WorldWideScience

Sample records for remote galaxy survey

  1. ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalcanton, Julianne

    2006-07-01

    Existing HST observations of nearby galaxies comprise a sparse and highly non-uniform archive, making comprehensive comparative studies among galaxies essentially impossible. We propose to secure HST's lasting impact on the study of nearby galaxies by undertaking a systematic, complete, and carefully crafted imaging survey of ALL galaxies in the Local Universe outside the Local Group. The resulting images will allow unprecedented measurements of: {1} the star formation history {SFH} of a >100 Mpc^3 volume of the Universe with a time resolution of Delta[log{t}]=0.25; {2} correlations between spatially resolved SFHs and environment; {3} the structure and properties of thick disks and stellar halos; and {4} the color distributions, sizes, and specific frequencies of globular and disk clusters as a function of galaxy mass and environment. To reach these goals, we will use a combination of wide-field tiling and pointed deep imaging to obtain uniform data on all 72 galaxies within a volume-limited sample extending to 3.5 Mpc, with an extension to the M81 group. For each galaxy, the wide-field imaging will cover out to 1.5 times the optical radius and will reach photometric depths of at least 2 magnitudes below the tip of the red giant branch throughout the limits of the survey volume. One additional deep pointing per galaxy will reach SNR 10 for red clump stars, sufficient to recover the ancient SFH from the color-magnitude diagram. This proposal will produce photometric information for 100 million stars {comparable to the number in the SDSS survey} and uniform multi-color images of half a square degree of sky. The resulting archive will establish the fundamental optical database for nearby galaxies, in preparation for the shift of high-resolution imaging to the near-infrared.

  2. The void galaxy survey: Star formation properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beygu, B.; Kreckel, K.; van der Hulst, J. M.; Jarrett, T. H.; Peletier, R.; van de Weygaert, R.; van Gorkom, J. H.; Aragon-Calvo, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    We study the star formation properties of 59 void galaxies as part of the Void Galaxy Survey (VGS). Current star formation rates are derived from H α and recent star formation rates from near-UV imaging. In addition, infrared 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 μm Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer emission is

  3. Host Galaxy Identification for Supernova Surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Ravi R.; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kovacs, Eve; Spinka, Harold; Kessler, Richard; Goldstein, Daniel A.; Liotine, Camille; Pomian, Katarzyna; D’Andrea, Chris B.; Sullivan, Mark; Carretero, Jorge; Castander, Francisco J.; Nichol, Robert C.; Finley, David A.; Fischer, John A.; Foley, Ryan J.; Kim, Alex G.; Papadopoulos, Andreas; Sako, Masao; Scolnic, Daniel M.; Smith, Mathew; Tucker, Brad E.; Uddin, Syed; Wolf, Rachel C.; Yuan, Fang; Abbott, Tim M. C.; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Benoit-Lévy, Aurélien; Bertin, Emmanuel; Brooks, David; Rosell, Aurelio Carnero; Kind, Matias Carrasco; Cunha, Carlos E.; Costa, Luiz N. da; Desai, Shantanu; Doel, Peter; Eifler, Tim F.; Evrard, August E.; Flaugher, Brenna; Fosalba, Pablo; Gaztañaga, Enrique; Gruen, Daniel; Gruendl, Robert; James, David J.; Kuehn, Kyler; Kuropatkin, Nikolay; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Miquel, Ramon; Plazas, Andrés A.; Romer, A. Kathy; Sánchez, Eusebio; Schubnell, Michael; Sevilla-Noarbe, Ignacio; Sobreira, Flávia; Suchyta, Eric; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Tarle, Gregory; Walker, Alistair R.; Wester, William

    2016-11-08

    Host galaxy identification is a crucial step for modern supernova (SN) surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), which will discover SNe by the thousands. Spectroscopic resources are limited, so in the absence of real-time SN spectra these surveys must rely on host galaxy spectra to obtain accurate redshifts for the Hubble diagram and to improve photometric classification of SNe. In addition, SN luminosities are known to correlate with host-galaxy properties. Therefore, reliable identification of host galaxies is essential for cosmology and SN science. We simulate SN events and their locations within their host galaxies to develop and test methods for matching SNe to their hosts. We use both real and simulated galaxy catalog data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys General Catalog and MICECATv2.0, respectively. We also incorporate "hostless" SNe residing in undetected faint hosts into our analysis, with an assumed hostless rate of 5%. Our fully automated algorithm is run on catalog data and matches SNe to their hosts with 91% accuracy. We find that including a machine learning component, run after the initial matching algorithm, improves the accuracy (purity) of the matching to 97% with a 2% cost in efficiency (true positive rate). Although the exact results are dependent on the details of the survey and the galaxy catalogs used, the method of identifying host galaxies we outline here can be applied to any transient survey.

  4. Measuring our Universe from Galaxy Redshift Surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahav Ofer

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Galaxy redshift surveys have achieved significant progress over the last couple of decades. Those surveys tell us in the most straightforward way what our local Universe looks like. While the galaxy distribution traces the bright side of the Universe, detailed quantitative analyses of the data have even revealed the dark side of the Universe dominated by non-baryonic dark matter as well as more mysterious dark energy (or Einstein's cosmological constant. We describe several methodologies of using galaxy redshift surveys as cosmological probes, and then summarize the recent results from the existing surveys. Finally we present our views on the future of redshift surveys in the era of precision cosmology.

  5. The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury: Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalcanton, Julianne

    2006-12-01

    The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury program (ANGST) consists of a carefully crafted imaging survey of a volume-limited sample of galaxies in the Local Universe outside the Local Group. The resulting images will allow unprecedented measurements of: (1) the SFH of a >100 Mpc3 volume of the Universe with a time resolution of Delta[log(t)]=0.25; (2) correlations between spatially resolved SFHs and environment; (3) the structure and properties of thick disks and stellar halos; and (4) the color distributions, sizes, and specific frequencies of globular and disk clusters as a function of galaxy mass and environment. To reach these goals, we are using a combination of wide-field tiling, pointed deep imaging, and archival data to carry out a uniform analysis of the ancient and recent star formation histories of 70 galaxies within a volume-limited sample extending to 3.5 Mpc, with an extension to the M81 group. For all galaxies, a radial strip of imaging will cover out to beyond the optical radius and will reach photometric depths of at least 2 magnitudes below the tip of the red giant branch throughout the limits of the survey volume. Additional deep pointings will reach SNR 10 for red clump stars, sufficient to recover the ancient star formation history (SFH) from the color-magnitude diagram for the galaxies that provide more than 99% of the star formation in the local volume. The resulting analysis will produce photometric information for several million stars.

  6. Extracting science from surveys of our Galaxy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Our knowledge of the Galaxy is being revolutionized by a series of photometric, spectroscopic and astrometric surveys. Already an enormous body of data is available from completed surveys, and data of ever-increasing quality and richness will accrue at least until the end of this decade. To extract science from these ...

  7. The Taipan Galaxy Survey: Scientific Goals and Observing Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Elisabete; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Colless, Matthew; Taylor, Edward N.; Blake, Chris; Howlett, Cullan; Magoulas, Christina; Lucey, John R.; Lagos, Claudia; Kuehn, Kyler; Gordon, Yjan; Barat, Dilyar; Bian, Fuyan; Wolf, Christian; Cowley, Michael J.; White, Marc; Achitouv, Ixandra; Bilicki, Maciej; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bolejko, Krzysztof; Brown, Michael J. I.; Brown, Rebecca; Bryant, Julia; Croom, Scott; Davis, Tamara M.; Driver, Simon P.; Filipovic, Miroslav D.; Hinton, Samuel R.; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Jones, D. Heath; Koribalski, Bärbel; Kleiner, Dane; Lawrence, Jon; Lorente, Nuria; Mould, Jeremy; Owers, Matt S.; Pimbblet, Kevin; Tinney, C. G.; Tothill, Nicholas F. H.; Watson, Fred

    2017-10-01

    The Taipan galaxy survey (hereafter simply `Taipan') is a multi-object spectroscopic survey starting in 2017 that will cover 2π steradians over the southern sky (δ ≲ 10°, |b| ≳ 10°), and obtain optical spectra for about two million galaxies out to z innovative `Starbugs' positioning system capable of rapidly and simultaneously deploying up to 150 spectroscopic fibres (and up to 300 with a proposed upgrade) over the 6° diameter focal plane, and a purpose-built spectrograph operating in the range from 370 to 870 nm with resolving power R ≳ 2000. The main scientific goals of Taipan are (i) to measure the distance scale of the Universe (primarily governed by the local expansion rate, H 0) to 1% precision, and the growth rate of structure to 5%; (ii) to make the most extensive map yet constructed of the total mass distribution and motions in the local Universe, using peculiar velocities based on improved Fundamental Plane distances, which will enable sensitive tests of gravitational physics; and (iii) to deliver a legacy sample of low-redshift galaxies as a unique laboratory for studying galaxy evolution as a function of dark matter halo and stellar mass and environment. The final survey, which will be completed within 5 yrs, will consist of a complete magnitude-limited sample (i ⩽ 17) of about 1.2 × 106 galaxies supplemented by an extension to higher redshifts and fainter magnitudes (i ⩽ 18.1) of a luminous red galaxy sample of about 0.8 × 106 galaxies. Observations and data processing will be carried out remotely and in a fully automated way, using a purpose-built automated `virtual observer' software and an automated data reduction pipeline. The Taipan survey is deliberately designed to maximise its legacy value by complementing and enhancing current and planned surveys of the southern sky at wavelengths from the optical to the radio; it will become the primary redshift and optical spectroscopic reference catalogue for the local extragalactic

  8. Probing Galaxy Formation and Submillimeter Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwek, Eli; Arendt, Richard G.; Benford, Dominic J.; Moseley, Harvey S.; Shafer, Richard A.; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Multiwavelength observations of galaxies have revealed that a significant fraction of the their stellar or accretion luminosity is absorbed and reradiated by dust at far-infrared (FIR) and submillimeter (submm) wavelengths. Submillimeter (850 micron) surveys conducted by the SCUBA instrument on the JCMT have detected a population of high redshift (z approximately equal to 1-4) ultraluminous infrared galaxies, that dominate the luminosity densities at those redshifts. Their cumulative contribution to the cosmic infrared background (CIB) detected by the COBE satellite is comparable to the observations, suggesting that at 850 microns the CIB is resolved into its constituent sources. This suggests that the early universe was much more dust enshrouded than the present one. FIR and submm surveys can therefore address fundamental questions regarding the early processes of galaxy formation and their evolution in number and luminosity over cosmic history. The scientific information that can be obtained from such surveys depend on a number of parameters, the most important of which are the diameter of the telescope and the wavelengths of the survey. We summarize the effect of these parameters on the scientific return from such surveys.

  9. WINGS: WFIRST Infrared Nearby Galaxy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Benjamin

    testing and optimizing WFIRST observing strategies and providing science guidance to trade studies of observatory requirements such as field of view, pixel scale and filter selection. First, we will perform extensive simulations of galaxies' halo substructures and stellar populations that will be used as input for optimizing observing strategies and sample selection. Second, we will develop a pipeline that optimizes stellar photometry, proper motion, and variability measurements with WFIRST. This software will: maximize data quality & scientific yield; provide essential, independent calibrations to the larger WFIRST efforts; and rapidly provide accurate photometry and astrometry to the community. Third, we will derive quantitative performance metrics to fairly evaluate trade-offs between different survey strategies and WFIRST performance capabilities. The end result of this effort will be: (1) an efficient survey strategy that maximizes the scientific yield of what would otherwise be a chaotic archive of observations from small, un-coordinated programs; (2) a suite of analysis tools and a state-of-the-art pipeline that can be deployed after launch to rapidly deliver stellar photometry to the public; (3) a platform to independently verify the calibration and point spread function modeling that are essential to the primary WFIRST goals, but that are best tested from images of stellar populations. These activities will be carried out by a Science Investigation Team that has decades of experience in using nearby galaxies to inform fundamental topics in astrophysics. This team is composed of researchers who have led the charge in observational and theoretical studies of resolved stellar populations and stellar halos. With our combined background, we are poised to take full advantage of the large field of view and high spatial resolution WFIRST will offer.

  10. Gravitational wave astronomy with radio galaxy surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raccanelli, Alvise

    2017-07-01

    In the next decade, new astrophysical instruments will deliver the first large-scale maps of gravitational waves (GWs) and radio sources. Therefore, it is timely to investigate the possibility to combine them to provide new and complementary ways to study the Universe. Using simulated catalogues appropriate to the planned surveys, it is possible to predict measurements of the cross-correlation between radio sources and GW maps and the effects of a stochastic GW background on galaxy maps. Effects of GWs on the large-scale structure (LSS) of the Universe can be used to investigate the nature of the progenitors of merging black holes, the validity of Einstein's general relativity, models for dark energy and detect a stochastic background of GW. The results obtained show that the galaxy-GW cross-correlation can provide useful information in the near future, while the detection of tensor perturbation effects on the LSS will require instruments with capabilities beyond the currently planned next generation of radio arrays. Nevertheless, any information from the combination of galaxy surveys with the GW maps will help provide additional information for the newly born GW astronomy.

  11. The HIX galaxy survey II: HI kinematics of HI eXtreme galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, K. A.; Kilborn, V. A.; Koribalski, B. S.; Catinella, B.; Józsa, G. I. G.; Wong, O. I.; Stevens, A. R. H.; Obreschkow, D.; Dénes, H.

    2018-02-01

    By analysing a sample of galaxies selected from the HI Parkes All Sky Survey (HIPASS) to contain more than 2.5 times their expected HI content based on their optical properties, we investigate what drives these HI eXtreme (HIX) galaxies to be so HI-rich. We model the H I kinematics with the Tilted Ring Fitting Code TiRiFiC and compare the observed HIX galaxies to a control sample of galaxies from HIPASS as well as simulated galaxies built with the semi-analytic model DARK SAGE. We find that (1) H I discs in HIX galaxies are more likely to be warped and more likely to host H I arms and tails than in the control galaxies, (2) the average H I and average stellar column density of HIX galaxies is comparable to the control sample, (3) HIX galaxies have higher H I and baryonic specific angular momenta than control galaxies, (4) most HIX galaxies live in higher-spin haloes than most control galaxies. These results suggest that HIX galaxies are H I-rich because they can support more H I against gravitational instability due to their high specific angular momentum. The majority of the HIX galaxies inherits their high specific angular momentum from their halo. The H I content of HIX galaxies might be further increased by gas-rich minor mergers. This paper is based on data obtained with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) through the large program C 2705.

  12. Chandra Survey of Nearby Galaxies: The Catalog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    She, Rui; Feng, Hua [Department of Engineering Physics and Center for Astrophysics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Ho, Luis C. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100087 (China)

    2017-02-01

    We searched the public archive of the Chandra X-ray Observatory as of 2016 March and assembled a sample of 719 galaxies within 50 Mpc with available Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer observations. By cross-correlation with the optical or near-infrared nuclei of these galaxies, 314 of them are identified to have an X-ray active galactic nucleus (AGN). The majority of them are low-luminosity AGNs and are unlikely X-ray binaries based upon their spatial distribution and luminosity functions. The AGN fraction is around 60% for elliptical galaxies and early-type spirals, but drops to roughly 20% for Sc and later types, consistent with previous findings in the optical. However, the X-ray survey is more powerful in finding weak AGNs, especially from regions with active star formation that may mask the optical AGN signature. For example, 31% of the H ii nuclei are found to harbor an X-ray AGN. For most objects, a single power-law model subject to interstellar absorption is adequate to fit the spectrum, and the typical photon index is found to be around 1.8. For galaxies with a non-detection, their stacked Chandra image shows an X-ray excess with a luminosity of a few times 10{sup 37} erg s{sup −1} on average around the nuclear region, possibly composed of faint X-ray binaries. This paper reports on the technique and results of the survey; in-depth analysis and discussion of the results will be reported in forthcoming papers.

  13. Galaxy-galaxy and galaxy-cluster lensing with the SDSS and FIRST surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetroullas, C.; Brown, M. L.

    2018-01-01

    We perform a galaxy-galaxy lensing study by correlating the shapes of ∼2.7 × 105 galaxies selected from the VLA FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty centimetres) radio survey with the positions of ∼38.5 million Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies, ∼132 000 Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) and ∼78 000 SDSS galaxies that are also detected in the VLA FIRST survey. The measurements are conducted on angular scales θ ≲ 1200 arcsec. On scales θ ≲ 200 arcsec, we find that the measurements are corrupted by residual systematic effects associated with the instrumental beam of the VLA data. Using simulations, we show that we can successfully apply a correction for these effects. Using the three lens samples (the SDSS DR10 sample, the BCG sample and the SDSS-FIRST matched object sample), we measure a tangential shear signal that is inconsistent with 0 at the 10.2σ, 3.8σ and 9σ levels, respectively. Fitting an NFW model to the detected signals, we find that the ensemble mass profile of the BCG sample agrees with the values in the literature. However, the mass profiles of the SDSS DR10 and the SDSS-FIRST matched object samples are found to be shallower and steeper than results in the literature, respectively. The best-fitting Virial masses for the SDSS DR10, BCG and SDSS-FIRST matched samples, derived using an NFW model and allowing for a varying concentration factor, are M_{200}^SDSS-DR10 = (1.2 ± 0.4) × 10^{12} M_{⊙}, M_{200}^BCG = (1.4 ± 1.3) × 10^{13} M_{⊙} and M_{200}^SDSS-FIRST =8.0 ± 4.2 × 10^{13} M_{⊙}, respectively. These results are in good agreement (within ∼2σ) with values in the literature. Our findings suggest that for galaxies to be bright both in the radio and in the optical, they must be embedded in very dense environment on scales R ≲ 1 Mpc.

  14. The Swift GRB Host Galaxy Legacy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perley, Daniel A.

    I will describe the Swift Host Galaxy Legacy Survey (SHOALS), a comprehensive multiwavelengthprogram to characterize the demographics of the GRB host population and its redshift evolution from z=0 to z=7.Using unbiased selection criteria we have designated a subset of 119 Swift gamma-ray bursts which are now beingtargeted with intensive observational follow-up. Deep Spitzer imaging of every field has already been obtained andanalyzed, with major programs ongoing at Keck, GTC, Gemini, VLT, and Magellan to obtain complementaryoptical/NIR photometry and spectroscopy to enable full SED modeling and derivation of fundamental physicalparameters such as mass, extinction, and star-formation rate. Using these data I will present an unbiasedmeasurement of the GRB host-galaxy luminosity and mass distributions and their evolution with redshift, compareGRB hosts to other star-forming galaxy populations, and discuss implications for the nature of the GRB progenitor andthe ability of GRBs to serve as tools for measuring and studying cosmic star-formation in the distant universe.

  15. The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey IX: the isolated galaxy sample

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Minchin, R.F.; Auld, R.; Davies, J.I.; Karachentsev, I.D.; Keenan, O.; Momjian, E.; Rodriguez, R.; Taber, T.; Taylor, Rhys

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 455, č. 4 (2016), s. 3430-3435 ISSN 0035-8711 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG14013; GA ČR GAP209/12/1795 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : individual galaxies NGC 1156 * individual galaxies NGC 5523 * individual galaxies UGC 2082 Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.961, year: 2016

  16. The new galaxy evolution paradigm revealed by the Herschel surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eales, Stephen; Smith, Dan; Bourne, Nathan; Loveday, Jon; Rowlands, Kate; van der Werf, Paul; Driver, Simon; Dunne, Loretta; Dye, Simon; Furlanetto, Cristina; Ivison, R. J.; Maddox, Steve; Robotham, Aaron; Smith, Matthew W. L.; Taylor, Edward N.; Valiante, Elisabetta; Wright, Angus; Cigan, Philip; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Jarvis, Matt J.; Marchetti, Lucia; Michałowski, Michał J.; Phillipps, Steven; Viaene, Sebastien; Vlahakis, Catherine

    2018-01-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory has revealed a very different galaxyscape from that shown by optical surveys which presents a challenge for galaxy-evolution models. The Herschel surveys reveal (1) that there was rapid galaxy evolution in the very recent past and (2) that galaxies lie on a single Galaxy Sequence (GS) rather than a star-forming 'main sequence' and a separate region of 'passive' or 'red-and-dead' galaxies. The form of the GS is now clearer because far-infrared surveys such as the Herschel ATLAS pick up a population of optically red star-forming galaxies that would have been classified as passive using most optical criteria. The space-density of this population is at least as high as the traditional star-forming population. By stacking spectra of H-ATLAS galaxies over the redshift range 0.001 < z < 0.4, we show that the galaxies responsible for the rapid low-redshift evolution have high stellar masses, high star-formation rates but, even several billion years in the past, old stellar populations - they are thus likely to be relatively recent ancestors of early-type galaxies in the Universe today. The form of the GS is inconsistent with rapid quenching models and neither the analytic bathtub model nor the hydrodynamical EAGLE simulation can reproduce the rapid cosmic evolution. We propose a new gentler model of galaxy evolution that can explain the new Herschel results and other key properties of the galaxy population.

  17. Dwarf Galaxies in the Chandra COSMOS Legacy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civano, Francesca Maria; Mezcua, Mar; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Marchesi, Stefano; Suh, Hyewon; Volonteri, Marta; cyrille

    2018-01-01

    The existence of intermediate mass black holes (100 7. While detecting these seed black holes in the young Universe is observationally challenging, the nuclei of local dwarf galaxies are among the best places where to look for them as these galaxies resemble in mass and metallicity the first galaxies and they have not significantly grown through merger and accretion processes. We present a sample of 40 AGN in dwarf galaxies (107 Legacy survey. Once the star formation contribution to the X-ray emission is subtracted, the AGN luminosities of the 40 dwarf galaxies are in the range L(0.5-10 keV)~1039 - 1044 erg/s. With 12 sources at z > 0.5, our sample constitutes the highest-redshift discovery of AGN in dwarf galaxies. One of the dwarf galaxies is the least massive galaxy (M* = 6.6x107 Msun) found so far to host an active BH. We also present for the first time the evolution of the AGN fraction with stellar mass, X-ray luminosity, and redshift in dwarf galaxies out to z = 0.7, finding that it decreases with X-ray luminosity and stellar mass. Unlike massive galaxies, the AGN fraction is found to decrease with redshift, suggesting that AGN in dwarf galaxies evolve differently than those in high-mass galaxies.

  18. The HIX galaxy survey I: Study of the most gas rich galaxies from HIPASS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, K. A.; Kilborn, V. A.; Catinella, B.; Koribalski, B. S.; Brown, T. H.; Cortese, L.; Dénes, H.; Józsa, G. I. G.; Wong, O. I.

    2017-05-01

    We present the H I eXtreme (HIX) galaxy survey targeting some of the most H I rich galaxies in the Southern hemisphere. The 13 HIX galaxies have been selected to host the most massive H I discs at a given stellar luminosity. We compare these galaxies to a control sample of average galaxies detected in the H I Parkes All Sky Survey (HIPASS). As the control sample is matched in stellar luminosity, we find that the stellar properties of HIX galaxies are similar to the control sample. Furthermore, the specific star formation rate and optical morphology do not differ between HIX and control galaxies. We find, however, the HIX galaxies to be less efficient in forming stars. For the most H I massive galaxy in our sample (ESO075-G006, log M_{H I} [M⊙] = (10.8 ± 0.1)), the kinematic properties are the reason for inefficient star formation and H I excess. Examining the Australian Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) H I imaging and Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS) optical spectra of ESO075-G006 reveals an undisturbed galaxy without evidence for recent major, violent accretion events. A tilted ring fitted to the H I disc together with the gas-phase oxygen abundance distribution supports the scenario that gas has been constantly accreted on to ESO075-G006 but the high specific angular momentum makes ESO075-G006 very inefficient in forming stars. Thus, a massive H I disc has been built up.

  19. UVES Investigates the Environment of a Very Remote Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-01

    Surplus of Intergalactic Material May Be Young Supercluster Summary Observations with ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) have enabled an international group of astronomers [1] to study in unprecedented detail the surroundings of a very remote galaxy, almost 12 billion light-years distant [2]. The corresponding light travel time means that it is seen at a moment only about 3 billion years after the Big Bang. This galaxy is designated MS 1512-cB58 and is the brightest known at such a large distance and such an early time. This is due to a lucky circumstance: a massive cluster of galaxies ( MS 1512+36 ) is located about halfway along the line-of-sight, at a distance of about 7 billion light-years, and acts as a gravitational "magnifying glass". Thanks to this lensing effect, the image of MS1512-cB58 appears 50 times brighter . Nevertheless, the apparent brightness is still as faint as magnitude 20.6 (i.e., nearly 1 million times fainter than what can be perceived with the unaided eye). Moreover, MS 1512-cB58 is located 36° north of the celestial equator and never rises more than 29° above the horizon at Paranal. It was therefore a great challenge to secure the present observational data with the UVES high-dispersion spectrograph on the 8.2-m VLT KUEYEN telescope . The extremely detailed UVES-spectrum of MS 1512-cB58 displays numerous signatures (absorption lines) of intergalactic gas clouds along the line-of-sight . Some of the clouds are quite close to the galaxy and the astronomers have therefore been able to investigate the distribution of matter in its immediate surroundings. They found an excess of material near MS 1512-cB58, possible evidence of a young supercluster of galaxies , already at this very early epoch. The new observations thus provide an invaluable contribution to current studies of the birth and evolution of structures in the early Universe. This is the first time this kind of observation has ever been done of a galaxy at such a large distance . All

  20. ChaMP Serendipitous Galaxy Cluster Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Green, P.J.; Vikhlinin, A.; Kim, D.-W.; Perley, D.; Cameron, R.; Silverman, J.; Mossman, A.; Burenin, R.; Jannuzi, B.T.; Kim, M.; Smith, M.G.; Smith,; Tananbaum, H.; Wilkes, B.J.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /SLAC /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /Moscow, Space Res. Inst. /NOAO, Tucson

    2006-04-03

    We present a survey of serendipitous extended X-ray sources and optical cluster candidates from the Chandra Multi-wavelength Project (ChaMP). Our main goal is to make an unbiased comparison of X-ray and optical cluster detection methods. In 130 archival Chandra pointings covering 13 square degrees, we use a wavelet decomposition technique to detect 55 extended sources, of which 6 are nearby single galaxies. Our X-ray cluster catalog reaches a typical flux limit of about {approx} 10{sup -14} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}, with a median cluster core radius of 21''. For 56 of the 130 X-ray fields, we use the ChaMP's deep NOAO/4m MOSAIC g', r', and i' imaging to independently detect cluster candidates using a Voronoi tessellation and percolation (VTP) method. Red-sequence filtering decreases the galaxy fore/background contamination and provides photometric redshifts to z {approx} 0.7. From the overlapping 6.1 square degree X-ray/optical imaging, we find 115 optical clusters (of which 11% are in the X-ray catalog) and 28 X-ray clusters (of which 46% are in the optical VTP catalog). The median redshift of the 13 X-ray/optical clusters is 0.41, and their median X-ray luminosity (0.5-2 keV) is L{sub X} = (2.65 {+-} 0.19) x 10{sup 43} ergs s{sup -1}. The clusters in our sample that are only detected in our optical data are poorer on average ({approx} 4{sigma}) than the X-ray/optically matched clusters, which may partially explain the difference in the detection fractions.

  1. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: disc-halo interactions in radio-selected star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, S. K.; Bryant, J. J.; Ho, I.-T.; Sadler, E. M.; Medling, A. M.; Groves, B.; Kewley, L. J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Croom, S. M.; Wong, O. I.; Brough, S.; Tescari, E.; Sweet, S. M.; Sharp, R.; Green, A. W.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Allen, J. T.; Fogarty, L. M. R.; Goodwin, M.; Lawrence, J. S.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Owers, M. S.; Richards, S. N.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we compare the radio emission at 1.4 GHz with optical outflow signatures of edge-on galaxies. We report observations of six edge-on star-forming galaxies in the Sydney-AAO Multiobject Integral-field spectrograph Galaxy Survey with 1.4 GHz luminosities >1 × 1021 W Hz-1. Extended minor axis optical emission is detected with enhanced [N II]/H α line ratios and velocity dispersions consistent with galactic winds in three of six galaxies. These galaxies may host outflows driven by a combination of thermal and cosmic ray processes. We find that galaxies with the strongest wind signatures have extended radio morphologies. Our results form a baseline for understanding the driving mechanisms of galactic winds.

  2. The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey - VIII. Discovery of an isolated dwarf galaxy in the Local Volume

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Taylor, Rhys; Minchin, R.F.; Herbst, H.; Smith, R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 442, č. 1 (2014), L46-L50 ISSN 0035-8711 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : surveys * galaxies * distances and redshifts Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 5.107, year: 2014

  3. cosmolike - cosmological likelihood analyses for photometric galaxy surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Elisabeth; Eifler, Tim

    2017-09-01

    We explore strategies to extract cosmological constraints from a joint analysis of cosmic shear, galaxy-galaxy lensing, galaxy clustering, cluster number counts and cluster weak lensing. We utilize the cosmolike software to simulate results from a Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) like data set, specifically, we (1) compare individual and joint analyses of the different probes, (2) vary the selection criteria for lens and source galaxies, (3) investigate the impact of blending, (4) investigate the impact of the assumed cosmological model in multiprobe covariances, (6) quantify information content as a function of scales and (7) explore the impact of intrinsic galaxy alignment in a multiprobe context. Our analyses account for all cross-correlations within and across probes and include the higher-order (non-Gaussian) terms in the multiprobe covariance matrix. We simultaneously model cosmological parameters and a variety of systematics, e.g. uncertainties arising from shear and photo-z calibration, cluster mass-observable relation, galaxy intrinsic alignment and galaxy bias (up to 54 parameters altogether). We highlight two results: first, increasing the number density of source galaxies by ˜30 per cent, which corresponds to solving blending for LSST, only gains little information. Secondly, including small scales in clustering and galaxy-galaxy lensing, by utilizing halo occupation distribution models, can substantially boost cosmological constraining power.

  4. Census of the Local Universe (CLU) Hα Galaxy Survey: Characterization of Galaxy Catalogs from Preliminary Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David O.; Kasliwal, Mansi; Van Sistine, Anglea; Kaplan, David; iPTF

    2018-01-01

    In this talk I introduce the Census of the Local Universe (CLU) galaxy survey. The survey uses 4 wavelength-adjacent, narrowband filters to search for emission-line (Hα) sources across ~3π (26,470 deg2) of the sky and out to distance of 200 Mpc. I will present an analysis of galaxy candidates in 14 preliminary fields (out of 3626) to assess the limits of the survey and the potential for finding new galaxies in the local Universe. We anticipate finding tens-of-thousands of new galaxies in the full ~3π survey. In addition, I present some interesting galaxies found in these fields, which include: newly discovered blue compact dwarfs (e.g., blueberries), 1 new green pea, 1 new QSO, and a known planetary nebula. The majority of the CLU galaxies show properties similar to normal star-forming galaxies; however, the newly discovered blueberries tend to have high star formation rates for their given stellar mass.

  5. Joint analysis of galaxy-galaxy lensing and galaxy clustering: Methodology and forecasts for Dark Energy Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Y.; Krause, E.; Dodelson, S.; Jain, B.; Amara, A.; Becker, M. R.; Bridle, S. L.; Clampitt, J.; Crocce, M.; Fosalba, P.; Gaztanaga, E.; Honscheid, K.; Rozo, E.; Sobreira, F.; Sánchez, C.; Wechsler, R. H.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Fausti Neto, A.; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; James, D. J.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Nichol, R. C.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Roe, N.; Romer, A. K.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Soares-Santos, M.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Weller, J.; Zuntz, J.

    2016-09-30

    The joint analysis of galaxy-galaxy lensing and galaxy clustering is a promising method for inferring the growth function of large scale structure. Our analysis will be carried out on data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES), with its measurements of both the distribution of galaxies and the tangential shears of background galaxies induced by these foreground lenses. We develop a practical approach to modeling the assumptions and systematic effects affecting small scale lensing, which provides halo masses, and large scale galaxy clustering. Introducing parameters that characterize the halo occupation distribution (HOD), photometric redshift uncertainties, and shear measurement errors, we study how external priors on different subsets of these parameters affect our growth constraints. Degeneracies within the HOD model, as well as between the HOD and the growth function, are identified as the dominant source of complication, with other systematic effects sub-dominant. The impact of HOD parameters and their degeneracies necessitate the detailed joint modeling of the galaxy sample that we employ. Finally, we conclude that DES data will provide powerful constraints on the evolution of structure growth in the universe, conservatively/optimistically constraining the growth function to 7.9%/4.8% with its first-year data that covered over 1000 square degrees, and to 3.9%/2.3% with its full five-year data that will survey 5000 square degrees, including both statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  6. Wide-angle effects in future galaxy surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jaiyul; Seljak, Uroš

    2015-02-01

    Current and future galaxy surveys cover a large fraction of the entire sky with a significant redshift range, and the recent theoretical development shows that general relativistic effects are present in galaxy clustering on very large scales. This trend has renewed interest in the wide-angle effect in galaxy clustering measurements, in which the distant-observer approximation is often adopted. Using the full wide-angle formula for computing the redshift-space correlation function, we show that compared to the sample variance, the deviation in the redshift-space correlation function from the simple Kaiser formula with the distant-observer approximation is negligible in galaxy surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Euclid and the BigBOSS, if the theoretical prediction from the Kaiser formula is properly averaged over the survey volume. We also find corrections to the wide-angle formula and clarify the confusion in literature between the wide-angle effect and the velocity contribution in galaxy clustering. However, when the FKP method is applied, substantial deviations can be present in the power spectrum analysis in future surveys, due to the non-uniform distribution of galaxy pairs.

  7. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: the intrinsic shape of kinematically selected galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, C.; van de Sande, J.; D'Eugenio, F.; Cortese, L.; McDermid, R. M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Bryant, J.; Croom, S. M.; Goodwin, M.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Lawrence, J.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Medling, A. M.; Owers, M. S.; Richards, S. N.; Scott, N.; Taranu, D. S.; Tonini, C.; Zafar, T.

    2017-11-01

    Using the stellar kinematic maps and ancillary imaging data from the Sydney AAO Multi Integral field (SAMI) Galaxy Survey, the intrinsic shape of kinematically selected samples of galaxies is inferred. We implement an efficient and optimized algorithm to fit the intrinsic shape of galaxies using an established method to simultaneously invert the distributions of apparent ellipticities and kinematic misalignments. The algorithm output compares favourably with previous studies of the intrinsic shape of galaxies based on imaging alone and our re-analysis of the ATLAS3D data. Our results indicate that most galaxies are oblate axisymmetric. We show empirically that the intrinsic shape of galaxies varies as a function of their rotational support as measured by the `spin' parameter proxy λ _{R_e}. In particular, low-spin systems have a higher occurrence of triaxiality, while high-spin systems are more intrinsically flattened and axisymmetric. The intrinsic shape of galaxies is linked to their formation and merger histories. Galaxies with high-spin values have intrinsic shapes consistent with dissipational minor mergers, while the intrinsic shape of low-spin systems is consistent with dissipationless multimerger assembly histories. This range in assembly histories inferred from intrinsic shapes is broadly consistent with expectations from cosmological simulations.

  8. The RSA survey of dwarf galaxies, 1: Optical photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vader, J. Patricia; Chaboyer, Brian

    1994-01-01

    We present detailed surface photometry, based on broad B-band charge coupled device (CCD) images, of about 80 dwarf galaxies. Our sample represents approximately 10% of all dwarf galaxies identified in the vicinity of Revised Shapley-Ames (RSA) galaxies on high resolution blue photographic plates, referred to as the RSA survey of dwarf galaxies. We derive global properties and radial surface brightness profiles, and examine the morphologies. The radial surface brightness profiles of dwarf galaxies, whether early or late type, display the same varieties in shape and complexity as those of classical giant galaxies. Only a few are well described by a pure r(exp 1/4) law. Exponential profiles prevail. Features typical of giant disk galaxies, such as exponential profiles with a central depression, lenses, and even, in one case (IC 2041), a relatively prominent bulge are also found in dwarf galaxies. Our data suggest that the central region evolves from being bulge-like, with an r(exp 1/4) law profile, in bright galaxies to a lens-like structure in dwarf galaxies. We prove detailed surface photometry to be a helpful if not always sufficient tool in investigating the structure of dwarf galaxies. In many cases kinematic information is needed to complete the picture. We find the shapes of the surface brightness profiles to be loosely associated with morphological type. Our sample contains several new galaxies with properties intermediate between those of giant and dwarf ellipticals (but no M32-like objects). This shows that such intermediate galaxies exist so that at least a fraction of early-type dwarf ellipticals is structurally related to early-type giants instead of belonging to a totally unrelated, disjunct family. This supports an origin of early-type dwarf galaxies as originally more massive systems that acquired their current morphology as a result of substantial, presumable supernova-driven, mass loss. On the other hand, several early-type dwarfs in our sample are

  9. Measuring neutrino masses with a future galaxy survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamann, Jan; Hannestad, Steen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Wong, Yvonne Y.Y., E-mail: hamann@phys.au.dk, E-mail: sth@phys.au.dk, E-mail: ywong@physik.rwth-aachen.de [Institut für Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie, RWTH Aachen, D-52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    We perform a detailed forecast on how well a EUCLID-like photometric galaxy and cosmic shear survey will be able to constrain the absolute neutrino mass scale. Adopting conservative assumptions about the survey specifications and assuming complete ignorance of the galaxy bias, we estimate that the minimum mass sum of Σm{sub ν} ≅ 0.06 eV in the normal hierarchy can be detected at 1.5σ to 2.5σ significance, depending on the model complexity, using a combination of galaxy and cosmic shear power spectrum measurements in conjunction with CMB temperature and polarisation observations from PLANCK. With better knowledge of the galaxy bias, the significance of the detection could potentially reach 5.4σ. Interestingly, neither PLANCK+shear nor PLANCK+galaxy alone can achieve this level of sensitivity; it is the combined effect of galaxy and cosmic shear power spectrum measurements that breaks the persistent degeneracies between the neutrino mass, the physical matter density, and the Hubble parameter. Notwithstanding this remarkable sensitivity to Σm{sub ν}, EUCLID-like shear and galaxy data will not be sensitive to the exact mass spectrum of the neutrino sector; no significant bias ( < 1σ) in the parameter estimation is induced by fitting inaccurate models of the neutrino mass splittings to the mock data, nor does the goodness-of-fit of these models suffer any significant degradation relative to the true one (Δχ{sub eff}{sup 2} < 1)

  10. An HST Archival Survey of Feathers in Spiral Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    La Vigne, Misty A.; Vogel, Stuart N.; Ostriker, Eve C.

    2006-01-01

    We present a survey of spiral arm extinction substructure referred to as feathers in 223 spiral galaxies using HST WFPC2 images. The sample includes all galaxies in the RC3 catalog with cz < 5000 km/s, B_T < 15, i < 60 degrees, and types Sa--Sd with well-exposed broadband WFPC2 images. The detection frequency of delineated, periodic feathers in this sample is 20% (45 of 223). This work is consistent with Lynds (1970), who concluded that feathers are common in prototypical Sc galaxies; we find...

  11. Loose Groups of Galaxies in the Perseus-Pisces Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Trasarti-Battistoni, Roberto

    1997-01-01

    We present a large catalog of loose groups of galaxies in the Southern Galactic Hemisphere, selected from the Perseus-Pisces redshift Survey (PPS). Particular care is taken in order to obtain group samples as homogeneous as possible to previously published catalogs. All our catalogs contain about 200 groups, significantly more than in most previous studies where group samples were obtained from galaxy data sets of comparable quality to (but smaller extent than) PPS. Groups are identified with...

  12. (Almost) Dark Galaxies in the ALFALFA Survey: HI-bearing Ultra-Diffuse Galaxies, and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisman, Luke; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; ALFALFA Almost Darks Team

    2017-01-01

    Scaling relations between HI and stars in galaxies suggest strong ties between their atomic gas content and star formation laws. The Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) blind extragalactic HI survey is well positioned to locate very low surface brightness sources that lie off these relations, the most extreme of which may fall below optical detection limits. Thus, the ALFALFA (Almost) Darks Project has been investigating extreme outliers from these relations by studying the ~1% of ALFALFA sources without apparent stellar counterparts in major optical surveys. We have obtained deep HI and optical imaging of 25 of these candidate "dark" sources. We find that most "dark" sources are not extreme "(almost) dark" galaxies. A few are rare OH Megamasers, redshifted into the ALFALFA bandpass, and many are part of large galactic plumes, stretching as far as 600 kpc from their host galaxy. However, a small handful of sources appear to be galaxies with extreme stellar systems. We find multiple systems with HI mass to stellar mass ratios an order of magnitude larger than typical gas rich dwarfs. Further, we find an isolated population of HI-bearing "ultra diffuse" galaxies (UDGs), with stellar masses of dwarfs, but HI and optical radii of L* galaxies. We suggest that these sources may be related to recently reported gas poor, quiescent UDGs.

  13. Extracting science from surveys of our Galaxy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    reservations one may have about the extent to which model galaxies extracted from cosmo- logical simulations are based on irrefutable physics, these models have had a big impact on our thinking, and they will undoubtedly play a significant role in the future. Nevertheless,. I shall now argue that we need other types of ...

  14. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: The Voronoi-Delaunay Method Catalog of Galaxy Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerke, Brian F.; /UC, Berkeley; Newman, Jeffrey A.; /LBNL, NSD; Davis, Marc; /UC, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley, Astron.Dept.; Marinoni, Christian; /Brera Observ.; Yan, Renbin; Coil, Alison L.; Conroy, Charlie; Cooper, Michael C.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron.Dept.; Faber, S.M.; /Lick Observ.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; /Lick Observ.; Kaiser, Nick; /Hawaii U.; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; /Lick Observ.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; /Maryland U.

    2012-02-14

    We use the first 25% of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey spectroscopic data to identify groups and clusters of galaxies in redshift space. The data set contains 8370 galaxies with confirmed redshifts in the range 0.7 {<=} z {<=} 1.4, over one square degree on the sky. Groups are identified using an algorithm (the Voronoi-Delaunay Method) that has been shown to accurately reproduce the statistics of groups in simulated DEEP2-like samples. We optimize this algorithm for the DEEP2 survey by applying it to realistic mock galaxy catalogs and assessing the results using a stringent set of criteria for measuring group-finding success, which we develop and describe in detail here. We find in particular that the group-finder can successfully identify {approx}78% of real groups and that {approx}79% of the galaxies that are true members of groups can be identified as such. Conversely, we estimate that {approx}55% of the groups we find can be definitively identified with real groups and that {approx}46% of the galaxies we place into groups are interloper field galaxies. Most importantly, we find that it is possible to measure the distribution of groups in redshift and velocity dispersion, n({sigma}, z), to an accuracy limited by cosmic variance, for dispersions greater than 350 km s{sup -1}. We anticipate that such measurements will allow strong constraints to be placed on the equation of state of the dark energy in the future. Finally, we present the first DEEP2 group catalog, which assigns 32% of the galaxies to 899 distinct groups with two or more members, 153 of which have velocity dispersions above 350 km s{sup -1}. We provide locations, redshifts and properties for this high-dispersion subsample. This catalog represents the largest sample to date of spectroscopically detected groups at z {approx} 1.

  15. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: kinematics of dusty early-type galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, R.; Bekki, K.; Cortese, L.; Couch, W. J.; Sansom, A. E.; van de Sande, J.; Bryant, J. J.; Foster, C.; Croom, S. M.; Brough, S.; Sweet, S. M.; Medling, A. M.; Owers, M. S.; Driver, S. P.; Davies, L. J. M.; Wong, O. I.; Groves, B. A.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Richards, S. N.; Goodwin, M.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Lawrence, J. S.

    2017-09-01

    Recently, large samples of visually classified early-type galaxies (ETGs) containing dust have been identified using space-based infrared observations with the Herschel Space Telescope. The presence of large quantities of dust in massive ETGs is peculiar as X-ray haloes of these galaxies are expected to destroy dust in ˜107 yr (or less). This has sparked a debate regarding the origin of the dust: Is it internally produced by asymptotic giant branch stars, or is it accreted externally through mergers? We examine the 2D stellar and ionized gas kinematics of dusty ETGs using integral field spectroscopy observations from the SAMI Galaxy Survey, and integrated star formation rates, stellar masses and dust masses from the GAMA survey. Only 8 per cent (4/49) of visually classified ETGs are kinematically consistent with being dispersion-supported systems. These 'dispersion-dominated galaxies' exhibit discrepancies between stellar and ionized gas kinematics, either offsets in the kinematic position angle or large differences in the rotational velocity, and are outliers in star formation rate at a fixed dust mass compared to normal star-forming galaxies. These properties are suggestive of recent merger activity. The remaining ˜90 per cent of dusty ETGs have low velocity dispersions and/or large circular velocities, typical of 'rotation-dominated galaxies'. These results, along with the general evidence of published works on X-ray emission in ETGs, suggest that they are unlikely to host hot, X-ray gas consistent with their low M* when compared to dispersion-dominated galaxies. This means that dust will be long-lived and thus these galaxies do not require external scenarios for the origin of their dust content.

  16. Comparison of ELG and UV Galaxies from the SBS Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyulzadian, Marieta V.

    This paper discusses the optical spectroscopic properties and comparison of the emission line galaxies (ELG) and galaxies with UV-excess (UV galaxies) from the Second Byurakan Survey (SBS). 155 galaxies spectra have been examined over the wavelength range 3500-57A. These objects are expected to be very rare, representing the possible ?tail? of the epoch of galaxy formation, or, rather, accidental ?secondary? galaxy formation from ultimate primeval material clouds at last submitted to astration because of interactive processes triggering coalescence into protogalaxies (G.Comte, 1998, Astrofizika, 41, 138). We investigate the relation between the observed emission-line widths, relative line intensity, the blue continuum colorant continuum properties for these galaxies. This includes investigating correlation between the various lines. We find anticorrelation between the equivalent width for the Hb and EW[OIII]/EW(Hb); EW[OIII] and EW[OIII]/EW(Hb). Anticorrelation for [OIII]/Hb and C3727-C4861 is also present. We find no correlation between a and relative intensive lines. There is faint correlation between a3727-4861 and C3727-C4861.

  17. The Westerbork HI survey of spiral and irregular galaxies - III. HI observations of early-type disk galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordermeer, E; van der Hulst, JM; Sancisi, R; Swaters, RA; van Albada, TS

    2005-01-01

    We present H. observations of 68 early-type disk galaxies from the WHISP survey. They have morphological types between S0 and Sab and absolute B-band magnitudes between - 14 and - 22. These galaxies form the massive, high surface-brightness extreme of the disk galaxy population, few of which have

  18. The Westerbork HI Survey os spiral and irregular galaxies III : HI observations of early-type disk galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordermeer, E.; Hulst, J.M. van der; Sancisi, R.; Swaters, R.A.; Abada, T.S. van

    2005-01-01

    Abstract: We present HI observations of 68 early-type disk galaxies from the WHISP survey. They have morphological types between S0 and Sab and absolute B-band magnitudes between -14 and -22. These galaxies form the massive, high surface-brightness extreme of the disk galaxy population, few of which

  19. The bispectrum of galaxies from high-redshift galaxy surveys: Primordial non-Gaussianity and non-linear galaxy bias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sefusatti, Emiliano; /Fermilab; Komatsu, Eiichiro; /Texas U., Astron. Dept.

    2007-05-01

    The greatest challenge in the interpretation of galaxy clustering data from any surveys is galaxy bias. Using a simple Fisher matrix analysis, we show that the bispectrum provides an excellent determination of linear and non-linear bias parameters of intermediate and high-z galaxies, when all measurable triangle configurations down to mildly non-linear scales, where perturbation theory is still valid, are included. The bispectrum is also a powerful probe of primordial non-Gaussianity. The planned galaxy surveys at z {approx}> 2 should yield constraints on non-Gaussian parameters, f{sub NL}{sup loc.} and f{sub NL}{sup eq.}, that are comparable to, or even better than, those from CMB experiments. We study how these constraints improve with volume, redshift range, as well as the number density of galaxies. Finally we show that a halo occupation distribution may be used to improve these constraints further by lifting degeneracies between gravity, bias, and primordial non-Gaussianity.

  20. Cross-correlating spectroscopic and photometric galaxy surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Martin B.; Gaztañaga, Enrique

    2014-05-01

    Does photometric and spectroscopic survey benefit from overlapping areas? The photometric survey measures 2D Weak Lensing (WL) information from galaxy shape distortions. On the other hand, the higher redshift precision of an spectroscopic survey allows measurements of redshift space distortions (RSD) and baryonic accustic oscillations (BAO) from 3D galaxy counts. The two surveys are combined using 2D-correlations, using sufficiently narrow bins to capture the radial information. This poster present effects of RSD and intrinsic correlations between narrow redshift bins. In understanding how the effects affects cosmological constrains, we first define two stage-IV and then present forecast for various configurations. When surveys overlap, they benefit from additional cross-correlations and sample variance cancellations from overlapping volumes. For a combined dark energy and growth history figure of merit, the result increase 50% for overlapping surveys, corresponding to 30% larger area.

  1. The Second Byurakan Survey Galaxies. I. The Optical Database

    OpenAIRE

    Gyulzadyan, M.; McLean, B.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Allen, R.J.; Kunth, D.; Petrosian, A.; Stepanian, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    A database for the entire catalog of the Second Byurakan Survey (SBS) galaxies is presented. It contains new measurements of their optical parameters and additional information taken from the literature and other databases. The measurements were made using Ipg(near-infrared), Fpg(red) and Jpg(blue) band images from photographic sky survey plates obtained by the Palomar Schmidt telescope and extracted from the STScI Digital Sky Survey (DSS). The database provides accurate coordinates, morpholo...

  2. Estimating Luminosity Function Constraints from High-Redshift Galaxy Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Brant E.

    2010-04-01

    The installation of the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) will revolutionize the study of high-redshift galaxy populations. Initial observations of the HST Ultra Deep Field (UDF) have yielded multiple z >~ 7 dropout candidates. Supplemented by the GOODS Early Release Science (ERS) and further UDF pointings, these data will provide crucial information about the most distant known galaxies. However, achieving tight constraints on the z ~ 7 galaxy luminosity function (LF) will require even more ambitious photometric surveys. Using a Fisher matrix approach to fully account for Poisson and cosmic sample variance, as well as covariances in the data, we estimate the uncertainties on LF parameters achieved by surveys of a given area and depth. Applying this method to WFC3 z ~ 7 dropout galaxy samples, we forecast the LF parameter uncertainties for a variety of model surveys. We demonstrate that performing a wide area (~1 deg2) survey to H AB ~ 27 depth or increasing the UDF depth to H AB ~ 30 provides excellent constraints on the high-z LF when combined with the existing Ultradeep Field Guest Observation and GOODS ERS data. We also show that the shape of the matter power spectrum may limit the possible gain of splitting wide area (gsim0.5 deg2) high-redshift surveys into multiple fields to probe statistically independent regions; the increased rms density fluctuations in smaller volumes mostly offset the improved variance gained from independent samples.

  3. Compact Core Galaxies in the RESOLVE Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Elaine; Kannappan, S.; Stark, D.; Eckert, K. D.; Norris, M. A.; Norman, D. J.; RESOLVE Team

    2014-01-01

    We identify a population of galaxies with half-light radii CCGs) include both compact ellipticals (cEs) and CCGs with envelopes of gas and stars. They occupy both isolated and non-isolated environments, spanning a variety of large scale structures in RESOLVE, including clusters, walls, and filaments. We deconvolve the radii of these galaxies with their seeing profiles, as CCGs are strongly affected by seeing at RESOLVE distances. We compare their radii and star formation histories with those of globular clusters, ultra compact dwarfs (UCDs), and cEs in the ~300 object AIMSS (Archive of Intermediate Mass Stellar Systems) catalog, making use of cross-matched GALEX NUV data for both data sets. We also present Gemini observations of velocity dispersions of the CCGs for comparison with RESOLVE and AIMSS kinematic data. By examining all of these properties, we seek to discriminate between formation scenarios for CCGs, such as tidal stripping (a likely scenario if they represent the high-mass end of the UCD population) or dissipative major mergers (a likely scenario if they represent the low-mass end of the massive spheroid population). We also use properties of AIMSS sample objects such as color and environment to guide the development of new algorithms for finding potentially overlooked cEs/CCGs in RESOLVE. Increasing the completeness of our sample of compact galaxies will strengthen its statistical power for analysis of their formation scenarios as a function of environment. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under AST-0955368, and by the grant HST-AR-12147.01-A .

  4. A targeted survey for HI clouds in galaxy groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, MA

    2001-01-01

    Five galaxy groups with properties similar to those of the Local Group have been surveyed for H I clouds with the Arecibo Telescope. In total 300 pointings have been observed on grids of approximately 2.5 x 1.5 Mpc(2) centred on the groups. The 4.5 sigma detection limit on the minimal detectable H I

  5. A NuSTAR survey of nearby ultraluminous infrared galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Rigby, Jane R.; Stern, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We present a Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), Chandra, and XMM-Newton survey of nine of the nearest ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). The unprecedented sensitivity of NuSTAR at energies above 10 keV enables spectral modeling with far better precision than was previously......] line luminosity than do Seyfert 1 galaxies. We identify IRAS 08572+3915 as another candidate intrinsically X-ray weak source, similar to Mrk 231. We speculate that the X-ray weakness of IRAS 08572+3915 is related to its powerful outflow observed at other wavelengths....

  6. The Dragonfly Nearby Galaxies Survey: A Census of the Stellar Halos of Nearby Luminous Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Allison T.

    2017-01-01

    The Dragonfly Telephoto Array, comprised of 48 individual Canon telephoto lenses operating together as a single telescope, is an innovative approach to low surface brightness imaging and the study of galactic stellar halos in particular. Sub-nanometer coatings on each optical element reduce scattered light from nearby bright stars and compact galaxy centers - typically a key obstacle for integrated light observations - by an order of magnitude, and Dragonfly's large field of view (2x2.6 degrees for a single frame) provides a large-scale view of stellar halos free from substructure biases. Using extremely deep (>30 mag/arcsec^2) optical imaging in g and r bands from the Dragonfly Nearby Galaxies Survey (DNGS), we have characterized the stellar halos of a sample of ~20 nearby luminous galaxies. I will present measurements of the stellar halo mass fractions of these galaxies as a function of stellar mass, morphology, and environment, and discuss the scatter in halo fractions in the context of the galaxies' individual accretion histories.

  7. (Almost) Dark Galaxies in the ALFALFA Survey: Isolated H I-bearing Ultra-diffuse Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisman, Lukas; Haynes, Martha P.; Janowiecki, Steven; Hallenbeck, Gregory; Józsa, Gyula; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Bernal Neira, David; Cannon, John M.; Janesh, William F.; Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John J.

    2017-06-01

    We present a sample of 115 very low optical surface brightness, highly extended, H I-rich galaxies carefully selected from the ALFALFA survey that have similar optical absolute magnitudes, surface brightnesses, and radii to recently discovered “ultra-diffuse” galaxies (UDGs). However, these systems are bluer and have more irregular morphologies than other UDGs, are isolated, and contain significant reservoirs of H I. We find that while these sources have normal star formation rates for H I-selected galaxies of similar stellar mass, they have very low star formation efficiencies. We further present deep optical and H I-synthesis follow-up imaging of three of these H I-bearing ultra-diffuse sources. We measure H I diameters extending to ˜40 kpc, but note that while all three sources have large H I diameters for their stellar mass, they are consistent with the H I mass-H I radius relation. We further analyze the H I velocity widths and rotation velocities for the unresolved and resolved sources, respectively, and find that the sources appear to inhabit halos of dwarf galaxies. We estimate spin parameters, and suggest that these sources may exist in high spin parameter halos, and as such may be potential H I-rich progenitors to the ultra-diffuse galaxies observed in cluster environments.

  8. (Almost) Dark Galaxies in the ALFALFA Survey: Isolated H i-bearing Ultra-diffuse Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leisman, Lukas; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo [Cornell Center for Astrophysics and Planetary Science, Space Sciences Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Janowiecki, Steven [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Hallenbeck, Gregory [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Union College, Schenectady, NY 12308 (United States); Józsa, Gyula [SKA South Africa Radio Astronomy Research Group, 3rd Floor, The Park, Park Road, Pinelands 7405 (South Africa); Adams, Elizabeth A. K. [ASTRON, the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Neira, David Bernal [Departamento de Física, Universidad de los Andes, Cra. 1 No. 18A-10, Edificio Ip, Bogotá (Colombia); Cannon, John M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Janesh, William F.; Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John J. [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, 727 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)

    2017-06-20

    We present a sample of 115 very low optical surface brightness, highly extended, H i-rich galaxies carefully selected from the ALFALFA survey that have similar optical absolute magnitudes, surface brightnesses, and radii to recently discovered “ultra-diffuse” galaxies (UDGs). However, these systems are bluer and have more irregular morphologies than other UDGs, are isolated, and contain significant reservoirs of H i. We find that while these sources have normal star formation rates for H i-selected galaxies of similar stellar mass, they have very low star formation efficiencies. We further present deep optical and H i-synthesis follow-up imaging of three of these H i-bearing ultra-diffuse sources. We measure H i diameters extending to ∼40 kpc, but note that while all three sources have large H i diameters for their stellar mass, they are consistent with the H i mass–H i radius relation. We further analyze the H i velocity widths and rotation velocities for the unresolved and resolved sources, respectively, and find that the sources appear to inhabit halos of dwarf galaxies. We estimate spin parameters, and suggest that these sources may exist in high spin parameter halos, and as such may be potential H i-rich progenitors to the ultra-diffuse galaxies observed in cluster environments.

  9. Miniaturised Gravity Sensors for Remote Gravity Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlemiss, R. P.; Bramsiepe, S. G.; Hough, J.; Paul, D. J.; Rowan, S.; Samarelli, A.; Hammond, G.

    2016-12-01

    Gravimetry lets us see the world from a completely different perspective. The ability to measure tiny variations in gravitational acceleration (g), allows one to see not just the Earth's gravitational pull, but the influence of smaller objects. The more accurate the gravimeter, the smaller the objects one can see. Gravimetry has applications in many different fields: from tracking magma moving under volcanoes before eruptions; to locating hidden tunnels. The top commercial gravimeters weigh tens of kg and cost at least $100,000, limiting the situations in which they can be used. By contrast, smart phones use a MEMS (microelectromechanical system) accelerometer that can measure the orientation of the device. These are not nearly sensitive or stable enough to be used for the gravimetry but they are cheap, light-weight and mass-producible. At Glasgow University we have developed a MEMS device with both the stability and sensitivity for useful gravimetric measurements. This was demonstrated by a measurement of the Earth tides - the first time this has been achieved with a MEMS sensor. A gravimeter of this size opens up the possiblility for new gravity imaging modalities. Thousands of gravimeters could be networked over a survey site, storing data on an SD card or communicating wirelessly to a remote location. These devices could also be small enough to be carried by a UAVs: airborne gravity surveys could be carried out at low altitude by mulitple UAVs, or UAVs could be used to deliver ground based gravimeters to remote or inaccessible locations.

  10. HI-bearing Ultra Diffuse Galaxies in the ALFALFA Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisman, Lukas; Janowiecki, Steven; Jones, Michael G.; ALFALFA Almost Darks Team

    2018-01-01

    The Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (Arecibo L-band Feed Array) extragalactic HI survey, with over 30,000 high significance extragalactic sources, is well positioned to locate gas-bearing, low surface brightness sources missed by optical detection algorithms. We investigate the nature of a population of HI-bearing sources in ALFALFA with properties similar to "ultra-diffuse" galaxies (UDGs): galaxies with stellar masses of dwarf galaxies, but radii of L* galaxies. These "HI-bearing ultra-diffuse" sources (HUDS) constitute a small, but pertinent, fraction of the dwarf-mass galaxies in ALFALFA. They are bluer and have more irregular morphologies than the optically-selected UDGs found in clusters, and they appear to be gas-rich for their stellar mass, indicating low star formation efficiency. To illuminate potential explanations for the extreme properties of these sources we explore their environments and estimate their halo properties. We conclude that environmental mechanism are unlikely the cause of HUDS' properties, as they exist in environments equivalent to that of the other ALFALFA sources of similar HI-masses, however, we do find some suggestion that these HUDS may reside in high spin parameter halos, a potential explanation for their "ultra-diffuse" nature.

  11. THE CARNEGIE-IRVINE GALAXY SURVEY. II. ISOPHOTAL ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Zhaoyu [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ho, Luis C. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Barth, Aaron J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-4575 (United States); Peng, Chien Y. [NRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2011-12-01

    The Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey (CGS) is a comprehensive investigation of the physical properties of a complete, representative sample of 605 bright (B{sub T} {<=} 12.9 mag) galaxies in the southern hemisphere. This contribution describes the isophotal analysis of the broadband (BVRI) optical imaging component of the project. We pay close attention to sky subtraction, which is particularly challenging for some of the large galaxies in our sample. Extensive crosschecks with internal and external data confirm that our calibration and sky subtraction techniques are robust with respect to the quoted measurement uncertainties. We present a uniform catalog of one-dimensional radial profiles of surface brightness and geometric parameters, as well as integrated colors and color gradients. Composite profiles highlight the tremendous diversity of brightness distributions found in disk galaxies and their dependence on Hubble type. A significant fraction of S0 and spiral galaxies exhibit non-exponential profiles in their outer regions. We perform Fourier decomposition of the isophotes to quantify non-axisymmetric deviations in the light distribution. We use the geometric parameters, in conjunction with the amplitude and phase of the m = 2 Fourier mode, to identify bars and quantify their size and strength. Spiral arm strengths are characterized using the m = 2 Fourier profiles and structure maps. Finally, we utilize the information encoded in the m = 1 Fourier profiles to measure disk lopsidedness. The databases assembled here and in Paper I lay the foundation for forthcoming scientific applications of CGS.

  12. DGSAT: Dwarf Galaxy Survey with Amateur Telescopes. I. Discovery of low surface brightness systems around nearby spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javanmardi, B.; Martinez-Delgado, D.; Kroupa, P.; Henkel, C.; Crawford, K.; Teuwen, K.; Gabany, R. J.; Hanson, M.; Chonis, T. S.; Neyer, F.

    2016-04-01

    Context. We introduce the Dwarf Galaxy Survey with Amateur Telescopes (DGSAT) project and report the discovery of eleven low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies in the fields of the nearby galaxies NGC 2683, NGC 3628, NGC 4594 (M 104), NGC 4631, NGC 5457 (M 101), and NGC 7814. Aims: The DGSAT project aims to use the potential of small-sized telescopes to probe LSB features around large galaxies and to increase the sample size of the dwarf satellite galaxies in the Local Volume. Methods: Using long exposure images, fields of the target spiral galaxies are explored for extended LSB objects. After identifying dwarf galaxy candidates, their observed properties are extracted by fitting models to their light profiles. Results: We find three, one, three, one, one, and two new LSB galaxies in the fields of NGC 2683, 3628, 4594, 4631, 5457, and 7814, respectively. In addition to the newly found galaxies, we analyse the structural properties of nine already known galaxies. All of these 20 dwarf galaxy candidates have effective surface brightnesses in the range 25.3 ≲ μe ≲ 28.8 mag arcsec-2 and are fit with Sersic profiles with indices n ≲ 1. Assuming that they are in the vicinity of the above mentioned massive galaxies, their r-band absolute magnitudes, their effective radii, and their luminosities are in the ranges -15.6 ≲ Mr ≲ -7.8, 160 pc ≲ Re ≲ 4.1 kpc, and 0.1 × 106 ≲ (L/L⊙)r ≲ 127 × 106, respectively. To determine whether these LSB galaxies are indeed satellites of the above mentioned massive galaxies, their distances need to be determined via further observations. Conclusions: Using small telescopes, we are readily able to detect LSB galaxies with similar properties to the known dwarf galaxies of the Local Group.

  13. Optical study of the DAFT/FADA galaxy cluster survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinet, N.; Durret, F.; Clowe, D.; Adami, C.

    2013-11-01

    DAFT/FADA (Dark energy American French Team) is a large survey of ˜90 high redshift (0.42×10^{14} M_{⊙}) clusters with HST weak lensing oriented data, plus BVRIZJ 4m ground based follow up to compute photometric redshifts. The main goals of this survey are to constrain dark energy parameters using weak lensing tomography and to study a large homogeneous sample of high redshift massive clusters. We will briefly review the latest results of this optical survey, focusing on two ongoing works: the calculation of galaxy luminosity functions from photometric redshift catalogs and the weak lensing analysis of ground based data.

  14. Hubble and ESO's VLT provide unique 3D views of remote galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Astronomers have obtained exceptional 3D views of distant galaxies, seen when the Universe was half its current age, by combining the twin strengths of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope's acute eye, and the capacity of ESO's Very Large Telescope to probe the motions of gas in tiny objects. By looking at this unique "history book" of our Universe, at an epoch when the Sun and the Earth did not yet exist, scientists hope to solve the puzzle of how galaxies formed in the remote past. ESO PR Photo 10a/09 A 3D view of remote galaxies ESO PR Photo 10b/09 Measuring motions in 3 distant galaxies ESO PR Video 10a/09 Galaxies in collision For decades, distant galaxies that emitted their light six billion years ago were no more than small specks of light on the sky. With the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope in the early 1990s, astronomers were able to scrutinise the structure of distant galaxies in some detail for the first time. Under the superb skies of Paranal, the VLT's FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectrograph (ESO 13/02) -- which obtains simultaneous spectra from small areas of extended objects -- can now also resolve the motions of the gas in these distant galaxies (ESO 10/06). "This unique combination of Hubble and the VLT allows us to model distant galaxies almost as nicely as we can close ones," says François Hammer, who led the team. "In effect, FLAMES/GIRAFFE now allows us to measure the velocity of the gas at various locations in these objects. This means that we can see how the gas is moving, which provides us with a three-dimensional view of galaxies halfway across the Universe." The team has undertaken the Herculean task of reconstituting the history of about one hundred remote galaxies that have been observed with both Hubble and GIRAFFE on the VLT. The first results are coming in and have already provided useful insights for three galaxies. In one galaxy, GIRAFFE revealed a region full of ionised gas, that is, hot gas composed of atoms that have been stripped of

  15. Applying galactic archeology to massive galaxies using deep imaging surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, Pierre-Alain

    2015-04-01

    Various programs aimed at exploring the still largely unknown low surface brightness Universe with deep imaging optical surveys have recently started. They open a new window for studies of galaxy evolution, pushing the technique of galactic archeology outside the Local Group (LG). The method, based on the detection and analysis of the diffuse light emitted by collisional debris or extended stellar halos (rather than on stellar counts as done for LG systems), faces however a number of technical difficulties, like the contamination of the images by reflection halos and Galactic cirrus. I review here the on-going efforts to address them and highlight the preliminary promising results obtained with a systematic survey with MegaCam on the CFHT of nearby massive early-type galaxies done as part of the ATLAS3D, NGVS and MATLAS collaborations.

  16. A survey of ring galaxies in search of IMBHs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolter, Anna

    2015-08-01

    Recent results support the notion that the majority of Ultra Luminous X-ray sources are X-ray binary systems. In particular, the higher luminosity sources are the main reservoir in which to look for Intermediate Mass Black Holes (IMBH). IMBH have fundamental cosmological implications, as they are deemed to be the seeds of SuperMassive BHs, sources of pre-heating of the intergalactic medium and of fluctuation in the Near IR Cosmic Background. Although a few hundred ULXs and candidates are now known, there has never been a specific survey tailored to find these sources. Most of the host galaxies that contain a large number of ULXs have been selected because they are bright and famous, such e.g. the Cartwheel. The collection of ULXs in various catalogs is based on detections without assessment of non-detections. As a first step towards creating a statistical significant sample of ULXs, we have started a small but focused project to observe a sample of Ring Galaxies. Ring galaxies are particularly suitable for this study, as they generally have high SFR and are expected to host a relatively large number of ULXs. Due to the peculiar morphology of ring galaxies, detected point sources in the ring are very likely to be physically associated with the galaxy, reducing the problem of contamination from spurious sources. From formation model we expect them to have a low metallicity content, which favours the formation of high mass remnants, possibly from direct collapse.We have selected all the peculiar galaxies labelled as collisional rings with a spectroscopic redshift zNewton. We will discuss the results of these observations and support for current models that propose low metallicity environments as the ideal cradle for ULXs. We will compare the results from this statistically selected sample with those from brighter and known ring galaxies in order to asses the likelihood to find IMBHs due to collision events. This pilot sample can also be used to plan deeper and wider

  17. The Westerbork HI survey of spiral and irregular galaxies - I. HI imaging of late-type dwarf galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaters, RA; Van Albada, TS; van der Hulst, JM; Sancisi, R

    Neutral hydrogen observations with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope are presented for a sample of 73 late-type dwarf galaxies. These observations are part of the WHISP project (Westerbork Hi Survey of Spiral and Irregular Galaxies). Here we present Hi maps, velocity fields, global profiles

  18. Mass and galaxy distributions of four massive galaxy clusters from Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melchior, P.; Suchyta, E.; Huff, E.; Hirsch, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Rykoff, E.; Gruen, D.; Armstrong, R.; Bacon, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bridle, S.; Clampitt, J.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; Jouvel, S.; Krause, E.; Lin, H.; MacCrann, N.; Patton, K.; Plazas, A.; Rowe, B.; Vikram, V.; Wilcox, H.; Young, J.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S. S.; Banerji, M.; Bernstein, J. P.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Castander, F. J.; da Costa, L. N.; Cunha, C. E.; Depoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Neto, A. F.; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J. A.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G. R.; Jarvis, M.; Karliner, I.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; Marriner, J.; Marshall, J. L.; Merritt, K. W.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B. D.; Reil, K.; Roe, N. A.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B. X.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Sypniewski, A. J.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D. L.; Walker, A.; Wechsler, R.; Weller, J.; Wester, W.

    2015-03-31

    We measure the weak lensing masses and galaxy distributions of four massive galaxy clusters observed during the Science Verification phase of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). This pathfinder study is meant to (1) validate the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) imager for the task of measuring weak lensing shapes, and (2) utilize DECam's large field of view to map out the clusters and their environments over 90 arcmin. We conduct a series of rigorous tests on astrometry, photometry, image quality, point spread function (PSF) modelling, and shear measurement accuracy to single out flaws in the data and also to identify the optimal data processing steps and parameters. We find Science Verification data from DECam to be suitable for the lensing analysis described in this paper. The PSF is generally well behaved, but the modelling is rendered difficult by a flux-dependent PSF width and ellipticity. We employ photometric redshifts to distinguish between foreground and background galaxies, and a red-sequence cluster finder to provide cluster richness estimates and cluster-galaxy distributions. By fitting Navarro-Frenk-White profiles to the clusters in this study, we determine weak lensing masses that are in agreement with previous work. For Abell 3261, we provide the first estimates of redshift, weak lensing mass, and richness. In addition, the cluster-galaxy distributions indicate the presence of filamentary structures attached to 1E 0657-56 and RXC J2248.7-4431, stretching out as far as 1. (approximately 20 Mpc), showcasing the potential of DECam and DES for detailed studies of degree-scale features on the sky.

  19. Mass and galaxy distributions of four massive galaxy clusters from Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melchior, P.; Suchyta, E.; Huff, E.; Hirsch, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Rykoff, E.; Gruen, D.; Armstrong, R.; Bacon, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bridle, S.; Clampitt, J.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; Jouvel, S.; Krause, E.; Lin, H.; MacCrann, N.; Patton, K.; Plazas, A.; Rowe, B.; Vikram, V.; Wilcox, H.; Young, J.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S. S.; Banerji, M.; Bernstein, J. P.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Castander, F. J.; da Costa, L. N.; Cunha, C. E.; Depoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Neto, A. F.; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J. A.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G. R.; Jarvis, M.; Karliner, I.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; Marriner, J.; Marshall, J. L.; Merritt, K. W.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B. D.; Reil, K.; Roe, N. A.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B. X.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Sypniewski, A. J.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D. L.; Walker, A.; Wechsler, R.; Weller, J.; Wester, W.

    2015-03-31

    We measure the weak-lensing masses and galaxy distributions of four massive galaxy clusters observed during the Science Verification phase of the Dark Energy Survey. This pathfinder study is meant to 1) validate the DECam imager for the task of measuring weak-lensing shapes, and 2) utilize DECam's large field of view to map out the clusters and their environments over 90 arcmin. We conduct a series of rigorous tests on astrometry, photometry, image quality, PSF modeling, and shear measurement accuracy to single out flaws in the data and also to identify the optimal data processing steps and parameters. We find Science Verification data from DECam to be suitable for the lensing analysis described in this paper. The PSF is generally well-behaved, but the modeling is rendered difficult by a flux-dependent PSF width and ellipticity. We employ photometric redshifts to distinguish between foreground and background galaxies, and a red-sequence cluster finder to provide cluster richness estimates and cluster-galaxy distributions. By fitting NFW profiles to the clusters in this study, we determine weak-lensing masses that are in agreement with previous work. For Abell 3261, we provide the first estimates of redshift, weak-lensing mass, and richness. In addition, the cluster-galaxy distributions indicate the presence of filamentary structures attached to 1E 0657-56 and RXC J2248.7-4431, stretching out as far as 1 degree (approximately 20 Mpc), showcasing the potential of DECam and DES for detailed studies of degree-scale features on the sky.

  20. THE SAMI GALAXY SURVEY: TOWARD A UNIFIED DYNAMICAL SCALING RELATION FOR GALAXIES OF ALL TYPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortese, L.; Glazebrook, K.; Mould, J. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, 3122 Victoria (Australia); Fogarty, L. M. R.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Croom, S. M.; Scott, N.; Allen, J. T.; Bloom, J.; Bryant, J. J. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Ho, I.-T. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Bekki, K. [ICRAR, The University of Western Australia, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia); Colless, M.; Sharp, R. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Couch, W.; Goodwin, M. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Tonini, C. [School of Physics, The University of Melbourne, VIC 3010 (Australia); Cluver, M. [Astronomy Department, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Davies, R. L. [Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Drinkwater, M. J. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, QLD 4072 (Australia); and others

    2014-11-10

    We take advantage of the first data from the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field Galaxy Survey to investigate the relation between the kinematics of gas and stars, and stellar mass in a comprehensive sample of nearby galaxies. We find that all 235 objects in our sample, regardless of their morphology, lie on a tight relation linking stellar mass (M {sub *}) to internal velocity quantified by the S {sub 0.5} parameter, which combines the contribution of both dispersion (σ) and rotational velocity (V {sub rot}) to the dynamical support of a galaxy (S{sub 0.5}=√(0.5 V{sub rot}{sup 2}+σ{sup 2})). Our results are independent of the baryonic component from which σ and V {sub rot} are estimated, as the S {sub 0.5} of stars and gas agree remarkably well. This represents a significant improvement compared to the canonical M {sub *} versus V {sub rot} and M {sub *} versus σ relations. Not only is no sample pruning necessary, but also stellar and gas kinematics can be used simultaneously, as the effect of asymmetric drift is taken into account once V {sub rot} and σ are combined. Our findings illustrate how the combination of dispersion and rotational velocities for both gas and stars can provide us with a single dynamical scaling relation valid for galaxies of all morphologies across at least the stellar mass range 8.5 galaxy kinematics and baryonic content, and a less biased comparison with theoretical models.

  1. Defining the Remote Library User: An Online Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Krista; Grodzinski, Alison

    2001-01-01

    Describes an online survey that was conducted at the Central Michigan University Library to assess the characteristics and needs of remote users. Results indicate that remote users continue to use the physical library, so traditional services should not be abandoned. A copy of the survey is appended. (Author/LRW)

  2. Spatial density fluctuations and selection effects in galaxy redshift surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labini, Francesco Sylos [Centro Studi e Ricerche Enrico Fermi, Via Panisperna 89 A, Compendio del Viminale, 00184 Rome (Italy); Tekhanovich, Daniil [Faculty of Mathematics and Mechanics, Saint Petersburg State University, Staryj Peterhoff, 198504, St.Petersburg (Russian Federation); Baryshev, Yurij V., E-mail: Francesco.SylosLabini@roma1.infn.it, E-mail: d.tekhanovich@spbu.ru, E-mail: y.baryshev@spbu.ru [Institute of Astronomy, St.Petersburg State University, Staryj Peterhoff, 198504, St.Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    One of the main problems of observational cosmology is to determine the range in which a reliable measurement of galaxy correlations is possible. This corresponds to determining the shape of the correlation function, its possible evolution with redshift and the size and amplitude of large scale structures. Different selection effects, inevitably entering in any observation, introduce important constraints in the measurement of correlations. In the context of galaxy redshift surveys selection effects can be caused by observational techniques and strategies and by implicit assumptions used in the data analysis. Generally all these effects are taken into account by using pair-counting algorithms to measure two-point correlations. We review these methods stressing that they are based on the a-priori assumption that galaxy distribution is spatially homogeneous inside a given sample. We show that, when this assumption is not satisfied by the data, results of the correlation analysis are affected by finite size effects. In order to quantify these effects, we introduce a new method based on the computation of the gradient of galaxy counts along tiny cylinders. We show, by using artificial homogeneous and inhomogeneous point distributions, that this method identifies redshift dependent selection effects and disentangles them from the presence of large scale density fluctuations. We then apply this new method to several redshift catalogs and we find evidence that galaxy distribution, in those samples where selection effects are small enough, is characterized by power-law correlations with exponent γ=0.9 up to 20 Mpc/h followed by a change of slope that, in the range 20–100 Mpc/h, corresponds to a power-law exponent γ=0.25. Whether a crossover to spatial uniformity occurs at ∼ 100 Mpc/h or larger scales cannot be clarified by the present data.

  3. Redshift-space correlation functions in large galaxy cluster surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valageas, P.; Clerc, N.

    2012-11-01

    Context. Large ongoing and upcoming galaxy cluster surveys in the optical, X-ray and millimetric wavelengths will provide rich samples of galaxy clusters at unprecedented depths. One key observable for constraining cosmological models is the correlation function of these objects, measured through their spectroscopic redshift. Aims: We study the redshift-space correlation functions of clusters of galaxies, averaged over finite redshift intervals, and their covariance matrices. Expanding as usual the angular anisotropy of the redshift-space correlation on Legendre polynomials, we consider the redshift-space distortions of the monopole as well as the next two multipoles, 2ℓ = 2 and 4. Methods: Taking into account the Kaiser effect, we developed an analytical formalism to obtain explicit expressions of all contributions to these mean correlations and covariance matrices. We include shot-noise and sample-variance effects as well as Gaussian and non-Gaussian contributions. Results: We obtain a reasonable agreement with numerical simulations for the mean correlations and covariance matrices on large scales (r > 10 h-1 Mpc). Redshift-space distortions amplify the monopole correlation by about 10-20%, depending on the halo mass, but the signal-to-noise ratio remains of the same order as for the real-space correlation. This distortion will be significant for surveys such as DES, Erosita, and Euclid, which should also measure the quadrupole 2ℓ = 2. The third multipole, 2ℓ = 4, may only be marginally detected by Euclid.

  4. Galaxy groups in the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: the catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchán, Manuel; Zandivarez, Ariel

    2002-09-01

    We construct a galaxy groups catalogue from the public 100-K data release of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey. The group identification is carried out using a slightly modified version of the group-finding algorithm developed by Huchra & Geller. Several tests using mock catalogues allow us to find the optimal conditions to increase the reliability of the final group sample. A minimum number of four members, an outer number density enhancement of 80 and a linking radial cut-off of 200 km s-1 are the best obtained values from the analysis. Using these parameters, approximately 90 per cent of groups identified in real space have a redshift space counterpart. On the other hand, the level of contamination in redshift space reaches 30 per cent, including ~6 per cent of artificial groups and ~24 per cent of groups associated with binaries or triplets in real space. The final sample comprises 2209 galaxy groups covering the sky region described by Colless et al.spanning over the redshift range of 0.003 <=z<= 0.25 with a mean redshift of 0.1.

  5. Detecting effects of filaments on galaxy properties in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Chi; Ho, Shirley; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Bahcall, Neta A.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Freeman, Peter E.; Genovese, Christopher R.; Schneider, Donald P.; Wasserman, Larry

    2017-04-01

    We study the effects of filaments on galaxy properties in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 12 using filaments from the 'Cosmic Web Reconstruction' catalogue, a publicly available filament catalogue for SDSS. Since filaments are tracers of medium- to high-density regions, we expect that galaxy properties associated with the environment are dependent on the distance to the nearest filament. Our analysis demonstrates that a red galaxy or a high-mass galaxy tends to reside closer to filaments than a blue or low-mass galaxy. After adjusting the effect from stellar mass, on average, early-forming galaxies or large galaxies have a shorter distance to filaments than late-forming galaxies or small galaxies. For the main galaxy sample, all signals are very significant (>6σ). For the LOWZ and CMASS sample, the stellar mass and size are significant (>2σ). The filament effects we observe persist until z = 0.7 (the edge of the CMASS sample). Comparing our results to those using the galaxy distances from redMaPPer galaxy clusters as a reference, we find a similar result between filaments and clusters. Moreover, we find that the effect of clusters on the stellar mass of nearby galaxies depends on the galaxy's filamentary environment. Our findings illustrate the strong correlation of galaxy properties with proximity to density ridges, strongly supporting the claim that density ridges are good tracers of filaments.

  6. Survey of remote data monitoring systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logee, T.L.; Kendall, P.W.; Pollock, E.O.; Raymond, M.G.; Knapp, R.C. Jr.

    1984-09-01

    A self-contained data-logger device called an SDAS (Site Data Acquisition Subsystem) was built for the National Solar Data Network (NSDN) which could collect analog data from 96 channels, store the data for up to three days, and then transmit the stored data on request to a central facility by voice-grade telephone lines. This system has worked fairly well for the eight years that it has been in service. However, the design and components are getting old and newer dataloggers may be more reliable and accurate and less expensive. This report discusses the results of an extensive search for an SDAS replacement. The survey covered 62 models from 36 manufacturers. These numbers are not indicative of all the dataloggers or manufacturers available, but only those which appeared to have some qualifications for the NSDN datalogger replacement. This report views the datalogger as a system which is made up of sensors, a data acquisition and storage unit, a telecommunications subsystem, and a data processing subsystem. Therefore, there is a section on sensors used in the NSDN, telecommunications technology, and data processing requirements. These four components or subsystems are all necessary in order to have an integrated, successful remote data monitoring network.

  7. Superclusters of galaxies in the 2dF redshift survey. 3. The properties of galaxies in superclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einasto, Maret; Einasto, J.; Tago, E.; Saar, E.; Liivamagi, L.J.; oeveer, M.J; Hutsi, G.; /Tartu Observ.; Heinamaki, P.; /Tuorla Observ.; Muller, V.; /Potsdam, Astrophys.; Tucker, D.; /Fermilab

    2006-09-01

    We use catalogues of superclusters of galaxies from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey to study the properties of galaxies in superclusters. We compare the properties of galaxies in high and low density regions of rich superclusters, in poor superclusters and in the field, as well as in groups, and of isolated galaxies in superclusters of various richness. We show that in rich superclusters the values of the luminosity density smoothed on a scale of 8 h{sup -1} Mpc are higher than in poor superclusters: the median density in rich superclusters is {sigma} {approx} 7.5, in poor superclusters {delta} {approx} 6.0. Rich superclusters contain high density cores with densities {sigma} > 10 while in poor superclusters such high density cores are absent. The properties of galaxies in rich and poor superclusters and in the field are different: the fraction of early type, passive galaxies in rich superclusters is slightly larger than in poor superclusters, and is the smallest among the field galaxies. Most importantly, in high density cores of rich superclusters ({delta} > 10) there is an excess of early type, passive galaxies in groups and clusters, as well as among those which do not belong to groups or clusters. The main galaxies of superclusters have a rather limited range of absolute magnitudes. The main galaxies of rich superclusters have larger luminosities than those of poor superclusters and of groups in the field (the median values are correspondingly M{sub bj} = -21.02, M{sub bj} = -20.9 and M{sub bj} = -19.7 for rich and poor superclusters and groups in the field). Our results show that both the local (group/cluster) environments and global (supercluster) environments influence galaxy morphologies and their star formation activity.

  8. Loose groups of galaxies in the Perseus-Pisces survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trasarti-Battistoni, R.

    1998-06-01

    We present a large catalog of loose groups of galaxies in the Southern Galactic Hemisphere, selected from the Perseus-Pisces redshift Survey (PPS). Particular care is taken in order to obtain group samples as homogeneous as possible to previously published catalogs. All our catalogs contain about 200 groups, significantly more than in most previous studies where group samples were obtained from galaxy data sets of comparable quality to (but smaller extent than) PPS. Groups are identified with the adaptive Friends-Of-Friends (FOF) algorithm of \\cite[Huchra & Geller (1982),]{HG82} with suitable normalizations D_0=0.231 \\ h(-1) Mpc and V_0=350 \\ km \\ s(-1) at cz_0=1000 \\ km \\ s(-1) . The luminosity function (LF) normalization phi_ *=0.02 \\ h(3) \\ Mpc(-3) appropriate for PPS yields a number density threshold delta n/n ~ 180 for the adopted D_0, instead of delta n/n ~ 80 used in previous studies of other samples. However, the customary choice of D_0 obtained (through the LF) from a fixed mass overdensity delta rho / rho =80, well motivated in theory, suffers from important observational uncertainties and sample-to-sample variations of the LF normalization, and from major uncertainties in the relation between galaxy density n and mass density rho . We discuss how to self-consistently match FOF parameters among different galaxy samples. We then separately vary several FOF and sample parameters, and discuss their effect on group properties. Loose groups in PPS nicely trace the large scale structure (LSS) in the parent galaxy sample. The group properties vary little with different redshift corrections, redshift cut-off, and galaxy LF, but are rather sensitive to the adopted links D_0 and V_0. More precisely, the typical group size (velocity dispersion) is linearly related to the adopted distance (velocity) link, while it is rather insensitive to the adopted velocity (distance) link. Physical properties of groups in PPS and in directly comparable samples show good

  9. AMICO: optimized detection of galaxy clusters in photometric surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellagamba, Fabio; Roncarelli, Mauro; Maturi, Matteo; Moscardini, Lauro

    2018-02-01

    We present Adaptive Matched Identifier of Clustered Objects (AMICO), a new algorithm for the detection of galaxy clusters in photometric surveys. AMICO is based on the Optimal Filtering technique, which allows to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the clusters. In this work, we focus on the new iterative approach to the extraction of cluster candidates from the map produced by the filter. In particular, we provide a definition of membership probability for the galaxies close to any cluster candidate, which allows us to remove its imprint from the map, allowing the detection of smaller structures. As demonstrated in our tests, this method allows the deblending of close-by and aligned structures in more than 50 per cent of the cases for objects at radial distance equal to 0.5 × R200 or redshift distance equal to 2 × σz, being σz the typical uncertainty of photometric redshifts. Running AMICO on mocks derived from N-body simulations and semi-analytical modelling of the galaxy evolution, we obtain a consistent mass-amplitude relation through the redshift range of 0.3 slope of ∼0.55 and a logarithmic scatter of ∼0.14. The fraction of false detections is steeply decreasing with S/N and negligible at S/N > 5.

  10. A faint galaxy redshift survey behind massive clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frye, Brenda Louise [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-05-01

    This thesis is concerned with the gravitational lensing effect by massive galaxy clusters. We have explored a new technique for measuring galaxy masses and for detecting high-z galaxies by their optical colors. A redshift survey has been obtained at the Keck for a magnitude limited sample of objects (I<23) behind three clusters, A1689, A2390, and A2218 within a radius of 0.5M pc. For each cluster we see both a clear trend of increasing flux and redshift towards the center. This behavior is the result of image magnifications, such that at fixed redshift one sees further down the luminosity function. The gradient of this magnification is, unlike measurements of image distortion, sensitive to the mass profile, and found to depart strongly from a pure isothermal halo. We have found that V RI color selection can be used effectively as a discriminant for finding high-z galaxies behind clusters and present five 4.1 < z < 5.1 spectra which are of very high quality due to their high mean magnification of ~20, showing strong, visibly-saturated interstellar metal lines in some cases. We have also investigated the radio ring lens PKS 1830-211, locating the source and multiple images and detected molecular absorption at mm wavelengths. Broad molecular absorption of width 1/40kms is found toward the southwest component only, where surprisingly it does not reach the base of the continuum, which implies incomplete coverage of the SW component by molecular gas, despite the small projected size of the source, less than 1/8h pc at the absorption redshift.

  11. The Extended Northern ROSAT Galaxy Cluster Survey (NORAS II). I. Survey Construction and First Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Böhringer, Hans; Chon, Gayoung; Trümper, Joachim [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Retzlaff, Jörg [ESO, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Meisenheimer, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Schartel, Norbert [ESAC, Camino Bajo del Castillo, Villanueva de la Cañada, E-28692 Madrid (Spain)

    2017-05-01

    As the largest, clearly defined building blocks of our universe, galaxy clusters are interesting astrophysical laboratories and important probes for cosmology. X-ray surveys for galaxy clusters provide one of the best ways to characterize the population of galaxy clusters. We provide a description of the construction of the NORAS II galaxy cluster survey based on X-ray data from the northern part of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. NORAS II extends the NORAS survey down to a flux limit of 1.8 × 10{sup −12} erg s{sup −1} cm{sup −2} (0.1–2.4 keV), increasing the sample size by about a factor of two. The NORAS II cluster survey now reaches the same quality and depth as its counterpart, the southern REFLEX II survey, allowing us to combine the two complementary surveys. The paper provides information on the determination of the cluster X-ray parameters, the identification process of the X-ray sources, the statistics of the survey, and the construction of the survey selection function, which we provide in numerical format. Currently NORAS II contains 860 clusters with a median redshift of z  = 0.102. We provide a number of statistical functions, including the log N –log S and the X-ray luminosity function and compare these to the results from the complementary REFLEX II survey. Using the NORAS II sample to constrain the cosmological parameters, σ {sub 8} and Ω{sub m}, yields results perfectly consistent with those of REFLEX II. Overall, the results show that the two hemisphere samples, NORAS II and REFLEX II, can be combined without problems into an all-sky sample, just excluding the zone of avoidance.

  12. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: gas content and interaction as the drivers of kinematic asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, J. V.; Croom, S. M.; Bryant, J. J.; Schaefer, A. L.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Callingham, J.; Cortese, L.; Federrath, C.; Scott, N.; Sande, J. van de; D'Eugenio, F.; Sweet, S.; Tonini, C.; Allen, J. T.; Goodwin, M.; Green, A. W.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Lawrence, J.; Lorente, N.; Medling, A. M.; Owers, M. S.; Richards, S. N.; Sharp, R.

    2018-02-01

    In order to determine the causes of kinematic asymmetry in the Hα gas in the SAMI Galaxy Survey sample, we investigate the comparative influences of environment and intrinsic properties of galaxies on perturbation. We use spatially resolved Hα velocity fields from the SAMI Galaxy Survey to quantify kinematic asymmetry (\\overline{v_{asym}}) in nearby galaxies and environmental and stellar mass data from the GAMA survey. We find that local environment, measured as distance to nearest neighbour, is inversely correlated with kinematic asymmetry for galaxies with log (M_*/M_⊙ )>10.0, but there is no significant correlation for galaxies with log (M_*/M_⊙ )galaxies (log (M_*/M_⊙ )galaxies. We propose that secular effects derived from gas fraction and gas mass may be the primary causes of asymmetry in low mass galaxies. High gas fraction is linked to high σ m/V (where σm is Hα velocity dispersion and V the rotation velocity), which is strongly correlated with \\overline{v_{asym}}, and galaxies with log (M*/M⊙) galaxies with log (M*/M⊙) dwarf galaxies may lead to asymmetric distribution of gas clouds, leading to increased relative turbulence.

  13. Galaxy bias from the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data: combining galaxy density maps and weak lensing maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C.; Pujol, A.; Gaztañaga, E.; Amara, A.; Réfrégier, A.; Bacon, D.; Becker, M. R.; Bonnett, C.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.; Fosalba, P.; Giannantonio, T.; Hartley, W.; Jarvis, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Ross, A. J.; Sheldon, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Vikram, V.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Cunha, C. E.; D' Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.

    2016-04-15

    We measure the redshift evolution of galaxy bias from a magnitude-limited galaxy sample by combining the galaxy density maps and weak lensing shear maps for a $\\sim$116 deg$^{2}$ area of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data. This method was first developed in Amara et al. (2012) and later re-examined in a companion paper (Pujol et al., in prep) with rigorous simulation tests and analytical treatment of tomographic measurements. In this work we apply this method to the DES SV data and measure the galaxy bias for a magnitude-limited galaxy sample. We find the galaxy bias and 1$\\sigma$ error bars in 4 photometric redshift bins to be 1.33$\\pm$0.18 (z=0.2-0.4), 1.19$\\pm$0.23 (z=0.4-0.6), 0.99$\\pm$0.36 ( z=0.6-0.8), and 1.66$\\pm$0.56 (z=0.8-1.0). These measurements are consistent at the 1-2$\\sigma$ level with mea- surements on the same dataset using galaxy clustering and cross-correlation of galaxies with CMB lensing. In addition, our method provides the only $\\sigma_8$-independent constraint among the three. We forward-model the main observational effects using mock galaxy catalogs by including shape noise, photo-z errors and masking effects. We show that our bias measurement from the data is consistent with that expected from simulations. With the forthcoming full DES data set, we expect this method to provide additional constraints on the galaxy bias measurement from more traditional methods. Furthermore, in the process of our measurement, we build up a 3D mass map that allows further exploration of the dark matter distribution and its relation to galaxy evolution.

  14. Selections from 2017: Hubble Survey Explores Distant Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-12-01

    Editors note:In these last two weeks of 2017, well be looking at a few selections that we havent yet discussed on AAS Nova from among the most-downloaded paperspublished in AAS journals this year. The usual posting schedule will resume in January.CANDELS Multi-Wavelength Catalogs: Source Identification and Photometry in the CANDELS COSMOSSurvey FieldPublished January2017Main takeaway:A publication led byHooshang Nayyeri(UC Irvine and UC Riverside) early this year details acatalog of sources built using the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey(CANDELS), a survey carried out by cameras on board the Hubble Space Telescope. The catalogliststhe properties of 38,000 distant galaxies visiblewithin the COSMOS field, a two-square-degree equatorial field explored in depthto answer cosmological questions.Why its interesting:Illustration showing the three-dimensional map of the dark matter distribution in theCOSMOS field. [Adapted from NASA/ESA/R. Massey(California Institute of Technology)]The depth and resolution of the CANDELS observations areuseful for addressingseveral major science goals, including the following:Studying the most distant objects in the universe at the epoch of reionization in the cosmic dawn.Understanding galaxy formation and evolution during the peak epoch of star formation in the cosmic high noon.Studying star formation from deep ultravioletobservations and studying cosmology from supernova observations.Why CANDELS is a major endeavor:CANDELS isthe largest multi-cycle treasury program ever approved on the Hubble Space Telescope using over 900 orbits between 2010 and 2013 withtwo cameras on board the spacecraftto study galaxy formation and evolution throughout cosmic time. The CANDELS images are all publicly available, and the new catalogrepresents an enormous source of information about distant objectsin our universe.CitationH. Nayyeri et al 2017 ApJS 228 7. doi:10.3847/1538-4365/228/1/7

  15. Page 1 Forest survey and management using remote sensing 229 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Forest survey and management using remote sensing 229. Lackner H 1966 Forstl. Bundesversuchsanstalt Wien, Heft, p. 72. Langley P G 1969 Remote sensing of environment, Proc. Int. Symp., Ann Arbor, p. 1179. Langley P G & Sharpnack D A 1968 The development of an earth resources information system using aerial.

  16. THE SINS/zC-SINF SURVEY OF z {approx} 2GALAXY KINEMATICS: THE NATURE OF DISPERSION-DOMINATED GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Sarah F.; Genzel, Reinhard [Department of Astronomy, Campbell Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Foerster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Buschkamp, Peter; Davies, Ric; Eisenhauer, Frank; Kurk, Jaron; Lutz, Dieter [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Giessenbachstr. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Shapiro Griffin, Kristen [Space Sciences Research Group, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (United States); Mancini, Chiara; Renzini, Alvio [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, Padova I-35122 (Italy); Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, C. Marcella; Peng, Yingjie [Institute of Astronomy, Department of Physics, Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, ETH Zuerich CH-8093 (Switzerland); Bouche, Nicolas [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Burkert, Andreas [Universitaets-Sternwarte Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (USM), Scheinerstr. 1, Muenchen D-81679 (Germany); Cresci, Giovanni [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica Osservatorio Astronomico di Arcetri, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Genel, Shy [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hicks, Erin K. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Naab, Thorsten, E-mail: sfnewman@berkeley.edu [Max-Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl Schwarzschildstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); and others

    2013-04-20

    We analyze the spectra, spatial distributions, and kinematics of H{alpha}, [N II], and [S II] emission in a sample of 38, z {approx} 2.2 UV/optically selected star-forming galaxies (SFGs) from the SINS and zC-SINF surveys, 34 of which were observed in the adaptive optics mode of SINFONI and 30 of those contain data presented for the first time here. This is supplemented by kinematic data from 43 z {approx} 1-2.5 galaxies from the literature. None of these 81 galaxies is an obvious major merger. We find that the kinematic classification of high-z SFGs as ''dispersion dominated'' or ''rotation dominated'' correlates most strongly with their intrinsic sizes. Smaller galaxies are more likely ''dispersion-dominated'' for two main reasons: (1) the rotation velocity scales linearly with galaxy size but intrinsic velocity dispersion does not depend on size or may even increase in smaller galaxies, and as such, their ratio is systematically lower for smaller galaxies, and (2) beam smearing strongly decreases large-scale velocity gradients and increases observed dispersion much more for galaxies with sizes at or below the resolution. Dispersion-dominated SFGs may thus have intrinsic properties similar to ''rotation-dominated'' SFGs, but are primarily more compact, lower mass, less metal enriched, and may have higher gas fractions, plausibly because they represent an earlier evolutionary state.

  17. Chandra Survey of Distant Galaxies Provides Evidence for Vigorous Starbursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-05-01

    Using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers have made the first long-duration X-ray survey of the Hubble Deep Field North. They detected X rays from six of the galaxies in the field, and were surprised by the lack of X rays from some of the most energetic galaxies in the field. The X-ray emitting objects discovered by the research team are a distant galaxy thought to contain a central giant black hole, three elliptically shaped galaxies, an extremely red distant galaxy, and a nearby spiral galaxy. "We were expecting about five X-ray sources in this field,"said Professor Niel Brandt of Penn State University, University Park, and one of the leaders of the research team that conducted the survey. "However, it was very surprising to find that none of the X-ray sources lined up with any of the submillimeter sources." The submillimeter sources are extremely luminous, dusty galaxies that produce large amounts of infrared radiation. Because they are over ten billion light years from Earth, their infrared radiation is shifted to longer, submillimeter wavelengths as it traverses the expanding universe. The primary source of the large power of the submillimeter sources is thought to be an unusually high rate of star formation, or the infall, or accretion of matter into a giant black hole in the center of the galaxy. X-ray observations provide the most direct measure of black hole accretion power. X rays, because of their high-energy, would be expected to pass through the gas and dust in these galaxies, unlike visible light. "With Chandra we have been able to place the best X-ray constraints ever on submillimeter sources," said Ann Hornschemeier, also of Penn State, and the lead author of an upcoming Astrophysical Journal paper describing the discovery. "Our results indicate that less than 15 percent of the submillimeter sources can be luminous X-ray sources." "That means," Brandt explains, "Either there is an enormous amount of star formation in those galaxies, or

  18. 0.8mm extragalactic surveys of nearby galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villicaña-Pedraza, Ilhuiyolitzin; Martín, Sergio; Martín-Pintado, Jesus; Requena-Torres, Miguel; Guesten, Rolf; Armijos, Jairo; Pérez-Beaupuits, Juan Pablo; Klein, Bernd; Heyminck, Stefan; Díaz, Angeles I.; Binette, Luc; Carreto-Parra, Francisco; Aladro, Rebeca

    2017-03-01

    We present the first submillimetric line survey of extragalactic sources carried out by APEX. The surveys cover the 0.8 mm atmospheric window from 270 to 370GHz toward NGC253, NGC4945 and Arp220. We found in NGC 253, 150 transitions of 26 molecules. For NGC 4945, 136 transitions of 24 molecules, and 64 transitions of 17 molecules for Arp 220. Column densities and rotation temperatures have been determinate using the Local Thermodinamical Equilibrium(LTE) line profile simulation and fitting in the MADCUBA IJ software. The differences found in ratios between the Galactic Center and the starburst galaxies NGC 4945 and NGC 253 suggest that the gas is less processed in the latter than in the Galactic Center. The high 18O/17O ratios in the galaxies NGC 4945 and NGC 253 suggest also material less processed in the nuclei of these galaxies than in the Galactic Center. This is consistent with the claim that 17O is a more representative primary product than 18O in stellar nucleosynthesis (Wilson and Rood 1994); Also, we did a Multitransitions study of H3O+ at 307GHz, 364GHz, 388GHz and 396GHz. From our non-LTE analysis of H3O+ in NGC253 with RADEX we found that the collisional excitation can not explain the observed intensity of the ortho 396 GHz line. Excitation by radiation from the dust in the Far-IR can roughly explain the observations if the H2 densities are relatively low. From the derived H3O+ column densities we conclude that the chemistry of this molecule is dominated by ionization produce by the starburst in NGC253 (UV radiation from the O stars) and Arp 220 (cosmic rays from the supernovae) and likely from the AGN in NGC4549 (X-rays ); Finally, we report, for the first time, the tentative detection of the molecular ion HCNH+ (precursor of HCN and HNC) toward a galaxy, NGC4945, abundance explain the claimed enhancement of HCN abundance in the AGN, due to the enhancement of the ionization rate by X-rays. The abundance is much larger than the Galactic center of the

  19. Angular power spectrum of galaxies in the 2MASS Redshift Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Shin'ichiro; Benoit-Lévy, Aurélien; Komatsu, Eiichiro

    2018-02-01

    We present the measurement and interpretation of the angular power spectrum of nearby galaxies in the 2MASS Redshift Survey catalogue with spectroscopic redshifts up to z ≈ 0.1. We detect the angular power spectrum up to a multipole of ℓ ≈ 1000. We find that the measured power spectrum is dominated by galaxies living inside nearby galaxy clusters and groups. We use the halo occupation distribution (HOD) formalism to model the power spectrum, obtaining a fit with reasonable parameters. These HOD parameters are in agreement with the 2MASS galaxy distribution we measure towards the known nearby galaxy clusters, confirming validity of our analysis.

  20. Characterizing Compact Core Galaxies in the RESOLVE Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Elaine M.; Kannappan, Sheila; Norman, Dara J.; Dallas, Samantha; Dell'Antonio, Ian P.; Norris, Mark A.; Maier, Millicent; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Stark, David V.; Resolve Team

    2015-01-01

    We identify a population of 67 "compact core galaxies" (CCGs) in the highly complete RESOLVE survey, which includes both compact ellipticals (cEs) and galaxies with dense cores surrounded by an envelope of gas and stars, possibly representing earlier or later evolutionary stages of cEs. CCGs are identified as objects having core effective radius CCGs with log Mstars >8.8Msun to ensure a complete, volume-limited sample. These CCGs have radii from ~200-800pc, which includes objects nearly as compact as the prototype M32 and comparable to the isolated cE found by Huxor et al. (2013). We find that our CCGs reside in a variety of environments, including 4 CCGs that are >1Mpc away from any other galaxy, as well as 6 in a massive group halo with log Mhalo~13.8Msun. Making use of cross-matched GALEX data, we compute fractional stellar mass growth rates, and find that many CCGs have recently formed stars. The CCG baryonic mass distribution appears to strongly tail off above the gas-richness threshold scale (log Mbary CCGs offset to higher or lower dispersion from the Faber-Jackson relation, which may indicate tidal stripping or dissipative formation, respectively. Initial results show several CCGs following the dissipative formation track. To put our results in context with the literature, we compare the kinematics and star formation histories of our sample CCGs with those of the lower-mass UCDs/cEs/dE,Ns in the AIMSS (Archive of Intermediate Mass Stellar Systems) catalog. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under AST-0955368 and by the grant HST-AR-12147.01-A.

  1. 3D Spectroscopic Surveys: Exploring Galaxy Evolution Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epinat, Benoît

    2011-12-01

    I review the major surveys of high redshift galaxies observed using integral field spectroscopy techniques in the visible and in the infrared. The comparison of various samples has to be done with care since they have different properties linked to their parent samples, their selection criteria and the methods used to study them. I present the various kinematic types of galaxies that are identified within these samples (rotators, mergers, etc.) and summarize the discussions on the mass assembly processes at various redshifts deduced from these classifications: at intermediate redshift (z ~ 0.6) merger may be the main mass assembly process whereas the role of cold gas accretion along cosmic web filaments may increase with redshift. The baryonic Tully-Fisher relation is also discussed. This relation seems to be already in place 3 Gyr after the Big-Bang and is then evolving until the present day. This evolution is interpreted as an increase of the stellar mass content of dark matter haloes of a given mass. The discovery of positive abundance gradients in MASSIV and LSD/AMAZE samples is highlighted. At z ~ 3 this discovery might be linked to cold gas accretion along cosmic filaments toward the centre whereas at lower redshift (z ~ 1.3), this may be mainly due to accretion of gas from outer reservoirs toward the centre via tidal tails due to interactions.

  2. A SUBMILLIMETER CONTINUUM SURVEY OF LOCAL DUST-OBSCURED GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Chul [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34055 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Ho Seong [School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, 85 Hoegiro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 02455 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Gwang-Ho, E-mail: jclee@kasi.re.kr [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-20

    We conduct a 350 μ m dust continuum emission survey of 17 dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) at z = 0.05–0.08 with the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). We detect 14 DOGs with S{sub 350μm} = 114–650 mJy and signal-to-noise > 3. By including two additional DOGs with submillimeter data in the literature, we are able to study dust content for a sample of 16 local DOGs, which consist of 12 bump and four power-law types. We determine their physical parameters with a two-component modified blackbody function model. The derived dust temperatures are in the range 57–122 K and 22–35 K for the warm and cold dust components, respectively. The total dust mass and the mass fraction of the warm dust component are 3–34 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ⊙} and 0.03%–2.52%, respectively. We compare these results with those of other submillimeter-detected infrared luminous galaxies. The bump DOGs, the majority of the DOG sample, show similar distributions of dust temperatures and total dust mass to the comparison sample. The power-law DOGs show a hint of smaller dust masses than other samples, but need to be tested with a larger sample. These findings support that the reason DOGs show heavy dust obscuration is not an overall amount of dust content, but probably the spatial distribution of dust therein.

  3. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: energy sources of the turbulent velocity dispersion in spatially resolved local star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Luwenjia; Federrath, Christoph; Yuan, Tiantian; Bian, Fuyan; Medling, Anne M.; Shi, Yong; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bryant, Julia J.; Brough, Sarah; Catinella, Barbara; Croom, Scott M.; Goodwin, Michael; Goldstein, Gregory; Green, Andrew W.; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis S.; Lawrence, Jon S.; Owers, Matt S.; Richards, Samuel N.; Sanchez, Sebastian F.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the energy sources of random turbulent motions of ionized gas from H α emission in eight local star-forming galaxies from the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey. These galaxies satisfy strict pure star-forming selection criteria to avoid contamination from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) or strong shocks/outflows. Using the relatively high spatial and spectral resolution of SAMI, we find that - on sub-kpc scales, our galaxies display a flat distribution of ionized gas velocity dispersion as a function of star formation rate (SFR) surface density. A major fraction of our SAMI galaxies shows higher velocity dispersion than predictions by feedback-driven models, especially at the low SFR surface density end. Our results suggest that additional sources beyond star formation feedback contribute to driving random motions of the interstellar medium in star-forming galaxies. We speculate that gravity, galactic shear and/or magnetorotational instability may be additional driving sources of turbulence in these galaxies.

  4. 2D Bayesian automated tilted-ring fitting of disc galaxies in large H I galaxy surveys: 2DBAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se-Heon; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Spekkens, Kristine; Kamphuis, Peter; Koribalski, Bärbel S.

    2018-01-01

    We present a novel algorithm based on a Bayesian method for 2D tilted-ring analysis of disc galaxy velocity fields. Compared to the conventional algorithms based on a chi-squared minimization procedure, this new Bayesian-based algorithm suffers less from local minima of the model parameters even with highly multimodal posterior distributions. Moreover, the Bayesian analysis, implemented via Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling, only requires broad ranges of posterior distributions of the parameters, which makes the fitting procedure fully automated. This feature will be essential when performing kinematic analysis on the large number of resolved galaxies expected to be detected in neutral hydrogen (H I) surveys with the Square Kilometre Array and its pathfinders. The so-called 2D Bayesian Automated Tilted-ring fitter (2DBAT) implements Bayesian fits of 2D tilted-ring models in order to derive rotation curves of galaxies. We explore 2DBAT performance on (a) artificial H I data cubes built based on representative rotation curves of intermediate-mass and massive spiral galaxies, and (b) Australia Telescope Compact Array H I data from the Local Volume H I Survey. We find that 2DBAT works best for well-resolved galaxies with intermediate inclinations (20° < i < 70°), complementing 3D techniques better suited to modelling inclined galaxies.

  5. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: global stellar populations on the size-mass plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Nicholas; Brough, S.; Croom, Scott M.; Davies, Roger L.; van de Sande, Jesse; Allen, J. T.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bryant, Julia J.; Cortese, Luca; D'Eugenio, Francesco; Federrath, Christoph; Ferreras, Ignacio; Goodwin, Michael; Groves, Brent; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis; Lawrence, Jon S.; Medling, Anne M.; Moffett, Amanda J.; Owers, Matt S.; Richards, Samuel; Robotham, A. S. G.; Tonini, Chiara; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2017-12-01

    We present an analysis of the global stellar populations of galaxies in the SAMI (Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph) Galaxy Survey. Our sample consists of 1319 galaxies spanning four orders of magnitude in stellar mass and includes all morphologies and environments. We derive luminosity-weighted, single stellar population equivalent stellar ages, metallicities and alpha enhancements from spectra integrated within one effective radius apertures. Variations in galaxy size explain the majority of the scatter in the age-mass and metallicity-mass relations. Stellar populations vary systematically in the plane of galaxy size and stellar mass, such that galaxies with high stellar surface mass density are older, more metal rich and alpha enhanced than less dense galaxies. Galaxies with high surface mass densities have a very narrow range of metallicities; however, at fixed mass, the spread in metallicity increases substantially with increasing galaxy size (decreasing density). We identify residual correlations with morphology and environment. At fixed mass and size, galaxies with late-type morphologies, small bulges and low Sérsic n are younger than early type, high n, high bulge-to-total galaxies. Both age and metallicity show small residual correlations with environment; at fixed mass and size, galaxies in denser environments or more massive haloes are older and somewhat more metal rich than those in less dense environments. We connect these trends to evolutionary tracks within the size-mass plane.

  6. A CLASSICAL MORPHOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF GALAXIES IN THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buta, Ronald J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Box 870324, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0324 (United States); Sheth, Kartik; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Kim, Taehyun [National Radio Astronomy Observatory/NAASC, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, A. [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d’Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388, Marseille (France); Knapen, Johan H. [Departamento de Astrofísica, Universidad de La Laguna, E-38206 La Laguna (Spain); Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Laine, Jarkko; Comerón, Sébastien [Division of Astronomy, Department of Physical Sciences, University of Oulu, Oulu, FI-90014 (Finland); Elmegreen, Debra [Vassar College, Deparment of Physics and Astronomy, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604 (United States); Ho, Luis C. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zaritsky, Dennis; Hinz, Joannah L. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Courtois, Helene [Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucléaire, Lyon (France); Regan, Michael W. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gadotti, Dimitri A. [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile); Paz, Armando Gil de [Departmento de Astrofisica, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Menéndez-Delmestre, Karín [University of Rio de Janeiro, Observatorio de Valongo, Ladeira Pedro Antonio, 43, CEP 20080-090, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); and others

    2015-04-15

    The Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S{sup 4}G) is the largest available database of deep, homogeneous middle-infrared (mid-IR) images of galaxies of all types. The survey, which includes 2352 nearby galaxies, reveals galaxy morphology only minimally affected by interstellar extinction. This paper presents an atlas and classifications of S{sup 4}G galaxies in the Comprehensive de Vaucouleurs revised Hubble-Sandage (CVRHS) system. The CVRHS system follows the precepts of classical de Vaucouleurs morphology, modified to include recognition of other features such as inner, outer, and nuclear lenses, nuclear rings, bars, and disks, spheroidal galaxies, X patterns and box/peanut structures, OLR subclass outer rings and pseudorings, bar ansae and barlenses, parallel sequence late-types, thick disks, and embedded disks in 3D early-type systems. We show that our CVRHS classifications are internally consistent, and that nearly half of the S{sup 4}G sample consists of extreme late-type systems (mostly bulgeless, pure disk galaxies) in the range Scd-Im. The most common family classification for mid-IR types S0/a to Sc is SA while that for types Scd to Sm is SB. The bars in these two type domains are very different in mid-IR structure and morphology. This paper examines the bar, ring, and type classification fractions in the sample, and also includes several montages of images highlighting the various kinds of “stellar structures” seen in mid-IR galaxy morphology.

  7. Stellar mass of elliptical galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen-Hung; Ko, Chung-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Stellar mass is an important ingredient in the study of the evolution of galaxies. As an alternative to the dark matter paradigm, MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) provides us a tool to estimate more directly the baryonic mass of a galaxy via its dynamical mass. As most baryons are resided in stars in an elliptical galaxy, we estimate its stellar mass by calculating its dynamical mass in the framework of MOND. Hernquist model is adopted for the mass distribution. We select elliptical galaxies with measured velocity dispersion and effective radius between redshift 0.05 and 0.5 from the main galaxy sample and the luminous red galaxy sample in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. In this contribution we present the evolution of the stellar mass of elliptical galaxies with redshift.

  8. The HIX Galaxy Survey: The Most HI Rich Galaxies In The Southern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Katharina

    2016-10-01

    When comparing the gas content of galaxies with their current star formation rate, it has been found that the gas consumption time scale is much smaller than the age of galaxies. In addition, the metallicity within galaxies is much smaller than expected from closed box modelling of galaxies. These discrepancies suggest that galaxies must replenish their gas reservoirs by accretion of metal-poor gas from the intergalactic medium.In order to investigate this process of gas accretion in more detail we target local galaxies that host an atomic hydrogen (HI) disc at least 2.5 times more massive than expected from their optical properties using scaling relations. For this sample of galaxies, we have been collecting a multiwavelength data set consisting of deep ATCA HI interferometry, ANU SSO 2.3m WiFeS optical integral field spectroscopy and publicly available photometry from GALEX (ultraviolet), WISE and 2MASS (both infrared).We find that these galaxies are normal star-forming spiral galaxies. However, their specific angular momentum is higher than in control galaxies, which allows these galaxies to support a massive HI disc.With the help of the HI interferometry and the optical IFU spectra, we are searching for signs of recent gas accretion. These signs may include among other things non-circular motion of HI, warped or lopsided HI discs, both of which can be identified through tilted-ring modelling of the HI disc or inhomogeneities in the IFU-based metallicity maps.In my talk I will first compare the HI rich galaxies to the control sample and the general galaxy population. I will then move on to the most HI massive galaxy in our sample and discuss its HI kinematics and its gas-phase oxygen abundance distribution in more detail. To conclude I will give an outlook on the more detailed HI kinematics of the remaining HI rich sample.

  9. Clusters of galaxies in the HST Medium Deep Survey database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnatunga, K. U.; Ostrander, E. J.; Griffiths, R. E.; Nichol, R. C.

    1997-12-01

    Quantitative morphological and structural parameters estimated for galaxies detected in the HST WFPC2 observations are now available on a set of CDROMS and is searchable via a web-interface at http://archive.stsci.edu/mds/ . A modeling approach based on maximum likelihood is used for the 2-dimensional Disk + Bulge decomposition of the faint undersampled galaxy images. We present a new objectively selected sample of galaxy overdensites found using the MDS database. These galaxy clusters represent some of the most distant systems ever detected and will facilitate more detailed studies of cluster and galaxy evolution.

  10. SPT-GMOS: A Gemini/GMOS-South Spectroscopic Survey of Galaxy Clusters in the SPT-SZ Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, M. B.; Ruel, J.; Stubbs, C. W.; Allen, S. W.; Applegate, D. E.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Capasso, R.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Chiu, I.; Cho, H.-M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; de Haan, T.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Doucouliagos, A. N.; Foley, R. J.; Forman, W. R.; Garmire, G. P.; George, E. M.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Gupta, N.; Halverson, N. W.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Hoekstra, H.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hou, Z.; Hrubes, J. D.; Huang, N.; Jones, C.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; von der Linden, A.; Luong-Van, D.; Mantz, A.; Marrone, D. P.; McDonald, M.; McMahon, J. J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L. M.; Mohr, J. J.; Murray, S. S.; Padin, S.; Pryke, C.; Rapetti, D.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Schrabback, T.; Shirokoff, E.; Song, J.; Spieler, H. G.; Stalder, B.; Stanford, S. A.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikhlinin, A.; Williamson, R.; Zenteno, A.

    2016-11-01

    We present the results of SPT-GMOS, a spectroscopic survey with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) on Gemini South. The targets of SPT-GMOS are galaxy clusters identified in the SPT-SZ survey, a millimeter-wave survey of 2500 deg2 of the southern sky using the South Pole Telescope (SPT). Multi-object spectroscopic observations of 62 SPT-selected galaxy clusters were performed between 2011 January and 2015 December, yielding spectra with radial velocity measurements for 2595 sources. We identify 2243 of these sources as galaxies, and 352 as stars. Of the galaxies, we identify 1579 as members of SPT-SZ galaxy clusters. The primary goal of these observations was to obtain spectra of cluster member galaxies to estimate cluster redshifts and velocity dispersions. We describe the full spectroscopic data set and resulting data products, including galaxy redshifts, cluster redshifts, and velocity dispersions, and measurements of several well-known spectral indices for each galaxy: the equivalent width, W, of [O ii] λλ3727, 3729 and H-δ, and the 4000 Å break strength, D4000. We use the spectral indices to classify galaxies by spectral type (i.e., passive, post-starburst, star-forming), and we match the spectra against photometric catalogs to characterize spectroscopically observed cluster members as a function of brightness (relative to m ⋆). Finally, we report several new measurements of redshifts for ten bright, strongly lensed background galaxies in the cores of eight galaxy clusters. Combining the SPT-GMOS data set with previous spectroscopic follow-up of SPT-SZ galaxy clusters results in spectroscopic measurements for >100 clusters, or ˜20% of the full SPT-SZ sample.

  11. Determining the Intrinsic Shapes of Galaxies in the RESOLVE and ECO Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litke, Katrina; Kannappan, S.; Stark, D.; Moffett, A. J.; Eckert, K. D.; the RESOLVE Team

    2014-01-01

    We present an algorithm for determining the intrinsic shapes (edge-on axial ratios) of galaxies from the distribution of observed shapes. Galaxies are modeled as oblate ellipsoids, and the effects of nonaxisymmetry in the galaxies, seeing, and errors in measuring apparent axis ratios are included. A model grid with up to three intrinsic shapes and variable fractions of galaxies with each intrinsic shape is generated, and the models in the grid are compared to the data. We analyze likelihood distributions to identify the intrinsic shapes and the fraction of galaxies with each intrinsic shape. We test this algorithm by application to a massive early-type sample selected from the volume-limited Environmental COntext (ECO) catalog. The data are consistent with intrinsic axial ratios of 0.33 (42.5% of galaxies), 0.50 (27.9% of galaxies), and 0.72 (29.5% of galaxies). More specifically, galaxies with higher stellar masses, higher halo masses, and higher densities are found to have rounder intrinsic shapes, as expected. We describe work in progress to apply our modeling algorithm to dwarf galaxies in the volume-limited RESOLVE survey, which provides an exceptionally complete view of the low-mass galaxy population across multiple z=0 environments. This research was funded by NSF AST-0955368 and CAP REU OCI-1156614.

  12. Host Galaxy Spectra and Consequences for SN Typing from the SDSS SN Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olmstead, Matthew D.; Brown, Peter J.; Sako, Masao; Bassett, Bruce; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brinkmann, J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Brewington, Howard; Campbell, Heather; D’Andrea, Chris B.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Ebelke, Garrett L.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Galbany, Lluís; Garnavich, Peter; Gupta, Ravi R.; Hlozek, Renee; Jha, Saurabh W.; Kunz, Martin; Lampeitl, Hubert; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Marriner, John; Miquel, Ramon; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Nichol, Robert C.; Oravetz, Daniel J.; Pan, Kaike; Schneider, Donald P.; Simmons, Audrey E.; Smith, Mathew; Snedden, Stephanie A.

    2014-03-06

    We present the spectroscopy from 5254 galaxies that hosted supernovae (SNe) or other transient events in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II). Obtained during SDSS-I, SDSS-II, and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), this sample represents the largest systematic, unbiased, magnitude limited spectroscopic survey of supernova (SN) host galaxies. Using the host galaxy redshifts, we test the impact of photometric SN classification based on SDSS imaging data with and without using spectroscopic redshifts of the host galaxies. Following our suggested scheme, there are a total of 1166 photometrically classified SNe Ia when using a flat redshift prior and 1126 SNe Ia when the host spectroscopic redshift is assumed. For 1024 (87.8%) candidates classified as likely SNe Ia without redshift information, we find that the classification is unchanged when adding the host galaxy redshift. Using photometry from SDSS imaging data and the host galaxy spectra, we also report host galaxy properties for use in future nalysis of SN astrophysics. Finally, we investigate the differences in the interpretation of the light curve properties with and without knowledge of the redshift. When using the SALT2 light curve fitter, we find a 21% increase in the number of fits that converge when using the spectroscopic redshift. Without host galaxy redshifts, we find that SALT2 light curve fits are systematically biased towards lower photometric redshift estimates and redder colors in the limit of low signal-to-noise data. The general improvements in performance of the light curve fitter and the increased diversity of the host galaxy sample highlights the importance of host galaxy spectroscopy for current photometric SN surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey and future surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  13. The Environmental Dependence of the Galaxy Stellar Mass Function in the ECO Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richstein, Hannah; Berlind, Andreas A.; Calderon, Victor; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Kannappan, Sheila; Moffett, Amanda J.; Stark, David

    2017-01-01

    We study the environmental dependence of the galaxy stellar mass function in the ECO survey and compare it with models that associate galaxies with dark matter halos. Specifically, we quantify the environment of each galaxy in the ECO survey using an Nth nearest neighbor distance metric, and we measure how the galaxy stellar mass distribution varies from low density to high density environments. As expected, we find that massive galaxies preferentially populate high density regions, while low mass galaxies preferentially populate lower density environments. We investigate whether this trend can be explained simply by the stellar-to-halo mass relation combined with the environmental dependence of the halo mass function. In other words, we test the hypothesis that the stellar mass of a galaxy depends solely on the mass of its dark matter halo and does not exhibit a residual dependence on the halo’s larger environment. To test this hypothesis, we first construct mock ECO catalogs by populating dark matter halos in an N-body simulation with galaxies using a model that preserves the overall clustering strength of the galaxy population. We then assign stellar masses to the mock galaxies using physically motivated models that connect stellar mass to halo mass and are constrained to match the global ECO stellar mass function. Finally, we impose the radial and angular selection functions of the ECO survey and repeat our environmental analysis on the mock catalogs. We find that the environmental dependence of stellar mass in the mock catalogs is in agreement with that observed in the ECO survey. Our results are thus consistent with the simple hypothesis that galaxy stellar mass only depends on halo mass. The RESOLVE/ECO surveys were supported by NSF award AST-0955368.

  14. Aperture corrections for disk galaxy properties derived from the CALIFA survey. Balmer emission lines in spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Vílchez, J. M.; Galbany, L.; Sánchez, S. F.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Mast, D.; García-Benito, R.; Husemann, B.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Alves, J.; Bekeraité, S.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Catalán-Torrecilla, C.; de Amorim, A. L.; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, A.; Ellis, S.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Flores, H.; Florido, E.; Gallazzi, A.; Gomes, J. M.; González Delgado, R. M.; Haines, T.; Hernández-Fernández, J. D.; Kehrig, C.; López-Sánchez, A. R.; Lyubenova, M.; Marino, R. A.; Mollá, M.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; Mourão, A.; Papaderos, P.; Rodrigues, M.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Spekkens, K.; Stanishev, V.; van de Ven, G.; Walcher, C. J.; Wisotzki, L.; Zibetti, S.; Ziegler, B.

    2013-05-01

    This work investigates the effect of the aperture size on derived galaxy properties for which we have spatially-resolved optical spectra. We focus on some indicators of star formation activity and dust attenuation for spiral galaxies that have been widely used in previous work on galaxy evolution. We investigated 104 spiral galaxies from the CALIFA survey for which 2D spectroscopy with complete spatial coverage is available. From the 3D cubes we derived growth curves of the most conspicuous Balmer emission lines (Hα, Hβ) for circular apertures of different radii centered at the galaxy's nucleus after removing the underlying stellar continuum. We find that the Hα flux (f(Hα)) growth curve follows a well-defined sequence with aperture radius that shows a low dispersion around the median value. From this analysis, we derived aperture corrections for galaxies in different magnitude and redshift intervals. Once stellar absorption is properly accounted for, the f(Hα)/f(Hβ) ratio growth curve shows a smooth decline, pointing toward the absence of differential dust attenuation as a function of radius. Aperture corrections as a function of the radius are provided in the interval [0.3, 2.5]R50. Finally, the Hα equivalent-width (EW(Hα)) growth curve increases with the size of the aperture and shows a very high dispersion for small apertures. This prevents us from using reliable aperture corrections for this quantity. In addition, this result suggests that separating star-forming and quiescent galaxies based on observed EW(Hα) through small apertures will probably result in low EW(Hα) star-forming galaxies begin classified as quiescent.

  15. A NuSTAR SURVEY OF NEARBY ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Rigby, Jane R.; Ptak, Andrew [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Alexander, D. M. [Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Bauer, Franz E. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Boggs, Stephen E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Brandt, W. Niel; Luo, Bin [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space-National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Comastri, Andrea [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Farrah, Duncan [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Gandhi, Poshak [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Hailey, Charles J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Harrison, Fiona A. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Hickox, Ryan C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Koss, Michael [Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); and others

    2015-11-20

    We present a Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), Chandra, and XMM-Newton survey of nine of the nearest ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). The unprecedented sensitivity of NuSTAR at energies above 10 keV enables spectral modeling with far better precision than was previously possible. Six of the nine sources observed were detected sufficiently well by NuSTAR to model in detail their broadband X-ray spectra, and recover the levels of obscuration and intrinsic X-ray luminosities. Only one source (IRAS 13120–5453) has a spectrum consistent with a Compton-thick active galactic nucleus (AGN), but we cannot rule out that a second source (Arp 220) harbors an extremely highly obscured AGN as well. Variability in column density (reduction by a factor of a few compared to older observations) is seen in IRAS 05189–2524 and Mrk 273, altering the classification of these borderline sources from Compton-thick to Compton-thin. The ULIRGs in our sample have surprisingly low observed fluxes in high-energy (>10 keV) X-rays, especially compared to their bolometric luminosities. They have lower ratios of unabsorbed 2–10 keV to bolometric luminosity, and unabsorbed 2–10 keV to mid-IR [O iv] line luminosity than do Seyfert 1 galaxies. We identify IRAS 08572+3915 as another candidate intrinsically X-ray weak source, similar to Mrk 231. We speculate that the X-ray weakness of IRAS 08572+3915 is related to its powerful outflow observed at other wavelengths.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SAMI Galaxy Survey: gas streaming (Cecil+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, G.; Fogarty, L. M. R.; Richards, S.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Lange, R.; Moffett, A.; Catinella, B.; Cortese, L.; Ho, I.-T.; Taylor, E. N.; Bryant, J. J.; Allen, J. T.; Sweet, S. M.; Croom, S. M.; Driver, S. P.; Goodwin, M.; Kelvin, L.; Green, A. W.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Owers, M. S.; Lawrence, J. S.; Lorente, N. P. F.

    2016-08-01

    From the first ~830 targets observed in the SGS, we selected 344 rotationally supported galaxies having enough gas to map their CSC. We rejected 8 whose inclination angle to us is too small (i71°), compact size, or observed in atrocious conditions, leaving 163 SGS GAMA survey sub-sample and 15 "cluster" sub-sample galaxies with discs. (3 data files).

  17. Photographic photometry of 16000 galaxies on ESO blue and red survey plates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lauberts, A.; Valentijn, E. A.

    1985-01-01

    An ongoing photometric survey of 16,000 galaxies on ESO red and blue plates is described. The galaxies of the ESO/Uppsala Catalog (Lauberts, 1982) are being PDS scanned, and the results are combined with existing photometry and supplementary observational data obtained at the 1-m ESO telescope to

  18. The global and local stellar mass assembly histories of galaxies from the MaNGA survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra-Medel, Hétor J.; Sánchez,, Sebastián F.; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Hernández-Toledo, Héctor M., J.; González, J. Jesús; Drory, Niv; Bundy, Kevin; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Cano-Díaz, Mariana; Malanushenko, Elena; Pan, Kaike; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Thomas, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    By means of the fossil record method implemented through Pipe3D we reconstruct the global and radial stellar mass growth histories (MGHs) of a large sample of galaxies in the mass range 10^{8.5}M⊙-10^{11.5}M⊙ from the MaNGA survey. We find that: (1) The main driver of the global MGHs is mass, with more massive galaxies assembling their masses earlier (downsizing). (2) For most galaxies in their late evolutionary stages, the innermost regions formed earlier than the outermost ones (inside-out). This behaviour is stronger for blue/late-type galaxies.

  19. Smart Cameras for Remote Science Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David R.; Abbey, William; Allwood, Abigail; Bekker, Dmitriy; Bornstein, Benjamin; Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Castano, Rebecca; Estlin, Tara; Fuchs, Thomas; Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-01-01

    Communication with remote exploration spacecraft is often intermittent and bandwidth is highly constrained. Future missions could use onboard science data understanding to prioritize downlink of critical features [1], draft summary maps of visited terrain [2], or identify targets of opportunity for followup measurements [3]. We describe a generic approach to classify geologic surfaces for autonomous science operations, suitable for parallelized implementations in FPGA hardware. We map these surfaces with texture channels - distinctive numerical signatures that differentiate properties such as roughness, pavement coatings, regolith characteristics, sedimentary fabrics and differential outcrop weathering. This work describes our basic image analysis approach and reports an initial performance evaluation using surface images from the Mars Exploration Rovers. Future work will incorporate these methods into camera hardware for real-time processing.

  20. Magellan FIRE Spectroscopy of Star-Forming Galaxies at 1.5 WISP) Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Daniel C.; McCarthy, P. J.; Hathi, N. P.; WISP survey Team

    2013-01-01

    We present high-resolution, near-infrared echelle spectra of strongly star-forming emission line galaxies at 1.5 WISP) survey, using the slitless grism capability of the WFC3 to identify galaxies with strong emission lines in an unbiased way. We are able to identify low-mass, high sSFR galaxies at these redshifts, which are likely analogues to galaxies in the early stages of formation at much higher redshifts. FIRE follow-up observations provide high-resolution rest-frame optical spectra, allowing us to identify possible AGN activity in the sample, estimate metallicity, and investigate the gas-phase dynamics of the galaxies. By obtaining high-resolution near-IR spectra of a statistically significant number of these galaxies we can begin to understand the population in detail and probe the low-mass end of the mass-metallicity relationship at 2.

  1. STarlight Absorption Reduction through a Survey of Multiple Occulting Galaxies (STARSMOG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holwerda, Benne

    2014-10-01

    Dust absorption remains the poorest constrained parameter in both Cosmological distances and multi-wavelength studies of galaxy populations. A galaxy's dust distribution can be measured to great accuracy in the case of an overlapping pair of galaxies, i.e., when a foreground spiral galaxy accidentally overlaps a more distant, preferably elliptical galaxy. We have identified over 300 bona-fide overlapping pairs --well separated in redshift but close on the sky-- in the GAMA spectroscopic survey, taking advantage of its high completeness (98%) on small scales. We propose to map the fine-scale (~50pc) dust structure in these occulting galaxies, using HST/WFC3 SNAP observations. The resulting dust maps will (1) serve as an extinction probability for supernova lightcurve fits in similar type host galaxies, (2) strongly constrain the role of ISM structure in Spectral Energy Distribution models of spiral galaxies, and (3) map the level of ISM turbulence (through the spatial power-spectrum). We ask for SNAP observations with a parent list of 355 targets to ensure a complete and comprehensive coverage of each foreground galaxy mass, radius and inclination. The resulting extinction maps will serve as a library for SNIa measurements, galaxy SED modelling and ISM turbulence measurements.

  2. The U.S. Geological Survey Land Remote Sensing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2007-01-01

    The fundamental goals of the U.S. Geological Survey's Land Remote Sens-ing (LRS) Program are to provide the Federal Government and the public with a primary source of remotely sensed data and applications and to be a leader in defining the future of land remote sensing, nationally and internationally. Remotely sensed data provide information that enhance the understand-ing of ecosystems and the capabilities for predicting ecosystem change. The data promote an understanding of the role of the environment and wildlife in human health issues, the requirements for disaster response, the effects of climate variability, and the availability of energy and mineral resources. Also, as land satellite systems acquire global coverage, the program coordinates a network of international receiving stations and users of the data. It is the responsibility of the program to assure that data from land imaging satellites, airborne photography, radar, and other technologies are available to the national and global science communities.

  3. Galaxy-galaxy lensing constraints on the relation between baryons and dark matter in galaxies in the Red Sequence Cluster Survey 2

    OpenAIRE

    van Uitert, Edo; Hoekstra, Henk; Velander, Malin; Gilbank, David G.; Gladders, Michael D.; Yee, H. K. C.

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a study of weak gravitational lensing by galaxies using imaging data that were obtained as part of the second Red Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS2). In order to compare to the baryonic properties of the lenses we focus here on the ~300 square degrees that overlap with the DR7 of the SDSS. The depth and image quality of the RCS2 enables us to significantly improve upon earlier work for luminous galaxies at z>=0.3. Comparison with dynamical masses from the SDSS shows a go...

  4. Near-ultraviolet signatures of environment-driven galaxy quenching in Sloan Digital Sky Survey groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossett, Jacob P.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Jones, D. Heath; Brown, Michael J. I.; Stott, John P.

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of group environment on residual star formation in galaxies, using Galaxy Evolution Explorer near-ultraviolet (NUV) galaxy photometry with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey group catalogue of Yang et al. We compared the (NUV - r) colours of grouped and non-grouped galaxies, and find a significant increase in the fraction of red sequence galaxies with blue (NUV - r) colours outside of groups. When comparing galaxies in mass-matched samples of satellite (non-central), and non-grouped galaxies, we found a >4σ difference in the distribution of (NUV - r) colours, and an (NUV - r) blue fraction >3σ higher outside groups. A comparison of satellite and non-grouped samples has found the NUV fraction is a factor of ˜2 lower for satellite galaxies between 1010.5 and 10^{10.7} M_{⊙}, showing that higher mass galaxies are more likely to have residual star formation when not influenced by a group potential. There was a higher (NUV - r) blue fraction of galaxies with lower Sérsic indices (n < 3) outside of groups, not seen in the satellite sample. We have used stellar population models of Bruzual & Charlot with multiple burst, or exponentially declining star formation histories to find that many of the (NUV - r) blue non-grouped galaxies can be explained by a slow (˜2 Gyr) decay of star formation, compared to the satellite galaxies. We suggest that taken together, the difference in (NUV - r) colours between samples can be explained by a population of secularly evolving, non-grouped galaxies, where star formation declines slowly. This slow channel is less prevalent in group environments where more rapid quenching can occur.

  5. Chandra Survey of Nearby Galaxies: A Significant Population of Candidate Central Black Holes in Late-type Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Rui; Ho, Luis C.; Feng, Hua

    2017-06-01

    Based on the Chandra data archive as of 2016 March, we have identified 314 candidate active galactic nuclei in 719 galaxies located closer than 50 Mpc, among them late-type galaxies (Hubble types Sc and later) that previously had been classified from optical observations as containing star-forming (H II) nuclei. These late-type galaxies comprise a valuable subsample to search for low-mass (≲ {10}6 {M}⊙ ) central black holes. For the sample as a whole, the overall dependence of the fraction of active nuclei on galaxy type and nuclear spectral classification is consistent with previous results based on optical surveys. We detect 51 X-ray cores among the 163 H II nuclei and estimate that, very conservatively, ˜74% of them with luminosities above 1038 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 are not contaminated by X-ray binaries; the fraction increases to ˜92% for X-ray cores with a luminosity of 1039 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 or higher. This allows us to estimate a black hole occupation fraction of ≳ 21% in these late-type galaxies, many of which are bulgeless.

  6. Caltech Faint Galaxy Redshift Survey. VIII. Analysis of the Field J0053+1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Judith G.; Blandford, Roger; Hogg, David W.; Pahre, Michael A.; Shopbell, Patrick L.

    1999-02-01

    The results of a spectroscopic investigation of a complete sample of objects with Ksincidence of emission lines in the luminous galaxies increases with redshift. The estimated dynamical masses of these redshift peaks, and the sky distribution of the galaxies within them, appear similar to groups or poor clusters of galaxies in the local universe at various stages of virialization. Some groups of galaxies therefore form at epochs z>1.5, and the galaxies in such groups appear to be coeval and to show little sign of ongoing star formation. The galaxies outside the redshift peaks are also clustered, albeit more weakly, are less luminous and more frequently exhibit strong emission lines. These ``isolated'' galaxies therefore appear, on average, to form stars at later epochs than the strongly clustered galaxies. The galaxy spectral energy distributions (SEDs) derived from our UBVRIK photometry are also very closely correlated with the galaxy spectral types and luminosities. These results have strong implications for the analysis of redshift surveys at intermediate redshift. The sample is used to investigate the evolution of the combined galaxy luminosity function back to z=0.8. No significant change is found in the characteristic luminosity L*, and only weak color changes are detected, consistent with passive evolution. The blue galaxy-luminosity function is more dwarf rich than the red galaxy-luminosity function. No significant change in the comoving density is found in this sample out to z~1.4, assuming that the objects without redshifts (16% of the sample) are galaxies, essentially all of which have z>0.8. This suggests that mergers are not important among the objects in this sample. A population of extremely red objects with (R-K)>5 mag exists in the infrared-selected sample; all four such objects with redshifts are found to be absorption-line galaxies with z~1. Most of the very red objects therefore appear to be galaxies with z>~1 that are not heavily reddened by

  7. Redshifts for a sample of fainter galaxies in the first CfA survey slice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorstensen, J. R.; Wegner, G. A.; Hamwey, R.; Boley, F.; Geller, M. J.

    1989-01-01

    Redshifts were measured for 93 of the 94 galaxies in the Zwicky-Nilson merged catalog with the value of m(B/01) between 15.5 and 15.7 and with right ascension alpha between 8(h) and 17(h) and declination delta between 29 and 30 deg. This region is within the one covered by the first slice of the CfA (Center for Astrophysics) survey. The galaxies reinforce features already visible in the earlier survey.

  8. Measuring neutrino masses with a future galaxy survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Jan; Hannestad, Steen; Wong, Yvonne Y. Y.

    2012-01-01

    that the minimum mass sum of sum m_nu ~ 0.06 eV in the normal hierarchy can be detected at 1.5 sigma to 2.5 sigma significance, depending on the model complexity, using a combination of galaxy and cosmic shear power spectrum measurements in conjunction with CMB temperature and polarisation observations from Planck....... With better knowledge of the galaxy bias, the significance of the detection could potentially reach 5.4 sigma. Interestingly, neither Planck+shear nor Planck+galaxy alone can achieve this level of sensitivity; it is the combined effect of galaxy and cosmic shear power spectrum measurements that breaks...... the persistent degeneracies between the neutrino mass, the physical matter density, and the Hubble parameter. Notwithstanding this remarkable sensitivity to sum m_nu, Euclid-like shear and galaxy data will not be sensitive to the exact mass spectrum of the neutrino sector; no significant bias (sigma...

  9. Unbiased Large Spectroscopic Surveys of Galaxies Selected by SPICA Using Dust Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, H.; Ishihara, D.; Oyabu, S.; Yamagishi, M.; Wada, T.; Armus, L.; Baes, M.; Charmandaris, V.; Czerny, B.; Efstathiou, A.; Fernández-Ontiveros, J. A.; Ferrara, A.; González-Alfonso, E.; Griffin, M.; Gruppioni, C.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Imanishi, M.; Kohno, K.; Kwon, J.; Nakagawa, T.; Onaka, T.; Pozzi, F.; Scott, D.; Smith, J.-D. T.; Spinoglio, L.; Suzuki, T.; van der Tak, F.; Vaccari, M.; Vignali, C.; Wang, L.

    2017-11-01

    The mid-infrared range contains many spectral features associated with large molecules and dust grains such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and silicates. These are usually very strong compared to fine-structure gas lines, and thus valuable in studying the spectral properties of faint distant galaxies. In this paper, we evaluate the capability of low-resolution mid-infrared spectroscopic surveys of galaxies that could be performed by SPICA. The surveys are designed to address the question how star formation and black hole accretion activities evolved over cosmic time through spectral diagnostics of the physical conditions of the interstellar/circumnuclear media in galaxies. On the basis of results obtained with Herschel far-infrared photometric surveys of distant galaxies and Spitzer and AKARI near- to mid-infrared spectroscopic observations of nearby galaxies, we estimate the numbers of the galaxies at redshift z > 0.5, which are expected to be detected in the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features or dust continuum by a wide (10 deg2) or deep (1 deg2) blind survey, both for a given observation time of 600 h. As by-products of the wide blind survey, we also expect to detect debris disks, through the mid-infrared excess above the photospheric emission of nearby main-sequence stars, and we estimate their number. We demonstrate that the SPICA mid-infrared surveys will efficiently provide us with unprecedentedly large spectral samples, which can be studied further in the far-infrared with SPICA.

  10. MAPPING THE GALAXY COLOR–REDSHIFT RELATION: OPTIMAL PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT CALIBRATION STRATEGIES FOR COSMOLOGY SURVEYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masters, Daniel; Steinhardt, Charles; Faisst, Andreas [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Capak, Peter [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stern, Daniel; Rhodes, Jason [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Ilbert, Olivier [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire dAstrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388, Marseille (France); Salvato, Mara [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Schmidt, Samuel [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Longo, Giuseppe [Department of Physics, University Federico II, via Cinthia 6, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Paltani, Stephane; Coupon, Jean [Department of Astronomy, University of Geneva ch. dcogia 16, CH-1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Mobasher, Bahram [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Hoekstra, Henk [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA, Leiden (Netherlands); Hildebrandt, Hendrik [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Universität Bonn, Auf dem H’´ugel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Speagle, Josh [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, 60 Garden Street, MS 46, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kalinich, Adam [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Brodwin, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Brescia, Massimo; Cavuoti, Stefano [Astronomical Observatory of Capodimonte—INAF, via Moiariello 16, I-80131, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-11-01

    Calibrating the photometric redshifts of ≳10{sup 9} galaxies for upcoming weak lensing cosmology experiments is a major challenge for the astrophysics community. The path to obtaining the required spectroscopic redshifts for training and calibration is daunting, given the anticipated depths of the surveys and the difficulty in obtaining secure redshifts for some faint galaxy populations. Here we present an analysis of the problem based on the self-organizing map, a method of mapping the distribution of data in a high-dimensional space and projecting it onto a lower-dimensional representation. We apply this method to existing photometric data from the COSMOS survey selected to approximate the anticipated Euclid weak lensing sample, enabling us to robustly map the empirical distribution of galaxies in the multidimensional color space defined by the expected Euclid filters. Mapping this multicolor distribution lets us determine where—in galaxy color space—redshifts from current spectroscopic surveys exist and where they are systematically missing. Crucially, the method lets us determine whether a spectroscopic training sample is representative of the full photometric space occupied by the galaxies in a survey. We explore optimal sampling techniques and estimate the additional spectroscopy needed to map out the color–redshift relation, finding that sampling the galaxy distribution in color space in a systematic way can efficiently meet the calibration requirements. While the analysis presented here focuses on the Euclid survey, similar analysis can be applied to other surveys facing the same calibration challenge, such as DES, LSST, and WFIRST.

  11. Cluster galaxy population evolution from the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam survey: brightest cluster galaxies, stellar mass distribution, and active galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Ting; Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Lin, Sheng-Chieh; Oguri, Masamune; Chen, Kai-Feng; Tanaka, Masayuki; Chiu, I.-non; Huang, Song; Kodama, Tadayuki; Leauthaud, Alexie; More, Surhud; Nishizawa, Atsushi; Bundy, Kevin; Lin, Lihwai; Miyazaki, Satoshi; HSC Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The unprecedented depth and area surveyed by the Subaru Strategic Program with the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC-SSP) have enabled us to construct and publish the largest distant cluster sample out to z~1 to date. In this exploratory study of cluster galaxy evolution from z=1 to z=0.3, we investigate the stellar mass assembly history of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), and evolution of stellar mass and luminosity distributions, stellar mass surface density profile, as well as the population of radio galaxies. Our analysis is the first high redshift application of the top N richest cluster selection, which is shown to allow us to trace the cluster galaxy evolution faithfully. Our stellar mass is derived from a machine-learning algorithm, which we show to be unbiased and accurate with respect to the COSMOS data. We find very mild stellar mass growth in BCGs, and no evidence for evolution in both the total stellar mass-cluster mass correlation and the shape of the stellar mass surface density profile. The clusters are found to contain more red galaxies compared to the expectations from the field, even after the differences in density between the two environments have been taken into account. We also present the first measurement of the radio luminosity distribution in clusters out to z~1.

  12. The Sloan Lens ACS Survey. XIII. Discovery of 40 New Galaxy-scale Strong Lenses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shu, Yiping; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bolton, Adam S.; Koopmans, Léon V. E.; Treu, Tommaso; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Auger, Matthew W.; Czoske, Oliver; Gavazzi, Raphaël; Marshall, Philip J.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2017-01-01

    We present the full sample of 118 galaxy-scale strong-lens candidates in the Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) Survey for the Masses (S4TM) Survey, which are spectroscopically selected from the final data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Follow-up Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging observations

  13. Hα star formation rates of z > 1 galaxy clusters in the IRAC shallow cluster survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeimann, Gregory R.; Stanford, S. A. [Department of Physics, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Brodwin, Mark [University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Mancone, Conor [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Snyder, Gregory F. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Stern, Daniel; Eisenhardt, Peter [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Dey, Arjun [NOAO, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Moustakas, John [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Siena College, 515 Loudon Road, Loudonville, NY 12211 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope near-IR spectroscopy for 18 galaxy clusters at 1.0 Survey. We use Wide Field Camera 3 grism data to spectroscopically identify Hα emitters in both the cores of galaxy clusters as well as in field galaxies. We find a large cluster-to-cluster scatter in the star formation rates within a projected radius of 500 kpc, and many of our clusters (∼60%) have significant levels of star formation within a projected radius of 200 kpc. A stacking analysis reveals that dust reddening in these star-forming galaxies is positively correlated with stellar mass and may be higher in the field than the cluster at a fixed stellar mass. This may indicate a lower amount of gas in star-forming cluster galaxies than in the field population. Also, Hα equivalent widths of star-forming galaxies in the cluster environment are still suppressed below the level of the field. This suppression is most significant for lower mass galaxies (log M {sub *} < 10.0 M {sub ☉}). We therefore conclude that environmental effects are still important at 1.0 galaxies in galaxy clusters with log M {sub *} ≲ 10.0 M {sub ☉}.

  14. Galaxy masses in large surveys: Connecting luminous and dark matter with weak lensing and kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Reinabelle

    2011-01-01

    Galaxy masses are difficult to determine because light traces stars and gas in a non-trivial way, and does not trace dark matter, which extends well beyond the luminous regions of galaxies. In this thesis, I use the most direct probes of dark matter available---weak gravitational lensing and galaxy kinematics---to trace the total mass in galaxies (and galaxy clusters) in large surveys. In particular, I use the large, homogeneous dataset from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), which provides spectroscopic redshifts for a large sample of galaxies at z ≲ 0.2 and imaging data to a depth of r distortions and clustering measurements to derive a robust probe of gravity on cosmological scales. Finally, I combine weak lensing with the kinematics of disk galaxies to constrain the total mass profile over several orders of magnitude. I derive a minimal-scatter relation between disk velocity and stellar mass (also known as the Tully-Fisher relation) that can be used, by construction, on a similarly-selected lens sample. Then, I combine this relation with halo mass measurements from weak lensing to place constraints on the ratio of the optical to virial velocities, as well as the ratio of halo to stellar masses, both as a function of stellar mass. These results will serve as inputs to and constraints on disk galaxy formation models, which will be explored in future work.

  15. The remnants of galaxy formation from a panoramic survey of the region around M31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnachie, Alan W; Irwin, Michael J; Ibata, Rodrigo A; Dubinski, John; Widrow, Lawrence M; Martin, Nicolas F; Côté, Patrick; Dotter, Aaron L; Navarro, Julio F; Ferguson, Annette M N; Puzia, Thomas H; Lewis, Geraint F; Babul, Arif; Barmby, Pauline; Bienaymé, Olivier; Chapman, Scott C; Cockcroft, Robert; Collins, Michelle L M; Fardal, Mark A; Harris, William E; Huxor, Avon; Mackey, A Dougal; Peñarrubia, Jorge; Rich, R Michael; Richer, Harvey B; Siebert, Arnaud; Tanvir, Nial; Valls-Gabaud, David; Venn, Kimberly A

    2009-09-03

    In hierarchical cosmological models, galaxies grow in mass through the continual accretion of smaller ones. The tidal disruption of these systems is expected to result in loosely bound stars surrounding the galaxy, at distances that reach 10-100 times the radius of the central disk. The number, luminosity and morphology of the relics of this process provide significant clues to galaxy formation history, but obtaining a comprehensive survey of these components is difficult because of their intrinsic faintness and vast extent. Here we report a panoramic survey of the Andromeda galaxy (M31). We detect stars and coherent structures that are almost certainly remnants of dwarf galaxies destroyed by the tidal field of M31. An improved census of their surviving counterparts implies that three-quarters of M31's satellites brighter than M(v) = -6 await discovery. The brightest companion, Triangulum (M33), is surrounded by a stellar structure that provides persuasive evidence for a recent encounter with M31. This panorama of galaxy structure directly confirms the basic tenets of the hierarchical galaxy formation model and reveals the shared history of M31 and M33 in the unceasing build-up of galaxies.

  16. The MASSIVE survey - VIII. Stellar velocity dispersion profiles and environmental dependence of early-type galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, Melanie; Ma, Chung-Pei; Greene, Jenny E.; Thomas, Jens; Blakeslee, John P.; Walsh, Jonelle L.; Ito, Jennifer

    2018-02-01

    We measure the radial profiles of the stellar velocity dispersions, σ(R), for 90 early-type galaxies (ETGs) in the MASSIVE survey, a volume-limited integral-field spectroscopic (IFS) galaxy survey targeting all northern-sky ETGs with absolute K-band magnitude MK galaxies with sufficient radial coverage to determine γouter we find 36 per cent to have rising outer dispersion profiles, 30 per cent to be flat within the uncertainties and 34 per cent to be falling. The fraction of galaxies with rising outer profiles increases with M* and in denser galaxy environment, with 10 of the 11 most massive galaxies in our sample having flat or rising dispersion profiles. The strongest environmental correlations are with local density and halo mass, but a weaker correlation with large-scale density also exists. The average γouter is similar for brightest group galaxies, satellites and isolated galaxies in our sample. We find a clear positive correlation between the gradients of the outer dispersion profile and the gradients of the velocity kurtosis h4. Altogether, our kinematic results suggest that the increasing fraction of rising dispersion profiles in the most massive ETGs are caused (at least in part) by variations in the total mass profiles rather than in the velocity anisotropy alone.

  17. RASS-SDSS Galaxy cluster survey. IV. A ubiquitous dwarf galaxy population in clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popesso, P.; Biviano, A.; Böhringer, H.; Romaniello, M.

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the Luminosity Functions (LFs) of a subsample of 69 clusters from the RASS-SDSS galaxy cluster catalog. When calculated within the cluster physical sizes, given by r200 or r500, all the cluster LFs appear to have the same shape, well fitted by a composite of two Schechter functions with a marked upturn and a steepening at the faint-end. Previously reported cluster-to-cluster variations of the LF faint-end slope are due to the use of a metric cluster aperture for computing the LF of clusters of different masses. We determine the composite LF for early- and late-type galaxies, where the typing is based on the galaxy u-r colors. The late-type LF is well fitted by a single Schechter function with a steep slope (α=-2.0 in the r band, within r200). The early-type LF instead cannot be fitted by a single Schechter function, and a composite of two Schechter functions is needed. The faint-end upturn of the global cluster LF is due to the early-type cluster galaxies. The shape of the bright-end tail of the early-type LF does not seem to depend upon the local galaxy density or the distance from the cluster center. The late-type LF shows a significant variation only very near the cluster center. On the other hand, the faint-end tail of the early-type LF shows a significant and continuous variation with the environment. We provide evidence that the process responsible for creating the excess population of dwarf early type galaxies in clusters is a threshold process that occurs when the density exceeds ˜ 500 times the critical density of the Universe. We interpret our results in the context of the "harassment" scenario, where faint early-type cluster galaxies are predicted to be the descendants of tidally-stripped late-type galaxies.

  18. The Fueling of Active Galaxies: A Near-Infrared Imaging Survey of Seyfert and Normal Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, A.; Mulchaey, J. S.; Regan, M. W.

    1996-12-01

    Galactic bars are frequently invoked as a candidate for facilitating the transfer of mass from the interstellar medium of active galaxies to their central engines. However, studies of large Seyfert samples show little evidence that Seyferts occur preferentially in barred systems. The failure to find evidence for bars in many Seyfert galaxies may be due to the fact that most studies have concentrated on optical wavelengths where the presence of extinction or a young stellar population might mask any bar structures. In contrast, the near-infrared is expected to be a good place to study the host galaxy of Seyferts because neither dust nor young stars strongly affect the observed emission at these wavelengths. To study the role bars play in the fueling of active galaxies, we have obtained K' images of a large sample of nearby Seyfert and `` normal'' \\ galaxies, matched in redshift, Hubble type, inclination and blue luminosity. We use these images to compare the incidence of bars in Seyfert and normal galaxies and constrain the importance of bars in the fueling of nuclear activity.

  19. Dark energy properties from large future galaxy surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basse, Tobias; Bjælde, Ole Eggers; Hannestad, Steen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Hamann, Jan [Theory Division, Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Wong, Yvonne Y.Y., E-mail: basse@phys.au.dk, E-mail: oeb@phys.au.dk, E-mail: jan.hamann@cern.ch, E-mail: sth@phys.au.dk, E-mail: yvonne.y.wong@unsw.edu.au [School of Physics, The University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2014-05-01

    We perform a detailed forecast on how well a Euclid-like survey will be able to constrain dark energy and neutrino parameters from a combination of its cosmic shear power spectrum, galaxy power spectrum, and cluster mass function measurements. We find that the combination of these three probes vastly improves the survey's potential to measure the time evolution of dark energy. In terms of a dark energy figure-of-merit defined as (σ(w{sub p})σ(w{sub a})){sup −1}, we find a value of 690 for Euclid-like data combined with Planck-like measurements of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies in a 10-dimensional cosmological parameter space, assuming a ΛCDM fiducial cosmology. For the more commonly used 7-parameter model, we find a figure-of-merit of 1900 for the same data combination. We consider also the survey's potential to measure dark energy perturbations in models wherein the dark energy is parameterised as a fluid with a nonstandard non-adiabatic sound speed, and find that in an optimistic scenario in which w{sub 0} deviates from -1 by as much as is currently observationally allowed, models with c-circumflex {sub s}{sup 2} = 10{sup −6} and c-circumflex {sub s}{sup 2} = 1 can be distinguished from one another at more than 2σ significance. We emphasise that constraints on the dark energy sound speed from cluster measurements are strongly dependent on the modelling of the cluster mass function; significantly weaker sensitivities ensue if we modify our model to include fewer features of nonlinear dark energy clustering. Finally, we find that the sum of neutrino masses can be measured with a 1σ precision of 0.015 eV, even in complex cosmological models in which the dark energy equation of state varies with time. The 1σ sensitivity to the effective number of relativistic species N{sub eff}{sup ml} is approximately 0.03, meaning that the small deviation of 0.046 from 3 in the standard value of N{sub eff}{sup ml} due to non

  20. The EDGE-CALIFA Survey: Interferometric Observations of 126 Galaxies with CARMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolatto, Alberto D.; Wong, Tony; Utomo, Dyas; Blitz, Leo; Vogel, Stuart N.; Sánchez, Sebastián F.; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge; Cao, Yixian; Colombo, Dario; Dannerbauer, Helmut; García-Benito, Rubén; Herrera-Camus, Rodrigo; Husemann, Bernd; Kalinova, Veselina; Leroy, Adam K.; Leung, Gigi; Levy, Rebecca C.; Mast, Damián; Ostriker, Eve; Rosolowsky, Erik; Sandstrom, Karin M.; Teuben, Peter; van de Ven, Glenn; Walter, Fabian

    2017-09-01

    We present interferometric CO observations, made with the Combined Array for Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) interferometer, of galaxies from the Extragalactic Database for Galaxy Evolution survey (EDGE). These galaxies are selected from the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) sample, mapped with optical integral field spectroscopy. EDGE provides good-quality CO data (3σ sensitivity {{{Σ }}}{mol}˜ 11 {M}⊙ {{pc}}-2 before inclination correction, resolution ˜1.4 kpc) for 126 galaxies, constituting the largest interferometric CO survey of galaxies in the nearby universe. We describe the survey and data characteristics and products, then present initial science results. We find that the exponential scale lengths of the molecular, stellar, and star-forming disks are approximately equal, and galaxies that are more compact in molecular gas than in stars tend to show signs of interaction. We characterize the molecular-to-stellar ratio as a function of Hubble type and stellar mass and present preliminary results on the resolved relations between the molecular gas, stars, and star-formation rate. We then discuss the dependence of the resolved molecular depletion time on stellar surface density, nebular extinction, and gas metallicity. EDGE provides a key data set to address outstanding topics regarding gas and its role in star formation and galaxy evolution, which will be publicly available on completion of the quality assessment.

  1. Galaxy Evolution Insights from Spectral Modeling of Large Data Sets from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoversten, Erik A. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2007-10-01

    This thesis centers on the use of spectral modeling techniques on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to gain new insights into current questions in galaxy evolution. The SDSS provides a large, uniform, high quality data set which can be exploited in a number of ways. One avenue pursued here is to use the large sample size to measure precisely the mean properties of galaxies of increasingly narrow parameter ranges. The other route taken is to look for rare objects which open up for exploration new areas in galaxy parameter space. The crux of this thesis is revisiting the classical Kennicutt method for inferring the stellar initial mass function (IMF) from the integrated light properties of galaxies. A large data set (~ 105 galaxies) from the SDSS DR4 is combined with more in-depth modeling and quantitative statistical analysis to search for systematic IMF variations as a function of galaxy luminosity. Galaxy Hα equivalent widths are compared to a broadband color index to constrain the IMF. It is found that for the sample as a whole the best fitting IMF power law slope above 0.5 M is Γ = 1.5 ± 0.1 with the error dominated by systematics. Galaxies brighter than around Mr,0.1 = -20 (including galaxies like the Milky Way which has Mr,0.1 ~ -21) are well fit by a universal Γ ~ 1.4 IMF, similar to the classical Salpeter slope, and smooth, exponential star formation histories (SFH). Fainter galaxies prefer steeper IMFs and the quality of the fits reveal that for these galaxies a universal IMF with smooth SFHs is actually a poor assumption. Related projects are also pursued. A targeted photometric search is conducted for strongly lensed Lyman break galaxies (LBG) similar to MS1512-cB58. The evolution of the photometric selection technique is described as are the results of spectroscopic follow-up of the best targets. The serendipitous discovery of two interesting blue compact dwarf galaxies is reported. These

  2. AN HST/WFC3-IR MORPHOLOGICAL SURVEY OF GALAXIES AT z = 1.5-3.6. I. SURVEY DESCRIPTION AND MORPHOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, David R.; Shapley, Alice E.; Nagy, Sarah R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Steidel, Charles C. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Reddy, Naveen A. [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Erb, Dawn K., E-mail: drlaw@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: aes@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: snagy@ucla.edu, E-mail: ccs@astro.caltech.edu [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States)

    2012-01-20

    We present the results of a 42-orbit Hubble Space Telescope Wide-Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3) survey of the rest-frame optical morphologies of star-forming galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the range z = 1.5-3.6. The survey consists of 42 orbits of F160W imaging covering {approx}65 arcmin{sup 2} distributed widely across the sky and reaching a depth of 27.9 AB for a 5{sigma} detection within a 0.2 arcsec radius aperture. Focusing on an optically selected sample of 306 star-forming galaxies with stellar masses in the range M{sub *} = 10{sup 9}-10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }, we find that typical circularized effective half-light radii range from {approx}0.7 to 3.0 kpc and describe a stellar mass-radius relation as early as z {approx} 3. While these galaxies are best described by an exponential surface brightness profile (Sersic index n {approx} 1), their distribution of axis ratios is strongly inconsistent with a population of inclined exponential disks and is better reproduced by triaxial stellar systems with minor/major and intermediate/major axis ratios {approx}0.3 and 0.7, respectively. While rest-UV and rest-optical morphologies are generally similar for a subset of galaxies with HST/Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging data, differences are more pronounced at higher masses M{sub *} > 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }. Finally, we discuss galaxy morphology in the context of efforts to constrain the merger fraction, finding that morphologically identified mergers/non-mergers generally have insignificant differences in terms of physical observables such as stellar mass and star formation rate, although merger-like galaxies selected according to some criteria have statistically smaller effective radii and correspondingly larger {Sigma}{sub SFR}.

  3. EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES WITH TIDAL DEBRIS AND THEIR SCALING RELATIONS IN THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Taehyun; Sheth, Kartik; Munoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos [National Radio Astronomy Observatory/NAASC, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Hinz, Joannah L.; Zaritsky, Dennis [Steward Observatory University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Lee, Myung Gyoon [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Gadotti, Dimitri A. [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile); Knapen, Johan H. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Schinnerer, Eva [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Ho, Luis C.; Madore, Barry F. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki [Division of Astronomy, Department of Physical Sciences, University of Oulu, Oulu FIN-90014 (Finland); Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille (LAM), UMR6110, Universite de Provence/CNRS, Technopole de Marseille Etoile, 38 rue Frederic Joliot Curie, 13388 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); De Swardt, Bonita [South African Astronomical Observatory, Observatory 7935, Cape Town (South Africa); Comeron, Sebastien [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 61-1 Hwaamdong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Regan, Michael W. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Menendez-Delmestre, Karin [Observatorio do Valongo, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ladeira Pedro Antonio, 43, Saude CEP 20080-090 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); De Paz, Armando Gil [Departamento de Astrofisica, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); and others

    2012-07-01

    Tidal debris around galaxies can yield important clues on their evolution. We have identified tidal debris in 11 early-type galaxies (T {<=} 0) from a sample of 65 early types drawn from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S{sup 4}G). The tidal debris includes features such as shells, ripples, and tidal tails. A variety of techniques, including two-dimensional decomposition of galactic structures, were used to quantify the residual tidal features. The tidal debris contributes {approx}3%-10% to the total 3.6 {mu}m luminosity of the host galaxy. Structural parameters of the galaxies were estimated using two-dimensional profile fitting. We investigate the locations of galaxies with tidal debris in the fundamental plane and Kormendy relation. We find that galaxies with tidal debris lie within the scatter of early-type galaxies without tidal features. Assuming that the tidal debris is indicative of recent gravitational interaction or merger, this suggests that these galaxies have either undergone minor merging events so that the overall structural properties of the galaxies are not significantly altered, or they have undergone a major merging events but already have experienced sufficient relaxation and phase mixing so that their structural properties become similar to those of the non-interacting early-type galaxies.

  4. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: Spatially Resolving the Main Sequence of Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medling, Anne M.; Cortese, Luca; Croom, Scott M.; Green, Andrew W.; Groves, Brent; Hampton, Elise; Ho, I.-Ting; Davies, Luke J. M.; Kewley, Lisa J.; Moffett, Amanda J.; Schaefer, Adam L.; Taylor, Edward; Zafar, Tayyaba; Bekki, Kenji; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bloom, Jessica V.; Brough, Sarah; Bryant, Julia J.; Catinella, Barbara; Cecil, Gerald; Colless, Matthew; Couch, Warrick J.; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Driver, Simon P.; Federrath, Christoph; Foster, Caroline; Goldstein, Gregory; Goodwin, Michael; Hopkins, Andrew; Lawrence, J. S.; Leslie, Sarah K.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Lorente, Nuria P. F.; Owers, Matt S.; McDermid, Richard; Richards, Samuel N.; Sharp, Robert; Scott, Nicholas; Sweet, Sarah M.; Taranu, Dan S.; Tescari, Edoardo; Tonini, Chiara; van de Sande, Jesse; Walcher, C. Jakob; Wright, Angus

    2018-01-01

    We present the ˜800 star formation rate maps for the SAMI Galaxy Survey based on Hα emission maps, corrected for dust attenuation via the Balmer decrement, that are included in the SAMI Public Data Release 1. We mask out spaxels contaminated by non-stellar emission using the [O III]/Hβ, [N II]/Hα, [S II]/Hα, and [O I]/Hα line ratios. Using these maps, we examine the global and resolved star-forming main sequences of SAMI galaxies as a function of morphology, environmental density, and stellar mass. Galaxies further below the star-forming main sequence are more likely to have flatter star formation profiles. Early-type galaxies split into two populations with similar stellar masses and central stellar mass surface densities. The main sequence population has centrally-concentrated star formation similar to late-type galaxies, while galaxies >3σ below the main sequence show significantly reduced star formation most strikingly in the nuclear regions. The split populations support a two-step quenching mechanism, wherein halo mass first cuts off the gas supply and remaining gas continues to form stars until the local stellar mass surface density can stabilize the reduced remaining fuel against further star formation. Across all morphologies, galaxies in denser environments show a decreased specific star formation rate from the outside in, supporting an environmental cause for quenching, such as ram-pressure stripping or galaxy interactions.

  5. The Mass-Size Relation of Quenched, Quiescent Galaxies in the WISP Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahl, Anthony; Scarlata, Claudia; Rutkowski, Michael J.; Zanella, Anita; Bagley, Micaela B.; Colbert, James W.; Baronchelli, Ivano; Henry, Alaina L.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Teplitz, Harry I.; Rafelski, Marc; Dai, Yu Sophia; Malkan, Matthew Arnold; Mehta, Vihang; Beck, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    The relation between the stellar mass and size, if measured for galaxies of similar types, can be a useful tool for studying galactic evolution. We study the mass-size relation of quenched, quiescent galaxies to determine the effect of star-formation history on the growth of these objects over time. The WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallels (WISP) survey is a large HST IR grism survey of over 385 fields of ~4 arcmin2 each, and it is ideal for studying the star-formation rate with its broad spectral coverage. Using a subset of these fields with deep IR data and measurements across both filters (28 fields), we perform a color selection and identify 83 quenched galaxies with a median z~1.6. With GALFIT, we measure their effective radius and sersic index on the 2-D surface brightness distribution in the F110W band. We perform fitting of grism spectra of the observed galaxies to derive redshift, stellar mass and age for all galaxies. We combine the size, stellar mass, and stellar age determinations to investigate whether the evolution of the mass-size relation over time is primarily driven by the entrance of newly quenched galaxies or by processes affecting the individual quenched galaxies.

  6. The Gemini Deep Deep Survey and Integrated Spectra of Galaxies in the Redshift Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savaglio, S.; Glazebrook, K.; Abraham, R. G.; Crampton, D.; Chen, H.-W.; McCarthy, P. J. P.; Jorgensen, I.; Roth, K. C.; Hook, I. M.; Marzke, R. O.; Murowinski, R. G.; Carlberg, R. G.

    2003-12-01

    The Gemini Deep Deep Survey (GDDS) is an infrared-selected ultra-deep spectroscopic program aiming to investigate galaxies in the redshift interval 1 1 galaxies are at the most 5 Gyr old, it is easier to understand their underlying stellar populations. Using the multi-object spectrograph at the Gemini North telescope, combined with the nod and shuffle technique, we have detected a number of interesting galaxies showing very different spectral features, from blue star-forming, to red quiescent, to ``k+a" post starburst. To identify the nature of these objects, we use the newly proposed spectral synthesis models able to deal with young/metal poor stellar systems.

  7. Distribution Of Maximal Luminosity Of Galaxies In The Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Regós, E; Rácz, Z; Taghizadeh, M; Ozogany, K

    2010-01-01

    Extreme value statistics (EVS) is applied to the pixelized distribution of galaxy luminosities in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We analyze the DR6 Main Galaxy Sample (MGS), divided into red and blue subsamples, as well as the Luminous Red Galaxy Sample (LRGS). A non-parametric comparison of the EVS of the luminosities with the Fisher-Tippett-Gumbel distribution (limit distribution for independent variables distributed by the Press-Schechter law) indicates a good agreement provided uncertainties arising both from the finite size of the samples and from the sample size distribution are accounted for.

  8. VLA-ANGST: A HIGH-RESOLUTION H I SURVEY OF NEARBY DWARF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, Juergen [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Stilp, Adrienne M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Warren, Steven R.; Skillman, Evan D. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); De Blok, W. J. G. [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Oude Hoogeveensedijk 4, 7991 PD Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Koribalski, Baerbel [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); West, Andrew A., E-mail: jott@nrao.edu, E-mail: adrienne@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: jd@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: warren@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: walter@mpia.de, E-mail: blok@astron.nl, E-mail: Baerbel.Koribalski@csiro.au, E-mail: aawest@bu.edu [Department of Astronomy, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    We present the 'Very Large Array survey of Advanced Camera for Surveys Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury galaxies (VLA-ANGST)'. VLA-ANGST is a National Radio Astronomy Observatory Large Program consisting of high spectral (0.6-2.6 km s{sup -1}) and spatial ({approx}6'') resolution observations of neutral, atomic hydrogen (H I) emission toward 35 nearby dwarf galaxies from the ANGST survey. ANGST is a systematic Hubble Space Telescope survey to establish a legacy of uniform multi-color photometry of resolved stars for a volume-limited sample of nearby galaxies (D {approx}< 4 Mpc). VLA-ANGST provides VLA H I observations of the sub-sample of ANGST galaxies with recent star formation that are observable from the northern hemisphere and that were not observed in the 'The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey' (THINGS). The overarching scientific goal of VLA-ANGST is to investigate fundamental characteristics of the neutral interstellar medium (ISM) of dwarf galaxies. Here we describe the VLA observations, the data reduction, and the final VLA-ANGST data products. We present an atlas of the integrated H I maps, the intensity-weighted velocity fields, the second moment maps as a measure for the velocity dispersion of the H I, individual channel maps, and integrated H I spectra for each VLA-ANGST galaxy. We closely follow the observational setup and data reduction of THINGS to achieve comparable sensitivity and angular resolution. A major difference between VLA-ANGST and THINGS, however, is the high velocity resolution of the VLA-ANGST observations (0.65 and 1.3 km s{sup -1} for the majority of the galaxies). The VLA-ANGST data products are made publicly available through a dedicated Web site (https://science.nrao.edu/science/surveys/vla-angst). With available star formation histories from resolved stellar populations and lower resolution ancillary observations from the far-infrared to the ultraviolet, VLA-ANGST will enable detailed studies of the

  9. The nearby field galaxy survey : a spectrophotometric study of 196 galaxies in the local field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Rolf Arthur

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to accurately describe the distribution in the local galaxy population of (1) the magnitudes and colors, (2) emission and absorption line strengths, (3) star formation rate and star formation history, (4) morphology, and (5) structural parameters. zie: Chapter 1,

  10. The SAGA Survey. I. Satellite Galaxy Populations around Eight Milky Way Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geha, Marla; Wechsler, Risa H.; Mao, Yao-Yuan; Tollerud, Erik J.; Weiner, Benjamin; Bernstein, Rebecca; Hoyle, Ben; Marchi, Sebastian; Marshall, Phil J.; Muñoz, Ricardo; Lu, Yu

    2017-09-01

    We present the survey strategy and early results of the “Satellites Around Galactic Analogs” (SAGA) Survey. The SAGA Survey’s goal is to measure the distribution of satellite galaxies around 100 systems analogous to the Milky Way down to the luminosity of the Leo I dwarf galaxy ({M}rsatellite luminosity functions for eight Milky-Way-analog galaxies between 20 and 40 Mpc. These systems have nearly complete spectroscopic coverage of candidate satellites within the projected host virial radius down to {r}osatellite galaxies: 14 new satellite galaxies meet our formal criteria around our complete host systems, plus 11 additional satellites in either incompletely surveyed hosts or below our formal magnitude limit. Combined with 13 previously known satellites, there are a total of 27 satellites around 8 complete Milky-Way-analog hosts. We find a wide distribution in the number of satellites per host, from 1 to 9, in the luminosity range for which there are 5 Milky Way satellites. Standard abundance matching extrapolated from higher luminosities predicts less scatter between hosts and a steeper luminosity function slope than observed. We find that the majority of satellites (26 of 27) are star-forming. These early results indicate that the Milky Way has a different satellite population than typical in our sample, potentially changing the physical interpretation of measurements based only on the Milky Way’s satellite galaxies.

  11. Galaxy-Galaxy Lensing in EAGLE: comparison with data from 180 square degrees of the KiDS and GAMA surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Velliscig, Marco; Cacciato, Marcello; Hoekstra, Henk; Schaye, Joop; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Loveday, Jon; Norberg, Peder; Sifón, Cristóbal; Schneider, Peter; van Uitert, Edo; Viola, Massimo; Brough, Sarah; Erben, Thomas; Holwerda, Benne W.

    2016-01-01

    We present predictions for the galaxy-galaxy lensing (GGL) profile from the EAGLE hydrodynamical cosmological simulation at redshift z = 0.18, in the spatial range 0.02 galaxies imaged by the Kilo Degree Survey around spectroscopically confirmed foreground galaxies from the Ga...

  12. Autonomous Coral Reef Survey in Support of Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven G. Ackleson

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available An autonomous surface vehicle instrumented with optical and acoustical sensors was deployed in Kane'ohe Bay, HI, U.S.A., to provide high-resolution, in situ observations of coral reef reflectance with minimal human presence. The data represented a wide range in bottom type, water depth, and illumination and supported more thorough investigations of remote sensing methods for identifying and mapping shallow reef features. The in situ data were used to compute spectral bottom reflectance and remote sensing reflectance, Rrs,λ, as a function of water depth and benthic features. The signals were used to distinguish between live coral and uncolonized sediment within the depth range of the measurements (2.5–5 m. In situRrs, λ were found to compare well with remotely sensed measurements from an imaging spectrometer, the Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS, deployed on an aircraft at high altitude. Cloud cover and in situ sensor orientation were found to have minimal impact on in situRrs, λ, suggesting that valid reflectance data may be collected using autonomous surveys even when atmospheric conditions are not favorable for remote sensing operations. The use of reflectance in the red and near infrared portions of the spectrum, expressed as the red edge height, REHλ, was investigated for detecting live aquatic vegetative biomass, including coral symbionts and turf algae. The REHλ signal from live coral was detected in Kane'ohe Bay to a depth of approximately 4 m with in situ measurements. A remote sensing algorithm based on the REHλ signal was defined and applied to AVIRIS imagery of the entire bay and was found to reveal areas of shallow, dense coral and algal cover. The peak wavelength of REHλ decreased with increasing water depth, indicating that a more complete examination of the red edge signal may potentially yield a remote sensing approach to simultaneously estimate vegetative biomass and bathymetry in shallow water.

  13. THE SPITZER INTERACTING GALAXIES SURVEY: A MID-INFRARED ATLAS OF STAR FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brassington, N. J. [School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Zezas, A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Lanz, L.; Smith, Howard A.; Willner, S. P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Klein, C., E-mail: n.brassington@herts.ac.uk [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    The Spitzer Interacting Galaxies Survey is a sample of 103 nearby galaxies in 48 systems, selected using association likelihoods and therefore free from disturbed morphology biases. All galaxies have been observed with Infrared Array Camera and MIPS 24 μm bands from the Spitzer Space Telescope. This catalog presents the global flux densities and colors of all systems and correlations between the interacting systems and their specific star formation rate (sSFR). This sample contains a wide variety of galaxy interactions with systems ranging in mass, mass ratios, and gas-content as well as interaction strength. This study seeks to identify the process of triggering star formation in galaxy interactions, therefore, we focus on the non-active galactic nucleus spiral galaxies only. From this subset of 70 spiral galaxies we have determined that this sample has enhanced sSFR compared to a sample of non-interacting field galaxies. Through optical data we have classified each system by “interaction strength”; the strongly interacting (Stage 4) galaxies have higher sSFR values than the weakly (Stage 2) and moderately (Stage 3) interacting systems. However, the Stage 2 and 3 systems have statistically identical sSFR properties, despite the lack of optical interaction signatures exhibited by the Stage 2 galaxies. We suggest that the similarity of sSFR in these stages could be a consequence of some of these Stage 2 systems actually being post-perigalactic and having had sufficient time for their tidal features to fade to undetectable levels. This interpretation is consistent with the correlation of sSFR with separation, which we have determined to have little variation up to 100 kpc.

  14. Gemini Observations of Galaxies in Rich Early Environments (GOGREEN) I: survey description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, Michael L.; Gilbank, David G.; Muzzin, Adam; Rudnick, Gregory; Cooper, Michael C.; Lidman, Chris; Biviano, Andrea; Demarco, Ricardo; McGee, Sean L.; Nantais, Julie B.; Noble, Allison; Old, Lyndsay; Wilson, Gillian; Yee, Howard K. C.; Bellhouse, Callum; Cerulo, Pierluigi; Chan, Jeffrey; Pintos-Castro, Irene; Simpson, Rane; van der Burg, Remco F. J.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Ziparo, Felicia; Alonso, María Victoria; Bower, Richard G.; De Lucia, Gabriella; Finoguenov, Alexis; Lambas, Diego Garcia; Muriel, Hernan; Parker, Laura C.; Rettura, Alessandro; Valotto, Carlos; Wetzel, Andrew

    2017-10-01

    We describe a new Large Program in progress on the Gemini North and South telescopes: Gemini Observations of Galaxies in Rich Early Environments (GOGREEN). This is an imaging and deep spectroscopic survey of 21 galaxy systems at 1 10 in halo mass. The scientific objectives include measuring the role of environment in the evolution of low-mass galaxies, and measuring the dynamics and stellar contents of their host haloes. The targets are selected from the SpARCS, SPT, COSMOS, and SXDS surveys, to be the evolutionary counterparts of today's clusters and groups. The new red-sensitive Hamamatsu detectors on GMOS, coupled with the nod-and-shuffle sky subtraction, allow simultaneous wavelength coverage over λ ˜ 0.6-1.05 μm, and this enables a homogeneous and statistically complete redshift survey of galaxies of all types. The spectroscopic sample targets galaxies with AB magnitudes z΄ < 24.25 and [3.6] μm < 22.5, and is therefore statistically complete for stellar masses M* ≳ 1010.3 M⊙, for all galaxy types and over the entire redshift range. Deep, multiwavelength imaging has been acquired over larger fields for most systems, spanning u through K, in addition to deep IRAC imaging at 3.6 μm. The spectroscopy is ˜50 per cent complete as of semester 17A, and we anticipate a final sample of ˜500 new cluster members. Combined with existing spectroscopy on the brighter galaxies from GCLASS, SPT, and other sources, GOGREEN will be a large legacy cluster and field galaxy sample at this redshift that spectroscopically covers a wide range in stellar mass, halo mass, and clustercentric radius.

  15. The statistical investigation of the First and Second Byurakan survey galaxies and their neighbors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazaryan, Tigran A.

    2014-05-01

    In the thesis we study close pairs of galaxies with the aim of understanding the influence of gravitational interaction on nuclear activity and star formation of paired galaxies. For this purpose we investigate dependences of integral parameters of galaxies, their star formation and properties of nuclei on kinematic parameters of systems and their large-scale environment. The thesis has an introduction, three main chapters, a summary, lists of abbreviations and references, and three appendices. In the first chapter, the methods of selection of sample of pairs of galaxies and measurements of physical parameters of the First Byurakan Survey (Markarian) galaxies and their neighbors are presented, and the databases in appendices A and B are described, which contain parameters of neighbors of Markarian galaxies measured by us, and the parameters of pairs having Markarian galaxies, based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data. The selection effects of sample of pairs are discussed, and the statistical comparison of Markarian galaxies and their neighbors is done. The results of statistical study of star formation and activity of nuclei in pairs having Markarian galaxies are presented, as well as the correlations between properties of galaxies in pairs and the physical mechanisms behind them. In the second chapter, the results of statistical study of the Second Byurakan Survey (SBS) galaxies and their neighbors, and star formation and activity of nuclei in those pairs are presented and discussed. In the third chapter, possibilities of using supernovae as indicators of star formation are discussed, the sample of supernovae in pairs of galaxies is presented, and study of star formation in pairs of interacting galaxies by means of that sample of supernovae is done. Also а conclusion about the nature of progenitors of different types of supernovae is made. The short summary of main results of the study concludes the thesis. The thesis has 158 pages. The main results

  16. Adaptive Optics Imaging Survey of Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laag, E A; Canalizo, G; van Breugel, W; Gates, E L; de Vries, W; Stanford, S A

    2006-03-13

    We present high resolution imaging observations of a sample of previously unidentified far-infrared galaxies at z < 0.3. The objects were selected by cross-correlating the IRAS Faint Source Catalog with the VLA FIRST catalog and the HST Guide Star Catalog to allow for adaptive optics observations. We found two new ULIGs (with L{sub FIR} {ge} 10{sup 12} L{sub {circle_dot}}) and 19 new LIGs (with L{sub FIR} {ge} 10{sup 11} L{sub {circle_dot}}). Twenty of the galaxies in the sample were imaged with either the Lick or Keck adaptive optics systems in H or K{prime}. Galaxy morphologies were determined using the two dimensional fitting program GALFIT and the residuals examined to look for interesting structure. The morphologies reveal that at least 30% are involved in tidal interactions, with 20% being clear mergers. An additional 50% show signs of possible interaction. Line ratios were used to determine powering mechanism; of the 17 objects in the sample showing clear emission lines--four are active galactic nuclei and seven are starburst galaxies. The rest exhibit a combination of both phenomena.

  17. Molecules as tracers of galaxy evolution: an EMIR survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costagliola, F.; Aalto, S.; I. Rodriguez, M.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the molecular gas properties of a sample of 23 galaxies in order to find and test chemical signatures of galaxy evolution and to compare them to IR evolutionary tracers. Observation at 3 mm wavelengths were obtained with the EMIR broadband receiver, mounted on the IRAM 30 m telescope...... on Pico Veleta, Spain. We compare the emission of the main molecular species with existing models of chemical evolution by means of line intensity ratios diagrams and principal component analysis. We detect molecular emission in 19 galaxies in two 8 GHz-wide bands centred at 88 and 112 GHz. The main...... detected transitions are the J=1-0 lines of CO, 13CO, HCN, HNC, HCO+, CN, and C2H. We also detect HC3N J=10-9 in the galaxies IRAS 17208, IC 860, NGC 4418, NGC 7771, and NGC 1068. The only HC3N detections are in objects with HCO+/HCN 0.8). The brightest HC3N emission is found in IC 860, where we also...

  18. THE RINGS SURVEY. I. Hα AND H i VELOCITY MAPS OF GALAXY NGC 2280

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Carl J.; Williams, T. B.; Sellwood, J. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Spekkens, Kristine; Lee-Waddell, K. [Department of Physics, Royal Military College of Canada, P.O. Box 17000, Station Forces, Kingston, ON, K7K 7B4, XNS (Canada); Naray, Rachel Kuzio de, E-mail: cmitchell@physics.rutgers.edu, E-mail: williams@saao.ac.za, E-mail: kristine.spekkens@rmc.ca, E-mail: karen.lee-waddell@rmc.ca, E-mail: kuzio@astro.gsu.edu, E-mail: sellwood@physics.rutgers.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, 25 Park Place, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Precise measurements of gas kinematics in the disk of a spiral galaxy can be used to estimate its mass distribution. The Southern African Large Telescope has a large collecting area and field of view, and is equipped with a Fabry–Pérot (FP) interferometer that can measure gas kinematics in a galaxy from the Hα line. To take advantage of this capability, we have constructed a sample of 19 nearby spiral galaxies, the RSS Imaging and Spectroscopy Nearby Galaxy Survey, as targets for detailed study of their mass distributions and have collected much of the needed data. In this paper, we present velocity maps produced from Hα FP interferometry and H i aperture synthesis for one of these galaxies, NGC 2280, and show that the two velocity measurements are generally in excellent agreement. Minor differences can mostly be attributed to the different spatial distributions of the excited and neutral gas in this galaxy, but we do detect some anomalous velocities in our Hα velocity map of the kind that have previously been detected in other galaxies. Models produced from our two velocity maps agree well with each other and our estimates of the systemic velocity and projection angles confirm previous measurements of these quantities for NGC 2280.

  19. Emission-Line Galaxies from the HST PEARS Grism Survey Southern Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straughn, Amber; Pirzkal, N.; Meurer, G.; Cohen, S.; Windhorst, R.; Malhotra, S.; Gardner, J.; Rhoads, J.; Hathi, N.; Xu, C.

    2009-01-01

    We have detected a sample of emission-line galaxies (ELGs) from the PEARS (Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically) HST/ACS grism survey Southern Fields. The PEARS Southern Fields consist of five ACS pointings (including the Hubble Ultra Deep Field) with the G800L grism for a total of 120 orbits, revealing thousands of faint object spectra in the GOODS-South region of the sky. Using a 2-dimensional detection and extraction procedure, we find 320 emission lines orginating from 230 galaxy ``knots'' within 203 individual galaxies. Line identification results in 118 new grism-spectroscopic redshifts for galaxies in the GOODS-South Field. Our detection method has allowed us to observe emission lines from distinct giant star-forming regions across individual galaxies at redshifts z 0.5. We find that the radial distances of these HII regions generally reside near the galaxies' optical continuum half-light radii, similar to those of giant HII regions in local galaxies.

  20. The stellar orbit distribution in present-day galaxies inferred from the CALIFA survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ling; van de Ven, Glenn; Bosch, Remco van den; Rix, Hans-Walter; Lyubenova, Mariya; Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; Martig, Marie; Mao, Shude; Xu, Dandan; Jin, Yunpeng; Obreja, Aura; Grand, Robert J. J.; Dutton, Aaron A.; Macciò, Andrea V.; Gómez, Facundo A.; Walcher, Jakob C.; García-Benito, Rubén; Zibetti, Stefano; Sánchez, Sebastian F.

    2018-03-01

    Galaxy formation entails the hierarchical assembly of mass, along with the condensation of baryons and the ensuing, self-regulating star formation1,2. The stars form a collisionless system whose orbit distribution retains dynamical memory that can constrain a galaxy's formation history3. The orbits dominated by ordered rotation, with near-maximum circularity λz ≈ 1, are called kinematically cold, and the orbits dominated by random motion, with low circularity λz ≈ 0, are kinematically hot. The fraction of stars on `cold' orbits, compared with the fraction on `hot' orbits, speaks directly to the quiescence or violence of the galaxies' formation histories4,5. Here we present such orbit distributions, derived from stellar kinematic maps through orbit-based modelling for a well-defined, large sample of 300 nearby galaxies. The sample, drawn from the CALIFA survey6, includes the main morphological galaxy types and spans a total stellar mass range from 108.7 to 1011.9 solar masses. Our analysis derives the orbit-circularity distribution as a function of galaxy mass and its volume-averaged total distribution. We find that across most of the considered mass range and across morphological types, there are more stars on `warm' orbits defined as 0.25 ≤ λz ≤ 0.8 than on either `cold' or `hot' orbits. This orbit-based `Hubble diagram' provides a benchmark for galaxy formation simulations in a cosmological context.

  1. FAINT TIDAL FEATURES IN GALAXIES WITHIN THE CANADA-FRANCE-HAWAII TELESCOPE LEGACY SURVEY WIDE FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkinson, Adam M.; Abraham, Roberto G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Ferguson, Annette M. N. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-01

    We present an analysis of the detectability of faint tidal features in galaxies from the wide-field component of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. Our sample consists of 1781 luminous (M{sub r{sup '}}<-19.3 mag) galaxies in the magnitude range 15.5 mag < r' < 17 mag and in the redshift range 0.04 < z < 0.2. Although we have classified tidal features according to their morphology (e.g., streams, shells, and tails), we do not attempt to interpret them in terms of their physical origin (e.g., major versus minor merger debris). Instead, we provide a catalog that is intended to provide raw material for future investigations which will probe the nature of low surface brightness substructure around galaxies. We find that around 12% of the galaxies in our sample show clear tidal features at the highest confidence level. This fraction rises to about 18% if we include systems with convincing, albeit weaker tidal features, and to 26% if we include systems with more marginal features that may or may not be tidal in origin. These proportions are a strong function of rest-frame color and of stellar mass. Linear features, shells, and fans are much more likely to occur in massive galaxies with stellar masses >10{sup 10.5} M {sub Sun }, and red galaxies are twice as likely to show tidal features than are blue galaxies.

  2. The SAGES Legacy Unifying Globulars and Galaxies survey (SLUGGS): sample definition, methods, and initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodie, Jean P.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Jennings, Zachary G.; Pota, Vincenzo; Kader, Justin; Roediger, Joel C.; Villaume, Alexa; Arnold, Jacob A.; Woodley, Kristin A. [University of California Observatories, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Strader, Jay [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Forbes, Duncan A.; Pastorello, Nicola; Usher, Christopher; Blom, Christina; Kartha, Sreeja S. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Foster, Caroline; Spitler, Lee R., E-mail: jbrodie@ucsc.edu [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia)

    2014-11-20

    We introduce and provide the scientific motivation for a wide-field photometric and spectroscopic chemodynamical survey of nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs) and their globular cluster (GC) systems. The SAGES Legacy Unifying Globulars and GalaxieS (SLUGGS) survey is being carried out primarily with Subaru/Suprime-Cam and Keck/DEIMOS. The former provides deep gri imaging over a 900 arcmin{sup 2} field-of-view to characterize GC and host galaxy colors and spatial distributions, and to identify spectroscopic targets. The NIR Ca II triplet provides GC line-of-sight velocities and metallicities out to typically ∼8 R {sub e}, and to ∼15 R {sub e} in some cases. New techniques to extract integrated stellar kinematics and metallicities to large radii (∼2-3 R {sub e}) are used in concert with GC data to create two-dimensional (2D) velocity and metallicity maps for comparison with simulations of galaxy formation. The advantages of SLUGGS compared with other, complementary, 2D-chemodynamical surveys are its superior velocity resolution, radial extent, and multiple halo tracers. We describe the sample of 25 nearby ETGs, the selection criteria for galaxies and GCs, the observing strategies, the data reduction techniques, and modeling methods. The survey observations are nearly complete and more than 30 papers have so far been published using SLUGGS data. Here we summarize some initial results, including signatures of two-phase galaxy assembly, evidence for GC metallicity bimodality, and a novel framework for the formation of extended star clusters and ultracompact dwarfs. An integrated overview of current chemodynamical constraints on GC systems points to separate, in situ formation modes at high redshifts for metal-poor and metal-rich GCs.

  3. The EDGE–CALIFA Survey: Variations in the Molecular Gas Depletion Time in Local Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utomo, Dyas; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Wong, Tony; Ostriker, Eve C.; Blitz, Leo; Sanchez, Sebastian F.; Colombo, Dario; Leroy, Adam K.; Cao, Yixian; Dannerbauer, Helmut; Garcia-Benito, Ruben; Husemann, Bernd; Kalinova, Veselina; Levy, Rebecca C.; Mast, Damian; Rosolowsky, Erik; Vogel, Stuart N.

    2017-11-01

    We present results from the EDGE survey, a spatially resolved CO(1‑0) follow-up to CALIFA, an optical Integral Field Unit survey of local galaxies. By combining the data products of EDGE and CALIFA, we study the variation in molecular gas depletion time (τ dep) on kiloparsec scales in 52 galaxies. We divide each galaxy into two parts: the center, defined as the region within 0.1 {R}25, and the disk, defined as the region between 0.1 and 0.7 {R}25. We find that 14 galaxies show a shorter τ dep (∼1 Gyr) in the center relative to that in the disk (τ dep ∼ 2.4 Gyr), which means the central region in those galaxies is more efficient at forming stars per unit molecular gas mass. This finding implies that the centers with shorter τ dep resemble the intermediate regime between galactic disks and starburst galaxies. Furthermore, the central drop in τ dep is correlated with a central increase in the stellar surface density, suggesting that a shorter τ dep is associated with molecular gas compression by the stellar gravitational potential. We argue that varying the CO-to-H2 conversion factor only exaggerates the central drop of τ dep.

  4. A multiwavelength survey of HI-excess galaxies with surprisingly inefficient star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geréb, K.; Janowiecki, S.; Catinella, B.; Cortese, L.; Kilborn, V.

    2018-01-01

    We present the results of a multiwavelength survey of H I-excess galaxies, an intriguing population with large H I reservoirs associated with little current star formation. These galaxies have stellar masses M⋆ > 1010 M⊙, and were identified as outliers in the gas fraction vs. NUV-r color and stellar mass surface density scaling relations based on the GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey (GASS). We obtained H I interferometry with the GMRT, Keck optical long-slit spectroscopy and deep optical imaging (where available) for four galaxies. Our analysis reveals multiple possible reasons for the H I excess in these systems. One galaxy, AGC 10111, shows an H I disk that is counter-rotating with respect to the stellar bulge, a clear indication of external origin of the gas. Another galaxy appears to host a Malin 1-type disk, where a large specific angular momentum has to be invoked to explain the extreme MHI/M⋆ ratio of 166%. The other two galaxies have early-type morphology with very high gas fractions. The lack of merger signatures (unsettled gas, stellar shells and streams) in these systems suggests that these gas-rich disks have been built several Gyr-s ago, but it remains unclear how the gas reservoirs were assembled. Numerical simulations of large cosmological volumes are needed to gain insight into the formation of these rare and interesting systems.

  5. Mg II-Absorbing Galaxies in the UltraVISTA Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroupe, Darren; Lundgren, Britt

    2018-01-01

    Light that is emitted from distant quasars can become partially absorbed by intervening gaseous structures, including galaxies, in its path toward Earth, revealing information about the chemical content, degree of ionization, organization and evolution of these structures through time. In this project, quasar spectra are used to probe the halos of foreground galaxies at a mean redshift of z=1.1 in the COSMOS Field. Mg II absorption lines in Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar spectra are paired with galaxies in the UltraVISTA catalog at an impact parameter less than 200 kpc. A sample of 77 strong Mg II absorbers with a rest-frame equivalent width ≥ 0.3 Å and redshift from 0.34 < z < 2.21 are investigated to find equivalent width ratios of Mg II, C IV and Fe II absorption lines, and their relation to the impact parameter and the star formation rates, stellar masses, environments and redshifts of their host galaxies.

  6. Clustering of far-infrared galaxies in the AKARI All-Sky Survey North

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollo, A.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Solarz, A.; Rybka, P.; Suzuki, T. L.; Pȩpiak, A.; Oyabu, S.

    2013-10-01

    We present the measurements of the angular two-point correlation function for AKARI 90-μm point sources, detected outside the Milky Way plane and other regions characterized by high Galactic extinction in the northern Galactic hemisphere, and categorized as extragalactic sources according to our far-infrared-color based criterion. Together with our previous work (Pollo et al., 2013) this is the first measurement of the large-scale angular clustering of galaxies selected in the far-infrared after IRAS. We present the first attempt to estimate the spatial clustering properties of AKARI All-Sky galaxies and we conclude that they are mostly a very nearby ( z ≤ 0.1) population of moderately clustered galaxies. We measure their correlation length r 0 ~ 4.5 h -1 Mpc, which is consistent with the assumption that the FIS AKARI All-Sky surveys observes mostly a nearby star-forming population of galaxies.

  7. SHELS: A complete galaxy redshift survey with R ≤ 20.6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geller, Margaret J.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Kurtz, Michael J. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dell' Antonio, Ian P. [Department of Physics, Brown University, Box 1843, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Zahid, Harus Jabran, E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: hhwang@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: dfabricant@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: mkurtz@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: ian@het.brown.edu, E-mail: jabran@ifa.hawaii.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The SHELS (Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey) is a complete redshift survey covering two well-separated fields (F1 and F2) of the Deep Lens Survey to a limiting R = 20.6. Here we describe the redshift survey of the F2 field (R.A.{sub 2000} = 09{sup h}19{sup m}32.4 and decl.{sub 2000} = +30°00'00''). The survey includes 16,294 new redshifts measured with the Hectospec on the MMT. The resulting survey of the 4 deg{sup 2} F2 field is 95% complete to R = 20.6, currently the densest survey to this magnitude limit. The median survey redshift is z = 0.3; the survey provides a view of structure in the range 0.1 ≲ z ≲ 0.6. An animation displays the large-scale structure in the survey region. We provide a redshift, spectral index D {sub n}4000, and stellar mass for each galaxy in the survey. We also provide a metallicity for each galaxy in the range 0.2 survey, we examine the behavior of the index D {sub n}4000 as a function of galaxy luminosity, stellar mass, and redshift. The known evolutionary and stellar mass dependent properties of the galaxy population are cleanly evident in the data. We also show that the mass-metallicity relation previously determined from these data is robust to the analysis approach.

  8. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). Star formation history of passive red galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siudek, M.; Małek, K.; Scodeggio, M.; Garilli, B.; Pollo, A.; Haines, C. P.; Fritz, A.; Bolzonella, M.; de la Torre, S.; Granett, B. R.; Guzzo, L.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; De Lucia, G.; Davidzon, I.; Franzetti, P.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Marchetti, A.; Marulli, F.; Polletta, M.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Branchini, E.; Ilbert, O.; Gargiulo, A.; Moscardini, L.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Zamorani, G.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We trace the evolution and the star formation history of passive red galaxies, using a subset of the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). The detailed spectral analysis of stellar populations of intermediate-redshift passive red galaxies allows the build up of their stellar content to be followed over the last 8 billion years. Methods: We extracted a sample of passive red galaxies in the redshift range 0.4 history of passive red galaxies. We compare the results with a grid of synthetic spectra to constrain the star formation epochs of these galaxies. We characterize the formation redshift-stellar mass relation for intermediate-redshift passive red galaxies. Results: We find that at z 1 stellar populations in low-mass passive red galaxies are younger than in high-mass passive red galaxies, similar to what is observed at the present epoch. Over the full analyzed redshift range 0.4 time passes, I.e., what has become known as the downsizing picture. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile, using the Very Large Telescope under programs 182.A-0886 and partly 070.A-9007. Also based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products produced at TERAPIX and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, a collaborative project of NRC and CNRS. The VIPERS web site is http://www.vipers.inaf.it/

  9. EVOLUTION OF GROUP GALAXIES FROM THE FIRST RED-SEQUENCE CLUSTER SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, I. H. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Yee, H. K. C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Hsieh, B. C. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Gladders, M., E-mail: tli@astro.swin.edu.au, E-mail: hyee@astro.utoronto.ca, E-mail: bchsieh@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: gladders@oddjob.uchicago.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Ave, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2012-04-20

    We study the evolution of the red-galaxy fraction (f{sub red}) in 905 galaxy groups with 0.15 {<=} z < 0.52. The galaxy groups are identified by the 'probability friends-of-friends' algorithm from the first Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS1) photometric-redshift sample. There is a high degree of uniformity in the properties of the red sequence of the group galaxies, indicating that the luminous red-sequence galaxies in the groups are already in place by z {approx} 0.5 and that they have a formation epoch of z {approx}> 2. In general, groups at lower redshifts exhibit larger f{sub red} than those at higher redshifts, showing a group Butcher-Oemler effect. We investigate the evolution of f{sub red} by examining its dependence on four parameters, one of which can be classified as intrinsic and three of which can be classified as environmental: galaxy stellar mass (M{sub *}), total group stellar mass (M{sub *,grp}, a proxy for group halo mass), normalized group-centric radius (r{sub grp}), and local galaxy density ({Sigma}{sub 5}). We find that M{sub *} is the dominant parameter such that there is a strong correlation between f{sub red} and galaxy stellar mass. Furthermore, the dependence of f{sub red} on the environmental parameters is also a strong function of M{sub *}. Massive galaxies (M{sub *} {approx}> 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }) show little dependence of f{sub red} on r{sub grp}, M{sub *,grp}, and {Sigma}{sub 5} over the redshift range. The dependence of f{sub red} on these parameters is primarily seen for galaxies with lower masses, especially for M{sub *} {approx}< 10{sup 10.6} M{sub Sun }. We observe an apparent 'group down-sizing' effect, in that galaxies in lower-mass halos, after controlling for galaxy stellar mass, have lower f{sub red}. We find a dependence of f{sub red} on both r{sub grp} and {Sigma}{sub 5} after the other parameters are controlled. At a fixed r{sub grp}, there is a significant dependence of f{sub red} on {Sigma}{sub 5

  10. The SPLASH Survey: Spectroscopy of Newly Discovered Tidal Streams in the Outer Halo of the Andromeda Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhathakurta, Puragra; Beaton, R.; Bullock, J.; Chiba, M.; Fardal, M.; Geha, M.; Gilbert, K.; Howley, K.; Iye, M.; Johnston, K.; Kalirai, J.; Kirby, E.; Komiyama, Y.; Majewski, S.; Patterson, R.; Tanaka, M.; Tollerud, E.; SPLASH Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    We present Keck DEIMOS spectra of stars associated with three newly discovered tidal streams in the remote outer halo of the Andromeda spiral galaxy (M31). Two of these streams, Streams E and F (at Rproj 60 and 100 kpc, respectively, on the NW minor axis), were discovered by members of our collaboration in a deep, wide-field Subaru SuprimeCam imaging survey. The third stream (at Rproj 90 kpc near the SW major axis) was identified by others in their ongoing wide-field CFHT MegaCam survey. Spectroscopic and broadband photometric diagnostics (plus KPNO/Mosaic DDO51 photometry for the SW major axis stream) are used to distinguish between various categories of objects along the line of sight: red giant stars associated with the stream (kinematically cold), red giants in the general M31 field halo population (kinematically hot), and foreground/background contaminants (Milky Way dwarf stars and distant galaxies, respectively). We measure the surface brightness, mean velocity, velocity dispersion, and metallicity distribution of these three new tidal streams, based on spectroscopically confirmed secure red giant members. These measurements should be useful for constraining models of the tidal interactions that produced these streams (e.g. orbit and nature of progenitor). The properties of these new streams are viewed in the context of previously known tidal streams in the M31 halo. A comparison between the statistical properties of M31's tidal streams and state-of-the-art Lambda-CDM simulations provides insight into the details of the hierarchical formation process that leads to the growth of galaxy halos. This research was funded by the National Science Foundation and NASA/STScI.

  11. Cross-correlation of galaxies and galaxy clusters in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the importance of non-Poissonian shot noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paech, Kerstin; Hamaus, Nico; Hoyle, Ben; Costanzi, Matteo; Giannantonio, Tommaso; Hagstotz, Steffen; Sauerwein, Georg; Weller, Jochen

    2017-09-01

    We present measurements of angular cross power spectra between galaxies and optically-selected galaxy clusters in the final photometric sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We measure the autocorrelations and cross correlations between galaxy and cluster samples, from which we extract the effective biases and study the shot noise properties. We model the non-Poissonian shot noise by introducing an effective number density of tracers and fit for this quantity. We find that we can only describe the cross-correlation of galaxies and galaxy clusters, as well as the autocorrelation of galaxy clusters, on the relevant scales using a non-Poissonian shot noise contribution. The values of effective bias we finally measure for a volume-limited sample are bcc = 4.09 ± 0.47 for the cluster autocorrelation and bgc = 2.15 ± 0.09 for the galaxy-cluster cross-correlation. We find that these results are consistent with expectations from the autocorrelations of galaxies and clusters and are in good agreement with previous studies. The main result is two-fold: first we provide a measurement of the cross-correlation of galaxies and clusters, which can be used for further cosmological analysis; and secondly we describe an effective treatment of the shot noise.

  12. The Sloan Lens ACS Survey. I. A Large Spectroscopically Selected Sample of Massive Early-Type Lens Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Adam S.; Burles, Scott; Koopmans, Leon V. E.; Treu, Tommaso; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2006-01-01

    The Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) Survey is an efficient Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Snapshot imaging survey for new galaxy-scale strong gravitational lenses. The targeted lens candidates are selected spectroscopically from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database of galaxy spectra for having multiple nebular emission lines at a redshift significantly higher than that of the SDSS target galaxy. The SLACS survey is optimized to detect bright early-type lens galaxies with faint lensed sources in order to increase the sample of known gravitational lenses suitable for detailed lensing, photometric, and dynamical modeling. In this paper, the first in a series on the current results of our HST Cycle 13 imaging survey, we present a catalog of 19 newly discovered gravitational lenses, along with nine other observed candidate systems that are either possible lenses, nonlenses, or nondetections. The survey efficiency is thus >=68%. We also present Gemini 8 m and Magellan 6.5 m integral-field spectroscopic data for nine of the SLACS targets, which further support the lensing interpretation. A new method for the effective subtraction of foreground galaxy images to reveal faint background features is presented. We show that the SLACS lens galaxies have colors and ellipticities typical of the spectroscopic parent sample from which they are drawn (SDSS luminous red galaxies and quiescent MAIN sample galaxies), but are somewhat brighter and more centrally concentrated. Several explanations for the latter bias are suggested. The SLACS survey provides the first statistically significant and homogeneously selected sample of bright early-type lens galaxies, furnishing a powerful probe of the structure of early-type galaxies within the half-light radius. The high confirmation rate of lenses in the SLACS survey suggests consideration of spectroscopic lens discovery as an explicit science goal of future spectroscopic galaxy surveys.

  13. DGSAT: Dwarf Galaxy Survey with Amateur Telescopes. II. A catalogue of isolated nearby edge-on disk galaxies and the discovery of new low surface brightness systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, C.; Javanmardi, B.; Martínez-Delgado, D.; Kroupa, P.; Teuwen, K.

    2017-07-01

    The connection between the bulge mass or bulge luminosity in disk galaxies and the number, spatial and phase space distribution of associated dwarf galaxies is a discriminator between cosmological simulations related to galaxy formation in cold dark matter and generalised gravity models. Here, a nearby sample of isolated Milky Way-class edge-on galaxies is introduced, to facilitate observational campaigns to detect the associated families of dwarf galaxies at low surface brightness. Three galaxy pairs with at least one of the targets being edge-on are also introduced. Approximately 60% of the catalogued isolated galaxies contain bulges of different size, while the remaining objects appear to be bulgeless. Deep images of NGC 3669 (small bulge, with NGC 3625 at the edge of the image) and NGC 7814 (prominent bulge), obtained with a 0.4 m aperture, are also presented, resulting in the discovery of two new dwarf galaxy candidates, NGC 3669-DGSAT-3 and NGC 7814-DGSAT-7. Eleven additional low surface brightness galaxies are identified, previously notified with low quality measurement flags in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Integrated magnitudes, surface brightnesses, effective radii, Sersic indices, axis ratios, and projected distances to their putative major hosts are displayed. At least one of the galaxies, NGC 3625-DGSAT-4, belongs with a surface brightness of μr ≈ 26 mag arcsec-2 and effective radius >1.5 kpc to the class of ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs). NGC 3669-DGSAT-3, the galaxy with the lowest surface brightness in our sample, may also be an UDG.

  14. No galaxy left behind: accurate measurements with the faintest objects in the Dark Energy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchyta, E.; Huff, E. M.; Aleksić, J.; Melchior, P.; Jouvel, S.; MacCrann, N.; Ross, A. J.; Crocce, M.; Gaztanaga, E.; Honscheid, K.; Leistedt, B.; Peiris, H. V.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sheldon, E.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Banerji, M.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Percival, W. J.; Reil, K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zhang, Y.; DES Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Accurate statistical measurement with large imaging surveys has traditionally required throwing away a sizable fraction of the data. This is because most measurements have relied on selecting nearly complete samples, where variations in the composition of the galaxy population with seeing, depth, or other survey characteristics are small. We introduce a new measurement method that aims to minimize this wastage, allowing precision measurement for any class of detectable stars or galaxies. We have implemented our proposal in BALROG, software which embeds fake objects in real imaging to accurately characterize measurement biases. We demonstrate this technique with an angular clustering measurement using Dark Energy Survey (DES) data. We first show that recovery of our injected galaxies depends on a variety of survey characteristics in the same way as the real data. We then construct a flux-limited sample of the faintest galaxies in DES, chosen specifically for their sensitivity to depth and seeing variations. Using the synthetic galaxies as randoms in the Landy-Szalay estimator suppresses the effects of variable survey selection by at least two orders of magnitude. With this correction, our measured angular clustering is found to be in excellent agreement with that of a matched sample from much deeper, higher resolution space-based Cosmological Evolution Survey (COSMOS) imaging; over angular scales of 0.004° < θ < 0.2°, we find a best-fitting scaling amplitude between the DES and COSMOS measurements of 1.00 ± 0.09. We expect this methodology to be broadly useful for extending measurements' statistical reach in a variety of upcoming imaging surveys.

  15. Cross-correlation of spectroscopic and photometric galaxy surveys: cosmology from lensing and redshift distortions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaztañaga, Enrique; Eriksen, Martin; Crocce, Martin; Castander, Francisco J.; Fosalba, Pablo; Marti, Pol; Miquel, Ramon; Cabré, Anna

    2012-06-01

    Cosmological galaxy surveys aim at mapping the largest volumes to test models with techniques such as cluster abundance, cosmic shear correlations or baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), which are designed to be independent of galaxy bias. Here, we explore an alternative route to constrain cosmology: sampling more moderate volumes with the cross-correlation of photometric and spectroscopic surveys. We consider the angular galaxy-galaxy auto-correlation in narrow redshift bins and its combination with different probes of weak gravitational lensing (WL) and redshift space distortions (RSD). Including the cross-correlation of these surveys improves by factors of a few the constraints on both the dark energy equation of state w(z) and the cosmic growth history, parametrized by γ. The additional information comes from using many narrow redshift bins and from measurement of galaxy bias with both WL and RSD, breaking degeneracies that are present when using each method separately. We show forecasts for a joint w(z) and γ figure of merit (FoM?) using linear scales over a deep (iAB RSD or BAO over the spectroscopic sample. However, the cross-correlation of these probes over the same area yields a FoM? that is up to a factor of 100 times larger. Magnification alone, without shape measurements, can also be used for these cross-correlations and can produce better results than using shear alone. For a spectroscopic follow-up survey strategy, measuring the spectra of the foreground lenses to perform this cross-correlation provides five times better FoM? than targeting the higher redshift tail of the galaxy distribution to study BAO over a 2.5 times larger volume.

  16. The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxy Legacy Survey. I. Sample Selection and Redshift Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perley, D. A.; Krühler, T.; Schulze, S.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Hjorth, J.; Berger, E.; Cenko, S. B.; Chary, R.; Cucchiara, A.; Ellis, R.; Fong, W.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Gorosabel, J.; Greiner, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Kim, S.; Laskar, T.; Levan, A. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Tanvir, N. R.; Thöne, C. C.; Wiersema, K.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxy Legacy Survey (“SHOALS”), a multi-observatory high-redshift galaxy survey targeting the largest unbiased sample of long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) hosts yet assembled (119 in total). We describe the motivations of the survey and the development of our selection criteria, including an assessment of the impact of various observability metrics on the success rate of afterglow-based redshift measurement. We briefly outline our host galaxy observational program, consisting of deep Spitzer/IRAC imaging of every field supplemented by similarly deep, multicolor optical/near-IR photometry, plus spectroscopy of events without preexisting redshifts. Our optimized selection cuts combined with host galaxy follow-up have so far enabled redshift measurements for 110 targets (92%) and placed upper limits on all but one of the remainder. About 20% of GRBs in the sample are heavily dust obscured, and at most 2% originate from z\\gt 5.5. Using this sample, we estimate the redshift-dependent GRB rate density, showing it to peak at z∼ 2.5 and fall by at least an order of magnitude toward low (z = 0) redshift, while declining more gradually toward high (z∼ 7) redshift. This behavior is consistent with a progenitor whose formation efficiency varies modestly over cosmic history. Our survey will permit the most detailed examination to date of the connection between the GRB host population and general star-forming galaxies, directly measure evolution in the host population over cosmic time and discern its causes, and provide new constraints on the fraction of cosmic star formation occurring in undetectable galaxies at all redshifts.

  17. The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxy Legacy Survey. I. Sample Selection and Redshift Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perley, D. A.; Kruhler, T.; Schulze, S.; Postigo, A. De Ugarte; Hjorth, J.; Berger, E.; Cenko, S. B.; Chary, R.; Cucchiara, A.; Ellis, R.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxy Legacy Survey (SHOALS), a multi-observatory high redshift galaxy survey targeting the largest unbiased sample of long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) hosts yet assembled (119 in total). We describe the motivations of the survey and the development of our selection criteria, including an assessment of the impact of various observability metrics on the success rate of afterglow-based redshift measurement. We briefly outline our host galaxy observational program, consisting of deep Spitzer/IRAC imaging of every field supplemented by similarly deep, multicolor optical/near-IR photometry, plus spectroscopy of events without preexisting redshifts. Our optimized selection cuts combined with host galaxy follow-up have so far enabled redshift measurements for 110 targets (92%) and placed upper limits on all but one of the remainder. About 20% of GRBs in the sample are heavily dust obscured, and at most 2% originate from z > 5.5. Using this sample, we estimate the redshift-dependent GRB rate density, showing it to peak at z approx. 2.5 and fall by at least an order of magnitude toward low (z = 0) redshift, while declining more gradually toward high (z approx. 7) redshift. This behavior is consistent with a progenitor whose formation efficiency varies modestly over cosmic history. Our survey will permit the most detailed examination to date of the connection between the GRB host population and general star-forming galaxies, directly measure evolution in the host population over cosmic time and discern its causes, and provide new constraints on the fraction of cosmic star formation occurring in undetectable galaxies at all redshifts.

  18. Fossil evidence for spin alignment of Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies in filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bernard J. T.; van de Weygaert, Rien; Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A.

    2010-10-01

    We search for and find fossil evidence that the spin axes of galaxies in cosmic web filaments relative to their host filaments are not randomly distributed. This indicates the fact that the action of large-scale tidal torques affected the alignments of galaxies located in cosmic filaments. To this end, we constructed a catalogue of clean filaments containing edge-on galaxies. We started by applying the multiscale morphology filter technique to the galaxies in a redshift-distortion-corrected version of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5. From this sample, we extracted 426 filaments that contained edge-on galaxies (b/a analysis using `feature measures' indicates that the distribution of orientations of these edge-on galaxies relative to their parent filament deviates significantly from what would be expected on the basis of a random distribution of orientations. Fewer than 1 per cent of orientation histograms generated from simulated random distributions show the same features as observed in the data histogram. The interpretation of this result may not be immediately apparent, but it is easy to identify a population of 14 objects whose spin axes are aligned perpendicular to the spine of the parent filament (cosθ evidence of alignment yields relatively few candidate objects, but it does not suffer from the dilution effects inherent in correlation analysis of large samples. The candidate objects could be the subjects of a programme of observations aimed at understanding in what way they might differ from their non-aligned counterparts.

  19. The Effect of Host Galaxies on Type Ia Supernovae in the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampeitl, Hubert; /Portsmouth U., ICG; Smith, Mathew; /Cape Town U. /Portsmouth U., ICG; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U., ICG; Bassett, Bruce; /South African Astron. Observ. /Cape Town U.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; Dilday, Benjamin; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Foley, Ryan J.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Chicago U. /Fermilab; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Goobar, Ariel; /Stockholm U., OKC; Im, Myungshin; /Seoul Natl. U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway

    2010-05-01

    We present an analysis of the host galaxy dependencies of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from the full three year sample of the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. We re-discover, to high significance, the strong correlation between host galaxy type and the width of the observed SN light curve, i.e., fainter, quickly declining SNe Ia favor passive host galaxies, while brighter, slowly declining Ia's favor star-forming galaxies. We also find evidence (at between 2 to 3{sigma}) that SNe Ia are {approx_equal} 0.1 magnitudes brighter in passive host galaxies, than in star-forming hosts, after the SN Ia light curves have been standardized using the light curve shape and color variations: This difference in brightness is present in both the SALT2 and MCLS2k2 light curve fitting methodologies. We see evidence for differences in the SN Ia color relationship between passive and star-forming host galaxies, e.g., for the MLCS2k2 technique, we see that SNe Ia in passive hosts favor a dust law of R{sub V} {approx_equal} 1, while SNe Ia in star-forming hosts require R{sub V} {approx} 2. The significance of these trends depends on the range of SN colors considered. We demonstrate that these effects can be parameterized using the stellar mass of the host galaxy (with a confidence of > 4{sigma}) and including this extra parameter provides a better statistical fit to our data. Our results suggest that future cosmological analyses of SN Ia samples should include host galaxy information.

  20. High-redshift Post-starburst Galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattarakijwanich, Petchara

    Post-starburst galaxies are a rare class of galaxy that show the spectral signature of recent, but not ongoing, star-formation activity, and are thought to have their star formation suddenly quenched within the one billion years preceding the observations. In other words, these are galaxies in the transitional stage between blue, star-forming galaxies and red, quiescent galaxies, and therefore hold important information regarding our understanding of galaxy evolution. This class of objects can be used to study the mechanisms responsible for star-formation quenching, which is an important unsettled question in galaxy evolution. In this thesis, we study this class of galaxies through a number of different approaches. First of all, we systematically selected a large, statistical sample of post-starburst galaxies from the spectroscopic dataset of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This sample contains 13219 objects in total, with redshifts ranging from local universe to z ˜ 1.3 and median redshift zmedian = 0.59. This is currently the largest sample of post-starburst galaxies available in the literature. Using this sample, we calculated the luminosity functions for a number of redshift bins. A rapid downsizing redshift evolution of the luminosity function is observed, whereby the number density of post-starburst galaxies at fixed luminosity is larger at higher redshift. From the luminosity functions, we calculated the amount of star-formation quenching accounted for in post-starburst galaxies, and compared to the amount required by the global decline of star-formation rate of the universe. We found that only a small fraction (˜ 0.2%) of all star-formation quenching in the universe goes through the post-starburst galaxy channel, at least for the luminous sources in our sample. We also searched the SDSS spectroscopic database the post-starburst quasars, which are an even more special class of objects that show both a post-starburst stellar population and AGN activity

  1. The SLUGGS survey: wide-field stellar kinematics of early-type galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Jacob A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Woodley, Kristin A. [University of California Observatories, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Forbes, Duncan A.; Blom, Christina; Kartha, Sreeja S.; Pastorello, Nicola; Pota, Vincenzo; Usher, Christopher [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Strader, Jay [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Spitler, Lee R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Foster, Caroline, E-mail: romanow@ucolick.org [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW (Australia)

    2014-08-20

    We present stellar kinematics of 22 nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs), based on two-dimensional (2D) absorption line stellar spectroscopy out to ∼2-4 R {sub e} (effective radii), as part of the ongoing SLUGGS Survey. The galaxies span a factor of 20 in intrinsic luminosity, as well as a full range of environment and ETG morphology. Our data consist of good velocity resolution (σ{sub inst} ∼ 25 km s{sup –1}) integrated stellar-light spectra extracted from the individual slitlets of custom made Keck/DEIMOS slitmasks. We extract stellar kinematics measurements (V, σ, h {sub 3}, and h {sub 4}) for each galaxy. Combining with literature values from smaller radii, we present 2D spatially resolved maps of the large-scale kinematic structure in each galaxy. We find that the kinematic homogeneity found inside 1 R {sub e} often breaks down at larger radii, where a variety of kinematic behaviors are observed. While central slow rotators remain slowly rotating in their halos, central fast rotators show more diversity, ranging from rapidly increasing to rapidly declining specific angular momentum profiles in the outer regions. There are indications that the outer trends depend on morphological type, raising questions about the proposed unification of the elliptical and lenticular (S0) galaxy families in the ATLAS{sup 3D} survey. Several galaxies in our sample show multiple lines of evidence for distinct disk components embedded in more slowly rotating spheroids, and we suggest a joint photometric-kinematic approach for robust bulge-disk decomposition. Our observational results appear generally consistent with a picture of two-phase (in-situ plus accretion) galaxy formation.

  2. COMPARING DENSE GALAXY CLUSTER REDSHIFT SURVEYS WITH WEAK-LENSING MAPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Ho Seong; Geller, Margaret J.; Zahid, H. Jabran [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Diaferio, Antonaldo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Torino, V. Pietro Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Rines, Kenneth J., E-mail: hhwang@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: harus.zahid@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it, E-mail: kenneth.rines@wwu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    We use dense redshift surveys of nine galaxy clusters at z ∼ 0.2 to compare the galaxy distribution in each system with the projected matter distribution from weak lensing. By combining 2087 new MMT/Hectospec redshifts and the data in the literature, we construct spectroscopic samples within the region of weak-lensing maps of high (70%-89%) and uniform completeness. With these dense redshift surveys, we construct galaxy number density maps using several galaxy subsamples. The shape of the main cluster concentration in the weak-lensing maps is similar to the global morphology of the number density maps based on cluster members alone, mainly dominated by red members. We cross-correlate the galaxy number density maps with the weak-lensing maps. The cross-correlation signal when we include foreground and background galaxies at 0.5z {sub cl} < z < 2z {sub cl} is 10%-23% larger than for cluster members alone at the cluster virial radius. The excess can be as high as 30% depending on the cluster. Cross-correlating the galaxy number density and weak-lensing maps suggests that superimposed structures close to the cluster in redshift space contribute more significantly to the excess cross-correlation signal than unrelated large-scale structure along the line of sight. Interestingly, the weak-lensing mass profiles are not well constrained for the clusters with the largest cross-correlation signal excesses (>20% for A383, A689, and A750). The fractional excess in the cross-correlation signal including foreground and background structures could be a useful proxy for assessing the reliability of weak-lensing cluster mass estimates.

  3. The Spitzer/Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxy Legacy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perley, Daniel; Berger, Edo; Butler, Nathaniel; Cenko, S. Bradley; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Cucchiara, Antonino; Ellis, Richard; Fong, Wen-fai; Fruchter, Andrew; Fynbo, Johan; Gehrels, Neil; Graham, John; Greiner, Jochen; Hjorth, Jens; Hunt, Leslie; Jakobsson, Pall; Kruehler, Thomas; Laskar, Tanmoy; Le Floc'h, Emerich; Levan, Andrew; Levesque, Emily; Littlejohns, Owen; Malesani, Daniele; Michalowski, Michal; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Salvaterra, Ruben; Schulze, Steve; Schady, Patricia; Tanvir, Nial; de Ugarte Postigo, Antonio; Vergani, Susanna; Watson, Darach

    2016-08-01

    Long-duration gamma-ray bursts act as beacons to the sites of star-formation in the distant universe. GRBs reveal galaxies too faint and star-forming regions too dusty to characterize in detail using any other method, and provide a powerful independent constraint on the evolution of the cosmic star-formation rate density at high-redshift. However, a full understanding of the GRB phenomenon and its relation to cosmic star-formation requires connecting the observations obtained from GRBs to the properties of the galaxies hosting them. The large majority of GRBs originate at moderate to high redshift (z>1) and Spitzer has proven crucial for understanding the host population, given its unique ability to observe the rest-frame NIR and its unrivaled sensitivity and efficiency. We propose to complete a comprehensive public legacy survey of the Swift GRB host population to build on our earlier successes and push beyond the statistical limits of previous, smaller efforts. Our survey will enable a diverse range of GRB and galaxy science including: (1) to quantitatively and robustly map the connection between GRBs and cosmic star-formation to constrain the GRB progenitor and calibrate GRB rate-based measurements of the high-z cosmic star-formation rate; (2) to constrain the luminosity function of star-forming galaxies at the faint end and at high redshift; (3) to understand how the ISM properties seen in absorption in high-redshift galaxies unveiled by GRBs - metallicity, dust column, dust properties - connect to global properties of the host galaxies such as mass and age. Building on a decade of experience at both observatories, our observations will create an enduring joint Swift-Spitzer legacy sample - providing the definitive resource with which to examine all aspects of the GRB/galaxy connection for years to come and setting the stage for intensive JWST follow-up of the most interesting sources from our sample.

  4. The last 6 Gyr of dark matter assembly in massive galaxies from the Kilo Degree Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, C.; Napolitano, N. R.; Roy, N.; Radovich, M.; Getman, F.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Verdoes Kleijn, G. A.; Kuijken, K. H.

    2018-01-01

    We study the dark matter (DM) assembly in the central regions of massive early-type galaxies up to z ∼ 0.65. We use a sample of ∼3800 massive (log M⋆/M⊙ > 11.2) galaxies with photometry and structural parameters from 156 deg2 of the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS), and spectroscopic redshifts and velocity dispersions from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We obtain central total-to-stellar mass ratios, Mdyn/M⋆, and DM fractions, by determining dynamical masses, Mdyn, from Jeans modelling of SDSS aperture velocity dispersions and stellar masses, M⋆, from KiDS galaxy colours. We first show how the central DM fraction correlates with structural parameters, mass and density proxies, and demonstrate that most of the local correlations are still observed up to z ∼ 0.65; at fixed M⋆, local galaxies have larger DM fraction, on average, than their counterparts at larger redshift. We also interpret these trends with a non-universal initial mass function (IMF), finding a strong evolution with redshift, which contrast independent observations and is at odds with the effect of galaxy mergers. For a fixed IMF, the galaxy assembly can be explained, realistically, by mass and size accretion, which can be physically achieved by a series of minor mergers. We reproduce both the Re-M⋆ and Mdyn/M⋆-M⋆ evolution with stellar and dark mass changing at a different rate. This result suggests that the main progenitor galaxy is merging with less massive systems, characterized by a smaller Mdyn/M⋆, consistently with results from halo abundance matching.

  5. The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey : Wiener reconstruction of the cosmic web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erdogdu, P; Lahav, O; Zaroubi, S; Efstathiou, G; Moody, S; Peacock, JA; Colless, M; Baldry, IK; Baugh, CM; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Bridges, T; Cannon, R; Cole, S; Collins, C; Couch, W; Dalton, G; De Propris, R; Driver, SP; Ellis, RS; Frenk, CS; Glazebrook, K; Jackson, C; Lewis, [No Value; Lumsden, S; Maddox, S; Madgwick, D; Norberg, P; Peterson, BA; Sutherland, W; Taylor, K

    2004-01-01

    We reconstruct the underlying density field of the Two-degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) for the redshift range 0.035

  6. Self-consistent dynamical models for early-type galaxies in the CALIFA Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posti, L.; van de Ven, G.; Binney, J.; Nipoti, C.; Ciotti, L.

    2016-01-01

    We present the first application of self-consistent, continuous models with distribution functions (DFs) depending on the action integrals, to a sample of nearby early-type galaxies in the CALIFA Survey. Each model is axisymmetric, flattened, anisotropic and rotating and the total gravitational

  7. A Multi-epoch Kinematic Study of the Remote Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Leo II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Meghin E.; Mateo, Mario; Walker, Matthew G.; Olszewski, Edward W.

    2017-02-01

    We conducted a large spectroscopic survey of 336 red giants in the direction of the Leo II dwarf galaxy using Hectochelle on the Multiple Mirror Telescope, and we conclude that 175 of them are members based on their radial velocities and surface gravities. Of this set, 40 stars have never before been observed spectroscopically. The systemic velocity of the dwarf is 78.3 ± 0.6 km s-1 with a velocity dispersion of 7.4 ± 0.4 km s-1. We identify one star beyond the tidal radius of Leo II but find no signatures of uniform rotation, kinematic asymmetries, or streams. The stars show a strong metallicity gradient of -1.53 ± 0.10 dex kpc-1 and have a mean metallicity of -1.70 ± 0.02 dex. There is also evidence of two different chemodynamic populations, but the signal is weak. A larger sample of stars would be necessary to verify this feature. Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the University of Arizona and the Smithsonian Institution.

  8. A Multi-epoch Kinematic Study of the Remote Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Leo II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Meghin E.; Mateo, Mario [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Walker, Matthew G. [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Olszewski, Edward W., E-mail: meghins@umich.edu [Steward Observatory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2017-02-20

    We conducted a large spectroscopic survey of 336 red giants in the direction of the Leo II dwarf galaxy using Hectochelle on the Multiple Mirror Telescope, and we conclude that 175 of them are members based on their radial velocities and surface gravities. Of this set, 40 stars have never before been observed spectroscopically. The systemic velocity of the dwarf is 78.3 ± 0.6 km s{sup −1} with a velocity dispersion of 7.4 ± 0.4 km s{sup −1}. We identify one star beyond the tidal radius of Leo II but find no signatures of uniform rotation, kinematic asymmetries, or streams. The stars show a strong metallicity gradient of −1.53 ± 0.10 dex kpc{sup −1} and have a mean metallicity of −1.70 ± 0.02 dex. There is also evidence of two different chemodynamic populations, but the signal is weak. A larger sample of stars would be necessary to verify this feature.

  9. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: Data Release One with emission-line physics value-added products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Andrew W.; Croom, Scott M.; Scott, Nicholas; Cortese, Luca; Medling, Anne M.; D'Eugenio, Francesco; Bryant, Julia J.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Allen, J. T.; Sharp, Rob; Ho, I.-Ting; Groves, Brent; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Mannering, Elizabeth; Harischandra, Lloyd; van de Sande, Jesse; Thomas, Adam D.; O'Toole, Simon; McDermid, Richard M.; Vuong, Minh; Sealey, Katrina; Bauer, Amanda E.; Brough, S.; Catinella, Barbara; Cecil, Gerald; Colless, Matthew; Couch, Warrick J.; Driver, Simon P.; Federrath, Christoph; Foster, Caroline; Goodwin, Michael; Hampton, Elise J.; Hopkins, A. M.; Jones, D. Heath; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis S.; Lawrence, J. S.; Leon-Saval, Sergio G.; Liske, Jochen; López-Sánchez, Ángel R.; Lorente, Nuria P. F.; Mould, Jeremy; Obreschkow, Danail; Owers, Matt S.; Richards, Samuel N.; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Schaefer, Adam L.; Sweet, Sarah M.; Taranu, Dan S.; Tescari, Edoardo; Tonini, Chiara; Zafar, T.

    2018-03-01

    We present the first major release of data from the SAMI Galaxy Survey. This data release focuses on the emission-line physics of galaxies. Data Release One includes data for 772 galaxies, about 20 per cent of the full survey. Galaxies included have the redshift range 0.004 < z < 0.092, a large mass range (7.6 < log M*/ M⊙ < 11.6), and star formation rates of ˜10-4 to ˜101M⊙ yr-1. For each galaxy, we include two spectral cubes and a set of spatially resolved 2D maps: single- and multi-component emission-line fits (with dust-extinction corrections for strong lines), local dust extinction, and star formation rate. Calibration of the fibre throughputs, fluxes, and differential atmospheric refraction has been improved over the Early Data Release. The data have average spatial resolution of 2.16 arcsec (full width at half-maximum) over the 15 arcsec diameter field of view and spectral (kinematic) resolution of R = 4263 (σ = 30 km s-1) around H α. The relative flux calibration is better than 5 per cent, and absolute flux calibration has an rms of 10 per cent. The data are presented online through the Australian Astronomical Observatory's Data Central.

  10. Star/galaxy separation at faint magnitudes: application to a simulated Dark Energy Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soumagnac, M. T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Lahav, O.; Kirk, D.; Sevilla, I.; Bertin, E.; Rowe, B. T. P.; Annis, J.; Busha, M. T.; Da Costa, L. N.; Frieman, J. A.; Gaztanaga, E.; Jarvis, M.; Lin, H.; Percival, W. J.; Santiago, B. X.; Sabiu, C. G.; Wechsler, R. H.; Wolz, L.; Yanny, B.

    2015-04-14

    We address the problem of separating stars from galaxies in future large photometric surveys. We focus our analysis on simulations of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). In the first part of the paper, we derive the science requirements on star/galaxy separation, for measurement of the cosmological parameters with the gravitational weak lensing and large-scale structure probes. These requirements are dictated by the need to control both the statistical and systematic errors on the cosmological parameters, and by point spread function calibration. We formulate the requirements in terms of the completeness and purity provided by a given star/galaxy classifier. In order to achieve these requirements at faint magnitudes, we propose a new method for star/galaxy separation in the second part of the paper. We first use principal component analysis to outline the correlations between the objects parameters and extract from it the most relevant information. We then use the reduced set of parameters as input to an Artificial Neural Network. This multiparameter approach improves upon purely morphometric classifiers (such as the classifier implemented in SExtractor), especially at faint magnitudes: it increases the purity by up to 20 per cent for stars and by up to 12 per cent for galaxies, at i-magnitude fainter than 23.

  11. Star/galaxy separation at faint magnitudes: Application to a simulated Dark Energy Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soumagnac, M.T.; et al.

    2013-06-21

    We address the problem of separating stars from galaxies in future large photometric surveys. We focus our analysis on simulations of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). In the first part of the paper, we derive the science requirements on star/galaxy separation, for measurement of the cosmological parameters with the Gravitational Weak Lensing and Large Scale Structure probes. These requirements are dictated by the need to control both the statistical and systematic errors on the cosmological parameters, and by Point Spread Function calibration. We formulate the requirements in terms of the completeness and purity provided by a given star/galaxy classifier. In order to achieve these requirements at faint magnitudes, we propose a new method for star/galaxy separation in the second part of the paper. We first use Principal Component Analysis to outline the correlations between the objects parameters and extract from it the most relevant information. We then use the reduced set of parameters as input to an Artificial Neural Network. This multi-parameter approach improves upon purely morphometric classifiers (such as the classifier implemented in SExtractor), especially at faint magnitudes: it increases the purity by up to 20% for stars and by up to 12% for galaxies, at i-magnitude fainter than 23.

  12. Galaxy-scale Bars in Late-type Sloan Digital Sky Survey Galaxies Do Not Influence the Average Accretion Rates of Supermassive Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, A. D.; Matthaey, E.; Greene, J. E.; Hickox, R. C.; Alexander, D. M.; Forman, W. R.; Jones, C.; Lehmer, B. D.; Griffis, S.; Kanek, S.; Oulmakki, M.

    2017-07-01

    Galaxy-scale bars are expected to provide an effective means for driving material toward the central region in spiral galaxies, and possibly feeding supermassive black holes (BHs). Here we present a statistically complete study of the effect of bars on average BH accretion. From a well-selected sample of 50,794 spiral galaxies (with {M}* ˜ 0.2{--}30× {10}10 {M}⊙ ) extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Galaxy Zoo 2 project, we separate those sources considered to contain galaxy-scale bars from those that do not. Using archival data taken by the Chandra X-ray Observatory, we identify X-ray luminous ({L}{{X}}≳ {10}41 {erg} {{{s}}}-1) active galactic nuclei and perform an X-ray stacking analysis on the remaining X-ray undetected sources. Through X-ray stacking, we derive a time-averaged look at accretion for galaxies at fixed stellar mass and star-formation rate, finding that the average nuclear accretion rates of galaxies with bar structures are fully consistent with those lacking bars ({\\dot{M}}{acc}≈ 3× {10}-5 {M}⊙ yr-1). Hence, we robustly conclude that large-scale bars have little or no effect on the average growth of BHs in nearby (z< 0.15) galaxies over gigayear timescales.

  13. Galaxy-galaxy lensing in EAGLE: comparison with data from 180 deg2 of the KiDS and GAMA surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velliscig, Marco; Cacciato, Marcello; Hoekstra, Henk; Schaye, Joop; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Loveday, Jon; Norberg, Peder; Sifón, Cristóbal; Schneider, Peter; van Uitert, Edo; Viola, Massimo; Brough, Sarah; Erben, Thomas; Holwerda, Benne W.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Kuijken, Konrad

    2017-11-01

    We present predictions for the galaxy-galaxy lensing (GGL) profile from the EAGLE hydrodynamical cosmological simulation at redshift z = 0.18, in the spatial range 0.02 EAGLE predictions are in broad agreement with the observed profiles for both central and satellite galaxies, although the signal is underestimated at R ≈ 0.5-2 h- 1 Mpc for the highest stellar mass bins. When central and satellite galaxies are considered simultaneously, agreement is found only when the selection function of lens galaxies is taken into account in detail. Specifically, in the case of GAMA galaxies, it is crucial to account for the variation of the fraction of satellite galaxies in bins of stellar mass induced by the flux-limited nature of the survey. We report the inferred stellar-to-halo mass relation and we find good agreement with recent published results. We note how the precision of the GGL profiles in the simulation holds the potential to constrain fine-grained aspects of the galaxy-dark matter connection.

  14. Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV: Mapping the Milky Way, Nearby Galaxies, and the Distant Universe

    OpenAIRE

    Blanton, Michael R.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Abolfathi, Bela; Albareti, Franco D.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Almeida, Andres; Alonso-García, Javier; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott F.; Andrews, Brett; Aquino-Ortíz, Erik; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernandez, Maria; Armengaud, Eric; Aubourg, Eric

    2017-01-01

    © 2017. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. We describe the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV), a project encompassing three major spectroscopic programs. The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment 2 (APOGEE-2) is observing hundreds of thousands of Milky Way stars at high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratios in the near-infrared. The Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey is obtaining spatially resolved spectroscopy for ...

  15. Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA): Optimal Tiling of Dense Surveys with a Multi-Object Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robotham, A.; Driver, S. P.; Norberg, P.; Baldry, I. K.; Bamford, S. P.; Hopkins, A. M.; Liske, J.; Loveday, J.; Peacock, J. A.; Cameron, E.; Croom, S. M.; Doyle, I. F.; Frenk, C. S.; Hill, D. T.; Jones, D. H.; van Kampen, E.; Kelvin, L. S.; Kuijken, K.; Nichol, R. C.; Parkinson, H. R.; Popescu, C. C.; Prescott, M.; Sharp, R. G.; Sutherland, W. J.; Thomas, D.; Tuffs, R. J.

    2010-03-01

    A heuristic greedy algorithm is developed for efficiently tiling spatially dense redshift surveys. In its first application to the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) redshift survey we find it rapidly improves the spatial uniformity of our data, and naturally corrects for any spatial bias introduced by the 2dF multi-object spectrograph. We make conservative predictions for the final state of the GAMA redshift survey after our final allocation of time, and can be confident that even if worse than typical weather affects our observations, all of our main survey requirements will be met.

  16. Scaling analysis of galaxy distribution in the Las Campanas Redshift Survey data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, T.; Morikawa, M.; Mouri, H.

    2001-05-01

    The Las Campanas Redshift Survey data are used to investigate structures ofthe galaxy number distribution. We construct two volume-limited samples with sizes of 113 × 113 and 126 × 126 h-1 Mpc, and calculate the second- to ninth-order moments with the count-in-cell method. The galaxy distribution at >=30 h-1 Mpc is found to be statistically homogeneous. On the other hand, we find a multifractal scaling at < 30 h-1 Mpc. From the scaling exponent, we obtain the generalized dimension, which decreases from 2 toward 1 as the order is increased from 2 to 9. Galaxies are known to lie, around voids, in planar structures with filamentary dense regions. The present result indicates that these void-filament structures are predominant up to 30 h-1 Mpc. Statistically, they appear to be the largest-scale significant structures in the Universe.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: MUSE-Wide survey: 831 emission line galaxies (Herenz+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herenz, E. C.; Urrutia, T.; Wisotzki, L.; Kerutt, J.; Saust, R.; Werhahn, M.; Schmidt, K. B.; Caruana, J.; Diener, C.; Bacon, R.; Brinchman, J.; Schaye, J.; Maseda, M.; Weilbacher, P. M.

    2017-05-01

    This data release consists of an emission line galaxy catalogue containing 831 emission line galaxies detected in the first period of observations of the MUSE-Wide survey. We also release 1D PSF-weighted extracted spectra and 3D datacubes for each of those 831 sources. The emission line galaxy catalogue consists of two tables: A catalogue of all 831 detected emission line objects and a table of all 1652 detected emission lines in those objects. These tables are described in detail in Sect. 4.1 and 4.2 of the paper. Both tables are in the FITS binary table format, adhering to the FITS standard described in Pence et al. (2010A&A...524A..42P). (8 data files).

  18. Emission line galaxy pairs up to z=1.5 from the WISP survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplitz, Harry I.; Dai, Yu Sophia; Malkan, Matthew Arnold; Scarlata, Claudia; Colbert, James W.; Atek, Hakim; Bagley, Micaela B.; Baronchelli, Ivano; Bedregal, Alejandro; Beck, Melanie; Bunker, Andrew; Dominguez, Alberto; Hathi, Nimish P.; Henry, Alaina L.; Mehta, Vihang; Pahl, Anthony; Rafelski, Marc; Ross, Nathaniel; Rutkowski, Michael J.; Siana, Brian D.; WISPs Team

    2016-01-01

    We present a sample of spectroscopically identified emission line galaxy pairs up to z=1.5 from WISPs (WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallel survey) using high resolution direct and grism images from HST. We searched ~150 fields with a covered area of ~600 arcmin^2, and a comoving volume of > 400 Gpc^3 at z=1-2, and found ~80 very close physical pairs (projected separation Dp < 50 h^{-1}kpc, relative velocity d_v < 500 kms^{-1}), and ~100 close physical pairs (50 < Dp < 100 h^{-1}kpc, d_v < 1000 kms^{-1}) of emission line galaxies, including two dozen triplets and quadruples. In this poster we present the multi-wavelength data, star formation rate (SFR), mass ratio, and study the merger rate evolution with this special galaxy pair sample.

  19. Deep Grism Spectroscopy of High Redshift Galaxies with the HST GRAPES and PEARS Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, S.; Pirzkal, N.; GRAPES Team; PEARS Team

    2011-01-01

    We have obtained the deepest slitless spectroscopic samples ever using the Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys, in two related projects, the "Grism ACS Program for Extragalactic Science" (GRAPES) and "Probing Evolution and Reionization Spectroscopically" (PEARS). In combination, these two programs obtained deep public spectroscopy of about 100 square arcminutes in the GOODS north and south fields. We are using these data to study galaxy evolution over a wide range of cosmic history. We are able to spectroscopically confirm Lyman break galaxies from redshift 4 to 6.5, down to AB magnitudes fainter than i=27.5. We use these samples to study a range of galaxy properties, including spatial clustering, Lyman alpha emitter fraction, and spatial extent of Lyman alpha emission.

  20. MASSIVE+: The Growth Histories of MASSIVE Survey Galaxies from their Globular Cluster Colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, John

    2017-08-01

    The MASSIVE survey is targeting the 100 most massive galaxies within 108 Mpc that are visible in the northern sky. These most massive galaxies in the present-day universe reside in a surprisingly wide variety of environments, from rich clusters to fossil groups to near isolation. We propose to use WFC3/UVIS and ACS to carry out a deep imaging study of the globular cluster populations around a selected subset of the MASSIVE targets. Though much is known about GC systems of bright galaxies in rich clusters, we know surprisingly little about the effects of environment on these systems. The MASSIVE sample provides a golden opportunity to learn about the systematics of GC systems and what they can tell us about environmental drivers on the evolution of the highest mass galaxies. The most pressing questions to be addressed include: (1) Do isolated giants have the same constant mass fraction of GCs to total halo mass as BCGs of similar luminosity? (2) Do their GC systems show the same color (metallicity) distribution, which is an outcome of the mass spectrum of gas-rich halos during hierarchical growth? (3) Do the GCs in isolated high-mass galaxies follow the same radial distribution versus metallicity as in rich environments (a test of the relative importance of growth by accretion)? (4) Do the GCs of galaxies in sparse environments follow the same mass function? Our proposed second-band imaging will enable us to secure answers to these questions and add enormously to the legacy value of existing HST imaging of the highest mass galaxies in the universe.

  1. The Molecular Interstellar Medium of Dwarf Galaxies on Kiloparsec Scales: A New Survey for CO in Northern, IRAS-detected Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, A.; Bolatto, A. D.; Simon, J. D.; Blitz, L.

    2005-06-01

    We present a new survey for CO in dwarf galaxies using the ARO Kitt Peak 12 m telescope. This survey consists of observations of the central regions of 121 northern dwarfs with IRAS detections and no known CO emission. We detect CO in 28 of these galaxies and marginally detect another 16, increasing by about 50% the number of such galaxies known to have significant CO emission. The galaxies we detect are comparable in stellar and dynamical mass to the Large Magellanic Cloud, although somewhat brighter in CO and fainter in the far-IR. Within dwarfs, we find that the CO luminosity LCO is most strongly correlated with the K-band and the far-infrared luminosities. There are also strong correlations with the radio continuum (RC) and B-band luminosities and linear diameter. Conversely, we find that far-IR dust temperature is a poor predictor of CO emission within the dwarfs alone, although a good predictor of normalized CO content among a larger sample of galaxies. We suggest that LCO and LK correlate well because the stellar component of a galaxy dominates the midplane gravitational field and thus sets the pressure and density of the atomic gas, which control the formation of H2 from H I. We compare our sample with more massive galaxies and find that dwarfs and large galaxies obey the same relationship between CO and the 1.4 GHz RC surface brightness. This relationship is well described by a Schmidt law with ΣRC~Σ1.3CO. Therefore, dwarf galaxies and large spirals exhibit the same relationship between molecular gas and star formation rate (SFR). We find that this result is robust to moderate changes in the RC-to-SFR and CO-to-H2 conversion factors. Our data appear to be inconsistent with large (order of magnitude) variations in the CO-to-H2 conversion factor in the star-forming molecular gas.

  2. THE DISTRIBUTION OF FAINT SATELLITES AROUND CENTRAL GALAXIES IN THE CANADA-FRANCE-HAWAII TELESCOPE LEGACY SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, C. Y.; Jing, Y. P.; Li, Cheng [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Nandan Road 80, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2012-11-20

    We investigate the radial number density profile and the abundance distribution of faint satellites around central galaxies in the low-redshift universe using the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) Legacy Survey. We consider three samples of central galaxies with magnitudes of M {sub r} = -21, -22, and -23 selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey group catalog of Yang et al. The satellite distribution around these central galaxies is obtained by cross-correlating these galaxies with the photometric catalog of the CFHT Legacy Survey. The projected radial number density of the satellites obeys a power-law form with the best-fit logarithmic slope of -1.05, independent of both the central galaxy luminosity and the satellite luminosity. The projected cross-correlation function between central and satellite galaxies exhibits a non-monotonic trend with satellite luminosity. It is most pronounced for central galaxies with M {sub r} = -21, where the decreasing trend of clustering amplitude with satellite luminosity is reversed when satellites are fainter than central galaxies by more than 2 mag. A comparison with the satellite luminosity functions in the Milky Way (MW) and M31 shows that the MW/M31 system has about twice as many satellites as around a typical central galaxy of similar luminosity. The implications for theoretical models are briefly discussed.

  3. Morphological parameters of a Spitzer survey of stellar structure in galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holwerda, B. W. [ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, 2200-AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Muñoz-Mateos, J.-C.; Sheth, K.; Kim, T. [National Radio Astronomfy Observatory/NAASC, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Comerón, S.; Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.; Laine, J. [Astronomy Division, Department of Physical Sciences, FI-90014 University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, Oulu (Finland); Meidt, S.; Mizusawa, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie/Königstühl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Laine, S. [Spitzer Science Center, Mail Stop 220-6, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Hinz, J. L.; Zaritsky, D. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Regan, M. W. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gil de Paz, A. [Departamento de Astrofísica, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Menéndez-Delmestre, K.; Seibert, M.; Ho, L. C. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Gadotti, D. A. [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile); Erroz-Ferrer, S., E-mail: benne.holwerda@esa.int, E-mail: benne.holwerda@gmail.com [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Vía Láctea s/n E-38205 La Laguna (Spain); and others

    2014-01-20

    The morphology of galaxies can be quantified to some degree using a set of scale-invariant parameters. Concentration (C), asymmetry (A), smoothness (S), the Gini index (G), the relative contribution of the brightest pixels to the second-order moment of the flux (M {sub 20}), ellipticity (E), and the Gini index of the second-order moment (G{sub M} ) have all been applied to morphologically classify galaxies at various wavelengths. Here, we present a catalog of these parameters for the Spitzer Survey of stellar structure in Galaxies, a volume-limited, near-infrared (NIR) imaging survey of nearby galaxies using the 3.6 and 4.5 μm channels of the Infrared Array Camera on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our goal is to provide a reference catalog of NIR quantified morphology for high-redshift studies and galaxy evolution models with enough detail to resolve stellar mass morphology. We explore where normal, non-interacting galaxies—those typically found on the Hubble tuning fork—lie in this parameter space and show that there is a tight relation between concentration (C {sub 82}) and M {sub 20} for normal galaxies. M {sub 20} can be used to classify galaxies into earlier and later types (i.e., to separate spirals from irregulars). Several criteria using these parameters exist to select systems with a disturbed morphology, i.e., those that appear to be undergoing a tidal interaction. We examine the applicability of these criteria to Spitzer NIR imaging. We find that four relations, based on the parameters A and S, G and M {sub 20}, G{sub M} , C, and M {sub 20}, respectively, select outliers in morphological parameter space, but each selects different subsets of galaxies. Two criteria (G{sub M} > 0.6, G > –0.115 × M {sub 20} + 0.384) seem most appropriate to identify possible mergers and the merger fraction in NIR surveys. We find no strong relation between lopsidedness and most of these morphological parameters, except for a weak dependence of lopsidedness on

  4. A Photometric redshift galaxy catalog from the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Bau-Ching; /Taiwan, Natl. Central U. /Taipei, Inst. Astron. Astrophys.; Yee, H.K.C.; /Toronto U., Astron. Dept.; Lin, H.; /Fermilab; Gladders, M.D.; /Carnegie Inst.

    2005-02-01

    The Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS) provides a large and deep photometric catalog of galaxies in the z' and R{sub c} bands for 90 square degrees of sky, and supplemental V and B data have been obtained for 33.6 deg{sup 2}. They compile a photometric redshift catalog from these 4-band data by utilizing the empirical quadratic polynomial photometric redshift fitting technique in combination with CNOC2 and GOODS/HDF-N redshift data. The training set includes 4924 spectral redshifts. The resulting catalog contains more than one million galaxies with photometric redshifts < 1.5 and R{sub c} < 24, giving an rms scatter {delta}({Delta}z) < 0.06 within the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.5 and {sigma}({Delta}z) < 0.11 for galaxies at 0.0 < z < 1.5. They describe the empirical quadratic polynomial photometric redshift fitting technique which they use to determine the relation between red-shift and photometry. A kd-tree algorithm is used to divide up the sample to improve the accuracy of the catalog. They also present a method for estimating the photometric redshift error for individual galaxies. They show that the redshift distribution of the sample is in excellent agreement with smaller and much deeper photometric and spectroscopic redshift surveys.

  5. Semi-analytic models for the CANDELS survey: comparison of predictions for intrinsic galaxy properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yu; Wechsler, Risa H. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Physics Department, and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Somerville, Rachel S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Croton, Darren [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Porter, Lauren; Primack, Joel; Moody, Chris [Department of Physics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Behroozi, Peter S.; Ferguson, Henry C. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Koo, David C.; Guo, Yicheng [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Safarzadeh, Mohammadtaher; White, Catherine E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Finlator, Kristian [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Castellano, Marco; Sommariva, Veronica, E-mail: luyu@stanford.edu, E-mail: rwechsler@stanford.edu [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio (Italy)

    2014-11-10

    We compare the predictions of three independently developed semi-analytic galaxy formation models (SAMs) that are being used to aid in the interpretation of results from the CANDELS survey. These models are each applied to the same set of halo merger trees extracted from the 'Bolshoi' high-resolution cosmological N-body simulation and are carefully tuned to match the local galaxy stellar mass function using the powerful method of Bayesian Inference coupled with Markov Chain Monte Carlo or by hand. The comparisons reveal that in spite of the significantly different parameterizations for star formation and feedback processes, the three models yield qualitatively similar predictions for the assembly histories of galaxy stellar mass and star formation over cosmic time. Comparing SAM predictions with existing estimates of the stellar mass function from z = 0-8, we show that the SAMs generally require strong outflows to suppress star formation in low-mass halos to match the present-day stellar mass function, as is the present common wisdom. However, all of the models considered produce predictions for the star formation rates (SFRs) and metallicities of low-mass galaxies that are inconsistent with existing data. The predictions for metallicity-stellar mass relations and their evolution clearly diverge between the models. We suggest that large differences in the metallicity relations and small differences in the stellar mass assembly histories of model galaxies stem from different assumptions for the outflow mass-loading factor produced by feedback. Importantly, while more accurate observational measurements for stellar mass, SFR and metallicity of galaxies at 1 < z < 5 will discriminate between models, the discrepancies between the constrained models and existing data of these observables have already revealed challenging problems in understanding star formation and its feedback in galaxy formation. The three sets of models are being used to construct catalogs

  6. SPHEREx: Probing the Physics of Inflation with an All-Sky Spectroscopic Galaxy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dore, Olivier; SPHEREx Science Team

    2018-01-01

    SPHEREx, a mission in NASA's Medium Explorer (MIDEX) program that was selected for Phase A in August 2017, is an all-sky survey satellite designed to address all three science goals in NASA’s astrophysics division: probe the origin and destiny of our Universe; explore whether planets around other stars could harbor life; and explore the origin and evolution of galaxies. These themes are addressed by a single survey, with a single instrument.In this poster, we describe how SPHEREx can probe the physics of inflationary non-Gaussianity by measuring large-scale structure with galaxy redshifts over a large cosmological volume at low redshifts, complementing high-redshift surveys optimized to constrain dark energy.SPHEREx will be the first all-sky near-infrared spectral survey, creating a legacy archive of spectra. In particular, it will measure the redshifts of over 500 million galaxies of all types, an unprecedented dataset. Using this catalog, SPHEREx will reduce the uncertainty in fNL -- a parameter describing the inflationary initial conditions -- by a factor of more than 10 compared with CMB measurements. At the same time, this catalog will enable strong scientific synergies with Euclid, WFIRST and LSST

  7. THE ADVANCED CAMERA FOR SURVEYS GENERAL CATALOG: STRUCTURAL PARAMETERS FOR APPROXIMATELY HALF A MILLION GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, Roger L.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cooper, Michael C. [Center for Galaxy Evolution, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Newman, Jeffrey A. [Pittsburgh Particle Physics, Astrophysics, and Cosmology Center, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Comerford, Julia M. [Astronomy Department, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Davis, Marc [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, Hearst Field Annex B, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lotz, Jennifer M.; Koekemoer, Anton M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Barden, Marco [Institute of Astro- and Particle Physics, University of Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Conselice, Christopher J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Capak, Peter L.; Scoville, Nick; Sheth, Kartik; Shopbell, Patrick [Spitzer Science Centre, 314-6 California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, CA (United States); Noeske, Kai G. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Willmer, Christopher N. A. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); and others

    2012-05-01

    We present the Advanced Camera for Surveys General Catalog (ACS-GC), a photometric and morphological database using publicly available data obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope. The goal of the ACS-GC database is to provide a large statistical sample of galaxies with reliable structural and distance measurements to probe the evolution of galaxies over a wide range of look-back times. The ACS-GC includes approximately 470,000 astronomical sources (stars + galaxies) derived from the AEGIS, COSMOS, GEMS, and GOODS surveys. GALAPAGOS was used to construct photometric (SEXTRACTOR) and morphological (GALFIT) catalogs. The analysis assumes a single Sersic model for each object to derive quantitative structural parameters. We include publicly available redshifts from the DEEP2, COMBO-17, TKRS, PEARS, ACES, CFHTLS, and zCOSMOS surveys to supply redshifts (spectroscopic and photometric) for a considerable fraction ({approx}74%) of the imaging sample. The ACS-GC includes color postage stamps, GALFIT residual images, and photometry, structural parameters, and redshifts combined into a single catalog.

  8. Field calibration and validation of remote-sensing surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pe'eri, Shachak; McLeod, Andy; Lavoie, Paul; Ackerman, Seth D.; Gardner, James; Parrish, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The Optical Collection Suite (OCS) is a ground-truth sampling system designed to perform in situ measurements that help calibrate and validate optical remote-sensing and swath-sonar surveys for mapping and monitoring coastal ecosystems and ocean planning. The OCS system enables researchers to collect underwater imagery with real-time feedback, measure the spectral response, and quantify the water clarity with simple and relatively inexpensive instruments that can be hand-deployed from a small vessel. This article reviews the design and performance of the system, based on operational and logistical considerations, as well as the data requirements to support a number of coastal science and management projects. The OCS system has been operational since 2009 and has been used in several ground-truth missions that overlapped with airborne lidar bathymetry (ALB), hyperspectral imagery (HSI), and swath-sonar bathymetric surveys in the Gulf of Maine, southwest Alaska, and the US Virgin Islands (USVI). Research projects that have used the system include a comparison of backscatter intensity derived from acoustic (multibeam/interferometric sonars) versus active optical (ALB) sensors, ALB bottom detection, and seafloor characterization using HSI and ALB.

  9. THE SINS/zC-SINF SURVEY of z {approx} 2 GALAXY KINEMATICS: OUTFLOW PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Sarah F.; Genzel, Reinhard [Department of Astronomy, Campbell Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Foerster-Schreiber, Natascha M.; Buschkamp, Peter; Davies, Ric; Eisenhauer, Frank; Kurk, Jaron; Lutz, Dieter [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Giessenbachstr.1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Griffin, Kristen Shapiro [Space Sciences Research Group, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (United States); Mancini, Chiara; Renzini, Alvio [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dellOsservatorio 5, Padova, I-35122 (Italy); Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, C. Marcella; Peng, Yingjie [Institute of Astronomy, Department of Physics, Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 (Switzerland); Bouche, Nicolas [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie (IRAP), Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, 14, avenue Edouard Berlin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Burkert, Andreas [Department fuer Physik, Universitaets-Sternwarte Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (USM), Scheinerstr. 1, Muenchen, D-81679 (Germany); Cresci, Giovanni [Istituto Nazionale di AstrofisicaOsservatorio Astronomico di Arcetri, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Genel, Shy [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hicks, Erin K. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, U.W., Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Naab, Thorsten, E-mail: sfnewman@berkeley.edu [Max-Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl Schwarzschildstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); and others

    2012-12-10

    Using SINFONI H{alpha}, [N II], and [S II] AO data of 27 z {approx} 2 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) from the SINS and zC-SINF surveys, we explore the dependence of outflow strength (via the broad flux fraction) on various galaxy parameters. For galaxies that have evidence for strong outflows, we find that the broad emission is spatially extended to at least the half-light radius ({approx}a few kpc). Decomposition of the [S II] doublet into broad and narrow components suggests that this outflowing gas probably has a density of {approx}10-100 cm{sup -3}, less than that of the star-forming gas (600 cm{sup -3}). There is a strong correlation of the H{alpha} broad flux fraction with the star formation surface density of the galaxy, with an apparent threshold for strong outflows occurring at 1 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. Above this threshold, we find that SFGs with log m{sub *} > 10 have similar or perhaps greater wind mass-loading factors ({eta} = M-dot{sub out}/SFR) and faster outflow velocities than lower mass SFGs, suggesting that the majority of outflowing gas at z {approx} 2 may derive from high-mass SFGs. The mass-loading factor is also correlated with the star formation rate (SFR), galaxy size, and inclination, such that smaller, more star-forming, and face-on galaxies launch more powerful outflows. We propose that the observed threshold for strong outflows and the observed mass loading of these winds can be explained by a simple model wherein break-out of winds is governed by pressure balance in the disk.

  10. Galaxy interactions trigger rapid black hole growth: An unprecedented view from the Hyper Suprime-Cam survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, Andy D.; Greene, Jenny E.; Bezanson, Rachel; Greco, Johnny; Johnson, Sean; Leauthaud, Alexie; Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Medezinski, Elinor; Price-Whelan, Adrian M.

    2018-01-01

    Collisions and interactions between gas-rich galaxies are thought to be pivotal stages in their formation and evolution, causing the rapid production of new stars, and possibly serving as a mechanism for fueling supermassive black holes (BHs). Harnessing the exquisite spatial resolution (˜0{^''.}5) afforded by the first ˜170 deg2 of the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) survey, we present our new constraints on the importance of galaxy-galaxy major mergers (1 : 4) in growing BHs throughout the last ˜8 Gyr. Utilizing mid-infrared observations in the WISE all-sky survey, we robustly select active galactic nuclei (AGN) and mass-matched control galaxy samples, totaling ˜140000 spectroscopically confirmed systems at i < 22 mag. We identify galaxy interaction signatures using a novel machine-learning random forest decision tree technique allowing us to select statistically significant samples of major mergers, minor mergers / irregular systems, and non-interacting galaxies. We use these samples to show that galaxies undergoing mergers are a factor of ˜2-7 more likely to contain luminous obscured AGN than non-interacting galaxies, and this is independent of both stellar mass and redshift to z < 0.9. Furthermore, based on our comparison of AGN fractions in mass-matched samples, we determine that the most luminous AGN population (LAGN ≳ 1045 erg s-1) systematically reside in merging systems over non-interacting galaxies. Our findings show that galaxy-galaxy interactions do, on average, trigger luminous AGN activity substantially more often than in secularly evolving non-interacting galaxies, and we further suggest that the BH growth rate may be closely tied to the dynamical time of the merger system.

  11. Type ia Supernovae Rates and Galaxy Clustering from the CFHT Supernova Legacy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, M. L.; Pritchet, C. J.; Sullivan, M.; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Neill, J. D.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Astier, P.; Balam, D.; Balland, C.; Basa, S.; Carlberg, R. G.; Conley, A.; Fouchez, D.; Guy, J.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I. M.; Howell, D. A.; Pain, R.; Perrett, K.; Regnault, N.; Baumont, S.; LeDu, J.; Lidman, C.; Perlmutter, S.; Ripoche, P.; Suzuki, N.; Walker, E. S.; Zhang, T.

    2008-04-01

    The Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey (CFHT SNLS) has created a large homogeneous database of intermediate redshift (0.2 z influence of galaxy clustering on the SN Ia rate, over and above the expected effect due to the dependence of SFR on clustering through the morphology-density relation. We identify three cluster SNe Ia, plus three additional possible cluster SNe Ia, and find the SN Ia rate per unit mass in clusters at intermediate redshifts is consistent with the rate per unit mass in field early-type galaxies and the SN Ia cluster rate from low-redshift cluster targeted surveys. We also find the number of SNe Ia in cluster environments to be within a factor of 2 of expectations from the two-component SN Ia rate model.

  12. Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV: Mapping the Milky Way, Nearby Galaxies, and the Distant Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, Michael R.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Abolfathi, Bela; Albareti, Franco D.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Almeida, Andres; Alonso-García, Javier; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott F.; Andrews, Brett; Aquino-Ortíz, Erik; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernández, Maria; Armengaud, Eric; Aubourg, Eric; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Bailey, Stephen; Barger, Kathleen A.; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge; Bartosz, Curtis; Bates, Dominic; Baumgarten, Falk; Bautista, Julian; Beaton, Rachael; Beers, Timothy C.; Belfiore, Francesco; Bender, Chad F.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Bernardi, Mariangela; Beutler, Florian; Bird, Jonathan C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S.; Boquien, Médéric; Borissova, Jura; van den Bosch, Remco; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, William N.; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Burgasser, Adam J.; Burtin, Etienne; Busca, Nicolás G.; Cappellari, Michele; Delgado Carigi, Maria Leticia; Carlberg, Joleen K.; Carnero Rosell, Aurelio; Carrera, Ricardo; Chanover, Nancy J.; Cherinka, Brian; Cheung, Edmond; Gómez Maqueo Chew, Yilen; Chiappini, Cristina; Doohyun Choi, Peter; Chojnowski, Drew; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Chung, Haeun; Cirolini, Rafael Fernando; Clerc, Nicolas; Cohen, Roger E.; Comparat, Johan; da Costa, Luiz; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Covey, Kevin; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cruz-Gonzalez, Irene; Garrido Cuadra, Daniel; Cunha, Katia; Damke, Guillermo J.; Darling, Jeremy; Davies, Roger; Dawson, Kyle; de la Macorra, Axel; Dell'Agli, Flavia; De Lee, Nathan; Delubac, Timothée; Di Mille, Francesco; Diamond-Stanic, Aleks; Cano-Díaz, Mariana; Donor, John; Downes, Juan José; Drory, Niv; du Mas des Bourboux, Hélion; Duckworth, Christopher J.; Dwelly, Tom; Dyer, Jamie; Ebelke, Garrett; Eigenbrot, Arthur D.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Emsellem, Eric; Eracleous, Mike; Escoffier, Stephanie; Evans, Michael L.; Fan, Xiaohui; Fernández-Alvar, Emma; Fernandez-Trincado, J. G.; Feuillet, Diane K.; Finoguenov, Alexis; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Fredrickson, Alexander; Freischlad, Gordon; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Fuentes, Carla E.; Galbany, Lluís; Garcia-Dias, R.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Gaulme, Patrick; Geisler, Doug; Gelfand, Joseph D.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Gillespie, Bruce A.; Goddard, Daniel; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Grabowski, Kathleen; Green, Paul J.; Grier, Catherine J.; Gunn, James E.; Guo, Hong; Guy, Julien; Hagen, Alex; Hahn, ChangHoon; Hall, Matthew; Harding, Paul; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hearty, Fred; Gonzalez Hernández, Jonay I.; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Holtzman, Jon A.; Holzer, Parker H.; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Hutchinson, Timothy A.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Ibarra-Medel, Héctor J.; da Silva Ilha, Gabriele; Ivans, Inese I.; Ivory, KeShawn; Jackson, Kelly; Jensen, Trey W.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Jones, Amy; Jönsson, Henrik; Jullo, Eric; Kamble, Vikrant; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Klaene, Mark; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Lacerna, Ivan; Lane, Richard R.; Lang, Dustin; Law, David R.; Lazarz, Daniel; Lee, Youngbae; Le Goff, Jean-Marc; Liang, Fu-Heng; Li, Cheng; Li, Hongyu; Lian, Jianhui; Lima, Marcos; Lin, Lihwai; Lin, Yen-Ting; Bertran de Lis, Sara; Liu, Chao; de Icaza Lizaola, Miguel Angel C.; Long, Dan; Lucatello, Sara; Lundgren, Britt; MacDonald, Nicholas K.; Deconto Machado, Alice; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Geimba Maia, Marcio Antonio; Maiolino, Roberto; Majewski, Steven R.; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Manchado, Arturo; Mao, Shude; Maraston, Claudia; Marques-Chaves, Rui; Masseron, Thomas; Masters, Karen L.; McBride, Cameron K.; McDermid, Richard M.; McGrath, Brianne; McGreer, Ian D.; Medina Peña, Nicolás; Melendez, Matthew; Merloni, Andrea; Merrifield, Michael R.; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Meza, Andres; Minchev, Ivan; Minniti, Dante; Miyaji, Takamitsu; More, Surhud; Mulchaey, John; Müller-Sánchez, Francisco; Muna, Demitri; Munoz, Ricardo R.; Myers, Adam D.; Nair, Preethi; Nandra, Kirpal; Correa do Nascimento, Janaina; Negrete, Alenka; Ness, Melissa; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; Nitschelm, Christian; Ntelis, Pierros; O'Connell, Julia E.; Oelkers, Ryan J.; Oravetz, Audrey; Oravetz, Daniel; Pace, Zach; Padilla, Nelson; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Alonso Palicio, Pedro; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K.; Parikh, Taniya; Pâris, Isabelle; Park, Changbom; Patten, Alim Y.; Peirani, Sebastien; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Penny, Samantha; Percival, Will J.; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pinsonneault, Marc; Pisani, Alice; Poleski, Radosław; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Queiroz, Anna Bárbara de Andrade; Raddick, M. Jordan; Raichoor, Anand; Barboza Rembold, Sandro; Richstein, Hannah; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Riffel, Rogério; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Roman-Lopes, A.; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos; Rosado, Margarita; Ross, Ashley J.; Rossi, Graziano; Ruan, John; Ruggeri, Rossana; Rykoff, Eli S.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Salvato, Mara; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Aguado, D. S.; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Santana, Felipe A.; Santiago, Basílio Xavier; Sayres, Conor; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; da Silva Schimoia, Jaderson; Schlafly, Edward F.; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Schultheis, Mathias; Schuster, William J.; Schwope, Axel; Seo, Hee-Jong; Shao, Zhengyi; Shen, Shiyin; Shetrone, Matthew; Shull, Michael; Simon, Joshua D.; Skinner, Danielle; Skrutskie, M. F.; Slosar, Anže; Smith, Verne V.; Sobeck, Jennifer S.; Sobreira, Flavia; Somers, Garrett; Souto, Diogo; Stark, David V.; Stassun, Keivan; Stauffer, Fritz; Steinmetz, Matthias; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Streblyanska, Alina; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Suárez, Genaro; Sun, Jing; Suzuki, Nao; Szigeti, Laszlo; Taghizadeh-Popp, Manuchehr; Tang, Baitian; Tao, Charling; Tayar, Jamie; Tembe, Mita; Teske, Johanna; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Thomas, Daniel; Thompson, Benjamin A.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tissera, Patricia; Tojeiro, Rita; Hernandez Toledo, Hector; de la Torre, Sylvain; Tremonti, Christy; Troup, Nicholas W.; Valenzuela, Octavio; Martinez Valpuesta, Inma; Vargas-González, Jaime; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Villanova, Sandro; Vivek, M.; Vogt, Nicole; Wake, David; Walterbos, Rene; Wang, Yuting; Weaver, Benjamin Alan; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Weinberg, David H.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Whelan, David G.; Wild, Vivienne; Wilson, John; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Wylezalek, Dominika; Xiao, Ting; Yan, Renbin; Yang, Meng; Ybarra, Jason E.; Yèche, Christophe; Zakamska, Nadia; Zamora, Olga; Zarrouk, Pauline; Zasowski, Gail; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Zheng; Zheng, Zheng; Zhou, Xu; Zhou, Zhi-Min; Zhu, Guangtun B.; Zoccali, Manuela; Zou, Hu

    2017-07-01

    We describe the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV), a project encompassing three major spectroscopic programs. The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment 2 (APOGEE-2) is observing hundreds of thousands of Milky Way stars at high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratios in the near-infrared. The Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey is obtaining spatially resolved spectroscopy for thousands of nearby galaxies (median z˜ 0.03). The extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) is mapping the galaxy, quasar, and neutral gas distributions between z˜ 0.6 and 3.5 to constrain cosmology using baryon acoustic oscillations, redshift space distortions, and the shape of the power spectrum. Within eBOSS, we are conducting two major subprograms: the SPectroscopic IDentification of eROSITA Sources (SPIDERS), investigating X-ray AGNs and galaxies in X-ray clusters, and the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS), obtaining spectra of variable sources. All programs use the 2.5 m Sloan Foundation Telescope at the Apache Point Observatory; observations there began in Summer 2014. APOGEE-2 also operates a second near-infrared spectrograph at the 2.5 m du Pont Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, with observations beginning in early 2017. Observations at both facilities are scheduled to continue through 2020. In keeping with previous SDSS policy, SDSS-IV provides regularly scheduled public data releases; the first one, Data Release 13, was made available in 2016 July.

  13. Large-scale clustering of galaxies in the CfA Redshift Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogeley, Michael S.; Park, Changbom; Geller, Margaret J.; Huchra, John P.

    1992-05-01

    The power spectrum of the galaxy distribution in the Center for Astrophysics Redshift Survey (de Lapparent et al., 1986; Geller and Huchra, 1989; and Huchra et al., 1992) is measured up to wavelengths of 200/h Mpc. Results are compared with several cosmological simulations with Gaussian initial conditions. It is shown that the power spectrum of the standard CDM model is inconsistent with the observed power spectrum at the 99 percent confidence level.

  14. Large-scale clustering of galaxies in the CfA Redshift Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogeley, Michael S.; Park, Changbom; Geller, Margaret J.; Huchra, John P.

    1992-01-01

    The power spectrum of the galaxy distribution in the Center for Astrophysics Redshift Survey (de Lapparent et al., 1986; Geller and Huchra, 1989; and Huchra et al., 1992) is measured up to wavelengths of 200/h Mpc. Results are compared with several cosmological simulations with Gaussian initial conditions. It is shown that the power spectrum of the standard CDM model is inconsistent with the observed power spectrum at the 99 percent confidence level.

  15. A strong-lensing elliptical galaxy in the MaNGA survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Russell J.

    2017-01-01

    I report discovery of a new galaxy-scale gravitational lens system, identified using public data from the Mapping Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey, as part of a systematic search for lensed background line emitters. The lens is SDSS J170124.01+372258.0, a giant elliptical galaxy with velocity dispersion σ = 256 km s-1, at a redshift of zl = 0.122. After modelling and subtracting the target galaxy light, the integral-field data cube reveals [O II], [O III] and Hβ emission lines corresponding to a source at zs = 0.791, forming an identifiable ring around the galaxy centre. If the ring is formed by a single lensed source, then the Einstein radius is REin ≈ 2.3 arcsec, projecting to ˜5 kpc at the distance of the lens. The total projected lensing mass is MEin = (3.6 ± 0.6) × 1011 M⊙, and the total J-band mass-to-light ratio is 3.0 ± 0.7 solar units. Plausible estimates of the likely dark matter content could reconcile this with a Milky Way-like initial mass function (IMF), for which M/L ≈ 1.5 is expected, but heavier IMFs are by no means excluded with the present data. An alternative interpretation of the system, with a more complex source plane, is also discussed. The discovery of this system bodes well for future lens searches based on MaNGA and other integral-field spectroscopic surveys.

  16. Early-Type Galaxies in the PEARS Survey: Probing the Stellar Populations at Moderate Redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreras, Ignacio; Pasquali, Anna; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James; Cohen, Seth; Windhorst, Rogier; Pirzkal, Nor; Grogin, Norman; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Lisker, Thorsten; Panagia, Nino; Daddi, Emanuele; Hathi, Nimish P.

    2009-11-01

    Using Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) slitless grism spectra from the PEARS program, we study the stellar populations of morphologically selected early-type galaxies in the GOODS North and South fields. The sample—extracted from a visual classification of the (v2.0) HST/ACS images and restricted to redshifts z > 0.4—comprises 228 galaxies (i F775W < 24 mag, AB) out to z lsim 1.3 over 320 arcmin2, with a median redshift z M = 0.75. This work significantly increases our previous sample from the GRAPES survey in the HUDF (18 galaxies over ~11 arcmin2). The grism data allow us to separate the sample into "red" and "blue" spectra, with the latter comprising 15% of the total. Three different grids of models parameterizing the star formation history are used to fit the low-resolution spectra. Over the redshift range of the sample—corresponding to a cosmic age between 5 and 10 Gyr—we find a strong correlation between stellar mass and average age, whereas the spread of ages (defined by the root mean square of the distribution) is roughly ~1 Gyr and independent of stellar mass. The best-fit parameters suggest that it is the formation epoch and not the formation timescale that best correlates with mass in early-type galaxies. This result—along with the recently observed lack of evolution of the number density of massive galaxies—motivates the need for a channel of (massive) galaxy formation bypassing any phase in the blue cloud, as suggested by the simulations of Dekel et al.

  17. VERY STRONG EMISSION-LINE GALAXIES IN THE WFC3 INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC PARALLEL SURVEY AND IMPLICATIONS FOR HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atek, H.; Colbert, J.; Shim, H. [Spitzer Science Center, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Siana, B.; Bridge, C. [Department of Astronomy, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Scarlata, C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Malkan, M.; Ross, N. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); McCarthy, P.; Dressler, A.; Hathi, N. P. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Teplitz, H. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Henry, A.; Martin, C. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Bunker, A. J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Fosbury, R. A. E. [Space Telescope-European Coordinating Facility, Garching bei Muenchen (Germany)

    2011-12-20

    The WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallel Survey uses the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) infrared grism capabilities to obtain slitless spectra of thousands of galaxies over a wide redshift range including the peak of star formation history of the universe. We select a population of very strong emission-line galaxies with rest-frame equivalent widths (EWs) higher than 200 A. A total of 176 objects are found over the redshift range 0.35 < z < 2.3 in the 180 arcmin{sup 2} area that we have analyzed so far. This population consists of young and low-mass starbursts with high specific star formation rates (sSFR). After spectroscopic follow-up of one of these galaxies with Keck/Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer, we report the detection at z = 0.7 of an extremely metal-poor galaxy with 12 + log(O/H) =7.47 {+-} 0.11. After estimating the active galactic nucleus fraction in the sample, we show that the high-EW galaxies have higher sSFR than normal star-forming galaxies at any redshift. We find that the nebular emission lines can substantially affect the total broadband flux density with a median brightening of 0.3 mag, with some examples of line contamination producing brightening of up to 1 mag. We show that the presence of strong emission lines in low-z galaxies can mimic the color-selection criteria used in the z {approx} 8 dropout surveys. In order to effectively remove low-redshift interlopers, deep optical imaging is needed, at least 1 mag deeper than the bands in which the objects are detected. Without deep optical data, most of the interlopers cannot be ruled out in the wide shallow HST imaging surveys. Finally, we empirically demonstrate that strong nebular lines can lead to an overestimation of the mass and the age of galaxies derived from fitting of their spectral energy distribution (SED). Without removing emission lines, the age and the stellar mass estimates are overestimated by a factor of 2 on average and up to a factor of 10 for the high-EW galaxies

  18. Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Cosmological Constraints from Galaxy Clustering and Weak Lensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, T.M.C.; et al.

    2017-08-04

    We present cosmological results from a combined analysis of galaxy clustering and weak gravitational lensing, using 1321 deg$^2$ of $griz$ imaging data from the first year of the Dark Energy Survey (DES Y1). We combine three two-point functions: (i) the cosmic shear correlation function of 26 million source galaxies in four redshift bins, (ii) the galaxy angular autocorrelation function of 650,000 luminous red galaxies in five redshift bins, and (iii) the galaxy-shear cross-correlation of luminous red galaxy positions and source galaxy shears. To demonstrate the robustness of these results, we use independent pairs of galaxy shape, photometric redshift estimation and validation, and likelihood analysis pipelines. To prevent confirmation bias, the bulk of the analysis was carried out while blind to the true results; we describe an extensive suite of systematics checks performed and passed during this blinded phase. The data are modeled in flat $\\Lambda$CDM and $w$CDM cosmologies, marginalizing over 20 nuisance parameters, varying 6 (for $\\Lambda$CDM) or 7 (for $w$CDM) cosmological parameters including the neutrino mass density and including the 457 $\\times$ 457 element analytic covariance matrix. We find consistent cosmological results from these three two-point functions, and from their combination obtain $S_8 \\equiv \\sigma_8 (\\Omega_m/0.3)^{0.5} = 0.783^{+0.021}_{-0.025}$ and $\\Omega_m = 0.264^{+0.032}_{-0.019}$ for $\\Lambda$CDM for $w$CDM, we find $S_8 = 0.794^{+0.029}_{-0.027}$, $\\Omega_m = 0.279^{+0.043}_{-0.022}$, and $w=-0.80^{+0.20}_{-0.22}$ at 68% CL. The precision of these DES Y1 results rivals that from the Planck cosmic microwave background measurements, allowing a comparison of structure in the very early and late Universe on equal terms. Although the DES Y1 best-fit values for $S_8$ and $\\Omega_m$ are lower than the central values from Planck ...

  19. Local starburst galaxies and their descendants. Statistics from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergvall, Nils; Marquart, Thomas; Way, Michael J.; Blomqvist, Anna; Holst, Emma; Ostlin, Goran; Zackrisson, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Despite strong interest in the starburst phenomenon in extragalactic astronomy, the concept remains ill-defined. Here we use a strict definition of starburst to examine the statistical properties of starburst galaxies in the local universe. We also seek to establish links between starburst galaxies, post-starburst (hereafter postburst) galaxies, and active galaxies. Data were selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7. We applied a novel method of treating dust attenuation and derive star formation rates, ages, and stellar masses assuming a two-component stellar population model. Dynamical masses are calculated from the width of the H-alpha line. These masses agree excellently with the photometric masses. The mass (gas+stars) range is approximately 10( exp 9) - 10(exp 11.5) solar mass. As a selection criterion for starburst galaxies, we use, the birthrate parameter, b = SFR/SFR, requiring that b is greater than 3. For postburst galaxies, we use, the equivalent width of Hdelta in absorption with the criterion EW (sub Hdelta_abs) is greater than 6 A. Results. We find that only 1% of star-forming galaxies are starburst galaxies. They contribute 3-6% to the stellar production and are therefore unimportant for the local star formation activity. The median starburst age is 70 Myr roughly independent of mass, indicating that star formation is mainly regulated by local feedback processes. The b-parameter strongly depends on burst age. Values close to b = 60 are found at ages approximately 10 Myr, while almost no starbursts are found at ages greater than 1 Gyr. The median baryonic burst mass fraction of sub-L galaxies is 5% and decreases slowly towards high masses. The median mass fraction of the recent burst in the postburst sample is 5-10%. A smaller fraction of the postburst galaxies, however, originates in non-bursting galaxies. The age-mass distribution of the postburst progenitors (with mass fractions is greater than 3%) is bimodal with a break at logM(solar mass

  20. EXTENDED PHOTOMETRY FOR THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: A TESTBED FOR PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Daniel J.; Newman, Jeffrey A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O' Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Coil, Alison L. [Department of Physics, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Cooper, Michael C. [Center for Galaxy Evolution, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Gwyn, Stephen D. J., E-mail: djm70@pitt.edu, E-mail: janewman@pitt.edu, E-mail: acoil@ucsd.edu, E-mail: m.cooper@uci.edu, E-mail: Stephen.Gwyn@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Canadian Astronomical Data Centre, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, British Columbia V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2013-02-15

    This paper describes a new catalog that supplements the existing DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey photometric and spectroscopic catalogs with ugriz photometry from two other surveys: the Canada-France-Hawaii Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Each catalog is cross-matched by position on the sky in order to assign ugriz photometry to objects in the DEEP2 catalogs. We have recalibrated the CFHTLS photometry where it overlaps DEEP2 in order to provide a more uniform data set. We have also used this improved photometry to predict DEEP2 BRI photometry in regions where only poorer measurements were available previously. In addition, we have included improved astrometry tied to SDSS rather than USNO-A2.0 for all DEEP2 objects. In total this catalog contains {approx}27, 000 objects with full ugriz photometry as well as robust spectroscopic redshift measurements, 64% of which have r > 23. By combining the secure and accurate redshifts of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey with ugriz photometry, we have created a catalog that can be used as an excellent testbed for future photo-z studies, including tests of algorithms for surveys such as LSST and DES.

  1. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: the low-redshift stellar mass Tully-Fisher relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, J. V.; Croom, S. M.; Bryant, J. J.; Callingham, J. R.; Schaefer, A. L.; Cortese, L.; Hopkins, A. M.; D'Eugenio, F.; Scott, N.; Glazebrook, K.; Tonini, C.; McElroy, R. E.; Clark, H. A.; Catinella, B.; Allen, J. T.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Goodwin, M.; Green, A. W.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Lawrence, J.; Lorente, N.; Medling, A. M.; Owers, M. S.; Richards, S. N.; Sharp, R.

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the Tully-Fisher relation (TFR) for a morphologically and kinematically diverse sample of galaxies from the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey using two-dimensional spatially resolved H α velocity maps and find a well-defined relation across the stellar mass range of 8.0 kinematic H α asymmetry of all galaxies in the sample, and find a correlation between scatter (i.e. residuals off the TFR) and asymmetry. This effect is pronounced at low stellar mass, corresponding to the inverse relationship between stellar mass and kinematic asymmetry found in previous work. For galaxies with log (M*/M⊙) 9.5 the fraction is 10 ± 1 per cent. We use 'simulated slits' to directly compare our results with those from long slit spectroscopy and find that aligning slits with the photometric, rather than the kinematic, position angle, increases global scatter below the TFR. Further, kinematic asymmetry is correlated with misalignment between the photometric and kinematic position angles. This work demonstrates the value of 2D spatially resolved kinematics for accurate TFR studies; integral field spectroscopy reduces the underestimation of rotation velocity that can occur from slit positioning off the kinematic axis.

  2. A Chandra Archival Survey of the X-ray Source Populations of Nearby Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgard, Roy; Wright, Simon; Fonseca, Gloria; Santini, Anthony; Fritze, Hannah

    2018-01-01

    We present results of a volume-limited Chandra archival survey of the X-ray point sources populations of nearby galaxies. We define our sample to include all observations of at least 5 ks of any galaxy within 15 Mpc. The complete sample is in excess of 15000 individual point sources, approximately half of which are contained with the D25 ellipses of galaxies. We present spectral and temporal analyses of this sample, from which we can cleanly define the parameter spaces in color, variability, and luminosity occupied by different classes of sources (e.g., LMXBs vs. HMXBs). For all sources, we perform detailed spatial modeling, spectral fitting, multiband X-ray photometry, and multimodal timing analyses. We further discuss source classes as a function of host galaxy morphology, star formation rate, stellar mass distribution, optical extent, interaction history, and metallicity. Finally, we discuss incompleteness in the sample, and what observations can be conducted in the following years to fill the gap.

  3. A Chandra Archival Survey of the X-ray Source Populations of Nearby Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgard, Roy E.; Wright, Simon; Fonseca, Gloria; Santini, Anthony; Fritze, Hannah

    2017-08-01

    We present results of a volume-limited Chandra archival survey of the X-ray point sources populations of nearby galaxies. We define our sample to include all observations of at least 5 ks of any galaxy within 15 Mpc. The complete sample is in excess of 15000 individual point sources, approximately half of which are contained with the D25 ellipses of galaxies. We present spectral and temporal analyses of this sample, from which we can cleanly define the parameter spaces in color, variability, and luminosity occupied by different classes of sources (e.g., LMXBs vs. HMXBs). For all sources, we perform detailed spatial modeling, spectral fitting, multiband X-ray photometry, and multimodal timing analyses. We further discuss source classes as a function of host galaxy morphology, star formation rate, stellar mass distribution, optical extent, interaction history, and metallicity. Finally, we discuss incompleteness in the sample, and what observations can be conducted in the following years to fill the gap.

  4. Size and Morphology of Galaxies in the HST Medium Deep Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnatunga, K. U.; Casertano, S.; Griffiths, R. E.; Im, M.; Neuschaefer, L. W.; Ostrander, E. J.

    1994-12-01

    A modeling approach based on the maximum likelihood has been used to extract quantitative morphological and structural parameter estimates for over 15,000 faint galaxy images observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera. Because convolved galaxy images are compared directly with the observations, we avoid the need for deconvolution, which is difficult and potentially unstable for faint images. Direct comparison of structural parameters measured from WFC and WFPC2 observations of the same objects in fields observed by both instruments show results that are consistent within the nominal errors derived in the procedure itself. The procedure successfully measures the parameters of faint galaxies, despite the potential difficulties related to the aberration in WF/PC and to the undersampling in WFPC2.' We illustrate the procedure as applied to process both WF/PC and WFPC2 data and present results from the HST Medium Deep Survey galaxy catalog which has now been made available through the HST archive. This work was supported by NASA/HST grants GO-2684-0*-94A from STScI, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  5. A new method for finding and characterizing galaxy groups via low-frequency radio surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croston, J. H.; Ineson, J.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Mingo, B.

    2017-09-01

    We describe a new method for identifying and characterizing the thermodynamic state of large samples of evolved galaxy groups at high redshifts using high-resolution, low-frequency radio surveys, such as those that will be carried out with LOFAR and the Square Kilometre Array. We identify a sub-population of morphologically regular powerful [Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II)] radio galaxies and demonstrate that, for this sub-population, the internal pressure of the radio lobes is a reliable tracer of the external intragroup/intracluster medium (ICM) pressure, and that the assumption of a universal pressure profile for relaxed groups enables the total mass and X-ray luminosity to be estimated. Using a sample of well-studied FR II radio galaxies, we demonstrate that our method enables the estimation of group/cluster X-ray luminosities over three orders of magnitude in luminosity to within a factor of ˜2 from low-frequency radio properties alone. Our method could provide a powerful new tool for building samples of thousands of evolved galaxy groups at z > 1 and characterizing their ICM.

  6. Exploring the expansion dynamics of the universe from galaxy cluster surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Deng; Meng, Xin-He

    2017-12-01

    To understand the expansion dynamics of the universe from galaxy cluster scales, using the angular diameter distance (ADD) data from two different galaxy cluster surveys, we constrain four cosmological models to explore the underlying value of H0 and employ the model-independent Gaussian Processes to investigate the evolution of the equation of state of dark energy. The ADD data in the X-ray bands consists of two samples covering the redshift ranges [0.023, 0.784] and [0.14, 0.89], respectively. We find that: (i) For these two samples, the obtained values of H0 are more consistent with the recent local observation by Riess et al. than the global measurement by the Planck Collaboration, and the ΛCDM model is still preferred utilizing the information criterions; (ii) For the first sample, there is no evidence of dynamical dark energy (DDE) at the 2 σ confidence level (CL); (iii) For the second one, the reconstructed equation of state of dark energy exhibits a phantom-crossing behavior in the relatively low redshift range over the 2 σ CL, which gives a hint that the late-time universe may be actually dominated by the DDE from galaxy cluster scales; (iv) By adding a combination of Type Ia Supernovae, cosmic chronometers and Planck-2015 shift parameter and HII galaxy measurements into both ADD samples, the DDE exists evidently over the 2 σ CL.

  7. Monitoring survey of pulsating giant stars in the Local Group galaxies: survey description, science goals, target selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saremi, E.; Javadi, A.; van Loon, J. Th; Khosroshahi, H.; Abedi, A.; Bamber, J.; Hashemi, S. A.; Nikzat, F.; Molaei Nezhad, A.

    2017-06-01

    The population of nearby dwarf galaxies in the Local Group constitutes a complete galactic environment, perfect suited for studying the connection between stellar populations and galaxy evolution. In this study, we are conducting an optical monitoring survey of the majority of dwarf galaxies in the Local Group, with the Isaac Newton Telescope (INT), to identify long period variable stars (LPVs). These stars are at the end points of their evolution and therefore their luminosity can be directly translated into their birth masses; this enables us to reconstruct the star formation history. By the end of the monitoring survey, we will have performed observations over ten epochs, spaced approximately three months apart, and identified long-period, dust-producing AGB stars; five epochs of data have been obtained already. LPVs are also the main source of dust; in combination with Spitzer Space Telescope images at mid-IR wavelengths we will quantify the mass loss, and provide a detailed map of the mass feedback into the interstellar medium. We will also use the amplitudes in different optical passbands to determine the radius variations of the stars, and relate this to their mass loss.

  8. The JCMT Nearby Galaxies Legacy Survey - XI. Environmental variations in the atomic and molecular gas radial profiles of nearby spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Angus; Wilson, C. D.; Knapen, J. H.; Sánchez-Gallego, J. R.; Brinks, E.; Rosolowsky, E.

    2017-06-01

    We present an analysis of the radial profiles of a sample of 43 H I-flux selected spiral galaxies from the Nearby Galaxies Legacy Survey (NGLS) with resolved James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) CO J = 3 - 2 and/or Very Large Array (VLA) H I maps. Comparing the Virgo and non-Virgo populations, we confirm that the H I discs are truncated in the Virgo sample, even for these relatively H I-rich galaxies. On the other hand, the H2 distribution is enhanced for the Virgo galaxies near their centres, resulting in higher H2 to H I ratios and steeper H2 and total gas radial profiles. This is likely due to the effects of moderate ram pressure stripping in the cluster environment, which would preferentially remove low-density gas in the outskirts while enhancing higher density gas near the centre. Combined with Hα star formation rate data, we find that the star formation efficiency (SFR/H2) is relatively constant with radius for both samples, but the Virgo galaxies have an ˜40 per cent lower star formation efficiency than the non-Virgo galaxies.

  9. Machine-learning-based photometric redshifts for galaxies of the ESO Kilo-Degree Survey data release 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavuoti, S.; Brescia, M.; Tortora, C.; Longo, G.; Napolitano, N. R.; Radovich, M.; Barbera, F. La; Capaccioli, M.; de Jong, J. T. A.; Getman, F.; Grado, A.; Paolillo, M.

    We have estimated photometric redshifts (zphot) for more than 1.1 million galaxies of the public European Southern Observatory (ESO) Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) data release 2. KiDS is an optical wide-field imaging survey carried out with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) Survey Telescope (VST) and the

  10. THE DATA REDUCTION PIPELINE FOR THE SDSS-IV MaNGA IFU GALAXY SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, David R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Cherinka, Brian [Center for Astrophysical Sciences, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Yan, Renbin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, 505 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40506-0055 (United States); Andrews, Brett H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and PITT PACC, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O’Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Bershady, Matthew A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Bizyaev, Dmitry [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Blanc, Guillermo A. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Camino del Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Blanton, Michael R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 S 1400 E, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Bundy, Kevin [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the universe, Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, 277-8583 (Kavli IPMU, WPI) (Japan); Chen, Yanmei [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Drory, Niv [McDonald Observatory, Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); D’Souza, Richard; Jones, Amy; Kauffmann, Guinevere [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Fu, Hai, E-mail: dlaw@stsci.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); and others

    2016-10-01

    Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) is an optical fiber-bundle integral-field unit (IFU) spectroscopic survey that is one of three core programs in the fourth-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV). With a spectral coverage of 3622–10354 Å and an average footprint of ∼500 arcsec{sup 2} per IFU the scientific data products derived from MaNGA will permit exploration of the internal structure of a statistically large sample of 10,000 low-redshift galaxies in unprecedented detail. Comprising 174 individually pluggable science and calibration IFUs with a near-constant data stream, MaNGA is expected to obtain ∼100 million raw-frame spectra and ∼10 million reduced galaxy spectra over the six-year lifetime of the survey. In this contribution, we describe the MaNGA Data Reduction Pipeline algorithms and centralized metadata framework that produce sky-subtracted spectrophotometrically calibrated spectra and rectified three-dimensional data cubes that combine individual dithered observations. For the 1390 galaxy data cubes released in Summer 2016 as part of SDSS-IV Data Release 13, we demonstrate that the MaNGA data have nearly Poisson-limited sky subtraction shortward of ∼8500 Å and reach a typical 10 σ limiting continuum surface brightness μ  = 23.5 AB arcsec{sup −2} in a five-arcsecond-diameter aperture in the g -band. The wavelength calibration of the MaNGA data is accurate to 5 km s{sup −1} rms, with a median spatial resolution of 2.54 arcsec FWHM (1.8 kpc at the median redshift of 0.037) and a median spectral resolution of σ  = 72 km s{sup −1}.

  11. The Data Reduction Pipeline for the SDSS-IV MaNGA IFU Galaxy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, David R.; Cherinka, Brian; Yan, Renbin; Andrews, Brett H.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Chen, Yanmei; Drory, Niv; D'Souza, Richard; Fu, Hai; Jones, Amy; Kauffmann, Guinevere; MacDonald, Nicholas; Masters, Karen L.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Parejko, John K.; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Schlegel, David J.; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David A.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Westfall, Kyle B.; Zhang, Kai

    2016-10-01

    Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) is an optical fiber-bundle integral-field unit (IFU) spectroscopic survey that is one of three core programs in the fourth-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV). With a spectral coverage of 3622-10354 Å and an average footprint of ˜500 arcsec2 per IFU the scientific data products derived from MaNGA will permit exploration of the internal structure of a statistically large sample of 10,000 low-redshift galaxies in unprecedented detail. Comprising 174 individually pluggable science and calibration IFUs with a near-constant data stream, MaNGA is expected to obtain ˜100 million raw-frame spectra and ˜10 million reduced galaxy spectra over the six-year lifetime of the survey. In this contribution, we describe the MaNGA Data Reduction Pipeline algorithms and centralized metadata framework that produce sky-subtracted spectrophotometrically calibrated spectra and rectified three-dimensional data cubes that combine individual dithered observations. For the 1390 galaxy data cubes released in Summer 2016 as part of SDSS-IV Data Release 13, we demonstrate that the MaNGA data have nearly Poisson-limited sky subtraction shortward of ˜8500 Å and reach a typical 10σ limiting continuum surface brightness μ = 23.5 AB arcsec-2 in a five-arcsecond-diameter aperture in the g-band. The wavelength calibration of the MaNGA data is accurate to 5 km s-1 rms, with a median spatial resolution of 2.54 arcsec FWHM (1.8 kpc at the median redshift of 0.037) and a median spectral resolution of σ = 72 km s-1.

  12. Galaxy interactions trigger rapid black hole growth: An unprecedented view from the Hyper Suprime-Cam survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, Andy D.; Greene, Jenny E.; Bezanson, Rachel; Greco, Johnny; Johnson, Sean; Leauthaud, Alexie; Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Medezinski, Elinor; Price-Whelan, Adrian M.

    2017-12-01

    Collisions and interactions between gas-rich galaxies are thought to be pivotal stages in their formation and evolution, causing the rapid production of new stars, and possibly serving as a mechanism for fueling supermassive black holes (BHs). Harnessing the exquisite spatial resolution (˜0{^''.}5) afforded by the first ˜170 deg2 of the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) survey, we present our new constraints on the importance of galaxy-galaxy major mergers (1 : 4) in growing BHs throughout the last ˜8 Gyr. Utilizing mid-infrared observations in the WISE all-sky survey, we robustly select active galactic nuclei (AGN) and mass-matched control galaxy samples, totaling ˜140000 spectroscopically confirmed systems at i forest decision tree technique allowing us to select statistically significant samples of major mergers, minor mergers / irregular systems, and non-interacting galaxies. We use these samples to show that galaxies undergoing mergers are a factor of ˜2-7 more likely to contain luminous obscured AGN than non-interacting galaxies, and this is independent of both stellar mass and redshift to z based on our comparison of AGN fractions in mass-matched samples, we determine that the most luminous AGN population (LAGN ≳ 1045 erg s-1) systematically reside in merging systems over non-interacting galaxies. Our findings show that galaxy-galaxy interactions do, on average, trigger luminous AGN activity substantially more often than in secularly evolving non-interacting galaxies, and we further suggest that the BH growth rate may be closely tied to the dynamical time of the merger system.

  13. A WISE Survey of Star Formation in the Milky Way: New Insight into Galaxy Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Xavier

    We propose to measure the recent star formation rate (SFR) in the Perseus Arm of the Milky Way galaxy and its relation to the surface density of gas, whether molecular or atomic on a range of scales from star forming clusters through large star forming complexes to the full scale of the Galactic Arm. We will test the connection between the SFR-gas relationship in the Galaxy and comparable measurements made in external galaxies in order to probe its origin and better understand the role and contribution of star formation to cosmological galaxy evolution. We also propose to study star formation that has been triggered by the recent formation of massive star clusters in order to discern the mechanisms of triggering that may be operating on super bubble size scales of more than 100 parsecs. This study will allow us to understand one of the key factors that sets the efficiency with which gas becomes stars as galaxies evolve with time. In order to achieve these goals, we will carry out a census of young stellar objects in the outer Milky Way Perseus Arm, using data gathered by the WISE and 2MASS all-sky surveys, with additional use of archival data from the Spitzer Space Telescope. We will develop and refine a young star finding algorithm that uses WISE and 2MASS photometry to identify and classify young stars and filters out contaminating objects such as background galaxies. We will measure the gas content with extinction maps made with data from 2MASS. We will test the triggered star formation models by analyzing the spatial distributions of young stars in super-bubbles and massive star forming regions in the Perseus Arm. This study will produce a key, like-for-like comparison between the extragalactic star formation rate-molecular gas relation and the Galactic relation and will advance the progress in linking Galactic and extragalactic studies of star formation, studying massive star forming regions that are representative of the major mode of star formation. The

  14. Three-dimensional Identification and Reconstruction of Galaxy Systems within Flux-limited Redshift Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinoni, Christian; Davis, Marc; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Coil, Alison L.

    2002-11-01

    We have developed a new geometrical method for identifying and reconstructing a homogeneous and highly complete set of galaxy groups within flux-limited redshift surveys. Our method combines information from the three-dimensional Voronoi diagram and its dual, the Delaunay triangulation, to obtain group and cluster catalogs that are remarkably robust over wide ranges in redshift and degree of density enhancement. As free by-products, this Voronoi-Delaunay method (VDM) provides a nonparametric measurement of the galaxy density around each object observed and a quantitative measure of the distribution of cosmological voids in the survey volume. In this paper, we describe the VDM algorithm in detail and test its effectiveness using a family of mock catalogs that simulate the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe (DEEP2) Redshift Survey, which should present at least as much challenge to cluster reconstruction methods as any other near-future survey that is capable of resolving their velocity dispersions. Using these mock DEEP2 catalogs, we demonstrate that the VDM algorithm can be used to identify a homogeneous set of groups in a magnitude-limited sample throughout the survey redshift window 0.7method can construct a homogeneous sample of systems that reproduces major properties of the ``real'' cluster parent population down to ~200 km s-1 for systems with at least five members (and down to ~400 km s-1 for clusters as a whole). In a Λ cold dark matter cosmology, that limit translates into an identification rate of ~270 systems per square degree with 0.7volume. By comparing the galaxy cluster catalogs derived from mock observations to the underlying distribution of clusters as found in real space with much fainter galaxies included (which should more closely trace mass in the cluster), we can assess completeness in velocity dispersion directly. We conclude that if our VDM algorithm is used, the recovered DEEP2 group and cluster sample should be statistically complete

  15. Star Formation Intensities Of Non-Isolated Galaxies With The Califa Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Vargas, Abdías; Torres-Papaqui, Juan Pablo; Rosales-Ortega, Fernando Fabián; Sánchez, Sebastián F.; Chow-Martínez, Marcel; Ortega-Minakata, René Alberto; Romero-Cruz, Fernando J.; Trejo-Alonso, Josué de Jesús; Neri-Larios, Daniel Marcos; Robleto-Orús Aitor, Carlos

    2017-08-01

    Poster presented at the conference Galaxy Evolution Across Time, 12-16 June, Paris, France. The influence of interactions on the star formation (SF) is investigated by studying a sample of 34 CALIFA survey non-isolated galaxies. We use the instantaneous star formation rate intensity (SFRI) obtained from the Halpha recombination line emission normalized by a unit of projected area. We explore the SFRI, stellar mass and stellar age annulus structures (split by morphology group), also for a control population of star-forming isolated galaxies observed with the CALIFA survey likewise. By morphology groups, the SF efficiency of early type spirals (ETSs) results magnified likely because of angular momentum loss. The SFRI of the non-isolated sample is then compared with that one of the isolated sample. It is found statistically and moderately enhanced in the non-isolated sample by a factor of at most 2. We also find the SFRI as to be a function of the degree of tidal perturbation what might consequently suggest interactions as to facilitate the gas transport to central regions. Contrasting behaviors of the SFRI structures, a gradual quench with clear outer presence of SF (isolated sample) while a steeper decrease from the center with poor SFRIs outwards (non-isolated one) are found. Similitudes in a variety of stellar population properties support the closeness of companions as to be the cause of the SFRI differences between samples.

  16. Initial results from the Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey in the Pegasus Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minchin, Robert; Taylor, Rhys; AGES Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    As part of the Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey (AGES), we have covered a 5deg x 4deg region centered on the Pegasus Cluster and its principal member, the elliptical galaxy NGC 7619, in the 21-cm line of neutral hydrogen. The survey takes in the full redshift range of the cluster and the volume behind it out to 18,000 km/s. In the cluster and the volume we detect over 500 sources, many of which are previously uncataloged. These include five sources without obvious optical counterparts (three within the redshift range of the cluster, which are assumed to be members); of these, four (two within the cluster) have possible low surface-brightness counterparts identified on stacked and/or smoothed SDSS images, while the third remains without an optical counterpart. We also detect three low surface-brightness ultra-diffuse galaxies from the catalog of Shi et al. (2017) in HI for the first time, and find fourteen other HI sources where both a UDG and other potential counterparts are present in the beam, making an unambiguous association with the UDG not possible on the basis of this data alone. In addition to these, we detect N objects with HI and stellar streams.

  17. Redshifts for fainter galaxies in the first CfA survey slice. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Gary; Thorstensen, John R.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Geller, Margaret J.; Huchra, John P.

    1990-01-01

    Redshifts were measured for 96 galaxies in right ascension alpha between 8h and 17h declination delta between 30 and 31 deg, and with m(Zwicky) in the range 15.6-15.7. These correspond to 94 of the 96 entries in the Zwicky-Nilson merged catalog. The declination range delta between 29 deg and 31 deg is now complete to m(Zwicky) = 15.7. The structures in the first 6-deg-wide slice of the Center for Astrophysics redshift survey slice (delta between 26.5 and 32.5 deg are clearly defined in the 2-deg-wide slightly deeper sample; the fainter galaxies trace the structures defined by the brighter ones.

  18. The C4 clustering algorithm: Clusters of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Christopher J.; Nichol, Robert; Reichart, Dan; Wechsler, Risa H.; Evrard, August; Annis, James; McKay, Timothy; Bahcall, Neta; Bernardi, Mariangela; Boehringer,; Connolly, Andrew; Goto, Tomo; Kniazev, Alexie; Lamb, Donald; Postman, Marc; Schneider, Donald; Sheth, Ravi; Voges, Wolfgang; /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Portsmouth U.,

    2005-03-01

    We present the ''C4 Cluster Catalog'', a new sample of 748 clusters of galaxies identified in the spectroscopic sample of the Second Data Release (DR2) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The C4 cluster-finding algorithm identifies clusters as overdensities in a seven-dimensional position and color space, thus minimizing projection effects that have plagued previous optical cluster selection. The present C4 catalog covers {approx}2600 square degrees of sky and ranges in redshift from z = 0.02 to z = 0.17. The mean cluster membership is 36 galaxies (with redshifts) brighter than r = 17.7, but the catalog includes a range of systems, from groups containing 10 members to massive clusters with over 200 cluster members with redshifts. The catalog provides a large number of measured cluster properties including sky location, mean redshift, galaxy membership, summed r-band optical luminosity (L{sub r}), velocity dispersion, as well as quantitative measures of substructure and the surrounding large-scale environment. We use new, multi-color mock SDSS galaxy catalogs, empirically constructed from the {Lambda}CDM Hubble Volume (HV) Sky Survey output, to investigate the sensitivity of the C4 catalog to the various algorithm parameters (detection threshold, choice of passbands and search aperture), as well as to quantify the purity and completeness of the C4 cluster catalog. These mock catalogs indicate that the C4 catalog is {approx_equal}90% complete and 95% pure above M{sub 200} = 1 x 10{sup 14} h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}} and within 0.03 {le} z {le} 0.12. Using the SDSS DR2 data, we show that the C4 algorithm finds 98% of X-ray identified clusters and 90% of Abell clusters within 0.03 {le} z {le} 0.12. Using the mock galaxy catalogs and the full HV dark matter simulations, we show that the L{sub r} of a cluster is a more robust estimator of the halo mass (M{sub 200}) than the galaxy line-of-sight velocity dispersion or the richness of the cluster

  19. Survey of technology for decommissioning of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. 8. Remote handling and cutting techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Ryuichiro; Ishijima, Noboru [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1999-03-01

    In nuclear fuel cycle facility decommissioning and refurbishment, the remote handling techniques such as dismantling, waste handling and decontamination are needed to reduce personnel radiation exposure. The survey research for the status of R and D activities on remote handling tools suitable for nuclear facilities in the world and domestic existing commercial cutting tools applicable to decommissioning of the facilities was conducted. In addition, the drive mechanism, sensing element and control system applicable to the remote handling devices were also surveyed. This report presents brief surveyed summaries. (H. Itami)

  20. The CfA-Rosat Survey of Distant Clusters of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Brian

    1998-01-01

    We (Vikhlinin, McNamara, Forman, Jones, Hornstrup, Quintana) have completed a new survey of distant clusters of galaxies, which we use to to study cluster evolution over cosmological timescales. The clusters were identified as extended X-ray sources in 650 ROSAT PSPC images of high Galactic latitude fields. Our catalog of approximately 230 extended X-ray sources covers 160 square degrees on the sky. Ours is the largest of the several ROSAT serendipitous cluster surveys in progress (e.g. SHARC, Rosati, WARPS etc.). Using V,R,I imagery obtained at several observatories, we find that greater than 90% of the X-ray sources are associated with distant clusters of galaxies. We have obtained spectroscopic redshifts for nearly 80 clusters in our catalog, and we have measured photometric redshifts for the remaining clusters. Our sample contains more than 20 clusters at z > 0.5. I will discuss the logN-logS relationship for our clusters. Because our large survey area, we are able to confirm the evolution of the most luminous distant clusters first seen in the Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey. In addition, I will discuss the relationships between optical richness, core radius, and X-ray luminosity for distant, X-ray-selected clusters.

  1. Filament hunting: integrated H i 21 cm emission from filaments inferred by galaxy surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooistra, Robin; Silva, Marta B.; Zaroubi, Saleem

    2017-06-01

    Large-scale filaments, with lengths that can reach tens of Mpc, are the most prominent features in the cosmic web. These filaments have only been observed indirectly through the positions of galaxies in large galaxy surveys or through absorption features in the spectra of high-redshift sources. In this study, we propose to go one step further and directly detect intergalactic medium filaments through their emission in the H i 21 cm line. We make use of high-resolution cosmological simulations to estimate the intensity of this emission in low-redshift filaments and use it to make predictions for the direct detectability of specific filaments previously inferred from galaxy surveys, in particular the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Given the expected signal of these filaments, our study shows that H i emission from large filaments can be observed by current and next-generation radio telescopes. We estimate that gas in filaments of length l ≳ 15 h-1 Mpc with relatively small inclinations to the line of sight (≲ 10°) can be observed in ˜40-100 h with telescopes such as Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope or Expanded Very Large Array, potentially providing large improvements over our knowledge of the astrophysical properties of these filaments. Due to their large field of view and sufficiently long integration times, upcoming H i surveys with the Apertif and Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder instruments will be able to detect large filaments independently of their orientation and curvature. Furthermore, our estimates indicate that a more powerful future radio telescope like Square Kilometre Array can be used to map most of these filaments, which will allow them to be used as a strong cosmological probe.

  2. BREAKS IN THIN AND THICK DISKS OF EDGE-ON GALAXIES IMAGED IN THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comeron, Sebastien; Salo, Heikki; Laurikainen, Eija; Laine, Jarkko [Astronomy Division, Department of Physics, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FI-90014 (Finland); Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille-LAM, Universite d' Aix-Marseille and CNRS, UMR7326, 38 rue F. Joliot-Curie, F-13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Knapen, Johan H. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna (Spain); Gadotti, Dimitri A. [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile); Sheth, Kartik; Munoz-Mateos, Juan Carlos; Kim, Taehyun [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Hinz, Joannah L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Regan, Michael W. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States); Gil de Paz, Armando [Departamento de Astrofisica, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Menendez-Delmestre, Karin [Observatorio do Valongo, Universidade Federal de Rio de Janeiro, Ladeira Pedro Antonio, 43, Saude CEP 20080-090, Rio de Janeiro-RJ-Brazil (Brazil); Seibert, Mark; Ho, Luis C. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA (United States); Mizusawa, Trisha [Department of Physics and Space Sciences, Florida Institute of Technology, 150 W. University Boulevard, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States); Holwerda, Benne [European Space Agency, ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, 2200-AG, Noordwijk (Netherlands)

    2012-11-10

    Breaks in the radial luminosity profiles of galaxies have until now been mostly studied averaged over disks. Here, we study separately breaks in thin and thick disks in 70 edge-on galaxies using imaging from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. We built luminosity profiles of the thin and thick disks parallel to midplanes and we found that thin disks often truncate (77%). Thick disks truncate less often (31%), but when they do, their break radius is comparable with that in the thin disk. This suggests either two different truncation mechanisms-one of dynamical origin affecting both disks simultaneously and another one only affecting the thin disk-or a single mechanism that creates a truncation in one disk or in both depending on some galaxy property. Thin disks apparently antitruncate in around 40% of galaxies. However, in many cases, these antitruncations are an artifact caused by the superposition of a thin disk and a thick disk, with the latter having a longer scale length. We estimate the real thin disk antitruncation fraction to be less than 15%. We found that the ratio of the thick and thin stellar disk mass is roughly constant (0.2 < M{sub T} /M{sub t} < 0.7) for circular velocities v{sub c} > 120 km s{sup -1}, but becomes much larger at smaller velocities. We hypothesize that this is due to a combination of a high efficiency of supernova feedback and a slower dynamical evolution in lower-mass galaxies causing stellar thin disks to be younger and less massive than in higher-mass galaxies.

  3. An alma survey of sub-millimeter galaxies in the extended Chandra deep field south: Sub-millimeter properties of color-selected galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decarli, R.; Walter, F.; Hodge, J. A.; Rix, H.-W.; Schinnerer, E. [Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Smail, I.; Swinbank, A. M.; Karim, A.; Simpson, J. M. [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Chapman, S. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Coppin, K. E. K. [Centre for Astrophysics, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Cox, P. [IRAM, 300 rue de la piscine, F-38406 Saint-Martin d' Hères (France); Dannerbauer, H. [Universität Wien, Institut für Astrophysik, Türenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Wien (Austria); Greve, T. R. [University College London, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Ivison, R. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Knudsen, K. K.; Lindroos, L. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, Onsala SE-439 92 (Sweden); Van der Werf, P. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Weiß, A., E-mail: decarli@mpia.de [Max-Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2014-01-10

    We study the sub-millimeter properties of color-selected galaxies via a stacking analysis applied for the first time to interferometric data at sub-millimeter wavelengths. We base our study on 344 GHz ALMA continuum observations of ∼20''-wide fields centered on 86 sub-millimeter sources detected in the LABOCA Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS) Sub-millimeter Survey. We select various classes of galaxies (K-selected, star-forming sBzK galaxies, extremely red objects, and distant red galaxies) according to their optical/near-infrared fluxes. We find clear, >10σ detections in the stacked images of all these galaxy classes. We include in our stacking analysis Herschel/SPIRE data to constrain the dust spectral energy distribution of these galaxies. We find that their dust emission is well described by a modified blackbody with T {sub dust} ≈ 30 K and β = 1.6 and infrared luminosities of (5-11) × 10{sup 11} L {sub ☉} or implied star formation rates of 75-140 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. We compare our results with those of previous studies based on single-dish observations at 870 μm and find that our flux densities are a factor 2-3 higher than previous estimates. The discrepancy is observed also after removing sources individually detected in ALESS maps. We report a similar discrepancy by repeating our analysis on 1.4 GHz observations of the whole ECDFS. Hence, we find tentative evidence that galaxies that are associated in projected and redshift space with sub-mm bright sources are brighter than the average population. Finally, we put our findings in the context of the cosmic star formation rate density as a function of redshift.

  4. QUIESCENT GALAXIES IN THE 3D-HST SURVEY: SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF A LARGE NUMBER OF GALAXIES WITH RELATIVELY OLD STELLAR POPULATIONS AT z {approx} 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitaker, Katherine E. [Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Skelton, Rosalind; Nelson, Erica J. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Brammer, Gabriel [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Casilla 19001, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Franx, Marijn; Labbe, Ivo; Fumagalli, Mattia; Patel, Shannon G. [Sterrewacht Leiden, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Kriek, Mariska [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lundgren, Britt F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Rix, Hans-Walter, E-mail: kate.whitaker@nasa.gov [Max Planck Institut fur Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-06-20

    Quiescent galaxies at z {approx} 2 have been identified in large numbers based on rest-frame colors, but only a small number of these galaxies have been spectroscopically confirmed to show that their rest-frame optical spectra show either strong Balmer or metal absorption lines. Here, we median stack the rest-frame optical spectra for 171 photometrically quiescent galaxies at 1.4 < z < 2.2 from the 3D-HST grism survey. In addition to H{beta} ({lambda}4861 A), we unambiguously identify metal absorption lines in the stacked spectrum, including the G band ({lambda}4304 A), Mg I ({lambda}5175 A), and Na I ({lambda}5894 A). This finding demonstrates that galaxies with relatively old stellar populations already existed when the universe was {approx}3 Gyr old, and that rest-frame color selection techniques can efficiently select them. We find an average age of 1.3{sup +0.1}{sub -0.3} Gyr when fitting a simple stellar population to the entire stack. We confirm our previous result from medium-band photometry that the stellar age varies with the colors of quiescent galaxies: the reddest 80% of galaxies are dominated by metal lines and have a relatively old mean age of 1.6{sup +0.5}{sub -0.4} Gyr, whereas the bluest (and brightest) galaxies have strong Balmer lines and a spectroscopic age of 0.9{sup +0.2}{sub -0.1} Gyr. Although the spectrum is dominated by an evolved stellar population, we also find [O III] and H{beta} emission. Interestingly, this emission is more centrally concentrated than the continuum with L{sub OIII}=1.7{+-}0.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}, indicating residual central star formation or nuclear activity.

  5. Quiescent Galaxies in the 3D-HST Survey: Spectroscopic Confirmation of a Large Number of Galaxies With Relatively Old Stellar Populations at z Approx. 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tease, Katherine Whitaker; vanDokkum, Pieter G.; Brammer, Gabriel; Momcheva, Ivelina; Skelton, Rosalind; Franx, Marijin; Kriek, Mariska; Labbe, Ivo; Fumagalli, Mattia; Lundgren, Britt F.; hide

    2013-01-01

    Quiescent galaxies at z approx. 2 have been identified in large numbers based on rest-frame colors, but only a small number of these galaxies have been spectroscopically confirmed to show that their rest-frame optical spectra show either strong Balmer or metal absorption lines. Here, we median stack the rest-frame optical spectra for 171 photometrically quiescent galaxies at 1.4 grism survey. In addition to H (4861 ),we unambiguously identify metal absorption lines in the stacked spectrum, including the G band (4304 ),Mgi (5175 ), and Na i (5894 ). This finding demonstrates that galaxies with relatively old stellar populations already existed when the universe was approx. 3 Gyr old, and that rest-frame color selection techniques can efficiently select them. We find an average age of 1.3+0.10.3 Gyr when fitting a simple stellar population to the entire stack. We confirm our previous result from medium-band photometry that the stellar age varies with the colors of quiescent galaxies: the reddest 80 of galaxies are dominated by metal lines and have a relatively old mean age of 1.6+0.50.4 Gyr, whereas the bluest (and brightest) galaxies have strong Balmer lines and a spectroscopic age of 0.9+0.20.1 Gyr. Although the spectrum is dominated by an evolved stellar population, we also find [O iii] and H emission. Interestingly, this emission is more centrally concentrated than the continuum with LOiii = 1.7+/- 0.3 x 10(exp 40) erg/s, indicating residual central star formation or nuclear activity.

  6. Exploring the Nature of Galaxies with Abundance Gradient Anomalies in the SDSS-IV/MaNGA Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Celeste; Tremonti, Christy; Pace, Zach; Schaefer, Adam

    2018-01-01

    Disk galaxies are known to have radial oxygen abundance gradients with their centers being more chemically enriched than their outskirts. The steepness of the abundance gradient has recently been shown to correlate with galaxy stellar mass, on average. However, individual galaxies sometimes show pronounced deviations from the expected trends, such as flatter or steeper slopes than expected for their mass, abrupt changes in slope, or azimuthal asymmetries. Here we report on a systematic search for galaxies with abundance gradient anomalies using 2-D spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV MaNGA. We construct nebular oxygen and nitrogen abundance maps for 300 moderately inclined non-interacting disk galaxies and use visual inspection to identify the most interesting cases. We use this training set to develop an automated pipeline to flag galaxies with abundance anomalies from the larger MaNGA dataset for visual inspection. We combine the metallicity maps with kinematic data and measurements of the galaxies' local environments to better understand the processes that shape the radial abundance gradients of disk galaxies.

  7. DOUBLE-PEAKED NARROW EMISSION-LINE GALAXIES FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY. I. SAMPLE AND BASIC PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge Junqiang; Hu Chen; Wang Jianmin; Zhang Shu [Key Laboratory for Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19B Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Bai Jinming, E-mail: wangjm@mail.ihep.ac.cn [Yunnan Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2012-08-01

    Recently, much attention has been paid to double-peaked narrow emission-line (NEL) galaxies, some of which are suggested to be related to merging galaxies. We make a systematic search to build the largest sample of these sources from Data Release 7 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). With reasonable criteria for fluxes, FWHMs of the emission lines, and separations of the peaks, we select 3030 double-peaked NEL galaxies. In light of the existence of broad Balmer lines and the locations of the two components of double-peaked NELs distinguished by the Kauffmann et al. criteria in the Baldwin-Phillips-Terlevich diagram, we find that there are 81 Type I active galactic nuclei (AGNs), 837 double Type II AGNs (2-Type II), 708 galaxies with double star-forming components (2-SF), 400 with mixed star-forming and Type II AGN components (Type II + SF), and 1004 unknown-type objects. As a by-product, a sample of galaxies (12,582) with asymmetric or top-flat profiles of emission lines is established. After visually inspecting the SDSS images of the two samples, we find 54 galaxies with dual cores. The present samples can be used to study the dynamics of merging galaxies, the triggering mechanism of black hole activity, the hierarchical growth of galaxies, and the dynamics of narrow line regions driven by outflows and a rotating disk.

  8. The Sloan Lens ACS Survey. XIII. Discovery of 40 New Galaxy-scale Strong Lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Yiping; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bolton, Adam S.; Koopmans, Léon V. E.; Treu, Tommaso; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Auger, Matthew W.; Czoske, Oliver; Gavazzi, Raphaël; Marshall, Philip J.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2017-12-01

    We present the full sample of 118 galaxy-scale strong-lens candidates in the Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) Survey for the Masses (S4TM) Survey, which are spectroscopically selected from the final data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Follow-up Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging observations confirm that 40 candidates are definite strong lenses with multiple lensed images. The foreground-lens galaxies are found to be early-type galaxies (ETGs) at redshifts 0.06–0.44, and background sources are emission-line galaxies at redshifts 0.22–1.29. As an extension of the SLACS Survey, the S4TM Survey is the first attempt to preferentially search for strong-lens systems with relatively lower lens masses than those in the pre-existing strong-lens samples. By fitting HST data with a singular isothermal ellipsoid model, we find that the total projected mass within the Einstein radius of the S4TM strong-lens sample ranges from 3 × 1010 M ⊙ to 2 × 1011 M ⊙. In Shu et al., we have derived the total stellar mass of the S4TM lenses to be 5 × 1010 M ⊙ to 1 × 1012 M ⊙. Both the total enclosed mass and stellar mass of the S4TM lenses are on average almost a factor of 2 smaller than those of the SLACS lenses, which also represent the typical mass scales of the current strong-lens samples. The extended mass coverage provided by the S4TM sample can enable a direct test, with the aid of strong lensing, for transitions in scaling relations, kinematic properties, mass structure, and dark-matter content trends of ETGs at intermediate-mass scales as noted in previous studies. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (HST), obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with HST program #12210.

  9. The JCMT nearby galaxies legacy survey - X. Environmental effects on the molecular gas and star formation properties of spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Angus; Wilson, C. D.; Golding, J.; Warren, B. E.; Israel, F. P.; Serjeant, S.; Knapen, J. H.; Sánchez-Gallego, J. R.; Barmby, P.; Bendo, G. J.; Rosolowsky, E.; van der Werf, P.

    2016-03-01

    We present a study of the molecular gas properties in a sample of 98 H I - flux selected spiral galaxies within ˜25 Mpc, using the CO J = 3 - 2 line observed with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. We use the technique of survival analysis to incorporate galaxies with CO upper limits into our results. Comparing the group and Virgo samples, we find a larger mean H2 mass in the Virgo galaxies, despite their lower mean H I mass. This leads to a significantly higher H2 to H I ratio for Virgo galaxies. Combining our data with complementary Hα star formation rate measurements, Virgo galaxies have longer molecular gas depletion times compared to group galaxies, due to their higher H2 masses and lower star formation rates. We suggest that the longer depletion times may be a result of heating processes in the cluster environment or differences in the turbulent pressure. From the full sample, we find that the molecular gas depletion time has a positive correlation with the stellar mass, indicative of differences in the star formation process between low- and high-mass galaxies, and a negative correlation between the molecular gas depletion time and the specific star formation rate.

  10. Probing the Redshift Desert Using the Gemini Deep Deep Survey: observing galaxy mass assembly at z>1

    OpenAIRE

    Glazebrook, Karl; team, the GDDS

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the Gemini Deep Deep Survey is to push spectroscopic studies of complete galaxy samples (both red and blue objects) significantly beyond z=1; this is the redshift where the current Hubble sequence of ellipticals and spirals is already extant. In the Universe at z=2 the only currently spectroscopically confirmed galaxies are blue, star-forming and of fragmented morphology. Exploring this transition means filling the `redshift desert' 1

  11. The JCMT Nearby Galaxies Legacy Survey X. Environmental Effects on the Molecular Gas and Star Formation Properties of Spiral Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Mok, Angus; Wilson, C. D.; Golding, J.; Warren, B. E.; Israel, F. P.; Serjeant, S.; Knapen, J. H.; Sanchez-Gallego, J. R.; Barmby, P.; Bendo, G. J.; Rosolowsky, E.; van der Werf, P.

    2015-01-01

    We present a study of the molecular gas properties in a sample of 98 HI - flux selected spiral galaxies within $\\sim25$ Mpc, using the CO $J=3-2$ line observed with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. We use the technique of survival analysis to incorporate galaxies with CO upper limits into our results. Comparing the group and Virgo samples, we find a larger mean H$_{2}$ mass in the Virgo galaxies, despite their lower mean HI mass. This leads to a significantly higher H$_{2}$ to HI ratio for ...

  12. A MEASUREMENT OF THE CORRELATION OF GALAXY SURVEYS WITH CMB LENSING CONVERGENCE MAPS FROM THE SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleem, L. E.; Becker, M. R.; Benson, B. A.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Van Engelen, A.; Holder, G. P.; De Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); Aird, K. A. [University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Armstrong, R. [National Center for Supercomputing Applications, University of Illinois, 1205 West Clark Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Ashby, M. L. N. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Biesiadzinski, T. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Brodwin, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, 5110 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Busha, M. T. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Cho, H. M. [NIST Quantum Devices Group, 325 Broadway, Mailcode 817.03, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Desai, S. [Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Scheinerstr. 1, 81679 Muenchen (Germany); Dore, O. [Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, 1216 East California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); and others

    2012-07-01

    We compare cosmic microwave background lensing convergence maps derived from South Pole Telescope (SPT) data with galaxy survey data from the Blanco Cosmology Survey, WISE, and a new large Spitzer/IRAC field designed to overlap with the SPT survey. Using optical and infrared catalogs covering between 17 and 68 deg{sup 2} of sky, we detect a correlation between the SPT convergence maps and each of the galaxy density maps at >4{sigma}, with zero correlation robustly ruled out in all cases. The amplitude and shape of the cross-power spectra are in good agreement with theoretical expectations and the measured galaxy bias is consistent with previous work. The detections reported here utilize a small fraction of the full 2500 deg{sup 2} SPT survey data and serve as both a proof of principle of the technique and an illustration of the potential of this emerging cosmological probe.

  13. Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Redshift distributions of the weak lensing source galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyle, B.; et al.

    2017-08-04

    We describe the derivation and validation of redshift distribution estimates and their uncertainties for the galaxies used as weak lensing sources in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Year 1 cosmological analyses. The Bayesian Photometric Redshift (BPZ) code is used to assign galaxies to four redshift bins between z=0.2 and 1.3, and to produce initial estimates of the lensing-weighted redshift distributions $n^i_{PZ}(z)$ for bin i. Accurate determination of cosmological parameters depends critically on knowledge of $n^i$ but is insensitive to bin assignments or redshift errors for individual galaxies. The cosmological analyses allow for shifts $n^i(z)=n^i_{PZ}(z-\\Delta z^i)$ to correct the mean redshift of $n^i(z)$ for biases in $n^i_{\\rm PZ}$. The $\\Delta z^i$ are constrained by comparison of independently estimated 30-band photometric redshifts of galaxies in the COSMOS field to BPZ estimates made from the DES griz fluxes, for a sample matched in fluxes, pre-seeing size, and lensing weight to the DES weak-lensing sources. In companion papers, the $\\Delta z^i$ are further constrained by the angular clustering of the source galaxies around red galaxies with secure photometric redshifts at 0.15

  14. The Photometric and Kinematic Properties of Compact Core Galaxies in the RESOLVE Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Elaine M.; Bittner, Ashley; Kannappan, Sheila; Norman, Dara J.; Hood, Callie; Brown, Samantha; Dell'Antonio, Ian P.; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Ray, Christine; RESOLVE Team

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the complete set of compact core galaxies (CCGs) in the volume-limited RESOLVE survey to investigate the formation and evolution of compact galaxies across a broad statistical distribution of environments. CCGs include both compact ellipticals (cEs) and compact cores surrounded by an envelope of gas and stars, which may represent earlier or later evolutionary stages of cEs. We select CCGs to have core-only radius CCGs naturally occur in a range of environments from isolated to cluster. With GALEX NUV data, we derive star formation histories and find that a significant number of CCGs have recently formed stars. We compare velocity dispersions of CCGs derived from Gemini IFU data to velocity dispersions of other RESOLVE galaxies derived from SOAR spectroscopy. We search for CCGs offset to higher or lower dispersion in the dispersion-stellar mass relation, which may indicate tidal stripping or dissipative formation, respectively. Initial results show several CCGs following the dissipative formation track. Lastly, we compare the kinematics of cEs formed via tidal stripping in numerical simulations to our observed CCG kinematics. This work has been supported by funding from NSF grants AST-0955368 and OCI-1156614 and NASA grant HST-AR-12147.01-A.

  15. The GOGREEN Survey: The Relationship between Quenching, Morphological Transformation and Size Growth of Satellite Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Gillian

    2017-08-01

    Despite a dramatic build-up in the number of quenched galaxies at z 1000 members of 12 Coma- and Virgo-mass progenitor clusters at 1 600 field galaxies). Here, we propose for WFC3/F160W imaging of the GOGREEN sample to 1) measure the relative timing of star-formation quenching and morphological transformation, 2) make the first high-z measurement of satellite quenching by controlling for intrinsic quenching, and 3) constrain the dominant driver of size growth in the early-type population. Our team has the modeling framework to interpret the trends and to place unrivaled constraints on the physical processes that underlie environmental quenching and morphological transformation from late- to early-type galaxies. Because of Gemini Observatory's huge investment in the GOGREEN program, this survey will return the premier high-redshift cluster spectroscopic dataset for the foreseeable future. All reduced images, spectra and catalogs will be made publicly available, including catalogs from the F160W observations proposed here.

  16. The XMM Cluster Survey: A Massive Galaxy Cluster at z = 1.45

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanford, S A; Romer, A K; Sabirli, K; Davidson, M; Hilton, M; Viana, P P; Collins, C A; Kay, S T; Liddle, A R; Mann, R G; Miller, C J; Nichol, R C; West, M J; Conselice, C J; Spinrad, H; Stern, D; Bundy, K

    2006-05-24

    We report the discovery of XMMXCS J2215.9-1738, a massive galaxy cluster at z = 1.45, which was found in the XMM Cluster Survey. The cluster candidate was initially identified as an extended X-ray source in archival XMM data. Optical spectroscopy shows that 6 galaxies within a {approx}60 arcsec diameter region lie at z = 1.45 {+-} 0.01. Model fits to the X-ray spectra of the extended emission yield kT = 7.4{sub -1.8}{sup +2.7} keV (90% confidence); if there is an undetected central X-ray point source then kT = 6.5{sub -1.8}{sup +2.6} keV. The bolometric X-ray luminosity is L{sub x} = 4.4{sub -0.6}{sup +0.8} x 10{sup 44} ergs s{sup -1} over a 2 Mpc radial region. The measured T{sub x}, which is the highest for any known cluster at z > 1, suggests that this cluster is relatively massive for such a high redshift. The redshift of XMMXCS J2215.9-1738 is the highest currently known for a spectroscopically-confirmed cluster of galaxies.

  17. Overview of the SDSS-IV MaNGA Survey: Mapping nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bundy, Kevin; Bershady, Matthew A.; Law, David R.; Yan, Renbin; Drory, Niv; MacDonald, Nicholas; Wake, David A.; Cherinka, Brian; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Thomas, Daniel; Tremonti, Christy; Masters, Karen; Coccato, Lodovico; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Falcón-Barroso, Jésus; Belfiore, Francesco; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Blanton, Michael R.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Byler, Nell; Cappellari, Michele; Conroy, Charlie; Dutton, Aaron A.; Emsellem, Eric; Etherington, James; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Fu, Hai; Gunn, James E.; Harding, Paul; Johnston, Evelyn J.; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Kinemuchi, Karen; Klaene, Mark A.; Knapen, Johan H.; Leauthaud, Alexie; Li, Cheng; Lin, Lihwai; Maiolino, Roberto; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Mao, Shude; Maraston, Claudia; McDermid, Richard M.; Merrifield, Michael R.; Nichol, Robert C.; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K.; Sanchez, Sebastian F.; Schlegel, David; Simmons, Audrey; Steele, Oliver; Steinmetz, Matthias; Thanjavur, Karun; Thompson, Benjamin A.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; van den Bosch, Remco C. E.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Wilkinson, David; Wright, Shelley; Xiao, Ting; Zhang, Kai

    We present an overview of a new integral field spectroscopic survey called MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory), one of three core programs in the fourth-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) that began on 2014 July 1. MaNGA will investigate the internal kinematic

  18. THE ACS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. XI. THE REMARKABLY UNDISTURBED NGC 2403 DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Stilp, Adrienne; Radburn-Smith, David [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew [Raytheon, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States); Skillman, Evan D., E-mail: ben@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: jd@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: adrienne@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: dolphin@raytheon.com, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2013-03-10

    We present detailed analysis of color-magnitude diagrams of NGC 2403, obtained from a deep (m {approx}< 28) Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 observation of the outer disk of NGC 2403, supplemented by several shallow (m {approx}< 26) HST Advanced Camera for Surveys fields. We derive the spatially resolved star formation history of NGC 2403 out to 11 disk scale lengths. In the inner portions of the galaxy, we compare the recent star formation rates (SFRs) we derive from the resolved stars with those measured using GALEX FUV + Spitzer 24{mu} fluxes, finding excellent agreement between the methods. Our measurements also show that the radial gradient in recent SFR mirrors the disk exponential profile to 11 scale lengths with no break, extending to SFR densities a factor of {approx}100 lower than those that can be measured with GALEX and Spitzer ({approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}). Furthermore, we find that the cumulative stellar mass of the disk was formed at similar times at all radii. We compare these characteristics of NGC 2403 to those of its ''morphological twins'', NGC 300 and M 33, showing that the structure and age distributions of the NGC 2403 disk are more similar to those of the relatively isolated system NGC 300 than to those of the Local Group analog M 33. We also discuss the environments and HI morphologies of these three nearby galaxies, comparing them to integrated light studies of larger samples of more distant galaxy disks. Taken together, the physical properties and evolutionary history of NGC 2403 suggest that the galaxy has had no close encounters with other M 81 group members and may be falling into the group for the first time.

  19. The KMOS Cluster Survey (KCS). III. Fundamental Plane of Cluster Galaxies at z ≃ 1.80 in JKCS 041

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prichard, Laura J.; Davies, Roger L.; Beifiori, Alessandra; Chan, Jeffrey C. C.; Cappellari, Michele; Houghton, Ryan C. W.; Mendel, J. Trevor; Bender, Ralf; Galametz, Audrey; Saglia, Roberto P.; Stott, John P.; Wilman, David J.; Lewis, Ian J.; Sharples, Ray; Wegner, Michael

    2017-12-01

    We present data for 16 galaxies in the overdensity JKCS 041 at z≃ 1.80 as part of the K-band Multi-Object Spectrograph (KMOS) Cluster Survey (KCS). With 20 hr integrations, we have obtained deep absorption-line spectra from which we derived velocity dispersions for seven quiescent galaxies. We combined photometric parameters derived from Hubble Space Telescope images with the dispersions to construct a fundamental plane (FP) for quiescent galaxies in JKCS 041. From the zero-point evolution of the FP, we derived a formation redshift for the galaxies of {z}{form}=3.0+/- 0.3, corresponding to a mean age of 1.4 ± 0.2 Gyr. We tested the effect of structural and velocity dispersion evolution on our FP zero-point and found a negligible contribution when using dynamical mass-normalized parameters (˜ 3 % ) but a significant contribution from stellar-mass-normalized parameters (˜ 42 % ). From the relative velocities of the galaxies, we probed the 3D structure of these 16 confirmed members of JKCS 041 and found that a group of galaxies in the southwest of the overdensity had systematically higher velocities. We derived ages for the galaxies in the different groups from the FP. We found that the east-extending group had typically older galaxies ({2.1}-0.2+0.3 Gyr) than those in the southwest group (0.3 ± 0.2 Gyr). Although based on small numbers, the overdensity dynamics, morphology, and age results could indicate that JKCS 041 is in formation and may comprise two merging groups of galaxies. This result could link large-scale structure to ages of galaxies for the first time at this redshift. Based on observations obtained at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO), Paranal, Chile (ESO program IDs: 095.A-0137(A) and 096.A-0189(A)).

  20. Origins Space Telescope: 3D infrared surveys of star formation and black hole growth in galaxies over cosmic time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Alexandra; Armus, Lee; bradford, charles; Origins Space Telescope STDT

    2018-01-01

    In the coming decade, new telescope facilities and surveys aim to provide a 3D map of the unobscured Universe over cosmic time. However, much of galaxy formation and evolution occurs behind dust, and is only observable through infrared observations. Previous extragalactic infrared surveys were fundamentally limited to a 2D mapping of the most extreme populations of galaxies due to spatial resolution and sensitivity. The Origins Space Telescope (OST) is the mission concept for the Far-Infrared Surveyor, one of the four science and technology definition studies sponsored by NASA to provide input to the 2020 Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal survey. OST is planned to be a large aperture, actively-cooled telescope covering a wide span of the mid- to far-infrared spectrum, which will achieve spectral line sensitivities up to 1000 times deeper than previous infrared facilities. With powerful instruments such as the Medium Resolution Survey Spectrometer (MRSS), capable of simultaneous imaging and spectroscopy, the extragalactic infrared sky can finally be surveyed in 3D. In addition to spectroscopic redshifts, the rich suite of lines in the infrared provides unique diagnostics of the ongoing star formation (both obscured and unobscured) and the central supermassive black hole growth. In this poster, we present a simulated extragalactic survey with OST/MRSS which will detect millions of galaxies down to well below the knee of the infrared luminosity function. We demonstrate how this survey can map the coeval star formation and black hole growth in galaxies over cosmic time.

  1. The SDSS-IV extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: final emission line galaxy target selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raichoor, A.; Comparat, J.; Delubac, T.; Kneib, J.-P.; Yèche, Ch; Dawson, K. S.; Percival, W. J.; Dey, A.; Lang, D.; Schlegel, D. J.; Gorgoni, C.; Bautista, J.; Brownstein, J. R.; Mariappan, V.; Seo, H.-J.; Tinker, J. L.; Ross, A. J.; Wang, Y.; Zhao, G.-B.; Moustakas, J.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Jullo, E.; Newmann, J. A.; Prada, F.; Zhu, G. B.

    2017-11-01

    We describe the algorithm used to select the emission line galaxy (ELG) sample at z ˜ 0.85 for the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV, using photometric data from the DECam Legacy Survey. Our selection is based on a selection box in the g - r versus r - z colour-colour space and a cut on the g-band magnitude, to favour galaxies in the desired redshift range with strong [O II] emission. It provides a target density of 200 deg-2 on the North Galactic Cap and of 240 deg-2 on the South Galactic Cap (SGC), where we use a larger selection box because of deeper imaging. We demonstrate that this selection passes the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey requirements in terms of homogeneity. About 50 000 ELGs have been observed since the observations have started in 2016, September. These roughly match the expected redshift distribution, though the measured efficiency is slightly lower than expected. The efficiency can be increased by enlarging the redshift range and with incoming pipeline improvement. The cosmological forecast based on these first data predict σ _{D_V}/D_V = 0.023, in agreement with previous forecasts. Lastly, we present the stellar population properties of the ELG SGC sample. Once observations are completed, this sample will be suited to provide a cosmological analysis at z ˜ 0.85, and will pave the way for the next decade of massive spectroscopic cosmological surveys, which heavily rely on ELGs. The target catalogue over the SGC will be released along with DR14.

  2. The RESOLVE Survey Atomic Gas Census and Environmental Influences on Galaxy Gas Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, David; Kannappan, Sheila; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Jonathan, Florez; Hall, Kirsten; Watson, Linda C.; Hoversten, Erik A.; Burchett, Joseph; Guynn, David; Baker, Ashley; Moffett, Amanda J.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Norris, Mark A.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Leroy, Adam K.; Pisano, Daniel J.; Wei, Lisa H.; Gonzalez, Roberto; RESOLVE Team

    2016-01-01

    We present the >93% complete 21cm inventory for the RESOLVE survey, a volume-limited census of ~1500 galaxies spanning diverse environments and probing baryonic masses down to ~109 M⊙. A key strength of the 21cm observational program is its fractional mass limited design, which yields an unbiased inventory of atomic gas mass, with either clean detections or strong upper limits cosmic web and classification into filaments, walls, and voids) to investigate the influence of small and large-scale environment on galaxy gas content. We show that satellites in groups down to 1012 M⊙ have lower gas fractions compared to centrals at similar stellar mass, suggesting that group processes that deplete gas content are active well below the large group/cluster scale. In addition, at fixed halo mass both centrals and satellites in large-scale walls have systematically lower gas fractions than galaxies in filaments or voids, and this trend cannot be fully explained by differing stellar mass distributions within these large-scale environments. Lastly, we show that the abundance of gas-poor (gas-to-stellar mass ratio 1012 M⊙ groups than do more gas-rich but otherwise analogous low halo-mass centrals, suggesting that the gas-poor centrals have lost their gas in flyby interactions with the nearby groups. We discuss how the observed trends may be shaped by a number of physical processes such as gas stripping, starvation, and halo assembly bias. This project has been supported by NSF funding for the RESOLVE survey (AST-0955368), the GBT Student Observing Support program, and a UNC Royster Society of Fellows Dissertation Completion Fellowship.

  3. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS): galaxy segregation inside filaments at z ≃ 0.7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavasi, N.; Arnouts, S.; Vibert, D.; de la Torre, S.; Moutard, T.; Pichon, C.; Davidzon, I.; Kraljic, K.; Bolzonella, M.; Guzzo, L.; Garilli, B.; Scodeggio, M.; Granett, B. R.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; Franzetti, P.; Fritz, A.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Tasca, L.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Bel, J.; Branchini, E.; Coupon, J.; De Lucia, G.; Dubois, Y.; Hawken, A.; Ilbert, O.; Laigle, C.; Moscardini, L.; Sousbie, T.; Treyer, M.; Zamorani, G.

    2017-03-01

    We present the first quantitative detection of large-scale filamentary structure at z ≃ 0.7 in the large cosmological volume probed by the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). We use simulations to show the capability of VIPERS to recover robust topological features in the galaxy distribution, in particular the filamentary network. We then investigate how galaxies with different stellar masses and stellar activities are distributed around the filaments, and find a significant segregation, with the most massive or quiescent galaxies being closer to the filament axis than less massive or active galaxies. The signal persists even after downweighting the contribution of peak regions. Our results suggest that massive and quiescent galaxies assemble their stellar mass through successive mergers during their migration along filaments towards the nodes of the cosmic web. On the other hand, low-mass star-forming galaxies prefer the outer edge of filaments, a vorticity-rich region dominated by smooth accretion, as predicted by the recent spin alignment theory. This emphasizes the role of large-scale cosmic flows in shaping galaxy properties.

  4. Optimizing Spectroscopic and Photometric Galaxy Surveys: Same-Sky Benefits for Dark Energy and Modified Gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Donnacha [University Coll. London; Lahav, Ofer [University Coll. London; Bridle, Sarah [Manchester U.; Jouvel, Stephanie [Barcelona, IEEC; Abdalla, Filipe B. [University Coll. London; Frieman, Joshua A. [Chicago U., KICP

    2015-08-21

    The combination of multiple cosmological probes can produce measurements of cosmological parameters much more stringent than those possible with any individual probe. We examine the combination of two highly correlated probes of late-time structure growth: (i) weak gravitational lensing from a survey with photometric redshifts and (ii) galaxy clustering and redshift space distortions from a survey with spectroscopic redshifts. We choose generic survey designs so that our results are applicable to a range of current and future photometric redshift (e.g. KiDS, DES, HSC, Euclid) and spectroscopic redshift (e.g. DESI, 4MOST, Sumire) surveys. Combining the surveys greatly improves their power to measure both dark energy and modified gravity. An independent, non-overlapping combination sees a dark energy figure of merit more than 4 times larger than that produced by either survey alone. The powerful synergies between the surveys are strongest for modified gravity, where their constraints are orthogonal, producing a non-overlapping joint figure of merit nearly 2 orders of magnitude larger than either alone. Our projected angular power spectrum formalism makes it easy to model the cross-correlation observable when the surveys overlap on the sky, producing a joint data vector and full covariance matrix. We calculate a same-sky improvement factor, from the inclusion of these cross-correlations, relative to non-overlapping surveys. We find nearly a factor of 4 for dark energy and more than a factor of 2 for modified gravity. The exact forecast figures of merit and same-sky benefits can be radically affected by a range of forecasts assumption, which we explore methodically in a sensitivity analysis. We show that that our fiducial assumptions produce robust results which give a good average picture of the science return from combining photometric and spectroscopic surveys.

  5. The Effects of Halo Assembly Bias on Self-Calibration in Galaxy Cluster Surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hao-Yi; Rozo, Eduardo; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2008-08-07

    Self-calibration techniques for analyzing galaxy cluster counts utilize the abundance and the clustering amplitude of dark matter halos. These properties simultaneously constrain cosmological parameters and the cluster observable-mass relation. It was recently discovered that the clustering amplitude of halos depends not only on the halo mass, but also on various secondary variables, such as the halo formation time and the concentration; these dependences are collectively termed 'assembly bias'. Applying modified Fisher matrix formalism, we explore whether these secondary variables have a significant impact on the study of dark energy properties using the self-calibration technique in current (SDSS) and the near future (DES, SPT, and LSST) cluster surveys. The impact of the secondary dependence is determined by (1) the scatter in the observable-mass relation and (2) the correlation between observable and secondary variables. We find that for optical surveys, the secondary dependence does not significantly influence an SDSS-like survey; however, it may affect a DES-like survey (given the high scatter currently expected from optical clusters) and an LSST-like survey (even for low scatter values and low correlations). For an SZ survey such as SPT, the impact of secondary dependence is insignificant if the scatter is 20% or lower but can be enhanced by the potential high scatter values introduced by a highly-correlated background. Accurate modeling of the assembly bias is necessary for cluster self-calibration in the era of precision cosmology.

  6. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: cosmic flows and cosmic web from luminous red galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ata, Metin; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Angulo, Raul E.; Ferraro, Simone; Gil-Marín, Hector; McDonald, Patrick; Hernández Monteagudo, Carlos; Müller, Volker; Yepes, Gustavo; Autefage, Mathieu; Baumgarten, Falk; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Guo, Hong; Ho, Shirley; McBride, Cameron; Neyrinck, Mark; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Schlegel, David; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2017-06-01

    We present a Bayesian phase-space reconstruction of the cosmic large-scale matter density and velocity fields from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 CMASS galaxy clustering catalogue. We rely on a given Λ cold dark matter cosmology, a mesh resolution in the range of 6-10 h-1 Mpc, and a lognormal-Poisson model with a redshift-dependent non-linear bias. The bias parameters are derived from the data and a general renormalized perturbation theory approach. We use combined Gibbs and Hamiltonian sampling, implemented in the argo code, to iteratively reconstruct the dark matter density field and the coherent peculiar velocities of individual galaxies, correcting hereby for coherent redshift space distortions. Our tests relying on accurate N-body-based mock galaxy catalogues show unbiased real space power spectra of the non-linear density field up to k ˜ 0.2 h Mpc-1, and vanishing quadrupoles down to r ˜ 20 h-1 Mpc. We also demonstrate that the non-linear cosmic web can be obtained from the tidal field tensor based on the Gaussian component of the reconstructed density field. We find that the reconstructed velocities have a statistical correlation coefficient compared to the true velocities of each individual light-cone mock galaxy of r ˜ 0.68 including about 10 per cent of satellite galaxies with virial motions (about r = 0.75 without satellites). The power spectra of the velocity divergence agree well with theoretical predictions up to k ˜ 0.2 h Mpc-1. This work will be especially useful to improve, for example, baryon acoustic oscillation reconstructions, kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich, integrated Sachs-Wolfe measurements or environmental studies.

  7. Scaling relations for galaxies of all types with CALIFA and MaNGA surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino-Ortíz, E.; Sánchez-Sánchez, S. F.; Valenzuela, O.; Cano-Díaz, M.; Hernández-Toledo, H.

    2016-06-01

    We used gas and stellar kinematics for the final Data Release of 667 spatially resolved galaxies publicly available from Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area survey (CALIFA) with the aim of study dynamical scaling relations as Tully & Fisher for rotation velocity, Faber & Jackson for velocity dispersion and also a combination of them through the S_{K} parameter defined as S_{K}^2 = KV_{rot}^2 + σ^2. We found a offset between gas and stellar kinematics in Tully & Fisher and Faber & Jackson relations, however when we used the S_{K} parameter all galaxies regardless of the morphological type lie in this M_{*} vs S_{k} scaling relation with a significant improvement compared with the M_{*} vs V_{rot} and M_{*} vs σ relations, in agreement with previous studies with SAMI survey, however the slope ant zero-point are different with them. We also explored different values of the K parameter, as well as different proxys to estimate V_{rot} in order to understand and characterize the physical source of scatter, slope and zero-point.

  8. A New Method for the Detection of Galaxy Clusters in X-Ray Surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piacentine, J.M.; Marshall, P.J.; Peterson, J.R.; Andersson, K.E.

    2005-01-01

    For many years the power of counting clusters of galaxies as a function of their mass has been recognized as a powerful cosmological probe; however, we are only now beginning to acquire data from dedicated surveys with sufcient sky coverage and sensitivity to measure the cluster population out to distances where the dark energy came to dominate the Universe’s evolution. One such survey uses the XMM X-ray telescope to scan a large area of sky, detecting the X-ray photons from the hot plasma that lies in the deep potential wells of massive clusters of galaxies. These clusters appear as extended (not point-like) objects, each providing just a few hundred photons in a typical observation. The detection of extended sources in such a low signal-to-noise situation is an important problem in astrophysics: we attempt to solve it by using as much prior information as possible, translating our experience with wellmeasured clusters to define a “template” cluster that can be varied and matched to the features seen in the XMM images. In this work we adapt an existing Monte Carlo analysis code for this problem. Two detection templates were dened and their suitability explored using simulated data; the method was then applied to a publically avalable XMM observation of a “blank” field. Presented are the encouraging results of this series of experiments, suggesting that this approach continue to be developed for future cluster-identication endeavours.

  9. Disk and Bulge Morphology of WFPC2 Galaxies: The HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE Medium Deep Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnatunga, Kavan U.; Griffiths, Richard E.; Ostrander, Eric J.

    1999-07-01

    Quantitative morphological and structural parameters are estimated for galaxies detected in Hubble Space Telescope observations of WFPC2 survey fields. A modeling approach based on maximum likelihood has been developed for two-dimensional decomposition of faint undersampled galaxy images into components of disk and bulge morphology. Decomposition can be achieved for images down to F814W(I)~23.0, F606W(V)~23.8, and F450W(B)~23.3 mag in WFPC2 exposures of 1 hr. We discuss details of the fitting procedure and present the observed distributions of magnitude, color, effective half-light radius, disk and bulge axis ratios, bulge-to-(disk+bulge) flux ratio, bulge-to-disk half-light radius ratio, and surface brightness. We also discuss the various selection limits on the measured parameters. The Medium Deep Survey catalogs and images of random pure parallel fields and other similar archival primary WFPC2 fields have been made available via the Internet with a searchable browser interface to the database.

  10. Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Methodology and Projections for Joint Analysis of Galaxy Clustering, Galaxy Lensing, and CMB Lensing Two-point Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannantonio, T.; et al.

    2018-02-14

    Optical imaging surveys measure both the galaxy density and the gravitational lensing-induced shear fields across the sky. Recently, the Dark Energy Survey (DES) collaboration used a joint fit to two-point correlations between these observables to place tight constraints on cosmology (DES Collaboration et al. 2017). In this work, we develop the methodology to extend the DES Collaboration et al. (2017) analysis to include cross-correlations of the optical survey observables with gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as measured by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Planck. Using simulated analyses, we show how the resulting set of five two-point functions increases the robustness of the cosmological constraints to systematic errors in galaxy lensing shear calibration. Additionally, we show that contamination of the SPT+Planck CMB lensing map by the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect is a potentially large source of systematic error for two-point function analyses, but show that it can be reduced to acceptable levels in our analysis by masking clusters of galaxies and imposing angular scale cuts on the two-point functions. The methodology developed here will be applied to the analysis of data from the DES, the SPT, and Planck in a companion work.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Groups of Galaxies from CfA2 Redshift Survey (Mahtessian++, 2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahtessian, A. P.; Movsessian, V. G.

    2009-11-01

    The catalog contains statistically homogeneous and physically well graunded groups of galaxies based on the CfA2 redshift survey (Cat. J/ApJS/121/287) in the area of space 1000km/s=20°. For identification of groups we used a modification of a friends of friends (FoF) method. Principles of friendship and definition of values of presented there free parameters described in Mahtessian (1988Afz....28..255M, 1997Ap.....40..285M). There are 1971 groups with 2 or more members, for a total of 6787 members (46.3%); 765 of the groups have 3 or more members with 4375 galaxies (28.1%). The others 8790 (56.4%) galaxies make a sample of "single" galaxies. The catalog includes group numbers, numbers of members, equatorial coordinates, Virgo-centric radial velocities, line-of-sight-velocity dispersions, integrated group luminosities, and relative quantity of false members. (2 data files).

  12. Evolution of Galaxy Luminosity and Stellar-Mass Functions since $z=1$ with the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capozzi, D.; et al.

    2017-07-27

    We present the first study of the evolution of the galaxy luminosity and stellar-mass functions (GLF and GSMF) carried out by the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We describe the COMMODORE galaxy catalogue selected from Science Verification images. This catalogue is made of $\\sim 4\\times 10^{6}$ galaxies at $0galaxy catalogues and they enable us to study the evolution of GLF and GSMF at $0galaxies build up their masses over cosmic time. We find that both the ${\\it i}$-band galaxy luminosity and stellar mass functions are characterised by a double-Schechter shape at $z<0.2$. Both functions agree well with those based on spectroscopic redshifts. The DES GSMF agrees especially with those measured for the GAlaxy Mass Assembly and the PRism MUlti-object Survey out to $z\\sim1$. At $0.2galaxies have less stellar mass, their luminosities do not change substantially because of their younger and brighter stellar populations. Finally, we also find evidence for a top-down mass-dependent evolution of the GSMF.

  13. The 13th data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: first spectroscopic data from the SDSS-IV survey mapping nearby galaxies at Apache Point Observatory

    OpenAIRE

    Albareti, Franco D.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Almeida, Andres; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott; Andrews, Brett H.; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernández, Maria; Armengaud, Eric; Aubourg, Eric; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Bailey, Stephen; Barbuy, Beatriz; Barger, Kat

    2017-01-01

    The fourth generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) began observations in 2014 July. It pursues three core programs: the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment 2 (APOGEE-2), Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA), and the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS). As well as its core program, eBOSS contains two major subprograms: the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS) and the SPectroscopic IDentification of ERosita Sources (SPIDERS). This paper ...

  14. The Baryonic Collapse Efficiency of Galaxy Groups in the RESOLVE and ECO Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Kathleen D.; Kannappan, Sheila J.; Lagos, Claudia del P.; Baker, Ashley D.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Stark, David V.; Moffett, Amanda J.; Nasipak, Zachary; Norris, Mark A.

    2017-11-01

    We examine the z = 0 group-integrated stellar and cold baryonic (stars + cold atomic gas) mass functions (group SMF and CBMF) and the baryonic collapse efficiency (group cold baryonic to dark matter halo mass ratio) using the RESOLVE and ECO survey galaxy group catalogs and a galform semi-analytic model (SAM) mock catalog. The group SMF and CBMF fall off more steeply at high masses and rise with a shallower low-mass slope than the theoretical halo mass function (HMF). The transition occurs at the group-integrated cold baryonic mass {M}{bary}{cold} ∼ 1011 {M}ȯ . The SAM, however, has significantly fewer groups at the transition mass ∼1011 {M}ȯ and a steeper low-mass slope than the data, suggesting that feedback is too weak in low-mass halos and conversely too strong near the transition mass. Using literature prescriptions to include hot halo gas and potential unobservable galaxy gas produces a group BMF with a slope similar to the HMF even below the transition mass. Its normalization is lower by a factor of ∼2, in agreement with estimates of warm-hot gas making up the remaining difference. We compute baryonic collapse efficiency with the halo mass calculated two ways, via halo abundance matching (HAM) and via dynamics (extended all the way to three-galaxy groups using stacking). Using HAM, we find that baryonic collapse efficiencies reach a flat maximum for groups across the halo mass range of {M}{halo}∼ {10}11.4-12 {M}ȯ , which we label “nascent groups.” Using dynamics, however, we find greater scatter in baryonic collapse efficiencies, likely indicating variation in group hot-to-cold baryon ratios. Similarly, we see higher scatter in baryonic collapse efficiencies in the SAM when using its true groups and their group halo masses as opposed to friends-of-friends groups and HAM masses.

  15. Peculiar early-type galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe82

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviraj, Sugata

    2010-07-01

    We explore the properties of `peculiar' early-type galaxies (ETGs) in the local Universe that show (faint) morphological signatures of recent interactions such as tidal tails, shells and dust lanes. Standard-depth (~51-s exposure) multicolour galaxy images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) are combined with the significantly (~2 mag) deeper monochromatic images from the public SDSS Stripe82 to extract, through careful visual inspection, a robust sample of nearby (z evidence of dust lanes and patches. An analysis of optical emission-line ratios indicates that the fraction of peculiar ETGs that are Seyferts or LINERs (19.4 per cent) is twice the corresponding values in their relaxed counterparts (10.1 per cent). LINER-like emission is the dominant type of nebular activity in all ETG classes, plausibly driven by stellar photoionization associated with recent star formation. An analysis of ultraviolet-optical colours indicates that, regardless of the luminosity range being considered, the fraction of peculiar ETGs that have experienced star formation in the last Gyr is a factor of ~1.5 higher than that in their relaxed counterparts. The spectrophotometric results strongly suggest that the interactions that produce the morphological peculiarities also induce low-level recent star formation which, based on the recent literature, are likely to contribute a few per cent of the stellar mass over the last ~1Gyr. Peculiar ETGs preferentially inhabit low-density environments (outskirts of clusters, groups or the field), either due to high peculiar velocities in clusters making merging unlikely or because shell systems are disrupted through frequent interactions within a cluster crossing time. The catalogue of galaxies that forms the basis of this paper can be obtained at http://www.mssl.ucl.ac.uk/~ska/stripe82/skaviraj_stripe82.dat or on request from the author.

  16. Predicting emission line fluxes and number counts of distant galaxies for cosmological surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, F.; Daddi, E.; Silverman, J. D.; Puglisi, A.; Kashino, D.; Renzini, A.; Cimatti, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Rodighiero, G.; Pannella, M.; Gobat, R.; Zamorani, G.

    2017-12-01

    We estimate the number counts of line emitters at high redshift and their evolution with cosmic time based on a combination of photometry and spectroscopy. We predict the H α, H β, [O II], and [O III] line fluxes for more than 35 000 galaxies down to stellar masses of ∼109 M⊙ in the COSMOS and GOODS-S fields, applying standard conversions and exploiting the spectroscopic coverage of the FMOS-COSMOS survey at z ∼ 1.55 to calibrate the predictions. We calculate the number counts of H α, [O II], and [O III] emitters down to fluxes of 1 × 10-17 erg cm-2 s-1 in the range 1.4 differential and cumulative H α counts, steeply declining at the brightest fluxes. We expect ∼9300-9700 and ∼2300-2900 galaxies deg-2 for fluxes ≥1 × 10-16 and ≥2 × 10-16 erg cm-2 s-1 over the range of 0.9 < z < 1.8. We show that the observed evolution of the main sequence of galaxies with redshift is enough to reproduce the observed counts variation at 0.2 < z < 2.5. We characterize the physical properties of the H α emitters with fluxes ≥2 × 10-16 erg cm-2 s-1 including their stellar masses, UV sizes, [N II]/H α ratios and H α equivalent widths. An aperture of R ∼ Re ∼ 0.5 arcsec maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio for a detection, whilst causing a factor of ∼2 × flux losses, influencing the recoverable number counts, if neglected. Our approach, based on deep and large photometric data sets, reduces the uncertainties on the number counts due to the selection and spectroscopic samplings whilst exploring low fluxes. We publicly release the line flux predictions for the explored photometric samples.

  17. The extended epoch of galaxy formation: Age dating of 3600 galaxies with 2 < z < 6.5 in the VIMOS Ultra-Deep Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R.; Le Fèvre, O.; Scodeggio, M.; Cassata, P.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Lemaux, B. C.; Maccagni, D.; Pforr, J.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Zamorani, G.; Bardelli, S.; Hathi, N. P.; Tresse, L.; Zucca, E.; Koekemoer, A. M.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper we aim at improving constraints on the epoch of galaxy formation by measuring the ages of 3597 galaxies with reliable spectroscopic redshifts 2 ≤ z ≤ 6.5 in the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey (VUDS). We derive ages and other physical parameters from the simultaneous fitting with the GOSSIP+ software of observed UV rest-frame spectra and photometric data from the u band up to 4.5 μm using model spectra from composite stellar populations. We perform extensive simulations and conclude that at z ≥ 2 the joint analysis of spectroscopy and photometry, combined with restricted age possibilities when taking the age of the Universe into account, substantially reduces systematic uncertainties and degeneracies in the age derivation; we find that age measurements from this process are reliable. We find that galaxy ages range from very young with a few tens of million years to substantially evolved with ages up to 1.5 Gyr or more. This large age spread is similar for different age definitions including ages corresponding to the last major star formation event, stellar mass-weighted ages, and ages corresponding to the time since the formation of 25% of the stellar mass. We derive the formation redshift zf from the measured ages and find galaxies that may have started forming stars as early as zf 15. We produce the formation redshift function (FzF), the number of galaxies per unit volume formed at a redshift zf, and compare the FzF in increasing observed redshift bins finding a remarkably constant FzF. The FzF is parametrized with (1 + z)ζ, where ζ ≃ 0.58 ± 0.06, indicating a smooth increase of about 2 dex from the earliest redshifts, z 15, to the lowest redshifts of our sample at z 2. Remarkably, this observed increase in the number of forming galaxies is of the same order as the observed rise in the star formation rate density (SFRD). The ratio of the comoving SFRD with the FzF gives an average SFR per galaxy of 7-17M⊙/yr at z 4-6, in agreement with the

  18. The FMOS-COSMOS Survey of Star-forming Galaxies at Z ˜ 1.6. V: Properties of Dark Matter Halos Containing Hα Emitting Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashino, Daichi; More, Surhud; Silverman, John D.; Daddi, Emanuele; Renzini, Alvio; Sanders, David B.; Rodighiero, Giulia; Puglisi, Annagrazia; Kajisawa, Masaru; Valentino, Francesco; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Le Fèvre, Olivier; Nagao, Tohru; Arimoto, Nobuo; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2017-07-01

    We study the properties of dark matter halos that contain star-forming galaxies at 1.43 ≤ z ≤ 1.74, using the FMOS-COSMOS survey. The sample consists of 516 objects with a detection of the Hα emission line, which represent the star forming population at this epoch, having a stellar mass range of 109.57 ≤ M */M ⊙ ≲ 1011.4 and a star-formation rate range of 15 ≲ SFR/(M ⊙ yr-1) ≲ 600. We measure the projected two-point correlation function while carefully taking into account observational biases, and find a significant clustering amplitude at scales of 0.04-10 h -1 cMpc, with a correlation length {r}0={5.26}-0.62+0.75 {h}-1 {cMpc} and a bias b={2.44}-0.32+0.38. We interpret our clustering measurement using a halo occupation distribution model. The sample galaxies appear to reside in halos with mass {M}{{h}}={4.71}-1.62+1.19× {10}12 {h}-1 {M}⊙ on average, which will likely become present-day halos of mass M h (z = 0) ˜ 2 × 1013 h -1 M ⊙, equivalent to the typical halo mass scale of galaxy groups. We then confirm the decline of the stellar-to-halo mass ratio at M h generation instrument that will provide strong constraints on the galaxy-formation scenario by obtaining precise measurements of galaxy clustering at z > 1.

  19. The extended ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-ray Galaxy Cluster Survey (REFLEX II). VII. The mass function of galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhringer, Hans; Chon, Gayoung; Fukugita, Masataka

    2017-12-01

    The mass function of galaxy clusters is a sensitive tracer of the gravitational evolution of the cosmic large-scale structure and serves as an important census of the fraction of matter bound in large structures. We obtain the mass function by fitting the observed cluster X-ray luminosity distribution from the REFLEX galaxy cluster survey to models of cosmological structure formation. We marginalise over uncertainties in the cosmological parameters as well as those of the relevant galaxy cluster scaling relations. The mass function is determined with an uncertainty of less than 10% in the mass range 3 × 1012 to 5 × 1014M⊙. For the cumulative mass function we find a slope at the low-mass end consistent with a value of - 1, while the mass-rich end cut-off is milder than a Schechter function with an exponential term exp( - Mδ) with δ smaller than 1. Changing the Hubble parameter in the range H0 = 67 - 73 km s-1 Mpc-1 or allowing the total neutrino mass to have a value in the range 0 - 0.4 eV causes variations less than the uncertainties. We estimate the fraction of mass locked up in galaxy clusters: about 4.4% of the matter in the Universe is bound in clusters (inside r200) with a mass larger than 1014M⊙ and 14% to clusters and groups with a mass larger than 1013M⊙ at the present Universe. We also discuss the evolution of the galaxy cluster population with redshift. Our results imply that there is hardly any clusters with a mass ≥1015M⊙ above a redshift of z = 1.

  20. The Westerbork HI survey of spiral and irregular galaxies - III. HI observations of early-type disk galaxies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Noordermeer, E; van der Hulst, JM; Sancisi, R; Swaters, RA; van Albada, TS

    2005-01-01

    .... properties of the galaxies in our sample span a large range; the average values of M-HI/L-B and D-HI/D-25 are comparable to the ones found in later-type spirals, but the dispersions around the mean are larger...

  1. Extragalactic jets as probes of distant clusters of galaxies and the clusters occupied by bent radio AGN (COBRA) survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, Elizabeth L.; Paterno-Mahler, Rachel; Wing, Joshua D.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Golden-Marx, Emmet; Brodwin, Mark; Douglass, E. M.; Randall, Scott W.; Clarke, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    We are conducting a large survey of distant clusters of galaxies using radio sources with bent jets and lobes as tracers. These radio sources are driven by AGN and achieve their bent morphologies through interaction with the surrounding gas found in clusters of galaxies. Based on low-redshift studies, these types of sources can be used to identify clusters very efficiently. We present initial results from our survey of 653 bent-double radio sources with optical hosts too faint to appear in the SDSS. The sample was observed in the infrared with Spitzer, and it has revealed ~200 distant clusters or proto-clusters in the redshift range z ~ 0.7 - 3.0. The sample of bent-doubles contains both quasars and radio galaxies enabling us to study both radiative and kinetic mode feedback in cluster and group environments at a wide range of redshifts.

  2. Higgs-dilaton cosmology: An inflation-dark-energy connection and forecasts for future galaxy surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Santiago; Pauly, Martin; Rubio, Javier

    2018-02-01

    The Higgs-dilaton model is a scale-invariant extension of the Standard Model nonminimally coupled to gravity and containing just one additional degree of freedom on top of the Standard Model particle content. This minimalistic scenario predicts a set of measurable consistency relations between the inflationary observables and the dark-energy equation-of-state parameter. We present an alternative derivation of these consistency relations that highlights the connections and differences with the α -attractor scenario. We study how far these constraints allow one to distinguish the Higgs-dilaton model from Λ CDM and w CDM cosmologies. To this end we first analyze existing data sets using a Markov chain Monte Carlo approach. Second, we perform forecasts for future galaxy surveys using a Fisher matrix approach, both for galaxy clustering and weak lensing probes. Assuming that the best fit values in the different models remain comparable to the present ones, we show that both Euclid- and SKA2-like missions will be able to discriminate a Higgs-dilaton cosmology from Λ CDM and w CDM .

  3. Radio AGN in 13,240 galaxy clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croft, S; de Vries, W; Becker, R

    2007-05-30

    We correlate the positions of 13,240 Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) with 0.1 {le} z {le} 0.3 from the maxBCG catalog with radio sources from the FIRST survey to study the sizes and distributions of radio AGN in galaxy clusters. We find that 19.7% of our BCGs are radio-loud, and this fraction depends on the stellar mass of the BCG, and to a lesser extent on the richness of the parent cluster (in the sense of increasing radio loudness with increasing mass). The intrinsic size of the radio emission associated with the BCGs peaks at 55 kpc, with a tail extending to 200 kpc. The radio power of the extended sources places them on the divide between FR I and FR II type sources, while sources compact in the radio tend to be somewhat less radio-luminous. We also detect an excess of radio sources associated with the cluster, instead of with the BCG itself, extending out to {approx} 1.4 kpc.

  4. A Herschel/PACS Far-infrared Line Emission Survey of Local Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Santos, T.; Armus, L.; Charmandaris, V.; Lu, N.; Stierwalt, S.; Stacey, G.; Malhotra, S.; van der Werf, P. P.; Howell, J. H.; Privon, G. C.; Mazzarella, J. M.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Murphy, E. J.; Barcos-Muñoz, L.; Linden, S. T.; Inami, H.; Larson, K. L.; Evans, A. S.; Appleton, P.; Iwasawa, K.; Lord, S.; Sanders, D. B.; Surace, J. A.

    2017-09-01

    We present an analysis of {[{{O}}{{I}}]}63, [O III]88, [N II]122, and {[{{C}}{{II}}]}158 far-infrared (FIR) fine-structure line observations obtained with Herschel/PACS, for ˜240 local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) in the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey. We find pronounced declines (“deficits”) of line-to-FIR continuum emission for [N II]122, {[{{O}}{{I}}]}63, and {[{{C}}{{II}}]}158 as a function of FIR color and infrared luminosity surface density, {{{Σ }}}{IR}. The median electron density of the ionized gas in LIRGs, based on the [N II]122/[N II]205 ratio, is {n}{{e}} = 41 cm-3. We find that the dispersion in the {[{{C}}{{II}}]}158 deficit of LIRGs is attributed to a varying fractional contribution of photodissociation regions (PDRs) to the observed {[{{C}}{{II}}]}158 emission, f([{{C}} {{II}}{]}158{PDR}) = [{{C}} {{II}}{]}158{PDR}/{[{{C}}{{II}}]}158, which increases from ˜60% to ˜95% in the warmest LIRGs. The {[{{O}}{{I}}]}63/[{{C}} {{II}}{]}158{PDR} ratio is tightly correlated with the PDR gas kinetic temperature in sources where {[{{O}}{{I}}]}63 is not optically thick or self-absorbed. For each galaxy, we derive the average PDR hydrogen density, {n}{{H}}, and intensity of the interstellar radiation field, G, in units of {G}0 and find G/{n}{{H}} ratios of ˜0.1-50 {G}0 cm3, with ULIRGs populating the upper end of the distribution. There is a relation between G/{n}{{H}} and {{{Σ }}}{IR}, showing a critical break at {{{Σ }}}{IR}* ≃ 5 × 1010 L ⊙ kpc-2. Below {{{Σ }}}{IR}* , G/{n}{{H}} remains constant, ≃0.32 {G}0 cm3, and variations in {{{Σ }}}{IR} are driven by the number density of star-forming regions within a galaxy, with no change in their PDR properties. Above {{{Σ }}}{IR}* , G/{n}{{H}} increases rapidly with {{{Σ }}}{IR}, signaling a departure from the typical PDR conditions found in normal star-forming galaxies toward more intense/harder radiation fields and compact geometries typical of starbursting sources.

  5. Color-magnitude distribution of face-on nearby galaxies in Sloan digital sky survey DR7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Shuo-Wen; Feng, Long-Long [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Gu, Qiusheng; Huang, Song; Shi, Yong, E-mail: qsgu@nju.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2014-05-20

    We have analyzed the distributions in the color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of a large sample of face-on galaxies to minimize the effect of dust extinctions on galaxy color. About 300,000 galaxies with log (a/b) < 0.2 and redshift z < 0.2 are selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 catalog. Two methods are employed to investigate the distributions of galaxies in the CMD, including one-dimensional (1D) Gaussian fitting to the distributions in individual magnitude bins and two-dimensional (2D) Gaussian mixture model (GMM) fitting to galaxies as a whole. We find that in the 1D fitting, two Gaussians are not enough to fit galaxies with the excess present between the blue cloud and the red sequence. The fitting to this excess defines the center of the green valley in the local universe to be (u – r){sub 0.1} = –0.121M {sub r,} 0{sub .1} – 0.061. The fraction of blue cloud and red sequence galaxies turns over around M {sub r,} {sub 0.1} ∼ –20.1 mag, corresponding to stellar mass of 3 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}. For the 2D GMM fitting, a total of four Gaussians are required, one for the blue cloud, one for the red sequence, and the additional two for the green valley. The fact that two Gaussians are needed to describe the distributions of galaxies in the green valley is consistent with some models that argue for two different evolutionary paths from the blue cloud to the red sequence.

  6. The sloan lens acs survey. II. Stellar populations and internal structure of early-type lens galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treu, Tommaso; Koopmans, Léon V.; Bolton, Adam S.; Burles, Scott; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2006-01-01

    We use HST images to derive effective radii and effective surface brightnesses of 15 early-type (E+S0) lens galaxies identified by the SLACS Survey. Our measurements are combined with stellar velocity dispersions from the SDSS database to investigate for the first time the distribution of lens

  7. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: Multi-wavelength Properties of ALMA-identified Submillimeter Galaxies in UKIDSS UDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simpson, J. M.; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, A. M.; Ivison, R. J.; Dunlop, J. S.; Geach, J. E.; Almaini, O.; Arumugam, V.; Bremer, M. N.; Chen, Chian-Chou; Conselice, C.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Farrah, D.; Ibar, E.; Hartley, W. G.; Ma, C. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Scott, D.; Spaans, M.; Thomson, A. P.; van der Werf, P. P.

    2017-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of 52 submillimeter galaxies (SMGs), identified using ALMA 870 μm continuum imaging in a pilot program to precisely locate bright SCUBA-2-selected submillimeter sources in the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey (UDS) field. Using the available deep (especially

  8. Spectroscopic survey of the Galaxy with Gaia - II. The expected science yield from the Radial Velocity Spectrometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilkinson, MI; Vallenari, A; Turon, C; Munari, U; Katz, D; Bono, G; Cropper, M; Helmi, A; Robichon, N; Thevenin, F; Vidrih, S; Zwitter, T; Arenou, F; Baylac, MO; Bertelli, G; Bijaoui, A; Boschi, F; Castelli, F; Crifo, F; David, M; Gomboc, A; Gomez, A; Haywood, M; Jauregi, U; de Laverny, P; Lebreton, Y; Marrese, P; Marsh, T; Mignot, S; Morin, D; Pasetto, S; Perryman, M; Prsa, A; Recio-Blanco, A; Royer, F; Sellier, A; Siviero, A; Sordo, R; Soubiran, C; Tomasella, L; Viala, Y

    2005-01-01

    The Gaia mission is designed as a Galaxy explorer, and will measure simultaneously, in a survey mode, the five or six phase-space parameters of all stars brighter than 20th magnitude, as well as providing a description of their astrophysical characteristics. These measurements are obtained by

  9. A CFH12k lensing survey of X-ray luminous galaxy clusters - II. Weak lensing analysis and global correlations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bardeau, S.; Soucail, G.; Kneib, J.-P.; Czoske, O.; Ebeling, H.; Hudelot, P.; Smail, I.; Smith, G. P.

    Aims. We present a wide-field multi-color survey of a homogeneous sample of eleven clusters of galaxies for which we measure total masses and mass distributions from weak lensing. This sample, spanning a small range in both X-ray luminosity and redshift, is ideally suited to determining the

  10. Hydra II: A Faint and Compact Milky Way Dwarf Galaxy Found in the Survey of the Magellanic Stellar History

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, Nicolas F.; Nidever, David L.; Besla, Gurtina; Olsen, Knut; Walker, Alistair R.; Vivas, A. Katherina; Gruendl, Robert A.; Kaleida, Catherine C.; Muñoz, Ricardo R.; Blum, Robert D.; Saha, Abhijit; Conn, Blair C.; Bell, Eric F.; Chu, You-Hua; Cioni, Maria-Rosa L.; de Boer, Thomas J. L.; Gallart, Carme; Jin, Shoko; Kunder, Andrea; Majewski, Steven R.; Martinez-Delgado, David; Monachesi, Antonela; Monelli, Matteo; Monteagudo, Lara; Noël, Noelia E. D.; Olszewski, Edward W.; Stringfellow, Guy S.; van der Marel, Roeland P.; Zaritsky, Dennis

    We present the discovery of a new dwarf galaxy, Hydra II, found serendipitously within the data from the ongoing Survey of the Magellanic Stellar History conducted with the Dark Energy Camera on the Blanco 4 m Telescope. The new satellite is compact ({{r}h}=68 ± 11 pc) and faint ({{M}V}=-4.8 ± 0.3),

  11. The Sloan Lens ACS survey. IV. The mass density profile of early-type galaxies out to 100 effective radii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gavazzi, Raphael; Treu, Tommaso; Rhodes, Jason D.; Koopmans, Leon V. E.; Bolton, Adam S.; Burles, Scott; Massey, Richard J.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2007-01-01

    We present a weak-lensing analysis of 22 early-type (strong) lens galaxies, based on deep HST images obtained as part of the Sloan Lens ACS Survey. Using advanced techniques to control systematic uncertainties, we show that weak-lensing signal is detected out to similar to 300 h(-1) kpc (at the mean

  12. Field #3 of the Palomar-Groningen Survey; 1, Variable stars at the edge of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultheis, M.

    1996-01-01

    Submitted to: Astron. Astrophys. Abstract: A catalogue is presented with variable (RR Lyrae, semiregular and Mira) stars located inside field #3 of the Palomar-Groningen Survey, at the outer edge of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy. One of the semiregular variables is a carbon star, comparable with

  13. Large-scale structure in the HI Parkes All-Sky Survey : filling the voids with HI galaxies?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basilakos, S.; Plionis, M.; Kovac, K.; Voglis, N.

    2007-01-01

    We estimate the two-point correlation function in redshift space of the recently compiled HI Parkes All-Sky Survey neutral hydrogen (HI) sources catalogue, which if modelled as a power law, xi(r) = (r(0)/r)(gamma), the best-fitting parameters for the HI selected galaxies are found to be r(0) = 3.3

  14. Machine-learning-based photometric redshifts for galaxies of the ESO Kilo-Degree Survey data release 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavuoti, S.; Brescia, M.; Tortora, C.; Longo, G.; Napolitano, N. R.; Radovich, M.; La Barbera, F.; Capaccioli, M.; de Jong, J. T. A.; Getman, F.; Grado, A.; Paolillo, M.

    2015-09-01

    We have estimated photometric redshifts (zphot) for more than 1.1 million galaxies of the public European Southern Observatory (ESO) Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) data release 2. KiDS is an optical wide-field imaging survey carried out with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) Survey Telescope (VST) and the OmegaCAM camera, which aims to tackle open questions in cosmology and galaxy evolution, such as the origin of dark energy and the channel of galaxy mass growth. We present a catalogue of photometric redshifts obtained using the Multi-Layer Perceptron with Quasi-Newton Algorithm (MLPQNA) model, provided within the framework of the DAta Mining and Exploration Web Application REsource (DAMEWARE). These photometric redshifts are based on a spectroscopic knowledge base that was obtained by merging spectroscopic data sets from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) data release 2 and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) data release 9. The overall 1σ uncertainty on Δz = (zspec - zphot)/(1 + zspec) is ˜0.03, with a very small average bias of ˜0.001, a normalized median absolute deviation of ˜0.02 and a fraction of catastrophic outliers (|Δz| > 0.15) of ˜0.4 per cent.

  15. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Dusty Star-Forming Galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei in the Southern Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Danica; Gralla, Megan; Marriage, Tobias A.; Switzer, Eric R.; Partridge, Bruce; Massardi, Marcella; Morales, Gustavo; Addison, Graeme; Bond, J. Richard; Crighton, Devin; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present a catalogue of 191 extragalactic sources detected by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) at 148 and/or 218 GHz in the 2008 Southern survey. Flux densities span 14 -1700 mJy, and we use source spectral indices derived using ACT-only data to divide our sources into two subpopulations: 167 radio galaxies powered by central active galactic nuclei (AGN) and 24 dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs). We cross-identify 97 per cent of our sources (166 of the AGN and 19 of the DSFGs) with those in currently available catalogues. When combined with flux densities from the Australia Telescope 20 GHz survey and follow-up observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the synchrotron-dominated population is seen to exhibit a steepening of the slope of the spectral energy distribution from 20 to 148 GHz, with the trend continuing to 218 GHz. The ACT dust-dominated source population has a median spectral index, A(sub 148-218), of 3.7 (+0.62 or -0.86), and includes both local galaxies and sources with redshift around 6. Dusty sources with no counterpart in existing catalogues likely belong to a recently discovered subpopulation of DSFGs lensed by foreground galaxies or galaxy groups.

  16. Probing the Redshift Desert Using the Gemini Deep Deep Survey: Observing Galaxy Mass Assembly at z > 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazebrook, K.; Gemini Deep Deep Survey Team

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the Gemini Deep Deep Survey is to push spectroscopic studies of complete galaxy samples (both red and blue objects) significantly beyond z=1; this is the redshift where the current Hubble sequence of ellipticals and spirals is already extant. In the Universe at z=2 the only currently spectroscopically confirmed galaxies are blue, star-forming and of fragmented morphology. Exploring this transition means filling the `redshift desert' 1>1 which has led us to carry out the longest exposure redshift survey ever done: 100 ksec spectroscopic MOS exposures with GMOS on Gemini North. We have developed an implementation of the CCD ``nod & shuffle'' technique to ensure precise sky-subtraction in these ultra-deep exposures. At the halfway mark the GDDS now has ˜ 36 galaxies in the redshift desert 1.2galaxy assembly is now being probed by direct spectroscopic investigation for the first time. On behalf of the GDDS team I present our first results on the properties of galaxies in the `redshift desert'.

  17. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Dusty Star-Forming Galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei in the Southern Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Danica; Gralla, Megan; Marriage, Tobias A.; Switzer, Eric R.; Partridge, Bruce; Massardi, Marcella; Morales, Gustavo; Addison, Graeme; Bond, J. Richard; Crichton, Devin; hide

    2013-01-01

    We present a catalog of 191 extragalactic sources detected by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) at 148 GHz and/or 218GHz in the 2008 Southern survey. Flux densities span 14-1700mJy, and we use source spectral indices derived using ACT-only data to divide our sources into two sub-populations: 167 radio galaxies powered by central active galactic nuclei (AGN), and 24 dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs). We cross-identify 97% of our sources (166 of the AGN and 19 of the DSFGs) with those in currently available catalogs. When combined with flux densities from the Australian Telescope 20 GHz survey and follow-up observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the synchrotron-dominated population is seen to exhibit a steepening of the slope of the spectral energy distribution from 20 to 148GHz, with the trend continuing to 218GHz. The ACT dust-dominated source population has a median spectral index, alpha(sub 148-218), of 3.7+0.62 or -0.86, and includes both local galaxies and sources with redshifts as great as 5.6. Dusty sources with no counterpart in existing catalogs likely belong to a recently discovered subpopulation of DSFGs lensed by foreground galaxies or galaxy groups.

  18. Chemical Abundance Measurements of Ultra-Faint Dwarf Galaxies Discovered by the Dark Energy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Daniel; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Simon, Joshua D.; Hansen, Terese; Li, Ting; Bernstein, Rebecca; Balbinot, Eduardo; Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Pace, Andrew; Strigari, Louis; Pellegrino, Craig; DePoy, Darren L.; Suntzeff, Nicholas; Bechtol, Keith; Dark Energy Suvey

    2018-01-01

    We present chemical abundance analysis results derived from high-resolution spectroscopy of ultra-faint dwarfs discovered by the Dark Energy Survey. Ultra-faint dwarf galaxies preserve a fossil record of the chemical abundance patterns imprinted by the first stars in the Universe. High-resolution spectroscopic observations of member stars in several recently discovered Milky Way satellites reveal a range of abundance patterns among ultra-faint dwarfs suggesting that star formation processes in the early Universe were quite diverse. The chemical content provides a glimpse not only of the varied nucleosynthetic processes and chemical history of the dwarfs themselves, but also the environment in which they were formed. We present the chemical abundance analysis of these objects and discuss possible explanations for the observed abundance patterns.

  19. High-Redshift Galaxy Surveys and the Reionization of the Universe

    OpenAIRE

    Bouwens, Rychard J.

    2015-01-01

    Star-forming galaxies in the early universe provide us with perhaps the most natural way of explaining the reionization of the universe. Current observational results are sufficiently comprehensive, as to allow us to approximately calculate how the ionizing radiation from galaxies varies as a function of cosmic time. Important uncertainties in modeling reionization by galaxies revolve around the escape fraction and its luminosity and redshift dependence, a possible truncation of the galaxy lu...

  20. The MUSE-Wide survey: A first catalogue of 831 emission line galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herenz, Edmund Christian; Urrutia, Tanya; Wisotzki, Lutz; Kerutt, Josephine; Saust, Rikke; Werhahn, Maria; Schmidt, Kasper Borello; Caruana, Joseph; Diener, Catrina; Bacon, Roland; Brinchmann, Jarle; Schaye, Joop; Maseda, Michael; Weilbacher, Peter M.

    2017-09-01

    We present a first instalment of the MUSE-Wide survey, covering an area of 22.2 arcmin2 (corresponding to 20% of the final survey) in the CANDELS/Deep area of the Chandra Deep Field South. We use the MUSE integral field spectrograph at the ESO VLT to conduct a full-area spectroscopic mapping at a depth of 1 h exposure time per 1 arcmin2 pointing. We searched for compact emission line objects using our newly developed LSDCat software based on a 3D matched filtering approach, followed by interactive classification and redshift measurement of the sources. Our catalogue contains 831 distinct emission line galaxies with redshifts ranging from 0.04 to 6. Roughly one third (237) of the emission line sources are Lyman α emitting galaxies with 3 line (0.3 ≲ z ≲ 1.5), 189 by their [O III] line (0.21 ≲ z ≲ 0.85), and 46 by their Hα line (0.04 ≲ z ≲ 0.42). Comparing our spectroscopic redshifts to photometric redshift estimates from the literature, we find excellent agreement for z 3. Together with the catalogue we also release 1D PSF-weighted extracted spectra and small 3D datacubes centred on each of the 831 sources. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere under ESO programme 094.A-0205.Data products are available via http://muse-vlt.eu/science/ and at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/606/A12 .

  1. Pacific Remote Islands MNM: Initial Survey Instructions for Terrestrial Arthropods

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purposes of the terrestrial arthropod surveys are to: develop a species list of native and non-native terrestrial arthropods on land portions of the refuge;...

  2. Survey of emission-line galaxies: Universidad Complutense de Madrid list

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamorano, J.; Rego, Gallego, J.; Gallego, J. G.; Vitores, A. G.RA, R.; Gonzalez-Riestra, R..; Rodriguez-Caderot, G.

    1994-01-01

    A low-dispersion objective-prism survey for low-redshift emission-line galaxies (ELGs) is being carried out by the University Complutense de Madrid with the Schmidt telescope at the German-Spanish Observatory of Calar Alto (Almeria, Spain). A 4 deg full aperture prism, which provides a dispersion of 1950 A/mm, and IIIaF emulsion combination has been used to search for ELGs selected by the presence of H-alpha emission in their spectra. Our survey has proved to be able to recover objects already found by similar surveys with different techniques and, what is more important, to discover new objects not previously cataloged. A compilation of descriptions and positions, along with finding charts when necessary, is presented for 160 extragalactic emission-line objects. This is the first list, which contains objects located in a region of the sky covering 270 sq deg in 10 fields near alpha = 0(sup h) and delta = 20 deg.

  3. The 13th Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the SDSS-IV Survey Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albareti, Franco D.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Almeida, Andres

    2017-01-01

    The fourth generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) began observations in 2014 July. It pursues three core programs: the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment 2 (APOGEE-2), Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA), and the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Surve...

  4. The Two-Point Correlation Function of Rich Clusters of Galaxies: Results from an Extended APM Cluster Redshift Survey

    OpenAIRE

    G. B. Dalton; Croft, R. A. C.; Efstathiou, G.; Sutherland, W.J.; Maddox, S. J.; Davis, M.

    1994-01-01

    We present new estimates of the spatial two-point correlation function of rich clusters of galaxies selected from the APM Galaxy Survey. We have measured redshifts for a sample of $364$ clusters out to a depth of $\\sim 450\\hmpc$. The clusters have a mean space density of $\\bar{n} = 3.4\\times 10^{-5}\\hmpccc$. The two-point correlation function, $\\xi_{cc}$, for this sample is equal to unity at a pair-separation of $r_0 = 14.3\\pm1.75\\hmpc$ (2$\\sigma$ errors), consistent with our earlier results ...

  5. The Origin of Stellar Species: constraining stellar evolution scenarios with Local Group galaxy surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarbadhicary, Sumit; Badenes, Carles; Chomiuk, Laura; Maldonado, Jessica; Caprioli, Damiano; Heger, Mairead; Huizenga, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Our understanding of the progenitors of many stellar species, such as supernovae, massive and low-mass He-burning stars, is limited because of many poorly constrained aspects of stellar evolution theory. For my dissertation, I have focused on using Local Group galaxy surveys to constrain stellar evolution scenarios by measuring delay-time distributions (DTD). The DTD is the hypothetical occurrence rate of a stellar object per elapsed time after a brief burst of star formation. It is the measured distribution of timescales on which stars evolve, and therefore serves as a powerful observational constraint on theoretical progenitor models. The DTD can be measured from a survey of stellar objects and a set of star-formation histories of the host galaxy, and is particularly effective in the Local Group, where high-quality star-formation histories are available from resolved stellar populations. I am currently calculating a SN DTD with supernova remnants (SNRs) in order to provide the strongest constraints on the progenitors of thermonuclear and core-collapse supernovae. However, most SNRs do not have reliable age measurements and their evolution depends on the ambient environment. For this reason, I wrote a radio light curve model of an SNR population to extract the visibility times and rates of supernovae - crucial ingredients for the DTD - from an SNR survey. The model uses observational constraints on the local environments from multi-wavelength surveys, accounts for missing SNRs and employs the latest models of shock-driven particle acceleration. The final calculation of the SN DTD in the Local Group is awaiting completion of a systematic SNR catalog from deep radio-continuum images, now in preparation by a group led by Dr. Laura Chomiuk. I have also calculated DTDs for the LMC population of RR Lyrae and Cepheid variables, which serve as important distance calibrators and stellar population tracers. We find that Cepheids can have delay-times between 10 Myrs - 1 Gyr

  6. Measuring the Ultimate Halo Mass of Galaxy Clusters: Redshifts and Mass Profiles from the Hectospec Cluster Survey (HeCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rines, Kenneth; Geller, Margaret J.; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Kurtz, Michael J.

    2013-04-01

    The infall regions of galaxy clusters represent the largest gravitationally bound structures in a ΛCDM universe. Measuring cluster mass profiles into the infall regions provides an estimate of the ultimate mass of these halos. We use the caustic technique to measure cluster mass profiles from galaxy redshifts obtained with the Hectospec Cluster Survey (HeCS), an extensive spectroscopic survey of galaxy clusters with MMT/Hectospec. We survey 58 clusters selected by X-ray flux at 0.1 noise spectra for ~200 cluster members and a comparable number of foreground/background galaxies. The cluster members trace out infall patterns around the clusters. The members define a very narrow red sequence. We demonstrate that the determination of velocity dispersion is insensitive to the inclusion of bluer members (a small fraction of the cluster population). We apply the caustic technique to define membership and estimate the mass profiles to large radii. The ultimate halo mass of clusters (the mass that remains bound in the far future of a ΛCDM universe) is on average (1.99 ± 0.11)M 200, a new observational cosmological test in essential agreement with simulations. Summed profiles binned in M 200 and in LX demonstrate that the predicted Navarro-Frenk-White form of the density profile is a remarkably good representation of the data in agreement with weak lensing results extending to large radius. The concentration of these summed profiles is also consistent with theoretical predictions.

  7. First Results from the KMOS Lens-Amplified Spectroscopic Survey (KLASS): Kinematics of Lensed Galaxies at Cosmic Noon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Charlotte A.; Treu, Tommaso; Fontana, Adriano; Jones, Tucker; Morishita, Takahiro; Amorin, Ricardo; Bradač, Maruša; Quinn Finney, Emily; Grillo, Claudio; Henry, Alaina; Hoag, Austin; Huang, Kuang-Han; Schmidt, Kasper B.; Trenti, Michele; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2017-03-01

    We present the first results of the K-band Multi-Object Spectrometer (KMOS) Lens-Amplified Spectroscopic Survey, a new ESO Very Large Telescope large program, doing multi-object integral field spectroscopy of galaxies gravitationally lensed behind seven galaxy clusters selected from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space. Using the power of the cluster magnification, we are able to reveal the kinematic structure of 25 galaxies at 0.7≲ z≲ 2.3, in four cluster fields, with stellar masses 7.8≲ {log}({M}\\star / {M}⊙ )≲ 10.5. This sample includes five sources at z> 1 with lower stellar masses than in any previous kinematic integral field unit (IFU) surveys. Our sample displays a diversity in kinematic structure over this mass and redshift range. The majority of our kinematically resolved sample is rotationally supported, but with a lower ratio of rotational velocity to velocity dispersion than in the local universe, indicating the fraction of dynamically hot disks changes with cosmic time. We find that no galaxies with stellar mass grism-selected objects more faithfully than slit spectrographs. With artificial slits, we estimate that slit spectrographs miss, on average, 60% of the total flux of emission lines, which decreases rapidly if the emission line is spatially offset from the continuum.

  8. The XXL Survey. VII. A supercluster of galaxies at z = 0.43

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompei, E.; Adami, C.; Eckert, D.; Gastaldello, F.; Lavoie, S.; Poggianti, B.; Altieri, B.; Alis, S.; Baran, N.; Benoist, C.; Jaffé, Y. L.; Koulouridis, E.; Maurogordato, S.; Pacaud, F.; Pierre, M.; Sadibekova, T.; Smolčić, V.; Valtchanov, I.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The XXL Survey is the largest homogeneous and contiguous survey carried out with XMM-Newton. Covering an area of 50 deg2 distributed over two fields, it primarily investigates the large-scale structures of the Universe using the distribution of galaxy clusters and active galactic nuclei as tracers of the matter distribution. Aims: Given its depth and sky coverage, XXL is particularly suited to systematically unveiling the clustering of X-ray clusters and to identifying superstructures in a homogeneous X-ray sample down to the typical mass scale of a local massive cluster. Methods: A friends-of-friends algorithm in three-dimensional physical space was run to identify large-scale structures. In this paper we report the discovery of the highest redshift supercluster of galaxies found in the XXL Survey. We describe the X-ray properties of the clusters members of the structure and the optical follow-up. Results: The newly discovered supercluster is composed of six clusters of galaxies at a median redshift z ~ 0.43 and distributed across ~30'× 15' (10 × 5 Mpc) on the sky. This structure is very compact with all the clusters residing in one XMM pointing; for this reason this is the first supercluster discovered with the XXL Survey. Photometric redshifts from the CFHTLS (Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey) data release T0007 placed the supercluster at an approximate redshift of zphot ~ 0.45; subsequent spectroscopic follow-up with WHT (William Herschel Telescope) and NTT (New Technology Telescope) confirmed a median redshift of z ~ 0.43. An estimate of the X-ray mass and luminosity of this supercluster returns values of 1.7 × 1015 M⊙ and of 1.68 × 1044 erg s-1, respectively, and a total gas mass of Mgas = 9.3 × 1013 M⊙. These values put XLSSC-e at the average mass range of superclusters; its appearance, with two members of equal size, is quite unusual with respect to other superclusters and provides a unique view of the formation process of a

  9. The SLUGGS Survey: A comparison of total-mass profiles of early-type galaxies from observations and cosmological simulations, to ˜4 effective radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellstedt, Sabine; Forbes, Duncan A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Remus, Rhea-Silvia; Stevens, Adam R. H.; Brodie, Jean P.; Poci, Adriano; McDermid, Richard; Alabi, Adebusola; Chevalier, Leonie; Adams, Caitlin; Ferré-Mateu, Anna; Wasserman, Asher; Pandya, Viraj

    2018-02-01

    We apply the Jeans Anisotropic MGE (JAM) dynamical modelling method to SAGES Legacy Unifying Globulars and GalaxieS (SLUGGS) survey data of early-type galaxies in the stellar mass range 1010 galaxies, utilising a hyperparameter method to combine the two independent datasets. The total-mass density profile slope values derived for these galaxies are consistent with those measured in the inner regions of galaxies by other studies. Furthermore, the total-mass density slopes (γtot) appear to be universal over this broad stellar mass range, with an average value of γtot = -2.24 ± 0.05 , i.e. slightly steeper than isothermal. We compare our results to model galaxies from the Magneticum and EAGLE cosmological hydrodynamic simulations, in order to probe the mechanisms that are responsible for varying total-mass density profile slopes. The simulated-galaxy slopes are shallower than the observed values by ˜0.3 - 0.5, indicating that the physical processes shaping the mass distributions of galaxies in cosmological simulations are still incomplete. For galaxies with M* > 1010.7M⊙ in the Magneticum simulations, we identify a significant anticorrelation between total-mass density profile slopes and the fraction of stellar mass formed ex situ (i.e. accreted), whereas this anticorrelation is weaker for lower stellar masses, implying that the measured total mass density slopes for low-mass galaxies are less likely to be determined by merger activity.

  10. MOIRCS Deep Survey. VI. Near-infrared Spectroscopy of K-Selected Star-forming Galaxies at z ~ 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Akiyama, Masayuki; Kajisawa, Masaru; Alexander, David M.; Ohta, Kouji; Suzuki, Ryuji; Tokoku, Chihiro; Uchimoto, Yuka K.; Konishi, Masahiro; Yamada, Toru; Tanaka, Ichi; Omata, Koji; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Brandt, Niel; Ichikawa, Takashi

    2010-07-01

    We present the results of near-infrared multi-object spectroscopic observations for 37 BzK-color-selected star-forming galaxies conducted with MOIRCS on the Subaru Telescope. The sample is drawn from the Ks -band-selected catalog of the MOIRCS Deep Survey in the GOODS-N region. About half of our samples are selected from the publicly available 24 μm-source catalog of the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. Hα emission lines are detected from 23 galaxies, of which the median redshift is 2.12. We derived the star formation rates (SFRs) from extinction-corrected Hα luminosities. The extinction correction is estimated from the spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting of multiband photometric data covering UV to near-infrared wavelengths. The Balmer decrement of the stacked emission lines shows that the amount of extinction for the ionized gas is larger than that for the stellar continuum. From a comparison of the extinction-corrected Hα luminosity and other SFR indicators, we found that the relation between the dust properties of stellar continuum and ionized gas is different depending on the intrinsic SFR (differential extinction). We compared SFRs estimated from extinction-corrected Hα luminosities with stellar masses estimated from SED fitting. The comparison shows no correlation between SFR and stellar mass. Some galaxies with stellar mass smaller than ~1010 M sun show SFRs higher than ~100 M sun yr-1. The specific SFRs (SSFRs) of these galaxies are remarkably high; galaxies which have SSFR higher than ~10-8 yr-1 are found in eight of the present sample. From the best-fit parameters of SED fitting for these high-SSFR galaxies, we find that the average age of the stellar population is younger than 100 Myr, which is consistent with the implied high SSFR. The large SFR implies the possibility that the high-SSFR galaxies significantly contribute to the cosmic SFR density of the universe at z ~ 2. When we apply the

  11. Revealing the AGN-Host Galaxy Connection: Preliminary Results from an Arecibo Survey of HI Absorption in AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kristen M.

    2018-01-01

    The presence of an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) can have an extensive effect on a host galaxy, most notably through powerful outflows or jets that it produces. Such outflows often deposit kinetic energy into the interstellar medium of the host galaxy at sub-kpc, kpc, and 10s of kpc scales. While this can ionize the gaseous material, studies of absorption of neutral hydrogen (HI) have also detected kinematic outflows with velocities ranging from 100s to 1000s of km/s. Such outflows can be difficult to detect due to the diffuse nature of the HI gas, especially in galaxies with low radio brightnesses. The sensitivity of the Arecibo Observatory 305m, however, makes such a study feasible. We present preliminary results of a survey of AGN-dominated sources in the Arecibo sky that has revealed complex HI absorption structures in several objects, revealing complex HI absorption structures in several objects.

  12. Galaxies in the Illustris simulation as seen by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - II. Size-luminosity relations and the deficit of bulge-dominated galaxies in Illustris at low mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottrell, Connor; Torrey, Paul; Simard, Luc; Ellison, Sara L.

    2017-05-01

    The interpretive power of the newest generation of large-volume hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation rests upon their ability to reproduce the observed properties of galaxies. In this second paper in a series, we employ bulge+disc decompositions of realistic dust-free galaxy images from the Illustris simulation in a consistent comparison with galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Examining the size-luminosity relations of each sample, we find that galaxies in Illustris are roughly twice as large and 0.7 mag brighter on average than galaxies in the SDSS. The trend of increasing slope and decreasing normalization of size-luminosity as a function of bulge fraction is qualitatively similar to observations. However, the size-luminosity relations of Illustris galaxies are quantitatively distinguished by higher normalizations and smaller slopes than for real galaxies. We show that this result is linked to a significant deficit of bulge-dominated galaxies in Illustris relative to the SDSS at stellar masses log M_{\\star }/M_{⊙}≲ 11. We investigate this deficit by comparing bulge fraction estimates derived from photometry and internal kinematics. We show that photometric bulge fractions are systematically lower than the kinematic fractions at low masses, but with increasingly good agreement as the stellar mass increases.

  13. Optimal BRUVs (baited remote underwater video system) survey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) play an important role in coastal conservation, but there is presently no uniformly applied methodology for monitoring the efficacy of coastal fish protection. Whereas underwater visual census and controlled angling surveys have been used, their skilled-labour requirements and environmental ...

  14. Notes on a remotely operated vehicle survey to describe reef ichthyofauna and habitats – Agulhas Bank, South Africa

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Makwela, Mapula S; Kerwath, Sven E; Götz, Albrecht; Sink, Kerry; Samaai, Toufiek; Wilke, Christopher G

    2016-01-01

    ... video (BRUV) surveys (Cappo, Speare & De’ath 2007), remotely operated vehicle (ROV) surveys, like diver-based UVC, allow for a comprehensive inspection of the sampling area and can also be used wi...

  15. The ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field: Molecular Gas Reservoirs in High-redshift Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decarli, Roberto; Walter, Fabian; Aravena, Manuel; Carilli, Chris; Bouwens, Rychard; da Cunha, Elisabete; Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Riechers, Dominik; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, Mark; Weiss, Axel; Bacon, Roland; Bauer, Franz; Bell, Eric F.; Bertoldi, Frank; Chapman, Scott; Colina, Luis; Cortes, Paulo C.; Cox, Pierre; Gónzalez-López, Jorge; Inami, Hanae; Ivison, Rob; Hodge, Jacqueline; Karim, Alex; Magnelli, Benjamin; Ota, Kazuaki; Popping, Gergö; Rix, Hans-Walter; Sargent, Mark; van der Wel, Arjen; van der Werf, Paul

    2016-12-01

    We study the molecular gas properties of high-z galaxies observed in the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey (ASPECS) that targets an ˜1 arcmin2 region in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UDF), a blind survey of CO emission (tracing molecular gas) in the 3 and 1 mm bands. Of a total of 1302 galaxies in the field, 56 have spectroscopic redshifts and correspondingly well-defined physical properties. Among these, 11 have infrared luminosities {L}{IR}\\gt {10}11 {L}⊙ , i.e., a detection in CO emission was expected. Out of these, 7 are detected at various significance in CO, and 4 are undetected in CO emission. In the CO-detected sources, we find CO excitation conditions that are lower than those typically found in starburst/sub-mm galaxy/QSO environments. We use the CO luminosities (including limits for non-detections) to derive molecular gas masses. We discuss our findings in the context of previous molecular gas observations at high redshift (star formation law, gas depletion times, gas fractions): the CO-detected galaxies in the UDF tend to reside on the low-{L}{IR} envelope of the scatter in the {L}{IR}{--}{L}{CO}\\prime relation, but exceptions exist. For the CO-detected sources, we find an average depletion time of ˜1 Gyr, with significant scatter. The average molecular-to-stellar mass ratio ({M}{{H}2}/M *) is consistent with earlier measurements of main-sequence galaxies at these redshifts, and again shows large variations among sources. In some cases, we also measure dust continuum emission. On average, the dust-based estimates of the molecular gas are a factor ˜2-5× smaller than those based on CO. When we account for detections as well as non-detections, we find large diversity in the molecular gas properties of the high-redshift galaxies covered by ASPECS.

  16. Full-sky Gravitational Lensing Simulation for Large-area Galaxy Surveys and Cosmic Microwave Background Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ryuichi; Hamana, Takashi; Shirasaki, Masato; Namikawa, Toshiya; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Osato, Ken; Shiroyama, Kosei

    2017-11-01

    We present 108 full-sky gravitational lensing simulation data sets generated by performing multiple-lens plane ray-tracing through high-resolution cosmological N-body simulations. The data sets include full-sky convergence and shear maps from redshifts z = 0.05 to 5.3 at intervals of 150 {h}-1{Mpc} comoving radial distance (corresponding to a redshift interval of {{Δ }}z≃ 0.05 at the nearby universe), enabling the construction of a mock shear catalog for an arbitrary source distribution up to z = 5.3. The dark matter halos are identified from the same N-body simulations with enough mass resolution to resolve the host halos of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) CMASS and luminous red galaxies (LRGs). Angular positions and redshifts of the halos are provided by a ray-tracing calculation, enabling the creation of a mock halo catalog to be used for galaxy-galaxy and cluster-galaxy lensing. The simulation also yields maps of gravitational lensing deflections for a source redshift at the last scattering surface, and we provide 108 realizations of lensed cosmic microwave background (CMB) maps in which the post-Born corrections caused by multiple light scattering are included. We present basic statistics of the simulation data, including the angular power spectra of cosmic shear, CMB temperature and polarization anisotropies, galaxy-galaxy lensing signals for halos, and their covariances. The angular power spectra of the cosmic shear and CMB anisotropies agree with theoretical predictions within 5% up to {\\ell }=3000 (or at an angular scale θ > 0.5 arcmin). The simulation data sets are generated primarily for the ongoing Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam survey, but are freely available for download at http://cosmo.phys.hirosaki-u.ac.jp/takahasi/allsky_raytracing/.

  17. THE ACS VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY. XVII. THE SPATIAL ALIGNMENT OF GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS WITH EARLY-TYPE HOST GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Qiushi; Peng, Eric W. [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Blakeslee, John P.; Cote, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Jordan, Andres [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Mei, Simona [University of Paris 7 Denis Diderot, F-75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); West, Michael J., E-mail: peng@pku.edu.cn [Maria Mitchell Observatory, 4 Vestal Street, Nantucket, MA 02554 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    We study the azimuthal distribution of globular clusters (GCs) in early-type galaxies and compare them to their host galaxies using data from the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey. We find that in host galaxies with visible elongation ({epsilon} > 0.2) and intermediate to high luminosities (M{sub z} < -19), the GCs are preferentially aligned along the major axis of the stellar light. The red (metal-rich) GC subpopulations show strong alignment with the major axis of the host galaxy, which supports the notion that these GCs are associated with metal-rich field stars. The metal-rich GCs in lenticular galaxies show signs of being more strongly associated with disks rather than bulges. Surprisingly, we also find that the blue (metal-poor) GCs can also show the same correlation. If the metal-poor GCs are part of the early formation of the halo and built up through mergers, then our results support a picture where halo formation and merging occur anisotropically, and that the present-day major axis is an indicator of the preferred merging axis.

  18. The HST Medium Deep Survey: Light Profiles and Redshifts for Field Galaxies out to z{ ~ }0.6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, P. C.; Windhorst, R. A.; Mutz, S. B.; Pascarelle, S. M.; Franklin, B. E.; Ostrander, E. J.; Griffiths, R. E.

    1994-12-01

    Isophotal light profiles have been determined for 29 faint field galaxies in Hubble Space Telescope (``HST'') images taken for the Medium Deep Survey (``MDS'') prior to the refurbishment mission, for which ground-based spectroscopy and reshifts are available. The images were obtained with the Wide Field Camera in ``parallel mode'' and deconvolved using the Lucy method with a large grid of observed field stars as point-spread functions. The effective resolution of the restored WFC images is { ~ }0.2('') FWHM. By fitting the light profiles to models of exponential disks and/or r(1/4) -bulges, accurate values for their scale-lengths (r_s and/or r_e) have been determined. Most galaxies in this sample are disk-dominated, with small central bulges. From ground-based spectroscopy, the measured redshifts for these galaxies are z=0.026---0.554. The light-profiles, color gradients and spectra of these galaxies are discussed as a function of galaxy type and cosmic time. This work was supported by NASA/HST grants GO-2684-0*-94A from STScI, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  19. The Radial Distribution of Star Formation in Galaxies at z1 From The 3D-HST Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Erica June; Dokkum, Pieter G. Van; Momcheva, Ivelina; Brammer, Gabriel; Lundgren, Britt; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Tease, Katherine Whitaker; Cunha, Elisabete Da; Schreiber, Natascha Forster; Franx, Marijn; hide

    2013-01-01

    The assembly of galaxies can be described by the distribution of their star formation as a function of cosmic time.Thanks to the WFC3 grism on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) it is now possible to measure this beyond thelocal Universe. Here we present the spatial distribution of H emission for a sample of 54 strongly star-forming-galaxies at z1 in the 3D-HST Treasury survey. By stacking the Halpha emission, we find that star formation occurredin approximately exponential distributions at z1, with a median Sersic index of n=1.0 plus or minus 0.2. The stacks areelongated with median axis ratios of b/a 0.58 plus or minus 0.09 in Halpha consistent with (possibly thick) disks at randomorientation angles. Keck spectra obtained for a subset of eight of the galaxies show clear evidence for rotation, withinclination corrected velocities of 90-330 km per second. The most straightforward interpretation of our results is that starformation in strongly star-forming galaxies at z1 generally occurred in disks. The disks appear to be scaled-upversions of nearby spiral galaxies: they have EW(Halpha)100 Angstroms out to the solar orbit and they have star formation surface densities above the threshold for driving galactic scale winds.

  20. THE RADIAL DISTRIBUTION OF STAR FORMATION IN GALAXIES AT z {approx} 1 FROM THE 3D-HST SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Erica June; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Momcheva, Ivelina; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Leja, Joel [Astronomy Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Brammer, Gabriel [European Southern Observatory, Alonson de Cordova 3107, Casilla 19001, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Lundgren, Britt [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Whitaker, Katherine E. [Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Da Cunha, Elisabete; Rix, Hans-Walter; Van der Wel, Arjen [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy (MPIA), Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Foerster Schreiber, Natascha; Wuyts, Stijn [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Labbe, Ivo; Patel, Shannon [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Leiden (Netherlands); Kriek, Mariska [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Schmidt, Kasper B. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2013-01-20

    The assembly of galaxies can be described by the distribution of their star formation as a function of cosmic time. Thanks to the WFC3 grism on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) it is now possible to measure this beyond the local Universe. Here we present the spatial distribution of H{alpha} emission for a sample of 54 strongly star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 1 in the 3D-HST Treasury survey. By stacking the H{alpha} emission, we find that star formation occurred in approximately exponential distributions at z {approx} 1, with a median Sersic index of n = 1.0 {+-} 0.2. The stacks are elongated with median axis ratios of b/a = 0.58 {+-} 0.09 in H{alpha} consistent with (possibly thick) disks at random orientation angles. Keck spectra obtained for a subset of eight of the galaxies show clear evidence for rotation, with inclination corrected velocities of 90-330 km s{sup -1}. The most straightforward interpretation of our results is that star formation in strongly star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 1 generally occurred in disks. The disks appear to be 'scaled-up' versions of nearby spiral galaxies: they have EW(H{alpha}) {approx} 100 A out to the solar orbit and they have star formation surface densities above the threshold for driving galactic scale winds.

  1. The Radial Distribution of Star Formation in Galaxies at Z approximately 1 from the 3D-HST Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Erica June; vanDokkum, Pieter G.; Momcheva, Ivelina; Brammer, Gabriel; Lundgren, Britt; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; DaCunha, Elisabete; Schreiber, Natascha Foerster; Franx, Marijn; hide

    2013-01-01

    The assembly of galaxies can be described by the distribution of their star formation as a function of cosmic time. Thanks to the WFC3 grism on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) it is now possible to measure this beyond the local Universe. Here we present the spatial distribution of H emission for a sample of 54 strongly star-forming galaxies at z 1 in the 3D-HST Treasury survey. By stacking the H emission, we find that star formation occurred in approximately exponential distributions at z approximately 1, with a median Sersic index of n = 1.0 +/- 0.2. The stacks are elongated with median axis ratios of b/a = 0.58 +/- 0.09 in H consistent with (possibly thick) disks at random orientation angles. Keck spectra obtained for a subset of eight of the galaxies show clear evidence for rotation, with inclination corrected velocities of 90.330 km s(exp 1-). The most straightforward interpretation of our results is that star formation in strongly star-forming galaxies at z approximately 1 generally occurred in disks. The disks appear to be scaled-up versions of nearby spiral galaxies: they have EW(H alpha) at approximately 100 A out to the solar orbit and they have star formation surface densities above the threshold for driving galactic scale winds.

  2. An ALMA Survey of Submillimeter Galaxies in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South: Spectroscopic Redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, A. L. R.; Swinbank, A. M.; Smail, Ian; Simpson, J. M.; Casey, C. M.; Chapman, S. C.; da Cunha, E.; Hodge, J. A.; Walter, F.; Wardlow, J. L.; Alexander, D. M.; Brandt, W. N.; de Breuck, C.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dickinson, M.; Edge, A. C.; Gawiser, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Karim, A.; Kovacs, A.; Lutz, D.; Menten, K.; Schinnerer, E.; Weiß, A.; van der Werf, P.

    2017-05-01

    We present spectroscopic redshifts of {\\text{}}{S}870μ {{m}} ≳ 2 mJy submillimeter galaxies (SMGs), which have been identified from the ALMA follow-up observations of 870 μm detected sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (the ALMA-LESS survey). We derive spectroscopic redshifts for 52 SMGs, with a median of z = 2.4 ± 0.1. However, the distribution features a high-redshift tail, with ˜23% of the SMGs at z≥slant 3. Spectral diagnostics suggest that the SMGs are young starbursts, and the velocity offsets between the nebular emission and UV ISM absorption lines suggest that many are driving winds, with velocity offsets of up to 2000 km s-1. Using the spectroscopic redshifts and the extensive UV-to-radio photometry in this field, we produce optimized spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using Magphys, and use the SEDs to infer a median stellar mass of {M}\\star = (6 ± 1)× 1010 M {}⊙ for our SMGs with spectroscopic redshift. By combining these stellar masses with the star formation rates (measured from the far-infrared SEDs), we show that SMGs (on average) lie a factor of ˜5 above the so-called “main sequence” at z˜ 2. We provide this library of 52 template fits with robust and uniquely well-sampled SEDs as a resource for future studies of SMGs, and also release the spectroscopic catalog of ˜2000 (mostly infrared-selected) galaxies targeted as part of the spectroscopic campaign.

  3. The Richness Dependence of Galaxy Cluster Correlations: Results From A Redshift Survey Of Rich APM Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, R. A. C.; Dalton, G. B.; Efstathiou, G.; Sutherland, W. J.; Maddox, S. J.

    1997-01-01

    We analyze the spatial clustering properties of a new catalog of very rich galaxy clusters selected from the APM Galaxy Survey. These clusters are of comparable richness and space density to Abell Richness Class greater than or equal to 1 clusters, but selected using an objective algorithm from a catalog demonstrably free of artificial inhomogeneities. Evaluation of the two-point correlation function xi(sub cc)(r) for the full sample and for richer subsamples reveals that the correlation amplitude is consistent with that measured for lower richness APM clusters and X-ray selected clusters. We apply a maximum likelihood estimator to find the best fitting slope and amplitude of a power law fit to x(sub cc)(r), and to estimate the correlation length r(sub 0) (the value of r at which xi(sub cc)(r) is equal to unity). For clusters with a mean space density of 1.6 x 10(exp -6) h(exp 3) MpC(exp -3) (equivalent to the space density of Abell Richness greater than or equal to 2 clusters), we find r(sub 0) = 21.3(+11.1/-9.3) h(exp -1) Mpc (95% confidence limits). This is consistent with the weak richness dependence of xi(sub cc)(r) expected in Gaussian models of structure formation. In particular, the amplitude of xi(sub cc)(r) at all richnesses matches that of xi(sub cc)(r) for clusters selected in N-Body simulations of a low density Cold Dark Matter model.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: FourStar galaxy evolution survey (ZFOURGE) (Straatman+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straatman, C. M. S.; Spitler, L. R.; Quadri, R. F.; Labbe, I.; Glazebrook, K.; Persson, S. E.; Papovich, C.; Tran, K.-V.; Brammer, G. B.; Cowley, M.; Tomczak, A.; Nanayakkara, T.; Alcorn, L.; Allen, R.; Broussard, A.; van Dokkum, P.; Forrest, B.; van Houdt, J.; Kacprzak, G. G.; Kawinwanichakij, L.; Kelson, D. D.; Lee, J.; McCarthy, P. J.; Mehrtens, N.; Monson, A.; Murphy, D.; Rees, G.; Tilvi, V.; Whitaker, K. E.

    2017-03-01

    We present the FourStar galaxy evolution survey (ZFOURGE) photometric catalogs comprising >70000 galaxies, selected from ultradeep Ks-band detection images (25.5-26.5 AB mag, 5σ, total). We use 5 near-IR medium-bandwidth filters (J1, J2, J3, Hs, Hl) as well as broad-band Ks at 1.05-2.16 micron to 25-26 AB at a seeing of ~0.5 arcsec. Each field has ancillary imaging in 26-40 filters at 0.3-8 micron. We derive photometric redshifts, rest-frame U-V and V-J colors, and stellar population properties from SED fitting. The photometric redshifts have uncertainty σz=0.010, 0.009, and 0.011 in CDFS, COSMOS and UDS, respectively, if compared with spectroscopic redshifts. A pair test indicates σz,pairs=0.01-0.02 at 1PACS data. FourStar data are gathered with the 6.5m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas observatory, Chile, during a total of 45 nights from December 2010 until November 2012. The FourStar instrument has 6 custom-made near_IR filters: J1, 1.0540 um, medium-bandwidth J2, 1.1448 um, medium-bandwidth J3, 1.2802 um, medium-bandwidth Hs, 1.5544 um, medium-bandwidth Hl, 1.7020 um, medium-bandwidth Ks, 2.1538 um, broad-bandwidth Observing conditions were excellent with a seeing of 0.4 to 0.5" for most individual frames. We paid special attention to the Ks-band, which resulted in a median 0.4 arcsecond seeing. (37 data files).

  5. Aerial remote sensing survey of Fusarium wilt of cotton in New Mexico and Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium wilt of cotton, caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum (FOV), is a widespread cotton disease, but the more virulent FOV race 4 (FOV4) has recently been identified in the New Mexico-Texas border area near El Paso, Texas. A preliminary aerial remote sensing survey was cond...

  6. Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Longair, Malcolm S

    2008-01-01

    This second edition of Galaxy Formation is an up-to-date text on astrophysical cosmology, expounding the structure of the classical cosmological models from a contemporary viewpoint. This forms the background to a detailed study of the origin of structure and galaxies in the Universe. The derivations of many of the most important results are derived by simple physical arguments which illuminate the results of more advanced treatments. A very wide range of observational data is brought to bear upon these problems, including the most recent results from WMAP, the Hubble Space Telescope, galaxy surveys like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey, studies of Type 1a supernovae, and many other observations.

  7. The Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs: A Multi-Wavelength Perspective on Low-Mass Galaxy Evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cannon, John M.; McNichols, Andrew; Teich, Yaron; Adams, Elizabeth A.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; McQuinn, Kristen B.; Salzer, John Joseph; Skillman, Evan D.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Elson, Edward C.; Haurberg, Nathalie C.; Huang, Shan; Janowiecki, Steven; Jozsa, Gyula; Leisman, Luke; Ott, Juergen; Papastergis, Emmanouil; Rhode, Katherine L.; Saintonge, Amelie; Van Sistine, Angela; Warren, Steven R.

    2017-01-01

    The “Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs” (SHIELD) is a multiwavelength study of local volume low-mass galaxies drawn from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) catalog. HST/Spitzer joint program GO-12658 revealed the stellar populations of the first 12 SHIELD galaxies (Cannon et al. 2011),

  8. Growing Galaxies Gently

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    helium as "heavy elements". [2] By carefully splitting up the faint light coming from a galaxy into its component colours using powerful telescopes and spectrographs, astronomers can identify the fingerprints of different chemicals in remote galaxies, and measure the amounts of heavy elements present. With the SINFONI instrument on the VLT astronomers can go one better and get a separate spectrum for each part of an object. This allows them to make a map that shows the quantity of heavy elements present in different parts of a galaxy and also determine where in the galaxy star formation is occurring most vigorously. More information This research was presented in a paper, Gas accretion in distant galaxies as the origin of chemical abundance gradients, by Cresci et al., to appear in Nature on 14 October 2010. The team is composed of G. Cresci (Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Italy), F. Mannucci (Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Italy), R. Maiolino (INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Italy), A. Marconi (Universitá di Firenze, Italy), A. Gnerucci (Universitá di Firenze, Italy) and L. Magrini (Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Italy). ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 14 countries: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. At Paranal, ESO operates the Very Large Telescope, the world's most advanced visible

  9. The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: the amplitudes of fluctuations in the 2dFGRS and the CMB, and implications for galaxy biasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahav, Ofer; Bridle, Sarah L.; Percival, Will J.; Peacock, John A.; Efstathiou, George; Baugh, Carlton M.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bridges, Terry; Cannon, Russell; Cole, Shaun; Colless, Matthew; Collins, Chris; Couch, Warrick; Dalton, Gavin; de Propris, Roberto; Driver, Simon P.; Ellis, Richard S.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Glazebrook, Karl; Jackson, Carole; Lewis, Ian; Lumsden, Stuart; Maddox, Steve; Madgwick, Darren S.; Moody, Stephen; Norberg, Peder; Peterson, Bruce A.; Sutherland, Will; Taylor, Keith

    2002-07-01

    We compare the amplitudes of fluctuations probed by the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) and by the latest measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. By combining the 2dFGRS and CMB data, we find the linear-theory rms mass fluctuations in 8 h-1Mpc spheres to be σ8m=0.73+/-0.05 (after marginalization over the matter density parameter Ωm and three other free parameters). This normalization is lower than the COBE normalization and previous estimates from cluster abundance, but it is in agreement with some revised cluster abundance determinations. We also estimate the scale-independent bias parameter of present-epoch Ls=1.9L* APM-selected galaxies to be b(Ls,z=0)=1.10+/-0.08 on comoving scales of 0.02marginalizing over other free parameters and fixing the spectral index n=1 and the optical depth due to reionization τ=0. We also study the best-fitting pair (Ωm, b), and the robustness of the results to varying n and τ. Various modelling corrections can each change the resulting b by 5-15 per cent. The results are compared with other independent measurements from the 2dFGRS itself, and from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), cluster abundance and cosmic shear.

  10. SDSS-IV MaNGA IFS Galaxy Survey—Survey Design, Execution, and Initial Data Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Renbin; Bundy, Kevin; Law, David R.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Andrews, Brett; Cherinka, Brian; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Drory, Niv; MacDonald, Nicholas; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David A.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Westfall, Kyle B.; Zhang, Kai; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Belfiore, Francesco; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Brownstein, Joel; Cappellari, Michele; D'Souza, Richard; Emsellem, Eric; Fu, Hai; Gaulme, Patrick; Graham, Mark T.; Goddard, Daniel; Gunn, James E.; Harding, Paul; Jones, Amy; Kinemuchi, Karen; Li, Cheng; Li, Hongyu; Maiolino, Roberto; Mao, Shude; Maraston, Claudia; Masters, Karen; Merrifield, Michael R.; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K.; Sanchez, Sebastian F.; Schlegel, David; Simmons, Audrey; Thanjavur, Karun; Tinker, Jeremy; Tremonti, Christy; van den Bosch, Remco; Zheng, Zheng

    2016-12-01

    The MaNGA Survey (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory) is one of three core programs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV. It is obtaining integral field spectroscopy for 10,000 nearby galaxies at a spectral resolution of R ˜ 2000 from 3622 to 10354 Å. The design of the survey is driven by a set of science requirements on the precision of estimates of the following properties: star formation rate surface density, gas metallicity, stellar population age, metallicity, and abundance ratio, and their gradients; stellar and gas kinematics; and enclosed gravitational mass as a function of radius. We describe how these science requirements set the depth of the observations and dictate sample selection. The majority of targeted galaxies are selected to ensure uniform spatial coverage in units of effective radius (R e ) while maximizing spatial resolution. About two-thirds of the sample is covered out to 1.5R e (Primary sample), and one-third of the sample is covered to 2.5R e (Secondary sample). We describe the survey execution with details that would be useful in the design of similar future surveys. We also present statistics on the achieved data quality, specifically the point-spread function, sampling uniformity, spectral resolution, sky subtraction, and flux calibration. For our Primary sample, the median r-band signal-to-noise ratio is ˜70 per 1.4 Å pixel for spectra stacked between 1R e and 1.5R e . Measurements of various galaxy properties from the first-year data show that we are meeting or exceeding the defined requirements for the majority of our science goals.

  11. SDSS-IV MaNGA IFS GALAXY SURVEY—SURVEY DESIGN, EXECUTION, AND INITIAL DATA QUALITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Renbin; Zhang, Kai [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, 505 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40506-0057 (United States); Bundy, Kevin [Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Law, David R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bershady, Matthew A.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Winsconsin-Madison, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706-1582 (United States); Andrews, Brett [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Pittsburgh Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology Center (PITT PACC), University of Pittsburgh, 3941 OHara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Cherinka, Brian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg Center, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Drory, Niv [McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); MacDonald, Nicholas; Sánchez-Gallego, José R. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Thomas, Daniel; Westfall, Kyle B. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth (United Kingdom); Wake, David A. [Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Weijmans, Anne-Marie [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Belfiore, Francesco, E-mail: yanrenbin@uky.edu [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 19 J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); and others

    2016-12-01

    The MaNGA Survey (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory) is one of three core programs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV. It is obtaining integral field spectroscopy for 10,000 nearby galaxies at a spectral resolution of R  ∼ 2000 from 3622 to 10354 Å. The design of the survey is driven by a set of science requirements on the precision of estimates of the following properties: star formation rate surface density, gas metallicity, stellar population age, metallicity, and abundance ratio, and their gradients; stellar and gas kinematics; and enclosed gravitational mass as a function of radius. We describe how these science requirements set the depth of the observations and dictate sample selection. The majority of targeted galaxies are selected to ensure uniform spatial coverage in units of effective radius (R{sub e}) while maximizing spatial resolution. About two-thirds of the sample is covered out to 1.5 R{sub e} (Primary sample), and one-third of the sample is covered to 2.5 R{sub e} (Secondary sample). We describe the survey execution with details that would be useful in the design of similar future surveys. We also present statistics on the achieved data quality, specifically the point-spread function, sampling uniformity, spectral resolution, sky subtraction, and flux calibration. For our Primary sample, the median r -band signal-to-noise ratio is ∼70 per 1.4 Å pixel for spectra stacked between 1 R{sub e} and 1.5 R{sub e}. Measurements of various galaxy properties from the first-year data show that we are meeting or exceeding the defined requirements for the majority of our science goals.

  12. Structural Parameters of Faint Galaxies from Prerefurbishment Hubble Space Telescope Medium Deep Survey Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casertano, S.; Ratnatunga, K. U.; Griffiths, R. E.; Im, M.; Neuschaefer, L. W.; Ostrander, E. J.; Windhorst, R. A.

    1995-11-01

    We present a statistical study of the properties of faint galaxies from a large catalog of about 13,500 objects found in 112 random fields observed with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera before refurbishment. The majority of the objects are faint galaxies with 18 20 mag. Typical half-light radii of faint galaxies are somewhat smaller than spirals. Half-light radius is not correlated with (V - I) color for I ≲ 21 mag; at fainter magnitudes, a weak correlation in the sense of larger galaxies being redder is marginally detected.

  13. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies: Keystones of galaxy evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, John S., III; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1994-01-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are the most insignificant extragalactic stellar systems in terms of their visibility, but potentially very significant in terms of their role in the formation and evolution of much more luminous galaxies. We discuss the present observational data and their implications for theories of the formation and evolution of both dwarf and giant galaxies. The putative dark-matter content of these low-surface-brightness systems is of particular interest, as is their chemical evolution. Surveys for new dwarf spheroidals hidden behind the stars of our Galaxy and those which are not bound to giant galaxies may give new clues as to the origins of this unique class of galaxy.

  14. THE HST/ACS COMA CLUSTER SURVEY. VIII. BARRED DISK GALAXIES IN THE CORE OF THE COMA CLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinova, Irina; Jogee, Shardha; Weinzirl, Tim [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States); Erwin, Peter [Max-Planck-Insitut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Trentham, Neil [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Hammer, Derek [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Den Brok, Mark; Peletier, Reynier F.; Kleijn, Gijs V. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Graham, Alister W. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn (Australia); Carter, David; Mouhcine, Mustapha [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Birkenhead (United Kingdom); Balcells, Marc [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Guzman, Rafael; Hoyos, Carlos [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Mobasher, Bahram [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Peng, Eric W., E-mail: marinova@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: sj@astro.as.utexas.edu [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2012-02-20

    We use high-resolution ({approx}0.''1) F814W Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) images from the Hubble Space Telescope ACS Treasury survey of the Coma cluster at z {approx} 0.02 to study bars in massive disk galaxies (S0s), as well as low-mass dwarf galaxies in the core of the Coma cluster, the densest environment in the nearby universe. Our study helps to constrain the evolution of bars and disks in dense environments and provides a comparison point for studies in lower density environments and at higher redshifts. Our results are: (1) we characterize the fraction and properties of bars in a sample of 32 bright (M{sub V} {approx}< -18, M{sub *} > 10{sup 9.5} M{sub Sun }) S0 galaxies, which dominate the population of massive disk galaxies in the Coma core. We find that the measurement of a bar fraction among S0 galaxies must be handled with special care due to the difficulty in separating unbarred S0s from ellipticals, and the potential dilution of the bar signature by light from a relatively large, bright bulge. The results depend sensitively on the method used: the bar fraction for bright S0s in the Coma core is 50% {+-} 11%, 65% {+-} 11%, and 60% {+-} 11% based on three methods of bar detection, namely, strict ellipse fit criteria, relaxed ellipse fit criteria, and visual classification. (2) We compare the S0 bar fraction across different environments (the Coma core, A901/902, and Virgo) adopting the critical step of using matched samples and matched methods in order to ensure robust comparisons. We find that the bar fraction among bright S0 galaxies does not show a statistically significant variation (within the error bars of {+-}11%) across environments which span two orders of magnitude in galaxy number density (n {approx} 300-10,000 galaxies Mpc{sup -3}) and include rich and poor clusters, such as the core of Coma, the A901/902 cluster, and Virgo. We speculate that the bar fraction among S0s is not significantly enhanced in rich clusters compared to

  15. ALFAZOA Deep HI Survey to Identify Galaxies in the ZOA 37° ≦ l ≦ 43° and -2.5° ≦ b ≦ 3°

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palencia, Kelby; Robert Minchin, Monica Sanchez, Patricia Henning , Rhys Taylor

    2018-01-01

    The area where the galaxy lies, as viewed from the solar system, is called the Zone of Avoidance (ZOA). Due to extinction and confusion in the ZOA sources behind it appear to be blocked. This project is working with data from the Arecibo ALFAZOA Deep survey to identify galaxies in the ZOA amid 37° ≦ l ≦ 43° and -2.5° ≦ b ≦ 3° . The ALFAZOA Deep surveyed a part of the inner galaxy for the first time in the ZOA. The ALFAZOA Deep survey is a more sensitive survey than the previous survey the ALFAZOA Shallow. FRELLED and Miriad were used to identify and analyze the data in this region. With the data 57 sources where identified. Within these 57 sources, 51 were galaxies, which 3 were previously discovered galaxies; leaving 48 as new galaxies. The other 6 remaining sources from the 57, were follow-up sources. Two groups of galaxies were also identified, one lies around 1,500-3,200 km/s and the other between 10,600-11,700 km/s in redshift. The sources from the group in 10,600-11,700 km/s in redshift also need a follow up as they lie near the spectrum where the receiver signal starts to weaken.

  16. The SCUBA-2 cosmology legacy survey: Ultraluminous star-forming galaxies in a z = 1.6 cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smail, Ian; Swinbank, A. M.; Danielson, A. L. R.; Edge, A. C.; Simpson, J. M. [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Geach, J. E. [Centre for Astrophysics Research, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Tadaki, K. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan); Arumugam, V.; Dunlop, J. S.; Ivison, R. J. [Institute for Astronomy, Royal Observatory, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Hartley, W. [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Almaini, O.; Conselice, C. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG9 2RD (United Kingdom); Bremer, M. N. [H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Chapin, E. [XMM SOC, ESAC, Apartado 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Chapman, S. C. [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, 6310 Coburg Road, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada); Scott, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Simpson, C. J. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool Science Park, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Karim, A. [Argelander-Institute of Astronomy, Bonn University, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53121, Bonn (Germany); Kodama, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); and others

    2014-02-10

    We analyze new SCUBA-2 submillimeter and archival SPIRE far-infrared imaging of a z = 1.62 cluster, Cl 0218.3–0510, which lies in the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey/Ultra-Deep Survey field of the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey. Combining these tracers of obscured star-formation activity with the extensive photometric and spectroscopic information available for this field, we identify 31 far-infrared/submillimeter-detected probable cluster members with bolometric luminosities ≳10{sup 12} L {sub ☉} and show that by virtue of their dust content and activity, these represent some of the reddest and brightest galaxies in this structure. We exploit ALMA submillimeter continuum observations, which cover one of these sources, to confirm the identification of a SCUBA-2-detected ultraluminous star-forming galaxy in this structure. Integrating the total star-formation activity in the central region of the structure, we estimate that it is an order of magnitude higher (in a mass-normalized sense) than clusters at z ∼ 0.5-1. However, we also find that the most active cluster members do not reside in the densest regions of the structure, which instead host a population of passive and massive, red galaxies. We suggest that while the passive and active populations have comparable near-infrared luminosities at z = 1.6, M{sub H} ∼ –23, the subsequent stronger fading of the more active galaxies means that they will evolve into passive systems at the present day that are less luminous than the descendants of those galaxies that were already passive at z ∼ 1.6 (M{sub H} ∼ –20.5 and M{sub H} ∼ –21.5, respectively, at z ∼ 0). We conclude that the massive galaxy population in the dense cores of present-day clusters were already in place at z = 1.6 and that in Cl 0218.3–0510 we are seeing continuing infall of less extreme, but still ultraluminous, star-forming galaxies onto a pre-existing structure.

  17. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). The coevolution of galaxy morphology and colour to z 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krywult, J.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Pollo, A.; Vergani, D.; Bolzonella, M.; Davidzon, I.; Iovino, A.; Gargiulo, A.; Haines, C. P.; Scodeggio, M.; Guzzo, L.; Zamorani, G.; Garilli, B.; Granett, B. R.; de la Torre, S.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; Franzetti, P.; Fritz, A.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; Polletta, M.; Tojeiro, R.; Zanichelli, A.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Branchini, E.; Coupon, J.; De Lucia, G.; Ilbert, O.; McCracken, H. J.; Moscardini, L.; Takeuchi, T. T.

    2017-02-01

    Context. The study of the separation of galaxy types into different classes that share the same characteristics, and of the evolution of the specific parameters used in the classification are fundamental for understanding galaxy evolution. Aims: We explore the evolution of the statistical distribution of galaxy morphological properties and colours combining high-quality imaging data from the CFHT Legacy Survey with the large number of redshifts and extended photometry from the VIPERS survey. Methods: Galaxy structural parameters were combined with absolute magnitudes, colours and redshifts in order to trace evolution in a multi-parameter space. Using a new method we analysed the combination of colours and structural parameters of early- and late-type galaxies in luminosity-redshift space. Results: We find that both the rest-frame colour distributions in the (U-B) vs. (B-V) plane and the Sérsic index distributions are well fitted by a sum of two Gaussians, with a remarkable consistency of red-spheroidal and blue-disky galaxy populations, over the explored redshift (0.5 < z < 1) and luminosity (-1.5 < B-B∗ < 1.0) ranges. The combination of the rest-frame colour and Sérsic index as a function of redshift and luminosity allows us to present the structure of both galaxy types and their evolution. We find that early-type galaxies display only a slow change in their concentrations after z = 1. Their high concentrations were already established at z 1 and depend much more strongly on their luminosity than redshift. In contrast, late-type galaxies clearly become more concentrated with cosmic time with only little evolution in colour, which remains dependent mainly on their luminosity. Conclusions: The combination of rest-frame colours and Sérsic index as a function of redshift and luminosity leads to a precise statistical description of the structure of galaxies and their evolution. Additionally, the proposed method provides a robust way to split galaxies into early

  18. Aerial remote sensing surveys, geophysical characterization. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labson, V.F.; Pellerin, L.; Anderson, W.L.

    1998-06-01

    The application of helicopter electromagnetic (HEM) and magnetic methods to the requirements of the environmental restoration of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) demand the use of advanced, nontraditional methods of data acquisition, processing and interpretation. The cooperative study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and University of California (UCB) has resulted in the planning and supervision of data acquisition, the development of tools for data processing and interpretation, and an intensive application of the methods developed. This final report consists of a series of publications which the USGS collaborated with the ORNL technical staff. These reports represent the full scope of the USGS assistance. Copies of the reports and papers are included in the Appendix. The primary goals of this effort were to quantify the effectiveness of the geophysical methods applied in the survey of the ORR for the identification of buried waste, hydrogeologic pathways by which contamination could migrate through or off the site, and for the more accurate geologic mapping of the ORR. The objectives in buried waste identification are the accurate description of the source of the geophysical anomaly and the determination of the limits of resolution of the geophysical methods to acknowledge what we might have missed. The study of hydrogeologic pathways concentrated on the identification of karst features in the limestone underlying much of the ORR. Work in this study has indicated to the ORNL staff that these karst features can be located from the airborne geophysics. The defining characteristic of this helicopter geophysical study is the collaborative nature of the effort. Each task in which the USGS was involved has included a designated staff member from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  19. DETECTION OF COASTLINE DEFORMATION USING REMOTE SENSING AND GEODETIC SURVEYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sabuncu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The coastal areas are being destroyed due to the usage that effect the natural balance. Unconsciously sand mining from the sea for nearshore nourishment and construction uses are the main ones. Physical interferences for mining of sand cause an ecologic threat to the coastal environment. However, use of marine sand is inevitable because of economic reasons or unobtainable land-based sand resources. The most convenient solution in such a protection–usage dilemma is to reduce negative impacts of sand production from marine. This depends on the accurate determination of criteriaon production place, style, and amount of sand. With this motivation, nearshore geodedic surveying studies performed on Kilyos Campus of Bogazici University located on the Black Sea coast, north of Istanbul, Turkey between 2001-2002. The study area extends 1 km in the longshore. Geodetic survey was carried out in the summer of 2001 to detect the initial condition for the shoreline. Long-term seasonal changes in shoreline positions were determined biannually. The coast was measured with post-processed kinematic GPS. Besides, shoreline change has studied using Landsat imagery between the years 1986-2015. The data set of Landsat 5 imageries were dated 05.08.1986 and 31.08.2007 and Landsat 7 imageries were dated 21.07.2001 and 28.07.2015. Landcover types in the study area were analyzed on the basis of pixel based classification method. Firstly, unsupervised classification based on ISODATA (Iterative Self Organizing Data Analysis Technique has been applied and spectral clusters have been determined that gives prior knowledge about the study area. In the second step, supervised classification was carried out by using the three different approaches which are minimum-distance, parallelepiped and maximum-likelihood. All pixel based classification processes were performed with ENVI 4.8 image processing software. Results of geodetic studies and classification outputs will be

  20. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: RSD measurement from the power spectrum and bispectrum of the DR12 BOSS galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Marín, Héctor; Percival, Will J.; Verde, Licia; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A.; Olmstead, Matthew D.

    2017-02-01

    We measure and analyse the bispectrum of the final data release 12 (DR12), galaxy sample provided by the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, splitting by selection algorithm into LOWZ and CMASS galaxies. The LOWZ sample contains 361 762 galaxies with an effective redshift of zLOWZ = 0.32, and the CMASS sample contains 777 202 galaxies with an effective redshift of zCMASS = 0.57. Combining the power spectrum, measured relative to the line of sight, with the spherically averaged bispectrum, we are able to constrain the product of the growth of structure parameter, f, and the amplitude of dark matter density fluctuations, σ8, along with the geometric Alcock-Paczynski parameters, the product of the Hubble constant and the comoving sound horizon at the baryon drag epoch, H(z)rs(zd), and the angular distance parameter divided by the sound horizon, DA(z)/rs(zd). After combining pre-reconstruction RSD analyses of the power spectrum monopole, quadrupole and bispectrum monopole with post-reconstruction analysis of the BAO power spectrum monopole and quadrupole, we find f(zLOWZ)σ8(zLOWZ) = 0.427 ± 0.056, DA(zLOWZ)/rs(zd) = 6.60 ± 0.13, H(zLOWZ)rs(zd) = (11.55 ± 0.38)103 km s-1 for the LOWZ sample, and f(zCMASS)σ8(zCMASS) = 0.426 ± 0.029, DA(zCMASS)/rs(zd) = 9.39 ± 0.10, H(zCMASS)rs(zd) = (14.02 ± 0.22)103 km s-1 for the CMASS sample. We find general agreement with previous Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey DR11 and DR12 measurements. Combining our data set with Planck15 we perform a null test of General Relativity through the γ-parametrization finding γ =0.733^{+0.068}_{-0.069}, which is ˜2.7σ away from the General Relativity predictions.

  1. Chandra survey of nearby highly inclined disk galaxies - IV. New insights into the working of stellar feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q. Daniel; Li, Jiangtao; Jiang, Xiaochuan; Fang, Taotao

    2016-04-01

    Galaxy evolution is regulated by the interplay between galactic discs and their surrounding medium. We study this interplay by examining how the galactic coronal emission efficiency of stellar feedback depends on the (surface and specific) star formation rates (SFRs) and other parameters for a sample of 52 Chandra-observed nearby highly inclined disc galaxies. We first measure the star-forming galactic disc sizes, as well as the SFRs of these galaxies, using data from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer, and then show that (1) the specific 0.5-2 keV luminosity of the coronal emission correlates with the specific SFR in a sub-linear fashion: on average, LX/LK∝(SFR/M*)Γ with Γ = 0.29 ± 0.12; (2) the efficiency of the emission LX/SFR decreases with increasing surface SFR (ISFR; Γ = -0.44 ± 0.12); and (3) the characteristic temperature of the X-ray-emitting plasma weakly correlates with ISFR (Γ = 0.08 ± 0.04). These results, somewhat surprising and anti-intuitive, suggest that (i) the linear correlation between LX and SFR, as commonly presented, is largely due to the correlation of these two parameters with galaxy mass; (ii) much of the mechanical energy from stellar feedback likely drives global outflows with little X-ray cooling and with a mass-loading efficiency decreasing fast with increasing ISFR (Γ ≲ -0.5); (iii) these outflows heat and inflate the medium around the galactic disks of massive galaxies, reducing its radiative cooling rate, whereas for relatively low-mass galaxies, the energy in the outflows is probably dissipated in regions far away from the galactic discs.

  2. Beyond MACS: A Snapshot Survey of the Most Massive Clusters of Galaxies at z>0.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebeling, Harald

    2017-08-01

    Truly massive galaxy clusters play a pivotal role for a wealth of extragalactic and cosmological research topics, and SNAPshot observations of these systems are ideally suited to identify the most promising cluster targets for further, in-depth study. The power of this approach was demonstrated by ACS/WFC3 SNAPshots of X-ray selected MACS and eMACS clusters at z>0.3 obtained by us in previous Cycles (44 of them in all of F606W, F814W, F110W, and F140W). Based on these data, the CLASH MCT program selected 16 out of 25 of their targets to be MACS clusters. Similarly, all but one of the six most powerful cluster lenses selected for in-depth study by the HST Frontier Fields initiative are MACS detections, and so are 16 of the 29 z>0.3 clusters targeted by the RELICS legacy program.We propose to extend our spectacularly successful SNAPshot survey of the most X-ray luminous distant clusters to a redshift-mass regime that is poorly sampled by any other project. Targeting only extremely massive clusters at z>0.5 from the X-ray selected eMACS sample (median velocity dispersion: 1180 km/s), the proposed program will (a) identify the most powerful gravitational telescopes at yet higher redshift for the next generation of in-depth studies of the distant Universe with HST and JWST, (b) provide constraints on the mass distribution within these extreme systems, (c) help improve our understanding of the physical nature of galaxy-galaxy and galaxy-gas interactions in cluster cores, and (d) unveil Balmer Break Galaxies at z 2 and Lyman-break galaxies at z>6 as F814W dropouts.Acknowledging the broad community interest in our sample we waive our data rights for these observations.

  3. The Pristine survey - I. Mining the Galaxy for the most metal-poor stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkenburg, Else; Martin, Nicolas; Youakim, Kris; Aguado, David S.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Arentsen, Anke; Bernard, Edouard J.; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Caffau, Elisabetta; Carlberg, Raymond G.; Côté, Patrick; Fouesneau, Morgan; François, Patrick; Franke, Oliver; González Hernández, Jonay I.; Gwyn, Stephen D. J.; Hill, Vanessa; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Jablonka, Pascale; Longeard, Nicolas; McConnachie, Alan W.; Navarro, Julio F.; Sánchez-Janssen, Rubén; Tolstoy, Eline; Venn, Kim A.

    2017-11-01

    We present the Pristine survey, a new narrow-band photometric survey focused on the metallicity-sensitive Ca H&K lines and conducted in the Northern hemisphere with the wide-field imager MegaCam on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. This paper reviews our overall survey strategy and discusses the data processing and metallicity calibration. Additionally we review the application of these data to the main aims of the survey, which are to gather a large sample of the most metal-poor stars in the Galaxy, to further characterize the faintest Milky Way satellites, and to map the (metal-poor) substructure in the Galactic halo. The current Pristine footprint comprises over 1000 deg2 in the Galactic halo ranging from b ˜ 30° to ˜78° and covers many known stellar substructures. We demonstrate that, for Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) stellar objects, we can calibrate the photometry at the 0.02-mag level. The comparison with existing spectroscopic metallicities from SDSS/Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE) and Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope shows that, when combined with SDSS broad-band g and I photometry, we can use the CaHK photometry to infer photometric metallicities with an accuracy of ˜0.2 dex from [Fe/H] = -0.5 down to the extremely metal-poor regime ([Fe/H] < -3.0). After the removal of various contaminants, we can efficiently select metal-poor stars and build a very complete sample with high purity. The success rate of uncovering [Fe/H]SEGUE < -3.0 stars among [Fe/H]Pristine < -3.0 selected stars is 24 per cent, and 85 per cent of the remaining candidates are still very metal poor ([Fe/H]<-2.0). We further demonstrate that Pristine is well suited to identify the very rare and pristine Galactic stars with [Fe/H] < -4.0, which can teach us valuable lessons about the early Universe.

  4. Reconstructing the Gamma-Ray Photon Optical Depth of the Universe To Z Approx. 4 from Multiwavelength Galaxy Survey Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgason, Kari; Kashlinsky, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Reconstructing the Gamma-Ray Photon Optical Depth of the Universe To Z Approx. 4fFrom Multiwavelength Galaxy Survey Data We reconstruct the gamma-ray opacity of the universe out to z approx. photons already at z approx. < 0.2 and reaching tau approx 10 at z = 1. Comparing with the currently available Fermi/LAT gamma-ray burst and blazar data shows that there is room for significant emissions originating in the first stars era.

  5. The MOSDEF Survey: The Prevalence and Properties of Galaxy-wide AGN-driven Outflows at z ˜ 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Gene C. K.; Coil, Alison L.; Azadi, Mojegan; Aird, James; Shapley, Alice; Kriek, Mariska; Mobasher, Bahram; Reddy, Naveen; Siana, Brian; Freeman, William R.; Price, Sedona H.; Sanders, Ryan L.; Shivaei, Irene

    2017-11-01

    Using observations from the first 2 yr of the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey, we study 13 active galactic nucleus (AGN) driven outflows detected from a sample of 67 X-ray, IR, and/or optically selected AGNs at z˜ 2. The AGNs have bolometric luminosities of ˜ {10}44{--}{10}46 {erg} {{{s}}}-1, including both quasars and moderate-luminosity AGNs. We detect blueshifted, ionized gas outflows in the Hβ, [O III], Hα, and/or [N II] emission lines of 19% of the AGNs, while only 1.8% of the MOSDEF galaxies have similarly detected outflows. The outflow velocities span ˜300 to 1000 km s-1. Eight of the 13 outflows are spatially extended on similar scales to the host galaxies, with spatial extents of 2.5-11.0 kpc. Outflows are detected uniformly across the star-forming main sequence, showing little trend with the host galaxy star formation rate. Line ratio diagnostics indicate that the outflowing gas is photoionized by the AGNs. We do not find evidence for positive AGN feedback, in either our small MOSDEF sample or a much larger Sloan Digital Sky Survey sample, using the BPT diagram. Given that a galaxy with an AGN is 10 times more likely to have a detected outflow, the outflowing gas is photoionized by the AGNs, and estimates of the mass and energy outflow rates indicate that stellar feedback is insufficient to drive at least some of these outflows; they are very likely to be AGN driven. The outflows have mass-loading factors of the order of unity, suggesting that they help regulate star formation in their host galaxies, though they may be insufficient to fully quench it.

  6. Fossil evidence for spin alignment of Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies in filaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, Bernard J. T.; van de Weijgaert, Marinus; Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    We search for and find fossil evidence that the spin axes of galaxies in cosmic web filaments relative to their host filaments are not randomly distributed. This indicates the fact that the action of large-scale tidal torques affected the alignments of galaxies located in cosmic filaments. To this

  7. Nuclei of nearby disk galaxies .1. A Hubble Space Telescope imaging survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phillips, AC; Illingworth, GD; MacKenty, JW; Franx, M

    We present deconvolved images of the central regions of 20 nearby disk galaxies, obtained with the original Planetary Camera of the Hubble Space Telescope. The galaxies span a range in Hubble type from SO to Sm. We have measured surface brightness profiles, and inverted these to estimate

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SPT-SZ survey galaxy clusters optical spectroscopy (Ruel+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruel, J.; Bazin, G.; Bayliss, M.; Brodwin, M.; Foley, R. J.; Stalder, B.; Aird, K. A.; Armstrong, R.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bocquet, S.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Chapman, S. C.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; de Haan, T.; Desai, S.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dudley, J. P.; Forman, W. R.; George, E. M.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; High, F. W.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hrubes, J. D.; Jones, C.; Joy, M.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Liu, J.; Lueker, M.; Luong-van, D.; Mantz, A.; Marrone, D. P.; McDonald, M.; McMahon, J. J.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L.; Mohr, J. J.; Montroy, T. E.; Murray, S. S.; Natoli, T.; Nurgaliev, D.; Padin, S.; Plagge, T.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shaw, L.; Shirokoff, E.; Song, J.; Suhada, R.; Spieler, H. G.; Stanford, S. A.; Staniszewski, Z.; Starsk, A. A.; Story, K.; Stubbs, C. W.; van Engelen, A.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikhlinin, A.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.; Zenteno, A.

    2017-04-01

    Most of the galaxy clusters for which we report spectroscopic observations were published as SPT cluster detections (and new discoveries) in Vanderlinde et al. (2010ApJ...722.1180V), Williamson et al. (2011ApJ...738..139W), and Reichardt et al. (2013, J/ApJ/763/127); we refer the reader to those publications for details of the SPT observations. The spectroscopic observations presented in this work are the first of our ongoing follow-up program. The data were taken from 2008 to 2012 using the Gemini Multi Object Spectrograph (GMOS; Hook et al. 2004PASP..116..425H) on Gemini South, the Focal Reducer and low dispersion Spectrograph (FORS2; Appenzeller et al. 1998Msngr..94....1A) on VLT Antu, the Inamori Magellan Areal Camera and Spectrograph (IMACS; Dressler et al. 2006SPIE.6269E..0FD) on Magellan Baade, and the Low Dispersion Survey Spectrograph (LDSS339; Allington-Smith et al. 1994PASP..106..983A) on Magellan Clay. (3 data files).

  9. High-Redshift Galaxy Surveys and the Reionization of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwens, Rychard

    Star-forming galaxies in the early universe provide us with perhaps the most natural way of explaining the reionization of the universe. Current observational results are sufficiently comprehensive, as to allow us to approximately calculate how the ionizing radiation from galaxies varies as a function of cosmic time. Important uncertainties in modeling reionization by galaxies revolve around the escape fraction and its luminosity and redshift dependence, a possible truncation of the galaxy luminosity function at the faint end, and an evolution in the production efficiency of Lyman-continuum photons with cosmic time. Despite these uncertainties, plausible choices for these parameters naturally predict a cosmic ionizing emissivity at z ˜ 6 - 10 z ˜ 6-10 whose evolution and overall normalization is in excellent agreement with that derived from current observational constraints. This strongly suggests that galaxies provide the necessary photons to reionize the universe.

  10. Bathymetric evolution of Tasman Glacier terminal lake, New Zealand, as determined by remote surveying techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdie, Heather; Bealing, Paul; Tidey, Emily; Gomez, Christopher; Harrison, Justin

    2016-12-01

    Processes that drive iceberg calving at the margins of freshwater terminating glaciers are still poorly understood. This knowledge-gap is in part due to the challenge of obtaining good in situ data in a highly dynamic and dangerous environment. We are using emerging remote technologies, in the form of a remote controlled jet boat to survey bathymetry, and Structure from Motion (SfM) to characterize terminus morphology, to better understand relationships between lake growth and terminus evolution. Comparison of results between the jet boat mounted dual-frequency Garmin fish-finder with an Odom Echotrac DF3200 MKII with 200/38 kHz dual-frequency transducer, showed that after a sound velocity adjustment, the remote survey obtained depth data within ± 1 m of the higher grade survey equipment. Water depths of up to 240 m were recorded only 100 m away from the terminus, and subaerial cliff height ranged from around 6 to 33 m, with the central region of the terminus more likely to experience buoyancy. Subaqueous ice ramps are ephemeral features, and in 2015 multiple ice ramps extended out into the lake from the terminus by 100-200 m. The consistent location of some of the subaqueous ramps between surveys may indicate that other processes, for example, subglacial hydrology, also influence evolving terminus morphology.

  11. Probe combination in large galaxy surveys: application of Fisher information and Shannon entropy to weak lensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carron, J.; Amara, A.; Lilly, S. J.

    2011-11-01

    This paper aims at developing a better understanding of the structure of the information that is contained in galaxy surveys, so as to find optimal ways to combine observables from such surveys. We first show how Jaynes' Maximum Entropy Principle allows us, in the general case, to express the Fisher information content of data sets in terms of the curvature of the Shannon entropy surface with respect to the relevant observables. This allows us to understand the Fisher information content of a data set, once a physical model is specified, independently of the specific way that the data will be processed, and without any assumptions of Gaussianity. This includes as a special case the standard Fisher matrix prescriptions for Gaussian variables widely used in the cosmological community, for instance for power spectra extraction. As an application of this approach, we evaluate the prospects of a joint analysis of weak lensing tracers up to the second order in the shapes distortions, in the case that the noise in each probe can be effectively treated as model-independent. These include the magnification, and the two ellipticity and four flexion fields. At the two-point level, we show that the only effect of treating these observables in combination is a simple scale-dependent decrease in the noise contaminating the accessible spectrum of the lensing E-mode. We provide simple bounds to its extraction by a combination of such probes as well as its quantitative evaluation when the correlations between the noise variables for any two such probes can be ignored.

  12. Cosmological constraints from Galaxy Clusters in 2500 square-degree SPT-SZ survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haan, T. de; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Allen, S. W.; Applegate, D. E.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Bayliss, M.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Chiu, I.; Cho, H-M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Doucouliagos, A. N.; Foley, R. J.; Forman, W. R.; Garmire, G. P.; George, E. M.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Gupta, N.; Halverson, N. W.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Hoekstra, H.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hou, Z.; Hrubes, J. D.; Huang, N.; Jones, C.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Linden, A. von der; Luong-Van, D.; Mantz, A.; Marrone, D. P.; McDonald, M.; McMahon, J. J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L. M.; Mohr, J. J.; Murray, S. S.; Padin, S.; Pryke, C.; Rapetti, D.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruel, J.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Schrabback, T.; Shirokoff, E.; Song, J.; Spieler, H. G.; Stalder, B.; Stanford, S. A.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Stubbs, C. W.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikhlinin, A.; Williamson, R.; Zenteno, A.

    2016-11-18

    We present cosmological parameter constraints obtained from galaxy clusters identified by their SunyaevZel'dovich effect signature in the 2500 square-degree South Pole Telescope Sunyaev Zel'dovich (SPT-SZ) survey. We consider the 377 cluster candidates identified at z > 0.25 with a detection significance greater than five, corresponding to the 95% purity threshold for the survey. We compute constraints on cosmological models using the measured cluster abundance as a function of mass and redshift. We include additional constraints from multi-wavelength observations, including Chandra X-ray data for 82 clusters and a weak lensing-based prior on the normalization of the mass-observable scaling relations. Assuming a spatially flat Lambda CDM cosmology, we combine the cluster data with a prior on H-0 and find sigma(8)= 0.784. +/- 0.039 and Omega(m) = 0.289. +/- 0.042, with the parameter combination sigma(8) (Omega(m)/0.27)(0.3) = 0.797 +/- 0.031. These results are in good agreement with constraints from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from SPT, WMAP, and Planck, as well as with constraints from other cluster data sets. We also consider several extensions to Lambda CDM, including models in which the equation of state of dark energy w, the species-summed neutrino mass, and/or the effective number of relativistic species (N-eff) are free parameters. When combined with constraints from the Planck CMB, H-0, baryon acoustic oscillation, and SNe, adding the SPT cluster data improves the w constraint by 14%, to w = -1.023 +/- 0.042.

  13. Measurements of Lyman-Alpha Escape From HST Far-UV Spectral SNAP Survey of 33 Starforming Galaxies: Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwine, Keith

    2018-01-01

    This thesis will describe and analyze far-UV spectra from nearby starforming galaxies to investigate how line features like the hydrogen Lyman-alpha (Lyα) line at 1216 Å are related to the local properties of the host galaxy. It has been suggested that Lyα can be used as a proxy for the escape of Lyman continuum (LyC) radiation, the escape of of which from bright regions of galaxies is of particular interest. Most notably, the reionization epoch of neutral atomic hydrogen in the universe over a redshift range from z∼6 to z∼12, was highly dependent on the flux of ionizing LyC photons in the interstellar and intergalactic media. Expanding our understanding of the dynamics of the Lyα escape fraction (fLyα) from the local environment of its emission could be key to determining a total LyC escape fraction (fLyC) across all morphologies of galaxies. The wide range of Lyα emitters and absorbors (occasionally both) of this Cycle 22 SNAP survey observed by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) onboard Hubble Space Telescope (HST) provides a unique look at far-UV spectra in candidate LyC emitters. Lyα profiles are easily observable in short exposures, and line features discernable in the low-resolution G140L mode can inform and guide future observations by COS or other FUV spectroscopy.

  14. The 13th Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the SDSS-IV Survey Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albareti, Franco D.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Almeida, Andres; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott; Andrews, Brett H.; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernández, Maria; Armengaud, Eric; Aubourg, Eric; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Bailey, Stephen; Barbuy, Beatriz; Barger, Kat; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge; Bartosz, Curtis; Basu, Sarbani; Bates, Dominic; Battaglia, Giuseppina; Baumgarten, Falk; Baur, Julien; Bautista, Julian; Beers, Timothy C.; Belfiore, Francesco; Bershady, Matthew; Bertran de Lis, Sara; Bird, Jonathan C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blanton, Michael; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S.; Borissova, J.; Bovy, Jo; Nielsen Brandt, William; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Burtin, Etienne; Busca, Nicolás G.; Orlando Camacho Chavez, Hugo; Cano Díaz, M.; Cappellari, Michele; Carrera, Ricardo; Chen, Yanping; Cherinka, Brian; Cheung, Edmond; Chiappini, Cristina; Chojnowski, Drew; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Chung, Haeun; Cirolini, Rafael Fernando; Clerc, Nicolas; Cohen, Roger E.; Comerford, Julia M.; Comparat, Johan; Correa do Nascimento, Janaina; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Covey, Kevin; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Croft, Rupert; Cunha, Katia; Darling, Jeremy; Davidson, James W., Jr.; Dawson, Kyle; Da Costa, Luiz; Da Silva Ilha, Gabriele; Deconto Machado, Alice; Delubac, Timothée; De Lee, Nathan; De la Macorra, Axel; De la Torre, Sylvain; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Donor, John; Downes, Juan Jose; Drory, Niv; Du, Cheng; Du Mas des Bourboux, Hélion; Dwelly, Tom; Ebelke, Garrett; Eigenbrot, Arthur; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Elsworth, Yvonne P.; Emsellem, Eric; Eracleous, Michael; Escoffier, Stephanie; Evans, Michael L.; Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; Fan, Xiaohui; Favole, Ginevra; Fernandez-Alvar, Emma; Fernandez-Trincado, J. G.; Feuillet, Diane; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Freischlad, Gordon; Frinchaboy, Peter; Fu, Hai; Gao, Yang; Garcia, Rafael A.; Garcia-Dias, R.; Garcia-Hernández, D. A.; Garcia Pérez, Ana E.; Gaulme, Patrick; Ge, Junqiang; Geisler, Douglas; Gillespie, Bruce; Gil Marin, Hector; Girardi, Léo; Goddard, Daniel; Gomez Maqueo Chew, Yilen; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Grabowski, Kathleen; Green, Paul; Grier, Catherine J.; Grier, Thomas; Guo, Hong; Guy, Julien; Hagen, Alex; Hall, Matt; Harding, Paul; Harley, R. E.; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawley, Suzanne; Hayes, Christian R.; Hearty, Fred; Hekker, Saskia; Hernandez Toledo, Hector; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Holtzman, Jon A.; Holzer, Parker H.; Hu, Jian; Huber, Daniel; Hutchinson, Timothy Alan; Hwang, Ho Seong; Ibarra-Medel, Héctor J.; Ivans, Inese I.; Ivory, KeShawn; Jaehnig, Kurt; Jensen, Trey W.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Jones, Amy; Jullo, Eric; Kallinger, T.; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Klaene, Mark; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Lacerna, Ivan; Lane, Richard R.; Lang, Dustin; Laurent, Pierre; Law, David R.; Leauthaud, Alexie; Le Goff, Jean-Marc; Li, Chen; Li, Cheng; Li, Niu; Li, Ran; Liang, Fu-Heng; Liang, Yu; Lima, Marcos; Lin, Lihwai; Lin, Lin; Lin, Yen-Ting; Liu, Chao; Long, Dan; Lucatello, Sara; MacDonald, Nicholas; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Mackereth, J. Ted; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Geimba Maia, Marcio Antonio; Maiolino, Roberto; Majewski, Steven R.; Malanushenko, Olena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Dullius Mallmann, Nícolas; Manchado, Arturo; Maraston, Claudia; Marques-Chaves, Rui; Martinez Valpuesta, Inma; Masters, Karen L.; Mathur, Savita; McGreer, Ian D.; Merloni, Andrea; Merrifield, Michael R.; Meszáros, Szabolcs; Meza, Andres; Miglio, Andrea; Minchev, Ivan; Molaverdikhani, Karan; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Mosser, Benoit; Muna, Demitri; Myers, Adam; Nair, Preethi; Nandra, Kirpal; Ness, Melissa; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; Nitschelm, Christian; O’Connell, Julia; Oravetz, Audrey; Oravetz, Daniel J.; Pace, Zachary; Padilla, Nelson; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John; Paris, Isabelle; Park, Changbom; Peacock, John A.; Peirani, Sebastien; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Penny, Samantha; Percival, Will J.; Percival, Jeffrey W.; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Pisani, Alice; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Price-Jones, Natalie; Raddick, M. Jordan; Rahman, Mubdi; Raichoor, Anand; Barboza Rembold, Sandro; Reyna, A. M.; Rich, James; Richstein, Hannah; Ridl, Jethro; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Riffel, Rogério; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Rodrigues, Thaíse S.; Roe, Natalie; Lopes, A. Roman; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos; Ross, Ashley J.

    2017-12-01

    The fourth generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) began observations in 2014 July. It pursues three core programs: the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment 2 (APOGEE-2), Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA), and the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS). As well as its core program, eBOSS contains two major subprograms: the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS) and the SPectroscopic IDentification of ERosita Sources (SPIDERS). This paper describes the first data release from SDSS-IV, Data Release 13 (DR13). DR13 makes publicly available the first 1390 spatially resolved integral field unit observations of nearby galaxies from MaNGA. It includes new observations from eBOSS, completing the Sloan Extended QUasar, Emission-line galaxy, Luminous red galaxy Survey (SEQUELS), which also targeted variability-selected objects and X-ray-selected objects. DR13 includes new reductions of the SDSS-III BOSS data, improving the spectrophotometric calibration and redshift classification, and new reductions of the SDSS-III APOGEE-1 data, improving stellar parameters for dwarf stars and cooler stars. DR13 provides more robust and precise photometric calibrations. Value-added target catalogs relevant for eBOSS, TDSS, and SPIDERS and an updated red-clump catalog for APOGEE are also available. This paper describes the location and format of the data and provides references to important technical papers. The SDSS web site, http://www.sdss.org, provides links to the data, tutorials, examples of data access, and extensive documentation of the reduction and analysis procedures. DR13 is the first of a scheduled set that will contain new data and analyses from the planned ∼6 yr operations of SDSS-IV.

  15. Overdensities of Y-dropout Galaxies from the Brightest-of-Reionizing Galaxies Survey: A Candidate Protocluster at Redshift z ≈ 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenti, Michele; Bradley, L. D.; Stiavelli, M.; Shull, J. M.; Oesch, P.; Bouwens, R. J.; Muñoz, J. A.; Romano-Diaz, E.; Treu, T.; Shlosman, I.; Carollo, C. M.

    2012-02-01

    Theoretical and numerical modeling of the assembly of dark-matter halos predicts that the most massive and luminous galaxies at high redshift are surrounded by overdensities of fainter companions. We test this prediction with Hubble Space Telescope observations acquired by our Brightest-of-Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG) survey, which identified four very bright z ~ 8 candidates as Y 098-dropout sources in four of the 23 non-contiguous Wide Field Camera 3 fields observed. We extend here the search for Y 098-dropouts to fainter luminosities (M * galaxies with M AB ~ -20), with detections at >=5σ confidence (compared to the 8σ confidence threshold adopted earlier) identifying 17 new candidates. We demonstrate that there is a correlation between number counts of faint and bright Y 098-dropouts at >=99.84% confidence. Field BoRG58, which contains the best bright z ~ 8 candidate (M AB = -21.3), has the most significant overdensity of faint Y 098-dropouts. Four new sources are located within 70'' (corresponding to 3.1 comoving Mpc at z = 8) from the previously known brighter z ~ 8 candidate. The overdensity of Y 098-dropouts in this field has a physical origin to very high confidence (p > 99.975%), independent of completeness and contamination rate of the Y 098-dropout selection. We modeled the overdensity by means of cosmological simulations and estimate that the principal dark-matter halo has mass Mh ≈ (4-7) × 1011 M ⊙ (~5σ density peak) and is surrounded by several Mh ≈ 1011 M ⊙ halos which could host the fainter dropouts. In this scenario, we predict that all halos will eventually merge into a Mh > 2 × 1014 M ⊙ galaxy cluster by z = 0. Follow-up observations with ground- and space-based telescopes are required to secure the z ~ 8 nature of the overdensity, discover new members, and measure their precise redshift. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in

  16. OVERDENSITIES OF Y-DROPOUT GALAXIES FROM THE BRIGHTEST-OF-REIONIZING GALAXIES SURVEY: A CANDIDATE PROTOCLUSTER AT REDSHIFT z Almost-Equal-To 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trenti, Michele; Shull, J. M. [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Science, University of Colorado, Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Bradley, L. D.; Stiavelli, M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Oesch, P.; Bouwens, R. J. [Astronomy and Astrophysics Department, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Munoz, J. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Romano-Diaz, E.; Shlosman, I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0055 (United States); Treu, T. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States); Carollo, C. M., E-mail: trenti@colorado.edu [Institute of Astronomy, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2012-02-10

    Theoretical and numerical modeling of the assembly of dark-matter halos predicts that the most massive and luminous galaxies at high redshift are surrounded by overdensities of fainter companions. We test this prediction with Hubble Space Telescope observations acquired by our Brightest-of-Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG) survey, which identified four very bright z {approx} 8 candidates as Y{sub 098}-dropout sources in four of the 23 non-contiguous Wide Field Camera 3 fields observed. We extend here the search for Y{sub 098}-dropouts to fainter luminosities (M{sub *} galaxies with M{sub AB} {approx} -20), with detections at {>=}5{sigma} confidence (compared to the 8{sigma} confidence threshold adopted earlier) identifying 17 new candidates. We demonstrate that there is a correlation between number counts of faint and bright Y{sub 098}-dropouts at {>=}99.84% confidence. Field BoRG58, which contains the best bright z {approx} 8 candidate (M{sub AB} = -21.3), has the most significant overdensity of faint Y{sub 098}-dropouts. Four new sources are located within 70'' (corresponding to 3.1 comoving Mpc at z = 8) from the previously known brighter z {approx} 8 candidate. The overdensity of Y{sub 098}-dropouts in this field has a physical origin to very high confidence (p > 99.975%), independent of completeness and contamination rate of the Y{sub 098}-dropout selection. We modeled the overdensity by means of cosmological simulations and estimate that the principal dark-matter halo has mass M{sub h} Almost-Equal-To (4-7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} ({approx}5{sigma} density peak) and is surrounded by several M{sub h} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} halos which could host the fainter dropouts. In this scenario, we predict that all halos will eventually merge into a M{sub h} > 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun} galaxy cluster by z = 0. Follow-up observations with ground- and space-based telescopes are required to secure the z {approx} 8 nature

  17. OVERVIEW OF THE SDSS-IV MaNGA SURVEY: MAPPING NEARBY GALAXIES AT APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bundy, Kevin [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU, WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Bershady, Matthew A.; Wake, David A.; Tremonti, Christy; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Law, David R.; Cherinka, Brian [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H4 (Canada); Yan, Renbin; Sánchez-Gallego, José R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, 505 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40506-0055 (United States); Drory, Niv [McDonald Observatory, Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); MacDonald, Nicholas [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Weijmans, Anne-Marie [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Thomas, Daniel; Masters, Karen; Coccato, Lodovico [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth (United Kingdom); Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Avila-Reese, Vladimir [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-264, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Badenes, Carles [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Pittsburgh Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology Center (PITT PACC), University of Pittsburgh, 3941 OHara St, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Falcón-Barroso, Jésus [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Belfiore, Francesco [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 19 J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-01-01

    We present an overview of a new integral field spectroscopic survey called MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory), one of three core programs in the fourth-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) that began on 2014 July 1. MaNGA will investigate the internal kinematic structure and composition of gas and stars in an unprecedented sample of 10,000 nearby galaxies. We summarize essential characteristics of the instrument and survey design in the context of MaNGA's key science goals and present prototype observations to demonstrate MaNGA's scientific potential. MaNGA employs dithered observations with 17 fiber-bundle integral field units that vary in diameter from 12'' (19 fibers) to 32'' (127 fibers). Two dual-channel spectrographs provide simultaneous wavelength coverage over 3600-10300 Å at R ∼ 2000. With a typical integration time of 3 hr, MaNGA reaches a target r-band signal-to-noise ratio of 4-8 (Å{sup –1} per 2'' fiber) at 23 AB mag arcsec{sup –2}, which is typical for the outskirts of MaNGA galaxies. Targets are selected with M {sub *} ≳ 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} using SDSS-I redshifts and i-band luminosity to achieve uniform radial coverage in terms of the effective radius, an approximately flat distribution in stellar mass, and a sample spanning a wide range of environments. Analysis of our prototype observations demonstrates MaNGA's ability to probe gas ionization, shed light on recent star formation and quenching, enable dynamical modeling, decompose constituent components, and map the composition of stellar populations. MaNGA's spatially resolved spectra will enable an unprecedented study of the astrophysics of nearby galaxies in the coming 6 yr.

  18. Emission-Line Galaxies from the Hubble Space Telescope Probing Evolution and Reionization Spectroscopically (PEARS) Grism Survey. I. The South Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straughn, Amber N.; Pirzkal, Norbert; Meurer, Gerhardt R.; Cohen, Seth H.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Jansen, Rolf A.; Grogin, Norman; Panagia, Nino; di Serego Alighieri, Sperello; Gronwall, Caryl; Walsh, Jeremy; Pasquali, Anna; Xu, Chun

    2009-10-01

    We present results of a search for emission-line galaxies (ELGs) in the southern fields of the Hubble Space Telescope Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically (PEARS) grism survey. The PEARS South Fields consist of five Advanced Camera for Surveys pointings (including the Hubble Ultra Deep Field) with the G800L grism for a total of 120 orbits, revealing thousands of faint object spectra in the GOODS-South region of the sky. ELGs are one subset of objects that are prevalent among the grism spectra. Using a two-dimensional detection and extraction procedure, we find 320 emission lines originating from 226 galaxy "knots" within 192 individual galaxies. Line identification results in 118 new grism-spectroscopic redshifts for galaxies in the GOODS-South Field. We measure emission-line fluxes using standard Gaussian fitting techniques. At the resolution of the grism data, the Hβ and [O III] doublet are blended. However, by fitting two Gaussian components to the Hβ and [O III] features, we find that many of the PEARS ELGs have high [O III]/Hβ ratios compared to other galaxy samples of comparable luminosities. The star formation rates of the ELGs are presented, as well as a sample of distinct giant star-forming regions at z ~ 0.1-0.5 across individual galaxies. We find that the radial distances of these H II regions in general reside near the galaxies' optical continuum half-light radii, similar to those of giant H II regions in local galaxies.

  19. Remote-Sensing Survey of the Bayou Labranche Wetlands Restoration Borrow Area, St. Charles Parish, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-01

    Beaumont, Jean Pujeau, Joseph Harasse, Claude Merand, and finally Ferandon (Conrad 1970:19, 20). Above Ferandon are Francois Moyne, Edme Dounon...estate of almost $100,000 to his three children (St. Charles Parish:Original Acts of Judge Claude Dejean, Act 47:21). A few years later Jean Francois...Louisiana. Lafayette. Remote-Sensing Survey of the Bayou Labranche Wetlands Restoration Borrow Area D’Anville, Jean Baptiste Bourguignon 1732 Carte de la

  20. Synchrotron Emission from Dark Matter Annihilation: Predictions for Constraints from Non-detections of Galaxy Clusters with New Radio Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Emma; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Splettstoesser, Megan; Profumo, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    The annihilation of dark matter particles is expected to yield a broad radiation spectrum via the production of Standard Model particles in astrophysical environments. In particular, electrons and positrons from dark matter annihilation produce synchrotron radiation in the presence of magnetic fields. Galaxy clusters are the most massive collapsed structures in the universe, and are known to host ˜μG-scale magnetic fields. They are therefore ideal targets to search for, or to constrain the synchrotron signal from dark matter annihilation. In this work, we use the expected sensitivities of several planned surveys from the next generation of radio telescopes to predict the constraints on dark matter annihilation models which will be achieved in the case of non-detections of diffuse radio emission from galaxy clusters. Specifically, we consider the Tier 1 survey planned for the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) at 120 MHz, the Evolutionary Map of the Universe (EMU) survey planned for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) at 1.4 GHz, and planned surveys for Aperture Tile in Focus (APERTIF) at 1.4 GHz. We find that, for massive clusters and dark matter masses ≲ 100 {GeV}, the predicted limits on the annihilation cross section would rule out vanilla thermal relic models for even the shallow LOFAR Tier 1, ASKAP, and APERTIF surveys.

  1. Use of remote-sensing techniques to survey the physical habitat of large rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edsall, Thomas A.; Behrendt, Thomas E.; Cholwek, Gary; Frey, Jeffery W.; Kennedy, Gregory W.; Smith, Stephen B.; Edsall, Thomas A.; Behrendt, Thomas E.; Cholwek, Gary; Frey, Jeffrey W.; Kennedy, Gregory W.; Smith, Stephen B.

    1997-01-01

    Remote-sensing techniques that can be used to quantitatively characterize the physical habitat in large rivers in the United States where traditional survey approaches typically used in small- and medium-sized streams and rivers would be ineffective or impossible to apply. The state-of-the-art remote-sensing technologies that we discuss here include side-scan sonar, RoxAnn, acoustic Doppler current profiler, remotely operated vehicles and camera systems, global positioning systems, and laser level survey systems. The use of these technologies will permit the collection of information needed to create computer visualizations and hard copy maps and generate quantitative databases that can be used in real-time mode in the field to characterize the physical habitat at a study location of interest and to guide the distribution of sampling effort needed to address other habitat-related study objectives. This report augments habitat sampling and characterization guidance provided by Meador et al. (1993) and is intended for use primarily by U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment program managers and scientists who are documenting water quality in streams and rivers of the United States.

  2. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: cosmological analysis of the DR12 galaxy sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Shadab; Ata, Metin; Bailey, Stephen; Beutler, Florian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blazek, Jonathan A.; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Escoffier, Stephanie; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Hand, Nick; Ho, Shirley; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Maraston, Claudia; McBride, Cameron K.; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Percival, Will J.; Petitjean, Patrick; Prada, Francisco; Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Reid, Beth A.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A.; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Rubiño-Martín, Jose Alberto; Saito, Shun; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Satpathy, Siddharth; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Scóccola, Claudia G.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Sheldon, Erin S.; Simmons, Audrey; Slosar, Anže; Strauss, Michael A.; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Magaña, Mariana Vargas; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Verde, Licia; Wake, David A.; Wang, Yuting; Weinberg, David H.; White, Martin; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael; Yèche, Christophe; Zehavi, Idit; Zhai, Zhongxu; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2017-09-01

    We present cosmological results from the final galaxy clustering data set of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. Our combined galaxy sample comprises 1.2 million massive galaxies over an effective area of 9329 deg2 and volume of 18.7 Gpc3, divided into three partially overlapping redshift slices centred at effective redshifts 0.38, 0.51 and 0.61. We measure the angular diameter distance DM and Hubble parameter H from the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) method, in combination with a cosmic microwave background prior on the sound horizon scale, after applying reconstruction to reduce non-linear effects on the BAO feature. Using the anisotropic clustering of the pre-reconstruction density field, we measure the product DMH from the Alcock-Paczynski (AP) effect and the growth of structure, quantified by fσ8(z), from redshift-space distortions (RSD). We combine individual measurements presented in seven companion papers into a set of consensus values and likelihoods, obtaining constraints that are tighter and more robust than those from any one method; in particular, the AP measurement from sub-BAO scales sharpens constraints from post-reconstruction BAOs by breaking degeneracy between DM and H. Combined with Planck 2016 cosmic microwave background measurements, our distance scale measurements simultaneously imply curvature ΩK = 0.0003 ± 0.0026 and a dark energy equation-of-state parameter w = -1.01 ± 0.06, in strong affirmation of the spatially flat cold dark matter (CDM) model with a cosmological constant (ΛCDM). Our RSD measurements of fσ8, at 6 per cent precision, are similarly consistent with this model. When combined with supernova Ia data, we find H0 = 67.3 ± 1.0 km s-1 Mpc-1 even for our most general dark energy model, in tension with some direct measurements. Adding extra relativistic species as a degree of freedom loosens the constraint only slightly, to H0 = 67.8 ± 1.2 km s-1 Mpc-1. Assuming flat

  3. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: single-probe measurements from DR12 galaxy clustering - towards an accurate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley J.; Zhao, Gong-bo; Wang, Yuting; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Prada, Francisco; Alam, Shadab; Beutler, Florian; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Percival, Will J.; Rossi, Graziano; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Satpathy, Siddharth; Slosar, Anže; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose A.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.

    2017-10-01

    We analyse the broad-range shape of the monopole and quadrupole correlation functions of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 (DR12) CMASS and LOWZ galaxy sample to obtain constraints on the Hubble expansion rate H(z), the angular-diameter distance DA(z), the normalized growth rate f(z)σ8(z) and the physical matter density Ωm h2. We adopt wide and flat priors on all model parameters in order to ensure the results are those of a 'single-probe' galaxy clustering analysis. We also marginalize over three nuisance terms that account for potential observational systematics affecting the measured monopole. However, such Monte Carlo Markov Chain analysis is computationally expensive for advanced theoretical models. We develop a new methodology to speed up the analysis. Using the range 40 h-1 Mpc < s < 180 h-1 Mpc, we obtain {DA(z)rs,fid/rs (Mpc), H(z)rs/rs,fid km s-1 Mpc-1, f(z)σ8(z), Ωm h2} = {956 ± 28, 75.0 ± 4.0, 0.397 ± 0.073, 0.143 ± 0.017} at z = 0.32 and {1421 ± 23, 96.7 ± 2.7, 0.497 ± 0.058, 0.137 ± 0.015} at z = 0.59 where rs is the comoving sound horizon at the drag epoch and rs,fid = 147.66 Mpc for the fiducial cosmology used in this study. Combining our measurements with Planck data, we obtain Ωm = 0.306 ± 0.009, H0 = 67.9 ± 0.7 km s-1 Mpc-1 and σ8 = 0.815 ± 0.009 assuming Λcold dark matter (CDM); Ωk = 0.000 ± 0.003 and w = -1.02 ± 0.08 assuming owCDM. Our results show no tension with the flat ΛCDM cosmological paradigm. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering data set from Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey.

  4. The role of interactions in galaxy evolution: A new perspective from the CALIFA and MaNGA Integral Field Spectroscopic surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; Sanchez, S. F.; Califa Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Interactions and mergers have been playing a paramount role to understand how galaxies evolve. In recent years integral field spectroscopic (IFS) observations have become routinely allowing researchers to conduct large IFS surveys. In this context, these surveys are providing a new observational scenario to probe the properties of galaxies at different stages of the interaction —from close pairs to post-merger galaxies. Even more, these surveys also include homogeneous observations of non-interacting galaxies which in turns allows to distinguish the processes induce by secular evolution from those driven by interactions. In this talk, We review the studies of interacting studies from the CALIFA survey. They consider from the thorough analysis of a single interactive systems (e.g., the Mice, Wild et al. 2014) to the the statistical study of physical properties of a large sample of interacting/merging galaxies such as their internal structure via their stellar and gas line-of-sight kinematic maps (Barrera-Ballesteros et al. 2015a) or the spatial distribution of the star-forming gas in these galaxies (Barrera-Ballesteros et al. 2015b). Then we present some of the on-going studies within the MaNGA survey. Due to its statistical power (sample size ~10000 objects), this survey will allow us to probe the properties of galaxies in a wide range of the interaction-parameter space. This in turn provides a unique view on the key parameters that affect the internal structure and properties of galaxies during the interaction and subsequent merger.

  5. A survey of 286 Virgo cluster galaxies at optical griz and near-IR H band: surface brightness profiles and bulge-disc decompositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Michael; Courteau, Stéphane; Tully, R. Brent; Roediger, Joel

    2011-07-01

    We present and g-, r-, i-, z- and H-band surface brightness profiles and bulge-disc decompositions for a morphologically broad sample of 286 Virgo Cluster Catalogue (VCC) galaxies. The H-band data come from a variety of sources including our survey of 171 VCC galaxies at the University of Hawaii (UH) 2.2-m telescope, Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) and United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT), and another 115 galaxies from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) and GOLDMine archives. The optical data for all 286 VCC galaxies were extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images. The H-band and the SDSS griz data were analysed in a homogeneous manner using our own software, yielding a consistent set of deep, multiband surface brightness profiles for each galaxy. Average surface brightness profiles per morphological bin were created in order to characterize the variety of galaxy light profiles across the Hubble sequence. The 1D bulge-disc decomposition parameters, as well as non-parametric galaxy measures, such as effective radius, effective surface brightness and light concentration, are presented for all 286 VCC galaxies in each of the five optical/near-infrared wavebands. The profile decompositions account for bulge and disc components, spiral arms, nucleus and atmospheric blurring. The Virgo spiral galaxy bulges typically have a Sérsic index n˜ 1, while elliptical galaxies prefer n˜ 2. No galaxy spheroid requires n > 3. The light profiles for 70 per cent of the Virgo elliptical galaxies reveal the presence of both a spheroid and disc component. A more in-depth discussion of the structural parameter trends can be found in McDonald, Courteau & Tully. The data provided here should serve as a base for studies of galaxy structure and stellar populations in the cluster environment. The galaxy light profiles and bulge-disc decomposition results are available at the Centre de Données astronomiques de Strasbourg (CDS; ) and the author's own website ().

  6. Northern dwarf and low surface brightness galaxies. II - The Green Bank neutral hydrogen survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Stephen E.; Thuan, Trinh X.; Mangum, Jeffrey G.; Miller, John

    1992-01-01

    The paper reports neutral hydrogen observations of a large sample of dwarf and other low surface brightness galaxies. A detailed discussion and error analysis of the observations are presented, and spectra are displayed for 329 galaxies detected for the first time, or detected with substantially better signal-to-noise ratios than achieved previously. The positions on the sky of 667 galaxies meeting the present selection criteria north of delta = 38 deg are shown. The distribution of the redshifts of galaxies detected at Green Bank is illustrated. The Green Bank detections tapered off strongly below the median H I flux of 3.7 Jy km/s detected at Arecibo: only 12 percent of the Green Bank sample was detected with smaller fluxes.

  7. The Development, Validation and Use of the Rural and Remote Teaching, Working, Living and Learning Environment Survey (RRTWLLES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Jeffrey; Kennedy, Joy; Young, Janelle

    2015-01-01

    Research in rural and remote schools and communities of Queensland resulted in the development and validation of the Rural and Remote Teaching, Working, Living and Learning Environment Survey (RRTWLLES). Samples of 252 teachers and 191 community members were used to validate the structure of this questionnaire. It was developed within the standard…

  8. Remote Sensing by Satellite for Environmental Education: A Survey and a Proposal for Teaching at Upper Secondary and University Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosler, Ulrich

    Knowledge of the environment has grown to such an extent that information technology (IT) is essential to make sense of the available data. An example of this is remote sensing by satellite. In recent years this field has grown in importance and remote sensing is used for a range of uses including the automatic survey of wheat yields in North…

  9. The RESOLVE Survey Atomic Gas Census and Environmental Influences on Galaxy Gas Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, David V.; Kannappan, Sheila J.; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Florez, Jonathan; Hall, Kirsten R.; Watson, Linda C.; Hoversten, Erik A.; Burchett, Joseph N.; Guynn, David T.; Baker, Ashley D.; Moffett, Amanda J.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Norris, Mark A.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Leroy, Adam K.; Pisano, D. J.; Wei, Lisa H.; Gonzalez, Roberto E.; Calderon, Victor F.

    2016-12-01

    We present the H i mass inventory for the REsolved Spectroscopy Of a Local VolumE (RESOLVE) survey, a volume-limited, multi-wavelength census of >1500 z = 0 galaxies spanning diverse environments and complete in baryonic mass down to dwarfs of ˜109 {M}⊙ . This first 21 cm data release provides robust detections or strong upper limits (1.4M H i dark matter halo mass M h, central/satellite designation, relative mass density of the cosmic web, and distance to the nearest massive group. We find that at fixed M *, satellites have decreasing G/S with increasing M h starting clearly at M h ˜ 1012 {M}⊙ , suggesting the presence of starvation and/or stripping mechanisms associated with halo gas heating in intermediate-mass groups. The analogous relationship for centrals is uncertain because halo abundance matching builds in relationships between central G/S, stellar mass, and halo mass, which depend on the integrated group property used as a proxy for halo mass (stellar or baryonic mass). On larger scales G/S trends are less sensitive to the abundance matching method. At fixed M h ≤ 1012 {M}⊙ , the fraction of gas-poor centrals increases with large-scale structure density. In overdense regions, we identify a rare population of gas-poor centrals in low-mass (M h 1012 {M}⊙ ) halos, suggesting that gas stripping and/or starvation may be induced by interactions with larger halos or the surrounding cosmic web. We find that the detailed relationship between G/S and environment varies when we examine different subvolumes of RESOLVE independently, which we suggest may be a signature of assembly bias.

  10. Snapshot Survey of the Globular Cluster Populations of Isolated Early Type Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Michael

    2017-08-01

    We propose WFC3/UVIS snapshot observations of a sample of 75 isolated early type galaxiesresiding in cosmic voids or extremely low density regions. The primary aim is to usetheir globular cluster populations to reconstruct their evolutionary history, revealingif, how, and why void ellipticals differ from cluster ellipticals. The galaxies span arange of luminosities, providing a varied sample for comparison with the well-documentedglobular cluster populations in denser environments. This proposed WFC3 study of isolatedearly type galaxies breaks new ground by targeting a sample which has thus far receivedlittle attention, and, significantly, this will be the first such study with HST.Characterizing early type galaxies in voids and their GC systems promises to increase ourunderstanding of galaxy formation and evolution of galaxies in general because isolatedobjects are the best approximation to a control sample that we have for understanding theinfluence of environment on formation and evolution. Whether these isolated objects turnout to be identical to or distinct from counterparts in other regions of the Universe,they will supply insight into the formation and evolution of all galaxies. Parallel ACSimaging will help to characterize the near field environments of the sample.

  11. THE GASEOUS ENVIRONMENT OF HIGH-z GALAXIES: PRECISION MEASUREMENTS OF NEUTRAL HYDROGEN IN THE CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM OF z {approx} 2-3 GALAXIES IN THE KECK BARYONIC STRUCTURE SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudie, Gwen C.; Steidel, Charles C.; Trainor, Ryan F. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Rakic, Olivera [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Bogosavljevic, Milan [Astronomical Observatory, Volgina 7, 11060 Belgrade (Serbia); Pettini, Max [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Reddy, Naveen [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Shapley, Alice E. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, 430 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90024 (United States); Erb, Dawn K. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Law, David R., E-mail: gwen@astro.caltech.edu [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto M5S 3H4, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-05-01

    We present results from the Keck Baryonic Structure Survey (KBSS), a unique spectroscopic survey of the distant universe designed to explore the details of the connection between galaxies and intergalactic baryons within the same survey volumes, focusing particularly on scales from {approx}50 kpc to a few Mpc. The KBSS is optimized for the redshift range z {approx} 2-3, combining S/N {approx}100 Keck/HIRES spectra of 15 of the brightest QSOs in the sky at z {approx_equal} 2.5-2.9 with very densely sampled galaxy redshift surveys within a few arcmin of each QSO sightline. In this paper, we present quantitative results on the distribution, column density, kinematics, and absorber line widths of neutral hydrogen (H I) surrounding a subset of 886 KBSS star-forming galaxies with 2.0 {approx}< z {approx}< 2.8 and with projected distances {<=}3 physical Mpc from a QSO sightline. Using Voigt profile decompositions of the full Ly{alpha} forest region of all 15 QSO spectra, we compiled a catalog of {approx}6000 individual absorbers in the redshift range of interest, with 12 {<=} log (N{sub HI}) {<=}21. These are used to measure H I absorption statistics near the redshifts of foreground galaxies as a function of projected galactocentric distance from the QSO sightline and for randomly chosen locations in the intergalactic medium (IGM) within the survey volume. We find that N{sub HI} and the multiplicity of velocity-associated H I components increase rapidly with decreasing galactocentric impact parameter and as the systemic redshift of the galaxy is approached. The strongest H I absorbers within {approx_equal} 100 physical kpc of galaxies have N{sub HI} {approx}3 orders of magnitude higher than those near random locations in the IGM. The circumgalactic zone of most significantly enhanced H I absorption is found within transverse distances of {approx}< 300 kpc and within {+-}300 km s{sup -1} of galaxy systemic redshifts. Taking this region as the defining bounds of the

  12. A complete distribution of redshifts for submillimetre galaxies in the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey UDS field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. J. B.; Hayward, C. C.; Jarvis, M. J.; Simpson, C.

    2017-10-01

    Submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) are some of the most luminous star-forming galaxies in the Universe; however, their properties remain hard to determine due to the difficulty of identifying their optical/near-infrared counterparts. One of the key steps to determining the nature of SMGs is measuring a redshift distribution representative of the whole population. We do this by applying statistical techniques to a sample of 761 850 μm sources from the Submillimetre Common User Bolometer Array 2 Cosmology Legacy Survey observations of the UKIDSS Ultra-Deep Survey (UDS) field. We detect excess galaxies around >98.4 per cent of the 850 μm positions in the deep UDS catalogue, giving us the first 850 μm selected sample to have virtually complete optical/near-infrared redshift information. Under the reasonable assumption that the redshifts of the excess galaxies are representative of the SMGs themselves, we derive a median SMG redshift of z = 2.05 ± 0.03, with 68 per cent of SMGs residing between 1.07 star forming, 8.0 ± 2.1 per cent have passive rest-frame colours and are therefore unlikely to be detected at submillimetre wavelengths even in deep interferometry. We show that brighter SMGs lie at higher redshifts, and use our SMG redshift distribution - along with the assumption of a universal far-infrared Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) - to estimate that SMGs contribute around 30 per cent of the cosmic star formation rate density between 0.5 < z < 5.0.

  13. CONNECTION BETWEEN THE CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM AND THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM OF GALAXIES: RESULTS FROM THE COS-GASS SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Heckman, Timothy [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Tumlinson, Jason; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Thom, Christopher [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Catinella, Barbara [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Schiminovich, David [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Davé, Romeel [University of the Western Cape, Bellville, Cape Town 7535 (South Africa); Kauffmann, Guinevere [Max-Planck Institut für Astrophysik, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Moran, Sean M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Saintonge, Amelie, E-mail: sanch@pha.jhu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Place, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-01

    We present a study exploring the nature and properties of the circumgalactic medium (CGM) and its connection to the atomic gas content in the interstellar medium (ISM) of galaxies as traced by the H i 21 cm line. Our sample includes 45 low-z (0.026–0.049) galaxies from the GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey (Galaxy Evolution Explorer/Arecibo/Sloan Digital Sky Survey). Their CGM was probed via absorption in the spectra of background quasi-stellar objects at impact parameters of 63–231 kpc. The spectra were obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. We detected neutral hydrogen (Lyα absorption lines) in the CGM of 92% of the galaxies. We find that the radial profile of the CGM as traced by the Lyα equivalent width can be fit as an exponential with a scale length of roughly the virial radius of the dark matter halo. We found no correlation between the orientation of the sightline relative to the galaxy’s major axis and the Lyα equivalent width. The velocity spread of the circumgalactic gas is consistent with that seen in the atomic gas in the ISM. We find a strong correlation (99.8% confidence) between the gas fraction (M(H i)/M{sub ⋆}) and the impact-parameter-corrected Lyα equivalent width. This is stronger than the analogous correlation between corrected Lyα equivalent width and specific star formation rate (SFR)/M{sub ⋆} (97.5% confidence). These results imply a physical connection between the H i disk and the CGM, which is on scales an order of magnitude larger. This is consistent with the picture in which the H i disk is nourished by accretion of gas from the CGM.

  14. Unveiling the structure of barred galaxies at 3.6 μm with the Spitzer survey of stellar structure in galaxies (S{sup 4}G). I. Disk breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Taehyun; Lee, Myung Gyoon [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile); Sheth, Kartik [National Radio Astronomy Observatory/NAASC, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Madore, Barry F.; Ho, Luis C. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Elmegreen, Bruce [IBM Research Division, T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Knapen, Johan H.; Cisternas, Mauricio; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Zaritsky, Dennis [University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Comerón, Sébastien; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki [Division of Astronomy, Department of Physical Sciences, University of Oulu, Oulu, FIN-90014 (Finland); Holwerda, Benne [European Space Agency, ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, 2200-AG, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Hinz, Joannah L. [MMTO, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Buta, Ron [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Box 870324, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); and others

    2014-02-20

    We have performed two-dimensional multicomponent decomposition of 144 local barred spiral galaxies using 3.6 μm images from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. Our model fit includes up to four components (bulge, disk, bar, and a point source) and, most importantly, takes into account disk breaks. We find that ignoring the disk break and using a single disk scale length in the model fit for Type II (down-bending) disk galaxies can lead to differences of 40% in the disk scale length, 10% in bulge-to-total luminosity ratio (B/T), and 25% in bar-to-total luminosity ratios. We find that for galaxies with B/T ≥ 0.1, the break radius to bar radius, r {sub br}/R {sub bar}, varies between 1 and 3, but as a function of B/T the ratio remains roughly constant. This suggests that in bulge-dominated galaxies the disk break is likely related to the outer Lindblad resonance of the bar and thus moves outward as the bar grows. For galaxies with small bulges, B/T < 0.1, r {sub br}/R {sub bar} spans a wide range from 1 to 6. This suggests that the mechanism that produces the break in these galaxies may be different from that in galaxies with more massive bulges. Consistent with previous studies, we conclude that disk breaks in galaxies with small bulges may originate from bar resonances that may be also coupled with the spiral arms, or be related to star formation thresholds.

  15. A Zoo of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Karen L.

    2015-03-01

    We live in a universe filled with galaxies with an amazing variety of sizes and shapes. One of the biggest challenges for astronomers working in this field is to understand how all these types relate to each other in the background of an expanding universe. Modern astronomical surveys (like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey) have revolutionised this field of astronomy, by providing vast numbers of galaxies to study. The sheer size of the these databases made traditional visual classification of the types galaxies impossible and in 2007 inspired the Galaxy Zoo project (www.galaxyzoo.org); starting the largest ever scientific collaboration by asking members of the public to help classify galaxies by type and shape. Galaxy Zoo has since shown itself, in a series of now more than 30 scientific papers, to be a fantastic database for the study of galaxy evolution. In this Invited Discourse I spoke a little about the historical background of our understanding of what galaxies are, of galaxy classification, about our modern view of galaxies in the era of large surveys. I finish with showcasing some of the contributions galaxy classifications from the Galaxy Zoo project are making to our understanding of galaxy evolution.

  16. THE GALEX ARECIBO SDSS SURVEY. V. THE RELATION BETWEEN THE H I CONTENT OF GALAXIES AND METAL ENRICHMENT AT THEIR OUTSKIRTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, Sean M.; Heckman, Timothy M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Kauffmann, Guinevere; Catinella, Barbara; Wang Jing; Fabello, Silvia [Max Planck Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Dave, Romeel [Astronomy Department, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Brinchmann, Jarle [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Schiminovich, David; Hummels, Cameron; Lemonias, Jenna [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Saintonge, Amelie; Gracia-Carpio, Javier; Tacconi, Linda [Max Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessesbach-Str., 85748 Garching (Germany); Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha [Department of Astronomy, 610 Space Sciences Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Wu Ronin, E-mail: moran@pha.jhu.edu [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2012-01-20

    We have obtained long-slit spectra of 174 star-forming galaxies with stellar masses greater than 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} from the GALEX Arecibo Sloan Digital Sky Survey (GASS) survey. These galaxies have both H I and H{sub 2} mass measurements. The average metallicity profile is strikingly flat out to R{sub 90}, the radius enclosing 90% of the r-band light. Metallicity profiles which decline steadily with radius are found primarily for galaxies in our sample with low stellar mass (log(M{sub *}) < 10.2), concentration, and/or mean stellar mass density. Beyond {approx}R{sub 90}, however, around 10% of the galaxies in our sample exhibit a sharp downturn in metallicity. Remarkably, we find that the magnitude of the outer metallicity drop is well correlated with the total H I content of the galaxy (measured as f{sub HI} = M{sub HI}/M{sub *}). We examine the radial profiles of stellar population ages and star formation rate densities, and conclude that the galaxies with largest outer metallicity drops are actively growing their stellar disks, with mass-doubling times across the whole disk only one-third as long as a typical GASS galaxy. We also describe a correlation between local stellar mass density and metallicity, which is valid across all galaxies in our sample. We argue that much of the recent stellar mass growth at the edges of these galaxies can be linked to the accretion or radial transport of relatively pristine gas from beyond the galaxies' stellar disks.

  17. Morphology of Seyfert Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yen-Chen; Hwang, Chorng-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    We probed the relation between properties of Seyfert nuclei and morphology of their host galaxies. We selected Seyfert galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey with redshifts less 0.2 identified by the V\\'{e}ron Catalog (13th). We used the "{\\it{FracDev}}" parameter from SDSS galaxy fitting models to represent the bulge fractions of the Seyfert host galaxies. We found that the host galaxies of Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 are dominated by large bulge fractions, and Seyfert 2 galaxies are more li...

  18. ARIEL: Atmospheric Remote Sensing Infrared Exoplanet Large Survey. A proposal for the ESA Cosmic Vision M4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, E.; Micela, G.; Ariel Team

    The Atmospheric Remote sensing Infrared Exoplanet Large survey (ARIEL) is a proposal in response to the call for a Medium-size mission opportunity in ESA’s Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 Science Programme for a launch in 2025 (M4). This mission will be devoted to observe spectroscopically in the IR a large population (hundreds to one thousand) of known planets in our Galaxy, opening a new discovery space in the field of extrasolar planet exploration and enabling a quantum leap in the understanding of the physics and chemistry of these far away worlds. The population of planets will include warm and hot gas‑giants, Neptunes and large terrestrial planets. The main ARIEL goal is the determination of the composition, formation and history of these planetary systems In order to fulfill the scientific goals of ARIEL, we propose the development of a 1‑meter class aperture space telescope, passively cooled to 70‑80K, to observe the combined light of stars and their planets, building on the current experience of transit and combined light observations with Hubble, Spitzer, and ground-based telescopes. While JWST and EELT will initiate a detailed mid- to high-resolution IR spectroscopic observation of a few tens of planets, this mission will extend the study to a much larger (an order of magnitude difference) representative population of extrasolar planets discovered by ESA GAIA, Cheops, PLATO, NASA Kepler II, TESS and from the ground. The statistical perspective provided by this mission, will allow us to address some of the fundamental questions of the Cosmic Vision programme: What are the conditions for planet formation and the emergence of life? ls our Solar System unique, rare or very common? How does the Solar System work?

  19. Pacific Remote Islands MNM: Initial Survey Instructions for Seabird Colony Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the seabird survey is to assess, to the extent possible within the period of time available ashore, the species composition, number of adults, number...

  20. The ACS Virgo Cluster Survey XV. The Formation Efficiencies of Globular Clusters in Early-Type Galaxies: The Effects of Mass and Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Eric W.; Jordan, Andres; Cote, Patrick; Takamiya, Marianne; West, Michael J.; Blakeslee, John P.; Chen, Chin-Wei; Ferrarese, Laura; Mei, Simona; Tonry, John L.; West, Andrew A.

    2008-01-01

    The fraction of stellar mass contained in globular clusters (GCs), also measured by number as the specific frequency, is a fundamental quantity that reflects both a galaxy's early star formation and its entire merging history. We present specific frequencies, luminosities, and mass fractions for the globular cluster systems of 100 early-type galaxies in the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey, the largest homogeneous catalog of its kind. We find that 1) GC mass fractions can be high in both giants and d...

  1. The MASSIVE survey. I. A volume-limited integral-field spectroscopic study of the most massive early-type galaxies within 108 Mpc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Chung-Pei [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Greene, Jenny E.; Murphy, Jeremy D. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); McConnell, Nicholas [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Janish, Ryan [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Blakeslee, John P. [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, NRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Thomas, Jens, E-mail: cpma@berkeley.edu [Max Planck-Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstr. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany)

    2014-11-10

    Massive early-type galaxies represent the modern day remnants of the earliest major star formation episodes in the history of the universe. These galaxies are central to our understanding of the evolution of cosmic structure, stellar populations, and supermassive black holes, but the details of their complex formation histories remain uncertain. To address this situation, we have initiated the MASSIVE Survey, a volume-limited, multi-wavelength, integral-field spectroscopic (IFS) and photometric survey of the structure and dynamics of the ∼100 most massive early-type galaxies within a distance of 108 Mpc. This survey probes a stellar mass range M* ≳ 10{sup 11.5} M {sub ☉} and diverse galaxy environments that have not been systematically studied to date. Our wide-field IFS data cover about two effective radii of individual galaxies, and for a subset of them, we are acquiring additional IFS observations on sub-arcsecond scales with adaptive optics. We are also acquiring deep K-band imaging to trace the extended halos of the galaxies and measure accurate total magnitudes. Dynamical orbit modeling of the combined data will allow us to simultaneously determine the stellar, black hole, and dark matter halo masses. The primary goals of the project are to constrain the black hole scaling relations at high masses, investigate systematically the stellar initial mass function and dark matter distribution in massive galaxies, and probe the late-time assembly of ellipticals through stellar population and kinematical gradients. In this paper, we describe the MASSIVE sample selection, discuss the distinct demographics and structural and environmental properties of the selected galaxies, and provide an overview of our basic observational program, science goals and early survey results.

  2. Hand therapy services for rural and remote residents: Results of a survey of Australian occupational therapists and physiotherapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, Gail A; Williams, Gary; Judd, Jenni; Gray, Marion A

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how interventions were provided to meet the needs of rural/remote residents who have had a traumatic hand injury, including the coordination of services between rural/remote and metro/regional therapists. Barriers to providing services, use of technology and professional support provided to therapists in rural/remote areas were also explored. Cross-sectional survey. Metropolitan/regional and rural/remote public health facilities in Australia. Occupational therapists and physiotherapists who provide hand therapy to rural/remote patients. Quantitative and qualitative questionnaire responses analysed with descriptive statistics and inductive analysis. There were 64 respondents out of a possible 185. Over half of rural/remote respondents provided initial splinting and exercise prescriptions, and over 85% reported that they continued with exercise protocols. Videoconferencing technology for patient intervention and clinical review was used by 39.1% respondents. Barriers to providing services in rural/remote locations included transport, travelling time, limited staff, and lack of expert knowledge in hand injuries or rural/remote health care. Four major themes emerged from the open-ended questions: working relationships, patient-centred care, staff development and education, and rural and remote practice. The use of technology across Australia to support rural/remote patient intervention requires attention to achieve equity and ease of use. Flexible and realistic goals and interventions should be considered when working with rural/remote patients. A shared care approach between metropolitan/regional and rural/remote therapists can improve understanding of rural/remote issues and provide support to therapists. Further research is recommended to determine the suitability of this approach when providing hand therapy to rural/remote residents. © 2015 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  3. Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: The Impact of Galaxy Neighbours on Weak Lensing Cosmology with im3shape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuroff, S.; et al.

    2017-08-04

    We use a suite of simulated images based on Year 1 of the Dark Energy Survey to explore the impact of galaxy neighbours on shape measurement and shear cosmology. The hoopoe image simulations include realistic blending, galaxy positions, and spatial variations in depth and PSF properties. Using the im3shape maximum-likelihood shape measurement code, we identify four mechanisms by which neighbours can have a non-negligible influence on shear estimation. These effects, if ignored, would contribute a net multiplicative bias of $m \\sim 0.03 - 0.09$ in the DES Y1 im3shape catalogue, though the precise impact will be dependent on both the measurement code and the selection cuts applied. This can be reduced to percentage level or less by removing objects with close neighbours, at a cost to the effective number density of galaxies $n_\\mathrm{eff}$ of 30%. We use the cosmological inference pipeline of DES Y1 to explore the cosmological implications of neighbour bias and show that omitting blending from the calibration simulation for DES Y1 would bias the inferred clustering amplitude $S_8\\equiv \\sigma_8 (\\Omega _\\mathrm{m} /0.3)^{0.5}$ by $2 \\sigma$ towards low values. Finally, we use the hoopoe simulations to test the effect of neighbour-induced spatial correlations in the multiplicative bias. We find the impact on the recovered $S_8$ of ignoring such correlations to be subdominant to statistical error at the current level of precision.

  4. Searching for the influence radius of AGN in nearby narrow emission-line galaxies using the CALIFA survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robleto-Orús, A. C.; Torres-Papaqui, J. P.; Coziol, R.; Morales-Vargas, A.; Romero-Cruz, F. J.; Ortega-Minakata, R. A.; Chow-Martinez, M.; Trejo-Alonso, J. J.

    2017-07-01

    In narrow emission-line galaxies, one important problem consists in discriminating gas ionization due to an AGN and gas ionization due to OB stars in active star-forming regions. This problem becomes more acute in case of AGNs classified as transition-type objects (TO), where star formation is relatively intense, and for LINERs, where the AGN is very weak. Thanks to the integral field spectroscopy, we have a new way to attack this problem. By definition, OB stars ionize a definite portion of space, the Strömgren's sphere, which size depends on the total luminosity of the star, its temperature, and the density of the surrounding gas. Therefore one expects gas ionized by OB stars to cover limited areas in a galaxy. On the other hand, due to the huge amount of ionizing photons emitted by an AGN, its "influence radius" is expected do be much more extended, in the order of kpc. Using a sample of galaxies from included in the CALIFA survey DR3, we will test a new way to measure the characteristic "influence radius" of AGN with different intensities.

  5. A Measurement of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae in Galaxy Clusters from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilday, Benjamin; /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U., Dept. Math. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Bender, Ralf; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U. Observ.; Castander, Francisco; /Barcelona, IEEC; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Chicago U. /Fermilab; Galbany, Lluis; /Barcelona, IFAE; Garnavich, Peter; /Notre Dame U.; Goobar, Ariel; /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.; Hopp, Ulrich; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U. Observ. /Tokyo U.

    2010-03-01

    We present measurements of the Type Ia supernova (SN) rate in galaxy clusters based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The cluster SN Ia rate is determined from 9 SN events in a set of 71 C4 clusters at z {le} 0.17 and 27 SN events in 492 maxBCG clusters at 0.1 {le} z {le} 0.3. We find values for the cluster SN Ia rate of (0.37{sub -0.12-0.01}{sup +0.17+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.55{sub -0.11-0.01}{sup +0.13+0.02}) SNur h{sup 2} (SNux = 10{sup -12}L{sub x{circle_dot}}{sup -1} yr{sup -1}) in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively, where the quoted errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. The SN rate for early-type galaxies is found to be (0.31{sub -0.12-0.01}{sup +0.18+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.49{sub -0.11-0.01}{sup +0.15+0.02}) SNur h{sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate for the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG) is found to be (2.04{sub -1.11-0.04}{sup +1.99+0.07}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.36{sub -0.30-0.01}{sup +0.84+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The ratio of the SN Ia rate in cluster early-type galaxies to that of the SN Ia rate in field early-type galaxies is 1.94{sub -0.91-0.015}{sup +1.31+0.043} and 3.02{sub -1.03-0.048}{sup +1.31+0.062}, for C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate in galaxy clusters as a function of redshift, which probes the late time SN Ia delay distribution, shows only weak dependence on redshift. Combining our current measurements with previous measurements, we fit the cluster SN Ia rate data to a linear function of redshift, and find r{sub L} = [(0.49{sub -0.14}{sup +0.15}) + (0.91{sub -0.81}{sup +0.85}) x z] SNuB h{sup 2}. A comparison of the radial distribution of SNe in cluster to field early-type galaxies shows possible evidence for an enhancement of the SN rate in the cores of cluster early-type galaxies. With an observation of at most 3 hostless, intra-cluster SNe Ia, we estimate the fraction of cluster SNe that are

  6. An optimally weighted estimator of the linear power spectrum disentangling the growth of density perturbations across galaxy surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorini, D.

    2017-04-01

    Measuring the clustering of galaxies from surveys allows us to estimate the power spectrum of matter density fluctuations, thus constraining cosmological models. This requires careful modelling of observational effects to avoid misinterpretation of data. In particular, signals coming from different distances encode information from different epochs. This is known as ``light-cone effect'' and is going to have a higher impact as upcoming galaxy surveys probe larger redshift ranges. Generalising the method by Feldman, Kaiser and Peacock (1994) [1], I define a minimum-variance estimator of the linear power spectrum at a fixed time, properly taking into account the light-cone effect. An analytic expression for the estimator is provided, and that is consistent with the findings of previous works in the literature. I test the method within the context of the Halofit model, assuming Planck 2014 cosmological parameters [2]. I show that the estimator presented recovers the fiducial linear power spectrum at present time within 5% accuracy up to k ~ 0.80 h Mpc-1 and within 10% up to k ~ 0.94 h Mpc-1, well into the non-linear regime of the growth of density perturbations. As such, the method could be useful in the analysis of the data from future large-scale surveys, like Euclid.

  7. The SDSS-IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: The Clustering of Luminous Red Galaxies Using Photometric Redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Abhishek; SDSS-IV/eBOSS

    2017-01-01

    SDSS-IV/eBOSS survey will allow a ˜1% measurement of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) scale and a 4.0%Redshift Space Distortion (RSD) measurement using a relatively uniform set of luminous, early-type galaxies in the redshift range 0.6 < z < 1. In this talk, I will present the 3D real space clustering of a sample of ~600,000 LRGs measured by the SDSS/eBOSS, using photometric redshifts. These galaxies have accurate photometric redshifts with an average error of z = 0.028. These LRGs range from redshift z = 0.6 to 1.0 over 10,000 deg2 of the sky, making it the largest volume ever used for galaxy clustering measurements. We measure the angular clusteringpower spectrum in different redshift slices and use well-calibrated redshift distributions to combine these into a high precision 3D real space clustering. i will present an evidence for BAO in the 2-point correlation function. The detection of BAO also allows the measurement of the comoving distance to z = 1.0. Traditionally, spectroscopic redshifts are used to estimate distances to the galaxies and, in turn, to measuregalaxy clustering. However, acquiring spectroscopic redshifts is a time consuming and expensive process even with modern multi-fiber spectrographs. Although photometric redshifts are less accurate, they are signicantly easier to obtain, and for a constant amount of time, one can image both wider areas and deeper volumes than would be possible with spectroscopy, allowing one to probe both larger scales and larger volumes. The ability to make precise clustering measurements with photometric data has been well demonstrated by Padmanabhan et al. (2007).

  8. First Spectroscopic Confirmations of z ∼ 7.0 Ly α Emitting Galaxies in the LAGER Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Weida; Wang, Junxian; Kang, Wenyong; Kong, Xu; Yang, Huan [CAS Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Department of Astronomy, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zheng, Zhen-Ya; Jiang, Chunyan [CAS Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Shanghai 200030 (China); Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James; Gonzalez, Alicia; Tilvi, Vithal [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Infante, Leopoldo [Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Institution for Science, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Walker, Alistair R. [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Jiang, Linhua [The Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Hibon, Pascale [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Casilla 19001, Santiago (Chile); Barrientos, L. Felipe; Galaz, Gaspar [Centro de Astroingeniería, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Finkelstein, Steven [Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Zheng, XianZhong, E-mail: urverda@mail.ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: jxw@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: zhengzy@shao.ac.cn, E-mail: Sangeeta.Malhotra@asu.edu, E-mail: James.Rhoads@asu.edu, E-mail: linfante@carnegiescience.edu [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2017-08-20

    Narrowband imaging is a highly successful approach for finding large numbers of high-redshift Ly α emitting galaxies (LAEs) up to z ∼ 6.6. However, at z ≳ 7 there are as of yet only three narrowband selected LAEs with spectroscopic confirmations (two at z ∼ 6.9–7.0, one at z ∼ 7.3), which hinders extensive studies on cosmic reionization and galaxy evolution at this key epoch. We have selected 23 candidate z ∼ 6.9 LAEs in COSMOS field with the large area narrowband survey Lyman-Alpha Galaxies at the End of Reionization (LAGER). In this work, we present spectroscopic follow-up observations of 12 candidates using the Inamori Magellan Areal Camera and Spectrograph on Magellan. For nine of these, the observations are sufficiently deep to detect the expected lines. Ly α emission lines are identified in six sources (yielding a success rate of 2/3), including three luminous LAEs with Ly α luminosities of L {sub Lyα} ∼ 10{sup 43.5} erg s{sup −1}, the highest among known spectroscopically confirmed galaxies at ≳7.0. This triples the sample size of spectroscopically confirmed narrowband selected LAEs at z ≳ 7, and confirms the bright-end bump in the Ly α luminosity function we previously derived based on the photometric sample, supporting a patchy reionization scenario. Two luminous LAEs appear physically linked with a projected distance of 1.1 pMpc and velocity difference of ∼170 km s{sup −1}. They likely sit in a common ionized bubble produced by themselves or with close neighbors, which reduces the intergalactic medium attenuation of Ly α . A tentative narrow N v λ 1240 line is seen in one source, hinting at activity of a central massive black hole with metal-rich line-emitting gas.

  9. THE COMPARATIVE CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF AN ISOLATED DWARF GALAXY: A VLT AND KECK SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY OF WLM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leaman, Ryan; Venn, Kim A.; Mendel, J. Trevor [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8P 1A1 (Canada); Brooks, Alyson M. [California Institute of Technology, M/C 350-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Battaglia, Giuseppina [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Cole, Andrew A. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS (Australia); Ibata, Rodrigo A. [Observatoire Astronomique, Universite de Strasbourg, CNRS, 11 rue de l' Universite, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Irwin, Mike J. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); McConnachie, Alan W. [National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Starkenburg, Else; Tolstoy, Eline, E-mail: rleaman@iac.es [Kapteyn Institute, University of Groningen, Postbus 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-04-20

    Building on our previous spectroscopic and photometric analysis of the isolated Local Group dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxy WLM, we present a comparison of the metallicities of its red giant branch stars with respect to the well-studied Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) and Magellanic Clouds. We calculate a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] =-1.28 {+-} 0.02 and an intrinsic spread in metallicity of {sigma} = 0.38 {+-} 0.04 dex, similar to the mean and spread observed in the massive dSph Fornax and the Small Magellanic Cloud. Thus, despite WLM's isolated environment, its global metallicity still follows expectations for mass and its global chemical evolution is similar to other nearby luminous dwarf galaxies (gas-rich or gas-poor). The data also show a radial gradient in [Fe/H] of d[Fe/H]/dr{sub c} = -0.04 {+-} 0.04 dex r{sub c}{sup -1}, which is flatter than that seen in the unbiased and spatially extended surveys of dSphs. Comparison of the spatial distribution of [Fe/H] in WLM, the Magellanic Clouds, and a sample of Local Group dSphs shows an apparent dichotomy in the sense that the dIrrs have statistically flatter radial [Fe/H] gradients than the low angular momentum dSphs. The correlation between angular momentum and radial metallicity gradient is further supported when considering the Local Group dEs. This chemodynamic relationship offers a new and useful constraint for environment-driven dwarf galaxy evolution models in the Local Group.

  10. Nurses who work in rural and remote communities in Canada: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Martha L P; Stewart, Norma J; Kulig, Judith C; Anguish, Penny; Andrews, Mary Ellen; Banner, Davina; Garraway, Leana; Hanlon, Neil; Karunanayake, Chandima; Kilpatrick, Kelley; Koren, Irene; Kosteniuk, Julie; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Mix, Nadine; Moffitt, Pertice; Olynick, Janna; Penz, Kelly; Sluggett, Larine; Van Pelt, Linda; Wilson, Erin; Zimmer, Lela

    2017-05-23

    In Canada, as in other parts of the world, there is geographic maldistribution of the nursing workforce, and insufficient attention is paid to the strengths and needs of those providing care in rural and remote settings. In order to inform workforce planning, a national study, Nursing Practice in Rural and Remote Canada II, was conducted with the rural and remote regulated nursing workforce (registered nurses, nurse practitioners, licensed or registered practical nurses, and registered psychiatric nurses) with the intent of informing policy and planning about improving nursing services and access to care. In this article, the study methods are described along with an examination of the characteristics of the rural and remote nursing workforce with a focus on important variations among nurse types and regions. A cross-sectional survey used a mailed questionnaire with persistent follow-up to achieve a stratified systematic sample of 3822 regulated nurses from all provinces and territories, living outside of the commuting zones of large urban centers and in the north of Canada. Rural workforce characteristics reported here suggest the persistence of key characteristics noted in a previous Canada-wide survey of rural registered nurses (2001-2002), namely the aging of the rural nursing workforce, the growth in baccalaureate education for registered nurses, and increasing casualization. Two thirds of the nurses grew up in a community of under 10 000 people. While nurses' levels of satisfaction with their nursing practice and community are generally high, significant variations were noted by nurse type. Nurses reported coming to rural communities to work for reasons of location, interest in the practice setting, and income, and staying for similar reasons. Important variations were noted by nurse type and region. The proportion of the rural nursing workforce in Canada is continuing to decline in relation to the proportion of the Canadian population in rural and remote

  11. Nebular excitation in z ∼ 2 star-forming galaxies from the SINS and LUCI surveys: The influence of shocks and active galactic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Sarah F.; Genzel, Reinhard [Department of Astronomy, Campbell Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Buschkamp, Peter; Förster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Kurk, Jaron; Rosario, David; Davies, Ric; Eisenhauer, Frank; Lutz, Dieter [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Giessenbachstr. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Sternberg, Amiel [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Gnat, Orly [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Mancini, Chiara; Renzini, Alvio [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, C. Marcella [Institute of Astronomy, Department of Physics, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, ETH, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Burkert, Andreas [Universitäts-Sternwarte Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (USM), Scheinerstr. 1, D-81679 München (Germany); Cresci, Giovanni [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica Osservatorio di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Genel, Shy [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Shapiro Griffin, Kristen [Space Sciences Research Group, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (United States); Hicks, Erin K. S., E-mail: sfnewman@berkeley.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, U.W., Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); and others

    2014-01-20

    Based on high-resolution, spatially resolved data of 10 z ∼ 2 star-forming galaxies from the SINS/zC-SINF survey and LUCI data for 12 additional galaxies, we probe the excitation properties of high-z galaxies and the impact of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), shocks, and photoionization. We explore how these spatially resolved line ratios can inform our interpretation of integrated emission line ratios obtained at high redshift. Many of our galaxies fall in the 'composite' region of the z ∼ 0 [N II]/Hα versus [O III]/Hβ diagnostic (BPT) diagram, between star-forming galaxies and those with AGNs. Based on our resolved measurements, we find that some of these galaxies likely host an AGN, while others appear to be affected by the presence of shocks possibly caused by an outflow or from an enhanced ionization parameter as compared with H II regions in normal, local star-forming galaxies. We find that the Mass-Excitation (MEx) diagnostic, which separates purely star-forming and AGN hosting local galaxies in the [O III]/Hβ versus stellar mass plane, does not properly separate z ∼ 2 galaxies classified according to the BPT diagram. However, if we shift the galaxies based on the offset between the local and z ∼ 2 mass-metallicity relation (i.e., to the mass they would have at z ∼ 0 with the same metallicity), we find better agreement between the MEx and BPT diagnostics. Finally, we find that metallicity calibrations based on [N II]/Hα are more biased by shocks and AGNs at high-z than the [O III]/Hβ/[N II]/Hα calibration.

  12. The Evolution of the Stellar Mass Functions of Star-forming and Quiescent Galaxies to z = 4 from the COSMOS/UltraVISTA Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzin, Adam; Marchesini, Danilo; Stefanon, Mauro; Franx, Marijn; McCracken, Henry J.; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Dunlop, James S.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Brammer, Gabriel; Labbé, Ivo; van Dokkum, Pieter G.

    2013-11-01

    We present measurements of the stellar mass functions (SMFs) of star-forming and quiescent galaxies to z = 4 using a sample of 95,675 Ks -selected galaxies in the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field. The SMFs of the combined population are in good agreement with previous measurements and show that the stellar mass density of the universe was only 50%, 10%, and 1% of its current value at z ~ 0.75, 2.0, and 3.5, respectively. The quiescent population drives most of the overall growth, with the stellar mass density of these galaxies increasing as ρstarvprop(1 + z)-4.7 ± 0.4 since z = 3.5, whereas the mass density of star-forming galaxies increases as ρstarvprop(1 + z)-2.3 ± 0.2. At z > 2.5, star-forming galaxies dominate the total SMF at all stellar masses, although a non-zero population of quiescent galaxies persists to z = 4. Comparisons of the Ks -selected star-forming galaxy SMFs with UV-selected SMFs at 2.5 3.5. We estimate the average mass growth of individual galaxies by selecting galaxies at fixed cumulative number density. The average galaxy with log(M star/M ⊙) = 11.5 at z = 0.3 has grown in mass by only 0.2 dex (0.3 dex) since z = 2.0 (3.5), whereas those with log(M star/M ⊙) = 10.5 have grown by >1.0 dex since z = 2. At z budget in the SMFs. Based on data products from observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under ESO programme ID 179.A-2005 and on data products produced by TERAPIX and the Cambridge Astronomy Survey Unit on behalf of the UltraVISTA consortium.

  13. Optical spectroscopy and velocity dispersions of galaxy clusters from the SPT-SZ survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruel, J.; Bayliss, M. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, 17 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bazin, G.; Bocquet, S. [Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Scheinerstr. 1, 81679 München (Germany); Brodwin, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, 5110 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Foley, R. J.; Stalder, B.; Ashby, M. L. N. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Aird, K. A. [University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Armstrong, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Bautz, M. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Chapman, S. C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Cho, H. M. [NIST Quantum Devices Group, 325 Broadway Mailcode 817.03, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Clocchiatti, A., E-mail: mbayliss@cfa.harvard.edu [Instituto de Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica (Chile); and others

    2014-09-01

    We present optical spectroscopy of galaxies in clusters detected through the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect with the South Pole Telescope (SPT). We report our own measurements of 61 spectroscopic cluster redshifts, and 48 velocity dispersions each calculated with more than 15 member galaxies. This catalog also includes 19 dispersions of SPT-observed clusters previously reported in the literature. The majority of the clusters in this paper are SPT-discovered; of these, most have been previously reported in other SPT cluster catalogs, and five are reported here as SPT discoveries for the first time. By performing a resampling analysis of galaxy velocities, we find that unbiased velocity dispersions can be obtained from a relatively small number of member galaxies (≲ 30), but with increased systematic scatter. We use this analysis to determine statistical confidence intervals that include the effect of membership selection. We fit scaling relations between the observed cluster velocity dispersions and mass estimates from SZ and X-ray observables. In both cases, the results are consistent with the scaling relation between velocity dispersion and mass expected from dark-matter simulations. We measure a ∼30% log-normal scatter in dispersion at fixed mass, and a ∼10% offset in the normalization of the dispersion-mass relation when compared to the expectation from simulations, which is within the expected level of systematic uncertainty.

  14. Nearby supernova host galaxies from the CALIFA survey. II. Supernova environmental metallicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galbany, L.; Stanishev, V.; Mourão, A. M.; Rodrigues, M.; Flores, H.; Walcher, C. J.; Sánchez, S. F.; García-Benito, R.; Mast, D.; Badenes, C.; González Delgado, R. M.; Kehrig, C.; Lyubenova, M.; Marino, R. A.; Mollá, M.; Meidt, S.; Pérez, E.; van de Ven, G.; Vílchez, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The metallicity of a supernova progenitor, together with its mass, is one of the main parameters that can rule the progenitor's fate. We present the second study of nearby supernova (SN) host galaxies (0.005 ⊙) > 10 dex) by targeted searches. We neither found evidence that the metallicity at the SN

  15. The ACS Nearby Galaxies Survey Treasury: Recovering Spatially Resolved Recent Star Formation Histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillman, Evan D.; ANGST Team

    2006-12-01

    Because the supergiant phase of stellar evolution is short relative to the main sequence phase, it is possible to use them as chronometers to reconstruct the spatially resolved recent star formation histories of galaxies (cf., Dohm-Palmer et al. 1997, AJ, 114, 2514). Under the aegis of a cycle 14 HST program to observe a sample of M81 group dwarf galaxies (GO-HST-10605), we have used the star formation history codes of Dolphin (2002, MNRAS, 332, 91) to re-engineer the programs used in Dohm-Palmer et al. and produced automated codes with a wide range of applicability. The ANGST database will allow us our first opportunity to make the transition from analyzing prototypes to analyzing a statistically meaningful sample of galaxies. This promises real progress in quantifying the role of feedback in the evolution of galaxies. This work is supported by NASA grants HST-GO-10605.01-A and HST-GO-10915.06-A

  16. The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey - X. The structure of halo gas around M33

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Keenan, O.; Davies, J.I.; Taylor, Rhys; Minchin, R.F.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 456, č. 1 (2016), s. 951-960 ISSN 0035-8711 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG14013; GA ČR GAP209/12/1795 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : galaxies * clusters * radio lines Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.961, year: 2016

  17. Clustering of far-infrared galaxies in the AKARI All-Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollo, A.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Suzuki, T. L.; Oyabu, S.

    2013-03-01

    We present the first measurement of the angular two-point correlation function for AKARI 90-μm point sources, detected outside of the Milky Way plane and other regions characterized by high Galactic extinction, and categorized as extragalactic sources according to our far-infrared-color based criterion (Pollo et al., 2010). This is the first measurement of the large-scale angular clustering of galaxies selected in the far-infrared after IRAS measurements. Although a full description of the clustering properties of these galaxies will be obtained by more detailed studies, using either a spatial correlation function, or better information about properties and, at least, photometric redshifts of these galaxies, the angular correlation function remains the first diagnostic tool to establish the clustering properties of the catalog and the observed galaxy population. We find a non-zero clustering signal in both hemispheres extending up to ~40 degrees, without any significant fluctuations at larger scales. The observed correlation function is well fitted by a power-law function. The notable differences between the northern and southern hemispheres are found, which can probably be attributed to the photometry problems, and might point to the necessity of performing a better calibration in the data from the southern hemisphere.

  18. A representative survey of the dynamics and energetics of FR II radio galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ineson, J.; Croston, J. H.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Mingo, B.

    2017-05-01

    We report the first large, systematic study of the dynamics and energetics of a representative sample of Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II) radio galaxies with well-characterized group/cluster environments. We used X-ray inverse-Compton and radio synchrotron measurements to determine the internal radio-lobe conditions, and these were compared with external pressures acting on the lobes, determined from measurements of the thermal X-ray emission of the group/cluster. Consistent with previous work, we found that FR II radio lobes are typically electron dominated by a small factor relative to equipartition, and are overpressured relative to the external medium in their outer parts. These results suggest that there is typically no energetically significant proton population in the lobes of FR II radio galaxies (unlike for FR Is), and so for this population, inverse-Compton modelling provides an accurate way of measuring total energy content and estimating jet power. We estimated the distribution of Mach numbers for the population of expanding radio lobes, finding that at least half of the radio galaxies are currently driving strong shocks into their group/cluster environments. Finally, we determined a jet power-radio luminosity relation for FR II radio galaxies based on our estimates of lobe internal energy and Mach number. The slope and normalization of this relation are consistent with theoretical expectations, given the departure from equipartition and environmental distribution for our sample.

  19. Biodiversity and agriculture in dynamic landscapes: Integrating ground and remotely-sensed baseline surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillison, Andrew N; Asner, Gregory P; Fernandes, Erick C M; Mafalacusser, Jacinto; Banze, Aurélio; Izidine, Samira; da Fonseca, Ambrósio R; Pacate, Hermenegildo

    2016-07-15

    Sustainable biodiversity and land management require a cost-effective means of forecasting landscape response to environmental change. Conventional species-based, regional biodiversity assessments are rarely adequate for policy planning and decision making. We show how new ground and remotely-sensed survey methods can be coordinated to help elucidate and predict relationships between biodiversity, land use and soil properties along complex biophysical gradients that typify many similar landscapes worldwide. In the lower Zambezi valley, Mozambique we used environmental, gradient-directed transects (gradsects) to sample vascular plant species, plant functional types, vegetation structure, soil properties and land-use characteristics. Soil fertility indices were derived using novel multidimensional scaling of soil properties. To facilitate spatial analysis, we applied a probabilistic remote sensing approach, analyzing Landsat 7 satellite imagery to map photosynthetically active and inactive vegetation and bare soil along each gradsect. Despite the relatively low sample number, we found highly significant correlations between single and combined sets of specific plant, soil and remotely sensed variables that permitted testable spatial projections of biodiversity and soil fertility across the regional land-use mosaic. This integrative and rapid approach provides a low-cost, high-return and readily transferable methodology that permits the ready identification of testable biodiversity indicators for adaptive management of biodiversity and potential agricultural productivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. MOLECULAR AND ATOMIC LINE SURVEYS OF GALAXIES. I. THE DENSE, STAR-FORMING GAS PHASE AS A BEACON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geach, James E. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 rue University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); Papadopoulos, Padelis P., E-mail: jimgeach@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: padelis@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Radioastronomy, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2012-10-01

    We predict the space density of molecular gas reservoirs in the universe and place a lower limit on the number counts of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen cyanide (HCN) molecular, and [C II] atomic emission lines in blind redshift surveys in the submillimeter-centimeter spectral regime. Our model uses (1) recently available HCN spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) of local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs, L{sub IR} > 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun }), (2) a value for {epsilon}{sub *} = SFR/M{sub dense}(H{sub 2}) provided by new developments in the study of star formation feedback on the interstellar medium, and (3) a model for the evolution of the infrared luminosity density. Minimal 'emergent' CO SLEDs from the dense gas reservoirs expected in all star-forming systems in the universe are then computed from the HCN SLEDs since warm, HCN-bright gas will necessarily be CO-bright, with the dense star-forming gas phase setting an obvious minimum to the total molecular gas mass of any star-forming galaxy. We include [C II] as the most important of the far-infrared cooling lines. Optimal blind surveys with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) could potentially detect very distant (z {approx} 10-12) [C II] emitters in the {>=}ULIRG galaxy class at a rate of {approx}0.1-1 hr{sup -1} (although this prediction is strongly dependent on the star formation and enrichment history at this early epoch), whereas the (high-frequency) Square Kilometer Array will be capable of blindly detecting z > 3 low-J CO emitters at a rate of {approx}40-70 hr{sup -1}. The [C II] line holds special promise for detecting metal-poor systems with extensive reservoirs of CO-dark molecular gas where detection rates with ALMA can reach up to 2-7 hr{sup -1} in Bands 4-6.

  1. Gemini NIFS survey of feeding and feedback processes in nearby active galaxies - I. Stellar kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffel, Rogemar A.; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Riffel, Rogerio; Dahmer-Hahn, Luis G.; Diniz, Marlon R.; Schönell, Astor J.; Dametto, Natacha Z.

    2017-09-01

    We use the Gemini Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrograph (NIFS) to map the stellar kinematics of the inner few hundred parsecs of a sample of 16 nearby Seyfert galaxies, at a spatial resolution of tens of parsecs and spectral resolution of 40 km s- 1. We find that the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity fields for most galaxies are well reproduced by rotating disc models. The kinematic position angle (PA) derived for the LOS velocity field is consistent with the large-scale photometric PA. The residual velocities are correlated with the hard X-ray luminosity, suggesting that more luminous active galactic nuclei have a larger impact in the surrounding stellar dynamics. The central velocity dispersion values are usually higher than the rotation velocity amplitude, what we attribute to the strong contribution of bulge kinematics in these inner regions. For 50 per cent of the galaxies, we find an inverse correlation between the velocities and the h3 Gauss-Hermitte moment, implying red wings in the blueshifted side and blue wings in the redshifted side of the velocity field, attributed to the movement of the bulge stars lagging the rotation. Two of the 16 galaxies (NGC 5899 and Mrk 1066) show an S-shape zero velocity line, attributed to the gravitational potential of a nuclear bar. Velocity dispersion (σ) maps show rings of low-σ values (˜50-80 km s- 1) for four objects and 'patches' of low σ for six galaxies at 150-250 pc from the nucleus, attributed to young/ intermediate age stellar populations.

  2. Emission-line Galaxies from the Hubble Space Telescope Probing Evolution and Reionization Spectroscopically (PEARS) Grism Survey. II. The Complete Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirzkal, Nor; Rothberg, Barry; Ly, Chun; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.; Grogin, Norman A.; Dahlen, Tomas; Noeske, Kai G.; Meurer, Gerhardt R.; Walsh, Jeremy R.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Cohen, Seth H.; Bellini, Andrea; Holwerda, Benne W.; Straughn, Amber N.; Mechtley, Matthew; Windhorst, Rogier A.

    2013-07-01

    We present a full analysis of the Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically (PEARS) slitess grism spectroscopic data obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board Hubble Space Telescope. PEARS covers fields within both the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) North and South fields, making it ideal as a random survey of galaxies, as well as the availability of a wide variety of ancillary observations complemented by the spectroscopic results. Using the PEARS data, we are able to identify star-forming galaxies (SFGs) within the redshift volume 0 = 109 M ⊙ decreases by an order of magnitude at z <= 0.5 relative to the number at 0.5 < z < 0.9, supporting the argument of galaxy downsizing.

  3. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). The distinct build-up of dense and normal massive passive galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, A.; Bolzonella, M.; Scodeggio, M.; Krywult, J.; De Lucia, G.; Guzzo, L.; Garilli, B.; Granett, B. R.; de la Torre, S.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; Davidzon, I.; Franzetti, P.; Fritz, A.; Haines, C.; Hawken, A. J.; Iovino, A.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; Moutard, T.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Zamorani, G.; Bel, J.; Branchini, E.; Coupon, J.; Ilbert, O.; Moscardini, L.; Peacock, J. A.

    2017-10-01

    We have used the final data from the VIPERS redshift survey to extract an unparalleled sample of more than 2000 massive ℳ≥1011 M⊙ passive galaxies (MPGs) at redshift 0.5≤z≤1.0, based on their NUVrK colours. This has enabled us to investigate how the population of these objects was built up over cosmic time. We find that the evolution of the number density depends on the galaxy mean surface stellar mass density, Σ. In particular, dense (Σ≥2000 M⊙ pc-2) MPGs show a constant comoving number density over this redshift range, whilst this increases by a factor of approximately four for the least dense objects, defined as having Σ programs 182.A-0886 and partly 070.A-9007. Also based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products produced at TERAPIX and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, a collaborative project of NRC and CNRS. The VIPERS web site is http://www.vipers.inaf.it/

  4. The Westerbork HI survey of spiral and irregular galaxies - II. R-band surface photometry of late-type dwarf galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaters, RA; Balcells, M

    R-band surface photometry is presented for 171 late-type dwarf and irregular galaxies. For a subsample of 46 galaxies B-band photometry is presented as well. We present surface brightness profiles as well as isophotal and photometric parameters including magnitudes, diameters and central surface

  5. EMISSION-LINE GALAXIES FROM THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE PROBING EVOLUTION AND REIONIZATION SPECTROSCOPICALLY (PEARS) GRISM SURVEY. II. THE COMPLETE SAMPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirzkal, Nor; Rothberg, Barry; Ly, Chun; Grogin, Norman A.; Dahlen, Tomas; Noeske, Kai G.; Bellini, Andrea [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21210 (United States); Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.; Cohen, Seth H.; Mechtley, Matthew; Windhorst, Rogier A. [School of Earth And Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1404 (United States); Meurer, Gerhardt R. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Walsh, Jeremy R. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hathi, Nimish P. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Holwerda, Benne W. [ESA-ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, 2200 AG, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Straughn, Amber N. [Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-07-20

    We present a full analysis of the Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically (PEARS) slitess grism spectroscopic data obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board Hubble Space Telescope. PEARS covers fields within both the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) North and South fields, making it ideal as a random survey of galaxies, as well as the availability of a wide variety of ancillary observations complemented by the spectroscopic results. Using the PEARS data, we are able to identify star-forming galaxies (SFGs) within the redshift volume 0 < z < 1.5. Star-forming regions in the PEARS survey are pinpointed independently of the host galaxy. This method allows us to detect the presence of multiple emission-line regions (ELRs) within a single galaxy. We identified a total of 1162 H{alpha}, [O III], and/or [O II] emission lines in the PEARS sample of 906 galaxies to a limiting flux of {approx}10{sup -18} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. The ELRs have also been compared to the properties of the host galaxy, including morphology, luminosity, and mass. From this analysis, we find three key results: (1) the computed line luminosities show evidence of a flattening in the luminosity function with increasing redshift; (2) the star-forming systems show evidence of complex morphologies with star formation occurring predominantly within one effective (half-light) radius. However, the morphologies show no correlation with host stellar mass. (3) Also, the number density of SFGs with M{sub *} {>=} 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} decreases by an order of magnitude at z {<=} 0.5 relative to the number at 0.5 < z < 0.9, supporting the argument of galaxy downsizing.

  6. Acoustic water bottom investigation with a remotely operated watercraft survey system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Shintaro; Tabusa, Tomonori; Iwasaki, Shunsuke; Hiramatsu, Masahiro

    2017-12-01

    This paper describes a remotely operated investigation system developed by combining a modern leisure-use fish finder and an unmanned watercraft to survey water bottom topography and other data related to bottom materials. Current leisure-use fish finders have strong depth sounding capabilities and can provide precise sonar images and bathymetric information. Because these sonar instruments are lightweight and small, they can be used on unmanned small watercraft. With the developed system, an operator can direct the heading of an unmanned watercraft and monitor a PC display showing real-time positioning information through the use of onboard equipment and long-distance communication devices. Here, we explain how the system was developed and demonstrate the use of the system in an area of submerged woods in a lake. The system is low cost, easy to use, and mobile. It should be useful in surveying areas that have heretofore been hard to investigate, including remote, small, and shallow lakes, for example, volcanic and glacial lakes.

  7. COMPARING H{alpha} AND H I SURVEYS AS MEANS TO A COMPLETE LOCAL GALAXY CATALOG IN THE ADVANCED LIGO/VIRGO ERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzger, Brian D. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08542 (United States); Kaplan, David L. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Berger, Edo, E-mail: bmetzger@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: kaplan@uwm.edu, E-mail: eberger@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    Identifying the electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave (GW) sources detected by upcoming networks of advanced ground-based interferometers will be challenging, due in part to the large number of unrelated astrophysical transients within the {approx}10-100 deg{sup 2} sky localizations. A potential way to greatly reduce the number of such false positives is to limit detailed follow-up to only those candidates near galaxies within the GW sensitivity range of {approx}200 Mpc for binary neutron star mergers. Such a strategy is currently hindered by the fact that galaxy catalogs are grossly incomplete within this volume. Here, we compare two methods for completing the local galaxy catalog: (1) a narrowband H{alpha} imaging survey and (2) an H I emission line radio survey. Using H{alpha} fluxes, stellar masses (M {sub *}), and star formation rates (SFRs) from galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), combined with H I data from the GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey and the Herschel Reference Survey, we estimate that an H{alpha} survey with a luminosity sensitivity of L {sub H{alpha}} = 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} at 200 Mpc could achieve a completeness of f {sup H{alpha}} {sub SFR} Almost-Equal-To 75% with respect to total SFR, but only f{sub M* Star-Operator }{sup H{alpha}} approx. 33% with respect to M {sub *} (due to lack of sensitivity to early-type galaxies). These numbers are significantly lower than those achieved by an idealized spectroscopic survey due to the loss of H{alpha} flux resulting from resolving out nearby galaxies and the inability to correct for the underlying stellar continuum. An H I survey with sensitivity similar to the proposed WALLABY survey on ASKAP could achieve f{sub SFR}{sup H{sub I}} Almost-Equal-To 80% and f{sub M Star-Operator }{sup H{sub I}} Almost-Equal-To 50%, somewhat higher than that of the H{alpha} survey. Finally, both H{alpha} and H I surveys should achieve {approx}> 50% completeness with respect to the host galaxies of

  8. An alma survey of submillimeter galaxies in the extended Chandra deep field-south: The agn fraction and X-ray properties of submillimeter galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S. X.; Brandt, W. N.; Luo, B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Smail, I.; Alexander, D. M.; Danielson, A. L. R.; Karim, A.; Simpson, J. M.; Swinbank, A. M. [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Hodge, J. A.; Walter, F. [Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Lehmer, B. D. [The Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Wardlow, J. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Xue, Y. Q. [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Center for Astrophysics, Department of Astronomy, University of Science and Technology of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Chapman, S. C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Coppin, K. E. K. [Centre for Astrophysics, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Dannerbauer, H. [Universität Wien, Institute für Astrophysik, Türkenschanzstraße 17, 1180 Wien (Austria); De Breuck, C. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild Straße 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Menten, K. M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Van der Werf, P., E-mail: xxw131@psu.edu, E-mail: niel@astro.psu.edu [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2013-12-01

    The large gas and dust reservoirs of submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) could potentially provide ample fuel to trigger an active galactic nucleus (AGN), but previous studies of the AGN fraction in SMGs have been controversial largely due to the inhomogeneity and limited angular resolution of the available submillimeter surveys. Here we set improved constraints on the AGN fraction and X-ray properties of the SMGs with Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and Chandra observations in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (E-CDF-S). This study is the first among similar works to have unambiguously identified the X-ray counterparts of SMGs; this is accomplished using the fully submillimeter-identified, statistically reliable SMG catalog with 99 SMGs from the ALMA LABOCA E-CDF-S Submillimeter Survey. We found 10 X-ray sources associated with SMGs (median redshift z = 2.3), of which eight were identified as AGNs using several techniques that enable cross-checking. The other two X-ray detected SMGs have levels of X-ray emission that can be plausibly explained by their star formation activity. Six of the eight SMG-AGNs are moderately/highly absorbed, with N {sub H} > 10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}. An analysis of the AGN fraction, taking into account the spatial variation of X-ray sensitivity, yields an AGN fraction of 17{sub −6}{sup +16}% for AGNs with rest-frame 0.5-8 keV absorption-corrected luminosity ≥7.8 × 10{sup 42} erg s{sup –1}; we provide estimated AGN fractions as a function of X-ray flux and luminosity. ALMA's high angular resolution also enables direct X-ray stacking at the precise positions of SMGs for the first time, and we found four potential SMG-AGNs in our stacking sample.

  9. THE SWIFT GRB HOST GALAXY LEGACY SURVEY. II. REST-FRAME NEAR-IR LUMINOSITY DISTRIBUTION AND EVIDENCE FOR A NEAR-SOLAR METALLICITY THRESHOLD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perley, D. A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Tanvir, N. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Hjorth, J.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Krühler, T. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 København Ø (Denmark); Laskar, T.; Berger, E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Chary, R. [US Planck Data Center, MS220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Postigo, A. de Ugarte [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (IAA-CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, E-18008, Granada (Spain); Levan, A. J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Michałowski, M. J. [Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Schulze, S., E-mail: dperley@dark-cosmology.dk [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 7820436 Macul, Santiago 22 (Chile)

    2016-01-20

    We present rest-frame near-IR (NIR) luminosities and stellar masses for a large and uniformly selected population of gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies using deep Spitzer Space Telescope imaging of 119 targets from the Swift GRB Host Galaxy Legacy Survey spanning 0.03 < z < 6.3, and we determine the effects of galaxy evolution and chemical enrichment on the mass distribution of the GRB host population across cosmic history. We find a rapid increase in the characteristic NIR host luminosity between z ∼ 0.5 and z ∼ 1.5, but little variation between z ∼ 1.5 and z ∼ 5. Dust-obscured GRBs dominate the massive host population but are only rarely seen associated with low-mass hosts, indicating that massive star-forming galaxies are universally and (to some extent) homogeneously dusty at high redshift while low-mass star-forming galaxies retain little dust in their interstellar medium. Comparing our luminosity distributions with field surveys and measurements of the high-z mass–metallicity relation, our results have good consistency with a model in which the GRB rate per unit star formation is constant in galaxies with gas-phase metallicity below approximately the solar value but heavily suppressed in more metal-rich environments. This model also naturally explains the previously reported “excess” in the GRB rate beyond z ≳ 2; metals stifle GRB production in most galaxies at z < 1.5 but have only minor impact at higher redshifts. The metallicity threshold we infer is much higher than predicted by single-star models and favors a binary progenitor. Our observations also constrain the fraction of cosmic star formation in low-mass galaxies undetectable to Spitzer to be small at z < 4.

  10. A 16 deg2 survey of emission-line galaxies at z < 1.5 in HSC-SSP Public Data Release 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Masao; Tanaka, Masayuki; Shimakawa, Rhythm; Furusawa, Hisanori; Momose, Rieko; Koyama, Yusei; Silverman, John D.; Kodama, Tadayuki; Komiyama, Yutaka; Leauthaud, Alexie; Lin, Yen-Ting; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Nagao, Tohru; Nishizawa, Atsushi J.; Ouchi, Masami; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Tadaki, Ken-ichi; Yabe, Kiyoto

    2018-01-01

    We present initial results from the Subaru Strategic Program (SSP) with Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) on a comprehensive survey of emission-line galaxies at z Deep layer, 4.3 deg2) for NB816, and 25.1 mag (UltraDeep, 2.9 deg2) and 24.6-24.8 mag (Deep, 13.3 deg2) for NB921. The wide-field imaging allows us to construct unprecedentedly large samples of 8054 H α emitters at z ≈ 0.25 and 0.40, 8656 [O III] emitters at z ≈ 0.63 and 0.84, and 16877 [O II] emitters at z ≈ 1.19 and 1.47. We map the cosmic web on scales out to about 50 comoving Mpc that includes galaxy clusters, identified by red sequence galaxies, located at the intersection of filamentary structures of star-forming galaxies. The luminosity functions of emission-line galaxies are measured with precision and are consistent with published studies. The wide field coverage of the data enables us to measure the luminosity functions up to brighter luminosities than previous studies. The comparison of the luminosity functions between the different HSC-SSP fields suggests that a survey volume of >5 × 105 Mpc3 is essential to overcome cosmic variance. Since the current data have not reached the full depth expected for the HSC-SSP, the color cut in i - NB816 or z - NB921 induces a bias towards star-forming galaxies with large equivalent widths, primarily seen in the stellar mass functions for the H α emitters at z ≈ 0.25-0.40. Even so, the emission-line galaxies clearly cover a wide range of luminosity, stellar mass, and environment, thus demonstrating the usefulness of the narrowband data from the HSC-SSP for investigating star-forming galaxies at z < 1.5.

  11. AGN and Starbursts in Dusty Galaxy Mergers: Insights from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzarella, Joseph M.

    2014-07-01

    The Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) is combining imaging and spectroscopic data from the Herschel, Spitzer, Hubble, GALEX, Chandra, and XMM-Newton space telescopes augmented with extensive ground-based observations in a multiwavelength study of approximately 180 Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) and 20 Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) that comprise a statistically complete subset of the 60μm-selected IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample. The objects span the full range of galaxy environments (giant isolated spirals, wide and close pairs, minor and major mergers, merger remnants) and nuclear activity types (Seyfert 1, Seyfert 2, LINER, starburst/HII), with proportions that depend strongly on the total infrared luminosity. I will review the science motivations and present highlights of recent results selected from over 25 peer-reviewed journal articles published recently by the GOALS Team. Statistical investigations include detection of high-ionization Fe K emission indicative of deeply embedded AGN, comparison of UV and far-IR properties, investigations of the fraction of extended emission as a function of wavelength derived from mid-IR spectroscopy, mid-IR spectral diagnostics and spectral energy distributions revealing the relative contributions of AGN and starbursts to powering the bolometric luminosity, and quantitative structure analyses that delineate the evolution of stellar bars and nuclear stellar cusps during the merger process. Multiwavelength dissections of individual systems have unveiled large populations of young star clusters and heavily obscured AGN in early-stage (II Zw 96), intermediate-stage (Mrk 266, Mrk 273), and late-stage (NGC 2623, IC 883) mergers. A recently published study that matches numerical simulations to the observed morphology and gas kinematics in mergers has placed four systems on a timeline spanning 175-260 million years after their first passages, and modeling of additional (U)LIRGs is underway. A very

  12. Fundamental Black Hole/Galaxy Science from AGN Surveys with EXIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Della Ceca, R.; Foschini, L.; Ghisellini, G.; Tavecchio, F.; Panessa, F.; Coppi, P.; Grindlay, J. E.; EXIST Collaboration

    2009-12-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei, powered by accretion onto a Supermassive Black Hole (SMBH), emit over the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Besides being sources where high energy physical processes take place, it is now emerging that they are leading actors in the formation and evolution of galaxies and, in general, of cosmic structures in the Universe. Fully understanding the story of galaxy formation (a top priority of current astrophysics) will thus require us to find when, where, and how SMBH grow and interact with their surroundings. The EXIST mission has been properly designed to tackle many of these hot questions. We will summarize here the steps forward expected from this mission regarding a few selected hot topics: a) the real census of SMBH in the Universe (by revealing and measuring heavily obscured accretion), b) the physics on how SMBH accrete (by studying the broad-band X-ray spectra) and c) the link between accretion power and jet power (by using observations of blazars).

  13. The concentration-mass relation of clusters of galaxies from the OmegaWINGS survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biviano, A.; Moretti, A.; Paccagnella, A.; Poggianti, B. M.; Bettoni, D.; Gullieuszik, M.; Vulcani, B.; Fasano, G.; D'Onofrio, M.; Fritz, J.; Cava, A.

    2017-11-01

    Context. The relation between a cosmological halo concentration and its mass (cMr) is a powerful tool to constrain cosmological models of halo formation and evolution. Aims: On the scale of galaxy clusters the cMr has so far been determined mostly with X-ray and gravitational lensing data. The use of independent techniques is helpful in assessing possible systematics. Here we provide one of the few determinations of the cMr by the dynamical analysis of the projected-phase-space distribution of cluster members. Methods: Based on the WINGS and OmegaWINGS data sets, we used the Jeans analysis with the MAMPOSSt technique to determine masses and concentrations for 49 nearby clusters, each of which has ≳60 spectroscopic members within the virial region, after removal of substructures. Results: Our cMr is in statistical agreement with theoretical predictions based on ΛCDM cosmological simulations. Our cMr is different from most previous observational determinations because of its flatter slope and lower normalization. It is however in agreement with two recent cMr obtained using the lensing technique on the CLASH and LoCuSS cluster data sets. Conclusions: The dynamical study of the projected-phase-space of cluster members is an independent and valid technique to determine the cMr of galaxy clusters. Our cMr shows no tension with theoretical predictions from ΛCDM cosmological simulations for low-redshift, massive galaxy clusters. In the future we will extend our analysis to galaxy systems of lower mass and at higher redshifts.

  14. Search and Analysis of Galaxy-Scale Strong Gravitational Lenses in Cosmological Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brault, F.

    2013-11-01

    This article focuses on the development of a novel detector of strong galaxy-galaxy lenses based on the massive modelling of candidates in wide-field ground-based imaging data. Indeed, not only are these events rare in the Universe, but they are at the same time very valuable to understand galaxy formation and evolution in a cosmological context. We use parametric models, which are optimized by MCMC in a bayesian framework, so that we know the distribution of errors. We first generate several training samples : a hundred lenses simulated in HST and CFHT conditions, along with 325 observed lens candidates resulting from a series of preselections on the CFHTLS-Wide galaxies, and that we classify according to their credibility. The whole challenge in designing this detector lies in a subtle balance between the quality of models and the execution time. We massively run the modelling on our samples, beginning with ideal application conditions that we make more complex by stages so as to get closer to the observation conditions and save time. We show that a 7-parameter model assuming a spherical source can recover the Einstein radius from the CFHT simulations with a precision of 7%. We apply a mask to the input data that noticeably enhances the robustness of the models facing environment problems, with a median convergence time of 4 minutes that could be easily reduced by a factor of 10 with more direct optimization techniques. From our results, we define selection contours in the parameter space, resulting in a completeness of 38% and a purity of 55% for the sample of 51 candidates accepted by our robot among the 325 preselected systems.

  15. The Three-Dimensional Power Spectrum Of Galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-05-10

    universe — methods: data analysis On-line material: color figures 1. INTRODUCTION The spectacular recent cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements...Sunspot, NM 88349-0059. 15 Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cam- bridge, MA 02139. 16 Institut d’Estudis Espacials de... Analysis of the first 147,000 2dFGRS galaxies (Peacock et al. 2001; Percival et al. 2001, 2002; Norberg et al. 2001, 2002; Madgwick et al. 2002) has

  16. Measuring galaxy [O ii] emission line doublet with future ground-based wide-field spectroscopic surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparat, Johan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Bacon, Roland; Mostek, Nick J.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Schlegel, David J.; Yèche, Christophe

    2013-11-01

    The next generation of wide-field spectroscopic redshift surveys will map the large-scale galaxy distribution in the redshift range 0.7 ≤ z ≤ 2 to measure baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO). The primary optical signature used in this redshift range comes from the [Oii] emission line doublet, which provides a unique redshift identification that can minimize confusion with other single emission lines. To derive the required spectrograph resolution for these redshift surveys, we simulate observations of the [Oii] (λλ 3727, 3729) doublet for various instrument resolutions, and line velocities. We foresee two strategies for the choice of the resolution for future spectrographs for BAO surveys. For bright [Oii] emitter surveys ([Oii] flux ~30 × 10-17 erg cm-2 s-1 like SDSS-IV/eBOSS), a resolution of R ~ 3300 allows the separation of 90 percent of the doublets. The impact of the sky lines on the completeness in redshift is less than 6 percent. For faint [Oii] emitter surveys ([Oii] flux ~10 × 10-17 erg cm-2 s-1 like DESi), the detection improves continuously with resolution, so we recommend the highest possible resolution, the limit being given by the number of pixels (4k by 4k) on the detector and the number of spectroscopic channels (2 or 3).

  17. The DiskMass Survey. VI. Gas and stellar kinematics in spiral galaxies from PPak integral-field spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinsson, Thomas P. K.; Verheijen, Marc A. W.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Andersen, David R.; Swaters, Rob A.

    2013-09-01

    We present ionized-gas ([Oiii]λ5007 Å) and stellar kinematics (velocities and velocity dispersions) for 30 nearly face-on spiral galaxies out to as many as three K-band disk scale lengths (hR). These data have been derived from PPak integral-field-unit spectroscopy from 4980-5370 Å observed at a mean resolution of λ/Δλ = 7700 (σinst = 17 km s-1). These data are a fundamental product of our survey and will be used in companion papers to, e.g., derive the detailed (baryonic+dark) mass budget of each galaxy in our sample. Our presentation provides a comprehensive description of the observing strategy and data reduction, including a robust measurement and removal of shift, scale, and rotation effects in the data due to instrumental flexure. Using an in-plane coordinate system determined by fitting circular-speed curves to our velocity fields, we derive azimuthally averaged rotation curves and line-of-sight velocity dispersion (σLOS) and luminosity profiles for both the stars and [Oiii]-emitting gas. Along with a clear presentation of the data, we demonstrate: (1) The [Oiii] and stellar rotation curves exhibit a clear signature of asymmetric drift with a rotation difference that is 11% of the maximum rotation speed of the galaxy disk, comparable to measurements in the solar neighborhood in the Milky Way. (2) The e-folding length of the stellar velocity dispersion (hσ) is 2hR on average, as expected for a disk with a constant scale height and mass-to-light ratio, with a scatter that is notably smaller for massive, high-surface-brightness disks in the most luminous galaxies. (3) At radii larger than 1.5hR, σLOS tends to decline slower than the best-fitting exponential function, which may be due to an increase in the disk mass-to-light ratio, disk flaring, or disk heating by the dark-matter halo. (4) A strong correlation exists between the central vertical stellar velocity dispersion of the disks (σz,0) and their circular rotational speed at 2.2hR (V2.2h

  18. Subaqueous terminus evolution at Tasman Glacier, New Zealand, as determined by remote-controlled survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdie, Heather; Bealing, Paul; Tidey, Emily; Harrison, Justin

    2016-04-01

    The presence of subaqueous ice ramps at the terminus of calving glaciers result from a combination of subaerial and subaqueous processes. These ice ramps eventually buoyantly calve, an event that can be hazardous to companies operating boat tours on proglacial lakes. However our knowledge of ice ramp forming processes, and feedbacks associated with their evolution, is sparse. We are using a remote controlled jet boat to survey bathymetry at an active calving margin. This vessel, mounted with both depth and side-scan sonar, can map subaqueous portions of the terminus right up to the active calving face at no risk to the operators. Surveys at the Tasman Glacier terminus over three consecutive years have revealed that subaqueous ice ramps are ephemeral features. In 2015 multiple ice ramps extended out into the lake from the terminus by 100-200 m, with the ramp surface being as much as 60 m below the water line at its outer perimeter. The maximum depth of the Tasman Lake at this time was 240 m. Within one month of the survey taking place, the largest of these ice ramps had calved and disintegrated. The consistent location of ice ramps between surveys indicates that other factors, like subglacial hydrology, may influence ice ramp evolution.

  19. Deconstructing dwarf galaxies: a Suprime-Cam survey of Andromeda II

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnachie, Alan W.; Arimoto, Nobuo; Irwin, Mike

    2007-07-01

    We present deep, subhorizontal-branch, multicolour photometry of the Andromeda II dwarf spheroidal (And II dSph) taken with the Subaru Suprime-Cam wide-field camera. We identify a red clump population in this galaxy, the first time this feature has been detected in an M31 dSph, which are normally characterized as having no significant intermediate-age populations. We construct radial profiles for the various stellar populations and show that the horizontal branch (HB) has a nearly constant density spatial distribution out to large radius, whereas the reddest red giant branch stars are centrally concentrated in an exponential profile. We argue that these populations trace two distinct structural components in And II, and show that this assumption provides a good match to the overall radial profile of this galaxy. The extended component dominates the stellar populations at large radius, whereas the exponential component dominates the inner few arcminutes. By examining colour-magnitude diagrams in these regions, we show that the two components have very different stellar populations; the exponential component has an average age of ~7-10 Gyr, is relatively metal-rich ([Fe/H] ~ -1) but with a significant tail to low metallicities, and possesses a red clump. The extended component, on the other hand, is ancient (~13 Gyr), metal-poor ([Fe/H] ~ -1.5) with a narrower dispersion σ[Fe/H] ~= 0.28, and has a well-developed blue HB. The extended component contains approximately three-quarters of the light of And II and its unusual density profile is unique in Local Group dwarf galaxies. This suggests that its formation and/or evolution may have been quite different from other dwarf galaxies. The obvious chemodynamical complexity of And II lends further support to the accumulating body of evidence which shows that the evolutionary histories of faint dSph galaxies can be every bit as complicated as their brighter and more massive counterparts. Based on data collected at Subaru

  20. First Results from the Lyman Alpha Galaxies in the Epoch of Reionization (LAGER) Survey: Cosmological Reionization at z ˜ 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhen-Ya; Wang, Junxian; Rhoads, James; Infante, Leopoldo; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Hu, Weida; Walker, Alistair R.; Jiang, Linhua; Jiang, Chunyan; Hibon, Pascale; Gonzalez, Alicia; Kong, Xu; Zheng, XianZhong; Galaz, Gaspar; Barrientos, L. Felipe

    2017-06-01

    We present the first results from the ongoing Lyman Alpha Galaxies in the Epoch of Reionization (LAGER) project, which is the largest narrowband survey for z ˜ 7 galaxies to date. Using a specially built narrowband filter NB964 for the superb large-area Dark Energy Camera (DECam) on the NOAO/CTIO 4 m Blanco telescope, LAGER has collected 34 hr NB964 narrowband imaging data in the 3 deg2 COSMOS field. We have identified 23 Lyα Emitter candidates at z = 6.9 in the central 2-deg2 region, where DECam and public COSMOS multi-band images exist. The resulting luminosity function (LF) can be described as a Schechter function modified by a significant excess at the bright end (four galaxies with L Lyα ˜ 1043.4±0.2 erg s-1). The number density at L Lyα ˜ 1043.4±0.2 erg s-1 is little changed from z = 6.6, while at fainter L Lyα it is substantially reduced. Overall, we see a fourfold reduction in Lyα luminosity density from z = 5.7 to z = 6.9. Combined with a more modest evolution of the continuum UV luminosity density, this suggests a factor of ˜3 suppression of Lyα by radiative transfer through the z ˜ 7 intergalactic medium (IGM). It indicates an IGM neutral fraction of x H I ˜ 0.4-0.6 (assuming Lyα velocity offsets of 100-200 km s-1). The changing shape of the Lyα LF between z ≲ 6.6 and z = 6.9 supports the hypothesis of ionized bubbles in a patchy reionization at z ˜ 7.

  1. Redshift distributions of galaxies in the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification shear catalogue and implications for weak lensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnett, C.; Troxel, M. A.; Hartley, W.; Amara, A.; Leistedt, B.; Becker, M. R.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bridle, S. L.; Bruderer, C.; Busha, M. T.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Childress, M. J.; Castander, F. J.; Chang, C.; Crocce, M.; Davis, T. M.; Eifler, T. F.; Frieman, J.; Gangkofner, C.; Gaztanaga, E.; Glazebrook, K.; Gruen, D.; Kacprzak, T.; King, A.; Kwan, J.; Lahav, O.; Lewis, G.; Lidman, C.; Lin, H.; MacCrann, N.; Miquel, R.; O’Neill, C. R.; Palmese, A.; Peiris, H. V.; Refregier, A.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sadeh, I.; Sánchez, C.; Sheldon, E.; Uddin, S.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Armstrong, R.; Banerji, M.; Bauer, A. H.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; D’Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Fausti Neto, A.; Fernandez, E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kim, A. G.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    We present photometric redshift estimates for galaxies used in the weak lensing analysis of the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification (DES SV) data. Four model- or machine learning-based photometric redshift methods { annz2, bpz calibrated against BCC-U fig simulations, skynet, and tpz { are analysed. For training, calibration, and testing of these methods, we also construct a catalogue of spectroscopically confirmed galaxies matched against DES SV data. The performance of the methods is evalu-ated against the matched spectroscopic catalogue, focusing on metrics relevant for weak lensing analyses, with additional validation against COSMOS photo-zs. From the galaxies in the DES SV shear catalogue, which have mean redshift 0.72 ±0.01 over the range 0:3 < z < 1:3, we construct three tomographic bins with means of z = {0.45; 0.67,1.00g}. These bins each have systematic uncertainties δz ≲ 0.05 in the mean of the fiducial skynet photo-z n(z). We propagate the errors in the redshift distributions through to their impact on cosmological parameters estimated with cosmic shear, and find that they cause shifts in the value of σ8 of approx. 3%. This shift is within the one sigma statistical errors on σ8 for the DES SV shear catalog. We also found that further study of the potential impact of systematic differences on the critical surface density, Σcrit, contained levels of bias safely less than the statistical power of DES SV data. We recommend a final Gaussian prior for the photo-z bias in the mean of n(z) of width 0:05 for each of the three tomographic bins, and show that this is a sufficient bias model for the corresponding cosmology analysis.

  2. The Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Supernova Survey. II. The Type Ia Supernova Rate in High-redshift Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbary, K.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Brodwin, M.; Connolly, N.; Dawson, K. S.; Doi, M.; Eisenhardt, P.; Faccioli, L.; Fadeyev, V.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Fruchter, A. S.; Gilbank, D. G.; Gladders, M. D.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Hattori, T.; Hsiao, E.; Huang, X.; Ihara, Y.; Kashikawa, N.; Koester, B.; Konishi, K.; Kowalski, M.; Lidman, C.; Lubin, L.; Meyers, J.; Morokuma, T.; Oda, T.; Panagia, N.; Perlmutter, S.; Postman, M.; Ripoche, P.; Rosati, P.; Rubin, D.; Schlegel, D. J.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stanford, S. A.; Strovink, M.; Suzuki, N.; Takanashi, N.; Tokita, K.; Yasuda, N.; Supernova Cosmology Project

    2012-01-01

    We report a measurement of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate in galaxy clusters at 0.9 z z > 0.9 SNe. Finding 8 ± 1 cluster SNe Ia, we determine an SN Ia rate of 0.50+0.23 -0.19 (stat) +0.10 -0.09 (sys) h 2 70 SNuB (SNuB ≡ 10-12 SNe L -1 ⊙, B yr-1). In units of stellar mass, this translates to 0.36+0.16 -0.13 (stat) +0.07 -0.06 (sys) h 2 70 SNuM (SNuM ≡ 10-12 SNe M -1 ⊙ yr-1). This represents a factor of ≈5 ± 2 increase over measurements of the cluster rate at z influence of younger stellar populations by calculating the rate specifically in cluster red-sequence galaxies and in morphologically early-type galaxies, finding results similar to the full cluster rate. Finally, the upper limit of one hostless cluster SN Ia detected in the survey implies that the fraction of stars in the intra-cluster medium is less than 0.47 (95% confidence), consistent with measurements at lower redshifts. Based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the data archive at the Space Telescope Institute. STScI is operated by the association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under the NASA contract NAS 5-26555. The observations are associated with program GO-10496.

  3. State-Of in Uav Remote Sensing Survey - First Insights Into Applications of Uav Sensing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasen, H.

    2017-08-01

    UAVs are increasingly adapted as remote sensing platforms. Together with specialized sensors, they become powerful sensing systems for environmental monitoring and surveying. Spectral data has great capabilities to the gather information about biophysical and biochemical properties. Still, capturing meaningful spectral data in a reproducible way is not trivial. Since a couple of years small and lightweight spectral sensors, which can be carried on small flexible platforms, have become available. With their adaption in the community, the responsibility to ensure the quality of the data is increasingly shifted from specialized companies and agencies to individual researchers or research teams. Due to the complexity of the data acquisition of spectral data, this poses a challenge for the community and standardized protocols, metadata and best practice procedures are needed to make data intercomparable. In November 2016, the ESSEM COST action Innovative optical Tools for proximal sensing of ecophysiological processes (OPTIMISE; http://optimise.dcs.aber.ac.uk/) held a workshop on best practices for UAV spectral sampling. The objective of this meeting was to trace the way from particle to pixel and identify influences on the data quality / reliability, to figure out how well we are currently doing with spectral sampling from UAVs and how we can improve. Additionally, a survey was designed to be distributed within the community to get an overview over the current practices and raise awareness for the topic. This talk will introduce the approach of the OPTIMISE community towards best practises in UAV spectral sampling and present first results of the survey (survey/"target="_blank">http://optimise.dcs.aber.ac.uk/uav-survey/). This contribution briefly introduces the survey and gives some insights into the first results given by the interviewees.

  4. Do Galaxies Follow Darwinian Evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    Using VIMOS on ESO's Very Large Telescope, a team of French and Italian astronomers have shown the strong influence the environment exerts on the way galaxies form and evolve. The scientists have for the first time charted remote parts of the Universe, showing that the distribution of galaxies has considerably evolved with time, depending on the galaxies' immediate surroundings. This surprising discovery poses new challenges for theories of the formation and evolution of galaxies. The 'nature versus nurture' debate is a hot topic in human psychology. But astronomers too face similar conundrums, in particular when trying to solve a problem that goes to the very heart of cosmological theories: are the galaxies we see today simply the product of the primordial conditions in which they formed, or did experiences in the past change the path of their evolution? ESO PR Photo 17/06 ESO PR Photo 45/06 Galaxy Distribution in Space In a large, three-year long survey carried out with VIMOS [1], the Visible Imager and Multi-Object Spectrograph on ESO's VLT, astronomers studied more than 6,500 galaxies over a wide range of distances to investigate how their properties vary over different timescales, in different environments and for varying galaxy luminosities [2]. They were able to build an atlas of the Universe in three dimensions, going back more than 9 billion years. This new census reveals a surprising result. The colour-density relation, that describes the relationship between the properties of a galaxy and its environment, was markedly different 7 billion years ago. The astronomers thus found that the galaxies' luminosity, their initial genetic properties, and the environments they reside in have a profound impact on their evolution. "Our results indicate that environment is a key player in galaxy evolution, but there's no simple answer to the 'nature versus nurture' problem in galaxy evolution," said Olivier Le Fèvre from the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille

  5. Spiral Survey Expedition: A proposal to organize for the Survey, exploration and eventual colonization of the Milky Way Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Scott

    1993-12-01

    This paper details a plan to explore the galaxy. Areas of interest to an era of cyberspace include the Tech-Index information system for the expedition and the role cyberspace has in increasing expedition productivity and increasing the capabilities of cyberspace by expanding the goals and data set. The paper offers lists of projects for the cybermarket pool. The expedition is described also as a developers tool for cyberspace to acknowledge the scope of the human mind far surpasses present engineering yet guides our direction of energies and materials. Maintaining the biological capability to reproduce the Terran biosphere via Evolution park conservation areas is discussed. The ecological repair of Spaceship Earth and the