WorldWideScience

Sample records for repair mechanistic insights

  1. A quantitative model of human DNA base excision repair. I. mechanistic insights

    OpenAIRE

    Sokhansanj, Bahrad A.; Rodrigue, Garry R.; Fitch, J. Patrick; David M Wilson

    2002-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is a multistep process involving the sequential activity of several proteins that cope with spontaneous and environmentally induced mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA damage. Quantitative kinetic data on single proteins of BER have been used here to develop a mathematical model of the BER pathway. This model was then employed to evaluate mechanistic issues and to determine the sensitivity of pathway throughput to altered enzyme kinetics. Notably, the model predicts conside...

  2. A quantitative model of human DNA base excision repair. I. Mechanistic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokhansanj, Bahrad A; Rodrigue, Garry R; Fitch, J Patrick; Wilson, David M

    2002-04-15

    Base excision repair (BER) is a multistep process involving the sequential activity of several proteins that cope with spontaneous and environmentally induced mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA damage. Quantitative kinetic data on single proteins of BER have been used here to develop a mathematical model of the BER pathway. This model was then employed to evaluate mechanistic issues and to determine the sensitivity of pathway throughput to altered enzyme kinetics. Notably, the model predicts considerably less pathway throughput than observed in experimental in vitro assays. This finding, in combination with the effects of pathway cooperativity on model throughput, supports the hypothesis of cooperation during abasic site repair and between the apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease, Ape1, and the 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, Ogg1. The quantitative model also predicts that for 8-oxoguanine and hydrolytic AP site damage, short-patch Polbeta-mediated BER dominates, with minimal switching to the long-patch subpathway. Sensitivity analysis of the model indicates that the Polbeta-catalyzed reactions have the most control over pathway throughput, although other BER reactions contribute to pathway efficiency as well. The studies within represent a first step in a developing effort to create a predictive model for BER cellular capacity.

  3. Pathophysiology of osteoporosis: new mechanistic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Laura A G; Recker, Robert R

    2012-09-01

    Understanding of the pathophysiology of osteoporosis has evolved to include compromised bone strength and skeletal fragility caused by several factors: (1) defects in microarchitecture of trabeculae, (2) defective intrinsic material properties of bone tissue, (3) defective repair of microdamage from normal daily activities, and (4) excessive bone remodeling rates. These factors occur in the context of age-related bone loss. Clinical studies of estrogen deprivation, antiresorptives, mechanical loading, and disuse have helped further knowledge of the factors affecting bone quality and the mechanisms that underlie them. This progress has led to several new drug targets in the treatment of osteoporosis.

  4. Mechanistic insights into type III restriction enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavendra, Nidhanapati K; Bheemanaik, Shivakumara; Rao, Desirazu N

    2012-01-01

    Type III restriction-modification (R-M) enzymes need to interact with two separate unmethylated DNA sequences in indirectly repeated, head-to-head orientations for efficient cleavage to occur at a defined location next to only one of the two sites. However, cleavage of sites that are not in head-to-head orientation have been observed to occur under certain reaction conditions in vitro. ATP hydrolysis is required for the long-distance communication between the sites prior to cleavage. Type III R-M enzymes comprise two subunits, Res and Mod that form a homodimeric Mod2 and a heterotetrameric Res2Mod2 complex. The Mod subunit in M2 or R2M2 complex recognizes and methylates DNA while the Res subunit in R2M2 complex is responsible for ATP hydrolysis, DNA translocation and cleavage. A vast majority of biochemical studies on Type III R-M enzymes have been undertaken using two closely related enzymes, EcoP1I and EcoP15I. Divergent opinions about how the long-distance interaction between the recognition sites exist and at least three mechanistic models based on 1D- diffusion and/or 3D- DNA looping have been proposed.

  5. Splicing in immune cells-mechanistic insights and emerging topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Annalisa; Glasmacher, Elke

    2017-04-01

    Differential splicing of mRNAs not only enables regulation of gene expression levels, but also ensures a high degree of gene-product diversity. The extent to which splicing of mRNAs is utilized as a mechanism in immune cells has become evident within the last few years. Still, only a few of these mechanisms have been well studied. In this review, we discuss some of the best-understood mechanisms, for instance the differential splicing of CD45 in T cells, as well as immunoglobulin genes in B cells. Beyond that we provide general mechanistic insights on how, when and where this process takes place and discuss the current knowledge regarding these topics in immune cells. We also highlight some of the reported links to immune-related diseases, genome-wide sequencing studies that revealed thousands of differentially spliced transcripts, as well as splicing studies on immune cells that remain mechanistically not fully understood. We thereby display potential emerging topics for future studies centered on splicing mechanisms in immune cells. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society for Immunology.

  6. Mechanistic insights into acyclovir-polyethylene glycol 20000 binary dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateskumar, Krishnamoorthy; Parasuraman, Subramani; Gunasunderi, Raju; Sureshkumar, Krishnan; Nayak, M. Muralidhar; Shah, Syed Adnan Ali; Kassen, Khoo; Kai, Heng Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to provide a mechanistic insight into solubility enhancement and dissolution of acyclovir (ACY) by polyethylene glycol20000 (PEG20000). Materials and Methods: Solid dispersions with differing ratios of drug (ACY) and carrier (PEG20000) were prepared and evaluated by phase solubility, in vitro release studies, kinetic analysis, in situ perfusion, and in vitro permeation studies. Solid state characterization was also done by Powder X-Ray Diffraction (PXRD), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis and surface morphology was assessed by Polarizing Microscopic Image (PMI) analysis, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) analysis. Results: Thermodynamic parameters proved the solubilization effect of carrier. The aqueous solubility and dissolution of ACY were increased in all samples. Formation of solid solution, crystallinity reduction, and absence of interaction between drug and carrier was proved by XRD, DSC, and FTIR analysis. The particle size reduction and change in surface morphology were confirmed by SEM and AFM and analysis. The permeation coefficient and amount of drug diffused was higher in samples as compared to ACY. The stability was high in dispersions, and it was proved by NMR analysis. Conclusion: The mechanical insights into the enhancement of solubility and dissolution could be used as a platform to improve the aqueous solubility for other poor water soluble drugs. PMID:28123988

  7. DNA damage and radical reactions: Mechanistic aspects, formation in cells and repair studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadet, J.; Ravanat, J.L. [CEA Grenoble, Inst Nanosci and Cryogenie, SCIB-UMR-E 3, Lab Les Acides Nucl, UJF, F-38054 Grenoble 9 (France); Carell, T. [Univ Munich, Dept Chem and Biochem, Ctr Integrat Prot Sci, D-81377 Munich (Germany); Cellai, L. [CNR, Ist Cristalog, Monterotondo Stn, I-00016 Rome (Italy); Chatgilialoglu, Ch. [CNR, ISOF, I-40129 Bologna, (Italy); Gimisis, Th. [Univ Athens, Dept Chem, Organ Chem Lab, Athens 15784, (Greece); Miranda, M. [Univ Politecn Valencia, Inst Technol Quim, Dept Quim, Valencia 46022 (Spain); O' Neill, P. [Univ Oxford, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); Robert, M. [Univ Paris 07, CNRS, UMR 7591, Electrochim Mol Lab, F-75251 Paris 05 (France)

    2008-07-01

    Several examples of oxidative and reductive reactions of DNA components that lead to single and tandem modifications are discussed in this review. These include nucleophilic addition reactions of the one-electron oxidation-mediated guanine radical cation and the one-electron reduced intermediate of 8-bromo-purine 2'-de-oxy-ribo-nucleosides that give rise to either an oxidizing guanine radical or related 5',8-cyclo-purine nucleosides. In addition, mechanistic insights into the reductive pathways involved in the photolyase induced reversal of cyclo-buta-cli-pyrimidine and pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts are provided. Evidence for the occurrence and validation in cellular DNA of (OH){sup {center_dot}} radical degradation pathways of guanine that have been established in model systems has been gained from the accurate measurement of degradation products. Relevant information on biochemical aspects of the repair of single and clustered oxidatively generated damage to DNA has been gained from detailed investigations that rely on the synthesis of suitable modified probes. Thus the preparation of stable carbocyclic derivatives of purine nucleoside containing defined sequence oligonucleotides has allowed detailed crystallographic studies of the recognition step of the base damage by enzymes implicated in the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Detailed insights are provided on the BER processing of non-double strand break bi-stranded clustered damage that may consist of base lesions, a single strand break or abasic sites and represent one of the main deleterious classes of radiation-induced DNA damage. (authors)

  8. Mechanistic Modelling of DNA Repair and Cellular Survival Following Radiation-Induced DNA Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Stephen J.; Schuemann, Jan; Paganetti, Harald; Prise, Kevin M.

    2016-09-01

    Characterising and predicting the effects of ionising radiation on cells remains challenging, with the lack of robust models of the underlying mechanism of radiation responses providing a significant limitation to the development of personalised radiotherapy. In this paper we present a mechanistic model of cellular response to radiation that incorporates the kinetics of different DNA repair processes, the spatial distribution of double strand breaks and the resulting probability and severity of misrepair. This model enables predictions to be made of a range of key biological endpoints (DNA repair kinetics, chromosome aberration and mutation formation, survival) across a range of cell types based on a set of 11 mechanistic fitting parameters that are common across all cells. Applying this model to cellular survival showed its capacity to stratify the radiosensitivity of cells based on aspects of their phenotype and experimental conditions such as cell cycle phase and plating delay (correlation between modelled and observed Mean Inactivation Doses R2 > 0.9). By explicitly incorporating underlying mechanistic factors, this model can integrate knowledge from a wide range of biological studies to provide robust predictions and may act as a foundation for future calculations of individualised radiosensitivity.

  9. Alternative-NHEJ is a mechanistically distinct pathway of mammalian chromosome break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Bennardo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing the functional overlap and mutagenic potential of different pathways of chromosomal double-strand break (DSB repair is important to understand how mutations arise during cancer development and treatment. To this end, we have compared the role of individual factors in three different pathways of mammalian DSB repair: alternative-nonhomologous end joining (alt-NHEJ, single-strand annealing (SSA, and homology directed repair (HDR/GC. Considering early steps of repair, we found that the DSB end-processing factors KU and CtIP affect all three pathways similarly, in that repair is suppressed by KU and promoted by CtIP. In contrast, both KU and CtIP appear dispensable for the absolute level of total-NHEJ between two tandem I-SceI-induced DSBs. During later steps of repair, we find that while the annealing and processing factors RAD52 and ERCC1 are important to promote SSA, both HDR/GC and alt-NHEJ are significantly less dependent upon these factors. As well, while disruption of RAD51 causes a decrease in HDR/GC and an increase in SSA, inhibition of this factor did not affect alt-NHEJ. These results suggest that the regulation of DSB end-processing via KU/CtIP is a common step during alt-NHEJ, SSA, and HDR/GC. However, at later steps of repair, alt-NHEJ is a mechanistically distinct pathway of DSB repair, and thus may play a unique role in mutagenesis during cancer development and therapy.

  10. Alternative-NHEJ is a mechanistically distinct pathway of mammalian chromosome break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Bennardo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing the functional overlap and mutagenic potential of different pathways of chromosomal double-strand break (DSB repair is important to understand how mutations arise during cancer development and treatment. To this end, we have compared the role of individual factors in three different pathways of mammalian DSB repair: alternative-nonhomologous end joining (alt-NHEJ, single-strand annealing (SSA, and homology directed repair (HDR/GC. Considering early steps of repair, we found that the DSB end-processing factors KU and CtIP affect all three pathways similarly, in that repair is suppressed by KU and promoted by CtIP. In contrast, both KU and CtIP appear dispensable for the absolute level of total-NHEJ between two tandem I-SceI-induced DSBs. During later steps of repair, we find that while the annealing and processing factors RAD52 and ERCC1 are important to promote SSA, both HDR/GC and alt-NHEJ are significantly less dependent upon these factors. As well, while disruption of RAD51 causes a decrease in HDR/GC and an increase in SSA, inhibition of this factor did not affect alt-NHEJ. These results suggest that the regulation of DSB end-processing via KU/CtIP is a common step during alt-NHEJ, SSA, and HDR/GC. However, at later steps of repair, alt-NHEJ is a mechanistically distinct pathway of DSB repair, and thus may play a unique role in mutagenesis during cancer development and therapy.

  11. Antidepressants and gabapentinoids in neuropathic pain: Mechanistic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Mélanie; Salvat, Eric; Muller, André; Yalcin, Ipek; Barrot, Michel

    2016-12-03

    Neuropathic pain arises as a consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system. It is generally chronic and challenging to treat. The recommended pharmacotherapy for neuropathic pain includes the use of some antidepressants, such as tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) (amitriptyline…) or serotonin and noradrenaline re-uptake inhibitors (duloxetine…), and/or anticonvulsants such as the gabapentinoids gabapentin or pregabalin. Antidepressant drugs are not acute analgesics but require a chronic treatment to relieve neuropathic pain, which suggests the recruitment of secondary downstream mechanisms as well as long-term molecular and neuronal plasticity. Noradrenaline is a major actor for the action of antidepressant drugs in a neuropathic pain context. Mechanistic hypotheses have implied the recruitment of noradrenergic descending pathways as well as the peripheral recruitment of noradrenaline from sympathetic fibers sprouting into dorsal root ganglia; and importance of both α2 and β2 adrenoceptors have been reported. These monoamine re-uptake inhibitors may also indirectly act as anti-proinflammatory cytokine drugs; and their therapeutic action requires the opioid system, particularly the mu (MOP) and/or delta (DOP) opioid receptors. Gabapentinoids, which target the voltage-dependent calcium channels α2δ-1 subunit, inhibit calcium currents, thus decreasing the excitatory transmitter release and spinal sensitization. Gabapentinoids also activate the descending noradrenergic pain inhibitory system coupled to spinal α2 adrenoceptors. Gabapentinoid treatment may also indirectly impact on neuroimmune actors, like proinflammatory cytokines. These drugs are effective against neuropathic pain both with acute administration at high dose and with repeated administration. This review focuses on mechanistic knowledge concerning chronic antidepressant treatment and gabapentinoid treatment in a neuropathic pain context. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by

  12. Fine particulate matter air pollution and atherosclerosis: Mechanistic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yuntao; Sun, Qinghua

    2016-12-01

    Atherosclerosis is a progressive disease characterized by the accumulation of lipids and fibrous plaque in the arteries. Its etiology is very complicated and its risk factors primarily include genetic defects, smoking, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, lack of exercise, and infection. Recent studies suggest that fine particulate matter (PM2.5) air pollution may also contribute to the development of atherosclerosis. The present review integrates current experimental evidence with mechanistic pathways whereby PM2.5 exposure can promote the development of atherosclerosis. PM2.5-mediated enhancement of atherosclerosis is likely due to its pro-oxidant and pro-inflammatory effects, involving multiple organs, different cell types, and various molecular mediators. Studies about the effects of PM2.5inhalation on atherosclerosis may yield a better understanding of the link between air pollution and major cardiovascular diseases, and provide useful information for policy makers to determine acceptable levels of PM2.5 air quality. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Air Pollution, edited by Wenjun Ding, Andrew J. Ghio and Weidong Wu. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Mechanistic insight into sonochemical biodiesel synthesis using heterogeneous base catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Hanif A; Chakma, Sankar; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2014-01-01

    The beneficial effect of ultrasound on transesterification reaction is well known. Heterogeneous (or solid) catalysts for biodiesel synthesis have merit that they do not contaminate the byproduct of glycerol. In this paper, we have attempted to identify the mechanistic features of ultrasound-enhanced biodiesel synthesis with the base-catalyst of CaO. A statistical design of experiments (Box-Behnken) was used to identify the influence of temperature, alcohol to oil molar ratio and catalyst loading on transesterification yield. The optimum values of these parameters for the highest yield were identified through Response Surface Method (with a quadratic model) and ANOVA. These values are: temperature=62 °C, molar ratio=10:1 and catalyst loading=6 wt.%. The activation energy was determined as 82.3 kJ/mol, which is higher than that for homogeneous catalyzed system (for both acidic and basic catalyst). The experimental results have been analyzed vis-à-vis simulations of cavitation bubble dynamics. Due to 3-phase heterogeneity of the system, the yield was dominated by intrinsic kinetics, and the optimum temperature for the highest yield was close to boiling point of methanol. At this temperature, the influence of cavitation bubbles (in terms of both sonochemical and sonophysical effect) is negligible, and ultrasonic micro-streaming provided necessary convection in the system. The influence of all parameters on the reaction system was found to be strongly inter-dependent.

  14. Metabolic diseases and pro- and prebiotics: Mechanistic insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamura Yukiko K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metabolic diseases, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes, are world-wide health problems. The prevalence of metabolic diseases is associated with dynamic changes in dietary macronutrient intake during the past decades. Based on national statistics and from a public health viewpoint, traditional approaches, such as diet and physical activity, have been unsuccessful in decreasing the prevalence of metabolic diseases. Since the approaches strongly rely on individual’s behavior and motivation, novel science-based strategies should be considered for prevention and therapy for the diseases. Metabolism and immune system are linked. Both overnutrition and infection result in inflammation through nutrient and pathogen sensing systems which recognize compounds with structural similarities. Dietary macronutrients (fats and sugars can induce inflammation through activation of an innate immune receptor, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4. Long-term intake of diets high in fats and meats appear to induce chronic systemic low-grade inflammation, endotoxicity, and metabolic diseases. Recent investigations support the idea of the involvement of intestinal bacteria in host metabolism and preventative and therapeutic potentials of probiotic and prebiotic interventions for metabolic diseases. Specific intestinal bacteria seem to serve as lipopolysaccharide (LPS sources through LPS and/or bacterial translocation into the circulation due to a vulnerable microbial barrier and increased intestinal permeability and to play a role in systemic inflammation and progression of metabolic diseases. This review focuses on mechanistic links between metabolic diseases (mainly obesity and type 2 diabetes, chronic systemic low-grade inflammation, intestinal environment, and nutrition and prospective views of probiotic and prebiotic interventions for the diseases.

  15. Metabolic diseases and pro- and prebiotics: Mechanistic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yukiko K; Omaye, Stanley T

    2012-06-19

    Metabolic diseases, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes, are world-wide health problems. The prevalence of metabolic diseases is associated with dynamic changes in dietary macronutrient intake during the past decades. Based on national statistics and from a public health viewpoint, traditional approaches, such as diet and physical activity, have been unsuccessful in decreasing the prevalence of metabolic diseases. Since the approaches strongly rely on individual's behavior and motivation, novel science-based strategies should be considered for prevention and therapy for the diseases. Metabolism and immune system are linked. Both overnutrition and infection result in inflammation through nutrient and pathogen sensing systems which recognize compounds with structural similarities. Dietary macronutrients (fats and sugars) can induce inflammation through activation of an innate immune receptor, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Long-term intake of diets high in fats and meats appear to induce chronic systemic low-grade inflammation, endotoxicity, and metabolic diseases. Recent investigations support the idea of the involvement of intestinal bacteria in host metabolism and preventative and therapeutic potentials of probiotic and prebiotic interventions for metabolic diseases. Specific intestinal bacteria seem to serve as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) sources through LPS and/or bacterial translocation into the circulation due to a vulnerable microbial barrier and increased intestinal permeability and to play a role in systemic inflammation and progression of metabolic diseases. This review focuses on mechanistic links between metabolic diseases (mainly obesity and type 2 diabetes), chronic systemic low-grade inflammation, intestinal environment, and nutrition and prospective views of probiotic and prebiotic interventions for the diseases.

  16. Mechanistic Insights into Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Asymmetric Iron Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenberg, Jessica

    Our group has been focused on replacing toxic and expensive precious metal catalysts with iron for the synthesis of enantiopure compounds for industrial applications. During an investigation into the mechanism of asymmetric transfer hydrogenation with our first generation iron-(P-N-N-P) catalysts we found substantial evidence for zero-valent iron nanoparticles coated in chiral ligand acting as the active site. Extensive experimental and computational experiments were undertaken which included NMR, DFT, reaction profile analysis, substoichiometric poisoning, electron microscope imaging, XPS and multiphasic analysis, all of which supported the fact that NPs were the active species in catalysis. Reversibility of this asymmetric reaction on the nanoparticle surface was then probed using oxidative kinetic resolution of racemic alcohols, yielding modest enantiopurity and high turnover frequencies (TOF) for a range of aromatic alcohols. Efficient dehydrogenation of ammonia-borane for hydrogen evolution and the formation of B-N oligomers was also shown using the NP system, yielding highly active systems, with a maximum TOF of 3.66 H2/s-1 . We have also begun to focus on the development of iron catalysts for asymmetric direct hydrogenation of ketones using hydrogen gas. New chiral iron-(P-N-P) catalysts were developed and shown to be quite active and selective for a wide range of substrates. Mechanistic investigations primarily using NMR and DFT indicated that a highly active trans-dihydride species was being formed during catalyst activation. Lastly, a new library of chiral P-N-P and P-NH-P ligands were developed, as well as their corresponding iron complexes, some of which show promise for the development of future generations of active asymmetric direct hydrogenation catalysts.

  17. Mechanistic Modelling and Bayesian Inference Elucidates the Variable Dynamics of Double-Strand Break Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks are lesions that form during metabolism, DNA replication and exposure to mutagens. When a double-strand break occurs one of a number of repair mechanisms is recruited, all of which have differing propensities for mutational events. Despite DNA repair being of crucial importance, the relative contribution of these mechanisms and their regulatory interactions remain to be fully elucidated. Understanding these mutational processes will have a profound impact on our knowledge of genomic instability, with implications across health, disease and evolution. Here we present a new method to model the combined activation of non-homologous end joining, single strand annealing and alternative end joining, following exposure to ionising radiation. We use Bayesian statistics to integrate eight biological data sets of double-strand break repair curves under varying genetic knockouts and confirm that our model is predictive by re-simulating and comparing to additional data. Analysis of the model suggests that there are at least three disjoint modes of repair, which we assign as fast, slow and intermediate. Our results show that when multiple data sets are combined, the rate for intermediate repair is variable amongst genetic knockouts. Further analysis suggests that the ratio between slow and intermediate repair depends on the presence or absence of DNA-PKcs and Ku70, which implies that non-homologous end joining and alternative end joining are not independent. Finally, we consider the proportion of double-strand breaks within each mechanism as a time series and predict activity as a function of repair rate. We outline how our insights can be directly tested using imaging and sequencing techniques and conclude that there is evidence of variable dynamics in alternative repair pathways. Our approach is an important step towards providing a unifying theoretical framework for the dynamics of DNA repair processes. PMID:27741226

  18. Mechanistic insights into influenza vaccine-associated narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, S Sohail; Steinman, Lawrence

    2016-12-01

    We previously reported an increased frequency of antibodies to hypocretin (HCRT) receptor 2 in sera obtained from narcoleptic patients who received the European AS03-adjuvanted vaccine Pandemrix (GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, s.a.) for the global influenza A H1N1 pandemic in 2009 [A(H1N1)pdm09]. These antibodies cross-reacted with a particular fragment of influenza nucleoprotein (NP) - one of the proteins naturally contained in the virus used to make seasonal influenza vaccine and pandemic influenza vaccines. The purpose of this commentary is to provide additional insights and interpretations of the findings and share additional data not presented in the original paper to help the reader appreciate the key messages of that publication. First, a brief background to narcolepsy and vaccine-induced narcolepsy will be provided. Then, additional insights and clarification will be provided on the following topics: 1) the critical difference identified in the adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccines, 2) the contributing factor likely for the discordant association of narcolepsy between the AS03-adjuvanted pandemic vaccines Pandemrix and Arepanrix (GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, s.a.), 3) the significance of detecting HCRT receptor 2 (HCRTr2) antibodies in some Finnish control subjects, 4) the approach used for the detection of HCRTr2 antibodies in vaccine-associated narcolepsy, and 5) the plausibility of the proposed mechanism involving HCRTr2 modulation in vaccine-associated narcolepsy.

  19. Mechanistic insights into aging, cell cycle progression, and stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troy Anthony Alan Harkness

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The longevity of an organism depends on the health of its cells. Throughout life cells are exposed to numerous intrinsic and extrinsic stresses, such as free radicals, generated through mitochondrial electron transport, and ultraviolet irradiation. The cell has evolved numerous mechanisms to scavenge free radicals and repair damage induced by these insults. One mechanism employed by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to combat stress utilizes the Anaphase Promoting Complex (APC, an essential multi-subunit ubiquitin-protein ligase structurally and functionally conserved from yeast to humans that controls progression through mitosis and G1. We have observed that yeast cells expressing compromised APC subunits are sensitive to multiple stresses and have shorter replicative and chronological lifespans. In a pathway that runs parallel to that regulated by the APC, members of the Forkhead box (Fox transcription factor family also regulate stress responses. The yeast Fox orthologues Fkh1 and Fkh2 appear to drive the transcription of stress response factors and slow early G1 progression, while the APC seems to regulate chromatin structure, chromosome segregation, and resetting of the transcriptome in early G1. In contrast, under non-stress conditions, the Fkhs play a complex role in cell cycle progression, partially through activation of the APC. Direct and indirect interactions between the APC and the yeast Fkhs appear to be pivotal for lifespan determination. Here we explore the potential for these interactions to be evolutionarily conserved as a mechanism to balance cell cycle regulation with stress responses.

  20. Zebrafish Models of Human Leukemia: Technological Advances and Mechanistic Insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Nicholas R; Laroche, Fabrice J F; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Feng, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Insights concerning leukemic pathophysiology have been acquired in various animal models and further efforts to understand the mechanisms underlying leukemic treatment resistance and disease relapse promise to improve therapeutic strategies. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a vertebrate organism with a conserved hematopoietic program and unique experimental strengths suiting it for the investigation of human leukemia. Recent technological advances in zebrafish research including efficient transgenesis, precise genome editing, and straightforward transplantation techniques have led to the generation of a number of leukemia models. The transparency of the zebrafish when coupled with improved lineage-tracing and imaging techniques has revealed exquisite details of leukemic initiation, progression, and regression. With these advantages, the zebrafish represents a unique experimental system for leukemic research and additionally, advances in zebrafish-based high-throughput drug screening promise to hasten the discovery of novel leukemia therapeutics. To date, investigators have accumulated knowledge of the genetic underpinnings critical to leukemic transformation and treatment resistance and without doubt, zebrafish are rapidly expanding our understanding of disease mechanisms and helping to shape therapeutic strategies for improved outcomes in leukemic patients.

  1. Obesity and cancer: mechanistic insights from transdisciplinary studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allott, Emma H; Hursting, Stephen D

    2015-12-01

    Obesity is associated with a range of health outcomes that are of clinical and public health significance, including cancer. Herein, we summarize epidemiologic and preclinical evidence for an association between obesity and increased risk of breast and prostate cancer incidence and mortality. Moreover, we describe data from observational studies of weight change in humans and from calorie-restriction studies in mouse models that support a potential role for weight loss in counteracting tumor-promoting properties of obesity in breast and prostate cancers. Given that weight loss is challenging to achieve and maintain, we also consider evidence linking treatments for obesity-associated co-morbidities, including metformin, statins and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, with reduced breast and prostate cancer incidence and mortality. Finally, we highlight several challenges that should be considered when conducting epidemiologic and preclinical research in the area of obesity and cancer, including the measurement of obesity in population-based studies, the timing of obesity and weight change in relation to tumor latency and cancer diagnosis, and the heterogeneous nature of obesity and its associated co-morbidities. Given that obesity is a complex trait, comprised of behavioral, epidemiologic and molecular/metabolic factors, we argue that a transdisciplinary approach is the key to understanding the mechanisms linking obesity and cancer. As such, this review highlights the critical need to integrate evidence from both epidemiologic and preclinical studies to gain insight into both biologic and non-biologic mechanisms contributing to the obesity-cancer link.

  2. How phenyl makes a difference: mechanistic insights into the ruthenium( ii )-catalysed isomerisation of allylic alcohols

    KAUST Repository

    Manzini, Simone

    2013-10-16

    [RuCl(η5-3-phenylindenyl)(PPh3)2] (1) has been shown to be a highly active catalyst for the isomerisation of allylic alcohols to the corresponding ketones. A variety of substrates undergo the transformation, typically with 0.25-0.5 mol% of catalyst at room temperature, outperforming commonly-used complexes such as [RuCl(Cp)(PPh3) 2] and [RuCl(η5-indenyl)(PPh3) 2]. Mechanistic experiments and density functional theory have been employed to investigate the mechanism and understand the effect of catalyst structure on reactivity. These investigations suggest a oxo-π-allyl mechanism is in operation, avoiding intermediate ruthenium hydride complexes and leading to a characteristic 1,3-deuterium shift. Important mechanistic insights from DFT and experiments also allowed for the design of a protocol that expands the scope of the transformation to include primary allylic alcohols. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  3. Perspectives in radiation biophysics: From radiation track structure simulation to mechanistic models of DNA damage and repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikjoo, H.; Taleei, R.; Liamsuwan, T.; Liljequist, D.; Emfietzoglou, D.

    2016-11-01

    In radiation targeted therapy and genetic risk estimation of low dose radiation protection there is a crucial need for full description of DNA damage response and repair (DDR) leading to cell death and cell mutation. We propose such a description can be arrived through realistic track-structure simulations together with mechanistic mathematical formulation of DDR and the availability of experimental data for testing the proof of principle. In this paper we review briefly first the state of the art in DNA damage and repair, and then the recent advances in the physics of track structure which represents an essential tool in radiation biophysics.

  4. Mechanistic and Evolutionary Insights from Comparative Enzymology of Phosphomonoesterases and Phosphodiesterases across the Alkaline Phosphatase Superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunden, Fanny; AlSadhan, Ishraq; Lyubimov, Artem Y; Ressl, Susanne; Wiersma-Koch, Helen; Borland, Jamar; Brown, Clayton L; Johnson, Tory A; Singh, Zorawar; Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-11-02

    from existing promiscuous templates. More generally, comparative enzymology and analysis of catalytic promiscuity can provide mechanistic and evolutionary insights.

  5. Exploring soil organic matter-mineral interactions: mechanistic insights at the nanometer and molecular length scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, C.; Qafoku, N. P.; Grate, J. W.; Hufschmid, R.; Browning, N.; De Yoreo, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    With elevated levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere due to anthropogenic emissions and disruption to the carbon cycle, the effects of climate change are being accelerated. Approximately 80% of Earth's terrestrial organic carbon is stored in soil, and the residence time of this carbon can range from hours to millenia. Understanding the dynamics of this carbon pool in the carbon cycle is crucial to both predicting climate and sustaining ecosystem services. Soil organic carbon is known to be strongly associated with high surface area clay minerals. The nature of these interactions is not well understood primarily due to the heterogeneity of soil, as much of the current knowledge relies on experiments that take a top-down approach using bulk experimental measurements. Our work seeks to probe physical, chemical, and molecular-level interactions at the organic-mineral interface using a bottom-up approach that establishes a model system where complexity can be built in systematically. By performing in situ techniques such as dynamic force spectroscopy, a technique where organic molecules can be brought into contact with mineral surfaces in a controlled manner using an atomic force microscope, we demonstrate the ability to mechanistically probe the energy landscape of individual organic molecules with mineral surfaces. We demonstrate the ability to measure the binding energies of soil-inspired organic functional groups (including carboxylic acid, amine, methyl, and phosphate) with clay and mineral surfaces as a function of solution chemistry. This effort can provide researchers with both guiding principles about carbon dynamics at the sub-nanometer length scale and insights into early aggregation events, where organic-mineral interactions play a significant role.

  6. Mechanistic insights into the neutralization of cytotoxic abrin by the monoclonal antibody D6F10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shradha Bagaria

    Full Text Available Abrin, an A/B toxin obtained from the Abrus precatorius plant is extremely toxic and a potential bio-warfare agent. Till date there is no antidote or vaccine available against this toxin. The only known neutralizing monoclonal antibody against abrin, namely D6F10, has been shown to rescue the toxicity of abrin in cells as well as in mice. The present study focuses on mapping the epitopic region to understand the mechanism of neutralization of abrin by the antibody D6F10. Truncation and mutational analysis of abrin A chain revealed that the amino acids 74-123 of abrin A chain contain the core epitope and the residues Thr112, Gly114 and Arg118 are crucial for binding of the antibody. In silico analysis of the position of the mapped epitope indicated that it is present close to the active site cleft of abrin A chain. Thus, binding of the antibody near the active site blocks the enzymatic activity of abrin A chain, thereby rescuing inhibition of protein synthesis by the toxin in vitro. At 1∶10 molar concentration of abrin:antibody, the antibody D6F10 rescued cells from abrin-mediated inhibition of protein synthesis but did not prevent cell attachment of abrin. Further, internalization of the antibody bound to abrin was observed in cells by confocal microscopy. This is a novel finding which suggests that the antibody might function intracellularly and possibly explains the rescue of abrin's toxicity by the antibody in whole cells and animals. To our knowledge, this study is the first report on a neutralizing epitope for abrin and provides mechanistic insights into the poorly understood mode of action of anti-A chain antibodies against several toxins including ricin.

  7. Mechanistic Insights Underlying Tolerance to Acetic Acid Stress in Vaginal Candida glabrata Clinical Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Diana V; Salazar, Sara B; Lopes, Maria M; Mira, Nuno P

    2017-01-01

    During colonization of the vaginal tract Candida glabrata cells are challenged with the presence of acetic acid at a low pH, specially when dysbiosis occurs. To avoid exclusion from this niche C. glabrata cells are expected to evolve efficient adaptive responses to cope with this stress; however, these responses remain largely uncharacterized, especially in vaginal strains. In this work a cohort of 18 vaginal strains and 2 laboratory strains (CBS138 and KUE100) were phenotyped for their tolerance against inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid at pH 4. Despite some heterogeneity has been observed among the vaginal strains tested, in general these strains were considerably more tolerant to acetic acid than the laboratory strains. To tackle the mechanistic insights behind this differential level of tolerance observed, a set of vaginal strains differently tolerant to acetic acid (VG281∼VG49 acetic acid the more tolerant vaginal strains exhibited a higher activity of the plasma membrane proton pump CgPma1 and a reduced internal accumulation of the acid, these being two essential features to maximize tolerance. Based on the higher level of resistance exhibited by the vaginal strains against the action of a β-1,3-glucanase, it is hypothesized that the reduced internal accumulation of acetic acid inside these strains may originate from them having a different cell wall structure resulting in a reduced porosity to undissociated acetic acid molecules. Both the vaginal and the two laboratory strains were found to consume acetic acid in the presence of glucose indicating that metabolization of the acid is used by C. glabrata species as a detoxification mechanism. The results gathered in this study advance the current knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the increased competitiveness of C. glabrata in the vaginal tract, a knowledge that can be used to guide more suitable strategies to treat infections caused by this pathogenic yeast.

  8. Mechanistic Insights Underlying Tolerance to Acetic Acid Stress in Vaginal Candida glabrata Clinical Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Diana V.; Salazar, Sara B.; Lopes, Maria M.; Mira, Nuno P.

    2017-01-01

    During colonization of the vaginal tract Candida glabrata cells are challenged with the presence of acetic acid at a low pH, specially when dysbiosis occurs. To avoid exclusion from this niche C. glabrata cells are expected to evolve efficient adaptive responses to cope with this stress; however, these responses remain largely uncharacterized, especially in vaginal strains. In this work a cohort of 18 vaginal strains and 2 laboratory strains (CBS138 and KUE100) were phenotyped for their tolerance against inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid at pH 4. Despite some heterogeneity has been observed among the vaginal strains tested, in general these strains were considerably more tolerant to acetic acid than the laboratory strains. To tackle the mechanistic insights behind this differential level of tolerance observed, a set of vaginal strains differently tolerant to acetic acid (VG281∼VG49 < VG99 < VG216) and the highly susceptible laboratory strain KUE100 were selected for further studies. When suddenly challenged with acetic acid the more tolerant vaginal strains exhibited a higher activity of the plasma membrane proton pump CgPma1 and a reduced internal accumulation of the acid, these being two essential features to maximize tolerance. Based on the higher level of resistance exhibited by the vaginal strains against the action of a β-1,3-glucanase, it is hypothesized that the reduced internal accumulation of acetic acid inside these strains may originate from them having a different cell wall structure resulting in a reduced porosity to undissociated acetic acid molecules. Both the vaginal and the two laboratory strains were found to consume acetic acid in the presence of glucose indicating that metabolization of the acid is used by C. glabrata species as a detoxification mechanism. The results gathered in this study advance the current knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the increased competitiveness of C. glabrata in the vaginal tract, a knowledge that can

  9. Obesity and adverse breast cancer risk and outcome: Mechanistic insights and strategies for intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picon-Ruiz, Manuel; Morata-Tarifa, Cynthia; Valle-Goffin, Janeiro J; Friedman, Eitan R; Slingerland, Joyce M

    2017-09-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Recent decades have seen an unprecedented rise in obesity, and the health impact thereof is increasingly evident. In 2014, worldwide, more than 1.9 billion adults were overweight (body mass index [BMI], 25-29.9 kg/m(2) ), and of these, over 600 million were obese (BMI ≥30 kg/m(2) ). Although the association between obesity and the risk of diabetes and coronary artery disease is widely known, the impact of obesity on cancer incidence, morbidity, and mortality is not fully appreciated. Obesity is associated both with a higher risk of developing breast cancer, particularly in postmenopausal women, and with worse disease outcome for women of all ages. The first part of this review summarizes the relationships between obesity and breast cancer development and outcomes in premenopausal and postmenopausal women and in those with hormone receptor-positive and -negative disease. The second part of this review addresses hypothesized molecular mechanistic insights that may underlie the effects of obesity to increase local and circulating proinflammatory cytokines, promote tumor angiogenesis and stimulate the most malignant cancer stem cell population to drive cancer growth, invasion, and metastasis. Finally, a review of observational studies demonstrates that increased physical activity is associated with lower breast cancer risk and better outcomes. The effects of recent lifestyle interventions to decrease sex steroids, insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 pathway activation, and inflammatory biomarkers associated with worse breast cancer outcomes in obesity also are discussed. Although many observational studies indicate that exercise with weight loss is associated with improved breast cancer outcome, further prospective studies are needed to determine whether weight reduction will lead to improved patient outcomes. It is hoped that several ongoing lifestyle intervention trials, which are reviewed herein, will support the systematic

  10. Obesity and adverse breast cancer risk and outcome: Mechanistic insights and strategies for intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picon‐Ruiz, Manuel; Morata‐Tarifa, Cynthia; Valle‐Goffin, Janeiro J.; Friedman, Eitan R.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Recent decades have seen an unprecedented rise in obesity, and the health impact thereof is increasingly evident. In 2014, worldwide, more than 1.9 billion adults were overweight (body mass index [BMI], 25‐29.9 kg/m2), and of these, over 600 million were obese (BMI ≥30 kg/m2). Although the association between obesity and the risk of diabetes and coronary artery disease is widely known, the impact of obesity on cancer incidence, morbidity, and mortality is not fully appreciated. Obesity is associated both with a higher risk of developing breast cancer, particularly in postmenopausal women, and with worse disease outcome for women of all ages. The first part of this review summarizes the relationships between obesity and breast cancer development and outcomes in premenopausal and postmenopausal women and in those with hormone receptor‐positive and ‐negative disease. The second part of this review addresses hypothesized molecular mechanistic insights that may underlie the effects of obesity to increase local and circulating proinflammatory cytokines, promote tumor angiogenesis and stimulate the most malignant cancer stem cell population to drive cancer growth, invasion, and metastasis. Finally, a review of observational studies demonstrates that increased physical activity is associated with lower breast cancer risk and better outcomes. The effects of recent lifestyle interventions to decrease sex steroids, insulin/insulin‐like growth factor‐1 pathway activation, and inflammatory biomarkers associated with worse breast cancer outcomes in obesity also are discussed. Although many observational studies indicate that exercise with weight loss is associated with improved breast cancer outcome, further prospective studies are needed to determine whether weight reduction will lead to improved patient outcomes. It is hoped that several ongoing lifestyle intervention trials, which are reviewed herein, will support the

  11. Insights on accelerated skeletal repair in Cushing's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-Young Kim

    2015-06-01

    In this patient, spontaneous recovery of trabecular bone architecture was reflected by the early correction in TBS. Subsequent TPTD treatment was associated with marked improvement in BMD, presumably due to enhanced mineralization. Complete skeletal repair was achieved by this two-step mechanism in a very short time following successful surgical treatment for Cushing's disease.

  12. Functional and mechanistic studies of XPC DNA-repair complex as transcriptional coactivator in embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattoglio, Claudia; Zhang, Elisa T; Grubisic, Ivan; Chiba, Kunitoshi; Fong, Yick W; Tjian, Robert

    2015-05-01

    The embryonic stem cell (ESC) state is transcriptionally controlled by OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG with cofactors, chromatin regulators, noncoding RNAs, and other effectors of signaling pathways. Uncovering components of these regulatory circuits and their interplay provides the knowledge base to deploy ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells. We recently identified the DNA-repair complex xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC)-RAD23B-CETN2 as a stem cell coactivator (SCC) required for OCT4/SOX2 transcriptional activation. Here we investigate the role of SCC genome-wide in murine ESCs by mapping regions bound by RAD23B and analyzing transcriptional profiles of SCC-depleted ESCs. We establish OCT4 and SOX2 as the primary transcription factors recruiting SCC to regulatory regions of pluripotency genes and identify the XPC subunit as essential for interaction with the two proteins. The present study reveals new mechanistic and functional aspects of SCC transcriptional activity, and thus underscores the diversified functions of this regulatory complex.

  13. Aortic valve repair via neo-chordae technique: mechanistic insight through numerical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votta, Emiliano; Paroni, Luca; Conti, Carlo A; Pelosi, Alessandra; Mangini, Andrea; D'Alesio, Paolo; Vismara, Riccardo; Antona, Carlo; Redaelli, Alberto

    2012-05-01

    Recently, the neo-chordae technique (NCT) was proposed to stabilize the surgical correction of isolated aortic valve (AV) prolapse. Neo-chordae are inserted into the corrected leaflet to drive its closure by minimal tensions and prevent relapses. In a previous in vitro study we analysed the NCT effects on healthy aortic roots (ARs). Here we extend that analysis via finite element models (FEMs). After successfully replicating the experimental conditions for validation purposes, we modified our AR FEM, obtaining a continent AV with minor isolated prolapse, thus representing a realistic clinical scenario. We then simulated the NCT, and systematically assessed the acute effects of changing neo-chordae length, opening angle, asymmetry and insertion on the aorta. In the baseline configuration the NCT restored physiological AV dynamics and coaptation, without inducing abnormal leaflet stresses. This outcome was notably sensitive only to neo-chordae length, suggesting that the NCT is a potentially easy-to-standardize technique. However, this parameter is crucial: major shortenings (6 mm) prevent coaptation and increase leaflet stresses by 359 kPa, beyond the yield limit. Minor shortenings (2-4 mm) only induce a negligible stress increase and mild leaflet tethering, which however may hamper the long-term surgical outcome.

  14. Structural and mechanistic insight into Holliday-junction dissolution by topoisomerase IIIα and RMI1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bocquet, Nicolas; Bizard, Anna H; Abdulrahman, Wassim;

    2014-01-01

    Repair of DNA double-strand breaks via homologous recombination can produce double Holliday junctions (dHJs) that require enzymatic separation. Topoisomerase IIIα (TopIIIα) together with RMI1 disentangles the final hemicatenane intermediate obtained once dHJs have converged. How binding of RMI1 t...

  15. Catalytic intermolecular amination of C-H bonds: method development and mechanistic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, Kristin Williams; Du Bois, J

    2007-01-24

    Reaction methodology for intermolecular C-H amination of benzylic and 3 degrees C-H bonds is described. This process uses the starting alkane as the limiting reagent, gives optically pure tetrasubstituted amines through stereospecific insertion into enantiomeric 3 degrees centers, displays high chemoselectivity for benzylic oxidation, and enables the facile preparation of isotopically enriched 15N-labeled compounds. Access to substituted amines, amino alcohols, and diamines is thereby made possible in a single transformation. Important information relevant to understanding the initial steps in the catalytic cycle, reaction chemoselectivity, the nature of the active oxidant, and pathways for catalyst inactivation has been gained through mechanistic analysis; these studies are also presented.

  16. Abdominal aortic aneurysms : clinical insights and outcome after endovascular repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandvoort, H.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a focal dilatation of the abdominal aorta. The pathophysiology of AAA is a complex multifactorial process and much is still unknown. Histologic and biochemical analysis of AAA wall characteristics can contribute to a better insight in AAA pathophysiology. To make t

  17. A structural classification of carbohydrate epimerases: From mechanistic insights to practical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Overtveldt, Stevie; Verhaeghe, Tom; Joosten, Henk-Jan; van den Bergh, Tom; Beerens, Koen; Desmet, Tom

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, carbohydrate epimerases have attracted a lot of attention as efficient biocatalysts that can convert abundant sugars (e.g.d-fructose) directly into rare counterparts (e.g.d-psicose). Despite increased research activities, no review about these enzymes has been published in more than a decade, meaning that their full potential is hard to appreciate. Here, we present an overview of all known carbohydrate epimerases based on a classification in structural families, which links every substrate specificity to a well-defined reaction mechanism. The mechanism can even be predicted for enzymes that have not yet been characterized or that lack structural information. In this review, the different families are discussed in detail, both structurally and mechanistically, with special reference to recent examples in the literature. Furthermore, the value of understanding the reaction mechanism will be illustrated by making the link to possible application and engineering targets.

  18. Mechanistic insights on immunosenescence and chronic immune activation in HIV-tuberculosis co-infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Esaki M; Velu, Vijayakumar; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Larsson, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Immunosenescence is marked by accelerated degradation of host immune responses leading to the onset of opportunistic infections, where senescent T cells show remarkably higher ontogenic defects as compared to healthy T cells. The mechanistic association between T-cell immunosenescence and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression, and functional T-cell responses in HIV-tuberculosis (HIV-TB) co-infection remains to be elaborately discussed. Here, we discussed the association of immunosenescence and chronic immune activation in HIV-TB co-infection and reviewed the role played by mediators of immune deterioration in HIV-TB co-infection necessitating the importance of designing therapeutic strategies against HIV disease progression and pathogenesis. PMID:25674514

  19. Mechanistic insights into the oxidation of substituted phenols via hydrogen atom abstraction by a cupric-superoxo complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Yoon; Peterson, Ryan L; Ohkubo, Kei; Garcia-Bosch, Isaac; Himes, Richard A; Woertink, Julia; Moore, Cathy D; Solomon, Edward I; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2014-07-16

    To obtain mechanistic insights into the inherent reactivity patterns for copper(I)-O2 adducts, a new cupric-superoxo complex [(DMM-tmpa)Cu(II)(O2(•-))](+) (2) [DMM-tmpa = tris((4-methoxy-3,5-dimethylpyridin-2-yl)methyl)amine] has been synthesized and studied in phenol oxidation-oxygenation reactions. Compound 2 is characterized by UV-vis, resonance Raman, and EPR spectroscopies. Its reactions with a series of para-substituted 2,6-di-tert-butylphenols (p-X-DTBPs) afford 2,6-di-tert-butyl-1,4-benzoquinone (DTBQ) in up to 50% yields. Significant deuterium kinetic isotope effects and a positive correlation of second-order rate constants (k2) compared to rate constants for p-X-DTBPs plus cumylperoxyl radical reactions indicate a mechanism that involves rate-limiting hydrogen atom transfer (HAT). A weak correlation of (k(B)T/e) ln k2 versus E(ox) of p-X-DTBP indicates that the HAT reactions proceed via a partial transfer of charge rather than a complete transfer of charge in the electron transfer/proton transfer pathway. Product analyses, (18)O-labeling experiments, and separate reactivity employing the 2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenoxyl radical provide further mechanistic insights. After initial HAT, a second molar equiv of 2 couples to the phenoxyl radical initially formed, giving a Cu(II)-OO-(ArO') intermediate, which proceeds in the case of p-OR-DTBP substrates via a two-electron oxidation reaction involving hydrolysis steps which liberate H2O2 and the corresponding alcohol. By contrast, four-electron oxygenation (O-O cleavage) mainly occurs for p-R-DTBP which gives (18)O-labeled DTBQ and elimination of the R group.

  20. Mechanistic Insights into the Oxidation of Substituted Phenols via Hydrogen Atom Abstraction by a Cupric–Superoxo Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    To obtain mechanistic insights into the inherent reactivity patterns for copper(I)–O2 adducts, a new cupric–superoxo complex [(DMM-tmpa)CuII(O2•–)]+ (2) [DMM-tmpa = tris((4-methoxy-3,5-dimethylpyridin-2-yl)methyl)amine] has been synthesized and studied in phenol oxidation–oxygenation reactions. Compound 2 is characterized by UV–vis, resonance Raman, and EPR spectroscopies. Its reactions with a series of para-substituted 2,6-di-tert-butylphenols (p-X-DTBPs) afford 2,6-di-tert-butyl-1,4-benzoquinone (DTBQ) in up to 50% yields. Significant deuterium kinetic isotope effects and a positive correlation of second-order rate constants (k2) compared to rate constants for p-X-DTBPs plus cumylperoxyl radical reactions indicate a mechanism that involves rate-limiting hydrogen atom transfer (HAT). A weak correlation of (kBT/e) ln k2 versus Eox of p-X-DTBP indicates that the HAT reactions proceed via a partial transfer of charge rather than a complete transfer of charge in the electron transfer/proton transfer pathway. Product analyses, 18O-labeling experiments, and separate reactivity employing the 2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenoxyl radical provide further mechanistic insights. After initial HAT, a second molar equiv of 2 couples to the phenoxyl radical initially formed, giving a CuII–OO–(ArO′) intermediate, which proceeds in the case of p-OR-DTBP substrates via a two-electron oxidation reaction involving hydrolysis steps which liberate H2O2 and the corresponding alcohol. By contrast, four-electron oxygenation (O–O cleavage) mainly occurs for p-R-DTBP which gives 18O-labeled DTBQ and elimination of the R group. PMID:24953129

  1. New Mechanistic Insights on the Selectivity of Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Organic Reactions: The Role of Computational Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinhao; Chung, Lung Wa; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2016-06-21

    With new advances in theoretical methods and increased computational power, applications of computational chemistry are becoming practical and routine in many fields of chemistry. In organic chemistry, computational chemistry plays an indispensable role in elucidating reaction mechanisms and the origins of various selectivities, such as chemo-, regio-, and stereoselectivities. Consequently, mechanistic understanding improves synthesis and assists in the rational design of new catalysts. In this Account, we present some of our recent works to illustrate how computational chemistry provides new mechanistic insights for improvement of the selectivities of several organic reactions. These examples include not only explanations for the existing experimental observations, but also predictions which were subsequently verified experimentally. This Account consists of three sections discuss three different kinds of selectivities. The first section discusses the regio- and stereoselectivities of hydrosilylations of alkynes, mainly catalyzed by [Cp*Ru(MeCN)3](+) or [CpRu(MeCN)3](+). Calculations suggest a new mechanism that involves a key ruthenacyclopropene intermediate. This mechanism not only explains the unusual Markovnikov regio-selectivity and anti-addition stereoselectivity observed by Trost and co-workers, but also motivated further experimental investigations. New intriguing experimental observations and further theoretical studies led to an extension of the reaction mechanism. The second section includes three cases of meta-selective C-H activation of aryl compounds. In the case of Cu-catalyzed selective meta-C-H activation of aniline, a new mechanism that involves a Cu(III)-Ar-mediated Heck-like transition state, in which the Ar group acts as an electrophile, was proposed. This mechanism predicted a higher reactivity for more electron-deficient Ar groups, which was supported by experiments. For two template-mediated, meta-selective C-H bond activations catalyzed by

  2. Structural and Mechanistic Insights into C-P Bond Hydrolysis by Phosphonoacetate Hydrolase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Vinayak; Borisova, Svetlana A.; Metcalf, William W.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.; Nair, Satish K. (UIUC)

    2011-12-22

    Bacteria have evolved pathways to metabolize phosphonates as a nutrient source for phosphorus. In Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021, 2-aminoethylphosphonate is catabolized to phosphonoacetate, which is converted to acetate and inorganic phosphate by phosphonoacetate hydrolase (PhnA). Here we present detailed biochemical and structural characterization of PhnA that provides insights into the mechanism of C-P bond cleavage. The 1.35 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure reveals a catalytic core similar to those of alkaline phosphatases and nucleotide pyrophosphatases but with notable differences, such as a longer metal-metal distance. Detailed structure-guided analysis of active site residues and four additional cocrystal structures with phosphonoacetate substrate, acetate, phosphonoformate inhibitor, and a covalently bound transition state mimic provide insight into active site features that may facilitate cleavage of the C-P bond. These studies expand upon the array of reactions that can be catalyzed by enzymes of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily.

  3. Carcinogenicity and mechanistic insights on the behavior of epoxides and epoxide-forming chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, Ronald L

    2002-12-01

    Many epoxides and their precursors are high production volume chemicals that have major uses in the polymer industry and as intermediates in the manufacture of other chemicals. Several of these chemicals were demonstrated to be carcinogenic in laboratory animal studies conducted by the Ramazzini Foundation (e.g., vinyl chloride, acrylonitrile, styrene, styrene oxide, and benzene) and by the National Toxicology Program (e.g., ethylene oxide, 1,3-butadiene, isoprene, chloroprene, acrylonitrile, glycidol, and benzene). The most common sites of tumor induction were lung, liver, harderian gland, and circulatory system in mice; Zymbal's gland and brain in rats; and mammary gland and forestomach in both species. Differences in cancer outcome among studies of epoxide chemicals may be related to differences in study design (e.g., dose, duration, and route of exposure; observation period; animal strains), as well as biological factors affecting target organ dosimetry of the DNA-reactive epoxide (toxicokinetics) and tissue response (toxicodynamics). N7-Alkylguanine, N1-alkyladenine, and cyclic etheno adducts, as well as K-ras and p53 mutations, have been detected in animals and/or workers exposed to several of these chemicals. The classifications of these chemical carcinogens by IARC and NTP are based on animal and human data and results of mechanistic studies. Reducing occupational and environmental exposures to these chemicals will certainly reduce human cancer risks.

  4. Unified superresolution experiments and stochastic theory provide mechanistic insight into protein ion-exchange adsorptive separations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisley, Lydia; Chen, Jixin; Mansur, Andrea P; Shuang, Bo; Kourentzi, Katerina; Poongavanam, Mohan-Vivekanandan; Chen, Wen-Hsiang; Dhamane, Sagar; Willson, Richard C; Landes, Christy F

    2014-02-11

    Chromatographic protein separations, immunoassays, and biosensing all typically involve the adsorption of proteins to surfaces decorated with charged, hydrophobic, or affinity ligands. Despite increasingly widespread use throughout the pharmaceutical industry, mechanistic detail about the interactions of proteins with individual chromatographic adsorbent sites is available only via inference from ensemble measurements such as binding isotherms, calorimetry, and chromatography. In this work, we present the direct superresolution mapping and kinetic characterization of functional sites on ion-exchange ligands based on agarose, a support matrix routinely used in protein chromatography. By quantifying the interactions of single proteins with individual charged ligands, we demonstrate that clusters of charges are necessary to create detectable adsorption sites and that even chemically identical ligands create adsorption sites of varying kinetic properties that depend on steric availability at the interface. Additionally, we relate experimental results to the stochastic theory of chromatography. Simulated elution profiles calculated from the molecular-scale data suggest that, if it were possible to engineer uniform optimal interactions into ion-exchange systems, separation efficiencies could be improved by as much as a factor of five by deliberately exploiting clustered interactions that currently dominate the ion-exchange process only accidentally.

  5. Mechanistic insights on organocatalytic enantioselective decarboxylative protonation by epicinchona-thiourea hybrid derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Arkajyoti; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2012-12-07

    Mechanism and the origin of enantioselectivity in the decarboxylative protonation of α-amino malonate hemiester promoted by epicinchona-thiourea hybrid organocatalyst is established by using the DFT(M06-2X/6-311+G**//ONIOM2) computational methods. The origin of stereoselectivity rendered by this hybrid bifunctional catalyst in asymmetric protonation is investigated for the first time using suitable transition-state models. A detailed conformational analysis of N-[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)]phenylthiourea-based epicinchonidine reveals the potential for a bifunctional mode of activation of the substrate α-amino malonate hemiester through hydrogen bonding. Six different conformer families differing in characteristic dihedral angles are identified within a range of 16 kcal/mol with respect to the lowest energy conformer. Different likely mechanistic pathways obtained through detailed analysis of the transition states and intermediates are compared. It is identified that in the preferred pathway, the decarboxylation is followed by a direct proton transfer from the chiral quinuclidinium moiety to the enolate carbon as opposed to a conventional protonation at the enolate oxygen followed by a keto-enol tautomerization. The factors responsible for high levels of observed stereoselectivity are traced to interesting hydrogen-bonding interactions offered by the thiourea-cinchona bifunctional framework. The predicted stereoselectivities using computed Gibbs free energies of diastereomeric transition states are in fair agreement with the experimental stereoselectivities.

  6. Unified superresolution experiments and stochastic theory provide mechanistic insight into protein ion-exchange adsorptive separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisley, Lydia; Chen, Jixin; Mansur, Andrea P.; Shuang, Bo; Kourentzi, Katerina; Poongavanam, Mohan-Vivekanandan; Chen, Wen-Hsiang; Dhamane, Sagar; Willson, Richard C.; Landes, Christy F.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatographic protein separations, immunoassays, and biosensing all typically involve the adsorption of proteins to surfaces decorated with charged, hydrophobic, or affinity ligands. Despite increasingly widespread use throughout the pharmaceutical industry, mechanistic detail about the interactions of proteins with individual chromatographic adsorbent sites is available only via inference from ensemble measurements such as binding isotherms, calorimetry, and chromatography. In this work, we present the direct superresolution mapping and kinetic characterization of functional sites on ion-exchange ligands based on agarose, a support matrix routinely used in protein chromatography. By quantifying the interactions of single proteins with individual charged ligands, we demonstrate that clusters of charges are necessary to create detectable adsorption sites and that even chemically identical ligands create adsorption sites of varying kinetic properties that depend on steric availability at the interface. Additionally, we relate experimental results to the stochastic theory of chromatography. Simulated elution profiles calculated from the molecular-scale data suggest that, if it were possible to engineer uniform optimal interactions into ion-exchange systems, separation efficiencies could be improved by as much as a factor of five by deliberately exploiting clustered interactions that currently dominate the ion-exchange process only accidentally. PMID:24459184

  7. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M

    2016-05-05

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared - non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents.

  8. Mechanistic insights into flow induced segregation in blood and other multicomponent suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Graham, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Blood is a multicomponent suspension comprising mostly of red-blood-cells (RBCs) along with trace amounts of leukocytes and platelets. Under normal flow conditions both the leukocytes and the platelets segregate near the vessel walls, a phenomenon commonly known as margination. The key physical differences between RBCs, leukocytes, and platelets are their relative size and rigidity: leukocytes are larger than RBCs and platelets smaller, but both are considerably stiffer than RBCs. In this work we study the blood flow problem using a model system of fluid-filled elastic capsule mixtures. Using boundary integral (BI) simulations we delineate the effect of size and rigidity on the segregation behavior, and relate these to the observations of leukocyte and platelet margination in blood. Further, we introduce a novel Monte Carlo simulation technique, which incorporates two of the key transport mechanisms in confined suspensions: the wall-induced migration and hydrodynamic pair collisions. The model accurately reproduces the results of BI simulations and provides a mechanistic understanding of the margination phenomena. In particular, it clarifies the important role of heterogeneous pair collisions (collisions between two different species) on the observed margination behavior.

  9. Rational Design of Transcranial Current Stimulation (TCS through Mechanistic Insights into Cortical Network Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio eFrohlich

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial current stimulation (TCS is a promising method of non-invasive brain stimulation to modulate cortical network dynamics. Preliminary studies have demonstrated the ability of TCS to enhance cognition and reduce symptoms in both neurological and psychiatric illnesses. Despite the encouraging results of these studies, the mechanisms by which TCS and endogenous network dynamics interact remain poorly understood. Here, we propose that the development of the next generation of TCS paradigms with increased efficacy requires such mechanistic understanding of how weak electric fields imposed by TCS interact with the nonlinear dynamics of large-scale cortical networks. We highlight key recent advances in the study of the interaction dynamics between TCS and cortical network activity. In particular, we demonstrate the opportunities provided by an interdisciplinary approach that bridges neurobiology and electrical engineering. We discuss the use of (1 hybrid biological-electronic experimental approaches to disentangle feedback interactions, (2 large-scale computer simulations for the study of weak global perturbations imposed by TCS, and (3 optogenetic manipulations informed by dynamics systems theory to probe network dynamics. Together, we here provide the foundation for the use of rational design for the development of the next generation of TCS neurotherapeutics.

  10. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared - non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents.

  11. Structural and mechanistic insight into DNA unwinding by Deinococcus radiodurans UvrD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike Stelter

    Full Text Available DNA helicases are responsible for unwinding the duplex DNA, a key step in many biological processes. UvrD is a DNA helicase involved in several DNA repair pathways. We report here crystal structures of Deinococcus radiodurans UvrD (drUvrD in complex with DNA in different nucleotide-free and bound states. These structures provide us with three distinct snapshots of drUvrD in action and for the first time trap a DNA helicase undergoing a large-scale spiral movement around duplexed DNA. Our structural data also improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate DNA unwinding by Superfamily 1A (SF1A helicases. Our biochemical data reveal that drUvrD is a DNA-stimulated ATPase, can translocate along ssDNA in the 3'-5' direction and shows ATP-dependent 3'-5', and surprisingly also, 5'-3' helicase activity. Interestingly, we find that these translocase and helicase activities of drUvrD are modulated by the ssDNA binding protein. Analysis of drUvrD mutants indicate that the conserved β-hairpin structure of drUvrD that functions as a separation pin is critical for both drUvrD's 3'-5' and 5'-3' helicase activities, whereas the GIG motif of drUvrD involved in binding to the DNA duplex is essential for the 5'-3' helicase activity only. These special features of drUvrD may reflect its involvement in a wide range of DNA repair processes in vivo.

  12. Understanding impacts of climatic extremes on diarrheal disease epidemics: Insights from mechanistic disease propagation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutla, A.; Akanda, A. S.; Colwell, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    An epidemic outbreak of diarrheal diseases (primarily cholera) in Haiti in 2010 is a reminder that our understanding on disease triggers, transmission and spreading mechanisms is incomplete. Cholera can occur in two forms - epidemic (defined as sudden outbreak in a historically disease free region) and endemic (recurrence and persistence of the disease for several consecutive years). Examples of countries with epidemic cholera include Pakistan (2008), Congo (2008), and most recently Haiti (2010). A significant difference between endemic and epidemic regions is the mortality rate, i.e., 1% or lower in an endemic regions versus 3-7% during recent epidemic outbreaks. A fundamentally transformational approach - a warning system with several months prediction lead time - is needed to prevent disease outbreak and minimize its impact on population. Lack of information on spatial and temporal variability of disease incidence as well as transmission in human population continues to be significant challenge in the development of early-warning systems for cholera. Using satellite data on regional hydroclimatic processes, water and sanitation infrastructure indices, and biological pathogen growth information, here we present a Simple, Mechanistic, Adaptive, Remote sensing based Regional Transmission or SMART model to (i) identify regions of potential cholera outbreaks and (ii) quantify mechanism of spread of the disease in previously disease free region. Our results indicate that epidemic regions are located near regional rivers and are characterized by sporadic outbreaks, which are likely to be initiated during episodes of prevailing warm air temperature with low river flows, creating favorable environmental conditions for the growth of cholera bacteria. Heavy rainfall, through inundation or breakdown of sanitary infrastructure, accelerates interaction between contaminated water and human activities, resulting in an epidemic. We discuss the above findings in light of

  13. Mechanistic insights on platinum- and palladium-pincer catalyzed coupling and cyclopropanation reactions between olefins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeev, Ramanan; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2012-07-21

    The mechanism of M(II)-PNP-pincer catalyzed reaction between (i) ethene, (ii) trans-butene with 2-methylbut-2-ene, 2,3-dimethylbut-2-ene and tert-butylbutene is examined by using density functional theory methods (where M = Pt or Pd). All key intermediates and transition states involved in the reaction are precisely located on the respective potential energy surfaces using the popular DFT functionals such as mPW1K, M06-2X, and B3LYP in conjunction with the 6-31+G** basis set. The reaction between these olefins can lead to a linear coupling product or a substituted cyclopropane. The energetic comparison between coupling as well as cyclopropanation pathways involving four pairs of olefins for both platinum (1-4) and palladium (5-8) catalyzed reactions is performed. The key events in the lower energy pathway in the mechanistic course involves (i) a C-C bond formation between the metal bound olefin (ethene or trans-butene) and a free olefin, and (ii) two successive [1,2] hydrogen migrations in the ensuing carbocationic intermediates (1c-4c, and 1d-4d), toward the formation of the coupling product. The computed barriers for these steps in the reaction of metal bound ethene to free tert-butylbutene (or other butenes) are found to be much lower than the corresponding steps when trans-butene is bound to the metal pincer. The Gibbs free energy differences between the transition states leading to the coupling product (TS(d-e)) and that responsible for cyclopropanated product (TS(d-g)) are found to be diminishingly closer in the case of the platinum pincer as compared to that in the palladium system. The computed energetics indicate that the coupled product prefers to remain as a metal olefin complex, consistent with the earlier experimental reports.

  14. A genetic cause of Alzheimer disease: mechanistic insights from Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Frances K; Al-Janabi, Tamara; Hardy, John; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Nizetic, Dean; Tybulewicz, Victor L J; Fisher, Elizabeth M C; Strydom, André

    2015-09-01

    Down syndrome, which arises in individuals carrying an extra copy of chromosome 21, is associated with a greatly increased risk of early-onset Alzheimer disease. It is thought that this risk is conferred by the presence of three copies of the gene encoding amyloid precursor protein (APP)--an Alzheimer disease risk factor--although the possession of extra copies of other chromosome 21 genes may also play a part. Further study of the mechanisms underlying the development of Alzheimer disease in people with Down syndrome could provide insights into the mechanisms that cause dementia in the general population.

  15. A genetic cause of Alzheimer disease: mechanistic insights from Down syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Frances K.; Al-Janabi, Tamara; Hardy, John; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Nizetic, Dean; Tybulewicz, Victor L. J.; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.; Strydom, André

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome, which arises in individuals carrying an extra copy of chromosome 21, is associated with a greatly increased risk of early-onset Alzheimer disease. It is thought that this risk is conferred by the presence of three copies of the gene encoding amyloid precursor protein (APP) — an Alzheimer disease risk factor — although the possession of extra copies of other chromosome 21 genes may also play a part. Further study of the mechanisms underlying the development of Alzheimer disease in people with Down syndrome could provide insights into the mechanisms that cause dementia in the general population. PMID:26243569

  16. Mechanistic insights into the impact of Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma on human epithelial cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezest, Marlène; Chavatte, Laurent; Bourdens, Marion; Quinton, Damien; Camus, Mylène; Garrigues, Luc; Descargues, Pascal; Arbault, Stéphane; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Casteilla, Louis; Clément, Franck; Planat, Valérie; Bulteau, Anne-Laure

    2017-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma (CAPP) has potential as a new cancer therapy. However, knowledge about cellular signaling events and toxicity subsequent to plasma treatment is still poorly documented. The aim of this study was to focus on the interaction between 3 different types of plasma (He, He-O2, He-N2) and human epithelial cell lines to gain better insight into plasma-cell interaction. We provide evidence that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) are inducing cell death by apoptosis and that the proteasome, a major intracellular proteolytic system which is important for tumor cell growth and survival, is a target of (He or He-N2) CAPP. However, RONS are not the only actors involved in cell death; electric field and charged particles could play a significant role especially for He-O2 CAPP. By differential label-free quantitative proteomic analysis we found that CAPP triggers antioxidant and cellular defense but is also affecting extracellular matrix in keratinocytes. Moreover, we found that malignant cells are more resistant to CAPP treatment than normal cells. Taken together, our findings provide insight into potential mechanisms of CAPP-induced proteasome inactivation and the cellular consequences of these events.

  17. Mechanistic insights into the impact of Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma on human epithelial cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezest, Marlène; Chavatte, Laurent; Bourdens, Marion; Quinton, Damien; Camus, Mylène; Garrigues, Luc; Descargues, Pascal; Arbault, Stéphane; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Casteilla, Louis; Clément, Franck; Planat, Valérie; Bulteau, Anne-Laure

    2017-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma (CAPP) has potential as a new cancer therapy. However, knowledge about cellular signaling events and toxicity subsequent to plasma treatment is still poorly documented. The aim of this study was to focus on the interaction between 3 different types of plasma (He, He-O2, He-N2) and human epithelial cell lines to gain better insight into plasma-cell interaction. We provide evidence that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) are inducing cell death by apoptosis and that the proteasome, a major intracellular proteolytic system which is important for tumor cell growth and survival, is a target of (He or He-N2) CAPP. However, RONS are not the only actors involved in cell death; electric field and charged particles could play a significant role especially for He-O2 CAPP. By differential label-free quantitative proteomic analysis we found that CAPP triggers antioxidant and cellular defense but is also affecting extracellular matrix in keratinocytes. Moreover, we found that malignant cells are more resistant to CAPP treatment than normal cells. Taken together, our findings provide insight into potential mechanisms of CAPP-induced proteasome inactivation and the cellular consequences of these events. PMID:28120925

  18. Mechanistic insights into chemical and photochemical transformations of bismuth vanadate photoanodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Francesca M.; Cooper, Jason K.; Kunzelmann, Viktoria; McDowell, Matthew T.; Yu, Jie; Larson, David M.; Borys, Nicholas J.; Abelyan, Christine; Beeman, Jeffrey W.; Yu, Kin Man; Yang, Jinhui; Chen, Le; Shaner, Matthew R.; Spurgeon, Joshua; Houle, Frances A.; Persson, Kristin A.; Sharp, Ian D.

    2016-07-01

    Artificial photosynthesis relies on the availability of semiconductors that are chemically stable and can efficiently capture solar energy. Although metal oxide semiconductors have been investigated for their promise to resist oxidative attack, materials in this class can suffer from chemical and photochemical instability. Here we present a methodology for evaluating corrosion mechanisms and apply it to bismuth vanadate, a state-of-the-art photoanode. Analysis of changing morphology and composition under solar water splitting conditions reveals chemical instabilities that are not predicted from thermodynamic considerations of stable solid oxide phases, as represented by the Pourbaix diagram for the system. Computational modelling indicates that photoexcited charge carriers accumulated at the surface destabilize the lattice, and that self-passivation by formation of a chemically stable surface phase is kinetically hindered. Although chemical stability of metal oxides cannot be assumed, insight into corrosion mechanisms aids development of protection strategies and discovery of semiconductors with improved stability.

  19. Structure of the vacuolar H+-ATPase rotary motor reveals new mechanistic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Shaun; Phillips, Clair; Huss, Markus; Tiburcy, Felix; Wieczorek, Helmut; Trinick, John; Harrison, Michael A; Muench, Stephen P

    2015-03-03

    Vacuolar H(+)-ATPases are multisubunit complexes that operate with rotary mechanics and are essential for membrane proton transport throughout eukaryotes. Here we report a ∼ 1 nm resolution reconstruction of a V-ATPase in a different conformational state from that previously reported for a lower-resolution yeast model. The stator network of the V-ATPase (and by implication that of other rotary ATPases) does not change conformation in different catalytic states, and hence must be relatively rigid. We also demonstrate that a conserved bearing in the catalytic domain is electrostatic, contributing to the extraordinarily high efficiency of rotary ATPases. Analysis of the rotor axle/membrane pump interface suggests how rotary ATPases accommodate different c ring stoichiometries while maintaining high efficiency. The model provides evidence for a half channel in the proton pump, supporting theoretical models of ion translocation. Our refined model therefore provides new insights into the structure and mechanics of the V-ATPases.

  20. Mechanistic insights into chemical and photochemical transformations of bismuth vanadate photoanodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Francesca M; Cooper, Jason K; Kunzelmann, Viktoria; McDowell, Matthew T; Yu, Jie; Larson, David M; Borys, Nicholas J; Abelyan, Christine; Beeman, Jeffrey W; Yu, Kin Man; Yang, Jinhui; Chen, Le; Shaner, Matthew R; Spurgeon, Joshua; Houle, Frances A; Persson, Kristin A; Sharp, Ian D

    2016-07-05

    Artificial photosynthesis relies on the availability of semiconductors that are chemically stable and can efficiently capture solar energy. Although metal oxide semiconductors have been investigated for their promise to resist oxidative attack, materials in this class can suffer from chemical and photochemical instability. Here we present a methodology for evaluating corrosion mechanisms and apply it to bismuth vanadate, a state-of-the-art photoanode. Analysis of changing morphology and composition under solar water splitting conditions reveals chemical instabilities that are not predicted from thermodynamic considerations of stable solid oxide phases, as represented by the Pourbaix diagram for the system. Computational modelling indicates that photoexcited charge carriers accumulated at the surface destabilize the lattice, and that self-passivation by formation of a chemically stable surface phase is kinetically hindered. Although chemical stability of metal oxides cannot be assumed, insight into corrosion mechanisms aids development of protection strategies and discovery of semiconductors with improved stability.

  1. Inflammation Following Traumatic Brain Injury in Humans: Insights from Data-Driven and Mechanistic Models into Survival and Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Abboud

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation induced by traumatic brain injury (TBI is a complex mediator of morbidity and mortality. We have previously demonstrated the utility of both data-driven and mechanistic models in settings of traumatic injury. We hypothesized that differential dynamic inflammation programs characterize TBI survivors vs. non-survivors, and sought to leverage computational modeling to derive novel insights into this life/death bifurcation. Thirteen inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were determined using Luminex™ in serial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples from 31 TBI patients over 5 days. In this cohort, 5 were non-survivors (Glasgow Outcome Scale [GOS] score = 1 and 26 were survivors (GOS > 1. A Pearson correlation analysis of initial injury (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] vs. GOS suggested that survivors and non-survivors had distinct clinical response trajectories to injury. Statistically significant differences in interleukin (IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α were observed between TBI survivors vs. non-survivors over 5 days. Principal Component Analysis and Dynamic Bayesian Network inference suggested differential roles of chemokines, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10, based upon which an ordinary differential equation model of TBI was generated. This model was calibrated separately to the time course data of TBI survivors vs. non-survivors as a function of initial GCS. Analysis of parameter values in ensembles of simulations from these models suggested differences in microglial and damage responses in TBI survivors vs. non-survivors. These studies suggest the utility of combined data-driven and mechanistic models in the context of human TBI.

  2. Stereochemistry and Mechanistic Insight in the [2(k)+2(i)+2(i)] Annulations of Ketenes and Imines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhanhui; He, Wei; Cheng, Baoxiang; Xu, Jiaxi

    2016-06-03

    The stereochemistry and mechanistic insight in the annulations of one ketene molecule with two imine molecules ([2(k)+2(i)+2(i)] annulation) are studied by using six-membered 3,4-dihydroisoquinoline as an imine probe. A concerted hetero-Diels-Alder cycloaddition mechanism is proposed to explain the stereochemical outcomes. In most cases, the zwitterionic 2-aza-1,3-butadiene-type intermediates, generated from ketenes and imines, undergo endo hetero-Diels-Alder cycloaddition with the second imine molecule. For ketenes with electron-donating substituents, (2,4)-cis-(4,5)-cis-[2(k)+2(i)+2(i)] annuladducts formed stereospecifically, while, for ketenes with electron-accepting substituents, (2,4)-cis-(4,5)-trans-[2(k)+2(i)+2(i)] annuladducts are generated stereospecifically. The [2(k)+2(i)+2(i)] annulations of aryloxyketenes and 3,4-dihydroisoquinoline give stereodivergent products due to the occurrence of the stepwise nucleophilic annulation. However, in the [2(k)+2(i)+2(i)] annulations of seven-membered cyclic imine dibenzo[b,f][1,4]oxazepine, the zwitterionic aza-butadiene-type intermediates exclusively undergo exo hetero-Diels-Alder cycloadditions with another molecule of imine to yield (2,4)-trans-(4,5)-trans-[2(k)+2(i)+2(i)] annuladducts stereospecifically, regardless of the ketene substituents. The mechanistic model not only discloses the nature of the [2(k)+2(i)+2(i)] annulations, but also can be used to explain and predict the stereochemistry of the [2(k)+2(i)+2(i)] annuladducts from different ketenes and imines.

  3. Inflammation Following Traumatic Brain Injury in Humans: Insights from Data-Driven and Mechanistic Models into Survival and Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Andrew; Mi, Qi; Puccio, Ava; Okonkwo, David; Buliga, Marius; Constantine, Gregory; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation induced by traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a complex mediator of morbidity and mortality. We have previously demonstrated the utility of both data-driven and mechanistic models in settings of traumatic injury. We hypothesized that differential dynamic inflammation programs characterize TBI survivors vs. non-survivors, and sought to leverage computational modeling to derive novel insights into this life/death bifurcation. Thirteen inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were determined using Luminex™ in serial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from 31 TBI patients over 5 days. In this cohort, 5 were non-survivors (Glasgow Outcome Scale [GOS] score = 1) and 26 were survivors (GOS > 1). A Pearson correlation analysis of initial injury (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS]) vs. GOS suggested that survivors and non-survivors had distinct clinical response trajectories to injury. Statistically significant differences in interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were observed between TBI survivors vs. non-survivors over 5 days. Principal Component Analysis and Dynamic Bayesian Network inference suggested differential roles of chemokines, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10, based upon which an ordinary differential equation model of TBI was generated. This model was calibrated separately to the time course data of TBI survivors vs. non-survivors as a function of initial GCS. Analysis of parameter values in ensembles of simulations from these models suggested differences in microglial and damage responses in TBI survivors vs. non-survivors. These studies suggest the utility of combined data-driven and mechanistic models in the context of human TBI. PMID:27729864

  4. Clinical and Mechanistic Insights Into the Genetics of Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Michael A; Cook, Stuart A; Seidman, Jonathan G; Seidman, Christine E

    2016-12-27

    Over the last quarter-century, there has been tremendous progress in genetics research that has defined molecular causes for cardiomyopathies. More than a thousand mutations have been identified in many genes with varying ontologies, therein indicating the diverse molecules and pathways that cause hypertrophic, dilated, restrictive, and arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies. Translation of this research to the clinic via genetic testing can precisely group affected patients according to molecular etiology, and identify individuals without evidence of disease who are at high risk for developing cardiomyopathy. These advances provide insights into the earliest manifestations of cardiomyopathy and help to define the molecular pathophysiological basis for cardiac remodeling. Although these efforts remain incomplete, new genomic technologies and analytic strategies provide unparalleled opportunities to fully explore the genetic architecture of cardiomyopathies. Such data hold the promise that mutation-specific pathophysiology will uncover novel therapeutic targets, and herald the beginning of precision therapy for cardiomyopathy patients. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mechanistic insight into sono-enzymatic degradation of organic pollutants with kinetic and thermodynamic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malani, Ritesh S; Khanna, Swati; Chakma, Sankar; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we have attempted to get a physical insight into process of sono-enzymatic treatment for degradation of recalcitrant organic pollutants. Decolourization of an azo dye has been used as model reaction with different experimental protocols that alter characteristics of ultrasound and cavitation phenomena in the system. Experimental data is analyzed to determine kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of decolorization process. The trends observed in kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of decolourization are essentially manifestations of the dominating mechanism of the decolorization of the textile dye (or nature of prevalent chemical reaction in the system), viz. either molecular reaction due to enzyme or radical reaction due to transient cavitation. The activation energy for sonochemical protocol is negative, which indicates instantaneity of the radical reactions. The frequency factor is also low, which is attributed to high instability of radicals. For enzymatic and sono-enzymatic protocols, activation energy is positive with higher frequency factor. Enthalpy change for sonochemical protocol is negative, while that for enzymatic and sono-enzymatic protocols is positive. The net entropy change for sonochemical protocol is more negative than enzymatic or sono-enzymatic protocol due to differences in prevalent chemical mechanism of dye decolorization. Due to inverse variations of frequency factor and activation energy, marginal rise in reaction kinetics is seen for sono-enzymatic protocol, as compared to enzymatic treatment alone. Due to inverse variations of enthalpy and entropy change, net Gibbs energy change in all experimental protocols shows little variation indicating synergism of the mechanism of ultrasound and enzyme.

  6. Mechanistic insight into the ability of American ginseng to suppress colon cancer associated with colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiangli; Jin, Yu; Poudyal, Deepak; Chumanevich, Alexander A; Davis, Tia; Windust, Anthony; Hofseth, Anne; Wu, Wensong; Habiger, Joshua; Pena, Edsel; Wood, Patricia; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S; Hofseth, Lorne

    2010-10-01

    We have recently shown that American ginseng (AG) prevents and treats mouse colitis. Because both mice and humans with chronic colitis have a high colon cancer risk, we tested the hypothesis that AG can be used to prevent colitis-driven colon cancer. Using the azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) mouse model of ulcerative colitis, we show that AG can suppress colon cancer associated with colitis. To explore the molecular mechanisms of the anticancer effects of AG, we also carried out antibody array experiments on colon cells isolated at a precancerous stage. We found there were 82 protein end points that were either significantly higher (41 proteins) or significantly lower (41 proteins) in the AOM + DSS group compared with the AOM-alone (control) group. In contrast, there were only 19 protein end points that were either significantly higher (10 proteins) or significantly lower (9 proteins) in the AOM + DSS + AG group compared with the AOM-alone (control) group. Overall, these results suggest that AG keeps the colon environment in metabolic equilibrium when mice are treated with AOM + DSS and gives insight into the mechanisms by which AG protects from colon cancer associated with colitis.

  7. The Microbial Signature Provides Insight into the Mechanistic Basis of Coral Success across Reef Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggat, William; Bongaerts, Pim

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT For ecosystems vulnerable to environmental change, understanding the spatiotemporal stability of functionally crucial symbioses is fundamental to determining the mechanisms by which these ecosystems may persist. The coral Pachyseris speciosa is a successful environmental generalist that succeeds in diverse reef habitats. The generalist nature of this coral suggests it may have the capacity to form functionally significant microbial partnerships to facilitate access to a range of nutritional sources within different habitats. Here, we propose that coral is a metaorganism hosting three functionally distinct microbial interactions: a ubiquitous core microbiome of very few symbiotic host-selected bacteria, a microbiome of spatially and/or regionally explicit core microbes filling functional niches (100,000 phylotypes). We find that this coral hosts upwards of 170,000 distinct phylotypes and provide evidence for the persistence of a select group of bacteria in corals across environmental habitats of the Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea. We further show that a higher number of bacteria are consistently associated with corals on mesophotic reefs than on shallow reefs. An increase in microbial diversity with depth suggests reliance by this coral on bacteria for nutrient acquisition on reefs exposed to nutrient upwelling. Understanding the complex microbial communities of host organisms across broad biotic and abiotic environments as functionally distinct microbiomes can provide insight into those interactions that are ubiquitous niche symbioses and those that provide competitive advantage within the hosts’ environment. PMID:27460792

  8. The Microbial Signature Provides Insight into the Mechanistic Basis of Coral Success across Reef Habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Hernandez-Agreda

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available For ecosystems vulnerable to environmental change, understanding the spatiotemporal stability of functionally crucial symbioses is fundamental to determining the mechanisms by which these ecosystems may persist. The coral Pachyseris speciosa is a successful environmental generalist that succeeds in diverse reef habitats. The generalist nature of this coral suggests it may have the capacity to form functionally significant microbial partnerships to facilitate access to a range of nutritional sources within different habitats. Here, we propose that coral is a metaorganism hosting three functionally distinct microbial interactions: a ubiquitous core microbiome of very few symbiotic host-selected bacteria, a microbiome of spatially and/or regionally explicit core microbes filling functional niches (100,000 phylotypes. We find that this coral hosts upwards of 170,000 distinct phylotypes and provide evidence for the persistence of a select group of bacteria in corals across environmental habitats of the Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea. We further show that a higher number of bacteria are consistently associated with corals on mesophotic reefs than on shallow reefs. An increase in microbial diversity with depth suggests reliance by this coral on bacteria for nutrient acquisition on reefs exposed to nutrient upwelling. Understanding the complex microbial communities of host organisms across broad biotic and abiotic environments as functionally distinct microbiomes can provide insight into those interactions that are ubiquitous niche symbioses and those that provide competitive advantage within the hosts’ environment.

  9. Mechanistic Insights from Structural Analyses of Ran-GTPase-Driven Nuclear Export of Proteins and RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-22

    Understanding how macromolecules are rapidly exchanged between the nucleus and the cytoplasm through nuclear pore complexes is a fundamental problem in biology. Exportins are Ran-GTPase-dependent nuclear transport factors that belong to the karyopherin-β family and mediate nuclear export of a plethora of proteins and RNAs, except for bulk mRNA nuclear export. Exportins bind cargo macromolecules in a Ran-GTP-dependent manner in the nucleus, forming exportin-cargo-Ran-GTP complexes (nuclear export complexes). Transient weak interactions between exportins and nucleoporins containing characteristic FG (phenylalanine-glycine) repeat motifs facilitate nuclear pore complex passage of nuclear export complexes. In the cytoplasm, nuclear export complexes are disassembled, thereby releasing the cargo. GTP hydrolysis by Ran promoted in the cytoplasm makes the disassembly reaction virtually irreversible and provides thermodynamic driving force for the overall export reaction. In the past decade, X-ray crystallography of some of the exportins in various functional states coupled with functional analyses, single-particle electron microscopy, molecular dynamics simulations, and small-angle solution X-ray scattering has provided rich insights into the mechanism of cargo binding and release and also begins to elucidate how exportins interact with the FG repeat motifs. The knowledge gained from structural analyses of nuclear export is being translated into development of clinically useful inhibitors of nuclear export to treat human diseases such as cancer and influenza.

  10. Mechanistic Insights into Molecular Targeting and Combined Modality Therapy for Aggressive, Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan eDal Pra

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy (RT is one of the mainstay treatments for prostate cancer (PCa. The potentially curative approaches can provide satisfactory results for many patients with non-metastatic PCa; however, a considerable number of individuals may present disease recurrence and die from the disease. Exploiting the rich molecular biology of PCa will provide insights into how the most resistant tumor cells can be eradicated to improve treatment outcomes. Important for this biology-driven individualized treatment is a robust selection procedure. The development of predictive biomarkers for RT efficacy is therefore of utmost importance for a clinically exploitable strategy to achieve tumor-specific radiosensitization. This review highlights the current status and possible opportunities in the modulation of four key processes to enhance radiation response in PCa by targeting the: I. androgen signaling pathway; II. hypoxic tumor cells and regions; III. DNA damage response (DDR pathway; and IV. abnormal extra/intra-cell signaling pathways. In addition, we discuss how and which patients should be selected for biomarker-based clinical trials exploiting and validating these targeted treatment strategies with precision RT to improve cure rates in non-indolent, localized PCa.

  11. Kynurenine pathway metabolomics predicts and provides mechanistic insight into multiple sclerosis progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chai K.; Bilgin, Ayse; Lovejoy, David B.; Tan, Vanessa; Bustamante, Sonia; Taylor, Bruce V.; Bessede, Alban; Brew, Bruce J.; Guillemin, Gilles J.

    2017-01-01

    Activation of the kynurenine pathway (KP) of tryptophan metabolism results from chronic inflammation and is known to exacerbate progression of neurodegenerative disease. To gain insights into the links between inflammation, the KP and multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis, we investigated the KP metabolomics profile of MS patients. Most significantly, we found aberrant levels of two key KP metabolites, kynurenic acid (KA) and quinolinic acid (QA). The balance between these metabolites is important as it determines overall excitotoxic activity at the N-methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) receptor. We also identified that serum KP metabolic signatures in patients can discriminate clinical MS subtypes with high sensitivity and specificity. A C5.0 Decision Tree classification model discriminated the clinical subtypes of MS with a sensitivity of 91%. After validation in another independent cohort, sensitivity was maintained at 85%. Collectively, our studies suggest that abnormalities in the KP may be associated with the switch from early-mild stage MS to debilitating progressive forms of MS and that analysis of KP metabolites in MS patient serum may have application as MS disease biomarkers. PMID:28155867

  12. Selective inhibition of aggregation/fibrillation of bovine serum albumin by osmolytes: Mechanistic and energetics insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Moumita

    2017-01-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) is an important transport protein of the blood and its aggregation/fibrillation would adversely affect its transport ability leading to metabolic disorder. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of fibrillation/aggregation of BSA and design of suitable inhibitor molecules for stabilizing its native conformation, are of utmost importance. The qualitative and quantitative aspects of the effect of osmolytes (proline, hydroxyproline, glycine betaine, sarcosine and sorbitol) on heat induced aggregation/fibrillation of BSA at physiological pH (pH 7.4) have been studied employing a combination of fluorescence spectroscopy, Rayleigh scattering, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Formation of fibrils by BSA under the given conditions was confirmed from increase in fluorescence emission intensities of Thioflavin T over a time period of 600 minutes and TEM images. Absence of change in fluorescence emission intensities of 8-Anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (ANS) in presence of native and aggregated BSA signify the absence of any amorphous aggregates. ITC results have provided important insights on the energetics of interaction of these osmolytes with different stages of the fibrillar aggregates of BSA, thereby suggesting the possible modes/mechanism of inhibition of BSA fibrillation by these osmolytes. The heats of interaction of the osmolytes with different stages of fibrillation of BSA do not follow a trend, suggesting that the interactions of stages of BSA aggregates are osmolyte specific. Among the osmolytes used here, we found glycine betaine to be supporting and promoting the aggregation process while hydroxyproline to be maximally efficient in suppressing the fibrillation process of BSA, followed by sorbitol, sarcosine and proline in the following order of their decreasing potency: Hydroxyproline> Sorbitol> Sarcosine> Proline> Glycine betaine. PMID:28207877

  13. High pressure thermal inactivation of Clostridium botulinum type E endospores – kinetic modeling and mechanistic insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Andreas Lenz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cold-tolerant, neurotoxigenic, endospore forming Clostridium (C. botulinum type E belongs to the non-proteolytic physiological C. botulinum group II, is primarily associated with aquatic environments, and presents a safety risk for seafood. High pressure thermal (HPT processing exploiting the synergistic effect of pressure and temperature can be used to inactivate bacterial endospores.We investigated the inactivation of C. botulinum type E spores by (near isothermal HPT treatments at 300 – 1200 MPa at 30 – 75 °C for 1 s – 10 min. The occurrence of heat and lysozyme susceptible spore fractions after such treatments was determined. The experimental data were modeled to obtain kinetic parameters and represented graphically by isoeffect lines. In contrast to findings for spores of other species and within the range of treatment parameters applied, zones of spore stabilization (lower inactivation than heat treatments alone, large heat susceptible (HPT-induced germinated or lysozyme-dependently germinable (damaged coat layer spore fractions were not detected. Inactivation followed 1st order kinetics. DPA release kinetics allowed for insights into possible inactivation mechanisms suggesting a (poorly effective physiologic-like (similar to nutrient-induced germination at ≤ 450 MPa/≤ 45 °C and non-physiological germination at >500 MPa/>60 – 70 °C.Results of this study support the existence of some commonalities in the HPT inactivation mechanism of C. botulinum type E spores and Bacillus spores although both organisms have significantly different HPT resistance properties. The information presented here contributes to closing the gap in knowledge regarding the HPT inactivation of spore formers relevant to food safety and may help industrial implementation of HPT processing. The markedly lower HPT resistance of C. botulinum type E spores than spores from other C. botulinum types, could allow for the implementation of milder processes without

  14. Mechanistic Insights into Ring Cleavage and Contraction of Benzene over a Titanium Hydride Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xiaohui; Luo, Gen; Luo, Lun; Hu, Shaowei; Luo, Yi; Hou, Zhaomin

    2016-09-14

    Carbon-carbon bond cleavage of benzene by transition metals is of great fundamental interest and practical importance, as this transformation is involved in the production of fuels and other important chemicals in the industrial hydrocracking of naphtha on solid catalysts. Although this transformation is thought to rely on cooperation of multiple metal sites, molecular-level information on the reaction mechanism has remained scarce to date. Here, we report the DFT studies of the ring cleavage and contraction of benzene by a molecular trinuclear titanium hydride cluster. Our studies suggest that the reaction is initiated by benzene coordination, followed by H2 release, C6H6 hydrometalation, repeated C-C and C-H bond cleavage and formation to give a MeC5H4 unit, and insertion of a Ti atom into the MeC5H4 unit with release of H2 to give a metallacycle product. The C-C bond cleavage and ring contraction of toluene can also occur in a similar fashion, though some details are different due to the presence of the methyl substituent. Obviously, the facile release of H2 from the metal hydride cluster to provide electrons and to alter the charge population at the metal centers, in combination with the flexible metal-hydride connections and dynamic redox behavior of the trimetallic framework, has enabled this unusual transformation to occur. This work has not only provided unprecedented insights into the activation and transformation of benzene over a multimetallic framework but it may also offer help in the design of new molecular catalysts for the activation and transformation of inactive aromatics.

  15. Methanol synthesis on ZnO(000 anti 1): Free energy landscapes, reaction pathways, and mechanistic insights.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenzel, Johannes; Kiss, Janos; Marx, Dominik [LS Theoretische Chemie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Nair, Nisanth [Dept. of Chemistry, IIT, Kanapur (India); Meyer, Bernd [ICMM, CCC, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The interplay of physical and chemical processes in the heterogeneous catalytic synthesis of methanol on the ZnO(000 anti 1) surface with oxygen vacancies is expected to give rise to a complex free energy landscape. A manifold of intermediate species and reaction pathways has been proposed over the years for the reduction of CO on this catalyst at high temperature and pressure conditions as required in the industrial process. In the present study, the underlying complex reaction network from CO to methanol is generated in the first place by using ab initio metadynamics for computational heterogeneous catalysis. After having synthesized the previously discussed intermediates in addition to finding novel species, mechanistic insights into this network of surface chemical reactions are obtained based on exploring the global free energy landscape, which is refined by investigating individual reaction pathways. Furthermore, the impact of homolytic adsorption and desorption of hydrogen at the required reducing gas phase conditions are probed by studying such processes using different charge states of the F-center.

  16. Molecular interaction between natural IgG and ficolin - mechanistic insights on adaptive-innate immune crosstalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Saswati; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Lifeng; Anand, Ganesh S.; Ding, Jeak L.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we found that natural IgG (nIgG; a non-specific immunoglobulin of adaptive immunity) is not quiescent, but plays a crucial role in immediate immune defense by collaborating with ficolin (an innate immune protein). However, how the nIgG and ficolin interplay and what factors control the complex formation during infection is unknown. Here, we found that mild acidosis and hypocalcaemia induced by infection- inflammation condition increased the nIgG:ficolin complex formation. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry delineated the binding interfaces to the CH2-CH3 region of nIgG Fc and P-subdomain of ficolin FBG domain. Infection condition exposes novel binding sites. Site-directed mutagenesis and surface plasmon resonance analyses of peptides, derived from nIgG and ficolin, defined the interacting residues between the proteins. These results provide mechanistic insights on the interaction between two molecules representing the adaptive and innate immune pathways, prompting potential development of immunomodulatory/prophylactic peptides tunable to prevailing infection conditions.

  17. Mechanistic insights from comparing intrinsic clearance values between human liver microsomes and hepatocytes to guide drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Li; Keefer, Christopher; Scott, Dennis O; Strelevitz, Timothy J; Chang, George; Bi, Yi-An; Lai, Yurong; Duckworth, Jonathon; Fenner, Katherine; Troutman, Matthew D; Obach, R Scott

    2012-11-01

    Metabolic stability of drug candidates are often determined in both liver microsome and hepatocyte assays. Comparison of intrinsic clearance values between the two assays provides additional information to guide drug design. Intrinsic clearance values from human liver microsomes and hepatocytes were compared for a set of commercial drugs with known metabolic pathways and transporter characteristics. The results showed that for compounds that were predominately metabolized by CYP mediated mechanisms, the intrinsic clearance values from the two assays were comparable. For compounds with non-CYP pathways, such as UGT and AO, intrinsic clearance was faster in hepatocytes than in microsomes. Substrates of uptake or efflux transporters in this study did not have significant differences of intrinsic clearance between microsomes and hepatocytes, when uptake into the hepatocytes was not the rate-limiting step. When hepatic uptake was rate limiting, intrinsic clearance in microsomes was faster than that in hepatocytes, which was more prevalent for compounds with rapid metabolism. Low passive permeability can limit the exposure to drug molecules to the metabolizing enzymes in the hepatocytes in relationship to the rate of metabolism. The faster the rate of metabolism, the higher permeability is needed for molecule to enter the cells and not becoming rate-limiting. The findings are very useful for drug discovery programs to gain additional insights on mechanistic information to help drug design without added experiments. Follow-up studies can then be designed to address specific questions.

  18. High Content Analysis Provides Mechanistic Insights on the Pathways of Toxicity Induced by Amine-Modified Polystyrene Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguissola, Sergio; Garry, David; Salvati, Anna; O'Brien, Peter J.; Dawson, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    The fast-paced development of nanotechnology needs the support of effective safety testing. We have developed a screening platform measuring simultaneously several cellular parameters for exposure to various concentrations of nanoparticles (NPs). Cell lines representative of different organ cell types, including lung, endothelium, liver, kidney, macrophages, glia, and neuronal cells were exposed to 50 nm amine-modified polystyrene (PS-NH2) NPs previously reported to induce apoptosis and to 50 nm sulphonated and carboxyl-modified polystyrene NPs that were reported to be silent. All cell lines apart from Raw 264.7 executed apoptosis in response to PS-NH2 NPs, showing specific sequences of EC50 thresholds; lysosomal acidification was the most sensitive parameter. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and plasma membrane integrity measured by High Content Analysis resulted comparably sensitive to the equivalent OECD-recommended assays, allowing increased output. Analysis of the acidic compartments revealed good cerrelation between size/fluorescence intensity and dose of PS-NH2 NPs applied; moreover steatosis and phospholipidosis were observed, consistent with the lysosomal alterations revealed by Lysotracker green; similar responses were observed when comparing astrocytoma cells with primary astrocytes. We have established a platform providing mechanistic insights on the response to exposure to nanoparticles. Such platform holds great potential for in vitro screening of nanomaterials in highthroughput format. PMID:25238162

  19. Mechanistic insights into the role of C-type lectin receptor/CARD9 signaling in human antifungal immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A. Drummond

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Human CARD9 deficiency is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency disorder caused by biallelic mutations in the gene CARD9, which encodes a signaling protein that is found downstream of many C-type lectin receptors (CLRs. CLRs encompass a large family of innate recognition receptors, expressed predominantly by myeloid and epithelial cells, which bind fungal carbohydrates and initiate antifungal immune responses. Accordingly, human CARD9 deficiency is associated with the spontaneous development of persistent and severe fungal infections that primarily localize to the skin and subcutaneous tissue, mucosal surfaces and/or central nervous system (CNS. In the last few years, more than 15 missense and nonsense CARD9 mutations have been reported which associate with the development of a wide spectrum of fungal infections caused by a variety of fungal organisms. The mechanisms by which CARD9 provides organ-specific protection against these fungal infections are now emerging. In this review, we summarize recent immunological and clinical advances that have provided significant mechanistic insights into the pathogenesis of human CARD9 deficiency. We also discuss how genetic mutations in CARD9-coupled receptors (Dectin-1, Dectin-2 and CARD9-binding partners (MALT1, BCL10 affect human antifungal immunity relative to CARD9 deficiency, and we highlight major understudied research questions which merit future investigation.

  20. High content analysis provides mechanistic insights on the pathways of toxicity induced by amine-modified polystyrene nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguissola, Sergio; Garry, David; Salvati, Anna; O'Brien, Peter J; Dawson, Kenneth A

    2014-01-01

    The fast-paced development of nanotechnology needs the support of effective safety testing. We have developed a screening platform measuring simultaneously several cellular parameters for exposure to various concentrations of nanoparticles (NPs). Cell lines representative of different organ cell types, including lung, endothelium, liver, kidney, macrophages, glia, and neuronal cells were exposed to 50 nm amine-modified polystyrene (PS-NH2) NPs previously reported to induce apoptosis and to 50 nm sulphonated and carboxyl-modified polystyrene NPs that were reported to be silent. All cell lines apart from Raw 264.7 executed apoptosis in response to PS-NH2 NPs, showing specific sequences of EC50 thresholds; lysosomal acidification was the most sensitive parameter. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and plasma membrane integrity measured by High Content Analysis resulted comparably sensitive to the equivalent OECD-recommended assays, allowing increased output. Analysis of the acidic compartments revealed good cerrelation between size/fluorescence intensity and dose of PS-NH2 NPs applied; moreover steatosis and phospholipidosis were observed, consistent with the lysosomal alterations revealed by Lysotracker green; similar responses were observed when comparing astrocytoma cells with primary astrocytes. We have established a platform providing mechanistic insights on the response to exposure to nanoparticles. Such platform holds great potential for in vitro screening of nanomaterials in highthroughput format.

  1. Fluid mechanics in dentinal microtubules provides mechanistic insights into the difference between hot and cold dental pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Min; Luo, Zheng Yuan; Bai, Bo Feng; Xu, Feng; Lu, Tian Jian

    2011-03-23

    Dental thermal pain is a significant health problem in daily life and dentistry. There is a long-standing question regarding the phenomenon that cold stimulation evokes sharper and more shooting pain sensations than hot stimulation. This phenomenon, however, outlives the well-known hydrodynamic theory used to explain dental thermal pain mechanism. Here, we present a mathematical model based on the hypothesis that hot or cold stimulation-induced different directions of dentinal fluid flow and the corresponding odontoblast movements in dentinal microtubules contribute to different dental pain responses. We coupled a computational fluid dynamics model, describing the fluid mechanics in dentinal microtubules, with a modified Hodgkin-Huxley model, describing the discharge behavior of intradental neuron. The simulated results agreed well with existing experimental measurements. We thence demonstrated theoretically that intradental mechano-sensitive nociceptors are not "equally sensitive" to inward (into the pulp) and outward (away from the pulp) fluid flows, providing mechanistic insights into the difference between hot and cold dental pain. The model developed here could enable better diagnosis in endodontics which requires an understanding of pulpal histology, neurology and physiology, as well as their dynamic response to the thermal stimulation used in dental practices.

  2. Methane to acetic acid over Cu-exchanged zeolites: mechanistic insights from a site-specific carbonylation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narsimhan, Karthik; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Mathies, Guinevere; Gunther, William R; Griffin, Robert G; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2015-02-11

    The selective low temperature oxidation of methane is an attractive yet challenging pathway to convert abundant natural gas into value added chemicals. Copper-exchanged ZSM-5 and mordenite (MOR) zeolites have received attention due to their ability to oxidize methane into methanol using molecular oxygen. In this work, the conversion of methane into acetic acid is demonstrated using Cu-MOR by coupling oxidation with carbonylation reactions. The carbonylation reaction, known to occur predominantly in the 8-membered ring (8MR) pockets of MOR, is used as a site-specific probe to gain insight into important mechanistic differences existing between Cu-MOR and Cu-ZSM-5 during methane oxidation. For the tandem reaction sequence, Cu-MOR generated drastically higher amounts of acetic acid when compared to Cu-ZSM-5 (22 vs 4 μmol/g). Preferential titration with sodium showed a direct correlation between the number of acid sites in the 8MR pockets in MOR and acetic acid yield, indicating that methoxy species present in the MOR side pockets undergo carbonylation. Coupled spectroscopic and reactivity measurements were used to identify the genesis of the oxidation sites and to validate the migration of methoxy species from the oxidation site to the carbonylation site. Our results indicate that the Cu(II)-O-Cu(II) sites previously associated with methane oxidation in both Cu-MOR and Cu-ZSM-5 are oxidation active but carbonylation inactive. In turn, combined UV-vis and EPR spectroscopic studies showed that a novel Cu(2+) site is formed at Cu/Al <0.2 in MOR. These sites oxidize methane and promote the migration of the product to a Brønsted acid site in the 8MR to undergo carbonylation.

  3. Kinetics and Mechanistic Investigations of Atmospheric Oxidation of HFO-1345fz by OH Radical: Insights from Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Pradeep Kumar; Gejji, Shridhar P

    2017-01-26

    HFO-1345fz (CF3CF2CH═CH2 or 3,3,4,4,4-pentafluoro-1-butene) belongs to a class of hydrofluoro-olefins and represents a new generation of potential foam expansion agents. Its atmospheric impact and environmental acceptability can be estimated from the studies of kinetics and mechanism of its oxidative degradation. The molecular insights accompanying the reaction pathways in terms of the characterization of intermediates or products and radiative properties should prove useful for large-scale industrial applications. Systematic mechanistic gas-phase kinetics investigations on the reactivity of HFO-1345fz with the (•)OH facilitating a variety of degradation routes have been carried out employing the M06-2x-based density functional theory. Structure and energetics of different reaction pathways such as hydrogen abstraction, (•)OH addition, isomerization-dissociation, or interaction with atmospheric O2 have been analyzed. The formation of gaseous products from the interaction of HFO-1345fz with (•)OH in the absence and presence of NOx atmospheric conditions has been reported. Calculated branching ratios have shown that the addition channel dominates such oxidative degradation, whereas the abstraction channel contributes negligibly to the global rate constant and addition of (•)OH to the terminal carbon is favored over the nonterminal one. The rate constants for all reaction channels were computed by conventional transition state theory (TST) and canonical variation transition state theory (CVT) including small curvature tunneling (SCT) over the temperature range of 200-1000 K at atmospheric pressure. The CVT calculated rate constant for the reaction at 298 K was shown to be 1.17 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), which compares well with the 1.24 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) as obtained from TST and is in excellent agreement with the experiments reported earlier. The atmospheric lifetime, radiative efficiency, and global warming potential (GWP) have

  4. Mechanistic insights into RNA transphosphorylation from kinetic isotope effects and linear free energy relationships of model reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haoyuan; Giese, Timothy J; Huang, Ming; Wong, Kin-Yiu; Harris, Michael E; York, Darrin M

    2014-10-27

    Phosphoryl transfer reactions are ubiquitous in biology and the understanding of the mechanisms whereby these reactions are catalyzed by protein and RNA enzymes is central to reveal design principles for new therapeutics. Two of the most powerful experimental probes of chemical mechanism involve the analysis of linear free energy relations (LFERs) and the measurement of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). These experimental data report directly on differences in bonding between the ground state and the rate-controlling transition state, which is the most critical point along the reaction free energy pathway. However, interpretation of LFER and KIE data in terms of transition-state structure and bonding optimally requires the use of theoretical models. In this work, we apply density-functional calculations to determine KIEs for a series of phosphoryl transfer reactions of direct relevance to the 2'-O-transphosphorylation that leads to cleavage of the phosphodiester backbone of RNA. We first examine a well-studied series of phosphate and phosphorothioate mono-, di- and triesters that are useful as mechanistic probes and for which KIEs have been measured. Close agreement is demonstrated between the calculated and measured KIEs, establishing the reliability of our quantum model calculations. Next, we examine a series of RNA transesterification model reactions with a wide range of leaving groups in order to provide a direct connection between observed Brønsted coefficients and KIEs with the structure and bonding in the transition state. These relations can be used for prediction or to aid in the interpretation of experimental data for similar non-enzymatic and enzymatic reactions. Finally, we apply these relations to RNA phosphoryl transfer catalyzed by ribonuclease A, and demonstrate the reaction coordinate-KIE correlation is reasonably preserved. A prediction of the secondary deuterium KIE in this reaction is also provided. These results demonstrate the utility of

  5. Mercury-induced hepatotoxicity in zebrafish: in vivo mechanistic insights from transcriptome analysis, phenotype anchoring and targeted gene expression validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathavan Sinnakaruppan

    2010-03-01

    pathway, gluconeogenesis, and adipogenesis, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction, endocrine disruption and metabolic disorders. This study provides important mechanistic insights into mercury-induced liver toxicity in a whole-animal physiology context, which will help in understanding the syndromes caused by mercury poisoning. The molecular conservation of mercury-induced hepatotoxicity between zebrafish and human cell line reveals the feasibility of using zebrafish to model molecular toxicity in human for toxicant risk assessments.

  6. Mechanistic insight into formation and changes of nanoparticles in MgF2 sols evidenced by liquid and solid state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karg, M; Scholz, G; König, R; Kemnitz, E

    2012-02-28

    The fluorolytic sol-gel reaction of magnesium methoxide with HF in methanol was studied by (19)F, (1)H and (13)C liquid and solid state NMR. In (19)F NMR five different species were identified, three of which belong to magnesium fluoride nanoparticles, i.e. NMR gave access to local structures of solid particles in suspensions. The long-term evolution of (19)F signals was followed and along with (19)F MAS NMR experiments of sols rotating at 13 kHz mechanistic insights into the ageing processes were obtained.

  7. Mechanistic insights on N-heterocyclic carbene-catalyzed annulations: the role of base-assisted proton transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Pragya; Patni, Priya A; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2011-07-15

    The density functional theory investigation on the mechanism of NHC-catalyzed cycloannulation reaction of the homoenolate derived from butenal with pentenone is studied. The M06-2X/6-31+G** and B3LYP/6-31+G** levels of theory, including the effect of continuum solvation in dichloromethane and tetrahydrofuran, are employed. Several mechanistic scenarios are examined for each elementary step by identifying the key intermediates and the corresponding transition states interconnecting them on the respective potential energy surfaces. Both assisted and unassisted pathways for important proton transfer steps are considered, respectively, with and without the explicit inclusion of base (DBU) in the corresponding transition states. The barrier for the crucial proton transfer steps involved in the formation of the Breslow intermediate as well as in the subsequent steps is found to be significantly lowered by explicit inclusion of DBU. The energetic comparison between two key pathways, depicted as path A and path B, respectively, leading to cyclopentene and cyclopentanone derivatives, is performed. The major mechanistic bifurcation has been identified as emanating from the site of enolization of the initial zwitterionic intermediate resulting from the addition of a homoenolate equivalent to enone. If the enolization occurs nearer to the NHC moiety, the reaction is likely to proceed through path A, leading to cyclopentene. The enolization away from NHC leads to cyclopentanone product through path B. The computed results are generally in good agreement with the reported experimental results.

  8. Mechanistic Insight into the Rh(III)-Catalyzed C-H Activation of 2-Acetyl-1-Arythydrazines in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weirong; Liu, Tao; Huang, Caiyun; Zhang, Jing; Man, Xiaoping

    2017-03-02

    A mechanistic study of the Cp*Rh(III)-catalyzed C-H functionalization of 2-acetyl-1-arythydrazines with diazo compounds in water was carried out by using density functional theory calculations. The results reveal that the acetyl-bonded N-H deprotonation is prior to the phenyl C-H activation. The mechanisms from protonation by acetic acid disagree with the proposal by the Wang group. Different from the Rh(III)-catalyzed C-H activation reported by experimental literature, the rate-determining step of the whole catalytic cycle with an overall barrier of 31.7 kcal mol(-1) (IV → TS12-P') is the protonation process of hydroxy O rather than the C-H bond cleavage step. The present theoretical study rationalizes the experimental observation at the molecular level.

  9. Mechanistic insight into the Brust-Schiffrin two-phase method for organochalcogenate-protected metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Jimenez, Francisco

    The primary objective of this thesis research was to explore the mechanism of the Brust---Schiffrin two--phase method, which has been widely used for preparing the thiolate--protected metal nanoparticles with the core diameter less than 5nm; to synthesize and characterize the ligand--protected gold nanoparticles using dialkyl ditelluride with different alkyl chain length as ligand precursor; and to develop a new synthetic route for obtaining ultra--small (125Te NMR, IR, and XPS. The chemical behaviours of dialkyl ditelluride in the formation of ligand--protected nanoparticles were also investigated by 1H NMR and Raman spectroscopies. More importantly, during the aforementioned mechanistic study, we developed a new synthetic route, by which homogenous tellurium-containing ligand-proteced Au nanoparticles with the sizes less than 2 nm were obtained.

  10. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), inflammation, and endothelial progenitor cells-New mechanistic insights of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Arnon

    2014-01-01

    Statins have been shown to favorably affect the prognosis of patients with risk factors to atherosclerosis-both as a primary and a secondary prevention. The beneficial effects observed with statin therapy are not merely related to changes in lipid profile but also are due to a positive effect on vascular inflammation and on immune-modulation of T lymphocytes and endothelial progenitor stem cells (EPCs). This dual effect has been demonstrated mainly in clinical trials where a change in endothelial function was observed within hours, much earlier than the effects of statins on the lipid profile (weeks). Based on all the knowledge that we have today questions were raised as to the mechanistic pathways that may explain the process of atherosclerosis and through this pathway to find better solutions and therapies to prevent and fight atherosclerosis. Our review will focus on the new updates in the field of inflammation and stem cells in vascular biology-in relation with atherosclerosis.

  11. The democratization of gene editing: Insights from site-specific cleavage and double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasin, Maria; Haber, James E

    2016-08-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are dangerous lesions that if not properly repaired can lead to genomic change or cell death. Organisms have developed several pathways and have many factors devoted to repairing DSBs, which broadly occurs by homologous recombination, which relies on an identical or homologous sequence to template repair, or nonhomologous end-joining. Much of our understanding of these repair mechanisms has come from the study of induced DNA cleavage by site-specific endonucleases. In addition to their biological role, these cellular pathways can be co-opted for gene editing to study gene function or for gene therapy or other applications. While the first gene editing experiments were done more than 20 years ago, the recent discovery of RNA-guided endonucleases has simplified approaches developed over the years to make gene editing an approach that is available to the entire biomedical research community. Here, we review DSB repair mechanisms and site-specific cleavage systems that have provided insight into these mechanisms and led to the current gene editing revolution.

  12. Mechanistic insights into a novel exporter-importer system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis unravel its role in trafficking of iron.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha Farhana

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elucidation of the basic mechanistic and biochemical principles underlying siderophore mediated iron uptake in mycobacteria is crucial for targeting this principal survival strategy vis-à-vis virulence determinants of the pathogen. Although, an understanding of siderophore biosynthesis is known, the mechanism of their secretion and uptake still remains elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we demonstrate an interplay among three iron regulated Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb proteins, namely, Rv1348 (IrtA, Rv1349 (IrtB and Rv2895c in export and import of M.tb siderophores across the membrane and the consequent iron uptake. IrtA, interestingly, has a fused N-terminal substrate binding domain (SBD, representing an atypical subset of ABC transporters, unlike IrtB that harbors only the permease and ATPase domain. SBD selectively binds to non-ferrated siderophores whereas Rv2895c exhibits relatively higher affinity towards ferrated siderophores. An interaction between the permease domain of IrtB and Rv2895c is evident from GST pull-down assay. In vitro liposome reconstitution experiments further demonstrate that IrtA is indeed a siderophore exporter and the two-component IrtB-Rv2895c system is an importer of ferrated siderophores. Knockout of msmeg_6554, the irtA homologue in Mycobacterium smegmatis, resulted in an impaired M.tb siderophore export that is restored upon complementation with M.tb irtA. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest the interplay of three proteins, namely IrtA, IrtB and Rv2895c in synergizing the balance of siderophores and thus iron inside the mycobacterial cell.

  13. Streptococcus pneumoniae Endohexosaminidase D, Structural and Mechanistic Insight into Substrate-Assisted Catalysis in Family 85 Glycoside Hydrolases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, D.; Macauley, M; Vocadlo, D; Boraston, A

    2009-01-01

    Endo-?-d-glucosaminidases from family 85 of glycoside hydrolases (GH85 endohexosaminidases) act to cleave the glycosidic linkage between the two N-acetylglucosamine units that make up the chitobiose core of N-glycans. Endohexosaminidase D (Endo-D), produced by Streptococcus pneumoniae, is believed to contribute to the virulence of this organism by playing a role in the deglycosylation of IgG antibodies. Endohexosaminidases have received significant attention for this reason and, moreover, because they are powerful tools for chemoenzymatic synthesis of proteins having defined glycoforms. Here we describe mechanistic and structural studies of the catalytic domain (SpGH85) of Endo-D that provide compelling support for GH85 enzymes using a catalytic mechanism involving substrate-assisted catalysis. Furthermore, the structure of SpGH85 in complex with the mechanism-based competitive inhibitor NAG-thiazoline (Kd = 28 ?m) provides a coherent rationale for previous mutagenesis studies of Endo-D and other related GH85 enzymes. We also find GH85, GH56, and GH18 enzymes have a similar configuration of catalytic residues. Notably, GH85 enzymes have an asparagine in place of the aspartate residue found in these other families of glycosidases. We propose that this residue, as the imidic acid tautomer, acts analogously to the key catalytic aspartate of GH56 and GH18 enzymes. This topographically conserved arrangement of the asparagine residue and a conserved glutamic acid, coupled with previous kinetic studies, suggests these enzymes may use an unusual proton shuttle to coordinate effective general acid and base catalysis to aid cleavage of the glycosidic bond. These results collectively provide a blueprint that may be used to facilitate protein engineering of these enzymes to improve their function as biocatalysts for synthesizing glycoproteins having defined glycoforms and also may serve as a guide for generating inhibitors of GH85 enzymes.

  14. Why did high-dose rosuvastatin not improve cardiac remodeling in chronic heart failure? Mechanistic insights from the UNIVERSE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Emma; Windebank, Emma; Skiba, Marina; Reid, Christopher; Schneider, Hans; Rosenfeldt, Franklin; Tonkin, Andrew; Krum, Henry

    2011-02-03

    Statins are often prescribed for prevention of atherosclerotic outcomes in patients who have chronic heart failure (CHF), if this has an ischaemic etiology. These agents may also possess additional properties, independent of effects on blood lipid levels, which may have an effect on cardiac remodeling. However, beneficial effects were not observed in the recent UNIVERSE trial. We prospectively planned a sub-study of UNIVERSE to explore relevant mechanistic effects of rosuvastatin, including effects on collagen turnover and plasma coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) levels. Additionally, CoQ levels in CHF patients receiving chronic statin therapy were measured. CoQ levels were significantly reduced after 26 weeks of rosuvastatin statin therapy (n = 32), compared to placebo (n = 37) in CHF patients in UNIVERSE trial. Patients with CHF (n = 56) matched for age, gender and severity of disease who had been taking statins for 12 months or longer had CoQ levels of 847 ± 344 nmol/L, significantly lower than 1065.4 ± 394 nmol/L in UNIVERSE patients at baseline (p = 0.0001). Serum types I and III N-terminal procollagen peptide (PINP and PIIINP), measures of collagen turnover which can contribute to cardiac fibrosis were significantly increased in the rosuvastatin group compared to baseline in UNIVERSE patients (PINP: p = 0.03, PIIINP: p = 0.001). In conclusion putative beneficial effects of statin therapy on cardiac remodeling in UNIVERSE may have been negated by increases in collagen turnover markers as well as a reduction in plasma CoQ levels in these patients with CHF. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mechanistic Insight into Bunyavirus-Induced Membrane Fusion from Structure-Function Analyses of the Hantavirus Envelope Glycoprotein Gc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stettner, Eva; Jeffers, Scott Allen; Pérez-Vargas, Jimena; Pehau-Arnaudet, Gerard; Tortorici, M. Alejandra; Jestin, Jean-Luc; England, Patrick; Tischler, Nicole D.; Rey, Félix A.

    2016-01-01

    Hantaviruses are zoonotic viruses transmitted to humans by persistently infected rodents, giving rise to serious outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) or of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), depending on the virus, which are associated with high case fatality rates. There is only limited knowledge about the organization of the viral particles and in particular, about the hantavirus membrane fusion glycoprotein Gc, the function of which is essential for virus entry. We describe here the X-ray structures of Gc from Hantaan virus, the type species hantavirus and responsible for HFRS, both in its neutral pH, monomeric pre-fusion conformation, and in its acidic pH, trimeric post-fusion form. The structures confirm the prediction that Gc is a class II fusion protein, containing the characteristic β-sheet rich domains termed I, II and III as initially identified in the fusion proteins of arboviruses such as alpha- and flaviviruses. The structures also show a number of features of Gc that are distinct from arbovirus class II proteins. In particular, hantavirus Gc inserts residues from three different loops into the target membrane to drive fusion, as confirmed functionally by structure-guided mutagenesis on the HPS-inducing Andes virus, instead of having a single “fusion loop”. We further show that the membrane interacting region of Gc becomes structured only at acidic pH via a set of polar and electrostatic interactions. Furthermore, the structure reveals that hantavirus Gc has an additional N-terminal “tail” that is crucial in stabilizing the post-fusion trimer, accompanying the swapping of domain III in the quaternary arrangement of the trimer as compared to the standard class II fusion proteins. The mechanistic understandings derived from these data are likely to provide a unique handle for devising treatments against these human pathogens. PMID:27783711

  16. Characterising the inhibitory actions of ceramide upon insulin signaling in different skeletal muscle cell models: a mechanistic insight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Mahfouz

    Full Text Available Ceramides are known to promote insulin resistance in a number of metabolically important tissues including skeletal muscle, the predominant site of insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. Depending on cell type, these lipid intermediates have been shown to inhibit protein kinase B (PKB/Akt, a key mediator of the metabolic actions of insulin, via two distinct pathways: one involving the action of atypical protein kinase C (aPKC isoforms, and the second dependent on protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A. The main aim of this study was to explore the mechanisms by which ceramide inhibits PKB/Akt in three different skeletal muscle-derived cell culture models; rat L6 myotubes, mouse C2C12 myotubes and primary human skeletal muscle cells. Our findings indicate that the mechanism by which ceramide acts to repress PKB/Akt is related to the myocellular abundance of caveolin-enriched domains (CEM present at the plasma membrane. Here, we show that ceramide-enriched-CEMs are markedly more abundant in L6 myotubes compared to C2C12 myotubes, consistent with their previously reported role in coordinating aPKC-directed repression of PKB/Akt in L6 muscle cells. In contrast, a PP2A-dependent pathway predominantly mediates ceramide-induced inhibition of PKB/Akt in C2C12 myotubes. In addition, we demonstrate for the first time that ceramide engages an aPKC-dependent pathway to suppress insulin-induced PKB/Akt activation in palmitate-treated cultured human muscle cells as well as in muscle cells from diabetic patients. Collectively, this work identifies key mechanistic differences, which may be linked to variations in plasma membrane composition, underlying the insulin-desensitising effects of ceramide in different skeletal muscle cell models that are extensively used in signal transduction and metabolic studies.

  17. Toward a mechanistic understanding of patterns in biomineralization and new insights for old dogmas in geological settings (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, P. M.; Hamm, L.; Giuffre, A. J.; Han, N.; De Yoreo, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    The ability of organisms to mineralize tissues into skeletons and other functional structures is a remarkable achievement of biology. Yet, the physical basis for how macromolecules regulate the placement and onset of mineral formation is not well established. Efforts to understand nucleation onto organic substrates have produced two, seemingly contradictory, lines of thought: The biomineralization community widely assumes the organic matrix promotes nucleation through stereochemical matching to guide the organization of solute ions, while materials synthesis groups use simple binding assays to correlate high binding strength with good promoters of nucleation. This study reconciles the two views and provides a mechanistic explanation for template-directed nucleation by correlating heterogeneous nucleation barriers with crystal-substrate binding free energies. Using surface assembled monolayers (SAM) as simple model systems, we first measure the kinetics of calcite nucleation onto model substrates that present different functional group chemistries (carboxyl, thiol, phosphate, hydroxyl) and conformations (C11, C16 chain lengths). We find rates are substrate-specific and obey predictions of classical nucleation theory at supersaturations that extend above the solubility of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC). Analysis of the kinetic data shows the thermodynamic barrier to nucleation is reduced by minimizing the interfacial free energy of the system, γ. We then use dynamic force spectroscopy to independently measure calcite-substrate binding free energies, ΔGb. Moreover, we show that within the classical theory of nucleation, γ and ΔGb should be linearly related. The results bear out this prediction and demonstrate that low energy barriers to nucleation correlate with strong crystal-substrate binding. This relationship is general to all functional group chemistries and conformations. These findings reconcile the long-standing concept of templated nucleation through

  18. New insights in (acute) endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair : when fenestrated devices fall short

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, R. A.; Tielliu, I. F. J.; Zeebregts, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    The suitability for endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is determined primarily by abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) anatomy. For patients unsuitable for standard EVAR, due to proximal neck anatomy, fenestrated aortic stent-grafting (FEVAR) is a viable alternative to open repair surgery. Initially FEV

  19. The crystal structure of a sodium galactose transporter reveals mechanistic insights into Na[superscript +]/sugar symport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faham, S.; Watanabe, A.; Besserer, G.M.; Cascio, D.; Specht, A.; Hirayama, B.A.; Wright, E.M.; Abramson, J. (CNRS-UMR); (UCLA)

    2009-08-27

    Membrane transporters that use energy stored in sodium gradients to drive nutrients into cells constitute a major class of proteins. We report the crystal structure of a member of the solute sodium symporters (SSS), the Vibrio parahaemolyticus sodium/galactose symporter (vSGLT). The -3.0 angstrom structure contains 14 transmembrane (TM) helices in an inward-facing conformation with a core structure of inverted repeats of 5 TM helices (TM2 to TM6 and TM7 to TM11). Galactose is bound in the center of the core, occluded from the outside solutions by hydrophobic residues. Surprisingly, the architecture of the core is similar to that of the leucine transporter (LeuT) from a different gene family. Modeling the outward-facing conformation based on the LeuT structure, in conjunction with biophysical data, provides insight into structural rearrangements for active transport.

  20. Mechanistic Insights of a Selective C-H Alkylation of Alkenes by a Ru-based Catalyst and Alcohols

    KAUST Repository

    Poater, Albert

    2016-09-11

    Density functional theory calculations have been used to investigate the reaction mechanism for [(C6H6)(PCy3)(CO) RuH](+) (1; Cy, cyclohexyl) mediated alkylation of indene substrate using ethanol as solvent. According to Yi et al. [ Science 2011, 333, 1613] the plausible reaction mechanism involves a cationic Rualkenyl species, which is initially formed from 1 with two equivalents of the olefin substrate via the vinylic C-H activation and an alkane elimination step. Once the active catalytic species is achieved the oxidative addition step is faced. The latter step together with the next C-C bond formation might display the upper barrier of the catalytic cycle. Having these experimental insights at hand, we investigated in detail the whole reaction pathway using several computational DFT approaches including alternative pathways, higher in energy.

  1. The mechanistic basis of hemoglobin adaptation in the high-flying barheaded goose: insights from ancestral protein resurrection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Amit; Moriyama, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    of this text-book example of biochemical adaptation. Previous hypotheses about the molecular basis of the evolved increase in Hb-O2 affinity were tested by engineering BHGspecific mutations into recombinant human Hb. This approach can provide important insights, but one problem with such ‘horizontal......’ comparisons – swapping residues between proteins of contemporary species – is that the focal mutations are introduced into a sequence context that may not be evolutionarily relevant. If mutations have context-dependent effects, then introducing BHG-specific substitutions into human Hb may not recapitulate...... the functional effects of causative mutations on the genetic background in which they actually occurred during evolution (i.e., in the BHG ancestor). An alternative ‘vertical’ approach is to reconstruct and resurrect ancestral proteins to test the effects of historical mutations on the genetic background...

  2. Mechanistic insights on the responses of plant and ecosystem gas exchange to global environmental change: lessons from Biosphere 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A; Rucks, Jessica S; Aubanell, Gerard

    2014-09-01

    Scaling up leaf processes to canopy/ecosystem level fluxes is critical for examining feedbacks between vegetation and climate. Collectively, studies from Biosphere 2 Laboratory have provided important insight of leaf-to-ecosystem investigations of multiple environmental parameters that were not before possible in enclosed or field studies. B2L has been a testing lab for the applicability of new technologies such as spectral approaches to detect spatial and temporal changes in photosynthesis within canopies, or for the development of cavity ring-down isotope applications for ecosystem evapotranspiration. Short and long term changes in atmospheric CO2, drought or temperature allowed for intensive investigation of the interactions between photosynthesis and leaf, soil and ecosystem respiration. Experiments conducted in the rainforest biome have provided some of the most comprehensive dataset to date on the effects of climate change variables on tropical ecosystems. Results from these studies have been later corroborated in natural rainforest ecosystems and have improved the predictive capabilities of models that now show increased resilience of tropics to climate change. Studies of temperature and CO2 effects on ecosystem respiration and its leaf and soil components have helped reconsider the use of simple first-order kinetics for characterizing respiration in models. The B2L also provided opportunities to quantify the rhizosphere priming effect, or establish the relationships between net primary productivity, atmospheric CO2 and isoprene emissions.

  3. Mechanistic insights into a Ca2+-dependent family of α-mannosidases in a human gut symbiont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanping; Suits, Michael D. L.; Thompson, Andrew J.; Chavan, Sambhaji; Dinev, Zoran; Dumon, Claire; Smith, Nicola; Moremen, Kelley W.; Xiang, Yong; Siriwardena, Aloysius; Williams, Spencer J.; Gilbert, Harry J.; Davies, Gideon J.

    2014-01-01

    Colonic bacteria, exemplified by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, play a key role in maintaining human health by harnessing large families of glycoside hydrolases (GHs) to exploit dietary polysaccharides and host glycans as nutrients. Such GH family expansion is exemplified by the 23 family GH92 glycosidases encoded by the B. thetaiotaomicron genome. Here we show that these are α-mannosidases that act via a single displacement mechanism to utilize host N-glycans. The three-dimensional structure of two GH92 mannosidases defines a family of two-domain proteins in which the catalytic center is located at the domain interface, providing acid (glutamate) and base (aspartate) assistance to hydrolysis in a Ca2+-dependent manner. The three-dimensional structures of the GH92s in complex with inhibitors provide insight into the specificity, mechanism and conformational itinerary of catalysis. Ca2+ plays a key catalytic role in helping distort the mannoside away from its ground-state 4C1 chair conformation toward the transition state. PMID:20081828

  4. Mechanistic insights into osmolyte action in protein stabilization under harsh conditions: N-methylacetamide in glycine betaine-urea mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Narendra; Kishore, Nand

    2014-10-01

    Glycine betaine (GB), a small naturally occurring osmolyte, stabilizes proteins and counteracts harsh denaturing conditions such as extremes of temperature, cellular dehydration, and presence of high concentration of urea. In spite of several studies on understanding mechanism of protein stabilization and counteraction of these harsh conditions by osmolytes, studies centred on GB, one of the most important osmolyte, are scarce, hence, there is need for more investigations. To explore mechanism of protein stabilization and counteraction of denaturing property of urea by GB, molecular dynamics studies of N-methylacetamide (NMA), a model peptide representing denatured state of a protein, in the presence of GB, urea, and GB-urea mixture were carried out. The results show that GB and urea work such that the strength of GB as a protecting osmolyte is increased and the denaturing ability of urea is decreased in the GB-urea mixture. It can be inferred that GB counteracts urea by decreasing its hydrophobic interactions with proteins. The mutual interactions between GB and urea also play an important role in protein stabilization. This study provides insights on osmolyte induced counteraction of denaturing property of urea.

  5. Controlled oxidation of aliphatic CH bonds in metallo-monooxygenases: mechanistic insights derived from studies on deuterated and fluorinated hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao-Sheng; Luo, Wen-I; Yang, Chung-Ling; Tu, Yi-Jung; Chang, Chun-Wei; Chiang, Chih-Hsiang; Chang, Chi-Yao; Chan, Sunney I; Yu, Steve S-F

    2014-05-01

    The control over the regio- and/or stereo-selective aliphatic CH oxidation by metalloenzymes is of great interest to scientists. Typically, these enzymes invoke host-guest chemistry to sequester the substrates within the protein pockets, exploiting sizes, shapes and specific interactions such as hydrogen-bonding, electrostatic forces and/or van der Waals interactions to control the substrate specificity, regio-specificity and stereo-selectivity. Over the years, we have developed a series of deuterated and fluorinated variants of these hydrocarbon substrates as probes to gain insights into the controlled CH oxidations of hydrocarbons facilitated by these enzymes. In this review, we illustrate the application of these designed probes in the study of three monooxygenases: (i) the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), which oxidizes straight-chain C1-C5 alkanes and alkenes to form their corresponding 2-alcohols and epoxides, respectively; (ii) the recombinant alkane hydroxylase (AlkB) from Pseudomonas putida GPo1, which oxidizes the primary CH bonds of C5-C12 linear alkanes; and (iii) the recombinant cytochrome P450 from Bacillus megaterium, which oxidizes C12-C20 fatty acids at the ω-1, ω-2 or ω-3 CH positions.

  6. Mechanistic insights into validoxylamine A 7'-phosphate synthesis by VldE using the structure of the entire product complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C Cavalier

    Full Text Available The pseudo-glycosyltransferase VldE catalyzes non-glycosidic C-N coupling between an unsaturated cyclitol and a saturated aminocyclitol with the conservation of the stereochemical configuration of the substrates to form validoxylamine A 7'-phosphate, the biosynthetic precursor of the antibiotic validamycin A. To study the molecular basis of its mechanism, the three-dimensional structures of VldE from Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. limoneus was determined in apo form, in complex with GDP, in complex with GDP and validoxylamine A 7'-phosphate, and in complex with GDP and trehalose. The structure of VldE with the catalytic site in both an "open" and "closed" conformation is also described. With these structures, the preferred binding of the guanine moiety by VldE, rather than the uracil moiety as seen in OtsA could be explained. The elucidation of the VldE structure in complex with the entirety of its products provides insight into the internal return mechanism by which catalysis occurs with a net retention of the stereochemical configuration of the donated cyclitol.

  7. Reduction of α,β-Unsaturated Ketones by Old Yellow Enzymes: Mechanistic Insights from Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdale, Richard; Reetz, Manfred T

    2015-11-25

    Enoate reductases catalyze the reduction of activated C═C bonds with high enantioselectivity. The oxidative half-reaction, which involves the addition of a hydride and a proton to opposite faces of the C═C bond, has been studied for the first time by hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM). The reduction of 2-cyclohexen-1-one by YqjM from Bacillus subtilis was selected as the model system. Two-dimensional QM/MM (B3LYP-D/OPLS2005) reaction pathways suggest that the hydride and proton are added as distinct steps, with the former step preceding the latter. Furthermore, we present interesting insights into the reactivity of this enzyme, including the weak binding of the substrate in the active site, the role of the two active site histidine residues for polarization of the substrate C═O bond, structural details of the transition states to hydride and proton transfer, and the role of Tyr196 as proton donor. The information presented here will be useful for the future design of enantioselective YqjM mutants for other substrates.

  8. Mechanistic insights into c-di-GMP-dependent control of the biofilm regulator FleQ from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Bruno Y; Krasteva, Petya V; Baraquet, Claudine; Harwood, Caroline S; Sondermann, Holger; Navarro, Marcos V A S

    2016-01-12

    Bacterial biofilm formation during chronic infections confers increased fitness, antibiotic tolerance, and cytotoxicity. In many pathogens, the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to collaborative, sessile biofilms represents a regulated process orchestrated by the intracellular second-messenger c-di-GMP. A main effector for c-di-GMP signaling in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the transcription regulator FleQ. FleQ is a bacterial enhancer-binding protein (bEBP) with a central AAA+ ATPase σ(54)-interaction domain, flanked by a C-terminal helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif and a divergent N-terminal receiver domain. Together with a second ATPase, FleN, FleQ regulates the expression of flagellar and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis genes in response to cellular c-di-GMP. Here we report structural and functional data that reveal an unexpected mode of c-di-GMP recognition that is associated with major conformational rearrangements in FleQ. Crystal structures of FleQ's AAA+ ATPase domain in its apo-state or bound to ADP or ATP-γ-S show conformations reminiscent of the activated ring-shaped assemblies of other bEBPs. As revealed by the structure of c-di-GMP-complexed FleQ, the second messenger interacts with the AAA+ ATPase domain at a site distinct from the ATP binding pocket. c-di-GMP interaction leads to active site obstruction, hexameric ring destabilization, and discrete quaternary structure transitions. Solution and cell-based studies confirm coupling of the ATPase active site and c-di-GMP binding, as well as the functional significance of crystallographic interprotomer interfaces. Taken together, our data offer unprecedented insight into conserved regulatory mechanisms of gene expression under direct c-di-GMP control via FleQ and FleQ-like bEBPs.

  9. Structural and Mechanistic Insights into Hemoglobin-catalyzed Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation and the Fate of Polysulfide Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitvitsky, Victor; Yadav, Pramod K.; An, Sojin; Seravalli, Javier; Cho, Uhn-Soo; Banerjee, Ruma (Michigan-Med); (UNL)

    2017-02-17

    Hydrogen sulfide is a cardioprotective signaling molecule but is toxic at elevated concentrations. Red blood cells can synthesize H2S but, lacking organelles, cannot dispose of H2S via the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway. We have recently shown that at high sulfide concentrations, ferric hemoglobin oxidizes H2S to a mixture of thiosulfate and iron-bound polysulfides in which the latter species predominates. Here, we report the crystal structure of human hemoglobin containing low spin ferric sulfide, the first intermediate in heme-catalyzed sulfide oxidation. The structure provides molecular insights into why sulfide is susceptible to oxidation in human hemoglobin but is stabilized against it in HbI, a specialized sulfide-carrying hemoglobin from a mollusk adapted to life in a sulfide-rich environment. We have also captured a second sulfide bound at a postulated ligand entry/exit site in the α-subunit of hemoglobin, which, to the best of our knowledge, represents the first direct evidence for this site being used to access the heme iron. Hydrodisulfide, a postulated intermediate at the junction between thiosulfate and polysulfide formation, coordinates ferric hemoglobin and, in the presence of air, generated thiosulfate. At low sulfide/heme iron ratios, the product distribution between thiosulfate and iron-bound polysulfides was approximately equal. The iron-bound polysulfides were unstable at physiological glutathione concentrations and were reduced with concomitant formation of glutathione persulfide, glutathione disulfide, and H2S. Hence, although polysulfides are unlikely to be stable in the reducing intracellular milieu, glutathione persulfide could serve as a persulfide donor for protein persulfidation, a posttranslational modification by which H2S is postulated to signal.

  10. New Mechanistic Insight from Substrate- and Product-Bound Structures of the Metal-Dependent Dimethylsulfoniopropionate Lyase DddQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummett, Adam E; Dey, Mishtu

    2016-11-08

    The marine microbial catabolism of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) by the lyase pathway liberates ∼300 million tons of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) per year, which plays a major role in the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur. Recent biochemical and structural studies of some DMSP lyases, including DddQ, reveal the importance of divalent transition metal ions in assisting DMSP cleavage. While DddQ is believed to be zinc-dependent primarily on the basis of structural studies, excess zinc inhibits the enzyme. We examine the importance of iron in regulating the DMSP β-elimination reaction catalyzed by DddQ as our as-isolated purple-colored enzyme possesses ∼0.5 Fe/subunit. The UV-visible spectrum exhibited a feature at 550 nm, consistent with a tyrosinate-Fe(III) ligand-to-metal charge transfer transition. Incubation of as-isolated DddQ with added iron increases the intensity of the 550 nm peak, whereas addition of dithionite causes a bleaching as Fe(III) is reduced. Both the Fe(III) oxidized and Fe(II) reduced species are active, with similar kcat values and 2-fold differences in their Km values for DMSP. The slow turnover of Fe(III)-bound DddQ allowed us to capture a substrate-bound form of the enzyme. Our DMSP-Fe(III)-DddQ structure reveals conformational changes associated with substrate binding and shows that DMSP is positioned optimally to bind iron and is in the proximity of Tyr 120 that acts as a Lewis base to initiate catalysis. The structures of Tris-, DMSP-, and acrylate-bound forms of Fe(III)-DddQ reported here illustrate various states of the enzyme along the reaction pathway. These results provide new insights into DMSP lyase catalysis and have broader significance for understanding the mechanism of oceanic DMS production.

  11. On the role of thermal activation in selective photochemistry: mechanistic insight into the oxidation of propene on the V4O11- cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaohui; Demuth, Juri; Mirabal, Aldo; Wöste, Ludger; Siebert, Torsten

    2012-01-07

    An experimental methodology for a mechanistic analysis of gas phase chemical reactions is presented in the context of structure-reactivity relationships of metal oxide clusters relevant to photocatalysis. The spectroscopic approach is demonstrated with the investigation of the photoinduced oxygenation of propene on the V(4)O(11)(-) cluster, where the thermal activation and subsequent photoreaction are deduced with the information from (i) the temperature dependency of the aggregation kinetics in the propene-seeded helium atmosphere of an ion-trap reactor; (ii) the fluence dependency in the yield of different product channels of the photoreaction and (iii) the intensity dependency in the fragmentation of neutral reaction products that are probed via in situ multi-photon ionization. For the thermal reaction, selective hydrogen abstraction from the allylic position of propene accompanied by the linkage to the cluster at the dioxo moiety is postulated as the mechanism in the aggregation of propene on the V(4)O(11)(-) cluster. In accordance with an insightful neutralization-reionization study (Schröder et al., J. Mass. Spectrom., 2010, 301, 84), the subsequent photoinduced reaction is defined by an allylic oxidation in the formation of acrolein from the initial allyloxy radical photoproduct. The relevance of the observed selectivity is discussed in view of the electronic structure and bond motifs offered by high valence oxide systems such as the V(4)O(11)(-) cluster.

  12. HPRT-deficiency dysregulates cAMP-PKA signaling and phosphodiesterase 10A expression: mechanistic insight and potential target for Lesch-Nyhan Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guibinga, Ghiabe-Henri; Murray, Fiona; Barron, Nikki

    2013-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan Disease (LND) is the result of mutations in the X-linked gene encoding the purine metabolic enzyme, hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT). LND gives rise to severe neurological anomalies including mental retardation, dystonia, chorea, pyramidal signs and a compulsive and aggressive behavior to self injure. The neurological phenotype in LND has been shown to reflect aberrant dopaminergic signaling in the basal ganglia, however there are little data correlating the defect in purine metabolism to the neural-related abnormalities. In the present studies, we find that HPRT-deficient neuronal cell lines have reduced CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) expression and intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP), which correlates with attenuated CREB-dependent transcriptional activity and a reduced phosphorylation of protein kinase A (PKA) substrates such as synapsin (p-syn I). Of interest, we found increased expression of phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) in HPRT-deficient cell lines and that the PDE10 inhibitor papaverine and PDE10A siRNA restored cAMP/PKA signaling. Furthermore, reconstitution of HPRT expression in mutant cells partly increased cAMP signaling synapsin phosphorylation. In conclusion, our data show that HPRT-deficiency alters cAMP/PKA signaling pathway, which is in part due to the increased of PDE10A expression and activity. These findings suggest a mechanistic insight into the possible causes of LND and highlight PDE10A as a possible therapeutic target for this intractable neurological disease.

  13. Extracellular matrix considerations for scar-free repair and regeneration: insights from regenerative diversity among vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin, James; Kuraitis, Drew; Rosenthal, Nadia

    2014-11-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is an essential feature of development, tissue homeostasis and recovery from injury. How the ECM responds dynamically to cellular and soluble components to support the faithful repair of damaged tissues in some animals but leads to the formation of acellular fibrotic scar tissue in others has important clinical implications. Studies in highly regenerative organisms such as the zebrafish and the salamander have revealed a specialist formulation of ECM components that support repair and regeneration, while avoiding scar tissue formation. By comparing a range of different contexts that feature scar-less healing and full regeneration vs. scarring through fibrotic repair, regenerative therapies that incorporate ECM components could be significantly enhanced to improve both regenerative potential and functional outcomes. This article is part of a directed issue entitled: Regenerative Medicine: the challenge of translation.

  14. HPRT-deficiency dysregulates cAMP-PKA signaling and phosphodiesterase 10A expression: mechanistic insight and potential target for Lesch-Nyhan Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghiabe-Henri Guibinga

    Full Text Available Lesch-Nyhan Disease (LND is the result of mutations in the X-linked gene encoding the purine metabolic enzyme, hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT. LND gives rise to severe neurological anomalies including mental retardation, dystonia, chorea, pyramidal signs and a compulsive and aggressive behavior to self injure. The neurological phenotype in LND has been shown to reflect aberrant dopaminergic signaling in the basal ganglia, however there are little data correlating the defect in purine metabolism to the neural-related abnormalities. In the present studies, we find that HPRT-deficient neuronal cell lines have reduced CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein expression and intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP, which correlates with attenuated CREB-dependent transcriptional activity and a reduced phosphorylation of protein kinase A (PKA substrates such as synapsin (p-syn I. Of interest, we found increased expression of phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A in HPRT-deficient cell lines and that the PDE10 inhibitor papaverine and PDE10A siRNA restored cAMP/PKA signaling. Furthermore, reconstitution of HPRT expression in mutant cells partly increased cAMP signaling synapsin phosphorylation. In conclusion, our data show that HPRT-deficiency alters cAMP/PKA signaling pathway, which is in part due to the increased of PDE10A expression and activity. These findings suggest a mechanistic insight into the possible causes of LND and highlight PDE10A as a possible therapeutic target for this intractable neurological disease.

  15. Advances in psoriasis physiopathology and treatments: Up to date of mechanistic insights and perspectives of novel therapies based on innovative skin drug delivery systems (ISDDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, M; Elaissari, A; Fessi, H

    2016-10-10

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting mainly the skin but which can be complicated by psoriatic arthritis (PsA).This autoimmune skin disorder concerns 2-5% of the world population. To date, the physiopathology of psoriasis is not still completely elucidated but many researches are ongoing which have led for example to the discovery of the Th17/Th22 pathway. The conventional therapeutic approaches (local or systemic route) appeal to various classes of drugs with complex mechanisms of action and non-negligible side effects. Although there is no therapy capable to cure psoriasis, the current goal is to relieve symptoms as longer as possible with a good benefit/risk ratio. That is one of the principal limits of conventional antipsoriatic drugs. New formulations based on nanoencapsulation are a promising opportunity to answer to this limit by offering an optimization of the conventional antipsoriatic drug use (higher activity, lower side effects and frequency of application, etc.). Herein, we tried to put in perspective the mechanistic insights (histological and immunological views) proposed into scientific literature these last years in order to have a better comprehension of psoriasis physiopathology resulting in skin lesions and PsA. The therapeutic armamentarium and the different strategies in the management of psoriasis are discussed in greater details. To finish, the field of encapsulation in nanoparticles is broached in order to put forward recent advances in innovative skin drug delivery systems (ISDDSs) of antipsoriatic active agents for a better efficacy, safety and compliance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Potential use of mesenchymal stem cells in human meniscal repair: current insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Jaewoo; Lee, Jung Hun; Park, Kwang Seung; Jeon, Jeong Ho; Lee, Sang Hee

    2017-01-01

    The menisci of the human knee play an important role in maintaining normal functions to provide stability and nutrition to the articular cartilage, and to absorb shock. Once injured, these important structures have very limited natural healing potential. Unfortunately, the traditional arthroscopic meniscectomy performed on these damaged menisci may predispose the joint toward early development of osteoarthritis. Although a very limited number of studies are available, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been investigated as an alternative therapeutic modality to repair human knee meniscal tears. This review summarizes the results of published applications of MSCs in human patients, which showed that the patients who received MSCs (autologous adipose tissue-derived stem cells or culture-expanded bone marrow-derived stem cells) presented symptomatic improvements, along with magnetic resonance imaging evidences of the meniscal repair. PMID:28356779

  17. Structure of the FANCI-FANCD2 Complex: Insights into the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Woo; Xu, Guozhou; Persky, Nicole S.; Smogorzewska, Agata; Rudge, Derek G.; Buzovetsky, Olga; Elledge, Stephen J.; Pavletich, Nikola P. (Harvard-Med); (Cornell); (MSKCC)

    2011-08-29

    Fanconi anemia is a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by defects in the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Central to this pathway is the Fanconi anemia I-Fanconi anemia D2 (FANCI-FANCD2) (ID) complex, which is activated by DNA damage-induced phosphorylation and monoubiquitination. The 3.4 angstrom crystal structure of the {approx}300 kilodalton ID complex reveals that monoubiquitination and regulatory phosphorylation sites map to the I-D interface, suggesting that they occur on monomeric proteins or an opened-up complex and that they may serve to stabilize I-D heterodimerization. The 7.8 angstrom electron-density map of FANCI-DNA crystals and in vitro data show that each protein has binding sites for both single- and double-stranded DNA, suggesting that the ID complex recognizes DNA structures that result from the encounter of replication forks with an ICL.

  18. Structure of the FANCI-FANCD2 Complex: Insights into the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W Joo; G Xu; n Persky; A Smogorzewska; D Rudge; O Buzovetsky; S Elledge; N Pavletich

    2011-12-31

    Fanconi anemia is a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by defects in the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Central to this pathway is the Fanconi anemia I-Fanconi anemia D2 (FANCI-FANCD2) (ID) complex, which is activated by DNA damage-induced phosphorylation and monoubiquitination. The 3.4 angstrom crystal structure of the {approx}300 kilodalton ID complex reveals that monoubiquitination and regulatory phosphorylation sites map to the I-D interface, suggesting that they occur on monomeric proteins or an opened-up complex and that they may serve to stabilize I-D heterodimerization. The 7.8 angstrom electron-density map of FANCI-DNA crystals and in vitro data show that each protein has binding sites for both single- and double-stranded DNA, suggesting that the ID complex recognizes DNA structures that result from the encounter of replication forks with an ICL.

  19. Injury and repair in perinatal brain injury: Insights from non-invasive MR perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintermark, Pia

    2015-03-01

    Injury to the developing brain remains an important complication in critically ill newborns, placing them at risk for future neurodevelopment impairments. Abnormal brain perfusion is often a key mechanism underlying neonatal brain injury. A better understanding of how alternations in brain perfusion can affect normal brain development will permit the development of therapeutic strategies that prevent and/or minimize brain injury and improve the neurodevelopmental outcome of these high-risk newborns. Recently, non-invasive MR perfusion imaging of the brain has been successfully applied to the neonatal brain, which is known to be smaller and have lower brain perfusion compared to older children and adults. This article will present an overview of the potential role of non-invasive perfusion imaging by MRI to study maturation, injury, and repair in perinatal brain injury and demonstrate why this perfusion sequence is an important addition to current neonatal imaging protocols, which already include different sequences to assess the anatomy and metabolism of the neonatal brain.

  20. Precision and accuracy of mechanistic-empirical pavement design

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Theyse, HL

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The availability of mechanistic-empirical pavement design methods is increasing internationally. Although mechanistic-empirical design does offer some insight into pavement behaviour and performance, at least more so than empirical design methods...

  1. Gold-Catalyzed β-Regioselective Formal [3 + 2] Cycloaddition of Ynamides with Pyrido[1,2-b]indazoles: Reaction Development and Mechanistic Insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yinghua; Chen, Gui; Zhu, Lei; Liao, Yun; Wu, Yufeng; Huang, Xueliang

    2016-09-16

    Here, we report an unprecedented gold(I)-induced β-site regioselective formal [3 + 2] cycloaddition of ynamides with pyrido[1,2-b]indazoles, giving 3-amido-7-(pyrid-2'-yl)indoles in good to excellent yields. A complex of gold(I) catalyst with ynamide was isolated and characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis for the first time. Mechanistic investigations suggest the reaction pathway involves a gold-stabilized carbocation intermediate, which in turn participated in sequential C-H bond functionalization of the ortho-position of the phenyl ring.

  2. New insights regarding the incidence, presentation and treatment options of aorto-oesophageal fistulation after thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czerny, Martin; Eggebrecht, Holger; Sodeck, Gottfried

    2014-01-01

    To review the incidence, clinical presentation, definite management and 1-year outcome in patients with aorto-oesophageal fistulation (AOF) following thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR).......To review the incidence, clinical presentation, definite management and 1-year outcome in patients with aorto-oesophageal fistulation (AOF) following thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR)....

  3. Mechanistic Insights into Cofactor-Dependent Coupling of RNA Folding and mRNA Transcription/Translation by a Cobalamin Riboswitch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob T. Polaski

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Riboswitches are mRNA elements regulating gene expression in response to direct binding of a metabolite. While these RNAs are increasingly well understood with respect to interactions between receptor domains and their cognate effector molecules, little is known about the specific mechanistic relationship between metabolite binding and gene regulation by the downstream regulatory domain. Using a combination of cell-based, biochemical, and biophysical techniques, we reveal the specific RNA architectural features enabling a cobalamin-dependent hairpin loop docking interaction between receptor and regulatory domains. Furthermore, these data demonstrate that docking kinetics dictate a regulatory response involving the coupling of translation initiation to general mechanisms that control mRNA abundance. These results yield a comprehensive picture of how RNA structure in the riboswitch regulatory domain enables kinetically constrained ligand-dependent regulation of gene expression.

  4. Selective Alcohol Oxidation by a Copper TEMPO Catalyst: Mechanistic Insights by Simultaneously Coupled Operando EPR/UV-Vis/ATR-IR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabeah, Jabor; Bentrup, Ursula; Stößer, Reinhard; Brückner, Angelika

    2015-09-28

    The first coupled operando EPR/UV-Vis/ATR-IR spectroscopy setup for mechanistic studies of gas-liquid phase reactions is presented and exemplarily applied to the well-known copper/TEMPO-catalyzed (TEMPO=(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-yl)oxyl) oxidation of benzyl alcohol. In contrast to previous proposals, no direct redox reaction between TEMPO and Cu(I) /Cu(II) has been detected. Instead, the role of TEMPO is postulated to be the stabilization of a (bpy)(NMI)Cu(II) -O2 (⋅-) -TEMPO (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine, NMI=N-methylimidazole) intermediate formed by electron transfer from Cu(I) to molecular O2 .

  5. Simulating the effects of climate change on the distribution of an invasive plant, using a high resolution, local scale, mechanistic approach: challenges and insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Mark; Murphy, James E; Gallagher, Tommy; Osborne, Bruce

    2013-04-01

    The growing economic and ecological damage associated with biological invasions, which will likely be exacerbated by climate change, necessitates improved projections of invasive spread. Generally, potential changes in species distribution are investigated using climate envelope models; however, the reliability of such models has been questioned and they are not suitable for use at local scales. At this scale, mechanistic models are more appropriate. This paper discusses some key requirements for mechanistic models and utilises a newly developed model (PSS[gt]) that incorporates the influence of habitat type and related features (e.g., roads and rivers), as well as demographic processes and propagule dispersal dynamics, to model climate induced changes in the distribution of an invasive plant (Gunnera tinctoria) at a local scale. A new methodology is introduced, dynamic baseline benchmarking, which distinguishes climate-induced alterations in species distributions from other potential drivers of change. Using this approach, it was concluded that climate change, based on IPCC and C4i projections, has the potential to increase the spread-rate and intensity of G. tinctoria invasions. Increases in the number of individuals were primarily due to intensification of invasion in areas already invaded or in areas projected to be invaded in the dynamic baseline scenario. Temperature had the largest influence on changes in plant distributions. Water availability also had a large influence and introduced the most uncertainty in the projections. Additionally, due to the difficulties of parameterising models such as this, the process has been streamlined by utilising methods for estimating unknown variables and selecting only essential parameters.

  6. Recent STM, DFT and HAADF-STEM studies of sulfide-based hydrotreating catalysts: Insight into mechanistic, structural and particle size effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besenbacher, Flemming; Brorson, M.; Clausen, B.S.

    2008-01-01

    -angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) studies which have provided insight into the detailed atomic structure. In accordance with earlier theoretical studies, the experimental studies show that the Ni-Mo-S structures may in some instances differ from the Co...

  7. PEG chain length impacts yield of solid-phase protein PEGylation and efficiency of PEGylated protein separation by ion-exchange chromatography: insights of mechanistic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Noriko; Isakari, Yu; Itoh, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Shuichi

    2013-07-01

    The mechanisms behind protein PEGylation are complex and dictated by the structure of the protein reactant. Hence, it is difficult to design a reaction process which can produce the desired PEGylated form at high yield. Likewise, efficient purification processes following protein PEGylation must be constructed on an ad hoc basis for each product. The retention and binding mechanisms driving electrostatic interaction-based chromatography (ion-exchange chromatography) of PEGylated proteins (randomly PEGylated lysozyme and mono-PEGylated bovine serum albumin) were investigated, based on our previously developed model Chem. Eng. Technol. 2005, 28, 1387-1393. PEGylation of each protein resulted in a shift to a smaller elution volume compared to the unmodified molecule, but did not affect the number of binding sites appreciably. The shift of the retention volume of PEGylated proteins correlated with the calculated thickness of PEG layer around the protein molecule. Random PEGylation was carried out on a column (solid-phase PEGylation) and the PEGylated proteins were separated on the same column. Solid-phase PEGylation inhibited the production of multi-PEGylated forms and resulted in a relatively low yield of selective mono-PEGylated form. Pore diffusion may play an important role in solid-phase PEGylation. These results suggest the possibility of a reaction and purification process development based on the mechanistic model for PEGylated proteins on ion exchange chromatography.

  8. The Ternary Complex of PrnB (the Second Enzyme in the Pyrrolnitrin Biosynthesis Pathway), Tryptophan, and Cyanide Yields New Mechanistic Insights into the Indolamine Dioxygenase Superfamily*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; van Pée, Karl-Heinz; Naismith, James H.

    2010-01-01

    Pyrrolnitrin (3-chloro-4-(2′-nitro-3′-chlorophenyl)pyrrole) is a broad-spectrum antifungal compound isolated from Pseudomonas pyrrocinia. Four enzymes (PrnA, PrnB, PrnC, and PrnD) are required for pyrrolnitrin biosynthesis from tryptophan. PrnB rearranges the indole ring of 7-Cl-l-tryptophan and eliminates the carboxylate group. PrnB shows robust activity in vivo, but in vitro activity for PrnB under defined conditions remains undetected. The structure of PrnB establishes that the enzyme belongs to the heme b-dependent indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) family. We report the cyanide complex of PrnB and two ternary complexes with both l-tryptophan or 7-Cl-l-tryptophan and cyanide. The latter two complexes are essentially identical and mimic the likely catalytic ternary complex that occurs during turnover. In the cyanide ternary complexes, a loop previously disordered becomes ordered, contributing to the binding of substrates. The conformations of the bound tryptophan substrates are changed from that seen previously in the binary complexes. In l-tryptophan ternary complex, the indole ring now adopts the same orientation as seen in the PrnB binary complexes with other tryptophan substrates. The amide and carboxylate group of the substrate are orientated in a new conformation. Tyr321 and Ser332 play a key role in binding these groups. The structures suggest that catalysis requires an l-configured substrate. Isothermal titration calorimetry data suggest d-tryptophan does not bind after cyanide (or oxygen) coordinates with the distal (or sixth) site of heme. This is the first ternary complex with a tryptophan substrate of a member of the tryptophan dioxygenase superfamily and has mechanistic implications. PMID:20421301

  9. MicroRNAs: tools of mechanistic insights and biological therapeutics discovery for the rare neurogenetic syndrome Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guibinga, Ghiabe-Henri

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory RNAs that modulate the translation of mRNA. They have emerged over the past few years as indispensable entities in the transcriptional regulation of genes. Their discovery has added additional layers of complexity to regulatory networks that control cellular homeostasis. Also, their dysregulated pattern of expression is now well demonstrated in myriad diseases and pathogenic processes. In the current review, we highlight the role of miRNAs in Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND), a rare neurogenetic syndrome caused by mutations in the purine metabolic gene encoding the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) enzyme. We describe how experimental and biocomputational approaches have helped to unravel genetic and signaling pathways that provide mechanistic understanding of some of the molecular and cellular basis of this ill-defined neurogenetic disorder. Through miRNA-based target predictions, we have identified signaling pathways that may be of significance in guiding biological therapeutic discovery for this incurable neurological disorder. We also propose a model to explain how a gene such as HPRT, mostly known for its housekeeping metabolic functions, can have pleiotropic effects on disparate genes and signal transduction pathways. Our hypothetical model suggests that HPRT mRNA transcripts may be acting as competitive endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) intertwined in multiregulatory cross talk between key neural transcripts and miRNAs. Overall, this approach of using miRNA-based genomic approaches to elucidate the molecular and cellular basis of LND and guide biological target identification might be applicable to other ill-defined rare inborn-error metabolic diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Transcriptional Profiling of Dibenzo[def,p]chrysene-induced Spleen Atrophy Provides Mechanistic Insights into its Immunotoxicity in MutaMouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepelev, Nikolai L; Long, Alexandra S; Williams, Andrew; Kuo, Byron; Gagné, Rémi; Kennedy, Dean A; Phillips, David H; Arlt, Volker M; White, Paul A; Yauk, Carole L

    2016-01-01

    Dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC) is the most carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) examined to date. We investigated the immunotoxicity of DBC, manifested as spleen atrophy, following acute exposure of adult MutaMouse males by oral gavage. Mice were exposed to 0, 2.0, 6.2, or 20.0 mg DBC /kg-bw per day, for 3 days. Genotoxic endpoints (DBC-DNA adducts and lacZ mutant frequency in spleen and bone marrow, and red blood cell micronucleus frequency) and global gene expression changes were measured. All of the genotoxicity measures increased in a dose-dependent manner in spleen and bone marrow. Gene expression analysis showed that DBC activates p53 signaling pathways related to cellular growth and proliferation, which was evident even at the low dose. Strikingly, the expression profiles of DBC exposed mouse spleens were highly inversely correlated with the expression profiles of the only published toxicogenomics dataset of enlarged mouse spleen. This analysis suggested a central role for Bnip3l, a pro-apoptotic protein involved in negative regulation of erythroid maturation. RT-PCR confirmed expression changes in several genes related to apoptosis, iron metabolism, and aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling that are regulated in the opposite direction during spleen atrophy versus benzo[a]pyrene-mediated splenomegaly. In addition, benchmark dose modeling of toxicogenomics data yielded toxicity estimates that are very close to traditional toxicity endpoints. This work illustrates the power of toxicogenomics to reveal rich mechanistic information for immunotoxic compounds and its ability to provide information that is quantitatively similar to that derived from standard toxicity methods in health risk assessment.

  11. Identification of the dominant photochemical pathways and mechanistic insights to the ultrafast ligand exchange of Fe(CO5 to Fe(CO4EtOH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kunnus

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We utilized femtosecond time-resolved resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and ab initio theory to study the transient electronic structure and the photoinduced molecular dynamics of a model metal carbonyl photocatalyst Fe(CO5 in ethanol solution. We propose mechanistic explanation for the parallel ultrafast intra-molecular spin crossover and ligation of the Fe(CO4 which are observed following a charge transfer photoexcitation of Fe(CO5 as reported in our previous study [Wernet et al., Nature 520, 78 (2015]. We find that branching of the reaction pathway likely happens in the 1A1 state of Fe(CO4. A sub-picosecond time constant of the spin crossover from 1B2 to 3B2 is rationalized by the proposed 1B2 → 1A1 → 3B2 mechanism. Ultrafast ligation of the 1B2 Fe(CO4 state is significantly faster than the spin-forbidden and diffusion limited ligation process occurring from the 3B2 Fe(CO4 ground state that has been observed in the previous studies. We propose that the ultrafast ligation occurs via 1B2 → 1A1 → 1A′ Fe(CO4EtOH pathway and the time scale of the 1A1 Fe(CO4 state ligation is governed by the solute-solvent collision frequency. Our study emphasizes the importance of understanding the interaction of molecular excited states with the surrounding environment to explain the relaxation pathways of photoexcited metal carbonyls in solution.

  12. Intracellular siRNA delivery dynamics of integrin-targeted, PEGylated chitosan-poly(ethylene imine) hybrid nanoparticles: A mechanistic insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragelle, Héloïse; Colombo, Stefano; Pourcelle, Vincent; Vanvarenberg, Kevin; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; Bouzin, Caroline; Marchand-Brynaert, Jacqueline; Feron, Olivier; Foged, Camilla; Préat, Véronique

    2015-08-10

    Integrin-targeted nanoparticles are promising for the delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to tumor cells or tumor endothelium in cancer therapy aiming at silencing genes essential for tumor growth. However, during the process of optimizing and realizing their full potential, it is pertinent to gain a basic mechanistic understanding of the bottlenecks existing for nanoparticle-mediated intracellular delivery. We designed αvβ3 integrin-targeted nanoparticles by coupling arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) or RGD peptidomimetic (RGDp) ligands to the surface of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) grafted chitosan-poly(ethylene imine) hybrid nanoparticles. The amount of intracellular siRNA delivered by αvβ3-targeted versus non-targeted nanoparticles was quantified in the human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line H1299 expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) using a stem-loop reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) approach. Data demonstrated that the internalization of αvβ3-targeted nanoparticles was highly dependent on the surface concentration of the ligand. Above a certain threshold concentration, the use of targeted nanoparticles provided a two-fold increase in the number of siRNA copies/cell, subsequently resulting in as much as 90% silencing of EGFP at well-tolerated carrier concentrations. In contrast, non-targeted nanoparticles mediated low levels of gene silencing, despite relatively high intracellular siRNA concentrations, indicating that these nanoparticles might end up in late endosomes or lysosomes without releasing their cargo to the cell cytoplasm. Thus, the silencing efficiency of the chitosan-based nanoparticles is strongly dependent on the uptake and the intracellular trafficking in H1299 EGFP cells, which is critical information towards a more complete understanding of the delivery mechanism that can facilitate the future design of efficient siRNA delivery systems.

  13. Mechanistic insights into c-di-GMP–dependent control of the biofilm regulator FleQ from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuyama, Bruno Y.; Krasteva, Petya V.; Baraquet, Claudine; Harwood, Caroline S.; Sondermann, Holger; Navarro, Marcos V.A. S. (UWASH); (U. Sao Paulo); (Cornell); (CNRS-UMR)

    2016-07-05

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen that can cause fatal chronic infections, relies on the intracellular second-messenger c-di-GMP to form robust multicellular biofilms during host tissue colonization. c-di-GMP is sensed directly by the transcription regulator FleQ, which inversely regulates flagellar motility and exopolysaccharide secretion to secure a planktonic to sessile life-form transition. FleQ belongs to the diverse family of AAA+ ATPase enhancer-binding proteins, but how its noncanonical function on transcriptional regulation is controlled by c-di-GMP remains enigmatic. Here, we report structural and functional data that identify an unusual mode of c-di-GMP recognition accompanied by a major quaternary structure reorganization. Our analyses offer a consensus to previous studies and unique insights into the mechanism of action of FleQ and FleQ-like proteins.

  14. Investigation of the biological properties of Cinnulin PF in the context of diabetes: mechanistic insights by genome-wide mRNA-Seq analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Ververis

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The accumulating evidence of the beneficial effects of cinnamon (Cinnamomum burmanni in type-2 diabetes, a chronic age-associated disease, has prompted the commercialisation of various supplemental forms of the spice. One such supplement, Cinnulin PF®, represents the water soluble fraction containing relatively high levels of the double-linked procyanidin type-A polymers of flavanoids. The overall aim of this study was to utilize genome-wide mRNA-Seq analysis to characterise the changes in gene expression caused by Cinnulin PF in immortalised human keratinocytes and microvascular endothelial cells, which are relevant with respect to diabetic complications. In summary, our findings provide insights into the mechanisms of action of Cinnulin PF in diabetes and diabetic complications. More generally, we identify relevant candidate genes which could provide the basis for further investigation. To access the supplementary material to this article: ‘Supplementary tables 1–3’ please see Supplementary files under Reading Tools online.

  15. Repair or Replacement for Isolated Tricuspid Valve Pathology? Insights from a Surgical Analysis on Long-Term Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Mina; Arif, Rawa; Sabashnikov, Anton; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Ruhparwar, Arjang; Schmack, Bastian; Dohmen, Pascal M.; Szabó, Gábor; Karck, Matthias; Weymann, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Background Long-term follow-up data concerning isolated tricuspid valve pathology after replacement or reconstruction is limited. Current American Heart Association guidelines equally recommend repair and replacement when surgical intervention is indicated. Our aim was to investigate and compare operative mortality and long-term survival in patients undergoing isolated tricuspid valve repair surgery versus replacement. Material/Methods Between 1995 and 2011, 109 consecutive patients underwent surgical correction of tricuspid valve pathology at our institution for varying structural pathologies. A total of 41 (37.6%) patients underwent tricuspid annuloplasty/repair (TAP) with or without ring implantation, while 68 (62.3%) patients received tricuspid valve replacement (TVR) of whom 36 (53%) were mechanical and 32 (47%) were biological prostheses. Results Early survival at 30 days after surgery was 97.6% in the TAP group and 91.1% in the TVR group. After 6 months, 89.1% in the TAP group and 87.8% in the TVR group were alive. In terms of long-term survival, there was no further mortality observed after one year post surgery in both groups (Log Rank p=0.919, Breslow p=0.834, Tarone-Ware p=0.880) in the Kaplan-Meier Survival analysis. The 1-, 5-, and 8-year survival rates were 85.8% for TAP and 87.8% for TVR group. Conclusions Surgical repair of the tricuspid valve does not show survival benefit when compared to replacement. Hence valve replacement should be considered generously in patients with reasonable suspicion that regurgitation after repair will reoccur. PMID:28236633

  16. Mechanistic insight into selective catalytic combustion of acrylonitrile (C2H3CN): NCO formation and its further transformation towards N2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Yuan, Xiaoning; Zhang, Runduo; Xu, Rongrong; Li, Yingxia

    2017-03-15

    A series of zeolite catalysts, M(Cu, Fe, Co)-ZSM-5, was prepared by an impregnation method and evaluated for the selective catalytic combustion of acrylonitrile (AN-SCC). Cu-ZSM-5, exhibiting the highest AN conversion activity and best N2 yield, was further selected for an AN-SCC mechanism investigation, wherein both experimental [in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS)] and theoretical [density functional theory (DFT)] approaches were employed. The in situ DRIFTS revealed that AN-SCC followed a hydrolysis mechanism at T 300 °C via an intermediate of NCO. The DFT simulations gave much deeper insights suggesting that: (i) the NCO could be generated by oxidation of AN over [Cu](+) active sites, with an assistance of dissociated atomic O from gaseous O2; (ii) three types of reaction routes could be proposed for the further reaction of NCO to produce N2, namely NCO direct dissociation, NCO coupling, and NO + NCO reaction; and (iii) the last route (NO + NCO), possessing the lowest energy barrier, was the most probable reaction pathway, wherein the NO could be produced by oxidation of NCO. The DFT energy calculation results and microkinetic analyses revealed that the NCO generation step, possessing an energy barrier of 17.0 kcal mol(-1) and a forward reaction rate constant of 2.20 × 10(7) s(-1), was the rate-determining step of the whole catalytic cycle.

  17. Mechanistic Insights into Validoxylamine A 7'-Phosphate Synthesis by VldE Using the Structure of the Entire Product Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalier, Michael C.; Yim, Young-Sun; Asamizu, Shumpei; Neau, David; Almabruk, Khaled H.; Mahmud, Taifo; Lee, Yong-Hwan [Oregon State U.; (Cornell); (LSU)

    2013-09-09

    The pseudo-glycosyltransferase VldE catalyzes non-glycosidic C-N coupling between an unsaturated cyclitol and a saturated aminocyclitol with the conservation of the stereochemical configuration of the substrates to form validoxylamine A 7'-phosphate, the biosynthetic precursor of the antibiotic validamycin A. To study the molecular basis of its mechanism, the three-dimensional structures of VldE from Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. limoneus was determined in apo form, in complex with GDP, in complex with GDP and validoxylamine A 7'-phosphate, and in complex with GDP and trehalose. The structure of VldE with the catalytic site in both an “open” and “closed” conformation is also described. With these structures, the preferred binding of the guanine moiety by VldE, rather than the uracil moiety as seen in OtsA could be explained. The elucidation of the VldE structure in complex with the entirety of its products provides insight into the internal return mechanism by which catalysis occurs with a net retention of the stereochemical configuration of the donated cyclitol.

  18. Mechanistic insight into conjugated N-N bond cleavage by Rh(III)-catalyzed redox-neutral C-H activation of pyrazolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weirong; Liu, Yuxia; Bi, Siwei

    2015-08-14

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to investigate the detailed mechanism of Rh(III)-catalyzed redox-neutral C-H activation of pyrazolones with PhC≡CPh. It is found that (1) the methylene C-H activation is prior to the phenyl C-H activation, (2) the N-N bond cleavage is realized via Rh(III) → Rh(I) → Rh(III) rather than via Rh(III) → Rh(V) → Rh(III). The zwitterionic Rh(I) complex is identified to be a key intermediate in promoting the N-N bond cleavage. (3) Different from the Rh(III)-catalyzed hydrazine-directed C-H activation for indole synthesis, the rate-determining step of the reaction studied in this work is the Rh(III) → Rh(I) → Rh(III) process resulting in the N-N bond cleavage rather than the alkyne insertion step. The present theoretical study provides new insight into the mechanism of the conjugated N-N bond cleavage.

  19. Probing the role of chemical enhancers in facilitating drug release from patches: Mechanistic insights based on FT-IR spectroscopy, molecular modeling and thermal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenting; Quan, Peng; Li, Shanshan; Liu, Chao; Lv, Siji; Zhao, Yongshan; Fang, Liang

    2016-04-10

    In patches, a drug must release from patches prior to its percutaneous absorption. Chemical enhancers have been used for several decades, but their roles in drug release from patches are poorly understood. In this work, the roles of chemical enhancers in bisoprolol tartrate (BSP-T) release from patches were probed in vitro and in vivo. More importantly, an innovative mechanism insight of chemical enhancers in drug release process was provided at molecular level. FT-IR spectroscopy and molecular modeling were employed to investigate the influence of chemical enhancers on drug-adhesive interaction. The results showed chemical enhancers like Span 80, which had a strong ability forming hydrogen bonds, could decrease drug-adhesive interaction leading to the release of drug from adhesive of patches. Thermal analysis was conducted to research the influence of chemical enhancers on the thermodynamic properties of patch system. It showed that chemical enhancers promoted the formation of free volume of adhesive, which facilitated drug release process. By contrast, the influence on the thermodynamic properties of BSP-T was less effective in influencing BSP-T release process. In conclusion, chemical enhancers played an important role in facilitating BSP-T release from the adhesive DURO-TAK® 87-2287 of patches by decreasing drug-adhesive interaction and promoting the formation of free volume of adhesive. This work may be an important step in understanding the important roles of chemical enhancers in drug release process.

  20. Reaching for mechanistic consensus across life kingdoms: structure and insights into catalysis of the myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase (mIPS) from Archaeoglobus fulgidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieglitz, Kimberly A; Yang, Hongying; Roberts, Mary F; Stec, Boguslaw

    2005-01-11

    myo-Inositol-1-phosphate synthase (mIPS) catalyzes the first step in the synthesis of l-myo-inositol-1-phosphate. We have solved and refined the structure of the mIPS from the hyperthermophilic sulfate reducer Archaeoglobus fulgidus at 1.9 A resolution. The enzyme crystallized from poly(ethylene glycol) in the P1 space group with one tetramer in the asymmetric unit and provided a view of the entire biologically active oligomer. Despite significant changes in sequence length and amino acid composition, the general architecture of the archaeal enzyme is similar to that of the eukaryotic mIPS from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and bacterial mIPS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The enhanced thermostability of the archaeal enzyme as compared to that from yeast is consistent with deletion of a number of surface loops that results in a significantly smaller protein. In the structure of the A. fulgidus mIPS, the active sites of all four subunits were fully ordered and contained NAD(+) and inorganic phosphate. The structure also contained a single metal ion (identified as K(+)) in two of the four subunits. The analysis of the electrostatic potential maps of the protein suggested the presence of a second metal-ion-binding site in close proximity to the first metal ion and NAD(+). The modeling of the substrate and known inhibitors suggests a critical role for the second metal ion in catalysis and provides insights into the common elements of the catalytic cycle in enzymes from different life kingdoms.

  1. Transcriptome analysis of the human T lymphocyte cell line Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to deoxynivalenol (DON): New mechanistic insights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katika, Madhumohan R. [RIKILT-Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen (Netherlands); Department of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology, Maastricht University (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands); Hendriksen, Peter J.M. [RIKILT-Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands); Shao, Jia [RIKILT-Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen (Netherlands); Department of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology, Maastricht University (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands); Loveren, Henk van [Department of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology, Maastricht University (Netherlands); National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands); Peijnenburg, Ad, E-mail: ad.peijnenburg@wur.nl [RIKILT-Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands)

    2012-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) or vomitoxin is a commonly encountered type-B trichothecene mycotoxin, produced by Fusarium species predominantly found in cereals and grains. DON is known to exert toxic effects on the gastrointestinal, reproductive and neuroendocrine systems, and particularly on the immune system. Depending on dose and exposure time, it can either stimulate or suppress immune function. The main objective of this study was to obtain a deeper insight into DON-induced effects on lymphoid cells. For this, we exposed the human T-lymphocyte cell line Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to various concentrations of DON for various times and examined gene expression changes by DNA microarray analysis. Jurkat cells were exposed to 0.25 and 0.5 μM DON for 3, 6 and 24 h. Biological interpretation of the microarray data indicated that DON affects various processes in these cells: It upregulates genes involved in ribosome structure and function, RNA/protein synthesis and processing, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, calcium-mediated signaling, mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, the NFAT and NF-κB/TNF-α pathways, T cell activation and apoptosis. The effects of DON on the expression of genes involved in ER stress, NFAT activation and apoptosis were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Other biochemical experiments confirmed that DON activates calcium-dependent proteins such as calcineurin and M-calpain that are known to be involved in T cell activation and apoptosis. Induction of T cell activation was also confirmed by demonstrating that DON activates NFATC1 and induces its translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. For the gene expression profiling of PBMCs, cells were exposed to 2 and 4 μM DON for 6 and 24 h. Comparison of the Jurkat microarray data with those obtained with PBMCs showed that most of the processes affected by DON in the Jurkat cell line were also affected in the PBMCs. -- Highlights: ► The human T cell line Jurkat and human

  2. Incorporation of deuterium oxide in MCF-7 cells to shed further mechanistic insights into benzo[a]pyrene-induced low-dose effects discriminated by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppenstall, Lara D; Strong, Rebecca J; Trevisan, Júlio; Martin, Francis L

    2013-05-07

    This study evaluated the potential of deuteration to enhance the mechanistic information obtainable by biospectroscopy techniques in biological-cell models. These techniques were previously demonstrated to identify low-dose effects (≤nM) induced by test agents; this is of critical interest in terms of developing novel approaches to monitor environmentally-induced cell alterations. Attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy was coupled with multivariate analysis to characterize a low-dose (10(-10) M) compared to a high-dose (10(-6) M) exposure of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) in oestrogen-responsive MCF-7 cells; these results were used as a positive control for spectroscopic detection of B[a]P-induced effects. Deuterium oxide (D2O) was then applied as part of a fixative solution and/or at low levels incorporated into growth medium prior to ATR-FTIR spectrochemical analysis. The application of D2O as an alternative solvent in spectroscopy is widespread, but D2O has never before been applied to biospectroscopic analysis of in vitro toxicology assays. This allowed comparison between deuterated- and typically-derived IR spectra, facilitating significant insights into the effects of deuteration, and suggested that the addition of D2O to biospectroscopy assays could improve understanding of low-dose effects.

  3. Mechanistic Insights into an Unexpected Carbon DioxideInsertion Reaction through the Crystal Structures of CarbamicDiphenylthiophosphinic Anhydride and 1-[( 4-Nitrophenyl )-sulfonyl ]-trans-2,5-pyrrolidinedicarboxylic Acid Methyl Ester

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI, Min; SHEN, Yu-Mei; JIANG, Jian-Kang

    2001-01-01

    The crystal structures of an unexpected carbon dioxide inserted carbamicdiphenylthiophosphinic anhydride and 1-[(4-nitrophenyl) sulfonyl]- trans-2, 5-pyrrolidinedicarboxylic acid methyl ester were determined by X-ray analysis. They crystallized in the space group P21(#4) with α=0.9550(2), b=0.9401(4), c= 1.2880(2) nm, β= 107.74°, V=1.1013(5) nm3, D calcd = 1.349 g/cm3, Z = 2 and P212121 ( # 19)with α= 1.4666(2), b = 0.7195(2), c = 1.6339(2) nm, V= 1.7240(7) nm3, Dcalcd= 1.434 g/cm3, Z=4, respectively.Through the investigation of these two crystal structures, the mechanistic insights into this unexpected carbon dioxide insertion in the reaction of trans-2,5-disubstituted pyrrolidine with diphenylthiophosphoryl chloride in the presence of potassium carbonate were disclosed.

  4. Damage, DNA Repair, Aging, and Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Scott; Fang, Evandro Fei; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Croteau, Deborah L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2017-01-01

    Aging in mammals is accompanied by a progressive atrophy of tissues and organs, and stochastic damage accumulation to the macromolecules DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids. The sequence of the human genome represents our genetic blueprint, and accumulating evidence suggests that loss of genomic maintenance may causally contribute to aging. Distinct evidence for a role of imperfect DNA repair in aging is that several premature aging syndromes have underlying genetic DNA repair defects. Accumulation of DNA damage may be particularly prevalent in the central nervous system owing to the low DNA repair capacity in postmitotic brain tissue. It is generally believed that the cumulative effects of the deleterious changes that occur in aging, mostly after the reproductive phase, contribute to species-specific rates of aging. In addition to nuclear DNA damage contributions to aging, there is also abundant evidence for a causative link between mitochondrial DNA damage and the major phenotypes associated with aging. Understanding the mechanistic basis for the association of DNA damage and DNA repair with aging and age-related diseases, such as neurodegeneration, would give insight into contravening age-related diseases and promoting a healthy life span. PMID:26385091

  5. Mechanistic Insights of Vitamin D Anticancer Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingyu; Johnson, Candace S; Trump, Donald L

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D is a secosteroid hormone that regulates many biological functions in addition to its classical role in maintaining calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism. Vitamin D deficiency appears to predispose individuals to increased risk of developing a number of cancers. Compelling epidemiological and experimental evidence supports a role for vitamin D in cancer prevention and treatment in many types of cancers. Preclinical studies show that 1,25D3, the active metabolite of vitamin D, and its analogs have antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo through multiple mechanisms including the induction of cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, differentiation and the suppression of inflammation, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. 1,25D3 also potentiates the effect of chemotherapeutic agents and other agents in the combination treatment. In this review, the antitumor effects of 1,25D3 and the potential underlying mechanisms will be discussed. The current findings support the application of 1,25D3 in cancer prevention and treatment.

  6. Mechanistic insights into heterogeneous methane activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Allegra A; Aljama, Hassan; Kakekhani, Arvin; Yoo, Jong Suk; Kulkarni, Ambarish; Tsai, Charlie; Garcia-Melchor, Max; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Nørskov, Jens K

    2017-02-01

    While natural gas is an abundant chemical fuel, its low volumetric energy density has prompted a search for catalysts able to transform methane into more useful chemicals. This search has often been aided through the use of transition state (TS) scaling relationships, which estimate methane activation TS energies as a linear function of a more easily calculated descriptor, such as final state energy, thus avoiding tedious TS energy calculations. It has been shown that methane can be activated via a radical or surface-stabilized pathway, both of which possess a unique TS scaling relationship. Herein, we present a simple model to aid in the prediction of methane activation barriers on heterogeneous catalysts. Analogous to the universal radical TS scaling relationship introduced in a previous publication, we show that a universal TS scaling relationship that transcends catalysts classes also seems to exist for surface-stabilized methane activation if the relevant final state energy is used. We demonstrate that this scaling relationship holds for several reducible and irreducible oxides, promoted metals, and sulfides. By combining the universal scaling relationships for both radical and surface-stabilized methane activation pathways, we show that catalyst reactivity must be considered in addition to catalyst geometry to obtain an accurate estimation for the TS energy. This model can yield fast and accurate predictions of methane activation barriers on a wide range of catalysts, thus accelerating the discovery of more active catalysts for methane conversion.

  7. Insights into the epigenetic mechanisms involving histone lysine methylation and demethylation in ischemia induced damage and repair has therapeutic implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Sumana; Jhelum, Priya; Bhat, Unis Ahmad; Rajan, Wenson D; Maitra, Swati; Pathak, Salil S; Patel, Anant B; Kumar, Arvind

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. Therapeutic interventions to minimize ischemia-induced neural damage are limited due to poor understanding of molecular mechanisms mediating complex pathophysiology in stroke. Recently, epigenetic mechanisms mostly histone lysine (K) acetylation and deacetylation have been implicated in ischemic brain damage and have expanded the dimensions of potential therapeutic intervention to the systemic/local administration of histone deacetylase inhibitors. However, the role of other epigenetic mechanisms such as histone lysine methylation and demethylation in stroke-induced damage and subsequent recovery process is elusive. Here, we established an Internal Carotid Artery Occlusion (ICAO) model in CD1 mouse that resulted in mild to moderate level of ischemic damage to the striatum, as suggested by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), TUNEL and histopathological staining along with an evaluation of neurological deficit score (NDS), grip strength and rotarod performance. The molecular investigations show dysregulation of a number of histone lysine methylases (KMTs) and few of histone lysine demethylases (KDMs) post-ICAO with significant global attenuation in the transcriptionally repressive epigenetic mark H3K9me2 in the striatum. Administration of Dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG), an inhibitor of KDM4 or JMJD2 class of histone lysine demethylases, significantly ameliorated stroke-induced NDS by restoring perturbed H3K9me2 levels in the ischemia-affected striatum. Overall, these results highlight the novel role of epigenetic regulatory mechanisms controlling the epigenetic mark H3K9me2 in mediating the stroke-induced striatal damage and subsequent repair following mild to moderate cerebral ischemia.

  8. Potential of human γD-crystallin for hair damage repair: insights into the mechanical properties and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, A; Matamá, T; Cruz, C F; Gomes, A C; Cavaco-Paulo, A M

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a new strategy to physically 'repair' chemically damaged hair. Hence the human eye γD-crystallin, a protein from the superfamily characterized structurally by the Greek key motif, was studied. The human γD-crystallin was chosen based on the ability of proteins belonging to this superfamily to be involved in the coating of specific structures. Two crystallins were used on the study, the wild type (Protein Data Bank ID: 1HK0) and the mutant protein. The mutant form was intended to induce a strong and quick protein polymerization as well to have new possible points of anchorage to hair. The ability of both crystallins to bind to damaged hair and even penetrate into its cortex was checked by fluorescence microscopy, confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore the reinforcement of hair mechanical resistance, the potential cytotoxic/inflammatory effect of crystallins were studied in order to have a fully comprehension about the protein based formulation. Although the chemical over-bleaching treatment induced a decrease of 20% on the resistance of the hair, the crystallins which bind and penetrate the hair fibre were able to recover and even to improve its mechanical properties when compared to the virgin hair. Moreover none of the crystallins displayed a toxic effect in fibroblasts for all the range of tested concentrations upon 72 h of exposure. The active aggregation process of mutant crystallin induced an inflammatory response in fibroblasts in the first 24 h of contact, measured by the amount of released pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 to the medium. In contrast contact with wild type crystallin did not lead to significant inflammation. Outcome from protein formulation characterization supports the hypothesis that the γD-crystallin it is able to recover and improve the mechanical properties of chemical damaged hair. Therefore it can be considered as a very promising strengthening agent for the

  9. DNA double-strand break repair: a tale of pathway choices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Li; Xingzhi Xu

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid double-strand breaks (DSBs) are cytotoxic lesions that must be repaired either through homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathways.DSB repair is critical for genome integrity,cellular homeostasis and also constitutes the biological foundation for radiotherapy and the majority of chemotherapy.The choice between HR and NHEJ is a complex yet not completely understood process that will entail more future efforts.Herein we review our current understandings about how the choice is made over an antagonizing balance between p53-binding protein 1 and breast cancer 1 in the context of cell cycle stages,downstream effects,and distinct chromosomal histone marks.These exciting areas of research will surely bring more mechanistic insights about DSB repair and be utilized in the clinical settings.

  10. Retrograde ascending aortic dissection during or after thoracic aortic stent graft placement: insight from the European registry on endovascular aortic repair complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggebrecht, Holger; Thompson, Matt; Rousseau, Hervé

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Single-center reports have identified retrograde ascending aortic dissection (rAAD) as a potentially lethal complication of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). METHODS AND RESULTS: Between 1995 and 2008, 28 centers participating in the European Registry on Endovascular Aortic...

  11. Detoxification of olefinic epoxides and nucleotide excision repair of epoxide-mediated DNA damage: Insights from animal models examining human sensitivity to 1,3-butadiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickliffe, Jeffrey K; Herring, Stacy M; Hallberg, Lance M; Galbert, Lori A; Masters, Oscar E; Ammenheuser, Marinel M; Xie, Jingwu; Friedberg, Errol C; Lloyd, R Stephen; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z; Ward, Jonathan B

    2007-03-20

    1,3-Butadiene (BD) is a well-documented mutagen and carcinogen in rodents and is currently classified as a probable carcinogen in humans. Studies investigating workers exposed to BD indicate that, in some plants, there may be an increased genetic risk, and that polymorphisms in biotransformation and DNA repair proteins may modulate genetic susceptibility. To investigate the role of genetic polymorphisms in microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) or nucleotide excision repair (NER) in contributing to the mutagenicity of BD, we conducted a series of experiments in which mice lacking mEH or NER activity were exposed to BD by inhalation or to the reactive epoxide metabolites of BD (epoxybutene-EB or diepoxybutane-DEB) by i.p. injection. Genetic susceptibility was measured using the Hprt cloning assay. Both deficient strains of mouse were significantly more sensitive to the mutagenic effects of BD and the injected epoxides. These studies provide support for the critical role that mEH plays in the biotransformation of BD, and the role that NER plays in maintaining genomic integrity following exposure to BD. Additional studies are needed to examine the importance of base excision repair (BER) in maintaining genomic integrity, the differential formation of DNA and protein adducts in deficient strains, and the potential for enhanced sensitivity to BD genotoxicity in mice either lacking or deficient in both biotransformation and DNA repair activity.

  12. Collective cell migration: a mechanistic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedula, Sri Ram Krishna; Ravasio, Andrea; Lim, Chwee Teck; Ladoux, Benoit

    2013-11-01

    Collective cell migration is fundamental to gaining insights into various important biological processes such as wound healing and cancer metastasis. In particular, recent in vitro studies and in silico simulations suggest that mechanics can explain the social behavior of multicellular clusters to a large extent with minimal knowledge of various cellular signaling pathways. These results suggest that a mechanistic perspective is necessary for a comprehensive and holistic understanding of collective cell migration, and this review aims to provide a broad overview of such a perspective.

  13. New insights in the removal of the hydantoins, oxidation product of pyrimidines, via the base excision and nucleotide incision repair pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Couve, Sophie; Mazouzi, Abdelghani; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Gasparutto, Didier; Saparbaev, Murat

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative damage to DNA, if not repaired, can be both miscoding and blocking. These genetic alterations can lead to mutations and/or cell death, which in turn cause cancer and aging. Oxidized DNA bases are substrates for two overlapping repair pathways: base excision (BER) and nucleotide incision repair (NIR). Hydantoin derivatives such as 5-hydroxyhydantoin (5OH-Hyd) and 5-methyl-5-hydroxyhydantoin (5OH-5Me-Hyd), major products of cytosine and thymine oxidative degradation pathways, respectively, have been detected in cancer cells and ancient DNA. Hydantoins are blocking lesions for DNA polymerases and excised by bacterial and yeast DNA glycosylases in the BER pathway. However little is known about repair of pyrimidine-derived hydantoins in human cells. Here, using both denaturing PAGE and MALDI-TOF MS analyses we report that the bacterial, yeast and human AP endonucleases can incise duplex DNA 5' next to 5OH-Hyd and 5OH-5Me-Hyd thus initiating the NIR pathway. We have fully reconstituted the NIR pathway for these lesions in vitro using purified human proteins. Depletion of Nfo in E. coli and APE1 in HeLa cells abolishes the NIR activity in cell-free extracts. Importantly, a number of redundant DNA glycosylase activities can excise hydantoin residues, including human NTH1, NEIL1 and NEIL2 and the former protein being a major DNA glycosylase activity in HeLa cells extracts. This study demonstrates that both BER and NIR pathways can compete and/or back-up each other to remove hydantoin DNA lesions in vivo.

  14. New insights in the removal of the hydantoins, oxidation product of pyrimidines, via the base excision and nucleotide incision repair pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modesto Redrejo-Rodríguez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oxidative damage to DNA, if not repaired, can be both miscoding and blocking. These genetic alterations can lead to mutations and/or cell death, which in turn cause cancer and aging. Oxidized DNA bases are substrates for two overlapping repair pathways: base excision (BER and nucleotide incision repair (NIR. Hydantoin derivatives such as 5-hydroxyhydantoin (5OH-Hyd and 5-methyl-5-hydroxyhydantoin (5OH-5Me-Hyd, major products of cytosine and thymine oxidative degradation pathways, respectively, have been detected in cancer cells and ancient DNA. Hydantoins are blocking lesions for DNA polymerases and excised by bacterial and yeast DNA glycosylases in the BER pathway. However little is known about repair of pyrimidine-derived hydantoins in human cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, using both denaturing PAGE and MALDI-TOF MS analyses we report that the bacterial, yeast and human AP endonucleases can incise duplex DNA 5' next to 5OH-Hyd and 5OH-5Me-Hyd thus initiating the NIR pathway. We have fully reconstituted the NIR pathway for these lesions in vitro using purified human proteins. Depletion of Nfo in E. coli and APE1 in HeLa cells abolishes the NIR activity in cell-free extracts. Importantly, a number of redundant DNA glycosylase activities can excise hydantoin residues, including human NTH1, NEIL1 and NEIL2 and the former protein being a major DNA glycosylase activity in HeLa cells extracts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates that both BER and NIR pathways can compete and/or back-up each other to remove hydantoin DNA lesions in vivo.

  15. Structural basis for bacterial transcription-coupled DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaconescu, Alexandra M; Chambers, Anna L; Smith, Abigail J; Nickels, Bryce E; Hochschild, Ann; Savery, Nigel J; Darst, Seth A

    2006-02-10

    Coupling of transcription and DNA repair in bacteria is mediated by transcription-repair coupling factor (TRCF, the product of the mfd gene), which removes transcription elongation complexes stalled at DNA lesions and recruits the nucleotide excision repair machinery to the site. Here we describe the 3.2 A-resolution X-ray crystal structure of Escherichia coli TRCF. The structure consists of a compact arrangement of eight domains, including a translocation module similar to the SF2 ATPase RecG, and a region of structural similarity to UvrB. Biochemical and genetic experiments establish that another domain with structural similarity to the Tudor-like domain of the transcription elongation factor NusG plays a critical role in TRCF/RNA polymerase interactions. Comparison with the translocation module of RecG as well as other structural features indicate that TRCF function involves large-scale conformational changes. These data, along with a structural model for the interaction of TRCF with the transcription elongation complex, provide mechanistic insights into TRCF function.

  16. Comparative investigation on cation-cation (Al-Sn) and cation-anion (Al-F) co-doping in RF sputtered ZnO thin films: Mechanistic insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Arindam; Basak, Durga

    2017-07-01

    Herein, we report a comparative mechanistic study on cation-cation (Al-Sn) and cation-anion (Al-F) co-doped nanocrystalline ZnO thin films grown on glass substrate by RF sputtering technique. Through detailed analyses of crystal structure, surface morphology, microstructure, UV-VIS-NIR transmission-reflection and electrical transport property, the inherent characteristics of the co-doped films were revealed and compared. All the nanocrystalline films retain the hexagonal wurtzite structure of ZnO and show transparency above 90% in the visible and NIR region. As opposed to expectation, Al-Sn (ATZO) co-doped film show no enhanced carrier concentration consistent with the probable formation of SnO2 clusters supported by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study. Most interestingly, it has been found that Al-F (AFZO) co-doped film shows three times enhanced carrier concentration as compared to Al doped and Al-Sn co-doped films attaining a value of ∼9 × 1020 cm-3 due to the respective cation and anion substitution. The carrier relaxation time increases in AFZO while it decreases significantly for ATZO film consistent with the concurrence of the impurity scattering in the latter.

  17. Tendon repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repair of tendon ... Tendon repair can be performed using: Local anesthesia (the immediate area of the surgery is pain-free) ... a cut on the skin over the injured tendon. The damaged or torn ends of the tendon ...

  18. Longer Left Ventricular Electric Delay Reduces Mitral Regurgitation After Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy: Mechanistic Insights From the SMART-AV Study (SmartDelay Determined AV Optimization: A Comparison to Other AV Delay Methods Used in Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Neal A; Gold, Michael R; Waggoner, Alan D; Picard, Michael H; Stein, Kenneth M; Yu, Yinghong; Meyer, Timothy E; Wold, Nicholas; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A; Singh, Jagmeet P

    2016-11-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is associated with worse survival in those undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Left ventricular (LV) lead position in CRT may ameliorate mechanisms of MR. We examine the association between a longer LV electric delay (QLV) at the LV stimulation site and MR reduction after CRT. QLV was assessed retrospectively in 426 patients enrolled in the SMART-AV study (SmartDelay Determined AV Optimization: A Comparison to Other AV Delay Methods Used in CRT). QLV was defined as the time from QRS onset to the first large peak of the LV electrogram. Linear regression and logistic regression were used to assess the association between baseline QLV and MR reduction at 6 months (absolute change in vena contracta width and odds of ≥1 grade reduction in MR). At baseline, there was no difference in MR grade, LV dyssynchrony, or LV volumes in those with QLV above versus below the median (95 ms). After multivariable adjustment, increasing QLV was an independent predictor of MR reduction at 6 months as reflected by an increased odds of MR response (odds ratio: 1.13 [1.03-1.25]/10 ms increase QLV; P=0.02) and a decrease in vena contracta width (P<0.001). At 3 months, longer QLV (≥median) was associated with significant decrease in LV end-systolic volume (ΔLV end-systolic volume -28.2±38.9 versus -4.9±33.8 mL, P<0.001). Adjustment for 3-month ΔLV end-systolic volume attenuated the association between QLV and 6-month MR reduction. In patients undergoing CRT, longer QLV was an independent predictor of MR reduction at 6 months and associated with interval 3-month LV reverse remodeling. These findings provide a mechanistic basis for using an electric-targeting LV lead strategy at the time of CRT implant. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Mechanistic insights into a novel chromone-appended Cu(II) anticancer drug entity: in vitro binding profile with DNA/RNA substrates and cytotoxic activity against MCF-7 and HepG2 cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousuf, Imtiyaz; Arjmand, Farukh; Tabassum, Sartaj; Toupet, Loic; Khan, Rais Ahmad; Siddiqui, Maqsood Ahmad

    2015-06-14

    A new chromone-appended Cu(ii) drug entity () was designed and synthesized as a potential anticancer chemotherapeutic agent. The structural elucidation was carried out thoroughly by elemental analysis, FT-IR, EPR, ESI-MS and single crystal X-ray crystallography. Complex resulted from the in situ methoxylation reaction of the 3-formylchromone ligand and its subsequent complexation with the copper nitrate salt in a 2 : 1 ratio, respectively. crystallized in the monoclinic P21/c space group possessing the lattice parameters, a = 8.75 Å, b = 5.07 Å, c = 26.22 Å, α = γ = 90°, β = 96.3° per unit cell. Furthermore, in vitro interaction studies of with ct-DNA and tRNA were carried out which suggested more avid binding propensity towards the RNA target via intercalative mode, which was reflected from its Kb, K and Ksv values. The gel electrophoretic mobility assay was carried out on the pBR322 plasmid DNA substrate, to ascertain the cleaving ability and the mechanistic pathway in the presence of additives, and the results revealed the efficient cleaving ability of via the oxidative pathway. In vitro cell growth inhibition via the MTT assay was carried out to evaluate the cytotoxicity of complex and IC50 values were found to be in the range of 5-10 μg mL(-1) in HepG2 and MCF-7 cancer cell lines, which were found to be much lower than the IC50 values of previously reported similar Cu(ii) complexes. Additionally, in the presence of , reactive oxygen species (ROS) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) levels in the tested cancer cell lines increased significantly, coupled with reduced glutathione (GSH) levels. Thus, our results suggested that ROS plays an important role in cell apoptosis induced by the Cu(ii) complex and validates its potential to act as a robust anticancer drug entity.

  20. Application of a 5-tiered scheme for standardized classification of 2,360 unique mismatch repair gene variants in the InSiGHT locus-specific database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, Bryony A.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Plazzer, John-Paul; Greenblatt, Marc S.; Akagi, Kiwamu; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Bapat, Bharati; Bernstein, Inge; Capella, Gabriel; den Dunnen, Johan T.; du Sart, Desiree; Fabre, Aurelie; Farrell, Michael P.; Farrington, Susan M.; Frayling, Ian M.; Frebourg, Thierry; Goldgar, David E.; Heinen, Christopher D.; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Kohonen-Corish, Maija; Robinson, Kristina Lagerstedt; Leung, Suet Yi; Martins, Alexandra; Moller, Pal; Morak, Monika; Nystrom, Minna; Peltomaki, Paivi; Pineda, Marta; Qi, Ming; Ramesar, Rajkumar; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte; Scott, Rodney J.; Sijmons, Rolf; Tavtigian, Sean V.; Tops, Carli M.; Weber, Thomas; Wijnen, Juul; Woods, Michael O.; Macrae, Finlay; Genuardi, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    The clinical classification of hereditary sequence variants identified in disease-related genes directly affects clinical management of patients and their relatives. The International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumours (InSiGHT) undertook a collaborative effort to develop, test and appl

  1. Application of a 5-tiered scheme for standardized classification of 2,360 unique mismatch repair gene variants in the InSiGHT locus-specific database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Bryony A; Spurdle, Amanda B; Plazzer, John-Paul

    2014-01-01

    The clinical classification of hereditary sequence variants identified in disease-related genes directly affects clinical management of patients and their relatives. The International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumours (InSiGHT) undertook a collaborative effort to develop, test and a...

  2. Mechanistic studies of olefin metathesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grubbs, R.H.

    1979-03-01

    A review covers studies of the olefin metathesis mechanism which indicated that the reaction proceeds by a non-pairwise mechanism; detailed mechanistic studies on the homogeneously and heterogeneously catalyzed metathesis; and stereochemical investigations.

  3. From mechanistic to functional behaviorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxley, R A

    1992-11-01

    A shift from mechanistic behaviorism to functional behaviorism is presented against the background of two historical traditions, one with an emphasis on form, the other with an emphasis on function. Skinner's work, which made more contributions to a functional behaviorism than to a mechanistic behaviorism, exemplifies this shift. The two traditions and an account of Skinner's development of functional relations are presented in order to show Skinner's contributions to aligning modern behavior analysis with the functional tradition.

  4. Bladder exstrophy repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladder birth defect repair; Everted bladder repair; Exposed bladder repair; Repair of bladder exstrophy ... Bladder exstrophy repair involves two surgeries. The first surgery is to repair the bladder and the second one is to attach ...

  5. The Polycomb Group Protein EZH2 Impairs DNA Repair in Breast Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Zeidler

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The Polycomb group protein EZH2 is a transcriptional repressor involved in controlling cellular memory and has been linked to aggressive and metastatic breast cancer. Here we report that EZH2 decreased the expression of five RAD51 paralog proteins involved in homologous recombination (HR repair of DNA doublestrand breaks (RAD51B/RAD51L1, RAD51C/RAD51L2, RAD51D/RAD51L3, XRCC2, and XRCC3, but did not affect the levels of DMC1, a gene that only functions in meiosis. EZH2 overexpression impaired the formation of RAD51 repair foci at sites of DNA breaks. Overexpression of EZH2 resulted in decreased cell survival and clonogenic capacity following DNA damage induced independently by etoposide and ionizing radiation. We suggest that EZH2 may contribute to breast tumorigenesis by specific downregulation of RAD51-like proteins and by impairment of HR repair. We provide mechanistic insights into the function of EZH2 in mammalian cells and uncover a link between EZH2, a regulator of homeotic gene expression, and HR DNA repair. Our study paves the way for exploring the blockade of EZH2 overexpression as a novel approach for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer.

  6. Fusion tyrosine kinase NPM-ALK Deregulates MSH2 and suppresses DNA mismatch repair function novel insights into a potent oncoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Leah C; Bone, Kathleen M; Wang, Peng; Wu, Fang; Adam, Benjamin A; Hegazy, Samar; Gelebart, Pascal; Holovati, Jelena; Li, Liang; Andrew, Susan E; Lai, Raymond

    2011-07-01

    The fusion tyrosine kinase NPM-ALK is central to the pathogenesis of ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALK(+)ALCL). We recently identified that MSH2, a key DNA mismatch repair (MMR) protein integral to the suppression of tumorigenesis, is an NPM-ALK-interacting protein. In this study, we found in vitro evidence that enforced expression of NPM-ALK in HEK293 cells suppressed MMR function. Correlating with these findings, six of nine ALK(+)ALCL tumors displayed evidence of microsatellite instability, as opposed to none of the eight normal DNA control samples (P = 0.007, Student's t-test). Using co-immunoprecipitation, we found that increasing levels of NPM-ALK expression in HEK293 cells resulted in decreased levels of MSH6 bound to MSH2, whereas MSH2·NPM-ALK binding was increased. The NPM-ALK·MSH2 interaction was dependent on the activation/autophosphorylation of NPM-ALK, and the Y191 residue of NPM-ALK was a crucial site for this interaction and NPM-ALK-mediated MMR suppression. MSH2 was found to be tyrosine phosphorylated in the presence of NPM-ALK. Finally, NPM-ALK impeded the expected DNA damage-induced translocation of MSH2 out of the cytoplasm. To conclude, our data support a model in which the suppression of MMR by NPM-ALK is attributed to its ability to interfere with normal MSH2 biochemistry and function.

  7. Reaction Coordinates and Mechanistic Hypothesis Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Baron

    2016-05-27

    Reaction coordinates are integral to several classic rate theories that can (a) predict kinetic trends across conditions and homologous reactions, (b) extract activation parameters with a clear physical interpretation from experimental rates, and (c) enable efficient calculations of free energy barriers and rates. New trajectory-based rare events methods can provide rates directly from dynamical trajectories without a reaction coordinate. Trajectory-based frameworks can also generate ideal (but abstract) reaction coordinates such as committors and eigenfunctions of the master equation. However, rates and mechanistic insights obtained from trajectory-based methods and abstract coordinates are not readily generalized across simulation conditions or reaction families. We discuss methods for identifying physically meaningful reaction coordinates, including committor analysis, variational transition state theory, Kramers-Langer-Berezhkovskii-Szabo theory, and statistical inference methods that can use path sampling data to screen, mix, and optimize thousands of trial coordinates. Special focus is given to likelihood maximization and inertial likelihood maximization approaches.

  8. Reaction Coordinates and Mechanistic Hypothesis Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Baron

    2016-05-01

    Reaction coordinates are integral to several classic rate theories that can (a) predict kinetic trends across conditions and homologous reactions, (b) extract activation parameters with a clear physical interpretation from experimental rates, and (c) enable efficient calculations of free energy barriers and rates. New trajectory-based rare events methods can provide rates directly from dynamical trajectories without a reaction coordinate. Trajectory-based frameworks can also generate ideal (but abstract) reaction coordinates such as committors and eigenfunctions of the master equation. However, rates and mechanistic insights obtained from trajectory-based methods and abstract coordinates are not readily generalized across simulation conditions or reaction families. We discuss methods for identifying physically meaningful reaction coordinates, including committor analysis, variational transition state theory, Kramers-Langer-Berezhkovskii-Szabo theory, and statistical inference methods that can use path sampling data to screen, mix, and optimize thousands of trial coordinates. Special focus is given to likelihood maximization and inertial likelihood maximization approaches.

  9. Bone repair and stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Noriaki; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2016-10-01

    Bones are an important component of vertebrates; they grow explosively in early life and maintain their strength throughout life. Bones also possess amazing capabilities to repair-the bone is like new without a scar after complete repair. In recent years, a substantial progress has been made in our understanding on mammalian bone stem cells. Mouse genetic models are powerful tools to understand the cell lineage, giving us better insights into stem cells that regulate bone growth, maintenance and repair. Recent findings about these stem cells raise new questions that require further investigations.

  10. Recurrent Glioblastomas Reveal Molecular Subtypes Associated with Mechanistic Implications of Drug-Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Mee Kwon

    Full Text Available Previously, transcriptomic profiling studies have shown distinct molecular subtypes of glioblastomas. It has also been suggested that the recurrence of glioblastomas could be achieved by transcriptomic reprograming of tumors, however, their characteristics are not yet fully understood. Here, to gain the mechanistic insights on the molecular phenotypes of recurrent glioblastomas, gene expression profiling was performed on the 43 cases of glioblastomas including 15 paired primary and recurrent cases. Unsupervised clustering analyses revealed two subtypes of G1 and G2, which were characterized by proliferation and neuron-like gene expression traits, respectively. While the primary tumors were classified as G1 subtype, the recurrent glioblastomas showed two distinct expression types. Compared to paired primary tumors, the recurrent tumors in G1 subtype did not show expression alteration. By contrast, the recurrent tumors in G2 subtype showed expression changes from proliferation type to neuron-like one. We also observed the expression of stemness-related genes in G1 recurrent tumors and the altered expression of DNA-repair genes (i.e., AURK, HOX, MGMT, and MSH6 in the G2 recurrent tumors, which might be responsible for the acquisition of drug resistance mechanism during tumor recurrence in a subtype-specific manner. We suggest that recurrent glioblastomas may choose two different strategies for transcriptomic reprograming to escape the chemotherapeutic treatment during tumor recurrence. Our results might be helpful to determine personalized therapeutic strategy against heterogeneous glioma recurrence.

  11. Hypospadias repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the problem. If the repair is not done, problems may occur later on such as: Difficulty controlling and directing urine stream A curve in the penis during erection Decreased fertility Embarrassment about appearance of penis Surgery ...

  12. Describing dengue epidemics: Insights from simple mechanistic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Maíra; Stollenwerk, Nico; Kooi, Bob W.

    2012-09-01

    We present a set of nested models to be applied to dengue fever epidemiology. We perform a qualitative study in order to show how much complexity we really need to add into epidemiological models to be able to describe the fluctuations observed in empirical dengue hemorrhagic fever incidence data offering a promising perspective on inference of parameter values from dengue case notifications.

  13. Mechanistic insights into a classic wonder drug--aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jinping; Zhou, Yanzi; Xie, Daiqian; Zhang, Yingkai

    2015-01-14

    Aspirin, one of the oldest and most common anti-inflammatory agents, has recently been shown to reduce cancer risks. The principal pharmacological effects of aspirin are known to arise from its covalent modification of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) through acetylation of Ser530, but the detailed mechanism of its biochemical action and specificity remains to be elucidated. In this work, we have filled this gap by employing a state-of-the-art computational approach, Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations with ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical potential and umbrella sampling. Our studies have characterized a substrate-assisted inhibition mechanism for aspirin acetylating COX: it proceeds in two successive stages with a metastable tetrahedral intermediate, in which the carboxyl group of aspirin serves as the general base. The computational results confirmed that aspirin would be 10-100 times more potent against COX-1 than against COX-2, and revealed that this inhibition specificity between the two COX isoforms can be attributed mainly to the difference in kinetics rate of the covalent inhibition reaction, not the aspirin-binding step. The structural origin of this differential inhibition of the COX enzymes by aspirin has also been elucidated.

  14. Mechanistic insights into seeded growth processes of gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polte, Jörg; Herder, Martin; Erler, Robert; Rolf, Simone; Fischer, Anna; Würth, Christian; Thünemann, Andreas F.; Kraehnert, Ralph; Emmerling, Franziska

    2010-11-01

    A facile approach for the synthesis of monodisperse gold nanoparticles with radii in the range of 7 to 20 nm is presented. Starting from monodisperse seeds with radii of 7 nm, produced in the first step, the addition of a defined amount of additional precursor material permits distinct size regulation and the realization of predicted nanoparticle sizes. These information were derived from ex- and in situ investigations by comprehensive small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and UV-Vis data to obtain information on the physicochemical mechanisms. The obtained mechanisms can be transferred to other seeded growth processes. Compared to similar approaches, the presented synthesis route circumvents the use of different reducing or stabilizing agents. The size of resulting nanoparticles can be varied over a large size range presented for the first time without a measurable change in the shape, polydispersity or surface chemistry. Thus, the resulting nanoparticles are ideal candidates for size dependence investigations.A facile approach for the synthesis of monodisperse gold nanoparticles with radii in the range of 7 to 20 nm is presented. Starting from monodisperse seeds with radii of 7 nm, produced in the first step, the addition of a defined amount of additional precursor material permits distinct size regulation and the realization of predicted nanoparticle sizes. These information were derived from ex- and in situ investigations by comprehensive small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and UV-Vis data to obtain information on the physicochemical mechanisms. The obtained mechanisms can be transferred to other seeded growth processes. Compared to similar approaches, the presented synthesis route circumvents the use of different reducing or stabilizing agents. The size of resulting nanoparticles can be varied over a large size range presented for the first time without a measurable change in the shape, polydispersity or surface chemistry. Thus, the resulting nanoparticles are ideal candidates for size dependence investigations. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional data. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00541j

  15. Synthesis, characterization and mechanistic insights of mycogenic iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhargava, Arpit; Jain, Navin; Manju Barathi L [Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Centre for Biotechnology, Department of Biological Sciences (India); Akhtar, Mohd Sayeed [Jimma University, Department of Applied Microbiology, College of Natural Sciences (Ethiopia); Yun, Yeoung-Sang [Chonbuk National University, Division of Environmental and Chemical Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Panwar, Jitendra, E-mail: drjitendrapanwar@yahoo.co.in [Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Centre for Biotechnology, Department of Biological Sciences (India)

    2013-11-15

    In the present study, extracellular synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) was achieved using Aspergillus japonicus isolate AJP01. The isolate demonstrated its ability to hydrolyze the precursor salt solution, a mixture of iron cyanide complexes, under ambient conditions. Hydrolysis of these complexes released ferric and ferrous ions, which underwent protein-mediated coprecipitation and controlled nucleation resulting in the formation of IONPs. Transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction pattern, energy dispersive spectroscopy and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the mycosynthesis of IONPs. The synthesized particles were cubic in shape with a size range of 60–70 nm with crystal structure corresponding to magnetite. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed the absence of IONPs on fungal biomass surface, indicating the extracellular nature of synthesis. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the presence of proteins on as-synthesised IONPs, which may confer their stability. Preliminary investigation indicated the role of proteins in the synthesis and stabilization of IONPs. On the basis of present findings, a probable mechanism for synthesis of IONPs is suggested. The simplicity and versatility of the present approach can be utilized for the synthesis of other nanomaterials.

  16. Metabolic diseases and pro- and prebiotics: Mechanistic insights

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura Yukiko K; Omaye Stanley T

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Metabolic diseases, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes, are world-wide health problems. The prevalence of metabolic diseases is associated with dynamic changes in dietary macronutrient intake during the past decades. Based on national statistics and from a public health viewpoint, traditional approaches, such as diet and physical activity, have been unsuccessful in decreasing the prevalence of metabolic diseases. Since the approaches strongly rely on individual’s behavior and motiva...

  17. A mechanistic insight into MDMA-mediated hepatotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antolino Lobo, I.

    2011-01-01

    methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, Ecstasy) is a popular drug of abuse among young people that can induce adverse effects. However, these effects lack a specific pattern, as consumption quantities are not correlated with the initiation and severity of the injury. MDMA can cause drug-induced liver

  18. Mechanistic insights on cooperative asymmetric multicatalysis using chiral counterions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Garima; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2014-08-15

    Cooperative multicatalytic methods are steadily gaining popularity in asymmetric catalysis. The use of chiral Brønsted acids such as phosphoric acids in conjunction with a range of transition metals has been proven to be effective in asymmetric synthesis. However, the lack of molecular-level understanding and the accompanying ambiguity on the role of the chiral species in stereoinduction continues to remain an unresolved puzzle. Herein, we intend to disclose some novel transition state models obtained through DFT(B3LYP and M06) computations for a quintessential reaction in this family, namely, palladium-catalyzed asymmetric Tsuji-Trost allylation of aldehydes. The aldehyde is activated as an enamine by the action of a secondary amine (organocatalysis), which then adds to an activated Pd-allylic species (transition metal catalysis) generated through the protonation of allyic alcohol by chiral BINOL-phosphoric acid (Brønsted acid catalysis). We aim to decipher the nature of chiral BINOL-phosphates and their role in creating a quaternary chiral carbon atom in this triple catalytic system. The study reports the first transition state model capable of rationalizing chiral counterion-induced enantioselectivity. It is found that the chiral phosphate acts as a counterion in the stereocontrolling event rather than the conventional ligand mode.

  19. Obesity and cancer: mechanistic insights from transdisciplinary studies

    OpenAIRE

    Allott, Emma H.; Hursting, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a range of health outcomes that are of clinical and public health significance, including cancer. Herein, we summarize epidemiologic and preclinical evidence for an association between obesity and increased risk of breast and prostate cancer incidence and mortality. Moreover, we describe data from observational studies of weight change in humans and from calorie restriction studies in mouse models which support a potential role for weight loss in counteracting tumor...

  20. Inhibition of insulin fibrillation by osmolytes: Mechanistic Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Sinjan; Kishore, Nand; Hosur, Ramakrishna V.

    2015-11-01

    We have studied here using a number of biophysical tools the effects of osmolytes, betaine, citrulline, proline and sorbitol which differ significantly in terms of their physical characteristics such as, charge distribution, polarity, H-bonding abilities etc, on the fibrillation of insulin. Among these, betaine, citrulline, and proline are very effective in decreasing the extent of fibrillation. Proline also causes a substantial delay in the onset of fibrillation in the concentration range (50-250 mM) whereas such an effect is seen for citrulline only at 250 mM, and in case of betaine this effect is not seen at all in the whole concentration range. The enthalpies of interaction at various stages of fibrillation process have suggested that the preferential exclusion of the osmolyte and its polar interaction with the protein are important in inhibition. The results indicate that the osmolytes are most effective when added prior to the elongation stage of fibrillation. These observations have significant biological implications, since insulin fibrillation is known to cause injection amyloidosis and our data may help in designing lead drug molecules and development of potential therapeutic strategies.

  1. Reprogramming of B cells into macrophages: mechanistic insights

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Recientemente, nuestro grupo ha demostrado que las células pre-B se pueden reprogramar a macrófagos mediante la sobreexpresión del factor de transcripción C/EBP, con una eficiencia elevada. Así mismo, mediante la expresión de la forma inducible de C/EBP en una línea de células pre-B (C11), éstas también se puede convertir en células similares a macrófagos. Usando este sistema hemos estudiado si durante el proceso de trans-diferenciacion las células requieren volver a un estadio de célula pr...

  2. Testicular dysgenesis syndrome: mechanistic insights and potential new downstream effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharpe, R.M.; Skakkebæk, Niels Erik

    2008-01-01

    Reproductive disorders of newborn (cryptorchidism, hypospadias) and young adult males (low sperm counts, testicular germ cell cancer) are common and/or increasing in incidence. It has been hypothesized that these disorders may comprise a testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS) with a common origin...

  3. Mechanistic insights into the regulation of metabolic enzymes by acetylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The activity of metabolic enzymes is controlled by three principle levels: the amount of enzyme, the catalytic activity, and the accessibility of substrates. Reversible lysine acetylation is emerging as a major regulatory mechanism in metabolism that is involved in all three levels of controlling metabolic enzymes and is altered frequently in human diseases. Acetylation rivals other common posttranslational modifications in cell regulation not only in the number of substrates it modifies, but also the variety of regulatory mechanisms it facilitates. PMID:22826120

  4. Mechanistic insights into C-H amination via dicopper nitrenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguila, Mae Joanne B; Badiei, Yosra M; Warren, Timothy H

    2013-06-26

    We examine important reactivity pathways relevant to stoichiometric and catalytic C-H amination via isolable β-diketiminato dicopper alkylnitrene intermediates {[Cl2NN]Cu}2(μ-NR). Kinetic studies involving the stoichiometric amination of ethylbenzene by {[Cl2NN]Cu}2(μ-N(t)Bu) (3) demonstrate that the terminal nitrene [Cl2NN]Cu═N(t)Bu is the active intermediate in C-H amination. Initial rates exhibit saturation behavior at high ethylbenzene loadings and an inverse dependence on the copper species [Cl2NN]Cu, both consistent with dissociation of a [Cl2NN]Cu fragment from 3 prior to C-H amination. C-H amination experiments employing 1,4-dimethylcyclohexane and benzylic radical clock substrate support a stepwise H-atom abstraction/radical rebound pathway. Dicopper nitrenes [Cu]2(μ-NCHRR') derived from 1° and 2° alkylazides are unstable toward tautomerization to copper(I) imine complexes [Cu](HN═CRR'), rendering 1° and 2° alkylnitrene complexes unsuitable for C-H amination.

  5. Hypochloremia and Diuretic Resistance in Heart Failure : Mechanistic Insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanberg, Jennifer S; Rao, Veena; Ter Maaten, Jozine M; Laur, Olga; Brisco, Meredith A; Perry Wilson, F; Grodin, Justin L; Assefa, Mahlet; Samuel Broughton, J; Planavsky, Noah J; Ahmad, Tariq; Bellumkonda, Lavanya; Tang, W H Wilson; Parikh, Chirag R; Testani, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent epidemiological studies have implicated chloride, rather than sodium, as the driver of poor survival previously attributed to hyponatremia in heart failure. Accumulating basic science evidence has identified chloride as a critical factor in renal salt sensing. Our goal was to prob

  6. A mechanistic insight into MDMA-mediated hepatotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antolino Lobo, I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833088

    2011-01-01

    methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, Ecstasy) is a popular drug of abuse among young people that can induce adverse effects. However, these effects lack a specific pattern, as consumption quantities are not correlated with the initiation and severity of the injury. MDMA can cause drug-induced liver

  7. Mechanistic and therapeutic insights gained from studying rare skeletal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Laura L; Warman, Matthew L

    2015-07-01

    Rare bone diseases account for 5% of all birth defects and can cause significant morbidity throughout patients' lives. Significant progress is being made to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these diseases. This paper summarizes presentation highlights of a workshop on Rare Skeletal Diseases convened to explore how the study of rare diseases has influenced the field's understanding of bone anabolism and catabolism and directed the search for new therapies benefiting patients with rare conditions as well as patients with common skeletal disorders.

  8. New mechanistic insight in the gold-based propene epoxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parvulescu, E.

    2009-01-01

    Propene oxide is a very important intermediate for the synthesis of commercial products, including adhesives, paints, and cosmetics. The gas-phase epoxidation of propene over Au/Ti-based catalysts is an intriguing scientific topic, not only because of the industrial importance of the production of p

  9. Cardiac disease and arrhythmogenesis: Mechanistic insights from mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lois Choy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The mouse is the second mammalian species, after the human, in which substantial amount of the genomic information has been analyzed. With advances in transgenic technology, mutagenesis is now much easier to carry out in mice. Consequently, an increasing number of transgenic mouse systems have been generated for the study of cardiac arrhythmias in ion channelopathies and cardiomyopathies. Mouse hearts are also amenable to physical manipulation such as coronary artery ligation and transverse aortic constriction to induce heart failure, radiofrequency ablation of the AV node to model complete AV block and even implantation of a miniature pacemaker to induce cardiac dyssynchrony. Last but not least, pharmacological models, despite being simplistic, have enabled us to understand the physiological mechanisms of arrhythmias and evaluate the anti-arrhythmic properties of experimental agents, such as gap junction modulators, that may be exert therapeutic effects in other cardiac diseases. In this article, we examine these in turn, demonstrating that primary inherited arrhythmic syndromes are now recognized to be more complex than abnormality in a particular ion channel, involving alterations in gene expression and structural remodelling. Conversely, in cardiomyopathies and heart failure, mutations in ion channels and proteins have been identified as underlying causes, and electrophysiological remodelling are recognized pathological features. Transgenic techniques causing mutagenesis in mice are extremely powerful in dissecting the relative contributions of different genes play in producing disease phenotypes. Mouse models can serve as useful systems in which to explore how protein defects contribute to arrhythmias and direct future therapy.

  10. Synthetic and mechanistic insight into nosylation of glycine residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stuhr-Hansen, Nicolai; Sølling, Theis Ivan; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    The Fukuyama-Mitsunobu alkylation procedure is widely used to introduce alkyl substituents to amino groups in general and N-alkylation of peptides in particular. Here we have investigated the procedure in detail for N-alkylation of peptides with N-terminal glycine residues, based on the observati...

  11. Mechanistic Insights Into Filamentous Phage Integration In Vibrio cholerae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhabatosh eDas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of acute diarrhoeal disease cholera, harbors large numbers of lysogenic filamentous phages, contribute significantly to the host pathogenesis and provide fitness factors to the pathogen that help the bacterium to survive in natural environment. Most of the vibriophage genomes are not equipped with integrase and thus exploit two host-encoded tyrosine recombinases, XerC and XerD, for lysogenic conversion. Integration is site-specific and it occurs at dimer resolution site (dif of either one or both chromosomes of V. cholerae. Each dif sequence contains two recombinase-binding sequences flanking a central region. The integration follows a sequential strand exchanges between dif and attP sites within a DNA-protein complex consisting of one pair of each recombinase and two DNA fragments. During entire process of recombination, both the DNA components and recombinases of the synaptic complex keep transiently interconnected. Within the context of synaptic complex, both of the actuated enzymes mediate cleavage of phosphodiester bonds. First cleavage generates a phosphotyrosyl-linked recombinase-DNA complex at the recombinase binding sequence and free 5’-hydroxyl end at the first base of the central region. Following the cleavage, the exposed bases with 5’-hydroxyl ends of the central region of dif and attP sites melt from their complementary strands and react with the recombinase-DNA phosphotyrosyl linkage of their recombining partner. Subsequent ligation between dif and attP strands requires complementary base pair interactions at the site of phosphodiester bond formation. Integration mechanism is mostly influenced by the compatibility of dif and attP sequences. dif sites are highly conserved across bacterial phyla. Different phage genomes have different attP sequences; therefore they rely on different mechanisms for integration. Here, I review our current understanding of integration mechanisms used by the vibriophages.

  12. Mechanistic individualism versus organistic totalitarianism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.J. Venter

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Mechanistic individualism versus organistic totalitarianismIn this article it is argued that the organistic world picture, when functioning as a world view, is associated with a totalitarian view of social relationships, usually promoting the interests o f the state or the ethnic group as the interests which should dominate. This is illustrated by referring to the social ideas of Hobbes, Rousseau, D.H. Lawrence and Mussolini. The mechanistic world picture, however, when functioning as a world view, is associated with individualism, according to which the individuals have a relatively independent existence; it suggests that justice and morality are the automatic products of the equilibrating process. Cases in point: Hobbes, Adam Smith, Kant, Darwin, New-Classical and Monetarist economics. Finally (in Neo-Calvinist vein it is argued that the application o f such worldviewish metaphors should be limited, so that justice can be done to both the differentiation of social relationships and their integration.

  13. Femoral hernia repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Femorocele repair; Herniorrhaphy; Hernioplasty - femoral ... During surgery to repair the hernia, the bulging tissue is pushed back in. The weakened area is sewn closed or strengthened. This repair ...

  14. Undescended testicle repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchidopexy; Inguinal orchidopexy; Orchiopexy; Repair of undescended testicle; Cryptorchidism repair ... first year of life without treatment. Undescended testicle repair surgery is recommended for patients whose testicles do ...

  15. Intestinal obstruction repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repair of volvulus; Intestinal volvulus - repair; Bowel obstruction - repair ... Intestinal obstruction repair is done while you are under general anesthesia . This means you are asleep and DO NOT feel pain. ...

  16. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    Science.gov (United States)

    EVAR; Endovascular aneurysm repair - aorta; AAA repair - endovascular; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular ... Endovascular aortic repair is done because your aneurysm is very large, growing quickly, or is leaking or bleeding. You may have ...

  17. Motorcycle Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Jim; Bundy, Mike

    This motorcycle repair curriculum guide contains the following ten areas of study: brake systems, clutches, constant mesh transmissions, final drives, suspension, mechanical starting mechanisms, electrical systems, fuel systems, lubrication systems, and overhead camshafts. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction. Each instructional…

  18. Turbine repair process, repaired coating, and repaired turbine component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Rupak; Delvaux, John McConnell; Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-11-03

    A turbine repair process, a repaired coating, and a repaired turbine component are disclosed. The turbine repair process includes providing a turbine component having a higher-pressure region and a lower-pressure region, introducing particles into the higher-pressure region, and at least partially repairing an opening between the higher-pressure region and the lower-pressure region with at least one of the particles to form a repaired turbine component. The repaired coating includes a silicon material, a ceramic matrix composite material, and a repaired region having the silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material. The repaired turbine component a ceramic matrix composite layer and a repaired region having silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material.

  19. HTGR Mechanistic Source Terms White Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayne Moe

    2010-07-01

    The primary purposes of this white paper are: (1) to describe the proposed approach for developing event specific mechanistic source terms for HTGR design and licensing, (2) to describe the technology development programs required to validate the design methods used to predict these mechanistic source terms and (3) to obtain agreement from the NRC that, subject to appropriate validation through the technology development program, the approach for developing event specific mechanistic source terms is acceptable

  20. Mechanistic study on the ruthenium-catalyzed direct amination of alcohols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pingen, Dennis; Lutz, Martin; Vogt, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    The Ru-catalyzed direct amination of alcohols with ammonia was investigated for the RuHCl(CO)(PPh3)3/Xantphos system in order to gain mechanistic insight. For several Ru(II) precursor complexes the influence of different additives on catalytic performance was investigated. NMR studies revealed that

  1. Rational and Mechanistic Perspectives on Reinforcement Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chater, Nick

    2009-01-01

    This special issue describes important recent developments in applying reinforcement learning models to capture neural and cognitive function. But reinforcement learning, as a theoretical framework, can apply at two very different levels of description: "mechanistic" and "rational." Reinforcement learning is often viewed in mechanistic terms--as…

  2. Models of the behaviour of (thermally stressed) microbial spores in foods: Tools to study mechanisms of damage and repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Beek, A.; Hornstra, L.M.; Pandey, R.; Kallemeijn, W.W.; Smelt, J.P.P.M.; Manders, E.M.M.; Brul, S.

    2011-01-01

    The ‘Omics’ revolution has brought a wealth of new mechanistic insights in many fields of biology. It offers options to base predictions of microbial behaviour on mechanistic insight. As the cellular mechanisms involved often turn out to be highly intertwined it is crucial that model development aim

  3. Noncanonical IFN Signaling: Mechanistic Linkage of Genetic and Epigenetic Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard M. Johnson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The canonical model of cytokine signaling via the JAK/STAT pathway dominates our view of signal transduction but provides no insight into the significance of the simultaneous presence of activated JAKs and STATs in the nucleus of cells treated with cytokines. Such a mechanistic shortcoming challenges the usefulness of the model in its present form. Focusing on the interferon (IFN cytokines, we have developed a noncanonical model of IFN signaling that naturally connects activated JAKs and STATs at or near response elements of genes that are activated by the IFNs. Specifically, cells treated with IFNγ showed association of activated STAT1α and JAK2 at the GAS element of genes activated by IFNγ. For IFNα treated cells, the association involved activated STAT1α and TYK2 JAK kinase at the ISRE promoter. The power of the noncanonical model is that it provides mechanistic insight into specific gene activation at the level of the associated epigenetics, akin to that of steroid/steroid receptor signaling.

  4. DFT mechanistic study of the selective terminal C–H activation of n-pentane with a tungsten allyl nitrosyl complex

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Richmond; Tan, Davin; Liu, Chaoli; Li, Huaifeng; Guo, Hao; Shyue, Jing-Jong; Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Mechanistic insights into the selective C–H terminal activation of n-pentane with tungsten allyl nitrosyl complex reported by Legzdins were gained by employing density functional theory with B3LYP hybrid functional. Using...

  5. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lazy eye repair - discharge; Strabismus repair - discharge; Extraocular muscle surgery - discharge ... You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle ... term for crossed eyes is strabismus. Children most often ...

  6. Ventral hernia repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007661.htm Ventral hernia repair To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Ventral hernia repair is surgery to repair a ventral hernia. ...

  7. Brain aneurysm repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  8. Mfd as a central partner of transcription coupled repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnet, Jordan; Grange, Wilfried; Strick, Terence R; Joly, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is one of the key of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathways required to preserve genome integrity. Although understanding TCR is still a major challenge, recent single-molecule experiments have brought new insights into the initial steps of TCR leading to new perspectives.

  9. Haemophilus influenzae does not fit theories of postreplication repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlow, J K; Notani, N K

    1980-01-01

    Studies with Escherichia coli have provided all the initial insights into the molecular bases of repair processes. It is the thesis of this article that especially if we believe that there are some general mechanisms in nature, it is important to consider more than one microorganism in arriving at an understanding of the biology of repair of DNA.

  10. DNA repair. [UV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlow, R.

    1978-01-01

    Some topics discussed are as follows: difficulty in extrapolating data from E. coli to mammalian systems; mutations caused by UV-induced changes in DNA; mutants deficient in excision repair; other postreplication mechanisms; kinds of excision repair systems; detection of repair by biochemical or biophysical means; human mutants deficient in repair; mutagenic effects of UV on XP cells; and detection of UV-repair defects among XP individuals. (HLW)

  11. c-Myc Suppression of DNA Double-strand Break Repair12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaozhong; Owonikoko, Taofeek K; Sun, Shi-Yong; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Doetsch, Paul W; Xiao, Zhi-Qiang; Khuri, Fadlo R; Curran, Walter J; Deng, Xingming

    2012-01-01

    c-Myc is a transcriptional factor that functions as a central regulator of cell growth, proliferation, and apoptosis. Overexpression of c-Myc also enhances DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), genetic instability, and tumorigenesis. However, the mechanism(s) involved remains elusive. Here, we discovered that γ-ray ionizing radiation-induced DSBs promote c-Myc to form foci and to co-localize with γ-H2AX. Conditional expression of c-Myc in HO15.19 c-Myc null cells using the Tet-Off/Tet-On inducible system results in down-regulation of Ku DNA binding and suppressed activities of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and DNA end-joining, leading to inhibition of DSB repair and enhanced chromosomal and chromatid breaks. Expression of c-Myc reduces both signal and coding joins with decreased fidelity during V(D)J recombination. Mechanistically, c-Myc directly interacts with Ku70 protein through its Myc box II (MBII) domain. Removal of the MBII domain from c-Myc abrogates its inhibitory effects on Ku DNA binding, DNA-PKcs, and DNA end-joining activities, which results in loss of c-Myc's ability to block DSB repair and V(D)J recombination. Interestingly, c-Myc directly disrupts the Ku/DNA-PKcs complex in vitro and in vivo. Thus, c-Myc suppression of DSB repair and V(D)J recombination may occur through inhibition of the nonhomologous end-joining pathway, which provides insight into the mechanism of c-Myc in the development of tumors through promotion of genomic instability. PMID:23308051

  12. Mechanistic models in computational social science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Petter; Liljeros, Fredrik

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative social science is not only about regression analysis or, in general, data inference. Computer simulations of social mechanisms have an over 60 years long history. They have been used for many different purposes—to test scenarios, to test the consistency of descriptive theories (proof-of-concept models), to explore emergent phenomena, for forecasting, etc. In this essay, we sketch these historical developments, the role of mechanistic models in the social sciences and the influences from the natural and formal sciences. We argue that mechanistic computational models form a natural common ground for social and natural sciences, and look forward to possible future information flow across the social-natural divide.

  13. Mechanistic Models in Computational Social Science

    CERN Document Server

    Holme, Petter

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative social science is not only about regression analysis or, in general, data inference. Computer simulations of social mechanisms have an over 60 years long history. They have been used for many different purposes -- to test scenarios, to test the consistency of descriptive theories (proof-of-concept models), to explore emerging phenomena, for forecasting, etc. In this essay, we sketch these historical developments, the role of mechanistic models in the social sciences and the influences from natural and formal sciences. We argue that mechanistic computational models form a natural common ground for social and natural sciences, and look forward to possible future information flow across the social-natural divide.

  14. Functional and Biomechanical Effects of the Edge-to-Edge Repair in the Setting of Mitral Regurgitation: Consolidated Knowledge and Novel Tools to Gain Insight into Its Percutaneous Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturla, Francesco; Redaelli, Alberto; Puppini, Giovanni; Onorati, Francesco; Faggian, Giuseppe; Votta, Emiliano

    2015-06-01

    Mitral regurgitation is the most prevalent heart valve disease in the western population. When severe, it requires surgical treatment, repair being the preferred option. The edge-to-edge repair technique treats mitral regurgitation by suturing the leaflets together and creating a double-orifice valve. Due to its relative simplicity and versatility, it has become progressively more widespread. Recently, its percutaneous version has become feasible, and has raised interest thanks to the positive results of the Mitraclip(®) device. Edge-to-edge features and evolution have stimulated debate and multidisciplinary research by both clinicians and engineers. After providing an overview of representative studies in the field, here we propose a novel computational approach to the most recent percutaneous evolution of the edge-to-edge technique. Image-based structural finite element models of three mitral valves affected by posterior prolapse were derived from cine-cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. The models accounted for the patient-specific 3D geometry of the valve, including leaflet compound curvature pattern, patient-specific motion of annulus and papillary muscles, and hyperelastic and anisotropic mechanical properties of tissues. The biomechanics of the three valves throughout the entire cardiac cycle was simulated before and after Mitraclip(®) implantation, assessing the biomechanical impact of the procedure. For all three simulated MVs, Mitraclip(®) implantation significantly improved systolic leaflets coaptation, without inducing major alterations in systolic peak stresses. Diastolic orifice area was decreased, by up to 58.9%, and leaflets diastolic stresses became comparable, although lower, to systolic ones. Despite established knowledge on the edge-to-edge surgical repair, latest technological advances make its percutanoues implementation a challenging field of research. The modeling approach herein proposed may be expanded to analyze clinical scenarios that

  15. Pectus excavatum repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002949.htm Pectus excavatum repair To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pectus excavatum repair is surgery to correct pectus excavatum . This ...

  16. Diverless pipeline repair system for deep water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinelli, Carlo M. [Eni Gas and Power, Milan (Italy); Fabbri, Sergio; Bachetta, Giuseppe [Saipem/SES, Venice (Italy)

    2009-07-01

    SiRCoS (Sistema Riparazione Condotte Sottomarine) is a diverless pipeline repair system composed of a suite of tools to perform a reliable subsea pipeline repair intervention in deep and ultra deep water which has been on the ground of the long lasting experience of Eni and Saipem in designing, laying and operating deep water pipelines. The key element of SiRCoS is a Connection System comprising two end connectors and a repair spool piece to replace a damaged pipeline section. A Repair Clamp with elastomeric seals is also available for pipe local damages. The Connection System is based on pipe cold forging process, consisting in swaging the pipe inside connectors with suitable profile, by using high pressure seawater. Three swaging operations have to be performed to replace the damaged pipe length. This technology has been developed through extensive theoretical work and laboratory testing, ending in a Type Approval by DNV over pipe sizes ranging from 20 inches to 48 inches OD. A complete SiRCoS system has been realised for the Green Stream pipeline, thoroughly tested in workshop as well as in shallow water and is now ready, in the event of an emergency situation.The key functional requirements for the system are: diverless repair intervention and fully piggability after repair. Eni owns this technology and is now available to other operators under Repair Club arrangement providing stand-by repair services carried out by Saipem Energy Services. The paper gives a description of the main features of the Repair System as well as an insight into the technological developments on pipe cold forging reliability and long term duration evaluation. (author)

  17. Heavy Metal Exposure Influences Double Strand Break DNA Repair Outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E Morales

    Full Text Available Heavy metals such as cadmium, arsenic and nickel are classified as carcinogens. Although the precise mechanism of carcinogenesis is undefined, heavy metal exposure can contribute to genetic damage by inducing double strand breaks (DSBs as well as inhibiting critical proteins from different DNA repair pathways. Here we take advantage of two previously published culture assay systems developed to address mechanistic aspects of DNA repair to evaluate the effects of heavy metal exposures on competing DNA repair outcomes. Our results demonstrate that exposure to heavy metals significantly alters how cells repair double strand breaks. The effects observed are both specific to the particular metal and dose dependent. Low doses of NiCl2 favored resolution of DSBs through homologous recombination (HR and single strand annealing (SSA, which were inhibited by higher NiCl2 doses. In contrast, cells exposed to arsenic trioxide preferentially repaired using the "error prone" non-homologous end joining (alt-NHEJ while inhibiting repair by HR. In addition, we determined that low doses of nickel and cadmium contributed to an increase in mutagenic recombination-mediated by Alu elements, the most numerous family of repetitive elements in humans. Sequence verification confirmed that the majority of the genetic deletions were the result of Alu-mediated non-allelic recombination events that predominantly arose from repair by SSA. All heavy metals showed a shift in the outcomes of alt-NHEJ repair with a significant increase of non-templated sequence insertions at the DSB repair site. Our data suggest that exposure to heavy metals will alter the choice of DNA repair pathway changing the genetic outcome of DSBs repair.

  18. When "Other" Initiate Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schegloff, Emanuel A.

    2000-01-01

    Elaborates on the locus of other-initiated repair, and reports on a number of environments in which others initiate repair turns later than the one directly following the trouble-source turn. Describes several ways that other initiation of repair, which occurs in next-turn position, may be delayed within that position. (Author/VWL)

  19. Exploring Organic Mechanistic Puzzles with Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Gail; Schwartz, Gary

    2004-01-01

    The molecular modeling was used to reinforce more general skills such as deducing and drawing reaction mechanisms, analyzing reaction kinetics and thermodynamics and drawing reaction coordinate energy diagrams. This modeling was done through the design of mechanistic puzzles, involving reactions not familiar to the students.

  20. Testing mechanistic models of growth in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maino, James L; Kearney, Michael R

    2015-11-22

    Insects are typified by their small size, large numbers, impressive reproductive output and rapid growth. However, insect growth is not simply rapid; rather, insects follow a qualitatively distinct trajectory to many other animals. Here we present a mechanistic growth model for insects and show that increasing specific assimilation during the growth phase can explain the near-exponential growth trajectory of insects. The presented model is tested against growth data on 50 insects, and compared against other mechanistic growth models. Unlike the other mechanistic models, our growth model predicts energy reserves per biomass to increase with age, which implies a higher production efficiency and energy density of biomass in later instars. These predictions are tested against data compiled from the literature whereby it is confirmed that insects increase their production efficiency (by 24 percentage points) and energy density (by 4 J mg(-1)) between hatching and the attainment of full size. The model suggests that insects achieve greater production efficiencies and enhanced growth rates by increasing specific assimilation and increasing energy reserves per biomass, which are less costly to maintain than structural biomass. Our findings illustrate how the explanatory and predictive power of mechanistic growth models comes from their grounding in underlying biological processes.

  1. Mechanistic basis of infertility of mouse intersubspecific hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Tanmoy; Gregorova, Sona; Mihola, Ondrej; Anger, Martin; Sebestova, Jaroslava; Denny, Paul; Simecek, Petr; Forejt, Jiri

    2013-02-01

    According to the Dobzhansky-Muller model, hybrid sterility is a consequence of the independent evolution of related taxa resulting in incompatible genomic interactions of their hybrids. The model implies that the incompatibilities evolve randomly, unless a particular gene or nongenic sequence diverges much faster than the rest of the genome. Here we propose that asynapsis of heterospecific chromosomes in meiotic prophase provides a recurrently evolving trigger for the meiotic arrest of interspecific F1 hybrids. We observed extensive asynapsis of chromosomes and disturbance of the sex body in >95% of pachynemas of Mus m. musculus × Mus m. domesticus sterile F1 males. Asynapsis was not preceded by a failure of double-strand break induction, and the rate of meiotic crossing over was not affected in synapsed chromosomes. DNA double-strand break repair was delayed or failed in unsynapsed autosomes, and misexpression of chromosome X and chromosome Y genes was detected in single pachynemas and by genome-wide expression profiling. Oocytes of F1 hybrid females showed the same kind of synaptic problems but with the incidence reduced to half. Most of the oocytes with pachytene asynapsis were eliminated before birth. We propose the heterospecific pairing of homologous chromosomes as a preexisting condition of asynapsis in interspecific hybrids. The asynapsis may represent a universal mechanistic basis of F1 hybrid sterility manifested by pachytene arrest. It is tempting to speculate that a fast-evolving subset of the noncoding genomic sequence important for chromosome pairing and synapsis may be the culprit.

  2. Percutaneous mitral valve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillinov, A Marc; Liddicoat, John R

    2006-01-01

    Surgical mitral valve repair is the procedure of choice to treat mitral regurgitation of all etiologies. Whereas annuloplasty is the cornerstone of mitral valve repair, a variety of other surgical techniques are utilized to correct dysfunction of the leaflets and subvalvular apparatus; in most cases, surgical repair entails application of multiple repair techniques in each patient. Preclinical studies and early human experience have demonstrated that some of these surgical repair techniques can be performed using percutaneous approaches. Specifically, there has been great progress in the development of novel technology to facilitate percutaneous annuloplasty and percutaneous edge-to-edge repair. The objectives of this report were to (1) discuss the surgical foundations for these percutaneous approaches; (2) review device design and experimental and clinical results of percutaneous valve repair; and (3) address future directions, including the key challenges of patient selection and clinical trial design.

  3. Mechanistic fracture criteria for the failure of human cortical bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalla, Ravi K.; Kinney, John H.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2002-12-13

    A mechanistic understanding of fracture in human bone is critical to predicting fracture risk associated with age and disease. Despite extensive work, a mechanistic framework for describing how the underlying microstructure affects the failure mode in bone is lacking.

  4. Evolutionary and mechanistic theories of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kimberly A; Reynolds, Rose M

    2005-01-01

    Senescence (aging) is defined as a decline in performance and fitness with advancing age. Senescence is a nearly universal feature of multicellular organisms, and understanding why it occurs is a long-standing problem in biology. Here we present a concise review of both evolutionary and mechanistic theories of aging. We describe the development of the general evolutionary theory, along with the mutation accumulation, antagonistic pleiotropy, and disposable soma versions of the evolutionary model. The review of the mechanistic theories focuses on the oxidative stress resistance, cellular signaling, and dietary control mechanisms of life span extension. We close with a discussion of how an approach that makes use of both evolutionary and molecular analyses can address a critical question: Which of the mechanisms that can cause variation in aging actually do cause variation in natural populations?

  5. Mechanistic models in computational social science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petter eHolme

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative social science is not only about regression analysis or, in general, data inference. Computer simulations of social mechanisms have an over 60 years long history. They have been used for many different purposes—to test scenarios, to test the consistency of descriptive theories (proof-of-concept models, to explore emergent phenomena, for forecasting, etc. In this essay, we sketch these historical developments, the role of mechanistic models in the social sciences and the influences from the natural and formal sciences. We argue that mechanistic computational models form a natural common ground for social and natural sciences, and look forward to possible future information flow across the social-natural divide.

  6. New insights into the surgical treatment of mitral regurgitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, Wobbe

    2016-01-01

    New Insights into the Surgical Treatment of Mitral Regurgitation. The mitral valve and mitral valve repair techniques have been subject of extensive research over the past few decades. Mitral valve repair techniques have evolved considerably and have become the gold standard for common conditions su

  7. Mechanistic models in computational social science

    OpenAIRE

    Petter eHolme; Fredrik eLiljeros

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative social science is not only about regression analysis or, in general, data inference. Computer simulations of social mechanisms have an over 60 years long history. They have been used for many different purposes—to test scenarios, to test the consistency of descriptive theories (proof-of-concept models), to explore emergent phenomena, for forecasting, etc. In this essay, we sketch these historical developments, the role of mechanistic models in the social sciences and the influenc...

  8. Mechanistic models in computational social science

    OpenAIRE

    Holme, Petter; Liljeros, Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative social science is not only about regression analysis or, in general, data inference. Computer simulations of social mechanisms have an over 60 years long history. They have been used for many different purposes -- to test scenarios, to test the consistency of descriptive theories (proof-of-concept models), to explore emergent phenomena, for forecasting, etc. In this essay, we sketch these historical developments, the role of mechanistic models in the social sciences and the influ...

  9. Tear gas: an epidemiological and mechanistic reassessment

    OpenAIRE

    Rothenberg, Craig; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Svendsen, Erik R.; Jordt, Sven‐Eric

    2016-01-01

    Deployments of tear gas and pepper spray have rapidly increased worldwide. Large amounts of tear gas have been used in densely populated cities, including Cairo, Istanbul, Rio de Janeiro, Manama (Bahrain), and Hong Kong. In the United States, tear gas was used extensively during recent riots in Ferguson, Missouri. Whereas tear gas deployment systems have rapidly improved—with aerial drone systems tested and requested by law enforcement—epidemiological and mechanistic research have lagged behi...

  10. Testing mechanistic models of growth in insects

    OpenAIRE

    Maino, James L.; Kearney, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Insects are typified by their small size, large numbers, impressive reproductive output and rapid growth. However, insect growth is not simply rapid; rather, insects follow a qualitatively distinct trajectory to many other animals. Here we present a mechanistic growth model for insects and show that increasing specific assimilation during the growth phase can explain the near-exponential growth trajectory of insects. The presented model is tested against growth data on 50 insects, and compare...

  11. Optimality in DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Morgiane; Fryett, Matthew; Miller, Samantha; Booth, Ian; Grebogi, Celso; Moura, Alessandro

    2012-01-07

    DNA within cells is subject to damage from various sources. Organisms have evolved a number of mechanisms to repair DNA damage. The activity of repair enzymes carries its own risk, however, because the repair of two nearby lesions may lead to the breakup of DNA and result in cell death. We propose a mathematical theory of the damage and repair process in the important scenario where lesions are caused in bursts. We use this model to show that there is an optimum level of repair enzymes within cells which optimises the cell's response to damage. This optimal level is explained as the best trade-off between fast repair and a low probability of causing double-stranded breaks. We derive our results analytically and test them using stochastic simulations, and compare our predictions with current biological knowledge.

  12. NAD(+) Replenishment Improves Lifespan and Healthspan in Ataxia Telangiectasia Models via Mitophagy and DNA Repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Evandro Fei; Kassahun, Henok; Croteau, Deborah L

    2016-01-01

    function, delay memory loss, and extend lifespan in both animal models. Mechanistically, treatments that increase intracellular NAD(+) also stimulate neuronal DNA repair and improve mitochondrial quality via mitophagy. This work links two major theories on aging, DNA damage accumulation, and mitochondrial...

  13. Mechanistic studies of the radical SAM enzyme spore photoproduct lyase (SPL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei

    2012-11-01

    Spore photoproduct lyase (SPL) repairs a special thymine dimer 5-thyminyl-5,6-dihydrothymine, which is commonly called spore photoproduct or SP at the bacterial early germination phase. SP is the exclusive DNA photo-damage product in bacterial endospores; its generation and swift repair by SPL are responsible for the spores' extremely high UV resistance. The early in vivo studies suggested that SPL utilizes a direct reversal strategy to repair the SP in the absence of light. The research in the past decade further established SPL as a radical SAM enzyme, which utilizes a tri-cysteine CXXXCXXC motif to harbor a [4Fe-4S] cluster. At the 1+ oxidation state, the cluster provides an electron to the S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), which binds to the cluster in a bidentate manner as the fourth and fifth ligands, to reductively cleave the CS bond associated with the sulfonium ion in SAM, generating a reactive 5'-deoxyadenosyl (5'-dA) radical. This 5'-dA radical abstracts the proR hydrogen atom from the C6 carbon of SP to initiate the repair process; the resulting SP radical subsequently fragments to generate a putative thymine methyl radical, which accepts a back-donated H atom to yield the repaired TpT. SAM is suggested to be regenerated at the end of each catalytic cycle; and only a catalytic amount of SAM is needed in the SPL reaction. The H atom source for the back donation step is suggested to be a cysteine residue (C141 in Bacillus subtilis SPL), and the H-atom transfer reaction leaves a thiyl radical behind on the protein. This thiyl radical thus must participate in the SAM regeneration process; however how the thiyl radical abstracts an H atom from the 5'-dA to regenerate SAM is unknown. This paper reviews and discusses the history and the latest progress in the mechanistic elucidation of SPL. Despite some recent breakthroughs, more questions are raised in the mechanistic understanding of this intriguing DNA repair enzyme. This article is part of a Special Issue

  14. DNA repair activity in fish and interest in ecotoxicology: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienzler, Aude; Bony, Sylvie; Devaux, Alain

    2013-06-15

    The knowledge of DNA repair in a target species is of first importance as it is the primary line of defense against genotoxicants, and a better knowledge of DNA repair capacity in fish could help to interpret genotoxicity data and/or assist in the choice of target species, developmental stage and tissues to focus on, both for environmental biomonitoring studies and DNA repair testing. This review focuses in a first part on what is presently known on a mechanistic basis, about the various DNA repair systems in fish, in vivo and in established cell lines. Data on base excision repair (BER), direct reversal with O⁶-alkylguanine transferase and double strand breaks repair, although rather scarce, are being reviewed, as well as nucleotide excision repair (NER) and photoreactivation repair (PER), which are by far the most studied repair mechanisms in fish. Most of these repair mechanisms seem to be strongly species and tissue dependent; they also depend on the developmental stage of the organisms. BER is efficient in vivo, although no data has been found on in vitro models. NER activity is quite low or even inexistent depending on the studies; however this lack is partly compensated by a strong PER activity, especially in early developmental stage. In a second part, a survey of the ecotoxicological studies integrating DNA repair as a parameter responding to single or mixture of contaminant is realized. Three main approaches are being used: the measurement of DNA repair gene expression after exposure, although it has not yet been clearly established whether gene expression is indicative of repair capacity; the monitoring of DNA damage removal by following DNA repair kinetics; and the modulation of DNA repair activity following exposure in situ, in order to assess the impact of exposure history on DNA repair capacity. Since all DNA repair processes are possible targets for environmental pollutants, we can also wonder at which extent such a modulation of repair capacities

  15. Repairs of composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Hee Seok

    Repair on damaged composite panels was conducted. To better understand adhesively bonded repair, the study investigates the effect of design parameters on the joint strength. The design parameters include bondline length, thickness of adherend and type of adhesive. Adhesives considered in this study were tested to measure their tensile material properties. Three types of adhesively bonded joints, single strap, double strap, and single lap joint were considered under changing bondline lengths, thickness of adherend and type of adhesive. Based on lessons learned from bonded joints, a one-sided patch repair method for composite structures was conducted. The composite patch was bonded to the damaged panel by either film adhesive FM-73M or paste adhesive EA-9394 and the residual strengths of the repaired specimens were compared under varying patch sizes. A new repair method using attachments has been suggested to enhance the residual strength. Results obtained through experiments were analyzed using finite element analysis to provide a better repair design and explain the experimental results. It was observed that the residual strength of the repaired specimen was affected by patch length. Method for rapid repairs of damaged composite structures was investigated. The damage was represented by a circular hole in a composite laminated plate. Pre-cured composite patches were bonded with a quick-curing commercial adhesive near (rather than over) the hole. Tensile tests were conducted on specimens repaired with various patch geometries. The test results showed that, among the methods investigated, the best repair method restored over 90% of the original strength of an undamaged panel. The interfacial stresses in the adhesive zone for different patches were calculated in order to understand the efficiencies of the designs of these patch repairs. It was found that the composite patch that yielded the best strength had the lowest interfacial peel stress between the patch and

  16. Mechanistic insights on the ortho-hydroxylation of aromatic compounds by non-heme iron complex: a computational case study on the comparative oxidative ability of ferric-hydroperoxo and high-valent Fe(IV)═O and Fe(V)═O intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Azaj; Kaushik, Abhishek; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2013-03-20

    ortho-Hydroxylation of aromatic compounds by non-heme Fe complexes has been extensively studied in recent years by several research groups. The nature of the proposed oxidant varies from Fe(III)-OOH to high-valent Fe(IV)═O and Fe(V)═O species, and no definitive consensus has emerged. In this comprehensive study, we have investigated the ortho-hydroxylation of aromatic compounds by an iron complex using hybrid density functional theory incorporating dispersion effects. Three different oxidants, Fe(III)-OOH, Fe(IV)═O, and Fe(V)═O, and two different pathways, H-abstraction and electrophilic attack, have been considered to test the oxidative ability of different oxidants and to underpin the exact mechanism of this regiospecific reaction. By mapping the potential energy surface of each oxidant, our calculations categorize Fe(III)-OOH as a sluggish oxidant, as both proximal and distal oxygen atoms of this species have prohibitively high barriers to carry out the aromatic hydroxylation. This is in agreement to the experimental observation where Fe(III)-OOH is found not to directly attack the aromatic ring. A novel mechanism for the explicit generation of non-heme Fe(IV)═O and Fe(V)═O from isomeric forms of Fe(III)-OOH has been proposed where the O···O bond is found to cleave via homolytic (Fe(IV)═O) or heterolytic (Fe(V)═O) fashion exclusively. Apart from having favorable formation energies, the Fe(V)═O species also has a lower barrier height compared to the corresponding Fe(IV)═O species for the aromatic ortho-hydroxylation reaction. The transient Fe(V)═O prefers electrophilic attack on the benzene ring rather than the usual aromatic C-H activation step. A large thermodynamic drive for the formation of a radical intermediate is encountered in the mechanistic scene, and this intermediate substantially diminishes the energy barrier required for C-H activation by the Fe(V)═O species. Further spin density distribution and the frontier orbitals of

  17. Mechanistic aspects of ionic reactions in flames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, H.; Carlsen, L.

    1993-01-01

    Some fundamentals of the ion chemistry of flames are summarized. Mechanistic aspects of ionic reactions in flames have been studied using a VG PlasmaQuad, the ICP-system being substituted by a simple quartz burner. Simple hydrocarbon flames as well as sulfur-containing flames have been investigated....... The simple hydrocarbon flames are dominated by a series of hydrocarbonic ions and, to a minor extent, protonated oxo-compounds. The introduction of sulfur to the flames leads to significant changes in the ion composition, as sulfur-containing species become dominant. The ability of the technique to study...

  18. Mechanistic studies of carbon monoxide reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geoffroy, G.L.

    1990-06-12

    The progress made during the current grant period (1 January 1988--1 April 1990) in three different areas of research is summarized. The research areas are: (1) oxidatively-induced double carbonylation reactions to form {alpha}-ketoacyl complexes and studies of the reactivity of the resulting compounds, (2) mechanistic studies of the carbonylation of nitroaromatics to form isocyanates, carbamates, and ureas, and (3) studies of the formation and reactivity of unusual metallacycles and alkylidene ligands supported on binuclear iron carbonyl fragments. 18 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Workshop on DNA repair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Lehmann (Alan); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); A.A. van Zeeland (Albert); C.M.P. Backendorf (Claude); B.A. Bridges; A. Collins; R.P.D. Fuchs; G.P. Margison; R. Montesano; E. Moustacchi; A.T. Natarajan; M. Radman; A. Sarasin; E. Seeberg; C.A. Smith; M. Stefanini (Miria); L.H. Thompson; G.P. van der Schans; C.A. Weber (Christine); M.Z. Zdzienika

    1992-01-01

    textabstractA workshop on DNA repair with emphasis on eukaryotic systems was held, under the auspices of the EC Concerted Action on DNA Repair and Cancer, at Noordwijkerhout (The Netherlands) 14-19 April 1991. The local organization of the meeting was done under the auspices of the Medical Genetic C

  20. Laparoscopic lumbar hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Atul K; Ternovits, Craig A; Speck, Karen E; Pritchard, F Elizabeth; Tichansky, David S

    2006-04-01

    Lumbar hernias are rare clinical entities that often pose a challenge for repair. Because of the surrounding anatomy, adequate surgical herniorraphy is often difficult. Minimally invasive surgery has become an option for these hernias. Herein, we describe two patients with lumbar hernias (one with a recurrent traumatic hernia and one with an incisional hernia). Both of these hernias were successfully repaired laparoscopically.

  1. DNA repair protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergbæk, Lotte

    In its 3rd edition, this Methods in Molecular Biology(TM) book covers the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including advanced protocols and standard techniques in the field of DNA repair. Offers expert guidance for DNA repair, recombination, and replication. Current knowledge of the mechanisms...... that regulate DNA repair has grown significantly over the past years with technology advances such as RNA interference, advanced proteomics and microscopy as well as high throughput screens. The third edition of DNA Repair Protocols covers various aspects of the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including...... recent advanced protocols as well as standard techniques used in the field of DNA repair. Both mammalian and non-mammalian model organisms are covered in the book, and many of the techniques can be applied with only minor modifications to other systems than the one described. Written in the highly...

  2. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bill Bruce; Nancy Porter; George Ritter; Matt Boring; Mark Lozev; Ian Harris; Bill Mohr; Dennis Harwig; Robin Gordon; Chris Neary; Mike Sullivan

    2005-07-20

    The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without

  3. Analytical techniques for mechanistic characterization of EUV photoresists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzeskowiak, Steven; Narasimhan, Amrit; Murphy, Michael; Ackerman, Christian; Kaminsky, Jake; Brainard, Robert L.; Denbeaux, Greg

    2017-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV, 13.5 nm) lithography is the prospective technology for high volume manufacturing by the microelectronics industry. Significant strides towards achieving adequate EUV source power and availability have been made recently, but a limited rate of improvement in photoresist performance still delays the implementation of EUV. Many fundamental questions remain to be answered about the exposure mechanisms of even the relatively well understood chemically amplified EUV photoresists. Moreover, several groups around the world are developing revolutionary metal-based resists whose EUV exposure mechanisms are even less understood. Here, we describe several evaluation techniques to help elucidate mechanistic details of EUV exposure mechanisms of chemically amplified and metal-based resists. EUV absorption coefficients are determined experimentally by measuring the transmission through a resist coated on a silicon nitride membrane. Photochemistry can be evaluated by monitoring small outgassing reaction products to provide insight into photoacid generator or metal-based resist reactivity. Spectroscopic techniques such as thin-film Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy can measure the chemical state of a photoresist system pre- and post-EUV exposure. Additionally, electrolysis can be used to study the interaction between photoresist components and low energy electrons. Collectively, these techniques improve our current understanding of photomechanisms for several EUV photoresist systems, which is needed to develop new, better performing materials needed for high volume manufacturing.

  4. Mechanistic Perspectives of Maslinic Acid in Targeting Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Hsum Yap

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation drives the development of various pathological diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, multiple sclerosis, and cancer. The arachidonic acid pathway represents one of the major mechanisms for inflammation. Prostaglandins (PGs are lipid products generated from arachidonic acid by the action of cyclooxygenase (COX enzymes and their activity is blocked by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS. The use of natural compounds in regulation of COX activity/prostaglandins production is receiving increasing attention. In Mediterranean diet, olive oil and table olives contain significant dietary sources of maslinic acid. Maslinic acid is arising as a safe and novel natural pentacyclic triterpene which has protective effects against chronic inflammatory diseases in various in vivo and in vitro experimental models. Understanding the anti-inflammatory mechanism of maslinic acid is crucial for its development as a potential dietary nutraceutical. This review focuses on the mechanistic action of maslinic acid in regulating the inflammation pathways through modulation of the arachidonic acid metabolism including the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB/COX-2 expression, upstream protein kinase signaling, and phospholipase A2 enzyme activity. Further investigations may provide insight into the mechanism of maslinic acid in regulating the molecular targets and their associated pathways in response to specific inflammatory stimuli.

  5. Equation-free mechanistic ecosystem forecasting using empirical dynamic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hao; Beamish, Richard J; Glaser, Sarah M; Grant, Sue C H; Hsieh, Chih-Hao; Richards, Laura J; Schnute, Jon T; Sugihara, George

    2015-03-31

    It is well known that current equilibrium-based models fall short as predictive descriptions of natural ecosystems, and particularly of fisheries systems that exhibit nonlinear dynamics. For example, model parameters assumed to be fixed constants may actually vary in time, models may fit well to existing data but lack out-of-sample predictive skill, and key driving variables may be misidentified due to transient (mirage) correlations that are common in nonlinear systems. With these frailties, it is somewhat surprising that static equilibrium models continue to be widely used. Here, we examine empirical dynamic modeling (EDM) as an alternative to imposed model equations and that accommodates both nonequilibrium dynamics and nonlinearity. Using time series from nine stocks of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) from the Fraser River system in British Columbia, Canada, we perform, for the the first time to our knowledge, real-data comparison of contemporary fisheries models with equivalent EDM formulations that explicitly use spawning stock and environmental variables to forecast recruitment. We find that EDM models produce more accurate and precise forecasts, and unlike extensions of the classic Ricker spawner-recruit equation, they show significant improvements when environmental factors are included. Our analysis demonstrates the strategic utility of EDM for incorporating environmental influences into fisheries forecasts and, more generally, for providing insight into how environmental factors can operate in forecast models, thus paving the way for equation-free mechanistic forecasting to be applied in management contexts.

  6. A mechanistic stochastic framework for regulating bacterial cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghusinga, Khem Raj; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-07-26

    How exponentially growing cells maintain size homeostasis is an important fundamental problem. Recent single-cell studies in prokaryotes have uncovered the adder principle, where cells add a fixed size (volume) from birth to division, irrespective of their size at birth. To mechanistically explain the adder principle, we consider a timekeeper protein that begins to get stochastically expressed after cell birth at a rate proportional to the volume. Cell-division time is formulated as the first-passage time for protein copy numbers to hit a fixed threshold. Consistent with data, the model predicts that the noise in division timing increases with size at birth. Intriguingly, our results show that the distribution of the volume added between successive cell-division events is independent of the newborn cell size. This was dramatically seen in experimental studies, where histograms of the added volume corresponding to different newborn sizes collapsed on top of each other. The model provides further insights consistent with experimental observations: the distribution of the added volume when scaled by its mean becomes invariant of the growth rate. In summary, our simple yet elegant model explains key experimental findings and suggests a mechanism for regulating both the mean and fluctuations in cell-division timing for controlling size.

  7. Tear gas: an epidemiological and mechanistic reassessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, Craig; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Svendsen, Erik R.

    2016-01-01

    Deployments of tear gas and pepper spray have rapidly increased worldwide. Large amounts of tear gas have been used in densely populated cities, including Cairo, Istanbul, Rio de Janeiro, Manama (Bahrain), and Hong Kong. In the United States, tear gas was used extensively during recent riots in Ferguson, Missouri. Whereas tear gas deployment systems have rapidly improved—with aerial drone systems tested and requested by law enforcement—epidemiological and mechanistic research have lagged behind and have received little attention. Case studies and recent epidemiological studies revealed that tear gas agents can cause lung, cutaneous, and ocular injuries, with individuals affected by chronic morbidities at high risk for complications. Mechanistic studies identified the ion channels TRPV1 and TRPA1 as targets of capsaicin in pepper spray, and of the tear gas agents chloroacetophenone, CS, and CR. TRPV1 and TRPA1 localize to pain‐sensing peripheral sensory neurons and have been linked to acute and chronic pain, cough, asthma, lung injury, dermatitis, itch, and neurodegeneration. In animal models, transient receptor potential inhibitors show promising effects as potential countermeasures against tear gas injuries. On the basis of the available data, a reassessment of the health risks of tear gas exposures in the civilian population is advised, and development of new countermeasures is proposed. PMID:27391380

  8. The Mechanistic Approach to Psychiatric Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Sirgiovanni

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A Kuhnian reformulation of the recent debate in psychiatric nosography suggested that the current psychiatric classification system (the DSM is in crisis and that a sort of paradigm shift is awaited (Aragona, 2009. Among possible revolutionary alternatives, the proposed fi ve-axes etiopathogenetic taxonomy (Charney et al., 2002 emphasizes the primacy of the genotype over the phenomenological level as the relevant basis for psychiatric nosography. Such a position is along the lines of the micro-reductionist perspective of E. Kandel (1998, 1999, which sees mental disorders reducible to explanations at a fundamental epistemic level of genes and neurotransmitters. This form of micro-reductionism has been criticized as a form of genetic-molecular fundamentalism (e.g. Murphy, 2006 and a multi-level approach, in the form of the burgeoning Cognitive Neuropsychiatry, was proposed. This article focuses on multi-level mechanistic explanations, coming from Cognitive Science, as a possible alternative etiopathogenetic basis for psychiatric classification. The idea of a mechanistic approach to psychiatric taxonomy is here defended on the basis of a better conception of levels and causality. Nevertheless some critical remarks of Mechanism as a psychiatric general view are also offered.

  9. Tear gas: an epidemiological and mechanistic reassessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, Craig; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Svendsen, Erik R; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2016-08-01

    Deployments of tear gas and pepper spray have rapidly increased worldwide. Large amounts of tear gas have been used in densely populated cities, including Cairo, Istanbul, Rio de Janeiro, Manama (Bahrain), and Hong Kong. In the United States, tear gas was used extensively during recent riots in Ferguson, Missouri. Whereas tear gas deployment systems have rapidly improved-with aerial drone systems tested and requested by law enforcement-epidemiological and mechanistic research have lagged behind and have received little attention. Case studies and recent epidemiological studies revealed that tear gas agents can cause lung, cutaneous, and ocular injuries, with individuals affected by chronic morbidities at high risk for complications. Mechanistic studies identified the ion channels TRPV1 and TRPA1 as targets of capsaicin in pepper spray, and of the tear gas agents chloroacetophenone, CS, and CR. TRPV1 and TRPA1 localize to pain-sensing peripheral sensory neurons and have been linked to acute and chronic pain, cough, asthma, lung injury, dermatitis, itch, and neurodegeneration. In animal models, transient receptor potential inhibitors show promising effects as potential countermeasures against tear gas injuries. On the basis of the available data, a reassessment of the health risks of tear gas exposures in the civilian population is advised, and development of new countermeasures is proposed.

  10. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; George Ritter; Bill Mohr; Matt Boring; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2004-12-31

    The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without

  11. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; George Ritter; Bill Mohr; Matt Boring; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2004-08-17

    The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners

  12. Salvage hypospadias repairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sripathi V

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Review of our experience and to develop an algorithm for salvage procedures in the management of hypospadias cripples and treatment of urethral strictures following hypospadias repair. Methods: This is a retrospective review of hypospadias surgeries over a 41-month period. Out of a total 168 surgeries, 20 were salvage/re-operative repairs. In three children a Duplay repair was feasible, while in four others a variety of single-stage repairs could be done. The repair was staged in seven children - buccal mucosal grafts (BMGs in five, buccal mucosal tube in one, and skin graft in one. Five children with dense strictures were managed by dorsal BMG inlay grafting in one, vascularized tunical onlay grafting on the ventrum in one, and a free tunical patch in one. Three children were treated by internal urethrotomy and stenting for four weeks with a poor outcome. Results: The age of children ranged from 1.5-15 years (mean 4.5. Follow-up ranged from 3 months to 3.5 years. Excellent results were obtained in 10 children (50% with a well-surfaced erect penis and a slit-like meatus. Glans closure could not be achieved and meatus was coronal in three. Two children developed fistulae following a Duplay repair and following a staged BMG. Three repairs failed completely - a composite repair broke down, a BMG tube stenosed with a proximal leak, and a stricture recurred with loss of a ventral free tunical graft. Conclusions: In salvage procedures performed on hypospadias cripples, a staged repair with buccal mucosa as an inlay in the first stage followed by tubularization 4-6 months later provides good results. A simple algorithm to plan corrective surgery in failed hypospadias cases and obtain satisfactory results is devised.

  13. Consumer Insights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JANKOT

    2004-01-01

    Fang Jun, the head of consumer and market insights of Unilever Shanghai, has summarized his early life as a market in two sentences: rush about to study market changes;act all day to observe consumer behavior. And now?"Tell stories, conduct interviews and piece together different data; calculate numbers,build models and write reports."

  14. Causation at Different Levels: Tracking the Commitments of Mechanistic Explanations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazekas, Peter; Kertész, Gergely

    2011-01-01

    This paper tracks the commitments of mechanistic explanations focusing on the relation between activities at different levels. It is pointed out that the mechanistic approach is inherently committed to identifying causal connections at higher levels with causal connections at lower levels. For th...... their autonomy at the same time than standard reductive accounts are, and that what mechanistic explanations are able to do at best is showing that downward causation does not exist....

  15. Applying mechanistic models in bioprocess development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lencastre Fernandes, Rita; Bodla, Vijaya Krishna; Carlquist, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    models should be combined with proper model analysis tools, such as uncertainty and sensitivity analysis. When assuming distributed inputs, the resulting uncertainty in the model outputs can be decomposed using sensitivity analysis to determine which input parameters are responsible for the major part...... of the output uncertainty. Such information can be used as guidance for experimental work; i.e., only parameters with a significant influence on model outputs need to be determined experimentally. The use of mechanistic models and model analysis tools is demonstrated in this chapter. As a practical case study......, experimental data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentations are used. The data are described with the well-known model of Sonnleitner and Käppeli (Biotechnol Bioeng 28:927-937, 1986) and the model is analyzed further. The methods used are generic, and can be transferred easily to other, more complex case...

  16. Mechanistic issues in asparagine synthetase catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, N G; Schuster, S M

    1998-01-01

    The enzymatic synthesis of asparagine is an ATP-dependent process that utilizes the nitrogen atom derived from either glutamine or ammonia. Despite a long history of kinetic and mechanistic investigation, there is no universally accepted catalytic mechanism for this seemingly straightforward carboxyl group activating enzyme, especially as regards those steps immediately preceding amide bond formation. This chapter considers four issues dealing with the mechanism: (a) the structural organization of the active site(s) partaking in glutamine utilization and aspartate activation; (b) the relationship of asparagine synthetase to other amidotransferases; (c) the way in which ATP is used to activate the beta-carboxyl group; and (d) the detailed mechanism by which nitrogen is transferred.

  17. Green tea and skin cancer: photoimmunology, angiogenesis and DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyar, Suchitra; Elmets, Craig A; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2007-05-01

    Human skin is constantly exposed to numerous noxious physical, chemical and environmental agents. Some of these agents directly or indirectly adversely affect the skin. Cutaneous overexposure to environmental solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation (290-400 nm) has a variety of adverse effects on human health, including the development of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. Therefore, there is a need to develop measures or strategies, and nutritional components are increasingly being explored for this purpose. The polyphenols present in green tea (Camellia sinensis) have been shown to have numerous health benefits, including protection from UV carcinogenesis. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is the major and most photoprotective polyphenolic component of green tea. In this review article, we have discussed the most recent investigations and mechanistic studies that define and support the photoprotective efficacy of green tea polyphenols (GTPs) against UV carcinogenesis. The oral administration of GTPs in drinking water or the topical application of EGCG prevents UVB-induced skin tumor development in mice, and this prevention is mediated through: (a) the induction of immunoregulatory cytokine interleukin (IL) 12; (b) IL-12-dependent DNA repair following nucleotide excision repair mechanism; (c) the inhibition of UV-induced immunosuppression through IL-12-dependent DNA repair; (d) the inhibition of angiogenic factors; and (e) the stimulation of cytotoxic T cells in a tumor microenvironment. New mechanistic information strongly supports and explains the chemopreventive activity of GTPs against photocarcinogenesis.

  18. Progress of peripheral nerve repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈峥嵘

    2002-01-01

    Study on repair of peripheral nerve injury has been proceeding over a long period of time. With the use of microsurgery technique since 1960s,the quality of nerve repair has been greatly improved. In the past 40 years, with the continuous increase of surgical repair methods, more progress has been made on the basic research of peripheral nerve repair.

  19. Achilles tendon repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles tendon rupture-surgery; Percutaneous Achilles tendon rupture repair ... To fix your torn Achilles tendon, the surgeon will: Make a cut down the back of your heel Make several small cuts rather than one large cut ...

  20. Diaphragmatic hernia repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... presentations/100014.htm Diaphragmatic hernia repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... Overview The chest cavity includes the heart and lungs. The abdominal cavity includes the liver, the stomach, ...

  1. Eye muscle repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100062.htm Eye muscle repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... the eyeball to the eye socket. The external muscles of the eye are found behind the conjunctiva. ...

  2. Tracheoesophageal fistula repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100103.htm Tracheoesophageal fistula repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Esophagus Disorders Fistulas Tracheal Disorders A.D.A.M., Inc. is ...

  3. Inguinal hernia repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100027.htm Inguinal hernia repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 4 out of 4 Overview A hernia occurs when part of an organ protrudes through ...

  4. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2004-04-12

    The two broad categories of deposited weld metal repair and fiber-reinforced composite liner repair technologies were reviewed for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Preliminary test programs were developed for both deposited weld metal repair and for fiber-reinforced composite liner repair. Evaluation trials have been conducted using a modified fiber-reinforced composite liner provided by RolaTube and pipe sections without liners. All pipe section specimens failed in areas of simulated damage. Pipe sections containing fiber-reinforced composite liners failed at pressures marginally greater than the pipe sections without liners. The next step is to evaluate a liner material with a modulus of elasticity approximately 95% of the modulus of elasticity for steel. Preliminary welding parameters were developed for deposited weld metal repair in preparation of the receipt of Pacific Gas & Electric's internal pipeline welding repair system (that was designed specifically for 559 mm (22 in.) diameter pipe) and the receipt of 559 mm (22 in.) pipe sections from Panhandle Eastern. The next steps are to transfer welding parameters to the PG&E system and to pressure test repaired pipe sections to failure. A survey of pipeline operators was conducted to better understand the needs and performance requirements of the natural gas transmission industry regarding internal repair. Completed surveys contained the following principal conclusions: (1) Use of internal weld repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling (HDD) when a new bore must be created

  5. Pectus excavatum repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100035.htm Pectus excavatum repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... Go to slide 4 out of 4 Overview Pectus excavatum is a deformity of the front of the ...

  6. Hiatal hernia repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... presentations/100028.htm Hiatal hernia repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on ... Overview The esophagus runs through the diaphragm to the stomach. It functions to carry food from the mouth ...

  7. Repairing ceramic insulating tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, B. R.; Laymance, E. L.

    1980-01-01

    Fused-silica tiles containing large voids or gauges are repaired without adhesives by plug insertion method. Tiles are useful in conduits for high-temperature gases, in furnaces, and in other applications involving heat insulation.

  8. Rotator cuff repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100229.htm Rotator cuff repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 4 out of 4 Overview The rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons that ...

  9. Cleft lip repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100010.htm Cleft lip repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... abnormal opening in the middle of the upper lip. A cleft palate is an opening in the roof of ...

  10. Grey Repairable System Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Renkuan Guo; Charles Ernie Love

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we systematically discuss the basic concepts of grey theory, particularly the grey differential equation and its mathematical foundation, which is essentially unknown in the reliability engineering community. Accordingly,we propose a small-sample based approach to estimate repair improvement effects by partitioning system stopping times into intrinsic functioning times and repair improvement times. An industrial data set is used for illustrative purposes in a stepwise manner.

  11. Comparative evaluation of statistical and mechanistic models of Escherichia coli at beaches in southern Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaie, Ammar; Wendzel, Aaron; Ge, Zhongfu; Nevers, Meredith; Whitman, Richard L.; Corsi, Steven R.; Phanikumar, Mantha S.

    2016-01-01

    Statistical and mechanistic models are popular tools for predicting the levels of indicator bacteria at recreational beaches. Researchers tend to use one class of model or the other, and it is difficult to generalize statements about their relative performance due to differences in how the models are developed, tested, and used. We describe a cooperative modeling approach for freshwater beaches impacted by point sources in which insights derived from mechanistic modeling were used to further improve the statistical models and vice versa. The statistical models provided a basis for assessing the mechanistic models which were further improved using probability distributions to generate high-resolution time series data at the source, long-term “tracer” transport modeling based on observed electrical conductivity, better assimilation of meteorological data, and the use of unstructured-grids to better resolve nearshore features. This approach resulted in improved models of comparable performance for both classes including a parsimonious statistical model suitable for real-time predictions based on an easily measurable environmental variable (turbidity). The modeling approach outlined here can be used at other sites impacted by point sources and has the potential to improve water quality predictions resulting in more accurate estimates of beach closures.

  12. Biomechanical and Clinical Studies in EndoVascular Aortic Repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, FJH

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This thesis investigates biomechanical and clinical performances of endovascular repair for thoracic aortic dissection (AD) and aneurysm. Insights from both medical and bio-engineering perspectives are pursued with the aim of providing scientific data that will help guide endovascular aor

  13. Mesenteric ischemia after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair : a systemic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, J. L. M.; Tielliu, I. F. J.; Zeebregts, C. J.; Pol, R. A.

    2014-01-01

    Mesenteric ischemia after abdominal aneurysm repair is a devastating complication with mortality rates up to 70%. Incidence however is relatively low. The aim of this review was to provide an overview on current insights, diagnostic modalities and on mesenteric ischemia after abdominal aortic aneury

  14. Electrocatalytic carbon dioxide reduction - a mechanistic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, Klaas Jan Schouten

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents new insights into the reduction of carbon dioxide to methane and ethylene on copper electrodes. This electrochemical process has great potential for the storage of surplus renewable electrical energy in the form of hydrocarbons. The research described in this thesis focuses on t

  15. The InSiGHT database : utilizing 100 years of insights into Lynch Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plazzer, J. P.; Sijmons, R. H.; Woods, M. O.; Peltomaki, P.; Thompson, B.; Den Dunnen, J. T.; Macrae, F.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a historical overview of the online database (www.insight-group.org/mutations) maintained by the International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumours. The focus is on the mismatch repair genes which are mutated in Lynch Syndrome. APC, MUTYH and other genes are also an

  16. Mechanistic curiosity will not kill the Bayesian cat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borsboom, Denny; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan; Romeijn, Jan-Willem

    2011-01-01

    Jones & Love (J&L) suggest that Bayesian approaches to the explanation of human behavior should be constrained by mechanistic theories. We argue that their proposal misconstrues the relation between process models, such as the Bayesian model, and mechanisms. While mechanistic theories can answer spe

  17. Mechanistic investigations on six bacterial terpene cyclases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Rabe

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The products obtained by incubation of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP with six purified bacterial terpene cyclases were characterised by one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopic methods, allowing for a full structure elucidation. The absolute configurations of four terpenes were determined based on their optical rotary powers. Incubation experiments with 13C-labelled isotopomers of FPP in buffers containing water or deuterium oxide allowed for detailed insights into the cyclisation mechanisms of the bacterial terpene cyclases.

  18. Automaticity: Componential, Causal, and Mechanistic Explanations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moors, Agnes

    2016-01-01

    The review first discusses componential explanations of automaticity, which specify non/automaticity features (e.g., un/controlled, un/conscious, non/efficient, fast/slow) and their interrelations. Reframing these features as factors that influence processes (e.g., goals, attention, and time) broadens the range of factors that can be considered (e.g., adding stimulus intensity and representational quality). The evidence reviewed challenges the view of a perfect coherence among goals, attention, and consciousness, and supports the alternative view that (a) these and other factors influence the quality of representations in an additive way (e.g., little time can be compensated by extra attention or extra stimulus intensity) and that (b) a first threshold of this quality is required for unconscious processing and a second threshold for conscious processing. The review closes with a discussion of causal explanations of automaticity, which specify factors involved in automatization such as repetition and complexity, and a discussion of mechanistic explanations, which specify the low-level processes underlying automatization.

  19. Semiconductor photocatalysis--mechanistic and synthetic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisch, Horst

    2013-01-14

    Preceding work on photoelectrochemistry at semiconductor single-crystal electrodes has formed the basis for the tremendous growth in the three last decades in the field of photocatalysis at semiconductor powders. The reason for this is the unique ability of inorganic semiconductor surfaces to photocatalyze concerted reduction and oxidation reactions of a large variety of electron-donor and -acceptor substrates. Whereas great attention was paid to water splitting and the exhaustive aerobic degradation of pollutants, only a small amount of research also explored synthetic aspects. After introducing the basic mechanistic principles, standard experiments for the preparation and characterization of visible light active photocatalysts as well as the investigation of reaction mechanisms are discussed. Novel atom-economic C-C and C-N coupling reactions illustrate the relevance of semiconductor photocatalysis for organic synthesis, and demonstrate that the multidisciplinary field combines classical photochemistry with electrochemistry, solid-state chemistry, and heterogeneous catalysis. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. 1999 Gordon Research Conference on Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-12

    This Conference will examine DNA repair as the key component in genomic surveillance that is so crucial to the overall integrity and function of mammalian cells. Recent discoveries have catapulted the field of DNA repair into a pivotal position for fundamental investigations into oncology, aging, environmental health, and developmental biology. We hope to highlight the most promising and exciting avenues of research in robust discussions at this conference. This Mammalian DNA Repair Gordon Conference differs from the past conferences in this series, in which the programs were broader in scope, with respect to topics and biological systems covered. A conference sponsored by the Genetics Society in April 1998 emphasized recombinational mechanisms for double-strand break repair and the role of mismatch repair deficiency in colorectal cancer. These topics will therefore receive somewhat less emphasis in the upcoming Conference. In view of the recent mechanistic advances in mammalian DNA repair, an upcoming comprehensive DNA repair meeting next autumn at Hilton Head; and the limited enrollment for Gordon Conferences we have decided to focus session-by-session on particular areas of controversy and/or new developments specifically in mammalian systems. Thus, the principal presentations will draw upon results from other cellular systems only to the extent that they impact our understanding of mammalian DNA repair.

  1. Detecting and Correcting Speech Repairs

    CERN Document Server

    Heeman, P A; Heeman, Peter; Allen, James

    1994-01-01

    Interactive spoken dialog provides many new challenges for spoken language systems. One of the most critical is the prevalence of speech repairs. This paper presents an algorithm that detects and corrects speech repairs based on finding the repair pattern. The repair pattern is built by finding word matches and word replacements, and identifying fragments and editing terms. Rather than using a set of prebuilt templates, we build the pattern on the fly. In a fair test, our method, when combined with a statistical model to filter possible repairs, was successful at detecting and correcting 80\\% of the repairs, without using prosodic information or a parser.

  2. Groin hernia repair in young males: mesh or sutured repair?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, T; Bay-Nielsen, M; Kehlet, H

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale data for the optimal inguinal hernia repair in younger men with an indirect hernia is not available. We analysed nationwide data for risk of reoperation in younger men after a primary repair using a Lichtenstein operation or a conventional non-mesh hernia repair....

  3. Identifying mechanistic similarities in drug responses

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, C.

    2012-05-15

    Motivation: In early drug development, it would be beneficial to be able to identify those dynamic patterns of gene response that indicate that drugs targeting a particular gene will be likely or not to elicit the desired response. One approach would be to quantitate the degree of similarity between the responses that cells show when exposed to drugs, so that consistencies in the regulation of cellular response processes that produce success or failure can be more readily identified.Results: We track drug response using fluorescent proteins as transcription activity reporters. Our basic assumption is that drugs inducing very similar alteration in transcriptional regulation will produce similar temporal trajectories on many of the reporter proteins and hence be identified as having similarities in their mechanisms of action (MOA). The main body of this work is devoted to characterizing similarity in temporal trajectories/signals. To do so, we must first identify the key points that determine mechanistic similarity between two drug responses. Directly comparing points on the two signals is unrealistic, as it cannot handle delays and speed variations on the time axis. Hence, to capture the similarities between reporter responses, we develop an alignment algorithm that is robust to noise, time delays and is able to find all the contiguous parts of signals centered about a core alignment (reflecting a core mechanism in drug response). Applying the proposed algorithm to a range of real drug experiments shows that the result agrees well with the prior drug MOA knowledge. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  4. Black tea polyphenols: a mechanistic treatise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, M S; Imran, A; Sharif, M K; Ahmad, Rabia Shabir; Xiao, Hang; Imran, M; Rsool, H A

    2014-01-01

    Dietary interventions are among the emerging trends to curtail physiological malfunctioning like cancer, diabetes, cardiac complications, etc. The essence of phytonutrients has developed the concept of nutraceuticals at the junction of diet health linkages. In this context, theaflavin & thearubigins are the oxidized derivatives of black tea catechins during fermentation having nutraceutical potential owing to esterification of hydroxyl ring with digallate esters. Theaflavin may influence activation of transcription factors such as NFnB or AP-1 that ultimately hinder the formation of nitric oxide expression gene. Likewise, black tea contains a unique amino acid theanine acts as neurotransmitter owing to its ability to cross the blood-brain barrier. Moreover, it boasts immunity by enhancing the disease-fighting ability of gamma delta T cells. Theaflavin & thearubigins act as safeguard against oxidative stress thereby effective in the cardiac functioning. The mechanistic approach of these antioxidants is likely to be associated with inhibition of redox sensitive transcription factors & pro-oxidant enzymes such as xanthine oxidase or nitric oxide synthase. However, their involvement in antioxidative enzyme induction as in glutathione-S-transferases is also well documented. They act as curative agent against numerous pathological disorders by disrupting the electron chain thus inhibiting the progression of certain ailments. Black tea polyphenols established themselves as strong antioxidants due to their standard one-electron potential, and their vitality is dependent on the concentration of polyphenols and pH for their inclusive execution. Present review is an attempt to enrich the readers regarding the health promoting aspects of black tea polyphenols. Concomitantly, it needs core attention of researchers for the exploitations of black tea flavanols as an important dietary constituent for the vulnerable segment.

  5. Cleft lip and palate repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002979.htm Cleft lip and palate repair To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cleft lip and cleft palate repair is surgery to fix birth defects ...

  6. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007392.htm Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is surgery to fix a widened part ...

  7. Homologous recombination in DNA repair and DNA damage tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuan Li; Wolf-Dietrich Heyer

    2008-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) comprises a series of interrelated pathways that function in the repair of DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) and interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). In addition, recombination provides critical sup-port for DNA replication in the recovery of stalled or broken replication forks, contributing to tolerance of DNA damage. A central core of proteins, most critically the RecA homolog Rad51, catalyzes the key reactions that typify HR: homology search and DNA strand invasion. The diverse functions of recombination are reflected in the need for context-specific factors that perform supplemental functions in conjunction with the core proteins. The inability to properly repair complex DNA damage and resolve DNA replication stress leads to genomic instability and contributes to cancer etiology. Mutations in the BRCA2 recombination gene cause predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer as well as Fanconi anemia, a cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by a defect in the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks. The cellular functions of recombination are also germane to DNA-based treatment modaUties of cancer, which target replicating cells by the direct or indirect induction of DNA lesions that are substrates for recombination pathways. This review focuses on mechanistic aspects of HR relating to DSB and ICL repair as well as replication fork support.

  8. Nanomaterials promise better bone repair

    OpenAIRE

    Qifei Wang; Jianhua Yan; Junlin Yang; Bingyun Li

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials mimicking the nano-features of bones and offering unique smart functions are promising for better bone fracture repair. This review provides an overview of the current state-of-the-art research in developing and using nanomaterials for better bone fracture repair. This review begins with a brief introduction of bone fracture repair processes, then discusses the importance of vascularization, the role of growth factors in bone fracture repair, and the failure of bone fracture rep...

  9. Laparoscopic repair of femoral hernia

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xue-Fei; Liu, Jia-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia is mini-invasive and has confirmed effects. Femoral hernia could be repaired through the laparoscopic procedures for inguinal hernia. These procedures have clear anatomic view in the operation and preoperatively undiagnosed femoral hernia could be confirmed and treated. Lower recurrence ratio was reported in laparoscopic procedures compared with open procedures for repair of femoral hernia. The technical details of laparoscopic repair of femoral hernia, ...

  10. Aircraft Propeller Hub Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muth, Thomas R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peter, William H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-02-13

    The team performed a literature review, conducted residual stress measurements, performed failure analysis, and demonstrated a solid state additive manufacturing repair technique on samples removed from a scrapped propeller hub. The team evaluated multiple options for hub repair that included existing metal buildup technologies that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has already embraced, such as cold spray, high velocity oxy-fuel deposition (HVOF), and plasma spray. In addition the team helped Piedmont Propulsion Systems, LLC (PPS) evaluate three potential solutions that could be deployed at different stages in the life cycle of aluminum alloy hubs, in addition to the conventional spray coating method for repair. For new hubs, a machining practice to prevent fretting with the steel drive shaft was recommended. For hubs that were refurbished with some material remaining above the minimal material condition (MMC), a silver interface applied by an electromagnetic pulse additive manufacturing method was recommended. For hubs that were at or below the MMC, a solid state additive manufacturing technique using ultrasonic welding (UW) of thin layers of 7075 aluminum to the hub interface was recommended. A cladding demonstration using the UW technique achieved mechanical bonding of the layers showing promise as a viable repair method.

  11. Mediator MED23 Links Pigmentation and DNA Repair through the Transcription Factor MITF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Xia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA repair is related to many physiological and pathological processes, including pigmentation. Little is known about the role of the transcriptional cofactor Mediator complex in DNA repair and pigmentation. Here, we demonstrate that Mediator MED23 plays an important role in coupling UV-induced DNA repair to pigmentation. The loss of Med23 specifically impairs the pigmentation process in melanocyte-lineage cells and in zebrafish. Med23 deficiency leads to enhanced nucleotide excision repair (NER and less DNA damage following UV radiation because of the enhanced expression and recruitment of NER factors to chromatin for genomic stability. Integrative analyses of melanoma cells reveal that MED23 controls the expression of a melanocyte master regulator, Mitf, by modulating its distal enhancer activity, leading to opposing effects on pigmentation and DNA repair. Collectively, the Mediator MED23/MITF axis connects DNA repair to pigmentation, thus providing molecular insights into the DNA damage response and skin-related diseases.

  12. Protein damage and repair controlling seed vigor and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogé, Laurent; Broyart, Caroline; Collet, Boris; Godin, Béatrice; Jallet, Denis; Bourdais, Gildas; Job, Dominique; Grappin, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The formation of abnormal isoaspartyl residues derived from aspartyl or asparaginyl residues is a major source of spontaneous protein misfolding in cells. The repair enzyme protein L: -isoaspartyl methyltransferase (PIMT) counteracts such damage by catalyzing the conversion of abnormal isoaspartyl residues to their normal aspartyl forms. Thus, this enzyme contributes to the survival of many organisms, including plants. Analysis of the accumulation of isoaspartyl-containing proteins and its modulation by the PIMT repair pathway, using germination tests, immunodetection, enzymatic assays, and HPLC analysis, gives new insights in understanding controlling mechanisms of seed longevity and vigor.

  13. Bacterial replication, transcription and translation : mechanistic insights from single-molecule biochemical studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robinson, Andrew; van Oijen, Antoine M.

    2013-01-01

    Decades of research have resulted in a remarkably detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms of bacterial DNA replication, transcription and translation. Our understanding of the kinetics and physical mechanisms that drive these processes forward has been expanded by the ability of single-mo

  14. Mechanistic insights into selective killing of OXPHOS-dependent cancer cells by arctigenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecht, Karin; Riebel, Virginie; Couttet, Philippe; Paech, Franziska; Wolf, Armin; Chibout, Salah-Dine; Pognan, Francois; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Uteng, Marianne

    2017-04-01

    Arctigenin has previously been identified as a potential anti-tumor treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer. However, the mechanism of how arctigenin kills cancer cells is not fully understood. In the present work we studied the mechanism of toxicity by arctigenin in the human pancreatic cell line, Panc-1, with special emphasis on the mitochondria. A comparison of Panc-1 cells cultured in glucose versus galactose medium was applied, allowing assessments of effects in glycolytic versus oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS)-dependent Panc-1 cells. For control purposes, the mitochondrial toxic response to treatment with arctigenin was compared to the anti-cancer drug, sorafenib, which is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor known for mitochondrial toxic off-target effects (Will et al., 2008). In both Panc-1 OXPHOS-dependent and glycolytic cells, arctigenin dissipated the mitochondrial membrane potential, which was demonstrated to be due to inhibition of the mitochondrial complexes II and IV. However, arctigenin selectively killed only the OXPHOS-dependent Panc-1 cells. This selective killing of OXPHOS-dependent Panc-1 cells was accompanied by generation of ER stress, mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and caspase activation leading to apoptosis and aponecrosis.

  15. Early life stress enhancement of limbic epileptogenesis in adult rats: mechanistic insights.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Kumar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exposure to early postnatal stress is known to hasten the progression of kindling epileptogenesis in adult rats. Despite the significance of this for understanding mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE and its associated psychopathology, research findings regarding underlying mechanisms are sparse. Of several possibilities, one important candidate mechanism is early life 'programming' of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis by postnatal stress. Elevated corticosterone (CORT in turn has consequences for neurogenesis and cell death relevant to epileptogenesis. Here we tested the hypotheses that MS would augment seizure-related corticosterone (CORT release and enhance neuroplastic changes in the hippocampus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Eight-week old Wistar rats, previously exposed on postnatal days 2-14 to either maternal separation stress (MS or control brief early handling (EH, underwent rapid amygdala kindling. We measured seizure-induced serum CORT levels and post-kindling neurogenesis (using BrdU. Three weeks post-kindling, rats were euthanized for histology of the hippocampal CA3c region (pyramidal cell counts and dentate gyrus (DG (to count BrdU-labelled cells and measure mossy fibre sprouting. As in our previous studies, rats exposed to MS had accelerated kindling rates in adulthood. Female MS rats had heightened CORT responses during and after kindling (p<0.05, with a similar trend in males. In both sexes total CA3c pyramidal cell numbers were reduced in MS vs. EH rats post-kindling (p = 0.002. Dentate granule cell neurogenesis in female rats was significantly increased post-kindling in MS vs. EH rats. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data demonstrate that early life stress results in enduring enhancement of HPA axis responses to limbic seizures, with increased hippocampal CA3c cell loss and augmented neurogenesis, in a sex-dependent pattern. This implicates important candidate mechanisms through which early life stress may promote vulnerability to limbic epileptogenesis in rats as well as to human MTLE and its associated psychiatric disorders.

  16. Mechanistic insights into lithium ion battery electrolyte degradation - a quantitative NMR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiemers-Meyer, S; Winter, M; Nowak, S

    2016-09-29

    The changes in electrolyte composition on the molecular level and the reaction mechanisms of electrolyte degradation upon thermal aging are monitored by quantitative NMR spectroscopy, revealing similar rates of degradation for pristine and already aged electrolytes. The data analysis is not in favor of an autocatalytic reaction mechanism based on OPF3 but rather indicates that the degradation of LiPF6 in carbonate based solvents proceeds via a complex sequence of "linear" reactions rather than a cyclic reaction pattern which is determined by the amount of water present in the samples. All investigated electrolytes are reasonably stable at temperatures of up to 60 °C in the presence of minor amounts or absence of water hence indicating that chemical instability of electrolyte components against water is decisive for degradation and an increase in temperature ("thermal aging") just accelerates the degradation impact of water.

  17. Mechanistic insights into the dehalogenation reaction of fluoroacetate/fluoroacetic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda-Rojas, Sebastián, E-mail: sebastian.miranda@unab.cl [Chemical Processes and Catalysis (CPC), Departamento de Ciencias Químicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avenida República 275, Santiago (Chile); Toro-Labbé, Alejandro [Laboratorio de Química Teórica Computacional (QTC), Facultad de Química, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Avenida Vicuña Mackenna 4860, Macul, Santiago (Chile)

    2015-05-21

    Fluoroacetate is a toxic compound whose environmental accumulation may represent an important contamination problem, its elimination is therefore a challenging issue. Fluoroacetate dehalogenase catalyzes its degradation through a two step process initiated by an S{sub N}2 reaction in which the aspartate residue performs a nucleophilic attack on the carbon bonded to the fluorine; the second step is hydrolysis that releases the product as glycolate. In this paper, we present a study based on density functional theory calculations of the S{sub N}2 initiation reaction modeled through the interaction between the substrate and the propionate anion as the nucleophile. Results are analyzed within the framework of the reaction force and using the reaction electronic flux to identify and characterize the electronic activity that drives the reaction. Our results reveal that the selective protonation of the substrate catalyzes the reaction by decreasing the resistance of the structural and electronic reorganization needed to reach the transition state. Finally, the reaction energy is modulated by the degree of stabilization of the fluoride anion formed after the S{sub N}2 reaction. In this way, a site-induced partial protonation acts as a chemical switch in a key process that determines the output of the reaction.

  18. Reaction of iodine atoms with submicrometer squalane and squalene droplets: mechanistic insights into heterogeneous reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popolan-Vaida, Denisia M; Wilson, Kevin R; Leone, Stephen R

    2014-11-13

    The gas-phase reaction of iodine atoms with hydrocarbon molecules is energetically unfavorable, and there is no direct evidence for iodinated product formation by either H abstraction or I addition reactions at ambient temperature. Here we consider the possible heterogeneous reaction of I atoms with submicrometer droplets composed of a saturated alkane, squalane (Sq), and an unsaturated alkene, squalene (Sqe). The investigations are performed in an atmospheric pressure photochemical flow tube reactor in conjunction with a vacuum ultraviolet photoionization aerosol mass spectrometer and a scanning mobility particle sizer. Squalane, a branched alkane, is unreactive toward I atoms within the signal-to-noise, and an upper limit of the effective reactive uptake coefficient is estimated to be γI(Sq) ≤ 8.58 × 10(–7). In contrast, the reaction of I atoms with unsaturated submicrometer squalene droplets results in observable iodinated squalene products. The effective reactive uptake coefficient of I atom with squalene particles is determined to be γI(Sqe) = (1.20 ± 0.52) × 10(–4) at an average I concentration of 1.5 × 10(14) molecules·cm(–3).

  19. Mechanistic insights into induction of vitellogenin gene expression by estrogens in Sydney rock oysters, Saccostrea glomerata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thi Kim Anh; MacFarlane, Geoff R; Kong, Richard Yuen Chong; O'Connor, Wayne A; Yu, Richard Man Kit

    2016-05-01

    Marine molluscs, such as oysters, respond to estrogenic compounds with the induction of the egg yolk protein precursor, vitellogenin (Vtg), availing a biomarker for estrogenic pollution. Despite this application, the precise molecular mechanism through which estrogens exert their action to induce molluscan vitellogenesis is unknown. As a first step to address this question, we cloned a gene encoding Vtg from the Sydney rock oyster Saccostrea glomerata (sgVtg). Using primers designed from a partial sgVtg cDNA sequence available in Genbank, a full-length sgVtg cDNA of 8498bp was obtained by 5'- and 3'-RACE. The open reading frame (ORF) of sgVtg was determined to be 7980bp, which is substantially longer than the orthologs of other oyster species. Its deduced protein sequence shares the highest homology at the N- and C-terminal regions with other molluscan Vtgs. The full-length genomic DNA sequence of sgVtg was obtained by genomic PCR and genome walking targeting the gene body and flanking regions, respectively. The genomic sequence spans 20kb and consists of 30 exons and 29 introns. Computer analysis identified three closely spaced half-estrogen responsive elements (EREs) in the promoter region and a 210-bp CpG island 62bp downstream of the transcription start site. Upregulation of sgVtg mRNA expression was observed in the ovaries following in vitro (explants) and in vivo (tank) exposure to 17β-estradiol (E2). Notably, treatment with an estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist in vitro abolished the upregulation, suggesting a requirement for an estrogen-dependent receptor for transcriptional activation. DNA methylation of the 5' CpG island was analysed using bisulfite genomic sequencing of the in vivo exposed ovaries. The CpG island was found to be hypomethylated (with 0-3% methylcytosines) in both control and E2-exposed oysters. However, no significant differential methylation or any correlation between methylation and sgVtg expression levels was observed. Overall, the results support the possible involvement of an ERE-containing promoter and an estrogen-activated receptor in estrogen signalling in marine molluscs.

  20. Proteomics and metabolomics for mechanistic insights and biomarker discovery in cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barallobre-Barreiro, Javier; Chung, Yuen-Li; Mayr, Manuel

    2013-08-01

    In the last decade, proteomics and metabolomics have contributed substantially to our understanding of cardiovascular diseases. The unbiased assessment of pathophysiological processes without a priori assumptions complements other molecular biology techniques that are currently used in a reductionist approach. In this review, we highlight some of the "omics" methods used to assess protein and metabolite changes in cardiovascular disease. A discrete biological function is very rarely attributed to a single molecule; more often it is the combined input of many proteins. In contrast to the reductionist approach, in which molecules are studied individually, "omics" platforms allow the study of more complex interactions in biological systems. Combining proteomics and metabolomics to quantify changes in metabolites and their corresponding enzymes will advance our understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms and aid the identification of novel biomarkers for cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Removal of hexavalent chromium upon interaction with biochar under acidic conditions: mechanistic insights and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Bharat; Paul, Debajyoti; Singh, Abhas; Gupta, Tarun

    2017-07-01

    Chromium pollution of soil and water is a serious environmental concern due to potential carcinogenicity of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] when ingested. Eucalyptus bark biochar (EBB), a carbonaceous black porous material obtained by pyrolysis of biomass at 500 °C under oxygen-free atmosphere, was used to investigate the removal of aqueous Cr(VI) upon interaction with the EBB, the dominant Cr(VI) removal mechanism(s), and the applicability to treat Cr(VI)-contaminated wastewater. Batch experiments showed complete removal of aqueous Cr(VI) at pH 1-2; sorption was negligible at pH 1, but ~55% of total Cr was sorbed onto the EBB surface at pH 2. Detailed investigations on unreacted and reacted EBB through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS) indicate that the carboxylic groups in biochar played a dominant role in Cr(VI) sorption, whereas the phenolic groups were responsible for Cr(VI) reduction. The predominance of sorption-reduction mechanism was confirmed by XPS studies that indicated ~82% as Cr(III) and ~18% as Cr(VI) sorbed on the EBB surface. Significantly, Cr(VI) reduction was also facilitated by dissolved organic matter (DOM) extracted from biochar. This reduction was enhanced by the presence of biochar. Overall, the removal of Cr(VI) in the presence of biochar was affected by sorption due to electrostatic attraction, sorption-reduction mediated by surface organic complexes, and aqueous reduction by DOM. Relative dominance of the aqueous reduction mechanism depended on a critical biochar dosage for a given electrolyte pH and initial Cr(VI) concentration. The low-cost EBB developed here successfully removed all Cr(VI) in chrome tanning acidic wastewater and Cr(VI)-contaminated groundwater after pH adjustment, highlighting its potential applicability in effective Cr(VI) remediation.

  2. Mechanistic insight into the interaction of BLM helicase with intra-strand G-quadruplex structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sujoy; Zagelbaum, Jennifer; Savitsky, Pavel; Sturzenegger, Andreas; Huttner, Diana; Janscak, Pavel; Hickson, Ian D.; Gileadi, Opher; Rothenberg, Eli

    2014-11-01

    Bloom syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the RecQ family helicase BLM that is associated with growth retardation and predisposition to cancer. BLM helicase has a high specificity for non-canonical G-quadruplex (G4) DNA structures, which are formed by G-rich DNA strands and play an important role in the maintenance of genomic integrity. Here we used single-molecule FRET to define the mechanism of interaction of BLM helicase with intra-stranded G4 structures. We show that the activity of BLM is substrate dependent, and highly regulated by a short-strand DNA (ssDNA) segment that separates the G4 motif from double-stranded DNA. We demonstrate cooperativity between the RQC and HRDC domains of BLM during binding and unfolding of the G4 structure, where the RQC domain interaction with G4 is stabilized by HRDC binding to ssDNA. We present a model that proposes a unique role for G4 structures in modulating the activity of DNA processing enzymes.

  3. Mechanistic insight into the interaction of BLM helicase with intra-strand G-quadruplex structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatterjee, Sujoy; Zagelbaum, Jennifer; Savitsky, Pavel;

    2014-01-01

    Bloom syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the RecQ family helicase BLM that is associated with growth retardation and predisposition to cancer. BLM helicase has a high specificity for non-canonical G-quadruplex (G4) DNA structures, which are formed by G-rich DNA...

  4. Evaluation of colorimetric assays for analyzing reductively methylated proteins: Biases and mechanistic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Pamlea N; Macnaughtan, Megan A

    2015-12-15

    Colorimetric protein assays, such as the Coomassie blue G-250 dye-binding (Bradford) and bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assays, are commonly used to quantify protein concentration. The accuracy of these assays depends on the amino acid composition. Because of the extensive use of reductive methylation in the study of proteins and the importance of biological methylation, it is necessary to evaluate the impact of lysyl methylation on the Bradford and BCA assays. Unmodified and reductively methylated proteins were analyzed using the absorbance at 280 nm to standardize the concentrations. Using model compounds, we demonstrate that the dimethylation of lysyl ε-amines does not affect the proteins' molar extinction coefficients at 280 nm. For the Bradford assay, the responses (absorbance per unit concentration) of the unmodified and reductively methylated proteins were similar, with a slight decrease in the response upon methylation. For the BCA assay, the responses of the reductively methylated proteins were consistently higher, overestimating the concentrations of the methylated proteins. The enhanced color formation in the BCA assay may be due to the lower acid dissociation constants of the lysyl ε-dimethylamines compared with the unmodified ε-amine, favoring Cu(II) binding in biuret-like complexes. The implications for the analysis of biologically methylated samples are discussed.

  5. Oleanolic acid (OA) as an antileishmanial agent: Biological evaluation and in silico mechanistic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Tahira Souza; Gattass, Cerli Rocha; Soares, Deivid Costa; Cunha, Micael Rodrigues; Ferreira, Christian; Tavares, Maurício Temotheo; Saraiva, Elvira; Parise-Filho, Roberto; Braden, Hannah; Delorenzi, Jan Carlo

    2016-06-01

    Although a worldwide health problem, leishmaniasis is considered a highly neglected disease, lacking efficient and low toxic treatment. The efforts for new drug development are based on alternatives such as new uses for well-known drugs, in silico and synthetic studies and naturally derived compounds. Oleanolic acid (OA) is a pentacyclic triterpenoid widely distributed throughout the Plantae kingdom that displays several pharmacological activities. OA showed potent leishmancidal effects in different Leishmania species, both against promastigotes (IC(50 L. braziliensis) 30.47 ± 6.35 μM; IC(50 L. amazonensis) 40.46 ± 14.21 μM; IC(50 L. infantum) 65.93 ± 15.12 μM) and amastigotes (IC(50 L. braziliensis) 68.75 ± 16.55 μM; IC(50 L. amazonensis) 38.45 ± 12.05 μM; IC(50 L. infantum) 64.08 ± 23.52 μM), with low cytotoxicity against mouse peritoneal macrophages (CC(50) 235.80 ± 36.95 μM). Moreover, in silico studies performed to evaluate OA molecular properties and to elucidate the possible mechanism of action over the Leishmania enzyme sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) suggested that OA interacts efficiently with CYP51 and could inhibit the ergosterol synthesis pathway. Collectively, these data indicate that OA is a good candidate as leading compound for the development of a new leishmaniasis treatment.

  6. Mechanistic insights into the LsrK kinase required for autoinducer-2 quorum sensing activation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Jie; Hixon, Mark S.; Globisch, Daniel; Kaufmann, Gunnar F.; Janda, Kim D.

    2013-01-01

    In enteric bacteria, the kinase LsrK catalyzes the phosphorylation of the C5-hydroxyl group in the linear form of 4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione (DPD), the precursor of the type II bacterial quorum sensing molecule (AI-2). This phosphorylation is required for AI-2 sequestration in the cytoplasm and subsequent derepression of AI-2 related genes necessary for quorum development. While LsrK is a critical enzyme within the DPD quorum sensing relay system, kinetic details of this kinase have yet t...

  7. Mass Spectrometry Based Mechanistic Insights into Formation of Tris Conjugates: Implications on Protein Biopharmaceutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabadi, Pradeep G.; Sankaran, Praveen Kallamvalliillam; Palanivelu, Dinesh V.; Adhikary, Laxmi; Khedkar, Anand; Chatterjee, Amarnath

    2016-10-01

    We present here extensive mass spectrometric studies on the formation of a Tris conjugate with a therapeutic monoclonal antibody. The results not only demonstrate the reactive nature of the Tris molecule but also the sequence and reaction conditions that trigger this reactivity. The results corroborate the fact that proteins are, in general, prone to conjugation and/or adduct formation reactions and any modification due to this essentially leads to formation of impurities in a protein sample. Further, the results demonstrate that the conjugation reaction happens via a succinimide intermediate and has sequence specificity. Additionally, the data presented in this study also shows that the Tris formation is produced in-solution and is not an in-source phenomenon. We believe that the facts given here will open further avenues on exploration of Tris as a conjugating agent as well as ensure that the use of Tris or any ionic buffer in the process of producing a biopharmaceutical drug is monitored closely for the presence of such conjugate formation.

  8. Transcriptional Activation of Inflammatory Genes: Mechanistic Insight into Selectivity and Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Afsar U; Williams, Bryan R G; Hannigan, Gregory E

    2015-11-11

    Acute inflammation, an integral part of host defence and immunity, is a highly conserved cellular response to pathogens and other harmful stimuli. An inflammatory stimulation triggers transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes that carry out specific functions such as anti-microbial activity or tissue healing. Based on the nature of inflammatory stimuli, an extensive exploitation of selective transcriptional activations of pro-inflammatory genes is performed by the host to ensure a defined inflammatory response. Inflammatory signal transductions are initiated by the recognition of inflammatory stimuli by transmembrane receptors, followed by the transmission of the signals to the nucleus for differential gene activations. The differential transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory genes is precisely controlled by the selective binding of transcription factors to the promoters of these genes. Among a number of transcription factors identified to date, NF-κB still remains the most prominent and studied factor for its diverse range of selective transcriptional activities. Differential transcriptional activities of NF-κB are dictated by post-translational modifications, specificities in dimer formation, and variability in activation kinetics. Apart from the differential functions of transcription factors, the transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes is also governed by chromatin structures, epigenetic markers, and other regulators as the field is continuously expanding.

  9. Structural and mechanistic insights into cooperative assembly of dimeric Notch transcription complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnett, Kelly L.; Hass, Matthew; McArthur, Debbie G.; Ilagan, Ma Xenia G.; Aster, Jon C.; Kopan, Raphael; Blacklow, Stephen C. (WU); (BWH); (DFCI)

    2010-11-12

    Ligand-induced proteolysis of Notch produces an intracellular effector domain that transduces essential signals by regulating the transcription of target genes. This function relies on the formation of transcriptional activation complexes that include intracellular Notch, a Mastermind co-activator and the transcription factor CSL bound to cognate DNA. These complexes form higher-order assemblies on paired, head-to-head CSL recognition sites. Here we report the X-ray structure of a dimeric human Notch1 transcription complex loaded on the paired site from the human HES1 promoter. The small interface between the Notch ankyrin domains could accommodate DNA bending and untwisting to allow a range of spacer lengths between the two sites. Cooperative dimerization occurred on the human and mouse Hes5 promoters at a sequence that diverged from the CSL-binding consensus at one of the sites. These studies reveal how promoter organizational features control cooperativity and, thus, the responsiveness of different promoters to Notch signaling.

  10. Mechanistic insights into the inhibitory effects of palmitoylation on cytosolic thioredoxin reductase and thioredoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Huijun; Liang, Wei; Xu, Zhiyu; Ye, Fei; Li, Xiaoming; Zhong, Liangwei

    2015-03-01

    Overnutrition can lead to oxidative stress, but its underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we report that human liver-derived HepG2 cells utilize cytosolic thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) and thioredoxin (hTrx1) to defend against the high glucose/palmitate-mediated increase in reactive oxygen species. However, enhanced TrxR1/hTrx1 palmitoylation occurs in parallel with a decrease in their activities under the conditions studied here. An autoacylation process appears to be the major mechanism for generating palmitoylated TrxR1/Trx1 in HepG2 cells. A novel feature of this post-translational modification is the covalent inhibition of TrxR1/hTrx1 by palmitoyl-CoA, an activated form of palmitate. The palmitoyl-CoA/TrxR1 reaction is NADPH-dependent and produces palmitoylated TrxR1 at an active site selenocysteine residue. Conversely, S-palmitoylation occurs at the structural Cys62/Cys69/Cys72 residues but not the active site Cys32/Cys35 residues of hTrx1. Palmitoyl-CoA concentration and the period of incubation with TrxR1/hTrx1 are important factors that influence the inhibitory efficacy of palmitoyl-CoA on TrxR1/hTrx1. Thus, an increase in TrxR1/hTrx1 palmitoylation could be a potential consequence of high glucose/palmitate. The time-dependent inactivation of the NADPH-TrxR1-Trx1 system by palmitoyl-CoA occurs in a biphasic manner - a fast phase followed by a slow phase. Kinetic analysis suggests that the fast phase is consistent with a fast and reversible association between TrxR1/hTrx1 and palmitoyl-CoA. The slow phase is correlated with a slow and irreversible inactivation, in which selenolate/thiolate groups nucleophilically attack the α-carbon of bound palmitoyl-CoA, leading to the formation of thioester/selenoester bonds. hTrx1 can enhance rate of fast phase but limits the rate of slow phase when it is present in a preincubation mixture containing NADPH, TrxR1 and palmitoyl-CoA. Therefore, hTrx1 may provide palmitoylation sites or partially protect the TrxR1 active site selenol/thiol group(s) from palmitoylation. Our data suggest that Se/S-palmitoylation acts as an important modulator of TrxR1/hTrx1 activities, representing a novel potential mechanism that underlies overnutrition-induced events. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  11. Mechanistic insights into the formation of chloroform from natural organic matter using stable carbon isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breider, Florian; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Chloroform can be naturally formed in terrestrial environments (e.g. forest soils, peatland) by chlorination of natural organic matter (NOM). Recently, it was demonstrated that natural and anthropogenic chloroform have a distinctly different carbon isotope signature that makes it possible to identify its origin in soil and groundwater. In order to evaluate the contribution of different functional groups to chloroform production and factors controlling the isotopic composition of chloroform, carbon isotope trends during chlorination of model compounds, soil organic matter (SOM) and humic acids were evaluated, and apparent kinetic isotope effects (AKIEs) quantified. Phenol and propanone were selected as model compounds representing common functional groups in NOM. Chlorination was induced by hypochlorous acid to mimic natural chlorination. The pH ranged between 4 and 8 to cover typical soil conditions. For each model compound and pH, different AKIEs were observed. For phenol, the AKIE was normal at pH 4 (1.0156 ± 0.0012) and inverse at pH 8 (0.9900 ± 0.0007). For 2-propoanol, an opposite pH dependence was observed with an inverse AKIE at pH 4 (0.9935 ± 0.0007) and a normal AKIE at pH 8 (1.0189 ± 0.0016). The variations of the AKIE values suggest that the rate-limiting step of the reaction is either the re-hybridization of the carbon atom involved in chloroform formation or the hydrolysis of trichloroacetyl intermediates depending on the nature of functional group and pH. The chloroform formation from humic acid and SOM gives rise to small isotope variations. A comparison of the isotopic trends of chloroform formed from humic acid and SOM with those found for the model compounds suggest that opposed AKIE associated with the chlorination of phenolic and ketone moieties of NOM partly compensate each other during chlorination of NOM indicating that different types of functional groups contribute to chloroform formation.

  12. Structural and mechanistic insights into ABC-type ECF transporters for vitamin uptake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dosz-Majsnerowska, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Dit proefschrift gaat over de relatie tussen de structuur en het mechanisme van ABC-type ECF transporters voor vitamines, uit de bacterie Lactococcus lactis. Energy-Coupling Factor (ECF) transporters vormen een subgroep van de ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters en zijn betrokken bij de opname v

  13. Post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome: mechanistic insights into chronic disturbances following enteric infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Jennifer K; Bhargava, Amol; Buret, Andre G

    2014-04-14

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a commonly encountered chronic functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder. Approximately 10% of IBS patients can trace the onset of their symptoms to a previous a bout of infectious dysentery. The appearance of new IBS symptoms following an infectious event is defined as post-infectious-IBS. Indeed, with the World Health Organization estimating between 2 and 4 billion cases annually, infectious diarrheal disease represents an incredible international healthcare burden. Additionally, compounding evidence suggests many commonly encountered enteropathogens as unique triggers behind IBS symptom generation and underlying pathophysiological features. A growing body of work provides evidence supporting a role for pathogen-mediated modifications in the resident intestinal microbiota, epithelial barrier integrity, effector cell functions, and innate and adaptive immune features, all proposed physiological manifestations that can underlie GI abnormalities in IBS. Enteric pathogens must employ a vast array of machinery to evade host protective immune mechanisms, and illicit successful infections. Consequently, the impact of infectious events on host physiology can be multidimensional in terms of anatomical location, functional scope, and duration. This review offers a unique discussion of the mechanisms employed by many commonly encountered enteric pathogens that cause acute disease, but may also lead to the establishment of chronic GI dysfunction compatible with IBS.

  14. A Comprehensive Review on the Chemotherapeutic Potential of Piceatannol for Cancer Treatment, with Mechanistic Insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyed, Mohamed Ali; Jantan, Ibrahim; Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas; Vijayaraghavan, Kavitha

    2016-02-03

    Cancer is a diverse class of diseases characterized by uncontrolled cell growth that constitutes the greatest cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Despite steady progress, the treatment modalities of cancer are still insufficient. Several new concepts have emerged for therapeutic intervention in malignant diseases with the goal of identifying specific targets and overcoming resistance against current cytotoxic therapies. Many studies have reported the remarkable and significant properties of dietary plant polyphenols such as curcumin, resveratrol, flavopiridol, indirubin, magnolol, piceatannol, parthenolide, epigallocatechin gallate, and cucurbitacin as anticancer agents known for their pleiotropic effects on cancer, immune cells, and inflammation. Piceatannol, an analogue and metabolite of resveratrol, is a natural stilbene commonly found in grape skins and wine. Compared to resveratrol, this molecule exhibits superior bioactivities as an inhibitor of COX-1/2 and the CSN-associated kinase. Piceatannol is thought to be a potent natural compound with many therapeutic effects, such as the prevention of hypercholesterolemia, arrhythmia, atherosclerosis, angiogenesis, and cardiovascular diseases. It also demonstrates vasorelaxation, antioxidant, and anticancer activities. This comprehensive review summarizes the current data regarding the mechanisms of action of piceatannol, its chemopreventive properties, and its possible therapeutic potential against various types of human cancer.

  15. Mechanistic insights into aqueous phase propanol dehydration in H-ZSM-5 zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Donghai [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate & Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Richland WA 99352; Lercher, Johannes A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate & Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Richland WA 99352; Dept. of Chemistry and Catalysis Research Institute, TU München, Lichtenbergstrasse 4 Garching 85748 Germany

    2016-10-06

    Aqueous phase dehydration of 1-propanol over H-ZSM-5 zeolite was investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The water molecules in the zeolite pores prefer to aggregate via the hydrogen bonding network and be protonated at the Brønsted acidic sites (BAS). Two typical configurations, i.e., dispersed and clustered, of water molecules were identified by ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of the mimicking aqueous phase H-ZSM-5 zeolite unit cell with 20 water molecules per unit cell. DFT calculated Gibbs free energies suggest that the dimeric propanol-propanol, the propanol-water complex, and the trimeric propanol-propanol-water are formed at high propanol concentrations, which provide a kinetically feasible dehydration reaction channel of 1-propanol to propene. However, calculation results also indicate that the propanol dehydration via the unimolecular mechanism becomes kinetically discouraged due to the enhanced stability of the protonated dimeric propanol and the protonated water cluster acting as the BAS site for alcohol dehydration reaction. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computing time was granted by the grand challenge of computational catalysis of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). EMSL is a national scientific user facility located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and sponsored by DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research.

  16. Antioxidant activity of ferulic acid alkyl esters in a heterophasic system: a mechanistic insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmi, Cecilia; Centini, Marisanna; Granata, Paola; Sega, Alessandro; Buonocore, Anna; Bernini, Andrea; Facino, Roberto Maffei

    2004-10-20

    The antioxidant activity of some esters of ferulic acid with the linear fatty alcohols C7, C8 (branched and linear), C9, C11, C12, C13, C15, C16, and C18 has been studied in homogeneous and heterogeneous phases. Whereas in homogeneous phase all of the alkyl ferulates possessed similar radical-scavenging abilities, in rat liver microsomes they showed striking differences, the more effective being C12 (7) (IC50 = 11.03 M), linear C8 (3) (IC50 = 12.40 microM), C13 (8) (IC50 = 18.60 microM), and C9 (5) (IC50 = 19.74 microM), followed by C7 (2), C15 (9), C11 (6), branched C8 (4), C16 (10), and C18 (11) (ferulic acid was the less active, IC50 = 243.84 microM). All of the molecules showed similar partition coefficients in an octanol-buffer system. Three-dimensional studies (NMR in solution, modeling in vacuo) indicate that this behavior might be due to a different anchorage of the molecules with the ester side chain to the microsomal phospholipid bilayer and to a consequent different orientation/positioning of the scavenging phenoxy group outside the membrane surface against the flux of oxy radicals.

  17. Mechanistic Insight in the Enzymatic Ring-Opening Polymerization of beta-Propiolactam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwab, Leendert W.; Baum, Iris; Fels, Gregor; Loos, Katja; Cheng, HN; Gross, RA

    2010-01-01

    Here we report the polymerization of beta-propiolactam to poly(beta-alanine) catalyzed by the immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B (N435). The polymer is characterized by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy and MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry. The best results were obtained with N435 (dried for 24 hours in vacua a

  18. Functional reconstitution of Haemonchus contortus acetylcholine receptors in Xenopus oocytes provides mechanistic insights into levamisole resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulin, T; Fauvin, A; Charvet, CL; Cortet, J; Cabaret, J; Bessereau, J-L; Neveu, C

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The cholinergic agonist levamisole is widely used to treat parasitic nematode infestations. This anthelmintic drug paralyses worms by activating a class of levamisole-sensitive acetylcholine receptors (L-AChRs) expressed in nematode muscle cells. However, levamisole efficacy has been compromised by the emergence of drug-resistant parasites, especially in gastrointestinal nematodes such as Haemonchus contortus. We report here the first functional reconstitution and pharmacological characterization of H. contortus L-AChRs in a heterologous expression system. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH In the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, five AChR subunit and three ancillary protein genes are necessary in vivo and in vitro to synthesize L-AChRs. We have cloned the H. contortus orthologues of these genes and expressed them in Xenopus oocytes. We reconstituted two types of H. contortus L-AChRs with distinct pharmacologies by combining different receptor subunits. KEY RESULTS The Hco-ACR-8 subunit plays a pivotal role in selective sensitivity to levamisole. As observed with C. elegans L-AChRs, expression of H. contortus receptors requires the ancillary proteins Hco-RIC-3, Hco-UNC-50 and Hco-UNC-74. Using this experimental system, we demonstrated that a truncated Hco-UNC-63 L-AChR subunit, which was specifically detected in a levamisole-resistant H. contortus isolate, but not in levamisole-sensitive strains, hampers the normal function of L-AChRs, when co-expressed with its full-length counterpart. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS We provide the first functional evidence for a putative molecular mechanism involved in levamisole resistance in any parasitic nematode. This expression system will provide a means to analyse molecular polymorphisms associated with drug resistance at the electrophysiological level. PMID:21486278

  19. Structure of active IspH enzyme from escherichia coli provides mechanistic insights into substrate reduction

    KAUST Repository

    Gräwert, Tobias

    2009-07-20

    The terminal step of the non-mevalonate pathway of terpene biosynthesis is catalyzed by IspH (see scheme). In the crystal structure of IspH from E. coli, a bound inorganic diphosphate ligand occupies the position of the diphosphate residue of the substrate. Together with mutation studies and theoretical calculations, these data support a mechanism which is analogous to the Birch reduction of allylic alcohols. © 2009 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  20. Contact angle hysteresis on superhydrophobic surfaces: an ionic liquid probe fluid offers mechanistic insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumpfer, Joseph W; Bian, Pei; Zheng, Peiwen; Gao, Lichao; McCarthy, Thomas J

    2011-03-15

    Silicon/silicon dioxide surfaces containing 3 μm (width) × 6 μm (length) × 40 μm (height) staggered rhombus posts were prepared using photolithography and hydrophobized using a perfluoroalkyl-containing monofunctional silane. These surfaces exhibit water contact angles of θ(A)/θ(R) = 169°/156°. Water drops come to rest on a carefully aligned horizontal sample but roll when the surface is tilted slightly. No visible trail or evidence of water "left behind" at the receding edge of the drop is apparent on surfaces that water drops have rolled on or on samples removed from water through the air-water interface. When dimethylbis(β-hydroxyethyl)ammonium methanesulfonate (N(+)S(-), a nonvolatile ionic liquid) is used as the liquid probe fluid (instead of water), contact angles of θ(A)/θ(R) = 164°/152° are observed and ∼3-μm-diameter sessile drops are visible (by scanning electron microscopy - SEM) on the top of every post of a sample drawn out of this liquid. We interpret the formation of these sessile microdrops as arising from microcapillary bridge failure that occurs during receding events and emphasize that the capillary bridges rupture in primarily a tensile failure mode. Smaller sessile drops could be prepared using mixtures of water and N(+)S(-). Microdroplets of N(+)S(-) were also observed to form selectively at particular features on surfaces containing square holes separated by ridges. This suggests that pinning sites can be identified using microscopy and this ionic liquid probe fluid.

  1. Role of Glyoxalase 1 (Glo1 and methylglyoxal (MG in behavior: recent advances and mechanistic insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret G Distler

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Glyoxalase 1 (GLO1 is a ubiquitous cellular enzyme that participates in the detoxification of methylglyoxal (MG, a cyotoxic byproduct of glycolysis that induces protein modification (advanced glycation end-products, AGEs, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. The concentration of MG is elevated under high-glucose conditions, such as diabetes. As such, GLO1 and MG have been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Recently, findings have linked GLO1 to numerous behavioral phenotypes, including psychiatric diseases (anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, and autism and pain. This review highlights GLO1’s association with behavioral phenotypes, describes recent discoveries that have elucidated the underlying mechanisms, and identifies opportunities for future research.

  2. Structural and mechanistic insights into prokaryotic energy-coupling factor transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slotboom, Dirk J.

    2014-01-01

    Energy-coupling factor (ECF) transporters belong to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-transporter family and mediate the uptake of essential micronutrients in many prokaryotic species. Two crystal structures of bacterial ECF transporters have recently been obtained and suggest that transport involves

  3. Mechanistic insights into caspase-9 activation by the structure of the apoptosome holoenzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yini; Zhou, Mengying; Hu, Qi; Bai, Xiao-chen; Huang, Weiyun; Shi, Yigong

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian intrinsic apoptosis requires activation of the initiator caspase-9, which then cleaves and activates the effector caspases to execute cell killing. The heptameric Apaf-1 apoptosome is indispensable for caspase-9 activation by together forming a holoenzyme. The molecular mechanism of caspase-9 activation remains largely enigmatic. Here, we report the cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of an apoptotic holoenzyme and structure-guided biochemical analyses. The caspase recruitment domains (CARDs) of Apaf-1 and caspase-9 assemble in two different ways: a 4:4 complex docks onto the central hub of the apoptosome, and a 2:1 complex binds the periphery of the central hub. The interface between the CARD complex and the central hub is required for caspase-9 activation within the holoenzyme. Unexpectedly, the CARD of free caspase-9 strongly inhibits its proteolytic activity. These structural and biochemical findings demonstrate that the apoptosome activates caspase-9 at least in part through sequestration of the inhibitory CARD domain. PMID:28143931

  4. Mechanistic insights into the oxidative dehydrogenation of amines to nitriles in continuous flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corker, Emily C.; Ruiz-Martínez, Javier; Riisager, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    The oxidative dehydrogenation of various aliphatic amines to their corresponding nitrile compounds using RuO2/Al2O3 catalysts in air was successfully applied to a continuous flow reaction. Conversions of amines (up to >99%) and yields of nitriles (up to 77%) varied depending on reaction conditions...... and the amine utilised. The presence of water was found to be important for the activity and stability of the RuO2/Al2O3 catalyst. The Hammett relationship and in situ infrared spectroscopy were applied to divulge details about the catalytic mechanism of the oxidative dehydrogenation of amines over RuO2/Al2O3...

  5. The coproporphyrin ferrochelatase of Staphylococcus aureus : mechanistic insights into a regulatory iron binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Charlie; Reid, J D; Shepherd, Mark

    2017-09-01

    The majority of characterised ferrochelatase enzymes catalyse the final step of classical haem synthesis, inserting ferrous iron into protoporphyrin IX. However, for the recently-discovered coproporphyrin-dependent pathway, ferrochelatase catalyses the penultimate reaction where ferrous iron is inserted into coproporphyrin III. Ferrochelatase enzymes from the bacterial phyla Firmicutes and Actinobacteria have previously been shown to insert iron into coproporphyrin, and those from Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus are known to be inhibited by elevated iron concentrations. The work herein reports a Km (coproporphyrin III) for S. aureus ferrochelatase of 1.5 µM and it is shown that elevating the iron concentration increases the Km for coproporphyrin III, providing a potential explanation for the observed iron-mediated substrate inhibition. Together, structural modelling, site-directed mutagenesis, and kinetic analyses confirm residue Glu271 as being essential for the binding of iron to the inhibitory regulatory site on S. aureus ferrochelatase, providing a molecular explanation for the observed substrate inhibition patterns. This work therefore has implications for how haem biosynthesis in S. aureus is regulated by iron availability. ©2017 The Author(s).

  6. Mechanistic prospective for human PrPC conversion to PrPSc: Molecular dynamic insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nooshin Azari

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available PrPC conversion to PrPSc isoform is the main known cause for prion diseases including Crutzfeldt-Jakob, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Sheinker syndrome and fatal familial insomnia in human. The precise mechanism underling this conversion is yet to be well understood. In the present work, using the coordinate file of PrPC (available on the Protein Data Bank as a starting structure, separate molecular dynamic simulations were carried out at neutral and acidic pH in an explicit water box at 37°C and 1 atmosphere pressure for 10ns second period. Results showed that the acidic pH accelerates PrPC conversion to PrPSc by decreasing the protein gyration radius, flexibility and protein-solvent hydrogen bonds. In acidic conditions, PrPC attains a more folded and less flexible tertiary structure compared to its native structure at neutral pH; otherwise, the decrease of protein-solvent hydrogen bonds at acidic pH will enhance the hydrophobic character of PrPC that may exhibit association as multimeric assemblies. It can also lower water solubility and increase resistance to proteolytic degradations. Data indicated that there was no sensible protein denaturation during this conversion. It is hypothesized that the formation of slightly misfolded conformations with minor structural changes in secondary and/or tertiary structures are enough to menace scrapie formation in PrPC. Our findings show that scrapie formation seems to be a theoretically reversible process.

  7. Mechanistic insight into benzenethiol catalyzed amide bond formations from thioesters and primary amines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stuhr-Hansen, Nicolai; Bork, Nicolai; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    The influence of arylthiols on cysteine-free ligation, i.e. the reaction between an alkyl thioester and a primary amine forming an amide bond, was studied in a polar aprotic solvent. We reacted the ethylthioester of hippuric acid with cyclohexylamine in the absence or presence of various quantities...... of thiophenol (PhSH) in a slurry of disodium hydrogen phosphate in dry DMF. Quantitative conversions into the resulting amide were observed within a few hours in the presence of equimolar amounts of thiophenol. Ab initio calculations showed that the reaction mechanism in DMF is similar to the well-known aqueous...... in the aromatic thioester amidation reaction. Under similar conditions, cysteine-free ligation was achieved by coupling a fully side-chain protected 15 amino acid phosphopeptide thioester to the free N-terminal of a side-chain protected 9 amino acid peptide producing the corresponding 24 amino acid phosphopeptide....

  8. Energetics of methanol and formic acid oxidation on Pt(111): Mechanistic insights from adsorption calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbaugh, Trent L.; Karp, Eric M.; Campbell, Charles T.

    2016-08-01

    The catalytic and electrocatalytic oxidation and reforming of methanol and formic acid have received intense interest due to potential use in direct fuel cells and as prototype models for understanding electrocatalysis. Consequently, the reaction energy diagram (energies of all the adsorbed intermediates and activation energies of all the elementary steps) have been estimated for these reactions on Pt(111) by density functional theory (DFT) in several studies. However, no experimental measurement of these energy diagrams have been reported, nor is there a consensus on the mechanisms. Here, we use energies of key intermediates on Pt(111) from single crystal adsorption calorimetry (SCAC) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) to build a combined energy diagram for these reactions. It suggests a new pathway involving monodentate formate as a key intermediate, with bidentate formate only being a spectator species that slows the rate. This helps reconcile conflicting proposed mechanisms.

  9. Carbapenem resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii: laboratory challenges, mechanistic insights and therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Iain; Cerqueira, Gustavo M; Bhuiyan, Saruar; Peleg, Anton Y

    2013-04-01

    Unprecedented levels of antimicrobial resistance in bacterial isolates have prompted great concerns globally. In 2012 the WHO released a publication outlining the evolving threat of antimicrobial resistance in order to raise awareness and to stimulate coordinated international efforts. The carbapenem class of antibiotics is largely considered as an antibiotic of last-resort when treating infections. Now carbapenem resistance further limits treatment options. In this article the authors discuss carbapenem resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii, a bacterial isolate often implicated in nosocomial infections. Virulence factors, intrinsic and acquired resistance mechanisms, together with laboratory challenges in the detection and antibiotic susceptibility testing of A. baumannii make this a truly problematic isolate. Therapeutic options are exceedingly limited, relying on polymyxins in combinations with other antibiotics, with few, if any, new active agents in the pipeline.

  10. In Situ Generation of Molybdenum-Based Catalyst for Alkyne Metathesis: Further Developments and Mechanistic Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Lopez Joaquin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum-based catalysts are among the best candidates to achieve alkyne metathesis. They can be either well-defined carbynes, previously synthesized before their use, but also prepared in situ upon using stable molybdenum carbonyl complexes, or high oxidation state molybdenum salts that need a previous alkylation, both type of precursors being “activated” by hydroxyl-containing compounds such as phenols and silanols. This paper is presenting studies made on these systems, directed towards the knowledge of the reaction paths leading to the active species, and in particular to define the essential role of hydroxyl-containing co-catalyst in the formation of the active species, still ill-defined. From an analysis of the byproducts formed during the reaction, as well as of the initial products, reaction paths to access catalytic carbyne species is suggested, where the ligand environment consists of phenoxy (or siloxy groups, typically required and identified to lead to alkyne metathesis in the case of well-defined catalysts.

  11. Mechanistic insights into chemical and photochemical transformations of bismuth vanadate photoanodes

    OpenAIRE

    Toma, Francesca M.; Cooper, Jason K.; Kunzelmann, Viktoria; McDowell, Matthew T.; Yu, Jie; Larson, David M.; Borys, Nicholas J.; Abelyan, Christine; Beeman, Jeffrey W.; Yu, Kin Man; Yang, Jinhui; Chen, Le; Shaner, Matthew R.; Spurgeon, Joshua; Houle, Frances A.

    2016-01-01

    Artificial photosynthesis relies on the availability of semiconductors that are chemically stable and can efficiently capture solar energy. Although metal oxide semiconductors have been investigated for their promise to resist oxidative attack, materials in this class can suffer from chemical and photochemical instability. Here we present a methodology for evaluating corrosion mechanisms and apply it to bismuth vanadate, a state-of-the-art photoanode. Analysis of changing morphology and compo...

  12. Mechanistic Insights into the Formation of InP Quantum Dots**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Peter M.; Walker, Brian J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the molecular mechanism of InP colloidal quantum dot (QD) syntheses. Unlike methods for monodisperse PbSe and CdSe we found that existing InP syntheses result in total depletion of molecular phosphorous species following nucleation, so QD growth is due exclusively to non-molecular ripening. We find that amines inhibit precursor depletion via solvation, and these findings may lead to better synthetic methodology for InP QDs. PMID:20025010

  13. T-tubule disruption promotes calcium alternans in failing ventricular myocytes: mechanistic insights from computational modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivala, Michael; Song, Zhen; Weiss, James N; Qu, Zhilin

    2015-02-01

    In heart failure (HF), T-tubule (TT) disruption contributes to dyssynchronous calcium (Ca) release and impaired contraction, but its role in arrhythmogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we investigate the effects of TT disruption and other HF remodeling factors on Ca alternans in ventricular myocytes using computer modeling. A ventricular myocyte model with detailed spatiotemporal Ca cycling modeled by a coupled Ca release unit (CRU) network was used, in which the L-type Ca channels and the ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels were simulated by random Markov transitions. TT disruption, which removes the L-type Ca channels from the associated CRUs, results in "orphaned" RyR clusters and thus provides increased opportunity for spark-induced Ca sparks to occur. This effect combined with other HF remodeling factors promoted alternans by two distinct mechanisms: 1) for normal sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca ATPase (SERCA) activity, alternans was caused by both CRU refractoriness and coupling. The increased opportunity for spark-induced sparks by TT disruption combined with the enhanced CRU coupling by Ca elevation in the presence or absence of increased RyR leakiness facilitated spark synchronization on alternate beats to promote Ca alternans; 2) for down-regulated SERCA, alternans was caused by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca load-dependent mechanism, independent of CRU refractoriness. TT disruption and increased RyR leakiness shifted and steepened the SR Ca release-load relationship, which combines with down-regulated SERCA to promote Ca alternans. In conclusion, the mechanisms of Ca alternans for normal and down-regulated SERCA are different, and TT disruption promotes Ca alternans by both mechanisms, which may contribute to alternans at different stages of HF.

  14. Mechanistic Insight of Bivalent Compound 21MO as Potential Neuroprotectant for Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Saathoff

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We have recently developed a bivalent strategy to provide novel compounds that potentially target multiple risk factors involved in the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Our previous studies employing a bivalent compound with a shorter spacer (17MN implicated that this compound can localize into mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER, thus interfering with the change of mitochondria membrane potential (MMP and Ca2+ levels in MC65 cells upon removal of tetracycline (TC. In this report, we examined the effects by a bivalent compound with a longer spacer (21MO in MC65 cells. Our results demonstrated that 21MO suppressed the change of MMP, possibly via interaction with the mitochondrial complex I in MC65 cells. Interestingly, 21MO did not show any effects on the Ca2+ level upon TC removal in MC65 cells. Our previous studies suggested that the mobilization of Ca2+ in MC65 cells, upon withdraw of TC, originated from ER, so the results implicated that 21MO may preferentially interact with mitochondria in MC65 cells under the current experimental conditions. Collectively, the results suggest that bivalent compounds with varied spacer length and cell membrane anchor moiety may exhibit neuroprotective activities via different mechanisms of action.

  15. Direct observation of failing fibers in muscles of dystrophic mice provides mechanistic insight into muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claflin, Dennis R; Brooks, Susan V

    2008-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is caused by the absence of the protein dystrophin. Dystrophin's function is not known, but its cellular location and associations with both the force-generating contractile core and membrane-spanning entities suggest a role in mechanically coupling force from its intracellular origins to the fiber membrane and beyond. We report here the presence of destructive contractile activity in lumbrical muscles from dystrophin-deficient (mdx) mice during nominally quiescent periods following exposure to mechanical stress. The ectopic activity, which was observable microscopically, resulted in longitudinal separation and clotting of fiber myoplasm and was absent when calcium (Ca(2+)) was removed from the bathing medium. Separation and clotting of myoplasm were also produced in dystrophin-deficient muscles by local application of a Ca(2+) ionophore to create membrane breaches in the absence of mechanical stress, whereas muscles from control mice tolerated ionophore-induced entry of Ca(2+) without damage. These observations suggest a failure cascade in dystrophin-deficient fibers that 1) is initiated by a stress-induced influx of extracellular Ca(2+), causing localized activation to continue after cessation of stimulation, and 2) proceeds as the persistent local activation, combined with reduced lateral mechanical coupling between the contractile core and the extracellular matrix, results in longitudinal separation of myoplasm in nonactivated regions of the fiber. This mechanism invokes both the membrane stabilization and the mechanical coupling functions frequently proposed for dystrophin and suggests that, whereas the absence of either function alone is not sufficient to cause fiber failure, their combined absence is catastrophic.

  16. Mechanistic insight into degradation of endocrine disrupting chemical by hydroxyl radical: An experimental and theoretical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ruiyang; Gao, Lingwei; Wei, Zongsu; Spinney, Richard; Luo, Shuang; Wang, Donghong; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Tang, Chong-Jian; Yang, Weichun

    2017-09-13

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) based on formation of free radicals at ambient temperature and pressure are effective for treating endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in waters. In this study, we systematically investigated the degradation kinetics of bisphenol A (BPA), a representative EDC by hydroxyl radical (OH) with a combination of experimental and theoretical approaches. The second-order rate constant (k) of BPA with OH was experimentally determined to be 7.2 ± 0.34 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 7.55. We also calculated the thermodynamic and kinetic behaviors for the bimolecular reactions by density functional theory (DFT) using the M05-2X method with 6-311++G** basis set and solvation model based on density (SMD). The results revealed that H-abstraction on the phenol group is the most favorable pathway for OH. The theoretical k value corrected by the Collins-Kimball approach was determined to be 1.03 × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1), which is in reasonable agreement with the experimental observation. These results are of fundamental and practical importance in understanding the chemical interactions between OH and BPA, and aid further AOPs design in treating EDCs during wastewater treatment processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Structural and mechanistic insights into MICU1 regulation of mitochondrial calcium uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lele; Yang, Xue; Li, Siwei; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Yu; Feng, Jianrong; Zhu, Yushan; Shen, Yuequan

    2014-03-18

    Mitochondrial calcium uptake is a critical event in various cellular activities. Two recently identified proteins, the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU), which is the pore-forming subunit of a Ca(2+) channel, and mitochondrial calcium uptake 1 (MICU1), which is the regulator of MCU, are essential in this event. However, the molecular mechanism by which MICU1 regulates MCU remains elusive. In this study, we report the crystal structures of Ca(2+)-free and Ca(2+)-bound human MICU1. Our studies reveal that Ca(2+)-free MICU1 forms a hexamer that binds and inhibits MCU. Upon Ca(2+) binding, MICU1 undergoes large conformational changes, resulting in the formation of multiple oligomers to activate MCU. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the affinity of MICU1 for Ca(2+) is approximately 15-20 μM. Collectively, our results provide valuable details to decipher the molecular mechanism of MICU1 regulation of mitochondrial calcium uptake.

  18. Mechanistic insights into the bleaching of melanin by alkaline hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R A W; Garrett, B; Naqvi, K R; Fülöp, A; Godfrey, S P; Marsh, J M; Chechik, V

    2017-07-01

    This work aims to determine the roles of reactive oxygen species HO∙ and HO2(-) in the bleaching of melanins by alkaline hydrogen peroxide. Experiments using melanosomes isolated from human hair indicated that the HO∙ radical generated in the outside solution does not contribute significantly to bleaching. However, studies using soluble Sepia melanin demonstrated that both HO2(-) and HO∙ will individually bleach melanin. Additionally, when both oxidants are present, bleaching is increased dramatically in both rate and extent. Careful experimental design enabled the separation of the roles and effects of these key reactive species, HO∙ and HO2(-). Rationalisation of the results presented, and review of previous literature, allowed the postulation of a simplified general scheme whereby the strong oxidant HO∙ is able to pre-oxidise melanin units to o-quinones enabling more facile ring opening by the more nucleophilic HO2(-). In this manner the efficiency of the roles of both species is maximised. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanistic Insights to the Influence of Adsorbed Organic Macromolecules on Nanoparticle Attachment Efficiency in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phenrat, T.; Song, J.; Cisneros, C. M.; Schoenfelder, D. P.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Tilton, R. D.; Lowry, G. V.

    2009-12-01

    Assessing the potential risks of natural or engineered nanoparticles to the environment and human health requires the ability to predict their mobility in porous media such as groundwater aquifers or sand filters used in water treatment. Semi-empirical correlations to predict the collision efficiency of electrostatically stabilized nanoparticles are available; however, they are not applicable to nanoparticles coated with natural organic matter (NOM) or polymeric surface coatings because the existing correlations do not account the electrosteric repulsions and lubrication afforded by coatings that inhibit or reverse nanoparticle attachment to surfaces. Regression analysis of published data on the collision efficiency of NOM-coated latex and hematite particles, and on new data collected for poly(styrene sulfonate)-, carboxy methyl cellulose, and polyaspartate-coated hematite and titanium dioxide nanoparticles was used to develop an empirical correlation of the collision efficiency of NOM- and polymer-coated nanomaterials and dimensionless parameters including the adsorbed layer-electrokinetic parameter (NLEK) representing electrosteric repulsions and lubrication afforded by adsorbed NOM or polyelectrolyte. An empirical correlation with three dimensionless parameters can predict the measured collision efficiency on coated metal oxide nanoparticles over a wide dynamic range in particle type, coating type, and solution conditions (~80 data points). This study indicates that including the adsorbed NOM and polymer layer properties of the properties is essential for understanding the transport and fate of NOM- and polymer-coated natural and manufactured nanomaterials in porous media.

  20. Bacterial replication, transcription and translation : mechanistic insights from single-molecule biochemical studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robinson, Andrew; van Oijen, Antoine M.

    2013-01-01

    Decades of research have resulted in a remarkably detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms of bacterial DNA replication, transcription and translation. Our understanding of the kinetics and physical mechanisms that drive these processes forward has been expanded by the ability of single-mo

  1. Mechanistic insight provided by glutaredoxin within a fusion to redox-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björnberg, Olof; Østergaard, Henrik; Winther, Jakob R

    2006-01-01

    Redox-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein (rxYFP) contains a dithiol disulfide pair that is thermodynamically suitable for monitoring intracellular glutathione redox potential. Glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1p) from yeast is known to catalyze the redox equilibrium between rxYFP and glutathione, and here, we...... have generated a fusion of the two proteins, rxYFP-Grx1p. In comparison to isolated subunits, intramolecular transfer of reducing equivalents made the fusion protein kinetically superior in reactions with glutathione. The rate of GSSG oxidation was thus improved by a factor of 3300. The reaction...... separately and in the fusion. This could not be ascribed to the lack of an unproductive side reaction to glutaredoxin disulfide. Instead, slower alkylation kinetics with iodoacetamide indicates a better leaving-group capability of the remaining cysteine residue, which can explain the increased activity....

  2. Mechanistic insights from atomically precise gold nanocluster-catalyzed reduction of 4-nitrophenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Zhao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A trio of thiolate-protected atomically precise gold nanoclusters, [Au23(S-c-C6H1116]–, Au24(SCH2pHtBu20 and [Au25(SCH2CH2pH18]–, are utilized as catalysts for 4-nitrophenol (4-NP reduction to 4-aminophenol (4-AP. Despite nearly identical sizes (~1 nm, the three nanoclusters possess distinctly different atomic packing structures and surface ligand binding modes, which contribute to different catalytic performance. The [Au23(S-c-C6H1116]– nanocluster shows the highest activity with a kinetic rate constant of 0.0370 s−1, which is higher than those of Au24(SCH2pHtBu20 (0.0090 s−1 and [Au25(SCH2CH2pH18]– (0.0242 s−1. Such a trio of gold nanoclusters indicate that the atomic packing mode and electronic structure play a crucial role in determining their catalytic performance.

  3. A mechanistic insight into 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine ("ecstasy")-mediated hepatotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antolino-Lobo, I.; Meulenbelt, J.; van den Berg, M.; van Duursen, M.B.M.

    2012-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") is a popular drug of abuse among young people with stimulant and hallucinogenic properties. The drug is generally thought to be safe among consumers due to its low-mortality rates. However, MDMA-adverse effects can occur and the risks are not clear

  4. Structural and mechanistic insights into ABC-type ECF transporters for vitamin uptake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dosz-Majsnerowska, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Dit proefschrift gaat over de relatie tussen de structuur en het mechanisme van ABC-type ECF transporters voor vitamines, uit de bacterie Lactococcus lactis. Energy-Coupling Factor (ECF) transporters vormen een subgroep van de ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters en zijn betrokken bij de opname

  5. Mechanistic and Kinetic Insight into Spontaneous Cocrystallization of Isoniazid and Benzoic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarceviča, Inese; Orola, Liana; Nartowski, Karol P; Khimyak, Yaroslav Z; Round, Andrew N; Fábián, László

    2015-08-03

    Solid-state cocrystallization is of contemporary interest because it offers an easy and efficient way to produce cocrystals, which are recognized as prospective pharmaceutical materials. Research explaining solid-state cocrystallization mechanisms is important but still too scarce to give a broad understanding of factors governing and limiting these reactions. Here we report an investigation of the mechanism and kinetics of isoniazid cocrystallization with benzoic acid. This reaction is spontaneous; however, its rate is greatly influenced by environmental conditions (humidity and temperature) and pretreatment (milling) of the sample. The acceleration of cocrystallization in the presence of moisture is demonstrated by kinetic studies at elevated humidity. The rate dependence on humidity stems from moisture facilitated rearrangements on the surface of isoniazid crystallites, which lead to cocrystallization in the presence of benzoic acid vapor. Furthermore, premilling the mixture of the cocrystal ingredients eliminated the induction time of the reaction and considerably increased its rate.

  6. Structural and mechanistic insights into Helicobacter pylori NikR activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahlawane, C.; Dian, C.; Muller, C.; Round, A.; Fauquant, C.; Schauer, K.; de Reuse, H.; Terradot, L.; Michaud-Soret, I.

    2010-01-01

    NikR is a transcriptional metalloregulator central in the mandatory response to acidity of Helicobacter pylori that controls the expression of numerous genes by binding to specific promoter regions. NikR/DNA interactions were proposed to rely on protein activation by Ni(II) binding to high-affinity (HA) and possibly secondary external (X) sites. We describe a biochemical characterization of HpNikR mutants that shows that the HA sites are essential but not sufficient for DNA binding, while the secondary external (X) sites and residues from the HpNikR dimer–dimer interface are important for DNA binding. We show that a second metal is necessary for HpNikR/DNA binding, but only to some promoters. Small-angle X-ray scattering shows that HpNikR adopts a defined conformation in solution, resembling the cis-conformation and suggests that nickel does not trigger large conformational changes in HpNikR. The crystal structures of selected mutants identify the effects of each mutation on HpNikR structure. This study unravels key structural features from which we derive a model for HpNikR activation where: (i) HA sites and an hydrogen bond network are required for DNA binding and (ii) metallation of a unique secondary external site (X) modulates HpNikR DNA binding to low-affinity promoters by disruption of a salt bridge. PMID:20089510

  7. Antioxidative activity of high-density lipoprotein (HDL): Mechanistic insights into potential clinical benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brites, Fernando; Martin, Maximiliano; Guillas, Isabelle; Kontush, Anatol

    2017-12-01

    Uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles by macrophages represents a key step in the development of atherosclerotic plaques, leading to the foam cell formation. Chemical modification of LDL is however necessary to induce this process. Proatherogenic LDL modifications include aggregation, enzymatic digestion and oxidation. LDL oxidation by one-electron (free radicals) and two-electron oxidants dramatically increases LDL affinity to macrophage scavenger receptors, leading to rapid LDL uptake and fatty streak formation. Circulating high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles, primarily small, dense, protein-rich HDL3, provide potent protection of LDL from oxidative damage by free radicals, resulting in the inhibition of the generation of pro-inflammatory oxidized lipids. HDL-mediated inactivation of lipid hydroperoxides involves their initial transfer from LDL to HDL and subsequent reduction to inactive hydroxides by redox-active Met residues of apolipoprotein A-I. Several HDL-associated enzymes are present at elevated concentrations in HDL3 relative to large, light HDL2 and can be involved in the inactivation of short-chain oxidized phospholipids. Therefore, HDL represents a multimolecular complex capable of acquiring and inactivating proatherogenic lipids. Antioxidative function of HDL can be impaired in several metabolic and inflammatory diseases. Structural and compositional anomalies in the HDL proteome and lipidome underlie such functional deficiency. Concomitant normalization of the metabolism, circulating levels, composition and biological activities of HDL particles, primarily those of small, dense HDL3, can constitute future therapeutic target.

  8. Immunity activation in brain cells in epilepsy: mechanistic insights and pathological consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravizza, Teresa; Kostoula, Chrysaugi; Vezzani, Annamaria

    2013-12-01

    The search of targets for developing novel drugs that can control seizures resistant to available treatments in children and adults represents a great challenge for basic science. In the past decade, emerging evidence pointed out to the crucial role played by glia, the innate immunity brain-resident cells, in the generation of hyperexcitable neuronal networks underlying seizures. Molecular and pharmacological studies targeting glia, and the inflammatory mediators released by these cells in experimental models of epilepsy, highlighted novel targets for drug intervention aimed at interfering with the disease mechanisms, therefore providing putative disease-modifying treatments. This article will focus on the role of immunity activation in the brain and the concomitant release by glia of inflammatory molecules with neuromodulatory properties, in the pathogenesis of epileptic seizures, cell loss, and comorbidities.

  9. Mechanistic insights into amplification of specific ion effect in water-nonaqueous solvent mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lvdan; Wang, Tao; Liu, Chang; Lin, Ke; Ding, Yanwei; Liu, Guangming; Zhang, Guangzhao

    2013-02-28

    Ethylene glycol (EG) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can act as both hydrogen-bond donors and acceptors in the formation of solvent complexes with water molecules. In the present work, we have systematically investigated the ion-specific lower critical solution temperature (LCST) behavior of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) in H2O–EG and H2O–H2O2 mixtures. The results obtained from turbidity measurements show that the specific anion effect is amplified with the increasing molar fraction of EG (x(EG)) but is independent of the molar fraction of H2O2 (x(H2O2)). The studies of Raman spectra and differential scanning calorimetry indicate that the discrepancy in amplification of specific anion effect between H2O–EG and H2O–H2O2 mixtures is due to the difference in the anion–solvent complex interactions rather than the anion–polymer or solvent–polymer interactions. On the other hand, the specific cation effect can also be amplified with the increasing x(EG) but changes only slightly with the x(H2O2). The discrepancy in amplification of specific cation effect between the two types of solvent mixtures is attributed to the difference in the solvent–polymer interactions.

  10. Mechanistic insight into the norepinephrine-induced fibrosis in systemic sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Akihito; Motegi, Sei-ichiro; Yamada, Kazuya; Uchiyama, Akihiko; Perera, Buddhini; Toki, Sayaka; Ogino, Sachiko; Yokoyama, Yoko; Takeuchi, Yuko; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Raynaud’s phenomenon is frequently observed in systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients, and cold- or stress-induced norepinephrine (NE) has been speculated to be associated with vasoconstriction. Objective was to elucidate the role of NE in fibrosis in SSc. IL-6 is a potent stimulator of collagen production in fibroblasts. NE enhanced IL-6 production and proliferation more significantly in SSc fibroblasts than in normal fibroblasts. Furthermore, the production of IL-6 and phosphorylation of p38 in SSc fibroblasts was enhanced by adrenergic receptor (AR)β agonist, isoproterenol, but not ARα agonist, oxymetazoline. ARβ blocker, propranolol, inhibited NE-induced IL-6 production and phosphorylation of p38 in SSc fibroblasts. NE-induced IL-6 was significantly inhibited by p38 inhibitor, SB203580, suggesting that NE-induced phosphorylation of p38 via ARβ enhances IL-6 production in SSc fibroblasts. NE-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 via ARα inhibited IL-6 production in SSc fibroblasts. Combined treatment with NE and endothelin-1 resulted in an additive increase in IL-6 production in SSc fibroblasts. NE-induced IL-6/IL-6 receptor trans-signaling increased the production of collagen type I in SSc fibroblasts, and both propranolol and SB203580 inhibited NE-induced collagen production. These results suggest that cold exposure and/or emotional stress-induced NE might contribute to the skin fibrosis via potentiation of IL-6 production from fibroblasts in SSc. PMID:27650973

  11. Recent structural and mechanistic insights into protein O-GalNAc glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon

    2016-02-01

    Protein O-GalNAcylation is an abundant post-translational modification and predicted to occur in over 80% of the proteins passing through the Golgi apparatus. This modification is driven by 20 polypeptide GaINAc (N-acetylgalactosamine)-transferases (GalNAc-Ts), which are unique in that they possess both catalytic and lectin domains. The peptide substrate specificities of GalNAc-Ts are still poorly defined and our understanding of the sequence and structural features that direct O-glycosylation of proteins is limited. Part of this may be attributed to the complex regulation by coordinated action of multiple GalNAc-T isoforms, and part of this may also be attributed to the two functional domains of GalNAc-Ts that both seems to be involved in directing the substrate specificities. Recent studies have resulted in 3D structures of GalNAc-Ts and determination of the reaction mechanism of this family of enzymes. Key advances include the trapping of binary/ternary complexes in combination with computational simulations and AFM/small-SAXS experiments, which have allowed for the dissection of the reaction coordinates and the mechanism by which the lectin domains modulate the glycosylation. These studies not only broaden our knowledge of the modes-of-action of this family of enzymes but also open up potential avenues for the rational design of effective and selective inhibitors of O-glycosylation.

  12. Mechanistic Insights into the Structure-Dependent Selectivity of Catalytic Furfural Conversion on Platinum Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Qiuxia; Wang, Jianguo; Wang, Yang-Gang; Mei, Donghai

    2015-11-01

    The effects of structure and size on the selectivity of catalytic furfural conversion over supported Pt catalysts in the presence of hydrogen have been studied using first principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations and microkinetic modeling. Four Pt model systems, i.e., periodic Pt(111), Pt(211) surfaces, as well as small nanoclusters (Pt13 and Pt55) are chosen to represent the terrace, step, and corner sites of Pt nanoparticles. Our DFT results show that the reaction routes for furfural hydrogenation and decarbonylation are strongly dependent on the type of reactive sites, which lead to the different selectivity. On the basis of the size-dependent site distribution rule, we correlate the site distributions as a function of the Pt particle size. Our microkinetic results indicate the critical particle size that controls the furfural selectivity is about 1.0 nm, which is in good agreement with the reported experimental value under reaction conditions. This work was supported by National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (2013CB733501) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC-21306169, 21176221, 21136001, 21101137 and 91334103). This work was also partially supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computing time was granted by the grand challenge of computational catalysis of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). EMSL is a national scientific user facility located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and sponsored by DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research.

  13. Structure of a Human Astrovirus Capsid-Antibody Complex and Mechanistic Insights into Virus Neutralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdanoff, Walter A.; Campos, Jocelyn; Perez, Edmundo I.; Yin, Lu; Alexander, David L.; DuBois, Rebecca M. (UCSC)

    2016-11-02

    ABSTRACT

    Human astroviruses (HAstVs) are a leading cause of viral diarrhea in young children, the immunocompromised, and the elderly. There are no vaccines or antiviral therapies against HAstV disease. Several lines of evidence point to the presence of protective antibodies in healthy adults as a mechanism governing protection against reinfection by HAstV. However, development of anti-HAstV therapies is hampered by the gap in knowledge of protective antibody epitopes on the HAstV capsid surface. Here, we report the structure of the HAstV capsid spike domain bound to the neutralizing monoclonal antibody PL-2. The antibody uses all six complementarity-determining regions to bind to a quaternary epitope on each side of the dimeric capsid spike. We provide evidence that the HAstV capsid spike is a receptor-binding domain and that the antibody neutralizes HAstV by blocking virus attachment to cells. We identify patches of conserved amino acids that overlap the antibody epitope and may comprise a receptor-binding site. Our studies provide a foundation for the development of therapies to prevent and treat HAstV diarrheal disease.

    IMPORTANCEHuman astroviruses (HAstVs) infect nearly every person in the world during childhood and cause diarrhea, vomiting, and fever. Despite the prevalence of this virus, little is known about how antibodies in healthy adults protect them against reinfection. Here, we determined the crystal structure of a complex of the HAstV capsid protein and a virus-neutralizing antibody. We show that the antibody binds to the outermost spike domain of the capsid, and we provide evidence that the antibody blocks virus attachment to human cells. Importantly, our findings suggest that a subunit-based vaccine focusing the immune system on the HAstV capsid spike domain could be effective in protecting children against HAstV disease.

  14. Insight into the Willgerodt-Kindler Reaction of ω-Haloacetophenone Derivatives: Mechanistic Implication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbain C. Kasséhin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports efforts aimed at tuning up the synthesis of a compound library centered on the general template 2-amino-1-phenyl-2-thioxoethanone taking the condensation of ω-haloacetophenone, octasulfur, and morpholine as pilot reaction. Considerations about atomic economy were found extremely precious in selecting the best starting halo-reagent. A one-pot practical method based on use of 2-bromo-1-phenylethanone as substrate and N,N-dimethylformamide as solvent can be easily scaled up to gram amounts (72% yield. Based on this synthetic approach, some more specific examples are reported.

  15. Unified superresolution experiments and stochastic theory provide mechanistic insight into protein ion-exchange adsorptive separations

    OpenAIRE

    Kisley, Lydia; Chen, Jixin; Mansur, Andrea P.; Shuang, Bo; Kourentzi, Katerina; Poongavanam, Mohan-Vivekanandan; Chen, Wen-Hsiang; Dhamane, Sagar; Willson, Richard C.; Landes, Christy F.

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of proteins underlies the purification of biopharmaceuticals, as well as therapeutic apheresis, immunoassays, and biosensors. In particular, separation of proteins by interactions with charged ligands on surfaces (ion-exchange chromatography) is an essential tool of the modern pharmaceutical industry. By quantifying the interactions of single proteins with individual charged ligands, we demonstrate that clusters of charges are necessary to create functional adsorption sites and tha...

  16. Mouse xenograft modeling of human adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia provides mechanistic insights into adult LIC biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Aditi; Castleton, Anna Z.; Schwab, Claire; Samuel, Edward; Sivakumaran, Janani; Beaton, Brendan; Zareian, Nahid; Zhang, Christie Yu; Rai, Lena; Enver, Tariq; Moorman, Anthony V.; Fielding, Adele K.

    2014-01-01

    The distinct nature of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adults, evidenced by inferior treatment outcome and different genetic landscape, mandates specific studies of disease-initiating mechanisms. In this study, we used NOD/LtSz-scid IL2Rγ nullc (NSG) mouse xenotransplantation approaches to elucidate leukemia-initiating cell (LIC) biology in primary adult precursor B (pre-B) ALL to optimize disease modeling. In contrast with xenografting studies of pediatric ALL, we found that modification of the NSG host environment using preconditioning total body irradiation (TBI) was indispensable for efficient engraftment of adult non-t(4;11) pre-B ALL, whereas t(4;11) pre-B ALL was successfully reconstituted without this adaptation. Furthermore, TBI-based xenotransplantation of non-t(4;11) pre-B ALL enabled detection of a high frequency of LICs (<1:6900) and permitted frank leukemic engraftment from a remission sample containing drug-resistant minimal residual disease. Investigation of TBI-sensitive stromal-derived factor-1/chemokine receptor type 4 signaling revealed greater functional dependence of non-t(4;11) pre-B ALL on this niche-based interaction, providing a possible basis for the differential engraftment behavior. Thus, our studies establish the optimal conditions for experimental modeling of human adult pre-B ALL and demonstrate the critical protumorogenic role of microenvironment-derived SDF-1 in regulating adult pre-B LIC activity that may present a therapeutic opportunity. PMID:24825861

  17. Mechanistic phenotypes: an aggregative phenotyping strategy to identify disease mechanisms using GWAS data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D Mosley

    Full Text Available A single mutation can alter cellular and global homeostatic mechanisms and give rise to multiple clinical diseases. We hypothesized that these disease mechanisms could be identified using low minor allele frequency (MAF<0.1 non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs associated with "mechanistic phenotypes", comprised of collections of related diagnoses. We studied two mechanistic phenotypes: (1 thrombosis, evaluated in a population of 1,655 African Americans; and (2 four groupings of cancer diagnoses, evaluated in 3,009 white European Americans. We tested associations between nsSNPs represented on GWAS platforms and mechanistic phenotypes ascertained from electronic medical records (EMRs, and sought enrichment in functional ontologies across the top-ranked associations. We used a two-step analytic approach whereby nsSNPs were first sorted by the strength of their association with a phenotype. We tested associations using two reverse genetic models and standard additive and recessive models. In the second step, we employed a hypothesis-free ontological enrichment analysis using the sorted nsSNPs to identify functional mechanisms underlying the diagnoses comprising the mechanistic phenotypes. The thrombosis phenotype was solely associated with ontologies related to blood coagulation (Fisher's p = 0.0001, FDR p = 0.03, driven by the F5, P2RY12 and F2RL2 genes. For the cancer phenotypes, the reverse genetics models were enriched in DNA repair functions (p = 2×10-5, FDR p = 0.03 (POLG/FANCI, SLX4/FANCP, XRCC1, BRCA1, FANCA, CHD1L while the additive model showed enrichment related to chromatid segregation (p = 4×10-6, FDR p = 0.005 (KIF25, PINX1. We were able to replicate nsSNP associations for POLG/FANCI, BRCA1, FANCA and CHD1L in independent data sets. Mechanism-oriented phenotyping using collections of EMR-derived diagnoses can elucidate fundamental disease mechanisms.

  18. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 and DNA repair by uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Karen L; Dashner, Erica J; Tsosie, Ranalda; Cho, Young Mi; Lewis, Johnnye; Hudson, Laurie G

    2016-01-15

    Uranium has radiological and non-radiological effects within biological systems and there is increasing evidence for genotoxic and carcinogenic properties attributable to uranium through its heavy metal properties. In this study, we report that low concentrations of uranium (as uranyl acetate; uranium exacerbates DNA damage and cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that uranium may inhibit DNA repair processes. Concentrations of uranyl acetate in the low micromolar range inhibited the zinc finger DNA repair protein poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 and caused zinc loss from PARP-1 protein. Uranyl acetate exposure also led to zinc loss from the zinc finger DNA repair proteins Xeroderma Pigmentosum, Complementation Group A (XPA) and aprataxin (APTX). In keeping with the observed inhibition of zinc finger function of DNA repair proteins, exposure to uranyl acetate enhanced retention of induced DNA damage. Co-incubation of uranyl acetate with zinc largely overcame the impact of uranium on PARP-1 activity and DNA damage. These findings present evidence that low concentrations of uranium can inhibit DNA repair through disruption of zinc finger domains of specific target DNA repair proteins. This may provide a mechanistic basis to account for the published observations that uranium exposure is associated with DNA repair deficiency in exposed human populations.

  19. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 and DNA repair by uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Karen L.; Dashner, Erica J.; Tsosie, Ranalda; Cho, Young Mi; Lewis, Johnnye

    2015-01-01

    Uranium has radiological and non-radiological effects within biological systems and there is increasing evidence for genotoxic and carcinogenic properties attributable to uranium through its heavy metal properties. In this study, we report that low concentrations of uranium (as uranyl acetate; <10 μM) is not cytotoxic to human embryonic kidney cells or normal human keratinocytes; however, uranium exacerbates DNA damage and cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that uranium may inhibit DNA repair processes. Concentrations of uranyl acetate in the low micromolar range inhibited the zinc finger DNA repair protein poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 and caused zinc loss from PARP-1 protein. Uranyl acetate exposure also led to zinc loss from the zinc finger DNA repair proteins Xeroderma Pigmentosum, Complementation Group A (XPA) and aprataxin (APTX). In keeping with the observed inhibition of zinc finger function of DNA repair proteins, exposure to uranyl acetate enhanced retention of induced DNA damage. Co-incubation of uranyl acetate with zinc largely overcame the impact of uranium on PARP-1 activity and DNA damage. These findings present evidence that low concentrations of uranium can inhibit DNA repair through disruption of zinc finger domains of specific target DNA repair proteins. This may provide a mechanistic basis to account for the published observations that uranium exposure is associated with DNA repair deficiency in exposed human populations. PMID:26627003

  20. Nanomaterials promise better bone repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qifei Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials mimicking the nano-features of bones and offering unique smart functions are promising for better bone fracture repair. This review provides an overview of the current state-of-the-art research in developing and using nanomaterials for better bone fracture repair. This review begins with a brief introduction of bone fracture repair processes, then discusses the importance of vascularization, the role of growth factors in bone fracture repair, and the failure of bone fracture repair. Next, the review discusses the applications of nanomaterials for bone fracture repair, with a focus on the recent breakthroughs such as nanomaterials leading to precise immobilization of growth factors at the molecular level, promoting vascularization without the use of growth factors, and re-loading therapeutic agents after implantation. The review concludes with perspectives on challenges and future directions for developing nanomaterials for improved bone fracture repair.

  1. Combining solvent isotope effects with substrate isotope effects in mechanistic studies of alcohol and amine oxidation by enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2015-11-01

    Oxidation of alcohols and amines is catalyzed by multiple families of flavin- and pyridine nucleotide-dependent enzymes. Measurement of solvent isotope effects provides a unique mechanistic probe of the timing of the cleavage of the OH and NH bonds, necessary information for a complete description of the catalytic mechanism. The inherent ambiguities in interpretation of solvent isotope effects can be significantly decreased if isotope effects arising from isotopically labeled substrates are measured in combination with solvent isotope effects. The application of combined solvent and substrate (mainly deuterium) isotope effects to multiple enzymes is described here to illustrate the range of mechanistic insights that such an approach can provide. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment.

  2. MECHANISTIC STUDIES OF IMPROVED FOAM EOR PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William R. Rossen

    2003-03-31

    . We find that such behavior is consistent with earlier models of foam viscosity in tubes, and a modified model for the low-quality regime can account for this behavior. It is not yet clear why this new regime appears in some cases and not in others. Simple modeling suggests that the answer may have to do with the sensitivity of gas trapping to pressure gradient. Research on Task 3 continued to focus on foam generation at limited pressure gradient in sandpacks. We investigated the effects of permeability, surfactant concentration and liquid injection rates on foam generation. In addition, a careful review of published studies showed that repeated snap-off is not a plausible mechanism of foam generation in homogeneous porous media beyond the stage of initial drainage from a fully liquid-saturated state. Snap-off has been the focus of much research on foam generation and is incorporated into most mechanistic foam simulators. This finding should force a reconsideration of its role in foam generation and properties in porous media.

  3. DSB repair model for mammalian cells in early S and G1 phases of the cell cycle: application to damage induced by ionizing radiation of different quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taleei, Reza; Girard, Peter M; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to test the hypothesis that kinetics of double strand breaks (DSB) repair is governed by complexity of DSB. To test the hypothesis we used our recent published mechanistic mathematical model of DSB repair for DSB induced by selected protons, deuterons, and helium ions of different energies representing radiations of different qualities. In light of recent advances in experimental and computational techniques, the most appropriate method to study cellular responses in radiation therapy, and exposures to low doses of ionizing radiations is using mechanistic approaches. To this end, we proposed a 'bottom-up' approach to study cellular response that starts with the DNA damage. Monte Carlo track structure method was employed to simulate initial damage induced in the genomic DNA by direct and indirect effects. Among the different types of DNA damage, DSB are known to be induced in simple and complex forms. The DSB repair model in G1 and early S phases of the cell cycle was employed to calculate the repair kinetics. The model considers the repair of simple and complex DSB, and the DSB produced in the heterochromatin. The inverse sampling method was used to calculate the repair kinetics for each individual DSB. The overall repair kinetics for 500 DSB induced by single tracks of the radiation under test were compared with experimental results. The results show that the model is capable of predicting the repair kinetics for the DSB induced by radiations of different qualities within an accepted range of uncertainty.

  4. Defective DSB repair correlates with abnormal nuclear morphology and is improved with FTI treatment in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantinescu, Dan [Department of Cell Biology-Physiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Pittsburgh Development Center, Magee-Women' s Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Csoka, Antonei B. [Division of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Navara, Christopher S. [Division of Developmental and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Pittsburgh Development Center, Magee-Women' s Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Schatten, Gerald P., E-mail: schattengp@upmc.edu [Division of Developmental and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Department of Cell Biology-Physiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Pittsburgh Development Center, Magee-Women' s Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Impaired DSB repair has been implicated as a molecular mechanism contributing to the accelerating aging phenotype in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), but neither the extent nor the cause of the repair deficiency has been fully elucidated. Here we perform a quantitative analysis of the steady-state number of DSBs and the repair kinetics of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DSBs in HGPS cells. We report an elevated steady-state number of DSBs and impaired repair of IR-induced DSBs, both of which correlated strongly with abnormal nuclear morphology. We recreated the HGPS cellular phenotype in human coronary artery endothelial cells for the first time by lentiviral transduction of GFP-progerin, which also resulted in impaired repair of IR-induced DSBs, and which correlated with abnormal nuclear morphology. Farnesyl transferase inhibitor (FTI) treatment improved the repair of IR-induced DSBs, but only in HGPS cells whose nuclear morphology was also normalized. Interestingly, FTI treatment did not result in a statistically significant reduction in the higher steady-state number of DSBs. We also report a delay in localization of phospho-NBS1 and MRE11, MRN complex repair factors necessary for homologous recombination (HR) repair, to DSBs in HGPS cells. Our results demonstrate a correlation between nuclear structural abnormalities and the DSB repair defect, suggesting a mechanistic link that may involve delayed repair factor localization to DNA damage. Further, our results show that similar to other HGPS phenotypes, FTI treatment has a beneficial effect on DSB repair.

  5. Defective DSB repair correlates with abnormal nuclear morphology and is improved with FTI treatment in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu, Dan; Csoka, Antonei B; Navara, Christopher S; Schatten, Gerald P

    2010-10-15

    Impaired DSB repair has been implicated as a molecular mechanism contributing to the accelerating aging phenotype in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), but neither the extent nor the cause of the repair deficiency has been fully elucidated. Here we perform a quantitative analysis of the steady-state number of DSBs and the repair kinetics of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DSBs in HGPS cells. We report an elevated steady-state number of DSBs and impaired repair of IR-induced DSBs, both of which correlated strongly with abnormal nuclear morphology. We recreated the HGPS cellular phenotype in human coronary artery endothelial cells for the first time by lentiviral transduction of GFP-progerin, which also resulted in impaired repair of IR-induced DSBs, and which correlated with abnormal nuclear morphology. Farnesyl transferase inhibitor (FTI) treatment improved the repair of IR-induced DSBs, but only in HGPS cells whose nuclear morphology was also normalized. Interestingly, FTI treatment did not result in a statistically significant reduction in the higher steady-state number of DSBs. We also report a delay in localization of phospho-NBS1 and MRE11, MRN complex repair factors necessary for homologous recombination (HR) repair, to DSBs in HGPS cells. Our results demonstrate a correlation between nuclear structural abnormalities and the DSB repair defect, suggesting a mechanistic link that may involve delayed repair factor localization to DNA damage. Further, our results show that similar to other HGPS phenotypes, FTI treatment has a beneficial effect on DSB repair.

  6. Evaluating the remaining strength factor for repaired pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, J.L.F.; Vieira, R.D [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Diniz, J.L.A. [Fluke Engenharia Ltda., Macae, RJ (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    This paper discusses and brings experimental evidence to the application of the remaining strength factor (RSF) to pipeline that has undergone metal thickness loss due to erosion, corrosion or grinding. The RSF is defined as the ratio between pressures that plastically collapse pipeline segments with and without metal loss (damage), and it may also be extended to damaged pipes that have been repaired with composite sleeves. Data from burst tests performed on undamaged, damaged and damage-repaired pipe specimens are utilized to back up the use of the RSF concept, allowing better insight into the safety factor derived from the application of standard fitness-for-purpose methodologies. The paper concludes by showing that the RSF may be used to establish a quantitative measurement of the effectiveness of a specific repair system applied to damaged pipes. (author)

  7. A mechanistic niche model for measuring species' distributional responses to seasonal temperature gradients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William B Monahan

    Full Text Available Niche theory is central to understanding how species respond geographically to climate change. It defines a species' realized niche in a biological community, its fundamental niche as determined by physiology, and its potential niche--the fundamental niche in a given environment or geographic space. However, most predictions of the effects of climate change on species' distributions are limited to correlative models of the realized niche, which assume that species are in distributional equilibrium with respect to the variables or gradients included in the model. Here, I present a mechanistic niche model that measures species' responses to major seasonal temperature gradients that interact with the physiology of the organism. I then use lethal physiological temperatures to parameterize the model for bird species in North and South America and show that most focal bird species are not in direct physiological equilibrium with the gradients. Results also show that most focal bird species possess broad thermal tolerances encompassing novel climates that could become available with climate change. I conclude with discussion of how mechanistic niche models may be used to (i gain insights into the processes that cause species to respond to climate change and (ii build more accurate correlative distribution models in birds and other species.

  8. Predicting interactions from mechanistic information: can omic data validate theories?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgert, Christopher J

    2007-09-01

    To address the most pressing and relevant issues for improving mixture risk assessment, researchers must first recognize that risk assessment is driven by both regulatory requirements and scientific research, and that regulatory concerns may expand beyond the purely scientific interests of researchers. Concepts of "mode of action" and "mechanism of action" are used in particular ways within the regulatory arena, depending on the specific assessment goals. The data requirements for delineating a mode of action and predicting interactive toxicity in mixtures are not well defined from a scientific standpoint due largely to inherent difficulties in testing certain underlying assumptions. Understanding the regulatory perspective on mechanistic concepts will be important for designing experiments that can be interpreted clearly and applied in risk assessments without undue reliance on extrapolation and assumption. In like fashion, regulators and risk assessors can be better equipped to apply mechanistic data if the concepts underlying mechanistic research and the limitations that must be placed on interpretation of mechanistic data are understood. This will be critically important for applying new technologies to risk assessment, such as functional genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. It will be essential not only for risk assessors to become conversant with the language and concepts of mechanistic research, including new omic technologies, but also, for researchers to become more intimately familiar with the challenges and needs of risk assessment.

  9. Mechanistic aspects of protein corona formation: insulin adsorption onto gold nanoparticle surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grass, Stefan; Treuel, Lennart

    2014-02-01

    In biological fluids, an adsorption layer of proteins, a "protein corona" forms around nanoparticles (NPs) largely determining their biological identity. In many interactions with NPs proteins can undergo structural changes. Here, we study the adsorption of insulin onto gold NPs (mean hydrodynamic particle diameter 80 ± 18 nm), focusing on the structural consequences of the adsorption process for the protein. We use surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy to study changes in the protein's secondary structure as well as the impact on integrity and conformations of disulfide bonds immediately on the NP surface. A detailed comparison to SERS spectra of cysteine and cystine provides first mechanistic insights into the causes for these conformational changes. Potential biological and toxicological implications of these findings are also discussed.

  10. Revisiting sesquiterpene biosynthetic pathways leading to santalene and its analogues: a comprehensive mechanistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Garima; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2012-10-21

    Santalene and bergamotene are the major olefinic sesquiterpenes responsible for the fragrance of sandalwood oil. Herein we report the details of density functional theory investigations on the biosynthetic pathway of this important class of terpenes. The mechanistic study has been found to be effective toward gaining significant new insight into different possibilities for the formation of the key intermediates involved in santalene and bergamotene biosynthesis. The stereoelectronic features of the transition states and intermediates for (i) ring closure of the initial bisabolyl cation, and (ii) skeletal rearrangements in the ensuing bicyclic carbocationic intermediates leading to (-)-epi-β-santalene, (-)-β-santalene, (-)-α-santalene, (+)-epi-β-santalene, exo-β-bergamotene, endo-β-bergamotene, exo-α-bergamotene, and endo-α-bergamotene are presented. Interesting structural features pertaining to certain new carbocationic intermediates (such as b) resulting from the ring closure of bisabolyl cation are discussed. Extensive conformational sampling of all key intermediates along the biosynthetic pathway offered new insight into the role of the isoprenyl side chain conformation in the formation of santalene and its analogues. Although the major bicyclic products in Santalum album appear to arise from the right or left handed helical form of farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP), different alternatives for their formation are found to be energetically feasible. The interconversion of the exo and endo isomers of bisabolyl cation and a likely epimerization, both with interesting mechanistic implications, are presented. The exo to endo conversion is identified to be energetically more favorable than another pathway emanating from the left handed helical FPP. The role of pyrophosphate (OPP(-)) in the penultimate deprotonation step leading to olefinic sesquiterpenes is also examined.

  11. Why did Jacques Monod make the choice of mechanistic determinism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loison, Laurent

    2015-06-01

    The development of molecular biology placed in the foreground a mechanistic and deterministic conception of the functioning of macromolecules. In this article, I show that this conception was neither obvious, nor necessary. Taking Jacques Monod as a case study, I detail the way he gradually came loose from a statistical understanding of determinism to finally support a mechanistic understanding. The reasons of the choice made by Monod at the beginning of the 1950s can be understood only in the light of the general theoretical schema supported by the concept of mechanistic determinism. This schema articulates three fundamental notions for Monod, namely that of the rigidity of the sequence of the genetic program, that of the intrinsic stability of macromolecules (DNA and proteins), and that of the specificity of molecular interactions.

  12. Managing mechanistic and organic structure in health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olden, Peter C

    2012-01-01

    Managers at all levels in a health care organization must organize work to achieve the organization's mission and goals. This requires managers to decide the organization structure, which involves dividing the work among jobs and departments and then coordinating them all toward the common purpose. Organization structure, which is reflected in an organization chart, may range on a continuum from very mechanistic to very organic. Managers must decide how mechanistic versus how organic to make the entire organization and each of its departments. To do this, managers should carefully consider 5 factors for the organization and for each individual department: external environment, goals, work production, size, and culture. Some factors may push toward more mechanistic structure, whereas others may push in the opposite direction toward more organic structure. Practical advice can help managers at all levels design appropriate structure for their departments and organization.

  13. Laparoscopic Repair of Morgagni Hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ilker murat arer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Morgagni hernia is a congenital herniation of abdominal contents into the thoracic cavity through a retrosternal diaphragmatic defect and make up about 1 % - 5 % of all types of congenital diaphragmatic hernias. Surgical repair of Morgagni hernias is usually indicated when patients are symptomatic and have a high risk of strangulation or incarceration of the contained viscera. 71-year-old male patient admitted to emergency department with a 2-day history of abdominal pain, vomiting and obstipation. Laparoscopic repair for Morgagni hernia was performed. Laparoscopic repair for Morgagni hernia with mesh repair is secure, satisfactory and easily performed. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(Suppl 1: 71-74

  14. Stem cells for cardiac repair: an introduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bastiaan C du Pr(e); Pieter A Doevendans; Linda W van Laake

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Most cardiovascular diseases, such as ischemic heart disease and cardiomyopathy, are associated with loss of functional cardiomyocytes. Unfortunately, the heart has a limited regenerative capacity and is not able to replace these cardiomyocytes once lost. In recent years, stem cells have been put forward as a potential source for cardiac regeneration. Pre-clinical studies that use stem cell-derived cardiac cells show promising results. The mechanisms, though, are not well understood, results have been variable, sometimes transient in the long term, and often without a mechanistic explanation. There are still several major hurdles to be taken. Stem cell-derived cardiac cells should resemble original cardiac cell types and be able to integrate in the damaged heart. Integration requires administration of stem cell-derived cardiac cells at the right time using the right mode of delivery. Once delivered, transplanted cells need vascularization, electrophysiological coupling with the injured heart, and prevention of immunological rejection. Finally, stem cell therapy needs to be safe, reproducible, and affordable. In this review, we will give an introduction to the principles of stem cell based cardiac repair.

  15. DNA double strand break repair via non-homologous end-joining

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Anthony J.; Chen, David J.

    2013-01-01

    DNA double-stranded breaks (DSB) are among the most dangerous forms of DNA damage. Unrepaired DSBs results in cells undergoing apoptosis or senescence whereas mis-processing of DSBs can lead to genomic instability and carcinogenesis. One important pathway in eukaryotic cells responsible for the repair of DSBs is non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). In this review we will discuss the interesting new insights into the mechanism of the NHEJ pathway and the proteins which mediate this repair proces...

  16. Combinatorial Reliability and Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-07-01

    Press, Oxford, 1987. [2] G. Gordon and L. Traldi, Generalized activities and the Tutte polynomial , Discrete Math. 85 (1990), 167-176. [3] A. B. Huseby, A...particular, Satyanarayana and Tindell introduced a notion of (K,j)-domination in their study of a K-terminal version of the chromatic polynomial [6], and it...G)) graphs. He also intends to look into the properties of the polynomial that gives the expected number of needed repairs of a K-terminal network

  17. Mammalian mismatch repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Javier; Jiricny, Josef

    2012-01-01

    A considerable surge of interest in the mismatch repair (MMR) system has been brought about by the discovery of a link between Lynch syndrome, an inherited predisposition to cancer of the colon and other organs, and malfunction of this key DNA metabolic pathway. This review focuses on recent...... advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of canonical MMR, which improves replication fidelity by removing misincorporated nucleotides from the nascent DNA strand. We also discuss the involvement of MMR proteins in two other processes: trinucleotide repeat expansion and antibody maturation...

  18. Network-based discovery through mechanistic systems biology. Implications for applications--SMEs and drug discovery: where the action is.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Neil

    2015-08-01

    Phase II attrition remains the most important challenge for drug discovery. Tackling the problem requires improved understanding of the complexity of disease biology. Systems biology approaches to this problem can, in principle, deliver this. This article reviews the reports of the application of mechanistic systems models to drug discovery questions and discusses the added value. Although we are on the journey to the virtual human, the length, path and rate of learning from this remain an open question. Success will be dependent on the will to invest and make the most of the insight generated along the way.

  19. Mechanistic diversity of the van Leusen reaction applied to 6-ketomorphinans and synthetic potential of the resulting acrylonitrile substructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, Johannes; Windisch, Petra; Kristeva, Elka; Wurst, Klaus; Ongania, Karl-Hans; Horvath, Ulrike E I; Schottenberger, Herwig; Laus, Gerhard; Schmidhammer, Helmut

    2005-06-24

    Tosylmethyl isocyanide was used to convert 7,8-didehydro-6-ketomorphinans to 6,7-didehydromorphinan-6-carbonitriles with retainment of the 4,5-epoxy ring. However, ring opening occurred in the presence of NaH giving 5,6,7,8-tetradehydromorphinan-6-carbonitriles. Addition of nucleophiles such as Li diisopropylamide or Grignard reagents to the acrylonitrile substructure yielded ring-opened 5,6-didehydro products. Seven products were characterized by X-ray crystal structure analysis and revealed insight into the mechanistic diversity of the van Leusen reaction.

  20. RNF4 is required for DNA double-strand break repair in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vyas, R; Kumar, R; Clermont, F

    2013-01-01

    for both homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining repair. To establish a link between Rnf4 and the DNA damage response (DDR) in vivo, we generated an Rnf4 allelic series in mice. We show that Rnf4-deficiency causes persistent ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage and signaling......Unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) cause genetic instability that leads to malignant transformation or cell death. Cells respond to DSBs with the ordered recruitment of signaling and repair proteins to the sites of DNA lesions. Coordinated protein SUMOylation and ubiquitylation have crucial......, and that Rnf4-deficient cells and mice exhibit increased sensitivity to genotoxic stress. Mechanistically, we show that Rnf4 targets SUMOylated MDC1 and SUMOylated BRCA1, and is required for the loading of Rad51, an enzyme required for HR repair, onto sites of DNA damage. Similarly to inactivating mutations...

  1. Analysis of DNA double-strand break repair pathways in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brugmans, Linda [Department of Cell Biology and Genetics, Erasmus MC, Dr. Molewaterplein 50, PO Box 1738, Rotterdam 3015GE (Netherlands); Kanaar, Roland [Department of Cell Biology and Genetics, Erasmus MC, Dr. Molewaterplein 50, PO Box 1738, Rotterdam 3015GE (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, PO Box 1738, 3000 DR Rotterdam (Netherlands); Essers, Jeroen [Department of Cell Biology and Genetics, Erasmus MC, Dr. Molewaterplein 50, PO Box 1738, Rotterdam 3015GE (Netherlands) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, PO Box 1738, 3000 DR Rotterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: j.essers@erasmusmc.nl

    2007-01-03

    During the last years significant new insights have been gained into the mechanism and biological relevance of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in relation to genome stability. DSBs are a highly toxic DNA lesion, because they can lead to chromosome fragmentation, loss and translocations, eventually resulting in cancer. DSBs can be induced by cellular processes such as V(D)J recombination or DNA replication. They can also be introduced by exogenous agents DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation or mitomycin C. During evolution several pathways have evolved for the repair of these DSBs. The most important DSB repair mechanisms in mammalian cells are nonhomologous end-joining and homologous recombination. By using an undamaged repair template, homologous recombination ensures accurate DSB repair, whereas the untemplated nonhomologous end-joining pathway does not. Although both pathways are active in mammals, the relative contribution of the two repair pathways to genome stability differs in the different cell types. Given the potential differences in repair fidelity, it is of interest to determine the relative contribution of homologous recombination and nonhomologous end-joining to DSB repair. In this review, we focus on the biological relevance of DSB repair in mammalian cells and the potential overlap between nonhomologous end-joining and homologous recombination in different tissues.

  2. Radical behaviorism and scientific frameworks. From mechanistic to relational accounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa, M

    1992-11-01

    A substantial portion of B. F. Skinner's scholarship was devoted to developing methods and terms for a scientific study of behavior. Three concepts central to scientific accounts--cause, explanation, and theory--are examined to illustrate the distinction between mechanistic and relational frameworks and radical behaviorism's relationship to those frameworks. Informed by a scientific tradition that explicitly rejects mechanistic interpretations, radical behaviorism provides a distinctive stance in contemporary psychology. The present analysis suggests that radical behaviorism makes closer contact with the "new world view" advocated by physicists and philosophers of science than does much of contemporary psychology.

  3. DNA replication, repair, and repair tests. [Rat; human leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, B.

    1980-09-01

    The rate of inhibition and recovery of DNA synthesis can be used in a rapid assay system to detect genotoxic potentials of chemicals. Also, the observation that an agent stimulates DNA repair in a test system indicates its ability to cause damage in DNA. Different experimental approaches to the study of repair synthesis are discussed.

  4. Regulation of tissue repair and regeneration by electric fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG En-tong; ZHAO Min

    2010-01-01

    Endogenous electric fields(Efs)have been detected at wounds and damaged tissues.The potential roles of Efs in tissue repair and regeneration have been an intriguing topic for centuries.Recent researches have provided significant insights into how naturally occurring Efs may participate in the control of tissue repair and regeneration.Applied Efs equivalent to the size of fields measured in vivo direct cell migration,cell proliferation and nerve sprouting at wounds.More remarkably,physiological Efs are a guidance cue that directs cell migration which overrides other well accepted directional signals including initial injury stimulation,wound void,contact inhibition release,population pressure and chemotaxis.Efs activate many intracellular signaling pathways in a directional manner.Modulation of endogenous wound Efs affects epithelial cell migration,cell proliferation,and nerve growth at cornea wounds in vivo.Electric stimulation is being tested clinically for the treatments of bone fracture,wound healing and spinal cord injury.Efs thus may represent a novel type of signaling paradigm in tissue repair and regeneration.Combination of the electric stimulation and other well understood biochemical regulatory mechanisms may offer powerful and effective therapies for tissue repair and regeneration.This review introduces experimental evidence for the existence of endogenous Efs and discusses their roles in tissue repair and regeneration.

  5. Regulation of tissue repair and regeneration by electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, En-tong; Zhao, Min

    2010-02-01

    Endogenous electric fields (EFs) have been detected at wounds and damaged tissues. The potential roles of EFs in tissue repair and regeneration have been an intriguing topic for centuries. Recent researches have provided significant insights into how naturally occurring EFs may participate in the control of tissue repair and regeneration. Applied EFs equivalent to the size of fields measured in vivo direct cell migration, cell proliferation and nerve sprouting at wounds. More remarkably, physiological EFs are a guidance cue that directs cell migration which overrides other well accepted directional signals including initial injury stimulation, wound void, contact inhibition release, population pressure and chemotaxis. EFs activate many intracellular signaling pathways in a directional manner. Modulation of endogenous wound EFs affects epithelial cell migration, cell proliferation, and nerve growth at cornea wounds in vivo. Electric stimulation is being tested clinically for the treatments of bone fracture, wound healing and spinal cord injury. EFs thus may represent a novel type of signaling paradigm in tissue repair and regeneration. Combination of the electric stimulation and other well understood biochemical regulatory mechanisms may offer powerful and effective therapies for tissue repair and regeneration. This review introduces experimental evidence for the existence of endogenous EFs and discusses their roles in tissue repair and regeneration.

  6. Biologics for tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docheva, Denitsa; Müller, Sebastian A; Majewski, Martin; Evans, Christopher H

    2015-04-01

    Tendon injuries are common and present a clinical challenge to orthopedic surgery mainly because these injuries often respond poorly to treatment and require prolonged rehabilitation. Therapeutic options used to repair ruptured tendons have consisted of suture, autografts, allografts, and synthetic prostheses. To date, none of these alternatives has provided a successful long-term solution, and often the restored tendons do not recover their complete strength and functionality. Unfortunately, our understanding of tendon biology lags far behind that of other musculoskeletal tissues, thus impeding the development of new treatment options for tendon conditions. Hence, in this review, after introducing the clinical significance of tendon diseases and the present understanding of tendon biology, we describe and critically assess the current strategies for enhancing tendon repair by biological means. These consist mainly of applying growth factors, stem cells, natural biomaterials and genes, alone or in combination, to the site of tendon damage. A deeper understanding of how tendon tissue and cells operate, combined with practical applications of modern molecular and cellular tools could provide the long awaited breakthrough in designing effective tendon-specific therapeutics and overall improvement of tendon disease management.

  7. Kvitebjoern gas pipeline repair - baptism of remote pipeline repair system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gjertveit, Erling

    2010-07-01

    On the 1st of November 2007, severe anchor damage was discovered on the 30 inch Kvitebjoern gas export pipeline. The damage constituted a localised dent and a 17deg buckle, but no leakage. Statoil has invested in building an effective repair contingency structure for the large pipeline network on the Norwegian Continental shelf, with particular focus on the large gas export pipelines. The repair method for the Kvitebjoern pipeline was remotely operated using two Morgrip couplings and a spool. The installation used the purpose built Pipeline Repair System stored at Killingoey and couplings produced and tested back in 2005. This presentation will cover the initial damage investigations, the temporary operational phase, the repair preparations, the actual repair and lessons learned. (Author)

  8. Imaging of the rotator cuff following repair: human and animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Hollis G; Jawetz, Shari T; Foo, Li Foong

    2007-01-01

    Imaging of the rotator cuff following repair may be challenging due to the type of fixation, surgical manipulation of the tissue and the presence of residual defects that may exist in the presence of good functional outcome. Both ultrasound and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging present unique advantages in evaluation of the postoperative tissue. MR imaging has superior soft tissue contrast and provides a more global shoulder assessment, including the degree of arthrosis, while ultrasound enables a more dynamic testing of the repaired tissue. Power Doppler ultrasound and new contrast agents provide insight into the degree of vascular recruitment following repair.

  9. Microvesicle shedding and lysosomal repair fulfill divergent cellular needs during the repair of streptolysin O-induced plasmalemmal damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander P Atanassoff

    Full Text Available Pathogenic bacteria secrete pore-forming toxins that permeabilize the plasma membrane of host cells. Nucleated cells possess protective mechanisms that repair toxin-damaged plasmalemma. Currently two putative repair scenarios are debated: either the isolation of the damaged membrane regions and their subsequent expulsion as microvesicles (shedding or lysosome-dependent repair might allow the cell to rid itself of its toxic cargo and prevent lysis. Here we provide evidence that both mechanisms operate in tandem but fulfill diverse cellular needs. The prevalence of the repair strategy varies between cell types and is guided by the severity and the localization of the initial toxin-induced damage, by the morphology of a cell and, most important, by the incidence of the secondary mechanical damage. The surgically precise action of microvesicle shedding is best suited for the instant elimination of individual toxin pores, whereas lysosomal repair is indispensable for mending of self-inflicted mechanical injuries following initial plasmalemmal permeabilization by bacterial toxins. Our study provides new insights into the functioning of non-immune cellular defenses against bacterial pathogens.

  10. Handbook of adhesive bonded structural repair

    CERN Document Server

    Wegman, Raymond F

    1992-01-01

    Provides repair methods for adhesive bonded and composite structures; identifies suitable materials and equipment for repairs; describes damage evaluation criteria and techniques, and methods of inspection before and after repair.

  11. Clamp wins pipe repair prize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2001-04-01

    This paper describes the permanent pipeline repair system, developed by Tekmar, which is powered by seawater hydraulics and is easily installed and tested by any workclass remotely operated vehicle (rov). Details are given of the two main components of the system, namely, the diverless high pressure split repair clamp and the rov-operated tool to install it.

  12. The journey of DNA repair

    OpenAIRE

    Saini, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    21 years ago, the DNA Repair Enzyme was declared “Molecule of the Year”. Today, we are celebrating another “year of repair”, with the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry being awarded to Aziz Sancar, Tomas Lindahl and Paul Modrich for their collective work on the different DNA repair pathways.

  13. Nucleotide excision repair in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, Patrick van

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) is a conserved DNA repair pathway capable of removing a broad spectrum of DNA damage. In human cells a defect in NER leads to the disorder Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model organism to study the mechanism of NER. The

  14. Advanced reach tool (ART) : Development of the mechanistic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransman, W.; Tongeren, M. van; Cherrie, J.W.; Tischer, M.; Schneider, T.; Schinkel, J.; Kromhout, H.; Warren, N.; Goede, H.; Tielemans, E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the mechanistic model within a collaborative project, referred to as the Advanced REACH Tool (ART) project, to develop a tool to model inhalation exposure for workers sharing similar operational conditions across different industries and locations in Europe. T

  15. Mechanistic model for dispersion coefficients in bubble column

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Skosana, PJ

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A mechanistic model describing the mass and momentum exchange in bubble columns is proposed that is based on the observations that the gas distribution in a bubble column is not uniform across the column and that as a consequence large liquid...

  16. A mechanistic assessment of nutrient flushing at the catchment scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willem J. van Verseveld; Jeffrey J. McDonnell; Kate Lajtha

    2008-01-01

    This paper mechanistically assesses the flushing mechanism of DOC, DON, and DIN at the hillslope and catchment scales during two storm events, in a small catchment (WS10), H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest in the western Cascade Mountains of Oregon. Using a combination of natural tracer and hydrometric data, and end-member mixing analysis, we were able to describe the...

  17. Does Mechanistic Thinking Improve Student Success in Organic Chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Nathaniel P.; Cooper, Melanie M.; Cox, Elizabeth L.

    2012-01-01

    The use of the curved-arrow notation to depict electron flow during mechanistic processes is one of the most important representational conventions in the organic chemistry curriculum. Our previous research documented a disturbing trend: when asked to predict the products of a series of reactions, many students do not spontaneously engage in…

  18. Mechanistic investigation on the formation of indolizines from 2-enynylpyridines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoz, Inma R; Sicre, Cristina; Navarro-Vázquez, Armando; Silva López, Carlos; Cid, María-Magdalena

    2009-11-05

    2,3,7-Trisubstituted indolizines were obtained from E- or Z-2-enynyl-4-substituted pyridines. The mechanistic pathway involves a base-catalyzed double-bond isomerization, if the E-isomer is the starting material, followed by a concerted pseudocoarctate cyclization.

  19. Bridging Mechanistic and Phenomenological Models of Complex Biological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transtrum, Mark K.; Qiu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The inherent complexity of biological systems gives rise to complicated mechanistic models with a large number of parameters. On the other hand, the collective behavior of these systems can often be characterized by a relatively small number of phenomenological parameters. We use the Manifold Boundary Approximation Method (MBAM) as a tool for deriving simple phenomenological models from complicated mechanistic models. The resulting models are not black boxes, but remain expressed in terms of the microscopic parameters. In this way, we explicitly connect the macroscopic and microscopic descriptions, characterize the equivalence class of distinct systems exhibiting the same range of collective behavior, and identify the combinations of components that function as tunable control knobs for the behavior. We demonstrate the procedure for adaptation behavior exhibited by the EGFR pathway. From a 48 parameter mechanistic model, the system can be effectively described by a single adaptation parameter τ characterizing the ratio of time scales for the initial response and recovery time of the system which can in turn be expressed as a combination of microscopic reaction rates, Michaelis-Menten constants, and biochemical concentrations. The situation is not unlike modeling in physics in which microscopically complex processes can often be renormalized into simple phenomenological models with only a few effective parameters. The proposed method additionally provides a mechanistic explanation for non-universal features of the behavior. PMID:27187545

  20. Does Mechanistic Thinking Improve Student Success in Organic Chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Nathaniel P.; Cooper, Melanie M.; Cox, Elizabeth L.

    2012-01-01

    The use of the curved-arrow notation to depict electron flow during mechanistic processes is one of the most important representational conventions in the organic chemistry curriculum. Our previous research documented a disturbing trend: when asked to predict the products of a series of reactions, many students do not spontaneously engage in…

  1. Rearrangements of Allylic Sulfinates to Sulfones: A Mechanistic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, David B.; Mollard, Paul; Voigtritter, Karl R.; Ball, Jenelle L.

    2010-01-01

    Most current organic chemistry textbooks are organized by functional groups and those of us who teach organic chemistry use functional-group organization in our courses but ask students to learn organic chemistry from a mechanistic approach. To enrich and extend the chemical understanding and knowledge of pericyclic-type reactions for chemistry…

  2. Rethinking transcription coupled DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarthapu, Venu; Nudler, Evgeny

    2015-04-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an evolutionarily conserved, multistep process that can detect a wide variety of DNA lesions. Transcription coupled repair (TCR) is a subpathway of NER that repairs the transcribed DNA strand faster than the rest of the genome. RNA polymerase (RNAP) stalled at DNA lesions mediates the recruitment of NER enzymes to the damage site. In this review we focus on a newly identified bacterial TCR pathway in which the NER enzyme UvrD, in conjunction with NusA, plays a major role in initiating the repair process. We discuss the tradeoff between the new and conventional models of TCR, how and when each pathway operates to repair DNA damage, and the necessity of pervasive transcription in maintaining genome integrity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Reward optimization of a repairable system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, I.T. [Departamento de Matematicas, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de la Universidad, s/n. 10071 Caceres (Spain)]. E-mail: inmatorres@unex.es; Perez-Ocon, R. [Departamento de Estadistica e Investigacion Operativa, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, Avenida de Severo Ochoa, s/n. 18071 Granada (Spain)]. E-mail: rperezo@ugr.es

    2006-03-15

    This paper analyzes a system subject to repairable and non-repairable failures. Non-repairable failures lead to replacement of the system. Repairable failures, first lead to repair but they lead to replacement after a fixed number of repairs. Operating and repair times follow phase type distributions (PH-distributions) and the pattern of the operating times is modelled by a geometric process. In this context, the problem is to find the optimal number of repairs, which maximizes the long-run average reward per unit time. To this end, the optimal number is determined and it is obtained by efficient numerical procedures.

  4. Wound repair in Pocillopora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Villalobos, Jenny Carolina; Work, Thierry M.; Calderon-Aguileraa, Luis Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Corals routinely lose tissue due to causes ranging from predation to disease. Tissue healing and regeneration are fundamental to the normal functioning of corals, yet we know little about this process. We described the microscopic morphology of wound repair in Pocillopora damicornis. Tissue was removed by airbrushing fragments from three healthy colonies, and these were monitored daily at the gross and microscopic level for 40 days. Grossly, corals healed by Day 30, but repigmentation was not evident at the end of the study (40 d). On histology, from Day 8 onwards, tissues at the lesion site were microscopically indistinguishable from adjacent normal tissues with evidence of zooxanthellae in gastrodermis. Inflammation was not evident. P. damicornis manifested a unique mode of regeneration involving projections of cell-covered mesoglea from the surface body wall that anastomosed to form gastrovascular canals.

  5. Groin hernia repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, Henrik; Aasvang, Eske

    2005-01-01

    The choice of anesthesia for groin hernia repair is between general, regional (epidural or spinal), and local anesthesia. Existing data from large consecutive patient series and randomized studies have shown local anesthesia to be the method of choice because it can be performed by the surgeon......, does not necessarily require an attending anesthesiologist, translates into the shortest recovery (bypassing the postanesthesia care unit), has the lowest cost, and has the lowest postoperative morbidity regarding risk of urinary retention. Spinal anesthesia has no documented benefits for this small...... scientific data to support the choice of anesthesia, large epidemiologic and nationwide information from databases show an undesirable high (about 10-20%) use of spinal anesthesia and low (about 10%) use of local infiltration anesthesia. Surgeons and anesthesiologists should therefore adjust their anesthesia...

  6. Emerging models for DNA repair: Dictyostelium discoideum as a model for nonhomologous end-joining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pears, Catherine J; Lakin, Nicholas D

    2014-05-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are a particularly cytotoxic variety of DNA lesion that can be repaired by homologous recombination (HR) or nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). HR utilises sequences homologous to the damage DNA template to facilitate repair. In contrast, NHEJ does not require homologous sequences for repair but instead functions by directly re-joining DNA ends. These pathways are critical to resolve DSBs generated intentionally during processes such as meiotic and site-specific recombination. However, they are also utilised to resolve potentially pathological DSBs generated by mutagens and errors during DNA replication. The importance of DSB repair is underscored by the findings that defects in these pathways results in chromosome instability that contributes to a variety of disease states including malignancy. The general principles of NHEJ are conserved in eukaryotes. As such, relatively simple model organisms have been instrumental in identifying components of these pathways and providing a mechanistic understanding of repair that has subsequently been applied to vertebrates. However, certain components of the NHEJ pathway are absent or show limited conservation in the most commonly used invertebrate models exploited to study DNA repair. Recently, however, it has become apparent that vertebrate DNA repair pathway components, including those involved in NHEJ, are unusually conserved in the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. Traditionally, this genetically tractable organism has been exploited to study the molecular basis of cell type specification, cell motility and chemotaxis. Here we discuss the use of this organism as an additional model to study DNA repair, with specific reference to NHEJ. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. How to repair an episiotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Mary; Cummins, Bernie

    2016-02-17

    Rationale and key points Skilful repair of an episiotomy is an important aspect of maternal health care. It is essential that midwives and doctors have the knowledge and skills to undertake this procedure in a safe and effective manner. ▶ An episiotomy should be repaired promptly to reduce blood loss and prevent infection. ▶ Repair of an episiotomy is undertaken in three stages: repair of the vaginal mucosa, repair of the muscle layer and repair of the skin layer. ▶ Adequate pain relief should be provided before suturing. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. Why a rectal examination is recommended before and following repair of an episiotomy. 2. What you would do to improve your suturing skills. 3. The factors that may prevent or delay an episiotomy from healing. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at rcni.com/portfolio .

  8. DNA repair in Chromobacterium violaceum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Fábio Teixeira; Carvalho, Fabíola Marques de; Bezerra e Silva, Uaska; Scortecci, Kátia Castanho; Blaha, Carlos Alfredo Galindo; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara Fassarella; Batistuzzo de Medeiros, Silvia Regina

    2004-03-31

    Chromobacterium violaceum is a Gram-negative beta-proteobacterium that inhabits a variety of ecosystems in tropical and subtropical regions, including the water and banks of the Negro River in the Brazilian Amazon. This bacterium has been the subject of extensive study over the last three decades, due to its biotechnological properties, including the characteristic violacein pigment, which has antimicrobial and anti-tumoral activities. C. violaceum promotes the solubilization of gold in a mercury-free process, and has been used in the synthesis of homopolyesters suitable for the production of biodegradable polymers. The complete genome sequence of this organism has been completed by the Brazilian National Genome Project Consortium. The aim of our group was to study the DNA repair genes in this organism, due to their importance in the maintenance of genomic integrity. We identified DNA repair genes involved in different pathways in C. violaceum through a similarity search against known sequences deposited in databases. The phylogenetic analyses were done using programs of the PHILYP package. This analysis revealed various metabolic pathways, including photoreactivation, base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, recombinational repair, and the SOS system. The similarity between the C. violaceum sequences and those of Neisserie miningitidis and Ralstonia solanacearum was greater than that between the C. violaceum and Escherichia coli sequences. The peculiarities found in the C. violaceum genome were the absence of LexA, some horizontal transfer events and a large number of repair genes involved with alkyl and oxidative DNA damage.

  9. Biochemical discrimination between selenium and sulfur 2: mechanistic investigation of the selenium specificity of human selenocysteine lyase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Louise Johansson

    Full Text Available Selenium is an essential trace element incorporated into selenoproteins as selenocysteine. Selenocysteine (Sec lyases (SCLs and cysteine (Cys desulfurases (CDs catalyze the removal of selenium or sulfur from Sec or Cys, respectively, and generally accept both substrates. Intriguingly, human SCL (hSCL is specific for Sec even though the only difference between Sec and Cys is a single chalcogen atom.The crystal structure of hSCL was recently determined and gain-of-function protein variants that also could accept Cys as substrate were identified. To obtain mechanistic insight into the chemical basis for its substrate discrimination, we here report time-resolved spectroscopic studies comparing the reactions of the Sec-specific wild-type hSCL and the gain-of-function D146K/H389T variant, when given Cys as a substrate. The data are interpreted in light of other studies of SCL/CD enzymes and offer mechanistic insight into the function of the wild-type enzyme. Based on these results and previously available data we propose a reaction mechanism whereby the Sec over Cys specificity is achieved using a combination of chemical and physico-mechanical control mechanisms.

  10. Biochemical discrimination between selenium and sulfur 2: mechanistic investigation of the selenium specificity of human selenocysteine lyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Ann-Louise; Collins, Ruairi; Arnér, Elias S J; Brzezinski, Peter; Högbom, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element incorporated into selenoproteins as selenocysteine. Selenocysteine (Sec) lyases (SCLs) and cysteine (Cys) desulfurases (CDs) catalyze the removal of selenium or sulfur from Sec or Cys, respectively, and generally accept both substrates. Intriguingly, human SCL (hSCL) is specific for Sec even though the only difference between Sec and Cys is a single chalcogen atom.The crystal structure of hSCL was recently determined and gain-of-function protein variants that also could accept Cys as substrate were identified. To obtain mechanistic insight into the chemical basis for its substrate discrimination, we here report time-resolved spectroscopic studies comparing the reactions of the Sec-specific wild-type hSCL and the gain-of-function D146K/H389T variant, when given Cys as a substrate. The data are interpreted in light of other studies of SCL/CD enzymes and offer mechanistic insight into the function of the wild-type enzyme. Based on these results and previously available data we propose a reaction mechanism whereby the Sec over Cys specificity is achieved using a combination of chemical and physico-mechanical control mechanisms.

  11. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.” (a... killing or growth inhibition of repair deficient bacteria in a set of repair proficient and deficient...

  12. Repairing and Upgrading Your PC

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Repairing and Upgrading Your PC delivers start-to-finish instructions, simple enough for even the most inexperienced PC owner, for troubleshooting, repairing, and upgrading your computer. Written by hardware experts Robert Bruce Thompson and Barbara Fritchman Thompson, this book covers it all: how to troubleshoot a troublesome PC, how to identify which components make sense for an upgrade, and how to tear it all down and put it back together. This book shows how to repair and upgrade all of your PC's essential components.

  13. Laparoscopic repair of incisional hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, H; Lee, F; Patil, N G

    2001-09-01

    A 75-year-old man developed an incisional hernia over the upper abdomen following a wedge resection of a gastric stromal tumour in 1996. This is the first published report of a successful repair of an incisional hernia via a laparoscopic intraperitoneal on-lay technique using GORE-TEX DualMesh material in Hong Kong. Compared with conventional open repair of incisional hernia, long incisions and wound tension are avoided using the laparoscopic approach. This translates into a reduced risk of wound-related complications and facilitates recovery. In selected cases, minimally invasive surgery is a safe technique for the repair of incisional hernias.

  14. [Inguinal and femoral hernia repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, B; Anthuber, M

    2011-05-01

    With an incidence of 200,000 new cases per year in Germany, inguinal hernia has a significant socioeconomic impact. The 2009 guidelines from the European Hernia Society established treatment recommendations. Hernia repair is based on reinforcing the posterior wall of the inguinal canal by suture or mesh repair by an anterior or posterior approach. Lightweight mesh reduces recurrence rates and is the treatment of choice even in primary hernias. Laparoscopic hernia repair is associated with specific risks but is superior in postoperative pain and earlier return to work.

  15. [Studies of the repair of radiation-induced genetic damage in Drosophila]. Annual progress report, February 1, 1993--November 1, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawley, R.S.

    1998-09-01

    This research focuses on two repair deficient mutations in Drosophila melanogaster, namely mei-9, mei-41. In addition, the authors propose to extend this study to include the mus-312 mutation. They expect these studies to provide substantial insights into both the molecular mechanisms of DNA repair in Drosophila and the role these genes play in normal biological processes.

  16. [Studies of the repair of radiation-induced genetic damage in Drosophila]. Annual progress report, February 1, 1993--November 1, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawley, R.S.

    1998-09-01

    This research focuses on two repair deficient mutations in Drosophila melanogaster, namely mei-9, mei-41. In addition, the authors propose to extend this study to include the mus-312 mutation. They expect these studies to provide substantial insights into both the molecular mechanisms of DNA repair in Drosophila and the role these genes play in normal biological processes.

  17. Dual roles for DNA polymerase theta in alternative end-joining repair of double-strand breaks in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sze Ham Chan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks are repaired by multiple mechanisms that are roughly grouped into the categories of homology-directed repair and non-homologous end joining. End-joining repair can be further classified as either classical non-homologous end joining, which requires DNA ligase 4, or "alternative" end joining, which does not. Alternative end joining has been associated with genomic deletions and translocations, but its molecular mechanism(s are largely uncharacterized. Here, we report that Drosophila melanogaster DNA polymerase theta (pol theta, encoded by the mus308 gene and previously implicated in DNA interstrand crosslink repair, plays a crucial role in DNA ligase 4-independent alternative end joining. In the absence of pol theta, end joining is impaired and residual repair often creates large deletions flanking the break site. Analysis of break repair junctions from flies with mus308 separation-of-function alleles suggests that pol theta promotes the use of long microhomologies during alternative end joining and increases the likelihood of complex insertion events. Our results establish pol theta as a key protein in alternative end joining in Drosophila and suggest a potential mechanistic link between alternative end joining and interstrand crosslink repair.

  18. Mismatch-mediated error prone repair at the immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahwan, Richard; Edelmann, Winfried; Scharff, Matthew D; Roa, Sergio

    2011-12-01

    The generation of effective antibodies depends upon somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) of antibody genes by activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and the subsequent recruitment of error prone base excision and mismatch repair. While AID initiates and is required for SHM, more than half of the base changes that accumulate in V regions are not due to the direct deamination of dC to dU by AID, but rather arise through the recruitment of the mismatch repair complex (MMR) to the U:G mismatch created by AID and the subsequent perversion of mismatch repair from a high fidelity process to one that is very error prone. In addition, the generation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) is essential during CSR, and the resolution of AID-generated mismatches by MMR to promote such DSBs is critical for the efficiency of the process. While a great deal has been learned about how AID and MMR cause hypermutations and DSBs, it is still unclear how the error prone aspect of these processes is largely restricted to antibody genes. The use of knockout models and mice expressing mismatch repair proteins with separation-of-function point mutations have been decisive in gaining a better understanding of the roles of each of the major MMR proteins and providing further insight into how mutation and repair are coordinated. Here, we review the cascade of MMR factors and repair signals that are diverted from their canonical error free role and hijacked by B cells to promote genetic diversification of the Ig locus. This error prone process involves AID as the inducer of enzymatically-mediated DNA mismatches, and a plethora of downstream MMR factors acting as sensors, adaptors and effectors of a complex and tightly regulated process from much of which is not yet well understood.

  19. Large myelomeningocele repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Nejat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wound closure is accomplished in most cases of myelomeningocele (MMC by undermining of the skin edges surrounding the defect. However, large defects cannot be closed reliably by this simple technique. Due to the technical challenge associated with large MMC, surgeons have devised different methods for repairing large defects. In this paper, we report our experience of managing large defects, which we believe bears a direct relationship to decrease the incidence of wound complications. Materials and Methods: Forty children with large MMCs underwent surgical repair and represent our experience. We recommend using all hairy skin around the defect as a way to decrease the tension on the edges of the wound and the possible subsequent necrosis. It is our experience that vertical incision on one or two flanks parallel to the midline can decrease the tension of the wound. Moreover, ventriculo-peritoneal shunting for children who developed hydrocephalus was performed simultaneously, which constitutes another recommendation for preventing fluid collection and build up of pressure on the wound. Results: Patients in this study were in the age range of 2 days to 8 years. The most common location of MMC was in the thoracolumbar area. All but four patients had severe weakness in lower extremities. We used as much hairy skin around the MMC sac as possible in all cases. Vertical incisions on one or both flanks and simultaneous shunt procedure were performed in 36 patients. We treated children with large MMC defects with acceptable tension-free closure. Nonetheless, three patients developed superficial skin infection and partial wound dehiscence, and they were managed conservatively. Conclusions: We recommend using all hairy skin around the MMC defect for closure of large defects. In cases that were expected to be at a higher risk to develop dehiscence release incisions on one or two flanks towards the fascia were found to be useful. Simultaneous

  20. Kohler's Insight Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windholtz, George

    1985-01-01

    Psychology textbooks frequently present Wolfgang Kohler's two-stick experiment with chimpanzees as having demonstrated insight in learning. Studies that replicated Kohler's work support his findings but not his interpretation in terms of insightful solution. The uncritical inclusion of Kohler's insight interpretation in texts is not warranted in…

  1. Mechanistic Studies at the Interface Between Organometallic Chemistry and Homogeneous Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Charles P

    2012-11-14

    Mechanistic Studies at the Interface Between Organometallic Chemistry and Homogeneous Catalysis Charles P. Casey, Principal Investigator Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 Phone 608-262-0584 FAX: 608-262-7144 Email: casey@chem.wisc.edu http://www.chem.wisc.edu/main/people/faculty/casey.html Executive Summary. Our goal was to learn the intimate mechanistic details of reactions involved in homogeneous catalysis and to use the insight we gain to develop new and improved catalysts. Our work centered on the hydrogenation of polar functional groups such as aldehydes and ketones and on hydroformylation. Specifically, we concentrated on catalysts capable of simultaneously transferring hydride from a metal center and a proton from an acidic oxygen or nitrogen center to an aldehyde or ketone. An economical iron based catalyst was developed and patented. Better understanding of fundamental organometallic reactions and catalytic processes enabled design of energy and material efficient chemical processes. Our work contributed to the development of catalysts for the selective and mild hydrogenation of ketones and aldehydes; this will provide a modern green alternative to reductions by LiAlH4 and NaBH4, which require extensive work-up procedures and produce waste streams. (C5R4OH)Ru(CO)2H Hydrogenation Catalysts. Youval Shvo described a remarkable catalytic system in which the key intermediate (C5R4OH)Ru(CO)2H (1) has an electronically coupled acidic OH unit and a hydridic RuH unit. Our efforts centered on understanding and improving upon this important catalyst for reduction of aldehydes and ketones. Our mechanistic studies established that the reduction of aldehydes by 1 to produce alcohols and a diruthenium bridging hydride species occurs much more rapidly than regeneration of the ruthenium hydride from the diruthenium bridging hydride species. Our mechanistic studies require simultaneous transfer of hydride from ruthenium to

  2. A Two-Unit Cold Standby Repairable System with One Replaceable Repair Facility and Delay Repair:Some Reliability Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Ying-yuan; TANG Ying-hui

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers a two-unit same cold standby repairable system with a replaceable repair facility and delay repair .The failure time of unit is assumed to follow exponential distribution , and the repair time and delay time of failed unit are assumed to follow arbitrary distributions , whereas the failure and replacement time distributions of the repair facility are exponential and arbitrary . By using the Markov renewal process theory, some primary reliability quantities of the system are obtained.

  3. Green tea prevents non-melanoma skin cancer by enhancing DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyar, Santosh K

    2011-04-15

    Excessive exposure of the skin to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is one of the major factors for the development of skin cancers, including non-melanoma. For the last several centuries the consumption of dietary phytochemicals has been linked to numerous health benefits including the photoprotection of the skin. Green tea has been consumed as a popular beverage world-wide and skin photoprotection by green tea polyphenols (GTPs) has been widely investigated. In this article, we have discussed the recent investigations and mechanistic studies which define the potential efficacy of GTPs on the prevention of non-melanoma skin cancer. UV-induced DNA damage, particularly the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, has been implicated in immunosuppression and initiation of skin cancer. Topical application or oral administration of green tea through drinking water of mice prevents UVB-induced skin tumor development, and this prevention is mediated, at least in part, through rapid repair of DNA. The DNA repair by GTPs is mediated through the induction of interleukin (IL)-12 which has been shown to have DNA repair ability. The new mechanistic investigations support and explain the anti-photocarcinogenic activity, in particular anti-non-melanoma skin cancer, of green tea and explain the benefits of green tea for human health.

  4. 40 CFR 63.1024 - Leak repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Leak repair. 63.1024 Section 63.1024... Standards for Equipment Leaks-Control Level 2 Standards § 63.1024 Leak repair. (a) Leak repair schedule. The owner or operator shall repair each leak detected as soon as practical, but not later than 15...

  5. 40 CFR 65.105 - Leak repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Leak repair. 65.105 Section 65.105... FEDERAL AIR RULE Equipment Leaks § 65.105 Leak repair. (a) Leak repair schedule. The owner or operator shall repair each leak detected as soon as practical but not later than 15 calendar days after it...

  6. 40 CFR 63.1005 - Leak repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... successful repair of the leak. (3) Maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Leak repair. 63.1005 Section 63.1005... Standards for Equipment Leaks-Control Level 1 § 63.1005 Leak repair. (a) Leak repair schedule. The owner...

  7. Mechanistic Fermentation Models for Process Design, Monitoring, and Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mears, Lisa; Stocks, Stuart M.; Albæk, Mads Orla

    2017-01-01

    Mechanistic models require a significant investment of time and resources, but their application to multiple stages of fermentation process development and operation can make this investment highly valuable. This Opinion article discusses how an established fermentation model may be adapted...... for application to different stages of fermentation process development: planning, process design, monitoring, and control. Although a longer development time is required for such modeling methods in comparison to purely data-based model techniques, the wide range of applications makes them a highly valuable tool...... for fermentation research and development. In addition, in a research environment, where collaboration is important, developing mechanistic models provides a platform for knowledge sharing and consolidation of existing process understanding....

  8. DNA repair deficiency in neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna V.

    2011-01-01

    : homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining. Ataxia telangiectasia and related disorders with defects in these pathways illustrate that such defects can lead to early childhood neurodegeneration. Aging is a risk factor for neurodegeneration and accumulation of oxidative mitochondrial DNA damage......Deficiency in repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders. Many recent experimental results indicate that the post-mitotic neurons are particularly prone to accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions potentially leading to progressive...... neurodegeneration. Nucleotide excision repair is the cellular pathway responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA damage and deficiency in such repair is found in a number of diseases with neurodegenerative phenotypes, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome. The main pathway for repairing oxidative...

  9. Exploring the pros and cons of mechanistic case diagrams for problem-based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjeong Kim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Mechanistic case diagram (MCD was recommended for increasing the depth of understanding of disease, but with few articles on its specific methods. We address the experience of making MCD in the fullest depth to identify the pros and cons of using MCDs in such ways. Methods During problem-based learning, we gave guidelines of MCD for its mechanistic exploration from subcellular processes to clinical features, being laid out in as much detail as possible. To understand the students’ attitudes and depth of study using MCDs, we analyzed the results of a questionnaire in an open format about experiencing MCDs and examined the resulting products. Results Through the responses to questionnaire, we found several favorable outcomes, major of which was deeper insight and comprehensive understanding of disease facilitated by the process of making well-organized diagram. The main disadvantages of these guidelines were the feeling of too much workload and difficulty of finding mechanisms. Students gave suggestions to overcome these problems: cautious reading of comprehensive texts, additional guidance from staff about depth and focus of mechanisms, and cooperative group work. From the analysis of maps, we recognized there should be allowance of diversities in the appearance of maps and many hypothetical connections, which could be related to an insufficient understanding of mechanisms in nature. Conclusion The more detailed an MCD task is, the better students can become acquainted with deep knowledges. However, this advantage should be balanced by the results that there are many ensuing difficulties for the work and deliberate help plans should be prepared.

  10. Advancements in the mechanistic understanding of the copper-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Berg

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The copper-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC is one of the most broadly applicable and easy-to-handle reactions in the arsenal of organic chemistry. However, the mechanistic understanding of this reaction has lagged behind the plethora of its applications for a long time. As reagent mixtures of copper salts and additives are commonly used in CuAAC reactions, the structure of the catalytically active species itself has remained subject to speculation, which can be attributed to the multifaceted aggregation chemistry of copper(I alkyne and acetylide complexes. Following an introductory section on common catalyst systems in CuAAC reactions, this review will highlight experimental and computational studies from early proposals to very recent and more sophisticated investigations, which deliver more detailed insights into the CuAAC’s catalytic cycle and the species involved. As diverging mechanistic views are presented in articles, books and online resources, we intend to present the research efforts in this field during the past decade and finally give an up-to-date picture of the currently accepted dinuclear mechanism of CuAAC. Additionally, we hope to inspire research efforts on the development of molecularly defined copper(I catalysts with defined structural characteristics, whose main advantage in contrast to the regularly used precatalyst reagent mixtures is twofold: on the one hand, the characteristics of molecularly defined, well soluble catalysts can be tuned according to the particular requirements of the experiment; on the other hand, the understanding of the CuAAC reaction mechanism can be further advanced by kinetic studies and the isolation and characterization of key intermediates.

  11. Early days of DNA repair: discovery of nucleotide excision repair and homology-dependent recombinational repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, W Dean

    2013-12-13

    The discovery of nucleotide excision repair in 1964 showed that DNA could be repaired by a mechanism that removed the damaged section of a strand and replaced it accurately by using the remaining intact strand as the template. This result showed that DNA could be actively metabolized in a process that had no precedent. In 1968, experiments describing postreplication repair, a process dependent on homologous recombination, were reported. The authors of these papers were either at Yale University or had prior Yale connections. Here we recount some of the events leading to these discoveries and consider the impact on further research at Yale and elsewhere.

  12. Construction, repair and maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinger, R. [Terasen Pipelines, Calgary, AB (Canada); Wong, P. [KC Integrity Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada); Yeomans, M.; Glover, A. [TransCanada PipeLines Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    The presentations by Working Group 4 focused on construction, repair and maintenance of pipelines with particular reference to high-strength steels and their applications for natural gas transmission pipelines. Discussions focused on how technology can be used to provide cost-effective design and construction solutions for long distance pipelines in a manner that does not compromise safety and reliability. The role that carbon plays in increasing the toughness of steel was also discussed. A few fundamental changes in steel production technology and a reduction in carbon content can result in a simultaneous increase in strength and toughness of steels. The cost impact of this technology was summarized. It was concluded that high strength steels offer effective solutions to deliver cost-effective pipelines to transport natural gas from northern basins. This session also presented pipeline routes that transport diluted bitumens from the Athabasca Oil Sands Project and the Muskeg River Mine to upgrader facilities in Alberta. Construction issues included design conservatism, water course crossings, winter construction, winter ditching, and public consultation. Examples of high strength steel pipe applications were also included with reference to experience gained by TransCanada and Corridor Pipeline. tabs., figs.

  13. Mechanistic Links Between PARP, NAD, and Brain Inflammation After TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-2-0091 TITLE: Mechanistic Links Between PARP, NAD, and Brain Inflammation After TBI PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR ...Raymond A. Swanson, M.D CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Northern California Institute for Research & Education San Francisco, CA 94121 REPORT DATE: October 2015...STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This project is a pre-clinical evaluation of the

  14. Human Glycinamide Ribonucleotide Transformylase: Active Site Mutants as Mechanistic Probes†

    OpenAIRE

    Manieri, Wanda; Moore, Molly E.; Soellner, Matthew B.; Tsang, Pearl; Caperelli, Carol A.

    2007-01-01

    Human glycinamide ribonucleotide transformylase (GART) (EC2.1.2.2) is a validated target for cancer chemotherapy, but mechanistic studies of this therapeutically important enzyme are limited. Site-directed mutagenesis, initial velocity studies, pH-rate studies, and substrate binding studies have been employed to probe the role of the strictly conserved active site residues, N106, H108, D144, and the semi-conserved K170 in substrate binding and catalysis. Only two conservative substitutions, N...

  15. Laparoscopic repair of postoperative perineal hernia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Perineal hernias are infrequent complications following abdominoperineal operations. Various approaches have been described for repair of perineal hernias including open transabdominal, transperineal or combined abdominoperineal repairs. The use of laparoscopic transabdominal repair of perineal hernias is not well-described. We present a case report demonstrating the benefits of laparoscopic repair of perineal hernia following previous laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection (APR) using a nonabsorbable mesh to repair the defect. We have demonstrated that the use of laparoscopy with repair of the pelvic floor defect using a non absorbable synthetic mesh offers an excellent alternative with many potential advantages over open transabdominal and transperineal repairs.

  16. Umbilical and epigastric hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschaweck, Ulrike

    2003-10-01

    The repair of umbilical and epigastric hernias still represents a challenge to surgeons. Although a common and relatively simple procedure, there is no exact protocol today on how the repair should be done. The Mayo technique and its alterations could not stand the test of time: a recurrence rate of 20% and higher is not acceptable for any surgical procedure. Although there is no consensus opinion, one thing is clear: the importance of an anatomic repair without tension and without an artificial enlargement of the defect. In 1987 Lichtenstein reported on 6321 cases of herniorraphy with a tension free repair, and in 1994 Stuart reemphasized that special importance in his editorial in the Lancet. A newer study from Brancato and coworkers in Italy also states the advantage of a tension-free prosthetic repair in 16 patients with epigastric hernia. We have gone even further and recommend a tailored-to-the-patient repair using a customized polypropylene mesh and a one-layer running suture. The advantages should be obvious: no artificial creation of an even bigger than original defect, a completely tension-free repair, and little to no recurrence of the hernia. Our results clearly prove that assumption. Moreover, the procedure is extremely safe and complications are very rare and minor. We conclude that using a mesh plug in a customized tension-free repair of umbilical and epigastric hernia shows many advantages over the commonly used methods. And we finally conclude with the words of Albert Einstein: "The only source of knowledge is experience."

  17. Repair Types, Procedures - Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    New Jersey, USA. Repair Types, Procedures – Part I RTO-EN-AVT-156 9 - 19 [5] Drieker R, Botello C, MacBeth S, and Grody J, “Aircraft Battle... MacBeth S, and Grody J, “Aircraft Battle Damage Assessment and Repair (ABDAR), Vol. III: Field Test Report,” AFRL-HE-WP-TR-2002-0039, July 2000. [8

  18. Hand function after nerve repair.

    OpenAIRE

    Lundborg, Göran; Rosén, Birgitta

    2007-01-01

    Treatment of injuries to major nerve trunks in the hand and upper extremity remains a major and challenging reconstructive problem. Such injuries may cause long-lasting disabilities in terms of lost fine sensory and motor functions. Nowadays there is no surgical repair technique that can ensure recovery of tactile discrimination in the hand of an adult patient following nerve repair while very young individuals usually regain a complete recovery of functional sensibility. Post-traumatic nerve...

  19. Cobbler's technique for Iridodialysis repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surinder Singh Pandav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a novel “Cobbler's technique” for iridodialysis repair in the right eye of a patient aged 18 years, with a traumatic iridodialysis secondary to open globe injury with an iron rod. Our technique is simple with easy surgical maneuvers, that is, effective for repairing iridodialysis. The “Cobbler's technique” allows a maximally functional and cosmetic result for iridodialysis.

  20. Rehabilitation after Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaidou, Ourania; Migkou, Stefania; Karampalis, Christos

    2017-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are a very common condition that is often incapacitating. Whether non-surgical or surgical, successful management of rotator cuff disease is dependent on appropriate rehabilitation. If conservative management is insufficient, surgical repair is often indicated. Postsurgical outcomes for patients having had rotator cuff repair can be quite good. A successful outcome is much dependent on surgical technique as it is on rehabilitation. Numerous rehabilitation protocols for the management of rotator cuff disease are based primarily on clinical experience and expert opinion. This article describes the different rehabilitation protocols that aim to protect the repair in the immediate postoperative period, minimize postoperative stiffness and muscle atrophy. A review of currently available literature on rehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff tear repair was performed to illustrate the available evidence behind various postoperative treatment modalities. There were no statistically significant differences between a conservative and an accelerated rehabilitation protocol . Early passive range of motion (ROM) following arthroscopic cuff repair is thought to decrease postoperative stiffness and improve functionality. However, early aggressive rehabilitation may compromise repair integrity. The currently available literature did not identify any significant differences in functional outcomes and relative risks of re-tears between delayed and early motion in patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs. A gentle rehabilitation protocol with limits in range of motion and exercise times after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair would be better for tendon healing without taking any substantial risks. A close communication between the surgeon, the patient and the physical therapy team is important and should continue throughout the whole recovery process.

  1. Repairing Learned Knowledge Using Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-01

    It necessar and Identify by’ 6109h nii be) learning precedent-based learning knowledge repair explanation-based learning near - miss groups 20. ABSTRACT...can a program use explanations to repair a recollection, preventing further misapplication? Near - Miss Groups Isolate Suspicious Relations If a metal...pail differs from a porcelain cup only in the position of handle attachment, then we would say that the pail is a near miss . Unfortunately, there are

  2. Aircraft Metal Skin Repair and Honeycomb Structure Repair; Sheet Metal Work 3: 9857.02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course helps students determine types of repairs, compute repair sizes, and complete the repair through surface protection. Course content includes goals, specific objectives, protection of metals, repairs to metal skin, and honeycomb structure repair. A bibliography and post-test are appended. A prerequisite for this course is mastery of the…

  3. Home range analysis using a mechanistic home range model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moorcroft, P.R. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology); Lewis, M.A. (Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Mathematics) Crabtree, R.L. (Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife Resources)

    1999-07-01

    The traditional models used to characterize animal home ranges have no mechanistic basis underlying their descriptions of space use, and as a result, the analysis of animal home ranges has primarily been a descriptive endeavor. In this paper, the authors characterize coyote (Canis latrans) home range patterns using partial differential equations for expected space use that are formally derived from underlying descriptions of individual movement behavior. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time that mechanistic models have been used to characterize animal home ranges. The results provide empirical support for a model formulation of movement response to scent marks, and suggest that having relocation data for individuals in adjacent groups is necessary to capture the spatial arrangement of home range boundaries. The authors then show how the model fits can be used to obtain predictions for individual movement and scent marking behavior and to predict changes in home range patterns. More generally, the findings illustrate how mechanistic models permit the development of a predictive theory for the relationship between movement behavior and animal spatial distribution.

  4. Numerical simulation in steam injection process by a mechanistic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Souza, J.C.Jr.; Campos, W.; Lopes, D.; Moura, L.S.S. [Petrobras, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2008-10-15

    Steam injection is a common thermal recovery method used in very viscous oil reservoirs. The method involves the injection of heat to reduce viscosity and mobilize oil. A steam generation and injection system consists primarily of a steam source, distribution lines, injection wells and a discarding tank. In order to optimize injection and improve the oil recovery factor, one must determine the parameters of steam flow such as pressure, temperature and steam quality. This study focused on developing a unified mathematical model by means of a mechanistic approach for two-phase steam flow in pipelines and wells. The hydrodynamic and heat transfer mechanistic model was implemented in a computer simulator to model the parameters of steam injection while trying to avoid the use of empirical correlations. A marching algorithm was used to determine the distribution of pressure and temperature along the pipelines and wellbores. The mathematical model for steam flow in injection systems, developed by a mechanistic approach (VapMec) performed well when the simulated values of pressures and temperatures were compared with the values measured during field tests. The newly developed VapMec model was incorporated in the LinVap-3 simulator that constitutes an engineering supporting tool for steam injection wells operated by Petrobras. 23 refs., 7 tabs., 6 figs.

  5. Base excision repair in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnez-Lima Lucymara F.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage can be induced by a large number of physical and chemical agents from the environment as well as compounds produced by cellular metabolism. This type of damage can interfere with cellular processes such as replication and transcription, resulting in cell death and/or mutations. The low frequency of mutagenesis in cells is due to the presence of enzymatic pathways which repair damaged DNA. Several DNA repair genes (mainly from bacteria, yeasts and mammals have been cloned and their products characterized. The high conservation, especially in eukaryotes, of the majority of genes related to DNA repair argues for their importance in the maintenance of life on earth. In plants, our understanding of DNA repair pathways is still very poor, the first plant repair genes having only been cloned in 1997 and the mechanisms of their products have not yet been characterized. The objective of our data mining work was to identify genes related to the base excision repair (BER pathway, which are present in the database of the Sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tag (SUCEST Project. This search was performed by tblastn program. We identified sugarcane clusters homologous to the majority of BER proteins used in the analysis and a high degree of conservation was observed. The best results were obtained with BER proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana. For some sugarcane BER genes, the presence of more than one form of mRNA is possible, as shown by the occurrence of more than one homologous EST cluster.

  6. Scarf Repair of Composite Laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Zonghong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of composite materials, such as carbon-fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP composites, aero-structures has led to an increased need of advanced assembly joining and repair technologies. Adhesive bonded repairs as an alternative to recover full or part of initial strength were investigated. Tests were conducted with the objective of evaluating the effectiveness of techniques used for repairing damage fiber reinforced laminated composites. Failure loads and failure modes were generated and compared with the following parameters: scarf angles, roughness of grind tool and number of external plies. Results showed that scarf angle was the critical parameter and the largest tensile strength was observed with the smallest scarf angle. Besides, the use of external plies at the outer surface could not increase the repairs efficiency for large scarf angle. Preparing the repair surfaces by sanding them with a sander ranging from 60 to 100 grit number had significant effect on the failure load. These results allowed the proposal of design principles for repairing CFRP structures.

  7. Aging and DNA repair capability. [Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tice, R R

    1977-01-01

    A review of the literature on DNA repair processes in relation to aging is presented under the following headings: DNA repair processes; age-related occurrence of unrepaired DNA lesions; DNA repair capability as a function of age; tissue-specific DNA repair capability; acceleration of the aging process by exposure to DNA damaging agents; human genetic syndromes; and longevity and DNA repair processes. (HLW)

  8. Mechanism of DNA loading by the DNA repair helicase XPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu-Aruxandei, Diana; Petrovic-Stojanovska, Biljana; Penedo, J Carlos; White, Malcolm F; Naismith, James H

    2016-04-07

    The xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD) helicase is a component of the transcription factor IIH complex in eukaryotes and plays an essential role in DNA repair in the nucleotide excision repair pathway. XPD is a 5' to 3' helicase with an essential iron-sulfur cluster. Structural and biochemical studies of the monomeric archaeal XPD homologues have aided a mechanistic understanding of this important class of helicase, but several important questions remain open. In particular, the mechanism for DNA loading, which is assumed to require large protein conformational change, is not fully understood. Here, DNA binding by the archaeal XPD helicase from Thermoplasma acidophilum has been investigated using a combination of crystallography, cross-linking, modified substrates and biochemical assays. The data are consistent with an initial tight binding of ssDNA to helicase domain 2, followed by transient opening of the interface between the Arch and 4FeS domains, allowing access to a second binding site on helicase domain 1 that directs DNA through the pore. A crystal structure of XPD from Sulfolobus acidocaldiarius that lacks helicase domain 2 has an otherwise unperturbed structure, emphasizing the stability of the interface between the Arch and 4FeS domains in XPD.

  9. Mechanism of DNA loading by the DNA repair helicase XPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu-Aruxandei, Diana; Petrovic-Stojanovska, Biljana; Penedo, J. Carlos; White, Malcolm F.; Naismith, James H.

    2016-01-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD) helicase is a component of the transcription factor IIH complex in eukaryotes and plays an essential role in DNA repair in the nucleotide excision repair pathway. XPD is a 5′ to 3′ helicase with an essential iron–sulfur cluster. Structural and biochemical studies of the monomeric archaeal XPD homologues have aided a mechanistic understanding of this important class of helicase, but several important questions remain open. In particular, the mechanism for DNA loading, which is assumed to require large protein conformational change, is not fully understood. Here, DNA binding by the archaeal XPD helicase from Thermoplasma acidophilum has been investigated using a combination of crystallography, cross-linking, modified substrates and biochemical assays. The data are consistent with an initial tight binding of ssDNA to helicase domain 2, followed by transient opening of the interface between the Arch and 4FeS domains, allowing access to a second binding site on helicase domain 1 that directs DNA through the pore. A crystal structure of XPD from Sulfolobus acidocaldiarius that lacks helicase domain 2 has an otherwise unperturbed structure, emphasizing the stability of the interface between the Arch and 4FeS domains in XPD. PMID:26896802

  10. 49 CFR 1242.42 - Administration, repair and maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Administration, repair and maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired property, fringe benefits, other casualties and insurance... maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired property, fringe benefits,...

  11. Making ends meet: repairing breaks in bacterial DNA by non-homologous end-joining.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Bowater

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are one of the most dangerous forms of DNA lesion that can result in genomic instability and cell death. Therefore cells have developed elaborate DSB-repair pathways to maintain the integrity of genomic DNA. There are two major pathways for the repair of DSBs in eukaryotes: homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ. Until very recently, the NHEJ pathway had been thought to be restricted to the eukarya. However, an evolutionarily related NHEJ apparatus has now been identified and characterized in the prokarya. Here we review the recent discoveries concerning bacterial NHEJ and discuss the possible origins of this repair system. We also examine the insights gained from the recent cellular and biochemical studies of this DSB-repair process and discuss the possible cellular roles of an NHEJ pathway in the life-cycle of prokaryotes and phages.

  12. Genetic and environmental influence on DNA strand break repair: a twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garm, Christian; Moreno-Villanueva, Maria; Bürkle, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    factors are likely to influence DNA repair capacity. In order to gain more insight into the genetic and environmental contribution to the molecular basis of DNA repair, we have performed a human twin study, where we focused on the consequences of some of the most abundant types of DNA damage (single......Accumulation of DNA damage deriving from exogenous and endogenous sources has significant consequences for cellular survival, and is implicated in aging, cancer, and neurological diseases. Different DNA repair pathways have evolved in order to maintain genomic stability. Genetic and environmental......-strand breaks), and some of the most hazardous lesions (DNA double-strand breaks). DNA damage signaling response (Gamma-H2AX signaling), relative amount of endogenous damage, and DNA-strand break repair capacities were studied in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 198 twins (94 monozygotic and 104...

  13. Models of the behaviour of (thermally stressed) microbial spores in foods: tools to study mechanisms of damage and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter Beek, Alex; Hornstra, Luc M; Pandey, Rachna; Kallemeijn, Wouter W; Smelt, Jan P P M; Manders, Erik M M; Brul, Stanley

    2011-06-01

    The 'Omics' revolution has brought a wealth of new mechanistic insights in many fields of biology. It offers options to base predictions of microbial behaviour on mechanistic insight. As the cellular mechanisms involved often turn out to be highly intertwined it is crucial that model development aims at identifying the level of complexity that is relevant to work at. For the prediction of microbiologically stable foods insight in the behaviour of bacterial spore formers is crucial. Their chances of germination and likelihood of outgrowth are major food stability indicators, as well as the transition from outgrowth to first cell division and vegetative growth. Current available technology to assess these parameters in a time-resolved manner at the single spore level will be discussed. Tools to study molecular processes operative in heat induced damage will be highlighted.

  14. Pyramidalization of the Glycosidic Nitrogen Provides the Way for Efficient Cleavage of the N‑Glycosidic Bond of 8‑OxoG with the hOGG1 DNA Repair Protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sebera, J.; Trantirek, L.; Tanaka, Y.; Sychrovský, V.

    2012-01-01

    A mechanistic pathway for cleavage of the N-glycosidic bond of 8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine (oxoG) catalyzed with the human 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 DNA repair protein (hOGG1) is proposed in this theoretical study. The reaction scheme suggests direct proton addition to the glycosidic nitrogen N9 of oxo

  15. 3D construction and repair from welding and material science perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marya, Surendar; Hascoet, Jean-Yves

    2016-10-01

    Additive manufacturing, based on layer-by-layer deposition of a feedstock material from a 3D data, can be mechanistically associated to welding. With feedstock fusion based processes, both additive manufacturing and welding implement similar heat sources, feedstock materials and translation mechanisms. From material science perspectives, additive manufacturing can take clue from lessons learned by millennium old welding technology to rapidly advance in its quest to generate fit for service metallic parts. This paper illustrates material science highlights extracted from the fabrication of a 316 L air vent and the functional repair of a Monel K500 (UNS N0500) with Inconel 625.

  16. ATM prevents DSB formation by coordinating SSB repair and cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoronenkova, Svetlana V; Dianov, Grigory L

    2015-03-31

    DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) arise as a consequence of spontaneous DNA instability and are also formed as DNA repair intermediates. Their repair is critical because they otherwise terminate gene transcription and generate toxic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) on replication. To prevent the formation of DSBs, SSB repair must be completed before DNA replication. To accomplish this, cells should be able to detect unrepaired SSBs, and then delay cell cycle progression to allow more time for repair; however, to date there is no evidence supporting the coordination of SSB repair and replication in human cells. Here we report that ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM) plays a major role in restricting the replication of SSB-containing DNA and thus prevents DSB formation. We show that ATM is activated by SSBs and coordinates their repair with DNA replication. SSB-mediated ATM activation is followed by a G1 cell cycle delay that allows more time for repair and thus prevents the replication of damaged DNA and DSB accrual. These findings establish an unanticipated role for ATM in the signaling of DNA SSBs and provide important insight into the molecular defects leading to genetic instability in patients with ataxia-telangiectasia.

  17. Dorsal variant blister aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couldwell, William T; Chamoun, Roukoz

    2012-01-01

    Dorsal variant proximal carotid blister aneurysms are treacherous lesions to manage. It is important to recognize this variant on preoperative angiographic imaging, in anticipation of surgical strategies for their treatment. Strategies include trapping the involved segment and revascularization if necessary. Other options include repair of the aneurysm rupture site directly. Given that these are not true berry aneurysms, repair of the rupture site involves wrapping or clip-grafting techniques. The case presented here was a young woman with a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured dorsal variant blister aneurysm. The technique used is demonstrated in the video and is a modified clip-wrap technique using woven polyester graft material. The patient was given aspirin preoperatively as preparation for the clip-wrap technique. It is the authors' current protocol to attempt a direct repair with clip-wrapping and leaving artery sacrifice with or without bypass as a salvage therapy if direct repair is not possible. Assessment of vessel patency after repair is performed by intraoperative Doppler and indocyanine green angiography. Intraoperative somatosensory and motor evoked potential monitoring is performed in all cases. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/crUreWGQdGo.

  18. Advanced Reach Tool (ART): development of the mechanistic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransman, Wouter; Van Tongeren, Martie; Cherrie, John W; Tischer, Martin; Schneider, Thomas; Schinkel, Jody; Kromhout, Hans; Warren, Nick; Goede, Henk; Tielemans, Erik

    2011-11-01

    This paper describes the development of the mechanistic model within a collaborative project, referred to as the Advanced REACH Tool (ART) project, to develop a tool to model inhalation exposure for workers sharing similar operational conditions across different industries and locations in Europe. The ART mechanistic model is based on a conceptual framework that adopts a source receptor approach, which describes the transport of a contaminant from the source to the receptor and defines seven independent principal modifying factors: substance emission potential, activity emission potential, localized controls, segregation, personal enclosure, surface contamination, and dispersion. ART currently differentiates between three different exposure types: vapours, mists, and dust (fumes, fibres, and gases are presently excluded). Various sources were used to assign numerical values to the multipliers to each modifying factor. The evidence used to underpin this assessment procedure was based on chemical and physical laws. In addition, empirical data obtained from literature were used. Where this was not possible, expert elicitation was applied for the assessment procedure. Multipliers for all modifying factors were peer reviewed by leading experts from industry, research institutes, and public authorities across the globe. In addition, several workshops with experts were organized to discuss the proposed exposure multipliers. The mechanistic model is a central part of the ART tool and with advancing knowledge on exposure, determinants will require updates and refinements on a continuous basis, such as the effect of worker behaviour on personal exposure, 'best practice' values that describe the maximum achievable effectiveness of control measures, the intrinsic emission potential of various solid objects (e.g. metal, glass, plastics, etc.), and extending the applicability domain to certain types of exposures (e.g. gas, fume, and fibre exposure).

  19. Mechanistic species distribution modeling reveals a niche shift during invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Daniel S; Scalone, Romain; Štefanić, Edita; Bullock, James M

    2017-06-01

    Niche shifts of nonnative plants can occur when they colonize novel climatic conditions. However, the mechanistic basis for niche shifts during invasion is poorly understood and has rarely been captured within species distribution models. We quantified the consequence of between-population variation in phenology for invasion of common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.) across Europe. Ragweed is of serious concern because of its harmful effects as a crop weed and because of its impact on public health as a major aeroallergen. We developed a forward mechanistic species distribution model based on responses of ragweed development rates to temperature and photoperiod. The model was parameterized and validated from the literature and by reanalyzing data from a reciprocal common garden experiment in which native and invasive populations were grown within and beyond the current invaded range. It could therefore accommodate between-population variation in the physiological requirements for flowering, and predict the potentially invaded ranges of individual populations. Northern-origin populations that were established outside the generally accepted climate envelope of the species had lower thermal requirements for bud development, suggesting local adaptation of phenology had occurred during the invasion. The model predicts that this will extend the potentially invaded range northward and increase the average suitability across Europe by 90% in the current climate and 20% in the future climate. Therefore, trait variation observed at the population scale can trigger a climatic niche shift at the biogeographic scale. For ragweed, earlier flowering phenology in established northern populations could allow the species to spread beyond its current invasive range, substantially increasing its risk to agriculture and public health. Mechanistic species distribution models offer the possibility to represent niche shifts by varying the traits and niche responses of individual

  20. Development of Improved Mechanistic Deterioration Models for Flexible Pavements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullidtz, Per; Ertman, Hans Larsen

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes a pilot study in Denmark with the main objective of developing improved mechanistic deterioration models for flexible pavements based on an accelerated full scale test on an instrumented pavement in the Danish Road Tessting Machine. The study was the first in "International...... Pavement Subgrade Performance Study" sponsored by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), USA. The paper describes in detail the data analysis and the resulting models for rutting, roughness, and a model for the plastic strain in the subgrade.The reader will get an understanding of the work needed...

  1. Organometallic Reactions Development, Mechanistic Studies and Synthetic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Johan Hygum

    a mechanistic study of the Barbier allylation of benzaldehydes with six different metals (Zn, In, Sb, Sn, Bi and Mg) in aqueous media. The mechanism of the allylation was investigated by means of Hammett plots and the secondary deuterium kinetic isotope effect. It was found that all metals except magnesium form...... a discrete allylmetal species and the rate-determining step is the polar addition to the carbonyl. For magnesium data indicates that the selectivity-determining step is generation of the radical anion of the benzaldehyde. The second project discusses a concise and enantiopure total synthesis...

  2. Mechanistic differences in the transcriptional interpretation of local and long-range Shh morphogen signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterveen, Tony; Kurdija, Sanja; Alekseenko, Zhanna; Uhde, Christopher W; Bergsland, Maria; Sandberg, Magnus; Andersson, Elisabet; Dias, José M; Muhr, Jonas; Ericson, Johan

    2012-11-13

    Morphogens orchestrate tissue patterning in a concentration-dependent fashion during vertebrate embryogenesis, yet little is known of how positional information provided by such signals is translated into discrete transcriptional outputs. Here we have identified and characterized cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) of genes operating downstream of graded Shh signaling and bifunctional Gli proteins in neural patterning. Unexpectedly, we find that Gli activators have a noninstructive role in long-range patterning and cooperate with SoxB1 proteins to facilitate a largely concentration-independent mode of gene activation. Instead, the opposing Gli-repressor gradient is interpreted at transcriptional levels, and, together with CRM-specific repressive input of homeodomain proteins, comprises a repressive network that translates graded Shh signaling into regional gene expression patterns. Moreover, local and long-range interpretation of Shh signaling differs with respect to CRM context sensitivity and Gli-activator dependence, and we propose that these differences provide insight into how morphogen function may have mechanistically evolved from an initially binary inductive event.

  3. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of free-radical reactions in combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tully, F.P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Combustion is driven by energy-releasing chemical reactions. Free radicals that participate in chain reactions carry the combustion process from reactants to products. Research in chemical kinetics enables us to understand the microscopic mechanisms involved in individual chemical reactions as well as to determine the rates at which they proceed. Both types of information are required for an understanding of how flames burn, why engines knock, how to minimize the production of pollutants, and many other important questions in combustion. In this program the authors emphasize accurate measurements over wide temperature ranges of the rates at which ubiquitous free radicals react with stable molecules. The authors investigate a variety of OH, CN, and CH + stable molecule reactions important to fuel conversion, emphasizing application of the extraordinarily precise technique of laser photolysis/continuous-wave laser-induced fluorescence (LP/cwLIF). This precision enables kinetic measurements to serve as mechanistic probes. Since considerable effort is required to study each individual reaction, prudent selection is critical. Two factors encourage selection of a specific reaction: (1) the rates and mechanisms of the subject reaction are required input to a combustion model; and (2) the reaction is a chemical prototype which, upon characterization, will provide fundamental insight into chemical reactivity, facilitate estimation of kinetic parameters for similar reactions, and constrain and test the computational limits of reaction-rate theory. Most studies performed in this project satisfy both conditions.

  4. Analysis of initial cell spreading using mechanistic contact formulations for a deformable cell model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Odenthal

    Full Text Available Adhesion governs to a large extent the mechanical interaction between a cell and its microenvironment. As initial cell spreading is purely adhesion driven, understanding this phenomenon leads to profound insight in both cell adhesion and cell-substrate interaction. It has been found that across a wide variety of cell types, initial spreading behavior universally follows the same power laws. The simplest cell type providing this scaling of the radius of the spreading area with time are modified red blood cells (RBCs, whose elastic responses are well characterized. Using a mechanistic description of the contact interaction between a cell and its substrate in combination with a deformable RBC model, we are now able to investigate in detail the mechanisms behind this universal power law. The presented model suggests that the initial slope of the spreading curve with time results from a purely geometrical effect facilitated mainly by dissipation upon contact. Later on, the spreading rate decreases due to increasing tension and dissipation in the cell's cortex as the cell spreads more and more. To reproduce this observed initial spreading, no irreversible deformations are required. Since the model created in this effort is extensible to more complex cell types and can cope with arbitrarily shaped, smooth mechanical microenvironments of the cells, it can be useful for a wide range of investigations where forces at the cell boundary play a decisive role.

  5. New web-based applications for mechanistic case diagramming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred R. Dee

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The goal of mechanistic case diagraming (MCD is to provide students with more in-depth understanding of cause and effect relationships and basic mechanistic pathways in medicine. This will enable them to better explain how observed clinical findings develop from preceding pathogenic and pathophysiological events. The pedagogic function of MCD is in relating risk factors, disease entities and morphology, signs and symptoms, and test and procedure findings in a specific case scenario with etiologic pathogenic and pathophysiological sequences within a flow diagram. In this paper, we describe the addition of automation and predetermined lists to further develop the original concept of MCD as described by Engelberg in 1992 and Guerrero in 2001. We demonstrate that with these modifications, MCD is effective and efficient in small group case-based teaching for second-year medical students (ratings of ~3.4 on a 4.0 scale. There was also a significant correlation with other measures of competency, with a ‘true’ score correlation of 0.54. A traditional calculation of reliability showed promising results (α =0.47 within a low stakes, ungraded environment. Further, we have demonstrated MCD's potential for use in independent learning and TBL. Future studies are needed to evaluate MCD's potential for use in medium stakes assessment or self-paced independent learning and assessment. MCD may be especially relevant in returning students to the application of basic medical science mechanisms in the clinical years.

  6. Novel catalytic and mechanistic studies on wastewater denitrification with hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theologides, C P; Olympiou, G G; Savva, P G; Pantelidou, N A; Constantinou, B K; Chatziiona, V K; Valanidou, L Y; Piskopianou, C T; Costa, C N

    2014-01-01

    The present work reports up-to-date information regarding the reaction mechanism of the catalytic hydrogenation of nitrates in water media. In the present mechanistic study, an attempt is made, for the first time, to elucidate the crucial role of several catalysts and reaction parameters in the mechanism of the NO(3)(-)/H(2) reaction. Steady-state isotopic transient kinetic analysis (SSITKA) experiments coupled with ex situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) were performed on supported Pd-Cu catalysts for the NO(3)(-)/H(2) and NO(3)(-)/H(2)/O(2) reactions. The latter experiments revealed that the formation and surface coverage of various adsorbed active intermediate N-species on the support or Pd/Cu metal surface is significantly favored in the presence of TiO(2) in the support mixture and in the presence of oxygen in the reaction's gaseous feed stream. The differences in the reactivity of these adsorbed N-species, found in the present work, adequately explain the large effect of the chemical composition of the support and the gas feed composition on catalyst behaviour (activity and selectivity). The present study leads to solid mechanistic evidence concerning the presence of a hydrogen spillover process from the metal to the support. Moreover, this study shows that Cu clusters are active sites for the reduction of nitrates to nitrites.

  7. Surgery for malignant gliomas: mechanistic reasoning and slippery statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Patrick; Ellison, David W; Mendelow, A David

    2005-07-01

    Current surgical treatment of malignant gliomas largely depends on mechanistic reasoning and data collected in non-randomised studies. Technological advance has enabled more accurate resection of tumours and preservation of eloquent brain areas but ethical considerations have restricted randomised trials on the efficacy of surgery to one small trial that found a 3 month survival advantage for patients over age 65 years who received surgery and interim analysis of a larger trial. There is an argument for surgery as a palliative measure in patients with symptoms caused by mechanisms that are surgically remediable. Whether there is any survival advantage from surgery in patients other than those with immediately life-threatening, surgically remediable complications, such as raised intracranial pressure, is unclear. The available data show that if such an advantage does exist, it is modest at best. Adjuvant treatments given surgically are being studied. Chemotherapy wafers are the most prominent of the adjuvant treatments but the evidence available is insufficient to recommend their use in routine practice. In this review we examine the prevailing mechanistic model and observational data; we assess how these are applied and the priorities they indicate for future research.

  8. Trichloroethylene: Mechanistic, Epidemiologic and Other Supporting Evidence of Carcinogenic Hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusyn, Ivan; Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Lash, Lawrence H.; Kromhout, Hans; Hansen, Johnni; Guyton, Kathryn Z.

    2013-01-01

    The chlorinated solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. The carcinogenic hazard of TCE was the subject of a 2012 evaluation by a Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Information on exposures, relevant data from epidemiologic studies, bioassays in experimental animals, and toxicity and mechanism of action studies was used to conclude that TCE is carcinogenic to humans (Group 1). This article summarizes the key evidence forming the scientific bases for the IARC classification. Exposure to TCE from environmental sources (including from hazardous waste sites and contaminated water) is common throughout the world. While workplace use of TCE has been declining, occupational exposures remain of concern, especially in developing countries. Strongest human evidence is from studies of occupational TCE exposure and kidney cancer. Positive, although less consistent, associations were reported for liver cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. TCE is carcinogenic at multiple sites in multiple species and strains of experimental animals. The mechanistic evidence includes extensive data on the toxicokinetics and genotoxicity of TCE and its metabolites. Together, available evidence provided a cohesive database supporting the human cancer hazard of TCE, particularly in the kidney. For other target sites of carcinogenicity, mechanistic and other data were found to be more limited. Important sources of susceptibility to TCE toxicity and carcinogenicity were also reviewed by the Working Group. In all, consideration of the multiple evidence streams presented herein informed the IARC conclusions regarding the carcinogenicity of TCE. PMID:23973663

  9. Trichloroethylene: Mechanistic, epidemiologic and other supporting evidence of carcinogenic hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusyn, Ivan; Chiu, Weihsueh A; Lash, Lawrence H; Kromhout, Hans; Hansen, Johnni; Guyton, Kathryn Z

    2014-01-01

    The chlorinated solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. The carcinogenic hazard of TCE was the subject of a 2012 evaluation by a Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Information on exposures, relevant data from epidemiologic studies, bioassays in experimental animals, and toxicity and mechanism of action studies was used to conclude that TCE is carcinogenic to humans (Group 1). This article summarizes the key evidence forming the scientific bases for the IARC classification. Exposure to TCE from environmental sources (including hazardous waste sites and contaminated water) is common throughout the world. While workplace use of TCE has been declining, occupational exposures remain of concern, especially in developing countries. The strongest human evidence is from studies of occupational TCE exposure and kidney cancer. Positive, although less consistent, associations were reported for liver cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. TCE is carcinogenic at multiple sites in multiple species and strains of experimental animals. The mechanistic evidence includes extensive data on the toxicokinetics and genotoxicity of TCE and its metabolites. Together, available evidence provided a cohesive database supporting the human cancer hazard of TCE, particularly in the kidney. For other target sites of carcinogenicity, mechanistic and other data were found to be more limited. Important sources of susceptibility to TCE toxicity and carcinogenicity were also reviewed by the Working Group. In all, consideration of the multiple evidence streams presented herein informed the IARC conclusions regarding the carcinogenicity of TCE.

  10. Mechanistic and Economical Characteristics of Asphalt Rubber Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mena I. Souliman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Load associated fatigue cracking is one of the major distress types occurring in flexible pavement systems. Flexural bending beam fatigue laboratory test has been used for several decades and is considered to be an integral part of the new superpave advanced characterization procedure. One of the most significant solutions to prolong the fatigue life for an asphaltic mixture is to utilize flexible materials as rubber. A laboratory testing program was performed on a conventional and Asphalt Rubber- (AR- gap-graded mixtures to investigate the impact of added rubber on the mechanical, mechanistic, and economical attributes of asphaltic mixtures. Strain controlled fatigue tests were conducted according to American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO procedures. The results from the beam fatigue tests indicated that the AR-gap-graded mixtures would have much longer fatigue life compared with the reference (conventional mixtures. In addition, a mechanistic analysis using 3D-Move software coupled with a cost analysis study based on the fatigue performance on the two mixtures was performed. Overall, analysis showed that AR modified asphalt mixtures exhibited significantly lower cost of pavement per 1000 cycles of fatigue life per mile compared to conventional HMA mixture.

  11. New web-based applications for mechanistic case diagramming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, Fred R.; Haugen, Thomas H.; Kreiter, Clarence D.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of mechanistic case diagraming (MCD) is to provide students with more in-depth understanding of cause and effect relationships and basic mechanistic pathways in medicine. This will enable them to better explain how observed clinical findings develop from preceding pathogenic and pathophysiological events. The pedagogic function of MCD is in relating risk factors, disease entities and morphology, signs and symptoms, and test and procedure findings in a specific case scenario with etiologic pathogenic and pathophysiological sequences within a flow diagram. In this paper, we describe the addition of automation and predetermined lists to further develop the original concept of MCD as described by Engelberg in 1992 and Guerrero in 2001. We demonstrate that with these modifications, MCD is effective and efficient in small group case-based teaching for second-year medical students (ratings of ~3.4 on a 4.0 scale). There was also a significant correlation with other measures of competency, with a ‘true’ score correlation of 0.54. A traditional calculation of reliability showed promising results (α =0.47) within a low stakes, ungraded environment. Further, we have demonstrated MCD's potential for use in independent learning and TBL. Future studies are needed to evaluate MCD's potential for use in medium stakes assessment or self-paced independent learning and assessment. MCD may be especially relevant in returning students to the application of basic medical science mechanisms in the clinical years. PMID:25059836

  12. Nucleotide excision repair in the test tube.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe eukaryotic nucleotide excision-repair pathway has been reconstituted in vitro, an achievement that should hasten the full enzymological characterization of this highly complex DNA-repair pathway.

  13. Biological Augmentation of Rotator Cuff Tendon Repair

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kovacevic, David; Rodeo, Scott A

    2008-01-01

    A histologically normal insertion site does not regenerate following rotator cuff tendon-to-bone repair, which is likely due to abnormal or insufficient gene expression and/or cell differentiation at the repair site...

  14. Cleft lip and palate repair - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000004.htm Cleft lip and palate repair - discharge To use the sharing ... Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 8. Read More Cleft lip and palate Cleft lip and palate repair Review Date 5/9/ ...

  15. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000240.htm Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open - discharge To use the sharing features ... References Orandi BJ, Black JH. Open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms. In: Cameron JL, Cameron AM, eds. Current Surgical ...

  16. Mechanisms of DNA repair and radio-induced mutagenesis in higher eukaryotes; Mecanismes de reparation et mutagenese radio-induite chez les eucaryotes superieurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D. [Centre Universitaire d' Orsay, Institut Curie, Section de Recherche, Lab. Raymond-Latarjet, UMR 2027 CNRS, 91 (France)

    2000-10-01

    Cells of higher eukaryotes possess several very efficient systems for the repair of radiation-induced lesions in DNA. Different strategies have been adopted at the cellular level to remove or even tolerate various types of lesions in order to assure survival and limit the mutagenic consequences. In mammalian cells, the main DNA repair systems comprise direct reversion of damage, excision of damage and exchange mechanisms with intact DNA. Among these, the direct ligation of single strand breaks (SSB) by a DNA ligase and the multi-enzymatic repair systems of mismatch repair, base and nucleotide excision repair as well as the repair of double strand breaks (DSB) by homologous recombination or non homologous end-joining are the most important systems. Most of these processes are error-free except the non homologous end-joining pathway used for the repair of DSB. Moreover, certain lesions can be tolerated by more or less accurately acting polymerases capable of performing trans-lesion DNA syntheses. The DNA repair systems are intimately integrated in the network of cellular regulation. Some of their components are DNA damage inducible. Radiation-induced mutagenesis is largely due to unrepaired DNA damage but also involves error-prone repair processes like the repair of DSB by non-homologous end-joining. Generally, mammalian cells are well prepared to repair radiation-induced lesions. However, some questions remain to be asked about mechanistic details and efficiencies of the systems for removing certain types of radiation-damage and about their order and timing of action. The answers to these questions would be important for radioprotection as well as radiotherapy. (author)

  17. New insights into the catalytic cleavage of the lignin β-O-4 linkage in multifunctional ionic liquid media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scott, Martin; Deuss, Peter J.; de Vries, Johannes; Prechtl, Martin H. G.; Barta, Katalin

    2016-01-01

    Ionic liquids are attractive reaction media for the solubilisation and depolymerisation of lignin into value-added products. However, mechanistic insight related to the cleavage of specific linkages relevant for efficient lignin depolymerisation in such solvents is still lacking. This study presents

  18. Transvesicoscopic Repair of Vesicovaginal Fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Nerli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Vesicovaginal fistula has been a social and surgical problem for centuries. Many surgical techniques have been developed to correct this abnormality, including transabdominal, transvaginal, and endoscopic approaches. The best approach is probably the one with which the surgeon feels most experienced and comfortable. Laparoscopy has become increasingly popular in urology, reducing the invasiveness of treatment and shortening the period of convalescence. We report our results of transvesicoscopic approach for VVF repair. Materials and Methods. Patients with VVF were offered repair using the transvesicoscopic route. With the patient under general anaesthesia and in modified lithotomy position cystoscopy was performed with gas insufflation. Under cystoscopic guidance the bladder was fixed to anterior abdominal wall and ports inserted into the bladder. The fistula was repaired under endoscopic vision. Results. Four women, who had VVF following abdominal hysterectomy, underwent this procedure. The operating time ranged from 175 to 235 minutes. There was minimal bleeding. Post operative complications included ileus in one and fever in another. No recurrence of VVF was noted in any patient. Conclusions. Transvesicoscopic repair of VVF is feasible, safe, and results in lower morbidity and quicker recovery time.

  19. Small Crater Expedient Repair Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    Force Base, New Mexico , October 1975. 3. Rollings, Raymond S., Laboratory Evaluation of Expedient Pavement Repair Materials, CEEDO-TR-7-44, Civil and...blank) APPENDIX A EQUIPMENT PERFORMANCE SP6WCIFICATIONS Performance specit’ications are included i.n tl is appe udi \\ tor the following equipment: 1

  20. Outcome of quadriceps tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puranik, Gururaj S; Faraj, Adnan

    2006-04-01

    Complete rupture of the quadriceps tendon is a well-described injury. There is a scarcity of literature relating to the outcome of patients with this injury after surgery. We undertook a retrospective analysis of patients who had surgical repair of their quadriceps tendon at our institution over a 13-year period, totalling 21 patients. Males were more commonly affected, with a male/female ratio of 4:1. The peak incidence was in the sixth decade of life. Assessment consisted of the completion of a functional knee questionnaire and a clinical examination. Symptomatic outcome following surgical repair was good with a mean symptom score generated of 19.16 out of a maximum of 25 using the Rougraff et al scoring system. Most of the patients returned to their pre-injury level of activity. Five degrees deficit and extension lag was present in three patients; these patients had the quadriceps repaired using transosseous sutures. Patients who had direct repair of the tendon using the Bunnell technique had lower Rougraff scores than the rest.

  1. How the Brain Repairs Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kell, Christian A.; Neumann, Katrin; von Kriegstein, Katharina; Posenenske, Claudia; von Gudenberg, Alexander W.; Euler, Harald; Giraud, Anne-Lise

    2009-01-01

    Stuttering is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with left inferior frontal structural anomalies. While children often recover, stuttering may also spontaneously disappear much later after years of dysfluency. These rare cases of unassisted recovery in adulthood provide a model of optimal brain repair outside the classical windows of…

  2. Microwave Oven Repair. Teacher Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smreker, Eugene

    This competency-based curriculum guide for teachers addresses the skills a technician will need to service microwave ovens and to provide customer relations to help retain the customer's confidence in the product and trust in the service company that performs the repair. The guide begins with a task analysis, listing 20 cognitive tasks and 5…

  3. Pure robotic retrocaval ureter repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok k. Hemal

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To demonstrate the feasibility of pure robotic retrocaval ureter repair. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 33 year old female presented with right loin pain and obstruction on intravenous urography with the classical "fish-hook" appearance. She was counseled on the various methods of repair and elected to have a robot assisted repair. The following steps are performed during a pure robotic retrocaval ureter repair. The patient is placed in a modified flank position, pneumoperitoneum created and ports inserted. The colon is mobilized to expose the retroperitoneal structures: inferior vena cava, right gonadal vein, right ureter, and duodenum. The renal pelvis and ureter are mobilized and the renal pelvis transected. The ureter is transposed anterior to the inferior vena cava and a pyelopyelostomy is performed over a JJ stent. RESULTS: This patient was discharged on postoperative day 3. The catheter and drain tube were removed on day 1. Her JJ stent was removed at 6 weeks postoperatively. The postoperative intravenous urography at 3 months confirmed normal drainage of contrast medium. CONCLUSION: Pure robotic retrocaval ureter is a feasible procedure; however, there does not appear to be any great advantage over pure laparoscopy, apart from the ergonomic ease for the surgeon as well the simpler intracorporeal suturing.

  4. [Complications of inguinal hernia repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, A; D'Urso, A; Gallinaro, L S; Lo Storto, G; Bosco, M R; Vietri, F; Beltrami, V

    2002-03-01

    It's shown by literature and confirmed by Author's experience that, on account of the excellent results, prosthetic repair of inguinal hernia is more effective than "conventional" (Bassini, Mc Vay, Shouldice). Between January 1993 and December 2000 were observed 875 patients with inguinal hernia (814 monolateral, 61 bilateral); all patients underwent a Lichtenstein repair both in the primary version and in its variations (internal ring plastic, trasversalis plicate, plug repair). The patients were discharged from hospital within 24 hours after surgery in 90% of cases. No important intraoperative complications were observed; the patients restarting work varied from 3 to 15 days after the discharging in relation to patient anxiety, onset of complications and to the type of work. The complications observed were: urine retention (1.6%), superficial haematoma (1.3%), superficial infection (1%), wound suppuration (0.5%), serous effusion (0.7%), postsurgery pain (2.1%), scrotal edema (1.7%), persistent inguinal neuralgia (0.6), local hypoesthesia (4.3%), ischemical orchitis (0.1%), recurrence (0.2%). In conclusion Authors assert that "tension free" repair allows optimal results both for the surgery point (easiness of the technique, repeatability, less invasivity, scanty incident of recurrences, low frequency of postoperative complications) and in economic terms, allowing an early mobilization of the patients. A further improvement would be obtained with more care in surgical and patient management, with more excellent results.

  5. Effect of some non functional surfactants and electrolytes on the hexavalent chromium reduction by glycerol. A mechanistic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, A.; Ghosh, S.K.; Saha, R.; Nandi, R.; Saha, B. [Burdwan Univ., WB (India). Dept. of Chemistry; Gosh, T. [A.B.N. Seal College, Coochbehar, WB (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    2011-11-15

    Hexavalent chromium is a widespread environmental contaminant and a known human carcinogen. Kinetics of reduction of hexavalent chromium by bio-molecule glycerol in micellar media have been studied spectrophotometrically. The cytoplasmic reduction of hexavalent chromium to trivalent chromium occurs in micro-heterogeneous systems. In vitro, the micelles are considered to mimic the cellular membranes. The electron transfer processes occurring in the micellar systems is considered as model to obtain insight into the electron transport process prevailing in biological systems. Micellar media is also a probe to establish the mechanistic paths of reduction of hexavalent chromium to trivalent chromium. Effects of electrolytes common to biological system are studied to establish the proposed reaction mechanism strongly. (orig.)

  6. Exposure to a heat wave under food limitation makes an agricultural insecticide lethal: a mechanistic laboratory experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinh, Khuong Van; Janssens, Lizanne; Stoks, Robby

    2016-01-01

    Extreme temperatures and exposure to agricultural pesticides are becoming more frequent and intense under global change. Their combination may be especially problematic when animals suffer food limitation. We exposed Coenagrion puella damselfly larvae to a simulated heat wave combined with food...... limitation and subsequently to a widespread agricultural pesticide (chlorpyrifos) in an indoor laboratory experiment designed to obtain mechanistic insights in the direct effects of these stressors in isolation and when combined. The heat wave reduced immune function (activity of phenoloxidase, PO...... variables. While the immediate effects of the heat wave were subtle, our results indicate the importance of delayed effects in shaping the total fitness impact of a heat wave when followed by pesticide exposure. Firstly, the combination of delayed negative effects of the heat wave and starvation...

  7. Fix-It Careers: Jobs in Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torpey, Elka Maria

    2010-01-01

    From auto mechanic to HVAC technicians, many occupations require repair skills. For jobseekers with the right skills, there are many advantages to a repair career. Repair work provides millions of jobs throughout the United States. Wages are often higher than average. And in many occupations, the employment outlook is bright. Plus, most repair…

  8. 30 CFR 57.6801 - Vehicle repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vehicle repair. 57.6801 Section 57.6801 Mineral... and Underground § 57.6801 Vehicle repair. Vehicles containing explosive material and oxidizers shall not be taken into a repair garage or shop....

  9. Nationwide prevalence of groin hernia repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Jakob; Pedersen, Michael; Bisgaard, Thue;

    2013-01-01

    Groin hernia repair is a commonly performed surgical procedure in the western world but large-scaled epidemiologic data are sparse. Large-scale data on the occurrence of groin hernia repair may provide further understanding to the pathophysiology of groin hernia development. This study was undert...... was undertaken to investigate the age and gender dependent prevalence of groin hernia repair....

  10. REPAIR MECHANISM IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM INTERACTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents practical research on repair mechanismand its four repair trajectories in FL classroom interaction. Thisshows that it is effective and efficient in assisting FL learners todevelop their communicative competence and understand theprocess of language acquisition. Repair strategies that are ofgreat value to FL teachers in FL classroom teaching are also ex-pounded.

  11. Hand function after nerve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundborg, G; Rosén, B

    2007-02-01

    Treatment of injuries to major nerve trunks in the hand and upper extremity remains a major and challenging reconstructive problem. Such injuries may cause long-lasting disabilities in terms of lost fine sensory and motor functions. Nowadays there is no surgical repair technique that can ensure recovery of tactile discrimination in the hand of an adult patient following nerve repair while very young individuals usually regain a complete recovery of functional sensibility. Post-traumatic nerve regeneration is a complex biological process where the outcome depends on multiple biological and environmental factors such as survival of nerve cells, axonal regeneration rate, extent of axonal misdirection, type of injury, type of nerve, level of the lesion, age of the patient and compliance to training. A major problem is the cortical functional reorganization of hand representation which occurs as a result of axonal misdirection. Although protective sensibility usually occurs following nerve repair, tactile discriminative functions seldom recover--a direct result of cortical remapping. Sensory re-education programmes are routinely applied to facilitate understanding of the new sensory patterns provided by the hand. New trends in hand rehabilitation focus on modulation of central nervous processes rather than peripheral factors. Principles are being evolved to maintain the cortical hand representation by using the brain capacity for visuo-tactile and audio-tactile interaction for the initial phase following nerve injury and repair (phase 1). After the start of the re-innervation of the hand (phase 2), selective de-afferentation, such as cutaneous anaesthesia of the forearm of the injured hand, allows expansion of the nerve-injured cortical hand representation, thereby enhancing the effects of sensory relearning. Recent data support the view that training protocols specifically addressing the relearning process substantially increase the possibilities for improved

  12. REPAIR TECHNOLOGY IMPROVEMENT OF SPECIALIZED FREIGHT CARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Bubnov

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The volume of cargo transportation demands the introduction of a new generation of cars that would be able to provide all the needs of carriers. But this is impossible without the implementation of renovation repair facilities with the introduction of new technologies and modernization of the repair process. Repair of rolling stock is a key factor that must proceed with the establishment of new cars, as not all of the inventions may be repaired in car-repair depots, most of which are obsolete. The purpose is to analyze the possibility of increasing the efficiency of the repair process by introducing new repair technologies or improving the existing ones. It will improve not only the quality of the repair, but also its rate. Methodology. Works on improving the designs of freight cars are held by many design organizations in almost all industrialized countries. It makes repair organizations (depots and car-repair plants to upgrade the repair process. Achievements of-this goal is possible by improving the technology renovation and reorganization through the use of flexible flow technologies, which to date are the most effective in the repair of rolling stock. Findings. When performing the analysis it was determined that there are different designs of cars. More of cars are all-purpose and their repair does not cause difficulties for car-repair business. However, the number of specialized cars is also significant, and the technology of their repair should be improved. One of the reasons is that many models, such as tank wagons for the carriage of sulfur, are intended for the carriage of dangerous goods and their failure at the time of motion is not permitted. Originality. Firstly the authors have defined direction at improving technologies of repair specialized cars. Practical value. Actual improvement in the construction of cars is to improve the existing repair facilities. In addition, the repair technology using nowadays when repairing

  13. Mechanistic Perspectives on Organic Photoredox Catalysis for Aromatic Substitutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majek, Michal; Jacobi von Wangelin, Axel

    2016-10-18

    Photoredox catalysis has emerged as a powerful tool for the utilization of visible light to drive chemical reactions between organic molecules that exhibit two rather ubiquitous properties: colorlessness and redox-activity. The photocatalyst, however, requires significant absorption in the visible spectrum and reversible redox activity. This very general framework has led to the development of several new modes of reactivity based on electron and energy transfer steps between photoexcited catalyst states and various organic molecules. In the past years, major effort has been devoted to photoredox-catalytic aromatic substitutions involving an initial reductive activation of various aryl electrophiles by the photocatalyst, which opens a new entry into selective arene functionalizations within organic synthesis endeavors. This, however, has led to a unilateral emphasis of synthetic developments including catalyst modifications, substrate scope studies, and combinations with other chemical processes. This Account summarizes recent reports of new protocols for the synthesis of aromatic esters, thioethers, boronates, sulfonates, heterobiaryls, deuteroarenes, and other functionalized arenes under mild photoredox conditions with organic dyes. On the other hand, mechanistic studies were largely neglected. This Account emphasizes the most relevant experiments and techniques, which can greatly assist in the exploration of the mechanistic foundation of aromatic photoredox substitutions and the design of new chemical reactivities. The nature and physicochemical properties of the employed organic dyes, the control of its acid-base chemistry, the choice of the irradiation sources, and the concentrations of substrates and dyes are demonstrated to decisively affect the activity of organic photocatalysts, the chemo- and regioselectivities of reactions, and the operating mechanisms. Several methods of distinction between photocatalytic and radical chain processes are being discussed

  14. Conservative or reactive? Mechanistic chemical perspectives on organic matter stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Boris

    2016-04-01

    Carbon fixation by terrestrial and marine primary production has a fundamental seasonal effect on the atmospheric carbon content and it profoundly contributes to long-term carbon storage in form of organic matter (OM) in soils, water, and sediments. The efficacy of this sequestration process strongly depends on the degree of OM persistence. Therefore, one of the key issues in dissolved and particulate OM research is to assess the stability of reservoirs and to quantify their contribution to global carbon fluxes. Incubation experiments are helpful to assess OM stability during the first, early diagenetic turnover induced by sunlight or microbes. However, net carbon fluxes within the global carbon cycle also act on much longer time scales, which are not amenable in experiments. It is therefore critical to improve our mechanistic understanding to be able to assess potential future changes in the organic matter cycle. This session contribution highlights some achievements and open questions in the field. An improved mechanistic understanding of OM turnover particularly depends on the molecular characterization of biogeochemical processes and their kinetics: (i) in soils and sediments, aggregation/disaggregation of OM is primarily controlled by its molecular composition. Hence, the chemical composition determines the transfer of organic carbon from the large particulate to the small dissolved organic matter reservoir - an important substrate for microbial metabolism. (ii) In estuaries, dissolved organic carbon gradients usually suggest conservative behavior, whereas molecular-level studies reveal a substantial chemical modification of terrestrial DOM along the land-ocean interface. (iii) In the ocean, previous studies have shown that the recalcitrance of OM depends on bulk concentration and energy yield. However, ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry in combination with radiocarbon analyses also emphasized that stability is tightly connected to molecular composition

  15. A new mechanistic framework to predict OCS fluxes in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauze, Joana; Ogee, Jérôme; Launois, Thomas; Kesselmeier, Jürgen; Van Diest, Heidi; Wingate, Lisa

    2015-04-01

    A better description of the amplitude of photosynthetic and respiratory gross CO2 fluxes at large scales is needed to improve our predictions of the current and future global CO2 cycle. Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is the most abundant sulphur gas in the atmosphere and has been proposed as a new tracer of gross photosynthesis, as the uptake of COS from the atmosphere is dominated by the activity of carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme abundant in leaves that also catalyses CO2 hydration during photosynthesis. However, soils also exchange COS with the atmosphere and there is growing evidence that this flux must also be accounted for in atmospheric budgets. In this context a new mechanistic description of soil-atmosphere COS exchange is clearly needed. Soils can take up COS from the atmosphere as the soil biota also contain CA, and COS emissions from soils have also been reported in agricultural fields or anoxic soils. Previous studies have also shown that soil COS fluxes present an optimum soil water content and soil temperature. Here we propose a new mechanistic framework to predict the fluxes of COS between the soils and the atmosphere. We describe the COS soil budget by a first-order reaction-diffusion-production equation, assuming that the hydrolysis of COS by CA is total and irreversible. To describe COS diffusion through the soil matrix, we use different formulations of soil air-filled pore space and temperature, depending on the turbulence level above the soil surface. Using this model we are able to explain the observed presence of an optimum temperature for soil COS uptake and show how this optimum can shift to cooler temperatures in the presence of soil COS emissions. Our model can also explain the observed optimum with soil moisture content previously described in the literature (e.g. Van Diest & Kesselmeier, 2008) as a result of diffusional constraints on COS hydrolysis. These diffusional constraints are also responsible for the response of COS uptake to soil

  16. Renal tubule cell repair following acute renal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humes, H D; Lake, E W; Liu, S

    1995-01-01

    Experimental data suggests the recovery of renal function after ischemic or nephrotoxic acute renal failure is due to a replicative repair process dependent upon predominantly paracrine release of growth factors. These growth factors promote renal proximal tubule cell proliferation and a differentiation phase dependent on the interaction between tubule cells and basement membrane. These insights identify the molecular basis of renal repair and ischemic and nephrotoxic acute renal failure, and may lead to potential therapeutic modalities that accelerate renal repair and lessen the morbidity and mortality associated with these renal disease processes. In this regard, there is a prominent vasoconstrictor response of the renal vasculature during the postischemic period of developing acute renal failure. The intravenous administration of pharmacologic doses of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in the postischemic period have proven efficacious by altering renal vascular resistance, so that renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate improve. ANF also appears to protect renal tubular epithelial integrity and holds significant promise as a therapeutic agent in acute renal failure. Of equal or greater promise are the therapeutic interventions targeting the proliferative reparative zone during the postischemic period. The exogenous administration of epidermal growth factor or insulin-like growth factor-1 in the postischemic period have effectively decreased the degree of renal insufficiency as measured by the peak serum creatinine and has hastened renal recovery as measured by the duration of time required to return the baseline serum creatinine values. A similarly efficacious role for hepatocyte growth factor has also been recently demonstrated.

  17. Bone Injury and Repair Trigger Central and Peripheral NPY Neuronal Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alencastre, Inês S.; Neto, Estrela; Ribas, João; Ferreira, Sofia; Vasconcelos, Daniel M.; Sousa, Daniela M.; Summavielle, Teresa; Lamghari, Meriem

    2016-01-01

    Bone repair is a specialized type of wound repair controlled by complex multi-factorial events. The nervous system is recognized as one of the key regulators of bone mass, thereby suggesting a role for neuronal pathways in bone homeostasis. However, in the context of bone injury and repair, little is known on the interplay between the nervous system and bone. Here, we addressed the neuropeptide Y (NPY) neuronal arm during the initial stages of bone repair encompassing the inflammatory response and ossification phases in femoral-defect mouse model. Spatial and temporal analysis of transcriptional and protein levels of NPY and its receptors, Y1R and Y2R, reported to be involved in bone homeostasis, was performed in bone, dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and hypothalamus after femoral injury. The results showed that NPY system activity is increased in a time- and space-dependent manner during bone repair. Y1R expression was trigged in both bone and DRG throughout the inflammatory phase, while a Y2R response was restricted to the hypothalamus and at a later stage, during the ossification step. Our results provide new insights into the involvement of NPY neuronal pathways in bone repair. PMID:27802308

  18. Mechanistic failure mode investigation and resolution of parvovirus retentive filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaCasse, Daniel; Lute, Scott; Fiadeiro, Marcus; Basha, Jonida; Stork, Matthew; Brorson, Kurt; Godavarti, Ranga; Gallo, Chris

    2016-07-01

    Virus retentive filters are a key product safety measure for biopharmaceuticals. A simplistic perception is that they function solely based on a size-based particle removal mechanism of mechanical sieving and retention of particles based on their hydrodynamic size. Recent observations have revealed a more nuanced picture, indicating that changes in viral particle retention can result from process pressure and/or flow interruptions. In this study, a mechanistic investigation was performed to help identify a potential mechanism leading to the reported reduced particle retention in small virus filters. Permeate flow rate or permeate driving force were varied and analyzed for their impact on particle retention in three commercially available small virus retentive filters. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:959-970, 2016.

  19. Mechanistic modeling confronts the complexity of molecular cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phair, Robert D

    2014-11-05

    Mechanistic modeling has the potential to transform how cell biologists contend with the inescapable complexity of modern biology. I am a physiologist-electrical engineer-systems biologist who has been working at the level of cell biology for the past 24 years. This perspective aims 1) to convey why we build models, 2) to enumerate the major approaches to modeling and their philosophical differences, 3) to address some recurrent concerns raised by experimentalists, and then 4) to imagine a future in which teams of experimentalists and modelers build-and subject to exhaustive experimental tests-models covering the entire spectrum from molecular cell biology to human pathophysiology. There is, in my view, no technical obstacle to this future, but it will require some plasticity in the biological research mind-set.

  20. Mechanistic study of ZnO nanorod array electrodeposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Belghiti, H.; Pauporte, T.; Lincot, D. [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et Chimie Analytique, UMR7575, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris-Universite Paris 6 (France)

    2008-10-15

    The growth of ZnO nanorods by electrodeposition from oxygenated aqueous mixture of zinc chloride and potassium chloride is studied experimentally as a function of the deposition time, zinc concentration and the substrate. These parameters influence markedly the characteristics of the deposits (rod density, aspect ratio, orientation). A mechanistic model is presented in order to explain the formation of ZnO nanorod arrays by electrodeposition. The model is based on the effect of zinc concentration on the interfacial pH at the electrode surface and then on the charged stable zinc species able to react with the growing film. The charge of the complex seems to be the key parameter which stops the lateral growth and then significantly increases the aspect ratio of the single crystalline nanorods. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)