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Sample records for renin secretion hepatic

  1. Thyroid hormones and renin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W F

    Circulating angiotensin is produced by the action of renin from the kidneys on circulating angiotensinogen. There are other renin-angiotensin systems in various organs in the body, and recent observations raise the intriguing possibility that angiotensin II is produced by a totally intracellular pathway in the juxtaglomerular cells, the gonadotrops of the anterior pituitary, neurons, in the brain, salivary duct cells, and neuroblastoma cells. Circulating angiotensin II levels depend in large part on the plasma concentration of angiotensinogen, which is hormonally regulated, and on the rate of renin secretion. Renin secretion is regulated by an intrarenal baroreceptor mechanism, a macula densa mechanism, angiotensin II, vasopressin, and the sympathetic nervous system. The increase in renin secretion produced by sympathetic discharge is mediated for the most part by beta-adrenergic receptors, which are probably located on the juxtaglomerular cells. Hyperthyroidism would be expected to be associated with increased renin secretion in view of the increased beta-adrenergic activity in this condition, and hypothyroidism would be associated with decreased plasma renin activity due to decreased beta-adrenergic activity. Our recent research on serotonin-mediated increases in renin secretion that depend on the integrity of the dorsal raphe nucleus and the mediobasal hypothalamus has led us to investigate the effect of the pituitary on the renin response to p-chloroamphetamine. The response is potentiated immediately after hypophysectomy, but 22 days after the operation, it is abolished. This slowly developing decrease in responsiveness may be due to decreased thyroid function.

  2. Metabolic control of renin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Lam, Lisa; Riquier-Brison, Anne

    2013-01-01

    One emerging topic in renin-angiotensin system (RAS) research is the direct local control of renin synthesis and release by endogenous metabolic intermediates. During the past few years, our laboratory has characterized the localization and signaling of the novel metabolic receptor GPR91 in the normal and diabetic kidney and established GPR91 as a new, direct link between high glucose and RAS activation in diabetes. GPR91 (also called SUCNR1) binds tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate succinate which can rapidly accumulate in the local tissue environment when energy supply and demand are out of balance. In a variety of physiological and pathological conditions associated with metabolic stress, succinate signaling via GPR91 appears to be an important mediator or modulator of renin secretion. This review summarizes our current knowledge on the control of renin release by molecules of endogenous metabolic pathways with the main focus on succinate/GPR91.

  3. Control of renin secretion from kidneys with renin cell hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Birgül; Karger, Christian; Wagner, Charlotte; Kurtz, Armin

    2014-02-01

    In states of loss-of-function mutations of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, kidneys develop a strong hyperplasia of renin-producing cells. Those additional renin cells are located outside the classic juxtaglomerular areas, mainly in the walls of preglomerular vessels and most prominently in multilayers surrounding afferent arterioles. Since the functional behavior of those ectopic renin cells is yet unknown, we aimed to characterize the control of renin secretion from kidneys with renin cell hyperplasia. As a model, we used kidneys from mice lacking aldosterone synthase (AS⁻/⁻ mice), which displayed 10-fold elevations of renin mRNA and plasma renin concentrations. On the absolute level, renin secretion from isolated AS⁻/⁻ kidneys was more than 10-fold increased over wild-type kidneys. On the relative level, the stimulation of renin secretion by the β-adrenergic activator isoproterenol or by lowering of the concentration of extracellular Ca²⁺ was very similar between the two genotypes. In addition, the inhibitory effects of ANG II and of perfusion pressure were similar between the two genotypes. Deletion of connexin40 blunted the pressure dependency of renin secretion and the stimulatory effect of low extracellular Ca²⁺ on renin secretion in the same manner in kidneys of AS⁻/⁻ mice as in wild-type mice. Our findings suggest a high degree of functional similarity between renin cells originating during development and located at different positions in the adult kidney. They also suggest a high similarity in the expression of membrane proteins relevant for the control of renin secretion, such as β₁-adrenergic receptors, ANG II type 1 receptors, and connexin40.

  4. Peptides and neurotransmitters that affect renin secretion

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    Ganong, W. F.; Porter, J. P.; Bahnson, T. D.; Said, S. I.

    1984-01-01

    Substance P inhibits renin secretion. This polypeptide is a transmitter in primary afferent neurons and is released from the peripheral as well as the central portions of these neurons. It is present in afferent nerves from the kidneys. Neuropeptide Y, which is a cotransmitter with norepinephrine and epinephrine, is found in sympathetic neurons that are closely associated with and presumably innervate the juxtagolmerular cells. Its effect on renin secretion is unknown, but it produces renal vasoconstriction and natriuresis. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) is a cotransmitter with acetylocholine in cholinergic neurons, and this polypeptide stimulates renin secretion. We cannot find any evidence for its occurence in neurons in the kidneys, but various stimuli increase plasma VIP to levels comparable to those produced by doses of exogenous VIP which stimulated renin secretion. Neostigmine increases plasma VIP and plasma renin activity, and the VIP appears to be responsible for the increase in renin secretion, since the increase is not blocked by renal denervation or propranolol. Stimulation of various areas in the brain produces sympathetically mediated increases in plasma renin activity associated with increases in blood pressure. However, there is pharmacological evidence that the renin response can be separated from the blood pressure response. In anaesthetized dogs, drugs that increase central serotonergic discharge increase renin secretion without increasing blood pressure. In rats, activation of sertonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus increases renin secretion by a pathway that projects from this nucleus to the ventral hypothalamus, and from there to the kidneys via the sympathetic nervous system. The serotonin releasing drug parachloramphetamine also increases plasma VIP, but VIP does not appear to be the primary mediator of the renin response. There is preliminary evidence that the serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus are part of the

  5. Peptides and neurotransmitters that affect renin secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W. F.; Porter, J. P.; Bahnson, T. D.; Said, S. I.

    1984-01-01

    Substance P inhibits renin secretion. This polypeptide is a transmitter in primary afferent neurons and is released from the peripheral as well as the central portions of these neurons. It is present in afferent nerves from the kidneys. Neuropeptide Y, which is a cotransmitter with norepinephrine and epinephrine, is found in sympathetic neurons that are closely associated with and presumably innervate the juxtagolmerular cells. Its effect on renin secretion is unknown, but it produces renal vasoconstriction and natriuresis. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) is a cotransmitter with acetylocholine in cholinergic neurons, and this polypeptide stimulates renin secretion. We cannot find any evidence for its occurence in neurons in the kidneys, but various stimuli increase plasma VIP to levels comparable to those produced by doses of exogenous VIP which stimulated renin secretion. Neostigmine increases plasma VIP and plasma renin activity, and the VIP appears to be responsible for the increase in renin secretion, since the increase is not blocked by renal denervation or propranolol. Stimulation of various areas in the brain produces sympathetically mediated increases in plasma renin activity associated with increases in blood pressure. However, there is pharmacological evidence that the renin response can be separated from the blood pressure response. In anaesthetized dogs, drugs that increase central serotonergic discharge increase renin secretion without increasing blood pressure. In rats, activation of sertonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus increases renin secretion by a pathway that projects from this nucleus to the ventral hypothalamus, and from there to the kidneys via the sympathetic nervous system. The serotonin releasing drug parachloramphetamine also increases plasma VIP, but VIP does not appear to be the primary mediator of the renin response. There is preliminary evidence that the serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus are part of the

  6. Prostaglandins stimulate renin secretion and renin mRNA in mouse renal juxtaglomerular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B L; Schmid, C; Kurtz, A

    1996-01-01

    This study examined 1) effects of prostaglandins (PG) on renin secretion and renin gene expression from isolated juxtaglomerular granular cells and 2) expression of cyclooxygenases in juxtaglomerular structures. Incubation of granular cell cultures with PGE2, -I2, -F2 alpha, and thromboxane B2...... identified PGI2 and PGE2 as stimulators of renin secretion; the effects were dose and time dependent. PGE2 also increased renin mRNA accumulation time and dose dependent. PGE2 and PGI2 activated adenylate cyclase concentration dependent in granular cells. PGE2 stimulations of renin secretion and renin m...

  7. Effect of amlodipine on renin secretion and renin gene expression in rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Schricker, K.; Hamann, M.; Macher, A.; Krämer, B. K.; Kaissling, B; Kurtz, A.

    1996-01-01

    1. This study was done to characterize the influence of calcium channel blockade on renin secretion and renin gene expression in normal rats and rats with renovascular hypertension. To this end we studied the effects of the 1,4-dihydropyridine derivative, amlodipine, on plasma renin activity and renal renin m-RNA levels in normal rats and rats with unilateral renal hypoperfusion induced by applying 0.2 mm left renal artery clips over four days. 2. In normotensive rats, amlodipine significantl...

  8. Renal renin secretion as regulator of body fluid homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkjær, Mads; Isaksson, Gustaf L; Stubbe, Jane;

    2013-01-01

    intake, but the specific pathways involved and the relations between them are not well defined. In animals, renin secretion is a log-linear function of sodium intake. Close associations exist between sodium intake, total body sodium, extracellular fluid volume, and blood volume. Plasma volume increases...... by about 1.5 mL/mmol increase in daily sodium intake. Several lines of evidence indicate that central blood volume may vary substantially without measurable changes in arterial blood pressure. At least five intertwining feedback loops of renin regulation are identifiable based on controlled variables......The renin-angiotensin system is essential for body fluid homeostasis and blood pressure regulation. This review focuses on the homeostatic regulation of the secretion of active renin in the kidney, primarily in humans. Under physiological conditions, renin secretion is determined mainly by sodium...

  9. Involvement of chloride in renin secretion from isolated rat glomeruli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skøtt, O; Jensen, B L

    1992-01-01

    M) inhibited renin release reversibly. Substitution of Cl- with nitrate (101 mM) stimulated renin secretion. Substitution with iodide (15 or 101 mM) had no consistent effect. The stimulation induced by calcium-free solutions was high in May and low in September. In the absence of chloride, the response....... It is concluded that the renin secretory process has a demand for permeant anions. The stimulation caused by low external calcium involves at least two mechanisms: one is anion sensitive, powerful, varies with the season, and includes a recruitment phenomenon; another is anion insensitive and weak....

  10. The aldo-keto reductase AKR1B7 coexpresses with renin without influencing renin production and secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machura, Katharina; Iankilevitch, Elina; Neubauer, Björn; Theuring, Franz; Kurtz, Armin

    2013-03-01

    On the basis of evidence that within the adult kidney, the aldo-keto reductase AKR1B7 (aldo-keto reductase family 1, member 7, also known as mouse vas deferens protein, MVDP) is selectively expressed in renin-producing cells, we aimed to define a possible role of AKR1B7 for the regulation and function of renin cells in the kidney. We could confirm colocalization and corecruitment of renin and of AKR1B7 in wild-type kidneys. Renin cells in AKR1B7-deficient kidneys showed normal morphology, numbers, and intrarenal distribution. Plasma renin concentration (PRC) and renin mRNA levels of AKR1B7-deficient mice were normal at standard chow and were lowered by a high-salt diet directly comparable to wild-type mice. Treatment with a low-salt diet in combination with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor strongly increased PRC and renin mRNA in a similar fashion both in AKR1B7-deficient and wild-type mice. Under this condition, we also observed a strong retrograde recruitment of renin-expressing cell along the preglomerular vessels, however, without a difference between AKR1B7-deficient and wild-type mice. The isolated perfused mouse kidney model was used to study the acute regulation of renin secretion by ANG II and by perfusion pressure. Regarding these parameters, no differences were observed between AKR1B7-deficient and wild-type kidneys. In summary, our data suggest that AKR1B7 is not of major relevance for the regulation of renin production and secretion in spite of its striking coregulation with renin expression.

  11. Regulation of renin secretion by renal juxtaglomerular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ulla G; Madsen, Kirsten; Stubbe, Jane

    2013-01-01

    of stimulation; fetal life and chronic stimulation by extracellular volume contraction is associated with recruitment of renin-producing cells. Upon stimulation of renin release, labeled renin granules "disappear;" the number of granules decrease; cell membrane surface area increases in single cells, and release...... is quantal. Together, this indicates exocytosis as the predominant mode of release. JG cells release few percent of total renin content by physiological stimulation, and recruitment of renin cells is preferred to recruitment of granules during prolonged stimulation. Several endocrine and paracrine agonists...

  12. Connexin 43 is not essential for the control of renin synthesis and secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerl, Melanie; Kurt, Birgül; Kurtz, Armin; Wagner, Charlotte

    2014-05-01

    The juxtaglomerular areas of mammalian kidneys express the gap junction proteins connexin 37, 40, 43, and 45. Among these, Cx40 plays a major role for the function of juxtaglomerular renin-expressing cells, while Cx37 and Cx45 appear to be less relevant in this context. Since the role of the remaining Cx43 for the function of renin expression is not well understood, this study aimed to systematically characterize the direct role of Cx43 for renin expression and secretion. For this aim, we generated mice with endothelium and with renin cell-specific deletions of Cx43, and we characterized the regulation of renin expression and renin secretion in the kidneys of these mice on normal salt diet and during chronic challenge of the renin system by pretreatment of mice with a low-salt diet in combination with an angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitor. We found that renal renin mRNA abundance, plasma renin concentration, and systolic blood pressure did not differ between wild-type, Cx43(fl/fl) Ren1d(+/Cre) mice as well as Cx43(fl/fl) Tie-2(+/Cre) mice under basal conditions nor under chronic stimulation by salt depletion. The localization of renin-expressing cells was also regular in kidneys of all genotypes, and moreover, regulation of renin secretion by beta-adrenergic stimulation and renal perfusion pressure measured in isolated perfused kidneys of Cx43(fl/fl) Ren1d(+/Cre) and Cx43(fl/fl) Tie-2(+/Cre) mice was not different from control. We infer from these results that Cx43 plays if at all only a minor role for the functional control of renin-producing cells in the kidney.

  13. Normotensive sodium loading in conscious dogs: Regulation of renin secretion during beta receptor blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bie, Peter; Mølstrøm, Simon; Wamberg, Søren

    2009-01-01

    irrespective of diet. In conclusion, PRC depended on dietary sodium and beta1-adrenergic control as expected; however, the acute sodium-driven decrease in PRC at constant MAP and GFR was unaffected by beta1-receptor blockade demonstrating that renin may be regulated without changes in MAP, GFR, or beta1......Renin secretion is regulated in part by renal nerves operating through beta1-receptors of the renal juxtaglomerular cells. Slow sodium loading may decrease plasma renin (PRC) and cause natriuresis at constant mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). We hypothesized...... that in this setting, renin secretion and renin-dependent sodium excretion are controlled by via the renal nerves and therefore eliminated or reduced by blocking the action of norepinephrine on the juxtaglomerular cells with the beta1-receptor antagonist metoprolol. This was tested in conscious dogs by infusion of Na...

  14. Relation of central alpha-adrenoceptor and other receptors to the control of renin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W F

    1983-02-01

    The location and nature of the receptors in the brain on which clonidine acts to decrease renin secretion have been investigated in dogs. Clonidine was injected into the vertebral and carotid arteries, and its effects were compared with those of norepinephrine and epinephrine when injected into the third ventricle. It was also injected intravenously (IV) after transection of the brain stem and following treatment with intraventricular 6-hydroxydopamine. The results suggest that the renin-regulating receptors are located in the brain stem in a region different from the receptors mediating the depressor response, that they are alpha 2-adrenoceptors, and that they are postsynaptic in location. Central alpha 1-adrenoceptors appear to mediate increased renin secretion. Central serotonergic receptors also mediate increased renin secretion, but it is not known how the alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptors interact with the serotonergic systems.

  15. Neural mechanisms by which gravitational stimuli and stress affect the secretion of renin and other hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, William F.

    1987-01-01

    The present goal is to determine by the production of discrete lesions the parts of the hypothalamus and brainstem that are involved in serotonin-mediated increases in renin secretion. A variety of stimuli which act in different ways to increase renin stimuli were developed and standardized. The experiments with p-chloroamphetamine (PCA) demonstrated that there is a serotonergic pathway which projects from the dorsal raphe nuclei to the paraventricular nuclei and the vetromedial nuclei of the hypothalamus; that projection from paraventricular nuclei to the brainstem and spinal cord may be oxytocinergic; and that the pathway from the spinal cord to the renin secreting cells is sympathetic. The demonstration that paraventicular lesions lower circulating renin substrate is important because it raises the possibility that substrate secretion is under neural control, either via the pituitary or by direct neural pathways. The discovery that lesions of the ventromedial nuclei appear to abolish the increase in renin secretion produced by many different stimuli without affecting the concentration of renin substrate in the plasma makes the position of the hypothalamus in the regulation of fluid and electrolyte balance more prominent than previously suspected.

  16. Stimulation of renin secretion by catecholamines is dependent on adenylyl cyclases 5 and 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldehni, Fadi; Tang, Tong; Madsen, Kirsten; Plattner, Michael; Schreiber, Andrea; Friis, Ulla G; Hammond, H Kirk; Han, Pyung Lim; Schweda, Frank

    2011-03-01

    The sympathetic nervous system stimulates renin release from juxtaglomerular cells via the β-adrenoreceptor-cAMP pathway. Recent in vitro studies have suggested that the calcium-inhibited adenylyl cyclases (ACs) 5 and 6 possess key roles in the control of renin exocytosis. To investigate the relative contribution of AC5 and AC6 to the regulation of renin release in vivo we performed experiments using AC5 and AC6 knockout mice. Male AC5(-/-) mice exhibited normal plasma renin concentrations, renal renin synthesis (mRNA and renin content), urinary volume, and systolic blood pressure. In male AC6(-/-) mice, plasma renin concentration (AC6(-/-): 732 ± 119; AC6 (+/+): 436 ± 78 ng of angiotensin I per hour*mL(-1); Prenin synthesis were stimulated associated with an increased excretion of dilute urine (1.55-fold; Pplasma renin concentration by a single injection of the β-adrenoreceptor agonist isoproterenol (10 mg/kg IP) was significantly attenuated in AC5(-/-) (male: -20%; female: -33%) compared with wild-type mice in vivo. The mitigation of the plasma renin concentration response to isoproterenol was even more pronounced in AC6(-/-) (male: -63%; female: -50% versus AC6(+/+)). Similarly, the effects of isoproterenol, prostaglandin E2, and pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide on renin release from isolated perfused kidneys were attenuated to a higher extent in AC6(-/-) (-51% to -98% versus AC6(+/+)) than in AC5(-/-) (-31% to 46% versus AC5(+/+)). In conclusion, both AC5 and AC6 are involved in the stimulation of renin secretion in vivo, and AC6 is the dominant isoforms in this process.

  17. Neural Mechanism by which Gravitational Stimuli and Stress Affect the Secretion of Renin and Other Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W. F.; Gotoh, E.; Alper, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The serotonin-releasing drug p-chloroamphetamine (PCA), as well as L-propranolol and chloriasondamine were used in a study which established that the pathway from the hypothalamus to the kidneys is sympathetic. Which hypothalamic nuclei mediate the response to PCA is being investigated experiments are being conducted to determine a readily reproducible psychological stimulus to renin secretion that can be used in rats. The effects of equithesin, urethane, and inactin on plasma renin activity were examined in preparation for tilting experiments. The relation of vasopressin-secreting neurons in the brain sem to PCA response was explored in Brattleboro rats that are congenitally unable to produce vasopressin in their hypothalami.

  18. Neural Mechanism by which Gravitational Stimuli and Stress Affect the Secretion of Renin and Other Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W. F.; Gotoh, E.; Alper, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The serotonin-releasing drug p-chloroamphetamine (PCA), as well as L-propranolol and chloriasondamine were used in a study which established that the pathway from the hypothalamus to the kidneys is sympathetic. Which hypothalamic nuclei mediate the response to PCA is being investigated experiments are being conducted to determine a readily reproducible psychological stimulus to renin secretion that can be used in rats. The effects of equithesin, urethane, and inactin on plasma renin activity were examined in preparation for tilting experiments. The relation of vasopressin-secreting neurons in the brain sem to PCA response was explored in Brattleboro rats that are congenitally unable to produce vasopressin in their hypothalami.

  19. Effects of lead on the renin-angiotensin system. [Rabbits; rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiser, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system was evaluated in both acute and chronic lead-exposed rabbits and in unanaesthetized chronic lead-exposed rats. In addition, the acute effects of lead on in vitro secretion of renin were evaluated using rabbit and renal cortical slices. The clearance of renin was measured in chronic lead-exposed rats. Basal PRAs were significantly elevated in lead-exposed rats; renal renin activities were also significantly higher. In contrast, renin clearances were not different in the two groups. These findings support the hypothesis that the increase in basal PRA seen in lead-exposed rats is due to increased renin secretion not decreased hepatic removal of renin. In conclusion, we found no evidence for decreased renin degradation in the chronic lead-exposed rabbit or rat; rather, changes in renin secretion appear to account for observed increases in PRA. In contrast, acute lead-exposure inhibits both renin secretion and degradation in the rabbit.

  20. Blood, pituitary, and brain renin-angiotensin systems and regulation of secretion of anterior pituitary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W F

    1993-07-01

    In addition to increasing blood pressure, stimulating aldosterone and vasopressin secretion, and increasing water intake, angiotensin II affects the secretion of anterior pituitary hormones. Some of these effects are direct. There are angiotensin II receptors on lactotropes and corticotropes in rats, and there may be receptors on thyrotropes and other secretory cells. Circulating angiotensin II reaches these receptors, but angiotensin II is almost certainly generated locally by the pituitary renin-angiotensin system as well. There are also indirect effects produced by the effects of brain angiotensin II on the secretion of hypophyseotropic hormones. In the anterior pituitary of the rat, the gonadotropes contain renin, angiotensin II, and some angiotensin-converting enzyme. There is debate about whether these cells also contain small amounts of angiotensinogen, but most of the angiotensinogen is produced by a separate population of cells and appears to pass in a paracrine fashion to the gonadotropes. An analogous situation exists in the brain. Neurons contain angiotensin II and probably renin, but most angiotensin-converting enzyme is located elsewhere and angiotensinogen is primarily if not solely produced by astrocytes. Angiotensin II causes secretion of prolactin and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) when added to pituitary cells in vitro. Paracrine regulation of prolactin secretion by angiotensin II from the gonadotropes may occur in vitro under certain circumstances, but the effects of peripheral angiotensin II on ACTH secretion appear to be mediated via the brain and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). In the brain, there is good evidence that locally generated angiotensin II causes release of norepinephrine that in turn stimulates gonadotropin-releasing hormone-secreting neurons, increasing circulating luteinizing hormone. In addition, there is evidence that angiotensin II acts in the arcuate nuclei to increase the secretion of dopamine into the portal

  1. An ectopic renin-secreting adrenal corticoadenoma in a child with malignant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaslow, Abraham M; Riquier-Brison, Anne; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Shillingford, Nick; HaDuong, Josephine; Venkatramani, Rajkumar; Gayer, Christopher P

    2016-03-01

    A previously healthy 7-year-old male presented with hypertensive emergency, hypokalemia, and elevated plasma renin activity and aldosterone levels. There was no evidence of virilization or cushingoid features. MRI of the abdomen revealed a large (5 × 5 × 3 cm) peripherally enhancing, heterogeneous mass arising from the left adrenal gland. The patient was treated for a suspected pheochromocytoma. However, his blood pressure was not responsive to alpha-blockade. Blood pressure was controlled with a calcium channel blocker and an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor. A complete surgical resection of the mass was performed. Postoperatively, his blood pressure normalized and he did not require antihypertensives. On pathological examination, the tumor tissue stained negative for chromogranin and positive for renin. The final diagnosis was renin-secreting adrenal corticoadenoma, an extremely rare adrenal tumor not previously reported in a pediatric patient. Malignant hypertension due to a renin-secreting tumor may need to be distinguished from a pheochromocytoma if alpha-adrenergic blockade is ineffective.

  2. Renin release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweda, Frank; Friis, Ulla; Wagner, Charlotte;

    2007-01-01

    The aspartyl-protease renin is the key regulator of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, which is critically involved in salt, volume, and blood pressure homeostasis of the body. Renin is mainly produced and released into circulation by the so-called juxtaglomerular epithelioid cells, located......, salt, and volume overload. In contrast, the events controlling the function of renin-secreting cells at the organ and cellular level are markedly less clear and remain mysterious in certain aspects. The unravelling of these mysteries has led to new and interesting insights into the process of renin...

  3. A Case of Ectopic Renin-secreting Orbital Hemangiopericy-toma Associated with Juvenile Hypertension and Hypokalemia

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    Yokoyama,Hisamitsu

    1979-08-01

    Full Text Available An unusual case of orbital tumor with high renin content and severe hypertension is described. The patient was a 15-year-old girl with juvenile hypertension (200-140 mmHg associated with right exophthalmos and hypokalemia. The patient showed extremely high levels of plasma renin activity and plasma aldosterone concentration. No difference was present in plasma renin activity from either side of the renal veins. Preoperatively, hypertension responded to treatment with spironolactone. The tumor could not be completely removed because of intracranial metastasis and infiltration, and the hyperreninemia and secondary hyperaldosteronism persisted. The renin content in the orbital tissue was 1,403-2,225 ng/angiotensin I generated/h/g wet weight of tissue. The postmortem histopathologic diagnosis was orbital hemangiopericytoma. This is the first case of extrarenal (ectopic renin-secreting (or -producing hemangiopericytoma of the orbital origin. Furthermore this case is worthy of note in the point of view of the presence of the extrarenal renin-angiotensin system, particularly in the brain.

  4. Renin-angiotensin system stimulates erythropoietin secretion in chronic hemodialysis patients.

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    Vlahakos, D V; Balodimos, C; Papachristopoulos, V; Vassilakos, P; Hinari, E; Vlachojannis, J G

    1995-01-01

    A series of observations suggests an interrelationship between the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and erythropoietin (EPO) secretion. To further evaluate the role of RAS in erythropoiesis of chronic hemodialysis patients, we studied two groups of such patients: Group A consisted of 16 patients (14 male and 2 female, 54.7 +/- 3.3 years old), who maintained a target hematocrit value of 0.30 (0.32 +/- 0.01), without recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) supplementation. Group B consisted of 14 patients (7 male and 7 female, 50 +/- 5.3 years old), who required subcutaneous injections of rhEPO (90.8 +/- 10 IU.kg-1.week-1), to maintain the same target hematocrit value of 0.30 (30 +/- 0.01). Plasma renin activity (PRA) was found to be the major feature to distinguish patients in these two Groups and it was five times higher in Group A (10 +/- 2 ng.ml-1.h-1) compared to Group B patients (1.8 +/- 0.6 ng.ml-1.h-1) (p < 0.001). Moreover, activation of RAS in Group A patients by volume depletion (2.2 +/- 0.2 l) during hemodialysis resulted in a 118 +/- 33 percent increment of PRA (p < 0.01) which was accompanied by a 69 +/- 25 percent increment of serum EPO levels (p < 0.05). Repetition of the same protocol after inhibiting the converting enzyme with 50 mg of Captopril prior to dialysis session, resulted in a 315 +/- 64 percent increment of PRA (p < 0.001), while at the same time completely blocked the expected rise in serum EPO levels (1.25 +/- 12.5 percent increment).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide stimulates renin secretion via activation of PAC1 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hautmann, Matthias; Friis, Ulla G; Desch, Michael

    2007-01-01

    concentration was significantly lower in PAC1-/- compared with their wild-type littermates under control conditions as well as under a low- or high-salt diet and under treatment with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor ramipril, whereas no differences in plasma renin concentration between the genotypes......), because PACAP (1-27) applied in concentrations in the physiologic range (10 and 100 pmol/L) did not enhance renin release from isolated kidneys of PAC1 receptor knockout mice (PAC1-/-), whereas it stimulated renin release 1.38- and 2.5-fold in kidneys from wild-type mice. Moreover, plasma renin...... were detectable after water deprivation. These data show that PACAP acting on PAC1 receptors potently stimulates renin release, serving as a tonic enhancer of the renin system in vivo....

  6. Multiple short-term effects of lead on the renin-angiotensin system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, J.M.; Vander, A.J.; Mouw, D.R.; Keiser, J.; Nicholls, M.G.

    1981-02-01

    We previously demonstrated that lead (3 mg/kg iv) sharply raises PRA in dogs. In the present study, the short-term effects of the same dose of lead on renin secretion, hepatic removal of renin, and arterial All levels were measured in anesthetized dogs. Despite large increases in PRA in all nine lead-treated dogs, renin secretion increased in only three out of nine lead-treated animals (those whith the lowest baseline renin secretion). Hepatic extraction of renin was eliminated by lead, and so total hepatic removal of renin became zero by 2 or 3 hr after lead administration. Finally, despite large increases in PRA, All levels did not rise after lead. The linear relationship of All to PRA seen in animals not treated with lead was changed, so that after lead, All levels were disproportionately low for the corresponding level of PRA. It is concluded that lead may increase renin secretion in animals otherwise unstimulated to secrete but that the major mechanism for the short-term rise in PRA after lead is elimination of hepatic removal of renin; further, lead prevents All from rising proportionately with PRA, presumably by inhibiting angiotensin-converting enzyme.

  7. Hypertension secondary to renin-secreting juxtaglomerular cell tumor: case report and review of 38 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVicar, M; Carman, C; Chandra, M; Abbi, R J; Teichberg, S; Kahn, E

    1993-08-01

    A 15-year-old girl with severe high renin hypertension caused by a juxtaglomerular cell tumor (JCT) was successfully treated with the calcium channel blocker nifedipine until surgical removal effected a permanent cure. This case was incorporated into a review of the 37 cases previously published. Comparison of the children and adolescents with the adult population showed that the features of JCT were similar in the two groups except for the average duration of symptoms prior to diagnosis (pediatric group 2.6 years vs. 6.0 years for the adult group). Analysis of all 38 cases demonstrated the following: 1. Teenagers constituted the largest single population with JCT (39%) and approximately two-thirds of the entire population were female. 2. Many patients failed to show persistent hypokalemia despite high plasma renin activity and secondary hyperaldosteronism. 3. Renal angiography was initially negative in more than half the cases. 4. Renal vein renin failed to show lateralization to the affected kidney in 52% of the cases. 5. Computerized tomography demonstrated a renal mass in all of the cases in which it was performed, even when other imaging studies were negative. 6. Calcium channel blockers may evolve as the preferred treatment for the high renin hypertension of JCT.

  8. Control of renin secretion from rat juxtaglomerular cells by cAMP-specific phosphodiesterases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ulla G; Jensen, Boye L; Sethi, Shala

    2002-01-01

    trequinsin increased cellular cAMP content, enhanced forskolin-induced cAMP formation, and stimulated renin release from incubated and superfused JG cells. Trequinsin-mediated stimulation of renin release was inhibited by the permeable protein kinase A antagonist Rp-8-CPT-cAMPS. PDE4C was also expressed......, and the PDE4 inhibitor rolipram enhanced cellular cAMP content. Dialysis of single JG cells with cAMP in whole-cell patch-clamp experiments led to concentration-dependent, biphasic changes in cell membrane capacitance (C(m)) with a marked increase in C(m) at 1 micromol/L, no net change at 10 micromol...

  9. Normotensive sodium loading in normal man: Regulation of renin secretion during beta-receptor blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølstrøm, Simon; Larsen, Nils Heden; Simonsen, Jane Angel;

    2008-01-01

    and renal excretion during slow saline loading at constant plasma sodium con-centration (Na-loading: 12 micromol Na(+) kg(-1) min(-1) for 4 h). Normal subjects were studied on low-sodium intake with and without beta1-adrenergic blockade by metoprolol. Metoprolol per se reduced RAAS activity as expected. Na......-loading decreased plasma renin (PRC) by 1/3, AngII by 1/2, and aldosterone (pAldo) by 2/3, (all pmetoprolol administration. Concomitantly, sodium excretion increased indistinguishably with and without metoprolol (16+/-2 to 71...

  10. Central effects of humanin on hepatic triglyceride secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhenwei; Su, Kai; Cui, Lingguang; Tas, Emir; Zhang, Ting; Dong, H Henry; Yakar, Shoshana; Muzumdar, Radhika H

    2015-08-01

    Humanin (HN) is an endogenous mitochondria-associated peptide that has been shown to protect against various Alzheimer's disease-associated insults, myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury, and reactive oxygen species-induced cell death. We have shown previously that HN improves whole body glucose homeostasis by improving insulin sensitivity and increasing glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from the β-cells. Here, we report that intraperitoneal treatment with one of HN analogs, HNG, decreases body weight gain, visceral fat, and hepatic triglyceride (TG) accumulation in high-fat diet-fed mice. The decrease in hepatic TG accumulation is due to increased activity of hepatic microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP) and increased hepatic TG secretion. Both intravenous (iv) and intracerebroventricular (icv) infusion of HNG acutely increase TG secretion from the liver. Vagotomy blocks the effect on both iv and icv HNG on TG secretion, suggesting that the effects of HNG on hepatic TG flux are centrally mediated. Our data suggest that HN is a new player in central regulation of peripheral lipid metabolism. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Olfactory receptor responding to gut microbiota-derived signals plays a role in renin secretion and blood pressure regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluznick, Jennifer L; Protzko, Ryan J; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Peterlin, Zita; Sipos, Arnold; Han, Jinah; Brunet, Isabelle; Wan, La-Xiang; Rey, Federico; Wang, Tong; Firestein, Stuart J; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Gordon, Jeffrey I; Eichmann, Anne; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Caplan, Michael J

    2013-03-12

    Olfactory receptors are G protein-coupled receptors that mediate olfactory chemosensation and serve as chemosensors in other tissues. We find that Olfr78, an olfactory receptor expressed in the kidney, responds to short chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Olfr78 is expressed in the renal juxtaglomerular apparatus, where it mediates renin secretion in response to SCFAs. In addition, both Olfr78 and G protein-coupled receptor 41 (Gpr41), another SCFA receptor, are expressed in smooth muscle cells of small resistance vessels. Propionate, a SCFA shown to induce vasodilation ex vivo, produces an acute hypotensive response in wild-type mice. This effect is differentially modulated by disruption of Olfr78 and Gpr41 expression. SCFAs are end products of fermentation by the gut microbiota and are absorbed into the circulation. Antibiotic treatment reduces the biomass of the gut microbiota and elevates blood pressure in Olfr78 knockout mice. We conclude that SCFAs produced by the gut microbiota modulate blood pressure via Olfr78 and Gpr41.

  12. Quantitative changes in rat renin secretory granules after acute and chronic stimulation of the renin system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Ruth; Jensen, B L; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    1998-01-01

    In order to study the cellular mode of renin secretion, stereological methods were used to estimate number and volume of rat renin secretory granules during stimulation of the renin system. An acute decrease in renal perfusion pressure to 40 mmHg for 5 min increased plasma renin concentration (PR...

  13. Salt sensitivity of renin secretion, glomerular filtration rate and blood pressure in conscious Sprague-Dawley rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaksson, G L; Stubbe, J; Hansen, Per Lyngs;

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that in normal rats in metabolic steady state, (i) the plasma renin concentration (PRC) is log-linearly related to Na(+) intake (NaI), (ii) the concurrent changes in mean arterial pressure (MABP) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) are negligible and (iii) the function PRC = f(Na...... = f(NaI) is altered by β1 -adrenoceptor blockade (metoprolol) and surgical renal denervation (DNX)....

  14. Biliary Secretion of Quasi-Enveloped Human Hepatitis A Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asuka Hirai-Yuki

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis A virus (HAV is an unusual picornavirus that is released from cells cloaked in host-derived membranes. These quasi-enveloped virions (eHAV are the only particle type circulating in blood during infection, whereas only nonenveloped virions are shed in feces. The reason for this is uncertain. Hepatocytes, the only cell type known to support HAV replication in vivo, are highly polarized epithelial cells with basolateral membranes facing onto hepatic (blood sinusoids and apical membranes abutting biliary canaliculi from which bile is secreted to the gut. To assess whether eHAV and nonenveloped virus egress from cells via vectorially distinct pathways, we studied infected polarized cultures of Caco-2 and HepG2-N6 cells. Most (>99% progeny virions were released apically from Caco-2 cells, whereas basolateral (64% versus apical (36% release was more balanced with HepG2-N6 cells. Both apically and basolaterally released virions were predominantly enveloped, with no suggestion of differential vectorial release of eHAV versus naked virions. Basolateral to apical transcytosis of either particle type was minimal (<0.02%/h in HepG2-N6 cells, arguing against this as a mechanism for differences in membrane envelopment of serum versus fecal virus. High concentrations of human bile acids converted eHAV to nonenveloped virions, whereas virus present in bile from HAV-infected Ifnar1−/−Ifngr1−/− and Mavs−/− mice banded over a range of densities extending from that of eHAV to that of nonenveloped virions. We conclude that nonenveloped virions shed in feces are derived from eHAV released across the canalicular membrane and stripped of membranes by the detergent action of bile acids within the proximal biliary canaliculus.

  15. Connexin45 is expressed in the juxtaglomerular apparatus and is involved in the regulation of renin secretion and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanner, Fiona; von Maltzahn, Julia; Maxeiner, Stephan; Toma, Ildiko; Sipos, Arnold; Krüger, Olaf; Willecke, Klaus; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2008-08-01

    Connexin (Cx) proteins are known to play a role in cell-to-cell communication via intercellular gap junction channels or transiently open hemichannels. Previous studies have identified several connexin isoforms in the juxtaglomerular apparatus (JGA), but the vascular connexin isoform Cx45 has not yet been studied in this region. The present work aimed to identify in detail the localization of Cx45 in the JGA and to suggest a functional role for Cx45 in the kidney using conditions where Cx45 expression or function was altered. Using mice that express lacZ coding DNA under the control of the Cx45 promoter, we observed beta-galactosidase staining in cortical vasculature and glomeruli, with specific localization to the JGA region. Renal vascular localization of Cx45 was further confirmed with the use of conditional Cx45-deficient (Cx45fl/fl:Nestin-Cre) mice, which express enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) instead of Cx45 only in cells that, during development, expressed the intermediate filament nestin. EGFP fluorescence was found in the afferent and efferent arteriole smooth muscle cells, in the renin-producing juxtaglomerular cells, and in the extra- and intraglomerular mesangium. Cx45fl/fl:Nestin-Cre mice exhibited increased renin expression and activity, as well as higher systemic blood pressure. The propagation of mechanically induced calcium waves was slower in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from Cx45fl/fl:Nestin-Cre mice and in control VSMC treated with a Cx45 gap mimetic peptide that inhibits Cx45 gap junctional communication. VSMCs allowed the cell-to-cell passage of the gap junction permeable dye Lucifer yellow, and calcium wave propagation was not altered by addition of the ATP receptor blocker suramin, suggesting that Cx45 regulates calcium wave propagation via direct gap junction coupling. In conclusion, the localization of Cx45 to the JGA and functional data from Cx45fl/fl:Nestin-Cre mice suggest that Cx45 is involved in the

  16. Adrenomedullin stimulates renin release and renin mRNA in mouse juxtaglomerular granular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B L; Krämer, B K; Kurtz, A

    1997-01-01

    The recently discovered peptide adrenomedullin (AM) alters blood pressure through effects on the resistance vessels. Moreover, AM modifies the secretion of corticotropin and aldosterone and could thereby indirectly influence blood pressure through the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Although...... on juxtaglomerular cells, possibly through increases in cAMP. AM could act as an autocrine/paracrine stimulatory factor in the control of renin secretion and renin gene expression....

  17. Reproduction and the renin-angiotensin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W F

    1995-01-01

    A unique aspect of the circulating renin-angiotensin system and the many independent tissue renin-angiotensin systems is their interactions at multiple levels with reproduction. These interactions, which have received relatively little attention, include effects of estrogens and possibly androgens on hepatic and renal angiotensinogen mRNA; effects of androgens on the Ren-2 gene and salivary renin in mice; the prorenin surge that occurs with but outlasts the LH surge during the menstrual cycle; the inhibitory effects of estrogens on thirst and water intake; the tissue renin-angiotensin systems in the brain, the anterior pituitary, and the ovaries and testes, that is, in all the components of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis; the presence of some components of the renin-angiotensin system in the uterus and the fetoplacental unit; and the possible relation of renin and angiotensin to ovulation and fetal well-being. These interactions are described and their significance considered in this short review.

  18. Reproduction and the renin-angiotensin system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W. F.

    1995-01-01

    A unique aspect of the circulating renin-angiotensin system and the many independent tissue renin-angiotensin systems is their interactions at multiple levels with reproduction. These interactions, which have received relatively little attention, include effects of estrogens and possibly androgens on hepatic and renal angiotensinogen mRNA; effects of androgens on the Ren-2 gene and salivary renin in mice; the prorenin surge that occurs with but outlasts the LH surge during the menstrual cycle; the inhibitory effects of estrogens on thirst and water intake; the tissue renin-angiotensin systems in the brain, the anterior pituitary, and the ovaries and testes, that is, in all the components of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis; the presence of some components of the renin-angiotensin system in the uterus and the fetoplacental unit; and the possible relation of renin and angiotensin to ovulation and fetal well-being. These interactions are described and their significance considered in this short review.

  19. Reproduction and the renin-angiotensin system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W. F.

    1995-01-01

    A unique aspect of the circulating renin-angiotensin system and the many independent tissue renin-angiotensin systems is their interactions at multiple levels with reproduction. These interactions, which have received relatively little attention, include effects of estrogens and possibly androgens on hepatic and renal angiotensinogen mRNA; effects of androgens on the Ren-2 gene and salivary renin in mice; the prorenin surge that occurs with but outlasts the LH surge during the menstrual cycle; the inhibitory effects of estrogens on thirst and water intake; the tissue renin-angiotensin systems in the brain, the anterior pituitary, and the ovaries and testes, that is, in all the components of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis; the presence of some components of the renin-angiotensin system in the uterus and the fetoplacental unit; and the possible relation of renin and angiotensin to ovulation and fetal well-being. These interactions are described and their significance considered in this short review.

  20. Increased hepatic gluconeogenesis: the secret of Lance Armstrong's success.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongaerts, G.P.A.; Wagener, D.J.T.

    2007-01-01

    Enormous amounts of lactic acid are produced during endurance sport by muscle cells. This metabolite is thought responsible for the muscle pain and the fatigue during sport. Its internal removal from the body by enzymatic conversion depends mainly on the capacity of the hepatic gluconeogenesis that

  1. Hepatic SR-BI, not endothelial lipase, expression determines biliary cholesterol secretion in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, Harmen; Gatti, Alberto; Nijstad, Niels; Kuipers, Folkert; Tietge, Uwe J. F.

    High density lipoprotein cholesterol is thought to represent a preferred source of sterols secreted into bile following hepatic uptake by scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI). The present study aimed to determine the metabolic effects of an endothelial lipase (EL)-mediated stimulation of HDL

  2. Secretion and apparent activation of human hepatic lipase requires proper oligosaccharide processing in the endoplasmic reticulum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.M. Verhoeven (Adrie); B.P. Neve (Bernadette); H. Jansen (Hans)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractHuman hepatic lipase (HL) is a glycoprotein with four N-linked oligosaccharide side chains. The importance of glycosylation for the secretion of catalytically active HL was studied in HepG2 cells by using inhibitors of intracellular trafficking, N-glycosylat

  3. Relationship between hepatic fatty acid desaturation and lipid secretion in the estrogenized chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermier, D; Catheline, D; Legrand, P

    1996-11-01

    Desaturation of fatty acids is thought to facilitate their incorporation into glyceride and their subsequent secretion as lipoproteins. However, in the laying hen, the dramatic increase in hepatic lipogenesis is often paralleled by a liver steatosis that may affect egg production and even result in death. The balance between lipid secretion and storage, in relation to the fatty acid desaturation process, was therefore investigated in young male estrogenized chicken. Estrogen stimulation resulted in a dramatic increase in VLDL concentration (40.4 mg/ml versus 0.158 mg/ml in control) and hepatic lipid content (8.61 g/liver versus 1.47 g/liver in control). In estrogenized chickens, VLDL, total liver, and microsomes contained relatively more monounsaturated and less saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids, whereas hepatic delta 9 desaturase activity was twofold higher. Moreover, in these birds, the proportion of monoenoic fatty acids was greater in VLDL (55%) than in the liver (50%), which was indicative of their preferential secretion. Therefore, under the influence of estrogen, fatty acid synthesis and desaturation are associated with and increased VLDL secretion, which limits the degree of hepatic accumulation of triglyceride and the risk of subsequent steatosis.

  4. Characterization of inactive renin from human kidney and plasma. Evidence of a renal source of circulating inactive renin.

    OpenAIRE

    Hsueh, W A; Carlson, E J; Dzau, V J

    1983-01-01

    An inactive form of renin has been isolated from human plasma. It has been suggested that this may represent renin precursor secreted from the kidney. However, early studies failed to isolate inactive renin from human renal tissue. In this investigation, rapid processing of human kidney cortex at temperatures below 4 degrees C in the presence of protease inhibitors followed by cibacron-blue affinity chromatography allowed us to extract a totally inactive form of renal renin. Furthermore, we f...

  5. Glucagon stimulates hepatic FGF21 secretion through a PKA- and EPAC-dependent posttranscriptional mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly A Cyphert

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that whole body deletion of the glucagon receptor suppresses the ability of starvation to increase hepatic fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 expression and plasma FGF21 concentration. Here, we investigate the mechanism by which glucagon receptor activation increases hepatic FGF21 production. Incubating primary rat hepatocyte cultures with glucagon, dibutyryl cAMP or forskolin stimulated a 3-4-fold increase in FGF21 secretion. The effect of these agents on FGF21 secretion was not associated with an increase in FGF21 mRNA abundance. Glucagon induction of FGF21 secretion was additive with the stimulatory effect of a PPARα activator (GW7647 on FGF21 secretion. Inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA and downstream components of the PKA pathway [i.e. AMP-activated protein kinase and p38 MAPK] suppressed glucagon activation of FGF21 secretion. Incubating hepatocytes with an exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (EPAC-selective cAMP analog [i.e. 8-(4-chlorophenylthio-2'-O-methyladenosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate (cpTOME], stimulated a 3.9-fold increase FGF21 secretion, whereas inhibition of the EPAC effector, Rap1, suppressed glucagon activation of FGF21 secretion. Treatment of hepatocytes with insulin also increased FGF21 secretion. In contrast to glucagon, insulin activation of FGF21 secretion was associated with an increase in FGF21 mRNA abundance. Glucagon synergistically interacted with insulin to stimulate a further increase in FGF21 secretion and FGF21 mRNA abundance. These results demonstrate that glucagon increases hepatic FGF21 secretion via a posttranscriptional mechanism and provide evidence that both the PKA branch and EPAC branch of the cAMP pathway play a role in mediating this effect. These results also identify a novel synergistic interaction between glucagon and insulin in the regulation of FGF21 secretion and FGF21 mRNA abundance. We propose that this insulin/glucagon synergism plays a role in

  6. ASSOCIATION OF GENE POLYMORPHISMS OF THE RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM AND ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION WITH DEVELOPMENT AND SEVERITY OF PORTAL HYPERTENSION IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEPATITIS C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Taratina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: At present, much attention is paid to genetic factors explaining the clinical course of chronic hepatitis C. Aim: To evaluate an association of the gene polymorphisms involved in the formation of endothelial dysfunction (NOS3 894G/T, CYBA 242C/T, MTHFR 677C/T and encoding components of the renin-angiotensin system (ATR1 1166A/C, AGT (-6G/T and 235M/T with development and severity of portal hypertension syndrome in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Materials and methods: 162 patients with chronic hepatitis C and HCV-related cirrhosis (114 women and 48 men were divided into the following groups: no portal hypertension (n = 98, "compensated" (n = 19 and "decompensated" (n = 45 portal hypertension. The gene polymorphisms were assessed by molecular genetic methods. Results: TT genotype of CYBA was more common in patients with portal hypertension than in those without (odds ratio (OR for TT = 3.59, p = 0.031. This difference becomes larger when comparing the decompensated portal hypertension group with the no portal hypertension group (OR TT = 5.46, p = 0.009. Other gene polymorphisms were not associated with development or decompensation of portal hypertension. Multivariate analysis of the impact of genetic, clinical and demographic factors showed that portal hypertension was associated primarily with patients age at the time of the study (Wald's х2 = 14.99 and with their body mass index (Wald's х2 = 4.35. After exclusion of these population-wide risk factors from the model, the development of portal hypertension correlated with the carriage of 235TT genotype of CYBA (Wald's х2 = 6.07, OR = 4.29 and (-6AA genotype AGT (Wald's х2 = 4.73, OR = 4.13, as well as with the lack of protective 235TT genotype AGT (Wald's х2 = 4.06, OR = 0.33. The combined effects of the studied gene polymorphisms on decompensation of the portal hypertension in patients with chronic HCV infection were similar. Conclusion: The development and increase in

  7. Caspase-1 deficiency in mice reduces intestinal triglyceride absorption and hepatic triglyceride secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diepen, Janna A; Stienstra, Rinke; Vroegrijk, Irene O C M; van den Berg, Sjoerd A A; Salvatori, Daniela; Hooiveld, Guido J; Kersten, Sander; Tack, Cees J; Netea, Mihai G; Smit, Johannes W A; Joosten, Leo A B; Havekes, Louis M; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Rensen, Patrick C N

    2013-02-01

    Caspase-1 is known to activate the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18. Additionally, it can cleave other substrates, including proteins involved in metabolism. Recently, we showed that caspase-1 deficiency in mice strongly reduces high-fat diet-induced weight gain, at least partly caused by an increased energy production. Increased feces secretion by caspase-1-deficient mice suggests that lipid malabsorption possibly further reduces adipose tissue mass. In this study we investigated whether caspase-1 plays a role in triglyceride-(TG)-rich lipoprotein metabolism using caspase-1-deficient and wild-type mice. Caspase-1 deficiency reduced the postprandial TG response to an oral lipid load, whereas TG-derived fatty acid (FA) uptake by peripheral tissues was not affected, demonstrated by unaltered kinetics of [(3)H]TG-labeled very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-like emulsion particles. An oral gavage of [(3)H]TG-containing olive oil revealed that caspase-1 deficiency reduced TG absorption and subsequent uptake of TG-derived FA in liver, muscle, and adipose tissue. Similarly, despite an elevated hepatic TG content, caspase-1 deficiency reduced hepatic VLDL-TG production. Intestinal and hepatic gene expression analysis revealed that caspase-1 deficiency did not affect FA oxidation or FA uptake but rather reduced intracellular FA transport, thereby limiting lipid availability for the assembly and secretion of TG-rich lipoproteins. The current study reveals a novel function for caspase-1, or caspase-1-cleaved substrates, in controlling intestinal TG absorption and hepatic TG secretion.

  8. Mechanisms of renin release from juxtaglomerular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skøtt, O; Salomonsson, Max; Sellerup Persson, Anja;

    1991-01-01

    In microdissected, nonperfused afferent arterioles changes in intravascular pressure did not affect renin secretion. On the contrary, renin release from isolated afferent arterioles perfused in a free-flow system has been reported to be sensitive to simultaneous changes in luminal pressure and flow....... Hence local blood flow may be involved in the baroreceptor control of renin release. If flow is sensed, the sensor is likely to be located near the endothelial cell layer, where ion channels have been shown to be influenced by variations in shear stress....

  9. C-terminal domain of hepatitis C virus core protein is essential for secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soo-Ho Choi; Kyu-Jin Park; So-Yeon Kim; Dong-Hwa Choi; Jung-Min Park; Soon B. Hwang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: We have previously demonstrated that hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is efficiently released into the culture medium in insect cells. The objective of this study is to characterize the HCV core secretion in insect cells.METHODS: We constructed recombinant baculoviruses expressing various-length of mutant core proteins, expressed these proteins in insect cells, and examined core protein secretion in insect cells.RESULTS: Only wild type core was efficiently released into the culture medium, although the protein expression level of wild type core was lower than those of other mutant core proteins. We found that the shorter form of the core construct expressed the higher level of protein. However, if more than 18 amino acids of the core were truncated at the C-terminus,core proteins were no longer seareted into the culture medium.Membrane flotation data show that the secreted core proteins are associated with the cellular membrane protein, indicating that HCV core is secreted as a membrane complex.CONCLUSION: The C-terminal 18 amino acids of HCV core were crucial for core secretion into the culture media.Since HCV replication occurs on lipid raft membrane structure,these results suggest that HCV may utilize a unique core release mechanism to escape immune surveillance, thereby potentially representing the feature of HCV morphogenesis.

  10. Significance of glucagon for insulin secretion and hepatic glycogenolysis during exercise in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Galbo, H; Holst, J J;

    1981-01-01

    , cardiac blood for glucose analysis and a biopsy of the liver were obtained, and either antigen-stripped glucagon antibodies (A) or control gamma globulins (N) in saline were injected through the cardiac cannula. Subsequently, the rats swam in tepid water (33-34 degree C) for 100 minutes with a tail weight......The significance of glucagon and of the sympatho-adrenal system for insulin secretion and hepatic glycogen depletion during exercise was studied. Male rats were either adrenodemedullated and chemically sympathectomized with 6-hydroxydopamine (SX) or sham-treated (C). During light ether anesthesia...... attached (2% of body weight). Then cardiac blood was drawn for analysis of glucose, insulin and glucagon, and a sample of the liver was collected. In both CA and CN rats, the blood glucose concentration tended to increase (p less than 0.1) during exercise, whereas hepatic glycogen depletion and the plasma...

  11. Secretion of hepatitis C virus envelope glycoproteins depends on assembly of apolipoprotein B positive lipoproteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinca Icard

    Full Text Available The density of circulating hepatitis C virus (HCV particles in the blood of chronically infected patients is very heterogeneous. The very low density of some particles has been attributed to an association of the virus with apolipoprotein B (apoB positive and triglyceride rich lipoproteins (TRL likely resulting in hybrid lipoproteins known as lipo-viro-particles (LVP containing the viral envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2, capsid and viral RNA. The specific infectivity of these particles has been shown to be higher than the infectivity of particles of higher density. The nature of the association of HCV particles with lipoproteins remains elusive and the role of apolipoproteins in the synthesis and assembly of the viral particles is unknown. The human intestinal Caco-2 cell line differentiates in vitro into polarized and apoB secreting cells during asymmetric culture on porous filters. By using this cell culture system, cells stably expressing E1 and E2 secreted the glycoproteins into the basal culture medium after one week of differentiation concomitantly with TRL secretion. Secreted glycoproteins were only detected in apoB containing density fractions. The E1-E2 and apoB containing particles were unique complexes bearing the envelope glycoproteins at their surface since apoB could be co-immunoprecipitated with E2-specific antibodies. Envelope protein secretion was reduced by inhibiting the lipidation of apoB with an inhibitor of the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein. HCV glycoproteins were similarly secreted in association with TRL from the human liver cell line HepG2 but not by Huh-7 and Huh-7.5 hepatoma cells that proved deficient for lipoprotein assembly. These data indicate that HCV envelope glycoproteins have the intrinsic capacity to utilize apoB synthesis and lipoprotein assembly machinery even in the absence of the other HCV proteins. A model for LVP assembly is proposed.

  12. Direct renin inhibition — a new way of targeting the renin system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris J Brown

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The renin system plays a key role in the pathology of hypertension and is influenced, both directly and indirectly, by most antihypertensive agents. The system is the target of several established classes of antihypertensive agents including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and beta-blockers. Of currently available drugs, only the beta-blockers suppress renin secretion, but these also reduce heart rate and cardiac output. Calcium channel blockers and diuretics cause a modest activation of the renin system secondary to the fall in renal afferent arteriolar pressure and reduction in filtered sodium load. Aliskiren is the first orally available direct inhibitor that blocks the renin system at its rate limiting step and is shown to reduce angiotensin I and II and plasma renin activity.

  13. 前列腺素E2在肾脏球旁器调节肾素分泌中的作用%Role of prostaglandin E2 in regulation of renin secretion at juxtaglomerular apparatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈丽萌; 黄宇宁; 秦岩; 刘冬妍; 李艳; 段琳

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect and mechanism of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in renin regulation at the juxtaglomerular apparatus (JGA). Methods Macula densa cell line (MMDD1) was cultured on the special filter. In the medium on the apical lateral of the cells, low concentration of sodium chloride, chloride and different doses of angiotensin Ⅱ (Ang Ⅱ) were used to stimulate the PGE2 secretion. The PGE2 concentration was tested by ELISA. In the animal experiment, the response of plasma renin activity (PRA) to acute intraperitoneal administration of captopril (30 mg/kg) was determined, in conscious wild-type (WT) and cyclooxygenase COX-2-/- mice on C57BL/6 genetic backgrounds. PRA was measured in plasma obtained by tail vein puncture. Different concentrations of PGE2 were used to stimulate the renin secretion of primary cultured JGA cells from COX-2-/- mice and wild type mice. In specific Gsα gene delete mice (low renin producing mice), 24 h urine was collected to test the concentration of PGE2. The COX-2 mRNA and protein of the kidney cortex were observed by real-time PCR and immunohistochemicul staining. Results Low chloride could stimulate the PGE2 secretion both at the apical and basement of the macula densa cells. In COX-2-/- mice, the base PRA and were obviously lower than wild type mice. Captopril could stimulate the PRA of (COX)-2-/- mice increasing 32.8 times. But Ang Ⅱ had no effect on PGE2 secretion in macula densa cells. In primary cultured JGA cells, the decreasing renin seretion was partly recovered by PGE2 in cells from COX-2-/- mice. In low renin producing mice, the expression of COX-2 mRNA in the kidney cortex increased by (8.07±1.08) times (n=6, P=0.0022). The COX-2 protein of the kidney cortex and the urine PGE2 increased by several times. Conclusions Low chloride is the primary stimulation messenger of PGE2 secretion in macula densa cells. The PRA in COX-2-/- mice can be stimulated by angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, but the Ang

  14. Hepatic stellate cells secreted hepatocyte growth factor contributes to the chemoresistance of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guofeng Yu

    Full Text Available As the main source of extracellular matrix proteins in tumor stroma, hepatic stellate cells (HSCs have a great impact on biological behaviors of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. In the present study, we have investigated a mechanism whereby HSCs modulate the chemoresistance of hepatoma cells. We used human HSC line lx-2 and chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin to investigate their effects on human HCC cell line Hep3B. The results showed that cisplatin resistance in Hep3B cells was enhanced with LX-2 CM (cultured medium exposure in vitro as well as co-injection with LX-2 cells in null mice. Meanwhile, in presence of LX-2 CM, Hep3B cells underwent epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT and upregulation of cancer stem cell (CSC -like properties. Besides, LX-2 cells synthesized and secreted hepatic growth factor (HGF into the CM. HGF receptor tyrosine kinase mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (Met was activated in Hep3B cells after LX-2 CM exposure. The HGF level of LX-2 CM could be effectively reduced by using HGF neutralizing antibody. Furthermore, depletion of HGF in LX-2 CM abolished its effects on activation of Met as well as promotion of the EMT, CSC-like features and cisplatin resistance in Hep3B cells. Collectively, secreting HGF into tumor milieu, HSCs may decrease hepatoma cells sensitization to chemotherapeutic agents by promoting EMT and CSC-like features via HGF/Met signaling.

  15. Parathyroid hormone-related protein stimulates plasma renin activity via its anorexic effects on sodium chloride intake

    OpenAIRE

    Atchison, Douglas K.; Westrick, Elizabeth; Szandzik, David L.; Gordish, Kevin L; Beierwaltes, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) increases renin release from isolated perfused kidneys and may act as an autacoid regulator of renin secretion, but its effects on renin in vivo are unknown. In vivo, PTHrP causes hypercalcemia and anorexia, which may affect renin. We hypothesized that chronically elevated PTHrP would increase plasma renin activity (PRA) indirectly via its anorexic effects, reducing sodium chloride (NaCl) intake and causing NaCl restriction. We infused male Sprague-...

  16. Signal peptide replacements enhance expression and secretion of hepatitis C virus envelope glycoproteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Wen; Yao Deng; Jie Guan; Weizheng Yan; Yue Wang; Wenjie Tan; Jimin Gao

    2011-01-01

    A large number of researches focused on glycoproteins E1 and E2 of hepatitis C virus (HCV) aimed at the develop-ment of anti-HCV vaccines and inhibitors. Enhancement of E1/E2 expression and secretion is critical for the charac-terization of these glycoproteins and thus for subunit vaccine development. In this study, we designed and syn-thesized three signal peptide sequences based on onlineprograms SignalP, TargetP, and PSORT, then removed and replaced the signal peptide preceding E1/E2 by over-lapping the polymerase chain reaction method. We assessed the effect of this alteration on E1/E2 expression and secretion in mammalian cells, using western blot analysis, dot blot, and Galanthus nivalis agglutinin iectin capture enzyme immunoassay. Replacing the peptides pre-ceding E1 and E2 with the signal peptides of the tissue plasminogen activator and Gaussia luciferase resulted in maximum enhancement of E1/E2 expression and secretion of E1 in mammalian cells, without altering glycosylation.Such an advance would help to facilitate both the research of E1/E2 biology and the development of an effective HCV subunit vaccine. The strategy used in this study could be applied to the expression and production of other glyco-proteins in mammalian ceil line-based systems.

  17. Molecular biology of the renin-angiotensin system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzau, V.J.; Burt, D.W.; Pratt, R.E. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA))

    1988-10-01

    This paper reviews the molecular biology of the renin-angiotensin system. The renin gene structure is analyzed in detail, including an examination of the putative regulatory regions. The combined action of these regulatory sequences would result in the complex, tissue-specific expression and regulation observed in vivo. The expression of the tissue renin-angiotensin systems, which may have important physiological functions, is also described. In addition, the pathway of renin biosynthesis and secretion is reviewed. This includes speculation on the fate of circulating prorenin and the physiological role of multiple renin forms and secretory pathways. The molecular approaches described in this paper have greatly advanced our knowledge of the biology of the renin-angiotensin system. Future studies using these and other approaches should provide further insight into this complex system.

  18. The renin-angiotensin system and the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W F

    1977-04-01

    One of several factors affecting the secretion of renin by the kidneys is the sympathetic nervous system. The sympathetic input is excitatory and is mediated by beta-adrenergic receptors, which are probably located on the membranes of the juxtaglomerular cells. Stimulation of sympathetic areas in the medulla, midbrain and hypothalamus raises blood pressure and increases renin secretion, whereas stimulation of other parts of the hypothalamus decreases blood pressure and renin output. The centrally active alpha-adrenergic agonist clonidine decreases renin secretion, lowers blood pressure, inhibits ACTH and vasopressin secretion, and increases growth hormone secretion in dogs. The effects on ACTH and growth hormone are abolished by administration of phenoxybenzamine into the third ventricle, whereas the effect on blood pressure is abolished by administration of phenoxybenzamine in the fourth ventricle without any effect on the ACTH and growth hormone responses. Fourth ventricular phenoxybenzamine decreases but does not abolish the inhibitory effect of clonidine on renin secretion. Circulating angiotensin II acts on the brain via the area postrema to raise blood pressure and via the subfornical organ to increase water intake. Its effect on vasopressin secretion is debated. The brain contains a renin-like enzyme, converting enzyme, renin substrate, and angiotensin. There is debate about the nature and physiological significance of the angiotensin II-generating enzyme in the brain, and about the nature of the angiotensin I and angiotensin II that have been reported to be present in the central nervous system. However, injection of angiotensin II into the cerebral ventricles produces drinking, increased secretion of vasopressin and ACTH, and increased blood pressure. The same responses are produced by intraventricular renin. Angiotensin II also facilitates sympathetic discharge in the periphery, and the possibility that it exerts a similar action on the adrenergic neurons

  19. Salidroside attenuates concanavalin A-induced hepatitis via modulating cytokines secretion and lymphocyte migration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Baoji; Zou, Yun; Liu, Shanshan; Wang, Jun; Zhu, Jiali; Li, Jinbao; Bo, Lulong; Deng, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    Salidroside, isolated from the medicinal plant Rhodiola, was reported to serve as an "adaptogen." This study was designed to explore the protective effect of salidroside on concanavalin A- (Con A-) induced hepatitis in mice and investigate potential mechanisms. C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into control group, Con A group, and salidroside group. Salidroside (50 mg/kg) was injected intravenously followed by Con A administration. The levels of ALT, AST, inflammatory cytokines and CXCL-10 were examined. The pathological damage of livers was assessed, the amounts of phosphorylated IκBα and p65 were measured, and the numbers of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes in the blood, spleen and infiltrated in the liver were calculated. Our results showed that salidroside pretreatment reduced the levels of ALT, AST dramatically and suppressed the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines through downregulating the activity of NF-κB partly. Salidroside altered the distribution of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocyte in the liver and spleen through regulating CXCL-10 and decreased the severity of liver injuries. In conclusion, these results confirm the efficacy of salidroside in the prevention of immune mediated hepatitis in mice.

  20. Salidroside Attenuates Concanavalin A-Induced Hepatitis via Modulating Cytokines Secretion and Lymphocyte Migration in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoji Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Salidroside, isolated from the medicinal plant Rhodiola, was reported to serve as an “adaptogen.” This study was designed to explore the protective effect of salidroside on concanavalin A- (Con A- induced hepatitis in mice and investigate potential mechanisms. C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into control group, Con A group, and salidroside group. Salidroside (50 mg/kg was injected intravenously followed by Con A administration. The levels of ALT, AST, inflammatory cytokines and CXCL-10 were examined. The pathological damage of livers was assessed, the amounts of phosphorylated IκBα and p65 were measured, and the numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in the blood, spleen and infiltrated in the liver were calculated. Our results showed that salidroside pretreatment reduced the levels of ALT, AST dramatically and suppressed the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines through downregulating the activity of NF-κB partly. Salidroside altered the distribution of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte in the liver and spleen through regulating CXCL-10 and decreased the severity of liver injuries. In conclusion, these results confirm the efficacy of salidroside in the prevention of immune mediated hepatitis in mice.

  1. Dietary protein-induced hepatic IGF-1 secretion mediated by PPARγ activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiaojuan; Wang, Songbo; Xu, Jingren; Zhuang, Lu; Xing, Kongping; Zhang, Mengyuan; Zhu, Xiaotong; Wang, Lina; Gao, Ping; Xi, Qianyun; Sun, Jiajie; Zhang, Yongliang; Li, Tiejun; Shu, Gang; Jiang, Qingyan

    2017-01-01

    Dietary protein or amino acid (AA) is a crucial nutritional factor to regulate hepatic insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) expression and secretion. However, the underlying intracellular mechanism by which dietary protein or AA induces IGF-1 expression remains unknown. We compared the IGF-1 gene expression and plasma IGF-1 level of pigs fed with normal crude protein (CP, 20%) and low-protein levels (LP, 14%). RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) was performed to detect transcript expression in the liver in response to dietary protein. The results showed that serum concentrations and mRNA levels of IGF-1 in the liver were higher in the CP group than in the LP group. RNA-seq analysis identified a total of 1319 differentially expressed transcripts (667 upregulated and 652 downregulated), among which the terms “oxidative phosphorylation”, “ribosome”, “gap junction”, “PPAR signaling pathway”, and “focal adhesion” were enriched. In addition, the porcine primary hepatocyte and HepG2 cell models also demonstrated that the mRNA and protein levels of IGF-1 and PPARγ increased with the increasing AA concentration in the culture. The PPARγ activator troglitazone increased IGF-1 gene expression and secretion in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, inhibition of PPARγ effectively reversed the effects of the high AA concentration on the mRNA expression of IGF-1 and IGFBP-1 in HepG2 cells. Moreover, the protein levels of IGF-1 and PPARγ, as well as the phosphorylation of mTOR, significantly increased in HepG2 cells under high AA concentrations. mTOR phosphorylation can be decreased by the mTOR antagonist, rapamycin. The immunoprecipitation results also showed that high AA concentrations significantly increased the interaction of mTOR and PPARγ. In summary, PPARγ plays an important role in the regulation of IGF-1 secretion and gene expression in response to dietary protein. PMID:28257428

  2. The water channel aquaporin-1 contributes to renin cell recruitment during chronic stimulation of renin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinning, Anne R; Jensen, Boye L; Schweda, Frank; Machura, Katharina; Hansen, Pernille B L; Stubbe, Jane; Gramsbergen, Jan Bert; Madsen, Kirsten

    2014-12-01

    Both the processing and release of secretory granules involve water movement across granule membranes. It was hypothesized that the water channel aquaporin (AQP)1 directly contributes to the recruitment of renin-positive cells in the afferent arteriole. AQP1(-/-) and AQP1(+/+) mice were fed a low-salt (LS) diet [0.004% (wt/wt) NaCl] for 7 days and given enalapril [angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI), 0.1 mg/ml] in drinking water for 3 days. There were no differences in plasma renin concentration at baseline. After LS-ACEI, plasma renin concentrations increased markedly in both genotypes but was significantly lower in AQP1(-/-) mice compared with AQP1(+/+) mice. Tissue renin concentrations were higher in AQP1(-/-) mice, and renin mRNA levels were not different between genotypes. Mean arterial blood pressure was not different at baseline and during LS diet but decreased significantly in both genotypes after the addition of ACEI; the response was faster in AQP1(-/-) mice but then stabilized at a similar level. Renin release after 200 μl blood withdrawal was not different. Isoprenaline-stimulated renin release from isolated perfused kidneys did not differ between genotypes. Cortical tissue norepinephrine concentrations were lower after LS-ACEI compared with baseline with no difference between genotypes. Plasma nitrite/nitrate concentrations were unaffected by genotype and LS-ACEI. In AQP1(-/-) mice, the number of afferent arterioles with recruitment was significantly lower compared with AQP1(+/+) mice after LS-ACEI. We conclude that AQP1 is not necessary for acutely stimulated renin secretion in vivo and from isolated perfused kidneys, whereas recruitment of renin-positive cells in response to chronic stimulation is attenuated or delayed in AQP1(-/-) mice.

  3. Reduced hepatic triglyceride secretion in rats fed docosahexaenoic acid-rich fish oil suppresses postprandial hypertriglyceridemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, I; Kumamaru, J; Nakatani, N; Sakono, M; Murota, I; Imaizumi, K

    2001-04-01

    To evaluate the mechanisms of suppression of postprandial hypertriglyceridemia by fish oil rich in docosahexaenoic acid, the effect on the intestinal absorption of triglyceride, activities of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hepatic triglyceride lipase (HTGL) and metabolism of chylomicrons (CM) and CM remnants were compared with that of safflower oil in Sprague-Dawley rats in a series of studies. The feeding of fish oil for 3 wk suppressed postprandial hypertriglyceridemia (study 1). Dietary fish oil did not alter the rate of lymphatic absorption of triglyceride (study 2). The activities of LPL and HTGL were measured at 5 h after the beginning of feeding, when serum triglyceride concentrations were highest in both dietary groups. The activities of LPL in adipose tissue and heart were greater (P fish oil (study 3). In contrast, there were no differences in the activities of LPL and HTGL in postheparin plasma between the fish and safflower oil groups (study 4). The clearance rates of CM and CM remnants were measured by injecting intravenously CM collected from rats fed safflower or fish oils with [14C]triolein and [3H]cholesterol (study 5). Dietary oil did not influence the half-lives of CM or CM remnants. The secretion of triglyceride from the liver of rats injected with Triton WR-1339 was lower (P fish oil, than those fed linoleic acid, a major component of safflower oil (study 6). These observations strongly support the hypothesis that in rats, the principal cause of the suppression of postprandial hypertriglyceridemia by fish oil is the depression of triglyceride secretion from the liver.

  4. Interleukin-1 inhibits renin gene expression in As4.1 cells but not in native juxtaglomerular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B L; Lehle, U; Müller, Maja

    1998-01-01

    Cardiovascular effects of inflammatory interleukins (IL) have been suggested to be mediated by the renin-angiotensin system in vivo. To address the direct cellular effect of IL, we examined the influence of IL-1beta on renin secretion and renin mRNA in cultures of mouse juxtaglomerular granular (...

  5. Conjugated linoleic acid reduces hepatic steatosis and restores liver triacylglycerol secretion and the fatty acid profile during protein repletion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, María F; Illesca, Paola G; González, Marcela A; Bernal, Claudio A

    2010-11-01

    Protein depletion is associated with hepatic steatosis and decreased circulating triacylglycerol (TAG). Since conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) increases lean body mass, protects against muscle catabolism, and modulates lipid metabolism, the aim of this work was to investigate the effects of CLA with two different amounts of dietary fat on the regulation of plasma and hepatic TAG concentration, and its possible connections with changes in fatty acid (FA) profile in plasma, liver and adipose tissue and hepatic oxidative status during protein repletion. Rats were fed a low protein diet (14 days) and then a protein repletion diet (30 days), supplemented or not with CLA, containing 7% (w/w) or 20% (w/w) of fat. Hepatic TAG secretion and removal by muscle and adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase, FA profile and liver oxidative status were evaluated. Protein depletion affected hepatic TAG secretion and peripheral removal, decreasing plasma and increasing liver TAG concentration, whereas protein repletion with CLA improved these abnormalities independently of the amount of dietary fat by increasing hepatic TAG secretion. This prevention in the absence of CLA was not observed. CLA was incorporated in plasma and tissues (adipose > liver > plasma, and c9,t11-CLA > t10,c12-CLA), accompanied by alterations in FA composition, mainly in adipose tissue. The hepatic oxidative stress was overcome by protein repletion. CLA had a beneficial impact on TAG metabolism in protein repleted animals, preventing hepatic steatosis through higher hepatic TAG secretion.

  6. Selective hypoaldosteronism due to combined defects of the conversion from inactive renin to active renin and the aldosterone biosynthesis from corticosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, S; Akai, Y; Ono, S; Kusano, E; Asano, Y

    2001-07-01

    A 24-year-old Japanese woman with IgA nephropathy exhibited a decreased serum aldosterone level with normal plasma renin activity after toxemia of pregnancy. Our studies revealed selective hypoaldosteronism with normal adrenoglucocorticoid functions. Levels of serum corticosterone and deoxycorticosterone were normal. Resting plasma renin activity was normal, and plasma levels of total and inactive renin were increased. Rapid ACTH administration failed to stimulate any secretion of aldosterone, whereas it adequately increased serum cortisol, deoxycorticosterone, and corticosterone concentrations. Responses of both plasma renin activity and serum aldosterone level to the furosemide-posture challenge were blunted. Angiotensin II also failed to stimulate any secretion of aldosterone despite a progressive rise in blood pressure and an appropriate increase in serum corticosterone. These results suggest that combined defects of the conversion from inactive renin to active renin and aldosterone biosynthesis are the causes of selective hypoaldosteronism in our patient.

  7. Control of the renal renin system by local factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, C; Jensen, B L; Krämer, B K

    1998-01-01

    prostanoid, both stimulate renin secretion and renin gene expression by activating cAMP formation in JG cells. Although the direct effect of NO on JG cells is less clear, its overall effect in vivo seems to be to stimulate the renin system. Evidence is emerging that stimulation by NO is related to the c......AMP pathway, and cGMP-induced inhibition of cAMP-phosphodiesterase III (PDE-III) may mediate this effect. ETs, on the other hand, appear to inhibit the renin system, in particular in those pathways activated by cAMP, acting via Ca2+- and protein kinase C-related mechanisms. There is increasing evidence...... that both NO and PGs could be involved in the physiological regulatory mechanisms by which salt intake affects the renin system....

  8. Functional Characterization of Intracellular and Secreted Forms of a Truncated Hepatitis C Virus E2 Glycoprotein†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Mike; Dubuisson, Jean; Maidens, Catherine; Harrop, Richard; Guile, Geoffrey R.; Borrow, Persephone; McKeating, Jane A.

    2000-01-01

    The E2 protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is believed to be a virion surface glycoprotein that is a candidate for inclusion in an antiviral vaccine. A truncated soluble version of E2 has recently been shown to interact with CD81, suggesting that this protein may be a component of the receptor for HCV. When expressed in eukaryotic cells, a significant proportion of E2 forms misfolded aggregates. To analyze the specificity of interaction between E2 and CD81, the aggregated and monomeric forms of a truncated E2 glycoprotein (E2661) were separated by high-pressure liquid chromatography and analyzed for CD81 binding. Nonaggregated forms of E2 preferentially bound CD81 and a number of conformation-dependent monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Furthermore, intracellular forms of E2661 were found to bind CD81 with greater affinity than the extracellular forms. Intracellular and secreted forms of E2661 were also found to differ in reactivity with MAbs and human sera, consistent with differences in antigenicity. Together, these data indicate that proper folding of E2 is important for its interaction with CD81 and that modifications of glycans can modulate this interaction. Identification of the biologically active forms of E2 will assist in the future design of vaccines to protect against HCV infection. PMID:10623732

  9. Brain glucagon-like peptide–1 increases insulin secretion and muscle insulin resistance to favor hepatic glycogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauf, Claude; Cani, Patrice D.; Perrin, Christophe; Iglesias, Miguel A.; Maury, Jean François; Bernard, Elodie; Benhamed, Fadilha; Grémeaux, Thierry; Drucker, Daniel J.; Kahn, C. Ronald; Girard, Jean; Tanti, Jean François; Delzenne, Nathalie M.; Postic, Catherine; Burcelin, Rémy

    2005-01-01

    Intestinal glucagon-like peptide–1 (GLP-1) is a hormone released into the hepatoportal circulation that stimulates pancreatic insulin secretion. GLP-1 also acts as a neuropeptide to control food intake and cardiovascular functions, but its neural role in glucose homeostasis is unknown. We show that brain GLP-1 controlled whole-body glucose fate during hyperglycemic conditions. In mice undergoing a hyperglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp, icv administration of the specific GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin 9–39 (Ex9) increased muscle glucose utilization and glycogen content. This effect did not require muscle insulin action, as it also occurred in muscle insulin receptor KO mice. Conversely, icv infusion of the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin 4 (Ex4) reduced insulin-stimulated muscle glucose utilization. In hyperglycemia achieved by i.v. infusion of glucose, icv Ex4, but not Ex9, caused a 4-fold increase in insulin secretion and enhanced liver glycogen storage. However, when glucose was infused intragastrically, icv Ex9 infusion lowered insulin secretion and hepatic glycogen levels, whereas no effects of icv Ex4 were observed. In diabetic mice fed a high-fat diet, a 1-month chronic i.p. Ex9 treatment improved glucose tolerance and fasting glycemia. Our data show that during hyperglycemia, brain GLP-1 inhibited muscle glucose utilization and increased insulin secretion to favor hepatic glycogen stores, preparing efficiently for the next fasting state. PMID:16322793

  10. Brain glucagon-like peptide-1 increases insulin secretion and muscle insulin resistance to favor hepatic glycogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauf, Claude; Cani, Patrice D; Perrin, Christophe; Iglesias, Miguel A; Maury, Jean François; Bernard, Elodie; Benhamed, Fadilha; Grémeaux, Thierry; Drucker, Daniel J; Kahn, C Ronald; Girard, Jean; Tanti, Jean François; Delzenne, Nathalie M; Postic, Catherine; Burcelin, Rémy

    2005-12-01

    Intestinal glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a hormone released into the hepatoportal circulation that stimulates pancreatic insulin secretion. GLP-1 also acts as a neuropeptide to control food intake and cardiovascular functions, but its neural role in glucose homeostasis is unknown. We show that brain GLP-1 controlled whole-body glucose fate during hyperglycemic conditions. In mice undergoing a hyperglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp, icv administration of the specific GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin 9-39 (Ex9) increased muscle glucose utilization and glycogen content. This effect did not require muscle insulin action, as it also occurred in muscle insulin receptor KO mice. Conversely, icv infusion of the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin 4 (Ex4) reduced insulin-stimulated muscle glucose utilization. In hyperglycemia achieved by i.v. infusion of glucose, icv Ex4, but not Ex9, caused a 4-fold increase in insulin secretion and enhanced liver glycogen storage. However, when glucose was infused intragastrically, icv Ex9 infusion lowered insulin secretion and hepatic glycogen levels, whereas no effects of icv Ex4 were observed. In diabetic mice fed a high-fat diet, a 1-month chronic i.p. Ex9 treatment improved glucose tolerance and fasting glycemia. Our data show that during hyperglycemia, brain GLP-1 inhibited muscle glucose utilization and increased insulin secretion to favor hepatic glycogen stores, preparing efficiently for the next fasting state.

  11. Differential effects of low-fat and high-fat diets on fed-state hepatic triacylglycerol secretion, hepatic fatty acid profiles, and DGAT-1 protein expression in obese-prone Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heden, Timothy D; Morris, E Matthew; Kearney, Monica L; Liu, Tzu-Wen; Park, Young-Min; Kanaley, Jill A; Thyfault, John P

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of short-term low-fat (LF) and high-fat (HF) diets on fed-state hepatic triacylglycerol (TAG) secretion, the content of proteins involved in TAG assembly and secretion, fatty acid oxidation (FAO), and the fatty acid profile of stored TAG. Using selectively bred obese-prone Sprague-Dawley rats, we directly measured fed-state hepatic TAG secretion, using Tyloxapol (a lipoprotein lipase inhibitor) and a standardized oral mixed meal (45% carbohydrate, 40% fat, 15% protein) bolus in animals fed a HF or LF diet for 2 weeks, after which the rats were maintained on their respective diet for 1 week (washout) prior to the liver being excised to measure protein content, FAO, and TAG fatty acid profiles. Hepatic DGAT-1 protein expression was ∼27% lower in HF- than in LF-fed animals (p hepatic TAG secretion rate was ∼39% lower (p Hepatic TAG content was ∼2-fold higher (p profile of liver TAG in HF-fed animals closely resembled the diet, whereas in LF-fed animals, the fatty acid profile consisted of mostly de novo synthesized fatty acids. FAO was not altered by diet. LF and HF diets differentially alter fed-state hepatic TAG secretion, hepatic fatty acid profiles, and DGAT-1 protein expression.

  12. Cytoplasm-translocated Ku70/80 complex sensing of HBV DNA induces hepatitis-associated chemokine secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiming Wei

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis B remains a serious disease, mainly owing to the severe pathological consequences of persistent hepatitis B virus (HBV infection of carriers, which is difficult to cure using current therapies. When the immune system responds to hepatocytes experiencing rapid HBV replication, effector cells (such as HBV-specific CD8+ T cells, NK cells, NKT cells and other subtypes of immune cells infiltrate the liver and cause hepatitis. However, precisely how these cells are recruited remains unclear. In the present study, we found that the cytoplasm-translocated Ku70/80 complex in liver-derived cells sensed cytosolic HBV DNA and promoted hepatitis-associated chemokine secretion. Upon sensing HBV DNA, DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs and PARP1 were assembled. Then IRF1 was activated and translocated into the nucleus, which upregulated CCL3 and CCL5 expression. Because CCR5, a major chemokine receptor for CCL3 and CCL5, is known to be critical in hepatitis B, Ku70/80 sensing of HBV DNA likely plays a critical role in immune cell recruitment in response to HBV infection.

  13. Increased hepatic VLDL secretion, lipogenesis, and SREBP-1 expression in the corpulent JCR:LA-cp rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elam, M B; Wilcox, H G; Cagen, L M; Deng, X; Raghow, R; Kumar, P; Heimberg, M; Russell, J C

    2001-12-01

    The corpulent JCR:LA-cp rat (cp/cp) is a useful model for study of the metabolic consequences of obesity and hyperinsulinemia. To assess the effect of hyperinsulinemia on VLDL secretion in this model, we measured rates of secretion of VLDL in perfused livers derived from cp/cp rats and their lean littermates. Livers of cp/cp rats secreted significantly greater amounts of VLDL triglyceride and apolipoprotein, compared with lean littermates. The content of apoB, apoE, and apoCs in both perfusate and plasma VLDL was greater in the cp/cp rat, as was the apolipoprotein (apo)C, apoA-I, and apoA-IV content of plasma HDL. Triglyceride content was also greater in cp/cp livers, as was hepatic lipogenesis and expression of lipogenic enzymes and sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP-1). Hepatic mRNAs for apoE, and apoA-I were higher in livers of cp/cp rats. In contrast, the steady state levels of apoC-II, apoC-III, and apoB mRNAs were unchanged. Thus, livers of obese hyperinsulinemic cp/cp JCR:LA-cp rats secrete a greater number of VLDL particles that are enriched in triglyceride, apoE, and apoC. Greater secretion of VLDL in the cp/cp rat in part results from higher endogenous fatty acid synthesis, which in turn may occur in response to increased expression of the lipogenic enzyme regulator SREBP-1c.

  14. Modulation of α-enolase post-translational modifications by dengue virus: increased secretion of the basic isoforms in infected hepatic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza M Higa

    Full Text Available Hepatic cells are major sites of dengue virus (DENV replication and liver injury constitutes a characteristic of severe forms of dengue. The role of hepatic cells in dengue pathogenesis is not well established, but since hepatocytes are the major source of plasma proteins, changes in protein secretion by these cells during infection might contribute to disease progression. Previously, we showed that DENV infection alters the secretion pattern of hepatic HepG2 cells, with α-enolase appearing as one of the major proteins secreted in higher levels by infected cells. ELISA analysis demonstrated that DENV infection modulates α-enolase secretion in HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner, but has no effect on its gene expression and on the intracellular content of the protein as assessed by PCR and western blot analyses, respectively. Two-dimensional western blots showed that both intracellular and secreted forms of α-enolase appear as five spots, revealing α-enolase isoforms with similar molecular weights but distinct isoeletric points. Remarkably, quantification of each spot content revealed that DENV infection shifts the isoform distribution pattern of secreted α-enolase towards the basic isoforms, whereas the intracellular protein remains unaltered, suggesting that post-translational modifications might be involved in α-enolase secretion by infected cells. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying α-enolase secretion by hepatic cells and its relationship with the role of liver in dengue pathogenesis. In addition, preliminary results obtained with plasma samples from DENV-infected patients suggest an association between plasma levels of α-enolase and disease severity. Since α-enolase binds plasminogen and modulates its activation, it is plausible to speculate the association of the increase in α-enolase secretion by infected hepatic cells with the haemostatic dysfunction observed in dengue patients including the

  15. Cytoplasm-Translocated Ku70/80 Complex Sensing of HBV DNA Induces Hepatitis-Associated Chemokine Secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Young; Wu, Yang; Zheng, Xiaohu; Cong, Jingjing; Liu, Yanyan; Li, Jiabin; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang G.; Wei, Haiming M.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a serious disease, mainly due to its severe pathological consequences, which are difficult to cure using current therapies. When the immune system responds to hepatocytes experiencing rapid HBV replication, effector cells (such as HBV-specific CD8+ T cells, NK cells, NKT cells, and other subtypes of immune cells) infiltrate the liver and cause hepatitis. However, the precise recruitment of these cells remains unclear. In the present study, we found that the cytoplasm-translocated Ku70/80 complex in liver-derived cells sensed cytosolic HBV DNA and promoted hepatitis-associated chemokine secretion. Upon sensing HBV DNA, DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit and PARP1 were assembled. Then, IRF1 was activated and translocated into the nucleus, which upregulated CCL3 and CCL5 expression. Because CCR5, a major chemokine receptor for CCL3 and CCL5, is known to be critical in hepatitis B, Ku70/80 sensing of HBV DNA likely plays a critical role in immune cell recruitment in response to HBV infection. PMID:27994596

  16. Secretion of genome-free hepatitis B virus--single strand blocking model for virion morphogenesis of para-retrovirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaojun Ning; David Nguyen; Laura Mentzer; Christina Adams; Hyunwook Lee; Robert Ashley; Susan Hafenstein; Jianming Hu

    2011-01-01

    As a para-retrovirus, hepatitis B virus (HBV) is an enveloped virus with a double-stranded (DS) DNA genome that is replicated by reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate, the pregenomic RNA or pgRNA. HBV assembly begins with the formation of an “immature” nucleocapsid (NC) incorporating pgRNA, which is converted via reverse transcription within the maturing NC to the DS DNA genome. Only the mature, DS DNA-containing NCs are enveloped and secreted as virions whereas immature NCs containing...

  17. Relationships between storage and secretion of hepatic lipids in two breeds of geese with different susceptibility to liver steatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, E; Peresson, R; Guy, G; Hermier, D

    1997-04-01

    Susceptibility to liver steatosis was studied in Landes and Poland geese, which are hyper- and hyporesponsive, respectively, to overfeeding. Plasma lipoproteins were characterized at different stages of the overfeeding process, whereas fatty liver composition was determined after completion of overfeeding and slaughtering. Before overfeeding, plasma lipoprotein profile was typical of birds in both breeds, except that very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) were low in triglyceride (approximately 30%). Moreover, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) concentration was higher in the Poland geese (6.44 vs 4.97 g/L). During overfeeding, hepatic lipogenesis was increased, and fatty liver resulted from accumulation of primarily triglyceride (approximately 95% of lipid content), but also of all other lipids. This accumulation was significantly greater in the Landes geese for all lipids but phospholipid. Thus, the liver weight was 100% higher in this breed (1,005 g vs 485 g), whereas lipid release during sterilization was twofold higher (26.3 vs 7.5%). Parallel, plasma concentration and triglyceride content of hepatic lipoproteins, VLDL and HDL, increased about one- to twofold, this effect being greater in the Poland geese. Therefore, channeling of triglyceride towards secretion rather than in situ storage may be responsible for the hyporesponsiveness of this breed to overfeeding. In both breeds, and especially in the Landes geese, a relative deficiency in phospholipid synthesis together with an enhanced secretion may be limiting factors of hepatocyte hypertrophia and, therefore, of steatosis.

  18. Reduction of VLDL secretion decreases cholesterol excretion in niemann-pick C1-like 1 hepatic transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M Marshall

    Full Text Available An effective way to reduce LDL cholesterol, the primary risk factor of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, is to increase cholesterol excretion from the body. Our group and others have recently found that cholesterol excretion can be facilitated by both hepatobiliary and transintestinal pathways. However, the lipoprotein that moves cholesterol through the plasma to the small intestine for transintestinal cholesterol efflux (TICE is unknown. To test the hypothesis that hepatic very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL support TICE, antisense oligonucleotides (ASO were used to knockdown hepatic expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP, which is necessary for VLDL assembly. While maintained on a high cholesterol diet, Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 hepatic transgenic (L1Tg mice, which predominantly excrete cholesterol via TICE, and wild type (WT littermates were treated with control ASO or MTP ASO. In both WT and L1Tg mice, MTP ASO decreased VLDL triglyceride (TG and cholesterol secretion. Regardless of treatment, L1Tg mice had reduced biliary cholesterol compared to WT mice. However, only L1Tg mice treated with MTP ASO had reduced fecal cholesterol excretion. Based upon these findings, we conclude that VLDL or a byproduct such as LDL can move cholesterol from the liver to the small intestine for TICE.

  19. Reduction of VLDL secretion decreases cholesterol excretion in niemann-pick C1-like 1 hepatic transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Stephanie M; Kelley, Kathryn L; Davis, Matthew A; Wilson, Martha D; McDaniel, Allison L; Lee, Richard G; Crooke, Rosanne M; Graham, Mark J; Rudel, Lawrence L; Brown, J Mark; Temel, Ryan E

    2014-01-01

    An effective way to reduce LDL cholesterol, the primary risk factor of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, is to increase cholesterol excretion from the body. Our group and others have recently found that cholesterol excretion can be facilitated by both hepatobiliary and transintestinal pathways. However, the lipoprotein that moves cholesterol through the plasma to the small intestine for transintestinal cholesterol efflux (TICE) is unknown. To test the hypothesis that hepatic very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) support TICE, antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) were used to knockdown hepatic expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP), which is necessary for VLDL assembly. While maintained on a high cholesterol diet, Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 hepatic transgenic (L1Tg) mice, which predominantly excrete cholesterol via TICE, and wild type (WT) littermates were treated with control ASO or MTP ASO. In both WT and L1Tg mice, MTP ASO decreased VLDL triglyceride (TG) and cholesterol secretion. Regardless of treatment, L1Tg mice had reduced biliary cholesterol compared to WT mice. However, only L1Tg mice treated with MTP ASO had reduced fecal cholesterol excretion. Based upon these findings, we conclude that VLDL or a byproduct such as LDL can move cholesterol from the liver to the small intestine for TICE.

  20. Effects of tegaserod on bile composition and hepatic secretion in Richardson ground squirrels on an enriched cholesterol diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfannkuche Hans-Juergen

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tegaserod is effective in treating IBS patients with constipation, and does not alter gallbladder motility in healthy individuals or in patients with IBS. However, it is not known if tegaserod affects the biliary tract in gallstone disease, so to this end the effects of tegaserod on bile composition and hepatic secretion of Richardson ground squirrels maintained on an enriched cholesterol diet were examined. Results Animals were fed either a control (0.03% or enriched (1% cholesterol diet for 28 days, and treated s.c. with tegaserod (0.1 mg/kg BID or vehicle. Bile flow, bile acid, phospholipids and cholesterol secretion were measured with standard methods. Tegaserod treatment or enriched cholesterol diet, alone or combination, did not alter body or liver weights. The enriched cholesterol diet increased cholesterol saturation index (CSI, cholesterol concentrations in gallbladder and hepatic duct bile by ~50% and decreased bile acids in gallbladder bile by 17%. Tegaserod treatment reversed these cholesterol-induced changes. None of the treatments, drug or diet, altered fasting gallbladder volume, bile flow and bile salts or phospholipid secretion in normal diet and cholesterol-fed animals. However, tegaserod treatment prevented the decreases in bile acid pool size and cycling frequency caused by the enriched cholesterol diet, consequent to re-establishing normal bile acid to concentrations in the gall bladder. Tegaserod had no effect on these parameters with normal diet animals. Conclusion Tegaserod treatment results in increased enterohepatic cycling and lowers cholesterol saturation in the bile of cholesterol-fed animals. These effects would decrease conditions favorable to cholesterol gallstone formation.

  1. Resveratrol prevents inflammation-dependent hepatic melanoma metastasis by inhibiting the secretion and effects of interleukin-18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valcarcel Maria

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Implantation and growth of metastatic cancer cells at distant organs is promoted by inflammation-dependent mechanisms. A hepatic melanoma metastasis model where a majority of metastases are generated via interleukin-18-dependent mechanisms was used to test whether anti-inflammatory properties of resveratrol can interfere with mechanisms of metastasis. Methods Two experimental treatment schedules were used: 1 Mice received one daily oral dose of 1 mg/kg resveratrol after cancer cell injection and the metastasis number and volume were determined on day 12. 2 Mice received one daily oral dose of 1 mg/kg resveratrol along the 5 days prior to the injection of cancer cells and both interleukin-18 (IL-18 concentration in the hepatic blood and microvascular retention of luciferase-transfected B16M cells were determined on the 18th hour. In vitro, primary cultured hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells were treated with B16M-conditioned medium to mimic their in vivo activation by tumor-derived factors and the effect of resveratrol on IL-18 secretion, on vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 expression and on tumor cell adhesion were studied. The effect of resveratrol on melanoma cell activation by IL-18 was also studied. Results Resveratrol remarkably inhibited hepatic retention and metastatic growth of melanoma cells by 50% and 75%, respectively. The mechanism involved IL-18 blockade at three levels: First, resveratrol prevented IL-18 augmentation in the blood of melanoma cell-infiltrated livers. Second, resveratrol inhibited IL-18-dependent expression of VCAM-1 by tumor-activated hepatic sinusoidal endothelium, preventing melanoma cell adhesion to the microvasculature. Third, resveratrol inhibited adhesion- and proliferation-stimulating effects of IL-18 on metastatic melanoma cells through hydrogen peroxide-dependent nuclear factor-kappaB translocation blockade on these cells. Conclusions These results demonstrate multiple sites

  2. Osmotically sensitive renin release from permeabilized juxtaglomerular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B L; Skøtt, O

    1993-01-01

    Renin secretion from juxtaglomerular (JG) cells is sensitive to external osmolality in a way that has been suggested to depend either on cellular volume or on effects on secretory granules. To distinguish between these possibilities, a technique for permeabilization of JG cell membranes was devel...

  3. Lack of effect of vasopressin replacement on renin hypersecretion in Brattleboro rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golin, Raffaello M. A.; Gotoh, Eiji; Keil, Lanny C.; Shackelford, Roy L.; Ganong, William F.

    1989-01-01

    The congenital vasopressin deficiency in homozygous Brattleboro rats with diabetes insipidus is associated with elevated plasma renin activity at rest and supernormal responses to stimuli that increase renin secretion. The mechanism underlying this phenomenon was investigated by infusing homozygous and heterozygous Brattleboro rats with a dose of arginine vasopressin that restored plasma vasopressin to normal in the homozygous animals. The resulting data indicate that increased renin secretion in homozygous rats results from increased sympathetic activity. Because circulating vasopressin does not cross the blood-brain barrier, it seems likely that the increased sympathetic activity is central in origin.

  4. Lack of effect of vasopressin replacement on renin hypersecretion in Brattleboro rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golin, Raffaello M. A.; Gotoh, Eiji; Keil, Lanny C.; Shackelford, Roy L.; Ganong, William F.

    1989-01-01

    The congenital vasopressin deficiency in homozygous Brattleboro rats with diabetes insipidus is associated with elevated plasma renin activity at rest and supernormal responses to stimuli that increase renin secretion. The mechanism underlying this phenomenon was investigated by infusing homozygous and heterozygous Brattleboro rats with a dose of arginine vasopressin that restored plasma vasopressin to normal in the homozygous animals. The resulting data indicate that increased renin secretion in homozygous rats results from increased sympathetic activity. Because circulating vasopressin does not cross the blood-brain barrier, it seems likely that the increased sympathetic activity is central in origin.

  5. Improved immunoradiometric assay for plasma renin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Deinum (Jacob); F.H.M. Derkx (Frans); M.A.D.H. Schalekamp (Maarten)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Our renin IRMA overestimated renin in plasmas with high prorenin-to-renin ratios. We suspected that the overestimation of renin was caused less by cross-reactivity of the renin-specific antibody with prorenin than by a conformational change of pr

  6. Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Up-regulates TNF-α and IL-1β Secretion of Macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To provide the experimental basis for further studying the molecular transformation mechanism of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) X protein (HBx) on hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods: Reconstructed plasmid pcDNA3.1(+)-HBx was transfected into THP-1 macrophages. Expression of HBx was assayed in macrophages lysate by Western-blotting, and TNF-α and IL-1β contents were detected respectively by ELISA. All the data were analyzed by SPSS13.0. Results: In THP-1 macrophages, the pcDNA3.1(+)-HBx plasmid expressed HBx with a molecular weight of about 17 KDa demonstrated by Western-blotting. The secreted TNF-α and IL-1β from macrophages were determined by ELISA, the results from analysis of all groups showed as following: control group was different from LPS group and pcDNA3.1(+) group (P<0.01), and so was pcDNA3.1(+)-HBx group; but there was no obvious difference between pcDNA3.1(+) group and LPS group (P>0.05), all of which indicated that transient overexpression of HBx enhanced LPS-induced production of TNF-α and IL-1β by macrophages.Conclusion: Transient overexpression of HBx up-regulates LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-1β secretion of macrophages.

  7. Effects of endothelin- 1 on hepatic stellate cell proliferation, collagen synthesis and secretion, intracellular free calcium concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan-Yong Guo; Jian-Ye Wu; Yun-Bin Wu; Min-Zhang Zhong; Han-Ming Lu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the effects of endothelin-1(ET-1) on hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) DNA uptake, DNA synthesis, collagen synthesis and secretion, inward whole-cell calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) as well as the blocking effect of verapamil on ET-1-stimulated release of inward calcium (Ca2+) of HSC in vitro.METHODS: Rat hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) were isolated and cultivated. 3H-TdR and 3H-proline incorporation used for testing DNA uptake and synthesis, collagen synthesis and secretion of HSCs cultured in vitro; Fluorescent calciumindicator Fura-2/AM was used to measure [Ca2+]i inward HSCs.RESULTS: ET-1 at the concentration of 5×10-8 mol/L,caused significant increase both in HSC DNA synthesis(2 247±344 cpm, P<0.05) and DNA uptake (P<0.05) whencompared with the control group. ET-1 could also increase collagen synthesis (P<0.05 vs control group) and collagen secretion (P<0.05 vs control group). Besides, inward HSC [Ca2+]i reached a peak concentration (422±98 mol/L, P<0.001)at 2 min and then went down slowly to165±51 mol/L(P<0.01) at 25 min from resting state (39±4 mol/L)aftertreated with ET-1. Verapamil (5 mol/L) blocked ET-1activated [Ca2+]i inward HSCs compared with control group(P<0.05). Fura-2/AM loaded HSC was suspended in no Ca2+ buffer containing 1 mol/L EGTA, 5 min later, 10-8 mol/Lof ET-1 was added, [Ca2+]i inward HSCs rose from restingstate to peak 399±123 mol/L, then began to come downby the time of 20 min. It could also raise [Ca2+]i inwardHSCs even without Ca2+ in extracellular fluid, and had a remarkable dose-effect relationship(P<0.05). Meanwhile, verapamil could restrain the action of ET-1(P<0.05). CONCLUSION: Actions of ET-1 on collagen metabolism of HSCs may depend on the transportation of inward wholecell calcium.

  8. Characterization of renin mRNA expression and enzyme activity in rat and mouse mesangial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade A.Q.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Renin is an enzyme involved in the stepwise generation of angiotensin II. Juxtaglomerular cells are the main source of plasma renin, but renin activity has been detected in other cell types. In the present study we evaluated the presence of renin mRNA in adult male Wistar rat and mouse (C-57 Black/6 mesangial cells (MC and their ability to process, store and release both the active and inactive forms of the enzyme. Active renin and total renin content obtained after trypsin treatment were estimated by angiotensinogen consumption analyzed by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and quantified by angiotensin I generation by HPLC. Renin mRNA, detected by RT-PCR, was present in both rat and mouse MC under basal conditions. Active renin was significantly higher (P<0.05 in the cell lysate (43.5 ± 5.7 ng h-1 10(6 cells than in the culture medium (12.5 ± 2.5 ng h-1 10(6 cells. Inactive prorenin content was similar for the intra- and extracellular compartments (9.7 ± 3.1 and 3.9 ± 0.9 ng h-1 10(6 cells. Free active renin was the predominant form found in both cell compartments. These results indicate that MC in culture are able to synthesize and translate renin mRNA probably as inactive prorenin which is mostly processed to active renin inside the cell. MC secrete both forms of the enzyme but at a lower level compared with intracellular content, suggesting that the main role of renin synthesized by MC may be the intracellular generation of angiotensin II.

  9. HD-03/ES: A Herbal Medicine Inhibits Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Secretion in Transfected Human Hepatocarcinoma PLC/PRF/5 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Sandeep R; Sundaram, R; Gopumadhavan, S; Vidyashankar, Satyakumar; Patki, Pralhad S

    2013-01-01

    HD-03/ES is a herbal formulation used for the treatment of hepatitis B. However, the molecular mechanism involved in the antihepatitis B (HBV) activity of this drug has not been studied using in vitro models. The effect of HD-03/ES on hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) secretion and its gene expression was studied in transfected human hepatocarcinoma PLC/PRF/5 cells. The anti-HBV activity was tested based on the inhibition of HBsAg secretion into the culture media, as detected by HBsAg-specific antibody-mediated enzyme assay (ELISA) at concentrations ranging from 125 to 1000  μ g/mL. The effect of HD-03/ES on HBsAg gene expression was analyzed using semiquantitative multiplex RT-PCR by employing specific primers. The results showed that HD-03/ES suppressed HBsAg production with an IC50 of 380  μ g/mL in PLC/PRF/5 cells for a period of 24 h. HD-03/ES downregulated HBsAg gene expression in PLC/PRF/5 cells. In conclusion, HD-03/ES exhibits strong anti-HBV properties by inhibiting the secretion of hepatitis B surface antigen in PLC/PRF/5 cells, and this action is targeted at the transcription level. Thus, HD-03/ES could be beneficial in the treatment of acute and chronic hepatitis B infections.

  10. Chronic effects of lead on the renin-angiotensin system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vander, A.J.

    1988-06-01

    This paper reviews the chronic effects of lead exposure on the renin-angiotensin system in experimental animals and human beings. In rats, when lead exposure is begun several weeks after birth in doses that cause blood lead concentration (PbB) of 30 to 40 ..mu..g/L, the result is an increase in basal plasma renin activity (PRA) and renal renin concentration, with no change in the metabolic clearance of renin; this is presumptive evidence for increased renin secretion. PRA is also increased in 1-month-old animals whose exposure to lead (in doses that raise PbB to 9 ..mu..g/dL) was begun in utero. In contrast, older animals whose exposure was begun in utero manifest no change or a decrease in their PRA and renal renin concentration. Regardless of when the exposure is begun, lead can decrease the plasma concentration of angiotensin II at any given PRA, but the dose required for this effect is highly variable. The hypertension induced by lead exposure is associated with low PRA and a normal anigotensin II/PRA ratio. Chronic human exposure to lead also is associated with highly variable changes in PRA from study to study; it has been reported to be decreased under both basal and stimulated conditions, unchanged, or increased in a manner exponentially related to PbB. The human data are consistent with the tentative hypothesis that lead-exposed persons may have higher PRA than normal during the early periods of modest exposure but normal or depressed PRA following more chronic severe exposures. In a small preliminary study, blood lead concentration was found to be higher in high-renin hypertensive persons than in normotensive persons.

  11. Trans-11 vaccenic acid reduces hepatic lipogenesis and chylomicron secretion in JCR:LA-cp rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye; Jacome-Sosa, M Miriam; Ruth, Megan R; Goruk, Sue D; Reaney, Martin J; Glimm, David R; Wright, David C; Vine, Donna F; Field, Catherine J; Proctor, Spencer D

    2009-11-01

    Trans-11 vaccenic acid (VA) is the predominant trans isomer in ruminant fat and a major precursor to the endogenous synthesis of cis9,trans11-conjugated linoleic acid in humans and animals. We have previously shown that 3-wk VA supplementation has a triglyceride (TG)-lowering effect in a rat model of dyslipidemia, obesity, and metabolic syndrome (JCR:LA-cp rats). The objective of this study was to assess the chronic effect (16 wk) of VA on lipid homeostasis in both the liver and intestine in obese JCR:LA-cp rats. Plasma TG (P JCR:LA-cp rats. The appreciable hypolipidemic benefits of VA may be attributed to a reduction in both intestinal CM and hepatic de novo lipogenesis pathways.

  12. Elicitation of strong immune responses by a DNA vaccine expressing a secreted form of hepatitis C virus envelope protein E2 in murine and porcine animal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yiping; Kang, H.N.; Babiuk, L.A.

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the immunogenicity of a hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 DNA vaccine alone or with a protein vaccine boost in murine and porcine animal models. METHODS: A DNA vaccine expressing a secreted form of HCV E2 protein was constructed and used to vaccinate mice and piglets with or without...... boosting with a recombinant E2 protein vaccine formulated with CpG ODN and 10% Emulsigen. The immunogenicity of HCV E2 vaccines was analyzed by ELISA for antibody responses, MTT assay for lymphocyte proliferation, ELISPOT for the number of interferon-gamma secreting cells, and cytotoxic T lymphocyte assays...

  13. Decrease in hepatic very-low-density lipoprotein-triglyceride secretion after weight loss is inversely associated with changes in circulating leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magkos, F; Fabbrini, E; McCrea, J; Patterson, B W; Eagon, J C; Klein, S

    2010-07-01

    Although weight loss usually decreases very-low-density lipoprotein-triglyceride (VLDL-TG) secretion rate, the change in VLDL-TG kinetics is not directly related to the change in body weight. Circulating leptin also declines with weight loss and can affect hepatic lipid metabolism. The aim of this study was to determine whether circulating leptin is associated with weight loss-induced changes in VLDL-TG secretion. Ten extremely obese subjects were studied. VLDL-TG secretion rate and the contribution of systemic (derived from lipolysis of subcutaneous adipose tissue TG) and non-systemic fatty acids (derived primarily from lipolysis of intrahepatic and intraperitoneal TG, and de novo lipogenesis) to VLDL-TG production were determined by using stable isotopically labelled tracer methods before and 1 year after gastric bypass surgery. Subjects lost 33 +/- 12% of body weight, and VLDL-TG secretion rate decreased by 46 +/- 23% (p = 0.001), primarily because of a decrease in the secretion of VLDL-TG from non-systemic fatty acids (p = 0.002). Changes in VLDL-TG secretion rates were not significantly related to reductions in body weight, body mass index, plasma palmitate flux, free fatty acid or insulin concentrations. The change in VLDL-TG secretion was inversely correlated with the change in plasma leptin concentration (r = -0.72, p = 0.013), because of a negative association between changes in leptin and VLDL-TG secretion from non-systemic fatty acids (r = -0.95, p Weight loss-induced changes in plasma leptin concentration are inversely associated with changes in VLDL-TG secretion rate. Additional studies are needed to determine whether the correlation between circulating leptin and VLDL-TG secretion represents a cause-and-effect relationship.

  14. Acute inhibition of hepatic beta-oxidation in APOE*3Leiden mice does not affect hepatic VLDL secretion or insulin sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duivenvoorden, [No Value; Teusink, B; Rensen, PCN; Kuipers, F; Romijn, JA; Havekes, LM; Voshol, PJ

    2005-01-01

    Hepatic VLDL and glucose production is enhanced in type 2 diabetes and associated with hepatic steatosis. Whether the derangements in hepatic metabolism are attributable to steatosis or to the increased availability of FA metabolites is not known. We used methyl palmoxirate ( MP), an inhibitor of ca

  15. CD161+CD4+ T cells are enriched in the liver during chronic hepatitis and associated with co-secretion of IL-22 and Interferon-gamma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hoi eKang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease. CD4+ T cells play a key role in disease outcome. However, the critical functions and associated phenotypes of intrahepatic CD4+ T cells are not well defined. We have previously shown that CD8+ T cells expressing the C type lectin CD161 are highly enriched in the human liver, especially during chronic hepatitis. These cells are associated with a type 17 differentiation pattern and express cytokines including IL-17A, IL-22 and IFNγ. We therefore analysed expression of CD161 on CD4+ T cells in blood and liver and addressed the relevant phenotype and functional capacity of these populations. We observed marked enrichment of CD161+CD4+ T cells in the liver during chronic hepatitis such that they are the dominant subtype (mean 55% of CD4+ T cells. IL-22 and IL-17 secreting CD4+ cells were readily found in the livers of HCV+ and NASH donors, although not enriched compared to blood. There was, however, specific enrichment of a novel subset of IL-22/IFN-γ dual secretors (p=0.02 compared to blood, a result reconfirmed with direct ex vivo analyses. These data indicate the dominance of CD161+ expressing lymphocyte populations within the hepatic infiltrate, associated with a distinct cytokine profile. Given their documented roles as antiviral and hepatoprotective cytokines respectively, the impact of co-secretion of IFNγ and IL-22 in the liver may be particularly significant.

  16. Hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930140 Hepatocyte stimulator peptide and itsclinical significance in viral hepatitis.ZHOUWeiping(周卫平),et al.Instit Viral Hepatitis,Chongqing Med Univ,630010.Chin J InternMed 1992;31(10):626-628.Hepatocyte stimulator peptide(HSP)is anewly developed hepatic stimulator substance.Its monoclonal antibodies have been obtained inour laboratory.In this study,HSP was deter-mined in the sera of 315 subjects including pa-

  17. Hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    2010349 Relationships between serum hepatitis B virus load in mothers,free maternal DNA in peripheral blood of newborns and hepatitis B virus infection of newborns. WEI Junni(魏俊妮),et al. Dept Epidemiol,Shanxi Med Univ,Taiyuan 030001. Chin J Infect Dis 2010;28(5):297-300. Objective To study the relationships between serum hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA level

  18. Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inflammation of the liver.” This inflammation can be caused by a wide variety of toxins, drugs, and metabolic diseases, as well as infection. There are at least 5 hepatitis viruses. Hepatitis A is contracted when a child eats food or drinks water that is contaminated with the virus or has ...

  19. Hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970349 Primary structure and variability of partialsequences in nonstructural gene 5 region of hepatitis Gvirus, CHANG Jinhong(常锦红), et al. Hepatol Instis,People’s Hosp, Beijing Med Univ, Beijing, 100044. NatlMed J China 1997; 77(3): 178-182. Objective: To sequence partial genome of hepatitis G

  20. Hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    2009209 Effects of chronic hepatitis B virus infection on human hepatic cytochrome P450 2C9.ZHO Fuping(周福平),et al.Dept Infect Dis,Shanghai Changzheng Hosp,Shanghai 200003.Chin J Infect Dis,2009;27(2):94-98.

  1. Hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920691 The determination of serum hepa-titis B virus DNA by polymerase chain rea-ction in hepatitis B patients treated withalpha-interferon. XU. Jianye(徐建业), et al.Centr Lab, Chongqing Cancer Instit, 630030.Chin J Intern Med, 1992; 31(5): 278-280. To clarify the status of HBV in serum of

  2. Enhanced hepatic apoA-I secretion and peripheral efflux of cholesterol and phospholipid in CD36 null mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin Yue

    Full Text Available CD36 facilitates oxidized low density lipoprotein uptake and is implicated in development of atherosclerotic lesions. CD36 also binds unmodified high and very low density lipoproteins (HDL, VLDL but its role in the metabolism of these particles is unclear. Several polymorphisms in the CD36 gene were recently shown to associate with serum HDL cholesterol. To gain insight into potential mechanisms for these associations we examined HDL metabolism in CD36 null (CD36(-/- mice. Feeding CD36(-/- mice a high cholesterol diet significantly increased serum HDL, cholesterol and phospholipids, as compared to wild type mice. HDL apolipoproteins apoA-I and apoA-IV were increased and shifted to higher density HDL fractions suggesting altered particle maturation. Clearance of dual-labeled HDL was unchanged in CD36(-/- mice and cholesterol uptake from HDL or LDL by isolated CD36(-/- hepatocytes was unaltered. However, CD36(-/- hepatocytes had higher cholesterol and phospholipid efflux rates. In addition, expression and secretion of apoA-I and apoA-IV were increased reflecting enhanced PXR. Similar to hepatocytes, cholesterol and phospholipid efflux were enhanced in CD36(-/- macrophages without changes in protein levels of ABCA1, ABCG1 or SR-B1. However, biotinylation assays showed increased surface ABCA1 localization in CD36(-/- cells. In conclusion, CD36 influences reverse cholesterol transport and hepatic ApoA-I production. Both pathways are enhanced in CD36 deficiency, increasing HDL concentrations, which suggests the potential benefit of CD36 inhibition.

  3. The supercritical CO₂ extract from the skin of Bufo bufo gargarizans Cantor blocks hepatitis B virus antigen secretion in HepG2.2.15 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaoyan; Inagaki, Yoshinori; Wang, Dongliang; Gao, Jianjun; Qi, Fanghua; Gao, Bo; Kokudo, Norihiro; Fang, Dingzhi; Tang, Wei

    2014-02-01

    The skin of Bufo bufo gargarizans Cantor has long been used for the treatment of hepatitis B in China and supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (SC-CO₂) is widely used in extracting active ingredients from natural products. The aim of present study was to assess the anti-hepatitis B virus (HBV) effect of the supercritical CO₂ extract from the skin of Bufo bufo gargarizans Cantor (SCE-BC). Cytotoxicity of SCE-BC was analyzed using an MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay in HepG2.2.15 cells. The hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), and hepatitis B core-related antigen (HBcrAg) concentrations in cell culture medium were determined by chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay. HBV mRNA in cells was determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction. SCE-BC concentrations below 10(-2) μg/mL had no significant toxicity to HepG2.2.15 cells. SCE-BC at 10(-4) μg/mL effectively inhibited the secretion of HBeAg by 23.36% on day 6. It was more potent than the positive control lamivudine (100 μg/mL) in terms of the inhibition of HBeAg and HBcrAg secretion on day 6. Consistent with the HBV antigen reduction, HBV mRNA expression was markedly inhibited in comparison to the control when HepG2.2.15 cells were treated with SCE-BC. Moreover, SCE-BC had greater inhibitory activity with respect to HBeAg than to HBsAg. Since HBeAg promotes immune tolerance and persistent infection during HBV infection, the present results suggest that immune tolerance induced by HBeAg might be overcome by SCE-BC. Therefore, SCE-BC warrants further investigation.

  4. Decreased hepatic RBP4 secretion is correlated with reduced hepatic glucose production but is not associated with insulin resistance in patients with liver cirrhosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bahr, Matthias J.; Boeker, Klaus H. W.; Manns, Michael P.; Tietge, Uwe J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with liver cirrhosis have a high incidence of insulin resistance and diabetes. This study was designed to determine circulating levels and hepatic production of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) in relation to parameters of hepatic and systemic metabolism in patients with liver cirrhosis. Ci

  5. Elicitation of strong immune responses by a DNA vaccine expressing a secreted form of hepatitis C virus envelope protein E2 in murine and porcine animal models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Ping Li; Hye Na Kang; Lorne A Babiuk; Qiang Liu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the immunogenicity of a hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 DNA vaccine alone or with a protein vaccine boost in murine and porcine animal models.METHODS: A DNA vaccine expressing a secreted form of HCV E2 protein was constructed and used to vaccinate mice and piglets with or without boosting with a recombinant E2 protein vaccine formulated with CpG ODN and 10% Emulsigen. The immunogenicity of HCV E2 vaccines was analyzed by ELISA for antibody responses, MTT assay for lymphocyte proliferation,ELISPOT for the number of interferon-γ secreting cells,and cytotoxic T lymphocyte assays.RESULTS: Intradermal injection of E2 DNA vaccine induced strong Th1-like immune responses in mice. In piglets, E2 DNA vaccine elicited moderate and more balanced immune responses. A DNA vaccine prime and protein boost vaccination strategy induced significantly higher E2-specific antibody levels and shifted the immune response towards Th2-like ones in piglets.CONCLUSION: A DNA vaccine expressing a secreted form of HCV E2 protein elicited E2-specific immune responses in mice and piglets. Recombinant E2 protein vaccination following DNA immunization significantly increased the antibody response in piglets. These HCV E2 vaccines may represent promising hepatitis C vaccine candidates for further investigations.

  6. Hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005226 Characteristics of peripheral blood T lymphocyte subsets in hepatitis B patients. FAN Zhen-ping(范振平),et al. Center Bio Ther, Instit Infect Dis, 302 Hosp Chin PLA, Beijing 100039. World Chin J Digestol, 2005;13(2): 194-197. Objective: To characterize the T-lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood of patients with acute and chronic hepatitis B, and to explore their relations with the disease state. Methods: Peripheral blood

  7. New monoclonal antibodies directed against human renin. Powerful tools for the investigation of the renin system.

    OpenAIRE

    Galen, F X; Devaux, C.; Atlas, S; Guyenne, T; Menard, J; Corvol, P; Simon, D.; Cazaubon, C; Richer, P; Badouaille, G

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed against human renin were obtained by the fusing of myeloma cells with spleen cells from Balb/c or high-responder Biozzi mice injected with pure tumoral or highly purified renal renin. These procedures resulted in the production of seven stable monoclonal antibodies to human renin. Antibodies in the hybridoma culture medium were screened by binding to pure iodinated renin or insolubilized renin in a solid phase assay. The concentration of purified antibodies that...

  8. Hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008312 Impact of hepatitis B virus infection on the activity of hematopoietic stem cell.SHI Yanmei(石雁梅),et al.Dept Infect Dis,1st Clin Coll,Harbin Med Univ,Harbin 150001.Chin J Infect Dis 2008;26(4):197-201.Objective To study the impact of hepatitis B virus (HBV)infection on the activity of cord hematopoieticstem cells.Methods CD34+cells were isolated from healthy human cord blood by mini MACS.Cells were

  9. Hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008449 A cross-sectional survey of occult hepatitis B virus infection in HIV-infected patients. MA Jianxin(马建新), et al.Dept Infect Dis, Shanghai Public Health Clin Center, Shanghai 201508. Chin J Intern Med 2008;47(7):574-577. Objective To assess the prevalence of occult HBV infection in HIV-infected patients.

  10. Hepatitis E virus ORF1 encoded macro domain protein interacts with light chain subunit of human ferritin and inhibits its secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Nishant Kumar; Lole, Kavita S

    2016-06-01

    Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) is the major causative agent of acute hepatitis in developing countries. Its genome has three open reading frames (ORFs)-called as ORF1, ORF2, and ORF3. ORF1 encodes nonstructural polyprotein having multiple domains, namely: Methyltransferase, Y domain, Protease, Macro domain, Helicase, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. In the present study, we show that HEV-macro domain specifically interacts with light chain subunit of human ferritin (FTL). In cultured hepatoma cells, HEV-macro domain reduces secretion of ferritin without causing any change in the expression levels of FTL. This inhibitory effect was further enhanced upon Brefeldin-A treatment. The levels of transferrin Receptor 1 or ferroportin, two important proteins in iron metabolism, remained unchanged in HEV-macro domain expressing cells. Similarly, there were no alterations in the levels of cellular labile iron pool and reactive oxygen species, indicating that HEV-macro domain does not influence cellular iron homeostasis/metabolism. As ferritin is an acute-phase protein, secreted in higher level in infected persons and HEV-macro domain has the property of reducing synthesis of inflammatory cytokines, we propose that by directly binding to FTL, macro domain prevents ferritin from entering into circulation and helps in further attenuation of the host immune response.

  11. Angiotensin II reactivation and aldosterone escape phenomena in renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade: is oral renin inhibition the solution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athyros, Vasilios G; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Kakafika, Anna I; Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Karagiannis, Asterios

    2007-04-01

    This editorial considers the use of the first selective oral renin inhibitor, aliskiren, in reducing angiotensin (Ang) II reactivation or aldosterone (ALDO) escape during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibition. RAAS blockade with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and/or angiotensin receptor AT(1) blockers (ARBs) is very useful for the treatment of arterial hypertension, chronic heart failure (CHF), atherosclerosis and diabetes. 'Ang II reactivation' and 'ALDO escape' or 'breakthrough' have been observed during either ACEI or ARB treatment, and may attenuate the clinical benefit of RAAS blockade. Renin and Ang I accumulate during ACE inhibition, and might overcome the ability of an ACEI to effectively suppress ACE activity. There is also data suggesting that 30 - 40% of Ang II formation in the healthy human during RAAS activation is formed via renin-dependent, but ACE-independent, pathways. Moreover, ACE gene polymorphisms contribute to the modulation and adequacy of the neurohormonal response to long-term ACE inhibition, at least in patients with CHF (up to 45% of CHF patients have elevated Ang II levels despite the long-term use of an ACEI) or diabetes. The reactivated Ang II promotes ALDO secretion and sodium reabsorption. ALDO breakthrough also occurs during long-term ARB therapy, mainly by an AT(2)-dependent mechanism. This was related to target-organ damage in animal models. Oral renin inhibition with aliskiren has showed excellent efficacy and safety in the treatment of hypertension. Aliskiren can be co-administered with ACEIs, ARBs or hydrochlorothiazide. Furthermore, there is evidence suggesting that aliskiren reduces Ang II reactivation in ACE inhibition and ALDO escape during treatment with an ACEI or an ARB, at least to the degree that this is associated with the RAAS. For RAAS-independent ALDO production, the combination of aliskiren with eplerenone might prove useful.

  12. Ribavirin and IFN-α combination therapy induces CD4+ T-cell proliferation and Th1 cytokine secretion in patients with chronic hepatitis B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the anti-viral mechanism of combination therapy of interferon (IFN)-α and ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis B.METHODS: Twenty patients were assigned to receive either IFN-α plus ribavirin (group A,n = 14) or no treatment as a control (group B,n = 6). Patients were analyzed for T-cell proliferative responses specific for hepatitis B virus (HBV)-antigen and cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs).RESULTS: Combination therapy induced HBV-antigen specific CD4+ T-cell proliferative responses in four patients (28.6%). Production of high levels of HBV-specific IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-12 by PBMCs was found in five patients (35.7%),who showed significantly lower HBV DNA levels in serum at 12 mo after treatment ended (P = 0.038) and at 24 mo of follow-up (P = 0.004) than those without high levels of cytokine production.CONCLUSION: HBV-antigen specific CD4+ T cells may directly control HBV replication and secretion of anti-viral T helper 1 (Th1) cytokines by PBMCs during combination therapy of chronic hepatitis B with ribavirin and IFN-α.

  13. TWEAK/Fn14 promotes pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in hepatic stellate cells via NF-κB/STAT3 pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aixiu; Zhang, Feng; Xu, Hui; Xu, Mingcui; Cao, Yu; Wang, Chen; Xu, Yuanyuan; Su, Min; Zhang, Ming; Zhuge, Yuzheng

    2017-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) and its receptor fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14) have been associated with liver disease. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a critical role in the hepatic wound-healing response after liver injury, but there is little information available on the role of the TWEAK/Fn14 pathway in human HSCs. In this study, we explored the role of TWEAK/Fn14 in activated human HSCs. The LX-2 cells were treated with TWEAK, and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines was assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Western blotting and RT-PCR were performed to evaluate the expression of Fn14 after TWEAK stimulation. Total and phosphorylated of inhibitor-κB (I-κB), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) were examined by western blotting after TWEAK stimulation and small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection. The result showed that TWEAK upregulated the expression of Fn14 and pro-inflammatory factors interleukin-8 (IL-8), interleukin-6 (IL-6), regulated upon activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1). In LX-2 cells, the pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion was closely related to the activation of the NF-κB and STAT3 pathways. Furthermore, our research showed that STAT3 and NF-κB could interact with each other, which resulted in a significant increase of pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. The activation of NF-κB and STAT3 signalling-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine expression may be responsible for such a novel principle and new therapeutic targets in chronic liver disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008079 Relationship of HBV genotype and bcp and pc mutations with HBV DNA rebound after lamivudine therapy. SU Minghua(苏明华), et al. Dept Infect Dis Clin Hosp, Guangxi Med Univ, Nanning 530027. World Chin J Digestol 2007;15(33):3507-3513. Objective To investigate the relationship of HBV gene mutations with HBV DNA rebound after lamivudine therapy. Methods Twenty-seven hepatitis B patients with HBV DNA rebound after

  15. Renin, (pro)renin and receptor: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Genevieve

    2011-03-01

    PRR [(pro)renin receptor] was named after its biological characteristics, namely the binding of renin and of its inactive precursor prorenin, that triggers intracellular signalling involving ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) 1/2. However the gene encoding for PRR is named ATP6ap2 (ATPase 6 accessory protein 2) because PRR was initially found as a truncated form co-purifying with V-ATPase (vacuolar H+-ATPase). There are now data showing that this interaction is not only physical, but also functional in the kidney and the heart. However, the newest and most fascinating development of PRR is its involvement in both the canonical Wnt/β-catenin and non-canonical Wnt/PCP (planar cell polarity) pathways, which are essential for adult and embryonic stem cell biology, embryonic development and disease, including cancer. In the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, it has been shown that PRR acts as an adaptor between the Wnt receptor LRP5/6 (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5/6) and Fz (frizzled) and that the proton gradient generated by the V-ATPase in endosomes is necessary for LRP5/6 phosphorylation and β-catenin activation. In the Wnt/PCP pathway, PRR binds to Fz and controls its asymetrical subcellular distribution and therefore the polarization of the cells in a plane of a tissue. These essential cellular functions of PRR are independent of renin and open new avenues on the pathophysiological role of PRR. The present review will summarize our knowledge of (pro)renin-dependent functions of PRR and will discuss the newly recognized functions of PRR related to the V-ATPase and to Wnt signalling.

  16. Effect of Blockade of Nitric Oxide Synthesis on the Renin Secretory Response to Frusemide in Conscious Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Ian A.; Chou, Lance

    1995-01-01

    The enzyme nitric oxide synthase is present in the macula densa and may participate in the control of renin secretion by the adjacent juxtagiomerular cells. In the present study, we investigated the effect of inhibiting nitric oxide synthase on the renin secretory response to frusemide, which stimulates renin secretion by blocking Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) co-transport in the macula densa. Injection of frusemide in 12 conscious rabbits elicited a transient increase in mean arterial pressure from 84 +/- 2 to 92 +/-3 mm Hg at 5 min (P less than 0.01) and a sustained increase in heart rate from 246 +/- 6 to 281 +/- 10 beats/min at 45 min (P less than 0.01). Plasma renin activity increased from 8.0 +/- 1.2 to 14.3 +/- 1.8, 12.4 +/- 1.6 and 11.6 +/- 1.5 pmol/2h ml at 15, 30 and 45min respectively (P less than 0.01). There were no changes in plasma sodium and potassium concentrations or osmoiality. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase with N(sup G)-nitro-L- arginine methyl ester increased mean arterial pressure by 9 mm Hg, decreased heart rate and plasma renin activity, and markedly suppressed the renin response to frusemide (from 4.6 +/- 0.7 to 7.6 +/- 1.7, 4.7 +/- 1.0 and 4.6 +/- 0.7pmol/2h ml at 15, 30 and 45 min respectively). By contrast, infusion of an equipressor dose of phenylephrine did not suppress the renin response to frusemide. Histochemical studies with the NADPH diaphorase technique confirmed the presence of nitric oxide synthase in the macula densa, and suggested that enzyme activity is increased by treatment with frusemide. These results are consistent with a role for the L- arginine-nitric oxide pathway in the modulation of renin secretion by the macula densa.

  17. Active immunization against renin in normotensive marmoset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, J.B.; Guettier, C.; Philippe, M.; Galen, F.X.; Corvol, P.; Menard, J.

    1987-06-01

    Primate renins (human and monkey) are very similar. We used pure human renin to immunize marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) and thereby produce a chronic blockade of the renin-angiotensinogen reaction. After a control period of 2 months, five male marmosets, on their usual sodium-poor diet, were immunized against pure human renin by three subcutneous injections of 30 ..mu..g each, with complete and then incomplete Freund's adjuvant. Three marmosets were injected with adjuvant only and served as controls. Blood sampling and blood pressure measurements were performed weekly. After the third injection, the five marmosets immunized against renin developed a high titer of renin antibodies (50% binding of /sup 125/I-labeled human renin at a dilution of greater than or equal to 1:10,000). The antibodies inhibited the enzymatic activity of both marmoset and human renins. At the same time, systolic blood pressure decreased significantly. Plasma renin enzyme activity was undetectable in the animals. Plasma aldosterone decreased significantly. After 1-4 months with low blood pressure, a normal urinary output, and a normal plasma creatinine, the five marmosets became sick and died within one month. At autopsy an immunological renal disease, characterize by the presence of immunoglobulin and macrophage infiltration colocalized with renin, was found. No immunoglobulin was detectable in extrarenal vessels or in other organs. These experiments demonstrate that, in this primate, a chronic blockade of the renin-angiotensin system can be achieved by active immunization against homologous renin, but this blockade is associated with the development of an autoimmune disease localized in the kidney.

  18. (pro)renin receptor: A stable molecule

    OpenAIRE

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2011-01-01

    Background: Basically, (pro)renin acts via a specific receptor, (pro)renin receptor (PRR) binding between renin and prorenin, its inactive proenzyme form. The study on the molecular level of PRR can give useful knowledge to help understand many renal disorders. Method: Here, the author focuses on the stability of the PRR molecule. The mutation prone positions within the PRR molecule was assessed using standard reference technique. Result: The study showed there is no identified mutation prone...

  19. Increased renal renin content in mice lacking the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanner, Fiona; Chambrey, Régine; Bourgeois, Soline; Meer, Elliott; Mucsi, István; Rosivall, László; Shull, Gary E; Lorenz, John N; Eladari, Dominique; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2008-04-01

    Macula densa (MD) cells express the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE) isoform NHE2 at the apical membrane, which may play an important role in tubular salt sensing through the regulation of cell volume and intracellular pH. These studies aimed to determine whether NHE2 participates in the MD control of renin synthesis. Renal renin content and activity and elements of the MD signaling pathway were analyzed using wild-type (NHE2(+/+)) and NHE2 knockout (NHE2(-/-)) mice. Immunofluorescence studies indicated that NHE2(-/-) mice lack NHE3 at the MD apical membrane, so the other apical NHE isoform has not compensated for the lack of NHE2. Importantly, the number of renin-expressing cells in the afferent arteriole in NHE2(-/-) mice was increased approximately 2.5-fold using renin immunohistochemistry. Western blotting confirmed approximately 20% higher renal cortical renin content in NHE2(-/-) mice compared with wild type. No-salt diet for 1 wk significantly increased renin content and activity in NHE2(+/+) mice, but the response was blunted in NHE2(-/-) mice. Renal tissue renin activity and plasma renin concentration were elevated three- and twofold, respectively, in NHE2(-/-) mice compared with wild type. NHE2(-/-) mice also exhibited a significantly increased renal cortical cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase (mPGES) expression, indicating MD-specific mechanisms responsible for the increased renin content. Significant and chronic activation of ERK1/2 was observed in MD cells of NHE2(-/-) kidneys. Removal of salt or addition of NHE inhibitors to cultured mouse MD-derived (MMDD1) cells caused a time-dependent activation of ERK1/2. In conclusion, the NHE2 isoform appears to be important in the MD feedback control of renin secretion, and the signaling pathway likely involves MD cell shrinkage and activation of ERK1/2, COX-2, and mPGES, all well-established elements of the MD-PGE(2)-renin release pathway.

  20. Renin and angiotensin levels in children.

    OpenAIRE

    Broughton Pipkin, F; Smales, O R; O'Callaghan, M.

    1981-01-01

    Plasma renin activity, plasma renin concentration, and angiotensin II levels were measured in 63 normal children aged between 2 months and 12 years. The results showed that the high levels of renin and angiotensin II present in infancy remained above adult levels throughout the first decade of life but that there was a decline with age. Boys less than 8 years old had lower plasma renin activity and angiotensin II levels than girls of a similar age; this may be due to a relative substrate defi...

  1. Hepatitis B virus genotype C isolates with wild-type core promoter sequence replicate less efficiently than genotype B isolates but possess higher virion secretion capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yanli; Tang, Xiaoli; Garcia, Tamako; Hussain, Munira; Zhang, Jiming; Lok, Anna; Wands, Jack; Li, Jisu; Tong, Shuping

    2011-10-01

    Infection by hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype C is associated with a prolonged viremic phase, delayed hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) seroconversion, and an increased incidence of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma compared with genotype B infection. Genotype C is also associated with the more frequent emergence of core promoter mutations, which increase genome replication and are independently associated with poor clinical outcomes. We amplified full-length HBV genomes from serum samples from Chinese and U. S. patients with chronic HBV infection and transfected circularized genome pools or dimeric constructs of individual clones into Huh7 cells. The two genotypes could be differentiated by Western blot analysis due to the reactivities of M and L proteins toward a monoclonal pre-S2 antibody and slightly different S-protein mobilities. Great variability in replication capacity was observed for both genotypes. The A1762T/G1764A core promoter mutations were prevalent in genotype C isolates and correlated with increased replication capacity, while the A1752G/T mutation frequently found in genotype B isolates correlated with a low replication capacity. Importantly, most genotype C isolates with wild-type core promoter sequence replicated less efficiently than the corresponding genotype B isolates due to less efficient transcription of the 3.5-kb RNA. However, genotype C isolates often displayed more efficient virion secretion. We propose that the low intracellular levels of viral DNA and core protein of wild-type genotype C delay immune clearance and trigger the subsequent emergence of A1762T/G1764A core promoter mutations to upregulate replication; efficient virion secretion compensates for the low replication capacity to ensure the establishment of persistent infection by genotype C.

  2. Hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY) controls hepatic VLDL-triglyceride secretion in rats via the sympathetic nervous system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinstroop, E.; Pei, L.; Ackermans, M.T.; Foppen, E.; Borgers, A.J.F.; Kwakkel, J.; Alkemade, A.; Fliers, E.; Kalsbeek, A.

    2012-01-01

    Excessive secretion of triglyceride-rich very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL-TG) contributes to diabetic dyslipidemia. Earlier studies have indicated a possible role for the hypothalamus and autonomic nervous system in the regulation of VLDL-TG. In the current study, we investigated whether the auto

  3. Ethanolic Extract of Butea monosperma Leaves Elevate Blood Insulin Level in Type 2 Diabetic Rats, Stimulate Insulin Secretion in Isolated Rat Islets, and Enhance Hepatic Glycogen Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Bin Samad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We measured a vast range of parameters, in an attempt to further elucidate previously claimed antihyperglycemic activity of Butea monosperma. Our study clearly negates the possibility of antidiabetic activity by inhibited gastrointestinal enzyme action or by reduced glucose absorption. Reduction of fasting and postprandial glucose level was reconfirmed (P<0.05. Improved serum lipid profile via reduced low density lipoprotein (LDL, cholesterol, triglycerides (TG, and increased high density lipoprotein (HDL was also reestablished (P<0.05. Significant insulin secretagogue activity of B. monosperma was found in serum insulin assay of B. monosperma treated type 2 diabetic rats (P<0.01. This was further ascertained by our study on insulin secretion on isolated rat islets (P<0.05. Improved sensitivity of glucose was shown by the significant increase in hepatic glycogen deposition (P<0.05. Hence, we concluded that antihyperglycemic activity of B. monosperma was mediated by enhanced insulin secretion and enhanced glycogen formation in the liver.

  4. The Renin-Angiotensin System Modulates Inflammatory Processes in Atherosclerosis: Evidence from Basic Research and Clinical Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Montecucco

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence shows that the renin-angiotensin system is a crucial player in atherosclerotic processes. The regulation of arterial blood pressure was considered from its first description of the main mechanism involved. Vasoconstriction (mediated by angiotensin II and salt and water retention (mainly due to aldosterone were classically considered as pivotal proatherosclerotic activities. However, basic research and animal studies strongly support angiotensin II as a proinflammatory mediator, which directly induces atherosclerotic plaque development and heart remodeling. Furthermore, angiotensin II induces proatherosclerotic cytokine and chemokine secretion and increases endothelial dysfunction. Accordingly, the pharmacological inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system improves prognosis of patients with cardiovascular disease even in settings of normal baseline blood pressure. In the present review, we focused on angiotensin-convertingenzyme (ACE inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs, and renin inhibitors to update the direct activities of the renin-angiotensin system in inflammatory processes governing atherosclerosis.

  5. Possible Involvement of the Local Renin-Angiotensin System in Exocrine Pancreas Responses to Food Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant G

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The functioning of the exocrine and endocrine pancreas is strictly co-ordinated through an interdependent array of neural and endocrine, paracrine and autocrine hormonal factors. The responses of the exocrine pancreas to food are primarily initiated via hormones secreted by neuroendocrine cells in the gut. No role for the pancreatic renin-angiotensin system in these mechanisms has so far been established. However, because of its distribution throughout the pancreas, the renin-angiotensin system could have a function in fine-tuning of secretory responses or in integrating some of the actions of the endocrine and exocrine pancreas. In the normal diet, we are exposed to an array of bioactive (lectins, protease inhibitors, hormone-mimics, tannins, etc. Some can profoundly alter pancreas metabolism both in a beneficial or detrimental manner. Others could have beneficial effects on the pancreas renin-angiotensin system. The effects of these compounds need to be evaluated.

  6. Plasma renin is increased in young rats exposed to lead in utero and during nursing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victery, W.; Vander, A.J.; Schoeps, P.; Germain, C.

    1983-01-01

    Rats were exposed continuously to Pb in utero and after birth by giving their mothers, during pregnancy and lactation, drinking water containing 0, 5, 25, 100, or 500 ppm Pb (as Pb acetate); they were sacrificed at 1 month of age, at which time their mean blood Pb concentrations were, respectively, approximately 3, 9, 19, 30, and 70 ..mu..g/dl. All Pb-exposed groups sacrificed by decapitation had elevated mean plasma renin activities (PRA), relative to controls. Pentobarbital-anesthesia and laparotomy markedly increased PRA in the 0, 100, and 500 ppm groups, but the increase was significantly less in the 100 ppm group. Renal renin concentration was normal in the 5 and 25 ppm groups, but was significantly increased in the 100 and 500 ppm groups. The ratio of plasma angiotensin II to PRA was normal in the 100 ppm group but significantly reduced in the 500 ppm group. We conclude that exposure of rats to those generally present in human populations stimulates basal renin secretion in 1-month-old rats, but partially inhibits the response to renin-releasing stimuli. The highest dose reduces plasma angiotensin II at any given PRA. These results, taken with previous publications, emphasize that the effects of lead on plasma renin even within a single species are greatly affected by the timing of the exposure.

  7. Intrarenal activation of renin angiotensin system in the development of cyclosporine A induced chronic nephrotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG Ming-hua; YUAN Wei-jie; ZHANG Shujian; FAN Yu; ZHANG Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Background The relationship between cyclosporine-induced chronic nephrotoxicity (CAN) and renin-angiotenein Ⅱ in humans is still contradictory. This study was conducted to detect the levels of renin and angiotensin Ⅱ (ANGII) both in renal tissue and plasma from kidney transplantation patients suffering from CAN.Methods Twenty-six patients with allograft biopsy-proven CsA-related chronic nephrotoxicity (CAN group) and chronic rejection (control group) were enrolled in this study. Renal tissues were subjected to immunohistochemical staining with renin and ANGII antibodies. Renin and ANGII plasma levels were measured when the biopsy was performed. The relationship between expression of renin or ANGII and clinicopathological manifestations were also investigated. The cyclosporine plasma level was obtained 2 hours after morning dose (C2). In vitro, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and rat mesangial cells (MC) were incubated with different concentrations of CsA (0, 250, 500, 1000 μg/L) for 24 hours. Secretion and expression of renin and ANGII was measured by radioimmunoassay or immunohistochemical staining.Results Renal pathological scores for renin and ANGII expression were significantly higher in specimens of CAN than in controls (P<0.05). The plasma levels of renin, ANGII and C2 in the CAN group were higher than the control group, but no significant difference was found ((0.37±0.12) ng.ml-1·h-1 vs (0.20±0.10) ng.ml-1·h-1, P=0.076; (122.69±26.73) pg/ml vs(121.88±36.35) pg/ml, P=0.977; (719.04±55.89) ng/ml vs (658.80±90.78) ng/ml, P=0.196, respectively). In vitro, renin as well as ANGII expression increased significantly in both HUVEC and MC after the cells were incubated with CsA for 24 hours (P <0.05). CsA also stimulated the secretion of ANGII in HUVEC and MC in a dose-dependent manner.Conclusions Renal allograft biopsy is important to differentiate chronic CsA-related nephropathy from chronic rejection. The intrarenal renin angiotensin

  8. (Pro)renin and its receptors: Pathophysiological implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.W. Batenburg (Wendy); A.H.J. Danser (Jan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractTissue angiotensin generation depends on the uptake of circulating (kidney-derived) renin and/or its precursor prorenin [together denoted as (pro)renin]. Since tissue renin levels are usually somewhat higher than expected based upon the amount of (renin-containing) blood in tissue, an

  9. Prolactin is a major inhibitor of hepatic Leptin A synthesis and secretion: studies utilizing a homologous Leptin A ELISA in the tilapia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douros, Jonathan D; Baltzegar, David A; Breves, Jason P; Lerner, Darren T; Seale, Andre P; Gordon Grau, E; Borski, Russell J

    2014-10-01

    The present study identifies regulatory interactions between leptin A (LepA) and the pituitary hormone prolactin (PRL). In order to measure tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) LepA, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) utilizing a rabbit polyclonal antibody specific to tilapia LepA was first developed. The antibody shows strong cross reactivity to recombinant tilapia LepA (rtLepA), and a corresponding 16kDa protein in both tilapia and striped bass plasma, but not to recombinant human leptin (rhLep). The assay has a linear detection range of 0.25-1000nM, with intra- and interassay variability of 9% and 16%, respectively. Plasma LepA levels measured in tilapia ranged from 0.8 to 3.9nM, similar to that found for other vertebrates. Hypophysectomy (Hx) increased circulating LepA and lepa mRNA levels in the liver, the dominant source of hormone production. Adminstration of ovine PRL (oPRL, 5μg/g BW) to Hx fish restored circulating LepA and hepatic lepa mRNA levels to those of control fish. Additionally, oPRL reduced lepa mRNA levels in a dose-dependent fashion in cultured hepatocytes following an 18h incubation. Previous work in our lab indicates that rhLep stimulates PRL release in vitro from tilapia pituitaries. Here, both rtLepA and rhLep (0.5μg/g BW) increased mRNA expression of tilapia prolactin mRNAs (prl1, prl2) in the pituitary in vivo. These results demonstrate that LepA enhances pituitary prolactin synthesis and release, while PRL in turn inhibits hepatic leptin secretion and synthesis in teleosts. We postulate this regulatory interaction may be necessary for mobilizing energy reserves during acute hyperosmotic adaptation.

  10. Impact of 9 days of bed rest on hepatic and peripheral insulin action, insulin secretion, and whole-body lipolysis in healthy young male offspring of patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alibegovic, Amra C; Højbjerre, Lise; Sonne, Mette P;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of 9 days of bed rest on insulin secretion, insulin action, and whole-body glucose and fat metabolism in first-degree relative (FDR) and matched control (CON) subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 13 FDR and 20 CON subjects...... deteriorates with 9 days of bed rest, converging toward similar degrees of whole-body insulin resistance. FDR subjects exhibit hepatic insulin resistance (HIR), which, in contrast to CON subjects, deteriorates in response to physical inactivity. FDR subjects exhibit reduced insulin secretion when seen...

  11. Plasma renin and prorenin and renin gene variation in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and nephropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Deinum (Jacob); L. Tarnow; J.M. van Gool (Jeanette); R.J.A. de Bruin (René); F.H.M. Derkx (Frans); M.A.D.H. Schalekamp (Maarten); H.H. Parving

    1999-01-01

    textabstractBackground. The most striking abnormality in the renin-angiotensin system in diabetic nephropathy (DN) is increased plasma prorenin. Renin is thought to be low or normal in DN. In spite of altered (pro)renin regulation the renin gene has not been studied for contribution to the

  12. Renin secretion and total body sodium: Pathways of integrative control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bie, Peter; Damkjaer, Mads

    2009-01-01

    Abstract 1. We review mechanisms of sodium balance operating at constant mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), i.e., conditions where MABP does not provide the primary signal to the kidney. 2. Relative constancy of body fluids requires accurate regulation of total body sodium (TBS). Normally, plenty......), but not necessarily in MABP. Signals different from MABP, therefore, seem to be the primary link between TBS and kidney function. 3. Renal functions involved in sodium homeostasis include (i) the rate of glomerular filtration (GFR) determined by renal hemodynamics including tubulo-glomerular feedback (TGF), (ii...

  13. Licensing virus-specific T cells to secrete the neutrophil attracting chemokine CXCL-8 during hepatitis B virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J Gehring

    Full Text Available T cell functional plasticity helps tailor antiviral immunity during different phases of infections. We tested whether, during different phases of HBV infection, virus-specific T cells can acquire specific proinflammatory functions that could drive granulocyte/mononuclear cell liver infiltration. Multifunctional analysis of HBV-specific T cells during acute and chronic HBV infection revealed that HBV-specific T cells had the capacity to produce the neutrophil chemokine CXCL-8 but not IL-17. CXCL-8 producing T cells were detectable in the liver of chronic HBV patients with active hepatitis; while in acute HBV patients CXCL-8 production by T cells was temporally limited to the acute phase of disease, concomitant with the peak of liver inflammation. Characterization of the conditions necessary for the development of CXCL-8 producing T cells showed a requirement for IL-7 and IL-15 during T cell expansion. These data show that functional plasticity of virus-specific T cells spontaneously occurs during HBV infection and that an environment rich IL-7 and IL-15 can license T cells with the ability to produce CXCL-8 and potentially influence liver pathology.

  14. Renin dynamics in adipose tissue: adipose tissue control of local renin concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Jason D; Krueth, Stacy B; Bernlohr, David A; Katz, Stephen A

    2009-02-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been implicated in a variety of adipose tissue functions, including tissue growth, differentiation, metabolism, and inflammation. Although expression of all components necessary for a locally derived adipose tissue RAS has been demonstrated within adipose tissue, independence of local adipose RAS component concentrations from corresponding plasma RAS fluctuations has not been addressed. To analyze this, we varied in vivo rat plasma concentrations of two RAS components, renin and angiotensinogen (AGT), to determine the influence of their plasma concentrations on adipose and cardiac tissue levels in both perfused (plasma removed) and nonperfused samples. Variation of plasma RAS components was accomplished by four treatment groups: normal, DOCA salt, bilateral nephrectomy, and losartan. Adipose and cardiac tissue AGT concentrations correlated positively with plasma values. Perfusion of adipose tissue decreased AGT concentrations by 11.1%, indicating that adipose tissue AGT was in equilibrium with plasma. Cardiac tissue renin levels positively correlated with plasma renin concentration for all treatments. In contrast, adipose tissue renin levels did not correlate with plasma renin, with the exception of extremely high plasma renin concentrations achieved in the losartan-treated group. These results suggest that adipose tissue may control its own local renin concentration independently of plasma renin as a potential mechanism for maintaining a functional local adipose RAS.

  15. Effects of renin inhibition in systemic hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, P W; Do, Y S; Schambelan, M; Horton, R; Boger, R S; Luther, R R; Hsueh, W A

    1990-12-01

    The effect of the direct renin inhibitor enalkiren (Abbott Laboratories) was examined in 8 healthy patients with essential hypertension. With an unrestricted sodium diet, plasma renin concentration was inhibited within 10 minutes by intravenous enalkiren and remained essentially undetectable for greater than or equal to 6 hours (11.9 +/- 4 to 1.0 +/- 0.6 ng angiotensin I/ml/hour, p less than 0.05). Mean arterial blood pressure declined gradually (108 +/- 5 to 84 +/- 4 mm Hg, p = 0.02), as did plasma aldosterone concentration (14.4 +/- 3.8 to 4.4 +/- 0.8 ng/dl, p = 0.03), whereas plasma immunoreactive active renin concentration increased progressively (35 +/- 14 to 160 +/- 60 pg/ml, p greater than 0.05). Urinary excretion of the stable metabolite of prostacyclin (6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha) decreased slightly, but not significantly (42 +/- 10 to 33 +/- 11 ng/g creatinine, p = 0.13). The addition of a diuretic decreased baseline blood pressure and increased baseline plasma renin and aldosterone values. Blood pressure responses to enalkiren were slightly (though not significantly) greater than those observed before diuretic administration. We conclude that enalkiren is effective in decreasing blood pressure and in inhibiting the renin system, without significantly altering urinary prostacyclin excretion, in patients with essential hypertension. These results suggest that the renin system contributes to the maintenance of elevated blood pressure in some patients with essential hypertension.

  16. [Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in diabetes insipidus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillov, G; Ankov, V

    1980-01-01

    Plasma renin activity (PR) and plasma aldosterone level (PA) were investigated in 38 patients with central diabetes incipidus under conditions of standard sodium intake and after a three-day reduction of sodium in the diet with an additional furosemide load. Blood was recovered for examination in the morning under complete rest and after a two-hour slow walk. Apparently healthy volunteers (20) served as control. The PR and PA content was determined by the radioimmunological method. Not only the basic, but also the stimulated renin secretion was increased in patients with diabetes incipidus. The basic PA level was significantly diminished; after stimulation its level did not differ from that in healthy persons. At rest and with decreased sodium intake the patients displayed two types of PR activity: in some (n=18) there was no elevation, and in other (n=19) the rise was marked. It is supposed that in diabetes incipidus hyperreninemia was compensatory, directed to water retention in the organism; apparently it participated in the mechanism of hypovolemic thirst. An unusual combination of increased PR with diminished PA level is described for the first time.

  17. Renin-angiotensin system in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Regina Maria Pereira; Robson Augusto Souza dos Santos; Filipi Leles da Costa Dias; Mauro Martins Teixeira; Ana Cristina Sim(o)es e Silva

    2009-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is considered a common response to many chronic hepatic injuries. It is a multifunctional process that involves several cell types, cytokines, chemokines and growth factors leading to a disruption of homeostatic mechanisms that maintain the liver ecosystem. In spite of many studies regarding the development of fibrosis, the understanding of the pathogenesis remains obscure. The hepatic tissue remodeling process is highly complex, resulting from the balance between collagen degradation and synthesis. Among the many mediators that take part in this process, the components of the Renin angiotensin system (RAS) have progressively assumed an important role. Angiotensin (Ang) Ⅱ acts as a profibrotic mediator and Ang-(1-7), the newly recognized RAS component, appears to exert a counter-regulatory role in liver tissue. We briefly review the liver fibrosis process and current aspects of the RAS. This review also aims to discuss some experimental evidence regarding the participation of RAS mediators in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis,focusing on the putative role of the ACE2-Ang-(1-7)-Mas receptor axis.

  18. Quantitative changes in rat renin secretory granules after acute and chronic stimulation of the renin system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Ruth; Jensen, B L; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    1998-01-01

    ) twofold, but did not significantly change the number of renin granules per arteriole or the renin-containing volume of the arteriole. Chronic stimulation was achieved by a combination of low-salt diet and inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) for 14 days, and resulted in a 36-fold increase...

  19. The water channel aquaporin-1 contributes to renin cell recruitment during chronic stimulation of renin production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tinning, Anne Robdrup; Jensen, Boye L; Schweda, Frank

    2014-01-01

    to (+/+) mice. Tissue renin concentration was higher in AQP1(-/-) mice and renin mRNA level was not different between genotypes. Mean arterial blood pressure was not different at baseline and during low salt diet but decreased significantly in both genotypes after addition of ACEI; the response was faster...

  20. PGE2 upregulates renin through E-prostanoid receptor 1 via PKC/cAMP/CREB pathway in M-1 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Alexis A; Salinas-Parra, Nicolas; Leach, Dan; Navar, L Gabriel; Prieto, Minolfa C

    2017-07-12

    During the early phase of angiotensin (ANG) II-dependent hypertension tubular prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is increased. Renin synthesis and secretion in the collecting duct (CD) is upregulated by ANGII contributing to further intratubular ANGII formation. However, what happens first and whether the triggering mechanism is independent of tubular ANGII, remain unknown. PGE2 stimulates renin synthesis in juxtaglomerular (JG) cells via E-prostanoid (EP) receptors through cAMP/CREB pathway. EP receptors are also expressed in the CD. Here, we tested the hypothesis that renin is upregulated by PGE2 in CD cells. M-1 CD cell line expressed EP1, EP3 and EP4 but not EP2. Dose response experiments in the presence of AT1 receptor blockade with candesartan demonstrated that 10-6 M PGE2 maximally increases renin mRNA (~4 fold) and prorenin/renin protein levels (~2 fold). This response was prevented by micromolar doses of SC-19220 (EP1 antagonist), attenuated by the EP4 antagonist, L-161,982, and exacerbated by the highly selective EP3 antagonist, L-798106 (~10 fold increase). To further evaluate the signaling pathway involved we used the PKC inhibitor calphostin C and transfections with PKCα dominant negative (DN). Both strategies blunted the PGE2-induced increases in cAMP levels, CREB phosphorylation and augmentation of renin. Knockdown of EP1 receptor and CREB also prevented renin upregulation. These results indicate that PGE2 increases CD renin expression through EP1 receptor via PKC/cAMP/CREB pathway. Therefore, we conclude that during early stages of ANGII-dependent hypertension, there is augmentation of PGE2 that stimulates renin in the CD, resulting in increased tubular ANGII formation and further stimulation of renin. Copyright © 2017, American Journal of Physiology-Renal Physiology.

  1. Transgenic mice overexpressing renin exhibit glucose intolerance and diet-genotype interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Fletcher

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous animal and clinical investigations have pointed to a potential role of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS in the development of insulin resistance and diabetes in conditions of expanded fat mass. However, the mechanisms underlying this association remain unclear. We used a transgenic mouse model overexpressing renin in the liver (RenTgMK to examine the effects of chronic activation of RAS on adiposity and insulin sensitivity. Hepatic overexpression of renin resulted in constitutively elevated plasma angiotensin II (4-6-fold increase vs. wild type. Surprisingly, RenTgMK mice developed glucose intolerance despite low levels of adiposity and insulinemia. The transgenics also had lower plasma triglyceride levels. Glucose intolerance in transgenic mice fed a low-fat diet was comparable to that observed in high fat-fed wild type mice. Glucose intolerance was exacerbated by high-fat feeding, only in female transgenic mice. These studies demonstrate that overexpression of renin and associated hyperangiotensinemia impair glucose tolerance in a diet-dependent manner and further support a consistent role of RAS in the pathogenesis of diabetes and insulin resistance, independent of changes in fat mass.

  2. Recent advances in tissue (pro)renin imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokai, Agnes; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    2010-06-01

    Due to its pivotal role in blood pressure control and renal pathologies there is renewed interest in renin and its precursor prorenin. Also, the newly discovered (pro)renin receptor is a new element of the ever broadening renin-angiotensin system (RAS). The complexity of RAS including the recently recognized collecting duct site of (pro)renin (a term denoting both renin and prorenin) synthesis requires the use of advanced research techniques such as multiphoton fluorescence microscopy. With the help of this technology we have pioneered an imaging approach to directly visualize (pro)renin content, release and tissue activity in the living kidney. The use of this technology is reviewed here and exemplified by the direct visualization of (pro)renin activity in the collecting duct. New pharmacological tools, the renin inhibitor aliskiren and the handle region peptide (decoy peptide) was used to further characterize the intra-renal, collecting duct RAS.

  3. Direct renin inhibition in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Frederik; Rossing, Peter; Parving, Hans-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    that renin inhibition could hold potential for improved treatment in patients with chronic kidney disease, with diabetic nephropathy as an obvious group of patients to investigate, as the activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is enhanced in these patients and as there is an unmet need...... early as a beneficial effect was unlikely and there was an increased frequency of side effects. Also in non-diabetic kidney disease a few intervention studies have been carried out, but there is no ongoing hard outcome study. In this review we provide the current evidence for renin inhibition in chronic...... kidney disease by reporting of the studies published so far as well as perspective on the future possibilites....

  4. Natriuretic peptides buffer renin-dependent hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demerath, Theo; Staffel, Janina; Schreiber, Andrea; Valletta, Daniela; Schweda, Frank

    2014-06-15

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and cardiac natriuretic peptides [atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP)] are opposing control mechanisms for arterial blood pressure. Accordingly, an inverse relationship between plasma renin concentration (PRC) and ANP exists in most circumstances. However, PRC and ANP levels are both elevated in renovascular hypertension. Because ANP can directly suppress renin release, we used ANP knockout (ANP(-/-)) mice to investigate whether high ANP levels attenuate the increase in PRC in response to renal hypoperfusion, thus buffering renovascular hypertension. ANP(-/-) mice were hypertensive and had reduced PRC compared with that in wild-type ANP(+/+) mice under control conditions. Unilateral renal artery stenosis (2-kidney, 1-clip) for 1 wk induced similar increases in blood pressure and PRC in both genotypes. Unexpectedly, plasma BNP concentrations in ANP(-/-) mice significantly increased in response to two-kidney, one-clip treatment, potentially compensating for the lack of ANP. In fact, in mice lacking guanylyl cyclase A (GC-A(-/-) mice), which is the common receptor for both ANP and BNP, renovascular hypertension was markedly augmented compared with that in wild-type GC-A(+/+) mice. However, the higher blood pressure in GC-A(-/-) mice was not caused by disinhibition of the renin system because PRC and renal renin synthesis were significantly lower in GC-A(-/-) mice than in GC-A(+/+) mice. Thus, natriuretic peptides buffer renal vascular hypertension via renin-independent effects, such as vasorelaxation. The latter possibility is supported by experiments in isolated perfused mouse kidneys, in which physiological concentrations of ANP and BNP elicited renal vasodilatation and attenuated renal vasoconstriction in response to angiotensin II.

  5. On the origin of urinary renin: A translational approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C.W. Roksnoer (Lodi); Heijnen, B.F.J. (Bart F.J.); Nakano, D. (Daisuke); Peti-Peterdi, J. (Janos); S.B. Walsh (Stephen); I.M. Garrelds (Ingrid); J.M. van Gool (Jeanette); R. Zietse (Bob); H.A.J. Struijker Boudier (Harry A.); E.J. Hoorn (Ewout); A.H.J. Danser (Jan)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractUrinary angiotensinogen excretion parallels albumin excretion, which is not the case for renin, while renin's precursor, prorenin, is undetectable in urine. We hypothesized that renin and prorenin, given their smaller size, are filtered through the glomerulus in larger amounts than album

  6. Blockade of chloride channels by DIDS stimulates renin release and inhibits contraction of afferent arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B L; Skøtt, O

    1996-01-01

    arterioles with the chloride channel blocker 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS). Renin secretion was equally enhanced by omission of extracellular calcium and by addition of 0.5 mM DIDS. The inhibitory effect of calcium was blocked by DIDS. The stimulatory effects of low calcium [with....... Norepinephrine (5 x 10(-7)-1 x 10(-6) M) and angiotensin II (1 x 10(-8)-10(-6) M) evoked reversible and dose-dependent contractions of microperfused rabbit afferent arterioles. DIDS (0.5 mM) did not affect the basal diameter of the arterioles but strongly inhibited the response to angiotensin II and attenuated...... the duration of the contractile response to norepinephrine. The results support the hypothesis that DIDS-sensitive calcium-activated chloride channels are involved in regulation of renin release and in the afferent arteriolar contraction after angiotensin II but do not play a pivotal role in the response...

  7. Plasma soluble (pro)renin receptor is independent of plasma renin, prorenin, and aldosterone concentrations but is affected by ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Geneviève; Blanchard, Anne; Curis, Emmanuel; Bergerot, Damien; Chambon, Yann; Hirose, Takuo; Caumont-Prim, Aurore; Tabard, Sylvie Brailly; Baron, Stéphanie; Frank, Michael; Totsune, Kazuhito; Azizi, Michel

    2014-02-01

    A soluble (pro)renin receptor (sPRR) circulates in plasma and is able to bind renin and prorenin. It is not known whether plasma sPRR concentrations vary with the activity of the renin-angiotensin system. We measured plasma sPRR, renin, prorenin, and aldosterone concentrations in 121 white and 9 black healthy subjects, 40 patients with diabetes mellitus, 41 hypertensive patients with or without renin-angiotensin system blockers, 9 patients with primary aldosteronism, and 10 patients with Gitelman syndrome. Median physiological plasma sPRR concentration was 23.5 ng/mL (interquartile range, 20.9-26.5) under usual uncontrolled sodium diet. sPRR concentration in healthy subjects, unlike renin and prorenin, did not display circadian variation or dependence on age, sex, posture, or hormonal status. sPRR concentrations were ≈25% lower in black than in white subjects, whereas renin concentrations were ≈40% lower. Patients with diabetes mellitus (average renin-high prorenin levels) and with hypertension only (average renin-average prorenin levels) had sPRR concentrations similar to healthy subjects. Renin-angiotensin system blockade was associated with increase of sPRR concentration by ≈12%. sPRR in patients with primary aldosteronism (low renin-low prorenin) and Gitelman syndrome (high renin-high prorenin) were similar and ≈10% higher than in healthy subjects. There was no correlation between sPRR and renin or prorenin. In conclusion, our results show that plasma sPRR concentrations are dependent on ethnicity and independent of renin, prorenin, and aldosterone concentrations in healthy subjects and in patients with contrasted degrees of renin-angiotensin system activity.

  8. The Renal Renin-Angiotensin System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison-Bernard, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a critical regulator of sodium balance, extracellular fluid volume, vascular resistance, and, ultimately, arterial blood pressure. In the kidney, angiotensin II exerts its effects to conserve salt and water through a combination of the hemodynamic control of renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate and…

  9. The ratios of aldosterone / plasma renin activity (ARR) versus aldosterone / direct renin concentration (ADRR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinicki, Piotr; Jeske, Wojciech; Bednarek-Papierska, Lucyna; Kruszyńska, Aleksandra; Gietka-Czernel, Małgorzata; Rosłonowska, Elżbieta; Słowińska-Srzednicka, Jadwiga; Kasperlik-Załuska, Anna; Zgliczyński, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Primary aldosteronism (PA) is estimated to occur in 5-12% of patients with hypertension. Assessment of aldosterone / plasma renin activity (PRA) ratio (ARR) has been used as a screening test in patients suspected of PA. Direct determination of renin (DRC) and calculation of aldosterone / direct renin concentration ratio (ADRR) could be similarly useful for screening patients suspected of PA. The study included 62 patients with indication for evaluation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and 35 healthy volunteers. In all participants we measured concentrations of serum aldosterone, plasma direct renin, and PRA after a night's rest and again after walking for two hours. The concentrations of aldosterone, direct renin, and PRA were measured by isotopic methods (radioimmunoassay (RIA) / immunoradiometric assay (IRMA)). Correlations of ARR with ADRR in the supine position were r = 0.9162, r(2) = 0.8165 (p 80% and 100%, respectively) appeared for the ratios ≥ 30. We suggest that for practical and economic reasons ARR can be replaced by ADRR.

  10. Imaging renin content and release in the living kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Ildikó; Kang, Jung Julie; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2006-01-01

    Renin release is the first, and at least initially, the rate-limiting step in the activation of the renin-angiotensin system, which helps to maintain body salt and water balance. Recent advances in our understanding of pathophysiology have generated a renewed interest in the multiple roles of renin and prorenin as a hormone, enzyme, and signaling molecule. The assays available to measure renin content, release and tissue activity are complex, indirect and work with significant internal errors. We developed an imaging approach to directly visualize renin content and study the dynamics of both the release and tissue activity of renin. Our experimental model uses multiphoton fluorescence microscopy, which is ideal for deep optical sectioning of the living renal tissue. Here we review the application of this renin imaging approach to the dissected, in vitro microperfused glomerulus as well as in the intact kidney in vivo.

  11. Factors affecting the aldosterone/renin ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowasser, M; Ahmed, A H; Pimenta, E; Taylor, P J; Gordon, R D

    2012-03-01

    Although the aldosterone/renin ratio (ARR) is the most reliable screening test for primary aldo-steronism, false positives and negatives occur. Dietary salt restriction, concomitant malignant or renovascular hypertension, pregnancy and treatment with diuretics (including spironolactone), dihydropyridine calcium blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, and angiotensin receptor antagonists can produce false negatives by stimulating renin. We recently reported selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors lower the ratio. Because potassium regulates aldosterone, uncorrected hypokalemia can lead to false negatives. Beta-blockers, alpha-methyldopa, clonidine, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs suppress renin, raising the ARR with potential for false positives. False positives may occur in patients with renal dysfunction or advancing age. We recently showed that (1) females have higher ratios than males, and (2) false positive ratios can occur during the luteal menstrual phase and while taking an oral ethynylestradiol/drospirenone (but not implanted subdermal etonogestrel) contraceptive, but only if calculated using direct renin concentration and not plasma renin activity. Where feasible, diuretics should be ceased at least 6 weeks and other interfering medications at least 2 before ARR measurement, substituting noninterfering agents (e. g., verapamil slow-release±hydralazine and prazosin or doxazosin) were required. Hypokalemia should be corrected and a liberal salt diet encouraged. Collecting blood midmorning from seated patients following 2-4 h upright posture improves sensitivity. The ARR is a screening test only and should be repeated once or more before deciding whether to proceed to confirmatory suppression testing. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry aldosterone assays represent a major advance towards addressing inaccuracies inherent in other available methods.

  12. The lipolysis/esterification cycle of hepatic triacylglycerol. Its role in the secretion of very-low-density lipoprotein and its response to hormones and sulphonylureas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, D; Gibbons, G F

    1992-01-01

    In hepatocyte cultures maintained in the absence of extracellular fatty acids, at least 70% of the secreted very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) triacylglycerol was derived via lipolysis of intracellular triacylglycerol. This proportion was unchanged when the cells were exposed for 24 h to insulin or glucagon, hormones which decreased the overall secretion of intracellular triacylglycerol, or to chloroquine or tolbutamide, agents which inhibit lysosomal lipolysis. The rate of intracellular lipolysis was 2-3-fold greater than that required to maintain the observed rate of triacylglycerol secretion. Most of the fatty acids released were returned to the intracellular pool. Neither insulin nor glucagon had any significant effect on the overall lipolysis and re-esterification of intracellular triacylglycerol. In these cases a greater proportion of the released fatty acids re-entered the cellular pool, rather than being recruited for VLDL assembly. Tolbutamide inhibited intracellular lipolysis, but suppressed VLDL secretion to a greater extent. 3,5-Dimethylpyrazole did not affect lipolysis or VLDL secretion. The increased secretion of VLDL triacylglycerol observed after exposure of cells to insulin for 3 days was not accompanied by an increased rate of intracellular lipolysis. However, a larger proportion of the triacylglycerol secreted under these conditions may not have undergone prior lipolysis. PMID:1599431

  13. Renin inhibitor in hypertension treatment: from pharmacological point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Hudyono

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of drugs that inhibit the renin-angiotensin system is one of the effective way to intervene in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and renal disorders, especially in hypertension treatment. The idea of blocking the renin system at its origin by renin inhibitor has existed for more than 30 years. Renin inhibitor supresses the covension of angiotensinogen into angiotensin, and further deacreases the generation of the active peptide angiotensin II. The first generation (enalkiren and second generation (remikiren of orally active renin inhibitors were never used clinically because of low bioavailability and weak blood pressure-lowering activity. At present, aliskiren is the first non-peptide orally active renin inhibitor of the third generation to progress to phase III clinical trials and was approved by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA in March 2007. Aliskiren becomes the first renin inhibitor with indications for the treatment of hypertension in Indonesia, a compounds with improved oral bioavailability, specificity and efficacy. This review summarises the development of oral renin inhibitors, pharmacological aspects, with a focus on aliskiren. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:232-7Keywords: aliskiren, hypertension, renin inhibitor, renin-angiotensin

  14. (Pro)renin and (pro)renin receptor expression during kidney development in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Tomomasa; Urushihara, Maki; Saijo, Takahiko; Nakagawa, Ryuji; Kagami, Shoji

    2017-02-01

    Although a recent study demonstrated that the (pro)renin receptor ((P)RR) was highly expressed in the developing kidney during the mouse embryonic development, the mechanism by which (P)RR supports renal development in humans is not fully understood. In this study, we examined the plasma levels of (pro)renin and soluble (P)RR (s(P)RR) in cord blood and neonates as well as (P)RR expression in human kidney tissues. Samples were collected from 57 preterm and 67 full-term human neonates. (Pro)renin and s(P)RR levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Additionally, we performed an immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of kidney tissues from neonates and minor glomerular abnormalities in order to assess (P)RR expression in the kidney. Plasma (pro)renin and s(P)RR levels in cord blood were significantly higher in preterm neonates than in full-term neonates. Four weeks after birth, these differences were no longer evident for either plasma (pro)renin or s(P)RR levels between the two groups. Importantly, plasma (pro)renin and s(P)RR levels in cord blood were inversely correlated with gestational age. Furthermore, IHC indicated that renal expression levels of (P)RR in neonates were stronger than those in minor glomerular abnormalities. (P)RR may play a pivotal role in prenatal renal development in humans. What is Known: • Renal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has several pathophysiologic functions not only in blood pressure regulation but also in pediatric renal disease. • Renal RAS activation plays a key role of renal development during gestation. What is New : • Plasma (pro)renin and soluble (pro)renin receptor (s(P)RR) levels in cord blood were significantly higher in preterm neonates than in full-term neonates. • Immunohistochemical analysis of kidney tissue indicated that renal expression levels of (P)RR in neonates were stronger than in minor glomerular abnormalities.

  15. Blockade of the renin-angiotensin system

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, BMY.

    2002-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system plays a key role in the regulation of fluid and electrolyte balance. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme and have been shown to be effective in many cardiovascular diseases. They should be considered for the treatment of hypertension in patients with heart failure, previous myocardial infarction, diabetes, or proteinuria. There are a number of side-effects associated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibito...

  16. Increase of plasma renin activity in male and female rabbits subjected to dysbaric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chryssanthou, C.; Kircikoglu, H.; Strugar, J.

    1985-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system may be implicated in hemodynamic alterations occurring in dysbaric disorders. This report concerns changes in plasma renin activity (PRA) induced by exposure of rabbits to a compression-decompression schedule that does not normally produce clinical manifestations of decompression sickness. The results revealed a significant increase in PRA in 19 of 23 animals following dysbaric exposure. Mean PRA rose from 1.18 ng ang I/ml hr (preexposure) to 2.40 ng ang I/ml hr (postexposure). The increase was particularly pronounced in female animals (217 percent). Asymptomatic intravascular gas bubbles (silent bubbles) were detected by gross or microscopic examination in the majority of the animals. Renin elaboration and secretion in asymptomatic dysbaric exposures may be mediated by bradykinin and/or prostaglandins released or activated in a chain reaction triggered by silent gas bubbles. This hypothesis is also applicable to increased PRA in altitude decompression. Alternatively elevation of PRA may result from decreased renal perfusion when dysbaric disorders are complicated by significant hypovolemia.

  17. Autophagy and the (Pro)renin Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binger, Katrina J; Muller, Dominik N

    2013-10-21

    The (pro)renin receptor (PRR) is a newly reported member of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS); a hormonal cascade responsible for regulating blood pressure. Originally, identification of PRR was heralded as the next drug target of the RAS, of which such therapies would have increased benefits against target-organ damage and hypertension. However, in the years since its discovery, several conditional knockout mouse models of PRR have demonstrated an essential role for this receptor unrelated to the RAS and blood pressure. Specific deletion of PRR in podocytes or cardiomyocytes resulted in the rapid onset of organ failure and subsequently animal mortality after only a matter of weeks. In both cell types, loss of PRR resulted in the intracellular accumulation of autophagosomes and misfolded proteins, indicating a disturbance in autophagy. In light of the fact that the majority of PRR is located intracellularly, this molecular function appears to be more relevant than its ability to bind to high, non-physiological concentrations of (pro)renin. This review will focus on the role of PRR in autophagy and its importance in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Understanding the link between PRR, autophagy and how its loss results in cell death will be essential for deciphering its role in physiology and pathology.

  18. Plasma Renin Activity in Diabetes Mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyo, Heui Jung; Park Jung Sik; Kim, Sung Kwon; Choi, Kang Won; Lee, Jung Sang; Lee, Mun Ho [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-03-15

    To evaluate the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in diabetes mellitus, basal plasma renin activity (PRA) and its response to intravenous furosemide were determined in 40 diabetic subjects. The diabetics were divided into 4 groups according to the presence of nephropathy and/or hypertension. Uncomplicated diabetics (Group I) were taken as control group and the results of the other groups were compared to this group. In diabetics with nephropathy alone (Group II), and with nephropathy and hypertension (Group III), basal PRA values were 0.63+-0.59 ng/ml/hr., and 0.79+-0.62 ng/ml/hr., respectively, both significantly lower than control group. (1.53+-1.09 ng/ml/hr.). (p<0.05) In both of the above groups, the responses to intravenous furosemide tended to be blunted. On the other hand, in diabetics, with hypertension only (Group IV), the basal and stimulated PRA were not significantly different from control. Above results suggests that nephropathy may be one of the factors which suppress renin activity in diabetes mellitus

  19. Renin release from permeabilized juxtaglomerular cells is stimulated by chloride but not by low calcium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B L; Skøtt, O

    1994-01-01

    The intracellular concentrations of calcium and chloride have been suggested to be involved in the control of renin secretion from juxtaglomerular (JG) cells. We have tested these propositions on permeabilized JG cells. Rat glomeruli with attached JG cells were isolated by the magnetic iron...... of chloride channels followed by a drop in the intracellular chloride concentration. The stimulation caused by the high calcium concentration may be a toxic effect or may be due to stimulation of the fusion between granules and cell membrane in a way analogous to other secretory cells....

  20. Real-time imaging of renin release in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Fintha, Attila; Fuson, Amanda L; Tousson, Albert; Chow, Robert H

    2004-08-01

    Renin release from juxtaglomerular granular cells is considered the rate-limiting step in activation of the renin-angiotensin system that helps to maintain body salt and water balance. Available assays to measure renin release are complex, indirect, and work with significant internal errors. To directly visualize and study the dynamics of both the release and tissue activity of renin, we isolated and perfused afferent arterioles with attached glomeruli dissected from rabbit kidneys and used multiphoton fluorescence imaging. Acidotropic fluorophores, such as quinacrine and LysoTrackers, clearly and selectively labeled renin granules. Immunohistochemistry of mouse kidney with a specific renin antibody and quinacrine staining colocalized renin granules and quinacrine fluorescence. A low-salt diet for 1 wk caused an approximately fivefold increase in the number of both individual granules and renin-positive granular cells. Time-lapse imaging showed no signs of granule trafficking or any movement, only the dimming and disappearance of fluorescence from individual renin granules within 1 s in response to 100 microM isoproterenol. There appeared to be a quantal release of the granular contents; i.e., an all-or-none phenomenon. Using As4.1 cells, a granular cell line, we observed further classic signs of granule exocytosis, the emptying of granule content associated with a flash of quinacrine fluorescence. Using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based, 5-(2-aminoethylamino)naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (EDANS)-conjugated renin substrate in the bath, an increase in EDANS fluorescence (renin activity) was observed around granular cells in response to isoproterenol. Fluorescence microscopy is an excellent tool for the further study of the mechanism, regulation, and dynamics of renin release.

  1. On the Origin of Urinary Renin: A Translational Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roksnoer, Lodi C W; Heijnen, Bart F J; Nakano, Daisuke; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Walsh, Stephen B; Garrelds, Ingrid M; van Gool, Jeanette M G; Zietse, Robert; Struijker-Boudier, Harry A J; Hoorn, Ewout J; Danser, A H Jan

    2016-05-01

    Urinary angiotensinogen excretion parallels albumin excretion, which is not the case for renin, while renin's precursor, prorenin, is undetectable in urine. We hypothesized that renin and prorenin, given their smaller size, are filtered through the glomerulus in larger amounts than albumin and angiotensinogen, and that differences in excretion rate are because of a difference in reabsorption in the proximal tubule. To address this, we determined the glomerular sieving coefficient of renin and prorenin and measured urinary renin/prorenin 1) after inducing prorenin in Cyp1a1-Ren2 rats and 2) in patients with Dent disease or Lowe syndrome, disorders characterized by defective proximal tubular reabsorption. Glomerular sieving coefficients followed molecular size (renin>prorenin>albumin). The induction of prorenin in rats resulted in a >300-fold increase in plasma prorenin and doubling of blood pressure but did not lead to the appearance of prorenin in urine. It did cause parallel rises in urinary renin and albumin, which losartan but not hydralazine prevented. Defective proximal tubular reabsorption increased urinary renin and albumin 20- to 40-fold, and allowed prorenin detection in urine, at ≈50% of its levels in plasma. Taken together, these data indicate that circulating renin and prorenin are filtered into urine in larger amounts than albumin. All 3 proteins are subsequently reabsorbed in the proximal tubule. For prorenin, such reabsorption is ≈100%. Minimal variation in tubular reabsorption (in the order of a few %) is sufficient to explain why urinary renin and albumin excretion do not correlate. Urinary renin does not reflect prorenin that is converted to renin in tubular fluid.

  2. Macula Densa Sensing and Signaling Mechanisms of Renin Release

    OpenAIRE

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Raymond C Harris

    2010-01-01

    Macula densa cells in the distal nephron, according to the classic paradigm, are salt sensors that generate paracrine chemical signals in the juxtaglomerular apparatus to control vital kidney functions, including renal blood flow, glomerular filtration, and renin release. Renin is the rate-limiting step in the activation of the renin-angiotensin system, a key modulator of body fluid homeostasis. Here, we discuss recent advances in understanding macula densa sensing and suggest these cells, in...

  3. Renin and angiotensinogen gene expression in maturing rat kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, R.A.; Lynch, K.R.; Chevalier, R.L.; Wilfong, N.; Everett, A.; Carey, R.M.; Peach, M.J. (Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville (USA))

    1988-04-01

    To determine whether angiotensinogen (A{sub o}) and renin are synthesized by the immature kidney and to assess the changes in intrarenal reinin distribution that occur with maturation, the kidneys from 24 newborn and 12 adult Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were processed for renin immunocytochemistry using a highly specific anti-rat renin antibody. Kidney renin and A{sub o} relative mRNA levels (mRNA/total RNA) were detected by Northern and dot blot techniques, using full-length rat renin and A{sub o} cDNAs. Renal renin concentration (RRC) was measured by radioimmunoassay of angiotensin I (ANG I) and expressed as ng ANG I{center dot}h{sup {minus}1}{center dot}mg protein{sup {minus}1} in the incubation media. RRC was higher in newborn than in adult SHR (979 {+-} 164 vs. 206 {+-} 47) and WKY. In the newborn kidneys of both rat strains, renin was distributed throughout the entire length of the afferent arterioles and interlobular arteries, whereas in the adult kidneys renin was confined to the classical juxtaglomerular position. With maturation, there was a decrease in the proportion of immunoreactive juxtaglomerular apparatuses and arterial segments that contained renin. Kidney renin mRNA levels were 7.9-fold higher in the newborn than in the adult animals. A{sub o} mRNA was detected in the newborn and adult kidneys of both rat strains. This study demonstrates conclusively that both renin and A{sub o} genes are expressed in the newborn kidney, providing evidence for a local renin-angiotensin system that is subjected to developmental changes.

  4. Macula densa sensing and signaling mechanisms of renin release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Harris, Raymond C

    2010-07-01

    Macula densa cells in the distal nephron, according to the classic paradigm, are salt sensors that generate paracrine chemical signals in the juxtaglomerular apparatus to control vital kidney functions, including renal blood flow, glomerular filtration, and renin release. Renin is the rate-limiting step in the activation of the renin-angiotensin system, a key modulator of body fluid homeostasis. Here, we discuss recent advances in understanding macula densa sensing and suggest these cells, in addition to salt, also sense various chemical and metabolic signals in the tubular environment that directly trigger renin release.

  5. Renin-angiotensin system in sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgenfeldt, U; Kienapfel, G; Kellermann, W; Schott, R; Schmidt, M

    1987-01-01

    The time course of the components of the renin-angiotensin system was investigated in the plasma of three patients on the intensive care unit. Two of them, which were both polytraumatized, suffered from adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). All patients had sepsis and impaired pulmonary and renal function. Plasma samples were investigated for up to two weeks, in which time all three patients showed a decrease in their angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) plasma concentration. Two of the patients with deteriorating renal function had three to four times elevated angiotensinogen (Ao) plasma levels, which were measured by both the direct and indirect radioimmunoassay. The ratio of the mean values between both assays was 1:1 in two patients and shifted to higher values in the direct assay in the third patient. This suggests that higher amounts of des-AngI-angiotensinogen were present in the latter patient, because "inactive" Ao is also detected by the direct assay. The decrease in active Ao may be caused by an up to twenty times elevated plasma renin activity (PRA). The PRA was correlated with the angiotensin I (AngI) plasma levels. However, at PRA values higher than 200 pmol AngI/ml/h this correlation decreased because of the rapid substrate consumption. In addition there was a good correlation between AngI and AngII plasma levels in two patients which could not be observed in the patient with the highest PRA and AngII values. A relationship between plasma ACE concentration and AngII formation could not be observed. Thus in two of the three septic patients the components of the renin angiotensin system were extremely stimulated at very low blood pressure values. These data show, that it is reasonable to follow the time course of the components of the renin angiotensin system in single patients. In addition it is demonstrated that the direct measurement of Ao is a valid supplement in the diagnosis of the renin angiotensin system.

  6. Renin-angiotensin system in vertebrates: phylogenetic view of structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Hiroko

    2017-03-01

    Renin substrate, biological renin activity, and/or renin-secreting cells in kidneys evolved at an early stage of vertebrate phylogeny. Angiotensin (Ang) I and II molecules have been identified biochemically in representative species of all vertebrate classes, although variation occurs in amino acids at positions 1, 5, and 9 of Ang I. Variations have also evolved in amino acid positions 3 and 4 in some cartilaginous fish. Angiotensin receptors, AT1 and AT2 homologues, have been identified molecularly or characterized pharmacologically in nonmammalian vertebrates. Also, various forms of angiotensins that bypass the traditional renin-angiotensin system (RAS) cascades or those from large peptide substrates, particularly in tissues, are present. Nonetheless, the phylogenetically important functions of RAS are to maintain blood pressure/blood volume homeostasis and ion-fluid balance via the kidney and central mechanisms. Stimulation of cell growth and vascularization, possibly via paracrine action of angiotensins, and the molecular biology of RAS and its receptors have been intensive research foci. This review provides an overview of: (1) the phylogenetic appearance, structure, and biochemistry of the RAS cascade; (2) the properties of angiotensin receptors from comparative viewpoints; and (3) the functions and regulation of the RAS in nonmammalian vertebrates. Discussions focus on the most fundamental functions of the RAS that have been conserved throughout phylogenetic advancement, as well as on their physiological implications and significance. Examining the biological history of RAS will help us analyze the complex RAS systems of mammals. Furthermore, suitable models for answering specific questions are often found in more primitive animals.

  7. Dexamethasone exposure of neonatal rats modulates biliary lipid secretion and hepatic expression of genes controlling bile acid metabolism in adulthood without interfering with primary bile acid kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Yan; Havinga, Rick; Van der Leij, Feike R.; Boverhof, Renze; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; Kuipers, Folkert; Stellaard, Frans

    2008-01-01

    Literature suggests that glucocorticoid (GC) exposure during early life may have long-term consequences into adult life. GCs are known to influence hepatic bile acid synthesis and their transport within the enterohepatic circulation. This study addresses effects of early postnatal exposure to GC on

  8. Early enhancements of hepatic and later of peripheral insulin sensitivity combined with increased postprandial insulin secretion contribute to improved glycemic control after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen-Møller, Kirstine N; Dirksen, Carsten; Jørgensen, Nils Bruun;

    2014-01-01

    to an intravenous glucose-glucagon challenge as well as an oral glucose load. Already within 1 week, RYGB reduced basal glucose production, improved basal hepatic insulin sensitivity and increased insulin clearance highlighting the liver as an important organ responsible for the early effects on glucose metabolism...

  9. A mouse renin distal enhancer is essential for blood pressure homeostasis in BAC-rescued renin-null mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Keiji; Kanafusa, Sumiyo; Ushiki, Aki; Matsuzaki, Hitomi; Ishida, Junji; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi

    2014-10-01

    Renin is predominantly expressed in juxtaglomerular cells in the kidney and regulates blood pressure homeostasis. To examine possible in vivo functions of a mouse distal enhancer (mdE), we generated transgenic mice (TgM) carrying either wild-type or mdE-deficient renin BACs (bacterial artificial chromosome), integrated at the identical chromosomal site. In the kidneys of the TgM, the mdE contributed 80% to basal renin promoter activity. To test for possible physiological roles for the mdE, renin BAC transgenes were used to rescue the hypotensive renin-null mice. Interestingly, renal renin expression in the Tg(BAC):renin-null compound mice was indistinguishable between the wild-type and mutant BAC carriers. Surprisingly, however, the plasma renin activity and angiotensin I concentration in the mdE compound mutant mice were significantly lower than the same parameters in the control mice, and the mutants were consistently hypotensive, demonstrating that blood pressure homeostasis is regulated through transcriptional cis elements controlling renin activity.

  10. Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Follow Us Home Health Information Liver Disease Hepatitis (Viral) Hepatitis C Related Topics English English Español Section Navigation Hepatitis (Viral) What Is Viral Hepatitis? Hepatitis A Hepatitis B ...

  11. Central nervous system neuropeptide Y regulates mediators of hepatic phospholipid remodeling and very low-density lipoprotein triglyceride secretion via sympathetic innervation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rojas, Jennifer M; Bruinstroop, E.; Printz, Richard L; Alijagic-Boers, Aldijana; Foppen, E.; Turney, Maxine K; George, Leena; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G; Kalsbeek, A.; Niswender, Kevin D

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Elevated very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-triglyceride (TG) secretion from the liver contributes to an atherogenic dyslipidemia that is associated with obesity, diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. Numerous models of obesity and diabetes are characterized by increased central nervous s

  12. Cytokine Signatures Discriminate Highly Frequent Acute Hepatitis a Virus and Hepatitis E Virus Coinfections from Monoinfections in Mexican Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realpe-Quintero, Mauricio; Copado-Villagrana, Edgar Daniel; Trujillo-Ochoa, Jorge Luis; Alvarez, Angel Hilario; Panduro, Arturo; Fierro, Nora Alma

    2017-07-01

    The frequency of hepatitis A virus and hepatitis E virus infections and their cytokine profiles were analyzed in Mexican pediatric patients with acute hepatitis. A high frequency of coinfections was found. Significant overexpression of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-12, IL-13 and interferon-gamma during hepatitis A virus monoinfections and limited secretion of cytokines in hepatitis E virus infections were observed.

  13. Vasopressin and angiotensin II in reflex regulation of ACTH, glucocorticoids, and renin: effect of water deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, V. L.; Keil, L. C.

    1992-01-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) and vasopressin participate in baroreflex regulation of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), glucocorticoid, and renin secretion. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this participation is enhanced in water-deprived dogs, with chronically elevated plasma ANG II and vasopressin levels, compared with water-replete dogs. The baroreflex was assessed by infusing increasing doses of nitroprusside (0.3, 0.6, 1.5, and 3.0 micrograms.kg-1.min-1) in both groups of animals. To quantitate the participation of ANG II and vasopressin, the dogs were untreated or pretreated with the competitive ANG II antagonist saralasin, a V1-vasopressin antagonist, or combined V1/V2-vasopressin antagonist, either alone or in combination. The findings were as follows. 1) Larger reflex increases in ANG II, vasopressin, and glucocorticoids, but not ACTH, were produced in water-deprived dogs compared with water-replete dogs. 2) ANG II blockade blunted the glucocorticoid and ACTH responses to hypotension in water-deprived dogs, but not water-replete dogs. In contrast, vasopressin blockade reduced the ACTH response only in water-replete dogs. 3) Vasopressin or combined vasopressin and ANG II blockade reduced the plasma level of glucocorticoids related either to the fall in arterial pressure or to the increase in plasma ACTH concentration in water-replete dogs, and this effect was enhanced in water-deprived dogs. 4) In both water-deprived and water-replete animals, saralasin and/or a V1-antagonist increased the renin response to hypotension, but a combined V1/V2-antagonist did not. These results reemphasize the importance of endogenous ANG II and vasopressin in the regulation of ACTH, glucocorticoid, and renin secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  14. Renin-angiotensin system blockade: Its contribution and controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Akira; Kosaka, Takeo; Kikuchi, Eiji; Oya, Mototsugu

    2015-08-01

    Angiotensin II is a key biological peptide in the renin-angiotensin system that regulates blood pressure and renal hemodynamics, and extensive experimental studies have shown that angiotensin II promotes diverse fibrotic changes and induces neovascularization in several inflammatory diseases. It is known that angiotensin II can be controlled using renin-angiotensin system blockade when angiotensin II is the main factor inducing a particular disease, and renin-angiotensin system blockade has assumed a central role in the treatment of inflammatory nephritis, cardiovascular disorders and retinopathy. In contrast, renin-angiotensin system blockade was found to have not only these effects but also other functions, such as inhibition of cancer growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Numerous studies have sought to elucidate the mechanisms and support these antitumor effects. However, a recent meta-analysis showed that renin-angiotensin system blockade use might in fact increase the incidence of cancer, so renin-angiotensin system blockade use has become somewhat controversial. Although the renin-angiotensin system has most certainly made great contributions to experimental models and clinical practice, some issues still need to be resolved. The present review discusses the contribution and controversy surrounding the renin-angiotensin system up to the present time.

  15. Partial characterization of hog renin purified by affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaux, C; Ménard, J; Sicard, P; Corvol, P

    1976-05-01

    A method has been set up to purify renin on a large scale by affinity chromatography using Pepstatin, a potent inhibitor of renin, as a ligand. Pepstatin was covalently coupled to Sepharose via six different spacer 'arms'. The Sepharose-hexamethylenediamino-Pepstatin appeared to be the better derivative for renin purification even at a concentration as low as 160 nmol of Pepstatin/ml of moist gel. Renin was extracted from 100 kg of hog kidneys and semi-purified by ammonium sulfate precipitations and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. The active fraction (48.5 g of proteins) was applied on a 500-ml affinity column. Renin was eluted in the starting buffer containing 6 M urea. Renin was purified 120-fold by the affinity chromatography step with a 79% recovery. Physico-chemical characterization of highly purified renin was performed. Isoelectrofocusing on a pH gradient from 3 to 6 showed a major peak with an isoelectric point (pI) of 4.95 and a minor peak (pI = 4.70). Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, pH 7.8, at different gel concentrations, showed a single peak of renin activity which was found in the major protein band. Molecular size estimated on agarose-acrylamide gel filtration was 40 000. All these physical parameters were similar before and after purification.

  16. Urinary renin and angiotensinogen in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Frederik; Lu, Xifeng; Rossing, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    Urinary levels of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) components may reflect renal RAAS activity and/or the renal efficacy of RAAS inhibition. Our aim was to determine whether urinary angiotensinogen and renin are circulating RAAS-independent markers during RAAS blockade....

  17. Plasma renin and outcome in the community : data from PREVEND

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Rudolf A.; Schroten, Nicolas F.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Mahmud, Hasan; Szymanski, Mariusz K.; van der Harst, Pim; Gansevoort, Ron T.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Hillege, Hans L.

    2012-01-01

    The reninangiotensin system plays a central role in patients with established cardiovascular (CV) disease, but the prognostic effect of plasma renin in the community is unclear. The relationship between plasma renin concentration and CV events was studied in 6228 subjects who were enrolled in the Pr

  18. Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific in vitro antibody secretion by peripheral blood lymphocytes: correlation with progression of disease and HCV RNA in HCV antibody-positive patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Ducos, J.; Bianchi-Mondain, A M; Francois, M.; Boisset, M; Vendrell, J P; Barin, F; Serre, A; Larrey, D

    1994-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus-specific in vitro antibody production (HCV IVAP) by peripheral blood lymphocytes in 53 HCV antibody-positive patients was investigated in comparison with alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels and HCV RNA in serum samples. All 29 HCV IVAP-positive patients were HCV RNA positive; 26 had elevated ALT levels. Among the 24 HCV IVAP-negative patients, 16 were HCV RNA negative, with 12 presenting normal ALT values. These data indicate that HCV IVAP results are highly correlated (P ...

  19. Active renin mass concentration to determine aldosterone-to-renin ratio in screening for primary aldosteronism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corbin F

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available François Corbin1, Pierre Douville2, Marcel Lebel3 1Division of Biochemistry, l'Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada; 2Division of Biochemistry; 3Division of Nephrology, L'Hôtel-Dieu de Québec Hospital and l'Université Laval, Quebec, CanadaBackground: Active renin mass concentration (ARC is independent of the endogenous level of angiotensinogen, and less variable and more reproducible than plasma renin activity. Reference values for the aldosterone-to-renin ratio (ARR using ARC are still undefined. The objective of the present study was to determine the threshold of ARR using ARC measurement to screen for primary aldosteronism.Methods: A total of 211 subjects were included in the study, comprising 78 healthy normotensive controls, 95 patients with essential hypertension, and 38 patients with confirmed primary aldosteronism (20 with surgery-confirmed aldosterone-producing adenoma and 18 with idiopathic adrenal hyperplasia. Blood samples were drawn from ambulatory patients and volunteers in the mid-morning without specific dietary restriction for measuring plasma aldosterone concentration, ARC, and serum potassium.Results: Most normotensive controls and essential hypertension patients had ARR results below 100 pmol/ng, a value which corresponded to 3.3 times the median of these two groups.Conclusion: Patients with ARR values above this level should be considered for further investigation (confirmatory tests or for repeat testing should ARR values be borderline. This study indicates that ARC can be used reliably in determining ARR for primary aldosteronism screening.Keywords: primary aldosteronism, active renin mass concentration, aldosterone-to-renin ratio

  20. The Protective Arm of the Renin Angiotensin System (RAS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The Protective Arm of the Renin Angiotensin System: Functional Aspects and Therapeutic Implications is the first comprehensive publication to signal the protective role of a distinct part of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), providing readers with early insight into a complex system which...... will become of major medical importance in the near future. Focusing on recent research, The Protective Arm of the Renin Angiotensin System presents a host of new experimental studies on specific components of the RAS, namely angiotensin AT2 receptors (AT2R), the angiotensin (1-7) peptide with its receptor...... understanding of the protective side of the Renin Angiotensin System (RAS) involving angiotensin AT2 receptor, ACE2, and Ang(1-7)/Mas receptor Combines the knowledge of editors who pioneered research on the protective renin angiotensin system including; Dr. Thomas Unger, one of the founders of AT2 receptor...

  1. Very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-producing and hepatitis C virus-replicating HepG2 cells secrete no more lipoviroparticles than VLDL-deficient Huh7.5 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jammart, Baptiste; Michelet, Maud; Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle; Parent, Romain; Bartosch, Birke; Zoulim, Fabien; Durantel, David

    2013-05-01

    In the plasma samples of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients, lipoviroparticles (LVPs), defined as (very-) low-density viral particles immunoprecipitated with anti-β-lipoproteins antibodies are observed. This HCV-lipoprotein association has major implications with respect to our understanding of HCV assembly, secretion, and entry. However, cell culture-grown HCV (HCVcc) virions produced in Huh7 cells, which are deficient for very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) secretion, are only associated with and dependent on apolipoprotein E (apoE), not apolipoprotein B (apoB), for assembly and infectivity. In contrast to Huh7, HepG2 cells can be stimulated to produce VLDL by both oleic acid treatment and inhibition of the MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway but are not permissive for persistent HCV replication. Here, we developed a new HCV cell culture model to study the interaction between HCV and lipoproteins, based on engineered HepG2 cells stably replicating a blasticidin-tagged HCV JFH1 strain (JB). Control Huh7.5-JB as well as HepG2-JB cell lines persistently replicated viral RNA and expressed viral proteins with a subcellular colocalization of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), core, gpE2, and NS5A compatible with virion assembly. The intracellular RNA replication level was increased in HepG2-JB cells upon dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) treatment, MEK/ERK inhibition, and NS5A overexpression to a level similar to that observed in Huh7.5-JB cells. Both cell culture systems produced infectious virions, which were surprisingly biophysically and biochemically similar. They floated at similar densities on gradients, contained mainly apoE but not apoB, and were not neutralized by anti-apoB antibodies. This suggests that there is no correlation between the ability of cells to simultaneously replicate HCV as well as secrete VLDL and their capacity to produce LVPs.

  2. The effects of antidiuretic hormone and state of potassium balance on the renin-angiotensin system in rats with diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Repollet, E; Maldonado, M M; Opava-Stitzer, S

    1982-02-01

    1. The influence of ADH and the state of potassium balance on the renin-angiotensin system was studied in rats with hereditary diabetes insipidus (DI rats). 2. Plasma renin concentration in DI rats was higher than in control Long-Evans rats. 3. Spontaneous reversal of the hypokalaemia normally found in DI rats did not reduce plasma renin concentration (p.r.c.), suggesting that potassium deficiency does not contribute significantly to the elevation of p.r.c. in DI rats. Similarly, a low potassium diet failed to further increase p.r.c. in DI rats. 4. In contrast, the p.r.c. of DI rats was significantly diminished by a high potassium intake both in the presence and absence of ADH. A highly significant inverse correlation was found between p.r.c. and urinary potassium excretion in both ADH-treated and untreated DI rats on low, normal and high potassium diets. 5. Plasma renin concentration was significantly lower in ADH-treated than in untreated DI rats on a high potassium intake, suggesting that the inhibitory effects of ADH and potassium are additive. 6. ADH consistently reduced p.r.c. in DI rats independent of the state of potassium balance. 7. ADH and potassium may inhibit renin secretion via different mechanisms of action.

  3. Cyclooxygenase-2 contributes to elevated renin in the early postnatal period in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stubbe, Jane; Jensen, Boye L; Bachmann, Sebastian;

    2003-01-01

    We asked whether cyclooxygenase (COX) activity controls the renin-angiotensin system in the postnatal period. During kidney development, renin peaked at postnatal days 0-1 at the mRNA, tissue protein [renal renin concentration (RRC)], and plasma renin concentration (PRC) levels and was widely...

  4. Renin dynamics in adipose tissue: adipose tissue control of local renin concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Fowler, Jason D.; Krueth, Stacy B.; Bernlohr, David A.; Katz, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been implicated in a variety of adipose tissue functions, including tissue growth, differentiation, metabolism, and inflammation. Although expression of all components necessary for a locally derived adipose tissue RAS has been demonstrated within adipose tissue, independence of local adipose RAS component concentrations from corresponding plasma RAS fluctuations has not been addressed. To analyze this, we varied in vivo rat plasma concentrations of two ...

  5. Active renin mass concentration to determine aldosterone-to-renin ratio in screening for primary aldosteronism

    OpenAIRE

    Corbin F; Douville P; Lebel M

    2011-01-01

    François Corbin1, Pierre Douville2, Marcel Lebel3 1Division of Biochemistry, l'Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada; 2Division of Biochemistry; 3Division of Nephrology, L'Hôtel-Dieu de Québec Hospital and l'Université Laval, Quebec, CanadaBackground: Active renin mass concentration (ARC) is independent of the endogenous level of angiotensinogen, and less variable and more reproducible than plasma ren...

  6. Secrets Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Helena Guamanzara Torres

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a review of the book The Law of Secrets, of the author Juan Carlos Martínez-Villalba Riofrío studying the secrets and how law does protect. To this end, the author has analyzed the general theory of secrecy, secrets and methodology, its overall rating, essential elements and their different legal dimensions, the secret as a subjective right. It also establishes that professional secrecy is protected by constitutional principles such as the right to privacy.

  7. Multiple ascending dose study with the new renin inhibitor VTP-27999: nephrocentric consequences of too much renin inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcarek, Joanna; Sevá Pessôa, Bruno; Bryson, Catherine; Azizi, Michel; Ménard, Joël; Garrelds, Ingrid M; McGeehan, Gerard; Reeves, Richard A; Griffith, Sue G; Danser, A H Jan; Gregg, Richard

    2014-05-01

    This study compared the pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic profile of the new renin inhibitor VTP-27999 in salt-depleted healthy volunteers, administered once daily (75, 150, 300, and 600 mg) for 10 days, versus placebo and 300 mg aliskiren. VTP-27999 was well tolerated with no significant safety issues. It was rapidly absorbed, attaining maximum plasma concentrations at 1 to 4 hours after dosing, with a terminal half-life of 24 to 30 hours. Plasma renin activity remained suppressed during the 24-hour dosing interval at all doses. VTP-27999 administration resulted in a dose-dependent induction of renin, increasing the concentration of plasma renin maximally 350-fold. This induction was greater than with aliskiren, indicating greater intrarenal renin inhibition. VTP-27999 decreased plasma angiotensin II and aldosterone. At 24 hours and later time points after dosing on day 10 in the 600-mg group, angiotensin II and aldosterone levels were increased, and plasma renin activity was also increased at 48 and 72 hours, compared with baseline. VTP-27999 decreased urinary aldosterone excretion versus placebo on day 1. On day 10, urinary aldosterone excretion was higher in the 300- and 600-mg VTP-27999 dose groups compared with baseline. VTP-27999 decreased blood pressure to the same degree as aliskiren. In conclusion, excessive intrarenal renin inhibition, obtained at VTP-27999 doses of 300 mg and higher, is accompanied by plasma renin rises, that after stopping drug intake, exceed the capacity of extrarenal VTP-27999 to block fully the enzymatic reaction. This results in significant rises of angiotensin II and aldosterone. Therefore, renin inhibition has an upper limit.

  8. Influence of sedentary versus physically active conditions on regulation of plasma renin activity and vasopressin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Patrick J

    2008-09-01

    Physical inactivity is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Sedentary animals compared to physically active controls exhibit enhanced sympathoexcitatory responses, including arterial baroreflex-mediated sympathoexcitation. Hypotension-induced sympathoexcitation is also associated with the release of vasoactive hormones. We hypothesized that sedentary conditions may enhance release of the vasoactive hormones AVP and ANG II. To test this hypothesis, the humoral response to hypotension was examined in conscious rats after 9-12 wk of sedentary conditions or "normally active" conditions. Normally active conditions were produced by allowing rats access to running wheels in their home cages. Running distance peaked after 4 wk (4.5 +/- 0.7 km/day), and the total distance run after 9 wk was 174 +/- 23 km (n = 25). Similar levels of hypotension were induced in conscious sedentary or physically active animals with the arterial vasodilator, diazoxide (25 mg/kg iv). Control experiments used a saline injection of equivalent volume. Plasma samples were collected and assayed for plasma AVP concentration and plasma renin activity (PRA). Sedentary conditions significantly enhanced resting and hypotension-induced PRA relative to normal physical activity. In contrast, resting and hypotension-induced AVP levels were not statistically different between groups. These data suggest that baroreflex-mediated activation of the renin-angiotensin system, but not AVP secretion, is enhanced by sedentary conditions. We speculate that augmented activation of the renin-angiotensin system may be related to enhanced sympathetic outflow observed in sedentary animals and may contribute to increased risk of cardiovascular disease in the sedentary population.

  9. Cortisol-induced inhibition of ovine renin and aldosterone responses to hypotension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, C.E.; Silbiger, J.

    1987-03-01

    Previous studies from this laboratory have demonstrated that in preterm fetal sheep increases in plasma cortisol (F) concentration equal in amplitude to fetal F stress responses suppress plasma renin activity (PRA). The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility that this negative interaction exists in adult sheep. Cortisol was measured by radioimmunoassay. Five conscious ewes with chronically prepared carotid arterial loops were infused intravenously with F or vehicle for 5 h. One hour after the end of F or vehicle infusion, renin secretion was stimulated by hypotension produced by infusion of sodium nitroprusside. F infusion increased plasma F; during vehicle infusion plasma F did not change. F infusion decreased hematocrit from 29 +/- 2 to 26 +/- 1%. Basal PRA in vehicle- and F-infused groups were 0.4 +/- 0 and 0.2 +/- 0.1 ng angiotensin I-ml/sup -1/-h/sup -1/ and did not change. In vehicle-infused ewes, PRA increased from 0.4 +/- 0 to 4.6 +/- 0.4 and plasma aldosterone from 26.0 +/- 1.0 to 173.1 +/- 21.8 pg/ml, while in F-infused ewes, PRA increased from 0.2 +/- 1 to 3.3 +/- 0.4 ng angiotensin I-ml/sup -1/-h/sup -1/ and aldosterone from 25.0 +/- 0 to 48.2 +/- 23.2 pg/ml, significantly smaller responses. These results suggest that repeated stress may modulate the responses of the renin-angiotensin system in this species.

  10. Role of cardiopulmonary mechanoreceptors in the postural regulation of renin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, R.A.; Marco, E.J.; Oliveri, C.; Otero, F.J.; Degrossi, O.; Moledo, L.I.; Julius, S.

    1987-04-01

    To change the stretch on cardiopulmonary mechanoreceptors, large shifts of blood in the capacity space were elicited by tilting and by exerting positive lower body pressure in the tilted position. Twelve volunteers underwent invasive hemodynamic studies and in 10 other subjects cardiac size was determined by radionuclide cardiography. In all 22 subjects tilting caused the expected increase of renin, which was abolished by lower body compression. Decompression caused renin to increase again. Right atrial pressure in invasive studies and end-systolic and end-diastolic counts in noninvasive studies showed a significant and strong negative correlation with renin and norepinephrine levels. Thus, the degree of stretch of the cardiopulmonary mechanoreceptors is a major determinant of reflex regulation of renin release in humans.

  11. Effect of Dual Blockade of Renin-Angiotensin Aldosterone System ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nephropathy, Azotemia, Proteinuria, Aldosterone, Renin, Blood pressure. Tropical .... creatinine, MAP: mean arterial blood pressure, NS: not significant, U P/Cr: urinary protein/creatinine ratio .... laboratory and clinical monitoring of these.

  12. Optimization of orally bioavailable alkyl amine renin inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhenrong; Cacatian, Salvacion; Yuan, Jing; Simpson, Robert D.; Jia, Lanqi; Zhao, Wei; Tice, Colin M.; Flaherty, Patrick T.; Guo, Joan; Ishchenko, Alexey; Singh, Suresh B.; Wu, Zhongren; McKeever, Brian M.; Scott, Boyd B.; Bukhtiyarov, Yuri; Berbaum, Jennifer; Mason, Jennifer; Panemangalore, Reshma; Cappiello, Maria Grazia; Bentley, Ross; Doe, Christopher P.; Harrison, Richard K.; McGeehan, Gerard M.; Dillard, Lawrence W.; Baldwin, John J.; Claremon, David A. (Vitae); (GSKPA)

    2010-09-17

    Structure-guided drug design led to new alkylamine renin inhibitors with improved in vitro and in vivo potency. Lead compound 21a, has an IC{sub 50} of 0.83 nM for the inhibition of human renin in plasma (PRA). Oral administration of 21a at 10 mg/kg resulted in >20 h reduction of blood pressure in a double transgenic rat model of hypertension.

  13. Design of potent substrate-analogue inhibitors of canine renin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, K. Y.; Siragy, H. M.; Haber, E.

    1992-01-01

    Through a systematic study of structure-activity relationships, we designed potent renin inhibitors for use in dog models. In assays against dog plasma renin at neutral pH, we found that, as in previous studies of rat renin inhibitors, the structure at the P2 position appears to be important for potency. The substitution of Val for His at this position increases potency by one order of magnitude. At the P3 position, potency appears to depend on a hydrophobic side chain that does not necessarily have to be aromatic. Our results also support the approach of optimizing potency in a renin inhibitor by introducing a moiety that promotes aqueous solubility (an amino group) at the C-terminus of the substrate analogue. In the design of potent dog plasma renin inhibitors, the influence of the transition-state residue 4(S)-amino-3(S)-hydroxy-5-cyclohexylpentanoic acid (ACHPA)-commonly used as a substitute for the scissile-bond dipeptide to boost potency-is not obvious, and appears to be sequence dependent. The canine renin inhibitor Ac-paF-Pro-Phe-Val-statine-Leu-Phe-paF-NH2 (compound 15; IC50 of 1.7 nM against dog plasma renin at pH 7.4; statine, 4(S)-amino-3(S)-hydroxy-6-methylheptanoic acid; paF, para-aminophenylalanine) had a potent hypotensive effect when infused intravenously into conscious, sodium-depleted, normotensive dogs. Also, compound 15 concurrently inhibited plasma renin activity and had a profound diuretic effect.

  14. Renin Lineage Cells Repopulate the Glomerular Mesangium after Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Starke, Charlotte; Betz, Hannah; Hickmann, Linda; Lachmann, Peter; Neubauer, Björn; Kopp, Jeffrey B.; Sequeira-Lopez, Maria Luisa S; Gomez, R. Ariel; Hohenstein, Bernd; Todorov, Vladimir T.; Hugo, Christian P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Mesangial cell injury has a major role in many CKDs. Because renin-positive precursor cells give rise to mesangial cells during nephrogenesis, this study tested the hypothesis that the same phenomenon contributes to glomerular regeneration after murine experimental mesangial injury. Mesangiolysis was induced by administration of an anti-mesangial cell serum in combination with LPS. In enhanced green fluorescent protein–reporter mice with constitutively labeled renin lineage cells, the size of...

  15. Very-Low-Density Lipoprotein (VLDL)-Producing and Hepatitis C Virus-Replicating HepG2 Cells Secrete No More Lipoviroparticles than VLDL-Deficient Huh7.5 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jammart, Baptiste; Michelet, Maud; Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle; Parent, Romain; Bartosch, Birke; Zoulim, Fabien

    2013-01-01

    In the plasma samples of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients, lipoviroparticles (LVPs), defined as (very-) low-density viral particles immunoprecipitated with anti-β-lipoproteins antibodies are observed. This HCV-lipoprotein association has major implications with respect to our understanding of HCV assembly, secretion, and entry. However, cell culture-grown HCV (HCVcc) virions produced in Huh7 cells, which are deficient for very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) secretion, are only associated with and dependent on apolipoprotein E (apoE), not apolipoprotein B (apoB), for assembly and infectivity. In contrast to Huh7, HepG2 cells can be stimulated to produce VLDL by both oleic acid treatment and inhibition of the MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway but are not permissive for persistent HCV replication. Here, we developed a new HCV cell culture model to study the interaction between HCV and lipoproteins, based on engineered HepG2 cells stably replicating a blasticidin-tagged HCV JFH1 strain (JB). Control Huh7.5-JB as well as HepG2-JB cell lines persistently replicated viral RNA and expressed viral proteins with a subcellular colocalization of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), core, gpE2, and NS5A compatible with virion assembly. The intracellular RNA replication level was increased in HepG2-JB cells upon dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) treatment, MEK/ERK inhibition, and NS5A overexpression to a level similar to that observed in Huh7.5-JB cells. Both cell culture systems produced infectious virions, which were surprisingly biophysically and biochemically similar. They floated at similar densities on gradients, contained mainly apoE but not apoB, and were not neutralized by anti-apoB antibodies. This suggests that there is no correlation between the ability of cells to simultaneously replicate HCV as well as secrete VLDL and their capacity to produce LVPs. PMID:23427158

  16. Renin Lineage Cells Repopulate the Glomerular Mesangium after Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, Charlotte; Betz, Hannah; Hickmann, Linda; Lachmann, Peter; Neubauer, Björn; Kopp, Jeffrey B.; Sequeira-Lopez, Maria Luisa S.; Gomez, R. Ariel; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Mesangial cell injury has a major role in many CKDs. Because renin-positive precursor cells give rise to mesangial cells during nephrogenesis, this study tested the hypothesis that the same phenomenon contributes to glomerular regeneration after murine experimental mesangial injury. Mesangiolysis was induced by administration of an anti-mesangial cell serum in combination with LPS. In enhanced green fluorescent protein–reporter mice with constitutively labeled renin lineage cells, the size of the enhanced green fluorescent protein–positive area in the glomerular tufts increased after mesangial injury. Furthermore, we generated a novel Tet-on inducible triple-transgenic LacZ reporter line that allowed selective labeling of renin cells along renal afferent arterioles of adult mice. Although no intraglomerular LacZ expression was detected in healthy mice, about two-thirds of the glomerular tufts became LacZ positive during the regenerative phase after severe mesangial injury. Intraglomerular renin descendant LacZ-expressing cells colocalized with mesangial cell markers α8-integrin and PDGF receptor-β but not with endothelial, podocyte, or parietal epithelial cell markers. In contrast with LacZ-positive cells in the afferent arterioles, LacZ-positive cells in the glomerular tuft did not express renin. These data demonstrate that extraglomerular renin lineage cells represent a major source of repopulating cells for reconstitution of the intraglomerular mesangium after injury. PMID:24904091

  17. The Renin-Angiotensin System in the Endocrine Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlsson PO

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental data suggest that a tissue renin-angiotensin system is present in the pancreatic islets of several species, including man. However, the physiological role for this local renin-angiotensin system remains largely unknown. In vitro findings argue against a direct effect of angiotensin II on alpha- and beta-cells. In contrast, when the influence of angiotensin II on the pancreatic islets has been evaluated in the presence of an intact vascular system either in vivo or in the perfused pancreas, a suppression of insulin release has been observed, also in man. These discrepancies may be explained by the profound effects of the renin-angiotensin system on pancreatic islet blood perfusion. Alterations in the systemic renin-angiotensin system and an increased vascular sensitivity for its components have been observed in diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Whether changes occur also in the pancreatic islet renin-angiotensin system during these conditions remains unknown. Future research may help to provide an answer to this question, and to elucidate to what extent the renin-angiotensin system may contribute to beta-cell dysfunction in these diseases.

  18. Control of plasma renin activity in heat-stressed baboons on varied salt intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proppe, D W

    1987-04-01

    The characteristics and control of the increase in plasma renin activity (PRA) during environmental heating (EH) were determined in 12 unanesthetized, chronically catheterized baboons. Each EH experiment consisted of a 1.5- to 4-h exposure to an ambient temperature of 39-44 degrees C until core temperature (Tc) reached 39.5-40.0 degrees C. These EH experiments were done on the baboon in an unblocked state and during beta-adrenergic receptor blockade produced by propranolol when on normal-to-high salt intake (NHSI) and on low-salt intake (LSI). PRA rose linearly with Tc during EH, but the increase in PRA was considerably larger when the baboon was on LSI. The PRA-Tc linear regression coefficients were 2.32 and 5.98 ng angiotensin I X ml-1 X h-1 X degrees C-1 in NHSI and LSI states, respectively. This rise in PRA during EH was completely eliminated during beta-blockade in both NHSI and LSI states. It is concluded that heat stress activates the sympathetic nervous system to stimulate beta-receptor-mediated renin secretion by the kidney, this activation is controlled primarily by internal thermoreceptors, and variations in salt intake alters only the magnitude of the increase in PRA during heat stress, not the mechanisms that produce it.

  19. Effect of hydration on plasma vasopressin, renin, and aldosterone responses to head-up tilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, M. H.; Geelen, G.; Keil, L. C.; Wade, C. A.; Hill, L. C.

    1986-01-01

    If plasma vasopressin (PVP), plasma renin (PRA), and plasma aldosterone (PA) responses to change in posture are mediated only by alterations in intrathoracic baroreceptor activity hydration status should have minimal influence on these responses. To test this hypothesis, six male subjects underwent 45 min of 70 deg head-up tilt (HUT) following 26 h dehydration, and again, 105 min later, following rehydration. Compared with preceding supine hydrated control values, PVP, PRA, and PA increased (p less than 0.001) during dehydrated HUT, but only PVP and PRA increased during rehydrated HUT (p less than 0.001). The dissociation during rehydrated HUT of PRA and PA may have been related more to the reduction (p less than 0.001) in plasma potassium concentration than to the accompanying decrease (p less than 0.001) in plasma osmolality and sodium concentration. Although increases in PVP and PRA during HUT were attenuated (p less than 0.01) following rehydration, this attenuation was associated with the absence of symptoms of overt hypotension following rehydration. However, since rehydration did not abolish the increases in PVP and PRA induced by HUT, it is concluded that the present observations support the concept of intrathoracic baroreceptor involvement in the regulation of vasopressin secretion and renin release.

  20. Inhibiting renin angiotensin system in rate limiting step by aliskiren as a new approach for preventing indomethacin induced gastric ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halici, Zekai; Polat, Beyzagul; Cadirci, Elif; Topcu, Atilla; Karakus, Emre; Kose, Duygu; Albayrak, Abdulmecit; Bayir, Yasin

    2016-10-25

    Previously blocking the renin angiotensin system (RAAS) has been effective in the prevention of gastric damage. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of aliskiren, and thus, direct renin blockage, in indomethacin-induced gastric damage model. Effects of aliskiren were evaluated in indomethacin-induced gastric damage model on Albino Wistar rats. Effects of famotidine has been investigated as standard antiulcer agent. Stereological analyses for ulcer area determination, biochemical analyses for oxidative status determination and molecular analyses for tissue cytokine and cyclooxygenase determination were performed on stomach tissues. In addition, to clarify antiulcer effect mechanism of aliskiren pylorus ligation-induced gastric acid secretion model was applied on rats. Aliskiren was able to inhibit indomethacin-induced ulcer formation. It also inhibited renin, and thus, decreased over-produced Angiotensin-II during ulcer formation. Aliskiren improved the oxidative status and cytokine profile of the stomach, which was most probably impaired by increased Angiotensin II concentration. Aliskiren also increased gastroprotective prostaglandin E2 concentration. Finally, aliskiren did not change the gastric acidity in pylorus ligation model. Aliskiren exerted its protective effects on stomach tissue by decreasing inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress as a result of inhibiting the RAAS, at a rate-limiting step, as well as its end product, angiotensin II. Aliskiren also significantly increased protective factors such as PGE2, but not affect aggressive factors such as gastric acidity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Prostaglandins, renin, aldosterone, and catecholamines in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, E B; Christensen, N J; Christensen, P; Johannesen, P; Kornerup, H J; Kristensen, S; Lauritsen, J G; Leyssac, P P; Rasmussen, A B; Wohlert, M

    1983-01-01

    Urinary excretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha), plasma concentrations of renin (PRC), aldosterone (PAC), noradrenaline (PNA) and adrenaline (PA) were determined in the third trimester of pregnancy, 5 days and 3 months after delivery in preeclampsia and normotensive pregnant and non-pregnant control subjects. PGE2 was higher in pregnant control subjects than in non-pregnant subjects, but reduced to non-pregnant level in preeclampsia. PGF2 alpha was the same in preeclampsia and normotensive pregnancy but higher than in the non-pregnant group. PRC and PAC were increased during pregnancy, but considerably lesser in preeclampsia than during normotensive pregnancy. PNA and PA were the same in all three groups. All parameters were normal 3 months after delivery. There were no correlations between any of the hormones and blood pressure in any of the groups. PGE2 was positively correlated to PRC. The lack of renal PGE2 in preeclampsia might be responsible for the decrease in renal blood flow and sodium excretion, and the changes in PRC and PAC are supposed to be secondary to changes in PGE2. It is hypothesised that preeclampsia is a state of prostaglandin deficiency.

  2. The Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone system in patients with depression compared to controls – a sleep endocrine study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Künzel Heike

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypercortisolism as a sign of hypothamamus-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA axis overactivity and sleep EEG changes are frequently observed in depression. Closely related to the HPA axis is the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS as 1. adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH is a common stimulus for cortisol and aldosterone, 2. cortisol release is suppressed by mineralocorticoid receptor (MR agonists 3. angiotensin II (ATII releases CRH and vasopressin from the hypothalamus. Furthermore renin and aldosterone secretion are synchronized to the rapid eyed movement (REM-nonREM cycle. Methods Here we focus on the difference of sleep related activity of the RAAS between depressed patients and healthy controls. We studied the nocturnal plasma concentration of ACTH, cortisol, renin and aldosterone, and sleep EEG in 7 medication free patients with depression (1 male, 6 females, age: (mean +/-SD 53.3 ± 14.4 yr. and 7 age matched controls (2 males, 5 females, age: 54.7 ± 19.5 yr.. After one night of accommodation a polysomnography was performed between 23.00 h and 7.00 h. During examination nights blood samples were taken every 20 min between 23.00 h and 7.00 h. Area under the curve (AUC for the hormones separated for the halves of the night (23.00 h to 3.00 h and 3.00 h to 7.00 h were used for statistical analysis, with analysis of co variance being performed with age as a covariate. Results No differences in ACTH and renin concentrations were found. For cortisol, a trend to an increase was found in the first half of the night in patients compared to controls (p Conclusion Hyperaldosteronism could be a sensitive marker for depression. Further our findings point to an altered renal mineralocorticoid sensitivity in patients with depression.

  3. Selective Deletion of the Brain-Specific Isoform of Renin Causes Neurogenic Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Keisuke; Liu, Xuebo; Morgan, Donald A; Davis, Deborah R; Sequeira-Lopez, Maria Luisa S; Cassell, Martin D; Grobe, Justin L; Rahmouni, Kamal; Sigmund, Curt D

    2016-12-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the brain is a critical determinant of blood pressure, but the mechanisms regulating RAS activity in the brain remain unclear. Expression of brain renin (renin-b) occurs from an alternative promoter-first exon. The predicted translation product is a nonsecreted enzymatically active renin whose function is unknown. We generated a unique mouse model by selectively ablating the brain-specific isoform of renin (renin-b) while preserving the expression and function of the classical isoform expressed in the kidney (renin-a). Preservation of renal renin was confirmed by measurements of renin gene expression and immunohistochemistry. Surprisingly, renin-b-deficient mice exhibited hypertension, increased sympathetic nerve activity to the kidney and heart, and impaired baroreflex sensitivity. Whereas these mice displayed decreased circulating RAS activity, there was a paradoxical increase in brain RAS activity. Physiologically, renin-b-deficient mice exhibited an exaggerated depressor response to intracerebroventricular administration of losartan, captopril, or aliskiren. At the molecular level, renin-b-deficient mice exhibited increased expression of angiotensin-II type 1 receptor in the paraventricular nucleus, which correlated with an increased renal sympathetic nerve response to leptin, which was dependent on angiotensin-II type 1 receptor activity. Interestingly, despite an ablation of renin-b expression, expression of renin-a was significantly increased in rostral ventrolateral medulla. These data support a new paradigm for the genetic control of RAS activity in the brain by a coordinated regulation of the renin isoforms, with expression of renin-b tonically inhibiting expression of renin-a under baseline conditions. Impairment of this control mechanism causes neurogenic hypertension. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. 钠负荷及依那普利对肾积水小鼠肾素合成与分泌的相互作用%Interaction of sodium loading and enalapril on renin mRNA and renin release in hydronephrotic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张延玲; 武俊艳; 王学春; 刘磊

    2009-01-01

    本文应用肾积水小鼠,探讨了钠负荷及依那普利(enalapril)对.肾素合成及分泌的相互作用.实验动物分为4组:假手术组、钠负荷组、依那普利组、钠负荷及依那普利联合组.Balb/C小鼠采用左侧输尿管结扎形成肾积水.在不同的条件下,对主动脉及双侧肾静脉的血浆肾素浓度(plasma renin concentration,PRC)、肾组织肾素浓度(tissue renin concentration,TRC)及肾素mRNA水平进行了测定.与假手术组相比,钠负荷小鼠中,双侧肾静脉PRC降低(P<0.05),肾积水一侧的TRC及肾素mRNA也显著降低(P<0.05).用依那普利治疗肾积水小鼠后,PRC、双侧TRC及肾素mRNA水平高于假手术组(P<0.01).应用钠负荷及依那普利联合治疗,其效应较单独应用依那普利时为低,肾积水一侧肾静脉PRC与主动脉内PRC相似.以上结果提示,在正常及肾积水肾脏,钠负荷与依那普利通过相互作用而影响肾素-血管紧张素系统(renin-angiotensin system,RAS).肾素合成的调节可独立于致密斑,但后者对肾素分泌起重要调节作用.%The present study investigated the interaction between sodium loading and enalapril on renin synthesis and secretion in hydronephrotic mice. Four different experimental groups (n=10 each) were used: sham-operated animals with normal diet (controlgroup); sodium loading (SL group); enalapril treatment with normal diet (E group), or sodium loading combined with enalapril treatment (SL+E group). The hydronephrotic left kidney was induced by unilateral ureteral ligation in mice in the latter three groups. Plasma renin concentration (PRC) in the aorta, both the left and right renal veins, tissue renin concentration (TRC) and renin mRNA levels in the kidneys were examined under different procedures. In hydronephrotic mice treated with sodium loading, PRC in the left and right renal veins was lower than that in control mice (P<0.05), and TRC and renin mRNA levels in the hydronephrotic kidney were also

  5. Activity assays and immunoassays for plasma Renin and prorenin: information provided and precautions necessary for accurate measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, Duncan J; Nussberger, Juerg; Stowasser, Michael

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Measurement of plasma renin is important for the clinical assessment of hypertensive patients. The most common methods for measuring plasma renin are the plasma renin activity (PRA) assay and the renin immunoassay. The clinical application of renin inhibitor therapy has thrown...... are susceptible to renin overestimation due to prorenin activation. In addition, activity assays performed with peptidase inhibitors may overestimate the degree of inhibition of PRA by renin inhibitor therapy. Moreover, immunoassays may overestimate the reactive increase in plasma renin concentration in response...

  6. Renal haemodynamics and plasma renin in patients with essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, E B; Kornerup, H J

    1976-05-01

    1. Blood pressure, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal plasma flow (RPF) were measured in twenty-three patients with essential hypertension and in twenty-one control subjects. Plasma renin concentration was measured in all the hypertensive patients and in fifteen control subjects. 2. GFR and RPF were similar in the hypertensive group and in the control group, whereas the renal vascular resistance was significantly higher in the hypertensive patients. GFR and RPF decreased with increasing blood pressure in both groups. Increasing age induced a further reduction in GFR and RPF in the control subjects but not in the hypertensive patients. 3. Plasma renin concentration in the hypertensive group did not differ from that in the control subjects. The concentration was not correlated to age in either the hypertensive or normal group. 4. Plasma renin index was positively correlated to GFR and RPF and inversely correlated to filtration fraction and renal vascular resistance. 5. It is concluded that GFR and RPF depend on blood pressure in both hypertensive patients and normotensive control subjects. In contrast to the control group, the age effect was negligible in the hypertensive group. It is suggested that renin release depends on changes in renal vascular resistance in the arterioles at the glomerulus and the results support the baroreceptor theory of renin release.

  7. Renin and aldosterone at high altitude in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keynes, R J; Smith, G W; Slater, J D; Brown, M M; Brown, S E; Payne, N N; Jowett, T P; Monge, C C

    1982-01-01

    Measurements have been made of hormonal changes relevant to salt and water balance during prolonged exposure to hypoxia to improve our understanding of the syndrome of acute mountain sickness. We have attempted to delineate the detailed inter-relationships between the renin-aldosterone and the vasopressin systems by a metabolically controlled study, involving an orthostatic stress (45 degrees head-up tilt) and an injection of a standard dose of ACTH to test adrenal responsiveness. Three Caucasian medical students underwent a 7-day equilibration at 150 m (Lima, Peru), followed by a 6-day sojourn at 4350 m (Cerro de Pasco, Peru) and a final 7 days at 150 m. Measurements were made of sodium and potassium balance, body weight and the 24-h renal excretion of vasopressin, cortisol and aldosterone 18-glucuronide. These variables showed little change, except for that of aldosterone 18-glucuronide, which fell sharply at altitude and rebounded even more sharply on return to sea level. At altitude, basal plasma levels of renin activity and aldosterone fell, and the response to orthostasis was attenuated, but the fall of plasma renin activity, as compared to plasma aldosterone, was delayed; on return to sea level this dissociation was exacerbated with the return of normal renin responsiveness lagging behind that of aldosterone. We suggest that unknown factors which dissociate the orthodox renin-aldosterone relationship, other than the activity of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme, are operative on exposure to hypoxia.

  8. Large scale purification of hog renin. Physicochemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvol, P; Devaux, C; Ito, T; Sicard, P; Ducloux, J; Menard, J

    1977-11-01

    Renin was purified from 47 kg of hog kidney to produce enough enzyme for enzymatic and physicochemical characterization. The procedure included extraction at pH 3.5 in the presence of protease inhibitors, two ammonium sulfate precipitations, ion exchange chromatography on Sepharose-hexamethylenediamino-pepstatin gel, gel filtration, and isoelectric focusing. Renin, 2.3 mg, with a specific activity of 1,100 GU/mg of protein was obtained with about 70,000-fold purification and 16% overall recovery. The purity criteria were: (1) a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-gel electrophoresis, (2) same retardation factor on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for renin activity, protein and glycoprotein coloration. Renin was characterized by its stability at--20 degrees C, pH 6.5; its molecular weight on SDS-gel electrophoresis, 36,800; its relative mobility on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at pH 7.8; its isoelectric point, 5.15; its amino acid composition, which revealed that renin is a glycoprotein; and its Michaelis constant on tetradecapeptide substrate at pH 6.6, Km = 7.7 X 10(-6) M.

  9. Origin of the angiotensin II secreted by cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W F

    1994-03-01

    Circulating angiotensin II is unique in that it is formed in the blood by the interaction of circulating proteins. There are in addition many local renin-angiotensin systems in tissues in which angiotensin II is apparently secreted by various types of cells. This brief review considers the possible pathways for synthesis of locally produced angiotensin II in the brain, the anterior pituitary, the testes, the ovaries, the adrenal cortex, the kidneys, the heart, blood vessel walls, and brown and white fat. Synthesis by cells in culture is also reviewed. The possibility that certain cells contain a complete intracellular renin-angiotensin system is not ruled out, but there are problems with this hypothesis. Proteases other than renin may be involved, and there may be different pathways in different tissues. However, it appears that at least in some tissues, angiotensinogen is produced in one population of cells and transported in a paracrine fashion to other renin-containing cells, where it serves as the substrate for production of angiotensin II.

  10. Kallikrein and Renin in the Membrane Fractions of the Rat Kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-23

    and Renin _____ ___ i.;? - 2 SUMMARY Plasma membrane (P-H) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) enriched fractions were isolated from the homogenized rat...The inhibitor of proteases, p-methylsulfonylfluoride inhibited 77-80% all kallikrein preparations at 3 w*1 concentration . Activation of renin Renin ...fold although only at a concentration 5-10 times higher than used with kallikrein. The relative rate of activation of renin in the ER fraction was

  11. African Americans,hypertension and the renin angiotensin system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sandra; F; Williams; Susanne; B; Nicholas; Nosratola; D; Vaziri; Keith; C; Norris

    2014-01-01

    African Americans have exceptionally high rates of hypertension and hypertension related complications. It is commonly reported that the blood pressure lowering efficacy of renin angiotensin system(RAS) inhibitors is attenuated in African Americans due to a greater likelihood of having a low renin profile. Therefore these agents are often not recommended as initial therapy in African Americans with hypertension. However, the high prevalence of comorbid conditions, such as diabetes, cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease makes treatment with RAS inhibitors more compelling. Despite lower circulating renin levels and a less significant fall in blood pressure in response to RAS inhibitors in African Americans, numerous clinical trials support the efficacy of RAS inhibitors to improve clinical outcomes in this population, especially in those with hypertension and risk factors for cardiovascular and related diseases. Here, we discuss the rationale of RAS blockade as part of a comprehensive approach to attenuate the high rates of premature morbidity and mortality associated with hypertension among African Americans.

  12. [Method of determining tissue renin activity using heterologous serum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbetsova, V Ts; Kiprov, D

    1979-01-01

    The authors described a method for determination of tissue renin activity with heterologous substrate. The preparation of the substrate was performed at several stages: salting with amonium sulfate; dialisis of the precipitate till complete separation of amonium sulfate molecules; distruction of angiotensinases by interchangeble souring and alcalization of the medium; lyophylization of the pure substrate. The obtained renin-substrate was preserved in ampules and its usage had a series of advantages--duration, economic, a possibility for standartization of the determination, etc., which were described in details in the article. The described in details also the quantitative determination of the renin activity in the tissues (renal and cerebral) with the help of the obtained substrate as the moments, modiied by the authors, were indicated.

  13. Activated tissue renin-angiotensin systems add to the progression of heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinto, YM; Buikema, H; vanGilst, WH; Lie, KI

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we review the hypothesis that activated tissue renin-angiotensin systems play a detrimental role in heart failure. The main arguments for this idea are discussed: a) tissue renin-angiotensin systems behave functionally distinct from the circulating renin-angiotensin system; b) tissue

  14. Renal and cardio-protective effects of direct renin inhibition : a systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J.; Perkovic, Vlado; de Zeeuw, Dick

    2009-01-01

    Background Blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) at its rate-limiting step by means of renin inhibition has led to the development of direct renin inhibitors (DRIs). Given the renal and cardioprotective effects of RAAS blockade by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and an

  15. 咖啡因对肝星形细胞活性和分泌功能的影响%Effects of caffeine on viability and secretion of hepatic stellate cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李勇剑; 陈云扬; 施敏敏; 李宏为; 严佶祺

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of caffeine on viability and secretion of hepatic stellate cells (HSC) and the mechanisms. Methods Human HSC cell line LX-2 was used in in vitro study. LX-2 cells were incubated with caffeine at various concentrations (0, 5, 10, 20, 30 and 40 mM) and the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and cleaved-PARP in HSC was detected by Western blot. The effect of caffeine on viability and apoptosis of LX-2 cell was analyzed by CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry respectively. Results Compared to control group, caffeine decreased the expression ofα-SMA in LX-2 cell significantly indicating the secretion of HSC was inhibited. Caffeine was shown by CCK-8 assay to inhibit the viability of LX-2 cell in a dose-and time-dependent manner. It was indicated by flow cytometry that caffeine increased the number of apoptotic cells dose-dependently. Furthermore, it was also showed by Western blot the significant increase in the expression of cleaved-PARP of LX-2 cell compared with control group, suggesting caffeine could induce the apoptosis of LX-2 cell. Conclusions The results demonstrate that caffeine inhibits the viability of HSC via inducing apoptosis of HSC and reduces the expression of α-SMA in HSC, which inhibits the secretion of collagen fiber in HSC.%目的:研究咖啡因对肝星形细胞活化状态和分泌功能的影响及其潜在机制。方法:选取人肝星形细胞LX-2进行体外实验。经浓度为0、5、10、20、30、40 mM的咖啡因处理后,通过Western 印迹法分别检测不同浓度的咖啡因对肝星形细胞中α-平滑肌肌动蛋白和凋亡蛋白cleaved-PARP表达量的影响;分别用CCK-8实验和流式细胞仪检测咖啡因对肝星形细胞活性和凋亡的影响。结果:在咖啡因作用下,肝星形细胞表达α平滑肌肌动蛋白的量与对照组相比显著减少,表示其分泌功能受到明显抑制。 CCK-8实验表明咖啡因可抑制肝星形细胞的活性,

  16. Hepatitis A FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Policy and Programs Resource Center Viral Hepatitis Hepatitis A Questions and Answers for the Public Recommend on ... Hepatitis C. What is the difference between Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C? Hepatitis A , Hepatitis ...

  17. Parathyroid hormone-related protein stimulates plasma renin activity via its anorexic effects on sodium chloride intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, Douglas K; Westrick, Elizabeth; Szandzik, David L; Gordish, Kevin L; Beierwaltes, William H

    2012-08-15

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) increases renin release from isolated perfused kidneys and may act as an autacoid regulator of renin secretion, but its effects on renin in vivo are unknown. In vivo, PTHrP causes hypercalcemia and anorexia, which may affect renin. We hypothesized that chronically elevated PTHrP would increase plasma renin activity (PRA) indirectly via its anorexic effects, reducing sodium chloride (NaCl) intake and causing NaCl restriction. We infused male Sprague-Dawley rats with the vehicle (control) or 125 μg PTHrP/day (PTHrP) via subcutaneous osmotic minipumps for 5 days. To replenish NaCl consumption, a third group of PTHrP-infused rats received 0.3% NaCl (PTHrP + NaCl) in their drinking water. PTHrP increased PRA from a median control value of 3.68 to 18.4 ng Ang I·ml(-1)·h(-1) (P PTHrP + NaCl PRA value was normal (7.82 ng Ang I·ml(-1)·h(-1), P PTHrP). Plasma Ca(2+) (median control: 10.2 mg/dl; PTHrP: 13.7 mg/dl; PTHrP + NaCl: 14.1 mg/dl; P PTHrP (median control: 0.03 ng/ml; PTHrP: 0.12 ng/ml; PTHrP + NaCl: 0.15 ng/ml; P PTHrP- and PTHrP + NaCl-treated rats. Body weights and caloric consumption were lower in PTHrP- and PTHrP + NaCl-treated rats. NaCl consumption was lower in PTHrP-treated rats (mean Na(+): 28.5 ± 4.1 mg/day; mean Cl(-): 47.8 mg/day) compared with controls (Na(+): 67.3 ± 2.7 mg/day; Cl(-): 112.8 ± 4.6 mg/day; P PTHrP + NaCl group; 0.3% NaCl in the drinking water had no effect on PRA in normal rats. Thus, our data support the hypothesis that PTHrP increases PRA via its anorexic effects, reducing NaCl intake and causing NaCl restriction.

  18. Hepatitis A

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care, food, or sewage industry Other common hepatitis virus infections include hepatitis B and hepatitis C. Hepatitis A is the least serious and mildest of these diseases. Symptoms ... most often show up 2 to 6 weeks after being exposed to the hepatitis A virus. They are most often mild, but may last ...

  19. Reference Values for Aldosterone-Renin Ratios in Normotensive Individuals and Effect of Changes in Dietary Sodium Consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerstens, Michiel N.; Kobold, Anneke C. Muller; Volmer, Marcel; Koerts, Jan; Sluiter, Wim J.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Determination of the aldosterone-to-renin ratio (ARR) in blood is the preferred screening test for primary aldosteronism. Renin can be measured as the plasma renin activity (PRA) or the plasma renin concentration (PRC). Consequently, the ARR can be measured either based on the PRA (ARR(p

  20. Some Comparative Aspects of the Renin-Angiotensin System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvin, Richard L.

    1984-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) maintains salt and water balance. Discusses functions of the RAS as defined in mammalian species, considering how the system arose and what its original function was. Also discusses where some of the changes occurred in the system (and why) as well as other topics. (JN)

  1. Optimal blockade of the renin angiotensin system in cardiorenal dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, Rudy Martinus Adrianus van de

    2006-01-01

    The kidneys are responsible for regulating the body’s fluid volume, mineral composition and acidity. In order to do so, the kidneys depend on an adequate cardiac output. When the cardiac output is reduced, the interplay between kidneys and endocrine tissue will provoke activation of the renin angiot

  2. Renin-aldosterone-sodium profiling in hypertensive Filipinos. Pt. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guevara, R.; Torres, J. Jr; Abundo, H.P.; Perez, A.P.; Ochoa, W.K.

    1981-10-01

    Plasma renin activity determination by radioimmunoassay as profiling technique is a useful guide for more rational and precise treatment of hypertension. Statistical nomograms are developed for normals, essential hypertension, diabetic hypertension, renal diseases, renal disease and dialysis, normal pregnancy, toxemic pregnancy and contraceptive pill users with and without hypertension.

  3. Renin and prorenin receptor in hypertension: what's new?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Genevieve

    2011-02-01

    The (pro)renin receptor, PRR, was initially characterized as a component of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). PRR-bound renin and prorenin display increased enzymatic activity, and binding activates intracellular signaling, upregulating the expression of profibrotic proteins. As a consequence, most studies set out to demonstrate a role of PRR in hypertension, cardiovascular and renal diseases, and organ damage, and to identify PRR as a therapeutic target to optimize RAS blockade. The results of animal studies were disappointing and did not convincingly establish PRR as major player in hypertension or in organ damage, although human studies suggested a link between a polymorphism in the PRR gene and blood pressure. New data now suggest that PRR is functionally linked to the vacuolar proton-ATPase and, quite unexpectedly, that PRR is necessary to Wnt signaling pathways that are essential (independently of renin) for adult and embryonic stem cell biology, embryonic development, and diseases including cancer, thereby opening new perspectives on the pathophysiological roles of PRR.

  4. Preeclampsia, the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System and beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Verdonk (Koen)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) plays an essential role in the regulation of blood pressure and body fluid homeostasis, but also contributes importantly to the pathophysiology of hypertension, renal disease and heart failure. Clinically, the RAAS is of g

  5. Hepatitis E

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sheets Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Hepatitis E Fact sheet Updated July 2016 Key facts ... et al. Lancet 2012;380:2095-2128. World Hepatitis Day Know hepatitis - Act now Event notice Key ...

  6. The Effect of Drinking on Plasma Vasopressin and Renin in Dehydrated Human Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geelen, G.; Keil, L. C.; Kravik, S. E.; Wade, C. E.; Thrasher, T. N.; Barnes, P. R.; Pyka, G.; Nesvig, C.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1996-01-01

    Oropharyngeal mechanisms activated by drinking have been shown to induce a rapid decline in plasma vasopressin which preceeds postabsorptive changes in plasma composition in the dehydrated dog. The present study was undertaken to determine what factor(s) inhibit(s) vasopressin secretion after rehydration in water deprived human subjects. Hematocrit (Hct) and hemoglobin (Hb) were determined on the day of the experiment, together with electrolytes and osmolalities which were measured on freshly separated serum. Plasma was immediately frozen and further analyzed by radioimmunoassay for renin activity (PRA), vasopressin (AVP), and aldosterone. The data were analyzed using an analysis of variance for repeated measurements and significant differences between the dehydrated control period and various time points after the start of rehydration were determined using a multiple-range test. began and reached water replete levels 15 minutes after drinking in the absence of any detectable decline in serum sodium or osmolality, we conclude that 427 oropharyngeal factors, alone or combined with gastric distension account for the extremely rapid inhibition of AVP secretion after drinking in the water-deprived human, as has been shown to be the case in dogs. Our findings are also in agreement wiht the recent demonstration that at the onset of drinking in the dehydrated monkey, there is an abrupt fall in plasma AVP concentration associated with a considerable decrease in the firing rate of the supraoptic neurosecretory neurons.

  7. Google Secrets

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Yvette

    2011-01-01

    Become a Google guru with these effective tips, tricks, and techniques Sure, you use Google. But do you really use Google-and everything it has to offer-in the most effective way possible? Wish you could just sit down with a Google expert who would show you how to take your Google savviness to the next level? With Google Secrets, you can! Tech expert Jerri Ledford reveals the ins, outs, and little-known facts about Google to show you how to sharpen your skills so you can get more done, more efficiently. You may already be familiar with Google's most popular applications, but this indispensable

  8. Regulation of glucagon secretion by incretins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens Juul; Christensen, M; Lund, A;

    2011-01-01

    Glucagon secretion plays an essential role in the regulation of hepatic glucose production, and elevated fasting and postprandial plasma glucagon concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) contribute to their hyperglycaemia. The reason for the hyperglucagonaemia is unclear, but recent...... that endogenous GLP-1 plays an important role in regulation of glucagon secretion during fasting as well as postprandially. The mechanisms whereby GLP-1 regulates glucagon secretion are debated, but studies in isolated perfused rat pancreas point to an important role for a paracrine regulation by somatostatin...... studies have shown lack of suppression after oral but preserved suppression after isoglycaemic intravenous glucose, pointing to factors from the gut. Gastrointestinal hormones that are secreted in response to oral glucose include glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) that strongly inhibits glucagon secretion...

  9. Activation of the Endogenous Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System or Aldosterone Administration Increases Urinary Exosomal Sodium Channel Excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ying; Wang, Xiaojing; Rose, Kristie L; MacDonald, W Hayes; Zhang, Bing; Schey, Kevin L; Luther, James M

    2016-02-01

    Urinary exosomes secreted by multiple cell types in the kidney may participate in intercellular signaling and provide an enriched source of kidney-specific proteins for biomarker discovery. Factors that alter the exosomal protein content remain unknown. To determine whether endogenous and exogenous hormones modify urinary exosomal protein content, we analyzed samples from 14 mildly hypertensive patients in a crossover study during a high-sodium (HS, 160 mmol/d) diet and low-sodium (LS, 20 mmol/d) diet to activate the endogenous renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. We further analyzed selected exosomal protein content in a separate cohort of healthy persons receiving intravenous aldosterone (0.7 μg/kg per hour for 10 hours) versus vehicle infusion. The LS diet increased plasma renin activity and aldosterone concentration, whereas aldosterone infusion increased only aldosterone concentration. Protein analysis of paired urine exosome samples by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based multidimensional protein identification technology detected 2775 unique proteins, of which 316 exhibited significantly altered abundance during LS diet. Sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) and α- and γ-epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) subunits from the discovery set were verified using targeted multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry quantified with isotope-labeled peptide standards. Dietary sodium restriction or acute aldosterone infusion similarly increased urine exosomal γENaC[112-122] peptide concentrations nearly 20-fold, which correlated with plasma aldosterone concentration and urinary Na/K ratio. Urine exosomal NCC and αENaC concentrations were relatively unchanged during these interventions. We conclude that urinary exosome content is altered by renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activation. Urinary measurement of exosomal γENaC[112-122] concentration may provide a useful biomarker of ENaC activation in future clinical studies.

  10. Measurement of urinary prostaglandin E in normal subjects and in high-renin states. [Tritium tracer techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zia, P.; Zipser, R.; Speckart, P.; Horton, R.

    1978-09-01

    Antisera generated toward PGE was obtained from rabbits immunized with PGE/sub 2/ conjugated to bovine thyroglobulin by the carbodiimide reaction. The specificity of the antibody is such that only PGE/sub 1/ and PGE/sub 2/ had significant cross-reactions. 13,14-Dihydro and 15-keto PG's did not react. An RIA capable of measuring 6 pg of PGE/sub 2/ was developed to measure PGE in human urine. Urine samples adjusted with buffer to pH 5 are extracted with 5% MeOH in CH/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ and chromatographed through Sephadex LH-20 columns. The second-antibody technique is used to separate bound from free. This urine method yields blank values of 2 +- 2 pg per sample, with a between-assay precision determined by duplicate analysis of 14% and intra-assay precision of 8%. The mean urinary excretion rate is 500 +- 74 (S.E.), +-209 (S.D.) ng/day (n = 8) in men and 300 +- 70, +-242 (n = 12) in women. These values are in agreement with those reported by others using gas chromatography--mass spectrometry or receptor assay with hepatic plasma membranes. Patients in a high-renin state, whether normotensive or hypertensive, have elevated PGE in urine. These studies suggest a relationship between the renin-angiotensin system and renal PG's in man.

  11. New sensitive direct radioimmunoassay for human plasma renin and its clinical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higaki, J.; Ogihara, T.; Imai, N.; Kumahara, Y.; Hontani, S.; Nishiura, M.; Ogawa, H.; Hirose, S.; Murakami, K.

    1984-12-01

    A new sensitive direct radioimmunoassay for human plasma renin has been developed. Renin was purified from Haas' preparation utilizing a pepstatin-C/sub 6/-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Antiserum, prepared by immunizing rabbits with the purified renin, was used for the direct radioimmunoassay at a final dilution of 1:30,000. The antibody was specific for human renal and plasma renin, but did not cross-react with cathepsin D, trypsin, or renins of mouse, dog, and rat. Radioimmunoassay was performed by the double antibody technique using the delayed tracer addition method. In this method, a standard curve was obtained over a range from 0.2 to 8.0 ng/ml. The values from this assay correlated well with total renin activity measured as the generation rate of angiotensin I after trypsin activation, but correlated weakly with active renin activity. This finding disclosed that both active and inactive renin were detected by this method. In normal participants, plasma renin concentration determined by direct radioimmunoassay was increased by standing and furosemide injection. The plasma renin concentration determined by direct radioimmunoassay of patients with essential hypertension was not significantly different from values in normal controls. The values were higher in patients with renovascular hypertension, malignant hypertension and Bartter's syndrome, but lower in patients with primary aldosteronism than in normal controls. 20 references, 7 figures.

  12. Renin, prorenin and the kidney: a new chapter in an old saga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Sakoda, Mariyo; Kurauchi-Mito, Asako; Kaneshiro, Yuki; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    The binding of prorenin to the (pro)renin receptor triggers 2 major pathways: a nonproteolytic conformational change in prorenin to its active form (angiotensin II-dependent pathway) and an intracellular pathway via the (pro)renin receptor itself (angiotensin II-independent pathway). In diabetic animals, an increased plasma prorenin level not only causes the generation of angiotensin II via the angiotensin II-dependent pathway, it also stimulates the transliteration receptors own intracellular signaling pathway in a manner that is independent of the generated angiotensin II. Thus, the administration of a "handle" region peptide (HRP), which acts as a decoy peptide and competitively inhibits the binding of prorenin to the (pro)renin receptor, has a beneficial effect in the kidneys of diabetic animals with low plasma renin levels. However, the benefits of HRP are slightly reduced in animal models of essential hypertension with relatively high plasma renin levels, and these benefits disappear altogether in animal models of hypertension with extremely high plasma renin levels. Thus, in the kidneys of animal models of diabetes and/or hypertension, both renin and prorenin competitively bind to the (pro)renin receptor and contribute to the pathophysiology of nephropathy. Consequently, renin, prorenin and the (pro) renin receptor may be important therapeutic targets for the prevention and regression of nephropathy in patients with diabetes and/or hypertension.

  13. Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II regulates renin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Sandra; Roeser, Marc; Lachmann, Peter; Ishii, Sumiyashi; Suh, Jae Mi; Harlander, Sabine; Desch, Michael; Brunssen, Coy; Morawietz, Henning; Tsai, Sophia Y; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian; Todorov, Vladimir T

    2012-07-13

    This study aimed to investigate the possible involvement of the orphan nuclear receptor chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II (COUP-TFII) in the regulation of renin gene expression. COUP-TFII colocalized with renin in the juxtaglomerular cells of the kidney, which are the main source of renin in vivo. Protein-DNA binding studies demonstrated that COUP-TFII binds to an imperfect direct repeat COUP-TFII recognition sequence (termed hereafter proxDR) in the proximal renin promoter. Because cAMP signaling plays a central role in the control of the renin gene expression, we suggested that COUP-TFII may modulate this cAMP effect. Accordingly, knockdown of COUP-TFII in the clonal renin-producing cell lines As4.1 and Calu-6 diminished the stimulation of the renin mRNA expression by cAMP agonists. In addition, the mutation of the proxDR element in renin promoter reporter gene constructs abrogated the inducibility by cAMP. The proxDR sequence was found to be necessary for the function of a proximal renin promoter cAMP-response element (CRE). Knockdown of COUP-TFII or cAMP-binding protein (CREB), which is the archetypal transcription factor binding to CRE, decreased the basal renin gene expression. However, the deficiency of COUP-TFII did not further diminish the renin expression when CREB was knocked down. In agreement with the cell culture studies, mutant mice deficient in COUP-TFII have lower renin expression than their control strain. Altogether our data show that COUP-TFII is involved in the control of renin gene expression.

  14. Nephron-sparing surgery for treatment of reninoma: a rare renin secreting tumor causing secondary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Cesar Miranda Torricelli

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Main findings A 25-year-old hypertensive female patient was referred to our institution. Initial workup exams demonstrated a 2.8 cm cortical lower pole tumor in the right kidney. She underwent laparoscopic partial nephrectomy without complications. Histopathologic examination revealed a rare juxtaglomerular cell tumor known as reninoma. After surgery, she recovered uneventfully and all medications were withdrawn. Case hypothesis Secondary arterial hypertension is a matter of great interest to urologists and nephrologists. Renovascular hypertension, primary hyperadosteronism and pheocromocytoma are potential diagnosis that must not be forgotten and should be excluded. Although rare, chronic pyelonephritis and renal tumors as rennin-producing tumors, nephroblastoma, hypernephroma, and renal cell carcinoma might also induce hypertension and should be in the diagnostic list of clinicians. Promising future implications Approximately 5% of patients with high blood pressure have specific causes and medical investigation may usually identify such patients. Furthermore, these patients can be successfully treated and cured, most times by minimally invasive techniques. This interesting case might expand knowledge of physicians and aid better diagnostic care in future medical practice.

  15. Participation of the extracellular domain in (pro)renin receptor dimerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki-Nakagawa, Chiharu [The United Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Gifu University, Gifu (Japan); Nishimura, Misa; Tsukamoto, Tomoko; Aoyama, Sho [Department of Applied Life Science, Faculty of Applied Biological Sciences, Gifu University, Gifu (Japan); Ebihara, Akio; Suzuki, Fumiaki [The United Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Gifu University, Gifu (Japan); Department of Applied Life Science, Faculty of Applied Biological Sciences, Gifu University, Gifu (Japan); Nakagawa, Tsutomu, E-mail: nakagawa@gifu-u.ac.jp [The United Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Gifu University, Gifu (Japan); Department of Applied Life Science, Faculty of Applied Biological Sciences, Gifu University, Gifu (Japan)

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • The (pro)renin receptor [(P)RR] is a regulator of the renin–angiotensin system. • The region responsible for (P)RR dimerization was investigated. • (P)RR extracellular domain constructs were retained intracellularly. • The extracellular domain of (P)RR is responsible for its dimerization. • Novel insight into the regulatory mechanism of soluble (P)RR secretion is provided. - Abstract: The (pro)renin receptor [(P)RR] induces the catalytic activation of prorenin, as well as the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway; as such, it plays an important regulatory role in the renin–angiotensin system. (P)RR is known to form a homodimer, but the region participating in its dimerization is unknown. Using glutathione S-transferase (GST) as a carrier protein and a GST pull-down assay, we investigated the interaction of several (P)RR constructs with full-length (FL) (P)RR in mammalian cells. GST fusion proteins with FL (P)RR (GST-FL), the C-terminal M8-9 fragment (GST-M8-9), the extracellular domain (ECD) of (P)RR (GST-ECD), and the (P)RR ECD with a deletion of 32 amino acids encoded by exon 4 (GST-ECDd4) were retained intracellularly, whereas GST alone was efficiently secreted into the culture medium when transiently expressed in COS-7 cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed prominent localization of GST-ECD to the endoplasmic reticulum. The GST pull-down analysis revealed that GST-FL, GST-ECD, and GST-ECDd4 bound FLAG-tagged FL (P)RR, whereas GST-M8-9 showed little or no binding when transiently co-expressed in HEK293T cells. Furthermore, pull-down analysis using His-tag affinity resin showed co-precipitation of soluble (P)RR with FL (P)RR from a stable CHO cell line expressing FL h(P)RR with a C-terminal decahistidine tag. These results indicate that the (P)RR ECD participates in dimerization.

  16. The nephron (pro)renin receptor: function and significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkumar, Nirupama; Kohan, Donald E

    2016-12-01

    The (pro)renin receptor (PRR) is a multifunctional protein that is part of the renin-angiotensin system and is an important accessory molecule for the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase. The PRR is widely expressed in the kidney with relatively high abundance in the distal nephron. Determining the physiological relevance of the PRR has been challenging due to early lethality in whole animal and cell-specific PRR knockout models. Recently, viable renal cell-specific PRR knockout mice have been developed; these studies suggest that PRR in the nephron can modulate renal function via angiotensin II (ANG II)-dependent and -independent cell signaling pathways. In this mini-review, we highlight new developments in nephron PRR function in health and in pathophysiological conditions.

  17. The relationship between vitamin D and the renin-angiotensin system in the pathophysiology of hypertension, kidney disease, and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Anand; Williams, Jonathan S

    2012-04-01

    Vitamin D has been implicated in the pathophysiology of extraskeletal conditions such as hypertension, kidney disease, and diabetes via its ability to negatively regulate the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). This article reviews the evidence supporting a link between vitamin D and the RAS in these conditions, with specific emphasis on translational observations and their limitations. A literature review of animal and human studies evaluating the role of vitamin D in hypertension, kidney disease, and diabetes was performed. Excess activity of the RAS has been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension, chronic kidney disease, decreased insulin secretion, and insulin resistance. Animal studies provide strong support for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3)-mediated downregulation of renin expression and RAS activity via its interaction with the vitamin D receptor. Furthermore, the activity of vitamin D metabolites in animals is associated with reductions in blood pressure, proteinuria and renal injury, and with improved β-cell function. Many observational, and a few interventional, studies in humans have supported these findings; however, there is a lack of well-designed prospective human interventional studies to definitively assess clinical outcomes. There is a need for more well-designed prospective interventional studies to validate this hypothesis in human clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. ALISKIREN (RENIN INHIBITOR AS THE RECENT ANTIHYPERTENSIVE MODALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luh Gde Primahatini Suaka Putri

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Hypertension is a chronic disease which is commonly found. Many people pay attention on it. The prevalence of hypertension all over the world is almost one billion, of which mortality is approximately 1,7 million each year. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS has an important role which caused hypertension. Two kind of drugs which work on RAAS and recently used widely are angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI and angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB. Both of them have weakness in blocking RAAS and their side effects. Renin is an important component in RAAS and has specificity for angiotensinogen. Renin inhibitors can block RAAS at the highest level. Aliskiren is the first renin inhibitor which can be orally given and has developed until the clinical trial of the third phase. The disadvantages of ACEI and ARB can be solved because of the aliskiren. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  19. Roles of the (pro)renin receptor in the kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Yoichi; Morimoto, Satoshi; Ichihara, Atsuhiro

    2014-11-06

    Prorenin receptor (PRR) is a multi-functioning protein possessing at least four different roles: (1) working as a receptor for renin and prorenin producing angiotensin I from angiotensinogen thus enhancing the tissue renin-angiotensin system; (2) inducing intracellular signals when a ligand binds to PRR; (3) participating in the functions of vacuolar proton ATPase; and (4) constituting the Wnt signaling receptor complex. Here, the roles of PRR in kidney physiology and diabetic conditions as well as recent findings regarding a soluble form of PRR are discussed. We also propose the possible mechanism concerning diabetic nephropathy as "trade-off hypothesis" from a PRR point of view. In brief, under hyperglycemic conditions, injured podocytes degrade degenerated proteins and intracellular organelles which require V-ATPase and PRR for vesicle internal acidification. Sustained hyperglycemia overproduces PRR molecules, which are transported to the transmembrane and bind to increased serum prorenin in the diabetic condition. This enhances tissue renin-angiotensin system and PRR-mediated mitogen-activated protein kinase signals, resulting in increased injurious molecules such as transforming growth factor-β, cyclooxygenase2, interleukin-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α ending in diabetic nephropathy progression. Although many findings led us to better PRR understanding, future works should elucidate which PRR functions, of the four discussed here, are dominant in each cell and kidney disease context.

  20. Prorenin receptor regulates more than the renin-angiotensin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Dominik N; Binger, Katrina J; Riediger, Fabian

    2012-06-01

    The (pro)renin receptor (PRR) was initially believed to be a contributor to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases via the amplification of renin- or prorenin-induced angiotensin (Ang) formation. However, a recent paradigm shift suggests a new role for PRR, separate from the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), in contributing to cellular homeostasis. Specifically, PRR is thought to be essential for vacuolar H(+) -ATPase (V-ATPase) activity and acts as an adaptor between the V-ATPase and the Wnt signalling pathway. Recent PRR conditional knock-out studies have confirmed this link between V-ATPase and PRR, with deletion resulting in the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles and animal lethality. The molecular mechanism by which PRR contributes to V-ATPase activity, and whether multiple signalling pathways are affected by PRR loss, is currently unknown. Additionally, cleavage by furin at a single site within full-length PRR results in the production of a soluble form of the receptor, which is detectable in plasma. Soluble PRR is hypothesized to bind to specific ligands and receptors and mediate signal transduction pathways. Understanding the physiological function of full-length and soluble PRR will be important for establishing its role in pathology.

  1. Lead, hypertension, and the renin-angiotensin system in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victery, W.; Vander, A.J.; Shulak, J.M.; Schoeps, P.; Julius, S.

    1982-03-01

    Rats were exposed continuously to Pb in utero and after birth by giving their mothers, during pregnancy and lactation, drinking water containing 0, 100, or 500 ppm Pb (as Pb acetate) and then continuing this regimen after weaning. Male rats receiving 100 ppm developed a significant elevation of systolic blood pressure (152 +/- 3.7 mm Hg vs. 135 +/- 5.6 for controls) at 3 1/2 months and remained hypertensive until sacrifice at 6 months; 500 ppm rats remained normotensive. Both 100 ppm and 500 ppm females remained normotensive. At 6 months plasma renin activity (PRA) was significantly reduced in the 100 ppm male group but was normal in the 500 ppm group. There was dose-dependent decreases in the All/PRA ratio and in renal renin. Pulmonary converting enzyme activity was not changed by Pb exposure. Blood (Pb) was 40 and 71 ..mu..g/dl, respectively, and kidney (Pb) was 4.8 and 22.9 ..mu..g/gm. Renal histology was normal in the 100 ppm group. We conclude that doses of Pb which produce blood (Pb) seen in many people are capable of including modest hypertension in male rats; higher doses fail to do so. The hypertension is associated with a reduction in PRA and All and therefore is unlikely to be due to hyperactivity of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS).

  2. The Renin-Angiotensin System and the Exocrine Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chappell MC

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available An accumulating body of evidence strongly indicates a local tissue renin-angiotensin system in the pancreas of a various species. In contrast to the majority of tissues that primarily express the angiotensin type 1 (AT1 receptor, the pancreas is one of the few tissues that contain a significant proportion of the AT2 subtype. Moreover, our findings indicate a greater distribution angiotensin II binding sites in the exocrine pancreas. Although the physiological aspects of a local pancreatic renin-angiotensin system remain largely unexplored, recent studies in our laboratory utilizing an acinar cell model demonstrate both functional AT1 and AT2 receptors. Indeed, we show that the AR42J cell line expresses all components of an angiotensin system including the mRNA for renin, angiotensinogen, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE, AT1a, AT1b and AT2 receptors. Thus, these cells may be of particular value to study the interplay of the AT1 and AT2 receptors to regulate cell growth and potentially exocrine function.

  3. Activation of the renin-angiotensin system stimulates biliary hyperplasia during cholestasis induced by extrahepatic bile duct ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afroze, Syeda H; Munshi, Md Kamruzzaman; Martínez, Allyson K; Uddin, Mohammad; Gergely, Maté; Szynkarski, Claudia; Guerrier, Micheleine; Nizamutdinov, Damir; Dostal, David; Glaser, Shannon

    2015-04-15

    Cholangiocyte proliferation is regulated in a coordinated fashion by many neuroendocrine factors through autocrine and paracrine mechanisms. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is known to play a role in the activation of hepatic stellate cells and blocking the RAS attenuates hepatic fibrosis. We investigated the role of the RAS during extrahepatic cholestasis induced by bile duct ligation (BDL). In this study, we used normal and BDL rats that were treated with control, angiotensin II (ANG II), or losartan for 2 wk. In vitro studies were performed in a primary rat cholangiocyte cell line (NRIC). The expression of renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme, angiotensinogen, and angiotensin receptor type 1 was evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC), real-time PCR, and FACs and found to be increased in BDL compared with normal rat. The levels of ANG II were evaluated by ELISA and found to be increased in serum and conditioned media of cholangiocytes from BDL compared with normal rats. Treatment with ANG II increased biliary mass and proliferation in both normal and BDL rats. Losartan attenuated BDL-induced biliary proliferation. In vitro, ANG II stimulated NRIC proliferation via increased intracellular cAMP levels and activation of the PKA/ERK/CREB intracellular signaling pathway. ANG II stimulated a significant increase in Sirius red staining and IHC for fibronectin that was blocked by angiotensin receptor blockade. In vitro, ANG II stimulated the gene expression of collagen 1A1, fibronectin 1, and IL-6. These results indicate that cholangiocytes express a local RAS and that ANG II plays an important role in regulating biliary proliferation and fibrosis during extraheptic cholestasis.

  4. Clinical relevance of urinary angiotensinogen and renin as potential biomarkers in patients with overt proteinuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hye Ryoun; Jeon, Junseok; Park, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Jung Eun; Huh, Wooseong; Oh, Ha Young; Kim, Yoon-Goo

    2014-11-01

    Urinary angiotensinogen (AGT) and renin have been reported to reflect the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activity. However, the adequacy and clinical significance of these markers have not been evaluated in overtly proteinuric patients. In patients with biopsy-proven glomerulonephritis, plasma and urinary AGT and renin were analyzed. A cohort of 75 patients treated with RAS inhibitors was followed for 1 year. Among the 207 patients, 105 had subnephrotic and 102 had nephrotic-range proteinuria. Mean age, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and urinary protein-to-creatinine ratio (P/Cr) of all patients were 48 years, 79.7 mL/min/1.73 m(2), and 5.66 mg/mg, respectively. Both natural logarithm of urinary AGT/creatinine (ln [urinary AGT/Cr]) and ln (urinary renin/Cr) showed positive correlations with urinary P/Cr. There was a positive correlation between ln (urinary AGT/Cr) and ln (urinary renin/Cr). Ln (urinary renin/Cr) was not affected by ln (plasma renin) regardless of the degree of proteinuria. The treatment response to RAS inhibitors was greatest in patients with high urinary AGT and renin. However, the predictive value of those parameters was no longer present when the values were adjusted by the degree of proteinuria. Ln (urinary renin/Cr) and initial eGFR were independently associated with the changes in renal function for 1 year. Ln (urinary AGT/Cr) was associated with persistent overt proteinuria after 1 year. Our study suggests that urinary renin may be a better marker in heavy proteinuria, and the treatment response to RAS inhibitors may be enhanced in patients with high urinary renin and AGT. Further studies will be necessary to explore the value of urinary AGT and renin.

  5. The importance of the renin-angiotensin system in normal cardiovascular homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, E.

    1975-01-01

    Studies were carried out on adult mongrel dogs (20 to 30 kilograms) to investigate the importance of the renin-angiotensin system. Results indicate that the renin-angiotensin system plays a major role in the maintenance of circulatory homeostasis when extracellular fluid volume is depleted. It was also found that angiotensin II concentration, in addition to renal perfusion pressure, is a factor in the regulation of renin release.

  6. Biphenyl/diphenyl ether renin inhibitors: filling the S1 pocket of renin via the S3 pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing; Simpson, Robert D; Zhao, Wei; Tice, Colin M; Xu, Zhenrong; Cacatian, Salvacion; Jia, Lanqi; Flaherty, Patrick T; Guo, Joan; Ishchenko, Alexey; Wu, Zhongren; McKeever, Brian M; Scott, Boyd B; Bukhtiyarov, Yuri; Berbaum, Jennifer; Panemangalore, Reshma; Bentley, Ross; Doe, Christopher P; Harrison, Richard K; McGeehan, Gerard M; Singh, Suresh B; Dillard, Lawrence W; Baldwin, John J; Claremon, David A

    2011-08-15

    Structure-based design led to the discovery of a novel class of renin inhibitors in which an unprecedented phenyl ring filling the S1 site is attached to the phenyl ring filling the S3 pocket. Optimization for several parameters including potency in the presence of human plasma, selectivity against CYP3A4 inhibition and improved rat oral bioavailability led to the identification of 8d which demonstrated antihypertensive efficacy in a transgenic rat model of human hypertension.

  7. Identification of ATF2 as a transcriptional regulator of renin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desch, Michael; Hackmayer, Gerit; Todorov, Vladimir T

    2012-01-01

    The cAMP response element (enhCRE) in the distal enhancer regulatory region of renin gene is believed to play a major role in the control of renin transcription. enhCRE binds the CRE-binding protein (CREB), which is the main transcription factor target of cAMP signaling. Using the mouse renin-producing cell line As4.1 we found that activating transcription factor-2 (ATF2) also binds to enhCRE. N-terminal phosphorylation of ATF2, which controls its transactivation, is associated with downregulation of renin gene expression by the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα). The ubiquitin proteasome inhibitor MG132 also phosphorylates ATF2 and inhibits renin expression. Knockdown of ATF2 attenuated the suppression of renin gene expression by MG132, thus demonstrating that ATF2 mediates the inhibitory effect of MG132. In addition, MG132 increased the DNA-binding of ATF2 as well as the ratio of bound ATF2 to CREB. Using ATF2- and CREB-Gal4 fusion protein constructs coupled with luciferase reporter system we showed that ATF2 has a weaker transactivating capacity than CREB. These data suggest that ATF2 represses renin expression by drifting the transcriptional control of renin gene away from CREB. Accordingly, TNFα completely abrogated the cAMP-dependent stimulation of renin gene expression.

  8. 胆囊胆固醇结石易患鼠和免患鼠肝胆脂质代谢和分泌的差别%Differences between hepatic and biliary lipid metabolism and secretion in genetically gallstone-susceptible and gallstone-resistant mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许国强; 赵力; 等

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate differences between hepatic and biliary lipid metabolism and secretion of genetically gallstone-susceptible (C57L) and resistant (AKR) mice and the mechanism of cholesterol gallstone formation.Methods The inbred C57L and AKR mice were fed a lithogenic diet containing 15% fat, 1.25% cholesterol and 0.5% cholic acid for four weeks. Hepatic cholesterol content and secretion rates of biliary lipids, as well as phenotypes of the liver and gallbladder were determined and examined before and after the feeding of the lithogenic diet. Results Both before and after ingestion of the lithogenic diet, hepatic secretion rates of all biliary lipids in C57L mice were markedly higher than that of AKR mice (P<0.05, P<0.01, respectively), whereas hepatic cholesterol contents of C57L mice were significantly lower than that of AKR mice (P<0.05). Furthermore, after consumption of the lithogenic diet, the increase in hepatic secretion rate of biliary cholesterol in C57L mice was significantly higher than that in AKR mice (P<0.01). Cholesterol gallstones formed in C57L mice and fatty livers developed in AKR mice. Conclusions Biliary cholesterol hypersecretion is the key pathophysiological defect of gallstone formation, lith genes have effects on biliary cholesterol hypersecretion and susceptibility to cholesterol gallstone formation in C57L mice. Lithogenic bile is formed at the canalicular membrane and precedes the development of cholesterol gallstones. It is most likely that cholesterol and bile acid hyposecretion make the AKR strain susceptible to the development of fatty livers and resistant to gallstone formation.%目的研究胆囊胆固醇结石易患鼠(C57L)和免患鼠(AKR)肝胆脂质代谢和分泌的特征以及胆囊胆固醇结石形成的机制.方法用含15%脂肪、1.25%胆固醇和0.5%胆酸的结石餐饲喂C57L和AKR鼠四周,检测并比较两种鼠在结石餐干预前、后肝脏胆固醇含量、肝内胆汁中脂质的分泌率以及胆

  9. Aldosterone and cortisol co-secreting bifunctional adrenal cortical carcinoma: A rare event

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, Puskar Shyam; Nayak, Prasant; Gurumurthy, Srinivasan; David, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) co-secreting aldosterone and cortisol is extremely rare. We report the case of a 37-yearold female who presented with paresis and facial puffiness. Evaluation revealed hypertension, hyperglycemia, severe hypokalemia and hyperaldosteronemia with elevated plasma aldosterone to renin ratio (ARR). Urinary free cortisol estimation showed elevated levels. Computed tomography scan revealed a right adrenal mass. Radical adrenalectomy specimen revealed ACC (T3N1). Post-o...

  10. Pancreatic islet renin angiotensin system: its novel roles in islet function and in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Po Sing; Carlsson, Per-Ola

    2005-05-01

    Several regulatory systems are implicated in the regulation of islet function and beta cell mass. Of great interest in this context are some endocrine, paracrine/autocrine, and intracrine regulators. These include, to name but a few, the gut peptides, growth factors, prostaglandins, and some vasoactive mediators such as nitric oxide, bradykinins, endothelins, and angiotensins. Apart from its potent vasoconstrictor actions, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) that generates angiotensin II has several novel functions-stimulation and inhibition of cell proliferation; induction of apoptosis; generation of reactive oxygen species; regulation of hormone secretion; and proinflammatory and profibrogenic actions. In the pancreas, recent evidence supports the presence of an islet RAS, which is subject to activation by islet transplantation and diabetes. Such a local islet RAS, if activated, may drive islet fibrosis and reduce islet blood flow, oxygen tension, and insulin biosynthesis. Moreover, activation of an islet RAS may drive the synthesis of reactive oxygen species, cause oxidative stress-induced beta cell dysfunction and apoptosis, and thus contribute to the islet dysfunction seen in type 2 diabetes and after islet transplantation. Blockade of the RAS could contribute to the development of novel therapeutic strategies in the prevention and treatment of patients with diabetes and in islet transplantation.

  11. Hepatitis C and Incarceration

    Science.gov (United States)

    HEPATITIS C & INCARCERATION What is hepatitis? “Hepatitis” means inflammation or swelling of the liver. The liver is an important ... viral hepatitis: Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C. They are all different from each other and ...

  12. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of terms Donate Today Enroll in 123 What is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as portosystemic encephalopathy or PSE, is a condition that causes temporary worsening of brain ...

  13. Hepatitis A

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis A, is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). The disease spreads through contact with ... washed in untreated water Putting into your mouth a finger or object that came into contact with ...

  14. Hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... information on hepatitis, both in the context of HIV coinfection and as a separate illness. NATAP provides coverage of key conferences, maintains a selection of hepatitis articles, and features an ask-the-expert forum on ...

  15. Hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... personal items (such as toothbrush, razor, and nail clippers) with a person who has the virus Were ... B virus Digestive system Aggressive hepatitis Gianotti-Crosti syndrome on the leg Hepatitis B References Kim DK, ...

  16. Collecting duct-specific knockout of renin attenuates angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkumar, Nirupama; Stuart, Deborah; Rees, Sara; Hoek, Alfred Van; Sigmund, Curt D; Kohan, Donald E

    2014-10-15

    The physiological and pathophysiological significance of collecting duct (CD)-derived renin, particularly as it relates to blood pressure (BP) regulation, is unknown. To address this question, we generated CD-specific renin knockout (KO) mice and examined BP and renal salt and water excretion. Mice containing loxP-flanked exon 1 of the renin gene were crossed with mice transgenic for aquaporin-2-Cre recombinase to achieve CD-specific renin KO. Compared with controls, CD renin KO mice had 70% lower medullary renin mRNA and 90% lower renin mRNA in microdissected cortical CD. Urinary renin levels were significantly lower in KO mice (45% of control levels) while plasma renin concentration was significantly higher in KO mice (63% higher than controls) during normal-Na intake. While no observable differences were noted in BP between the two groups with varying Na intake, infusion of angiotensin II at 400 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1) resulted in an attenuated hypertensive response in the KO mice (mean arterial pressure 111 ± 4 mmHg in KO vs. 128 ± 3 mmHg in controls). Urinary renin excretion and epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) remained significantly lower in the KO mice following ANG II infusion compared with controls. Furthermore, membrane-associated ENaC protein levels were significantly lower in KO mice following ANG II infusion. These findings suggest that CD renin modulates BP in ANG II-infused hypertension and these effects are associated with changes in ENaC expression.

  17. Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis C, is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). It usually spreads through contact with ... childbirth. Most people who are infected with hepatitis C don't have any symptoms for years. If ...

  18. Sodium intake and renin system avtivity: Effects of metroprolol on the log-linear relationship in conscious rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bie, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Sodium intake and renin system avtivity: Effects of metroprolol on the log-linear relationship in conscious rats.......Sodium intake and renin system avtivity: Effects of metroprolol on the log-linear relationship in conscious rats....

  19. Theoretical basis of a beneficial role for vitamin D in viral hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lương, Khanh vinh quốc; Nguyễn, Lan Thi Hoàng

    2012-10-14

    Abnormal bone metabolism and dysfunction of the calcium-parathyroid hormone-vitamin D axis have been reported in patients with viral hepatitis. Some studies suggested a relationship between vitamin D and viral hepatitis. Genetic studies have provided an opportunity to identify the proteins that link vitamin D to the pathology of viral hepatitis (i.e., the major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, the vitamin D receptor, cytochrome P₄₅₀, the renin-angiotensin system, apolipoprotein E, liver X receptor, toll-like receptor, and the proteins regulated by the Sp1 promoter gene). Vitamin D also exerts its effects on viral hepatitis via non-genomic factors, i.e., matrix metalloproteinase, endothelial vascular growth factor, prostaglandins, cyclooxygenase-2, and oxidative stress. In conclusion, vitamin D could have a beneficial role in viral hepatitis. Calcitriol is best used for viral hepatitis because it is the active form of the vitamin D₃ metabolite.

  20. HYPERACTIVE TISSUE RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEMS IN CARDIOVASCULAR DYSFUNCTION - EXPERIMENTAL-EVIDENCE AND CLINICAL HYPOTHESES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PINTO, YM; BUIKEMA, H; VANGILST, WH

    1995-01-01

    In this review, hypotheses are discussed with regard to the role of local, tissue renin-angiotensin systems in the progression of cardiovascular dysfunction. After local renin-anglotensin systems had been described as functionally distinct systems, recent experimental studies have suggested an assoc

  1. Negative captopril renography on patients with renin mediated hypertension due to page kidney and reninoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yung, B.C.K. [Department of Radiology and Organ Imaging, United Christian Hospital, 130, Hip Wo Street, Kwun Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Wong, K.W. [Department of Radiology, Princess Margaret Hospital, 2-10, Princess Margaret Hospital Road, Lai Chi Kok, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Fan, W.C. [Department of Radiology and Organ Imaging, United Christian Hospital, 130, Hip Wo Street, Kwun Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Chan, J.C.S. [Department of Radiology and Organ Imaging, United Christian Hospital, 130, Hip Wo Street, Kwun Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Lo, S.S.S. [Department of Radiology and Organ Imaging, United Christian Hospital, 130, Hip Wo Street, Kwun Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    1999-07-01

    Through a mechanism similar to renal artery stenosis, patients with reninoma and page kidney also suffered from renin mediated hypertension. Captopril renograms performed on our patients with the latter two conditions, however, did not yield diagnostic findings. Therefore, equivocal or negative captopril renography cannot serve to rule out conditions with elevated renin other than renal artery stenosis.

  2. Spectrum of mutations in the renin-angiotensin system genes in autosomal recessive renal tubular dysgenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gribouval, Olivier; Morinière, Vincent; Pawtowski, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    , pulmonary hypoplasia, and refractory arterial hypotension. The disease is linked to mutations in the genes encoding several components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS): AGT (angiotensinogen), REN (renin), ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme), and AGTR1 (angiotensin II receptor type 1). Here, we review...

  3. Hypoksisk hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amadid, Hanan; Schiødt, Frank Vinholt

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxic hepatitis (HH), also known as ischaemic hepatitis or shock liver, is an acute liver injury caused by hepatic hypoxia. Cardiac failure, respiratory failure and septic shock are the main underlying conditions. In each of these conditions, several haemodynamic mechanisms lead to hepatic...... hypoxia. A shock state is observed in only 50% of cases. Thus, shock liver and ischaemic hepatitis are misnomers. HH can be a diagnostic pitfall but the diagnosis can be established when three criteria are met. Prognosis is poor and prompt identification and treatment of the underlying conditions...

  4. Activation of the succinate receptor GPR91 in macula densa cells causes renin release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Sarah Laurin; Toma, Ildikó; Kang, Jung Julie; Meer, Elliott James; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2009-05-01

    Macula densa (MD) cells of the juxtaglomerular apparatus (JGA) are salt sensors and generate paracrine signals that control renal blood flow, glomerular filtration, and release of the prohypertensive hormone renin. We hypothesized that the recently identified succinate receptor GPR91 is present in MD cells and regulates renin release. Using immunohistochemistry, we identified GPR91 in the apical plasma membrane of MD cells. Treatment of MD cells with succinate activated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs; p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and induced the synthesis and release of prostaglandin E(2), a potent vasodilator and classic paracrine mediator of renin release. Using microperfused JGA and real-time confocal fluorescence imaging of quinacrine-labeled renin granules, we detected significant renin release in response to tubular succinate (EC(50) 350 microM). Genetic deletion of GPR91 (GPR91(-/-) mice) or pharmacologic inhibition of MAPK or COX-2 blocked succinate-induced renin release. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes caused GPR91-dependent upregulation of renal cortical phospho-p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2, COX-2, and renin content. Salt depletion for 1 wk increased plasma renin activity seven-fold in wild-type mice but only 3.4-fold in GPR91(-/-) mice. In summary, MD cells can sense alterations in local tissue metabolism via accumulation of tubular succinate and GPR91 signaling, which involves the activation of MAPKs, COX-2, and the release of prostaglandin E(2). This mechanism may be integral in the regulation of renin release and activation of the renin-angiotensin system in health and disease.

  5. Hepatitis A through E (Viral Hepatitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nutrition Clinical Trials Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Wilson Disease Hepatitis (Viral) View or Print All Sections What is Viral Hepatitis? Viral hepatitis is an infection that causes liver inflammation ...

  6. [Autoimmune hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostojić, Rajko

    2003-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is an unresolving, hepatocellular inflammation of unknown cause that is characterized by the presence of periportal hepatitis on histologic examination, tissue autoantibodies in serum, and hypergammaglobulinemia. By international consensus, the designation autoimmune hepatitis has replaced alternative terms for the condition. Three types of autoimmune hepatitis have been proposed based on immunoserologic findings. Type 1 autoimmune hepatitis is characterized by the presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) or smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) (or both) in serum. Seventy percent of patients with type 1 of autoimmune hepatitis are women. This type is the most common form and accounts for at least 80% of cases. Type 2 is characterized by the presence of antibodies to liver-kidney microsome type 1 (anti-LKM1) in serum. Patients with this type of autoimmune hepatitis are predominantly children. Type 3 autoimmune hepatitis is characterized by the presence of antibodies to soluble liver antigen (anti-SLA) in serum. There are no individual features that are pathognomonic of autoimmune hepatitis, and its diagnosis requires the confident exclusion of other conditions. The large majority of patients show satisfactory response to corticosteroid (usually prednisone or prednisolone) therapy. For the past 30 years it has been customary to add azathioprine as a "steroid sparing" agent to allow lower doses of steroids to be used and remission, once achieved, can be sustained in many patients with azathioprine alone after steroid withdrawal. Patients with autoimmune hepatitis who have decompensated during or after corticosteroid therapy are candidates for liver transplantation.

  7. Influence of feeding schedules on the chronobiology of renin activity, urinary electrolytes and blood pressure in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochel, Jonathan P; Fink, Martin; Bon, Charlotte; Peyrou, Mathieu; Bieth, Bruno; Desevaux, Cyril; Deurinck, Mark; Giraudel, Jérôme M; Danhof, Meindert

    2014-06-01

    cascade, urinary electrolytes, and BP. Introducing a 6- or 12-h delay in the dogs' feeding schedule caused a shift of similar magnitude (05:06 and 12:32 h for Studies a and b, respectively) in the rhythm of these biomarkers. In all study groups, RA and BP exhibited a marked fall just after food intake. The drop in RA is consistent with sodium and water-induced body fluid expansion, while the reduction of BP could be related to the decreased activity of renin and the secretion of vasodilatory gut peptides. An approximately 1.5-fold (1.2-1.6-fold) change between the average early and late time after feeding observations was found for RA (p < 0.0001), UNa,fe (p < 0.01) and UK,fe (p < 0.05). Postprandial variations in BP, albeit small (ca. 10 mmHg), were statistically significant (p < 0.01) and supported by the model-based analysis. In conclusion, the timing of food intake appears to be pivotal to the circadian organization of the renin cascade and BP. This synchronizing effect could be mediated by feeding-related signals, such as dietary sodium, capable of entraining circadian oscillators downstream of the master, light-dark-adjusted pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

  8. Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and hepatitis C infections during pregnancy? • How is hepatitis B virus infection spread? • What is acute hepatitis B virus infection? • What is chronic hepatitis B virus infection? • Can ...

  9. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Can Strike Anyone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis Hepatitis Can Strike Anyone Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table ... from all walks of life are affected by hepatitis, especially hepatitis C, the most common form of ...

  10. Hepatitis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of three viruses: the hepatitis A virus the hepatitis B virus the hepatitis C virus In some rare cases, ... also called serum hepatitis) is caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV). HBV can cause a wide range of ...

  11. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3 - Hepatitis B Chapter 3 - Hepatitis E Hepatitis C Deborah Holtzman INFECTIOUS AGENT Hepatitis C virus (HCV), ... to child. Map 3-05. Prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection 1 PDF Version (printable) 1 Disease ...

  12. Hepatitis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Hepatitis KidsHealth > For Parents > Hepatitis Print A A A ... to Call the Doctor en español Hepatitis About Hepatitis The word hepatitis simply means an inflammation of ...

  13. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chapter 3 - Hepatitis A Chapter 3 - Hepatitis C Hepatitis B Francisco Averhoff INFECTIOUS AGENT Hepatitis B is ... their exposures. Map 3-04. Prevalence of chronic hepatitis B virus infection among adults PDF Version (printable) ...

  14. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chapter 3 - Hepatitis B Chapter 3 - Hepatitis E Hepatitis C Deborah Holtzman INFECTIOUS AGENT Hepatitis C virus ( ... human blood Map 3-05. Global epidemiology of hepatitis C virus infection 1 PDF Version (printable) 1 ...

  15. Heterogeneity of renin substrate released from hepatocytes and in brain extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, E.; Eggena, P.; Barrett, J.D.; Sambhi, M.P.

    1984-01-23

    Renin substrate was characterized in incubation medium of isolated hepatocytes, plasma, and brain extracts of the rat by isoelectric focusing and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isoelectric focusing (IEF) profile of renin substrate released into incubation medium of rat hepatocytes demonstrated two peaks with isoelectric points (pI) of 4.1 (minor peak) and 4.6 (major peak). Extracts of normal rat brain also showed two forms (pI 4.6 major form, and pI 5.1 minor form). In contrast, normal rat plasma contained a single broad peak of substrate with pI 4.5. Intraperitoneal injection of 17..beta.. estradiol (1 mg) or bilateral nephrectomy significantly elevated renin substrate levels in plasma and increased its release from hepatocytes, however, no change in the IEF and PAGE profiles was evident. Molecular weights of renin substrate were 60,000-65,000 from all preparations. The presence of distinct forms of brain renin substrate and the lack of an increase in brain renin substrate following nephrectomy or estrogen treatment suggest local synthesis and support the postulate of an independent renin-angiotensin system in the central nervous system.

  16. PPARgamma-Dependent Control of Renin Expression: Molecular Mechanisms and Pathophysiological Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir T. Todorov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last years accumulating evidence demonstrated that the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma regulates the expression of renin gene and thus the overall renin production. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the transcriptional control of the renin gene by PPARgamma received from variety of models ranging from cell culture to transgenic animals. The molecular mechanisms of the PPARgamma action on renin are particularly interesting because they are featured by two newly described characteristics: one of them is the recently identified PPARgamma target sequence Pal3 which is specific for the human renin gene and mediates exceptionally high sensitivity to transactivation; the other is the potentiating effect of PPARgamma on the cAMP signaling in the renin-producing cells. Furthermore, I discuss the need for generating of additional transgenic animal models which are more appropriate with regard to the role of the PPARgamma-dependent regulation of the renin gene expression in human diseases such as arterial hypertension and metabolic syndrome.

  17. PPARgamma-Dependent Control of Renin Expression: Molecular Mechanisms and Pathophysiological Relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Vladimir T

    2013-01-01

    During the last years accumulating evidence demonstrated that the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma) regulates the expression of renin gene and thus the overall renin production. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the transcriptional control of the renin gene by PPARgamma received from variety of models ranging from cell culture to transgenic animals. The molecular mechanisms of the PPARgamma action on renin are particularly interesting because they are featured by two newly described characteristics: one of them is the recently identified PPARgamma target sequence Pal3 which is specific for the human renin gene and mediates exceptionally high sensitivity to transactivation; the other is the potentiating effect of PPARgamma on the cAMP signaling in the renin-producing cells. Furthermore, I discuss the need for generating of additional transgenic animal models which are more appropriate with regard to the role of the PPARgamma-dependent regulation of the renin gene expression in human diseases such as arterial hypertension and metabolic syndrome.

  18. End-organ damage in urbanized Africans with low plasma renin levels: the SABPA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooyen, Johannes M; Schutte, Aletta E; Huisman, Hugo W; Schutte, Rudolph; Fourie, Carla M T; Malan, Nicolaas T; Malan, Leoné

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether active renin concentration is associated with markers of end-organ damage in urbanized Africans. This study forms part of the Sympathetic Activity and Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Africans (SABPA) study. For this study, 81 men and 74 women were divided into low- and high-renin groups. Ambulatory blood pressure measurements were conducted. A resting 12-lead ECG was determined in order to determine the gender-specific Cornell voltage. Cardiovascular variables were continuously recorded with the Finometer. Carotid-dorsalis pedis pulse wave velocity was obtained with the Complior acquisition system. The carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) was obtained with the SonoSite MicroMaxx. Blood samples were collected; serum and plasma were stored at -80 °C for analysis. Anthropometric measurements were taken using standard methods. A general health questionnaire was also completed. The urinary creatinine was determined with a calorimetric method and albumin with a turbidimetric method. The serum sodium and potassium were determined by making use of the Konelab TM 20i Sequential Multiple Analyzer Computer (SMAC). The concentration of active renin in the plasma was analyzed by making use of a high-sensitivity radio-immunometric assay. A negative association (r=-0.29, pplasma renin in the low-renin group (renin levels. It seems evident that low renin in black South Africans may result in sub-clinical renal damage and impaired vascular function in a group of urbanized black South Africans.

  19. The renin angiotensin system in the development of cardiovascular disease: role of aliskiren in risk reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Verdecchia

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Verdecchia1, Fabio Angeli1, Giovanni Mazzotta1, Giorgio Gentile2, Gianpaolo Reboldi21Department of Cardiology, Clinical Research Unit ‘Preventive Cardiology’, Hospital ‘Santa Maria della Misericordia’, and Fondazione Umbra Cuore e Ipertensione – AUCI Onlus, Perugia, Italy; 2Department of Internal Medicine University of Perugia, ItalyAbstract: An association has been shown between plasma renin activity (PRA and the risk of cardiovascular disease. There is also evidence that angiotensin II exerts detrimental effects on progression and instabilization of atherosclerotic plaque. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS can be inhibited through inhibition of angiotensin I (Ang I generation from angiotensinogen by direct renin inhibitors, inhibition of angiotensin II (Ang II generation from angiotensin I by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and finally by direct inhibition of the action of Ang II receptor level. Aliskiren, the first direct renin inhibitor to reach the market, is a lowmolecular-weight, orally active, hydrophilic nonpeptide. Aliskiren blocks Ang I generation, while plasma renin concentration increases because the drugs blocks the negative feed-back exerted by Ang II on renin synthesis. Because of its long pharmacological half-life, aliskiren is suitable for once-daily administration. Its through-to-peak ratio approximates 98% for the 300 mg/day dose. Because of its mechanism of action, aliskiren might offer the additional opportunity to inhibit progression of atherosclerosis at tissue level. Hypertension is an approved indication for this drug, which is also promising for the treatment of heart failure. The efficacy of this drug in reducing major clinical events is being tested in large ongoing clinical trials.Keywords: plasma renin activity, renin angiotensin system, aliskiren, angiotensinogen, renin, hypertension, heart failure, diabetes

  20. The renin-angiotensin system and its blockers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igić Rajko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on the renin-angiotensin system (RAS has contributed significantly to advances in understanding cardiovascular and renal homeostasis and to the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. This review offers a brief history of the RAS with an overview of its major components and their functions, as well as blockers of the RAS, their clinical usage and current research that targets various components of the RAS. Because angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE metabolizes two biologically active peptides, one in the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS and one in the RAS, it is the essential connection between the two systems. ACE releases very powerful hypertensive agent, angiotensin II and also inactivates strong hypotensive peptide, bradykinin. Inhibition of ACE thus has a dual effect, resulting in decreased angiotensin II and increased bradykinin. We described the KKS as well.

  1. Cardiovascular Risk Reduction with Renin-Angiotensin Aldosterone System Blockade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Houston Miller

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the evidence supporting treatments within the renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAS, the role cardioprotection plays within the management of hypertension, considerations around medication adherence, and the role of the nurse or nurse practitioner in guiding patients to achieve higher hypertension control rates. A large body of data now exists to support the use of angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs which act on RAS, in the management of hypertension and their effect on cardiovascular risk reduction. Current evidence suggests that inhibition of the RAS is an important target for cardioprotection. RAS inhibition controls blood pressure and also reduces target-organ damage. This is especially important in populations at high-risk for damage including patients with diabetes and those with chronic kidney disease. Both ARBs and ACEIs target the RAS offering important reductions in both BP and target organ damage.

  2. Engagement of renin-angiotensin system in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Hiroji; Hoshino, Koji; Kubota, Yoshinobu

    2011-05-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang-II) plays a role not only as a vasoconstrictor in controlling blood pressure and electrolyte and fluid homeostasis, but also as a mitogenic factor through the Ang-II type-1 (AT1) receptor in cardiovascular cells. Since a low prevalence of cancer in hypertensive patients receiving angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors has been reported, the molecular mechanisms of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in cancer cells have been elucidated. Interestingly, there is increasing evidence that the RAS is implicated in the development of prostate cancer. As previously reported, AT1 receptor blockers (ARBs), a class of antihypertensive agent, have the potential to inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cells and tumors through the AT1 receptor. This review highlights that the RAS plays a potential role in various aspects of prostate cancer, and ARBs could be useful for treatment of prostate cancer or its chemoprevention.

  3. Hepatitis A

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inflammation of the liver.” This inflammation can be caused by a wide variety of toxins, drugs, and metabolic diseases, as well as infection. There are at least 5 hepatitis viruses. Hepatitis A is contracted when a child eats food or drinks water that is contaminated with the virus or has ...

  4. PPARgamma-dependent regulation of adenylate cyclase 6 amplifies the stimulatory effect of cAMP on renin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desch, Michael; Schubert, Thomas; Schreiber, Andrea; Mayer, Sandra; Friedrich, Björn; Artunc, Ferruh; Todorov, Vladimir T

    2010-11-01

    The second messenger cAMP plays an important role in the regulation of renin gene expression. Nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is known to stimulate renin gene transcription acting through PPARγ-binding sequences in renin promoter. We show now that activation of PPARγ by unsaturated fatty acids or thiazolidinediones drastically augments the cAMP-dependent increase of renin mRNA in the human renin-producing cell line Calu-6. The underlying mechanism involves potentiation of agonist-induced cAMP increase and up-regulation of adenylate cyclase 6 (AC6) gene expression. We identified a palindromic element with a 3-bp spacer (Pal3) in AC6 intron 1 (AC6Pal3). AC6Pal3 bound PPARγ and mediated trans-activation by PPARγ agonist. AC6 knockdown decreased basal renin mRNA level and attenuated the maximal PPARγ-dependent stimulation of the cAMP-induced renin gene expression. AC6Pal3 decoy oligonucleotide abrogated the PPARγ-dependent potentiation of cAMP-induced renin gene expression. Treatment of mice with PPARγ agonist increased AC6 mRNA kidney levels. Our data suggest that in addition to its direct effect on renin gene transcription, PPARγ "sensitizes" renin gene to cAMP via trans-activation of AC6 gene. AC6 has been identified as PPARγ target gene with a functional Pal3 sequence.

  5. Calcium channel blocker prevents stress-induced activation of renin and aldosterone in conscious pig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceremuzynski, L.K.; Klos, J.; Barcikowski, B.; Herbaczynska-Cedro, K. (Department of Cardiology, Postgraduate Medical School, Warsaw (Poland))

    1991-06-01

    A considerable amount of data suggest the involvement of calcium-mediated processes in the activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAA) cascade. To investigate the effect of calcium-channel inhibition on the RAA system, the authors studied 21 conscious pigs. Blood renin and aldosterone levels increased by subjecting animals to 24 hours of immobilization stress. Renin and aldosterone levels were repeatedly measured by radioimmunoassay in blood samples taken periodically over 24 hours from a chronically implanted arterial cannula. Pretreatment of the animals (N = 11) with nisoldipine, 2 {times} 20 mg p.o. daily for 2 days before and on the day of immobilization, transiently attenuated the stress-induced increase of plasma renin activity and completely prevented the rise of aldosterone, as compared to nontreated controls (N = 10). The finding that nisoldipine suppresses RAA activation induced by a nonpharmacologic stimulus in the conscious intact animal may have clinical implications.

  6. Aliskiren, the first direct renin inhibitor for treatment of hypertension: The path of its development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Jadhav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Standard treatments available today for treating hypertension is diuretics, β-blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEs, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs, calcium channel blockers, a-blockers, vasodilators, and centrally acting drugs. It is difficult to achieve the optimized renin angiotensin aldosterone system suppression with currently available antihypertensive agents, because ACE inhibitors, ARBs, and diuretics all activate the compensatory feedback mechanism that increases renin release and increase plasma renin activity. The first orally active direct renin inhibitors (DRIs were developed in 1980s, including enalkiren, remikiren, and zankiren. However, poor absorption from the gastrointestinal tract, less bioavailability (<2%, short half life, and low potency hindered the development of these compounds. Aliskiren is the first DRI for the treatment of hypertension. Aliskiren is designed through a combination of molecular modeling techniques and crystal structure elucidation. Aliskiren effectively reduces the blood pressure as a mono therapy as well in combination therapy.

  7. Radioimmunoassay of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone in patients with adrenal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavnov, V.N.; Yakovlev, A.A.; Yugrinov, O.G.; Gandzha, T.I. (Kievskij Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Ehndokrinologii i Obmena Veshchestv (Ukrainian SSR))

    1983-02-01

    The results are presented of a study of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in 89 patients with aldosteronoma, corticosteroma, pheochromocytoma and hypertension. Radioimmunoassay was used to measure aldosterone concentration and renin activity in the peripheral blood and blood from vena cava inferior, the renal and adrenal veins, the circadian cycle of their content and the responsiveness of the glomerular zone of the adrenal cortex and the juxtaglomerular renal system under the influence of lasix intake and the change over from a horizontal into vertical position. Patients with adrenal tumors have shown disorders of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone function. Radioimmunoassay of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system promotes early detection of adrenal tumors in the general population of patients with hypertension and can be used for control over therapeutic efficacy.

  8. Guanfacine in essential hypertension: Effect on blood pressure, plasma noradrenaline concentration and plasma renin activity

    OpenAIRE

    Schoeppe, W.; Brecht, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    1 The acute and chronic effects of guanfacine on blood pressure, plasma noradrenaline concentration and plasma renin activity were investigated in 23 patients (15 males, 8 females) with essential hypertension (WHO grade I-II).

  9. Renin system of the kidney in ISIAH rats with inherited stress-induced arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedoseeva, L A; Dymshits, G M; Markel, A L; Jakobson, G S

    2009-02-01

    The renal renin system was studied in ISIAH rats with inherited stress-induced arterial hypertension. The expression of genes for renin (Ren1) and cyclooxygenase (Cox-2) was evaluated in renal tissue of ISIAH and WAG rats (normotensive control). Basal gene expression for Ren1 and Cox-2 in ISIAH rats was much lower than in WAG rats. Water deprivation for 11 h was followed by a 4-fold increase in Cox-2 gene expression in ISIAH rats. The increase in gene expression was insignificant in WAG rats (by 30%). Renin gene expression in renal tissue of ISIAH and WAG rats remained practically unchanged after water deprivation. We conclude that a change in Cox-2 gene expression after short-term water deprivation serves as a reliable criterion for functional strain of the renal renin system in hypertensive ISIAH rats.

  10. The evolution of renin-angiotensin blockade: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors as the starting point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sica, Domenic A

    2010-04-01

    The renin-angiotensin system has been a target in the treatment of hypertension for close to three decades. Several medication classes that block specific aspects of this system have emerged as useful therapies, including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and, most recently, direct renin inhibitors. There has been a natural history to the development of each of these three drug classes, starting with their use as antihypertensive agents; thereafter, in each case they have been employed as end-organ protective agents. To date, there has been scant evidence to favor angiotensin receptor blockers or direct renin inhibitors over angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in treating hypertension or in affording end-organ protection; thus, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors remain the standard of care when renin-angiotensin system blockade is warranted.

  11. Increased renin production in mice with deletion of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma in juxtaglomerular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desch, Michael; Schreiber, Andrea; Schweda, Frank; Madsen, Kirsten; Friis, Ulla G; Weatherford, Eric T; Sigmund, Curt D; Sequeira Lopez, Maria Luisa; Gomez, R Ariel; Todorov, Vladimir T

    2010-03-01

    We recently found that endogenous (free fatty acids) and pharmacological (thiazolidinediones) agonists of nuclear receptor Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)gamma stimulate renin transcription. In addition, the renin gene was identified as a direct target of PPARgamma. The mouse renin gene is regulated by PPARgamma through a distal enhancer direct repeat closely related to consensus PPAR response element (PPRE). In vitro studies demonstrated that PPARgamma knockdown stimulated PPRE-driven transcription. These data predicted that deficiency of PPARgamma would upregulate mouse renin expression. Consistent with these observations knockdown of PPARgamma increased the transcription of a reporter gene driven by the mouse renin PPRE-like motif in vitro. To study the impact of PPARgamma on renin production in vivo, we used a cre/lox system to generate double-transgenic mice with disrupted PPARgamma locus in renin-producing juxtaglomerular (JG) cells of the kidney (RC-PPARgamma(fl/fl) mice). We provide evidence that PPARgamma expression was effectively reduced in JG cells of RC-PPARgamma(fl/fl) mice. Fluorescent immunohistochemistry showed stronger renin signal in RC-PPARgamma(fl/fl) than in littermate control RC-PPARgamma(wt/wt) mice. Renin mRNA levels and plasma renin concentration in RC-PPARgamma(fl/fl) mice were almost 2-fold higher than in littermate controls. Arterial blood pressure and pressure control of renal vascular resistance, which play decisive roles in the regulation of renin production were indistinguishable between RC-PPARgamma(wt/wt) and RC-PPARgamma(fl/fl) mice. These data demonstrate that the JG-specific PPARgamma deficiency results in increased mouse renin expression in vivo thus corroborating earlier in vitro results. PPARgamma appears to be a relevant transcription factor for the control of renin gene in JG cells.

  12. Interstitial Fibroblast-Like Cells Express Renin-Angiotensin System Components in a Fibrosing Murine Kidney

    OpenAIRE

    Okada, Hirokazu; Inoue, Tsutomu; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Carey, Robert M.; SUZUKI, HIROMICHI

    2002-01-01

    Recently, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) was implicated in organ fibrosis. However, few studies have examined the localization of RAS components, such as angiotensin II receptors, renin (REN), angiotensinogen (AGTN), and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), in the fibrosing kidney. To localize these components in the fibrosing kidney, we used a murine model of renal fibrosis that shows an enhanced expression of angiotensin II type 1A receptor (AT1AR) and AGTN. Our results indicate that th...

  13. Prevention of atrial fibrillation by Renin-Angiotensin system inhibition a meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Markus; Hua, Tsushung A; Böhm, Michael;

    2010-01-01

    The authors reviewed published clinical trial data on the effects of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibition for the prevention of atrial fibrillation (AF), aiming to define when RAS inhibition is most effective.......The authors reviewed published clinical trial data on the effects of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibition for the prevention of atrial fibrillation (AF), aiming to define when RAS inhibition is most effective....

  14. PEP-on-DEP: A competitive peptide-based disposable electrochemical aptasensor for renin diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biyani, Manish; Kawai, Keiko; Kitamura, Koichiro; Chikae, Miyuki; Biyani, Madhu; Ushijima, Hiromi; Tamiya, Eiichi; Yoneda, Takashi; Takamura, Yuzuru

    2016-10-15

    Antibody-based immunosensors are relatively less accessible to a wide variety of unreachable targets, such as low-molecular-weight biomarkers that represent a rich untapped source of disease-specific diagnostic information. Here, we present a peptide aptamer-based electrochemical sensor technology called 'PEP-on-DEP' to detect less accessible target molecules, such as renin, and to improve the quality of life. Peptide-based aptamers represent a relatively smart class of affinity binders and show great promise in biosensor development. Renin is involved in the regulation of arterial blood pressure and is an emerging biomarker protein for predicting cardiovascular risk and prognosis. To our knowledge, no studies have described aptamer molecules that can be used as new potent probes for renin. Here, we describe a portable electrochemical biosensor platform based on the newly identified peptide aptamer molecules for renin. We constructed a randomized octapeptide library pool with diversified sequences and selected renin specific peptide aptamers using cDNA display technology. We identified a few peptide aptamer sequences with a KD in the µM binding affinity range for renin. Next, we grafted the selected peptide aptamers onto gold nanoparticles and detected renin in a one-step competitive assay using our originally developed DEP (Disposable Electrochemical Printed) chip and a USB powered portable potentiostat system. We successfully detected renin in as little as 300ngmL(-1) using the PEP-on-DEP method. Thus, the generation and characterization of novel probes for unreachable target molecules by merging a newly identified peptide aptamer with electrochemical transduction allowed for the development of a more practical biosensor that, in principle, can be adapted to develop a portable, low-cost and mass-producible biosensor for point-of-care applications.

  15. Wide distribution of immunoreactive renin in nerve cells of human brain.

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    By use of the indirect peroxidase-antiperoxidase complex immunocytochemical technique, antibody to purified human renal renin was applied to formalin-fixed paraffin sections of human cadaver brain. Immune reaction products were observed in most nerve cells in all areas of the brain examined; staining was limited to the soma and proximal dendrites. These experiments have confirmed the presence of a renin-like substance in central nervous tissue and suggest a more generalized function for "brai...

  16. Stimulatory effects of neuronally released norepinephrine on renin release in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, Yasuo; Kawazoe, Shinka; Ichihara, Toshio; Shinyama, Hiroshi; Kageyama, Masaaki; Morimoto, Shiro (Osaka Univ. of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Japan))

    1988-10-01

    Extracellular high potassium inhibits renin release in vitro by increasing calcium concentrations in the juxtaglomerular cells. The authors found that the decreased response of renin release from rat kidney cortical slices in high potassium solution changed to a strikingly increased one in the presence of nifedipine at doses over 10{sup {minus}6} M. They then examined the stimulatory effect of extracellular high potassium in the presence of nifedipine on renin release. The enhancement of release was significantly suppressed either by propranolol or by metoprolol but not by prazosin. High potassium plus nifedipine-induced increase in renin release was markedly attenuated by renal denervation. The enhancing effect was not observed when the slices were incubated in calcium-free medium. Divalent cations such as Cd{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, and Mn{sup 2+} blocked this enhancement in a concentration-dependent manner. High potassium elicited an increase in {sup 3}H efflux from the slices preloaded with ({sup 3}H)-norepinephrine. The increasing effect was not influenced by nifedipine but was abolished by the removal of extracellular calcium or by the addition of divalent cations. These observations suggest to us that the high potassium plus nifedipine-induced increase in renin release from the slices is mediated by norepinephrine derived from renal sympathetic nerves and that this neuronally released norepinephrine stimulates renin release via activation of {beta}-adrenoceptors.

  17. Vitamin D in the Pathophysiology of Hypertension, Kidney Disease, and Diabetes: Examining the Relationship Between Vitamin D and the Renin-Angiotensin System in Human Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Anand; Williams, Jonathan S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Vitamin D has been implicated in the pathophysiology of extra-skeletal conditions such as hypertension, kidney disease, and diabetes, via its ability to negatively regulate the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). This article reviews the evidence supporting a link between vitamin D and the RAS in these conditions, with specific emphasis on translational observations and their limitations. Methods Literature review of animal and human studies evaluating the role of vitamin D in hypertension, kidney disease, and diabetes. Results Excess activity of the RAS has been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension, chronic kidney disease, decreased insulin secretion, and insulin resistance. Animal studies provide strong support for 1,25(OH)2D mediated down-regulation of renin expression and RAS activity via its interaction with the vitamin D receptor. Furthermore, the activity of vitamin D metabolites in animals is associated with reductions in blood pressure, proteinuria and renal injury, and with improved β–cell function. Many observational, and a few interventional, studies in humans have supported these findings; however, there is a lack of well designed prospective human interventional studies to definitively assess clinical outcomes. Conclusion Animal studies implicate vitamin D receptor agonist therapy to lower RAS activity as a potential method to reduce the risk of hypertension, kidney disease, and diabetes. There is a need for more well designed prospective interventional studies to validate this hypothesis in human clinical outcomes. PMID:22075270

  18. Free Fatty Acids Activate Renin-Angiotensin System in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes through Nuclear Factor-kappa B Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The activity of a local renin-angiotensin system (RAS in the adipose tissue is closely associated with obesity-related diseases. However, the mechanism of RAS activation in adipose tissue is still unknown. In the current study, we found that palmitic acid (PA, one kind of free fatty acid, induced the activity of RAS in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In the presence of fetuin A (Fet A, PA upregulated the expression of angiotensinogen (AGT and angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R and stimulated the secretion of angiotensin II (ANG II in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Moreover, the activation of RAS in 3T3-L1 adipocytes was blocked when we blocked Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 signaling pathway using TAK242 or NF-κB signaling pathway using BAY117082. Together, our results have identified critical molecular mechanisms linking PA/TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway to the activity of the local renin-angiotensin system in adipose tissue.

  19. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Symptoms to look for Caregiver Support Caregiver Stories Home › What is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Why Your Liver is ... questions about HE, one step at a time. Home About Us Ways to Give Contact Us Privacy ...

  20. Hepatitis A

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hepatitis A is more common in parts of Africa, Asia, Central and South America, and Eastern Europe ... la salud en español Health Statistics Healthy Moments Radio Broadcast Clinical Trials For Health Professionals Diabetes Discoveries & ...

  1. Autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneghan, Michael A; Yeoman, Andrew D; Verma, Sumita; Smith, Alastair D; Longhi, Maria Serena

    2013-10-26

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a disease of the hepatic parenchyma that can present in acute or chronic forms. In common with many autoimmune diseases, autoimmune hepatitis is associated with non-organ-specific antibodies in the context of hepatic autoimmunity. This dichotomy has made definition of a unifying hypothesis in the pathophysiology of the disease difficult, although data from the past 8 years have drawn attention to the role of regulatory T cells. Several triggers have been identified, and the disease arises in genetically susceptible individuals. Clinical and biochemical remission is achievable in up to 85% of cases. For the remaining patients, alternative immunosuppression strategies are an option. Liver transplantation provides an excellent outcome for patients with acute liver failure or complications of end-stage liver disease, including hepatocellular carcinoma. Variant or overlapping syndromes are worthy of consideration when unexpected disease features arise.

  2. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Get Worse? How is HE Diagnosed? Prior to Treatment Who treats HE? Preparing for your Medical Appointment Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment Medications Importance of Adhering ...

  3. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is a condition that causes temporary worsening of brain function in people with advanced liver disease. When ... travel through your body until they reach your brain, causing mental and physical symptoms of HE. Hepatic ...

  4. Hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... using an infected person’s razor, toothbrush, or nail clippers You can’t get hepatitis B from being ... personal items such as toothbrushes, razors, or nail clippers using a latex or polyurethane condom during sex ...

  5. Hepatic ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or oxygen, causing injury to liver cells. Causes Low blood pressure from any condition can lead to hepatic ischemia. ... leading to reduced blood flow (vasculitis) Symptoms If low blood pressure continues for a long time, you may feel ...

  6. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Get Worse? How is HE Diagnosed? Prior to Treatment Who treats HE? Preparing for your Medical Appointment Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment Medications Importance of Adhering ...

  7. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Stages of Hepatic Encephalopathy? What Triggers or Can Cause HE to Get Worse? How is HE ... liver disease. When your liver is damaged it can no longer remove toxic substances from your blood. ...

  8. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Treatment Who treats HE? Preparing for your Medical Appointment Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment ... treatment. Being a fully-informed participant in your medical care is an important factor in staying as ...

  9. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is a condition that causes temporary worsening of brain function in people with advanced liver disease. When ... travel through your body until they reach your brain, causing mental and physical symptoms of HE. Hepatic ...

  10. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hepatic Encephalopathy so you can tell your doctor right away if you think you may have it. ... American Liver Foundation © 2017 American Liver Foundation. All rights reserved. Funding for the HE123 - Diagnosis, Treatment and ...

  11. Hepatitis autoinmune.

    OpenAIRE

    LOJA OROPEZA, David; VILCA VASQUEZ, Maricela; AVILES GONZAGA, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Three patients with autoinmune hepatitis type 1 diagnosed at the Hospital Nacional Arzobispo Loayza in Lima-Perú, between 1993 and 1995, are here reported, emphasis is made on the clinical, histological and therapeutical aspects.

  12. Targeted deletion of murine CEACAM 1 activates PI3K-Akt signaling and contributes to the expression of (Pro)renin receptor via CREB family and NF-κB transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiqian; Ledford, Kelly J; Pitkin, William B; Russo, Lucia; Najjar, Sonia M; Siragy, Helmy M

    2013-08-01

    The carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 regulates insulin sensitivity by promoting hepatic insulin clearance. Mice bearing a null mutation of Ceacam1 gene (Cc1(-/-)) develop impaired insulin clearance followed by hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance, in addition to visceral obesity and increased plasma fatty acids. Because insulin resistance is associated with increased blood pressure, we investigated whether they develop higher blood pressure with activated renal renin-angiotensin system and whether this is mediated, in part, by the upregulation of renal (pro)renin receptor (PRR) expression. Compared with age-matched wild-type littermates, Cc1(-/-) mice exhibited increased blood pressure with increased activation of renal renin-angiotensin systems and renal PRR expression. Cytoplasmic and nuclear immunostaining of phospho-PI3K p85α and phospho-Akt was enhanced in the kidney of Cc1(-/-) mice. In murine renal inner medullary collecting duct epithelial cells with lentiviral-mediated small hairpin RNA knockdown of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1, PRR expression was upregulated and phosphorylation of PI3K (Tyr508), Akt (Ser473), NF-κB p65 (Ser276), cAMP response element-binding protein/activated transcription factor (ATF)-1 (Ser133), and ATF-2 (Thr71) was enhanced. Inhibiting PI3K with LY294002 or Akt with Akt inhibitor VIII attenuated PRR expression. In conclusion, global null deletion of Ceacam1 caused an increase in blood pressure with increased renin-angiotensin system activation together with upregulation of PRR via PI3K-Akt activation of cAMP response element-binding protein 1, ATF-1, ATF-2, and NF-κB p65 transcription factors.

  13. Authentication Without Secrets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierson, Lyndon G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Robertson, Perry J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    This work examines a new approach to authentication, which is the most fundamental security primitive that underpins all cyber security protections. Current Internet authentication techniques require the protection of one or more secret keys along with the integrity protection of the algorithms/computations designed to prove possession of the secret without actually revealing it. Protecting a secret requires physical barriers or encryption with yet another secret key. The reason to strive for "Authentication without Secret Keys" is that protecting secrets (even small ones only kept in a small corner of a component or device) is much harder than protecting the integrity of information that is not secret. Promising methods are examined for authentication of components, data, programs, network transactions, and/or individuals. The successful development of authentication without secret keys will enable far more tractable system security engineering for high exposure, high consequence systems by eliminating the need for brittle protection mechanisms to protect secret keys (such as are now protected in smart cards, etc.). This paper is a re-release of SAND2009-7032 with new figures numerous edits.

  14. Hepatitis B Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... worldwide 2 Billion People have been infected with Hepatitis B Worldwide The Hepatitis B Foundation is working on ... of people living with hepatitis B. Learn About Hepatitis B in 11 Other Languages . Resource Video See More ...

  15. Hepatitis A Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Hepatitis A Testing Share this page: Was this page ... HAV-Ab total; Anti-HAV Formal name: Viral Hepatitis A Antibody Related tests: Hepatitis B Testing ; Hepatitis ...

  16. Hepatitis Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Requirements for Viral Hepatitis Liver Cancer and Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis and Young Persons Who Inject Drugs National Academies’ ... Sources for IG & HBIG About the Division of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us Anonymous Feedback File Formats Help: How ...

  17. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis A

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3 - Helminths, Soil-Transmitted Chapter 3 - Hepatitis B Hepatitis A Noele P. Nelson, Trudy V. Murphy INFECTIOUS ... hepatitis/HAV Table 3-02. Vaccines to prevent hepatitis A VACCINE TRADE NAME (MANUFACTURER) AGE (Y) DOSE ...

  18. Delta agent (Hepatitis D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatitis D virus ... Hepatitis D virus (HDV) is found only in people who carry the hepatitis B virus. HDV may make liver ... B virus but who never had symptoms. Hepatitis D infects about 15 million people worldwide. It occurs ...

  19. Kidney transplant artery stenosis. Interrelationship between blood pressure, kidney function, renin-aldosterone system and body sodium content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornerup, H J; Pedersen, E B; Fjeldborg, O

    1977-01-01

    Among 9 hypertensive recipients with kidney transplant artery stenosis (KTAS) evidence of increased activity of the renin system was present in 3. Surgical repair of KTAS in 4 recipients resulted in an increase in renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate associated with a decrease in exchangeable sodium and blood pressure. Peripheral plasma renin and aldosterone values were normal before and after operation in all. It is suggested that sodium retention may counterbalance increased activity of the renin system in KTAS. Preoperative determinations of plasma renin do not predict the effect of surgical repair of KTAS on hypertension.

  20. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis Hepatitis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention Past Issues / Spring 2009 ... No appetite Fever Headaches Diagnosis To check for hepatitis viruses, your doctor will test your blood. You ...

  1. Prostaglandins, catecholamines, renin and aldosterone during hypertensive and normotensive pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, E B; Christensen, N J; Christensen, P; Johannesen, P; Kornerup, H J; Kristensen, S; Lauritsen, J G; Leyssac, P P; Rasmussen, A B; Wohlert, M

    1982-01-01

    Urinary excretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha), plasma concentrations of renin (PRC), aldosterone (PAC), noradrenaline (PNA) and adrenaline (PA) were determined in the third trimester of pregnancy, 5 days and 3 months after delivery in preeclampsia and normotensive pregnant and non-pregnant control subjects. PGE2 was higher in pregnant control subjects than in non-pregnant subjects, but reduced to non-pregnant level in preeclampsia. PGF2 alpha was the same in preeclampsia and normotensive pregnancy but higher than in the non-pregnant group. PRC and PAC were increased during pregnancy, but considerably lesser in preeclampsia than during normotensive pregnancy. PNA and PA were the same in all three groups. All parameters were normal 3 months after delivery. There were no correlations between any of the hormones and blood pressure in any of the groups. PGE2 was positively correlated to PRC. The lack of renal PGE2 in preeclampsia might be responsible for the decrease in renal blood flow and sodium excretion, and the changes in PRC and PAC are supposed to be secondary to changes in PGE2. It is hypothesised that preeclampsia is a state of prostaglandin deficiency.

  2. Macrophages in neuroinflammation: role of the renin-angiotensin-system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Anna; Stegbauer, Johannes; Linker, Ralf A

    2017-04-01

    Macrophages are essential players of the innate immune system which are involved in the initiation and progression of various inflammatory and autoimmune diseases including neuroinflammation. In the past few years, it has become increasingly clear that the regulation of macrophage responses by the local tissue milieu is also influenced by mediators which were first discovered as regulators in the nervous or also cardiovascular system. Here, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a major focus of current research. Besides its classical role in blood pressure control, body fluid, and electrolyte homeostasis, the RAS may influence (auto)immune responses, modulate T cells, and particularly act on macrophages via different signaling pathways. Activation of classical RAS pathways including angiotensin (Ang) II and AngII type 1 (AT1R) receptors may drive pro-inflammatory macrophage responses in neuroinflammation via regulation of chemokines. More recently, alternative RAS pathways were described, such as binding of Ang-(1-7) to its receptor Mas. Signaling via Mas pathways may counteract some of the AngII/AT1R-mediated effects. In macrophages, the Ang-(1-7)/Mas exerts beneficial effects on neuroinflammation via modulating macrophage polarization, migration, and T cell activation in vitro and in vivo. These data delineate a pivotal role of the RAS in inflammation of the nervous system and identify RAS modulation as a potential new target for immunotherapy with a special focus on macrophages.

  3. Brain renin angiotensin system in cardiac hypertrophy and failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana eCampos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS is significantly involved in the roles of the endocrine RAS in cardiovascular regulation. Our studies indicate that the brain RAS participates in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis through sympathetic activation. Inhibition of sympathetic hyperactivity after myocardial infarction through suppression of the brain RAS appears beneficial. The brain RAS is involved in the modulation of circadian rhythms of arterial pressure, contributing to nondipping hypertension. We conclude that the brain RAS in pathophysiological states interacts synergistically with the chronically overactive RAS through a positive biofeedback in order to maintain a state of alert diseased conditions, such as cardiac hypertrophy and failure. Therefore, targeting brain RAS with drugs such as angiotensin converting inhibitors or receptor blockers having increased brain penetrability could be of advantage. These RAS-targeting drugs are first-line therapy for all heart failure patients. Since the RAS has both endocrine and local tissue components, RAS drugs are being developed to attain increased tissue penetrability and volume of distribution and consequently an efficient inhibition of both RAS components.

  4. Immunoglobins in mammary secretions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurley, W L; Theil, Peter Kappel

    2013-01-01

    Immunoglobulins secreted in colostrum and milk by the lactating mammal are major factors providing immune protection to the newborn. Immunoglobulins in mammary secretions represent the cumulative immune response of the lactating animal to exposure to antigenic stimulation that occurs through inte...

  5. Hepatitis C: Diet and Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with Hepatitis » Daily Living: Diet and Nutrition Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... have high cholesterol and have fatty liver. How hepatitis C affects diet If you have hepatitis, you ...

  6. Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Our Accomplishments Annual Reports Our Videos What Is Hepatitis B? What Is Hepatitis B? The ABCs of Viral Hepatitis Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B Hepatitis Delta Coinfection Hepatitis C Coinfection HIV/AIDS ...

  7. Autoimmune hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Motamed

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hepatitis is (AIH is a chronic hepatitis that occurs in children and adults of all ages. It is characterized by immunologic and autoimmune features, including circulating auto antibodies and high serum globulin concentrations. It was first described in the 1950s by term of chronic active hepatitis. It has 2 types with different auto antibodies. Diagnosis is based upon serologic and histologic findings and exclusion of other forms of chronic liver disease.   A scoring system should be used in assessment based upon: 1 Auto anti bodie titer 2 Serum IgG level  3 Liver histology 4 Absence of viral and other causes of hepatitis. Clear indications for treatment: 1   rise of aminotrasferases 2   clinical symptoms of liver disease 3   histological features in liver biopsy 4   Children with AIH initial treatment involve glucocorticoid with or without azathioprine. For patients with fulminant hepatitis liver transplantation, should be kept in mind.   Remission is defined by: 1   Resolution of symptoms 2   Normalization of serum trasaminases 3   Normalization of serum bilirubin and gamma globuline levels. 4   Improvement in liver histology 5   Treatment is continued for at least 2-5 years, glucocorticoids are with drawn first, by tapering over six weeks. Azathioprine will be with drawn.  

  8. [Chronic hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa Barrios, R

    1995-01-01

    Medical literature about chronic hepatitis is reviewed. This unresolving disease caused by viruses, drugs or unknown factors may progress to in cirrhosis and hepatocarcinoma. A classification based on liver biopsy histology into chronic persistent and chronic active types has been largely abandoned and emphasis is placed on recognizing the etiology of the various types. One is associated with continuing hepatitis B virus infection; another is related to chronic hepatitis C virus infection and the third is termed autoinmune, because of the association with positive serum autoantibodies. A fourth type with similar clinical functional and morphologic features is found with some drug reactions. Long term corticoesteroid therapy is usually successful in autoinmune type. Associations between antibodies to liver-kidney microsomes and the hepatitis C virus can cause diagnostic difficulties. Antiviral treatment of chronic hepatitis B and C with interpheron alfa is employed, controlling symptoms and abnormal biochemistry and the progression to cirrhosis and liver cancer in 30 to 40% patients. Alternative therapies or combinations with interpheron are being evaluated waiting for final results.

  9. The adipose renin-angiotensin system modulates sysemic markers of insulin sensitivity activates the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Suyeon [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Soltani-Bejnood, Morvarid [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Quignard-Boulange, Annie [Centre Biomedical des Cordeliers, Paris, France; Massiera, Florence [Centre de Biochimie, Nice, France; Teboul, Michele [Centre de Biochimie, Nice, France; Ailhaud, Gerard [Centre de Biochimie, Nice, France; Kim, Jung [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Moustaid-Moussa, Naima [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Voy, Brynn H [ORNL

    2006-07-01

    BACKGROUND: A growing body of data provides increasing evidence that the adipose tissue renin-angiotensin system (RAS) contributes to regulation of fat mass. Beyond its paracrine actions within adipose tissue, adipocyte-derived angiotensin II (Ang II) may also impact systemic functions such as blood pressure and metabolism. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used a genetic approach to manipulate adipose RAS activity in mice and then study the consequences on metabolic parameters and on feedback regulation of the RAS. The models included deletion of the angiotensinogen (Agt) gene (Agt-KO), its expression solely in adipose tissue under the control of an adipocyte-specific promoter (aP2-Agt/ Agt-KO), and overexpression in adipose tissue of wild type mice (aP2-Agt). Total body weight, epididymal fat pad weight, and circulating levels of leptin, insulin and resistin were significantly decreased in Agt-KO mice, while plasma adiponectin levels were increased. Overexpression of Agt in adipose tissue resulted in increased adiposity and plasma leptin and insulin levels compared to wild type (WT) controls. Angiotensinogen and type I Ang II receptor protein levels were also markedly elevated in kidney of aP2-Agt mice, suggesting that hypertension in these animals may be in part due to stimulation of the intrarenal RAS. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, the results from this study demonstrate that alterations in adipose RAS activity significantly alter both local and systemic physiology in a way that may contribute to the detrimental health effects of obesity.

  10. The Adipose Renin-Angiotensin System Modulates Systemic Markers of Insulin Sensitivity and Activates the Intrarenal Renin-Angiotensin System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyeon Kim

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The adipose tissue renin-angiotensin system (RAS contributes to regulation of fat mass and may also impact systemic functions such as blood pressure and metabolism. Methods and results. A panel of mouse models including mice lacking angiotensinogen, Agt (Agt-KO, mice expressing Agt solely in adipose tissue (aP2-Agt/Agt-KO, and mice overexpressing Agt in adipose tissue (aP2-Agt was studied. Total body weight, epididymal fat pad weight, and circulating levels of leptin, insulin, and resistin were significantly decreased in Agt-KO mice, while plasma adiponectin levels were increased. aP2-Agt mice exhibited increased adiposity and plasma leptin and insulin levels compared to wild type (WT controls. Angiotensinogen and type I Ang II receptor protein levels were also elevated in kidney of aP2-Agt mice. Conclusion. These findings demonstrate that alterations in adipose RAS activity significantly impact both local and systemic physiology in a way that may contribute to the detrimental health effects of obesity.

  11. Control plasma renin activity and changes in sympathetic tone as determinants of minoxidil-induced increase in plasma renin activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, K; Velasco, M; Wells, J; McNay, J L

    1975-01-01

    A study was made of the possible mechanism(s) underlying minoxidil-induced increase in plasma renin activity (PRA). 10 patients with essential hypertension were treated with minoxidil and subsequently with a combination of minoxidil plus propranolol. Minoxidil lowered mean arterial pressure 31.6 plus or minus 3.3 mm Hg, mean plus or minus SEM. There was an associated increase in both PRA, 6.26 plus or minus 2.43 NG/ML/H, and heart rate, 21.4 plus or minus 2.7 beats/min. The changes in PRA and heart rate were positively correlated, r, 0.79. Addition of propranolol reduced mean arterial pressure by a further 10.1 plus or minus 1.5 mm Hg and returned heart rate to control levels. Propranolol reduced PRA significantly but not to control levels. Control PRA positively correlated with PRA on minoxidil, r, 0.97, and with PRA on minoxidil plus propranolol, r, 0.98. We conclude that control PRA is a major determinant of change in PRA with minoxidil. Minoxidil increased PRA by at least two mechanisms: (a) an adrenergic mechanism closely related to change in heart rate and blocked by propranolol, and (b) a mechanism(s) not sensitive to propranolol and possibly related to decrease in renal perfusion pressure. PMID:1127099

  12. Radioimmunologic analysis of the state of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system in arterial hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavnov, V.N.; Yakovlev, A.A.; Gandzha, T.I.; Yugrinov, O.G. (AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev)

    1985-01-01

    In 110 patients suffering from various forms of arterial hypertension (hypertension, aldosteronoma, phaeochromocytoma, corticosteroma) the parameters of the system renin-angiotensin-aldosterone were measured. Basal values of aldosterone, renin activity in blood as well as their concentration in blood taken from the vena cava inferior, renal and adrenal veins during selective renography were determined. The 24-hours rhythm of the hormones in the blood, the reaction of the glomerular zone of the adrenal cortex and the juxtaglomerular renal system under acute Lasix (furosemide) stress was evaluated. It was found, that the system renin-angiotensin-aldosterone is disturbed in all patients with arterial hypertension. This is indicated by changes of aldosterone concentration, renin activity in peripheral blood and in the blood from the vena cava inferior, renal and adrenal veins, the 24-hours rhythm of their concentrations in serum and the reaction to acute Lasix stress. The radioimmunoassays of quantitative parameters of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system are decisive for the differential diagnosis of hypertension and adrenal gland tumors connected with a hypertension syndrome. They facilitate a rational choice of the hypertension therapy and the daily distribution of the medications for patients with hypertension. The radioimmunoassays can be used for checking the efficiency of medications and surgery.

  13. Aliskiren inhibits the renin-angiotensin system in retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simão, Sónia; Santos, Daniela F; Silva, Gabriela A

    2016-09-20

    Observations of increased angiotensin II levels and activation of the (pro)renin receptor in retinopathies support the role of ocular renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the development of retinal diseases. While targeting RAS presents significant therapeutic potential, current RAS-based therapies are ineffective halting the progression of these diseases. A new class of drugs, the direct renin inhibitors such as aliskiren, is a potential therapeutic alternative. However, it is unclear how aliskiren acts in the retina, in particular in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), the structure responsible for the maintenance of retinal homeostasis whose role is deeply compromised in retinal diseases. We firstly analyzed the expression and activity of the main RAS components in RPE cells. Time- and concentration-dependent treatments with aliskiren were performed to modulate different pathways of the RAS in RPE cells. Our data demonstrate that RPE cells express the main RAS constituents. Exposure of RPE cells to aliskiren inhibited the activity of renin and consequently decreased the levels of angiotensin II. Additionally, aliskiren reduced the translocation of the (pro)renin receptor to the cellular membrane of RPE cells preventing the activation of ERK1/2. Our findings of the RPE well-defined RAS, together with the demonstration that aliskiren effectively blocks this system at different steps of the cascade, suggest that aliskiren might be an alternative and successful drug in preventing the deleterious effects derived from the overactivation of the RAS, known to contribute to the pathogenesis of different retinal diseases.

  14. Effects of direct Renin inhibition on myocardial fibrosis and cardiac fibroblast function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhi

    Full Text Available Myocardial fibrosis, a major pathophysiologic substrate of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF, is modulated by multiple pathways including the renin-angiotensin system. Direct renin inhibition is a promising anti-fibrotic therapy since it attenuates the pro-fibrotic effects of renin in addition to that of other effectors of the renin-angiotensin cascade. Here we show that the oral renin inhibitor aliskiren has direct effects on collagen metabolism in cardiac fibroblasts and prevented myocardial collagen deposition in a non-hypertrophic mouse model of myocardial fibrosis. Adult mice were fed hyperhomocysteinemia-inducing diet to induce myocardial fibrosis and treated concomitantly with either vehicle or aliskiren for 12 weeks. Blood pressure and plasma angiotensin II levels were normal in control and hyperhomocysteinemic mice and reduced to levels lower than observed in the control group in the groups treated with aliskiren. Homocysteine-induced myocardial matrix gene expression and fibrosis were also prevented by aliskiren. In vitro studies using adult rat cardiac fibroblasts also showed that aliskiren attenuated the pro-fibrotic pattern of matrix gene and protein expression induced by D,L, homocysteine. Both in vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that the Akt pathway was activated by homocysteine, and that treatment with aliskiren attenuated Akt activation. In conclusion, aliskiren as mono-therapy has potent and direct effects on myocardial matrix turnover and beneficial effects on diastolic function.

  15. Increased activity of digoxin-like substance in low-renin hypertension in acromegaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soszynski, P.; Slowinska-Srzednicka, J.; Zgliczynski, S. (Medical Center for Postgraduate Education, Warsaw (Poland))

    1990-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is common in acromegaly, but the pathogenesis of this complication remains unknown. To determine the role of an endogenous Na,K pump inhibitor/digoxin-like substance (DLS) in the pathogenesis of hypertension in acromegaly 76 subjects: 28 with acromegaly, 20 with essential hypertension and 28 healthy controls were studied. Serum DLS was measured with the use of radioimmunoassay and bioassay by the inhibition of digoxin-sensitive erythrocyte 86-Rb uptake. In acromegaly, the activity of DLS was significantly increased and plasma renin activity decreased in the hypertensive group, as compared with that of the normotensive group and controls. Moreover, DLS was elevated in the low-renin group of essential hypertension, as compared with that of the normal/high-renin group or controls. The activity of DLS correlated positively with mean arterial pressure and negatively with plasma renin activity, but not with growth hormone levels. In conclusion, an endogenous sodium pump inhibitor/digoxin-like substance may play a role in the pathogenesis of low-renin hypertension in acromegaly.

  16. Aldosterone and cortisol co-secreting bifunctional adrenal cortical carcinoma: A rare event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Puskar Shyam; Nayak, Prasant; Gurumurthy, Srinivasan; David, Deepak

    2014-07-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) co-secreting aldosterone and cortisol is extremely rare. We report the case of a 37-yearold female who presented with paresis and facial puffiness. Evaluation revealed hypertension, hyperglycemia, severe hypokalemia and hyperaldosteronemia with elevated plasma aldosterone to renin ratio (ARR). Urinary free cortisol estimation showed elevated levels. Computed tomography scan revealed a right adrenal mass. Radical adrenalectomy specimen revealed ACC (T3N1). Post-operatively, the patient became normotensive and euglycemic with normalization of urinary cortisol and ARR. This case highlights the need for a complete evaluation in patients of hyperaldosteronism if overlapping symptoms of hypercortisolism are encountered, to avoid post-operative adrenal crisis.

  17. Renin angiotensin system and gender differences in dopaminergic degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez-Perez Ana I

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are sex differences in dopaminergic degeneration. Men are approximately two times as likely as premenopausal women of the same age to develop Parkinson's disease (PD. It has been shown that the local renin angiotensin system (RAS plays a prominent role in sex differences in the development of chronic renal and cardiovascular diseases, and there is a local RAS in the substantia nigra and dopaminergic cell loss is enhanced by angiotensin via type 1 (AT1 receptors. Results In the present study, we observed that intrastriatal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine induced a marked loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of male rats, which was significantly higher than the loss induced in ovariectomized female rats given estrogen implants (i.e. rats with estrogen. However, the loss of dopaminergic neurons was significantly lower in male rats treated with the AT1 antagonist candesartan, and similar to that observed in female rats with estrogen. The involvement of the RAS in gender differences in dopaminergic degeneration was confirmed with AT1a-null mice lesioned with the dopaminergic neurotoxin MPTP. Significantly higher expression of AT1 receptors, angiotensin converting enzyme activity, and NADPH-oxidase complex activity, and much lower levels of AT2 receptors were observed in male rats than in female rats with estrogen. Conclusions The results suggest that brain RAS plays a major role in the increased risk of developing PD in men, and that manipulation of brain RAS may be an efficient approach for neuroprotective treatment of PD in men, without the feminizing effects of estrogen.

  18. Renin-angiotensin system gene polymorphisms and endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Kirsty G; Delforce, Sarah J; Wang, Yu; Ashton, Katie A; Proietto, Anthony; Otton, Geoffrey; Blackwell, C Caroline; Scott, Rodney J; Lumbers, Eugenie R

    2016-05-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is the most common gynaecological malignancy and its incidence is increasing. Dysregulation of the endometrial renin-angiotensin system (RAS) could predispose to EC; therefore, we studied the prevalence of RAS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Australian women with EC. SNPs assessed were AGT M235T (rs699); AGTR1 A1166C (rs5186); ACE A240T and T93C (rs4291, rs4292) and ATP6AP2 (rs2968915). They were identified using TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assays. The C allele of the AGTR1 SNP (rs5186) was more prevalent in women with EC (odds ratio (OR) 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.2-2.3), P=0.002). The CC genotype of this SNP is associated with upregulation of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1). The G allele of AGT rs699, which is associated with higher angiotensinogen (AGT) levels, was less prevalent in women with EC (OR 0.54, 95% CI (0.39-0.74), P<0.001) compared with controls. AGT and AGT formed by removal of angiotensin I (des(Ang I)AGT) are both anti-angiogenic. In women with EC who had had hormone replacement therapy (HRT), the prevalence of the AGTR1 SNP (rs5186) and the ACE SNPs (rs4291 and rs4292) was greater than in women who had no record of HRT; SNP rs4291 is associated with increased plasma ACE activity. These data suggest there is an interaction between genotype, oestrogen replacement therapy and EC. In conclusion, the prevalence of two SNPs that enhance RAS activity was different in women with EC compared with healthy controls. These genetic factors may interact with obesity and hyperoestrogenism, predisposing ageing, obese women to EC.

  19. Plasma catecholamines and renin activity in wrestlers following vigorous swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigas, M; Celko, J; Juránková, E; Jezová, D; Kvetnanský, R

    1998-01-01

    Cardiovascular and neuroendocrine responses to exercise in a physically fit and an untrained group of young healthy subjects were compared to study the significance of physical fitness for performance in a discipline for which the athletes were not trained. Ten wrestlers of national rank prepared for an international competition (age 18 years) and 9 untrained healthy males (age 21 years). Exercise consisted of 27-min swimming, freestyle, in water of 29 degrees C, with last 3 min increased to maximal effort. The blood pressure, heart rate and sublingual temperature were measured and blood samples were withdrawn before exercise, immediately after and after a 30 min period of rest. Catecholamines were analyzed by radioenzymatic method and plasma renin activity (PRA) using commercial kits. Systolic blood pressure and heart rate after swimming were increased comparably in the two groups, diastolic pressure was unchanged in the controls and decreased in the wrestlers. Plasma cortisol remained unchanged. Plasma glucose tended to increase in the controls and so decrease in wrestlers, with a significant difference between them after swimming (p < 0.05). However, plasma adrenaline was concomitantly increased in both groups (p < 0.01). Noradrenaline and PRA were increased after swimming in both the control and trained group. The increments of noradrenaline and PRA in wrestlers were significantly reduced compared to the control group (p < 0.01, p < 0.05, respectively). Higher physical fitness in athletes significantly reduced plasma noradrenaline and angiotensin responses to maximal exercise demanding special skill in work performance which had not been included in their training program. Training of wrestlers did not cause an exaggerated plasma adrenaline response to exercise.

  20. Inflammation, oxidative stress and renin angiotensin system in atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazim; Husain; Wilfredo; Hernandez; Rais; A; Ansari; Leon; Ferder

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with cardiovascular dysfunction including myocardial infarction, unstable angina, sudden cardiac death, stroke and peripheral thromboses. It has been predicted that atherosclerosis will be the primary cause of death in the world by 2020. Atherogenesis is initiated by endothelial injury due to oxidative stress associated with cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cigarette smoking, dyslipidemia, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. The impairment of the endothelium associated with cardiovascular risk factors creates an imbalance between vasodilating and vasoconstricting factors, in particular, an increase in angiotensin Ⅱ(Ang Ⅱ) and a decrease in nitric oxide. The renin-angiotensin system(RAS), and its primary mediator Ang Ⅱ, also have a direct influence on the progression of the atherosclerotic process via effects on endothelial function, inflammation, fibrinolytic balance, and plaque stability. Anti-inflammatory agents [statins, secretory phospholipase A2 inhibitor, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 inhibitor, 5-lipoxygenase activating protein, chemokine motif ligand-2, C-C chemokine motif receptor 2 pathway inhibitors, methotrexate, IL-1 pathway inhibitor and RAS inhibitors(angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors)], Ang Ⅱ receptor blockers and ranin inhibitors may slow inflammatory processes and disease progression. Several studies in human using anti-inflammatory agents and RAS inhibitors revealed vascular benefits and reduced progression of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with stable angina pectoris; decreased vascular inflammatory markers, improved common carotid intima-media thickness and plaque volume in patients with diagnosed atherosclerosis. Recent preclinical studies have demonstrated therapeutic efficacy of vitamin D analogs paricalcitol in Apo E-deficient atherosclerotic mice.

  1. Maximal suppression of renin-angiotensin system in nonproliferative glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iodice, Carmela; Balletta, Mario M; Minutolo, Roberto; Giannattasio, Paolo; Tuccillo, Stefano; Bellizzi, Vincenzo; D'Amora, Maurizio; Rinaldi, Giorgio; Signoriello, Giuseppe; Conte, Giuseppe; De Nicola, Luca

    2003-06-01

    Elimination of residual proteinuria is the novel target in renoprotection; nevertheless, whether a greater suppression of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) effectively improves the antiproteinuric response in patients with moderate proteinuria remains ill-defined. We evaluated the effects of maximizing RAS suppression on quantitative and qualitative proteinuria in ten patients with stable nonnephrotic proteinuria (2.55 +/- 0.94 g/24 hours) due to primary nonproliferative glomerulonephritis (NPGN), and normal values of creatinine clearance (103 +/- 17 mL/min). The study was divided in three consecutive phases: (1) four subsequent 1-month periods of ramipril at the dose of 2.5, 5.0, 10, and 20 mg/day; (2) 2 months of ramipril 20 mg/day + irbesartan 300 mg/day; and (3) 2 months of irbesartan 300 mg/day alone. Maximizing RAS suppression was not coupled with any major effect on renal function and blood pressure; conversely, a significant decrement in hemoglobin levels, of 0.8 g/dL on average, was observed during up-titration of ramipril dose. The 2.5 mg dose of ramipril significantly decreased proteinuria by 29%. Similar changes were detected after irbesartan alone (-28%). The antiproteinuric effect was not improved either by the higher ramipril doses (-30% after the 20 mg dose) or after combined treatment (-33%). The reduction of proteinuria led to amelioration of the markers of tubular damage, as testified by the significant decrement of alpha 1 microglobulin (alpha 1m) excretion and of the tubular component of proteinuria at sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). In nonnephrotic NPGN patients, standard doses of either ramipril or irbesartan lead to significant reduction of residual proteinuria and amelioration of the qualitative features suggestive of tubular damage. The enhancement of RAS suppression up to the maximal degree does not improve the antiproteinuric response and is coupled with a decrement of hemoglobin levels.

  2. RENIN ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM GENE POLYMORPHISMS IN CHILDREN WITH NEPHROTIC SYNDROM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zh.P. Sharnova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the role of the reninangiotensin system genes polymorphisms in develop and progression of nephrotic syndrom (NS in children we determined the genotypes of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE, angiotensinogen (AGT and angiotensin ii receptor (ATII-R of 1 type in 80 russian children with ns including and 15 children with chronic renal failure (CRF. Genotype frequencies did not differ between patients with ns and controls (n = 165. The distribution of ace, AGT and ATII-R 1 type genotypes was similar among ns sub groups, such as focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS (n = 18, steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome (n = 32, nephrotic syndrome with hypertension and hemoturia (n = 22 and with control group. When ns subjects with CRF (n = 15 were compared with control, the prevalence of ace DD genotype was significantly higher (47% VS 21%; χ2 = 4,44; p < 0,05. Our results indicate that the DD genotype ace may be a factor of risk for the dеvеlopment of progressive renal impairment in the children with nephrotic syndrome. The analysis of treatment's effect with inhibitor of ace in groups patients with steroid resistant NS (SRNS demonstrated decreasing of renoprotective effect of this drugs in patients with id and dd genotypes com? Pared with ii genotype: the degree of blood pressure, proteinuria and the rate of glomerular filtration decrease was significantly lower (55,46 ± 9,25 VS 92,74 ± 25; р < 0,05 in these patients.Key words: nephrotic syndrom, chronic renal failure, polymorphism of genes, renin-angiotensin system.

  3. Association of Free Radicals and the Tissue Renin-Angiotensin System: Prospective Effects of Rhodiola, a Genus of Chinese Herb, on Hypoxia-Induced Pancreatic Injury

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system has long been recognized as crucial factor in the regulation of the systemic blood pressure and renal electrolyte homeostasis. Numerous studies have demonstrated the presence of a local renin-angiotensin system in a variety of organs. A recent study of the pancreatic renin-angiotensin system showed that chronic hypoxia significantly increased the mRNA expression for angiotensinogen II receptor subtypes AT1b and AT2. The activation of the renin-angiotensin system m...

  4. Incretin secretion: direct mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balk-Møller, Emilie; Holst, Jens Juul; Kuhre, Rune Ehrenreich

    2014-01-01

    The incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) are secreted from gastro-intestinal K- and L-cells, respectively, and play an important role in post-prandial blood glucose regulation. They do this by direct stimulation of the pancreatic β...... enzyme responsible for incretin degradation (dipeptidyl peptidase-4) is inhibited (drugs are already on the market) while the secretion of endogenous GLP-1 secretion is stimulated at the same time may prove particularly rewarding. In this section we review current knowledge on the mechanisms for direct...

  5. Increased expression of (pro)renin receptor does not cause hypertension or cardiac and renal fibrosis in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosendahl, Alva; Niemann, Gianina; Lange, Sascha; Ahadzadeh, Erfan; Krebs, Christian; Contrepas, Aurelie; van Goor, Harry; Wiech, Thorsten; Bader, Michael; Schwake, Michael; Peters, Judith; Stahl, Rolf; Nguyen, Genevieve; Wenzel, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Binding of renin and prorenin to the (pro)renin receptor (PRR) increases their enzymatic activity and upregulates the expression of pro-fibrotic genes in vitro. Expression of PRR is increased in the heart and kidney of hypertensive and diabetic animals, but its causative role in organ damage is stil

  6. At 1 antagonism and renin inhibition in mice: Pivotal role of targeting angiotensin II in chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Fraune (Christoph); S. Lange (Simon); C. Krebs (Christian); A. Hölzel (Alexandra); J. Baucke (Jana); N. Divac (Nevena); E. Schwedhelm (Edzard); T. Streichert (Thomas); J. Velden (Joachim); I.M. Garrelds (Ingrid); A.H.J. Danser (Jan); A.-R. Frenay (Anne-Roos); H. van Goor (Harry); J.A. Jankowski (Janusz Antoni); R. Stahl (Rolf); G. Nguyen (Genevieve); U. Wenzel (Ulrich)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe role of the renin-angiotensin system in chronic kidney disease involves multiple peptides and receptors. Exerting antipodal pathophysiological mechanisms, renin inhibition and AT 1 antagonism ameliorate renal damage. However, it is unclear which mechanism exerts better nephroprotecti

  7. The effects of direct renin inhibitor, aliskiren, on arterial hypertension, chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease: optimal pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Kusano, Eiji

    2013-03-01

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) plays pivotal roles in the pathogenesis of progression of arterial hypertension, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Previous studies suggested that a direct renin inhibitor, aliskiren, may be effective for blood pressure lowering, renoprotection and cardiovascular protection. This review focuses on the effects of aliskiren for arterial hypertension, CKD and CVD.

  8. Increased renin production in mice with deletion of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma in juxtaglomerular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desch, Michael; Schreiber, Andrea; Schweda, Frank;

    2010-01-01

    We recently found that endogenous (free fatty acids) and pharmacological (thiazolidinediones) agonists of nuclear receptor Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)gamma stimulate renin transcription. In addition, the renin gene was identified as a direct target of PPARgamma. The mouse re...

  9. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and electrolyte metabolism in rat blood after flight aboard Cosmos-1129 biosatellite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvetnansky, R.; Tigranyan, R.A.; Jindra, A.; Viting, T.A.

    1982-08-01

    Blood plasma aldosterone concentration and renin activity were studied in rats flow in space on the Cosmos 1129 satellite using radioimmunoassay techniques. Immediately after the flight, the animals presented significant decreases in plasma renin activity, as compared to rats in the vivarium control and animals in the synchronous experiment. R. J.

  10. Regulation of the Renin-Angiotensin System Pathways in the Human Decidua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Lumbers, Eugenie R; Sykes, Shane D; Pringle, Kirsty G

    2015-07-01

    Pregnancy outcome is influenced, in part, by the sex of the fetus. Decidual renin messenger RNA (REN) abundance is greater in women carrying a female fetus than a male fetus. Here, we explore whether the sex of the fetus also influences the regulation of decidual RAS expression with a known stimulator of renal renin and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Cyclic adenosine monophosphate had no affect on decidual REN expression, since REN abundance was still greater in decidual explants from women carrying a female fetus than a male fetus after cAMP treatment. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate decreased prorenin levels in the supernatant if the fetus was female (ie, prorenin levels were no longer sexually dimorphic) and altered the fetal sex-specific differences in other RAS genes seen in vitro. Therefore, fetal sex influences the decidual renin-angiotensin system response to cAMP. This may be related to the presence of fetal cells in the maternal decidua.

  11. Inhibition of calcineurin phosphatase promotes exocytosis of renin from juxtaglomerular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kirsten; Friis, Ulla Glenert; Gooch, Jennifer L;

    2010-01-01

    To examine the role of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin in regulation of renin release, we assayed exocytosis using whole-cell patch clamp of single juxtaglomerular cells in culture. The calcineurin inhibitor, cyclosporine A (CsA), significantly increased juxtaglomerular......A, but not tacrolimus, significantly stimulated renin release from cultured juxtaglomerular cells. Juxtaglomerular cells expressed the calcineurin isoforms A-beta and A-gamma but not A-alpha. Plasma renin concentrations (PRCs) were not different in wild-type, calcineurin A-alpha, or A-beta knockout mice but increased...... cell membrane capacitance, an index of cell surface area and an established measure of exocytosis in single-cell assays. This effect was mimicked by intracellular delivery of a calcineurin inhibitory peptide, the calcium chelator ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA), or the calmodulin inhibitor W-13...

  12. The renin-angiotensin system: a possible new target for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vian, João; Pereira, Círia; Chavarria, Victor; Köhler, Cristiano; Stubbs, Brendon; Quevedo, João; Kim, Sung-Wan; Carvalho, André F; Berk, Michael; Fernandes, Brisa S

    2017-08-01

    Depression remains a debilitating condition with an uncertain aetiology. Recently, attention has been given to the renin-angiotensin system. In the central nervous system, angiotensin II may be important in multiple pathways related to neurodevelopment and regulation of the stress response. Studies of drugs targeting the renin-angiotensin system have yielded promising results. Here, we review the potential beneficial effects of angiotensin blockers in depression and their mechanisms of action. Drugs blocking the angiotensin system have efficacy in several animal models of depression. While no randomised clinical trials were found, case reports and observational studies showed that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers had positive effects on depression, whereas other antihypertensive agents did not. Drugs targeting the renin-angiotensin system act on inflammatory pathways implicated in depression. Both preclinical and clinical data suggest that these drugs possess antidepressant properties. In light of these results, angiotensin system-blocking agents offer new horizons in mood disorder treatment.

  13. Hyperpotassemia and bradycardia in a bedridden elderly woman with selective hypoaldosteronism associated with low renin activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Mitsuo; Iwasaki, Keiko; Imai, Chihiro; Hashimoto, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    A bedridden 85-year-old woman had hyperpotassemia (7.7 mEq/L) and bradycardia (30/min). Endocrinologic findings revealed a decrease in the renin-aldosterone system and normal adrenoglucocorticoid function. The results were consistent with the abnormalities seen in selective hypoaldosteronism with low renin activity. In addition, 9 of 11 patients, selected randomly from 72 bedridden elderly patients with normal serum sodium and potassium levels in our hospital, had diminished plasma renin activity (PRA) and plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC). The present patient was prescribed nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). NSAID reduces renal potassium excretion through the inhibition of renal prostaglandin synthesis. Therefore, the use of NSAID in bedridden elderly patients might intensify the underlying asymptomatic hypoaldosteronism and cause life-threatening hyperpotassemia.

  14. The Pancreatic Renin-Angiotensin System: Does It Play a Role in Endocrine Oncology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam KY

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of a local renin-angiotensin system in the pancreas has attracted much attention because of its potential clinical applications. A pancreatic renin-angiotensin system may be present in humans and may interact with islet cells. Nevertheless, our knowledge of the renin-angiotensin system in the human pancreas is still in its infancy, especially in the field of endocrine oncology. Much of our knowledge stems from the study of the pancreas and pancreatic endocrine tumors of rodents. Thus, the direction of future research should be based on in-depth and collaborative efforts between researchers in the various disciplines in order to apply the newly acquired scientific knowledge to the patient.

  15. Insulin resistance and hepatitis C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manuel Romero-Gómez

    2006-01-01

    Insulin resistance is the major feature of the metabolic syndrome and depends on insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. In chronic hepatitis C, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus are more often seen than in healthy controls or chronic hepatitis B patients.Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection promotes insulin resistance, mainly by increased TNF production together with enhancement of suppressor of cytokine (SOC-3); both events block PI3K and Akt phosphorylation. Two types of insulin resistance could be found in chronic hepatitis C patients: "viral" and "metabolic" insulin resistance. Insulin resistance in chronic hepatitis C is relevant because it promotes steatosis and fibrosis. The mechanisms by which insulin resistance promotes fibrosis progression include: (1) steatosis, (2) hyperleptinemia, (3) increased TNF production, (4) impaired expression of PPARy receptors. Lastly, insulin resistance has been found as a common denominator in patients difficult-to-treat like cirrhotics, overweight, HIV coinfected and Afro-American.Insulin resistance together with fibrosis and genotype has been found to be independently associated with impaired response rate to peginterferon plus ribavirin.Indeed, in genotype 1, the sustained response rate was twice (60%) in patients with HOMA ≤ 2 than patients with HOMA > 2. In experiments carried out on Huh-7cells transfected by full length HCVRNA, interferon alpha blocks HCV replication. However, when insulin (at doses of 128 μU/mL, similar that seen in the hyperinsulinemic state) was added to interferon, the ability to block HCV replication disappeared, and the PKR synthesis was abolished. In summary, hepatitis C promotes insulin resistance and insulin resistance induces interferon resistance,steatosis and fibrosis progression.

  16. Hepatitis B virus morphogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) particle consists of an envelope containing three related surface proteins and probably lipid and an icosahedral nucleocapsid of approximately 30 nm diameter enclosing the viral DNA genome and DNA polymerase. The capsid is formed in the cytosol of the infected cell during packaging of an RNA pregenome replication complex by multiple copies of a 21-kDa C protein. The capsid gains the ability to bud during synthesis of the viral DNA genome by reverse transcription of the pregenome in the lumen of the particle. The three envelope proteins S,M, and L shape a complex transmembrane fold at the endoplasmic reticulum, and form disulfide-linked homoand heterodimers. The transmembrane topology of a fraction of the large envelope protein L changes posttranslationally, therefore, the N terminal domain of L (preS) finally appears on both sides of the membrane.During budding at an intracellular membrane, a short linear domain in the cytosolic preS region interacts with binding sites on the capsid surface. The virions are subsequently secreted into the blood. In addition, the surface proteins can bud in the absence of capsids and form subviral lipoprotein particles of 20 nm diameter which are also secreted.

  17. Autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassburg, Christian P

    2010-10-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the liver with a dismal prognosis when left untreated. Key for the improvement of prognosis is a timely diagnosis before cirrhosis has developed. This is reached by the exclusion of other causes of hepatitis, elevated immunoglobulin G, autoantibody profile and histological assessment. Treatment achieves remission rates in 80% of individuals and consists of immunosuppression with corticosteroids and azathioprine. A recent randomised controlled multicenter trial has added budesonide to the effective treatment options in non-cirrhotic patients and leads to a reduction of unwanted steroid side effects. Autoimmune hepatitis is an autoimmune disease of unknown aetiology. Association studies of major histocompatibility complex and other genes demonstrate an influence of immunogenetics. However, apart from the autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1, in which 10% of patients suffer from an autoantibody-positive autoimmune hepatitis linked to mutations of the autoimmune regulator gene, there is no clear evidence for a hereditary aetiology of this disease. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hepatitis A vaccine associated with autoimmune hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PA Berry; G Smith-Laing

    2007-01-01

    To describe a case of probable relapsing autoimmune hepatitis associated with vaccination against hepatitis A virus (HAV). A case report and review of literature were written concerning autoimmune hepatitis in association with hepatitis A and other hepatotropic viruses. Soon after the administration of formalin-inactivated hepatitis A vaccine, a man who had recently recovered from an uncharacterized but self-limiting hepatitic illness,experienced a severe deterioration (AST 1687 U/L, INR 1.4). Anti-nuclear antibodies were detectable, and liver biopsy was compatible with autoimmune hepatitis. The observation supports the role of HAV as a trigger of autoimmune hepatitis. Studies in helper T-cell activity and antibody expression against hepatic proteins in the context of hepatitis A infection are summarized, and the concept of molecular mimicry with regard to other forms of viral hepatitis and autoimmunity is briefly explored.

  19. Hypovolemia in syncope and orthostatic intolerance role of the renin-angiotensin system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, G.; Robertson, D.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.; Ertl, A. C.; Robertson, R. M.; Biaggioni, I.

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: Orthostatic intolerance is the cause of significant disability in otherwise normal patients. Orthostatic tachycardia is usually the dominant hemodynamic abnormality, but symptoms may include dizziness, visual changes, discomfort in the head or neck, poor concentration, fatigue, palpitations, tremulousness, anxiety and, in some cases, syncope. It is the most common disorder of blood pressure regulation after essential hypertension. There is a predilection for younger rather than older adults and for women more than men. Its cause is unknown; partial sympathetic denervation or hypovolemia has been proposed. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We tested the hypothesis that reduced plasma renin activity, perhaps from defects in sympathetic innervation of the kidney, could underlie a hypovolemia, giving rise to these clinical symptoms. Sixteen patients (14 female, 2 male) ranging in age from 16 to 44 years were studied. Patients were enrolled in the study if they had orthostatic intolerance, together with a raised upright plasma norepinephrine (> or = 600 pg/mL). Patients underwent a battery of autonomic tests and biochemical determinations. RESULTS: There was a strong positive correlation between the blood volume and plasma renin activity (r = 0.84, P = 0.001). The tachycardic response to upright posture correlated with the severity of the hypovolemia. There was also a correlation between the plasma renin activity measured in these patients and their concomitant plasma aldosterone level. CONCLUSIONS: Hypovolemia occurs commonly in orthostatic intolerance. It is accompanied by an inappropriately low level of plasma renin activity. The degree of abnormality of blood volume correlates closely with the degree of abnormality in plasma renin activity. Taken together, these observations suggest that reduced plasma renin activity may be an important pathophysiologic component of the syndrome of orthostatic intolerance.

  20. Hypovolemia in syncope and orthostatic intolerance role of the renin-angiotensin system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, G.; Robertson, D.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.; Ertl, A. C.; Robertson, R. M.; Biaggioni, I.

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: Orthostatic intolerance is the cause of significant disability in otherwise normal patients. Orthostatic tachycardia is usually the dominant hemodynamic abnormality, but symptoms may include dizziness, visual changes, discomfort in the head or neck, poor concentration, fatigue, palpitations, tremulousness, anxiety and, in some cases, syncope. It is the most common disorder of blood pressure regulation after essential hypertension. There is a predilection for younger rather than older adults and for women more than men. Its cause is unknown; partial sympathetic denervation or hypovolemia has been proposed. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We tested the hypothesis that reduced plasma renin activity, perhaps from defects in sympathetic innervation of the kidney, could underlie a hypovolemia, giving rise to these clinical symptoms. Sixteen patients (14 female, 2 male) ranging in age from 16 to 44 years were studied. Patients were enrolled in the study if they had orthostatic intolerance, together with a raised upright plasma norepinephrine (> or = 600 pg/mL). Patients underwent a battery of autonomic tests and biochemical determinations. RESULTS: There was a strong positive correlation between the blood volume and plasma renin activity (r = 0.84, P = 0.001). The tachycardic response to upright posture correlated with the severity of the hypovolemia. There was also a correlation between the plasma renin activity measured in these patients and their concomitant plasma aldosterone level. CONCLUSIONS: Hypovolemia occurs commonly in orthostatic intolerance. It is accompanied by an inappropriately low level of plasma renin activity. The degree of abnormality of blood volume correlates closely with the degree of abnormality in plasma renin activity. Taken together, these observations suggest that reduced plasma renin activity may be an important pathophysiologic component of the syndrome of orthostatic intolerance.

  1. Expression of local renin and angiotensinogen mRNA in cirrhotic portal hypertensive patient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhang; Zhen Yang; Bao-Min Shi; Da-Peng Li; Chong-Yun Fang; Fa-Zu Qiu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of local renin and angiotensinogen mRNA in cirrhotic portal hypertensive patients.METHODS: The expression of local renin and angiotensinogen mRNA in the liver, splenic artery and vein of PH patients was detected by RT-PCR analysis.RESULTS: Expression of local renin mRNA in the liver of control group was (0.19±0.11), significantly lower than that in splenic artery(0.45±0.17)or splenic vein(0.39±0.12)respectively, (P<0.05). Expression of local angiotensinogen mRNA in the liver was (0.64±0.21), significantly higher than that in splenic artery(0.41±0.15) or in splenic vein (0.35±0.18)respectively, (P<0.05). Expression of local renin mRNA in the liver, splenic artery and vein of PH group was (0.78±0.28),(0.86±0.35) and (0.81±0.22) respectively, significantly higher than that in the control group, (P<0.05). Expression of local angiotensinogen mRNA in the liver, splenic artery and vein of PH group was (0.96±0.25), (0.83±0.18) and (0.79±0.23)respectively, significantly higher than that in the control group,(P<0.05). There was no significant difference between the liver, splenic artery and vein in the expression of local renin or local angiotensinogen mRNA in PH group, (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: In normal subjects the expression of local renin and angiotensinogen mRNA was organ specific, but with increase of the expression of LRAS, the organ-specificity became lost in cirrhotic patients. LRAS may contribute to increased resistance of portal vein with liver and formation of splanchnic vasculopathy.

  2. Construct hepatic analog by cell-matrix controlled assembly technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Haixia; YAN Yongnian; WANG Xiaohong; CHENG Jie; LIN Feng; XIONG Zhuo; Wu Rendong

    2006-01-01

    A mixture of hepatic cells and chitosan/gelatin solution was deposited to construct a hepatic analog by way of layer-by-layer deposition technique using a home-made devise. The size and cell concentration of the analogs can be controlled freely. Approximately 90% of the hepatic cells remained viable under 0.2 Mpa extrusion pressure. Cultured in vitro 8 weeks before animal test, hepatic cells in structure maintained their phenotype and kept proliferating, and albumin and other secretion of the cells increased. Cords and hepaton-like structures were observed after culture for 20 d. These results indicate that hepatic cells could be assembled directly into a 3D viable structure and expanded to form a hepatic organoid. This accomplishment is considered to be an interesting means for the fabrication of liver replacements.

  3. Type VI secretion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Dor; Orth, Kim

    2015-03-30

    Bacteria employ a variety of tools to survive in a competitive environment. Salomon and Orth describe one such tool-the Type 6 Secretion Systems used by bacteria to deliver a variety of toxins into competing cells.

  4. Hepatic amebiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Maria Salles

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Amebiasis can be considered the most aggressive disease of the human intestine, responsible in its invasive form for clinical syndromes, ranging from the classic dysentery of acute colitis to extra-intestinal disease, with emphasis on hepatic amebiasis, unsuitably named amebic liver abscess. Found worldwide, with a high incidence in India, tropical regions of Africa, Mexico and other areas of Central America, it has been frequently reported in Amazonia. The trophozoite reaches the liver through the portal system, provoking enzymatic focal necrosis of hepatocytes and multiple micro-abscesses that coalesce to develop a single lesion whose central cavity contains a homogeneous thick liquid, with typically reddish brown and yellow color similar to "anchovy paste". Right upper quadrant pain, fever and hepatomegaly are the predominant symptoms of hepatic amebiasis. Jaundice is reported in cases with multiple lesions or a very large abscess, and it affects the prognosis adversely. Besides chest radiography, ultrasonography and computerized tomography have brought remarkable contributions to the diagnosis of hepatic abscesses. The conclusive diagnosis is made however by the finding of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites in the pus and by the detection of serum antibodies to the amoeba. During the evolution of hepatic amebiasis, in spite of the availability of highly effective drugs, some important complications may occur with regularity and are a result of local perforation with extension into the pleural and pericardium cavities, causing pulmonary abscesses and purulent pericarditis, respectively The ruptures into the abdominal cavity may lead to subphrenic abscesses and peritonitis. The treatment of hepatic amebiasis is made by medical therapy, with metronidazole as the initial drug, followed by a luminal amebicide. In patients with large abscesses, showing signs of imminent rupture, and especially those who do not respond to medical treatment, a

  5. Does Extremely Low Birth Weight Predispose to Low-Renin Hypertension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaijmakers, Anke; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Claessens, Jolien; Cauwenberghs, Nicholas; van Tienoven, Theun Pieter; Wei, Fang-Fei; Jacobs, Lotte; Levtchenko, Elena; Pauwels, Steven; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Allegaert, Karel; Staessen, Jan A

    2017-03-01

    Low birth weight and prematurity are risk factors for hypertension in adulthood. Few studies in preterm or full-term born children reported on plasma renin activity (PRA). We tested the hypothesis that renin might modulate the incidence of hypertension associated with prematurity. We enrolled 93 prematurely born children with birth weight hypertension associated with extreme low birth weight were 6.43 (2.52-16.4; Phypertension, but does not affect the inverse association between PRA and BP. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02147457. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. The Relevance of the Renin-Angiotensin System in the Development of Drugs to Combat Preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norikazu Ueki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a hypertensive disorder that occurs during pregnancy. It has an unknown etiology and affects approximately 5–8% of pregnancies worldwide. The pathophysiology of preeclampsia is not yet known, and preeclampsia has been called “a disease of theories.” The central symptom of preeclampsia is hypertension. However, the etiology of the hypertension is unknown. In this review, we analyze the molecular mechanisms of preeclampsia with a particular focus on the pathogenesis of the hypertension in preeclampsia and its association with the renin-angiotensin system. In addition, we propose potential alternative strategies to target the renin-angiotensin system, which is enhanced during pregnancy.

  7. Hypotonicity-induced Renin exocytosis from juxtaglomerular cells requires aquaporin-1 and cyclooxygenase-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ulla G; Madsen, Kirsten; Svenningsen, Per

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism by which extracellular hypotonicity stimulates release of renin from juxtaglomerular (JG) cells is unknown. We hypothesized that osmotically induced renin release depends on water movement through aquaporin-1 (AQP1) water channels and subsequent prostanoid formation. We recorded...... membrane capacitance (C(m)) by whole-cell patch clamp in single JG cells as an index of exocytosis. Hypotonicity increased C(m) significantly and enhanced outward current. Indomethacin, PLA(2) inhibition, and an antagonist of prostaglandin transport impaired the C(m) and current responses to hypotonicity...

  8. The angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril rescues mice from endotoxin-induced lethal hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Pu; Jiang, Rong; Yao, Xin; Li, Jing; Dai, Jie; Zhang, Li; Ye, Bin

    2017-02-01

    The renin-angiotensin system is classically regarded as a crucial regulator of circulatory homeostasis, but recent studies also revealed its pro-inflammatory roles. The beneficial effects of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) in severe inflammatory injury in the lung and heart have been previously reported, but its potential effects on lethal hepatitis were unknown. In this study, a mouse model with LPS/d-galactosamine (GalN)-induced fulminant hepatitis were used to test the protective potential of captopril, a representative ACEI. The results indicated that treatment with captopril significantly decreased the plasma level of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase, alleviated the histopathological damage of the liver tissue and improve the survival rate of LPS/GalN-challenged mice. These effects were accompanied by reduced mRNA levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in the liver, and decreased protein level of TNF-α and IL-6 in the plasma. In addition, the activation of caspases 3, 8 and 9, and the presence of TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells, were also suppressed by captopril treatment. The above evidence suggested that the renin-angiotensin system might be involved in the development of LPS/GalN-induced fulminant hepatitis and ACEI might have potential value in lethal hepatitis.

  9. Comparison of intrarenal renin-angiotensin system activity in diabetic versus non-diabetic patients with overt proteinuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Hyeon; Jang, Hye Ryoun; Lee, Jong-Ho; Lee, Jung Eun; Huh, Wooseong; Lee, Kyu-Beck; Kwon, Young-Joo; Do, Jun Young; Kim, Hye Young; Kim, Yoon-Goo

    2015-04-01

    The intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been reported to be activated in chronic proteinuria patients. This study aimed to compare intrarenal RAS activity between diabetic nephropathy (DN) and non-diabetic nephropathy (NDN) patients with overt proteinuria. A multicenter, cross-sectional study was conducted in 116 patients with overt proteinuria (urinary protein/creatinine ratio [uPCR] > 1 mg/mg Cr). To estimate intrarenal RAS activity we measured urinary excretion of angiotensinogen (uAGT) and renin (uRenin) in patients with DN (n = 38) and NDN (n = 78). Both natural logarithms of uAGT/urinary creatinine (ln[uAGT/uCr]) and uRenin (ln[uRenin/uCr]) levels were significantly higher in patients with DN compared with those with NDN (ln[uAGT/uCr]: 4.16 ± 1.13 in DN vs. 3.52 ± 1.21 in NDN, P = 0.007; ln[uRenin/uCr]: 5.66 ± 1.60 in DN vs. 4.29 ± 1.48 in NDN, P proteinuria, both uAGT and uRenin were higher in DN in patients with subnephrotic-range proteinuria (uPCR proteinuria (uPCR ≥ 3.5 mg/mg Cr), only uRenin was higher in DN compared to NDN. In a multiple regression analysis, diabetes showed independent association with uRenin. Consistently elevated uRenin in DN, regardless of the amount of proteinuria, indicates that intrarenal RAS activity may be higher in DN compared to NDN in patients with overt proteinuria. © 2014 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  10. Angiotensin receptor blockade recovers hepatic UCP2 expression and aconitase and SDH activities and ameliorates hepatic oxidative damage in insulin resistant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montez, Priscilla; Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Rodríguez, Rubén; Thorwald, Max A; Viscarra, José A; Lam, Lisa; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Nakano, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Akira; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2012-12-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is commonly associated with elevated renin-angiotensin system, oxidative stress, and steatohepatitis with down-regulation of uncoupling proteins (UCPs). However, the mechanisms linking renin-angiotensin system, steatosis, and UCP2 to hepatic oxidative damage during insulin resistance are not described. To test the hypothesis that angiotensin receptor activation contributes to decreased hepatic UCP2 expression and aconitase activity and to increased oxidative damage after increased glucose intake in a model of MetS, lean and obese Long Evans rats (n = 10/group) were randomly assigned to the following groups: 1) untreated Long Evans Tokushima Otsuka (lean, strain control), 2) untreated Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) (MetS model), 3) OLETF + angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) (10 mg olmesartan/kg·d × 6 wk), 4) OLETF + high glucose (HG) (5% in drinking water × 6 wk), and 5) OLETF + ARB + HG (ARB/HG × 6 wk). HG increased body mass (37%), plasma triglycerides (TGs) (35%), plasma glycerol (87%), plasma free fatty acids (28%), and hepatic nitrotyrosine (74%). ARB treatment in HG decreased body mass (12%), plasma TG (15%), plasma glycerol (23%), plasma free fatty acids (14%), and hepatic TG content (42%), suggesting that angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1) activation and increased adiposity contribute to the development of obesity-related dyslipidemia. ARB in HG also decreased hepatic nitrotyrosine and increased hepatic UCP2 expression (59%) and aconitase activity (40%), as well as antioxidant enzyme activities (50-120%), suggesting that AT1 activation also contributes to protein oxidation, impaired lipid metabolism, and antioxidant metabolism in the liver. Thus, in addition to promoting obesity-related hypertension, AT1 activation may also impair lipid metabolism and antioxidant capacity, resulting in steatosis via decreased UCP2 and tricarboxylic acid cycle activity.

  11. High potassium promotes mutual interaction between (pro)renin receptor and the local renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in rat inner medullary collecting duct cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chuanming; Fang, Hui; Zhou, Li; Lu, Aihua; Yang, Tianxin

    2016-10-01

    (Pro)renin receptor (PRR) is predominantly expressed in the collecting duct (CD) with unclear functional implication. It is not known whether CD PRR is regulated by high potassium (HK). Here, we aimed to investigate the effect of HK on PRR expression and its role in regulation of aldosterone synthesis and release in the CD. In primary rat inner medullary CD cells, HK augmented PRR expression and soluble PPR (sPRR) release in a time- and dose-dependent manner, which was attenuated by PRR small interfering RNA (siRNA), eplerenone, and losartan. HK upregulated aldosterone release in parallel with an increase of CYP11B2 (cytochrome P-450, family 11, subfamily B, polypeptide 2) protein expression and upregulation of medium renin activity, both of which were attenuated by a PRR antagonist PRO20, PRR siRNA, eplerenone, and losartan. Similarly, prorenin upregulated aldosterone release and CYP11B2 expression, both of which were attenuated by PRR siRNA. Interestingly, a recombinant sPRR (sPRR-His) also stimulated aldosterone release and CYP11B2 expression. Taken together, we conclude that HK enhances a local renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), leading to increased PRR expression, which in turn amplifies the response of the RAAS, ultimately contributing to heightened aldosterone release.

  12. Hepatic autoregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staehr, Peter; Hother-Nielsen, Ole; Beck-Nielsen, Henning

    2007-01-01

    The effect of increased glycogenolysis, simulated by galactose's conversion to glucose, on the contribution of gluconeogenesis (GNG) to hepatic glucose production (GP) was determined. The conversion of galactose to glucose is by the same pathway as glycogen's conversion to glucose, i.e., glucose 1......-phosphate --> glucose 6-phosphate --> glucose. Healthy men (n = 7) were fasted for 44 h. At 40 h, hepatic glycogen stores were depleted. GNG then contributed approximately 90% to a GP of approximately 8 micromol.kg(-1).min(-1). Galactose, 9 g/h, was infused over the next 4 h. The contribution of GNG to GP...... declined from approximately 90% to 65%, i.e., by approximately 2 micromol.kg(-1).min(-1). The rate of galactose conversion to blood glucose, measured by labeling the infused galactose with [1-(2)H]galactose (n = 4), was also approximately 2 micromol.kg(-1).min(-1). The 41st h GP rose by approximately 1...

  13. Hepatitis C Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Hepatitis C Testing Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Hepatitis C Antibody; Anti-HCV; HCV-PCR; HCV-RNA; Hepatitis ...

  14. HIV and Hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections and Coinfections HIV and Hepatitis B (Last updated 8/31/2016; last reviewed ... should be treated for both diseases. What is hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is a liver disease caused ...

  15. Drug-induced hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxic hepatitis ... to get liver damage. Some drugs can cause hepatitis with small doses, even if the liver breakdown ... liver. Many different drugs can cause drug-induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are ...

  16. HIV and Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections and Coinfections HIV and Hepatitis C (Last updated 8/31/2016; last reviewed ... the medicines for any side effects. What is hepatitis C? Hepatitis C is a liver disease caused ...

  17. Hepatitis B Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... helpful? Also known as: HBV Tests; Hep B; anti-HBs; Hepatitis B Surface Antibody; HBsAg; Hepatitis B Surface ... including "HBV carrier" state. Hepatitis B surface antibody (anti-HBs) Detects antibody produced in response to HBV surface ...

  18. Preventing hepatitis A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatitis A is inflammation (irritation and swelling) of the liver caused by the hepatitis A virus. You can take several steps to ... reduce your risk of spreading or catching the hepatitis A virus: Always wash your hands thoroughly after ...

  19. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis E

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chapter 3 - Hepatitis C Chapter 3 - Histoplasmosis Hepatitis E Chong-Gee Teo INFECTIOUS AGENT Infection is caused ... for infection. Map 3-06. Distribution of hepatitis E virus infection 1 PDF Version (printable) 1 Disease ...

  20. Hepatitis B virus (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatitis B is also known as serum hepatitis and is spread through blood and sexual contact. It is ... population. This photograph is an electronmicroscopic image of hepatitis B virus particles. (Image courtesy of the Centers for ...

  1. Hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharara, A I; Hunt, C M; Hamilton, J D

    1996-10-15

    To review the virology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, natural history, clinical manifestations, and current treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The MEDLINE database (1966 to 1996) was searched for English-language articles and abstracts on HCV and non-A, non-B hepatitis. Papers cited in relevant primary articles were also reviewed. More than 500 original and review articles were evaluated, and the most relevant were selected. Data were extracted and reviewed by all authors. In most patients, HCV infection results in chronic hepatitis. The disease is insidious and subclinical but may progress over decades into end-stage liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma, which makes HCV cirrhosis a leading indication for orthotopic liver transplantation. Current diagnostic methods are highly sensitive and specific, and quantitative assessment of viral load may help to predict and monitor response to treatment. The only available therapeutic option is interferon, and this agent is effective in only a small subset of patients. Infection with HCV is a significant public health problem that has important clinical and financial consequences. The tailoring of specific therapy according to viral load or genotype, better patient selection, and use of combination drug regimens may improve the chance of viral clearance and sustained biochemical and histologic response. Further understanding of the basic virology of HCV and the exact mechanisms of viral persistence and tissue injury is needed to help define future therapeutic and preventive strategies.

  2. [Hepatitis E].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotto, Gaetano; Bulla, Fabio; Campanale, Francesca; Tartaglia, Alessandra; Fazio, Vincenzina

    2013-09-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) represents the main aetiological agent of enteric non-A hepatitis and is the only member of a new virus, Hepevirus, belonging to the family of Hepeviridae. HEV is the single most important cause of acute clinical hepatitis among adults in many areas of the developing world, specifically the Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia, the Middle East and North Africa, where it is a common cause of sporadic and epidemic waterborne outbreaks and results in a high rate of morbidity and death, especially in pregnant women. Once thought of as an infection confined to developing countries, it is now recognized as a geographically widely distributed disease. In low-endemic regions (Western countries), sporadic cases of locally-acquired HEV infection are reported, acquired possibly through zoonotic transmission from pigs, wild boars or deer. In persons with pre-existing chronic liver disease, HEV superinfection can present as acute-on-chronic liver disease. In European countries, chronic infection, which may progress to liver cirrhosis, has been reported among immunosuppressed persons. Two testing vaccines proved to be highly effective in preventing the disease; these vaccines should be of particular use in groups that are at high risk of HEV infection.

  3. Hepatitis Information for the Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Requirements for Viral Hepatitis Liver Cancer and Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis and Young Persons Who Inject Drugs National ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir What is Viral Hepatitis? The word "hepatitis" means inflammation of the liver . ...

  4. Effect of oral labetalol on plasma catecholamines, renin and aldosterone in patients with severe arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornerup, H J; Pedersen, E B; Christensen, N J; Pedersen, A; Pedersen, G

    1979-11-01

    Arterial blood pressure and plasma catecholamines, renin activity and aldosterone concentration in 12 patients with severe essential hypertension were studied before and after combined alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptor blockage induced by oral labetalol treatment for 2 months. Furosemide in a fixed dose was employed as a basic antihypertensive agent throughout the study. Blood pressure was adequately controlled in only 6 patients. Mean body weight increased by 1.8 kg and there was a rise in body weight which was inversely correlated with the fall in standing mean blood pressure. The mean plasma noradrenaline concentration decreased from 0.30 to 0.20 ng/ml, whereas plasma adrenaline did not change significantly. Plasma renin activity and aldosterone concentration varied greatly, but the mean values did not change significantly. Change in body weight was correlated inversely with changes in plasma noradrenaline and renin. The results suggest that labetalol, through its combined alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptor blocking action, induces a rise in body weight, probably due to sodium and fluid retention, which partly counterbalances the antihypertensive effect of labetalol, and partly modifies both renin and sympathetic nervous activity.

  5. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase supports Renin release during sodium restriction through inhibition of phosphodiesterase 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sällström, Johan; Jensen, Boye L; Skøtt, Ole

    2010-01-01

    NOS supports renin release by cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-mediated inhibition of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-specific phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE3) in juxtaglomerular (JG) cells. METHODS: The experiments were performed in conscious nNOS⁻(/)⁻ and wild types after 10 days on a low-sodium diet...

  6. Cardiac repolarization during hypoglycaemia and hypoxaemia in healthy males: impact of renin-angiotensin system activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Andersen, Rikke; Høi-Hansen, Thomas; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal;

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: Activity in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) may influence the susceptibility to cardiac arrhythmia. To study the effect of basal RAS activity on cardiac repolarization during myocardial stress induced by hypoglycaemia or hypoxaemia in healthy humans. METHODS AND RESULTS: Ten subjects...

  7. The More Complex Renin-Angiotensin System: New Insights Into An Old System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Gembardt (Florian)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractSince the first description of renin by Tigerstedt and Bergmann in 1898,1 the reninangiotensin system (RAS) has been extensively studied. In the last decades, many investigations have demonstrated the importance of the RAS for maintenance and regulation of many physiological processes. O

  8. Impact of glycaemic control on the effect of direct renin inhibition in the AVOID study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Frederik; Lewis, Julia B; Lewis, Edmund J;

    2012-01-01

    Hyperglycaemia induces development and progression of microvascular complications in diabetes. A direct link between high glucose levels and intrarenal renin-angiotensin activation has been demonstrated. This post-hoc analysis assessed the influence of baseline glycaemic control on the reduction...

  9. Renin inhibition improves cardiac function and remodeling after myocardial infarction independent of blood pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Westermann (Dirk); A. Riad (Alexander); O. Lettau (Olga); A.J.M. Roks (Anton); K. Sawatis (Konstantinos); P.M. Becher (Peter Moritz); F. Escher (Felicitas); A.H.J. Danser (Jan); H.P. Schultheiss (Heinz-Peter); C. Tschöpe (Carsten)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractPharmacological renin inhibition with aliskiren is an effective antihypertensive drug treatment, but it is currently unknown whether aliskiren is able to attenuate cardiac failure independent of its blood pressure-lowering effects. We investigated the effect of aliskiren on cardiac remod

  10. Improvement of Sodium Status to Optimize the Efficacy of Renin-Angiotensin System Blockade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laverman, Gozewijn D.; Navis, Gerjan

    2011-01-01

    Blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) offers superior renoprotection in the treatment of patients with hypertension, but the efficacy of RAAS inhibition strongly depends on sodium status, presumably in relation to extracellular volume status. Because assessing volume status by

  11. Is kidney ischemia the central mechanism in parallel activation of the renin and sympathetic system?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siddiqi, Laima; Joles, Jaap A.; Grassi, Guido; Blankestijn, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    In chronic kidney disease simultaneous activation of the renin - angiotensin and sympathetic systems occurs. Kidney ischemia seems to play a key role in the pathogenesis. This review firstly summarizes experimental and clinical evidence in chronic kidney disease supporting this idea and addresses th

  12. Renal damage after myocardial infarction is prevented by renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windt, Willemijn A. K. M.; Eijkelkamp, Wouter B. A.; Henning, Robert H.; Kluppel, Alex C. A.; de Graeff, Pieter A.; Hillege, Hans L.; Schaefer, Stefan; de Zeeuw, Dick; van Dokkum, Richard P. E.

    2006-01-01

    Recently, it was shown that myocardial infarction aggravates preexistent mild renal damage that is elicited by unilateral nephrectomy in rats. The mechanism behind this cardiorenal interaction likely involves the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system and/or vasoactive peptides that are metabolized by

  13. Possible contribution of(pro)renin receptor to development of gestational diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kanako; Bokuda; Atsuhiro; Ichihara

    2014-01-01

    (Pro)renin receptor [(P)RR], a receptor for renin and prorenin, was first cloned in 2002. Since then, the pathophysiological roles of(P)RR have been growing concerns.(P)RR binds renin and prorenin, with two important consequences, nonproteolytic activation of prorenin, leading to the tissue renin-angiotensin system activation and the intracellular signalings. It is now also known to play an important role as vacuolar H+-ATPase associated protein, involving in Wnt signaling, main component of embryonic development. Extracellular domain of full-length(P)RR is cleaved in golgi-complex forming soluble(P)RR [s(P)RR]. The s(P)RR is now possible to be measured in human blood and urine. It is now measured in different pathophysiological states, and recent study showed that elevated plasma s(P)RR levels in the early stage of pregnancies are associated with higher incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus later in the pregnancies. Plasma s(P)RR levels of neonates are known to be higher than that of adults. It was also shown that, increased s(P)RR concentrations in cord blood, associated with a lower small for gestational age birth likelihood. These data suggests the involvement of(P)RR in embryo’s growth. In thisreview article, we attempt to figure out the possible pathophysiological roles of the(P)RR in maternal glucose intolerance and embryo’s growth, through reviewing previous studies.

  14. Prognostic value of renin and prorenin in heart failure patients with decreased kidney function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szymanski, Mariusz K.; Damman, Kevin; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Hillege, Hans L.; de Boer, Rudolf A.

    2011-01-01

    Background The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) plays a key role in the progression of heart failure (HF) and concomitant kidney dysfunction. Despite the use of RAAS blockade, sustained activation of RAAS has been suggested to link with adverse outcome. We aimed to investigate the prognos

  15. Aliskiren accumulation in the kidney : no major role for binding to renin or prorenin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, Sascha; Fraune, Christoph; Alenina, Natalia; Bader, Michael; Danser, A. H. Jan; Frenay, Anne-Roos; van Goor, Harry; Stahl, Rolf; Nguyen, Genevieve; Schwedhelm, Edzard; Wenzel, Ulrich Otto

    2013-01-01

    Background and objective: The antihypertensive effects of the direct renin inhibitor aliskiren last substantially longer after treatment withdrawal than expected based upon its plasma half-life. This may be attributable to drug accumulation in the kidney as recently shown in rats and mice. Since ali

  16. New roles for renin and prorenin in heart failure and cardiorenal crosstalk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroten, Nicolas F.; Gaillard, Carlo A. J. M.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Szymanski, Mariusz K.; Hillege, Hans L.; de Boer, Rudolf A.

    2012-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system (RAAS) plays a central role in the pathophysiology of heart failure and cardiorenal interaction. Drugs interfering in the RAAS form the pillars in treatment of heart failure and cardiorenal syndrome. Although RAAS inhibitors improve prognosis, heart failure-a

  17. Pretreatment renal vascular tone predicts the effect of specific renin inhibition on natriuresis in essential hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Paassen, P; Navis, GJ; de Jong, PE; de Zeeuw, D

    1999-01-01

    Background In essential hypertension an elevated renal vascular resistance (RVR) may be a marker of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system-mediated impairment of renal sodium excretion. This hypothesis was tested by investigating whether, in subjects with essential hypertension, the natriuretic respon

  18. Renin inhibitors containing a pyridyl amino diol derived C-terminus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitsch, H; Henning, R; Kleemann, H W; Linz, W; Nickel, W U; Ruppert, D; Urbach, H; Wagner, A

    1993-09-17

    Based on the concept of transition-state analogs, a series of nonpeptide renin inhibitors with the new (2S,3R,4S)-2-amino-1-cyclohexyl-3,4-dihydroxy-6-(2-pyridyl)hexane moiety at the C-terminal functionality were synthesized and evaluated for inhibition of renin both in vitro and in vivo. All compounds exhibited potencies in the nanomolar or even subnanomolar range when tested versus human renin in vitro. Selected inhibitors were evaluated in anesthetized, sodium-depleted rhesus monkeys and produced a marked reduction in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) upon intraduodenal administration of a dose of 2 mg/kg. Compound 38 (S 2864) containing an amino piperidyl succinic acid derived N-terminal is the most promising member in this series. 38 inhibited human renin with an IC50 of 0.38 nM, did not affect other human aspartic proteinases, and decreased mean arterial blood pressure significantly by 27% with a duration of action of 90 min after administration of 2 mg/kg id in anesthetized, sodium-depleted rhesus monkeys.

  19. 21 CFR 862.1085 - Angiotensin I and renin test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Angiotensin I and renin test system. 862.1085 Section 862.1085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  20. Aortic Pathology and the Role of the Renin-Angiotensin System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Moltzer (Els)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) are a potential life-threatening disease with limited pharmacological treatment options. Current treatment options are aimed at lowering aortic hemodynamic stress, predominantly with beta-blockers. Increasing evidence supports a role for the renin-angiote

  1. Relative Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Deficiency and Inadequate Renin and Angiotensin II Suppression in Obese Hypertensive Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asferg, Camilla L; Nielsen, Søren J; Andersen, Ulrik B

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a strong risk factor for hypertension, but the mechanisms by which obesity leads to hypertension are incompletely understood. On this background, we assessed dietary sodium intake, serum levels of natriuretic peptides (NPs), and the activity of the renin-angiotensin system in 63 obese...

  2. Improvement of Sodium Status to Optimize the Efficacy of Renin-Angiotensin System Blockade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laverman, Gozewijn D.; Navis, Gerjan

    2011-01-01

    Blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) offers superior renoprotection in the treatment of patients with hypertension, but the efficacy of RAAS inhibition strongly depends on sodium status, presumably in relation to extracellular volume status. Because assessing volume status by

  3. The role of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Unger

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS is increased in patients with heart failure, and its maladaptive mechanisms may lead to adverse effects such as cardiac remodelling and sympathetic activation. Elevated renin activity has been demonstrated in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. (Third-generation synthetic non-peptide renin inhibitors, with more favourable properties than earlier renin inhibitors, lower ambulatory blood pressure and may have a role to play in other cardiovascular disease. Chymase, a protease inhibitor stored in mast cells that generates angiotensin II (Ang II (in addition to angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE], has been linked to extracellular matrix remodelling in heart failure. Again, chymase inhibitors have been developed to investigate its functions in vitro and in vivo. Bradykinin is thought to contribute to the cardioprotective effect of ACE inhibition through modification of nitric oxide release, calcium handling and collagen accumulation. Ang II is believed to influence a number of molecular and structural changes in the heart, mostly mediated through the AT1-receptor. The importance of the RAAS in heart failure is shown by the survival benefit conferred by treatment with ACE inhibitors.

  4. Combined renin inhibition/(pro)renin receptor blockade in diabetic retinopathy--a study in transgenic (mREN2)27 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batenburg, Wendy W; Verma, Amrisha; Wang, Yunyang; Zhu, Ping; van den Heuvel, Mieke; van Veghel, Richard; Danser, A H Jan; Li, Qiuhong

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunction of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) contributes to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Prorenin, the precursor of renin is highly elevated in ocular fluid of diabetic patients with proliferative retinopathy. Prorenin may exert local effects in the eye by binding to the so-called (pro)renin receptor ((P)RR). Here we investigated the combined effects of the renin inhibitor aliskiren and the putative (P)RR blocker handle-region peptide (HRP) on diabetic retinopathy in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic transgenic (mRen2)27 rats (a model with high plasma prorenin levels) as well as prorenin stimulated cytokine expression in cultured Müller cells. Adult (mRen2)27 rats were randomly divided into the following groups: (1) non-diabetic; (2) diabetic treated with vehicle; (3) diabetic treated with aliskiren (10 mg/kg per day); and (4) diabetic treated with aliskiren+HRP (1 mg/kg per day). Age-matched non-diabetic wildtype Sprague-Dawley rats were used as control. Drugs were administered by osmotic minipumps for three weeks. Transgenic (mRen2)27 rat retinas showed increased apoptotic cell death of both inner retinal neurons and photoreceptors, increased loss of capillaries, as well as increased expression of inflammatory cytokines. These pathological changes were further exacerbated by diabetes. Aliskiren treatment of diabetic (mRen2)27 rats prevented retinal gliosis, and reduced retinal apoptotic cell death, acellular capillaries and the expression of inflammatory cytokines. HRP on top of aliskiren did not provide additional protection. In cultured Müller cells, prorenin significantly increased the expression levels of IL-1α and TNF-α, and this was completely blocked by aliskiren or HRP, their combination, (P)RR siRNA and the AT1R blocker losartan, suggesting that these effects entirely depended on Ang II generation by (P)RR-bound prorenin. In conclusion, the lack of effect of HRP on top of aliskiren, and the Ang II-dependency of the ocular

  5. Pressure-natriuresis and -diuresis in transgenic rats harboring both human renin and human angiotensinogen genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehmel, B; Mervaala, E; Lippoldt, A; Gross, V; Bohlender, J; Ganten, D; Luft, F C

    1998-12-01

    The hypertensive double transgenic rat harboring both the human renin and human angiotensinogen genes (dTGR) offers a unique opportunity to study the human renin-angiotensin system in an experimental animal model. Since nothing is known about the control of sodium and water excretion in these rats, this study was performed to compare pressure-natriuresis relationships in hypertensive dTGR and normotensive control rats harboring only the human renin gene (hREN), in order to determine how the pressure-natriuresis relationship is reset in hypertensive dTGR. To differentiate between extrinsic and intrinsic renal mechanisms, experiments were performed with and without renal denervation, and with and without infusions of vasopressin, norepinephrine, 17-OH-corticosterone, and aldosterone. Human and rat angiotensinogen and renin mRNA expression were also determined. In hREN without controlled renal function, urine flow and sodium excretion increased from 13 to 169 microl/min per g kidney wet weight (kwt) and from 1 to 30 micromol/min per g kwt, respectively, as renal perfusion pressure was increased from 67 to 135 mmHg. Renal blood flow (RBF) and GFR ranged between 3 to 7 and 0.9 to 1.5 ml/min per g kwt. In dTGR, pressure-natriuresis-diuresis relationships were shifted approximately 40 mmHg rightward. RBF was lower in dTGR than in hREN; GFR was not different. In dTGR with neurohormonal factors controlled, RBF was decreased and pressure-natriuresis-diuresis curves were not different compared to dTGR curves without these interventions. By light microscopy, the kidneys of these 6-wk-old dTGR and hREN rats were normal and indistinguishable. Both human and rat renin and angiotensinogen mRNA were expressed in the kidneys of dTGR. The two renin mRNA were decreased in dTGR, indicating a physiologic downregulation of renin gene expression by high BP. It is concluded that the renal pressure-natriuresis mechanism is reset toward higher pressure levels in dTGR and participates in the

  6. Hepatitis B Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a combination product containing Haemophilus influenzae type b, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... combination product containing Diphtheria, Tetanus Toxoids, Acellular Pertussis, Hepatitis B, Polio Vaccine)

  7. Human gut endogenous proteins as a potential source of angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I)-, renin inhibitory and antioxidant peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Lakshmi A; Hayes, Maria; Montoya, Carlos A; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Moughan, Paul J

    2016-02-01

    It is well known that endogenous bioactive proteins and peptides play a substantial role in the body's first line of immunological defence, immune-regulation and normal body functioning. Further, the peptides derived from the luminal digestion of proteins are also important for body function. For example, within the peptide database BIOPEP (http://www.uwm.edu.pl/biochemia/index.php/en/biopep) 12 endogenous antimicrobial and 64 angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I) inhibitory peptides derived from human milk and plasma proteins are listed. The antimicrobial peptide database (http://aps.unmc.edu/AP/main.php) lists over 111 human host-defence peptides. Several endogenous proteins are secreted in the gut and are subject to the same gastrointestinal digestion processes as food proteins derived from the diet. The human gut endogenous proteins (GEP) include mucins, serum albumin, digestive enzymes, hormones, and proteins from sloughed off epithelial cells and gut microbiota, and numerous other secreted proteins. To date, much work has been carried out regarding the health altering effects of food-derived bioactive peptides but little attention has been paid to the possibility that GEP may also be a source of bioactive peptides. In this review, we discuss the potential of GEP to constitute a gut cryptome from which bioactive peptides such as ACE-I inhibitory, renin inhibitory and antioxidant peptides may be derived.

  8. Unconventional protein secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yu; Wang, Juan; Wang, Junqi; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Robinson, David G; Jiang, Liwen

    2012-10-01

    It is generally believed that protein secretion or exocytosis is achieved via a conventional ER (endoplasmic reticulum)-Golgi-TGN (trans-Golgi network)-PM (plasma membrane) pathway in the plant endomembrane system. However, such signal peptide (SP)-dependent protein secretion cannot explain the increasing number of SP-lacking proteins which are found outside of the PM in plant cells. The process by which such leaderless secretory proteins (LSPs) gain access to the cell exterior is termed unconventional protein secretion (UPS) and has been well-studied in animal and yeast cells, but largely ignored by the plant community. Here, we review the evidence for UPS in plants especially in regard to the recently discovered EXPO (exocyst-positive-organelle).

  9. Plasma renin responses to mental stress and carotid intima-media thickness in black Africans: the SABPA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, M; Malan, L; Schutte, A E; Huisman, H W; van Rooyen, J M; Schutte, R; Fourie, C M T; Malan, N T; Seedat, Y K

    2011-07-01

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system can be activated by sympathetic nervous input and is thought to have an important role in the prevalence of hypertension and cardiovascular risk in black Africans. We examined (1) the association between plasma renin responses to mental stress and a marker of sub-clinical atherosclerosis; and (2) associations between resting renin and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure. Participants were 143 urbanized black African men and women (43.1 ± 7.7 years) drawn from a study of Sympathetic Activity and Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Africans (SABPA). After an overnight fast, participants completed the Stroop mental stress task. Blood samples were drawn during baseline and 10 min after the task to assess the concentration of active renin in plasma. Blood pressure assessments included continuous Finometer measures during the stress testing and 24-h ambulatory monitoring. Carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) was measured using high-resolution ultrasound. Approximately 50% of the sample responded to the task with an increase in renin concentration. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed an association between the renin stress response and CIMT (β = 0.024, 95% confidence interval, 0.004-0.043), after adjustment for conventional risk factors, blood pressure stress responses and basal levels of renin activity (R(2) for model = 0.37). In addition, resting renin was inversely associated with ambulatory blood pressure. In summary, heightened release of renin during a laboratory mental stressor was associated with a marker of sub-clinical atherosclerosis; thus, it may be a potential mechanism in explaining the increased burden of cardiovascular disease in urbanized black Africans.

  10. Mammary renin-angiotensin system-regulating aminopeptidase activities are modified in rats with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Pilar Carrera, Maria; Ramírez-Expósito, Maria Jesus; Mayas, Maria Dolores; García, Maria Jesus; Martínez-Martos, Jose Manuel

    2010-12-01

    Angiotensin II in particular and/or the local renin-angiotensin system in general could have an important role in epithelial tissue growth and modelling; therefore, it is possible that it may be involved in breast cancer. In this sense, previous works of our group showed a predominating role of angiotensin II in tumoral tissue obtained from women with breast cancer. However, although classically angiotensin II has been considered the main effector peptide of the renin-angiotensin system cascade, several of its catabolism products such as angiotensin III and angiotensin IV also possess biological functions. These peptides are formed through the activity of several proteolytic regulatory enzymes of the aminopeptidase type, also called angiotensinases. The aim of this work was to analyse several specific angiotensinase activities involved in the renin-angiotensin system cascade in mammary tissue from control rats and from rats with mammary tumours induced by N-methyl-nitrosourea (NMU), which may reflect the functional status of their target peptides under the specific conditions brought about by the tumoural process. The results show that soluble and membrane-bound specific aspartyl aminopeptidase activities and membrane-bound glutamyl aminopeptidase activity increased in mammary tissue from NMU-treated animals and soluble aminopeptidase N and aminopeptidase B activities significantly decreased in mammary tissue from NMU-treated rats. These changes support the existence of a local mammary renin-angiotensin system and that this system and its putative functions in breast tissue could be altered by the tumour process, in which we suggest a predominant role of angiotensin III. All described data about the renin-angiotensin system in mammary tissue support the idea that it must be involved in normal breast tissue functions, and its disruption could be involved in one or more steps of the carcinogenesis process.

  11. Studies on Renin Stimulation in Normal Controls and in Patients with Essential Hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Chang Soon; Choe, Kang Won; Lee, Hong Kyu; Lee, Jung Sang [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1978-03-15

    To find out a convenient and reliable method of detecting low renin status, we employed intravenous furosemide injection as a stimulatory maneuver. The results thus obtained were compared with those from the postural stimuli and basal plasma renin activity (PRA) in relation to sodium excretion. Intravenous furosemide test was performed in 66 control subjects and 44 patients with essential hypertension. The results were as follow; 1) Mean PRA in control subjects rose from 2.5+-1.95 ng/ml/hr (basal) to 4.5+-2.51, 5.2+-2.49 and 4.2+-2.44 ng/ml/hr at 1, 2 and 3 hrs after IV injection. One-hour response is more convenient in clinical practice. 2) Postural stimuli by assuming an upright posture for 3 hrs gave rise to considerable increase in PRA (4.0+-2.92 from 2.4+-1.85), but we found it less convenient than stimulation with furosemide. 3) The increase in PRA was much less marked in patients with essential hypertension as a whole (2.9+-2.75). Hyporesponsiveness to furosemide stimuli was found in 34.1%. Of these hyporesponders, a third had a normal basal PRA, indicating the need for this kind stimulatory procedure. 4) Younger age group showed greater renin responsiveness than older age group after furosemide stimuli. Likewise mean age of low renin patients (52.9+-5.38 years old) was significantly higher than that of high and normal renin patients (44.1+-13.78 years old).

  12. Imaging the renin-angiotensin system: an important target of anti-hypertensive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung Julie; Toma, Ildikó; Sipos, Arnold; McCulloch, Fiona; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2006-09-15

    Multiphoton fluorescence microscopy allows visualization, manipulation, and quantification of the structure-function relationships between pharmacological interventions and their physiological effects. The application of these methods to live animals permits direct observation of acute physical responses that lack chemically detectable signals in the blood or urine and would otherwise remain unknown. With the use of special fluorescent dyes, chemical/hormonal responses may also be detected. The delivery and site-specific effects of drugs can be monitored in real-time. The capacity to simultaneously visualize both proximal and distal segments of the nephron permits observation of the dynamic processes within the living kidney and a quantitative assessment of the various operations. Consequently, a clinically valuable and pending application for multi-photon microscopy will be to provide real-time, quantitative imaging of basic organ functions and their responses to therapeutic intervention. Imaging of the intra-renal renin content and enzymatic activity of renin in situ and in real-time is a new, more informative measure of RAS activity. Direct visualization of the molecular and cellular components of renin release signals and the interactions between the vascular endothelium, tubular epithelium, local mediators, and the renin producing cells provides great insight for drug development. Examples of how the effects of various RAS inhibitors can be visualized in the intact kidney are provided: including angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition (captopril), angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade (olmesartan), and renin inhibition (aliskiren). The site-specific actions of diuretics, like furosemide, have also been visualized. Quantitative imaging of basic renal functions in health and disease can provide key information to assess the delivery and effects of pharmaceutical interventions.

  13. Hemodynamic, morphometric and autonomic patterns in hypertensive rats - renin-angiotensin system modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda S. Zamo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spontaneously hypertensive rats develop left ventricular hypertrophy, increased blood pressure and blood pressure variability, which are important determinants of heart damage, like the activation of renin-angiotensin system. AIMS: To investigate the effects of the time-course of hypertension over 1 hemodynamic and autonomic patterns (blood pressure; blood pressure variability; heart rate; 2 left ventricular hypertrophy; and 3 local and systemic Renin-angiotensin system of the spontaneously hypertensive rats. METHODS: Male spontaneously hypertensive rats were randomized into two groups: young (n=13 and adult (n=12. Hemodynamic signals (blood pressure, heart rate, blood pressure variability (BPV and spectral analysis of the autonomic components of blood pressure were analyzed. LEFT ventricular hypertrophy was measured by the ratio of LV mass to body weight (mg/g, by myocyte diameter (μm and by relative fibrosis area (RFA, %. ACE and ACE2 activities were measured by fluorometry (UF/min, and plasma renin activity (PRA was assessed by a radioimmunoassay (ng/mL/h. Cardiac gene expressions of Agt, Ace and Ace2 were quantified by RT-PCR (AU. RESULTS: The time-course of hypertension in spontaneously hypertensive rats increased BPV and reduced the alpha index in adult spontaneously hypertensive rats. Adult rats showed increases in left ventricular hypertrophy and in RFA. Compared to young spontaneously hypertensive rats, adult spontaneously hypertensive rats had lower cardiac ACE and ACE2 activities, and high levels of PRA. No change was observed in gene expression of Renin-angiotensin system components. CONCLUSIONS: The observed autonomic dysfunction and modulation of Renin-angiotensin system activity are contributing factors to end-organ damage in hypertension and could be interacting. Our findings suggest that the management of hypertensive disease must start before blood pressure reaches the highest stable levels and the consequent

  14. Blood pressure lowering in essential hypertension with an oral renin inhibitor, aliskiren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Alice; Jensen, Chris; Nussberger, Juerg; O'Brien, Eoin

    2003-12-01

    Inhibition of the first and rate-limiting step of the renin-angiotensin system has long been an elusive therapeutic goal. Aliskiren, the first known representative of a new class of completely nonpeptide, orally active, renin inhibitors, has been shown to inhibit the production of angiotensin I and II in healthy volunteers and to reduce blood pressure (BP) in sodium-depleted marmosets. The aim of this randomized, double-blind, active comparator trial study was to assess the BP-lowering efficacy and safety of aliskiren. Two hundred twenty-six patients, 21 to 70 years of age, with mild to moderate hypertension, were randomly assigned to receive 37.5 mg, 75 mg, 150 mg, or 300 mg aliskiren or 100 mg losartan daily for 4 weeks. Dose-dependent reductions in daytime ambulatory systolic pressure (mean change, mm Hg [SD of change]; -0.4 [11.7], -5.3 [11.3], -8.0 [11.0], and -11.0 [11.0], P=0.0002) and in plasma renin activity (median change % [interquartile range]; -55 [-64, -11], -60 [-82, -46], -77 [-86, -72], and -83 [-92, -71], P=0.0008) were observed with 37.5, 75, 150, and 300 mg aliskiren. The change in daytime systolic pressure with 100 mg losartan (-10.9 [13.8]) was not significantly different from the changes seen with 75, 150, and 300 mg aliskiren. Aliskiren was well tolerated at all doses studied. This study demonstrates that aliskiren, through inhibition of renin, is an effective and safe orally active BP-lowering agent. Whether renin inhibition results in protection from heart attack, stroke, and nephropathy, similar to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition and angiotensin receptor blockade, needs to be researched.

  15. Renoprotection, renin inhibition, and blood pressure control: the impact of aliskiren on integrated blood pressure control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroon-Ur Rashid

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Haroon-Ur RashidDepartment of Cardiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Heart Institute, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Hypertension (HTN is an important factor in progressive loss of renal function. The kidney can be both a contributor to and a target of HTN. The functional integrity of the kidney is vital for the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis. Chronic activation of the renin system causes HTN and, ultimately, end-organ damage. Direct renin inhibitors (DRIs inhibit plasma renin activity (PRA, thereby preventing the conversion of angiotensinogen to angiotensin I; consequently, the levels of both Ang I and Ang II are reduced. There is no compensatory increase in PRA activity with DRIs as seen with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs. There are reasons to speculate that renin inhibition might prove to be a superior strategy for blocking the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system compared with ACEIs or ARBs. Evidence for the efficacy of aliskiren (a DRI is considered to be relatively strong, based on published, short-term, double-blind, randomized, controlled trials showing that aliskiren is as effective as other antihypertensive agents in reducing blood pressure (BP, with no rebound effects on BP after treatment withdrawal. When combined with diuretics, fully additive BP reduction is seen. When given with an ACEI or ARB, aliskiren produces significant additional BP reduction indicative of complimentary pharmacology and more complete renin–angiotensin system blockade.Keywords: aliskiren, direct renin inhibitor, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, ACE inhibitor, angiotensin II receptor blocker, chronic kidney disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus

  16. Assays to measure nanomolar levels of the renin inhibitor CGP 38 560 in plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cumin, F.; de Gasparo, M.; Wood, J.M.; Schnell, C.; Frueh, F.; Graf, P. (Ciba-Geigy Limited, Basel (Switzerland))

    1989-10-01

    A radioinhibitor binding assay and an enzyme inhibition assay have been developed to measure plasma levels of CGP 38 560, a potent human renin inhibitor. The detection limit of the assays was between 0.5 and 1 pmol/ml. There was a good correlation (r = 0.989) between the two assays for the measurement of human plasma spiked with CGP 38 560 in concentrations from 1.9 nM to 12 microM. Intra-assay variability was 6.1-17.3% and 4.4-27.2% for the radioinhibitor binding assay and the enzyme inhibition assay, respectively. Interassay variability was 6.0-28.2% and 3.8-28.4% for the radioinhibitor binding assay and the enzyme inhibition assay, respectively. Blood samples were collected during a pharmacological study performed in normotensive human volunteers on an unrestricted diet who were infused during a 30-minute period with CGP 38 560 A (50 micrograms/kg). Similar values for the concentrations of renin inhibitor in plasma were obtained with the radioinhibitor binding assay and the enzyme inhibitor assay, and there was a significant correlation between values obtained with the two different methodologies (r = 0.94). The plasma levels of renin inhibitor reached a maximum at the end of infusion and then decreased rapidly, indicating a short plasma half-life. The changes in biochemical parameters, plasma renin activity, and plasma concentration of active renin could be related to the concentrations of CGP 38 560 measured in the plasma.

  17. The role of individual domains and the significance of shedding of ATP6AP2/(pro)renin receptor in vacuolar H(+)-ATPase biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinouchi, Kenichiro; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Sano, Motoaki; Sun-Wada, Ge-Hong; Wada, Yoh; Ochi, Hiroki; Fukuda, Toru; Bokuda, Kanako; Kurosawa, Hideaki; Yoshida, Naohiro; Takeda, Shu; Fukuda, Keiichi; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The ATPase 6 accessory protein 2 (ATP6AP2)/(pro)renin receptor (PRR) is essential for the biogenesis of active vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase). Genetic deletion of ATP6AP2/PRR causes V-ATPase dysfunction and compromises vesicular acidification. Here, we characterized the domains of ATP6AP2/PRR involved in active V-ATPase biogenesis. Three forms of ATP6AP2/PRR were found intracellularly: full-length protein and the N- and C-terminal fragments of furin cleavage products, with the N-terminal fragment secreted extracellularly. Genetic deletion of ATP6AP2/PRR did not affect the protein stability of V-ATPase subunits. The extracellular domain (ECD) and transmembrane domain (TM) of ATP6AP2/PRR were indispensable for the biogenesis of active V-ATPase. A deletion mutant of ATP6AP2/PRR, which lacks exon 4-encoded amino acids inside the ECD (Δ4M) and causes X-linked mental retardation Hedera type (MRXSH) and X-linked parkinsonism with spasticity (XPDS) in humans, was defective as a V-ATPase-associated protein. Prorenin had no effect on the biogenesis of active V-ATPase. The cleavage of ATP6AP2/PRR by furin seemed also dispensable for the biogenesis of active V-ATPase. We conclude that the N-terminal ECD of ATP6AP2/PRR, which is also involved in binding to prorenin or renin, is required for the biogenesis of active V-ATPase. The V-ATPase assembly occurs prior to its delivery to the trans-Golgi network and hence shedding of ATP6AP2/PRR would not affect the biogenesis of active V-ATPase.

  18. Aliskiren attenuates steatohepatitis and increases turnover of hepatic fat in mice fed with a methionine and choline deficient diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuei-Chuan Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: Activation of the renin-angiotensin-system is known to play a role in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Renin knockout mice manifest decreased hepatic steatosis. Aliskiren is the first direct renin inhibitor to be approved for clinical use. Our study aims to evaluate the possible therapeutic effects and mechanism of the chronic administration of aliskiren in a dietary steatohepatitis murine model. METHODS: Male C57BL/6 mice were fed with a methionine and choline-deficient (MCD diet to induce steatohepatitis. After 8 weeks of feeding, the injured mice were randomly assigned to receive aliskiren (50 mg·kg(-1 per day or vehicle administration for 4 weeks. Normal controls were also administered aliskiren (50 mg·kg(-1 per day or a vehicle for 4 weeks. RESULTS: In the MCD mice, aliskiren attenuated hepatic steatosis, inflammation and fibrosis. Aliskiren did not change expression of lipogenic genes but increase turnover of hepatic fat by up-regulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a, cytochrome P450-4A14 and phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase. Furthermore, aliskiren decreased the hepatic expression of angiotensin II and nuclear factor κB. The levels of oxidative stress, hepatocyte apoptosis, activation of Kupffer cells and hepatic stellate cells, and pro-fibrotic markers were also reduced in the livers of the MCD mice receiving aliskiren. CONCLUSIONS: Aliskiren attenuates steatohepatitis and fibrosis in mice fed with a MCD diet. Thus, the noted therapeutic effects might come from not only the reduction of angiotensin II but also the up-regulation of fatty acid oxidation-related genes.

  19. Prolonged acute hepatitis A mimicking autoimmune hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rintaro Mikata; Osamu Yokosuka; Fumio Imazeki; Kenichi Fukai; Tatsuo Kanda; Hiromitsu Saisho

    2005-01-01

    AIM: We report a case with a prolonged course of hepatitisA, with alanine aminotransferase (ALT) higher than 500 IU/Lfor more than 2 mo.METHODS: A middle-aged woman had an elevated IgG level of more than 2 000 mg/dL, positive arti-nudear antibodies (ANA) and anti-smooth muscle antibodies (ASMA), but no evidence of persistent hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection. Liver biopsy findings were compatible with prolonged acute hepatitis, although acute onset of autoimmune hepatitis could not be ruled out.RESULTS: It was assumed that she developed a course of hepatitis similar to autoimmune hepatitis triggered by HAV infection. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) treatment was initiated and a favorable outcome was obtained. CONCLUSION: We describe a case of a middle-aged woman who showed a prolonged course of acute hepatitis A mimicking autoimmune hepatitis. Treatment with UDCAproved to be effective.

  20. The controversy concerning counterregulatory hormone secretion. A hypothesis for the prevention of diabetic ketoacidosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, D S; Eaton, R P

    1977-06-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis is characterized by an excess secretion of counterregulatory hormones (glucagon, catecholamines, cortisol, and growth hormone). Experimental evidence obtained in both diabetic man and animals suggests that elevation of the plasma concentration of these hormones is necessary to initiate excess hepatic production of ketone bodies. This increase in hepatic ketogenesis in concert with inability of peripheral tissues to completely utilize ketone bodies results in clinical ketoacidosis. This hypothesis would suggest that pharmacologic control of excess counterregulatory hormone secretion would be a rational therapeutic modality to prevent diabetic ketoacidosis.

  1. Secrets of Successful Homeschooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Parents who homeschool gifted children often find the daily practice of home education very different from what they had imagined. Gifted children are complex in both personality and learning styles. Parents who say that homeschooling works well for their gifted children have learned from others or discovered on their own several secrets that make…

  2. Physiology of bile secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alejandro Esteller

    2008-01-01

    The formation of bile depends on the structural and functional integrity of the bile-secretory apparatus and its impairment,in different situations,results in the syndrome of cholestasis.The structural bases that permit bile secretion as well as various aspects related with its composition and flow rate in physiological conditions will first be reviewed.Canalicular bile is produced by polarized hepatocytes that hold transporters in their basolateral (sinusoidal) and apical (canalicular) plasma membrane.This review summarizes recent data on the molecular determinants of this primary bile formation.The major function of the biliary tree is modification of canalicular bile by secretory and reabsorptive processes in bileduct epithelial cells (cholangiocytes) as bile passes through bile ducts.The mechanisms of fluid and solute transport in cholangiocytes will also be discussed.In contrast to hepatocytes where secretion is constant and poorly controlled,cholangiocyte secretion is regulated by hormones and nerves.A short section dedicated to these regulatory mechanisms of bile secretion has been included.The aim of this revision was to set the bases for other reviews in this series that will be devoted to specific issues related with biliary physiology and pathology.

  3. Salivary Gland Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, H. L.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes materials and procedures for an experiment utilizing a live dog to demonstrate: (1) physiology of the salivary gland; (2) parasympathetic control of the salivary gland; (3) influence of varying salivary flow rates on sodium and potassium ions, osmolarity and pH; and (4) salivary secretion as an active process. (DS)

  4. Almost-perfect secret sharing

    CERN Document Server

    Kaced, Tarik

    2011-01-01

    Splitting a secret s between several participants, we generate (for each value of s) shares for all participants. The goal: authorized groups of participants should be able to reconstruct the secret but forbidden ones get no information about it. In this paper we introduce several notions of non- perfect secret sharing, where some small information leak is permitted. We study its relation to the Kolmogorov complexity version of secret sharing (establishing some connection in both directions) and the effects of changing the secret size (showing that we can decrease the size of the secret and the information leak at the same time).

  5. Natural killer cells in hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shao-fei; Wang, Wen-jing; Gao, Yue-qiu

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells are a unique type of lymphocytes with cytotoxic capacity, and play important roles against tumors and infections. Recently, natural killer cells have been increasingly valued in their effects in hepatitis B virus infection. Since hepatitis B virus is not cytopathic, the subsequent antiviral immune responses of the host are responsible for sustaining the liver injury, which may result in cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. Many studies have confirmed that natural killer cells participate in anti-hepatitis B virus responses both in the early phase after infection and in the chronic phase via cytolysis, degranulation, and cytokine secretion. However, natural killer cells play dichotomic roles: they exert antiviral and immunoregulatory functions whilst contribute to the pathogenesis of liver injury. Here, we review the roles of natural killer cells in hepatitis B virus infection, introducing novel therapeutic strategies for controlling hepatitis B virus infection via the modulation of natural killer cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. The terminology of hepatitis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    It is proposed that the diseases formerly known as “infectious hepatitis” and “serum hepatitis” be referred to as viral hepatitis type A and viral hepatitis type B, respectively. It is further recommended that the “Australia” antigen be referred to as hepatitis B antigen (HB Ag) and the corresponding antibody as hepatitis B antibody (HB Ab). PMID:4544683

  7. Hepatitis A and HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C . Hepatitis A and HIV Hepatitis A is preventable with a vaccine, and ... Notice Network blog.aids.gov • locator.aids.gov • HIV/AIDS Service Locator Locator Widgets • Instructions • API Find ...

  8. Hepatitis B (HBV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hepatitis B (HBV) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hepatitis B (HBV) Print A A A What's in this ... poisons). There are several different types of hepatitis . Hepatitis B is a type that can move from one ...

  9. Hepatitis B (HBV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hepatitis B (HBV) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hepatitis B (HBV) A A A What's in this article? ... poisons). There are several different types of hepatitis . Hepatitis B is a type that can move from one ...

  10. Are Secrets Immoral? The Construction of Secrets in Everyday Conversation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunthner, Susanne; Luckmann, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Investigates the communicative treatment of secrets, presenting examples from recorded communicative interactions in a wide range of social milieus and settings in which the participants revealed knowledge of secrets, tried to dig out old secrets without appearing to be doing so, and occasionally, appeared to be hiding some items of knowledge from…

  11. Hepatic structural enhancement and insulin resistance amelioration due to AT1 receptor blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Mello, Vanessa

    2017-01-18

    Over the last decade, the role of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) on the development of obesity and its comorbidities has been extensively addressed. Both circulating and local RAS components are up-regulated in obesity and involved in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease onset. Pharmacological manipulations of RAS are viable strategies to tackle metabolic impairments caused by the excessive body fat mass. Renin inhibitors rescue insulin resistance, but do not have marked effects on hepatic steatosis. However, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) yield beneficial hepatic remodeling. ARBs elicit body mass loss and normalize insulin levels, tackling insulin resistance. Also, this drug class increases adiponectin levels, besides countering interleukin-6, tumoral necrosis factor-alpha, and transforming growth factor-beta 1. The latter is essential to prevent from liver fibrosis. When conjugated with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-alpha activation, ARB fully rescues fatty liver. These effects might be orchestrated by an indirect up-regulation of MAS receptor due to angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1R) blockade. These associations of ARB with PPAR activation and ACE2-angiotensin (ANG) (1-7)-MAS receptor axis deserve a better understanding. This editorial provides a brief overview of the current knowledge regarding AT1R blockade effects on sensitivity to insulin and hepatic structural alterations as well as the intersections of AT1R blockade with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor activation and ACE2-ANG (1-7) - MAS receptor axis.

  12. Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 and the Antiproteinuric Response to Dietary Sodium Restriction During Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Blockade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humalda, Jelmer K; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J; Kwakernaak, Arjan J; Slagman, Maartje C J; Waanders, Femke; Vervloet, Marc G; Ter Wee, Pieter M; Navis, Gerarda; de Borst, Martin H

    2015-01-01

    Background: Residual proteinuria during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade is a major renal and cardiovascular risk factor in chronic kidney disease. Dietary sodium restriction potentiates the antiproteinuric effect of RAAS blockade, but residual proteinuria remains in many patient

  13. Fibroblast growth factor 23 and the antiproteinuric response to dietary sodium restriction during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humalda, J.K.; Lambers Heerspink, H.J.; Kwakernaak, A.J.; Slagman, M.C.; Waanders, F.; Vervloet, M.G.; Wee, P.M. Ter; Navis, G.; Borst, M.H. de; Wee, P.M. ter; Vervloet, M.; Bindels, R.J.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Hillebrands, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Residual proteinuria during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade is a major renal and cardiovascular risk factor in chronic kidney disease. Dietary sodium restriction potentiates the antiproteinuric effect of RAAS blockade, but residual proteinuria remains in many patient

  14. Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 and the Antiproteinuric Response to Dietary Sodium Restriction During Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Blockade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humalda, Jelmer K; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J; Kwakernaak, Arjan J; Slagman, Maartje C J; Waanders, Femke; Vervloet, Marc G; Ter Wee, Pieter M; Navis, Gerarda; de Borst, Martin H

    2015-01-01

    Background: Residual proteinuria during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade is a major renal and cardiovascular risk factor in chronic kidney disease. Dietary sodium restriction potentiates the antiproteinuric effect of RAAS blockade, but residual proteinuria remains in many patient

  15. Fibroblast growth factor 23 and the antiproteinuric response to dietary sodium restriction during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humalda, J.K.; Lambers Heerspink, H.J.; Kwakernaak, A.J.; Slagman, M.C.; Waanders, F.; Vervloet, M.G.; Wee, P.M. Ter; Navis, G.; Borst, M.H. de; Wee, P.M. ter; Vervloet, M.; Bindels, R.J.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Hillebrands, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Residual proteinuria during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade is a major renal and cardiovascular risk factor in chronic kidney disease. Dietary sodium restriction potentiates the antiproteinuric effect of RAAS blockade, but residual proteinuria remains in many patient

  16. Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 and the Antiproteinuric Response to Dietary Sodium Restriction During Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Blockade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humalda, Jelmer K; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J; Kwakernaak, Arjan J; Slagman, Maartje C J; Waanders, Femke; Vervloet, Marc G; Ter Wee, Pieter M; Navis, Gerarda; de Borst, Martin H

    Background: Residual proteinuria during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade is a major renal and cardiovascular risk factor in chronic kidney disease. Dietary sodium restriction potentiates the antiproteinuric effect of RAAS blockade, but residual proteinuria remains in many

  17. Fibroblast growth factor 23 and the antiproteinuric response to dietary sodium restriction during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humalda, J.K.; Lambers Heerspink, H.J.; Kwakernaak, A.J.; Slagman, M.C.; Waanders, F.; Vervloet, M.G.; Wee, P.M. Ter; Navis, G.; Borst, M.H. de; Wee, P.M. ter; Vervloet, M.; Bindels, R.J.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Hillebrands, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Residual proteinuria during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade is a major renal and cardiovascular risk factor in chronic kidney disease. Dietary sodium restriction potentiates the antiproteinuric effect of RAAS blockade, but residual proteinuria remains in many

  18. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is a potential biomarker for hepatitis B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Function exertion of specific proteins are key factors in disease progression, thus the systematical identification of those specific proteins is a prerequisite to understand various diseases. Though many proteins have been verified to impact on hepatitis, no systematical protein screening has been documented to hepatitis B virus (HBV induced hepatitis, hindering the comprehensive understanding to this severe disease. Aim To identify the major proteins in the progression of HBV infection from mild stage to severe stage. Methods We performed an integrated strategy by combining two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE, peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF analysis, and tissue microarray techniques to screen the functional proteins and detect the localization of those proteins. Results Interestingly, MS/MS identification revealed the expression level of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT was significantly elevated in serum samples from patients with severe chronic hepatitis. Immunoblotting with a specific AAT antibody confirmed that AAT is highly expressed in serum samples from patients with hepatic carcinoma and severe chronic hepatitis. Furthermore, we observed that AAT is with highest expression in normal tissue and cells, but lowest in hepatic carcinoma and severe chronic hepatitis tissues and cells, suggesting the specific secretion of AAT from tissues and cells to serum. Conclusion These results suggest the possibility of AAT as a potential biomarker for hepatitis B in diagnosis.

  19. 抗纤复方I号对乙醛刺激的肝星状细胞的细胞外基质及细胞因子分泌的干预作用%KangXian FuFang I inhibits acetaldehyde-stimulated extracellular matrix synthesis and cytokine secretion in cultured hepatic stellate cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林红; 黄玉红; 李异玲; 傅宝玉; 王炳元

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of KangXian Fu-Fang I (KXI) on acetaldehyde-stimulated extracellular matrix synthesis and cytokine secretion in cultured hepatic stellate cells (HSCs).METHODS: HSCs were isolated from rats and then primarily cultured and subcultured in vitro. Serum containing KXI was collected from normal rats intragastrically given the drug. HSCs were treated with acetaldehyde and the drug-containing serum. The contents of hyaluronic acid (HA) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) in the media and expression of type I collagen al mRNA in stimulated HSCs were measured by radioimmunoassay, ELISA and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively.RESULTS: After HSCs were stimulated with acetaldehyde (100 μmol/L), the expression level of type I collagen al mRNA (1.193 ± 0.0344 vs 0.988 ± 0.0208, P < 0.05) in HSCs and secreted levels of HA (1243.22 ng/L ± 58.13 ng/L vs 602.33 ng/L ± 194.06 ng/L, P < 0.05) and TGF-β1 (2734.43 ng/L ± 787.12 ng/L vs 559.92 ng/L ± 97.63 ng/L, P < 0.01) in the media significantly increased. Drug-containing serum (10%) significantly inhibited acetaldehyde-stimulated expression of type I collagen al mRNA (0.973 ± 0.0605 vs 1.193 ± 0.0344, P < 0.05) and secretion of HA (1032.667 ng/L ± 77.65 ng/ L vs 1243.22 ng/L ± 58.13 ng/L, P < 0.05) and TGF-β1 (759.62 ng/L ± 205.34 ng/L vs 2734.43 ng/L ± 787.12 ng/L, P < 0.01).CONCLUSION: KXI could inhibit acetaldehyde-stimulated secretion of HA and TGF-β1 and expression of type I collagen al mRNA in cultured HSCs.%目的:研究乙醛对肝星状细胞(HSC) 细胞外基质和细胞因子分泌的影响及中药抗纤复方I号(KXI) 的干预作用.方法:采用大鼠肝脏原位灌流消化法获得并原代及传代培养HSC,大鼠灌以KXI 制备药物血清,以乙醛和药物血清作用于HSC,通过RTPCR 测定细胞内α1(I) 型胶原mRNA 的表达,以放射免疫法和ELISA 法分别测定培养上清中透明质酸(HA)

  20. Extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Darzins, Aldis

    2014-07-22

    Nucleic acids encoding secretion signals, expression vectors containing the nucleic acids, and host cells containing the expression vectors are disclosed. Also disclosed are polypeptides that contain the secretion signals and methods of producing polypeptides, including methods of directing the extracellular secretion of the polypeptides. Exemplary embodiments include cellulase proteins fused to secretion signals, methods to produce and isolate these polypeptides, and methods to degrade lignocellulosic biomass.

  1. Telling stories: keeping secrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Joan M

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the reticence of some farm women to share their experiences with historians and how that desire to keep secrets collides with the desire by scholars to tell the stories of these women. It argues that scholars must continue to struggle with the issue of which stories to tell publicly and which to keep private. The author discusses her own experience telling stories about rural women in the 1970s and the need to give voice to the heritage of rural women, especially of groups that have feared revealing their experiences. She offers examples of historians of rural women who have successfully worked with formerly silenced populations and urges historians to continue to tell stories about these lives, to reevaluate what has been already learned, to ask new questions, and to discuss which secrets need to be shared.

  2. Bucarest, Strictement Secret

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionela Mihai

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available L’émission Bucarest, strictement secret représente un documentaire organisésous la forme d’une série télé, qui dépeint le Bucarest à partir de deux perspectives: de l’histoire, de la conte et du lieu. La valeur d’une cité réside dans l’existence d’une mystique, d’un romantisme abscons, à part et des caractères empruntés de drames de Shakespeare, mystérieux, serrés d’angoisse et des secrets qui assombrissent leur existence. Par conséquence, le rôle du metteur en scène est de dévoiler leur vraie identité et de remettre en place, autant que possible, la vérité.

  3. Prorenin induces ERK activation in endothelial cells to enhance neovascularization independently of the renin-angiotensin system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uraoka, Maki [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Kyoto Prefectural University School of Medicine, 465 Kajii, Kawaramachi-Hirokoji, Kamigyo, Kyoto 602-8566 (Japan); Ikeda, Koji, E-mail: ikedak@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Kyoto Prefectural University School of Medicine, 465 Kajii, Kawaramachi-Hirokoji, Kamigyo, Kyoto 602-8566 (Japan); Nakagawa, Yusuke; Koide, Masahiro; Akakabe, Yoshiki; Nakano-Kurimoto, Ritsuko; Takahashi, Tomosaburo; Matoba, Satoaki; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Okigaki, Mitsuhiko; Matsubara, Hiroaki [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Kyoto Prefectural University School of Medicine, 465 Kajii, Kawaramachi-Hirokoji, Kamigyo, Kyoto 602-8566 (Japan)

    2009-12-25

    Prorenin is an enzymatically inactive precursor of renin, and its biological function in endothelial cells (ECs) is unknown despite its relevance with the incidence of diabetic microvascular complications. Recently, (pro)renin receptor was identified, and the receptor-associated prorenin system has been discovered, whereas its expression as well as function in ECs remain unclear. In the present study, we found that ECs express the (pro)renin receptor, and that prorenin provoked ERK activation through (pro)renin receptor independently of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Prorenin stimulated the proliferation, migration and tube-formation of ECs, while it inhibited endothelial apoptosis induced by serum and growth factor depletion. MEK inhibitor abrogated these proangiogenic effects of prorenin, while AT1 receptor antagonist or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor failed to block them. In vivo neovascularization in the Matrigel-plugs implanted into mouse flanks was significantly enhanced by prorenin, in which significant ERK activation was detected in ECs. Furthermore, tumor xenografts stably transfected with prorenin demonstrated the significantly accelerated growth rate concomitantly with enhanced intratumoral neovascularization. Our data demonstrated that the RAS-independent (pro)renin receptor-mediated signal transduction plays a pivotal role in the regulation of ECs function as well as in the neovascularization, and thus prorenin is potentially involved in the pathophysiology of diabetic microvascular complications as well as cancers.

  4. Aliskiren – an orally active renin inhibitor. Review of pharmacology, pharmacodynamics, kinetics, and clinical potential in the treatment of hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Allikmets

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Kristina AllikmetsDepartment of Drug Development and Medical Affairs, Nycomed Group, Roskilde, DenmarkAbstract: The importance of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS in diseases such as hypertension, congestive heart failure and chronic renal failure has long ago been recognized. It has also been established that inhibition of RAAS, using inhibitors of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB, is an effective way to intervene with the pathogenesis of these disorders. Renin inhibitors block the RAAS at the highest level, at its origin, and might thus offer a new exciting approach for pharmacotherapy of arterial hypertension. Aliskiren is the first in a new class of orally active, non-peptide, low molecular weight renin inhibitors, and so far the only renin inhibitor that has progressed to phase III clinical trials. This review summarizes the available data on the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of aliskiren and its clinical development for treatment of arterial hypertension.Keywords: aliskiren, hypertension, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, renin inhibition, essential hypertension

  5. Association between the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system and renal injury in chronic kidney disease of dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Sawane; Yabuki, Akira; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki; Yamato, Osamu

    2013-02-01

    The association of renin and angiotensin II, which are potent components of the renin-angiotensin system, with the severity of chronic renal disease was investigated immunohistochemically in dogs and cats. Immunoreactivities of renin and angiotensin II were evaluated quantitatively, and their correlations with the degrees of glomerulosclerosis, glomerular hypertrophy, interstitial cell infiltration and interstitial fibrosis were statistically analyzed. Immunoreactivities for renin were detected in afferent arteries in both dogs and cats. The score of renin-positive signals showed no correlation with plasma creatinine concentration or any of the histopathological parameters, except for the diameter of glomeruli in dogs. Immunoreactivities for angiotensin II were detected in tubules (primarily proximal tubules) and interstitial mononuclear cells in both dogs and cats. The score of tubular angiotensin II correlated with glomerulosclerosis and cell infiltration in cats but not in dogs. The score of interstitial angiotensin II correlated with plasma creatinine concentration, glomerulosclerosis, cell infiltration and fibrosis in dogs and with glomerulosclerosis and cell infiltration in cats. In conclusion, the results of the study suggest that intrarenal renin-angiotensin system is correlated with the severity of kidney disease, with the underlying mechanism differing between dogs and cats.

  6. Secret Key Crypto Implementations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoni, Guido Marco; Melzani, Filippo

    This chapter presents the algorithm selected in 2001 as the Advanced Encryption Standard. This algorithm is the base for implementing security and privacy based on symmetric key solutions in almost all new applications. Secret key algorithms are used in combination with modes of operation to provide different security properties. The most used modes of operation are presented in this chapter. Finally an overview of the different techniques of software and hardware implementations is given.

  7. Effects of exercise on plasma renin, aldosterone and catecholamines before and after surgery for aortic coarctation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehested, J; Kornerup, H J; Pedersen, E B; Christensen, N J

    1983-01-01

    The pre- and postoperative values of blood pressure, pulse rate, plasma renin activity, plasma aldosterone concentration and circulating catecholamines were studied in a group of 12 patients with uncomplicated aortic coarctation before and after exercise. Mean age of patients studied was 21.5 years. Postoperative studies were carried out on average 204 days after surgery. Following operation, both resting and exercising upper extremity pressures decreased. Six out of the 11 patients still had an abnormally high exercising blood pressure when compared with a normal control group of six persons. Postoperative pulse rates during exercise were significantly higher than pre-operatively (P less than 0.01). No statistically significant differences between pre- and postoperative values, and between patients and normal controls were found in the hormonal studies. This study suggests that the renin-aldosterone-system does not have a major role in the maintenance of the hypertension associated with coarctation of the aorta.

  8. The improvement of hypertension by probiotics: effects on cholesterol, diabetes, renin, and phytoestrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lye, Huey-Shi; Kuan, Chiu-Yin; Ewe, Joo-Ann; Fung, Wai-Yee; Liong, Min-Tze

    2009-08-27

    Probiotics are live organisms that are primarily used to improve gastrointestinal disorders such as diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome, constipation, lactose intolerance, and to inhibit the excessive proliferation of pathogenic intestinal bacteria. However, recent studies have suggested that probiotics could have beneficial effects beyond gastrointestinal health, as they were found to improve certain metabolic disorders such as hypertension. Hypertension is caused by various factors and the predominant causes include an increase in cholesterol levels, incidence of diabetes, inconsistent modulation of renin and imbalanced sexual hormones. This review discusses the antihypertensive roles of probiotics via the improvement and/or treatment of lipid profiles, modulation of insulin resistance and sensitivity, the modulation of renin levels and also the conversion of bioactive phytoestrogens as an alternative replacement of sexual hormones such as estrogen and progesterone.

  9. Influence of the adenosine A1 receptor on blood pressure regulation and renin release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Russell D.; Thorén, Peter; Steege, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the role of adenosine A1 receptors in regulating blood pressure in conscious mice. Adenosine A1-receptor knockout (A1R-/-) mice and their wild-type (A1R+/+) littermates were placed on standardized normal-salt (NS), high-salt (HS), or salt-deficient (SD......) diets for a minimum of 10 days before telemetric blood pressure and urinary excretion measurements in metabolic cages. On the NS diet, daytime and nighttime mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was 7-10 mmHg higher in A1R-/- than in A1R+/+ mice. HS diet did not affect the MAP in A1R-/- mice....... The elevated plasma renin concentrations found in the A1R-/- mice could also result in increased blood pressure. Our results confirm that adenosine, acting through the adenosine A1 receptor, plays an important role in regulating blood pressure, renin release, and sodium excretion....

  10. The Prorenin and (Prorenin Receptor: New Players in the Brain Renin-Angiotensin System?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wencheng Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the brain renin-angiotensin (RAS system plays an essential role in the development of hypertension, mainly through the modulation of autonomic activities and vasopressin release. However, how the brain synthesizes angiotensin (Ang II has been a debate for decades, largely due to the low renin activity. This paper first describes the expression of the vasoconstrictive arm of RAS components in the brain as well as their physiological and pathophysiological significance. It then focus on the (prorenin receptor (PRR, a newly discovered component of the RAS which has a high level in the brain. We review the role of prorenin and PRR in peripheral organs and emphasize the involvement of brain PRR in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Some future perspectives in PRR research are heighted with respect to novel therapeutic target for the treatment of hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases.

  11. Radioimmunoassay of haemoglobin F in K 562 cells following induction with renin substrate and erythropoietin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenloef, K.; Fyhrquist, F.; Hortling, L.; Groenhagen-Riska, C. (Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Minerva Inst. for Medical Research; Helsinki Univ. (Finland). 4th Dept. of Medicine)

    1985-06-01

    To test the hypothesis of renin substrate (RS: angiotensinogen) being a precursor of erythropoietin (EP), the capacity of RS and EP to induce Hb synthesis was compared in cultured human erythroid leukaemia cells of the K 562 line after prestimulation with haemin. For this purpose a radioimmunoassay for haemoglobin F (HbF) was developed. This assay was shown to be specific for HbF, reproducible, and sensitive for 0.1 ng of HbF. The cells were induced by RS and EP to increased HbF production. Cells stimulated with RS or EP showed increased benzidine staining. These data support the hypothesis that renin substrate is a likely precursor of erythropoietin.

  12. Time course of the antiproteinuric and antihypertensive effects of direct renin inhibition in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    Inhibition of renin with an active site inhibitor, aliskiren, lowers blood pressure (BP) in diabetic patients. Here, we studied the time course of the antihypertensive and antiproteinuric effect of renin inhibition in 15 patients with type 2 diabetes and elevated urinary albumin/creatinine ratios...... (UACRs) to check whether aliskiren can decrease proteinuria. After a 4-week washout of previous medications, patients received aliskiren and furosemide daily for 28 days followed by a 4-week withdrawal period. Twenty-four-hour BPs were measured at baseline throughout treatment and withdrawal periods....... The UACR was significantly reduced after 2-4 days of treatment with another significant reduction after 28 days. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was significantly lower after 7 days with no further reduction after 28 days. The BP returned toward baseline 3 days after withdrawal, whereas the UACR was still...

  13. Functional interactions between 7TM receptors in the renin-angiotensin system--dimerization or crosstalk?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsø, Christina; Erikstrup, Niels; Hansen, Jakob L

    2008-01-01

    . The importance of the RAS is clearly emphasised by the widespread use of drugs targeting this system in clinical practice. These include, renin inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor type I blockers, and inhibitors of the angiotensin converting enzyme. Some of the important effectors within the system are 7......The Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) is important for the regulation of cardiovascular physiology, where it controls blood pressure, and salt- and water homeostasis. Dysregulation of RAS can lead to severe diseases including hypertension, diabetic nephropathy, and cardiac arrhythmia, and -failure...... be important for receptor function, and in the development of cardiovascular diseases. This is very significant, since "dimers" may provide pharmacologists with novel targets for improved drug therapy. However, we know that 7TM receptors can mediate signals as monomeric units, and so far it has been very...

  14. Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system for prevention of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zografos, Theodoros; Katritsis, Demosthenes G

    2010-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a source of considerable morbidity and mortality. There has been compelling evidence supporting the role of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the genesis and perpetuation of AF through atrial remodeling, and experimental studies have validated the utilization of RAS inhibition for AF prevention. This article reviews clinical trials on the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) for the prevention of AF. Results have been variable, depending on the clinical background of treated patients. ACEIs and ARBs appear beneficial for primary prevention of AF in patients with heart failure, whereas they are not equally effective in hypertensive patients with normal left ventricular function. Furthermore, the use of ACEIs or ARBs for secondary prevention of AF has been found beneficial only after electrical cardioversion. Additional data are needed to establish the potential clinical role of renin-angiotensin inhibition for prevention of AF.

  15. The Improvement of Hypertension by Probiotics: Effects on Cholesterol, Diabetes, Renin, and Phytoestrogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huey-Shi Lye

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are live organisms that are primarily used to improve gastrointestinal disorders such as diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome, constipation, lactose intolerance, and to inhibit the excessive proliferation of pathogenic intestinal bacteria. However, recent studies have suggested that probiotics could have beneficial effects beyond gastrointestinal health, as they were found to improve certain metabolic disorders such as hypertension. Hypertension is caused by various factors and the predominant causes include an increase in cholesterol levels, incidence of diabetes, inconsistent modulation of renin and imbalanced sexual hormones. This review discusses the antihypertensive roles of probiotics via the improvement and/or treatment of lipid profiles, modulation of insulin resistance and sensitivity, the modulation of renin levels and also the conversion of bioactive phytoestrogens as an alternative replacement of sexual hormones such as estrogen and progesterone.

  16. Brief Introduction to Hepatitis B for Parents of Adopted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prevent the exposed individual from developing the disease. Hepatitis B is transmitted via blood and body secretions (not urine or stool). Families need age-appropriate counseling on prevention of disease transmission at the time of diagnosis and at intervals throughout the child’s life, with ...

  17. The role of renin angiotensin system intervention in stage B heart failure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collier, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    This article outlines the link between the renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) and various forms of cardiomyopathy, and also reviews the understanding of the effectiveness of RAAS intervention in this phase of ventricular dysfunction. The authors focus their discussion predominantly on patients who have had previous myocardial infarction or those who have left ventricular hypertrophy and also briefly discuss the role of RAAS activation and intervention in patients with alcoholic cardiomyopathy.

  18. You are what you eat: dietary salt intake and renin-angiotensin blockade in diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charytan, David M; Forman, John P

    2012-08-01

    Interactions between sodium intake, the renin-angiotensin system, and renal and cardiovascular outcomes are incompletely understood. The analysis by Lambers Heerspink et al. shows that angiotensin receptor blockade improves diabetic nephropathy and cardiovascular disease more when dietary sodium intake is low, and suggests possible harm when sodium intake is high. These findings highlight dietary salt as a modifiable cardiovascular and renal risk factor and emphasize the need for detailed mechanistic studies.

  19. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase-deficient mice have impaired Renin release but normal blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sällström, Johan; Carlström, Mattias; Jensen, Boye L

    2008-01-01

    BackgroundNitric oxide deficiency is involved in the development of hypertension, but the mechanisms are currently unclear. This study was conducted to further elucidate the role of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in blood pressure regulation and renin release in relation to different sodiu......-116; doi:10.1038/ajh.2007.16American Journal of Hypertension (2008) 21 111-116; doi:10.1038/ajh.2007.16....

  20. Local Renin-Angiotensin System in the Pancreas: The Significance in Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai PBS

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is a complex disease entity of which the pathogenesis is still not completely known. Research into the initiation and propagation of the diseases would hopefully help to design new treatment strategies for patients, especially those with severe acute pancreatitis. The novel observation of the activation of the local pancreatic renin-angiotensin system in experimental pancreatitis opens up new horizons for research regarding the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis.

  1. CHBPR: ANGIOTENSIN II, INDEPENDENT OF PLASMA RENIN ACTIVITY, CONTRIBUTES TO THE HYPERTENSION OF AUTONOMIC FAILURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Amy C.; Okamoto, Luis E.; Gamboa, Alfredo; Shibao, Cyndya; Raj, Satish R.; Robertson, David; Biaggioni, Italo

    2013-01-01

    At least half of primary autonomic failure patients exhibit supine hypertension, despite profound impairments in sympathetic activity. While the mechanisms underlying this hypertension are unknown, plasma renin activity is often undetectable suggesting renin-angiotensin pathways are not involved. However, because aldosterone levels are preserved, we tested the hypothesis that angiotensin II is intact and contributes to the hypertension of autonomic failure. Indeed, circulating angiotensin II was paradoxically increased in hypertensive autonomic failure patients (52±5 pg/ml, n=11) compared to matched healthy controls (27±4 pg/ml, n=10; p=0.002), despite similarly low renin activity (0.19±0.06 versus 0.34±0.13 ng/ml/hr, respectively; p=0.449). To determine the contribution of angiotensin II to supine hypertension in these patients, we administered the AT1 receptor blocker losartan (50 mg) at bedtime in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study (n=11). Losartan maximally reduced systolic blood pressure by 32±11 mmHg at 6 hours after administration (p<0.05), decreased nocturnal urinary sodium excretion (p=0.0461), and did not worsen morning orthostatic tolerance. In contrast, there was no effect of the captopril on supine blood pressure in a subset of these patients. These findings suggest that angiotensin II formation in autonomic failure is independent of plasma renin activity, and perhaps angiotensin converting enzyme. Furthermore, these studies suggest that elevations in angiotensin II contribute to the hypertension of autonomic failure, and provide rationale for the use of AT1 receptor blockers for treatment of these patients. PMID:23266540

  2. Activation of Renal (Pro)Renin Receptor Contributes to High Fructose-Induced Salt Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chuanming; Lu, Aihua; Lu, Xiaohan; Zhang, Linlin; Fang, Hui; Zhou, Li; Yang, Tianxin

    2017-02-01

    A high-fructose diet is shown to induce salt-sensitive hypertension, but the underlying mechanism largely remains unknown. The major goal of the present study was to test the role of renal (pro)renin receptor (PRR) in this model. In Sprague-Dawley rats, high-fructose intake increased renal expression of full-length PRR, which were attenuated by allopurinol. High-fructose intake also upregulated renal mRNA and protein expression of sodium/hydrogen exchanger 3 and Na/K/2Cl cotransporter, as well as in vivo Na/K/2Cl cotransporter activity, all of which were nearly completely blocked by a PRR decoy inhibitor PRO20 or allopurinol treatment. Parallel changes were observed for indices of intrarenal renin-angiotensin-system including renal and urinary renin and angiotensin II levels. Radiotelemetry demonstrated that high-fructose or a high-salt diet alone did not affect mean arterial pressure, but the combination of the 2 maneuvers induced a ≈10-mm Hg increase of mean arterial pressure, which was blunted by PRO20 or allopurinol treatment. In cultured human kidney 2 cells, both fructose and uric acid increased protein expression of soluble PRR in a time- and dose-dependent manner; fructose-induced PRR upregulation was inhibited by allopurinol. Taken together, our data suggest that fructose via uric acid stimulates renal expression of PRR/soluble PRR that stimulate sodium/hydrogen exchanger 3 and Na/K/2Cl cotransporter expression and intrarenal renin-angiotensin system to induce salt-sensitive hypertension.

  3. Crystal quality and inhibitor binding by aspartic proteinases; preparation of high quality crystals of mouse renin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badasso, M.; Sibanda, B. L.; Cooper, J. B.; Dealwis, C. G.; Wood, S. P.

    1992-08-01

    Renin from mouse submandibular glands has been highly purified and co-crystallized with a synthetic nonapeptide fragment of rat angiotensionogen in which the scissile Leu-Leu bond has been modified as a hydroxyethylene mimic of the transition state. The strong diffraction from these crystals compared to the native form is discussed in relation to the behaviour of other members of the aspartic proteinase family in crystallisation.

  4. Tissue Renin-Angiotensin Systems: A Unifying Hypothesis of Metabolic Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Jeppe; Persson, Frederik; Frøkiær, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    The actions of angiotensin peptides are diverse and locally acting tissue renin-angiotensin systems (RAS) are present in almost all tissues of the body. An activated RAS strongly correlates to metabolic disease (e.g., diabetes) and its complications and blockers of RAS have been demonstrated to p...... disease initiate and progress. The hypothesis plausibly unifies the major predictors of metabolic disease and places tissue RAS regulation in the center of metabolic control....

  5. Dual Blockade of the Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone System in Type 2 Diabetic Kidney Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Huan Feng; Ping Fu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine the efficacy and safety of dual blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) among patients with type 2 diabetic kidney disease.Data Sources: We searched the major literature repositories, including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE and EMBASE, for randomized clinical trials published between January 1990 and October 2015 that compared the efficacy and safety of the use of dual blockade of the RAAS versus the use ofmonotherapy, without applying any language restrictions.Keywords for the searches included "diabetic nephropathy," "chronic kidney disease," "chronic renal insufficiency," "diabetes mellitus," "dual therapy," "combined therapy,""dual blockade," "renin-angiotensin system," "angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor," "angiotensin-receptor blocker," "aldosterone blockade," "selective aldosterone blockade," "renin inhibitor," "direct renin inhibitor," "mineralocorticoid receptor blocker," etc.Study Selection: The selected articles were carefully reviewed.We excluded randomized clinical trials in which the kidney damage of patients was related to diseases other than diabetes mellitus.Results: Combination treatment with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor supplemented by an angiotensin Ⅱ receptor blocking agent is expected to provide a more complete blockade of the RAAS and a better control of hypertension.However, existing literature has presented mixed results, in particular, related to patient safety.In view of this, we conducted a comprehensive literature review in order to explain the rationale for dual blockade of the RAAS, and to discuss the pros and cons.Conclusions: Despite the negative results of some recent large-scale studies, it may be immature to declare that the dual blockade is a failure because of the complex nature of the RAAS surrounding its diversified functions and utility.Further trials are warranted to study the combination therapy as an evidence-based practice.

  6. G-protein coupled receptors of the renin-angiotensin system: new targets against breast cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues-Ferreira, Sylvie; Nahmias, Clara

    2015-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane receptors, with high potential for drug discovery. These receptors can be activated by a panel of different ligands including ions, hormones, small molecules, and vasoactive peptides. Among those, angiotensins [angiotensin II (AngII) and angiotensin 1–7] are the major biologically active products of the classical and alternative renin-angiotensin system (RAS). These peptides bind and activate three different subtype...

  7. Dual Blockade of the Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone System in Type 2 Diabetic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Huan Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine the efficacy and safety of dual blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS among patients with type 2 diabetic kidney disease. Data Sources: We searched the major literature repositories, including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE and EMBASE, for randomized clinical trials published between January 1990 and October 2015 that compared the efficacy and safety of the use of dual blockade of the RAAS versus the use of monotherapy, without applying any language restrictions. Keywords for the searches included "diabetic nephropathy," "chronic kidney disease," "chronic renal insufficiency," "diabetes mellitus," "dual therapy," "combined therapy," "dual blockade," "renin-angiotensin system," "angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor," "angiotensin-receptor blocker," "aldosterone blockade," "selective aldosterone blockade," "renin inhibitor," "direct renin inhibitor," "mineralocorticoid receptor blocker," etc. Study Selection: The selected articles were carefully reviewed. We excluded randomized clinical trials in which the kidney damage of patients was related to diseases other than diabetes mellitus. Results: Combination treatment with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor supplemented by an angiotensin II receptor blocking agent is expected to provide a more complete blockade of the RAAS and a better control of hypertension. However, existing literature has presented mixed results, in particular, related to patient safety. In view of this, we conducted a comprehensive literature review in order to explain the rationale for dual blockade of the RAAS, and to discuss the pros and cons. Conclusions: Despite the negative results of some recent large-scale studies, it may be immature to declare that the dual blockade is a failure because of the complex nature of the RAAS surrounding its diversified functions and utility. Further trials are warranted to study the combination therapy as an

  8. Biomarkers of activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in heart failure: how useful, how feasible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emdin, Michele; Fatini, Cinzia; Mirizzi, Gianluca; Poletti, Roberta; Borrelli, Chiara; Prontera, Concetta; Latini, Roberto; Passino, Claudio; Clerico, Aldo; Vergaro, Giuseppe

    2015-03-30

    Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), participated by kidney, liver, vascular endothelium, and adrenal cortex, and counter-regulated by cardiac endocrine function, is a complex endocrine system regulating systemic functions, such as body salt and water homeostasis and vasomotion, in order to allow the accomplishment of physiological tasks, such as orthostasis, physical and emotional stimuli, and to react towards the hemorrhagic insult, in tight conjunction with other neurohormonal axes, namely the sympathetic nervous system, the endothelin and vasopressin systems. The systemic as well as the tissue RAAS are also dedicated to promote tissue remodeling, particularly relevant after damage, when chronic activation may configure as a maladaptive response, leading to fibrosis, hypertrophy and apoptosis, and organ dysfunction. RAAS activation is a fingerprint of systemic arterial hypertension, kidney dysfunction, vascular atherosclerotic disease, and is definitely an hallmark of heart failure, which rapidly shifts from organ disease to a disorder of neurohormonal regulatory systems. Chronic RAAS activation is an indirect or direct target of most effective pharmacological treatments in heart failure, such as beta-blockers, inhibitors of angiotensin converting enzyme, angiotensin receptor blockers, direct renin inhibitors, and mineralocorticoid receptor blockers. Biomarkers of RAAS activation are available, with different feasibility and accuracy, such as plasma renin activity, renin, angiotensin II, and aldosterone, which all accompany the increasing clinical severity of heart failure disease, and are well recognized prognostic factors, even in patients with optimal therapy. Polymorphisms influencing the expression and activity of RAAS pathways have been recognized as clinically relevant biomarkers, likely influencing either the individual clinical phenotype, or the response to drugs. This solid, growing evidence strongly suggests the rationale for the use of

  9. Dynamic secrets in communication security

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Sheng; Towsley, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic secrets are constantly generated and updated from messages exchanged between two communication users. When dynamic secrets are used as a complement to existing secure communication systems, a stolen key or password can be quickly and automatically reverted to its secret status without disrupting communication. 'Dynamic Secrets in Communication Security' presents unique security properties and application studies for this technology. Password theft and key theft no longer pose serious security threats when parties frequently use dynamic secrets. This book also illustrates that a dynamic

  10. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 suppresses renin gene transcription by blocking the activity of the cyclic AMP response element in the renin gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Weihua; Pan, Wei; Kong, Juan; Zheng, Wei; Szeto, Frances L; Wong, Kari E; Cohen, Ronald; Klopot, Anna; Zhang, Zhongyi; Li, Yan Chun

    2007-10-12

    We have shown that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) down-regulates renin expression. To explore the molecular mechanism, we analyzed the mouse Ren-1c gene promoter by luciferase reporter assays. Deletion analysis revealed two DNA fragments from -2,725 to -2,647 (distal fragment) and from -117 to +6 (proximal fragment) that are sufficient to mediate the repression. Mutation of the cAMP response element (CRE) in the distal fragment blunted forskolin stimulation as well as 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) inhibition of the transcriptional activity, suggesting the involvement of CRE in 1,25(OH)(2)D(3)-induced suppression. EMSA revealed that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) markedly inhibited nuclear protein binding to the CRE in the promoter. ChIP and GST pull-down assays demonstrated that liganded VDR blocked the binding of CREB to the CRE by directly interacting with CREB with the ligand-binding domain, and the VDR-mediated repression can be rescued by CREB, CBP, or p300 overexpression. These data indicate that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) suppresses renin gene expression at least in part by blocking the formation of CRE-CREB-CBP complex.

  11. The patterns of peripheral plasma renin concentration in the early post-renal-transplant period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornerup, H J

    1979-01-01

    Serial determinations of peripheral plasma renin concentration (PRC) were performed in 11 kidney transplant recipients during the early post-transplant period. In 5 recipients with late onset of graft function, PRC values were increased during the anuric phase and, subsequently, PRC values declined in every during restoration of graft function. In 4 recipients with an acute renal allograft reaction, PRC values were increased at the onset of the allograft reaction in 3 with hypertension whereas PRC values were normal in one normotensive recipient. Subsequently, PRC normalized in the hypertensives coincident with increasing body weights. In 2 recipients with an uncomplicated course and with a normal graft function immediately after transplantation and throughout the study period, PRC values were constantly normal. The results indicate that acute anuria in the early phase after kidney transplantation is associated with an increased release of renin. The results also suggest that an increased activity of the renin-angiotensin system may be counterbalanced by sodium and fluid retention in hypertension following an acute renal allograft reaction.

  12. Chronic effects of lead on renin and renal sodium excretion. [Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischer, N.; Mouw, D.R.; Vander, A.J.

    1980-05-01

    Rats were chronically give 0.5 mg/ml Pb in drinking water. This produced blood and renal lead concentratoins of approximately 30 )g/dl and 20)g/gm, respectively, significant kidney swelling, but no change in body weight or hematocrit. After 6 weeks of Pb treatment and during ingestion of a sodium-free diet, plasma, renin activity (PRA) was elevated (controls: same diet, no lead), but there was no change in plasma resin substrate (PRS). After 5 months the PRA was significantly higher in the lead-treated group even on a 1% NaCl diet, but the difference between groups disappeared on an Na-free diet; that is, the renin response to sodium deprivation was blunted. As early as 6 weeks after beginning lead treatment, the treated group manifested reduced ability to decrease Na excretion following removal of NaCl from the diet; steady-state sodium excretion was normal on either the 1% NaCl or Na-free diet. We conclude that changes in the renin angiotensin system and renal sodium handling may be important toxic effects of low doses of lead on the kidneys of rats.

  13. Intrarenal renin-angiotensin system modulates glomerular angiotensin receptors in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkes, B.M.; Pion, I.; Sollott, S.; Michaels, S.; Kiesel, G. (North Shore Univ. Hospital and Cornell Univ. Medical College, Manhasset, NY (USA))

    1988-03-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) modulates glomerular angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors. In one protocol ANG II receptors were measured 7 days after unilateral denervation of the left kidney in rats. There were 50% more receptors in the glomeruli from denervated compared with innervated kidneys, which was associated with a 63% reduction in left renal vein renin. The differences in ANG II receptors between the left and right kidneys were not longer present when angiotensin-converting enzyme was inhibited with enalapril or when pharmacological amounts of ANG II were infused. In a second protocol, renal cortical renin content was raised in the left kidney by placing a 0.20-mm clip on the left renal artery. At 7 days, glomerular ANG II receptors were reduced by 72.3% in the clipped compared with the contralateral kidneys. The differences in ANG II receptors were no longer present after enalapril treatment. Pharmacological maneuvers that either blocked ANG II formation or increased circulating ANG II resulted in an equal number of ANG II receptors in the right and left kidneys. The data indicate that the intrarenal RAS modulates the density of glomerular ANG II receptors and is a more important receptor modulation than plasma ANG II.

  14. Drug discovery in renin-angiotensin system intervention: past and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Bryan

    2016-06-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a central role in the control of blood pressure in the body and the way this interacts with other systems is widely recognized. This has not always been the case and this review summarizes how our knowledge has evolved from the initial discovery of renin by Tigerstedt and Berman in 1898. This includes the identification of angiotensin in the 1950s to the proposed relationship between this system, hypertension and ultimately cardiovascular disease. While the RAS is far more complex than originally thought, much is now known about this system and the wide ranging effects of angiotensin in the body. This has enabled the development of therapies that target the various proteins in this pathway and hence are implicated in disease. The first of these treatments was the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is), followed by the angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and more recently the direct renin inhibitors (DRIs). Clinical outcome trials have shown these drugs to be effective, but as they act at contrasting points in the RAS, there are differences in their efficacy and safety profiles. RAS blockade is the foundation of modern combination therapy with a calcium channel blocker and/or a diuretic given to reduce blood pressure and limit the impact of RAS activation. Other options that complement these treatments may be available in the future and will offer more choice to clinicians.

  15. Plasma prolactin, renin and catecholamines in young normotensive and borderline hypertensive subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, I; Takeshita, E; Saruta, T; Nagano, S; Sekihara, T

    1984-02-01

    It has been reported that patients with essential hypertension have high plasma prolactin levels and suggested that reduced central dopaminergic activity may be a factor in the pathogenesis of essential hypertension. This study examines the influence of posture on plasma prolactin, plasma catecholamines, plasma renin activity, blood pressure and heart rate in 24 patients with borderline hypertension (age 19 +/- 1 years) and 20 normotensive subjects matched for age and body mass index. Supine plasma prolactin levels were similar in both groups [borderline hypertension, 11.3 +/- 0.7 ng/ml; normotensive, 10.7 +/- 0.8 ng/ml (mean +/- s.e.m.)] and no increase in plasma prolactin was observed after 10 min standing in both groups. Normotensive and borderline hypertensive subjects had similar values for supine and upright plasma renin activity and plasma norepinephrine. There were no significant correlations between supine plasma prolactin and supine blood pressure, supine plasma renin activity or plasma norepinephrine when data from both normotensive and borderline hypertensive subjects were combined. These results may provide indirect evidence against the occurrence of reduced central dopaminergic activity in borderline hypertension.

  16. The renin-angiotensin system and hypertension in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Miwa; Hoxha, Nita; Osman, Rania; Dell, Katherine Macrae

    2010-12-01

    Hypertension is a well-recognized complication of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD). The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a key regulator of blood pressure; however, data on the RAS in ARPKD are limited and conflicting, showing both up- and down-regulation. In the current study, we characterized intrarenal and systemic RAS activation in relationship to hypertension and progressive cystic kidney disease in the ARPKD orthologous polycystic kidney (PCK) rat. Clinical and histological measures of kidney disease, kidney RAS gene expression by quantitative real-time PCR, angiotensin II (Ang II) immunohistochemistry, and systemic Ang I and II levels were assessed in 2-, 4-, and 6-month-old cystic PCK and age-matched normal rats. PCK rats developed hypertension and progressive cystic kidney disease without significant worsening of renal function or relative kidney size. Intrarenal renin, ACE and Ang II expression was increased significantly in cystic kidneys; angiotensinogen and Ang II Type I receptor were unchanged. Systemic Ang I and II levels did not differ. This study demonstrates that intrarenal, but not systemic, RAS activation is a prominent feature of ARPKD. These findings help reconcile previous conflicting reports and suggest that intrarenal renin and ACE gene upregulation may represent a novel mechanism for hypertension development or exacerbation in ARPKD.

  17. Fundamental and clinical study of direct immunoradiometric assay in human renin concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurimoto, Fumihiko; Horiuchi, Junko; Sakurai, Hyoichiro; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Takita, Takashi; Saruta, Takao.

    1988-05-01

    'Renin RIA Pasteur' kit for directly measuring renin concentration in human plasma (PRC) was fundamentally and clinically evaluated. A standard curve for PRC was linear in the range of 10 - 640 pg/ml. Reproducibility, recovery, and stability were satisfactory. There was a significantly positive correlation between direct PRC and conventional plasma renin activity (PRA) and indirect PRC. PRC was directly measured in 119 healthy volunteers and 15 patients with primary aldosteronism (4), Cushing's syndrome (6), or non-functioning tumor (5). The basal PRC was 32.4 +- 18.8 pg/ml for men and 37.9 +- 22.6 pg/ml for women. PRC for primary aldosteronism was below detectable levels, and remained unchanged even after the administratin of ACTH. In the case of Cushing's syndrome, mean PRC and PRA were 19 pg/ml and 1.2 ng/ml/hr, and did not respond to ACTH. Although the administration of ATCH was significantly associated with a decreased PRC, there was only tendency toward the decreased PRA in the case of non-functioning tumors. The results indicate the usefulness of the present kit in terms of its ability to directly measure PRC without any complicated procedures. (Namekawa, K.).

  18. Direct radio-immunoassay of renin substrate: effect of converting enzyme inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metsaerinne, Kaj; Rosenloef, Katarina; Groenhagen-Riska, Carola; Fyhrquist, Frej

    1988-02-01

    A direct radio-immunoassay (RIA) for renin substrate (RS) was compared to enzymatic (indirect) assay. In normal subjects, a significant, albeit weak, correlation between the methods was seen. In hypertensive patients with different levels of plasma renin activity (PRA), RS concentration measured by both assays increased with increasing PRA, and for patients with PRA > 10 ..mu..g AI/l/h, direct assay gave significantly higher RS values (55%), compared to the enzymatic assay, indicating consumption of RS by increasing plasma renin and production rate of RS with increasing PRA. In 11 patients with renovascular hypertension, treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, lisinopril, resulted in a significant increase in PRA, accompanied by a decrease in RS measured by enzymatic assay. No change in RS measured by direct RIA was noticed. The results suggest that ACE inhibition may not have an effect upon RS production and that its effect on plasma RS is limited to a reduction of intact RS measured by the enzymatic assay.

  19. Plasma volume, osmolality, vasopressin, and renin activity during graded exercise in man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, V. A.; Keil, L. C.; Bernauer, E. M.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of work intensity on plasma volume, osmolality, vasopressin and renin activity and the interrelationships between these responses are investigated. Plasma volume, renin activity and osmotic, sodium and arginine vasopressin concentrations were measured in venous blood samples taken from 15 healthy male subjects before and after six minutes of bicycle ergometer exercise at 100, 175 and 225 W. Plasma volume is found to decrease significantly with increasing work intensity, while increases in Na(+) concentration, osmolality and vasopressin are only observed to be significant when the work intensity exceeds 40% maximal aerobic capacity and plasma resin activity increased linearly at all work levels. In addition, significant correlations are observed between plasma volume and osmolality and sodium changes, and between vasopressin and osmolality and sodium content changes. Data thus support the hypotheses that (1) vasopressin may be the primary controlling endocrine for fluid and electrolyte levels following exercise; (2) an exercise intensity greater than 40% maximal aerobic capacity is required to stimulate vasopressin release through changes in plasma osmolality; and (3) the stimulation of the renin-angiotensin system is a more general stress response.

  20. Theoretical basis of a beneficial role for vitamin D in viral hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khanh vinh qu(o)c L(u)(o)ng; Lan Thi Hoàng Nguy(e)n

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal bone metabolism and dysfunction of the calcium-parathyroid hormone-vitamin D axis have been reported in patients with viral hepatitis.Some studies suggested a relationship between vitamin D and viral hepatitis.Genetic studies have provided an opportunity to identify the proteins that link vitamin D to the pathology of viral hepatitis (i.e.,the major histocompatibility complex class Ⅱ molecules,the vitamin D receptor,cytochrome P450,the renin-angiotensin system,apolipoprotein E,liver X receptor,toll-like receptor,and the proteins regulated by the Sp1 promoter gene).Vitamin D also exerts its effects on viral hepatitis via non-genomic factors,i.e.,matrix metalloproteinase,endothelial vascular growth factor,prostaglandins,cyclooxygenase-2,and oxidative stress.In conclusion,vitamin D could have a beneficial role in viral hepatitis.Calcitriol is best used for viral hepatitis because it is the active form of the vitamin D3 metabolite.

  1. Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination Information for Diabetes Educators What is hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is a contagious liver disease that results from infection with the hepatitis B virus. When first infected, a person can develop ...

  2. Microbiological diagnostics of viral hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    HASDEMİR, Ufuk

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is an infection that primarily affects the liverbut may also have systemic clinical manifestations. The vastmajority of viral hepatitis are caused by one of five hepatotropicviruses: hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV),hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D (delta) virus (HDV), andhepatitis E virus (HEV) (Table I) [1]. HBV, HCV, and HDValso cause chronic hepatitis, whereas HAV does not. HEVcauses acute hepatitis in normal hosts but can cause protractedand chronic he...

  3. Microbiological diagnostics of viral hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    HASDEMİR, Ufuk

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is an infection that primarily affects the liverbut may also have systemic clinical manifestations. The vastmajority of viral hepatitis are caused by one of five hepatotropicviruses: hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV),hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D (delta) virus (HDV), andhepatitis E virus (HEV) (Table I) [1]. HBV, HCV, and HDValso cause chronic hepatitis, whereas HAV does not. HEVcauses acute hepatitis in normal hosts but can cause protractedand chronic he...

  4. Autotransporter protein secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tame, Jeremy R H

    2011-12-01

    Autotransporter proteins are a large family of virulence factors secreted from Gram-negative bacteria by a unique mechanism. First described in the 1980s, these proteins have a C-terminal region that folds into a β-barrel in the bacterial outer membrane. The so-called passenger domain attached to this barrel projects away from the cell surface and may be liberated from the cell by self-cleavage or surface proteases. Although the majority of passenger domains have a similar β-helical structure, they carry a variety of sub-domains, allowing them to carry out widely differing functions related to pathogenesis. Considerable biochemical and structural characterisation of the barrel domain has shown that 'autotransporters' in fact require a conserved and essential protein complex in the outer membrane for correct folding. Although the globular domains of this complex projecting into the periplasmic space have also been structurally characterised, the overall secretion pathway of the autotransporters remains highly puzzling. It was presumed for many years that the passenger domain passed through the centre of the barrel domain to reach the cell surface, driven at least in part by folding. This picture is complicated by conflicting data, and there is currently little hard information on the true nature of the secretion intermediates. As well as their medical importance therefore, autotransporters are proving to be an excellent system to study the folding and membrane insertion of outer membrane proteins in general. This review focuses on structural aspects of autotransporters; their many functions in pathogenesis are beyond its scope.

  5. Windows 8 secrets

    CERN Document Server

    Thurrott, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Tips, tricks, treats, and secrets revealed on Windows 8 Microsoft is introducing a major new release of its Windows operating system, Windows 8, and what better way to learn all its ins and outs than from two internationally recognized Windows experts and Microsoft insiders, authors Paul Thurrott and Rafael Rivera? They cut through the hype to get at useful information you'll not find anywhere else, including what role this new OS plays in a mobile and tablet world. Regardless of your level of knowledge, you'll discover little-known facts about how things work, what's new and different, and h

  6. Ghrelin and gastric acid secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Koji Yakabi; Junichi Kawashima; Shingo Kato

    2008-01-01

    Ghrelin, a novel growth hormone-releasing peptide, was originally isolated from rat and human stomach. Ghrelin has been known to increase the secretion of growth hormone (GH), food intake, and body weight gain when administered peripherally or centrally. Ghrelin is also known to stimulate the gastric motility and the secretion of gastric acid. In the previous studies, the action of ghrelin on acid secretion was shown to be as strong as that of histamine and gastrin in-vivo experiment. In the studies, the mechanism for the action of ghrelin was also investigated. It was shown that vagotomy completely inhibited the action of ghrelin on the secretion of gastric acid suggesting that vagal nerve is involved in the mechanism for the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. As famotidine did not inhibit ghrelin-in-duced acid secretion in the study by Masuda et al, they concluded that histamine was not involved in the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. However, we have shown that famotidine completely inhibited ghrelin-induced acid secretion and histidine decarboxylase (HDC) mRNA was increased in gastric mucosa by ghrelin injection which is inhibited by vagotomy Our results indicate that histamine is involved in the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. Furthermore synergistic action of gastrin and ghrelin on gastric add secretion was shown. Although gastrin has important roles in postprandial secretion of gastric acid, ghrelin may be related to acid secretion during fasting period or at night. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the physiological role of ghrelin in acid secretion.

  7. Ghrelin and gastric acid secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakabi, Koji; Kawashima, Junichi; Kato, Shingo

    2008-11-07

    Ghrelin, a novel growth hormone-releasing peptide, was originally isolated from rat and human stomach. Ghrelin has been known to increase the secretion of growth hormone (GH), food intake, and body weight gain when administered peripherally or centrally. Ghrelin is also known to stimulate the gastric motility and the secretion of gastric acid. In the previous studies, the action of ghrelin on acid secretion was shown to be as strong as that of histamine and gastrin in in-vivo experiment. In the studies, the mechanism for the action of ghrelin was also investigated. It was shown that vagotomy completely inhibited the action of ghrelin on the secretion of gastric acid suggesting that vagal nerve is involved in the mechanism for the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. As famotidine did not inhibit ghrelin-induced acid secretion in the study by Masuda et al, they concluded that histamine was not involved in the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. However, we have shown that famotidine completely inhibited ghrelin-induced acid secretion and histidine decarboxylase (HDC) mRNA was increased in gastric mucosa by ghrelin injection which is inhibited by vagotomy Our results indicate that histamine is involved in the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. Furthermore synergistic action of gastrin and ghrelin on gastric acid secretion was shown. Although gastrin has important roles in postprandial secretion of gastric acid, ghrelin may be related to acid secretion during fasting period or at night. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the physiological role of ghrelin in acid secretion.

  8. On Converting Secret Sharing Scheme to Visual Secret Sharing Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Daoshun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Traditional Secret Sharing (SS schemes reconstruct secret exactly the same as the original one but involve complex computation. Visual Secret Sharing (VSS schemes decode the secret without computation, but each share is m times as big as the original and the quality of the reconstructed secret image is reduced. Probabilistic visual secret sharing (Prob.VSS schemes for a binary image use only one subpixel to share the secret image; however the probability of white pixels in a white area is higher than that in a black area in the reconstructed secret image. SS schemes, VSS schemes, and Prob. VSS schemes have various construction methods and advantages. This paper first presents an approach to convert (transform a -SS scheme to a -VSS scheme for greyscale images. The generation of the shadow images (shares is based on Boolean XOR operation. The secret image can be reconstructed directly by performing Boolean OR operation, as in most conventional VSS schemes. Its pixel expansion is significantly smaller than that of VSS schemes. The quality of the reconstructed images, measured by average contrast, is the same as VSS schemes. Then a novel matrix-concatenation approach is used to extend the greyscale -SS scheme to a more general case of greyscale -VSS scheme.

  9. Hepatitis C FAQs for the Public

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    ... Requirements for Viral Hepatitis Liver Cancer and Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis and Young Persons Who Inject Drugs National ... Hepatitis Contact Us Anonymous Feedback Quick Links to Hepatitis … A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home Statistics & ...

  10. Hepatitis B Foundation Newsletter: B Informed

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    ... Our Accomplishments Annual Reports Our Videos What Is Hepatitis B? What Is Hepatitis B? The ABCs of Viral Hepatitis Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B Hepatitis Delta Coinfection Hepatitis C Coinfection HIV/AIDS ...

  11. Hepatitis B - children

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    ... care provider will perform blood tests called the hepatitis viral panel . These tests can help diagnose: A new ... 07, 2016. Jensen MK, William F, Balistreri WF. Viral hepatitis. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St Geme JW ...

  12. Hepatitis Foundation International

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    ... million people globally. admin / 03/17/2015 Viral Hepatitis An estimated 4.4 million Americans from all ... Events section below. EVENTS FULL CALENDAR Loading… VIRAL HEPATITIS DISPARITIES HARD TO REACH, HARD TO TREAT™ AFRICAN ...

  13. Hepatitis B Vaccination Protection

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    Fact Sheet Hepatitis B Vaccination Protection Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a pathogenic microorganism that can cause potentially life- threatening disease in humans. HBV infection is transmitted through exposure ...

  14. Hepatitis C (image)

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    Hepatitis C is a virus-caused liver inflammation which may cause jaundice, fever and cirrhosis. Persons who are most at risk for contracting and spreading hepatitis C are those who share needles for injecting drugs ...

  15. Hepatitis virus panel

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    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003558.htm Hepatitis virus panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The hepatitis virus panel is a series of blood tests used ...

  16. Hyperinsulinemia Enhances Hepatic Expression of the Fatty Acid Transporter Cd36 and Provokes Hepatosteatosis and Hepatic Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steneberg, Pär; Sykaras, Alexandros G; Backlund, Fredrik; Straseviciene, Jurate; Söderström, Ingegerd; Edlund, Helena

    2015-07-31

    Hepatosteatosis is associated with the development of both hepatic insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes. Hepatic expression of Cd36, a fatty acid transporter, is enhanced in obese and diabetic murine models and human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and thus it correlates with hyperinsulinemia, steatosis, and insulin resistance. Here, we have explored the effect of hyperinsulinemia on hepatic Cd36 expression, development of hepatosteatosis, insulin resistance, and dysglycemia. A 3-week sucrose-enriched diet was sufficient to provoke hyperinsulinemia, hepatosteatosis, hepatic insulin resistance, and dysglycemia in CBA/J mice. The development of hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance in CBA/J mice on a sucrose-enriched diet was paralleled by increased hepatic expression of the transcription factor Pparγ and its target gene Cd36 whereas that of genes implicated in lipogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, and VLDL secretion was unaltered. Additionally, we demonstrate that insulin, in a Pparγ-dependent manner, is sufficient to directly increase Cd36 expression in perfused livers and isolated hepatocytes. Mouse strains that display low insulin levels, i.e. C57BL6/J, and/or lack hepatic Pparγ, i.e. C3H/HeN, do not develop hepatic steatosis, insulin resistance, or dysglycemia on a sucrose-enriched diet, suggesting that elevated insulin levels, via enhanced CD36 expression, provoke fatty liver development that in turn leads to hepatic insulin resistance and dysglycemia. Thus, our data provide evidence for a direct role for hyperinsulinemia in stimulating hepatic Cd36 expression and thus the development of hepatosteatosis, hepatic insulin resistance, and dysglycemia. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Hepatitis C and HIV

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    ... Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B . Hepatitis C and HIV About 25% of people living with HIV in ... Notice Network blog.aids.gov • locator.aids.gov • HIV/AIDS Service Locator Locator Widgets • Instructions • API Find ...

  18. Hepatitis B and HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hepatitis A and Hepatitis C . Hepatitis B and HIV About 10% of people living with HIV in ... Notice Network blog.aids.gov • locator.aids.gov • HIV/AIDS Service Locator Locator Widgets • Instructions • API Find ...

  19. What Is Hepatitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... عربي 中文 English Français Русский Español What is hepatitis? Online Q&A Reviewed July 2016 Q: What ... Question and answer archives Submit a question World Hepatitis Day Know hepatitis - Act now Event notice Key ...

  20. Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel

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    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Blood Test: Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Test: Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel Print A A A What's in ... Is The hepatic function panel, also known as liver function tests, is a group of seven tests ...