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Sample records for remote mri sensitivity

  1. Sensitivity quantification of remote detection NMR and MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granwehr, J.; Seeley, J. A.

    2006-04-01

    A sensitivity analysis is presented of the remote detection NMR technique, which facilitates the spatial separation of encoding and detection of spin magnetization. Three different cases are considered: remote detection of a transient signal that must be encoded point-by-point like a free induction decay, remote detection of an experiment where the transient dimension is reduced to one data point like phase encoding in an imaging experiment, and time-of-flight (TOF) flow visualization. For all cases, the sensitivity enhancement is proportional to the relative sensitivity between the remote detector and the circuit that is used for encoding. It is shown for the case of an encoded transient signal that the sensitivity does not scale unfavorably with the number of encoded points compared to direct detection. Remote enhancement scales as the square root of the ratio of corresponding relaxation times in the two detection environments. Thus, remote detection especially increases the sensitivity of imaging experiments of porous materials with large susceptibility gradients, which cause a rapid dephasing of transverse spin magnetization. Finally, TOF remote detection, in which the detection volume is smaller than the encoded fluid volume, allows partial images corresponding to different time intervals between encoding and detection to be recorded. These partial images, which contain information about the fluid displacement, can be recorded, in an ideal case, with the same sensitivity as the full image detected in a single step with a larger coil.

  2. Time-sensitive remote sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Lippitt, Christopher; Coulter, Lloyd

    2015-01-01

    This book documents the state of the art in the use of remote sensing to address time-sensitive information requirements. Specifically, it brings together a group of authors who are both researchers and practitioners, who work toward or are currently using remote sensing to address time-sensitive information requirements with the goal of advancing the effective use of remote sensing to supply time-sensitive information. The book addresses the theoretical implications of time-sensitivity on the remote sensing process, assessments or descriptions of methods for expediting the delivery and improving the quality of information derived from remote sensing, and describes and analyzes time-sensitive remote sensing applications, with an emphasis on lessons learned. This book is intended for remote sensing scientists, practitioners (e.g., emergency responders or administrators of emergency response agencies), and students, but will also be of use to those seeking to understand the potential of remote sensing to addres...

  3. Remotely detected high-field MRI of porous samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Juliette A.; Han, Song-I.; Pines, Alexander

    2004-04-01

    Remote detection of NMR is a novel technique in which an NMR-active sensor surveys an environment of interest and retains memory of that environment to be recovered at a later time in a different location. The NMR or MRI information about the sensor nucleus is encoded and stored as spin polarization at the first location and subsequently moved to a different physical location for optimized detection. A dedicated probe incorporating two separate radio frequency (RF)—circuits was built for this purpose. The encoding solenoid coil was large enough to fit around the bulky sample matrix, while the smaller detection solenoid coil had not only a higher quality factor, but also an enhanced filling factor since the coil volume comprised purely the sensor nuclei. We obtained two-dimensional (2D) void space images of two model porous samples with resolution less than 1.4 mm 2. The remotely reconstructed images demonstrate the ability to determine fine structure with image quality superior to their directly detected counterparts and show the great potential of NMR remote detection for imaging applications that suffer from low sensitivity due to low concentrations and filling factor.

  4. Low-field MRI can be more sensitive than high-field MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Aaron M.; Truong, Milton L.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2013-12-01

    MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is the key factor for image quality. Conventionally, SNR is proportional to nuclear spin polarization, which scales linearly with magnetic field strength. Yet ever-stronger magnets present numerous technical and financial limitations. Low-field MRI can mitigate these constraints with equivalent SNR from non-equilibrium ‘hyperpolarization' schemes, which increase polarization by orders of magnitude independently of the magnetic field. Here, theory and experimental validation demonstrate that combination of field independent polarization (e.g. hyperpolarization) with frequency optimized MRI detection coils (i.e. multi-turn coils using the maximum allowed conductor length) results in low-field MRI sensitivity approaching and even rivaling that of high-field MRI. Four read-out frequencies were tested using samples with identical numbers of 1H and 13C spins. Experimental SNRs at 0.0475 T were ∼40% of those obtained at 4.7 T. Conservatively, theoretical SNRs at 0.0475 T 1.13-fold higher than those at 4.7 T were possible despite an ∼100-fold lower detection frequency, indicating feasibility of high-sensitivity MRI without technically challenging, expensive high-field magnets. The data at 4.7 T and 0.0475 T was obtained from different spectrometers with different RF probes. The SNR comparison between the two field strengths accounted for many differences in parameters such as system noise figures and variations in the probe detection coils including Q factors and coil diameters.

  5. In vitro assessment of MRI issues at 3-Tesla for a breast tissue expander with a remote port.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnemeyer, Hannah; Shellock, Frank G; Ahn, Christina Y

    2014-04-01

    A patient with a breast tissue expander may require a diagnostic assessment using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To ensure patient safety, this type of implant must undergo in vitro MRI testing using proper techniques. Therefore, this investigation evaluated MRI issues (i.e., magnetic field interactions, heating, and artifacts) at 3-Tesla for a breast tissue expander with a remote port. A breast tissue expander with a remote port (Integra Breast Tissue Expander, Model 3612-06 with Standard Remote Port, PMT Corporation, Chanhassen, MN) underwent evaluation for magnetic field interactions (translational attraction and torque), MRI-related heating, and artifacts using standardized techniques. Heating was evaluated by placing the implant in a gelled-saline-filled phantom and MRI was performed using a transmit/receive RF body coil at an MR system reported, whole body averaged specific absorption rate of 2.9-W/kg. Artifacts were characterized using T1-weighted and GRE pulse sequences. Magnetic field interactions were not substantial and, thus, will not pose a hazard to a patient in a 3-Tesla or less MRI environment. The highest temperature rise was 1.7°C, which is physiologically inconsequential. Artifacts were large in relation to the remote port and metal connector of the implant but will only present problems if the MR imaging area of interest is where these components are located. A patient with this breast tissue expander with a remote port may safely undergo MRI at 3-Tesla or less under the conditions used for this investigation. These findings are the first reported at 3-Tesla for a tissue expander. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sensitivity analysis in remote sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Ustinov, Eugene A

    2015-01-01

    This book contains a detailed presentation of general principles of sensitivity analysis as well as their applications to sample cases of remote sensing experiments. An emphasis is made on applications of adjoint problems, because they are more efficient in many practical cases, although their formulation may seem counterintuitive to a beginner. Special attention is paid to forward problems based on higher-order partial differential equations, where a novel matrix operator approach to formulation of corresponding adjoint problems is presented. Sensitivity analysis (SA) serves for quantitative models of physical objects the same purpose, as differential calculus does for functions. SA provides derivatives of model output parameters (observables) with respect to input parameters. In remote sensing SA provides computer-efficient means to compute the jacobians, matrices of partial derivatives of observables with respect to the geophysical parameters of interest. The jacobians are used to solve corresponding inver...

  7. Oxygen-sensitive 3He-MRI in bronchiolitis obliterans after lung transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gast, Klaus K.; Biedermann, Alexander; Herweling, Annette; Schreiber, Wolfgang G.; Schmiedeskamp, Joerg; Mayer, Eckhard; Heussel, Claus P.; Markstaller, Klaus; Eberle, Balthasar; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Oxygen-sensitive 3 He-MRI was studied for the detection of differences in intrapulmonary oxygen partial pressure (pO 2 ) between patients with normal lung transplants and those with bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS). Using software developed in-house, oxygen-sensitive 3 He-MRI datasets from patients with normal lung grafts (n = 8) and with BOS (n = 6) were evaluated quantitatively. Datasets were acquired on a 1.5-T system using a spoiled gradient echo pulse sequence. Underlying diseases were pulmonary emphysema (n 10 datasets) and fibrosis (n = 4). BOS status was verified by pulmonary function tests. Additionally, 3 He-MRI was assessed blindedly for ventilation defects. Median intrapulmonary pO 2 in patients with normal lung grafts was 146 mbar compared with 108 mbar in patients with BOS. Homogeneity of pO2 distribution was greater in normal grafts (standard deviation pO2 34 versus 43 mbar). Median oxygen decrease rate during breath hold was higher in unaffected patients (-1.75 mbar/s versus -0.38 mbar/s). Normal grafts showed fewer ventilation defects (5% versus 28%, medians). Oxygen-sensitive 3 He-MRI appears capable of demonstrating differences of intrapulmonary pO2 between normal lung grafts and grafts affected by BOS. Oxygen-sensitive 3 He-MRI may add helpful regional information to other diagnostic techniques for the assessment and follow-up of lung transplant recipients. (orig.)

  8. Modic Type 1 Changes: Detection Performance of Fat-Suppressed Fluid-Sensitive MRI Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkenstaedt, Tim; Del Grande, Filippo; Bolog, Nicolae; Ulrich, Nils; Tok, Sina; Kolokythas, Orpheus; Steurer, Johann; Andreisek, Gustav; Winklhofer, Sebastian

    2018-02-01

     To assess the performance of fat-suppressed fluid-sensitive MRI sequences compared to T1-weighted (T1w) / T2w sequences for the detection of Modic 1 end-plate changes on lumbar spine MRI.  Sagittal T1w, T2w, and fat-suppressed fluid-sensitive MRI images of 100 consecutive patients (consequently 500 vertebral segments; 52 female, mean age 74 ± 7.4 years; 48 male, mean age 71 ± 6.3 years) were retrospectively evaluated. We recorded the presence (yes/no) and extension (i. e., Likert-scale of height, volume, and end-plate extension) of Modic I changes in T1w/T2w sequences and compared the results to fat-suppressed fluid-sensitive sequences (McNemar/Wilcoxon-signed-rank test).  Fat-suppressed fluid-sensitive sequences revealed significantly more Modic I changes compared to T1w/T2w sequences (156 vs. 93 segments, respectively; p definition of Modic I changes is not fully applicable anymore.. · Fat-suppressed fluid-sensitive MRI sequences revealed more/greater extent of Modic I changes.. · Finkenstaedt T, Del Grande F, Bolog N et al. Modic Type 1 Changes: Detection Performance of Fat-Suppressed Fluid-Sensitive MRI Sequences. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2018; 190: 152 - 160. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Application of the remote-sensing communication model to a time-sensitive wildfire remote-sensing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher D. Lippitt; Douglas A. Stow; Philip J. Riggan

    2016-01-01

    Remote sensing for hazard response requires a priori identification of sensor, transmission, processing, and distribution methods to permit the extraction of relevant information in timescales sufficient to allow managers to make a given time-sensitive decision. This study applies and demonstrates the utility of the Remote Sensing Communication...

  10. MRI findings of a remote and isolated vaginal metastasis revealing an adenocarcinoma of the mid-sigmoid colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D’Arco, Felice; Pizzuti, Laura Micol; Romano, Federica; Natella, Valentina; Laccetti, Ettore; Storto, Giovanni; Maurea, Simone; Mainenti, Pier Paolo

    2014-01-01

    A remote vaginal metastasis from a colo-rectal carcinoma is extremely rare. Only few cases have been described in the literature. The radiological appearances of a vaginal metastasis from colon-rectal cancer have not been extensively investigated. We report the MRI findings with clinical and pathological correlations of a remote and isolated vaginal metastasis revealing a mid-sigmoid adenocarcinoma in a 67 years old woman

  11. Contrast-enhanced breast MRI: factors affecting sensitivity and specificity

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    Piccoli, C.W. [Department of Radiology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, 132 South 10th Street, 7th floor, Philadelphia, PA 19107-5244 (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) of the breast has been investigated for over 10 years. The reports of sensitivity for cancer detection have generally been greater than 90 %. However, estimates of specificity have varied greatly. Differing results are due to differences in study populations, technical methods and criteria for interpretation. Early and marked signal rise, detected using dynamic imaging technique following contrast administration, is the MRI hallmark of cancer. However, some malignant lesions may enhance slowly or minimally, and a variety of benign lesions may enhance rapidly with marked signal intensity. High resolution techniques generally requiring longer acquisition times are more likely to depict the slowly enhancing malignancies at the cost of a decrease in specificity due to lack of temporal resolution. This disadvantage may be offset by the improved visualization of lesion morphology with high resolution images. This report reviews the methods and results of the leading investigators of breast MRI. (orig.) With 3 figs., 70 refs.

  12. Contrast-enhanced breast MRI: factors affecting sensitivity and specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piccoli, C.W.

    1997-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) of the breast has been investigated for over 10 years. The reports of sensitivity for cancer detection have generally been greater than 90 %. However, estimates of specificity have varied greatly. Differing results are due to differences in study populations, technical methods and criteria for interpretation. Early and marked signal rise, detected using dynamic imaging technique following contrast administration, is the MRI hallmark of cancer. However, some malignant lesions may enhance slowly or minimally, and a variety of benign lesions may enhance rapidly with marked signal intensity. High resolution techniques generally requiring longer acquisition times are more likely to depict the slowly enhancing malignancies at the cost of a decrease in specificity due to lack of temporal resolution. This disadvantage may be offset by the improved visualization of lesion morphology with high resolution images. This report reviews the methods and results of the leading investigators of breast MRI. (orig.)

  13. Bucket-handle meniscal tears of the knee: sensitivity and specificity of MRI signs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorsay, Theodore A.; Helms, Clyde A.

    2003-01-01

    To determine the sensitivity and specificity of reported MRI signs in the evaluation of bucket-handle tears of the knee.Design and patients A retrospective analysis of 71 knee MR examinations that were read as displaying evidence of a bucket-handle or ''bucket-handle type'' tear was performed. We evaluated for the presence or absence of the absent bow tie sign, the coronal truncation sign, the double posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) sign, the anterior flipped fragment sign, and a fragment displaced into the intercondylar notch. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated relative to the gold standard of arthroscopy. Forty-three of 71 cases were surgically proven as bucket-handle tears. The absent bow tie sign demonstrated a sensitivity of 88.4%. The presence of at least one of the displaced fragment signs had a sensitivity of 90.7%. A finding of both the absent bow tie sign and one of the displaced fragment signs demonstrated a specificity of 85.7%. The double PCL sign demonstrated a specificity of 100%. The anterior flipped meniscus sign had a specificity of 89.7%. Bucket-handle tears of the menisci, reported in about 10% of most large series, have been described by several signs with MRI. This report gives the sensitivity and specificity of MRI for bucket-handle tears using each of these signs independently and in combination. MRI is shown to be very accurate for diagnosing bucket-handle tears when two or more of these signs coexist. (orig.)

  14. Modic type 1 changes. Detection performance of fat-suppressed fluid-sensitive MRI sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkenstaedt, Tim; Andreisek, Gustav [University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Del Grande, Filippo [Ospedale Regionale di Lugano (Switzerland). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Bolog, Nicolae [Phoenix Diagnostic Clinic, Bucharest (Romania); Ulrich, Nils; Tok, Sina [Schulthess Clinic, Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Kolokythas, Orpheus [Kantonsspital Winterthur (Switzerland). Inst. for Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Steurer, Johann [University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Horten Center for Patient Oriented Research and Knowledge Transfer; Winklhofer, Sebastian [University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Collaboration: LSOS Study Group

    2018-02-15

    To assess the performance of fat-suppressed fluid-sensitive MRI sequences compared to T1-weighted (T1w) / T2w sequences for the detection of Modic 1 end-plate changes on lumbar spine MRI. Sagittal T1w, T2w, and fat-suppressed fluid-sensitive MRI images of 100 consecutive patients (consequently 500 vertebral segments; 52 female, mean age 74 ± 7.4 years; 48 male, mean age 71 ± 6.3 years) were retrospectively evaluated. We recorded the presence (yes/no) and extension (i.e., Likert-scale of height, volume, and end-plate extension) of Modic I changes in T1w/T2w sequences and compared the results to fat-suppressed fluid-sensitive sequences (McNemar/Wilcoxon-signed-rank test). Fat-suppressed fluid-sensitive sequences revealed significantly more Modic I changes compared to T1w/T2w sequences (156 vs. 93 segments, respectively; p < 0.001). The extension of Modic I changes in fat-suppressed fluid-sensitive sequences was significantly larger compared to T1w/T2w sequences (height: 2.53 ± 0.82 vs. 2.27 ± 0.79, volume: 2.35 ± 0.76 vs. 2.1 ± 0.65, end-plate: 2.46 ± 0.76 vs. 2.19 ± 0.81), (p < 0.05). Modic I changes that were only visible in fat-suppressed fluid-sensitive sequences but not in T1w/T2w sequences were significantly smaller compared to Modic I changes that were also visible in T1w/T2w sequences (p < 0.05). In conclusion, fat-suppressed fluid-sensitive MRI sequences revealed significantly more Modic I end-plate changes and demonstrated a greater extent compared to standard T1w/T2w imaging.

  15. Diffusion properties of conventional and calcium-sensitive MRI contrast agents in the rat cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagberg, Gisela E; Mamedov, Ilgar; Power, Anthony; Beyerlein, Michael; Merkle, Hellmut; Kiselev, Valerij G; Dhingra, Kirti; Kubìček, Vojtĕch; Angelovski, Goran; Logothetis, Nikos K

    2014-01-01

    Calcium-sensitive MRI contrast agents can only yield quantitative results if the agent concentration in the tissue is known. The agent concentration could be determined by diffusion modeling, if relevant parameters were available. We have established an MRI-based method capable of determining diffusion properties of conventional and calcium-sensitive agents. Simulations and experiments demonstrate that the method is applicable both for conventional contrast agents with a fixed relaxivity value and for calcium-sensitive contrast agents. The full pharmacokinetic time-course of gadolinium concentration estimates was observed by MRI before, during and after intracerebral administration of the agent, and the effective diffusion coefficient D* was determined by voxel-wise fitting of the solution to the diffusion equation. The method yielded whole brain coverage with a high spatial and temporal sampling. The use of two types of MRI sequences for sampling of the diffusion time courses was investigated: Look-Locker-based quantitative T(1) mapping, and T(1) -weighted MRI. The observation times of the proposed MRI method is long (up to 20 h) and consequently the diffusion distances covered are also long (2-4 mm). Despite this difference, the D* values in vivo were in agreement with previous findings using optical measurement techniques, based on observation times of a few minutes. The effective diffusion coefficient determined for the calcium-sensitive contrast agents may be used to determine local tissue concentrations and to design infusion protocols that maintain the agent concentration at a steady state, thereby enabling quantitative sensing of the local calcium concentration. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Femoroacetabular cam-type impingement: Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of radiographic views compared to radial MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domayer, S.E.; Ziebarth, K.; Chan, J.; Bixby, S.; Mamisch, T.C.; Kim, Y.J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess the diagnostic sensitivity of 45° Dunn view and cross-table lateral radiographs for the assessment of cam deformity by comparison with radial MRI. Materials and methods: 60 cases with radiographs (38 a–p and 45° Dunn views, 22 a–p and cross-table lateral views) and radial MRI were assessed. Alpha angle measurements were obtained both for radiographs and radial MRI. Statistics included frequency analysis, bivariate linear correlation analyses of MRI and radiograph measurements and cross-table analyses testing for the sensitivity and specificity of radiographs for the detection of an alpha angle larger than 55°. Results: 53.3% had the maximum alpha angle in the superior–anterior aspect of the femoral head–neck junction. Cam deformity was found in 45/60 cases (75%) in radial MRI. Pearson correlation demonstrated the Dunn view was most accurate for the superior–anterior aspect (.772, P < .001). The cross-table lateral views were best suited for the anterior–superior aspect (.511, P < .05). The sensitivity for cam deformity in the Dunn view was 96.4% vs. 70.6% in the cross-table lateral view. Conclusion: The 45° Dunn view can improve the first line of impingement diagnostics. Radial MRI however remains indispensable for pre-operative planning and the evaluation of symptomatic cases without obvious deformity.

  17. Sensitivity of enhanced MRI for the detection of breast cancer: new, multicentric, residual, and recurrent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, P.L.; McCarty, K.S. Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast brings the advantages of high resolution cross-sectional imaging to breast cancer diagnosis, treatment and research: improved cancer detection, staging, selection of therapy, evaluation of therapeutic response in vivo, detection of recurrence, and even the development of new therapies. Until now breast cancer treatment and research has been impeded by the limited means of evaluating the breast cancer in vivo: primarily clinical palpation and mammography of the breast tumor. A review of the initial studies shows that with the use of paramagnetic contrast agents, MRI has a sensitivity of 96 % for detecting breast cancers. MRI detects multicentric disease with a sensitivity of 98 %, superior to any other modality. The ability of MRI to detect recurrent local breast cancer in the conservatively treated breast is nearly 100 %. MRI is capable of monitoring tumor response to chemotherapy and actually guiding therapeutic interventions such as interstitial laser photocoagulation. (orig.)

  18. Residual fMRI sensitivity for identity changes in acquired prosopagnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Christopher J; Iaria, Giuseppe; Duchaine, Bradley C; Barton, Jason J S

    2013-01-01

    While a network of cortical regions contribute to face processing, the lesions in acquired prosopagnosia are highly variable, and likely result in different combinations of spared and affected regions of this network. To assess the residual functional sensitivities of spared regions in prosopagnosia, we designed a rapid event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment that included pairs of faces with same or different identities and same or different expressions. By measuring the release from adaptation to these facial changes we determined the residual sensitivity of face-selective regions-of-interest. We tested three patients with acquired prosopagnosia, and all three of these patients demonstrated residual sensitivity for facial identity changes in surviving fusiform and occipital face areas of either the right or left hemisphere, but not in the right posterior superior temporal sulcus. The patients also showed some residual capabilities for facial discrimination with normal performance on the Benton Facial Recognition Test, but impaired performance on more complex tasks of facial discrimination. We conclude that fMRI can demonstrate residual processing of facial identity in acquired prosopagnosia, that this adaptation can occur in the same structures that show similar processing in healthy subjects, and further, that this adaptation may be related to behavioral indices of face perception.

  19. Residual fMRI sensitivity for identity changes in acquired prosopagnosia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Fox

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available While a network of cortical regions contribute to face processing, the lesions in acquired prosopagnosia are highly variable, and likely result in different combinations of spared and affected regions of this network. To assess the residual functional sensitivities of spared regions in prosopagnosia, we designed a rapid event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI experiment that included pairs of faces with same or different identities and same or different expressions. By measuring the release from adaptation to these facial changes we determined the residual sensitivity of face-selective regions-of-interest. We tested three patients with acquired prosopagnosia, and all three of these patients demonstrated residual sensitivity for facial identity changes in surviving fusiform and occipital face areas of either the right or left hemisphere, but not in the right posterior superior temporal sulcus. The patients also showed some residual capabilities for facial discrimination with normal performance on the Benton Facial Recognition Test, but impaired performance on more complex tasks of facial discrimination. We conclude that fMRI can demonstrate residual processing of facial identity in acquired prosopagnosia, that this adaptation can occur in the same structures that show similar processing in healthy subjects, and further, that this adaptation may be related to behavioral indices of face perception.

  20. A low cost fMRI-compatible tracking system using the Nintendo Wii remote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modroño, Cristián; Rodríguez-Hernández, Antonio F; Marcano, Francisco; Navarrete, Gorka; Burunat, Enrique; Ferrer, Marta; Monserrat, Raquel; González-Mora, José L

    2011-11-15

    It is sometimes necessary during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments to capture different movements made by the subjects, e.g. to enable them to control an item or to analyze its kinematics. The aim of this work is to present an inexpensive hand tracking system suitable for use in a high field MRI environment. It works by introducing only one light-emitting diode (LED) in the magnet room, and by receiving its signal with a Nintendo Wii remote (the primary controller for the Nintendo Wii console) placed outside in the control room. Thus, it is possible to take high spatial and temporal resolution registers of a moving point that, in this case, is held by the hand. We tested it using a ball and racket virtual game inside a 3 Tesla MRI scanner to demonstrate the usefulness of the system. The results show the involvement of a number of areas (mainly occipital and frontal, but also parietal and temporal) when subjects are trying to stop an object that is approaching from a first person perspective, matching previous studies performed with related visuomotor tasks. The system presented here is easy to implement, easy to operate and does not produce important head movements or artifacts in the acquired images. Given its low cost and ready availability, the method described here is ideal for use in basic and clinical fMRI research to track one or more moving points that can correspond to limbs, fingers or any other object whose position needs to be known. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Sensitivity of different MRI sequences in the early detection of melanoma brain metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckwoldt, Michael O.; Schwarz, Daniel; Radbruch, Alexander; Enk, Alexander; Bendszus, Martin; Hassel, Jessica; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter

    2018-01-01

    Background After the emergence of new MRI techniques such as susceptibility- and diffusion-weighted imaging (SWI and DWI) and because of specific imaging characteristics of melanoma brain metastases (MBM), it is unclear which MRI sequences are most beneficial for detection of MBM. This study was performed to investigate the sensitivity of six clinical MRI sequences in the early detection of MBM. Methods Medical records of all melanoma patients referred to our center between November 2005 and December 2016 were reviewed for presence of MBM. Analysis encompassed six MRI sequences at the time of initial diagnosis of first or new MBM, including non-enhanced T1-weighted (T1w), contrast-enhanced T1w (ceT1w), T2-weighted (T2w), T2w-FLAIR, susceptibility-weighted (SWI) and diffusion-weighted (DWI) MRI. Each lesion was rated with respect to its conspicuity (score from 0—not detectable to 3—clearly visible). Results Of 1210 patients, 217 with MBM were included in the analysis and up to 5 lesions per patient were evaluated. A total of 720 metastases were assessed and all six sequences were available for 425 MBM. Sensitivity (conspicuity ≥2) was 99.7% for ceT1w, 77.0% for FLAIR, 64.7% for SWI, 61.0% for T2w, 56.7% for T1w, and 48.4% for DWI. Thirty-one (7.3%) of 425 lesions were only detectable by ceT1w but no other sequence. Conclusions Contrast-enhanced T1-weighting is more sensitive than all other sequences for detection of MBM. Disruption of the blood-brain-barrier is consistently an earlier sign in MBM than perifocal edema, signal loss on SWI or diffusion restriction. PMID:29596475

  2. Adaptive smoothing based on Gaussian processes regression increases the sensitivity and specificity of fMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strappini, Francesca; Gilboa, Elad; Pitzalis, Sabrina; Kay, Kendrick; McAvoy, Mark; Nehorai, Arye; Snyder, Abraham Z

    2017-03-01

    Temporal and spatial filtering of fMRI data is often used to improve statistical power. However, conventional methods, such as smoothing with fixed-width Gaussian filters, remove fine-scale structure in the data, necessitating a tradeoff between sensitivity and specificity. Specifically, smoothing may increase sensitivity (reduce noise and increase statistical power) but at the cost loss of specificity in that fine-scale structure in neural activity patterns is lost. Here, we propose an alternative smoothing method based on Gaussian processes (GP) regression for single subjects fMRI experiments. This method adapts the level of smoothing on a voxel by voxel basis according to the characteristics of the local neural activity patterns. GP-based fMRI analysis has been heretofore impractical owing to computational demands. Here, we demonstrate a new implementation of GP that makes it possible to handle the massive data dimensionality of the typical fMRI experiment. We demonstrate how GP can be used as a drop-in replacement to conventional preprocessing steps for temporal and spatial smoothing in a standard fMRI pipeline. We present simulated and experimental results that show the increased sensitivity and specificity compared to conventional smoothing strategies. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1438-1459, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Labeling of mesenchymal stem cells for MRI with single-cell sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariza de Schellenberger A

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Angela Ariza de Schellenberger,1 Harald Kratz,1 Tracy D Farr,2,3 Norbert Löwa,4 Ralf Hauptmann,1 Susanne Wagner,1 Matthias Taupitz,1 Jörg Schnorr,1 Eyk A Schellenberger1 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Experimental Neurology, Center for Stroke Research Berlin, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany; 3School of Life Sciences, University of Nottingham, Medical School, Nottingham, UK; 4Department of Biomagnetic Signals, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt Berlin, Berlin, Germany Abstract: Sensitive cell detection by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is an important tool for the development of cell therapies. However, clinically approved contrast agents that allow single-cell detection are currently not available. Therefore, we compared very small iron oxide nanoparticles (VSOP and new multicore carboxymethyl dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (multicore particles, MCP designed by our department for magnetic particle imaging (MPI with discontinued Resovist® regarding their suitability for detection of single mesenchymal stem cells (MSC by MRI. We achieved an average intracellular nanoparticle (NP load of >10 pg Fe per cell without the use of transfection agents. NP loading did not lead to significantly different results in proliferation, colony formation, and multilineage in vitro differentiation assays in comparison to controls. MRI allowed single-cell detection using VSOP, MCP, and Resovist® in conjunction with high-resolution T2*-weighted imaging at 7 T with postprocessing of phase images in agarose cell phantoms and in vivo after delivery of 2,000 NP-labeled MSC into mouse brains via the left carotid artery. With optimized labeling conditions, a detection rate of ~45% was achieved; however, the experiments were limited by nonhomogeneous NP loading of the MSC population. Attempts should be made to achieve better cell separation for homogeneous NP loading and to thus improve NP

  4. Sensitivity of MRI in detecting alveolar infiltrates. Experimental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biederer, J.; Busse, I.; Grimm, J.; Reuter, M.; Heller, M.; Muhle, C.; Freitag, S.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: An experimental study using porcine lung explants and a dedicated chest phantom to evaluate the signal intensity of artificial alveolar infiltrates with T 1 - and T 2 -weighted MRI sequences. Material and Methods: 10 porcine lung explants were intubated, transferred into the cavity of a MRI-compatible chest phantom and inflated by continuous evacuation of the artificial pleural space. All lungs were examined with MRI at 1.5 T before and after intra-tracheal instillation of either 100 or 200 ml gelatine-stabilised liquid to simulate alveolar infiltrates. MR-examination comprised gradient echo (2D- and 3D-GRE) and fast spin echo sequences (T 2 -TSE and T 2 -HASTE). The signal intensity of lung parenchyma was evaluated at representative cross sections using a standardised scheme. Control studies were acquired with helical CT. Results: The instilled liquid caused patchy confluent alveolar infiltrates resembling the findings in patients with pneumonia or ARDS. CT revealed typical ground-glass opacities. Before the application of the liquid, only T 2 -HASTE and T 2 -TSE displayed lung parenchyma signals with a signal/noise ratio of 3.62 and 1.39, respectively. After application of the liquid, both T 2 -weighted sequences showed clearly visible infiltrates with an increase in signal intensity of approx. 30% at 100 ml (p 2 -weighted sequences detects artificial alveolar infiltrates with high signal intensity and may be a highly sensitive tool to detect pneumonia in patients. (orig.) [de

  5. Integrated imaging using MRI and 123I metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy to improve sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of pediatric neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfluger, Thomas; Schmied, Christoph; Porn, Ute; Leinsinger, Gerda; Vollmar, Christian; Dresel, Stefan; Schmid, Irene; Hahn, Klaus

    2003-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare MRI and iodine-123 ((123)I) metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy in the detection of neuroblastoma lesions in pediatric patients and to assess the additional value of combined imaging. Fifty MRI and 50 (123)I MIBG examinations (mean interval, 6.4 days) were analyzed retrospectively with regard to suspected or proven neuroblastoma lesions (n = 193) in 28 patients. MRI and MIBG scans were reviewed by two independent observers each. Separate and combined analyses of MRI and MIBG scintigraphy were compared with clinical and histologic findings. With regard to the diagnosis of neuroblastoma lesion, MIBG scintigraphy, MRI, and combined analysis showed a sensitivity of 69%, 86%, and 99% and a specificity of 85%, 77%, and 95%, respectively. On MRI, 15 false-positive findings were recorded: posttherapeutic reactive changes (n = 10), benign adrenal tumors (n = 3), and enlarged lymph nodes (n = 2). On MIBG scintigraphy, 10 false-positive findings occurred: ganglioneuromas (n = 2), benign liver tumors (n = 2), and physiologic uptake (n = 6). Thirteen neuroblastoma metastases and two residual masses under treatment with chemotherapy were judged to be false-negative findings on MRI. Two primary or residual neuroblastomas and one orbital metastasis were misinterpreted as Wilms' tumor, reactive changes after surgery, and rhabdomyosarcoma on MRI. Thirty-two bone metastases, six other neuroblastoma metastases, and one adrenal neuroblastoma showed no MIBG uptake. On combined imaging, one false-negative (bone metastasis) and three false-positive (two ganglioneuromas and one pheochromocytoma) findings remained. In the assessment of neuroblastoma lesions in pediatric patients, MRI showed a higher sensitivity and MIBG scintigraphy a higher specificity. However, integrated imaging showed an increase in both sensitivity and specificity.

  6. Comparative sensitivities of functional MRI sequences in detection of local recurrence of prostate carcinoma after radical prostatectomy or external-beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Catherine; Foudi, Fatah; Charton, Jeanne; Jung, Michel; Lang, Hervé; Saussine, Christian; Jacqmin, Didier

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the respective accuracies of three types of functional MRI sequences-diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI, and 3D (1)H-MR spectroscopy (MRS)-in the depiction of local prostate cancer recurrence after two different initial therapy options. From a cohort of 83 patients with suspicion of local recurrence based on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics who were imaged on a 3-T MRI unit using an identical protocol including the three functional sequences with an endorectal coil, we selected 60 patients (group A, 28 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy; group B, 32 patients who underwent external-beam radiation) who had local recurrence ascertained on the basis of a transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy results and a reduction in PSA level after salvage therapy. All patients presented with a local relapse. Sensitivity with T2-weighted MRI and 3D (1)H-MRS sequences was 57% and 53%, respectively, for group A and 71% and 78%, respectively, for group B. DCE-MRI alone showed a sensitivity of 100% and 96%, respectively, for groups A and B. DWI alone had a higher sensitivity for group B (96%) than for group A (71%). The combination of T2-weighted imaging plus DWI plus DCE-MRI provided a sensitivity as high as 100% in group B. The performance of functional imaging sequences for detecting recurrence is different after radical prostatectomy and external-beam radiotherapy. DCE-MRI is a valid and efficient tool to detect prostate cancer recurrence in radical prostatectomy as well as in external-beam radiotherapy. The combination of DCE-MRI and DWI is highly efficient after radiation therapy. Three-dimensional (1)H-MRS needs to be improved. Even though it is not accurate enough, T2-weighted imaging remains essential for the morphologic analysis of the area.

  7. Sensitivity and specificity of a new MRI method evaluating temporo-mandibular joint disc-condyle relationships: an in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbelaïd, R; Fleiter, B

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate sensitivity and specificity of a new method to locate temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) disc using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analyze disc-condyle relationships, in asymptomatic subjects and patients with disc displacement. Twenty-nine sagittal MRI of 16 subjects, 8 asymptomatic volunteers and 8 subjects with anterior disc displacement, were carried out during controlled opening from intercuspal position up to a 25 mm opening. Selected sections were analyzed with a graphic computerized system of coordinates. The total surface area (TS) of disc section was separated into anterior surface area (AS) and posterior surface area. Areas were determined by computer. Two trained examiners drew images at random. The reliability of AS/TS ratio index was evaluated in a previous study. AS/TS ratio sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) were calculated closed mouth, 5 mm open and 25 mm open mouth. Best sensitivity (Se=0.63) and specificity (Sp=0.81) were obtained when MRI was realized with closed mouth and 25 mm open mouth. Lower sensitivity was observed when MRI was performed either with closed mouth (Se=0.54) or 25 mm open mouth (Se=0.18). Lower specificity was observed with 5 mm open mouth (Sp=0.68). In conclusion, it was confirmed as well that MRI of anterior disc displacement should be performed with closed mouth and opened mouth. Thus, further studies are required to assess disc displacement and mechanical alterations and to evaluate the risk of direct damage on TMJ tissues.

  8. Integrated microchip incorporating atomic magnetometer and microfluidic channel for NMR and MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, Micah P [Oakland, CA; Savukov, Igor M [Los Alamos, NM; Budker, Dmitry [El Cerrito, CA; Shah, Vishal K [Plainsboro, NJ; Knappe, Svenja [Boulder, CO; Kitching, John [Boulder, CO; Michalak, David J [Berkeley, CA; Xu, Shoujun [Houston, TX; Pines, Alexander [Berkeley, CA

    2011-08-09

    An integral microfluidic device includes an alkali vapor cell and microfluidic channel, which can be used to detect magnetism for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Small magnetic fields in the vicinity of the vapor cell can be measured by optically polarizing and probing the spin precession in the small magnetic field. This can then be used to detect the magnetic field of in encoded analyte in the adjacent microfluidic channel. The magnetism in the microfluidic channel can be modulated by applying an appropriate series of radio or audio frequency pulses upstream from the microfluidic chip (the remote detection modality) to yield a sensitive means of detecting NMR and MRI.

  9. Quantitation of MRI sensitivity to quasi-monodisperse microbubble contrast agents for spatially resolved manometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencsik, Martin; Al-Rwaili, Amgad; Morris, Robert; Fairhurst, David J; Mundell, Victoria; Cave, Gareth; McKendry, Jonathan; Evans, Stephen

    2013-11-01

    The direct in-vivo measurement of fluid pressure cannot be achieved with MRI unless it is done with the contribution of a contrast agent. No such contrast agents are currently available commercially, whilst those demonstrated previously only produced qualitative results due to their broad size distribution. Our aim is to quantitate then model the MR sensitivity to the presence of quasi-monodisperse microbubble populations. Lipid stabilised microbubble populations with mean radius 1.2 ± 0.8 μm have been produced by mechanical agitation. Contrast agents with increasing volume fraction of bubbles up to 4% were formed and the contribution the bubbles bring to the relaxation rate was quantitated. A periodic pressure change was also continuously applied to the same contrast agent, until MR signal changes were only due to bubble radius change and not due to a change in bubble density. The MR data compared favourably with the prediction of an improved numerical simulation. An excellent MR sensitivity of 23 % bar(-1) has been demonstrated. This work opens up the possibility of generating microbubble preparations tailored to specific applications with optimised MR sensitivity, in particular MRI based in-vivo manometry. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A sensitive zinc-activated 129Xe MRI probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotera, N.; Delacour, L.; Traore, T.; Buisson, D.A.; Taran, F.; Coudert, S.; Rousseau, B.; Tassali, N.; Leonce, E.; Boutin, C.; Berthault, P.; Brotin, T.; Dutasta, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Herein we propose the use of hyper-polarized 129 Xe nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for the sensitive detection of Zn 2+ ions. To achieve this goal, the noble gas is encapsulated in dedicated host systems bearing a ligand that chelates the Zn 2+ ions. Cryptophanes, aromatic cage molecules made of cyclotriveratrylene groups, are perfectly suited to this purpose as 1) they can easily be rendered water-soluble, 2) the noble gas has a high affinity for their cavity, 3) when xenon is encapsulated, it takes a specific NMR frequency, and 4) xenon exchange in and out of the cavity insures a continuous refreshment of the Xe-cryptophane environment in hyper-polarization. We constructed a powerful 129 Xe NMR-based sensor of Zn 2+ ions, which enables for the first time measurement of Zn 2+ concentrations as low as 100 nm. This high sensitivity was achieved thanks to a smart 129 Xe MRI sensor, where the binding of the ion to the target is accompanied by a change in NMR parameters. We have also demonstrated the importance of working with enantiopure cryptophane derivatives. (O.M.)

  11. Sensitivity and specificity of CT- and MRI-scanning in evaluation of occult fracture of the proximal femur

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haubro, M; Stougaard, C; Torfing, T

    2015-01-01

    AND METHODS: 67 patients (27 males, 40 females, mean age 80.5) seen in the emergency room with hip pain after fall, inability to stand and a primary X-ray without fracture were evaluated with both CT and MRI. The images were analysed by a senior consulting musculoskeletal radiologist, a resident in radiology...... and a resident in orthopaedic surgery. Sensitivity and specificity were estimated with MRI as the golden standard. Kappa value was used to assess level of agreement in both MRI and CT finding. RESULTS: 15 fractures of the proximal femur were found (7 intertrochanteric-, 3 femoral neck and 5 fractures...

  12. The resolution sensitivity of the Asian summer monsoon and its inter-model comparison between MRI-AGCM and MetUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Tomomichi; Johnson, Stephanie J.; Schiemann, Reinhard; Demory, Marie-Estelle; Mizuta, Ryo; Yoshida, Kohei; Osamu Arakawa

    2017-11-01

    In this study, we compare the resolution sensitivity of the Asian Summer Monsoon (ASM) in two Atmospheric General Circulation Models (AGCMs): the MRI-AGCM and the MetUM. We analyze the MetUM at three different resolutions, N96 (approximately 200-km mesh on the equator), N216 (90-km mesh) and N512 (40-km mesh), and the MRI-AGCM at TL95 (approximately 180-km mesh on the equator), TL319 (60-km mesh), and TL959 (20-km mesh). The MRI-AGCM and the MetUM both show decreasing precipitation over the western Pacific with increasing resolution, but their precipitation responses differ over the Indian Ocean. In MRI-AGCM, a large precipitation increase appears off the equator (5-20°N). In MetUM, this off-equatorial precipitation increase is less significant and precipitation decreases over the equator. Moisture budget analysis demonstrates that a changing in moisture flux convergence at higher resolution is related to the precipitation response. Orographic effects, intra-seasonal variability and the representation of the meridional thermal gradient are explored as possible causes of the resolution sensitivity. Both high-resolution AGCMs (TL959 and N512) can represent steep topography, which anchors the rainfall pattern over south Asia and the Maritime Continent. In MRI-AGCM, representation of low pressure systems in TL959 also contributes to the rainfall pattern. Furthermore, the seasonal evolution of the meridional thermal gradient appears to be more accurate at higher resolution, particularly in the MRI-AGCM. These findings emphasize that the impact of resolution is only robust across the two AGCMs for some features of the ASM, and highlights the importance of multi-model studies of GCM resolution sensitivity.

  13. Prospective trial evaluating the sensitivity and specificity of 3,4-dihydroxy-6-[18F]-fluoro-L-phenylalanine (18F-DOPA) PET and MRI in patients with recurrent gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youland, Ryan S; Pafundi, Deanna H; Brinkmann, Debra H; Lowe, Val J; Morris, Jonathan M; Kemp, Bradley J; Hunt, Christopher H; Giannini, Caterina; Parney, Ian F; Laack, Nadia N

    2018-05-01

    Treatment-related changes can be difficult to differentiate from progressive glioma using MRI with contrast (CE). The purpose of this study is to compare the sensitivity and specificity of 18F-DOPA-PET and MRI in patients with recurrent glioma. Thirteen patients with MRI findings suspicious for recurrent glioma were prospectively enrolled and underwent 18F-DOPA-PET and MRI for neurosurgical planning. Stereotactic biopsies were obtained from regions of concordant and discordant PET and MRI CE, all within regions of T2/FLAIR signal hyperintensity. The sensitivity and specificity of 18F-DOPA-PET and CE were calculated based on histopathologic analysis. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed optimal tumor to normal (T/N) and SUVmax thresholds. In the 37 specimens obtained, 51% exhibited MRI contrast enhancement (M+) and 78% demonstrated 18F-DOPA-PET avidity (P+). Imaging characteristics included M-P- in 16%, M-P+ in 32%, M+P+ in 46% and M+P- in 5%. Histopathologic review of biopsies revealed grade II components in 16%, grade III in 43%, grade IV in 30% and no tumor in 11%. MRI CE sensitivity for recurrent tumor was 52% and specificity was 50%. PET sensitivity for tumor was 82% and specificity was 50%. A T/N threshold > 2.0 altered sensitivity to 76% and specificity to 100% and SUVmax > 1.36 improved sensitivity and specificity to 94 and 75%, respectively. 18F-DOPA-PET can provide increased sensitivity and specificity compared with MRI CE for visualizing the spatial distribution of recurrent gliomas. Future studies will incorporate 18F-DOPA-PET into re-irradiation target volume delineation for RT planning.

  14. Ecphory of Autobiographical Memories: an fMRI Study on Recent and Remote Memory Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinvorth, Sarah; Corkin, Suzanne; Halgren, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Ecphory occurs when one recollects a past event cued by a trigger, such as a picture, odor, or name. It is a central component of autobiographical memory, which allows us to “travel mentally back in time” and re-experience specific events from our personal past. Using fMRI and focusing on the role of medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures, we investigated the brain bases of autobiographical memory and whether they change with the age of memories. Importantly, we used an ecphory task in which the remote character of the memories was ensured. The results showed that a large bilateral network supports autobiographical memory: temporal lobe, temporo-occipito-parietal junction, dorsal prefrontal cortex, medial frontal cortex, retrosplenial cortex and surrounding areas, and MTL structures. This network, including MTL structures, changed little with the age of the memories. PMID:16257547

  15. MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeter, Aileen; Rudin, Markus; Gianolio, Eliana

    2017-01-01

    This chapter discusses principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and MRI followed by a survey on the major classes of MRI contrast agents (CA), their modes of action, and some of the most significative applications. The two more established classes of MRI-CA are represented by paramagnetic...... been attained that markedly increase the number and typology of systems with CEST properties. Currently much attention is also devoted to hyperpolarized molecules that display a sensitivity enhancement sufficient for their direct exploitation for the formation of the MR image. A real breakthrough...

  16. Emotional sensitivity, emotion regulation and impulsivity in borderline personality disorder : a critical review of fMRI studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zutphen, Linda; Siep, Nicolette; Jacob, Gitta A; Goebel, R.; Arntz, Arnoud

    Emotional sensitivity, emotion regulation and impulsivity are fundamental topics in research of borderline personality disorder (BPD). Studies using fMRI examining the neural correlates concerning these topics is growing and has just begun understanding the underlying neural correlates in BPD.

  17. MRI-powered biomedical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovet, Sierra; Ren, Hongliang; Xu, Sheng; Wood, Bradford; Tokuda, Junichi; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho

    2017-11-16

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is beneficial for imaging-guided procedures because it provides higher resolution images and better soft tissue contrast than computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, and X-ray. MRI can be used to streamline diagnostics and treatment because it does not require patients to be repositioned between scans of different areas of the body. It is even possible to use MRI to visualize, power, and control medical devices inside the human body to access remote locations and perform minimally invasive procedures. Therefore, MR conditional medical devices have the potential to improve a wide variety of medical procedures; this potential is explored in terms of practical considerations pertaining to clinical applications and the MRI environment. Recent advancements in this field are introduced with a review of clinically relevant research in the areas of interventional tools, endovascular microbots, and closed-loop controlled MRI robots. Challenges related to technology and clinical feasibility are discussed, including MRI based propulsion and control, navigation of medical devices through the human body, clinical adoptability, and regulatory issues. The development of MRI-powered medical devices is an emerging field, but the potential clinical impact of these devices is promising.

  18. Correlation of oxygenation and perfusion sensitive MRI with invasive micro probe measurements in healthy mice brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlacik, Jan; Fiehler, Jens; Reitz, Matthias; Schmidt, Nils O.; Bolar, Divya S.; Adalsteinsson, Elfar

    2015-01-01

    The non-invasive assessment of (patho-)physiological parameters such as, perfusion and oxygenation, is of great importance for the characterization of pathologies e.g., tumors, which may be helpful to better predict treatment response and potential outcome. To better understand the influence of physiological parameters on the investigated oxygenation and perfusion sensitive MRI methods, MRI measurements were correlated with subsequent invasive micro probe measurements during free breathing conditions of air, air+10% CO2 and 100% O2 in healthy mice brain. MRI parameters were the irreversible (R2), reversible (R2') and effective (R2*) transverse relaxation rates, venous blood oxygenation level assessed by quantitative blood oxygenation level dependent (qBOLD) method and cerebral blood flow (CBF) assessed by arterial spin labeling (ASL) using a 7T small animal MRI scanner. One to two days after MRI, tissue perfusion and pO2 were measured by Laser-Doppler flowmetry and fluorescence quenching micro probes, respectively. The tissue pO2 values were converted to blood oxygen saturation by using the Hill equation. The animals were anesthetized by intra peritoneal injection of ketamine-xylazine-acepromazine (10-2-0.3 mg/ml.kg). Results for normal/hypercapnia/hyperoxia conditions were: R2[s and -1] = 20.7/20.4/20.1, R2*[s and -1] = 31.6/29.6/25.9, R2'[s and 1] = 10.9/9.2/5.7, qBOLD venous blood oxygenation level = 0.43/0.51/0.56, CBF[ml.min and -1.100g and -1] = 70.6/105.5/81.8, Laser-Doppler flowmetry[a.u.] = 89.2/120.2/90.6 and pO2[mmHg] = 6.3/32.3/46.7. All parameters were statistically significantly different with P < 0.001 between all breathing conditions. All MRI and the corresponding micro probe measurements were also statistically significantly (P ≤ 0.03) correlated with each other. However, converting the tissue pO2 to blood oxygen saturation = 0.02/0.34/0.63, showed only very limited agreement with the qBOLD venous blood oxygenation level. We found good

  19. Correlation of oxygenation and perfusion sensitive MRI with invasive micro probe measurements in healthy mice brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlacik, Jan; Fiehler, Jens [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Neuroradiology; Reitz, Matthias; Schmidt, Nils O. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Neurosurgery; Bolar, Divya S. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, MA (United States). Radiology; Adalsteinsson, Elfar [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

    2015-05-01

    The non-invasive assessment of (patho-)physiological parameters such as, perfusion and oxygenation, is of great importance for the characterization of pathologies e.g., tumors, which may be helpful to better predict treatment response and potential outcome. To better understand the influence of physiological parameters on the investigated oxygenation and perfusion sensitive MRI methods, MRI measurements were correlated with subsequent invasive micro probe measurements during free breathing conditions of air, air+10% CO2 and 100% O2 in healthy mice brain. MRI parameters were the irreversible (R2), reversible (R2') and effective (R2*) transverse relaxation rates, venous blood oxygenation level assessed by quantitative blood oxygenation level dependent (qBOLD) method and cerebral blood flow (CBF) assessed by arterial spin labeling (ASL) using a 7T small animal MRI scanner. One to two days after MRI, tissue perfusion and pO2 were measured by Laser-Doppler flowmetry and fluorescence quenching micro probes, respectively. The tissue pO2 values were converted to blood oxygen saturation by using the Hill equation. The animals were anesthetized by intra peritoneal injection of ketamine-xylazine-acepromazine (10-2-0.3 mg/ml.kg). Results for normal/hypercapnia/hyperoxia conditions were: R2[s {sup and} -1] = 20.7/20.4/20.1, R2*[s {sup and} -1] = 31.6/29.6/25.9, R2'[s {sup and} 1] = 10.9/9.2/5.7, qBOLD venous blood oxygenation level = 0.43/0.51/0.56, CBF[ml.min {sup and} -1.100g {sup and} -1] = 70.6/105.5/81.8, Laser-Doppler flowmetry[a.u.] = 89.2/120.2/90.6 and pO2[mmHg] = 6.3/32.3/46.7. All parameters were statistically significantly different with P < 0.001 between all breathing conditions. All MRI and the corresponding micro probe measurements were also statistically significantly (P ≤ 0.03) correlated with each other. However, converting the tissue pO2 to blood oxygen saturation = 0.02/0.34/0.63, showed only very limited agreement with the qBOLD venous blood

  20. Correlation of oxygenation and perfusion sensitive MRI with invasive micro probe measurements in healthy mice brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlacik, Jan; Reitz, Matthias; Bolar, Divya S; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Schmidt, Nils O; Fiehler, Jens

    2015-03-01

    The non-invasive assessment of (patho-)physiological parameters such as, perfusion and oxygenation, is of great importance for the characterization of pathologies e.g., tumors, which may be helpful to better predict treatment response and potential outcome. To better understand the influence of physiological parameters on the investigated oxygenation and perfusion sensitive MRI methods, MRI measurements were correlated with subsequent invasive micro probe measurements during free breathing conditions of air, air+10% CO2 and 100% O2 in healthy mice brain. MRI parameters were the irreversible (R2), reversible (R2') and effective (R2*) transverse relaxation rates, venous blood oxygenation level assessed by quantitative blood oxygenation level dependent (qBOLD) method and cerebral blood flow (CBF) assessed by arterial spin labeling (ASL) using a 7 T small animal MRI scanner. One to two days after MRI, tissue perfusion and pO2 were measured by Laser-Doppler flowmetry and fluorescence quenching micro probes, respectively. The tissue pO2 values were converted to blood oxygen saturation by using the Hill equation. The animals were anesthetized by intra peritoneal injection of ketamine-xylazine-acepromazine (10-2-0.3 mg/ml · kg). Results for normal/hypercapnia/hyperoxia conditions were: R2[s(∧)-1] = 20.7/20.4/20.1, R2*[s(∧)-1] = 31.6/29.6/25.9, R2'[s-(∧)1] = 10.9/9.2/5.7, qBOLD venous blood oxygenation level = 0.43/0.51/0.56, CBF[ml · min(∧)-1 · 100 g(∧)-1] = 70.6/105.5/81.8, Laser-Doppler flowmetry[a.u.] = 89.2/120.2/90.6 and pO2[mmHg] = 6.3/32.3/46.7. All parameters were statistically significantly different with P effects of anesthesia and trauma due to micro probe insertion are strong confounding factors and need close attention for study planning and conduction of experiments. Investigation of the correlation of perfusion and oxygenation sensitive MRI methods with micro probe measurements in pathologic tissue such as tumors is now of compelling interest

  1. Ultra-sensitive molecular MRI of cerebrovascular cell activation enables early detection of chronic central nervous system disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montagne, Axel; Gauberti, Maxime; Jullienne, Amandine; Briens, Aurelien; Docagne, Fabian; Vivien, Denis; Maubert, Eric; Macrez, Richard; Defer, Gilles; Raynaud, Jean-Sebastien; Louin, Gaelle; Buisson, Alain; Haelewyn, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    Since endothelial cells can be targeted by large contrast-carrying particles, molecular imaging of cerebrovascular cell activation is highly promising to evaluate the underlying inflammation of the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, we aimed to demonstrate that molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cerebrovascular cell activation can reveal CNS disorders in the absence of visible lesions and symptoms. To this aim, we optimized contrast carrying particles targeting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and MRI protocols through both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Although, pre-contrast MRI images failed to reveal the ongoing pathology, contrast-enhanced MRI revealed hypoperfusion-triggered CNS injury in vascular dementia, unmasked amyloid-induced cerebrovascular activation in Alzheimer's disease and allowed monitoring of disease activity during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Moreover, contrast-enhanced MRI revealed the cerebrovascular cell activation associated with known risk factors of CNS disorders such as peripheral inflammation, ethanol consumption, hyperglycemia and aging. By providing a dramatically higher sensitivity than previously reported methods and molecular contrast agents, the technology described in the present study opens new avenues of investigation in the field of neuro-inflammation. (authors)

  2. Sensitivity and specificity considerations for fMRI encoding, decoding, and mapping of auditory cortex at ultra-high field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerel, Michelle; De Martino, Federico; Kemper, Valentin G; Schmitter, Sebastian; Vu, An T; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Formisano, Elia; Yacoub, Essa

    2018-01-01

    Following rapid technological advances, ultra-high field functional MRI (fMRI) enables exploring correlates of neuronal population activity at an increasing spatial resolution. However, as the fMRI blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) contrast is a vascular signal, the spatial specificity of fMRI data is ultimately determined by the characteristics of the underlying vasculature. At 7T, fMRI measurement parameters determine the relative contribution of the macro- and microvasculature to the acquired signal. Here we investigate how these parameters affect relevant high-end fMRI analyses such as encoding, decoding, and submillimeter mapping of voxel preferences in the human auditory cortex. Specifically, we compare a T 2 * weighted fMRI dataset, obtained with 2D gradient echo (GE) EPI, to a predominantly T 2 weighted dataset obtained with 3D GRASE. We first investigated the decoding accuracy based on two encoding models that represented different hypotheses about auditory cortical processing. This encoding/decoding analysis profited from the large spatial coverage and sensitivity of the T 2 * weighted acquisitions, as evidenced by a significantly higher prediction accuracy in the GE-EPI dataset compared to the 3D GRASE dataset for both encoding models. The main disadvantage of the T 2 * weighted GE-EPI dataset for encoding/decoding analyses was that the prediction accuracy exhibited cortical depth dependent vascular biases. However, we propose that the comparison of prediction accuracy across the different encoding models may be used as a post processing technique to salvage the spatial interpretability of the GE-EPI cortical depth-dependent prediction accuracy. Second, we explored the mapping of voxel preferences. Large-scale maps of frequency preference (i.e., tonotopy) were similar across datasets, yet the GE-EPI dataset was preferable due to its larger spatial coverage and sensitivity. However, submillimeter tonotopy maps revealed biases in assigned frequency

  3. Ex-vivo diffusion MRI reveals microstructural alterations in stress-sensitive brain regions: A chronic mild stress recovery study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Ahmad Raza; Hansen, Brian; Wiborg, Ove

    Depression is a leading cause of disability worldwide and causes significant microstructural alterations in stress-sensitive brain regions. However, the potential recovery of these microstructural alterations has not previously been investigated, which we, therefore, set out to do using diffusion...... MRI (d-MRI) in the chronic mild stress (CMS) rat model of depression. This study reveals significant microstructural alterations after 8 weeks of recovery, in the opposite direction to change induced by stress in the acute phase of the experiment. Such findings may be useful in the prognosis...... of depression or for monitoring treatment response....

  4. A Sensitivity Analysis of fMRI Balloon Model

    KAUST Repository

    Zayane, Chadia; Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2015-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allows the mapping of the brain activation through measurements of the Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) contrast. The characterization of the pathway from the input stimulus to the output BOLD signal requires the selection of an adequate hemodynamic model and the satisfaction of some specific conditions while conducting the experiment and calibrating the model. This paper, focuses on the identifiability of the Balloon hemodynamic model. By identifiability, we mean the ability to estimate accurately the model parameters given the input and the output measurement. Previous studies of the Balloon model have somehow added knowledge either by choosing prior distributions for the parameters, freezing some of them, or looking for the solution as a projection on a natural basis of some vector space. In these studies, the identification was generally assessed using event-related paradigms. This paper justifies the reasons behind the need of adding knowledge, choosing certain paradigms, and completing the few existing identifiability studies through a global sensitivity analysis of the Balloon model in the case of blocked design experiment.

  5. A Sensitivity Analysis of fMRI Balloon Model

    KAUST Repository

    Zayane, Chadia

    2015-04-22

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allows the mapping of the brain activation through measurements of the Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) contrast. The characterization of the pathway from the input stimulus to the output BOLD signal requires the selection of an adequate hemodynamic model and the satisfaction of some specific conditions while conducting the experiment and calibrating the model. This paper, focuses on the identifiability of the Balloon hemodynamic model. By identifiability, we mean the ability to estimate accurately the model parameters given the input and the output measurement. Previous studies of the Balloon model have somehow added knowledge either by choosing prior distributions for the parameters, freezing some of them, or looking for the solution as a projection on a natural basis of some vector space. In these studies, the identification was generally assessed using event-related paradigms. This paper justifies the reasons behind the need of adding knowledge, choosing certain paradigms, and completing the few existing identifiability studies through a global sensitivity analysis of the Balloon model in the case of blocked design experiment.

  6. Gadolinium-DTPA enhanced MRI of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosten, N.; Felix, R.

    1994-01-01

    The text reviews MRI findings in a variety of cerebral diseases. Advantages of Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) enhanced MRI over plain MRI and enhanced CT are discussed. Enhanced MRI is far superior to enhanced CT in the detection of meningeal tumor spread, meningeal inflammation, inflammatory lesions of the optic nerve, brain lesions in multiple sclerosis and infarction. Enhanced MRI is today the most sensitive diagnostic tool in hypophaseal adenomas. Also enhancement of gliomas is detected by MRI with higher sensitivity than by CT. Use Gd-DTPA allow to separate of vital tumor tissue from necrosis and edema, improve delineation of tumor extension and improve detection of lesions localized in gray matter

  7. Relative sensitivities of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters to arterial input function (AIF) scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Cai, Yu; Moloney, Brendan; Chen, Yiyi; Huang, Wei; Woods, Mark; Coakley, Fergus V; Rooney, William D; Garzotto, Mark G; Springer, Charles S

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic-Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) has been used widely for clinical applications. Pharmacokinetic modeling of DCE-MRI data that extracts quantitative contrast reagent/tissue-specific model parameters is the most investigated method. One of the primary challenges in pharmacokinetic analysis of DCE-MRI data is accurate and reliable measurement of the arterial input function (AIF), which is the driving force behind all pharmacokinetics. Because of effects such as inflow and partial volume averaging, AIF measured from individual arteries sometimes require amplitude scaling for better representation of the blood contrast reagent (CR) concentration time-courses. Empirical approaches like blinded AIF estimation or reference tissue AIF derivation can be useful and practical, especially when there is no clearly visible blood vessel within the imaging field-of-view (FOV). Similarly, these approaches generally also require magnitude scaling of the derived AIF time-courses. Since the AIF varies among individuals even with the same CR injection protocol and the perfect scaling factor for reconstructing the ground truth AIF often remains unknown, variations in estimated pharmacokinetic parameters due to varying AIF scaling factors are of special interest. In this work, using simulated and real prostate cancer DCE-MRI data, we examined parameter variations associated with AIF scaling. Our results show that, for both the fast-exchange-limit (FXL) Tofts model and the water exchange sensitized fast-exchange-regime (FXR) model, the commonly fitted CR transfer constant (K(trans)) and the extravascular, extracellular volume fraction (ve) scale nearly proportionally with the AIF, whereas the FXR-specific unidirectional cellular water efflux rate constant, kio, and the CR intravasation rate constant, kep, are both AIF scaling insensitive. This indicates that, for DCE-MRI of prostate cancer and possibly other cancers, kio and kep may be more suitable imaging

  8. Ecological Sensitivity Evaluation of Tourist Region Based on Remote Sensing Image - Taking Chaohu Lake Area as a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y.; Li, W. J.; Yu, J.; Wu, C. Z.

    2018-04-01

    Remote sensing technology is of significant advantages for monitoring and analysing ecological environment. By using of automatic extraction algorithm, various environmental resources information of tourist region can be obtained from remote sensing imagery. Combining with GIS spatial analysis and landscape pattern analysis, relevant environmental information can be quantitatively analysed and interpreted. In this study, taking the Chaohu Lake Basin as an example, Landsat-8 multi-spectral satellite image of October 2015 was applied. Integrated the automatic ELM (Extreme Learning Machine) classification results with the data of digital elevation model and slope information, human disturbance degree, land use degree, primary productivity, landscape evenness , vegetation coverage, DEM, slope and normalized water body index were used as the evaluation factors to construct the eco-sensitivity evaluation index based on AHP and overlay analysis. According to the value of eco-sensitivity evaluation index, by using of GIS technique of equal interval reclassification, the Chaohu Lake area was divided into four grades: very sensitive area, sensitive area, sub-sensitive areas and insensitive areas. The results of the eco-sensitivity analysis shows: the area of the very sensitive area was 4577.4378 km2, accounting for about 37.12 %, the sensitive area was 5130.0522 km2, accounting for about 37.12 %; the area of sub-sensitive area was 3729.9312 km2, accounting for 26.99 %; the area of insensitive area was 382.4399 km2, accounting for about 2.77 %. At the same time, it has been found that there were spatial differences in ecological sensitivity of the Chaohu Lake basin. The most sensitive areas were mainly located in the areas with high elevation and large terrain gradient. Insensitive areas were mainly distributed in slope of the slow platform area; the sensitive areas and the sub-sensitive areas were mainly agricultural land and woodland. Through the eco-sensitivity analysis of

  9. Chemical-exchange-sensitive MRI of amide, amine and NOE at 9.4 T versus 15.2 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Julius Juhyun; Choi, Wonmin; Jin, Tao; Lee, Jung Hee; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2017-09-01

    Chemical exchange (CE)-sensitive MRI benefits greatly from stronger magnetic fields; however, field effects on CE-sensitive imaging have not yet been studied well in vivo. We have compared CE-sensitive Z-spectra and maps obtained at the fields of 9.4 T and 15.2 T in phantoms and rats with off-resonance chemical-exchange-sensitive spin lock (CESL), which is similar to conventional chemical exchange saturation transfer. At higher fields, the background peak at water resonance has less spread and the exchange rate relative to chemical shift decreases, thus CESL intensity is dependent on B 0 . For the in vivo amide and nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) composite resonances of rat brains, intensities were similar for both magnetic fields, but effective amide proton transfer and NOE values obtained with three-point quantification or a curve fitting method were larger at 15.2 T due to the reduced spread of attenuation at the direct water resonance. When using intermediate exchange-sensitive irradiation parameters, the amine proton signal was 65% higher at 15.2 T than at 9.4 T due to a reduced ratio of exchange rate to chemical shift. In summary, increasing magnetic field provides enhancements to CE-sensitive signals in the intermediate exchange regime and reduces contamination from background signals in the slow exchange regime. Consequently, ultrahigh magnetic field is advantageous for CE-sensitive MRI, especially for amine and hydroxyl protons. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Glucose metabolism-weighted imaging with chemical exchange-sensitive MRI of 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) in brain: Sensitivity and biological sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tao; Mehrens, Hunter; Wang, Ping; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2016-12-01

    Recent proof-of-principle studies have demonstrated the feasibility of measuring the uptake and metabolism of non-labeled 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) by a chemical exchange-sensitive spin-lock (CESL) MRI approach. In order to gain better understanding of this new approach, we performed dynamic in vivo CESL MRI on healthy rat brains with an intravenous injection of 2DG under various conditions at 9.4T. For three 2DG doses of 0.25, 0.5 and 1g/kg, we found that 2DG-CESL signals increased linearly with injection dose at the initial (40min) suggesting time-dependent differential weightings of 2DG transport and metabolism. Remaining 2DG-CESL studies were performed with 0.25g/kg 2DG. Since a higher isoflurane level reduces glucose metabolism and increases blood flow, 2DG-CESL was measured under 0.5%, 1.5% and 2.2% isoflurane. The 2DG-CESL signal was reduced at higher isoflurane levels correlating well with the 2DG phosphorylation in the intracellular space. To detect regional heterogeneities of glucose metabolism, 2DG-CESL with 0.33×0.33×1.50mm 3 resolution was obtained, which indeed showed a higher response in the cortex compared to the corpus callosum. Lastly, unlike CESL MRI with the injection of non-transportable mannitol, the 2DG-CESL response decreased with an increased spin-lock pulse power confirming that 2DG-CESL is dominated by chemical exchange processes in the extravascular space. Taken together, our results showed that 2DG-CESL MRI signals mainly indicate glucose transport and metabolism and may be a useful biomarker for metabolic studies of normal and diseased brains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Sensitive technique for detecting outer defect on tube with remote field eddy current testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Noriyasu; Nagai, Satoshi; Ochiai, Makoto; Jimbo, Noboru; Komai, Masafumi

    2008-01-01

    In the remote field eddy current testing, we proposed the method of enhancing the magnetic flux density in the vicinity of an exciter coil by controlling the magnetic flux direction for increasing the sensitivity of detecting outer defects on a tube and used the flux guide made of a magnetic material for the method. The optimum structural shape of the flux guide was designed by the magnetic field analysis. On the experiment with the application of the flux guide, the magnetic flux density increased by 59% and the artificial defect detection signal became clear. We confirmed the proposed method was effective in a high sensitivity. (author)

  12. Cerebral malaria: susceptibility weighted MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinit Baliyan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral malaria is one of the fatal complications of Plasmodium falciparum infection. Pathogenesis involves cerebral microangiopathy related to microvascular plugging by infected red blood cells. Conventional imaging with MRI and CT do not reveal anything specific in case of cerebral malaria. Susceptibility weighted imaging, a recent advance in the MRI, is very sensitive to microbleeds related to microangiopathy. Histopathological studies in cerebral malaria have revealed microbleeds in brain parenchyma secondary to microangiopathy. Susceptibility weighted imaging, being exquisitely sensitive to microbleeds may provide additional information and improve the diagnostic accuracy of MRI in cerebral malaria.

  13. Emotional sensitivity, emotion regulation and impulsivity in borderline personality disorder: a critical review of fMRI studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zutphen, Linda; Siep, Nicolette; Jacob, Gitta A; Goebel, Rainer; Arntz, Arnoud

    2015-04-01

    Emotional sensitivity, emotion regulation and impulsivity are fundamental topics in research of borderline personality disorder (BPD). Studies using fMRI examining the neural correlates concerning these topics is growing and has just begun understanding the underlying neural correlates in BPD. However, there are strong similarities but also important differences in results of different studies. It is therefore important to know in more detail what these differences are and how we should interpret these. In present review a critical light is shed on the fMRI studies examining emotional sensitivity, emotion regulation and impulsivity in BPD patients. First an outline of the methodology and the results of the studies will be given. Thereafter important issues that remained unanswered and topics to improve future research are discussed. Future research should take into account the limited power of previous studies and focus more on BPD specificity with regard to time course responses, different regulation strategies, manipulation of self-regulation, medication use, a wider range of stimuli, gender effects and the inclusion of a clinical control group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. ECOLOGICAL SENSITIVITY EVALUATION OF TOURIST REGION BASED ON REMOTE SENSING IMAGE – TAKING CHAOHU LAKE AREA AS A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Lin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing technology is of significant advantages for monitoring and analysing ecological environment. By using of automatic extraction algorithm, various environmental resources information of tourist region can be obtained from remote sensing imagery. Combining with GIS spatial analysis and landscape pattern analysis, relevant environmental information can be quantitatively analysed and interpreted. In this study, taking the Chaohu Lake Basin as an example, Landsat-8 multi-spectral satellite image of October 2015 was applied. Integrated the automatic ELM (Extreme Learning Machine classification results with the data of digital elevation model and slope information, human disturbance degree, land use degree, primary productivity, landscape evenness , vegetation coverage, DEM, slope and normalized water body index were used as the evaluation factors to construct the eco-sensitivity evaluation index based on AHP and overlay analysis. According to the value of eco-sensitivity evaluation index, by using of GIS technique of equal interval reclassification, the Chaohu Lake area was divided into four grades: very sensitive area, sensitive area, sub-sensitive areas and insensitive areas. The results of the eco-sensitivity analysis shows: the area of the very sensitive area was 4577.4378 km2, accounting for about 37.12 %, the sensitive area was 5130.0522 km2, accounting for about 37.12 %; the area of sub-sensitive area was 3729.9312 km2, accounting for 26.99 %; the area of insensitive area was 382.4399 km2, accounting for about 2.77 %. At the same time, it has been found that there were spatial differences in ecological sensitivity of the Chaohu Lake basin. The most sensitive areas were mainly located in the areas with high elevation and large terrain gradient. Insensitive areas were mainly distributed in slope of the slow platform area; the sensitive areas and the sub-sensitive areas were mainly agricultural land and woodland

  15. Whole-body MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, and diffusion-weighted imaging for the staging of multiple myeloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutoit, Julie C.; Verstraete, Koenraad L. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2017-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most sensitive imaging technique for the detection of bone marrow infiltration, and has therefore recently been included in the new diagnostic myeloma criteria, as proposed by the International Myeloma Working Group. Nevertheless, conventional MRI only provides anatomical information and is therefore only of limited use in the response assessment of patients with multiple myeloma. The additional information from functional MRI techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, can improve the detection rate of bone marrow infiltration and the assessment of response. This can further enhance the sensitivity and specificity of MRI in the staging of multiple myeloma patients. This article provides an overview of the technical aspects of conventional and functional MRI techniques with practical recommendations. It reviews the diagnostic performance, prognostic value, and role in therapy assessment in multiple myeloma and its precursor stages. (orig.)

  16. Formal MRI criteria for the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harting, I.; Haehnel, S.; Meyding-Lamade, U.

    2004-01-01

    Multiple scloris (MS) is the most common demyelinating inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, presenting with multifocal, disseminated white matter lesions called plaques. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is very sensitive in detecting white matter abnormalities. By demonstrating the spatial and temporal dissemination in patients presenting with isolated clinical findings suggestive of MS, MRI contributes to estimating the likelihood of the disease. Since MRI is highly sensitive but not specific, it is important to apply formal MRI criteria. This article describes the characteristic MRI changes of MS and the so-called McDonald criteria for an MRI-supported diagnosis of MS. (orig.) [de

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging ...

  18. Chemical exchange-sensitive spin-lock MRI of glucose analog 3-O-methyl-d-glucose in normal and ischemic brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tao; Mehrens, Hunter; Wang, Ping; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2018-05-01

    Glucose transport is important for understanding brain glucose metabolism. We studied glucose transport with a presumably non-toxic and non-metabolizable glucose analog, 3-O-methyl-d-glucose, using a chemical exchange-sensitive spin-lock MRI technique at 9.4 Tesla. 3-O-methyl-d-glucose showed comparable chemical exchange properties with d-glucose and 2-deoxy-d-glucose in phantoms, and higher and lower chemical exchange-sensitive spin-lock sensitivity than Glc and 2-deoxy-d-glucose in in vivo experiments, respectively. The changes of the spin-lattice relaxation rate in the rotating frame (Δ R 1 ρ) in normal rat brain peaked at ∼15 min after the intravenous injection of 1 g/kg 3-O-methyl-d-glucose and almost maintained a plateau for >1 h. Doses up to 4 g/kg 3-O-methyl-d-glucose were linearly correlated with Δ R 1 ρ. In rats with focal ischemic stroke, chemical exchange-sensitive spin-lock with 3-O-methyl-d-glucose injection at 1 h after stroke onset showed reduced Δ R 1 ρ in the ischemic core but higher Δ R 1 ρ in the peri-core region compared to normal tissue, which progressed into the ischemic core at 3 h after stroke onset. This suggests that the hyper-chemical exchange-sensitive spin-lock region observed at 1 h is the ischemic penumbra at-risk of infarct. In summary, 3-O-methyl-d-glucose-chemical exchange-sensitive spin-lock can be a sensitive MRI technique to probe the glucose transport in normal and ischemic brains.

  19. A Novel High Sensitivity Sensor for Remote Field Eddy Current Non-Destructive Testing Based on Orthogonal Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojie Xu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Remote field eddy current is an effective non-destructive testing method for ferromagnetic tubular structures. In view of conventional sensors’ disadvantages such as low signal-to-noise ratio and poor sensitivity to axial cracks, a novel high sensitivity sensor based on orthogonal magnetic field excitation is proposed. Firstly, through a three-dimensional finite element simulation, the remote field effect under orthogonal magnetic field excitation is determined, and an appropriate configuration which can generate an orthogonal magnetic field for a tubular structure is developed. Secondly, optimized selection of key parameters such as frequency, exciting currents and shielding modes is analyzed in detail, and different types of pick-up coils, including a new self-differential mode pick-up coil, are designed and analyzed. Lastly, the proposed sensor is verified experimentally by various types of defects manufactured on a section of a ferromagnetic tube. Experimental results show that the proposed novel sensor can largely improve the sensitivity of defect detection, especially for axial crack whose depth is less than 40% wall thickness, which are very difficult to detect and identify by conventional sensors. Another noteworthy advantage of the proposed sensor is that it has almost equal sensitivity to various types of defects, when a self-differential mode pick-up coil is adopted.

  20. MRI for myocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutberlet, M.; Luecke, C.; Krieghoff, C.; Hildebrand, L.; Steiner, J.; Adam, J.; Grotthoff, M.; Lehmkuhl, L.; Lurz, P.; Eitel, I.; Thiele, H.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) has become the primary tool for the non-invasive assessment in patients with suspected myocarditis, especially after exclusion of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) for the differential diagnosis. Various MRI parameters are available which have different accuracies. Volumetric and functional ventricular assessment and the occurrence of pericardial effusion alone demonstrate only a poor sensitivity and specificity. The calculation of the T2-ratio (edema assessment), the early or global relative myocardial enhancement (gRE) and the late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), which represents irreversibly injured myocardium, are more specific parameters. All MRI parameters demonstrate the best accuracy in infarct-like acute myocarditis, whereas in chronic myocarditis sensitivity and specificity are less accurate. Therefore, a multisequential (at least two out of three parameters are positive) approach is recommended. The assessment of the value of newer, more quantitative MRI sequences, such as T1 and T2-mapping is still under investigation. (orig.) [de

  1. Improved sensitivity and specificity for resting state and task fMRI with multiband multi-echo EPI compared to multi-echo EPI at 7T.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boyacioglu, R.; Schulz, J.; Koopmans, P.J.; Barth, M.; Norris, David Gordon

    2015-01-01

    A multiband multi-echo (MBME) sequence is implemented and compared to a matched standard multi-echo (ME) protocol to investigate the potential improvement in sensitivity and spatial specificity at 7 T for resting state and task fMRI. ME acquisition is attractive because BOLD sensitivity is less

  2. MRI in head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jin Kyo

    1986-01-01

    In the diagnosis of head injury, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), like CT, is an effective method of distinguishing between intracerebral and extracerebral lesions. In our experience of MRI, early hematomas are almost isointense by Saturation Recovery (SR) method, so these must be performed with Spin Echo (SE) method for better visualization of hematomas. Isodense subdural hematomas, which is a diagnostic dilemma on CT images, are clearly seen on MRI. Delayed hematomas or residual parenchymal lesions are better demonstrated on MRI than on CT. Direct cornal, sagittal images and multiplanar facility of MRI provides excellent visualization of the the location and shape of extracerebral collection of hematoma. For the screening of head traumas, SE method is a technique of choice because of its excellent sensitivity within limited time.

  3. MRI in head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jin Kyo [Shin Wha Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-02-15

    In the diagnosis of head injury, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), like CT, is an effective method of distinguishing between intracerebral and extracerebral lesions. In our experience of MRI, early hematomas are almost isointense by Saturation Recovery (SR) method, so these must be performed with Spin Echo (SE) method for better visualization of hematomas. Isodense subdural hematomas, which is a diagnostic dilemma on CT images, are clearly seen on MRI. Delayed hematomas or residual parenchymal lesions are better demonstrated on MRI than on CT. Direct cornal, sagittal images and multiplanar facility of MRI provides excellent visualization of the the location and shape of extracerebral collection of hematoma. For the screening of head traumas, SE method is a technique of choice because of its excellent sensitivity within limited time.

  4. Comparison of a fast 5-min knee MRI protocol with a standard knee MRI protocol. A multi-institutional multi-reader study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FitzGerald Alaia, Erin; Beltran, Luis S.; Garwood, Elisabeth; Burke, Christopher J.; Gyftopoulos, Soterios [NYU Langone Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Division, New York, NY (United States); Benedick, Alex [Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States); Obuchowski, Nancy A. [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland, OH (United States); Polster, Joshua M.; Schils, Jean; Subhas, Naveen [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Division, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chang, I. Yuan Joseph [Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2018-01-15

    To compare diagnostic performance of a 5-min knee MRI protocol to that of a standard knee MRI. One hundred 3 T (100 patients, mean 38.8 years) and 50 1.5 T (46 patients, mean 46.4 years) MRIs, consisting of 5 fast, 2D multi-planar fast-spin-echo (FSE) sequences and five standard multiplanar FSE sequences, from two academic centers (1/2015-1/2016), were retrospectively reviewed by four musculoskeletal radiologists. Agreement between fast and standard (interprotocol agreement) and between standard (intraprotocol agreement) readings for meniscal, ligamentous, chondral, and bone pathology was compared for interchangeability. Frequency of major findings, sensitivity, and specificity was also tested for each protocol. Interprotocol agreement using fast MRI was similar to intraprotocol agreement with standard MRI (83.0-99.5%), with no excess disagreement (≤ 1.2; 95% CI, -4.2 to 3.8%), across all structures. Frequency of major findings (1.1-22.4% across structures) on fast and standard MRI was not significantly different (p ≥ 0.215), except more ACL tears on fast MRI (p = 0.021) and more cartilage defects on standard MRI (p < 0.001). Sensitivities (59-100%) and specificities (73-99%) of fast and standard MRI were not significantly different for meniscal and ligament tears (95% CI for difference, -0.08-0.08). For cartilage defects, fast MRI was slightly less sensitive (95% CI for difference, -0.125 to -0.01) but slightly more specific (95% CI for difference, 0.01-0.5) than standard MRI. A fast 5-min MRI protocol is interchangeable with and has similar accuracy to a standard knee MRI for evaluating internal derangement of the knee. (orig.)

  5. Comparison of a fast 5-min knee MRI protocol with a standard knee MRI protocol. A multi-institutional multi-reader study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FitzGerald Alaia, Erin; Beltran, Luis S.; Garwood, Elisabeth; Burke, Christopher J.; Gyftopoulos, Soterios; Benedick, Alex; Obuchowski, Nancy A.; Polster, Joshua M.; Schils, Jean; Subhas, Naveen; Chang, I. Yuan Joseph

    2018-01-01

    To compare diagnostic performance of a 5-min knee MRI protocol to that of a standard knee MRI. One hundred 3 T (100 patients, mean 38.8 years) and 50 1.5 T (46 patients, mean 46.4 years) MRIs, consisting of 5 fast, 2D multi-planar fast-spin-echo (FSE) sequences and five standard multiplanar FSE sequences, from two academic centers (1/2015-1/2016), were retrospectively reviewed by four musculoskeletal radiologists. Agreement between fast and standard (interprotocol agreement) and between standard (intraprotocol agreement) readings for meniscal, ligamentous, chondral, and bone pathology was compared for interchangeability. Frequency of major findings, sensitivity, and specificity was also tested for each protocol. Interprotocol agreement using fast MRI was similar to intraprotocol agreement with standard MRI (83.0-99.5%), with no excess disagreement (≤ 1.2; 95% CI, -4.2 to 3.8%), across all structures. Frequency of major findings (1.1-22.4% across structures) on fast and standard MRI was not significantly different (p ≥ 0.215), except more ACL tears on fast MRI (p = 0.021) and more cartilage defects on standard MRI (p < 0.001). Sensitivities (59-100%) and specificities (73-99%) of fast and standard MRI were not significantly different for meniscal and ligament tears (95% CI for difference, -0.08-0.08). For cartilage defects, fast MRI was slightly less sensitive (95% CI for difference, -0.125 to -0.01) but slightly more specific (95% CI for difference, 0.01-0.5) than standard MRI. A fast 5-min MRI protocol is interchangeable with and has similar accuracy to a standard knee MRI for evaluating internal derangement of the knee. (orig.)

  6. Rapid MRI evaluation of acute intracranial hemorrhage in pediatric head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, Maura E.; Jaju, Alok [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States); Ciolino, Jody D. [Northwestern University, Biostatistics Collaboration Center, Department of Preventive Medicine Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Alden, Tord [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Neurological Surgery, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Neurosurgery, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Rapid MRI with ultrafast T2 sequences can be performed without sedation and is often used in place of computed tomography (CT) to evaluate pediatric patients for indications such as hydrocephalus. This study investigated the sensitivity of rapid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection and follow-up of acute intracranial hemorrhage in comparison to CT, which is commonly the first-line imaging. Patients presenting to a pediatric hospital with acute intracranial hemorrhage on CT and follow-up rapid MRI within 48 h were included. Rapid MRI studies consisted of three plane ultrafast T2 sequences either with or without axial gradient echo (GRE) sequences. Identification of hemorrhage on rapid MRI was assessed by readers both blinded and unblinded to prior CT results. One hundred two acute hemorrhages in 61 patients were identified by CT. Rapid MRI detection of subdural and epidural hemorrhages was modest in the absence of prior CT for comparison (sensitivity 61-74 %), but increased with review of the prior CT (sensitivity 80-86 %). Hemorrhage size was a significant predictor of detection (p < 0.0001). Three plane fast T2 images alone without GRE sequences were poor at detecting subarachnoid hemorrhage (sensitivity 10-25 %); rapid MRI with GRE sequences identified the majority of subarachnoid hemorrhage (sensitivity 71-93 %). GRE modestly increased detection of other extra-axial hemorrhages. Rapid MRI with GRE sequences is sensitive for most acute intracranial hemorrhages only when a prior CT is available for review. Rapid MRI is not adequate to replace CT in initial evaluation of intracranial hemorrhages but may be helpful in follow-up of known hemorrhages. (orig.)

  7. Rapid MRI evaluation of acute intracranial hemorrhage in pediatric head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, Maura E.; Jaju, Alok; Ciolino, Jody D.; Alden, Tord

    2016-01-01

    Rapid MRI with ultrafast T2 sequences can be performed without sedation and is often used in place of computed tomography (CT) to evaluate pediatric patients for indications such as hydrocephalus. This study investigated the sensitivity of rapid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection and follow-up of acute intracranial hemorrhage in comparison to CT, which is commonly the first-line imaging. Patients presenting to a pediatric hospital with acute intracranial hemorrhage on CT and follow-up rapid MRI within 48 h were included. Rapid MRI studies consisted of three plane ultrafast T2 sequences either with or without axial gradient echo (GRE) sequences. Identification of hemorrhage on rapid MRI was assessed by readers both blinded and unblinded to prior CT results. One hundred two acute hemorrhages in 61 patients were identified by CT. Rapid MRI detection of subdural and epidural hemorrhages was modest in the absence of prior CT for comparison (sensitivity 61-74 %), but increased with review of the prior CT (sensitivity 80-86 %). Hemorrhage size was a significant predictor of detection (p < 0.0001). Three plane fast T2 images alone without GRE sequences were poor at detecting subarachnoid hemorrhage (sensitivity 10-25 %); rapid MRI with GRE sequences identified the majority of subarachnoid hemorrhage (sensitivity 71-93 %). GRE modestly increased detection of other extra-axial hemorrhages. Rapid MRI with GRE sequences is sensitive for most acute intracranial hemorrhages only when a prior CT is available for review. Rapid MRI is not adequate to replace CT in initial evaluation of intracranial hemorrhages but may be helpful in follow-up of known hemorrhages. (orig.)

  8. Sensitivity and reliability of language laterality assessment with a free reversed association task - a fMRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fesl, Gunther; Brueckmann, Hartmut; Bruhns, Philipp; Rau, Sabine; Ilmberger, Josef; Wiesmann, Martin; Kegel, Gerd

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the sensitivity and reliability of assessing hemispheric language dominance with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) using a 'free reversed association task.' Thirty-nine healthy subjects (13 dextrals, 13 sinistrals and 13 bimanuals) underwent two repeated fMRI sessions. In the active phases sets of words were presented via headphones, and an associated target item was named. During the baseline phases a standard answer was given after listening to unintelligible stimuli. Data were preprocessed with SPM, and then laterality indices (LI) and reliability coefficients (RC) were calculated. Extensive frontal, temporal and parietal activations were found. Seventy-eight percent of the subjects showed left-hemispheric dominance, 5% showed right-hemispheric dominance, and 17% had bilateral language representations. The incidence of right-hemispheric language dominance was 4.3 times higher in a left-hander with a handedness quotient (HQ) of -90 than in a right-hander with a HQ of +90. The RC was 0.61 for combined ROIs (global network). Strong correlations were found between the two session LIs (r = 0.95 for the global network). 'Free reversed association' is a sensitive and reliable task for the determination of individual language lateralization. This suggests that the task may be used in a clinical setting. (orig.)

  9. Cine MRI: a new approach to the diagnosis of scapholunate dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langner, I; Fischer, S; Eisenschenk, A; Langner, S

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of cine MRI for the detection of scapholunate dissociation (SLD) and to compare the sensitivity and specificity of cine MRI with those of cineradiography and arthroscopy. To evaluate feasibility, healthy subjects underwent cine MRI of the wrist. To evaluate sensitivity and specificity, patients with clinically suspected scapholunate ligament (SLL) injury after trauma to the wrist were prospectively included and underwent radiographic examination, cineradiography, and cine MRI. In 25 out of 38 patients, subsequent arthroscopy was performed. Results of cineradiography and cine MRI correlated with those of arthroscopy. Cine MRI was of diagnostic quality in all healthy subjects and patients with good interrater agreement. There was excellent correlation between cineradiography and cine MRI. Scapholunate distance differed significantly between healthy subjects and patients with scapholunate dissociation (p Cine MRI had 85% sensitivity and 90% specificity for the detection of SLD. Cine MRI of the wrist is a fast and reliable technique for the detection of SLD with diagnostic accuracy comparable to cineradiography. It can be easily implemented as a routine clinical MRI examination, facilitating diagnostic workup of patients with suspected SLD while avoiding radiation exposure.

  10. Cine MRI: a new approach to the diagnosis of scapholunate dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langner, I.; Eisenschenk, A. [University Medicine Greifswald, Division of Hand Surgery and Functional Microsurgery, Department of Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Greifswald (Germany); Fischer, S.; Langner, S. [University Medicine Greifswald, Institute for Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology, Greifswald (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of cine MRI for the detection of scapholunate dissociation (SLD) and to compare the sensitivity and specificity of cine MRI with those of cineradiography and arthroscopy. To evaluate feasibility, healthy subjects underwent cine MRI of the wrist. To evaluate sensitivity and specificity, patients with clinically suspected scapholunate ligament (SLL) injury after trauma to the wrist were prospectively included and underwent radiographic examination, cineradiography, and cine MRI. In 25 out of 38 patients, subsequent arthroscopy was performed. Results of cineradiography and cine MRI correlated with those of arthroscopy. Cine MRI was of diagnostic quality in all healthy subjects and patients with good interrater agreement. There was excellent correlation between cineradiography and cine MRI. Scapholunate distance differed significantly between healthy subjects and patients with scapholunate dissociation (p < 0.001), but not between imaging modalities in the patient group. Cine MRI had 85 % sensitivity and 90 % specificity for the detection of SLD. Cine MRI of the wrist is a fast and reliable technique for the detection of SLD with diagnostic accuracy comparable to cineradiography. It can be easily implemented as a routine clinical MRI examination, facilitating diagnostic workup of patients with suspected SLD while avoiding radiation exposure. (orig.)

  11. Virtual interactive presence and augmented reality (VIPAR) for remote surgical assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenai, Mahesh B; Dillavou, Marcus; Shum, Corey; Ross, Douglas; Tubbs, Richard S; Shih, Alan; Guthrie, Barton L

    2011-03-01

    Surgery is a highly technical field that combines continuous decision-making with the coordination of spatiovisual tasks. We designed a virtual interactive presence and augmented reality (VIPAR) platform that allows a remote surgeon to deliver real-time virtual assistance to a local surgeon, over a standard Internet connection. The VIPAR system consisted of a "local" and a "remote" station, each situated over a surgical field and a blue screen, respectively. Each station was equipped with a digital viewpiece, composed of 2 cameras for stereoscopic capture, and a high-definition viewer displaying a virtual field. The virtual field was created by digitally compositing selected elements within the remote field into the local field. The viewpieces were controlled by workstations mutually connected by the Internet, allowing virtual remote interaction in real time. Digital renderings derived from volumetric MRI were added to the virtual field to augment the surgeon's reality. For demonstration, a fixed-formalin cadaver head and neck were obtained, and a carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and pterional craniotomy were performed under the VIPAR system. The VIPAR system allowed for real-time, virtual interaction between a local (resident) and remote (attending) surgeon. In both carotid and pterional dissections, major anatomic structures were visualized and identified. Virtual interaction permitted remote instruction for the local surgeon, and MRI augmentation provided spatial guidance to both surgeons. Camera resolution, color contrast, time lag, and depth perception were identified as technical issues requiring further optimization. Virtual interactive presence and augmented reality provide a novel platform for remote surgical assistance, with multiple applications in surgical training and remote expert assistance.

  12. Comparison of diffusion-weighted fMRI and BOLD fMRI responses in a verbal working memory task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aso, Toshihiko; Urayama, Shin-ichi; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Le Bihan, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted functional MRI (DfMRI) has been reported to have a different response pattern in the visual cortex than that of BOLD-fMRI. Especially, the DfMRI signal shows a constantly faster response at both onset and offset of the stimulus, suggesting that the DfMRI signal might be more directly linked to neuronal events than the hemodynamic response. However, because the DfMRI response also contains a residual sensitivity to BOLD this hypothesis has been challenged. Using a verbal working memory task we show that the DfMRI time-course features are preserved outside visual cortices, but also less liable to between-subject/between-regional variation than the BOLD response. The overall findings not only support the feasibility of DfMRI as an approach for functional brain imaging, but also strengthen the uniqueness of the DfMRI signal origin. (authors)

  13. Diffusion, confusion and functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bihan, Denis

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion MRI has been introduced in 1985 and has had a very successful life on its own. While it has become a standard for imaging stroke and white matter disorders, the borders between diffusion MRI and the general field of fMRI have always remained fuzzy. First, diffusion MRI has been used to obtain images of brain function, based on the idea that diffusion MRI could also be made sensitive to blood flow, through the intra-voxel incoherent motion (IVIM) concept. Second, the IVIM concept helped better understand the contribution from different vasculature components to the BOLD fMRI signal. Third, it has been shown recently that a genuine fMRI signal can be obtained with diffusion MRI. This 'DfMRI' signal is notably different from the BOLD fMRI signal, especially for its much faster response to brain activation both at onset and offset, which points out to structural changes in the neural tissues, perhaps such as cell swelling, occurring in activated neural tissue. This short article reviews the major steps which have paved the way for this exciting development, underlying how technical progress with MRI equipment has each time been instrumental to expand the horizon of diffusion MRI toward the field of fMRI. (authors)

  14. Application of functional MRI in breast diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yun; Liu Shiyuan; Wang Chenguang; Tao Xiaofeng; Wang Jinlin; Wang Jian

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of functional MRI in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of breast diseases. Methods: Sixty-five patients with 68 lesions were enrolled in this study. Conventional T 1 WI and T 2 WI scan, dynamic contrast enhanced MRI, diffusion weighted imaging and 1 H single voxel MR spectroscopy were performed consequently. All lesions were verified by pathology, including 4 cases of breast adenosis, 22 fibroadenomas, 2 chronic inflammations, 3 cysts, 33 infitrating ductal carcinomas, 1 intraductal carcinoma and 3 cystosarcoma phyllodes tumors. Morphological features, maximum enhancement ratio, time-intensity curve, apparent diffusion coefficient and Choline peak were analyzed. Results: The detection rates of T 1 WI and T 2 WI were 14.7% (n=10) and 51.5% (n=35). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI for the malignant tumor were 94. 6%, 71.4% and 76.5% respectively. Retrospective study showed that diffusion weighted imaging, with the b value from 800 s/mm 2 to 1000 s/mm 2 , could be used to differentiate various types of breast lesions. 1 H signal voxel spectroscopy had a sensitivity of 51.4%, specificity of 82.6%, and accuracy of 67.6% for the malignent. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy could reach 97.3%, 90.0% and 92.6% respectively by combining conventional scan, dynamic contrast enhanced MRI and MR spectroscopy. Conclusion: Functional MRI, with high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy, can be used widely in the diagnosis of malignant breast lesions. (authors)

  15. Controlled Hyperthermia with MRI-guided Focused Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, Steffen; Salomir, Rares; Pedersen, Michael

    Introduction: Hyperthermia is an appealing oncological treatment since the significant regions of hypoxia contained in most solid tumours are known to be sensitive to the cytotoxic effect of heat. However, due to the seemingly insurmountable technical difficulties associated with delivering thermal......-sensitive promoters and localized drug delivery using thermo-sensitive micro-carriers. Subjects Here we will present some of the recent advances in MRI-FUS, and their technical background. This will include: 1) Real-time MRI-thermometry. 2) FUS-technology. 3) Temporal and Spatial temperature control using MRI...... and penetration depth are governed by the wavelength. Hence for US it is possible to body non-invasively position sub-millimeter focal points in deep seated regions of the. Temperature Control: Most solid tumours cover volumes larger than that of the focal region. This problem may be reduced somewhat...

  16. Sensitivity and reliability of language laterality assessment with a free reversed association task - a fMRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fesl, Gunther; Brueckmann, Hartmut [University of Munich, Department of Neuroradiology, Campus Grosshadern, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377, Munich (Germany); Bruhns, Philipp [University of Munich, Department of Neuroradiology, Campus Grosshadern, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377, Munich (Germany); University of Munich, Department of Psycholinguistics, Munich (Germany); Rau, Sabine; Ilmberger, Josef [University of Munich, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Munich (Germany); Wiesmann, Martin [Helios Hospitals Schwerin, Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Schwerin (Germany); Kegel, Gerd [University of Munich, Department of Psycholinguistics, Munich (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the sensitivity and reliability of assessing hemispheric language dominance with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) using a 'free reversed association task.' Thirty-nine healthy subjects (13 dextrals, 13 sinistrals and 13 bimanuals) underwent two repeated fMRI sessions. In the active phases sets of words were presented via headphones, and an associated target item was named. During the baseline phases a standard answer was given after listening to unintelligible stimuli. Data were preprocessed with SPM, and then laterality indices (LI) and reliability coefficients (RC) were calculated. Extensive frontal, temporal and parietal activations were found. Seventy-eight percent of the subjects showed left-hemispheric dominance, 5% showed right-hemispheric dominance, and 17% had bilateral language representations. The incidence of right-hemispheric language dominance was 4.3 times higher in a left-hander with a handedness quotient (HQ) of -90 than in a right-hander with a HQ of +90. The RC was 0.61 for combined ROIs (global network). Strong correlations were found between the two session LIs (r = 0.95 for the global network). 'Free reversed association' is a sensitive and reliable task for the determination of individual language lateralization. This suggests that the task may be used in a clinical setting. (orig.)

  17. Diagnostic accuracy and patient acceptance of MRI in children with suspected appendicitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thieme, Mai E.; Valdehueza, Zaldy D.; Wiarda, Bart M. [Medical Centre Alkmaar, Department of Radiology, Alkmaar (Netherlands); Leeuwenburgh, Marjolein M.N. [Academic Medical Centre Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Centre Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bouman, Donald E. [Medical Spectrum Twente, Department of Radiology, Enschede (Netherlands); Bruin, Ivar G.J.M. de; Schreurs, W.H.; Houdijk, Alexander P.J. [Medical Centre Alkmaar, Department of Surgery, Alkmaar (Netherlands); Stoker, Jaap [Academic Medical Centre Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-03-15

    To compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound in children with suspected appendicitis. In a single-centre diagnostic accuracy study, children with suspected appendicitis were prospectively identified at the emergency department. All underwent abdominal ultrasound and MRI within 2 h, with the reader blinded to other imaging findings. An expert panel established the final diagnosis after 3 months. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of three imaging strategies: ultrasound only, conditional MRI after negative or inconclusive ultrasound, and MRI only. Significance between sensitivity and specificity was calculated using McNemar's test statistic. Between April and December 2009 we included 104 consecutive children (47 male, mean age 12). According to the expert panel, 58 patients had appendicitis. The sensitivity of MRI only and conditional MRI was 100 % (95 % confidence interval 92-100), that of ultrasound was significantly lower (76 %; 63-85, P < 0.001). Specificity was comparable among the three investigated strategies; ultrasound only 89 % (77-95), conditional MRI 80 % (67-89), MRI only 89 % (77-95) (P values 0.13, 0.13 and 1.00). In children with suspected appendicitis, strategies with MRI (MRI only, conditional MRI) had a higher sensitivity for appendicitis compared with a strategy with ultrasound only, while specificity was comparable. (orig.)

  18. Functional MRI experiments : acquisition, analysis and interpretation of data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramsey, NF; Hoogduin, H; Jansma, JM

    2002-01-01

    Functional MRI is widely used to address basic and clinical neuroscience questions. In the key domains of fMRI experiments, i.e. acquisition, processing and analysis, and interpretation of data, developments are ongoing. The main issues are sensitivity for changes in fMRI signal that are associated

  19. Can breast MRI computer-aided detection (CAD) improve radiologist accuracy for lesions detected at MRI screening and recommended for biopsy in a high-risk population?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arazi-Kleinman, T.; Causer, P.A.; Jong, R.A.; Hill, K.; Warner, E.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) computer-aided detection (CAD) for breast MRI screen-detected lesions recommended for biopsy in a high-risk population. Material and methods: Fifty-six consecutive Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) 3-5 lesions with histopathological correlation [nine invasive cancers, 13 ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and 34 benign] were retrospectively evaluated using a breast MRI CAD prototype (CAD-Gaea). CAD evaluation was performed separately and in consensus by two radiologists specializing in breast imaging, blinded to the histopathology. Thresholds of 50, 80, and 100% and delayed enhancement were independently assessed with CAD. Lesions were rated as malignant or benign according to threshold and delayed enhancement only and in combination. Sensitivities, specificities, and negative predictive values (NPV) were determined for CAD assessments versus pathology. Initial MRI BI-RADS interpretation without CAD versus CAD assessments were compared using paired binary diagnostic tests. Results: Threshold levels for lesion enhancement were: 50% to include all malignant (and all benign) lesions; and 100% for all invasive cancer and high-grade DCIS. Combined use of threshold and enhancement patterns for CAD assessment was best (73% sensitivity, 56% specificity and 76% NPV for all cancer). Sensitivities and NPV were better for invasive cancer (100%/100%) than for all malignancies (54%/76%). Radiologists' MRI interpretation was more sensitive than CAD (p = 0.05), but less specific (p = 0.001) for cancer detection. Conclusion: The breast MRI CAD system used could not improve the radiologists' accuracy for distinguishing all malignant from benign lesions, due to the poor sensitivity for DCIS detection.

  20. Effect of patient age on accuracy of primary MRI signs of long head of biceps tearing and instability in the shoulder. An MRI-arthroscopy correlation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrero, Camilo G.; Costello, Joanna; Vyas, Dharmesh [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Bertolet, Marnie [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2018-02-15

    To determine the effect of patient age on the accuracy of primary MRI signs of long head of biceps (LHB) tendon tearing and instability in the shoulder using arthroscopy as a reference standard. Subjects with MRI studies and subsequent arthroscopy documenting LHB tendon pathology were identified and organized into three age groups (18-40, 41-60, 61-87). Normal and tendinopathic tendons were labeled grade 0, partial tears grade 1 and full tears grade 2. Two radiologists blinded to arthroscopic data graded MRI studies independently. Prevalence of disease, MRI accuracy for outcomes of interest, and inter-reader agreement were calculated. Eighty-nine subjects fulfilled inclusion criteria with 36 grade 0, 36 grade 1 and 17 grade 2 tendons found at arthroscopy. MRI sensitivity, regardless of age, ranged between 67-86% for grade 0, 72-94% for grade 1 and 82-94% for grade 2 tendons. Specificity ranged between 83-96% for grade 0, 75-85% for grade 1 and 99-100% for grade 2 tendons. MRI accuracy for detection of each LHB category was calculated for each age group. MRI was found to be least sensitive for grade 0 and 1 LHB tendons in the middle-aged group with sensitivity between 55-85% for grade 0 and 53-88% for grade 1 tendons. Agreement between MRI readers was moderate with an unweighted kappa statistic of 62%. MRI accuracy was moderate to excellent and agreement between MRI readers was moderate. MRI appears to be less accurate in characterizing lower grades of LHB tendon disease in middle-aged subjects. (orig.)

  1. A comparison of MRI and wrist arthrography in the diagnosis of TFC injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shionoya, Kaori; Nakamura, Ryogo; Imaeda, Toshihiko [Nagoya Univ., Aichi (Japan). Branch Hospital; Tsunoda, Kenji; Makino, Naoki

    1995-08-01

    The present study compared the diagnostic usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and wrist arthrography in triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) injuries. The subjects were 102 wrists with arthroscopically confirmed presence or absence of TFC perforation. TFC perforation was present in 35 and 47 wrists and absent in the other 67 and 55 wrists on arthrography and MRI, respectively. Using arthroscopy as the reference standard, arthrography for the detection of TFC perforation had a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 100%. All 6 false negative cases on arthrography had scarring adhesions of the TFC in the wrist. On the other hand, the sensitivity and specificity of MRI were 73% and 72%, respectively. An accuracy was 94% for arthrography and 73% for MRI. It was difficult to detect qualitative TFC injury and the presence or absence of TFC perforation on MRI. Arthrography is thus superior to MRI in both sensitivity and specificity. The complementary use of arthrography and MRI is considered to increase the diagnostic accuracy. (S.Y.).

  2. Bladder cancer: utility of MRI in detection of occult muscle-invasive disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Mussi, Thais C.; Melamed, Jonathan; Taneja, Samir S.; Huang, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The presence of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer is a key factor in prognosis and treatment decisions, although may be missed by biopsy due to sampling error. MRI has shown potential for detection of muscle invasion but has not specifically been evaluated for this purpose in the setting of bladder cancer patients without evidence of muscle invasion on initial biopsy. Purpose. To evaluate the role of MRI in detection of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer following a pathologic diagnosis of non-invasive tumor. Material and Methods. This retrospective study included 23 patients who underwent pelvic MRI following a pathologic diagnosis of bladder cancer without muscularis propria invasion and in whom additional histologic evaluation was performed following MRI. Two radiologists in consensus reviewed T2-weighted images to identify those cases suspicious for muscle invasion on MRI. The radiologists identified whether cases suspicious for invasion demonstrated disruption of the T2-hypointense muscularis layer of the bladder wall, peri-vesical fat stranding, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity. Findings were compared with pathologic results obtained after MRI. Results. Suspicion was raised for muscle invasion in eight of 23 cases, four of which exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. No case without suspicion on MRI exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. Therefore, sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 79%, respectively. Among individual findings, muscularis disruption on T2WI exhibited sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 79%, peri-vesical fat stranding exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 50% and 84%, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 25% and 100%. Conclusion. MRI demonstrated high sensitivity for detection of muscle invasion in cases of bladder cancer without invasion on initial histologic assessment. Muscularis disruption on T2WI appeared to exhibit a better

  3. Bladder cancer: utility of MRI in detection of occult muscle-invasive disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B. [Dept. of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States)], E-mail: Andrew.rosenkrantz@nyumc.org; Mussi, Thais C. [Dept. of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States); Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Melamed, Jonathan [Dept. of Pathology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States); Taneja, Samir S.; Huang, William C. [Dept. of Urology, Div. of Urologic Oncology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Background. The presence of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer is a key factor in prognosis and treatment decisions, although may be missed by biopsy due to sampling error. MRI has shown potential for detection of muscle invasion but has not specifically been evaluated for this purpose in the setting of bladder cancer patients without evidence of muscle invasion on initial biopsy. Purpose. To evaluate the role of MRI in detection of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer following a pathologic diagnosis of non-invasive tumor. Material and Methods. This retrospective study included 23 patients who underwent pelvic MRI following a pathologic diagnosis of bladder cancer without muscularis propria invasion and in whom additional histologic evaluation was performed following MRI. Two radiologists in consensus reviewed T2-weighted images to identify those cases suspicious for muscle invasion on MRI. The radiologists identified whether cases suspicious for invasion demonstrated disruption of the T2-hypointense muscularis layer of the bladder wall, peri-vesical fat stranding, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity. Findings were compared with pathologic results obtained after MRI. Results. Suspicion was raised for muscle invasion in eight of 23 cases, four of which exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. No case without suspicion on MRI exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. Therefore, sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 79%, respectively. Among individual findings, muscularis disruption on T2WI exhibited sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 79%, peri-vesical fat stranding exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 50% and 84%, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 25% and 100%. Conclusion. MRI demonstrated high sensitivity for detection of muscle invasion in cases of bladder cancer without invasion on initial histologic assessment. Muscularis disruption on T2WI appeared to exhibit a better

  4. Studies of MRI relaxivities of gadolinium-labeled dendrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hongmu; Daniel, Marie-Christine

    2011-05-01

    In cancer detection, imaging techniques have a great importance in early diagnosis. The more sensitive the imaging technique and the earlier the tumor can be detected. Contrast agents have the capability to increase the sensitivity in imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Until now, gadolinium-based contrast agents are mainly used for MRI, and show good enhancement. But improvement is needed for detection of smaller tumors at the earliest stage possible. The dendrons complexed with Gd(DOTA) were synthesized and evaluated as a new MRI contrast agent. The longitudinal and transverse relaxation effects were tested and compared with commercial drug Magnevist, Gd(DTPA).

  5. Clinical evaluation of pulmonary perfusion MRI using FAIR (flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery)-HASTE (Half-Fourier Single-Shot TurboSE) method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togami, Izumi; Sasai, Nobuya; Tsunoda, Masatoshi; Sei, Tetsurou; Sato, Shuhei; Yabuki, Takayuki; Hiraki, Yoshio

    2002-01-01

    The FAIR-HASTE method is a kind of noninvasive perfusion MR imaging obtained without the use of contrast media. By subtracting a flow-insensitive image from a flow-sensitive image, contrast enhancement of inflowing blood achieved. In the present study, we applied pulmonary perfusion FAIR-HASTE sequence for 23 patients with various pulmonary diseases, and compared the findings with those by pulmonary perfusion scintigraphy and Gadolinium perfusion MRI. Pulmonary perfusion imaging with the FAIR-HASTE method was possible in all clinical cases, and the findings corresponded well to those obtained by perfusion MRI using contrast media or pulmonary scintigraphy. The FAIR-HASTE method is a promising method for the evaluation of pulmonary perfusion. (author)

  6. Remote auscultatory patient monitoring during magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, S; Hök, B; Wiklund, L

    1992-01-01

    A system for patient monitoring during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is described. The system is based on remote auscultation of heart sounds and respiratory sounds using specially developed pickup heads that are positioned on the precordium or at the nostrils and connected to microphones via...... can be simultaneously auscultated both inside and outside the shielded MRI room by infrared transmission through a metal mesh window. Bench tests of the system show that common mode acoustic noise is suppressed by approximately 30 dB in the frequency region of interest (100-1,000 Hz), and that polymer...

  7. Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis of Radiative Transfer Equation: Temperature and Gas Mixing Ratio Weighting Functions for Remote Sensing of Scattering Atmospheres in Thermal IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustinov, E.

    1999-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis based on using of the adjoint equation of radiative transfer is applied to the case of atmospheric remote sensing in the thermal spectral region with non-negligeable atmospheric scattering.

  8. Sensitivity of whole-body CT and MRI versus projection radiography in the detection of osteolyses in patients with monoclonal plasma cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Maya B., E-mail: m.mueller-wolf@dkfz.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg Germany (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (Dkfz), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Murray, Fritz, E-mail: fritz.murray@hotmail.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg Germany (Germany); Kilk, Kerstin, E-mail: k_fechtner@hotmail.com [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg Germany (Germany); Hillengass, Jens, E-mail: jens.hillengass@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Haematology, Oncology, Rheumatology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Delorme, Stefan, E-mail: s.delorme@dkfz-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (Dkfz), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Heiss, Christiane, E-mail: c.heiss@dkfz-heidelberg.de [Department of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center (Dkfz), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Neben, Kai, E-mail: k.neben@klinikum-mittelbaden.de [Department of Haematology, Oncology, Rheumatology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Goldschmidt, Hartmut, E-mail: hartmut.goldschmidt@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Haematology, Oncology, Rheumatology, University Hospital Heidelberg and National Center for Tumour Diseases, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich, E-mail: hu.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg Germany (Germany); and others

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To compare sensitivity of whole-body Computed Tomography (wb-CT) and whole-body Magnetic Resonance Imaging (wb-MRI) with Projection Radiography (PR) regarding each method's ability to detect osteolyses in patients with monoclonal plasma cell disease. Patients and methods: The bone status of 171 patients was evaluated. All patients presented with multiple myeloma (MM) of all stages, monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS) or solitary plasmacytoma. Two groups were formed. Group A consisted of 52 patients (26 females, 26 males) with an average age of 62 years (range, 45–89 years) who received, both, PR and wb-CT as part of their diagnostic work-up. Group B comprised 119 patients (58 females, 61 males) averaging 57 years of age (range, 20–80 years) who received, both, PR and wb-MRI. Two experienced radiologists were blinded regarding the disease status and assessed the number and location of osteolyses in consensus. A distinction was made between axial and extra-axial lesions. Results: In group A, wb-CT revealed osteolyses in 12 patients (23%) that were not detected in PR. CT was superior in detecting lesions in patients with osteopenia and osteoporosis. Compared with PR, wb-CT was significantly more sensitive in detecting osteolyses than PR (p < 0.001). This was particularly true for axial lesions. Additionally, CT revealed clinically relevant incidental findings in 33 patients (63%). In group B, wb-MRI revealed lesions in 19 patients (16%) that were not detected in PR. All lesions detected by PR were also detected by wb-MRI and wb-CT. Wb-MRI and wb-CT are each superior to PR in detecting axial lesions. Conclusion: Wb-CT can detect 23% more focal lesions than PR, especially in the axial skeleton. Therefore, this imaging method should be preferred over PR in the diagnostic work-up and staging of patients with monoclonal plasma cell disease.

  9. MUSIC. a fast T2* - sensitive MRI technique with enhanced volume coverage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loenneker, Thomas; Hennig, Juergen

    1994-01-01

    A fast imaging method based on gradient-recalled echoes and echo time inter-leaved multi-slice excitation is presented. This method maintains the sensitivity of T 2 * by using a long echo time of at least 35 milliseconds. Bipolar gradients are used to shift the gradient echoes in order to ensure constant TE for each slab and prevent ghost-artefacts within the images caused by spin- or stimulated echoes. This method enhances the total imaging time of a conventional multi-slice gradient echo technique, while maintaining the high volume coverage. Thus, stimulated human cortical activation maps can be detected on standard clinical MR instruments at several planes within measuring times of a few seconds. The efficiency of the technique is demonstrated in the detection of temporary changes in T 2 * in functional MRI experiments of the human visual cortex at a magnetic field strength of 2 tesla. (author). 18 refs., 6 figs

  10. Cost-effectiveness of EOB-MRI for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishie, Akihiro; Goshima, Satoshi; Haradome, Hiroki; Hatano, Etsuro; Imai, Yasuharu; Kudo, Masatoshi; Matsuda, Masanori; Motosugi, Utaroh; Saitoh, Satoshi; Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Crawford, Bruce; Kruger, Eliza; Ball, Graeme; Honda, Hiroshi

    2017-04-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (EOB-MRI) in the diagnosis and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in Japan compared with extracellular contrast media-enhanced MRI (ECCM-MRI) and contrast media-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) scanning. A 6-stage Markov model was developed to estimate lifetime direct costs and clinical outcomes associated with EOB-MRI. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, along with clinical data on HCC survival, recurrence, treatment patterns, costs, and health state utility values, were derived from predominantly Japanese publications. Parameters unavailable from publications were estimated in a Delphi panel of Japanese clinical experts who also confirmed the structure and overall approach of the model. Sensitivity analyses, including one-way, probabilistic, and scenario analyses, were conducted to account for uncertainty in the results. Over a lifetime horizon, EOB-MRI was associated with lower direct costs (¥2,174,869) and generated a greater number of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) (9.502) than either ECCM-MRI (¥2,365,421, 9.303 QALYs) or CE-CT (¥2,482,608, 9.215 QALYs). EOB-MRI was superior to the other diagnostic strategies considered, and this finding was robust over sensitivity and scenario analyses. A majority of the direct costs associated with HCC in Japan were found to be costs of treatment. The model results revealed the superior cost-effectiveness of the EOB-MRI diagnostic strategy compared with ECCM-MRI and CE-CT. EOB-MRI could be the first-choice imaging modality for medical care of HCC among patients with hepatitis or liver cirrhosis in Japan. Widespread implementation of EOB-MRI could reduce health care expenditures, particularly downstream treatment costs, associated with HCC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Multi-class geospatial object detection based on a position-sensitive balancing framework for high spatial resolution remote sensing imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yanfei; Han, Xiaobing; Zhang, Liangpei

    2018-04-01

    Multi-class geospatial object detection from high spatial resolution (HSR) remote sensing imagery is attracting increasing attention in a wide range of object-related civil and engineering applications. However, the distribution of objects in HSR remote sensing imagery is location-variable and complicated, and how to accurately detect the objects in HSR remote sensing imagery is a critical problem. Due to the powerful feature extraction and representation capability of deep learning, the deep learning based region proposal generation and object detection integrated framework has greatly promoted the performance of multi-class geospatial object detection for HSR remote sensing imagery. However, due to the translation caused by the convolution operation in the convolutional neural network (CNN), although the performance of the classification stage is seldom influenced, the localization accuracies of the predicted bounding boxes in the detection stage are easily influenced. The dilemma between translation-invariance in the classification stage and translation-variance in the object detection stage has not been addressed for HSR remote sensing imagery, and causes position accuracy problems for multi-class geospatial object detection with region proposal generation and object detection. In order to further improve the performance of the region proposal generation and object detection integrated framework for HSR remote sensing imagery object detection, a position-sensitive balancing (PSB) framework is proposed in this paper for multi-class geospatial object detection from HSR remote sensing imagery. The proposed PSB framework takes full advantage of the fully convolutional network (FCN), on the basis of a residual network, and adopts the PSB framework to solve the dilemma between translation-invariance in the classification stage and translation-variance in the object detection stage. In addition, a pre-training mechanism is utilized to accelerate the training procedure

  12. Selection for biopsy of kidney transplant patients by diffusion-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiger, Philipp; Barbieri, Sebastiano; Ith, Michael; Thoeny, Harriet C. [Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, Inselspital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, and Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Diagnostic, Pediatric, and Interventional Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); Kruse, Anja [Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, Inselspital, Department of Nephrology and Hypertension, Bern (Switzerland)

    2017-10-15

    To assess retrospectively whether diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) allows physicians to determine the severity of histopathologic findings in biopsies of renal allograft patients with deteriorating renal function. Forty consecutive kidney transplant patients underwent DW-MRI and biopsy. Patients were assigned to one group with severe and to another group with normal or mild histopathologic findings. These two groups were compared based on a qualitative DW-MRI assessment (homo-/heterogeneity) and the combination of qualitative and quantitative DW-MRI parameters (ADC, and intravoxel incoherent motion, IVIM, parameters: D, f, D*). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were determined for each parameter. Biopsy findings were severe in 25 patients and normal or mild in 15 patients. Qualitative DW-MRI led to a sensitivity of 44.0% and a specificity of 93.3%. Combined qualitative and quantitative DW-MRI led to an accuracy of 80% for both the minimal ADC (ADCmin) and the minimal perfusion fraction (fmin) with a sensitivity of 84.0% and 92.0% and a specificity of 73.3% and 60.0%, respectively. Combined qualitative and quantitative DW-MRI might allow physicians to determine the severity of histopathologic findings in biopsies of a high number of kidney transplant patients. (orig.)

  13. Whole-body MRI screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puls, Ralf [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology; Hosten, Norbert (ed.) [Universitaetsklinikum Greifswald (Germany). Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology

    2014-07-01

    The advent of dedicated whole-body MRI scanners has made it possible to image the human body from head to toe with excellent spatial resolution and with the sensitivity and specificity of conventional MR systems. A comprehensive screening examination by MRI relies on fast image acquisition, and this is now feasible owing to several very recent developments, including multichannel techniques, new surface coil systems, and automatic table movement. The daily analysis of whole-body MRI datasets uncovers many incidental findings, which are discussed by an interdisciplinary advisory board of physicians from all specialties. This book provides a systematic overview of these incidental findings with the aid of approximately 240 high-quality images. The radiologists involved in the project have written chapters on each organ system, presenting a structured compilation of the most common findings, their morphologic appearances on whole-body MRI, and guidance on their clinical management. Chapters on technical and ethical issues are also included. It is hoped that this book will assist other diagnosticians in deciding how to handle the most common incidental findings encountered when performing whole-body MRI.

  14. Whole-body MRI screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puls, Ralf; Hosten, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    The advent of dedicated whole-body MRI scanners has made it possible to image the human body from head to toe with excellent spatial resolution and with the sensitivity and specificity of conventional MR systems. A comprehensive screening examination by MRI relies on fast image acquisition, and this is now feasible owing to several very recent developments, including multichannel techniques, new surface coil systems, and automatic table movement. The daily analysis of whole-body MRI datasets uncovers many incidental findings, which are discussed by an interdisciplinary advisory board of physicians from all specialties. This book provides a systematic overview of these incidental findings with the aid of approximately 240 high-quality images. The radiologists involved in the project have written chapters on each organ system, presenting a structured compilation of the most common findings, their morphologic appearances on whole-body MRI, and guidance on their clinical management. Chapters on technical and ethical issues are also included. It is hoped that this book will assist other diagnosticians in deciding how to handle the most common incidental findings encountered when performing whole-body MRI.

  15. Optimal assessment of paediatric IBD with MRI and barium follow-through.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Edward; Hanci, Ozan; McLean, Alison; Power, Niall; Cole, Angela; Croft, Nicholas M; McDonald, Kirsteen; Chippington, Sam; Naik, Sandhia

    2012-06-01

    The present UK criterion standard for assessing children with suspected inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is upper endoscopy, ileocolonoscopy, and barium follow-through (BaFT). Significant doses of radiation, unpalatable contrast, and volume intolerance are involved with BaFT. Practice in investigating Crohn disease (CD) is changing with the increasing use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of the present study was to compare BaFT and a new abdominal MRI protocol in a paediatric IBD population. All consecutive patients with a new diagnosis of IBD or requiring reassessment from September 2008 to December 2010 were investigated with both abdominal MRI and BaFT in accordance with a specific local paediatric IBD protocol. The studies were reported by nonblinded radiologists with an interest in gastrointestinal imaging. The reports were compared in conjunction with case note review. Eighty-seven patients underwent both BaFT and MRI abdomen. Thirty-one percent of patients had additional pathology on MRI, not seen on the BaFT. Sixty-seven percent of patients (n=59) had an MRI finding equivalent to BaFT. Using histology as a criterion standard for detecting terminal ileal disease, BaFT had a sensitivity and specificity of 76% and 67%, and MRI had a sensitivity and specificity of 83% and 95%, respectively. This is the largest series of small bowel MRI in a paediatric population. MRI reports were at least equivalent to BaFT. MRI had higher sensitivity and, particularly, specificity in detecting terminal ileal pathology. These findings suggest that MRI should become the criterion standard investigation in children with IBD in centres with appropriate expertise, with zero radiation exposure being highly advantageous.

  16. Standard high-resolution pelvic MRI vs. low-resolution pelvic MRI in the evaluation of deep infiltrating endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scardapane, Arnaldo; Lorusso, Filomenamila; Ferrante, Annunziata; Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio; Angelelli, Giuseppe; Scioscia, Marco

    2014-01-01

    To compare the capabilities of standard pelvic MRI with low-resolution pelvic MRI using fast breath-hold sequences to evaluate deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE). Sixty-eight consecutive women with suspected DIE were studied with pelvic MRI. A double-acquisition protocol was carried out in each case. High-resolution (HR)-MRI consisted of axial, sagittal, and coronal TSE T2W images, axial TSE T1W, and axial THRIVE. Low-resolution (LR)-MRI was acquired using fast single shot (SSH) T2 and T1 images. Two radiologists with 10 and 2 years of experience reviewed HR and LR images in two separate sessions. The presence of endometriotic lesions of the uterosacral ligament (USL), rectovaginal septum (RVS), pouch of Douglas (POD), and rectal wall was noted. The accuracies of LR-MRI and HR-MRI were compared with the laparoscopic and histopathological findings. Average acquisition times were 24 minutes for HR-MRI and 7 minutes for LR-MRI. The more experienced radiologist achieved higher accuracy with both HR-MRI and LR-MRI. The values of sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy did not significantly change between HR and LR images or interobserver agreement for all of the considered anatomic sites. LR-MRI performs as well as HR-MRI and is a valuable tool for the detection of deep endometriosis extension. (orig.)

  17. Standard high-resolution pelvic MRI vs. low-resolution pelvic MRI in the evaluation of deep infiltrating endometriosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scardapane, Arnaldo; Lorusso, Filomenamila; Ferrante, Annunziata; Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio; Angelelli, Giuseppe [University Hospital ' ' Policlinico' ' of Bari, Interdisciplinary Department of Medicine, Bari (Italy); Scioscia, Marco [Sacro Cuore Don Calabria General Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Negrar, Verona (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    To compare the capabilities of standard pelvic MRI with low-resolution pelvic MRI using fast breath-hold sequences to evaluate deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE). Sixty-eight consecutive women with suspected DIE were studied with pelvic MRI. A double-acquisition protocol was carried out in each case. High-resolution (HR)-MRI consisted of axial, sagittal, and coronal TSE T2W images, axial TSE T1W, and axial THRIVE. Low-resolution (LR)-MRI was acquired using fast single shot (SSH) T2 and T1 images. Two radiologists with 10 and 2 years of experience reviewed HR and LR images in two separate sessions. The presence of endometriotic lesions of the uterosacral ligament (USL), rectovaginal septum (RVS), pouch of Douglas (POD), and rectal wall was noted. The accuracies of LR-MRI and HR-MRI were compared with the laparoscopic and histopathological findings. Average acquisition times were 24 minutes for HR-MRI and 7 minutes for LR-MRI. The more experienced radiologist achieved higher accuracy with both HR-MRI and LR-MRI. The values of sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy did not significantly change between HR and LR images or interobserver agreement for all of the considered anatomic sites. LR-MRI performs as well as HR-MRI and is a valuable tool for the detection of deep endometriosis extension. (orig.)

  18. MRI and HMPAO-SPECT in the diagnosis of epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokisch, A.; Gruenwald, F.; Elger, C.E.; Kaiser, W.A.; Biersack, H.J.

    1992-01-01

    Eighty-three patients suffering from intractable epilepsy were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and by HMPAO-SPECT during presurgical evaluation. MRI was proven to be most sensitive concerning the detection of focal lesions. Acquisition of thin slices and high signal/noise ratios are prerequisites for optimal sensitivity, the use of Gd-DTPA, in addition, increases the reliability slightly. Histological findings were available in 21 patients and in all cases of focal lesions without prior surgery, malignancy was detected or excluded correctly. The sensitivity was reduced, however, in the 4 patients with recurrency of astrocytoma. 2 cases were missed. Quantitative evaluation of signal intensities in the amygdala/hippocampal region or of the signal dynamics after contrast media application were not helpful in patients without focal lesion. In these patients no reliable criterium to determine the side of the focus with MRI investigations could be established. HMPAO-SPECT investigations were found to be complementary to MRI. In 19 of 36 patients without focal lesions the lateralisation was feasible by scintigraphy. In addition a correlation between the volume asymmetry of the temporal horns detected by MRI and the scintigraphic finding was established. The statistical proven correlation between the unilateral dilatation of the temporal horn and relative hypoperfusion is too weak, however, to imply individual consequences. (orig.) [de

  19. Fusion of PET and MRI for Hybrid Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Zang-Hee; Son, Young-Don; Kim, Young-Bo; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    Recently, the development of the fusion PET-MRI system has been actively studied to meet the increasing demand for integrated molecular and anatomical imaging. MRI can provide detailed anatomical information on the brain, such as the locations of gray and white matter, blood vessels, axonal tracts with high resolution, while PET can measure molecular and genetic information, such as glucose metabolism, neurotransmitter-neuroreceptor binding and affinity, protein-protein interactions, and gene trafficking among biological tissues. State-of-the-art MRI systems, such as the 7.0 T whole-body MRI, now can visualize super-fine structures including neuronal bundles in the pons, fine blood vessels (such as lenticulostriate arteries) without invasive contrast agents, in vivo hippocampal substructures, and substantia nigra with excellent image contrast. High-resolution PET, known as High-Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT), is a brain-dedicated system capable of imaging minute changes of chemicals, such as neurotransmitters and -receptors, with high spatial resolution and sensitivity. The synergistic power of the two, i.e., ultra high-resolution anatomical information offered by a 7.0 T MRI system combined with the high-sensitivity molecular information offered by HRRT-PET, will significantly elevate the level of our current understanding of the human brain, one of the most delicate, complex, and mysterious biological organs. This chapter introduces MRI, PET, and PET-MRI fusion system, and its algorithms are discussed in detail.

  20. Accuracy of MRI findings in chronic lateral ankle ligament injury: Comparison with surgical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H.-J. [Department of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Kangwon National University, School of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Cha, S.-D. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Myongji Hospital, Kwandong University, College of Medicine, Koyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S.S. [Department of Radiology, Kangwon National University, School of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Rho, M.-H., E-mail: parkhiji@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwag, H.-J. [Department of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, N.-H. [Department of Radiology, Myongji Hospital, Kwandong University, College of Medicine, Koyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, S.-Y. [Department of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    Aim: To evaluate the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in chronic lateral ankle ligament injury in comparison with that of surgical findings. Materials and methods: Forty-eight cases (25 men, 23 women, mean age 36 years) of clinically suspected chronic ankle ligament injury underwent MRI studies and surgery. Sagittal, coronal, and axial, T1-weighted, spin-echo, proton density and T2-weighted, fast spin-echo images with fat saturation were obtained in all patients. MRI examinations were read in consensus by two fellowship-trained academic musculoskeletal radiologists who evaluated the lateral ankle ligaments, including the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) and calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) without clinical information. The results of the MRI studies were then compared with the surgical findings. Results: The MRI findings of ATFL injury showed a sensitivity of detection of complete tears of 75% and specificity of 86%. The sensitivity of detection of partial tears was 75% and the specificity was 78%. The sensitivity of detection of sprains was 44% and the specificity was 88%. Regarding the MRI findings of CFL injury, the sensitivity of detection of complete tears was 50% and the specificity was 98%. The sensitivity of detection of partial tear was 83% and the specificity was 93%. The sensitivity of detection of sprains was 100% and the specificity was 90%. Regarding the ATFL, the accuracies of detection were 88, 58, 77, and 85% for no injury, sprain, partial tear, and complete tear, respectively, and for the CFL the accuracies of detection were 90, 90, 92, and 96% for no injury, sprain, partial tear, and complete tear, respectively. Conclusions: The diagnosis of a complete tear of the ATFL on MRI is more sensitive than the diagnosis of a complete tear of the CFL. MRI findings of CFL injury are diagnostically specific but are not sensitive. However, only normal findings and complete tears were statistically significant between ATFL and CFL (p

  1. Accuracy of MRI findings in chronic lateral ankle ligament injury: Comparison with surgical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H.-J.; Cha, S.-D.; Kim, S.S.; Rho, M.-H.; Kwag, H.-J.; Park, N.-H.; Lee, S.-Y.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in chronic lateral ankle ligament injury in comparison with that of surgical findings. Materials and methods: Forty-eight cases (25 men, 23 women, mean age 36 years) of clinically suspected chronic ankle ligament injury underwent MRI studies and surgery. Sagittal, coronal, and axial, T1-weighted, spin-echo, proton density and T2-weighted, fast spin-echo images with fat saturation were obtained in all patients. MRI examinations were read in consensus by two fellowship-trained academic musculoskeletal radiologists who evaluated the lateral ankle ligaments, including the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) and calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) without clinical information. The results of the MRI studies were then compared with the surgical findings. Results: The MRI findings of ATFL injury showed a sensitivity of detection of complete tears of 75% and specificity of 86%. The sensitivity of detection of partial tears was 75% and the specificity was 78%. The sensitivity of detection of sprains was 44% and the specificity was 88%. Regarding the MRI findings of CFL injury, the sensitivity of detection of complete tears was 50% and the specificity was 98%. The sensitivity of detection of partial tear was 83% and the specificity was 93%. The sensitivity of detection of sprains was 100% and the specificity was 90%. Regarding the ATFL, the accuracies of detection were 88, 58, 77, and 85% for no injury, sprain, partial tear, and complete tear, respectively, and for the CFL the accuracies of detection were 90, 90, 92, and 96% for no injury, sprain, partial tear, and complete tear, respectively. Conclusions: The diagnosis of a complete tear of the ATFL on MRI is more sensitive than the diagnosis of a complete tear of the CFL. MRI findings of CFL injury are diagnostically specific but are not sensitive. However, only normal findings and complete tears were statistically significant between ATFL and CFL (p

  2. An MRI-compatible hand sensory vibrotactile system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Fa; Lakshminarayanan, Kishor; Slota, Gregory P; Seo, Na Jin; Webster, John G

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the application of vibrotactile noise to the wrist or back of the hand has been shown to enhance fingertip tactile sensory perception (Enders et al 2013), supporting the potential for an assistive device worn at the wrist, that generates minute vibrations to help the elderly or patients with sensory deficit. However, knowledge regarding the detailed physiological mechanism behind this sensory improvement in the central nervous system, especially in the human brain, is limited, hindering progress in development and use of such assistive devices. To enable investigation of the impact of vibrotactile noise on sensorimotor brain activity in humans, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible vibrotactile system was developed to provide vibrotactile noise during an MRI of the brain. The vibrotactile system utilizes a remote (outside the MR room) signal amplifier which provides a voltage from –40 to +40 V to drive a 12 mm diameter piezoelectric vibrator (inside the MR room). It is portable and is found to be MRI-compatible which enables its use for neurologic investigation with MRI. The system was also found to induce an improvement in fingertip tactile sensation, consistent with the previous study. (note)

  3. Analysis strategies for high-resolution UHF-fMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polimeni, Jonathan R; Renvall, Ville; Zaretskaya, Natalia; Fischl, Bruce

    2018-03-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) benefits from both increased sensitivity and specificity with increasing magnetic field strength, making it a key application for Ultra-High Field (UHF) MRI scanners. Most UHF-fMRI studies utilize the dramatic increases in sensitivity and specificity to acquire high-resolution data reaching sub-millimeter scales, which enable new classes of experiments to probe the functional organization of the human brain. This review article surveys advanced data analysis strategies developed for high-resolution fMRI at UHF. These include strategies designed to mitigate distortion and artifacts associated with higher fields in ways that attempt to preserve spatial resolution of the fMRI data, as well as recently introduced analysis techniques that are enabled by these extremely high-resolution data. Particular focus is placed on anatomically-informed analyses, including cortical surface-based analysis, which are powerful techniques that can guide each step of the analysis from preprocessing to statistical analysis to interpretation and visualization. New intracortical analysis techniques for laminar and columnar fMRI are also reviewed and discussed. Prospects for single-subject individualized analyses are also presented and discussed. Altogether, there are both specific challenges and opportunities presented by UHF-fMRI, and the use of proper analysis strategies can help these valuable data reach their full potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Sensitive change detection for remote sensing monitoring of nuclear treaties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canty, Morton J.; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Schlittenhardt, Jörg

    2005-01-01

    change is a commonplace application in remote sensing, the detection of anthropogenic changes associated with nuclear activities, whether declared or clandestine, presents a difficult challenge. It is necessary to discriminate subtle, often weak signals of interest on a background of irrelevant...... in multispectral, bitemporal image data: New approaches to change detection studies, Remote Sens. Environ. 64(1), 1998, pp. 1--19. Nielsen, A. A., Iteratively re-weighted multivariate alteration detection in multi- and hyperspectral data, to be published....

  5. Comparison between breast MRI and contrast-enhanced spectral mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łuczyńska, Elżbieta; Heinze-Paluchowska, Sylwia; Hendrick, Edward; Dyczek, Sonia; Ryś, Janusz; Herman, Krzysztof; Blecharz, Paweł; Jakubowicz, Jerzy

    2015-05-12

    The main goal of this study was to compare contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) and breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with histopathological results and to compare the sensitivity, accuracy, and positive and negative predictive values for both imaging modalities. After ethics approval, CESM and MRI examinations were performed in 102 patients who had suspicious lesions described in conventional mammography. All visible lesions were evaluated independently by 2 experienced radiologists using BI-RADS classifications (scale 1-5). Dimensions of lesions measured with each modality were compared to postoperative histopathology results. There were 102 patients entered into CESM/MRI studies and 118 lesions were identified by the combination of CESM and breast MRI. Histopathology confirmed that 81 of 118 lesions were malignant and 37 were benign. Of the 81 malignant lesions, 72 were invasive cancers and 9 were in situ cancers. Sensitivity was 100% with CESM and 93% with breast MRI. Accuracy was 79% with CESM and 73% with breast MRI. ROC curve areas based on BI-RADS were 0.83 for CESM and 0.84 for breast MRI. Lesion size estimates on CESM and breast MRI were similar, both slightly larger than those from histopathology. Our results indicate that CESM has the potential to be a valuable diagnostic method that enables accurate detection of malignant breast lesions, has high negative predictive value, and a false-positive rate similar to that of breast MRI.

  6. MRI appearance of muscle denervation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, S. [University Hospital of Wales, Department of Radiology, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Venkatanarasimha, N.; Walsh, M.A.; Hughes, P.M. [Derriford Hospital, Department of Radiology, Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-15

    Muscle denervation results from a variety of causes including trauma, neoplasia, neuropathies, infections, autoimmune processes and vasculitis. Traditionally, the diagnosis of muscle denervation was based on clinical examination and electromyography. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a distinct advantage over electromyography, not only in diagnosing muscle denervation, but also in determining its aetiology. MRI demonstrates characteristic signal intensity patterns depending on the stage of muscle denervation. The acute and subacutely denervated muscle shows a high signal intensity pattern on fluid sensitive sequences and normal signal intensity on T1-weighted MRI images. In chronic denervation, muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration demonstrate high signal changes on T1-weighted sequences in association with volume loss. The purpose of this review is to summarise the MRI appearance of denervated muscle, with special emphasis on the signal intensity patterns in acute and subacute muscle denervation. (orig.)

  7. MRI of head trauma. Serial changes and comparison with CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Osamu; Sato, Shuji; Suzuki, Takashi; Endo, Shunro; Takaku, Akira.

    1988-08-01

    Sequential changes in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were investigated in comparison with computed tomography (CT) in 31 cases of head trauma. Twenty-one of them were of acute head trauma; the first MRI study was performed within 48 hours after the accident. Forty-two intracranial lesions were observed in these cases on MRI. The other 10 cases were of chronic subdural hematoma, two cases of which had bilateral lesions. Fourteen lesions of acute head trauma and two lesions of chronic subdural hematoma were detected only by MRI. MRI was superior to CT for the detection of small contusions and thin extra-axial collections, especially those which were located near the bony structures. The abnormal lesions were visualized in MRI during a longer period than in CT. Because the signal intensity of a hematoma changed sequentially, the detection of brain edema was easier than that of a subarachnoid and parenchimal hemorrhage. Judging from this experience, it seems that careful attention should be taken in the diagnosis of hemorrhagic lesions. However, MRI was poor in tissue characterization because of the too-high tissue sensitivity. T/sub 2/-weight SE imaging was essentially sensitive and useful in the early stage.

  8. Role of FDG-PET/MRI, FDG-PET/CT, and Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Perfusion MRI in Differentiating Radiation Necrosis from Tumor Recurrence in Glioblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojjati, Mojgan; Badve, Chaitra; Garg, Vasant; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Rogers, Lisa; Sloan, Andrew; Faulhaber, Peter; Ros, Pablo R; Wolansky, Leo J

    2018-01-01

    To compare the utility of quantitative PET/MRI, dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion MRI (pMRI), and PET/CT in differentiating radiation necrosis (RN) from tumor recurrence (TR) in patients with treated glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The study included 24 patients with GBM treated with surgery, radiotherapy, and temozolomide who presented with progression on imaging follow-up. All patients underwent PET/MRI and pMRI during a single examination. Additionally, 19 of 24 patients underwent PET/CT on the same day. Diagnosis was established by pathology in 17 of 24 and by clinical/radiologic consensus in 7 of 24. For the quantitative PET/MRI and PET/CT analysis, a region of interest (ROI) was drawn around each lesion and within the contralateral white matter. Lesion to contralateral white matter ratios for relative maximum, mean, and median were calculated. For pMRI, lesion ROI was drawn on the cerebral blood volume (CBV) maps and histogram metrics were calculated. Diagnostic performance for each metric was assessed using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and area under curve (AUC) was calculated. In 24 patients, 28 lesions were identified. For PET/MRI, relative mean ≥ 1.31 resulted in AUC of .94 with both sensitivity and negative predictive values (NPVs) of 100%. For pMRI, CBV max ≥3.32 yielded an AUC of .94 with both sensitivity and NPV measuring 100%. The joint model utilizing r-mean (PET/MRI) and CBV mode (pMRI) resulted in AUC of 1.0. Our study demonstrates that quantitative PET/MRI parameters in combination with DSC pMRI provide the best diagnostic utility in distinguishing RN from TR in treated GBMs. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Neuroimaging published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society of Neuroimaging.

  9. fMRI study of neural sensitization to hedonic stimuli in long‐term, daily cannabis users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Joseph; Ketcherside, Ariel; Baine, Jessica; Rhinehardt, Tyler; Kuhn, Brittany; DeWitt, Sam; Alvi, Talha

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although there is emergent evidence illustrating neural sensitivity to cannabis cues in cannabis users, the specificity of this effect to cannabis cues as opposed to a generalized hyper‐sensitivity to hedonic stimuli has not yet been directly tested. Using fMRI, we presented 53 daily, long‐term cannabis users and 68 non‐using controls visual and tactile cues for cannabis, a natural reward, and, a sensory‐perceptual control object to evaluate brain response to hedonic stimuli in cannabis users. The results showed an interaction between group and reward type such that the users had greater response during cannabis cues relative to natural reward cues (i.e., fruit) in the orbitofrontal cortex, striatum, anterior cingulate gyrus, and ventral tegmental area compared to non‐users (cluster‐threshold z = 2.3, P cannabis cues in fronto‐striatal‐temporal regions and subjective craving, marijuana‐related problems, withdrawal symptoms, and levels of THC metabolites (cluster‐threshold z = 2.3, P cannabis cues in long‐term cannabis users that are above that of response to natural reward cues. These observations are concordant with incentive sensitization models suggesting sensitization of mesocorticolimbic regions and disruption of natural reward processes following drug use. Although the cross‐sectional nature of this study does not provide information on causality, the positive correlations between neural response and indicators of cannabis use (i.e., THC levels) suggest that alterations in the reward system are, in part, related to cannabis use. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3431–3443, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27168331

  10. Multi-flux-transformer MRI detection with an atomic magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savukov, Igor; Karaulanov, Todor

    2014-12-01

    Recently, anatomical ultra-low field (ULF) MRI has been demonstrated with an atomic magnetometer (AM). A flux-transformer (FT) has been used for decoupling MRI fields and gradients to avoid their negative effects on AM performance. The field of view (FOV) was limited because of the need to compromise between the size of the FT input coil and MRI sensitivity per voxel. Multi-channel acquisition is a well-known solution to increase FOV without significantly reducing sensitivity. In this paper, we demonstrate twofold FOV increase with the use of three FT input coils. We also show that it is possible to use a single atomic magnetometer and single acquisition channel to acquire three independent MRI signals by applying a frequency-encoding gradient along the direction of the detection array span. The approach can be generalized to more channels and can be critical for imaging applications of non-cryogenic ULF MRI where FOV needs to be large, including head, hand, spine, and whole-body imaging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Sensitivity enhancement of remotely coupled NMR detectors using wirelessly powered parametric amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Chunqi; Murphy-Boesch, Joseph; Dodd, Stephen; Koretsky, Alan

    2012-09-01

    A completely wireless detection coil with an integrated parametric amplifier has been constructed to provide local amplification and transmission of MR signals. The sample coil is one element of a parametric amplifier using a zero-bias diode that mixes the weak MR signal with a strong pump signal that is obtained from an inductively coupled external loop. The NMR sample coil develops current gain via reduction in the effective coil resistance. Higher gain can be obtained by adjusting the level of the pumping power closer to the oscillation threshold, but the gain is ultimately constrained by the bandwidth requirement of MRI experiments. A feasibility study here shows that on a NaCl/D(2) O phantom, (23) Na signals with 20 dB of gain can be readily obtained with a concomitant bandwidth of 144 kHz. This gain is high enough that the integrated coil with parametric amplifier, which is coupled inductively to external loops, can provide sensitivity approaching that of direct wire connection. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Management of breast lesions detectable only on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegmann-Luz, K.C.; Bahrs, S.D.; Preibsch, H.; Hattermann, V.; Claussen, C.D.

    2014-01-01

    Breast MR imaging has become established as the most sensitive imaging method for diagnosing breast cancer. As a result of the increasing examination volume and improved image quality, the number of breast lesions detected only on MRI and requiring further clarification has risen in recent years. According to the S3-guideline 'Diagnosis, Therapy, and Follow-Up of Breast Cancer' as revised in July 2012, institutions performing breast MRI should provide the option of an MRI-guided intervention for clarification. This review describes the indications, methods and results of MRI-guided interventions for the clarification of breast lesions only visible on MRI. Recent guidelines and study results are also addressed and alternative methods and pitfalls are presented. (orig.)

  13. Comparative diagnostic performance of multidetector computed tomography and MRI for characterization of pancreatic cystic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Sung Min; Shin, Sang Soo; Park, Jin Gyoon; Jeong, Yong Yeon

    2015-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in characterization of pancreatic cystic lesions. We conducted a retrospective study on 34 patients with histopathologically proven cystic pancreatic lesions who underwent both preoperative MDCT and MRI. CT and MRI were independently evaluated for differentiating mucinous vs. non-mucinous lesions, differentiating aggressive vs. non-aggressive lesion, analyzing morphological features, and evaluating specific leading diagnoses. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were determined. Competency assessment of lesional morphology analysis was performed using the kappa values of the 2 tests. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MRI for differentiating mucinous vs. non-mucinous lesions were higher than CT (p = 0.03). For differentiating aggressiveness, the sensitivity of MRI was better than CT, but the specificity of CT was better than MRI. In evaluation of morphologic features, MRI showed better performance in characterization of septa and wall. Otherwise, the 2 modalities showed similarly good performance. MRI was better than CT in determining a specific diagnosis (58.8% vs. 47.2%, respectively). CT and MRI are reasonable diagnostic methods for characterization of pancreatic cystic lesions. However, MRI enables more confident assessment than CT in differentiating mucinous vs. non-mucinous lesions and characterization of the septa and wall

  14. MRI evaluation of the posterior meniscus root tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianjun; Zheng Zhuozhao; Li Xuan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine the value of MRI for diagnosing the posterior meniscus root tear. Methods: MR examinations of 30 patients with tear of the posterior meniscus root confirmed by knee arthroscopies were retrospectively reviewed. Of the 30 patients, 17 with posterior medial meniscus root tear (MMRT) and 13 with posterior lateral meniscus root tear (LMRT). The diagnostic sensitivity of' MRI for the posterior meniscus root tear was analyzed. Fisher's exact test was used to compare the detection rate of MRI for MMRT with that for LMRT. Results: All 17 cases with MMRT and 9 cases out of 13 with LMRT were correctly diagnosed by MRI and the diagnostic sensitivity of MRI for the posterior meniscus root tear was 86.7% (26/30). The main MR appearance of the posterior meniscus root tear was distortion of the meniscal root, with its low signal replaced by abnormal high signal. The detection rate of MRI for MMRT (17/17) was significantly greater than that for LMRT (9/13) (P=0.026). The prevalence of MMRT associated with meniscus extrusion (15/17) was significantly greater than that of LMRT (6/13) (P=0.020), but the prevalence of MMRT associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury (5/17) was significantly lower than that of LMRT (11/13) (P=0.004). Conclusion: MRI is a relatively good method for detection of posterior meniscus root tears and associated injuries. (authors)

  15. TH-CD-BRA-02: 3D Remote Dosimetry for MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy: A Hybrid Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rankine, L [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States); The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Mein, S; Juang, T; Miles, D [Duke University Medical Physics Graduate Program, Durham, NC (United States); Adamovics, J [Rider University, Skillman, NJ (United States); Cai, B; Curcuru, A; Mutic, S; Wang, Y; Li, H [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Oldham, M [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To validate the dosimetric accuracy of a commercially available MR-IGRT system using a combination of 3D dosimetry measurements (with PRESAGE(R) radiochromic plastic and optical-CT readout) and an in-house developed GPU-accelerated PENELOPE Monte-Carlo dose calculation system. Methods: {sup 60}Co IMRT subject to a 0.35T lateral magnetic field has recently been commissioned in our institution following AAPM’s TG-119 recommendations. We performed PRESAGE(R) sensitivity studies in 4ml cuvettes to verify linearity, MR-compatibility, and energy-independence. Using 10cm diameter PRESAGE(R), we delivered an open calibration field to examine the percent depth dose and a symmetrical 3-field plan with three adjacent regions of varying dose to determine uniformity within the dosimeter under a magnetic field. After initial testing, TG-119 plans were created in the TPS and then delivered to 14.5cm 2kg PRESAGE(R) dosimeters. Dose readout was performed via optical-CT at a second institution specializing in remote 3D dosimetry. Absolute dose was measured using an IBA CC01 ion chamber and the institution standard patient-specific QA methods were used to validate plan delivery. Calculated TG-119 plans were then compared with an independent Monte Carlo dose calculation (gPENELOPE). Results: PRESAGE(R) responds linearly (R{sup 2}=0.9996) to {sup 60}Co irradiation, in the presence of a 0.35T magnetic field, with a sensitivity of 0.0305(±0.003)cm{sup −1}Gy{sup −1}, within 1% of a 6MV non-MR linac irradiation (R{sup 2}=0.9991) with a sensitivity of 0.0302(±0.003)cm{sup −1}Gy{sup −1}. Analysis of TG-119 clinical plans using 3D-gamma (3%/3mm, 10% threshold) give passing rates of: HN 99.1%, prostate 98.0%, C-shape 90.8%, and multi-target 98.5%. The TPS agreed with gPENELOPE with a mean gamma passing rate of 98.4±1.5% (2%/2mm) with the z-score distributions following a standard normal distribution. Conclusion: We demonstrate for the first time that 3D remote dosimetry

  16. Comparison of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI and MRI for pre-therapeutic tumor staging of patients with primary cancer of the uterine cervix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarabhai, Theresia; Wetter, Axel; Forsting, Michael; Umutlu, Lale; Grueneisen, Johannes [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Schaarschmidt, Benedikt M.; Kirchner, Julian [University Dusseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Faculty, Dusseldorf (Germany); Aktas, Bahriye [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Essen (Germany); Ruhlmann, Verena; Herrmann, Ken [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany)

    2018-01-15

    The aim of the present study was to assess and compare the diagnostic performance of integrated PET/MRI and MRI alone for local tumor evaluation and whole-body tumor staging of primary cervical cancers. In addition, the corresponding impact on further patient management of the two imaging modalities was assessed. A total of 53 consecutive patients with histopathological verification of a primary cervical cancer were prospectively enrolled for a whole-body 18F-FDG PET/MRI examination. Two experienced physicians analyzed the MRI data, in consensus, followed by a second reading session of the PET/MRI datasets. The readers were asked to perform a dedicated TNM staging in accordance with the 7th edition of the AJCC staging manual. Subsequently, the results of MRI and PET/MRI were discussed in a simulated interdisciplinary tumor board and therapeutic decisions based on both imaging modalities were recorded. Results from histopathology and cross-sectional imaging follow-up served as the reference standard. PET/MRI allowed for a correct determination of the T stage in 45/53 (85%) cases, while MRI alone enabled a correct identification of the tumor stage in 46/53 (87%) cases. In 24 of the 53 patients, lymph node metastases were present. For the detection of nodal-positive patients, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of PET/MRI were 83%, 90% and 87%, respectively. The respective values for MRI alone were 71%, 83% and 77%. In addition, PET/MRI showed higher values for the detection of distant metastases than MRI alone (sensitivity: 87% vs. 67%, specificity: 92% vs. 90%, diagnostic accuracy: 91% vs. 83%). Among the patients with discrepant staging results in the two imaging modalities, PET/MRI enabled correct treatment recommendations for a higher number (n = 9) of patients than MRI alone (n = 3). The present results demonstrate the successful application of integrated PET/MRI imaging for whole-body tumor staging of cervical cancer patients, enabling improved treatment

  17. Ultra-high field NMR and MRI - the role of magnet technology to increase sensitivity and specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Ewald; Laistler, Elmar; Schmitt, Franz; Kontaxis, Georg

    2017-08-01

    "History, of course, is difficult to write, if for no other reason, than that it has so many players and so many authors." - P. J. Keating (former Australian Prime Minister) Starting with post-war developments in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) a race for stronger and stronger magnetic fields has begun in the 1950s to overcome the inherently low sensitivity of this promising method. Further challenges were larger magnet bores to accommodate small animals and eventually humans. Initially, resistive electromagnets with small pole distances, or sample volumes, and field strengths up to 2.35 T (or 100 MHz 1H frequency) were used in applications in physics, chemistry, and material science. This was followed by stronger and more stable (NbTi based) superconducting magnet technology typically implemented first for small-bore systems in analytical chemistry, biochemistry and structural biology, and eventually allowing larger horizontal-bore magnets with diameters large enough to fit small laboratory animals. By the end of the 1970s, first low-field resistive magnets big enough to accommodate humans were developed and superconducting whole-body systems followed. Currently, cutting-edge analytical NMR systems are available at proton frequencies up to 1 GHz (23.5 T) based on Nb3Sn at 1.9 K. A new 1.2 GHz system (28 T) at 1.9 K, operating in persistent mode but using a combination of low and high temperature multi-filament superconductors is to be released. Preclinical instruments range from small-bore animal systems with typically 600 - 800 MHz (14.1 - 18.8 T) up to 900 MHz (21 T) at 1.9 K. Human whole-body MRI systems currently operate up to 10.5 T. Hybrid combined superconducting and resistive electromagnets with even higher field strength of 45 T dc and 100 T pulsed, are available for material research, of course with smaller free bore diameters. This rather costly development towards higher and higher field strength is a consequence of the inherently low and, thus

  18. [MRI semiotics features of experimental acute intracerebral hematomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burenchev, D V; Skvortsova, V I; Tvorogova, T V; Guseva, O I; Gubskiĭ, L V; Kupriianov, D A; Pirogov, Iu A

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the possibility of revealing intracerebral hematomas (ICH), using MRI, within the first hours after onset and to determine their MRI semiotics features. Thirty animals with experimental ICH were studied. A method of two-stage introduction of autologous blood was used to develop ICH as human spontaneous intracranial hematomas. Within 3-5h after blood introduction to the rat brain. The control MRI was performed in the 3rd and 7th days after blood injections. ICH were definitely identified in the first MRI scans. The MRI semiotics features of acute ICH and their transformations were assessed. The high sensitivity of MRI to ICH as well as the uniform manifestations in all animals were shown. In conclusion, the method has high specificity for acute ICH detection.

  19. Comparison of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI and PET/CT in the Evaluation of Laryngeal Cancer After Inadequate CT Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Citil, Serdal; Dogan, Serap; Atilgan, Hasan Ikbal; Menzilcioglu, Mehmet Sait; Sahin, Tuna; Abdulrezzak, Ummuhan; Duymus, Mahmut; Ozturk, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the diagnostic value of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for laryngeal cancers after inadequate CT results. The study comprised 45 patients investigated for primary laryngeal cancer or recurrence-residue in which CT was considered inadequate. A mass was found in 20 patients. Dynamic MRI and PET/CT were compared for diagnosis of mass, lymph node involvement, recurrence and residue. The dynamic curves formed in dynamic MRI were investigated for diagnostic contributions. The sensitivity and specificity of the dynamic MRI, for supraglottic, glottic and subglottic location, was 100%, 80%, and 92%; 100%, 85%, and 100%, respectively. In PET/CT the sensitivity and specificity were 100% for all of those localizations. For lymph node involvement, the sensitivity of dynamic MRI and PET/CT was 100%, the specificity was 100% and 93%, respectively. For recurrence-residue, the sensitivity and specificity of dynamic MRI were 86% and 67%, respectively, with 100% sensitivity and specificity in PET/CT. The sensitivity of type A curve for detection of malignancy was 40%, and specificity was 100%. When type A and B curves were included, the sensitivity was 100%. For patients investigated for laryngeal cancer in which CT is considered inadequate, dynamic MRI or PET/CT is useful

  20. Comparison of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI and PET/CT in the Evaluation of Laryngeal Cancer After Inadequate CT Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citil, Serdal; Dogan, Serap; Atilgan, Hasan Ikbal; Menzilcioglu, Mehmet Sait; Sahin, Tuna; Abdulrezzak, Ummuhan; Duymus, Mahmut; Ozturk, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the diagnostic value of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for laryngeal cancers after inadequate CT results. The study comprised 45 patients investigated for primary laryngeal cancer or recurrence-residue in which CT was considered inadequate. A mass was found in 20 patients. Dynamic MRI and PET/CT were compared for diagnosis of mass, lymph node involvement, recurrence and residue. The dynamic curves formed in dynamic MRI were investigated for diagnostic contributions. The sensitivity and specificity of the dynamic MRI, for supraglottic, glottic and subglottic location, was 100%, 80%, and 92%; 100%, 85%, and 100%, respectively. In PET/CT the sensitivity and specificity were 100% for all of those localizations. For lymph node involvement, the sensitivity of dynamic MRI and PET/CT was 100%, the specificity was 100% and 93%, respectively. For recurrence-residue, the sensitivity and specificity of dynamic MRI were 86% and 67%, respectively, with 100% sensitivity and specificity in PET/CT. The sensitivity of type A curve for detection of malignancy was 40%, and specificity was 100%. When type A and B curves were included, the sensitivity was 100%. For patients investigated for laryngeal cancer in which CT is considered inadequate, dynamic MRI or PET/CT is useful.

  1. The potential of multiparametric MRI of the breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinker, Katja; Helbich, Thomas H

    2017-01-01

    MRI is an essential tool in breast imaging, with multiple established indications. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) is the backbone of any breast MRI protocol and has an excellent sensitivity and good specificity for breast cancer diagnosis. DCE-MRI provides high-resolution morphological information, as well as some functional information about neoangiogenesis as a tumour-specific feature. To overcome limitations in specificity, several other functional MRI parameters have been investigated and the application of these combined parameters is defined as multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) of the breast. MpMRI of the breast can be performed at different field strengths (1.5–7 T) and includes both established (diffusion-weighted imaging, MR spectroscopic imaging) and novel MRI parameters (sodium imaging, chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging, blood oxygen level-dependent MRI), as well as hybrid imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI and different radiotracers. Available data suggest that multiparametric imaging using different functional MRI and PET parameters can provide detailed information about the underlying oncogenic processes of cancer development and progression and can provide additional specificity. This article will review the current and emerging functional parameters for mpMRI of the breast for improved diagnostic accuracy in breast cancer. PMID:27805423

  2. MRI diagnosis of meniscal tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuga, Naoyuki; Oh, Toshihiro

    1996-01-01

    We studied the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee in fifty-six patients who were also examined arthroscopically. The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity were 96%, 100%, and 95% for medial meniscal tears, and 91%, 67%, and 100% for lateral meniscal tears respectively. Two MRIs of the medial meniscus were false-positives. These MRI findings were both meniscocapsular separation of the medial meniscus, but the arthroscopic findings were normal. One case was an ACL injury and the other PCL and MCL injury. Hemorrhage and edema of the medial capsule caused by valgus stress at injury may look like a meniscal pseudo-tear on MRI. Five MRIs of the lateral meniscus were false-negatives. All menisci showed normal signal and shape on MRI but traumatic and stable tears of the lateral meniscus were identified arthroscopically. All were associated with ACL tears and lateral condylar bone bruise. The traumatic and stable tear of the meniscus tended to be overlooked on MRI because a meniscus without degeneration shows a normal signal. (author)

  3. Detection of hepatocellular carcinoma in gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI with respect to the severity of liver cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ah Yeong; Kim, Young Kon; Lee, Min Woo; Park, Min Jung; Hwang, Jiyoung; Lee, Mi Hee; Lee, Jae Won

    2012-01-01

    Background As gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) have been widely used for the evaluation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), it is clinically relevant to determine the diagnostic efficacy of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and DWI for detection of HCCs with respect to the severity of liver cirrhosis. Purpose To compare the diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and DWI for detection of HCCs with respect to the severity of liver cirrhosis. Material and Methods A total of 189 patients with 240 HCCs (≤3.0 cm) (Child-Pugh A, 81 patients with 90 HCCs; Child-Pugh B, 65 patients with 85 HCCs; Child-Pugh C, 43 patients with 65 HCCs) underwent DWI and gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI at 3.0 T. A gadoxetic acid set (dynamic and hepatobiliary phase plus T2-weighted image) and DWI set (DWI plus unenhanced MRIs) for each Child-Pugh class were analyzed independently by two observers for detecting HCCs using receiver-operating characteristic analysis. The diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity were calculated. Results There was a trend toward decreased diagnostic accuracy for gadoxetic acid and DWI set with respect to the severity of cirrhosis (Child-Pugh A [mean 0.974, 0.961], B [mean 0.904, 0.863], C [mean 0.779, 0.760]). For both observers, the sensitivities of both image sets were highest in Child-Pugh class A (mean 95.6%, 93.9%), followed by class B (mean 83.0%, 77.1%), and class C (mean 60.6%, 60.0%) (P < 0.05). Conclusion In HCC detection, the diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity for gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and DWI were highest in Child-Pugh class A, followed by Child-Pugh class B, and Child-Pugh class C, indicating a tendency toward decreased diagnostic capability with the severity of cirrhosis

  4. MRI of meniscal bucket-handle tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magee, T.H.; Hinson, G.W. [Menorah Medical Center, Overland Park, KS (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1998-09-01

    A meniscal bucket-handle tear is a tear with an attached fragment displaced from the meniscus of the knee joint. Low sensitivity of MRI for detection of bucket-handle tears (64% as compared with arthroscopy) has been reported previously. We report increased sensitivity for detecting bucket-handle tears with the use of coronal short tau inversion recovery (STIR) images. Results. By using four criteria for diagnosis of meniscal bucket-handle tears, our overall sensitivity compared with arthroscopy was 93% (28 of 30 meniscal bucket-handle tears seen at arthroscopy were detected by MRI). The meniscal fragment was well visualized in all 28 cases on coronal STIR images. The double posterior cruciate ligament sign was seen in 8 of 30 cases, the flipped meniscus was seen in 10 of 30 cases and a fragment in the intercondylar notch was seen in 18 of 30 cases. (orig.)

  5. Remote Reactor Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Adam [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dazeley, Steve [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dobie, Doug [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marleau, Peter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brennan, Jim [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gerling, Mark [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sumner, Matthew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sweany, Melinda [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-21

    The overall goal of the WATCHMAN project is to experimentally demonstrate the potential of water Cerenkov antineutrino detectors as a tool for remote monitoring of nuclear reactors. In particular, the project seeks to field a large prototype gadolinium-doped, water-based antineutrino detector to demonstrate sensitivity to a power reactor at ~10 kilometer standoff using a kiloton scale detector. The technology under development, when fully realized at large scale, could provide remote near-real-time information about reactor existence and operational status for small operating nuclear reactors out to distances of many hundreds of kilometers.

  6. Value of contrast-enhanced MRI of breast after silicone implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinig, A.; Heywang-Koebrunner, S.H.; Viehweg, P.; Spielmann, R.P.; Lampe, D.; Buchmann, J.

    1997-01-01

    Early recognition of recurrence and work-up of clinically indeterminate lesions may be impaired after reconstruction with silicone implants due to superimposition of the implant or to scarring. This study was undertaken to evaluate the use of contrast-enhanced MRI in patients with silicone implant after breast cancer. Contrast-enhanded MRI was offered to 169 patients. Comparative two- to three-view mammography was also performed in 169 patients, as well as comparative sonography in 144 patients. Conventional imaging and clinical examination detected only 8/13 recurrences, whereas 12/13 were detected by MRI. One recurrence had been visible as a strongly enhancing 2-mm dot in a previous examination (2 years before), but was not called. It was therefore counted as false negative. In addition, multicentricity was detected by MRI alone in two of three cases. MRI correctly diagnosed scar tissue in all cases with indeterminate findings. However, due to false-positive calls caused by enhancing granulomas specificity could not be improved. Contrast-enhanded MRI allowed decisive additional information in our study group and improved the sensitivity significantly (concerning all diagnoses). Contrast-enhanded MRI allowed decisive additional information in our study group and improved the sensitivity significantly (concerning all diagnoses). Contrast-enhanded MRI is recommended in patients with diagnostic problems or high risk of recurrence after silicone implants. (orig.) [de

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no risk, but you should ... a digital cloud server. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly the ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  10. Comparative studies of MRI and operative findings in rotator cuff tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakawa, Seigo; Ichikawa, Norikazu; Itadera, Eichi; Hashizume, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Hajime

    2001-01-01

    A prospective study was performed to determine the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared with operative findings in the evaluation of patients associated with rotator cuff tears. Fifty-four of 60 shoulders (58 patients) examined by MRI were confirmed as full-thickness tears and 6 as partial-thickness tears at the time of surgery. The oblique coronal, oblique sagittal, and axial planes of T2-weighted images with the 0.5 tesla MRI system were obtained preoperatively and compared with operative findings. MRI correctly identified 46 of 54 full-thickness rotator cuff tears and 5 of 6 partial-thickness tears. A comparison of MRI and operative findings in full-thickness cuff tears showed a sensitivity of 85%, a specificity of 83%, and a positive prospective value (PPV) of 99%. A comparison of partial-thickness tears showed a sensitivity of 83%, a specificity of 85%, and PPV of 39%. Linear regression analysis showed an excellent correlation between the MRI assessment and measurement at the time of surgery (r=0.90, P<0.01). MRI was useful in evaluating large and medium-sized rotator cuff tears, but less useful in distinguishing small full-thickness tears from partial-thickness tears. (author)

  11. Value of retrospective image fusion of 18F-FDG PET and MRI for preoperative staging of head and neck cancer: Comparison with PET/CT and contrast-enhanced neck MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanda, Tomonori; Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Suenaga, Yuko; Konishi, Jyunya; Sasaki, Ryohei; Morimoto, Koichi; Saito, Miki; Otsuki, Naoki; Nibu, Ken-ichi; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical value of retrospective image fusion of neck MRI and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) PET for locoregional extension and nodal staging of neck cancer. Materials and methods: Thirty patients with carcinoma of the oral cavity or hypopharynx underwent PET/CT and contrast-enhanced neck MRI for initial staging before surgery including primary tumor resection and neck dissection. Diagnostic performance of PET/CT, MRI, and retrospective image fusion of PET and MRI (fused PET/MRI) for assessment of the extent of the primary tumor (T stage) and metastasis to regional lymph nodes (N stage) was evaluated. Results: Accuracy for T status was 87% for fused PET/MRI and 90% for MRI, thus proving significantly superior to PET/CT, which had an accuracy of 67% (p = 0.041 and p = 0.023, respectively). Accuracy for N status was 77% for both fused PET/MRI and PET/CT, being superior to MRI, which had an accuracy of 63%, although the difference was not significant (p = 0.13). On a per-level basis, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detection of nodal metastasis were 77%, 96% and 93% for both fused PET/MRI and PET/CT, compared with 49%, 99% and 91% for MRI, respectively. The differences for sensitivity (p = 0.0026) and accuracy (p = 0.041) were significant. Conclusion: Fused PET/MRI combining the individual advantages of MRI and PET is a valuable technique for assessment of staging neck cancer

  12. Interference between PET and MRI sub-systems in a silicon-photomultiplier-based PET/MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Watabe, Hiroshi; Kanai, Yasukazu; Hatazawa, Jun; Aoki, Masaaki; Sugiyama, Eiji; Watabe, Tadashi; Imaizumi, Masao; Shimosegawa, Eku

    2011-01-01

    The silicon-photomultiplier (Si-PM) is a promising photodetector, especially for integrated PET/MRI systems, due to its small size, high gain, and low sensitivity to static magnetic fields. The major problem using a Si-PM-based PET system within the MRI system is the interference between the PET and MRI units. We measured the interference by combining a Si-PM-based PET system with a permanent-magnet MRI system. When the RF signal-induced pulse height exceeded the lower energy threshold level of the PET system, interference between the Si-PM-based PET system and MRI system was detected. The prompt as well as the delayed coincidence count rates of the Si-PM-based PET system increased significantly. These noise counts produced severe artifacts on the reconstructed images of the Si-PM-based PET system. In terms of the effect of the Si-PM-based PET system on the MRI system, although no susceptibility artifact was observed on the MR images, electronic noise from the PET detector ring was detected by the RF coil and reduced the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the MR images. The S/N degradation of the MR images was reduced when the distance between the RF coil and the Si-PM-based PET system was increased. We conclude that reducing the interference between the PET and MRI systems is essential for achieving the optimum performance of integrated Si-PM PET/MRI systems.

  13. Quantifying the microvascular origin of BOLD-fMRI from first principles with two-photon microscopy and an oxygen-sensitive nanoprobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Louis; Sakadžić, Sava; Lesage, Frédéric; Musacchia, Joseph J; Lefebvre, Joël; Fang, Qianqian; Yücel, Meryem A; Evans, Karleyton C; Mandeville, Emiri T; Cohen-Adad, Jülien; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Yaseen, Mohammad A; Lo, Eng H; Greve, Douglas N; Buxton, Richard B; Dale, Anders M; Devor, Anna; Boas, David A

    2015-02-25

    The blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast is widely used in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies aimed at investigating neuronal activity. However, the BOLD signal reflects changes in blood volume and oxygenation rather than neuronal activity per se. Therefore, understanding the transformation of microscopic vascular behavior into macroscopic BOLD signals is at the foundation of physiologically informed noninvasive neuroimaging. Here, we use oxygen-sensitive two-photon microscopy to measure the BOLD-relevant microvascular physiology occurring within a typical rodent fMRI voxel and predict the BOLD signal from first principles using those measurements. The predictive power of the approach is illustrated by quantifying variations in the BOLD signal induced by the morphological folding of the human cortex. This framework is then used to quantify the contribution of individual vascular compartments and other factors to the BOLD signal for different magnet strengths and pulse sequences. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/353663-13$15.00/0.

  14. MRI imaging in pediatric appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Riley

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available An 8-year-old male presents with two days of abdominal pain and emesis. Computed tomography was concerning for obstruction or reactive ileus with an apparent transition point in the right lower quadrant, possibly due to Crohn's. Magnetic resonance imaging was concerning for perforated appendicitis. As demonstrated by this case MRI can be as sensitive as CT in detecting pediatric appendicitis [2]. We recommend using MRI instead of CT to diagnose appendicitis to avoid ionizing radiation and increased cancer risk in the pediatric population. Keywords: Computer tomography, Magnetic resonance imaging, Pediatric appendicitis

  15. MRI Reporter Genes for Noninvasive Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caixia Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is one of the most important imaging technologies used in clinical diagnosis. Reporter genes for MRI can be applied to accurately track the delivery of cell in cell therapy, evaluate the therapy effect of gene delivery, and monitor tissue/cell-specific microenvironments. Commonly used reporter genes for MRI usually include genes encoding the enzyme (e.g., tyrosinase and β-galactosidase, the receptor on the cells (e.g., transferrin receptor, and endogenous reporter genes (e.g., ferritin reporter gene. However, low sensitivity limits the application of MRI and reporter gene-based multimodal imaging strategies are common including optical imaging and radionuclide imaging. These can significantly improve diagnostic efficiency and accelerate the development of new therapies.

  16. Measuring the mutual effects between a CZT detector and MRI for the development of a simultaneous MBI/MRI insert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Ashley [McMaster University (Canada); Farncombe, Troy [Hamilton Health Sciences (Canada); Noseworthy, Michael [McMaster University (Canada)

    2015-05-18

    While mammography is the gold standard for breast cancer screening, it suffers from poor sensitivity in women with dense breast tissue. Both breast MRI and molecular breast imaging (MBI) have been used as secondary imaging techniques. However, breast MRI suffers from low specificity and low sensitivity in MBI. A CZT based detector system has been developed with the goal of simultaneous MBI/MRI imaging to address the shortcomings of each modality. The performance of each modality needs to be addressed separately and together. The CZT system is comprised of four Redlen CZT modules tiled in a 2x2 array. Each module consists of 256 pixels and feature a builtin on-board ASIC and FPGA. A custom digital readout circuit board was designed to interface the four modules with a microcontroller to a PC. MR images were acquired with a 3T GE Discovery MR750 and Hologic breast coils. A gradient echo imaging sequence was used for all image acquisitions. A tissue mimicking phantom with a plastic grid insert (1 cm spacing) was used to evaluate geometric accuracy with the CZT detectors in the MRI bore. The average distance between the grid markers was 1Å 0.2cm indicating negligible geometric distortion. Field maps were generated with a uniform phantom to quantify the effect on magnetic field homogeneity. Early results indicate a significant distortion (~10ppm) in the magnetic field closest to the coil. Further analysis of the MR images will determine the extent of image quality degradation. A flood map of Tc-99m was acquired to evaluate and implement an energy correction map and a uniformity map. In the absence of a magnetic field, the mean energy resolution at 140keV was 6.3%. After fully characterizing the uniformity, geometric accuracy and sensitivity, the same metrics will be evaluated in the MRI bore.

  17. Value of fusion of PET and MRI in the detection of intra-pelvic recurrence of gynecological tumor: comparison with 18F-FDG contrast-enhanced PET/CT and pelvic MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Suenaga, Yuko; Ueno, Yoshiko; Kanda, Tomonori; Maeda, Tetsuo; Makihara, Natsuko; Ebina, Yasuhiko; Yamada, Hideto; Takahashi, Satoru; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of retrospective image fusion from pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) in detecting intra-pelvic recurrence of gynecological tumor. Thirty patients with a suspicion of recurrence of gynecological malignancy underwent inline contrast-enhanced PET/computed tomography (CT) and pelvic contrast-enhanced MRI for restaging. Diagnostic performance about the local recurrence, pelvic lymph node and bone metastasis and peritoneal lesion of PET/low-dose non-enhanced CT (PET/ldCT), PET/full-dose contrast-enhanced CT (PET/ceCT), contrast-enhanced MRI, and retrospective image fusion from PET and MRI (fused PET/MRI) were evaluated by two experienced readers. Final diagnoses were obtained by histopathological examinations, radiological imaging and clinical follow-up for at least 6 months. McNemar test was employed for statistical analysis. Documented positive locally recurrent disease, pelvic lymph node and bone metastases, and peritoneal dissemination were present in 53.3, 26.7, 10.0, and 16.7%, respectively. Patient-based sensitivity for detecting local recurrence, pelvic lymph node and bone metastasis and peritoneal lesion were 87.5, 87.5, 100 and 80.0%, respectively, for fused PET/MRI, 87.5, 62.5, 66.7 and 60.0%, respectively, for contrast-enhanced MRI, 62.5, 87.5, 66.7 and 80.0%, respectively, for PET/ceCT, and 50.0, 87.5, 66.7 and 60.0%, respectively, for PET/ldCT. The sensitivity of diagnosing local recurrence by fused PET/MRI was significantly better than that of PET/ldCT (p=0.041). The patient-based sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for the detection of intra-pelvic recurrence/metastasis were 91.3, 100 and 93.3% for fused PET/MRI, 82.6, 100 and 86.7% for contrast-enhanced MRI, 82.6, 100 and 86.7% for PET/ceCT and 78.3, 85.7 and 80.0% for PET/ldCT. Fused PET/MRI combines the individual advantages of MRI and PET, and is a valuable technique for assessment of intra

  18. High-field fMRI unveils orientation columns in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoub, Essa; Harel, Noam; Ugurbil, Kâmil

    2008-07-29

    Functional (f)MRI has revolutionized the field of human brain research. fMRI can noninvasively map the spatial architecture of brain function via localized increases in blood flow after sensory or cognitive stimulation. Recent advances in fMRI have led to enhanced sensitivity and spatial accuracy of the measured signals, indicating the possibility of detecting small neuronal ensembles that constitute fundamental computational units in the brain, such as cortical columns. Orientation columns in visual cortex are perhaps the best known example of such a functional organization in the brain. They cannot be discerned via anatomical characteristics, as with ocular dominance columns. Instead, the elucidation of their organization requires functional imaging methods. However, because of insufficient sensitivity, spatial accuracy, and image resolution of the available mapping techniques, thus far, they have not been detected in humans. Here, we demonstrate, by using high-field (7-T) fMRI, the existence and spatial features of orientation- selective columns in humans. Striking similarities were found with the known spatial features of these columns in monkeys. In addition, we found that a larger number of orientation columns are devoted to processing orientations around 90 degrees (vertical stimuli with horizontal motion), whereas relatively similar fMRI signal changes were observed across any given active column. With the current proliferation of high-field MRI systems and constant evolution of fMRI techniques, this study heralds the exciting prospect of exploring unmapped and/or unknown columnar level functional organizations in the human brain.

  19. FIACH: A biophysical model for automatic retrospective noise control in fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Tim M; Weiss-Croft, Louise J; Centeno, Maria; Shamshiri, Elhum A; Perani, Suejen; Baldeweg, Torsten; Clark, Christopher A; Carmichael, David W

    2016-01-01

    Different noise sources in fMRI acquisition can lead to spurious false positives and reduced sensitivity. We have developed a biophysically-based model (named FIACH: Functional Image Artefact Correction Heuristic) which extends current retrospective noise control methods in fMRI. FIACH can be applied to both General Linear Model (GLM) and resting state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI) studies. FIACH is a two-step procedure involving the identification and correction of non-physiological large amplitude temporal signal changes and spatial regions of high temporal instability. We have demonstrated its efficacy in a sample of 42 healthy children while performing language tasks that include overt speech with known activations. We demonstrate large improvements in sensitivity when FIACH is compared with current methods of retrospective correction. FIACH reduces the confounding effects of noise and increases the study's power by explaining significant variance that is not contained within the commonly used motion parameters. The method is particularly useful in detecting activations in inferior temporal regions which have proven problematic for fMRI. We have shown greater reproducibility and robustness of fMRI responses using FIACH in the context of task induced motion. In a clinical setting this will translate to increasing the reliability and sensitivity of fMRI used for the identification of language lateralisation and eloquent cortex. FIACH can benefit studies of cognitive development in young children, patient populations and older adults. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Value of retrospective image fusion of {sup 18}F-FDG PET and MRI for preoperative staging of head and neck cancer: Comparison with PET/CT and contrast-enhanced neck MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanda, Tomonori [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Department of Radiology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Hyogo (Japan); Kitajima, Kazuhiro, E-mail: kitajima@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Suenaga, Yuko; Konishi, Jyunya [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Sasaki, Ryohei [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Morimoto, Koichi; Saito, Miki; Otsuki, Naoki; Nibu, Ken-ichi [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical value of retrospective image fusion of neck MRI and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) PET for locoregional extension and nodal staging of neck cancer. Materials and methods: Thirty patients with carcinoma of the oral cavity or hypopharynx underwent PET/CT and contrast-enhanced neck MRI for initial staging before surgery including primary tumor resection and neck dissection. Diagnostic performance of PET/CT, MRI, and retrospective image fusion of PET and MRI (fused PET/MRI) for assessment of the extent of the primary tumor (T stage) and metastasis to regional lymph nodes (N stage) was evaluated. Results: Accuracy for T status was 87% for fused PET/MRI and 90% for MRI, thus proving significantly superior to PET/CT, which had an accuracy of 67% (p = 0.041 and p = 0.023, respectively). Accuracy for N status was 77% for both fused PET/MRI and PET/CT, being superior to MRI, which had an accuracy of 63%, although the difference was not significant (p = 0.13). On a per-level basis, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detection of nodal metastasis were 77%, 96% and 93% for both fused PET/MRI and PET/CT, compared with 49%, 99% and 91% for MRI, respectively. The differences for sensitivity (p = 0.0026) and accuracy (p = 0.041) were significant. Conclusion: Fused PET/MRI combining the individual advantages of MRI and PET is a valuable technique for assessment of staging neck cancer.

  1. MRI of placenta percreta: differentiation from other entities of placental adhesive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiravit, Shanigarn; Lapatikarn, Sukanya; Muangsomboon, Kobkun; Suvannarerg, Voraparee; Thiravit, Phakphoom; Korpraphong, Pornpim

    2017-01-01

    To retrospectively review the MRI findings of placenta percreta and identify those helpful for differentiation from non-placenta percreta. The MRI images of 21 patients with a preliminary diagnosis of placental adhesive disorder scanned between 2005 and 2014 were evaluated. Radiologists blinded to the final diagnosis evaluated six previously described MRI findings of placenta adhesive disorder. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, negative predictive value (NPV), and positive predictive value (PPV) of MRI for the diagnosis of placenta percreta were also calculated. The study included 12 cases of placenta percreta and 9 cases of non-placenta percreta. Invasion of placental tissue outside the uterus was found only in placenta percreta (p = 0.045; sensitivity 41.7 %; specificity 100 %). All placenta percreta cases also had a moderate to marked degree of heterogeneous placental signal intensity (p = 0.063; sensitivity 100 %; specificity 33.3 %). The size of the dark bands on T2-weighted imaging, and the presence of disorganized intra-placental vessels, showed no statistically significant difference between placenta percreta and non-placenta percreta. The sensitivity, specificity, NPV, PPV, and accuracy of MRI for detection of placenta percreta were 91.7, 44, 80, 68, and 71.4 %, respectively. MRI is recommended for the evaluation of placenta percreta, with the most specific signs including the invasion of placental tissue outside the uterus on B-FFE sequences, and consideration of the degree of placental signal heterogeneity. The size of the T2 dark band alone, or bizarre disorganized intra-placental vessels, did not correlate with the severity of invasion.

  2. Benign and malignant skull-involved lesions: discriminative value of conventional CT and MRI combined with diffusion-weighted MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Zhanhai; Xiao, Zebin; Zheng, Yingyan; Huang, Hongjie; Yang, Libin; Cao, Dairong

    2018-01-01

    Background Little is known about the value of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in distinguishing malignant from benign skull-involved lesions. Purpose To evaluate the discriminative value of DWI combined with conventional CT and MRI for differentiating between benign and malignant skull-involved lesions. Material and Methods CT and MRI findings of 58 patients with pathologically proven skull-involved lesions (43 benign and 15 malignant) were retrospectively reviewed. Conventional CT and MRI characteristics and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of the two groups were evaluated and compared. Multivariate logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were performed to assess the differential performance of each parameter separately and together. Results The presence of cortical defects or break-through and ill-defined margins were associated with malignant skull-involved lesions (both P benign and malignant skull-involved lesions. Conclusion The combination of CT, MRI, and DWI can help to differentiate malignant from benign skull-involved lesions. CT + MRI + DWI offers optimal sensitivity, while DWI offers optimal specificity.

  3. MRI in Optic Neuritis: Structure, Function, Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglø, Dan

    2011-01-01

    resonance imaging (MRI), and the visual evoked potential (VEP) continues to show a delayed P100 indicating persistent demyelination. The explanation for this apparent discrepancy between structure and function could be due to either a redundancy in the visual pathways so that some degree of signal loss...... will have very few or no clinical symptoms, or it could be due to compensatory mechanisms in the visual pathway or the visual cortex. In order to understand the pathophysiology and recovery processes in ON it is essential to have sensitive methods to asses both structure and function. These methods...... are low. Functional MRI (fMRI) is a non-invasive technique that can measure brain activity with a high spatial resolution. Recently, technical and methodological advancements have made it feasible to record VEPs and fMRI simultaneously and the relationship between averaged VEPs and averaged fMRI signals...

  4. Analysis and visualization methods for interpretation of diffusion MRI data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, S.B.

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion MRI is an imaging technique that is very sensitive to microstructural changes in tissue. Diffusion tensor MRI, the most commonly used method, can estimate the magnitude and anisotropy of diffusion. These tensor-based diffusion parameters have been shown to change in many neuropathological

  5. Application of the McDonald MRI criteria in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ling Ling; Sitoh, Yih Yian; Chong, June; See, Siew Ju; Umapathi, Thirugnanam N; Lim, Shih Hui; Ong, Benjamin

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the sensitivity of McDonald's magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) criteria for the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) in a group of Asian patients diagnosed with clinically definite MS, based on lesion characterisation on MRI scans. Forty-nine patients from 3 major neurological institutions were classified as having Asian- or Western-type MS based on clinical assessment. Each MRI scan was reviewed by 2 neuroradiologists for the presence and characteristics of brain and spinal lesions. The McDonald's MRI criteria were then applied and its sensitivity evaluated. Nine patients were excluded, leaving 34 females and 6 males who were dominantly Chinese (90%), with a mean age of 36.2 years. The MRI brain and spinal findings were detailed and tabulated. Statistically significant differences (P McDonald's MRI criteria were found between our Asian- and Western-type MS patients. The diagnostic yield of McDonald's MRI criteria increased by 20% when we substituted a cord for a brain lesion, and applied the substitution for enhancing cord lesions as well. The diagnosis is more likely to be made when using McDonald MRI criteria based on brain findings, in a patient who presents clinically with Western-type MS. The provision for substitution of "one brain for a spinal lesion" is helpful in Asian-type MS, where there is preponderance of spinal lesion load. Our findings suggest that minor modifications in the interpretation of McDonald's MRI criteria have significant impact on the diagnosis in patients clinically presenting as Asian-type MS, with potential bearing on their subsequent management.

  6. Elemental imaging of MRI contrast agents: benchmarking of LA-ICP-MS to MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugh, J.A.T. [University of Sheffield, Centre for Analytical Sciences, Sheffield (United Kingdom); University of Sheffield, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Cox, A.G.; McLeod, C.W. [University of Sheffield, Centre for Analytical Sciences, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Bunch, J. [University of Birmingham, School of Chemistry, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Writer, M.J.; Hart, S.L. [UCL Institute of Child Health, Wolfson Centre for Gene Therapy of Childhood Disease, London (United Kingdom); Bienemann, A.; White, E. [University of Bristol, School of Clinical Sciences, Southmead Hospital, Bristol (United Kingdom); Bell, J. [Hammersmith Hospital, Metabolic and Molecular Imaging Group, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) has been used to map the spatial distribution of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents (Gd-based) in histological sections in order to explore synergies with in vivo MRI. Images from respective techniques are presented for two separate studies namely (1) convection enhanced delivery of a Gd nanocomplex (developmental therapeutic) into rat brain and (2) convection enhanced delivery, with co-infusion of Magnevist (commercial Gd contrast agent) and Carboplatin (chemotherapy drug), into pig brain. The LA technique was shown to be a powerful compliment to MRI not only in offering improved sensitivity, spatial resolution and signal quantitation but also in giving added value regarding the fate of administered agents (Gd and Pt agents). Furthermore simultaneous measurement of Fe enabled assignment of an anomalous contrast enhancement region in rat brain to haemorrhage at the infusion site. (orig.)

  7. Remote RemoteRemoteRemote sensing potential for sensing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Remote RemoteRemoteRemote sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing p. A Ngie, F Ahmed, K Abutaleb ...

  8. Quantitative and Visual Assessments toward Potential Sub-mSv or Ultrafast FDG PET Using High-Sensitivity TOF PET in PET/MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Spencer C; Bahroos, Emma; Hawkins, Randall A; Nardo, Lorenzo; Ravanfar, Vahid; Capbarat, Emily V; Seo, Youngho

    2018-06-01

    Newer high-performance time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) systems have the capability to preserve diagnostic image quality with low count density, while maintaining a high raw photon detection sensitivity that would allow for a reduction in injected dose or rapid data acquisition. To assess this, we performed quantitative and visual assessments of the PET images acquired using a highly sensitive (23.3 cps/kBq) large field of view (25-cm axial) silicon photomultiplier (SiPM)-based TOF PET (400-ps timing resolution) integrated with 3 T-MRI in comparison to PET images acquired on non-TOF PET/x-ray computed tomography (CT) systems. Whole-body 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro-D-glucose ([ 18 F]FDG) PET/CT was acquired for 15 patients followed by whole body PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with an average injected dose of 325 ± 84 MBq. The PET list mode data from PET/MRI were reconstructed using full datasets (4 min/bed) and reduced datasets (2, 1, 0.5, and 0.25 min/bed). Qualitative assessment between PET/CT and PET/MR images were made. A Likert-type scale between 1 and 5, 1 for non-diagnostic, 3 equivalent to PET/CT, and 5 superior quality, was used. Maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUV max and SUV mean ) of normal tissues and lesions detected were measured and compared. Mean visual assessment scores were 3.54 ± 0.32, 3.62 ± 0.38, and 3.69 ± 0.35 for the brain and 3.05 ± 0.49, 3.71 ± 0.45, and 4.14 ± 0.44 for the whole-body maximum intensity projections (MIPs) for 1, 2, and 4 min/bed PET/MR images, respectively. The SUV mean values for normal tissues were lower and statistically significant for images acquired at 4, 2, 1, 0.5, and 0.25 min/bed on the PET/MR, with values of - 18 ± 28 % (p PET/MR datasets. High-sensitivity TOF PET showed comparable but still better visual image quality even at a much reduced activity in comparison to lower-sensitivity non-TOF PET. Our data translates to a seven times

  9. Documenting the location of systematic transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies: correlation with multi-parametric MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkbey, Baris; Xu, Sheng; Kruecker, Jochen; Locklin, Julia; Pang, Yuxi; Shah, Vijay; Bernardo, Marcelino; Baccala, Angelo; Rastinehad, Ardeshir; Benjamin, Compton; Merino, Maria J; Wood, Bradford J; Choyke, Peter L; Pinto, Peter A

    2011-03-29

    During transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsies, the actual location of the biopsy site is rarely documented. Here, we demonstrate the capability of TRUS-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image fusion to document the biopsy site and correlate biopsy results with multi-parametric MRI findings. Fifty consecutive patients (median age 61 years) with a median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of 5.8 ng/ml underwent 12-core TRUS-guided biopsy of the prostate. Pre-procedural T2-weighted magnetic resonance images were fused to TRUS. A disposable needle guide with miniature tracking sensors was attached to the TRUS probe to enable fusion with MRI. Real-time TRUS images during biopsy and the corresponding tracking information were recorded. Each biopsy site was superimposed onto the MRI. Each biopsy site was classified as positive or negative for cancer based on the results of each MRI sequence. Sensitivity, specificity, and receiver operating curve (ROC) area under the curve (AUC) values were calculated for multi-parametric MRI. Gleason scores for each multi-parametric MRI pattern were also evaluated. Six hundred and 5 systemic biopsy cores were analyzed in 50 patients, of whom 20 patients had 56 positive cores. MRI identified 34 of 56 positive cores. Overall, sensitivity, specificity, and ROC area values for multi-parametric MRI were 0.607, 0.727, 0.667, respectively. TRUS-MRI fusion after biopsy can be used to document the location of each biopsy site, which can then be correlated with MRI findings. Based on correlation with tracked biopsies, T2-weighted MRI and apparent diffusion coefficient maps derived from diffusion-weighted MRI are the most sensitive sequences, whereas the addition of delayed contrast enhancement MRI and three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopy demonstrated higher specificity consistent with results obtained using radical prostatectomy specimens.

  10. Diffusion-weighted MRI for detecting prostate tumour in men at increased genetic risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Nandita M. de; Morgan, Veronica A.; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Sohaib, S. Aslam; Giles, Sharon L.; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Castro, Elena; Hazell, Steven; Jafar, Maysam; Eeles, Rosalind

    2014-01-01

    •Endorectal T2W + DW-MRI is potentially useful for prostate cancer screening.•MRI is specific for detecting prostate cancer in men with increased genetic risk.•Detection of prostate cancer in men at genetically low risk with MRI is limited. Endorectal T2W + DW-MRI is potentially useful for prostate cancer screening. MRI is specific for detecting prostate cancer in men with increased genetic risk. Detection of prostate cancer in men at genetically low risk with MRI is limited. Diffusion-weighted (DW)-MRI is invaluable in detecting prostate cancer. We determined its sensitivity and specificity and established interobserver agreement for detecting tumour in men with a family history of prostate cancer stratified by genetic risk. 51 men with a family history of prostate cancer underwent T2-W + DW-endorectal MRI at 3.0 T. Presence of tumour was noted at right and left apex, mid and basal prostate sextants by 2 independent observers, 1 experienced and the other inexperienced in endorectal MRI. Sensitivity and specificity against a 10-core sampling technique (lateral and medial cores at each level considered together) in men with >2× population risk based on 71 SNP analysis versus those with lower genetic risk scores was established. Interobserver agreement was determined at a subject level. Biopsies indicated cancer in 28 sextants in 13/51 men; 32 of 51 men had twice the population risk (>0.25) based on 71 SNP profiling. Sensitivity/specificity per-subject for patients was 90.0%/86.4% (high-risk) vs. 66.7%/100% (low-risk, observer 1) and 60.0%/86.3% (high-risk) vs. 33.3%/93.8% (low-risk, observer 2) with moderate overall inter-observer agreement (kappa = 0.42). Regional sensitivities/specificities for high-risk vs. low-risk for observer 1 apex 72.2%/100% [33.3%/100%], mid 100%/93.1% [100%/97.3%], base 16.7%/98.3% [0%/100%] and for observer 2 apex 36.4%/98.1% [0%/100%], mid 28.6%/96.5% [100%/100%], base 20%/100% [0%/97.3%] were poorer as they failed to detect

  11. The predictive value of MRI in the syndesmotic instability of ankle fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Young Hwan; Choi, Won Seok; Kim, Hak Jun [Korea University Guro Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Min A.; Hong, Suk Joo [Korea University Guro Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Gi Won [Korea University Ansan Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2018-04-15

    Although many types of ankle fracture can be combined with syndesmosis injury, preoperative imaging studies rarely reveal instability of the syndesmosis. This study assessed the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for syndesmotic instability in patients with unstable ankle fracture. A total of 74 patients who were treated for Lauge-Hansen supination external rotation/Weber B type fracture or pronation external rotation/Weber C type fracture and who underwent MRI for preoperative assessment were enrolled. The MRI findings of the syndesmotic ligament and the results of an intraoperative stress test were evaluated. Twenty-six patients had a positive result on the intraoperative stress test for syndesmotic instability. The MRI findings of the syndesmotic ligaments revealed that complete tear of the posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (PITFL) was the most reliable predictor of syndesmotic instability (sensitivity, 74%; specificity, 78%; positive predictive value, 54%). Interobserver agreement for the intraoperative stress test and MRI assessment was excellent, except for the MRI findings of the interosseous ligament (62% agreement; kappa, 0.3). Complete tear of the PITFL on MRI has additional diagnostic value for syndesmotic instability in ankle fracture. However, because the sensitivity might not be sufficient to justify the costs associated with MRI, cost-effectiveness should be considered. (orig.)

  12. The predictive value of MRI in the syndesmotic instability of ankle fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Young Hwan; Choi, Won Seok; Kim, Hak Jun; Yoon, Min A.; Hong, Suk Joo; Choi, Gi Won

    2018-01-01

    Although many types of ankle fracture can be combined with syndesmosis injury, preoperative imaging studies rarely reveal instability of the syndesmosis. This study assessed the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for syndesmotic instability in patients with unstable ankle fracture. A total of 74 patients who were treated for Lauge-Hansen supination external rotation/Weber B type fracture or pronation external rotation/Weber C type fracture and who underwent MRI for preoperative assessment were enrolled. The MRI findings of the syndesmotic ligament and the results of an intraoperative stress test were evaluated. Twenty-six patients had a positive result on the intraoperative stress test for syndesmotic instability. The MRI findings of the syndesmotic ligaments revealed that complete tear of the posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (PITFL) was the most reliable predictor of syndesmotic instability (sensitivity, 74%; specificity, 78%; positive predictive value, 54%). Interobserver agreement for the intraoperative stress test and MRI assessment was excellent, except for the MRI findings of the interosseous ligament (62% agreement; kappa, 0.3). Complete tear of the PITFL on MRI has additional diagnostic value for syndesmotic instability in ankle fracture. However, because the sensitivity might not be sufficient to justify the costs associated with MRI, cost-effectiveness should be considered. (orig.)

  13. Enhancement pattern of small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) at contrast-enhanced US (CEUS), MDCT, and MRI: Intermodality agreement and comparison of diagnostic sensitivity between 2005 and 2010 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furlan, Alessandro; Marin, Daniele; Cabassa, Paolo; Taibbi, Adele; Brunelli, Elena; Agnello, Francesco; Lagalla, Roberto; Brancatelli, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate agreement between contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of typical and atypical enhancement patterns of small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC); and to compare diagnostic sensitivity of 2005 and 2010 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) guidelines. Materials and methods: Between January 2008 and December 2009, we included cirrhotic patients with newly diagnosed 10–20 mm HCC imaged at two contrast-enhanced imaging techniques among CEUS, MDCT, and MRI. Dynamic studies were reviewed by two radiologists to assess enhancement pattern. Percentage of cases with concordant findings and Cohen coefficient (k) were calculated. McNemar's test was used to compare sensitivity between 2005 and 2010 AASLD guidelines. Results: There were 91 patients (69 M; 22 F; mean age, 68 years) with 96 HCCs, studied with a combination of CEUS and MDCT (n = 59), CEUS and MRI (n = 26), or MDCT and MRI (n = 11). Intermodality agreement for assessment of tumor enhancement pattern was 67% (k = 0.294, P = 0.001). Typical enhancement pattern was detected coincidentally at two imaging modalities in 50 (52%) HCCs. Sensitivity for the diagnosis of HCC increased significantly using the 2010 AASLD (81/96 (84%) vs. 50/96 (52%), P < 0.001). Conclusions: Agreement between two imaging modalities for the detection of typical tumor enhancement pattern was reached in 52% of cases. The 2010 AASLD guidelines significantly increased the sensitivity for the diagnosis of HCC

  14. Advanced flow MRI: emerging techniques and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markl, M.; Schnell, S.; Wu, C.; Bollache, E.; Jarvis, K.; Barker, A.J.; Robinson, J.D.; Rigsby, C.K.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques provide non-invasive and non-ionising methods for the highly accurate anatomical depiction of the heart and vessels throughout the cardiac cycle. In addition, the intrinsic sensitivity of MRI to motion offers the unique ability to acquire spatially registered blood flow simultaneously with the morphological data, within a single measurement. In clinical routine, flow MRI is typically accomplished using methods that resolve two spatial dimensions in individual planes and encode the time-resolved velocity in one principal direction, typically oriented perpendicular to the two-dimensional (2D) section. This review describes recently developed advanced MRI flow techniques, which allow for more comprehensive evaluation of blood flow characteristics, such as real-time flow imaging, 2D multiple-venc phase contrast MRI, four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, quantification of complex haemodynamic properties, and highly accelerated flow imaging. Emerging techniques and novel applications are explored. In addition, applications of these new techniques for the improved evaluation of cardiovascular (aorta, pulmonary arteries, congenital heart disease, atrial fibrillation, coronary arteries) as well as cerebrovascular disease (intra-cranial arteries and veins) are presented.

  15. Neurodegenerative diseases of the central motor system in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfke, K.

    2005-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases of the central motor system often lead to discrete but functionally important parenchymal abnormalities in various parts of the brain. MRI is the most sensitive imaging method to detect these abnormalities. Various neurodegenerative diseases are presented with their clinical symptoms and MRI findings. Criteria for differential diagnosis are provided as well. (orig.)

  16. The usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in cervical carcinoma assessment - a preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tacikowska, M.; Grzesiakowska, U.; Tacikowski, T.; Sobiczewski, P.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of diagnostic imaging is not so much the detection of cervical carcinoma, but the evaluation of its stage. In view of this the aim of this study included: 1) comparison of MR results with the results of histological examinations after operations with reference to the dimensions of cervical carcinoma; 2) assessment of the sensitivity and specificity of MRl in the evaluation of parametrium infiltration; 3) analysis of the sensitivity and specificity of MRI in the evaluation of infiltration of the vagina and uterus; 4) assessment of the usefulness of this method in the detection of metastases to lymph nodes.The material consisted of pelvic MRI, obtained with 2T Elscint unit in 15 patients with cervical carcinoma, aged 37 to 73 years. All patients underwent surgical treatment within 30 days after MR. During the MR examination the following sequences were performed: SE (spin echo) T1 (longitudinal relaxation time) in axial projection before administration of gadolinium (Gd-DTPA); SE T1 in axial, frontal and sagittal projections after contrast injection and FSE (fast spin echo) T2 (transversal relaxation time) in axial, frontal and sagittal projections.1) in the assessment of cervical carcinoma dimensions MRI results are highly concordant with the results of postoperative histological examination (p = 0. 9389); 2) in the assessment of parametrium infiltration sensitivity and specificity of MRI are 75% and 100%, respectively; 3) in the assessment of the infiltration of the vagina and uterine corpus the sensitivity and specificity of MRI imaging were respectively 100% and 85%; 100% and 100%; 4) in the detection of lymph node metastases MRI sensitivity was 67% and its specificity 100%. In patients with cervical carcinoma MRI is a valuable method for the assessment of tumour dimensions, parametrium infiltration, infiltration of the vagina and uterine corpus.(author)

  17. fMRI study of neural sensitization to hedonic stimuli in long-term, daily cannabis users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filbey, Francesca M; Dunlop, Joseph; Ketcherside, Ariel; Baine, Jessica; Rhinehardt, Tyler; Kuhn, Brittany; DeWitt, Sam; Alvi, Talha

    2016-10-01

    Although there is emergent evidence illustrating neural sensitivity to cannabis cues in cannabis users, the specificity of this effect to cannabis cues as opposed to a generalized hyper-sensitivity to hedonic stimuli has not yet been directly tested. Using fMRI, we presented 53 daily, long-term cannabis users and 68 non-using controls visual and tactile cues for cannabis, a natural reward, and, a sensory-perceptual control object to evaluate brain response to hedonic stimuli in cannabis users. The results showed an interaction between group and reward type such that the users had greater response during cannabis cues relative to natural reward cues (i.e., fruit) in the orbitofrontal cortex, striatum, anterior cingulate gyrus, and ventral tegmental area compared to non-users (cluster-threshold z = 2.3, P brain-behavior correlations between neural response to cannabis cues in fronto-striatal-temporal regions and subjective craving, marijuana-related problems, withdrawal symptoms, and levels of THC metabolites (cluster-threshold z = 2.3, P brain response to cannabis cues in long-term cannabis users that are above that of response to natural reward cues. These observations are concordant with incentive sensitization models suggesting sensitization of mesocorticolimbic regions and disruption of natural reward processes following drug use. Although the cross-sectional nature of this study does not provide information on causality, the positive correlations between neural response and indicators of cannabis use (i.e., THC levels) suggest that alterations in the reward system are, in part, related to cannabis use. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3431-3443, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Low-Cost High-Performance MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarracanie, Mathieu; Lapierre, Cristen D.; Salameh, Najat; Waddington, David E. J.; Witzel, Thomas; Rosen, Matthew S.

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is unparalleled in its ability to visualize anatomical structure and function non-invasively with high spatial and temporal resolution. Yet to overcome the low sensitivity inherent in inductive detection of weakly polarized nuclear spins, the vast majority of clinical MRI scanners employ superconducting magnets producing very high magnetic fields. Commonly found at 1.5-3 tesla (T), these powerful magnets are massive and have very strict infrastructure demands that preclude operation in many environments. MRI scanners are costly to purchase, site, and maintain, with the purchase price approaching $1 M per tesla (T) of magnetic field. We present here a remarkably simple, non-cryogenic approach to high-performance human MRI at ultra-low magnetic field, whereby modern under-sampling strategies are combined with fully-refocused dynamic spin control using steady-state free precession techniques. At 6.5 mT (more than 450 times lower than clinical MRI scanners) we demonstrate (2.5 × 3.5 × 8.5) mm3 imaging resolution in the living human brain using a simple, open-geometry electromagnet, with 3D image acquisition over the entire brain in 6 minutes. We contend that these practical ultra-low magnetic field implementations of MRI (standards for affordable (<$50,000) and robust portable devices.

  19. Functional MRI of the patellofemoral joint: comparison of ultrafast MRI, motion-triggered cine MRI and static MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhle, C. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Brossmann, J. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Melchert, U.H. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Schroeder, C. [Radiologische Abt., Universitaets-Kinderklinik, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany); Boer, R. de [Philips Medical Systems, Best (Netherlands); Spielmann, R.P. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Heller, M. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    To evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of ultrafast MRI (u), patellar tracking from 30 of flexion to knee extension (0 ) was analysed and compared with motion-triggered cine MRI (m) and a static MRI technique (s). The different imaging methods were compared in respect of the patellofemoral relationship, the examination time and image quality. Eight healthy subjects and four patients (in total 18 joints) with patellar subluxation or luxation were examined. Significant differences between the static MRI series without quadriceps contraction and the functional MRI studies (motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI) were found for the patellar tilt angle. In the dynamic joint studies there was no statistical difference of the regression coefficients between the motion-triggered cine MRI studies and the ultrafast MRI studies. The findings of the functional MRI studies compared with the static MRI images were significantly different for the lateralisation of the patella, expressed by the lateral patellar displacement and bisect offset. No significant differences in patellar lateralisation were found between motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI. Ultrafast MRI was superior to motion-triggered cine MRI in terms of the reduction in imaging time and improvement of the image quality. (orig.)

  20. Functional MRI of the patellofemoral joint: comparison of ultrafast MRI, motion-triggered cine MRI and static MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhle, C.; Brossmann, J.; Melchert, U.H.; Schroeder, C.; Boer, R. de; Spielmann, R.P.; Heller, M.

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of ultrafast MRI (u), patellar tracking from 30 of flexion to knee extension (0 ) was analysed and compared with motion-triggered cine MRI (m) and a static MRI technique (s). The different imaging methods were compared in respect of the patellofemoral relationship, the examination time and image quality. Eight healthy subjects and four patients (in total 18 joints) with patellar subluxation or luxation were examined. Significant differences between the static MRI series without quadriceps contraction and the functional MRI studies (motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI) were found for the patellar tilt angle. In the dynamic joint studies there was no statistical difference of the regression coefficients between the motion-triggered cine MRI studies and the ultrafast MRI studies. The findings of the functional MRI studies compared with the static MRI images were significantly different for the lateralisation of the patella, expressed by the lateral patellar displacement and bisect offset. No significant differences in patellar lateralisation were found between motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI. Ultrafast MRI was superior to motion-triggered cine MRI in terms of the reduction in imaging time and improvement of the image quality. (orig.)

  1. Application of low field intensity joint MRI in ankle injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhenyu; Wang Wei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To observe the diagnostic value of the low field intensity joint magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in traumatic ankles. Methods: Through a retrospective examination and collection of 50 cases with complete information and checked by arthroscope or/and operated from Jan 2007 to Jun 2010, the diagnostic value ligament of the ankle joint, bone contusion,occult fracture, talus cartilage, and tendon could be evaluated. Cases of fracture for which could be diagnosed by X rays and CT were not included in this research. Results: The special low field intensity joint MRI had a high diagnostic sensitivity of 88.9% to ligamentum talofibulare anterius, but was only 50% sensitive to ligamentum calcaneofibulare. Its sensitivity to injury of ligamentum deltoideum and distal tibiofibular syndesmosis was up to 100%. Tendon injury, bone contusion and occult fracture could be exactly diagnosed. Its total sensitivity on talus cartilage traumatism was 70.6%. Its diagnosis sensitivity to talus cartilage traumatism at the 3rd-5th period by Mintz was 90%, with a lower one of 42.9% at the 1st-2nd period. Talus cartilage traumatism could be exactly predicted by osseous tissue dropsy below cartilage. Conclusion: The special low field intensity joint MRI is highly applicable to the diagnosis on ankle joint traumatism and facilitates clinical treatment. (authors)

  2. New nontoxic double information magnetic and fluorescent MRI agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kublickas, Augustinas; Rastenien, Loreta; Bloznelytė-Plėšnienė, Laima; Karalius, Nerijus [Liquid Crystals Laboratory, Institute of Science and Technology, Lithuanian University of Educational Sciences (Lithuania); Franckevinius, Marius [Institute of Physics, Center for Physical Sciences and Technology (Lithuania); Loudos, George [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece); Fahmi, Amir [Materials Science, Rhein-Waal University of Applied Sciences (Germany); Vaisnoras, Rimas [Liquid Crystals Laboratory, Institute of Science and Technology, Lithuanian University of Educational Sciences (Lithuania)

    2015-05-18

    Today sensitivity of the MRI is not enough compared to the nuclear methods, such as positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography. Challenging its extension to the nanometre scale could provide a powerful new tool for the nanosciences and nanomedicine. To achieve this potential, innovative new detection strategies are required to overcome the severe sensitivity limitations of conventional inductive detection techniques. In this regard, we perform embodiment of nanodiamonds in dendrimer matrix as additional fluorescent optical and magnetic (together with Gd (III)) imaging modalities of the MRI. New hybrid system composed of dendrimer-gadolinium Gd (III) - nanodiamond as a new contrast agent for MRI was studied. Poly(propilene-imine) PPI and poly(amidoamine) PAMAM dendrimers with fixed size of nanocavities will be used as host material to protect organism against the toxicity and also to increase relaxivity of contrast agent (resulting in the increases MRI resolution). Nanodiamond as biocompatible platform to functionalize the contrast agent will be used. This bimodal hybrid system enables to use smaller amount of the contrast agent and could permit the decrease of the lateral toxicity. This bimodal hybrid system as MRI agent is providing double information (magnetic and fluorescent) about the damaged cell.

  3. New nontoxic double information magnetic and fluorescent MRI agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kublickas, Augustinas; Rastenien, Loreta; Bloznelytė-Plėšnienė, Laima; Karalius, Nerijus; Franckevinius, Marius; Loudos, George; Fahmi, Amir; Vaisnoras, Rimas

    2015-01-01

    Today sensitivity of the MRI is not enough compared to the nuclear methods, such as positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography. Challenging its extension to the nanometre scale could provide a powerful new tool for the nanosciences and nanomedicine. To achieve this potential, innovative new detection strategies are required to overcome the severe sensitivity limitations of conventional inductive detection techniques. In this regard, we perform embodiment of nanodiamonds in dendrimer matrix as additional fluorescent optical and magnetic (together with Gd (III)) imaging modalities of the MRI. New hybrid system composed of dendrimer-gadolinium Gd (III) - nanodiamond as a new contrast agent for MRI was studied. Poly(propilene-imine) PPI and poly(amidoamine) PAMAM dendrimers with fixed size of nanocavities will be used as host material to protect organism against the toxicity and also to increase relaxivity of contrast agent (resulting in the increases MRI resolution). Nanodiamond as biocompatible platform to functionalize the contrast agent will be used. This bimodal hybrid system enables to use smaller amount of the contrast agent and could permit the decrease of the lateral toxicity. This bimodal hybrid system as MRI agent is providing double information (magnetic and fluorescent) about the damaged cell.

  4. Cerebral activity mapped by functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruening, R.; Danek, A.; Wu, R.H.; Berchtenbreiter, C.; Reiser, M.

    1997-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a method to noninvasively measure the changes in cerebral activation during sensitive, cognitive or motor activity. fMRI detects activity by subtraction of states of activity and rest. During activity the signal is increased presumably due to a decrease of deoxyhemoglobin in the capillary and venous structures. Using a full field visual stimulation by flashlight goggles, a signal increase of 3% was detected in the primary visual cortex (V1). Different sequences and postprocessing algorythms will be discussed. Data from the primary cortical areas suggest a high reproducability of the experiments. Successfull experiments highly depend on cooperation of subjects. Despite success in experiments fMRI still has to be established for clinical purposes. (orig.) [de

  5. Breast MRI of ductal carcinoma in situ. Is there MRI role?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francescutti, G.E.; Londero, V.; Berra, I.; Del Frate, C.; Zuiani, C.; Bazzocchi, M.

    2002-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study is to report our personal experience of 22 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients and methods. From September 1995 to December 2001, 22 women diagnosed with DCIS lesions underwent contrast enhanced MRI within 7 days after mammographic examination. Dynamic MRI was performed with a 1 T system, using a three dimensional fast low angle shot (FLASH) pulse sequence before and after contrast media administration. We evaluated the morphologic features of the enhancement, the enhancement rate and the signal time intensity curve. Pathology was obtained in all cases. Results. The results of histopatological examination included: 15 DCIS and 7 DCIS with associated microinvasive component or microfoci of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). On MRI, 21 of 22 (95%) DCIS lesions showed contrast enhancement. Fourteen out of 15 pure DCIS lesions demonstrated respectively a low (3), undeterminate (5), and strong (6) enhancement. Morphologically, the enhancing lesion was focal in 7, segmental in 4, and with linear branching in 3 cases. Wash out was found in 4 cases, plateau curve in 8 and Type I curve in 2 cases. Multifocality was present in 5 cases. All DCIS with associated microinvasion demonstrated contrast enhancement: 1/7 cases showed a low enhancement, 2/7 showed an indeterminate enhancement and 4/7 showed a strong enhancement. Morphologically, the enhancing lesion was focal in 3/9, segmental in 5 and with linear branching in 1 case. The wash out was demonstrated in 3/7 cases, plateau curve in 3 and Type 1 curve in 1 case. Multifocality was present in 3 cases. Conclusions. In conclusion, the sensitivity of MRI for DCIS detection is lower than that achieved for invasive breast cancer; however, contrast-enhanced MRI can depict foci of DCIS that are mammographically occult. The MRI technique is of complementary value for a better description of tumor size and detection of additional

  6. Combined PET/MRI in cerebral and paediatric diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfluger, T.; Vollmar, C.; Porn, U.; Schmid, R.; Dresel, S.; Leinsinger, G.; Schmid, I.; Winkler, P.; Fischer, S.; Hahn, K.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this overview is presentation of MRI and PET as synergistic modalities for combined analysis of morphology and function. For operative planning in epilepsy surgery, definition of the epileptogenic focus based on functional PET diagnostics and morphological MRI is decisive. For staging and follow-up examinations in oncology, MRI should be complemented by PET for the assessment of tumor vitality. In paediatric oncology patients we could demonstrate a therapy relevant increase of sensitivity/specificity with combined PET/MRI in contrast to single modalities. In the brain, full spectrum of digital image registration and three-dimensional reconstruction should be used. In extracranial cases, image fusion is disturbing due to a partial loss of image information of single modalities by the fusion process. (orig.) [de

  7. Diagnostic performance of MRI and MR myelography in infants with a brachial plexus birth injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, L.S.; Yaylali, Ilker; Zurakowski, David; Ruiz, Jennifer; Altman, Nolan R.; Grossman, John A.I.

    2006-01-01

    Detailed evaluation of a brachial plexus birth injury is important for treatment planning. To determine the diagnostic performance of MRI and MR myelography in infants with a brachial plexus birth injury. Included in the study were 31 children with perinatal brachial plexus injury who underwent surgical intervention. All patients had cervical and brachial plexus MRI. The standard of reference was the combination of intraoperative (1) surgical evaluation and (2) electrophysiological studies (motor evoked potentials, MEP, and somatosensory evoked potentials, SSEP), and (3) the evaluation of histopathological neuronal loss. MRI findings of cord lesion, pseudomeningocele, and post-traumatic neuroma were correlated with the standard of reference. Diagnostic performance characteristics including sensitivity and specificity were determined. From June 2001 to March 2004, 31 children (mean age 7.3 months, standard deviation 1.6 months, range 4.8-12.1 months; 19 male, 12 female) with a brachial plexus birth injury who underwent surgical intervention were enrolled. Sensitivity and specificity of an MRI finding of post-traumatic neuroma were 97% (30/31) and 100% (31/31), respectively, using the contralateral normal brachial plexus as the control. However, MRI could not determine the exact anatomic area (i.e. trunk or division) of the post-traumatic brachial plexus neuroma injury. Sensitivity and specificity for an MRI finding of pseudomeningocele in determining exiting nerve injury were 50% and 100%, respectively, using MEP, and 44% and 80%, respectively, using SSEP as the standard of reference. MRI in infants could not image well the exiting nerve roots to determine consistently the presence or absence of definite avulsion. In children younger than 18 months with brachial plexus injury, the MRI finding of pseudomeningocele has a low sensitivity and a high specificity for nerve root avulsion. MRI and MR myelography cannot image well the exiting nerve roots to determine

  8. The OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Scoring System: Updated Recommendations by the OMERACT MRI in Arthritis Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Peterfy, Charles G; Bird, Paul; Gandjbakhch, Frédérique; Glinatsi, Daniel; Eshed, Iris; Haavardsholm, Espen A; Lillegraven, Siri; Bøyesen, Pernille; Ejbjerg, Bo; Foltz, Violaine; Emery, Paul; Genant, Harry K; Conaghan, Philip G

    2017-11-01

    The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scoring system (RAMRIS), evaluating bone erosion, bone marrow edema/osteitis, and synovitis, was introduced in 2002, and is now the standard method of objectively quantifying inflammation and damage by MRI in RA trials. The objective of this paper was to identify subsequent advances and based on them, to provide updated recommendations for the RAMRIS. MRI studies relevant for RAMRIS and technical and scientific advances were analyzed by the OMERACT MRI in Arthritis Working Group, which used these data to provide updated considerations on image acquisition, RAMRIS definitions, and scoring systems for the original and new RA pathologies. Further, a research agenda was outlined. Since 2002, longitudinal studies and clinical trials have documented RAMRIS variables to have face, construct, and criterion validity; high reliability and sensitivity to change; and the ability to discriminate between therapies. This has enabled RAMRIS to demonstrate inhibition of structural damage progression with fewer patients and shorter followup times than has been possible with conventional radiography. Technical improvements, including higher field strengths and improved pulse sequences, allow higher image resolution and contrast-to-noise ratio. These have facilitated development and validation of scoring methods of new pathologies: joint space narrowing and tenosynovitis. These have high reproducibility and moderate sensitivity to change, and can be added to RAMRIS. Combined scores of inflammation or joint damage may increase sensitivity to change and discriminative power. However, this requires further research. Updated 2016 RAMRIS recommendations and a research agenda were developed.

  9. Methodological principles for optimising functional MRI experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuestenberg, T.; Giesel, F.L.; Strasburger, H.

    2005-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is one of the most common methods for localising neuronal activity in the brain. Even though the sensitivity of fMRI is comparatively low, the optimisation of certain experimental parameters allows obtaining reliable results. In this article, approaches for optimising the experimental design, imaging parameters and analytic strategies will be discussed. Clinical neuroscientists and interested physicians will receive practical rules of thumb for improving the efficiency of brain imaging experiments. (orig.) [de

  10. Imaging children suffering from lymphoma: an evaluation of different 18F-FDG PET/MRI protocols compared to whole-body DW-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Julian; Deuschl, Cornelius; Schweiger, Bernd; Herrmann, Ken; Forsting, Michael; Buchbender, Christian; Antoch, Gerald; Umutlu, Lale

    2017-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate and compare the diagnostic potential of different PET/MRI reading protocols, entailing non-enhanced / contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted 18 F-FDG PET/MR imaging and whole-body diffusion-weighted MRI for lesion detection and determination of the tumor stage in pediatric lymphoma patients. A total of 28 18 F-FDG PET/MRI datasets were included for analysis of four different reading protocols: (1) PET/MRI utilizing sole unenhanced T2w and T1w imaging, (2) PET/MRI utilizing additional contrast enhanced sequences, (3) PET/MR imaging utilizing unenhanced, contrast enhanced and DW imaging or (4) WB-DW-MRI. Statistical analyses were performed on a per-patient and a per-lesion basis. Follow-up and prior examinations as well as histopathology served as reference standards. PET/MRI correctly identified all 17 examinations with active lymphoma disease, while WB-DW-MRI correctly identified 15/17 examinations. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and diagnostic accuracy were 96%, 96.5%, 97%, 95%, and 96% for PET/MRI 1 ; 97%, 96.5%, 97%, 96.5%, and 97% for PET/MRI 2 ; 97%, 96.5%, 97%, 96.5%, and 97% for PET/MRI 3 and 77%, 96%, 96%, 78.5% and 86% for MRI-DWI. 18 F-FDG PET/MRI is superior to WB-DW-MRI in staging pediatric lymphoma patients. Neither application of contrast media nor DWI leads to a noticeable improvement of the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MRI. Thus, unenhanced PET/MRI may play a crucial role for the diagnostic work-up of pediatric lymphoma patients in the future.

  11. Assessment of CF lung disease using motion corrected PROPELLER MRI: a comparison with CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciet, Pierluigi [General Hospital Ca' Foncello, Radiology Department, Treviso (Italy); Sophia Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Pulmonology Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Serra, Goffredo; Catalano, Carlo [University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' , Radiology, Rome (Italy); Bertolo, Silvia; Morana, Giovanni [General Hospital Ca' Foncello, Radiology Department, Treviso (Italy); Spronk, Sandra [Erasmus MC, Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Epidemiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Ros, Mirco [Ca' Foncello Hospital, Pediatrics, Treviso (Italy); Fraioli, Francesco [University College London (UCL), Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Quattrucci, Serena [University of Rome Sapienza, Pediatrics, Rome (Italy); Assael, M.B. [Azienda Ospedaliera di Verona, Verona CF Center, Verona (Italy); Pomerri, Fabio [University of Padova, Department of Medicine-DIMED, Padova (Italy); Tiddens, Harm A.W.M. [Sophia Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Pulmonology Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-03-15

    To date, PROPELLER MRI, a breathing-motion-insensitive technique, has not been assessed for cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. We compared this technique to CT for assessing CF lung disease in children and adults. Thirty-eight stable CF patients (median 21 years, range 6-51 years, 22 female) underwent MRI and CT on the same day. Study protocol included respiratory-triggered PROPELLER MRI and volumetric CT end-inspiratory and -expiratory acquisitions. Two observers scored the images using the CF-MRI and CF-CT systems. Scores were compared with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plots. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI versus CT were calculated. MRI sensitivity for detecting severe CF bronchiectasis was 0.33 (CI 0.09-0.57), while specificity was 100 % (CI 0.88-1). ICCs for bronchiectasis and trapped air were as follows: MRI-bronchiectasis (0.79); CT-bronchiectasis (0.85); MRI-trapped air (0.51); CT-trapped air (0.87). Bland-Altman plots showed an MRI tendency to overestimate the severity of bronchiectasis in mild CF disease and underestimate bronchiectasis in severe disease. Motion correction in PROPELLER MRI does not improve assessment of CF lung disease compared to CT. However, the good inter- and intra-observer agreement and the high specificity suggest that MRI might play a role in the short-term follow-up of CF lung disease (i.e. pulmonary exacerbations). (orig.)

  12. Assessment of CF lung disease using motion corrected PROPELLER MRI: a comparison with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciet, Pierluigi; Serra, Goffredo; Catalano, Carlo; Bertolo, Silvia; Morana, Giovanni; Spronk, Sandra; Ros, Mirco; Fraioli, Francesco; Quattrucci, Serena; Assael, M.B.; Pomerri, Fabio; Tiddens, Harm A.W.M.

    2016-01-01

    To date, PROPELLER MRI, a breathing-motion-insensitive technique, has not been assessed for cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. We compared this technique to CT for assessing CF lung disease in children and adults. Thirty-eight stable CF patients (median 21 years, range 6-51 years, 22 female) underwent MRI and CT on the same day. Study protocol included respiratory-triggered PROPELLER MRI and volumetric CT end-inspiratory and -expiratory acquisitions. Two observers scored the images using the CF-MRI and CF-CT systems. Scores were compared with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plots. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI versus CT were calculated. MRI sensitivity for detecting severe CF bronchiectasis was 0.33 (CI 0.09-0.57), while specificity was 100 % (CI 0.88-1). ICCs for bronchiectasis and trapped air were as follows: MRI-bronchiectasis (0.79); CT-bronchiectasis (0.85); MRI-trapped air (0.51); CT-trapped air (0.87). Bland-Altman plots showed an MRI tendency to overestimate the severity of bronchiectasis in mild CF disease and underestimate bronchiectasis in severe disease. Motion correction in PROPELLER MRI does not improve assessment of CF lung disease compared to CT. However, the good inter- and intra-observer agreement and the high specificity suggest that MRI might play a role in the short-term follow-up of CF lung disease (i.e. pulmonary exacerbations). (orig.)

  13. Bladder cancer: Evaluation of staging accuracy using dynamic MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajesh, A.; Sokhi, H.K.; Fung, R.; Mulcahy, K.A.; Bankart, M.J.G.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To assess the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in staging bladder cancer and to assess whether dynamic gadolinium-enhanced sequences have any added benefit in staging. Materials and methods: Over a 22 month period, the MRI findings of 100 consecutive patients with histologically proven transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder were reviewed. The T stage was assessed independently on T2-weighted imaging alone and in combination with gadolinium-enhanced MRI. The final histological diagnosis was considered the reference standard. Statistical analysis was performed to ascertain stage-by-stage accuracy. Accuracy of MRI in differentiating superficial (≤T1) from invasive (≥T2) and in differentiating organ-confined (≤T2) from non-organ-confined (≥T3) disease was assessed. Results: On a stage-by-stage basis, tumours were correctly staged using MRI in 63% of patients (observed agreement = 0.63, weighted kappa = 0.57). The sensitivity and specificity of MRI to differentiate between superficial (≤T1) from invasive (≥T2) disease was 78.2 and 93.3%. The observed agreement for this group was 85% (kappa = 70%; p < 0.0001). The sensitivity and specificity of MRI to differentiate between organ-confined (≤T2) from non-organ confined (≥T3) disease was 90.5 and 60%. The observed agreement for this group was 89% (kappa = 30%; p < 0.01). Gadolinium-enhanced images improved staging in only three patients. Conclusion: In the present study MRI was found to be a moderately accurate tool in assessing the T stage. Agreement on a stage-by-stage basis was good. Agreement for differentiating between non-invasive versus muscle-invasive disease was good and that for organ-confined versus non-organ-confined disease was fair. Routine use of gadolinium-enhanced images is not routinely required.

  14. Bladder cancer: Evaluation of staging accuracy using dynamic MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajesh, A., E-mail: arajesh27@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester General Hospital (United Kingdom); Sokhi, H.K.; Fung, R.; Mulcahy, K.A. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester General Hospital (United Kingdom); Bankart, M.J.G. [Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    Aim: To assess the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in staging bladder cancer and to assess whether dynamic gadolinium-enhanced sequences have any added benefit in staging. Materials and methods: Over a 22 month period, the MRI findings of 100 consecutive patients with histologically proven transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder were reviewed. The T stage was assessed independently on T2-weighted imaging alone and in combination with gadolinium-enhanced MRI. The final histological diagnosis was considered the reference standard. Statistical analysis was performed to ascertain stage-by-stage accuracy. Accuracy of MRI in differentiating superficial ({<=}T1) from invasive ({>=}T2) and in differentiating organ-confined ({<=}T2) from non-organ-confined ({>=}T3) disease was assessed. Results: On a stage-by-stage basis, tumours were correctly staged using MRI in 63% of patients (observed agreement = 0.63, weighted kappa = 0.57). The sensitivity and specificity of MRI to differentiate between superficial ({<=}T1) from invasive ({>=}T2) disease was 78.2 and 93.3%. The observed agreement for this group was 85% (kappa = 70%; p < 0.0001). The sensitivity and specificity of MRI to differentiate between organ-confined ({<=}T2) from non-organ confined ({>=}T3) disease was 90.5 and 60%. The observed agreement for this group was 89% (kappa = 30%; p < 0.01). Gadolinium-enhanced images improved staging in only three patients. Conclusion: In the present study MRI was found to be a moderately accurate tool in assessing the T stage. Agreement on a stage-by-stage basis was good. Agreement for differentiating between non-invasive versus muscle-invasive disease was good and that for organ-confined versus non-organ-confined disease was fair. Routine use of gadolinium-enhanced images is not routinely required.

  15. Three-dimensional MRI of the glenoid labrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loehr, S.P.; Pope, T.L. Jr.; Martin, D.F.; Link, K.M.; Monu, J.U.V.; Hunter, M.; Reboussin, D.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reformation in the evaluation of tears of the glenoid labrum complex (GLC). Fifty-five shoulders were evaluated by MRI using standard spin-echo sequences. Gradient-refocused-echo axial projections were used to assess the GLC on the two-dimensional (2D) studies. Three-dimensional Fourier transform multiplanar gradient-recalled imaging with a resolution of 0.7 mm was also performed in all patients. Independent analyses of the anterior and posterior labra were performed in a blinded manner for both the 2D and 3D studies by three experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. Observations of the imaging studies were compared with the videoarthroscopic findings. The appearance of the GLC was rated on a scale of 0 to 4 (0-2=normal, 3, 4=abnormal or torn). The diagnostic confidence was averaged from the three reader's scores. Anterior labral tears were effectively detected with sensitivities of 89% and 96% and specificities of 96% and 100% (P<0.0001) for the 2D and 3D studies, respectively. For posterior labral tears, the sensitivity and specificity of the 2D method were 47% and 98%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the 3D volume sequence were 53% and 98%, respectively. The lower sensitivity of both imaging methods for detecting posterior labral tears may be influenced by the smaller number (n=5) of arthroscopically confirmed cases in our study and reflects the difficulty of visualizing the posteroinferior borders of the GLC with present MRI techniques. (orig.)

  16. MRI features of tuberculosis of peripheral joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawlani, V.; Chandra, T.; Mishra, R.N.; Aggarwal, A.; Jain, U.K.; Gujral, R.B. E-mail: gujralrb@sgpgi.ac.in

    2003-10-01

    The aim of this article is to present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of peripheral tubercular arthritis. The clinical presentation of peripheral tubercular arthritis is variable and simulates other chronic inflammatory arthritic disorders. MRI is a highly sensitive technique which demonstrates fine anatomical details and identifies the early changes of arthritis, which are not visible on radiographs. The MRI features of tubercular arthritis include synovitis, effusion, central and peripheral erosions, active and chronic pannus, abscess, bone chips and hypo-intense synovium. These imaging features in an appropriate clinical setting may help in the diagnosis of tubercular arthritis. Early diagnosis and treatment can effectively eliminate the long-term morbidity of joints affected by tuberculosis.

  17. MRI features of tuberculosis of peripheral joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawlani, V.; Chandra, T.; Mishra, R.N.; Aggarwal, A.; Jain, U.K.; Gujral, R.B.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of peripheral tubercular arthritis. The clinical presentation of peripheral tubercular arthritis is variable and simulates other chronic inflammatory arthritic disorders. MRI is a highly sensitive technique which demonstrates fine anatomical details and identifies the early changes of arthritis, which are not visible on radiographs. The MRI features of tubercular arthritis include synovitis, effusion, central and peripheral erosions, active and chronic pannus, abscess, bone chips and hypo-intense synovium. These imaging features in an appropriate clinical setting may help in the diagnosis of tubercular arthritis. Early diagnosis and treatment can effectively eliminate the long-term morbidity of joints affected by tuberculosis

  18. Utility of vaginal and rectal contrast medium in MRI for the detection of deep pelvic endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chassang, M.; Novellas, S.; Bloch-Marcotte, C.; Chevallier, P.; Delotte, J.; Bongain, A.; Toullalan, O.

    2010-01-01

    To study the sensitivity of MRI performed utilising vaginal and rectal opacification with ultrasound gel in the detection of deep pelvic endometriosis. This was a prospective monocentric study. All patients evaluated by the gynaecologist for pelvic pain, endometriosis or infertility were included. Axial and sagittal T2-weighted images were performed both with and without vaginal and rectal opacification with ultrasound gel. Three radiologists, all blinded, interpreted the images with a minimum of 15 days between the two readings. MRI performance with and without vaginal and rectal opacification was evaluated by calculating sensitivity, specificity and both positive and negative predictive values. Seventy-eight patients were included. Among these, 31 patients had deep pelvic endometriosis of which 24 were confirmed by laparoscopy. Seventy-six locations of deep pelvic endometriosis were discovered on MRI. For the three reviewers there was a significant improvement in sensitivity between pre- and post-contrast MRI (p < 0.0002). Opacification of the vagina and rectum significantly improved the sensitivity of MRI for the detection of deep pelvic endometriosis by expanding the vagina and rectum, thus allowing better delineation of the pelvic organs. This was especially apparent for lesions localised to the vagina and rectovaginal septum. (orig.)

  19. Utility of vaginal and rectal contrast medium in MRI for the detection of deep pelvic endometriosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassang, M.; Novellas, S.; Bloch-Marcotte, C.; Chevallier, P. [Hopital Archet 2, Service d' Imagerie Diagnostique et Interventionnelle, Centre Hospitalier Regional et Universitaire de Nice, 151 route de Saint Antoine de Ginestiere, B.P. 3079, Nice Cedex 3 (France); Delotte, J.; Bongain, A. [Hopital Archet 2, Service de Gynecologie-Obstetrique, Centre Hospitalier Regional et Universitaire de Nice, 151 route de Saint Antoine de Ginestiere, B.P. 3079, Nice Cedex 3 (France); Toullalan, O. [Hopital de Cannes, Service de Gynecologie, 15 avenue des Broussailles, B.P. 264, Cannes Cedex (France)

    2010-04-15

    To study the sensitivity of MRI performed utilising vaginal and rectal opacification with ultrasound gel in the detection of deep pelvic endometriosis. This was a prospective monocentric study. All patients evaluated by the gynaecologist for pelvic pain, endometriosis or infertility were included. Axial and sagittal T2-weighted images were performed both with and without vaginal and rectal opacification with ultrasound gel. Three radiologists, all blinded, interpreted the images with a minimum of 15 days between the two readings. MRI performance with and without vaginal and rectal opacification was evaluated by calculating sensitivity, specificity and both positive and negative predictive values. Seventy-eight patients were included. Among these, 31 patients had deep pelvic endometriosis of which 24 were confirmed by laparoscopy. Seventy-six locations of deep pelvic endometriosis were discovered on MRI. For the three reviewers there was a significant improvement in sensitivity between pre- and post-contrast MRI (p < 0.0002). Opacification of the vagina and rectum significantly improved the sensitivity of MRI for the detection of deep pelvic endometriosis by expanding the vagina and rectum, thus allowing better delineation of the pelvic organs. This was especially apparent for lesions localised to the vagina and rectovaginal septum. (orig.)

  20. Spectrum of MRI findings in clinical athletic pubalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajick, Donald C; Zoga, Adam C; Omar, Imran M; Meyers, William C

    2008-03-01

    Athletic pubalgia is a frequently encountered syndrome for clinicians who treat active patients participating in a wide variety of athletic endeavors worldwide. Pathologies associated with this clinical scenario span anatomically from the pubic symphysis to the hip and include a myriad of poorly understood and incompletely described musculoskeletal entities, many of which are centered about the pubic symphysis and its tendinous attachments. In this article, we discuss the relevant anatomy and pathophysiology for the most frequently encountered of these disorders, using magnetic resonance (MR) images as a guide. We describe an MR imaging protocol tailored to clinical athletic pubalgia. We then review reproducible MRI patterns of pathology about the pubic symphysis, the rectus abdominis/adductor aponeurosis and the inguinal ring, as well as a group of clinically confounding entities remote from the symphysis but visible by MRI.

  1. [MRI methods for pulmonary ventilation and perfusion imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, G; Bauman, G

    2016-02-01

    Separate assessment of respiratory mechanics, gas exchange and pulmonary circulation is essential for the diagnosis and therapy of pulmonary diseases. Due to the global character of the information obtained clinical lung function tests are often not sufficiently specific in the differential diagnosis or have a limited sensitivity in the detection of early pathological changes. The standard procedures of pulmonary imaging are computed tomography (CT) for depiction of the morphology as well as perfusion/ventilation scintigraphy and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for functional assessment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hyperpolarized gases, O2-enhanced MRI, MRI with fluorinated gases and Fourier decomposition MRI (FD-MRI) are available for assessment of pulmonary ventilation. For assessment of pulmonary perfusion dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), arterial spin labeling (ASL) and FD-MRI can be used. Imaging provides a more precise insight into the pathophysiology of pulmonary function on a regional level. The advantages of MRI are a lack of ionizing radiation, which allows a protective acquisition of dynamic data as well as the high number of available contrasts and therefore accessible lung function parameters. Sufficient clinical data exist only for certain applications of DCE-MRI. For the other techniques, only feasibility studies and case series of different sizes are available. The clinical applicability of hyperpolarized gases is limited for technical reasons. The clinical application of the techniques described, except for DCE-MRI, should be restricted to scientific studies.

  2. MRI methods for pulmonary ventilation and perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, G.; Bauman, G.

    2016-01-01

    Separate assessment of respiratory mechanics, gas exchange and pulmonary circulation is essential for the diagnosis and therapy of pulmonary diseases. Due to the global character of the information obtained clinical lung function tests are often not sufficiently specific in the differential diagnosis or have a limited sensitivity in the detection of early pathological changes. The standard procedures of pulmonary imaging are computed tomography (CT) for depiction of the morphology as well as perfusion/ventilation scintigraphy and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for functional assessment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hyperpolarized gases, O 2 -enhanced MRI, MRI with fluorinated gases and Fourier decomposition MRI (FD-MRI) are available for assessment of pulmonary ventilation. For assessment of pulmonary perfusion dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), arterial spin labeling (ASL) and FD-MRI can be used. Imaging provides a more precise insight into the pathophysiology of pulmonary function on a regional level. The advantages of MRI are a lack of ionizing radiation, which allows a protective acquisition of dynamic data as well as the high number of available contrasts and therefore accessible lung function parameters. Sufficient clinical data exist only for certain applications of DCE-MRI. For the other techniques, only feasibility studies and case series of different sizes are available. The clinical applicability of hyperpolarized gases is limited for technical reasons. The clinical application of the techniques described, except for DCE-MRI, should be restricted to scientific studies. (orig.) [de

  3. Dose Tc-99m MIBI scintimammography provide more information additive to contrast enhanced MRI in highly suspected breast cancer patients?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong Jang; Kim, In Ju; Kim, Yong Ki; Bae, Young Tae

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether Tc-99m MIBI scintimammography (SMM) provide more information than contrast enhanced MRI in highly suspected breast cancer patients. This study included 32 breast lesions of 29 highly suspected patients having breast cancer. All patients were performed SMM and contrast enhanced MRI. The SMMs and contrast enhanced MRI were correlated with histopathologic results. Thirty breast lesions were diagnosed malignant diseases and 2 were diagnosed benign diseases. SMM showed 29 true positives (TP), 1 true negative (TN), 1 false positive (FP), and 1 false negative (FN). The sensitivity was 96.6%. Contrast enhanced MRI revealed 24 TP, 0 TN, 1 FP, 3 FN and 4 indeterminate cases. The sensitivity was 88.8%. In the assessment of axillary lymph node metastasis, SMM showed 9 TP, 10 TN, 0 FP, and 3 FN. The sensitivity and specificity were 75% and 100%. Contrast enhanced MRI revealed 6 TP, 9 TN, 1 FP, and 6 FN. The sensitivity and specificity were 50% and 90%. Among 4 indeterminate cases with MRI findings, SMM correctly diagnosed malignant breast diseases in 3 lesions. However, SMM showed false positive in 1 lesion. SMM could correctly diagnosed malignant breast diseases more 5 lesions than contrast enhanced MRI. SMM revealed higher sensitivity in detection of primary breast cancer and axillary LN metastasis than contrast enhanced MRI. SMMs could correctly diagnosed malignant breast diseases even if the MRI showed indeterminate findings. In highly suspected patients having breast cancer, SMM may provide additive information in detection of breast cancer if contrast enhanced MRI showed indeterminate findings but this is to be determined later by large population based study

  4. Stress cine MRI for detection of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, T.; Hofer, U.; Schild, H.

    2002-01-01

    Stress testing is the cornerstone in the diagnosis of patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Stress echocardiography has become a well-established modality for the detection of ischemia-induced wall motion abnormalities. However, display and reliable interpretation of stress echocardiography studies are user-dependent, the test reproducibility is low, and 10 to 15% of patients yield suboptimal or non-diagnostic images. Due to its high spatial and contrast resolution, MRI is known to permit an accurate determination of left ventricular function and wall thickness at rest. Early stress MRI studies provided promising results with respect to the detection of CAD. However, the clinical impact was limited due to long imaging time and problematic patient monitoring in the MRI environment. Recent technical improvements - namely ultrafast MR image acquisition - led to a significant reduction of imaging time and improved patient safety. Stress can be induced by physical exercise or pharmacologically by administration of a beta 1 -agonist (dobutamine) or vasodilatator (dipyridamole and adenosine). The best developed and most promising stress MRI technique is a high-dose dobutamine/atropine stress protocol (10, 20, 30, 40 μg/kg/min; optionally 0.25-mg fractions of atropine up to maximal dose 1 mg). Severe complications (myocardial infarction, ventricular fibrillation and sustained tachycardia, cardiogenic shock) may be expected in 0.25% of patients. Currently, data of three high-dose dobutamine stress MRI studies are available, revealing a good sensitivity (83 - 87%) and specificity (83 - 86%) in the assessment of CAD. The direct comparison between echocardiography and MRI for the detection of stress-induced wall motion abnormalities yielded better results for dobutamine-MRI in terms of sensitivity (86.2% vs. 74.3%; p [de

  5. Sources of variation influencing concordance between functional MRI and direct cortical stimulation in brain tumor surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie A Morrison

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Object: Preoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI remains a promising method to aid in the surgical management of patients diagnosed with brain tumors. For patients that are candidates for awake craniotomies, surgical decisions can potentially be improved by fMRI but this depends on the level of concordance between preoperative brain maps and the maps provided by the gold standard intraoperative method, direct cortical stimulation (DCS. There have been numerous studies of the concordance between fMRI and DCS using sensitivity and specificity measures, however the results are variable across studies and the key factors influencing variability are not well understood. Thus, the present work addresses the influence of technical factors on fMRI and DCS concordance. Methods: Motor and language mapping data were collected for a group of glioma patients (n = 14 who underwent both preoperative fMRI and intraoperative DCS in an awake craniotomy procedure for tumor removal. Normative fMRI data were also acquired in a healthy control group (n = 12. The fMRI and DCS mapping data were co-registered; true positive (TP, true negative (TN, false positive (FP and false negative (FN occurrences were tabulated over the exposed brain surface. Sensitivity and specificity were measured for the total group, and the motor and language sub-groups. The influence of grid placement, fMRI statistical thresholding, and task standardization were assessed. Correlations between proportions of agreement and error were carefully scrutinized to evaluate concordance more in-depth. Results: Concordance was significantly better for motor versus language mapping. There was an inverse relationship between TP and TN with increasing statistical threshold, and FP dominated the total error. Sensitivity and specificity were reduced when tasks were not standardized across fMRI and DCS. Conclusions: Although the agreement between fMRI and DCS is good, variability is introduced

  6. The usefulness of transvaginal ultrasonography and MRI in endometrial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshihara, Eisuke

    1992-01-01

    Between October 1988 and March 1991, 29 patients with endometrial carcinoma had both transvaginal ultrasonography (TVUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed following hysterectomy at the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Okayama University Medical School. The findings were compared with the pathological findings to determine the usefulness of each method. The sensitivity of detecting myometrial invasion was 100% by TVUS and 96% by MRI. The accuracy was 86% by each method. The depth of myometrial invasion was classified into 3 degrees [no myometrial invasion, superficial invasion (≤1/2), deep invasion (>1/2)]. The correct diagnostic rate was 86% by TVUS and MRI. The minimum width and the minimum/maximum width ratio of the intact myometrium obtained by each method in the pathological deep invasion group were significantly lower than those obtained in the other two groups (p<0.01). The sensitivity, the accuracy and the specificity for detecting cervical invasion were 89%, 93% and 95% by both methods. There was no difference between TVUS and MRI for diagnosing myometrial and cervical invasion of endometrial carcinoma. (author)

  7. Long head of the biceps brachii tendon: unenhanced MRI versus direct MR arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadros, Anthony S.; Huang, Brady K. [University of California, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Wymore, Lucas; Hoenecke, Heinz; Fronek, Jan [Scripps Clinic, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, La Jolla, CA (United States); Chang, Eric Y. [VA San Diego Healthcare System, Radiology Service, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    We sought to determine the diagnostic accuracy of unenhanced MRI and direct MR arthrography (MRA) for evaluation of the intra-articular long head of the biceps brachii tendon (LHBT) using arthroscopy as the gold standard. A retrospective review of patients who underwent shoulder MRI (n = 132) and MRA (n = 67) within 12 months prior to arthroscopy was performed. MR images were independently reviewed by two blinded musculoskeletal radiologists. Routinely recorded arthroscopic photos/videos were reviewed by an orthopedic surgeon. The LHBT was graded as normal, tendinosis, partial thickness tear less or greater than 50 %, and complete tear. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy for tendinosis and tear detection were calculated. MRI correctly diagnosed fewer normal LHBTs compared to MRA (39-54 % versus 74-84 %, respectively; p < 0.005). MRI and MRA did not differ significantly in the diagnosis of tendinosis (18-36 % and 15-38 %, respectively; p > 0.05) and tears (75-83 % and 64-73 %, respectively; p > 0.05). For tendinosis, MRI versus MRA showed 18-36 % and 15-38 % sensitivity, 69-79 % and 83-91 % specificity, 22-28 % and 18-50 % PPV, 74-76 % and 80-86 % NPV, and 61-64 % and 70-81 % accuracy; respectively. For tears, MRI versus MRA showed 75-83 % and 64-73 % sensitivity, 73-75 % and 82-91 % specificity, 66-69 % and 41-62 % PPV, 82-87 % and 92-94 % NPV, and 74-78 % and 79-88 % accuracy; respectively. No significant difference was found between unenhanced MRI and direct MRA for the detection of tendinosis and tears of LHBTs. (orig.)

  8. Long head of the biceps brachii tendon: unenhanced MRI versus direct MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadros, Anthony S.; Huang, Brady K.; Wymore, Lucas; Hoenecke, Heinz; Fronek, Jan; Chang, Eric Y.

    2015-01-01

    We sought to determine the diagnostic accuracy of unenhanced MRI and direct MR arthrography (MRA) for evaluation of the intra-articular long head of the biceps brachii tendon (LHBT) using arthroscopy as the gold standard. A retrospective review of patients who underwent shoulder MRI (n = 132) and MRA (n = 67) within 12 months prior to arthroscopy was performed. MR images were independently reviewed by two blinded musculoskeletal radiologists. Routinely recorded arthroscopic photos/videos were reviewed by an orthopedic surgeon. The LHBT was graded as normal, tendinosis, partial thickness tear less or greater than 50 %, and complete tear. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy for tendinosis and tear detection were calculated. MRI correctly diagnosed fewer normal LHBTs compared to MRA (39-54 % versus 74-84 %, respectively; p < 0.005). MRI and MRA did not differ significantly in the diagnosis of tendinosis (18-36 % and 15-38 %, respectively; p > 0.05) and tears (75-83 % and 64-73 %, respectively; p > 0.05). For tendinosis, MRI versus MRA showed 18-36 % and 15-38 % sensitivity, 69-79 % and 83-91 % specificity, 22-28 % and 18-50 % PPV, 74-76 % and 80-86 % NPV, and 61-64 % and 70-81 % accuracy; respectively. For tears, MRI versus MRA showed 75-83 % and 64-73 % sensitivity, 73-75 % and 82-91 % specificity, 66-69 % and 41-62 % PPV, 82-87 % and 92-94 % NPV, and 74-78 % and 79-88 % accuracy; respectively. No significant difference was found between unenhanced MRI and direct MRA for the detection of tendinosis and tears of LHBTs. (orig.)

  9. Sensitivity of MRI tumor biomarkers to VEGFR inhibitor therapy in an orthotopic mouse glioma model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian T Farrar

    Full Text Available MRI biomarkers of tumor edema, vascular permeability, blood volume, and average vessel caliber are increasingly being employed to assess the efficacy of tumor therapies. However, the dependence of these biomarkers on a number of physiological factors can compromise their sensitivity and complicate the assessment of therapeutic efficacy. Here we examine the response of these MRI tumor biomarkers to cediranib, a potent vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR inhibitor, in an orthotopic mouse glioma model. A significant increase in the tumor volume and relative vessel caliber index (rVCI and a slight decrease in the water apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC were observed for both control and cediranib treated animals. This contrasts with a clinical study that observed a significant decrease in tumor rVCI, ADC and volume with cediranib therapy. While the lack of a difference between control and cediranib treated animals in these biomarker responses might suggest that cediranib has no therapeutic benefit, cediranib treated mice had a significantly increased survival. The increased survival benefit of cediranib treated animals is consistent with the significant decrease observed for cediranib treated animals in the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV, relative microvascular blood volume (rMBV, transverse relaxation time (T2, blood vessel permeability (K(trans, and extravascular-extracellular space (ν(e. The differential response of pre-clinical and clinical tumors to cediranib therapy, along with the lack of a positive response for some biomarkers, indicates the importance of evaluating the whole spectrum of different tumor biomarkers to properly assess the therapeutic response and identify and interpret the therapy-induced changes in the tumor physiology.

  10. Muscle magnetic resonance imaging sensitivity does not decrease in chronic, mild, or proximal lower limb neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroide, Nicolas; Bousson, Valérie; Daguet, Edouard; Dumurgier, Julien; Tin, Sophie Ng Wing; Hannouche, Didier; Richette, Pascal; Beaudreuil, Johann; Lioté, Frédéric; Lévy, Bernard; Vicaut, Eric; Laredo, Jean Denis; Kubis, Nathalie

    2012-05-01

    Muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an innovative tool for exploring focal neuropathies. However, its usefulness in mild, proximal, or chronic lesions, when electromyography (EMG), the current "gold standard" sensitivity is inadequate, has yet to be studied. Clinical, MRI, and EMG examinations were performed in 113 muscles of 17 consecutive patients with clinically diagnosed lower limb focal neuropathies. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI and EMG were evaluated in relation to disease duration, severity, and anatomical location. Muscle MRI was highly sensitive for the detection of denervated muscle, and, unlike EMG, its sensitivity did not decrease regardless of the anatomical location, duration, or severity of the neuropathy. Five MRI false positives were noted, including three in the thigh muscles. Muscle MRI is an alternative tool to EMG in proximal, mild, or chronic clinical diagnoses of lower limb focal neuropathies. However, it also seems prone to false-positive results, particularly in proximal muscles. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Diagnostic value of dynamic and morphologic breast MRI analysis in the diagnosis of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stusińska, Małgorzata; Szabo-Moskal, Jadwiga; Bobek-Billewicz, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Mammography is the most widely used method of breast imaging. However, its low sensitivity poses a problem. Breast MRI is one of so the called “complementary” breast imaging methods. The purpose of this study was to improve the specificity of breast MRI by combining 2 methods: dynamic and morphologic analysis of enhancing lesions. 222 women aged 19–76 years, who underwent breast MRI examination between November 2002 and April 2004 at the Radiology Department of Oncology Center in Bydgoszcz, were included in this study. The pathological examination revealed cancer in 55 women (25%). No cancer was found in 167 women (75%), 56 of which were verified pathologically, 111 by cytology and/or during follow-up (at least 24 months). Results of breast MRI were positive in 80 women (36%), in 54 of which cancer was found during pathological examination, 26 breast MRI results were false positive. Sensitivity and specificity of breast MRI for dynamic analysis were 87% and 72%, respectively; in case of morphologic analysis 98% and 74%, respectively. The combined dynamic and morphologic analysis achieved high (84%) specificity without loss of sensitivity (98%). The difference in specificity between the evaluated methods was statistically significant (p<0.05). The combined dynamic and morphologic breast MRI analysis is a useful method for the diagnosis of breast cancer

  12. MRI and ultrasound in children with juvenile chronic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamer, S.; Sebag, G.H.

    2000-01-01

    In this era of advancing imaging technology, a knowledge of the relative values of available imaging techniques is necessary to optimize the management of children with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA). After clinical examination, plain films remain the initial investigation. The need for radiation protection must be a priority in children with JCA. Conventional radiographs allow grouping of the various arthritides (on the base of the distribution and pattern of joint space changes) and staging of disease progression. Ultrasound (US) is very sensitive in the detection of joint effusions, especially in the hip, and guides fluid aspiration. US and Doppler can be used for the evaluation of synovial hypertrophy and activity. Arthrography and to a certain extent nuclear studies have been replaced by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI can demonstrate articular cartilage, joint effusion, synovial hypertrophy, cortical and medullary bone, cartilage and bone perfusion, and fibrocartilaginous structures (menisci and ligaments). Contrast enhanced MRI is the most sensitive modality to determine whether an arthritic condition is present. However, it does not assist in establishing a specific diagnosis. MRI determines accurately the activity and the extent of the disease and is particularly useful in the early detection of articular damage. Finally, MRI is of major importance in the evaluation of response to local therapy (especially steroids) and the detection of complications

  13. Cost-effectiveness analysis of a non-contrast screening MRI protocol for vestibular schwannoma in patients with asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowson, Matthew G.; Rocke, Daniel J.; Kaylie, David M.; Hoang, Jenny K.; Weissman, Jane L.

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to determine if a non-contrast screening MRI is cost-effective compared to a full MRI protocol with contrast for the evaluation of vestibular schwannomas. A decision tree was constructed to evaluate full MRI and screening MRI strategies for patients with asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss. If a patient were to have a positive screening MRI, s/he received a full MRI. Vestibular schwannoma prevalence, MRI specificity and sensitivity, and gadolinium anaphylaxis incidence were obtained through literature review. Institutional charge data were obtained using representative patient cohorts. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were completed to determine CE model threshold points for MRI performance characteristics and charges. The mean charge for a full MRI with contrast was significantly higher than a screening MRI ($4089 ± 1086 versus $2872 ± 741; p < 0.05). The screening MRI protocol was more cost-effective than a full MRI protocol with a willingness-to-pay from $0 to 20,000 USD. Sensitivity analyses determined that the screening protocol dominated when the screening MRI charge was less than $4678, and the imaging specificity exceeded 78.2%. The screening MRI protocol also dominated when vestibular schwannoma prevalence was varied between 0 and 1000 in 10,000 people. A screening MRI protocol is more cost-effective than a full MRI with contrast in the diagnostic evaluation of a vestibular schwannoma. A screening MRI likely also confers benefits of shorter exam time and no contrast use. Further investigation is needed to confirm the relative performance of screening protocols for vestibular schwannomas. (orig.)

  14. Cost-effectiveness analysis of a non-contrast screening MRI protocol for vestibular schwannoma in patients with asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowson, Matthew G.; Rocke, Daniel J.; Kaylie, David M. [Duke University Medical Center, Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Durham, NC (United States); Hoang, Jenny K. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States); Weissman, Jane L. [Oregon Health Sciences University, Professor Emerita of Diagnostic Radiology, Portland, OR (United States)

    2017-08-15

    We aimed to determine if a non-contrast screening MRI is cost-effective compared to a full MRI protocol with contrast for the evaluation of vestibular schwannomas. A decision tree was constructed to evaluate full MRI and screening MRI strategies for patients with asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss. If a patient were to have a positive screening MRI, s/he received a full MRI. Vestibular schwannoma prevalence, MRI specificity and sensitivity, and gadolinium anaphylaxis incidence were obtained through literature review. Institutional charge data were obtained using representative patient cohorts. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were completed to determine CE model threshold points for MRI performance characteristics and charges. The mean charge for a full MRI with contrast was significantly higher than a screening MRI ($4089 ± 1086 versus $2872 ± 741; p < 0.05). The screening MRI protocol was more cost-effective than a full MRI protocol with a willingness-to-pay from $0 to 20,000 USD. Sensitivity analyses determined that the screening protocol dominated when the screening MRI charge was less than $4678, and the imaging specificity exceeded 78.2%. The screening MRI protocol also dominated when vestibular schwannoma prevalence was varied between 0 and 1000 in 10,000 people. A screening MRI protocol is more cost-effective than a full MRI with contrast in the diagnostic evaluation of a vestibular schwannoma. A screening MRI likely also confers benefits of shorter exam time and no contrast use. Further investigation is needed to confirm the relative performance of screening protocols for vestibular schwannomas. (orig.)

  15. Imaging children suffering from lymphoma: an evaluation of different {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI protocols compared to whole-body DW-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchner, Julian; Buchbender, Christian; Antoch, Gerald [University Dusseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Faculty, Dusseldorf (Germany); Deuschl, Cornelius; Schweiger, Bernd; Forsting, Michael; Umutlu, Lale [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Herrmann, Ken [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate and compare the diagnostic potential of different PET/MRI reading protocols, entailing non-enhanced / contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR imaging and whole-body diffusion-weighted MRI for lesion detection and determination of the tumor stage in pediatric lymphoma patients. A total of 28 {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI datasets were included for analysis of four different reading protocols: (1) PET/MRI utilizing sole unenhanced T2w and T1w imaging, (2) PET/MRI utilizing additional contrast enhanced sequences, (3) PET/MR imaging utilizing unenhanced, contrast enhanced and DW imaging or (4) WB-DW-MRI. Statistical analyses were performed on a per-patient and a per-lesion basis. Follow-up and prior examinations as well as histopathology served as reference standards. PET/MRI correctly identified all 17 examinations with active lymphoma disease, while WB-DW-MRI correctly identified 15/17 examinations. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and diagnostic accuracy were 96%, 96.5%, 97%, 95%, and 96% for PET/MRI{sub 1}; 97%, 96.5%, 97%, 96.5%, and 97% for PET/MRI{sub 2}; 97%, 96.5%, 97%, 96.5%, and 97% for PET/MRI{sub 3} and 77%, 96%, 96%, 78.5% and 86% for MRI-DWI. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI is superior to WB-DW-MRI in staging pediatric lymphoma patients. Neither application of contrast media nor DWI leads to a noticeable improvement of the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MRI. Thus, unenhanced PET/MRI may play a crucial role for the diagnostic work-up of pediatric lymphoma patients in the future. (orig.)

  16. The application of MRI for depiction of subtle blood brain barrier disruption in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israeli, David; Tanne, David; Daniels, Dianne; Last, David; Shneor, Ran; Guez, David; Landau, Efrat; Roth, Yiftach; Ocherashvilli, Aharon; Bakon, Mati; Hoffman, Chen; Weinberg, Amit; Volk, Talila; Mardor, Yael

    2010-12-26

    The development of imaging methodologies for detecting blood-brain-barrier (BBB) disruption may help predict stroke patient's propensity to develop hemorrhagic complications following reperfusion. We have developed a delayed contrast extravasation MRI-based methodology enabling real-time depiction of subtle BBB abnormalities in humans with high sensitivity to BBB disruption and high spatial resolution. The increased sensitivity to subtle BBB disruption is obtained by acquiring T1-weighted MRI at relatively long delays (~15 minutes) after contrast injection and subtracting from them images acquired immediately after contrast administration. In addition, the relatively long delays allow for acquisition of high resolution images resulting in high resolution BBB disruption maps. The sensitivity is further increased by image preprocessing with corrections for intensity variations and with whole body (rigid+elastic) registration. Since only two separate time points are required, the time between the two acquisitions can be used for acquiring routine clinical data, keeping the total imaging time to a minimum. A proof of concept study was performed in 34 patients with ischemic stroke and 2 patients with brain metastases undergoing high resolution T1-weighted MRI acquired at 3 time points after contrast injection. The MR images were pre-processed and subtracted to produce BBB disruption maps. BBB maps of patients with brain metastases and ischemic stroke presented different patterns of BBB opening. The significant advantage of the long extravasation time was demonstrated by a dynamic-contrast-enhancement study performed continuously for 18 min. The high sensitivity of our methodology enabled depiction of clear BBB disruption in 27% of the stroke patients who did not have abnormalities on conventional contrast-enhanced MRI. In 36% of the patients, who had abnormalities detectable by conventional MRI, the BBB disruption volumes were significantly larger in the maps than in

  17. Cortical language activation in aphasia: a functional MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiaojun; Zhang Minming; Shang Desheng; Wang Qidong; Luo Benyan

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the differences of the underlying neural basis of language processing between normal subjects and aphasics, and to study the feasibility for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in examining the cortical language activation in clinical aphasics. Methods: fMRI was used to map language network in 6 normal subjects and 3 patients with aphasia who were in the stage of recovery from acute stroke. The participants performed word generation task during fMRI scanning, which measured the signal changes associated with regional neural activity induced by the task. These signal changes were processed to statistically generate the activation map that represented the language area. Results: In normal subjects, a distributed language network was activated. Activations were present in the frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital regions in normal group. In the patient group, however, no activation was showed in the left inferior frontal gyrus whether or not the patient had lesion in the left frontal lobe. Two patients showed activations in some right hemisphere regions where no activation appeared in normal subjects. Conclusion: The remote effect of focal lesion and functional redistribution or reorganization was found in aphasic patients. fMRI was useful in evaluating the language function in aphasic patients. (authors)

  18. Diagnosis of triangular fibrocartilage complex injury using arthrography and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Kiyonobu; Soejima, Osamu; Naito, Masatoshi [Fukuoka Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-09-01

    Twenty patients (twenty-one wrists) with chronic ulnar wrist pain who had undergone radiocarpal arthrography and MRI before arthroscopic examination were evaluated to determine the usefulness of these preoperative diagnostic procedures (arthrogrphy and MRI) for the detection of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) injury. Based on the arthroscopic findings, the sensitivity and specificity of arthrography were 63% and 100% respectively for detecting TFCC lesions, while they were 68% and 50% respectively for MRI. Although no significant superiority was observed between arthrography and MRI in this study, further improrumchts in the preoperative diagnostic procedures are still needed in order to more accurately detect TFCC injuries. (author)

  19. Diagnostic precision of PET imaging and functional MRI in disorders of consciousness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Johan; Gosseries, Olivia; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie

    2014-01-01

    a validation study of two neuroimaging-based diagnostic methods: PET imaging and functional MRI (fMRI). METHODS: For this clinical validation study, we included patients referred to the University Hospital of Liège, Belgium, between January, 2008, and June, 2012, who were diagnosed by our unit...... with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome, locked-in syndrome, or minimally conscious state with traumatic or non-traumatic causes. We did repeated standardised clinical assessments with the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (CRS-R), cerebral (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET, and fMRI during mental activation tasks. We...... state (48=traumatic, 78=non-traumatic; 110=chronic, 16=subacute). (18)F-FDG PET had high sensitivity for identification of patients in a minimally conscious state (93%, 95% CI 85-98) and high congruence (85%, 77-90) with behavioural CRS-R scores. The active fMRI method was less sensitive at diagnosis...

  20. Posterior fossa abnormalities in high-risk term infants: comparison of ultrasound and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steggerda, S.J.; Smits-Wintjens, V.E.H.J.; Verbon, P.; Walther, F.J. [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Neonatology, Leiden (Netherlands); Bruine, F.T. de [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Wezel-Meijler, G. van [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Isala Hospital, Department of Neonatology, Zwolle (Netherlands)

    2015-09-15

    We aimed to assess the characteristics of posterior fossa (PF) abnormalities in a cohort of high-risk term neonates, as well as the diagnostic performance of cranial ultrasound (CUS) with additional mastoid fontanelle (MF) views for the detection of these abnormalities, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) being the reference standard. In this retrospective study, 113 term neonates with CUS and subsequent MRI were included. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of routine CUS and CUS with MF views were calculated. Posterior fossa abnormalities were diagnosed on CUS in 46 of 113 infants. MRI confirmed these findings in 43 and showed additional abnormalities in 32 infants. The sensitivity and specificity of anterior fontanelle views for major PF abnormalities as seen on MRI were 16 % and 99 %. Adding MF views increased the sensitivity of US to 82 %. The sensitivity and specificity of MF views for the detection of any (major or minor) PF abnormality were 57 % and 95 %. Especially acute hypoxic-ischemic injury and small subdural and punctate cerebellar haemorrhage remained undetected by CUS. PF abnormalities are frequent in high-risk term infants. MF-CUS enables early diagnosis of major PF abnormalities. We therefore advocate to perform MF-CUS in high-risk term neonates. (orig.)

  1. Posterior fossa abnormalities in high-risk term infants: comparison of ultrasound and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steggerda, S.J.; Smits-Wintjens, V.E.H.J.; Verbon, P.; Walther, F.J.; Bruine, F.T. de; Wezel-Meijler, G. van

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to assess the characteristics of posterior fossa (PF) abnormalities in a cohort of high-risk term neonates, as well as the diagnostic performance of cranial ultrasound (CUS) with additional mastoid fontanelle (MF) views for the detection of these abnormalities, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) being the reference standard. In this retrospective study, 113 term neonates with CUS and subsequent MRI were included. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of routine CUS and CUS with MF views were calculated. Posterior fossa abnormalities were diagnosed on CUS in 46 of 113 infants. MRI confirmed these findings in 43 and showed additional abnormalities in 32 infants. The sensitivity and specificity of anterior fontanelle views for major PF abnormalities as seen on MRI were 16 % and 99 %. Adding MF views increased the sensitivity of US to 82 %. The sensitivity and specificity of MF views for the detection of any (major or minor) PF abnormality were 57 % and 95 %. Especially acute hypoxic-ischemic injury and small subdural and punctate cerebellar haemorrhage remained undetected by CUS. PF abnormalities are frequent in high-risk term infants. MF-CUS enables early diagnosis of major PF abnormalities. We therefore advocate to perform MF-CUS in high-risk term neonates. (orig.)

  2. The search for neuroimaging biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease with advanced MRI techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Tie-Qiang; Wahlund, Lars-Olof

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this review is to examine the recent literature on using advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques for finding neuroimaging biomarkers that are sensitive to the detection of risks for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since structural MRI techniques, such as brain structural volumetry and voxel based morphometry (VBM), have been widely used for AD studies and extensively reviewed, we will only briefly touch on the topics of volumetry and morphometry. The focus of the current review is about the more recent developments in the search for AD neuroimaging biomarkers with functional MRI (fMRI), resting-state functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), arterial spin-labeling (ASL), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)

  3. Complex Wavelet transform for MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junor, P.; Janney, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: There is a perpetual compromise encountered in magnetic resonance (MRl) image reconstruction, between the traditional elements of image quality (noise, spatial resolution and contrast). Additional factors exacerbating this trade-off include various artifacts, computational (and hence time-dependent) overhead, and financial expense. This paper outlines a new approach to the problem of minimizing MRI image acquisition and reconstruction time without compromising resolution and noise reduction. The standard approaches for reconstructing magnetic resonance (MRI) images from raw data (which rely on relatively conventional signal processing) have matured but there are a number of challenges which limit their use. A major one is the 'intrinsic' signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the reconstructed image that depends on the strength of the main field. A typical clinical MRI almost invariably uses a super-cooled magnet in order to achieve a high field strength. The ongoing running cost of these super-cooled magnets prompts consideration of alternative magnet systems for use in MRIs for developing countries and in some remote regional installations. The decrease in image quality from using lower field strength magnets can be addressed by improvements in signal processing strategies. Conversely, improved signal processing will obviously benefit the current conventional field strength MRI machines. Moreover, the 'waiting time' experienced in many MR sequences (due to the relaxation time delays) can be exploited by more rigorous processing of the MR signals. Acquisition often needs to be repeated so that coherent averaging may partially redress the shortfall in SNR, at the expense of further delay. Wavelet transforms have been used in MRI as an alternative for encoding and denoising for over a decade. These have not supplanted the traditional Fourier transform methods that have long been the mainstay of MRI reconstruction, but have some inflexibility. The dual

  4. MRI in ischemic brain diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbrich, W.; Friedmann, G.; Pawlik, G.; Boecher-Schwarz, H.G.; Heiss, W.D.

    1986-01-01

    The results of MRI and CT in 55 patients with brain infarcts were compared; in 26 of these cases an additional PET examination was obtained in order to study the regional glucose utilisation. MRI was superior to CT, demonstrating 11% more of the infarcts, particularly during the first 24 hours, in small lesions confined to the grey or subcortical white matter and in infratentorial ischemic lesion. On the other hand, only CT was able to show fresh hemorrhage, although MRI was the method of choice to demonstrate old blood collections. To characterise the follow up of an infarct, CT and MRI were similar, except the marginal contrast enhancement sometimes demonstrated by CT studies between the 2nd and 4th week after stroke event. PET was inferior to show details because of its poorer spatial resolution, but anyhow had a high sensitivity and provided additional informations concerning secondary inactivations of brain areas not directly damaged. Additionally PET was able to demonstrate areas of anaerobic glycolysis and lesions of diminished glucose utilisation in TIAs. Small areas of gliosis in the white matter of the cerebral hemispheres were frequently found in patients with cerebro-vascular diseases; they were best shown by MRI, but do not correlate with the extent of vascular stenoses or occlusions, shown by angiography. (orig) [de

  5. Pathophysiological changes detected by MRI within 24 hours after head injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, Tsukasa; Wakabayashi, Shinichi; Nariai, Tadashi; Ohno, Kikuo; Hirakawa, Kimiyoshi; Fukui, Shinsuke; Takei, Hidenori.

    1995-01-01

    This report concerns the evaluation of the usefulness of high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis and prognosis of patients with head injuries. For this purpose we compared the CT and MRI results obtained on 48 such patients. MRI of all cases was taken within 24 hours after head injury using a 1.5-Tesla unit. The sensitivity of the two modalities in the detection of small traumatic lesions was compared. Traumatic lesions of 23 patients (47.9%) were not detected by CT, but they were demonstrated on MRI. Overall, MRI was significantly more sensitive than CT in detecting early and/or subtle traumatic changes of the brain parenchyma (P 1 -WI and T 2 -WI. (B) Corpus callosum lesions with hyperintensity on T 2 -WI were in fact hemorrhagic contusions by signal changes on sequential MRI. The follow-up of chronological changes of a given corpus callosum lesion was essential for confirmation of its pathology. (C) In one case, scratch-like lesions with strong hypointensity on T 1 -WI and hyperintensity on T 2 -WI were clearly demonstrated in the white matter. These observations appeared to indicate axonal damages. (D) Even if initial GCS score is low ( 2 -WI and subsequently disappeared completely. We conclude that performing MRI in the early stage of a head injury is of utility for the understanding of pertinent pathophysiological changes and for predicting outcome. (author)

  6. Cine MRI of the temporomandibular joint in comparison to static MRI and axiography; Cine-MRT des Kiefergelenks im Vergleich zur konventionellen MRT und Achsiographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, A.; Rummeny, E.J. [Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik der Technischen Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany); Kolk, A.; Neff, A. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Mund-Kiefer-Gesichtschirurgie der Technischen Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany); Hof, N. [Abt. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie/Nuklearmedizin, Krankenhaus Dritter Orden, Muenchen-Nymphenburg (Germany); Treumann, T. [Roentgeninstitut, Kantonshospital Luzern (Switzerland)

    2004-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate Cine MRI (cMRI) of the temporomandibular joint in comparison to static MRI (sMRI) and axiography. Materials and Methods: In a prospective study with 57 healthy volunteers as well as 33 patients after temporomandibular joint (TMJ) surgery or with severe joint dysfunction, we measured the mobility of both condyle and disc as well as the sagittal angle of condylar inclination with sMRI and cMRI. Measurements and image analysis were performed by a radiologist and a maxillofacial surgeon in consensus. The results of axiography served as standard of reference. Result: Concerning the assessment of the discoligamentous complex, sMRI was superior to cMRI in the patient-group (sensitivity sMRI 85%, cMRI 76%), while no significant difference was found in the volunteer-group (sensitivity sMRI 97.4%, cMRI 98.3%). The results of cMRI and sMRI showed a highly significant correlation with each other, as well as with the axiographic reference tracings (r=0.90). The average mobility of the disc and condyle was 6% and 10% higher in sMRI compared to cMRI (p=0.001) and showed a slightly higher variance (0.043 vs. 0.038). Concerning the condylar inclination angle, both MRI-procedures had the best correlation (r=0.94) with each other and axiography. Conclusion: Real-time MRI of the TMJ is comparable to axiography in its accuracy and is a useful adjunct to conventional static MRI. (orig.) [German] Fragestellung: Evaluation der Cine-MRT (cMRT) des Kiefergelenks im Vergleich zur statischen MRT (sMRT) und Achsiographie. Material und Methode: Bei 57 Probanden und bei 33 Patienten nach operativem Gelenkeingriff oder mit klinischer Funktionsstoerung wurden die Kondylus- und Diskusmobilitaet sowie die horizontale Kondylenbahnneigung (HKN) in der sMRT und in der cMRT bestimmt. Die Auswertung erfolgte durch einen Radiologen und einen Mund-Kiefer-Gesichtschirurgen im Konsensus. Die Werte der Achsiographie dienten als Goldstandard. Ergebnisse: Bezueglich der Abgrenzbarkeit des

  7. Detection and grading of dAVF: prospects and limitations of 3T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bink, Andrea; Berkefeld, Joachim; Wagner, Marlies; You, Se-Jong; Ackermann, Hanns; Lorenz, Matthias W; Senft, Christian; du Mesnil de Rochemont, Richard

    2012-02-01

    DSA is currently the criterion standard for the assessment of dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVF). Recently, evolving MRA techniques have emerged as a non-invasive alternative. The aim of this study is to assess the value of 3 T MRI in detecting and describing dAVF and to determine whether MRI can replace DSA as diagnostic procedure. A total of 19 patients with dAVF and 19 without dAVF underwent the same MRI protocol, including 3D time-of-flight MRA and time-resolved contrast-enhanced MRA. The images were evaluated retrospectively by three independent readers with different levels of experience blinded to clinical information. The readers assessed the presence, the site, the venous drainage and the feeders of dAVF. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, intertechnique and interobserver agreements were calculated. DAVF can be detected with high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy by experienced and also by less experienced readers. However, MRI has limitations when used for grading and evaluation of the angioarchitecture of the dAVF. Different experience, the limited resolution of MRI and its inability to selectively display arteries were the reasons for these limitations. With MRI dAVF can be detected reliably. Nevertheless, at present MRI can not fully replace DSA, especially for treatment planning.

  8. Can multiparametric MRI replace Roach equations in staging prostate cancer before external beam radiation therapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girometti, Rossano; Signor, Marco Andrea; Pancot, Martina; Cereser, Lorenzo; Zuiani, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the agreement between Roach equations (RE) and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) in assessing the T-stage of prostate cancer (PCa). Materials and methods: Seventy-three patients with biopsy-proven PCa and previous RE assessment prospectively underwent mpMRI on a 3.0T magnet before external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Using Cohen’s kappa statistic, we assessed the agreement between RE and mpMRI in defining the T-stage (≥T3 vs.T ≤ 2) and risk category according to the National comprehensive cancer network criteria (≤intermediate vs. ≥high). We also calculated sensitivity and specificity for ≥T3 stage in an additional group of thirty-seven patients with post-prostatectomy histological examination (mpMRI validation group). Results: The agreement between RE and mpMRI in assessing the T stage and risk category was moderate (k = 0.53 and 0.56, respectively). mpMRI changed the T stage and risk category in 21.9% (95%C.I. 13.4–33-4) and 20.5% (95%C.I. 12.3–31.9), respectively, prevalently downstaging PCa compared to RE. Sensitivity and specificity for ≥T3 stage in the mpMRI validation group were 81.8% (95%C.I. 65.1–91.9) and 88.5% (72.8–96.1). Conclusion: RE and mpMRI show moderate agreement only in assessing the T-stage of PCa, translating into an mpMRI-induced change in risk assessment in about one fifth of patients. As supported by high sensitivity/specificity for ≥T3 stage in the validation group, the discrepancy we found is in favour of mpMRI as a tool to stage PCa before ERBT.

  9. Can multiparametric MRI replace Roach equations in staging prostate cancer before external beam radiation therapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girometti, Rossano, E-mail: rgirometti@sirm.org [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, University of Udine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Santa Maria della Misericordia − via Colugna, 50–33100, Udine (Italy); Signor, Marco Andrea, E-mail: marco.signor@asuiud.sanita.fvg.it [Department of Oncological Radiation Therapy, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Santa Maria della Misericordia, Piazzale S. M. della Misericordia, 15–33100, Udine (Italy); Pancot, Martina, E-mail: martypancot@libero.it [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, University of Udine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Santa Maria della Misericordia − via Colugna, 50–33100, Udine (Italy); Cereser, Lorenzo, E-mail: lcereser@sirm.org [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, University of Udine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Santa Maria della Misericordia − via Colugna, 50–33100, Udine (Italy); Zuiani, Chiara, E-mail: chiara.zuiani@uniud.it [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, University of Udine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Santa Maria della Misericordia − via Colugna, 50–33100, Udine (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    Purpose: To investigate the agreement between Roach equations (RE) and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) in assessing the T-stage of prostate cancer (PCa). Materials and methods: Seventy-three patients with biopsy-proven PCa and previous RE assessment prospectively underwent mpMRI on a 3.0T magnet before external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Using Cohen’s kappa statistic, we assessed the agreement between RE and mpMRI in defining the T-stage (≥T3 vs.T ≤ 2) and risk category according to the National comprehensive cancer network criteria (≤intermediate vs. ≥high). We also calculated sensitivity and specificity for ≥T3 stage in an additional group of thirty-seven patients with post-prostatectomy histological examination (mpMRI validation group). Results: The agreement between RE and mpMRI in assessing the T stage and risk category was moderate (k = 0.53 and 0.56, respectively). mpMRI changed the T stage and risk category in 21.9% (95%C.I. 13.4–33-4) and 20.5% (95%C.I. 12.3–31.9), respectively, prevalently downstaging PCa compared to RE. Sensitivity and specificity for ≥T3 stage in the mpMRI validation group were 81.8% (95%C.I. 65.1–91.9) and 88.5% (72.8–96.1). Conclusion: RE and mpMRI show moderate agreement only in assessing the T-stage of PCa, translating into an mpMRI-induced change in risk assessment in about one fifth of patients. As supported by high sensitivity/specificity for ≥T3 stage in the validation group, the discrepancy we found is in favour of mpMRI as a tool to stage PCa before ERBT.

  10. Masticatory and cervical muscle tenderness and pain sensitivity in a remote area in subjects with a temporomandibular disorder and neck disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Anelise; Armijo-Olivo, Susan; Gadotti, Inae C; Magee, David

    2014-01-01

    To compare the masticatory and cervical muscle tenderness and pain sensitivity in the hand (remote region) between patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and healthy controls. Twenty female subjects were diagnosed with chronic TMD, and 20 were considered healthy. Subjects completed the Neck Disability Index and Limitations of Daily Functions in a TMD questionnaire. Tenderness of the masticatory and cervical muscles and pain sensitivity in the hand were measured using an algometer. Three-way mixed analysis of variance (ANOVA) evaluated differences in muscle tenderness between groups. One-way ANOVA compared pain sensitivity in the hand between groups. Effect sizes were assessed using Cohen guidelines. Significantly increased masticatory and cervical muscle tenderness and pain sensitivity in the hand were found in subjects with TMD when compared with healthy subjects. Moderate to high effect sizes showed the clinical relevance of the findings. The results of this study have highlighted the importance of assessing TMD patients not only in the craniofacial region but also in the neck and other parts of the body. Future studies should focus on testing the effectiveness of treatments addressing the neck and the pain sensitivity in the hand in patients with TMD.

  11. Language mapping using high gamma electrocorticography, fMRI, and TMS versus electrocortical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babajani-Feremi, Abbas; Narayana, Shalini; Rezaie, Roozbeh; Choudhri, Asim F; Fulton, Stephen P; Boop, Frederick A; Wheless, James W; Papanicolaou, Andrew C

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare localization of the language cortex using cortical stimulation mapping (CSM), high gamma electrocorticography (hgECoG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Language mapping using CSM, hgECoG, fMRI, and TMS were compared in nine patients with epilepsy. Considering CSM as reference, we compared language mapping approaches based on hgECoG, fMRI, and TMS using their sensitivity, specificity, and the results of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses. Our results show that areas involved in language processing can be identified by hgECoG, fMRI, and TMS. The average sensitivity/specificity of hgECoG, fMRI, and TMS across all patients was 100%/85%, 50%/80%, and 67%/66%, respectively. The average area under the ROC curve of hgECoG, fMRI, and TMS across CSM-positive patients was 0.98, 0.76, and 0.68, respectively. There is considerable concordance between CSM, hgECoG, fMRI, and TMS language mapping. Our results reveal that hgECoG, fMRI, and TMS are valuable tools for presurgical language mapping. Language mapping on the basis of hgECoG, fMRI, and TMS can provide important additional information, therefore, these methods can be used in conjunction with CSM or as an alternative, when the latter is deemed impractical. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Unenhanced breast MRI (STIR, T2-weighted TSE, DWIBS): An accurate and alternative strategy for detecting and differentiating breast lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telegrafo, Michele; Rella, Leonarda; Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio; Angelelli, Giuseppe; Moschetta, Marco

    2015-10-01

    To assess the role of STIR, T2-weighted TSE and DWIBS sequences for detecting and characterizing breast lesions and to compare unenhanced (UE)-MRI results with contrast-enhanced (CE)-MRI and histological findings, having the latter as the reference standard. Two hundred eighty consecutive patients (age range, 27-73 years; mean age±standard deviation (SD), 48.8±9.8years) underwent MR examination with a diagnostic protocol including STIR, T2-weighted TSE, THRIVE and DWIBS sequences. Two radiologists blinded to both dynamic sequences and histological findings evaluated in consensus STIR, T2-weighted TSE and DWIBS sequences and after two weeks CE-MRI images searching for breast lesions. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and diagnostic accuracy for UE-MRI and CE-MRI were calculated. UE-MRI results were also compared with CE- MRI. UE-MRI sequences obtained sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy, PPV and NPV values of 94%, 79%, 86%, 79% and 94%, respectively. CE-MRI sequences obtained sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy, PPV and NPV values of 98%, 83%, 90%, 84% and 98%, respectively. No statistically significant difference between UE-MRI and CE-MRI was found. Breast UE-MRI could represent an accurate diagnostic tool and a valid alternative to CE-MRI for evaluating breast lesions. STIR and DWIBS sequences allow to detect breast lesions while T2-weighted TSE sequences and ADC values could be useful for lesion characterization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Clinical Utility and Diagnostic Performance of MRI for Identification of Early and Advanced Knee Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quatman, Carmen E.; Hettrich, Carolyn M.; Schmitt, Laura C.; Spindler, Kurt P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Current diagnostic strategies for detection of structural articular cartilage abnormalities, the earliest structural signs of osteoarthritis, often do not capture the condition until it is too far advanced for the most potential benefit of non-invasive interventions. Purpose Systematically review the literature relative to the following questions: (1) Is MRI a valid, sensitive, specific, accurate and reliable instrument to identify knee articular cartilage abnormalities compared to arthroscopy? (2) Is MRI a sensitive tool that can be utilized to identify early cartilage degeneration? Study Design Systematic Review Methods A systematic search was performed in November 2010 using PubMed MEDLINE (from 1966), CINAHL (from 1982), SPORTDiscus (from 1985), and SCOPUS (from 1996) databases. Results Fourteen level I and 13 level II studies were identified that met inclusion criteria and provided information related to diagnostic performance of MRI compared to arthroscopic evaluation. The diagnostic performance of MRI demonstrated a large range of sensitivities, specificities, and accuracies. The sensitivity for identifying articular cartilage abnormalities in the knee joint was reported between 26–96%. Specificity and accuracy was reported between 50–100% and 49–94%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for identifying early osteoarthritis were reported between 0–86%, 48–95%, and 5–94%, respectively. As a result of inconsistencies between imaging techniques and methodological shortcomings of many of the studies, a meta-analysis was not performed and it was difficult to fully synthesize the information to state firm conclusions about the diagnostic performance of MRI. Conclusions There is evidence in some MRI protocols that MRI is a relatively valid, sensitive, specific, accurate, and reliable clinical tool for identifying articular cartilage degeneration. Due to heterogeneity of MRI sequences it is not possible to make definitive

  14. Whole-body MRI in adult inflammatory myopathies: Do we need imaging of the trunk?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filli, Lukas; Manoliu, Andrei; Andreisek, Gustav; Guggenberger, Roman; Maurer, Britta

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate whether imaging of the trunk could be omitted in patients with inflammatory myopathies without losing diagnostic accuracy using a restricted whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (rWB-MRI) protocol. After approval by the institutional review board, this study was performed in 63 patients (male/female, 13/50; median age, 52 years; range, 20-81 years) with new-onset myopathic symptoms (group 1, n = 41) or previously diagnosed inflammatory myopathy (group 2, n = 22). After performing whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) at 3.0 Tesla, myositis and fatty atrophy were evaluated in different muscles by two independent radiologists. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated to evaluate inter-observer reliability. Acquisition time was 56:01 minutes for WB-MRI and 37:37 minutes (32.8 % shorter) for rWB-MRI. In group 1, 14 patients were diagnosed with inflammatory myopathy based on muscle biopsy. rWB-MRI and WB-MRI showed equal sensitivity (42.9 %) and specificity (100 %) for myositis, and showed equal sensitivity (71.4 %) and similar specificity (63.0 % and 48.1 %, respectively) for fatty atrophy. No myositis was found in the body trunk in any patient. Inter-observer reliability was between substantial and perfect (ICC, 0.77-1.00). rWB-MRI showed diagnostic accuracy similar to WB-MRI for inflammatory myopathy at markedly reduced overall acquisition time. (orig.)

  15. Whole-body MRI in adult inflammatory myopathies: Do we need imaging of the trunk?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filli, Lukas; Manoliu, Andrei; Andreisek, Gustav; Guggenberger, Roman [University Hospital Zurich, University of Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Maurer, Britta [University Hospital Zurich, University of Zurich, Division of Rheumatology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate whether imaging of the trunk could be omitted in patients with inflammatory myopathies without losing diagnostic accuracy using a restricted whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (rWB-MRI) protocol. After approval by the institutional review board, this study was performed in 63 patients (male/female, 13/50; median age, 52 years; range, 20-81 years) with new-onset myopathic symptoms (group 1, n = 41) or previously diagnosed inflammatory myopathy (group 2, n = 22). After performing whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) at 3.0 Tesla, myositis and fatty atrophy were evaluated in different muscles by two independent radiologists. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated to evaluate inter-observer reliability. Acquisition time was 56:01 minutes for WB-MRI and 37:37 minutes (32.8 % shorter) for rWB-MRI. In group 1, 14 patients were diagnosed with inflammatory myopathy based on muscle biopsy. rWB-MRI and WB-MRI showed equal sensitivity (42.9 %) and specificity (100 %) for myositis, and showed equal sensitivity (71.4 %) and similar specificity (63.0 % and 48.1 %, respectively) for fatty atrophy. No myositis was found in the body trunk in any patient. Inter-observer reliability was between substantial and perfect (ICC, 0.77-1.00). rWB-MRI showed diagnostic accuracy similar to WB-MRI for inflammatory myopathy at markedly reduced overall acquisition time. (orig.)

  16. MRI for clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis: an implemented program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Michael M.; Gustas, Cristy N.; Choudhary, Arabinda K.; Methratta, Sosamma T.; Hulse, Michael A.; Eggli, Kathleen D.; Boal, Danielle K.B. [Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Mail Code H066, 500 University Drive, P.O. Box 850, Hershey, PA (United States); Geeting, Glenn [Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Emergent MRI is now a viable alternative to CT for evaluating appendicitis while avoiding the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation. However, primary employment of MRI in the setting of clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis has remained significantly underutilized. To describe our institution's development and the results of a fully implemented clinical program using MRI as the primary imaging evaluation for children with suspected appendicitis. A four-sequence MRI protocol consisting of coronal and axial single-shot turbo spin-echo (SS-TSE) T2, coronal spectral adiabatic inversion recovery (SPAIR), and axial SS-TSE T2 with fat saturation was performed on 208 children, ages 3 to 17 years, with clinically suspected appendicitis. No intravenous or oral contrast material was administered. No sedation was administered. Data collection includes two separate areas: time parameter analysis and MRI diagnostic results. Diagnostic accuracy of MRI for pediatric appendicitis indicated a sensitivity of 97.6% (CI: 87.1-99.9%), specificity 97.0% (CI: 93.2-99.0%), positive predictive value 88.9% (CI: 76.0-96.3%), and negative predictive value 99.4% (CI: 96.6-99.9%). Time parameter analysis indicated clinical feasibility, with time requested to first sequence obtained mean of 78.7 +/- 52.5 min, median 65 min; first-to-last sequence time stamp mean 14.2 +/- 8.8 min, median 12 min; last sequence to report mean 57.4 +/- 35.2 min, median 46 min. Mean age was 11.2 +/- 3.6 years old. Girls represented 57% of patients. MRI is an effective and efficient method of imaging children with clinically suspected appendicitis. Using an expedited four-sequence protocol, sensitivity and specificity are comparable to CT while avoiding the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  17. Neural mechanism underlying autobiographical memory modulated by remoteness and emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Ruiyang; Fu, Yan; Wang, DaHua; Yao, Li; Long, Zhiying

    2012-03-01

    Autobiographical memory is the ability to recollect past events from one's own life. Both emotional tone and memory remoteness can influence autobiographical memory retrieval along the time axis of one's life. Although numerous studies have been performed to investigate brain regions involved in retrieving processes of autobiographical memory, the effect of emotional tone and memory age on autobiographical memory retrieval remains to be clarified. Moreover, whether the involvement of hippocampus in consolidation of autobiographical events is time dependent or independent has been controversial. In this study, we investigated the effect of memory remoteness (factor1: recent and remote) and emotional valence (factor2: positive and negative) on neural correlates underlying autobiographical memory by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique. Although all four conditions activated some common regions known as "core" regions in autobiographical memory retrieval, there are some other regions showing significantly different activation for recent versus remote and positive versus negative memories. In particular, we found that bilateral hippocampal regions were activated in the four conditions regardless of memory remoteness and emotional valence. Thus, our study confirmed some findings of previous studies and provided further evidence to support the multi-trace theory which believes that the role of hippocampus involved in autobiographical memory retrieval is time-independent and permanent in memory consolidation.

  18. MRI in diagnostic evaluation of osteomyelitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoever, B.; Sigmund, G.; Langer, M.; Brandis, M.

    1994-01-01

    Several MRI investigations for detecting or excluding acute and non-post-traumatic chronic osteomyelitis were performed in 31 children, osteomyelitis was evident in 21 patients. The sensitivity of MRI for osteomyelitis was 90%, and specificity was 100%. In children with confirmed osteomyelitis 23 follow-up investigations were carried out in order to evaluate duration of the medullary edema. In uncomplicated cases only treated by antibiotics edema regression was evident after 4 weeks and completed after 12-16 weeks. In cases in whom extended concomitant soft-tissue infection was depicted regression of edema was prolonged independent of surgical intervention. The study reveals that at onset of acute osteomyelitis in children MRI can replace technetium 99m-labeled scintigraphy and reduce plain-film investigations. The results support the usefulness of MRI in discrimination of isolated soft-tissue infection and noninfectious diseases of bone. (orig.)

  19. Remote measurement of atmospheric pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allario, F.; Hoell, J.; Seals, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    The concentration and vertical distribution of atmospheric ammonia and ozone are remotely sensed, using dual-C02-laser multichannel infrared Heterodyne Spectrometer (1HS). Innovation makes atmospheric pollution measurements possible with nearly-quantum-noise-limited sensitivity and ultrafine spectral resolution.

  20. Value of breast MRI as supplement to mammography and sonography for high risk breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlossbauer, T.; Hellerhoff, K.; Reiser, M.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to give an overview on early detection of breast cancer in patients with an increased risk of breast cancer. Sensitivities and diagnostic accuracies of breast MRI, mammography and ultrasound were compared. A systematic literature search of the past 3 years was performed. Studies which compared breast imaging modalities and used image-guided biopsy results as standard of reference were included. Patients included had to have had an increased lifetime risk for breast cancer (>15%). Regarding sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy, breast MRI performed best in comparison to the other modalities within this collective of patients. Sensitivities ranged from 71-100%, 0-78%, and 13-65%, for MRI, mammography, and ultrasound, respectively Breast MRI is a well established tool for screening in patients at high risk for developing breast cancer and is a valuable supplement to mammography and ultrasound within this selected cohort of patients. (orig.) [de

  1. The Application of MRI for Depiction of Subtle Blood Brain Barrier Disruption in Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    David Israeli, David Tanne, Dianne Daniels, David Last, Ran Shneor, David Guez, Efrat Landau, Yiftach Roth, Aharon Ocherashvilli, Mati Bakon, Chen Hoffman, Amit Weinberg, Talila Volk, Yael Mardor

    2011-01-01

    The development of imaging methodologies for detecting blood-brain-barrier (BBB) disruption may help predict stroke patient's propensity to develop hemorrhagic complications following reperfusion. We have developed a delayed contrast extravasation MRI-based methodology enabling real-time depiction of subtle BBB abnormalities in humans with high sensitivity to BBB disruption and high spatial resolution. The increased sensitivity to subtle BBB disruption is obtained by acquiring T1-weighted MRI...

  2. The Application of MRI for Depiction of Subtle Blood Brain Barrier Disruption in Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Israeli, David; Tanne, David; Daniels, Dianne; Last, David; Shneor, Ran; Guez, David; Landau, Efrat; Roth, Yiftach; Ocherashvilli, Aharon; Bakon, Mati; Hoffman, Chen; Weinberg, Amit; Volk, Talila; Mardor, Yael

    2010-01-01

    The development of imaging methodologies for detecting blood-brain-barrier (BBB) disruption may help predict stroke patient's propensity to develop hemorrhagic complications following reperfusion. We have developed a delayed contrast extravasation MRI-based methodology enabling real-time depiction of subtle BBB abnormalities in humans with high sensitivity to BBB disruption and high spatial resolution. The increased sensitivity to subtle BBB disruption is obtained by acquiring T1-weighted MRI...

  3. Zinc-sensitive MRI contrast agent detects differential release of Zn(II) ions from the healthy vs. malignant mouse prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavijo Jordan, M Veronica; Lo, Su-Tang; Chen, Shiuhwei; Preihs, Christian; Chirayil, Sara; Zhang, Shanrong; Kapur, Payal; Li, Wen-Hong; De Leon-Rodriguez, Luis M; Lubag, Angelo J M; Rofsky, Neil M; Sherry, A Dean

    2016-09-13

    Many secretory tissues release Zn(II) ions along with other molecules in response to external stimuli. Here we demonstrate that secretion of Zn(II) ions from normal, healthy prostate tissue is stimulated by glucose in fasted mice and that release of Zn(II) can be monitored by MRI. An ∼50% increase in water proton signal enhancement is observed in T1-weighted images of the healthy mouse prostate after infusion of a Gd-based Zn(II) sensor and an i.p. bolus of glucose. Release of Zn(II) from intracellular stores was validated in human epithelial prostate cells in vitro and in surgically exposed prostate tissue in vivo using a Zn(II)-sensitive fluorescent probe known to bind to the extracellular surface of cells. Given the known differences in intracellular Zn(II) stores in healthy versus malignant prostate tissues, the Zn(II) sensor was then evaluated in a transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model in vivo. The agent proved successful in detecting small malignant lesions as early as 11 wk of age, making this noninvasive MR imaging method potentially useful for identifying prostate cancer in situations where it may be difficult to detect using current multiparametric MRI protocols.

  4. A new remote-imaging diagnosis system at Komazawa University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Morio; Kohda, Eiichi; Yoshikawa, Kohki

    2007-01-01

    We developed a remote-imaging diagnosis system that links the highly experienced radiologists at Komazawa University with Fuji Electric Hospital, where no such radiologists are present. MRI or CT images from Fuji Electric hospital are transmitted to Komazawa University via private line (INS64). The radiologists at Komazawa University then read the MRI or CT images, and relay the results to Fuji Electric Hospital. We describe the advantages and disadvantages of this system. MRI or CT imaging data from 80 cases were used. The data were stored in the imaging system server at Fuji Electric Hospital and were evaluated by experienced radiologists at Komazawa University. The images were sent one by one to the diagnostic support system server at Komazawa University through the private INS64 line. We examined transmission time per case and the security of transmission. Transmission of MRI or CT images from the 80 cases required a mean duration of 63 minutes 30 seconds per image. The quality of all images was highly satisfactory. In addition, there was no evidence of weaknesses in security. A physician at Fuji Electric Hospital was able to readily explain to the patient the results of the images by referring to the findings written by a radiologist at Komazawa University. We were able to transmit MRI or CT images by using this system safely and readily. The primary disadvantage of this system was the slow transmission speed. This will be improved by upgrading to an optical fibers. (author)

  5. Prenatal MRI in correlation with ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balev, B.; Baleva, D.; Ivanova, D.; Popova, R.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Fetal MRI is an already established method in prenatal imaging, with complementary to US role. Most common considerations for fetal MRI are CNS anomalies and urogenital anomalies. Practically, the most frequent indication is ultrasonographically established ventriculomegaly. We introduce our experience in fetal MRI, presenting the distribution of pathological findings and our protocols. We have examined 33 fetuses for a 3-year period. Among these 13 cases were affected by CNS anomalies (neural tube defects, Dandy-Walker, cerebellar hypoplasia, agenesis of corpus callosum, aqueductal atresia, etc.), 11 fetuses are affected by urogenital anomalies (pieloureteral stenosis, VUR, renal agenesis, etc.), 5 with other pathology (congenital tumor, ovarian cysts, etc.) and 4 are normal fetuses. The findings in most interesting cases are reviewed; in some of them we present imaging-pathological correlation and/or follow up imaging. Main advantages of fetal MRI over US consist of acquiring objective and reproducible images, giving the opportunity of multiple expert-leveled reviews; exceptionally high detail concerning CNS-anatomy; additional confidence in excluding presence of concomitant anomalies; independence from calavarial ossification and maternal obesity. Ultrasound remains the main tool for prenatal imaging. MRI has similar sensitivity and higher specificity, thus serving as an arbitrage method and improving accuracy about outcome prognosis

  6. Soleus muscle injury: sensitivity of ultrasound patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balius, Ramon [Sport Catalan Council, Generalitat de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Clinica CMI Diagonal, Barcelona (Spain); Rodas, Gil [F.C. Barcelona Medical Services, Barcelona (Spain); Pedret, Carles [Clinica CMI Diagonal, Barcelona (Spain); Clinica Mapfre de Medicina del Tenis, Sports Medicine and Imaging Department, Barcelona (Spain); Centre de Diagnostic per Imatge de Tarragona, Tarragona (Spain); Capdevila, Lluis [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Laboratory of Sport Psychology, Barcelona (Spain); Alomar, Xavier [Clinica Creu Blanca, Barcelona (Spain); Bong, David A. [Instituto Poal de Reumatologia, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-06-15

    To assess the sensitivity of ultrasound in detecting soleus muscle lesions diagnosed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to characterize their location, ultrasound pattern, and evolution. Ultrasound and MRI studies were performed between May 2009 and February 2013 on all patients who presented to the Medical Services Clinic of the Catalan Sport Council with the initial onset of sharp pain in the calf compatible with injury of the soleus muscle. An inter-observer ultrasound reliability study was also performed. A total of 55 cases of soleus injury were studied prospectively (22 with right leg involvement, 33 left) by ultrasound and MRI, which was utilized as the ''gold standard.'' In MRI studies, 24 cases (43.7 %) had myofascial injuries that were localized in the posterior aponeurosis (PMF) in 15 cases (27.3 %) and in the anterior aponeurosis (AMF) in 9 (16.4 %). Thirty-one cases (56.3 %) were musculotendinous injuries, with 9 cases (16.4 %) in the medial aponeurosis (MMT), 11 cases (20 %) in the lateral aponeurosis (LMT), and 11 cases (20 %) in the central tendon (CMT). In comparison to MRI, ultrasound was able to detect injury to the soleus in 27.2 % of cases. No injuries were detected by ultrasound alone. Posterior myofascial injuries were more likely to be detected by ultrasound than anterior myofascial injuries or all types of musculotendinous injuries. Ultrasound patterns for each type of injury were described. Ultrasound is not a sensitive technique for detecting and assessing soleus traumatic tears compared with MRI, although the sensitivity is enhanced by a thorough anatomically based ultrasound examination. Timing of the ultrasound examination may be of importance. Each type of soleus injury appears to have a characteristic ultrasound pattern based on a defect of connective expansions, the existence of small myofascial filiform collections, and the rarefaction of the fibrillar area. (orig.)

  7. Soleus muscle injury: sensitivity of ultrasound patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balius, Ramon; Rodas, Gil; Pedret, Carles; Capdevila, Lluís; Alomar, Xavier; Bong, David A

    2014-06-01

    To assess the sensitivity of ultrasound in detecting soleus muscle lesions diagnosed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to characterize their location, ultrasound pattern, and evolution. Ultrasound and MRI studies were performed between May 2009 and February 2013 on all patients who presented to the Medical Services Clinic of the Catalan Sport Council with the initial onset of sharp pain in the calf compatible with injury of the soleus muscle. An inter-observer ultrasound reliability study was also performed. A total of 55 cases of soleus injury were studied prospectively (22 with right leg involvement, 33 left) by ultrasound and MRI, which was utilized as the "gold standard." In MRI studies, 24 cases (43.7%) had myofascial injuries that were localized in the posterior aponeurosis (PMF) in 15 cases (27.3%) and in the anterior aponeurosis (AMF) in 9 (16.4%). Thirty-one cases (56.3%) were musculotendinous injuries, with 9 cases (16.4%) in the medial aponeurosis (MMT), 11 cases (20%) in the lateral aponeurosis (LMT), and 11 cases (20%) in the central tendon (CMT). In comparison to MRI, ultrasound was able to detect injury to the soleus in 27.2% of cases. No injuries were detected by ultrasound alone. Posterior myofascial injuries were more likely to be detected by ultrasound than anterior myofascial injuries or all types of musculotendinous injuries. Ultrasound patterns for each type of injury were described. Ultrasound is not a sensitive technique for detecting and assessing soleus traumatic tears compared with MRI, although the sensitivity is enhanced by a thorough anatomically based ultrasound examination. Timing of the ultrasound examination may be of importance. Each type of soleus injury appears to have a characteristic ultrasound pattern based on a defect of connective expansions, the existence of small myofascial filiform collections, and the rarefaction of the fibrillar area.

  8. Soleus muscle injury: sensitivity of ultrasound patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balius, Ramon; Rodas, Gil; Pedret, Carles; Capdevila, Lluis; Alomar, Xavier; Bong, David A.

    2014-01-01

    To assess the sensitivity of ultrasound in detecting soleus muscle lesions diagnosed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to characterize their location, ultrasound pattern, and evolution. Ultrasound and MRI studies were performed between May 2009 and February 2013 on all patients who presented to the Medical Services Clinic of the Catalan Sport Council with the initial onset of sharp pain in the calf compatible with injury of the soleus muscle. An inter-observer ultrasound reliability study was also performed. A total of 55 cases of soleus injury were studied prospectively (22 with right leg involvement, 33 left) by ultrasound and MRI, which was utilized as the ''gold standard.'' In MRI studies, 24 cases (43.7 %) had myofascial injuries that were localized in the posterior aponeurosis (PMF) in 15 cases (27.3 %) and in the anterior aponeurosis (AMF) in 9 (16.4 %). Thirty-one cases (56.3 %) were musculotendinous injuries, with 9 cases (16.4 %) in the medial aponeurosis (MMT), 11 cases (20 %) in the lateral aponeurosis (LMT), and 11 cases (20 %) in the central tendon (CMT). In comparison to MRI, ultrasound was able to detect injury to the soleus in 27.2 % of cases. No injuries were detected by ultrasound alone. Posterior myofascial injuries were more likely to be detected by ultrasound than anterior myofascial injuries or all types of musculotendinous injuries. Ultrasound patterns for each type of injury were described. Ultrasound is not a sensitive technique for detecting and assessing soleus traumatic tears compared with MRI, although the sensitivity is enhanced by a thorough anatomically based ultrasound examination. Timing of the ultrasound examination may be of importance. Each type of soleus injury appears to have a characteristic ultrasound pattern based on a defect of connective expansions, the existence of small myofascial filiform collections, and the rarefaction of the fibrillar area. (orig.)

  9. MRI findings of fetal cleft lip and palate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guangbin; Chen Liguang; Zhu Xiangyu; Wang Cuiyan; Zhang Yinghua; Wang Liajuan; Li Huihua; Qiu Xiuling; Qu Lei; Wei Yulong; Ding Rui; Sun Xueqin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the MR findings of fetal cleft lip (CL) and evaluate the advantages and limitations of MRI in the diagnosis. Methods: Twelve pregnant women suspicious of fetal CL/cleft palate (CP) on ultrasonography were enrolled in the study. The findings of ultrasonography, MRI and following-up were compared. Results: MRI and ultrasonography detected 12 fetuses with CL/CP. The following-up results showed 1 case with incomplete cleft lip and the other 11 cases with complete cleft lips and cleft palates. MRI and unltrasonography were consistent with the follow-up in CL detection, showing completed or uncompleted soft tissue interruption of the fetal lips with amniotic fluid filling which is high signal on T 2 WI. On MRI, CP showed discontinuous of the soft tissue which were interrupted by long T 2 signal and communicating with oral cavity ad nasal cavity. MRI missed 1 case and excluded 1 case of CP. Ultrasonography predicted 5 case of CL, excluded 1 CP but missed 6 cases. The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity in detection CL/CP was 91.7% (11/12), 90.9% (10/11), 100% (1/1) for MRI and 50.0% (6/12), 45.5% (5/11), 100% (1/1) for ultrasonography, respectively. Conclusion: MR imaging had advantage over ultrasonography in detecting CP, MRI is an essential when CP is suspicious on ultrasonography. (authors)

  10. 3Tesla MRI surface coil: Is it sensitive for prostatic imaging??

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mahmoud Agha

    2014-01-30

    Jan 30, 2014 ... MRI, in pre-sampling diagnosis of prostate cancer, in an attempt to use it ... approved by the ethics committee in Al-Mana General Hospital. ... scopy; NPV, negative predictive value; PACS, Picture archiving and ... Some inherited genes had been found to raise the risk for more ..... ciplinary perspective.

  11. Identification of Breast Cancer Using Integrated Information from MRI and Mammography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Neng Yang

    Full Text Available Integration of information from corresponding regions between the breast MRI and an X-ray mammogram could benefit the detection of breast cancer in clinical diagnosis. We aimed to provide a framework of registration from breast MRI to mammography and to evaluate the diagnosis using the combined information.43 patients with 46 lesions underwent both MRI and mammography scans, and the interval between the two examinations was around one month. The distribution of malignant to benign lesions was 31/46 based on histological results. Maximum intensity projection and thin-plate spline methods were applied for image registration for MRI to mammography. The diagnosis using integrated information was evaluated using results of histology as the reference. The assessment of annotations and statistical analysis were performed by the two radiologists.For the cranio-caudal view, the mean post-registration error between MRI and mammography was 2.2±1.9 mm. For the medio-lateral oblique view, the proposed approach performed even better with a mean error of 3.0±2.4 mm. In the diagnosis using MRI assessment with information of mammography, the sensitivity was 91.9±2.3% (29/31, 28/31, specificity 70.0±4.7% (11/15, 10/15, accuracy 84.8±3.1% (40/46, 38/46, positive predictive value 86.4±2.1% (29/33, 28/33 and negative predictive value 80.8±5.4% (11/13, 10/13.MRI with the aid of mammography shows potential improvements of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV in clinical breast cancer diagnosis compared to the use of MRI alone.

  12. Diagnosis of superior labral lesions: comparison of noncontrast MRI with indirect MR arthrography in unexercised shoulders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinauer, Philip A.; Flemming, Donald J.; Murphy, Kevin P.; Doukas, William C.

    2007-01-01

    To prospectively compare the accuracy of noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with indirect MR arthrography (I-MRa) of unexercised shoulders for diagnosis of superior glenoid labral lesions. Institutional Review Board approval and patient informed consent were obtained for this prospective study. Superior labral findings on shoulder MRI and unexercised I-MRa studies of 104 patients were correlated with findings at arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently reviewed the two sets of MR images while blinded to arthroscopic results. For each radiologist, the McNemar test was used to detect statistically significant differences between techniques. The superior labrum was intact in 24 and abnormal in 80 subjects. For detection of superior labral lesions by each radiologist, I-MRa was more sensitive (84-91%) than MRI (66-85%), with statistically significant improvement in sensitivity for one reader (p = 0.003). However, I-MRa was less specific (58-71%) than MRI (75-83%). Overall, accuracy was slightly improved on I-MRa (78-86%) compared with MRI (70-83%), but this difference was not statistically significant for either reader. Compared with noncontrast MRI, I-MRa was more sensitive for diagnosis of superior glenoid labral lesions. However, the diagnostic value of I-MRa in shoulders remaining at rest is potentially limited by decreased specificity of the technique. (orig.)

  13. 3He-MRI in follow-up of lung transplant recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gast, Klaus Kurt; Zaporozhan, Julia; Ley, Sebastian; Biedermann, Alexander; Knitz, Frank; Eberle, Balthasar; Schmiedeskamp, Joerg; Heussel, Claus-Peter; Mayer, Eckhard; Schreiber, Wolfgang Guenter; Thelen, Manfred; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible contribution of 3 He-MRI to detect obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) in the follow-up of lung transplant recipients. Nine single- and double-lung transplanted patients were studied by an initial and a follow-up 3 He-MRI study. Images were evaluated subjectively by estimation of ventilation defect area and quantitatively by individually adapted threshold segmentation and subsequent calculation of ventilated lung volume. Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) was diagnosed using pulmonary function tests. At 3 He-MRI, OB was suspected if ventilated lung volume had decreased by 10% or more at the follow-up MRI study compared with the initial study. General accordance between pulmonary function testing and 3 He-MRI was good, although subjective evaluation of 3 He-MRI underestimated improvement in ventilation as obtained by pulmonary function tests. The 3 He-MRI indicated OB in 6 cases. According to pulmonary function tests, BOS was diagnosed in 5 cases. All diagnoses of BOS were also detected by 3 He-MRI. In 2 of these 5 cases, 3 He-MRI indicated OB earlier than pulmonary function tests. The results support the hypothesis that 3 He-MRI may be sensitive for early detection of OB and emphasize the need for larger prospective follow-up studies. (orig.)

  14. Integrated 18F-FDG PET/MRI compared to MRI alone for identification of local recurrences of soft tissue sarcomas: a comparison trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erfanian, Youssef; Grueneisen, Johannes; Wetter, Axel; Forsting, Michael; Umutlu, Lale [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Kirchner, Julian [University Hospital Dusseldorf, University of Dusseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Dusseldorf (Germany); Podleska, Lars Erik [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Sarcoma Surgery Division, Department of General-, Visceral- and Transplantation Surgery, Essen (Germany); Bauer, Sebastian [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Division of Solid Tumor Translational Oncology, Department of Medical Oncology, West German Cancer Center, Essen (Germany); Poeppel, Thorsten; Herrmann, Ken [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Clinic for Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    To assess and compare the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MRI and MRI alone for the detection of local recurrences of soft tissue sarcomas (STS) after initial surgical resection of the primary tumors. A total of 41 patients with clinically suspected tumor relapse of STS underwent an {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/MRI examination for assessment of local recurrence. Two experienced physicians interpreted the MRI data and subsequently the PET/MRI datasets in two separate reading sessions and were instructed to identify potential local tumor recurrences. Additionally, the diagnostic confidence in each reading for the identification of malignant lesions was determined. A McNemar test was applied to test for differences of both ratings and a Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to identify differences of the confidence levels. Histopathological verification and follow-up imaging were applied for standard of reference. Tumor relapse was present in 27/41 patients. Calculated sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and diagnostic accuracy for the detection of local tumor recurrence was 82%, 86%, 92%, 71% and 83% for MRI, and 96%, 79%, 90%, 92% and 90% for PET/MRI (p > 0.05). Furthermore, PET/MRI showed significantly higher confidence levels (p < 0.05) for the determination of malignant lesions. Our results endorse {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI to be an excellent imaging method in the evaluation of recurrent STS after surgical excision, yielding superior tumor detection when compared to MRI alone. (orig.)

  15. Diagnostic Values of DCE-MRI and DSC-MRI for Differentiation Between High-grade and Low-grade Gliomas: A Comprehensive Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jianye; Liu, Dexiang; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Dong; Chen, Hanwei; Shi, Changzheng; Luo, Liangping

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to collect the studies on the role of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSC-MRI) in differentiating the grades of gliomas, and evaluate the diagnostic performances of relevant quantitative parameters in glioma grading. We systematically searched studies on the diagnosis of gliomas with DCE-MRI or DSC-MRI in Medline, PubMed, China National Knowledge Infrastructure database, Cochrane Library, and Embase published between January 2005 and December 2016. Standardized mean differences and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for volume transfer coefficient (K trans ), volume fraction of extravascular extracellular space (V e ), rate constant of backflux (K ep ), relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) using Review Manager 5.2 software. Sensitivity, specificity, area under the curve (AUC), and Begg test were calculated by Stata 12.0. Twenty-two studies with available outcome data were included in the analysis. The standardized mean difference of K trans values between high-grade glioma and low-grade glioma were 1.18 (0.91, 1.45); V e values were 1.43 (1.06, 1.80); K ep values were 0.65 (-0.05, 1.36); rCBV values were 1.44 (1.08, 1.81); and rCBF values were 1.17 (0.68, 1.67), respectively. The results were all significant statistically (P values (P = .07), and high-grade glioma had higher K trans , V e , rCBV, and rCBF values than low-grade glioma. AUC values of K trans , V e , rCBV, and rCBF were 0.90, 0.88, 0.93, and 0.73, respectively; rCBV had the largest AUC among the four parameters (P < .05). Both DCE-MRI and DSC-MRI are reliable techniques in differentiating the grades of gliomas, and rCBV was found to be the most sensitive one. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. ROLE OF MRI IN WHITE MATTER DISEASES- CLINICO-RADIOLOGICAL CORRELATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindranath Reddy Kamireddy

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The diagnostic process is difficult as there are many different white matter disorders (inherited and acquired. MRI has high diagnostic specificity to study the pattern of brain structures. MRI is more useful in demonstrating abnormalities of myelination. MATERIALS AND METHODS Our study developed a practical algorithm that relies mainly on the characteristics of brain MRI. Our study included clinicallysuspected patients with demyelination during a period of one year. RESULTS Our study included 25 clinically-suspected patients (out of total of 400 patients with demyelination during a period of one year (February 2016 to January 2017.  Multiple sclerosis accounted for the majority of cases (36.0% followed by acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (20%.  In multiple sclerosis, majority of the patients presented in the third decade of life with a definite female preponderance (M:F-1:2.  The most common symptom and site of involvement were visual impairment (73.3% and periventricular area (80%, respectively.  Other causes like PML, PVL, CPM, reversible posterior leucoencephalopathy, leukodystrophies and motor neuron disease comprised the remainder of the cases. CONCLUSION MRI due to its excellent grey white matter resolution is very sensitive in detecting subtle demyelination, the sensitivity being still further enhanced by FLAIR sequences. MRI in correlation with the clinical signs and symptoms is an ideal modality in early diagnosis of white matter diseases.

  17. Longitudinal sensitivity to change of MRI-based muscle cross-sectional area versus isometric strength analysis in osteoarthritic knees with and without structural progression: pilot data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannhauer, Torben; Sattler, Martina; Wirth, Wolfgang; Hunter, David J; Kwoh, C Kent; Eckstein, Felix

    2014-08-01

    Biomechanical measurement of muscle strength represents established technology in evaluating limb function. Yet, analysis of longitudinal change suffers from relatively large between-measurement variability. Here, we determine the sensitivity to change of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based measurement of thigh muscle anatomical cross sectional areas (ACSAs) versus isometric strength in limbs with and without structural progressive knee osteoarthritis (KOA), with focus on the quadriceps. Of 625 "Osteoarthritis Initiative" participants with radiographic KOA, 20 had MRI cartilage and radiographic joint space width loss in the right knee isometric muscle strength measurement and axial T1-weighted spin-echo acquisitions of the thigh. Muscle ACSAs were determined from manual segmentation at 33% femoral length (distal to proximal). In progressor knees, the reduction in quadriceps ACSA between baseline and 2-year follow-up was -2.8 ± 7.9 % (standardized response mean [SRM] = -0.35), and it was -1.8 ± 6.8% (SRM = -0.26) in matched, non-progressive KOA controls. The decline in extensor strength was more variable than that in ACSAs, both in progressors (-3.9 ± 20%; SRM = -0.20) and in non-progressive controls (-4.5 ± 28%; SRM = -0.16). MRI-based analysis of quadriceps muscles ACSAs appears to be more sensitive to longitudinal change than isometric extensor strength and is suggestive of greater loss in limbs with structurally progressive KOA than in non-progressive controls.

  18. MRI on the tear of the triangular fibrocartilage of the wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Yoko; Sasaki, Taisuke; Sasaki, Yukio; Nishi, Naoko; Yodono, Hiraku; Takekawa, Shoichi; Toh, Satoshi; Harata, Seikou (Hirosaki Univ., Aomori (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-07-01

    MRI of the wrist joints in the normal volunteers and patients with triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) injury was performed and usefulness of MRI of TFC injury was discussed. Small FOV and thin slice thickness were selected. Normal TFCs were shown as low signal intensity areas. Injury of TFC was demonstrated as increased signal intensity areas. Diagnosis of TFC injury should be made after considering their ages and symptoms because TFC shows degenerative change with aging. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI in the detection of TFC tears were 80.0%, 81.8% and 81.0% respectively. MRI is considered to be a non-invasive good modality to demonstrate TFC tears. (author).

  19. Remote field eddy current testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, Y. M.; Jung, H. K.; Huh, H.; Lee, Y. S.; Shim, C. M.

    2001-03-01

    The state-of-art technology of the remote field eddy current, which is actively developed as an electromagnetic non-destructive testing tool for ferromagnetic tubes, is described. The historical background and recent R and D activities of remote-field eddy current technology are explained including the theoretical development of remote field eddy current, such as analytical and numerical approach, and the results of finite element analysis. The influencing factors for actual applications, such as the effect of frequency, magnetic permeability, receiving sensitivity, and difficulties of detection and classification of defects are also described. Finally, two examples of actual application, 1) the gap measurement between pressure tubes and calandria tube in CANDU reactor and, 2) the detection of defects in the ferromagnetic heat exchanger tubes, are described. The future research efforts are also included

  20. Simultaneous MRI and PET imaging of a rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raylman, Raymond R [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, Box 9236, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States); Majewski, Stan [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Lemieux, Susan K [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, Box 9236, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States); Velan, S Sendhil [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, Box 9236, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States); Kross, Brian [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Popov, Vladimir [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Smith, Mark F [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Weisenberger, Andrew G [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Zorn, Carl [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Marano, Gary D [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, Box 9236, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2006-12-21

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a long fibre optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The use of light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of a 3T MRI scanner where the magnetic field is relatively small. To test the device, simultaneous MRI and PET images of the brain of a male Sprague Dawley rat injected with FDG were successfully obtained. The images revealed no noticeable artefacts in either image set. Future work includes the construction of a full ring PET scanner, improved light guides and construction of a specialized MRI coil to permit higher quality MRI imaging.

  1. Simultaneous MRI and PET imaging of a rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raylman, Raymond R; Majewski, Stan; Lemieux, Susan K; Velan, S Sendhil; Kross, Brian; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F; Weisenberger, Andrew G; Zorn, Carl; Marano, Gary D

    2006-01-01

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a long fibre optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The use of light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of a 3T MRI scanner where the magnetic field is relatively small. To test the device, simultaneous MRI and PET images of the brain of a male Sprague Dawley rat injected with FDG were successfully obtained. The images revealed no noticeable artefacts in either image set. Future work includes the construction of a full ring PET scanner, improved light guides and construction of a specialized MRI coil to permit higher quality MRI imaging

  2. Probing the brain with molecular fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Souparno; Harvey, Peter; Simon, Jacob C; Jasanoff, Alan

    2018-04-09

    One of the greatest challenges of modern neuroscience is to incorporate our growing knowledge of molecular and cellular-scale physiology into integrated, organismic-scale models of brain function in behavior and cognition. Molecular-level functional magnetic resonance imaging (molecular fMRI) is a new technology that can help bridge these scales by mapping defined microscopic phenomena over large, optically inaccessible regions of the living brain. In this review, we explain how MRI-detectable imaging probes can be used to sensitize noninvasive imaging to mechanistically significant components of neural processing. We discuss how a combination of innovative probe design, advanced imaging methods, and strategies for brain delivery can make molecular fMRI an increasingly successful approach for spatiotemporally resolved studies of diverse neural phenomena, perhaps eventually in people. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Automatic MRI Quantifying Methods in Behavioral-Variant Frontotemporal Dementia Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antti Cajanus

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Aims: We assessed the value of automated MRI quantification methods in the differential diagnosis of behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD from Alzheimer disease (AD, Lewy body dementia (LBD, and subjective memory complaints (SMC. We also examined the role of the C9ORF72-related genetic status in the differentiation sensitivity. Methods: The MRI scans of 50 patients with bvFTD (17 C9ORF72 expansion carriers were analyzed using 6 quantification methods as follows: voxel-based morphometry (VBM, tensor-based morphometry, volumetry (VOL, manifold learning, grading, and white-matter hyperintensities. Each patient was then individually compared to an independent reference group in order to attain diagnostic suggestions. Results: Only VBM and VOL showed utility in correctly identifying bvFTD from our set of data. The overall classification sensitivity of bvFTD with VOL + VBM achieved a total sensitivity of 60%. Using VOL + VBM, 32% were misclassified as having LBD. There was a trend of higher values for classification sensitivity of the C9ORF72 expansion carriers than noncarriers. Conclusion: VOL, VBM, and their combination are effective in differential diagnostics between bvFTD and AD or SMC. However, MRI atrophy profiles for bvFTD and LBD are too similar for a reliable differentiation with the quantification methods tested in this study.

  4. Breast MRI: EUSOBI recommendations for women's information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, Ritse M.; Balleyguier, Corinne; Baltzer, Pascal A.; Helbich, Thomas H.; Pinker-Domenig, Katja; Bick, Ulrich; Fallenberg, Eva; Colin, Catherine; Cornford, Eleanor; Evans, Andrew; Forrai, Gabor; Fuchsjaeger, Michael H.; Gilbert, Fiona J.; Heywang-Koebrunner, Sylvia H.; Camps-Herrero, Julia; Kuhl, Christiane K.; Martincich, Laura; Pediconi, Federica; Panizza, Pietro; Pina, Luis J.; Pijnappel, Ruud M.; Skaane, Per; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarizes information about breast MRI to be provided to women and referring physicians. After listing contraindications, procedure details are described, stressing the need for correct scheduling and not moving during the examination. The structured report including BI-RADS registered categories and further actions after a breast MRI examination are discussed. Breast MRI is a very sensitive modality, significantly improving screening in high-risk women. It also has a role in clinical diagnosis, problem solving, and staging, impacting on patient management. However, it is not a perfect test, and occasionally breast cancers can be missed. Therefore, clinical and other imaging findings (from mammography/ultrasound) should also be considered. Conversely, MRI may detect lesions not visible on other imaging modalities turning out to be benign (false positives). These risks should be discussed with women before a breast MRI is requested/performed. Because breast MRI drawbacks depend upon the indication for the examination, basic information for the most important breast MRI indications is presented. Seventeen notes and five frequently asked questions formulated for use as direct communication to women are provided. The text was reviewed by Europa Donna-The European Breast Cancer Coalition to ensure that it can be easily understood by women undergoing MRI. (orig.)

  5. Breast MRI: EUSOBI recommendations for women's information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Ritse M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Balleyguier, Corinne [Gustave-Roussy Institute, Department of Radiology, Villejuif (France); Baltzer, Pascal A.; Helbich, Thomas H.; Pinker-Domenig, Katja [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Vienna (Austria); Bick, Ulrich; Fallenberg, Eva [Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Clinic of Radiology, Charite, Berlin (Germany); Colin, Catherine [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Lyon Sud, Radiology Unit, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Pierre Benite Cedex (France); Cornford, Eleanor [Nottingham University Hospitals, Nottingham Breast Institute, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Evans, Andrew [Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee Cancer Centre, Clinical Research Centre, Dundee (United Kingdom); Forrai, Gabor [MHEK Teaching Hospital University Semmelweis, Budapest (Hungary); Fuchsjaeger, Michael H. [Medical University of Graz, Department of Radiology, Graz (Austria); Gilbert, Fiona J. [University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, Department of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Heywang-Koebrunner, Sylvia H. [National Reference Centre Mammography, Munich, Munich (Germany); Camps-Herrero, Julia [Hospital de la Ribera, Department of Radiology, Alzira, Valencia (Spain); Kuhl, Christiane K. [University Hospital of Aachen, Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule, Aachen (Germany); Martincich, Laura [IRCCS-FPO, Radiology Unit, Candiolo, Turin (Italy); Pediconi, Federica [Sapienza University, Department of Radiological, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Panizza, Pietro [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Department of Radiology 1, Milan (Italy); Pina, Luis J. [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Department of Radiology, Pamplona, Navarra (Spain); Pijnappel, Ruud M. [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Imaging, Utrecht (Netherlands); Skaane, Per [Oslo University Hospital Ullevaal, University of Oslo, Department of Radiology, Oslo (Norway); Sardanelli, Francesco [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Radiology Unit, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Department of Biomedical Sciences for Health, San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy); Collaboration: for the European Society of Breast Imaging (EUSOBI), with language review by Europa Donna-The European Breast Cancer Coalition

    2015-12-15

    This paper summarizes information about breast MRI to be provided to women and referring physicians. After listing contraindications, procedure details are described, stressing the need for correct scheduling and not moving during the examination. The structured report including BI-RADS registered categories and further actions after a breast MRI examination are discussed. Breast MRI is a very sensitive modality, significantly improving screening in high-risk women. It also has a role in clinical diagnosis, problem solving, and staging, impacting on patient management. However, it is not a perfect test, and occasionally breast cancers can be missed. Therefore, clinical and other imaging findings (from mammography/ultrasound) should also be considered. Conversely, MRI may detect lesions not visible on other imaging modalities turning out to be benign (false positives). These risks should be discussed with women before a breast MRI is requested/performed. Because breast MRI drawbacks depend upon the indication for the examination, basic information for the most important breast MRI indications is presented. Seventeen notes and five frequently asked questions formulated for use as direct communication to women are provided. The text was reviewed by Europa Donna-The European Breast Cancer Coalition to ensure that it can be easily understood by women undergoing MRI. (orig.)

  6. Comparision the value of detecting myocardial viability between low dose dobutamine stress MRI and echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yi; Zhang Zhaoqi; Yu Wei; Miao Cuilian; Zhao Yike; Yan Zixu

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To Compare the diagnostic value between low dose dobutamine stress transthrotic echocardiography and low dose dobutamine stress MRI in detecting myocardial viability of chronic myocardial infarction. Methods: Rest and low dose dobutamine (5, 10 μg·kg -1 ·min -1 ) stress transthrotic echocardiography and cine-MRI were performed in 30 patients with chronic myocardial infarction. 24 patients underwent successful revascularization and 10 of them underwent another rest cine-MRI study to assess segmental myocardial functional recovery. Left ventricular were divided into 16 segments, the criteria of viability in different techniques is: MRI: dobutamine induced systolic wall thickening was ≥2 mm in akinetic or diskinetic segments at rest; Echocardiography: wall motion score reduced at least 1 after dobutamine stress in akinetic or' diskinetic segments at rest. Results: One hundren and eight segments showed wall motion abnormalities of 30 patients, 65 and 56 segments shows positive reaction, 43 and 52 segments shows negativereaction in MRI and echocardiography after dobutamine stress respectively. Kappa value of the two techniques is 0.75, concordance in both techniques is 88%. Twenty-four segments showed functional recovery, 14 segments remained dysfunction 3-6 months after revascularization, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of detecting myocardial viability in chronic myocardial infarction in MRI and echocardiography is 95.8% vs 79.2% (P>0.05), 85.7% vs 85.7% (P>0.05), 92.1% vs 81.6% (P>0.05) respectively. The sensitivity and accuracy of MRI is a little higher. Conclusion: The ability of detecting myocardial viability by both low dose dobutamine stress transthrotic echocardiography and low dose dobutamine stress MRI is similer, the sensitivity and accuracy of MRI is a little higher. (authors)

  7. Detection of hepatocellular carcinoma by Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced liver MRI: Comparison with triple phase 64 detector row helical CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akai, Hiroyuki; Kiryu, Shigeru; Matsuda, Izuru; Satou, Jirou; Takao, Hidemasa; Tajima, Taku; Watanabe, Yasushi; Imamura, Hiroshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Akahane, Masaaki; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the diagnostic performance of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI with that of triple phase 64-MDCT in the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients and methods: Thirty-four patients with 52 surgically proven lesions underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI and triple phase 64-MDCT. Two observers independently evaluated MR and CT imaging on a lesion-by-lesion basis. Sensitivity, positive and negative predictive values and reproducibility were evaluated. The diagnostic accuracy of each modality was assessed with alternative-free response receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results: Both observers showed higher sensitivity in detecting lesions with MRI compared to CT, however, only the difference between the two imaging techniques for observer 2 was significant (P = 0.034). For lesions 1 cm or smaller, MRI and CT showed equal sensitivity (both 62.5%) with one observer, and MRI proved superior to CT with the other observer (MRI 75% vs. CT 56.3%), but the latter difference was not significant (P = 0.083). The difference in positive and negative predictive value between the two imaging techniques for each observer was not significant (P > 0.05). The areas under the ROC curve for each observer were 0.843 and 0.861 for MRI vs. 0.800 and 0.833 for CT and the differences were not significant. Reproducibility was higher using MRI for both observers, but the result was not significant (MRI 32/33 vs. CT 29/33, P = 0.083). Conclusion: Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI tended to show higher diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity and reproducibility compared to triple phase 64-MDCT in the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma, however statistical significance was not achieved.

  8. Comparison of intraductal spread on dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI with clinicopathologic features in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, Shuhei; Lee, Chol-Joo; Hosokawa, Yohei; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Hamashima, Takashi; Shirono, Koichi; Okabe, Harumi; Kurioka, Hideaki; Oka, Takahiro

    2004-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) has emerged as a new diagnostic technology in various breast cancer treatments. However, little is known about the correlation between intraductal spread on CE-MRI and clinicopathologic features. This study was designed to evaluate these correlations for the surgical planning of breast cancer. Twenty-six breast cancer lesions (in 26 female patients) treated by breast conserving surgery between March 2001 and March 2003 were evaluated retrospectively. CE-MRI was performed with a 1.5 T unit using a dedicated bilateral breast coil. In detecting intraductal spread of breast cancer, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of CE-MRI were 82.4%, 60.0% and 77.3%, respectively. On mammography (MMG), these were 21.1%, 100.0% and 42.3%, respectively. Therefore, CE-MRI has a higher sensitivity and accuracy, although with a lower specificity than MMG. Compared with breast cancer lesions without intraductal spread on CE-MRI, lesions with intraductal spread on CE-MRI were found more frequently in larger-sized tumors (P=0.0088). Preoperative evaluation for intraductal spread by CE-MRI should be more useful than by MMG for breast cancer. When making the surgical decision regarding excision range, particular attention should be paid to this consideration for patients with larger-sized cancer tumors. (author)

  9. The diagnostic value of 18F-FDG-PET/CT and MRI in suspected vertebral osteomyelitis - a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouijzer, Ilse J E; Scheper, Henk; de Rooy, Jacky W J; Bloem, Johan L; Janssen, Marcel J R; van den Hoven, Leon; Hosman, Allard J F; Visser, Leo G; Oyen, Wim J G; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing vertebral osteomyelitis. From November 2015 until December 2016, 32 patients with suspected vertebral osteomyelitis were prospectively included. All patients underwent both 18 F-FDG-PET/CT and MRI within 48 h. All images were independently reevaluated by two radiologists and two nuclear medicine physicians who were blinded to each others' image interpretation. 18 F-FDG-PET/CT and MRI were compared to the clinical diagnosis according to international guidelines. For 18 F-FDG-PET/CT, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV in diagnosing vertebral osteomyelitis were 100%, 83.3%, 90.9%, and 100%, respectively. For MRI, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 100%, 91.7%, 95.2%, and 100%, respectively. MRI detected more epidural/spinal abscesses. An important advantage of 18 F-FDG-PET/CT is the detection of metastatic infection (16 patients, 50.0%). 18 F-FDG-PET/CT and MRI are both necessary techniques in diagnosing vertebral osteomyelitis. An important advantage of 18 F-FDG-PET/CT is the visualization of metastatic infection, especially in patients with bacteremia. MRI is more sensitive in detection of small epidural abscesses.

  10. Accuracy of high-field intraoperative MRI in the detectability of residual tumor in glioma grade IV resections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesselmann, Volker; Mager, Ann-Kathrin [Asklepios-Klinik Nord, Hamburg (Germany). Radiology/Neurologie; Goetz, Claudia; Kremer, Paul [Asklepios-Klinik Nord, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Detsch, Oliver [Asklepios-Klinik Nord, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine; Theisgen, Hannah-Katharina [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Friese, Michael; Gottschalk, Joachim [Asklepios-Klinik Nord, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Pathology and Neuropathology; Schwindt, Wolfram [Univ. Hospital Muenster (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology

    2017-06-15

    To assess the sensitivity/specificity of tumor detection by T1 contrast enhancement in intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) in comparison to histopathological assessment as the gold standard in patients receiving surgical resection of grade IV glioblastoma. 68 patients with a primary or a recurrent glioblastoma scheduled for surgery including fluorescence guidance and neuronavigation were included (mean age: 59 years, 26 female, 42 male patients). The ioMRI after the first resection included transverse FLAIR, DWI, T2-FFE and T1 - 3 d FFE ± GD-DPTA. The second resection was performed whenever residual contrast-enhancing tissue was detected on ioMRI. Resected tissue samples were histopathologically evaluated (gold standard). Additionally, we evaluated the early postoperative MRI scan acquired within 48 h post-OP for remaining enhancing tissue and compared them with the ioMRI scan. In 43 patients ioMRI indicated residual tumorous tissue, which could be confirmed in the histological specimens of the second resection. In 16 (4 with recurrent, 12 with primary glioblastoma) cases, ioMRI revealed truly negative results without residual tumor and follow-up MRI confirmed complete resection. In 7 cases (3 with recurrent, 4 with primary glioblastoma) ioMRI revealed a suspicious result without tumorous tissue in the histopathological workup. In 2 (1 for each group) patients, residual tumorous tissue was detected in spite of negative ioMRI. IoMRI had a sensitivity of 95 % (94 % recurrent and 96 % for primary glioblastoma) and a specificity of 69.5 % (57 % and 75 %, respectively). The positive predictive value was 86 % (84 % for recurrent and 87 % for primary glioblastoma), and the negative predictive value was 88 % (80 % and 92 %, respectively). ioMRI is effective for detecting remaining tumorous tissue after glioma resection. However, scars and leakage of contrast agent can be misleading and limit specificity. Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) presents with a high sensitivity for residual

  11. Accuracy of high-field intraoperative MRI in the detectability of residual tumor in glioma grade IV resections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesselmann, Volker; Mager, Ann-Kathrin; Goetz, Claudia; Kremer, Paul; Detsch, Oliver; Theisgen, Hannah-Katharina; Friese, Michael; Gottschalk, Joachim; Schwindt, Wolfram

    2017-01-01

    To assess the sensitivity/specificity of tumor detection by T1 contrast enhancement in intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) in comparison to histopathological assessment as the gold standard in patients receiving surgical resection of grade IV glioblastoma. 68 patients with a primary or a recurrent glioblastoma scheduled for surgery including fluorescence guidance and neuronavigation were included (mean age: 59 years, 26 female, 42 male patients). The ioMRI after the first resection included transverse FLAIR, DWI, T2-FFE and T1 - 3 d FFE ± GD-DPTA. The second resection was performed whenever residual contrast-enhancing tissue was detected on ioMRI. Resected tissue samples were histopathologically evaluated (gold standard). Additionally, we evaluated the early postoperative MRI scan acquired within 48 h post-OP for remaining enhancing tissue and compared them with the ioMRI scan. In 43 patients ioMRI indicated residual tumorous tissue, which could be confirmed in the histological specimens of the second resection. In 16 (4 with recurrent, 12 with primary glioblastoma) cases, ioMRI revealed truly negative results without residual tumor and follow-up MRI confirmed complete resection. In 7 cases (3 with recurrent, 4 with primary glioblastoma) ioMRI revealed a suspicious result without tumorous tissue in the histopathological workup. In 2 (1 for each group) patients, residual tumorous tissue was detected in spite of negative ioMRI. IoMRI had a sensitivity of 95 % (94 % recurrent and 96 % for primary glioblastoma) and a specificity of 69.5 % (57 % and 75 %, respectively). The positive predictive value was 86 % (84 % for recurrent and 87 % for primary glioblastoma), and the negative predictive value was 88 % (80 % and 92 %, respectively). ioMRI is effective for detecting remaining tumorous tissue after glioma resection. However, scars and leakage of contrast agent can be misleading and limit specificity. Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) presents with a high sensitivity for residual

  12. Strategies for sensing neurotransmitters with responsive MRI contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelovski, Goran; Tóth, Éva

    2017-01-23

    A great deal of research involving multidisciplinary approaches is currently dedicated to the understanding of brain function. The complexity of physiological processes that underlie neural activity is the greatest hurdle to faster advances. Among imaging techniques, MRI has great potential to enable mapping of neural events with excellent specificity, spatiotemporal resolution and unlimited tissue penetration depth. To this end, molecular imaging approaches using neurotransmitter-sensitive MRI agents have appeared recently to study neuronal activity, along with the first successful in vivo MRI studies. Here, we review the pioneering steps in the development of molecular MRI methods that could allow functional imaging of the brain by sensing the neurotransmitter activity directly. We provide a brief overview of other imaging and analytical methods to detect neurotransmitter activity, and describe the approaches to sense neurotransmitters by means of molecular MRI agents. Based on these initial steps, further progress in probe chemistry and the emergence of innovative imaging methods to directly monitor neurotransmitters can be envisaged.

  13. MRI differentiation of pneumonia-like mucinous adenocarcinoma and infectious pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaeta, Michele, E-mail: gaesam@hotmail.it [Department of Radiological Sciences, Policlinico ' G. Martino' , Via Consolare Valeria 1, 98100 Messina (Italy); Ascenti, Giorgio, E-mail: gascenti@unime.it [Department of Radiological Sciences, Policlinico ' G. Martino' , Via Consolare Valeria 1, 98100 Messina (Italy); Mazziotti, Silvio, E-mail: smazziotti@unime.it [Department of Radiological Sciences, Policlinico ' G. Martino' , Via Consolare Valeria 1, 98100 Messina (Italy); Contiguglia, Rosario, E-mail: rosariocontiguglia@libero.it [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Local Health Unit, Messina (Italy); Barone, Mario, E-mail: mario.barone@unime.it [Clinical and Experimental Department of Medicine and Pharmacology, Policlinico ' G. Martino' , Messina (Italy); Mileto, Achille, E-mail: achille.mileto@gmail.com [Department of Radiological Sciences, Policlinico ' G. Martino' , Via Consolare Valeria 1, 98100 Messina (Italy)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To evaluate the role of MRI water-sensitive sequences in the differential diagnosis between pneumonia-like mucinous adenocarcinoma and infectious pneumonia. Subjects and methods: Twenty-three patients with pneumonia-like mucinous adenocarcinoma and 30 patients with infectious pneumonia underwent computed tomography (CT) and MRI. Two blinded and independent readers evaluated CT and MR images using a 3-level confidence scale in two separate sessions. Results were tested for statistical significance using the Fisher's exact test and the Cohen's k test. Results: On CT, the two readers respectively made correct diagnoses of mucinous adenocarcinoma in 17 out of 23 cases (73.9%), and in 15 out of 23 cases (65.2%). A correct diagnosis of infectious pneumonia was made in 22 out of 30 cases (73.3%), and in 24 out of 30 cases (80.0%). On MRI, both readers made correct diagnoses of mucinous adenocarcinoma in 23 out of 23 (100%) cases, and of infectious pneumonia in 30 out of 30 (100%) cases. Fisher's exact test showed a significant difference in the diagnosis of mucinous adenocarcinoma between MRI and CT for both readers, P = 0.01 for reader 1 and P = 0.002 for reader 2, respectively. A good agreement (k = 0.73) was found between the two readers on CT evaluation, whereas an almost perfect agreement (k = 1.00) was found for MRI. Conclusions: MRI with 'water-sensitive' sequences should be added in the diagnostic protocol of every patient with pulmonary consolidation suspected to be mucinous adenocarcinoma.

  14. High-quality remote interactive imaging in the operating theatre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimstead, Ian J.; Avis, Nick J.; Evans, Peter L.; Bocca, Alan

    2009-02-01

    We present a high-quality display system that enables the remote access within an operating theatre of high-end medical imaging and surgical planning software. Currently, surgeons often use printouts from such software for reference during surgery; our system enables surgeons to access and review patient data in a sterile environment, viewing real-time renderings of MRI & CT data as required. Once calibrated, our system displays shades of grey in Operating Room lighting conditions (removing any gamma correction artefacts). Our system does not require any expensive display hardware, is unobtrusive to the remote workstation and works with any application without requiring additional software licenses. To extend the native 256 levels of grey supported by a standard LCD monitor, we have used the concept of "PseudoGrey" where slightly off-white shades of grey are used to extend the intensity range from 256 to 1,785 shades of grey. Remote access is facilitated by a customized version of UltraVNC, which corrects remote shades of grey for display in the Operating Room. The system is successfully deployed at Morriston Hospital, Swansea, UK, and is in daily use during Maxillofacial surgery. More formal user trials and quantitative assessments are being planned for the future.

  15. Deeply infiltrating endometriosis: Evaluation of retro-cervical space on MRI after vaginal opacification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiaschetti, Valeria; Crusco, Sonia; Meschini, Alessandro; Cama, Valentina; Di Vito, Livio; Marziali, Massimiliano; Piccione, Emilio; Calabria, Ferdinando; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To prospectively investigate diagnostic value and tolerability of MRI after intra-vaginal gel opacification for diagnosis and preoperative assessment of deeply infiltrating endometriosis. Methods: Sixty-three women with clinical suspicion of deeply infiltrating endometriosis were previously examined with trans-vaginal ultrasonography and then with MRI pre and post administration of vaginal gel. We evaluated the tolerability of this procedure with a scoring scale from 0 to 3. We also assessed with a score from 1 to 4 the visibility of four regions: Douglas-pouch, utero-sacral-ligaments, posterior-vaginal-fornix and recto-vaginal-septum. All patients underwent laparoscopic surgery after MRI. Results: Five patients considered procedure intolerable. Visibility of utero-sacral-ligaments and posterior-vaginal-fornix showed to be increased with gel (p < 0.001). In 57 out of 80 patients the MRI has allowed us to diagnose deeply infiltrating endometriosis. Overall, the percentages of MRI-sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were respectively 67.8%, 95.3%, 89.4 and 83.5% without gel, and 90.8%, 94.6%, 90.8% and 94.6% with gel; trans-vaginal ultrasonography sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 57.5%, 96.6%, 90.9% and 79.5%. In evaluation of utero-sacral-ligaments trans-vaginal ultrasonography, MRI without gel and with gel sensitivity was respectively 61.9%, 47.6% and 81%; for recto-vaginal-septum these values were 12.5%, 68.7% and 93.7%; for pouch of Douglas 82%, 87% and 97.4%; finally for posterior-vaginal-fornix 27.3%, 36.4% and 81.8%. Conclusions: MRI with gel opacification of vagina should be recommended for suspicion of deep infiltrating endometriosis, in particular for the added value in evaluation of recto-vaginal septum, utero-sacral ligaments and posterior vaginal fornix.

  16. Deeply infiltrating endometriosis: Evaluation of retro-cervical space on MRI after vaginal opacification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiaschetti, Valeria; Crusco, Sonia [Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, Fondazione Policlinico ' Tor Vergata' , Viale Oxford 81, Rome (Italy); Meschini, Alessandro, E-mail: a.mesko@libero.it [Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, Fondazione Policlinico ' Tor Vergata' , Viale Oxford 81, Rome (Italy); Cama, Valentina; Di Vito, Livio [Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, Fondazione Policlinico ' Tor Vergata' , Viale Oxford 81, Rome (Italy); Marziali, Massimiliano; Piccione, Emilio [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Fondazione Policlinico ' Tor Vergata' , Viale Oxford 81, Rome (Italy); Calabria, Ferdinando [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging, IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy); Simonetti, Giovanni [Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, Fondazione Policlinico ' Tor Vergata' , Viale Oxford 81, Rome (Italy)

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: To prospectively investigate diagnostic value and tolerability of MRI after intra-vaginal gel opacification for diagnosis and preoperative assessment of deeply infiltrating endometriosis. Methods: Sixty-three women with clinical suspicion of deeply infiltrating endometriosis were previously examined with trans-vaginal ultrasonography and then with MRI pre and post administration of vaginal gel. We evaluated the tolerability of this procedure with a scoring scale from 0 to 3. We also assessed with a score from 1 to 4 the visibility of four regions: Douglas-pouch, utero-sacral-ligaments, posterior-vaginal-fornix and recto-vaginal-septum. All patients underwent laparoscopic surgery after MRI. Results: Five patients considered procedure intolerable. Visibility of utero-sacral-ligaments and posterior-vaginal-fornix showed to be increased with gel (p < 0.001). In 57 out of 80 patients the MRI has allowed us to diagnose deeply infiltrating endometriosis. Overall, the percentages of MRI-sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were respectively 67.8%, 95.3%, 89.4 and 83.5% without gel, and 90.8%, 94.6%, 90.8% and 94.6% with gel; trans-vaginal ultrasonography sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 57.5%, 96.6%, 90.9% and 79.5%. In evaluation of utero-sacral-ligaments trans-vaginal ultrasonography, MRI without gel and with gel sensitivity was respectively 61.9%, 47.6% and 81%; for recto-vaginal-septum these values were 12.5%, 68.7% and 93.7%; for pouch of Douglas 82%, 87% and 97.4%; finally for posterior-vaginal-fornix 27.3%, 36.4% and 81.8%. Conclusions: MRI with gel opacification of vagina should be recommended for suspicion of deep infiltrating endometriosis, in particular for the added value in evaluation of recto-vaginal septum, utero-sacral ligaments and posterior vaginal fornix.

  17. SPECT/CT versus MRI in patients with nonspecific pain of the hand and wrist - a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huellner, Martin W.; Buerkert, Alexander; Schleich, Florian S.; Strobel, Klaus; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Schuerch, Maja; Hug, Urs; Wartburg, Urs von

    2012-01-01

    Hand and wrist pain is a diagnostic challenge for hand surgeons and radiologists due to the complex anatomy of the involved small structures. The American College of Radiology recommends MRI as the study of choice in patients with chronic wrist pain if radiographs are negative. Lately, state-of-the-art SPECT/CT systems have been introduced and may help in the diagnosis of this selected indication. This retrospective study included 21 patients with nonspecific pain of the hand/wrist. The diagnosis of nonspecific wrist pain was made by the referring hand surgeon based on patient history, clinical examination, plain radiography and clinical guidelines. All patients received planar early-phase imaging and late-phase SPECT/CT imaging as well as MRI. Lesions were divided into major (causative) and minor (not causative) pathologies according to clinical follow-up. Furthermore, oedema-like bone marrow changes seen on MRI were compared with focally increased tracer uptake seen on SPECT/CT images. MRI yielded a quite high sensitivity (0.86), but a low specificity (0.20). In contrast, SPECT/CT yielded a high specificity (1.00) and a low sensitivity (0.71). Oedema-like bone marrow changes were detected in 15 lesions in 11 patients. In ten lesions with bone marrow oedema on MRI, foci of elevated tracer uptake were detected on SPECT/CT. Overall, MRI was more sensitive, but SPECT/CT was more specific in the evaluation of causative pathologies. In this initial comparison, SPECT/CT showed higher specificity than MRI in the evaluation of causative pathologies in patients with nonspecific wrist pain. However, MRI was more sensitive. Thus, SPECT/CT was shown to be a useful problem-solving tool in the diagnostic work-up of these patients. (orig.)

  18. Role of MRI in predicting meniscal tear reparability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felisaz, Paolo Florent [Universita degli Studi di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Istituto di Radiologia, Pavia (Italy); Alessandrino, Francesco; Perelli, Simone [Universita degli Studi di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Zanon, Giacomo; Benazzo, Francesco [Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Clinica Ortopedica e Traumatologica, Pavia (Italy); Calliada, Fabrizio; Sammarchi, Luigi [Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Radiologia, Diagnostica per Immagini-Istituto di Radiologia, Pavia (Italy)

    2017-10-15

    To elucidate the role of MRI in predicting meniscal tear reparability according to tear type and location in relation to vascular zones. In this retrospective study, two readers evaluated 79 pre-surgical MRIs of meniscal tears arthroscopically treated with meniscectomy or meniscal repair. Tears were classified according to type into vertical, horizontal, radial, complex, flaps and bucket handle and were considered reparable if the distance measured from the tear to the menisco-capsular junction was less than or equal to 5 mm. Predictions were compared with the surgical procedure performed in arthroscopy. We assessed the diagnostic performance of MRI, agreement between MRI and arthroscopy, and interrater agreement. Then, we conducted an ROC analysis on the distances measured by the first reader and built a multivariate logistic regression model. MRI had a sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy, respectively, of 85%, 79%, 86%, 76% and 83% in predicting meniscal tear reparability. Correct predictions for the specific tear pattern were 76% for vertical, 84% for horizontal, 88% for radial, 86% for complex, 84% for flaps and 86% for bucket handle. Agreement between the two readers' predictions and arthroscopy was good (k = 0.65 and 0.61, respectively). Inter-rater agreement was almost excellent (k = 0.79). The ROC analysis revealed sensitivity and specificity of 73% and 83% with a cutoff value of <4 mm (p < 0.001). Anterior cruciate ligament injury and medial meniscal tear increased the likelihood of meniscal tear reparability. MRI can be a reliable and accurate tool to predict the reparability of meniscal tears, with higher prediction rates for bucket-handle tears. (orig.)

  19. Value of functional MRI in evaluation of patients with suspected prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Mohamed Mostafa Elian

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Functional MRI provided a highly sensitive method in diagnosing and localizing prostate cancer. Being noninvasive, highly sensitive with wider spectrum in nearby pelvic organs assessment in one imaging session, it may totally replace TRUS-guided biopsy.

  20. Preoperative axillary lymph node evaluation in breast cancer patients by breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): Can breast MRI exclude advanced nodal disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, Su Jeong; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Min Jung

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in preoperative evaluation of axillary lymph node metastasis (ALNM) in breast cancer patients and to assess whether breast MRI can be used to exclude advanced nodal disease. A total of 425 patients were included in this study and breast MRI findings were retrospectively reviewed. The diagnostic performance of breast MRI for diagnosis of ALNM was evaluated in all patients, patients with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), and those without NAC (no-NAC). We evaluated whether negative MRI findings (cN0) can exclude advanced nodal disease (pN2-pN3) using the negative predictive value (NPV) in each group. The sensitivity and NPV of breast MRI in evaluation of ALNM was 51.3 % (60/117) and 83.3 % (284/341), respectively. For cN0 cases on MRI, pN2-pN3 manifested in 1.8 % (6/341) of the overall patients, 0.4 % (1/257) of the no-NAC group, and 6 % (5/84) of the NAC group. The NPV of negative MRI findings for exclusion of pN2-pN3 was higher for the no-NAC group than for the NAC group (99.6 % vs. 94.0 %, p = 0.039). Negative MRI findings (cN0) can exclude the presence of advanced nodal disease with an NPV of 99.6 % in the no-NAC group. (orig.)

  1. Preoperative axillary lymph node evaluation in breast cancer patients by breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): Can breast MRI exclude advanced nodal disease?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyun, Su Jeong [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Breast Cancer Clinic, Severance Hospital, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hallym University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Min Jung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Breast Cancer Clinic, Severance Hospital, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in preoperative evaluation of axillary lymph node metastasis (ALNM) in breast cancer patients and to assess whether breast MRI can be used to exclude advanced nodal disease. A total of 425 patients were included in this study and breast MRI findings were retrospectively reviewed. The diagnostic performance of breast MRI for diagnosis of ALNM was evaluated in all patients, patients with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), and those without NAC (no-NAC). We evaluated whether negative MRI findings (cN0) can exclude advanced nodal disease (pN2-pN3) using the negative predictive value (NPV) in each group. The sensitivity and NPV of breast MRI in evaluation of ALNM was 51.3 % (60/117) and 83.3 % (284/341), respectively. For cN0 cases on MRI, pN2-pN3 manifested in 1.8 % (6/341) of the overall patients, 0.4 % (1/257) of the no-NAC group, and 6 % (5/84) of the NAC group. The NPV of negative MRI findings for exclusion of pN2-pN3 was higher for the no-NAC group than for the NAC group (99.6 % vs. 94.0 %, p = 0.039). Negative MRI findings (cN0) can exclude the presence of advanced nodal disease with an NPV of 99.6 % in the no-NAC group. (orig.)

  2. MRI for troubleshooting detection of prostate cancer; MRT zur Problemloesung beim Nachweis des Prostatakarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyersdorff, D.; Hamm, B. [Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Charite Mitte (Germany)

    2005-06-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in males. Men aged 50 and older are recommended to undergo an annual digital rectal examination (DRE) and determination of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in serum for early detection. However, prostate biopsies guided by transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) come up negative for cancer in many patients despite having PSA levels above 4 ng/ml. T2-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is able to represent the prostate including the surrounding anatomy and depict suspicious areas of low intensity within a high-intensity peripheral zone. MRI has a higher sensitivity for detecting prostate carcinomas than DRE and TRUS in patients having an elevated PSA value and a negative core biopsy. However, its specificity is poor since other abnormalities such as prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), prostatitis, scars, or haemmorrhage have a similar MRI appearance. The use of additional techniques such as MR spectroscopy and contrast-enhanced dynamic MRI improves sensitivity, but in particular it improves the specificity of tumor detection. Newly developed biopsy devices enable the performance of targeted biopsies in areas that appear suspicious in the MRI. (orig.)

  3. Short-Term changes on MRI predict long-Term changes on radiography in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterfy, Charles; Strand, Vibeke; Tian, Lu

    2017-01-01

    Objective In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), MRI provides earlier detection of structural damage than radiography (X-ray) and more sensitive detection of intra-Articular inflammation than clinical examination. This analysis was designed to evaluate the ability of early MRI findings to predict subsequent...

  4. MRI-guided biopsies and minimally invasive therapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeet Ghai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI have led to a paradigm shift in the diagnosis and management of prostate cancer (PCa. Its sensitivity in detecting clinically significant cancer and the ability to localize the tumor within the prostate gland has opened up discussion on targeted diagnosis and therapy in PCa. Use of mp-MRI in conjunction with prostate-specific antigen followed by targeted biopsy allows for a better diagnostic pathway than transrectal ultrasound (TRUS biopsy and improves the diagnosis of PCa. Improved detection of PCa by mp-MRI has also opened up opportunities for focal therapy within the organ while reducing the incidence of side-effects associated with the radical treatment methods for PCa. This review discusses the evidence and techniques for in-bore MRI-guided prostate biopsy and provides an update on the status of MRI-guided targeted focal therapy in PCa.

  5. Added value of diffusion-weighted MRI in detection of cervical cancer recurrence: comparison with morphologic and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Rita; Lopes Dias, João; Cunha, Teresa Margarida

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the added value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting post-treatment cervical cancer recurrence. The detection accuracy of T2-weighted (T2W) images was compared with that of T2W MRI combined with either dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI or DWI. Thirty-eight women with clinically suspected uterine cervical cancer recurrence more than six months after treatment completion were examined with 1.5 Tesla MRI including T2W, DCE, and DWI sequences. Disease was confirmed histologically and correlated with MRI findings. The diagnostic performance of T2W imaging and its combination with either DCE or DWI were analyzed. Sensitivity, positive predictive value, and accuracy were calculated. Thirty-six women had histologically proven recurrence. The accuracy for recurrence detection was 80% with T2W/DCE MRI and 92.1% with T2W/DWI. The addition of DCE sequences did not significantly improve the diagnostic ability of T2W imaging, and this sequence combination misclassified two patients as falsely positive and seven as falsely negative. The T2W/DWI combination revealed a positive predictive value of 100% and only three false negatives. The addition of DWI to T2W sequences considerably improved the diagnostic ability of MRI. Our results support the inclusion of DWI in the initial MRI protocol for the detection of cervical cancer recurrence, leaving DCE sequences as an option for uncertain cases.

  6. MRI comes of age in RA clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterfy, Charles; Østergaard, Mikkel; Conaghan, Philip G

    2013-01-01

    meant difficulties in differentiating structural progression using traditional radiographic outcome measures. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been demonstrated to assess damage more sensitively than radiographs, but importantly it can measure the upstream drivers of erosions and cartilage loss...

  7. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: the value of MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbach, H.; Tschampa, H.J.; Keller, E.; Schild, H.H.; Paus, S.

    2001-01-01

    To define the role of MRI in the diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Methods: 14 patients with suspected CJD were studied within 3 years. MRI findings were correlated with WHO established diagnostic criteria (clinical findings, EEG, CSF with 14-3-3 protein assay). Results: 12 patients had CJD. One patient each suffered from Hashimoto's encephalitis and ALS dementia complex, respectively. Nine of 12 CJD patients had increased signal intensity of the striatum (n = 8), pulvinar thalami (n = 5) and/or cerebellar and cerebral cortex (n = 3), respectively. Signal intensity was most pronounced on FLAIR sequences; six patients were studied with diffusion-weighted MRI and showed impaired diffusion in these areas. Both patients without CJD did not show the abovementioned signal changes (sensitivity 75%, specificity and positive predictive value 100%, respectively). Conclusion: If patients with suspected CJD are studied with FLAIR and diffusion-weighted sequences, this disorder can reliably be proven or ruled out. Typical MRI findings narrow down the differential diagnosis and should be included in the WHO diagnostic criteria. (orig.) [de

  8. Comparative study of diffusion weighted imaging and dynamic contrast enhanced MRI for the detection of small breast cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Jianhua; Yan Fuhua; Zhou Meiling; Ye Fang; Xu Pengju

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To compare the sensitivity of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) with dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI for the detection of small breast cancers and to evaluate the clinical value of DWI. Methods: Forty-eight patients with benign (n=25) and malignant (n=45) small breast lesions (≤2 cm) proved by pathology underwent DWI and DCE MRI. The DCE MRI was performed using FLASH sequence and the time-signal intensity curve was drawn. The DWI was performed using GRAPPA- EPI sequence with different b values (800, 1000 s/mm 2 ) and the ADC values of lesions were measured. The sensitivity and specificity of DWI for the detection of small breast cancers were compared with DCE MRI. Results: Forty of 45 small breast cancers and 19 of 25 small benign breast lesions were correctly diagnosed using DCE MRI. The sensitivity and positive predictive value of TIC were 88.9% (40/45) and 87.0% (40/46). With b values of 800 s/mm 2 and 1000 s/mm 2 , the average ADC values of small breast cancers were (1.153±0.192) x 10 -3 and (1.079±0.186) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, while those of benign ones were (1.473±0.252) x 10 -3 and (1.419 ± 0.255) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, respectively. There was no significant difference for the ADC values with different b values in the same group (P>0.05), while there was a significant difference between the malignant and the benign lesions (P 2 . Both the sensitivity and positive predictive value of diagnosis were 86.7% (39/45). The abilities of DWI and DCE MRI for the diagnosis of small breast cancers were the same. The sensitivity (93.3%) and positive predictive value (91.3%) were improved with the combination of DCE MRI and DWI. Conclusion: DWI has a high sensitivity for the detection of small breast cancers, the ADC value can provide valuable information in the differential diagnosis. (authors)

  9. SPECT and MRI in the diagnosis of epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenwald, F.; Biersack, H.J.; Bockisch, A.; Elger, C.E.; Durwen, H.F.; Penin, H.

    1989-01-01

    This study presents the results obtained using SPECT and MRI in epilepsy - mainly based on presurgical investigation in therapy-resistant cases of temporal lobe epilepsy. MRI was positive in 61% of 102 examined patients, SPECT was positive in 84%. In 46 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy subjected to partial temporal lobectomy was performed later on there was agreement of the results obtained with regard to the lateralisation in 74%. Although MRI, due to its sensitivity is superior to CT in diagnosis of epilepsy, CT should be performed in any case because some morphological changes - especially small arteriovenous malformations - are only seen in CT. MRI and SPECT should be considered as two complementary methods in epilepsy diagnosis, serving to evaluate morphology and function. A definite statement as to the predictive value of both methods remains to be made depending on a comparison of the results with the postoperative outcome referring to seizure frequency and cognitive function. (orig.) [de

  10. MRI diagnosis of intracranial tuberculosis (73 cases report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Qingyong; Li Xin; He Zhihui; Cheng Chuanhu; Deng Kaijun; Deng Ming

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess the MRI features, classification and diagnostic value for intracranial tuberculosis. Methods MRI findings of 73 patients suffering from intracranial tuberculosis proved by pathology or clinic were analyzed respectively. Among the total 73 patients, 39 cases were tuberculosis meningitis, 12 cases simple intracranial tuberculoma, while 22 cases were tuberculoma combining with meningitis. Results: The MRI features of tuberculous meningitis are cerebral infarction, hydrocephalus, abnormal meningeal and cerebral cistern enhancement. 12 cases mature tuberculoma demon- strated typical features with high or low density on T 2 WI images and ring contrast enhancement; 22 cases non-mature tuberculoma showed focal nodular contrast enhancement with evident cerebral edema. FLAIR is more sensitive to find out focus than T 2 WI. Small lesions could be showed definitively by contrast-enhanced scan. Conclusion: MRI possess typical features in the diagnosis of intracranial tuberculosis. It plays an important role in evaluating location, range, classification of intracranial tuberculosis, and is helpful to clinical treatment. (authors)

  11. The search for neuroimaging biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease with advanced MRI techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tie-Qiang (Karolinska Huddinge - Medical Physics, Stockholm (Sweden)), email: tieqiang.li@karolinska.se; Wahlund, Lars-Olof (Dept. of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2011-02-15

    The aim of this review is to examine the recent literature on using advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques for finding neuroimaging biomarkers that are sensitive to the detection of risks for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since structural MRI techniques, such as brain structural volumetry and voxel based morphometry (VBM), have been widely used for AD studies and extensively reviewed, we will only briefly touch on the topics of volumetry and morphometry. The focus of the current review is about the more recent developments in the search for AD neuroimaging biomarkers with functional MRI (fMRI), resting-state functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), arterial spin-labeling (ASL), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)

  12. Abbreviated protocol for breast MRI: Are multiple sequences needed for cancer detection?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mango, Victoria L.; Morris, Elizabeth A.; David Dershaw, D.; Abramson, Andrea; Fry, Charles; Moskowitz, Chaya S.; Hughes, Mary; Kaplan, Jennifer; Jochelson, Maxine S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Abbreviated breast MR demonstrates high sensitivity for breast carcinoma detection. • Time to perform/interpret the abbreviated exam is shorter than a standard MRI exam. • An abbreviated breast MRI could reduce costs and make MRI screening more available. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the ability of an abbreviated breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol, consisting of a precontrast T1 weighted (T1W) image and single early post-contrast T1W image, to detect breast carcinoma. Materials and methods: A HIPAA compliant Institutional Review Board approved review of 100 consecutive breast MRI examinations in patients with biopsy proven unicentric breast carcinoma. 79% were invasive carcinomas and 21% were ductal carcinoma in situ. Four experienced breast radiologists, blinded to carcinoma location, history and prior examinations, assessed the abbreviated protocol evaluating only the first post-contrast T1W image, post-processed subtracted first post-contrast and subtraction maximum intensity projection images. Detection and localization of tumor were compared to the standard full diagnostic examination consisting of 13 pre-contrast, post-contrast and post-processed sequences. Results: All 100 cancers were visualized on initial reading of the abbreviated protocol by at least one reader. The mean sensitivity for each sequence was 96% for the first post-contrast sequence, 96% for the first post-contrast subtraction sequence and 93% for the subtraction MIP sequence. Within each sequence, there was no significant difference between the sensitivities among the 4 readers (p = 0.471, p = 0.656, p = 0.139). Mean interpretation time was 44 s (range 11–167 s). The abbreviated imaging protocol could be performed in approximately 10–15 min, compared to 30–40 min for the standard protocol. Conclusion: An abbreviated breast MRI protocol allows detection of breast carcinoma. One pre and post-contrast T1W sequence may be adequate for detecting

  13. Abbreviated protocol for breast MRI: Are multiple sequences needed for cancer detection?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mango, Victoria L., E-mail: vlm2125@columbia.edu [Columbia University Medical Center, Herbert Irving Pavilion, 161 Fort Washington Avenue, 10th Floor, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Morris, Elizabeth A., E-mail: morrise@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); David Dershaw, D., E-mail: dershawd@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Abramson, Andrea, E-mail: abramsoa@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Fry, Charles, E-mail: charles_fry@nymc.edu [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); New York Medical College, 40 Sunshine Cottage Rd, Valhalla, NY 10595 (United States); Moskowitz, Chaya S. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Hughes, Mary, E-mail: hughesm@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Kaplan, Jennifer, E-mail: kaplanj@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Jochelson, Maxine S., E-mail: jochelsm@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Abbreviated breast MR demonstrates high sensitivity for breast carcinoma detection. • Time to perform/interpret the abbreviated exam is shorter than a standard MRI exam. • An abbreviated breast MRI could reduce costs and make MRI screening more available. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the ability of an abbreviated breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol, consisting of a precontrast T1 weighted (T1W) image and single early post-contrast T1W image, to detect breast carcinoma. Materials and methods: A HIPAA compliant Institutional Review Board approved review of 100 consecutive breast MRI examinations in patients with biopsy proven unicentric breast carcinoma. 79% were invasive carcinomas and 21% were ductal carcinoma in situ. Four experienced breast radiologists, blinded to carcinoma location, history and prior examinations, assessed the abbreviated protocol evaluating only the first post-contrast T1W image, post-processed subtracted first post-contrast and subtraction maximum intensity projection images. Detection and localization of tumor were compared to the standard full diagnostic examination consisting of 13 pre-contrast, post-contrast and post-processed sequences. Results: All 100 cancers were visualized on initial reading of the abbreviated protocol by at least one reader. The mean sensitivity for each sequence was 96% for the first post-contrast sequence, 96% for the first post-contrast subtraction sequence and 93% for the subtraction MIP sequence. Within each sequence, there was no significant difference between the sensitivities among the 4 readers (p = 0.471, p = 0.656, p = 0.139). Mean interpretation time was 44 s (range 11–167 s). The abbreviated imaging protocol could be performed in approximately 10–15 min, compared to 30–40 min for the standard protocol. Conclusion: An abbreviated breast MRI protocol allows detection of breast carcinoma. One pre and post-contrast T1W sequence may be adequate for detecting

  14. Bilateral symmetry analysis of breast MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alterson, Robert; Plewes, Donald B

    2003-01-01

    Mammographic interpretation often uses symmetry between left and right breasts to indicate the site of potential tumour masses. This approach has not been applied to breast images obtained from MRI. We present an automatic technique for breast symmetry detection based on feature extraction techniques which does not require any efforts to co-register breast MRI data. The approach applies computer-vision techniques to detect natural biological symmetries in breast MR scans based on three objective measures of similarity: multiresolution non-orthogonal wavelet representation, three-dimensional intensity distributions and co-occurrence matrices. Statistical distributions that are invariant to feature localization are computed for each of the extracted image features. These distributions are later compared against each other to account for perceptual similarity. Studies based on 51 normal MRI scans of randomly selected patients showed that the sensitivity of symmetry detection rate approached 94%. The symmetry analysis procedure presented in this paper can be applied as an aid in detecting breast tissue changes arising from disease

  15. Dynamic MRI study for breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Tsuneaki

    1990-01-01

    Application of MRI for diagnosis of breast tumors was retrospectively examined in 103 consecutive cases. Contrast enhancement, mostly by dynamic study, was performed in 83 cases using Gd-DTPA and 0.5 T superconductive apparatus. Results were compared to those of mammography and sonography. On dynamic study, carcinoma showed abrupt rise of signal intensity with clear-cut peak formation in early phase, while benign fibroadenoma showed slow rise of signal intensity and prolonged enhancement without peak formation. In 12 of 33 carcinomas (33%), peripheral ring enhancement was noted reflecting vascular stroma of histologic sections. All fibroadenomas showed homogenous enhancement without peripheral ring. In MRI, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 86%, 96%, 91%. In mammography 82%, 95%, 87% and in ultrasonography 91%, 95%, 93%. Although MRI should not be regarded as routine diagnostic procedure because of expense and limited availability, it may afford useful additional information when standard mammographic findings are not conclusive. (author)

  16. Preclinical study of diagnostic performances of contrast-enhanced spectral mammography versus MRI for breast diseases in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingguo; Li, Kangan; Wang, Lihui; Zhang, Jianbing; Zhou, Zhiguo; Feng, Yan

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate diagnostic performances of CESM for breast diseases with comparison to breast MRI in China. Sixty-eight patients with 77 breast lesions underwent MR and CESM. Two radiologists interpreted either MRI or CESM images, separately and independently. BI-RADS 1-3 and BI-RADS 4-5 were classified into the suspicious benign and suspicious malignant groups. Diagnostic accuracy parameters were calculated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed for the two modalities. The agreement and correlation between maximum lesion diameter based on CESM and MRI, or CESM and pathology were analyzed. Diagnostic accuracy parameters for CESM were sensitivity 95.8 %, specificity 65.5 %, PPV 82.1 %, NPV 90.5 % and accuracy 84.4 %. The diagnostic accuracy parameters for breast MRI were sensitivity 93.8 %, specificity 82.8 %, PPV 88.2 %, NPV 92.3 %and accuracy 89.6 %. Area under the curve (AUC) of ROC was 0.96 for breast MRI and 0.88 for CESM. The Bland-Altman plots showed a mean difference of 0.7 mm with 95 % limits of agreement of 11.4 mm in tumor diameter measured using CESM and breast MRI. The differences of size measurement between CESM and breast MRI were significant, whereas no difference was observed between CESM and pathology as well as between breast MRI and pathology. The better correlation with pathological results was found in CESM than breast MRI. Our study demonstrates that CESM possesses better diagnostic performances than breast MRI in terms of diagnostic sensitivity and lesion size assessment. And CESM is a good alternative method of screening breast cancer in high-risk people.

  17. Avascular necrosis (AVN) of the proximal fragment in scaphoid nonunion: Is intravenous contrast agent necessary in MRI?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, R.; Christopoulos, G.; Wagner, M.; Krimmer, H.; Fodor, S.; Schoonhoven, J. van; Prommersberger, K.J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this prospective study is to assess the diagnostic value of intravenously applied contrast agent for diagnosing osteonecrosis of the proximal fragment in scaphoid nonunion, and to compare the imaging results with intraoperative findings. Materials and methods: In 88 patients (7 women, 81 men) suffering from symptomatic scaphoid nonunion, preoperative MRI was performed (coronal PD-w FSE fs, sagittal-oblique T1-w SE nonenhanced and T1-w SE fs contrast-enhanced, sagittal T2*-w GRE). MRI interpretation was based on the intensity of contrast enhancement: 0 = none, 1 = focal, 2 = diffuse. Intraoperatively, the osseous viability was scored by means of bleeding points on the osteotomy site of the proximal scaphoid fragment: 0 = absent, 1 = moderate, 2 = good. Results: Intraoperatively, 17 necrotic, 29 compromised, and 42 normal proximal fragments were found. In nonenhanced MRI, bone viability was judged necrotic in 1 patient, compromised in 20 patients, and unaffected in 67 patients. Contrast-enhanced MRI revealed 14 necrotic, 21 compromised, and 53 normal proximal fragments. Judging surgical findings as the standard of reference, statistical analysis for nonenhanced MRI was: sensitivity 6.3%, specificity 100%, positive PV 100%, negative PV 82.6%, and accuracy 82.9%; statistics for contrast-enhanced MRI was: sensitivity 76.5%, specificity 98.6%, positive PV 92.9%, negative PV 94.6%, and accuracy 94.3%. Sensitivity for detecting avascular proximal fragments was significantly better (p < 0.001) in contrast-enhanced MRI in comparison to nonenhanced MRI. Conclusion: Viability of the proximal fragment in scaphoid nonunion can be significantly better assessed with the use of contrast-enhanced MRI as compared to nonenhanced MRI. Bone marrow edema is an inferior indicator of osteonecrosis. Application of intravenous gadolinium is recommended for imaging scaphoid nonunion.

  18. Avascular necrosis (AVN) of the proximal fragment in scaphoid nonunion: Is intravenous contrast agent necessary in MRI?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, R., E-mail: schmitt.radiologie@herzchirurgie.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Cardiovascular Center, Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany); Christopoulos, G.; Wagner, M. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Cardiovascular Center, Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany); Krimmer, H. [Department of Hand Surgery, Cardiovascular Center, Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany); Fodor, S. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Cardiovascular Center, Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany); Schoonhoven, J. van; Prommersberger, K.J. [Department of Hand Surgery, Cardiovascular Center, Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this prospective study is to assess the diagnostic value of intravenously applied contrast agent for diagnosing osteonecrosis of the proximal fragment in scaphoid nonunion, and to compare the imaging results with intraoperative findings. Materials and methods: In 88 patients (7 women, 81 men) suffering from symptomatic scaphoid nonunion, preoperative MRI was performed (coronal PD-w FSE fs, sagittal-oblique T1-w SE nonenhanced and T1-w SE fs contrast-enhanced, sagittal T2*-w GRE). MRI interpretation was based on the intensity of contrast enhancement: 0 = none, 1 = focal, 2 = diffuse. Intraoperatively, the osseous viability was scored by means of bleeding points on the osteotomy site of the proximal scaphoid fragment: 0 = absent, 1 = moderate, 2 = good. Results: Intraoperatively, 17 necrotic, 29 compromised, and 42 normal proximal fragments were found. In nonenhanced MRI, bone viability was judged necrotic in 1 patient, compromised in 20 patients, and unaffected in 67 patients. Contrast-enhanced MRI revealed 14 necrotic, 21 compromised, and 53 normal proximal fragments. Judging surgical findings as the standard of reference, statistical analysis for nonenhanced MRI was: sensitivity 6.3%, specificity 100%, positive PV 100%, negative PV 82.6%, and accuracy 82.9%; statistics for contrast-enhanced MRI was: sensitivity 76.5%, specificity 98.6%, positive PV 92.9%, negative PV 94.6%, and accuracy 94.3%. Sensitivity for detecting avascular proximal fragments was significantly better (p < 0.001) in contrast-enhanced MRI in comparison to nonenhanced MRI. Conclusion: Viability of the proximal fragment in scaphoid nonunion can be significantly better assessed with the use of contrast-enhanced MRI as compared to nonenhanced MRI. Bone marrow edema is an inferior indicator of osteonecrosis. Application of intravenous gadolinium is recommended for imaging scaphoid nonunion.

  19. Avascular necrosis (AVN) of the proximal fragment in scaphoid nonunion: is intravenous contrast agent necessary in MRI?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, R; Christopoulos, G; Wagner, M; Krimmer, H; Fodor, S; van Schoonhoven, J; Prommersberger, K J

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this prospective study is to assess the diagnostic value of intravenously applied contrast agent for diagnosing osteonecrosis of the proximal fragment in scaphoid nonunion, and to compare the imaging results with intraoperative findings. In 88 patients (7 women, 81 men) suffering from symptomatic scaphoid nonunion, preoperative MRI was performed (coronal PD-w FSE fs, sagittal-oblique T1-w SE nonenhanced and T1-w SE fs contrast-enhanced, sagittal T2*-w GRE). MRI interpretation was based on the intensity of contrast enhancement: 0 = none, 1 = focal, 2 = diffuse. Intraoperatively, the osseous viability was scored by means of bleeding points on the osteotomy site of the proximal scaphoid fragment: 0=absent, 1 = moderate, 2 = good. Intraoperatively, 17 necrotic, 29 compromised, and 42 normal proximal fragments were found. In nonenhanced MRI, bone viability was judged necrotic in 1 patient, compromised in 20 patients, and unaffected in 67 patients. Contrast-enhanced MRI revealed 14 necrotic, 21 compromised, and 53 normal proximal fragments. Judging surgical findings as the standard of reference, statistical analysis for nonenhanced MRI was: sensitivity 6.3%, specificity 100%, positive PV 100%, negative PV 82.6%, and accuracy 82.9%; statistics for contrast-enhanced MRI was: sensitivity 76.5%, specificity 98.6%, positive PV 92.9%, negative PV 94.6%, and accuracy 94.3%. Sensitivity for detecting avascular proximal fragments was significantly better (p<0.001) in contrast-enhanced MRI in comparison to nonenhanced MRI. Viability of the proximal fragment in scaphoid nonunion can be significantly better assessed with the use of contrast-enhanced MRI as compared to nonenhanced MRI. Bone marrow edema is an inferior indicator of osteonecrosis. Application of intravenous gadolinium is recommended for imaging scaphoid nonunion. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Bone scintigraphy compared to MRI and ultrasound in the early diagnosis of arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandrock, D.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory arthritis is recognized specifically by bone erosions, caused by characteristic pannus tissue. In the finger joints dynamic low-Tesla MRI is nearly double but not completely sensitive in the detection of erosions than conventional radiography, sonography takes an intermediate position. Less specific signs of synovitis and tenosynovitis are shown with high sensitivity by both 3(2)-phase bone scintigraphy and ultrasound, MRI is less sensitive in this respect. However, standard situation of inflammation in bone scintigraphy - positive finding in early as well as late phase - is of surprisingly low sensitivity, any singular finding in the early or late phase has to be regarded as positive. Specificity of these singular findings is nevertheless sufficiently high, acute inflammatory joint changes and even erosions are also seen with MRI in obviously healthy persons. Only 2-phase bone scintigraphy is easily able to present a simultaneous survey of all joints of the body. For this reason 2-phase bone scintigraphy is most suitable for exclusion but also for primary diagnosis of disease, specification must be done afterwards by other imaging modalities or by laboratory findings. (orig.)

  1. Remote sensing of land surface phenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, G.A.; Brown, Jesslyn F.

    2014-01-01

    Remote sensing of land-surface phenology is an important method for studying the patterns of plant and animal growth cycles. Phenological events are sensitive to climate variation; therefore phenology data provide important baseline information documenting trends in ecology and detecting the impacts of climate change on multiple scales. The USGS Remote sensing of land surface phenology program produces annually, nine phenology indicator variables at 250 m and 1,000 m resolution for the contiguous U.S. The 12 year archive is available at http://phenology.cr.usgs.gov/index.php.

  2. Rapid lung MRI in children with pulmonary infections: Time to change our diagnostic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodhi, Kushaljit Singh; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Saxena, Akshay Kumar; Singh, Meenu; Agarwal, Ritesh; Bhatia, Anmol; Lee, Edward Y

    2016-05-01

    To determine the diagnostic utility of a new rapid MRI protocol, as compared with computed tomography (CT) for the detection of various pulmonary and mediastinal abnormalities in children with suspected pulmonary infections. Seventy-five children (age range of 5 to 15 years) with clinically suspected pulmonary infections were enrolled in this prospective study, which was approved by the institutional ethics committee. All patients underwent thoracic MRI (1.5T) and CT (64 detector) scan within 48 h of each other. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of MRI were evaluated with CT as a standard of reference. Inter-observer agreement was measured with the kappa coefficient. MRI with a new rapid MRI protocol demonstrated sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of 100% for detecting pulmonary consolidation, nodules (>3 mm), cyst/cavity, hyperinflation, pleural effusion, and lymph nodes. The kappa-test showed almost perfect agreement between MRI and multidetector CT (MDCT) in detecting thoracic abnormalities (k = 0.9). No statistically significant difference was observed between MRI and MDCT for detecting thoracic abnormalities by the McNemar test (P = 0.125). Rapid lung MRI was found to be comparable to MDCT for detecting thoracic abnormalities in pediatric patients with clinically suspected pulmonary infections. It has a great potential as the first line cross-sectional imaging modality of choice in this patient population. However, further studies will be helpful for confirmation of our findings. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Muscle MRI STIR signal intensity and atrophy are correlated to focal lower limb neuropathy severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroide, N; Bousson, V; Mambre, L; Vicaut, E; Laredo, J D; Kubis, Nathalie

    2015-03-01

    The objective is to determine if muscle MRI is useful for assessing neuropathy severity. Clinical, MRI and electromyography (EMG) examinations were performed in 17 patients with focal lower limb neuropathies. MRI Short Tau Inversion Recovery (STIR) signal intensity, amyotrophy, and muscle fatty infiltration measured after T1-weighted image acquisition, EMG spontaneous activity (SA), and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) were graded using semiquantitative scores and quantitative scores for STIR signal intensity and were correlated to the Medical Research Council (MRC) score for testing muscle strength. Within this population, subgroups were selected according to severity (mild versus severe), duration (subacute versus chronic), and topography (distal versus proximal) of the neuropathy. EMG SA and MVC MRI amyotrophy and quantitative scoring of muscle STIR intensity were correlated with the MRC score. Moreover, MRI amyotrophy was significantly increased in severe, chronic, and proximal neuropathies along with fatty infiltration in chronic lesions. Muscle MRI atrophy and quantitative evaluation of signal intensity were correlated to MRC score in our study. Semiquantitative evaluation of muscle STIR signal was sensitive enough for detection of topography of the nerve lesion but was not suitable to assess severity. Muscle MRI could support EMG in chronic and proximal neuropathy, which showed poor sensitivity in these patients.

  4. Muscle MRI STIR signal intensity and atrophy are correlated to focal lower limb neuropathy severity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deroide, N.; Mambre, L.; Kubis, Nathalie [Service de Physiologie Clinique-Explorations Fonctionnelles, AP-HP, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite France, Paris (France); Bousson, V.; Laredo, J.D. [Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite France, Paris (France); Radiologie Osteo-articulaire, AP-HP, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Vicaut, E. [Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite France, Paris (France); URC, AP-HP, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France)

    2014-09-26

    The objective is to determine if muscle MRI is useful for assessing neuropathy severity. Clinical, MRI and electromyography (EMG) examinations were performed in 17 patients with focal lower limb neuropathies. MRI Short Tau Inversion Recovery (STIR) signal intensity, amyotrophy, and muscle fatty infiltration measured after T1-weighted image acquisition, EMG spontaneous activity (SA), and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) were graded using semiquantitative scores and quantitative scores for STIR signal intensity and were correlated to the Medical Research Council (MRC) score for testing muscle strength. Within this population, subgroups were selected according to severity (mild versus severe), duration (subacute versus chronic), and topography (distal versus proximal) of the neuropathy. EMG SA and MVC MRI amyotrophy and quantitative scoring of muscle STIR intensity were correlated with the MRC score. Moreover, MRI amyotrophy was significantly increased in severe, chronic, and proximal neuropathies along with fatty infiltration in chronic lesions. Muscle MRI atrophy and quantitative evaluation of signal intensity were correlated to MRC score in our study. Semiquantitative evaluation of muscle STIR signal was sensitive enough for detection of topography of the nerve lesion but was not suitable to assess severity. Muscle MRI could support EMG in chronic and proximal neuropathy, which showed poor sensitivity in these patients. (orig.)

  5. Diagnosis and heterogeneity of MS in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holst, B.; Fiehler, J.; Schippling, S.

    2008-01-01

    An efficient therapy of MS requires a quick and reliable diagnosis of the disease. MRI is the most leading paraclinical examination for MS diagnosis. Even though there is no pathognomic finding in MRI, there are MS characteristics with respect to morphology and localization. To exclude other neurological disorders and distinguish between different characteristics within MS, the use of contrast agent is advantageous. Postulated MRI criteria have been increasingly adjusted to the clinical routine and have become clearer, more sensitive, and more specific. Different imaging criteria will be introduced. In addition to the McDonald criteria of 2001 and 2005, new criteria will be presented in which the use of contrast agent is replaced by a second MRI and the dissemination in time and space is simplified. Different pathomechanisms which help to separate MS patients into subgroups are postulated. The diverse pathomechanisms also enable the development of new pharmaceuticals to manipulate the immunologic course in different stages. For varying therapy approaches, it is increasingly important to differentiate the heterogeneous appearance forms into subtypes. The two visible main components of the disorder in MRI are inflammation and neurodegeneration and are responsible for different clinical courses. Both are interdependent and independent of each other. We introduce a stratification which uses both components as a function of their different outcomes to compose subgroups. The previous challenge with respect to MRI was to support the diagnosis of MS via MRI criteria. A future problem will be the heterogeneity and classification of subgroups. This article gives an overview of both problems. (orig.)

  6. Placenta previa; MRI as an adjunct to ultrasound in assessment of suspected placental invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmaa M. Abdel Magied

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate adding MRI to ultrasound in imaging of placenta previa with suspected placenta accreta. Patients and methods: evaluation of 23 pregnant females presenting with placenta previa was done. The age ranged from 20 to 39 years (mean = 30.9. All of the patients were subjected to ultrasonography (US and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the pelvis at gestational age of 25–37 weeks prior to elective delivery. Results: 11 out of 23 patients were proved placenta accreta based on surgical and pathological reports. US suggested diagnosis of placenta previa/accreta in 8 patients and placenta previa without accreta in 15 cases. 7/8 was true positive (87.5% & one was false positive (12.5% with sensitivity 63.64%, accuracy 78.26%, and specificity 91.67%. MRI has suggested diagnosis of placenta previa/accreta in 8/23 & placenta previa with no accreta in 15/23 patients. MRI was found to give true positive results in 8/8 patients proved to be accreta. MRI gave true negative in 12 patients (80% & false negative in 3 (20% with sensitivity 72.73%, accuracy 86.96%, and specificity 100%. Conclusion: Combining MRI and ultra sound provide more diagnostic information and may reduce unnecessary interventions with favorable outcome. Keywords: Ultra sound, MRI, Placenta previa, Placenta accreta

  7. Dynamic contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) for the assessment of Pc 4-sensitized photodynamic therapy of a U87-derived glioma model in the athymic nude rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anka, Ali; Thompson, Paul; Mott, Eric; Sharma, Rahul; Zhang, Ruozhen; Cross, Nathan; Sun, Jiayang; Flask, Chris A.; Oleinick, Nancy L.; Dean, David

    2010-02-01

    Introduction: Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) may provide a means of tracking the outcome of Pc 4-sensitized photodynamic therapy (PDT) in deeply placed lesions (e.g., brain tumors). We previously determined that 150 μL of gadolinium (Gd-DTPA) produces optimal enhancement of U87-derived intracerebral tumors in an athymic nude rat glioma model. We wish to determine how consistently DCE-MRI enhancement will detect an increase in Gd-enhancement of these tumors following Pc 4-PDT. Methods: We injected 2.5 x 105 U87 cells into the brains of 6 athymic nude rats. After 7-8 days pre-Pc 4 PDT peri-tumor DCE-MRI images were acquired on a 7.0T microMRI scanner before and after administration of 150 μL Gd. DCE-MRI scans were repeated on Days 11, 12, and 13 following Pc 4-PDT (Day 8 or 9). Results: Useful DCE-MRI data were obtained for these animals before and after Pc 4- PDT. In the pre-Pc 4-PDT DCE-MRI scans an average normalized peak Gd enhancement was observed in tumor tissue that was 1.297 times greater than baseline (0.035 Standard Error [SE]). The average normalized peak Gd enhancement in the tumor tissue in the scan following PDT (Day 11) was 1.537 times greater than baseline (0.036 SE), a statistically significant increase in enhancement (p = 0.00584) over the pre-PDT level. Discussion: A 150 μL Gd dose appears to provide an unambiguous increase in signal indicating Pc 4-PDT-induced necrosis of the U87-derived tumor. Our DCEMRI protocol may allow the development of a clinically robust, unambiguous, non-invasive technique for the assessment of PDT outcome.

  8. Accuracy of High-Resolution MRI with Lumen Distention in Rectal Cancer Staging and Circumferential Margin Involvement Prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iannicelli, Elsa; Di Renzo, Sara; Ferri, Mario; Pilozzi, Emanuela; Di Girolamo, Marco; Sapori, Alessandra; Ziparo, Vincenzo; David, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with lumen distention for rectal cancer staging and circumferential resection margin (CRM) involvement prediction. Seventy-three patients with primary rectal cancer underwent high-resolution MRI with a phased-array coil performed using 60-80 mL room air rectal distention, 1-3 weeks before surgery. MRI results were compared to postoperative histopathological findings. The overall MRI T staging accuracy was calculated. CRM involvement prediction and the N staging, the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were assessed for each T stage. The agreement between MRI and histological results was assessed using weighted-kappa statistics. The overall MRI accuracy for T staging was 93.6% (k = 0.85). The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV for each T stage were as follows: 91.8%, 86.2%, 95.5%, 92.6% and 91.3% for the group ≤ T2; 90.4%, 94.6%, 86.1%, 87.5% and 94% for T3; 98,6%, 85.7%, 100%, 100% and 98.5% for T4, respectively. The predictive CRM accuracy was 94.5% (k = 0.86); the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were 89.5%, 96.3%, 89.5%, and 96.3% respectively. The N staging accuracy was 68.49% (k = 0.4). MRI performed with rectal lumen distention has proved to be an effective technique both for rectal cancer staging and involved CRM predicting

  9. Accuracy of High-Resolution MRI with Lumen Distention in Rectal Cancer Staging and Circumferential Margin Involvement Prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iannicelli, Elsa; Di Renzo, Sara [Radiology Institute, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); Department of Surgical and Medical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); Ferri, Mario [Department of Surgical and Medical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); Pilozzi, Emanuela [Department of Clinical and Molecular Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); Di Girolamo, Marco; Sapori, Alessandra [Radiology Institute, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); Department of Surgical and Medical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); Ziparo, Vincenzo [Department of Surgical and Medical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); David, Vincenzo [Radiology Institute, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy); Department of Surgical and Medical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, University of Rome, Sapienza, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome 00189 (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with lumen distention for rectal cancer staging and circumferential resection margin (CRM) involvement prediction. Seventy-three patients with primary rectal cancer underwent high-resolution MRI with a phased-array coil performed using 60-80 mL room air rectal distention, 1-3 weeks before surgery. MRI results were compared to postoperative histopathological findings. The overall MRI T staging accuracy was calculated. CRM involvement prediction and the N staging, the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were assessed for each T stage. The agreement between MRI and histological results was assessed using weighted-kappa statistics. The overall MRI accuracy for T staging was 93.6% (k = 0.85). The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV for each T stage were as follows: 91.8%, 86.2%, 95.5%, 92.6% and 91.3% for the group ≤ T2; 90.4%, 94.6%, 86.1%, 87.5% and 94% for T3; 98,6%, 85.7%, 100%, 100% and 98.5% for T4, respectively. The predictive CRM accuracy was 94.5% (k = 0.86); the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were 89.5%, 96.3%, 89.5%, and 96.3% respectively. The N staging accuracy was 68.49% (k = 0.4). MRI performed with rectal lumen distention has proved to be an effective technique both for rectal cancer staging and involved CRM predicting.

  10. MRI diagnosis of eyeball diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Xiaofeng; Shi Zengru; Xiao Xiangsheng; Yu Hong; Wei Ruili

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To review the MR imaging of eyeball mass in 75 patients with the intention to enhance the acknowledgement to eyeball diseases. Methods: Seventy-five patients, 45 males and 30 females, were examined with MRI before treatment. Most MRI studies were performed with head coil and a few with orbit surface coil. Sagittal, coronal, and axial images were attained. Enhanced MRI studies were performed in 37 cases. High magnetic field MRI studies were performed with additional fat saturation technique. Results: Retinoblastoma (20 cases) showed isointensity in 11 and low signal intensity in 9 on T 1 WI, and isointensity in 5 and slight high signal in 15 on T 2 WI. Coats' disease (5 cases) involved single eyeball in all cases without calcification or eyeball enlargement, and presented as slight high signal on T 1 WI and high signal on T 2 WI. Choroidal angioma (3 cases) showed slight high signal on T 1 WI and high signal on T 2 WI. Metastasis (20 cases) was located in the posterior wall of the eyeball. Extra-global invasion occurred in 8 cases and intra-global invasion in 20. Marked thickening of the global wall with isointensity (8 cases) or low signal intensity (12 cases) was detected on T 1 WI, and isointensity (6 cases) or slight high signal intensity (14 cases) was demonstrated on T 2 WI. Marked enhancement was revealed in all 15 cases. Melanoma (7 cases) showed high signal intensity (5) and isointensity (2) on T 1 WI, and low signal (7) on T 2 WI. Retinal detachment (19 cases) showed high signal on both T 1 and T 2 WI, etc. In the diagnosis of eyeball diseases with MRI, the total sensitivity was 100% and specificity was 86.7%. Conclusions: MRI imaging is an important examination method to eyeball diseases, and most diagnosis and differential diagnosis of eyeball diseases can be made correctly with MRI

  11. Development of a screening MRI for infants at risk for abusive head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flom, Lynda; Panigrahy, Ashok [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Fromkin, Janet [University of Pittsburgh, Department of Pediatrics, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth [University of Pittsburgh, Department of Neurosurgery, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Berger, Rachel P. [University of Pittsburgh, Department of Pediatrics, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); University of Pittsburgh, Safar Center for Resuscitation Research, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Abusive head trauma (AHT) is an important cause of morbidity in infants. Identifying which well-appearing infants are at risk for AHT and need neuroimaging is challenging, and concern about radiation exposure limits the use of head CT. Availability of an MRI protocol that is highly sensitive for intracranial hemorrhage would allow for AHT screening of well-appearing infants without exposing them to radiation. To develop a screening MRI protocol to identify intracranial hemorrhage in well-appearing infants at risk for AHT. Infants enrolled in a parent study of well-appearing infants at increased risk for AHT were eligible for the current study if they underwent both head CT and conventional brain MRI. A derivation cohort of nine infants with AHT was used to identify sequences that provided the highest sensitivity for intracranial hemorrhage. A validation cohort of 78 infants including both controls with normal neuroimaging and cases with AHT was used to evaluate the accuracy of the selected sequences. Three pulse sequences - axial T2, axial gradient recalled echo (GRE) and coronal T1-W inversion recovery - were 100% sensitive for intracranial hemorrhage in the derivation cohort. The same sequences were 100% sensitive (25/25) and 83% specific (44/53) for intracranial hemorrhage in the validation cohort. A screening MRI protocol including axial T2, axial GRE and coronal T1-W inversion recovery sequences is highly sensitive for intracranial hemorrhage and may be useful as a screening tool to differentiate well-appearing infants at risk for AHT who should undergo head CT from those who can safely be discharged without head CT. Additional research is needed to evaluate the feasibility of this approach in clinical practice. (orig.)

  12. Remote ENSO forcing versus local air-sea interaction in QTCM: a sensitivity study to intraseasonal variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Gushchina

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The skill of a newly designed global atmospheric model of intermediate complexity - QTCM (for quasi-equilibrium tropical circulation model in simulating the teleconnections is investigated. The role of the ENSO remote forcing over the Pacific surrounding regions is emphasized from sensitivity experiments to critical parameters of the model. The role of the tropical intraseasonal variability (ITV on the simulated ENSO teleconnection pattern is estimated using the methodology proposed by Lin et al. (2000 allowing to damp the energy of ITV in the model. The reduction of intraseasonal variability allows emphasizing the forced response of the atmosphere and eases the detection of local coupled atmosphere-ocean patterns. It was shown that the simulated ITV has an impact on the ENSO teleconnection pattern both in the mid-latitudes and in regions of ascending and descending branches of Walker circulation cells in the tropics.

  13. What are the differentiating clinical and MRI-features of enchondromas from low-grade chondrosarcomas?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douis, Hassan [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); University Hospital Birmingham, Department of Radiology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Parry, M. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Vaiyapuri, S. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Musculoskeletal Pathology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Davies, A.M. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2018-01-15

    To evaluate the role of clinical assessment, conventional and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in differentiating enchondromas from chondrosarcomas of long bone. The following clinical and MRI findings were assessed: age, gender, pain, pain attributable to lesion, tumour location, tumour length, presence, depth of endosteal scalloping, bone marrow oedema, soft tissue oedema, cortical destruction, periosteal reaction, bone expansion, macroscopic fat, calcification, soft tissue mass, haemorrhage, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. Clinical and MRI findings were compared with histopathological grading. Sixty patients with central chondroid tumours were included (27 enchondromas, 10 cartilaginous lesions of unknown malignant potential, 15 grade 1 chondrosarcomas, 8 high-grade chondrosarcomas). Pain attributed to lesion, tumour length, endosteal scalloping > 2/3, cortical destruction, bone expansion and soft tissue mass were differentiating features between enchondromas and grade 1 chondrosarcomas. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI could not differentiate enchondromas from grade 1 chondrosarcomas. Previously reported imaging signs of chondrosarcomas are useful in the diagnosis of grade 1 lesions but have lower sensitivity than in higher grade lesions. Deep endosteal scalloping is the most sensitive imaging sign of grade 1 chondrosarcomas. Pain due to the lesion is an important clinical sign of grade 1 chondrosarcomas. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is not useful in differentiating enchondromas from grade 1 chondrosarcomas. (orig.)

  14. Comparison of SPECT bone scintigraphy with MRI for diagnosis of meniscal tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahmasebi, Mohammad-naghi; Saghari, Mohsen; Moslehi, Masoud; Gholamrezanezhad, Ali

    2005-01-01

    Scintigraphy has been considered as competitive to MRI, but limited data are available on the accuracy of single photon emission tomography (SPECT) compared with MRI for the assessment of meniscal tears. Our objective was to assess the value of SPECT in comparison to MRI. Between January 2003 and March 2004, sixteen patients were studied with both modalities and the accuracy rates of SPECT scan results, and MRI findings in the diagnosis of meniscal tears were compared. Arthroscopy was the gold standard. The respective sensitivity rate, specificity rate, and positive and negative predictive accuracies of MRI were 89%, 94%, 93%, and 79% and for SPECT those were 78%, 94%, 94%, and 88%. There was good agreement on the presence or absence of tears between two modalities (κ statistic = 0.699). SPECT and MRI are both valuable imaging techniques. SPECT is a useful alternative when MRI is unavailable or unsuitable and it is beneficial when more possible accuracy is desired (such as when MRI results are either inconclusive or conflict with other clinical data)

  15. Multiparametric MRI in detection and staging of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    progression, the diagnosis and subsequent treatment planning can be challenging. The current diagnostic approach with PSA testing and digital rectal examination followed by transrectal ultrasound biopsies (TRUS-bx) lack in both sensitivity and specificity in PCa detection and offers limited information about......-MRI-targeted biopsies (mp-MRI-bx) under TRUS-guidance of any mp-MRI-suspicious lesion not hit on systematic TRUS-bx. Study II included patients with clinically localised PCa (cT1-T2) determined by digital rectal examination and/or TRUS and scheduled for radical prostatectomy (RP). Mp-MRI was performed prior to RP...... divided by ADCbenign). The ADC measurements (ADCtumour and ADCratio values) were correlated with the Gleason score (GS) from each tumour foci. RESULTS: Eighty-three patients were included in study I. PCa was found in 39/83 (47%) and both the PIRADS summation score and the over-all Likert classification...

  16. Reporting and management of breast lesions detected using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dall, B.J.G.; Vinnicombe, S.; Gilbert, F.J.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most accurate technique for diagnosing and delineating the extent of both invasive and in-situ breast cancer and is increasingly being used as part of the preoperative work-up to assess the local extent of disease. It is proving invaluable in providing information that allows successful single-stage surgery. An inevitable consequence of the high sensitivity of MRI is that it will identify additional lesions that may or may not represent significant extra disease. This may complicate and delay the preoperative process. This paper outlines a strategy for managing MRI-detected lesions to optimize the benefits of breast MRI as a local staging tool while minimizing the false-positive diagnoses. It discusses the importance of good technique to reduce the number of indeterminate lesions. Methods to refine the patient pathway to minimize delays are discussed. The format of MRI reporting is discussed in detail as is the usefulness of discussion of cases at multidisciplinary meetings. Illustrative cases are used to clarify the points made.

  17. Comparison of 7.0- and 3.0-T MRI and MRA in ischemic-type moyamoya disease: preliminary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Zihao; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Rong; Ye, Xun; Xu, Long; Wang, Bo; Wang, Kai; Zhao, Jizong

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT The authors compared the image quality and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 7.0-T and 3.0-T MRI and time-of-flight (TOF) MR angiography (MRA) in patients with moyamoya disease (MMD). METHODS MR images of 15 patients with ischemic-type MMD (8 males, 7 females; age 13-48 years) and 13 healthy controls (7 males, 6 females; age 19-28 years) who underwent both 7.0-T and 3.0-T MRI and MRA were studied retrospectively. The main intracranial arteries were assessed by using the modified Houkin's grading system (MRA score). Moyamoya vessels (MMVs) were evaluated by 2 grading systems: the MMV quality score and the MMV area score. Two diagnostic criteria for MMD were used: the T2 criteria, which used flow voids in the basal ganglion on T2-weighted images, and the TOF criteria, which used the high-intensity areas in the basal ganglion on source images from TOF MRA. All data were evaluated by 2 independent readers who were blinded to the strength field and presence or absence of MMD. Using conventional angiography as the gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity of 7.0-T and 3.0-T MRI/MRA in the diagnosis of MMD were calculated. The differences between 7.0-T and 3.0-T MRI and MRA were statistically compared. RESULTS No significant differences were observed between 7.0-T and 3.0-T MRA in MRA score (p = 0.317) or MRA grade (p = 0.317). There was a strong correlation between the Suzuki's stage and MRA grade in both 3.0-T (rs = 0.930; p 3.0-T MRA, suggested by both the MMV quality score (p = 0.001) and the MMV area score (p = 0.001). The correlation between the Suzuki's stage and the MMV area score was moderate in 3.0-T MRA (rs = 0.738; p = 0.002) and strong in 7.0-T MRA (rs = 0.908; p 3.0-T MRI/MRA (sensitivity 0.692; specificity 0.933) in diagnosing MMD; based on the TOF criteria, 7.0-T MRI/MRA was more sensitive (1.000 vs 0.733, respectively) and more specific (1.000 vs 0.923, respectively) than 3.0-T MRI/MRA. CONCLUSIONS Compared with 3.0-T MRI/MRA, 7.0-T

  18. Detection of early subclinical lung disease in children with cystic fibrosis by lung ventilation imaging with hyperpolarised gas MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Helen; Horsley, Alex; Taylor, Chris J; Smith, Laurie; Hughes, David; Horn, Felix C; Swift, Andrew J; Parra-Robles, Juan; Hughes, Paul J; Norquay, Graham; Stewart, Neil J; Collier, Guilhem J; Teare, Dawn; Cunningham, Steve; Aldag, Ina; Wild, Jim M

    2017-08-01

    Hyperpolarised 3 He ventilation-MRI, anatomical lung MRI, lung clearance index (LCI), low-dose CT and spirometry were performed on 19 children (6-16 years) with clinically stable mild cystic fibrosis (CF) (FEV 1 >-1.96), and 10 controls. All controls had normal spirometry, MRI and LCI. Ventilation-MRI was the most sensitive method of detecting abnormalities, present in 89% of patients with CF, compared with CT abnormalities in 68%, LCI 47% and conventional MRI 22%. Ventilation defects were present in the absence of CT abnormalities and in patients with normal physiology, including LCI. Ventilation-MRI is thus feasible in young children, highly sensitive and provides additional information about lung structure-function relationships. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Prospective evaluation of 18F-FACBC PET/CT and PET/MRI versus multiparametric MRI in intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer patients (FLUCIPRO trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambor, Ivan; Kuisma, Anna; Kähkönen, Esa; Kemppainen, Jukka; Merisaari, Harri; Eskola, Olli; Teuho, Jarmo; Perez, Ileana Montoya; Pesola, Marko; Aronen, Hannu J; Boström, Peter J; Taimen, Pekka; Minn, Heikki

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate 18 F-FACBC PET/CT, PET/MRI, and multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) in detection of primary prostate cancer (PCa). Twenty-six men with histologically confirmed PCa underwent PET/CT immediately after injection of 369 ± 10 MBq 18 F-FACBC (fluciclovine) followed by PET/MRI started 55 ± 7 min from injection. Maximum standardized uptake values (SUV max ) were measured for both hybrid PET acquisitions. A separate mpMRI was acquired within a week of the PET scans. Logan plots were used to calculate volume of distribution (V T ). The presence of PCa was estimated in 12 regions with radical prostatectomy findings as ground truth. For each imaging modality, area under the curve (AUC) for detection of PCa was determined to predict diagnostic performance. The clinical trial registration number is NCT02002455. In the visual analysis, 164/312 (53%) regions contained PCa, and 41 tumor foci were identified. PET/CT demonstrated the highest sensitivity at 87% while its specificity was low at 56%. The AUC of both PET/MRI and mpMRI significantly (p PET/CT while no differences were detected between PET/MRI and mpMRI. SUV max and V T of Gleason score (GS) >3 + 4 tumors were significantly (p PET/CT and PET/MRI demonstrated true-positive findings in only 1/7 patients with metastatic lymph nodes. Quantitative 18 F-FACBC imaging significantly correlated with GS but failed to outperform MRI in lesion detection. 18 F-FACBC may assist in targeted biopsies in the setting of hybrid imaging with MRI.

  20. MRI-based decision tree model for diagnosis of biliary atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Hee; Kim, Myung-Joon; Shin, Hyun Joo; Yoon, Haesung; Han, Seok Joo; Koh, Hong; Roh, Yun Ho; Lee, Mi-Jung

    2018-02-23

    To evaluate MRI findings and to generate a decision tree model for diagnosis of biliary atresia (BA) in infants with jaundice. We retrospectively reviewed features of MRI and ultrasonography (US) performed in infants with jaundice between January 2009 and June 2016 under approval of the institutional review board, including the maximum diameter of periportal signal change on MRI (MR triangular cord thickness, MR-TCT) or US (US-TCT), visibility of common bile duct (CBD) and abnormality of gallbladder (GB). Hepatic subcapsular flow was reviewed on Doppler US. We performed conditional inference tree analysis using MRI findings to generate a decision tree model. A total of 208 infants were included, 112 in the BA group and 96 in the non-BA group. Mean age at the time of MRI was 58.7 ± 36.6 days. Visibility of CBD, abnormality of GB and MR-TCT were good discriminators for the diagnosis of BA and the MRI-based decision tree using these findings with MR-TCT cut-off 5.1 mm showed 97.3 % sensitivity, 94.8 % specificity and 96.2 % accuracy. MRI-based decision tree model reliably differentiates BA in infants with jaundice. MRI can be an objective imaging modality for the diagnosis of BA. • MRI-based decision tree model reliably differentiates biliary atresia in neonatal cholestasis. • Common bile duct, gallbladder and periportal signal changes are the discriminators. • MRI has comparable performance to ultrasonography for diagnosis of biliary atresia.

  1. Heart MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  2. Invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast: MRI pathological correlation following bilateral total mastectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stivalet, Aude; Pigneur, Frederic; Luciani, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Background: Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) is more often multifocal and bilateral than invasive ductal carcinoma. MRI is usually recommended for detection of all ILC sites. The performance of known diagnostic breast MRI criteria for ILC characterization has not been evaluated to date using bilateral mastectomy specimens as gold standard. Purpose: To determine the value of BI-RADS 2006 MRI criteria for ILC detection and characterization, using pathological examination of bilateral mastectomy specimens as the reference standard. Material and Methods: Between 2004 and 2007, we retrospectively included all patients with pathologically documented ILC referred to our institution for bilateral mastectomy and preoperative bilateral breast MRI. The location, diameter, and characteristics (BI-RADS) of all lesions were compared with pathological findings. The sensitivity and positive predictive value of bilateral breast MRI for the diagnosis of ILC were calculated. Association of MRI BI-RADS categorical variables and characterization of ILC were assessed (Fisher exact test). Results: Among 360 patients treated for ILC in 2004-2007, 15 patients qualified for this study. Thirty-one ILC foci were found on pathological examination (30 ipsilateral and 1 contralateral tumor; mean diameter 23 mm; range 2-60 mm) and all were identified on MRI, with 90% of masses and 10% non-mass-like enhancements; MRI features significantly associated with ILC included absence of smooth margins (P = 0.02) and rim-shaped enhancement (P = 0.039). Enhancement kinetics of the 31 foci were evenly distributed among wash-out, plateau, and persistent profiles. Eleven additional lesions were seen on MRI, mainly corresponding to fibrocystic disease; 91% presented as masses and 9% had a wash-out profile. Conclusion: Based on the 2006 BI-RADS criteria, breast MRI shows a high sensitivity for ILC detection, at the expense of a 26% false-positive rate, suggesting that a pathological proof by US- or MR

  3. Invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast: MRI pathological correlation following bilateral total mastectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivalet, Aude; Pigneur, Frederic (AP-HP, Groupe Henri Mondor Albert Chenevier, Imagerie Medicale, Creteil (France)); Luciani, Alain (AP-HP, Groupe Henri Mondor Albert Chenevier, Imagerie Medicale, Creteil (France); INSERM Unite U 955, Equipe 17, Univ. Paris Est Creteil, Creteil (France)), email: alain.luciani@hmn.aphp.fr (and others)

    2012-05-15

    Background: Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) is more often multifocal and bilateral than invasive ductal carcinoma. MRI is usually recommended for detection of all ILC sites. The performance of known diagnostic breast MRI criteria for ILC characterization has not been evaluated to date using bilateral mastectomy specimens as gold standard. Purpose: To determine the value of BI-RADS 2006 MRI criteria for ILC detection and characterization, using pathological examination of bilateral mastectomy specimens as the reference standard. Material and Methods: Between 2004 and 2007, we retrospectively included all patients with pathologically documented ILC referred to our institution for bilateral mastectomy and preoperative bilateral breast MRI. The location, diameter, and characteristics (BI-RADS) of all lesions were compared with pathological findings. The sensitivity and positive predictive value of bilateral breast MRI for the diagnosis of ILC were calculated. Association of MRI BI-RADS categorical variables and characterization of ILC were assessed (Fisher exact test). Results: Among 360 patients treated for ILC in 2004-2007, 15 patients qualified for this study. Thirty-one ILC foci were found on pathological examination (30 ipsilateral and 1 contralateral tumor; mean diameter 23 mm; range 2-60 mm) and all were identified on MRI, with 90% of masses and 10% non-mass-like enhancements; MRI features significantly associated with ILC included absence of smooth margins (P = 0.02) and rim-shaped enhancement (P = 0.039). Enhancement kinetics of the 31 foci were evenly distributed among wash-out, plateau, and persistent profiles. Eleven additional lesions were seen on MRI, mainly corresponding to fibrocystic disease; 91% presented as masses and 9% had a wash-out profile. Conclusion: Based on the 2006 BI-RADS criteria, breast MRI shows a high sensitivity for ILC detection, at the expense of a 26% false-positive rate, suggesting that a pathological proof by US- or MR

  4. Monitoring local heating around an interventional MRI antenna with RF radiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertürk, M. Arcan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 and Division of MR Research, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Bottomley, Paul A., E-mail: bottoml@mri.jhu.edu [Division of MR Research, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Radiofrequency (RF) radiometry uses thermal noise detected by an antenna to measure the temperature of objects independent of medical imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, an active interventional MRI antenna can be deployed as a RF radiometer to measure local heating, as a possible new method of monitoring device safety and thermal therapy. Methods: A 128 MHz radiometer receiver was fabricated to measure the RF noise voltage from an interventional 3 T MRI loopless antenna and calibrated for temperature in a uniformly heated bioanalogous gel phantom. Local heating (ΔT) was induced using the antenna for RF transmission and measured by RF radiometry, fiber-optic thermal sensors, and MRI thermometry. The spatial thermal sensitivity of the antenna radiometer was numerically computed using a method-of-moment electric field analyses. The gel’s thermal conductivity was measured by MRI thermometry, and the localized time-dependent ΔT distribution computed from the bioheat transfer equation and compared with radiometry measurements. A “H-factor” relating the 1 g-averaged ΔT to the radiometric temperature was introduced to estimate peak temperature rise in the antenna’s sensitive region. Results: The loopless antenna radiometer linearly tracked temperature inside a thermally equilibrated phantom up to 73 °C to within ±0.3 °C at a 2 Hz sample rate. Computed and MRI thermometric measures of peak ΔT agreed within 13%. The peak 1 g-average temperature was H = 1.36 ± 0.02 times higher than the radiometric temperature for any media with a thermal conductivity of 0.15–0.50 (W/m)/K, indicating that the radiometer can measure peak 1 g-averaged ΔT in physiologically relevant tissue within ±0.4 °C. Conclusions: Active internal MRI detectors can serve as RF radiometers at the MRI frequency to provide accurate independent measures of local and peak temperature without the artifacts that can accompany MRI thermometry or

  5. Monitoring local heating around an interventional MRI antenna with RF radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertürk, M. Arcan; El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Radiofrequency (RF) radiometry uses thermal noise detected by an antenna to measure the temperature of objects independent of medical imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, an active interventional MRI antenna can be deployed as a RF radiometer to measure local heating, as a possible new method of monitoring device safety and thermal therapy. Methods: A 128 MHz radiometer receiver was fabricated to measure the RF noise voltage from an interventional 3 T MRI loopless antenna and calibrated for temperature in a uniformly heated bioanalogous gel phantom. Local heating (ΔT) was induced using the antenna for RF transmission and measured by RF radiometry, fiber-optic thermal sensors, and MRI thermometry. The spatial thermal sensitivity of the antenna radiometer was numerically computed using a method-of-moment electric field analyses. The gel’s thermal conductivity was measured by MRI thermometry, and the localized time-dependent ΔT distribution computed from the bioheat transfer equation and compared with radiometry measurements. A “H-factor” relating the 1 g-averaged ΔT to the radiometric temperature was introduced to estimate peak temperature rise in the antenna’s sensitive region. Results: The loopless antenna radiometer linearly tracked temperature inside a thermally equilibrated phantom up to 73 °C to within ±0.3 °C at a 2 Hz sample rate. Computed and MRI thermometric measures of peak ΔT agreed within 13%. The peak 1 g-average temperature was H = 1.36 ± 0.02 times higher than the radiometric temperature for any media with a thermal conductivity of 0.15–0.50 (W/m)/K, indicating that the radiometer can measure peak 1 g-averaged ΔT in physiologically relevant tissue within ±0.4 °C. Conclusions: Active internal MRI detectors can serve as RF radiometers at the MRI frequency to provide accurate independent measures of local and peak temperature without the artifacts that can accompany MRI thermometry or

  6. Monitoring local heating around an interventional MRI antenna with RF radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertürk, M. Arcan; El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Radiofrequency (RF) radiometry uses thermal noise detected by an antenna to measure the temperature of objects independent of medical imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, an active interventional MRI antenna can be deployed as a RF radiometer to measure local heating, as a possible new method of monitoring device safety and thermal therapy. Methods: A 128 MHz radiometer receiver was fabricated to measure the RF noise voltage from an interventional 3 T MRI loopless antenna and calibrated for temperature in a uniformly heated bioanalogous gel phantom. Local heating (ΔT) was induced using the antenna for RF transmission and measured by RF radiometry, fiber-optic thermal sensors, and MRI thermometry. The spatial thermal sensitivity of the antenna radiometer was numerically computed using a method-of-moment electric field analyses. The gel’s thermal conductivity was measured by MRI thermometry, and the localized time-dependent ΔT distribution computed from the bioheat transfer equation and compared with radiometry measurements. A “H-factor” relating the 1 g-averaged ΔT to the radiometric temperature was introduced to estimate peak temperature rise in the antenna’s sensitive region. Results: The loopless antenna radiometer linearly tracked temperature inside a thermally equilibrated phantom up to 73 °C to within ±0.3 °C at a 2 Hz sample rate. Computed and MRI thermometric measures of peak ΔT agreed within 13%. The peak 1 g-average temperature was H = 1.36 ± 0.02 times higher than the radiometric temperature for any media with a thermal conductivity of 0.15–0.50 (W/m)/K, indicating that the radiometer can measure peak 1 g-averaged ΔT in physiologically relevant tissue within ±0.4 °C. Conclusions: Active internal MRI detectors can serve as RF radiometers at the MRI frequency to provide accurate independent measures of local and peak temperature without the artifacts that can accompany MRI thermometry or

  7. Use of remote sensing and GIS in mapping the environmental sensitivity areas for desertification of Egyptian territory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, A.; Lotfy, I.

    2008-06-01

    Desertification is defined in the first art of the convention to combat desertification as "land degradation in arid, semiarid and dry sub-humid areas resulting from climatic variations and human activities". Its consequence include a set of important processes which are active in arid and semi arid environment, where water is the main limiting factor of land use performance in such ecosystem . Desertification indicators or the groups of associated indicators should be focused on a single process. They should be based on available reliable information sources, including remotely sensed images, topographic data (maps or DEM'S), climate, soils and geological data. The current work aims to map the Environmental Sensitivity Areas (ESA's) to desertification in whole territory of Egypt at a scale of 1:1 000 000. ETM satellite images, geologic and soil maps were used as main sources for calculating the index of Environmental Sensitivity Areas (ESAI) for desertification. The algorism is adopted from MEDALLUS methodology as follows; ESAI = (SQI * CQI * VQI)1/3 Where SQI is the soil quality index, CQI is the climate quality index and VQI is the vegetation quality index. The SQI is based on rating the parent material, slope, soil texture, and soil depth. The VQI is computed on bases of rating three categories (i.e. erosion protection, drought resistance and plant cover). The CQI is based on the aridity index, derived from values of annual rainfall and potential evapotranspiration. Arc-GIS 9 software was used for the computation and sensitivity maps production. The results show that the soil of the Nile Valley are characterized by a moderate SQI, however the those in the interference zone are low soil quality indexed. The dense vegetation of the valley has raised its VQI to be good, however coastal areas are average and interference zones are low. The maps of ESA's for desertification show that 86.1% of Egyptian territory is classified as very sensitive areas, while 4.3% as

  8. Screening for lung cancer: Does MRI have a role?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biederer, Juergen; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Hatabu, Hiroto; Schiebler, Mark L.; Beek, Edwin J.R. van; Vogel-Claussen, Jens; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • From a technical point of view, the feasibility of using MRI for lung cancer screening is evident. • Experience with the clinical use of lung MRI is growing, standardized protocols are available. • If lung cancer screening becomes effective, there will be an opportunity for MRI as primary screening modality or adjunct to CT. • Validation of better patient outcomes (test effectiveness) for the use of MRI is still missing, therefore. • A simultaneous evaluation of MRI should be embedded into any future prospective lung cancer screening trials. - Abstract: While the inauguration of national low dose computed tomographic (LDCT) lung cancer screening programs has started in the USA, other countries remain undecided, awaiting the results of ongoing trials. The continuous technical development achieved by stronger gradients, parallel imaging and shorter echo time has made lung magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) an interesting alternative to CT. For the detection of solid lesions with lung MRI, experimental and clinical studies have shown a threshold size of 3–4 mm for nodules, with detection rates of 60–90% for lesions of 5–8 mm and close to 100% for lesions of 8 mm or larger. From experimental work, the sensitivity for infiltrative, non-solid lesions would be expected to be similarly high as that for solid lesions, but the published data for the MRI detection of lepidic growth type adenocarcinoma is sparse. Moreover, biological features such as a longer T2 time of lung cancer tissue, tissue compliance and a more rapid uptake of contrast material compared to granulomatous diseases, in principle should allow for the multi-parametric characterization of lung pathology. Experience with the clinical use of lung MRI is growing. There are now standardized protocols which are easy to implement on current scanner hardware configurations. The image quality has become more robust and currently ongoing studies will help to further contribute experience

  9. Screening for lung cancer: Does MRI have a role?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biederer, Juergen, E-mail: Juergen.biederer@uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC), Member of the German Lung ResearchCenter (DZL), Im Neuenheimer Feld 430, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Radiologie Darmstadt, Gross-Gerau County Hospital, 64521 Gross-Gerau (Germany); Ohno, Yoshiharu [Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Centre, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Hatabu, Hiroto [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Schiebler, Mark L. [Department of Radiology, UW-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States); Beek, Edwin J.R. van [Clinical Research Imaging Centre, University of Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom); Vogel-Claussen, Jens [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany); Biomedical Research in Endstage and Obstructive Lung Disease Hannover (BREATH), Member of the German Center for Lung Research, Hannover (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC), Member of the German Lung ResearchCenter (DZL), Im Neuenheimer Feld 430, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • From a technical point of view, the feasibility of using MRI for lung cancer screening is evident. • Experience with the clinical use of lung MRI is growing, standardized protocols are available. • If lung cancer screening becomes effective, there will be an opportunity for MRI as primary screening modality or adjunct to CT. • Validation of better patient outcomes (test effectiveness) for the use of MRI is still missing, therefore. • A simultaneous evaluation of MRI should be embedded into any future prospective lung cancer screening trials. - Abstract: While the inauguration of national low dose computed tomographic (LDCT) lung cancer screening programs has started in the USA, other countries remain undecided, awaiting the results of ongoing trials. The continuous technical development achieved by stronger gradients, parallel imaging and shorter echo time has made lung magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) an interesting alternative to CT. For the detection of solid lesions with lung MRI, experimental and clinical studies have shown a threshold size of 3–4 mm for nodules, with detection rates of 60–90% for lesions of 5–8 mm and close to 100% for lesions of 8 mm or larger. From experimental work, the sensitivity for infiltrative, non-solid lesions would be expected to be similarly high as that for solid lesions, but the published data for the MRI detection of lepidic growth type adenocarcinoma is sparse. Moreover, biological features such as a longer T2 time of lung cancer tissue, tissue compliance and a more rapid uptake of contrast material compared to granulomatous diseases, in principle should allow for the multi-parametric characterization of lung pathology. Experience with the clinical use of lung MRI is growing. There are now standardized protocols which are easy to implement on current scanner hardware configurations. The image quality has become more robust and currently ongoing studies will help to further contribute experience

  10. An Information Technology Framework for the Development of an Embedded Computer System for the Remote and Non-Destructive Study of Sensitive Archaeology Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliya Georgiev

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes an information technology framework for the development of an embedded remote system for non-destructive observation and study of sensitive archaeological sites. The overall concept and motivation are described. The general hardware layout and software configuration are presented. The paper concentrates on the implementation of the following informational technology components: (a a geographically unique identification scheme supporting a global key space for a key-value store; (b a common method for octree modeling for spatial geometrical models of the archaeological artifacts, and abstract object representation in the global key space; (c a broadcast of the archaeological information as an Extensible Markup Language (XML stream over the Web for worldwide availability; and (d a set of testing methods increasing the fault tolerance of the system. This framework can serve as a foundation for the development of a complete system for remote archaeological exploration of enclosed archaeological sites like buried churches, tombs, and caves. An archaeological site is opened once upon discovery, the embedded computer system is installed inside upon a robotic platform, equipped with sensors, cameras, and actuators, and the intact site is sealed again. Archaeological research is conducted on a multimedia data stream which is sent remotely from the system and conforms to necessary standards for digital archaeology.

  11. MRI Based Localisation and Quantification of Abscesses following Experimental S. aureus Intravenous Challenge: Application to Vaccine Evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth R Allen

    Full Text Available To develop and validate a sensitive and specific method of abscess enumeration and quantification in a preclinical model of Staphylococcus aureus infection.S. aureus infected murine kidneys were fixed in paraformaldehyde, impregnated with gadolinium, and embedded in agar blocks, which were subjected to 3D magnetic resonance microscopy on a 9.4T MRI scanner. Image analysis techniques were developed, which could identify and quantify abscesses. The result of this imaging was compared with histological examination. The impact of a S. aureus Sortase A vaccination regime was assessed using the technique.Up to 32 murine kidneys could be imaged in a single MRI run, yielding images with voxels of about 25 μm3. S. aureus abscesses could be readily identified in blinded analyses of the kidneys after 3 days of infection, with low inter-observer variability. Comparison with histological sections shows a striking correlation between the two techniques: all presumptive abscesses identified by MRI were confirmed histologically, and histology identified no abscesses not evident on MRI. In view of this, simulations were performed assuming that both MRI reconstruction, and histology examining all sections of the tissue, were fully sensitive and specific at abscess detection. This simulation showed that MRI provided more sensitive and precise estimates of abscess numbers and volume than histology, unless at least 5 histological sections are taken through the long axis of the kidney. We used the MRI technique described to investigate the impact of a S. aureus Sortase A vaccine.Post mortem MRI scanning of large batches of fixed organs has application in the preclinical assessment of S. aureus vaccines.

  12. Management of breast lesions detectable only on MRI; Abklaerung ausschliesslich MRT-detektierbarer Mammalaesionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegmann-Luz, K.C.; Bahrs, S.D.; Preibsch, H.; Hattermann, V.; Claussen, C.D. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2014-01-15

    Breast MR imaging has become established as the most sensitive imaging method for diagnosing breast cancer. As a result of the increasing examination volume and improved image quality, the number of breast lesions detected only on MRI and requiring further clarification has risen in recent years. According to the S3-guideline 'Diagnosis, Therapy, and Follow-Up of Breast Cancer' as revised in July 2012, institutions performing breast MRI should provide the option of an MRI-guided intervention for clarification. This review describes the indications, methods and results of MRI-guided interventions for the clarification of breast lesions only visible on MRI. Recent guidelines and study results are also addressed and alternative methods and pitfalls are presented. (orig.)

  13. MRI of persistent cloaca: Can it substitute conventional imaging?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammad, Shaimaa Abdelsattar, E-mail: shaimaa96@hotmail.com [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Faculty of Medicine, Ain-Shams University (Egypt); AbouZeid, Amr Abdelhamid, E-mail: amrabdelhamid@hotmail.com [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Ain-Shams University (Egypt)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To define the role of MRI in the preoperative assessment of patients with persistent cloaca and whether it can substitute other imaging modalities. Methods: We prospectively examined eleven patients with persistent cloaca between July 2007 and March 2012. Non contrast MRI examinations were performed on 1.5 T magnet using head coil. Multiple pulse sequences (T1WI, T2WI, fat suppression) were obtained in axial, sagittal and coronal planes of the pelvis, abdomen, and spine. The scans were reviewed for the following: the level and type of rectal termination, the developmental state of striated muscle complex (SMC), associated genitourinary and spinal anomalies. MRI findings were compared to conventional fluoroscopic imaging, operative and endoscopic findings. We applied novel MRI parameters (urethral length, relative hiatal distance and vaginal volume). The relation between different parameters was tested statistically using Pearson correlation test. Results: MRI could accurately demonstrate the level of bowel termination in patients with persistent cloaca, in addition to its high sensitivity for detection of mullerian anomalies which were present in 73% of patients. Furthermore, MRI could disclose associating renal and spinal anomalies, and assess the developmental state of SMC. The shorter the urethra (higher urogenital confluence), the narrower the pelvic hiatus, and the more was the obstruction (vaginal distension). Conclusion: MRI is a valuable tool in exploring the different internal anatomical features of the cloacal anomaly; and when combined with endoscopy, MRI can make other preoperative conventional imaging unnecessary.

  14. High resolution anatomical and quantitative MRI of the entire human occipital lobe ex vivo at 9.4 T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sengupta, S.; Lagos Fritz, F.J.; Harms, R.L.; Hildebrand, S.; Tse, D.H.Y.; Poser, B.A.; Goebel, R.; Roebroeck, A.

    Several magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrasts are sensitive to myelin content in gray matter in vivo which has ignited ambitions of MRI-based in vivo cortical histology. Ultra-high field (UHF) MRI, at fields of 7 T and beyond, is crucial to provide the resolution and contrast needed to sample

  15. SU-E-T-675: Remote Dosimetry with a Novel PRESAGE Formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mein, S; Juang, T; Malcolm, J; Adamovics, J; Oldham, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: 3D-gel dosimetry provides high-resolution treatment validation; however, scanners aren’t widely available. In remote dosimetry, dosimeters are shipped out from a central base institution to a remote site for irradiation, then shipped back for scanning and analysis, affording a convenient service for treatment validation to institutions lacking the necessary equipment and resources. Previous works demonstrated the high-resolution performance and temporal stability of PRESAGE. Here the newest formulation is investigated for remote dosimetry use. Methods: A new formulation of PRESAGE was created with the aim of improved color stability post irradiation. Dose sensitivity was determined by irradiating cuvettes on a Varian Linac (6MV) from 0–15Gy and measuring change in optical density at 633nm. Sensitivity readings were tracked over time in a temperature control study to determine long-term stability. A large volume study was performed to evaluate the accuracy for remote dosimetry. A 1kg dosimeter was pre-scanned, irradiated on-site with an 8Gy 4field box treatment, post-scanned and shipped to Princess Margaret Hospital for remote reading on an identical scanner. Results: Dose sensitivities ranged from 0.0194–0.0295 ΔOD/(Gy*cm)—similar to previous formulations. Post-irradiated cuvettes stored at 10°C retained 100% initial sensitivity over 5 days and 98.6% over 10 weeks while cuvettes stored at room temperature fell to 95.8% after 5 days and 37.4% after 10 weeks. The immediate and 5-day scans of the 4field box dosimeter data was reconstructed, registered to the corresponding eclipse dose-distribution, and compared with analytical tools in CERR. Immediate and 5-day scans looked visually similar. Line profiles revealed close agreement aside from a slight elevation in dose at the edge in the 5-day readout. Conclusion: The remote dosimetry formulation exhibits excellent temporal stability in small volumes. While immediate and 5-day readout scans of large

  16. Distinctive MRI features of the epileptogenic zone in children with tuberous sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahodova, A.; Krsek, P.; Kyncl, M.; Jezdik, P.; Kudr, M.; Komarek, V.; Jayakar, P.; Miller, I.; Resnick, T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Localization of the epileptogenic zone (EZ) is challenging in children with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). We sought to ascertain whether brain MRI could identify the EZ in TSC patients independent of the clinical and diagnostic data. Methods: Presurgical MRI's of 34 children with TSC who underwent epilepsy surgery at Miami Children's Hospital were retrospectively reevaluated by experts blinded to all other data. Changes typical of TSC (tubers, calcifications, cystic changes) and abnormalities of the perituberal cortex typical of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) (increased cortical thickness, abnormal gyration, transmantle change, gray/white matter junction blurring) were identified and their localization was compared with the resection site. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of individual MRI features to localize the EZ were determined and statistically compared between postoperatively seizure-free and non-seizure-free patients as well as clusters of features typical of FCD and TSC. Results: MRI alone correctly localized the resection cavity in all 19 postoperatively seizure-free patients and 12 of 15 non-seizure-free subjects. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI features typical of FCD to localize EZ (90%, 96% and 96%, respectively) were superior to those typical of TCS (79%, 75% and 75%, p < 0.0001). Increased cortical thickness and abnormal gyral formation outside tubers occurred only in the resection site. Resection sites were better predicted by MRI in seizure-free than in non-seizure-free patients. Conclusion: Thorough MRI evaluation identifies the EZ in a significant proportion of TSC patients. Epileptogenic regions were mostly characterized by “FCD-like” changes outside cortical tubers. The findings may have important practical consequences for surgical planning in TSC

  17. Distinctive MRI features of the epileptogenic zone in children with tuberous sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahodova, A., E-mail: a.jagoda@email.cz [Department of Pediatric Neurology, Charles University, Second Medical School, Motol University Hospital, V Uvalu 84, Prague 5 150 06 (Czech Republic); Krsek, P., E-mail: pavel.krsek@post.cz [Department of Pediatric Neurology, Charles University, Second Medical School, Motol University Hospital, V Uvalu 84, Prague 5 150 06 (Czech Republic); Kyncl, M., E-mail: martinkyn@seznam.cz [Department of Radiology, Charles University, Second Medical School, Motol University Hospital, V Uvalu 84, Prague 5 150 06 (Czech Republic); Jezdik, P., E-mail: jezdip1@feld.cvut.cz [Department of Measurement, Faculty of Electric, Czech Technical University Prague, Technicka 2, CZ 166 27 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Kudr, M., E-mail: mat.kudr@gmail.com [Department of Pediatric Neurology, Charles University, Second Medical School, Motol University Hospital, V Uvalu 84, Prague 5 150 06 (Czech Republic); Komarek, V., E-mail: vladimir.komarek@fnmotol.cz [Department of Pediatric Neurology, Charles University, Second Medical School, Motol University Hospital, V Uvalu 84, Prague 5 150 06 (Czech Republic); Jayakar, P., E-mail: Prasanna.Jayakar@mch.com [Department of Neurology and Comprehensive Epilepsy Program, Brain Institute, Miami Children' s Hospital, 3200 S.W. 60th Court, Miami, FL (United States); Miller, I., E-mail: ian.miller@mchdocs.com [Department of Neurology and Comprehensive Epilepsy Program, Brain Institute, Miami Children' s Hospital, 3200 S.W. 60th Court, Miami, FL (United States); Resnick, T., E-mail: trevor.resnick@mch.com [Department of Neurology and Comprehensive Epilepsy Program, Brain Institute, Miami Children' s Hospital, 3200 S.W. 60th Court, Miami, FL (United States); Department of Neurology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); and others

    2014-04-15

    Objective: Localization of the epileptogenic zone (EZ) is challenging in children with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). We sought to ascertain whether brain MRI could identify the EZ in TSC patients independent of the clinical and diagnostic data. Methods: Presurgical MRI's of 34 children with TSC who underwent epilepsy surgery at Miami Children's Hospital were retrospectively reevaluated by experts blinded to all other data. Changes typical of TSC (tubers, calcifications, cystic changes) and abnormalities of the perituberal cortex typical of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) (increased cortical thickness, abnormal gyration, transmantle change, gray/white matter junction blurring) were identified and their localization was compared with the resection site. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of individual MRI features to localize the EZ were determined and statistically compared between postoperatively seizure-free and non-seizure-free patients as well as clusters of features typical of FCD and TSC. Results: MRI alone correctly localized the resection cavity in all 19 postoperatively seizure-free patients and 12 of 15 non-seizure-free subjects. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI features typical of FCD to localize EZ (90%, 96% and 96%, respectively) were superior to those typical of TCS (79%, 75% and 75%, p < 0.0001). Increased cortical thickness and abnormal gyral formation outside tubers occurred only in the resection site. Resection sites were better predicted by MRI in seizure-free than in non-seizure-free patients. Conclusion: Thorough MRI evaluation identifies the EZ in a significant proportion of TSC patients. Epileptogenic regions were mostly characterized by “FCD-like” changes outside cortical tubers. The findings may have important practical consequences for surgical planning in TSC.

  18. Value of fusion of PET and MRI for staging of endometrial cancer: Comparison with 18F-FDG contrast-enhanced PET/CT and dynamic contrast-enhanced pelvic MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Suenaga, Yuko; Ueno, Yoshiko; Kanda, Tomonori; Maeda, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Satoru; Ebina, Yasuhiko; Miyahara, Yoshiya; Yamada, Hideto; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the diagnostic value of retrospective fusion of pelvic MRI and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) PET images for assessment of locoregional extension and nodal staging of endometrial cancer. Materials and methods: Thirty patients with biopsy-proven endometrial cancer underwent preoperative contrast-enhanced PET/CT (PET/ceCT) and pelvic dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for initial staging. Diagnostic performance of PET/ceCT, contrast-enhanced MRI, and retrospective image fusion from PET and MRI (fused PET/MRI) for assessing the extent of the primary tumor (T stage) and metastasis to regional LNs (N stage) was evaluated by two experienced readers. Histopathological and follow-up imaging results were used as the gold standard. The McNemar test was employed for statistical analysis. Results: Fused PET/MRI and MRI detected 96.7% of the primary tumors, whereas PET/ceCT detected 93.3%. Accuracy for T status was 80.0% for fused PET/MRI, and MRI proved significantly more accurate than PET/ceCT, which had an accuracy of 60.0% (p = 0.041). Patient-based sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detecting pelvic nodal metastasis were 100%, 96.3% and 96.7% for both fused PET/MRI and PET/ceCT, and 66.7%, 100% and 96.7% for MRI, respectively. These three parameters were not statistically significant (p = 1). Conclusion: Fused PET/MRI, which complements the individual advantages of MRI and PET, is a valuable technique for assessment of the primary tumor and nodal staging in patients with endometrial cancer

  19. [Determination of joint contact area using MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hidenori; Kobayashi, Koichi; Sakamoto, Makoto; Tanabe, Yuji

    2009-10-20

    Elevated contact stress on the articular joints has been hypothesized to contribute to articular cartilage wear and joint pain. However, given the limitations of using contact stress and areas from human cadaver specimens to estimate articular joint stress, there is need for an in vivo method to obtain such data. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be a valid method of quantifying the human joint contact area, indicating the potential for in vivo assessment. The purpose of this study was to describe a method of quantifying the tibiofemoral joint contact area using MRI. The validity of this technique was established in porcine cadaver specimens by comparing the contact area obtained from MRI with the contact area obtained using pressure-sensitive film (PSF). In particular, we assessed the actual condition of contact by using the ratio of signal intensity of MR images of cartilage surfaces. Two fresh porcine cadaver knees were used. A custom loading apparatus was designed to apply a compressive load to the tibiofemoral joint. We measured the contact area by using MRI and PSF methods. When the ratio of signal intensity of the cartilage surface was 0.9, the error of the contact area between the MR image and PSF was about 6%. These results suggest that this MRI method may be a valuable tool in quantifying joint contact area in vivo.

  20. Determination of joint contact area using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hidenori; Kobayashi, Koichi; Sakamoto, Makoto; Tanabe, Yuji

    2009-01-01

    Elevated contact stress on the articular joints has been hypothesized to contribute to articular cartilage wear and joint pain. However, given the limitations of using contact stress and areas from human cadaver specimens to estimate articular joint stress, there is need for an in vivo method to obtain such data. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be a valid method of quantifying the human joint contact area, indicating the potential for in vivo assessment. The purpose of this study was to describe a method of quantifying the tibiofemoral joint contact area using MRI. The validity of this technique was established in porcine cadaver specimens by comparing the contact area obtained from MRI with the contact area obtained using pressure-sensitive film (PSF). In particular, we assessed the actual condition of contact by using the ratio of signal intensity of MR images of cartilage surfaces. Two fresh porcine cadaver knees were used. A custom loading apparatus was designed to apply a compressive load to the tibiofemoral joint. We measured the contact area by using MRI and PSF methods. When the ratio of signal intensity of the cartilage surface was 0.9, the error of the contact area between the MR image and PSF was about 6%. These results suggest that this MRI method may be a valuable tool in quantifying joint contact area in vivo. (author)

  1. Quantitative rotating frame relaxometry methods in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilani, Irtiza Ali; Sepponen, Raimo

    2016-06-01

    Macromolecular degeneration and biochemical changes in tissue can be quantified using rotating frame relaxometry in MRI. It has been shown in several studies that the rotating frame longitudinal relaxation rate constant (R1ρ ) and the rotating frame transverse relaxation rate constant (R2ρ ) are sensitive biomarkers of phenomena at the cellular level. In this comprehensive review, existing MRI methods for probing the biophysical mechanisms that affect the rotating frame relaxation rates of the tissue (i.e. R1ρ and R2ρ ) are presented. Long acquisition times and high radiofrequency (RF) energy deposition into tissue during the process of spin-locking in rotating frame relaxometry are the major barriers to the establishment of these relaxation contrasts at high magnetic fields. Therefore, clinical applications of R1ρ and R2ρ MRI using on- or off-resonance RF excitation methods remain challenging. Accordingly, this review describes the theoretical and experimental approaches to the design of hard RF pulse cluster- and adiabatic RF pulse-based excitation schemes for accurate and precise measurements of R1ρ and R2ρ . The merits and drawbacks of different MRI acquisition strategies for quantitative relaxation rate measurement in the rotating frame regime are reviewed. In addition, this review summarizes current clinical applications of rotating frame MRI sequences. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Correlation between neuromelanin-sensitive MR imaging and 123I-FP-CIT SPECT in patients with parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuya, Keita; Shinohara, Yuki; Miyoshi, Fuminori; Fujii, Shinya; Tanabe, Yoshio; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2016-01-01

    Neuromelanin-sensitive MR imaging (MRI) can visualize neuromelanin-containing neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), and its utility has been reported in the evaluation of parkinsonism. Conversely, dopamine transporter imaging by 123 I-N-v-fluoropropyl-2b-carbomethoxy-3b-(4-iodophenyl)nortropane (FP-CIT) SPECT (DaTSCAN) is now an established method for evaluating parkinsonism, detecting presynaptic dopamine neuronal dysfunction. Both methods can assist differentiating neurodegenerative and other forms of parkinsonism. However, to our knowledge, there have been no studies concerning a correlation between the two methods. The aim of this study was to assess the utility of neuromelanin-sensitive MRI for diagnosing parkinsonism by examining a correlation with DaTSCAN. Twenty-three patients with parkinsonism who underwent both neuromelanin-sensitive MRI and DaTSCAN were included. We measured the neuromelanin-positive SNc region volume by manually contouring the high signal intensity region of the SNc on neuromelanin-sensitive MRI and measured the specific binding ratio (SBR) on DaTSCAN. The asymmetry index of neuromelanin-positive SNc volume and the asymmetry index of SBR were also calculated. The volume of the neuromelanin-positive SNc region showed significant correlation with specific binding ratio (SBR) (right P <.001, ρ = 0.78, left P <.001, ρ = 0.86). The asymmetry index of neuromelanin-positive SNc volume also showed significant correlations with the asymmetry index of SBR (P <.001, ρ = 0.73). Decrease of the high signal intensity region of the SNc on neuromelanin-sensitive MRI would indicate damage to the nigrostriatal dopaminergic function as well as loss of dopaminergic neurons. We conclude that neuromelanin-sensitive MRI is a useful diagnostic biomarker for parkinsonism. (orig.)

  3. Prediction of mechanical properties of trabecular bone using quantitative MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammentausta, E; Hakulinen, M A; Jurvelin, J S; Nieminen, M T

    2006-01-01

    Techniques for quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been developed for non-invasive estimation of the mineral density and structure of trabecular bone. The R* 2 relaxation rate (i.e. 1/T* 2 ) is sensitive to bone mineral density (BMD) via susceptibility differences between trabeculae and bone marrow, and by binarizing MRI images, structural variables, such as apparent bone volume fraction, can be assessed. In the present study, trabecular bone samples of human patellae were investigated in vitro at 1.5 T to determine the ability of MRI-derived variables (R* 2 and bone volume fraction) to predict the mechanical properties (Young's modulus, yield stress and ultimate strength). Further, the MRI variables were correlated with reference measurements of volumetric BMD and bone area fraction as determined with a clinical pQCT system. The MRI variables correlated significantly (p 2 and MRI-derived bone volume fraction further improved the prediction of yield stress and ultimate strength. Although pQCT showed a trend towards better prediction of the mechanical properties, current results demonstrate the feasibility of combined MR imaging of marrow susceptibility and bone volume fraction in predicting the mechanical strength of trabecular bone and bone mineral density

  4. Detection of rotator cuff tears: the value of MRI following ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutten, Matthieu J.C.M.; Spaargaren, Gert-Jan; Jager, Gerrit J.; Loon, Ton van; Waal Malefijt, Maarten C. de; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the need for additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following ultrasound (US) in patients with shoulder pain and/or disability and to compare the accuracy of both techniques for the detection of partial-thickness and full-thickness rotator cuff tears (RCT). In 4 years, 5,216 patients underwent US by experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. Retrospectively, patient records were evaluated if MRI and surgery were performed within 5 months of US. US and MRI findings were classified into intact cuff, partial-thickness and full-thickness RCT, and were correlated with surgical findings. Additional MR imaging was performed in 275 (5.2%) patients. Sixty-eight patients underwent surgery within 5 months. US and MRI correctly depicted 21 (95%) and 22 (100%) of the 22 full-thickness tears, and 8 (89%) and 6 (67%) of the 9 partial-thickness tears, respectively. The differences in performance of US and MRI were not statistically significant (p = 0.15). MRI following routine shoulder US was requested in only 5.2% of the patients. The additional value of MRI was in detecting intra-articular lesions. In patients who underwent surgery, US and MRI yielded comparably high sensitivity for detecting full-thickness RCT. US performed better in detecting partial-thickness tears, although the difference was not significant. (orig.)

  5. Detection of rotator cuff tears: the value of MRI following ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutten, Matthieu J.C.M.; Spaargaren, Gert-Jan; Jager, Gerrit J. [Jeroen Bosch Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, NL' s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Loon, Ton van [Jeroen Bosch Ziekenhuis, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, NL' s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Waal Malefijt, Maarten C. de [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kiemeney, Lambertus A.L.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and HTA, Geert Grooteplein Noord 21, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-02-15

    To evaluate the need for additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following ultrasound (US) in patients with shoulder pain and/or disability and to compare the accuracy of both techniques for the detection of partial-thickness and full-thickness rotator cuff tears (RCT). In 4 years, 5,216 patients underwent US by experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. Retrospectively, patient records were evaluated if MRI and surgery were performed within 5 months of US. US and MRI findings were classified into intact cuff, partial-thickness and full-thickness RCT, and were correlated with surgical findings. Additional MR imaging was performed in 275 (5.2%) patients. Sixty-eight patients underwent surgery within 5 months. US and MRI correctly depicted 21 (95%) and 22 (100%) of the 22 full-thickness tears, and 8 (89%) and 6 (67%) of the 9 partial-thickness tears, respectively. The differences in performance of US and MRI were not statistically significant (p = 0.15). MRI following routine shoulder US was requested in only 5.2% of the patients. The additional value of MRI was in detecting intra-articular lesions. In patients who underwent surgery, US and MRI yielded comparably high sensitivity for detecting full-thickness RCT. US performed better in detecting partial-thickness tears, although the difference was not significant. (orig.)

  6. Utility of preoperative ferumoxtran-10 MRI to evaluate retroperitoneal lymph node metastasis in advanced cervical cancer: Results of ACRIN 6671/GOG 0233

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atri, Mostafa; Zhang, Zheng; Marques, Helga; Gorelick, Jeremy; Harisinghani, Mukesh; Sohaib, Aslam; Koh, Dow-Mu; Raman, Steven; Gee, Michael; Choi, Haesun; Landrum, Lisa; Mannel, Robert; Chuang, Linus; Yu, Jian Qin; McCourt, Carolyn Kay; Gold, Michael

    2014-01-01

    •We evaluated the added value of a USPIO agent (Ferumoxtran-10) to MRI evaluation of LN metastasis in loco-regionally advanced cervical cancer in a multicenter trial.•There was no significant difference in the accuracy of f-10 MRI as compared to standard MRI to detect LN metastasis in advanced cervical cancer (P > 0.05).•F-10 MRI increased sensitivity of MRI to detect metastasis in small (<8 mm) LNs but at the expense of lower specificity.•Mean size of the largest metastatic focus in the LN on pathology was 13.7 mm in the abdomen and 18.8 mm in the pelvis (P = 0.018). We evaluated the added value of a USPIO agent (Ferumoxtran-10) to MRI evaluation of LN metastasis in loco-regionally advanced cervical cancer in a multicenter trial. There was no significant difference in the accuracy of f-10 MRI as compared to standard MRI to detect LN metastasis in advanced cervical cancer (P > 0.05). F-10 MRI increased sensitivity of MRI to detect metastasis in small (<8 mm) LNs but at the expense of lower specificity. Mean size of the largest metastatic focus in the LN on pathology was 13.7 mm in the abdomen and 18.8 mm in the pelvis (P = 0.018). To assess if ferumoxtran-10 (f-10) improves accuracy of MRI to detect lymph node (LN) metastasis in advanced cervical cancer. F-10 MRI component of an IRB approved HIPAA compliant ACRIN/GOG trial was analyzed. Patients underwent f-10 MRI followed by extra-peritoneal or laparoscopic pelvic and abdominal lymphadenectomy. F-10-sensitive sequences were T2* GRE sequences with TE of 12 and 21. Seven independent blinded readers reviewed f-10-insensitive sequences and all sequences in different sessions. Region correlations were performed between pathology and MRI for eight abdomen and pelvis regions. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated at participant level. Reference standard is based on pathology result of surgically removed LNs. Among 43 women enrolled in the trial between September 2007 and November 2009, 33 women (mean age 49

  7. Stress-sensitive arterial hypertension, haemodynamic changes and brain metabolites in hypertensive ISIAH rats: MRI investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seryapina, A A; Shevelev, O B; Moshkin, M P; Markel, A L; Akulov, A E

    2017-05-01

    What is the central question of this study? Stress-sensitive arterial hypertension is considered to be controlled by changes in central and peripheral sympathetic regulating mechanisms, which eventually result in haemodynamic alterations and blood pressure elevation. Therefore, study of the early stages of development of hypertension is of particular interest, because it helps in understanding the aetiology of the disease. What is the main finding and its importance? Non-invasive in vivo investigation in ISIAH rats demonstrated that establishment of sustainable stress-sensitive hypertension is accompanied by a decrease in prefrontal cortex activity and mobilization of hypothalamic processes, with considerable correlations between haemodynamic parameters and individual metabolite ratios. The study of early development of arterial hypertension in association with emotional stress is of great importance for better understanding of the aetiology and pathogenesis of the hypertensive disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was applied to evaluate the changes in haemodynamics and brain metabolites in 1- and 3-month-old inherited stress-induced arterial hypertension (ISIAH) rats (10 male rats) with stress-sensitive arterial hypertension and in control normotensive Wistar Albino Glaxo (WAG) rats (eight male rats). In the 3-month-old ISIAH rats, the age-dependent increase in blood pressure was associated with increased blood flow through the renal arteries and decreased blood flow in the lower part of the abdominal aorta. The renal vascular resistance in the ISIAH rats decreased during ageing, although at both ages it remained higher than the renal vascular resistance in WAG rats. An integral metabolome portrait demonstrated that development of hypertension in the ISIAH rats was associated with an attenuation of the excitatory and energetic activity in the prefrontal cortex, whereas in the WAG rats the opposite age-dependent changes were observed. In contrast, in the

  8. Functional MRI of human hypothalamic responses following glucose ingestion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.A.M.; Graaf, C. de; Stafleu, A.; Osch, M.J.P. van; Grond, J. van der

    2005-01-01

    The hypothalamus is intimately involved in the regulation of food intake, integrating multiple neural and hormonal signals. Several hypothalamic nuclei contain glucose-sensitive neurons, which play a crucial role in energy homeostasis. Although a few functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)

  9. Diagnosis of glenoid labral tears using 3-tesla MRI vs. 3-tesla MRA: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajuied, Adil; McGarvey, Ciaran P; Harb, Ziad; Smith, Christian C; Houghton, Russell P; Corbett, Steven A

    2018-05-01

    Various protocols exist for magnetic resonance arthrogram (MRA) of the shoulder, including 3D isotropic scanning and positioning in neutral (2D neutral MRA), or abduction-external-rotation (ABER). MRA does not improve diagnostic accuracy for labral tears when compared to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed using 3-Tesla (3T) magnets. Systematic review of the Cochrane, MEDLINE, and PubMed databases according to PRISMA guidelines. Included studies compared 3T MRI or 3T MRA (index tests) to arthroscopic findings (reference test). Methodological appraisal performed using QUADAS-2. Pooled sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Ten studies including 929 patients were included. Index test bias and applicability were a concern in the majority of studies. The use of arthroscopy as the reference test raised concern of verification bias in all studies. For anterior labral lesions, 3T MRI was less sensitive (0.83 vs. 0.87 p = 0.083) than 3T 2D neutral MRA. Compared to 3T 2D neutral MRA, both 3T 3D Isotropic MRA and 3T ABER MRA significantly improved sensitivity (0.87 vs. 0.95 vs. 0.94). For SLAP lesions, 3T 2D neutral MRA was of similar sensitivity to 3T MRI (0.84 vs. 0.83, p = 0.575), but less specific (0.99 vs. 0.92 p < 0.0001). For posterior labral lesions, 3T 2D neutral MRA had greater sensitivity than 3T 3D Isotropic MRA and 3T MRI (0.90 vs. 0.83 vs. 0.83). At 3-T, MRA improved sensitivity for diagnosis of anterior and posterior labral lesions, but reduced specificity in diagnosis of SLAP tears. 3T MRA with ABER positioning further improved sensitivity in diagnosis of anterior labral tears. IV.

  10. MRI of interstitial lung diseases. What is possible?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biederer, J.; Wielpuetz, M.O.; Jobst, B.J.; Dinkel, J.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lungs is becoming increasingly appreciated as a third diagnostic imaging modality besides chest x-ray and computed tomography (CT). Its value is well acknowledged for pediatric patients or for scientific use particularly when radiation exposure should be strictly avoided. However, the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease is the biggest challenge of all indications. The objective of this article is a summary of the current state of the art for diagnostic MRI of interstitial lung diseases. This article reflects the results of a current search of the literature and discusses them against the background of the authors own experience with lung MRI. Due to its lower spatial resolution and a higher susceptibility to artefacts MRI does not achieve the sensitivity of CT for the detection of small details for pattern recognition (e.g. fine reticulation and micronodules) but larger details (e.g. coarse fibrosis and honeycombing) can be clearly visualized. Moreover, it could be shown that MRI has the capability to add clinically valuable information on regional lung function (e.g. ventilation, perfusion and mechanical properties) and inflammation with native signal and contrast dynamics. In its present state MRI can be used for comprehensive cardiopulmonary imaging in patients with sarcoidosis or for follow-up of lung fibrosis after initial correlation with CT. Far more indications are expected when the capabilities of MRI for the assessment of regional lung function and activity of inflammation can be transferred into robust protocols for clinical use. (orig.) [de

  11. Diagnostic performance of CT and MRI on the detection of symptomatic intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula: a meta-analysis with indirect comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yen-Heng [National Taiwan University, Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University Hospital in Taipei and Yuan-Lin Branch, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiology, Hospital and Medical College, Taipei (China); Lin, Hsien-Ho [National Taiwan University, Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Taipei (China); Liu, Hon-Man; Lee, Chung-Wei; Chen, Ya-Fang [National Taiwan University Hospital in Taipei and Yuan-Lin Branch, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiology, Hospital and Medical College, Taipei (China)

    2016-08-15

    This study aims to review the diagnostic performance of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in symptomatic dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF). EMBASE, PubMed, and Cochrane Library were searched until April 2015 for studies which compared CT, MRI, or both with angiography for the detection of DAVF. The diagnostic performances of MRI and CT were indirectly compared using modality as a covariate in the analysis. Thirteen studies met our inclusion criteria. MRI had a sensitivity of 0.90 (95 % confidence interval (CI) = 0.83-0.94) and specificity of 0.94 (95 % CI = 0.90-0.96). CT had a sensitivity of 0.80 (95 % CI = 0.62-0.90) and specificity of 0.87 (95 % CI = 0.74-0.94). MRI showed better diagnostic performance than CT (p = 0.02). Contrast medium use and time-resolved MR angiography did not improve MRI diagnostic performance (p = 0.31 and 0.44, respectively). Both CT and MRI had good diagnostic performance. MRI was better than CT on the detection of symptomatic intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula in the indirect comparison. (orig.)

  12. Value of fusion of PET and MRI for staging of endometrial cancer: Comparison with {sup 18}F-FDG contrast-enhanced PET/CT and dynamic contrast-enhanced pelvic MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitajima, Kazuhiro, E-mail: kitajima@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kobe University School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Suenaga, Yuko; Ueno, Yoshiko [Department of Radiology, Kobe University School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Kanda, Tomonori [Department of Obsterics and Gynecology of Kobe University School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Department of Radiology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Hyogo (Japan); Maeda, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Satoru [Department of Radiology, Kobe University School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Ebina, Yasuhiko; Miyahara, Yoshiya; Yamada, Hideto [Department of Obsterics and Gynecology of Kobe University School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Department of Radiology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Hyogo (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Department of Radiology, Kobe University School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the diagnostic value of retrospective fusion of pelvic MRI and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) PET images for assessment of locoregional extension and nodal staging of endometrial cancer. Materials and methods: Thirty patients with biopsy-proven endometrial cancer underwent preoperative contrast-enhanced PET/CT (PET/ceCT) and pelvic dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for initial staging. Diagnostic performance of PET/ceCT, contrast-enhanced MRI, and retrospective image fusion from PET and MRI (fused PET/MRI) for assessing the extent of the primary tumor (T stage) and metastasis to regional LNs (N stage) was evaluated by two experienced readers. Histopathological and follow-up imaging results were used as the gold standard. The McNemar test was employed for statistical analysis. Results: Fused PET/MRI and MRI detected 96.7% of the primary tumors, whereas PET/ceCT detected 93.3%. Accuracy for T status was 80.0% for fused PET/MRI, and MRI proved significantly more accurate than PET/ceCT, which had an accuracy of 60.0% (p = 0.041). Patient-based sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detecting pelvic nodal metastasis were 100%, 96.3% and 96.7% for both fused PET/MRI and PET/ceCT, and 66.7%, 100% and 96.7% for MRI, respectively. These three parameters were not statistically significant (p = 1). Conclusion: Fused PET/MRI, which complements the individual advantages of MRI and PET, is a valuable technique for assessment of the primary tumor and nodal staging in patients with endometrial cancer.

  13. Parameterization and sensitivity analyses of a radiative transfer model for remote sensing plant canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Carlton Raden

    A major objective of remote sensing is determination of biochemical and biophysical characteristics of plant canopies utilizing high spectral resolution sensors. Canopy reflectance signatures are dependent on absorption and scattering processes of the leaf, canopy properties, and the ground beneath the canopy. This research investigates, through field and laboratory data collection, and computer model parameterization and simulations, the relationships between leaf optical properties, canopy biophysical features, and the nadir viewed above-canopy reflectance signature. Emphasis is placed on parameterization and application of an existing irradiance radiative transfer model developed for aquatic systems. Data and model analyses provide knowledge on the relative importance of leaves and canopy biophysical features in estimating the diffuse absorption a(lambda,m-1), diffuse backscatter b(lambda,m-1), beam attenuation alpha(lambda,m-1), and beam to diffuse conversion c(lambda,m-1 ) coefficients of the two-flow irradiance model. Data sets include field and laboratory measurements from three plant species, live oak (Quercus virginiana), Brazilian pepper (Schinus terebinthifolius) and grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) sampled on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center Florida in March and April of 1997. Features measured were depth h (m), projected foliage coverage PFC, leaf area index LAI, and zenith leaf angle. Optical measurements, collected with a Spectron SE 590 high sensitivity narrow bandwidth spectrograph, included above canopy reflectance, internal canopy transmittance and reflectance and bottom reflectance. Leaf samples were returned to laboratory where optical and physical and chemical measurements of leaf thickness, leaf area, leaf moisture and pigment content were made. A new term, the leaf volume correction index LVCI was developed and demonstrated in support of model coefficient parameterization. The LVCI is based on angle adjusted leaf

  14. The diagnosis of breast implant rupture: MRI findings compared with findings at explantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoelmich, Lisbet R.; Vejborg, Ilse; Conrad, Carsten; Sletting, Susanne; McLaughlin, Joseph K.

    2005-01-01

    Study objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) as performed according to a strict study protocol in diagnosing rupture of silicone breast implants. Material and methods: The study population consisted of 64 women with 118 implants, who had participated in either one or two study MRI examinations, aiming at determining the prevalence and incidence of silent implant rupture, respectively, and who subsequently underwent explantation. Implant rupture status was determined by four independent readers and a consensus diagnosis of either rupture (intracapsular or extracapsular), possible rupture or intact implant was then obtained. Strict predetermined rupture criteria were applied as described in this report and findings at surgery were abstracted in a standardised manner and results compared. Results: At MRI, 66 implants were diagnosed as ruptured, nine as possibly ruptured and 43 as intact. Among the ruptured implants, 27 were categorized as extracapsular. At surgery, on average 297 days after the MRI, 65 of the 66 rupture diagnoses were confirmed, as were 20 of the cases with extracapsular silicone. Eight of the nine possibly ruptured implants were in fact ruptured at surgery. Thirty-four of the 43 intact implants were described as intact at surgery. When categorising possible ruptures as ruptures, there were one false positive and nine false negative rupture diagnoses at MRI yielding an accuracy of 92%, a sensitivity of 89%, and a specificity of 97%. Correspondingly, the predictive value of a positive MRI examination was 99% and the predictive value of a negative MRI examination was 79%. Conclusions: We conclude that MRI is highly accurate for identification of silicone breast implant rupture, with a high sensitivity and specificity when evaluation of images are based on presence of well-defined rupture criteria

  15. Calcium-sensitive MRI contrast agents based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasijevic, Tatjana; Shusteff, Maxim; Fam, Peter; Jasanoff, Alan

    2006-10-03

    We describe a family of calcium indicators for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), formed by combining a powerful iron oxide nanoparticle-based contrast mechanism with the versatile calcium-sensing protein calmodulin and its targets. Calcium-dependent protein-protein interactions drive particle clustering and produce up to 5-fold changes in T2 relaxivity, an indication of the sensors' potency. A variant based on conjugates of wild-type calmodulin and the peptide M13 reports concentration changes near 1 microM Ca(2+), suitable for detection of elevated intracellular calcium levels. The midpoint and cooperativity of the response can be tuned by mutating the protein domains that actuate the sensor. Robust MRI signal changes are achieved even at nanomolar particle concentrations (calcium levels. When combined with technologies for cellular delivery of nanoparticulate agents, these sensors and their derivatives may be useful for functional molecular imaging of biological signaling networks in live, opaque specimens.

  16. Gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging for the detection of colorectal liver metastases after neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Mi Hye; Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung-Ihn; Hur, Bo Yun; Kim, Tae-You; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Yi, Nam-Joon; Suh, Kyung-Suk

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for the detection of colorectal liver metastases (CRLMs) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Our study population comprised 77 patients with 140 CRLMs who underwent gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI within 1 month prior to surgery: group A (without NAC, n = 38) and group B (with NAC, n = 39). Two radiologists independently assessed all MR images and graded their diagnostic confidence for CRLM on a 5-point scale. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity and positive predictive values (PPV) were calculated and compared between the two groups. Diagnostic accuracy of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI in group B was slightly lower than in group A, but a statistically significant difference was not observed (observer 1: A z , 0.926 in group A, 0.905 in group B; observer 2: A z , 0.944 in group A, 0.885 in group B; p > 0.05). Sensitivity and PPV of group B were comparable to those of group A (observer 1: sensitivity = 93.5 % vs. 93.6 %, PPV = 95.1 % vs. 86.9 %; observer 2: sensitivity = 96.8 % vs. 91.0 %; PPV = 90.0 % vs. 89.7 %; all p > 0.05). Gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI including DWI provided good diagnostic performance with high sensitivity (>90 %) for the detection of CRLMs, regardless of the influence of NAC. (orig.)

  17. Comparison of SPECT/CT, MRI and CT in diagnosis of skull base bone invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-xu; Han, Peng-hui; Zhang, Guo-qian; Wang, Rui-hao; Ge, Yong-bin; Ren, Zhi-gang; Li, Jian-sheng; Fu, Wen-hai

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of skull base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is crucial for correct staging, assessing treatment response and contouring the tumor target in radiotherapy planning, as well as improving the patient's prognosis. To compare the diagnostic efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) for the detection of skull base invasion in NPC. Sixty untreated patients with histologically proven NPC underwent SPECT/CT imaging, contrast-enhanced MRI and CT. Of the 60 patients, 30 had skull base invasion confirmed by the final results of contrast-enhanced MRI, CT and six-month follow-up imaging (MRI and CT). The diagnostic efficacy of the three imaging modalities in detecting skull base invasion was evaluated. The rates of positive findings of skull base invasion for SPECT/CT, MRI and CT were 53.3%, 48.3% and 33.3%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 93.3%, 86.7% and 90.0% for SPECT/CT fusion imaging, 96.7%, 100.0% and 98.3% for contrast-enhanced MRI, and 66.7%, 100.0% and 83.3% for contrast-enhanced CT. MRI showed the best performance for the diagnosis of skull base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, followed closely by SPECT/CT. SPECT/CT had poorer specificity than that of both MRI and CT, while CT had the lowest sensitivity.

  18. Robust volume assessment of brain tissues for 3-dimensional fourier transformation MRI via a novel multispectral technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh-Wen Chai

    Full Text Available A new TRIO algorithm method integrating three different algorithms is proposed to perform brain MRI segmentation in the native coordinate space, with no need of transformation to a standard coordinate space or the probability maps for segmentation. The method is a simple voxel-based algorithm, derived from multispectral remote sensing techniques, and only requires minimal operator input to depict GM, WM, and CSF tissue clusters to complete classification of a 3D high-resolution multislice-multispectral MRI data. Results showed very high accuracy and reproducibility in classification of GM, WM, and CSF in multislice-multispectral synthetic MRI data. The similarity indexes, expressing overlap between classification results and the ground truth, were 0.951, 0.962, and 0.956 for GM, WM, and CSF classifications in the image data with 3% noise level and 0% non-uniformity intensity. The method particularly allows for classification of CSF with 0.994, 0.961 and 0.996 of accuracy, sensitivity and specificity in images data with 3% noise level and 0% non-uniformity intensity, which had seldom performed well in previous studies. As for clinical MRI data, the quantitative data of brain tissue volumes aligned closely with the brain morphometrics in three different study groups of young adults, elderly volunteers, and dementia patients. The results also showed very low rates of the intra- and extra-operator variability in measurements of the absolute volumes and volume fractions of cerebral GM, WM, and CSF in three different study groups. The mean coefficients of variation of GM, WM, and CSF volume measurements were in the range of 0.03% to 0.30% of intra-operator measurements and 0.06% to 0.45% of inter-operator measurements. In conclusion, the TRIO algorithm exhibits a remarkable ability in robust classification of multislice-multispectral brain MR images, which would be potentially applicable for clinical brain volumetric analysis and explicitly promising

  19. Comparison of hepatic MDCT, MRI, and DSA to explant pathology for the detection and treatment planning of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren M. Ladd

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims The diagnosis and treatment plan for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC can be made from radiologic imaging. However, lesion detection may vary depending on the imaging modality. This study aims to evaluate the sensitivities of hepatic multidetector computed tomography (MDCT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and digital subtraction angiography (DSA in the detection of HCC and the consequent management impact on potential liver transplant patients. Methods One hundred and sixteen HCC lesions were analyzed in 41 patients who received an orthotopic liver transplant (OLT. All of the patients underwent pretransplantation hepatic DSA, MDCT, and/or MRI. The imaging results were independently reviewed retrospectively in a blinded fashion by two interventional and two abdominal radiologists. The liver explant pathology was used as the gold standard for assessing each imaging modality. Results The sensitivity for overall HCC detection was higher for cross-sectional imaging using MRI (51.5%, 95% confidence interval [CI]=36.2-58.4% and MDCT (49.8%, 95% CI=43.7-55.9% than for DSA (41.7%, 95% CI=36.2-47.3% (P=0.05. The difference in false-positive rate was not statistically significant between MRI (22%, MDCT (29%, and DSA (29% (P=0.67. The sensitivity was significantly higher for detecting right lobe lesions than left lobe lesions for all modalities (MRI: 56.1% vs. 43.1%, MDCT: 55.0% vs. 42.0%, and DSA: 46.9% vs. 33.9%; all P<0.01. The sensitivities of the three imaging modalities were also higher for lesions ≥2 cm vs. <2 cm (MRI: 73.4% vs. 32.7%, MDCT: 66.9% vs. 33.8%, and DSA: 62.2% vs. 24.1%; all P<0.01. The interobserver correlation was rated as very good to excellent. Conclusion The sensitivity for detecting HCC is higher for MRI and MDCT than for DSA, and so cross-sectional imaging modalities should be used to evaluate OLT candidacy.

  20. Impact of MRI on high grade Ductal Carcinoma Insitu (HG DCIS) management, are we using the full scope of MRI?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajaj, Mohamad; Karim, Ahmed; Pascaline, Sana; Noor, Lubna; Patel, Shivali; Dakka, Mahmoud

    2017-10-01

    Preoperative assessment of pure Ductal Carcinoma Insitu (DCIS) is essential in the surgical planning. The role of Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has long been debated. The impact of MRI on the management of High Grade (HG) DCIS was assessed, whether it accurately captures the true size of this entity in comparison to conventional imaging, and, if MRI use would reduce the number of re-excision surgery. Ninety-one consecutive patients with HG DCIS, who were identified from a prospectively collected data at Kettering General Hospital between April 2011 and December 2015. All patients had preoperative MRI scan in addition to the standard breast imaging. This was compared to a control group of consecutive patients (n=52) which was obtained from a period just before 2011. Impact on surgical planning and number of surgeries for each patient was compared. The size of HG DCIS estimated by MRI was compared to the final histological size. Secondary outcomes included change of initial surgical plan and detection of occult contralateral breast cancer. MRI group had 91 patients with median age of 63. Seventy percent of which presented through the screening program. The overall sensitivity of MRI to detect HG DCIS was 77% (70/91) with a false negative rate FNR of 23% (21/91). Therefore, 70 patients only were included in the data analysis. The control group included 52 screening patients with comparable baseline characteristics. Re-excision (or completion mastectomy) rates were higher in the control group 26% compared to 8% in the MRI group (P-value 0.012). MRI use correctly converted the initial plan of breast conservation to mastectomy in 9 patients (13%). Five patients had additional ipsilateral malignant features (7%).Occult contra lateral disease, was diagnosed in 2 patients (3%). This study suggests that MRI could be an important tool in reducing the re-excision rates in the surgical management of HG DCIS. Although still controversial, selective MRI imaging can be useful

  1. [Accuracy of placenta accreta prenatal diagnosis by ultrasound and MRI in a high-risk population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daney de Marcillac, F; Molière, S; Pinton, A; Weingertner, A-S; Fritz, G; Viville, B; Roedlich, M-N; Gaudineau, A; Sananes, N; Favre, R; Nisand, I; Langer, B

    2016-02-01

    Main objective was to compare accuracy of ultrasonography and MRI for antenatal diagnosis of placenta accreta. Secondary objectives were to specify the most common sonographic and RMI signs associated with diagnosis of placenta accreta. This retrospective study used data collected from all potential cases of placenta accreta (patients with an anterior placenta praevia with history of scarred uterus) admitted from 01/2010 to 12/2014 in a level III maternity unit in Strasbourg, France. High-risk patients beneficiated antenatally from ultrasonography and MRI. Sonographic signs registered were: abnormal placental lacunae, increased vascularity on color Doppler, absence of the retroplacental clear space, interrupted bladder line. MRI signs registered were: abnormal uterine bulging, intraplacental bands of low signal intensity on T2-weighted images, increased vascularity, heterogeneous signal of the placenta on T2-weighed, interrupted bladder line, protrusion of the placenta into the cervix. Diagnosis of placenta accreta was confirmed histologically after hysterectomy or clinically in case of successful conservative treatment. Twenty-two potential cases of placenta accreta were referred to our center and underwent both ultrasonography and MRI. All cases of placenta accreta had a placenta praevia associated with history of scarred uterus. Sensibility and specificity for ultrasonography were, respectively, 0.92 and 0.67, for MRI 0.84 and 0.78 without significant difference (p>0.05). The most relevant signs associated with diagnosis of placenta accreta in ultrasonography were increased vascularity on color Doppler (sensibility 0.85/specificity 0.78), abnormal placental lacunae (sensibility 0.92/specificity 0.55) and loss of retroplacental clear space (sensibility 0.76/specificity 1.0). The most relevant signs in MRI were: abnormal uterine bulging (sensitivity 0.92/specificity 0.89), dark intraplacental bands on T2-weighted images (sensitivity 0.83/specificity 0.80) or

  2. Sensitivity of MODIS 2.1-(micrometers) Channel for Off-Nadir View Angles for Use in Remote Sensing of Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatebe, C. K.; King, M. D.; Tsay, S.-C.; Ji, Q.; Arnold, T.

    2000-01-01

    In this sensitivity study, we examined the ratio technique, the official method for remote sensing of aerosols over land from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) DATA, for view angles from nadir to 65 deg. off-nadir using Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) data collected during the Smoke, Clouds, and Radiation-Brazil (SCAR-B) experiment conducted in 1995. For the data analyzed and for the view angles tested, results seem to suggest that the reflectance (rho)0.47 and (rho)0.67 are predictable from (rho)2.1 using: (rho)0.47 = (rho)2.1/6, which is a slight modification and (rho)0.67 = (rho)2.1/2. These results hold for target viewed from backscattered direction, but not for the forward direction.

  3. Exploring fMRI Data for Periodic Signal Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Nielsen, Finn Årup; Larsen, Jan

    2002-01-01

    We use a Bayesian framework to detect periodic components in fMRI data. The resulting detector is sensitive to periodic components with a flexible number of harmonics and with arbitrary amplitude and phases of the harmonics. It is possible to detect the correct number of harmonics in periodic sig...

  4. Prospective evaluation of {sup 18}F-FACBC PET/CT and PET/MRI versus multiparametric MRI in intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer patients (FLUCIPRO trial)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jambor, Ivan [University of Turku, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Turku (Finland); University of Massachusetts Medical School - Baystate, Department of Radiology, Springfield, MA (United States); Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Kuisma, Anna [Turku University Hospital, Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Turku (Finland); Kaehkoenen, Esa; Bostroem, Peter J. [Turku University Hospital, Department of Urology, Turku (Finland); Kemppainen, Jukka [Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Turku University Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku (Finland); Merisaari, Harri [University of Turku, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Turku (Finland); Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); University of Turku, Department of Information Technology, Turku (Finland); Eskola, Olli; Teuho, Jarmo [Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Montoya Perez, Ileana [University of Turku, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Turku (Finland); University of Turku, Department of Information Technology, Turku (Finland); Turku University Hospital, Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku (Finland); Pesola, Marko [University of Turku, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Turku (Finland); Aronen, Hannu J. [University of Turku, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Turku (Finland); Turku University Hospital, Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku (Finland); Taimen, Pekka [University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Turku (Finland); Minn, Heikki [Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Turku University Hospital, Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Turku (Finland)

    2018-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate {sup 18}F-FACBC PET/CT, PET/MRI, and multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) in detection of primary prostate cancer (PCa). Twenty-six men with histologically confirmed PCa underwent PET/CT immediately after injection of 369 ± 10 MBq {sup 18}F-FACBC (fluciclovine) followed by PET/MRI started 55 ± 7 min from injection. Maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) were measured for both hybrid PET acquisitions. A separate mpMRI was acquired within a week of the PET scans. Logan plots were used to calculate volume of distribution (V{sub T}). The presence of PCa was estimated in 12 regions with radical prostatectomy findings as ground truth. For each imaging modality, area under the curve (AUC) for detection of PCa was determined to predict diagnostic performance. The clinical trial registration number is NCT02002455. In the visual analysis, 164/312 (53%) regions contained PCa, and 41 tumor foci were identified. PET/CT demonstrated the highest sensitivity at 87% while its specificity was low at 56%. The AUC of both PET/MRI and mpMRI significantly (p < 0.01) outperformed that of PET/CT while no differences were detected between PET/MRI and mpMRI. SUV{sub max} and V{sub T} of Gleason score (GS) >3 + 4 tumors were significantly (p < 0.05) higher than those for GS 3 + 3 and benign hyperplasia. A total of 442 lymph nodes were evaluable for staging, and PET/CT and PET/MRI demonstrated true-positive findings in only 1/7 patients with metastatic lymph nodes. Quantitative {sup 18}F-FACBC imaging significantly correlated with GS but failed to outperform MRI in lesion detection. {sup 18}F-FACBC may assist in targeted biopsies in the setting of hybrid imaging with MRI. (orig.)

  5. Evaluation of 18F-FDG PET and MRI in differentiating benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broski, Stephen M.; Howe, Benjamin M.; Nathan, Mark A.; Wenger, Doris E.; Johnson, Geoffrey B.; Spinner, Robert J.; Amrami, Kimberly K.

    2016-01-01

    To compare 18F-FDG PET/CT and MRI for differentiating benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (BPNSTs and MPNSTs) and correlate imaging characteristics with histopathology. Patients with pathologically proven PNSTs undergoing 18F-FDG PET/CT were retrospectively reviewed. PET/CTs and, if available, MRIs were analyzed, noting multiple imaging characteristics and likely pathology (benign or malignant). Thirty-eight patients with 23 BPNSTs and 20 MPNSTs were analyzed. MPNSTs had higher SUVmax (10.1 ± 1.0, 4.2 ± 0.4, p < 0.0001), metabolic tumor volume (146.5 ± 39.4, 21.7 ± 6.6 cm 3 , p = 0.01), total lesion glycolysis (640.7 ± 177.5, 89.9 ± 23.2 cm 3 *g/ml, p = 0.01), and SUVmax/LiverSUVmean (5.3 ± 0.5, 2.0 ± 0.2, p < 0.0001). All lesions with SUVmax < 4.3 were benign. All lesions with SUVmax > 8.1 were malignant. SUVmax cutoff of 6.1 yielded 90.0 % sensitivity and 78.3 % specificity for MPNSTs. SUVmax/LiverSUVmean cutoff of 3.0 yielded 90.0 % sensitivity and 82.6 % specificity. MPNSTs more commonly had heterogeneous FDG activity (p < 0.0001), perilesional edema (p = 0.004), cystic degeneration/necrosis (p = 0.015), and irregular margins (p = 0.004). There was no difference in lesion size, MRI signal characteristics, or enhancement. Expertly interpreted MRI had 62.5-81.3 % sensitivity and 94.1-100.0 % specificity while PET had 90.0-100.0 % sensitivity and 52.2-82.6 % specificity for diagnosing MPNSTs. FDG PET and MRI play a complementary role in PNST evaluation. Multiple metabolic parameters and MRI imaging characteristics are useful in differentiating BPNSTs from MPNSTs. This underscores the potential critical role of PET/MRI in these patients. (orig.)

  6. Differentiation between benign and malignant breast lesions using quantitative diffusion-weighted sequence on 3 T MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, S.L.L.; Rahmat, K.; Rozalli, F.I.; Mohd-Shah, M.N.; Aziz, Y.F.A.; Yip, C.H.; Vijayananthan, A.; Ng, K.H.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the capability and diagnostic accuracy of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in differentiating benign from malignant breast lesions using 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods: Women with suspicious or indeterminate breast lesions detected at MRI, mammogram and/or ultrasound were recruited for dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI and DWI prior to their biopsy. Image fusion of DCE-MRI with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map was utilized to select the region of interest (ROI) for ADC calculation in the area that showed the most avid enhancement. DWI was performed using two sets of b-values at 500 and 1000 s/mm 2 , respectively. Results: Fifty women were recruited and the final analysis comprised 44 breast lesions, 31 of which were malignant and 13 were benign. Significant results were obtained between ADC values of benign and malignant lesions (p −3 mm 2 /s for b = 500 s/mm 2 and 1.22 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s for b = 1000 s/mm 2 , respectively. The sensitivity of DCE-MRI alone was 100% with a specificity of 66.7%. When DCE-MRI was combined with b = 1000 s/mm 2 , the specificity rose to 100%, while only mildly affecting sensitivity (90.6%). No significant correlation was found between ADC values and prognostic factors, such as lymph node metastasis, tumour size, oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status, and tumour grades. Conclusion: The present study provides consistent evidence to support DWI as a diagnostic tool for breast lesion characterization. A combination of DCE-MRI with DWI is suggested to improve the sensitivity and specificity of lesion characterization

  7. Sensitivity of quantitative UTE MRI to the biomechanical property of the temporomandibular joint disc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Won C.; Biswas, Reni; Statum, Sheronda; Sah, Robert L.; Chung, Christine B.

    2014-01-01

    To quantify MR properties of discs from cadaveric human temporomandibular joints (TMJ) using quantitative conventional and ultrashort time-to-echo magnetic resonance imaging (UTE MRI) techniques and to corroborate regional variation in the MR properties with that of biomechanical indentation stiffness. This study was exempt from the institutional review board approval. Cadaveric (four donors, two females, 74 ± 10.7 years) TMJs were sliced (n = 14 slices total) sagittally and imaged using quantitative techniques of conventional spin echo T2 (SE T2), UTE T2*, and UTE T1rho. The discs were then subjected to biomechanical indentation testing, which is performed by compressing the tissue with the blunt end of a small solid cylinder. Regional variations in MR and indentation stiffness were correlated. TMJ of a healthy volunteer was also imaged to show in vivo feasibility. Using the ME SE T2 and the UTE T1rho techniques, a significant (each p 2 = 0.42) than SE T2 (R 2 = 0.19) or UTE T2* (R 2 = 0.02, p = 0.1) techniques. The UTE T1rho technique, applicable in vivo, facilitated quantitative evaluation of TMJ discs and showed a high sensitivity to biomechanical softening of the TMJ discs. With additional work, the technique may become a useful surrogate measure for loss of biomechanical integrity of TMJ discs reflecting degeneration. (orig.)

  8. Correlation between neuromelanin-sensitive MR imaging and {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT in patients with parkinsonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuya, Keita; Shinohara, Yuki; Miyoshi, Fuminori; Fujii, Shinya; Tanabe, Yoshio; Ogawa, Toshihide [Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Yonago (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Neuromelanin-sensitive MR imaging (MRI) can visualize neuromelanin-containing neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), and its utility has been reported in the evaluation of parkinsonism. Conversely, dopamine transporter imaging by {sup 123}I-N-v-fluoropropyl-2b-carbomethoxy-3b-(4-iodophenyl)nortropane (FP-CIT) SPECT (DaTSCAN) is now an established method for evaluating parkinsonism, detecting presynaptic dopamine neuronal dysfunction. Both methods can assist differentiating neurodegenerative and other forms of parkinsonism. However, to our knowledge, there have been no studies concerning a correlation between the two methods. The aim of this study was to assess the utility of neuromelanin-sensitive MRI for diagnosing parkinsonism by examining a correlation with DaTSCAN. Twenty-three patients with parkinsonism who underwent both neuromelanin-sensitive MRI and DaTSCAN were included. We measured the neuromelanin-positive SNc region volume by manually contouring the high signal intensity region of the SNc on neuromelanin-sensitive MRI and measured the specific binding ratio (SBR) on DaTSCAN. The asymmetry index of neuromelanin-positive SNc volume and the asymmetry index of SBR were also calculated. The volume of the neuromelanin-positive SNc region showed significant correlation with specific binding ratio (SBR) (right P <.001, ρ = 0.78, left P <.001, ρ = 0.86). The asymmetry index of neuromelanin-positive SNc volume also showed significant correlations with the asymmetry index of SBR (P <.001, ρ = 0.73). Decrease of the high signal intensity region of the SNc on neuromelanin-sensitive MRI would indicate damage to the nigrostriatal dopaminergic function as well as loss of dopaminergic neurons. We conclude that neuromelanin-sensitive MRI is a useful diagnostic biomarker for parkinsonism. (orig.)

  9. Aiming for a simpler early arthritis MRI protocol: can Gd contrast administration be eliminated?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stomp, Wouter; Bloem, Johan L.; Reijnierse, Monique; Krabben, Annemarie; Heijde, Desiree van der; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Helm-van Mil, Annette H.M. van der; Oestergaard, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate whether intravenous gadolinium (Gd) contrast administration can be eliminated when evaluating synovitis and tenosynovitis in early arthritis patients, thereby decreasing imaging time, cost, and invasiveness. Wrist MRIs of 93 early arthritis patients were evaluated by two readers for synovitis of the radioulnar, radiocarpal, and intercarpal joints, according to the Rheumatoid Arthritis MRI Scoring method (RAMRIS), and for tenosynovitis in ten compartments. Scores of MRI images without Gd contrast enhancement were compared to scores obtained when evaluating all, including contrast-enhanced, MRI images as reference. Subsequently, a literature review and pooled analysis of data from the present and two previous studies were performed. At the individual joint/tendon level, sensitivity to detect synovitis without Gd contrast was 91 % and 72 % for the two readers, respectively, with a specificity of 51 % and 81 %. For tenosynovitis, the sensitivity was 67 % and 54 %, respectively, with a specificity of 87 % and 91 %. Pooled data analysis revealed an overall sensitivity of 81 % and specificity of 50 % for evaluation of synovitis. Variations in tenosynovitis scoring systems hindered pooled analyses. Eliminating Gd contrast administration resulted in low specificity for synovitis and low sensitivity for tenosynovitis, indicating that Gd contrast administration remains essential for an optimal assessment. (orig.)

  10. Aiming for a simpler early arthritis MRI protocol: can Gd contrast administration be eliminated?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stomp, Wouter; Bloem, Johan L.; Reijnierse, Monique [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Krabben, Annemarie; Heijde, Desiree van der; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Helm-van Mil, Annette H.M. van der [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, P.O. Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Oestergaard, Mikkel [University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spinal Diseases, Glostrup Hospital, Glostrup (Denmark)

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate whether intravenous gadolinium (Gd) contrast administration can be eliminated when evaluating synovitis and tenosynovitis in early arthritis patients, thereby decreasing imaging time, cost, and invasiveness. Wrist MRIs of 93 early arthritis patients were evaluated by two readers for synovitis of the radioulnar, radiocarpal, and intercarpal joints, according to the Rheumatoid Arthritis MRI Scoring method (RAMRIS), and for tenosynovitis in ten compartments. Scores of MRI images without Gd contrast enhancement were compared to scores obtained when evaluating all, including contrast-enhanced, MRI images as reference. Subsequently, a literature review and pooled analysis of data from the present and two previous studies were performed. At the individual joint/tendon level, sensitivity to detect synovitis without Gd contrast was 91 % and 72 % for the two readers, respectively, with a specificity of 51 % and 81 %. For tenosynovitis, the sensitivity was 67 % and 54 %, respectively, with a specificity of 87 % and 91 %. Pooled data analysis revealed an overall sensitivity of 81 % and specificity of 50 % for evaluation of synovitis. Variations in tenosynovitis scoring systems hindered pooled analyses. Eliminating Gd contrast administration resulted in low specificity for synovitis and low sensitivity for tenosynovitis, indicating that Gd contrast administration remains essential for an optimal assessment. (orig.)

  11. Prospective Comparison of F-18 Choline PET/CT Scan Versus Axial MRI for Detecting Bone Metastasis in Biochemically Relapsed Prostate Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter Huysse

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We compared fluor-18 choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT and axial skeleton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI prospectively obtained for the detection of bone metastases in non-castrated patients with biochemically recurrent prostate cancer following primary treatment. PET/CT was performed 45 min post-injection of 3–4 MBq/kg F-18 methyl choline. MRI included T1- and fluid sensitive T2-weighted images of the spine and pelvis. Readers were initially blinded from other results and all scans underwent independent double reading. The best valuable comparator (BVC defined the metastatic status. On the basis of the BVC, 15 out of 64 patients presented with 24 bone metastases. On a patient level, the sensitivity and specificity of MRI and PET were not significantly different. On a lesion level, the sensitivity of MRI was significantly better compared to PET, and the specificity did not differ significantly. In conclusion, axial MRI is an interesting screening tool for the detection of bone metastases because of its low probability of false negative results. However, F-18 choline PET is a valuable addition as it can overrule false positive MRI results and detect non-axial metastases.

  12. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) versus MRI in the high-risk screening setting: patient preferences and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jordana; Miller, Matthew M; Mehta, Tejas S; Fein-Zachary, Valerie; Nathanson, Audrey; Hori, Wendy; Monahan-Earley, Rita; Slanetz, Priscilla J

    Our study evaluates patient preferences toward screening CESM versus MRI. As part of a prospective study, high-risk patients had breast MRI and CESM. Patients completed an anonymous survey to evaluate preferences regarding the two modalities. 88% of participants completed the survey. 79% preferred CESM over MRI if the exams had equal sensitivity. 89% would be comfortable receiving contrast as part of an annual screening test. High-risk populations may accept CESM as a screening exam and may prefer it over screening MRI if ongoing trials demonstrate screening CESM to be clinically non-inferior MRI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of standard, prone and cine MRI in the evaluation of tethered cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Sukhjinder; Kline-Fath, Beth; Racadio, Judy M.; Bierbrauer, Karin; Salisbury, Shelia; Macaluso, Maurizio; Jackson, Elizabeth C.; Egelhoff, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Tethered cord syndrome (TCS) is defined by abnormal traction on the spinal cord that confines its movement. Surgical cord release usually stops neurological deterioration; therefore, early and accurate neuroradiological diagnosis is important. Supine MRI is the imaging modality of choice, but prone MRI and cine MRI can demonstrate cord movement. We compared the diagnostic accuracies of standard MRI, prone MRI and cine MRI in patients with clinical suspicion of TCS and evaluated inter-reader reliability for MR imaging. Children who underwent MRI for suspicion of TCS were retrospectively identified. Supine, prone and cine MRI studies were re-read by two pediatric neuroradiologists. Conus level, filum appearance and cord movement were documented. Thirteen of 49 children had tethered cord documented at surgery. Conus level had the highest diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity 69-77%, specificity 94%, positive predictive value 82-83%, negative predictive value 89-92%, correct diagnosis 88-90%) and highest between-reader concordance (98%). Prone and cine MRI did not add to the accuracy of the supine imaging. Conus level provides the highest diagnostic accuracy and inter-reader reliability in TCS. Until a larger series is evaluated, it remains questionable whether prone or cine MRI provides enough additional diagnostic information to warrant routine use. (orig.)

  14. Comparison of standard, prone and cine MRI in the evaluation of tethered cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Sukhjinder [Cohen Children' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, New Hyde Park, NY (United States); Kline-Fath, Beth; Racadio, Judy M. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Bierbrauer, Karin [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Salisbury, Shelia; Macaluso, Maurizio [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Jackson, Elizabeth C. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Nephrology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Egelhoff, John C. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Phoenix Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Tethered cord syndrome (TCS) is defined by abnormal traction on the spinal cord that confines its movement. Surgical cord release usually stops neurological deterioration; therefore, early and accurate neuroradiological diagnosis is important. Supine MRI is the imaging modality of choice, but prone MRI and cine MRI can demonstrate cord movement. We compared the diagnostic accuracies of standard MRI, prone MRI and cine MRI in patients with clinical suspicion of TCS and evaluated inter-reader reliability for MR imaging. Children who underwent MRI for suspicion of TCS were retrospectively identified. Supine, prone and cine MRI studies were re-read by two pediatric neuroradiologists. Conus level, filum appearance and cord movement were documented. Thirteen of 49 children had tethered cord documented at surgery. Conus level had the highest diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity 69-77%, specificity 94%, positive predictive value 82-83%, negative predictive value 89-92%, correct diagnosis 88-90%) and highest between-reader concordance (98%). Prone and cine MRI did not add to the accuracy of the supine imaging. Conus level provides the highest diagnostic accuracy and inter-reader reliability in TCS. Until a larger series is evaluated, it remains questionable whether prone or cine MRI provides enough additional diagnostic information to warrant routine use. (orig.)

  15. The value of CT and MRI in the classification and surgical decision-making among spine surgeons in thoracolumbar spinal injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Shanmuganathan; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Kanna, Rishi Mugesh; Schroeder, Gregory D; Oner, Frank Cumhur; Vialle, Luiz; Chapman, Jens; Dvorak, Marcel; Fehlings, Michael; Shetty, Ajoy Prasad; Schnake, Klaus; Maheshwaran, Anupama; Kandziora, Frank

    2017-05-01

    Although imaging has a major role in evaluation and management of thoracolumbar spinal trauma by spine surgeons, the exact role of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in addition to radiographs for fracture classification and surgical decision-making is unclear. Spine surgeons (n = 41) from around the world classified 30 thoracolumbar fractures. The cases were presented in a three-step approach: first plain radiographs, followed by CT and MRI images. Surgeons were asked to classify according to the AOSpine classification system and choose management in each of the three steps. Surgeons correctly classified 43.4 % of fractures with plain radiographs alone; after, additionally, evaluating CT and MRI images, this percentage increased by further 18.2 and 2.2 %, respectively. AO type A fractures were identified in 51.7 % of fractures with radiographs, while the number of type B fractures increased after CT and MRI. The number of type C fractures diagnosed was constant across the three steps. Agreement between radiographs and CT was fair for A-type (k = 0.31), poor for B-type (k = 0.19), but it was excellent between CT and MRI (k > 0.87). CT and MRI had similar sensitivity in identifying fracture subtypes except that MRI had a higher sensitivity (56.5 %) for B2 fractures (p change after an MRI (p = 0.77). For accurate classification, radiographs alone were insufficient except for C-type injuries. CT is mandatory for accurately classifying thoracolumbar fractures. Though MRI did confer a modest gain in sensitivity in B2 injuries, the study does not support the need for routine MRI in patients for classification, assessing instability or need for surgery.

  16. Relationships between reward sensitivity, risk-taking and family history of alcoholism during an interactive competitive fMRI task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haley L Yarosh

    Full Text Available Individuals with a positive family history for alcoholism (FHP have shown differences from family-history-negative (FHN individuals in the neural correlates of reward processing. FHP, compared to FHN individuals, demonstrate relatively diminished ventral striatal activation during anticipation of monetary rewards, and the degree of ventral striatal activation shows an inverse correlation with specific impulsivity measures in alcohol-dependent individuals. Rewards in socially interactive contexts relate importantly to addictive propensities, yet have not been examined with respect to how their neural underpinnings relate to impulsivity-related measures. Here we describe impulsivity measures in FHN and FHP individuals as they relate to a socially interactive functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI task.Forty FHP and 29 FHN subjects without histories of Axis-I disorders completed a socially interactive Domino task during functional magnetic resonance imaging and completed self-report and behavioral impulsivity-related assessments.FHP compared to FHN individuals showed higher scores (p = .004 on one impulsivity-related factor relating to both compulsivity (Padua Inventory and reward/punishment sensitivity (Sensitivity to Punishment/Sensitivity to Reward Questionnaire. Multiple regression analysis within a reward-related network revealed a correlation between risk-taking (involving another impulsivity-related factor, the Balloon Analog Risk Task (BART and right ventral striatum activation under reward >punishment contrast (p<0.05 FWE corrected in the social task.Behavioral risk-taking scores may be more closely associated with neural correlates of reward responsiveness in socially interactive contexts than are FH status or impulsivity-related self-report measures. These findings suggest that risk-taking assessments be examined further in socially interactive settings relevant to addictive behaviors.

  17. Diagnostic value of pelvic enthesitis on MRI of the sacroiliac joints in spondyloarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jans, L.; Langenhove, C. van; Lambrecht, V.; Verstraete, K. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Gent (Belgium); Praet, L. van; Carron, P.; Elewaut, D.; Bosch, F.V. den [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Gent (Belgium); Jaremko, J.L. [University of Alberta Hospital, Department of Radiology, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2014-04-15

    To determine the prevalence and diagnostic value of pelvic enthesitis on MRI of the sacroiliac (SI) joints in spondyloarthritis (SpA). A retrospective study in 444 patients aged 17-45 years old with MRI of the SI joints and with clinically suspected sacroiliitis was performed. Patients were classified as having SpA if they fulfilled the Assessment of Spondyloarthritis International Society (ASAS) criteria. Pelvic enthesitis on MRI was correlated with the final diagnosis. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratio (LR) and predictive values (PV) of pelvic enthesitis for the diagnosis of SpA were calculated. MRI showed pelvic enthesitis in 24.4 % of patients with SpA and in 7.1 % of patients without SpA. Presence of any enthesitis had sensitivity, specificity, LR+, LR-, PPV and NPV of 24.4 %, 92.9 %, 3.45, 0.81, 69.4 % and 65.2 % for the diagnosis of SpA, respectively. The most commonly affected entheses were the longitudinal ligament insertion (4.5 %), the retroarticular ligaments (4.1 %) and the pubic symphysis (4.1 %). The sites of enthesitis with the highest PPV for SpA were the iliac crest/wing (85.7 %) and the retroarticular ligaments (81.3 %). Nearly one fourth of SpA patients with suspected sacroiliitis showed pelvic enthesitis on MRI. Such pelvic enthesitis has a high specificity for the diagnosis of spondyloarthritis. (orig.)

  18. [Role of MRI for detection and characterization of pulmonary nodules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, G; Koenigkam-Santos, M; Biederer, J; Puderbach, M

    2014-05-01

    Due to physical and technical limitations, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has hitherto played only a minor role in image-based diagnostics of the lungs. However, as a consequence of important methodological developments during recent years, MRI has developed into a technically mature and clinically well-proven method for specific pulmonary questions. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview on the currently available sequences and techniques for assessment of pulmonary nodules and analyzes the clinical significance according to the current literature. The main focus is on the detection of lung metastases, the detection of primary pulmonary malignancies in high-risk individuals and the differentiation between pulmonary nodules of benign and malignant character. The MRI technique has a sensitivity of approximately 80 % for detection of malignant pulmonary nodules compared to the reference standard low-dose computed tomography (CT) and is thus somewhat inferior to CT. Advantages of MRI on the other hand are a higher specificity in differentiating malignant and benign pulmonary nodules and the absence of ionizing radiation exposure. A systematic use of MRI as a primary tool for detection and characterization of pulmonary nodules is currently not recommended due to insufficient data. The diagnostic potential of MRI for early detection and staging of malignant pulmonary diseases, however, seems promising. Therefore, further evaluation of MRI as a secondary imaging modality in clinical trials is highly warranted.

  19. Clinical impact of gadolinium in the MRI diagnosis of musculoskeletal infection in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, J.H.; Young, Robert S.; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta [Vanderbilt University, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States); Yu, Chang [Vanderbilt University, Department of Biostatistics, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2010-07-15

    The incremental value of gadolinium in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal infection by MRI is controversial. To compare diagnostic utility of noncontrast with contrast MRI in the evaluation of pediatric musculoskeletal infections. We reviewed 90 gadolinium-enhanced MRIs in children with suspected musculoskeletal infection. Noncontrast and contrast MRI scans were evaluated to determine sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal infection and identification of abscesses. Pre- and post-contrast diagnosis of osteomyelitis sensitivity was 89% and 91% (P = 1.00) and specificity was 96% and 96% (P = 1.00), respectively; septic arthritis sensitivity was 50% and 67% (P = 1.00) and specificity was 98% and 98% (P = 1.00), respectively; cellulitis/myositis sensitivity was 100% and 100% (P = 1.00) and specificity was 84% and 88% (P = 0.59), respectively; abscess for the total group was 22 (24.4%) and 42 (46.6%), respectively (P < 0.0001). Abscesses identified only on contrast sequences led to intervention in eight additional children. No child with a final diagnosis of infection had a normal pre-contrast study. Intravenous gadolinium should not be routinely administered in the imaging work-up of nonspinal musculoskeletal infections, particularly when pre-contrast images are normal. However, gadolinium contrast significantly increases the detection of abscesses, particularly small ones that might not require surgical intervention. (orig.)

  20. Clinical impact of gadolinium in the MRI diagnosis of musculoskeletal infection in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, J.H.; Young, Robert S.; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta; Yu, Chang

    2010-01-01

    The incremental value of gadolinium in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal infection by MRI is controversial. To compare diagnostic utility of noncontrast with contrast MRI in the evaluation of pediatric musculoskeletal infections. We reviewed 90 gadolinium-enhanced MRIs in children with suspected musculoskeletal infection. Noncontrast and contrast MRI scans were evaluated to determine sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal infection and identification of abscesses. Pre- and post-contrast diagnosis of osteomyelitis sensitivity was 89% and 91% (P = 1.00) and specificity was 96% and 96% (P = 1.00), respectively; septic arthritis sensitivity was 50% and 67% (P = 1.00) and specificity was 98% and 98% (P = 1.00), respectively; cellulitis/myositis sensitivity was 100% and 100% (P = 1.00) and specificity was 84% and 88% (P = 0.59), respectively; abscess for the total group was 22 (24.4%) and 42 (46.6%), respectively (P < 0.0001). Abscesses identified only on contrast sequences led to intervention in eight additional children. No child with a final diagnosis of infection had a normal pre-contrast study. Intravenous gadolinium should not be routinely administered in the imaging work-up of nonspinal musculoskeletal infections, particularly when pre-contrast images are normal. However, gadolinium contrast significantly increases the detection of abscesses, particularly small ones that might not require surgical intervention. (orig.)

  1. Synergistic enhancement of iron oxide nanoparticle and gadolinium for dual-contrast MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Fan; Huang, Xinglu; Qian, Chunqi; Zhu, Lei; Hida, Naoki; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► MR contrast agents exert influence on T 1 or T 2 relaxation time of the surrounding tissue. ► Combined use of iron oxide and Gd-DTPA can improve the sensitivity/specificity of lesion detection. ► Dual contrast MRI enhances the delineation of tumor borders and small lesions. ► The effect of DC-MRI can come from the high paramagnetic susceptibility of Gd 3+ . ► The effect of DC-MRI can also come from the distinct pharmacokinetic distribution of SPIO and Gd-DTPA. -- Abstract: Purpose: The use of MR contrast agents allows accurate diagnosis by exerting an influence on the longitudinal (T 1 ) or transverse (T 2 ) relaxation time of the surrounding tissue. In this study, we combined the use of iron oxide (IO) particles and nonspecific extracellular gadolinium chelate (Gd) in order to further improve the sensitivity and specificity of lesion detection. Procedures: With a 7-Tesla scanner, pre-contrasted, IO-enhanced and dual contrast agent enhanced MRIs were performed in phantom, normal animals, and animal models of lymph node tumor metastases and orthotopic brain tumor. For the dual-contrast (DC) MRI, we focused on the evaluation of T 2 weighted DC MRI with IO administered first, then followed by the injection of a bolus of gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). Results: Based on the C/N ratios and MRI relaxometry, the synergistic effect of coordinated administration of Gd-DTPA and IO was observed and confirmed in phantom, normal liver and tumor models. At 30 min after administration of Feridex, Gd-DTPA further decreased T 2 relaxation in liver immediately after the injection. Additional administration of Gd-DTPA also immediately increased the signal contrast between tumor and brain parenchyma and maximized the C/N ratio to −4.12 ± 0.71. Dual contrast MRI also enhanced the delineation of tumor borders and small lesions. Conclusions: DC-MRI will be helpful to improve diagnostic accuracy and decrease the threshold size for

  2. MRI-based N-staging in esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupski, G.; Lorenzen, J.; Nicolas, V.; Adam, G.; Gawad, K.; Izbicki, J.R.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: For planning the therapeutic strategies and estimating the prognosis in esophageal cancer, N-staging is very important. To date, MRI still is of minor importance as imaging modality of the mediastinum despite promising developments in the past, like ECG-gating or 'averaging' sequences, e.g. LOTA (Long-term averaging), which facilitate mediastinal and thoracic MR-imaging. In a prospective approach, the value of MRI based N-staging was examined with respect to LOTA-sequences. Material and Methods: Within from weeks prior to esophagectomy, standardized MRI of the esophagus was performed in 15 patients (10 squamous-cell-carcinomas and 5 adenocarcinomas) using a 1.5 T whole body scanner. Imaging quality was classified based on depiction of aortic wall or tracheal wall layers. Criteria for malignant infiltration were a diameter of more than 15 mm or a round appearance of a lymph node together with GD-DTPA enhancement. All data were blinded and separately read by two radiologists. The data of the study were compared with those from the pathological workup of the resected specimen. Results: MRI had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 78% for lymph node metastases. Due to incomplete depiction of the celiac trunk (M1), nodal metastasis in a non-enlarged node was missed. Conclusion: With modern MRI, N-staging is almost as accurate as the gold standard endoscopic ultrasound and should particularly be used in patients not suited for an endoscopic ultrasound examination. (orig.) [de

  3. Applying independent component analysis to clinical fMRI at 7 T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Daniel Robinson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Increased BOLD sensitivity at 7 T offers the possibility to increase the reliability of fMRI, but ultra-high field is also associated with an increase in artifacts related to head motion, Nyquist ghosting and parallel imaging reconstruction errors. In this study, the ability of Independent Component Analysis (ICA to separate activation from these artifacts was assessed in a 7 T study of neurological patients performing chin and hand motor tasks. ICA was able to isolate primary motor activation with negligible contamination by motion effects. The results of General Linear Model (GLM analysis of these data were, in contrast, heavily contaminated by motion. Secondary motor areas, basal ganglia and thalamus involvement were apparent in ICA results, but there was low capability to isolate activation in the same brain regions in the GLM analysis, indicating that ICA was more sensitive as well as more specific. A method was developed to simplify the assessment of the large number of independent components. Task-related activation components could be automatically identified via intuitive and effective features. These findings demonstrate that ICA is a practical and sensitive analysis approach in high field fMRI studies, particularly where motion is evoked. Promising applications of ICA in clinical fMRI include presurgical planning and the study of pathologies affecting subcortical brain areas.

  4. Chemical shift MRI can aid in the diagnosis of indeterminate skeletal lesions of the spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douis, H. [University Hospital Birmingham, Department of Radiology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Davies, A.M. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Jeys, L. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Sian, P. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Spinal Surgery and Spinal Oncology, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-15

    To evaluate the role of chemical shift MRI in the characterisation of indeterminate skeletal lesions of the spine as benign or malignant. Fifty-five patients (mean age 54.7 years) with 57 indeterminate skeletal lesions of the spine were included in this retrospective study. In addition to conventional MRI at 3 T which included at least sagittal T1WI and T2WI/STIR sequences, patients underwent chemical shift MRI. A cut-off value with a signal drop-out of 20 % was used to differentiate benign lesions from malignant lesions (signal drop-out <20 % being malignant). There were 45 benign lesions and 12 malignant lesions. Chemical shift imaging correctly diagnosed 33 of 45 lesions as benign and 11 of 12 lesions as malignant. In contrast, there were 12 false positive cases and 1 false negative case based on chemical shift MRI. This yielded a sensitivity of 91.7 %, a specificity of 73.3 %, a negative predictive value of 97.1 %, a positive predictive value of 47.8 % and a diagnostic accuracy of 82.5 %. Chemical shift MRI can aid in the characterisation of indeterminate skeletal lesions of the spine in view of its high sensitivity in diagnosing malignant lesions. Chemical shift MRI can potentially avoid biopsy in a considerable percentage of patients with benign skeletal lesions of the spine. (orig.)

  5. MRI findings of serous atrophy of bone marrow and associated complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutin, Robert D.; White, Lawrence M.; Laor, Tal; Spitz, Damon J.; Lopez-Ben, Robert R.; Stevens, Kathryn J.; Bredella, Miriam A.

    2015-01-01

    To report the MRI appearance of serous atrophy of bone marrow (SABM) and analyse clinical findings and complications of SABM. A retrospective search of MRI examinations of SABM was performed. Symptoms, underlying conditions, MRI findings, delay in diagnosis and associated complications were recorded. We identified 30 patients (15 male, 15 female; mean age: 46 ± 21 years) with MRI findings of SABM. Underlying conditions included anorexia nervosa (n = 10), cachexia from malignant (n = 5) and non-malignant (n = 7) causes, massive weight loss after bariatric surgery (n = 1), biliary atresia (n = 1), AIDS (n = 3), endocrine disorders (n = 2) and scurvy (n = 1). MRI showed mildly hypointense signal on T1- weighted and hyperintense signal on fat-suppressed fluid-sensitive images of affected bone marrow in all cases and similar signal abnormalities of the adjacent subcutaneous fat in 29/30 cases. Seven patients underwent repeat MRI due to initial misinterpretation of bone marrow signal as technical error. Superimposed fractures of the hips and lower extremities were common (n = 14). SABM occurs most commonly in anorexia nervosa and cachexia. MRI findings of SABM are often misinterpreted as technical error requiring unnecessary repeat imaging. SABM is frequently associated with fractures of the lower extremities. (orig.)

  6. MRI findings of serous atrophy of bone marrow and associated complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutin, Robert D. [Department of Radiology, Sacramento, CA (United States); White, Lawrence M. [University of Toronto, Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Laor, Tal [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Spitz, Damon J. [New England Baptist Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Lopez-Ben, Robert R. [Carolinas HealthCare System, Charlotte Radiology, Diagnostic Radiology, Charlotte, NC (United States); Stevens, Kathryn J. [Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Bredella, Miriam A. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    To report the MRI appearance of serous atrophy of bone marrow (SABM) and analyse clinical findings and complications of SABM. A retrospective search of MRI examinations of SABM was performed. Symptoms, underlying conditions, MRI findings, delay in diagnosis and associated complications were recorded. We identified 30 patients (15 male, 15 female; mean age: 46 ± 21 years) with MRI findings of SABM. Underlying conditions included anorexia nervosa (n = 10), cachexia from malignant (n = 5) and non-malignant (n = 7) causes, massive weight loss after bariatric surgery (n = 1), biliary atresia (n = 1), AIDS (n = 3), endocrine disorders (n = 2) and scurvy (n = 1). MRI showed mildly hypointense signal on T1- weighted and hyperintense signal on fat-suppressed fluid-sensitive images of affected bone marrow in all cases and similar signal abnormalities of the adjacent subcutaneous fat in 29/30 cases. Seven patients underwent repeat MRI due to initial misinterpretation of bone marrow signal as technical error. Superimposed fractures of the hips and lower extremities were common (n = 14). SABM occurs most commonly in anorexia nervosa and cachexia. MRI findings of SABM are often misinterpreted as technical error requiring unnecessary repeat imaging. SABM is frequently associated with fractures of the lower extremities. (orig.)

  7. Non-gated fetal MRI of umbilical blood flow in an acardiac twin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, Nobuhiko [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Wada, Toru [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Kashima, Kyoko; Okada, Yoshiyuki [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Unno, Nobuya [Nagano Children' s Hospital, Center for Perinatal Medicine, Nagano (Japan); Kitagawa, Michihiro [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Prenatal Medicine and Maternal Care, Tokyo (Japan); Chiba, Toshio [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Strategic Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2005-08-01

    Currently, the standard method of diagnosis of twin reversed arterial perfusion (TRAP) sequence is ultrasound imaging. The use of MRI for flow visualization may be a useful adjunct to US imaging for assessing the presence of retrograde blood flow in the acardiac fetus and/or umbilical artery. The technical challenge in fetal MRI flow imaging, however, is that fetal electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring required for flow imaging is currently unavailable in the MRI scanner. A non-gated MRI flow imaging technique that requires no ECG monitoring was developed using the t-test to detect blood flow in 20 slices of phase-contrast MRI images randomly scanned at the same location over multiple cardiac cycles. A feasibility study was performed in a 24-week acardiac twin that showed no umbilical flow sonographically. Non-gated MRI flow images clearly indicated the presence of blood flow in the umbilical artery to the acardiac twin; however, there was no blood flow beyond the abdomen. This study leads us to conjecture that non-gated MRI flow imaging is sensitive in detecting low-range blood flow velocity and can be an adjunct to Doppler US imaging. (orig.)

  8. Non-gated fetal MRI of umbilical blood flow in an acardiac twin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Nobuhiko; Wada, Toru; Kashima, Kyoko; Okada, Yoshiyuki; Unno, Nobuya; Kitagawa, Michihiro; Chiba, Toshio

    2005-01-01

    Currently, the standard method of diagnosis of twin reversed arterial perfusion (TRAP) sequence is ultrasound imaging. The use of MRI for flow visualization may be a useful adjunct to US imaging for assessing the presence of retrograde blood flow in the acardiac fetus and/or umbilical artery. The technical challenge in fetal MRI flow imaging, however, is that fetal electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring required for flow imaging is currently unavailable in the MRI scanner. A non-gated MRI flow imaging technique that requires no ECG monitoring was developed using the t-test to detect blood flow in 20 slices of phase-contrast MRI images randomly scanned at the same location over multiple cardiac cycles. A feasibility study was performed in a 24-week acardiac twin that showed no umbilical flow sonographically. Non-gated MRI flow images clearly indicated the presence of blood flow in the umbilical artery to the acardiac twin; however, there was no blood flow beyond the abdomen. This study leads us to conjecture that non-gated MRI flow imaging is sensitive in detecting low-range blood flow velocity and can be an adjunct to Doppler US imaging. (orig.)

  9. Real-time QRS detection using integrated variance for ECG gated cardiac MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Marcus

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available During magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, a patient’s vital signs are required for different purposes. In cardiac MRI (CMR, an electrocardiogram (ECG of the patient is required for triggering the image acquisition process. However, a reliable QRS detection of an ECG signal acquired inside an MRI scanner is a challenging task due to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD effect which interferes with the ECG. The aim of this work was to develop a reliable QRS detector usable inside the MRI which also fulfills the standards for medical devices (IEC 60601-2-27. Therefore, a novel real-time QRS detector based on integrated variance measurements is presented. The algorithm was trained on ANSI/AAMI EC13 test waveforms and was then applied to two databases with 12-lead ECG signals recorded inside and outside an MRI scanner. Reliable results for both databases were achieved for the ECG signals recorded inside (DBMRI: sensitivity Se = 99.94%, positive predictive value +P = 99.84% and outside (DBInCarT: Se = 99.29%, +P = 99.72% the MRI. Due to the accurate R-peak detection in real-time this can be used for monitoring and triggering in MRI exams.

  10. Multimodal in vivo MRI and NIRF imaging of bladder tumor using peptide conjugated glycol chitosan nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Jaehong; Dhawan, Deepika; Knapp, Deborah W.; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Choi, Kuiwon; Leary, James F.

    2012-03-01

    Exact detection and complete removal of cancer is a key point to minimize cancer recurrence. However, it is currently very difficult to detect small tumors inside human body and continuously monitor tumors using a non-invasive imaging modality. Presently, positron emission tomography (PET) can provide the most sensitive cancer images in the human body. However, PET imaging has very limited imaging time because they typically use isotopes with short halflives. PET imaging cannot also visualize anatomical information. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide highresolution images inside the body but it has a low sensitivity, so MRI contrast agents are necessary to enhance the contrast of tumor. Near infrared fluorescent (NIRF) imaging has a good sensitivity to visualize tumor using optical probes, but it has a very limited tissue penetration depth. Therefore, we developed multi-modality nanoparticles for MRI based diagnosis and NIRF imaging based surgery of cancer. We utilized glycol chitosan of 350 nm as a vehicle for MRI contrast agents and NIRF probes. The glycol chitosan nanoparticles were conjugated with NIRF dye, Cy5.5 and bladder cancer targeting peptides to increase the internalization of cancer. For MR contrast effects, iron oxide based 22 nm nanocubes were physically loaded into the glycol chitosan nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized and evaluated in bladder tumor bearing mice. Our study suggests the potential of our nanoparticles by both MRI and NIRF imaging for tumor diagnosis and real-time NIRF image-guided tumor surgery.

  11. Sonographic and MRI evaluation of the plantar plate: a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregg, Julie; Silberstein, Morry; Schneider, Timothy; Marks, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the accuracy of ultrasound in the examination of the plantar plate by comparing it with MRI, or if available, surgical findings. The lesser metatarsophalangeal joint plantar plates of 40 symptomatic and 40 asymptomatic feet (160 asymptomatic and 160 symptomatic plantar plates) were examined with ultrasound and MRI. Patients treated with surgery were chosen on a clinical basis and provided surgical correlation for the imaging techniques. Symptomatic patients with metatatarsalgia and suspected metatarsophalangeal joint instability were referred by an orthopedic foot specialist; asymptomatic feet were obtained either through examination of the contralateral foot of the symptomatic patients or volunteers. Ultrasound detected 75/160 and 139/160 plantar plates torn in the asymptomatic and symptomatic groups, respectively. MRI detected 56/160 and 142/160 tears in the symptomatic and asymptomatic groups, respectively. The sensitivity of MRI and ultrasound with surgical correlation was calculated to be 87 and 96%, respectively, with poor specificity. Ultrasound correlates moderately with MRI in the evaluation of the plantar plate. Surgical correlations, although limited (n=10), indicate ultrasound is superior to MRI with more accurate detection of tears. (orig.)

  12. 123I-iomazenil brain receptor SPECT in focal epilepsy. In comparison with 99mTc-HMPAO brain SPECT, MRI and Video/EEG monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hao; Wang Tongge; Huang Li; Michael Cordes

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical value of 123 I-Iomazenil brain receptor SPECT in diagnosis of focal epilepsy in comparison with 99m Tc-HMPAO brain SPECT, MRI and Video/EEG monitoring. Methods 123 I-Iomazenil brain receptor SPECT was performed on 40 patients with focal epilepsy. The results were compared with those obtained by 99m Tc-HMPAO brain SPECT, MRI and Video/EEG monitoring. Results: In 40 patients, the sensitivity of Video/EEG monitoring for localization of epileptogenic area was 95% (38/40). The sensitivity of 123 I-iomazenil brain receptor SPECT, 99m Tc-HMPAO brain SPECT and MRI for localization of epileptogenic area compared with Video/EEG monitoring ('gold standard') was 65.8%(25/38), 55.3%(21/38) and 47.4%(18/38), respectively. The localization of epileptogenic area with 123 I-Iomazenil brain receptor SPECT was in concordance with Video/EEG monitoring in 20 patients, 99m Tc-HMPAO brain SPECT in 15 patients and MRI in 16 patients, respectively. The sensitivity of 123 I-Iomazenil brain receptor SPECT combined with MRI for localization of epileptogenic area was 84.2%(32/38). Conclusions: 123 I-Iomazenil brain receptor SPECT is a useful method in detecting and localizing epileptogenic area. The combination of 123 I-Iomazenil brain receptor SPECT and MRI has a high sensitivity for detecting epileptogenic area

  13. Cumulant expansions for measuring water exchange using diffusion MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Lipeng; Nilsson, Markus; Lasič, Samo; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Rathi, Yogesh

    2018-02-01

    The rate of water exchange across cell membranes is a parameter of biological interest and can be measured by diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI). In this work, we investigate a stochastic model for the diffusion-and-exchange of water molecules. This model provides a general solution for the temporal evolution of dMRI signal using any type of gradient waveform, thereby generalizing the signal expressions for the Kärger model. Moreover, we also derive a general nth order cumulant expansion of the dMRI signal accounting for water exchange, which has not been explored in earlier studies. Based on this analytical expression, we compute the cumulant expansion for dMRI signals for the special case of single diffusion encoding (SDE) and double diffusion encoding (DDE) sequences. Our results provide a theoretical guideline on optimizing experimental parameters for SDE and DDE sequences, respectively. Moreover, we show that DDE signals are more sensitive to water exchange at short-time scale but provide less attenuation at long-time scale than SDE signals. Our theoretical analysis is also validated using Monte Carlo simulations on synthetic structures.

  14. The Value of High-Resolution MRI Technique in Patients with Rectal Carcinoma: Pre-Operative Assessment of Mesorectal Fascia Involvement, Circumferential Resection Margin and Local Staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algebally, Ahmed Mohamed; Mohey, Nesreen; Szmigielski, Wojciech; Yousef, Reda Ramadan Hussein; Kohla, Samah

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the accuracy of high-resolution MRI in the pre-operative assessment of mesorectal fascia involvement, circumfrential resection margin (CRM) and local staging in patients with rectal carcinoma. The study included 56 patients: 32 male and 24 female. All patients underwent high-resolution MRI and had confirmed histopathological diagnosis of rectal cancer located within 15 cm from the anal verge, followed by surgery. MRI findings were compared with pathological and surgical results. The overall accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of MRI-based T-staging were 92.8, 88.8%, 96.5%, 96%, and 90.3%, respectively. The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of MRI-based assessment of CRM were 94.6%, 84.6%, 97.6%, 91.4, and 94.6%, respectively. The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of MRI-based N-staging were 82.1%, 75%, 67.3%, 60%, and 86.1%, respectively. Preoperative high-resolution rectal MRI is accurate in predicting tumor stage and CRM involvement. MRI is a precise diagnostic tool to select patients who may benefit from neo-adjuvant therapy and to avoid overtreatment in those patients who can proceed directly to surgery

  15. Improved detection of localized prostate cancer using co-registered MRI and {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jambor, Ivan, E-mail: ivjamb@utu.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); 2nd Department of Radiology, Comenius University and St. Elisabeth Oncology Institute, Bratislava (Slovakia); Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Borra, Ronald, E-mail: ronald.borra@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Kemppainen, Jukka, E-mail: Jukka.Kemppainen@tyks.fi [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Lepomaeki, Virva, E-mail: Virva.Lepomaki@tyks.fi [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Parkkola, Riitta, E-mail: Riitta.Parkkola@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Dean, Kirsti, E-mail: Kirsti.Dean@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Alanen, Kalle, E-mail: Kalle.Alanen@tyks.fi [Department of Pathology, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Arponen, Eveliina, E-mail: Eveliina.Arponen@utu.fi [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Nurmi, Martti, E-mail: Martti.Nurmi@tyks.fi [Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Aronen, Hannu J., E-mail: Hannu.Aronen@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); and others

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: We aimed to study the ability of contrast enhanced MRI at 1.5 T and {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT, both individually and using fused data, to detect localized prostate cancer. Methods: Thirty-six men with untreated prostate cancer and negative for metastatic disease on pelvic CT and bone scan were prospectively enrolled. A pelvic {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT scan was performed in all patients, and a contrast enhanced MRI scan in 33 patients (6 examinations using both endorectal coil and surface coils, and 27 examinations using surface coils only). After the imaging studies 10 patients underwent prostatectomy and 26 were treated by image guided external beam radiation treatment. Image fusion of co-registered PET and MRI data was performed based on anatomical landmarks visible on CT and MRI using an advanced in-house developed software package. PET/CT, MRI and fused PET/MRI data were evaluated visually and compared with biopsy findings on a lobar level, while a sextant approach was used for patients undergoing prostatectomy. Results: When using biopsy samples as method of reference, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for visual detection of prostate cancer on a lobar level by contrast enhanced MRI was 85%, 37%, 73% and that of {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT 88%, 41%, 74%, respectively. Fusion of PET with MRI data increased sensitivity, specificity and accuracy to 90%, 72% and 85%, respectively. Conclusions: Fusion of sequentially obtained PET/CT and MRI data for the localization of prostate cancer is feasible and superior to the performance of each individual modality alone.

  16. Accuracy of enhanced and unenhanced MRI in diagnosing scaphoid proximal pole avascular necrosis and predicting surgical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, M.G. [University of Virginia, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Wang, D.T. [University of Virginia, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Chhabra, A.B. [University of Virginia Health System, Department of Orthopedics, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Determine the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of unenhanced and enhanced MRI in diagnosing scaphoid proximal pole (PP) avascular necrosis (AVN) and correlate whether MRI can help guide the selection of a vascularized or nonvascularized bone graft. The study was approved by the IRB. Two MSK radiologists independently performed a retrospective review of unenhanced and enhanced MRIs from 18 patients (16 males, 2 females; median age, 17.5 years) with scaphoid nonunions and surgery performed within 65 days of the MRI. AVN was diagnosed on the unenhanced MRI when a diffusely decreased T1-W signal was present in the PP and on the enhanced MRI when PP enhancement was less than distal pole enhancement. Surgical absence of PP bleeding was diagnostic of PP AVN. Postoperative osseous union (OU) was assessed with computed tomography and/or radiographs. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for PP AVN were 71, 82 and 78 % for unenhanced and 43, 82 and 67 % for enhanced MRI. Patients with PP AVN on unenhanced MRI had 86 % (6/7) OU; 100 % (5/5) OU with vascularized bone grafts and 50 % (1/2) OU with nonvascularized grafts. Patients with PP AVN on enhanced MRI had 80 % (4/5) OU; 100 % (3/3) OU with vascularized bone grafts and 50 % (1/2) OU with nonvascularized grafts. Patients with viable PP on unenhanced and enhanced MRI had 91 % (10/11) and 92 % (12/13) OU, respectively, all but one with nonvascularized graft. When PP AVN is evident on MRI, OU is best achieved with vascularized grafts. If PP AVN is absent, OU is successful with nonvascularized grafts. (orig.)

  17. Accuracy of enhanced and unenhanced MRI in diagnosing scaphoid proximal pole avascular necrosis and predicting surgical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, M.G.; Wang, D.T.; Chhabra, A.B.

    2015-01-01

    Determine the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of unenhanced and enhanced MRI in diagnosing scaphoid proximal pole (PP) avascular necrosis (AVN) and correlate whether MRI can help guide the selection of a vascularized or nonvascularized bone graft. The study was approved by the IRB. Two MSK radiologists independently performed a retrospective review of unenhanced and enhanced MRIs from 18 patients (16 males, 2 females; median age, 17.5 years) with scaphoid nonunions and surgery performed within 65 days of the MRI. AVN was diagnosed on the unenhanced MRI when a diffusely decreased T1-W signal was present in the PP and on the enhanced MRI when PP enhancement was less than distal pole enhancement. Surgical absence of PP bleeding was diagnostic of PP AVN. Postoperative osseous union (OU) was assessed with computed tomography and/or radiographs. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for PP AVN were 71, 82 and 78 % for unenhanced and 43, 82 and 67 % for enhanced MRI. Patients with PP AVN on unenhanced MRI had 86 % (6/7) OU; 100 % (5/5) OU with vascularized bone grafts and 50 % (1/2) OU with nonvascularized grafts. Patients with PP AVN on enhanced MRI had 80 % (4/5) OU; 100 % (3/3) OU with vascularized bone grafts and 50 % (1/2) OU with nonvascularized grafts. Patients with viable PP on unenhanced and enhanced MRI had 91 % (10/11) and 92 % (12/13) OU, respectively, all but one with nonvascularized graft. When PP AVN is evident on MRI, OU is best achieved with vascularized grafts. If PP AVN is absent, OU is successful with nonvascularized grafts. (orig.)

  18. Accuracy of enhanced and unenhanced MRI in diagnosing scaphoid proximal pole avascular necrosis and predicting surgical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, M G; Wang, D T; Chhabra, A B

    2015-11-01

    Determine the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of unenhanced and enhanced MRI in diagnosing scaphoid proximal pole (PP) avascular necrosis (AVN) and correlate whether MRI can help guide the selection of a vascularized or nonvascularized bone graft. The study was approved by the IRB. Two MSK radiologists independently performed a retrospective review of unenhanced and enhanced MRIs from 18 patients (16 males, 2 females; median age, 17.5 years) with scaphoid nonunions and surgery performed within 65 days of the MRI. AVN was diagnosed on the unenhanced MRI when a diffusely decreased T1-W signal was present in the PP and on the enhanced MRI when PP enhancement was less than distal pole enhancement. Surgical absence of PP bleeding was diagnostic of PP AVN. Postoperative osseous union (OU) was assessed with computed tomography and/or radiographs. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for PP AVN were 71, 82 and 78% for unenhanced and 43, 82 and 67% for enhanced MRI. Patients with PP AVN on unenhanced MRI had 86% (6/7) OU; 100% (5/5) OU with vascularized bone grafts and 50% (1/2) OU with nonvascularized grafts. Patients with PP AVN on enhanced MRI had 80% (4/5) OU; 100% (3/3) OU with vascularized bone grafts and 50% (1/2) OU with nonvascularized grafts. Patients with viable PP on unenhanced and enhanced MRI had 91% (10/11) and 92% (12/13) OU, respectively, all but one with nonvascularized graft. When PP AVN is evident on MRI, OU is best achieved with vascularized grafts. If PP AVN is absent, OU is successful with nonvascularized grafts.

  19. MRI of chemical reactions and processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Melanie M

    2017-08-01

    As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can spatially resolve a wealth of molecular information available from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), it is able to non-invasively visualise the composition, properties and reactions of a broad range of spatially-heterogeneous molecular systems. Hence, MRI is increasingly finding applications in the study of chemical reactions and processes in a diverse range of environments and technologies. This article will explain the basic principles of MRI and how it can be used to visualise chemical composition and molecular properties, providing an overview of the variety of information available. Examples are drawn from the disciplines of chemistry, chemical engineering, environmental science, physics, electrochemistry and materials science. The review introduces a range of techniques used to produce image contrast, along with the chemical and molecular insight accessible through them. Methods for mapping the distribution of chemical species, using chemical shift imaging or spatially-resolved spectroscopy, are reviewed, as well as methods for visualising physical state, temperature, current density, flow velocities and molecular diffusion. Strategies for imaging materials with low signal intensity, such as those containing gases or low sensitivity nuclei, using compressed sensing, para-hydrogen or polarisation transfer, are discussed. Systems are presented which encapsulate the diversity of chemical and physical parameters observable by MRI, including one- and two-phase flow in porous media, chemical pattern formation, phase transformations and hydrodynamic (fingering) instabilities. Lastly, the emerging area of electrochemical MRI is discussed, with studies presented on the visualisation of electrochemical deposition and dissolution processes during corrosion and the operation of batteries, supercapacitors and fuel cells. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Radiation sensitive devices and systems for detection of radioactive materials and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotter, Dale K

    2014-12-02

    Radiation sensitive devices include a substrate comprising a radiation sensitive material and a plurality of resonance elements coupled to the substrate. Each resonance element is configured to resonate responsive to non-ionizing incident radiation. Systems for detecting radiation from a special nuclear material include a radiation sensitive device and a sensor located remotely from the radiation sensitive device and configured to measure an output signal from the radiation sensitive device. In such systems, the radiation sensitive device includes a radiation sensitive material and a plurality of resonance elements positioned on the radiation sensitive material. Methods for detecting a presence of a special nuclear material include positioning a radiation sensitive device in a location where special nuclear materials are to be detected and remotely interrogating the radiation sensitive device with a sensor.

  1. 11C-MET PET/MRI for detection of recurrent glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuschl, C; Kirchner, J; Poeppel, T D; Schaarschmidt, B; Kebir, S; El Hindy, N; Hense, J; Quick, H H; Glas, M; Herrmann, K; Umutlu, L; Moenninghoff, C; Radbruch, A; Forsting, M; Schlamann, M

    2018-04-01

    Radiological assessment of brain tumors is widely based on the Radiology Assessment of Neuro-Oncology (RANO) criteria that consider non-specific T1 and T2 weighted images. Limitation of the RANO criteria is that they do not include metabolic imaging techniques that have been reported to be helpful to differentiate treatment related changes from true tumor progression. In the current study, we assessed if the combined use of MRI and PET with hybrid 11 C-MET PET/MRI can improve diagnostic accuracy and diagnostic confidence of the readers to differentiate treatment related changes from true progression in recurrent glioma. Fifty consecutive patients with histopathologically proven glioma were prospectively enrolled for a hybrid 11 C-MET PET/MRI to differentiate recurrent glioma from treatment induced changes. Sole MRI data were analyzed based on RANO. Sole PET data and in a third evaluation hybrid 11 C-MET-PET/MRI data were assessed for metabolic respectively metabolic and morphologic glioma recurrence. Diagnostic performance and diagnostic confidence of the reader were calculated for the different modalities, and the McNemar test and Mann-Whitney U Test were applied for statistical analysis. Hybrid 11 C-MET PET/MRI was successfully performed in all 50 patients. Glioma recurrence was diagnosed in 35 of the 50 patients (70%). Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for MRI (86.11% and 71.43%), for 11 C-MET PET (96.77% and 73.68%), and for hybrid 11 C-MET-PET/MRI (97.14% and 93.33%). For diagnostic accuracy hybrid 11 C-MET-PET/MRI (96%) showed significantly higher values than MRI alone (82%), whereas no significant difference was found for 11C-MET PET (88%). Furthermore, by rating on a five-point Likert scale significantly higher scores were found for diagnostic confidence when comparing 11 C-MET PET/MRI (4.26 ± 0,777) to either PET alone (3.44 ± 0.705) or MRI alone (3.56 ± 0.733). This feasibility study showed that hybrid PET/MRI might strengthen

  2. Patellofemoral instability: Quantitative evaluation of predisposing factors by MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noha Mohamed Osman, M.D.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the contribution of MRI in evaluating patellofemoral instability (PFI and to compare the underlying predisposing factors between the study and control groups. Materials and methods: We enrolled knee MRI scans of 38 patients with lateral patellar dislocation (LPD and 38 control subjects. All MRI scans were examined for LPD and patellofemoral joint (PFJ morphological abnormalities. The lateral trochlear inclination angle, sulcus angle and trochlear depth were the MR measures for trochlear dysplasia (TD, patellar height ratio was used for evaluation of patella alta, the patellar tilt angle, and the tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove (TT-TG distance were also measured. Results: MRI confirmed PFI in 84.2% of study group and detected abnormal PFJ morphological factors in all cases. The prevalences and mean values of all MR parameters showed significant differences (p < 0.001 between the study and control groups. MR parameters for TD had the highest sensitivity of 57.9%, while the TT-TG distance was the most specific 97.4% for PFI. The prevalence of combined PFJ abnormal morphological factors was 36.8% in the study group. Conclusion: MRI was useful in quantitative measuring of the predisposing factors contributing to PFI resulting in significant difference in all MR parameters between the study and control groups.

  3. Diagnostic accuracy of three different MRI protocols in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesuratnam-Nielsen, Kayalvily; Løgager, Vibeke Berg; Munkholm, Pia; Thomsen, Henrik S

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used for workup and control of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, disagreement remains as to how the MRI should be performed. To compare prospectively the diagnostic accuracy of MRI with neither oral nor intravenous contrast medium (plain MRI), magnetic resonance follow-through (MRFT) and MR enteroclysis (MRE) using MRE as the reference standard in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Plain MRI and MRE were carried out in addition to MRFT. All patients underwent both plain MR and MRFT on the same day and MRE within seven days. For the evaluation, the bowel was divided into nine segments. One radiologist, blinded to clinical findings, evaluated bowel wall thickness, diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), mural hyperenhancement, and other inflammatory changes in each bowel segment. Twenty patients (6 men, 14 women; median age, 43.5 years; age range, 26–76 years) underwent all three examinations; 10 with Crohn’s disease (CD), three with ulcerative colitis (UC), and seven with IBD unclassified (IBD-U). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were in the range of 0–75%, 81–96%, and 75–95% for wall thickening, and 0–37%, 59–89%, and 50–86% for DWI in plain MRI, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were in the range of 0–50%, 96–100%, and 90–100% for wall thickening, 0–50%, 84–97%, and 82–95% for DWI, and 0–71%, 94–100%, and 85–100% for mural hyperenhancement in MRFT, respectively. The use of oral and intravenous contrast agent improves detection of bowel lesions resulting in MRFT remaining the superior choice over plain MRI for diagnostic workup in patients with IBD

  4. Upper abdominal gadoxetic acid-enhanced and diffusion-weighted MRI for the detection of gastric cancer: Comparison with two-dimensional multidetector row CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, K.M.; Kim, S.H.; Lee, S.J.; Lee, M.W.; Choi, D.; Kim, K.M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the detection of gastric cancer in comparison with that of two-dimensional (2D) multidetector row computed tomography (CT). Materials and methods: The study included 189 patients with 170 surgically confirmed gastric cancers and 19 patients without gastric cancer, all of whom underwent gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI with diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging, and multidetector contrast-enhanced abdominal CT imaging. Two observers independently analysed three sets of images (CT set, conventional MRI set, and combined conventional and DW MRI set). A five-point scale for likelihood of gastric cancer was used. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were evaluated. Quantitative [apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) analyses with Mann–Whitney U-test were conducted for gastric cancers and the nearby normal gastric wall. Results: The diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity for detection of gastric cancer were significantly higher on combined conventional and DW MRI set (77.8–78.3%; 75.3–75.9%) than the CT imaging set (67.7–71.4%; 64.1–68.2%) or the conventional MRI set (72–73%; 68.8–70%; p < 0.01). In particular, for gastric cancers with pT2 and pT3, the combined conventional and DW MRI set (91.6–92.6%) yielded significantly higher sensitivity for detection of gastric cancer than did the CT imaging set (76.8–81.1%) by both observers (p < 0.01). The mean ADC of gastric cancer lesions (1 ± 0.23 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s) differed significantly from that of normal gastric wall (1.77 ± 0.25 × 10 −3  mm 2 /s; p < 0.01). Conclusion: Abdominal MRI with DW imaging was more sensitive for the detection of gastric cancer than 2D-multidetector row CT or conventional MRI alone. - Highlights: • The sensitivity for detection of gastric cancer is high on abdominal MR imaging. • DW imaging is helpful for

  5. Forearm interosseous membrane trauma: MRI diagnostic criteria and injury patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinley, Joseph C. [Stanford University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Roach, Neil [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hopgood, Brendon C. [Albert Einstein Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Limmer, Karl [Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kozin, Scott H. [Shriners Hospital for Children, Temple University and Pediatric Hand and Upper Extremity Surgeon, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2006-05-15

    Define criteria for interosseous membrane (IOM) injury diagnosis using MRI, and characterize patterns of IOM disruption following forearm trauma. Our hypothesis is that most IOM injuries occur along the ulnar insertion, and MRI should be obtained following forearm trauma to assess IOM competency. Sixteen cadaver forearms were subjected to longitudinal impact trauma. Prior to and following injury, MR images were examined by a board-certified musculoskeletal radiologist using pre-defined criteria for determining IOM integrity. Each specimen was dissected and the viability/pattern of injury examined. The MRI and dissection results were compared using a double-blinded methodology. Eight of the 16 specimens demonstrated IOM trauma. Seven specimens demonstrated complete IOM disruption from the ulnar insertion, and one revealed a mid-substance tear with intact origin and insertion. The dorsal oblique bundle was disrupted in four specimens. MRI analysis identified IOM injury in seven of the eight forearms. The injury location was correctly identified in six specimens when compared to dissection observations. MRI determination of IOM injury demonstrated a positive predictive value of 100%, a negative predictive value of 89%, a sensitivity of 87.5% and a specificity of 100%. (orig.)

  6. Forearm interosseous membrane trauma: MRI diagnostic criteria and injury patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinley, Joseph C.; Roach, Neil; Hopgood, Brendon C.; Limmer, Karl; Kozin, Scott H.

    2006-01-01

    Define criteria for interosseous membrane (IOM) injury diagnosis using MRI, and characterize patterns of IOM disruption following forearm trauma. Our hypothesis is that most IOM injuries occur along the ulnar insertion, and MRI should be obtained following forearm trauma to assess IOM competency. Sixteen cadaver forearms were subjected to longitudinal impact trauma. Prior to and following injury, MR images were examined by a board-certified musculoskeletal radiologist using pre-defined criteria for determining IOM integrity. Each specimen was dissected and the viability/pattern of injury examined. The MRI and dissection results were compared using a double-blinded methodology. Eight of the 16 specimens demonstrated IOM trauma. Seven specimens demonstrated complete IOM disruption from the ulnar insertion, and one revealed a mid-substance tear with intact origin and insertion. The dorsal oblique bundle was disrupted in four specimens. MRI analysis identified IOM injury in seven of the eight forearms. The injury location was correctly identified in six specimens when compared to dissection observations. MRI determination of IOM injury demonstrated a positive predictive value of 100%, a negative predictive value of 89%, a sensitivity of 87.5% and a specificity of 100%. (orig.)

  7. Human brain functional MRI and DTI visualization with virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Moreland, John; Zhang, Jingyu

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and functional MRI (fMRI) are two active research areas in neuroimaging. DTI is sensitive to the anisotropic diffusion of water exerted by its macromolecular environment and has been shown useful in characterizing structures of ordered tissues such as the brain white matter, myocardium, and cartilage. The diffusion tensor provides two new types of information of water diffusion: the magnitude and the spatial orientation of water diffusivity inside the tissue. This information has been used for white matter fiber tracking to review physical neuronal pathways inside the brain. Functional MRI measures brain activations using the hemodynamic response. The statistically derived activation map corresponds to human brain functional activities caused by neuronal activities. The combination of these two methods provides a new way to understand human brain from the anatomical neuronal fiber connectivity to functional activities between different brain regions. In this study, virtual reality (VR) based MR DTI and fMRI visualization with high resolution anatomical image segmentation and registration, ROI definition and neuronal white matter fiber tractography visualization and fMRI activation map integration is proposed. Rationale and methods for producing and distributing stereoscopic videos are also discussed.

  8. A highly sensitive x-ray imaging modality for hepatocellular carcinoma detection in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Danielle; Walsh, Edward G.; Derdak, Zoltan; Wands, Jack R.; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Innovations that improve sensitivity and reduce cost are of paramount importance in diagnostic imaging. The novel x-ray imaging modality called spatial frequency heterodyne imaging (SFHI) is based on a linear arrangement of x-ray source, tissue, and x-ray detector, much like that of a conventional x-ray imaging apparatus. However, SFHI rests on a complete paradigm reversal compared to conventional x-ray absorption-based radiology: while scattered x-rays are carefully rejected in absorption-based x-ray radiology to enhance the image contrast, SFHI forms images exclusively from x-rays scattered by the tissue. In this study we use numerical processing to produce x-ray scatter images of hepatocellular carcinoma labeled with a nanoparticle contrast agent. We subsequently compare the sensitivity of SFHI in this application to that of both conventional x-ray imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although SFHI is still in the early stages of its development, our results show that the sensitivity of SFHI is an order of magnitude greater than that of absorption-based x-ray imaging and approximately equal to that of MRI. As x-ray imaging modalities typically have lower installation and service costs compared to MRI, SFHI could become a cost effective alternative to MRI, particularly in areas of the world with inadequate availability of MRI facilities.

  9. Ex vivo quantitative multiparametric MRI mapping of human meniscus degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nebelung, Sven; Kuhl, Christiane; Truhn, Daniel; Tingart, Markus; Jahr, Holger; Pufe, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of T1, T1ρ, T2, T2*, and UTE-T2* (ultrashort-echo time-enhanced T2*) mapping in the refined graduation of human meniscus degeneration with histology serving as standard-of-reference. This IRB-approved intra-individual comparative ex vivo study was performed on 24 lateral meniscus body samples obtained from 24 patients undergoing total knee replacement. Samples were assessed on a 3.0-T MRI scanner using inversion-recovery (T1), spin-lock multi-gradient-echo (T1ρ), multi-spin-echo (T2) and multi-gradient-echo (T2* and UTE-T2*) sequences to determine relaxation times of quantitative MRI (qMRI) parameters. Relaxation times were calculated on the respective maps, averaged to the entire meniscus and to its zones. Histologically, samples were analyzed on a four-point score according to Williams (0-III). QMRI results and Williams (sub)scores were correlated using Spearman's ρ, while Williams grade-dependent differences were assessed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests. Sensitivities and specificities in the detection of intact (Williams grade [WG]-0) and severely degenerate meniscus (WG-II-III) were calculated. Except for T2*, significant increases in qMRI parameters with increasing Williams grades were observed. T1, T1ρ, T2, and UTE-T2* exhibited high sensitivity and variable specificity rates. Significant marked-to-strong correlations were observed for these parameters with each other, with histological WGs and the subscores tissue integrity and cellularity. QMRI mapping holds promise in the objective evaluation of human meniscus. Although sufficient discriminatory power of T1, T1ρ, T2, and UTE-T2* was only demonstrated for the histological extremes, these data may aid in the future MRI-based parameterization and quantification of human meniscus degeneration. (orig.)

  10. Ex vivo quantitative multiparametric MRI mapping of human meniscus degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebelung, Sven; Tingart, Markus; Pufe, Thomas; Kuhl, Christiane; Jahr, Holger; Truhn, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of T1, T1ρ, T2, T2*, and UTE-T2* (ultrashort-echo time-enhanced T2*) mapping in the refined graduation of human meniscus degeneration with histology serving as standard-of-reference. This IRB-approved intra-individual comparative ex vivo study was performed on 24 lateral meniscus body samples obtained from 24 patients undergoing total knee replacement. Samples were assessed on a 3.0-T MRI scanner using inversion-recovery (T1), spin-lock multi-gradient-echo (T1ρ), multi-spin-echo (T2) and multi-gradient-echo (T2* and UTE-T2*) sequences to determine relaxation times of quantitative MRI (qMRI) parameters. Relaxation times were calculated on the respective maps, averaged to the entire meniscus and to its zones. Histologically, samples were analyzed on a four-point score according to Williams (0-III). QMRI results and Williams (sub)scores were correlated using Spearman's ρ, while Williams grade-dependent differences were assessed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests. Sensitivities and specificities in the detection of intact (Williams grade [WG]-0) and severely degenerate meniscus (WG-II-III) were calculated. Except for T2*, significant increases in qMRI parameters with increasing Williams grades were observed. T1, T1ρ, T2, and UTE-T2* exhibited high sensitivity and variable specificity rates. Significant marked-to-strong correlations were observed for these parameters with each other, with histological WGs and the subscores tissue integrity and cellularity. QMRI mapping holds promise in the objective evaluation of human meniscus. Although sufficient discriminatory power of T1, T1ρ, T2, and UTE-T2* was only demonstrated for the histological extremes, these data may aid in the future MRI-based parameterization and quantification of human meniscus degeneration.

  11. Ex vivo quantitative multiparametric MRI mapping of human meniscus degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebelung, Sven; Kuhl, Christiane; Truhn, Daniel [Aachen University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Aachen (Germany); Tingart, Markus; Jahr, Holger [Aachen University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, Aachen (Germany); Pufe, Thomas [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Aachen (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of T1, T1ρ, T2, T2*, and UTE-T2* (ultrashort-echo time-enhanced T2*) mapping in the refined graduation of human meniscus degeneration with histology serving as standard-of-reference. This IRB-approved intra-individual comparative ex vivo study was performed on 24 lateral meniscus body samples obtained from 24 patients undergoing total knee replacement. Samples were assessed on a 3.0-T MRI scanner using inversion-recovery (T1), spin-lock multi-gradient-echo (T1ρ), multi-spin-echo (T2) and multi-gradient-echo (T2* and UTE-T2*) sequences to determine relaxation times of quantitative MRI (qMRI) parameters. Relaxation times were calculated on the respective maps, averaged to the entire meniscus and to its zones. Histologically, samples were analyzed on a four-point score according to Williams (0-III). QMRI results and Williams (sub)scores were correlated using Spearman's ρ, while Williams grade-dependent differences were assessed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests. Sensitivities and specificities in the detection of intact (Williams grade [WG]-0) and severely degenerate meniscus (WG-II-III) were calculated. Except for T2*, significant increases in qMRI parameters with increasing Williams grades were observed. T1, T1ρ, T2, and UTE-T2* exhibited high sensitivity and variable specificity rates. Significant marked-to-strong correlations were observed for these parameters with each other, with histological WGs and the subscores tissue integrity and cellularity. QMRI mapping holds promise in the objective evaluation of human meniscus. Although sufficient discriminatory power of T1, T1ρ, T2, and UTE-T2* was only demonstrated for the histological extremes, these data may aid in the future MRI-based parameterization and quantification of human meniscus degeneration. (orig.)

  12. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after lumbar spinal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cevik, Belma; Kirbas, Ismail; Cakir, Banu; Akin, Kayihan; Teksam, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    Background: Postoperative remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) as a complication of lumbar spinal surgery is an increasingly recognized clinical entity. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery and to describe diagnostic imaging findings of RCH. Methods: Between October 1996 and March 2007, 2444 patients who had undergone lumbar spinal surgery were included in the study. Thirty-seven of 2444 patients were scanned by CT or MRI due to neurologic symptoms within the first 7 days of postoperative period. The data of all the patients were studied with regard to the following variables: incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery, gender and age, coagulation parameters, history of previous arterial hypertension, and position of lumbar spinal surgery. Results: The retrospective study led to the identification of two patients who had RCH after lumbar spinal surgery. Of 37 patients who had neurologic symptoms, 29 patients were women and 8 patients were men. CT and MRI showed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the folia of bilateral cerebellar hemispheres in both patients with RCH. The incidence of RCH was 0.08% among patients who underwent lumbar spinal surgery. Conclusion: RCH is a rare complication of lumbar spinal surgery, self-limiting phenomenon that should not be mistaken for more ominous pathologic findings such as hemorrhagic infarction. This type of bleeding is thought to occur secondary to venous infarction, but the exact pathogenetic mechanism is unknown. CT or MRI allowed immediate diagnosis of this complication and guided conservative management.

  13. Evaluation of bone viability in patients after girdlestone arthroplasty: comparison of bone SPECT/CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diederichs, G.; Collettini, F.; Hamm, B.; Makowski, M.R. [Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Hoppe, P.; Brenner, W. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Wassilew, G. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Berlin (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    To test the diagnostic performance of bone SPECT/CT and MRI for the evaluation of bone viability in patients after girdlestone-arthroplasty with histopathology used as gold standard. In this cross-sectional study, patients after girdlestone-arthroplasty were imaged with single-photon-emission-computed-tomography/computed-tomography (SPECT/CT) bone-scans using 99mTc-DPD. Additionally, 1.5 T MRI was performed with turbo-inversion-recovery-magnitude (TIRM), contrast-enhanced T1-fat sat (FS) and T1-mapping. All imaging was performed within 24 h prior to revision total-hip-arthroplasty in patients with a girdlestone-arthroplasty. In each patient, four standardized bone-tissue-biopsies (14 patients) were taken intraoperatively at the remaining acetabulum superior/inferior and trochanter major/minor. Histopathological evaluation of bone samples regarding bone viability was used as gold standard. A total of 56 bone-segments were analysed and classified as vital (n = 39) or nonvital (n = 17) by histopathology. Mineral/late-phase SPECT/CT showed a high sensitivity (90%) and specificity (94%) to distinguish viable and nonviable bone tissue. TIRM (sensitivity 87%, specificity 88%) and contrast-enhanced T1-FS (sensitivity 90%, specificity 88%) also achieved a high sensitivity and specificity. T1-mapping achieved the lowest values (sensitivity 82%, specificity 82%). False positive results in SPECT/CT and MRI resulted from small bone fragments close to metal artefacts. Both bone SPECT/CT and MRI allow a reliable differentiation between viable and nonviable bone tissue in patients after girdlestone arthroplasty. The findings of this study could also be relevant for the evaluation of bone viability in the context of avascular bone necrosis. (orig.)

  14. Evaluation of bone viability in patients after girdlestone arthroplasty: comparison of bone SPECT/CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diederichs, G.; Collettini, F.; Hamm, B.; Makowski, M.R.; Hoppe, P.; Brenner, W.; Wassilew, G.

    2017-01-01

    To test the diagnostic performance of bone SPECT/CT and MRI for the evaluation of bone viability in patients after girdlestone-arthroplasty with histopathology used as gold standard. In this cross-sectional study, patients after girdlestone-arthroplasty were imaged with single-photon-emission-computed-tomography/computed-tomography (SPECT/CT) bone-scans using 99mTc-DPD. Additionally, 1.5 T MRI was performed with turbo-inversion-recovery-magnitude (TIRM), contrast-enhanced T1-fat sat (FS) and T1-mapping. All imaging was performed within 24 h prior to revision total-hip-arthroplasty in patients with a girdlestone-arthroplasty. In each patient, four standardized bone-tissue-biopsies (14 patients) were taken intraoperatively at the remaining acetabulum superior/inferior and trochanter major/minor. Histopathological evaluation of bone samples regarding bone viability was used as gold standard. A total of 56 bone-segments were analysed and classified as vital (n = 39) or nonvital (n = 17) by histopathology. Mineral/late-phase SPECT/CT showed a high sensitivity (90%) and specificity (94%) to distinguish viable and nonviable bone tissue. TIRM (sensitivity 87%, specificity 88%) and contrast-enhanced T1-FS (sensitivity 90%, specificity 88%) also achieved a high sensitivity and specificity. T1-mapping achieved the lowest values (sensitivity 82%, specificity 82%). False positive results in SPECT/CT and MRI resulted from small bone fragments close to metal artefacts. Both bone SPECT/CT and MRI allow a reliable differentiation between viable and nonviable bone tissue in patients after girdlestone arthroplasty. The findings of this study could also be relevant for the evaluation of bone viability in the context of avascular bone necrosis. (orig.)

  15. Three Tesla MRI for the diagnosis of meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament pathology: a comparison to arthroscopic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampson, M.J.; Jackson, M.P.; Moran, C.J.; Moran, R.; Eustace, S.J.; Shine, S.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To assess the accuracy of 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Materials and methods: Sixty-one consecutive patients were identified who were referred for evaluation of suspected intra-articular pathology with a 3 T MRI and who, subsequently, underwent an arthroscopic procedure of the knee were included for the study. Two musculoskeletal radiologists interpreted the images. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were then calculated for the MRI versus the arthroscopic findings as a reference standard. Results: The sensitivity and specificity for the overall detection of meniscal tears in this study was 84 and 93%, respectively. The results for the medial meniscus separately were 91 and 93% and for the lateral 77 and 93%. The evaluation of ACL integrity was 100% sensitive and specific. The meniscal tear type was correctly identified in 75% of cases and its location in 94%. Conclusion: This study demonstrates good results of 3 T MRI in the evaluation of the injured knee. Caution should still be given to the interpretation on MRI of a lateral meniscus tear, and it is suggested that the standard diagnostic criteria of high signal reaching the articular surface on two consecutive image sections be adhered to even at these higher field strengths

  16. Added Value of Breast MRI for Preoperative Diagnosis of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ: Diagnostic Performance on 362 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, Antonella; Fusco, Roberta; Petrillo, Mario; Triunfo, Flavia; Filice, Salvatore; Vallone, Paolo; Setola, Sergio Venanzio; Rubulotta, Mariarosaria; Di Bonito, Maurizio; Rinaldo, Massimo; D'Aiuto, Massimiliano; Brunetti, Arturo

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the added value of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in preoperative diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). We reviewed our institution database of 3499 consecutive patients treated for breast cancer. A total of 362 patients with histologically proven DCIS were selected from the institutional database. Of these, 245 (67.7%) preoperatively underwent conventional imaging (CI) (mammography/ultrasonography) (CI group), and 117 (32.3%) underwent CI and dynamic MRI (CI + MRI group). The pathology of surgical specimens served as a reference standard. The Mann-Whitney U, χ 2 test, and Spearman correlation coefficient were performed. The CI + MRI group showed a sensitivity of 98.5% with an increase of 10.1% compared with the CI group to detect pure DCIS. Dynamic MRI identified 19.7% (n = 13) additional pure DCIS compared with CI. In the CI + MRI group, a single (1.5%) false negative was reported, whereas in the CI group, 11 (11.6%) false negatives were reported. Moreover, the CI + MRI group showed a sensitivity of 98.0% to detect DCIS + small invasive component. In this group, dynamic MRI identified 21.6% (n = 11) additional DCIS and a single (2.0%) false negative compared with the CI group, whereas in the CI group, 7 (4.7%) false negatives were reported. MRI and histopathologically measured lesion sizes, Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System MRI assessment categories, and enhancement signal intensity curve types showed a significant correlation. The MRI detection rate of DCIS increased significantly with increasing nuclear grade. Preoperative breast MRI showed a better accuracy then CI in preoperative diagnosis for both pure DCIS and DCIS + small invasive component with a precise assessment of lesion size. This can provide a more appropriate management of DCIS patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Textural kinetics: a novel dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI feature for breast lesion classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agner, Shannon C; Soman, Salil; Libfeld, Edward; McDonald, Margie; Thomas, Kathleen; Englander, Sarah; Rosen, Mark A; Chin, Deanna; Nosher, John; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-06-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast has emerged as an adjunct imaging tool to conventional X-ray mammography due to its high detection sensitivity. Despite the increasing use of breast DCE-MRI, specificity in distinguishing malignant from benign breast lesions is low, and interobserver variability in lesion classification is high. The novel contribution of this paper is in the definition of a new DCE-MRI descriptor that we call textural kinetics, which attempts to capture spatiotemporal changes in breast lesion texture in order to distinguish malignant from benign lesions. We qualitatively and quantitatively demonstrated on 41 breast DCE-MRI studies that textural kinetic features outperform signal intensity kinetics and lesion morphology features in distinguishing benign from malignant lesions. A probabilistic boosting tree (PBT) classifier in conjunction with textural kinetic descriptors yielded an accuracy of 90%, sensitivity of 95%, specificity of 82%, and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.92. Graph embedding, used for qualitative visualization of a low-dimensional representation of the data, showed the best separation between benign and malignant lesions when using textural kinetic features. The PBT classifier results and trends were also corroborated via a support vector machine classifier which showed that textural kinetic features outperformed the morphological, static texture, and signal intensity kinetics descriptors. When textural kinetic attributes were combined with morphologic descriptors, the resulting PBT classifier yielded 89% accuracy, 99% sensitivity, 76% specificity, and an AUC of 0.91.

  18. Tolosa-Hunt syndrome: MRI appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, R.; Sawhney, S.; Koul, R. L.; Chand, P.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: A review of MRI findings in seven patients with Tolosa-Hunt syndrome was carried out. Seven patients presented with unilateral painful ophthalmoplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging studies were carried out to evaluate the cavernous sinuses and orbits. Coronal fast spin-echo T 2 -weighted images and fat-saturated T 1 -weighted coronal and transverse images with and without contrast enhancement were obtained for the cavernous sinuses and orbits. All patients showed focal-enhancing masses expanding the ipsilateral cavernous sinus. In one patient the mass was extending to the orbital apex and intraorbital. All patients recovered on corticosteroid therapy and resolution of the masses was documented on follow-up MRI studies in five patients. One patient had a relapse of symptoms after discontinuing therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging studies of the cavernous sinus and orbital apex show high sensitivity for the detection and follow up of inflammatory mass lesions in Tolosa-Hunt syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging should be the initial screening study in these patients.

  19. A Technique for Generating Volumetric Cine MRI (VC-MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Wendy; Ren, Lei; Cai, Jing; Zhang, You; Chang, Zheng; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a technique to generate on-board volumetric-cine MRI (VC-MRI) using patient prior images, motion modeling and on-board 2D-cine MRI. Methods One phase of a 4D-MRI acquired during patient simulation is used as patient prior images. 3 major respiratory deformation patterns of the patient are extracted from 4D-MRI based on principal-component-analysis. The on-board VC-MRI at any instant is considered as a deformation of the prior MRI. The deformation field is represented as a linear combination of the 3 major deformation patterns. The coefficients of the deformation patterns are solved by the data fidelity constraint using the acquired on-board single 2D-cine MRI. The method was evaluated using both XCAT simulation of lung cancer patients and MRI data from four real liver cancer patients. The accuracy of the estimated VC-MRI was quantitatively evaluated using Volume-Percent-Difference(VPD), Center-of-Mass-Shift(COMS), and target tracking errors. Effects of acquisition orientation, region-of-interest(ROI) selection, patient breathing pattern change and noise on the estimation accuracy were also evaluated. Results Image subtraction of ground-truth with estimated on-board VC-MRI shows fewer differences than image subtraction of ground-truth with prior image. Agreement between profiles in the estimated and ground-truth VC-MRI was achieved with less than 6% error for both XCAT and patient data. Among all XCAT scenarios, the VPD between ground-truth and estimated lesion volumes was on average 8.43±1.52% and the COMS was on average 0.93±0.58mm across all time-steps for estimation based on the ROI region in the sagittal cine images. Matching to ROI in the sagittal view achieved better accuracy when there was substantial breathing pattern change. The technique was robust against noise levels up to SNR=20. For patient data, average tracking errors were less than 2 mm in all directions for all patients. Conclusions Preliminary studies demonstrated the

  20. 3T MRI evaluation of large nerve perineural spread of head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baulch, Justin; Gandhi, Mitesh; Sommerville, Jennifer; Panizza, Ben

    2015-10-01

    Accurate definition of the presence and extent of large nerve perineural spread (PNS) is a vital component in planning appropriate surgery and radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. Our research aimed to define the sensitivity and specificity of 3T MRI in detecting the presence and extent of large nerve PNS, compared with histologic evaluation. Retrospective review of surgically proven cases of large nerve PNS in patients with preoperative 3T MRI performed as high resolution neurogram. 3T MRI had a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 84%, detecting PNS in 36 of 38 nerves and correctly identifying uninvolved nerves in 16 of 19 cases. It correctly identified the zonal extent of spread in 32 of 36 cases (89%), underestimating the extent in three cases and overestimating the extent in one case. Targeted 3T MRI is highly accurate in defining the presence and extent of large nerve PNS in head and neck cancers. However, there is still a tendency to undercall the zonal extent due to microscopic, radiologically occult involvement. Superficial large nerve involvement also remains a difficult area of detection for radiologists and should be included as a 'check area' for review. Further research is required to define the role radiation-induced neuritis plays in the presence of false-positive PNS on MRI. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  1. 3T MRI evaluation of large nerve perineural spread of head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baulch, Justin; Gandhi, Mitesh; Sommerville, Jennifer; Panizza, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Accurate definition of the presence and extent of large nerve perineural spread (PNS) is a vital component in planning appropriate surgery and radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. Our research aimed to define the sensitivity and specificity of 3T MRI in detecting the presence and extent of large nerve PNS, compared with histologic evaluation. Retrospective review of surgically proven cases of large nerve PNS in patients with preoperative 3T MRI performed as high resolution neurogram. 3T MRI had a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 84%, detecting PNS in 36 of 38 nerves and correctly identifying uninvolved nerves in 16 of 19 cases. It correctly identified the zonal extent of spread in 32 of 36 cases (89%), underestimating the extent in three cases and overestimating the extent in one case. Targeted 3T MRI is highly accurate in defining the presence and extent of large nerve PNS in head and neck cancers. However, there is still a tendency to undercall the zonal extent due to microscopic, radiologically occult involvement. Superficial large nerve involvement also remains a difficult area of detection for radiologists and should be included as a ‘check area’ for review. Further research is required to define the role radiation-induced neuritis plays in the presence of false-positive PNS on MRI.

  2. Implementation of a ferromagnetic detection system in a clinical MRI setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orchard, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the implementation of a ferromagnetic detection system (FMDS) into a clinical MRI setting. Materials and methods: One thousand patients were considered for MRI safety screening using an FMDS. Equipment used was a Ferroguard ® Screener (Metrasens Ltd, Malvern, Worcestershire, UK). Fully gowned patients rotated 360° in front of the FMDS in a standardized manner following traditional MRI screening methods (the use of a written questionnaire (Fig. B.1) and verbal interview. Results: Final results included 1032 individual screening events performed in 977 patients. There were 922 (94%) initial passes using the FMDS; 34 (4%) failed initial screens but passed a subsequent screen; 21 (2%) failed the initial and subsequent screens. Thus, including all screening events (n = 1032), there were 956 (93%) true negatives (TN); 21 (2%) false positives (FP) and 55 (5%) true positives (TP). No false negatives (FN) were recorded. Therefore, sensitivity was 100% and specificity was 98%. Conclusion: Implementation and correct usage of an FMDS proved to increase safety within a clinical MRI environment by alerting staff to ferromagnetic items or implants not identified using traditional MRI screening methods. An FMDS should be used as an adjunct to these methods. The information in this study pertains to the specific equipment used in this investigation. - Highlights: • Ferromagnetic detection system sensitivity in this study was 100%. • Ferromagnetic detection system specificity in this study was 98%. • The additional screening procedure had little impact on throughput ie additional time taken was minimal. • Staff training, technique and compliance is important in implementing the screening procedures. • The ferromagnetic detection system identified objects that may have demonstrated projectile, heating or artefact effects

  3. MRI Primer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldendorf, W.; Oldendorf, W. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Designed for studies, radiologists, and clinicians at all levels of training, this book provides a basic introduction to the principles, physics, and instrumentation of magnetic resonance imaging. The fundamental concepts that are essential for the optimal clinical use of MRI are thoroughly explained in easily accessible terms. To facilitate the reader's comprehension, the material is presented nonmathematically, using no equations and a minimum of symbols and abbreviations. MRI Primer presents a clear account of the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and the use of gradient magnetic fields to create clinically useful images of cross-sectional slices. Close attention is given to the magnetization vector as a means of expressing nuclear behavior, the role of T 1 and T 2 weighing in imaging, the use of contrast agents, and the pulse sequences most often used in clinical practice, as well as to the relative capabilities and limitations of MRI and CT. The basic hardware components of an MRI scanner are described in detail. Sample MRI scans illustrate how MRI characterizes tissue. An appendix provides a brief introduction to quantum processes in MRI

  4. Correlation between radiological assessment of acute ankle fractures and syndesmotic injury on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermans, J.J. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Wentink, N. [Atrium Medisch Centrum, Department of Surgery, PO Box 4446, Heerlen (Netherlands); Beumer, A.; Moonen, A.F.C.M. [Amphia Ziekenhuis Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, PO Box 90158, Breda (Netherlands); Hop, W.C.J. [Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Biostatistics, PO Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Heijboer, M.P. [Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Orthopaedics, PO Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Ginai, A.Z. [Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, PO Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-07-15

    Owing to the shortcomings of clinical examination and radiographs, injury to the syndesmotic ligaments is often misdiagnosed. When there is no indication requiring that the fractured ankle be operated on, the syndesmosis is not tested intra-operatively, and rupture of this ligamentous complex may be missed. Subsequently the patient is not treated properly leading to chronic complaints such as instability, pain, and swelling. We evaluated three fracture classification methods and radiographic measurements with respect to syndesmotic injury. Prospectively the radiographs of 51 consecutive ankle fractures were classified according to Weber, AO-Mueller, and Lauge-Hansen. Both the fracture type and additional measurements of the tibiofibular clear space (TFCS), tibiofibular overlap (TFO), medial clear space (MCS), and superior clear space (SCS) were used to assess syndesmotic injury. MRI, as standard of reference, was performed to evaluate the integrity of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis. The sensitivity and specificity for detection of syndesmotic injury with radiography were compared to MRI. The Weber and AO-Mueller fracture classification system, in combination with additional measurements, detected syndesmotic injury with a sensitivity of 47% and a specificity of 100%, and Lauge-Hansen with both a sensitivity and a specificity of 92%. TFCS and TFO did not correlate with syndesmotic injury, and a widened MCS did not correlate with deltoid ligament injury. Syndesmotic injury as predicted by the Lauge-Hansen fracture classification correlated well with MRI findings. With MRI the extent of syndesmotic injury and therefore fracture stage can be assessed more accurately compared to radiographs. (orig.)

  5. Active pain coping is associated with the response in real-time fMRI neurofeedback during pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmert, Kirsten; Breimhorst, Markus; Bauermann, Thomas; Birklein, Frank; Rebhorn, Cora; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Haller, Sven

    2017-06-01

    Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) neurofeedback is used as a tool to gain voluntary control of activity in various brain regions. Little emphasis has been put on the influence of cognitive and personality traits on neurofeedback efficacy and baseline activity. Here, we assessed the effect of individual pain coping on rt-fMRI neurofeedback during heat-induced pain. Twenty-eight healthy subjects completed the Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ) prior to scanning. The first part of the fMRI experiment identified target regions using painful heat stimulation. Then, subjects were asked to down-regulate the pain target brain region during four neurofeedback runs with painful heat stimulation. Functional MRI analysis included correlation analysis between fMRI activation and pain ratings as well as CSQ ratings. At the behavioral level, the active pain coping (first principal component of CSQ) was correlated with pain ratings during neurofeedback. Concerning neuroimaging, pain sensitive regions were negatively correlated with pain coping. During neurofeedback, the pain coping was positively correlated with activation in the anterior cingulate cortex, prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and visual cortex. Thermode temperature was negatively correlated with anterior insula and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activation. In conclusion, self-reported pain coping mechanisms and pain sensitivity are a source of variance during rt-fMRI neurofeedback possibly explaining variations in regulation success. In particular, active coping seems to be associated with successful pain regulation.

  6. Diffusion-weighted MRI of myelination in the rat brain following treatment with gonadal hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, D.; Roberts, T.; Barkovich, A.J.; Prayer, L.; Kucharczyk, J.; Moseley, M.; Arieff, A.

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of high-resolution diffusion-weighted MRI to show maturation of white-matter structures in the developing rat brain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of gonadal steroid hormones on the rate of this development. Starting from their second postnatal day, 16 rat-pups of either sex were repeatedly treated with subcutaneous implants containing 17-beta estradiol or delta-androstene 3,17 dione, respectively. Serial T1-, T2- and diffusion-weighted MRI was performed weekly for 8 weeks using a 4.7 T unit. Maturation of anterior optic pathways and hemisphere commissures was assessed. Diffusion-weighted images were processed to produce ''anisotropy index maps'', previously shown to be sensitive to white-matter maturation. Compared with untreated rat-pups, estrogen-treated animals showed accelerated, and testosterone-treated animals delayed maturation on anisotropy index maps and histological sections. In all animals, maturational changes appeared earlie on anisotropy index maps than on other MRI sequences or on myelin-sensitive stained sections. Diffusion-weighted imaging, and the construction of spatial maps sensitive to diffusion anisotropy, seem to be the most sensitive approach for the detection of maturational white-matter changes, and thus may hold potential for early diagnosis of temporary delay or permanent disturbances of white-matter development. (orig.). With 6 figs., 1 tab

  7. Diffusion-weighted MRI of myelination in the rat brain following treatment with gonadal hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayer, D. [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, University of Vienna (Austria); Roberts, T. [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, University of California at San Francisco (UCSF), CA (United States); Barkovich, A.J. [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, University of California at San Francisco (UCSF), CA (United States); Prayer, L. [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, University of Vienna (Austria); Kucharczyk, J. [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, University of California at San Francisco (UCSF), CA (United States); Moseley, M. [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, University of California at San Francisco (UCSF), CA (United States); Arieff, A. [Department of Medicine, Geriatrics Section, Veteran`s Affairs Medical Center and University of California at San Francisco (UCSF), CA (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of high-resolution diffusion-weighted MRI to show maturation of white-matter structures in the developing rat brain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of gonadal steroid hormones on the rate of this development. Starting from their second postnatal day, 16 rat-pups of either sex were repeatedly treated with subcutaneous implants containing 17-beta estradiol or delta-androstene 3,17 dione, respectively. Serial T1-, T2- and diffusion-weighted MRI was performed weekly for 8 weeks using a 4.7 T unit. Maturation of anterior optic pathways and hemisphere commissures was assessed. Diffusion-weighted images were processed to produce ``anisotropy index maps``, previously shown to be sensitive to white-matter maturation. Compared with untreated rat-pups, estrogen-treated animals showed accelerated, and testosterone-treated animals delayed maturation on anisotropy index maps and histological sections. In all animals, maturational changes appeared earlie on anisotropy index maps than on other MRI sequences or on myelin-sensitive stained sections. Diffusion-weighted imaging, and the construction of spatial maps sensitive to diffusion anisotropy, seem to be the most sensitive approach for the detection of maturational white-matter changes, and thus may hold potential for early diagnosis of temporary delay or permanent disturbances of white-matter development. (orig.). With 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. MRI and pathological findings of epileptogenic lesions removed surgically

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moritake, Kouzo; Kikuchi, Haruhiko; Minamikawa, Jun

    1990-01-01

    MRI revealed focal cerebral lesions in 19 patients, 12 males and 7 females, who had suffered from disabling seizures refractory to medical therapy for over one year; the lengths of the periods of therapy ranged from one to 17 years; mean: 8.8 years. Their ages at surgery ranged from 3 to 46 years; mean: 15.2 years. The results of other preoperative and intraoperative examinations, including mobile long-term ambulatory EEG monitoring, local CBF two-dimensional imaging by SPECT, and intraoperative cortical EEG, justified the surgical resection of those lesions revealed by MRI. These lesions were removed totally or subtotally. The pathological findings of the excised lesions were neuronal loss and gliosis in 10 cases (porencephaly, 2; arachnoid cyst, 3; post-traumatic