newly hatched nauplii, ingestion rate, and assimilation of diet. In addition, we checked the modulated patterns of DNA repair and heat shock protein (hsp) chaperoning genes of P. nana. UV-B radiation induced a significant reduction (7–87%) of the re-brooding rate of ovigerous females, indicating that UV-induced egg sac damage is closely correlated with a reduction in the hatching rate of UV-irradiated ovigerous female offspring. Using chlorophyll a and stable carbon isotope incubation experiments, we found a dose-dependent decrease (P < 0.05) in food ingestion and the rate of assimilation to the body in response to UV radiation, implying that P. nana has an underlying ability to shift its balanced-energy status from growth and reproduction to DNA repair and adaptation. Also, expression of P. nana base excision repair (BER)-associated genes and hsp chaperoning genes was significantly increased in response to UV radiation in P. nana. These findings indicate that even 1 kJ/m{sup 2} of UV radiation induces a reduction in reproduction and growth patterns, alters the physiological balance and inhibits the ability to cope with UV-induced damage in P. nana.

  12. In vivo effects of UV radiation on multiple endpoints and expression profiles of DNA repair and heat shock protein (Hsp) genes in the cycloid copepod Paracyclopina nana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, Eun-Ji; Han, Jeonghoon; Lee, Yeonjung; Kumar, K. Suresh; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Lee, Su-Jae; Park, Heum Gi; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • UV-B radiation induced a significant reduction of the re-brooding rate of ovigerous females. • A dose-dependent decrease in food ingestion and the rate of assimilation to the body upon UV radiation. • Expression of base excision repair-associated and hsp chaperoning genes was significantly increased upon UV radiation in P. nana. - Abstract: To evaluate the effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on energy acquisition and consumption, the copepod Paracyclopina nana was irradiated with several doses (0–3 kJ/m 2 ) of UV. After UV radiation, we measured the re-brooding success, growth pattern of newly hatched nauplii, ingestion rate, and assimilation of diet. In addition, we checked the modulated patterns of DNA repair and heat shock protein (hsp) chaperoning genes of P. nana. UV-B radiation induced a significant reduction (7–87%) of the re-brooding rate of ovigerous females, indicating that UV-induced egg sac damage is closely correlated with a reduction in the hatching rate of UV-irradiated ovigerous female offspring. Using chlorophyll a and stable carbon isotope incubation experiments, we found a dose-dependent decrease (P < 0.05) in food ingestion and the rate of assimilation to the body in response to UV radiation, implying that P. nana has an underlying ability to shift its balanced-energy status from growth and reproduction to DNA repair and adaptation. Also, expression of P. nana base excision repair (BER)-associated genes and hsp chaperoning genes was significantly increased in response to UV radiation in P. nana. These findings indicate that even 1 kJ/m 2 of UV radiation induces a reduction in reproduction and growth patterns, alters the physiological balance and inhibits the ability to cope with UV-induced damage in P. nana

  13. DNA repair protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergbæk, Lotte

    In its 3rd edition, this Methods in Molecular Biology(TM) book covers the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including advanced protocols and standard techniques in the field of DNA repair. Offers expert guidance for DNA repair, recombination, and replication. Current knowledge of the mechanisms...... that regulate DNA repair has grown significantly over the past years with technology advances such as RNA interference, advanced proteomics and microscopy as well as high throughput screens. The third edition of DNA Repair Protocols covers various aspects of the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including...... recent advanced protocols as well as standard techniques used in the field of DNA repair. Both mammalian and non-mammalian model organisms are covered in the book, and many of the techniques can be applied with only minor modifications to other systems than the one described. Written in the highly...

  14. Deficiency of the DNA repair protein nibrin increases the basal but not the radiation induced mutation frequency in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessendorf, Petra; Vijg, Jan; Nussenzweig, André; Digweed, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • lacZ mutant frequencies measured in vivo in mouse models of radiosensitive Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome. • Spontaneous mutation frequencies are increased in lymphatic tissue due to Nbn mutation. • Single base transitions, not deletions, dominate the mutation spectrum. • Radiation induced mutation frequencies are not increased due to Nbn mutation. - Abstract: Nibrin (NBN) is a member of a DNA repair complex together with MRE11 and RAD50. The complex is associated particularly with the repair of DNA double strand breaks and with the regulation of cell cycle check points. Hypomorphic mutation of components of the complex leads to human disorders characterised by radiosensitivity and increased tumour occurrence, particularly of the lymphatic system. We have examined here the relationship between DNA damage, mutation frequency and mutation spectrum in vitro and in vivo in mouse models carrying NBN mutations and a lacZ reporter plasmid. We find that NBN mutation leads to increased spontaneous DNA damage in fibroblasts in vitro and high basal mutation rates in lymphatic tissue of mice in vivo. The characteristic mutation spectrum is dominated by single base transitions rather than the deletions and complex rearrangements expected after abortive repair of DNA double strand breaks. We conclude that in the absence of wild type nibrin, the repair of spontaneous errors, presumably arising during DNA replication, makes a major contribution to the basal mutation rate. This applies also to cells heterozygous for an NBN null mutation. Mutation frequencies after irradiation in vivo were not increased in mice with nibrin mutations as might have been expected considering the radiosensitivity of NBS patient cells in vitro. Evidently apoptosis is efficient, even in the absence of wild type nibrin

  15. Deficiency of the DNA repair protein nibrin increases the basal but not the radiation induced mutation frequency in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessendorf, Petra [Institute of Medical and Human Genetics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin (Germany); Vijg, Jan [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Michael F. Price Center, 1301 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Nussenzweig, André [Laboratory of Genome Integrity, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, 37 Convent Drive, Room 1106, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Digweed, Martin, E-mail: martin.digweed@charite.de [Institute of Medical and Human Genetics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • lacZ mutant frequencies measured in vivo in mouse models of radiosensitive Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome. • Spontaneous mutation frequencies are increased in lymphatic tissue due to Nbn mutation. • Single base transitions, not deletions, dominate the mutation spectrum. • Radiation induced mutation frequencies are not increased due to Nbn mutation. - Abstract: Nibrin (NBN) is a member of a DNA repair complex together with MRE11 and RAD50. The complex is associated particularly with the repair of DNA double strand breaks and with the regulation of cell cycle check points. Hypomorphic mutation of components of the complex leads to human disorders characterised by radiosensitivity and increased tumour occurrence, particularly of the lymphatic system. We have examined here the relationship between DNA damage, mutation frequency and mutation spectrum in vitro and in vivo in mouse models carrying NBN mutations and a lacZ reporter plasmid. We find that NBN mutation leads to increased spontaneous DNA damage in fibroblasts in vitro and high basal mutation rates in lymphatic tissue of mice in vivo. The characteristic mutation spectrum is dominated by single base transitions rather than the deletions and complex rearrangements expected after abortive repair of DNA double strand breaks. We conclude that in the absence of wild type nibrin, the repair of spontaneous errors, presumably arising during DNA replication, makes a major contribution to the basal mutation rate. This applies also to cells heterozygous for an NBN null mutation. Mutation frequencies after irradiation in vivo were not increased in mice with nibrin mutations as might have been expected considering the radiosensitivity of NBS patient cells in vitro. Evidently apoptosis is efficient, even in the absence of wild type nibrin.

  16. Construction of nerve guide conduits from cellulose/soy protein composite membranes combined with Schwann cells and pyrroloquinoline quinone for the repair of peripheral nerve defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Lihua [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Center of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Hubei University of Arts and Sciences, Xiangyang 441053 (China); Gan, Li; Liu, Yongming; Tian, Weiqun; Tong, Zan [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Wang, Xiong; Huselstein, Celine [Ingénierie Moléculaire et Physiopathologie Articulaire (IMoPA), UMR 7365 CNRS – Université de Lorraine, Biopôle, 54500 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Chen, Yun, E-mail: yunchen@whu.edu.cn [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2015-02-20

    conduits in the field of nerve tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A novel nerve conduit was constructed and applied to repair nerve defect in rats. • Transparent hollow cellulose/soy protein isolate tube was used as conduit matrix. • Pyrroloquinoline quinine was adsorbed into the hollow tube as nerve growth factor. • Schwann cells were cultured into the hollow tube as seed cells. • The new nerve conduit could repair and reconstruct the peripheral nerve defects.

  17. Do we see what we should see? Describing non-covalent interactions in protein structures including precision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manickam Gurusaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The power of X-ray crystal structure analysis as a technique is to `see where the atoms are'. The results are extensively used by a wide variety of research communities. However, this `seeing where the atoms are' can give a false sense of security unless the precision of the placement of the atoms has been taken into account. Indeed, the presentation of bond distances and angles to a false precision (i.e. to too many decimal places is commonplace. This article has three themes. Firstly, a basis for a proper representation of protein crystal structure results is detailed and demonstrated with respect to analyses of Protein Data Bank entries. The basis for establishing the precision of placement of each atom in a protein crystal structure is non-trivial. Secondly, a knowledge base harnessing such a descriptor of precision is presented. It is applied here to the case of salt bridges, i.e. ion pairs, in protein structures; this is the most fundamental place to start with such structure-precision representations since salt bridges are one of the tenets of protein structure stability. Ion pairs also play a central role in protein oligomerization, molecular recognition of ligands and substrates, allosteric regulation, domain motion and α-helix capping. A new knowledge base, SBPS (Salt Bridges in Protein Structures, takes these structural precisions into account and is the first of its kind. The third theme of the article is to indicate natural extensions of the need for such a description of precision, such as those involving metalloproteins and the determination of the protonation states of ionizable amino acids. Overall, it is also noted that this work and these examples are also relevant to protein three-dimensional structure molecular graphics software.

  18. Assigning Significance in Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics to Include Single-Peptide-Hit Proteins with Low Replicates

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Qingbo

    2010-01-01

    When sample replicates are limited in a label-free proteomics experiment, selecting differentially regulated proteins with an assignment of statistical significance remains difficult for proteins with a single-peptide hit or a small fold-change. This paper aims to address this issue. An important component of the approach employed here is to utilize the rule of Minimum number of Permuted Significant Pairings (MPSP) to reduce false positives. The MPSP rule generates permuted sample pairings fr...

  19. Nucleotide Excision Repair Lesion-Recognition Protein Rad4 Captures a Pre-Flipped Partner Base in a Benzo[a]pyrene-Derived DNA Lesion: How Structure Impacts the Binding Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Hong; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Min, Jung-Hyun; Zhang, Yingkai; Broyde, Suse

    2017-06-19

    The xeroderma pigmentosum C protein complex (XPC) recognizes a variety of environmentally induced DNA lesions and is the key in initiating their repair by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. When bound to a lesion, XPC flips two nucleotide pairs that include the lesion out of the DNA duplex, yielding a productively bound complex that can lead to successful lesion excision. Interestingly, the efficiencies of NER vary greatly among different lesions, influencing their toxicity and mutagenicity in cells. Though differences in XPC binding may influence NER efficiency, it is not understood whether XPC utilizes different mechanisms to achieve productive binding with different lesions. Here, we investigated the well-repaired 10R-(+)-cis-anti-benzo[a]pyrene-N 2 -dG (cis-B[a]P-dG) DNA adduct in a duplex containing normal partner C opposite the lesion. This adduct is derived from the environmental pro-carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene and is likely to be encountered by NER in the cell. We have extensively investigated its binding to the yeast XPC orthologue, Rad4, using umbrella sampling with restrained molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations. The NMR solution structure of this lesion in duplex DNA has shown that the dC complementary to the adducted dG is flipped out of the DNA duplex in the absence of XPC. However, it is not known whether the "pre-flipped" base would play a role in its recognition by XPC. Our results show that Rad4 first captures the displaced dC, which is followed by a tightly coupled lesion-extruding pathway for productive binding. This binding path differs significantly from the one deduced for the small cis-syn cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer lesion opposite mismatched thymines [ Mu , H. , ( 2015 ) Biochemistry , 54 ( 34 ), 5263 - 7 ]. The possibility of multiple paths that lead to productive binding to XPC is consistent with the versatile lesion recognition by XPC that is required for successful NER.

  20. Cold and Heat Stress Diversely Alter Both Cauliflower Respiration and Distinct Mitochondrial Proteins Including OXPHOS Components and Matrix Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rurek, Michał; Czołpińska, Magdalena; Pawłowski, Tomasz Andrzej; Krzesiński, Włodzimierz; Spiżewski, Tomasz

    2018-01-01

    Complex proteomic and physiological approaches for studying cold and heat stress responses in plant mitochondria are still limited. Variations in the mitochondrial proteome of cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) curds after cold and heat and after stress recovery were assayed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D PAGE) in relation to mRNA abundance and respiratory parameters. Quantitative analysis of the mitochondrial proteome revealed numerous stress-affected protein spots. In cold, major downregulations in the level of photorespiratory enzymes, porine isoforms, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and some low-abundant proteins were observed. In contrast, carbohydrate metabolism enzymes, heat-shock proteins, translation, protein import, and OXPHOS components were involved in heat response and recovery. Several transcriptomic and metabolic regulation mechanisms are also suggested. Cauliflower plants appeared less susceptible to heat; closed stomata in heat stress resulted in moderate photosynthetic, but only minor respiratory impairments, however, photosystem II performance was unaffected. Decreased photorespiration corresponded with proteomic alterations in cold. Our results show that cold and heat stress not only operate in diverse modes (exemplified by cold-specific accumulation of some heat shock proteins), but exert some associations at molecular and physiological levels. This implies a more complex model of action of investigated stresses on plant mitochondria. PMID:29547512

  1. Cyclosporin A inhibits nucleotide excision repair via downregulation of the xeroderma pigmentosum group A and G proteins, which is mediated by calcineurin inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuschal, Christiane; Thoms, Kai-Martin; Boeckmann, Lars; Laspe, Petra; Apel, Antje; Schön, Michael P; Emmert, Steffen

    2011-10-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) inhibits nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells, a process that contributes to the skin cancer proneness in organ transplant patients. We investigated the mechanisms of CsA-induced NER reduction by assessing all xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) genes (XPA-XPG). Western blot analyses revealed that XPA and XPG protein expression was reduced in normal human GM00637 fibroblasts exposed to 0.1 and 0.5 μm CsA. Interestingly, the CsA treatment reduced XPG, but not XPA, mRNA expression. Calcineurin knockdown in GM00637 fibroblasts using RNAi led to similar results suggesting that calcineurin-dependent signalling is involved in XPA and XPG protein regulation. CsA-induced reduction in NER could be complemented by the overexpression of either XPA or XPG protein. Likewise, XPA-deficient fibroblasts with stable overexpression of XPA (XP2OS-pCAH19WS) did not show the inhibitory effect of CsA on NER. In contrast, XPC-deficient fibroblasts overexpressing XPC showed CsA-reduced NER. Our data indicate that the CsA-induced inhibition of NER is a result of downregulation of XPA and XPG protein in a calcineurin-dependent manner. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Accumulation of small heat shock proteins, including mitochondrial HSP22, induced by oxidative stress and adaptive response in tomato cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banzet, N.; Richaud, C.; Deveaux, Y.; Kazmaier, M.; Gagnon, J.; Triantaphylides, C.

    1998-01-01

    Changes in gene expression, by application of H2O2, O2.- generating agents (methyl viologen, digitonin) and gamma irradiation to tomato suspension cultures, were investigated and compared to the well-described heat shock response. Two-dimensional gel protein mapping analyses gave the first indication that at least small heat shock proteins (smHSP) accumulated in response to application of H2O2 and gamma irradiation, but not to O2.- generating agents. While some proteins seemed to be induced specifically by each treatment, only part of the heat shock response was observed. On the basis of Northern hybridization experiments performed with four heterologous cDNA, corresponding to classes I-IV of pea smHSP, it could be concluded that significant amounts of class I and II smHSP mRNA are induced by H2O2 and by irradiation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that in plants some HSP genes are inducible by oxidative stresses, as in micro-organisms and other eukaryotic cells. HSP22, the main stress protein that accumulates following H2O2 action or gamma irradiation, was also purified. Sequence homology of amino terminal and internal sequences, and immunoreactivity with Chenopodium rubrum mitochondrial smHSP antibody, indicated that the protein belongs to the recently discovered class of plant mitochondrial smHSP. Heat shock or a mild H2O2 pretreatment was also shown to lead to plant cell protection against oxidative injury. Therefore, the synthesis of these stress proteins can be considered as an adaptive mechanism in which mitochondrial protection could be essential

  3. C. elegans ring finger protein RNF-113 is involved in interstrand DNA crosslink repair and interacts with a RAD51C homolog.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyojin Lee

    Full Text Available The Fanconi anemia (FA pathway recognizes interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICLs and contributes to their conversion into double-strand DNA breaks, which can be repaired by homologous recombination. Seven orthologs of the 15 proteins associated with Fanconi anemia are functionally conserved in the model organism C. elegans. Here we report that RNF-113, a ubiquitin ligase, is required for RAD-51 focus formation after inducing ICLs in C. elegans. However, the formation of foci of RPA-1 or FCD-2/FANCD2 in the FA pathway was not affected by depletion of RNF-113. Nevertheless, the RPA-1 foci formed did not disappear with time in the depleted worms, implying serious defects in ICL repair. As a result, RNF-113 depletion increased embryonic lethality after ICL treatment in wild-type worms, but it did not increase the ICL-induced lethality of rfs-1/rad51C mutants. In addition, the persistence of RPA-1 foci was suppressed in doubly-deficient rnf-113;rfs-1 worms, suggesting that there is an epistatic interaction between the two genes. These results lead us to suggest that RNF-113 and RFS-1 interact to promote the displacement of RPA-1 by RAD-51 on single-stranded DNA derived from ICLs.

  4. Search for novel remedies to augment radiation resistance of inhabitants of Fukushima and Chernobyl disasters: identifying DNA repair protein XRCC4 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mao-Feng; Chen, Hsin-Yi; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Lui, Shu-Hui; Chen, Chih-Yi; Chen, Calvin Yu-Chian

    2011-10-01

    Two nuclear plant disasters occurring within a span of 25 years threaten health and genome integrity both in Fukushima and Chernobyl. Search for remedies capable of enhancing DNA repair efficiency and radiation resistance in humans appears to be a urgent problem for now. XRCC4 is an important enhancer in promoting repair pathway triggered by DNA double-strand break (DSB). In the context of radiation therapy, active XRCC4 could reduce DSB-mediated apoptotic effect on cancer cells. Hence, developing XRCC4 inhibitors could possibly enhance radiotherapy outcomes. In this study, we screened traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) database, TCM Database@Taiwan, and have identified three potent inhibitor agents against XRCC4. Through molecular dynamics simulation, we have determined that the protein-ligand interactions were focused at Lys188 on chain A and Lys187 on chain B. Intriguingly, the hydrogen bonds for all three ligands fluctuated frequently but were held at close approximation. The pi-cation interactions and ionic interactions mediated by o-hydroxyphenyl and carboxyl functional groups respectively have been demonstrated to play critical roles in stabilizing binding conformations. Based on these results, we reported the identification of potential radiotherapy enhancers from TCM. We further characterized the key binding elements for inhibiting the XRCC4 activities.

  5. Persistence of Repair Proteins at Unrepaired DNA Damage Distinguishes Diseases with ERCC2 (XPD) Mutations: Cancer-Prone Xeroderma Pigmentosum vs. Non-Cancer-Prone Trichothiodystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Jennifer; Ueda, Takahiro; Oh, Kyu-Seon; Imoto, Kyoko; Tamura, Deborah; Jagdeo, Jared; Khan, Sikandar G.; Nadem, Carine; DiGiovanna, John J.; Kraemer, Kenneth H.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) have a 1,000-fold increase in ultraviolet (UV)-induced skin cancers while trichothiodystrophy (TTD) patients, despite mutations in the same genes, ERCC2 (XPD) or ERCC3 (XPB), are cancer-free. Unlike XP cells, TTD cells have a nearly normal rate of removal of UV-induced 6-4 photoproducts (6-4PP) in their DNA and low levels of the basal transcription factor, TFIIH. We examined seven XP, TTD, and XP/TTD complex patients and identified mutations in the XPD gene. We discovered large differences in nucleotide excision repair (NER) protein recruitment to sites of localized UV damage in TTD cells compared to XP or normal cells. XPC protein was rapidly localized in all cells. XPC was redistributed in TTD, and normal cells by 3 hr postirradiation, but remained localized in XP cells at 24-hr postirradiation. In XP cells recruitment of other NER proteins (XPB, XPD, XPG, XPA, and XPF) was also delayed and persisted at 24 hr (p < 0.001). In TTD cells with defects in the XPD, XPB, or GTF2H5 (TTDA) genes, in contrast, recruitment of these NER proteins was reduced compared to normals at early time points (p < 0.001) and remained low at 24 hr postirradiation. These data indicate that in XP persistence of NER proteins at sites of unrepaired DNA damage is associated with greatly increased skin cancer risk possibly by blockage of translesion DNA synthesis. In contrast, in TTD, low levels of unstable TFIIH proteins do not accumulate at sites of unrepaired photoproducts and may permit normal translesion DNA synthesis without increased skin cancer. PMID:18470933

  6. Effect of point substitutions within the minimal DNA-binding domain of xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein on interaction with DNA intermediates of nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltseva, E A; Krasikova, Y S; Naegeli, H; Lavrik, O I; Rechkunova, N I

    2014-06-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum factor A (XPA) is one of the key proteins in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) process. The effects of point substitutions in the DNA-binding domain of XPA (positively charged lysine residues replaced by negatively charged glutamate residues: XPA K204E, K179E, K141E, and tandem mutant K141E/K179E) on the interaction of the protein with DNA structures modeling intermediates of the damage recognition and pre-incision stages in NER were analyzed. All these mutations decreased the affinity of the protein to DNA, the effect depending on the substitution and the DNA structure. The mutant as well as wild-type proteins bind with highest efficiency partly open damaged DNA duplex, and the affinity of the mutants to this DNA is reduced in the order: K204E > K179E > K141E = K141/179E. For all the mutants, decrease in DNA binding efficiency was more pronounced in the case of full duplex and single-stranded DNA than with bubble-DNA structure, the difference between protein affinities to different DNA structures increasing as DNA binding activity of the mutant decreased. No effect of the studied XPA mutations on the location of the protein on the partially open DNA duplex was observed using photoinduced crosslinking with 5-I-dUMP in different positions of the damaged DNA strand. These results combined with earlier published data suggest no direct correlation between DNA binding and activity in NER for these XPA mutants.

  7. Deficiency of Double-Strand DNA Break Repair Does Not Impair Mycobacterium tuberculosis Virulence in Multiple Animal Models of Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Heaton, Brook E.; Barkan, Daniel; Bongiorno, Paola; Karakousis, Petros C.; Glickman, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persistence within its human host requires mechanisms to resist the effector molecules of host immunity, which exert their bactericidal effects through damaging pathogen proteins, membranes, and DNA. Substantial evidence indicates that bacterial pathogens, including M. tuberculosis, require DNA repair systems to repair the DNA damage inflicted by the host during infection, but the role of double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair systems is unclear. Double-strand DNA bre...

  8. HHR23B, a human RAD23 homolog, stimulates XPC protein in nucleotide excision repair in vitro.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Sugasawa (Kaoru); C. Masutani (Chikahide); A. Uchida; T. Maekawa; P.J. van der Spek (Peter); D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); F. Hanaoka (Fumio)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractA protein complex which specifically complements defects of XP-C cell extracts in vitro was previously purified to near homogeneity from HeLa cells. The complex consists of two tightly associated proteins: the XPC gene product and HHR23B, one of two human homologs of the Saccharomyces

  9. MSH3 mismatch repair protein regulates sensitivity to cytotoxic drugs and a histone deacetylase inhibitor in human colon carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Myung Park

    Full Text Available MSH3 is a DNA mismatch repair (MMR gene that undergoes frequent somatic mutation in colorectal cancers (CRCs with MMR deficiency. MSH3, together with MSH2, forms the MutSβ heteroduplex that interacts with interstrand cross-links induced by drugs such as cisplatin. To date, the impact of MSH3 on chemosensitivity is unknown.We utilized isogenic HCT116 (MLH1-/MSH3- cells where MLH1 is restored by transfer of chromosome 3 (HCT116+ch3 and also MSH3 by chromosome 5 (HCT116+3+5. We generated HCT116+3+5, SW480 (MLH1+/MSH3+ and SW48 (MLH1-/MSH3+ cells with shRNA knockdown of MSH3. Cells were treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, SN-38, oxaliplatin, or the histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor PCI-24781 and cell viability, clonogenic survival, DNA damage and apoptosis were analyzed.MSH3-deficient vs proficient CRC cells showed increased sensitivity to the irinotecan metabolite SN-38 and to oxaliplatin, but not 5-FU, as shown in assays for apoptosis and clonogenic survival. In contrast, suppression of MLH1 attenuated the cytotoxic effect of 5-FU, but did not alter sensitivity to SN-38 or oxaliplatin. The impact of MSH3 knockdown on chemosensitivity to SN-38 and oxaliplatin was maintained independent of MLH1 status. In MSH3-deficient vs proficient cells, SN-38 and oxaliplatin induced higher levels of phosphorylated histone H2AX and Chk2, and similar results were found in MLH1-proficient SW480 cells. MSH3-deficient vs proficient cells showed increased 53BP1 nuclear foci after irradiation, suggesting that MSH3 can regulate DNA double strand break (DSB repair. We then utilized PCI-24781 that interferes with homologous recombination (HR indicated by a reduction in Rad51 expression. The addition of PCI-24781 to oxaliplatin enhanced cytotoxicity to a greater extent compared to either drug alone.MSH3 status can regulate the DNA damage response and extent of apoptosis induced by chemotherapy. The ability of MSH3 to regulate chemosensitivity was independent of MLH1

  10. DNA repair in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regan, J.D.; Carrier, W.L.; Kusano, I.; Furuno-Fukushi, I.; Dunn, W.C. Jr.; Francis, A.A.; Lee, W.H.

    1982-01-01

    Our primary objective is to elucidate the molecular events in human cells when cellular macromolecules such as DNA are damaged by radiation or chemical agents. We study and characterize (i) the sequence of DNA repair events, (ii) the various modalities of repair, (iii) the genetic inhibition of repair due to mutation, (iv) the physiological inhibition of repair due to mutation, (v) the physiological inhibition of repair due to biochemical inhibitors, and (vi) the genetic basis of repair. Our ultimate goals are to (i) isolate and analyze the repair component of the mutagenic and/or carcinogenic event in human cells, and (ii) elucidate the magnitude and significance of this repair component as it impinges on the practical problems of human irradiation or exposure to actual or potential chemical mutagens and carcinogens. The significance of these studies lies in (i) the ubiquitousness of repair (most organisms, including man, have several complex repair systems), (ii) the belief that mutagenic and carcinogenic events may arise only from residual (nonrepaired) lesions or that error-prone repair systems may be the major induction mechanisms of the mutagenic or carcinogenic event, and (iii) the clear association of repair defects and highly carcinogenic disease states in man [xeroderma pigmentosum (XP)

  11. Involvement of mismatch repair proteins in adaptive responses induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine against {gamma}-induced genotoxicity in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Ayumi; Sakamoto, Yasuteru; Masumura, Kenichi; Honma, Masamitsu [Division of Genetics and Mutagenesis, National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan); Nohmi, Takehiko, E-mail: nohmi@nihs.go.jp [Division of Genetics and Mutagenesis, National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan)

    2011-08-01

    Highlights: {yields} Health effects of radiation should be evaluated in combination with chemicals. {yields} Here, we show that MNNG suppresses radiation-induced genotoxicity in human cells. {yields} Mismatch repair proteins play critical roles in the apparent adaptive responses. {yields} Chemical exposure may modulate radiation-induced genotoxicity in humans. - Abstract: As humans are exposed to a variety of chemical agents as well as radiation, health effects of radiation should be evaluated in combination with chemicals. To explore combined genotoxic effects of radiation and chemicals, we examined modulating effects of N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), a direct-acting methylating agent, against genotoxicity of {gamma}-radiation. Human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells and its mismatch-deficient derivative, i.e., MT1 cells, were treated with MNNG for 24 h before they were exposed to {gamma}-irradiation at a dose of 1.0 Gy, and the resulting genotoxicity was examined. In TK6 cells, the pretreatments with MNNG at low doses suppressed frequencies of the thymidine kinase (TK) gene mutation and micronucleus (MN) formation induced by {gamma}-irradiation and thus the dose responses of TK and MN assays were U-shaped along with the pretreatment doses of MNNG. In contrast, the genotoxic effects of MNNG and {gamma}-irradiation were additive in MT1 cells and the frequencies of TK mutations and MN induction increased along with the doses of MNNG. Apoptosis induced by {gamma}-radiation was suppressed by the pretreatments in TK6 cells, but not in MT1 cells. The expression of p53 was induced and cell cycle was delayed at G2/M phase in TK6, but not in MT1 cells, by the treatments with MNNG. These results suggest that pretreatments of MNNG at low doses suppress genotoxicity of {gamma}-radiation in human cells and also that mismatch repair proteins are involved in the apparent adaptive responses.

  12. Repairing fuel for reinsertion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krukshenk, A.

    1986-01-01

    Eqiupment for nuclear reactor fuel assembly repairing produced by Westinghouse and Brawn Bovery companies is described. Repair of failed fuel assemblies replacement of defect fuel elements gives a noticeable economical effect. Thus if the cost of a new fuel assembly is 450-500 thousand dollars, the replacement of one fuel element in it costs approximately 40-60 thousand dollars. In simple cases repairing includes either removal of failed fuel elements from a fuel assembly and its reinsertion with the rest of fuel elements into the reactor core (reactor refueling), or replacement of unfailed fuel elements from one fuel assembly to a new one (fuel assembly overhaul and reconditioning)

  13. Immunohistochemical null-phenotype for mismatch repair proteins in colonic carcinoma associated with concurrent MLH1 hypermethylation and MSH2 somatic mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Stadler, Zsofia K; Zhang, Liying; Weiser, Martin R; Basturk, Olca; Hechtman, Jaclyn F; Vakiani, Efsevia; Saltz, Lenard B; Klimstra, David S; Shia, Jinru

    2018-04-01

    Microsatellite instability, a well-established driver pathway in colorectal carcinogenesis, can develop in both sporadic and hereditary conditions via different molecular alterations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. MMR protein immunohistochemistry (IHC) is currently widely used for the detection of MMR deficiency in solid tumors. The IHC test, however, can show varied staining patterns, posing challenges in the interpretation of the staining results in some cases. Here we report a case of an 80-year-old female with a colonic adenocarcinoma that exhibited an unusual "null" IHC staining pattern with complete loss of all four MMR proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2). This led to subsequent MLH1 methylation testing and next generation sequencing which demonstrated that the loss of all MMR proteins was associated with concurrent promoter hypermethylation of MLH1 and double somatic truncating mutations in MSH2. These molecular findings, in conjunction with the patient's age being 80 years and the fact that the patient had no personal or family cancer history, indicated that the MMR deficiency was highly likely sporadic in nature. Thus, the stringent Lynch syndrome type surveillance programs were not recommended to the patient and her family members. This case illustrates a rare but important scenario where a null IHC phenotype signifies complex underlying molecular alternations that bear clinical management implications, highlighting the need for recognition and awareness of such unusual IHC staining patterns.

  14. DNA mismatch repair protein MSH2 dictates cellular survival in response to low dose radiation in endometrial carcinoma cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, Lynn M

    2013-07-10

    DNA repair and G2-phase cell cycle checkpoint responses are involved in the manifestation of hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS). The low-dose radioresponse of MSH2 isogenic endometrial carcinoma cell lines was examined. Defects in cell cycle checkpoint activation and the DNA damage response in irradiated cells (0.2 Gy) were evaluated. HRS was expressed solely in MSH2+ cells and was associated with efficient activation of the early G2-phase cell cycle checkpoint. Maintenance of the arrest was associated with persistent MRE11, γH2AX, RAD51 foci at 2 h after irradiation. Persistent MRE11 and RAD51 foci were also evident 24 h after 0.2 Gy. MSH2 significantly enhances cell radiosensitivity to low dose IR.

  15. The human cyclin B1 protein modulates sensitivity of DNA mismatch repair deficient prostate cancer cell lines to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, L J; Rasmussen, M; Lützen, A; Bisgaard, H C; Singh, K K

    2000-05-25

    DNA damage caused by alkylating agents results in a G2 checkpoint arrest. DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficient cells are resistant to killing by alkylating agents and are unable to arrest the cell cycle in G2 phase after alkylation damage. We investigated the response of two MMR-deficient prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and LNCaP to the alkylating agent MNNG. Our studies reveal that DU145 cancer cells are more sensitive to killing by MNNG than LNCaP. Investigation of the underlying reasons for lower resistance revealed that the DU145 cells contain low endogenous levels of cyclin B1. We provide direct evidence that the endogenous level of cyclin B1 modulates the sensitivity of MMR-deficient prostate cancer cells to alkylating agents.

  16. The Impact of Hedgehog Signaling Pathway on DNA Repair Mechanisms in Human Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Erhong; Hanna, Ann; Samant, Rajeev S.; Shevde, Lalita A.

    2015-01-01

    Defined cellular mechanisms have evolved that recognize and repair DNA to protect the integrity of its structure and sequence when encountering assaults from endogenous and exogenous sources. There are five major DNA repair pathways: mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, direct repair, base excision repair and DNA double strand break repair (including non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination repair). Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is a feature of many cancer types. The Hh pathway has been documented to be indispensable for epithelial-mesenchymal transition, invasion and metastasis, cancer stemness, and chemoresistance. The functional transcription activators of the Hh pathway include the GLI proteins. Inhibition of the activity of GLI can interfere with almost all DNA repair types in human cancer, indicating that Hh/GLI functions may play an important role in enabling tumor cells to survive lethal types of DNA damage induced by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Thus, Hh signaling presents an important therapeutic target to overcome DNA repair-enabled multi-drug resistance and consequently increase chemotherapeutic response in the treatment of cancer

  17. The Impact of Hedgehog Signaling Pathway on DNA Repair Mechanisms in Human Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Erhong; Hanna, Ann; Samant, Rajeev S.; Shevde, Lalita A., E-mail: lsamant@uab.edu [Department of Pathology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, WTI320D, 1824 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States)

    2015-07-21

    Defined cellular mechanisms have evolved that recognize and repair DNA to protect the integrity of its structure and sequence when encountering assaults from endogenous and exogenous sources. There are five major DNA repair pathways: mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, direct repair, base excision repair and DNA double strand break repair (including non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination repair). Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is a feature of many cancer types. The Hh pathway has been documented to be indispensable for epithelial-mesenchymal transition, invasion and metastasis, cancer stemness, and chemoresistance. The functional transcription activators of the Hh pathway include the GLI proteins. Inhibition of the activity of GLI can interfere with almost all DNA repair types in human cancer, indicating that Hh/GLI functions may play an important role in enabling tumor cells to survive lethal types of DNA damage induced by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Thus, Hh signaling presents an important therapeutic target to overcome DNA repair-enabled multi-drug resistance and consequently increase chemotherapeutic response in the treatment of cancer.

  18. DNA mismatch repair proteins MLH1 and PMS2 can be imported to the nucleus by a classical nuclear import pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, Andrea C; Takeda, Agnes A S; Dreyer, Thiago R; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Kobe, Boštjan; Fontes, Marcos R M

    2018-03-01

    MLH1 and PMS2 proteins form the MutLα heterodimer, which plays a major role in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in humans. Mutations in MMR-related proteins are associated with cancer, especially with colon cancer. The N-terminal region of MutLα comprises the N-termini of PMS2 and MLH1 and, similarly, the C-terminal region of MutLα is composed by the C-termini of PMS2 and MLH1, and the two are connected by linker region. The nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) necessary for the nuclear transport of the two proteins are found in this linker region. However, the exact NLS sequences have been controversial, with different sequences reported, particularly for MLH1. The individual components are not imported efficiently, presumably due to their C-termini masking their NLSs. In order to gain insights into the nuclear transport of these proteins, we solved the crystal structures of importin-α bound to peptides corresponding to the supposed NLSs of MLH1 and PMS2 and performed isothermal titration calorimetry to study their binding affinities. Both putative MLH1 and PMS2 NLSs can bind to importin-α as monopartite NLSs, which is in agreement with some previous studies. However, MLH1-NLS has the highest affinity measured by a natural NLS peptide, suggesting a major role of MLH1 protein in nuclear import compared to PMS2. Finally, the role of MLH1 and PMS2 in the nuclear transport of the MutLα heterodimer is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  19. The HTLV-1 Tax protein binding domain of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4 includes the regulatory PSTAIRE helix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grassmann Ralph

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Tax oncoprotein of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is leukemogenic in transgenic mice and induces permanent T-cell growth in vitro. It is found in active CDK holoenzyme complexes from adult T-cell leukemia-derived cultures and stimulates the G1- to-S phase transition by activating the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK CDK4. The Tax protein directly and specifically interacts with CDK4 and cyclin D2 and binding is required for enhanced CDK4 kinase activity. The protein-protein contact between Tax and the components of the cyclin D/CDK complexes increases the association of CDK4 and its positive regulatory subunit cyclin D and renders the complex resistant to p21CIP inhibition. Tax mutants affecting the N-terminus cannot bind cyclin D and CDK4. Results To analyze, whether the N-terminus of Tax is capable of CDK4-binding, in vitro binding -, pull down -, and mammalian two-hybrid analyses were performed. These experiments revealed that a segment of 40 amino acids is sufficient to interact with CDK4 and cyclin D2. To define a Tax-binding domain and analyze how Tax influences the kinase activity, a series of CDK4 deletion mutants was tested. Different assays revealed two regions which upon deletion consistently result in reduced binding activity. These were isolated and subjected to mammalian two-hybrid analysis to test their potential to interact with the Tax N-terminus. These experiments concurrently revealed binding at the N- and C-terminus of CDK4. The N-terminal segment contains the PSTAIRE helix, which is known to control the access of substrate to the active cleft of CDK4 and thus the kinase activity. Conclusion Since the N- and C-terminus of CDK4 are neighboring in the predicted three-dimensional protein structure, it is conceivable that they comprise a single binding domain, which interacts with the Tax N-terminus.

  20. Hsp27, Hsp70 and mismatch repair proteins hMLH1 and hMSH2 expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy subjects and cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadin, Silvina Beatriz; Vargas-Roig, Laura M; Drago, Gisela; Ibarra, Jorge; Ciocca, Daniel R

    2007-07-08

    Mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency and higher expression levels of heat shock proteins (Hsps) have been implicated with drug resistance to topoisomerase II poisons (doxorubicin) and to platinum compounds (cisplatin). This study was designed to determine individual influences of doxorubicin and cisplatin treatment on the expression of Hsp27, Hsp70, hMLH1 and hMSH2 proteins and in the DNA damage status in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). In addition, we studied whether these proteins and the DNA damage correlated with the survival of cancer patients. PBLs from 10 healthy donors and 25 cancer patients (before and after three cycles of chemotherapy) were exposed to in vitro treatments: C (control), HS (heat shock at 42 degrees C), Do or Pt (doxorubicin or cisplatin alone), and HS+Do or HS+Pt (heat shock+doxorubicin or heat shock+cisplatin). PBLs were collected at time 0 (T0: immediately after drug treatment) and after 24h of repair (T24). Hsp27, Hsp70, hMLH1 and hMSH2 were studied by immunocytochemistry and the DNA damage by alkaline comet assay. Immunofluorescence studies and confocal microscopy revealed that hMLH1 and hMSH2 colocalized with Hsp27 and Hsp72 (inducible form of Hsp70). hMLH1 and hMSH2 were significantly induced by Pt and HS+Pt at T24 in cancer patients, but only modestly influenced by Do. Cancer patients presented higher basal expression of total and nuclear Hsp27 and Hsp70 than controls, and these proteins were also increased by HS, Do and HS+Do. The Hsp70 induction by Pt and HS+Pt was noted in cancer patients, especially nuclear Hsp70. In cancer patients, basal DNA damage was slightly higher than in healthy persons; and after Pt and HS+Pt treatments, DNA migration and number of apoptotic cells were higher than controls. Hsps accomplished a cytoprotective function in pre-chemotherapy PBLs (HS before Do or Pt), but not in post-chemotherapy samples. In Pt-treated patients the ratio N/C (nuclear/cytoplasmic) of Hsp27 was related to disease free survival

  1. Proteomic identification of Drosophila melanogaster male accessory gland proteins, including a pro-cathepsin and a soluble γ-glutamyl transpeptidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajid Mohammed

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Background In Drosophila melanogaster, the male seminal fluid contains proteins that are important for reproductive success. Many of these proteins are synthesised by the male accessory glands and are secreted into the accessory gland lumen, where they are stored until required. Previous studies on the identification of Drosophila accessory gland products have largely focused on characterisation of male-specific accessory gland cDNAs from D. melanogaster and, more recently, Drosophila simulans. In the present study, we have used a proteomics approach without any sex bias to identify proteins in D. melanogaster accessory gland secretions. Results Thirteen secreted accessory gland proteins, including seven new accessory gland proteins, were identified by 2D-gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry of tryptic fragments. They included protein-folding and stress-response proteins, a hormone, a lipase, a serpin, a cysteine-rich protein and two peptidases, a pro-enzyme form of a cathepsin K-like cysteine peptidase and a γ-glutamyl transpeptidase. Enzymatic studies established that accessory gland secretions contain a cysteine peptidase zymogen that can be activated at low pH. This peptidase may have a role in the processing of female and other male-derived proteins, but is unlikely to be involved in the processing of the sex peptide. γ-Glutamyl transpeptidases are type II integral membrane proteins; however, the identified AG γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT-1 is unusual in that it is predicted to be a soluble secreted protein, a prediction that is supported by biochemical evidence. GGT-1 is possibly involved in maintaining a protective redox environment for sperm. The strong γ-glutamyl transpeptidase activity found in the secretions provides an explanation for the observation that glutamic acid is the most abundant free amino acid in accessory gland secretions of D. melanogaster. Conclusion We have applied biochemical approaches, not used

  2. Proteomic identification of Drosophila melanogaster male accessory gland proteins, including a pro-cathepsin and a soluble gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Michael J; Rylett, Caroline M; Keen, Jeff N; Audsley, Neil; Sajid, Mohammed; Shirras, Alan D; Isaac, R Elwyn

    2006-05-02

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the male seminal fluid contains proteins that are important for reproductive success. Many of these proteins are synthesised by the male accessory glands and are secreted into the accessory gland lumen, where they are stored until required. Previous studies on the identification of Drosophila accessory gland products have largely focused on characterisation of male-specific accessory gland cDNAs from D. melanogaster and, more recently, Drosophila simulans. In the present study, we have used a proteomics approach without any sex bias to identify proteins in D. melanogaster accessory gland secretions. Thirteen secreted accessory gland proteins, including seven new accessory gland proteins, were identified by 2D-gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry of tryptic fragments. They included protein-folding and stress-response proteins, a hormone, a lipase, a serpin, a cysteine-rich protein and two peptidases, a pro-enzyme form of a cathepsin K-like cysteine peptidase and a gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase. Enzymatic studies established that accessory gland secretions contain a cysteine peptidase zymogen that can be activated at low pH. This peptidase may have a role in the processing of female and other male-derived proteins, but is unlikely to be involved in the processing of the sex peptide. gamma-Glutamyl transpeptidases are type II integral membrane proteins; however, the identified AG gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT-1) is unusual in that it is predicted to be a soluble secreted protein, a prediction that is supported by biochemical evidence. GGT-1 is possibly involved in maintaining a protective redox environment for sperm. The strong gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activity found in the secretions provides an explanation for the observation that glutamic acid is the most abundant free amino acid in accessory gland secretions of D. melanogaster. We have applied biochemical approaches, not used previously, to characterise

  3. The cAMP signaling system inhibits the repair of {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage by promoting Epac1-mediated proteasomal degradation of XRCC1 protein in human lung cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Eun-Ah [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Cancer Research Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Juhnn, Yong-Sung, E-mail: juhnn@snu.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Cancer Research Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system inhibits repair of {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system inhibits DNA damage repair by decreasing XRCC1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system decreases XRCC1 expression by promoting its proteasomal degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The promotion of XRCC1 degradation by cAMP signaling system is mediated by Epac1. -- Abstract: Cyclic AMP is involved in the regulation of metabolism, gene expression, cellular growth and proliferation. Recently, the cAMP signaling system was found to modulate DNA-damaging agent-induced apoptosis by regulating the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins and inhibitors of apoptosis. Thus, we hypothesized that the cAMP signaling may modulate DNA repair activity, and we investigated the effects of the cAMP signaling system on {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage repair in lung cancer cells. Transient expression of a constitutively active mutant of stimulatory G protein (G{alpha}sQL) or treatment with forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator, augmented radiation-induced DNA damage and inhibited repair of the damage in H1299 lung cancer cells. Expression of G{alpha}sQL or treatment with forskolin or isoproterenol inhibited the radiation-induced expression of the XRCC1 protein, and exogenous expression of XRCC1 abolished the DNA repair-inhibiting effect of forskolin. Forskolin treatment promoted the ubiquitin and proteasome-dependent degradation of the XRCC1 protein, resulting in a significant decrease in the half-life of the protein after {gamma}-ray irradiation. The effect of forskolin on XRCC1 expression was not inhibited by PKA inhibitor, but 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP, an Epac-selective cAMP analog, increased ubiquitination of XRCC1 protein and decreased XRCC1 expression. Knockdown of Epac1 abolished the effect of 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP and restored XRCC1 protein level following {gamma}-ray irradiation. From

  4. Targeting DNA repair systems in antitubercular drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minias, Alina; Brzostek, Anna; Dziadek, Jaroslaw

    2018-01-28

    Infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, are difficult to treat using currently available chemotherapeutics. Clinicians agree on the urgent need for novel drugs to treat tuberculosis. In this mini review, we summarize data that prompts the consideration of DNA repair-associated proteins as targets for the development of new antitubercular compounds. We discuss data, including gene expression data, that highlight the importance of DNA repair genes during the pathogenic cycle as well as after exposure to antimicrobials currently in use. Specifically, we report experiments on determining the essentiality of DNA repair-related genes. We report the availability of protein crystal structures and summarize discovered protein inhibitors. Further, we describe phenotypes of available gene mutants of M. tuberculosis and model organisms Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium smegmatis. We summarize experiments regarding the role of DNA repair-related proteins in pathogenesis and virulence performed both in vitro and in vivo during the infection of macrophages and animals. We detail the role of DNA repair genes in acquiring mutations, which influence the rate of drug resistance acquisition. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. DNA repair deficiency in neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna V.

    2011-01-01

    Deficiency in repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders. Many recent experimental results indicate that the post-mitotic neurons are particularly prone to accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions potentially leading to progressive...... neurodegeneration. Nucleotide excision repair is the cellular pathway responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA damage and deficiency in such repair is found in a number of diseases with neurodegenerative phenotypes, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome. The main pathway for repairing oxidative...... base lesions is base excision repair, and such repair is crucial for neurons given their high rates of oxygen metabolism. Mismatch repair corrects base mispairs generated during replication and evidence indicates that oxidative DNA damage can cause this pathway to expand trinucleotide repeats, thereby...

  6. Emerging Importance of Helicases in Plant Stress Tolerance: Characterization of Oryza sativa Repair Helicase XPB2 Promoter and Its Functional Validation in Tobacco under Multiple Stresses

    OpenAIRE

    Raikwar, Shailendra; Srivastava, Vineet K.; Gill, Sarvajeet S.; Tuteja, Renu; Tuteja, Narendra

    2015-01-01

    Genetic material always remains at the risk of spontaneous or induced damage which challenges the normal functioning of DNA molecule, thus, DNA repair is vital to protect the organisms against genetic damage. Helicases, the unique molecular motors, are emerged as prospective molecules to engineer stress tolerance in plants and are involved in nucleic acid metabolism including DNA repair. The repair helicase, XPB is an evolutionary conserved protein present in different organisms, including pl...

  7. Hsp90: A New Player in DNA Repair?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Pennisi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 is an evolutionary conserved molecular chaperone that, together with Hsp70 and co-chaperones makes up the Hsp90 chaperone machinery, stabilizing and activating more than 200 proteins, involved in protein homeostasis (i.e., proteostasis, transcriptional regulation, chromatin remodeling, and DNA repair. Cells respond to DNA damage by activating complex DNA damage response (DDR pathways that include: (i cell cycle arrest; (ii transcriptional and post-translational activation of a subset of genes, including those associated with DNA repair; and (iii triggering of programmed cell death. The efficacy of the DDR pathways is influenced by the nuclear levels of DNA repair proteins, which are regulated by balancing between protein synthesis and degradation as well as by nuclear import and export. The inability to respond properly to either DNA damage or to DNA repair leads to genetic instability, which in turn may enhance the rate of cancer development. Multiple components of the DNA double strand breaks repair machinery, including BRCA1, BRCA2, CHK1, DNA-PKcs, FANCA, and the MRE11/RAD50/NBN complex, have been described to be client proteins of Hsp90, which acts as a regulator of the diverse DDR pathways. Inhibition of Hsp90 actions leads to the altered localization and stabilization of DDR proteins after DNA damage and may represent a cell-specific and tumor-selective radiosensibilizer. Here, the role of Hsp90-dependent molecular mechanisms involved in cancer onset and in the maintenance of the genome integrity is discussed and highlighted.

  8. Laparoscopic repair of postoperative perineal hernia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Perineal hernias are infrequent complications following abdominoperineal operations. Various approaches have been described for repair of perineal hernias including open transabdominal, transperineal or combined abdominoperineal repairs. The use of laparoscopic transabdominal repair of perineal hernias is not well-described. We present a case report demonstrating the benefits of laparoscopic repair of perineal hernia following previous laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection (APR) using a nonabsorbable mesh to repair the defect. We have demonstrated that the use of laparoscopy with repair of the pelvic floor defect using a non absorbable synthetic mesh offers an excellent alternative with many potential advantages over open transabdominal and transperineal repairs.

  9. Poly(lactic-co-glycolide) polymer constructs cross-linked with human BMP-6 and VEGF protein significantly enhance rat mandible defect repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anusuya; Fishero, Brian A; Christophel, J Jared; Li, Ching-Ju; Kohli, Nikita; Lin, Yong; Dighe, Abhijit S; Cui, Quanjun

    2016-04-01

    We have previously shown that the combined delivery of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP-6) induces significantly more bone formation than that induced by the delivery of any single factor or a combination of any two factors. We now determine whether the exogenous addition of VEGF and BMP-6 is sufficient for bone healing when MSCs are not provided. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLAGA) microsphere-based three-dimensional scaffolds (P) were fabricated by thermal sintering of PLAGA microspheres. The scaffolds were chemically cross-linked with 200 ng recombinant human VEGF (P(VEGF)) or BMP-6 (P(BMP-6)) or both (P(VEGF+BMP-6)) by the EDC-NHS-MES method. Release of the proteins from the scaffolds was detected for 21 days in vitro which confirmed their comparable potential to supply the proteins in vivo. The scaffolds were delivered to a critical-sized mandibular defect created in 32 Sprague Dawley rats. Significant bone regeneration was observed only in rats with P(VEGF+BMP-6) scaffolds at weeks 2, 8 and 12 as revealed by micro-computer tomography. Vascular ingrowth was higher in the P(VEGF+BMP-6) group as seen by microfil imaging than in other groups. Trichrome staining revealed that a soft callus formed in P(VEGF), P(BMP-6) and P(VEGF+BMP-6) but not in P. MSCs isolated from rat femurs displayed expression of the bone-specific marker osteocalcin when cultured with P(VEGF), P(BMP-6), or P(VEGF+BMP-6) but not with P. Robust mineralization and increased alkaline phosphatase gene expression were seen in rat MSCs when cultured on P(VEGF+BMP-6) but not on P, P(VEGF), or P(BMP-6). Thus, unlike the delivery of VEGF or BMP-6 alone, the combined delivery of VEGF and BMP-6 to the bone defect significantly enhanced bone repair through the enhancement of angiogenesis and the differentiation of endogenously recruited MSCs into the bone repair site.

  10. Post-Translational Regulation of Polycystin-2 Protein Expression as a Novel Mechanism of Cholangiocyte Reaction and Repair from Biliary Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirli, Carlo; Villani, Ambra; Mariotti, Valeria; Fabris, Luca; Fiorotto, Romina; Strazzabosco, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Polycystin-2 (PC2 /TRPP2), a member of the transient receptor potential channels (TRP) family, is a non-selective calcium channel. Mutations in PC2/TRPP2 are associated with Polycystic Liver Diseases. PC2-defective cholangiocytes shows increased production of cAMP, PKA-dependent activation of the ERK1/2 pathway, HIF1α-mediated VEGF production, and stimulation of cyst growth and progression. Activation of the ERK/HIF1α/VEGF pathway in cholangiocytes plays a key role during repair from biliary damage. We hypothesized that PC2 levels are modulated during biliary damage/repair, resulting in activation of the ERK/HIF1α/VEGF pathway. Results PC2 protein expression, but not its gene expression, was significantly reduced in mouse livers with biliary damage (Mdr2−/−-KO, bile duct ligation, DDC-treatment). Treatment of colangiocytes with pro-inflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide (NO) donors and ER stressors), increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation, HIF1α transcriptional activity, secretion of VEGF, VEGFR2 phosphorylation and downregulated PC2 protein expression without affecting PC2 gene expression. Expression of Herp and NEK, ubiquitin-like proteins that promote proteosomal PC2 degradation was increased. Pre-treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 restored the expression of PC2 in cells treated with cytokines but not in cells treated with NO donors or with ER stressors. In these conditions, PC2 degradation was instead inhibited by interfering with the autophagy pathway. Treatment of DDC-mice and of Mdr2−/−-mice with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, restored PC2 expression and significantly reduced the ductular reaction, fibrosis and p-ERK1/2. In conclusion, in response to biliary damage, PC2 expression is modulated post-translationally by the proteasome or the autophagy pathways. PC2-dowregulation is associated with activation of ERK1/2 and increase of HIF1α-mediated VEGF secretion. Treatments able to restore PC2 expression and to reduce ductular reaction

  11. Profile of serum alkaline phosphatase after inoculation of mononuclear cells and bone morphogenetic protein in the repair of osteochondral defects in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Augusto de Souza

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, serum alkaline phosphatase activity was measured in response to the repair of osteochondral defects in twenty-four New Zealand rabbits. The animals were divided into three groups: a control (GC, those treated with bone marrow mononuclear cells (GCM and those that received mononuclear cells with autologous bone morphogenetic protein (BMP + GCM. After exposing the trochlear groove of the left stifle joint, a wedge-shaped segment was removed. Later, the defect was filled with an osteochondral autograft preserved in 98% glycerin. For the GC group, only the bone graft was performed. For the GCM, in addition to the graft, 2x106 seed mononuclear cells were implanted. For the GCM + BMP, the same number of cells, associated with 1μg of bone morphogenetic protein, were intraarticularly administered. The osteoblastic response was measured by analyzing the serum alkaline phosphatase on day 0 (preoperative 3, 15, 30, and 45 after surgery, and by radiographic examinations. Analysis of variance in randomized blocks, factorial and Tukey’s test (p = 0.05 were made. The overall mean GCM was superior to the other groups and the highest rates were among the 15th and 45th days postoperatively. The discrepancy in values between individuals of the same group casts doubts on the veracity of the test.

  12. Studying repair of a single protein-bound nick in vivo using the Flp-nick system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ida; Andersen, Anni Hangaard; Bjergbæk, Lotte

    2012-01-01

    The Flp-nick system is a simple in vivo system developed for studying the cellular responses to a protein-bound nick at a single genomic site in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Flp-nick system takes advantage of a mutant Flp recombinase that can introduce a nick at a specific Flp ...

  13. Meningocele repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is surgery to repair birth defects of the spine and spinal membranes. Meningocele and myelomeningocele ... is covered by a sterile dressing. Your child may then be transferred to a neonatal intensive ...

  14. A study of everyday repair: informing interaction design

    OpenAIRE

    Maestri, Leah Adriana

    2012-01-01

    Repair is typically seen in design as the restoration of broken objects to their original state. Repair by non-experts, or everyday repair, can often lead to novel forms of repair resulting in the creative repurposing of objects that are often unforeseen by designers. Using a grounded theory approach, this study describes key aspects of repair including: the techniques non-experts employ for repairing their objects; the motivations that prompt acts of repair; and the outcomes that result fr...

  15. Sebaceous neoplasms and the immunoprofile of mismatch-repair proteins as a screening target for syndromic cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boennelycke, Marie; Thomsen, Birthe M; Holck, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    (SAs) and 6 sebaceous carcinomas (SCs) were accrued. The expression of MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 was recorded. MLH1-deficient cases were tested for p16 status. RESULTS: Eighteen (56%) of the 32 specimens with SA or SC displayed MMR-protein deficiency, comprising 17 (65.4%) SAs (MSH2/MSH6 loss in 12......, MLH1/PMS2 loss in 3, MSH6 loss only in 2 cases) and 1 (16.7%) SC (MLH1/PMS2 loss). All 4 MLH1 deficient cases were p16-positive. CONCLUSION: A substantial proportion of sebaceous neoplasms were MMR-protein deficient and thus likely MTS candidates. Given the low prevalence of sebaceous neoplasms...

  16. Bi-directional routing of DNA mismatch repair protein human exonuclease 1 to replication foci and DNA double strand breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liberti, Sascha E; Andersen, Sofie Dabros; Wang, Jing

    2011-01-01

    (PIP-box) region on hEXO1 located in its COOH-terminal ((788)QIKLNELW(795)). This motif is essential for PCNA binding and co-localization during S-phase. Recruitment of hEXO1 to DNA DSB sites is dependent on the MMR protein hMLH1. We show that two distinct hMLH1 interaction regions of hEXO1 (residues...

  17. Molecular network including eIF1AX, RPS7, and 14-3-3γ regulates protein translation and cell proliferation in bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Cuiping; Luo, Chaochao; Qu, Bo; Khudhair, Nagam; Gu, Xinyu; Zang, Yanli; Wang, Chunmei; Zhang, Na; Li, Qingzhang; Gao, Xuejun

    2014-12-15

    14-3-3γ, an isoform of the 14-3-3 protein family, was proved to be a positive regulator of mTOR pathway. Here, we analyzed the function of 14-3-3γ in protein synthesis using bovine mammary epithelial cells (BMECs). We found that 14-3-3γ interacted with eIF1AX and RPS7 by 14-3-3γ coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight/time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) peptide mass fingerprinting analysis. These interactions of 14-3-3γ with eIF1AX and RPS7 were further confirmed by colocalization and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis. We also found that methionine could promote protein synthesis and trigger the protein expression levels of 14-3-3γ, eIF1AX and RPS7. Analysis of overexpression and inhibition of 14-3-3γ confirmed that it positively affected the protein expression levels of eIF1AX, RPS7, Stat5 and mTOR pathway to promote protein synthesis and cell proliferation in BMECs. We further showed that overexpression of eIF1AX and RPS7 also triggered protein translation and cell proliferation. From these results, we conclude that molecular network including eIF1AX, RPS7, and 14-3-3γ regulates protein translation and cell proliferation in BMECs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Co-expression of antioxidant enzymes with expression of p53, DNA repair, and heat shock protein genes in the gamma ray-irradiated hermaphroditic fish Kryptolebias marmoratus larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, Jae-Sung [Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bo-Mi; Kim, Ryeo-Ok [Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Jung Soo [Pathology Team, National Fisheries Research and Development Institute, Busan 619-902 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Il-Chan [Division of Life Sciences, Korea Polar Research Institute, Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young-Mi, E-mail: ymlee70@smu.ac.kr [Department of Green Life Science, College of Convergence, Sangmyung University, Seoul 110-743 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Seong, E-mail: jslee2@hanyang.ac.kr [Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: •Novel identification of DNA repair-related genes in fish. •Investigation of whole expression profiling of DNA repair genes upon gamma radiation. •Analysis of effects of gamma radiation on antioxidant system and cell stress proteins. •Usefulness of verification of pathway-based profiling for mechanistic understanding. -- Abstract: To investigate effects of gamma ray irradiation in the hermaphroditic fish, Kryptolebias marmoratus larvae, we checked expression of p53, DNA repair, and heat shock protein genes with several antioxidant enzyme activities by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and biochemical methods in response to different doses of gamma radiation. As a result, the level of gamma radiation-induced DNA damage was initiated after 4 Gy of radiation, and biochemical and molecular damage became substantial from 8 Gy. In particular, several DNA repair mechanism-related genes were significantly modulated in the 6 Gy gamma radiation-exposed fish larvae, suggesting that upregulation of such DNA repair genes was closely associated with cell survival after gamma irradiation. The mRNA expression of p53 and most hsps was also significantly upregulated at high doses of gamma radiation related to cellular damage. This finding indicates that gamma radiation can induce oxidative stress with associated antioxidant enzyme activities, and linked to modulation of the expression of DNA repair-related genes as one of the defense mechanisms against radiation damage. This study provides a better understanding of the molecular mode of action of defense mechanisms upon gamma radiation in fish larvae.

  19. Stress and DNA repair biology of the Fanconi anemia pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longerich, Simonne; Li, Jian; Xiong, Yong; Sung, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) represents a paradigm of rare genetic diseases, where the quest for cause and cure has led to seminal discoveries in cancer biology. Although a total of 16 FA genes have been identified thus far, the biochemical function of many of the FA proteins remains to be elucidated. FA is rare, yet the fact that 5 FA genes are in fact familial breast cancer genes and FA gene mutations are found frequently in sporadic cancers suggest wider applicability in hematopoiesis and oncology. Establishing the interaction network involving the FA proteins and their associated partners has revealed an intersection of FA with several DNA repair pathways, including homologous recombination, DNA mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, and translesion DNA synthesis. Importantly, recent studies have shown a major involvement of the FA pathway in the tolerance of reactive aldehydes. Moreover, despite improved outcomes in stem cell transplantation in the treatment of FA, many challenges remain in patient care. PMID:25237197

  20. International congress on DNA damage and repair: Book of abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    This document contains the abstracts of 105 papers presented at the Congress. Topics covered include the Escherichia coli nucleotide excision repair system, DNA repair in malignant transformations, defective DNA repair, and gene regulation. (TEM)

  1. International congress on DNA damage and repair: Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This document contains the abstracts of 105 papers presented at the Congress. Topics covered include the Escherichia coli nucleotide excision repair system, DNA repair in malignant transformations, defective DNA repair, and gene regulation

  2. DNA double strand break repair in mammalian cells: role of MRE11 and BLM proteins at the initiation of Non Homologous End Joining (NHEJ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabarz, Anastazja

    2011-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic lesions, which can lead to genetic rearrangements. Two pathways are responsible for repairing these lesions: homologous recombination (HR) and non homologous end joining (NHEJ). In our laboratory, an intrachromosomal substrate has been established in order to measure the efficiency and the fidelity of NHEJ in living cells (Guirouilh-Barbat 2004). This approach led us to identify a KU-independent alternative pathway, which uses micro homologies in the proximity of the junction to accomplish repair - the alternative NHEJ (Guirouilh-Barbat 2004, Guirouilh-Barbat et Rass 2007). The goal of my thesis consisted in identifying and characterising major actors of this pathway. In the absence of KU, alternative NHEJ would be initiated by ssDNA resection of damaged ends. We showed that the nuclease activity of MRE11 is necessary for this mechanism. MRE11 overexpression leads to a two fold stimulation of NHEJ efficiency, while the extinction of MRE11 by siRNA results in a two fold decrease. Our results demonstrate that the proteins RAD50 and CtIP act in the same pathway as MRE11. Moreover, in cells deficient for XRCC4, MIRIN - an inhibitor of the MRN complex - leads to a decrease in repair efficiency, implicating MRE11 in alternative NHEJ. We also showed that MRE11 can act in an ATM-dependent and independent manner (Rass et Grabarz Nat Struct Mol Biol 2009). The initiation of break resection needs to be pursued by a more extensive degradation of DNA, which is accomplished in yeast by the proteins Exo1 and Sgs1/Dna2. In human cells, in vitro studies have recently proposed a similar model of a two-step break resection. We chose to elucidate the role of one of the human homologs of Sgs1 - the RecQ helicase BLM - in the resection process. Our experiments show, that he absence of BLM decreases the efficiency of end joining by NHEJ, accompanied by an increase in error-prone events, especially long-range deletions (≥200 nt). This

  3. Mismatch Repair Proteins and Microsatellite Instability in Colorectal Carcinoma (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2): Histopathological and Immunohistochemical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismael, Nour El Hoda S; El Sheikh, Samar A; Talaat, Suzan M; Salem, Eman M

    2017-03-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Microsatellite instability (MSI) is detected in about 15% of all colorectal cancers. CRC with MSI has particular characteristics such as improved survival rates and better prognosis. They also have a distinct sensitivity to the action of chemotherapy. The aim of the study was to detect microsatellite instability in a cohort of colorectal cancer Egyptian patients using the immunohistochemical expression of mismatch repair proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2). Cases were divided into Microsatellite stable (MSS), Microsatellite unstable low (MSI-L) and Microsatellite unstable high (MSI-H). This Microsatellite stability status was correlated with different clinicopathological parameters. There was a statistically significant correlation between the age of cases, tumor site & grade and the microsatellite stability status. There was no statistically significant correlation between the gender of patients, tumor subtype, stage, mucoid change, necrosis, tumor borders, lymphocytic response, lymphovascular emboli and the microsatellite stability status. Testing for MSI should be done for all colorectal cancer patients, especially those younger than 50 years old, right sided and high-grade CRCs.

  4. Synergistic effects of dimethyloxallyl glycine and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 on repair of critical-sized bone defects in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xin; Liu, Yang; Ding, Zhen-Yu; Cao, Jia-Qing; Huang, Jing-Huan; Zhang, Jie-Yuan; Jia, Wei-Tao; Wang, Jing; Liu, Chang-Sheng; Li, Xiao-Lin

    2017-02-01

    In bone remodeling, osteogenesis is closely coupled to angiogenesis. Bone tissue engineering using multifunctional bioactive materials is a promising technique which has the ability to simultaneously stimulate osteogenesis and angiogenesis for repair of bone defects. We developed mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG)-doped poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx) composite scaffolds as delivery vehicle. Two bioactive molecules, dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG), a small-molecule angiogenic drug, and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2), an osteoinductive growth factor, were co-incorporated into the scaffold. The synergistic effects of DMOG and rhBMP-2 released in the composite scaffolds on osteogenic and angiogenic differentiation of hBMSCs were investigated using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Moreover, in vivo studies were conducted to observe bone regeneration and vascular formation of critical-sized bone defects in rats using micro-computed tomography, histological analyses, Microfil® perfusion, fluorescence labeling, and immunohistochemical analysis. The results showed that DMOG and rhBMP-2 released in the MBG-PHBHHx scaffolds did exert synergistic effects on the osteogenic and angiogenic differentiation of hBMSCs. Moreover, DMOG and rhBMP-2 produced significant increases in newly-formed bone and neovascularization of calvarial bone defects in rats. It is concluded that the co-delivery strategy of both rhBMP-2 and DMOG can significantly improve the critical-sized bone regeneration.

  5. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 with improved proof-reading enhances homology-directed repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato-Inui, Tomoko; Takahashi, Gou; Hsu, Szuyin; Miyaoka, Yuichiro

    2018-05-18

    Genome editing using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) predominantly induces non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), which generates random insertions or deletions, whereas homology-directed repair (HDR), which generates precise recombination products, is useful for wider applications. However, the factors that determine the ratio of HDR to NHEJ products after CRISPR/Cas9 editing remain unclear, and methods by which the proportion of HDR products can be increased have not yet been fully established. We systematically analyzed the HDR and NHEJ products after genome editing using various modified guide RNAs (gRNAs) and Cas9 variants with an enhanced conformational checkpoint to improve the fidelity at endogenous gene loci in HEK293T cells and HeLa cells. We found that these modified gRNAs and Cas9 variants were able to enhance HDR in both single-nucleotide substitutions and a multi-kb DNA fragment insertion. Our results suggest that the original CRISPR/Cas9 system from the bacterial immune system is not necessarily the best option for the induction of HDR in genome editing and indicate that the modulation of the kinetics of conformational checkpoints of Cas9 can optimize the HDR/NHEJ ratio.

  6. A protein diet score, including plant and animal protein, investigating the association with HbA1c and eGFR - the PREVIEW project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Grith; Sluik, Diewertje; Ritz, Christian

    2017-01-01

    with glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Analyses were based on three population studies included in the PREVIEW project (PREVention of diabetes through lifestyle Intervention and population studies in Europe and around the World): NQplus, Lifelines, and the Young Finns.......02 ± 0.01 mmol/mol, p eGFR in Lifelines (slope 0.17 ± 0.02 mL/min/1.73 m², p

  7. Outreach Materials for the Collision Repair Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Collision Repair Campaign offers outreach materials to help collision repair shops reduce toxic air exposure. Materials include a DVD, poster, training video, and materials in Spanish (materiales del outreach en español).

  8. Identification and characterization of novel ERC-55 interacting proteins: evidence for the existence of several ERC-55 splicing variants; including the cytosolic ERC-55-C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludvigsen, Maja; Jacobsen, Christian; Maunsbach, Arvid B; Honoré, Bent

    2009-12-01

    ERC-55, encoded from RCN2, is localized in the ER and belongs to the CREC protein family. ERC-55 is involved in various diseases and abnormal cell behavior, however, the function is not well defined and it has controversially been reported to interact with a cytosolic protein, the vitamin D receptor. We have used a number of proteomic techniques to further our functional understanding of ERC-55. By affinity purification, we observed interaction with a large variety of proteins, including those secreted and localized outside of the secretory pathway, in the cytosol and also in various organelles. We confirm the existence of several ERC-55 splicing variants including ERC-55-C localized in the cytosol in association with the cytoskeleton. Localization was verified by immunoelectron microscopy and sub-cellular fractionation. Interaction of lactoferrin, S100P, calcyclin (S100A6), peroxiredoxin-6, kininogen and lysozyme with ERC-55 was further studied in vitro by SPR experiments. Interaction of S100P requires [Ca(2+)] of approximately 10(-7) M or greater, while calcyclin interaction requires [Ca(2+)] of >10(-5) M. Interaction with peroxiredoxin-6 is independent of Ca(2+). Co-localization of lactoferrin, S100P and calcyclin with ERC-55 in the perinuclear area was analyzed by fluorescence confocal microscopy. The functional variety of the interacting proteins indicates a broad spectrum of ERC-55 activities such as immunity, redox homeostasis, cell cycle regulation and coagulation.

  9. Functional analysis of the RAD50/MRE11 protein complex through targeted disruption of the murine RAD50 genomic locus: implications for DNA double strand break repair. An astro research fellowship presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Michelle S.; Bladl, Anthony R.; Petrini, John H.J.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The products of the S. cerevisiae genes ScRAD50 and ScMRE11 act in a protein complex and are required for non-homologous end-joining, the predominant mechanism of DNA double strand break (dsb) repair in mammalian cells. Mutation of these genes results in sensitivity to ionizing radiation (IR), a defect in initiation of meiosis, increased and error-prone recombination during mitosis, and overall genomic instability. This resultant phenotype is reminiscent of that seen in mammalian syndromes of genomic instability such as ataxia-telangiectasia and Bloom syndrome, hallmarks of which are radiation sensitivity and predisposition to malignancy. The murine homologues to ScRAD50 and ScMRE11 have recently been identified; both demonstrate impressive primary sequence conservation with their yeast counterparts, and are expected to mediate conserved functions. The roles of muRAD50 in genomic maintenance and in dsb repair will be examined in two parts. The first will include a determination of normal muRAD50 expression patterns. Second, the effects of disruption of the muRAD50 gene will be assessed. A specific targeting event has introduced a conditional murad50 null mutation into the genome of murine embryonic stem (ES) cells. These mutant ES cells are being used to create mutant mice, thus allowing functional characterization of muRAD50 on both the cellular and organismic levels. Such analyses will contribute to the delineation of the mammalian dsb repair pathway and to the cellular response to IR, and will serve as a mammalian model system for genomic instability. Materials and Methods: Wild-type tissue expression patterns and protein-protein interactions were determined by standard biochemical techniques, including immunoprecipitation, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and Western blotting. Molecular cloning techniques were used to create the gene targeting vectors, which were designed to result in either a deletion of exon 1 (equivalent to a null

  10. The extracellular adherence protein (Eap) of Staphylococcus aureus inhibits wound healing by interfering with host defense and repair mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasopoulos, Athanasios N; Economopoulou, Matina; Orlova, Valeria V; Sobke, Astrid; Schneider, Darius; Weber, Holger; Augustin, Hellmut G; Eming, Sabine A; Schubert, Uwe; Linn, Thomas; Nawroth, Peter P; Hussain, Muzaffar; Hammes, Hans-Peter; Herrmann, Mathias; Preissner, Klaus T; Chavakis, Triantafyllos

    2006-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen interfering with host-cell functions. Impaired wound healing is often observed in S aureus-infected wounds, yet, the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. Here, we identify the extracellular adherence protein (Eap) of S aureus to be responsible for impaired wound healing. In a mouse wound-healing model wound closure was inhibited in the presence of wild-type S aureus and this effect was reversible when the wounds were incubated with an isogenic Eap-deficient strain. Isolated Eap also delayed wound closure. In the presence of Eap, recruitment of inflammatory cells to the wound site as well as neovascularization of the wound were prevented. In vitro, Eap significantly reduced intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1)-dependent leukocyte-endothelial interactions and diminished the consequent activation of the proinflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) in leukocytes associated with a decrease in expression of tissue factor. Moreover, Eap blocked alphav-integrin-mediated endothelial-cell migration and capillary tube formation, and neovascularization in matrigels in vivo. Collectively, the potent anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic properties of Eap provide an underlying mechanism that may explain the impaired wound healing in S aureus-infected wounds. Eap may also serve as a lead compound for new anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic therapies in several pathologies.

  11. Proteins of nucleotide and base excision repair pathways interact in mitochondria to protect from loss of subcutaneous fat, a hallmark of aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Kamenisch (York); M.I. Fousteri (Maria); J. Knoch (Jennifer); A.K. Von Thaler (Anna Katherina); B. Fehrenbacher (Birgit); H. Kato (Hiroki); T. Becker (Tim); M.E.T. Dollé (Martijn); R. Kuiper (Ruud); M. Majora (Marc); M. Schaller (Martin); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); H. van Steeg (Harry); M. Röcken (Martin); D. Rapaport (Doron); J. Krutmann (Jean); L.H.F. Mullenders (Leon); M. Berneburg (Mark)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractDefects in the DNA repair mechanism nucleotide excision repair (NER) may lead to tumors in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) or to premature aging with loss of subcutaneous fat in Cockayne syndrome (CS). Mutations of mitochondrial (mt)DNA play a role in aging, but a link between the

  12. Lack of Detection of Bt Sugarcane Cry1Ab and NptII DNA and Proteins in Sugarcane Processing Products Including Raw Sugar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Cheavegatti-Gianotto

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Brazil is the largest sugarcane producer and the main sugar exporter in the world. The industrial processes applied by Brazilian mills are very efficient in producing highly purified sugar and ethanol. Literature presents evidence of lack of DNA/protein in these products, regardless of the nature of sugarcane used as raw material. Recently CTNBio, the Brazilian biosafety authority, has approved the first biotechnology-derived sugarcane variety for cultivation, event CTC175-A, which expresses the Cry1Ab protein to control the sugarcane borer (Diatraea saccharalis. The event also expresses neomycin-phosphotransferase type II (NptII protein used as selectable marker during the transformation process. Because of the high purity of sugar and ethanol produced from genetically modified sugarcane, these end-products should potentially be classified as “pure substances, chemically defined,” by Brazilian Biosafety Law No. 11.105. If this classification is to be adopted, these substances are not considered as “GMO derivatives” and fall out of the scope of Law No. 11.105. In order to assess sugar composition and quality, we evaluate Cry1Ab and NptII expression in several sugarcane tissues and in several fractions from laboratory-scale processing of event CTC175-A for the presence of these heterologous proteins as well as for the presence of traces of recombinant DNA. The results of these studies show that CTC175-A presents high expression of Cry1Ab in leaves and barely detectable expression of heterologous proteins in stalks. We also evaluated the presence of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase protein and DNA in the fractions of the industrial processing of conventional Brazilian sugarcane cultivars. Results from both laboratory and industrial processing were concordant, demonstrating that DNA and protein are not detected in the clarified juice and downstream processed fractions, including ethanol and raw sugar, indicating that protein

  13. Motorcycle Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Jim; Bundy, Mike

    This motorcycle repair curriculum guide contains the following ten areas of study: brake systems, clutches, constant mesh transmissions, final drives, suspension, mechanical starting mechanisms, electrical systems, fuel systems, lubrication systems, and overhead camshafts. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction. Each instructional…

  14. Coordinating repair of oxidative DNA damage with transcription and replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, P.K.

    2003-01-01

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) preferentially removes DNA lesions from template strands of active genes. Defects in TCR, which acts both on lesions removed by nucleotide excision repair (NER) and on oxidative lesions removed by base excision repair (BER), underlie the fatal developmental disorder Cockayne syndrome. Although its detailed mechanism remains unknown, TCR involves recognition of a stalled RNA polymerase (RNAP), removal or remodeling of RNAP to allow access to the lesion, and recruitment of repair enzymes. At a minimum, these early steps require a non-enzymatic function of the multifunctional repair protein XPG, the CSB protein with ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling activity, and the TFIIH complex (including the XPB and XPD helicases) that is also required for basal transcription initiation and NER. XPG exists in the cell in a complex with TFIIH, and in vitro evidence has suggested that it interacts with CSB. To address the mechanism of TCR, we are characterizing protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions of XPG. We show that XPG preferentially binds to double-stranded DNA containing bubbles resembling in size the unpaired regions associated with transcription. Two distinct domains of XPG are required for the observed strong binding specificity and stability. XPG both interacts directly with CSB and synergistically binds with it to bubble DNA, and it strongly stimulates the bubble DNA-dependent ATPase activity of CSB. Significantly for TCR, XPG also interacts directly with RNAP II, binds both the protein and nucleic acid components (the R-loop) of a stalled RNA polymerase, and forms a ternary complex with CSB and the stalled RNAP. These results are consistent with the model that XPG and CSB jointly interact with the DNA/chromatin structure in the vicinity of the stalled transcriptional apparatus and with the transcriptional machinery itself to remodel the chromatin and either move or remodel the blocked RNA polymerase to expose the lesion

  15. The calcium-binding protein complex S100A8/A9 has a crucial role in controlling macrophage-mediated renal repair following ischemia/reperfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dessing, Mark C.; Tammaro, Alessandra; Pulskens, Wilco P.; Teske, Gwendoline J.; Butter, Loes M.; Claessen, Nike; van Eijk, Marco; van der Poll, Tom; Vogl, Thomas; Roth, Johannes; Florquin, Sandrine; Leemans, Jaklien C.

    2015-01-01

    Upon ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced injury, several damage-associated molecular patterns are expressed including the calcium-binding protein S100A8/A9 complex. S100A8/A9 can be recognized by Toll-like receptor-4 and its activation is known to deleteriously contribute to renal I/R-induced injury.

  16. batman Interacts with polycomb and trithorax group genes and encodes a BTB/POZ protein that is included in a complex containing GAGA factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucheux, M; Roignant, J-Y; Netter, S; Charollais, J; Antoniewski, C; Théodore, L

    2003-02-01

    Polycomb and trithorax group genes maintain the appropriate repressed or activated state of homeotic gene expression throughout Drosophila melanogaster development. We have previously identified the batman gene as a Polycomb group candidate since its function is necessary for the repression of Sex combs reduced. However, our present genetic analysis indicates functions of batman in both activation and repression of homeotic genes. The 127-amino-acid Batman protein is almost reduced to a BTB/POZ domain, an evolutionary conserved protein-protein interaction domain found in a large protein family. We show that this domain is involved in the interaction between Batman and the DNA binding GAGA factor encoded by the Trithorax-like gene. The GAGA factor and Batman codistribute on polytene chromosomes, coimmunoprecipitate from nuclear embryonic and larval extracts, and interact in the yeast two-hybrid assay. Batman, together with the GAGA factor, binds to MHS-70, a 70-bp fragment of the bithoraxoid Polycomb response element. This binding, like that of the GAGA factor, requires the presence of d(GA)n sequences. Together, our results suggest that batman belongs to a subset of the Polycomb/trithorax group of genes that includes Trithorax-like, whose products are involved in both activation and repression of homeotic genes.

  17. Energy and Technology Review: Unlocking the mysteries of DNA repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirk, W.A.

    1993-04-01

    DNA, the genetic blueprint, has the remarkable property of encoding its own repair following diverse types of structural damage induced by external agents or normal metabolism. We are studying the interplay of DNA damaging agents, repair genes, and their protein products to decipher the complex biochemical pathways that mediate such repair. Our research focuses on repair processes that correct DNA damage produced by chemical mutagens and radiation, both ionizing and ultraviolet. The most important type of DNA repair in human cells is called excision repair. This multistep process removes damaged or inappropriate pieces of DNA -- often as a string of 29 nucleotides containing the damage -- and replaces them with intact ones. We have isolated, cloned, and mapped several human repair genes associated with the nucleotide excision repair pathway and involved in the repair of DNA damage after exposure to ultraviolet light or mutagens in cooked food. We have shown that a defect in one of these repair genes, ERCC2, is responsible for the repair deficiency in one of the groups of patients with the recessive genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP group D). We are exploring ways to purify sufficient quantities (milligrams) of the protein products of these and other repair genes so that we can understand their functions. Our long-term goals are to link defective repair proteins to human DNA repair disorders that predispose to cancer, and to produce DNA-repair-deficient mice that can serve as models for the human disorders.

  18. Comprehensive Small Engine Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hires, Bill; And Others

    This curriculum guide contains the basic information needed to repair all two- and four-stroke cycle engines. The curriculum covers four areas, each consisting of one or more units of instruction that include performance objectives, suggested activities for teacher and students, information sheets, assignment sheets, job sheets, visual aids,…

  19. DNA Repair Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thanks to the pioneering research work of Lindahl, Sancar, Modrich and their colleagues, we now have an holistic awareness of how DNA damage occurs and how the damage is rectified in bacteria as well as in higher organisms including human beings. A comprehensive understanding of DNA repair has proven crucial ...

  20. Members of the HCMV US12 family of predicted heptaspanning membrane proteins have unique intracellular distributions, including association with the cytoplasmic virion assembly complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Subhendu; Pellett, Philip E.

    2007-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) US12 gene family is a group of 10 predicted seven-transmembrane domain proteins that have some features in common with G-protein-coupled receptors. Little is known of their patterns of expression, localization, or functional interactions. Here, we studied the intracellular localization of three US12 family members, US14, US17, and US18, with respect to various intracellular markers and the cytoplasmic virion assembly compartment (AC). The three proteins have distinct patterns of expression, which include associations with the AC. US14 is often distributed in a uniform granular manner throughout the cytoplasm, concentrating in the AC in some cells. US17 is expressed in a segmented manner, with its N-terminal domain localizing to the periphery of what we show here to be the AC and the C-terminal domain localizing to nuclei and the cytoplasm [Das, S., Skomorovska-Prokvolit, Y., Wang, F. Z., Pellett, P.E., 2006. Infection-dependent nuclear localization of US17, a member of the US12 family of human cytomegalovirus-encoded seven-transmembrane proteins. J. Virol. 80, 1191-1203]. Here, we show that the C-terminal domain is present at the center of the AC, in close association with markers of early endosomes; the N-terminal staining corresponds to an area stained by markers for the Golgi and trans-Golgi. US18 is distributed throughout the cytoplasm, concentrating in the AC at later stages of infection; it is localized more to the periphery of the AC than are US14 and US17C, in association with markers of the trans-Golgi. Although not detected in virions, their structures and localization in various zones within the AC suggest possible roles for these proteins in the process of virion maturation and egress

  1. The effects of gamma irradiation on growth and expression of genes encoding DNA repair-related proteins in Lombardy poplar (Populus nigra var. italica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, Mitsuru; Nanjo, Tokihiko; Yoshida, Kazumasa

    2012-07-01

    In this study, to elucidate the mechanisms of adaptation and tolerance to ionizing radiation in woody plants, we investigated the various biological effects of γ-rays on the Lombardy poplar (Populus nigra L. var. italica Du Roi). We detected abnormal leaf shape and color, fusion, distorted venation, shortened internode, fasciation and increased axillary shoots in γ-irradiated poplar plants. Acute γ-irradiation with a dose of 100Gy greatly reduced the height, stem diameter and biomass of poplar plantlets. After receiving doses of 200 and 300Gy, all the plantlets stopped growing, and then most of them withered after 4-10 weeks of γ-irradiation. Comet assays showed that nuclear DNA in suspension-cultured poplar cells had been damaged by γ-rays. To determine whether DNA repair-related proteins are involved in the response to γ-rays in Lombardy poplars, we cloned the PnRAD51, PnLIG4, PnKU70, PnXRCC4, PnPCNA and PnOGG1 cDNAs and investigated their mRNA expression. The PnRAD51, PnLIG4, PnKU70, PnXRCC4 and PnPCNA mRNAs were increased by γ-rays, but the PnOGG1 mRNA was decreased. Moreover, the expression of PnLIG4, PnKU70 and PnRAD51 was also up-regulated by Zeocin known as a DNA cleavage agent. These observations suggest that the morphogenesis, growth and protective gene expression in Lombardy poplars are severely affected by the DNA damage and unknown cellular events caused by γ-irradiation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Recent advances in DNA repair and recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanejko, L A; Jones, N J

    1998-09-11

    The subjects of the talks at this 1-day DNA Repair Network meeting, held at City University, London on December 15, 1997, encompassed a range of topics and reflected some of the current areas of research in the United Kingdom. Topics included DNA double-strand break repair, V(D)J recombination, DNA ligases, the RecQ family of helicases and Bloom's syndrome, UVB and immunosuppression, the repair of oxidative damage and mismatch repair mechanisms.

  3. Radiation damage and its repair in non-sporulating bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moseley, B.E.B.

    1984-01-01

    A review is given of radiation damage and its repair in non-sporulating bacteria. The identification and measurement of radiation damage in the DNA of the bacteria after exposure to ultraviolet radiation and ionizing radiation is described. Measuring the extent of DNA repair and ways of isolating repair mutants are also described. The DNA repair mechanisms for UV-induced damage are discussed including photoreactivation repair, excision repair, post-replication recombination repair and induced error-prone repair. The DNA repair mechanisms for ionizing radiation damage are also discussed including the repair of both single and double-strand breaks. Other aspects discussed include the effects of growth, irradiation medium and recovery medium on survival, DNA repair in humans, the commercial use of UV and ionizing radiations and the future of ionizing irradiation as a food treatment process. (U.K.)

  4. Role of Cell Cycle Regulation and MLH1, A Key DNA Mismatch Repair Protein, In Adaptive Survival Responses. Final Report; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David A. Boothman

    1999-01-01

    Due to several interesting findings on both adaptive survival responses (ASRs) and DNA mismatch repair (MMR), this grant was separated into two discrete Specific Aim sets (each with their own discrete hypotheses). The described experiments were simultaneously performed

  5. Role of nuclear hexokinase II in DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, S.; Bhatt, A.N.; Dwarakanath, B.S.; Kalaiarasan, P.; Brahmachari, V.

    2012-01-01

    A common signature of many cancer cells is a high glucose catabolic rate primarily due to the over expression of Type II hexokinase (HKII; responsible for the phosphorylation of glucose), generally known as cytosolic and mitochondrial bound enzyme that also suppresses cell death. Although, nuclear localization and transcriptional regulation of HKII has been reported in yeast; we and few others have recently demonstrated its nuclear localization in malignant cell lines. Interestingly, modification of a human glioma cell line (BMG-1) for enhancing glycolysis through mitochondrial respiration (OPMBMG cells) resulted in a higher nuclear localization of HKII as compared to the parental cells with concomitant increase in DNA repair and radio-resistance. Further, the glucose phosphorylation activity of the nuclear HKII was nearly 2 folds higher in the relatively more radioresistant HeLa cells (human cervical cancer cell line) as compared to MRC-5 cells (human normal lung fibroblast cell line). Therefore, we hypothesize that nuclear HKII facilitates DNA repair, in a hither to unknown mechanism, that may partly contribute to the enhanced resistance of highly glycolytic cells to radiation. Sequence alignment studies suggest that the isoenzymes, HKI and HKII share strong homology in the kinase active site, which is also found in few protein kinases. Interestingly HKI has been shown to phosphorylate H2A in-vitro. Further, in-silico protein-protein interaction data suggest that HKII can interact with several DNA repair proteins including ATM. Taken together; available experimental evidences as well as in-silico predictions strongly suggest that HKII may play a role in DNA repair by phosphorylation of certain DNA repair proteins. (author)

  6. [Evaluation of ten fish species to be included as part of renal diet, due to their protein, phosphorus and fatty acids content].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-González, Maria Isabel; Maafs-Rodríguez, Ana Gabriela; Pérez-Gil Romo, Fernando

    2012-06-01

    Because renal disease is highly complex, its nutritional treatment is complicated and many foods are restricted, including fish because its phosphorus content. The aim of the present study was to analyze ten fillet fish species, commonly consumed in Mexico (Cyprinus carpio carpio, Ophichthus rex, Symphurus elongatus, Eucinostomus entomelas, Chirostoma patzcuaro, Bairdiella chrysoura, Salmo salar Oreochromis urolepis hornorum, Sphyraena guachancho, Istiophorus albicans), to determine their phosphorus (P), protein (Pr), cholesterol, sodium, potassium, vitamins D3 and E, and n-3 PUFA (EPA+DHA) according to the AOAC techniques, in order to identify which species could be included in renal diet; particularly because of their risk:benefit relations (calculated with those results). Protein values ranged from 16.5 to 33.5g/100 g of fillet; the specie with the highest phosphorus contest was Salmo salar, and with the lowest, Symphurus elongatus. EPA+DHA quantity ranged from 79.64 mg/100 g to 1,381.53 mg/100 g. Considering de P/Pr relation recommended to renal patients, all analyzed species (except Salmo salar, Ophichthus rex and Istiophorus albicans) could be included in their diet. As for the P/EPA+DHA relation, the species most recommended to renal patients are Symphurus elongatus, Bairdiella chrysoura and Sphyraena guachancho.

  7. Meniscal repair devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F A; Herbert, M A

    2000-09-01

    Meniscal repair devices not requiring accessory incisions are attractive. Many factors contribute to their clinical effectiveness including their biomechanical characteristics. This study compared several new meniscal repair devices with standard meniscal suture techniques. Using a porcine model, axis-of-insertion loads were applied to various meniscal sutures and repair devices. A single device or stitch was placed in a created meniscal tear and a load applied. Both loads and modes of failure were recorded. The load-to-failure data show stratification into 4 distinct statistical groups. Group A, 113 N for a double vertical stitch; group B, 80 N for a single vertical stitch; group C, 57 N for the BioStinger, 56 N for a horizontal mattress stitch, and 50 N for the T-Fix stitch; and group D, 33 N for the Meniscus Arrow (inserted by hand or gun), 32 N for the Clearfix screw, 31 N for the SDsorb staple, 30 N for the Mitek meniscal repair system, and 27 N for the Biomet staple. The failure mechanism varied. Sutures broke away from the knot. The Meniscus Arrow and BioStinger pulled through the inner rim with the crossbar intact. The Clearfix screw failed by multiple mechanisms, whereas 1 leg of the SDsorb staple always pulled out of the outer rim. The Mitek device usually failed by pullout from the inner rim. The Biomet staple always broke at the crosshead or just below it. Although the surgeon should be aware of the material properties of the repair technique chosen for a meniscal repair, this information is only an indication of device performance and may not correlate with clinical healing results.

  8. DNA repair and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathore, Shakuntla; Joshi, Pankaj Kumar; Gaur, Sudha

    2012-01-01

    DNA repair refers to a collection of processes by which a cell identifies and corrects damage to the DNA molecule that encode it's genome. In human cells, both normal metabolic activities and environmental factors such as UV light and radiation can cause DNA damage, resulting in as many one million individual molecular lesions per day. Many of these lesions cause structural damage to the DNA molecule and can alter or eliminate the cell's ability to transcribe the gene that the affected DNA encodes. Other lesions include potentially harmful mutation in cell's genome which affect the survival of it's daughter cells after it undergoes mitosis. As a consequence, the DNA repair process is constantly active as it responds to damage in the DNA structure. Inherited mutation that affect DNA repair genes are strongly associated with high cancer risks in humans. Hereditary non polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is strongly associated with specific mutation in the DNA mismatch repair pathway. BRCA1, BRCA2 two famous mutation conferring a hugely increased risk of breast cancer on carrier, are both associated with a large number of DNA repair pathway, especially NHEJ and homologous recombination. Cancer therapy procedures such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy work by overwhelming the capacity of the cell to repair DNA damage, resulting in cell death. Cells that are most rapidly dividing most typically cancer cells are preferentially affected. The side effect is that other non-cancerous but rapidly dividing cells such as stem cells in the bone marrow are also affected. Modern cancer treatment attempt to localize the DNA damage to cells and tissue only associated with cancer, either by physical means (concentrating the therapeutic agent in the region of the tumor) or by biochemical means (exploiting a feature unique to cancer cells in the body). (author)

  9. Multi-faceted proteomic characterization of host protein complement of Rift Valley fever virus virions and identification of specific heat shock proteins, including HSP90, as important viral host factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, Jonathan E; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Benedict, Ashwini; Costantino, Julie; Ward, Michael; Peyser, Brian D; Retterer, Cary J; Tressler, Lyal E; Wanner, Laura M; McGovern, Hugh F; Zaidi, Anum; Anthony, Scott M; Kota, Krishna P; Bavari, Sina; Hakami, Ramin M

    2014-01-01

    Rift Valley fever is a potentially fatal disease of humans and domestic animals caused by Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV). Infection with RVFV in ruminants can cause near 100% abortion rates and recent outbreaks in naïve human populations have suggested case fatality rates of greater than thirty percent. To elucidate the roles that host proteins play during RVFV infection, proteomic analysis of RVFV virions was conducted using complementary analytical approaches, followed by functional validation studies of select identified host factors. Coupling the more traditional Gel LC/MS/MS approach (SDS PAGE followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry) with an alternative technique that preserves protein complexes allowed the protein complement of these viral particles to be thoroughly examined. In addition to viral proteins present within the virions and virion-associated host proteins, multiple macromolecular complexes were identified. Bioinformatic analysis showed that host chaperones were among over-represented protein families associated with virions, and functional experiments using siRNA gene silencing and small molecule inhibitors identified several of these heat shock proteins, including heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), as important viral host factors. Further analysis indicated that HSP inhibition effects occur during the replication/transcription phase of the virus life cycle, leading to significant lowering of viral titers without compromising the functional capacity of released virions. Overall, these studies provide much needed further insight into interactions between RVFV and host cells, increasing our understanding of the infection process and suggesting novel strategies for anti-viral development. In particular, considering that several HSP90 inhibitors have been advancing through clinical trials for cancer treatment, these results also highlight the exciting potential of repurposing HSP90 inhibitors to treat RVF.

  10. Multi-faceted proteomic characterization of host protein complement of Rift Valley fever virus virions and identification of specific heat shock proteins, including HSP90, as important viral host factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E Nuss

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever is a potentially fatal disease of humans and domestic animals caused by Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV. Infection with RVFV in ruminants can cause near 100% abortion rates and recent outbreaks in naïve human populations have suggested case fatality rates of greater than thirty percent. To elucidate the roles that host proteins play during RVFV infection, proteomic analysis of RVFV virions was conducted using complementary analytical approaches, followed by functional validation studies of select identified host factors. Coupling the more traditional Gel LC/MS/MS approach (SDS PAGE followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with an alternative technique that preserves protein complexes allowed the protein complement of these viral particles to be thoroughly examined. In addition to viral proteins present within the virions and virion-associated host proteins, multiple macromolecular complexes were identified. Bioinformatic analysis showed that host chaperones were among over-represented protein families associated with virions, and functional experiments using siRNA gene silencing and small molecule inhibitors identified several of these heat shock proteins, including heat shock protein 90 (HSP90, as important viral host factors. Further analysis indicated that HSP inhibition effects occur during the replication/transcription phase of the virus life cycle, leading to significant lowering of viral titers without compromising the functional capacity of released virions. Overall, these studies provide much needed further insight into interactions between RVFV and host cells, increasing our understanding of the infection process and suggesting novel strategies for anti-viral development. In particular, considering that several HSP90 inhibitors have been advancing through clinical trials for cancer treatment, these results also highlight the exciting potential of repurposing HSP90 inhibitors to treat RVF.

  11. Procedures for maintenance and repairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickel, E.

    1981-01-01

    After a general review of the operation experience in the history of more than 12 operating years, the organization in the plant will be shown with special aspect to quality assurance, capacity of the workshops and connected groups as radiation protection, chemical laboratories etc. The number, time intervals and manpower effort for the repeating tests will be discussed. Reasons and examples for back-fitting activities in the plant are given. Besides special repair and maintenance procedures as repair of the steam generators, in-service inspection of the reactor pressure vessel, repair of a feed-water pipe and repair of the core structure in the pressure vessel, the general system to handle maintenance and repair-work in the KWO-plant will be shown. This includes also the detailed planning of the annual refueling and revision of the plant. (orig./RW)

  12. Umbilical hernia repair - series (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatment. The indications for umbilical hernia repair include: incarcerated (strangulated) umbilical hernia defects not spontaneously closed by 4 to 5 years of age children under 2 with very large defects unacceptable to ...

  13. Activated RecA protein may induce expression of a gene that is not controlled by the LexA repressor and whose function is required for mutagenesis and repair of UV-irradiated bacteriophage lambda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calsou, P.; Villaverde, A.; Defais, M.

    1987-01-01

    The activated form of the RecA protein (RecA) is known to be involved in the reactivation and mutagenesis of UV-irradiated bacteriophage lambda and in the expression of the SOS response in Escherichia coli K-12. The expression of the SOS response requires cleavage of the LexA repressor by RecA and the subsequent expression of LexA-controlled genes. The evidence presented here suggests that RecA induces the expression of a gene(s) that is not under LexA control and that is also necessary for maximal repair and mutagenesis of damaged phage. This conclusion is based on the chloramphenicol sensitivity of RecA -dependent repair and mutagenesis of damaged bacteriophage lambda in lexA(Def) hosts

  14. Aircraft Propeller Hub Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muth, Thomas R [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL

    2015-02-13

    The team performed a literature review, conducted residual stress measurements, performed failure analysis, and demonstrated a solid state additive manufacturing repair technique on samples removed from a scrapped propeller hub. The team evaluated multiple options for hub repair that included existing metal buildup technologies that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has already embraced, such as cold spray, high velocity oxy-fuel deposition (HVOF), and plasma spray. In addition the team helped Piedmont Propulsion Systems, LLC (PPS) evaluate three potential solutions that could be deployed at different stages in the life cycle of aluminum alloy hubs, in addition to the conventional spray coating method for repair. For new hubs, a machining practice to prevent fretting with the steel drive shaft was recommended. For hubs that were refurbished with some material remaining above the minimal material condition (MMC), a silver interface applied by an electromagnetic pulse additive manufacturing method was recommended. For hubs that were at or below the MMC, a solid state additive manufacturing technique using ultrasonic welding (UW) of thin layers of 7075 aluminum to the hub interface was recommended. A cladding demonstration using the UW technique achieved mechanical bonding of the layers showing promise as a viable repair method.

  15. Mutagenesis and repair of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janion, C.; Grzesiuk, E.; Fabisiewicz, A.; Tudek, B.; Ciesla, J.; Graziewicz, M.; Wojcik, A.; Speina, E.

    1998-01-01

    Full text. The discovery that the mfd gene codes for a transcription-coupling repair factor (TRCF) prompted us to re-investigate the MFD (mutation frequency decline) phenomenon in E.coli K-12 strain when mutations were induced by ultraviolet light, halogen light or MMS-treatment. These studies revealed that: (i) the process of MFD involves the proofreading activity of DNA pol III and the mismatch repair system, as well as, TRCF and the UvrABC-excinuclease (ii) a semi-rich plate test may be replaced by a rich liquid medium, (iii) the T-T pyrimidine dimers are the lesions excised with the highest activity, and (iv) overproduction of UmuD(D'C) proteins leads to a great increase in mutant frequency in irradiated and MMS-treated cells. The role of mismatch repair (MR) in MMS-induced mutagenesis is obscured by the fact that the spectra of mutational specificity are different in bacteria proficient and deficient in MR. It has been found that transposons Tn10 (and Tn5) when inserted into chromosomal DNA of E. coli influence the phenotype lowering the survival and frequency of mutations induced by UV or halogen light irradiation. This is connected with a deficiency of UmuD(D') and UmuC proteins. Transformation of bacteria with plasmids bearing the umuD(D')C genes, suppresses the effects of the transposon insertion, a phenomenon which has not been described before. Single-stranded DNA of M13mp18 phage was oxidized in vitro by a hydroxyl radical generating system including hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase/Fe3+/EDTA, and it was found that Fapy-Ade, Fapy-Gua, 8-oxyAde and thymine glycol were the main products formed. Replication of the oxidized template by T7 phage DNA polymerase, Klenow fragment of polymerase I, or polymerase beta from bovine thymus has revealed that oxidized pyrimidines are stronger blockers than oxidized purines for T7 phage and Klenow fragment polymerases and the blocking potency depends on the neighboring bases and on the type of polymerase. Studies of

  16. Bioinformatic prediction of G protein-coupled receptor encoding sequences from the transcriptome of the foreleg, including the Haller's organ, of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus australis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Munoz

    Full Text Available The cattle tick of Australia, Rhipicephalus australis, is a vector for microbial parasites that cause serious bovine diseases. The Haller's organ, located in the tick's forelegs, is crucial for host detection and mating. To facilitate the development of new technologies for better control of this agricultural pest, we aimed to sequence and annotate the transcriptome of the R. australis forelegs and associated tissues, including the Haller's organ. As G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are an important family of eukaryotic proteins studied as pharmaceutical targets in humans, we prioritized the identification and classification of the GPCRs expressed in the foreleg tissues. The two forelegs from adult R. australis were excised, RNA extracted, and pyrosequenced with 454 technology. Reads were assembled into unigenes and annotated by sequence similarity. Python scripts were written to find open reading frames (ORFs from each unigene. These ORFs were analyzed by different GPCR prediction approaches based on sequence alignments, support vector machines, hidden Markov models, and principal component analysis. GPCRs consistently predicted by multiple methods were further studied by phylogenetic analysis and 3D homology modeling. From 4,782 assembled unigenes, 40,907 possible ORFs were predicted. Using Blastp, Pfam, GPCRpred, TMHMM, and PCA-GPCR, a basic set of 46 GPCR candidates were compiled and a phylogenetic tree was constructed. With further screening of tertiary structures predicted by RaptorX, 6 likely GPCRs emerged and the strongest candidate was classified by PCA-GPCR to be a GABAB receptor.

  17. Epigenetics targeted protein-vorinostat nanomedicine inducing apoptosis in heterogeneous population of primary acute myeloid leukemia cells including refractory and relapsed cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Parwathy; Kavalakatt, Anu; Malarvizhi, Giridharan Loghanathan; Vasanthakumari, Divya Rani Vikraman Nair; Retnakumari, Archana Payickattu; Sidharthan, Neeraj; Pavithran, Keechilat; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2014-05-01

    Aberrant epigenetics play a key role in the onset and progression of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Herein we report in silico modelling based development of a novel, protein-vorinostat nanomedicine exhibiting selective and superior anti-leukemic activity against heterogeneous population of AML patient samples (n=9), including refractory and relapsed cases, and three representative cell lines expressing CD34(+)/CD38(-) stem cell phenotype (KG-1a), promyelocytic phenotype (HL-60) and FLT3-ITD mutation (MV4-11). Nano-vorinostat having ~100nm size exhibited enhanced cellular uptake rendering significantly lower IC50 in AML cell lines and patient samples, and induced enhanced HDAC inhibition, oxidative injury, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis compared to free vorinostat. Most importantly, nanomedicine showed exceptional single-agent activity against the clonogenic proliferative capability of bone marrow derived leukemic progenitors, while remaining non-toxic to healthy bone marrow cells. Collectively, this epigenetics targeted nanomedicine appears to be a promising therapeutic strategy against various French-American-British (FAB) classes of AML. Through the use of a protein-vorinostat agent, exceptional single-agent activity was demonstrated against the clonogenic proliferative capability of bone marrow derived leukemic progenitors, while remaining non-toxic to healthy bone marrow cells. The studied epigenetics targeted nanomedicine approach is a promising therapeutic strategy against various French-American-British classes of acute myeloid leukemia. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Brain aneurysm repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  19. The Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway: structural and functional insights into a complex disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walden, Helen; Deans, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in any of at least sixteen FANC genes (FANCA-Q) cause Fanconi anemia, a disorder characterized by sensitivity to DNA interstrand crosslinking agents. The clinical features of cytopenia, developmental defects, and tumor predisposition are similar in each group, suggesting that the gene products participate in a common pathway. The Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway consists of an anchor complex that recognizes damage caused by interstrand crosslinks, a multisubunit ubiquitin ligase that monoubiquitinates two substrates, and several downstream repair proteins including nucleases and homologous recombination enzymes. We review progress in the use of structural and biochemical approaches to understanding how each FANC protein functions in this pathway.

  20. DNA repair in Mycobacterium tuberculosis revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Vultos, Tiago; Mestre, Olga; Tonjum, Tone; Gicquel, Brigitte

    2009-05-01

    Our understanding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA repair mechanisms is still poor compared with that of other bacterial organisms. However, the publication of the first complete M. tuberculosis genome sequence 10 years ago boosted the study of DNA repair systems in this organism. A first step in the elucidation of M. tuberculosis DNA repair mechanisms was taken by Mizrahi and Andersen, who identified homologs of genes involved in the reversal or repair of DNA damage in Escherichia coli and related organisms. Genes required for nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, recombination, and SOS repair and mutagenesis were identified. Notably, no homologs of genes involved in mismatch repair were identified. Novel characteristics of the M. tuberculosis DNA repair machinery have been found over the last decade, such as nonhomologous end joining, the presence of Mpg, ERCC3 and Hlr - proteins previously presumed to be produced exclusively in mammalian cells - and the recently discovered bifunctional dCTP deaminase:dUTPase. The study of these systems is important to develop therapeutic agents that can counteract M. tuberculosis evolutionary changes and to prevent adaptive events resulting in antibiotic resistance. This review summarizes our current understanding of the M. tuberculosis DNA repair system.

  1. DNA repair , cell repair and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhestyanikov, V.D.

    1983-01-01

    Data obtained in laboratory of radiation cytology and literature data testifying to a considerable role of DNA repair in cell sensitivity to radiation and chemical DNA-tropic agents have been considered. Data pointing to the probability of contribution of inducible repair of DNA into plant cells sensitivity to X-rays are obtained. Certain violations of DNA repair do not result in the increase of radiosensitivity. It is assumed that in the cases unknown mechanisms of DNA repair operate

  2. Gene expression profiling in the stress control brain region hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus reveals a novel gene network including Amyloid beta Precursor Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deussing Jan M

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pivotal role of stress in the precipitation of psychiatric diseases such as depression is generally accepted. This study aims at the identification of genes that are directly or indirectly responding to stress. Inbred mouse strains that had been evidenced to differ in their stress response as well as in their response to antidepressant treatment were chosen for RNA profiling after stress exposure. Gene expression and regulation was determined by microarray analyses and further evaluated by bioinformatics tools including pathway and cluster analyses. Results Forced swimming as acute stressor was applied to C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice and resulted in sets of regulated genes in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN, 4 h or 8 h after stress. Although the expression changes between the mouse strains were quite different, they unfolded in phases over time in both strains. Our search for connections between the regulated genes resulted in potential novel signalling pathways in stress. In particular, Guanine nucleotide binding protein, alpha inhibiting 2 (GNAi2 and Amyloid β (A4 precursor protein (APP were detected as stress-regulated genes, and together with other genes, seem to be integrated into stress-responsive pathways and gene networks in the PVN. Conclusions This search for stress-regulated genes in the PVN revealed its impact on interesting genes (GNAi2 and APP and a novel gene network. In particular the expression of APP in the PVN that is governing stress hormone balance, is of great interest. The reported neuroprotective role of this molecule in the CNS supports the idea that a short acute stress can elicit positive adaptational effects in the brain.

  3. TFIIH with inactive XPD helicase functions in transcription initiation but is defective in DNA repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.S. Winkler (Sebastiaan); U. Fiedler; W. Vermeulen (Wim); F. Coin (Frédéric); R.D. Wood (Richard); H.T.M. Timmers (Marc); G. Weeda (Geert); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); S.J. Araú jo; J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractTFIIH is a multisubunit protein complex involved in RNA polymerase II transcription and nucleotide excision repair, which removes a wide variety of DNA lesions including UV-induced photoproducts. Mutations in the DNA-dependent ATPase/helicase subunits of TFIIH, XPB and

  4. Current Biomechanical Concepts for Rotator Cuff Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    For the past few decades, the repair of rotator cuff tears has evolved significantly with advances in arthroscopy techniques, suture anchors and instrumentation. From the biomechanical perspective, the focus in arthroscopic repair has been on increasing fixation strength and restoration of the footprint contact characteristics to provide early rehabilitation and improve healing. To accomplish these objectives, various repair strategies and construct configurations have been developed for rotator cuff repair with the understanding that many factors contribute to the structural integrity of the repaired construct. These include repaired rotator cuff tendon-footprint motion, increased tendon-footprint contact area and pressure, and tissue quality of tendon and bone. In addition, the healing response may be compromised by intrinsic factors such as decreased vascularity, hypoxia, and fibrocartilaginous changes or aforementioned extrinsic compression factors. Furthermore, it is well documented that torn rotator cuff muscles have a tendency to atrophy and become subject to fatty infiltration which may affect the longevity of the repair. Despite all the aforementioned factors, initial fixation strength is an essential consideration in optimizing rotator cuff repair. Therefore, numerous biomechanical studies have focused on elucidating the strongest devices, knots, and repair configurations to improve contact characteristics for rotator cuff repair. In this review, the biomechanical concepts behind current rotator cuff repair techniques will be reviewed and discussed. PMID:23730471

  5. SOS-like induction in Bacillus subtilis: induction of the RecA protein analog and a damage-inducible operon by DNA damage in Rec+ and DNA repair-deficient strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovett, C.M. Jr.; Love, P.E.; Yasbin, R.E.; Roberts, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    We quantitated the induction of the Bacillus subtilis Rec protein (the analog of Escherichia coli RecA protein) and the B. subtilis din-22 operon (representative of a set of DNA damage-inducible operons in B. subtilis) following DNA damage in Rec+ and DNA repair-deficient strains. After exposure to mitomycin C or UV irradiation, each of four distinct rec (recA1, recB2, recE4, and recM13) mutations reduced to the same extent the rates of both Rec protein induction (determined by densitometric scanning of immunoblot transfers) and din-22 operon induction (determined by assaying beta-galactosidase activity in din-22::Tn917-lacZ fusion strains). The induction deficiencies in recA1 and recE4 strains were partially complemented by the E. coli RecA protein, which was expressed on a plasmid in B. subtilis; the E. coli RecA protein had no effect on either induction event in Rec+, recB2, or recM13 strains. These results suggest that (i) the expression of both the B. subtilis Rec protein and the din-22 operon share a common regulatory component, (ii) the recA1 and recE4 mutations affect the regulation and/or activity of the B. subtilis Rec protein, and (iii) an SOS regulatory system like the E. coli system is highly conserved in B. subtilis. We also showed that the basal level of B. subtilis Rec protein is about 4,500 molecules per cell and that maximum induction by DNA damage causes an approximately fivefold increase in the rate of Rec protein accumulation

  6. Annexins are instrumental for efficient plasma membrane repair in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritzen, Stine Prehn; Boye, Theresa Louise; Nylandsted, Jesper

    2015-09-01

    Plasma membrane stress can cause damage to the plasma membrane, both when imposed by the extracellular environment and by enhanced oxidative stress. Cells cope with these injuries by rapidly activating their plasma membrane repair system, which is triggered by Ca(2+) influx at the wound site. The repair system is highly dynamic, depends on both lipid and protein components, and include cytoskeletal reorganization, membrane replacements, and membrane fusion events. Cancer cells experience enhanced membrane stress when navigating through dense extracellular matrix, which increases the frequency of membrane injuries. In addition, increased motility and oxidative stress further increase the risk of plasma membrane lesions. Cancer cells compensate by overexpressing Annexin proteins including Annexin A2 (ANXA2). Annexin family members can facilitate membrane fusion events and wound healing by binding to negatively charged phospholipids in the plasma membrane. Plasma membrane repair in cancer cells depends on ANXA2 protein, which is recruited to the wound site and forms a complex with the Ca(2+)-binding EF-hand protein S100A11. Here they regulate actin accumulation around the wound perimeter, which is required for wound closure. In this review, we will discuss the requirement for Annexins, S100 proteins and actin cytoskeleton in the plasma membrane repair response of cancer cells, which reveals a novel avenue for targeting metastatic cancers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Fanconi anemia associated protein FAAP24 uses two substrate specific binding surfaces for DNA recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wienk, H.L.J.; Slootweg, J.C.; Speerstra, S.; Kaptein, R.; Boelens, R.; Folkers, G.E.

    2013-01-01

    To maintain the integrity of the genome, multiple DNA repair systems exist to repair damaged DNA. Recognition of altered DNA, including bulky adducts, pyrimidine dimers and interstrand crosslinks (ICL), partially depends on proteins containing helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) domains. To understand how ICL

  8. Mitochondrial DNA repair and aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandavilli, Bhaskar S.; Santos, Janine H.; Van Houten, Bennett

    2002-01-01

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain plays an important role in energy production in aerobic organisms and is also a significant source of reactive oxygen species that damage DNA, RNA and proteins in the cell. Oxidative damage to the mitochondrial DNA is implicated in various degenerative diseases, cancer and aging. The importance of mitochondrial ROS in age-related degenerative diseases is further strengthened by studies using animal models, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila and yeast. Research in the last several years shows that mitochondrial DNA is more susceptible to various carcinogens and ROS when compared to nuclear DNA. DNA damage in mammalian mitochondria is repaired by base excision repair (BER). Studies have shown that mitochondria contain all the enzymes required for BER. Mitochondrial DNA damage, if not repaired, leads to disruption of electron transport chain and production of more ROS. This vicious cycle of ROS production and mtDNA damage ultimately leads to energy depletion in the cell and apoptosis

  9. Mitochondrial DNA repair and aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandavilli, Bhaskar S.; Santos, Janine H.; Van Houten, Bennett

    2002-11-30

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain plays an important role in energy production in aerobic organisms and is also a significant source of reactive oxygen species that damage DNA, RNA and proteins in the cell. Oxidative damage to the mitochondrial DNA is implicated in various degenerative diseases, cancer and aging. The importance of mitochondrial ROS in age-related degenerative diseases is further strengthened by studies using animal models, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila and yeast. Research in the last several years shows that mitochondrial DNA is more susceptible to various carcinogens and ROS when compared to nuclear DNA. DNA damage in mammalian mitochondria is repaired by base excision repair (BER). Studies have shown that mitochondria contain all the enzymes required for BER. Mitochondrial DNA damage, if not repaired, leads to disruption of electron transport chain and production of more ROS. This vicious cycle of ROS production and mtDNA damage ultimately leads to energy depletion in the cell and apoptosis.

  10. DNA Repair Defects and Chromosomal Aberrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Megumi; George, K. A.; Huff, J. L.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Yields of chromosome aberrations were assessed in cells deficient in DNA doublestrand break (DSB) repair, after exposure to acute or to low-dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma rays or acute high LET iron nuclei. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma irradiation induced greater yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair-defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both simple and complex chromosome exchanges were significantly higher for the ATM- and NBS-deficient lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, in the NBS cells the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges. The large increases in the quadratic dose-response terms in these repair-defective cell lines points the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize the formation of aberrations. The differences found between ATM- and NBS-deficient cells at low doses suggest that important questions should with regard to applying observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low-dose exposures. For aberrations induced by iron nuclei, regression models preferred purely linear dose responses for simple exchanges and quadratic dose responses for complex exchanges. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) factors of all of

  11. DNA excision repair in cell extracts from human cell lines exhibiting hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansson, J.; Keyse, S.M.; Lindahl, T.; Wood, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    Whole cell extracts from human lymphoid cell lines can perform in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids damaged by agents including UV or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP). Extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells are defective in repair synthesis. We have now studied in vitro DNA repair synthesis using extracts from lymphoblastoid cell lines representing four human hereditary syndromes with increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Extracts of cell lines from individuals with the sunlight-sensitive disorders dysplastic nevus syndrome or Cockayne's syndrome (complementation groups A and B) showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids with UV photoproducts. This is consistent with in vivo measurements of the overall DNA repair capacity in such cell lines. A number of extracts were prepared from two cell lines representing the variant form of XP (XP-V). Half of the extracts prepared showed normal levels of in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing UV lesions, but the remainder of the extracts from the same cell lines showed deficient repair synthesis, suggesting the possibility of an unusually labile excision repair protein in XP-V. Fanconi's anemia (FA) cells show cellular hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents including cis-DDP. Extracts from cell lines belonging to two different complementation groups of FA showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing cis-DDP or UV adducts. Thus, there does not appear to be an overall excision repair defect in FA, but the data do not exclude a defect in the repair of interstrand DNA cross-links

  12. Heterogenous mismatch-repair status in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joost, Patrick; Veurink, Nynke; Holck, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Immunohistochemical staining for mismatch repair proteins is efficient and widely used to identify mismatch repair defective tumors. The tumors typically show uniform and widespread loss of MMR protein staining. We identified and characterized colorectal cancers with alternative......, heterogenous mismatch repair protein staining in order to delineate expression patterns and underlying mechanisms. METHODS: Heterogenous staining patterns that affected at least one of the mismatch repair proteins MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and MSH6 were identified in 14 colorectal cancers. Based on alternative....... CONCLUSIONS: Heterogenous mismatch repair status can be demonstrated in colorectal cancer. Though rare, attention to this phenomenon is recommended since it corresponds to differences in mismatch repair status that are relevant for correct classification. VIRTUAL SLIDES: The virtual slide(s) for this article...

  13. Augmentation of protein production by a combination of the T7 RNA polymerase system and ubiquitin fusion: Overproduction of the human DNA repair protein, ERCC1, as a ubiquitin fusion protein in Escherichia coli.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.M. Koken (Marcel); J.H. Odijk; M. van Duin (Mark); M.W.J. Fornerod (Maarten); D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThis article presents the development of a set of new expression vectors for overproduction of proteins in Escherichia coli. The vectors, pETUBI-ES1, 2 and 3, allow in-frame cloning of any sequence with the ubiquitin gene driven by the strong T7f10 promoter. Combination of the T7

  14. Nanopolymers Delivery of the Bone Morphogenetic Protein-4 Plasmid to Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promotes Articular Cartilage Repair In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjun Shi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical application of viral vectors for gene therapy is limited for biosafety consideration. In this study, to promote articular cartilage repair, poly (lactic-co glycolic acid (PLGA nanopolymers were used as non-viral vectors to transfect rabbit mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs with the pDC316-BMP4-EGFP plasmid. The cytotoxicity and transfection efficiency in vitro were acceptable measuring by CCK-8 and flow cytometry. After transfection, Chondrogenic markers (mRNA of Col2a1, Sox9, Bmp4, and Agg of experimental cells (MSCs being transfected with BMP-4 plasmid by PLGA nanopolymers were increased more than those of control cells (MSCs being transfected with naked BMP-4 plasmid alone. In vivo study, twelve rabbits (24 knees with large full thickness articular cartilage defects were randomly divided into the experimental group (MSCs being transfected with BMP-4 plasmid by PLGA nanopolymers and the control group (MSCs being transfected with naked BMP-4 plasmid. The experimental group showed better regeneration than the control group 6 and 12 weeks postoperatively. Hyaline-like cartilage formed at week 12 in the experimental group, indicating the local delivery of BMP-4 plasmid to MSCs by PLGA nanopolymers improved articular cartilage repair significantly. PLGA nanopolymers could be a promising and effective non-viral vector for gene therapy in cartilage repair.

  15. The AlkB Family of Fe(II)/α-Ketoglutarate-dependent Dioxygenases: Repairing Nucleic Acid Alkylation Damage and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedeles, Bogdan I; Singh, Vipender; Delaney, James C; Li, Deyu; Essigmann, John M

    2015-08-21

    The AlkB family of Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases is a class of ubiquitous direct reversal DNA repair enzymes that remove alkyl adducts from nucleobases by oxidative dealkylation. The prototypical and homonymous family member is an Escherichia coli "adaptive response" protein that protects the bacterial genome against alkylation damage. AlkB has a wide variety of substrates, including monoalkyl and exocyclic bridged adducts. Nine mammalian AlkB homologs exist (ALKBH1-8, FTO), but only a subset functions as DNA/RNA repair enzymes. This minireview presents an overview of the AlkB proteins including recent data on homologs, structural features, substrate specificities, and experimental strategies for studying DNA repair by AlkB family proteins. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Prediction of binding modes between protein L-isoaspartyl (D-aspartyl) O-methyltransferase and peptide substrates including isomerized aspartic acid residues using in silico analytic methods for the substrate screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Akifumi; Noji, Ikuhiko; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi; Takahashi, Ohgi

    2015-12-10

    Because the aspartic acid (Asp) residues in proteins are occasionally isomerized in the human body, not only l-α-Asp but also l-β-Asp, D-α-Asp and D-β-Asp are found in human proteins. In these isomerized aspartic acids, the proportion of D-β-Asp is the largest and the proportions of l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp found in human proteins are comparatively small. To explain the proportions of aspartic acid isomers, the possibility of an enzyme able to repair l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp is frequently considered. The protein L-isoaspartyl (D-aspartyl) O-methyltransferase (PIMT) is considered one of the possible repair enzymes for l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp. Human PIMT is an enzyme that recognizes both l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp, and catalyzes the methylation of their side chains. In this study, the binding modes between PIMT and peptide substrates containing l-β-Asp or D-α-Asp residues were investigated using computational protein-ligand docking and molecular dynamics simulations. The results indicate that carboxyl groups of both l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp were recognized in similar modes by PIMT and that the C-terminal regions of substrate peptides were located in similar positions on PIMT for both the l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp peptides. In contrast, for peptides containing l-α-Asp or D-β-Asp residues, which are not substrates of PIMT, the computationally constructed binding modes between PIMT and peptides greatly differed from those between PIMT and substrates. In the nonsubstrate peptides, not inter- but intra-molecular hydrogen bonds were observed, and the conformations of peptides were more rigid than those of substrates. Thus, the in silico analytical methods were able to distinguish substrates from nonsubstrates and the computational methods are expected to complement experimental analytical methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Mutagenic DNA repair in enterobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedgwick, S.G.; Chao Ho; Woodgate, R.

    1991-01-01

    Sixteen species of enterobacteria have been screened for mutagenic DNA repair activity. In Escherichia coli, mutagenic DNA repair is encoded by the umuDC operon. Synthesis of UmuD and UmuC proteins is induced as part of the SOS response to DNA damage, and after induction, the UmuD protein undergoes an autocatalytic cleavage to produce the carboxy-terminal UmuD' fragment needed for induced mutagenesis. The presence of a similar system in other species was examined by using a combined approach of inducible-mutagenesis assays, cross-reactivity to E. coli UmuD and UmuD' antibodies to test for induction and cleavage of UmuD-like proteins, and hybridization with E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium u mu DNA probes to map umu-like genes. The results indicate a more widespread distribution of mutagenic DNA repair in other species than was previously thought. They also show that umu loci can be more complex in other species than in E. coli. Differences in UV-induced mutability of more than 200-fold were seen between different species of enteric bacteria and even between multiple natural isolates of E. coli, and yet some of the species which display a poorly mutable phenotype still have umu-like genes and proteins. It is suggested that umuDC genes can be curtailed in their mutagenic activities but that they may still participate in some other, unknown process which provides the continued stimulus for their retention

  18. Evaluation of Repair Tension in Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Does It Really Matter to the Integrity of the Rotator Cuff?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Hoon; Jang, Young Hoon; Choi, Young Eun; Lee, Hwa-Ryeong; Kim, Sae Hoon

    2016-11-01

    Repair tension of a torn rotator cuff can affect healing after repair. However, a measurement of the actual tension during arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is not feasible. The relationship between repair tension and healing of a rotator cuff repair remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of repair tension on healing at the repair site. The hypothesis was that repair tension would be a major factor in determining the anatomic outcome of rotator cuff repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs (132 patients) for full-thickness rotator cuff tears were analyzed. An intraoperative model was designed for the estimation of repair tension using a tensiometer. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed approximately 1 year (mean [±SD], 12.7 ± 3.2 months) postoperatively for the evaluation of healing at the repair site. Multivariable analysis was performed for tear size, amount of retraction, and fatty degeneration (FD) of rotator cuff muscles. The mean repair tension measured during the arthroscopic procedure was 28.5 ± 23.1 N. There was a statistically significant correlation between tension and tear size (Pearson correlation coefficient [PCC], 0.529; P repair tension also showed a significant inverse correlation with healing at the repair site (SCC, 0.195; P = .025). However, when sex, age, tear size, amount of retraction, tendon quality, and FD of rotator cuff muscles were included for multivariable logistic regression analysis, only FD of the infraspinatus showed an association with the anatomic outcome of repair (Exp(B) = 0.596; P = .010). Our intraoperative model for the estimation of rotator cuff repair tension showed an inverse correlation of repair tension with healing at the repair site, suggesting that complete healing is less likely with high-tension repairs. A significant association was observed on MRI between a high level of FD of the infraspinatus and repaired tendon integrity. © 2016

  19. Underwater coating repair cuts nuclear maintenance costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, C.O.

    1993-01-01

    This article discusses the cleaning and recoating/repair of condensate tanks or other vessels in a nuclear power plant. The topics of the article include the safety and regulatory need for this system of repair, a description of the work done on the Brown's Ferry MK-1 suppression chamber, coating failure mechanisms, qualitative inspection, quantitative inspection, quantitative inspection results, spot repairs, and economic considerations

  20. Early discharge after external anal sphincter repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Kehlet, H

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to describe an accelerated-stay program for repair of the external anal sphincter. METHODS: Twenty consecutive patients undergoing overlapping repair of the external anal sphincter were included in the study. Effect parameters were length of hospitalization....... CONCLUSION: We have described a safe accelerated-stay program (24 to 48 hours) for overlapping repair of external anal sphincter....

  1. The base excision repair pathway is required for efficient lentivirus integration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine E Yoder

    Full Text Available An siRNA screen has identified several proteins throughout the base excision repair (BER pathway of oxidative DNA damage as important for efficient HIV infection. The proteins identified included early repair factors such as the base damage recognition glycosylases OGG1 and MYH and the late repair factor POLß, implicating the entire BER pathway. Murine cells with deletions of the genes Ogg1, Myh, Neil1 and Polß recapitulate the defect of HIV infection in the absence of BER. Defective infection in the absence of BER proteins was also seen with the lentivirus FIV, but not the gammaretrovirus MMLV. BER proteins do not affect HIV infection through its accessory genes nor the central polypurine tract. HIV reverse transcription and nuclear entry appear unaffected by the absence of BER proteins. However, HIV integration to the host chromosome is reduced in the absence of BER proteins. Pre-integration complexes from BER deficient cell lines show reduced integration activity in vitro. Integration activity is restored by addition of recombinant BER protein POLß. Lentiviral infection and integration efficiency appears to depend on the presence of BER proteins.

  2. Inducible DNA-repair systems in yeast: competition for lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchel, R E; Morrison, D P

    1987-03-01

    DNA lesions may be recognized and repaired by more than one DNA-repair process. If two repair systems with different error frequencies have overlapping lesion specificity and one or both is inducible, the resulting variable competition for the lesions can change the biological consequences of these lesions. This concept was demonstrated by observing mutation in yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) exposed to combinations of mutagens under conditions which influenced the induction of error-free recombinational repair or error-prone repair. Total mutation frequency was reduced in a manner proportional to the dose of 60Co-gamma- or 254 nm UV radiation delivered prior to or subsequent to an MNNG exposure. Suppression was greater per unit radiation dose in cells gamma-irradiated in O2 as compared to N2. A rad3 (excision-repair) mutant gave results similar to wild-type but mutation in a rad52 (rec-) mutant exposed to MNNG was not suppressed by radiation. Protein-synthesis inhibition with heat shock or cycloheximide indicated that it was the mutation due to MNNG and not that due to radiation which had changed. These results indicate that MNNG lesions are recognized by both the recombinational repair system and the inducible error-prone system, but that gamma-radiation induction of error-free recombinational repair resulted in increased competition for the lesions, thereby reducing mutation. Similarly, gamma-radiation exposure resulted in a radiation dose-dependent reduction in mutation due to MNU, EMS, ENU and 8-MOP + UVA, but no reduction in mutation due to MMS. These results suggest that the number of mutational MMS lesions recognizable by the recombinational repair system must be very small relative to those produced by the other agents. MNNG induction of the inducible error-prone systems however, did not alter mutation frequencies due to ENU or MMS exposure but, in contrast to radiation, increased the mutagenic effectiveness of EMS. These experiments demonstrate

  3. Rapid road repair vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mara, Leo M.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find an the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was was heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past.

  4. Treatment and Controversies in Paraesophageal Hernia Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Marco eFisichella

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Historically all paraesophageal hernias were repaired surgically, today intervention is reserved for symptomatic paraesophageal hernias. In this review, we describe the indications for repair and explore the controversies in paraesophageal hernia repair, which include a comparison of open to laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair, the necessity of complete sac excision, the routine performance of fundoplication, and the use of mesh for hernia repair.Methods: We searched Pubmed for papers published between 1980 and 2015 using the following keywords: hiatal hernias, paraesophageal hernias, regurgitation, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, aspiration, GERD, endoscopy, manometry, pH monitoring, proton pump inhibitors, anemia, iron deficiency anemia, Nissen fundoplication, sac excision, mesh, mesh repair. Results: Indications for paraesophageal hernia repair have changed, and currently symptomatic paraesophageal hernias are recommended for repair. In addition, it is important not to overlook iron-deficiency anemia and pulmonary complaints, which tend to improve with repair. Current practice favors a laparoscopic approach, complete sac excision, primary crural repair with or without use of mesh, and a routine fundoplication.

  5. Phenomenology of an inducible mutagenic DNA repair pathway in Escherichia coli: SOS repair hypothesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radman, M.

    1974-01-01

    A hypothesis is proposed according to which E. coli possesses an inducible DNA repair system. This hypothetical repair, which we call SOS repair, is manifested only following damage to DNA, and requires de novo protein synthesis. SOS repair in E. coli requires some known genetic elements: recA + , lex + and probably zab + . Mutagenesis by ultraviolet light is observed only under conditions of functional SOS repair: we therefore suspect that this is a mutation-prone repair. A number of phenomena and experiments is reviewed which at this point can best be interpreted in terms of an inducible mutagenic DNA repair system. Two recently discovered phenomena support the proposed hypothesis: existence of a mutant (tif) which, after a shift to elevated temperature, mimicks the effect of uv irradiation in regard to repair of phage lambda and uv mutagenesis, apparent activation of SOS repair by introduction into the recipient cell of damaged plasmid or Hfr DNA. Several specific predictions based on SOS repair hypothesis are presented in order to stimulate further experimental tests. (U.S.)

  6. Construction of nerve guide conduits from cellulose/soy protein composite membranes combined with Schwann cells and pyrroloquinoline quinone for the repair of peripheral nerve defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lihua; Gan, Li; Liu, Yongming; Tian, Weiqun; Tong, Zan; Wang, Xiong; Huselstein, Celine; Chen, Yun

    2015-02-20

    Regeneration and functional reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects remained a significant clinical challenge. Nerve guide conduits, with seed cells or neurotrophic factors (NTFs), had been widely used to improve the repair and regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) was an antioxidant that can stimulate nerve growth factors (NGFs) synthesis and accelerate the Schwann cells (SCs) proliferation and growth. In present study, three kinds of nerve guide conduits were constructed: one from cellulose/SPI hollow tube (CSC), another from CSC combined with SCs (CSSC), and the third one from CSSC combined with PQQ (CSSPC), respectively. And then they were applied to bridge and repair the sciatic nerve defect in rats, using autograft as control. Effects of different nerve guide conduits on the nerve regeneration were comparatively evaluated by general analysis, sciatic function index (SFI) and histological analysis (HE and TEM). Newly-formed regenerative nerve fibers were observed and running through the transparent nerve guide conduits 12 weeks after surgery. SFI results indicated that the reconstruction of motor function in CSSPC group was better than that in CSSC and CSC groups. HE images from the cross-sections and longitudinal-sections of the harvested regenerative nerve indicated that regenerative nerve fibers had been formed and accompanied with new blood vessels and matrix materials in the conduits. TEM images also showed that lots of fresh myelinated and non-myelinated nerve fibers had been formed. Parts of vacuolar, swollen and abnormal axons occurred in CSC and CSSC groups, while the vacuolization and swell of axons was the least serious in CSSPC group. These results indicated that CSSPC group had the most ability to repair and reconstruct the nerve structure and functions due to the comprehensive contributions from hollow CSC tube, SCs and PQQ. As a result, the CSSPC may have the potential for the applications as nerve guide

  7. True Lies: The Double Life of the Nucleotide Excision Repair Factors in Transcription and DNA Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Le May

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide excision repair (NER is a major DNA repair pathway in eukaryotic cells. NER removes structurally diverse lesions such as pyrimidine dimers, arising upon UV irradiation or bulky chemical adducts, arising upon exposure to carcinogens and some chemotherapeutic drugs. NER defects lead to three genetic disorders that result in predisposition to cancers, accelerated aging, neurological and developmental defects. During NER, more than 30 polypeptides cooperate to recognize, incise, and excise a damaged oligonucleotide from the genomic DNA. Recent papers reveal an additional and unexpected role for the NER factors. In the absence of a genotoxic attack, the promoters of RNA polymerases I- and II-dependent genes recruit XPA, XPC, XPG, and XPF to initiate gene expression. A model that includes the growth arrest and DNA damage 45α protein (Gadd45α and the NER factors, in order to maintain the promoter of active genes under a hypomethylated state, has been proposed but remains controversial. This paper focuses on the double life of the NER factors in DNA repair and transcription and describes the possible roles of these factors in the RNA synthesis process.

  8. Imaging of cartilage repair procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanghvi, Darshana; Munshi, Mihir; Pardiwala, Dinshaw

    2014-01-01

    The rationale for cartilage repair is to prevent precocious osteoarthritis in untreated focal cartilage injuries in the young and middle-aged population. The gamut of surgical techniques, normal postoperative radiological appearances, and possible complications have been described. An objective method of recording the quality of repair tissue is with the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score. This scoring system evaluates nine parameters that include the extent of defect filling, border zone integration, signal intensity, quality of structure and surface, subchondral bone, subchondral lamina, and records presence or absence of synovitis and adhesions. The five common techniques of cartilage repair currently offered include bone marrow stimulation (microfracture or drilling), mosaicplasty, synthetic resorbable scaffold grafts, osteochondral allograft transplants, and autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). Complications of cartilage repair procedures that may be demonstrated on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) include plug loosening, graft protuberance, graft depression, and collapse in mosaicplasty, graft hypertrophy in ACI, and immune response leading to graft rejection, which is more common with synthetic grafts and cadaveric allografts

  9. Characterization of the stability and bio-functionality of tethered proteins on bioengineered scaffolds: implications for stem cell biology and tissue repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Yi; Bruggeman, Kiara A F; Sheean, Rebecca K; Turner, Bradley J; Nisbet, David R; Parish, Clare L

    2014-05-23

    Various engineering applications have been utilized to deliver molecules and compounds in both innate and biological settings. In the context of biological applications, the timely delivery of molecules can be critical for cellular and organ function. As such, previous studies have demonstrated the superiority of long-term protein delivery, by way of protein tethering onto bioengineered scaffolds, compared with conventional delivery of soluble protein in vitro and in vivo. Despite such benefits little knowledge exists regarding the stability, release kinetics, longevity, activation of intracellular pathway, and functionality of these proteins over time. By way of example, here we examined the stability, degradation and functionality of a protein, glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), which is known to influence neuronal survival, differentiation, and neurite morphogenesis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) revealed that GDNF, covalently tethered onto polycaprolactone (PCL) electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds, remained present on the scaffold surface for 120 days, with no evidence of protein leaching or degradation. The tethered GDNF protein remained functional and capable of activating downstream signaling cascades, as revealed by its capacity to phosphorylate intracellular Erk in a neural cell line. Furthermore, immobilization of GDNF protein promoted cell survival and differentiation in culture at both 3 and 7 days, further validating prolonged functionality of the protein, well beyond the minutes to hours timeframe observed for soluble proteins under the same culture conditions. This study provides important evidence of the stability and functionality kinetics of tethered molecules. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Mycobacteria exploit three genetically distinct DNA double-strand break repair pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Richa; Barkan, Daniel; Redelman-Sidi, Gil; Shuman, Stewart; Glickman, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on their DNA repair pathways to resist genomic damage inflicted by the host. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are especially threatening to bacterial viability. DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR) requires nucleases that resect DSB ends and a strand exchange protein that facilitates homology search. RecBCD and RecA perform these functions in Escherichia coli and constitute the major pathway of error-free DSB repair. Mycobacteria, including the human pathogen M. tuberculosis, elaborate an additional error-prone pathway of DSB repair via non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) catalysed by Ku and DNA ligase D (LigD). Little is known about the relative contributions of HR and NHEJ to mycobacterial chromosome repair, the factors that dictate pathway choice, or the existence of additional DSB repair pathways. Here we demonstrate that Mycobacterium smegmatis has three DSB repair pathway options: HR, NHEJ and a novel mechanism of single-strand annealing (SSA). Inactivation of NHEJ or SSA is compensated by elevated HR. We find that mycobacterial RecBCD does not participate in HR or confer resistance to ionizing radiation (IR), but is required for the RecA-independent SSA pathway. In contrast, the mycobacterial helicase-nuclease AdnAB participates in the RecA-dependent HR pathway, and is a major determinant of resistance to IR and oxidative DNA damage. These findings reveal distinctive features of mycobacterial DSB repair, most notably the dedication of the RecBCD and AdnAB helicase-nuclease machines to distinct repair pathways. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Soldier use of dietary supplements, including protein and body building supplements, in a combat zone is different than use in garrison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Krista G; McLellan, Tom M; Farina, Emily K; McGraw, Susan M; Lieberman, Harris R

    2016-01-01

    United States Army personnel in garrison who are not deployed to combat theater report using dietary supplements (DSs) to promote health, increase physical and mental strength, and improve energy levels. Given the substantial physical and cognitive demands of combat, DS use may increase during deployment. This study compared DS use by garrison soldiers with DS use by personnel deployed to a combat theater in Afghanistan. Prevalence and patterns of DS use, demographic factors, and health behaviors were assessed by survey (deployed n = 221; garrison n = 1001). Eighty-two percent of deployed and 74% of garrison soldiers used DSs ≥ 1 time·week(-1). Logistic regression analyses, adjusted for significant demographic and health predictors of DS use, showed deployed personnel were more likely than garrison soldiers to use protein, amino acids, and combination products. Deployed females were more likely to use protein supplements and deployed males were more likely to use multivitamins, combination products, protein, and body building supplements than garrison respondents. Significantly more deployed (17%) than garrison (10%) personnel spent more than $50∙month(-1) on DSs. Higher protein supplement use among deployed personnel was associated with higher frequency of strength training and lower amounts of aerobic exercise for males but similar amounts of strength training and aerobic exercise for females. Protein supplements and combination products are used more frequently by deployed than garrison soldiers with the intent of enhancing strength and energy.

  12. Cranberry juice consumption lowers markers of cardiometabolic risk, including blood pressure and circulating C-reactive protein, triglyceride, and glucose concentrations in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, Janet A; Baer, David J; Khoo, Christina; Gebauer, Sarah K; Charron, Craig S

    2015-06-01

    Cardiometabolic risk is the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, or stroke, which are leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The objective of this study was to determine the potential of low-calorie cranberry juice (LCCJ) to lower cardiometabolic risk. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-arm study was conducted with controlled diets. Thirty women and 26 men (mean baseline characteristics: 50 y; weight, 79 kg; body mass index, 28 kg/m(2)) completed an 8-wk intervention with LCCJ or a flavor/color/energy-matched placebo beverage. Twice daily volunteers consumed 240 mL of LCCJ or the placebo beverage, containing 173 or 62 mg of phenolic compounds and 6.5 or 7.5 g of total sugar per 240-mL serving, respectively. Fasting serum triglycerides (TGs) were lower after consuming LCCJ and demonstrated a treatment × baseline interaction such that the participants with higher baseline TG concentrations were more likely to experience a larger treatment effect (1.15 ± 0.04 mmol/L vs. 1.25 ± 0.04 mmol/L, respectively; P = 0.027). Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) was lower for individuals consuming LCCJ than for individuals consuming the placebo beverage [ln transformed values of 0.522 ± 0.115 ln(mg/L) vs. 0.997 ± 0.120 ln(mg/L), P = 0.0054, respectively, and equivalent to 1.69 mg/L vs. 2.71 mg/L back-transformed]. LCCJ lowered diastolic blood pressure (BP) compared with the placebo beverage (69.2 ± 0.8 mm Hg for LCCJ vs. 71.6 ± 0.8 mm Hg for placebo; P = 0.048). Fasting plasma glucose was lower (P = 0.03) in the LCCJ group (5.32 ± 0.03 mmol/L) than in the placebo group (5.42 ± 0.03 mmol/L), and LCCJ had a beneficial effect on homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance for participants with high baseline values (P = 0.035). LCCJ can improve several risk factors of CVD in adults, including circulating TGs, CRP, and glucose, insulin resistance, and diastolic BP. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01295684. © 2015

  13. cDNA cloning of the basement membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan core protein, bamacan: a five domain structure including coiled-coil motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, R R; Couchman, J R

    1997-01-01

    Basement membranes contain several proteoglycans, and those bearing heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans such as perlecan and agrin usually predominate. Most mammalian basement membranes also contain chondroitin sulfate, and a core protein, bamacan, has been partially characterized. We have now....... The protein sequence has low overall homology, apart from very small NH2- and COOH-terminal motifs. At the junctions between the distal globular domains and the coiled-coil regions lie glycosylation sites, with up to three N-linked oligosaccharides and probably three chondroitin chains. Three other Ser...

  14. Deficient expression of DNA repair enzymes in early progression to sporadic colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Cancers often arise within an area of cells (e.g. an epithelial patch) that is predisposed to the development of cancer, i.e. a "field of cancerization" or "field defect." Sporadic colon cancer is characterized by an elevated mutation rate and genomic instability. If a field defect were deficient in DNA repair, DNA damages would tend to escape repair and give rise to carcinogenic mutations. Purpose To determine whether reduced expression of DNA repair proteins Pms2, Ercc1 and Xpf (pairing partner of Ercc1) are early steps in progression to colon cancer. Results Tissue biopsies were taken during colonoscopies of 77 patients at 4 different risk levels for colon cancer, including 19 patients who had never had colonic neoplasia (who served as controls). In addition, 158 tissue samples were taken from tissues near or within colon cancers removed by resection and 16 tissue samples were taken near tubulovillous adenomas (TVAs) removed by resection. 568 triplicate tissue sections (a total of 1,704 tissue sections) from these tissue samples were evaluated by immunohistochemistry for 4 DNA repair proteins. Substantially reduced protein expression of Pms2, Ercc1 and Xpf occurred in field defects of up to 10 cm longitudinally distant from colon cancers or TVAs and within colon cancers. Expression of another DNA repair protein, Ku86, was infrequently reduced in these areas. When Pms2, Ercc1 or Xpf were reduced in protein expression, then either one or both of the other two proteins most often had reduced protein expression as well. The mean inner colon circumferences, from 32 resections, of the ascending, transverse and descending/sigmoid areas were measured as 6.6 cm, 5.8 cm and 6.3 cm, respectively. When combined with other measurements in the literature, this indicates the approximate mean number of colonic crypts in humans is 10 million. Conclusions The substantial deficiencies in protein expression of DNA repair proteins Pms2, Ercc1 and Xpf in about 1 million

  15. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase rapidly suppresses multiple pro-inflammatory pathways in adipocytes including IL-1 receptor-associated kinase-4 phosphorylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mancini, Sarah J; White, Anna D; Bijland, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation of adipose tissue in obesity is associated with increased IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α secretion and proposed to contribute to insulin resistance. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates nutrient metabolism and is reported to have anti-inflammatory actions in adipose tissue, yet the m...

  16. Defective DNA repair mechanisms in prostate cancer: impact of olaparib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Felice F

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Francesca De Felice,1 Vincenzo Tombolini,1 Francesco Marampon,2 Angela Musella,3 Claudia Marchetti3 1Department of Radiotherapy, Policlinico Umberto I, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Rome, 2Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, Laboratory of Radiobiology, University of L’Aquila, L’Aquila, 3Department of Gynecological and Obstetrical Sciences and Urological Sciences, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Rome, Italy Abstract: The field of prostate oncology has continued to change dramatically. It has truly become a field that is intensely linked to molecular genetic alterations, especially DNA-repair defects. Germline breast cancer 1 gene (BRCA1 and breast cancer 2 gene (BRCA2 mutations are implicated in the highest risk of prostate cancer (PC predisposition and aggressiveness. Poly adenosine diphosphate ribose polymerase (PARP proteins play a key role in DNA repair mechanisms and represent a valid target for new therapies. Olaparib is an oral PARP inhibitor that blocks DNA repair pathway and coupled with BRCA mutated-disease results in tumor cell death. In phase II clinical trials, including patients with advanced castration-resistant PC, olaparib seems to be efficacious and well tolerated. Waiting for randomized phase III trials, olaparib should be considered as a promising treatment option for PC. Keywords: prostate cancer, metastatic disease, castration resistant, BRCA, DNA-repair, PARP, olaparib

  17. Collision Repair Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Collision Repair Campaign targets meaningful risk reduction in the Collision Repair source category to reduce air toxic emissions in their communities. The Campaign also helps shops to work towards early compliance with the Auto Body Rule.

  18. Retinal detachment repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medicines Problems breathing You may not recover full vision. ... detachments can be repaired. Failure to repair the retina always results in loss of vision to some degree. After surgery, the quality of ...

  19. Repair of 3-methyladenine and abasic sites by base excision repair mediates glioblastoma resistance to temozolomide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobola, Michael S.; Kolstoe, Douglas D.; Blank, A. [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Chamberlain, Marc C. [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Neurology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Silber, John R., E-mail: jrsilber@u.washington.edu [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-11-30

    Alkylating agents have long played a central role in the adjuvant therapy of glioblastoma (GBM). More recently, inclusion of temozolomide (TMZ), an orally administered methylating agent with low systemic toxicity, during and after radiotherapy has markedly improved survival. Extensive in vitro and in vivo evidence has shown that TMZ-induced O{sup 6}-methylguanine (O{sup 6}-meG) mediates GBM cell killing. Moreover, low or absent expression of O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), the sole human repair protein that removes O{sup 6}-meG from DNA, is frequently associated with longer survival in GBMs treated with TMZ, promoting interest in developing inhibitors of MGMT to counter resistance. However, the clinical efficacy of TMZ is unlikely to be due solely to O{sup 6}-meG, as the agent produces approximately a dozen additional DNA adducts, including cytotoxic N3-methyladenine (3-meA) and abasic sites. Repair of 3-meA and abasic sites, both of which are produced in greater abundance than O{sup 6}-meG, is mediated by the base excision repair (BER) pathway, and occurs independently of removal of O{sup 6}-meG. These observations indicate that BER activities are also potential targets for strategies to potentiate TMZ cytotoxicity. Here we review the evidence that 3-meA and abasic sites mediate killing of GBM cells. We also present in vitro and in vivo evidence that alkyladenine-DNA glycosylase, the sole repair activity that excises 3-meA from DNA, and Ape1, the major human abasic site endonuclease, mediate TMZ resistance in GBMs and represent potential anti-resistance targets.

  20. Contact Dermatitis In Automobile Repair workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi M P

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Automobile repair workers are at risk of developing skin morbidity including occupational dermatoses because of their exposure to mineral oils, petroleum products and its derivatives and lubricating oil. This cross- sectional study was carried out at Maharashtra State Road Transport Corporation workshops in Nagpur city to investigate prevalence of skin morbidity including contact dermatitis in automobile repair workers. The study included 288 (49.9% automobile repair workers 180 (31.3% workshop office staff and 109 (18.8% divisional office employees. Dermatitis was the commonest skin morbidity in all the study subjects and it was significantly more prevalent in automobile repair workers. Folliculitis was detected in 13.2% of auto â€" repair workers and was not seen in the other two groups. Increasing trend of skin morbidity was correlated with the length of service of employees. Proper protective measures along with suitable washing facilities should be provided

  1. Cloning human DNA repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeggo, P.A.; Carr, A.M.; Lehmann, A.R.

    1994-01-01

    Many human genes involved in the repair of UV damage have been cloned using different procedures and they have been of great value in assisting the understanding of the mechanism of nucleotide excision-repair. Genes involved in repair of ionizing radiation damage have proved more difficult to isolate. Positional cloning has localized the XRCC5 gene to a small region of chromosome 2q33-35, and a series of yeast artificial chromosomes covering this region have been isolated. Very recent work has shown that the XRCC5 gene encodes the 80 kDa subunit of the Ku DNA-binding protein. The Ku80 gene also maps to this region. Studies with fission yeast have shown that radiation sensitivity can result not only from defective DNA repair but also from abnormal cell cycle control following DNA damage. Several genes involved in this 'check-point' control in fission yeast have been isolated and characterized in detail. It is likely that a similar checkpoint control mechanism exists in human cells. (author)

  2. Higher plants and UV-B radiation: balancing damage, repair and acclimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, M.A.K.; Gaba, V.; Greenberg, B.M.

    1998-01-01

    Although UV-B is a minor component of sunlight, it has a disproportionately damaging effect on higher plants. Ultraviolet-sensitive targets include DNA, proteins and membranes, and these must be protected for normal growth and development. DNA repair and secondary metabolite accumulation during exposure to UV-B have been characterized in considerable detail, but little is known about the recovery of photosynthesis, induction of free-radical scavenging and morphogenic changes. A future challenge is to elucidate how UV-B-exposed plants balance damage, repair, acclimation and adaptation responses in a photobiologically dynamic environment. (author)

  3. Reprogramming Cells for Brain Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randall D. McKinnon

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available At present there are no clinical therapies that can repair traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury or degenerative brain disease. While redundancy and rewiring of surviving circuits can recover some lost function, the brain and spinal column lack sufficient endogenous stem cells to replace lost neurons or their supporting glia. In contrast, pre-clinical studies have demonstrated that exogenous transplants can have remarkable efficacy for brain repair in animal models. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs can provide paracrine factors that repair damage caused by ischemic injury, and oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC grafts give dramatic functional recovery from spinal cord injury. These studies have progressed to clinical trials, including human embryonic stem cell (hESC-derived OPCs for spinal cord repair. However, ESC-derived allografts are less than optimal, and we need to identify a more appropriate donor graft population. The cell reprogramming field has developed the ability to trans-differentiate somatic cells into distinct cell types, a technology that has the potential to generate autologous neurons and glia which address the histocompatibility concerns of allografts and the tumorigenicity concerns of ESC-derived grafts. Further clarifying how cell reprogramming works may lead to more efficient direct reprogram approaches, and possibly in vivo reprogramming, in order to promote brain and spinal cord repair.

  4. Pseudomonas putida AlkA and AlkB proteins comprise different defense systems for the repair of alkylation damage to DNA - in vivo, in vitro, and in silico studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Mielecki

    Full Text Available Alkylating agents introduce cytotoxic and/or mutagenic lesions to DNA bases leading to induction of adaptive (Ada response, a mechanism protecting cells against deleterious effects of environmental chemicals. In Escherichia coli, the Ada response involves expression of four genes: ada, alkA, alkB, and aidB. In Pseudomonas putida, the organization of Ada regulon is different, raising questions regarding regulation of Ada gene expression. The aim of the presented studies was to analyze the role of AlkA glycosylase and AlkB dioxygenase in protecting P. putida cells against damage to DNA caused by alkylating agents. The results of bioinformatic analysis, of survival and mutagenesis of methyl methanesulfonate (MMS or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG treated P. putida mutants in ada, alkA and alkB genes as well as assay of promoter activity revealed diverse roles of Ada, AlkA and AlkB proteins in protecting cellular DNA against alkylating agents. We found AlkA protein crucial to abolish the cytotoxic but not the mutagenic effects of alkylans since: (i the mutation in the alkA gene was the most deleterious for MMS/MNNG treated P. putida cells, (ii the activity of the alkA promoter was Ada-dependent and the highest among the tested genes. P. putida AlkB (PpAlkB, characterized by optimal conditions for in vitro repair of specific substrates, complementation assay, and M13/MS2 survival test, allowed to establish conservation of enzymatic function of P. putida and E. coli AlkB protein. We found that the organization of P. putida Ada regulon differs from that of E. coli. AlkA protein induced within the Ada response is crucial for protecting P. putida against cytotoxicity, whereas Ada prevents the mutagenic action of alkylating agents. In contrast to E. coli AlkB (EcAlkB, PpAlkB remains beyond the Ada regulon and is expressed constitutively. It probably creates a backup system that protects P. putida strains defective in other DNA repair systems

  5. Pseudomonas putida AlkA and AlkB Proteins Comprise Different Defense Systems for the Repair of Alkylation Damage to DNA – In Vivo, In Vitro, and In Silico Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielecki, Damian; Saumaa, Signe; Wrzesiński, Michał; Maciejewska, Agnieszka M.; Żuchniewicz, Karolina; Sikora, Anna; Piwowarski, Jan; Nieminuszczy, Jadwiga; Kivisaar, Maia; Grzesiuk, Elżbieta

    2013-01-01

    Alkylating agents introduce cytotoxic and/or mutagenic lesions to DNA bases leading to induction of adaptive (Ada) response, a mechanism protecting cells against deleterious effects of environmental chemicals. In Escherichia coli, the Ada response involves expression of four genes: ada, alkA, alkB, and aidB. In Pseudomonas putida, the organization of Ada regulon is different, raising questions regarding regulation of Ada gene expression. The aim of the presented studies was to analyze the role of AlkA glycosylase and AlkB dioxygenase in protecting P. putida cells against damage to DNA caused by alkylating agents. The results of bioinformatic analysis, of survival and mutagenesis of methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) or N-methyl-N’-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treated P. putida mutants in ada, alkA and alkB genes as well as assay of promoter activity revealed diverse roles of Ada, AlkA and AlkB proteins in protecting cellular DNA against alkylating agents. We found AlkA protein crucial to abolish the cytotoxic but not the mutagenic effects of alkylans since: (i) the mutation in the alkA gene was the most deleterious for MMS/MNNG treated P. putida cells, (ii) the activity of the alkA promoter was Ada-dependent and the highest among the tested genes. P. putida AlkB (PpAlkB), characterized by optimal conditions for in vitro repair of specific substrates, complementation assay, and M13/MS2 survival test, allowed to establish conservation of enzymatic function of P. putida and E. coli AlkB protein. We found that the organization of P. putida Ada regulon differs from that of E. coli. AlkA protein induced within the Ada response is crucial for protecting P. putida against cytotoxicity, whereas Ada prevents the mutagenic action of alkylating agents. In contrast to E. coli AlkB (EcAlkB), PpAlkB remains beyond the Ada regulon and is expressed constitutively. It probably creates a backup system that protects P. putida strains defective in other DNA repair systems against

  6. Deficiency of double-strand DNA break repair does not impair Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence in multiple animal models of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Brook E; Barkan, Daniel; Bongiorno, Paola; Karakousis, Petros C; Glickman, Michael S

    2014-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persistence within its human host requires mechanisms to resist the effector molecules of host immunity, which exert their bactericidal effects through damaging pathogen proteins, membranes, and DNA. Substantial evidence indicates that bacterial pathogens, including M. tuberculosis, require DNA repair systems to repair the DNA damage inflicted by the host during infection, but the role of double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair systems is unclear. Double-strand DNA breaks are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage and must be repaired for chromosome replication to proceed. M. tuberculosis elaborates three genetically distinct DSB repair systems: homologous recombination (HR), nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), and single-strand annealing (SSA). NHEJ, which repairs DSBs in quiescent cells, may be particularly relevant to M. tuberculosis latency. However, very little information is available about the phenotype of DSB repair-deficient M. tuberculosis in animal models of infection. Here we tested M. tuberculosis strains lacking NHEJ (a Δku ΔligD strain), HR (a ΔrecA strain), or both (a ΔrecA Δku strain) in C57BL/6J mice, C3HeB/FeJ mice, guinea pigs, and a mouse hollow-fiber model of infection. We found no difference in bacterial load, histopathology, or host mortality between wild-type and DSB repair mutant strains in any model of infection. These results suggest that the animal models tested do not inflict DSBs on the mycobacterial chromosome, that other repair pathways can compensate for the loss of NHEJ and HR, or that DSB repair is not required for M. tuberculosis pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Amino acid profiles of rumen undegradable protein: a comparison between forages including cereal straws and alfalfa and their respective total mixed rations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B; Jiang, L S; Liu, J X

    2018-06-01

    Optimizing the amino acid (AA) profile of rumen undegradable protein (RUP) can positively affect the amount of milk protein. This study was conducted to improve knowledge regarding the AA profile of rumen undegradable protein from corn stover, rice straw and alfalfa hay as well as the total mixed ratio diets (TMR) based on one of them as forage source [forage-to-concentrate ratio of 45:55 (30% of corn stover (CS), 30% of rice straw (RS), 23% of alfalfa hay (AH) and dry matter basis)]. The other ingredients in the three TMR diets were similar. The RUP of all the forages and diets was estimated by incubation for 16 hr in the rumen of three ruminally cannulated lactating cows. All residues were corrected for microbial colonization, which was necessary in determining the AA composition of RUP from feed samples using in situ method. Compared with their original AA composition, the AA pattern of forages and forage-based diets changed drastically after rumen exposure. In addition, the extent of ruminal degradation of analysed AA was not constant among the forages. The greatest individual AA degradability of alfalfa hay and corn stover was Pro, but was His of rice straw. A remarkable difference was observed between microbial attachment corrected and uncorrected AA profiles of RUP, except for alfalfa hay and His in the three forages and TMR diets. The ruminal AA degradability of cereal straws was altered compared with alfalfa hay but not for the TMR diets. In summary, the AA composition of forages and TMR-based diets changed significantly after ruminal exposure, indicating that the original AA profiles of the feed cannot represent its AA composition of RUP. The AA profile of RUP and ruminal AA degradability for corn stover and rice straw contributed to missing information in the field. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. EspC, an Autotransporter Protein Secreted by Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, Causes Apoptosis and Necrosis through Caspase and Calpain Activation, Including Direct Procaspase-3 Cleavage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Serapio-Palacios

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC has the ability to antagonize host apoptosis during infection through promotion and inhibition of effectors injected by the type III secretion system (T3SS, but the total number of these effectors and the overall functional relationships between these effectors during infection are poorly understood. EspC produced by EPEC cleaves fodrin, paxillin, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK, which are also cleaved by caspases and calpains during apoptosis. Here we show the role of EspC in cell death induced by EPEC. EspC is involved in EPEC-mediated cell death and induces both apoptosis and necrosis in epithelial cells. EspC induces apoptosis through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway by provoking (i a decrease in the expression levels of antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2, (ii translocation of the proapoptotic protein Bax from cytosol to mitochondria, (iii cytochrome c release from mitochondria to the cytoplasm, (iv loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, (v caspase-9 activation, (vi cleavage of procaspase-3 and (vii an increase in caspase-3 activity, (viii PARP proteolysis, and (ix nuclear fragmentation and an increase in the sub-G1 population. Interestingly, EspC-induced apoptosis was triggered through a dual mechanism involving both independent and dependent functions of its EspC serine protease motif, the direct cleavage of procaspase-3 being dependent on this motif. This is the first report showing a shortcut for induction of apoptosis by the catalytic activity of an EPEC protein. Furthermore, this atypical intrinsic apoptosis appeared to induce necrosis through the activation of calpain and through the increase of intracellular calcium induced by EspC. Our data indicate that EspC plays a relevant role in cell death induced by EPEC.

  9. Connexin Communication Compartments and Wound Repair in Epithelial Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanson, Marc; Watanabe, Masakatsu; O'Shaughnessy, Erin M; Zoso, Alice; Martin, Patricia E

    2018-05-03

    Epithelial tissues line the lumen of tracts and ducts connecting to the external environment. They are critical in forming an interface between the internal and external environment and, following assault from environmental factors and pathogens, they must rapidly repair to maintain cellular homeostasis. These tissue networks, that range from a single cell layer, such as in airway epithelium, to highly stratified and differentiated epithelial surfaces, such as the epidermis, are held together by a junctional nexus of proteins including adherens, tight and gap junctions, often forming unique and localised communication compartments activated for localised tissue repair. This review focuses on the dynamic changes that occur in connexins, the constituent proteins of the intercellular gap junction channel, during wound-healing processes and in localised inflammation, with an emphasis on the lung and skin. Current developments in targeting connexins as corrective therapies to improve wound closure and resolve localised inflammation are also discussed. Finally, we consider the emergence of the zebrafish as a concerted whole-animal model to study, visualise and track the events of wound repair and regeneration in real-time living model systems.

  10. Connexin Communication Compartments and Wound Repair in Epithelial Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Chanson

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial tissues line the lumen of tracts and ducts connecting to the external environment. They are critical in forming an interface between the internal and external environment and, following assault from environmental factors and pathogens, they must rapidly repair to maintain cellular homeostasis. These tissue networks, that range from a single cell layer, such as in airway epithelium, to highly stratified and differentiated epithelial surfaces, such as the epidermis, are held together by a junctional nexus of proteins including adherens, tight and gap junctions, often forming unique and localised communication compartments activated for localised tissue repair. This review focuses on the dynamic changes that occur in connexins, the constituent proteins of the intercellular gap junction channel, during wound-healing processes and in localised inflammation, with an emphasis on the lung and skin. Current developments in targeting connexins as corrective therapies to improve wound closure and resolve localised inflammation are also discussed. Finally, we consider the emergence of the zebrafish as a concerted whole-animal model to study, visualise and track the events of wound repair and regeneration in real-time living model systems.

  11. Skeletal muscle repair in a mouse model of nemaline myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanoudou, Despina; Corbett, Mark A; Han, Mei; Ghoddusi, Majid; Nguyen, Mai-Anh T; Vlahovich, Nicole; Hardeman, Edna C; Beggs, Alan H

    2006-09-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM), the most common non-dystrophic congenital myopathy, is a variably severe neuromuscular disorder for which no effective treatment is available. Although a number of genes have been identified in which mutations can cause NM, the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to the phenotypes are poorly understood. To address this question, we examined gene expression patterns in an NM mouse model carrying the human Met9Arg mutation of alpha-tropomyosin slow (Tpm3). We assessed five different skeletal muscles from affected mice, which are representative of muscles with differing fiber-type compositions, different physiological specializations and variable degrees of pathology. Although these same muscles in non-affected mice showed marked variation in patterns of gene expression, with diaphragm being the most dissimilar, the presence of the mutant protein in nemaline muscles resulted in a more similar pattern of gene expression among the muscles. This result suggests a common process or mechanism operating in nemaline muscles independent of the variable degrees of pathology. Transcriptional and protein expression data indicate the presence of a repair process and possibly delayed maturation in nemaline muscles. Markers indicative of satellite cell number, activated satellite cells and immature fibers including M-Cadherin, MyoD, desmin, Pax7 and Myf6 were elevated by western-blot analysis or immunohistochemistry. Evidence suggesting elevated focal repair was observed in nemaline muscle in electron micrographs. This analysis reveals that NM is characterized by a novel repair feature operating in multiple different muscles.

  12. Dynamic Regulation of a Cell Adhesion Protein Complex Including CADM1 by Combinatorial Analysis of FRAP with Exponential Curve-Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai-Yageta, Mika; Maruyama, Tomoko; Suzuki, Takashi; Ichikawa, Kazuhisa; Murakami, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Protein components of cell adhesion machinery show continuous renewal even in the static state of epithelial cells and participate in the formation and maintenance of normal epithelial architecture and tumor suppression. CADM1 is a tumor suppressor belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecule and forms a cell adhesion complex with an actin-binding protein, 4.1B, and a scaffold protein, MPP3, in the cytoplasm. Here, we investigate dynamic regulation of the CADM1-4.1B-MPP3 complex in mature cell adhesion by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis. Traditional FRAP analysis were performed for relatively short period of around 10min. Here, thanks to recent advances in the sensitive laser detector systems, we examine FRAP of CADM1 complex for longer period of 60 min and analyze the recovery with exponential curve-fitting to distinguish the fractions with different diffusion constants. This approach reveals that the fluorescence recovery of CADM1 is fitted to a single exponential function with a time constant (τ) of approximately 16 min, whereas 4.1B and MPP3 are fitted to a double exponential function with two τs of approximately 40-60 sec and 16 min. The longer τ is similar to that of CADM1, suggesting that 4.1B and MPP3 have two distinct fractions, one forming a complex with CADM1 and the other present as a free pool. Fluorescence loss in photobleaching analysis supports the presence of a free pool of these proteins near the plasma membrane. Furthermore, double exponential fitting makes it possible to estimate the ratio of 4.1B and MPP3 present as a free pool and as a complex with CADM1 as approximately 3:2 and 3:1, respectively. Our analyses reveal a central role of CADM1 in stabilizing the complex with 4.1B and MPP3 and provide insight in the dynamics of adhesion complex formation. PMID:25780926

  13. 46 CFR 131.575 - Yearly inspections and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... repaired as needed at least once a year. This procedure includes emptying and cleaning each fuel tank and... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Yearly inspections and repair. 131.575 Section 131.575..., Drills, and Inspections § 131.575 Yearly inspections and repair. (a) Each lifeboat, rescue boat, rigid...

  14. 29 CFR 541.401 - Computer manufacture and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Computer manufacture and repair. 541.401 Section 541.401... SALES EMPLOYEES Computer Employees § 541.401 Computer manufacture and repair. The exemption for employees in computer occupations does not include employees engaged in the manufacture or repair of...

  15. Heterotrimeric G proteins-mediated resistance to necrotrophic pathogens includes mechanisms independent of salicylic acid-, jasmonic acid/ethylene- and abscisic acid-mediated defense signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusov, Yuri; Sewelam, Nasser; Rookes, James Edward; Kunkel, Matt; Nowak, Ekaterina; Schenk, Peer Martin; Botella, José Ramón

    2009-04-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are involved in the defense response against necrotrophic fungi in Arabidopsis. In order to elucidate the resistance mechanisms involving heterotrimeric G proteins, we analyzed the effects of the Gβ (subunit deficiency in the mutant agb1-2 on pathogenesis-related gene expression, as well as the genetic interaction between agb1-2 and a number of mutants of established defense pathways. Gβ-mediated signaling suppresses the induction of salicylic acid (SA)-, jasmonic acid (JA)-, ethylene (ET)- and abscisic acid (ABA)-dependent genes during the initial phase of the infection with Fusarium oxysporum (up to 48 h after inoculation). However, at a later phase it enhances JA/ET-dependent genes such as PDF1.2 and PR4. Quantification of the Fusarium wilt symptoms revealed that Gβ- and SA-deficient mutants were more susceptible than wild-type plants, whereas JA- and ET-insensitive and ABA-deficient mutants demonstrated various levels of resistance. Analysis of the double mutants showed that the Gβ-mediated resistance to F. oxysporum and Alternaria brassicicola was mostly independent of all of the previously mentioned pathways. However, the progressive decay of agb1-2 mutants was compensated by coi1-21 and jin1-9 mutations, suggesting that at this stage of F. oxysporum infection Gβ acts upstream of COI1 and ATMYC2 in JA signaling. © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Efficacy of humidity retention bags for the reduced adsorption and improved cleaning of tissue proteins including prion-associated amyloid to surgical stainless steel surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secker, T J; Pinchin, H E; Hervé, R C; Keevil, C W

    2015-01-01

    Increasing drying time adversely affects attachment of tissue proteins and prion-associated amyloid to surgical stainless steel, and reduces the efficacy of commercial cleaning chemistries. This study tested the efficacy of commercial humidity retention bags to reduce biofouling on surgical stainless steel and to improve subsequent cleaning. Surgical stainless steel surfaces were contaminated with ME7-infected brain homogenates and left to dry for 15 to 1,440 min either in air, in dry polythene bags or within humidity retention bags. Residual contamination pre/post cleaning was analysed using Thioflavin T/SYPRO Ruby dual staining and microscope analysis. An increase in biofouling was observed with increased drying time in air or in sealed dry bags. Humidity retention bags kept both protein and prion-associated amyloid minimal across the drying times both pre- and post-cleaning. Therefore, humidity bags demonstrate a cheap, easy to implement solution to improve surgical instrument reprocessing and to potentially reduce associated hospital acquired infections.

  17. Repair of DNA damage in Deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    The repair of DNA lesions in Deinococcus radiodurans was examined with particular reference to DNA excision repair of ultraviolet light (UV) induced pyrimidine dimers. The characteristics of excision repair via UV endonucleases α and β in vivo varied with respect to (a) the substrate range of the enzymes, (b) the rate of repair of DNA damage (c) the requirement for a protein synthesised in response to DNA damage to attenuate exonuclease action at repairing regions. UV endonuclease α is postulated to incise DNA in a different manner from UV endonuclease β thus defining the method of subsequent repair. Several DNA damage specific endonuclease activities independent of α and β are described. Mutations of the uvsA, uvsF and uvsG genes resulted in an increase in single-strand breaks in response to DNA damage producing uncontrolled DNA degradation. Evidence is presented that these genes have a role in limiting the access of UV endonuclease β to DNA lesions. uvsF and uvsG are also shown to be linked to the mtoA gene. Mutation of uvsH and reo-1 produces further distinct phenotypes which are discussed. An overall model of excision repair of DNA damage in Deinococcus radiodurans is presented. (author)

  18. Biochemical Characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA Repair Enzymes – Nfo, XthA and Nei2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sailau Abeldenov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tuberculosis (TB is a human disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb. Treatment of TB requires long-term courses of multi-drug therapies to eliminate subpopulations of bacteria, which sometimes persist against antibiotics. Therefore, understanding of the mechanism of Mtb antibiotic-resistance is extremely important. During infection, Mtb overcomes a variety of body defense mechanisms, including treatment with the reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen. The bases in DNA molecule are susceptible to the damages caused by reactive forms of intermediate compounds of oxygen and nitrogen. Most of this damage is repaired by the base excision repair (BER pathway. In this study, we aimed to biochemically characterize three Mtb DNA repair enzymes of BER pathway. Methods: XthA, nfo, and nei genes were identified in mycobacteria by homology search of genomic sequences available in the GenBank database. We used standard methods of genetic engineering  to clone and sequence Mtb genes, which coded Nfo, XthA and Nei2 repair enzymes. The protein products of Mtb genes were expressed and purified in Escherichia coli using affinity tags. The enzymatic activity of purified Nfo, XthA, and Nei2 proteins were measured using radioactively labeled DNA substrates containing various modified residues. Results: The genes end (Rv0670, xthA (Rv0427c, and nei (Rv3297 were PCR amplified using genomic DNA of Mtb H37Rv with primers that contain specific restriction sites. The amplified products were inserted into pET28c(+ expression vector in such a way that the recombinant proteins contain C-terminal histidine tags. The plasmid constructs were verified by sequencing and then transformed into the Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 strain. Purification of recombinant proteins was performed using Ni2+ ions immobilized affinity column, coupled with the fast performance liquid chromatography machine AKTA. Identification of the isolated proteins was performed by

  19. Genomic survey and expression analysis of DNA repair genes in the genus Leptospira.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Pinheiro, Marinalva; Schons-Fonseca, Luciane; da Silva, Josefa B; Domingos, Renan H; Momo, Leonardo Hiroyuki Santos; Simões, Ana Carolina Quirino; Ho, Paulo Lee; da Costa, Renata M A

    2016-04-01

    Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonosis with important economic and public health consequences and is caused by pathogenic leptospires. The genus Leptospira belongs to the order Spirochaetales and comprises saprophytic (L. biflexa), pathogenic (L. interrogans) and host-dependent (L. borgpetersenii) members. Here, we present an in silico search for DNA repair pathways in Leptospira spp. The relevance of such DNA repair pathways was assessed through the identification of mRNA levels of some genes during infection in animal model and after exposition to spleen cells. The search was performed by comparison of available Leptospira spp. genomes in public databases with known DNA repair-related genes. Leptospires exhibit some distinct and unexpected characteristics, for instance the existence of a redundant mechanism for repairing a chemically diverse spectrum of alkylated nucleobases, a new mutS-like gene and a new shorter version of uvrD. Leptospira spp. shares some characteristics from Gram-positive, as the presence of PcrA, two RecQ paralogs and two SSB proteins; the latter is considered a feature shared by naturally competent bacteria. We did not find a significant reduction in the number of DNA repair-related genes in both pathogenic and host-dependent species. Pathogenic leptospires were enriched for genes dedicated to base excision repair and non-homologous end joining. Their evolutionary history reveals a remarkable importance of lateral gene transfer events for the evolution of the genus. Up-regulation of specific DNA repair genes, including components of SOS regulon, during infection in animal model validates the critical role of DNA repair mechanisms for the complex interplay between host/pathogen.

  20. A dietary pattern including nopal, chia seed, soy protein, and oat reduces serum triglycerides and glucose intolerance in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara-Cruz, Martha; Tovar, Armando R; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Medina-Vera, Isabel; Gil-Zenteno, Lidia; Hernández-Viveros, Isaac; López-Romero, Patricia; Ordaz-Nava, Guillermo; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Guillen Pineda, Luz E; Torres, Nimbe

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a health problem throughout the world and is associated with cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Thus, the purpose of the present work was to evaluate the effects of a dietary pattern (DP; soy protein, nopal, chia seed, and oat) on the biochemical variables of MetS, the AUC for glucose and insulin, glucose intolerance (GI), the relationship of the presence of certain polymorphisms related to MetS, and the response to the DP. In this randomized trial, the participants consumed their habitual diet but reduced by 500 kcal for 2 wk. They were then assigned to the placebo (P; n = 35) or DP (n = 32) group and consumed the reduced energy diet plus the P or DP beverage (235 kcal) minus the energy provided by these for 2 mo. All participants had decreases in body weight (BW), BMI, and waist circumference during the 2-mo treatment (P < 0.0001); however, only the DP group had decreases in serum TG, C-reactive protein (CRP), and AUC for insulin and GI after a glucose tolerance test. Interestingly, participants in the DP group with MetS and the ABCA1 R230C variant had a greater decrease in BW and an increase in serum adiponectin concentration after 2 mo of dietary treatment than those with the ABCA1 R230R variant. The results from this study suggest that lifestyle interventions involving specific DP for the treatment of MetS could be more effective if local foods and genetic variations of the population are considered.

  1. Emerging connection between centrosome and DNA repair machinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Mikio; Komatsu, Kenshi

    2009-01-01

    Centrosomes function in proper cell division in animal cells. The centrosome consists of a pair of centrioles and the surrounding pericentriolar matrix (PCM). After cytokinesis, daughter cells each acquire one centrosome, which subsequently duplicates at the G1/S phase in a manner that is dependent upon CDK2/cyclin-E activity. Defects in the regulation of centrosome duplication lead to tumorigenesis through abnormal cell division and resulting inappropriate chromosome segregation. Therefore, maintenance of accurate centrosome number is important for cell fate. Excess number of centrosomes can be induced by several factors including ionizing radiation (IR). Recent studies have shown that several DNA repair proteins localize to the centrosome and are involved in the regulation of centrosome number possibly through cell cycle checkpoints or direct modification of centrosome proteins. Furthermore, it has been reported that the development of microcephaly is likely caused by defective expression of centrosome proteins, such as ASPM, which are also involved in the response to IR. The present review highlights centrosome duplication in association with genotoxic stresses and the regulatory mechanism mediated by DNA repair proteins. (author)

  2. Activation of DNA damage repair pathways by murine polyomavirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiser, Katie; Nicholas, Catherine; Garcea, Robert L., E-mail: Robert.Garcea@Colorado.edu

    2016-10-15

    Nuclear replication of DNA viruses activates DNA damage repair (DDR) pathways, which are thought to detect and inhibit viral replication. However, many DNA viruses also depend on these pathways in order to optimally replicate their genomes. We investigated the relationship between murine polyomavirus (MuPyV) and components of DDR signaling pathways including CHK1, CHK2, H2AX, ATR, and DNAPK. We found that recruitment and retention of DDR proteins at viral replication centers was independent of H2AX, as well as the viral small and middle T-antigens. Additionally, infectious virus production required ATR kinase activity, but was independent of CHK1, CHK2, or DNAPK signaling. ATR inhibition did not reduce the total amount of viral DNA accumulated, but affected the amount of virus produced, indicating a defect in virus assembly. These results suggest that MuPyV may utilize a subset of DDR proteins or non-canonical DDR signaling pathways in order to efficiently replicate and assemble. -- Highlights: •Murine polyomavirus activates and recruits DNA damage repair (DDR) proteins to replication centers. •Large T-antigen mediates recruitment of DDR proteins to viral replication centers. •Inhibition or knockout of CHK1, CHK2, DNA-PK or H2AX do not affect viral titers. •Inhibition of ATR activity reduces viral titers, but not viral DNA accumulation.

  3. NDR1 modulates the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint and nucleotide excision repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong-Min; Choi, Ji Ye [Department of Biological Science, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Joo Mi [Research Center, Dongnam Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jin Woong; Leem, Sun-Hee; Koh, Sang Seok [Department of Biological Science, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Tae-Hong, E-mail: thkang@dau.ac.kr [Department of Biological Science, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-05

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the sole mechanism of UV-induced DNA lesion repair in mammals. A single round of NER requires multiple components including seven core NER factors, xeroderma pigmentosum A–G (XPA–XPG), and many auxiliary effector proteins including ATR serine/threonine kinase. The XPA protein helps to verify DNA damage and thus plays a rate-limiting role in NER. Hence, the regulation of XPA is important for the entire NER kinetic. We found that NDR1, a novel XPA-interacting protein, modulates NER by modulating the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint. In quiescent cells, NDR1 localized mainly in the cytoplasm. After UV irradiation, NDR1 accumulated in the nucleus. The siRNA knockdown of NDR1 delayed the repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in both normal cells and cancer cells. It did not, however, alter the expression levels or the chromatin association levels of the core NER factors following UV irradiation. Instead, the NDR1-depleted cells displayed reduced activity of ATR for some set of its substrates including CHK1 and p53, suggesting that NDR1 modulates NER indirectly via the ATR pathway. - Highlights: • NDR1 is a novel XPA-interacting protein. • NDR1 accumulates in the nucleus in response to UV irradiation. • NDR1 modulates NER (nucleotide excision repair) by modulating the UV-induced DNA-damage checkpoint response.

  4. Insect cold tolerance and repair of chill-injury at fluctuating thermal regimes: Role of 70kDa heat shock protein expression

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tollarová-Borovanská, Michaela; Lalouette, L.; Košťál, Vladimír

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 5 (2009), s. 312-319 ISSN 0143-2044 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/07/0269 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : insect * cold tolerance * heat shock proteins Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.074, year: 2009

  5. Current topics in DNA double-strand break repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Junya; Takata, Minoru; Iwabuchi, Kuniyoshi; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Sonoda, Eiichiro; Suzuki, Keiji; Tauchi, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    DNA double strand break (DSB) is one of the most critical types of damage which is induced by ionizing radiation. In this review, we summarize current progress in investigations on the function of DSB repair-related proteins. We focused on recent findings in the analysis of the function of proteins such as 53BP1, histone H2AX, Mus81-Eme1, Fanc complex, and UBC13, which are found to be related to homologous recombination repair or to non-homologous end joining. In addition to the function of these proteins in DSB repair, the biological function of nuclear foci formation following DSB induction is discussed. (author)

  6. Repair of DNA in xeroderma pigmentosum conjunctiva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newsome, D.A.; Kraemer, K.H.; Robbins, J.H.

    1975-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is an autosomal recessive disease with tumor formation on sun-exposed areas of the skin and eyes. Cells from most XP patients are deficient in repairing DNA damaged by ultraviolet (uv) light as shown by a reduced rate of tritiated thymidine (3HTdR) incorporation during their DNA repair synthesis. We have studied such repair synthesis in conjunctival cells from an XP patient with a conjunctival epithelioma and from normal cadaver conjunctiva. Cultured conjunctival cells were irradiated with uv light and then incubated with 3HTdR. Autoradiograms were prepared and showed that uv radiation induced a considerably slower rate of DNA repair synthesis in the XP cells than in normal cells. Many of the ocular abnormalities of XP, including tumor formation, may be the result of this defective DNA repair process

  7. Identification of quantitative trait loci underlying seed protein content of soybean including main, epistatic, and QTL × environment effects in different regions of Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Weili; Li, Wen; Zhang, Qi; Wu, Depeng; Zhao, Xue; Li, Haiyan; Han, Yingpeng; Li, Wenbin

    2017-08-01

    The objective here was to identify QTL underlying soybean protein content (PC), and to evaluate the additive and epistatic effects of the QTLs. A mapping population, consisting of 129 recombinant inbred lines (RILs), was created by crossing 'Dongnong 46' and 'L-100'. Phenotypic data of the parents and RILs were collected for 4 years in three locations of Heilongjiang Province of China. A total of 213 SSR markers were used to construct a genetic linkage map. Eight QTLs, located on seven chromosomes (Chr), were identified to be associated with PC among the 10 tested environments. Of the seven QTLs, five QTLs, qPR-2 (Satt710, on Chr9), qPR-3 (Sat_122, on Chr12), qPR-5 (Satt543, on Chr17), qPR-7 (Satt163, on Chr18), and qPR-8 (Satt614, on Chr20), were detected in six, seven, seven, six, and seven environments, respectively, implying relatively stable QTLs. qPR-3 could explain 3.33%-11.26% of the phenotypic variation across eight tested environments. qPR-5 and qPR-8 explained 3.64%-10.1% and 11.86%-18.40% of the phenotypic variation, respectively, across seven tested environments. Eight QTLs associated with PC exhibited additive and (or) additive × environment interaction effects. The results showed that environment-independent QTLs often had higher additive effects. Moreover, five epistatic pairwise QTLs were identified in the 10 environments.

  8. 'Regular' and 'emergency' repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luchnik, N.V.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments on the combined action of radiation and a DNA inhibitor using Crepis roots and on split-dose irradiation of human lymphocytes lead to the conclusion that there are two types of repair. The 'regular' repair takes place twice in each mitotic cycle and ensures the maintenance of genetic stability. The 'emergency' repair is induced at all stages of the mitotic cycle by high levels of injury. (author)

  9. Planar optical waveguide based sandwich assay sensors and processes for the detection of biological targets including protein markers, pathogens and cellular debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Jennifer S [Santa Fe, NM; Swanson, Basil I [Los Alamos, NM; Grace, Karen M [Los Alamos, NM; Grace, Wynne K [Los Alamos, NM; Shreve, Andrew P [Santa Fe, NM

    2009-06-02

    An assay element is described including recognition ligands bound to a film on a single mode planar optical waveguide, the film from the group of a membrane, a polymerized bilayer membrane, and a self-assembled monolayer containing polyethylene glycol or polypropylene glycol groups therein and an assay process for detecting the presence of a biological target is described including injecting a biological target-containing sample into a sensor cell including the assay element, with the recognition ligands adapted for binding to selected biological targets, maintaining the sample within the sensor cell for time sufficient for binding to occur between selected biological targets within the sample and the recognition ligands, injecting a solution including a reporter ligand into the sensor cell; and, interrogating the sample within the sensor cell with excitation light from the waveguide, the excitation light provided by an evanescent field of the single mode penetrating into the biological target-containing sample to a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide thereby exciting the fluorescent-label in any bound reporter ligand within a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide and resulting in a detectable signal.

  10. Repair processes for photochemical damage in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleaver, J.E.

    1974-01-01

    Repair processes for photochemical damage in cells following uv irradiation are reviewed. Cultured fibroblast cells from human patients with xeroderma pigmentosum were used as an example to illustrate aspects of repair of injuries to DNA and proteins. (250 references) (U.S.)

  11. Repair kinetics in tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thames, H.D.

    1989-01-01

    Monoexponential repair kinetics is based on the assumption of a single, dose-independent rate of repair of sublethal injury in the target cells for tissue injury after exposure to ionizing radiation. Descriptions of the available data based on this assumption have proved fairly successful for both acutely responding (skin, lip mucosa, gut) and late-responding (lung, spinal cord) normal tissues. There are indications of biphasic exponential repair in both categories, however. Unfortunately, the data usually lack sufficient resolution to permit unambiguous determination of the repair rates. There are also indications that repair kinetics may depend on the size of the dose. The data are conflicting on this account, however, with suggestions of both faster and slower repair after larger doses. Indeed, experiments that have been explicitly designed to test this hypothesis show either no effect (gut, spinal cord), faster repair after higher doses (lung, kidney), or slower repair after higher doses (skin). Monoexponential repair appears to be a fairly accurate description that provides an approximation to a more complicated picture, the elucidation of whose details will, however, require very careful and extensive experimental study. (author). 30 refs.; 1 fig

  12. Implication of Posttranslational Histone Modifications in Nucleotide Excision Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shisheng Li

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Histones are highly alkaline proteins that package and order the DNA into chromatin in eukaryotic cells. Nucleotide excision repair (NER is a conserved multistep reaction that removes a wide range of generally bulky and/or helix-distorting DNA lesions. Although the core biochemical mechanism of NER is relatively well known, how cells detect and repair lesions in diverse chromatin environments is still under intensive research. As with all DNA-related processes, the NER machinery must deal with the presence of organized chromatin and the physical obstacles it presents. A huge catalogue of posttranslational histone modifications has been documented. Although a comprehensive understanding of most of these modifications is still lacking, they are believed to be important regulatory elements for many biological processes, including DNA replication and repair, transcription and cell cycle control. Some of these modifications, including acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation and ubiquitination on the four core histones (H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 or the histone H2A variant H2AX, have been found to be implicated in different stages of the NER process. This review will summarize our recent understanding in this area.

  13. Recent research in DNA repair, mutation and recombination: a report of the DNA Repair Network meeting, held at City University, London on 18 December 1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, N J; Strike, P

    1996-09-02

    The now traditional one day Christmas DNA Repair meeting was held at City University, London for the third year in succession. With over 130 participants and a programme consisting of a total of 24 pre-offered presentations the meeting reached record dimensions. Attendees were from 24 institutions throughout the United Kingdom, and with several distinct research groups contained within the large contingents from the ICRF Clare Hall Laboratories and the MRC Cell Mutation Unit in Brighton, this indicates the increasing interest and depth of UK research in DNA repair. One slight disappointment of the meeting was the fall in the numbers of non-UK participants. Although the meeting in 1994 (Strike, 1995) saw an increase in presentations from Continental Europe (six countries including France, Germany. The Netherlands and Switzerland), the trend did not continue this year, with only Denmark being represented. The 24 contributors consisted of approximately equal numbers of postgraduate students, postdoctoral researchers and more "established' scientists reflecting the continuing policy of encouraging younger members of the repair community to present their work. The mix of presenters was particularly well illustrated by two excellent and consecutive talks by Professor Bryn Bridges (MRC Cell Mutation Unit) and Alison Mitchell, a postgraduate student in Stephen West's laboratory (ICRF, Clare Hall). The organisms under study were as equally disparate and included Archaebacteria, Escherichia coli. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Aspergillus, mice and men. The range of topics was also varied and included bacterial mutagenesis, NMR studies of Ada protein, preferential DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoint genes, reconstitution of nucleotide excision repair and V(D)J recombination in vitro, creation of repair deficient transgenic mice and mismatch defects in human cells. The result was a very successful meeting which was characterized by the consistently high

  14. Repair of oxidative DNA base damage in the host genome influences the HIV integration site sequence preference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey R Bennett

    Full Text Available Host base excision repair (BER proteins that repair oxidative damage enhance HIV infection. These proteins include the oxidative DNA damage glycosylases 8-oxo-guanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1 and mutY homolog (MYH as well as DNA polymerase beta (Polβ. While deletion of oxidative BER genes leads to decreased HIV infection and integration efficiency, the mechanism remains unknown. One hypothesis is that BER proteins repair the DNA gapped integration intermediate. An alternative hypothesis considers that the most common oxidative DNA base damages occur on guanines. The subtle consensus sequence preference at HIV integration sites includes multiple G:C base pairs surrounding the points of joining. These observations suggest a role for oxidative BER during integration targeting at the nucleotide level. We examined the hypothesis that BER repairs a gapped integration intermediate by measuring HIV infection efficiency in Polβ null cell lines complemented with active site point mutants of Polβ. A DNA synthesis defective mutant, but not a 5'dRP lyase mutant, rescued HIV infection efficiency to wild type levels; this suggested Polβ DNA synthesis activity is not necessary while 5'dRP lyase activity is required for efficient HIV infection. An alternate hypothesis that BER events in the host genome influence HIV integration site selection was examined by sequencing integration sites in OGG1 and MYH null cells. In the absence of these 8-oxo-guanine specific glycosylases the chromatin elements of HIV integration site selection remain the same as in wild type cells. However, the HIV integration site sequence preference at G:C base pairs is altered at several positions in OGG1 and MYH null cells. Inefficient HIV infection in the absence of oxidative BER proteins does not appear related to repair of the gapped integration intermediate; instead oxidative damage repair may participate in HIV integration site preference at the sequence level.

  15. Accelerated repair and reduced mutagenicity of DNA damage induced by cigarette smoke in human bronchial cells transfected with E.coli formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Foresta

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoke (CS is associated to a number of pathologies including lung cancer. Its mutagenic and carcinogenic effects are partially linked to the presence of reactive oxygen species and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH inducing DNA damage. The bacterial DNA repair enzyme formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG repairs both oxidized bases and different types of bulky DNA adducts. We investigated in vitro whether FPG expression may enhance DNA repair of CS-damaged DNA and counteract the mutagenic effects of CS in human lung cells. NCI-H727 non small cell lung carcinoma cells were transfected with a plasmid vector expressing FPG fused to the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP. Cells expressing the fusion protein EGFP-FPG displayed accelerated repair of adducts and DNA breaks induced by CS condensate. The mutant frequencies induced by low concentrations of CS condensate to the Na(+K(+-ATPase locus (oua(r were significantly reduced in cells expressing EGFP-FPG. Hence, expression of the bacterial DNA repair protein FPG stably protects human lung cells from the mutagenic effects of CS by improving cells' capacity to repair damaged DNA.

  16. Laparoscopic repair of large suprapubic hernias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikar, Hasan Ediz; Çetin, Kenan; Eyvaz, Kemal; Kaptanoglu, Levent; Küçük, Hasan Fehmi

    2017-09-01

    Suprapubic hernia is the term to describe ventral hernias located less than 4 cm above the pubic arch in the midline. Hernias with an upper margin above the arcuate line encounter technical difficulties, and the differences in repair methods forced us to define them as large suprapubic hernias. To present our experience with laparoscopic repair of large suprapubic hernias that allows adequate mesh overlap. Nineteen patients with suprapubic incisional hernias who underwent laparoscopic repair between May 2013 and January 2015 were included in the study. Patients with laparoscopic extraperitoneal repair who had a suprapubic hernia with an upper margin below the arcuate line were excluded. Two men and 17 women, with a mean age of 58.2, underwent laparoscopic repair. Most of the incisions were midline vertical (13/68.4%). Twelve (63.1%) of the patients had previous incisional hernia repair (PIHR group); the mean number of previous incisional hernia repair was 1.4. Mean defect size of the PIHR group was higher than in patients without previous repair - 107.3 cm 2 vs. 50.9 cm 2 (p < 0.05). Mean operating time of the PIHR group was higher than in patients without repair - 126 min vs. 77.9 min (p < 0.05). Although all complications occurred in the PIHR group, there was no statistically significant difference. Laparoscopic repair of large suprapubic hernias can be considered as the first option in treatment. The low recurrence rates reported in the literature and the lack of recurrence, as observed in our study, support this view.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA repair and association with aging- an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diaz, Ricardo Gredilla; Bohr, Vilhelm; Stevnsner, Tinna V.

    2010-01-01

    in the aging process and to be particularly deleterious in post-mitotic cells. Thus, DNA repair is an important mechanism for maintenance of genomic integrity. Despite the importance of mitochondria in the aging process, it was thought for many years that mitochondria lacked an enzymatic DNA repair system...... proteins and novel DNA repair pathways, thought to be exclusively present in the nucleus, have recently been described also to be present in mitochondria. Here we review the main mitochondrial DNA repair pathways and their association with the aging process....

  18. DNA repair systems as targets of cadmium toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giaginis, Constantinos; Gatzidou, Elisavet; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a heavy metal and a potent carcinogen implicated in tumor development through occupational and environmental exposure. Recent evidence suggests that proteins participating in the DNA repair systems, especially in excision and mismatch repair, are sensitive targets of Cd toxicity. Cd by interfering and inhibiting these DNA repair processes might contribute to increased risk for tumor formation in humans. In the present review, the information available on the interference of Cd with DNA repair systems and their inhibition is summarized. These actions could possibly explain the indirect contribution of Cd to mutagenic effects and/or carcinogenicity

  19. Involvement of p53 Mutation and Mismatch Repair Proteins Dysregulation in NNK-Induced Malignant Transformation of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Shen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Genome integrity is essential for normal cellular functions and cell survival. Its instability can cause genetic aberrations and is considered as a hallmark of most cancers. To investigate the carcinogenesis process induced by tobacco-specific carcinogen NNK, we studied the dynamic changes of two important protectors of genome integrity, p53 and MMR system, in malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells after NNK exposure. Our results showed that the expression of MLH1, one of the important MMR proteins, was decreased early and maintained the downregulation during the transformation in a histone modification involved and DNA methylation-independent manner. Another MMR protein PMS2 also displayed a declined expression while being in a later stage of transformation. Moreover, we conducted p53 mutation analysis and revealed a mutation at codon 273 which led to the replacement of arginine by histidine. With the mutation, DNA damage-induced activation of p53 was significantly impaired. We further reintroduced the wild-type p53 into the transformed cells, and the malignant proliferation can be abrogated by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. These findings indicate that p53 and MMR system play an important role in the initiation and progression of NNK-induced transformation, and p53 could be a potential therapeutic target for tobacco-related cancers.

  20. Repair of radiation damage in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlow, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The responses, such as survival, mutation, and carcinogenesis, of mammalian cells and tissues to radiation are dependent not only on the magnitude of the damage to macromolecular structures - DNA, RNA, protein, and membranes - but on the rates of macromolecular syntheses of cells relative to the half-lives of the damages. Cells possess a number of mechanisms for repairing damage to DNA. If the repair systems are rapid and error free, cells can tolerate much larger doses than if repair is slow or error prone. It is important to understand the effects of radiation and the repair of radiation damage because there exist reasonable amounts of epidemiological data that permits the construction of dose-response curves for humans. The shapes of such curves or the magnitude of the response will depend on repair. Radiation damage is emphasized because: (a) radiation dosimetry, with all its uncertainties for populations, is excellent compared to chemical dosimetry; (b) a number of cancer-prone diseases are known in which there are defects in DNA repair and radiation results in more chromosomal damage in cells from such individuals than in cells from normal individuals; (c) in some cases, specific radiation products in DNA have been correlated with biological effects, and (d) many chemical effects seem to mimic radiation effects. A further reason for emphasizing damage to DNA is the wealth of experimental evidence indicating that damages to DNA can be initiating events in carcinogenesis.

  1. Repair of radiation damage in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The responses, such as survival, mutation, and carcinogenesis, of mammalian cells and tissues to radiation are dependent not only on the magnitude of the damage to macromolecular structures - DNA, RNA, protein, and membranes - but on the rates of macromolecular syntheses of cells relative to the half-lives of the damages. Cells possess a number of mechanisms for repairing damage to DNA. If the repair systems are rapid and error free, cells can tolerate much larger doses than if repair is slow or error prone. It is important to understand the effects of radiation and the repair of radiation damage because there exist reasonable amounts of epidemiological data that permits the construction of dose-response curves for humans. The shapes of such curves or the magnitude of the response will depend on repair. Radiation damage is emphasized because: (a) radiation dosimetry, with all its uncertainties for populations, is excellent compared to chemical dosimetry; (b) a number of cancer-prone diseases are known in which there are defects in DNA repair and radiation results in more chromosomal damage in cells from such individuals than in cells from normal individuals; (c) in some cases, specific radiation products in DNA have been correlated with biological effects, and (d) many chemical effects seem to mimic radiation effects. A further reason for emphasizing damage to DNA is the wealth of experimental evidence indicating that damages to DNA can be initiating events in carcinogenesis

  2. Snowmobile Repair. Teacher Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Stephen S.; Conrad, Rex

    This teacher's guide contains 14 units on snowmobile repair: (1) introduction to snowmobile repair; (2) skis, front suspension, and steering; (3) drive clutch; (4) drive belts; (5) driven clutch; (6) chain drives; (7) jackshafts and axles; (8) rear suspension; (9) tracks; (10) shock absorbers; (11) brakes; (12) engines; (13) ignition and…

  3. A mycobacterial smc null mutant is proficient in DNA repair and long-term survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güthlein, Carolin; Wanner, Roger M; Sander, Peter; Böttger, Erik C; Springer, Burkhard

    2008-01-01

    SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes) proteins play fundamental roles in various aspects of chromosome organization and dynamics, including repair of DNA damage. Mutant strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis defective in SMC were constructed. Surprisingly, inactivation of smc did not result in recognizable phenotypes in hallmark assays characteristic for the function of these genes. This is in contrast to data for smc null mutants in other species.

  4. A Mycobacterial smc Null Mutant Is Proficient in DNA Repair and Long-Term Survival▿

    OpenAIRE

    Güthlein, Carolin; Wanner, Roger M.; Sander, Peter; Böttger, Erik C.; Springer, Burkhard

    2007-01-01

    SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes) proteins play fundamental roles in various aspects of chromosome organization and dynamics, including repair of DNA damage. Mutant strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis defective in SMC were constructed. Surprisingly, inactivation of smc did not result in recognizable phenotypes in hallmark assays characteristic for the function of these genes. This is in contrast to data for smc null mutants in other species.

  5. Fanconi Anemia Proteins and Their Interacting Partners: A Molecular Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaddar, Tagrid; Carreau, Madeleine

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, Fanconi anemia (FA) has been the subject of intense investigations, primarily in the DNA repair research field. Many discoveries have led to the notion of a canonical pathway, termed the FA pathway, where all FA proteins function sequentially in different protein complexes to repair DNA cross-link damages. Although a detailed architecture of this DNA cross-link repair pathway is emerging, the question of how a defective DNA cross-link repair process translates into the disease phenotype is unresolved. Other areas of research including oxidative metabolism, cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and transcriptional regulation have been studied in the context of FA, and some of these areas were investigated before the fervent enthusiasm in the DNA repair field. These other molecular mechanisms may also play an important role in the pathogenesis of this disease. In addition, several FA-interacting proteins have been identified with roles in these “other” nonrepair molecular functions. Thus, the goal of this paper is to revisit old ideas and to discuss protein-protein interactions related to other FA-related molecular functions to try to give the reader a wider perspective of the FA molecular puzzle. PMID:22737580

  6. Cell-Autonomous Progeroid Changes in Conditional Mouse Models for Repair Endonuclease XPG Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Barnhoorn (Sander); L.M. Uittenboogaard (Lieneke); D. Jaarsma (Dick); W.P. Vermeij (Wilbert); M. Tresini (Maria); M. Weymaere (Michael); H. Menoni (Hervé); R.M.C. Brandt (Renata); M.C. de Waard (Monique); S.M. Botter (Sander); A.H. Sarker (Altraf); N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); P.K. Cooper (Priscilla K.); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); I. van der Pluijm (Ingrid)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAs part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG

  7. Radiation-induced strand-breaks and DNA-protein crosslinks depend predominantly on the dose, oxygen concentration and repair time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, K.T.; Miyagi, Y.; Zhang, H.

    1995-01-01

    It has been known for many years that the DNA damage produced by ionizing radiation depends upon the oxygen concentration around the DNA. For example, the number of DNA strand-breaks (SBs) formed per unit dose decreases at low oxygen concentrations, and the number of DNA-protein crosslinks formed per unit dose increases at low oxygen concentrations. If radiation-induced SBs and DPCs are to be useful for detecting and/or quantifying hypoxic cells in solid tumors, the formation of these lesions must depend predominantly on the oxygen concentration around the DNA. All other physical, biological, and physiological factors must either be controllable or have little influence on the assay used to measure these lesions. This paper is a summary of the authors' recent experiments to determine if the radiation-induced SBs and DPCs measured by alkaline elution may be used to estimate the hypoxic fraction or fractional hypoxic volume of solid tumors

  8. Nucleotide excision repair in differentiated cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wees, Caroline van der [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Department of Cardiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Jansen, Jacob [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Vrieling, Harry [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Laarse, Arnoud van der [Department of Cardiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Zeeland, Albert van [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Mullenders, Leon [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands)]. E-mail: l.mullenders@lumc.nl

    2007-01-03

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the principal pathway for the removal of a wide range of DNA helix-distorting lesions and operates via two NER subpathways, i.e. global genome repair (GGR) and transcription-coupled repair (TCR). Although detailed information is available on expression and efficiency of NER in established mammalian cell lines, little is known about the expression of NER pathways in (terminally) differentiated cells. The majority of studies in differentiated cells have focused on repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and 6-4-photoproducts (6-4PP) because of the high frequency of photolesions at low level of toxicity and availability of sensitive technologies to determine photolesions in defined regions of the genome. The picture that emerges from these studies is blurred and rather complex. Fibroblasts and terminally differentiated myocytes of the rat heart display equally efficient GGR of 6-4PP but poor repair of CPD due to the absence of p48 expression. This repair phenotype is clearly different from human terminal differentiated neurons. Furthermore, both cell types were found to carry out TCR of CPD, thus mimicking the repair phenotype of established rodent cell lines. In contrast, in intact rat spermatogenic cells repair was very inefficient at the genome overall level and in transcriptionally active genes indicating that GGR and TCR are non-functional. Also, non-differentiated mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells exhibit low levels of NER after UV irradiation. However, the mechanisms that lead to low NER activity are clearly different: in differentiated spermatogenic cells differences in chromatin compaction and sequestering of NER proteins may underlie the lack of NER activity in pre-meiotic cells, whereas in non-differentiated ES cells NER is impaired by a strong apoptotic response.

  9. Discovery of DNA repair inhibitors by combinatorial library profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Benjamin J.; Sidman, Richard L.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2011-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors of DNA repair are emerging as potent and selective anti-cancer therapies, but the sheer magnitude of the protein networks involved in DNA repair processes poses obstacles to discovery of effective candidate drugs. To address this challenge, we used a subtractive combinatorial selection approach to identify a panel of peptide ligands that bind DNA repair complexes. Supporting the concept that these ligands have therapeutic potential, we show that one selected peptide specifically binds and non-competitively inactivates DNA-PKcs, a protein kinase critical in double-strand DNA break repair. In doing so, this ligand sensitizes BRCA-deficient tumor cells to genotoxic therapy. Our findings establish a platform for large-scale parallel screening for ligand-directed DNA repair inhibitors, with immediate applicability to cancer therapy. PMID:21343400

  10. NAMPT and NAMPT-controlled NAD Metabolism in Vascular Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Li, Wen-Lin; Liu, Jian-Min; Miao, Chao-Yu

    2016-06-01

    Vascular repair plays important roles in postischemic remodeling and rehabilitation in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, such as stroke and myocardial infarction. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), a well-known coenzyme involved in electron transport chain for generation of adenosine triphosphate, has emerged as an important controller regulating various biological signaling pathways. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is the rate-limiting enzyme for NAD biosynthesis in mammals. NAMPT may also act in a nonenzymatic manner, presumably mediated by unknown receptor(s). Rapidly accumulating data in the past decade show that NAMPT and NAMPT-controlled NAD metabolism regulate fundamental biological functions in endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and endothelial progenitor cells. The NAD-consuming proteins, including sirtuins, poly-ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs), and CD38, may contribute to the regulatory effects of NAMPT-NAD axis in these cells and vascular repair. This review discusses the current data regarding NAMPT and NAMPT-controlled NAD metabolism in vascular repair and the clinical potential translational application of NAMPT-related products in treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease.

  11. Histone displacement during nucleotide excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinant, C.; Bartek, J.; Bekker-Jensen, S.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an important DNA repair mechanism required for cellular resistance against UV light and toxic chemicals such as those found in tobacco smoke. In living cells, NER efficiently detects and removes DNA lesions within the large nuclear macromolecular complex called...... of histone variants and histone displacement (including nucleosome sliding). Here we review current knowledge, and speculate about current unknowns, regarding those chromatin remodeling activities that physically displace histones before, during and after NER....

  12. A comparison of the DNA and chromosome repair kinetics after #betta# irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hittelman, W.N.; Pollard, M.

    1982-01-01

    The kinetics of repair at the chromosome and DNA levels were compared after #betta# irradiation of Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO). Induction and repair of DNA damage were measured by the alkaline and neutral elution techniques, while chromosome damage and repair were determined by the technique of premature chromosome condensation. During and after #betta# irradiation, significant DNA repair occurred within 2 min. This fast repair could be inhibited by EDTA and pyrophosphate and probably reflected polynucleotide ligase activity. A slower component of DNA repair was detected between 15 and 60 min after irradiation, by which time most of the DNA had been repaired. In contrast, chromosome repair was not detectable until 45 min after irradiation, and nearly half of the chromatid breaks were repaired by 60 min. Cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, prevented chromosome break repair, yet had no effect on the immediate formation of chromatid exchanges or DNA repair. These results suggest the following: (1) the rapidly repairing DNA lesions are not important in the repair of chromosomes; (2) chromosome damage involves only a minority of the DNA lesions measured by alkaline and neutral DNA elution; and (3) chromosome repair may involve more than simply the repair of damaged DNA that can be detected by the alkaline and neutral elution assays

  13. Competition between replicative and translesion polymerases during homologous recombination repair in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Kane

    Full Text Available In metazoans, the mechanism by which DNA is synthesized during homologous recombination repair of double-strand breaks is poorly understood. Specifically, the identities of the polymerase(s that carry out repair synthesis and how they are recruited to repair sites are unclear. Here, we have investigated the roles of several different polymerases during homologous recombination repair in Drosophila melanogaster. Using a gap repair assay, we found that homologous recombination is impaired in Drosophila lacking DNA polymerase zeta and, to a lesser extent, polymerase eta. In addition, the Pol32 protein, part of the polymerase delta complex, is needed for repair requiring extensive synthesis. Loss of Rev1, which interacts with multiple translesion polymerases, results in increased synthesis during gap repair. Together, our findings support a model in which translesion polymerases and the polymerase delta complex compete during homologous recombination repair. In addition, they establish Rev1 as a crucial factor that regulates the extent of repair synthesis.

  14. Mutagenic DNA repair in Escherichia coli. VII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridges, B.A.; Mottershead, R.P.

    1978-01-01

    Incubation of E. coli WP2 in the presence of chloramphenicol (CAP) for 90 min before and 60 min after γ-irradiation had no effect on the induction of Trp + mutations. Bacteria that had been treated with CAP for 90 min prior to UV irradiation showed normal or near normal yields of induced mutations to streptomycin or colicin E2 resistance. Most of these mutations lost their photoreversibility (indicating 'fixation') during continued incubation with CAP for a further 60 min after irradiation, during which time neither protein nor DNA synthesis was detectable. It is suggested that CAP-sensitive protein synthesis is not required for mutagenic (error-prone) repair of lesions in pre-existing DNA, arguing against an inducible component in this repair. In contrast the frequency of UV-induced mutations to Trp + (largely at suppressor loci) was drastically reduced by CAP pretreatment, confirming the need for an active replication fork for UV-mutagenesis at these loci. It is known from the work of others that CAP given after UV abolishes mutagenesis at these loci. It is concluded that CAP-sensitive protein synthesis (consistent with a requirement for an inducible function) is necessary for mutagenic repair only in newly-replicated DNA (presumably at daughter strand gaps) and not in pre-existing DNA. The data are consistent with but do not prove the hypothesis that CAP-sensitive and insensitive modes of mutagenesis reflect minor differences in the operation of a single basic mutagenic repair system. (Auth.)

  15. Small-Molecule Inhibitors Targeting DNA Repair and DNA Repair Deficiency in Research and Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengel, Sarah R; Spies, M Ashley; Spies, Maria

    2017-09-21

    To maintain stable genomes and to avoid cancer and aging, cells need to repair a multitude of deleterious DNA lesions, which arise constantly in every cell. Processes that support genome integrity in normal cells, however, allow cancer cells to develop resistance to radiation and DNA-damaging chemotherapeutics. Chemical inhibition of the key DNA repair proteins and pharmacologically induced synthetic lethality have become instrumental in both dissecting the complex DNA repair networks and as promising anticancer agents. The difficulty in capitalizing on synthetically lethal interactions in cancer cells is that many potential targets do not possess well-defined small-molecule binding determinates. In this review, we discuss several successful campaigns to identify and leverage small-molecule inhibitors of the DNA repair proteins, from PARP1, a paradigm case for clinically successful small-molecule inhibitors, to coveted new targets, such as RAD51 recombinase, RAD52 DNA repair protein, MRE11 nuclease, and WRN DNA helicase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. E2F1 and p53 Transcription Factors as Accessory Factors for Nucleotide Excision Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Johnson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Many of the biochemical details of nucleotide excision repair (NER have been established using purified proteins and DNA substrates. In cells however, DNA is tightly packaged around histones and other chromatin-associated proteins, which can be an obstacle to efficient repair. Several cooperating mechanisms enhance the efficiency of NER by altering chromatin structure. Interestingly, many of the players involved in modifying chromatin at sites of DNA damage were originally identified as regulators of transcription. These include ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, histone modifying enzymes and several transcription factors. The p53 and E2F1 transcription factors are well known for their abilities to regulate gene expression in response to DNA damage. This review will highlight the underappreciated, transcription-independent functions of p53 and E2F1 in modifying chromatin structure in response to DNA damage to promote global NER.

  17. Damage-induced DNA repair processes in Escherichia coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slezarikova, V.

    1986-01-01

    The existing knowledge is summed up of the response of Escherichia coli cells to DNA damage due to various factors including ultraviolet radiation. So far, three inducible mechanisms caused by DNA damage are known, viz., SOS induction, adaptation and thermal shock induction. Greatest attention is devoted to SOS induction. Its mechanism is described and the importance of the lexA recA proteins is shown. In addition, direct or indirect role is played by other proteins, such as the ssb protein binding the single-strand DNA sections. The results are reported of a study of induced repair processes in Escherichia coli cells repeatedly irradiated with UV radiation. A model of induction by repeated cell irradiation discovered a new role of induced proteins, i.e., the elimination of alkali-labile points in the daughter DNA synthetized on a damaged model. The nature of the alkali-labile points has so far been unclear. In the adaptation process, regulation proteins are synthetized whose production is induced by the presence of alkylation agents. In the thermal shock induction, new proteins synthetize in cells, whose function has not yet been clarified. (E.S.)

  18. Mitochondrial base excision repair assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maynard, Scott; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten

    2010-01-01

    The main source of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage is reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during normal cellular metabolism. The main mtDNA lesions generated by ROS are base modifications, such as the ubiquitous 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) lesion; however, base loss and strand breaks may also occur....... Many human diseases are associated with mtDNA mutations and thus maintaining mtDNA integrity is critical. All of these lesions are repaired primarily by the base excision repair (BER) pathway. It is now known that mammalian mitochondria have BER, which, similarly to nuclear BER, is catalyzed by DNA...... glycosylases, AP endonuclease, DNA polymerase (POLgamma in mitochondria) and DNA ligase. This article outlines procedures for measuring oxidative damage formation and BER in mitochondria, including isolation of mitochondria from tissues and cells, protocols for measuring BER enzyme activities, gene...

  19. Exposure of Human Lung Cells to Tobacco Smoke Condensate Inhibits the Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel Holcomb

    Full Text Available Exposure to tobacco smoke is the number one risk factor for lung cancer. Although the DNA damaging properties of tobacco smoke have been well documented, relatively few studies have examined its effect on DNA repair pathways. This is especially true for the nucleotide excision repair (NER pathway which recognizes and removes many structurally diverse DNA lesions, including those introduced by chemical carcinogens present in tobacco smoke. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of tobacco smoke on NER in human lung cells. We studied the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC, a surrogate for tobacco smoke, on the NER pathway in two different human lung cell lines; IMR-90 lung fibroblasts and BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells. To measure NER, we employed a slot-blot assay to quantify the introduction and removal of UV light-induced 6-4 photoproducts and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. We find a dose-dependent inhibition of 6-4 photoproduct repair in both cell lines treated with CSC. Additionally, the impact of CSC on the abundance of various NER proteins and their respective RNAs was investigated. The abundance of XPC protein, which is required for functional NER, is significantly reduced by treatment with CSC while the abundance of XPA protein, also required for NER, is unaffected. Both XPC and XPA RNA levels are modestly reduced by CSC treatment. Finally, treatment of cells with MG-132 abrogates the reduction in the abundance of XPC protein produced by treatment with CSC, suggesting that CSC enhances proteasome-dependent turnover of the protein that is mediated by ubiquitination. Together, these findings indicate that tobacco smoke can inhibit the same DNA repair pathway that is also essential for the removal of some of the carcinogenic DNA damage introduced by smoke itself, increasing the DNA damage burden of cells exposed to tobacco smoke.

  20. Theoretical approach of complex DNA lesions: from formation to repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bignon, Emmanuelle

    2017-01-01

    This thesis work is focused on the theoretical modelling of DNA damages, from formation to repair. Several projects have been led in this framework, which can be sorted into three different parts. One on hand, we studied complex DNA reactivity. It included a study about 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-guanine (8oxoG) mechanisms of formation, a project concerning the UV-induced pyrimidine 6-4 pyrimidone (6-4PP) endogenous photo-sensitizer features, and another one about DNA photo-sensitization by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (i.e. ketoprofen and ibuprofen). On the other hand, we investigated mechanical properties of damaged DNA. The structural signature of a DNA lesion is of major importance for their repair, unfortunately only few NMR and X-ray structures of such systems are available. In order to gain insights into their dynamical structure, we investigated a series of complex damages: clustered abasic sites, interstrand cross-links, and the 6-4PP photo-lesion. Likewise, we studied the interaction modes DNA with several polyamines, which are well known to interact with the double helix, but also with the perspective to model DNA-protein cross-linking. The third part concerned the study of DNA interactions with repair enzymes. In line with the structural study about clustered abasic sites, we investigated the dynamics of the same system, but this time interacting with the APE1 endonuclease. We also studied interactions between the Fpg glycosylase with an oligonucleotides containing tandem 8-oxoG on one hand and 8-oxoG - abasic site as multiply damaged sites. Thus, we shed new lights on damaged DNA reactivity, structure and repair, which provides perspectives for biomedicine and life's mechanisms understanding as we begin to describe nucleosomal DNA. (author)

  1. Radiation repair models for clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Roger G

    2018-02-28

    A number of newly emerging clinical techniques involve non-conventional patterns of radiation delivery which require an appreciation of the role played by radiation repair phenomena. This review outlines the main models of radiation repair, focussing on those which are of greatest clinical usefulness and which may be incorporated into biologically effective dose assessments. The need to account for the apparent "slowing-down" of repair rates observed in some normal tissues is also examined, along with a comparison of the relative merits of the formulations which can be used to account for such phenomena. Jack Fowler brought valuable insight to the understanding of radiation repair processes and this article includes reference to his important contributions in this area.

  2. Function of Rad51 paralogs in eukaryotic homologous recombinational repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, N.; Skowronek, K.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Homologous recombinational repair (HRR) is an important mechanism for maintaining genetic integrity and cancer prevention by accurately repair of DNA double strand breaks induced by environmental insults or occurred in DNA replication. A critical step in HRR is the polymerization of Rad51 on single stranded DNA to form nuclear protein filaments, the later conduct DNA strand paring and exchange between homologous strands. A number of proteins, including replication protein A (RPA), Rad52 and Rad51 paralogs, are suggested to modulate or facilitate the process of Rad51 filament formation. Five Rad51 paralogs, namely XRCC2, XRCC3, Rad51B, Rad51C and Rad51D have been identified in eucaryotic cells. These proteins show distant protein sequence identity to Rad51, to yeast Rad51 paralogs (Rad55 and Rad57) and to each other. Hamster or chicken mutants of Rad51 paralogs exhibit hypersensitivity to a variety of DNA damaging agents, especially cross-linking agents, and are defective in assembly of Rad51 onto HRR site after DNA damage. Recent data from our and other labs showed that Rad51 paralogs constitute two distinct complexes in cell extracts, one contains XRCC2, Rad51B, Rad51C and Rad51D, and the other contains Rad51C and XRCC3. Rad51C is involved in both complexes. Our results also showed that XRCC3-Rad51C complex interacts with Rad51 in vivo. Furthermore, overexpression of Rad52 can partially suppress the hypersensitivity of XRCC2 mutant irs1 to ionizing radiation and corrected the defects in Rad51 focus formation. These results suggest that XRCC2 and other Rad51 paralogs play a mediator function to Rad51 in the early stage of HRR

  3. DNA Repair Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DNA molecule which makes it ideal for storage and propagation of genetic information. ... of these errors are broadly referred to as DNA repair. DNA can ... changes occur in the human genome per day. ..... nails, frequent physical and mental.

  4. Brain aneurysm repair - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000123.htm Brain aneurysm repair - discharge To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. You had a brain aneurysm . An aneurysm is a weak area in ...

  5. Ventral hernia repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... incarcerated) in the hernia and become impossible to push back in. This is usually painful. The blood supply ... you are lying down or that you cannot push back in. Risks The risks of ventral hernia repair ...

  6. Omphalocele repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100033.htm Omphalocele repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... Go to slide 4 out of 4 Overview Omphalocele is an abdominal wall defect at the base ...

  7. Human Fanconi anemia monoubiquitination pathway promotes homologous DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Koji; Yang, Yun-Gui; Pierce, Andrew J; Taniguchi, Toshiyasu; Digweed, Martin; D'Andrea, Alan D; Wang, Zhao-Qi; Jasin, Maria

    2005-01-25

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a recessive disorder characterized by congenital abnormalities, progressive bone-marrow failure, and cancer susceptibility. Cells from FA patients are hypersensitive to agents that produce DNA crosslinks and, after treatment with these agents, have pronounced chromosome breakage and other cytogenetic abnormalities. Eight FANC genes have been cloned, and the encoded proteins interact in a common cellular pathway. DNA-damaging agents activate the monoubiquitination of FANCD2, resulting in its targeting to nuclear foci that also contain BRCA1 and BRCA2/FANCD1, proteins involved in homology-directed DNA repair. Given the interaction of the FANC proteins with BRCA1 and BRCA2, we tested whether cells from FA patients (groups A, G, and D2) and mouse Fanca-/- cells with a targeted mutation are impaired for this repair pathway. We find that both the upstream (FANCA and FANCG) and downstream (FANCD2) FA pathway components promote homology-directed repair of chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs). The FANCD2 monoubiquitination site is critical for normal levels of repair, whereas the ATM phosphorylation site is not. The defect in these cells, however, is mild, differentiating them from BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutant cells. Surprisingly, we provide evidence that these proteins, like BRCA1 but unlike BRCA2, promote a second DSB repair pathway involving homology, i.e., single-strand annealing. These results suggest an early role for the FANC proteins in homologous DSB repair pathway choice.

  8. Celebrating DNA's Repair Crew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Thomas A

    2015-12-03

    This year, the Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to Tomas Lindahl, Aziz Sancar, and Paul Modrich for their seminal studies of the mechanisms by which cells from bacteria to man repair DNA damage that is generated by normal cellular metabolism and stress from the environment. These studies beautifully illustrate the remarkable power of DNA repair to influence life from evolution through disease susceptibility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Base excision repair in Archaea: back to the future in DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Stefano; Tell, Gianluca

    2014-09-01

    Together with Bacteria and Eukarya, Archaea represents one of the three domain of life. In contrast with the morphological difference existing between Archaea and Eukarya, these two domains are closely related. Phylogenetic analyses confirm this evolutionary relationship showing that most of the proteins involved in DNA transcription and replication are highly conserved. On the contrary, information is scanty about DNA repair pathways and their mechanisms. In the present review the most important proteins involved in base excision repair, namely glycosylases, AP lyases, AP endonucleases, polymerases, sliding clamps, flap endonucleases, and ligases, will be discussed and compared with bacterial and eukaryotic ones. Finally, possible applications and future perspectives derived from studies on Archaea and their repair pathways, will be taken into account. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Repair of DNA-polypeptide crosslinks by human excision nuclease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Joyce T.; Sancar, Aziz

    2006-03-01

    DNA-protein crosslinks are relatively common DNA lesions that form during the physiological processing of DNA by replication and recombination proteins, by side reactions of base excision repair enzymes, and by cellular exposure to bifunctional DNA-damaging agents such as platinum compounds. The mechanism by which pathological DNA-protein crosslinks are repaired in humans is not known. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of recognition and repair of protein-DNA and oligopeptide-DNA crosslinks by the human excision nuclease. Under our assay conditions, the human nucleotide excision repair system did not remove a 16-kDa protein crosslinked to DNA at a detectable level. However, 4- and 12-aa-long oligopeptides crosslinked to the DNA backbone were recognized by some of the damage recognition factors of the human excision nuclease with moderate selectivity and were excised from DNA at relatively efficient rates. Our data suggest that, if coupled with proteolytic degradation of the crosslinked protein, the human excision nuclease may be the major enzyme system for eliminating protein-DNA crosslinks from the genome. damage recognition | nucleotide excision repair

  11. Isolating human DNA repair genes using rodent-cell mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Brookman, K.W.; Salazar, E.P.; Stewart, S.A.; Mitchell, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    The DNA repair systems of rodent and human cells appear to be at least as complex genetically as those in lower eukaryotes and bacteria. The use of mutant lines of rodent cells as a means of identifying human repair genes by functional complementation offers a new approach toward studying the role of repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In each of six cases examined using hybrid cells, specific human chromosomes have been identified that correct CHO cell mutations affecting repair of damage from uv or ionizing radiations. This finding suggests that both the repair genes and proteins may be virtually interchangeable between rodent and human cells. Using cosmid vectors, human repair genes that map to chromosome 19 have cloned as functional sequences: ERCC2 and XRCC1. ERCC1 was found to have homology with the yeast excision repair gene RAD10. Transformants of repair-deficient cell lines carrying the corresponding human gene show efficient correction of repair capacity by all criteria examined. 39 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  12. Involvement of the DNA mismatch repair system in cisplatin sensitivity of testicular germ cell tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolph, Christiane; Melau, Cecilie; Nielsen, John E.

    2017-01-01

    in the majority of tumours, although the underlying mechanism largely remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system in the cisplatin sensitivity of TGCT. MethodsThe expression pattern of key MMR proteins, including MSH2, MSH6, MLH1 and PMS2...... proteins, in particular MSH2 and MLH1, which are involved in the recognition of cisplatin adducts and in activation of the DNA damage response pathway to initiate apoptosis....

  13. Comprehensive Characterization of Minichromosome Maintenance Complex (MCM) Protein Interactions Using Affinity and Proximity Purifications Coupled to Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Marie-Line; Bastin, Charlotte; Lévesque, Dominique; Boisvert, François-Michel

    2016-09-02

    The extensive identification of protein-protein interactions under different conditions is an important challenge to understand the cellular functions of proteins. Here we use and compare different approaches including affinity purification and purification by proximity coupled to mass spectrometry to identify protein complexes. We explore the complete interactome of the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex by using both approaches for all of the different MCM proteins. Overall, our analysis identified unique and shared interaction partners and proteins enriched for distinct biological processes including DNA replication, DNA repair, and cell cycle regulation. Furthermore, we mapped the changes in protein interactions of the MCM complex in response to DNA damage, identifying a new role for this complex in DNA repair. In summary, we demonstrate the complementarity of these approaches for the characterization of protein interactions within the MCM complex.

  14. Proceedings of the specialist research meeting on 'abnormal protein aggregation and the folding diseases, and their protection and repair system' [1-2 November 2012, Kumatori, Osaka (Japan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadakane, Yutaka; Fujii, Noriko

    2013-03-01

    For this meeting, we invited leading biochemistry, structural biology, physical chemistry, analytical chemistry, molecular biology, radiation biology, and enzymology researchers. During the meeting, it was reported that the triggers of abnormal protein aggregation include racemization and isomerization of aspartyl residues, deamination of appraisingly residues. The process and the protection of amyloid fibril formation, and the alteration of the higher order structure of abnormal aggregated protein were also covered. Furthermore, the new analytical methods for the detection of the abnormal protein were presented. The topics of this meeting were widespread and the discussion was exciting. This special issue was the proceedings of the meeting with collection of 11 papers. The one of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  15. Fanconi anemia and DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grompe, M; D'Andrea, A

    2001-10-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by defects in at least eight distinct genes FANCA, B, C, D1, D2, E, F and G. The clinical phenotype of all FA complementation groups is similar and is characterized by progressive bone marrow failure, cancer proneness and typical birth defects. The principal cellular phenotype is hypersensitivity to DNA damage, particularly interstrand DNA crosslinks. The FA proteins constitute a multiprotein pathway whose precise biochemical function(s) remain unknown. Five of the FA proteins (FANCA, C, E, F and G) interact in a nuclear complex upstream of FANCD2. FANCB and FANCD1 have not yet been cloned, but it is likely that FANCB is part of the nuclear complex and that FANCD1 acts downstream of FANCD2. The FA nuclear complex regulates the mono-ubiquitination of FANCD2 in response to DNA damage, resulting in targeting of this protein into nuclear foci. These foci also contain BRCA1 and other DNA damage response proteins. In male meiosis, FANCD2 also co-localizes with BRCA1 at synaptonemal complexes. Together, these data suggest that the FA pathway functions primarily as a DNA damage response system, although its exact role (direct involvement in DNA repair versus indirect, facilitating role) has not yet been defined.

  16. A human repair gene ERCC5 is involved in group G xeroderma pigmentosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiomi, Tadahiro

    1994-01-01

    In E. coli, ultraviolet-induced DNA damage is removed by the coordinated action of UVR A, B, C, and D proteins (1). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, more than ten genes have been reported to be involved in excision repair (2). The nucleotide excision repair pathway has been extensively studied in these organisms. To facilitate studying nucleotide excision repair in mammalian cells. Ultraviolet-sensitive rodent cell mutants have been isolated and classified into 11 complementation groups (9,10). The human nucleotide excision repair genes which complement the defects of the mutants have been designated as the ERCC (excision repair cross-complementing) genes; a number is added to refer to the particular rodent complementation group that is corrected by the gene. Recently, several human DNA repair genes have been cloned using rodent cell lines sensitive to ultraviolet. These include ERCC2 (3), ERCC3 (4), and ERCC6 (5), which correspond to the defective genes in the ultraviolet-sensitive human disorders xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) group D (6) and group B (4), and Cockayne's syndrome (CS) group B (7), respectively. The human excision repair gene ERCC5 was cloned after DNA-mediated gene transfer of human HeLa cell genomic DNA into the ultraviolet-sensitive mouse mutant XL216, a member of rodent complementation group 5 (11,12) and the gene was mapped on human chromosome 13q32.3-q33.1 by the replication R-banding fluorescence in situ hybridization method (13). The ERCC5 cDNA encodes a predicted 133 kDa nuclear protein that shares some homology with product of the yeast DNA repair gene RAD 2. Transfection with mouse ERCC5 cDNA restored normal levels of ultraviolet-resistance to XL216 cells. Microinjection of ERCC5 cDNA specifically restored the defect of XP group G cells (XP-G) as measured by unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS), and XP-G cells stably transformed with ERCC5 cDNA showed nearly normal ultraviolet resistance. (J.P.N.)

  17. Repair of abasic sites in DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dianov, Grigory L.; Sleeth, Kate M.; Dianova, Irina I.; Allinson, Sarah L

    2003-10-29

    Repair of both normal and reduced AP sites is activated by AP endonuclease, which recognizes and cleaves a phosphodiester bond 5' to the AP site. For a short period of time an incised AP site is occupied by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and then DNA polymerase {beta} adds one nucleotide into the repair gap and simultaneously removes the 5'-sugar phosphate. Finally, the DNA ligase III/XRCC1 complex accomplishes repair by sealing disrupted DNA ends. However, long-patch BER pathway, which is involved in the removal of reduced abasic sites, requires further DNA synthesis resulting in strand displacement and the generation of a damage-containing flap that is later removed by the flap endonuclease. Strand-displacement DNA synthesis is accomplished by DNA polymerase {delta}/{epsilon} and DNA ligase I restores DNA integrity. DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase {delta}/{epsilon} is dependent on proliferating cell nuclear antigen, which also stimulates the DNA ligase I and flap endonuclease. These repair events are supported by multiple protein-protein interactions.

  18. DNA repair mechanism in radioresistant bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitayama, Shigeru

    1992-01-01

    Many radiation resistant bacteria have been isolated from various sources which are not in high background field. Since Deinococcus radiodurans had been isolated first in 1956, studies on the mechanism for radioresistance were carried out mostly using this bacterium. DNA in this bacterium isn't protected against injury induced by not only ionizing radiation but also ultraviolet light. Therefore, DNA damages induced by various treatments are efficiently and accurately repaired in this cells. Damages in base and/or sugar in DNA are removed by endonucleases which, if not all, are synthesized during postirradiation incubation. Following the endonucleolytic cleavage the strand scissions in DNA are seemed to be rejoined by a process common for the repair of strand scissions induced by such as ionizing radiations. Induce protein(s) is also involved in this rejoining process of strand scissions. DNA repair genes were classified into three phenotypic groups. (1)Genes which are responsible for the endonucleolytic activities. (2) Genes involved in the rejoining of DNA strand scissions. (3) Genes which participate in genetic recombination and repair. Three genes belong to (1) and (2) were cloned onto approximately 1 kbp DNA fragments which base sequences have been determined. (author)

  19. DNA repair mechanism in radioresistant bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitayama, Shigeru

    1992-01-01

    Many radiation resistant bacteria have been isolated from various sources which are not in high background field. Since Deinococcus radiodurans had been isolated first in 1956, the studies on the mechanism of radioresistance were mostly carried out using this bacterium. DNA in this bacterium isn't protected against injury induced by not only ionizing radiation but also ultraviolet light. Therefore, DNA damages induced by various treatments are efficiently and accurately repaired in this cells. Damages in base and/or sugar in DNA are removed by endonucleases which, if not all, are synthesized during postirradiation incubation. Following the endonucleolytic cleavage the strand scissions in DNA are seemed to be rejoined by a process common for the repair of strand scissions induced by such as ionizing radiations. Induce protein(s) is also involved in this rejoining process of strand scissions. DNA repair genes were classified into three phenotypic groups. (1) Genes which are responsible for the endonucleolytic activities. (2) Genes involved in the rejoining of DNA strand scissions. (3) Genes which participate in genetic recombination and repair. Three genes belong to (1) and (2) were cloned onto approximately 1 kbp DNA fragments which base sequences have been determined. (author)

  20. DNA repair in neurons: So if they don't divide what's to repair?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishel, Melissa L.; Vasko, Michael R.; Kelley, Mark R.

    2007-01-01

    Neuronal DNA repair remains one of the most exciting areas for investigation, particularly as a means to compare the DNA repair response in mitotic (cancer) vs. post-mitotic (neuronal) cells. In addition, the role of DNA repair in neuronal cell survival and response to aging and environmental insults is of particular interest. DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as generated by mitochondrial respiration includes altered bases, abasic sites, and single- and double-strand breaks which can be prevented by the DNA base excision repair (BER) pathway. Oxidative stress accumulates in the DNA of the human brain over time especially in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and is proposed to play a critical role in aging and in the pathogenesis of several neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease, ALS, and Alzheimer's diseases. Because DNA damage accumulates in the mtDNA more than nuclear DNA, there is increased interest in DNA repair pathways and the consequence of DNA damage in the mitochondria of neurons. The type of damage that is most likely to occur in neuronal cells is oxidative DNA damage which is primarily removed by the BER pathway. Following the notion that the bulk of neuronal DNA damage is acquired by oxidative DNA damage and ROS, the BER pathway is a likely area of focus for neuronal studies of DNA repair. BER variations in brain aging and pathology in various brain regions and tissues are presented. Therefore, the BER pathway is discussed in greater detail in this review than other repair pathways. Other repair pathways including direct reversal, nucleotide excision repair (NER), mismatch repair (MMR), homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining are also discussed. Finally, there is a growing interest in the role that DNA repair pathways play in the clinical arena as they relate to the neurotoxicity and neuropathy associated with cancer treatments. Among the numerous side effects of cancer treatments, major clinical effects

  1. DNA damage repair and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Norio

    2003-01-01

    Tailored treatment is not new in radiotherapy; it has been the major subject for the last 20-30 years. Radiation responses and RBE (relative biological effectiveness) depend on assay systems, endpoints, type of tissues and tumors, radiation quality, dose rate, dose fractionation, physiological and environmental factors etc, Latent times to develop damages also differ among tissues and endpoints depending on doses and radiation quality. Recent progress in clarification of radiation induced cell death, especially of apoptotic cell death, is quite important for understanding radiosensitivity of tumor cure process as well as of tumorigenesis. Apoptotic cell death as well as dormant cells had been unaccounted and missed into a part of reproductive cell death. Another area of major progress has been made in clarifying repair mechanisms of radiation damage, i.e., non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombinational repair (HRR). New approaches and developments such as cDNA or protein micro arrays and so called informatics in addition to basic molecular biological analysis are expected to aid identifying molecules and their roles in signal transduction pathways, which are multi-factorial and interactive each other being involved in radiation responses. (authors)

  2. Double-Strand DNA Break Repair in Mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickman, Michael S

    2014-10-01

    Discontinuity of both strands of the chromosome is a lethal event in all living organisms because it compromises chromosome replication. As such, a diversity of DNA repair systems has evolved to repair double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs). In part, this diversity of DSB repair systems has evolved to repair breaks that arise in diverse physiologic circumstances or sequence contexts, including cellular states of nonreplication or breaks that arise between repeats. Mycobacteria elaborate a set of three genetically distinct DNA repair pathways: homologous recombination, nonhomologous end joining, and single-strand annealing. As such, mycobacterial DSB repair diverges substantially from the standard model of prokaryotic DSB repair and represents an attractive new model system. In addition, the presence in mycobacteria of a DSB repair system that can repair DSBs in nonreplicating cells (nonhomologous end joining) or when DSBs arise between repeats (single-strand annealing) has clear potential relevance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis, although the exact role of these systems in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis is still being elucidated. In this article we will review the genetics of mycobacterial DSB repair systems, focusing on recent insights.

  3. Radiation-Induced Upregulation of Gene Expression From Adenoviral Vectors Mediated by DNA Damage Repair and Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nokisalmi, Petri; Rajecki, Maria; Pesonen, Sari; Escutenaire, Sophie; Soliymani, Rabah; Tenhunen, Mikko; Ahtiainen, Laura; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In the present study, we evaluated the combination of replication-deficient adenoviruses and radiotherapy in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the mechanism of radiation-mediated upregulation of adenoviral transgene expression. Methods and Materials: Adenoviral transgene expression (luciferase or green fluorescent protein) was studied with and without radiation in three cell lines: breast cancer M4A4-LM3, prostate cancer PC-3MM2, and lung cancer LNM35/enhanced green fluorescent protein. The effect of the radiation dose, modification of the viral capsid, and five different transgene promoters were studied. The cellular responses were studied using mass spectrometry and immunofluorescence analysis. Double strand break repair was modulated by inhibitors of heat shock protein 90, topoisomerase-I, and DNA protein kinase, and transgene expression was measured. Results: We found that a wide range of radiation doses increased adenoviral transgene expression regardless of the cell line, transgene, promoter, or viral capsid modification. Treatment with adenovirus, radiation, and double strand break repair inhibitors resulted in persistence of double strand breaks and subsequent increases in adenovirus transgene expression. Conclusions: Radiation-induced enhancement of adenoviral transgene expression is linked to DNA damage recognition and repair. Radiation induces a global cellular response that results in increased production of RNA and proteins, including adenoviral transgene products. This study provides a mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with adenoviral gene delivery.

  4. Both base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair in humans are influenced by nutritional factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, Asgeir; Karlsen, Anette; Azqueta, Amaya; Tirado, Anna Estaban; Blomhoff, Rune; Collins, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Lack of reliable assays for DNA repair has largely prevented measurements of DNA repair from being included in human biomonitoring studies. Using newly developed modifications of the comet assay we tested whether a fruit- and antioxidant-rich plant-based intervention could affect base excision repair (BER) and nucleotide excision repair (NER) in a group of 102 male volunteers. BER and NER repair capacities were measured in lymphocytes before and after a dietary intervention lasting 8 weeks. The study had one control group, one group consuming three kiwifruits per day and one group consuming a variety of antioxidant-rich fruits and plant products in addition to their normal diet. DNA strand breaks were reduced following consumption of both kiwifruits (13%, p = 0.05) and antioxidant-rich plant products (20%, p = 0.02). Increased BER (55%, p = 0.01) and reduced NER (-39%, p plant products. Reduced NER was also observed in the kiwifruit group (-38%, p = 0.05), but BER was not affected in this group. Here we have demonstrated that DNA repair is affected by diet and that modified versions of the comet assay can be used to assess activity of different DNA repair pathways in human biomonitoring studies. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Regulation of nucleotide excision repair through ubiquitination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Li; Audesh Bhat; Wei Xiao

    2011-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the most versatile DNA-repair pathway in all organisms.While bacteria require only three proteins to complete the incision step of NER,eukaryotes employ about 30 proteins to complete the same step.Here we summarize recent studies demonstrating that ubiquitination,a post-translational modification,plays critical roles in regulating the NER activity either dependent on or independent of ubiquitin-proteolysis.Several NER components have been shown as targets of ubiquitination while others are actively involved in the ubiquitination process.We argue through this analysis that ubiquitination serves to coordinate various steps of NER and meanwhile connect NER with other related pathways to achieve the efficient global DNA-damage response.

  6. Financial implications of ventral hernia repair: a hospital cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Drew; Davenport, Daniel L; Korosec, Ryan L; Roth, J Scott

    2013-01-01

    Complicated ventral hernias are often referred to tertiary care centers. Hospital costs associated with these repairs include direct costs (mesh materials, supplies, and nonsurgeon labor costs) and indirect costs (facility fees, equipment depreciation, and unallocated labor). Operative supplies represent a significant component of direct costs, especially in an era of proprietary synthetic meshes and biologic grafts. We aim to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of complex abdominal wall hernia repair at a tertiary care referral facility. Cost data on all consecutive open ventral hernia repairs (CPT codes 49560, 49561, 49565, and 49566) performed between 1 July 2008 and 31 May 2011 were analyzed. Cases were analyzed based upon hospital status (inpatient vs. outpatient) and whether the hernia repair was a primary or secondary procedure. We examined median net revenue, direct costs, contribution margin, indirect costs, and net profit/loss. Among primary hernia repairs, cost data were further analyzed based upon mesh utilization (no mesh, synthetic, or biologic). Four-hundred and fifteen patients underwent ventral hernia repair (353 inpatients and 62 outpatients); 173 inpatients underwent ventral hernia repair as the primary procedure; 180 inpatients underwent hernia repair as a secondary procedure. Median net revenue ($17,310 vs. 10,360, p costs for cases performed without mesh were $5,432; median direct costs for those using synthetic and biologic mesh were $7,590 and 16,970, respectively (p financial loss was $8,370. Outpatient ventral hernia repairs, with and without synthetic mesh, resulted in median net losses of $1,560 and 230, respectively. Ventral hernia repair is associated with overall financial losses. Inpatient synthetic mesh repairs are essentially budget neutral. Outpatient and inpatient repairs without mesh result in net financial losses. Inpatient biologic mesh repairs result in a negative contribution margin and striking net financial losses. Cost

  7. Radiobiological significance of DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzin, A.M.

    1978-01-01

    A short outline is given on the history of the problem relating to the repair of radiation injuries, specifically its molecular mechanisms. The most urgent problems which currently confront the researchers are noted. This is a further study on the role of DNA repair in post-radiation recovery, search for ways to activate and suppress DNA repair, investigations into the activity balance of various repair enzymes as well as the problem of errors in the structure of repairing DNA. An important role is attached to the investigations of DNA repair in solving a number of practical problems

  8. Transcriptional and Posttranslational Regulation of Nucleotide Excision Repair: The Guardian of the Genome against Ultraviolet Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Min Park

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV radiation from sunlight represents a constant threat to genome stability by generating modified DNA bases such as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD and pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4 photoproducts (6-4PP. If unrepaired, these lesions can have deleterious effects, including skin cancer. Mammalian cells are able to neutralize UV-induced photolesions through nucleotide excision repair (NER. The NER pathway has multiple components including seven xeroderma pigmentosum (XP proteins (XPA to XPG and numerous auxiliary factors, including ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR protein kinase and RCC1 like domain (RLD and homologous to the E6-AP carboxyl terminus (HECT domain containing E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 2 (HERC2. In this review we highlight recent data on the transcriptional and posttranslational regulation of NER activity.

  9. Double Strand Break Repair, one mechanism can hide another: Alternative non-homologous end joining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rass, E.; Grabarz, A.; Bertrand, P.; Lopez, B.S.

    2012-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks are major cytotoxic lesions encountered by the cells. They can be induced by ionizing radiation or endogenous stress and can lead to genetic instability. Two mechanisms compete for the repair of DNA double strand breaks: homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Homologous recombination requires DNA sequences homology and is initiated by single strand resection. Recently, advances have been made concerning the major steps and proteins involved in resection. NHEJ, in contrast, does not require sequence homology. The existence of a DNA double strand break repair mechanism, independent of KU and ligase IV, the key proteins of the canonical non homologous end joining pathway, has been revealed lately and named alternative non homologous end joining. The hallmarks of this highly mutagenic pathway are deletions at repair junctions and frequent use of distal micro-homologies. This mechanism is also initiated by a single strand resection of the break. The aim of this review is firstly to present recent data on single strand resection, and secondly the alternative NHEJ pathway, including a discussion on the fidelity of NHEJ. Based on current knowledge, canonical NHEJ does not appear as an intrinsically mutagenic mechanism, but in contrast, as a conservative one. The structure of broken DNA ends actually dictates the quality repair of the alternative NHEJ and seems the actual responsible for the mutagenesis attributed beforehand to the canonical NHEJ. The existence of this novel DNA double strand breaks repair mechanism needs to be taken into account in the development of radiosensitizing strategies in order to optimise the efficiency of radiotherapy. (authors)

  10. Remote repair of the dissolvers in Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otani, Yosikuni

    1985-01-01

    In the Tokai fuel reprocessing plant, there occurred failures (pinholes) in two dissolver tanks successively in 1982 and 1983. These dissolvers are set under high radiation field, not permitting access of the personnel. So, repair works were carried out after development of the remotely operated repair system. For repair of the failed dissolver tanks, after tests and studies, the means was employed of grinding off the wall surface to small depth and then forming over it a corrosion resistant sealing layer by padding welding. The repair system which enabled the repair and the inspection in the cell by remote operation consisted of six devices including polishing, welding, dye penetration test, etc. Repair works on the dissolvers took two months and a half from September 1983. (Mori, K.)

  11. Dynamic organization of genetic recombination proteins and chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essers, J.; Van Cappellen, G.; Van Drunen, E.; Theil, A.; Jaspers, N.N.G.J.; Houtsmuller, A.B.; Vermeulen, W.; Kanaar, R.

    2003-01-01

    Homologous recombination requires the co-ordinated action of the RAD52 group proteins, including Rad51, Rad52 and Rad54. Upon treatment of mammalian cells with ionizing radiation, these proteins accumulate into foci at sites of DSB induction. We probed the nature of the DNA damage-induced foci in living cells with the use of photobleaching techniques. These foci are not static assemblies of DNA repair proteins. Instead, they are dynamic structures of which Rad51 is a stable core component, while Rad52 and Rad54 reversibly interact with the structure. Furthermore, even though the RAD52 group proteins colocalize in the DNA damage-induced foci, the majority of the proteins are not part of the same multi-protein complex in the absence of DNA damage. Executing DNA transactions through dynamic multi-protein complexes, rather than stable holo-complexes, allows greater flexibility during the transaction. In case of DNA repair, for example, it allows cross talk between different DNA repair pathways and coupling to other DNA transactions, such as replication. In addition to the behavior of proteins in living cells, we have tracked chromosomes during cell division. Our results suggest that the relative position of chromosomes in the mother cell is conserved in its daughter cells

  12. 48 CFR 22.1003-6 - Repair distinguished from remanufacturing of equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... include the following: (1) Repair of an automobile, truck, or other vehicle, construction equipment... 22.1003-4(c)(1) and (d)(1)(iv)). (3) Repair of appliances, radios, television sets, calculators, and...

  13. Biological radiolesions and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskowski, W.

    1981-01-01

    In 7 chapters, the book answers the following questions: 1) What reactions are induced in biological matter by absorption of radiation energy. 2) In what parts of the cell do the radiation-induced reactions with detectable biological effects occur. 3) In which way are these cell components changed by different qualities of radiation. 4) What are the cell mechanisms by which radiation-induced changes can be repaired. 5) What is the importance of these repair processes for man, his life and evolution. At the end of each chapter, there is a bibliography of relevant publications in this field. (orig./MG) [de

  14. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters in Pediatric Patients: To Repair or Not Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnannt, Ralph; Patel, Premal; Temple, Michael; Al Brashdi, Yahya; Amaral, Joao; Parra, Dimitri; Rea, Vanessa; Stephens, Derek; Connolly, Bairbre

    2017-01-01

    IntroductionPreservation of venous access in children is a major concern in pediatric interventional radiology. If a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) breaks, there are two options: repair the line with a repair kit or exchange the line over a wire in the interventional suite. The purpose of this study is to assess the outcome of PICC repairs in children and to compare these with the outcomes of PICC exchange.Materials and MethodsThis is a single-center, retrospective study of central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) following management of externally broken PICCs (2010–2014). The occurrence of CLABSI within 30 days after repair (Group A) or exchange (Group B) of a line was analyzed, as well as PICCs exchanged following an initial and failed repair.ResultsA total of 235 PICC breaks were included in the study, of which 161 were repaired, and 116 of whom were successful (68%, Group A). No repair was performed in 74 PICCs—55/74 of these were exchanged over a wire (74%, Group B), and 19/74 lines were removed. The 30 days post-repair CLABSI rate (Group A) was 2.0 infections per 1000 catheter days, and the calculated risk was 4.3%. In comparison the 30 days post-exchange CLABSI rate (Group B) was 4.0 per 1000 catheter days and the calculated risk 10.9%. This difference was significant when adjusted for antibiotic use (OR 3.87; 95% CI 1.07–14.0, p = 0.039).ConclusionThe results of this study support repairing a broken PICC instead of removing or replacing the line.

  15. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters in Pediatric Patients: To Repair or Not Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnannt, Ralph, E-mail: ralph.gnannt@usz.ch; Patel, Premal; Temple, Michael; Al Brashdi, Yahya; Amaral, Joao; Parra, Dimitri; Rea, Vanessa [University of Toronto, Image Guided Therapy, Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children (Canada); Stephens, Derek [University of Toronto, Child Health Evaluative Sciences (Canada); Connolly, Bairbre [University of Toronto, Image Guided Therapy, Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children (Canada)

    2017-06-15

    IntroductionPreservation of venous access in children is a major concern in pediatric interventional radiology. If a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) breaks, there are two options: repair the line with a repair kit or exchange the line over a wire in the interventional suite. The purpose of this study is to assess the outcome of PICC repairs in children and to compare these with the outcomes of PICC exchange.Materials and MethodsThis is a single-center, retrospective study of central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) following management of externally broken PICCs (2010–2014). The occurrence of CLABSI within 30 days after repair (Group A) or exchange (Group B) of a line was analyzed, as well as PICCs exchanged following an initial and failed repair.ResultsA total of 235 PICC breaks were included in the study, of which 161 were repaired, and 116 of whom were successful (68%, Group A). No repair was performed in 74 PICCs—55/74 of these were exchanged over a wire (74%, Group B), and 19/74 lines were removed. The 30 days post-repair CLABSI rate (Group A) was 2.0 infections per 1000 catheter days, and the calculated risk was 4.3%. In comparison the 30 days post-exchange CLABSI rate (Group B) was 4.0 per 1000 catheter days and the calculated risk 10.9%. This difference was significant when adjusted for antibiotic use (OR 3.87; 95% CI 1.07–14.0, p = 0.039).ConclusionThe results of this study support repairing a broken PICC instead of removing or replacing the line.

  16. Primary repair of colon injuries: clinical study of nonselective approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazovic, Ranko G; Barisic, Goran I; Krivokapic, Zoran V

    2010-12-02

    This study was designed to determine the role of primary repair and to investigate the possibility of expanding indications for primary repair of colon injuries using nonselective approach. Two groups of patients were analyzed. Retrospective (RS) group included 30 patients managed by primary repair or two stage surgical procedure according to criteria published by Stone (S/F) and Flint (Fl). In this group 18 patients were managed by primary repair. Prospective (PR) group included 33 patients with primary repair as a first choice procedure. In this group, primary repair was performed in 30 cases. Groups were comparable regarding age, sex, and indexes of trauma severity. Time between injury and surgery was shorter in PR group, (1.3 vs. 3.1 hours). Stab wounds were more frequent in PR group (9:2), and iatrogenic lesions in RS group (6:2). Associated injuries were similar, as well as segmental distribution of colon injuries. S/F criteria and Flint grading were similar.In RS group 15 primary repairs were successful, while in two cases relaparotomy and colostomy was performed due to anastomotic leakage. One patient died. In PR group, 25 primary repairs were successful, with 2 immediate and 3 postoperative (7-10 days) deaths, with no evidence of anastomotic leakage. Results of this study justify more liberal use of primary repair in early management of colon injuries. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN94682396.

  17. Primary repair of colon injuries: clinical study of nonselective approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krivokapic Zoran V

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was designed to determine the role of primary repair and to investigate the possibility of expanding indications for primary repair of colon injuries using nonselective approach. Methods Two groups of patients were analyzed. Retrospective (RS group included 30 patients managed by primary repair or two stage surgical procedure according to criteria published by Stone (S/F and Flint (Fl. In this group 18 patients were managed by primary repair. Prospective (PR group included 33 patients with primary repair as a first choice procedure. In this group, primary repair was performed in 30 cases. Results Groups were comparable regarding age, sex, and indexes of trauma severity. Time between injury and surgery was shorter in PR group, (1.3 vs. 3.1 hours. Stab wounds were more frequent in PR group (9:2, and iatrogenic lesions in RS group (6:2. Associated injuries were similar, as well as segmental distribution of colon injuries. S/F criteria and Flint grading were similar. In RS group 15 primary repairs were successful, while in two cases relaparotomy and colostomy was performed due to anastomotic leakage. One patient died. In PR group, 25 primary repairs were successful, with 2 immediate and 3 postoperative (7-10 days deaths, with no evidence of anastomotic leakage. Conclusions Results of this study justify more liberal use of primary repair in early management of colon injuries. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN94682396

  18. Repair welding of cracked steam turbine blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaduri, A.K.; Gill, T.P.S.; Albert, S.K.; Shanmugam, K.; Iyer, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    The procedure for repair welding of cracked steam turbine blades made of martensitic stainless steels has been developed using the gas tungsten arc welding process. Weld repair procedures were developed using both ER316L austenitic stainless steel filler wire and ER410 martensitic stainless steel filler wire. The repair welding procedure with austenitic filler wire was developed to avoid preheating of the blade as also hydrogen induced cold cracking, and involved evaluation of three different austenitic filler wires, viz. ER309L, ER316L and ERNiCr-3. The overall development of the repair welding procedure included selection of welding consumables (for austenitic filler metal), optimisation of post weld heat treatment parameters, selection of suitable method for local pre-heating and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) of the blades, determination of mechanical properties of weldments in as-welded and PWHT conditions, and microstructural examination. After various trials using different procedures, the procedure of local PWHT using electrical resistance heating on the top surface of the weldment and monitoring the temperature by placing a thermocouple at the bottom of the weld, was found to give the most satisfactory results. A similar procedure was used for preheating while using ER410 filler metal. Mechanical testing of weldments before and after PWHT involved tensile tests at room temperature, face and root bend tests, and microhardness measurements across the fusion line and heat affected zone. During procedure qualification, mock-ups and actual repair welding, dye penetrant testing was used at different stages and where ever possible radiography was carried out. These procedures were developed for repair welding of cracked blades in the low-pressure (LP) steam turbines of Indian nuclear power plants. The procedure with ER316 L filler wire has so far been applied for repair welding of 2 cracked blades (made of AISI 410 SS) of LP steam turbines, while the procedure

  19. Synergistic interactions between RAD5, RAD16, and RAD54, three partially homologous yeast DNA repair genes each in a different repair pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glassner, B.J.; Mortimer, R.K.

    1994-01-01

    Considerable homology has recently been noted between the proteins encoded by the RAD5, RAD16 and RAD54 genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These genes are members of the RAD6, RAD3 and RAD50 epistasis groups, respectively, which correspond to the three major DNA repair pathways in yeast. These proteins also share homology with other eucaryotic proteins, including those encoded by SNF2 and MO1 of yeast, brahma and lodestar of Drosophila and the human ERCC6 gene. The homology shares features with known helicases, suggesting a newly identified helicase subfamily. We have constructed a series of congenic single-, double- and triple-deletion mutants involving RAD5, RAD16 and RAD54 to examine the interactions between these genes. Each deletion mutation alone has only a moderate effect on survival after exposure to UV radiation. Each pairwise-double mutant exhibits marked synergism. The triple-deletion mutant displays further synergism. These results confirm the assignment of the RAD54 gene to the RAD50 epistasis group and suggest that the RAD16 gene plays a larger role in DNA repair after exposure to UV radiation than has been suggested previously. Additionally, the proteins encoded by RAD5, RAD16, and RAD54 may compete for the same substrate after damage induced by UV radiation, possibly at an early step in their respective pathways. 49 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Impact of nuclear organization and chromatin structure on DNA repair and genome stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batte, Amandine

    2016-01-01

    The non-random organization of the eukaryotic cell nucleus and the folding of genome in chromatin more or less condensed can influence many functions related to DNA metabolism, including genome stability. Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most deleterious DNA damages for the cells. To preserve genome integrity, eukaryotic cells thus developed DSB repair mechanisms conserved from yeast to human, among which homologous recombination (HR) that uses an intact homologous sequence to repair a broken chromosome. HR can be separated in two sub-pathways: Gene Conversion (GC) transfers genetic information from one molecule to its homologous and Break Induced Replication (BIR) establishes a replication fork than can proceed until the chromosome end. My doctorate work was focused on the contribution of the chromatin context and 3D genome organization on DSB repair. In S. cerevisiae, nuclear organization and heterochromatin spreading at sub-telomeres can be modified through the overexpression of the Sir3 or sir3A2Q mutant proteins. We demonstrated that reducing the physical distance between homologous sequences increased GC rates, reinforcing the notion that homology search is a limiting step for recombination. We also showed that hetero-chromatinization of DSB site fine-tunes DSB resection, limiting the loss of the DSB ends required to perform homology search and complete HR. Finally, we noticed that the presence of heterochromatin at the donor locus decreased both GC and BIR efficiencies, probably by affecting strand invasion. This work highlights new regulatory pathways of DNA repair. (author) [fr

  1. Biomechanical properties of Achilles tendon repair augmented with a bioadhesive-coated scaffold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodie, Michael; Vollenweider, Laura; Murphy, John L; Xu Fangmin; Lyman, Arinne; Lew, William D; Lee, Bruce P, E-mail: b-lee@nerites.com [Nerites Corporation, 505 S. Rosa Road, Suite 123, Madison, WI 53719 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    The Achilles tendon is the most frequently ruptured tendon. Both acute and chronic (neglected) tendon ruptures can dramatically affect a patient's quality of life, and require a prolonged period of recovery before return to pre-injury activity levels. This paper describes the use of an adhesive-coated biologic scaffold to augment primary suture repair of transected Achilles tendons. The adhesive portion consisted of a synthetic mimic of mussel adhesive proteins that can adhere to various surfaces in a wet environment, including biologic tissues. When combined with biologic scaffolds such as bovine pericardium or porcine dermal tissues, these adhesive constructs demonstrated lap shear adhesive strengths significantly greater than that of fibrin glue, while reaching up to 60% of the strength of a cyanoacrylate-based adhesive. These adhesive constructs were wrapped around transected cadaveric porcine Achilles tendons repaired with a combination of parallel and three-loop suture patterns. Tensile mechanical testing of the augmented repairs exhibited significantly higher stiffness (22-34%), failure load (24-44%), and energy to failure (27-63%) when compared to control tendons with suture repair alone. Potential clinical implications of this novel adhesive biomaterial are discussed.

  2. Composite Repair System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — GTL has developed an innovative composite repair methodology known as the Composite Repair System (CRS). In this phase I effort, CRS is being developed for the...

  3. About the Collision Repair Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA developed the Collision Repair Campaign to focus on meaningful risk reduction in the Collision Repair source sector to complement ongoing community air toxics work and attain reductions at a faster rate.

  4. Vesicovaginal Fistula Repair During Pregnancy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vesicovaginal Fistula Repair During Pregnancy: A Case Report ... Abstract. We report a repair of Vesicovaginal fistula during pregnancy that was aimed at preventing another spontaneous ... practices that encourage teenage marriage and girl.

  5. Ship Repair Workflow Cost Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McDevitt, Mike

    2003-01-01

    The effects of intermittent work patterns and funding on the costs of ship repair and maintenance were modeled for the San Diego region in 2002 for Supervisor of Shipbuilding and Repair (SUPSHIP) San Diego...

  6. Reoperation Rates for Laparoscopic vs Open Repair of Femoral Hernias in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Kristoffer; Bisgaard, Thue; Kehlet, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: In Denmark approximately 10 000 groin hernias are repaired annually, of which 2% to 4% are femoral hernias. Several methods for repair of femoral hernias are used including sutured repair and different types of mesh repair with either open or laparoscopic techniques. The use of many...... laparoscopic vs open femoral hernia repair, analyzing data from a nationwide database. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A prospective cohort study was conducted. Data on femoral hernia repairs registered in the Danish Hernia Database from January 1998 until February 2012 were extracted and analyzed. All...... repairs were followed in the database and analyzed for reports of reoperation, which were used as a proxy for recurrence. Femoral hernia recurrence and inguinal hernia occurrence after the index repair were analyzed. EXPOSURE: Repair of a femoral hernia. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Reoperation...

  7. Role of XRCC4 phosphorylation by DNA-PK in the regulation of NHEJ repair pathway of DNA double strand break

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Imamichi, Shoji; Fukuchi, Mikoto; Kamdar, Radhika P.; Sicheng, Liu; Wanotayan, Rujira; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the predominant pathway of DNA double strand breaks in higher eukaryotes and is active throughout the cell cycle. NHEJ repair includes many factors as Ku70/86, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4-Ligase IV complex and XLF (also known as Cernunnos). In these factors, DNA-PKcs acts as central regulator in NHEJ repair. It recruited at the DNA damages site after DNA damage and after association with Ku its kinase activity is activated. It phosphorylates many of important NHEJ proteins in vitro including XRCC4, Ku 70/86, Artemis, and even DNA-PKcs but till now, very less studies have been done to know the role and significance of phosphorylation in the NHEJ repair. Studies by other researchers identified various phosphorylation sites in XRCC4 by DNA-PK using mass spectrometry but these phosphorylation sites were shown to be dispensable for DSB repair. In the present investigation, we identified 3 serine and one new threonine phosphorylation sites in XRCC4 protein by DNA-PK. In vivo phosphorylation at these sites was verified by generating phosphorylation specific antibodies and the requirement for DNA-PK therein was verified by using DNA-PK inhibitor and DNA-PK proficient and deficient cell lines in response to radiation and zeocin treatment. We have also found that phosphorylation at these sites showed dose dependency in response to radiation treatment. The two serine and one threonine phosphorylation site is also biological important as their mutation into alanine significantly elevated radiosensitivity as measured by colony formation assay. Neutral comet assay showed delayed kinetics in DSB repair of these mutants. Furthermore, we have found a protein, with putative DSB repair function, which interacts with domain including the phosphorylation sites.These results indicate that these phosphorylation sites would mediate functional link between XRCC4 and DNA-PK. (author)

  8. 7 CFR 58.214 - General construction, repair and installation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General construction, repair and installation. 58.214... Service 1 Equipment and Utensils § 58.214 General construction, repair and installation. All equipment and utensils necessary to the manufacture of dry milk products, including pasteurizer, timing-pump or device...

  9. Quality electric motor repair: A guidebook for electric utilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schueler, V.; Douglass, J.

    1995-08-01

    This guidebook provides utilities with a resource for better understanding and developing their roles in relation to electric motor repair shops and the industrial and commercial utility customers that use them. The guidebook includes information and tools that utilities can use to raise the quality of electric motor repair practices in their service territories.

  10. Factors Influencing Choice of Inguinal Hernia Repair Technique

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study sought to highlight factors that may influence ... Experienced peers play a major role in training on the various repair ... Reasons influencing choice of repair technique include training ... (after appendectomy) accounting for 10 to 15% of all surgical ..... in medical school [as undergraduate students or as residents].

  11. Mountain Plains Learning Experience Guide: Automotive Repair. Course: Brake Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, C.; Osland, Walt

    One of twelve individualized courses included in an automotive repair curriculum, this course covers theory, operation, and repair of drum brakes, disc brakes, and brake system components. The course is comprised of six units: (1) Fundamentals of Brake Systems, (2) Master Cylinder, (3) Drum Brakes, (4) Disc Brakes, (5) Power Brakes, and (6)…

  12. Standardized measurement of quality of life after incisional hernia repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian K; Henriksen, Nadia A; Harling, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    repair. The aim of this systematic review was to analyze existing standardized methods to measure quality of life after incisional hernia repair. DATA SOURCES: A PubMed and Embase search was carried out together with a cross-reference search of eligible papers, giving a total of 26 included studies...

  13. Nuclear alpha spectrin: Critical roles in DNA interstrand cross-link repair and genomic stability

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, Muriel W

    2016-01-01

    Non-erythroid alpha spectrin (?IISp) is a structural protein which we have shown is present in the nucleus of human cells. It interacts with a number of nuclear proteins such as actin, lamin, emerin, chromatin remodeling factors, and DNA repair proteins. ?IISp?s interaction with DNA repair proteins has been extensively studied. We have demonstrated that nuclear ?IISp is critical in DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair in S phase, in both genomic (non-telomeric) and telomeric DNA, and in ma...

  14. Social repair of relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahnøe, Kristian Relsted

    2017-01-01

    organisations, friends and family, and communities. These social relations are viewed as the foundation of citizenship as experienced and practised. Focusing on how two dimensions of lived citizenship, namely rights-responsibilities and belonging, are affected by the social repairs, the chapter shows how...

  15. Patent urachus repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools About MedlinePlus Show Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Patent urachus repair - series—Normal anatomy URL of this ...

  16. Patent urachus repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools About MedlinePlus Show Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Patent urachus repair URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ ...

  17. Role of DNA repair in repair of cytogenetic damages. Slowly repaired DNA injuries involved in cytogenetic damages repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaichkina, S.I.; Rozanova, O.M.; Aptikaev, G.F.; Ganassi, E.Eh.

    1989-01-01

    Caffeine was used to study the kinetics of cytogenetic damages repair in Chinese hamster fibroblasts. Its half-time (90 min) was shown to correlate with that of repair of slowly repaired DNA damages. The caffeine-induced increase in the number of irreparable DNA damages, attributed to inhibition of double-strand break repair, is in a quantitative correlation with the effect of the cytogenetic damage modification

  18. Cleft lip and palate repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002979.htm Cleft lip and palate repair To use the sharing features on this ... Cheiloplasty; Cleft rhinoplasty; Palatoplasty; Tip rhinoplasty Patient Instructions Cleft lip and palate repair - discharge Images Cleft lip repair - series References ...

  19. The journey of DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Natalie

    2015-12-01

    21 years ago, the DNA Repair Enzyme was declared "Molecule of the Year". Today, we are celebrating another "year of repair", with the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry being awarded to Aziz Sancar, Tomas Lindahl and Paul Modrich for their collective work on the different DNA repair pathways.

  20. Guardians of the mycobacterial genome: A review on DNA repair systems in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amandeep

    2017-12-01

    The genomic integrity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is continuously threatened by the harsh survival conditions inside host macrophages, due to immune and antibiotic stresses. Faithful genome maintenance and repair must be accomplished under stress for the bacillus to survive in the host, necessitating a robust DNA repair system. The importance of DNA repair systems in pathogenesis is well established. Previous examination of the M. tuberculosis genome revealed homologues of almost all the major DNA repair systems, i.e. nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair (BER), homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). However, recent developments in the field have pointed to the presence of novel proteins and pathways in mycobacteria. Homologues of archeal mismatch repair proteins were recently reported in mycobacteria, a pathway previously thought to be absent. RecBCD, the major nuclease-helicase enzymes involved in HR in E. coli, were implicated in the single-strand annealing (SSA) pathway. Novel roles of archeo-eukaryotic primase (AEP) polymerases, previously thought to be exclusive to NHEJ, have been reported in BER. Many new proteins with a probable role in DNA repair have also been discovered. It is now realized that the DNA repair systems in M. tuberculosis are highly evolved and have redundant backup mechanisms to mend the damage. This review is an attempt to summarize our current understanding of the DNA repair systems in M. tuberculosis.

  1. Regulation of DNA repair by parkin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, Shyan-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Mutation of parkin is one of the most prevalent causes of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that acts on a variety of substrates, resulting in polyubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome or monoubiquitination and regulation of biological activity. However, the cellular functions of parkin that relate to its pathological involvement in PD are not well understood. Here we show that parkin is essential for optimal repair of DNA damage. Parkin-deficient cells exhibit reduced DNA excision repair that can be restored by transfection of wild-type parkin, but not by transfection of a pathological parkin mutant. Parkin also protects against DNA damage-induced cell death, an activity that is largely lost in the pathological mutant. Moreover, parkin interacts with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a protein that coordinates DNA excision repair. These results suggest that parkin promotes DNA repair and protects against genotoxicity, and implicate DNA damage as a potential pathogenic mechanism in PD.

  2. DNA repair in human bronchial epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornace, A.J. Jr.; Lechner, J.F.; Grafstrom, R.C.; Harris, C.C.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the response of human cell types (bronchial epithelial cells and fibroblasts and skin fibroblasts) to various DNA damaging agents. Repair of DNA single strand breaks (SSB) induced by 5 krads of X-ray was similar for all cell types; approximately 90% of the DNA SSB were rejoined within one hour. During excision repair of DNA damage from u.v.-radiation, the frequencies of DNA SSB as estimated by the alkaline elution technique, were similar in all cell types. Repair replication as measured by BND cellulose chromatography was also similar in epithelial and fibroblastic cells after u.v.-irradiation. Similar levels of SSB were also observed in epithelial and fibroblastic cells after exposure to chemical carcinogens: 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene; benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE); or N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Significant repair replication of BPDE-induced DNA damage was detected in both bronchial epithelial and fibroblastic cells, although the level in fibroblasts was approximately 40% of that in epithelial cells. The pulmonary carcinogen asbestos did not damage DNA. DNA-protein crosslinks induced by formaldehyde were rapidly removed in bronchial cells. Further, epithelial and fibroblastic cells, which were incubated with formaldehyde and the polymerase inhibitor combination of cytosine arabinoside and hydroxyurea, accumulated DNA SSB at approximately equal frequencies. These results should provide a useful background for further investigations of the response of human bronchial cells to various DNA damaging agents

  3. Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) System Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Bradish, Martin A.; Juergens, Jeffrey R.; Lewis, Michael J.; Vrnak, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    This document captures the system architecture for a Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) capability needed for electronics maintenance and repair of the Constellation Program (CxP). CLEAR is intended to improve flight system supportability and reduce the mass of spares required to maintain the electronics of human rated spacecraft on long duration missions. By necessity it allows the crew to make repairs that would otherwise be performed by Earth based repair depots. Because of practical knowledge and skill limitations of small spaceflight crews they must be augmented by Earth based support crews and automated repair equipment. This system architecture covers the complete system from ground-user to flight hardware and flight crew and defines an Earth segment and a Space segment. The Earth Segment involves database management, operational planning, and remote equipment programming and validation processes. The Space Segment involves the automated diagnostic, test and repair equipment required for a complete repair process. This document defines three major subsystems including, tele-operations that links the flight hardware to ground support, highly reconfigurable diagnostics and test instruments, and a CLEAR Repair Apparatus that automates the physical repair process.

  4. Repair of damaged DNA in vivo: Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanawalt, P.C.

    1987-09-01

    This contract was initiated in 1962 with the US Atomic Energy Commission to carry out basic research on the effects of radiation on the process of DNA replication in bacteria. Within the first contract year we discovered repair replication at the same time that Setlow and Carrier discovered pyrimidine dimer excision. These discoveries led to the elucidation of the process of excision-repair, one of the most important mechanisms by which living systems, including humans, respond to structural damage in their genetic material. We improved methodology for distinguishing repair replication from semiconservative replication and instructed others in these techniques. Painter then was the first to demonstrate repair replication in ultraviolet irradiated human cells. He, in turn, instructed James Cleaver who discovered that skin fibroblasts from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum were defective in excision-repair. People with this genetic defect are extremely sensitive to sunlight and they develop carcinomas and melanomas of the skin with high frequency. The existence of this hereditary disease attests to the importance of DNA repair in man. We certainly could not survive in the normal ultraviolet flux from the sun if our DNA were not continuously monitored for damage and repaired. Other hereditary diseases such as ataxia telangiectasia, Cockayne's syndrome, Blooms syndrome and Fanconi's anemia also involve deficiencies in DNA damage processing. The field of DNA repair has developed rapidly as we have learned that most environmental chemical carcinogens as well as radiation produce repairable damage in DNA. 251 refs

  5. Double-row vs single-row rotator cuff repair: a review of the biomechanical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Lindley B; Keener, Jay D; Brophy, Robert H

    2009-01-01

    A review of the current literature will show a difference between the biomechanical properties of double-row and single-row rotator cuff repairs. Rotator cuff tears commonly necessitate surgical repair; however, the optimal technique for repair continues to be investigated. Recently, double-row repairs have been considered an alternative to single-row repair, allowing a greater coverage area for healing and a possibly stronger repair. We reviewed the literature of all biomechanical studies comparing double-row vs single-row repair techniques. Inclusion criteria included studies using cadaveric, animal, or human models that directly compared double-row vs single-row repair techniques, written in the English language, and published in peer reviewed journals. Identified articles were reviewed to provide a comprehensive conclusion of the biomechanical strength and integrity of the repair techniques. Fifteen studies were identified and reviewed. Nine studies showed a statistically significant advantage to a double-row repair with regards to biomechanical strength, failure, and gap formation. Three studies produced results that did not show any statistical advantage. Five studies that directly compared footprint reconstruction all demonstrated that the double-row repair was superior to a single-row repair in restoring anatomy. The current literature reveals that the biomechanical properties of a double-row rotator cuff repair are superior to a single-row repair. Basic Science Study, SRH = Single vs. Double Row RCR.

  6. Inhibition of DNA repair by trifluoperazine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charp, P.A.; Regan, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    The authors examined the possible role of calmodulin in the excision repair of ultraviolet light-induced pyrimidine dimers in damaged DNA by means of specialized assay systems. These assays included bromodeoxyuridine photolysis, dimer chromatography and cytosine arabinoside incorporation in conjunction with hydroxyurea. The calmodulin antagonist, trifluoperazine, and the calcium-chelating agent, EGTA, were employed to ascertain what affect calmodulin played in the repair process. Normal human fibroblast cells are used in all studies described in this report. After exposure to 10 J/m2 of 254 nm light, the authors observed a decrease of about 30% in the number of single-strand breaks produced in the presence of 25 M trifluoperazine (1.9 vs. 3.3) in controls although the numbers of bases re-inserted in the repaired regions were similar (64 vs. 72). Measurement of thymine-containing dimers remaining throughout a 24 h time period indicated a 30% difference decrease in the number of cytosine arabinoside arrested repair sites in the presence of either EGTA or trifluoperazine. The results are discussed with relation to the possibility of calmodulin altering the initial incision by repair endonuclease. 27 references, 3 figures.

  7. Safety of repair for severe duodenal injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velmahos, George C; Constantinou, Constantinos; Kasotakis, George

    2008-01-01

    There is ongoing debate about the management of severe duodenal injuries (SDIs), and earlier studies have recommended pyloric exclusion. The objective of this study was to compare primary repair with pyloric exclusion to examine if primary repair can be safely used in SDIs. The medical records of 193 consecutive patients who were admitted between August 1992 and January 2004 with duodenal injuries were reviewed. After excluding early deaths (n = 50), low-grade duodenal injuries (n = 81), and pancreatoduodenectomies for catastrophic trauma (n = 12), a total of 50 patients with SDIs (grade III, IV, or V) were analyzed. Primary repair (PR--simple duodenorrhaphy or resection and primary anastomosis) was performed in 34 (68%) and pyloric exclusion (PE) in 16 (32%). Characteristics and outcomes of these two groups were compared. PE and PR patients were similar for age, injury severity score, abdominal abbreviated injury score, physiologic status on admission, time to operation, and most abdominal organs injured. PE patients had more pancreatic injuries (63% vs. 24%, p duodenum (79% vs. 42%, p = 0.02), and a nonsignificant trend toward more grade IV and V injuries (37% vs. 18%, p = 0.11). There was no difference in morbidity (including complications specific to the duodenal repair), mortality, and intensive care unit and hospital length of stay between the two groups. Pyloric exclusion is not necessary for all patients with SDIs, as previously suggested. Selected SDI patients can be safely managed by simple primary repair.

  8. Specific protein supplementation using soya, casein or whey differentially affects regional gut growth and luminal growth factor bioactivity in rats; implications for the treatment of gut injury and stimulating repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchbank, Tania; Mandir, Nikki; Calnan, Denis; Goodlad, Robert A; Podas, Theo; Playford, Raymond J

    2018-01-24

    Modulation of regional growth within specific segments of the bowel may have clinical value for several gastrointestinal conditions. We therefore examined the effects of different dietary protein sources on regional gut growth and luminal growth factor bioactivity as potential therapies. Rats were fed for 14 days on isonitrogenous and isocaloric diets comprising elemental diet (ED) alone (which is known to cause gut atrophy), ED supplemented with casein or whey or a soya protein-rich feed. Effects on regional gut growth and intraluminal growth factor activity were then determined. Despite calorie intake being similar in all groups, soya rich feed caused 20% extra total body weight gain. Stomach weight was highest on soya and casein diets. Soya enhanced diet caused greatest increase in small intestinal weight and preserved luminal growth factor activity at levels sufficient to increase proliferation in vitro. Regional small intestinal proliferation was highest in proximal segment in ED fed animals whereas distal small intestine proliferation was greater in soya fed animals. Colonic weight and proliferation throughout the colon was higher in animals receiving soya or whey supplemented feeds. We conclude that specific protein supplementation with either soya, casein or whey may be beneficial to rest or increase growth in different regions of the bowel through mechanisms that include differentially affecting luminal growth factor bioactivity. These results have implications for targeting specific regions of the bowel for conditions such as Crohn's disease and chemotherapy.

  9. Roles of Aag, Alkbh2, and Alkbh3 in the Repair of Carboxymethylated and Ethylated Thymidine Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Changjun; Wang, Pengcheng; Nay, Stephanie L; Wang, Jianshuang; Dai, Xiaoxia; O'Connor, Timothy R; Wang, Yinsheng

    2016-05-20

    Environmental and endogenous genotoxic agents can result in a variety of alkylated and carboxymethylated DNA lesions, including N3-ethylthymidine (N3-EtdT), O(2)-EtdT, and O(4)-EtdT as well as N3-carboxymethylthymidine (N3-CMdT) and O(4)-CMdT. By using nonreplicative double-stranded vectors harboring a site-specifically incorporated DNA lesion, we assessed the potential roles of alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (Aag); alkylation repair protein B homologue 2 (Alkbh2); or Alkbh3 in modulating the effects of N3-EtdT, O(2)-EtdT, O(4)-EtdT, N3-CMdT, or O(4)-CMdT on DNA transcription in mammalian cells. We found that the depletion of Aag did not significantly change the transcriptional inhibitory or mutagenic properties of all five examined lesions, suggesting a negligible role of Aag in the repair of these DNA adducts in mammalian cells. In addition, our results revealed that N3-EtdT, but not other lesions, could be repaired by Alkbh2 and Alkbh3 in mammalian cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated the direct reversal of N3-EtdT by purified human Alkbh2 protein in vitro. These findings provided important new insights into the repair of the carboxymethylated and alkylated thymidine lesions in mammalian cells.

  10. Open preperitoneal groin hernia repair with mesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Kristoffer; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Background For the repair of inguinal hernias, several surgical methods have been presented where the purpose is to place a mesh in the preperitoneal plane through an open access. The aim of this systematic review was to describe preperitoneal repairs with emphasis on the technique. Data sources...... A systematic review was conducted and reported according to the PRISMA statement. PubMed, Cochrane library and Embase were searched systematically. Studies were included if they provided clinical data with more than 30 days follow up following repair of an inguinal hernia with an open preperitoneal mesh......-analysis. Open preperitoneal techniques with placement of a mesh through an open approach seem promising compared with the standard anterior techniques. This systematic review provides an overview of these techniques together with a description of surgical methods and clinical outcomes....

  11. Open preperitoneal groin hernia repair with mesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Kristoffer; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For the repair of inguinal hernias, several surgical methods have been presented where the purpose is to place a mesh in the preperitoneal plane through an open access. The aim of this systematic review was to describe preperitoneal repairs with emphasis on the technique. DATA SOURCES......: A systematic review was conducted and reported according to the PRISMA statement. PubMed, Cochrane library and Embase were searched systematically. Studies were included if they provided clinical data with more than 30 days follow up following repair of an inguinal hernia with an open preperitoneal mesh......-analysis. Open preperitoneal techniques with placement of a mesh through an open approach seem promising compared with the standard anterior techniques. This systematic review provides an overview of these techniques together with a description of surgical methods and clinical outcomes....

  12. Laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair: lessons learned from 3,100 hernia repairs over 15 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulucq, Jean-Louis; Wintringer, Pascal; Mahajna, Ahmad

    2009-03-01

    Two revolutions in inguinal hernia repair surgery have occurred during the last two decades. The first was the introduction of tension-free hernia repair by Liechtenstein in 1989 and the second was the application of laparoscopic surgery to the treatment of inguinal hernia in the early 1990s. The purposes of this study were to assess the safety and effectiveness of laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) repair and to discuss the technical changes that we faced on the basis of our accumulative experience. Patients who underwent an elective inguinal hernia repair at the Department of Abdominal Surgery at the Institute of Laparoscopic Surgery (ILS), Bordeaux, between June 1990 and May 2005 were enrolled retrospectively in this study. Patient demographic data, operative and postoperative course, and outpatient follow-up were studied. A total of 3,100 hernia repairs were included in the study. The majority of the hernias were repaired by TEP technique; the repair was done by transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) repair in only 3%. Eleven percent of the hernias were recurrences after conventional repair. Mean operative time was 17 min in unilateral hernia and 24 min in bilateral hernia. There were 36 hernias (1.2%) that required conversion: 12 hernias were converted to open anterior Liechtenstein and 24 to laparoscopic TAPP technique. The incidence of intraoperative complications was low. Most of the patients were discharged at the second day of the surgery. The overall postoperative morbidity rate was 2.2%. The incidence of recurrence rate was 0.35%. The recurrence rate for the first 200 repairs was 2.5%, but it decreased to 0.47% for the subsequent 1,254 hernia repairs According to our experience, in the hands of experienced laparoscopic surgeons, laparoscopic hernia repair seems to be the favored approach for most types of inguinal hernias. TEP is preferred over TAPP as the peritoneum is not violated and there are fewer intra-abdominal complications.

  13. Repair mechanisms and exposure standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.A.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are discussed; public policy for setting radiation standards; use of linear, nonthreshold theory in setting radiation standards; dose-rate dependence; occupational exposure to radiation; radon inhalation from radium in the soil in the vicinity of the phosphate industry; relation of repair mechanisms for cell survival to cancer induction; application of information on genetic repair to humans and to cancer induction; importance of repair processes in radiation protection standards; corrective factors for repair processes; relation of repair processes to age, sex, and other factors; and population distribution in radiosensitivity

  14. ONSTEP versus laparoscopy for inguinal hernia repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Kristoffer; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    repair. Patients are recruited from surgical departments in Denmark and follow-up is one year. In total, 188 patients will be included. DISCUSSION: This protocol describes one of the first randomised clinical trials investigating the ONSTEP technique. To our knowledge, it is the first clinical trial...

  15. Effect of caffeine on the expression of a major X-ray induced protein in human tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, E.N.; Boothman, D.A. (Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia (USA))

    1991-03-01

    We have examined the effect of caffeine on the concomitant processes of the repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD) and the synthesis of X-ray-induced proteins in the human malignant melanoma cell line, Ul-Mel. Caffeine administered at a dose of 5mM after X radiation not only inhibited PLD repair but also markedly reduced the level of XIP269, a major X-ray-induced protein whose expression has been shown to correlate with the capacity to repair PLD. The expression of the vast majority of other cellular proteins, including seven other X-ray-induced proteins, remained unchanged following caffeine treatment. A possible role for XIP269 in cell cycle delay following DNA damage by X irradiation is discussed.

  16. Phytochemicals radiosensitize cancer cells by inhibiting DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Rana P.

    2017-01-01

    Solid tumors are mostly treated with radiotherapy. Radiotherapy is toxic to normal tissues and also promote the invasiveness and radioresistance in cancer cells. The resistance against radiotherapy and adverse effects to normal cells reduce the overall therapeutic effects of the treatment. Radiosensitizing agents usually show limited success during clinical trials. Therefore, the search and development of new radiosensitizers showing selective response to only cancer cells is desirable. We analyzed the radiosensitizing effects including cell death effect of silibinin, a phytochemical on prostate cancer cells. Silibinin enhanced gamma radiation (2.5-10 Gy) induced inhibition in colony formation selectively in prostate cancer cells. In cell cycle progression, G2/M phase is the most sensitive phase for radiation-induced damage which was delayed by the compound treatment in radiation exposed cells. The lower concentrations of silibinin substantially enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis. A prolonged reactive oxygen species production was also observed in these treatments EGFR signaling pathway can contribute to radiation-induced pro-survival mechanisms and to the therapeutic resistance. Agent treatment reduced the IR-induced EGFR phosphorylation and consequently reversed the resistance mediating mechanisms within the cancer cell. Thus, inhibiting DNA repair in cancer cells would enhance therapeutic response of radiation in cancer cells. Silibinin affected the localization of EGFR and DNA-dependent protein kinase, the DNA-PK is known to be an important mediator of DSB repair in human cells, and showed increased number of pH2AX (ser139) foci, and thus indicating lower DNA repair in these cancer cells. This was also confirmed in the tumor xenograft study. Our findings suggest that a combination of silibinin with radiation could be an effective treatment of radioresistant human prostate cancer and warrants further investigation. (author)

  17. Laparoscopic repair for vesicouterine fistulae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael A. Maioli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: The purpose of this video is to present the laparoscopic repair of a VUF in a 42-year-old woman, with gross hematuria, in the immediate postoperative phase following a cesarean delivery. The obstetric team implemented conservative management, including Foley catheter insertion, for 2 weeks. She subsequently developed intermittent hematuria and cystitis. The urology team was consulted 15 days after cesarean delivery. Cystoscopy indicated an ulcerated lesion in the bladder dome of approximately 1.0cm in size. Hysterosalpingography and a pelvic computed tomography scan indicated a fistula. Materials and Methods: Laparoscopic repair was performed 30 days after the cesarean delivery. The patient was placed in the lithotomy position while also in an extreme Trendelenburg position. Pneumoperitoneum was established using a Veress needle in the midline infra-umbilical region, and a primary 11-mm port was inserted. Another 11-mm port was inserted exactly between the left superior iliac spine and the umbilicus. Two other 5-mm ports were established under laparoscopic guidance in the iliac fossa on both sides. The omental adhesions in the pelvis were carefully released and the peritoneum between the bladder and uterus was incised via cautery. Limited cystotomy was performed, and the specific sites of the fistula and the ureteral meatus were identified; thereafter, the posterior bladder wall was adequately mobilized away from the uterus. The uterine rent was then closed using single 3/0Vicryl sutures and two-layer watertight closure of the urinary bladder was achieved by using 3/0Vicryl sutures. An omental flap was mobilized and inserted between the uterus and the urinary bladder, and was fixed using two 3/0Vicryl sutures, followed by tube drain insertion. Results: The operative time was 140 min, whereas the blood loss was 100ml. The patient was discharged 3 days after surgery, and the catheter was removed 12 days after surgery

  18. Wellbore Seal Repair Using Nanocomposite Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stormont, John [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-08-31

    ), including the use of either cement or a nanocomposite in the microannulus to represent a repaired system. This wellbore model was successfully coupled with a field-scale model of CO2 injection, to enable predictions of stress and strains in the wellbore subjected to subsurface changes (i.e. domal uplift) associated with fluid injection.

  19. Induction of the SOS response in ultraviolet-irradiated Escherichia coli analyzed by dynamics of LexA, RecA and SulA proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksenov, S.V.

    1999-01-01

    The SOS response in Escherichia coli is induced after DNA-damaging treatments including ultraviolet light. Regulation of the SOS response is accomplished through specific interaction of the two SOS regulator proteins, LexA and RecA. In ultraviolet light treated cells nucleotide excision repair is the major system that removes the induced lesions from the DNA. Here, induction of the SOS response in Escherichia coli with normal and impaired excision repair function is studied by simulation of intracellular levels of regulatory LexA and RecA proteins, and SulA protein. SulA protein is responsible for SOS-inducible cell division inhibition. Results of the simulations show that nucleotide excision repair influences time-courses of LexA , RecA and SulA induction by modulating the dynamics of RecA protein distribution between its normal and SOS-activated forms

  20. Biomechanical Comparison of Single- Versus Double-Row Capsulolabral Repair for Shoulder Instability: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Matthew John; Bicos, James

    2017-12-01

    The glenohumeral joint is the most commonly dislocated joint in the body. Failure rates of capsulolabral repair have been reported to be approximately 8%. Recent focus has been on restoration of the capsulolabral complex by a double-row capsulolabral repair technique in an effort to decrease redislocation rates after arthroscopic capsulolabral repair. To present a review of the biomechanical literature comparing single- versus double-row capsulolabral repairs and discuss the previous case series of double-row fixation. Narrative review. A simple review of the literature was performed by PubMed search. Only biomechanical studies comparing single- versus double-row capsulolabral repair were included for review. Only those case series and descriptive techniques with clinical results for double-row repair were included in the discussion. Biomechanical comparisons evaluating the native footprint of the labrum demonstrated significantly superior restoration of the footprint through double-row capsulolabral repair compared with single-row repair. Biomechanical comparisons of contact pressure at the repair interface, fracture displacement in bony Bankart lesion, load to failure, and decreased external rotation (suggestive of increased load to failure) were also significantly in favor of double- versus single-row repair. Recent descriptive techniques and case series of double-row fixation have demonstrated good clinical outcomes; however, no comparative clinical studies between single- and double-row repair have assessed functional outcomes. The superiority of double-row capsulolabral repair versus single-row repair remains uncertain because comparative studies assessing clinical outcomes have yet to be performed.

  1. An inverse switch in DNA base excision and strand break repair contributes to melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirta M L Sousa

    Full Text Available Alterations in checkpoint and DNA repair pathways may provide adaptive mechanisms contributing to acquired drug resistance. Here, we investigated the levels of proteins mediating DNA damage signaling and -repair in RPMI8226 multiple myeloma cells and its Melphalan-resistant derivative 8226-LR5. We observed markedly reduced steady-state levels of DNA glycosylases UNG2, NEIL1 and MPG in the resistant cells and cross-resistance to agents inducing their respective DNA base lesions. Conversely, repair of alkali-labile sites was apparently enhanced in the resistant cells, as substantiated by alkaline comet assay, autoribosylation of PARP-1, and increased sensitivity to PARP-1 inhibition by 4-AN or KU58684. Reduced base-excision and enhanced single-strand break repair would both contribute to the observed reduction in genomic alkali-labile sites, which could jeopardize productive processing of the more cytotoxic Melphalan-induced interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICLs. Furthermore, we found a marked upregulation of proteins in the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ pathway of double-strand break (DSB repair, likely contributing to the observed increase in DSB repair kinetics in the resistant cells. Finally, we observed apparent upregulation of ATR-signaling and downregulation of ATM-signaling in the resistant cells. This was accompanied by markedly increased sensitivity towards Melphalan in the presence of ATR-, DNA-PK, or CHK1/2 inhibitors whereas no sensitizing effect was observed subsequent to ATM inhibition, suggesting that replication blocking lesions are primary triggers of the DNA damage response in the Melphalan resistant cells. In conclusion, Melphalan resistance is apparently contributed by modulation of the DNA damage response at multiple levels, including downregulation of specific repair pathways to avoid repair intermediates that could impair efficient processing of cytotoxic ICLs and ICL-induced DSBs. This study has revealed several novel

  2. Process methods and levels of automation of wood pallet repair in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonghun Park; Laszlo Horvath; Robert J. Bush

    2016-01-01

    This study documented the current status of wood pallet repair in the United States by identifying the types of processing and equipment usage in repair operations from an automation prespective. The wood pallet repair firms included in the sudy received an average of approximately 1.28 million cores (i.e., used pallets) for recovery in 2012. A majority of the cores...

  3. SPOC1 modulates DNA repair by regulating key determinants of chromatin compaction and DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mund, Andreas; Schubert, Tobias; Staege, Hannah

    2012-01-01

    -dependent manner. Moreover, SPOC1 localizes at endogenous repair foci, including OPT domains and accumulates at large DSB repair foci characteristic for delayed repair at heterochromatic sites. SPOC1 depletion enhances the kinetics of ionizing radiation-induced foci (IRIF) formation after γ-irradiation (γ-IR), non...

  4. Effects of post mortem interval and gender in DNA base excision repair activities in rat brains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltys, Daniela Tathiana; Pereira, Carolina Parga Martins; Ishibe, Gabriela Naomi; Souza-Pinto, Nadja Cristhina de, E-mail: nadja@iq.usp.br

    2015-06-15

    Most human tissues used in research are of post mortem origin. This is the case for all brain samples, and due to the difficulty in obtaining a good number of samples, especially in the case of neurodegenerative diseases, male and female samples are often included in the same experimental group. However, the effects of post mortem interval (PMI) and gender differences in the endpoints being analyzed are not always fully understood, as is the case for DNA repair activities. To investigate these effects, in a controlled genetic background, base excision repair (BER) activities were measured in protein extracts obtained from Wistar rat brains from different genders and defined PMI up to 24 hours, using a novel fluorescent-based in vitro incision assay. Uracil and AP-site incision activity in nuclear and mitochondrial extracts were similar in all groups included in this study. Our results show that gender and PMI up to 24 hours have no influence in the activities of the BER proteins UDG and APE1 in rat brains. These findings demonstrate that these variables do not interfere on the BER activities included in these study, and provide a security window to work with UDG and APE1 proteins in samples of post mortem origin.

  5. Effects of post mortem interval and gender in DNA base excision repair activities in rat brains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltys, Daniela Tathiana; Pereira, Carolina Parga Martins; Ishibe, Gabriela Naomi; Souza-Pinto, Nadja Cristhina de

    2015-01-01

    Most human tissues used in research are of post mortem origin. This is the case for all brain samples, and due to the difficulty in obtaining a good number of samples, especially in the case of neurodegenerative diseases, male and female samples are often included in the same experimental group. However, the effects of post mortem interval (PMI) and gender differences in the endpoints being analyzed are not always fully understood, as is the case for DNA repair activities. To investigate these effects, in a controlled genetic background, base excision repair (BER) activities were measured in protein extracts obtained from Wistar rat brains from different genders and defined PMI up to 24 hours, using a novel fluorescent-based in vitro incision assay. Uracil and AP-site incision activity in nuclear and mitochondrial extracts were similar in all groups included in this study. Our results show that gender and PMI up to 24 hours have no influence in the activities of the BER proteins UDG and APE1 in rat brains. These findings demonstrate that these variables do not interfere on the BER activities included in these study, and provide a security window to work with UDG and APE1 proteins in samples of post mortem origin

  6. Genomic and Molecular Landscape of DNA Damage Repair Deficiency across The Cancer Genome Atlas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theo A. Knijnenburg

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: DNA damage repair (DDR pathways modulate cancer risk, progression, and therapeutic response. We systematically analyzed somatic alterations to provide a comprehensive view of DDR deficiency across 33 cancer types. Mutations with accompanying loss of heterozygosity were observed in over 1/3 of DDR genes, including TP53 and BRCA1/2. Other prevalent alterations included epigenetic silencing of the direct repair genes EXO5, MGMT, and ALKBH3 in ∼20% of samples. Homologous recombination deficiency (HRD was present at varying frequency in many cancer types, most notably ovarian cancer. However, in contrast to ovarian cancer, HRD was associated with worse outcomes in several other cancers. Protein structure-based analyses allowed us to predict functional consequences of rare, recurrent DDR mutations. A new machine-learning-based classifier developed from gene expression data allowed us to identify alterations that phenocopy deleterious TP53 mutations. These frequent DDR gene alterations in many human cancers have functional consequences that may determine cancer progression and guide therapy. : Knijnenburg et al. present The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA Pan-Cancer analysis of DNA damage repair (DDR deficiency in cancer. They use integrative genomic and molecular analyses to identify frequent DDR alterations across 33 cancer types, correlate gene- and pathway-level alterations with genome-wide measures of genome instability and impaired function, and demonstrate the prognostic utility of DDR deficiency scores. Keywords: The Cancer Genome Atlas PanCanAtlas project, DNA damage repair, somatic mutations, somatic copy-number alterations, epigenetic silencing, DNA damage footprints, mutational signatures, integrative statistical analysis, protein structure analysis

  7. Factors affecting healing after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abtahi, Amir M; Granger, Erin K; Tashjian, Robert Z

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff repair has been shown to have good long-term results. Unfortunately, a significant proportion of repairs still fail to heal. Many factors, both patient and surgeon related, can influence healing after repair. Older age, larger tear size, worse muscle quality, greater muscle-tendon unit retraction, smoking, osteoporosis, diabetes and hypercholesterolemia have all shown to negatively influence tendon healing. Surgeon related factors that can influence healing include repair construct-single vs double row, rehabilitation, and biologics including platelet rich plasma and mesenchymal stem cells. Double-row repairs are biomechanically stronger and have better healing rates compared with single-row repairs although clinical outcomes are equivalent between both constructs. Slower, less aggressive rehabilitation programs have demonstrated improved healing with no negative effect on final range of motion and are therefore recommended after repair of most full thickness tears. Additionally no definitive evidence supports the use of platelet rich plasma or mesenchymal stem cells regarding improvement of healing rates and clinical outcomes. Further research is needed to identify effective biologically directed augmentations that will improve healing rates and clinical outcomes after rotator cuff repair. PMID:25793161

  8. Handbook of Equipment Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-14

    state of leapin- fn’rw.rd. Tn recent years, many mechanical repair workers often write and ask us to reprint the book. In our consideration, however...ast 4iron 1. .-eat _--OSIS-RTS 5.5 . . 4-5 t4- cast -3.01 -6 ~.0 ’ ɘ.᝱ 5,,:e j?24 2 * 10- 5 aron C l 50 S lcon : Ielt rSSIS-RQTS-s;.4 u a 2.47 5at- .0

  9. Putative Enzymes of UV Photoproduct Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia J. Sakofsky

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the biological relevance of two S. acidocaldarius proteins to the repair of UV photoproducts, the corresponding genes (Saci_1227 and Saci_1096 were disrupted, and the phenotypes of the resulting mutants were examined by various genetic assays. The disruption used integration by homologous recombination of a functional but heterologous pyrE gene, promoted by short sequences attached to both ends via PCR. The phenotypic analyses of the disruptants confirmed that ORF Saci_1227 encodes a DNA photolyase which functions in vivo, but they could not implicate ORF Saci_1096 in repair of UV- or other externally induced DNA damage despite its similarity to genes encoding UV damage endonucleases. The success of the gene-disruption strategy, which used 5′ extensions of PCR primers to target cassette integration, suggests potential advantages for routine construction of Sulfolobus strains.

  10. Patient selection, echocardiographic screening and treatment strategies for interventional tricuspid repair using the edge-to-edge repair technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausleiter, Jörg; Braun, Daniel; Orban, Mathias; Latib, Azeem; Lurz, Philipp; Boekstegers, Peter; von Bardeleben, Ralph Stephan; Kowalski, Marek; Hahn, Rebecca T; Maisano, Francesco; Hagl, Christian; Massberg, Steffen; Nabauer, Michael

    2018-04-24

    Severe tricuspid regurgitation (TR) has long been neglected despite its well known association with mortality. While surgical mortality rates remain high in isolated tricuspid valve surgery, interventional TR repair is rapidly evolving as an alternative to cardiac surgery in selected patients at high surgical risk. Currently, interventional edge-to-edge repair is the most frequently applied technique for TR repair even though the device has not been developed for this particular indication. Due to the inherent differences in tricuspid and mitral valve anatomy and pathology, percutaneous repair of the tricuspid valve is challenging due to a variety of factors including the complexity and variability of tricuspid valve anatomy, echocardiographic visibility of the valve leaflets, and device steering to the tricuspid valve. Furthermore, it remains to be clarified which patients are suitable for a percutaneous tricuspid repair and which features predict a successful procedure. On the basis of the available experience, we describe criteria for patient selection including morphological valve features, a standardized process for echocardiographic screening, and a strategy for clip placement. These criteria will help to achieve standardization of valve assessment and the procedural approach, and to further develop interventional tricuspid valve repair using either currently available devices or dedicated tricuspid edge-to-edge repair devices in the future. In summary, this manuscript will provide guidance for patient selection and echocardiographic screening when considering edge-to-edge repair for severe TR.

  11. Current concepts in repair of extremity venous injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Timothy K; Clouse, W Darrin

    2016-04-01

    Extremity venous injury management remains controversial. The purpose of this communication is to offer perspective as well as experiential and technical insight into extremity venous injury repair. Available literature is reviewed and discussed. Historical context is provided. Indication, the decision process for repair, including technical conduct, is delineated. In particular, the authors' experiences in both civilian and wartime injury are used for perspective. Extremity venous injury repair was championed within data from the Vietnam Vascular Registry. However, patterns of extremity venous injury differ between combat and civilian settings. Since Vietnam, civilian descriptive series opine the benefits and potential complications associated with both venous injury repair and ligation. These surround extremity edema, chronic venous insufficiency, thromboembolism, and limb loss. Whereas no clear superiority in either approach has been identified to date, there appears to be no increased risk of pulmonary embolism or chronic venous changes with repair. Newer data from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and meta-analysis have reinforced this and also have suggested limb salvage benefit for extremity venous repair in combined arterial and venous injuries in modern settings. The patient's physiologic state and associated injury drive five triage categories suggesting vein injury management. Vein repair thrombosis occurs in a significant proportion, yet many recanalize and possibly have a positive impact on limb venous return. Further, early decompression favors reduced blood loss, acute edema, and inflammation, supporting collateral development. Large soft tissue injury minimizing collateral capacity increases the importance of repair. Constructs of repair are varied with modest differences in patency. Venous shunting is feasible, but specific roles remain nebulous. An aggressive posture toward extremity venous injury repair seems justified today because of the likely

  12. Transcriptional Regulation of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) by Methyl CpG Binding Protein 2 (MeCP2): a Novel Mechanism for Re-Myelination and/or Myelin Repair Involved in the Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis (MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    KhorshidAhmad, Tina; Acosta, Crystal; Cortes, Claudia; Lakowski, Ted M; Gangadaran, Surendiran; Namaka, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive, neurological disease characterized by the targeted immune system-mediated destruction of central nervous system (CNS) myelin. Autoreactive CD4+ T helper cells have a key role in orchestrating MS-induced myelin damage. Once activated, circulating Th1-cells secrete a variety of inflammatory cytokines that foster the breakdown of blood-brain barrier (BBB) eventually infiltrating into the CNS. Inside the CNS, they become reactivated upon exposure to the myelin structural proteins and continue to produce inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) that leads to direct activation of antibodies and macrophages that are involved in the phagocytosis of myelin. Proliferating oligodendrocyte precursors (OPs) migrating to the lesion sites are capable of acute remyelination but unable to completely repair or restore the immune system-mediated myelin damage. This results in various permanent clinical neurological disabilities such as cognitive dysfunction, fatigue, bowel/bladder abnormalities, and neuropathic pain. At present, there is no cure for MS. Recent remyelination and/or myelin repair strategies have focused on the role of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its upstream transcriptional repressor methyl CpG binding protein (MeCP2). Research in the field of epigenetic therapeutics involving histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and lysine acetyl transferase (KAT) inhibitors is being explored to repress the detrimental effects of MeCP2. This review will address the role of MeCP2 and BDNF in remyelination and/or myelin repair and the potential of HDAC and KAT inhibitors as novel therapeutic interventions for MS.

  13. Vesicovaginal fistula repair through vaginal approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, S.; Rahim, J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the outcome of trans-vaginal repair of vesico-vaginal fistula through vaginal approach. Study Design: Prospective study. Material and Methods: This study was carried out in Department of Urology, Shaikh Zayed Postgraduate Medical Institute and National institute of Kidney Diseases, Lahore for the period extending from April 2009 to April 2014. Total 17 patients were included in the study. History, physical examination and findings on investigations were reviewed. In all patients cystoscopy and vaginal examination was performed to see fistula site and ureteral orfices. Then trans-vaginal repair was done in all cases. Results: VVF repair was performed on 17 patients aging 25 to 45 years (mean 35.83 ± 7.37 years). The symptoms preceded for a period of 3 months to 8 years. The cause was gynecological hysterectomy 8 (47.05%), obstetric C-section 7 (41.17%) and obstructed labor 2(11.76%). In three of our patients VVF was previously repaired trans-abdominally. On cystoscopy no patients had more than one fistula. In two (11.76%) patients fistula was supratrigonal. The average size of fistula was 2.05 em, detail of fistula site and size is given in table. One patient had leakage on second postop day that was managed with change of Foleys catheter. Successful repair was achieved in all patients and no patient required second attempt. No ureteric injury and other complications were observed. Conclusion: Trans-vaginal repair of VVF avoid laparotomy and bladder bisection. It has reduced hospital stay and morbidity. (author)

  14. Clustered DNA lesion repair in eukaryotes: Relevance to mutagenesis and cell survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sage, Evelyne [Institut Curie, Bat. 110, Centre Universitaire, 91405 Orsay (France); CNRS UMR3348, Bat. 110, Centre Universitaire, 91405 Orsay (France); Harrison, Lynn, E-mail: lclary@lsuhsc.edu [Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, LSUHSC-S, 1501 Kings Highway, Shreveport, LA 71130 (United States)

    2011-06-03

    A clustered DNA lesion, also known as a multiply damaged site, is defined as {>=}2 damages in the DNA within 1-2 helical turns. Only ionizing radiation and certain chemicals introduce DNA damage in the genome in this non-random way. What is now clear is that the lethality of a damaging agent is not just related to the types of DNA lesions introduced, but also to how the damage is distributed in the DNA. Clustered DNA lesions were first hypothesized to exist in the 1990s, and work has progressed where these complex lesions have been characterized and measured in irradiated as well as in non-irradiated cells. A clustered lesion can consist of single as well as double strand breaks, base damage and abasic sites, and the damages can be situated on the same strand or opposing strands. They include tandem lesions, double strand break (DSB) clusters and non-DSB clusters, and base excision repair as well as the DSB repair pathways can be required to remove these complex lesions. Due to the plethora of oxidative damage induced by ionizing radiation, and the repair proteins involved in their removal from the DNA, it has been necessary to study how repair systems handle these lesions using synthetic DNA damage. This review focuses on the repair process and mutagenic consequences of clustered lesions in yeast and mammalian cells. By examining the studies on synthetic clustered lesions, and the effects of low vs high LET radiation on mammalian cells or tissues, it is possible to extrapolate the potential biological relevance of these clustered lesions to the killing of tumor cells by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and to the risk of cancer in non-tumor cells, and this will be discussed.

  15. Relationship of DNA repair and chromosome aberrations to potentially lethal damage repair in X-irradiated mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornace, A.J. Jr.; Nagasawa, H.; Little, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    By the alkaline elution technique, the repair of x-ray-induced DNA single strand breaks and DNA-protein cross-links was investigated in stationary phase, contact-inhibited mouse cells. During the first hour of repair, approximately 90% of x-ray induced single strand breaks were rejoined whereas most of the remaining breaks were rejoined more slowly during the next 5 h. The number of residual non-rejoined single strand breaks was approximately proportional to the x-ray dose at early repair times. DNA-protein cross-links were removed at a slower rate - T 1/2 approximately 10 to 12 h. Cells were subcultured at low density at various times after irradiation and scored for colony survival, and chromosome aberrations in the first mitosis after sub-culture. Both cell lethality and the frequency of chromosome aberrations decreased during the first several hours of repair, reaching a minimum level by 6 h; this decrease correlated temporally with the repair of the slowly rejoining DNA strand breaks. The possible relationship of DNA repair to changes in survival and chromosome aberrations is discussed

  16. Bacteriophage T4 gene 32 participates in excision repair as well as recombinational repair of UV damages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosig, G.

    1985-01-01

    Gene 32 of phage T4 has been shown previously to be involved in recombinational repair of UV damages but, based on a mutant study, was thought not to be required for excision repair. However, a comparison of UV-inactivation curves of several gene 32 mutants grown under conditions permissive for progeny production in wild-type or polA- hosts demonstrates that gene 32 participates in both kinds of repair. Different gene 32 mutations differentially inactivate these repair functions. Under conditions permissive for DNA replication and progeny production, all gene 32 mutants investigated here are partially defective in recombinational repair, whereas only two of them, P7 and P401, are also defective in excision repair. P401 is the only mutant whose final slope of the inactivation curve is significantly steeper than that of wild-type T4. These results are discussed in terms of interactions of gp32, a single-stranded DNA-binding protein, with DNA and with other proteins

  17. Comparison of shrinkage related properties of various patch repair materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiawan, S. A.; Fitrianto, R. S.

    2017-02-01

    A patch repair material has been developed in the form of unsaturated polyester resin (UPR)-mortar. The performance and durability of this material are governed by its compatibility with the concrete being repaired. One of the compatibility issue that should be tackled is the dimensional compatibility as a result of differential shrinkage between the repair material and the concrete substrate. This research aims to evaluate such shrinkage related properties of UPR-mortar and to compare with those of other patch repair materials. The investigation includes the following aspects: free shrinkage, resistance to delamination and cracking. The results indicate that UPR-mortar poses a lower free shrinkage, lower risk of both delamination and cracking tendency in comparison to other repair materials.

  18. Wound repair and regeneration: Mechanisms, signaling, and translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eming, Sabine A.; Martin, Paul; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2015-01-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning tissue repair and its failure to heal are still poorly understood, and current therapies are limited. Poor wound healing after trauma, surgery, acute illness, or chronic disease conditions affects millions of people worldwide each year and is the consequence of poorly regulated elements of the healthy tissue repair response, including inflammation, angiogenesis, matrix deposition, and cell recruitment. Failure of one or several of these cellular processes is generally linked to an underlying clinical condition, such as vascular disease, diabetes, or aging, which are all frequently associated with healing pathologies. The search for clinical strategies that might improve the body’s natural repair mechanisms will need to be based on a thorough understanding of the basic biology of repair and regeneration. In this review, we highlight emerging concepts in tissue regeneration and repair, and provide some perspectives on how to translate current knowledge into viable clinical approaches for treating patients with wound-healing pathologies. PMID:25473038

  19. Improving Aviation Depot Level Repairable (AVDLR) Inventory and Repair Management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baird, Dennis

    1997-01-01

    .... Additionally, research was conducted to document the management process for determining repair requirements at the Naval Inventory Control Point Philadelphia and how those requirements are accepted...

  20. Construction of a series of congenic mice with recombinant chromosome 1 regions surrounding the genetic loci for resistance to intracellular parasites (Ity, Lsh, and Bcg), DNA repair responses (Rep-1), and the cytoskeletal protein villin (Vil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, B A; Holiday, D L; Cerretti, D P; Darnell, S C; O'Brien, A D; Potter, M

    1994-01-01

    The interval of mouse chromosome 1 extending from Idh-1 to Pep-3 harbors the natural resistance gene Ity/Lsh/Bcg; it controls the outcome of infection with Salmonella typhimurium, Leishmania donovani, and several Mycobacterium species. This region also contains a DNA repair gene, Rep-1, which determines the rapidity with which double-strand breaks in chromatin are repaired. BALB/cAnPt and DBA/2N mice differ in their phenotypic expression of these genes. To generate appropriate strains of mice for the study of these genes, a series of 10 C.D2 congenic strains recombinant across a 28-centimorgan interval of mouse chromosome 1 extending from Idh-1 to Pep-3 were derived from crosses of the C.D2-Idh-1 Pep-3 congenic strain back to BALB/cAn. Analyses of these recombinant strains will allow the correlation of biological-immunological phenotypes with defined genetic regions.

  1. Cost-Effectiveness of Emissions Reduction through Vehicle Repair Compared to CNG Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, Paul L; Lesko, Jon M; Stedman, Donald H

    1996-10-01

    In return for a temporary waiver from converting five vehicles to operate on compressed natural gas (CNG) for the Denver Clean Fuels program, the University of Denver identified, tested, repaired, and retested nine employee commuter vehicles. The results of the study validated the concept that employer-based identification and repair programs can be carried out in a cost-effective way. On average, each repaired vehicle removed fifty times more carbon monoxide (CO) emissions from Denver air than each CNG conversion. The average cost of each repair was eight times less than the average cost of each conversion. The average fuel economy benefit from the repairs was enough to pay for the average cost of repairs in less than three years of normal driving. When the expected lifetimes of repairs and conversions are included, the targeted repair program appears to be over sixty times more cost-effective as a CO emissions reduction strategy than CNG conversion.