WorldWideScience

Sample records for rendered existing in-situ

  1. High Performance Molecular Visualization: In-Situ and Parallel Rendering with EGL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, John E.; Messmer, Peter; Sisneros, Robert; Schulten, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Large scale molecular dynamics simulations produce terabytes of data that is impractical to transfer to remote facilities. It is therefore necessary to perform visualization tasks in-situ as the data are generated, or by running interactive remote visualization sessions and batch analyses co-located with direct access to high performance storage systems. A significant challenge for deploying visualization software within clouds, clusters, and supercomputers involves the operating system software required to initialize and manage graphics acceleration hardware. Recently, it has become possible for applications to use the Embedded-system Graphics Library (EGL) to eliminate the requirement for windowing system software on compute nodes, thereby eliminating a significant obstacle to broader use of high performance visualization applications. We outline the potential benefits of this approach in the context of visualization applications used in the cloud, on commodity clusters, and supercomputers. We discuss the implementation of EGL support in VMD, a widely used molecular visualization application, and we outline benefits of the approach for molecular visualization tasks on petascale computers, clouds, and remote visualization servers. We then provide a brief evaluation of the use of EGL in VMD, with tests using developmental graphics drivers on conventional workstations and on Amazon EC2 G2 GPU-accelerated cloud instance types. We expect that the techniques described here will be of broad benefit to many other visualization applications. PMID:27747137

  2. In-Situ Three-Dimensional Shape Rendering from Strain Values Obtained Through Optical Fiber Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Hon Man (Inventor); Parker, Jr., Allen R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method and system for rendering the shape of a multi-core optical fiber or multi-fiber bundle in three-dimensional space in real time based on measured fiber strain data. Three optical fiber cores arc arranged in parallel at 120.degree. intervals about a central axis. A series of longitudinally co-located strain sensor triplets, typically fiber Bragg gratings, are positioned along the length of each fiber at known intervals. A tunable laser interrogates the sensors to detect strain on the fiber cores. Software determines the strain magnitude (.DELTA.L/L) for each fiber at a given triplet, but then applies beam theory to calculate curvature, beading angle and torsion of the fiber bundle, and from there it determines the shape of the fiber in s Cartesian coordinate system by solving a series of ordinary differential equations expanded from the Frenet-Serrat equations. This approach eliminates the need for computationally time-intensive curve-tilting and allows the three-dimensional shape of the optical fiber assembly to be displayed in real-time.

  3. Survey of existing underground openings for in-situ experimental facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollenberg, H.; Graf, A.; Strisower, B.; Korbin, G.

    1981-07-01

    In an earlier project, a literature search identified 60 underground openings in crystalline rock capable of providing access for an in-situ experimental facility to develop geochemical and hydrological techniques for evaluating sites for radioactive waste isolation. As part of the current project, discussions with state geologists, owners, and operators narrowed the original group to 14. Three additional sites in volcanic rock and one site in granite were also identified. Site visits and application of technical criteria, including the geologic and hydrologic settings and depth, extent of the rock unit, condition, and accessibility of underground workings, determined four primary candidate sites: the Helms Pumped Storage Project in grandiodorite of the Sierra Nevada, California; the Tungsten Queen Mine in Precambrian granodiorite of the North Carolina Piedmont; the Mount Hope Mine in Precambrian granite and gneiss of northern New Jersey; and the Minnamax Project in the Duluth gabbro complex of northern Minnesota.

  4. Gene expression in the urinary bladder: a common carcinoma in situ gene expression signature exists disregarding histopathological classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Kruhøffer, Mogens; Andersen, Thomas Thykjær

    2004-01-01

    The presence of carcinoma in situ (CIS) lesions in the urinary bladder is associated with a high risk of disease progression to a muscle invasive stage. In this study, we used microarray expression profiling to examine the gene expression patterns in superficial transitional cell carcinoma (s...... urothelium and urothelium with CIS lesions from the same urinary bladder revealed that the gene expression found in sTCC with surrounding CIS is found also in CIS biopsies as well as in histologically normal samples adjacent to the CIS lesions. Furthermore, we also identified similar gene expression changes...

  5. Quantum rendering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzagorta, Marco O.; Gomez, Richard B.; Uhlmann, Jeffrey K.

    2003-08-01

    In recent years, computer graphics has emerged as a critical component of the scientific and engineering process, and it is recognized as an important computer science research area. Computer graphics are extensively used for a variety of aerospace and defense training systems and by Hollywood's special effects companies. All these applications require the computer graphics systems to produce high quality renderings of extremely large data sets in short periods of time. Much research has been done in "classical computing" toward the development of efficient methods and techniques to reduce the rendering time required for large datasets. Quantum Computing's unique algorithmic features offer the possibility of speeding up some of the known rendering algorithms currently used in computer graphics. In this paper we discuss possible implementations of quantum rendering algorithms. In particular, we concentrate on the implementation of Grover's quantum search algorithm for Z-buffering, ray-tracing, radiosity, and scene management techniques. We also compare the theoretical performance between the classical and quantum versions of the algorithms.

  6. Assessment of existing roadside swales with engineered filter soil: II. Treatment efficiency and in situ mobilization in soil columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingvertsen, Simon T; Cederkvist, Karin; Jensen, Marina B; Magid, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    Use of roadside infiltration systems using engineered filter soil for optimized treatment has been common practice in Germany for decades, but little documentation is available regarding their long-term treatment performance. Here we present the results of laboratory leaching experiments with intact soil columns (15 cm i.d., 25-30 cm length) collected from two German roadside infiltration swales constructed in 1997. The columns were irrigated with synthetic solutions of unpolluted or polluted (dissolved heavy metals and fine suspended solids) road runoff, as well as a soluble nonreactive tracer (bromide) and a dye (brilliant blue). The experiments were performed at two irrigation rates corresponding to catchment rainfall intensities of approximately 5.1 and 34 mm/h. The bromide curves indicated that preferential flow was more pronounced at high irrigation rates, which was supported by the flow patterns revealed in the dye tracing experiment. Nonetheless, the soils seemed to be capable of retaining most of the dissolved heavy metals from the polluted road runoff at both low and high irrigation rates, except for Cr, which appears to pass through the soil as chromate. Fluorescent microspheres (diameter = 5 μm) used as surrogates for fine suspended solids were efficiently retained by the soils (>99%). However, despite promising treatment abilities, internal mobilization of heavy metals and P from the soil was observed, resulting in potentially critical effluent concentrations of Cu, Zn, and Pb. This is mainly ascribed to high concentrations of in situ mobilized dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Suggestions are provided for possible improvements and further research to minimize DOC mobilization in engineered filter soils.

  7. Rendering the Topological Spines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieves-Rivera, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-05-05

    Many tools to analyze and represent high dimensional data already exits yet most of them are not flexible, informative and intuitive enough to help the scientists make the corresponding analysis and predictions, understand the structure and complexity of scientific data, get a complete picture of it and explore a greater number of hypotheses. With this in mind, N-Dimensional Data Analysis and Visualization (ND²AV) is being developed to serve as an interactive visual analysis platform with the purpose of coupling together a number of these existing tools that range from statistics, machine learning, and data mining, with new techniques, in particular with new visualization approaches. My task is to create the rendering and implementation of a new concept called topological spines in order to extend ND²AV's scope. Other existing visualization tools create a representation preserving either the topological properties or the structural (geometric) ones because it is challenging to preserve them both simultaneously. Overcoming such challenge by creating a balance in between them, the topological spines are introduced as a new approach that aims to preserve them both. Its render using OpenGL and C++ and is currently being tested to further on be implemented on ND²AV. In this paper I will present what are the Topological Spines and how they are rendered.

  8. Practical Parallel Rendering

    CERN Document Server

    Chalmers, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Meeting the growing demands for speed and quality in rendering computer graphics images requires new techniques. Practical parallel rendering provides one of the most practical solutions. This book addresses the basic issues of rendering within a parallel or distributed computing environment, and considers the strengths and weaknesses of multiprocessor machines and networked render farms for graphics rendering. Case studies of working applications demonstrate, in detail, practical ways of dealing with complex issues involved in parallel processing.

  9. Video-based rendering

    CERN Document Server

    Magnor, Marcus A

    2005-01-01

    Driven by consumer-market applications that enjoy steadily increasing economic importance, graphics hardware and rendering algorithms are a central focus of computer graphics research. Video-based rendering is an approach that aims to overcome the current bottleneck in the time-consuming modeling process and has applications in areas such as computer games, special effects, and interactive TV. This book offers an in-depth introduction to video-based rendering, a rapidly developing new interdisciplinary topic employing techniques from computer graphics, computer vision, and telecommunication en

  10. Dynamics of co-existing Escherichia colilineages in situ of the infant gut and multiplex phenotypic targeted recovery of previously uncultivated bacteria from the human gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gumpert, Heidi

    documented case wheretransfer of resistance genes was observed in situ of a non-perturbed gut in the absenceof antibiotic treatment. Additionally, cases of genomic deletions, phage infections andcuring, and plasmid loss were observed, highlighting that strains in the gut are highly dynamic. The detection...... were selected due to an observed change in their antibiotic susceptibility profile. Via full genome sequencing, we identified that in both cases a conjugative plasmid harboring antibiotic resistance genes was transferred between co-existing E. coli lineages and is responsible for the change...... in antibiotic susceptibility. In one case, the transfer occurred in the absenceof antibiotic treatment and the transconjugant remained amongst the gut microbiota for months, providing evidence to the hypothesis that resistance genes are stably maintained once acquired. To our knowledge, this is the first...

  11. Estimating the reactivation potential of existing fractures in subsurface granitoids from outcrop analogues and in-situ stress modeling: implications for EGS reservoir stimulation with an example from Meiningen (Thuringia, Central Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustaszewski, Kamil; Kasch, Norbert; Siegburg, Melanie; Navabpour, Payman; Thieme, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    The southwestern part of Thuringia (central Germany) hosts large subsurface extents of Lower Carboniferous granitoids of the Mid-German Crystalline Rise, overlain by an up to several kilometer thick succession of Lower Permian to Mid-Triassic volcanic and sedimentary rocks. The granitic basement represents a conductivity-controlled ('hot dry rock') reservoir of high potential that could be targeted for economic exploitation as an enhanced geothermal system (EGS) in the future. As a preparatory measure, the federal states of Thuringia and Saxony have jointly funded a collaborative research and development project ('Optiriss') aimed at mitigating non-productivity risks during the exploration of such reservoirs. In order to provide structural constraints on the fracture network design during reservoir stimulation, we have carried out a geometric and kinematic analysis of pre-existing fracture patterns in exposures of the Carboniferous basement and Mesozoic cover rocks within an area of c. 500 km2 around the towns of Meiningen and Suhl, where granitic basement and sedimentary cover are juxtaposed along the southern border fault of the Thuringian Forest basement high. The frequency distribution of fractures was assessed by combining outcrop-scale fracture measurements in 31 exposures and photogrammetric analysis of fractures using a LIDAR DEM with 5 m horizontal resolution and rectified aerial images at 4 localities. This analysis revealed a prevalence of NW-SE-trending fractures of mainly joints, extension veins, Permian magmatic dikes and subordinately brittle faults in the Carboniferous granitic basement, which probably resulted from Permian tectonics. In order to assess the reactivation potential of fractures in the reservoir during a stimulation phase, constraints on the current strain regime and in-situ stress magnitudes, including borehole data and earthquake focal mechanisms in a larger area, were needed. These data reveal a presently NW-SE-trending maximum

  12. Composed Scattering Model for Direct Volume Rendering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡文立; 石教英

    1996-01-01

    Based on the equation of transfer in transport theory of optical physics,a new volume rendering model,called composed scattering model(CSM),is presented.In calculating the scattering term of the equation,it is decomposed into volume scattering intensity and surface scattering intensity,and they are composed with the boundary detection operator as the weight function.This proposed model differs from the most current volume rendering models in the aspect that in CSM segmentation and illumination intensity calculation are taken as two coherent parts while in existing models they are regarded as two separate ones.This model has been applied to the direct volume rendering of 3D data sets obtained by CT and MRI.The resultant images show not only rich details but also clear boundary surfaces.CSM is demonstrated to be an accurate volume rendering model suitable for CT and MRI data sets.

  13. High Fidelity Haptic Rendering

    CERN Document Server

    Otaduy, Miguel A

    2006-01-01

    The human haptic system, among all senses, provides unique and bidirectional communication between humans and their physical environment. Yet, to date, most human-computer interactive systems have focused primarily on the graphical rendering of visual information and, to a lesser extent, on the display of auditory information. Extending the frontier of visual computing, haptic interfaces, or force feedback devices, have the potential to increase the quality of human-computer interaction by accommodating the sense of touch. They provide an attractive augmentation to visual display and enhance t

  14. Brain Image Representation and Rendering: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudassar Raza

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Brain image representation and rendering processes are basically used for evaluation, development and investigation consent experimental examination and formation of brain images of a variety of modalities that includes the major brain types like MEG, EEG, PET, MRI, CT or microscopy. So, there is a need to conduct a study to review the existing work in this area. This paper provides a review of different existing techniques and methods regarding the brain image representation and rendering. Image Rendering is the method of generating an image by means of a model, through computer programs. The basic purpose of brain image representation and rendering processes is to analyze the brain images precisely in order to effectively diagnose and examine the diseases and problems. The basic objective of this study is to evaluate and discuss different techniques and approaches proposed in order to handle different brain imaging types. The paper provides a short overview of different methods, in the form of advantages and limitations, presented in the prospect of brain image representation and rendering along with their sub categories proposed by different authors.

  15. Development of the integrated in situ lasagna process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, S.; Athmer, C.; Sheridan, P. [Monsanto Company, St. Louis, MO (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Contamination in deep, low permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in uniform delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ methods such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, and pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. Recently the use of electrokinetics as an in situ method for soil remediation has received increasing attention due to its unique applicability to low-permeability soils. Electrokinetics includes the transport of water (electroosmosis) as well as ions (electromigration) as a result of an applied electric field. For remedial applications, water is typically introduced into the soil at the anode to replenish the water flowing towards the cathode due to electroosmosis. The water flow is utilized to flush organic contaminants from the subsurface soil to the ground surface at the cathode region for further treatment or disposal. This report describes a treatment process under development termed the LASAGNA process which incorporates electrokinetics, along with the establishment of degradation zones, for pollutant removal.

  16. ARE: Ada Rendering Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Penge

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available E' ormai pratica diffusa, nello sviluppo di applicazioni web, l'utilizzo di template e di potenti template engine per automatizzare la generazione dei contenuti da presentare all'utente. Tuttavia a volte la potenza di tali engine è€ ottenuta mescolando logica e interfaccia, introducendo linguaggi diversi da quelli di descrizione della pagina, o addirittura inventando nuovi linguaggi dedicati.ARE (ADA Rendering Engine è€ pensato per gestire l'intero flusso di creazione del contenuto HTML/XHTML dinamico, la selezione del corretto template, CSS, JavaScript e la produzione dell'output separando completamente logica e interfaccia. I templates utilizzati sono puro HTML senza parti in altri linguaggi, e possono quindi essere gestiti e visualizzati autonomamente. Il codice HTML generato è€ uniforme e parametrizzato.E' composto da due moduli, CORE (Common Output Rendering Engine e ALE (ADA Layout Engine.Il primo (CORE viene utilizzato per la generazione OO degli elementi del DOM ed è pensato per aiutare lo sviluppatore nella produzione di codice valido rispetto al DTD utilizzato. CORE genera automaticamente gli elementi del DOM in base al DTD impostato nella configurazioneIl secondo (ALE viene utilizzato come template engine per selezionare automaticamente in base ad alcuni parametri (modulo, profilo utente, tipologia del nodo, del corso, preferenze di installazione il template HTML, i CSS e i file JavaScript appropriati. ALE permette di usare templates di default e microtemplates ricorsivi per semplificare il lavoro del grafico.I due moduli possono in ogni caso essere utilizzati indipendentemente l'uno dall'altro. E' possibile generare e renderizzare una pagina HTML utilizzando solo CORE oppure inviare gli oggetti CORE al template engine ALE che provvede a renderizzare la pagina HTML. Viceversa è possibile generare HTML senza utilizzare CORE ed inviarlo al template engine ALECORE è alla prima release ed è€ già utilizzato all

  17. Parallel hierarchical radiosity rendering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, M.

    1993-07-01

    In this dissertation, the step-by-step development of a scalable parallel hierarchical radiosity renderer is documented. First, a new look is taken at the traditional radiosity equation, and a new form is presented in which the matrix of linear system coefficients is transformed into a symmetric matrix, thereby simplifying the problem and enabling a new solution technique to be applied. Next, the state-of-the-art hierarchical radiosity methods are examined for their suitability to parallel implementation, and scalability. Significant enhancements are also discovered which both improve their theoretical foundations and improve the images they generate. The resultant hierarchical radiosity algorithm is then examined for sources of parallelism, and for an architectural mapping. Several architectural mappings are discussed. A few key algorithmic changes are suggested during the process of making the algorithm parallel. Next, the performance, efficiency, and scalability of the algorithm are analyzed. The dissertation closes with a discussion of several ideas which have the potential to further enhance the hierarchical radiosity method, or provide an entirely new forum for the application of hierarchical methods.

  18. Sea modeling and rendering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathala, Thierry; Latger, Jean

    2010-10-01

    More and more defence and civil applications require simulation of marine synthetic environment. Currently, the "Future Anti-Surface-Guided-Weapon" (FASGW) or "anti-navire léger" (ANL) missile needs this kind of modelling. This paper presents a set of technical enhancement of the SE-Workbench that aim at better representing the sea profile and the interaction with targets. The operational scenario variability is a key criterion: the generic geographical area (e.g. Persian Gulf, coast of Somalia,...), the type of situation (e.g. peace keeping, peace enforcement, anti-piracy, drug interdiction,...)., the objectives (political, strategic, or military objectives), the description of the mission(s) (e.g. antipiracy) and operation(s) (e.g. surveillance and reconnaissance, escort, convoying) to achieve the objectives, the type of environment (Weather, Time of day, Geography [coastlines, islands, hills/mountains]). The paper insists on several points such as the dual rendering using either ray tracing [and the GP GPU optimization] or rasterization [and GPU shaders optimization], the modelling of sea-surface based on hypertextures and shaders, the wakes modelling, the buoyancy models for targets, the interaction of coast and littoral, the dielectric infrared modelling of water material.

  19. Entropy, color, and color rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Luke L A

    2012-12-01

    The Shannon entropy [Bell Syst. Tech J.27, 379 (1948)] of spectral distributions is applied to the problem of color rendering. With this novel approach, calculations for visual white entropy, spectral entropy, and color rendering are proposed, indices that are unreliant on the subjectivity inherent in reference spectra and color samples. The indices are tested against real lamp spectra, showing a simple and robust system for color rendering assessment. The discussion considers potential roles for white entropy in several areas of color theory and psychophysics and nonextensive entropy generalizations of the entropy indices in mathematical color spaces.

  20. Exposure render: an interactive photo-realistic volume rendering framework.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kroes

    Full Text Available The field of volume visualization has undergone rapid development during the past years, both due to advances in suitable computing hardware and due to the increasing availability of large volume datasets. Recent work has focused on increasing the visual realism in Direct Volume Rendering (DVR by integrating a number of visually plausible but often effect-specific rendering techniques, for instance modeling of light occlusion and depth of field. Besides yielding more attractive renderings, especially the more realistic lighting has a positive effect on perceptual tasks. Although these new rendering techniques yield impressive results, they exhibit limitations in terms of their exibility and their performance. Monte Carlo ray tracing (MCRT, coupled with physically based light transport, is the de-facto standard for synthesizing highly realistic images in the graphics domain, although usually not from volumetric data. Due to the stochastic sampling of MCRT algorithms, numerous effects can be achieved in a relatively straight-forward fashion. For this reason, we have developed a practical framework that applies MCRT techniques also to direct volume rendering (DVR. With this work, we demonstrate that a host of realistic effects, including physically based lighting, can be simulated in a generic and flexible fashion, leading to interactive DVR with improved realism. In the hope that this improved approach to DVR will see more use in practice, we have made available our framework under a permissive open source license.

  1. RenderMan design principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca, Tony; Porter, Tom

    1989-01-01

    The two worlds of interactive graphics and realistic graphics have remained separate. Fast graphics hardware runs simple algorithms and generates simple looking images. Photorealistic image synthesis software runs slowly on large expensive computers. The time has come for these two branches of computer graphics to merge. The speed and expense of graphics hardware is no longer the barrier to the wide acceptance of photorealism. There is every reason to believe that high quality image synthesis will become a standard capability of every graphics machine, from superworkstation to personal computer. The significant barrier has been the lack of a common language, an agreed-upon set of terms and conditions, for 3-D modeling systems to talk to 3-D rendering systems for computing an accurate rendition of that scene. Pixar has introduced RenderMan to serve as that common language. RenderMan, specifically the extensibility it offers in shading calculations, is discussed.

  2. Exposure Render: An Interactive Photo-Realistic Volume Rendering Framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroes, T.; Post, F.H.; Botha, C.P.

    2012-01-01

    The field of volume visualization has undergone rapid development during the past years, both due to advances in suitable computing hardware and due to the increasing availability of large volume datasets. Recent work has focused on increasing the visual realism in Direct Volume Rendering (DVR) by i

  3. In-Situ Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Anders Thais; Slot, Susanne; Paltved, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In situ simulation offers on-site training to healthcare professionals. It refers to a training strategy where simulation technology is integrated into the clinical encounter. Training in the simulation laboratory does not easily tap into situational resources, e.g. individual, team......, and organisational characteristic. Therefore, it might fail to fully mimic real clinical team processes. Though research on in situ simulation in healthcare is in its infancy, literature is abundant on patient safety and team training1. Patient safety reporting systems that identify risks to patients can improve...... offered in situ simulation faculty with a model for integrating reported critical incidents and adverse events with contextual needs analysis and short-term observations. Furthermore the research group is working on detailing the barriers of in situ simulation such as resources for team training despite...

  4. In situ groundwater bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-02-01

    In situ groundwater bioremediation of hydrocarbons has been used for more than 40 years. Most strategies involve biostimulation; however, recently bioaugmentation have been used for dehalorespiration. Aquifer and contaminant profiles are critical to determining the feasibility and strategy for in situ groundwater bioremediation. Hydraulic conductivity and redox conditions, including concentrations of terminal electron acceptors are critical to determine the feasibility and strategy for potential bioremediation applications. Conceptual models followed by characterization and subsequent numerical models are critical for efficient and cost effective bioremediation. Critical research needs in this area include better modeling and integration of remediation strategies with natural attenuation.

  5. GPU Pro advanced rendering techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Engel, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    This book covers essential tools and techniques for programming the graphics processing unit. Brought to you by Wolfgang Engel and the same team of editors who made the ShaderX series a success, this volume covers advanced rendering techniques, engine design, GPGPU techniques, related mathematical techniques, and game postmortems. A special emphasis is placed on handheld programming to account for the increased importance of graphics on mobile devices, especially the iPhone and iPod touch.Example programs and source code can be downloaded from the book's CRC Press web page. 

  6. Carcinoma in situ in the testis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørth, M; Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Andersson, L

    2000-01-01

    Carcinoma in situ (CIS) of the testis is a common precursor of germ-cell tumours in adults and adolescents, with the exception of spermatocytic seminoma. This article reviews existing knowledge on the pathobiology, genetic aspects and epidemiology of CIS, discusses current hypotheses concerning...

  7. In Situ Mass Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The In Situ Mass Spectrometer projects focuses on a specific subsystem to leverage advanced research for laser-based in situ mass spectrometer development...

  8. Real-time graphics rendering engine

    CERN Document Server

    Bao, Hujun

    2011-01-01

    ""Real-Time Graphics Rendering Engine"" reveals the software architecture of the modern real-time 3D graphics rendering engine and the relevant technologies based on the authors' experience developing this high-performance, real-time system. The relevant knowledge about real-time graphics rendering such as the rendering pipeline, the visual appearance and shading and lighting models are also introduced. This book is intended to offer well-founded guidance for researchers and developers who are interested in building their own rendering engines. Hujun Bao is a professor at the State Key Lab of

  9. Hardware Accelerated Point Rendering of Isosurfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Christensen, Niels Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    an approximate technique for point scaling using distance attenuation which makes it possible to render points stored in display lists or vertex arrays. This enables us to render points quickly using OpenGL. Our comparisons show that point generation is significantly faster than triangle generation...... and that the advantage of rendering points as opposed to triangles increases with the size and complexity of the volumes. To gauge the visual quality of future hardware accelerated point rendering schemes, we have implemented a software based point rendering method and compare the quality to both MC and our OpenGL based...

  10. Cluster parallel rendering based on encoded mesh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Ai-hong; XIONG Hua; PENG Hao-yu; LIU Zhen; SHI Jiao-ying

    2006-01-01

    Use of compressed mesh in parallel rendering architecture is still an unexplored area, the main challenge of which is to partition and sort the encoded mesh in compression-domain. This paper presents a mesh compression scheme PRMC (Parallel Rendering based Mesh Compression) supplying encoded meshes that can be partitioned and sorted in parallel rendering system even in encoded-domain. First, we segment the mesh into submeshes and clip the submeshes' boundary into Runs, and then piecewise compress the submeshes and Runs respectively. With the help of several auxiliary index tables, compressed submeshes and Runs can serve as rendering primitives in parallel rendering system. Based on PRMC, we design and implement a parallel rendering architecture. Compared with uncompressed representation, experimental results showed that PRMC meshes applied in cluster parallel rendering system can dramatically reduce the communication requirement.

  11. Adaptive image contrast enhancement algorithm for point-based rendering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shaoping; Liu, Xiaoping P.

    2015-03-01

    Surgical simulation is a major application in computer graphics and virtual reality, and most of the existing work indicates that interactive real-time cutting simulation of soft tissue is a fundamental but challenging research problem in virtual surgery simulation systems. More specifically, it is difficult to achieve a fast enough graphic update rate (at least 30 Hz) on commodity PC hardware by utilizing traditional triangle-based rendering algorithms. In recent years, point-based rendering (PBR) has been shown to offer the potential to outperform the traditional triangle-based rendering in speed when it is applied to highly complex soft tissue cutting models. Nevertheless, the PBR algorithms are still limited in visual quality due to inherent contrast distortion. We propose an adaptive image contrast enhancement algorithm as a postprocessing module for PBR, providing high visual rendering quality as well as acceptable rendering efficiency. Our approach is based on a perceptible image quality technique with automatic parameter selection, resulting in a visual quality comparable to existing conventional PBR algorithms. Experimental results show that our adaptive image contrast enhancement algorithm produces encouraging results both visually and numerically compared to representative algorithms, and experiments conducted on the latest hardware demonstrate that the proposed PBR framework with the postprocessing module is superior to the conventional PBR algorithm and that the proposed contrast enhancement algorithm can be utilized in (or compatible with) various variants of the conventional PBR algorithm.

  12. Design Games for In-Situ Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Erik

    2013-01-01

    on a design problem where an in-situ design practice may further the early design process: the case of designing a pervasive game. Pervasive games are computer games, played using the city as a game board and often using mobile phones with GPS. Some contextual design methods exist, but we propose an approach...... that calls for the designer to conceptualise and perform ideas in-situ, that is on the site, where the game is supposed to be played. The problem was to design a creativity method that incorporated in-situ design work and which generated game concepts for pervasive games. The proposed design method, called...... sitestorming, is based on a game using Situationistic individual exploration of the site and different types of game cards, followed by a joint evaluation of the generated ideas. A series of evaluations showed that the designers found the method enjoyable to use, that the method motivated idea generation...

  13. Reusable In Situ AirCore System for CO2 and Trace Gas Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel design for an in situ atmospheric sensor for CO2 and trace gases is proposed. The sensor, named AirCore, provides the advantages of existing in situ sensors...

  14. AirCore Reusable InSitu Sampler for CO2 and Trace Gas Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel design for an in situ air sampling sensor for CO2 and trace gases is proposed. The sensor, named AirCore, provides the advantages of existing in situ...

  15. Binaural Rendering in MPEG Surround

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristofer Kjörling

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes novel methods for evoking a multichannel audio experience over stereo headphones. In contrast to the conventional convolution-based approach where, for example, five input channels are filtered using ten head-related transfer functions, the current approach is based on a parametric representation of the multichannel signal, along with either a parametric representation of the head-related transfer functions or a reduced set of head-related transfer functions. An audio scene with multiple virtual sound sources is represented by a mono or a stereo downmix signal of all sound source signals, accompanied by certain statistical (spatial properties. These statistical properties of the sound sources are either combined with statistical properties of head-related transfer functions to estimate “binaural parameters” that represent the perceptually relevant aspects of the auditory scene or used to create a limited set of combined head-related transfer functions that can be applied directly on the downmix signal. Subsequently, a binaural rendering stage reinstates the statistical properties of the sound sources by applying the estimated binaural parameters or the reduced set of combined head-related transfer functions directly on the downmix. If combined with parametric multichannel audio coders such as MPEG Surround, the proposed methods are advantageous over conventional methods in terms of perceived quality and computational complexity.

  16. Binaural Rendering in MPEG Surround

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breebaart, Jeroen; Villemoes, Lars; Kjörling, Kristofer

    2008-12-01

    This paper describes novel methods for evoking a multichannel audio experience over stereo headphones. In contrast to the conventional convolution-based approach where, for example, five input channels are filtered using ten head-related transfer functions, the current approach is based on a parametric representation of the multichannel signal, along with either a parametric representation of the head-related transfer functions or a reduced set of head-related transfer functions. An audio scene with multiple virtual sound sources is represented by a mono or a stereo downmix signal of all sound source signals, accompanied by certain statistical (spatial) properties. These statistical properties of the sound sources are either combined with statistical properties of head-related transfer functions to estimate "binaural parameters" that represent the perceptually relevant aspects of the auditory scene or used to create a limited set of combined head-related transfer functions that can be applied directly on the downmix signal. Subsequently, a binaural rendering stage reinstates the statistical properties of the sound sources by applying the estimated binaural parameters or the reduced set of combined head-related transfer functions directly on the downmix. If combined with parametric multichannel audio coders such as MPEG Surround, the proposed methods are advantageous over conventional methods in terms of perceived quality and computational complexity.

  17. Development of an integrated in-situ remediation technology. Topical report for Task {number_sign}3.2 entitled, ``Modeling and iron dechlorination studies`` (September 26, 1994--August 31, 1997)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, A.P.; Sivavec, T.M.; Principe, J.M. [General Electric Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Contamination in low-permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, and pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low-permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. The technology is an integrated in-situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil, and electro-osmosis is utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is complete. The present Topical Report for Task {number_sign}3.2 summarizes the modeling and dechlorination research conducted by General Electric Research and Development.

  18. Rendering Caustics on Non-Lambertian Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik Wann

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a new technique for rendering caustics on non-Lambertian surfaces. The method is based on an extension of the photon map which removes previous restrictions limiting the usage to Lambertian surfaces. We add information about the incoming direction to the photons and this allow...... reduces the rendering time. We have used the method to render caustics on surfaces with reflectance functions varying from Lambertian to glossy specular....

  19. Building Interstellar's black hole: the gravitational renderer

    OpenAIRE

    James, Oliver; Dieckmann, Sylvan; Pabst, Simon; Roberts, Paul-George H.; Thorne, Kip S.

    2015-01-01

    Interstellar is the first feature film to attempt depicting a black hole as it would actually be seen by somebody nearby. A close collaboration between the production's Scientific Advisor and the Visual Effects team led to the development of a new renderer, DNGR (Double Negative Gravitational Renderer) which uses novel techniques for rendering in curved space-time. Following the completion of the movie, the code was adapted for scientific research, leading to new insights into gravitational l...

  20. Image Based Rendering under Varying Illumination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Chengfeng (王城峰); Hu Zhanyi

    2003-01-01

    A new approach for photorealistic rendering of a class of objects at arbitrary illumination is presented. The approach of the authors relies entirely on image based rendering techniques. A scheme is utilized for re-illumination of objects based on linear combination of low dimensional image representations. The minimum rendering condition of technique of the authors is three sample images under varying illumination of a reference object and a single input image of an interested object. Important properties of this approach are its simplicity, robustness and speediness. Experimental results validate the proposed rendering approach.

  1. Overview of In - Situ Biodegradation and Enhancement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Jun; Anthony ADZOMANI; ZHAO Yongsheng

    2002-01-01

    Microbial degradation technologies have been developed to restore ground water quality in aquifers polluted by organic contaminants effectively in recent years. However, in course of the degradation, the formation of biofilms in ground water remediation technology can be detrimental to the effectiveness of a ground water remediation project. Several alternatives are available to a remedial design engineer, such as Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRBs) and in -situ bioremediation, Hydrogen Releasing Compounds (HRCs) barrier, Oxygen Releasing Compounds (ORCs) barrier etc. which are efficient and cost- effective technologies. Excessive biomass formation renders a barrier ineffective in degrading the contaminants, Efforts are made to develop kinetics models which accurately determine bio - fouling and bio - filn formation and to control excessive biomass formation.

  2. RenderToolbox3: MATLAB tools that facilitate physically based stimulus rendering for vision research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heasly, Benjamin S; Cottaris, Nicolas P; Lichtman, Daniel P; Xiao, Bei; Brainard, David H

    2014-02-07

    RenderToolbox3 provides MATLAB utilities and prescribes a workflow that should be useful to researchers who want to employ graphics in the study of vision and perhaps in other endeavors as well. In particular, RenderToolbox3 facilitates rendering scene families in which various scene attributes and renderer behaviors are manipulated parametrically, enables spectral specification of object reflectance and illuminant spectra, enables the use of physically based material specifications, helps validate renderer output, and converts renderer output to physical units of radiance. This paper describes the design and functionality of the toolbox and discusses several examples that demonstrate its use. We have designed RenderToolbox3 to be portable across computer hardware and operating systems and to be free and open source (except for MATLAB itself). RenderToolbox3 is available at https://github.com/DavidBrainard/RenderToolbox3.

  3. Image Based Rendering and Virtual Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore

    The Presentation concerns with an overview of Image Based Rendering approaches and their use on Virtual Reality, including Virtual Photography and Cinematography, and Mobile Robot Navigation.......The Presentation concerns with an overview of Image Based Rendering approaches and their use on Virtual Reality, including Virtual Photography and Cinematography, and Mobile Robot Navigation....

  4. Physically based rendering: from theory to implementation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pharr, Matt; Humphreys, Greg, Ph. D

    2010-01-01

    ... rendering algorithm variations. This book is not only a textbook for students, but also a useful reference book for practitioners in the field. The second edition has been extended with sections on Metropolis light transport, subsurface scattering, precomputed light transport, and more. Per Christensen Senior Software Developer, RenderMan Products,...

  5. Image Based Rendering and Virtual Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore

    The Presentation concerns with an overview of Image Based Rendering approaches and their use on Virtual Reality, including Virtual Photography and Cinematography, and Mobile Robot Navigation.......The Presentation concerns with an overview of Image Based Rendering approaches and their use on Virtual Reality, including Virtual Photography and Cinematography, and Mobile Robot Navigation....

  6. Moisture movements in render on brick wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Munch, Thomas Astrup; Thorsen, Peter Schjørmann

    2003-01-01

    A three-layer render on brick wall used for building facades is studied in the laboratory. The vertical render surface is held in contact with water for 24 hours simulating driving rain while it is measured with non-destructive X-ray equipment every hour in order to follow the moisture front...... through the render and into the brick. The test specimen is placed between the source and the detector. The test specimens are all scanned before they are exposed to water. In that way the loss of counts from the dry scan to the wet scan qualitatively shows the presence of water. The results show nearly...... no penetration of water through the render and into the brick, and the results are independent of the start condition of the test specimens. Also drying experiments are performed. The results show a small difference in the rate of drying, in favour of the bricks without render....

  7. Physically based rendering from theory to implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Pharr, Matt

    2010-01-01

    "Physically Based Rendering, 2nd Edition" describes both the mathematical theory behind a modern photorealistic rendering system as well as its practical implementation. A method - known as 'literate programming'- combines human-readable documentation and source code into a single reference that is specifically designed to aid comprehension. The result is a stunning achievement in graphics education. Through the ideas and software in this book, you will learn to design and employ a full-featured rendering system for creating stunning imagery. This book features new sections on subsurface scattering, Metropolis light transport, precomputed light transport, multispectral rendering, and much more. It includes a companion site complete with source code for the rendering system described in the book, with support for Windows, OS X, and Linux. Code and text are tightly woven together through a unique indexing feature that lists each function, variable, and method on the page that they are first described.

  8. Optimization-Based Wearable Tactile Rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Alvaro G; Lobo, Daniel; Chinello, Francesco; Cirio, Gabriel; Malvezzi, Monica; San Martin, Jose; Prattichizzo, Domenico; Otaduy, Miguel A

    2016-10-20

    Novel wearable tactile interfaces offer the possibility to simulate tactile interactions with virtual environments directly on our skin. But, unlike kinesthetic interfaces, for which haptic rendering is a well explored problem, they pose new questions about the formulation of the rendering problem. In this work, we propose a formulation of tactile rendering as an optimization problem, which is general for a large family of tactile interfaces. Based on an accurate simulation of contact between a finger model and the virtual environment, we pose tactile rendering as the optimization of the device configuration, such that the contact surface between the device and the actual finger matches as close as possible the contact surface in the virtual environment. We describe the optimization formulation in general terms, and we also demonstrate its implementation on a thimble-like wearable device. We validate the tactile rendering formulation by analyzing its force error, and we show that it outperforms other approaches.

  9. Calibrating feedwater flow nozzles in-situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caudill, M. [Tri-State Generation and Transmission, Inc., Montrose, CA (United States); Diaz-Tous, I.; Murphy, S.; Leggett, M.; Crandall, C. [ENCOR-AMERICA, Inc., Mountain View, CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    This paper presents a new method for in-situ calibration of feedwater flow nozzles wherein feedwater flow is determined indirectly by performing a high accuracy heat balance around the highest-pressure feedwater heater. It is often difficult to reliably measure feedwater flow. Over the life of a power plant, the feedwater nozzle can accumulate deposits, erode, or suffer other damage that can render the original nozzle calibration inaccurate. Recalibration of installed feedwater flow nozzles is expensive and time consuming. Traditionally, the nozzle is cut out of the piping and sent to a laboratory for recalibration, which can be an especially difficult, expensive, and time-consuming task when involving high pressure feedwater lines. ENCOR-AMERICA, INC. has developed an accurate and cost-effective method of calibrating feedwater nozzles in-situ as previously reported at the 1994 EPRI Heat Rate Improvement Conference. In this method, feedwater flow and differential pressure across the nozzle are measured concurrently. The feedwater flow is determined indirectly by performing a heat balance around the highest-pressure feedwater heater. Extraction steam to the feedwater heater is measured by use of a high accuracy turbine flowmeter. The meters used have been calibrated at an independent laboratory with a primary or secondary device traceable to the NIST. In this paper, a new variation on the above method is reported. The new approach measures the heater drains and vent flows instead of the extraction steam flow. Test theory and instrumentation will be discussed. Results of in-situ feedwater nozzle calibration tests performed at two units owned by Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association will be presented.

  10. Controllable in situ synthesis of silver nanoparticles on multilayered film-coated silk fibers for antibacterial application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Mei; He, Huawei; Xiao, Jing; Zhao, Ping; Xie, Jiale; Lu, Zhisong

    2016-01-01

    Layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly is a versatile technique for the preparation of multilayered polymeric films. However, fabrication of LbL polymetic film on silk for the in situ growth of high-density silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) has not been realized. Herein poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)/poly(dimethyldiallylammonium chloride) (PDDA) multilayers are constructed on silk via the LbL approach, subsequently serving as a 3-dimensional matrix for in situ synthesis of AgNPs. After 8 rounds of LbL assembly, the silk is fully covered with a layer of polymeric film. AgNPs with good crystalline structures could be in-situ generated in the silk-coated multilayers and their amount could be tailored by adjusting the bilayer numbers. The as-prepared silk could effectively kill the existing bacteria and inhibit the bacterial growth, demonstrating the antimicrobial activity. Moreover, the release of Ag(+) from the modified silk can last for 120 h, rendering the modified silk sustainable antimicrobial activity. This work may provide a novel method to prepare AgNPs-functionalized antimicrobial silk for potential applications in textile industry.

  11. 3D Rendering - Techniques and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekta Walia

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Computer generated images and animations are getting more and more common. They are used in many different contexts such as movies,mobiles, medical visualization, architectural visualization and CAD. Advanced ways of describing surface and light source properties are important to ensure that artists are able to create realistic and stylish looking images. Even when using advanced rendering algorithms such as ray tracing, time required for shading may contribute towards a large part of the image creation time. Therefore both performance and flexibility is important in a rendering system. This paper gives a comparative study of various 3D Rendering techniques and their challenges in a complete and systematic manner.

  12. Anisotropic 3D texture synthesis with application to volume rendering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Lasse Farnung; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel approach to improving volume rendering by using synthesized textures in combination with a custom transfer function. First, we use existing knowledge to synthesize anisotropic solid textures to fit our volumetric data. As input to the synthesis method, we acquire high quality....... This method is applied to a high quality visualization of a pig carcass, where samples of meat, bone, and fat have been used to produce the anisotropic 3D textures....

  13. An experiment on the color rendering of different light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, Simonetta; Bonanomi, Cristian; Rizzi, Alessandro

    2013-02-01

    The color rendering index (CRI) of a light source attempts to measure how much the color appearance of objects is preserved when they are illuminated by the given light source. This problem is of great importance for various industrial and scientific fields, such as lighting architecture, design, ergonomics, etc. Usually a light source is specified through the Correlated Color Temperature or CCT. However two (or more) light sources with the same CCT but different spectral power distribution can exist. Therefore color samples viewed under two light sources with equal CCTs can appear different. Hence, the need for a method to assess the quality of a given illuminant in relation to color. Recently CRI has had a renewed interest because of the new LED-based lighting systems. They usually have a color rendering index rather low, but good preservation of color appearance and a pleasant visual appearance (visual appeal). Various attempts to develop a new color rendering index have been done so far, but still research is working for a better one. This article describes an experiment performed by human observers concerning the appearance preservation of color under some light sources, comparing it with a range of available color rendering indices.

  14. FAST CROWD RENDERING IN COMPUTER GAMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaya OĞUZ

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Computer games, with the speed advancements of graphical processors, are coming closer to the quality of cinema industry. Contrary to offline rendering of the scenes in a motion picture, computer games should be able to render at 30 frames per second. Therefore, CPU and memory performance are sought by using various techniques. This paper is about using instancing feature of contemporary graphical processors along with level of detail techniques which has been in use for a very long time. Using instancing, 15,000 instances were successfully rendered at 30 frames per second using a very low %10 CPU usage. The application can render 40,000 instances at 13 frames per second.

  15. Visibility-Aware Direct Volume Rendering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wai-Ho Mak; Yingcai Wu; Ming-Yuen Chan; Huamin Qu

    2011-01-01

    Direct volume rendering (DVR) is a powerful visualization technique which allows users to effectively explore and study volumetric datasets. Different transparency settings can be flexibly assigned to different structures such that some valuable information can be revealed in direct volume rendered images (DVRIs). However, end-users often feel that some risks are always associated with DVR because they do not know whether any important information is missing from the transparent regions of DVRIs. In this paper, we investigate how to semi-automatically generate a set of DVRIs and also an animation which can reveal information missed in the original DVRIs and meanwhile satisfy some image quality criteria such as coherence. A complete framework is developed to tackle various problems related to the generation and quality evaluation of visibility-aware DVRIs and animations. Our technique can reduce the risk of using direct volume rendering and thus boost the confidence of users in volume rendering systems.

  16. ARC Code TI: SLAB Spatial Audio Renderer

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SLAB is a software-based, real-time virtual acoustic environment rendering system being developed as a tool for the study of spatial hearing. SLAB is designed to...

  17. Layered Textures for Image-Based Rendering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    en-Cheng Wang; ui-Yu Li; in Zheng; n-Hua Wu

    2004-01-01

    An extension to texture mapping is given in this paper for improving the efficiency of image-based rendering. For a depth image with an orthogonal displacement at each pixel, it is decomposed by the displacement into a series of layered textures (LTs) with each one having the same displacement for all its texels. Meanwhile,some texels of the layered textures are interpolated for obtaining a continuous 3D approximation of the model represented in the depth image. Thus, the plane-to-plane texture mapping can be used to map these layered textures to produce novel views and the advantages can be obtained as follows: accelerating the rendering speed,supporting the 3D surface details and view motion parallax, and avoiding the expensive task of hole-filling in the rendering stage. Experimental results show the new method can produce high-quality images and run faster than many famous image-based rendering techniques.

  18. In Situ Aerosol Detector Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is developing new platform systems that have the potential to benefit Earth science research activities, which include in situ instruments for atmospheric...

  19. Software System for Vocal Rendering of Printed Documents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian DARDALA

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to present a software system architecture developed to render the printed documents in a vocal form. On the other hand, in the paper are described the software solutions that exist as software components and are necessary for documents processing as well as for multimedia device controlling used by the system. The usefulness of this system is for people with visual disabilities that can access the contents of documents without that they be printed in Braille system or to exist in an audio form.

  20. Real-time rendering of optical effects using spatial convolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokita, Przemyslaw

    1998-03-01

    Simulation of special effects such as: defocus effect, depth-of-field effect, raindrops or water film falling on the windshield, may be very useful in visual simulators and in all computer graphics applications that need realistic images of outdoor scenery. Those effects are especially important in rendering poor visibility conditions in flight and driving simulators, but can also be applied, for example, in composing computer graphics and video sequences- -i.e. in Augmented Reality systems. This paper proposes a new approach to the rendering of those optical effects by iterative adaptive filtering using spatial convolution. The advantage of this solution is that the adaptive convolution can be done in real-time by existing hardware. Optical effects mentioned above can be introduced into the image computed using conventional camera model by applying to the intensity of each pixel the convolution filter having an appropriate point spread function. The algorithms described in this paper can be easily implemented int the visualization pipeline--the final effect may be obtained by iterative filtering using a single hardware convolution filter or with the pipeline composed of identical 3 X 3 filters placed as the stages of this pipeline. Another advantage of the proposed solution is that the extension based on proposed algorithm can be added to the existing rendering systems as a final stage of the visualization pipeline.

  1. Rendering and Compositing Infrastructure Improvements to VisIt for Insitu Rendering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loring, Burlen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ruebel, Oliver [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Compared to posthoc rendering, insitu rendering often generates larger numbers of images, as a result rendering performance and scalability are critical in the insitu setting. In this work we present improvements to VisIt's rendering and compositing infrastructure that deliver increased performance and scalability in both posthoc and insitu settings. We added the capability for alpha blend compositing and use it with ordered compositing when datasets have disjoint block domain decomposition to optimize the rendering of transparent geometry. We also made improvements that increase overall efficiency by reducing communication and data movement and have addressed a number of performance issues. We structured our code to take advantage of SIMD parallelization and use threads to overlap communication and compositing. We tested our improvements on a 20 core workstation using 8 cores to render geometry generated from a $256^3$ cosmology dataset and on a Cray XC31 using 512 cores to render geometry generated from a $2000^2 \\times 800$ plasma dataset. Our results show that ordered compositing provides a speed up of up to $4 \\times$ over the current sort first strategy. The other improvements resulted in modest speed up with one notable exception where we achieve up to $40 \\times$ speed up of rendering and compositing of opaque geometry when both opaque and transparent geometry are rendered together. We also investigated the use of depth peeling, but found that the implementation provided by VTK is substantially slower,both with and without GPU acceleration, than a local camera order sort.

  2. Equalizer: a scalable parallel rendering framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilemann, Stefan; Makhinya, Maxim; Pajarola, Renato

    2009-01-01

    Continuing improvements in CPU and GPU performances as well as increasing multi-core processor and cluster-based parallelism demand for flexible and scalable parallel rendering solutions that can exploit multipipe hardware accelerated graphics. In fact, to achieve interactive visualization, scalable rendering systems are essential to cope with the rapid growth of data sets. However, parallel rendering systems are non-trivial to develop and often only application specific implementations have been proposed. The task of developing a scalable parallel rendering framework is even more difficult if it should be generic to support various types of data and visualization applications, and at the same time work efficiently on a cluster with distributed graphics cards. In this paper we introduce a novel system called Equalizer, a toolkit for scalable parallel rendering based on OpenGL which provides an application programming interface (API) to develop scalable graphics applications for a wide range of systems ranging from large distributed visualization clusters and multi-processor multipipe graphics systems to single-processor single-pipe desktop machines. We describe the system architecture, the basic API, discuss its advantages over previous approaches, present example configurations and usage scenarios as well as scalability results.

  3. Standardized rendering from IR surveillance motion imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokoski, F. J.

    2014-06-01

    Government agencies, including defense and law enforcement, increasingly make use of video from surveillance systems and camera phones owned by non-government entities.Making advanced and standardized motion imaging technology available to private and commercial users at cost-effective prices would benefit all parties. In particular, incorporating thermal infrared into commercial surveillance systems offers substantial benefits beyond night vision capability. Face rendering is a process to facilitate exploitation of thermal infrared surveillance imagery from the general area of a crime scene, to assist investigations with and without cooperating eyewitnesses. Face rendering automatically generates greyscale representations similar to police artist sketches for faces in surveillance imagery collected from proximate locations and times to a crime under investigation. Near-realtime generation of face renderings can provide law enforcement with an investigation tool to assess witness memory and credibility, and integrate reports from multiple eyewitnesses, Renderings can be quickly disseminated through social media to warn of a person who may pose an immediate threat, and to solicit the public's help in identifying possible suspects and witnesses. Renderings are pose-standardized so as to not divulge the presence and location of eyewitnesses and surveillance cameras. Incorporation of thermal infrared imaging into commercial surveillance systems will significantly improve system performance, and reduce manual review times, at an incremental cost that will continue to decrease. Benefits to criminal justice would include improved reliability of eyewitness testimony and improved accuracy of distinguishing among minority groups in eyewitness and surveillance identifications.

  4. Electromechanical instabilities of thermoplastics: Theory and in situ observation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Qiming; Niu, Xiaofan; Pei, Qibing; Michael D. Dickey; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2012-01-01

    Thermoplastics under voltages are used in diverse applications ranging from insulating cables to organic capacitors. Electromechanical instabilities have been proposed as a mechanism that causes electrical breakdown of thermoplastics. However, existing experiments cannot provide direct observations of the instability process, and existing theories for the instabilities generally assume thermoplastics are mechanically unconstrained. Here, we report in situ observations of electromechanical ins...

  5. In Situ Formation and Dynamical Evolution of Hot Jupiter Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batygin, Konstantin; Bodenheimer, Peter H.; Laughlin, Gregory P.

    2016-10-01

    Hot Jupiters, giant extrasolar planets with orbital periods shorter than ˜10 days, have long been thought to form at large radial distances, only to subsequently experience long-range inward migration. Here, we offer the contrasting view that a substantial fraction of the hot Jupiter population formed in situ via the core-accretion process. We show that under conditions appropriate to the inner regions of protoplanetary disks, rapid gas accretion can be initiated by super-Earth-type planets, comprising 10-20 Earth masses of refractory material. An in situ formation scenario leads to testable consequences, including the expectation that hot Jupiters should frequently be accompanied by additional low-mass planets with periods shorter than ˜100 days. Our calculations further demonstrate that dynamical interactions during the early stages of planetary systems’ lifetimes should increase the inclinations of such companions, rendering transits rare. High-precision radial velocity monitoring provides the best prospect for their detection.

  6. In Situ Formation and Dynamical Evolution of Hot Jupiter Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Batygin, Konstantin; Laughlin, Gregory P

    2015-01-01

    Hot Jupiters, giant extrasolar planets with orbital periods shorter than ~10 days, have long been thought to form at large radial distances, only to subsequently experience long-range inward migration. Here, we propose that in contrast with this picture, a substantial fraction of the hot Jupiter population formed in situ via the core accretion process. We show that under conditions appropriate to the inner regions of protoplanetary disks, rapid gas accretion can be initiated by Super-Earth type planets, comprising 10-20 Earth masses of refractory composition material. An in situ formation scenario leads to testable consequences, including the expectation that hot Jupiters should frequently be accompanied by additional low-mass planets with periods shorter than ~100 days. Our calculations further demonstrate that dynamical interactions during the early stages of planetary systems' lifetimes should increase the inclinations of such companions, rendering transits rare. High-precision radial velocity monitoring p...

  7. Adaptive Rendering Based on Visual Acuity Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new method of adaptable rendering for interaction in Virtual Environment(VE) through different visual acuity equations is proposed. An acuity factor equation of luminance vision is first given. Secondly, five equations which calculate the visual acuity through visual acuity factors are presented, and adaptive rendering strategy based on different visual acuity equations is given. The VE system may select one of them on the basis of the host's load, hereby select LOD for each model which would be rendered. A coarser LOD is selected where the visual acuity is lower, and a better LOD is used where it is higher. This method is tested through experiments and the experimental results show that it is effective.

  8. Rendering Falling Leaves on Graphics Hardware

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Balsa

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing interest in simulating natural phenomena in computer graphics applications. Animating natural scenes in real time is one of the most challenging problems due to the inherent complexity of their structure, formed by millions of geometric entities, and the interactions that happen within. An example of natural scenario that is needed for games or simulation programs are forests. Forests are difficult to render because the huge amount of geometric entities and the large amount of detail to be represented. Moreover, the interactions between the objects (grass, leaves and external forces such as wind are complex to model. In this paper we concentrate in the rendering of falling leaves at low cost. We present a technique that exploits graphics hardware in order to render thousands of leaves with different falling paths in real time and low memory requirements.

  9. Blender cycles lighting and rendering cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Iraci, Bernardo

    2013-01-01

    An in-depth guide full of step-by-step recipes to explore the concepts behind the usage of Cycles. Packed with illustrations, and lots of tips and tricks; the easy-to-understand nature of the book will help the reader understand even the most complex concepts with ease.If you are a digital artist who already knows your way around Blender, and you want to learn about the new Cycles' rendering engine, this is the book for you. Even experts will be able to pick up new tips and tricks to make the most of the rendering capabilities of Cycles.

  10. Volume Rendering for Curvilinear and Unstructured Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Max, N; Williams, P; Silva, C; Cook, R

    2003-03-05

    We discuss two volume rendering methods developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first, cell projection, renders the polygons in the projection of each cell. It requires a global visibility sort in order to composite the cells in back to front order, and we discuss several different algorithms for this sort. The second method uses regularly spaced slice planes perpendicular to the X, Y, or Z axes, which slice the cells into polygons. Both methods are supplemented with anti-aliasing techniques to deal with small cells that might fall between pixel samples or slice planes, and both have been parallelized.

  11. GPU Pro 5 advanced rendering techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Engel, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    In GPU Pro5: Advanced Rendering Techniques, section editors Wolfgang Engel, Christopher Oat, Carsten Dachsbacher, Michal Valient, Wessam Bahnassi, and Marius Bjorge have once again assembled a high-quality collection of cutting-edge techniques for advanced graphics processing unit (GPU) programming. Divided into six sections, the book covers rendering, lighting, effects in image space, mobile devices, 3D engine design, and compute. It explores rasterization of liquids, ray tracing of art assets that would otherwise be used in a rasterized engine, physically based area lights, volumetric light

  12. Digital color acquisition, perception, coding and rendering

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-Maloigne, Christine; Macaire, Ludovic

    2013-01-01

    In this book the authors identify the basic concepts and recent advances in the acquisition, perception, coding and rendering of color. The fundamental aspects related to the science of colorimetry in relation to physiology (the human visual system) are addressed, as are constancy and color appearance. It also addresses the more technical aspects related to sensors and the color management screen. Particular attention is paid to the notion of color rendering in computer graphics. Beyond color, the authors also look at coding, compression, protection and quality of color images and videos.

  13. Haptic rendering for simulation of fine manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Dangxiao; Zhang, Yuru

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces the latest progress in six degrees of freedom (6-DoF) haptic rendering with the focus on a new approach for simulating force/torque feedback in performing tasks that require dexterous manipulation skills. One of the major challenges in 6-DoF haptic rendering is to resolve the conflict between high speed and high fidelity requirements, especially in simulating a tool interacting with both rigid and deformable objects in a narrow space and with fine features. The book presents a configuration-based optimization approach to tackle this challenge. Addressing a key issue in man

  14. In situ microbial filter used for bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, M. Leslie; Taylor, Robert T.

    2000-01-01

    An improved method for in situ microbial filter bioremediation having increasingly operational longevity of an in situ microbial filter emplaced into an aquifer. A method for generating a microbial filter of sufficient catalytic density and thickness, which has increased replenishment interval, improved bacteria attachment and detachment characteristics and the endogenous stability under in situ conditions. A system for in situ field water remediation.

  15. Rendering Visible: Painting and Sexuate Subjectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Linda

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, I examine Luce Irigaray's aesthetic of sexual difference, which she develops by extrapolating from Paul Klee's idea that the role of painting is to render the non-visible rather than represent the visible. This idea is the premise of her analyses of phenomenology and psychoanalysis and their respective contributions to understanding…

  16. Haptic rendering for dental training system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG DangXiao; ZHANG YuRu; WANG Yong; L(U) PeiJun; ZHOU RenGe; ZHOU WanLin

    2009-01-01

    Immersion and Interaction are two key features of virtual reality systems,which are especially important for medical applications.Based on the requirement of motor skill training in dental surgery,haptic rendering method based on triangle model is investigated in this paper.Multi-rate haptic rendering architecture is proposed to solve the contradiction between fidelity and efficiency requirements.Realtime collision detection algorithm based on spatial partition and time coherence is utilized to enable fast contact determination.Proxy-based collision response algorithm is proposed to compute surface contact point.Cutting force model based on piecewise contact transition model is proposed for dental drilling simulation during tooth preparation.Velocity-driven levels of detail hapUc rendering algorithm is proposed to maintain high update rate for complex scenes with a large number of triangles.Hapticvisual collocated dental training prototype is established using half-mirror solution.Typical dental operations have been realized Including dental caries exploration,detection of boundary within dental crose-section plane,and dental drilling during tooth preparation.The haptic rendering method is a fundamental technology to improve Immersion and interaction of virtual reality training systems,which is useful not only in dental training,but also in other surgical training systems.

  17. ProteinShader: illustrative rendering of macromolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Joseph R

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cartoon-style illustrative renderings of proteins can help clarify structural features that are obscured by space filling or balls and sticks style models, and recent advances in programmable graphics cards offer many new opportunities for improving illustrative renderings. Results The ProteinShader program, a new tool for macromolecular visualization, uses information from Protein Data Bank files to produce illustrative renderings of proteins that approximate what an artist might create by hand using pen and ink. A combination of Hermite and spherical linear interpolation is used to draw smooth, gradually rotating three-dimensional tubes and ribbons with a repeating pattern of texture coordinates, which allows the application of texture mapping, real-time halftoning, and smooth edge lines. This free platform-independent open-source program is written primarily in Java, but also makes extensive use of the OpenGL Shading Language to modify the graphics pipeline. Conclusion By programming to the graphics processor unit, ProteinShader is able to produce high quality images and illustrative rendering effects in real-time. The main feature that distinguishes ProteinShader from other free molecular visualization tools is its use of texture mapping techniques that allow two-dimensional images to be mapped onto the curved three-dimensional surfaces of ribbons and tubes with minimum distortion of the images.

  18. Rendering Visible: Painting and Sexuate Subjectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Linda

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, I examine Luce Irigaray's aesthetic of sexual difference, which she develops by extrapolating from Paul Klee's idea that the role of painting is to render the non-visible rather than represent the visible. This idea is the premise of her analyses of phenomenology and psychoanalysis and their respective contributions to understanding…

  19. In Situ Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talacua, H

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, the feasibility of in situ TE for vascular and valvular purposes were tested with the use of different materials, and animal models. First, the feasibility of a decellularized biological scaffold (pSIS-ECM) as pulmonary heart valve prosthesis is examined in sheep (Chapter 2). Next,

  20. In situ bypass og diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Leif Panduro; Schroeder, T V; Lorentzen, J E

    1993-01-01

    From 1986 through to 1990 a total of 483 in situ bypass procedures were performed in 444 patients. Preoperative risk-factors were equally distributed among diabetic (DM) and non-diabetic (NDM) patients, except for smoking habits (DM:48%, NDM:64%, p = 0.002) and cardiac disease (DM:45%, NDM:29%, p...

  1. In situ dehydration of yugawaralite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artioli, G.; Ståhl, Kenny; Cruciani, G.;

    2001-01-01

    The structural response of the natural zeolite yugawaralite (CaAl2Si6O16. 4H(2)O) upon thermally induced dehydration has been studied by Rietveld analysis of temperature-resolved powder diffraction data collected in situ in the temperature range 315-791 K using synchrotron radiation. The room-tem...

  2. RAY TRACING RENDER MENGGUNAKAN FRAGMENT ANTI ALIASING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Febriliyan Samopa

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Rendering is generating surface and three-dimensional effects on an object displayed on a monitor screen. Ray tracing as a rendering method that traces ray for each image pixel has a drawback, that is, aliasing (jaggies effect. There are some methods for executing anti aliasing. One of those methods is OGSS (Ordered Grid Super Sampling. OGSS is able to perform aliasing well. However, this method requires more computation time since sampling of all pixels in the image will be increased. Fragment Anti Aliasing (FAA is a new alternative method that can cope with the drawback. FAA will check the image when performing rendering to a scene. Jaggies effect is only happened at curve and gradient object. Therefore, only this part of object that will experience sampling magnification. After this sampling magnification and the pixel values are computed, then downsample is performed to retrieve the original pixel values. Experimental results show that the software can implement ray tracing well in order to form images, and it can implement FAA and OGSS technique to perform anti aliasing. In general, rendering using FAA is faster than using OGSS

  3. Development of an integrated, in-situ remediation technology. Topical report for task No. 9. Part I. TCE degradation using nonbiological methods, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, A.P.; Sivavec, T.M.; Baghel, S.S. [General Electric Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Contamination in low-permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge for in situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low-permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. The technology is an integrated in situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electro-osmosis is used to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. The present Draft Topical Report for Task No. 9 summarizes laboratory investigations into TCE degradation using nonbiological methods. These studies were conducted by the General Electric Company. The report concentrates on zero valent iron as the reducing agent and presents data on TCE and daughter product degradation rates in batch experiments, column studies, and electroosmotic cells. It is shown that zero valent iron effectively degrades TCE in electroosmotic experiments. Daughter product degradation and gas generation are shown to be important factors in designing field scale treatment zones for the Lasagna{trademark} process.

  4. Development of an integrated, in-situ remediation technology: Task 1 -- Evaluation of treatment zone formation options. Topical report, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoemaker, S.H.; Landis, R.C.; Griffith, R.J.; Schultz, D.S. [Monsanto Co., St. Louis, MO (United States); Quinton, G.E. [E.I. duPont de Nemours and Co., Inc., Wilmington, DE (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Contamination in low permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. The technology is an integrated in-situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electro-osmosis is utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. This topical report presents the results of evaluations by E.I. duPont de Nemours and Co., Inc. of treatment zone and electrode emplacement alternatives for use in the integrated treatment process. Specifically, the scope of this study was limited to vertical configuration emplacements. Several promising alternatives were identified ranging from approaches involving standard excavation techniques to relatively specialized geotechnical construction methods which could be modified for the treatment zone emplacement purpose. Information developed in this report is designed to help the user select the most promising emplacement method(s) for a given site on the basis of (1) depth of emplacement, and (2) restrictions on handling excavated soils. Advantages, disadvantages, and estimated costs are identified for each alternative, and possible bases for improvement and cost reduction through further development are described.

  5. Automatic Image-Based Pencil Sketch Rendering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王进; 鲍虎军; 周伟华; 彭群生; 徐迎庆

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an automatic image-based approach for converting greyscale images to pencil sketches, in which strokes follow the image features. The algorithm first extracts a dense direction field automatically using Logical/Linear operators which embody the drawing mechanism. Next, a reconstruction approach based on a sampling-and-interpolation scheme is introduced to generate stroke paths from the direction field. Finally, pencil strokes are rendered along the specified paths with consideration of image tone and artificial illumination.As an important application, the technique is applied to render portraits from images with little user interaction. The experimental results demonstrate that the approach can automatically achieve compelling pencil sketches from reference images.

  6. Anti-Aliased Rendering of Water Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Ying Qin; Eihachiro Nakamae; Wei Hua; Yasuo Nagai; Qun-Sheng Peng

    2004-01-01

    Water surface is one of the most important components of landscape scenes. When rendering spacious far from the viewpoint. This is because water surface consists of stochastic water waves which are usually modeled by periodic bump mapping. The incident rays on the water surface are actually scattered by the bumped waves,pattern, we estimate this solid angle of reflected rays and trace these rays. An image-based accelerating method is adopted so that the contribution of each reflected ray can be quickly obtained without elaborate intersection calculation. We also demonstrate anti-aliased shadows of sunlight and skylight on the water surface. Both the rendered images and animations show excellent effects on the water surface of a reservoir.

  7. Optimization techniques for computationally expensive rendering algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Navarro Gil, Fernando; Gutiérrez Pérez, Diego; Serón Arbeloa, Francisco José

    2012-01-01

    Realistic rendering in computer graphics simulates the interactions of light and surfaces. While many accurate models for surface reflection and lighting, including solid surfaces and participating media have been described; most of them rely on intensive computation. Common practices such as adding constraints and assumptions can increase performance. However, they may compromise the quality of the resulting images or the variety of phenomena that can be accurately represented. In this thesi...

  8. Visualization of Medpor implants using surface rendering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Meng; GUI Lai; LIU Xiao-jing

    2011-01-01

    Background The Medpor surgical implant is one of the easiest implants in clinical practice, especially in craniomaxillofacial surgery. It is often used as a bone substitute material for the repair of skull defects and facial deformities. The Medpor implant has several advantages but its use is limited because it is radiolucent in both direct radiography and conventional computed tomography, causing serious problems with visualization.Methods In this study, a new technique for visualizing Medpor implants was evaluated in 10 patients who had undergone facial reconstruction using the material. Continuous volume scans were made using a 16-channel tomographic scanner and 3D reconstruction software was used to create surface renderings. The threshold values for surface renderings of the implant ranged from -70 HU to -20 HU, with bone as the default.Results The shape of the implants and the spatial relationship between bone and implant could both be displayed.Conclusion Surface rendering can allow successful visualization of Medpor implants in the body.

  9. In situ chemical degradation of DNAPLS in contaminated soils and sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, D.D.; Korte, N.E.; Siegrist, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    An emerging approach to in situ treatment of organic contaminants is chemical degradation. The specific processes discussed in this chapter are in situ chemical oxidation using either hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) or potassium permanganate (KMnO{sub 4}) and in situ dechlorination of halogenated hydrocarbons using zero-valence base metals such as iron. These technologies are primarily chemical treatment processes, where the treatment goal is to manipulate the chemistry of the subsurface environment in such a manner that the contaminants of interest are destroyed and/or rendered non-toxic. Chemical properties that can be altered include pH, ionic strength, oxidation and reduction potential, and chemical equilibria. In situ contaminant destruction processes alter or destroy contaminants in place and are typically applied to compounds that can be either converted to innocuous species such as CO{sub 2} and water, or can be degraded to species that are non-toxic or amenable to other in situ processes (i.e., bioremediation). With in situ chemical oxidation, the delivery and distribution of chemical reagents are critical to process effectiveness. In contrast, published approaches for the use of zero valence base metals suggest passive approaches in which the metals are used in a permeable reaction wall installed in situ in the saturated zone. Both types of processes are receiving increasing attention and are being applied both in technology demonstration and as final solutions to subsurface contaminant problems. 43 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Testicular carcinoma in situ in subfertile Danish men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Inge A; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Skakkebaek, Niels E

    2007-01-01

    Carcinoma in situ (CIS) testis is the precursor stage for the majority of testicular germ cell tumours (TGCT). Infertility is one of the conditions known to predispose to TGCT, but based on scarce existing data, the prevalence of CIS in this risk group was estimated at only approximately 1...

  11. Crystal Transformation of Nylon 11 Using in situ WAXD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    a Form Nylon 11 films were found to exist a non-linear transformation at 70oC during the heating process using in situ WAXD. The a Form disappeared but d form appeared when the temperature was higher 70℃.

  12. Ultrasensitive in situ visualization of active glucocerebrosidase molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, Martin D.; Kallemeijn, Wouter W.; Aten, Jan; Li, Kah-Yee; Strijland, Anneke; Donker-Koopman, Wilma E.; Nieuwendijk, Adrianus M.C.H. van den; Bleijlevens, Boris; Kramer, Gertjan; Florea, Bogdan I.; Hooibrink, Berend; Hollak, Carla E.M.; Ottenhoff, Roelof; Boot, Rolf G.; Marel, Gijsbert A. van der; Overkleeft, Herman S.; Aerts, Johannes M.F.G.

    2010-01-01

    Deficiency of glucocerebrosidase (GBA) underlies Gaucher disease, a common lysosomal storage disorder. Carriership for Gaucher disease has recently been identified as major risk for parkinsonism. Presently, no method exists to visualize active GBA molecules in situ. We here report the design, synthe

  13. In situ vadose zone bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhener, Patrick; Ponsin, Violaine

    2014-06-01

    Contamination of the vadose zone with various pollutants is a world-wide problem, and often technical or economic constraints impose remediation without excavation. In situ bioremediation in the vadose zone by bioventing has become a standard remediation technology for light spilled petroleum products. In this review, focus is given on new in situ bioremediation strategies in the vadose zone targeting a variety of other pollutants such as perchlorate, nitrate, uranium, chromium, halogenated solvents, explosives and pesticides. The techniques for biostimulation of either oxidative or reductive degradation pathways are presented, and biotransformations to immobile pollutants are discussed in cases of non-degradable pollutants. Furthermore, research on natural attenuation in the vadose zone is presented.

  14. In Situ TEM Electrical Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canepa, Silvia; Alam, Sardar Bilal; Ngo, Duc-The

    2016-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) offers high spatial and temporal resolution that provides unique information for understanding the function and properties of nanostructures on their characteristic length scales. Under controlled environmental conditions and with the ability to dynamically...... influence the sample by external stimuli, e.g. through electrical connections, the TEM becomes a powerful laboratory for performing quantitative real time in situ experiments. Such TEM setups enable the characterization of nanostructures and nanodevices under working conditions, thereby providing a deeper...... materials and devices with the specimen being contacted by electrical, mechanical or other means, with emphasis on in situ electrical measurements performed in a gaseous or liquid environment. We will describe the challenges and prospects of electrical characterization of devices and processes induced...

  15. Oldest biliary endoprosthesis in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolo, Pierluigi; Scalisi, Giuseppe; Crinò, Stefano F; Tortora, Andrea; Giacobbe, Giuseppa; Cintolo, Marcello; Familiari, Luigi; Pallio, Socrate

    2013-01-01

    The advantages of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography over open surgery have made it the predominant method of treating patients with choledocholithiasis. After sphincterotomy, however, 10%-15% of common bile duct stones cannot be removed with a basket or balloon. The methods for managing “irretrievable stones” include surgery, mechanical lithotripsy, intraductal or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and biliary stenting. The case presented was a referred 82-year-old Caucasian woman with a 7-year-old plastic biliary endoprosthesis in situ. To the best of our knowledge the examined endoprosthesis is the oldest endoprosthesis in situ reported in the literature. Endoscopic biliary endoprosthesis placement remains a simple and safe procedure for patients with stones that are difficult to manage by conventional endoscopic methods and for patients who are unfit for surgery or who are high surgical risks. To date no consensus has been reached regarding how long a biliary prosthesis should remain in situ. Long-term biliary stenting may have a role in selected elderly patients if stones extraction has failed because the procedure may prevent stones impaction and cholangitis. PMID:23858381

  16. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumhansl, James Lee; Beauheim, Richard Louis; Brady, Patrick Vane; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2009-05-01

    Expansion of uranium mining in the United States is a concern to some environmental groups and sovereign Native American Nations. An approach which may alleviate some problems is to develop inherently safe in situ uranium recovery ('ISR') technologies. Current ISR technology relies on chemical extraction of trace levels of uranium from aquifers that, once mined, can still contain dissolved uranium and other trace metals that are a health concern. Existing ISR operations are few in number; however, high uranium prices are driving the industry to consider expanding operations nation-wide. Environmental concerns and enforcement of the new 30 ppb uranium drinking water standard may make opening new mining operations more difficult and costly. Here we propose a technological fix: the development of inherently safe in situ recovery (ISISR) methods. The four central features of an ISISR approach are: (1) New 'green' leachants that break down predictably in the subsurface, leaving uranium, and associated trace metals, in an immobile form; (2) Post-leachant uranium/metals-immobilizing washes that provide a backup decontamination process; (3) An optimized well-field design that increases uranium recovery efficiency and minimizes excursions of contaminated water; and (4) A combined hydrologic/geochemical protocol for designing low-cost post-extraction long-term monitoring. ISISR would bring larger amounts of uranium to the surface, leave fewer toxic metals in the aquifer, and cost less to monitor safely - thus providing a 'win-win-win' solution to all stakeholders.

  17. GPU Pro 4 advanced rendering techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Engel, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    GPU Pro4: Advanced Rendering Techniques presents ready-to-use ideas and procedures that can help solve many of your day-to-day graphics programming challenges. Focusing on interactive media and games, the book covers up-to-date methods producing real-time graphics. Section editors Wolfgang Engel, Christopher Oat, Carsten Dachsbacher, Michal Valient, Wessam Bahnassi, and Sebastien St-Laurent have once again assembled a high-quality collection of cutting-edge techniques for advanced graphics processing unit (GPU) programming. Divided into six sections, the book begins with discussions on the abi

  18. Haptic rendering foundations, algorithms, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Ming C

    2008-01-01

    For a long time, human beings have dreamed of a virtual world where it is possible to interact with synthetic entities as if they were real. It has been shown that the ability to touch virtual objects increases the sense of presence in virtual environments. This book provides an authoritative overview of state-of-theart haptic rendering algorithms and their applications. The authors examine various approaches and techniques for designing touch-enabled interfaces for a number of applications, including medical training, model design, and maintainability analysis for virtual prototyping, scienti

  19. GPU PRO 3 Advanced rendering techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Engel, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    GPU Pro3, the third volume in the GPU Pro book series, offers practical tips and techniques for creating real-time graphics that are useful to beginners and seasoned game and graphics programmers alike. Section editors Wolfgang Engel, Christopher Oat, Carsten Dachsbacher, Wessam Bahnassi, and Sebastien St-Laurent have once again brought together a high-quality collection of cutting-edge techniques for advanced GPU programming. With contributions by more than 50 experts, GPU Pro3: Advanced Rendering Techniques covers battle-tested tips and tricks for creating interesting geometry, realistic sha

  20. Defects of organization in rendering medical aid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shavkat Islamov

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The defects of organization at the medical institution mean disturbance of rules, norms and order of rendering of medical aid. The number of organization defects in Uzbekistan increased from 20.42%, in 1999 to 25.46% in 2001 with gradual decrease to 19.9% in 2003 and 16.66%, in 2006 and gradual increase to 21.95% and 28.28% (P<0.05 in 2005 and 2008. Among the groups of essential defects of organization there were following: disturbance of transportation rules, lack of dispensary care, shortcomings in keeping medical documentation.

  1. Noise canceling in-situ detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, David O.

    2014-08-26

    Technologies applicable to noise canceling in-situ NMR detection and imaging are disclosed. An example noise canceling in-situ NMR detection apparatus may comprise one or more of a static magnetic field generator, an alternating magnetic field generator, an in-situ NMR detection device, an auxiliary noise detection device, and a computer.

  2. In situ vitrification: application analysis for stabilization of transuranic waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oma, K.H.; Farnsworth, R.K.; Rusin, J.M.

    1982-09-01

    The in situ vitrification process builds upon the electric melter technology previously developed for high-level waste immobilization. In situ vitrification converts buried wastes and contaminated soil to an extremely durable glass and crystalline waste form by melting the materials, in place, using joule heating. Once the waste materials have been solidified, the high integrity waste form should not cause future ground subsidence. Environmental transport of the waste due to water or wind erosion, and plant or animal intrusion, is minimized. Environmental studies are currently being conducted to determine whether additional stabilization is required for certain in-ground transuranic waste sites. An applications analysis has been performed to identify several in situ vitrification process limitations which may exist at transuranic waste sites. Based on the process limit analysis, in situ vitrification is well suited for solidification of most in-ground transuranic wastes. The process is best suited for liquid disposal sites. A site-specific performance analysis, based on safety, health, environmental, and economic assessments, will be required to determine for which sites in situ vitrification is an acceptable disposal technique. Process economics of in situ vitrification compare favorably with other in-situ solidification processes and are an order of magnitude less than the costs for exhumation and disposal in a repository. Leachability of the vitrified product compares closely with that of Pyrex glass and is significantly better than granite, marble, or bottle glass. Total release to the environment from a vitrified waste site is estimated to be less than 10/sup -5/ parts per year. 32 figures, 30 tables.

  3. A Multiresolution Image Cache for Volume Rendering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaMar, E; Pascucci, V

    2003-02-27

    The authors discuss the techniques and implementation details of the shared-memory image caching system for volume visualization and iso-surface rendering. One of the goals of the system is to decouple image generation from image display. This is done by maintaining a set of impostors for interactive display while the production of the impostor imagery is performed by a set of parallel, background processes. The system introduces a caching basis that is free of the gap/overlap artifacts of earlier caching techniques. instead of placing impostors at fixed, pre-defined positions in world space, the technique is to adaptively place impostors relative to the camera viewpoint. The positions translate with the camera but stay aligned to the data; i.e., the positions translate, but do not rotate, with the camera. The viewing transformation is factored into a translation transformation and a rotation transformation. The impostor imagery is generated using just the translation transformation and visible impostors are displayed using just the rotation transformation. Displayed image quality is improved by increasing the number of impostors and the frequency that impostors are re-rendering is improved by decreasing the number of impostors.

  4. Rendering of 3D Dynamic Virtual Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Catanese, Salvatore; Fiumara, Giacomo; Pagano, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a framework for the rendering of dynamic 3D virtual environments which can be integrated in the development of videogames. It includes methods to manage sounds and particle effects, paged static geometries, the support of a physics engine and various input systems. It has been designed with a modular structure to allow future expansions. We exploited some open-source state-of-the-art components such as OGRE, PhysX, ParticleUniverse, etc.; all of them have been properly integrated to obtain peculiar physical and environmental effects. The stand-alone version of the application is fully compatible with Direct3D and OpenGL APIs and adopts OpenAL APIs to manage audio cards. Concluding, we devised a showcase demo which reproduces a dynamic 3D environment, including some particular effects: the alternation of day and night infuencing the lighting of the scene, the rendering of terrain, water and vegetation, the reproduction of sounds and atmospheric agents.

  5. Master of Puppets: Cooperative Multitasking for In Situ Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozov, Dmitriy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lukic, Zarija [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Modern scientific and engineering simulations track the time evolution of billions of elements. For such large runs, storing most time steps for later analysis is not a viable strategy. It is far more efficient to analyze the simulation data while it is still in memory. Here, we present a novel design for running multiple codes in situ: using coroutines and position-independent executables we enable cooperative multitasking between simulation and analysis, allowing the same executables to post-process simulation output, as well as to process it on the fly, both in situ and in transit. We present Henson, an implementation of our design, and illustrate its versatility by tackling analysis tasks with different computational requirements. This design differs significantly from the existing frameworks and offers an efficient and robust approach to integrating multiple codes on modern supercomputers. The techniques we present can also be integrated into other in situ frameworks.

  6. Silver-cotton nanocomposite via in-situ synthesis of silver nanoparticles in self-controlling microfibrillar reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are effective antimicrobial agents, but their application on the surface of a fiber renders them ineffective because Ag NPs are washable. In this study, a stable, non-leaching Ag-cotton nanocomposite was produced by the in-situ formation of Ag NPs in the microfibrillar ...

  7. Development of an integrated in-situ remediation technology. Topical report for task No. 12 and 13 entitled: Large scale field test of the Lasagna{trademark} process, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athmer, C.J.; Ho, Sa V.; Hughes, B.M. [and others

    1997-04-01

    Contamination in low permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. This technology is an integrated in-situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to instant degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electroosmosis is utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. This topical report summarizes the results of the field experiment conducted at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, KY. The test site covered 15 feet wide by 10 feet across and 15 feet deep with steel panels as electrodes and wickdrains containing granular activated carbon as treatment zone& The electrodes and treatment zones were installed utilizing innovative adaptation of existing emplacement technologies. The unit was operated for four months, flushing TCE by electroosmosis from the soil into the treatment zones where it was trapped by the activated carbon. The scale up from laboratory units to this field scale was very successful with respect to electrical parameters as weft as electroosmotic flow. Soil samples taken throughout the site before and after the test showed over 98% TCE removal, with most samples showing greater than 99% removal.

  8. Photon Differential Splatting for Rendering Caustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Schjøth, Lars; Erleben, Kenny;

    2014-01-01

    We present a photon splatting technique which reduces noise and blur in the rendering of caustics. Blurring of illumination edges is an inherent problem in photon splatting, as each photon is unaware of its neighbours when being splatted. This means that the splat size is usually based...... on heuristics rather than knowledge of the local flux density. We use photon differentials to determine the size and shape of the splats such that we achieve adaptive anisotropic flux density estimation in photon splatting. As compared to previous work that uses photon differentials, we present the first method...... where no photons or beams or differentials need to be stored in a map. We also present improvements in the theory of photon differentials, which give more accurate results and a faster implementation. Our technique has good potential for GPU acceleration, and we limit the number of parameters requiring...

  9. Immersive volume rendering of blood vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Gregory; Kim, Han Suk; Marsden, Alison; Bazilevs, Yuri; Schulze, Jürgen P.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method of visualizing flow in blood vessels. Our approach reads unstructured tetrahedral data, resamples it, and uses slice based 3D texture volume rendering. Due to the sparse structure of blood vessels, we utilize an octree to efficiently store the resampled data by discarding empty regions of the volume. We use animation to convey time series data, wireframe surface to give structure, and utilize the StarCAVE, a 3D virtual reality environment, to add a fully immersive element to the visualization. Our tool has great value in interdisciplinary work, helping scientists collaborate with clinicians, by improving the understanding of blood flow simulations. Full immersion in the flow field allows for a more intuitive understanding of the flow phenomena, and can be a great help to medical experts for treatment planning.

  10. Constructing And Rendering Vectorised Photographic Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Willis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We address the problem of representing captured images in the continuous mathematical space more usually associated with certain forms of drawn ('vector' images. Such an image is resolution-independent so can be used as a master for varying resolution-specific formats. We briefly describe the main features of a vectorising codec for photographic images, whose significance is that drawing programs can access images and image components as first-class vector objects. This paper focuses on the problem of rendering from the isochromic contour form of a vectorised image and demonstrates a new fill algorithm which could also be used in drawing generally. The fill method is described in terms of level set diffusion equations for clarity. Finally we show that image warping is both simplified and enhanced in the vector form and that we can demonstrate real histogram equalisation with genuinely rectangular histograms straightforwardly.

  11. Resolution-independent surface rendering using programmable graphics hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loop, Charles T.; Blinn, James Frederick

    2008-12-16

    Surfaces defined by a Bezier tetrahedron, and in particular quadric surfaces, are rendered on programmable graphics hardware. Pixels are rendered through triangular sides of the tetrahedra and locations on the shapes, as well as surface normals for lighting evaluations, are computed using pixel shader computations. Additionally, vertex shaders are used to aid interpolation over a small number of values as input to the pixel shaders. Through this, rendering of the surfaces is performed independently of viewing resolution, allowing for advanced level-of-detail management. By individually rendering tetrahedrally-defined surfaces which together form complex shapes, the complex shapes can be rendered in their entirety.

  12. Guidesonde: Targeting meteorological dropsonde with optical and in-situ sensors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There exists a programmatic need across several government agencies for both UAV and manned aircraft to be able to deploy in-situ observation sensors within areas of...

  13. Efficient and Effective Volume Visualization with Enhanced Isosurface Rendering

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Fei; Tian, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Compared with full volume rendering, isosurface rendering has several well recognized advantages in efficiency and accuracy. However, standard isosurface rendering has some limitations in effectiveness. First, it uses a monotone colored approach and can only visualize the geometry features of an isosurface. The lack of the capability to illustrate the material property and the internal structures behind an isosurface has been a big limitation of this method in applications. Another limitation of isosurface rendering is the difficulty to reveal physically meaningful structures, which are hidden in one or multiple isosurfaces. As such, the application requirements of extract and recombine structures of interest can not be implemented effectively with isosurface rendering. In this work, we develop an enhanced isosurface rendering technique to improve the effectiveness while maintaining the performance efficiency of the standard isosurface rendering. First, an isosurface color enhancement method is proposed to il...

  14. Compression, Modeling, and Real-Time Rendering of Realistic Materials and Objects

    OpenAIRE

    Menzel, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    The realism of a scene basically depends on the quality of the geometry, the illumination and the materials that are used. Whereas many sources for the creation of three-dimensional geometry exist and numerous algorithms for the approximation of global illumination were presented, the acquisition and rendering of realistic materials remains a challenging problem. Realistic materials are very important in computer graphics, because...

  15. Training for teamwork through in situ simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Asta; Poehlman, Jon; Bollenbacher, John; Riggan, Scott; Davis, Stan; Miller, Kristi; Ivester, Thomas; Kahwati, Leila

    2015-01-01

    In situ simulations allow healthcare teams to practice teamwork and communication as well as clinical management skills in a team's usual work setting with typically available resources and equipment. The purpose of this video is to demonstrate how to plan and conduct in situ simulation training sessions, with particular emphasis on how such training can be used to improve communication and teamwork. The video features an in situ simulation conducted at a labour and delivery unit in response to postpartum hemorrhage. PMID:26294962

  16. The Tensions of In Situ Visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreland, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    In situ visualization is the coupling of visualization software with a simulation or other data producer to process the data "in memory" before the data are offloaded to a storage system. Although in situ visualization provides superior analysis, it has implementation tradeoffs resulting from conflicts with some traditional expected requirements. Numerous conflicting requirements create tensions that lead to difficult implementation tradeoffs. This article takes a look at the most prevailing tensions of in situ visualization.

  17. The SENSEI Generic In Situ Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayachit, Utkarsh [Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States); Whitlock, Brad [Intelligent Light, Rutherford, NJ (United States); Wolf, Matthew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Loring, Burlen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Geveci, Berk [Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States); Lonie, David [Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States); Bethel, E. Wes [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-04-11

    The SENSEI generic in situ interface is an API that promotes code portability and reusability. From the simulation view, a developer can instrument their code with the SENSEI API and then make make use of any number of in situ infrastructures. From the method view, a developer can write an in situ method using the SENSEI API, then expect it to run in any number of in situ infrastructures, or be invoked directly from a simulation code, with little or no modification. This paper presents the design principles underlying the SENSEI generic interface, along with some simplified coding examples.

  18. Direct volume rendering methods for cell structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martišek, Dalibor; Martišek, Karel

    2012-01-01

    The study of the complicated architecture of cell space structures is an important problem in biology and medical research. Optical cuts of cells produced by confocal microscopes enable two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of observed cells. This paper discuses new possibilities for direct volume rendering of these data. We often encounter 16 or more bit images in confocal microscopy of cells. Most of the information contained in these images is unsubstantial for the human vision. Therefore, it is necessary to use mathematical algorithms for visualization of such images. Present software tools as OpenGL or DirectX run quickly in graphic station with special graphic cards, run very unsatisfactory on PC without these cards and outputs are usually poor for real data. These tools are black boxes for a common user and make it impossible to correct and improve them. With the method proposed, more parameters of the environment can be set, making it possible to apply 3D filters to set the output image sharpness in relation to the noise. The quality of the output is incomparable to the earlier described methods and is worth increasing the computing time. We would like to offer mathematical methods of 3D scalar data visualization describing new algorithms that run on standard PCs very well.

  19. Large-area proportional counter for in situ transuranic measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, K.M.

    1994-12-31

    Improved methods for site characterization are desired for environmental restoration at nuclear facilities. Measurements of transuranics, in particular several isotopes of plutonium, are especially difficult due to the low penetrating nature of the radiations involved, namely, alpha particles and X rays. The effects of attenuation by soil and vegetation generally render direct alpha survey methods useless. For this reason, thin scintillators, such as the FIDLER (field instrument for detection of low-energy radiation) or its more sophisticated successor, the VIOLINIST, that rely on the detection of the L shell X rays (13 to 21 keV) are used for survey work. Semiconductor detectors (germanium and silicon), used singly or in arrays, can be effective, especially for situations where {sup 241}Am (60 keV) is present in the isotropic mix. In principle, in situ spectrometric techniques that have been successfully applied at higher photon energies for the measurement of gamma-emitting radionuclides in the environment can be extended to the X-ray region as well. For situations where {sup 241}Am is not present or its ratio to plutonium is unknown, an alternative detector that we have explored for in situ X-ray spectrometry is a large-area proportional counter (LAPC). These instruments were developed for X-ray astronomical measurements in space and offer the combination of large window area and medium energy resolution. Smaller versions have also been used for lung counting.

  20. Adaptive Performance-Constrained in Situ Visualization of Atmospheic Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorier, Matthieu; Sisneros, Roberto; Bautista Gomez, Leonard; Peterka, Tom; Orf, Leigh; Rahmani, Lokman; Antoniu, Gabriel; Bouge, Luc

    2016-09-12

    While many parallel visualization tools now provide in situ visualization capabilities, the trend has been to feed such tools with large amounts of unprocessed output data and let them render everything at the highest possible resolution. This leads to an increased run time of simulations that still have to complete within a fixed-length job allocation. In this paper, we tackle the challenge of enabling in situ visualization under performance constraints. Our approach shuffles data across processes according to its content and filters out part of it in order to feed a visualization pipeline with only a reorganized subset of the data produced by the simulation. Our framework leverages fast, generic evaluation procedures to score blocks of data, using information theory, statistics, and linear algebra. It monitors its own performance and adapts dynamically to achieve appropriate visual fidelity within predefined performance constraints. Experiments on the Blue Waters supercomputer with the CM1 simulation show that our approach enables a 5 speedup with respect to the initial visualization pipeline and is able to meet performance constraints.

  1. DIRECT VOXEL-PROJECTION FOR VOLUMETRIC DATA RENDERING IN MEDICAL IMAGERY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕忆松; 陈亚珠; 郭玉红

    2002-01-01

    The volumetric rendering of 3-D medical image data is very effective method for communication about radiological studies to clinicians. Algorithms that produce images with artifacts and inaccuracies are not clinically useful. This paper proposed a direct voxel-projection algorithm to implement volumetric data rendering. Using this algorithm, arbitrary volume rotation, transparent and cutaway views are generated satisfactorily. Compared with the existing raytracing methods, it improves the projection image quality greatly. Some experimental results about real medical CT image data demonstrate the advantages and fidelity of the proposed algorithm.

  2. HDlive rendering images of the fetal stomach: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inubashiri, Eisuke; Abe, Kiyotaka; Watanabe, Yukio; Akutagawa, Noriyuki; Kuroki, Katumaru; Sugawara, Masaki; Maeda, Nobuhiko; Minami, Kunihiro; Nomura, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to show reconstruction of the fetal stomach using the HDlive rendering mode in ultrasound. Seventeen healthy singleton fetuses at 18-34 weeks' gestational age were observed using the HDlive rendering mode of ultrasound in utero. In all of the fetuses, we identified specific spatial structures, including macroscopic anatomical features (e.g., the pyrous, cardia, fundus, and great curvature) of the fetal stomach, using the HDlive rendering mode. In particular, HDlive rendering images showed remarkably fine details that appeared as if they were being viewed under an endoscope, with visible rugal folds after 27 weeks' gestational age. Our study suggests that the HDlive rendering mode can be used as an additional method for evaluating the fetal stomach. The HDlive rendering mode shows detailed 3D structural images and anatomically realistic images of the fetal stomach. This technique may be effective in prenatal diagnosis for examining detailed information of fetal organs.

  3. Development of an integrated in-situ remediation technology. Topical report for task No. 11 entitled: Evaluation of TCE contamination before and after the field experiment, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, B.M.; Athmer, C.J.; Sheridan, P.W. [and others

    1997-04-01

    Contamination in low permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. The technology is an integrated in-situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electro-osmosis is utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. The present Topical Report for Task No. 11 summarizes the results of TCE analysis in soil and carbon before and after conducting the field experiment. In addition, a discussion of the TCE material balance demonstrates that the Lasagna{trademark} process is effective in moving TCE from the contaminated soil into carbon treatment zones in the field experiment at DOE`s Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, Kentucky.

  4. In situ vitrification: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, L.L.; Fields, D.E.

    1989-11-01

    The in situ vitrification process (ISV) converts contaminated soils and sludges to a glass and crystalline product. The process appears to be ideally suited for on site treatment of both wet and dry wastes. Basically, the system requires four molybdenum electrodes, an electrical power system for vitrifying the soil, a hood to trap gaseous effluents, an off-gas treatment system, an off-gas cooling system, and a process control station. Mounted in three transportable trailers, the ISV process can be moved from site to site. The process has the potential for treating contaminated soils at most 13 m deep. The ISV project has won a number of outstanding achievement awards. The process has also been patented with exclusive worldwide rights being granted to Battelle Memorial Institute for nonradioactive applications. While federal applications still belong to the Department of Energy, Battelle transferred the rights of ISV for non-federal government, chemical hazardous wastes to a separate corporation in 1989 called Geosafe. This report gives a review of the process including current operational behavior and applications.

  5. Chemically enhanced in situ recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sale, T. [CH2M Hill, Denver, CO (United States); Pitts, M.; Wyatt, K. [Surtek, Inc., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    Chemically enhanced recovery is a promising alternative to current technologies for management of subsurface releases of organic liquids. Through the inclusion of surfactants, solvents, polymers, and/or alkaline agents to a waterflood, the transport of targeted organic compounds can be increased and rates of recovery enhanced. By far, the vast majority of work done in the field of chemically enhanced recovery has been at a laboratory scale. The following text focuses on chemically enhanced recovery from a field application perspective with emphasis given to chlorinated solvents in a low permeability setting. While chlorinated solvents are emphasized, issues discussed are also relevant to organic liquids less dense than water such as petroleum products. Topics reviewed include: (1) Description of technology; (2) General technology considerations; (3) Low permeability media considerations; (4) Cost and reliability considerations; (5) Commercial availability; and (6) Case histories. Through this paper an appreciation is developed of both the potential and limitations of chemically enhanced recovery. Excluded from the scope of this paper is the in situ destruction of organic compounds through processes such as chemical or biological oxidation, chemically enhanced recovery of inorganic compounds, and ex situ soil treatment processes. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Fast combinative volume rendering by indexed data structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙文武; 王文成; 吴恩华

    2001-01-01

    It is beneficial to study the interesting contents in a data set by combining and rendering variouscontents of the data. In this regard, an indexed data structure is proposed to facilitate the reorganization of data so that the contents of the data can be combined conveniently and only the selected contents in the data are processed for rendering. Based on the structure, the cells of different contents can be queued up easily so that the volume rendering can be conducted more accurately and quickly. Experimental results show that the indexed data structure is very efficient in improving combinative volume rendering.

  7. Four Models of In Situ Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musaeus, Peter; Krogh, Kristian; Paltved, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    that there are four fruitful approaches to in situ simulation: (1) In situ simulation informed by reported critical incidents and adverse events from emergency departments (ED) in which team training is about to be conducted to write scenarios. (2) In situ simulation through ethnographic studies at the ED. (3) Using...... prewritten scenarios from the simulation lab and transferring them to in situ simulation. (4) Action research – insider or participant action research to obtain in-depth understanding of team processes to guide scenario design. We evaluate the approach relying on Marks’ et al. taxonomy that posits...... the following processes: Transition processes, Action processes and Interpersonal processes. Design and purpose This abstract suggests four approaches to in situ simulation. A pilot study will evaluate the different approaches in two emergency departments in the Central Region of Denmark. Methods The typology...

  8. Significance of HER2 protein examination in ductal carcinoma in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horimoto, Yoshiya; Tokuda, Emi; Arakawa, Atsushi; Kosaka, Taijiro; Saito, Mitsue; Kasumi, Fujio

    2011-05-15

    HER2 expression is routinely checked in ductal carcinoma in situ, as in invasive ductal carcinoma. However, the effect of HER2 status in ductal carcinoma in situ on the development of malignancy and the significance of overexpression of HER2 are still not clear. We experienced 103 cases that were diagnosed as pure ductal carcinoma in situ from operative specimens in the 2-y period from 2006 to 2007. We examined their HER2 status and other markers. We added 38 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ with small invasive disease 5mm or less in diameter as subjects. We also examined how accurately HER2 status in biopsy specimens predicted the existence of an invasive component. In pure ductal carcinoma in situ, tumors that were comedo type, high grade, or ER negative showed a high frequency of HER2 overexpression. In cases with small invasion, HER2 expression was higher than that in pure ductal carcinoma in situ. Among cases that were diagnosed as ductal carcinoma in situ by biopsy, 28% had invasive disease in operative specimens. In tumors that were palpable, large, or expressed HER2 3+ in biopsy samples, invasive disease was frequently observed in operative specimens. Overexpression of HER2 in ductal carcinoma in situ might not always be necessary for progression to invasive ductal carcinoma. To clarify the significance of HER2 examination in DCIS, further investigations of the potential for invasive ductal carcinoma and the prognosis are still needed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Additive manufacturing for in situ repair of osteochondral defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Daniel L; Lipton, Jeffrey I; Bonassar, Lawrence J; Lipson, Hod, E-mail: dlc44@cornell.ed, E-mail: jil26@cornell.ed, E-mail: lb244@cornell.ed, E-mail: hod.lipson@cornell.ed [Cornell University, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Tissue engineering holds great promise for injury repair and replacement of defective body parts. While a number of techniques exist for creating living biological constructs in vitro, none have been demonstrated for in situ repair. Using novel geometric feedback-based approaches and through development of appropriate printing-material combinations, we demonstrate the in situ repair of both chondral and osteochondral defects that mimic naturally occurring pathologies. A calf femur was mounted in a custom jig and held within a robocasting-based additive manufacturing (AM) system. Two defects were induced: one a cartilage-only representation of a grade IV chondral lesion and the other a two-material bone and cartilage fracture of the femoral condyle. Alginate hydrogel was used for the repair of cartilage; a novel formulation of demineralized bone matrix was used for bone repair. Repair prints for both defects had mean surface errors less than 0.1 mm. For the chondral defect, 42.8 {+-} 2.6% of the surface points had errors that were within a clinically acceptable error range; however, with 1 mm path planning shift, an estimated {approx}75% of surface points could likely fall within the benchmark envelope. For the osteochondral defect, 83.6 {+-} 2.7% of surface points had errors that were within clinically acceptable limits. In addition to implications for minimally invasive AM-based clinical treatments, these proof-of-concept prints are some of the only in situ demonstrations to-date, wherein the substrate geometry was unknown a priori. The work presented herein demonstrates in situ AM, suggests potential biomedical applications and also explores in situ-specific issues, including geometric feedback, material selection and novel path planning techniques.

  10. Realistic Real-Time Outdoor Rendering in Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolivand, Hoshang; Sunar, Mohd Shahrizal

    2014-01-01

    Realistic rendering techniques of outdoor Augmented Reality (AR) has been an attractive topic since the last two decades considering the sizeable amount of publications in computer graphics. Realistic virtual objects in outdoor rendering AR systems require sophisticated effects such as: shadows, daylight and interactions between sky colours and virtual as well as real objects. A few realistic rendering techniques have been designed to overcome this obstacle, most of which are related to non real-time rendering. However, the problem still remains, especially in outdoor rendering. This paper proposed a much newer, unique technique to achieve realistic real-time outdoor rendering, while taking into account the interaction between sky colours and objects in AR systems with respect to shadows in any specific location, date and time. This approach involves three main phases, which cover different outdoor AR rendering requirements. Firstly, sky colour was generated with respect to the position of the sun. Second step involves the shadow generation algorithm, Z-Partitioning: Gaussian and Fog Shadow Maps (Z-GaF Shadow Maps). Lastly, a technique to integrate sky colours and shadows through its effects on virtual objects in the AR system, is introduced. The experimental results reveal that the proposed technique has significantly improved the realism of real-time outdoor AR rendering, thus solving the problem of realistic AR systems. PMID:25268480

  11. Realistic real-time outdoor rendering in augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolivand, Hoshang; Sunar, Mohd Shahrizal

    2014-01-01

    Realistic rendering techniques of outdoor Augmented Reality (AR) has been an attractive topic since the last two decades considering the sizeable amount of publications in computer graphics. Realistic virtual objects in outdoor rendering AR systems require sophisticated effects such as: shadows, daylight and interactions between sky colours and virtual as well as real objects. A few realistic rendering techniques have been designed to overcome this obstacle, most of which are related to non real-time rendering. However, the problem still remains, especially in outdoor rendering. This paper proposed a much newer, unique technique to achieve realistic real-time outdoor rendering, while taking into account the interaction between sky colours and objects in AR systems with respect to shadows in any specific location, date and time. This approach involves three main phases, which cover different outdoor AR rendering requirements. Firstly, sky colour was generated with respect to the position of the sun. Second step involves the shadow generation algorithm, Z-Partitioning: Gaussian and Fog Shadow Maps (Z-GaF Shadow Maps). Lastly, a technique to integrate sky colours and shadows through its effects on virtual objects in the AR system, is introduced. The experimental results reveal that the proposed technique has significantly improved the realism of real-time outdoor AR rendering, thus solving the problem of realistic AR systems.

  12. Method of producing hydrogen, and rendering a contaminated biomass inert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Dennis N [Idaho Falls, ID; Klingler, Kerry M [Idaho Falls, ID; Wilding, Bruce M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-02-23

    A method for rendering a contaminated biomass inert includes providing a first composition, providing a second composition, reacting the first and second compositions together to form an alkaline hydroxide, providing a contaminated biomass feedstock and reacting the alkaline hydroxide with the contaminated biomass feedstock to render the contaminated biomass feedstock inert and further producing hydrogen gas, and a byproduct that includes the first composition.

  13. Realistic real-time outdoor rendering in augmented reality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoshang Kolivand

    Full Text Available Realistic rendering techniques of outdoor Augmented Reality (AR has been an attractive topic since the last two decades considering the sizeable amount of publications in computer graphics. Realistic virtual objects in outdoor rendering AR systems require sophisticated effects such as: shadows, daylight and interactions between sky colours and virtual as well as real objects. A few realistic rendering techniques have been designed to overcome this obstacle, most of which are related to non real-time rendering. However, the problem still remains, especially in outdoor rendering. This paper proposed a much newer, unique technique to achieve realistic real-time outdoor rendering, while taking into account the interaction between sky colours and objects in AR systems with respect to shadows in any specific location, date and time. This approach involves three main phases, which cover different outdoor AR rendering requirements. Firstly, sky colour was generated with respect to the position of the sun. Second step involves the shadow generation algorithm, Z-Partitioning: Gaussian and Fog Shadow Maps (Z-GaF Shadow Maps. Lastly, a technique to integrate sky colours and shadows through its effects on virtual objects in the AR system, is introduced. The experimental results reveal that the proposed technique has significantly improved the realism of real-time outdoor AR rendering, thus solving the problem of realistic AR systems.

  14. 7 CFR 54.15 - Advance information concerning service rendered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advance information concerning service rendered. 54.15... Service § 54.15 Advance information concerning service rendered. Upon request of any applicant, all or any... SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED)...

  15. Local and Global Illumination in the Volume Rendering Integral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Max, N; Chen, M

    2005-10-21

    This article is intended as an update of the major survey by Max [1] on optical models for direct volume rendering. It provides a brief overview of the subject scope covered by [1], and brings recent developments, such as new shadow algorithms and refraction rendering, into the perspective. In particular, we examine three fundamentals aspects of direct volume rendering, namely the volume rendering integral, local illumination models and global illumination models, in a wavelength-independent manner. We review the developments on spectral volume rendering, in which visible light are considered as a form of electromagnetic radiation, optical models are implemented in conjunction with representations of spectral power distribution. This survey can provide a basis for, and encourage, new efforts for developing and using complex illumination models to achieve better realism and perception through optical correctness.

  16. Research of global illumination algorithms rendering in glossy scene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Shuangxue; ZHANG Qiang; ZHOU Dongsheng

    2012-01-01

    In computer graphic (CG), illumination rendering generated realistic effect at virtual scene is amazing. Not only plausible lighting effect is to show the relative position between of the objects, but also to reflect the material of visual appearance of the vir- tual objects. The diffuse-scene rendering reflectance credibility has gradually matured. Global illumination rendering method for the glossy material is still a challenge for the CG research. Because of the shiny materials is highly energy reflection between the com- plex light paths. Whether we trace glossy reflection paths, or use of one-reflection or multi-reflection approximate above complex il- lumination transmission is a difficult working. This paper we gather some commonly used global illumination algorithms recently year and its extension glossy scene improvements. And we introduce the limitation of classical algorithms rendering glossy scene and some extended solution. Finally, we will summarize the illumination rendering for specular scene, there are still some open prob- lems.

  17. Perception-based transparency optimization for direct volume rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ming-Yuen; Wu, Yingcai; Mak, Wai-Ho; Chen, Wei; Qu, Huamin

    2009-01-01

    The semi-transparent nature of direct volume rendered images is useful to depict layered structures in a volume. However, obtaining a semi-transparent result with the layers clearly revealed is difficult and may involve tedious adjustment on opacity and other rendering parameters. Furthermore, the visual quality of layers also depends on various perceptual factors. In this paper, we propose an auto-correction method for enhancing the perceived quality of the semi-transparent layers in direct volume rendered images. We introduce a suite of new measures based on psychological principles to evaluate the perceptual quality of transparent structures in the rendered images. By optimizing rendering parameters within an adaptive and intuitive user interaction process, the quality of the images is enhanced such that specific user requirements can be met. Experimental results on various datasets demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of our method.

  18. A Volume Rendering Algorithm for Sequential 2D Medical Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕忆松; 陈亚珠

    2002-01-01

    Volume rendering of 3D data sets composed of sequential 2D medical images has become an important branch in image processing and computer graphics.To help physicians fully understand deep-seated human organs and focuses(e.g.a tumour)as 3D structures.in this paper,we present a modified volume rendering algorithm to render volumetric data,Using this method.the projection images of structures of interest from different viewing directions can be obtained satisfactorily.By rotating the light source and the observer eyepoint,this method avoids rotates the whole volumetric data in main memory and thus reduces computational complexity and rendering time.Experiments on CT images suggest that the proposed method is useful and efficient for rendering 3D data sets.

  19. Development of an integrated in-situ remediation technology. Topical report for task No. 7 entitled: Development of degradation processes, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brackin, M.J.; Heitkamp, M.A.; Ho, Sa V. [and others

    1997-04-01

    Contamination in low permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to law permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. The Lasagna technology is an integrated in-situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electro-osmosis is utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. The general concept of the technology is to use electrokinetics to move contaminants from the soils into {open_quotes}treatment zones{close_quotes} where the contaminants can be removed from the water by either adsorption or degradation. The focus of technical task No. 7 was to optimize the conditions required for electro-osmotic movement of contaminants and microbial degradation in the treatment zones. This topical report summarizes the results of aerobic microbial research performed to evaluate the feasibility of incorporating the chemical-degrading organisms into biotreatment zones in laboratory-scale electro-osmosis units and to demonstrate the combination of electrokinetics and aerobic microbial degradation for the removal of contaminants from clay. Also included in this report are the results of investigating microbial movement during electro-osmosis and studies involving the optimization of the microbial support matrix in the biozone. The Stanford study was conducted in order to obtain a better understanding of rates of anaerobic reductive dehalogenation of TCE to ethylene and of factors affecting these rates in order to determine the potential for application of TCE biodegradation as part of the Lasagna technology.

  20. In Situ TEM Creation of Nanowire Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Sardar Bilal

    Integration of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) as active components in devices requires that desired mechanical, thermal and electrical interfaces can be established between the nanoscale geometry of the SiNW and the microscale architecture of the device. In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM...... of SiNW were also investigated in situ. SiNWs were grown on silicon microcantilever heaters using the VLS mechanism. When grown across a gap between adjacent cantilevers, contact was formed when the SiNW impinged on the sidewall of an adjacent cantilever. Using in situ TEM, SiNW contact formation...

  1. WikiPrints: rendering enterprise Wiki content for printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkner, Kathrin

    2010-02-01

    Wikis have become a tool of choice for collaborative, informative communication. In contrast to the immense Wikipedia, that serves as a reference web site and typically covers only one topic per web page, enterprise wikis are often used as project management tools and contain several closely related pages authored by members of one project. In that scenario it is useful to print closely related content for review or teaching purposes. In this paper we propose a novel technique for rendering enterprise wiki content for printing called WikiPrints, that creates a linearized version of wiki content formatted as a mixture between web layout and conventional document layout suitable for printing. Compared to existing print options for wiki content, Wikiprints automatically selects content from different wiki pages given user preferences and usage scenarios. Meta data such as content authors or time of content editing are considered. A preview of the linearized content is shown to the user and an interface for making manual formatting changes provided.

  2. Scientific rationale of Saturn's in situ exploration

    CERN Document Server

    Mousis, O; Lebreton, J -P; Wurz, P; Cavalié, T; Coustenis, A; Courtin, R; Gautier, D; Helled, R; Irwin, P G J; Morse, A D; Nettelmann, N; Marty, B; Rousselot, P; Venot, O; Atkinson, D H; Waite, J H; Reh, K R; Simon-Miller, A; Atreya, S; André, N; Blanc, M; Daglis, I A; Fischer, G; Geppert, W D; Guillot, T; Hedman, M M; Hueso, R; Lellouch, E; Lunine, J I; Murray, C D; O'Donoghue, J; Rengel, M; Sanchez-Lavega, A; Schmider, F -X; Spiga, A; Spilker, T; Petit, J -M; Tiscareno, M S; Ali-Dib, M; Altwegg, K; Bouquet, A; Briois, C; Fouchet, T; Guerlet, S; Kostiuk, T; Lebleu, D; Moreno, R; Orton, G S; Poncy, J

    2014-01-01

    Remote sensing observations meet some limitations when used to study the bulk atmospheric composition of the giant planets of our solar system. A remarkable example of the superiority of in situ probe measurements is illustrated by the exploration of Jupiter, where key measurements such as the determination of the noble gases abundances and the precise measurement of the helium mixing ratio have only been made available through in situ measurements by the Galileo probe. This paper describes the main scientific goals to be addressed by the future in situ exploration of Saturn placing the Galileo probe exploration of Jupiter in a broader context and before the future probe exploration of the more remote ice giants. In situ exploration of Saturn's atmosphere addresses two broad themes that are discussed throughout this paper: first, the formation history of our solar system and second, the processes at play in planetary atmospheres. In this context, we detail the reasons why measurements of Saturn's bulk element...

  3. An Interoperable Framework to Access In-Situ OPeNDAP Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.; Yang, C.; Li, Z.; Li, J.; Zhu, H.; Xie, J.

    2008-12-01

    A huge amount of in-situ ocean observation and hydrology related data are made available to scientists through a uniform access interface, the OPeNDAP inteface. However, there are few interoperable clients that support the interface, and existing clients only provide data access to a specific OPeNDAP server rather than employ flexible data access mechanisms. Moreover, current data visualization is limited to 2-D, which is not very intuitive for end users. To overcome the shortcomings, we developed a linkage and a client to provide a compatible and interactive data access and visualization interface for both gridded and sequence data from multiple remote OPeNDAP servers providing NetCDF, HDF5 and other data formats. The system 1) to fully understand the data structures, attributes and knowledge of data from different OPeNDAP servers, semantic technique is employed and a semantic mapping table defining the usage conventions helps parsing the given metadata description files. 2) After selecting the variable, time interval and spatial extent, the request constructor is started to organize the constraint expression for subsetting the datasets. 3) The multi- threading enabled downloading mechanism helps to download the subset datasets in the intermediate format-DODS simultaneously. Once all the datasets are downloaded, an applet based java plug-in is able to support 3-D visualization by rendering the data with extended NASA's World Wind. If the data are in a time sequence, an animation is automatically generated and displayed within World Wind. Meanwhile, a KML file is generated automatically for users to visualize data in Google Earth.

  4. Observatory Magnetometer In-Situ Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Marusenkov

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available An experimental validation of the in-situ calibration procedure, which allows estimating parameters of observatory magnetometers (scale factors, sensor misalignment without its operation interruption, is presented. In order to control the validity of the procedure, the records provided by two magnetometers calibrated independently in a coil system have been processed. The in-situ estimations of the parameters are in very good agreement with the values provided by the coil system calibration.

  5. In-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Jose A; Chupas, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Helps researchers develop new catalysts for sustainable fuel and chemical production Reviewing the latest developments in the field, this book explores the in-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts, enabling readers to take full advantage of the sophisticated techniques used to study heterogeneous catalysts and reaction mechanisms. In using these techniques, readers can learn to improve the selectivity and the performance of catalysts and how to prepare catalysts as efficiently as possible, with minimum waste. In-situ Characterization of Heterogeneous Catalysts feat

  6. In situ and in-transit analysis of cosmological simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Brian; Almgren, Ann; Lukić, Zarija; Weber, Gunther; Morozov, Dmitriy; Beckner, Vincent; Day, Marcus

    2016-08-01

    Modern cosmological simulations have reached the trillion-element scale, rendering data storage and subsequent analysis formidable tasks. To address this circumstance, we present a new MPI-parallel approach for analysis of simulation data while the simulation runs, as an alternative to the traditional workflow consisting of periodically saving large data sets to disk for subsequent `offline' analysis. We demonstrate this approach in the compressible gasdynamics/ N-body code Nyx, a hybrid MPI+OpenMP code based on the BoxLib framework, used for large-scale cosmological simulations. We have enabled on-the-fly workflows in two different ways: one is a straightforward approach consisting of all MPI processes periodically halting the main simulation and analyzing each component of data that they own (` in situ'). The other consists of partitioning processes into disjoint MPI groups, with one performing the simulation and periodically sending data to the other `sidecar' group, which post-processes it while the simulation continues (`in-transit'). The two groups execute their tasks asynchronously, stopping only to synchronize when a new set of simulation data needs to be analyzed. For both the in situ and in-transit approaches, we experiment with two different analysis suites with distinct performance behavior: one which finds dark matter halos in the simulation using merge trees to calculate the mass contained within iso-density contours, and another which calculates probability distribution functions and power spectra of various fields in the simulation. Both are common analysis tasks for cosmology, and both result in summary statistics significantly smaller than the original data set. We study the behavior of each type of analysis in each workflow in order to determine the optimal configuration for the different data analysis algorithms.

  7. In situ microcosms in aquifer bioremediation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelbaum, R T; Shati, M R; Ronen, D

    1997-07-01

    The extent to which aquifer microbiota can be studied under laboratory or simulated conditions is limited by our inability to authentically duplicate natural conditions in the laboratory. Therefore, extrapolation of laboratory results to real aquifer situations is often criticized, unless validation of the data is performed in situ. Reliable data acquisition is critical for the estimation of chemical and biological reaction rates of biodegradation processes in groundwater and as input data for mathematical models. Typically, in situ geobiochemical studies relied on the injection of groundwater spiked with compounds or bacteria of interest into the aquifer, followed by monitoring the changes over time and space. In situ microcosms provide a more confined study site for measurements of microbial reactions, yet closer to natural conditions than laboratory microcosms. Two basic types of in situ aquifer microcosm have been described in recent years, and both originated from in situ instruments initially designed for geochemical measurements. Gillham et al. [Ground Water 28 (1990) 858-862] constructed an instrument that isolates a portion of an aquifer for in situ biochemical rate measurements. More recently Shati et al. [Environ. Sci. Technol. 30 (1996) 2646-2653] modified a multilayer sampler for studying the activity of inoculated bacteria in a contaminated aquifer Keeping in mind recent advances in environmental microbiology methodologies such as immunofluorescence direct counts, oligonucleotide and PCR probes, fatty acid methyl esther analysis for the detection and characterization of bacterial communities, measurement of mRNA and expression of proteins, it is evident that much new information can now be gained from in situ work. Using in situ microcosms to study bioremediation efficiencies, the fate of introduced microorganisms and general geobiochemical aquifer processes can shed more realistic light on the microbial underworld. The aim of this paper is to

  8. Switchable Pickering emulsions stabilized by silica nanoparticles hydrophobized in situ with a conventional cationic surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yue; Jiang, Jianzhong; Liu, Kaihong; Cui, Zhenggang; Binks, Bernard P

    2015-03-24

    A stable oil-in-water Pickering emulsion stabilized by negatively charged silica nanoparticles hydrophobized in situ with a trace amount of a conventional cationic surfactant can be rendered unstable on addition of an equimolar amount of an anionic surfactant. The emulsion can be subsequently restabilized by adding a similar trace amount of cationic surfactant along with rehomogenization. This destabilization-stabilization behavior can be cycled many times, demonstrating that the Pickering emulsion is switchable. The trigger is the stronger electrostatic interaction between the oppositely charged ionic surfactants compared with that between the cationic surfactant and the (initially) negatively charged particle surfaces. The cationic surfactant prefers to form ion pairs with the added anionic surfactant and thus desorbs from particle surfaces rendering them surface-inactive. This access to switchable Pickering emulsions is easier than those employing switchable surfactants, polymers, or surface-active particles, avoiding both the complicated synthesis and the stringent switching conditions.

  9. Multiresolution maximum intensity volume rendering by morphological adjunction pyramids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.

    We describe a multiresolution extension to maximum intensity projection (MIP) volume rendering, allowing progressive refinement and perfect reconstruction. The method makes use of morphological adjunction pyramids. The pyramidal analysis and synthesis operators are composed of morphological 3-D

  10. Multiresolution Maximum Intensity Volume Rendering by Morphological Adjunction Pyramids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.

    2001-01-01

    We describe a multiresolution extension to maximum intensity projection (MIP) volume rendering, allowing progressive refinement and perfect reconstruction. The method makes use of morphological adjunction pyramids. The pyramidal analysis and synthesis operators are composed of morphological 3-D

  11. Foggy Scene Rendering Based on Transmission Map Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Realistic rendering of foggy scene is important in game development and virtual reality. Traditional methods have many parameters to control or require a long time to compute, and they are usually limited to depicting a homogeneous fog without considering the foggy scene with heterogeneous fog. In this paper, a new rendering method based on transmission map estimation is proposed. We first generate perlin noise image as the density distribution texture of heterogeneous fog. Then we estimate the transmission map using the Markov random field (MRF model and the bilateral filter. Finally, virtual foggy scene is realistically rendered with the generated perlin noise image and the transmission map according to the atmospheric scattering model. Experimental results show that the rendered results of our approach are quite satisfactory.

  12. Comparison of Morphological Pyramids for Multiresolution MIP Volume Rendering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.

    2002-01-01

    We recently proposed a multiresolution representation for maximum intensity projection (MIP) volume rendering based on morphological adjunction pyramids which allow progressive refinement and have the property of perfect reconstruction. In this algorithm the pyramidal analysis and synthesis

  13. Experiencing "Macbeth": From Text Rendering to Multicultural Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisin, Gail

    1993-01-01

    Shows how one teacher used innovative methods in teaching William Shakespeare's "Macbeth." Outlines student assignments including text renderings, rewriting a scene from the play, and creating a multicultural scrapbook for the play. (HB)

  14. View compensated compression of volume rendered images for remote visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalgudi, Hariharan G; Marcellin, Michael W; Bilgin, Ali; Oh, Han; Nadar, Mariappan S

    2009-07-01

    Remote visualization of volumetric images has gained importance over the past few years in medical and industrial applications. Volume visualization is a computationally intensive process, often requiring hardware acceleration to achieve a real time viewing experience. One remote visualization model that can accomplish this would transmit rendered images from a server, based on viewpoint requests from a client. For constrained server-client bandwidth, an efficient compression scheme is vital for transmitting high quality rendered images. In this paper, we present a new view compensation scheme that utilizes the geometric relationship between viewpoints to exploit the correlation between successive rendered images. The proposed method obviates motion estimation between rendered images, enabling significant reduction to the complexity of a compressor. Additionally, the view compensation scheme, in conjunction with JPEG2000 performs better than AVC, the state of the art video compression standard.

  15. High-quality multi-resolution volume rendering in medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Kai; YANG Jie; LI Xiao-liang

    2007-01-01

    In order to perform a high-quality interactive rendering of large medical data sets on a single off-theshelf PC, a LOD selection algorithm for multi-resolution volume rendering using 3D texture mapping is presented, which uses an adaptive scheme that renders the volume in a region-of-interest at a high resolution and the volume away from this region at lower resolutions. The algorithm is based on several important criteria, and rendering is done adaptively by selecting high-resolution cells close to a center of attention and low-resolution cells away from this area. In addition, our hierarchical level-of-detail representation guarantees consistent interpolation between different resolution levels. Experiments have been applied to a number of large medical data and have produced high quality images at interactive frame rates using standard PC hardware.

  16. Factors affecting extension workers in their rendering of effective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors affecting extension workers in their rendering of effective service to pre ... the objective of achieving sustainable livelihoods for the poor and commonages. ... marketing and management to adequately service the land reform programs.

  17. does knowledge influence their attitude and comfort in rendering care?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kemrilib

    Physicians and AIDS care: does knowledge influence their attitude and comfort in rendering ... experience, age and being a consultant or a senior resident influenced attitude, while male ..... having or not having children, prior instructions on ...

  18. Accelerating Monte Carlo Renderers by Ray Histogram Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Delbracio

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper details the recently introduced Ray Histogram Fusion (RHF filter for accelerating Monte Carlo renderers [M. Delbracio et al., Boosting Monte Carlo Rendering by Ray Histogram Fusion, ACM Transactions on Graphics, 33 (2014]. In this filter, each pixel in the image is characterized by the colors of the rays that reach its surface. Pixels are compared using a statistical distance on the associated ray color distributions. Based on this distance, it decides whether two pixels can share their rays or not. The RHF filter is consistent: as the number of samples increases, more evidence is required to average two pixels. The algorithm provides a significant gain in PSNR, or equivalently accelerates the rendering process by using many fewer Monte Carlo samples without observable bias. Since the RHF filter depends only on the Monte Carlo samples color values, it can be naturally combined with all rendering effects.

  19. A parallel architecture for interactively rendering scattering and refraction effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabei, Daniele; Hakke-Patil, Ajit; Banterle, Francesco; Di Benedetto, Marco; Ganovelli, Fabio; Pattanaik, Sumanta; Scopigno, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    A new method for interactive rendering of complex lighting effects combines two algorithms. The first performs accurate ray tracing in heterogeneous refractive media to compute high-frequency phenomena. The second applies lattice-Boltzmann lighting to account for low-frequency multiple-scattering effects. The two algorithms execute in parallel on modern graphics hardware. This article includes a video animation of the authors' real-time algorithm rendering a variety of scenes.

  20. Wavelet subdivision methods gems for rendering curves and surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Chui, Charles

    2010-01-01

    OVERVIEW Curve representation and drawing Free-form parametric curves From subdivision to basis functions Wavelet subdivision and editing Surface subdivision BASIS FUNCTIONS FOR CURVE REPRESENTATION Refinability and scaling functions Generation of smooth basis functions Cardinal B-splines Stable bases for integer-shift spaces Splines and polynomial reproduction CURVE SUBDIVISION SCHEMES Subdivision matrices and stencils B-spline subdivision schemes Closed curve rendering Open curve rendering BASIS FUNCTIONS GENERATED BY SUBDIVISION MATRICES Subdivision operators The up-sampling convolution ope

  1. A Sort-Last Rendering System over an Optical Backplane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Kirihata

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Sort-Last is a computer graphics technique for rendering extremely large data sets on clusters of computers. Sort-Last works by dividing the data set into even-sized chunks for parallel rendering and then composing the images to form the final result. Since sort-last rendering requires the movement of large amounts of image data among cluster nodes, the network interconnecting the nodes becomes a major bottleneck. In this paper, we describe a sort-last rendering system implemented on a cluster of computers whose nodes are connected by an all-optical switch. The rendering system introduces the notion of the Photonic Computing Engine, a computing system built dynamically by using the optical switch to create dedicated network connections among cluster nodes. The sort-last volume rendering algorithm was implemented on the Photonic Computing Engine, and its performance is evaluated. Prelimi- nary experiments show that performance is affected by the image composition time and average payload size. In an attempt to stabilize the performance of the system, we have designed a flow control mechanism that uses feedback messages to dynamically adjust the data flow rate within the computing engine.

  2. Remote volume rendering pipeline for mHealth applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutenko, Ievgeniia; Petkov, Kaloian; Papadopoulos, Charilaos; Zhao, Xin; Park, Ji Hwan; Kaufman, Arie; Cha, Ronald

    2014-03-01

    We introduce a novel remote volume rendering pipeline for medical visualization targeted for mHealth (mobile health) applications. The necessity of such a pipeline stems from the large size of the medical imaging data produced by current CT and MRI scanners with respect to the complexity of the volumetric rendering algorithms. For example, the resolution of typical CT Angiography (CTA) data easily reaches 512^3 voxels and can exceed 6 gigabytes in size by spanning over the time domain while capturing a beating heart. This explosion in data size makes data transfers to mobile devices challenging, and even when the transfer problem is resolved the rendering performance of the device still remains a bottleneck. To deal with this issue, we propose a thin-client architecture, where the entirety of the data resides on a remote server where the image is rendered and then streamed to the client mobile device. We utilize the display and interaction capabilities of the mobile device, while performing interactive volume rendering on a server capable of handling large datasets. Specifically, upon user interaction the volume is rendered on the server and encoded into an H.264 video stream. H.264 is ubiquitously hardware accelerated, resulting in faster compression and lower power requirements. The choice of low-latency CPU- and GPU-based encoders is particularly important in enabling the interactive nature of our system. We demonstrate a prototype of our framework using various medical datasets on commodity tablet devices.

  3. Fast DRR splat rendering using common consumer graphics hardware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoerk, Jakob; Bergmann, Helmar; Wanschitz, Felix; Dong, Shuo; Birkfellner, Wolfgang

    2007-11-01

    Digitally rendered radiographs (DRR) are a vital part of various medical image processing applications such as 2D/3D registration for patient pose determination in image-guided radiotherapy procedures. This paper presents a technique to accelerate DRR creation by using conventional graphics hardware for the rendering process. DRR computation itself is done by an efficient volume rendering method named wobbled splatting. For programming the graphics hardware, NVIDIAs C for Graphics (Cg) is used. The description of an algorithm used for rendering DRRs on the graphics hardware is presented, together with a benchmark comparing this technique to a CPU-based wobbled splatting program. Results show a reduction of rendering time by about 70%-90% depending on the amount of data. For instance, rendering a volume of 2 x 10(6) voxels is feasible at an update rate of 38 Hz compared to 6 Hz on a common Intel-based PC using the graphics processing unit (GPU) of a conventional graphics adapter. In addition, wobbled splatting using graphics hardware for DRR computation provides higher resolution DRRs with comparable image quality due to special processing characteristics of the GPU. We conclude that DRR generation on common graphics hardware using the freely available Cg environment is a major step toward 2D/3D registration in clinical routine.

  4. In situ fabrication and investigation of nanostructures and nanodevices with a microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Li, Huiqiao; Gan, Lin; Ma, Ying; Golberg, Dmitri; Zhai, Tianyou

    2016-05-07

    The widespread availability of nanostructures and nanodevices has placed strict requirements on their comprehensive characterization. Herein, in situ techniques are demonstrated to have created a rare opportunity to accurately analyze the intrinsic properties of individual nanostructures and to accomplish the smart design of nanodevices made from these nanostructures. This paper reviews recent developments in in situ fabrication and characterization technologies established within various types of microscopes and the rich information they may provide. The in situ techniques are shown to be important for exploration of many intriguing phenomena at the nanoscale which may then be followed by the smart integration of nanostructures into real functional devices. Successful in situ detection results are presented and discussed, especially in the areas of energy generation, biological imaging and water pumping. Finally, we conclude this article with an examination of the existing challenges and the outlook for this quickly emerging field.

  5. FluoRender: joint freehand segmentation and visualization for many-channel fluorescence data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yong; Otsuna, Hideo; Holman, Holly A; Bagley, Brig; Ito, Masayoshi; Lewis, A Kelsey; Colasanto, Mary; Kardon, Gabrielle; Ito, Kei; Hansen, Charles

    2017-05-26

    Image segmentation and registration techniques have enabled biologists to place large amounts of volume data from fluorescence microscopy, morphed three-dimensionally, onto a common spatial frame. Existing tools built on volume visualization pipelines for single channel or red-green-blue (RGB) channels have become inadequate for the new challenges of fluorescence microscopy. For a three-dimensional atlas of the insect nervous system, hundreds of volume channels are rendered simultaneously, whereas fluorescence intensity values from each channel need to be preserved for versatile adjustment and analysis. Although several existing tools have incorporated support of multichannel data using various strategies, the lack of a flexible design has made true many-channel visualization and analysis unavailable. The most common practice for many-channel volume data presentation is still converting and rendering pseudosurfaces, which are inaccurate for both qualitative and quantitative evaluations. Here, we present an alternative design strategy that accommodates the visualization and analysis of about 100 volume channels, each of which can be interactively adjusted, selected, and segmented using freehand tools. Our multichannel visualization includes a multilevel streaming pipeline plus a triple-buffer compositing technique. Our method also preserves original fluorescence intensity values on graphics hardware, a crucial feature that allows graphics-processing-unit (GPU)-based processing for interactive data analysis, such as freehand segmentation. We have implemented the design strategies as a thorough restructuring of our original tool, FluoRender. The redesign of FluoRender not only maintains the existing multichannel capabilities for a greatly extended number of volume channels, but also enables new analysis functions for many-channel data from emerging biomedical-imaging techniques.

  6. MENDING THE IN SITU MANIPULATION BARRIER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN, S.W.

    2006-02-06

    In early 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland and Fluor Hanford requested technical assistance from the DOE Headquarters EM-23 Technical Assistance Program to provide a team of technical experts to develop recommendations for mending the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) Barrier in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site in Washington State. To accommodate this request, EM-23 provided support to convene a group of technical experts from industry, a national laboratory, and a DOE site to participate in a 2 1/2-day workshop with the objective of identifying and recommending options to enhance the performance of the 100-D Area reactive barrier and of a planned extension to the northeast. This report provides written documentation of the team's findings and recommendations. In 1995, a plume of dissolved hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], which resulted from operation of the D/DR Reactors at the Hanford site, was discovered along the Columbia River shoreline and in the 100-D Area. Between 1999 and 2003, a reactive barrier using the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) technology, was installed a distance of 680 meters along the river to reduce the Cr(VI) in the groundwater. The ISRM technology creates a treatment zone within the aquifer by injection of sodium dithionite, a strong reducing agent that scavenges dissolved oxygen (DO) from the aquifer and reduces ferric iron [Fe(III)], related metals, and oxy-ions. The reduction of Fe(III) to ferrous [Fe(II)] iron provides the primary reduction capacity to reduce Cr(VI) to the +3 state, which is less mobile and less toxic. Bench-scale and field-scale treatability tests were initially conducted to demonstrate proof-of principle and to provide data for estimation of barrier longevity. These calculations estimated barrier longevity in excess of twenty years. However, several years after initial and secondary treatment, groundwater in a number of wells has been found to contain elevated chromium (Cr) concentrations

  7. MENDING THE IN SITU MANIPULATION BARRIER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN, S.W.

    2006-02-06

    In early 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland and Fluor Hanford requested technical assistance from the DOE Headquarters EM-23 Technical Assistance Program to provide a team of technical experts to develop recommendations for mending the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) Barrier in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site in Washington State. To accommodate this request, EM-23 provided support to convene a group of technical experts from industry, a national laboratory, and a DOE site to participate in a 2 1/2-day workshop with the objective of identifying and recommending options to enhance the performance of the 100-D Area reactive barrier and of a planned extension to the northeast. This report provides written documentation of the team's findings and recommendations. In 1995, a plume of dissolved hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], which resulted from operation of the D/DR Reactors at the Hanford site, was discovered along the Columbia River shoreline and in the 100-D Area. Between 1999 and 2003, a reactive barrier using the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) technology, was installed a distance of 680 meters along the river to reduce the Cr(VI) in the groundwater. The ISRM technology creates a treatment zone within the aquifer by injection of sodium dithionite, a strong reducing agent that scavenges dissolved oxygen (DO) from the aquifer and reduces ferric iron [Fe(III)], related metals, and oxy-ions. The reduction of Fe(III) to ferrous [Fe(II)] iron provides the primary reduction capacity to reduce Cr(VI) to the +3 state, which is less mobile and less toxic. Bench-scale and field-scale treatability tests were initially conducted to demonstrate proof-of principle and to provide data for estimation of barrier longevity. These calculations estimated barrier longevity in excess of twenty years. However, several years after initial and secondary treatment, groundwater in a number of wells has been found to contain elevated chromium (Cr) concentrations

  8. In situ macromolecular crystallography using microbeams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L; Aishima, Jun; Foadi, James; Morgan, Ann W; Robinson, James I; Nettleship, Joanne E; Owens, Raymond J; Moraes, Isabel; Fry, Elizabeth E; Grimes, Jonathan M; Harlos, Karl; Kotecha, Abhay; Ren, Jingshan; Sutton, Geoff; Walter, Thomas S; Stuart, David I; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2012-05-01

    Despite significant progress in high-throughput methods in macromolecular crystallography, the production of diffraction-quality crystals remains a major bottleneck. By recording diffraction in situ from crystals in their crystallization plates at room temperature, a number of problems associated with crystal handling and cryoprotection can be side-stepped. Using a dedicated goniometer installed on the microfocus macromolecular crystallography beamline I24 at Diamond Light Source, crystals have been studied in situ with an intense and flexible microfocus beam, allowing weakly diffracting samples to be assessed without a manual crystal-handling step but with good signal to noise, despite the background scatter from the plate. A number of case studies are reported: the structure solution of bovine enterovirus 2, crystallization screening of membrane proteins and complexes, and structure solution from crystallization hits produced via a high-throughput pipeline. These demonstrate the potential for in situ data collection and structure solution with microbeams.

  9. In situ viscometry by optical trapping interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzmán, C.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Köszali, R.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate quantitative in situ viscosity measurements by tracking the thermal fluctuations of an optically trapped microsphere subjected to a small oscillatory flow. The measured power spectral density of the sphere's positions displays a characteristic peak at the driving frequency of the f......We demonstrate quantitative in situ viscosity measurements by tracking the thermal fluctuations of an optically trapped microsphere subjected to a small oscillatory flow. The measured power spectral density of the sphere's positions displays a characteristic peak at the driving frequency...

  10. In situ ion gun cleaning of surface adsorbates and its effect on electrostatic forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Robert; Xu, Jun; Mohideen, Umar

    2016-01-01

    To obtain precise measurements of the Casimir force, it is crucial to take into account the electrostatic interactions that exist between the two boundaries. Two otherwise grounded conductors will continue to have residual electrostatic effects from patch potentials existing on the surfaces. In this paper, we look at the effect of in situ cleaning of adsorbate patches, and the resultant effect on the net electrostatic potential difference between two surfaces. We find a significant reduction in the residual potential due to in situ Ar+ cleaning for the samples used.

  11. Visions of architecture. Perspective and photographic manipulation from photomontage to rendering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Magagnini

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The submitted article investigates the existence of a philological and semantic continuity between contemporary perspectives made with photorealistic three-dimensional CG techniques and the analogical ones that use photography for the design process. The research, which moves from historical milestones, tracks the purposes of photomontage in architecture, form the first use in art and the in architecture, to the contemporary CG rendering. The goal is not to search for ways to construct architectural objects, but rather to use potential capability of digital design to realize the assertiveness of the image. Another issue is about the role of perspective (and the mastery of descriptive geometry nowadays. In support of the theoretical speculations, some unedited comments by the same authors to the photomontages of Superstudio and to the renderings of Giacomo Costa.

  12. In Situ Flash Pyrolysis of Straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Niels

    In-Situ Flash Pyrolysis of Straw Ph.D. dissertation by Niels Bech Submitted: April 2007. Supervisors: Professor Kim Dam-Johansen, Associate Professor Peter Arendt Jensen Erfaringerne med forbrænding af halm opnået gennem et årti har vist, at en proces der kan koncentrere energien på marken, fjerne...

  13. Treatment options for carcinoma in situ testis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M S; Gundgaard, M.G.; Daugaard, G

    2011-01-01

    Carcinoma in situ testis (CIS) is known as the precursor of germ cell cancer of the testis. International guidelines on diagnosis and treatment are inconsistent. Some countries offer routine biopsies of the contralateral testicle in relation to orchidectomy for testicular cancer, whereas other...

  14. Recent Advances in Fluorescence in situ Hybridization

    OpenAIRE

    吉田, 廸弘; Michihiro C., Yoshida; 北海道大学理学部附属動物染色体研究施設; Chromosome Research Unit, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University

    1992-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedures that directly couple molecular and cytological information allow precise visualization of DNA sequences on metaphase chromosomes and interphase nuclei. These techniques can be used to identify chromosomes, detect chromosomal aberrations, and analyze linear and spetial genome organization. FISH procedures are also used to clinical fields for diagnosis of disease-related chromosome changes and tumor biology.

  15. Clustered deep shadow maps for integrated polyhedral and volume rendering

    KAUST Repository

    Bornik, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a hardware-accelerated approach for shadow computation in scenes containing both complex volumetric objects and polyhedral models. Our system is the first hardware accelerated complete implementation of deep shadow maps, which unifies the computation of volumetric and geometric shadows. Up to now such unified computation was limited to software-only rendering . Previous hardware accelerated techniques can handle only geometric or only volumetric scenes - both resulting in the loss of important properties of the original concept. Our approach supports interactive rendering of polyhedrally bounded volumetric objects on the GPU based on ray casting. The ray casting can be conveniently used for both the shadow map computation and the rendering. We show how anti-aliased high-quality shadows are feasible in scenes composed of multiple overlapping translucent objects, and how sparse scenes can be handled efficiently using clustered deep shadow maps. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  16. Real-Time Rendering of Teeth with No Preprocessing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Christian Thode; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Jensen, Peter Dahl Ejby

    2012-01-01

    We present a technique for real-time rendering of teeth with no need for computational or artistic preprocessing. Teeth constitute a translucent material consisting of several layers; a highly scattering material (dentine) beneath a semitransparent layer (enamel) with a transparent coating (saliva......). In this study we examine how light interacts with this multilayered structure. In the past, rendering of teeth has mostly been done using image-based texturing or volumetric scans. We work with surface scans and have therefore developed a simple way of estimating layer thicknesses. We use scattering properties...... based on measurements reported in the optics literature, and we compare rendered results qualitatively to images of ceramic teeth created by denturists....

  17. [A hybrid volume rendering method using general hardware].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Tian, Lianfang; Chen, Ping; Mao, Zongyuan

    2008-06-01

    In order to improve the effect and efficiency of the reconstructed image after hybrid volume rendering of different kinds of volume data from medical sequential slices or polygonal models, we propose a hybrid volume rendering method based on Shear-Warp with economical hardware. First, the hybrid volume data are pre-processed by Z-Buffer method and RLE (Run-Length Encoded) data structure. Then, during the process of compositing intermediate image, a resampling method based on the dual-interpolation and the intermediate slice interpolation methods is used to improve the efficiency and the effect. Finally, the reconstructed image is rendered by the texture-mapping technology of OpenGL. Experiments demonstrate the good performance of the proposed method.

  18. Universal Rendering Mechanism Supporting Dual-Mode Presentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐鹏; 杨文军; 王克宏

    2003-01-01

    XML is a standard for the exchange of business data that is completely platform and vendor neutral. Because XML data comes in many forms, one of the most important technologies needed for XML applications is the ability to convert the data into visible renderings. This paper focuses on the rendering of XML/XSL documents into a readable and printable format by means of a platform-independent process that enables high-quality printing of the product. This paper introduces the core components in the data rendering engine, the X2P server and different levels of object abstraction. The design pattern and the complete formatting and representation of the XSL stylesheet into different types of output formats in the X2P server are also given. The results show that the X2P sever simultaneously constructs the formatting object tree and the area tree in a very efficient design that saves execution time and memory.

  19. Virtual try-on through image-based rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauswiesner, Stefan; Straka, Matthias; Reitmayr, Gerhard

    2013-09-01

    Virtual try-on applications have become popular because they allow users to watch themselves wearing different clothes without the effort of changing them physically. This helps users to make quick buying decisions and, thus, improves the sales efficiency of retailers. Previous solutions usually involve motion capture, 3D reconstruction or modeling, which are time consuming and not robust for all body poses. Our method avoids these steps by combining image-based renderings of the user and previously recorded garments. It transfers the appearance of a garment recorded from one user to another by matching input and recorded frames, image-based visual hull rendering, and online registration methods. Using images of real garments allows for a realistic rendering quality with high performance. It is suitable for a wide range of clothes and complex appearances, allows arbitrary viewing angles, and requires only little manual input. Our system is particularly useful for virtual try-on applications as well as interactive games.

  20. Contemporary management of ductal carcinoma in situ and lobular carcinoma in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeng-Gyasi, Samilia; Ong, Cecilia; Hwang, E Shelley

    2016-06-01

    The management of in situ lesions ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) continues to evolve. These diagnoses now comprise a large burden of mammographically diagnosed cancers, and with a global trend towards more population-based screening, the incidence of these lesions will continue to rise. Because outcomes following treatment for DCIS and LCIS are excellent, there is emerging controversy about what extent of treatment is optimal for both diseases. Here we review the current approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of both DCIS and LCIS. In addition, we will consider potential directions for future management of these lesions.

  1. In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: Technology summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was instituted out of recognition that in situ remediation could fulfill three important criteria: significant cost reduction of cleanup by eliminating or minimizing excavation, transportation, and disposal of wastes; reduced health impacts on workers and the public by minimizing exposure to wastes during excavation and processing; and remediation of inaccessible sites, including: deep subsurfaces, in, under, and around buildings. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized wastes are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive wastes, volatile and non-volatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials. The ISR IP intends to facilitate development of in situ remediation technologies for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes in soils, groundwater, and storage tanks. Near-term focus is on containment of the wastes, with treatment receiving greater effort in future years. ISR IP is an applied research and development program broadly addressing known DOE environmental restoration needs. Analysis of a sample of 334 representative sites by the Office of Environmental Restoration has shown how many sites are amenable to in situ remediation: containment--243 sites; manipulation--244 sites; bioremediation--154 sites; and physical/chemical methods--236 sites. This needs assessment is focused on near-term restoration problems (FY93--FY99). Many other remediations will be required in the next century. The major focus of the ISR EP is on the long term development of permanent solutions to these problems. Current needs for interim actions to protect human health and the environment are also being addressed.

  2. Efficient rendering of breaking waves using MPS method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qiang; ZHENG Yao; CHEN Chun; FUJIMOTO Tadahiro; CHIBA Norishige

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach for rendering breaking waves out of large-scale ofparticle-based simulation. Moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) is used to solve the governing equation, and 2D simulation is expanded to 3D representation by giving motion variation using fractional Brownian motion (fBm). The waterbody surface is reconstructed from the outlines of 2D simulation. The splashing effect is computed according to the properties of the particles. Realistic features of the wave are rendered on GPU, including the reflective and refractive effect and the effect of splash. Experiments showed that the proposed method can simulate large scale breaking waves efficiently.

  3. Beaming teaching application: recording techniques for spatial xylophone sound rendering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovic, Milos; Madsen, Esben; Olesen, Søren Krarup;

    2012-01-01

    BEAMING is a telepresence research project aiming at providing a multimodal interaction between two or more participants located at distant locations. One of the BEAMING applications allows a distant teacher to give a xylophone playing lecture to the students. Therefore, rendering of the xylophone...... played at student's location is required at teacher's site. This paper presents a comparison of different recording techniques for a spatial xylophone sound rendering. Directivity pattern of the xylophone was measured and spatial properties of the sound field created by a xylophone as a distributed sound...

  4. Chromium Renderserver: Scalable and Open Source Remote RenderingInfrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Brian; Ahern, Sean; Bethel, E. Wes; Brugger, Eric; Cook,Rich; Daniel, Jamison; Lewis, Ken; Owen, Jens; Southard, Dale

    2007-12-01

    Chromium Renderserver (CRRS) is software infrastructure thatprovides the ability for one or more users to run and view image outputfrom unmodified, interactive OpenGL and X11 applications on a remote,parallel computational platform equipped with graphics hardwareaccelerators via industry-standard Layer 7 network protocolsand clientviewers. The new contributions of this work include a solution to theproblem of synchronizing X11 and OpenGL command streams, remote deliveryof parallel hardware-accelerated rendering, and a performance analysis ofseveral different optimizations that are generally applicable to avariety of rendering architectures. CRRSis fully operational, Open Sourcesoftware.

  5. Depth of Field Effects for Interactive Direct Volume Rendering

    KAUST Repository

    Schott, Mathias

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, a method for interactive direct volume rendering is proposed for computing depth of field effects, which previously were shown to aid observers in depth and size perception of synthetically generated images. The presented technique extends those benefits to volume rendering visualizations of 3D scalar fields from CT/MRI scanners or numerical simulations. It is based on incremental filtering and as such does not depend on any precomputation, thus allowing interactive explorations of volumetric data sets via on-the-fly editing of the shading model parameters or (multi-dimensional) transfer functions. © 2011 The Author(s).

  6. Morphological study of transpterional-insula approach using volume rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Linpei; Su, Lue; Sun, Wei; Wang, Lina; Yao, Jihang; Li, Youqiong; Luo, Qi

    2012-11-01

    This study describes the measurements of inferior circular insular sulcus (ICIS) and the shortest distance from ICIS to the temporal horn and determines the position of the incision, which does less harm to the temporal stem in the transpterional-insula approach using volume-rendering technique. Results of the research showed that one-third point over the anterior side of ICIS may be the ideal penetration point during operation. And there is no difference between 2 hemispheres (P ICIS from other Chinese researches demonstrated that volume rendering is a reliable method in insular research that enables mass measurements.

  7. Electromechanical instabilities of thermoplastics: Theory and in situ observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiming; Niu, Xiaofan; Pei, Qibing; Dickey, Michael D; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2012-10-01

    Thermoplastics under voltages are used in diverse applications ranging from insulating cables to organic capacitors. Electromechanical instabilities have been proposed as a mechanism that causes electrical breakdown of thermoplastics. However, existing experiments cannot provide direct observations of the instability process, and existing theories for the instabilities generally assume thermoplastics are mechanically unconstrained. Here, we report in situ observations of electromechanical instabilities in various thermoplastics. A theory is formulated for electromechanical instabilities of thermoplastics under different mechanical constraints. We find that the instabilities generally occur in thermoplastics when temperature is above their glass transition temperatures and electric field reaches a critical value. The critical electric field for the instabilities scales with square root of yield stress of the thermoplastic and depends on its Young's modulus and hardening property.

  8. New in situ crosslinking chemistries for hydrogelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Meredith Colleen

    Over the last half century, hydrogels have found immense value as biomaterials in a vast number of biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. One subset of hydrogels receiving increased attention is in situ forming gels. Gelling by either bioresponsive self-assembly or mixing of binary crosslinking systems, these technologies are useful in minimally invasive applications as well as drug delivery systems in which the sol-to-gel transition aids the formulation's performance. Thus far, the field of in situ crosslinking hydrogels has received limited attention in the development of new crosslinking chemistries. Moreover, not only does the chemical nature of the crosslinking moieties allow these systems to perform in situ, but they contribute dramatically to the mechanical properties of the hydrogel networks. For example, reversible crosslinks with finite lifetimes generate dynamic viscoelastic gels with time-dependent properties, whereas irreversible crosslinks form highly elastic networks. The aim of this dissertation is to explore two new covalent chemistries for their ability to crosslink hydrogels in situ under physiological conditions. First, reversible phenylboronate-salicylhydroxamate crosslinking was implemented in a binary, multivalent polymeric system. These gels formed rapidly and generated hydrogel networks with frequency-dependent dynamic rheological properties. Analysis of the composition-structure-property relationships of these hydrogels---specifically considering the effects of pH, degree of polymer functionality, charge of the polymer backbone and polymer concentration on dynamic theological properties---was performed. These gels demonstrate diverse mechanical properties, due to adjustments in the binding equilibrium of the pH-sensitive crosslinks, and thus have the potential to perform in a range of dynamic or bioresponsive applications. Second, irreversible catalyst-free "click" chemistry was employed in the hydrogelation of multivalent azide

  9. Remote parallel rendering for high-resolution tiled display walls

    KAUST Repository

    Nachbaur, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    © 2014 IEEE. We present a complete, robust and simple to use hardware and software stack delivering remote parallel rendering of complex geometrical and volumetric models to high resolution tiled display walls in a production environment. We describe the setup and configuration, present preliminary benchmarks showing interactive framerates, and describe our contributions for a seamless integration of all the software components.

  10. Light Field Rendering for Head Mounted Displays using Pixel Reprojection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Juhler; Kraus, Martin; Klein, Jákup

    2017-01-01

    of the information of the different images is redundant, we use pixel reprojection from the corner cameras to compute the remaining images in the light field. We compare the reprojected images with directly rendered images in a user test. In most cases, the users were unable to distinguish the images. In extreme...

  11. Interacting with Stroke-Based Rendering on a Wall Display

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grubert, Jens; Hanckock, Mark; Carpendale, Sheelagh; Tse, Edward; Isenberg, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    We introduce two new interaction techniques for creating and interacting with non-photorealistic images using stroke-based rendering. We provide bimanual control of a large interactive canvas through both remote pointing and direct touch. Remote pointing allows people to sit and interact at a distan

  12. Selection of plasters and renders for salt laden masonry substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, C.; Hees, R.P.J. van; Wijffels, T.J.

    2009-01-01

    The choice of a repair plaster or render by architects often appears to be the result of fortuitous circumstances, such as prior experience with a plaster or a recommendation by a producer. Seldom is the choice based on a sound assessment of the state of the building and the wall that is to be repai

  13. Depth-Dependent Halos : Illustrative Rendering of Dense Line Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everts, Maarten H.; Bekker, Henk; Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.; Isenberg, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    We present a technique for the illustrative rendering of 3D line data at interactive frame rates. We create depth-dependent halos around lines to emphasize tight line bundles while less structured lines are de-emphasized. Moreover, the depth-dependent halos combined with depth cueing via line width

  14. Virtual Environment of Real Sport Hall and Analyzing Rendering Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Popovski

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Here is presented virtual environment of a real sport hall created in Quest3D VR Edition. All analyzes of the rendering quality, techniques of interaction and performance of the system in real time are presented. We made critical analysis on all of these techniques on different machines and have excellent results.

  15. Interacting with Stroke-Based Rendering on a Wall Display

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grubert, Jens; Hanckock, Mark; Carpendale, Sheelagh; Tse, Edward; Isenberg, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    We introduce two new interaction techniques for creating and interacting with non-photorealistic images using stroke-based rendering. We provide bimanual control of a large interactive canvas through both remote pointing and direct touch. Remote pointing allows people to sit and interact at a

  16. 7 CFR 54.1016 - Advance information concerning service rendered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advance information concerning service rendered. 54..., Processing, and Packaging of Livestock and Poultry Products § 54.1016 Advance information concerning service... MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  17. 7 CFR 53.17 - Advance information concerning service rendered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advance information concerning service rendered. 53.17... (CONTINUED) LIVESTOCK (GRADING, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) Regulations Service § 53.17 Advance information... SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED)...

  18. Fast Rendering of Realistic Virtual Character in Game Scene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengzhao Yang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Human skin is made up of multiple translucent layers and rendering of skin appearance usually acquire complex modeling and massive calculation. In some practical applications such as 3D game development, we not only approximate the realistic looking skin but also develop efficient method to implement easily for meeting needs of real-time rendering. In this study, we solve the problem of wrap lighting and introduce a surface details approximation method to give realistic rendering of virtual character. Our method considers that different thicknesses of geometry on the skin surface can result in different scattering degree of incident light and so pre-calculate the diffuse falloff into a look-up texture. Also, we notice that scattering is strongly color dependent and small bumps are common on the skin surface and so pre-soften the finer details on the skin surface according to the R/G/B channel. At last, we linearly interpolate the diffuse lighting with different scattering degree from the look-up texture sampled with the curvature and NdotL. Experiment results show that the proposed approach yields realistic virtual character and obtains high frames per second in real-time rendering.

  19. Democratizing rendering for multiple viewers in surround VR systems

    KAUST Repository

    Schulze, Jürgen P.

    2012-03-01

    We present a new approach for how multiple users\\' views can be rendered in a surround virtual environment without using special multi-view hardware. It is based on the idea that different parts of the screen are often viewed by different users, so that they can be rendered from their own view point, or at least from a point closer to their view point than traditionally expected. The vast majority of 3D virtual reality systems are designed for one head-tracked user, and a number of passive viewers. Only the head tracked user gets to see the correct view of the scene, everybody else sees a distorted image. We reduce this problem by algorithmically democratizing the rendering view point among all tracked users. Researchers have proposed solutions for multiple tracked users, but most of them require major changes to the display hardware of the VR system, such as additional projectors or custom VR glasses. Our approach does not require additional hardware, except the ability to track each participating user. We propose three versions of our multi-viewer algorithm. Each of them balances image distortion and frame rate in different ways, making them more or less suitable for certain application scenarios. Our most sophisticated algorithm renders each pixel from its own, optimized camera perspective, which depends on all tracked users\\' head positions and orientations. © 2012 IEEE.

  20. One-Dimensional Haptic Rendering Using Audio Speaker with Displacement Determined by Inductance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avin Khera

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We report overall design considerations and preliminary results for a new haptic rendering device based on an audio loudspeaker. Our application models tissue properties during microsurgery. For example, the device could respond to the tip of a tool by simulating a particular tissue, displaying a desired compressibility and viscosity, giving way as the tissue is disrupted, or exhibiting independent motion, such as that caused by pulsations in blood pressure. Although limited to one degree of freedom and with a relatively small range of displacement compared to other available haptic rendering devices, our design exhibits high bandwidth, low friction, low hysteresis, and low mass. These features are consistent with modeling interactions with delicate tissues during microsurgery. In addition, our haptic rendering device is designed to be simple and inexpensive to manufacture, in part through an innovative method of measuring displacement by existing variations in the speaker’s inductance as the voice coil moves over the permanent magnet. Low latency and jitter are achieved by running the real-time simulation models on a dedicated microprocessor, while maintaining bidirectional communication with a standard laptop computer for user controls and data logging.

  1. A Fast Ambient Occlusion Method for Real-Time Plant Rendering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Teng; Marc Jaeger; Bao-Gang HU

    2007-01-01

    Global illumination effects are crucial for virtual plant rendering. Whereas real-time global illumination rendering of plants is impractical, ambient occlusion is an efficient alternative approximation. A tree model with millions of triangles is common, and the triangles can be considered as randomly distributed. The existing ambient occlusion methods fail to apply on such a type of object. In this paper, we present a new ambient occlusion method dedicated to real time plant rendering with limited user interaction. This method is a three-step ambient occlusion calculation framework which is suitable for a huge number of geometry objects distributed randomly in space. The complexity of the proposed algorithm is O(n), compared to the conventional methods with complexities of O(n2). Furthermore, parameters in this method can be easily adjusted to achieve flexible ambient occlusion effects. With this ambient occlusion calculation method, we can manipulate plant models with millions of organs, as well as geometry objects with large number of randomly distributed components with affordable time, and with perceptual quality comparable to the previous ambient occlusion methods.

  2. Fast Time-Varying Volume Rendering Using Time-Space Partition (TSP) Tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Han-Wei; Chiang, Ling-Jen; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    1999-01-01

    We present a new, algorithm for rapid rendering of time-varying volumes. A new hierarchical data structure that is capable of capturing both the temporal and the spatial coherence is proposed. Conventional hierarchical data structures such as octrees are effective in characterizing the homogeneity of the field values existing in the spatial domain. However, when treating time merely as another dimension for a time-varying field, difficulties frequently arise due to the discrepancy between the field's spatial and temporal resolutions. In addition, treating spatial and temporal dimensions equally often prevents the possibility of detecting the coherence that is unique in the temporal domain. Using the proposed data structure, our algorithm can meet the following goals. First, both spatial and temporal coherence are identified and exploited for accelerating the rendering process. Second, our algorithm allows the user to supply the desired error tolerances at run time for the purpose of image-quality/rendering-speed trade-off. Third, the amount of data that are required to be loaded into main memory is reduced, and thus the I/O overhead is minimized. This low I/O overhead makes our algorithm suitable for out-of-core applications.

  3. In-Situ Visualization Experiments with ParaView Cinema in RAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kares, Robert John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-15

    A previous paper described some numerical experiments performed using the ParaView/Catalyst in-situ visualization infrastructure deployed in the Los Alamos RAGE radiation-hydrodynamics code to produce images from a running large scale 3D ICF simulation. One challenge of the in-situ approach apparent in these experiments was the difficulty of choosing parameters likes isosurface values for the visualizations to be produced from the running simulation without the benefit of prior knowledge of the simulation results and the resultant cost of recomputing in-situ generated images when parameters are chosen suboptimally. A proposed method of addressing this difficulty is to simply render multiple images at runtime with a range of possible parameter values to produce a large database of images and to provide the user with a tool for managing the resulting database of imagery. Recently, ParaView/Catalyst has been extended to include such a capability via the so-called Cinema framework. Here I describe some initial experiments with the first delivery of Cinema and make some recommendations for future extensions of Cinema’s capabilities.

  4. "In Situ Didactics" - creating moments of universal and existential quality and beauty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenderup, Mogens Larsen; Nørgaard, Britta Kusk

    2016-01-01

    In Situ Didatics” - creating moments of universal and existential quality and beauty. Written by: Senior Lecturers Mogens Larsen Stenderup and Britta Nørgaard, ( UCN ) University College of Northern Denmark ( mls@ucn.dk; bkn@ucn.dk), published April 2016. Læs den på www.academi.edu "Il existe...

  5. "In Situ Didactics" - creating moments of universal and existential quality and beauty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenderup, Mogens Larsen; Nørgaard, Britta Kusk

    2016-01-01

    In Situ Didatics” - creating moments of universal and existential quality and beauty. Written by: Senior Lecturers Mogens Larsen Stenderup and Britta Nørgaard, ( UCN ) University College of Northern Denmark ( mls@ucn.dk; bkn@ucn.dk), published April 2016. Læs den på www.academi.edu "Il existe...

  6. In situ hydrogen loading on zirconium powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maimaitiyili, Tuerdi, E-mail: tuerdi.maimaitiyili@mah.se; Blomqvist, Jakob [Malmö University, Östra Varvsgatan 11 A, Malmö, Skane 20506 (Sweden); Steuwer, Axel [Lund University, Ole Römers väg, Lund, Skane 22100 (Sweden); Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Gardham Avenue, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Bjerkén, Christina [Malmö University, Östra Varvsgatan 11 A, Malmö, Skane 20506 (Sweden); Zanellato, Olivier [Ensam - Cnam - CNRS, 151 Boulevard de l’Hôpital, Paris 75013 (France); Blackmur, Matthew S. [Materials Performance Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Andrieux, Jérôme [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue J Horowitz, Grenoble 38043 (France); Université de Lyon, 43 Bd du 11 novembre 1918, Lyon 69100 (France); Ribeiro, Fabienne [Institut de Radioprotection et Sûreté Nucléaire, IRSN, BP 3, 13115 Saint-Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2015-06-26

    Commercial-grade Zr powder loaded with hydrogen in situ and phase transformations between various Zr and ZrH{sub x} phases have been monitored in real time. For the first time, various hydride phases in a zirconium–hydrogen system have been prepared in a high-energy synchrotron X-ray radiation beamline and their transformation behaviour has been studied in situ. First, the formation and dissolution of hydrides in commercially pure zirconium powder were monitored in real time during hydrogenation and dehydrogenation, then whole pattern crystal structure analysis such as Rietveld and Pawley refinements were performed. All commonly reported low-pressure phases presented in the Zr–H phase diagram are obtained from a single experimental arrangement.

  7. In situ SU-8 silver nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Søren Vang; Uthuppu, Basil; Jakobsen, Mogens Havsteen

    2015-01-01

    to this problem, an easy new method of fabricating silver nanocomposites by an in situ reduction of precursors within the epoxy-based photoresist SU-8 has been developed. AgNO3 dissolved in acetonitrile and mixed with the epoxy-based photoresist SU-8 forms silver nanoparticles primarily during the pre- and post......Nanocomposite materials containing metal nanoparticles are of considerable interest in photonics and optoelectronics applications. However, device fabrication of such materials always encounters the challenge of incorporation of preformed nanoparticles into photoresist materials. As a solution......-exposure soft bake steps at 95 degrees C. A further high-temperature treatment at 300 degrees C resulted in the formation of densely homogeneously distributed silver nanoparticles in the photoresist matrix. No particle growth or agglomeration of nanoparticles is observed at this point. The reported new in situ...

  8. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumhansl, James L; Brady, Patrick V

    2014-04-29

    An in situ recovery of uranium operation involves circulating reactive fluids through an underground uranium deposit. These fluids contain chemicals that dissolve the uranium ore. Uranium is recovered from the fluids after they are pumped back to the surface. Chemicals used to accomplish this include complexing agents that are organic, readily degradable, and/or have a predictable lifetime in an aquifer. Efficiency is increased through development of organic agents targeted to complexing tetravalent uranium rather than hexavalent uranium. The operation provides for in situ immobilization of some oxy-anion pollutants under oxidizing conditions as well as reducing conditions. The operation also artificially reestablishes reducing conditions on the aquifer after uranium recovery is completed. With the ability to have the impacted aquifer reliably remediated, the uranium recovery operation can be considered inherently safe.

  9. In situ models, physico-chemical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Cate, J M

    1994-07-01

    In situ (intra-oral) caries models are used for two purposes. First, they provide information about oral physiological processes. Such information helps to detail our knowledge of the oral ecosystem and to verify conclusions from in vitro experiments. Second, in situ models are utilized to test preventive agents in the phase between laboratory testing and clinical trials. Most investigations involving enamel inserts have been aimed at testing new dentifrices. The experimental designs of such studies usually do not allow one to draw conclusions on physico-chemical processes, e.g., because of single point measurements. Studies of model parameters (lesion type, lesion severity, and de/remineralization in time) constitute only a minority of the research reports. The most striking observation obtained with in situ models has been the significant differences in de/remineralization observed among individuals and, more importantly, within one individual during different time periods and between different sites in the same mouth (for review, see ten Cate et al., 1992). Regardless of this, some general findings can be inferred: During in situ demineralization, up to 62 vol% microns/day may be removed from enamel. For dentin specimens, this value may be as high as 89 vol% microns/day. For remineralization, during fluoride dentifrice treatment, a median deposition rate of 0.7%/day (for lesions with integrated mineral loss values between 2000 and 4000 vol% microns) is found. The rate of deposition seems to be correlated with the extent of the pre-formed lesion. This suggests that the number of sites (crystallite surface) available for calcium phosphate precipitation is an important parameter.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. In situ hybridization-theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadkol, S S; Gage, W R; Pasternack, G R

    1999-09-01

    In situ hybridization is a technique to determine and localize target nucleic acids in morphologically preserved tissue sections. Recent advances in methods have greatly increased the sensitivity of the technique, and it is currently possible to detect extremely few copies of any given target sequence with nonisotopic methods. In this teaching review, we integrate theoretical background, technical considerations, and guidelines for usage for this important component of molecular diagnosis.

  11. In situ health monitoring of piezoelectric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Scott L. (Inventor); Drouant, George J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An in situ health monitoring apparatus may include an exciter circuit that applies a pulse to a piezoelectric transducer and a data processing system that determines the piezoelectric transducer's dynamic response to the first pulse. The dynamic response can be used to evaluate the operating range, health, and as-mounted resonance frequency of the transducer, as well as the strength of a coupling between the transducer and a structure and the health of the structure.

  12. Squamous cell carcinoma in situ after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kambara, Takeshi; Nishiyama, Takafumi; Yamada, Rie; Nagatani, Tetsuo; Nakajima, Hiroshi [Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Sugiyama, Asami

    1997-12-31

    We report two cases with Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) in situ caused by irradiation to hand eczemas, resistant to any topical therapies. Both of our cases clinically show palmer sclerosis and flexor restriction of the fingers, compatible to chronic radiation dermatitis. Although SCC arising in chronic radiation dermatitis is usually developed ten to twenty years after irradiation, in our cases SCC were found more than forty years after irradiation. (author)

  13. In situ ion irradiation of zirconium carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Christopher J.; Motta, Arthur T.; Kirk, Mark A.

    2015-11-01

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is a candidate material for use in one of the layers of TRISO coated fuel particles to be used in the Generation IV high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor, and thus it is necessary to study the effects of radiation damage on its structure. The microstructural evolution of ZrCx under irradiation was studied in situ using the Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscope (IVEM) at Argonne National Laboratory. Samples of nominal stoichiometries ZrC0.8 and ZrC0.9 were irradiated in situ using 1 MeV Kr2+ ions at various irradiation temperatures (T = 20 K-1073 K). In situ experiments made it possible to continuously follow the evolution of the microstructure during irradiation using diffraction contrast imaging. Images and diffraction patterns were systematically recorded at selected dose points. After a threshold dose during irradiations conducted at room temperature and below, black-dot defects were observed which accumulated until saturation. Once created, the defect clusters did not move or get destroyed during irradiation so that at the final dose the low temperature microstructure consisted only of a saturation density of small defect clusters. No long-range migration of the visible defects or dynamic defect creation and elimination were observed during irradiation, but some coarsening of the microstructure with the formation of dislocation loops was observed at higher temperatures. The irradiated microstructure was found to be only weakly dependent on the stoichiometry.

  14. In situ Raman mapping of art objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauwers, D.; Brondeel, Ph.; Moens, L.; Vandenabeele, P.

    2016-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy has grown to be one of the techniques of interest for the investigation of art objects. The approach has several advantageous properties, and the non-destructive character of the technique allowed it to be used for in situ investigations. However, compared with laboratory approaches, it would be useful to take advantage of the small spectral footprint of the technique, and use Raman spectroscopy to study the spatial distribution of different compounds. In this work, an in situ Raman mapping system is developed to be able to relate chemical information with its spatial distribution. Challenges for the development are discussed, including the need for stable positioning and proper data treatment. To avoid focusing problems, nineteenth century porcelain cards are used to test the system. This work focuses mainly on the post-processing of the large dataset which consists of four steps: (i) importing the data into the software; (ii) visualization of the dataset; (iii) extraction of the variables; and (iv) creation of a Raman image. It is shown that despite the challenging task of the development of the full in situ Raman mapping system, the first steps are very promising. This article is part of the themed issue "Raman spectroscopy in art and archaeology".

  15. Development of in-situ Space Debris Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Waldemar; Romberg, O.; Wiedemann, C.; Drolshagen, G.; Vörsmann, P.

    2014-11-01

    Due to high relative velocities, collisions of spacecraft in orbit with Space Debris (SD) or Micrometeoroids (MM) can lead to payload degradation, anomalies as well as failures in spacecraft operation, or even loss of mission. Flux models and impact risk assessment tools, such as MASTER (Meteoroid and Space Debris Terrestrial Environment Reference) or ORDEM (Orbital Debris Engineering Model), and ESABASE2 or BUMPER II are used to analyse mission risk associated with these hazards. Validation of flux models is based on measured data. Currently, as most of the SD and MM objects are too small (millimeter down to micron sized) for ground-based observations (e.g. radar, optical), the only available data for model validation is based upon retrieved hardware investigations e.g. Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), Hubble Space Telescope (HST), European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA). Since existing data sets are insufficient, further in-situ experimental investigation of the SD and MM populations are required. This paper provides an overview and assessment of existing and planned SD and MM impact detectors. The detection area of the described detectors is too small to adequately provide the missing data sets. Therefore an innovative detection concept is proposed that utilises existing spacecraft components for detection purposes. In general, solar panels of a spacecraft provide a large area that can be utilised for in-situ impact detection. By using this method on several spacecraft in different orbits the detection area can be increased significantly and allow the detection of SD and MM objects with diameters as low as 100 μm. The design of the detector is based on damage equations from HST and EURECA solar panels. An extensive investigation of those panels was performed by ESA and is summarized within this paper. Furthermore, an estimate of the expected sensitivity of the patented detector concept as well as examples for its implementation into large and small

  16. ENHANCED DATA DISCOVERABILITY FOR IN SITU HYPERSPECTRAL DATASETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Rasaiah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Field spectroscopic metadata is a central component in the quality assurance, reliability, and discoverability of hyperspectral data and the products derived from it. Cataloguing, mining, and interoperability of these datasets rely upon the robustness of metadata protocols for field spectroscopy, and on the software architecture to support the exchange of these datasets. Currently no standard for in situ spectroscopy data or metadata protocols exist. This inhibits the effective sharing of growing volumes of in situ spectroscopy datasets, to exploit the benefits of integrating with the evolving range of data sharing platforms. A core metadataset for field spectroscopy was introduced by Rasaiah et al., (2011-2015 with extended support for specific applications. This paper presents a prototype model for an OGC and ISO compliant platform-independent metadata discovery service aligned to the specific requirements of field spectroscopy. In this study, a proof-of-concept metadata catalogue has been described and deployed in a cloud-based architecture as a demonstration of an operationalized field spectroscopy metadata standard and web-based discovery service.

  17. Enhanced Data Discoverability for in Situ Hyperspectral Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasaiah, B.; Bellman, C.; Hewson, R. D.; Jones, S. D.; Malthus, T. J.

    2016-06-01

    Field spectroscopic metadata is a central component in the quality assurance, reliability, and discoverability of hyperspectral data and the products derived from it. Cataloguing, mining, and interoperability of these datasets rely upon the robustness of metadata protocols for field spectroscopy, and on the software architecture to support the exchange of these datasets. Currently no standard for in situ spectroscopy data or metadata protocols exist. This inhibits the effective sharing of growing volumes of in situ spectroscopy datasets, to exploit the benefits of integrating with the evolving range of data sharing platforms. A core metadataset for field spectroscopy was introduced by Rasaiah et al., (2011-2015) with extended support for specific applications. This paper presents a prototype model for an OGC and ISO compliant platform-independent metadata discovery service aligned to the specific requirements of field spectroscopy. In this study, a proof-of-concept metadata catalogue has been described and deployed in a cloud-based architecture as a demonstration of an operationalized field spectroscopy metadata standard and web-based discovery service.

  18. In situ Management and Domestication of Plants in Mesoamerica

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    ALEJANDRO CASAS; ADRIANA OTERO-ARNAIZ; EDGAR PÉREZ-NEGRÓN; ALFONSO VALIENTE-BANUET

    2007-01-01

    ... in plant populations under in situ management in the region. • Methods Information on wild and in situ managed populations of the herbaceous weedy plants Anoda cristata and Crotalaria puntila, the tree Leucaena esculenta...

  19. Intrathecal Delivery of Ketorolac Loaded In Situ Gels for Prolonged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in situ gel near the fractured vertebra in a rat model). ... The formulated in situ gels can potentially be used as implants for the treatment of .... xanthan gum orally in an appropriate volume. ..... polyelectrolyte alginate-chitosan complex based.

  20. Application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to the analysis of ... In this study, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) as a culture-independent molecular ... a high percentage and took place in an oily biological system under aerobic ...

  1. In situ synthesis studies of silicon clathrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Peter Thomas

    Solid state clathrates have shown considerable potential as a new class of materials over the past 30 years. Experimental and theoretical studies have shown that precise tuning and synthetic control of these materials, may lead to desirable properties. Very little is known about the mechanism of formation of the clathrates and so the desire to have accurate synthetic control was, until now, unrealistic. This thesis address the problem using in situ synchrotron x-ray techniques. In this study, experiments were designed to utilise time-resolved in situ diffraction techniques and high temperature 23Na NMR, in efforts to understand the mechanism of formation for this class of expanded framework materials. A complex high vacuum capillary synthesis cell was designed for loading under inert conditions and operation under high vacuum at station 6.2 of the SRS Daresbury. The cell was designed to operate in conjunction with a custom made furnace capable of temperatures in excess of 1000 C, as well as a vacuum system capable of 10"5 bar. The clathrate system was studied in situ, using rapid data collection to elucidate the mechanism of formation. The data were analysed using Rietveld methods and showed a structural link between the monoclinic, C2/c, Zintl precursors and the cubic, Pm3n, clathrate I phase. The phases were found to be linked by relation of the sodium planes in the silicide and the sodium atoms resident at cages centres in the clathrate system. This evidence suggests the guest species is instrumental in formation of the clathrate structure by templating the formation of the cages in the structure. Solid state 23Na NMR was utilised to complete specially design experiments, similar to those complete in situ using synchrotron x-ray techniques. The experiments showed increased spherical symmetry of the alkali metal sites and suggested increased mobility of the guest atoms during heating. In addition, cyclic heating experiments using in situ diffraction showed

  2. Latex-modified grouts for in-situ stabilization of buried transuranic/mixed waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan, M.L.

    1996-06-01

    The Department of Applied Science at Brookhaven national Laboratory was requested to investigate latex-modified grouts for in-situ stabilization of buried TRU/mixed waste for INEL. The waste exists in shallow trenches that were backfilled with soil. The objective was to formulate latex-modified grouts for use with the jet grouting technique to enable in-situ stabilization of buried waste. The stabilized waste was either to be left in place or retrieved for further processing. Grouting prior to retrieval reduces the potential release of contaminants. Rheological properties of latex-modified grouts were investigated and compared with those of conventional neat cement grouts used for jet grouting.

  3. Report for in-situ 7Li NMR experiment in PNNL Phase -1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jian Zhi [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2014-08-19

    To understand the detailed local structural evolution, an in-situ 7Li NMR study was performed. An operando identification of the lithium germanide phases under various cycling regimens permitted understanding of the kinetics of phase transition between different structural phases, including the amorphous phases, and how these correlated with capacity retention. Combining data from TEM and in-situ 7Li NMR, we discovered that the phase inter-conversion during cycling was mediated by co-existing amorphous and crystalline phases, and that the high capacity observed was correlated with an over-lithiated lithium germanide phase.

  4. Demonstrating an In Situ Topological Band Transition in Cylindrical Granular Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaunsali, R.; Kim, E.; Thakkar, A.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Yang, J.

    2017-07-01

    We numerically investigate and experimentally demonstrate an in situ topological band transition in a highly tunable mechanical system made of cylindrical granular particles. This system allows us to tune its interparticle stiffness in a controllable way, simply by changing the contact angles between the cylinders. The spatial variation of particles' stiffness results in an in situ transition of the system's topology. This manifests as the emergence of a boundary mode in the finite system, which we observe experimentally via laser Doppler vibrometry. When two topologically different systems are placed adjacently, we analytically predict and computationally and experimentally demonstrate the existence of a finite-frequency topologically protected mode at their interface.

  5. NEO Targets for Biological In Situ Resource Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, J. M.; Ernst, S. M.; Navarrete, J. U.; Gentry, D.

    2014-12-01

    We are investigating a mission architecture concept for low-cost pre-processing of materials on long synodic period asteroids using bioengineered microbes delivered by small spacecraft. Space exploration opportunities, particularly those requiring a human presence, are sharply constrained by the high cost of launching resources such as fuel, construction materials, oxygen, water, and foodstuffs. Near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) have been proposed for supporting a human space presence. However, the combination of high initial investment requirements, delayed potential return, and uncertainty in resource payoff currently prevents their effective utilization.Biomining is the process in which microorganisms perform useful material reduction, sequestration or separation. It is commonly used in terrestrial copper extraction. Compared to physical and chemical methods of extraction it is slow, but very low cost, thus rendering economical even very poor ores. These advantages are potentially extensible to asteroid in situ resource utilization (ISRU).One of the first limiting factors for the use of biology in these environments is temperature. A survey of NEA data was conducted to identify those NEAs whose projected interior temperatures remained within both potential (-5 - 100 ºC) and preferred (15 - 45 ºC) ranges for the minimum projected time per synodic period without exceeding 100 ºC at any point. Approximately 2800 of the 11000 NEAs (25%) are predicted to remain within the potential range for at least 90 days, and 120 (1%) in the preferred range.A second major factor is water availability and stability. We have evaluated a design for a small-spacecraft-based injector which forces low-temperature fluid into the NEA interior, creating potentially habitable microniches. The fluid contains microbes genetically engineered to accelerate the degradation rates of a desired fraction of the native resources, allowing for more efficient material extraction upon a subsequent

  6. 30 CFR 828.12 - In situ processing: Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In situ processing: Monitoring. 828.12 Section 828.12 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... PROCESSING § 828.12 In situ processing: Monitoring. (a) Each person who conducts in situ...

  7. 30 CFR 828.11 - In situ processing: Performance standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In situ processing: Performance standards. 828.11 Section 828.11 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT... STANDARDS-IN SITU PROCESSING § 828.11 In situ processing: Performance standards. (a) The person who...

  8. 9 CFR 315.1 - Carcasses and parts passed for cooking; rendering into lard or tallow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...; rendering into lard or tallow. 315.1 Section 315.1 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION... PARTS PASSED FOR COOKING § 315.1 Carcasses and parts passed for cooking; rendering into lard or tallow... subchapter or rendered into tallow, provided such rendering is done in the following manner: (a) When...

  9. In situ upgrading : coupled enhanced oil recovery with in situ upgrading : ultra dispersed catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almao, P.P. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Schulich School of Engineering]|[Alberta Ingenuity Centre for In Situ Energy, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    This paper presented a research program that demonstrates the use of ultra dispersed (UD) catalysts as a means of improving the economics of oil sands processing. An outline of current processing techniques was provided. In situ upgrading options included the use of solvents, thermal methods, radiation methods, bio-upgrading, and thermo-catalytic methods. Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is often combined with in situ upgrading to increase the efficiency of energy use in reservoirs where thermal methods are used. The use of diluents often reduces water usage as well as problems related to contamination and emissions. Recent studies have suggested that vis-breaking (VB) is the lowest investment residual conversion process currently available for in situ processing. UD catalyst formulations can be commercially prepared using nano-particle techniques, and can be used in portable configurations. UD catalysts are known to outperform conventional fixed bed types for both hydrogenation, hydrotreating, and hydrocracking. Research is currently being conducted at the Alberta Ingenuity Centre for In Situ Energy to examine issues related to particles recycling, deactivation and losses. Permeability studies are also being conducted to examine permeability rates of emulsions and nanoparticles through oil sands porous media. The short term financial rewards of various in situ upgrading technologies were also considered. refs., tabs, figs.

  10. Realistic Haptic Rendering of Interacting Deformable Objects in Virtual Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Duriez, Christian; Kheddar, Abderrahmane; Andriot, Claude

    2008-01-01

    A new computer haptics algorithm to be used in general interactive manipulations of deformable virtual objects is presented. In multimodal interactive simulations, haptic feedback computation often comes from contact forces. Subsequently, the fidelity of haptic rendering depends significantly on contact space modeling. Contact and friction laws between deformable models are often simplified in up to date methods. They do not allow a "realistic" rendering of the subtleties of contact space physical phenomena (such as slip and stick effects due to friction or mechanical coupling between contacts). In this paper, we use Signorini's contact law and Coulomb's friction law as a computer haptics basis. Real-time performance is made possible thanks to a linearization of the behavior in the contact space, formulated as the so-called Delassus operator, and iteratively solved by a Gauss-Seidel type algorithm. Dynamic deformation uses corotational global formulation to obtain the Delassus operator in which the mass and s...

  11. Hybrid fur rendering: combining volumetric fur with explicit hair strands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tobias Grønbeck; Falster, Viggo; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall

    2016-01-01

    Hair is typically modeled and rendered using either explicitly defined hair strand geometry or a volume texture of hair densities. Taken each on their own, these two hair representations have difficulties in the case of animal fur as it consists of very dense and thin undercoat hairs in combination...... with coarse guard hairs. Explicit hair strand geometry is not well-suited for the undercoat hairs, while volume textures are not well-suited for the guard hairs. To efficiently model and render both guard hairs and undercoat hairs, we present a hybrid technique that combines rasterization of explicitly...... defined guard hairs with ray marching of a prismatic shell volume with dynamic resolution. The latter is the key to practical combination of the two techniques, and it also enables a high degree of detail in the undercoat. We demonstrate that our hybrid technique creates a more detailed and soft fur...

  12. Chromium Renderserver: scalable and open remote rendering infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Brian; Ahern, Sean; Bethel, E Wes; Brugger, Eric; Cook, Rich; Daniel, Jamison; Lewis, Ken; Owen, Jens; Southard, Dale

    2008-01-01

    Chromium Renderserver (CRRS) is software infrastructure that provides the ability for one or more users to run and view image output from unmodified, interactive OpenGL and X11 applications on a remote, parallel computational platform equipped with graphics hardware accelerators via industry-standard Layer 7 network protocols and client viewers. The new contributions of this work include a solution to the problem of synchronizing X11 and OpenGL command streams, remote delivery of parallel hardware accelerated rendering, and a performance analysis of several different optimizations that are generally applicable to a variety of rendering architectures. CRRS is fully operational, Open Source software. imagery and sending it to a remote viewer.

  13. Hybrid fur rendering: combining volumetric fur with explicit hair strands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tobias Grønbeck; Falster, Viggo; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall

    2016-01-01

    Hair is typically modeled and rendered using either explicitly defined hair strand geometry or a volume texture of hair densities. Taken each on their own, these two hair representations have difficulties in the case of animal fur as it consists of very dense and thin undercoat hairs in combination...... with coarse guard hairs. Explicit hair strand geometry is not well-suited for the undercoat hairs, while volume textures are not well-suited for the guard hairs. To efficiently model and render both guard hairs and undercoat hairs, we present a hybrid technique that combines rasterization of explicitly...... defined guard hairs with ray marching of a prismatic shell volume with dynamic resolution. The latter is the key to practical combination of the two techniques, and it also enables a high degree of detail in the undercoat. We demonstrate that our hybrid technique creates a more detailed and soft fur...

  14. Tactile display for virtual 3D shape rendering

    CERN Document Server

    Mansutti, Alessandro; Bordegoni, Monica; Cugini, Umberto

    2017-01-01

    This book describes a novel system for the simultaneous visual and tactile rendering of product shapes which allows designers to simultaneously touch and see new product shapes during the conceptual phase of product development. This system offers important advantages, including potential cost and time savings, compared with the standard product design process in which digital 3D models and physical prototypes are often repeatedly modified until an optimal design is achieved. The system consists of a tactile display that is able to represent, within a real environment, the shape of a product. Designers can explore the rendered surface by touching curves lying on the product shape, selecting those curves that can be considered style features and evaluating their aesthetic quality. In order to physically represent these selected curves, a flexible surface is modeled by means of servo-actuated modules controlling a physical deforming strip. The tactile display is designed so as to be portable, low cost, modular,...

  15. In situ investigation of ordering phase transformations in FePt magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittig, James E; Bentley, James; Allard, Lawrence F

    2016-12-11

    In situ high-resolution electron microscopy was used to reveal information at the atomic level for the disordered-to-ordered phase transformation of equiatomic FePt nanoparticles that can exhibit outstanding magnetic properties after transforming from disordered face-centered-cubic into the tetragonal L10 ordered structure. High-angle annular dark-field imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope provided sufficient contrast between the Fe and Pt atoms to readily monitor the ordering of the atoms during in situ heating experiments. However, during continuous high-magnification imaging the electron beam influenced the kinetics of the transformation so annealing had to be performed with the electron beam blanked. At 500°C where the reaction rate was relatively slow, observation of the transformation mechanisms using this sequential imaging protocol revealed that ordering proceeded from (002) surface facets but was incomplete and multiple-domain particles were formed that contained anti-phase domain boundaries and anti-site defects. At 600 and 700°C, the limitations of sequential imaging were revealed as a consequence of increased transformation kinetics. Annealing for only 5min at 700°C produced complete single-domain L10 order; such single-domain particles were more spherical in shape with (002) facets. The in situ experiments also provided information concerning nanoparticle sintering, coalescence, and consolidation. Although there was resistance to complete sintering due to the crystallography of L10 order, the driving force from the large surface-area-to-volume ratio resulted in considerable nanoparticle coalescence, which would render such FePt nanoparticles unsuitable for use as magnetic recording media. Comparison of the in situ data acquired using the protocol described above with parallel ex situ annealing experiments showed that identical behavior resulted in all cases.

  16. Binaural technology for e.g. rendering auditory virtual environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammershøi, Dorte

    2008-01-01

    , helped mediate the understanding that if the transfer functions could be mastered, then important dimensions of the auditory percept could also be controlled. He early understood the potential of using the HRTFs and numerical sound transmission analysis programs for rendering auditory virtual...... environments. Jens Blauert participated in many European cooperation projects exploring  this field (and others), among other the SCATIS project addressing the auditory-tactile dimensions in the absence of visual information....

  17. Haptic Rendering Techniques for Non-Physical, Command Decision Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-01

    tactile and haptic rendering techniques. BACKGROUND Usually visualizing battlefield implies maps, computer screens filled with information and perhaps 3...Traditional 2-D Screens 3-D stereo glasses HMD CAVE Audio Haptics Level 1, 2 3 …..Fusion - Estimates INTEL SATELLITE RAW DATA Transforms...sensory modes of data presentation Haptics Tactile 8-14 Virtual Lexicon Haptic feedback The sensation of weight or resistance in a virtual world. (from

  18. Rendering Optical Effects Based on Spectra Representation in Complex Scenes

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Weiming

    2006-01-01

    http://www.springerlink.com/; Rendering the structural color of natural objects or modern industrial products in the 3D environment is not possible with RGB-based graphics platforms and software and very time consuming, even with the most efficient spectra representation based methods previously proposed. Our framework allows computing full spectra light object interactions only when it is needed, i.e. for the part of the scene that requires simulating special spectra sensitive phenomena. Ach...

  19. A review on in situ stiffness adjustment methods in MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laat, M. L. C.; Pérez Garza, H. H.; Herder, J. L.; Ghatkesar, M. K.

    2016-06-01

    In situ stiffness adjustment in microelectromechanical systems is used in a variety of applications such as radio-frequency mechanical filters, energy harvesters, atomic force microscopy, vibration detection sensors. In this review we provide designers with an overview of existing stiffness adjustment methods, their working principle, and possible adjustment range. The concepts are categorized according to their physical working principle. It is concluded that the electrostatic adjustment principle is the most applied method, and narrow to wide ranges in stiffness can be achieved. But in order to obtain a wide range in stiffness change, large, complex devices were designed. Mechanical stiffness adjustment is found to be a space-effective way of obtaining wide changes in stiffness, but these methods are often discrete and require large tuning voltages. Stiffness adjustment through stressing effects or change in Young’s modulus was used only for narrow ranges. The change in second moment of inertia was used for stiffness adjustment in the intermediate range.

  20. Conceptual designs for in situ analysis of Mars soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckay, C. P.; Zent, A. P.; Hartman, H.

    1991-01-01

    A goal of this research is to develop conceptual designs for instrumentation to perform in situ measurements of the Martian soil in order to determine the existence and nature of any reactive chemicals. Our approach involves assessment and critical review of the Viking biology results which indicated the presence of a soil oxidant, an investigation of the possible application of standard soil science techniques to the analysis of Martian soil, and a preliminary consideration of non-standard methods that may be necessary for use in the highly oxidizing Martian soil. Based on our preliminary analysis, we have developed strawman concepts for standard soil analysis on Mars, including pH, suitable for use on a Mars rover mission. In addition, we have devised a method for the determination of the possible strong oxidants on Mars.

  1. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1993-03-04

    Genetic mapping is approached using the techniques of high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This technology and the results of its application are designed to rapidly generate whole genome as tool box of expressed sequence to speed the identification of human disease genes. The results of this study are intended to dovetail with and to link the results of existing technologies for creating backbone YAC and genetic maps. In the first eight months, this approach generated 60--80% of the expressed sequence map, the remainder expected to be derived through more long-term, labor-intensive, regional chromosomal gene searches or sequencing. The laboratory has made significant progress in the set-up phase, in mapping fetal and adult brain and other cDNAs, in testing a model system for directly linking genetic and physical maps using FISH with small fragments, in setting up a database, and in establishing the validity and throughput of the system.

  2. The measurement of in situ stress using NQR/NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schempp, E.; Murdoch, J. B.; Klainer, S. M.

    1982-09-01

    The measurement of stress in rocks underground is a difficult but very important problem in mining engineering and in the design of underground waste repositories. The structural stability of any excavation is critically dependent on the stress distribution in the surrounding rock and its capability to bear the stress, which can build up to hundreds of atmospheres in deep mines. Because existing methods for the determination of stress have limitations, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) has been investigating the use of spectroscopic techniques - nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) - for rapid in situ measurements of three-dimensional stress in both salt and hard rock. Efforts in the past year have been directed toward computer simulation of boreholes stress patterns and NQR lineshapes, laboratory measurements on salt and aluminosilicates, and construction of a state-of-the-art pulsed NQR spectrometer.

  3. An evaluation of in-situ bioremediation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, L.L. [Prairie View A and M Univ., TX (United States); Rashidi, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental Programs Directorate

    1996-08-01

    Remediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater was the primary focus in the initial application of in-situ bioremediation which, from its development in the 1970s, has grown to become one of the most promising technologies for the degradation of a wide variety of organic contaminants. The degradation of contaminants in subsurface soils is the current new focus of the technology. While the need for improvements in the technology does exist, the indisputable fact remains that this technology is by far the least expensive and that it has the capability to provide long term reduced levels of contaminants or long term complete remediation of contaminated sites. The aim of this paper is to disclose pertinent information related to current conditions and current feelings in the area of new research, novel applications, new government regulations, and an overview of new topics on the horizon that relate to the overall technology.

  4. Capturing, processing, and rendering real-world scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyland, Lars S.; Lastra, Anselmo A.; McAllister, David K.; Popescu, Voicu; McCue, Chris; Fuchs, Henry

    2000-12-01

    While photographs vividly capture a scene from a single viewpoint, it is our goal to capture a scene in such a way that a viewer can freely move to any viewpoint, just as he or she would in an actual scene. We have built a prototype system to quickly digitize a scene using a laser rangefinder and a high-resolution digital camera that accurately captures a panorama of high-resolution range and color information. With real-world scenes, we have provided data to fuel research in many area, including representation, registration, data fusion, polygonization, rendering, simplification, and reillumination. The real-world scene data can be used for many purposes, including immersive environments, immersive training, re-engineering and engineering verification, renovation, crime-scene and accident capture and reconstruction, archaeology and historic preservation, sports and entertainment, surveillance, remote tourism and remote sales. We will describe our acquisition system, the necessary processing to merge data from the multiple input devices and positions. We will also describe high quality rendering using the data we have collected. Issues about specific rendering accelerators and algorithms will also be presented. We will conclude by describing future uses and methods of collection for real- world scene data.

  5. High Performance GPU-Based Fourier Volume Rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellah, Marwan; Eldeib, Ayman; Sharawi, Amr

    2015-01-01

    Fourier volume rendering (FVR) is a significant visualization technique that has been used widely in digital radiography. As a result of its (N (2)log⁡N) time complexity, it provides a faster alternative to spatial domain volume rendering algorithms that are (N (3)) computationally complex. Relying on the Fourier projection-slice theorem, this technique operates on the spectral representation of a 3D volume instead of processing its spatial representation to generate attenuation-only projections that look like X-ray radiographs. Due to the rapid evolution of its underlying architecture, the graphics processing unit (GPU) became an attractive competent platform that can deliver giant computational raw power compared to the central processing unit (CPU) on a per-dollar-basis. The introduction of the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) technology enables embarrassingly-parallel algorithms to run efficiently on CUDA-capable GPU architectures. In this work, a high performance GPU-accelerated implementation of the FVR pipeline on CUDA-enabled GPUs is presented. This proposed implementation can achieve a speed-up of 117x compared to a single-threaded hybrid implementation that uses the CPU and GPU together by taking advantage of executing the rendering pipeline entirely on recent GPU architectures.

  6. High Performance GPU-Based Fourier Volume Rendering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwan Abdellah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fourier volume rendering (FVR is a significant visualization technique that has been used widely in digital radiography. As a result of its O(N2log⁡N time complexity, it provides a faster alternative to spatial domain volume rendering algorithms that are O(N3 computationally complex. Relying on the Fourier projection-slice theorem, this technique operates on the spectral representation of a 3D volume instead of processing its spatial representation to generate attenuation-only projections that look like X-ray radiographs. Due to the rapid evolution of its underlying architecture, the graphics processing unit (GPU became an attractive competent platform that can deliver giant computational raw power compared to the central processing unit (CPU on a per-dollar-basis. The introduction of the compute unified device architecture (CUDA technology enables embarrassingly-parallel algorithms to run efficiently on CUDA-capable GPU architectures. In this work, a high performance GPU-accelerated implementation of the FVR pipeline on CUDA-enabled GPUs is presented. This proposed implementation can achieve a speed-up of 117x compared to a single-threaded hybrid implementation that uses the CPU and GPU together by taking advantage of executing the rendering pipeline entirely on recent GPU architectures.

  7. High dynamic range (HDR) virtual bronchoscopy rendering for video tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Teo; Choi, Jae

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, we present the design and implementation of a new rendering method based on high dynamic range (HDR) lighting and exposure control. This rendering method is applied to create video images for a 3D virtual bronchoscopy system. One of the main optical parameters of a bronchoscope's camera is the sensor exposure. The exposure adjustment is needed since the dynamic range of most digital video cameras is narrower than the high dynamic range of real scenes. The dynamic range of a camera is defined as the ratio of the brightest point of an image to the darkest point of the same image where details are present. In a video camera exposure is controlled by shutter speed and the lens aperture. To create the virtual bronchoscopic images, we first rendered a raw image in absolute units (luminance); then, we simulated exposure by mapping the computed values to the values appropriate for video-acquired images using a tone mapping operator. We generated several images with HDR and others with low dynamic range (LDR), and then compared their quality by applying them to a 2D/3D video-based tracking system. We conclude that images with HDR are closer to real bronchoscopy images than those with LDR, and thus, that HDR lighting can improve the accuracy of image-based tracking.

  8. Partition of biocides between water and inorganic phases of renders with organic binder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbanczyk, Michal M; Bollmann, Ulla E; Bester, Kai

    2016-01-01

    , the partition of biocides between water and inorganic phases of render with organic binder was investigated. The partition constants of carbendazim, diuron, iodocarb, isoproturon, cybutryn (irgarol), octylisothiazolinone, terbutryn, and tebuconazole towards minerals typically used in renders, e.g. barite...... with render-water distribution constants of two artificially made renders showed that the distribution constants can be estimated based on partition constants of compounds for individual components of the render....

  9. Review of possible correlations between in situ stress and PFL fracture transmissivity data at Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Derek (University of Alberta (United States)); Follin, Sven (SF GeoLogic AB (Sweden))

    2011-11-15

    In laboratory samples, the fracture transmissivity decreases significantly as the confining stress increases. While these experimental relationships are widely accepted and validated on laboratory samples, it is unknown if such relationships exist in situ or if these relationships can be scaled from the centimetre-scale laboratory tests to the metre-scale of in situ fractures. The purpose of this work is to assess the relationship between the structural-hydraulic data gathered in deep, cored boreholes at Forsmark and the in situ stress state acting on the these fractures. In conclusion, there does not appear to be sufficient evidence from these analyses to support the notion that the magnitude of the flow along the fractures at Forsmark is solely controlled by the in situ stress acting on the fracture. This should not be surprising because the majority of the fractures formed more than 1 billion years ago and the current in situ stress state has only been active for the past 12 million years. It is more likely that the transmissivity values are controlled by fracture roughness, open channels within the fracture, fracture stiffness and fracture infilling material

  10. The lime renderings from plaza de la Corredera, Córdoba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González, T.

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The causes of the pathologies found on the lime renderings from Plaza de la Corredera façades are analysed in this study. For this purpose, the mineralogical and chemical analyses of the building materials -brickwork and rendering mortar- has been carried out, as well as their physical, hydric and mechanical properties have been determined. The obtained results from both unaltered and altered materials, and the analysis of the rendering's raw materials, have allowed us to establish that rendering deterioration is connected to the presence of saline compounds (gypsum, halite, which existing in the brickwork substratum, have been removed due to the water saturation of such brickwork. The main cause responsible of the alteration forms - efflorescence, crusts, grain-disintegration, bulging, flaking found on the renderings, has been the salts precipitation (halite, hexahydrite, epsomite in their way towards the external surface.

    En este estudio se analizan las causas de las patologías de los revocos de cal de las fachadas de la Plaza de la Corredera. Para ello se ha realizado el análisis mineralógico y químico de los materiales de construcción - fábrica de ladrillo y mortero de revestimiento- y se han determinado sus propiedades físicas, hídricas y mecánicas. Mediante la comparación de los resultados obtenidos en los materiales inalterados y en los alterados, así como una vez analizadas las materias primas utilizadas en la realización del revoco, se ha podido establecer que la alteración de este último está relacionada con la existencia de compuestos salinos (yeso, halita que, presentes en el substrato de fábrica de ladrillo, se han exudado por saturación de agua de la misma. La precipitación de las sales (halita, hexahidrita, epsomita en su migración hacia el exterior ha sido la principal responsable de las formas de alteración -eflorescencias, costras, arenización, abombamientos, descamaciones- que aparecen sobre los

  11. In-situ thermal testing program strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    In the past year the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project has implemented a new Program Approach to the licensing process. The Program Approach suggests a step-wise approach to licensing in which the early phases will require less site information than previously planned and necessitate a lesser degree of confidence in the longer-term performance of the repository. Under the Program Approach, the thermal test program is divided into two principal phases: (1) short-term in situ tests (in the 1996 to 2000 time period) and laboratory thermal tests to obtain preclosure information, parameters, and data along with bounding information for postclosure performance; and (2) longer-term in situ tests to obtain additional data regarding postclosure performance. This effort necessitates a rethinking of the testing program because the amount of information needed for the initial licensing phase is less than previously planned. This document proposes a revised and consolidated in situ thermal test program (including supporting laboratory tests) that is structured to meet the needs of the Program Approach. A customer-supplier model is used to define the Project data needs. These data needs, along with other requirements, were then used to define a set of conceptual experiments that will provide the required data within the constraints of the Program Approach schedule. The conceptual thermal tests presented in this document represent a consolidation and update of previously defined tests that should result in a more efficient use of Project resources. This document focuses on defining the requirements and tests needed to satisfy the goal of a successful license application in 2001, should the site be found suitable.

  12. In situ rheology of yeast biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugnoni, Lorena I; Tarifa, María C; Lozano, Jorge E; Genovese, Diego

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the in situ rheological behavior of yeast biofilms growing on stainless steel under static and turbulent flow. The species used (Rhodototula mucilaginosa, Candida krusei, Candida kefyr and Candida tropicalis) were isolated from a clarified apple juice industry. The flow conditions impacted biofilm composition over time, with a predominance of C. krusei under static and turbulent flow. Likewise, structural variations occurred, with a tighter appearance under dynamic flow. Under turbulent flow there was an increase of 112 μm in biofilm thickness at 11 weeks (p rheology and contribute to a thin body of knowledge about fungal biofilm formation.

  13. Computer Aided in situ Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chongtay, Rocio A.; Hansen, John Paulin; Decker, Lone

    2006-01-01

    . One of the most common and successfully used treatments for phobic conditions has been Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), which helps people learn to detect thinking patterns that trigger the irrational fear and to replace them with more realistic ideas. The health and financial impacts in society...... presented here is being designed in a modular and scalable fashion. The web-based module can be accessed anywhere any time from a PC connected to the internet and can be used alone or as supplement for a location-based module for in situ gradual exposure therapy....

  14. In Situ Preservation of Historic Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, R.; Brooks, R.

    The loss of the Mir space station is shown to symbolize a new consciousness of the value of space artefacts. The reasons why such artefacts as Mir become historic objects worthy of preservation are examined. Preservation of space vehicles in situ is discussed, with particular reference to safety, monitoring and long term costs. An argument is made for a wider definition for World Heritage designations to include material beyond the surface of the Earth, and for international bodies to assess, monitor and oversee these projects. Such heritage sites are seen as an economic driver for the development of space tourism in the 21st century.

  15. In situ viscometry by optical trapping interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Camilo; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Köszali, Roland; Ecoffet, Carole; Forró, László; Jeney, Sylvia

    2008-11-01

    We demonstrate quantitative in situ viscosity measurements by tracking the thermal fluctuations of an optically trapped microsphere subjected to a small oscillatory flow. The measured power spectral density of the sphere's positions displays a characteristic peak at the driving frequency of the flow, which is simply proportional to the viscosity, when measured in units of the thermal power spectral density at the same frequency. Measurements are validated on different water-glycerol mixtures, as well as in a glycerol gradient, where no a priori knowledge of the solution is used to determine the glycerol concentration.

  16. In situ characterization of undulator magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Thierry; Otero, Edwige; Ohresser, Philippe

    2012-03-01

    A new in situ method is proposed to characterize the peak magnetic fields of undulator sources. The X-ray beam emitted by the HU52 Apple-2 undulator of the DEIMOS beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron is analyzed using the Bragg diffraction of a Si(111) crystal. Measurements over the undulator gap range in linear horizontal polarization are compared with simulations in order to rebuild the Halbach function linking the undulator gaps to their peak magnetic fields. The method presented also allows information about the electron beam to be obtained.

  17. Polypropylene/graphite nanocomposites by in situ polymerization; Nanocompositos polipropileno/grafite via polimerizacao in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milani, Marceo A.; Galland, Giselda B., E-mail: griselda@iq.ufrgs.br [Instituto de Quimica, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Quijada, Raul [Universidade de Chile, Santiago (Chile). Centro de Ciencias de los Materiales; Basso, Nara R.S. [Fac. de Quimica, PUCRS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This work presents the synthesis of nanocomposites of polypropylene/graphite by in situ polymerization using metallocene catalyst and graphene nanosheets. Initially was analyzed which of the metallocene catalysts rac-Et(Ind){sub 2}ZrCl{sub 2} or rac-Me{sub 2}Si(Ind){sub 2}ZrCl{sub 2} produces polypropylene with mechanical properties more relevant. Then it were performed the in situ polymerization reactions to obtain the nanocomposites. The polymeric materials were characterized by XRD, DSC, GPC and DMTA. (author)

  18. In situ combustion field experiences in Venezuela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalba, M.; Estrada, M.; Bolivar, J. [INTEVEP, Caracas (Venezuela)

    1995-02-01

    A literature review of four in situ combustion projects: in Miga, Tia Juana, Melones and Morichal fields in Venezuela was made, and a summary of these projects is presented. Reservoir description and project performance data were analyzed. The behavior of the four in situ combustion field tests can be summarized as follows: The problems most often encountered were corrosion and high temperature producing wells. The direction in which the burning front moved was guided essentially by reservoir characteristics. The produced oil was upgraded by about 4{degrees} API, and viscosity was substantially reduced. For Mirochal and Miga fields, the analyses of available information from the combustion projects indicated that the process has been successful in the affected region. Conclusions from this review indicate that the two most frequent problems encountered were operational problems in producing wells and the direction of the burning front. The heterogeneous nature of the sands probably resulted in the burning front moving in a preferential direction, hence reducing areal sweep efficiency.

  19. GAS TURBINE REHEAT USING IN SITU COMBUSTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. Bachovchin; T.E. Lippert; R.A. Newby P.G.A. Cizmas

    2004-05-17

    In situ reheat is an alternative to traditional gas turbine reheat design in which fuel is fed through airfoils rather than in a bulky discrete combustor separating HP and LP turbines. The goals are to achieve increased power output and/or efficiency without higher emissions. In this program the scientific basis for achieving burnout with low emissions has been explored. In Task 1, Blade Path Aerodynamics, design options were evaluated using CFD in terms of burnout, increase of power output, and possible hot streaking. It was concluded that Vane 1 injection in a conventional 4-stage turbine was preferred. Vane 2 injection after vane 1 injection was possible, but of marginal benefit. In Task 2, Combustion and Emissions, detailed chemical kinetics modeling, validated by Task 3, Sub-Scale Testing, experiments, resulted in the same conclusions, with the added conclusion that some increase in emissions was expected. In Task 4, Conceptual Design and Development Plan, Siemens Westinghouse power cycle analysis software was used to evaluate alternative in situ reheat design options. Only single stage reheat, via vane 1, was found to have merit, consistent with prior Tasks. Unifying the results of all the tasks, a conceptual design for single stage reheat utilizing 24 holes, 1.8 mm diameter, at the trailing edge of vane 1 is presented. A development plan is presented.

  20. Molecular cytogenetics using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, J.W.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Lucas, J.; Pinkel, D.; Weier, H-U.; Yu, Loh-Chung.

    1990-12-07

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome-specific probes enables several new areas of cytogenetic investigation by allowing visual determination of the presence and normality of specific genetic sequences in single metaphase or interphase cells. in this approach, termed molecular cytogenetics, the genetic loci to be analyzed are made microscopically visible in single cells using in situ hybridization with nucleic acid probes specific to these loci. To accomplish this, the DNA in the target cells is made single stranded by thermal denaturation and incubated with single-stranded, chemically modified probe under conditions where the probe will anneal only with DNA sequences to which it has high DNA sequence homology. The bound probe is then made visible by treatment with a fluorescent reagent such as fluorescein that binds to the chemical modification carried by the probe. The DNA to which the probe does not bind is made visible by staining with a dye such as propidium iodide that fluoresces at a wavelength different from that of the reagent used for probe visualization. We show in this report that probes are now available that make this technique useful for biological dosimetry, prenatal diagnosis and cancer biology. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  1. In situ SU-8 silver nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren V. Fischer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposite materials containing metal nanoparticles are of considerable interest in photonics and optoelectronics applications. However, device fabrication of such materials always encounters the challenge of incorporation of preformed nanoparticles into photoresist materials. As a solution to this problem, an easy new method of fabricating silver nanocomposites by an in situ reduction of precursors within the epoxy-based photoresist SU-8 has been developed. AgNO3 dissolved in acetonitrile and mixed with the epoxy-based photoresist SU-8 forms silver nanoparticles primarily during the pre- and post-exposure soft bake steps at 95 °C. A further high-temperature treatment at 300 °C resulted in the formation of densely homogeneously distributed silver nanoparticles in the photoresist matrix. No particle growth or agglomeration of nanoparticles is observed at this point. The reported new in situ silver nanocomposite materials can be spin coated as homogeneous thin films and structured by using UV lithography. A resolution of 5 µm is achieved in the lithographic process. The UV exposure time is found to be independent of the nanoparticle concentration. The fabricated silver nanocomposites exhibit high plasmonic responses suitable for the development of new optoelectronic and optical sensing devices.

  2. Mitigating in situ oil sands carbon costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theriault, D.J.; Peterson, J. [Laricina Energy Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Heinrichs, H. [Canadian Chemical Technology Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Carbon capture and sequestration is a complex problem with a variety of dimensions that need to be considered. The political, social, and regulatory pressures are forcing carbon costs on the oil sands industry in an effort to reduce the carbon footprint of oil sands operations. This paper reviewed the political, social, and regulatory pressures and obligations for the in-situ oil sands industry. It presented the views and insights of Laricina Energy on the carbon challenge. It also described the initiatives that Laricina Energy is taking to manage these imperatives and outlined the challenges the industry is facing. The purpose of the paper was to encourage dialogue and collaboration by the oil sands industry. The paper also described the dimensions of the carbon problem and how the industry can contribute to a solution. Last, the paper reviewed the parameters of carbon dioxide or greenhouse gas containment and storage issues. It was concluded that the regulatory and policy requirements need to be clarified so that industry understands the new business landscape as well as the requirements that influence the economics of in-situ oil sands development. 7 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Alternatieve in situ bodemsaneringstechnieken; literatuuronderzoek bij het project "In Situ Biorestauratie" Asten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheuter AJ; LBG

    1997-01-01

    In developing in situ remediation most of the focus used to be on techniques using infiltration water to supply oxygen to the location. Later, techniques were developed in which soil was flushed with air to enhance the oxygen availability to microorganisms. The aim of the study reported here was to

  4. Alternatieve in situ bodemsaneringstechnieken; literatuuronderzoek bij het project "In Situ Biorestauratie" Asten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheuter AJ; LBG

    1997-01-01

    In developing in situ remediation most of the focus used to be on techniques using infiltration water to supply oxygen to the location. Later, techniques were developed in which soil was flushed with air to enhance the oxygen availability to microorganisms. The aim of the study reported here was to

  5. A survey on hair modeling: styling, simulation, and rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Kelly; Bertails, Florence; Kim, Tae-Yong; Marschner, Stephen R; Cani, Marie-Paule; Lin, Ming C

    2007-01-01

    Realistic hair modeling is a fundamental part of creating virtual humans in computer graphics. This paper surveys the state of the art in the major topics of hair modeling: hairstyling, hair simulation, and hair rendering. Because of the difficult, often unsolved problems that arise in all these areas, a broad diversity of approaches are used, each with strengths that make it appropriate for particular applications. We discuss each of these major topics in turn, presenting the unique challenges facing each area and describing solutions that have been presented over the years to handle these complex issues. Finally, we outline some of the remaining computational challenges in hair modeling.

  6. Interactive View-Dependent Rendering of Large Isosurfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregorski, B; Duchaineau, M; Lindstrom, P; Pascucci, V; Joy, K I

    2002-11-19

    We present an algorithm for interactively extracting and rendering isosurfaces of large volume datasets in a view-dependent fashion. A recursive tetrahedral mesh refinement scheme, based on longest edge bisection, is used to hierarchically decompose the data into a multiresolution structure. This data structure allows fast extraction of arbitrary isosurfaces to within user specified view-dependent error bounds. A data layout scheme based on hierarchical space filling curves provides access to the data in a cache coherent manner that follows the data access pattern indicated by the mesh refinement.

  7. An example of quantum imaging: rendering an object undetectable

    CERN Document Server

    Ataman, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we propose and analyse a Gedankenexperiment involving three non-linear crystals and two objects inserted in the idler beams. We show that, besides the behaviour that can be extrapolated from previous experiments involving two crystals and one object, we are able to predict a new effect: under certain circumstances, one of the objects can be rendered undetectable to any single detection rate on the signal photons with discarded idler photons. This effect could find applications in future developments of quantum imaging techniques.

  8. An example of quantum imaging: rendering an object undetectable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataman, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we propose and analyse a Gedankenexperiment involving three non-linear crystals and two objects inserted in the idler beams. We show that, besides the behaviour that can be extrapolated from previous experiments involving two crystals and one object, we are able to predict a new effect: under certain circumstances, one of the objects can be rendered undetectable to any single detection rate on the signal photons with discarded idler photons. This effect could find applications in future developments of quantum imaging techniques.

  9. Horse-shoe lung-rediscovered via volume rendered images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alpa Bharati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Horseshoe lung, usually associated with pulmonary venolobar syndrome, is a rare congenital anomaly involving the fusion of the postero-basal segments of the right and left lungs across the midline. The fused segment or the isthmus lies posterior to the pericardium and anterior to the aorta.The associated pulmonary venolobar syndrome involves anomalous systemic arterial supply and anomlaous systemic venous drainage of the right lung. With the advent of MDCT imaging, we can diagnose this rare condition as well all its associated anomalies non-invasively. Volume-rendered techniques greatly simplify the complex anatomy and provide easy understanding of the same.

  10. Partitioning of biocides between water and inorganic phases of render

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbanczyk, Michal; Bollmann, Ulla E.; Bester, Kai

    The use of biocides as additives for building materials has gained importance in recent years. These biocides are, e.g., applied to renders and paints to prevent them from microbial spoilage. However, these biocides can leach out into the environment. In order to better understand this leaching...... compared. The partitioning constants for calcium carbonate varied between 0.1 (isoproturon) and 1.1 (iodocarb) and 84.6 (dichlorooctylisothiazolinone), respectively. The results for barite, kaolinite and mica were in a similar range and usually the compounds with high partitioning constants for one mineral...

  11. Practical rendering and computation with Direct3D 11

    CERN Document Server

    Zink, Jason; Hoxley, Jack

    2011-01-01

    Practical Rendering and Computation with Direct3D 11 packs in documentation and in-depth coverage of basic and high-level concepts related to using Direct 3D 11 and is a top pick for any serious programming collection. … perfect for a wide range of users. Any interested in computation and multicore models will find this packed with examples and technical applications.-Midwest Book Review, October 2011The authors have generously provided us with an optimal blend of concepts and philosophy, illustrative figures to clarify the more difficult points, and source code fragments to make the ideas con

  12. Removal of trace mercury(II) from aqueous solution by in situ formed Mn–Fe (hydr)oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xixin, E-mail: luxixin@outlook.com; Huangfu, Xiaoliu, E-mail: hfxl-hit@163.com; Ma, Jun, E-mail: majun@hit.edu.cn

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Trace mercury removal from solution was performed using in situ Mn–Fe. • In situ Mn–Fe have better removal efficiency of trace mercury than PAC and FeCl{sub 3}. • Mercury removal mechanism by in situ Mn–Fe is adsorption–flocculation–precipitation. - Abstract: The efficiency and mechanism of trace mercury (Hg(II)) removal by in situ formed manganese–ferric (hydr)oxides (in situ Mn–Fe) were investigated by reacting KMnO{sub 4} with Fe(II) in simulated solutions and natural water. In the simulated solutions, the impact of coagulant dosage, pH, and temperature on mercury removal was studied. Experimental results showed that in situ Mn–Fe more effectively removed mercury compared with polyaluminum chloride (PAC) and iron(III) chloride (FeCl{sub 3}), and that mercury existed in the form of uncharged species, namely Hg(OH){sub 2}, HgClOH(aq), and HgCl{sub 2}(aq). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy demonstrated that in situ Mn–Fe contained hydroxyl groups as the surface active sites, while X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements revealed that MnO{sub 2} or MnOOH and FeOOH were the dominant species in the precipitates. XPS analysis indicated that an Hg–Mn–Fe mixture was formed in the precipitates, suggesting that mercury was removed from solutions via transfer from the liquid phase to solid phase. These results indicated that the primary mercury removal mechanisms in in situ Mn–Fe were surface complexation and flocculation–precipitation processes. Satisfactory removal efficiency of mercury was also observed following in situ Mn–Fe in natural waters.

  13. Third-strand in situ hybridization (TISH) to non-denatured metaphase spreads and interphase nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M D; Fresco, J R

    1999-07-01

    A methodology has been developed for binding oligodeoxyribonucleotide 'third strands' to duplex DNA targets in fixed but not additionally denatured metaphase spreads and interphase nuclei under conditions found to be optimal in solution. Third-strand in situ hybridization (TISH) at pH 6.0 of a psoralen- and biotin-modified 16-nucleotide homopyrimidine third strand to a unique multicopy target sequence in human chromosome 17 alpha-satellite (D17Z1 locus) is described. UVA-photofixed third strands, rendered fluorescent by fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled avidin, are reproducibly centromere-specific for chromosome 17, and visible without amplification of the signal in lymphocyte and somatic cell hybrid spreads and interphase nuclei. Two third-strand-specific D17Z1 haplotypes were identified. TISH has potential diagnostic, biochemical, and flow cytometric applicability to native metaphase and interphase chromatin.

  14. Glutaraldehyde vapor cross-linked nanofibrous PVA mat with in situ formed silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destaye, Addisu Getachew; Lin, Cheng-Keng; Lee, Cheng-Kang

    2013-06-12

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibrous mat can be easily prepared via electrospinning its aqueous solution. However, the obtained nanofibrous mat is instantaneously dissolved in water. Therefore, rendering the environmentally friendly nanofibrous mat water insoluble by cross-linking mechanism is of great interest. The electrospun PVA nanofibrous mat with an average fiber diameter of ca. 400 nm could be effectively cross-linked by glutaraldehyde vapor at room temperature. The cross-linking not only resulted in a water-insoluble nanofibrous mat but also generated an excess amount of unreacted aldehyde functional groups that could reduce silver salts into silver nanoparticles. The in situ formed silver nanoparticles along the fibrous surface showed excellent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. The vapor cross-linked nanofibrous mat shows a high potential to be used for efficiently capturing and killing pathogenic bacteria.

  15. In situ measurement of Scots pine needle PRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mõttus, Matti; Hernández-Clemente, Rocío; Perheentupa, Viljami; Markiet, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    The Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI) calculated from narrow-band spectral reflectance data is a vegetation index which is increasingly used as an indicator of photosynthetic activity. The leaf-level link between the status of photosynthetic apparatus and PRI has been robustly established under controlled light conditions. However, when a whole canopy is measured instantaneously, the PRI signal is heavily modified by vegetation structure and local variations in incident light conditions. To apply PRI for monitoring the photosynthesis of whole canopies under natural conditions, these large-scale measurements need to be validated against simultaneous leaf PRI. Unfortunately, PRI changes dynamically with incident light and has a large natural variation. No generally accepted procedure exists today for determining the PRI of canopy elements in situ. We present a successful procedure for in situ measurements of needle PRI. We describe, characterize and test an optical measurement protocol and demonstrate its applicability in field conditions. The measurement apparatus consisted of a light source, needle clip, spectroradiometer and a controlling computer. The light level inside the clip was approximately two-thirds of that on sunlit needle surfaces at midday. During each measurement the needle was inserted into the clip for approximately 5 s. We found no near-instantaneous changes (sub-second scale jumps) in PRI during the measurements. The time constants for PRI variation in light to full shade acclimations were approximately 10 s. The procedure was successfully applied to monitor the greening-up of Scots pine trees. We detected both facultative (diurnal) PRI changes of 0.02 (unitless) and constitutive (seasonal) variations of 0.1. In order to reliably detect the facultative PRI change of 0.02, 20 needles need to be sampled from both sunlit and shaded locations. We established a robust procedure for irradiance-dependent leaf (needle) PRI measurements, facilitating

  16. In-situ trainable intrusion detection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symons, Christopher T.; Beaver, Justin M.; Gillen, Rob; Potok, Thomas E.

    2016-11-15

    A computer implemented method detects intrusions using a computer by analyzing network traffic. The method includes a semi-supervised learning module connected to a network node. The learning module uses labeled and unlabeled data to train a semi-supervised machine learning sensor. The method records events that include a feature set made up of unauthorized intrusions and benign computer requests. The method identifies at least some of the benign computer requests that occur during the recording of the events while treating the remainder of the data as unlabeled. The method trains the semi-supervised learning module at the network node in-situ, such that the semi-supervised learning modules may identify malicious traffic without relying on specific rules, signatures, or anomaly detection.

  17. IN SITU URANIUM STABILIZATION BY MICROBIAL METABOLITES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C; Anna Knox, A; Chad L Leverette,C; Yianne Kritzas, Y

    2006-11-29

    Soil contaminated with U was the focus of this study in order to develop in-situ, U bio-immobilization technology. We have demonstrated microbial production of a metal chelating biopolymer, pyomelanin, in U contaminated soil from the Tims Branch area of the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) as a result of tyrosine amendments. Bacterial densities of pyomelanin producers were >106 cells/g wet soil. Pyomelanin demonstrated U chelating and mineral binding capacities at pH 4 and 7. In laboratory studies, in the presence of goethite or illite, pyomelanin enhanced U sequestration by these minerals. Tyrosine amended soils in field tests demonstrated increased U sequestration capacity following pyomelanin production up to 13 months after tyrosine treatments.

  18. Unannounced in situ simulation of obstetric emergencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Jette Led; Lottrup, Pernille; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To describe how unannounced in situ simulation (ISS) was perceived by healthcare professionals before and after its implementation, and to describe the organisational impact of ISS. STUDY DESIGN: Ten unannounced ISS involving all staff were scheduled March-August 2007. Questionnaire surveys...... on staff perceptions were conducted before (2003-2006) and after (2007-2008) implementation of unannounced ISS. Information from the debriefing sessions following each ISS constituted a proxy measure of the organisational impact of the ISS. RESULTS: Five out of ten of the unannounced ISS scheduled were...... conducted. Twenty-three members of the staff at work on a scheduled day for ISS were randomly selected to participate. Questionnaires before implementation revealed that 137/196 (70%) of staff members agreed or strongly agreed that ISS was a good idea and 52/199 (26%) thought it likely to be stressful...

  19. In-situ SEM electrochemistry and radiolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Nilsen, Rolf Erling Robberstad; Norby, Poul

    Electron microscopy is a ubiquitous technique to see effects which are too small to see with traditional optical microscopes. Recently it has become possible to also image liquid samples by encapsulating them from the vacuum of the microscope and a natural evolution from that has been to include...... microelectrodes on the windows to enable studies of electrohcemical processes. In this way it is possible to perform in-situ electrochemical experiments such as electroplating and charge and discharge analysis of battery electrodes. In a typical liquid cell, electrons are accelerated to sufficiently high energies...... to traverse a thin window made by a silicon nitride membrane, and interact with the sample immersed in liquid. In transmission electron microscopy (TEM) the majority of the electrons continue through the sample to form an image. In scanning electron microscopy (SEM) a fraction of the electrons...

  20. High resolution in situ ultrasonic corrosion monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, R.J.

    1984-01-10

    An ultrasonic corrosion monitor is provided which produces an in situ measurement of the amount of corrosion of a monitoring zone or zones of an elongate probe placed in the corrosive environment. A monitoring zone is preferably formed between the end of the probe and the junction of the zone with a lead-in portion of the probe. Ultrasonic pulses are applied to the probe and a determination made of the time interval between pulses reflected from the end of the probe and the junction referred to, both when the probe is uncorroded and while it is corroding. Corresponding electrical signals are produced and a value for the normalized transit time delay derived from these time interval measurements is used to calculate the amount of corrosion.

  1. Support Routines for In Situ Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deen, Robert G.; Pariser, Oleg; Yeates, Matthew C.; Lee, Hyun H.; Lorre, Jean

    2013-01-01

    This software consists of a set of application programs that support ground-based image processing for in situ missions. These programs represent a collection of utility routines that perform miscellaneous functions in the context of the ground data system. Each one fulfills some specific need as determined via operational experience. The most unique aspect to these programs is that they are integrated into the large, in situ image processing system via the PIG (Planetary Image Geometry) library. They work directly with space in situ data, understanding the appropriate image meta-data fields and updating them properly. The programs themselves are completely multimission; all mission dependencies are handled by PIG. This suite of programs consists of: (1)marscahv: Generates a linearized, epi-polar aligned image given a stereo pair of images. These images are optimized for 1-D stereo correlations, (2) marscheckcm: Compares the camera model in an image label with one derived via kinematics modeling on the ground, (3) marschkovl: Checks the overlaps between a list of images in order to determine which might be stereo pairs. This is useful for non-traditional stereo images like long-baseline or those from an articulating arm camera, (4) marscoordtrans: Translates mosaic coordinates from one form into another, (5) marsdispcompare: Checks a Left Right stereo disparity image against a Right Left disparity image to ensure they are consistent with each other, (6) marsdispwarp: Takes one image of a stereo pair and warps it through a disparity map to create a synthetic opposite- eye image. For example, a right eye image could be transformed to look like it was taken from the left eye via this program, (7) marsfidfinder: Finds fiducial markers in an image by projecting their approximate location and then using correlation to locate the markers to subpixel accuracy. These fiducial markets are small targets attached to the spacecraft surface. This helps verify, or improve, the

  2. DUCTAL CARCINOMA IN SITU OF THE BREAST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical characteristics, treatment and prognosis of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. Methods: Clinicopathological and follow-up data were collected in 52 patients with DCIS. Results: The clinic data showed that 50 patients had signs of breast lumps or/and nipple discharges, 2 patients presented abnormal mammography; 2 patients had lymph node involved; and 14 patients were accompanied with intraductal papillomatosis. All patients were Received surgical therapy. The follow-up data showed 1 patient locally recurred after lumpectomy, and was underwent mastectomy again, then cured. There were no patients died of DCIS. Conclusion: Mastectomy should be a standard surgical mode, and the prognosis of DCIS was favorable, but mammography for screening of asymptomatic women should be strengthened to find DCIS.

  3. In situ Fabrication of Monolithic Copper Azide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Li, Mingyu; Zeng, Qingxuan; Wu, Xingyu

    2016-04-01

    Fabrication and characterization of monolithic copper azide were performed. The monolithic nanoporous copper (NPC) with interconnected pores and nanoparticles was prepared by decomposition and sintering of the ultrafine copper oxalate. The preferable monolithic NPC can be obtained through decomposition and sintering at 400°C for 30 min. Then, the available monolithic NPC was in situ reacted with the gaseous HN3 for 24 h and the monolithic NPC was transformed into monolithic copper azide. Additionally, the copper particles prepared by electrodeposition were also reacted with the gaseous HN3 under uniform conditions as a comparison. The fabricated monolithic copper azide was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC).

  4. Sparse PDF Volumes for Consistent Multi-Resolution Volume Rendering

    KAUST Repository

    Sicat, Ronell Barrera

    2014-12-31

    This paper presents a new multi-resolution volume representation called sparse pdf volumes, which enables consistent multi-resolution volume rendering based on probability density functions (pdfs) of voxel neighborhoods. These pdfs are defined in the 4D domain jointly comprising the 3D volume and its 1D intensity range. Crucially, the computation of sparse pdf volumes exploits data coherence in 4D, resulting in a sparse representation with surprisingly low storage requirements. At run time, we dynamically apply transfer functions to the pdfs using simple and fast convolutions. Whereas standard low-pass filtering and down-sampling incur visible differences between resolution levels, the use of pdfs facilitates consistent results independent of the resolution level used. We describe the efficient out-of-core computation of large-scale sparse pdf volumes, using a novel iterative simplification procedure of a mixture of 4D Gaussians. Finally, our data structure is optimized to facilitate interactive multi-resolution volume rendering on GPUs.

  5. Sparse PDF Volumes for Consistent Multi-Resolution Volume Rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicat, Ronell; Krüger, Jens; Möller, Torsten; Hadwiger, Markus

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a new multi-resolution volume representation called sparse pdf volumes, which enables consistent multi-resolution volume rendering based on probability density functions (pdfs) of voxel neighborhoods. These pdfs are defined in the 4D domain jointly comprising the 3D volume and its 1D intensity range. Crucially, the computation of sparse pdf volumes exploits data coherence in 4D, resulting in a sparse representation with surprisingly low storage requirements. At run time, we dynamically apply transfer functions to the pdfs using simple and fast convolutions. Whereas standard low-pass filtering and down-sampling incur visible differences between resolution levels, the use of pdfs facilitates consistent results independent of the resolution level used. We describe the efficient out-of-core computation of large-scale sparse pdf volumes, using a novel iterative simplification procedure of a mixture of 4D Gaussians. Finally, our data structure is optimized to facilitate interactive multi-resolution volume rendering on GPUs.

  6. Fast polyhedral cell sorting for interactive rendering of unstructured grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combra, J; Klosowski, J T; Max, N; Silva, C T; Williams, P L

    1998-10-30

    Direct volume rendering based on projective methods works by projecting, in visibility order, the polyhedral cells of a mesh onto the image plane, and incrementally compositing the cell's color and opacity into the final image. Crucial to this method is the computation of a visibility ordering of the cells. If the mesh is ''well-behaved'' (acyclic and convex), then the MPVO method of Williams provides a very fast sorting algorithm; however, this method only computes an approximate ordering in general datasets, resulting in visual artifacts when rendered. A recent method of Silva et al. removed the assumption that the mesh is convex, by means of a sweep algorithm used in conjunction with the MPVO method; their algorithm is substantially faster than previous exact methods for general meshes. In this paper we propose a new technique, which we call BSP-XMPVO, which is based on a fast and simple way of using binary space partitions on the boundary elements of the mesh to augment the ordering produced by MPVO. Our results are shown to be orders of magnitude better than previous exact methods of sorting cells.

  7. Non-Photorealistic Rendering in Chinese Painting of Animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A set of algorithms is proposed in this paper to automatically transform 3D animal models to Chinese painting style. Inspired by real painting process in Chinese painting of animals, we divide the whole rendering process into two parts: borderline stroke making and interior shading. In borderline stroke making process we first find 3D model silhouettes in real-time depending on the viewing direction of a user. After retrieving silhouette information from all model edges, a stroke linking mechanism is applied to link these independent edges into a long stroke. Finally we grow a plain thin silhouette line to a stylus stroke with various widths at each control point and a 2D brush model is combined with it to simulate a Chinese painting stroke. In the interior shading pipeline, three stages are used to convert a Gouraud-shading image to a Chinese painting style image: color quantization, ink diffusion and box filtering. The color quantization stage assigns all pixels in an image into four color levels and each level represents a color layer in a Chinese painting. Ink diffusion stage is used to transfer inks and water between different levels and to grow areas in an irregular way. The box filtering stage blurs sharp borders between different levels to embellish the appearance of final interior shading image. In addition to automatic rendering, an interactive Chinese painting system which is equipped with friendly input devices can be also combined to generate more artistic Chinese painting images manually.

  8. Protein and mineral characterisation of rendered meat and bone meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, M; Penkman, K E H; Wess, T J; Reaney, S; Collins, M J

    2012-10-01

    We report the characterisation of meat and bone meal (MBM) standards (Set B-EFPRA) derived from cattle, sheep, pig and chicken, each rendered at four different temperatures (133, 137, 141 and 145 °C). The standards, prepared for an EU programme STRATFEED (to develop new methodologies for the detection and quantification of illegal addition of mammalian tissues in feeding stuffs), have been widely circulated and used to assess a range of methods for identification of the species composition of MBM. The overall state of mineral alteration and protein preservation as a function of temperature was monitored using small angle X-ray diffraction (SAXS), amino acid composition and racemization analyses. Progressive increases in protein damage and mineral alteration in chicken and cattle standards was observed. In the case of sheep and pig, there was greater damage to the proteins and alteration of the minerals at the lowest treatment temperature (133 °C), suggesting that the thermal treatments must have been compromised in some way. This problem has probably impacted upon the numerous studies which tested methods against these heat treatments. We use protein mass spectrometric methods to explore if thermostable proteins could be used to identify rendered MBM. In more thermally altered samples, so-called 'thermostable' proteins such as osteocalcin which has been proposed as a ideal target to speciate MBM were no longer detectable, but the structural protein type I collagen could be used to differentiate all four species, even in the most thermally altered samples.

  9. Fungal biodegradation of phthalate plasticizer in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeep, S; Faseela, P; Josh, M K Sarath; Balachandran, S; Devi, R Sudha; Benjamin, Sailas

    2013-04-01

    This unique study describes how Aspergillus japonicus, Penicillium brocae and Purpureocillium lilacinum, three novel isolates of our laboratory from heavily plastics-contaminated soil completely utilized the plasticizer di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) bound to PVC blood storage bags (BB) in simple basal salt medium (BSM) by static submerged growth (28 °C). Initial quantification as well as percentage utilization of DEHP blended to BB were estimated periodically by extracting it into n-hexane. A two-stage cultivation strategy was employed for the complete mycoremediation of DEHP from BB in situ. During the first growth stage, about two-third parts of total (33.5% w/w) DEHP bound to BB were utilized in two weeks, accompanied by increased fungal biomass (~0.15-0.32 g per g BB) and sharp declining (to ~3) of initial pH (7.2). At this stagnant growth state (low pH), spent medium was replaced by fresh BSM (pH, 7.2), and thus in the second stage the remaining DEHP (one-third) in BB was utilized completely. The ditches and furrows seen from the topology of the BB as seen by the 3D AFM image further confirmed the bioremediation of DEHP physically bound to BB in situ. Of the three mycelial fungi employed, P. lilacinum independently showed highest efficiency for the complete utilization of DEHP bound to BB, whose activity was comparable to that of the consortium comprising all the three fungi described herein. To sum up, the two-stage cultivation strategy demonstrated in this study shows that a batch process would efficiently remediate the phthalic acid esters blended in plastics on a large scale, and thus it offers potentials for the management of plastics wastes.

  10. In Situ Field Testing of Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Wang

    2001-12-14

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This revision updates data and analyses presented in the initial issue of this AMR. This AMR was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' and ''Technical Work Plan for UZ Flow, Transport, and Coupled Processes Process Model Report. These activities were performed to investigate in situ flow and transport processes. The evaluations provide the necessary framework to: (1) refine and confirm the conceptual model of matrix and fracture processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and (2) analyze the impact of excavation (including use of construction water and effect of ventilation) on the UZ flow and transport processes. This AMR is intended to support revisions to ''Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport'' and ''Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Process Model Report''. In general, the results discussed in this AMR are from studies conducted using a combination or a subset of the following three approaches: (1) air-injection tests, (2) liquid-release tests, and (3) moisture monitoring using in-drift sensors or in-borehole sensors, to evaluate the impact of excavation, ventilation, and construction-water usage on the surrounding rocks. The liquid-release tests and air-injection tests provide an evaluation of in situ fracture flow and the competing processes of matrix imbibition. Only the findings from testing and data not covered in the ''Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data'' are analyzed in detail in the AMR.

  11. In-situ gelling polymers for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the research involving in situ gelling polymers and can be used as a guidebook for academics, industrialists and postgraduates interested in this area. This work summaries the academic contributions from the top authorities in the field and explore the fundamental principles of in situ gelling polymeric networks, along with examples of their major applications. This book aims to provide an up-to-date resource of in situ gelling polymer research.

  12. Efficient rendering and compression for full-parallax computer-generated holographic stereograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartch, Daniel Aaron

    2000-10-01

    . Holograms contain enormous amounts of data, which make storage and transmission cumbersome. We have derived new methods for efficiently compressing this data. Results compare favorably with existing techniques. Finally, we describe an algorithm for simulating a camera viewing a computed hologram from arbitrary positions. It uses wave optics to track the propagation of light from the hologram, through a lens, and onto a film plane. This enabled us to evaluate our rendering and compression methods in the absence of an electronic holographic display and without the lengthy processing time of hardcopy holographic printing.

  13. A review of in-situ EBSD experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stuart I. WRIGHT; Matthew M. NOWELL

    2005-01-01

    Automated EBSD or Orientation Imaging Microscopy (OIM) systems are being used in combination with other equipment within the scanning electron microscope (SEM) to perform in-situ measurements. This paper briefly reviews OIM studies of in-situ experiments performed using tensile and heating stages as well as in-situ serial sectioning. In particular, in-situ OIM scan results on an aluminum alloy sample deformed in tension; phase transformations in a cobalt sample, recrystallization and grain growth in a copper sample and serial sectioning of a nickel super-alloy sample are reviewed.

  14. Fluorescence in situ hybridization applications for super-resolution 3D structured illumination microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markaki, Yolanda; Smeets, Daniel; Cremer, Marion; Schermelleh, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization on three-dimensionally preserved cells (3D-FISH) is an efficient tool to analyze the subcellular localization and spatial arrangement of targeted DNA sequences and RNA transcripts at the single cell level. 3D reconstructions from serial optical sections obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) have long been considered the gold standard for 3D-FISH analyses. Recent super-resolution techniques circumvent the diffraction-limit of optical resolution and have defined a new state-of-the-art in bioimaging. Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) represents one of these technologies. Notably, 3D-SIM renders an eightfold improved volumetric resolution over conventional imaging, and allows the simultaneous visualization of differently labeled target structures. These features make this approach highly attractive for the analysis of spatial relations and substructures of nuclear targets that escape detection by conventional light microscopy. Here, we focus on the application of 3D-SIM for the visualization of subnuclear 3D-FISH preparations. In comparison with conventional fluorescence microscopy, the quality of 3D-SIM data is dependent to a much greater extent on the optimal sample preparation, labeling and acquisition conditions. We describe typical problems encountered with super-resolution imaging of in situ hybridizations in mammalian tissue culture cells and provide optimized DNA-/(RNA)-FISH protocols including combinations with immunofluorescence staining (Immuno-FISH) and DNA replication labeling using click chemistry.

  15. Clinical system for non-invasive in situ monitoring of gases in the human paranasal sinuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewander, Märta; Guan, Zuguang; Svanberg, Katarina; Svanberg, Sune; Svensson, Tomas

    2009-06-22

    We present a portable system for non-invasive, simultaneous sensing of molecular oxygen (O(2)) and water vapor (H(2)O) in the human paranasal cavities. The system is based on high-resolution tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLAS) and digital wavelength modulation spectroscopy (dWMS). Since optical interference and non-ideal tuning of the diode lasers render signal processing complex, we focus on Fourier analysis of dWMS signals and procedures for removal of background signals. Clinical data are presented, and exhibit a significant improvement in signal-to-noise with respect to earlier work. The in situ detection limit, in terms of absorption fraction, is about 5x10(-5) for oxygen and 5x10(-4) for water vapor, but varies between patients due to differences in light attenuation. In addition, we discuss the use of water vapor as a reference in quantification of in situ oxygen concentration in detail. In particular, light propagation aspects are investigated by employing photon time-of-flight spectroscopy.

  16. Responsive Aqueous Foams Stabilized by Silica Nanoparticles Hydrophobized in Situ with a Conventional Surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yue; Pei, Xiaomei; Jiang, Jianzhong; Cui, Zhenggang; Binks, Bernard P

    2015-12-01

    In the recent past, switchable surfactants and switchable/stimulus-responsive surface-active particles have been of great interest. Both can be transformed between surface-active and surface-inactive states via several triggers, making them recoverable and reusable afterward. However, the synthesis of these materials is complicated. In this paper we report a facile protocol to obtain responsive surface-active nanoparticles and their use in preparing responsive particle-stabilized foams. Hydrophilic silica nanoparticles are initially hydrophobized in situ with a trace amount of a conventional cationic surfactant in water, rendering them surface-active such that they stabilize aqueous foams. The latter can then be destabilized by adding equal moles of an anionic surfactant, and restabilized by adding another trace amount of the cationic surfactant followed by shaking. The stabilization-destabilization of the foams can be cycled many times at room temperature. The trigger is the stronger electrostatic interaction between the oppositely charged surfactants than that between the cationic surfactant and the negatively charged particles. The added anionic surfactant tends to form ion pairs with the cationic surfactant, leading to desorption of the latter from particle surfaces and dehydrophobization of the particles. Upon addition of another trace amount of cationic surfactant, the particles are rehydrophobized in situ and can then stabilize foams again. This principle makes it possible to obtain responsive surface-active particles using commercially available inorganic nanoparticles and conventional surfactants.

  17. Underwater reflectance transformation imaging: a technology for in situ underwater cultural heritage object-level recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmo, David; Sturt, Fraser; Miles, James; Basford, Philip; Malzbender, Tom; Martinez, Kirk; Thompson, Charlie; Earl, Graeme; Bevan, George

    2017-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for high-resolution recording of in situ underwater cultural heritage. Reflectance transformation imaging (RTI) has a proven track record in terrestrial contexts for acquiring high-resolution diagnostic data at small scales. The research presented here documents the first adaptation of RTI protocols to the subaquatic environment, with a scuba-deployable method designed around affordable off-the-shelf technologies. Underwater RTI (URTI) was used to capture detail from historic shipwrecks in both the Solent and the western Mediterranean. Results show that URTI can capture submillimeter levels of qualitative diagnostic detail from in situ archaeological material. In addition, this paper presents the results of experiments to explore the impact of turbidity on URTI. For this purpose, a prototype fixed-lighting semisubmersible RTI photography dome was constructed to allow collection of data under controlled conditions. The signal-to-noise data generated reveals that the RGB channels of underwater digital images captured in progressive turbidity degraded faster than URTI object geometry calculated from them. URTI is shown to be capable of providing analytically useful object-level detail in conditions that would render ordinary underwater photography of limited use.

  18. Melanoma "in situ" tratado con Imiquimod Melanoma in situ treated with Imiquimod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RE Achenbach

    Full Text Available Comunicamos un caso con dos melanomas "in situ", en un varón de 86 años, localizados en ambos lados de la cara con alto riesgo quirúrgico, quien fuera tratado con imiquimod al 5% una vez al día durante dos meses; los resultados hasta el momento, clínicos e histológicos han sido satisfactorios.A 86 years-old man with two melanomas "in situ" at both sides of his face, treated with imiquimod 5% are presented. The patient has a cardiovascular high risk due to isquemic heart disease, for that reason we start the treatment with imiquimod once a day for two months. The clinical and histological response was good and a follow up will be as long as we can.

  19. Detection of denitrification genes by in situ rolling circle amplification - fluorescence in situ hybridization (in situ RCA-FISH) to link metabolic potential with identity inside bacterial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoshino, Tatsuhiko; Schramm, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    A target-primed in situ rolling circle amplification (in situ RCA) protocol was developed for detection of single-copy genes inside bacterial cells and optimized with Pseudomonas stutzeri, targeting nitrite and nitrous oxide reductase genes (nirS and nosZ). Two padlock probes were designed per gene......). Nevertheless, multiple genes (nirS and nosZ; nirS and the 16S rRNA gene) could be detected simultaneously in P. stutzeri. Environmental application of in situ RCA-FISH was demonstrated on activated sludge by the differential detection of two types of nirS-defined denitrifiers; one of them was identified...

  20. Excellent color rendering indexes of multi-package white LEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ji Hye; Yang, Su Ji; Sung, Yeon-Goog; Do, Y R

    2012-08-27

    This study introduces multi-package white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) system with the ability to realize high luminous efficacy and an excellent color rendering index (CRI, R a) using the R B,M A B,M G B,M C B (R B,M A B,M G B,M denoted as a long-pass dichroic filter (LPDF)-capped, monochromatic red, amber and green phosphor converted-LED (pc-LED) pumped by a blue LED chip, and C B denoted as a cyan and blue mixed pc-LED pumped by a blue LED) system. The luminous efficacy and color rendering index (CRI) of multi-package white LED systems are compared while changing the concentration of the cyan phosphor used in the paste of a cyan-blue LED package and the driving current of individual LEDs in multi-package white LEDs at correlated color temperatures (CCTs) ranging from 6,500 K (cold white) to 2,700 K (warm white) using a set of eight CCTs as specified by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard number C78.377-2008. A R B,M A B,M G B,M C B white LED system provides high luminous efficacy (≥ 96 lm/W) and a color rendering index (≥ 91) encompassing the complete CCT range. We also compare the optical properties of the R B,M A B,M G B,M C B system with those of the R B,M A B,M G B,M B and RAGB (red, amber, green, and blue semiconductor-type narrow-spectrum-band LEDs) systems. It can be expected that the cyan color added to a blue LED in multi-package white LEDs based on LPDF-capped, phosphor-converted monochromatic LEDs will meet the needs of the high-quality, highly efficient, full-color white LED lighting market in the near future.

  1. Quantitative digital in situ senescence-associated β-galactosidase assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehezkel Shiran

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular senescence plays important roles in the aging process of complex organisms, in tumor suppression and in response to stress. Several markers can be used to identify senescent cells, of which the most widely used is the senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SABG activity. The main advantage of SABG activity over other markers is the simplicity of the detection assay and the capacity to identify in situ a senescent cell in a heterogeneous cell population. Several approaches have been introduced to render the SABG assay quantitative. However none of these approaches to date has proven particularly amenable to quantitative analysis of SABG activity in situ. Furthermore the role of cellular senescence (CS in vivo remains unclear mainly due to the ambiguity of current cellular markers in identifying CS of individual cells in tissues. Results In the current study we applied a digital image analysis technique to the staining generated using the original SABG assay, and demonstrate that this analysis is highly reproducible and sensitive to subtle differences in staining intensities resulting from diverse cellular senescence pathways in culture. We have further validated our method on mouse kidney samples with and without diabetes mellitus, and show that a more accurate quantitative SABG activity with a wider range of values can be achieved at a pH lower than that used in the conventional SABG assay. Conclusions We conclude that quantitative in situ SABG assay, is feasible and reproducible and that the pH at which the reaction is performed should be tailored and chosen, depending on the research question and experimental system of interest.

  2. 9 CFR 319.703 - Rendered animal fat or mixture thereof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rendered animal fat or mixture thereof... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Fats, Oils, Shortenings § 319.703 Rendered animal fat or mixture thereof. “Rendered Animal Fat,” or any mixture of...

  3. Chromogenic in situ hybridization: a multicenter study comparing silver in situ hybridization with FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, J M S; Campbell, Fiona M; Ibrahim, Merdol; Wencyk, Peter; Ellis, Ian; Kay, Elaine; Connolly, Yvonne; O'Grady, Anthony; Di Palma, Silvana; Starczynski, Jane; Morgan, John M; Jasani, Bharat; Miller, Keith

    2009-10-01

    Our purposes were to perform a robust assessment of a new HER2 chromogenic in situ hybridization test and report on concordance of silver in situ hybridization (SISH) data with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) data and on intraobserver and interlaboratory scoring consistency. HER2 results were scored from 45 breast cancers in 7 laboratories using the Ventana (Tucson, AZ) INFORM HER-2 SISH assay and in 1 central laboratory using a standard FISH assay. Overall, 94.8% of cases were successfully analyzed by SISH across the 6 participating laboratories that reported data. Concordance for diagnosis of HER2 amplification by SISH compared with FISH was high (96.0% overall). Intraobserver variability (8.0%) and intersite variability (12.66%) of absolute HER2/chromosome 17 ratios appear to be tightly controlled across all 6 participating laboratories. The Ventana INFORM HER-2 SISH assay is robust and reproducible, shows good concordance with a standard FISH assay, and complies with requirements in national guidelines for performance of diagnostic tests.

  4. In situ Raman Spectroscopy Study of the Formation of Graphene from Urea and Graphite Oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Mowry, Michael N.

    2012-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Graphene, 10 or fewer atomic layers of carbon atoms, has attracted much attention during recent years due to its unique structure and exceptional physical properties. While there exist a wide range of potential applications, as with many nanomaterials, new synthesis techniques are required that allow for a production of graphene on an industrial scale. In this study, in situ Raman spectroscopy was used to study the formation and doping...

  5. Gelation-driven Dynamic Systemic Resolution: in situ Generation and Self-Selection of an Organogelator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lei; Zhang, Yang; Ramström, Olof

    2015-06-01

    An organogelator was produced and identified from a dynamic imine system, resolved and amplified by selective gelation. The formation of the organogel was monitored in situ by 1H NMR, showing the existence of multiple reversible reactions operating simultaneously, and the redistribution of the involved species during gelation. The formed organogelator proved effective with a range of organic solvents, including DMSO, toluene, and longer, linear alcohols.

  6. Perception-based 3D tactile rendering from a single image for human skin examinations by dynamic touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K; Lee, S

    2015-05-01

    Diagnosis of skin conditions is dependent on the assessment of skin surface properties that are represented by more tactile properties such as stiffness, roughness, and friction than visual information. Due to this reason, adding tactile feedback to existing vision based diagnosis systems can help dermatologists diagnose skin diseases or disorders more accurately. The goal of our research was therefore to develop a tactile rendering system for skin examinations by dynamic touch. Our development consists of two stages: converting a single image to a 3D haptic surface and rendering the generated haptic surface in real-time. Converting to 3D surfaces from 2D single images was implemented with concerning human perception data collected by a psychophysical experiment that measured human visual and haptic sensibility to 3D skin surface changes. For the second stage, we utilized real skin biomechanical properties found by prior studies. Our tactile rendering system is a standalone system that can be used with any single cameras and haptic feedback devices. We evaluated the performance of our system by conducting an identification experiment with three different skin images with five subjects. The participants had to identify one of the three skin surfaces by using a haptic device (Falcon) only. No visual cue was provided for the experiment. The results indicate that our system provides sufficient performance to render discernable tactile rendering with different skin surfaces. Our system uses only a single skin image and automatically generates a 3D haptic surface based on human haptic perception. Realistic skin interactions can be provided in real-time for the purpose of skin diagnosis, simulations, or training. Our system can also be used for other applications like virtual reality and cosmetic applications. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Efficient Unbiased Rendering using Enlightened Local Path Sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders Wang

    . The downside to using these algorithms is that they can be slow to converge. Due to the nature of Monte Carlo methods, the results are random variables subject to variance. This manifests itself as noise in the images, which can only be reduced by generating more samples. The reason these methods are slow...... is because of a lack of eeffective methods of importance sampling. Most global illumination algorithms are based on local path sampling, which is essentially a recipe for constructing random walks. Using this procedure paths are built based on information given explicitly as part of scene description......, such as the location of the light sources or cameras, or the re flection models at each point. In this work we explore new methods of importance sampling paths. Our idea is to analyze the scene before rendering and compute various statistics that we use to improve importance sampling. The first of these are adjoint...

  8. Real-time Flame Rendering with GPU and CUDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wei

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a method of flame simulation based on Lagrange process and chemical composition, which was non-grid and the problems associated with there grids were overcome. The turbulence movement of flame was described by Lagrange process and chemical composition was added into flame simulation which increased the authenticity of flame. For real-time applications, this paper simplified the EMST model. GPU-based particle system combined with OpenGL VBO and PBO unique technology was used to accelerate finally, the speed of vertex and pixel data interaction between CPU and GPU increased two orders of magnitude, frame rate of rendering increased by 30%, which achieved fast dynamic flame real-time simulation. For further real-time applications, this paper presented a strategy to implement flame simulation with CUDA on GPU, which achieved a speed up to 2.5 times the previous implementation.

  9. Latency in Distributed Acquisition and Rendering for Telepresence Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, Stephan; Willert, Malte; Staadt, Oliver

    2015-12-01

    Telepresence systems use 3D techniques to create a more natural human-centered communication over long distances. This work concentrates on the analysis of latency in telepresence systems where acquisition and rendering are distributed. Keeping latency low is important to immerse users in the virtual environment. To better understand latency problems and to identify the source of such latency, we focus on the decomposition of system latency into sub-latencies. We contribute a model of latency and show how it can be used to estimate latencies in a complex telepresence dataflow network. To compare the estimates with real latencies in our prototype, we modify two common latency measurement methods. This presented methodology enables the developer to optimize the design, find implementation issues and gain deeper knowledge about specific sources of latency.

  10. IN-SITU TRITIUM BETA DETECTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.W. Berthold; L.A. Jeffers

    1998-04-15

    The objectives of this three-phase project were to design, develop, and demonstrate a monitoring system capable of detecting and quantifying tritium in situ in ground and surface waters, and in water from effluent lines prior to discharge into public waterways. The tritium detection system design is based on measurement of the low energy beta radiation from the radioactive decay of tritium using a special form of scintillating optical fiber directly in contact with the water to be measured. The system consists of the immersible sensor module containing the optical fiber, and an electronics package, connected by an umbilical cable. The system can be permanently installed for routine water monitoring in wells or process or effluent lines, or can be moved from one location to another for survey use. The electronics will read out tritium activity directly in units of pico Curies per liter, with straightforward calibration. In Phase 1 of the project, we characterized the sensitivity of fluor-doped plastic optical fiber to tritium beta radiation. In addition, we characterized the performance of photomultiplier tubes needed for the system. In parallel with this work, we defined the functional requirements, target specifications, and system configuration for an in situ tritium beta detector that would use the fluor-doped fibers as primary sensors of tritium concentration in water. The major conclusions from the characterization work are: A polystyrene optical fiber with fluor dopant concentration of 2% gave best performance. This fiber had the highest dopant concentration of any fibers tested. Stability may be a problem. The fibers exposed to a 22-day soak in 120 F water experienced a 10x reduction in sensitivity. It is not known whether this was due to the build up of a deposit (a potentially reversible effect) or an irreversible process such as leaching of the scintillating dye. Based on the results achieved, it is premature to initiate Phase 2 and commit to a prototype

  11. Distributed Dimensonality-Based Rendering of LIDAR Point Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brédif, M.; Vallet, B.; Ferrand, B.

    2015-08-01

    Mobile Mapping Systems (MMS) are now commonly acquiring lidar scans of urban environments for an increasing number of applications such as 3D reconstruction and mapping, urban planning, urban furniture monitoring, practicability assessment for persons with reduced mobility (PRM)... MMS acquisitions are usually huge enough to incur a usability bottleneck for the increasing number of non-expert user that are not trained to process and visualize these huge datasets through specific softwares. A vast majority of their current need is for a simple 2D visualization that is both legible on screen and printable on a static 2D medium, while still conveying the understanding of the 3D scene and minimizing the disturbance of the lidar acquisition geometry (such as lidar shadows). The users that motivated this research are, by law, bound to precisely georeference underground networks for which they currently have schematics with no or poor absolute georeferencing. A solution that may fit their needs is thus a 2D visualization of the MMS dataset that they could easily interpret and on which they could accurately match features with their user datasets they would like to georeference. Our main contribution is two-fold. First, we propose a 3D point cloud stylization for 2D static visualization that leverages a Principal Component Analysis (PCA)-like local geometry analysis. By skipping the usual and error-prone estimation of a ground elevation, this rendering is thus robust to non-flat areas and has no hard-to-tune parameters such as height thresholds. Second, we implemented the corresponding rendering pipeline so that it can scale up to arbitrary large datasets by leveraging the Spark framework and its Resilient Distributed Dataset (RDD) and Dataframe abstractions.

  12. On-the-Fly Decompression and Rendering of Multiresolution Terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstrom, P; Cohen, J D

    2009-04-02

    We present a streaming geometry compression codec for multiresolution, uniformly-gridded, triangular terrain patches that supports very fast decompression. Our method is based on linear prediction and residual coding for lossless compression of the full-resolution data. As simplified patches on coarser levels in the hierarchy already incur some data loss, we optionally allow further quantization for more lossy compression. The quantization levels are adaptive on a per-patch basis, while still permitting seamless, adaptive tessellations of the terrain. Our geometry compression on such a hierarchy achieves compression ratios of 3:1 to 12:1. Our scheme is not only suitable for fast decompression on the CPU, but also for parallel decoding on the GPU with peak throughput over 2 billion triangles per second. Each terrain patch is independently decompressed on the fly from a variable-rate bitstream by a GPU geometry program with no branches or conditionals. Thus we can store the geometry compressed on the GPU, reducing storage and bandwidth requirements throughout the system. In our rendering approach, only compressed bitstreams and the decoded height values in the view-dependent 'cut' are explicitly stored on the GPU. Normal vectors are computed in a streaming fashion, and remaining geometry and texture coordinates, as well as mesh connectivity, are shared and re-used for all patches. We demonstrate and evaluate our algorithms on a small prototype system in which all compressed geometry fits in the GPU memory and decompression occurs on the fly every rendering frame without any cache maintenance.

  13. Technologies Render Views of Earth for Virtual Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    On a December night in 1995, 159 passengers and crewmembers died when American Airlines Flight 965 flew into the side of a mountain while in route to Cali, Colombia. A key factor in the tragedy: The pilots had lost situational awareness in the dark, unfamiliar terrain. They had no idea the plane was approaching a mountain until the ground proximity warning system sounded an alarm only seconds before impact. The accident was of the kind most common at the time CFIT, or controlled flight into terrain says Trey Arthur, research aerospace engineer in the Crew Systems and Aviation Operations Branch at NASA s Langley Research Center. In situations such as bad weather, fog, or nighttime flights, pilots would rely on airspeed, altitude, and other readings to get an accurate sense of location. Miscalculations and rapidly changing conditions could contribute to a fully functioning, in-control airplane flying into the ground. To improve aviation safety by enhancing pilots situational awareness even in poor visibility, NASA began exploring the possibilities of synthetic vision creating a graphical display of the outside terrain on a screen inside the cockpit. How do you display a mountain in the cockpit? You have to have a graphics-powered computer, a terrain database you can render, and an accurate navigation solution, says Arthur. In the mid-1990s, developing GPS technology offered a means for determining an aircraft s position in space with high accuracy, Arthur explains. As the necessary technologies to enable synthetic vision emerged, NASA turned to an industry partner to develop the terrain graphical engine and database for creating the virtual rendering of the outside environment.

  14. Mars Biosignature - Detection Capabilities: A Method for Objective Comparison of In Situ Measurements and Sample Return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbin, Charles R.; Lincoln, William; Papanastassiou, Dimitri A.; Coleman, Max L.

    2013-01-01

    A Mars sample-return mission has been proposed within NASA's Mars Exploration Program. Studying Martian samples in laboratories on Earth could address many important issues in planetary science, but arguably none is as scientifically compelling as the question of whether biosignatures indicative of past or present life exist on that planet. It is reasonable to ask before embarking on a sample-return mission whether equivalent investigation of Martian biosignatures could be conducted in situ. This study presents an approach to (1)identifying an optimal instrument suite for in situ detection of biosignatures on Mars,and (2)comparing the projected confidence level of in situ detection in a 2026 timeframe to that of Earth-based analysis. We identify a set of candidate instruments, the development of which is projected to be achievable by 2026 well within a $200 million cost cap. Assuming that any biosignatures near the surface of Mars are similar to those of terrestrial life, we find that this instrument suite, if successfully developed and deployed, would enable in situ biosignature detection at essentially the same level of confidence as that of Earth-based analysis of the same samples. At a cost cap of half that amount,the confidence level of in situbiosignature detection analysis could reach about 90% that of Earth-based investigations.

  15. Fragrance composition of Dendrophylax lindenii (Orchidaceae using a novel technique applied in situ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J. Sadler

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The ghost orchid, Dendrophylax lindenii (Lindley Bentham ex Rolfe (Orchidaceae, is one of North America’s rarest and well-known orchids. Native to Cuba and SW Florida where it frequents shaded swamps as an epiphyte, the species has experienced steady decline. Little information exists on D. lindenii’s biology in situ, raising conservation concerns. During the summer of 2009 at an undisclosed population in Collier County, FL, a substantial number (ca. 13 of plants initiated anthesis offering a unique opportunity to study this species in situ. We report a new technique aimed at capturing floral headspace of D. lindenii in situ, and identified volatile compounds using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS. All components of the floral scent were identified as terpenoids with the exception of methyl salicylate. The most abundant compound was the sesquiterpene (E,E-α-farnesene (71% followed by (E-β-ocimene (9% and methyl salicylate (8%. Other compounds were: linalool (5%, sabinene (4%, (E-α-bergamotene (2%, α-pinene (1%, and 3-carene (1%. Interestingly, (E,E-α-farnesene has previously been associated with pestiferous insects (e.g., Hemiptera. The other compounds are common floral scent constituents in other angiosperms suggesting that our in situ technique was effective. Volatile capture was, therefore, possible without imposing physical harm (e.g., inflorescence detachment to this rare orchid.

  16. Requirements for existing buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund; Wittchen, Kim Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    This report collects energy performance requirements for existing buildings in European member states by June 2012.......This report collects energy performance requirements for existing buildings in European member states by June 2012....

  17. Requirements for existing buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund; Wittchen, Kim Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    This report collects energy performance requirements for existing buildings in European member states by June 2012.......This report collects energy performance requirements for existing buildings in European member states by June 2012....

  18. Experimental Measurement of In Situ Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbo, Maria; Milkereit, Bernd; Nasseri, Farzine; Schmitt, Douglas; Young, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The World Stress Map data is determined by stress indicators including earthquake focal mechanisms, in situ measurement in mining, oil and gas boreholes as well as the borehole cores, and geologic data. Unfortunately, these measurements are not only infrequent but sometimes infeasible, and do not provide nearly enough data points with high accuracy to correctly infer stress fields in deep mines around the world. Improvements in stress measurements of Earth's crust is fundamental to several industries such as oil and gas, mining, nuclear waste management, and enhanced geothermal systems. Quantifying the state of stress and the geophysical properties of different rock types is a major complication in geophysical monitoring of deep mines. Most stress measurement techniques involve either the boreholes or their cores, however these measurements usually only give stress along one axis, not the complete stress tensor. The goal of this project is to investigate a new method of acquiring a complete stress tensor of the in situ stress in the Earth's crust. This project is part of a comprehensive, exploration geophysical study in a deep, highly stressed mine located in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, and focuses on two boreholes located in this mine. These boreholes are approximately 400 m long with NQ diameters and are located at depths of about 1300 - 1600 m and 1700 - 2000 m. Two borehole logging surveys were performed on both boreholes, October 2013 and July 2015, in order to perform a time-lapse analysis of the geophysical changes in the mine. These multi-parameter surveys include caliper, full waveform sonic, televiewer, chargeability (IP), and resistivity. Laboratory experiments have been performed on borehole core samples of varying geologies from each borehole. These experiments have measured the geophysical properties including elastic modulus, bulk modulus, P- and S-wave velocities, and density. The apparatus' used for this project are geophysical imaging cells capable

  19. Preparation of ion-activated in situ gel systems of scopolamine hydrobromide and evaluation of its antimotion sickness efficacy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-lei CAO; Qi-zhi ZHANG; Xin-guo JIANG

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To develop a novel, in situ gel system for nasal delivery of scopolamine hydrohromide (SCOP) and study its efficacy on motion sickness. Methods: SCOP in situ gels at 0.2%, 0.5%, and 1.0% gellan gum concentration (w/v) were prepared,respectively, and characterized in terms of viscosity, in vitro release, and nasal ciliotoxicity. Single photon emission computing tomography technique was used to evaluate the nasal residence time of gel containing 99mTc tracer. The antimotion sickness efficacy produced by the in situ gel formulation was investigated in rats and compared with those achieved after subcutaneous and oral administration.Results: The viscosity of the gellan gum formulations either in solution or in gel increased with increasing concentrations of gellan gum. Its release in vitro was moderate in artificial nasal fluid. The micrographic results showed that in situ gels were safe, without nasal ciliotoxicity. In comparison with phosphate buffer saline,a prolonged radioactivity of 99mTc in the rabbit nasal cavity was observed after administration of the gellan gum formulation. Intranasal SCOP in situ gel at a dose of 100 μg/kg decreased symptoms of motion sickness significantly in comparison with subcutaneous and oral administration (P<0.01). Conclusion: SCOP nasal in situ gel is a safe and promising therapeutic alternative to existing medications for motion sickness.

  20. Removal of trace mercury(II) from aqueous solution by in situ formed Mn-Fe (hydr)oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xixin; Huangfu, Xiaoliu; Ma, Jun

    2014-09-15

    The efficiency and mechanism of trace mercury (Hg(II)) removal by in situ formed manganese-ferric (hydr)oxides (in situ Mn-Fe) were investigated by reacting KMnO4 with Fe(II) in simulated solutions and natural water. In the simulated solutions, the impact of coagulant dosage, pH, and temperature on mercury removal was studied. Experimental results showed that in situ Mn-Fe more effectively removed mercury compared with polyaluminum chloride (PAC) and iron(III) chloride (FeCl3), and that mercury existed in the form of uncharged species, namely Hg(OH)2, HgClOH(aq), and HgCl2(aq). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy demonstrated that in situ Mn-Fe contained hydroxyl groups as the surface active sites, while X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements revealed that MnO2 or MnOOH and FeOOH were the dominant species in the precipitates. XPS analysis indicated that an Hg-Mn-Fe mixture was formed in the precipitates, suggesting that mercury was removed from solutions via transfer from the liquid phase to solid phase. These results indicated that the primary mercury removal mechanisms in in situ Mn-Fe were surface complexation and flocculation-precipitation processes. Satisfactory removal efficiency of mercury was also observed following in situ Mn-Fe in natural waters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Robotic tele-existence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachi, Susumu; Arai, Hirohiko; Maeda, Taro

    1989-01-01

    Tele-existence is an advanced type of teleoperation system that enables a human operator at the controls to perform remote manipulation tasks dexterously with the feeling that he or she exists in the remote anthropomorphic robot in the remote environment. The concept of a tele-existence is presented, the principle of the tele-existence display method is explained, some of the prototype systems are described, and its space application is discussed.

  2. Optimized Watermarking for Light Field Rendering based Free-View TV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Apostolidis, Evlampios; Kounalakis, Tsampikos; Manifavas, Charalampos

    2013-01-01

    In Free-View Television the viewers select freely the viewing position and angle of the transmitted multiview video. It is apparent that copyright and copy protection problems exist, since a video of this arbitrarily selected view can be recorded and then misused. In this context, the watermark...... and the efficiency of the watermarks and their corresponding Mathematical Distributions, in terms of “robustness” and “successful detection” from new constructed views of FTV, using Light Field Rendering (LFR) techniques. We studied the values which characterize the watermark’s performance and the parameters...... introduced by the watermark’s insertion-extraction scheme. Therefore, we ended up to the best five Mathematical Distributions, and we concluded that the watermark’s robustness in FTV case does not depend only on the FTV image’s characteristics, but it also relies on the characteristics of the Mathematical...

  3. MaterialVis: material visualization tool using direct volume and surface rendering techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyan, Erhan; Güdükbay, Uğur; Bulutay, Ceyhun; Heinig, Karl-Heinz

    2014-05-01

    Visualization of the materials is an indispensable part of their structural analysis. We developed a visualization tool for amorphous as well as crystalline structures, called MaterialVis. Unlike the existing tools, MaterialVis represents material structures as a volume and a surface manifold, in addition to plain atomic coordinates. Both amorphous and crystalline structures exhibit topological features as well as various defects. MaterialVis provides a wide range of functionality to visualize such topological structures and crystal defects interactively. Direct volume rendering techniques are used to visualize the volumetric features of materials, such as crystal defects, which are responsible for the distinct fingerprints of a specific sample. In addition, the tool provides surface visualization to extract hidden topological features within the material. Together with the rich set of parameters and options to control the visualization, MaterialVis allows users to visualize various aspects of materials very efficiently as generated by modern analytical techniques such as the Atom Probe Tomography.

  4. Topological Galleries: A High Level User Interface for Topology Controlled Volume Rendering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacCarthy, Brian; Carr, Hamish; Weber, Gunther H.

    2011-06-30

    Existing topological interfaces to volume rendering are limited by their reliance on sophisticated knowledge of topology by the user. We extend previous work by describing topological galleries, an interface for novice users that is based on the design galleries approach. We report three contributions: an interface based on hierarchical thumbnail galleries to display the containment relationships between topologically identifiable features, the use of the pruning hierarchy instead of branch decomposition for contour tree simplification, and drag-and-drop transfer function assignment for individual components. Initial results suggest that this approach suffers from limitations due to rapid drop-off of feature size in the pruning hierarchy. We explore these limitations by providing statistics of feature size as function of depth in the pruning hierarchy of the contour tree.

  5. SVGenes: a library for rendering genomic features in scalable vector graphic format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etherington, Graham J; MacLean, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Drawing genomic features in attractive and informative ways is a key task in visualization of genomics data. Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) format is a modern and flexible open standard that provides advanced features including modular graphic design, advanced web interactivity and animation within a suitable client. SVGs do not suffer from loss of image quality on re-scaling and provide the ability to edit individual elements of a graphic on the whole object level independent of the whole image. These features make SVG a potentially useful format for the preparation of publication quality figures including genomic objects such as genes or sequencing coverage and for web applications that require rich user-interaction with the graphical elements. SVGenes is a Ruby-language library that uses SVG primitives to render typical genomic glyphs through a simple and flexible Ruby interface. The library implements a simple Page object that spaces and contains horizontal Track objects that in turn style, colour and positions features within them. Tracks are the level at which visual information is supplied providing the full styling capability of the SVG standard. Genomic entities like genes, transcripts and histograms are modelled in Glyph objects that are attached to a track and take advantage of SVG primitives to render the genomic features in a track as any of a selection of defined glyphs. The feature model within SVGenes is simple but flexible and not dependent on particular existing gene feature formats meaning graphics for any existing datasets can easily be created without need for conversion. The library is provided as a Ruby Gem from https://rubygems.org/gems/bio-svgenes under the MIT license, and open source code is available at https://github.com/danmaclean/bioruby-svgenes also under the MIT License. dan.maclean@tsl.ac.uk.

  6. CGS and In Situ Measurements in Gävle 1999

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Helle Karina; Korsbech, Uffe C C; Bargholz, Kim

    1999-01-01

    Calibration of CGS-equipment.In situ measuremts with HPGe-detector (and dose rate meter)in Gävle Sweden as part of the Nordic exercise RESUME99.......Calibration of CGS-equipment.In situ measuremts with HPGe-detector (and dose rate meter)in Gävle Sweden as part of the Nordic exercise RESUME99....

  7. In-situ remediation of contaminated sediments : conceivable and feasible?!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joziasse, J.; Gun, J. van der

    2000-01-01

    In-situ remediation has assumed large proportions in dealing with terrestrial soil pollution. Although implementation of in-situ remediation for contaminated sediments is restricted by the fact that dredging is necessary for nautical or water management reasons, it should not be discarded

  8. In-situ tensile testing of propellant samples within SEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benedetto, G.L. di; Ramshorst, M.C.J. van; Duvalois, W.; Hooijmeijer, P.A.; Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der; Klerk, W.P.C. de

    2015-01-01

    A tensile module system placed within a FEI NovaNanoSEM 650 Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) was utilized in this work to conduct in-situ tensile testing of propellant material samples. This tensile module system allows for real-time in-situ SEM analysis of the samples to determine the failure mec

  9. In situ silica-EPDM nanocomposites obtained via reactive processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miloskovska, Elena; Hristova-Bogaerds, Denka; van Duin, Martin; de With, Gijsbertus

    2015-01-01

    In situ rubber nanocomposites prepared via reactive batch mixing and via reactive extrusion were studied. Materials produced via reactive batch mixing showed a significantly higher silica content for a similar reaction time as compared to previously prepared in situ nanocomposites using a diffusion

  10. Oxidative stress inhibits calpain activity in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttmann, R P; Johnson, G V

    1998-05-22

    In this study, the effects of oxidative stress on calpain-mediated proteolysis and calpain I autolysis in situ were examined. Calpain activity was stimulated in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells with the calcium ionophore, ionomycin. Calpain-mediated proteolysis of the membrane-permeable fluorescent substrate N-succinyl-L-leucyl-L-leucyl-L-valyl-L-tyrosine-7-amido-4-methylcouma rin, as well as the endogenous protein substrates microtubule-associated protein 2, tau and spectrin, was measured. Oxidative stress, induced by addition of either doxorubicin or 2-mercaptopyridine N-oxide, resulted in a significant decrease in the extent of ionophore-stimulated calpain activity of both the fluorescent compound and the endogenous substrates compared with control, normoxic conditions. Addition of glutathione ethyl ester, as well as other antioxidants, resulted in the retention/recovery of calpain activity, indicating that oxidation-induced calpain inactivation was preventable/reversible. The rate of autolytic conversion of the large subunit of calpain I from 80 to 78 to 76 kDa was decreased during oxidative stress; however, the extent of calpain autolysis was not altered. These data indicate that oxidative stress may reversibly inactivate calpain I in vivo.

  11. Visualizing T cell migration in-situ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre P Benechet

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mounting a protective immune response is critically dependent on the orchestrated movement of cells within lymphoid tissues. The structure of secondary lymphoid organs regulates immune responses by promoting optimal cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Naïve T cells are initially activated by antigen presenting cells in secondary lymphoid organs. Following priming, effector T cells migrate to the site of infection to exert their functions. Majority of the effector cells die while a small population of antigen specific T cells persist as memory cells in distinct anatomical locations. The persistence and location of memory cells in lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues is critical to protect the host from re-infection. The localization of memory T cells is carefully regulated by several factors including the highly organized secondary lymphoid structure, the cellular expression of chemokine receptors and compartmentalized secretion of their cognate ligands. This balance between the anatomy and the ordered expression of cell surface and soluble proteins regulates the subtle choreography of T cell migration. In recent years, our understanding of cellular dynamics of T cells has been advanced by the development of new imaging techniques allowing in-situ visualization of T cell responses. Here we review the past and more recent studies that have utilized sophisticated imaging technologies to investigate the migration dynamics of naive, effector and memory T cells.

  12. Cubesat in-situ degradation detector (CIDD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rievers, Benny; Milke, Alexander; Salden, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    The design of the thermal control and management system (TCS) is a central task in satellite design. In order to evaluate and dimensionize the properties of the TCS, material parameters specifying the conductive and radiative properties of the different TCS components have to be known including their respective variations within the mission lifetime. In particular the thermo-optical properties of the outer surfaces including critical TCS components such as radiators and thermal insulation are subject to degradation caused by interaction with the space environment. The evaluation of these material parameters by means of ground testing is a time-consuming and expensive endeavor. Long-term in-situ measurements on board the ISS or large satellites not only realize a better implementation of the influence of the space environment but also imply high costs. Motivated by this we propose the utilization of low-cost nano-satellite systems to realize material tests within space at a considerably reduced cost. We present a nanosat-scale degradation sensor concept which realizes low power consumption and data rates compatible with nanosat boundaries at UHF radio. By means of a predefined measurement and messaging cycle temperature curves are measured and evaluated on ground to extract the change of absorptivity and emissivity over mission lifetime.

  13. In-situ combustion with solvent injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Silva, J.; Kakade, G. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)]|[Maharashtra Inst. of Technology, Pune (India)

    2008-10-15

    The effects of combining in situ combustion and heavy hydrocarbon naphtha vapor injection techniques in a heavy oil reservoir were investigated. Oil production rates and steam injection efficiencies were considered. The technique was also combined with toe-to-heel air injection (THAI) processes. The study showed that the modified THAI process achieved high rates of recovery for both primary production and as a follow-up technique in partially depleted reservoirs after cyclic steam and cold production. Oil produced using the modified THAI technique was also partially upgraded by the process. Results of the vapour chamber pressure calculations showed that the volume of oil produced by naphtha assisted gravity drainage was between 1 to 3 times higher than amounts of oil produced by SAGD processes during the same amount of time. The naphtha injection process produced more oil than the steam only process. However, high amounts of naphtha were needed to produce oil. Injection and production rates during the naphtha injection process were higher. Naphtha vapor was injected near the heel of a horizontal producer well. The vapor acted as a thermal and diluent mechanism in order to reduce the viscosity of the heavy oil . 9 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs.

  14. Photonic MEMS for NIR in-situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, T C; Cole, G D; Goddard, L L; Behymer, E

    2007-07-03

    We report on a novel sensing technique combining photonics and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) for the detection and monitoring of gas emissions for critical environmental, medical, and industrial applications. We discuss how MEMS-tunable vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) can be exploited for in-situ detection and NIR spectroscopy of several gases, such as O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, CO{sub x}, CH{sub 4}, HF, HCl, etc., with estimated sensitivities between 0.1 and 20 ppm on footprints {approx}10{sup -3} mm{sup 3}. The VCSELs can be electrostatically tuned with a continuous wavelength shift up to 20 nm, allowing for unambiguous NIR signature determination. Selective concentration analysis in heterogeneous gas compositions is enabled, thus paving the way to an integrated optical platform for multiplexed gas identification by bandgap and device engineering. We will discuss here, in particular, our efforts on the development of a 760 nm AlGaAs based tunable VCSEL for O{sub 2} detection.

  15. In Situ Immobilization of Selenium in Sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Robert C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stewart, Thomas Austin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This project focused on the use of a sorbent, carbonated apatite, to immobilize selenium in the environment. It is know that apatite will sorb selenium and based on the mechanism of sorption it is theorized that carbonated apatite will be more effective that pure apatite. Immobilization of selenium in the environment is through the use of a sorbent in a permeable reactive barrier (PRB). A PRB can be constructed by trenching and backfill with the sorbent or in the case of apatite as the sorbent formed in situ using the apatite forming solution of Moore (2003, 2004). There is very little data on selenium sorption by carbonated apatite in the literature. Therefore, in this work, the basic sorptive properties of carbonated apatite were investigated. Carbonated apatite was synthesized by a precipitation method and characterized. Batch selenium kinetic and equilibrium experiments were performed. The results indicate the carbonated apatite contained 9.4% carbonate and uptake of selenium as selenite was rapid; 5 hours for complete uptake of selenium vs. more than 100 hours for pure hydroxyapatite reported in the literature. Additionally, the carbonated apatite exhibited significantly higher distribution coefficients in equilibrium experiments than pure apatite under similar experimental conditions. The next phase of this work will be to seek additional funds to continue the research with the goal of eventually demonstrating the technology in a field application.

  16. Efficient in-situ visualization of unsteady flows in climate simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Michael; Olbrich, Stephan

    2017-04-01

    The simulation of climate data tends to produce very large data sets, which hardly can be processed in classical post-processing visualization applications. Typically, the visualization pipeline consisting of the processes data generation, visualization mapping and rendering is distributed into two parts over the network or separated via file transfer. Within most traditional post-processing scenarios the simulation is done on a supercomputer whereas the data analysis and visualization is done on a graphics workstation. That way temporary data sets with huge volume have to be transferred over the network, which leads to bandwidth bottlenecks and volume limitations. The solution to this issue is the avoidance of temporary storage, or at least significant reduction of data complexity. Within the Climate Visualization Lab - as part of the Cluster of Excellence "Integrated Climate System Analysis and Prediction" (CliSAP) at the University of Hamburg, in cooperation with the German Climate Computing Center (DKRZ) - we develop and integrate an in-situ approach. Our software framework DSVR is based on the separation of the process chain between the mapping and the rendering processes. It couples the mapping process directly to the simulation by calling methods of a parallelized data extraction library, which create a time-based sequence of geometric 3D scenes. This sequence is stored on a special streaming server with an interactive post-filtering option and then played-out asynchronously in a separate 3D viewer application. Since the rendering is part of this viewer application, the scenes can be navigated interactively. In contrast to other in-situ approaches where 2D images are created as part of the simulation or synchronous co-visualization takes place, our method supports interaction in 3D space and in time, as well as fixed frame rates. To integrate in-situ processing based on our DSVR framework and methods in the ICON climate model, we are continuously evolving

  17. In situ containment and stabilization of buried waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan, M.L.; Kukacka, L.E.; Heiser, J.H.

    1992-11-01

    The objective of the project was to develop, demonstrate and implement advanced grouting materials for the in-situ installation of impermeable, durable subsurface barriers and caps around waste sites and for the in-situ stabilization of contaminated soils. Specifically, the work was aimed at remediation of the Chemical Waste (CWL) and Mixed Waste Landfills (MWL) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as part of the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID). This report documents this project, which was conducted in two subtasks. These were (1) Capping and Barrier Grouts, and (2) In-situ Stabilization of Contaminated Soils. Subtask 1 examined materials and placement methods for in-situ containment of contaminated sites by subsurface barriers and surface caps. In Subtask 2 materials and techniques were evaluated for in-situ chemical stabilization of chromium in soil.

  18. Foreword: In situ gas surface interactions: approaching realistic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Edvin; Over, Herbert

    2008-03-01

    -crystal surfaces, by neglecting defects, by the simultaneous presence of various orientations on the catalyst's particle, and by communication between the various facets and by having support-particle interaction. However, there is a third and extremely important issue which is devoted to the interaction of the catalyst with the reactant gas phase at elevated pressure and elevated temperatures [4, 5]. Under such conditions, the catalyst can easily undergo a chemical transformation into a surface compound, and the shape of a catalytic nanoparticle may change substantially. For instance, under typical reaction conditions for the oxidation of CO and other molecules the transition metal (TM) catalyst may be oxidized, while under more reducing reaction conditions the TM oxide surface formed may decompose to form metallic TM particles. Therefore, the interaction of the reactant gas mixture and the catalyst surface may have a dramatic influence on the catalytic properties of catalysts under reaction conditions. Consequently the application of in situ techniques is mandatory to identify the catalytically active state of the catalyst. At the moment, the nature of the active catalyst cannot be theoretically predicted without experimental input, or easily envisaged through studies at low temperatures under UHV conditions. In recent years, a substantial effort has been directed to overcoming these obstacles in model catalysis [6]. At present, the technical development is rapid, and it is expected that a number of groups and laboratories (in particular emerging synchrotron ones) will actively promote the building of in situ instruments based on existing design as well as the invention of novel experimental in situ techniques. This special issue presents a collection of studies illustrating these efforts. The ultimate goal of these efforts is to allow transfer of the knowledge gained by model catalysis to practical catalysis. The first six studies in this issue [7-12] concentrate on the effect

  19. Progress in automated extraction and purification of in situ {sup 14}C from quartz: Results from the Purdue in situ {sup 14}C laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lifton, Nathaniel, E-mail: nlifton@purdue.edu [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Purdue University, 550 Stadium Mall Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy and Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab), Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Avenue, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Goehring, Brent, E-mail: bgoehrin@tulane.edu [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Purdue University, 550 Stadium Mall Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Wilson, Jim, E-mail: jim.wilson@aeonlaboratories.com [Aeon Laboratories, LLC, 5835 North Genematas Drive, Tucson, AZ 85704 (United States); Kubley, Thomas [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab), Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Avenue, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Caffee, Marc [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Purdue University, 550 Stadium Mall Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy and Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab), Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Avenue, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Current extraction methods for in situ {sup 14}C from quartz [e.g., Lifton et al., (2001), Pigati et al., (2010), Hippe et al., (2013)] are time-consuming and repetitive, making them an attractive target for automation. We report on the status of in situ {sup 14}C extraction and purification systems originally automated at the University of Arizona that have now been reconstructed and upgraded at the Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab). The Purdue in situ {sup 14}C laboratory builds on the flow-through extraction system design of Pigati et al. (2010), automating most of the procedure by retrofitting existing valves with external servo-controlled actuators, regulating the pressure of research purity O{sub 2} inside the furnace tube via a PID-based pressure controller in concert with an inlet mass flow controller, and installing an automated liquid N{sub 2} distribution system, all driven by LabView® software. A separate system for cryogenic CO{sub 2} purification, dilution, and splitting is also fully automated, ensuring a highly repeatable process regardless of the operator. We present results from procedural blanks and an intercomparison material (CRONUS-A), as well as results of experiments to increase the amount of material used in extraction, from the standard 5 g to 10 g or above. Results thus far are quite promising with procedural blanks comparable to previous work and significant improvements in reproducibility for CRONUS-A measurements. The latter analyses also demonstrate the feasibility of quantitative extraction of in situ {sup 14}C from sample masses up to 10 g. Our lab is now analyzing unknowns routinely, but lowering overall blank levels is the focus of ongoing research.

  20. Existence of magnetic charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, David

    1990-10-01

    A status report is presented on the existence of quarks carrying the Dirac unit of magnetic charge g = (137/2) e. The Paschen-Back effect in dyonium is discussed. From the dyonium model, Akers predicted the existence of a new η meson at 1814 MeV with I G(JPC) = 0+(0-+). Experimental evidence now confirms the existence of the meson resonance.

  1. In situ preparation of Nanoparticles/polymer composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) is the matter between molecule and bulk material. It has attracted much attention in catalysis, optoelectronics and biology due to its unique physical and chemical properties. Incorporation of these NPs into the polymer matrix is one of the best methods to display their special functions, which not only stabilize the NPs but also realize the functional assembly of NPs and polymers. However, reali- zation of this idea depends largely on the compatibility of NPs and polymers as well as the interaction between them. Therefore, many methods have been developed to prepare the composites of NPs and polymers in order to obtain the function ex- pected. In this review, we mainly focus on the combination of in situ method with other methods to synthesize different functional one-dimension, two-dimension as well as bulk composites, which has been recently developed by our group. The most striking character of our method is the excellent compatibility between NPs and polymers which ensures a homogeneous distribution of NPs in the polymer matrix. The existence of the polymer network makes the NPs more stable, and is significant for displaying their functions.

  2. Human papillomavirus (HPV) in vulvar dysplasia and carcinoma in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junge, Jette; Poulsen, H; Horn, T;

    1995-01-01

    and 6 with HPV type 33) evenly distributed in all age groups and in all types of lesions (WHO and Toki et al. 1991). By ISH HPV was detected in 24/62 cases (39%) (21 with HPV type 16/18 and 3 with HPV type 31/33), nearly always in warty areas. All these cases were positive for the same virus type by PCR...... whereas no case of pure basaloid type was found. Various combinations of warty and basaloid types were shown in 52 cases and mixed forms in 7 cases. The results indicate that pure forms of warty and basaloid types probably do not exist. HPV DNA was detected by PCR in 51/58 cases (88%) (45 with HPV type 16....... No case revealed more than one type of HPV. HPV type 6, 11, 18, and 31 were not detected by PCR. The results indicate a correlation between HPV type 16 and 33 and dysplasia/carcinoma in situ in the vulva....

  3. In situ preparation of Nanoparticles/polymer composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN HaiZhu; YANG Bai

    2008-01-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) is the matter between molecule and bulk material. It has attracted much attention in catalysis, optoelectronics and biology due to its unique physical and chemical properties. Incorporation of these NPs into the polymer matrix is one of the best methods to display their special functions, which not only stabilize the NPs but also realize the functional assembly of NPs and polymers. However, reali-zation of this idea depends largely on the compatibility of NPs and polymers as well as the interaction between them. Therefore, many methods have been developed to prepare the composites of NPs and polymers in order to obtain the function ex-pected. In this review, we mainly focus on the combination of in situ method with other methods to synthesize different functional one-dimension, two-dimension as well as bulk composites, which has been recently developed by our group. The most striking character of our method is the excellent compatibility between NPs and polymers which ensures a homogeneous distribution of NPs in the polymer matrix. The existence of the polymer network makes the NPs more stable, and is significant for displaying their functions.

  4. In situ Synchrotron X-ray Thermodiffraction of Boranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal G. Yot

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Boranes of low molecular weight are crystalline materials that have been much investigated over the past decade in the field of chemical hydrogen storage. In the present work, six of them have been selected to be studied by in situ synchrotron X-ray thermodiffraction. The selected boranes are ammonia borane NH3BH3 (AB, hydrazine borane N2H4BH3 (HB, hydrazine bisborane N2H4(BH32 (HBB, lithium LiN2H3BH3 (LiHB and sodium NaN2H3BH3 (NaHB hydrazinidoboranes, and sodium triborane NaB3H8 (STB. They are first investigated separately over a wide range of temperature (80–300 K, and subsequently compared. Differences in crystal structures, the existence of phase transition, evolutions of unit cell parameters and volumes, and variation of coefficients of thermal expansion can be observed. With respect to AB, HB and HBB, the differences are mainly explained in terms of molecule size, conformation and motion (degree of freedom of the chemical groups (NH3, N2H4, BH3. With respect to LiHB, NaHB and STB, the differences are explained by a stabilization effect favored by the alkali cations via M···H interactions with four to five borane anions. The main results are presented and discussed herein.

  5. in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshiko Fujita; Robert W. Smith

    2009-08-01

    in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization Yoshiko Fujita (Yoshiko.fujita@inl.gov) (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Robert W. Smith (University of Idaho-Idaho Falls, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Subsurface radionuclide and trace metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of DOE’s greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent trace ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide strontium-90, is co-precipitation in calcite. Calcite, a common mineral in the arid western U.S., can form solid solutions with trace metals. The rate of trace metal incorporation is susceptible to manipulation using either abiotic or biotic means. We have previously demonstrated that increasing the calcite precipitation rate by stimulating the activity of urea hydrolyzing microorganisms can result in significantly enhanced Sr uptake. Urea hydrolysis causes the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing pH and alkalinity, and also by liberating the reactive cations from the aquifer matrix via exchange reactions involving the ammonium ion derived from urea: H2NCONH2 + 3H2O ? 2NH4+ + HCO3- + OH- urea hydrolysis >X:2Ca + 2NH4+ ? 2>X:NH4 + Ca2+ ion exchange Ca2+ + HCO3- + OH- ? CaCO3(s) + H2O calcite precipitation where >X: is a cation exchange site on the aquifer matrix. This contaminant immobilization approach has several attractive features. Urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which is produced by many indigenous subsurface microorganisms. Addition of foreign microbes is unnecessary. In turn the involvement of the native microbes and the consequent in situ generation of reactive components in the aqueous phase (e.g., carbonate and Ca or Sr) can allow dissemination of the reaction over a larger volume and/or farther away from an amendment injection point, as compared to direct addition of the reactants at

  6. Retinal detachment after laser In Situ keratomileusis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Al-Rashaed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To report characteristics and outcome of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK for myopia. Materials and Methods : A retrospective chart review of patients who presented with RRD after myopic LASIK over a 10-year period. Results : Fourteen eyes were identified with RRD. Of these, two of 6112 LASIK procedures were from our center. The mean age of patients with RRD was 35.43 years. The mean interval of RRD after LASIK was 37.71 months (range, 4 months to 10 years. The macula was involved in eight eyes and spared in six eyes. Retinal breaks included a macular hole in two eyes, and giant tear in two eyes. Multiple breaks (>2 breaks occurred in 6 cases. Pars plana vitrectomy (PPV was performed in 3 (21.4% eyes, a scleral buckle (SB was performed in 4 (28.5% eyes and 7 (50% eyes underwent combined PPV and SB. Mean follow-up was 15.18 months (range, 1 month to 7 years. The retina was successfully attached in all cases. The final visual acuity was 20/40 or better in 7 (50% eyes, 20/40 to 20/60 in 4 (28.5% eyes, and 20/200 or less in 3 (21.4% eyes. Poor visual outcome was secondary to proliferative vitreoretinopathy, epiretinal membrane, macular scar and amblyopia. Conclusion : The prevalence of RRD after LASIK was low at our institute. Anatomical and visual outcomes were acceptable in eyes that were managed promptly. Although there is no cause-effect relationship between LASIK and RRD, a dilated fundus examination is highly recommended before and after LASIK for myopia.

  7. Ductal carcinoma in situ: a challenging disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevilay Altintas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS represents a heterogenous group of lesions with variable malignant potential. Although it is clearly pre-invasive, not all lesions progress to an invasive malignant disease. The significant increase in the frequency of diagnosis is the result of both widespread use of screening mammography and better recognition among pathologists. Treatment is controversial, but for several decades total mastectomy has been considered as the appropriate treatment. The tendency to be less aggressive in terms of surgery has followed the pattern of events observed in the treatment of invasive breast carcinomas. More recently, it has become clear that breastconserving procedures could be applied and selected on the basis of diagnostics and risk factors. When all patients with DCIS are considered, the overall mortality is extremely low, only about 1–2%. On the other hand, breast-conserving surgery is only curative in 75–85%; 50% of the local recurrences have proven to be invasive with a mortality rate of 12–15%. There is no place for axillary node dissection, adjuvant hormonal treatment or chemotherapy in the treatment. Important factors in predicting local recurrence are age, family history, nuclear grade, comedo-type necrosis, tumor size and margin width. With the addition of radiation therapy to excisional surgery, there is a 50% reduction in the overall local recurrence rate. The Van Nuys Prognostic Index (VNPI, recently updated, is a tool that quantifies measurable prognostic factors that can be used in the decision-making process of treatment. Recent data from large cohort studies and randomized trials have emerged to guide treatment. DCIS is now understood to have diverse malignant potential and it is unlikely that there will be a single treatment for this wide range of lesions. Advances in molecular biology and gene expression profiling of human breast tumors have been providing important insights into the relationship

  8. Microbial Repopulation Following In Situ STAR Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhard, J.; Overbeeke, G.; Edwards, E.; Lomheim, L.; Grant, G.

    2016-12-01

    STAR (Self-sustaining Treatment for Active Remediation) is an emerging remediation technology that employs a self-sustaining smouldering reaction to destroy nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in the subsurface. The reaction front travels outwards from an ignition well at approximately 0.5 per day and subjects the soil to temperatures of 400°C-1000°C. The objectives of this work were to monitor re-saturation of the soil over time and quantify the microbial repopulation of the treated zone. STAR is currently being applied as a full scale, in situ remedy for coal tar beneath a former creosol manufacturing facility in New Jersey, USA. This study analyzed soil cores taken at regular intervals following STAR treatment, allowing time for groundwater to re-infiltrate and for microbial populations to potentially reestablish. Soil and groundwater were analyzed for total number of microorganisms via quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR), as well as microbial diversity via amplicon sequencing. Results demonstrate that microbes rapidly repopulated over a 2 month period to 106 gene copies/g of soil. However, concentrations in the treated zone did not rise above this concentration over 6 months post-STAR, indicating a low carrying capacity of the treated soil. To examine the system in more detail and consider the effects of bio-stimulation, a bench top column study using site soil and artificial groundwater explored the rate at which STAR-treated soil is repopulated with naturally occurring microorganisms in the presence and absence of lactate and a terminal electron acceptor. Results demonstrated that biostimulation did not increase the carrying capacity of the STAR treated sol, but rather shifted the microbial community to reflect the TEA provided, in this case, promoting sulfate reducers. Overall, the work illustrates that microbial populations in STAR treated soil do recover via groundwater infiltration but robust communities will take time to naturally establish.

  9. In-situ bioassays using caged bivalves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar, M.H.; Salazar, S.M.

    1995-12-31

    It is important to make the distinction between chemical measurements to assess bioaccumulation potential versus biological measurements to assess potential bioeffects because bioaccumulation is not a bioeffect. Caging provides a unique opportunity to make synoptic measurements of each and facilitates making these measurements over space and time. Measuring bioaccumulation in resident and transplanted bivalves has probably been the most frequently used form of an in-situ bioassay because bivalves concentrate chemicals in their tissues. They are also easy to collect, cage, and measure. The authors have refined bivalve bioassay methods by minimizing the size range of test animals, making repetitive measurements of the same individuals, and standardizing test protocols for a variety of applications. They are now attempting to standardize criteria for accepting and interpreting data in the same way that laboratory bioassays have been standardized. Growth measurements can serve two purposes in this assessment strategy: (1) An integrated biological response endpoint that is easily quantifiable and with significance to the population, and (2) A means of calibrating bioaccumulation by assessing the relative health and physiological state of tissues that have accumulated the chemicals. In general, the authors have found the highest bioconcentration factors associated with the highest growth rates, the highest concentrations ({micro}g/g) of chemicals in juvenile mussels, and the highest chemical content ({micro}g/animal) in adult mussels. Without accounting for possible dilution of chemical concentrations by tissue growth or magnification through degrowth, contaminant concentrations can be misleading. Examples are provided for the Sudbury River in Massachusetts (Elliptio complanata), San Diego Bay (Mytilus galloprovincialis), and the Harbor Island Superfund Site in Puget Sound (Mytilus trossulus).

  10. Age, Health and Attractiveness Perception of Virtual (Rendered) Human Hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Bernhard; Hufschmidt, Carla; Hirn, Thomas; Will, Susanne; McKelvey, Graham; Lankhof, John

    2016-01-01

    The social significance of physical appearance and beauty has been documented in many studies. It is known that even subtle manipulations of facial morphology and skin condition can alter people's perception of a person's age, health and attractiveness. While the variation in facial morphology and skin condition cues has been studied quite extensively, comparably little is known on the effect of hair on social perception. This has been partly caused by the technical difficulty of creating appropriate stimuli for investigations of people's response to systematic variation of certain hair characteristics, such as color and style, while keeping other features constant. Here, we present a modeling approach to the investigation of human hair perception using computer-generated, virtual (rendered) human hair. In three experiments, we manipulated hair diameter (Experiment 1), hair density (Experiment 2), and hair style (Experiment 3) of human (female) head hair and studied perceptions of age, health and attractiveness. Our results show that even subtle changes in these features have an impact on hair perception. We discuss our findings with reference to previous studies on condition-dependent quality cues in women that influence human social perception, thereby suggesting that hair is a salient feature of human physical appearance, which contributes to the perception of beauty.

  11. VITRAIL: Acquisition, Modeling, and Rendering of Stained Glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanikachalam, Niranjan; Baboulaz, Loic; Prandoni, Paolo; Trumpler, Stefan; Wolf, Sophie; Vetterli, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Stained glass windows are designed to reveal their powerful artistry under diverse and time-varying lighting conditions; virtual relighting of stained glass, therefore, represents an exceptional tool for the appreciation of this age old art form. However, as opposed to most other artifacts, stained glass windows are extremely difficult if not impossible to analyze using controlled illumination because of their size and position. In this paper, we present novel methods built upon image based priors to perform virtual relighting of stained glass artwork by acquiring the actual light transport properties of a given artifact. In a preprocessing step, we build a material-dependent dictionary for light transport by studying the scattering properties of glass samples in a laboratory setup. We can now use the dictionary to recover a light transport matrix in two ways: under controlled illuminations the dictionary constitutes a sparsifying basis for a compressive sensing acquisition, while in the case of uncontrolled illuminations the dictionary is used to perform sparse regularization. The proposed basis preserves volume impurities and we show that the retrieved light transport matrix is heterogeneous, as in the case of real world objects. We present the rendering results of several stained glass artifacts, including the Rose Window of the Cathedral of Lausanne, digitized using the presented methods.

  12. Moisture Transfer through Facades Covered with Organic Binder Renders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen DICO

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Year after year we witness the negative effect of water over buildings, caused by direct or indirect actions. This situation is obvious in case of old, historical building, subjected to this aggression for a long period of time, but new buildings are also affected. Moisture in building materials causes not only structural damage, but also reduces the thermal insulation capacity of building components.Materials like plasters or paints have been used historically for a long period of time, fulfilling two basics functions: Decoration and Protection. The most acute demands are made on exterior plasters, as they, besides being an important decorative element for the facade, must perform two different functions simultaneously: protect the substrate against weathering and moisture without sealing, providing it a certain ability to “breathe” (Heilen, 2005. In order to accomplish this aim, the first step is to understand the hygrothermal behavior of coating and substrate and define the fundamental principles of moisture transfer; According to Künzel’s Facade Protection Theory, two material properties play the most important role: Water absorption and Vapor permeability.In the context of recently adoption (2009 of the “harmonized” European standard EN 15824 – „Specifications for external renders and internal plasters based on organic binders”, this paper deals extensively with the interaction of the two mentioned above properties for the coating materials, covered by EN 15824.

  13. Light field rendering with omni-directional camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todoroki, Hiroshi; Saito, Hideo

    2003-06-01

    This paper presents an approach to capture visual appearance of a real environment such as an interior of a room. We propose the method for generating arbitrary viewpoint images by building light field with the omni-directional camera, which can capture the wide circumferences. Omni-directional camera used in this technique is a special camera with the hyperbolic mirror in the upper part of a camera, so that we can capture luminosity in the environment in the range of 360 degree of circumferences in one image. We apply the light field method, which is one technique of Image-Based-Rendering(IBR), for generating the arbitrary viewpoint images. The light field is a kind of the database that records the luminosity information in the object space. We employ the omni-directional camera for constructing the light field, so that we can collect many view direction images in the light field. Thus our method allows the user to explore the wide scene, that can acheive realistic representation of virtual enviroment. For demonstating the proposed method, we capture image sequence in our lab's interior environment with an omni-directional camera, and succesfully generate arbitray viewpoint images for virual tour of the environment.

  14. Age, Health and Attractiveness Perception of Virtual (Rendered) Human Hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Bernhard; Hufschmidt, Carla; Hirn, Thomas; Will, Susanne; McKelvey, Graham; Lankhof, John

    2016-01-01

    The social significance of physical appearance and beauty has been documented in many studies. It is known that even subtle manipulations of facial morphology and skin condition can alter people’s perception of a person’s age, health and attractiveness. While the variation in facial morphology and skin condition cues has been studied quite extensively, comparably little is known on the effect of hair on social perception. This has been partly caused by the technical difficulty of creating appropriate stimuli for investigations of people’s response to systematic variation of certain hair characteristics, such as color and style, while keeping other features constant. Here, we present a modeling approach to the investigation of human hair perception using computer-generated, virtual (rendered) human hair. In three experiments, we manipulated hair diameter (Experiment 1), hair density (Experiment 2), and hair style (Experiment 3) of human (female) head hair and studied perceptions of age, health and attractiveness. Our results show that even subtle changes in these features have an impact on hair perception. We discuss our findings with reference to previous studies on condition-dependent quality cues in women that influence human social perception, thereby suggesting that hair is a salient feature of human physical appearance, which contributes to the perception of beauty. PMID:28066276

  15. Differentiation renders susceptibility to excitotoxicity in HT22 neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minchao He; Jun Liu; Shaowu Cheng; Yigang Xing; William Z Suo

    2013-01-01

    HT22 is an immortalized mouse hippocampal neuronal cell line that does not express cholinergic and glutamate receptors like mature hippocampal neurons in vivo. This in part prevents its use as a model for mature hippocampal neurons in memory-related studies. We now report that HT22 cells were appropriately induced to differentiate and possess properties similar to those of mature hippocampal neurons in vivo, such as becoming more glutamate-receptive and excitatory. Results showed that sensitivity of HT22 cells to glutamate-induced toxicity changed dramatically when comparing undifferentiated with differentiated cells, with the half-effective concentration for differentiated cells reducing approximately two orders of magnitude. Moreover, glutamate-induced toxicity in differentiated cells, but not undifferentiated cells, was inhibited by the N-methyl-D- aspartate receptor antagonists MK-801 and memantine. Evidently, differentiated HT22 cells expressed N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, while undifferentiated cells did not. Our experimental findings indicated that differentiation is important for immortalized cell lines to render post-mitotic neuronal properties, and that differentiated HT22 neurons represent a better model of hippocampal neurons than undifferentiated cells.

  16. Validation of MODIS FLH and In Situ Chlorophyll a from Tampa Bay, Florida (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Andrew; MorenoMadrinan, Max J.

    2012-01-01

    Satellite observation of phytoplankton concentration or chlorophyll-a (chla) is an important characteristic, critically integral to monitoring coastal water quality. However, the optical properties of estuarine and coastal waters are highly variable and complex and pose a great challenge for accurate analysis. Constituents such as suspended solids and dissolved organic matter and the overlapping and uncorrelated absorptions in the blue region of the spectrum renders the blue-green ratio algorithms for estimating chl-a inaccurate. Measurement of suninduced chlorophyll fluorescence, on the other hand, which utilizes the near infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum may, provide a better estimate of phytoplankton concentrations. While modelling and laboratory studies have illustrated both the utility and limitations of satellite algorithms based on the sun induced chlorophyll fluorescence signal, few have examined the empirical validity of these algorithms or compared their accuracy against bluegreen ratio algorithms . In an unprecedented analysis using a long term (2003-2011) in situ monitoring data set from Tampa Bay, Florida (USA), we assess the validity of the FLH product from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer against a suite of water quality parameters taken in a variety of conditions throughout this large optically complex estuarine system. . Overall, the results show a 106% increase in the validity of chla concentration estimation using FLH over the standard chla estimate from the blue-green OC3M algorithm. Additionally, a systematic analysis of sampling sites throughout the bay is undertaken to understand how the FLH product responds to varying conditions in the estuary and correlations are conducted to see how the relationships between satellite FLH and in situ chlorophyll-a change with depth, distance from shore, from structures like bridges, and nutrient concentrations and turbidity. Such analysis illustrates that the correlations between

  17. Upper Arctic Ocean velocity structure from in-situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recinos, Beatriz; Rabe, Benjamin; Schauer, Ursula

    2016-04-01

    The gross circulation of the upper and intermediate layers of the Arctic Ocean has been inferred from water mass properties: the mixed layer, containing fresh water from the shelf seas, travels from Siberia towards the Atlantic sector, and the saline and warm layer of Atlantic origin below, follows cyclonic pathways along topographic features. Direct observations of the flow below the sea ice are, however, sparse and difficult to obtain. This research presents the analysis of a unique time series/section of in situ velocity measurements obtained by a drifting ice-tethered platform in the Transpolar Drift near the North Pole. Two instruments were used to obtain in situ measurements of velocity, temperature, salinity and pressure: an Ice-tethered Acoustic Current profiler (ITAC) and an Ice-tethered Profiler (ITP). Both systems were deployed in the Amundsen basin, during the Arctic Ocean expedition ARK XXII/2 of the German Research Vessel Polarstern in September 2007. The systems transmitted profile data from the 14th of September to the 29th of November 2007 and covered a maximum depth range of 23 to 400 m. The results are compared to observations by a shipboard Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) from the 2011 Polarstern expedition ARK-XXVI/3, and wind and ice concentration from satellite reanalysis products. The data set allows an overview of the upper and intermediate circulation along the Lomonosov Ridge. Near-surface velocity and ice drift obtained by the ITAC unit are consistent with the Transpolar Drift Current. Ekman transports calculated from the observed ice drift and assumed ice-ocean drag behaviour suggest that Ekman dynamics influenced velocities at depths greater than the Ekman layer. Direct velocity observations in combination with water mass analyses from the temperature and salinity data, suggest the existence of a current along the Eurasian side of the Lomonosov Ridge within the warm Atlantic layer below the cold halocline. At those depths

  18. Size Dependent Pore Formation in Germanium Nanowires Undergoing Reversible Delithiation Observed by In Situ TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xiaotang; He, Yang; Mao, Scott X.; Wang, Chong-min; Korgel, Brian A.

    2016-12-22

    Germanium (Ge) nanowires coated with an amorphous silicon (Si) shell undergoing lithiation and delithiation were studied using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Delithiation creates pores in nanowires with diameters larger than ~25 nm, but not in smaller diameter nanowires. The formation of pores in Ge nanowires undergoing delithiation has been observed before in in situ TEM experiments, but there has been no indication that a critical diameter exists below which pores do not form. Pore formation occurs as a result of fast lithium diffusion compared to vacancy migration. We propose that a short diffusion path for vacancies to the nanowire surface plays a role in limiting pore formation even when lithium diffusion is fast.

  19. NMR bioreactor development for live in-situ microbial functional analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majors, Paul D.; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Scholten, Johannes C. M.

    2008-05-01

    A live, in-situ metabolomics capability was developed for prokaryotic cultures under controlled growth conditions. Toward this goal, a radiofrequency-transparent bioreactor was developed and integrated with a commercial wide-bore nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging spectrometer and a commercial bioreactor controller. Water suppressed 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to monitor glucose and fructose utilization and byproduct excretion by Eubacterium aggregans (an anaerobic bacterial species relevant for biofuel production) under controlled batch and continuous culture conditions. The resulting metabolite profiles (short chain organic acids and ethanol) and trends are consistent with existing knowledge of its metabolism. However, our study also showed that E. aggregans produces lactate end product in significant concentrations—a result not previously reported. The advantages of live in-situ microbial metabolomics analysis and its complementariness with functional genomics/systems biology methods are discussed.

  20. Two-dimensional in situ metrology of X-ray mirrors using the speckle scanning technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Laundy, David; Sawhney, Kawal

    2015-07-01

    In situ metrology overcomes many of the limitations of existing metrology techniques and is capable of exceeding the performance of present-day optics. A novel technique for precisely characterizing an X-ray bimorph mirror and deducing its two-dimensional (2D) slope error map is presented. This technique has also been used to perform fast optimization of a bimorph mirror using the derived 2D piezo response functions. The measured focused beam size was significantly reduced after the optimization, and the slope error map was then verified by using geometrical optics to simulate the focused beam profile. This proposed technique is expected to be valuable for in situ metrology of X-ray mirrors at synchrotron radiation facilities and in astronomical telescopes.

  1. Two-dimensional in situ metrology of X-ray mirrors using the speckle scanning technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongchang, E-mail: hongchang.wang@diamond.ac.uk; Kashyap, Yogesh; Laundy, David; Sawhney, Kawal [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-06

    The two-dimensional slope error of an X-ray mirror has been retrieved by employing the speckle scanning technique, which will be valuable at synchrotron radiation facilities and in astronomical telescopes. In situ metrology overcomes many of the limitations of existing metrology techniques and is capable of exceeding the performance of present-day optics. A novel technique for precisely characterizing an X-ray bimorph mirror and deducing its two-dimensional (2D) slope error map is presented. This technique has also been used to perform fast optimization of a bimorph mirror using the derived 2D piezo response functions. The measured focused beam size was significantly reduced after the optimization, and the slope error map was then verified by using geometrical optics to simulate the focused beam profile. This proposed technique is expected to be valuable for in situ metrology of X-ray mirrors at synchrotron radiation facilities and in astronomical telescopes.

  2. Stability of added and in situ-produced vitamin B12 in breadmaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelmann, Minnamari; Chamlagain, Bhawani; Santin, Marco; Kariluoto, Susanna; Piironen, Vieno

    2016-08-01

    Vitamin B12 exists naturally in foods of animal origin and is synthesised only by certain bacteria. New food sources are needed to ensure vitamin B12 intake in risk groups. This study aimed to investigate the stability of added cyanocobalamin (CNCbl, chemically modified form) and hydroxocobalamin (OHCbl, natural form) and in situ-synthesised vitamin B12 in breadmaking. Samples were analysed both with a microbiological (MBA) and a liquid chromatographic (UHPLC) method to test applicability of these two methods. Proofing did not affect CNCbl and OHCbl levels. By contrast, 21% and 31% of OHCbl was lost in oven-baking steps in straight- and sponge-dough processes, respectively, whereas CNCbl remained almost stable. In sourdough baking, 23% of CNCbl and 44% of OHCbl were lost. In situ-produced vitamin B12 was almost as stable as added CNCbl and more stable than OHCbl. The UHPLC method showed its superiority to the MBA in determining the active vitamin B12.

  3. Pattern classification by memristive crossbar circuits using ex situ and in situ training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibart, Fabien; Zamanidoost, Elham; Strukov, Dmitri B.

    2013-06-01

    Memristors are memory resistors that promise the efficient implementation of synaptic weights in artificial neural networks. Whereas demonstrations of the synaptic operation of memristors already exist, the implementation of even simple networks is more challenging and has yet to be reported. Here we demonstrate pattern classification using a single-layer perceptron network implemented with a memrisitive crossbar circuit and trained using the perceptron learning rule by ex situ and in situ methods. In the first case, synaptic weights, which are realized as conductances of titanium dioxide memristors, are calculated on a precursor software-based network and then imported sequentially into the crossbar circuit. In the second case, training is implemented in situ, so the weights are adjusted in parallel. Both methods work satisfactorily despite significant variations in the switching behaviour of the memristors. These results give hope for the anticipated efficient implementation of artificial neuromorphic networks and pave the way for dense, high-performance information processing systems.

  4. NOVEL IN-SITU METAL AND MINERAL EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn O' Gorman; Hans von Michaelis; Gregory J. Olson

    2004-09-22

    This white paper summarizes the state of art of in-situ leaching of metals and minerals, and describes a new technology concept employing improved fragmentation of ores underground in order to prepare the ore for more efficient in-situ leaching, combined with technology to continuously improve solution flow patterns through the ore during the leaching process. The process parameters and economic benefits of combining the new concept with chemical and biological leaching are described. A summary is provided of the next steps required to demonstrate the technology with the goal of enabling more widespread use of in-situ leaching.

  5. Enhancement of in situ Remediation of Hydrocarbon Contaminated Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmroth, M.

    2006-07-01

    Approximately 750 000 sites of contaminated land exist across Europe. The harmful chemicals found in Finnish soils include heavy metals, oil products, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlorophenols, and pesticides. Petroleum and petroleum products enter soil from ruptured oil pipelines, land disposal of refinery products, leaking storage tanks and through accidents. PAH contamination is caused by the spills of coal tar and creosote from coal gasification and wood treatment sites in addition to oil spills. Cleanup of soil by bioremediation is cheaper than by chemical and physical processes. However, the cleaning capacity of natural attenuation and in situ bioremediation is limited. The purpose of this thesis was to find feasible options to enhance in situ remediation of hydrocarbon contaminants. The aims were to increase the bioavailability of the contaminants and microbial activity at the subsurface in order to achieve higher contaminant removal efficiency than by intrinsic biodegradation alone. Enhancement of microbial activity and decrease of soil toxicity during remediation were estimated by using several biological assays. The performance of these assays was compared in order to find suitable indicators to follow the progress of remediation. Phytoremediation and chemical oxidation are promising in situ techniques to increase the degradation of hydrocarbons in soil. Phytoremediation is plant-enhanced decontamination of soil and water. Degradation of hydrocarbons is enhanced in the root zone by increased microbial activity and through the detoxifying enzymes of plants themselves. Chemical oxidation of contaminants by Fenton's reaction can produce degradation products which are more biodegradable than the parent compounds. Fenton's reaction and its modifications apply solutions of hydrogen peroxide and iron for the oxidation of organic chemicals. The cost of oxidation can be reduced by aiming at partial instead of full

  6. satellite and in-situ measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José de Jesús Salas Pérez

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available La distribución espacial y temporal de la circulación superficial de la Bahía de Banderas se obtuvo con el empleo de series temporales de rapidez de viento, temperatura superficial del mar (AVHR radiómetro y un termógrafo, nivel del mar y trazas ascendentes y descendentes del radar altimétrico ERS-2. El período que abarca dichos datos es de cuatro años, ya que comenzó en el verano de 1997 y finalizó en el invierno de 2002. La marea en la Bahía es mixta (F=0.25 con predominio del armónico M2. La bahía no muestra características de resonancia con la marea del mar abierto. Amplitudes promedio de 30 cms., resultan en corrientes de marea de pocos cms./s. Las bajas frecuencias (periodos mayores a tres días parecen ser los principales generadores de la circulación marina en esta área, en la que predomina el periodo estacional sobre los otros periodos. FEOs fueron aplicadas a las componentes de velocidad, calculadas con observaciones de altimetría medidas en la boca de la Bahía, las cuales mostraron dos principales distribuciones espaciales. El primer periodo de distribución, que se extendió desde febrero hasta julio, muestra un flujo de entrada por la porción norte/sur de la bahía, con un flujo de salida por su boca (distribución anticiclónica. El segundo periodo se extiende desde agosto hasta diciembre y es opuesto al primero (distribución ciclónica. Las características de la circulación aquí presentadas son hipotéticas y observaciones de velocidad medidas in-situ deben confirmarlas

  7. In Situ Probe Science at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, D.H.; Lunine, J.I.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Atreya, S. K.; Brinckerhoff, W.; Colaprete, A.; Coustenis, A.; Fletcher, L. N.; Guillot, T.; Lebreton, J.-P.; Mahaffy, P.; Mousis, O.; Orton, G. S.; Reh, K.; Spilker, L. J.; Spilker, T. R.; Webster, C.

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental goal of solar system exploration is to understand the origin of the solar sys-tem, the initial stages, conditions, and processes by which the solar system formed, how the formation pro-cess was initiated, and the nature of the interstellar seed material from which the solar system was born. Key to understanding solar system formation and subsequent dynamical and chemical evolution is the origin and evolution of the giant planets and their atmospheres. Several theories have been put forward to explain the process of solar system formation, and the origin and evolution of the giant planets and their atmospheres. Each theory offers quantifiable predictions of the abundances of noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe, and abundances of key isotopic ratios 4He3He, DH, 15N14N, 18O16O, and 13C12C. Detection of certain dis-equilibrium species, diagnostic of deeper internal pro-cesses and dynamics of the atmosphere, would also help discriminate between competing theories. Measurements of the critical abundance profiles of these key constituents into the deeper well-mixed at-mosphere must be complemented by measurements of the profiles of atmospheric structure and dynamics at high vertical resolution and also require in situ explora-tion. The atmospheres of the giant planets can also serve as laboratories to better understand the atmospheric chem-istries, dynamics, processes, and climates on all planets including Earth, and offer a context and provide a ground truth for exoplanets and exoplanetary systems. Additionally, Giant planets have long been thought to play a critical role in the development of potentially habitable planetary systems. In the context of giant planet science provided by the Galileo, Juno, and Cassini missions to Jupiter and Sat-urn, a small, relatively shallow Saturn probe capable of measuring abundances and isotopic ratios of key at-mospheric constituents, and atmospheric structure in-cluding pressures, temperatures, dynamics, and cloud

  8. In-situ nanochemistry for optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won Jin

    This thesis describes recent results on simple methods to arrange nanosize objects such as semiconductor nanocrystals, noble metal nanoparticles, and upconversion nanophosphors by means of top-down processes. Specific focus is directed towards approaches to produce predefined patterns of various nanostructure materials using optical lithography for direct writing of films for optoelectronic and electronic devices. To obtain photo-patternability, the nanostructure materials [for example semiconductor nanocrystals (CdSe, CdTe, PbSe), metallic nanoparticles (Ag), upconversion nanophosphors (Er3+/Yb 3+ or Tm3+/Yb3+ co-doped NaYF4 ), and transparent conducting oxide nanoparticles (ITO, ZnO)] were functionalized by incorporation of the functional ligand t-butoxycarbonyl (t-BOC) which has an acid-labile moiety. The t-BOC group undergoes a cleavage, when subjected to UV irradiation in the presence of a photo acid generator (PAG) to releases isobutene and carbon dioxide. Depending on the need of the application, either the exposed regions (negative pattern) or the non-exposed regions (positive pattern) could be developed from the exposed films by appropriate solvent selection. The photo exposed regions of the film are rendered hydrophilic due to the degradation of the t-BOC, the un-exposed regions remain hydrophobic. This solubility change in the QDs is the basis of their patternablity. The un-exposed regions can be removed to obtain the negative pattern by washing with hydrophobic solvents, whereas the exposed regions can be selectively removed to obtain positive pattern by washing with hydrophilic solvents. This change in the surface chemistry results in the ability to photo-pattern the various nanostructure materials where desired for a number of optoelectronic device geometries. We demonstrate that the ultimate resolution (linewidth and spacing) of this technique is below submicron. Details on technological aspects concerning nanoparticle patterning as well as practical

  9. Design of simulation-based medical education and advantages and disadvantages of in situ simulation versus off-site simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Jette Led; Østergaard, Doris; LeBlanc, Vicki; Ottesen, Bent; Konge, Lars; Dieckmann, Peter; Van der Vleuten, Cees

    2017-01-21

    Simulation-based medical education (SBME) has traditionally been conducted as off-site simulation in simulation centres. Some hospital departments also provide off-site simulation using in-house training room(s) set up for simulation away from the clinical setting, and these activities are called in-house training. In-house training facilities can be part of hospital departments and resemble to some extent simulation centres but often have less technical equipment. In situ simulation, introduced over the past decade, mainly comprises of team-based activities and occurs in patient care units with healthcare professionals in their own working environment. Thus, this intentional blend of simulation and real working environments means that in situ simulation brings simulation to the real working environment and provides training where people work. In situ simulation can be either announced or unannounced, the latter also known as a drill. This article presents and discusses the design of SBME and the advantage and disadvantage of the different simulation settings, such as training in simulation-centres, in-house simulations in hospital departments, announced or unannounced in situ simulations. Non-randomised studies argue that in situ simulation is more effective for educational purposes than other types of simulation settings. Conversely, the few comparison studies that exist, either randomised or retrospective, show that choice of setting does not seem to influence individual or team learning. However, hospital department-based simulations, such as in-house simulation and in situ simulation, lead to a gain in organisational learning. To our knowledge no studies have compared announced and unannounced in situ simulation. The literature suggests some improved organisational learning from unannounced in situ simulation; however, unannounced in situ simulation was also found to be challenging to plan and conduct, and more stressful among participants. The importance of

  10. High-performance GPU-based rendering for real-time, rigid 2D/3D-image registration and motion prediction in radiation oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoerk, Jakob; Gendrin, Christelle; Weber, Christoph; Figl, Michael; Pawiro, Supriyanto Ardjo; Furtado, Hugo; Fabri, Daniella; Bloch, Christoph; Bergmann, Helmar; Gröller, Eduard; Birkfellner, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    A common problem in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of lung cancer as well as other malignant diseases is the compensation of periodic and aperiodic motion during dose delivery. Modern systems for image-guided radiation oncology allow for the acquisition of cone-beam computed tomography data in the treatment room as well as the acquisition of planar radiographs during the treatment. A mid-term research goal is the compensation of tumor target volume motion by 2D/3D registration. In 2D/3D registration, spatial information on organ location is derived by an iterative comparison of perspective volume renderings, so-called digitally rendered radiographs (DRR) from computed tomography volume data, and planar reference x-rays. Currently, this rendering process is very time consuming, and real-time registration, which should at least provide data on organ position in less than a second, has not come into existence. We present two GPU-based rendering algorithms which generate a DRR of 512 × 512 pixels size from a CT dataset of 53 MB size at a pace of almost 100 Hz. This rendering rate is feasible by applying a number of algorithmic simplifications which range from alternative volume-driven rendering approaches – namely so-called wobbled splatting – to sub-sampling of the DRR-image by means of specialized raycasting techniques. Furthermore, general purpose graphics processing unit (GPGPU) programming paradigms were consequently utilized. Rendering quality and performance as well as the influence on the quality and performance of the overall registration process were measured and analyzed in detail. The results show that both methods are competitive and pave the way for fast motion compensation by rigid and possibly even non-rigid 2D/3D registration and, beyond that, adaptive filtering of motion models in IGRT. PMID:21782399

  11. New light field camera based on physical based rendering tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ming-Han; Chang, Shan-Ching; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2014-03-01

    Even though light field technology was first invented more than 50 years ago, it did not gain popularity due to the limitation imposed by the computation technology. With the rapid advancement of computer technology over the last decade, the limitation has been uplifted and the light field technology quickly returns to the spotlight of the research stage. In this paper, PBRT (Physical Based Rendering Tracing) was introduced to overcome the limitation of using traditional optical simulation approach to study the light field camera technology. More specifically, traditional optical simulation approach can only present light energy distribution but typically lack the capability to present the pictures in realistic scenes. By using PBRT, which was developed to create virtual scenes, 4D light field information was obtained to conduct initial data analysis and calculation. This PBRT approach was also used to explore the light field data calculation potential in creating realistic photos. Furthermore, we integrated the optical experimental measurement results with PBRT in order to place the real measurement results into the virtually created scenes. In other words, our approach provided us with a way to establish a link of virtual scene with the real measurement results. Several images developed based on the above-mentioned approaches were analyzed and discussed to verify the pros and cons of the newly developed PBRT based light field camera technology. It will be shown that this newly developed light field camera approach can circumvent the loss of spatial resolution associated with adopting a micro-lens array in front of the image sensors. Detailed operational constraint, performance metrics, computation resources needed, etc. associated with this newly developed light field camera technique were presented in detail.

  12. Reutilizing Existing Library Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Marlys Cresap

    1987-01-01

    This discussion of the reutilization of existing library space reviews the decision process and considerations for implementation. Two case studies of small public libraries which reassigned space to better use are provided, including floor plans. (1 reference) (MES)

  13. FluoRender: An application of 2D image space methods for 3D and 4D confocal microscopy data visualization in neurobiology research

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Yong

    2012-02-01

    2D image space methods are processing methods applied after the volumetric data are projected and rendered into the 2D image space, such as 2D filtering, tone mapping and compositing. In the application domain of volume visualization, most 2D image space methods can be carried out more efficiently than their 3D counterparts. Most importantly, 2D image space methods can be used to enhance volume visualization quality when applied together with volume rendering methods. In this paper, we present and discuss the applications of a series of 2D image space methods as enhancements to confocal microscopy visualizations, including 2D tone mapping, 2D compositing, and 2D color mapping. These methods are easily integrated with our existing confocal visualization tool, FluoRender, and the outcome is a full-featured visualization system that meets neurobiologists\\' demands for qualitative analysis of confocal microscopy data. © 2012 IEEE.

  14. Design and Implementation of an Application. Programming Interface for Volume Rendering

    OpenAIRE

    Selldin, Håkan

    2002-01-01

    To efficiently examine volumetric data sets from CT or MRI scans good volume rendering applications are needed. This thesis describes the design and implementation of an application programming interface (API) to be used when developing volume-rendering applications. A complete application programming interface has been designed. The interface is designed so that it makes writing application programs containing volume rendering fast and easy. The interface also makes created application progr...

  15. Epoxy nanodielectrics fabricated with in situ and ex situ techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuncer, Enis [ORNL; Polyzos, Georgios [ORNL; Sauers, Isidor [ORNL; James, David Randy [ORNL; Ellis, Alvin R [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we report fabrication and characterisation of a nanocomposite system composed of a commercial resin and extremely small (several nanometres in diameter) titanium dioxide particles. Nanoparticles were synthesised in situ with particle nucleation occurring inside the resin matrix. In this nanodielectric fabrication method, the nanoparticle precursor was mixed to the resin solution, and the nanoparticles were in situ precipitated. Note that no high shear mixing equipment was needed to improve particle dispersion - nanoparticles were distributed in the polymer matrix uniformly since particle nucleation occurs uniformly throughout the matrix. The properties of in situ nanodielectrics are compared to the unfilled resin and an ex situ nanocomposite. We anticipate that the presented in situ nanocomposite would be employed in high-temperature superconductivity applications. In additions, the improvement shown in the dielectric breakdown indicates that conventional high-voltage components and systems can be reduced in size with novel nanodielectrics.

  16. Novel Instrumentation for In Situ Combustion Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the Phase I is to develop, demonstrate and test a novel instrument based on laser absorption diagnostics for fast, in situ measurements of important...

  17. Novel Instrumentation for In Situ Combustion Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the Phase I is to develop, demonstrate and test a novel instrument based on laser absorption diagnostics for fast, in situ measurements of...

  18. Fathead minnow whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This study demonstrates the potential of whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH), in conjunction with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (QPCR)...

  19. In Situ Oxygen Production from Lunar and Martian Regolith Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In situ oxygen production is of immense importance to NASA in the support of the NASA initiative to sustain man's permanent presence in space. The oxygen produced...

  20. In Situ Instrument to Detect Prebiotic Compounds in Planetary Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getty, Stephanie A.; Dworkin, Jason; Glavin, Daniel P.; Southard, Adrian; Balvin, Manuel; Kotecki, Carl; Ferrance, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    The development of an in situ LC-MS instrument for future planetary science missions to icy surfaces that are of high astrobiology and astrochemistry potential will advance our understanding of organics in the solar system.

  1. An Efficient Heat Exchanger for In Situ Resource Utilization Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In situ resource utilization (ISRU) is essential for several of NASA's future flagship missions. Currently envisioned ISRU plants include production of oxygen from...

  2. Real-Time In Situ Landing Site Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, D.; Hibbard, K.; McGee, T.

    2017-02-01

    Landing spacecraft on other objects in the solar system provides a unique opportunity to make direct in situ science measurements, but extraterrestrial environments create unique challenges for the design and testing of the system.

  3. In situ quantification of genomic instability in breast cancer progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos; Chin, Koei; Gray, Joe W.; Lockett, Stephen J.

    2003-05-15

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of breast and other solid cancers. Presumably caused by critical telomere reduction, GI is responsible for providing the genetic diversity required in the multi-step progression of the disease. We have used multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization and 3D image analysis to quantify genomic instability cell-by-cell in thick, intact tissue sections of normal breast epithelium, preneoplastic lesions (usual ductal hyperplasia), ductal carcinona is situ or invasive carcinoma of the breast. Our in situ-cell by cell-analysis of genomic instability shows an important increase of genomic instability in the transition from hyperplasia to in situ carcinoma, followed by a reduction of instability in invasive carcinoma. This pattern suggests that the transition from hyperplasia to in situ carcinoma corresponds to telomere crisis and invasive carcinoma is a consequence of telomerase reactivation afertelomere crisis.

  4. Comparison Between Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH) and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... were collected, for culture method and bacteria characterized by biochemical ... for 24 hours and later preserved in 70% alcohol before in situ hybridization test. ... were observed in 47 to 75% while the bacterium was isolated on culture in 7 ...

  5. In-Situ Burning of Crude Oil on Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gelderen, Laurens

    in the small scale water basin. Boilovers were also observed during the burning of a heavy crude oil with a substantial light fraction without a water layer, however, which suggests that water is not essential for boilover occurrence. Further studies are required to determine the conditions under which......The fire dynamics and fire chemistry of in-situ burning of crude oil on water was studied in order to improve predictions on the suitability of this oil spill response method. For this purpose, several operational parameters were studied to determine the factors that control the burning efficiency...... of in-situ burning, i.e. the amount of oil (in wt%) removed from the water surface by the burning process. The burning efficiency is the main parameter for expressing the oil removal effectiveness of in-situ burning as response method and is thus relevant for suitability predictions of in-situ burning...

  6. In-situ Airborne Sampler for Advanced Guided Dropsonde Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a low-cost, retrievable and reusable, autonomously guided dropsonde capable of in-situ atmospheric measurements. The proposed effort will...

  7. New quantitative, in-situ characterization of weathering in geomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrivano, Simona; Gaggero, Laura; Gisbert Aguilar, Josep; Yus Gonzalez, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    intensity results are defined and categorized. Drdàcky M. & Slìzkovà Z., 2014. In situ peeling tests for assessing the cohesion and consolidation characteristics of historic plasters and render surfaces. Studies in conservation, vol 0. Fitzner B. & Heinrichs K., 2002. Damage diagnosis on stone monuments weathering forms, damage categories and damage indices. - In: Prikryl R. and Viles H.A. (eds.): Understanding and managing stone decay. - Proceedings Internat. Conf. "Stone weathering and atmospheric pollution network (SWAPNET)": 11-56, Charles Univ. Prague (Karolinum Press). ICOMOS.ISCS, 2008 Illustrated glossary on stone deterioration patterns, 78 pp. Scrivano S., Gaggero L. & Taddei A., 2013. Alteration patterns of marble under different environmental exposures: a systematic approach from the Staglieno Monumental cemetery and museum collections in Genoa (Italy). In: Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Deterioration and Conservation of Stone, New York, 22-26 October 2012. In press.

  8. In situ guided tissue regeneration in musculoskeletal diseases and aging

    OpenAIRE

    Jakob, Franz; Ebert, Regina; Rudert, Maximilian; Nöth, Ulrich; Walles, Heike; Docheva, Denitsa; Schieker, Matthias; Meinel, Lorenz; Groll, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In situ guided tissue regeneration, also addressed as in situ tissue engineering or endogenous regeneration, has a great potential for population-wide “minimal invasive” applications. During the last two decades, tissue engineering has been developed with remarkable in vitro and preclinical success but still the number of applications in clinical routine is extremely small. Moreover, the vision of population-wide applications of ex vivo tissue engineered constructs based on cells, growth and ...

  9. In-situ resist colloidal lithography for affordable plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochenkov, Vladimir E.

    2017-09-01

    A recently developed extension of Sparse Colloidal Lithography, an In-situ Resist Colloidal Lithography method is presented. The technique is based on in-situ deposition of structured resist layer having low adhesion to target material to form nanoparticles of desired shape. A high potential of the method is demonstrated by the examples of fabricated plasmonic nanostructures with different shapes, including concentric and non-concentric rings, disks and chiral comma-like particles.

  10. In situ primary production in young Antarctic sea ice

    OpenAIRE

    Mock, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    An in situ incubation technique used successfully to measure the photosynthetic carbon assimilation of internal algal assemblages within thick multiyear Arctic sea ice was developed and improved to measure the photosynthetic carbon assimilation within young sea ice only 50 cm thick (Eastern Weddell Sea, Antarctica). The new device enabled some of the first precise measurements of in situ photosynthetic carbon assimilation in newly formed Antarctic sea ice.

  11. BAW and SAW sensors for in-situ analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.; Bao, X. Q.; Chang, Z.; Sherrit, S.

    2003-01-01

    In-situ analysis is a major goal in current and future NASA exploration missions. In general in-situ analysis experiments are designed to investigate chmical, biological or geological markers or properties to determine the complex history of the body being studied. In order to expand the number of applicable sensor schemes an investigation into piezoelectric bulk acoustic wave (BAW) and surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators has been initiated.

  12. Characterization of VPO ammoxidation catalysts by in situ methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A.; Luecke, B.; Brueckner, A.; Steinike, U. [Institut fuer Angewandte Chemie Berlin-Adlershof e.V., Berlin (Germany); Brzezinka, K.W. [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany); Meisel, M. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Chemie

    1998-12-31

    In-situ methods are well known as powerful tools in studying catalyst formation processes, their solid state properties under working conditions and the interaction with the feed, intermediates and products to reveal reaction mechanisms. This paper gives a short overview on results of intense studies using in-situ techniques to reveal VPO catalyst generation processes, interaction of educts, intermediates and products with VPO catalyst surfaces and mechanistic insights. Catalytic data of the ammoxidation of toluene on different VPOs complete these findings. The precursor-catalyst transformation processes were preferently investigated by in-situ XRD, in-situ Raman and in-situ ESR spectroscopy. The interaction of aromatic molecules and intermediates, resp., and VPO solid surfaces was followed by in-situ ESR and in-situ FTIR spectroscopy. Mechanistic information was mainly obtained using in-situ FTIR spectroscopy and the temporal-analysis-of-products (TAP) technique. Catalytic studies were carried out in a fixed-bed microreactor on pure (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}(VO){sub 3}(P{sub 2}O{sub 7}){sub 2}, generated [(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}(VO{sub 3})(P{sub 2}O{sub 7}){sub 2}+V{sub x}O{sub y}] catalysts, having different V{sub x}O{sub y} proportions by use of VOHPO{sub 4} x 1/2H{sub 2}O (V/P=1) and recently studied (VO){sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} x 7 H{sub 2}O (V/P=1.5) precursors; the well-known (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} was used for comparison. (orig.)

  13. Advanced and In Situ Analytical Methods for Solar Fuel Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Candace K; Tüysüz, Harun; Braun, Artur; Ranjan, Chinmoy; La Mantia, Fabio; Miller, Benjamin K; Zhang, Liuxian; Crozier, Peter A; Haber, Joel A; Gregoire, John M; Park, Hyun S; Batchellor, Adam S; Trotochaud, Lena; Boettcher, Shannon W

    2016-01-01

    In situ and operando techniques can play important roles in the development of better performing photoelectrodes, photocatalysts, and electrocatalysts by helping to elucidate crucial intermediates and mechanistic steps. The development of high throughput screening methods has also accelerated the evaluation of relevant photoelectrochemical and electrochemical properties for new solar fuel materials. In this chapter, several in situ and high throughput characterization tools are discussed in detail along with their impact on our understanding of solar fuel materials.

  14. Matrix diffusion model. In situ tests using natural analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasilainen, K. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-11-01

    Matrix diffusion is an important retarding and dispersing mechanism for substances carried by groundwater in fractured bedrock. Natural analogues provide, unlike laboratory or field experiments, a possibility to test the model of matrix diffusion in situ over long periods of time. This thesis documents quantitative model tests against in situ observations, done to support modelling of matrix diffusion in performance assessments of nuclear waste repositories. 98 refs. The thesis includes also eight previous publications by author.

  15. Influence of rendering methods on yield and quality of chicken fat recovered from broiler skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Kun Lin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective In order to utilize fat from broiler byproducts efficiently, it is necessary to develop an appropriate rendering procedure and establish quality information for the rendered fat. A study was therefore undertaken to evaluate the influence of rendering methods on the amounts and general properties of the fat recovered from broiler skin. Methods The yield and quality of the broiler skin fat rendered through high and lower energy microwave rendering (3.6 W/g for 10 min and 2.4 W/g for 10 min for high power microwave rendering (HPMR and high power microwave rendering (LPMR, respectively, oven baking (OB, at 180°C for 40 min, and water cooking (WC, boiling for 40 min were compared. Results Microwave-rendered skin exhibited the highest yields and fat recovery rates, followed by OB, and WC fats (p<0.05. HPMR fat had the highest L*, a*, and b* values, whereas WC fat had the highest moisture content, acid values, and thiobarbituric acid (TBA values (p<0.05. There was no significant difference in the acid value, peroxide value, and TBA values between HPMR and LPMR fats. Conclusion Microwave rendering at a power level of 3.6 W/g for 10 min is suggested base on the yield and quality of chicken fat.

  16. Performance Assessment of Three Rendering Engines in 3D Computer Graphics Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žan Vidmar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was the determination of testing conditions and visual and numerical evaluation of renderings made with three different rendering engines in Maya software, which is widely used for educational and computer art purposes. In the theoretical part the overview of light phenomena and their simulation in virtual space is presented. This is followed by a detailed presentation of the main rendering methods and the results and limitations of their applications to 3D objects. At the end of the theoretical part the importance of a proper testing scene and especially the role of Cornell box are explained. In the experimental part the terms and conditions as well as hardware and software used for the research are presented. This is followed by a description of the procedures, where we focused on the rendering quality and time, which enabled the comparison of settings of different render engines and determination of conditions for further rendering of testing scenes. The experimental part continued with rendering a variety of simple virtual scenes including Cornell box and virtual object with different materials and colours. Apart from visual evaluation, which was the starting point for comparison of renderings, a procedure for numerical estimation and colour deviations of renderings using the selected regions of interest in the final images is presented.

  17. Real-time volume rendering of digital medical images on an iOS device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noon, Christian; Holub, Joseph; Winer, Eliot

    2013-03-01

    Performing high quality 3D visualizations on mobile devices, while tantalizingly close in many areas, is still a quite difficult task. This is especially true for 3D volume rendering of digital medical images. Allowing this would empower medical personnel a powerful tool to diagnose and treat patients and train the next generation of physicians. This research focuses on performing real time volume rendering of digital medical images on iOS devices using custom developed GPU shaders for orthogonal texture slicing. An interactive volume renderer was designed and developed with several new features including dynamic modification of render resolutions, an incremental render loop, a shader-based clipping algorithm to support OpenGL ES 2.0, and an internal backface culling algorithm for properly sorting rendered geometry with alpha blending. The application was developed using several application programming interfaces (APIs) such as OpenSceneGraph (OSG) as the primary graphics renderer coupled with iOS Cocoa Touch for user interaction, and DCMTK for DICOM I/O. The developed application rendered volume datasets over 450 slices up to 50-60 frames per second, depending on the specific model of the iOS device. All rendering is done locally on the device so no Internet connection is required.

  18. IN SITU FIELD TESTING OF PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.S.Y. YANG

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts and surface-based boreholes through unsaturated zone (UZ) tuff rock units. In situ testing, monitoring, and associated laboratory studies are conducted to directly assess and evaluate the waste emplacement environment and the natural barriers to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report supports and provides data to UZ flow and transport model reports, which in turn contribute to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of Yucca Mountain, an important document for the license application (LA). The objectives of ambient field-testing activities are described in Section 1.1. This report is the third revision (REV 03), which supercedes REV 02. The scientific analysis of data for inputs to model calibration and validation as documented in REV 02 were developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167969]). This revision was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.4) for better integrated, consistent, transparent, traceable, and more complete documentation in this scientific analysis report and associated UZ flow and transport model reports. No additional testing or analyses were performed as part of this revision. The list of relevant acceptance criteria is provided by ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]), Table 3-1. Additional deviations from the TWP regarding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) list are discussed in Section 1.3. Documentation in this report includes descriptions of how, and under what

  19. Characterizing In Situ Uranium and Groundwater Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, J.; Newman, M. A.; Stucker, V.; Peacock, A.; Ranville, J.; Cabaniss, S.; Hatfield, K.; Annable, M. D.; Klammler, H.; Perminova, I. V.

    2010-12-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a new sensor that incorporates the field-tested concepts of the passive flux meter to provide direct in situ measures of uranium and groundwater fluxes. The sensor uses two sorbents and resident tracers to measure uranium flux and specific discharge directly; but, sensor principles and design should also apply to fluxes of other radionuclides. Flux measurements will assist with obtaining field-scale quantification of subsurface processes affecting uranium transport (e.g., advection) and transformation (e.g., uranium attenuation) and further advance conceptual and computational models for field scale simulations. Project efforts will expand our current understanding of how field-scale spatial variations in uranium fluxes and those for salient electron donor/acceptors, and groundwater are coupled to spatial variations in measured microbial biomass/community composition, effective field-scale uranium mass balances, attenuation, and stability. The new sensor uses an anion exchange resin to measure uranium fluxes and activated carbon with resident tracers to measure water fluxes. Several anion-exchange resins including Dowex 21K and 21K XLT, Purolite A500, and Lewatit S6328 were tested as sorbents for capturing uranium on the sensor and Lewatit S6328 was determined to be the most effective over the widest pH range. Four branched alcohols proved useful as resident tracers for measuring groundwater flows using activated carbon for both laboratory and field conditions. The flux sensor was redesigned to prevent the discharge of tracers to the environment, and the new design was tested in laboratory box aquifers and the field. Geochemical modeling of equilibrium speciation using Visual Minteq and an up-to-date thermodynamic data base suggested Ca-tricarbonato-uranyl complexes predominate under field conditions, while calculated uranyl ion activities were sensitive to changes in pH, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and alkaline earth

  20. The Relativity of Existence

    CERN Document Server

    Heinrich, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Despite the success of physics in formulating mathematical theories that can predict the outcome of experiments, we have made remarkably little progress towards answering some of the most basic questions about our existence, such as: why does the universe exist? Why is the universe apparently fine-tuned to be able to support life? Why are the laws of physics so elegant? Why do we have three dimensions of space and one of time? How is it that the universe can be non-local and non-causal at the quantum scale, and why is there quantum randomness? In this paper, it is shown that all of these questions are answered if existence is relative, and moreover, it seems that we are logically bound to accept it.

  1. This elusive objective existence

    CERN Document Server

    Mohrhoff, U

    2004-01-01

    Zurek's existential interpretation of quantum mechanics suffers from three classical prejudices, including the belief that space and time are intrinsically and infinitely differentiated. They compel him to relativize the concept of objective existence in two ways. The elimination of these prejudices makes it possible to recognize the quantum formalism's ontological implications - the relative and contingent reality of spatiotemporal distinctions and the extrinsic and finite spatiotemporal differentiation of the physical world - which in turn makes it possible to arrive at an unqualified objective existence. Contrary to a widespread misconception, viewing the quantum formalism as being fundamentally a probability algorithm does not imply that quantum mechanics is concerned with states of knowledge rather than states of Nature. On the contrary, it makes possible a complete and strongly objective description of the physical world that requires no reference to observers. What objectively exists, in a sense that r...

  2. In situ management and domestication of plants in Mesoamerica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Alejandro; Otero-Arnaiz, Adriana; Pérez-Negrón, Edgar; Valiente-Banuet, Alfonso

    2007-11-01

    Ethnobotanical studies in Mexico have documented that Mesoamerican peoples practise systems of in situ management of wild and weedy vegetation directed to control availability of useful plants. In situ management includes let standing, encouraging growing and protection of individual plants of useful species during clearance of vegetation, which in some cases may involve artificial selection. The aim of this study was to review, complement and re-analyse information from three case studies which examined patterns of morphological, physiological and genetic effects of artificial selection in plant populations under in situ management in the region. Information on wild and in situ managed populations of the herbaceous weedy plants Anoda cristata and Crotalaria pumila, the tree Leucaena esculenta subsp. esculenta and the columnar cacti Escontria chiotilla, Polaskia chichipe and Stenocereus stellatus from Central Mexico was re-analysed. Analyses compared morphology and frequency of morphological variants, germination patterns, and population genetics parameters between wild and managed in situ populations of the species studied. Species of columnar cacti are under different management intensities and their populations, including cultivated stands of P. chichipe and S. stellatus, were also compared between species. Significant differences in morphology, germination patterns and genetic variation documented between wild, in situ managed and cultivated populations of the species studied are associated with higher frequencies of phenotypes favoured by humans in managed populations. Genetic diversity in managed populations of E. chiotilla and P. chichipe is slightly lower than in wild populations but in managed populations of S. stellatus variation was higher than in the wild. However, genetic distance between populations was generally small and influenced more by geographic distance than by management. Artificial selection operating on in situ managed populations of the

  3. Decaf: Decoupled Dataflows for In Situ High-Performance Workflows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreher, M.; Peterka, T.

    2017-07-31

    Decaf is a dataflow system for the parallel communication of coupled tasks in an HPC workflow. The dataflow can perform arbitrary data transformations ranging from simply forwarding data to complex data redistribution. Decaf does this by allowing the user to allocate resources and execute custom code in the dataflow. All communication through the dataflow is efficient parallel message passing over MPI. The runtime for calling tasks is entirely message-driven; Decaf executes a task when all messages for the task have been received. Such a messagedriven runtime allows cyclic task dependencies in the workflow graph, for example, to enact computational steering based on the result of downstream tasks. Decaf includes a simple Python API for describing the workflow graph. This allows Decaf to stand alone as a complete workflow system, but Decaf can also be used as the dataflow layer by one or more other workflow systems to form a heterogeneous task-based computing environment. In one experiment, we couple a molecular dynamics code with a visualization tool using the FlowVR and Damaris workflow systems and Decaf for the dataflow. In another experiment, we test the coupling of a cosmology code with Voronoi tessellation and density estimation codes using MPI for the simulation, the DIY programming model for the two analysis codes, and Decaf for the dataflow. Such workflows consisting of heterogeneous software infrastructures exist because components are developed separately with different programming models and runtimes, and this is the first time that such heterogeneous coupling of diverse components was demonstrated in situ on HPC systems.

  4. In-situ Production of High Density Polyethylene and Other Useful Materials on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a revolutionary materials structure and power storage concept based on the in-situ production of abiotic carbon 4 compounds. One of the largest single mass penalties required to support the human exploration of Mars is the surface habitat. This proposal will use physical chemical technologies to produce high density polyethylene (HDPE) inflatable structures and construction materials from Mars atmospheric CO2. The formation of polyethylene from Mars CO2 is based on the use of the Sabatier and modified Fischer Tropsch reactions. The proposed system will fully integrate with existing in-situ propellant production concepts. The technology will also be capable of supplementing human caloric requirements, providing solid and liquid fuels for energy storage, and providing significant reduction in mission risk. The NASA Mars Reference Mission Definition Team estimated that a conventional Mars surface habitat structure would weigh 10 tonnes. It is estimated that this technology could reduce this mass by 80%. This reduction in mass will significantly contribute to the reduction in total mission cost need to make a Mars mission a reality. In addition the potential reduction of risk provided by the ability to produce C4 and potentially higher carbon based materials in-situ on Mars is significant. Food, fuel, and shelter are only three of many requirements that would be impacted by this research.

  5. Progress report on a novel in situ14C extraction scheme at the University of Cologne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fülöp, R.-H.; Wacker, L.; Dunai, T. J.

    2015-10-01

    We present initial results of in situ14C system blank and calibration sample measurements obtained using the in situ14C extraction scheme developed at the University of Cologne. The 14C extraction scheme specifically exploits the phase transformation of quartz to cristobalite in order to quantitatively extract the carbon as CO2 and follows a scheme that is different to that of existing extraction systems. Features are offline furnace extraction, single pass catalytic oxidation using mixed copper (I,II) oxide as catalyst, the use of UHV-compatible components and of vacuum annealed copper tubing. The design allows a relatively rapid sample throughput - two samples per day as opposed to the current 2 days per sample that can be done on other lines - and can accommodate samples ranging between 0.5 and 4 g of clean quartz. Following extraction and cleaning, the CO2 gas is measured using the gas ion source of the MICADAS AMS facility at ETH Zurich. The extraction system yields low systems blanks (10 +16/-10 × 103 atoms 14C, ±1 σ) and the initial results indicate that further improvements are achievable. Measurements of the CRONUS-A standard sample show a good reproducibility and results are consistent with published values. We also present the first in situ14C results for the CRONUS-R standard material.

  6. In-situ Production of High Density Polyethylene and Other Useful Materials on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a revolutionary materials structure and power storage concept based on the in-situ production of abiotic carbon 4 compounds. One of the largest single mass penalties required to support the human exploration of Mars is the surface habitat. This proposal will use physical chemical technologies to produce high density polyethylene (HDPE) inflatable structures and construction materials from Mars atmospheric CO2. The formation of polyethylene from Mars CO2 is based on the use of the Sabatier and modified Fischer Tropsch reactions. The proposed system will fully integrate with existing in-situ propellant production concepts. The technology will also be capable of supplementing human caloric requirements, providing solid and liquid fuels for energy storage, and providing significant reduction in mission risk. The NASA Mars Reference Mission Definition Team estimated that a conventional Mars surface habitat structure would weigh 10 tonnes. It is estimated that this technology could reduce this mass by 80%. This reduction in mass will significantly contribute to the reduction in total mission cost need to make a Mars mission a reality. In addition the potential reduction of risk provided by the ability to produce C4 and potentially higher carbon based materials in-situ on Mars is significant. Food, fuel, and shelter are only three of many requirements that would be impacted by this research.

  7. In situ dielectric measurements of Zn?Al layered double hydroxide with anionic nitrate ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Abdullah Ahmed Ali; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Hussein, Mohd Zobir bin; Zakaria, Azmi

    2012-08-01

    Zn-Al-NO3-layered double hydroxide (Zn-Al-NO3-LDH) was prepared by the co-precipitation method with a ratio of Zn/Al = 4 and at a constant pH of 7. Powder XRD patterns showed the characteristic peaks of layered structure of the LDH sample. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and infrared spectra of the sample were investigated. Because of the existence of water molecules and anionic NO3- in the interlayer of the LDH, the in situ dielectric spectroscopy of the LDH can be described by an anomalous low frequency dispersion using the second type of Universal Power Law. Novel measurements of activation energy of LDH have been obtained at five different frequencies. The energy value increased from 0.05 eV at 1 MHz to 0.37 eV at 134 Hz. The conductivity spectra of sample were studied as a function in temperature of the in situ measurements. The ionic conductivity (dc) of LDH increased as the in situ temperature increased.

  8. Life cycle Greenhouse gas emissions of current Oil Sands Technologies: surface mining and in situ applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergerson, Joule A; Kofoworola, Oyeshola; Charpentier, Alex D; Sleep, Sylvia; Maclean, Heather L

    2012-07-17

    Life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with two major recovery and extraction processes currently utilized in Alberta's oil sands, surface mining and in situ, are quantified. Process modules are developed and integrated into a life cycle model-GHOST (GreenHouse gas emissions of current Oil Sands Technologies) developed in prior work. Recovery and extraction of bitumen through surface mining and in situ processes result in 3-9 and 9-16 g CO(2)eq/MJ bitumen, respectively; upgrading emissions are an additional 6-17 g CO(2)eq/MJ synthetic crude oil (SCO) (all results are on a HHV basis). Although a high degree of variability exists in well-to-wheel emissions due to differences in technologies employed, operating conditions, and product characteristics, the surface mining dilbit and the in situ SCO pathways have the lowest and highest emissions, 88 and 120 g CO(2)eq/MJ reformulated gasoline. Through the use of improved data obtained from operating oil sands projects, we present ranges of emissions that overlap with emissions in literature for conventional crude oil. An increased focus is recommended in policy discussions on understanding interproject variability of emissions of both oil sands and conventional crudes, as this has not been adequately represented in previous studies.

  9. X-ray microscopy for in situ characterization of 3D nanostructural evolution in the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornberger, Benjamin; Bale, Hrishikesh; Merkle, Arno; Feser, Michael; Harris, William; Etchin, Sergey; Leibowitz, Marty; Qiu, Wei; Tkachuk, Andrei; Gu, Allen; Bradley, Robert S.; Lu, Xuekun; Withers, Philip J.; Clarke, Amy; Henderson, Kevin; Cordes, Nikolaus; Patterson, Brian M.

    2015-09-01

    X-ray microscopy (XRM) has emerged as a powerful technique that reveals 3D images and quantitative information of interior structures. XRM executed both in the laboratory and at the synchrotron have demonstrated critical analysis and materials characterization on meso-, micro-, and nanoscales, with spatial resolution down to 50 nm in laboratory systems. The non-destructive nature of X-rays has made the technique widely appealing, with potential for "4D" characterization, delivering 3D micro- and nanostructural information on the same sample as a function of sequential processing or experimental conditions. Understanding volumetric and nanostructural changes, such as solid deformation, pore evolution, and crack propagation are fundamental to understanding how materials form, deform, and perform. We will present recent instrumentation developments in laboratory based XRM including a novel in situ nanomechanical testing stage. These developments bridge the gap between existing in situ stages for micro scale XRM, and SEM/TEM techniques that offer nanometer resolution but are limited to analysis of surfaces or extremely thin samples whose behavior is strongly influenced by surface effects. Several applications will be presented including 3D-characterization and in situ mechanical testing of polymers, metal alloys, composites and biomaterials. They span multiple length scales from the micro- to the nanoscale and different mechanical testing modes such as compression, indentation and tension.

  10. In situ conservation of wild potato germplasm in Argentina: Example and possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos F. Marfil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The potato is the third most important food crop worldwide and in situ conservation of its wild relatives is considered an urgent priority. Although regions of the Americas with high wild potato species richness have been identified, the need to identify specific sites for establishing genetic reserves is still pending. Matching distribution data of Argentinean wild potato species to existing protected areas (PA, two priority sites were identified. The creation of genetic reserves in these two PA would make possible to preserve populations of species that have been successfully incorporated into the crop and are listed in the global priority Crop Wild Relative inventory. While the presence of target species in PA could ensure a passive conservation, in situ conservation programs require to actively intervene in selected areas. From a field study performed on populations of the wild potato Solanum kurtzianum naturally growing in a PA, the Villavicencio Natural Reserve (Mendoza province, a baseline with distribution, biotic interactions, sprouting behavior, population dynamics, AFLP and pollen viability data was established. Based on a systematic work in this Reserve we have generated a working protocol to be implemented at national and regional levels for the in situ conservation of potato wild relatives.

  11. Relativity, Dimensionality, and Existence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkov, Vesselin

    A 100 years have passed since the advent of special relativity and 2008 will mark another important to all relativists anniversary - 100 years since Minkowski gave his talk "Space and Time" on September 21, 1908 in which he proposed the unifi- cation of space and time into an inseparable entity - space-time. Although special relativity has been an enormously successful physical theory no progress has been made in clarifying the question of existence of the objects represented by two of its basic concepts - space-time and world lines (or worldtubes in the case of extended bodies). The major reason for this failure appears to be the physicists' tradition to call such questions of existence philosophical. This tradition, however, is not quite consistent. In Newtonian mechanics physicists believe that they describe real objects whenever they talk about particles - one of the basic concepts of Newtonian physics. The situation is the same in quantum physics - no one questions the existence of electrons, protons, etc. Then why should the question of existence of worldtubes (representing particles in relativity) be regarded as a philosophical question?

  12. 31 CFR 515.548 - Services rendered by Cuba to United States aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Services rendered by Cuba to United... REGULATIONS Licenses, Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 515.548 Services rendered by Cuba to United States aircraft. Specific licenses are issued for payment to Cuba of charges for services...

  13. Frequency domain volume rendering by the wavelet X-ray transform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenberg, Michel A.; Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a wavelet-based X-ray rendering method in the frequency domain with a smaller time complexity than wavelet splatting. Standard Fourier volume rendering is summarized and interpolation and accuracy issues are briefly discussed. We review the implementation of the fast wavelet transform in

  14. Evaluation of voxel-based rendering of high resolution surface descriptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammershøi, Dorte; Olesen, Søren Krarup; Markovic, Milos

    2014-01-01

    responses by having more “distinct” representations of the individual reflections. When rendered audible, such descriptions will lead to a sound quality that can best be described as “canned”. For the rendering of real rooms, as e.g. in "teletransporting", this problem may be addressed by using high...

  15. GenExp: an interactive web-based genomic DAS client with client-side data rendering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernat Gel Moreno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Distributed Annotation System (DAS offers a standard protocol for sharing and integrating annotations on biological sequences. There are more than 1000 DAS sources available and the number is steadily increasing. Clients are an essential part of the DAS system and integrate data from several independent sources in order to create a useful representation to the user. While web-based DAS clients exist, most of them do not have direct interaction capabilities such as dragging and zooming with the mouse. RESULTS: Here we present GenExp, a web based and fully interactive visual DAS client. GenExp is a genome oriented DAS client capable of creating informative representations of genomic data zooming out from base level to complete chromosomes. It proposes a novel approach to genomic data rendering and uses the latest HTML5 web technologies to create the data representation inside the client browser. Thanks to client-side rendering most position changes do not need a network request to the server and so responses to zooming and panning are almost immediate. In GenExp it is possible to explore the genome intuitively moving it with the mouse just like geographical map applications. Additionally, in GenExp it is possible to have more than one data viewer at the same time and to save the current state of the application to revisit it later on. CONCLUSIONS: GenExp is a new interactive web-based client for DAS and addresses some of the short-comings of the existing clients. It uses client-side data rendering techniques resulting in easier genome browsing and exploration. GenExp is open source under the GPL license and it is freely available at http://gralggen.lsi.upc.edu/recerca/genexp.

  16. In meso in situ serial X-ray crystallography of soluble and membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chia Ying; Olieric, Vincent; Ma, Pikyee; Panepucci, Ezequiel; Diederichs, Kay; Wang, Meitian; Caffrey, Martin

    2015-06-01

    The lipid cubic phase (LCP) continues to grow in popularity as a medium in which to generate crystals of membrane (and soluble) proteins for high-resolution X-ray crystallographic structure determination. To date, the PDB includes 227 records attributed to the LCP or in meso method. Among the listings are some of the highest profile membrane proteins, including the β2-adrenoreceptor-Gs protein complex that figured in the award of the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Lefkowitz and Kobilka. The most successful in meso protocol to date uses glass sandwich crystallization plates. Despite their many advantages, glass plates are challenging to harvest crystals from. However, performing in situ X-ray diffraction measurements with these plates is not practical. Here, an alternative approach is described that provides many of the advantages of glass plates and is compatible with high-throughput in situ measurements. The novel in meso in situ serial crystallography (IMISX) method introduced here has been demonstrated with AlgE and PepT (alginate and peptide transporters, respectively) as model integral membrane proteins and with lysozyme as a test soluble protein. Structures were solved by molecular replacement and by experimental phasing using bromine SAD and native sulfur SAD methods to resolutions ranging from 1.8 to 2.8 Å using single-digit microgram quantities of protein. That sulfur SAD phasing worked is testament to the exceptional quality of the IMISX diffraction data. The IMISX method is compatible with readily available, inexpensive materials and equipment, is simple to implement and is compatible with high-throughput in situ serial data collection at macromolecular crystallography synchrotron beamlines worldwide. Because of its simplicity and effectiveness, the IMISX approach is likely to supplant existing in meso crystallization protocols. It should prove particularly attractive in the area of ligand screening for drug discovery and development.

  17. On the existence of stationary Ricci solitons

    CERN Document Server

    Figueras, Pau

    2016-01-01

    Previously the DeTurck 'trick' has been used to render the stationary Einstein's equation a well posed elliptic system that may be solved numerically by geometric flow or directly. Whilst in the static case for pure gravity with zero or negative cosmological constant there is a simple proof that solving the modified "harmonic" Einstein's equation leads to a solution of the original Einstein system - i.e. not a Ricci soliton - in the stationary case this argument no longer works. Here we provide a new argument that extends the static result to the case of stationary spacetimes that possess a "$t$-$\\phi$" reflection symmetry. Defining a "soliton charge" from the asymptotic behaviour of the solution, we show that this quantity is always non-positive. Provided asymptotic conditions are chosen such that this charge vanishes, then stationary solitons cannot exist.

  18. In situ, dual-mode monitoring of organ-on-a-chip with smartphone-based fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Soohee; Islas-Robles, Argel; Nicolini, Ariana M; Monks, Terrence J; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2016-12-15

    The use of organ-on-a-chip (OOC) platforms enables improved simulation of the human kidney's response to nephrotoxic drugs. The standard method of analyzing nephrotoxicity from existing OOC has majorly consisted of invasively collecting samples (cells, lysates, media, etc.) from an OOC. Such disruptive analyses potentiate contamination, disrupt the replicated in vivo environment, and require expertize to execute. Moreover, traditional analyses, including immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblot, and microplate immunoassay are essentially not in situ and require substantial time, resources, and costs. In the present work, the incorporation of fluorescence nanoparticle immunocapture/immunoagglutination assay into an OOC enabled dual-mode monitoring of drug-induced nephrotoxicity in situ. A smartphone-based fluorescence microscope was fabricated as a handheld in situ monitoring device attached to an OOC. Both the presence of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) on the apical brush-border membrane of 786-O proximal tubule cells within the OOC surface, and the release of GGT to the outflow of the OOC were evaluated with the fluorescence scatter detection of captured and immunoagglutinated anti-GGT conjugated nanoparticles. This dual-mode assay method provides a novel groundbreaking tool to enable the internal and external in situ monitoring of the OOC, which may be integrated into any existing OOCs to facilitate their subsequent analyses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Method and system for rendering and interacting with an adaptable computing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osbourn, Gordon Cecil [Albuquerque, NM; Bouchard, Ann Marie [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-06-12

    An adaptable computing environment is implemented with software entities termed "s-machines", which self-assemble into hierarchical data structures capable of rendering and interacting with the computing environment. A hierarchical data structure includes a first hierarchical s-machine bound to a second hierarchical s-machine. The first hierarchical s-machine is associated with a first layer of a rendering region on a display screen and the second hierarchical s-machine is associated with a second layer of the rendering region overlaying at least a portion of the first layer. A screen element s-machine is linked to the first hierarchical s-machine. The screen element s-machine manages data associated with a screen element rendered to the display screen within the rendering region at the first layer.

  20. Accelerating Time-Varying Hardware Volume Rendering Using TSP Trees and Color-Based Error Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, David; Chiang, Ling-Jen; Shen, Han-Wei; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a new hardware volume rendering algorithm for time-varying data. The algorithm uses the Time-Space Partitioning (TSP) tree data structure to identify regions within the data that have spatial or temporal coherence. By using this coherence, the rendering algorithm can improve performance when the volume data is larger than the texture memory capacity by decreasing the amount of textures required. This coherence can also allow improved speed by appropriately rendering flat-shaded polygons instead of textured polygons, and by not rendering transparent regions. To reduce the polygonization overhead caused by the use of the hierarchical data structure, we introduce an optimization method using polygon templates. The paper also introduces new color-based error metrics, which more accurately identify coherent regions compared to the earlier scalar-based metrics. By showing experimental results from runs using different data sets and error metrics, we demonstrate that the new methods give substantial improvements in volume rendering performance.

  1. IN-SITU AFM OF POLYMER CRYSTALLIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.K.Hobbs

    2003-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy images taken during the crystallization of polyethylene both from processed and quiescent melts are presented. Crystallization from processed melts provides further evidence of a region in front of a growing lamella that is influenced by the crystallization process, but extending only 40 nm into the melt. High-resolution images of the growing crystal tip, taken during crystallization, show no direct evidence of the existence of intermediate phases. The growing tip is shown to be slightly rounded. In-filling crystallization, occurring after the initial flush of growth,is imaged in polyethylene for the first time, and shown to continue to a temperature 8℃ below the initial crystallization temperature.

  2. The Problem of Existence

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    envisionment ) produced by GIZMO . ? In the envisionment , I s indicates the set of quantity—conditioned individuals that exists during a situa- tion... envisionment step by step . In START, the initial state, GIZMO deduces that heat flow occurs, since there is assumed to be a temperature difference between the...stov e GIZMO implements the basic operations of qualitative process theory, including an envisioner for makin g predictions and a program for

  3. Hermeneutics as Embodied Existence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marja Schuster RN, PhD

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the possibilities and limits of a hermeneutic way of being in the world, more specifically being a researcher as a part of human, embodied existence. Understanding existence as embodied highlights the subjectivity of a researcher. For a hermeneutic researcher this subjectivity is both a precondition for interpretation and something that might endanger the scientific endeavour. In this article, I examine the possibilities of combining Hans-Georg Gadamer's empathetic hermeneutics with Paul Ricoeur's critical hermeneutics as a means of both recognizing and, to some extent, controlling my subjectivity in the research process. With Gabriel Marcel I also argue for hermeneutics as an embodied experience. This is exemplified by my study with a focus on the existential dimensions of the nursing profession. The first part of the article introduces Marcel and his philosophical anthropology concerning our bodily existence as essential for shared lives with others. In the second part, this understanding of self and others is further developed by means of the hermeneutics of Gadamer and Ricoeur. In the third part, I present a way of applying hermeneutics in procedures for interviews, transcription, and analysis of data.

  4. HER2 testing in the UK: recommendations for breast and gastric in-situ hybridisation methods

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bartlett, J. M. S.

    2011-01-01

    These guidelines supplement existing guidelines on HER2 testing by immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridisation(ISH) methods in the UK. They provide a specific focus on aspects of guidance relevant to HER2 ISH testing methods, both fluorescent and chromogenic. They are formulated to give advice on methodology, interpretation and quality control for ISH-based testing of HER2 status in common tumour types, including both breast and gastric tumours. The aim is to ensure that all ISH-based testing is accurate, reliable and timely.

  5. Rapid in situ detection of chromosome 21 by PRINS technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellestor, F.; Girardet, A.; Andreo, B. [CNRS UPR 9008, Montpellier (France)] [and others

    1995-05-08

    The {open_quotes}PRimed IN Situ labeling{close_quotes} (PRINS) method is an interesting alternative to in situ hybridization for chromosomal detection. In this procedure, chromosome labeling is performed by in situ annealing of specific oligonucleotide primers, followed by primer elongation by a Taq polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides. Using this process, we have developed a simple and semi-automatic method for rapid in situ detection of human chromosome 21. The reaction was performed on a programmable temperature cycler, with a chromosome 21 specific oligonucleotide primer. Different samples of normal and trisomic lymphocytes and amniotic fluid cells were used for testing the method. Specific labeling of chromosome 21 was obtained in both metaphases and interphase nuclei in a 1 hour reaction. The use of oligonucleotide primer for in situ labeling overcomes the need for complex preparations of specific DNA probes. The present results demonstrate that PRINS may be a simple and reliable technique for rapidly detecting aneuploidies. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  6. In situ Measurements of Phytoplankton Fluorescence Using Low Cost Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana L. Wright

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Chlorophyll a fluorometry has long been used as a method to study phytoplankton in the ocean. In situ fluorometry is used frequently in oceanography to provide depth-resolved estimates of phytoplankton biomass. However, the high price of commercially manufactured in situ fluorometers has made them unavailable to some individuals and institutions. Presented here is an investigation into building an in situ fluorometer using low cost electronics. The goal was to construct an easily reproducible in situ fluorometer from simple and widely available electronic components. The simplicity and modest cost of the sensor makes it valuable to students and professionals alike. Open source sharing of architecture and software will allow students to reconstruct and customize the sensor on a small budget. Research applications that require numerous in situ fluorometers or expendable fluorometers can also benefit from this study. The sensor costs US$150.00 and can be constructed with little to no previous experience. The sensor uses a blue LED to excite chlorophyll a and measures fluorescence using a silicon photodiode. The sensor is controlled by an Arduino microcontroller that also serves as a data logger.

  7. Nanoparticles laden in situ gelling system for ocular drug targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Designing an ophthalmic drug delivery system is one of the most difficult challenges for the researchers. The anatomy and physiology of eye create barriers like blinking which leads to the poor retention time and penetration of drug moiety. Some conventional ocular drug delivery systems show shortcomings such as enhanced pre-corneal elimination, high variability in efficiency, and blurred vision. To overcome these problems, several novel drug delivery systems such as liposomes, nanoparticles, hydrogels, and in situ gels have been developed. In situ-forming hydrogels are liquid upon instillation and undergo phase transition in the ocular cul-de-sac to form viscoelastic gel and this provides a response to environmental changes. In the past few years, an impressive number of novel temperature, pH, and ion-induced in situ-forming systems have been reported for sustain ophthalmic drug delivery. Each system has its own advantages and drawbacks. Thus, a combination of two drug delivery systems, i.e., nanoparticles and in situ gel, has been developed which is known as nanoparticle laden in situ gel. This review describes every aspects of this novel formulation, which present the readers an exhaustive detail and might contribute to research and development.

  8. Management of Adenocarcinoma In Situ of Cervix in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Abidi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Adenocarcinoma in situ is one of the premalignant lesions of the cervix and its incidence is believed to be increasing while the pathogenesis of the disease is not clearly understood. Management of Adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS unlike carcinoma in situ (CIS has not been clearly described in the current literature. Here we describe conservative management and serial colposcopy of two pregnant women with adenocarcinoma in situ of the cervix. Both of the cases were diagnosed initially with abnormal Pap smears and were confirmed by colposcopic directed biopsy. None of the patients agreed with any invasive procedure during pregnancy and both of them were followed with serial colposcopy. None of the lesions showed any evidence of progression. All cases underwent cold knife cone biopsies in their postpartum period. Hysterectomy as the final treatment has been done in both cases with no evidence of progression of the disease during pregnancy. We concluded that adenocarcinoma in situ of the cervix during pregnancy could be managed conservatively with definite treatment postponed till after delivery.

  9. Feasibility of in situ beta ray measurements in underwater environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye Min; Park, Ki Hyun; Kang, Sung Won; Joo, Koan Sik

    2017-09-01

    We describe an attempt at the development of an in situ detector for beta ray measurements in underwater environment. The prototype of the in situ detector is based on a CaF2: Eu scintillator using crystal light guide and Si photomultiplier. Tests were conducted using various reference sources for evaluating the linearity and stability of the detector in underwater environment. The system is simple and stable for long-term monitoring, and consumes low power. We show here an effective detection distance of 7 mm and a 2.273 MeV end-point energy spectrum of (90)Sr/(90)Y when using the system underwater. The results demonstrate the feasibility of in situ beta ray measurements in underwater environment and can be applied for designing an in situ detector for radioactivity measurement in underwater environment. The in situ detector can also have other applications such as installation on the marine monitoring platform and quantitative analysis of radionuclides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Nanoparticles laden in situ gel for sustained ocular drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Proper availability of drug on to corneal surface is a challenging task. However, due to ocular physiological barriers, conventional eye drops display poor ocular bioavailability of drugs (< 1%. To improve precorneal residence time and ocular penetration, earlier our group developed and evaluated in situ gel and nanoparticles for ocular delivery. In interest to evaluate the combined effect of in situ gel and nanoparticles on ocular retention, we combined them. We are the first to term this combination as "nanoparticle laden in situ gel", that is, poly lactic co glycolic acid nanoparticle incorporated in chitosan in situ gel for sparfloxacin ophthalmic delivery. The formulation was tested for various physicochemical properties. It showed gelation pH near pH 7.2. The observation of acquired gamma camera images showed good retention over the entire precorneal area for sparfloxacin nanoparticle laden in situ gel (SNG as compared to marketed formulation. SNG formulation cleared at a very slow rate and remained at corneal surface for longer duration as no radioactivity was observed in systemic circulation. The developed formulation was found to be better in combination and can go up to the clinical evaluation and application.

  11. In-situ ultra-sensitive infrared absorption spectroscopy of biomolecule interactions in real time with plasmonic nanoantennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adato, Ronen; Altug, Hatice

    2013-01-01

    Infrared absorption spectroscopy is a powerful biochemical analysis tool as it extracts detailed molecular structural information in a label-free fashion. Its molecular specificity renders the technique sensitive to the subtle conformational changes exhibited by proteins in response to a variety of stimuli. Yet, sensitivity limitations and the extremely strong absorption bands of liquid water severely limit infrared spectroscopy in performing kinetic measurements in biomolecules' native, aqueous environments. Here we demonstrate a plasmonic chip-based technology that overcomes these challenges, enabling the in-situ monitoring of protein and nanoparticle interactions at high sensitivity in real time, even allowing the observation of minute volumes of water displacement during binding events. Our approach leverages the plasmonic enhancement of absorption bands in conjunction with a non-classical form of internal reflection. These features not only expand the reach of infrared spectroscopy to a new class of biological interactions but also additionally enable a unique chip-based technology.

  12. Usage of data-encoded web maps with client side color rendering for combined data access, visualization, and modeling purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliutau, Denis; Prasad, Narasimha S.

    2013-05-01

    Current approaches to satellite observation data storage and distribution implement separate visualization and data access methodologies which often leads to the need in time consuming data ordering and coding for applications requiring both visual representation as well as data handling and modeling capabilities. We describe an approach we implemented for a data-encoded web map service based on storing numerical data within server map tiles and subsequent client side data manipulation and map color rendering. The approach relies on storing data using the lossless compression Portable Network Graphics (PNG) image data format which is natively supported by web-browsers allowing on-the-fly browser rendering and modification of the map tiles. The method is easy to implement using existing software libraries and has the advantage of easy client side map color modifications, as well as spatial subsetting with physical parameter range filtering. This method is demonstrated for the ASTER-GDEM elevation model and selected MODIS data products and represents an alternative to the currently used storage and data access methods. One additional benefit includes providing multiple levels of averaging due to the need in generating map tiles at varying resolutions for various map magnification levels. We suggest that such merged data and mapping approach may be a viable alternative to existing static storage and data access methods for a wide array of combined simulation, data access and visualization purposes.

  13. In Situ Sensors for the Chemical Industry- Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tate, J D; Knittel, Trevor

    2006-06-30

    The project focused on analytical techniques that can be applied in situ. The innovative component of this project is the focus on achieving a significant breakthrough in two of the three primary Process Analytical (PA) fields. PA measurements can roughly be broken down into:Single component measurements, Multiple component measurements and Multiple component isomer analysis. This project targeted single component measurements and multiple component measurements with two basic technologies, and to move these measurements to the process, achieving many of the process control needs. During the project the following achievements were made: Development of a low cost Tunable Diode Laser (TDL) Analyzer system for measurement of 1) Oxygen in process and combustion applications, 2) part per million (ppm) H2O impurities in aggressive service, 3) ppm CO in large scale combustion systems. This product is now commercially available Development of a process pathlength enhanced (high sensitivity) Laser Based Analyzer for measurement of product impurities. This product is now commercially available. Development of signal processing methods to eliminate measurement errors in complex and changing backgrounds (critical to chemical industry measurements). This development is incorporated into 2 commercially available products. Development of signal processing methods to allow multi-component measurements in complex chemical streams. This development is incorporated into 2 commercially available products. Development of process interface designs to allow in-situ application of TDL technology in aggressive (corrosive, high temperature, high pressure) commonly found in chemical processes. This development is incorporated in the commercially available ASI TDL analyzer. Field proving of 3 laser-based analyzer systems in process control and combustion applications at Dow Chemical. Laser based analyzers have been available for >5yrs, however significant product price/performance issues have

  14. Optimized watermarking for light field rendering based free-view TV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolidis, Evlampios; Kounalakis, Tsampikos; Manifavas, Charalampos; Triantafyllidis, Georgios A.

    2013-03-01

    In Free-View Television the viewers select freely the viewing position and angle of the transmitted multiview video. It is apparent that copyright and copy protection problems exist, since a video of this arbitrarily selected view can be recorded and then misused. In this context, the watermark in FTV should not only be resistant to common video processing and multi-view video processing operations (as in 2D case), but it should also be extracted from a generated video of an arbitrary view. Based on this remark, this paper focuses on this problem by evaluating the functionality and the efficiency of the watermarks and their corresponding Mathematical Distributions, in terms of "robustness" and "successful detection" from new constructed views of FTV, using Light Field Rendering (LFR) techniques. We studied the values which characterize the watermark's performance and the parameters introduced by the watermark's insertion-extraction scheme. Therefore, we ended up to the best five Mathematical Distributions, and we concluded that the watermark's robustness in FTV case does not depend only on the FTV image's characteristics, but it also relies on the characteristics of the Mathematical Distribution that is used as watermark generator. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Metals for bone implants. Part 1. Powder metallurgy and implant rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andani, Mohsen Taheri; Shayesteh Moghaddam, Narges; Haberland, Christoph; Dean, David; Miller, Michael J; Elahinia, Mohammad

    2014-10-01

    New metal alloys and metal fabrication strategies are likely to benefit future skeletal implant strategies. These metals and fabrication strategies were looked at from the point of view of standard-of-care implants for the mandible. These implants are used as part of the treatment for segmental resection due to oropharyngeal cancer, injury or correction of deformity due to pathology or congenital defect. The focus of this two-part review is the issues associated with the failure of existing mandibular implants that are due to mismatched material properties. Potential directions for future research are also studied. To mitigate these issues, the use of low-stiffness metallic alloys has been highlighted. To this end, the development, processing and biocompatibility of superelastic NiTi as well as resorbable magnesium-based alloys are discussed. Additionally, engineered porosity is reviewed as it can be an effective way of matching the stiffness of an implant with the surrounding tissue. These porosities and the overall geometry of the implant can be optimized for strain transduction and with a tailored stiffness profile. Rendering patient-specific, site-specific, morphology-specific and function-specific implants can now be achieved using these and other metals with bone-like material properties by additive manufacturing. The biocompatibility of implants prepared from superelastic and resorbable alloys is also reviewed.

  16. Existing chemicals: international activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purchase, J F

    1989-01-01

    The standards of care used in the protection of the health and safety of people exposed to chemicals has increased dramatically in the last decade. Standards imposed by regulation and those adopted by industry have required a greater level of knowledge about the hazards of chemicals. In the E.E.C., the 6th amendment of the dangerous substances directive imposed the requirement that al new chemicals should be tested according to prescribed programme before introduction on to the market. The development of a European inventory of existing chemicals was an integral part of the 6th amendment. It has now become clear that increased standards of care referred to above must be applied to the chemicals on the inventory list. There is, however, a considerable amount of activity already under way in various international agencies. The OECD Chemicals Programme has been involved in considering the problem of existing chemicals for some time, and is producing a priority list and action programme. The International Programme on Chemical Safety produces international chemical safety cards, health and safety guides and environmental health criteria documents. The international register of potentially toxic compounds (part of UNEP) has prepared chemical data profiles on 990 compounds. The International Agency for Research on Cancer prepared monographs on the carcinogenic risk of chemicals to man. So far 42 volumes have been prepared covering about 900 substances. IARC and IPCS also prepare periodic reports on ongoing research on carcinogenicity or toxicity (respectively) of chemicals. The chemical industry through ECETOC (the European Chemical Industry Ecology and Toxicology Centre) has mounted a major initiative on existing chemicals. Comprehensive reviews of the toxicity of selected chemicals are published (Joint Assessment of Commodity Chemicals). In its technical report no. 30 ECETOC lists reviews and evaluations by major national and international organisations, which provides

  17. Review on Fabrication Methods of in situ Metal Matrix Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper deals with a series of novel processing techniques based on the in situ production of metal matrix composites (MMCs). In situ techniques involve a chemical reaction resulting in the formation of a very fine and thermodynamically stable reinforcing ceramic phase within a metal matrix. As a result, this provides thermodynamic compatibility at the matrix-reinforcement interface. The reinforcement surfaces are also likely to be free of contamination and, therefore, a stronger matrix-dispersion bond can be achieved. Some of these technologies including DIMOXTM, XD, PRIMEXTM, reactive gas infiltration, high-temperature self-propagating synthesis (SHS), and liquid-solid, or solid-gas-liquid reactions as well as plasma in situ MMCs are expressed in this paper.

  18. Characteristics of in situ stress field at Qingshui coal mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Xiaojie; Pang Jiewen; Lou Haopeng; Fan Lipeng

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the characteristics of geological structure at Qingshui coal mine were analyzed. And the hollow inclusion strain cell overcoring method was used to obtain the in situ stress. The effect of in situ stress on the stability of soft rock roadway was analyzed. The results show that the maximum principal stress is in the horizontal direction with a northeast orientation and has a value of about 1.2–1.9 times larger than gravity; the right side of roadway roof and floor is easily subject to serious deformation and failure, and the in situ stress is found to be a major factor. This paper presents important information for developing countermeasures against the large deformation of the soft rock roadway at Qingshui coal mine.

  19. Microstructure analysis of laboratory and in-situ compacted silts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russo Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents and discusses some results of an experimental research aimed at analysing the influence of compaction variables (w and energy and method on the resulting microstructure of a compacted silty soil. In particular, the experimental data here discussed allow to compare the microstructure induced by different dynamic compaction techniques, comparing that characterising specimens obtained by two laboratory methods (Proctor standard and Harvard and that of samples compacted in-situ during the construction of an embankment built for river regimentation purposes. Both undisturbed and disturbed samples have been retrieved from the embankment, the latter one with the purpose of collecting the soil subsequently used for laboratory compaction. Microstructural analyses (SEM, MIP performed on laboratory and in-situ compacted samples evidenced a substantial similarity of the texture induced by the various compaction techniques, highlighting that laboratory compaction is suitable to provide soil samples representative of earth in-situ compacted soil.

  20. Detector calibration for in-situ gamma ray spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Balea, G

    2002-01-01

    The power in the technique of in-situ spectrometry lies in the fact that a detector placed on ground measures gamma radiation from sources situated over an area of several hundred square meters. The 'field of view' for the detector would be larger for high energy radiation sources and for sources closer to the soil surface. In contrast, a soil sample would represent an area of a few tens of hundreds of square centimeters. In practice, an effective characterization of a site would involve in-situ gamma ray spectrometry in conjunction with soil sampling. As part of an overall program, in-situ gamma ray spectrometry provides a means to assess the degree of contamination in areas during the course of operations in the field, thus guiding the investigator on where to collect samples. It can also substantially reduce the number of samples need to be collected and subsequently analyzed. (author)

  1. In Situ Atom Probe Deintercalation of Lithium-Manganese-Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Björn; Maier, Johannes; Arlt, Jonas; Nowak, Carsten

    2017-01-30

    Atom probe tomography is routinely used for the characterization of materials microstructures, usually assuming that the microstructure is unaltered by the analysis. When analyzing ionic conductors, however, gradients in the chemical potential and the electric field penetrating dielectric atom probe specimens can cause significant ionic mobility. Although ionic mobility is undesirable when aiming for materials characterization, it offers a strategy to manipulate materials directly in situ in the atom probe. Here, we present experimental results on the analysis of the ionic conductor lithium-manganese-oxide with different atom probe techniques. We demonstrate that, at a temperature of 30 K, characterization of the materials microstructure is possible without measurable Li mobility. Also, we show that at 298 K the material can be deintercalated, in situ in the atom probe, without changing the manganese-oxide host structure. Combining in situ atom probe deintercalation and subsequent conventional characterization, we demonstrate a new methodological approach to study ionic conductors even in early stages of deintercalation.

  2. Development of portable HPGe spectrometer for in situ measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kail Artjoms

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In situ applications require a very high level of portability of high-resolution spectrometric equipment. Usage of HPGe detectors for radioactivity measurements in the environment or for nuclear safeguard applications, to combat illicit trafficking of nuclear materials or uranium and plutonium monitoring in nuclear wastes, has become a norm in the recent years. Portable HPGe-based radionuclide spectrometer with electrical cooling has lately appeared on the market for in situ applications. At the same time deterioration of energy resolution associated with vibrations produced by cryocooler or high weight of the instrument, short time of autonomous operation and high price of these spectrometers are limiting their usage in many cases. In this paper we present development results of ultra compact hand held all-in-one spectrometer for in situ measurements based on HPGe detector cooled by liquid nitrogen without listing the above disadvantages.

  3. Performance of a Fiber Optic Spectrofluorometer with Applications for In Situ Sensing and Eddy Correlatio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, I. H.; Hemond, H.

    2016-02-01

    A novel optical fiber spectrofluorometer has been created capable of high-speed, high-resolution in situ measurements of naturally fluorescing compounds. This low-power (acid and fluorescence concentration measurements. For example, in a 3 ppm humic acid solution, 1,900 photons were measured in 50 ms (20 Hz), with a stdev/avg error of 2.9%. This compares favorably to the theoretical counting statistics sqrt(N)/N error of 2.3%. The calibration curve for humic acid is highly linear at low to moderate concentrations (e.g. at environment. The use of optical fibers to interrogate a distal sensing volume allows great flexibility in physical setup, making the instrument suitable for a variety of marine applications. In particular, its adaptable geometry and fast response time render it particularly suitable for use in aquatic eddy correlation (EC) systems. EC is a relatively new technique for determining benthic fluxes that to date has mainly been used to determine dissolved oxygen fluxes. By coupling this spectrofluorometer to an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter, it will be possible to determine benthic fluxes of naturally fluorescing compounds. Expanding the capabilities of EC in this way to a much wider range of biogeochemical fluxes is one exciting potential application of this new instrument.

  4. In-Situ Formed Type I Nanocrystalline Perovskite Film for Highly Efficient Light-Emitting Diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Wook; Choi, Yung Ji; Yang, June-Mo; Ham, Sujin; Jeon, Sang Kyu; Lee, Jun Yeob; Song, Young-Hyun; Ji, Eun Kyung; Yoon, Dae-Ho; Seo, Seongrok; Shin, Hyunjung; Han, Gil Sang; Jung, Hyun Suk; Kim, Dongho; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2017-03-28

    Excellent color purity with a tunable band gap renders organic-inorganic halide perovskite highly capable of performing as light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Perovskite nanocrystals show a photoluminescence quantum yield exceeding 90%, which, however, decreases to lower than 20% upon formation of a thin film. The limited photoluminescence quantum yield of a perovskite thin film has been a formidable obstacle for development of highly efficient perovskite LEDs. Here, we report a method for highly luminescent MAPbBr3 (MA = CH3NH3) nanocrystals formed in situ in a thin film based on nonstoichiometric adduct and solvent-vacuum drying approaches. Excess MABr with respect to PbBr2 in precursor solution plays a critical role in inhibiting crystal growth of MAPbBr3, thereby forming nanocrystals and creating type I band alignment with core MAPbBr3 by embedding MAPbBr3 nanocrystals in the unreacted wider band gap MABr. A solvent-vacuum drying process was developed to preserve nanocrystals in the film, which realizes a fast photoluminescence lifetime of 3.9 ns along with negligible trapping processes. Based on a highly luminescent nanocrystalline MAPbBr3 thin film, a highly efficient green LED with a maximum external quantum efficiency of 8.21% and a current efficiency of 34.46 cd/A was demonstrated.

  5. Laser-induced in situ synthesis of Pd and Pt nanoparticles on polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabanian, Mehran; Morselli, Davide; Caputo, Gianvito; Scarpellini, Alice; Palazon, Francisco; Athanassiou, Athanassia; Fragouli, Despina

    2016-12-01

    We present the localized in situ formation of Pd and Pt nanoparticles embedded in chitosan solid films. This is achieved by the photo-induced reduction of metallic precursors, previously incorporated in chitosan films, through controlled UV pulsed laser irradiation. Interestingly, at high number of laser pulses, Pd and Pt follow different formation pathways, contrary to their common photoreduction mechanism occurring at low irradiation pulses. Specifically, in the case of the Pd, a photofragmentation process takes place fracturing the previously formed nanoparticles into smaller ones; whereas in the case of Pt, the prolonged irradiation promotes the nanoparticles agglomeration. The combination of both precursors in a binary solid system results in the combined formation of both Pd and Pt nanoparticles in the polymer film upon laser irradiation. The herein reported approach is an efficient and precise tool to generate size- and density-controlled Pd and Pt nanoparticles in desired areas of polymeric films, rendering this method a potential candidate for the fabrication of flexible polymeric devices for gas-sensing or electro-catalysis applications.

  6. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes (BACs) to mitotic heterochromatin of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardo, Maria Carmela; Dimitri, Patrizio

    2010-01-01

    The organization of eukaryotic chromosomes into euchromatin and heterochromatin represents an enigmatic aspect of genome evolution. Constitutive heterochromatin is a basic, yet still poorly understood component of eukaryotic genomes and its molecular characterization by means of standard genomic approaches is intrinsically difficult. Drosophila melanogaster polytene chromosomes do not seem to be particularly useful to map heterochromatin sequences because the typical features of heterochromatin, organized as it is into a chromocenter, limit cytogenetic analysis. In contrast, constitutive heterochromatin has been well-defined at the cytological level in mitotic chromosomes of neuroblasts and has been subdivided into several bands with differential staining properties. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes (BAC) probes that carry large genomic portions defined by sequence annotation has yielded a "revolution" in the field of cytogenetics because it has allowed the mapping of multiple genes at once, thus rendering constitutive heterochromatin amenable to easy and fast cytogenetics analyses. Indeed, BAC-based FISH approaches on Drosophila mitotic chromosomes have made it possible to correlate genomic sequences to their cytogenetic location, aiming to build an integrated map of the pericentric heterochromatin. This chapter presents our standard protocols for BAC-based FISH, aimed at mapping large chromosomal regions of mitotic heterochromatin in Drosophila melanogaster.

  7. Extreme Spectroscopy: In situ nuclear materials behavior from optical data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimbretiere, G.; Canizares, A.; Raimboux, N.; Omnee, R.; Duval, F.; Ammar, M.R.; Simon, P. [CNRS - UPR3079 CEMHTI, Universite d' Orleans, 45071Orleans cedex 2 (France); Desgranges, L.; Mohun, R. [CEA, DEN, DEC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Jegou, C.; Magnin, M. [CEA/DTCD/SECM/LMPA, Marcoule 30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France); Clavier, N.; Dacheux, N. [ICSM-UMR5257 CEA/CNRS/UM2/ENSCM, Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    2015-07-01

    In the nuclear industry, materials are regularly exposed to high temperature or/and irradiation and a better knowledge and understanding of their behavior under such extreme conditions is a key-point for improvements and further developments. Nowadays, Raman spectroscopy begins to be well known as a promising technique in the post mortem and remote characterization of nuclear materials exposed to extreme conditions. On this topic, at ANIMMA 2013 conference, we have presented some results about its implementation in the study of model or real nuclear fuel. However, the strength of Raman spectroscopy as in situ characterization tool is mainly its ability to be implemented remotely through optical fibers. Aware of this, implementation of other optical techniques can be considered in order to gain information not only on the structural dynamics of materials but also on the electronic charge carrier populations. In this paper, we propose to present our last advances in Raman characterization of nuclear materials and enlarge to the in situ use of complementary optical spectroscopies. Emphasis will be made on the information that can be gained to the behavior of the model fuel depleted UO{sub 2} under extreme conditions of high temperature and ionic irradiation: - In Situ Raman identification of the radiolysis alteration products of UO{sub 2} in contact with water under ionic irradiation. - In Situ Raman recording of the damaged dynamic of UO{sub 2} under inert atmosphere. - In Situ Raman and photo-luminescence study of virgin and damaged UO2 at high temperature. - In Situ study of electronic charge carriers' behavior in U{sub x}Th{sub 1-x}O{sub 2} solid solutions by mean of Iono- and Thermo- luminescence under and post- ionic irradiation. (authors)

  8. In situ measurement of conductivity during nanocomposite film deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blattmann, Christoph O.; Pratsinis, Sotiris E., E-mail: sotiris.pratsinis@ptl.mavt.ethz.ch

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Flame-made nanosilver dynamics are elucidated in the gas-phase & on substrates. • The resistance of freshly depositing nanosilver layers is monitored. • Low T{sub g} polymers facilitate rapid synthesis of conductive films. • Conductive nanosilver films form on top of or within the polymer depending on MW. - Abstract: Flexible and electrically conductive nanocomposite films are essential for small, portable and even implantable electronic devices. Typically, such film synthesis and conductivity measurement are carried out sequentially. As a result, optimization of filler loading and size/morphology characteristics with respect to film conductivity is rather tedious and costly. Here, freshly-made Ag nanoparticles (nanosilver) are made by scalable flame aerosol technology and directly deposited onto polymeric (polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate)) films during which the resistance of the resulting nanocomposite is measured in situ. The formation and gas-phase growth of such flame-made nanosilver, just before incorporation onto the polymer film, is measured by thermophoretic sampling and microscopy. Monitoring the nanocomposite resistance in situ reveals the onset of conductive network formation by the deposited nanosilver growth and sinternecking. The in situ measurement is much faster and more accurate than conventional ex situ four-point resistance measurements since an electrically percolating network is detected upon its formation by the in situ technique. Nevertheless, general resistance trends with respect to filler loading and host polymer composition are consistent for both in situ and ex situ measurements. The time lag for the onset of a conductive network (i.e., percolation) depends linearly on the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) of the host polymer. This is attributed to the increased nanoparticle-polymer interaction with decreasing T{sub g}. Proper selection of the host polymer in combination with in situ resistance

  9. Hinged Dissections Exist

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, Timothy G; Charlton, David; Demaine, Erik D; Demaine, Martin L; Kominers, Scott D

    2007-01-01

    We prove that any finite collection of polygons of equal area has a common hinged dissection. That is, for any such collection of polygons there exists a chain of polygons hinged at vertices that can be folded in the plane continuously without self-intersection to form any polygon in the collection. This result settles the open problem about the existence of hinged dissections between pairs of polygons that goes back implicitly to 1864 and has been studied extensively in the past ten years. Our result generalizes and indeed builds upon the result from 1814 that polygons have common dissections (without hinges). We also extend our common dissection result to edge-hinged dissections of solid 3D polyhedra that have a common (unhinged) dissection, as determined by Dehn's 1900 solution to Hilbert's Third Problem. Our proofs are constructive, giving explicit algorithms in all cases. For a constant number of planar polygons, both the number of pieces and running time required by our construction are pseudopolynomial...

  10. In-Situ Spectrometry of Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Richard H.

    1999-01-01

    High energy charged particles of extra-galactic, galactic and solar origin collide with spacecraft structures in Earth orbit outside the atmosphere and in interplanetary travel beyond the Earth's magnetosphere. These primaries create a number of secondary particles inside the structures that can produce a significant ionizing radiation environment. This radiation is a threat to long term inhabitants or travelers for space missions and produces an increased risk of cancer and DNA damage. The primary high energy cosmic rays and trapped protons collide with common spacecraft materials such as aluminum and silicon and create secondary particles inside structures that are mostly protons and neutrons. Charged protons are readily detected and instruments are already in existence for this task. Neutrons are electrically neutral and therefore much more difficult to measure and detect. These neutrons are reported to contribute 30-60% of the dose inside space structures and cannot be ignored. Currently there is no compact, portable and real time neutron detector instrumentation available for use inside spacecraft or on planetary surfaces where astronauts will live and work. We propose to design and build a portable, low power and robust neutron spectrometer that will measure the neutron spectrum from 10 KeV to 500 MeV with at least 10% energy resolution in the various energy intervals. This instrument will monitor the existing neutron environment both inside spacecraft structures and on planetary surfaces to determine the safest living areas, warn of high fluxes associated with solar storms and assist the NSBRI Radiation Effects Team in making an accurate assessment of increased cancer risk and DNA damage to astronauts. The instrument uses a highly efficient proportional counter Helium 3 tube at the lowest energy intervals where .equivalent damage factors for tissue are the highest (10 KeV-2 MeV). The Helium 3 tube may be shielded with a cadmium absorber to eliminate the much

  11. COMPANION ANIMALS SYMPOSIUM: Rendered ingredients significantly influence sustainability, quality, and safety of pet food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, D L; Meisinger, J L

    2015-03-01

    The rendering industry collects and safely processes approximately 25 million t of animal byproducts each year in the United States. Rendering plants process a variety of raw materials from food animal production, principally offal from slaughterhouses, but include whole animals that die on farms or in transit and other materials such as bone, feathers, and blood. By recycling these byproducts into various protein, fat, and mineral products, including meat and bone meal, hydrolyzed feather meal, blood meal, and various types of animal fats and greases, the sustainability of food animal production is greatly enhanced. The rendering industry is conscious of its role in the prevention of disease and microbiological control and providing safe feed ingredients for livestock, poultry, aquaculture, and pets. The processing of otherwise low-value OM from the livestock production and meat processing industries through rendering drastically reduces the amount of waste. If not rendered, biological materials would be deposited in landfills, burned, buried, or inappropriately dumped with large amounts of carbon dioxide, ammonia, and other compounds polluting air and water. The majority of rendered protein products are used as animal feed. Rendered products are especially valuable to the livestock and pet food industries because of their high protein content, digestible AA levels (especially lysine), mineral availability (especially calcium and phosphorous), and relatively low cost in relation to their nutrient value. The use of these reclaimed and recycled materials in pet food is a much more sustainable model than using human food for pets.

  12. In situ and operando transmission electron microscopy of catalytic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crozier, Peter A.; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic nanomaterials play a major role in chemical conversions and energy transformations. Understanding how materials control and regulate surface reactions is a major objective for fundamental research on heterogeneous catalysts. In situ environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM......) is a powerful technique for revealing the atomic structures of materials at elevated temperatures in the presence of reactive gases. This approach can allow the structure-reactivity relations underlying catalyst functionality to be investigated. Thus far, ETEM has been limited by the absence of in situ...

  13. In Situ burning of Arctic marine oil spills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritt-Rasmussen, Janne

    Oil spills in ice filled and Arctic waters pose other challenges for oil spill response compared to open and temperate waters. In situ burning has been proven to be an effective oil spill response method for oil spills in ice filled waters. This thesis presents results from laboratory and field...... experiments where the ignitability of oil spill as a function of oil type and weathering conditions (time/ice) was tested. The results show that the composition of the oil and the ice cover is important for the in situ burning time-window. The results were used to develop an algorithm that was implemented...

  14. In-situ bioremediation drilling and characterization work plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koegler, K.J.

    1994-04-26

    This work plan describes the design and construction of proposed wells and outlines the characterization activities to be performed in support of the In Situ Bioremediation Task for FY 1994. The purpose of the well-design is to facilitate implementation and monitoring of in situ biodegradation of CCl{sub 4} in ground water. However, the wells will also be used to characterize the geology, hydrology, microbiology, and contaminant distribution, which will all feed into the design of the technology. Implementation and design of this remediation demonstration technology will be described separately in an integrated test plan.

  15. Continued Development of in Situ Geochronology for Planetary Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devismes, D.; Cohen, B. A.

    2015-01-01

    The instrument 'Potassium (K) Argon Laser Experiment' (KArLE) is developed and designed for in situ absolute dating of rocks on planetary surfaces. It is based on the K-Ar dating method and uses the Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy - Laser Ablation - Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry (LIBSLA- QMS) technique. We use a dedicated interface to combine two instruments similar to SAM of Mars Science Laboratory (for the QMS) and ChemCam (for the LA and LIBS). The prototype has demonstrated that KArLE is a suitable and promising instrument for in situ absolute dating.

  16. In-Situ Investigation of Advanced Structural Coatings and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustundag, Ersan

    2003-01-01

    The premise of this project is a comprehensive study that involves the in-situ characterization of advanced coatings and composites by employing both neutron and x-ray diffraction techniques in a complementary manner. The diffraction data would then be interpreted and used in developing or validating advanced micromechanics models with life prediction capability. In the period covered by this report, basic work was conducted to establish the experimental conditions for various specimens and techniques. In addition, equipment was developed that will allow the in-situ studies under a range of conditions (stress, temperature, atmosphere, etc.).

  17. Future directions for in-situ product removal (ISPR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodley, John; Bisschops, Marc; Straathof, Adrie J J

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes the main findings of a round-table discussion held to examine the key bottlenecks in the further application and industrial implementation of in-situ product removal (ISPR) techniques. It is well established that ISPR can yield great benefits for processes limited by inhibit......This paper summarizes the main findings of a round-table discussion held to examine the key bottlenecks in the further application and industrial implementation of in-situ product removal (ISPR) techniques. It is well established that ISPR can yield great benefits for processes limited...

  18. In-situ ALD growth of hafnium oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karavaev, Konstantin; Tallarida, Massimo; Schmeisser, Dieter [Brandenburgische Technische Universitaet Cottbus (Germany). Angewandte Physik - Sensorik; Zschech, Ehrenfried [AMD Saxony LLC and Co. KG, Center for Complex Analysis, Dresden (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    We report on a novel system for in-situ atomic layer growth (ALD) of high-k dielectric films. First results were obtained for Hf-oxide samples by using Hf-tetrachloride as precursor and water as oxidizer. We compare the photoelectron spectra of Si 2p, O 1s and Hf 4f of our in-situ prepared films with samples (ex-situ) prepared by industrial ALD reactors and discuss similarities and differences observed in the core level spectra of the various samples by considering the different growth conditions.

  19. In-situ strain observation in high power laser cladding

    OpenAIRE

    Ocelik, V.; Bosgra, J.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2009-01-01

    The modern experimental technique - so called Digital Image Correlation - is applied during high power laser surface treatments for in-situ observation of displacements and strains near the processing area during and a short time after laser processing. An experimental setup has been designed and tested to measure in-situ the strain during treatment with a high power 2 kW CW Nd:YAG laser, i.e. laser hardening, surface remelting, and laser cladding with Nanosteel, Eutroloy 16012 and MicroMelt ...

  20. DEBIE - first standard in-situ debris monitoring instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuitunen, J.; Drolshagen, G.; McDonnell, J. A. M.; Svedhem, H.; Leese, M.; Mannermaa, H.; Kaipiainen, M.; Sipinen, V.

    2001-10-01

    Objects larger than a few centimetres can be tracked with radar or with optical telescopes. The population of smaller particles can only be investigated by the analysis of retrieved spacecraft and passive detectors or by in-situ monitors in orbit. Patria Finavitec together with UniSpace Kent have developed the DEBIE (DEBris In-orbit Evaluator) instrument to determine the parameters of sub-millimetre sized space debris and micrometeoroids in-situ by their impact with a detecting surface. The main goal has been to develop an economical and low-resource instrument, easy to integrate into any spacecraft, while providing reliable real-time data for space debris modelling.

  1. Electrochemical atomic force microscopy: In situ monitoring of electrochemical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reggente, Melania; Passeri, Daniele; Rossi, Marco; Tamburri, Emanuela; Terranova, Maria Letizia

    2017-08-01

    The in-situ electrodeposition of polyaniline (PANI), one of the most attractive conducting polymers (CP), has been monitored performing electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM) experiments. The electropolymerization of PANI on a Pt working electrode has been observed performing cyclic voltammetry experiments and controlling the evolution of current flowing through the electrode surface, together with a standard AFM image. The working principle and the potentialities of this emerging technique are briefly reviewed and factors limiting the studying of the in-situ electrosynthesis of organic compounds discussed.

  2. Joint Rendering and Segmentation of Free-Viewpoint Video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishii Masato

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents a method that jointly performs synthesis and object segmentation of free-viewpoint video using multiview video as the input. This method is designed to achieve robust segmentation from online video input without per-frame user interaction and precomputations. This method shares a calculation process between the synthesis and segmentation steps; the matching costs calculated through the synthesis step are adaptively fused with other cues depending on the reliability in the segmentation step. Since the segmentation is performed for arbitrary viewpoints directly, the extracted object can be superimposed onto another 3D scene with geometric consistency. We can observe that the object and new background move naturally along with the viewpoint change as if they existed together in the same space. In the experiments, our method can process online video input captured by a 25-camera array and show the result image at 4.55 fps.

  3. Three-dimensional rendering of segmented object using matlab - biomed 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jeffrey R; Barrett, Steven F

    2010-01-01

    The three-dimensional rendering of microscopic objects is a difficult and challenging task that often requires specialized image processing techniques. Previous work has been described of a semi-automatic segmentation process of fluorescently stained neurons collected as a sequence of slice images with a confocal laser scanning microscope. Once properly segmented, each individual object can be rendered and studied as a three-dimensional virtual object. This paper describes the work associated with the design and development of Matlab files to create three-dimensional images from the segmented object data previously mentioned. Part of the motivation for this work is to integrate both the segmentation and rendering processes into one software application, providing a seamless transition from the segmentation tasks to the rendering and visualization tasks. Previously these tasks were accomplished on two different computer systems, windows and Linux. This transition basically limits the usefulness of the segmentation and rendering applications to those who have both computer systems readily available. The focus of this work is to create custom Matlab image processing algorithms for object rendering and visualization, and merge these capabilities to the Matlab files that were developed especially for the image segmentation task. The completed Matlab application will contain both the segmentation and rendering processes in a single graphical user interface, or GUI. This process for rendering three-dimensional images in Matlab requires that a sequence of two-dimensional binary images, representing a cross-sectional slice of the object, be reassembled in a 3D space, and covered with a surface. Additional segmented objects can be rendered in the same 3D space. The surface properties of each object can be varied by the user to aid in the study and analysis of the objects. This inter-active process becomes a powerful visual tool to study and understand microscopic objects.

  4. SUPERSENSITIVE IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION BY TYRAMIDE SIGNAL AMPLIFICATION AND NANOGOLD SILVER STAINING: THE CONTRIBUTION OF AUTOMETALLOGRAPHY AND CATALYZED REPORTER DEPOSITION TO THE REJUVENATION OF IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TUBBS,R.R.PETTAY,J.GROGAN,T.CHEUNG,A.L.M.POWELL,R.D.HAINFELD,J.HAUSER-KRONBERGER,C.HACKER,G.W.

    2002-04-17

    It is peculiar that in situ hybridization (ISH), a technique with many similarities to immunohistochemistry (IHC), has not enjoyed the phenomenal growth in both basic research and clinical applications as has its sister technique IHC. Since the late 1970s, when immunoperoxidase techniques began to be applied to routine diagnostic material and to numerous research applications, there has been a natural evolution of the IHC procedure. Namely, only a few primary antibodies were available commercially at the onset, and only one indirect and the peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) technique detection systems were in place. With the advent of avidin-biotin detection systems and monoclonal antibodies, and a viable commercial market, extraordinary growth of the procedure's applications in clinical research and diagnostic pathology occurred during the subsequent two decades. Today, IHC is automated and widely used for research purposes and, to a large extent, has become a routine diagnostic ''special stain'' in most clinical laboratories. During the same period, ISH enjoyed very little growth in both research and diagnostic applications. What has accounted for this lack of maturation of the technique? The success of IHC is part of the reason measuring a gene's encoded protein routinely and inexpensively, particularly as automation evolved, rendered IHC a more viable choice in many instances. Inherent comparative sensitivity of the procedures has also clearly been a factor. Unfortunately, the chromogenic procedures in place are often insufficiently sensitive to detect the relatively low amounts of DNA and RNA levels at which the clinical utility is to be found.

  5. Lebesgue Sets Immeasurable Existence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Marginean Petrovai

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the notion of measure and integral were released early enough in close connection with practical problems of measuring of geometric figures. Notion of measure was outlined in the early 20th century through H. Lebesgue’s research, founder of the modern theory of measure and integral. It was developed concurrently a technique of integration of functions. Gradually it was formed a specific area todaycalled the measure and integral theory. Essential contributions to building this theory was made by a large number of mathematicians: C. Carathodory, J. Radon, O. Nikodym, S. Bochner, J. Pettis, P. Halmos and many others. In the following we present several abstract sets, classes of sets. There exists the sets which are not Lebesgue measurable and the sets which are Lebesgue measurable but are not Borel measurable. Hence B ⊂ L ⊂ P(X.

  6. Existence of Minkowski space

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Physics textbooks present Minkowski space as an almost pure mathematical construct, without any explicit restriction on a domain where it is applicable in physics. Meanwhile, its physical meaning cannot but follow the same premises as those which underlies the special relativity theory: motion of free point particles and propagation of electromagnetic waves. However, the common formalism of coordinate transformations between any two inertial frames appears too ponderous to infer the existence of Minkowski space. For this reason, the time dilation and retardation, the contraction of the length along and the spatial invariance across the direction of relative motion of two frames are presented in a coordinate-free manner. This results in the transformation between two frames in the form of relationships between the time moments and the components of the position vector of a given event, along and across the directions of the frames' motion. The obtained transformation rules for the components of the position ve...

  7. Spatial sound rendering of a playing xylophone for the telepresence application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovic, Milos; Madsen, Esben; Hoffmann, Pablo F.

    2013-01-01

    xylophone sound rendering is proposed. The recorded signal is processed in order to define multiple virtual sources which are spatially distributed for the auditory width representation of the virtual xylophone. The results of the analyzed recording and rendering techniques are compared in terms...... played at the student's location is required at the teacher’s site. This paper presents a comparison of different recording techniques for a spatial xylophone sound rendering, focusing on the horizontal width of the xylophone auditory image. The directivity pattern of the xylophone was measured...

  8. TractRender: a new generalized 3D medical image visualization and output platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Darryl H.; Tsao, Sinchai; Gajawelli, Niharika; Law, Meng; Lepore, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion MRI allows us not only voxelized diffusion characteristics but also the potential to delineate neuronal fiber path through tractography. There is a dearth of flexible open source tractography software programs for visualizing these complicated 3D structures. Moreover, rendering these structures using various shading, lighting, and representations will result in vastly different graphical feel. In addition, the ability to output these objects in various formats increases the utility of this platform. We have created TractRender that leverages openGL features through Matlab, allowing for maximum ease of use but still maintain the flexibility of custom scene rendering.

  9. Methods for Quantifying and Characterizing Errors in Pixel-Based 3D Rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, John G; Terrill, Judith E; Peskin, Adele P; Filliben, James J

    2008-01-01

    We present methods for measuring errors in the rendering of three-dimensional points, line segments, and polygons in pixel-based computer graphics systems. We present error metrics for each of these three cases. These methods are applied to rendering with OpenGL on two common hardware platforms under several rendering conditions. Results are presented and differences in measured errors are analyzed and characterized. We discuss possible extensions of this error analysis approach to other aspects of the process of generating visual representations of synthetic scenes.

  10. Background Signal as an in Situ Predictor of Dopamine Oxidation Potential: Improving Interpretation of Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Carl J; Roberts, James G; McCarty, Gregory S; Sombers, Leslie A

    2017-02-15

    Background-subtracted fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) has emerged as a powerful analytical technique for monitoring subsecond molecular fluctuations in live brain tissue. Despite increasing utilization of FSCV, efforts to improve the accuracy of quantification have been limited due to the complexity of the technique and the dynamic recording environment. It is clear that variable electrode performance renders calibration necessary for accurate quantification; however, the nature of in vivo measurements can make conventional postcalibration difficult, or even impossible. Analyte-specific voltammograms and scaling factors that are critical for quantification can shift or fluctuate in vivo. This is largely due to impedance changes, and the effects of impedance on these measurements have not been characterized. We have previously reported that the background current can be used to predict electrode-specific scaling factors in situ. In this work, we employ model circuits to investigate the impact of impedance on FSCV measurements. Additionally, we take another step toward in situ electrode calibration by using the oxidation potential of quinones on the electrode surface to accurately predict the oxidation potential for dopamine at any point in an electrochemical experiment, as both are dependent on impedance. The model, validated both in adrenal slice and live brain tissue, enables information encoded in the shape of the background voltammogram to determine electrochemical parameters that are critical for accurate quantification. This improves data interpretation and provides a significant next step toward more automated methods for in vivo data analysis.

  11. High resolution 3-D temperature and salinity fields derived from in situ and satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Guinehut

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an observation-based approach that efficiently combines the main components of the global ocean observing system using statistical methods. Accurate but sparse in situ temperature and salinity profiles (mainly from Argo for the last 10 yr are merged with the lower accuracy but high-resolution synthetic data derived from satellite altimeter and sea surface temperature observations to provide global 3-D temperature and salinity fields at high temporal and spatial resolution. The first step of the method consists in deriving synthetic temperature fields from altimeter and sea surface temperature observations, and salinity fields from altimeter observations, through multiple/simple linear regression methods. The second step of the method consists in combining the synthetic fields with in situ temperature and salinity profiles using an optimal interpolation method. Results show the revolutionary nature of the Argo observing system. Argo observations now allow a global description of the statistical relationships that exist between surface and subsurface fields needed for step 1 of the method, and can constrain the large-scale temperature and mainly salinity fields during step 2 of the method. Compared to the use of climatological estimates, results indicate that up to 50% of the variance of the temperature fields can be reconstructed from altimeter and sea surface temperature observations and a statistical method. For salinity, only about 20 to 30% of the signal can be reconstructed from altimeter observations, making the in situ observing system essential for salinity estimates. The in situ observations (step 2 of the method further reduce the differences between the gridded products and the observations by up to 20% for the temperature field in the mixed layer, and the main contribution is for salinity and the near surface layer with an improvement up to 30%. Compared to estimates derived using in situ observations only, the

  12. High Resolution 3-D temperature and salinity fields derived from in situ and satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Guinehut

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an observation-based approach that combines efficiently the main components of the global ocean observing system using statistical methods. Accurate but sparse in situ temperature and salinity profiles (mainly from Argo for the last 10 years are merged with the lower accuracy but high-resolution synthetic data derived from altimeter and sea surface temperature satellite observations to provide global 3-D temperature and salinity fields at high temporal and spatial resolution. The first step of the method consists in deriving synthetic temperature fields from altimeter and sea surface temperature observations and salinity fields from altimeter observations through multiple/simple linear regression methods. The second step of the method consists in combining the synthetic fields with in situ temperature and salinity profiles using an optimal interpolation method. Results show the revolution of the Argo observing system. Argo observations now allow a global description of the statistical relationships that exist between surface and subsurface fields needed for step 1 of the method and can constrain the large-scale temperature and mainly salinity fields during step 2 of the method. Compared to the use of climatological estimates, results indicate that up to 50 % of the variance of the temperature fields can be reconstructed from altimeter and sea surface temperature observations and a statistical method. For salinity, only about 20 to 30 % of the signal can be reconstructed from altimeter observations, making the in situ observing system mandatory for salinity estimates. The in situ observations (step 2 of the method reduce additionally the error by up to 20 % for the temperature field in the mixed layer and the main contribution is for salinity and the near surface layer with an improvement up to 30 %. Compared to estimates derived using in situ observations only, the merged fields provide a better reconstruction of the high

  13. In meso in situ serial X-ray crystallography of soluble and membrane proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chia-Ying [Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland); Olieric, Vincent [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Ma, Pikyee [Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland); Panepucci, Ezequiel [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Diederichs, Kay [Universität Konstanz, M647, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Wang, Meitian, E-mail: meitian.wang@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Caffrey, Martin, E-mail: meitian.wang@psi.ch [Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland)

    2015-05-14

    A method for performing high-throughput in situ serial X-ray crystallography with soluble and membrane proteins in the lipid cubic phase is described. It works with microgram quantities of protein and lipid (and ligand when present) and is compatible with the most demanding sulfur SAD phasing. The lipid cubic phase (LCP) continues to grow in popularity as a medium in which to generate crystals of membrane (and soluble) proteins for high-resolution X-ray crystallographic structure determination. To date, the PDB includes 227 records attributed to the LCP or in meso method. Among the listings are some of the highest profile membrane proteins, including the β{sub 2}-adrenoreceptor–G{sub s} protein complex that figured in the award of the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Lefkowitz and Kobilka. The most successful in meso protocol to date uses glass sandwich crystallization plates. Despite their many advantages, glass plates are challenging to harvest crystals from. However, performing in situ X-ray diffraction measurements with these plates is not practical. Here, an alternative approach is described that provides many of the advantages of glass plates and is compatible with high-throughput in situ measurements. The novel in meso in situ serial crystallography (IMISX) method introduced here has been demonstrated with AlgE and PepT (alginate and peptide transporters, respectively) as model integral membrane proteins and with lysozyme as a test soluble protein. Structures were solved by molecular replacement and by experimental phasing using bromine SAD and native sulfur SAD methods to resolutions ranging from 1.8 to 2.8 Å using single-digit microgram quantities of protein. That sulfur SAD phasing worked is testament to the exceptional quality of the IMISX diffraction data. The IMISX method is compatible with readily available, inexpensive materials and equipment, is simple to implement and is compatible with high-throughput in situ serial data collection at

  14. Landscape preservation under ice? In-situ 10Be and 26Al from summit surfaces along Sognefjord, Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jane Lund; Egholm, David Lundbek; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou

    et al. Landscape preservation under Fennoscandian ice sheets determined from in situ produced 10 Be and 26 Al. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 201(2), 397-406, 2002. Gjermundsen et al. Minimal erosion of Arctic alpine topography during late Quaternary glaciation. Nature Geoscience 8(10), 789......In-situ cosmogenic nuclides demonstrate existence of landforms preserved under glacial ice in regions such as Northern Sweden (Fabel, 2002), Svalbard (Gjermundsen, 2015) and New England (Bierman, 2015). Elsewhere, the existence of relict landforms is inferred from landscape morphology. Low......-792, 2015. Nesje & Whillans. Erosion of Sognefjord, Norway. Geomorphology 9(1), 33-45, 1994. Steer et al. Bimodal Plio-Quaternary glacial erosion of fjords and low-relief surfaces in Scandinavia. Nature Geoscience 5(9), 635-639, 2012....

  15. Diagnosis of In Situ Metabolic State and Rates of Microbial Metabolism During In Situ Uranium Bioremediation with Molecular Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovley, Derek R. [University of Massachusetts, Amherst

    2012-11-28

    The goal of these projects was to develop molecule tools to tract the metabolic activity and physiological status of microorganisms during in situ uranium bioremediation. Such information is important in able to design improved bioremediation strategies. As summarized below, the research was highly successful with new strategies developed for estimating in situ rates of metabolism and diagnosing the physiological status of the predominant subsurface microorganisms. This is a first not only for groundwater bioremediation studies, but also for subsurface microbiology in general. The tools and approaches developed in these studies should be applicable to the study of microbial communities in a diversity of soils and sediments.

  16. Biopolymer from microbial assisted in situ hydrolysis of triglycerides and dimerization of fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, V; Radhakrishnan, N; Madhavacharyulu, E; Sailakshmi, G; Sekaran, G; Reddy, B S R; Rajkumar, G Suseela; Gnanamani, Arumugam

    2010-01-01

    The present study demonstrates biopolymer production by in situ bio-based dimerization of fatty acids by microorganism isolated from marine sediments. Microbial isolate grown in Zobell medium in the presence of triglycerides for the period of 24-240 h at 37 degrees C, hydrolyze the applied triglycerides and sequentially dimerized the hydrolyzed products and subsequently polymerized and transformed to a biopolymer having appreciable adhesive properties. Physical (nature, odour, stickyness and tensile strength), chemical (instrumentation) and biochemical (cell free broth) methods of analyses carried out provided the hypotheses involved in the formation of the product as well as the nature of the product formed. Results revealed, lipolytic enzymes released during initial period of growth and the biosurfactant production during later period, respectively, hydrolyze the applied triglycerides and initiate the dimerization and further accelerated when the incubation period extended. The existence and the non-existence of in situ hydrolysis of various triglycerides followed by dimerization and polymerization and the mechanism of transformation of triglycerides to biopolymer are discussed in detail.

  17. Study on the in-situ coupling process of fermentation, extraction and distillation for biobutanol production: process analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Fuqiang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Hua, Dongliang; Xu, Haipeng; Li, Yan; Mu, Hui

    2017-01-01

    The transfer process of the in-situ coupling process of fermentation, extraction and distillation for biobutanol production was discussed from a theoretical point of view. The existence of temperature gradient in the extraction section was proved. The force of solute in the extracted liquid was discussed. And the mass transfer mechanism and impetus of the FEDIC process was analyzed. The theoretical analysis could provide a foundation for the following research.

  18. Direct visualization of initial SEI morphology and growth kinetics during lithium deposition by in situ electrochemical transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacci, Robert L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science adn Technology Division; Dudney, Nancy J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science adn Technology Division; More, Karren L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Science; Parent, Lucas R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate; Arslan, Ilke [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate; Browning, Nigel D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate; Unocic, Raymond R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Science

    2013-12-20

    Deposition of Li is a major safety concern existing in Li-ion secondary batteries. We perform the first in situ high spatial resolution measurement coupled with real-time quantitative electrochemistry to characterize SEI formation on gold using a standard battery electrolyte. We also demonstrate that a dendritic SEI forms prior to Li deposition and that it remains on the surface after Li electrodissolution.

  19. Mixing and In situ product removal in micro-bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Of the thesis :’ Mixing and In-situ product removal in micro bioreactors’ by Xiaonan Li The work presented in this thesis is a part of a large cluster project, which was formed between DSM, Organon, Applikon and two university groups (TU Delft and University of Twente), under the ACTS and

  20. Repurposing CRISPR/Cas9 for in situ functional assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malina, Abba; Mills, John R; Cencic, Regina; Yan, Yifei; Fraser, James; Schippers, Laura M; Paquet, Marilène; Dostie, Josée; Pelletier, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    RNAi combined with next-generation sequencing has proven to be a powerful and cost-effective genetic screening platform in mammalian cells. Still, this technology has its limitations and is incompatible with in situ mutagenesis screens on a genome-wide scale. Using p53 as a proof-of-principle

  1. In situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minor, Andrew M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This dissertation presents the development of the novel mechanical testing technique of in situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). This technique makes it possible to simultaneously observe and quantify the mechanical behavior of nano-scale volumes of solids.

  2. Applied in situ product recovery in ABE fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalander, Carl‐Axel; Lee, Jonathan G. M.; Davies, E. Timothy; Harvey, Adam P.

    2017-01-01

    The production of biobutanol is hindered by the product's toxicity to the bacteria, which limits the productivity of the process. In situ product recovery of butanol can improve the productivity by removing the source of inhibition. This paper reviews in situ product recovery techniques applied to the acetone butanol ethanol fermentation in a stirred tank reactor. Methods of in situ recovery include gas stripping, vacuum fermentation, pervaporation, liquid–liquid extraction, perstraction, and adsorption, all of which have been investigated for the acetone, butanol, and ethanol fermentation. All techniques have shown an improvement in substrate utilization, yield, productivity or both. Different fermentation modes favored different techniques. For batch processing gas stripping and pervaporation were most favorable, but in fed‐batch fermentations gas stripping and adsorption were most promising. During continuous processing perstraction appeared to offer the best improvement. The use of hybrid techniques can increase the final product concentration beyond that of single‐stage techniques. Therefore, the selection of an in situ product recovery technique would require comparable information on the energy demand and economics of the process. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:563–579, 2017 PMID:28188696

  3. In situ measurements of Merensky pillar behaviour at Impala Platinum

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Watson, BP

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available to stabilize the stoping excavations. This paper describes the in situ measurement, of stress within a Merensky pillar from Impala Platinum. These measurements were used to derive a stress-strain curve that includes pre and post failure behaviour. 2D FLAC...

  4. Light-emission from in-situ grown organic nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira Hansen, Roana Melina de; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2011-01-01

    Organic crystalline nanofibers made from phenylene-based molecules exhibit a wide range of extraordinary optical properties such as intense, anisotropic and polarized luminescence that can be stimulated either optically or electrically, waveguiding and random lasing. For lighting and display...... of morphological characterization and demonstrate how appropriate biasing with an AC gate voltage enables electroluminescence from these in-situ grown organic nanostructures....

  5. In situ spectrophotometric measurement of dissolved inorganic carbon in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuewu; Byrne, Robert H; Adornato, Lori; Yates, Kimberly K; Kaltenbacher, Eric; Ding, Xiaoling; Yang, Bo

    2013-10-01

    Autonomous in situ sensors are needed to document the effects of today's rapid ocean uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide (e.g., ocean acidification). General environmental conditions (e.g., biofouling, turbidity) and carbon-specific conditions (e.g., wide diel variations) present significant challenges to acquiring long-term measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) with satisfactory accuracy and resolution. SEAS-DIC is a new in situ instrument designed to provide calibrated, high-frequency, long-term measurements of DIC in marine and fresh waters. Sample water is first acidified to convert all DIC to carbon dioxide (CO2). The sample and a known reagent solution are then equilibrated across a gas-permeable membrane. Spectrophotometric measurement of reagent pH can thereby determine the sample DIC over a wide dynamic range, with inherent calibration provided by the pH indicator's molecular characteristics. Field trials indicate that SEAS-DIC performs well in biofouling and turbid waters, with a DIC accuracy and precision of ∼2 μmol kg(-1) and a measurement rate of approximately once per minute. The acidic reagent protects the sensor cell from biofouling, and the gas-permeable membrane excludes particulates from the optical path. This instrument, the first spectrophotometric system capable of automated in situ DIC measurements, positions DIC to become a key parameter for in situ CO2-system characterizations.

  6. NASAL IN SITU GEL: A NOVEL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhrupesh panchal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades, advances in the in situ gel technologies have spurred development in manymedical and biomedical applications including controlled drug delivery. Many novel in situ gel baseddelivery matrices have been designed and fabricated to fulfill the ever increasing needs of thepharmaceutical and medical fields. In situ gelling systems are liquid at room temperature but undergogelation when in contact with body fluids or change in pH. In situ gel forming drug delivery is a type ofmucoadhesive drug delivery system. The formation of gel depends on factors like temperaturemodulation, pH change, presence of ions and ultraviolet irradiation from which the drug gets released ina sustained and controlled manner. Nasal delivery is a promising drug delivery option where commondrug administrations such as intravenous, intramuscular or oral are inapplicable. Recently, it has beenshown that many drugs have better bioavailability by nasal route than the oral route. This has beenattributed to rich vasculature and a highly permeable structure of the nasal mucosa coupled withavoidance of hepatic first-pass elimination, gut wall metabolism and/or destruction in thegastrointestinal tract. The physiology of the nose presents obstacles but offers a promising route for noninvasivesystemic delivery of numerous therapies and debatably drug delivery route to the brain. Thusthis review focuses on nasal drug delivery, various aspects of nasal anatomy and physiology, nasal drugabsorption mechanisms, various nasal drug delivery systems and their applications in drug delivery.

  7. Supernumerary ring chromosome 20 characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Langen, Irene M.; Otter, Mariëlle A.; Aronson, Daniël C.; Overweg-Plandsoen, W.C.G.; Hennekam, Raoul C.M.; Leschot, Nico J.; Hoovers, Jan M.N.

    1996-01-01

    We report on a boy with mild dysmorphic features and developmental delay, in whom karyotyping showed an additional minute ring chromosome in 60% of metaphases. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a centromere specific probe demonstrated that the ring chromosome contained the centromeric r

  8. In situ polarization of polymer films in microsensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, M.; Allen, M. G.; Hudson, T.

    2012-04-01

    Electret and polymer piezoelectric films have been previously integrated into Micro Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) acoustic sensors and energy harvesters. Common techniques employed in MEMS polymer integration include corona discharge [1] and backlighted thyratron [2], followed by macro-scale assembly of the polymer into the micro device. In contrast, this paper reports a method for post-fabrication in-situ polarization of polymer films embedded within the MEMS device itself. The method utilizes microplasma discharges with self-aligned charging grids integrated within the device to charge fluoropolymer films in a fashion similar to the common corona discharge technique. This in-situ approach enables the integration of uncharged polymer films into MEMS and subsequent post-fabrication and post-packaging polarization, simultaneously enabling the formation of buried or encapsulated electrets as well as eliminating the need to restrict fabrication and packaging processes that might otherwise discharge pre-charged materials. Using the in situ approach, a microscale charging grid structure is fabricated and suspended a short distance above the polymer film. After fabrication of the charging grid, standard microfabrication steps are performed to build MEMS sensors. After completing the entire fabrication and packaging flow, the polarization process is performed. When energized by a high voltage, the sharp metal edges of the charging grid lead to high dielectric fields that ionize the air in the gap and force electric charge onto the polymer surface. This paper presents modeling and results for this in situ polarization process.

  9. In Situ Magnetic Separation for Extracellular Protein Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappler, T.; Cerff, Martin; Ottow, Kim Ekelund

    2009-01-01

    employed directly in the broth during the fermentation, followed by in situ magnetic separation, Proof of the concept was first demonstrated in shake flask culture, then scaled up and applied during a fed batch cultivation ill a 3.7 L bioreactor. It could be demonstrated that growth of B. licheniformis...

  10. In situ XAS of the solvothermal decomposition of dithiocarbamate complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Islam, H.-U.; Roffey, A.; Hollingsworth, N.; Catlow, R.; Wolthers, M.; de Leeuw, N.H.; Bras, W.; Sankar, G.; Hogarth, G.

    2012-01-01

    An in situ XAS study of the solvothermal decomposition of iron and nickel dithiocarbamate complexes was performed in order to gain understanding of the decomposition mechanisms. This work has given insight into the steps involved in the decomposition, showing variation in reaction pathways between t

  11. ENGINEERING ISSUE: IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED UNSATURATED SUBSURFACE SOILS

    Science.gov (United States)

    An emerging technology for the remediation of unsaturated subsurface soils involves the use of microorganisms to degrade contaminants which are present in such soils. Understanding the processes which drive in situ bioremediation, as well as the effectiveness and efficiency of th...

  12. In-situ strain observation in high power laser cladding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, V.; Bosgra, J.; de Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2009-01-01

    The modern experimental technique - so called Digital Image Correlation - is applied during high power laser surface treatments for in-situ observation of displacements and strains near the processing area during and a short time after laser processing. An experimental setup has been designed and

  13. In situ quantification of membrane foulant accumulation by reflectometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroen, C. G. P. H.; Roosjen, A.; Norde, W.; Boom, R. M.; Tang, K.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present laser light reflectometry [1] (not to be mistaken with ultrasound reflectometry [2] that uses ultrasound waves) as a tool for quantitative investigation of (the initial stages of) fouling on membrane-like surfaces. Reflectometry allows in situ investigation of adsorption an

  14. In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

  15. AFM cantilever with in situ renewable mercury microelectrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schön, Peter Manfred; Geerlings, J.; Tas, Niels Roelof; Sarajlic, Edin

    2013-01-01

    We report here first results obtained on a novel, in situ renewable mercury microelectrode integrated into an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever. Our approach is based on a fountain pen probe with appropriate dimensions enabling reversible filling with(nonwetting) mercury under changing the

  16. Supernumerary ring chromosome 17 identified by fluorescent in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagan, K. [Hunter Area Pathology Service, New South Wales (Australia); Edwards, M. [Western Suburbs Hospital, New South Wales (Australia)

    1997-04-14

    We present a patient with multiple anomalies and severe developmental delay. A small supernumerary ring chromosome was found in 40% of her lymphocyte cells at birth. The origin of the marker chromosome could not be determined by GTG banding, but fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) later identified the marker as deriving from chromosome 17. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. In situ nonlinear elastic behavior of soil observed by DAET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larmat, Carene [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Renaud, Guillaume [Eramus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Rutledge, James T. [EES-17: GEOPHYSICS; Lee, Richard C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Guyer, Robert A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Paul A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-05

    The key to safe design of critical facilities (strong ground motion in low velocity materials such as soils). Current approaches are predictions from measurements of the elastic non-linear properties of boreholes samples. Need for in-situ, local and complete determination of non-linear properties of soil, rock in response to high-strain motion.

  18. In-situ strain observation in high power laser cladding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, V.; Bosgra, J.; de Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2009-01-01

    The modern experimental technique - so called Digital Image Correlation - is applied during high power laser surface treatments for in-situ observation of displacements and strains near the processing area during and a short time after laser processing. An experimental setup has been designed and te

  19. Simulating realistic imaging conditions for in situ liquid microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, David A., E-mail: dawelch@ucdavis.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Faller, Roland [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Evans, James E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Browning, Nigel D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Fundamental Computational Sciences Directorate, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-12-15

    In situ transmission electron microscopy enables the imaging of biological cells, macromolecular protein complexes, nanoparticles, and other systems in a near-native environment. In order to improve interpretation of image contrast features and also predict ideal imaging conditions ahead of time, new virtual electron microscopic techniques are needed. A technique for virtual fluid-stage high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy with the multislice method is presented that enables the virtual imaging of model fluid-stage systems composed of millions of atoms. The virtual technique is exemplified by simulating images of PbS nanoparticles under different imaging conditions and the results agree with previous experimental findings. General insight is obtained on the influence of the effects of fluid path length, membrane thickness, nanoparticle position, defocus and other microscope parameters on attainable image quality. - Highlights: • Image simulation has been performed to understand in situ electron microscopy experiments. • Experimentally observed resolution of in situ grown PbS nanoparticles has been virtually reproduced. • General relationships between image resolution and in situ holder design, defocus, and particle size have been determined. • The presented image simulation technique can predict the obtainable resolution of future experiments.

  20. Acral Lentiginous Melanoma in Situ: A Diagnostic and Management Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Sun Park

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Early stage recognition of acral lentiginous melanoma (ALM is important for a better prognosis, but in-depth understanding and proper management of ALM in situ is complicated, because there are only a few reports, probably due to its rarity and diagnostic difficulty. We have reviewed our experience with seven patients who were diagnosed as having ALM in situ and discuss how to accurately diagnose and properly manage these rare lesions. Clinically the lesions showed black to brown discoloration of the nail with Hutchinson’s sign and hyperpigmented macules on the heel with color variegation. All the lesions showed a diffuse lentiginous pattern of melanocytic proliferation with variable level of atypism along the dermoepidermal junction. Dermoscopic findings were available in three and revealed parallel ridge patterns. Confrontation of clinical and histopathologic findings was observed in three, and the lesions were not recognized or diagnosed as ALM in situ in the first place. Excision of the primary lesion with variable operative margin was done as an initial treatment. Recurrence was observed in three patients and one developed invasive ALM and lymph node metastasis. Integration of all available information concerning the clinical presentation, histopathology, and dermoscopic findings is very important and can lead to the best classification for correct diagnosis. Lack of knowledge upon clinical course and optimal margin to control ALM in situ provokes the need for further studies with longer follow up and larger number of cases.