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Sample records for relevant drug-drug interactions

  1. Comparative analysis of three drug-drug interaction screening systems against probable clinically relevant drug-drug interactions: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhič, Neža; Mrhar, Ales; Brvar, Miran

    2017-07-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) screening systems report potential DDIs. This study aimed to find the prevalence of probable DDI-related adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and compare the clinical usefulness of different DDI screening systems to prevent or warn against these ADRs. A prospective cohort study was conducted in patients urgently admitted to medical departments. Potential DDIs were checked using Complete Drug Interaction®, Lexicomp® Online™, and Drug Interaction Checker®. The study team identified the patients with probable clinically relevant DDI-related ADRs on admission, the causality of which was assessed using the Drug Interaction Probability Scale (DIPS). Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of screening systems to prevent or warn against probable DDI-related ADRs were evaluated. Overall, 50 probable clinically relevant DDI-related ADRs were found in 37 out of 795 included patients taking at least two drugs, most common of them were bleeding, hyperkalemia, digitalis toxicity, and hypotension. Complete Drug Interaction showed the best sensitivity (0.76) for actual DDI-related ADRs, followed by Lexicomp Online (0.50), and Drug Interaction Checker (0.40). Complete Drug Interaction and Drug Interaction Checker had positive predictive values of 0.07; Lexicomp Online had 0.04. We found no difference in specificity and negative predictive values among these systems. DDI screening systems differ significantly in their ability to detect probable clinically relevant DDI-related ADRs in terms of sensitivity and positive predictive value.

  2. Clinically relevant potential drug-drug interactions among outpatients: A nationwide database study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazbar, Janja; Locatelli, Igor; Horvat, Nejc; Kos, Mitja

    2018-06-01

    Adverse drug events due to drug-drug interactions (DDIs) represent a considerable public health burden, also in Slovenia. A better understanding of the most frequently occurring potential DDIs may enable safer pharmacotherapy and minimize drug-related problems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and predictors of potential DDIs among outpatients in Slovenia. An analysis of potential DDIs was performed using health claims data on prescription drugs from a nationwide database. The Lexi-Interact Module was used as the reference source of interactions. The influence of patient-specific predictors on the risk of potential clinically relevant DDIs was evaluated using logistic regression model. The study population included 1,179,803 outpatients who received 15,811,979 prescriptions. The total number of potential DDI cases identified was 3,974,994, of which 15.6% were potentially clinically relevant. Altogether, 9.3% (N = 191,213) of the total population in Slovenia is exposed to clinically relevant potential DDIs, and the proportion is higher among women and the elderly. After adjustment for cofactors, higher number of medications and older age are associated with higher odds of clinically relevant potential DDIs. The burden of DDIs is highest with drug combinations that increase risk of bleeding, enhance CNS depression or anticholinergic effects or cause cardiovascular complications. The current study revealed that 1 in 10 individuals in the total Slovenian population is exposed to clinically relevant potential DDIs yearly. Taking into account the literature based conservative estimate that approximately 1% of potential DDIs result in negative health outcomes, roughly 1800 individuals in Slovenia experience an adverse health outcome each year as a result of clinically relevant potential interactions alone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Antifungal therapy: drug-drug interactions at your fingertips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lempers, V.J.; Bruggemann, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    The Information Age has revolutionized the ability of healthcare professionals (HCPs) to oversee a substantial body of clinically relevant information literally at one's fingertips. In the field of clinical pharmacology, this may be particularly useful for managing drug-drug interactions (DDIs). A

  4. Risk of Clinically Relevant Pharmacokinetic-based Drug-drug Interactions with Drugs Approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Between 2013 and 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jingjing; Zhou, Zhu; Tay-Sontheimer, Jessica; Levy, Rene H; Ragueneau-Majlessi, Isabelle

    2018-03-23

    A total of 103 drugs (including 14 combination drugs) were approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration from 2013 to 2016. Pharmacokinetic-based drug interaction profiles were analyzed using the University of Washington Drug Interaction Database and the clinical relevance of these observations was characterized based on information from New Drug Application reviews. CYP3A was identified as a major contributor to clinical drug-drug interactions (DDIs), involved in approximately 2/3 of all interactions. Transporters (alone or with enzymes) were found to participate in about half of all interactions, although most of these were weak-to-moderate interactions. When considered as victims, eight new molecular entities (NMEs; cobimetinib, ibrutnib, isavuconazole, ivabradine, naloxegol, paritaprevir, simeprevir, and venetoclax) were identified as sensitive substrates of CYP3A, two NMEs (pirfenidone and tasimelteon) were sensitive substrates of CYP1A2, one NME (dasabuvir) was a sensitive substrate of CYP2C8, one NME (eliglustat) was a sensitive substrate of CYP2D6, and one NME (grazoprevir) was a sensitive substrate of OATP1B1/3 (with changes in exposure greater than 5-fold when co-administered with a strong inhibitor). Interestingly, approximately 75% of identified CYP3A substrates were also substrates of P-gp. As perpetrators, most clinical DDIs involved weak-to-moderate inhibition or induction, with only two drugs (Viekira Pak and idelalisib) showing strong inhibition of CYP3A, and one NME (lumacaftor) considered as a strong CYP3A inducer. Among drugs with large changes in exposure (≥ 5-fold), whether as victim or perpetrator, the most represented therapeutic classes were antivirals and oncology drugs, suggesting a significant risk of clinical DDIs in these patient populations. The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  5. Observational study of drug-drug interactions in oncological inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Sacramento Díaz-Carrasco

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence of potential clinically relevant drug- drug interactions in adult oncological inpatients, as well as to describe the most frequent interactions. A standard database was used. Method: An observational, transversal, and descriptive study including patients admitted to the Oncology Service of a reference hospital. All prescriptions were collected twice a week during a month. They were analysed using Lexicomp® database, recording all interactions classified with a level of risk: C, D or X. Results: A total of 1 850 drug-drug interactions were detected in 218 treatments. The prevalence of treatments with at least one clinically relevant interaction was 95%, being 94.5% for those at level C and 26.1% for levels D and X. The drugs most commonly involved in the interactions detected were opioid analgesics, antipsychotics (butyrophenones, benzodiazepines, pyrazolones, glucocorticoids and heparins, whereas interactions with antineoplastics were minimal, highlighting those related to paclitaxel and between metamizole and various antineoplastics. Conclusions: The prevalence of clinically relevant drug-drug interactions rate was very high, highlighting the high risk percentage of them related to level of risk X. Due to the frequency of onset and potential severity, highlighted the concomitant use of central nervous system depressants drugs with risk of respiratory depression, the risk of onset of anticholinergic symptoms when combining morphine or haloperidol with butylscopolamine, ipratropium bromide or dexchlorpheniramine and the multiple interactions involving metamizole.

  6. Potential drug-drug interactions on in-patient medication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Potential drug-drug interactions on in-patient medication prescriptions at Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital (MRRH) in western Uganda: prevalence, clinical importance and associated factors. SJ Lubinga, E Uwiduhaye ...

  7. Identification of clinically significant drug-drug interactions in cardiac ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To identify clinically significant potential drug-drug interactions in cardiac intensive care units of two tertiary care ... hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes or other diseases .... May result in digoxin toxicity (nausea, vomiting, cardiac.

  8. Clopidogrel paclitaxel drug-drug interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, K; Mau-Sørensen, M; Stage, T B

    2017-01-01

    register. Peripheral sensory neuropathy was retrospectively evaluated from medical charts and compared to that of 88 age and sex matched controls treated with paclitaxel and low dose aspirin. By a cumulative dose of 1500 mg paclitaxel, 35% of the patients had developed severe neuropathy. The overall hazard...... ratio between clopidogrel use and severe paclitaxel neuropathy was 1.7 (95% CI, 0.9-3.0). Among those receiving a high dose paclitaxel regimen, the hazard ratio was 2.3 (95% CI, 1.1-4.5). Our study indicates that clopidogrel is associated with a clinically relevant increased risk of neuropathy......Paclitaxel is mainly eliminated by CYP2C8 in the liver. CYP2C8 is strongly inhibited by the clopidogrel metabolite acyl-β-D-glucuronide. To determine if this interaction has clinical relevance, we identified 48 patients treated with clopidogrel and paclitaxel using databases and a prescription...

  9. Drug-drug interactions in prescriptions for hospitalized elderly with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Aparecido Maschio de Lima

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to determine the rate of potential drug-drug interactions in prescriptions for elderly diagnosed with Acute Coronary Syndrome in a teaching hospital. This is an exploratory, descriptive study that analyzed 607 prescriptions through databases to identify and classify the interactions based on intensity (major, moderate or minor, the mechanism (pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamics and documentation relevance. We detected 10,162 drug-drug interactions, distributed in 554 types of different combinations within the prescribed drugs, and 99% of prescriptions presented at least one and a maximum of 53 interactions; highlighting the prevalence of major and moderates ones. There was a correlation between the number of drug-drug interactions and the number of prescribed drugs and the hospitalization time. This study contributes for the delimitation of a prevalence pattern in drug-drug interactions in prescriptions for Acute Coronary Syndrome, besides subsidizing the importance of the effective implementation of the Clinical Pharmacy in teaching hospitals.

  10. Drug repurposing based on drug-drug interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bin; Wang, Rong; Wu, Ping; Kong, De-Xin

    2015-02-01

    Given the high risk and lengthy procedure of traditional drug development, drug repurposing is gaining more and more attention. Although many types of drug information have been used to repurpose drugs, drug-drug interaction data, which imply possible physiological effects or targets of drugs, remain unexploited. In this work, similarity of drug interaction was employed to infer similarity of the physiological effects or targets for the drugs. We collected 10,835 drug-drug interactions concerning 1074 drugs, and for 700 of them, drug similarity scores based on drug interaction profiles were computed and rendered using a drug association network with 589 nodes (drugs) and 2375 edges (drug similarity scores). The 589 drugs were clustered into 98 groups with Markov Clustering Algorithm, most of which were significantly correlated with certain drug functions. This indicates that the network can be used to infer the physiological effects of drugs. Furthermore, we evaluated the ability of this drug association network to predict drug targets. The results show that the method is effective for 317 of 561 drugs that have known targets. Comparison of this method with the structure-based approach shows that they are complementary. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of drug repurposing based on drug-drug interaction data. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Evaluation of drug-drug interactions among patients with chronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The risk of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is high in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) necessitating dose adjustments or the avoidance of drug combinations. This study aimed to evaluate DDIs among patients with CKD in the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH), Enugu, South-East Nigeria.

  12. Drug-Drug and Herb-Drug Interaction-A Comment | Esimone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions may be pharmacodynamic or pharmacokinetic. And herbal medicinal products are becoming increasingly popular. Drug interactions can be in vivo or in vitro. Pharmacodynamic outcomes take such forms as Additive, Synergistic, Antagonistic or Indifferent. The paper reviews and ...

  13. A survey of attitudes, practices, and knowledge regarding drug-drug interactions among medical residents in Iran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabovati, Ehsan; Vakili-Arki, Hasan; Taherzadeh, Zhila; Saberi, Mohammad Reza; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Eslami, Saeid

    2017-01-01

    Background When prescribing medications, physicians should recognize clinically relevant potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs). To improve medication safety, it is important to understand prescribers' knowledge and opinions pertaining to DDIs. Objective To determine the current DDI information

  14. Drug-Drug Interaction Extraction via Convolutional Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengyu Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-drug interaction (DDI extraction as a typical relation extraction task in natural language processing (NLP has always attracted great attention. Most state-of-the-art DDI extraction systems are based on support vector machines (SVM with a large number of manually defined features. Recently, convolutional neural networks (CNN, a robust machine learning method which almost does not need manually defined features, has exhibited great potential for many NLP tasks. It is worth employing CNN for DDI extraction, which has never been investigated. We proposed a CNN-based method for DDI extraction. Experiments conducted on the 2013 DDIExtraction challenge corpus demonstrate that CNN is a good choice for DDI extraction. The CNN-based DDI extraction method achieves an F-score of 69.75%, which outperforms the existing best performing method by 2.75%.

  15. Prolonged Drug-Drug Interaction between Terbinafine and Perphenazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Min

    2012-12-01

    I report here an elderly woman receiving perphenazine together with terbinafine. After 1 week of terbinafine treatment she experienced extrapyramidal symptoms and, in particular, akathisia. Her symptoms did not disappear for 6 weeks, and so at 2 weeks prior to this most recent admission she had stopped taking terbinafine. However, these symptoms persisted for 3 weeks after discontinuing terbinafine. It is well known that terbinafine inhibits CYP2D6 and that perphenazine is metabolized mainly by CYP2D6. Thus, when terbinafine and perphenazine are coadministrated, the subsequent increase in the concentration of perphenazine may induce extrapyramidal symptoms. Thus, terbinafine therapy may be associated with the induction and persistence of extrapyramidal symptoms, including akathisia. This case report emphasizes the importance of monitoring drug-drug interactions in patients undergoing terbinafine and perphenazine therapy.

  16. Statin drug-drug interactions in a Romanian community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiu, Raluca; Bucsa, Camelia; Mogosan, Cristina; Dumitrascu, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Statins are frequently prescribed for patients with dyslipidemia and have a well-established safety profile. However, when associated with interacting dugs, the risk of adverse effects, especially muscular toxicity, is increased. The objective of this study was to identify, characterize and quantify the prevalence of the potential drug-drug interactions (pDDIs) of statins in reimbursed prescriptions from a community pharmacy in Bucharest. We analyzed the reimbursed prescriptions including statins collected during one month in a community pharmacy. The online program Medscape Drug Interaction Checker was used for checking the drug interactions and their classification based on severity: Serious - Use alternative, Significant - Monitor closely and Minor. 132 prescriptions pertaining to 125 patients were included in the analysis. Our study showed that 25% of the patients who were prescribed statins were exposed to pDDIs: 37 Serious and Significant interactions in 31 of the statins prescriptions. The statins involved were atorvastatin, simvastatin and rosuvastatin. Statin pDDIs have a high prevalence and patients should be monitored closely in order to prevent the development of adverse effects that result from statin interactions.

  17. Indolealkylamines: biotransformations and potential drug-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ai-Ming

    2008-06-01

    Indolealkylamine (IAA) drugs are 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT or serotonin) analogs that mainly act on the serotonin system. Some IAAs are clinically utilized for antimigraine therapy, whereas other substances are notable as drugs of abuse. In the clinical evaluation of antimigraine triptan drugs, studies on their biotransformations and pharmacokinetics would facilitate the understanding and prevention of unwanted drug-drug interactions (DDIs). A stable, principal metabolite of an IAA drug of abuse could serve as a useful biomarker in assessing intoxication of the IAA substance. Studies on the metabolism of IAA drugs of abuse including lysergic acid amides, tryptamine derivatives and beta-carbolines are therefore emerging. An important role for polymorphic cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) in the metabolism of IAA drugs of abuse has been revealed by recent studies, suggesting that variations in IAA metabolism, pharmaco- or toxicokinetics and dynamics can arise from distinct CYP2D6 status, and CYP2D6 polymorphism may represent an additional risk factor in the use of these IAA drugs. Furthermore, DDIs with IAA agents could occur additively at the pharmaco/toxicokinetic and dynamic levels, leading to severe or even fatal serotonin toxicity. In this review, the metabolism and potential DDIs of these therapeutic and abused IAA drugs are described.

  18. Drug-drug interactions involving antidepressants: focus on desvenlafaxine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Yvette; Setia, Sajita; Lima, Graca

    2018-01-01

    Psychiatric and physical conditions often coexist, and there is robust evidence that associates the frequency of depression with single and multiple physical conditions. More than half of patients with depression may have at least one chronic physical condition. Therefore, antidepressants are often used in cotherapy with other medications for the management of both psychiatric and chronic physical illnesses. The risk of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is augmented by complex polypharmacy regimens and extended periods of treatment required, of which possible outcomes range from tolerability issues to lack of efficacy and serious adverse events. Optimal patient outcomes may be achieved through drug selection with minimal potential for DDIs. Desvenlafaxine is a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor approved for the treatment of adults with major depressive disorder. Pharmacokinetic studies of desvenlafaxine have shown a simple metabolic profile unique among antidepressants. This review examines the DDI profiles of antidepressants, particularly desvenlafaxine, in relation to drugs of different therapeutic areas. The summary and comparison of information available is meant to help clinicians in making informed decisions when using desvenlafaxine in patients with depression and comorbid chronic conditions.

  19. Compliance with national guidelines for the management of drug-drug interactions in Dutch community pharmacies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurma, H.; Schalekamp, T.; Egberts, A.C.G.; Smet, P.A.G.M. de

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pharmacists contribute to the detection and prevention of drug therapy-related problems, including drug-drug interactions. Little is known about compliance with pharmacy practice guidelines for the management of drug-drug interaction alerts. OBJECTIVE: To measure the compliance of

  20. Clinical risk management in Dutch community pharmacies: the case of drug-drug interactions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurma, H.; Smet, P.A.G.M. de; Egberts, A.C.G.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevention of drug-drug interactions requires a systematic approach for which the concept of clinical risk management can be used. The objective of our study was to measure the frequency, nature and management of drug-drug interaction alerts as these occur in daily practice of Dutch

  1. QSAR Modeling and Prediction of Drug-Drug Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Alexey V; Varlamova, Ekaterina V; Lagunin, Alexey A; Dmitriev, Alexander V; Muratov, Eugene N; Fourches, Denis; Kuz'min, Victor E; Poroikov, Vladimir V; Tropsha, Alexander; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2016-02-01

    Severe adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are the fourth leading cause of fatality in the U.S. with more than 100,000 deaths per year. As up to 30% of all ADRs are believed to be caused by drug-drug interactions (DDIs), typically mediated by cytochrome P450s, possibilities to predict DDIs from existing knowledge are important. We collected data from public sources on 1485, 2628, 4371, and 27,966 possible DDIs mediated by four cytochrome P450 isoforms 1A2, 2C9, 2D6, and 3A4 for 55, 73, 94, and 237 drugs, respectively. For each of these data sets, we developed and validated QSAR models for the prediction of DDIs. As a unique feature of our approach, the interacting drug pairs were represented as binary chemical mixtures in a 1:1 ratio. We used two types of chemical descriptors: quantitative neighborhoods of atoms (QNA) and simplex descriptors. Radial basis functions with self-consistent regression (RBF-SCR) and random forest (RF) were utilized to build QSAR models predicting the likelihood of DDIs for any pair of drug molecules. Our models showed balanced accuracy of 72-79% for the external test sets with a coverage of 81.36-100% when a conservative threshold for the model's applicability domain was applied. We generated virtually all possible binary combinations of marketed drugs and employed our models to identify drug pairs predicted to be instances of DDI. More than 4500 of these predicted DDIs that were not found in our training sets were confirmed by data from the DrugBank database.

  2. Pharmacodynamics and common drug-drug interactions of the third-generation antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanović, Srđan; Janković, Slobodan M; Novaković, Milan; Milosavljević, Marko; Folić, Marko

    2018-02-01

    Anticonvulsants that belong to the third generation are considered as 'newer' antiepileptic drugs, including: eslicarbazepine acetate, lacosamide, perampanel, brivaracetam, rufinamide and stiripentol. Areas covered: This article reviews pharmacodynamics (i.e. mechanisms of action) and clinically relevant drug-drug interactions of the third-generation antiepileptic drugs. Expert opinion: Newer antiepileptic drugs have mechanisms of action which are not shared with the first and the second generation anticonvulsants, like inhibition of neurotransmitters release, blocking receptors for excitatory amino acids and new ways of sodium channel inactivation. New mechanisms of action increase chances of controlling forms of epilepsy resistant to older anticonvulsants. Important advantage of the third-generation anticonvulsants could be their little propensity for interactions with both antiepileptic and other drugs observed until now, making prescribing much easier and safer. However, this may change with new studies specifically designed to discover drug-drug interactions. Although the third-generation antiepileptic drugs enlarged therapeutic palette against epilepsy, 20-30% of patients with epilepsy is still treatment-resistant and need new pharmacological approach. There is great need to explore all molecular targets that may directly or indirectly be involved in generation of seizures, so a number of candidate compounds for even newer anticonvulsants could be generated.

  3. Managing Drug-Drug Interaction Between Ombitasvir, Paritaprevir/Ritonavir, Dasabuvir, and Mycophenolate Mofetil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaitre, Florian; Ben Ali, Zeineb; Tron, Camille; Jezequel, Caroline; Boglione-Kerrien, Christelle; Verdier, Marie-Clémence; Guyader, Dominique; Bellissant, Eric

    2017-08-01

    No drug-drug interaction study has been conducted to date for the combination of ombitasvir, paritaprevir/ritonavir, dasabuvir (3D), and mycophenolic acid (MPA). We here report the case of a hepatitis C virus-infected patient treated with 3D and MPA for vasculitis. In light of the threat of drug-drug interaction, the concentration of MPA was measured before, during, and 15 days after the end of the 3D treatment. Similar values were found at all 3 time points, thus indicating that there is probably no need to adapt MPA dosage to 3D.

  4. [Drug-Drug Interactions with Consideration of Pharmacogenetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Shogo

    2018-01-01

     Elderly patients often suffer from a variety of diseases and therefore may be prescribed several kinds of drugs. Interactions between these drugs may cause problems in some patients. Guidelines for drug interactions were released on July 8, 2014 "Drug Interaction Guideline for Drug Development and Labeling Recommendations (Final Draft)". These guidelines include the theoretical basis for evaluating the mechanisms of drug interaction, the possible extent of drug interactions, and take into consideration special populations (e.g., infants, children, elderly patients, patients with hepatic or renal dysfunction, and subjects with minor deficient alleles for drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters). In this symposium article, I discuss this last special population: altered drug metabolism and drug interactions in subjects with minor alleles of genes encoding deficient drug metabolizing enzymes. I further discuss a drug label for eliglustat (Cerdelga) with instructions for patients with ultra-rapid, extensive, intermediate, and poor metabolizer phenotypes that arise from different CYP2D6 gene alleles.

  5. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Prevalence of drug-drug interactions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-02-02

    Feb 2, 2008 ... Table II. Frequency of level 2 interactions between ARVs and the other drugs. Interacting ARVs and other drugs. N. %*. Didanosine + ketoconazole. 1. 0.91. Didanosine + ofloxacin. 1. 0.91. Didanosine + ciprofloxacin. 2. 1.82. Didanosine + iraconazole. 3. 2.73. Didanosine + ketoconazole. 2. 1.82. Efavirenz ...

  6. P-glycoprotein interaction with risperidone and 9-OH-risperidone studied in vitro, in knock-out mice and in drug-drug interaction experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing, Thomas B.; Pedersen, Anne D.; Linnet, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    P-glycoprotein, risperidone, nortriptyline, cyclosporine A, drug-drug interaction, blood-brain barrier, knock-out mice......P-glycoprotein, risperidone, nortriptyline, cyclosporine A, drug-drug interaction, blood-brain barrier, knock-out mice...

  7. Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions in cancer patients treated with oral anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, R. W. F.; Brundel, D. H. S.; Neef, C.; van Gelder, T.; Mathijssen, R. H. J.; Burger, D. M.; Jansman, F. G. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) in patients with cancer are common, but have not previously been quantified for oral anticancer treatment. We assessed the prevalence and seriousness of potential PDDIs among ambulatory cancer patients on oral anticancer treatment. Methods: A

  8. Statin-associated rhabdomyolysis triggered by drug-drug interaction with itraconazole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybro, Anne Mette; Damkier, Per; Rasmussen, Torsten Bloch

    2016-01-01

    -associated rhabdomyolysis, probably caused by a drug-drug interaction between simvastatin and itraconazole. The patient made full recovery. Three commonly used statins-simvastatin, atorvastatin and lovastatin-are metabolised by the liver enzyme CYP3A4. Several potent inhibitors of this enzyme are known, for example, azole...

  9. Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions in cancer patients treated with oral anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W.F. van Leeuwen (Roelof); D.H.S. Brundel (D. H S); C. Neef (Cees); T. van Gelder (Teun); A.H.J. Mathijssen (Ron); D.M. Burger (David); F.G.A. Jansman (Frank)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) in patients with cancer are common, but have not previously been quantified for oral anticancer treatment. We assessed the prevalence and seriousness of potential PDDIs among ambulatory cancer patients on oral anticancer treatment.

  10. Drug-drug interactions in patients treated for cancer : a prospective study on clinical interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, R. W. F.; Jansman, F. G. A.; van den Bemt, P. M. L. A.; de Man, F.; Piran, F.; Vincenten, I.; Jager, A.; Rijneveld, A. W.; Brugma, J. D.; Mathijssen, R. H. J.; van Gelder, T.

    Background: Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are of major concern in oncology, since cancer patients typically take many concomitant medications. Retrospective studies have been conducted to determine the prevalence of DDIs. However, prospective studies on DDIs needing interventions in cancer patients

  11. Clinical management of drug-drug interactions in HCV therapy: Challenges and solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, D.M.; Back, D.; Buggisch, P.; Buti, M.; Craxi, A.; Foster, G.; Klinker, H.; Larrey, D.; Nikitin, I.; Pol, S. van der; Puoti, M.; Romero-Gomez, M.; Wedemeyer, H.; Zeuzem, S.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients often take multiple co-medications to treat adverse events related to HCV therapy, or to manage other co-morbidities. Drug-drug interactions associated with this polypharmacy are relatively new to the field of HCV pharmacotherapy. With the advent of the

  12. Drug-drug interactions involving lysosomes: mechanisms and potential clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Randall; Funk, Ryan S; Axcell, Erick; Krise, Jeffrey P

    2012-08-01

    Many commercially available, weakly basic drugs have been shown to be lysosomotropic, meaning they are subject to extensive sequestration in lysosomes through an ion trapping-type mechanism. The extent of lysosomal trapping of a drug is an important therapeutic consideration because it can influence both activity and pharmacokinetic disposition. The administration of certain drugs can alter lysosomes such that their accumulation capacity for co-administered and/or secondarily administered drugs is altered. In this review the authors explore what is known regarding the mechanistic basis for drug-drug interactions involving lysosomes. Specifically, the authors address the influence of drugs on lysosomal pH, volume and lipid processing. Many drugs are known to extensively accumulate in lysosomes and significantly alter their structure and function; however, the therapeutic and toxicological implications of this remain controversial. The authors propose that drug-drug interactions involving lysosomes represent an important potential source of variability in drug activity and pharmacokinetics. Most evaluations of drug-drug interactions involving lysosomes have been performed in cultured cells and isolated tissues. More comprehensive in vivo evaluations are needed to fully explore the impact of this drug-drug interaction pathway on therapeutic outcomes.

  13. Potential drug-drug interactions with direct oral anticoagulants in elderly hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Heather L; Polasek, Thomas M

    2017-10-01

    To determine the prevalence and nature of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) with direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in elderly hospitalized patients. This was a retrospective observational study. Inclusion criteria were: aged over 65 years; taking apixaban, rivaroxaban or dabigatran; and admitted to the Repatriation General Hospital between April 2014 and July 2015. A list of clinically relevant 'perpetrator' drugs was compiled from product information, the Australian Medicines Handbook, the Australian National Prescribing Service resources, and local health network guidelines. The prevalence and nature of potential DDIs with DOACs was determined by comparing inpatient drug charts with the list of perpetrator drugs. There were 122 patients in the study with a mean age of 82 years. Most patients had nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and were taking DOACs to prevent thrombotic stroke (83%). Overall, 45 patients (37%) had a total of 54 potential DDIs. Thirty-five patients had potential pharmacodynamic DDIs with antidepressants, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antiplatelets (35/122, 29%). Nineteen patients had potential pharmacokinetic DDIs (19/122, 16%). Of these, 68% (13/19) were taking drugs that increase DOAC plasma concentrations (amiodarone, erythromycin, diltiazem or verapamil) and 32% (6/19) were taking drugs that decrease DOAC plasma concentrations (carbamazepine, primidone or phenytoin). There were no cases of patients taking contraindicated interacting drugs. Potential DDIs with DOACs in elderly hospital inpatients are relatively common, particularly interactions that may increase the risk of bleeding. The risk-benefit ratio of DOACs in elderly patients on polypharmacy should always be carefully considered.

  14. Drug-drug interactions of antifungal agents and implications for patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubbins, Paul O; Amsden, Jarrett R

    2005-10-01

    Drug interactions in the gastrointestinal tract, liver and kidneys result from alterations in pH, ionic complexation, and interference with membrane transport proteins and enzymatic processes involved in intestinal absorption, enteric and hepatic metabolism, renal filtration and excretion. Azole antifungals can be involved in drug interactions at all the sites, by one or more of the above mechanisms. Consequently, azoles interact with a vast array of compounds. Drug-drug interactions associated with amphotericin B formulations are predictable and result from the renal toxicity and electrolyte disturbances associated with these compounds. The echinocandins are unknown cytochrome P450 substrates and to date are relatively devoid of significant drug-drug interactions. This article reviews drug interactions involving antifungal agents that affect other agents and implications for patient care are highlighted.

  15. Drug-drug interactions among recently hospitalised patients--frequent but mostly clinically insignificant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Bente; Andersen, Stig Ejdrup; Dalhoff, Kim

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients use and store considerable amounts of drugs. The aim of the present study was to identify potential drug-drug interactions between drugs used by patients recently discharged from the hospital and, subsequently, to estimate the clinical implications of these interactions. METHODS......: Patients were visited within 1 week following their discharge from hospital and interviewed about their drug use. Stored products were inspected. We used a bibliography (Hansten and Horn; Wolters Kluwer Health, St. Louis, Mo., 2004) to identify and classify potential drug-drug interactions. RESULTS......: eight per patient; range: 1-24). With respect to those drugs used daily or on demand, 476 potential interactions were identified (126 patients); none were class 1 (always avoid drug combination) and 25 were class 2 (usually avoid combination; 24 patients). Eleven of the potential class 2 interactions...

  16. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction and their implication in clinical management

    OpenAIRE

    Palleria, Caterina; DI PAOLO, Antonello; Giofrè, Chiara; Caglioti, Chiara; Leuzzi, Giacomo; Siniscalchi, Antonio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Gallelli, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are one of the commonest causes of medication error in developed countries, particularly in the elderly due to poly-therapy, with a prevalence of 20-40%. In particular, poly-therapy increases the complexity of therapeutic management and thereby the risk of clinically important DDIs, which can both induce the development of adverse drug reactions or reduce the clinical efficacy. DDIs can be classify into two main groups: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic. In thi...

  17. Global patient safety and antiretroviral drug-drug interactions in the resource-limited setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seden, Kay; Khoo, Saye H; Back, David; Byakika-Kibwika, Pauline; Lamorde, Mohammed; Ryan, Mairin; Merry, Concepta

    2013-01-01

    Scale-up of HIV treatment services may have contributed to an increase in functional health facilities available in resource-limited settings and an increase in patient use of facilities and retention in care. As more patients are reached with medicines, monitoring patient safety is increasingly important. Limited data from resource-limited settings suggest that medication error and antiretroviral drug-drug interactions may pose a significant risk to patient safety. Commonly cited causes of medication error in the developed world include the speed and complexity of the medication use cycle combined with inadequate systems and processes. In resource-limited settings, specific factors may contribute, such as inadequate human resources and high disease burden. Management of drug-drug interactions may be complicated by limited access to alternative medicines or laboratory monitoring. Improving patient safety by addressing the issue of antiretroviral drug-drug interactions has the potential not just to improve healthcare for individuals, but also to strengthen health systems and improve vital communication among healthcare providers and with regulatory agencies.

  18. Potential Drug-Drug Interactions among Patients prescriptions collected from Medicine Out-patient Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqui, Riffat; Hoor, Talea; Karim, Nasim; Muneer, Mehtab

    2018-01-01

    To identify and evaluate the frequency, severity, mechanism and common pairs of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) in prescriptions by consultants in medicine outpatient department. This cross sectional descriptive study was done by Pharmacology department of Bahria University Medical & Dental College (BUMDC) in medicine outpatient department (OPD) of a private hospital in Karachi from December 2015 to January 2016. A total of 220 prescriptions written by consultants were collected. Medications given with patient's diagnosis were recorded. Drugs were analyzed for interactions by utilizing Medscape drug interaction checker, drugs.com checker and stockley`s drug interactions index. Two hundred eleven prescriptions were selected while remaining were excluded from the study because of unavailability of the prescribed drugs in the drug interaction checkers. In 211 prescriptions, two common diagnoses were diabetes mellitus (28.43%) and hypertension (27.96%). A total of 978 medications were given. Mean number of medications per prescription was 4.6. A total of 369 drug-drug interactions were identified in 211 prescriptions (175%). They were serious 4.33%, significant 66.12% and minor 29.53%. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions were 37.94% and 51.21% respectively while 10.84% had unknown mechanism. Number wise common pairs of DDIs were Omeprazole-Losartan (S), Gabapentine- Acetaminophen (M), Losartan-Diclofenac (S). The frequency of DDIs is found to be too high in prescriptions of consultants from medicine OPD of a private hospital in Karachi. Significant drug-drug interactions were more and mostly caused by Pharmacodynamic mechanism. Number wise evaluation showed three common pairs of drugs involved in interactions.

  19. Using Nonexperts for Annotating Pharmacokinetic Drug-Drug Interaction Mentions in Product Labeling: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochheiser, Harry; Ning, Yifan; Hernandez, Andres; Horn, John R; Jacobson, Rebecca; Boyce, Richard D

    2016-04-11

    Because vital details of potential pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions are often described in free-text structured product labels, manual curation is a necessary but expensive step in the development of electronic drug-drug interaction information resources. The use of nonexperts to annotate potential drug-drug interaction (PDDI) mentions in drug product label annotation may be a means of lessening the burden of manual curation. Our goal was to explore the practicality of using nonexpert participants to annotate drug-drug interaction descriptions from structured product labels. By presenting annotation tasks to both pharmacy experts and relatively naïve participants, we hoped to demonstrate the feasibility of using nonexpert annotators for drug-drug information annotation. We were also interested in exploring whether and to what extent natural language processing (NLP) preannotation helped improve task completion time, accuracy, and subjective satisfaction. Two experts and 4 nonexperts were asked to annotate 208 structured product label sections under 4 conditions completed sequentially: (1) no NLP assistance, (2) preannotation of drug mentions, (3) preannotation of drug mentions and PDDIs, and (4) a repeat of the no-annotation condition. Results were evaluated within the 2 groups and relative to an existing gold standard. Participants were asked to provide reports on the time required to complete tasks and their perceptions of task difficulty. One of the experts and 3 of the nonexperts completed all tasks. Annotation results from the nonexpert group were relatively strong in every scenario and better than the performance of the NLP pipeline. The expert and 2 of the nonexperts were able to complete most tasks in less than 3 hours. Usability perceptions were generally positive (3.67 for expert, mean of 3.33 for nonexperts). The results suggest that nonexpert annotation might be a feasible option for comprehensive labeling of annotated PDDIs across a broader

  20. Common drug-drug interactions in antifungal treatments for superficial fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Aditya K; Versteeg, Sarah G; Shear, Neil H

    2018-04-01

    Antifungal agents can be co-administered alongside several other medications for a variety of reasons such as the presence of comorbidities. Pharmacodynamic interactions such as synergistic and antagonistic interactions could be the result of co-administered medications. Pharmacokinetic interactions could also transpire through the inhibition of metabolizing enzymes and drug transport systems, altering the absorption, metabolism and excretion of co-administered medications. Both pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions can result in hospitalization due to serious adverse effects associated with antifungal agents, lower therapeutic doses required to achieve desired antifungal activity, and prevent antifungal resistance. Areas covered: The objective of this review is to summarize pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions associated with common antifungal agents used to treat superficial fungal infections. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions that impact the therapeutic effects of antifungal agents and drugs that are influenced by the presence of antifungal agents was the context to which these antifungal agents were addressed. Expert opinion: The potential for drug-drug interactions is minimal for topical antifungals as opposed to oral antifungals as they have minimal exposure to other co-administered medications. Developing non-lipophilic antifungals that have unique metabolizing pathways and are topical applied are suggested properties that could help limit drug-drug interactions associated with future treatments.

  1. A review of drug-drug interactions in older HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chary, Aarthi; Nguyen, Nancy N; Maiton, Kimberly; Holodniy, Mark

    2017-12-01

    The number of older HIV-infected people is growing due to increasing life expectancies resulting from the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Both HIV and aging increase the risk of other comorbidities, such as cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and some malignancies, leading to greater challenges in managing HIV with other conditions. This results in complex medication regimens with the potential for significant drug-drug interactions and increased morbidity and mortality. Area covered: We review the metabolic pathways of ART and other medications used to treat medical co-morbidities, highlight potential areas of concern for drug-drug interactions, and where feasible, suggest alternative approaches for treating these conditions as suggested from national guidelines or articles published in the English language. Expert commentary: There is limited evidence-based data on ART drug interactions, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in the older HIV-infected population. Choosing and maintaining effective ART regimens for older adults requires consideration of side effect profile, individual comorbidities, interactions with concurrent prescriptions and non-prescription medications and supplements, dietary patterns with respect to dosing, pill burden and ease of dosing, cost and affordability, patient preferences, social situation, and ART resistance history. Practitioners must remain vigilant for potential drug interactions and intervene when there is a potential for harm.

  2. Pharmacogenetics of drug-drug interaction and drug-drug-gene interaction : A systematic review on CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP2D6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bahar, Muh Akbar; Setiawan, Didik; Hak, Eelko; Wilffert, Bob

    Currently, most guidelines on drug-drug interaction (DDI) neither consider the potential effect of genetic polymorphism in the strength of the interaction nor do they account for the complex interaction caused by the combination of DDI and drug-gene interaction (DGI) where there are multiple

  3. Predicting drug?drug interactions through drug structural similarities and interaction networks incorporating pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Takeda, Takako; Hao, Ming; Cheng, Tiejun; Bryant, Stephen H.; Wang, Yanli

    2017-01-01

    Drug?drug interactions (DDIs) may lead to adverse effects and potentially result in drug withdrawal from the market. Predicting DDIs during drug development would help reduce development costs and time by rigorous evaluation of drug candidates. The primary mechanisms of DDIs are based on pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD). This study examines the effects of 2D structural similarities of drugs on DDI prediction through interaction networks including both PD and PK knowledge. Our a...

  4. Potential drug-drug and drug-disease interactions in well-functioning community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, J T; Perera, S; Newman, A B; Thorpe, J M; Donohue, J M; Simonsick, E M; Shorr, R I; Bauer, D C; Marcum, Z A

    2017-04-01

    There are few studies examining both drug-drug and drug-disease interactions in older adults. Therefore, the objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of potential drug-drug and drug-disease interactions and associated factors in community-dwelling older adults. This cross-sectional study included 3055 adults aged 70-79 without mobility limitations at their baseline visit in the Health Aging and Body Composition Study conducted in the communities of Pittsburgh PA and Memphis TN, USA. The outcome factors were potential drug-drug and drug-disease interactions as per the application of explicit criteria drawn from a number of sources to self-reported prescription and non-prescription medication use. Over one-third of participants had at least one type of interaction. Approximately one quarter (25·1%) had evidence of had one or more drug-drug interactions. Nearly 10·7% of the participants had a drug-drug interaction that involved a non-prescription medication. % The most common drug-drug interaction was non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) affecting antihypertensives. Additionally, 16·0% had a potential drug-disease interaction with 3·7% participants having one involving non-prescription medications. The most common drug-disease interaction was aspirin/NSAID use in those with history of peptic ulcer disease without gastroprotection. Over one-third (34·0%) had at least one type of drug interaction. Each prescription medication increased the odds of having at least one type of drug interaction by 35-40% [drug-drug interaction adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1·35, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1·27-1·42; drug-disease interaction AOR = 1·30; CI = 1·21-1·40; and both AOR = 1·45; CI = 1·34-1·57]. A prior hospitalization increased the odds of having at least one type of drug interaction by 49-84% compared with those not hospitalized (drug-drug interaction AOR = 1·49, 95% CI = 1·11-2·01; drug-disease interaction AOR = 1·69, CI = 1·15-2

  5. Information needs for making clinical recommendations about potential drug-drug interactions: a synthesis of literature review and interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnoli, Katrina M; Nelson, Scott D; Hines, Lisa; Empey, Philip; Boyce, Richard D; Hochheiser, Harry

    2017-02-22

    Drug information compendia and drug-drug interaction information databases are critical resources for clinicians and pharmacists working to avoid adverse events due to exposure to potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs). Our goal is to develop information models, annotated data, and search tools that will facilitate the interpretation of PDDI information. To better understand the information needs and work practices of specialists who search and synthesize PDDI evidence for drug information resources, we conducted an inquiry that combined a thematic analysis of published literature with unstructured interviews. Starting from an initial set of relevant articles, we developed search terms and conducted a literature search. Two reviewers conducted a thematic analysis of included articles. Unstructured interviews with drug information experts were conducted and similarly coded. Information needs, work processes, and indicators of potential strengths and weaknesses of information systems were identified. Review of 92 papers and 10 interviews identified 56 categories of information needs related to the interpretation of PDDI information including drug and interaction information; study design; evidence including clinical details, quality and content of reports, and consequences; and potential recommendations. We also identified strengths/weaknesses of PDDI information systems. We identified the kinds of information that might be most effective for summarizing PDDIs. The drug information experts we interviewed had differing goals, suggesting a need for detailed information models and flexible presentations. Several information needs not discussed in previous work were identified, including temporal overlaps in drug administration, biological plausibility of interactions, and assessment of the quality and content of reports. Richly structured depictions of PDDI information may help drug information experts more effectively interpret data and develop recommendations

  6. Venetoclax (ABT-199) Might Act as a Perpetrator in Pharmacokinetic Drug-Drug Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Johanna; Gajek, Thomas; Köhler, Bruno Christian; Haefeli, Walter Emil

    2016-02-24

    Venetoclax (ABT-199) represents a specific B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) inhibitor that is currently under development for the treatment of lymphoid malignancies. So far, there is no published information on its interaction potential with important drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters, or its efficacy in multidrug resistant (MDR) cells. We therefore scrutinized its drug-drug interaction potential in vitro. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) was quantified by commercial kits. Inhibition of drug transporters (P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs)) was evaluated by the use of fluorescent probe substrates. Induction of drug transporters and drug metabolizing enzymes was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. The efficacy of venetoclax in MDR cells lines was evaluated with proliferation assays. Venetoclax moderately inhibited P-gp, BCRP, OATP1B1, OATP1B3, CYP3A4, and CYP2C19, whereas CYP2B6 activity was increased. Venetoclax induced the mRNA expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, UGT1A3, and UGT1A9. In contrast, expression of ABCB1 was suppressed, which might revert tumor resistance towards antineoplastic P-gp substrates. P-gp over-expression led to reduced antiproliferative effects of venetoclax. Effective concentrations for inhibition and induction lay in the range of maximum plasma concentrations of venetoclax, indicating that it might act as a perpetrator drug in pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions.

  7. Target mediated drug disposition with drug-drug interaction, Part II: competitive and uncompetitive cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Gilbert; Jusko, William J; Schropp, Johannes

    2017-02-01

    We present competitive and uncompetitive drug-drug interaction (DDI) with target mediated drug disposition (TMDD) equations and investigate their pharmacokinetic DDI properties. For application of TMDD models, quasi-equilibrium (QE) or quasi-steady state (QSS) approximations are necessary to reduce the number of parameters. To realize those approximations of DDI TMDD models, we derive an ordinary differential equation (ODE) representation formulated in free concentration and free receptor variables. This ODE formulation can be straightforward implemented in typical PKPD software without solving any non-linear equation system arising from the QE or QSS approximation of the rapid binding assumptions. This manuscript is the second in a series to introduce and investigate DDI TMDD models and to apply the QE or QSS approximation.

  8. The potential drug-drug interaction between proton pump inhibitors and warfarin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard; Stage, Tore Bjerregaard; Hansen, Morten Rix

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been suggested to increase the effect of warfarin, and clinical guidelines recommend careful monitoring of international normalized ratio (INR) when initiating PPI among warfarin users. However, this drug-drug interaction is sparsely investigated...... in a clinical setting. The aim was to assess whether initiation of PPI treatment among users of warfarin leads to increased INR values. METHODS: The study was an observational self-controlled study from 1998 to 2012 leveraging data on INR measurements on patients treated with warfarin from primary care...... and outpatient clinics and their use of prescription drugs. Data were analyzed in 2015. We assessed INR, warfarin dose, and dose/INR ratio before and after initiating PPI treatment using the paired student's t-test. RESULTS: We identified 305 warfarin users initiating treatment with PPIs. The median age was 71...

  9. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction and their implication in clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palleria, Caterina; Di Paolo, Antonello; Giofrè, Chiara; Caglioti, Chiara; Leuzzi, Giacomo; Siniscalchi, Antonio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Gallelli, Luca

    2013-07-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are one of the commonest causes of medication error in developed countries, particularly in the elderly due to poly-therapy, with a prevalence of 20-40%. In particular, poly-therapy increases the complexity of therapeutic management and thereby the risk of clinically important DDIs, which can both induce the development of adverse drug reactions or reduce the clinical efficacy. DDIs can be classify into two main groups: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic. In this review, using Medline, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library and Reference lists we searched articles published until June 30 2012, and we described the mechanism of pharmacokinetic DDIs focusing the interest on their clinical implications.

  10. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction and their implication in clinical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palleria Caterina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-drug interactions (DDIs are one of the commonest causes of medication error in developed countries, particularly in the elderly due to poly-therapy, with a prevalence of 20-40%. In particular, poly-therapy increases the complexity of therapeutic management and thereby the risk of clinically important DDIs, which can both induce the development of adverse drug reactions or reduce the clinical efficacy. DDIs can be classify into two main groups: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic. In this review, using Medline, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library and Reference lists we searched articles published until June 30 2012, and we described the mechanism of pharmacokinetic DDIs focusing the interest on their clinical implications.

  11. Analysis of clinical drug-drug interaction data to predict uncharacterized interaction magnitudes between antiretroviral drugs and co-medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stader, Felix; Kinvig, Hannah; Battegay, Manuel; Khoo, Saye; Owen, Andrew; Siccardi, Marco; Marzolini, Catia

    2018-04-23

    Despite their high potential for drug-drug-interactions (DDI), clinical DDI studies of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) are often lacking, because the full range of potential interactions cannot feasibly or pragmatically be studied, with some high-risk DDI studies also ethically difficult to undertake. Thus, a robust method to screen and to predict the likelihood of DDIs is required.We developed a method to predict DDIs based on two parameters: the degree of metabolism by specific enzymes such as CYP3A and the strength of an inhibitor or inducer. These parameters were derived from existing studies utilizing paradigm substrates, inducers and inhibitors of CYP3A, to assess the predictive performance of this method by verifying predicted magnitudes of changes in drug exposure against clinical DDI studies involving ARVs.The derived parameters were consistent with the FDA classification of sensitive CYP3A substrates and the strength of CYP3A inhibitors and inducers. Characterized DDI magnitudes (n = 68) between ARVs and co-medications were successfully quantified meaning 53%, 85% and 98% of the predictions were within 1.25-fold (0.80 - 1.25), 1.5-fold (0.66 - 1.48) and 2-fold (0.66 - 1.94) of the observed clinical data. In addition, the method identifies CYP3A substrates likely to be highly or conversely minimally impacted by CYP3A inhibitors or inducers, thus categorizing the magnitude of DDIs.The developed effective and robust method has the potential to support a more rational identification of dose adjustment to overcome DDIs being particularly relevant in a HIV-setting giving the treatments complexity, high DDI risk and limited guidance on the management of DDIs. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Pharmacogenetics of drug-drug interaction and drug-drug-gene interaction: a systematic review on CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP2D6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar, Muh Akbar; Setiawan, Didik; Hak, Eelko; Wilffert, Bob

    2017-05-01

    Currently, most guidelines on drug-drug interaction (DDI) neither consider the potential effect of genetic polymorphism in the strength of the interaction nor do they account for the complex interaction caused by the combination of DDI and drug-gene interaction (DGI) where there are multiple biotransformation pathways, which is referred to as drug-drug-gene interaction (DDGI). In this systematic review, we report the impact of pharmacogenetics on DDI and DDGI in which three major drug-metabolizing enzymes - CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 - are central. We observed that several DDI and DDGI are highly gene-dependent, leading to a different magnitude of interaction. Precision drug therapy should take pharmacogenetics into account when drug interactions in clinical practice are expected.

  13. Drug-drug interactions as a result of co-administering Δ9-THC and CBD with other psychotropic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Carola; Carmona, Nicole E; Lee, Yena L; Ragguett, Renee-Marie; Pan, Zihang; Rosenblat, Joshua D; Subramaniapillai, Mehala; Shekotikhina, Margarita; Almatham, Fahad; Alageel, Asem; Mansur, Rodrigo; Ho, Roger C; McIntyre, Roger S

    2018-01-01

    To determine, via narrative, non-systematic review of pre-clinical and clinical studies, whether the effect of cannabis on hepatic biotransformation pathways would be predicted to result in clinically significant drug-drug interactions (DDIs) with commonly prescribed psychotropic agents. Areas covered: A non-systematic literature search was conducted using the following databases: PubMed, PsycInfo, and Scopus from inception to January 2017. The search term cannabis was cross-referenced with the terms drug interactions, cytochrome, cannabinoids, cannabidiol, and medical marijuana. Pharmacological, molecular, and physiologic studies evaluating the pharmacokinetics of Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ 9 -THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), both in vitro and in vivo, were included. Bibliographies were also manually searched for additional citations that were relevant to the overarching aim of this paper. Expert opinion: Δ 9 -Tetrahydrocannabinol and CBD are substrates and inhibitors of cytochrome P450 enzymatic pathways relevant to the biotransformation of commonly prescribed psychotropic agents. The high frequency and increasing use of cannabis invites the need for healthcare providers to familiarize themselves with potential DDIs in persons receiving select psychotropic agents, and additionally consuming medical marijuana and/or recreational marijuana.

  14. Computational prediction of drug-drug interactions based on drugs functional similarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdousi, Reza; Safdari, Reza; Omidi, Yadollah

    2017-06-01

    Therapeutic activities of drugs are often influenced by co-administration of drugs that may cause inevitable drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and inadvertent side effects. Prediction and identification of DDIs are extremely vital for the patient safety and success of treatment modalities. A number of computational methods have been employed for the prediction of DDIs based on drugs structures and/or functions. Here, we report on a computational method for DDIs prediction based on functional similarity of drugs. The model was set based on key biological elements including carriers, transporters, enzymes and targets (CTET). The model was applied for 2189 approved drugs. For each drug, all the associated CTETs were collected, and the corresponding binary vectors were constructed to determine the DDIs. Various similarity measures were conducted to detect DDIs. Of the examined similarity methods, the inner product-based similarity measures (IPSMs) were found to provide improved prediction values. Altogether, 2,394,766 potential drug pairs interactions were studied. The model was able to predict over 250,000 unknown potential DDIs. Upon our findings, we propose the current method as a robust, yet simple and fast, universal in silico approach for identification of DDIs. We envision that this proposed method can be used as a practical technique for the detection of possible DDIs based on the functional similarities of drugs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Consistency of psychotropic drug-drug interactions listed in drug monographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinyue; Hatton, Randy C; Zhu, Yanmin; Hincapie-Castillo, Juan M; Bussing, Regina; Barnicoat, Marie; Winterstein, Almut G

    With an increasing prevalence of psychotropic polypharmacy, clinicians depend on drug-drug interaction (DDI) references to ensure safe regimens, but the consistency of such information is frequently questioned. To evaluate the consistency of psychotropic DDIs documented in Clinical Pharmacology (CP), Micromedex (MM), and Lexicomp (LC) and summarize consistent psychotropic DDIs. In May 2016, we extracted severe or major psychotropic DDIs for 102 psychotropic drugs, including central nervous system (CNS) stimulants, antidepressants, an antimanic agent (lithium), antipsychotics, anticonvulsants, and anxiolytics-sedatives-hypnotics from CP, MM, and LC. We then summarized the psychotropic DDIs that were included in all 3 references and with evidence quality of "excellent" or "good" based on MM. We identified 1496, 938, and 1006 unique severe or major psychotropic DDIs from CP, MM, and LC, respectively. Common adverse effects related to psychotropic DDIs include increased or decreased effectiveness, CNS depression, neurotoxicity, QT prolongation, serotonin syndrome, and multiple adverse effects. Among these interactions, only 371 psychotropic DDIs were documented in all 3 references, 59 of which had "excellent" or "good" quality of evidence based on MM. The consistency of psychotropic DDI documentation across CP, MM, and LC is poor. DDI documentations need standards that would encourage consistency among drug information references. The list of the 59 DDIs may be useful in the assessment of psychotropic polypharmacy and highlighting DDI alerts in clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Detection of Potential Drug-Drug Interactions for Outpatients across Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ting Yeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The National Health Insurance Administration (NHIA has adopted smart cards (or NHI-IC cards as health cards to carry patients’ medication histories across hospitals in Taiwan. The aims of this study are to enhance a computerized physician order entry system to support drug-drug interaction (DDI checking based on a patient’s medication history stored in his/her NHI-IC card. For performance evaluation, we developed a transaction tracking log to keep track of every operation on NHI-IC cards. Based on analysis of the transaction tracking log from 1 August to 31 October 2007, physicians read patients’ NHI-IC cards in 71.01% (8,246 of patient visits; 33.02% (2,723 of the card reads showed at least one medicine currently being taken by the patient, 82.94% of which were prescribed during the last visit. Among 10,036 issued prescriptions, seven prescriptions (0.09% contained at least one drug item that might interact with the currently-taken medicines stored in NHI-IC cards and triggered pop-up alerts. This study showed that the capacity of an NHI-IC card is adequate to support DDI checking across hospitals. Thus, the enhanced computerized physician order entry (CPOE system can support better DDI checking when physicians are making prescriptions and provide safer medication care, particularly for patients who receive medication care from different hospitals.

  17. Detection of potential drug-drug interactions for outpatients across hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yu-Ting; Hsu, Min-Hui; Chen, Chien-Yuan; Lo, Yu-Sheng; Liu, Chien-Tsai

    2014-01-27

    The National Health Insurance Administration (NHIA) has adopted smart cards (or NHI-IC cards) as health cards to carry patients' medication histories across hospitals in Taiwan. The aims of this study are to enhance a computerized physician order entry system to support drug-drug interaction (DDI) checking based on a patient's medication history stored in his/her NHI-IC card. For performance evaluation, we developed a transaction tracking log to keep track of every operation on NHI-IC cards. Based on analysis of the transaction tracking log from 1 August to 31 October 2007, physicians read patients' NHI-IC cards in 71.01% (8,246) of patient visits; 33.02% (2,723) of the card reads showed at least one medicine currently being taken by the patient, 82.94% of which were prescribed during the last visit. Among 10,036 issued prescriptions, seven prescriptions (0.09%) contained at least one drug item that might interact with the currently-taken medicines stored in NHI-IC cards and triggered pop-up alerts. This study showed that the capacity of an NHI-IC card is adequate to support DDI checking across hospitals. Thus, the enhanced computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system can support better DDI checking when physicians are making prescriptions and provide safer medication care, particularly for patients who receive medication care from different hospitals.

  18. A novel algorithm for analyzing drug-drug interactions from MEDLINE literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yin; Shen, Dan; Pietsch, Maxwell; Nagar, Chetan; Fadli, Zayd; Huang, Hong; Tu, Yi-Cheng; Cheng, Feng

    2015-11-27

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) is becoming a serious clinical safety issue as the use of multiple medications becomes more common. Searching the MEDLINE database for journal articles related to DDI produces over 330,000 results. It is impossible to read and summarize these references manually. As the volume of biomedical reference in the MEDLINE database continues to expand at a rapid pace, automatic identification of DDIs from literature is becoming increasingly important. In this article, we present a random-sampling-based statistical algorithm to identify possible DDIs and the underlying mechanism from the substances field of MEDLINE records. The substances terms are essentially carriers of compound (including protein) information in a MEDLINE record. Four case studies on warfarin, ibuprofen, furosemide and sertraline implied that our method was able to rank possible DDIs with high accuracy (90.0% for warfarin, 83.3% for ibuprofen, 70.0% for furosemide and 100% for sertraline in the top 10% of a list of compounds ranked by p-value). A social network analysis of substance terms was also performed to construct networks between proteins and drug pairs to elucidate how the two drugs could interact.

  19. Hepatic transporter drug-drug interactions: an evaluation of approaches and methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Beth; Riley, Robert J

    2017-12-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) continue to account for 5% of hospital admissions and therefore remain a major regulatory concern. Effective, quantitative prediction of DDIs will reduce unexpected clinical findings and encourage projects to frontload DDI investigations rather than concentrating on risk management ('manage the baggage') later in drug development. A key challenge in DDI prediction is the discrepancies between reported models. Areas covered: The current synopsis focuses on four recent influential publications on hepatic drug transporter DDIs using static models that tackle interactions with individual transporters and in combination with other drug transporters and metabolising enzymes. These models vary in their assumptions (including input parameters), transparency, reproducibility and complexity. In this review, these facets are compared and contrasted with recommendations made as to their application. Expert opinion: Over the past decade, static models have evolved from simple [I]/k i models to incorporate victim and perpetrator disposition mechanisms including the absorption rate constant, the fraction of the drug metabolised/eliminated and/or clearance concepts. Nonetheless, models that comprise additional parameters and complexity do not necessarily out-perform simpler models with fewer inputs. Further, consideration of the property space to exploit some drug target classes has also highlighted the fine balance required between frontloading and back-loading studies to design out or 'manage the baggage'.

  20. Position-aware deep multi-task learning for drug-drug interaction extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Deyu; Miao, Lei; He, Yulan

    2018-05-01

    A drug-drug interaction (DDI) is a situation in which a drug affects the activity of another drug synergistically or antagonistically when being administered together. The information of DDIs is crucial for healthcare professionals to prevent adverse drug events. Although some known DDIs can be found in purposely-built databases such as DrugBank, most information is still buried in scientific publications. Therefore, automatically extracting DDIs from biomedical texts is sorely needed. In this paper, we propose a novel position-aware deep multi-task learning approach for extracting DDIs from biomedical texts. In particular, sentences are represented as a sequence of word embeddings and position embeddings. An attention-based bidirectional long short-term memory (BiLSTM) network is used to encode each sentence. The relative position information of words with the target drugs in text is combined with the hidden states of BiLSTM to generate the position-aware attention weights. Moreover, the tasks of predicting whether or not two drugs interact with each other and further distinguishing the types of interactions are learned jointly in multi-task learning framework. The proposed approach has been evaluated on the DDIExtraction challenge 2013 corpus and the results show that with the position-aware attention only, our proposed approach outperforms the state-of-the-art method by 0.99% for binary DDI classification, and with both position-aware attention and multi-task learning, our approach achieves a micro F-score of 72.99% on interaction type identification, outperforming the state-of-the-art approach by 1.51%, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed approach. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical assessment of drug-drug interactions of tasimelteon, a novel dual melatonin receptor agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, Brian W; Torres, Rosarelis; Dressman, Marlene A; Kramer, William G; Baroldi, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Tasimelteon ([1R-trans]-N-[(2-[2,3-dihydro-4-benzofuranyl] cyclopropyl) methyl] propanamide), a novel dual melatonin receptor agonist that demonstrates specificity and high affinity for melatonin receptor types 1 and 2 (MT1 and MT2 receptors), is the first treatment approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Disorder. Tasimelteon is rapidly absorbed, with a mean absolute bioavailability of approximately 38%, and is extensively metabolized primarily by oxidation at multiple sites, mainly by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2 and CYP3A4/5, as initially demonstrated by in vitro studies and confirmed by the results of clinical drug-drug interactions presented here. The effects of strong inhibitors and moderate or strong inducers of CYP1A2 and CYP3A4/5 on the pharmacokinetics of tasimelteon were evaluated in humans. Coadministration with fluvoxamine resulted in an approximately 6.5-fold increase in tasimelteon's area under the curve (AUC), whereas cigarette smoking decreased tasimelteon's exposure by approximately 40%. Coadministration with ketoconazole resulted in an approximately 54% increase in tasimelteon's AUC, whereas rifampin pretreatment resulted in a decrease in tasimelteon's exposure of approximately 89%. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  2. Knowledge Integration and Use-Case Analysis for a Customized Drug-Drug Interaction CDS Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Hye Jin; Park, Man Young; Kim, Woojae; Yoon, Duk Yong; Ahn, Eun Kyoung; Park, Rae Woong

    Clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) are thought to reduce adverse drug events (ADEs) by monitoring drug-drug interactions(DDIs). However, clinically improper or excessive alerts can result in high alert overrides. A tailored CDS service, which is appropriate for clinicians and their ordering situations, is required to increase alert acceptance. In this study, we conducted a 12-week pilot project adopting a tailed CDSS at an emergency department. The new CDSS was conducted via a stepwise integration of additional new rules. The alert status with changes in acceptance rate was analyzed. The most frequent DDI alerts were related to prescriptions of anti-inflammatory drugs. The percentages of alert overrides for each stage were 98.0%, 96.0%, 96.9%, and 98.1%, respectively. 91.5% of overridden alerts were related to discharge medications. To reduce the potential hazards of ADEs, the development of an effective customized DDI CDSS is required, via in-depth analysis on alert patterns and overridden reasons.

  3. Data-driven prediction of adverse drug reactions induced by drug-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruifeng; AbdulHameed, Mohamed Diwan M; Kumar, Kamal; Yu, Xueping; Wallqvist, Anders; Reifman, Jaques

    2017-06-08

    The expanded use of multiple drugs has increased the occurrence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) induced by drug-drug interactions (DDIs). However, such reactions are typically not observed in clinical drug-development studies because most of them focus on single-drug therapies. ADR reporting systems collect information on adverse health effects caused by both single drugs and DDIs. A major challenge is to unambiguously identify the effects caused by DDIs and to attribute them to specific drug interactions. A computational method that provides prospective predictions of potential DDI-induced ADRs will help to identify and mitigate these adverse health effects. We hypothesize that drug-protein interactions can be used as independent variables in predicting ADRs. We constructed drug pair-protein interaction profiles for ~800 drugs using drug-protein interaction information in the public domain. We then constructed statistical models to score drug pairs for their potential to induce ADRs based on drug pair-protein interaction profiles. We used extensive clinical database information to construct categorical prediction models for drug pairs that are likely to induce ADRs via synergistic DDIs and showed that model performance deteriorated only slightly, with a moderate amount of false positives and false negatives in the training samples, as evaluated by our cross-validation analysis. The cross validation calculations showed an average prediction accuracy of 89% across 1,096 ADR models that captured the deleterious effects of synergistic DDIs. Because the models rely on drug-protein interactions, we made predictions for pairwise combinations of 764 drugs that are currently on the market and for which drug-protein interaction information is available. These predictions are publicly accessible at http://avoid-db.bhsai.org . We used the predictive models to analyze broader aspects of DDI-induced ADRs, showing that ~10% of all combinations have the potential to induce ADRs

  4. Detecting drug-drug interactions using a database for spontaneous adverse drug reactions : an example with diuretics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Puijenbroek, E P; Egberts, A C; Heerdink, E R; Leufkens, H G

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Drug-drug interactions are relatively rarely reported to spontaneous reporting systems (SRSs) for adverse drug reactions. For this reason, the traditional approach for analysing SRS has major limitations for the detection of drug-drug interactions. We developed a method that may enable

  5. Clinical Drug-Drug Pharmacokinetic Interaction Potential of Sucralfate with Other Drugs: Review and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulochana, Suresh P; Syed, Muzeeb; Chandrasekar, Devaraj V; Mullangi, Ramesh; Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2016-10-01

    Sucralfate, a complex of aluminium hydroxide with sulfated sucrose, forms a strong gastrointestinal tract (GIT) mucosal barrier with excellent anti-ulcer property. Because sucralfate does not undergo any significant oral absorption, sucralfate resides in the GIT for a considerable length of time. The unabsorbed sucralfate may alter the pharmacokinetics of the oral drugs by impeding its absorption and reducing the oral bioavailability. Because of the increased use of sucralfate, it was important to provide a reappraisal of the published clinical drug-drug interaction studies of sucralfate with scores of drugs. This review covers several category of drugs such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, fluoroquinolones, histamine H2-receptor blockers, macrolides, anti-fungals, anti-diabetics, salicylic acid derivatives, steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and provides pharmacokinetic data summary along with study design, objectives and key remarks. While the loss of oral bioavailability was significant for the fluoroquinolone class, it generally varied for other classes of drugs, suggesting that impact of the co-administration of sucralfate is manageable in clinical situations. Given the technology advancement in formulation development, it may be in order feasible to develop appropriate formulation strategies to either avoid or minimize the absorption-related issues when co-administered with sucralfate. It is recommended that consideration of both in vitro and preclinical studies may be in order to gauge the level of interaction of a drug with sucralfate. Such data may aid in the development of appropriate strategies to navigate the co-administration of sucralfate with other drugs in this age of polypharmacy.

  6. A Novel Design for Drug-Drug Interaction Alerts Improves Prescribing Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Alissa L; Chen, Siying; Melton, Brittany L; Johnson, Elizabette G; Spina, Jeffrey R; Weiner, Michael; Zillich, Alan J

    2015-09-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are common in clinical care and pose serious risks for patients. Electronic health records display DDI alerts that can influence prescribers, but the interface design of DDI alerts has largely been unstudied. In this study, the objective was to apply human factors engineering principles to alert design. It was hypothesized that redesigned DDI alerts would significantly improve prescribers' efficiency and reduce prescribing errors. In a counterbalanced, crossover study with prescribers, two DDI alert designs were evaluated. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) prescribers were video recorded as they completed fictitious patient scenarios, which included DDI alerts of varying severity. Efficiency was measured from time-stamped recordings. Prescribing errors were evaluated against predefined criteria. Efficiency and prescribing errors were analyzed with the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Other usability data were collected on the adequacy of alert content, prescribers' use of the DDI monograph, and alert navigation. Twenty prescribers completed patient scenarios for both designs. Prescribers resolved redesigned alerts in about half the time (redesign: 52 seconds versus original design: 97 seconds; p<.001). Prescribing errors were not significantly different between the two designs. Usability results indicate that DDI alerts might be enhanced by facilitating easier access to laboratory data and dosing information and by allowing prescribers to cancel either interacting medication directly from the alert. Results also suggest that neither design provided adequate information for decision making via the primary interface. Applying human factors principles to DDI alerts improved overall efficiency. Aspects of DDI alert design that could be further enhanced prior to implementation were also identified.

  7. Core drug-drug interaction alerts for inclusion in pediatric electronic health records with computerized prescriber order entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Marvin B; Longhurst, Christopher A; McGuire, Troy L; Tarrago, Rod; Desai, Bimal R; Patterson, Al

    2014-03-01

    The study aims to develop a core set of pediatric drug-drug interaction (DDI) pairs for which electronic alerts should be presented to prescribers during the ordering process. A clinical decision support working group composed of Children's Hospital Association (CHA) members was developed. CHA Pharmacists and Chief Medical Information Officers participated. Consensus was reached on a core set of 19 DDI pairs that should be presented to pediatric prescribers during the order process. We have provided a core list of 19 high value drug pairs for electronic drug-drug interaction alerts to be recommended for inclusion as high value alerts in prescriber order entry software used with a pediatric patient population. We believe this list represents the most important pediatric drug interactions for practical implementation within computerized prescriber order entry systems.

  8. Characterization of the mechanism of drug-drug interactions from PubMed using MeSH terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yin; Figler, Bryan; Huang, Hong; Tu, Yi-Cheng; Wang, Ju; Cheng, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Identifying drug-drug interaction (DDI) is an important topic for the development of safe pharmaceutical drugs and for the optimization of multidrug regimens for complex diseases such as cancer and HIV. There have been about 150,000 publications on DDIs in PubMed, which is a great resource for DDI studies. In this paper, we introduced an automatic computational method for the systematic analysis of the mechanism of DDIs using MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) terms from PubMed literature. MeSH term is a controlled vocabulary thesaurus developed by the National Library of Medicine for indexing and annotating articles. Our method can effectively identify DDI-relevant MeSH terms such as drugs, proteins and phenomena with high accuracy. The connections among these MeSH terms were investigated by using co-occurrence heatmaps and social network analysis. Our approach can be used to visualize relationships of DDI terms, which has the potential to help users better understand DDIs. As the volume of PubMed records increases, our method for automatic analysis of DDIs from the PubMed database will become more accurate.

  9. Characterization of the mechanism of drug-drug interactions from PubMed using MeSH terms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Lu

    Full Text Available Identifying drug-drug interaction (DDI is an important topic for the development of safe pharmaceutical drugs and for the optimization of multidrug regimens for complex diseases such as cancer and HIV. There have been about 150,000 publications on DDIs in PubMed, which is a great resource for DDI studies. In this paper, we introduced an automatic computational method for the systematic analysis of the mechanism of DDIs using MeSH (Medical Subject Headings terms from PubMed literature. MeSH term is a controlled vocabulary thesaurus developed by the National Library of Medicine for indexing and annotating articles. Our method can effectively identify DDI-relevant MeSH terms such as drugs, proteins and phenomena with high accuracy. The connections among these MeSH terms were investigated by using co-occurrence heatmaps and social network analysis. Our approach can be used to visualize relationships of DDI terms, which has the potential to help users better understand DDIs. As the volume of PubMed records increases, our method for automatic analysis of DDIs from the PubMed database will become more accurate.

  10. A linguistic rule-based approach to extract drug-drug interactions from pharmacological documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Bedmar, Isabel; Martínez, Paloma; de Pablo-Sánchez, César

    2011-03-29

    A drug-drug interaction (DDI) occurs when one drug influences the level or activity of another drug. The increasing volume of the scientific literature overwhelms health care professionals trying to be kept up-to-date with all published studies on DDI. This paper describes a hybrid linguistic approach to DDI extraction that combines shallow parsing and syntactic simplification with pattern matching. Appositions and coordinate structures are interpreted based on shallow syntactic parsing provided by the UMLS MetaMap tool (MMTx). Subsequently, complex and compound sentences are broken down into clauses from which simple sentences are generated by a set of simplification rules. A pharmacist defined a set of domain-specific lexical patterns to capture the most common expressions of DDI in texts. These lexical patterns are matched with the generated sentences in order to extract DDIs. We have performed different experiments to analyze the performance of the different processes. The lexical patterns achieve a reasonable precision (67.30%), but very low recall (14.07%). The inclusion of appositions and coordinate structures helps to improve the recall (25.70%), however, precision is lower (48.69%). The detection of clauses does not improve the performance. Information Extraction (IE) techniques can provide an interesting way of reducing the time spent by health care professionals on reviewing the literature. Nevertheless, no approach has been carried out to extract DDI from texts. To the best of our knowledge, this work proposes the first integral solution for the automatic extraction of DDI from biomedical texts.

  11. Variable Linezolid Exposure in Intensive Care Unit Patients-Possible Role of Drug-Drug Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töpper, Christoph; Steinbach, Cathérine L; Dorn, Christoph; Kratzer, Alexander; Wicha, Sebastian G; Schleibinger, Michael; Liebchen, Uwe; Kees, Frieder; Salzberger, Bernd; Kees, Martin G

    2016-10-01

    Standard doses of linezolid may not be suitable for all patient groups. Intensive care unit (ICU) patients in particular may be at risk of inadequate concentrations. This study investigated variability of drug exposure and its potential sources in this population. Plasma concentrations of linezolid were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography in a convenience sample of 20 ICU patients treated with intravenous linezolid 600 mg twice daily. Ultrafiltration applying physiological conditions (pH 7.4/37°C) was used to determine the unbound fraction. Individual pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters were estimated by population PK modeling. As measures of exposure to linezolid, area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) and trough concentrations (Cmin) were calculated and compared with published therapeutic ranges (AUC 200-400 mg*h/L, Cmin 2-10 mg/L). Coadministered inhibitors or inducers of cytochrome P450 and/or P-glycoprotein were noted. Data from 18 patients were included into the PK evaluation. Drug exposure was highly variable (median, range: AUC 185, 48-618 mg*h/L, calculated Cmin 2.92, 0.0062-18.9 mg/L), and only a minority of patients had values within the target ranges (6 and 7, respectively). AUC and Cmin were linearly correlated (R = 0.98), and classification of patients (underexposed/within therapeutic range/overexposed) according to AUC or Cmin was concordant in 15 cases. Coadministration of inhibitors was associated with a trend to higher drug exposure, whereas 3 patients treated with levothyroxine showed exceedingly low drug exposure (AUC ∼60 mg*h/L, Cmin linezolid is highly variable and difficult to predict in ICU patients, and therapeutic drug monitoring seems advisable. PK drug-drug interactions might partly be responsible and should be further investigated; protein binding appears to be stable and irrelevant.

  12. An attention-based effective neural model for drug-drug interactions extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Lin, Hongfei; Luo, Ling; Zhao, Zhehuan; Li, Zhengguang; Zhang, Yijia; Yang, Zhihao; Wang, Jian

    2017-10-10

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) often bring unexpected side effects. The clinical recognition of DDIs is a crucial issue for both patient safety and healthcare cost control. However, although text-mining-based systems explore various methods to classify DDIs, the classification performance with regard to DDIs in long and complex sentences is still unsatisfactory. In this study, we propose an effective model that classifies DDIs from the literature by combining an attention mechanism and a recurrent neural network with long short-term memory (LSTM) units. In our approach, first, a candidate-drug-oriented input attention acting on word-embedding vectors automatically learns which words are more influential for a given drug pair. Next, the inputs merging the position- and POS-embedding vectors are passed to a bidirectional LSTM layer whose outputs at the last time step represent the high-level semantic information of the whole sentence. Finally, a softmax layer performs DDI classification. Experimental results from the DDIExtraction 2013 corpus show that our system performs the best with respect to detection and classification (84.0% and 77.3%, respectively) compared with other state-of-the-art methods. In particular, for the Medline-2013 dataset with long and complex sentences, our F-score far exceeds those of top-ranking systems by 12.6%. Our approach effectively improves the performance of DDI classification tasks. Experimental analysis demonstrates that our model performs better with respect to recognizing not only close-range but also long-range patterns among words, especially for long, complex and compound sentences.

  13. An Evidence-Based Assessment of the Clinical Significance of Drug-Drug Interactions Between Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs and Non-Antirheumatic Drugs According to Rheumatologists and Pharmacists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roon, Eric N.; van den Bemt, Patricia M. L. A.; Jansen, Tim L. Th. A.; Houtman, Nella M.; van de Laar, Mart A. F. J.; Brouwers, Jacobus R. B. J.

    Background: Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions (DDIs) must be recognized in a timely manner and managed appropriately to prevent adverse drug reactions or therapeutic failure. Because the evidence for most DDIs is based on case reports or poorly documented clinical information, there is a

  14. Predicting and understanding comprehensive drug-drug interactions via semi-nonnegative matrix factorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui; Mao, Kui-Tao; Shi, Jian-Yu; Huang, Hua; Chen, Zhi; Dong, Kai; Yiu, Siu-Ming

    2018-04-11

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) always cause unexpected and even adverse drug reactions. It is important to identify DDIs before drugs are used in the market. However, preclinical identification of DDIs requires much money and time. Computational approaches have exhibited their abilities to predict potential DDIs on a large scale by utilizing pre-market drug properties (e.g. chemical structure). Nevertheless, none of them can predict two comprehensive types of DDIs, including enhancive and degressive DDIs, which increases and decreases the behaviors of the interacting drugs respectively. There is a lack of systematic analysis on the structural relationship among known DDIs. Revealing such a relationship is very important, because it is able to help understand how DDIs occur. Both the prediction of comprehensive DDIs and the discovery of structural relationship among them play an important guidance when making a co-prescription. In this work, treating a set of comprehensive DDIs as a signed network, we design a novel model (DDINMF) for the prediction of enhancive and degressive DDIs based on semi-nonnegative matrix factorization. Inspiringly, DDINMF achieves the conventional DDI prediction (AUROC = 0.872 and AUPR = 0.605) and the comprehensive DDI prediction (AUROC = 0.796 and AUPR = 0.579). Compared with two state-of-the-art approaches, DDINMF shows it superiority. Finally, representing DDIs as a binary network and a signed network respectively, an analysis based on NMF reveals crucial knowledge hidden among DDIs. Our approach is able to predict not only conventional binary DDIs but also comprehensive DDIs. More importantly, it reveals several key points about the DDI network: (1) both binary and signed networks show fairly clear clusters, in which both drug degree and the difference between positive degree and negative degree show significant distribution; (2) the drugs having large degrees tend to have a larger difference between positive degree

  15. Evaluation of Drug-Drug Interaction Potential Between Sacubitril/Valsartan (LCZ696) and Statins Using a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen; Ji, Tao; Einolf, Heidi; Ayalasomayajula, Surya; Lin, Tsu-Han; Hanna, Imad; Heimbach, Tycho; Breen, Christopher; Jarugula, Venkateswar; He, Handan

    2017-05-01

    Sacubitril/valsartan (LCZ696) has been approved for the treatment of heart failure. Sacubitril is an in vitro inhibitor of organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs). In clinical studies, LCZ696 increased atorvastatin C max by 1.7-fold and area under the plasma concentration-time curve by 1.3-fold, but had little or no effect on simvastatin or simvastatin acid exposure. A physiologically based pharmacokinetics modeling approach was applied to explore the underlying mechanisms behind the statin-specific LCZ696 drug interaction observations. The model incorporated OATP-mediated clearance (CL int,T ) for simvastatin and simvastatin acid to successfully describe the pharmacokinetic profiles of either analyte in the absence or presence of LCZ696. Moreover, the model successfully described the clinically observed drug effect with atorvastatin. The simulations clarified the critical parameters responsible for the observation of a low, yet clinically relevant, drug-drug interaction DDI between sacubitril and atorvastatin and the lack of effect with simvastatin acid. Atorvastatin is administered in its active form and rapidly achieves C max that coincide with the low C max of sacubitril. In contrast, simvastatin requires a hydrolysis step to the acid form and therefore is not present at the site of interactions at sacubitril concentrations that are inhibitory. Similar models were used to evaluate the drug-drug interaction risk for additional OATP-transported statins which predicted to maximally result in a 1.5-fold exposure increase. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Projecting ADME Behavior and Drug-Drug Interactions in Early Discovery and Development: Application of the Extended Clearance Classification System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kattan, Ayman F; Varma, Manthena V; Steyn, Stefan J; Scott, Dennis O; Maurer, Tristan S; Bergman, Arthur

    2016-12-01

    To assess the utility of Extended Clearance Classification System (ECCS) in understanding absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination (ADME) attributes and enabling victim drug-drug interaction (DDI) predictions. A database of 368 drugs with relevant ADME parameters, main metabolizing enzymes, uptake transporters, efflux transporters, and highest change in exposure (%AUC) in presence of inhibitors was developed using published literature. Drugs were characterized according to ECCS using ionization, molecular weight and estimated permeability. Analyses suggested that ECCS class 1A drugs are well absorbed and systemic clearance is determined by metabolism mediated by CYP2C, esterases, and UGTs. For class 1B drugs, oral absorption is high and the predominant clearance mechanism is hepatic uptake mediated by OATP transporters. High permeability neutral/basic drugs (class 2) showed high oral absorption, with metabolism mediated generally by CYP3A, CYP2D6 and UGTs as the predominant clearance mechanism. Class 3A/4 drugs showed moderate absorption with dominant renal clearance involving OAT/OCT2 transporters. Class 3B drugs showed low to moderate absorption with hepatic uptake (OATPs) and/or renal clearance as primary clearance mechanisms. The highest DDI risk is typically seen with class 2/1B/3B compounds manifested by inhibition of either CYP metabolism or active hepatic uptake. Class 2 showed a wider range in AUC change likely due to a variety of enzymes involved. DDI risk for class 3A/4 is small and associated with inhibition of renal transporters. ECCS provides a framework to project ADME profiles and further enables prediction of victim DDI liabilities in drug discovery and development.

  17. Comparison of three commercial knowledge bases for detection of drug-drug interactions in clinical decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Kin Wah; Kapusnik-Uner, Joan; Cunningham, Jean; Higby-Baker, Stefanie; Bodenreider, Olivier

    2017-07-01

    To compare 3 commercial knowledge bases (KBs) used for detection and avoidance of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) in clinical practice. Drugs in the DDI tables from First DataBank (FDB), Micromedex, and Multum were mapped to RxNorm. The KBs were compared at the clinical drug, ingredient, and DDI rule levels. The KBs were evaluated against a reference list of highly significant DDIs from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC). The KBs and the ONC list were applied to a prescription data set to simulate their use in clinical decision support. The KBs contained 1.6 million (FDB), 4.5 million (Micromedex), and 4.8 million (Multum) clinical drug pairs. Altogether, there were 8.6 million unique pairs, of which 79% were found only in 1 KB and 5% in all 3 KBs. However, there was generally more agreement than disagreement in the severity rankings, especially in the contraindicated category. The KBs covered 99.8-99.9% of the alerts of the ONC list and would have generated 25 (FDB), 145 (Micromedex), and 84 (Multum) alerts per 1000 prescriptions. The commercial KBs differ considerably in size and quantity of alerts generated. There is less variability in severity ranking of DDIs than suggested by previous studies. All KBs provide very good coverage of the ONC list. More work is needed to standardize the editorial policies and evidence for inclusion of DDIs to reduce variation among knowledge sources and improve relevance. Some DDIs considered contraindicated in all 3 KBs might be possible candidates to add to the ONC list. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the United States.

  18. A review of pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions with the anthelmintic medications albendazole and mebendazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawluk, Shane Ashley; Roels, Craig Allan; Wilby, Kyle John; Ensom, Mary H H

    2015-04-01

    Medications indicated for helminthes and other parasitic infections are frequently being used in mass populations in endemic areas. Currently, there is a lack of guidance for clinicians on how to appropriately manage drug interactions when faced with patients requiring short-term anthelmintic therapy with albendazole or mebendazole while concurrently taking other agents. The objective of this review was to systematically summarize and evaluate published literature on the pharmacokinetics of albendazole or mebendazole when taken with other interacting medications. A search of MEDLINE (1946 to October 2014), EMBASE (1974 to October 2014), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970 to October 2014), Google, and Google Scholar was conducted for articles describing the pharmacokinetics of albendazole or mebendazole when given with other medications (and supplemented by a bibliographic review of all relevant articles). Altogether, 17 articles were included in the review. Studies reported data on pharmacokinetic parameters for albendazole or mebendazole when taken with cimetidine, dexamethasone, ritonavir, phenytoin, carbamazepine, phenobarbital, ivermectin, praziquantel, diethylcarbamazine, azithromycin, and levamisole. Cimetidine increased the elimination half-life of albendazole and maximum concentration (Cmax) of mebendazole; dexamethasone increased the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) of albendazole; levamisole decreased the Cmax of albendazole; anticonvulsants (phenytoin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine) decreased the AUC of albendazole; praziquantel increased the AUC of albendazole; and ritonavir decreased the AUC of both albendazole and mebendazole. No major interactions were found with ivermectin, azithromycin, or diethylcarbamazine. Future research is required to clarify the clinical relevance of the interactions observed.

  19. High-Throughput Cytochrome P450 Cocktail Inhibition Assay for Assessing Drug-Drug and Drug-Botanical Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guannan; Huang, Ke; Nikolic, Dejan; van Breemen, Richard B

    2015-11-01

    Detection of drug-drug interactions is essential during the early stages of drug discovery and development, and the understanding of drug-botanical interactions is important for the safe use of botanical dietary supplements. Among the different forms of drug interactions that are known, inhibition of cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes is the most common cause of drug-drug or drug-botanical interactions. Therefore, a rapid and comprehensive mass spectrometry-based in vitro high-throughput P450 cocktail inhibition assay was developed that uses 10 substrates simultaneously against nine CYP isoforms. Including probe substrates for CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, and two probes targeting different binding sites of CYP3A4/5, this cocktail simultaneously assesses at least as many P450 enzymes as previous assays while remaining among the fastest due to short incubation times and rapid analysis using ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The method was validated using known inhibitors of each P450 enzyme and then shown to be useful not only for single-compound testing but also for the evaluation of potential drug-botanical interactions using the botanical dietary supplement licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) as an example. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  20. Impact of the CYP2C8 *3 polymorphism on the drug-drug interaction between gemfibrozil and pioglitazone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilante, Christina L; Kosmiski, Lisa A; Bourne, David W A; Bushman, Lane R; Daily, Elizabeth B; Hammond, Kyle P; Hopley, Charles W; Kadam, Rajendra S; Kanack, Alexander T; Kompella, Uday B; Le, Merry; Predhomme, Julie A; Rower, Joseph E; Sidhom, Maha S

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which the CYP2C8*3 allele influences pharmacokinetic variability in the drug-drug interaction between gemfibrozil (CYP2C8 inhibitor) and pioglitazone (CYP2C8 substrate). In this randomized, two phase crossover study, 30 healthy Caucasian subjects were enrolled based on CYP2C8*3 genotype (n = 15, CYP2C8*1/*1; n = 15, CYP2C8*3 carriers). Subjects received a single 15 mg dose of pioglitazone or gemfibrozil 600 mg every 12 h for 4 days with a single 15 mg dose of pioglitazone administered on the morning of day 3. A 48 h pharmacokinetic study followed each pioglitazone dose and the study phases were separated by a 14 day washout period. Gemfibrozil significantly increased mean pioglitazone AUC(0,∞) by 4.3-fold (P gemfibrozil administration was significantly influenced by CYP2C8 genotype. Specifically, CYP2C8*3 carriers had a 5.2-fold mean increase in pioglitazone AUC(0,∞) compared with a 3.3-fold mean increase in CYP2C8*1 homozygotes (P = 0.02). CYP2C8*3 is associated with decreased pioglitazone plasma exposure in vivo and significantly influences the pharmacokinetic magnitude of the gemfibrozil-pioglitazone drug-drug interaction. Additional studies are needed to evaluate the impact of CYP2C8 genetics on the pharmacokinetics of other CYP2C8-mediated drug-drug interactions. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  1. Drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions in polypharmacy among older adults: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Maria Cristina Soares; Oliveira, Cesar de

    2016-09-01

    to identify and summarize studies examining both drug-drug interactions (DDI) and adverse drug reactions (ADR) in older adults polymedicated. an integrative review of studies published from January 2008 to December 2013, according to inclusion and exclusion criteria, in MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases were performed. forty-seven full-text studies including 14,624,492 older adults (≥ 60 years) were analyzed: 24 (51.1%) concerning ADR, 14 (29.8%) DDI, and 9 studies (19.1%) investigating both DDI and ADR. We found a variety of methodological designs. The reviewed studies reinforced that polypharmacy is a multifactorial process, and predictors and inappropriate prescribing are associated with negative health outcomes, as increasing the frequency and types of ADRs and DDIs involving different drug classes, moreover, some studies show the most successful interventions to optimize prescribing. DDI and ADR among older adults continue to be a significant issue in the worldwide. The findings from the studies included in this integrative review, added to the previous reviews, can contribute to the improvement of advanced practices in geriatric nursing, to promote the safety of older patients in polypharmacy. However, more research is needed to elucidate gaps. identificar e sintetizar estudos que examinam as interações medicamentosas (IM) e reações adversas a medicamentos (RAM) em idosos polimedicados. revisão integrativa de estudos publicados de janeiro de 2008 a dezembro de 2013, de acordo com critérios de inclusão e exclusão, nas bases de dados eletrônicas MEDLINE e EMBASE. foram analisados 47 estudos de texto completo, incluindo 14,624,492 idosos (≥ 60 anos): 24 (51,1%) sobre RAM, 14 (29,8%) sobre IM e 9 estudos (19,1%) que investigaram tanto IM como RAM. Encontramos uma variedade de desenhos metodológicos. Os estudos revisados reforçaram que a polifarmácia é um processo multifatorial, e os preditores e a prescrição inadequada estão associados a

  2. Large-scale structural and textual similarity-based mining of knowledge graph to predict drug-drug interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelaziz, Ibrahim; Fokoue, Achille; Hassanzadeh, Oktie; Zhang, Ping; Sadoghi, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Drug-Drug Interactions (DDIs) are a major cause of preventable Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs), causing a significant burden on the patients’ health and the healthcare system. It is widely known that clinical studies cannot sufficiently and accurately identify DDIs for new drugs before they are made available on the market. In addition, existing public and proprietary sources of DDI information are known to be incomplete and/or inaccurate and so not reliable. As a result, there is an emerging body of research on in-silico prediction of drug-drug interactions. In this paper, we present Tiresias, a large-scale similarity-based framework that predicts DDIs through link prediction. Tiresias takes in various sources of drug-related data and knowledge as inputs, and provides DDI predictions as outputs. The process starts with semantic integration of the input data that results in a knowledge graph describing drug attributes and relationships with various related entities such as enzymes, chemical structures, and pathways. The knowledge graph is then used to compute several similarity measures between all the drugs in a scalable and distributed framework. In particular, Tiresias utilizes two classes of features in a knowledge graph: local and global features. Local features are derived from the information directly associated to each drug (i.e., one hop away) while global features are learnt by minimizing a global loss function that considers the complete structure of the knowledge graph. The resulting similarity metrics are used to build features for a large-scale logistic regression model to predict potential DDIs. We highlight the novelty of our proposed Tiresias and perform thorough evaluation of the quality of the predictions. The results show the effectiveness of Tiresias in both predicting new interactions among existing drugs as well as newly developed drugs.

  3. Large-scale structural and textual similarity-based mining of knowledge graph to predict drug-drug interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelaziz, Ibrahim

    2017-06-12

    Drug-Drug Interactions (DDIs) are a major cause of preventable Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs), causing a significant burden on the patients’ health and the healthcare system. It is widely known that clinical studies cannot sufficiently and accurately identify DDIs for new drugs before they are made available on the market. In addition, existing public and proprietary sources of DDI information are known to be incomplete and/or inaccurate and so not reliable. As a result, there is an emerging body of research on in-silico prediction of drug-drug interactions. In this paper, we present Tiresias, a large-scale similarity-based framework that predicts DDIs through link prediction. Tiresias takes in various sources of drug-related data and knowledge as inputs, and provides DDI predictions as outputs. The process starts with semantic integration of the input data that results in a knowledge graph describing drug attributes and relationships with various related entities such as enzymes, chemical structures, and pathways. The knowledge graph is then used to compute several similarity measures between all the drugs in a scalable and distributed framework. In particular, Tiresias utilizes two classes of features in a knowledge graph: local and global features. Local features are derived from the information directly associated to each drug (i.e., one hop away) while global features are learnt by minimizing a global loss function that considers the complete structure of the knowledge graph. The resulting similarity metrics are used to build features for a large-scale logistic regression model to predict potential DDIs. We highlight the novelty of our proposed Tiresias and perform thorough evaluation of the quality of the predictions. The results show the effectiveness of Tiresias in both predicting new interactions among existing drugs as well as newly developed drugs.

  4. Diclofenac sex-divergent drug-drug interaction with Sunitinib: pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution in male and female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Chii Chii; Ng, Salby; Chee, Yun Lee; Koo, Teng Wai; Liew, Ming Hui; Chee, Evelyn Li-Ching; Modamio, Pilar; Fernández, Cecilia; Mariño, Eduardo L; Segarra, Ignacio

    2017-08-01

    Coadministration of diclofenac and sunitinib, tyrosine kinase inhibitor, led to sex-divergent pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction outcomes. Male and female mice were administered 60 mg/kg PO sunitinib alone (control groups) or with 30 mg/kg PO diclofenac. Sunitinib concentration in plasma, brain, kidney and liver were determined by HPLC and non-compartmental pharmacokinetic parameters calculated. In male mice, diclofenac decreased AUC 0→∞ 38% in plasma (p diclofenac increased the liver uptake efficiency in male (27%, p diclofenac with probable clinical translatability due to potential different effects in male and female patients requiring careful selection of the NSAID and advanced TDM to implement a personalized treatment.

  5. Target-mediated drug disposition with drug-drug interaction, Part I: single drug case in alternative formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Gilbert; Jusko, William J; Schropp, Johannes

    2017-02-01

    Target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) describes drug binding with high affinity to a target such as a receptor. In application TMDD models are often over-parameterized and quasi-equilibrium (QE) or quasi-steady state (QSS) approximations are essential to reduce the number of parameters. However, implementation of such approximations becomes difficult for TMDD models with drug-drug interaction (DDI) mechanisms. Hence, alternative but equivalent formulations are necessary for QE or QSS approximations. To introduce and develop such formulations, the single drug case is reanalyzed. This work opens the route for straightforward implementation of QE or QSS approximations of DDI TMDD models. The manuscript is the first part to introduce DDI TMDD models with QE or QSS approximations.

  6. Development of description framework of pharmacodynamics ontology and its application to possible drug-drug interaction reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Takeshi; Hayakawa, Masayo; Ohe, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of synergistic or antagonistic effects of drug-drug interaction (DDI) in vivo has been of considerable interest over the years. Formal representation of pharmacological knowledge such as ontology is indispensable for machine reasoning of possible DDIs. However, current pharmacology knowledge bases are not sufficient to provide formal representation of DDI information. With this background, this paper presents: (1) a description framework of pharmacodynamics ontology; and (2) a methodology to utilize pharmacodynamics ontology to detect different types of possible DDI pairs with supporting information such as underlying pharmacodynamics mechanisms. We also evaluated our methodology in the field of drugs related to noradrenaline signal transduction process and 11 different types of possible DDI pairs were detected. The main features of our methodology are the explanation capability of the reason for possible DDIs and the distinguishability of different types of DDIs. These features will not only be useful for providing supporting information to prescribers, but also for large-scale monitoring of drug safety.

  7. The role of drug profiles as similarity metrics: applications to repurposing, adverse effects detection and drug-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Santiago; Hripcsak, George

    2017-07-01

    Explosion of the availability of big data sources along with the development in computational methods provides a useful framework to study drugs' actions, such as interactions with pharmacological targets and off-targets. Databases related to protein interactions, adverse effects and genomic profiles are available to be used for the construction of computational models. In this article, we focus on the description of biological profiles for drugs that can be used as a system to compare similarity and create methods to predict and analyze drugs' actions. We highlight profiles constructed with different biological data, such as target-protein interactions, gene expression measurements, adverse effects and disease profiles. We focus on the discovery of new targets or pathways for drugs already in the pharmaceutical market, also called drug repurposing, in the interaction with off-targets responsible for adverse reactions and in drug-drug interaction analysis. The current and future applications, strengths and challenges facing all these methods are also discussed. Biological profiles or signatures are an important source of data generation to deeply analyze biological actions with important implications in drug-related studies. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. A quantitative systems pharmacology approach, incorporating a novel liver model, for predicting pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkaoui-Rbati, Mohammed H; Paine, Stuart W; Littlewood, Peter; Rauch, Cyril

    2017-01-01

    All pharmaceutical companies are required to assess pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) of new chemical entities (NCEs) and mathematical prediction helps to select the best NCE candidate with regard to adverse effects resulting from a DDI before any costly clinical studies. Most current models assume that the liver is a homogeneous organ where the majority of the metabolism occurs. However, the circulatory system of the liver has a complex hierarchical geometry which distributes xenobiotics throughout the organ. Nevertheless, the lobule (liver unit), located at the end of each branch, is composed of many sinusoids where the blood flow can vary and therefore creates heterogeneity (e.g. drug concentration, enzyme level). A liver model was constructed by describing the geometry of a lobule, where the blood velocity increases toward the central vein, and by modeling the exchange mechanisms between the blood and hepatocytes. Moreover, the three major DDI mechanisms of metabolic enzymes; competitive inhibition, mechanism based inhibition and induction, were accounted for with an undefined number of drugs and/or enzymes. The liver model was incorporated into a physiological-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model and simulations produced, that in turn were compared to ten clinical results. The liver model generated a hierarchy of 5 sinusoidal levels and estimated a blood volume of 283 mL and a cell density of 193 × 106 cells/g in the liver. The overall PBPK model predicted the pharmacokinetics of midazolam and the magnitude of the clinical DDI with perpetrator drug(s) including spatial and temporal enzyme levels changes. The model presented herein may reduce costs and the use of laboratory animals and give the opportunity to explore different clinical scenarios, which reduce the risk of adverse events, prior to costly human clinical studies.

  9. A quantitative systems pharmacology approach, incorporating a novel liver model, for predicting pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed H Cherkaoui-Rbati

    Full Text Available All pharmaceutical companies are required to assess pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (DDIs of new chemical entities (NCEs and mathematical prediction helps to select the best NCE candidate with regard to adverse effects resulting from a DDI before any costly clinical studies. Most current models assume that the liver is a homogeneous organ where the majority of the metabolism occurs. However, the circulatory system of the liver has a complex hierarchical geometry which distributes xenobiotics throughout the organ. Nevertheless, the lobule (liver unit, located at the end of each branch, is composed of many sinusoids where the blood flow can vary and therefore creates heterogeneity (e.g. drug concentration, enzyme level. A liver model was constructed by describing the geometry of a lobule, where the blood velocity increases toward the central vein, and by modeling the exchange mechanisms between the blood and hepatocytes. Moreover, the three major DDI mechanisms of metabolic enzymes; competitive inhibition, mechanism based inhibition and induction, were accounted for with an undefined number of drugs and/or enzymes. The liver model was incorporated into a physiological-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK model and simulations produced, that in turn were compared to ten clinical results. The liver model generated a hierarchy of 5 sinusoidal levels and estimated a blood volume of 283 mL and a cell density of 193 × 106 cells/g in the liver. The overall PBPK model predicted the pharmacokinetics of midazolam and the magnitude of the clinical DDI with perpetrator drug(s including spatial and temporal enzyme levels changes. The model presented herein may reduce costs and the use of laboratory animals and give the opportunity to explore different clinical scenarios, which reduce the risk of adverse events, prior to costly human clinical studies.

  10. Colchicine in Pericardial Disease: from the Underlying Biology and Clinical Benefits to the Drug-Drug Interactions in Cardiovascular Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenone, Aldo L; Menon, Venu

    2018-06-14

    This is an in-depth review on the mechanism of action, clinical utility, and drug-drug interactions of colchicine in the management of pericardial disease. Recent evidence about therapeutic targets on pericarditis has demonstrated that NALP3 inflammasome blockade is the cornerstone in the clinical benefits of colchicine. Such benefits extend from acute and recurrent pericarditis to transient constriction and post-pericardiotomy syndrome. Despite the increased utilization of colchicine in cardiovascular medicine, safety concerns remains unsolved regarding the long-term use of colchicine in the cardiac patient. Moreover, recent evidence has demonstrated that numerous cardiovascular medications, ranging from antihypertensive medication to antiarrhythmics, are known to interact with the CYP3A4 and/or P-gp system increasing the toxicity potential of colchicine. The use of adjunctive colchicine in the management of inflammatory pericardial diseases is standard of care in current practice. It is advised that a careful medication reconciliation with emphasis on pharmacokinetic is completed before prescribing colchicine in order to avoid harmful interaction by finding an alternative regimen or adjusting colchicine dosing.

  11. Hypericum perforatum: pharmacokinetic, mechanism of action, tolerability, and clinical drug-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Emilio; Scicchitano, Francesca; Whalley, Benjamin J; Mazzitello, Carmela; Ciriaco, Miriam; Esposito, Stefania; Patanè, Marinella; Upton, Roy; Pugliese, Michela; Chimirri, Serafina; Mammì, Maria; Palleria, Caterina; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2014-05-01

    Hypericum perforatum (HP) belongs to the Hypericaceae family and is one of the oldest used and most extensively investigated medicinal herbs. The medicinal form comprises the leaves and flowering tops of which the primary ingredients of interest are naphthodianthrones, xanthones, flavonoids, phloroglucinols (e.g. hyperforin), and hypericin. Although several constituents elicit pharmacological effects that are consistent with HP's antidepressant activity, no single mechanism of action underlying these effects has thus far been found. Various clinical trials have shown that HP has a comparable antidepressant efficacy as some currently used antidepressant drugs in the treatment of mild/moderate depression. Interestingly, low-hyperforin-content preparations are effective in the treatment of depression. Moreover, HP is also used to treat certain forms of anxiety. However, HP can induce various cytochrome P450s isozymes and/or P-glycoprotein, of which many drugs are substrates and which are the main origin of HP-drug interactions. Here, we analyse the existing evidence describing the clinical consequence of HP-drug interactions. Although some of the reported interactions are based on findings from in vitro studies, the clinical importance of which remain to be demonstrated, others are based on case reports where causality can, in some cases, be determined to reveal clinically significant interactions that suggest caution, consideration, and disclosure of potential interactions prior to informed use of HP. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Polypharmacy and the risk of drug-drug interactions among Danish elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosholm, J U; Bjerrum, L; Hallas, J

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the use of all subsidized prescription drugs with special attention to the elderly (> or = 70 years of age), including their use of drug combination generally accepted as carrying a risk of severe interactions. DESIGN: Descriptive prevalence study. SETTING: Odense...... accepted as carrying a risk of severe interactions. RESULTS: Among persons less than 70 years, 67.9% used none, 16.5% used one drug and 15.6% used two or more prescription drugs. The corresponding prevalences for the elderly were 35.7%, 15.9% and 48.4%. The 26,337 elderly patients with at least two drugs...... used 21,293 different combinations. Of the elderly patients who had purchased > or = two drugs, 4.4% had combinations of drugs carrying a risk of severe interactions. CONCLUSIONS: Most elderly use drugs and usually several drugs concomitantly. The elderly form a heterogeneous group of drug users. Drug...

  13. Possible drug-drug interaction between pregabalin and clozapine in patients with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjerning, O; Lykkegaard, S; Damkier, P

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Pregabalin is an antiepileptic drug with anti-anxiety properties and is approved for treatment of generalized anxiety disorder. Anxiety is common in patients with schizophrenia and pregabalin has been suggested as an off-label add-on treatment. METHODS: Pregabalin was added...... patient was less clear. DISCUSSION: This short report discusses the possible mechanism of a pregabalin-clozapine interaction....

  14. Drug-drug interactions as a determinant of elevated lithium serum levels in daily clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilting, [No Value; Movig, KL; Moolenaar, M; Hekster, YA; Brouwers, [No Value; Heerdink, ER; Nolen, WA; Egberts, AC

    Objective: Lithium is a drug with a narrow therapeutic window. Concomitantly used medication is a potentially influencing factor of lithium serum concentrations. We conducted a multicentre retrospective case-control study with the aim of investigating lithium-related drug interactions as

  15. 6-mercaptopurine and daunorubicin double drug liposomes-preparation, drug-drug interaction and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Vineet; Paul, Manash K; Mukhopadhyay, Anup K

    2005-01-01

    This article addresses and investigates the dual incorporation of daunorubicin (DR) and 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) in liposomes for better chemotherapy. These drugs are potential candidates for interaction due to the quinone (H acceptor) and hydroxyl (H donor) groups on DR and 6-MP, respectively. Interactions between the two drugs in solution were monitored by UV/Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. Interaction between the two drugs inside the liposomes was evaluated by HPLC (for 6-MP) and by fluorescence spectroscopy (for daunorubicin) after phospholipase-mediated liposome lysis. Our results provide evidence for the lack of interaction between the two drugs in solution and in liposomes. The entrapment efficiencies of 6-MP in the neutral Phosphatidyl choline (PC):Cholesterol (Chol):: 2:1 and anionic PC:Chol:Cardiolipin (CL) :: 4:5:1 single and double drug liposomes were found to be 0.4% and 1.5% (on average), respectively. The entrapment efficiencies of DR in the neutral and anionic double drug liposomes were found to be 55% and 31%, respectively. The corresponding entrapment of daunorubicin in the single drug liposomes was found to be 62% on average. Our thin layer chromatography (TLC) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results suggest stability of lipid and liposomes, thus pointing plausible existence of double drug liposomes. Cytotoxicity experiments were performed by using both single drug and double drug liposomes. By comparing the results of phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy, it was observed that the double drug liposomes were internalized in the jurkat and Hut78 (highly resistant cell line) leukemia cells as viewed by the fluorescence of daunorubicin. The cytotoxicity was dose dependent and had shown a synergistic effect when double drug liposome was used.

  16. Drug-drug interactions between anti-retroviral therapies and drugs of abuse in HIV systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Rao, P S S; Earla, Ravindra; Kumar, Anil

    2015-03-01

    Substance abuse is a common problem among HIV-infected individuals. Importantly, addictions as well as moderate use of alcohol, smoking, or other illicit drugs have been identified as major reasons for non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV patients. The literature also suggests a decrease in the response to ART among HIV patients who use these substances, leading to failure to achieve optimal virological response and increased disease progression. This review discusses the challenges with adherence to ART as well as observed drug interactions and known toxicities with major drugs of abuse, such as alcohol, smoking, methamphetamine, cocaine, marijuana, and opioids. The lack of adherence and drug interactions potentially lead to decreased efficacy of ART drugs and increased ART, and drugs of abuse-mediated toxicity. As CYP is the common pathway in metabolizing both ART and drugs of abuse, we discuss the possible involvement of CYP pathways in such drug interactions. We acknowledge that further studies focusing on common metabolic pathways involving CYP and advance research in this area would help to potentially develop novel/alternate interventions and drug dose/regimen adjustments to improve medication outcomes in HIV patients who consume drugs of abuse.

  17. Retrospective use of PBPK modelling to understand a clinical drug-drug interaction between dextromethorphan and GSK1034702.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Michael J; Bloomer, Jackie; Dear, Gordon

    2017-08-01

    1. In a clinical trial, a strong drug-drug interaction (DDI) was observed between dextromethorphan (DM, the object or victim drug) and GSK1034702 (the precipitant or perpetrator drug), following single and repeat doses. This study determined the inhibition parameters of GSK1034702 in vitro and applied PBPK modelling approaches to simulate the clinical observations and provide mechanistic hypotheses to understand the DDI. 2. In vitro assays were conducted to determine the inhibition parameters of human CYP2D6 by GSK1034702. PBPK models were populated with the in vitro parameters and DDI simulations conducted and compared to the observed data from a clinical study with DM and GSK1034702. 3. GSK1034702 was a potent direct and metabolism-dependent inhibitor of human CYP2D6, with inhibition parameters of: IC 50  =   1.6 μM, K inact  = 3.7 h -1 and K I  = 0.8 μM. Incorporating these data into PBPK models predicted a DDI after repeat, but not single, 5 mg doses of GSK1034702. 4. The DDI observed with repeat administration of GSK1034702 (5 mg) can be attributed to metabolism-dependent inhibition of CYP2D6. Further, in vitro data were generated and several potential mechanisms proposed to explain the interaction observed following a single dose of GSK1034702.

  18. Reduced Effectiveness of Interruptive Drug-Drug Interaction Alerts after Conversion to a Commercial Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Aaron, Skye; Seger, Diane L; Samal, Lipika; Schiff, Gordon D; Bates, David W

    2018-05-15

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) alerts in electronic health records (EHRs) can help prevent adverse drug events, but such alerts are frequently overridden, raising concerns about their clinical usefulness and contribution to alert fatigue. To study the effect of conversion to a commercial EHR on DDI alert and acceptance rates. Two before-and-after studies. 3277 clinicians who received a DDI alert in the outpatient setting. Introduction of a new, commercial EHR and subsequent adjustment of DDI alerting criteria. Alert burden and proportion of alerts accepted. Overall interruptive DDI alert burden increased by a factor of 6 from the legacy EHR to the commercial EHR. The acceptance rate for the most severe alerts fell from 100 to 8.4%, and from 29.3 to 7.5% for medium severity alerts (P fell by 50.5%, and acceptance of Tier 1 alerts rose from 9.1 to 12.7% (P < 0.01). Changing from a highly tailored DDI alerting system to a more general one as part of an EHR conversion decreased acceptance of DDI alerts and increased alert burden on users. The decrease in acceptance rates cannot be fully explained by differences in the clinical knowledge base, nor can it be fully explained by alert fatigue associated with increased alert burden. Instead, workflow factors probably predominate, including timing of alerts in the prescribing process, lack of differentiation of more and less severe alerts, and features of how users interact with alerts.

  19. Preferences of Patients and Pharmacists with Regard to the Management of Drug-Drug Interactions : A Choice-Based Conjoint Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heringa, Mette; Floor-Schreudering, Annemieke; Wouters, Hans; De Smet, Peter A G M; Bouvy, Marcel L

    INTRODUCTION: The management of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is a complex process in which risk-benefit assessments should be combined with the patient's perspective. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine patients' and pharmacists' preferences regarding DDI management. METHODS: We

  20. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction between erlotinib and paracetamol: A potential risk for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbownik, Agnieszka; Szałek, Edyta; Sobańska, Katarzyna; Grabowski, Tomasz; Wolc, Anna; Grześkowiak, Edmund

    2017-05-01

    Erlotinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor available for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Paracetamol is an analgesic agent, commonly used in cancer patients. Because these drugs are often co-administered, there is an increasing issue of interaction between them. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of paracetamol on the pharmacokinetic parameters of erlotinib, as well as the influence of erlotinib on the pharmacokinetics of paracetamol. The rabbits were divided into three groups: the rabbits receiving erlotinib (I ER ), the group receiving paracetamol (II PR ), and the rabbits receiving erlotinib+paracetamol (III ER+PR ). A single dose of erlotinib was administered orally (25mg) and was administered intravenously (35mg/kg). Plasma concentrations of erlotinib, its metabolite (OSI420), paracetamol and its metabolites - glucuronide and sulphate were measured with the validated method. During paracetamol co-administration we observed increased erlotinib maximum concentration (C max ) and area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity (AUC 0-∞ ) by 87.7% and 31.1%, respectively. In turn, erlotinib lead to decreased paracetamol AUC 0-∞ by 35.5% and C max by 18.9%. The mean values of paracetamol glucuronide/paracetamol ratios for C max were 32.2% higher, whereas paracetamol sulphate/paracetamol ratios for C max and AUC 0-∞ were 37.1% and 57.1% lower in the II PR group, when compared to the III ER+PR group. Paracetamol had significant effect on the enhanced plasma exposure of erlotinib. Additionally, erlotinib contributed to the lower concentrations of paracetamol. Decreased glucuronidation and increased sulphation of paracetamol after co-administration of erlotinib were also observed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Analysis of Potential Drug-Drug Interactions and Its Clinical Manifestation of Pediatric Prescription on 2 Pharmacies in Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa I. Barliana

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The potential of Drug-Drug Interactions (DDI in prescription have high incidence around the world, including Indonesia. However, scientific evidence regarding DDI in Indonesia is not available. Therefore, in this study we have conducted survey in 2 pharmacies in Bandung against pediatric prescription given by pediatrician. These prescriptions then analyzed the potential for DDI contained in the prescription and clinical manifestation. The analysis showed that in pharmacy A, there are 33 prescriptions (from a total of 155 prescriptions that have potential DDI, or approximately 21.19% (2 prescriptions have the potential DDI major categories, 23 prescriptions categorized as moderate, and 8 prescriptions as minor. In Pharmacy B, there are 6 prescriptions (from a total of 40 prescriptions or 15% of potential DDI (4 prescriptions categorized as moderate and 2 prescriptions as minor. This result showed that potential DDI happened less than 50% in pediatric prescription from both pharmacies. However, this should get attention because DDI should not happen in a prescription considering its clinical manifestations caused by DDI. Moreover, current pharmaceutical care refers to patient oriented than product oriented. In addition, further study for the pediatric prescription on DDI incidence in large scale need to be investigated.

  2. Cumulative organic anion transporter-mediated drug-drug interaction potential of multiple components in salvia miltiorrhiza (danshen) preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Venitz, Jürgen; Sweet, Douglas H

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate organic anion transporter-mediated drug-drug interaction (DDI) potential for individual active components of Danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza) vs. combinations using in vitro and in silico approaches. Inhibition profiles for single Danshen components and combinations were generated in stably-expressing human (h)OAT1 and hOAT3 cells. Plasma concentration-time profiles for compounds were estimated from in vivo human data using an i.v. two-compartment model (with first-order elimination). The cumulative DDI index was proposed as an indicator of DDI potential for combination products. This index was used to evaluate the DDI potential for Danshen injectables from 16 different manufacturers and 14 different lots from a single manufacturer. The cumulative DDI index predicted in vivo inhibition potentials, 82% (hOAT1) and 74% (hOAT3), comparable with those observed in vitro, 72 ± 7% (hOAT1) and 81 ± 10% (hOAT3), for Danshen component combinations. Using simulated unbound Cmax values, a wide range in cumulative DDI index between manufacturers, and between lots, was predicted. Many products exhibited a cumulative DDI index > 1 (50% inhibition). Danshen injectables will likely exhibit strong potential to inhibit hOAT1 and hOAT3 function in vivo. The proposed cumulative DDI index might improve prediction of DDI potential of herbal medicines or pharmaceutical preparations containing multiple components.

  3. Improved Predictions of Drug-Drug Interactions Mediated by Time-Dependent Inhibition of CYP3A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Jaydeep; Korzekwa, Ken; Nagar, Swati

    2018-05-07

    Time-dependent inactivation (TDI) of cytochrome P450s (CYPs) is a leading cause of clinical drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Current methods tend to overpredict DDIs. In this study, a numerical approach was used to model complex CYP3A TDI in human-liver microsomes. The inhibitors evaluated included troleandomycin (TAO), erythromycin (ERY), verapamil (VER), and diltiazem (DTZ) along with the primary metabolites N-demethyl erythromycin (NDE), norverapamil (NV), and N-desmethyl diltiazem (NDD). The complexities incorporated into the models included multiple-binding kinetics, quasi-irreversible inactivation, sequential metabolism, inhibitor depletion, and membrane partitioning. The resulting inactivation parameters were incorporated into static in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC) models to predict clinical DDIs. For 77 clinically observed DDIs, with a hepatic-CYP3A-synthesis-rate constant of 0.000 146 min -1 , the average fold difference between the observed and predicted DDIs was 3.17 for the standard replot method and 1.45 for the numerical method. Similar results were obtained using a synthesis-rate constant of 0.000 32 min -1 . These results suggest that numerical methods can successfully model complex in vitro TDI kinetics and that the resulting DDI predictions are more accurate than those obtained with the standard replot approach.

  4. Drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions in polypharmacy among older adults: an integrative review 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Maria Cristina Soares; de Oliveira, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to identify and summarize studies examining both drug-drug interactions (DDI) and adverse drug reactions (ADR) in older adults polymedicated. Methods: an integrative review of studies published from January 2008 to December 2013, according to inclusion and exclusion criteria, in MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases were performed. Results: forty-seven full-text studies including 14,624,492 older adults (≥ 60 years) were analyzed: 24 (51.1%) concerning ADR, 14 (29.8%) DDI, and 9 studies (19.1%) investigating both DDI and ADR. We found a variety of methodological designs. The reviewed studies reinforced that polypharmacy is a multifactorial process, and predictors and inappropriate prescribing are associated with negative health outcomes, as increasing the frequency and types of ADRs and DDIs involving different drug classes, moreover, some studies show the most successful interventions to optimize prescribing. Conclusions: DDI and ADR among older adults continue to be a significant issue in the worldwide. The findings from the studies included in this integrative review, added to the previous reviews, can contribute to the improvement of advanced practices in geriatric nursing, to promote the safety of older patients in polypharmacy. However, more research is needed to elucidate gaps. PMID:27598380

  5. Potential drug-drug interactions in a Brazilian teaching hospital: age-related differences?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Oliveira Melo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes to measure frequency and to characterize the profile of potential drug interactions (pDDI in a general medicine ward of a teaching hospital. Data about identification and clinical status of patients were extracted from medical records between March to August 2006. The occurrence of pDDI was analyzed using the database monographs Micromedex® DrugReax® System. From 5,336 prescriptions with two or more drugs, 3,097 (58.0% contained pDDI. The frequency of major and well document pDDI was 26.5%. Among 647 patients, 432 (66.8% were exposed to at least one pDDI and 283 (43.7% to major pDDI. The multivariate analysis identified that factors related to higher rates of major pDDI were the same age (p< 0.0001, length of stay (p< 0.0001, prevalence of hypertension [OR=3.42 (p< 0.0001] and diabetes mellitus [OR=2.1 (p< 0.0001], cardiovascular diseases (p< 0.0001 and the number of prescribed drugs (Spearman’s correlation=0.640622, p< 0.0001. Between major pDDI, the main risk was hemorrhage (50.3%, the most frequent major pDDI involved combination of anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs. Among moderate pDDI, 3,866 (90.8% involved medicines for the treatment of chronic non-communicable diseases, mainly hypertension. In HU-USP, the profile of pDDI was similar among adults and elderly (the most frequent pDDI and major pDDI were same, the difference was only the frequency in either group. The efforts of the clinical pharmacists should be directed to elderly patients with cardiovascular compromise, mainly in use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs. Furthermore, hospital managers should increase the integration between levels of health care to promote safety patient after discharge.Keywords: Drug interactions. Aged. Internal Medicine. Hospitals, University. RESUMOInterações medicamentosas potenciais em um hospital escolar brasileiro: diferenças relacionadas à idade?O estudo tem por objetivo descrever o perfil de intera

  6. Drug-drug Interactions of Statins Potentially Leading to Muscle-Related Side Effects in Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucsa, Camelia; Farcas, Andreea; Leucuta, D; Mogosan, Cristina; Bojita, M; Dumitrascu, D L

    2015-01-01

    The associations of drugs that may interact with the statins resulting in elevated serum concentration of the statins are an important risk factor for statin induced muscle disorders. We aimed to determine the prevalence of these associations in all hospitalized patients that had been prescribed statins before/during hospitalization and to find out how often they are associated with muscle-related side effects. This prospective, non-interventional study performed in two internal medicine departments included patients with statin therapy before/during hospitalization. Data on each patient demographic characteristics, co-morbidities and treatment was collected from medical charts and interviews. We evaluated patients' therapy for the targeted associations using Thomson Micromedex Drug Interactions checker and we ranked the identified drug-drug interactions (DDIs) accordingly. Each patient with statin treatment before admission was additionally interviewed in order to identify muscular symptoms. In 109 patients on statin treatment we found 35 potential (p) DDIs of statins in 30 (27.5%) patients, most of which were in the therapy before admission (27 pDDIs). The pDDIs were moderate (20 pDDIs) and major (15 pDDIs). Of the total number of pDDIs, 24 were targeting the muscular system. The drugs most frequently involved in the statins' pDDIs were amiodarone and fenofibrate. Two of the patients with pDDIs reported muscle pain, both having additional risk factors for statin induced muscular effects. The prevalence of statins' pDDIs was high in our study, mostly in the therapy before admission, with only a small number of pDDIs resulting in clinical outcome.

  7. Drug-drug interaction of microdose and regular-dose omeprazole with a CYP2C19 inhibitor and inducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gab-Jin; Bae, Soo Hyeon; Park, Wan-Su; Han, Seunghoon; Park, Min-Ho; Shin, Seok-Ho; Shin, Young G; Yim, Dong-Seok

    2017-01-01

    A microdose drug-drug interaction (DDI) study may be a valuable tool for anticipating drug interaction at therapeutic doses. This study aimed to compare the magnitude of DDIs at microdoses and regular doses to explore the applicability of a microdose DDI study. Six healthy male volunteer subjects were enrolled into each DDI study of omeprazole (victim) and known perpetrators: fluconazole (inhibitor) and rifampin (inducer). For both studies, the microdose (100 μg, cold compound) and the regular dose (20 mg) of omeprazole were given at days 0 and 1, respectively. On days 2-9, the inhibitor or inducer was given daily, and the microdose and regular dose of omeprazole were repeated at days 8 and 9, respectively. Full omeprazole pharmacokinetic samplings were performed at days 0, 1, 8, and 9 of both studies for noncompartmental analysis. The magnitude of the DDI, the geometric mean ratios (with perpetrator/omeprazole only) of maximum concentration (C max ) and area under the curve to the last measurement (AUC t ) of the microdose and the regular dose were compared. The geometric mean ratios in the inhibition study were: 2.17 (micro) and 2.68 (regular) for C max , and 4.07 (micro), 4.33 (regular) for AUC t . For the induction study, they were 0.26 (micro) and 0.21 (regular) for C max , and 0.16 (micro) and 0.15 (regular) for AUC t . There were no significant statistical differences in the magnitudes of DDIs between microdose and regular-dose conditions, regardless of induction or inhibition. Our results may be used as partial evidence that microdose DDI studies may replace regular-dose studies, or at least be used for DDI-screening purposes.

  8. Optimization of drug-drug interaction alert rules in a pediatric hospital's electronic health record system using a visual analytics dashboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpao, Allan F; Ahumada, Luis M; Desai, Bimal R; Bonafide, Christopher P; Gálvez, Jorge A; Rehman, Mohamed A; Jawad, Abbas F; Palma, Krisha L; Shelov, Eric D

    2015-03-01

    To develop and evaluate an electronic dashboard of hospital-wide electronic health record medication alerts for an alert fatigue reduction quality improvement project. We used visual analytics software to develop the dashboard. We collaborated with the hospital-wide Clinical Decision Support committee to perform three interventions successively deactivating clinically irrelevant drug-drug interaction (DDI) alert rules. We analyzed the impact of the interventions on care providers' and pharmacists' alert and override rates using an interrupted time series framework with piecewise regression. We evaluated 2 391 880 medication alerts between January 31, 2011 and January 26, 2014. For pharmacists, the median alert rate prior to the first DDI deactivation was 58.74 alerts/100 orders (IQR 54.98-60.48) and 25.11 alerts/100 orders (IQR 23.45-26.57) following the three interventions (pdashboard facilitated safe rapid-cycle reductions in alert burden that were temporally associated with lower pharmacist override rates in a subgroup of DDIs not directly affected by the interventions; meanwhile, the pharmacists' frequency of selecting the 'cancel' option increased. We hypothesize that reducing the alert burden enabled pharmacists to devote more attention to clinically relevant alerts. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Detecting drug-drug interactions using a database for spontaneous adverse drug reactions: an example with diuretics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Puijenbroek, E P; Egberts, A C; Heerdink, E R; Leufkens, H G

    2000-12-01

    Drug-drug interactions are relatively rarely reported to spontaneous reporting systems (SRSs) for adverse drug reactions. For this reason, the traditional approach for analysing SRS has major limitations for the detection of drug-drug interactions. We developed a method that may enable signalling of these possible interactions, which are often not explicitly reported, utilising reports of adverse drug reactions in data sets of SRS. As an example, the influence of concomitant use of diuretics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on symptoms indicating a decreased efficacy of diuretics was examined using reports received by the Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Foundation Lareb. Reports received between 1 January 1990 and 1 January 1999 of patients older than 50 years were included in the study. Cases were defined as reports with symptoms indicating a decreased efficacy of diuretics, non-cases as all other reports. Exposure categories were the use of NSAIDs or diuretics versus the use of neither of these drugs. The influence of the combined use of both drugs was examined using logistic regression analysis. The odds ratio of the statistical interaction term of the combined use of both drugs was increased [adjusted odds ratio 2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-3.7], which may indicate an enhanced effect of concomitant drug use. The findings illustrate that spontaneous reporting systems have a potential for signal detection and the analysis of possible drug-drug interactions. The method described may enable a more active approach in the detection of drug-drug interactions after marketing.

  10. Investigation of bioequivalence of a new fixed-dose combination of nifedipine and candesartan with the corresponding loose combination as well as the drug-drug interaction potential between both drugs under fasting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendel, Erich; Weimann, Boris; Dietrich, Hartmut; Froede, Christoph; Thomas, Dirk

    2013-09-01

    To determine the bioequivalence of a nifedipine and candesartan fixed-dose combination (FDC) with the corresponding loose combination, and to investigate the pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction potential between both drugs. 49 healthy, white, male subjects received: 60 mg nifedipine and 32 mg candesartan FDC, the loose combination of 60 mg nifedipine GITS and 32 mg candesartan, 60 mg nifedipine GITS alone, or 32 mg candesartan alone in a randomized, non-blinded, 4-period, 4-way crossover design with each dosing following overnight fasting. Treatment periods were separated by washout periods of ≥ 5 days. Plasma samples were collected for 48 hours after dosing and assayed using a validated LC-MS/MS method. Bioequivalence between the FDC and the loose combination as well as the impact of combined treatment with both drugs on candesartan pharmacokinetics was evaluated in 47 subjects, while the corresponding impact of treatment with both drugs on nifedipine pharmacokinetics was assessed in 46 patients. For AUC(0-tlast) and Cmax the 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for the ratios of the FDC vs. the corresponding loose combination were within the acceptance range for bioequivalence of 80 - 125%. When comparing AUC(0-tlast) and Cmax of nifedipine and candesartan after dosing with the loose combination vs. each drug alone, the 90% CIs remained within the range of 80 - 125% indicating the absence of a clinically relevant pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction. Nifedipine and candesartan as well as the combinations were well tolerated. The FDC containing 60 mg nifedipine and 32 mg candesartan was bioequivalent to the corresponding loose combination following single oral doses under fasting conditions. No clinically relevant pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction between nifedipine and candesartan was observed.

  11. Drug-drug interactions with sodium-glucose cotransporters type 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, new oral glucose-lowering agents for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, André J

    2014-04-01

    Inhibitors of sodium-glucose cotransporters type 2 (SGLT2) reduce hyperglycaemia by decreasing renal glucose threshold and thereby increasing urinary glucose excretion. They are proposed as a novel approach for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. They have proven their efficacy in reducing glycated haemoglobin, without inducing hypoglycaemia, as monotherapy or in combination with various other glucose-lowering agents, with the add-on value of promoting some weight loss and lowering arterial blood pressure. As they may be used concomitantly with many other drugs, we review the potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) regarding the three leaders in the class (dapagliglozin, canagliflozin and empagliflozin). Most of the available studies were performed in healthy volunteers and have assessed the pharmacokinetic interferences with a single administration of the SGLT2 inhibitor. The exposure [assessed by peak plasma concentrations (Cmax) and area under the concentration-time curve (AUC)] to each SGLT2 inhibitor tested was not significantly influenced by the concomitant administration of other glucose-lowering agents or cardiovascular agents commonly used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Reciprocally, these medications did not influence the pharmacokinetic parameters of dapagliflozin, canagliflozin or empagliflozin. Some modest changes were not considered as clinically relevant. However, drugs that could specifically interfere with the metabolic pathways of SGLT2 inhibitors [rifampicin, inhibitors or inducers of uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)] may result in significant changes in the exposure of SGLT2 inhibitors, as shown for dapagliflozin and canagliflozin. Potential DDIs in patients with type 2 diabetes receiving chronic treatment with an SGLT2 inhibitor deserve further attention, especially in individuals treated with several medications or in more fragile patients with hepatic and/or renal impairment.

  12. Inhibitory effects of drugs on the metabolic activity of mouse and human aldehyde oxidases and influence on drug-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoka, Naoki; Sanoh, Seigo; Okuda, Katsuhiro; Kotake, Yaichiro; Sugahara, Go; Yanagi, Ami; Ishida, Yuji; Tateno, Chise; Tayama, Yoshitaka; Sugihara, Kazumi; Kitamura, Shigeyuki; Kurosaki, Mami; Terao, Mineko; Garattini, Enrico; Ohta, Shigeru

    2018-04-17

    As aldehyde oxidase (AOX) plays an emerging role in drug metabolism, understanding its significance for drug-drug interactions (DDI) is important. Therefore, we tested 10 compounds for species-specific and substrate-dependent differences in the inhibitory effect of AOX activity using genetically engineered HEK293 cells over-expressing human AOX1, mouse AOX1 or mouse AOX3. The IC 50 values of 10 potential inhibitors of the three AOX enzymes were determined using phthalazine and O 6 -benzylguanine as substrates. 17β-Estradiol, menadione, norharmane and raloxifene exhibited marked differences in inhibitory effects between the human and mouse AOX isoforms when the phthalazine substrate was used. Some of the compounds tested exhibited substrate-dependent differences in their inhibitory effects. Docking simulations with human AOX1 and mouse AOX3 were conducted for six representative inhibitors. The rank order of the minimum binding energy reflected the order of the corresponding IC 50 values. We also evaluated the potential DDI between an AOX substrate (O 6 -benzylguanine) and an inhibitor (hydralazine) using chimeric mice with humanized livers. Pretreatment of hydralazine increased the maximum plasma concentration (C max ) and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC 0-24 ) of O 6 -benzylguanine compared to single administration. Our in vitro data indicate species-specific and substrate-dependent differences in the inhibitory effects on AOX activity. Our in vivo data demonstrate the existence of a DDI which may be of relevance in the clinical context. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Drug disposition and drug-drug interaction data in 2013 FDA new drug applications: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jingjing; Ritchie, Tasha K; Mulgaonkar, Aditi; Ragueneau-Majlessi, Isabelle

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the present work was to perform a systematic review of drug metabolism, transport, pharmacokinetics, and DDI data available in the NDAs approved by the FDA in 2013, using the University of Washington Drug Interaction Database, and to highlight significant findings. Among 27 NMEs approved, 22 (81%) were well characterized with regard to drug metabolism, transport, or organ impairment, in accordance with the FDA drug interaction guidance (2012) and were fully analyzed in this review. In vitro, a majority of the NMEs were found to be substrates or inhibitors/inducers of at least one drug metabolizing enzyme or transporter. However, in vivo, only half (n = 11) showed clinically relevant drug interactions, with most related to the NMEs as victim drugs and CYP3A being the most affected enzyme. As perpetrators, the overall effects for NMEs were much less pronounced, compared with when they served as victims. In addition, the pharmacokinetic evaluation in patients with hepatic or renal impairment provided useful information for further understanding of the drugs' disposition. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  14. Entecavir Interacts with Influx Transporters hOAT1, hCNT2, hCNT3, but Not with hOCT2: The Potential for Renal Transporter-Mediated Cytotoxicity and Drug-Drug Interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mandíková, J.; Volková, M.; Pávek, P.; Navrátilová, L.; Hyršová, L.; Janeba, Zlatko; Pavlík, J.; Bárta, P.; Trejtnar, F.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, Jan 5 (2016), č. článku 304. ISSN 1663-9812 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : antivirals * nephrotoxicity * renal disposition * drug-drug interactions Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.400, year: 2016 http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fphar.2015.00304/full

  15. Simultaneous Assessment of Transporter-Mediated Drug-Drug Interactions Using a Probe Drug Cocktail in Cynomolgus Monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosa, Rachel E; Lazzaro, Sarah; Bi, Yi-An; Tierney, Brendan; Gates, Dana; Modi, Sweta; Costales, Chester; Rodrigues, A David; Tremaine, Larry M; Varma, Manthena V

    2018-06-07

    We aim to establish an in vivo preclinical model to enable simultaneous assessment of inhibition potential of an investigational drug on clinically relevant drug transporters, organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP)1B, breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and organic anion transporter (OAT)3. Pharmacokinetics of substrate cocktail consisting of pitavastatin (OATP1B substrate), rosuvastatin (OATP1B/BCRP/OAT3), sulfasalazine (BCRP) and talinolol (P-gp) were obtained in cynomolgus monkey - alone or in combination with transporter inhibitors. Single dose rifampicin (30 mg/kg) significantly (pdrugs, with a marked effect on pitavastatin and rosuvastatin (AUC ratio ~21-39). Elacridar, BCRP/P-gp inhibitor, increased the AUC of sulfasalazine, talinolol, as well as rosuvastatin and pitavastatin. An OAT1/3 inhibitor (probenecid) significantly (pdrug-drug interaction risk assessment, before advancing a new molecular entity into clinical development, as well as providing mechanistic insights on transporter-mediated interactions. The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  16. Evaluation of a Potential Metabolism-Mediated Drug-Drug Interaction Between Atomoxetine and Bupropion in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todor, Ioana; Popa, Adina; Neag, Maria; Muntean, Dana; Bocsan, Corina; Buzoianu, Anca; Vlase, Laurian; Gheldiu, Ana-Maria; Briciu, Corina

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of bupropion on the pharmacokinetic profile of atomoxetine and its main active metabolite (glucuronidated form), 4-hydroxyatomoxetine-O-glucuronide, in healthy volunteers. An open-label, non-randomized, two-period, sequential clinical trial was conducted as follows: during Period I (Reference), each volunteer received a single oral dose of 25 mg atomoxetine, whilst during Period II (Test), a combination of 25 mg atomoxetine and 300 mg bupropion was administered to all volunteers, after a pretreatment regimen with bupropion for 7 days. Next, after determining atomoxetine and 4-hydroxyatomoxetine-O-glucuronide plasma concentrations, their pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using a noncompartmental method and subsequently compared to determine any statistically significant differences between the two periods. Bupropion intake influenced all the pharmacokinetic parameters of both atomoxetine and its metabolite. For atomoxetine, Cmax increased from 226±96.1 to 386±137 ng/mL and more importantly, AUC0-∞ was significantly increasedfrom 1580±1040 to 8060±4160 ng*h/mL, while the mean t1/2 was prolonged after bupropion pretreatment. For 4-hydroxyatomoxetine-O-glucuronide, Cmax and AUC0-∞  were decreased from 707±269 to 212±145 ng/mL and from 5750±1240 to 3860±1220 ng*h/mL, respectively. These results demonstrated that the effect of bupropion on CYP2D6 activity was responsible for an increased systemic exposure to atomoxetine (5.1-fold) and also for a decreased exposure to its main metabolite (1.5-fold). Additional studies are required in order to evaluate the clinical relevance of this pharmacokinetic drug interaction.This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page.

  17. Drug-drug interaction and doping, part 1: an in vitro study on the effect of non-prohibited drugs on the phase I metabolic profile of toremifene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzarino, Monica; de la Torre, Xavier; Fiacco, Ilaria; Palermo, Amelia; Botrè, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    The present study was designed to provide preliminary information on the potential impact of metabolic drug-drug interaction on the effectiveness of doping control strategies currently followed by the anti-doping laboratories to detect the intake of banned agents. In vitro assays based on the use of human liver microsomes and recombinant CYP isoforms were designed and performed to characterize the phase I metabolic profile of the prohibited agent toremifene, selected as a prototype drug of the class of selective oestrogen receptor modulators, both in the absence and in the presence of medicaments (fluconazole, ketoconazole, itraconazole, miconazole, cimetidine, ranitidine, fluoxetine, paroxetine, nefazodone) not included in the World Anti-Doping Agency list of prohibited substances and methods and frequently administered to athletes. The results show that the in vitro model developed in this study was adequate to simulate the in vivo metabolism of toremifene, confirming the results obtained in previous studies. Furthermore, our data also show that ketoconazole, itraconazole, miconazole and nefazodone cause a marked modification in the production of the metabolic products (i.e. hydroxylated and carboxylated metabolites) normally selected by the anti-doping laboratories as target analytes to detect toremifene intake; moderate variations were registered in the presence of fluconazole, paroxetine and fluoxetine; while no significant modifications were measured in the presence of ranitidine and cimetidine. This evidence imposes that the potential effect of drug-drug interactions is duly taken into account in anti-doping analysis, also for a broader significance of the analytical results. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA): interindividual differences due to polymorphisms and drug-drug interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietjens, S.J.; Hondebrink, L.; Westerink, R.H.S.; Meulenbelt, J.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical outcome following 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) intake ranges from mild entactogenic effects to a life-threatening intoxication. Despite ongoing research, the clinically most relevant mechanisms causing acute MDMA-induced adverse effects remain largely unclear. This complicates

  19. Critical drug-drug interactions for use in electronic health records systems with computerized physician order entry: review of leading approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classen, David C; Phansalkar, Shobha; Bates, David W

    2011-06-01

    Medications represent the most common intervention in health care, despite their benefits; they also lead to an estimated 1.5 million adverse drug events and tens of thousands of hospital admissions each year. Although some are not preventable given what is known today, many types are, and one key cause which is preventable is drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Most electronic health record systems include programs that can check and prevent these types of interactions as a routine part of medication ordering. Studies suggest that these systems as implemented often do not effectively screen for these DDIs. A major reason for this deficiency is the lack of any national standard for the critical DDIs that should be routinely operationlized in these complex systems. We review the leading critical DDI lists from multiple sources including several leading health systems, a leading commercial content provider, the Leapfrog CPOE Testing Standard, and the new Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) DDI List. Implementation of strong DDI checking is one of the important steps in terms of realizing the benefits of electronic prescribing with respect to safety. Hopefully, the ONC list will make it easier for organizations to ensure they are including the most important interactions, and the Leapfrog List may help these organizations develop an operational DDI list that can be practically implemented. In addition, this review has identified 7 common DDIs that can be the starting point for all organizations in this area of medication safety.

  20. [Predictive factors of clinically significant drug-drug interactions among regimens based on protease inhibitors, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and raltegravir].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervero, Miguel; Torres, Rafael; Jusdado, Juan José; Pastor, Susana; Agud, Jose Luis

    2016-04-15

    To determine the prevalence and types of clinically significant drug-drug interactions (CSDI) in the drug regimens of HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral treatment. retrospective review of database. Centre: Hospital Universitario Severo Ochoa, Infectious Unit. one hundred and forty-two participants followed by one of the authors were selected from January 1985 to December 2014. from their outpatient medical records we reviewed information from the last available visit of the participants, in relation to HIV infection, comorbidities, demographics and the drugs that they were receiving; both antiretroviral drugs and drugs not related to HIV infection. We defined CSDI from the information sheet and/or database on antiretroviral drug interactions of the University of Liverpool (http://www.hiv-druginteractions.org) and we developed a diagnostic tool to predict the possibility of CSDI. By multivariate logistic regression analysis and by estimating the diagnostic performance curve obtained, we identified a quick tool to predict the existence of drug interactions. Of 142 patients, 39 (29.11%) had some type of CSDI and in 11.2% 2 or more interactions were detected. In only one patient the combination of drugs was contraindicated (this patient was receiving darunavir/r and quetiapine). In multivariate analyses, predictors of CSDI were regimen type (PI or NNRTI) and the use of 3 or more non-antiretroviral drugs (AUC 0.886, 95% CI 0.828 to 0.944; P=.0001). The risk was 18.55 times in those receiving NNRTI and 27,95 times in those receiving IP compared to those taking raltegravir. Drug interactions, including those defined as clinically significant, are common in HIV-infected patients treated with antiretroviral drugs, and the risk is greater in IP-based regimens. Raltegravir-based prescribing, especially in patients who receive at least 3 non-HIV drugs could avoid interactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. A drug-drug interaction study to assess the effect of the CYP1A2 inhibitor fluvoxamine on the pharmacokinetics of dovitinib (TKI258) in patients with advanced solid tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Weger, Vincent A; Goel, Sanjay; von Moos, Roger; Schellens, Jan H M; Mach, Nicholas; Tan, Eugene; Anand, Suraj; Scott, Jeffrey W; Lassen, Ulrik N

    PURPOSE: Dovitinib is an orally available multi tyrosine kinase inhibitor which inhibits VEGFR 1-3, FGFR 1-3, and PDGFR. This study was performed to investigate the potential drug-drug interaction of dovitinib with the CYP1A2 inhibitor fluvoxamine in patients with advanced solid tumors. METHODS:

  2. A drug-drug interaction study to assess the effect of the CYP1A2 inhibitor fluvoxamine on the pharmacokinetics of dovitinib (TKI258) in patients with advanced solid tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Weger, Vincent A; Goel, Sanjay; von Moos, Roger

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: Dovitinib is an orally available multi tyrosine kinase inhibitor which inhibits VEGFR 1-3, FGFR 1-3, and PDGFR. This study was performed to investigate the potential drug-drug interaction of dovitinib with the CYP1A2 inhibitor fluvoxamine in patients with advanced solid tumors. METHODS: ...

  3. Strategy for the Prediction of Steady-State Exposure of Digoxin to Determine Drug-Drug Interaction Potential of Digoxin With Other Drugs in Digitalization Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2016-01-20

    Digoxin, a narrow therapeutic index drug, is widely used in congestive heart failure. However, the digitalization therapy involves dose titration and can exhibit drug-drug interaction. Ctrough versus area under the plasma concentration versus time curve in a dosing interval of 24 hours (AUC0-24h) and Cmax versus AUC0-24h for digoxin were established by linear regression. The predictions of digoxin AUC0-24h values were performed using published Ctrough or Cmax with appropriate regression lines. The fold difference, defined as the quotient of the observed/predicted AUC0-24h values, was evaluated. The mean square error and root mean square error, correlation coefficient (r), and goodness of the fold prediction were used to evaluate the models. Both Ctrough versus AUC0-24h (r = 0.9215) and Cmax versus AUC0-24h models for digoxin (r = 0.7781) showed strong correlations. Approximately 93.8% of the predicted digoxin AUC0-24h values were within 0.76-fold to 1.25-fold difference for Ctrough model. In sharp contrast, the Cmax model showed larger variability with only 51.6% of AUC0-24h predictions within 0.76-1.25-fold difference. The r value for observed versus predicted AUC0-24h for Ctrough (r = 0.9551; n = 177; P < 0.001) was superior to the Cmax (r = 0.6134; n = 275; P < 0.001) model. The mean square error and root mean square error (%) for the Ctrough model were 11.95% and 16.2% as compared to 67.17% and 42.3% obtained for the Cmax model. Simple linear regression models for Ctrough/Cmax versus AUC0-24h were derived for digoxin. On the basis of statistical evaluation, Ctrough was superior to Cmax model for the prediction of digoxin AUC0-24h and can be potentially used in a prospective setting for predicting drug-drug interaction or lack of it.

  4. A mechanistic framework for in vitro-in vivo extrapolation of liver membrane transporters: prediction of drug-drug interaction between rosuvastatin and cyclosporine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamei, M; Bajot, F; Neuhoff, S; Barter, Z; Yang, J; Rostami-Hodjegan, A; Rowland-Yeo, K

    2014-01-01

    The interplay between liver metabolising enzymes and transporters is a complex process involving system-related parameters such as liver blood perfusion as well as drug attributes including protein and lipid binding, ionisation, relative magnitude of passive and active permeation. Metabolism- and/or transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions (mDDIs and tDDIs) add to the complexity of this interplay. Thus, gaining meaningful insight into the impact of each element on the disposition of a drug and accurately predicting drug-drug interactions becomes very challenging. To address this, an in vitro-in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE)-linked mechanistic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) framework for modelling liver transporters and their interplay with liver metabolising enzymes has been developed and implemented within the Simcyp Simulator(®). In this article an IVIVE technique for liver transporters is described and a full-body PBPK model is developed. Passive and active (saturable) transport at both liver sinusoidal and canalicular membranes are accounted for and the impact of binding and ionisation processes is considered. The model also accommodates tDDIs involving inhibition of multiple transporters. Integrating prior in vitro information on the metabolism and transporter kinetics of rosuvastatin (organic-anion transporting polypeptides OATP1B1, OAT1B3 and OATP2B1, sodium-dependent taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide [NTCP] and breast cancer resistance protein [BCRP]) with one clinical dataset, the PBPK model was used to simulate the drug disposition of rosuvastatin for 11 reported studies that had not been used for development of the rosuvastatin model. The simulated area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC), maximum concentration (C max) and the time to reach C max (t max) values of rosuvastatin over the dose range of 10-80 mg, were within 2-fold of the observed data. Subsequently, the validated model was used to investigate the impact of

  5. P-gp, MRP2 and OAT1/OAT3 mediate the drug-drug interaction between resveratrol and methotrexate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Yongming [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Liu, Zhihao; Wang, Changyuan; Meng, Qiang; Huo, Xiaokui; Liu, Qi; Sun, Huijun [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Provincial Key Laboratory for Pharmacokinetics and Transport, Liaoning, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Sun, Pengyuan; Yang, Xiaobo; Ma, Xiaodong [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Liu, Kexin, E-mail: kexinliu@dlmedu.edu.cn [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Provincial Key Laboratory for Pharmacokinetics and Transport, Liaoning, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China)

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of present study was to investigate the effect of resveratrol (Res) on altering methotrexate (MTX) pharmacokinetics and clarify the related molecular mechanism. Res significantly increased rat intestinal absorption of MTX in vivo and in vitro. Simultaneously, Res inhibited MTX efflux transport in MDR1-MDCK and MRP2-MDCK cell monolayers, suggesting that the target of drug interaction was MDR1 and MRP2 in the intestine during the absorption process. Furthermore, there was a significant decrease in renal clearance of MTX after simultaneous intravenous administration. Similarly, MTX uptake was markedly inhibited by Res in rat kidney slices and hOAT1/3-HEK293 cell, indicating that OAT1 and OAT3 were involved in the drug interaction in the kidney. Additionally, concomitant administration of Res decreased cytotoxic effects of MTX in hOAT1/3-HEK293 cells, and ameliorated nephrotoxicity caused by MTX in rats. Conversely, intestinal damage caused by MTX was not exacerbated after Res treatment. In conclusion, Res enhanced MTX absorption in intestine and decreased MTX renal elimination by inhibiting P-gp, MRP2, OAT1 and OAT3 in vivo and in vitro. Res improved MTX-induced renal damage without increasing intestinal toxicity. - Highlights: • DDI between MTX and Res will occur when they are co-administered. • The first targets of the DDI are P-gp and MRP2 located in intestine. • The second targets of the DDI are OAT1 and OAT3 in kidney. • Res improved MTX-induced renal damage without increasing intestinal toxicity.

  6. MRP2 mediated drug-drug interaction: indomethacin increases sulfasalazine absorption in the small intestine, potentially decreasing its colonic targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Arik; Amidon, Gordon L

    2010-02-15

    We have recently shown that efflux transport, mediated by multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), is responsible for sulfasalazine low-permeability in the small intestine, thereby enabling its colonic targeting and therapeutic action. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the potential pharmacokinetic interaction between indomethacin and sulfasalazine, in the mechanism of efflux transporter competition. The concentration-dependent effects of indomethacin on sulfasalazine intestinal epithelial transport were investigated across Caco-2 cell monolayers, in both apical to basolateral (AP-BL) and BL-AP directions. The interaction was then investigated in the in situ single-pass rat jejunal perfusion model. Sulfasalazine displayed 30-fold higher BL-AP than AP-BL Caco-2 permeability, indicative of net mucosal secretion. Indomethacin significantly increased AP-BL and decreased BL-AP sulfasalazine Caco-2 transport, in a concentration-dependent manner, with IC(50) values of 75 and 196 microM respectively. In the rat model, higher sulfasalazine concentrations resulted in higher intestinal permeability, consistent with saturation of efflux transporter. Without indomethacin, sulfasalazine demonstrated low rat jejunal permeability (vs. metoprolol). Indomethacin significantly increased sulfasalazine P(eff), effectively shifting it from BCS (biopharmaceutics classification system) Class IV to II. In conclusion, the data indicate that concomitant intake of indomethacin and sulfasalazine may lead to increased absorption of sulfasalazine in the small intestine, thereby reducing its colonic concentration and potentially altering its therapeutic effect. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Drug-Drug Interactions Potential of Icariin and Its Intestinal Metabolites via Inhibition of Intestinal UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Feng Cao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Icariin is known as an indicative constituent of the Epimedium genus, which has been commonly used in Chinese herbal medicine to enhance treat impotence and improve sexual function, as well as for several other indications for over 2000 years. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of icariin and its intestinal metabolites on the activities of human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT activities. Using a panel of recombinant human UGT isoforms, we found that icariin exhibited potent inhibition against UGT1A3. It is interesting that the intestinal metabolites of icariin exhibited a different inhibition profile compared with icariin. Different from icariin, icariside II was a potent inhibitor of UGT1A4, UGT1A7, UGT1A9, and UGT2B7, and icaritin was a potent inhibitor of UGT1A7 and UGT1A9. The potential for drug interactions in vivo was also quantitatively predicted and compared. The quantitative prediction of risks indicated that in vivo inhibition against intestinal UGT1A3, UGT1A4, and UGT1A7 would likely occur after oral administration of icariin products.

  8. Evaluation of Potential Drug-Drug Interaction Between Delayed-Release Dimethyl Fumarate and a Commonly Used Oral Contraceptive (Norgestimate/Ethinyl Estradiol) in Healthy Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bing; Nestorov, Ivan; Zhao, Guolin; Meka, Venkata; Leahy, Mark; Kam, Jeanelle; Sheikh, Sarah I

    2017-11-01

    Delayed-release dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is an oral therapy for relapsing multiple sclerosis with anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties. This 2-period crossover study was conducted to evaluate the potential for drug-drug interaction between DMF (240 mg twice daily) and a combined oral contraceptive (OC; norgestimate 250 μg, ethinyl estradiol 35 μg). Forty-six healthy women were enrolled; 32 completed the study. After the lead-in period (OC alone), 41 eligible participants were randomized 1:1 to sequence 1 (OC and DMF coadministration in period 1; OC alone in period 2) or sequence 2 (regimens reversed). Mean concentration profiles of plasma norelgestromin (primary metabolite of norgestimate) and ethinyl estradiol were superimposable following OC alone and OC coadministered with DMF, with 90% confidence intervals of geometric mean ratios for area under the plasma concentration-time curve over the dosing interval and peak plasma concentration contained within the 0.8-1.25 range. Low serum progesterone levels during combined treatment confirmed suppression of ovulation. The pharmacokinetics of DMF (measured via its primary active metabolite, monomethyl fumarate) were consistent with historical data when DMF was administered alone. No new safety concerns were identified. These results suggest that norgestimate/ethinyl estradiol-based OCs may be used with DMF without dose modification. © 2017, The Authors. Clinical Pharmacology in Drug Development Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  9. Underlying mechanism of drug-drug interaction between pioglitazone and gemfibrozil: Gemfibrozil acyl-glucuronide is a mechanism-based inhibitor of CYP2C8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Motoi; Sakamoto, Masaya; Itoh, Tomoo; Fujiwara, Ryoichi

    2015-08-01

    While co-administered gemfibrozil can increase the area under the concentration/time curve (AUC) of pioglitazone more than 3-fold, the underlying mechanism of the drug-drug interaction between gemfibrozil and pioglitazone has not been fully understood. In the present study, gemfibrozil preincubation time-dependently inhibited the metabolism of pioglitazone in the cytochrome P450 (CYP)- and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)-activated human liver microsomes. We estimated the kinact and K'app values, which are the maximum inactivation rate constant and the apparent dissociation constant, of gemfibrozil to be 0.071 min(-1) and 57.3 μM, respectively. In this study, the kobs, in vivo value was defined as a parameter that indicates the potency of the mechanism-based inhibitory effect at the blood drug concentration in vivo. The kobs, in vivo values of potent mechanism-based inhibitors, clarithromycin and erythromycin, were estimated to be 0.0096 min(-1) and 0.0051 min(-1), respectively. The kobs, in vivo value of gemfibrozil was 0.0060 min(-1), which was comparable to those of clarithromycin and erythromycin, suggesting that gemfibrozil could be a mechanism-based inhibitor as potent as clarithromycin and erythromycin in vivo. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Enantioselective determinination of R-warfarin/S-warfarin in human plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and its application in a drug-drug interaction study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shu; Zhang, Yi-Fan; Chen, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Ke; Zhong, Da-Fang

    2012-01-01

    To study the drug-drug interaction of morinidazole and warfarin and its application, a sensitive and rapid liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method was developed for the determination of R-warfarin/S-warfarin in human plasma. In a random, two-period crossover study, 12 healthy volunteers received a single oral dose of 5 mg racemic warfarin in the absence and presence of morinidazole. Blood samples were collected according to a pre-designed time schedule. R-warfarin, S-warfarin and methyclothiazide were extracted with ethylether : methylenechloride (3 : 2), then separated on a Astec Chirobiotic V (150 mm x 4.6 mm ID, 5 microm) column using 5 mmol x L(-1) ammonium acetate (pH 4.0) - acetonitrile as mobile phase at a flow-rate of 1.5 mL x min(-1). The mobile phase was splitted and 0.5 mL x min(-1) was introduced into MS. A tandem mass spectrometer equipped with electrospray ionization source was used as detector and operated in the negative ion mode. Quantification was performed using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The resolution of warfarin enantiomers is 1.56. The linear calibration curves for R-warfarin and S-warfarin both were obtained in the concentration range of 5 - 1 000 ng x mL(-1). Intra- and inter-day relative standard deviation (RSD) for R-warfarin and S-warfarin over the entire concentration range across three validation runs was both less than 10%, and relative error (RE) ranged from -4.9% to 0.7%, separately. The method herein described is effective and convenient, and suitable for the study of metabolic interaction between morinidazole and warfarin. The results showed that coadministration of warfarin with morinidazole did not affect the pharmacokinetics of either R-warfarin or S-warfarin.

  11. Prevalence of potentially serious drug-drug interactions among South African elderly private health sector patients using the Mimica Matanović/Vlahović-Palčevski protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heerden, Julandi A; Burger, Johanita R; Gerber, Jan J; Vlahović-Palčevski, Vera

    2018-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of potentially serious drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and their relationship with gender and age, among elderly in South Africa. A cross-sectional study was conducted using pharmaceutical claims data for 2013, for a total of 103 420 medical scheme beneficiaries' ≥65 years. All medications dispensed within one calendar month where the days' supply of medication dispensed overlapped, were grouped as one prescription. DDIs per prescription were then identified using the Mimica Matanović/Vlahović-Palčevski DDI protocol. Results were interpreted using effect sizes, that is Cramér's V, Cohen's d and Cohen's ƒ 2 . A total of 331 659 DDIs were identified on 235 870 (25.8%, N = 912 713) prescriptions (mean 0.36 (SD 0.7) (95% CI, 0.36 to 0.37)). Women encountered 63.5% of all DDIs. Effect sizes for the association between DDIs and age group (Cramér's V = 0.06), and gender (Cramér's V = 0.05) was negligible. There was no difference between men and women regarding the mean number of DDIs identified per prescription (Cohen's d = 0.10). The number of medicine per prescription (ƒ 2 = 0.51) was the biggest predictor of the DDIs. The most frequent interacting drug combinations were between central nervous system medicines (30.6%). Our study is the first to report the prevalence of potentially serious DDIs among an elderly population in the South African private health sector utilising the Mimica Matanović/Vlahović-Palčevski DDI protocol. Overall, we identified DDIs in approximately 26% of the prescriptions in our study. Age and gender were not found to be predictors of potentially serious DDIs. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  12. Extent of poly-pharmacy, occurrence and associated factors of drug-drug interaction and potential adverse drug reactions in Gondar Teaching Referral Hospital, North West Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endalkachew Admassie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the extent of poly-pharmacy, occurrence, and associated factors for the occurrence of drug-drug interaction (DDI and potential adverse drug reaction (ADR in Gondar University Teaching Referral Hospital. Institutional-based retrospective cross-sectional study. This study was conducted on prescriptions of both in and out-patients for a period of 3 months at Gondar University Hospital. Both bivariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression were used to identify risk factors for the occurrence of DDI and possible ADRs. All the statistical calculations were performed using SPSS; software. A total of 12,334 prescriptions were dispensed during the study period of which, 2,180 prescriptions were containing two or more drugs per prescription. A total of 21,210 drugs were prescribed and the average number of drugs per prescription was 1.72. Occurrences of DDI of all categories (Major, Moderate, and Minor were analyzed and DDI were detected in 711 (32.6% prescriptions. Sex was not found to be a risk factor for the occurrence of DDI and ADR, while age and number of medications per prescription were found to be significant risk factors for the occurrence of DDI and ADR. The mean number of drugs per prescription was 1.72 and hence with regard to the WHO limit of drugs per prescription, Gondar hospital was able to maintain the limit and prescriptions containing multiple drugs supposed to be taken systemically. Numbers of drugs per prescription as well as older age were found to be predisposing factors for the occurrence of DDI and potential ADRs while sex was not a risk factor.

  13. Prediction of Drug-Drug Interactions with Bupropion and Its Metabolites as CYP2D6 Inhibitors Using a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Caifu; Zhang, Xunjie; Cai, Weimin

    2017-12-21

    The potential of inhibitory metabolites of perpetrator drugs to contribute to drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is uncommon and underestimated. However, the occurrence of unexpected DDI suggests the potential contribution of metabolites to the observed DDI. The aim of this study was to develop a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for bupropion and its three primary metabolites-hydroxybupropion, threohydrobupropion and erythrohydrobupropion-based on a mixed "bottom-up" and "top-down" approach and to contribute to the understanding of the involvement and impact of inhibitory metabolites for DDIs observed in the clinic. PK profiles from clinical researches of different dosages were used to verify the bupropion model. Reasonable PK profiles of bupropion and its metabolites were captured in the PBPK model. Confidence in the DDI prediction involving bupropion and co-administered CYP2D6 substrates could be maximized. The predicted maximum concentration (C max ) area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) values and C max and AUC ratios were consistent with clinically observed data. The addition of the inhibitory metabolites into the PBPK model resulted in a more accurate prediction of DDIs (AUC and C max ratio) than that which only considered parent drug (bupropion) P450 inhibition. The simulation suggests that bupropion and its metabolites contribute to the DDI between bupropion and CYP2D6 substrates. The inhibitory potency from strong to weak is hydroxybupropion, threohydrobupropion, erythrohydrobupropion, and bupropion, respectively. The present bupropion PBPK model can be useful for predicting inhibition from bupropion in other clinical studies. This study highlights the need for caution and dosage adjustment when combining bupropion with medications metabolized by CYP2D6. It also demonstrates the feasibility of applying the PBPK approach to predict the DDI potential of drugs undergoing complex metabolism, especially in the DDI involving inhibitory

  14. Consumer Mobile Apps for Potential Drug-Drug Interaction Check: Systematic Review and Content Analysis Using the Mobile App Rating Scale (MARS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ben Yb; Sharafoddini, Anis; Tran, Nam; Wen, Emily Y; Lee, Joon

    2018-03-28

    General consumers can now easily access drug information and quickly check for potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) through mobile health (mHealth) apps. With aging population in Canada, more people have chronic diseases and comorbidities leading to increasing numbers of medications. The use of mHealth apps for checking PDDIs can be helpful in ensuring patient safety and empowerment. The aim of this study was to review the characteristics and quality of publicly available mHealth apps that check for PDDIs. Apple App Store and Google Play were searched to identify apps with PDDI functionality. The apps' general and feature characteristics were extracted. The Mobile App Rating Scale (MARS) was used to assess the quality. A total of 23 apps were included for the review-12 from Apple App Store and 11 from Google Play. Only 5 of these were paid apps, with an average price of $7.19 CAD. The mean MARS score was 3.23 out of 5 (interquartile range 1.34). The mean MARS scores for the apps from Google Play and Apple App Store were not statistically different (P=.84). The information dimension was associated with the highest score (3.63), whereas the engagement dimension resulted in the lowest score (2.75). The total number of features per app, average rating, and price were significantly associated with the total MARS score. Some apps provided accurate and comprehensive information about potential adverse drug effects from PDDIs. Given the potentially severe consequences of incorrect drug information, there is a need for oversight to eliminate low quality and potentially harmful apps. Because managing PDDIs is complex in the absence of complete information, secondary features such as medication reminder, refill reminder, medication history tracking, and pill identification could help enhance the effectiveness of PDDI apps. ©Ben YB Kim, Anis Sharafoddini, Nam Tran, Emily Y Wen, Joon Lee. Originally published in JMIR Mhealth and Uhealth (http://mhealth.jmir.org), 28.03.2018.

  15. Usefulness of Two-Compartment Model-Assisted and Static Overall Inhibitory-Activity Method for Prediction of Drug-Drug Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iga, Katsumi; Kiriyama, Akiko

    2017-12-01

    Our study of drug-drug interaction (DDI) started with the clarification of unusually large DDI observed between ramelteon (RAM) and fluvoxamine (FLV). The main cause of this DDI was shown to be the extremely small hepatic availability of RAM (vF h ). Traditional DDI prediction assuming the well-stirred hepatic extraction kinetic ignores the relative increase of vF h by DDI, while we could solve this problem by use of the tube model. Ultimately, we completed a simple and useful method for prediction of DDI. Currently, DDI prediction becomes more complex and difficult when examining issues such as dynamic changes in perpetrator level, inhibitory metabolites, etc. The regulatory agents recommend DDI prediction by use of some sophisticated methods. However, they seem problematic in requiring plural in vitro data that reduce the flexibility and accuracy of the simulation. In contrast, our method is based on the static and two-compartment models. The two-compartment model has advantages in that it uses common pharmacokinetics (PK) parameters determined from the actual clinical data, guaranteeing the simulation of the reference standard in DDI. Our studies confirmed that dynamic changes in perpetrator level do not make a difference between static and dynamic methods. DDIs perpetrated by FLV and itraconazole were successfully predicted by use of the present method where two DDI predictors [perpetrator-specific inhibitory activities toward CYP isoforms (pA i, CYP s) and victim-specific fractional CYP-isoform contributions to the clearance (vf m, CYP s)] are determined successively as shown in the graphical abstract. Accordingly, this approach will accelerate DDI prediction over the traditional methods.

  16. Analysis of drug-drug interactions among patients receiving antiretroviral regimens using data from a large open-source prescription database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nimish; Borg, Peter; Haubrich, Richard; McNicholl, Ian

    2018-06-14

    Results of a study of contraindicated concomitant medication use among recipients of preferred antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens are reported. A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate concomitant medication use in a cohort of previously treatment-naive, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected U.S. patients prescribed preferred ART regimens during the period April 2014-March 2015. Data were obtained from a proprietary longitudinal prescription database; elements retrieved included age, sex, and prescription data. The outcome of interest was the frequency of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) associated with concomitant use of contraindicated medications. Data on 25,919 unique treatment-naive patients who used a preferred ART regimen were collected. Overall, there were 384 instances in which a contraindicated medication was dispensed for concurrent use with a recommended ART regimen. Rates of contraindicated concomitant medication use differed significantly by ART regimen; the highest rate (3.2%) was for darunavir plus ritonavir plus emtricitabine-tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (DRV plus RTV plus FTC/TDF), followed by elvitegravir-cobicistat-emtricitabine-tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (EVG/c/FTC/TDF)(2.8%). The highest frequencies of DDIs were associated with ART regimens that included a pharmacoenhancing agent: DRV plus RTV plus FTC/TDF (3.2%) and EVG/c/FTC/TDF (2.8%). In a large population of treatment-naive HIV-infected patients, ART regimens that contained a pharmacoenhancing agent were involved most frequently in contraindicated medication-related DDIs. All of the DDIs could have been avoided by using therapeutic alternatives within the same class not associated with a DDI. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. In Vitro Dissolution of Fluconazole and Dipyridamole in Gastrointestinal Simulator (GIS), Predicting in Vivo Dissolution and Drug-Drug Interaction Caused by Acid-Reducing Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Kazuki; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Amidon, Gregory E; Amidon, Gordon L

    2015-07-06

    Weakly basic drugs typically exhibit pH-dependent solubility in the physiological pH range, displaying supersaturation or precipitation along the gastrointestinal tract. Additionally, their oral bioavailabilities may be affected by coadministration of acid-reducing agents that elevate gastric pH. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of a multicompartmental in vitro dissolution apparatus, Gastrointestinal Simulator (GIS), in predicting in vivo dissolution of certain oral medications. In vitro dissolution studies of fluconazole, a BCS class I, and dipyridamole, a BCS class II weak bases (class IIb), were performed in the GIS as well as United States Pharmacopeia (USP) apparatus II and compared with the results of clinical drug-drug interaction (DDI) studies. In both USP apparatus II and GIS, fluconazole completely dissolved within 60 min regardless of pH, reflecting no DDI between fluconazole and acid-reducing agents in a clinical study. On the other hand, seven-fold and 15-fold higher concentrations of dipyridamole than saturation solubility were observed in the intestinal compartments in GIS with gastric pH 2.0. Precipitation of dipyridamole was also observed in the GIS, and the percentage of dipyridamole in solution was 45.2 ± 7.0%. In GIS with gastric pH 6.0, mimicking the coadministration of acid-reducing agents, the concentration of dipyridamole was equal to its saturation solubility, and the percentage of drug in solution was 9.3 ± 2.7%. These results are consistent with the clinical DDI study of dipyridamole with famotidine, which significantly reduced the Cmax and area under the curve. An In situ mouse infusion study combined with GIS revealed that high concentration of dipyridamole in the GIS enhanced oral drug absorption, which confirmed the supersaturation of dipyridamole. In conclusion, GIS was shown to be a useful apparatus to predict in vivo dissolution for BCS class IIb drugs.

  18. Characterization of simvastatin acid uptake by organic anion transporting polypeptide 3A1 (OATP3A1) and influence of drug-drug interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atilano-Roque, Amandla; Joy, Melanie S

    2017-12-01

    Human organic anion transporting polypeptide 3A1 (OATP3A1) is predominately expressed in the heart. The ability of OATP3A1 to transport statins into cardiomyocytes is unknown, although other OATPs are known to mediate the uptake of statin drugs in liver. The pleiotropic effects and uptake of simvastatin acid were analyzed in primary human cardiomyocytes and HEK293 cells transfected with the OATP3A1 gene. Treatment with simvastatin acid reduced indoxyl sulfate-mediated reactive oxygen species and modulated OATP3A1 expression in cardiomyocytes and HEK293 cells transfected with the OATP3A1 gene. We observed a pH-dependent effect on OATP3A1 uptake, with more efficient simvastatin acid uptake at pH5.5 in HEK293 cells transfected with the OATP3A1 gene. The Michaelis-Menten constant (K m ) for simvastatin acid uptake by OATP3A1 was 0.017±0.002μM and the V max was 0.995±0.027fmol/min/10 5 cells. Uptake of simvastatin acid was significantly increased by known (benzylpenicillin and estrone-3-sulfate) and potential (indoxyl sulfate and cyclosporine) substrates of OATP3A1. In conclusion, the presence of OATP3A1 in cardiomyocytes suggests that this transporter may modulate the exposure of cardiac tissue to simvastatin acid due to its enrichment in cardiomyocytes. Increases in uptake of simvastatin acid by OATP3A1 when combined with OATP substrates suggest the potential for drug-drug interactions that could influence clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Prevalence of possible drug-drug interactions between antiretroviral agents in different age groups in a section of the private health care sector setting in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katende-Kyenda, N L; Lubbe, M S; Serfontein, J H P; Truter, I

    2008-08-01

    The chronic nature of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection requires lifelong highly active antiretroviral (ARV) therapy (HAART) to continuously suppress HIV-1 viral replication, thus reducing morbidity and mortality. HAART is restricted by complex dosing, drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and toxicities. To determine the prevalence of possible DDIs between ARV drugs in different age groups in a section of the private primary health care sector in South Africa. A quantitative, retrospective drug utilization review was performed on 47 085 ARV prescriptions claimed through a national medicine claims database during 2006. Possible DDIs identified were classified according to a clinical significance rating as described by Tatro [Drug Interaction Facts 2005. St Louis, MO: Facts and Comparisons (2005)]. The total number of patients who received prescriptions that were claimed through the medicine claims database was 275 424, of whom 25.11% were males, 28.28% were females and the gender of 46.61% patients was unknown. Of the total number of patients, 3.27% were HIV patients of which an average of 5.23 +/- 3.86 ARV prescriptions (n = 47 085) per patient were claimed for representing 4.73% of the total number of prescriptions claimed during the study period (N = 993 804). HIV patients received an average of 2.36 +/- 0.61 ARVs per prescription. Only 4.95% of the prescriptions had one ARV medicine item, 56.04% two, 37.10% three, 1.75% four and 6 years and 12 and 60 years with patients <40 years and < or =60 years having the highest number of DDIs and patients older than 60 years the lowest. The majority of DDIs between the ARVs presented in significance levels 2 and 4. The most important interactions were between: indinavir (IDV) and ritonavir (n = 199); efavirenz (EFV) and lopinavir/ritonavir (n = 65) and EFV and IDV (n = 60) all interacting at level 2. The importance of using drug utilization study as an identification tool to provide insight into the prescribing and

  20. Clopidogrel-Proton Pump Inhibitor Drug-Drug Interaction and Risk of Adverse Clinical Outcomes Among PCI-Treated ACS Patients: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbin, Michael A; Guzauskas, Gregory F; Veenstra, David L

    2016-08-01

    Uncertainty regarding clopidogrel effectiveness attenuation because of a drug-drug interaction with proton pump inhibitors (PPI) has led to conflicting guidelines on concomitant therapy. In particular, the effect of this interaction in patients who undergo a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), a population known to have increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events, has not been systematically evaluated. To synthesize the evidence of the effect of clopidogrel-PPI drug interaction on adverse cardiovascular outcomes in a PCI patient population. We conducted a systematic literature review for studies reporting clinical outcomes in patients who underwent a PCI and were initiated on clopidogrel with or without a PPI. Studies were included in the analysis if they reported at least 1 of the clinical outcomes of interest (major adverse cardiovascular event [MACE], cardiovascular death, all-cause death, myocardial infarction, stroke, stent thrombosis, and bleed events). We excluded studies that were not exclusive to PCI patients or had no PCI subgroup analysis and/or did not report at least a 6-month follow-up. Statistical and clinical heterogeneity were evaluated and HRs and 95% CIs for adverse clinical events were pooled using the DerSimonian and Laird random-effects meta-analysis method. We identified 12 studies comprising 50,277 PCI patients that met our inclusion and exclusion criteria. Our analysis included retrospective analyses of randomized controlled trials (2), health registries (3), claims databases (2), and institutional records (5); no prospective studies of PCI patients were identified. On average, patients were in their mid-60s, male, and had an array of comorbidities, including hyperlipidemia, diabetes, hypertension, and smoking history. Concomitant therapy following PCI resulted in statistically significant increases in composite MACE (HR = 1.28; 95% CI = 1.24-1.32), myocardial infarction (HR = 1.51; 95% CI = 1.40-1.62), and stroke (HR = 1.46; 95

  1. Valerian: No Evidence for Clinically Relevant Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Kelber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent popular publications as well as in widely used information websites directed to cancer patients, valerian is claimed to have a potential of adverse interactions with anticancer drugs. This questions its use as a safe replacement for, for example, benzodiazepines. A review on the interaction potential of preparations from valerian root (Valeriana officinalis L. root was therefore conducted. A data base search and search in a clinical drug interaction data base were conducted. Thereafter, a systematic assessment of publications was performed. Seven in vitro studies on six CYP 450 isoenzymes, on p-glycoprotein, and on two UGT isoenzymes were identified. However, the methodological assessment of these studies did not support their suitability for the prediction of clinically relevant interactions. In addition, clinical studies on various valerian preparations did not reveal any relevant interaction potential concerning CYP 1A2, 2D6, 2E1, and 3A4. Available animal and human pharmacodynamic studies did not verify any interaction potential. The interaction potential of valerian preparations therefore seems to be low and thereby without clinical relevance. We conclude that there is no specific evidence questioning their safety, also in cancer patients.

  2. Hydrogen interaction with fusion-relevant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caorlin, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is an outline of the work carried out at JRC Ispra in the Tritium-materials Interaction Laboratory, on the interaction of gaseous hydrogen with several materials of interest in the field of fusion technology. Experimental work is reported and a concise review of relevant theoretical and numerical supporting activity is given as well. A period of about seven years is covered since 1982. Current work and possible future extensions are also briefly mentioned. 11 figs., 18 refs

  3. Prevalence of acid-reducing agents (ARA) in cancer populations and ARA drug-drug interaction potential for molecular targeted agents in clinical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smelick, Gillian S; Heffron, Timothy P; Chu, Laura; Dean, Brian; West, David A; Duvall, Scott L; Lum, Bert L; Budha, Nageshwar; Holden, Scott N; Benet, Leslie Z; Frymoyer, Adam; Dresser, Mark J; Ware, Joseph A

    2013-11-04

    Acid-reducing agents (ARAs) are the most commonly prescribed medications in North America and Western Europe. There are currently no data describing the prevalence of their use among cancer patients. However, this is a paramount question due to the potential for significant drug-drug interactions (DDIs) between ARAs, most commonly proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), and orally administered cancer therapeutics that display pH-dependent solubility, which may lead to decreased drug absorption and decreased therapeutic benefit. Of recently approved orally administered cancer therapeutics, >50% are characterized as having pH-dependent solubility, but there are currently no data describing the potential for this ARA-DDI liability among targeted agents currently in clinical development. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine the prevalence of ARA use among different cancer populations and (2) investigate the prevalence of orally administered cancer therapeutics currently in development that may be liable for an ARA-DDI. To address the question of ARA use among cancer patients, a retrospective cross-sectional analysis was performed using two large healthcare databases: Thomson Reuters MarketScan (N = 1,776,443) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA, N = 1,171,833). Among all cancer patients, the total prevalence proportion of ARA use (no. of cancer patients receiving an ARA/total no. of cancer patients) was 20% and 33% for the MarketScan and VA databases, respectively. PPIs were the most commonly prescribed agent, comprising 79% and 65% of all cancer patients receiving a prescription for an ARA (no. of cancer patients receiving a PPI /no. of cancer patients receiving an ARA) for the MarketScan and VA databases, respectively. To estimate the ARA-DDI liability of orally administered molecular targeted cancer therapeutics currently in development, two publicly available databases, (1) Kinase SARfari and (2) canSAR, were examined. For those orally administered

  4. [Terbinafine : Relevant drug interactions and their management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürrbeck, A; Nenoff, P

    2016-09-01

    The allylamine terbinafine is the probably most frequently prescribed systemic antifungal agent in Germany for the treatment of dermatomycoses and onychomycoses. According to the German drug law, terbinafine is approved for patients who are 18 years and older; however, this antifungal agent is increasingly used off-label for treatment of onychomycoses and tinea capitis in children. Terbinafine is associated with only a few interactions with other drugs, which is why terbinafine can generally be used without problems in older and multimorbid patients. Nevertheless, some potential interactions of terbinafine with certain drug substances are known, including substances of the group of antidepressants/antipsychotics and some cardiovascular drugs. Decisive for the relevance of interactions is-along with the therapeutic index of the substrate and the possible alternative degradation pathways-the genetically determined type of metabolism. When combining terbinafine with tricyclic antidepressants or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin/noradrenalin reuptake inhibitors, the clinical response and potential side effects must be monitored. Problematic is the use of terbinafine with simultaneous treatment with tamoxifen. The administration of potent CYP2D6 inhibitors leads to a diminished efficacy of tamoxifen because one of its most important active metabolites-endoxifen-is not sufficiently available. Therefore, combination of tamoxifen and terbinafine should be avoided. In conclusion, the number of substances which are able to cause clinically relevant interactions in case of simultaneously administration with terbinafine is clear and should be manageable in the dermatological office with adequate monitoring.

  5. PREDICTING RELEVANT EMPTY SPOTS IN SOCIAL INTERACTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshiharu MAENO; Yukio OHSAWA

    2008-01-01

    An empty spot refers to an empty hard-to-fill space which can be found in the records of the social interaction, and is the clue to the persons in the underlying social network who do not appear in the records. This contribution addresses a problem to predict relevant empty spots in social interaction. Homogeneous and inhomogeneous networks are studied as a model underlying the social interaction. A heuristic predictor function method is presented as a new method to address the problem. Simulation experiment is demonstrated over a homogeneous network. A test data set in the form of market baskets is generated from the simulated communication. Precision to predict the empty spots is calculated to demonstrate the performance of the presented method.

  6. Drug-Drug/Drug-Excipient Compatibility Studies on Curcumin using Non-Thermal Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moorthi Chidambaram

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Curcumin is a hydrophobic polyphenol isolated from dried rhizome of turmeric. Clinical usefulness of curcumin in the treatment of cancer is limited due to poor aqueous solubility, hydrolytic degradation, metabolism, and poor oral bioavailability. To overcome these limitations, we proposed to fabricate curcumin-piperine, curcumin-quercetin and curcumin-silibinin loaded polymeric nanoformulation. However, unfavourable combinations of drug-drug and drug-excipient may result in interaction and rises the safety concern. Hence, the present study was aimed to assess the interaction of curcumin with excipients used in nanoformulations. Methods: Isothermal stress testing method was used to assess the compatibility of drug-drug/drug-excipient. Results: The combination of curcumin-piperine, curcumin-quercetin, curcumin-silibinin and the combination of other excipients with curcumin, piperine, quercetin and silibinin have not shown any significant physical and chemical instability. Conclusion: The study concludes that the curcumin, piperine, quercetin and silibinin is compatible with each other and with other excipients.

  7. Metabolic Pathway of Icotinib In Vitro: The Differential Roles of CYP3A4, CYP3A5, and CYP1A2 on Potential Pharmacokinetic Drug-Drug Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, TianHong; Zhang, KeRong; Ma, Li; Li, Zheng; Wang, Juan; Zhang, YunXia; Lu, Chuang; Zhu, Mingshe; Zhuang, XiaoMei

    2018-04-01

    Icotinib is the first self-developed small molecule drug in China for targeted therapy of non-small cell lung cancer. To date, systematic studies on the pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction of icotinib were limited. By identifying metabolite generated in human liver microsomes and revealing the contributions of major cytochromes P450 (CYPs) in the formation of major metabolites, the aim of the present work was to understand the mechanisms underlying pharmacokinetic and pharmacological variability in clinic. A liquid chromatography/UV/high-resolution mass spectrometer method was developed to characterize the icotinib metabolites. The formation of 6 major metabolites was studied in recombinant CYP isozymes and human liver microsomes with specific inhibitors to identify the CYPs responsible for icotinib metabolism. The metabolic pathways observed in vitro are consistent with those observed in human. Results demonstrated that the metabolites are predominantly catalyzed by CYP3A4 (77%∼87%), with a moderate contribution from CYP3A5 (5%∼15%) and CYP1A2 (3.7%∼7.5%). The contribution of CYP2C8, 2C9, 2C19, and 2D6 is insignificant. Based on our observations, to minimize drug-drug interaction risk in clinic, coprescription of icotinib with strong CYP3A inhibitors or inducers must be weighed. CYP1A2, a highly inducible enzyme in the smoking population, may also represent a determinant of pharmacokinetic and pharmacological variability of icotinib, especially in lung cancer patients with smoking history. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A strategy for early-risk predictions of clinical drug-drug interactions involving the GastroPlusTM DDI module for time-dependent CYP inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohlenius-Sternbeck, Anna-Karin; Meyerson, Gabrielle; Hagbjörk, Ann-Louise; Juric, Sanja; Terelius, Ylva

    2018-04-01

    1. A set of reference compounds for time-dependent inhibition (TDI) of cytochrome P450 with available literature data for k inact and K I was used to predict clinical implications using the GastroPlus TM software. Comparisons were made to in vivo literature interaction data. 2. The predicted AUC ratios (AUC +inhibitor /AUC control ) could be compared with the observed ratios from literature for all compounds with detailed information about in vivo administration, pharmacokinetics and in vivo interactions (N = 21). For this dataset, the difference between predicted and observed AUC ratios for interactions with midazolam was within twofold for all compounds except one (telaprevir, for which non-CYP-mediated metabolism likely plays a role after multiple dosing). 3. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the GastroPlus TM predictions using a binary classification as no-to-weak interaction versus moderate-to-strong interaction for all compounds with available in vivo interaction data, were 80%, 82% and 81%, respectively (N = 31). 4. As a result of our evaluations of the DDI module in GastroPlus TM , we have implemented an early TDI risk assessment decision tree for our drug discovery projects involving in vitro screening and early GastroPlus TM predictions. Shifted IC 50 values are determined and k inact /K I estimated (by using a regression line established with in house-shifted IC 50 values and literature k inact /K I ratios), followed by GastroPlus TM predictions.

  9. Relative contributions of the major human CYP450 to the metabolism of icotinib and its implication in prediction of drug-drug interaction between icotinib and CYP3A4 inhibitors/inducers using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; Liu, Dongyang; Zheng, Xin; Zhao, Qian; Jiang, Ji; Hu, Pei

    2015-06-01

    Icotinib is an anticancer drug, but relative contributions of CYP450 have not been identified. This study was carried out to identify the contribution percentage of CYP450 to icotinib and use the results to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, which can help to predict drug-drug interaction (DDI). Human liver microsome (HLM) and supersome using relative activity factor (RAF) were employed to determine the relative contributions of the major human P450 to the net hepatic metabolism of icotinib. These values were introduced to develop a PBPK model using SimCYP. The model was validated by the observed data in a Phase I clinical trial in Chinese healthy subjects. Finally, the model was used to simulate the DDI with ketoconazole or rifampin. Final contribution of CYP450 isoforms determined by HLM showed that CYP3A4 provided major contributions to the metabolism of icotinib. The percentage contributions of the P450 to the net hepatic metabolism of icotinib were determined by HLM inhibition assay and RAF. The AUC ratio under concomitant use of ketoconazole and rifampin was 3.22 and 0.55, respectively. Percentage of contribution of CYP450 to icotinib metabolism was calculated by RAF. The model has been proven to fit the observed data and is used in predicting icotinib-ketoconazole/rifampin interaction.

  10. [Rhabdomyolysis and severe hepatotoxicity due to a drug-drug interaction between ritonavir and simvastatin. Could we use the most cost-effective statin in all human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastida, Carla; Also, Maria Antonia; Pericas, Juan Manuel; Letang, Emili; Tuset, Montse; Miró, Josep Maria

    2014-11-01

    Drugs like statins may induce rhabdomyolysis. Simvastatin and lovastatin have a high hepatic metabolism and their potential toxicity could be increased by interactions with other drugs that reduce their metabolism. A case-report is presented of an HIV-infected patient treated with antiretroviral drugs who developed a rhabdomyolysis-induced renal failure and liver toxicity when simvastatin was substituted for atorvastatin. A literature review is also presented. The patient required hospital admission and showed a favorable response after hydration and urine alkalinization. There were 4 additional cases published of which there was one death. Drug-drug interactions can increase the risk of statin induced rhabdomyolysis. In order to evaluate them properly, physicians at all levels of clinical care should be aware of all drugs prescribed to their patients and the contraindicated combinations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  11. Free software to analyse the clinical relevance of drug interactions with antiretroviral agents (SIMARV®) in patients with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, N A; Amariles, P; Monsalve, M; Faus, M J

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy has extended the expected lifespan of patients with HIV/AIDS. However, the therapeutic benefits of some drugs used simultaneously with highly active antiretroviral therapy may be adversely affected by drug interactions. The goal was to design and develop a free software to facilitate analysis, assessment, and clinical decision making according to the clinical relevance of drug interactions in patients with HIV/AIDS. A comprehensive Medline/PubMed database search of drug interactions was performed. Articles that recognized any drug interactions in HIV disease were selected. The publications accessed were limited to human studies in English or Spanish, with full texts retrieved. Drug interactions were analyzed, assessed, and grouped into four levels of clinical relevance according to gravity and probability. Software to systematize the information regarding drug interactions and their clinical relevance was designed and developed. Overall, 952 different references were retrieved and 446 selected; in addition, 67 articles were selected from the citation lists of identified articles. A total of 2119 pairs of drug interactions were identified; of this group, 2006 (94.7%) were drug-drug interactions, 1982 (93.5%) had an identified pharmacokinetic mechanism, and 1409 (66.5%) were mediated by enzyme inhibition. In terms of clinical relevance, 1285 (60.6%) drug interactions were clinically significant in patients with HIV (levels 1 and 2). With this information, a software program that facilitates identification and assessment of the clinical relevance of antiretroviral drug interactions (SIMARV ® ) was developed. A free software package with information on 2119 pairs of antiretroviral drug interactions was designed and developed that could facilitate analysis, assessment, and clinical decision making according to the clinical relevance of drug interactions in patients with HIV/AIDS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Drug-Drug Interaction of Sacubitril/Valsartan (LCZ696) and Sildenafil in Patients With Mild-to-Moderate Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, H-L; Langenickel, T H; Petruck, J; Kode, K; Ayalasomayajula, S; Schuehly, U; Greeley, M; Pal, P; Zhou, W; Prescott, M F; Sunkara, G; Rajman, I

    2018-03-01

    Sacubitril/valsartan (LCZ696) is indicated for the treatment of patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). Since patients with HFrEF may receive sacubitril/valsartan and sildenafil, both increasing cyclic guanosine monophosphate, the present study evaluated the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interaction potential between sacubitril/valsartan and sildenafil. In this open-label, three-period, single sequence study, patients with mild-to-moderate hypertension (153.8 ± 8.2 mmHg mean systolic blood pressure (SBP)) received a single dose of sildenafil 50 mg, sacubitril/valsartan 400 mg once daily for 5 days, and sacubitril/valsartan and sildenafil coadministration. When coadministered with sildenafil, the AUC and C max of valsartan decreased by 29% and 39%, respectively. Coadministration of sacubitril/valsartan and sildenafil resulted in a greater decrease in BP (-5/-4/-4 mmHg mean ambulatory SBP/DBP/MAP (mean arterial pressure)) than with sacubitril/valsartan alone. Both treatments were generally safe and well tolerated in this study; however, the additional BP reduction suggests that sildenafil should be administered cautiously in patients receiving sacubitril/valsartan. Unique identifier: NCT01601470. © 2017 The Authors Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  13. The Consequence of Drug-Drug Interactions Influencing the Interplay between P-Glycoprotein and Cytochrome P450 3a: An Ex Vivo Study with Rat Precision-Cut Intestinal Slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; de Graaf, Inge A M; Siissalo, Sanna; de Jager, Marina H; van Dam, Annie; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2016-05-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) are differentially expressed along the intestine and work coordinately to reduce the intracellular concentration of xenobiotics and the absorption of orally taken drugs. Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) based on P-gp/CYP3A interplay are of clinical importance and require preclinical investigation. We investigated the P-gp/Cyp3a interplay and related DDIs with different P-gp inhibitors in the various regions of the rat intestine ex vivo using precision-cut intestinal slices (PCIS) with quinidine (Qi), a dual substrate of P-gp and Cyp3a, as the probe. The results showed that P-gp efflux was the main factor limiting the intracellular Qi content at concentrations below 5µM, whereas both efflux and metabolism were saturated at [Qi] > 50µM. The selective P-gp inhibitors CP100356 [N-(3,4-dimethoxyphenethyl)-4-(6,7-dimethoxy-3,4-dihydroisoquinolin-2[1H]-yl)-6,7-dimethoxyquinazolin-2-amine] and PSC833 [valspodar, 6-[(2S,4R,6E)-4-methyl-2-(methylamino)-3-oxo-6-octenoic acid]-7-l-valine-cyclosporin A] enhanced the Qi accumulation in slices in line with the different P-gp expression in the intestinal regions and, as a result, also enhanced metabolism in the jejunum and ileum. Dual inhibitors of both P-gp and Cyp3a (verapamil and ketoconazole) increased the concentration of Qi in the jejunum and ileum, but less 3-hydroxy-quinidine was produced due to inhibition of Cyp3a. The results indicate that the P-gp/Cyp3a interplay depends on the concentration of the drug and on the intestinal region under study. Furthermore, due to the P-gp/Cyp3a interplay, DDIs can lead to remarkable changes in the intracellular concentration of both the parent drug and the metabolite, which varies among the intestinal regions and depends on the selectivity of the inhibitors, with potentially important implications for disposition and toxicity of drugs and their metabolites. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental

  14. Farmacología en la tercera edad: medicamentos de uso continuo y peligros de la interacción medicamentosa Pharmacology in the elderly: continuous use medicines and drug-drug interaction risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Filié Haddad

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: Se observó un considerable crecimiento del contingente poblacional de ancianos. Ellos son los mayores usuarios de medicamentos. Los cambios fisiológicos relacionados con el envejecimiento pueden alterar la propiedad farmacocinética y la farmacodinamia. El cuadro de declinación cognitiva, las limitaciones físicas y las enfermedades crónicas asociadas afectan la habilidad de usar adecuadamente los medicamentos. Objetivo: Indicar las principales clases farmacológicas administradas a pacientes geriátricos y los riesgos de la interacción medicamentosa en base a una revisión de literatura. Conclusión: La mayor parte de los ancianos hacen uso continuo de por lo menos tres fármacos, los más prescritos son aquellos destinados a problemas cardiovasculares y trastornos psíquicos.Introduction: It was observed a considerable growth of elderly people. They are who use more medicines. The physiological changes associated with the age advancing can make pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic alterations. The cognitive decline, physical limitations and associate chronic pathology affect the medications appropriately use ability. Aims: Based in a literature review, appoint the main pharmacological groups prescribed to the elderly and the drug-drug interaction risks. Conclusion: The most of elderly use continually at least 3 medicines, the most prescribed are to cardiovascular and psychic diseases treatment.

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Complex Drug-Drug Interactions Between Repaglinide and Cyclosporin A/Gemfibrozil Using Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models With In Vitro Transporter/Enzyme Inhibition Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Jin; Toshimoto, Kota; Yao, Yoshiaki; Yoshikado, Takashi; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2017-09-01

    Quantitative analysis of transporter- and enzyme-mediated complex drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is challenging. Repaglinide (RPG) is transported into the liver by OATP1B1 and then is metabolized by CYP2C8 and CYP3A4. The purpose of this study was to describe the complex DDIs of RPG quantitatively based on unified physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models using in vitro K i values for OATP1B1, CYP3A4, and CYP2C8. Cyclosporin A (CsA) or gemfibrozil (GEM) increased the blood concentrations of RPG. The time profiles of RPG and the inhibitors were analyzed by PBPK models, considering the inhibition of OATP1B1 and CYP3A4 by CsA or OATP1B1 inhibition by GEM and its glucuronide and the mechanism-based inhibition of CYP2C8 by GEM glucuronide. RPG-CsA interaction was closely predicted using a reported in vitro K i,OATP1B1 value in the presence of CsA preincubation. RPG-GEM interaction was underestimated compared with observed data, but the simulation was improved with the increase of f m,CYP2C8 . These results based on in vitro K i values for transport and metabolism suggest the possibility of a bottom-up approach with in vitro inhibition data for the prediction of complex DDIs using unified PBPK models and in vitro f m value of a substrate for multiple enzymes should be considered carefully for the prediction. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Relevance of induced gauge interactions in decoherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, D.P.

    1994-07-01

    Decoherence in quantum cosmology is shown to occur naturally in the presence of induced geometric gauge interactions associated with particle production. A new ''gauge'' - variant form of the semiclassical Einstein equations is also presented which makes the non-gravitating character of the vacuum polarization energy explicit. (author). 20 refs

  17. Clinical relevance of cimetidine drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, A F

    1992-01-01

    The excellent efficacy and tolerability profiles of H2-antagonists have established these agents as the leading class of antiulcer drugs. Attention has been focused on drug interactions with H2-antagonists as a means of product differentiation and because many patients are receiving multiple drug therapy. The main mechanism of most drug interactions involving cimetidine appears to be inhibition of the hepatic microsomal enzyme cytochrome P450, an effect which may be related to the different structures of H2-antagonists. Ranitidine appears to have less affinity than cimetidine for this system. There have been many published case reports and studies of drug interactions with cimetidine, but many of these have provided pharmacokinetic data only, with little information concerning the clinical significance of these findings. Nevertheless, the coadministration of cimetidine with drugs that have a narrow therapeutic margin (such as theophylline) may potentially result in clinically significant adverse effects. The monitoring of serum concentrations of drugs coadministered with cimetidine may reduce the risk of adverse events but does not abolish the problem. However, for most patients, concomitant administration of cimetidine with drugs possessing a wide therapeutic margin is unlikely to pose a significant problem.

  18. Prediction of the overall renal tubular secretion and hepatic clearance of anionic drugs and a renal drug-drug interaction involving organic anion transporter 3 in humans by in vitro uptake experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takao; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Tomoko; Debori, Yasuyuki; Maeda, Kazuya; Kondo, Tsunenori; Nakayama, Hideki; Horita, Shigeru; Ogilvie, Brian W; Parkinson, Andrew; Hu, Zhuohan; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2011-06-01

    The present study investigated prediction of the overall renal tubular secretion and hepatic clearances of anionic drugs based on in vitro transport studies. The saturable uptake of eight drugs, most of which were OAT3 substrates (rosuvastatin, pravastatin, pitavastatin, valsartan, olmesartan, trichlormethiazide, p-aminohippurate, and benzylpenicillin) by freshly prepared human kidney slices underestimated the overall intrinsic clearance of the tubular secretion; therefore, a scaling factor of 10 was required for in vitro-in vivo extrapolation. We examined the effect of gemfibrozil and its metabolites, gemfibrozil glucuronide and the carboxylic metabolite, gemfibrozil M3, on pravastatin uptake by human kidney slices. The inhibition study using human kidney slices suggests that OAT3 plays a predominant role in the renal uptake of pravastatin. Comparison of unbound concentrations and K(i) values (1.5, 9.1, and 4.0 μM, for gemfibrozil, gemfibrozil glucuronide, and gemfibrozil M3, respectively) suggests that the mechanism of the interaction is due mainly to inhibition by gemfibrozil and gemfibrozil glucuronide. Furthermore, extrapolation of saturable uptake by cryopreserved human hepatocytes predicts clearance comparable with the observed hepatic clearance although fluvastatin and rosuvastatin required a scaling factor of 11 and 6.9, respectively. This study suggests that in vitro uptake assays using human kidney slices and hepatocytes provide a good prediction of the overall tubular secretion and hepatic clearances of anionic drugs and renal drug-drug interactions. It is also recommended that in vitro-in vivo extrapolation be performed in animals to obtain more reliable prediction.

  19. The burden and management of cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6)-mediated drug-drug interaction (DDI): co-medication of metoprolol and paroxetine or fluoxetine in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar, Muh Akbar; Hak, Eelko; Bos, Jens H J; Borgsteede, Sander D; Wilffert, Bob

    2017-07-01

    Metoprolol and paroxetine/fluoxetine are inevitably co-prescribed because cardiovascular disorders and depression often coexist in the elderly. This leads to CYP2D6-mediated drug-drug interactions (DDI). Because systematic evaluations are lacking, we assessed the burden of metoprolol-paroxetine/fluoxetine interaction in the elderly and how these interactions are managed in Dutch community pharmacies. Dispensing data were collected from the University of Groningen pharmacy database (IADB.nl, 1999-2014) for elderly patients (≥60 years) starting beta-blockers and/or antidepressants. Based on the two main DDI alert systems (G-Standard and Pharmabase), incidences were divided between signalled (metoprolol-fluoxetine/paroxetine) and not-signalled (metoprolol-alternative antidepressants and alternative beta-blockers-paroxetine/fluoxetine) combinations. Incident users were defined as patients starting at least one signalled or a non-signalled combination. G-Standard signalled throughout the study period, whereas Pharmabase stopped after 2005. A total of 1763 patients had 2039 metoprolol-paroxetine/fluoxetine co-prescriptions, despite DDI alert systems, and about 57.3% were signalled. The number of metoprolol-alternative antidepressant combinations (incidences = 3150) was higher than alternative beta-blocker-paroxetine/fluoxetine combinations (incidences = 1872). Metoprolol users are more likely to be co-medicated with an alternative antidepressant (incidences = 2320) than paroxetine/fluoxetine users (incidences = 1232) are. The number of paroxetine/fluoxetine users co-prescribed with alternative beta-blockers was comparable to those co-medicated with metoprolol (about 50%). Less than 5% of patients received a substitute therapy after using metoprolol-paroxetine/fluoxetine. Most of the metoprolol users (90%) received a low dose (mean DDD = 0.47) regardless whether they were prescribed paroxetine/fluoxetine. Despite the signalling software, metoprolol

  20. Drug-Drug Interactions Between the Anti-Hepatitis C Virus 3D Regimen of Ombitasvir, Paritaprevir/Ritonavir, and Dasabuvir and Eight Commonly Used Medications in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polepally, Akshanth R; King, Jennifer R; Ding, Bifeng; Shuster, Diana L; Dumas, Emily O; Khatri, Amit; Chiu, Yi-Lin; Podsadecki, Thomas J; Menon, Rajeev M

    2016-08-01

    The three direct-acting antiviral regimen of ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir and dasabuvir (3D regimen) is approved for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infection. Drug-drug interaction (DDI) studies of the 3D regimen and commonly used medications were conducted in healthy volunteers to provide information on coadministering these medications with or without dose adjustments. Three phase I studies evaluated DDIs between the 3D regimen (ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir 25/150/100 mg once daily + dasabuvir 250 mg twice daily) and hydrocodone bitartrate/acetaminophen (5/300 mg), metformin hydrochloride (500 mg), diazepam (2 mg), cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride (5 mg), carisoprodol (250 mg), or sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (SMZ/TMP) (800/160 mg twice daily), all administered orally. DDI magnitude was determined using geometric mean ratios and 90 % confidence intervals for the maximum plasma concentration (C max) and area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC). Changes in exposures (C max and AUC geometric mean ratios) of acetaminophen, metformin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, and diazepam were ≤25 % upon coadministration with the 3D regimen. The C max and AUC of nordiazepam, an active metabolite of diazepam, increased by 10 % and decreased by 44 %, respectively. Exposures of cyclobenzaprine and carisoprodol decreased by ≤40 and ≤46 %, respectively, whereas exposures of hydrocodone increased up to 90 %. Ombitasvir, paritaprevir, ritonavir, and dasabuvir exposures changed by ≤25 %, except for a 37 % decrease in paritaprevir C max with metformin and a 33 % increase in dasabuvir AUC with SMZ/TMP. Acetaminophen, metformin, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim can be coadministered with the 3D regimen without dose adjustment. Higher doses may be needed for diazepam, cyclobenzaprine, and carisoprodol based on clinical monitoring. A 50 % lower dose and/or clinical monitoring should be considered for hydrocodone. No dose

  1. Relevance of metric-free interactions in flocking phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginelli, Francesco; Chaté, Hugues

    2010-10-15

    We show that the collective properties of self-propelled particles aligning with their topological (Voronoi) neighbors are qualitatively different from those of usual models where metric interaction ranges are used. This relevance of metric-free interactions, shown in a minimal setting, indicate that realistic models for the cohesive motion of cells, bird flocks, and fish schools may have to incorporate them, as suggested by recent observations.

  2. Public health relevance of drug–nutrition interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Péter, Szabolcs; Navis, Gerjan; Borst, de Martin H.; Schacky, von Clemens; Orten-Luiten, van Anne Claire B.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Witkamp, Renger F.; Janse, André; Weber, Peter; Bakker, Stephan L.J.; Eggersdorfer, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    The public health relevance of drug–nutrition interactions is currently highly undervalued and overlooked. This is particularly the case for elderly persons where multi-morbidity and consequently polypharmacy is very common. Vitamins and other micronutrients have central functions in metabolism, and

  3. Public health relevance of drug-nutrition interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Péter, Szabolcs; Navis, Gerjan; de Borst, Martin H; von Schacky, Clemens; van Orten-Luiten, Anne Claire B; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Witkamp, Renger F; Janse, André; Weber, Peter; Bakker, Stephan J L; Eggersdorfer, Manfred

    The public health relevance of drug-nutrition interactions is currently highly undervalued and overlooked. This is particularly the case for elderly persons where multi-morbidity and consequently polypharmacy is very common. Vitamins and other micronutrients have central functions in metabolism, and

  4. Interaction of dermatologically relevant nanoparticles with skin cells and skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Vogt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of nanoparticle interactions with tissues is complex. High levels of standardization, ideally testing of different material types in the same biological model, and combinations of sensitive imaging and detection methods are required. Here, we present our studies on nanoparticle interactions with skin, skin cells, and biological media. Silica, titanium dioxide and silver particles were chosen as representative examples for different types of skin exposure to nanomaterials, e.g., unintended environmental exposure (silica versus intended exposure through application of sunscreen (titanium dioxide or antiseptics (silver. Because each particle type exhibits specific physicochemical properties, we were able to apply different combinations of methods to examine skin penetration and cellular uptake, including optical microscopy, electron microscopy, X-ray microscopy on cells and tissue sections, flow cytometry of isolated skin cells as well as Raman microscopy on whole tissue blocks. In order to assess the biological relevance of such findings, cell viability and free radical production were monitored on cells and in whole tissue samples. The combination of technologies and the joint discussion of results enabled us to look at nanoparticle–skin interactions and the biological relevance of our findings from different angles.

  5. Vitamin E-drug interactions: molecular basis and clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podszun, Maren; Frank, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Vitamin E (α-, β-, γ- and δ-tocopherol and -tocotrienol) is an essential factor in the human diet and regularly taken as a dietary supplement by many people, who act under the assumption that it may be good for their health and can do no harm. With the publication of meta-analyses reporting increased mortality in persons taking vitamin E supplements, the safety of the micronutrient was questioned and interactions with prescription drugs were suggested as one potentially underlying mechanism. Here, we review the evidence in the scientific literature for adverse vitamin E-drug interactions and discuss the potential of each of the eight vitamin E congeners to alter the activity of drugs. In summary, there is no evidence from animal models or randomised controlled human trials to suggest that the intake of tocopherols and tocotrienols at nutritionally relevant doses may cause adverse nutrient-drug interactions. Consumption of high-dose vitamin E supplements ( ≥  300 mg/d), however, may lead to interactions with the drugs aspirin, warfarin, tamoxifen and cyclosporine A that may alter their activities. For the majority of drugs, however, interactions with vitamin E, even at high doses, have not been observed and are thus unlikely.

  6. Drug-Drug/Drug-Excipient Compatibility Studies on Curcumin using Non-Thermal Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Moorthi Chidambaram; Kathiresan Krishnasamy

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Curcumin is a hydrophobic polyphenol isolated from dried rhizome of turmeric. Clinical usefulness of curcumin in the treatment of cancer is limited due to poor aqueous solubility, hydrolytic degradation, metabolism, and poor oral bioavailability. To overcome these limitations, we proposed to fabricate curcumin-piperine, curcumin-quercetin and curcumin-silibinin loaded polymeric nanoformulation. However, unfavourable combinations of drug-drug and drug-excipient may result in interacti...

  7. Reactor water chemistry relevant to coolant-cladding interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    The report is a summary of the work performed in a frame of a Coordinated Research Program organized by the IAEA and carried out from 1981 till 1986. It consists of a survey on our knowledge on coolant-cladding interaction: the basic phenomena, the relevant parameters, their control and the modelling techniques implemented for their assessment. Based upon the results of this Coordinated Research Program, the following topics are reviewed on the report: role of water chemistry in reliable operation of nuclear power plants; water chemistry specifications and their control; behaviour of fuel cladding materials; corrosion product behaviour and crud build-up in reactor circuits; modelling of corrosion product behaviour. This report should be of interest to water chemistry supervisors at the power plants, to experts in utility engineering departments, to fuel designers, to R and D institutes active in the field and to the consultants of these organizations. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 3 papers included in the Annex of this document. Refs, figs, tabs

  8. The SADI Personal Health Lens: A Web Browser-Based System for Identifying Personally Relevant Drug Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandervalk, Ben; McCarthy, E Luke; Cruz-Toledo, José; Klein, Artjom; Baker, Christopher J O; Dumontier, Michel; Wilkinson, Mark D

    2013-04-05

    The Web provides widespread access to vast quantities of health-related information that can improve quality-of-life through better understanding of personal symptoms, medical conditions, and available treatments. Unfortunately, identifying a credible and personally relevant subset of information can be a time-consuming and challenging task for users without a medical background. The objective of the Personal Health Lens system is to aid users when reading health-related webpages by providing warnings about personally relevant drug interactions. More broadly, we wish to present a prototype for a novel, generalizable approach to facilitating interactions between a patient, their practitioner(s), and the Web. We utilized a distributed, Semantic Web-based architecture for recognizing personally dangerous drugs consisting of: (1) a private, local triple store of personal health information, (2) Semantic Web services, following the Semantic Automated Discovery and Integration (SADI) design pattern, for text mining and identifying substance interactions, (3) a bookmarklet to trigger analysis of a webpage and annotate it with personalized warnings, and (4) a semantic query that acts as an abstract template of the analytical workflow to be enacted by the system. A prototype implementation of the system is provided in the form of a Java standalone executable JAR file. The JAR file bundles all components of the system: the personal health database, locally-running versions of the SADI services, and a javascript bookmarklet that triggers analysis of a webpage. In addition, the demonstration includes a hypothetical personal health profile, allowing the system to be used immediately without configuration. Usage instructions are provided. The main strength of the Personal Health Lens system is its ability to organize medical information and to present it to the user in a personalized and contextually relevant manner. While this prototype was limited to a single knowledge domain

  9. The SADI Personal Health Lens: A Web Browser-Based System for Identifying Personally Relevant Drug Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandervalk, Ben; McCarthy, E Luke; Cruz-Toledo, José; Klein, Artjom; Baker, Christopher J O; Dumontier, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Background The Web provides widespread access to vast quantities of health-related information that can improve quality-of-life through better understanding of personal symptoms, medical conditions, and available treatments. Unfortunately, identifying a credible and personally relevant subset of information can be a time-consuming and challenging task for users without a medical background. Objective The objective of the Personal Health Lens system is to aid users when reading health-related webpages by providing warnings about personally relevant drug interactions. More broadly, we wish to present a prototype for a novel, generalizable approach to facilitating interactions between a patient, their practitioner(s), and the Web. Methods We utilized a distributed, Semantic Web-based architecture for recognizing personally dangerous drugs consisting of: (1) a private, local triple store of personal health information, (2) Semantic Web services, following the Semantic Automated Discovery and Integration (SADI) design pattern, for text mining and identifying substance interactions, (3) a bookmarklet to trigger analysis of a webpage and annotate it with personalized warnings, and (4) a semantic query that acts as an abstract template of the analytical workflow to be enacted by the system. Results A prototype implementation of the system is provided in the form of a Java standalone executable JAR file. The JAR file bundles all components of the system: the personal health database, locally-running versions of the SADI services, and a javascript bookmarklet that triggers analysis of a webpage. In addition, the demonstration includes a hypothetical personal health profile, allowing the system to be used immediately without configuration. Usage instructions are provided. Conclusions The main strength of the Personal Health Lens system is its ability to organize medical information and to present it to the user in a personalized and contextually relevant manner. While this

  10. Allosteric cross-talk in chromatin can mediate drug-drug synergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhireksan, Zenita; Palermo, Giulia; Riedel, Tina; Ma, Zhujun; Muhammad, Reyhan; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Dyson, Paul J.; Davey, Curt A.

    2017-03-01

    Exploitation of drug-drug synergism and allostery could yield superior therapies by capitalizing on the immensely diverse, but highly specific, potential associated with the biological macromolecular landscape. Here we describe a drug-drug synergy mediated by allosteric cross-talk in chromatin, whereby the binding of one drug alters the activity of the second. We found two unrelated drugs, RAPTA-T and auranofin, that yield a synergistic activity in killing cancer cells, which coincides with a substantially greater number of chromatin adducts formed by one of the compounds when adducts from the other agent are also present. We show that this occurs through an allosteric mechanism within the nucleosome, whereby defined histone adducts of one drug promote reaction of the other drug at a distant, specific histone site. This opens up possibilities for epigenetic targeting and suggests that allosteric modulation in nucleosomes may have biological relevance and potential for therapeutic interventions.

  11. Aspects of statistical spectroscopy relevant to effective-interaction theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, J.B.

    1975-01-01

    The three aspects of statistical spectroscopy discussed in this paper are the information content of complex spectra: procedures for spectroscopy in huge model spaces, useful in effective-interaction theory; and practical ways of identifying and calculating measurable parameters of the effective Hamiltonian and other operators, and of comparing different effective Hamiltonians. (4 figures) (U.S.)

  12. How relevant is social interaction in second language learning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eVerga

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Verbal language is the most widespread mode of human communication, and an intrinsically social activity. This claim is strengthen by evidence emerging from different fields, which clearly indicate that social interaction influences human communication, and more specifically, language learning. Indeed, research conducted with infants and children shows that interaction with a caregiver is necessary to acquire language. Further evidence on the influence of sociality on language comes from social and linguistic pathologies, in which deficits in social and linguistic abilities are tightly intertwined, as it is the case for Autism, for example. However, studies on adult second language learning have been mostly focused on individualistic approaches, partly because of methodological constraints especially of imaging methods. The question as to whether social interaction should be considered as a critical factor impacting upon adult language learning still remains underspecified. Here, we review evidence in support of the view that sociality plays a significant role in communication and language learning, in an attempt to emphasize factors that could facilitate this process in adult language learning. We suggest that sociality should be considered as a potentially influential factor in adult language learning and that future studies in this domain should explicitly target this factor.

  13. How relevant is social interaction in second language learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verga, Laura; Kotz, Sonja A

    2013-09-03

    Verbal language is the most widespread mode of human communication, and an intrinsically social activity. This claim is strengthened by evidence emerging from different fields, which clearly indicates that social interaction influences human communication, and more specifically, language learning. Indeed, research conducted with infants and children shows that interaction with a caregiver is necessary to acquire language. Further evidence on the influence of sociality on language comes from social and linguistic pathologies, in which deficits in social and linguistic abilities are tightly intertwined, as is the case for Autism, for example. However, studies on adult second language (L2) learning have been mostly focused on individualistic approaches, partly because of methodological constraints, especially of imaging methods. The question as to whether social interaction should be considered as a critical factor impacting upon adult language learning still remains underspecified. Here, we review evidence in support of the view that sociality plays a significant role in communication and language learning, in an attempt to emphasize factors that could facilitate this process in adult language learning. We suggest that sociality should be considered as a potentially influential factor in adult language learning and that future studies in this domain should explicitly target this factor.

  14. Drug-drug interactions: new trends | Garba | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in installed (for example, a recent version of Adobe Acrobat Reader). If you would like more information about how to print, save, and work with PDFs, Highwire Press provides a helpful Frequently Asked Questions about PDFs.

  15. Drug-drug interaction may explain failed antibiotic effectiveness - an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The in vivo effect of co-administration of the NSAIDs (acetyl salicylic acid (ASA), piroxicam, indomethacin and paracetamol) with ciprofloxacin against Staphylococcus aureus in Swiss mice, rendered neutropenic by pre-treatment with cyclophosphamide, was evaluated using animal model. Using the murine thigh model, ...

  16. Prolonged Drug-Drug Interaction between Terbinafine and Perphenazine

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Young-Min

    2012-01-01

    I report here an elderly woman receiving perphenazine together with terbinafine. After 1 week of terbinafine treatment she experienced extrapyramidal symptoms and, in particular, akathisia. Her symptoms did not disappear for 6 weeks, and so at 2 weeks prior to this most recent admission she had stopped taking terbinafine. However, these symptoms persisted for 3 weeks after discontinuing terbinafine. It is well known that terbinafine inhibits CYP2D6 and that perphenazine is metabolized mainly ...

  17. Social and emotional relevance in face processing: Happy faces of future interaction partners enhance the LPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian eBublatzky

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Human face perception is modulated by both emotional valence and social relevance, but their interaction has rarely been examined. Event-related brain potentials (ERP to happy, neutral, and angry facial expressions with different degrees of social relevance were recorded. Social relevance was manipulated by presenting pictures of two specific face actors as future interaction partners (meet condition, whereas two other face actors remained non-relevant. As a further control condition all stimuli were presented without specific task instructions (passive viewing condition. A within-subject design (Facial Expression x Relevance x Task was implemented, where randomly ordered face stimuli of four actors (2 women, from the KDEF were presented for 1s to 26 participants (16 female. Results showed an augmented N170, early posterior negativity (EPN, and late positive potential (LPP for emotional in contrast to neutral facial expressions. Of particular interest, face processing varied as a function of instructed social relevance. Whereas the meet condition was accompanied with unspecific effects regardless of relevance (P1, EPN, viewing potential interaction partners was associated with increased LPP amplitudes. The LPP was specifically enhanced for happy facial expressions of the future interaction partners. This underscores that social relevance can impact face processing already at an early stage of visual processing. These findings are discussed within the framework of motivated attention and face processing theories.

  18. Prevalence of Potential and Clinically Relevant Statin-Drug Interactions in Frail and Robust Older Inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Michele; Hilmer, Sarah; Pearson, Sallie-Anne; Reeve, Emily; Gnjidic, Danijela

    2015-10-01

    A significant proportion of older people are prescribed statins and are also exposed to polypharmacy, placing them at increased risk of statin-drug interactions. To describe the prevalence rates of potential and clinically relevant statin-drug interactions in older inpatients according to frailty status. A cross-sectional study of patients aged ≥65 years who were prescribed a statin and were admitted to a teaching hospital between 30 July and 10 October 2014 in Sydney, Australia, was conducted. Data on socio-demographics, comorbidities and medications were collected using a standardized questionnaire. Potential statin-drug interactions were defined if listed in the Australian Medicines Handbook and three international drug information sources: the British National Formulary, Drug Interaction Facts and Drug-Reax(®). Clinically relevant statin-drug interactions were defined as interactions with the highest severity rating in at least two of the three international drug information sources. Frailty was assessed using the Reported Edmonton Frail Scale. A total of 180 participants were recruited (median age 78 years, interquartile range 14), 35.0% frail and 65.0% robust. Potential statin-drug interactions were identified in 10% of participants, 12.7% of frail participants and 8.5% of robust participants. Clinically relevant statin-drug interactions were identified in 7.8% of participants, 9.5% of frail participants and 6.8% of robust participants. Depending on the drug information source used, the prevalence rates of potential and clinically relevant statin-drug interactions ranged between 14.4 and 35.6% and between 14.4 and 20.6%, respectively. In our study of frail and robust older inpatients taking statins, the overall prevalence of potential statin-drug interactions was low and varied significantly according to the drug information source used.

  19. Professional Interaction, Relevant Practical Experience, and Intellectual Contributions at Nondoctoral AACSB-Accredited Accounting Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlinghaus, Barry P.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses a survey of faculty members at nondoctoral AACSB-accredited accounting programs in the United States. The purpose of the survey was to determine the environment for professional interaction and relevant experience in light of institutional demands for intellectual contributions. The findings show that the…

  20. Current R and D status on material motion and interactions relevant to core disruptive accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Satoru [Safety Engineering Division, O-arai Engineering Center, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, O-arai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1994-07-01

    In this paper, the current status of research and development activities are briefly reviewed on evaluation of material-coolant interactions and material movement and relocation relevant to the safety of liquid-metal fast reactors. Since the status of European activities are well summarized in other papers submitted to the present meeting, the activities in Japan and the United States are highlighted in this paper. The review includes: out-of-pile experiments, in-pile experiments and relevant computer code development. It is emphasized that improved understanding on material motion has contributed to establishing more realistic and rational safety evaluation methods, where various mitigation mechanisms are inherently effective. (author)

  1. Regression Trees Identify Relevant Interactions: Can This Improve the Predictive Performance of Risk Adjustment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, Florian; Wasem, Jürgen; Schillo, Sonja

    2017-01-01

    Risk equalization formulas have been refined since their introduction about two decades ago. Because of the complexity and the abundance of possible interactions between the variables used, hardly any interactions are considered. A regression tree is used to systematically search for interactions, a methodologically new approach in risk equalization. Analyses are based on a data set of nearly 2.9 million individuals from a major German social health insurer. A two-step approach is applied: In the first step a regression tree is built on the basis of the learning data set. Terminal nodes characterized by more than one morbidity-group-split represent interaction effects of different morbidity groups. In the second step the 'traditional' weighted least squares regression equation is expanded by adding interaction terms for all interactions detected by the tree, and regression coefficients are recalculated. The resulting risk adjustment formula shows an improvement in the adjusted R 2 from 25.43% to 25.81% on the evaluation data set. Predictive ratios are calculated for subgroups affected by the interactions. The R 2 improvement detected is only marginal. According to the sample level performance measures used, not involving a considerable number of morbidity interactions forms no relevant loss in accuracy. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. A Vietnamese man with selective mutism: the relevance of multiple interacting 'cultures' in clinical psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollifield, Michael; Geppert, Cynthia; Johnson, Yuam; Fryer, Carol

    2003-09-01

    Multiple cultural variables have effects on the psychobiology and behavioral manifestations of illness, as do patient and physician perceptions of illness. The interaction among these variables is at the heart of clinical psychiatry. This case of a Vietnamese man with selective mutism underscores the relevance of the 'cultures' of medicine, psychiatry, and war and trauma on the manifestations of illness and illness perceptions by patient and physician. The discussion focuses on how these cultures interact and play a crucial role in formulating diagnosis and treatment planning. Suggestions are given for shifts in medical education that will encourage relevant cultural paradigms to make their way into educational and clinical systems, which in turn should improve cultural competence in clinical psychiatry.

  3. Final Report: Laser-Material Interactions Relevant to Analytic Spectroscopy of Wide Band Gap Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickinson, J. Thomas [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    2014-04-05

    We summarize our studies aimed at developing an understanding of the underlying physics and chemistry in terms of laser materials interactions relevant to laser-based sampling and chemical analysis of wide bandgap materials. This work focused on the determination of mechanisms for the emission of electrons, ions, atoms, and molecules from laser irradiation of surfaces. We determined the important role of defects on these emissions, the thermal, chemical, and physical interactions responsible for matrix effects and mass-dependent transport/detection. This work supported development of new techniques and technology for the determination of trace elements contained such as nuclear waste materials.

  4. Fungal-bacterial interactions and their relevance to oral health: linking the clinic and the bench.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Patricia I; Strausbaugh, Linda D; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2014-01-01

    High throughput sequencing has accelerated knowledge on the oral microbiome. While the bacterial component of oral communities has been extensively characterized, the role of the fungal microbiota in the oral cavity is largely unknown. Interactions among fungi and bacteria are likely to influence oral health as exemplified by the synergistic relationship between Candida albicans and oral streptococci. In this perspective, we discuss the current state of the field of fungal-bacterial interactions in the context of the oral cavity. We highlight the need to conduct longitudinal clinical studies to simultaneously characterize the bacterial and fungal components of the human oral microbiome in health and during disease progression. Such studies need to be coupled with investigations using disease-relevant models to mechanistically test the associations observed in humans and eventually identify fungal-bacterial interactions that could serve as preventive or therapeutic targets for oral diseases.

  5. Fungal-bacterial interactions and their relevance to oral health: linking the clinic and the bench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia I Diaz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available High throughput sequencing has accelerated knowledge on the oral microbiome. While the bacterial component of oral communities has been extensively characterized, the role of the fungal microbiota in the oral cavity is largely unknown. Interactions among fungi and bacteria are likely to influence oral health as exemplified by the synergistic relationship between Candida albicans and oral streptococci. In this perspective, we discuss the current state of the field of fungal-bacterial interactions in the context of the oral cavity. We highlight the need to conduct longitudinal clinical studies to simultaneously characterize the bacterial and fungal components of the human oral microbiome in health and during disease progression. Such studies need to be coupled with investigations using disease-relevant models to mechanistically test the associations observed in humans and eventually identify fungal-bacterial interactions that could serve as preventive or therapeutic targets for oral diseases.

  6. Drug Interaction API

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Interaction API is a web service for accessing drug-drug interactions. No license is needed to use the Interaction API. Currently, the API uses DrugBank for its...

  7. Drug-Drug Multicomponent Solid Forms: Cocrystal, Coamorphous and Eutectic of Three Poorly Soluble Antihypertensive Drugs Using Mechanochemical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneef, Jamshed; Chadha, Renu

    2017-08-01

    The present study deals with the application of mechanochemical approach for the preparation of drug-drug multicomponent solid forms of three poorly soluble antihypertensive drugs (telmisartan, irbesartan and hydrochlorothiazide) using atenolol as a coformer. The resultant solid forms comprise of cocrystal (telmisartan-atenolol), coamorphous (irbesartan-atenolol) and eutectic (hydrochlorothiazide-atenolol). The study emphasizes that solid-state transformation of drug molecules into new forms is a result of the change in structural patterns, diminishing of dimers and creating new facile hydrogen bonding network based on structural resemblance. The propensity for heteromeric or homomeric interaction between two different drugs resulted into diverse solid forms (cocrystal/coamorphous/eutectics) and become one of the interesting aspects of this research work. Evaluation of these solid forms revealed an increase in solubility and dissolution leading to better antihypertensive activity in deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) salt-induced animal model. Thus, development of these drug-drug multicomponent solid forms is a promising and viable approach to addressing the issue of poor solubility and could be of considerable interest in dual drug therapy for the treatment of hypertension.

  8. Frequency, Levels and Predictors of Potential Drug-Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    major or moderate interactions included rifampin + pyrazinamide (14 cases), phenobarbital + diazepam (14), dexamethasone + rifampin (8), amikacin + furosemide (7), furosemide + captopril (7), dexamethasone + phenobarbital (6), phenobarbital + divalproex sodium (6), isoniazid + rifampin (5) amikacin + ibuprofen (5), ...

  9. Predictors of illicit drug/s use among university students in Northern Ireland, Wales and England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ansari, Walid; Vallentin-Holbech, Lotte; Stock, Christiane

    2014-12-16

    The use of illicit drug/s among university students is a public health concern. Nevertheless, many UK studies investigated a narrow spectrum of variables to explore their association/s with illicit drug/s use. We assessed the associations between a wide range of socio-demographic, health and wellbeing variables (independent variables) and having used illicit drug/s regularly, occasionally or never in life (dependent variables). Data (3706 students) were collected from seven universities in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, using a self-administered questionnaire. About 5% of the sample had regularly used illicit drug/s, 25% occasionally, and 70% never. Regular drug use (RDU) was significantly more likely among males aged 21-29 years, daily smokers, those with heavy episodic drinking or possible alcohol dependency (CAGE test), and those who perceived their academic performance better than their peers. RDU was less likely among students with high health awareness and those living with parents. The predictors of occasional drug use (ODU) were similar to those of RDU. However, in addition, students with higher perceived stress were less likely, and students who felt financial burden/s were more likely to report ODU, while no association with academic performance was found. Never use of illicit drug/s was inversely associated with most of the variables listed above, and was positively associated with religiosity. Illicit drug/s use goes along with other substance use (alcohol and smoking). The finding that illicit drug/s use was higher among students reporting good academic performance was surprising and raises the question of whether illicit drug/s may be used as performance enhancing drugs. The factors identified with illicit drug/s use in this study could be utilized to develop appropriate public health policies and preventive measures for the health of students. Multilevel, value based, comprehensive, and strategic long-term intervention plans are required. This could include social interventions aimed at generating recreations alternatives and opportunities for youth, and a critical review for current authorities' interventions and services. Suggestions for coping with problems of campus illicit drug use/abuse also need to be offered.

  10. Prevalence and Characteristics of Polypharmacy and Drug-Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polypharmacy is the prescription of multiple medications for a patient which is a common problem worldwide. The aim of this study was to identify the extent of polypharmacy and occurrence of drug–drug interaction in Afincho Ber Health Centre, Addis Ababa. The study was conducted by retrospective crosssectional review ...

  11. Simple and efficient machine learning frameworks for identifying protein-protein interaction relevant articles and experimental methods used to study the interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Shashank; Liu, Feifan; Yu, Hong

    2011-10-03

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) is an important biomedical phenomenon. Automatically detecting PPI-relevant articles and identifying methods that are used to study PPI are important text mining tasks. In this study, we have explored domain independent features to develop two open source machine learning frameworks. One performs binary classification to determine whether the given article is PPI relevant or not, named "Simple Classifier", and the other one maps the PPI relevant articles with corresponding interaction method nodes in a standardized PSI-MI (Proteomics Standards Initiative-Molecular Interactions) ontology, named "OntoNorm". We evaluated our system in the context of BioCreative challenge competition using the standardized data set. Our systems are amongst the top systems reported by the organizers, attaining 60.8% F1-score for identifying relevant documents, and 52.3% F1-score for mapping articles to interaction method ontology. Our results show that domain-independent machine learning frameworks can perform competitively well at the tasks of detecting PPI relevant articles and identifying the methods that were used to study the interaction in such articles. Simple Classifier is available at http://sourceforge.net/p/simpleclassify/home/ and OntoNorm at http://sourceforge.net/p/ontonorm/home/.

  12. Using novel descriptor accounting for ligand-receptor interactions to define and visually explore biologically relevant chemical space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabal, Obdulia; Oyarzabal, Julen

    2012-05-25

    The definition and pragmatic implementation of biologically relevant chemical space is critical in addressing navigation strategies in the overlapping regions where chemistry and therapeutically relevant targets reside and, therefore, also key to performing an efficient drug discovery project. Here, we describe the development and implementation of a simple and robust method for representing biologically relevant chemical space as a general reference according to current knowledge, independently of any reference space, and analyzing chemical structures accordingly. Underlying our method is the generation of a novel descriptor (LiRIf) that converts structural information into a one-dimensional string accounting for the plausible ligand-receptor interactions as well as for topological information. Capitalizing on ligand-receptor interactions as a descriptor enables the clustering, profiling, and comparison of libraries of compounds from a chemical biology and medicinal chemistry perspective. In addition, as a case study, R-groups analysis is performed to identify the most populated ligand-receptor interactions according to different target families (GPCR, kinases, etc.), as well as to evaluate the coverage of biologically relevant chemical space by structures annotated in different databases (ChEMBL, Glida, etc.).

  13. An evolutionary-game model of tumour-cell interactions: possible relevance to gene therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, L.A.; Bentzen, S.M.; Alsner, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Evolutionary games have been applied as simple mathematical models of populations where interactions between individuals control the dynamics. Recently, it has been proposed to use this type of model to describe the evolution of tumour cell populations with interactions between cells. We extent...

  14. The Environment for Professional Interaction and Relevant Practical Experience in AACSB-Accredited Accounting Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlinghaus, Barry P.

    2002-01-01

    Responses from 276 of 1,128 faculty at Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business-accredited schools indicated that 231 were certified; only 96 served in professional associations; large numbers received financial support for professional activities, but only small numbers felt involvement or relevant experience (which are required for…

  15. Interactive Effects of Working Memory Self-Regulatory Ability and Relevance Instructions on Text Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Nancy Jo

    2012-01-01

    Reading is a process that requires the enactment of many cognitive processes. Each of these processes uses a certain amount of working memory resources, which are severely constrained by biology. More efficiency in the function of working memory may mediate the biological limits of same. Reading relevancy instructions may be one such method to…

  16. Using Social Media as a Marketing Channel : how relevance, realness, and remarkableness influence interactivity and engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Boer, de

    2010-01-01

    This research explored a potential working framework for using social media as a marketing channel. Based on an extensive literature review and a multiple case study, important factors for using social media have been identified. Companies should provide relevant information, show signs of real

  17. Tritrophic Interactions Mediated by Herbivore-Induced Plant Volatiles: Mechanisms, Ecological Relevance, and Application Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlings, Ted C J; Erb, Matthias

    2018-01-07

    Tritrophic interactions between plants, herbivores, and their natural enemies are an integral part of all terrestrial ecosystems. Herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) play a key role in these interactions, as they can attract predators and parasitoids to herbivore-attacked plants. Thirty years after this discovery, the ecological importance of the phenomena is widely recognized. However, the primary function of HIPVs is still subject to much debate, as is the possibility of using these plant-produced cues in crop protection. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the role of HIPVs in tritrophic interactions from an ecological as well as a mechanistic perspective. This overview focuses on the main gaps in our knowledge of tritrophic interactions, and we argue that filling these gaps will greatly facilitate efforts to exploit HIPVs for pest control.

  18. Citations and references as keys to relevance ranking in interactive IR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingwersen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    According to the principle of Polyrepresentation (Ingwersen & Järvelin, 2005; Ingwersen, 2012) bibliographic references in scientific documents as well as citations to documents have the potential of serving as useful features for re-ranking of retrieved documents. References (and thus citations...... been demonstrated to improve retrieval performance (Skov et al. 2008), whereas the number of citations has not provided similar improvements. The presentation will discuss the following phenomena and characteristics of references and citations as means for relevance re-ranking: 1) Are academic...... references (and thus citations) associated with relevance? 2) What are their potentials for IR? 3) What are their limitations? The presentation will propose a range of potentials and provide an initial research design. Selected cases are exemplified from the Web of Science database....

  19. Drogas antituberculose: interações medicamentosas, efeitos adversos e utilização em situações especiais - parte 1: fármacos de primeira linha Antituberculosis drugs: drug interactions, adverse effects, and use in special situations - part 1: first-line drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Abdo Arbex

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Os objetivos principais do tratamento da tuberculose são curar o paciente e minimizar a possibilidade de transmissão do bacilo para indivíduos saudáveis. Reações adversas ou interações das drogas antituberculose entre si e com outros fármacos podem causar modificação ou descontinuação da terapêutica. Revisamos sucintamente o novo tratamento farmacológico da tuberculose introduzido pelo Ministério da Saúde do Brasil em 2009 e mostramos os mecanismos gerais de ação, absorção, metabolização e excreção dos medicamentos utilizados no esquema básico. Descrevemos as reações adversas e as interações (com medicamentos, alimentos e antiácidos assim como a abordagem mais adequada para situações especiais, como gravidez, amamentação, insuficiência hepática e renal. Também descrevemos os mecanismos pelos quais as interações das drogas antituberculose do esquema básico podem causar hepatite medicamentosa e as possíveis alternativas nessa situação.The main objectives of tuberculosis therapy are to cure the patients and to minimize the possibility of transmission of the bacillus to healthy subjects. Adverse effects of antituberculosis drugs or drug interactions (among antituberculosis drugs or between antituberculosis drugs and other drugs can make it necessary to modify or discontinue treatment. We briefly review the new guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of tuberculosis, introduced by the Brazilian National Ministry of Health in 2009, and describe the general mechanism of action, absorption, metabolization, and excretion of the first-line drugs used in the basic regimen. We describe adverse drug reactions and interactions (with other drugs, food, and antacids, as well as the most appropriate approach to special situations, such as pregnancy, breastfeeding, liver failure, and kidney failure. We also describe the mechanisms by which the interactions among the antituberculosis drugs used in the basic regimen

  20. Drogas antituberculose: interações medicamentosas, efeitos adversos e utilização em situações especiais - parte 2: fármacos de segunda linha Antituberculosis drugs: drug interactions, adverse effects, and use in special situations - part 2: second line drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Abdo Arbex

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Os objetivos principais do tratamento da tuberculose são curar o paciente e minimizar a possibilidade de transmissão do bacilo para indivíduos saudáveis. Reações adversas ou interações das drogas antituberculose entre si e com outros fármacos podem causar modificação ou descontinuação da terapêutica. Descrevemos os mecanismos gerais de ação, absorção, metabolização e excreção dos medicamentos utilizados no tratamento da tuberculose multidroga resistente (aminoglicosídeos, fluoroquinolonas, cicloserina/terizidona, etionamida, capreomicina e ácido para-aminossalicílico. Descrevemos as reações adversas e as interações (com medicamentos, alimentos e antiácidos assim como a abordagem mais adequada para situações especiais, como gravidez, amamentação, insuficiência hepática e renal.The main objectives of tuberculosis therapy are to cure the patients and to minimize the possibility of transmission of the bacillus to healthy subjects. Adverse effects of antituberculosis drugs or drug interactions (among antituberculosis drugs or between antituberculosis drugs and other drugs can make it necessary to modify or discontinue treatment. We describe the general mechanism of action, absorption, metabolization, and excretion of the drugs used to treat multidrug resistant tuberculosis (aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, cycloserine/terizidone, ethionamide, capreomycin, and para-aminosalicylic acid. We describe adverse drug reactions and interactions (with other drugs, food, and antacids, as well as the most appropriate approach to special situations, such as pregnancy, breastfeeding, liver failure, and kidney failure.

  1. Teaching Interaction Design and Children: Understanding the Relevance of Theory for Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilde Bekker

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we address the challenge of teaching interaction design for children’s products especially pertaining to bridging the gap between child development theories and interaction design issues. We describe our experiences from developing a one-week course on interaction design and children, that is part of a competency based Masters program in design. We conclude that key elements in this course, to support learning how to incorporate theoretical knowledge in design, are a providing design tool that covers a child developmental model of four domains (cognitive, social, emotional and physical , such as the Developmentally Situated Design cards for creating child personas and design concepts b using a design exercise c giving students the possibility to work on several iterations d giving students more than one age-group to work with in the project, and e providing the students with an evaluation protocol.

  2. Applications and interactions of solid impurity pellets with reactor relevant plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Baiquan; Peng Lilin; Huang Jinhua; Yan Jiancheng

    2003-01-01

    Based on the kinetic two-dimensional lentil-shape ablation theory of hydrogenic pellet developed by Kuteev, the new extended algorithm for erosion speed and ablation rate calculations of the impurity pellets in reactor relevant plasma has been derived. The preliminary exploration for the feasibility of applying impurity pellet injection to the α particle diagnostics in the future ITER device has been performed. The comparisons between the numerical integral calculation results and analysis show that the lithium pellet injection possesses much more compatibilities. It might be feasible to apply this technique to both α particle diagnostics and safety factor q profile measurement in the future ITER device. (authors)

  3. S66: A Well-balanced Database of Benchmark Interaction Energies Relevant to Biomolecular Structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezáč, Jan; Riley, Kevin Eugene; Hobza, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 8 (2011), s. 2427-2438 ISSN 1549-9618 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : noncovalent interactions * benchmarking * CCSD(T) Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.215, year: 2011

  4. Comparative Genomics and Disorder Prediction Identify Biologically Relevant SH3 Protein Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Protein interaction networks are an important part of the post-genomic effort to integrate a part-list view of the cell into system-level understanding. Using a set of 11 yeast genomes we show that combining comparative genomics and secondary structure information greatly increases consensus-based prediction of SH3 targets. Benchmarking of our method against positive and negative standards gave 83% accuracy with 26% coverage. The concept of an optimal divergence time for effective comparative genomics studies was analyzed, demonstrating that genomes of species that diverged very recently from Saccharomyces cerevisiae(S. mikatae, S. bayanus, and S. paradoxus, or a long time ago (Neurospora crassa and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, contain less information for accurate prediction of SH3 targets than species within the optimal divergence time proposed. We also show here that intrinsically disordered SH3 domain targets are more probable sites of interaction than equivalent sites within ordered regions. Our findings highlight several novel S. cerevisiae SH3 protein interactions, the value of selection of optimal divergence times in comparative genomics studies, and the importance of intrinsic disorder for protein interactions. Based on our results we propose novel roles for the S. cerevisiae proteins Abp1p in endocytosis and Hse1p in endosome protein sorting.

  5. Comparative genomics and disorder prediction identify biologically relevant SH3 protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Beltrao

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Protein interaction networks are an important part of the post-genomic effort to integrate a part-list view of the cell into system-level understanding. Using a set of 11 yeast genomes we show that combining comparative genomics and secondary structure information greatly increases consensus-based prediction of SH3 targets. Benchmarking of our method against positive and negative standards gave 83% accuracy with 26% coverage. The concept of an optimal divergence time for effective comparative genomics studies was analyzed, demonstrating that genomes of species that diverged very recently from Saccharomyces cerevisiae(S. mikatae, S. bayanus, and S. paradoxus, or a long time ago (Neurospora crassa and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, contain less information for accurate prediction of SH3 targets than species within the optimal divergence time proposed. We also show here that intrinsically disordered SH3 domain targets are more probable sites of interaction than equivalent sites within ordered regions. Our findings highlight several novel S. cerevisiae SH3 protein interactions, the value of selection of optimal divergence times in comparative genomics studies, and the importance of intrinsic disorder for protein interactions. Based on our results we propose novel roles for the S. cerevisiae proteins Abp1p in endocytosis and Hse1p in endosome protein sorting.

  6. The Relationship between Passibility, Agency and Social Interaction and Its Relevance for Research and Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirch, Susan A.; Ma, Jasmine Y.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction analysis presented by Kim and Roth examines nine students, their teachers, the learning task and materials in a mixed second and third grade science classroom during the school day. In the research narrative readers are introduced to two resourceful and creative groups of students as they work on a task assigned by their…

  7. Communication and interaction with the society inside of a construction process of waste disposal - relevant aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Ivan Pedro Salati de

    2010-01-01

    The CIS Project was established in order to analyze aspects related to the process of communication and interaction with society in the construction of a waste disposal and to propose measures that can improve the performance of organs responsible of this undertaking. This document is the first product of the discussion of a multidisciplinary group consisting of representatives from CNEN - Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission, INB - Brazilian Nuclear Industries, ELETRONUCLEAR and CTMSP - Navy Technology Center. This document aims to provide a data base to the responsible about radioactive waste disposals decision. Therefore tries to illustrate and to characterize the situation related to the subject Communication and Interaction with Society, based on works about the subject and examples of national or other countries

  8. Raman-Brillouin interplay for inertial confinement fusion relevant laser–plasma interaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Riconda, C.; Weber, Stefan A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 4, Jul (2016), 1-16, č. článku e23. ISSN 2095-4719 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : inertial confinement fusion * kinetic effects * laser- plasma interaction Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  9. Interaction of thorium with human blood proteins: relevance to the development of strategies for actinide decorporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Manjoor; Kumar, Amit; Pandey, Badri N.

    2016-01-01

    Thorium-232 (Th), a naturally-available actinide is emerging as an alternative source of nuclear fuel for energy generation in India and other countries. Therefore, understanding the biological interaction of Th and other lanthanides (Ln) related to Th fuel cycle would enable its efficient utilization with adequate human health and environmental protection. Studies on complexation behavior of Th with human blood proteins would yield a rationale insight for the development of potential chelation based strategies for decorporation of Th. Present study was carried out to characterize the site of interaction of Th/other Ln ions with the two most abundant protein of blood, human serum albumin (HSA) and hemoglobin (Hb). Using various spectroscopic techniques (UV-VIS, FT-IR, Raman, Fluorescence and Circular dichroism), results showed that Th interacts with carbonyl/amide groups of HSA and alters its secondary conformation. These effects of Th were compared with U and Ln ions. Comparing the structural/protein unfolding effects of these metals, ionic potential of metal ions seemed to determine their toxic action at protein level. In blood, Hb is the most abundant Fe-containing protein, transporting oxygen to the various parts of the body. Th and other metal ions were found to interact with peptide and heme sites of Hb depending upon the concentration. Results elucidated that the metal ions,Th and Ce(IV), which charge-ionic-radii-ratio are close to Fe(III), affected heme significantly as compared to metal ions of lower or higher charge-ionic-radii-ratio (La(III), Ce(III) and U(VI)). These results were found consistent to the effect of Th and Ce(IV) on oxygen-binding ability of Hb. In addition, deeper insight about binding characteristics of Th with HSA and Hb would have important implications for the development of decorporating agents for the biomedical management of actinides-induced toxicity. (author)

  10. Cerebral interactions of pain and reward and their relevance for chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Susanne; Gandhi, Wiebke; Schweinhardt, Petra

    2012-06-29

    Pain and reward are opponent, interacting processes. Such interactions are enabled by neuroanatomical and neurochemical overlaps of brain systems that process pain and reward. Cerebral processing of hedonic ('liking') and motivational ('wanting') aspects of reward can be separated: the orbitofrontal cortex and opioids play an important role for the hedonic experience, and the ventral striatum and dopamine predominantly process motivation for reward. Supported by neuroimaging studies, we present here the hypothesis that the orbitofrontal cortex and opioids are responsible for pain modulation by hedonic experience, while the ventral striatum and dopamine mediate motivational effects on pain. A rewarding stimulus that appears to be particularly important in the context of pain is pain relief. Further, reward, including pain relief, leads to operant learning, which can affect pain sensitivity. Indirect evidence points at brain mechanisms that might underlie pain relief as a reward and related operant learning but studies are scarce. Investigating the cerebral systems underlying pain-reward interactions as well as related operant learning holds the potential of better understanding mechanisms that contribute to the development and maintenance of chronic pain, as detailed in the last section of this review. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Analysis and Identification of Aptamer-Compound Interactions with a Maximum Relevance Minimum Redundancy and Nearest Neighbor Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, ShaoPeng; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Lu, Jing; Cui, Weiren; Hu, Jerry; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    The development of biochemistry and molecular biology has revealed an increasingly important role of compounds in several biological processes. Like the aptamer-protein interaction, aptamer-compound interaction attracts increasing attention. However, it is time-consuming to select proper aptamers against compounds using traditional methods, such as exponential enrichment. Thus, there is an urgent need to design effective computational methods for searching effective aptamers against compounds. This study attempted to extract important features for aptamer-compound interactions using feature selection methods, such as Maximum Relevance Minimum Redundancy, as well as incremental feature selection. Each aptamer-compound pair was represented by properties derived from the aptamer and compound, including frequencies of single nucleotides and dinucleotides for the aptamer, as well as the constitutional, electrostatic, quantum-chemical, and space conformational descriptors of the compounds. As a result, some important features were obtained. To confirm the importance of the obtained features, we further discussed the associations between them and aptamer-compound interactions. Simultaneously, an optimal prediction model based on the nearest neighbor algorithm was built to identify aptamer-compound interactions, which has the potential to be a useful tool for the identification of novel aptamer-compound interactions. The program is available upon the request.

  12. L-selectin-carbohydrate interactions: relevant modifications of the Lewis x trisaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, W J; Katsumoto, T R; Bertozzi, C R; Rosen, S D; Kiessling, L L

    1996-11-26

    Protein-carbohydrate interactions are known to mediate cell-cell recognition and adhesion events. Specifically, three carbohydrate binding proteins termed selectins (E-, P-, and L-selectin) have been shown to be essential for leukocyte rolling along the vascular endothelium, the first step in the recruitment of leukocytes from the blood into inflammatory sites or into secondary lymphoid organs. Although this phenomenon is well-established, little is known about the molecular-level interactions on which it depends. All three selectins recognize sulfated and sialylated derivatives of the Lewis x [Le(x):Gal beta 1-->4(Fuc alpha 1-->3)GlcNAc] and Lewis a [Le(a): Gal beta 1-->3(Fuc alpha 1-->4)GlcNAc] trisaccharide cores with affinities in the millimolar range, and it is believed that variants of these structures are the carbohydrate determinants of selectin recognition. Recently it was shown that the mucin GlyCAM-1, a secreted physiological ligand for L-selectin, is capped with sulfated derivatives of sialyl Lewis x [sLe(x): Sia alpha 2-->3Gal beta 1-->4(Fuc alpha 1-->3)GlcNAc] and that sulfation is required for the high-affinity interaction between GlyCAM-1 and L-selectin. To elucidate the important sites of sulfation on Le(x) with respect to L-selectin recognition, we have synthesized six sulfated Le(x) analogs and determined their abilities to block binding of a recombinant L-selectin-Ig chimera to immobilized GlyCAM-1. Our results suggest that 6-sulfo sLe(x) binds to L-selectin with higher affinity than does sLe(x) or 6'-sulfo sLe(x) and that sulfation of sLe(x) capping groups on GlyCAM-1 at the 6-position is important for L-selectin recognition.

  13. Experimental Study of Plasma-Surface Interaction and Material Damage Relevant to ITER Type I Elms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhlai, V.A.; Bandura, A.N.; Byrka, O.V. and others; Landman, I.; Neklyudov, I.M.

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents experimental investigations of main features of plasma surface interaction and energy transfer to the material surface in dependence on plasma heat loads. The experiments were performed with QSPA repetitive plasma pulses of the duration of 0.25 ms and the energy density up to 2.5 MJ/m 2 . Surface morphology of the targets exposed to QSPA plasma screams is analyzed. Relative contribution of the Lorentz force and plasma pressure gradient to the resulting surface profile is discussed. development of cracking on the tungsten surface and swelling of the surface are found to be in strong dependence on initial temperature of the target

  14. A review of hydrodynamic instabilities and their relevance to mixing in molten fuel coolant interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, D.F.

    1984-03-01

    A review of the literature on Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz and capillary instability is presented. The concept of Weber breakup is examined and found to involve a combination of the above instabilities. Sample calculations are given which show how these instabilities may contribute to the mixing of melt and coolant in a molten fuel coolant interaction. It is concluded that Rayleigh-Taylor instability is likely to be important as the melt falls into the coolant and that Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is likely to develop when significant vapour velocities occur. (author)

  15. Socio-technical systems and interaction design - 21st century relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Martin

    2014-03-01

    This paper focuses on the relationship between the socio-technical system and the user-technology interface. It looks at specific aspects of the organisational context such as multiple user roles, job change, work processes and workflows, technical infrastructure, and the challenges they present for the interaction designer. The implications of trends such as more mobile and flexible working, the use of social media, and the growth of the virtual organisation, are also considered. The paper also reviews rapidly evolving technologies such as pervasive systems and artificial intelligence, and the skills that workers will need to engage with them. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Antiparallel Self-Association of a γ,α-Hybrid Peptide: More Relevance of Weak Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopalan, Paloth; Kishore, Raghuvansh

    2015-08-01

    To learn how a preorganized peptide-based molecular template, together with diverse weak non-covalent interactions, leads to an effective self-association, we investigated the conformational characteristics of a simple γ,α-hybrid model peptide, Boc-γ-Abz-Gly-OMe. The single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis revealed the existence of a fully extended β-strand-like structure stabilized by two non-conventional C-H⋅⋅⋅O=C intramolecular H-bonds. The 2D (1) H NMR ROESY experiment led us to propose that the flat topology of the urethane-γ-Abz-amide moiety is predominantly preserved in a non-polar environment. The self-association of the energetically more favorable antiparallel β-strand-mimic in solid-state engenders an unusual 'flight of stairs' fabricated through face-to-face and edge-to-edge Ar⋅⋅⋅Ar interactions. In conjunction with FT-IR spectroscopic analysis in chloroform, we highlight that conformationally semi-rigid γ-Abz foldamer in appositely designed peptides may encourage unusual β-strand or β-sheet-like self-association and supramolecular organization stabilized via weak attractive forces. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Interaction of selected actinides (U, Cm) with bacteria relevant to nuclear waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luetke, Laura

    2013-07-01

    To assess the safety of a site destined for storage of nuclear waste enhanced research effort is demanded to investigate the complex interactions of released radionuclides with parts of the environment that includes indigenous microorganisms. This work aimed at assessing the interactions of two bacterial strains with the actinides uranium and curium with a focus on thermodynamics to provide stability constants of the actinide bacteria species formed usable for modelling the distribution of these actinides in the environment. The influences of Pseudomonas fluorescens (CCUG 32456A) isolated from the granitic aquifers at Aespoe(Sweden) and a novel isolate from Mont Terri Opalinus clay (Switzerland), Paenibacillus sp. MT-2.2, were investigated. A combined approach using microbiological and spectroscopic techniques as well as potentiometry was employed to characterize the U(VI) and Cm(III) binding onto the cell surface functional groups structurally and thermodynamically. Further, due to its similar ionic radius to Cm(III) also Eu(III) was studied as non-radioactive analog.

  18. Emotion and attention interaction: a trade-off between stimuli relevance, motivation and individual differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Leticia; Mocaiber, Izabela; David, Isabel A.; Erthal, Fátima; Volchan, Eliane; Pereira, Mirtes G.

    2013-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that the neural processing of emotional stimuli is prioritized. However, whether the processing of emotional stimuli is dependent on attention remains debatable. Several studies have investigated this issue by testing the capacity of emotional distracters to divert processing resources from an attentional main task. The attentional load theory postulates that the perceptual load of the main task determines the selective processing of the distracter. Although we agree with this theory, we also suggest that other factors could be important in determining the association between the load of the main task and distracter processing, namely, (1) the relevance of the to-be ignored stimuli and (2) the engagement in the main task due to motivation. We postulate that these factors function as opposite forces to influence distracter processing. In addition, we propose that this trade-off is modulated by individual differences. In summary, we suggest that the relationship between emotion and attention is flexible rather than rigid and depends on several factors. Considering this perspective may help us to understand the divergence in the results described by several studies in this field. PMID:23874284

  19. Emotion and Attention Interaction: a trade-off between stimuli relevance, motivation and individual differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia eOliveira

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mounting evidence suggests that the neural processing of emotional stimuli is prioritized. However, whether the processing of emotional stimuli is dependent on attention remains debatable. Several studies have investigated this issue by testing the capacity of emotional distracters to divert processing resources from an attentional main task. The attentional load theory postulates that the perceptual load of the main task determines the selective processing of the distracter. Although we agree with this theory, we also suggest that other factors could be important in determining the association between the load of the main task and distracter processing, namely, (1 the relevance of the to-be ignored stimuli and (2 the engagement in the main task resulting from motivation. We postulate that these factors function as opposite forces to influence distracter processing. In addition, we propose that this trade-off is modulated by individual differences. In summary, we suggest that the relationship between emotion and attention is flexible rather than rigid and depends on several factors. Considering this perspective may help us to understand the divergence in the results described by several studies in this field.

  20. Emotion and attention interaction: a trade-off between stimuli relevance, motivation and individual differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Leticia; Mocaiber, Izabela; David, Isabel A; Erthal, Fátima; Volchan, Eliane; Pereira, Mirtes G

    2013-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that the neural processing of emotional stimuli is prioritized. However, whether the processing of emotional stimuli is dependent on attention remains debatable. Several studies have investigated this issue by testing the capacity of emotional distracters to divert processing resources from an attentional main task. The attentional load theory postulates that the perceptual load of the main task determines the selective processing of the distracter. Although we agree with this theory, we also suggest that other factors could be important in determining the association between the load of the main task and distracter processing, namely, (1) the relevance of the to-be ignored stimuli and (2) the engagement in the main task due to motivation. We postulate that these factors function as opposite forces to influence distracter processing. In addition, we propose that this trade-off is modulated by individual differences. In summary, we suggest that the relationship between emotion and attention is flexible rather than rigid and depends on several factors. Considering this perspective may help us to understand the divergence in the results described by several studies in this field.

  1. Accelerator-Based Studies of Heavy Ion Interactions Relevant to Space Biomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.; Heilbronn, L.; Zeitlin, C.

    1999-01-01

    Evaluation of the effects of space radiation on the crews of long duration space missions must take into account the interactions of high energy atomic nuclei in spacecraft and planetary habitat shielding and in the bodies of the astronauts. These heavy ions (i.e. heavier than hydrogen), while relatively small in number compared to the total galactic cosmic ray (GCR) charged particle flux, can produce disproportionately large effects by virtue of their high local energy deposition: a single traversal by a heavy charged particle can kill or, what may be worse, severely damage a cell. Research into the pertinent physics and biology of heavy ion interactions has consequently been assigned a high priority in a recent report by a task group of the National Research Council. Fragmentation of the incident heavy ions in shielding or in the human body will modify an initially well known radiation field and thereby complicate both spacecraft shielding design and the evaluation of potential radiation hazards. Since it is impractical to empirically test the radiation transport properties of each possible shielding material and configuration, a great deal of effort is going into the development of models of charged particle fragmentation and transport. Accurate nuclear fragmentation cross sections (probabilities), either in the form of measurements with thin targets or theoretical calculations, are needed for input to the transport models, and fluence measurements (numbers of fragments produced by interactions in thick targets) are needed both to validate the models and to test specific shielding materials and designs. Fluence data are also needed to characterize the incident radiation field in accelerator radiobiology experiments. For a number of years, nuclear fragmentation measurements at GCR-like energies have been carried out at heavy ion accelerators including the LBL Bevalac, Saturne (France), the Synchrophasotron and Nuklotron (Dubna, Russia), SIS-18 (GSI, Germany), the

  2. Pharmacokinetic Drug-Drug Interaction Study Between Raltegravir and Atorvastatin 20 mg in Healthy Volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blonk, M.I.; Beek, M. van; Colbers, A.; Schouwenberg, B.J.; Burger, D.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dyslipidemia is highly prevalent among patients with HIV infection and contributes to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. We investigated the influence of a frequently used statin, atorvastatin, on the pharmacokinetics of the HIV-integrase inhibitor raltegravir and vice versa.

  3. Potential drug-drug interactions in the neurology ward of a tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With this type of program, this better patient health outcomes can be achieved. Keywords: ... technological advancements and ... impact in improving-the quality of patient's-life. .... spinal-hematoma if Aspirin and Enoxaparin .... To avoid the.

  4. Clinical Drug-Drug Pharmacokinetic Interaction Potential of Sucralfate with Other Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulochana, Suresh P; Syed, Muzeeb; Chandrasekar, Devaraj V

    2016-01-01

    of drugs. This review covers several category of drugs such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, fluoroquinolones, histamine H2-receptor blockers, macrolides, anti-fungals, anti-diabetics, salicylic acid derivatives, steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and provides pharmacokinetic data summary along...

  5. Data-driven prediction of adverse drug reactions induced by drug drug interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-08

    oped the AVOID-DB and Web-based graphical user interface (GUI) by using a three-tier software architec- ture comprising a backend database, controller... mobile device Web-browsers. The GUI uses stan- dards supported by modern Web browsers. Results and Discussion As described above (see Methods), we

  6. Computerized techniques pave the way for drug-drug interaction prediction and interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Safdari

    2016-06-01

    Results: Computerized data-mining in pharmaceutical sciences and related databases provide new key transformative paradigms that can revolutionize the treatment of diseases and hence medical care. Given that various aspects of drug discovery and pharmacotherapy are closely related to the clinical and molecular/biological information, the scientifically sound databases (e.g., DDIs, ADRs can be of importance for the success of pharmacotherapy modalities. Conclusion: A better understanding of DDIs not only provides a robust means for designing more effective medicines but also grantees patient safety.

  7. Interactions between dodecyl phosphates and hydroxyapatite or tooth enamel: relevance to inhibition of dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Siân B; Barbour, Michele E; Shellis, R Peter; Rees, Gareth D

    2014-05-01

    Tooth surface modification is a potential method of preventing dental erosion, a form of excessive tooth wear facilitated by softening of tooth surfaces through the direct action of acids, mainly of dietary origin. We have previously shown that dodecyl phosphates (DPs) effectively inhibit dissolution of native surfaces of hydroxyapatite (the type mineral for dental enamel) and show good substantivity. However, adsorbed saliva also inhibits dissolution and DPs did not augment this effect, which suggests that DPs and saliva interact at the hydroxyapatite surface. In the present study the adsorption and desorption of potassium and sodium dodecyl phosphates or sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) to hydroxyapatite and human tooth enamel powder, both native and pre-treated with saliva, were studied by high performance liquid chromatography-mass Spectrometry. Thermo gravimetric analysis was used to analyse residual saliva and surfactant on the substrates. Both DPs showed a higher affinity than SDS for both hydroxyapatite and enamel, and little DP was desorbed by washing with water. SDS was readily desorbed from hydroxyapatite, suggesting that the phosphate head group is essential for strong binding to this substrate. However, SDS was not desorbed from enamel, so that this substrate has surface properties different from those of hydroxyapatite. The presence of a salivary coating had little or no effect on adsorption of the DPs, but treatment with DPs partly desorbed saliva; this could account for the failure of DPs to increase the dissolution inhibition due to adsorbed saliva. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinically Relevant Pharmacological Strategies That Reverse MDMA-Induced Brain Hyperthermia Potentiated by Social Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Ren, Suelynn; Wakabayashi, Ken T; Baumann, Michael H; Shaham, Yavin

    2016-01-01

    MDMA-induced hyperthermia is highly variable, unpredictable, and greatly potentiated by the social and environmental conditions of recreational drug use. Current strategies to treat pathological MDMA-induced hyperthermia in humans are palliative and marginally effective, and there are no specific pharmacological treatments to counteract this potentially life-threatening condition. Here, we tested the efficacy of mixed adrenoceptor blockers carvedilol and labetalol, and the atypical antipsychotic clozapine, in reversing MDMA-induced brain and body hyperthermia. We injected rats with a moderate non-toxic dose of MDMA (9 mg/kg) during social interaction, and we administered potential treatment drugs after the development of robust hyperthermia (>2.5 °C), thus mimicking the clinical situation of acute MDMA intoxication. Brain temperature was our primary focus, but we also simultaneously recorded temperatures from the deep temporal muscle and skin, allowing us to determine the basic physiological mechanisms of the treatment drug action. Carvedilol was modestly effective in attenuating MDMA-induced hyperthermia by moderately inhibiting skin vasoconstriction, and labetalol was ineffective. In contrast, clozapine induced a marked and immediate reversal of MDMA-induced hyperthermia via inhibition of brain metabolic activation and blockade of skin vasoconstriction. Our findings suggest that clozapine, and related centrally acting drugs, might be highly effective for reversing MDMA-induced brain and body hyperthermia in emergency clinical situations, with possible life-saving results.

  9. Setup of a Biomedical Facility to Study Physiologically Relevant Flow-Structure Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi, Faraz; Sheng, Jian

    2013-11-01

    The design and implementation of a closed loop biomedical facility to study arterial flows is presented. The facility has a test section of 25 inches, and is capable of generating both steady and pulsatile flows via a centrifugal and a dual piston pump respectively. The Reynolds and Womersley numbers occurring in major blood vessels can be matched. The working fluid is a solution of NaI that allows refractive index matching with both rigid glass and compliant polymer models to facilitate tomographic PIV and holographic PIV. The combination of these two techniques allows us to study both large scale flow features as well as flows very close to the wall. The polymer models can be made with different modulus of elasticity and can be pre-stressed using a 5-axis stage. Radially asymmetric patches can also be pre-fabricated and incorporated in the tube during the manufacturing process to simulate plaque formation in arteries. These tubes are doped with tracer particles allowing for the measurement of wall deformation. Preliminary flow data over rigid and compliant walls is presented. One of the aims of this study is to characterize the changes in flow as the compliancy of blood vessels change due to age or disease, and explore the fluid interactions with an evolving surface boundary.

  10. Relevance of slow positron beam research to astrophysical studies of positron interactions and annihilation in the interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guessoum, N.; Jean, P.; Gillard, W.

    2006-01-01

    The processes undergone by positrons in the interstellar medium (ISM) from the moments of their birth to their annihilation are examined. Both the physics of the positron interactions with gases and solids (dust grains), and the physical conditions and characteristics of the environments where the processes of energy loss, positronium formation, and annihilation taking place, are reviewed. An explanation is given as to how all the relevant physical information are taken into account in order to calculate annihilation rates and spectra of the 511 keV emission for the various phases of the ISM; special attention is paid to positron interactions with dust and with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. An attempt is made to show to what extent the interactions between positrons and interstellar dust grains are similar to laboratory experiments in which beams of slow positrons impinge upon solids and surfaces. Sample results are shown for the effect of dust grains on positron annihilation spectra in some phases of the ISM which, together with high resolution spectra measured by satellites, can be used to infer useful knowledge about the environment where the annihilation is predominantly taking place and ultimately about the birth place and history of positrons in the Galaxy. The important complementarity between work done by the astrophysical and the solid-state positron communities is strongly emphasized and specific experimental work is suggested which could assist the modeling of the interaction and annihilation of positrons in the ISM

  11. Relevance of slow positron beam research to astrophysical studies of positron interactions and annihilation in the interstellar medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guessoum, N. [American University of Sharjah, Physics Department, P.O. Box 26666, Sharjah (United Arab Emirates)]. E-mail: nguessoum@aus.ac.ae; Jean, P. [Centre d' Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements, Toulouse (France); Gillard, W. [Centre d' Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements, Toulouse (France)

    2006-02-28

    The processes undergone by positrons in the interstellar medium (ISM) from the moments of their birth to their annihilation are examined. Both the physics of the positron interactions with gases and solids (dust grains), and the physical conditions and characteristics of the environments where the processes of energy loss, positronium formation, and annihilation taking place, are reviewed. An explanation is given as to how all the relevant physical information are taken into account in order to calculate annihilation rates and spectra of the 511 keV emission for the various phases of the ISM; special attention is paid to positron interactions with dust and with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. An attempt is made to show to what extent the interactions between positrons and interstellar dust grains are similar to laboratory experiments in which beams of slow positrons impinge upon solids and surfaces. Sample results are shown for the effect of dust grains on positron annihilation spectra in some phases of the ISM which, together with high resolution spectra measured by satellites, can be used to infer useful knowledge about the environment where the annihilation is predominantly taking place and ultimately about the birth place and history of positrons in the Galaxy. The important complementarity between work done by the astrophysical and the solid-state positron communities is strongly emphasized and specific experimental work is suggested which could assist the modeling of the interaction and annihilation of positrons in the ISM.

  12. Dissipative Evolution of Unequal-mass Binary–single Interactions and Its Relevance to Gravitational-wave Detections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsing, Johan; MacLeod, Morgan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2018-02-01

    We present a study of binary–single interactions with energy-loss terms such as tidal dissipation and gravitational-wave (GW) emission added to the equation of motion. The inclusion of such terms leads to the formation of compact binaries that form during the three-body interaction through two-body captures. These binaries predominantly merge relatively promptly at high eccentricity, with several observable and dynamical consequences to follow. Despite their possibility for being observed in both present and upcoming transient surveys, their outcomes are not firmly constrained. In this paper, we present an analytical framework that allows to estimate the cross section of such two-body captures, which permits us to study how the corresponding rates depend on the initial orbital parameters, the mass hierarchy, the type of interacting object, and the energy dissipation mechanism. This formalism is applied here to study the formation of two-body GW captures, for which we estimate absolute and relative rates relevant to Advanced LIGO detections. It is shown that two-body GW captures should have compelling observational implications if a sizable fraction of detected compact binaries are formed via dynamical interactions.

  13. Vulcan: A steady-state tokamak for reactor-relevant plasma–material interaction science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olynyk, G.M.; Hartwig, Z.S.; Whyte, D.G.; Barnard, H.S.; Bonoli, P.T.; Bromberg, L.; Garrett, M.L.; Haakonsen, C.B.; Mumgaard, R.T.; Podpaly, Y.A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new scaling for obtaining reactor similarity in the divertor of scaled tokamaks. ► Conceptual design for a tokamak (“Vulcan”) to implement this new scaling. ► Demountable superconducting coils and compact neutron shielding. ► Helium-cooled high-temperature vacuum vessel and first wall. ► High-field-side lower hybrid current drive for non-inductive operation. - Abstract: An economically viable magnetic-confinement fusion reactor will require steady-state operation and high areal power density for sufficient energy output, and elevated wall/blanket temperatures for efficient energy conversion. These three requirements frame, and couple to, the challenge of plasma–material interaction (PMI) for fusion energy sciences. Present and planned tokamaks are not designed to simultaneously meet these criteria. A new and expanded set of dimensionless figures of merit for PMI have been developed. The key feature of the scaling is that the power flux across the last closed flux surface P/S ≃ 1 MW m −2 is to be held constant, while scaling the core volume-averaged density weakly with major radius, n ∼ R −2/7 . While complete similarity is not possible, this new “P/S” or “PMI” scaling provides similarity for the most critical reactor PMI issues, compatible with sufficient current drive efficiency for non-inductive steady-state core scenarios. A conceptual design is developed for Vulcan, a compact steady-state deuterium main-ion tokamak which implements the P/S scaling rules. A zero-dimensional core analysis is used to determine R = 1.2 m, with a conventional reactor aspect ratio R/a = 4.0, as the minimum feasible size for Vulcan. Scoping studies of innovative fusion technologies to support the Vulcan PMI mission were carried out for three critical areas: a high-temperature, helium-cooled vacuum vessel and divertor design; a demountable superconducting toroidal field magnet system; and a steady-state lower hybrid current drive system

  14. The relationship between passibility, agency and social interaction and its relevance for research and pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirch, Susan A.; Ma, Jasmine Y.

    2016-12-01

    The interaction analysis presented by Kim and Roth examines nine students, their teachers, the learning task and materials in a mixed second and third grade science classroom during the school day. In the research narrative readers are introduced to two resourceful and creative groups of students as they work on a task assigned by their teacher—to cantilever a pizza box over the edge of a student desk. Readers are given glimpses (through images and transcripts) of the inventive ways each group solved the cantilever problem. Sometimes the children disregarded the design constraints, but even after compliance they managed to successfully solve the problem. The point of the learning task was not clearly stated, but readers are told the unit focused on investigating forces, forces in equilibrium, and structures as well as different forces (push, pull, etc.), properties of materials, and the relations between weight and balance while building structures. Kim and Roth were specifically interested in using this session to investigate and resolve the problem of learning as described by socio-cultural theorists as, how does a learner orient toward a learning outcome when they cannot do that until they have learned it? To answer this question Kim and Roth argued that learners (in engineering design) learn when and because: (1) they are open to be affected by the responses of materials to student action (i.e. student and material agency and physical touch) (2) their bodies are endowed with the capacity to be affected (i.e. passibility), and (3) knowledge and understanding emerge as and in social relations first. In their analysis, Kim and Roth argued that knowledge and knowing-how depend on these three universal processes. The authors further theorized the concept of passibility. Included in their theory of passibility was the claim that passibility is necessary for agency. After reading this paper we found we had many questions about Kim and Roth's analysis, context, and

  15. Clinical relevancy and determinants of potential drug–drug interactions in chronic kidney disease patients: results from a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleem A

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ahsan Saleem,1,2 Imran Masood,1 Tahir Mehmood Khan3 1Department of Pharmacy, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Bahawalpur, Pakistan; 2Pharmacy Services Department, Integrated Medical Center, The Aga Khan University Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan; 3School of Pharmacy, Monash University, Sunway Campus, Selangor, Malaysia Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD alters the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic responses of various renally excreted drugs and increases the risk of drug-related problems, such as drug–drug interactions.Objectives: To assess the pattern, determinants, and clinical relevancy of potential drug–drug interactions (pDDIs in CKD patients.Materials and methods: This study retrospectively reviewed medical charts of all CKD patients admitted in the nephrology unit of a tertiary care hospital in Pakistan from January 2013 to December 2014. The Micromedex Drug-Reax® system was used to screen patient profiles for pDDIs, and IBM SPSS version 20 was used to carry out statistical analysis.Results: We evaluated 209 medical charts and found pDDIs in nearly 78.5% CKD patients. Overall, 541 pDDIs were observed, of which, nearly 60.8% patients had moderate, 41.1% had minor, 27.8% had major, and 13.4% had contraindicated interactions. Among those interactions, 49.4% had good evidence, 44.0% had fair, 6.3% had excellent evidence, and 35.5% interactions had delayed onset of action. The potential adverse outcomes of pDDIs included postural hypotension, QT prolongation, ceftriaxone–calcium precipitation, cardiac arrhythmias, and reduction in therapeutic effectiveness. The occurrence of pDDIs was found strongly associated with the age of <60 years, number of prescribed medicines ≥5, hypertension, and the lengthy hospitalization of patients.Conclusion: The occurrence of pDDIs was high in CKD patients. It was observed that CKD patients with an older age, higher number of prescribed medicines, lengthy hospitalization, and hypertension were at

  16. Design, Characterization, and Optimization of Controlled Drug Delivery System Containing Antibiotic Drug/s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apurv Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was design, characterization, and optimization of controlled drug delivery system containing antibiotic drug/s. Osmotic drug delivery system was chosen as controlled drug delivery system. The porous osmotic pump tablets were designed using Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken factorial design to find out the best formulation. For screening of three categories of polymers, six independent variables were chosen for Plackett-Burman design. Osmotic agent sodium chloride and microcrystalline cellulose, pore forming agent sodium lauryl sulphate and sucrose, and coating agent ethyl cellulose and cellulose acetate were chosen as independent variables. Optimization of osmotic tablets was done by Box-Behnken design by selecting three independent variables. Osmotic agent sodium chloride, pore forming agent sodium lauryl sulphate, and coating agent cellulose acetate were chosen as independent variables. The result of Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken design and ANOVA studies revealed that osmotic agent and pore former had significant effect on the drug release up to 12 hr. The observed independent variables were found to be very close to predicted values of most satisfactory formulation which demonstrates the feasibility of the optimization procedure in successful development of porous osmotic pump tablets containing antibiotic drug/s by using sodium chloride, sodium lauryl sulphate, and cellulose acetate as key excipients.

  17. Drug Interactions in Clinical Practice | Ohaju-Obodo | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The existence of numerous drugs available today for clinical management of patients require consideration of their potential interactions - alteration of the effects of one drug by the concurrent or prior administration of one or more drugs (drug-drug interactions). There could also be alteration of the effects of a drug by food ...

  18. Relevance of the Interaction between the M-Phthalocyanines and Carbon Nanotubes in the Electroactivity toward ORR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Gaitán, Carolina; Ruiz-Rosas, Ramiro; Morallón, Emilia; Cazorla-Amorós, Diego

    2017-10-31

    In this work, the influence of the interaction between the iron and cobalt-phthalocyanines (FePc and CoPc) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) used as support in the electroactivity toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media has been investigated. A series of thermal treatments were performed on these materials in order to modify the interaction between the CNTs and the phthalocyanines. The FePc-based catalysts showed the highest activity, with comparable performance to the state-of-the-art Pt-Vulcan catalyst. A heat treatment at 400 °C improved the activity of FePc-based catalysts, while the use of higher temperatures or oxidative atmosphere rendered the decomposition of the macrocyclic compound and consequently the loss of the electrochemical activity of the complex. CoPc-based catalysts performance was negatively affected for all of the tested treatments. Thermogravimetric analyses demonstrated that the FePc was stabilized when loaded onto CNTs, while CoPc did not show such a feature, pointing to a better interaction of the FePc instead of the CoPc. Interestingly, electrochemical measurements demonstrated an improvement of the electron transfer rate in thermally treated FePc-based catalysts. They also allowed us to assess that only 15% of the iron in the catalyst was available for direct electron transfer. This is the same iron amount that remains on the catalyst after a strong acid washing with concentrated HCl (ca. 0.3 wt %), which is enough to deliver a comparable ORR activity. Durability tests confirmed that the catalysts deactivation occurs at a slower rate in those catalysts where FePc is strongly attached to the CNT surface. Thus, the highest ORR activity seems to be provided by those FePc molecules that are strongly attached to the CNT surface, pointing out the relevance of the interaction between the support and the FePc in these catalysts.

  19. Physiologically-Relevant Modes of Membrane Interactions by the Human Antimicrobial Peptide, LL-37, Revealed by SFG Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bei; Soblosky, Lauren; Nguyen, Khoi; Geng, Junqing; Yu, Xinglong; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Chen, Zhan

    2013-05-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) could become the next generation antibiotic compounds which can overcome bacterial resistance by disrupting cell membranes and it is essential to determine the factors underlying its mechanism of action. Although high-resolution NMR and other biological studies have provided valuable insights, it has been a major challenge to follow the AMP-membrane interactions at physiologically-relevant low peptide concentrations. In this study, we demonstrate a novel approach to overcome this major limitation by performing Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopic experiments on lipid bilayers containing an AMP, LL-37. Our results demonstrate the power of SFG to study non-linear helical peptides and also infer that lipid-peptide interaction and the peptide orientation depend on the lipid membrane composition. The observed SFG signal changes capture the aggregating process of LL-37 on membrane. In addition, our SFG results on cholesterol-containing lipid bilayers indicate the inhibition effect of cholesterol on peptide-induced membrane permeation process.

  20. Relevance of d-D interactions on neutron and tritium production in IFMIF-EVEDA accelerator prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayoral, A.; Sanz, J.; Sauvan, P.; Lopez, D.; Garcia, M.; Ogando, F.

    2011-01-01

    In the IFMIF-EVEDA accelerator prototype, deuterium is implanted in the components due to beam losses and in the beam dump, where the beam is stopped. The interaction of the deuterons with the deuterium previously implanted leads to the production of neutrons and tritium, which are important issues for radioprotection and safety analysis. A methodology to assess these production pathways in more realistic approach has been developed. The new tools and their main achievement are: (i) an 'effective diffusivity coefficient' (deduced from available experimental data) that enables simulation of the diffusion phase, and (ii) the MCUNED code (able to handle deuteron transport libraries) allows to simulate the transport-slowdown of deuteron/tritium (to get the concentration profiles) and the neutron/tritium productions from d-Cu and d-D for up to 9 MeV incident deuteron. The results with/without theses tools are presented and their effect on the relevance of d-D sources versus d-Cu is evaluated.

  1. Hierarchthis: An Interactive Interface for Identifying Mission-Relevant Components of the Advanced Multi-Mission Operations System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litomisky, Krystof

    2012-01-01

    Even though NASA's space missions are many and varied, there are some tasks that are common to all of them. For example, all spacecraft need to communicate with other entities, and all spacecraft need to know where they are. These tasks use tools and services that can be inherited and reused between missions, reducing systems engineering effort and therefore reducing cost.The Advanced Multi-Mission Operations System, or AMMOS, is a collection of multimission tools and services, whose development and maintenance are funded by NASA. I created HierarchThis, a plugin designed to provide an interactive interface to help customers identify mission-relevant tools and services. HierarchThis automatically creates diagrams of the AMMOS database, and then allows users to show/hide specific details through a graphical interface. Once customers identify tools and services they want for a specific mission, HierarchThis can automatically generate a contract between the Multimission Ground Systems and Services Office, which manages AMMOS, and the customer. The document contains the selected AMMOS components, along with their capabilities and satisfied requirements. HierarchThis reduces the time needed for the process from service selections to having a mission-specific contract from the order of days to the order of minutes.

  2. Yeast screens identify the RNA polymerase II CTD and SPT5 as relevant targets of BRCA1 interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig B Bennett

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BRCA1 has been implicated in numerous DNA repair pathways that maintain genome integrity, however the function responsible for its tumor suppressor activity in breast cancer remains obscure. To identify the most highly conserved of the many BRCA1 functions, we screened the evolutionarily distant eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae for mutants that suppressed the G1 checkpoint arrest and lethality induced following heterologous BRCA1 expression. A genome-wide screen in the diploid deletion collection combined with a screen of ionizing radiation sensitive gene deletions identified mutants that permit growth in the presence of BRCA1. These genes delineate a metabolic mRNA pathway that temporally links transcription elongation (SPT4, SPT5, CTK1, DEF1 to nucleopore-mediated mRNA export (ASM4, MLP1, MLP2, NUP2, NUP53, NUP120, NUP133, NUP170, NUP188, POM34 and cytoplasmic mRNA decay at P-bodies (CCR4, DHH1. Strikingly, BRCA1 interacted with the phosphorylated RNA polymerase II (RNAPII carboxy terminal domain (P-CTD, phosphorylated in the pattern specified by the CTDK-I kinase, to induce DEF1-dependent cleavage and accumulation of a RNAPII fragment containing the P-CTD. Significantly, breast cancer associated BRCT domain defects in BRCA1 that suppressed P-CTD cleavage and lethality in yeast also suppressed the physical interaction of BRCA1 with human SPT5 in breast epithelial cells, thus confirming SPT5 as a relevant target of BRCA1 interaction. Furthermore, enhanced P-CTD cleavage was observed in both yeast and human breast cells following UV-irradiation indicating a conserved eukaryotic damage response. Moreover, P-CTD cleavage in breast epithelial cells was BRCA1-dependent since damage-induced P-CTD cleavage was only observed in the mutant BRCA1 cell line HCC1937 following ectopic expression of wild type BRCA1. Finally, BRCA1, SPT5 and hyperphosphorylated RPB1 form a complex that was rapidly degraded following MMS treatment in wild type but not BRCA1

  3. RVMAB: Using the Relevance Vector Machine Model Combined with Average Blocks to Predict the Interactions of Proteins from Protein Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Yong An

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs play essential roles in most cellular processes. Knowledge of PPIs is becoming increasingly more important, which has prompted the development of technologies that are capable of discovering large-scale PPIs. Although many high-throughput biological technologies have been proposed to detect PPIs, there are unavoidable shortcomings, including cost, time intensity, and inherently high false positive and false negative rates. For the sake of these reasons, in silico methods are attracting much attention due to their good performances in predicting PPIs. In this paper, we propose a novel computational method known as RVM-AB that combines the Relevance Vector Machine (RVM model and Average Blocks (AB to predict PPIs from protein sequences. The main improvements are the results of representing protein sequences using the AB feature representation on a Position Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM, reducing the influence of noise using a Principal Component Analysis (PCA, and using a Relevance Vector Machine (RVM based classifier. We performed five-fold cross-validation experiments on yeast and Helicobacter pylori datasets, and achieved very high accuracies of 92.98% and 95.58% respectively, which is significantly better than previous works. In addition, we also obtained good prediction accuracies of 88.31%, 89.46%, 91.08%, 91.55%, and 94.81% on other five independent datasets C. elegans, M. musculus, H. sapiens, H. pylori, and E. coli for cross-species prediction. To further evaluate the proposed method, we compare it with the state-of-the-art support vector machine (SVM classifier on the yeast dataset. The experimental results demonstrate that our RVM-AB method is obviously better than the SVM-based method. The promising experimental results show the efficiency and simplicity of the proposed method, which can be an automatic decision support tool. To facilitate extensive studies for future proteomics research, we developed

  4. Drug interactions in primary health care in the George subdistrict ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-02-15

    Feb 15, 2012 ... Drug-drug interactions are a recognised cause of morbidity and mortality ..... or fatal if the interaction increases toxicity or reduces the intended effect of the ... antihypertensive effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors ...

  5. The terrestrial isopod microbiome: An all-in-one toolbox for animal-microbe interactions of ecological relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier Bouchon

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial symbionts represent essential drivers of arthropod ecology and evolution, influencing host traits such as nutrition, reproduction, immunity and speciation. However, the majority of work on arthropod microbiota has been conducted in insects and more studies in non-model species across different ecological niches will be needed to complete our understanding of host-microbiota interactions. In this review, we present terrestrial isopod crustaceans as an emerging model organism to investigate symbiotic associations with potential relevance to ecosystem functioning. Terrestrial isopods comprise a group of crustaceans that have evolved a terrestrial lifestyle and represent keystone species in terrestrial ecosystems, contributing to the decomposition of organic matter and regulating the microbial food web. Since their nutrition is based on plant detritus, it has long been suspected that bacterial symbionts located in the digestive tissues might play an important role in host nutrition via the provisioning of digestive enzymes, thereby enabling the utilization of recalcitrant food compounds (e.g. cellulose or lignins. If this were the case, then (i the acquisition of these bacteria might have been an important evolutionary prerequisite for the colonization of land by isopods, and (ii these bacterial symbionts would directly mediate the role of their hosts in ecosystem functioning. Several bacterial symbionts have indeed been discovered in the midgut caeca of terrestrial isopods and some of them might be specific to this group of animals (i.e. Candidatus Hepatoplasma crinochetorum, Candidatus Hepatincola porcellionum and Rhabdochlamydia porcellionis, while others are well-known intracellular pathogens (Rickettsiella spp. or reproductive parasites (Wolbachia sp.. Moreover, a recent investigation of the microbiota in Armadillidium vulgare has revealed that this species harbors a highly diverse bacterial community which varies between host

  6. The Terrestrial Isopod Microbiome: An All-in-One Toolbox for Animal-Microbe Interactions of Ecological Relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchon, Didier; Zimmer, Martin; Dittmer, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial symbionts represent essential drivers of arthropod ecology and evolution, influencing host traits such as nutrition, reproduction, immunity, and speciation. However, the majority of work on arthropod microbiota has been conducted in insects and more studies in non-model species across different ecological niches will be needed to complete our understanding of host-microbiota interactions. In this review, we present terrestrial isopod crustaceans as an emerging model organism to investigate symbiotic associations with potential relevance to ecosystem functioning. Terrestrial isopods comprise a group of crustaceans that have evolved a terrestrial lifestyle and represent keystone species in terrestrial ecosystems, contributing to the decomposition of organic matter and regulating the microbial food web. Since their nutrition is based on plant detritus, it has long been suspected that bacterial symbionts located in the digestive tissues might play an important role in host nutrition via the provisioning of digestive enzymes, thereby enabling the utilization of recalcitrant food compounds (e.g., cellulose or lignins). If this were the case, then (i) the acquisition of these bacteria might have been an important evolutionary prerequisite for the colonization of land by isopods, and (ii) these bacterial symbionts would directly mediate the role of their hosts in ecosystem functioning. Several bacterial symbionts have indeed been discovered in the midgut caeca of terrestrial isopods and some of them might be specific to this group of animals (i.e., Candidatus Hepatoplasma crinochetorum, Candidatus Hepatincola porcellionum, and Rhabdochlamydia porcellionis ), while others are well-known intracellular pathogens ( Rickettsiella spp.) or reproductive parasites ( Wolbachia sp.). Moreover, a recent investigation of the microbiota in Armadillidium vulgare has revealed that this species harbors a highly diverse bacterial community which varies between host populations

  7. Food-Drug Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Yar Khan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of drug on a person may be different than expected because that drug interacts with another drug the person is taking (drug-drug interaction, food, beverages, dietary supplements the person is consuming (drug-nutrient/food interaction or another disease the person has (drug-disease interaction. A drug interaction is a situation in which a substance affects the activity of a drug, i.e. the effects are increased or decreased, or they produce a new effect that neither produces on its own. These interactions may occur out of accidental misuse or due to lack of knowledge about the active ingredients involved in the relevant substances. Regarding food-drug interactions physicians and pharmacists recognize that some foods and drugs, when taken simultaneously, can alter the body's ability to utilize a particular food or drug, or cause serious side effects. Clinically significant drug interactions, which pose potential harm to the patient, may result from changes in pharmaceutical, pharmacokinetic, or pharmacodynamic properties. Some may be taken advantage of, to the benefit of patients, but more commonly drug interactions result in adverse drug events. Therefore it is advisable for patients to follow the physician and doctors instructions to obtain maximum benefits with least fooddrug interactions. The literature survey was conducted by extracting data from different review and original articles on general or specific drug interactions with food. This review gives information about various interactions between different foods and drugs and will help physicians and pharmacists prescribe drugs cautiously with only suitable food supplement to get maximum benefit for the patient.

  8. Surface-supported Ag islands stabilized by a quantum size effect: Their interaction with small molecules relevant to ethylene epoxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Dahai [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-05-15

    This dissertation focuses on how QSE-stabilized, surface-supported Ag nanoclusters will interact with ethylene or oxygen. Experiments are performed to determine whether the QSE-mediated Ag islands react differently toward adsorption of ethylene or oxygen, or whether the adsorption of these small molecules will affect the QSE-mediated stability of Ag islands. Studies of the interaction of oxygen with Ag/Si(111)-7×7 were previously reported, but these studies were performed at a low Ag coverage where 3D Ag islands were not formed. So the study of such a system at a higher Ag coverage will be a subject of this work. The interaction of ethylene with Ag/Si(111)-7×7, as well as the interaction of oxygen with Ag/NiAl(110) are also important parts of this study.

  9. Relevance of the hadronic interaction model in the interpretation of multiple muon data as detected with the MACRO experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosio, M; Aramo, C; Auriemma, G; Baldini, A; Barbarino, G C; Barish, B C; Battistoni, G; Bellotti, R; Bemporad, C; Bernardini, P; Bilokon, H; Bisi, V; Bloise, C; Bower, C; Bussino, S; Cafagna, F; Calicchio, M; Campana, D; Carboni, M; Castellano, M G; Cecchini, S; Cei, F; Chiarella, V; Coutu, S; De Benedictis, L; De Cataldo, G; Dekhissi, H; De Marzo, C; De Mitri, I; De Vincenzi, M; Di Credico, A; Erriquez, O; Favuzzi, C; Forti, C; Fusco, P; Giacomelli, G; Giannini, G; Giglietto, N; Grassi, M; Gray, L; Grillo, A; Guarino, F; Guarnaccia, P; Gustavino, C; Habig, A; Hanson, K; Hawthorne, A; Heinz, R; Iarocci, Enzo; Katsavounidis, E; Kearns, E T; Kyriazopoulou, S; Lamanna, E; Lane, C; Levin, D S; Lipari, P; Longley, N P; Longo, M J; Maaroufi, F; Mancarella, G; Mandrioli, G; Manzoor, S; Margiotta-Neri, A; Marini, A; Martello, D; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Mazziotta, M N; Mazzotta, C; Michael, D G; Mikheyev, S P; Miller, L; Monacelli, P; Montaruli, T; Monteno, M; Mufson, S L; Musser, J; Nicolò, D; Nolty, R; Okada, C; Orth, C; Osteria, G; Palamara, O; Patera, V; Patrizii, L; Pazzi, R; Peck, C W; Petrera, S; Pistilli, P; Popa, V; Rainó, A; Rastelli, A; Reynoldson, J; Ronga, F; Rubizzo, U; Sanzgiri, A; Satriano, C; Satta, L; Scapparone, E; Scholberg, K; Sciubba, A; Serra-Lugaresi, P; Severi, M; Sioli, M; Sitta, M; Spinelli, P; Spinetti, M; Spurio, M; Steinberg, R; Stone, J L; Sulak, Lawrence R; Surdo, A; Tarle, G; Togo, V; Walter, C W; Webb, R

    1999-01-01

    With the aim of discussing the effect of the possible sources of systematic uncertainties in simulation models, the analysis of multiple muon events from the MACRO experiment at Gran Sasso is reviewed. In particular, the predictions $9 from different currently available hadronic interaction models are compared. (9 refs).

  10. Relevant patient perceptions and experiences for evaluating quality of interaction with physiotherapists during outpatient rehabilitation: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Baño-Aledo, M Elena; Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc; Escolar-Reina, Pilar; Montilla-Herrador, Joaquina; Collins, Sean M

    2014-03-01

    To identify elements of the physiotherapist-patient interaction considered by patients when they evaluate the quality of care in outpatient rehabilitation settings. A qualitative study with nine focus groups, Two researchers conducted the focus groups, and a topic guide with predetermined questions was used. Each group discussion was audiotaped,, transcribed verbatim and analyzed thematically according to a modified grounded theory approach. Three postacute ambulatory centers in Barcelona, Madrid and Seville (Spain). Fifty-seven adults undergoing outpatient rehabilitation for musculoskeletal conditions/injuries. Patients based their evaluations of quality of care on their assessment of physiotherapists' willingness to provide information and education, technical expertise and interpersonal manners (eg. respect, emotional support and sensitivity changes in the patient's status). Both positive and negative aspects of the physiotherapist-patient interaction emerged under all these themes, except for friendly and respectful communication. This study identified which elements of the physiotherapist-patient interaction are considered by patients when evaluating the quality of care in rehabilitation outpatient settings. Further research should work to develop self-report questionnaires about patients' experiences of the physiotherapist-patient interaction in rehabilitation services to provide empirical and quantitative evidence. Copyright © 2013 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Relevance of the hadronic interaction model in the interpretation of multiple muon data as detected with the MACRO experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosio, M.; Antolini, R.; Aramo, C.; Auriemma, G.; Baldini, A.; Barbarino, G. C.; Barish, B. C.; Battistoni, G.; Bellotti, R.; Bemporad, C.; Bernardini, P.; Bilokon, H.; Bisi, V.; Bloise, C.; Bower, C.; Bussino, S.; Cafagna, F.; Calicchio, M.; Campana, D.; Carboni, M.; Castellano, M.; Cecchini, S.; Cei, F.; Chiarella, V.; Coutu, S.; De Benedictis, L.; De Cataldo, G.; Dekhissi, H.; De Marzo, C.; De Mitri, I.; De Vincenzi, M.; Di Credico, A.; Erriquez, O.; Favuzzi, C.; Forti, C.; Fusco, P.; Giacomelli, G.; Giannini, G.; Giglietto, N.; Grassi, M.; Gray, L.; Grillo, A.; Guarino, F.; Guarnaccia, P.; Gustavino, C.; Habig, A.; Hanson, K.; Hawthorne, A.; Heinz, R.; Iarocci, E.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kearns, E.; Kyriazopoulou, S.; Lamanna, E.; Lane, C.; Levin, D. S.; Lipari, P.; Longley, N. P.; Longo, M. J.; Maaroufi, F.; Mancarella, G.; Mandrioli, G.; Manzoor, S.; Neri, A. Margiotta; Marini, A.; Martello, D.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Mazzotta, C.; Michael, D. G.; Mikheyev, S.; Miller, L.; Monacelli, P.; Montaruli, T.; Monteno, M.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nicolo, D.; Nolty, R.; Okada, C.; Orth, C.; Osteria, G.; Palamara, O.; Patera, V.; Patrizii, L.; Pazzi, R.; Peck, C. W.; Petrera, S.; Pistilli, P.; Popa, V.; Raino, A.; Rastelli, A.; Reynoldson, J.; Ronga, F.; Rubizzo, U.; Sanzgiri, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, L.; Scapparone, E.; Scholberg, K.; Sciubba, A.; Serra-Lugaresi, P.; Severi, M.; Sioli, M.; Sitta, M.; Spinelli, P.; Spinetti, M.; Spurio, M.; Steinberg, R.; Stone, J. L.; Sulak, L. R.; Surdo, A.; Tarle, G.; Togo, V.; Walter, C. W.; Webb, R.

    1999-01-01

    With the aim of discussing the effect of the possible sources of systematic uncertainties in simulation models, the analysis of multiple muon events from the MACRO experiment at Gran Sasso is reviewed. In particular, the predictions from different currently available hadronic interaction models are compared

  12. The interaction of actinide and lanthanide ions with hemoglobin and its relevance to human and environmental toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Amit, E-mail: amitk@barc.gov.in [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Ali, Manjoor [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Ningthoujam, Raghumani S. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Gaikwad, Pallavi [Department of Zoology, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411 007, Mumbai (India); Kumar, Mukesh [Solid State, Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Nath, Bimalendu B. [Department of Zoology, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411 007, Mumbai (India); Pandey, Badri N. [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • The sites of Ln and An interaction in Hb depend upon their charge-to-ionic-radii ratio. • Th(IV), Ce(IV) and U(VI) altered structure and oxygen-binding of Hb. • Spectroscopic studies determined binding characteristics of actinides. • Metal–Hb interaction was tested in an environmentally-important aquatic midge, Chironomus. - Abstract: Due to increasing use of lanthanides/actinides in nuclear and civil applications, understanding the impact of these metal ions on human health and environment is a growing concern. Hemoglobin (Hb), which occurs in all the kingdom of living organism, is the most abundant protein in human blood. In present study, effect of lanthanides and actinides [thorium: Th(IV), uranium: U(VI), lanthanum: La(III), cerium: Ce(III) and (IV)] on the structure and function of Hb has been investigated. Results showed that these metal ions, except Ce(IV) interacted with carbonyl and amide groups of Hb, which resulted in the loss of its alpha-helix conformation. However, beyond 75 μM, these ions affected heme moiety. Metal–heme interaction was found to affect oxygen-binding of Hb, which seems to be governed by their closeness with the charge-to-ionic-radius ratio of iron(III). Consistently, Ce(IV) being closest to iron(III), exhibited a greater effect on heme. Binding constant and binding stoichiometry of Th(IV) were higher than that of U(VI). Experiments using aquatic midge Chironomus (possessing human homologous Hb) and human blood, further validated metal–Hb interaction and associated toxicity. Thus, present study provides a biochemical basis to understand the actinide/lanthanide-induced interference in heme, which may have significant implications for the medical and environmental management of lanthanides/actinides toxicity.

  13. The interaction of actinide and lanthanide ions with hemoglobin and its relevance to human and environmental toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Amit; Ali, Manjoor; Ningthoujam, Raghumani S.; Gaikwad, Pallavi; Kumar, Mukesh; Nath, Bimalendu B.; Pandey, Badri N.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The sites of Ln and An interaction in Hb depend upon their charge-to-ionic-radii ratio. • Th(IV), Ce(IV) and U(VI) altered structure and oxygen-binding of Hb. • Spectroscopic studies determined binding characteristics of actinides. • Metal–Hb interaction was tested in an environmentally-important aquatic midge, Chironomus. - Abstract: Due to increasing use of lanthanides/actinides in nuclear and civil applications, understanding the impact of these metal ions on human health and environment is a growing concern. Hemoglobin (Hb), which occurs in all the kingdom of living organism, is the most abundant protein in human blood. In present study, effect of lanthanides and actinides [thorium: Th(IV), uranium: U(VI), lanthanum: La(III), cerium: Ce(III) and (IV)] on the structure and function of Hb has been investigated. Results showed that these metal ions, except Ce(IV) interacted with carbonyl and amide groups of Hb, which resulted in the loss of its alpha-helix conformation. However, beyond 75 μM, these ions affected heme moiety. Metal–heme interaction was found to affect oxygen-binding of Hb, which seems to be governed by their closeness with the charge-to-ionic-radius ratio of iron(III). Consistently, Ce(IV) being closest to iron(III), exhibited a greater effect on heme. Binding constant and binding stoichiometry of Th(IV) were higher than that of U(VI). Experiments using aquatic midge Chironomus (possessing human homologous Hb) and human blood, further validated metal–Hb interaction and associated toxicity. Thus, present study provides a biochemical basis to understand the actinide/lanthanide-induced interference in heme, which may have significant implications for the medical and environmental management of lanthanides/actinides toxicity.

  14. Using the Relevance Vector Machine Model Combined with Local Phase Quantization to Predict Protein-Protein Interactions from Protein Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Yong An

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel computational method known as RVM-LPQ that combines the Relevance Vector Machine (RVM model and Local Phase Quantization (LPQ to predict PPIs from protein sequences. The main improvements are the results of representing protein sequences using the LPQ feature representation on a Position Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM, reducing the influence of noise using a Principal Component Analysis (PCA, and using a Relevance Vector Machine (RVM based classifier. We perform 5-fold cross-validation experiments on Yeast and Human datasets, and we achieve very high accuracies of 92.65% and 97.62%, respectively, which is significantly better than previous works. To further evaluate the proposed method, we compare it with the state-of-the-art support vector machine (SVM classifier on the Yeast dataset. The experimental results demonstrate that our RVM-LPQ method is obviously better than the SVM-based method. The promising experimental results show the efficiency and simplicity of the proposed method, which can be an automatic decision support tool for future proteomics research.

  15. Possible Relevance of Receptor-Receptor Interactions between Viral- and Host-Coded Receptors for Viral-Induced Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi F. Agnati

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that some viruses, such as the cytomegalovirus, code for G-protein coupled receptors not only to elude the immune system, but also to redirect cellular signaling in the receptor networks of the host cells. In view of the existence of receptor-receptor interactions, the hypothesis is introduced that these viral-coded receptors not only operate as constitutively active monomers, but also can affect other receptor function by interacting with receptors of the host cell. Furthermore, it is suggested that viruses could also insert not single receptors (monomers, but clusters of receptors (receptor mosaics, altering the cell metabolism in a profound way. The prevention of viral receptor-induced changes in host receptor networks may give rise to novel antiviral drugs that counteract viral-induced disease.

  16. Autism-relevant traits interact with temporoparietal junction stimulation effects on social cognition: a high-definition transcranial direct current stimulation and electroencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Peter H; Kirkovski, Melissa; Rinehart, Nicole J; Enticott, Peter G

    2018-03-01

    The temporoparietal junction (TPJ) is implicated in mental and emotional state attribution, processes associated with autism-relevant traits. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to the TPJ can influence social-cognitive performance. However, associations with electrophysiology and autism-relevant traits remain relatively unexamined. This study had two aims: first, exploring links between Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ) scores and social-cognitive performance; second, examining interactions between AQ scores and high-definition-tDCS (HD-tDCS) applied to the right TPJ in terms of mental/emotional state attribution and neurophysiological outcomes. Fifty-three participants completed mental/emotional state attribution tasks before and after HD-tDCS. Pre-stimulation mental state attribution accuracy was reduced in participants with higher AQ Switching scores. Cathodal stimulation was associated with reduced emotion attribution performance in participants with higher AQ Switching and AQ Social scores (the latter at trend-level). Anodal stimulation more frequently interacted with AQ Social scores in terms of neurophysiology, in particular regarding reduced delta power in the left compared to right TPJ, and trend-level positive interactions with P100 and P300 latencies during the emotion recognition task. Elements of attention/switching (AQ Switching) may subserve or underpin elements of social cognition (AQ Social), and cathodal and anodal stimulation may have differing effects depending on trait levels in these domains. This study makes an important and original contribution in terms of increasing understanding of how such trait-level variation might interact with the effects of tDCS and also extending previous studies with regard to understanding potential roles of the rTPJ in both attention and social cognition and how autism-relevant traits might influence TPJ function. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Relevancies of multiple-interaction events and signal-to-noise ratio for Anger-logic based PET detector designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hao

    2015-10-01

    A fundamental challenge for PET block detector designs is to deploy finer crystal elements while limiting the number of readout channels. The standard Anger-logic scheme including light sharing (an 8 by 8 crystal array coupled to a 2×2 photodetector array with an optical diffuser, multiplexing ratio: 16:1) has been widely used to address such a challenge. Our work proposes a generalized model to study the impacts of two critical parameters on spatial resolution performance of a PET block detector: multiple interaction events and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The study consists of the following three parts: (1) studying light output profile and multiple interactions of 511 keV photons within crystal arrays of different crystal widths (from 4 mm down to 1 mm, constant height: 20 mm); (2) applying the Anger-logic positioning algorithm to investigate positioning/decoding uncertainties (i.e., "block effect") in terms of peak-to-valley ratio (PVR), with light sharing, multiple interactions and photodetector SNR taken into account; and (3) studying the dependency of spatial resolution on SNR in the context of modulation transfer function (MTF). The proposed model can be used to guide the development and evaluation of a standard Anger-logic based PET block detector including: (1) selecting/optimizing the configuration of crystal elements for a given photodetector SNR; and (2) predicting to what extent additional electronic multiplexing may be implemented to further reduce the number of readout channels.

  18. Studying the molecular mechanisms of radiation damage : low-energy electron interactions with biomolecules and medically relevant molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanzer, K.

    2015-01-01

    Since it was discovered in the year 2000 that secondary electrons with energies below 20 eV, which are the most abundant secondary species produced upon the interaction of ionizing radiation with biological tissue, can induce severe damages in the DNA such as single and double strand breaks, the interest for the study of the interaction of electrons with essential molecules of the human body has grown immensely. Double strand breaks can lead to cancer and are therefore a substantial threat to human health, however, the radiation research community is not sure how these strand breaks are formed upon interaction with ionizing radiation. The fact that even electrons with energies well below the ionization threshold can induce great damage in biological molecules via a resonant process called dissociative electron attachment (DEA), has even furthered the interest in these electron interactions, as it was shown to be a very efficient decomposition mechanism. A variety of studies, such as DEA studies to components of the DNA, for example, have been undertaken so far to shed more light on the role electrons play in the radiation damage of biomolecules. In this thesis two nucleobases, adenine and hypoxanthine, have been studied by observing their response towards low-energy electrons. It has been found that these nucleobases behave in a similar manner upon low-energy electron interaction, as do other nucleobases, that have been studied previously. The loss of hydrogen is suspected to act as a precursor for the decomposition of the DNA and the nucleobases can also undergo ring cleavage, which will induce substantial damage in the DNA. Furthermore, the search for improved and more efficient methods for the treatment of cancer is as important as ever, considering the ever-rising number of cancer deaths. Radiotherapy has proven to be one of the best treatments for tumors, but was found to be ineffective in hypoxic - oxygen deprived - tumors. Compounds called radiosensitizers

  19. The relevance of chemical interactions with CYP17 enzyme activity: Assessment using a novel in vitro assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roelofs, Maarke J.E.; Piersma, Aldert H.; Berg, Martin van den; Duursen, Majorie B.M. van

    2013-01-01

    The steroidogenic cytochrome P450 17 (CYP17) enzyme produces dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), which is the most abundant circulating endogenous sex steroid precursor. DHEA plays a key role in e.g. sexual functioning and development. To date, no rapid screening assay for effects on CYP17 is available. In this study, a novel assay using porcine adrenal cortex microsomes (PACMs) was described. Effects of twenty-eight suggested endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) on CYP17 activity were compared with effects in the US EPA validated H295R (human adrenocorticocarcinoma cell line) steroidogenesis assay. In the PACM assay DHEA production was higher compared with the H295R assay (4.4 versus 2.2 nmol/h/mg protein). To determine the additional value of a CYP17 assay, all compounds were also tested for interaction with CYP19 (aromatase) using human placental microsomes (HPMs) and H295R cells. 62.5% of the compounds showed enzyme inhibition in at least one of the microsomal assays. Only the cAMP inducer forskolin induced CYP17 activity, while CYP19 was induced by four test compounds in the H295R assay. These effects remained unnoticed in the PACM and HPM assays. Diethylstilbestrol and tetrabromobisphenol A inhibited CYP17 but not CYP19 activity, indicating different mechanisms for the inhibition of these enzymes. From our results it becomes apparent that CYP17 can be a target for EDCs and that this interaction differs from interactions with CYP19. Our data strongly suggest that research attention should focus on validating a specific assay for CYP17 activity, such as the PACM assay, that can be included in the EDC screening battery. - Highlights: ► DHEA, produced by CYP17, plays a key role in sexual functioning and development. ► No rapid screening assay for effects on CYP17 is available yet. ► A novel assay using porcine adrenal cortex microsomes (PACMs) was described. ► Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) targeting CYP17 interact differently with CYP19. ► A

  20. The relevance of chemical interactions with CYP17 enzyme activity: Assessment using a novel in vitro assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roelofs, Maarke J.E., E-mail: m.j.e.roelofs@uu.nl [Endocrine Toxicology Research Group, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.177, NL-3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands); Center for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Piersma, Aldert H. [Endocrine Toxicology Research Group, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.177, NL-3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands); Center for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Berg, Martin van den; Duursen, Majorie B.M. van [Endocrine Toxicology Research Group, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.177, NL-3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-05-01

    The steroidogenic cytochrome P450 17 (CYP17) enzyme produces dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), which is the most abundant circulating endogenous sex steroid precursor. DHEA plays a key role in e.g. sexual functioning and development. To date, no rapid screening assay for effects on CYP17 is available. In this study, a novel assay using porcine adrenal cortex microsomes (PACMs) was described. Effects of twenty-eight suggested endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) on CYP17 activity were compared with effects in the US EPA validated H295R (human adrenocorticocarcinoma cell line) steroidogenesis assay. In the PACM assay DHEA production was higher compared with the H295R assay (4.4 versus 2.2 nmol/h/mg protein). To determine the additional value of a CYP17 assay, all compounds were also tested for interaction with CYP19 (aromatase) using human placental microsomes (HPMs) and H295R cells. 62.5% of the compounds showed enzyme inhibition in at least one of the microsomal assays. Only the cAMP inducer forskolin induced CYP17 activity, while CYP19 was induced by four test compounds in the H295R assay. These effects remained unnoticed in the PACM and HPM assays. Diethylstilbestrol and tetrabromobisphenol A inhibited CYP17 but not CYP19 activity, indicating different mechanisms for the inhibition of these enzymes. From our results it becomes apparent that CYP17 can be a target for EDCs and that this interaction differs from interactions with CYP19. Our data strongly suggest that research attention should focus on validating a specific assay for CYP17 activity, such as the PACM assay, that can be included in the EDC screening battery. - Highlights: ► DHEA, produced by CYP17, plays a key role in sexual functioning and development. ► No rapid screening assay for effects on CYP17 is available yet. ► A novel assay using porcine adrenal cortex microsomes (PACMs) was described. ► Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) targeting CYP17 interact differently with CYP19. ► A

  1. Interactions between mobilized radionuclides and secondary phases in final repository-relevant formation aquifers. Final report; Wechselwirkung mobilisierter Radionuklide mit sekundaeren Phasen in endlagerrelevanten Formationswaessern. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtius, H.; Kaiser, G.; Paparigas, Z.; Hansen, B.; Neumann, A.; Klinkenberg, M.; Mueller, E.; Bruecher, H.; Bosbach, D.

    2010-10-15

    The report on interactions between mobilized radionuclides and secondary phases in final repository-relevant formation aquifers covers the following issues: scope of study, leaching experiments, secondary phases, incorporation and sorption studies, summary and prospects. The results show that the investigated spent fuels dissolve instantaneously in contact with the repository-relevant aquifers in presence of iron ions. For the elements Cs and Sr no re-immobilization was observed. These elements have to be considered as mobile species in the radionuclide source term. The secondary phases due to corrosion processes are radionuclide sinks, i.e. actinides are re-immobilized, the retention mechanisms were clarified. The studies with irradiated nuclear fuel show that the uranium/silicon containing phases effect the molar solubility of actinides.

  2. Social behavior in deer mice as a novel interactive paradigm of relevance for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolmarans, De Wet; Stein, Dan J; Harvey, Brian H

    2017-04-01

    Greater obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptom severity may be associated with poor social adjustment. Rather than possessing deficits in social skill per se, OCD patients may be more socially isolative in the presence of normal controls. We aimed to apply a novel social interaction challenge (SIC) to an established animal model of OCD, viz., the deer mouse, to assess complex social behavior in animals by investigating group sociability and its response to chronic escitalopram treatment (50 mg/kg/day × 28 days), both within and between non (N)- (viz., normal) and high (H)- (viz., OCD-like) stereotypical cohorts. Using automated screening, we scored approach behavior, episodes of proximity, duration of proximity, and relative net weighted movement. H animals socialized more with one another within cohort in all of the above parameters compared to the within-cohort behavior of N animals. Furthermore, the social behavior of H animals toward one another, both within and between cohort demonstrated significant improvements following chronic escitalopram treatment. However, the study also demonstrates that the social interaction between H and N animals remain poor even after chronic escitalopram treatment. To conclude, findings from the current investigation support clinical data demonstrating altered sociability in patients with OCD.

  3. Of 'disgrace' and 'pain'--corticolimbic interaction patterns for disorder-relevant and emotional words in social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laeger, Inga; Dobel, Christian; Radenz, Britta; Kugel, Harald; Keuper, Kati; Eden, Annuschka; Arolt, Volker; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Dannlowski, Udo; Zwanzger, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Limbic hyperactivation and an impaired functional interplay between the amygdala and the prefrontal cortex are discussed to go along with, or even cause, pathological anxiety. Within the multi-faceted group of anxiety disorders, the highly prevalent social phobia (SP) is characterized by excessive fear of being negatively evaluated. Although there is widespread evidence for amygdala hypersensitivity to emotional faces in SP, verbal material has rarely been used in imaging studies, in particular with an eye on disorder-specificity. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a block design consisting of (1) overall negative, (2) social-phobia related, (3) positive, and (4) neutral words, we studied 25 female patients with social phobia and 25 healthy female control subjects (HC). Results demonstrated amygdala hyperactivation to disorder-relevant but not to generally negative words in SP patients, with a positive correlation to symptom severity. A functional connectivity analysis revealed a weaker coupling between the amygdala and the left middle frontal gyrus in patients. Symptom severity was negatively related to connectivity strength between the amygdala and the ventromedial prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann Area 10 and 11). The findings clearly support the view of a hypersensitive threat-detection system, combined with disorder-related alterations in amygdala-prefrontal cortex connectivity in pathological anxiety.

  4. Studies of Sociosexual Interactions in Rats in an Externally Valid Procedure: Are They Relevant for Understanding Human Sexual Behavior?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Chu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available When a prolonged observation of groups of rats in a seminatural environment is used as testing procedure, different behavioral patterns are shown compared with what observed in a pair housed in a small cage. Males and females copulate simultaneously, they show a promiscuously and random copulatory pattern. Females remain completely receptive from the first lordosis displayed in the period of behavioral estrus until the last. There is no reduction in paracopulatory behaviors and no increase in rejections towards the end of estrus. Female paracopulatory behavior and receptivity change in a most abrupt way at both initiation and termination of behavioral estrus. It appears that, in the seminatural environment, males copulate in bouts, and males do not pursue the females unless they are fully receptive. Non-sexual, social behavior including affiliative and nonaffiliative interaction among rats is rather unrelated to sexual activities in both sex.

  5. Interactions of AChE with Aβ Aggregates in Alzheimer’s Brain: Therapeutic Relevance of IDN 5706

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Carvajal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholinesterase (AChE; EC 3.1.1.7 plays a crucial role in the rapid hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, in the central and peripheral nervous system and might also participate in non-cholinergic mechanism related to neurodegenerative diseases. Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive deterioration of cognitive abilities, amyloid-β peptide (Aβ accumulation and synaptic alterations. We have previously shown that AChE is able to accelerate the Aβ peptide assembly into Alzheimer-type aggregates increasing its neurotoxicity. Furthermore, AChE activity is altered in brain and blood of Alzheimer’s patients. The enzyme associated to amyloid plaques changes its enzymatic and pharmacological properties, as well as, increases its resistant to low pH, inhibitors and excess of substrate. Here, we reviewed the effects of IDN 5706, a hyperforin derivative that has potential preventive effects on the development of AD. Our results show that treatment with IDN5706 for 10 weeks increases brain AChE activity in seven month-old double transgenic mice (APPswe - PS1 and decreases the content of AChE associated with different types of amyloid plaques in this Alzheimer’s model. We concluded that early treatment with IDN 5706 decreases AChE-Aβ interaction and this effect might be of therapeutic interest in the treatment of AD.

  6. Natural frequencies, modeshapes and modal interactions for strings vibrating against an obstacle: Relevance to Sitar and Veena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, A. K.; Wahi, P.

    2015-03-01

    We study the vibration characteristics of a string with a smooth unilateral obstacle placed at one of the ends similar to the strings in musical instruments like sitar and veena. In particular, we explore the correlation between the string vibrations and some unique sound characteristics of these instruments like less inharmonicity in the frequencies, a large number of overtones and the presence of both frequency and amplitude modulations. At the obstacle, we have a moving boundary due to the wrapping of the string and an appropriate scaling of the spatial variable leads to a fixed boundary at the cost of introducing nonlinearity in the governing equation. Reduced order system of equations has been obtained by assuming a functional form for the string displacement which satisfies all the boundary conditions and gives the free length of the string in terms of the modal coordinates. To study the natural frequencies and mode-shapes, the nonlinear governing equation is linearized about the static configuration. The natural frequencies have been found to be harmonic and they depend on the shape of the obstacle through the effective free length of the string. Expressions have been obtained for the time-varying mode-shapes as well as the variation of the nodal points. Modal interactions due to coupling have been studied which show the appearance of higher overtones as well as amplitude modulations in our theoretical model akin to the experimental observations. All the obtained results have been verified with an alternate formulation based on the assumed mode method with polynomial shape functions.

  7. Is the clinical relevance of drug-food and drug-herb interactions limited to grapefruit juice and Saint-John's Wort?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouly, Stéphane; Lloret-Linares, Célia; Sellier, Pierre-Olivier; Sene, Damien; Bergmann, J-F

    2017-04-01

    An interaction of drug with food, herbs, and dietary supplements is usually the consequence of a physical, chemical or physiologic relationship between a drug and a product consumed as food, nutritional supplement or over-the-counter medicinal plant. The current educational review aims at reminding to the prescribing physicians that the most clinically relevant drug-food interactions may not be strictly limited to those with grapefruit juice and with the Saint John's Wort herbal extract and may be responsible for changes in drug plasma concentrations, which in turn decrease efficacy or led to sometimes life-threatening toxicity. Common situations handled in clinical practice such as aging, concomitant medications, transplant recipients, patients with cancer, malnutrition, HIV infection and those receiving enteral or parenteral feeding may be at increased risk of drug-food or drug-herb interactions. Medications with narrow therapeutic index or potential life-threatening toxicity, e.g., the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioid analgesics, cardiovascular medications, warfarin, anticancer drugs and immunosuppressants may be at risk of significant drug-food interactions to occur. Despite the fact that considerable effort has been achieved to increase patient' and doctor's information and ability to anticipate their occurrence and consequences in clinical practice, a thorough and detailed health history and dietary recall are essential for identifying potential problems in order to optimize patient prescriptions and drug dosing on an individual basis as well as to increase the treatment risk/benefit ratio. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Discovery of multiple interacting partners of gankyrin, a proteasomal chaperone and an oncoprotein--evidence for a common hot spot site at the interface and its functional relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanaware, Padma P; Ramteke, Manoj P; Somavarapu, Arun K; Venkatraman, Prasanna

    2014-07-01

    Gankyrin, a non-ATPase component of the proteasome and a chaperone of proteasome assembly, is also an oncoprotein. Gankyrin regulates a variety of oncogenic signaling pathways in cancer cells and accelerates degradation of tumor suppressor proteins p53 and Rb. Therefore gankyrin may be a unique hub integrating signaling networks with the degradation pathway. To identify new interactions that may be crucial in consolidating its role as an oncogenic hub, crystal structure of gankyrin-proteasome ATPase complex was used to predict novel interacting partners. EEVD, a four amino acid linear sequence seems a hot spot site at this interface. By searching for EEVD in exposed regions of human proteins in PDB database, we predicted 34 novel interactions. Eight proteins were tested and seven of them were found to interact with gankyrin. Affinity of four interactions is high enough for endogenous detection. Others require gankyrin overexpression in HEK 293 cells or occur endogenously in breast cancer cell line- MDA-MB-435, reflecting lower affinity or presence of a deregulated network. Mutagenesis and peptide inhibition confirm that EEVD is the common hot spot site at these interfaces and therefore a potential polypharmacological drug target. In MDA-MB-231 cells in which the endogenous CLIC1 is silenced, trans-expression of Wt protein (CLIC1_EEVD) and not the hot spot site mutant (CLIC1_AAVA) resulted in significant rescue of the migratory potential. Our approach can be extended to identify novel functionally relevant protein-protein interactions, in expansion of oncogenic networks and in identifying potential therapeutic targets. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Bliss and Loewe interaction analyses of clinically relevant drug combinations in human colon cancer cell lines reveal complex patterns of synergy and antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashif, Muhammad; Andersson, Claes; Mansoori, Sharmineh; Larsson, Rolf; Nygren, Peter; Gustafsson, Mats G

    2017-11-28

    We analyzed survival effects for 15 different pairs of clinically relevant anti-cancer drugs in three iso-genic pairs of human colorectal cancer carcinoma cell lines, by applying for the first time our novel software (R package) called COMBIA. In our experiments iso-genic pairs of cell lines were used, differing only with respect to a single clinically important KRAS or BRAF mutation. Frequently, concentration dependent but mutation independent joint Bliss and Loewe synergy/antagonism was found statistically significant. Four combinations were found synergistic/antagonistic specifically to the parental (harboring KRAS or BRAF mutation) cell line of the corresponding iso-genic cell lines pair. COMBIA offers considerable improvements over established software for synergy analysis such as MacSynergy™ II as it includes both Bliss (independence) and Loewe (additivity) analyses, together with a tailored non-parametric statistical analysis employing heteroscedasticity, controlled resampling, and global (omnibus) testing. In many cases Loewe analyses found significant synergistic as well as antagonistic effects in a cell line at different concentrations of a tested drug combination. By contrast, Bliss analysis found only one type of significant effect per cell line. In conclusion, the integrated Bliss and Loewe interaction analysis based on non-parametric statistics may provide more robust interaction analyses and reveal complex patterns of synergy and antagonism.

  10. Final Report for Project "A high-throughput pipeline for mapping inter-species interactions and metabolic synergy relevant to next-generation biofuel production"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segre, Daniel [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Marx, Christopher J. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Northen, Trent [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2018-01-03

    . Throughout the project, we have used mass spectrometry to characterize and measure the metabolic inputs and outputs of each of these consortium members, providing valuable information for model refinement, and enabling the establishment of metabolism-mediated interactions. In addition to lignocellulose degradation, we have started addressing the challenge of removing metabolites (e.g. formaldehyde) produced by the demethoxylation of lignin monomers, which can otherwise inhibit microbial growth due to their toxicity. On the computational side, we have implemented genome-scale models for all consortium members, based on KBase reconstructions and literature curation, and we studied small consortia and their properties. Overall, our project has identified a complex landscape of interactions types and metabolic processes relevant to community-level functions, illustrating the challenges and opportunities of microbial community engineering for the transformation of biomass into bioproducts.

  11. Information Needs/Relevance

    OpenAIRE

    Wildemuth, Barbara M.

    2009-01-01

    A user's interaction with a DL is often initiated as the result of the user experiencing an information need of some kind. Aspects of that experience and how it might affect the user's interactions with the DL are discussed in this module. In addition, users continuously make decisions about and evaluations of the materials retrieved from a DL, relative to their information needs. Relevance judgments, and their relationship to the user's information needs, are discussed in this module. Draft

  12. Microglia in the mouse retina alter the structure and function of retinal pigmented epithelial cells: a potential cellular interaction relevant to AMD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxin Ma

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a leading cause of legal blindness in the elderly in the industrialized word. While the immune system in the retina is likely to be important in AMD pathogenesis, the cell biology underlying the disease is incompletely understood. Clinical and basic science studies have implicated alterations in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE layer as a locus of early change. Also, retinal microglia, the resident immune cells of the retina, have been observed to translocate from their normal position in the inner retina to accumulate in the subretinal space close to the RPE layer in AMD eyes and in animal models of AMD.In this study, we examined the effects of retinal microglia on RPE cells using 1 an in vitro model where activated retinal microglia are co-cultured with primary RPE cells, and 2 an in vivo mouse model where retinal microglia are transplanted into the subretinal space. We found that retinal microglia induced in RPE cells 1 changes in RPE structure and distribution, 2 increased expression and secretion of pro-inflammatory, chemotactic, and pro-angiogenic molecules, and 3 increased extent of in vivo choroidal neovascularization in the subretinal space.These findings share similarities with important pathological features found in AMD and suggest the relevance of microglia-RPE interactions in AMD pathogenesis. We speculate that the migration of retinal microglia into the subretinal space in early stages of the disease induces significant changes in RPE cells that perpetuate further microglial accumulation, increase inflammation in the outer retina, and fosters an environment conducive for the formation of neovascular changes responsible for much of vision loss in advanced AMD.

  13. Patient Counseling about Herbal-Drug Interactions | Hussain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The multitude of pharmacologically active compounds obviously increases the likelihood of interactions taking place. Hence, the likelihood of herb-drug interactions is theoretically higher than drug-drug interactions because synthetic drugs usually contain single chemical entity. Case reports and clinical studies have ...

  14. Lower alert rates by clustering of related drug interaction alerts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heringa, M.; Siderius, Hidde; Schreudering, A.; De Smet, Peter Agm; Bouvy, M.L.

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate to what extent clustering of related drug interaction alerts (drug-drug and drug-disease interaction alerts) would decrease the alert rate in clinical decision support systems (CDSSs). METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of drug interaction alerts

  15. [Does implementation of benchmarking in quality circles improve the quality of care of patients with asthma and reduce drug interaction?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann-Kolle, Petra; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Broge, Björn; Haefeli, Walter Emil; Schneider, Antonius

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this cluster-randomised controlled trial was to evaluate the efficacy of quality circles (QCs) working either with general data-based feedback or with an open benchmark within the field of asthma care and drug-drug interactions. Twelve QCs, involving 96 general practitioners from 85 practices, were randomised. Six QCs worked with traditional anonymous feedback and six with an open benchmark. Two QC meetings supported with feedback reports were held covering the topics "drug-drug interactions" and "asthma"; in both cases discussions were guided by a trained moderator. Outcome measures included health-related quality of life and patient satisfaction with treatment, asthma severity and number of potentially inappropriate drug combinations as well as the general practitioners' satisfaction in relation to the performance of the QC. A significant improvement in the treatment of asthma was observed in both trial arms. However, there was only a slight improvement regarding inappropriate drug combinations. There were no relevant differences between the group with open benchmark (B-QC) and traditional quality circles (T-QC). The physicians' satisfaction with the QC performance was significantly higher in the T-QCs. General practitioners seem to take a critical perspective about open benchmarking in quality circles. Caution should be used when implementing benchmarking in a quality circle as it did not improve healthcare when compared to the traditional procedure with anonymised comparisons. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  16. Mechanism of the pharmacokinetic interaction between methotrexate and benzimidazoles: potential role for breast cancer resistance protein in clinical drug-drug interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breedveld, Pauline; Zelcer, Noam; Pluim, Dick; Sönmezer, Ozgür; Tibben, Matthijs M.; Beijnen, Jos H.; Schinkel, Alfred H.; van Tellingen, Olaf; Borst, Piet; Schellens, Jan H. M.

    2004-01-01

    The antifolate drug methotrexate (MTX) is transported by breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; ABCG2) and multidrug resistance-associated protein1-4 (MRP1-4; ABCC1-4). In cancer patients, coadministration of benzimidazoles and MTX can result in profound MTX-induced toxicity coinciding with an

  17. A bioinformatics approach for precision medicine off-label drug drug selection among triple negative breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lijun; Schneider, Bryan P; Li, Lang

    2016-07-01

    Cancer has been extensively characterized on the basis of genomics. The integration of genetic information about cancers with data on how the cancers respond to target based therapy to help to optimum cancer treatment. The increasing usage of sequencing technology in cancer research and clinical practice has enormously advanced our understanding of cancer mechanisms. The cancer precision medicine is becoming a reality. Although off-label drug usage is a common practice in treating cancer, it suffers from the lack of knowledge base for proper cancer drug selections. This eminent need has become even more apparent considering the upcoming genomics data. In this paper, a personalized medicine knowledge base is constructed by integrating various cancer drugs, drug-target database, and knowledge sources for the proper cancer drugs and their target selections. Based on the knowledge base, a bioinformatics approach for cancer drugs selection in precision medicine is developed. It integrates personal molecular profile data, including copy number variation, mutation, and gene expression. By analyzing the 85 triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) patient data in the Cancer Genome Altar, we have shown that 71.7% of the TNBC patients have FDA approved drug targets, and 51.7% of the patients have more than one drug target. Sixty-five drug targets are identified as TNBC treatment targets and 85 candidate drugs are recommended. Many existing TNBC candidate targets, such as Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 (PARP1), Cell division protein kinase 6 (CDK6), epidermal growth factor receptor, etc., were identified. On the other hand, we found some additional targets that are not yet fully investigated in the TNBC, such as Gamma-Glutamyl Hydrolase (GGH), Thymidylate Synthetase (TYMS), Protein Tyrosine Kinase 6 (PTK6), Topoisomerase (DNA) I, Mitochondrial (TOP1MT), Smoothened, Frizzled Class Receptor (SMO), etc. Our additional analysis of target and drug selection strategy is also fully

  18. Pharmacogenetic Aspects of the Interaction of AT1 Receptor Antagonists With ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter ABCG2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Ripperger

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2 (BCRP and MXR is involved in the absorption, distribution, and elimination of numerous drugs. Thus, drugs that are able to reduce the activity of ABCG2, e.g., antihypertensive AT1 receptor antagonists (ARBs, may cause drug-drug interactions and compromise drug safety and efficacy. In addition, genetic variability within the ABCG2 gene may influence the ability of the transporter to interact with ARBs. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterize the ARB-ABCG2 interaction in the light of naturally occurring variations (F489L, R482G or amino acid substitutions with in silico-predicted relevance for the ARB-ABCG2 interaction (Y469A; M483F; Y570A. For this purpose, ABCG2 variants were expressed in HEK293 cells and the impact of ARBs on ABCG2 activity was studied in vitro using the pheophorbide A (PhA efflux assay. First, we demonstrated that both the F489L and the Y469A substitution, respectively, reduced ABCG2 protein levels in these cells. Moreover, both substitutions enhanced the inhibitory effect of candesartan cilexetil, irbesartan, losartan, and telmisartan on ABCG2-mediated PhA efflux, whereas the R482G substitution blunted the inhibitory effect of candesartan cilexetil and telmisartan in this regard. In contrast, the ARB-ABCG2 interaction was not altered in cells expressing either the M483F or the Y570A variant, respectively. In conclusion, our data indicate that the third transmembrane helix and adjacent regions of ABCG2 may be of major importance for the interaction of ARBs with the ABC transporter. Moreover, we conclude from our data that individuals carrying the F489L polymorphism may be at increased risk of developing ABCG2-related drug-drug interactions in multi-drug regimens involving ARBs.

  19. Pharmacoepidemiological assessment of drug interactions with vitamin K antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Christensen, Rene dePont; Wang, Shirley V

    2014-01-01

    PurposeWe present a database of prescription drugs and international normalized ratio (INR) data and the applied methodology for its use to assess drug-drug interactions with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). We use the putative interaction between VKAs and tramadol as a case study. MethodsWe used...

  20. Creating a Model of Acceptance: Preservice Teachers Interact with Non-English-Speaking Latino Parents Using Culturally Relevant Mathematics and Science Activities at Family Learning Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Olga; McCollough, Cherie A.; Diaz, Zulmaris

    2016-01-01

    The following describes a culturally relevant mathematics and science content program implemented by preservice teachers (PSTs) at Family Math/Science Learning Events (FM/SLEs) conducted through two different university programs in south Texas. These experiences are required course activities designed to inform PSTs of the importance of…

  1. Responsiveness to physicians' requests for information concerning drug interactions: a comparison of brand and generic companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, M; Lexchin, J

    1990-01-01

    Research-based pharmaceutical companies maintain that there are important differences between themselves and their generic competitors. Prominent among them is an alleged greater ability to provide accurate and rapid responses to requests from physicians for information about drug products. This study evaluates pharmaceutical company behavior with regard to these issues. Two drug-drug interactions were identified, along with all of the companies in Canada marketing any of the four drugs involved. Each company received a letter describing symptoms suggestive of an interaction in a patient taking its particular product and the relevant second drug. The companies were asked if they were aware of any evidence of an interaction involving the two drugs. They were also asked to provide references regarding the interaction. Responses were received from all companies contacted except one. There were no significant differences (in the hypothesized direction) between the generic and brand companies with regard to either the accuracy or promptness of the response, or the usefulness of the references cited. On the contrary, generic firms were markedly quicker to respond than were brand manufacturers. The latter were slightly more likely to acknowledge evidence of an adverse drug interaction, and to provide useful references to relevant published research.

  2. Evaluation of cumulus cloud – radiation interaction effects on air quality –relevant meteorological variables from WRF, from a regional climate perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aware only of the resolved, grid-scale clouds, the Weather Research & Forecasting model (WRF) does not consider the interactions between subgrid-scale convective clouds and radiation. One consequence of this omission may be WRF’s overestimation of surface precipitation during sum...

  3. Interaction of platinum drugs with clinically relevant x-ray doses in mammalian cells: A comparison of cisplatin, carboplatin, iproplatin, and tetraplatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skov, K.; MacPhail, S.

    1991-01-01

    Whereas the interaction between radiation and platinum complexes has never been pronounced in radiobiological experiments (to 30 Gy in mammalian cells), there have been reports of interest in this combination in the clinic, where fractionated doses of approximately 2 Gy are used. Our studies on the marked interaction in hypoxia at the 80% survival level (1-2.5 Gy) with cisplatin have been extended to second generation platinum drugs of clinical interest. The studies in the lower radiation dose region have been facilitated by the use of the cell analyzer DMIPS to identify individual cells and follow them microscopically to assess for clonogenic ability. Chinese hamster V79 cells were used, which were exposed to drug for 1 hr prior to irradiation in hypoxia (or air). None of the drugs give an enhancement ratio (ER) greater than 1.3 in the high radiation dose region, whereas all can produce ER80% (ER calculated at iso-survival of 80%) of 2 or higher at low doses in hypoxic cells. The enhancement of radiation kill in oxic V79 cells (ER's to 1.1 at 1-2% S) disappears at low doses (ER80% = 1.0) except for tetraplatin, where a moderate ER80% (to 1.64) was measured. Comparison of the hypoxic interaction on a concentration basis suggests that cisplatin is the best drug at low x-ray doses and low concentrations, but the interaction reaches a plateau at ER80% approximately 2.0. Tetraplatin continues to give better interaction with increasing concentration (up to ER80% = 3.7 at 25 microM). Interaction of radiation with the less toxic drugs, iproplatin and carboplatin, used at around 100 microM can be improved by longer exposure times prior to irradiation. Comparison on the basis of toxicity, for which the plating efficiency was used, suggests that cisplatin gives a better interaction than the three newer drugs for a given level of toxicity in hypoxic V79 cells

  4. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions of morphine, codeine, and their derivatives: theory and clinical reality, part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Scott C; Cozza, Kelly L

    2003-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions with morphine, hydromorphone, and oxymorphone are reviewed in this column. Morphine is a naturally occurring opiate that is metabolized chiefly through glucuronidation by uridine diphosphate glucuronosyl transferase (UGT) enzymes in the liver. These enzymes produce an active analgesic metabolite and a potentially toxic metabolite. In vivo drug-drug interaction studies with morphine are few, but they do suggest that inhibition or induction of UGT enzymes could alter morphine and its metabolite levels. These interactions could change analgesic efficacy. Hydromorphone and oxymorphone, close synthetic derivatives of morphine, are also metabolized primarily by UGT enzymes. Hydromorphone may have a toxic metabolite similar to morphine. In vivo drug-drug interaction studies with hydromorphone and oxymorphone have not been done, so it is difficult to make conclusions with these drugs.

  5. Prognostic relevance of the interaction between short-term, metronome-paced heart rate variability, and inflammation: results from the population-based CARLA cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medenwald, Daniel; Swenne, Cees A; Loppnow, Harald; Kors, Jan A; Pietzner, Diana; Tiller, Daniel; Thiery, Joachim; Nuding, Sebastian; Greiser, Karin H; Haerting, Johannes; Werdan, Karl; Kluttig, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    To determine the interaction between HRV and inflammation and their association with cardiovascular/all-cause mortality in the general population. Subjects of the CARLA study (n = 1671; 778 women, 893 men, 45-83 years of age) were observed for an average follow-up period of 8.8 years (226 deaths, 70 cardiovascular deaths). Heart rate variability parameters were calculated from 5-min segments of 20-min resting electrocardiograms. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and soluble tumour necrosis factor-alpha receptor type 1 (sTNF-R1) were measured as inflammation parameters. The HRV parameters determined included the standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN), the root-mean-square of successive normal-interval differences (RMSSD), the low- and high-frequency (HF) power, the ratio of both, and non-linear parameters [Poincaré plot (SD1, SD2, SD1/SD2), short-term detrended fluctuation analysis]. We estimated hazard ratios by using covariate-adjusted Cox regression for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality incorporating an interaction term of HRV/inflammation parameters. Relative excess risk due to interactions (RERIs) were computed. We found an interaction effect of sTNF-R1 with SDNN (RERI: 0.5; 99% confidence interval (CI): 0.1-1.0), and a weaker effect with RMSSD (RERI: 0.4; 99% CI: 0.0-0.9) and HF (RERI: 0.4; 99% CI: 0.0-0.9) with respect to cardiovascular mortality on an additive scale after covariate adjustment. Neither IL-6 nor hsCRP showed a significant interaction with the HRV parameters. A change in TNF-α levels or the autonomic nervous system influences the mortality risk through both entities simultaneously. Thus, TNF-α and HRV need to be considered when predicating mortality. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Cocaine self-administration differentially affects allosteric A2A-D2 receptor-receptor interactions in the striatum. Relevance for cocaine use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintsuk, Julia; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Pomierny, Bartosz; Wydra, Karolina; Zaniewska, Magdalena; Filip, Malgorzata; Fuxe, Kjell

    2016-05-01

    In the current study behavioral and biochemical experiments were performed to study changes in the allosteric A2AR-D2R interactions in the ventral and dorsal striatum after cocaine self-administration versus corresponding yoked saline control. By using ex vivo [(3)H]-raclopride/quinpirole competition experiments, the effects of the A2AR agonist CGS 21680 (100 nM) on the KiH and KiL values of the D2-like receptor (D2-likeR) were determined. One major result was a significant reduction in the D2-likeR agonist high affinity state observed with CGS 21680 after cocaine self-administration in the ventral striatum compared with the yoked saline group. The results therefore support the hypothesis that A2AR agonists can at least in part counteract the motivational actions of cocaine. This action is mediated via the D2-likeR by targeting the A2AR protomer of A2AR-D2-like R heteroreceptor complexes in the ventral striatum, which leads to the reduction of D2-likeR protomer recognition through the allosteric receptor-receptor interaction. In contrast, in the dorsal striatum the CGS 21680-induced antagonistic modulation in the D2-likeR agonist high affinity state was abolished after cocaine self-administration versus the yoked saline group probably due to a local dysfunction/disruption of the A2AR-D2-like R heteroreceptor complexes. Such a change in the dorsal striatum in cocaine self-administration can contribute to the development of either locomotor sensitization, habit-forming learning and/or the compulsive drug seeking by enhanced D2-likeR protomer signaling. Potential differences in the composition and stoichiometry of the A2AR-D2R heteroreceptor complexes, including differential recruitment of sigma 1 receptor, in the ventral and dorsal striatum may explain the differential regional changes observed in the A2A-D2-likeR interactions after cocaine self-administration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Synthesis and Structural Investigation of New Bio-Relevant Complexes of Lanthanides with 5-Hydroxyflavone: DNA Binding and Protein Interaction Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra-Cristina Munteanu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we attempted to develop new metal coordination complexes of the natural flavonoid 5-hydroxyflavone with Sm(III, Eu(III, Gd(III, Tb(III. The resultant hydroxo complexes have been characterized by a variety of spectroscopic techniques, including fluorescence, FT-IR, UV-Vis, EPR and mass spectral studies. The general chemical formula of the complexes is [Ln(C15H9O33(OH2(H2Ox]·nH2O, where Ln is the lanthanide cation and x = 0 for Sm(III, x = 1 for Eu(III, Gd(III, Tb(III and n = 0 for Sm(III, Gd(III, Tb(III, n = 1 for Eu(III, respectively. The proposed structures of the complexes were optimized by DFT calculations. Theoretical calculations and experimental determinations sustain the proposed structures of the hydroxo complexes, with two molecules of 5-hydroxyflavone acting as monoanionic bidentate chelate ligands. The interaction of the complexes with calf thymus DNA has been explored by fluorescence titration and UV-Vis absorption binding studies, and revealed that the synthesized complexes interact with DNA with binding constants (Kb ~ 104. Human serum albumin (HSA and transferrin (Tf binding studies have also been performed by fluorescence titration techniques (fluorescence quenching studies, synchronous fluorescence spectra. The apparent association constants (Ka and thermodynamic parameters have been calculated from the fluorescence quenching experiment at 299 K, 308 K, and 318 K. The quenching curves indicate that the complexes bind to HSA with smaller affinity than the ligand, but to Tf with higher binding affinities than the ligand.

  8. Nursing documentation in inpatient psychiatry: The relevance of nurse-patient interactions in progress notes-A focus group study with mental health staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myklebust, Kjellaug K; Bjørkly, Stål; Råheim, Målfrid

    2018-02-01

    To gain insight into mental health staff's perception of writing progress notes in an acute and subacute psychiatric ward context. The nursing process structures nursing documentation. Progress notes are intended to be an evaluation of a patient's nursing diagnoses, interventions and outcomes. Within this template, a patient's status and the care provided are to be recorded. The therapeutic nurse-patient relationship is recognised as a key component of psychiatric care today. At the same time, the biomedical model remains strong. Research literature exploring nursing staff's experiences with writing progress notes in psychiatric contexts, and especially the space given to staff-patient relations, is sparse. Qualitative design. Focus group interviews with mental health staff working in one acute and one subacute psychiatric ward were conducted. Systematic text condensation, a method for transverse thematic analysis, was used. Two main categories emerged from the analysis: the position of the professional as an expert and distant observer in the progress notes, and the weak position of professional-patient interactions in progress notes. The participants did not perceive that the current recording model, which is based on the nursing process, supported a focus on patients' resources or reporting professional-patient interactions. This model appeared to put ward staff in an expert position in relation to patients, which made it challenging to involve patients in the recording process. Essential aspects of nursing care related to recovery and person-centred care were not prioritised for documentation. This study contributes to the critical examination of the documentation praxis, as well as to the critical examination of the documentation tool as to what is considered important to document. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions ...

  10. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions of morphine, codeine, and their derivatives: theory and clinical reality, Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Scott C; Cozza, Kelly L

    2003-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions with codeine, dihydrocodeine, hydrocodone, oxycodone, and buprenorphine are reviewed in this column. These compounds have a very similar chemical structure to morphine. Unlike morphine, which is metabolized chiefly through conjugation reactions with uridine diphosphate glucuronosyl transferase (UGT) enzymes, these five drugs are metabolized both through oxidative reactions by the cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzyme and conjugation by UGT enzymes. There is controversy as to whether codeine, dihydrocodeine, and hydrocodone are actually prodrugs requiring activation by the CYP450 2D6 enzyme or UGT enzymes. Oxycodone and buprenorphine, however, are clearly not prodrugs and are metabolized by the CYP450 2D6 and 3A4 enzymes, respectively. Knowledge of this metabolism assists in the understanding for the potential of drug-drug interactions with these drugs. This understanding is important so that clinicians can choose the proper dosages for analgesia and anticipate potential drug-drug interactions.

  11. Drug interaction databases in medical literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsholm, Gertrud Gansmo; Nielsen, Anna Katrine Toft; Damkier, Per

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: It is well documented that drug-drug interaction databases (DIDs) differ substantially with respect to classification of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). The aim of this study was to study online available transparency of ownership, funding, information, classifications, staff training...... available transparency of ownership, funding, information, classifications, staff training, and underlying documentation varies substantially among various DIDs. Open access DIDs had a statistically lower score on parameters assessed....... and the three most commonly used subscription DIDs in the medical literature. The following parameters were assessed for each of the databases: Ownership, classification of interactions, primary information sources, and staff qualification. We compared the overall proportion of yes/no answers from open access...

  12. Bacterial interactions with proteins and cells relevant to the development of life-threatening endocarditis studied by use of a quartz-crystal microbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewski, Stefanie; Rheinlaender, Johannes; Ries, Philip; Canjuga, Denis; Mack, Carmen; Scheideler, Lutz; Schäffer, Tilman E; Geis-Gerstorfer, Jürgen; Wendel, Hans-Peter; Rupp, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Implant-related infections are a major challenge in clinical routine because of severe complications, for example infective endocarditis (IE). The purpose of this study was to investigate the real-time interaction of S. gordonii with proteins and cells important in the development of IE, in a flow system, by use of a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM). Acoustic sensors were biologically modified by preconditioning with sterile saliva, platelet-poor plasma (PPP), or platelet-rich plasma (PRP), followed then by perfusion of a bacterial suspension. After perfusion, additional fluorescence and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) studies were performed. The surface structure of S. gordonii was analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Compared with S. gordonii adhesion on the abiotic sensor surface following normal mass loading indicated by a frequency decrease, adhesion on saliva, PPP, or PRP-conditioned sensors resulted in an increase in frequency. Furthermore, adhesion induced slightly increased damping signals for saliva and PPP-coated sensors but a decrease upon bacterial adhesion to PRP, indicating the formation of a more rigid biofilm. Microscopic analysis confirmed the formation of dense and vital bacterial layers and the aggregation of platelets and bacteria. In conclusion, our study shows that the complex patterns of QCM output data observed are strongly dependent on the biological substrate and adhesion mechanisms of S. gordonii. Overall, QCM sheds new light on the pathways of such severe infections as IE.

  13. Why relevance theory is relevant for lexicography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bothma, Theo; Tarp, Sven

    2014-01-01

    This article starts by providing a brief summary of relevance theory in information science in relation to the function theory of lexicography, explaining the different types of relevance, viz. objective system relevance and the subjective types of relevance, i.e. topical, cognitive, situational...... that is very important for lexicography as well as for information science, viz. functional relevance. Since all lexicographic work is ultimately aimed at satisfying users’ information needs, the article then discusses why the lexicographer should take note of all these types of relevance when planning a new...... dictionary project, identifying new tasks and responsibilities of the modern lexicographer. The article furthermore discusses how relevance theory impacts on teaching dictionary culture and reference skills. By integrating insights from lexicography and information science, the article contributes to new...

  14. Variability in P-Glycoprotein Inhibitory Potency (IC50) Using Various in Vitro Experimental Systems: Implications for Universal Digoxin Drug- Drug Interaction Risk Assessment Decision Criterias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentz, J.; O'Connor, M.P.; Bednarczyk, D.; Coleman, J.; Lee, C.; Palm, J.; Pak, Y.A.; Perloff, E.S.; Reyner, E.; Balimane, P.; Brännström, M.; Chu, X.; Funk, C.; Guo, A.; Hanna, I.; Herédi-Szabó, K.; Hillgren, K.; Li, L.; Hollnack-Pusch, E.; Jamei, M.; Lin, X.; Mason, A.K.; Neuhoff, S.; Patel, A.; Podila, L.; Plise, E.; Rajaraman, G.; Salphati, L.; Sands, E.; Taub, M.E.; Taur, J.-S.; Weitz, D.; Wortelboer, H.M.; Xia, C.Q.; Xiao, G.; Yabut, J.; Yamagata, T.; Zhang, L.; Ellens, H.

    2013-01-01

    A P-glycoprotein (P-gp) IC50 working group was established with 23 participating pharmaceutical and contract research laboratories and one academic institution to assess interlaboratory variability in P-gp IC 50 determinations. Each laboratory followed its in-house protocol to determine in vitro

  15. Evaluations of in vitro metabolism, drug-drug interactions mediated by reversible and time-dependent inhibition of CYPs, and plasma protein binding of MMB4 DMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, S Peter; Lusiak, Bozena D; Burback, Brian L; Johnson, Jerry D

    2013-01-01

    1,1'-Methylenebis[4-[(hydroxyimino)methyl]-pyridinium] (MMB4) dimethanesulfonate (DMS) is a bisquaternary pyridinium aldoxime that reactivates acetylcholinesterase inhibited by organophosphorus nerve agent. Drug metabolism and plasma protein binding for MMB4 DMS were examined using various techniques and a wide range of species. When (14)C-MMB4 DMS was incubated in liver microsomes, 4-pyridine aldoxime (4-PA) and an additional metabolite were detected in all species tested. Identity of the additional metabolite was postulated to be isonicotinic acid (INA) based on liquid chromatography with a tandem mass spectrometry analysis, which was confirmed by comparison with authentic INA. Formation of INA was dependent on species, with the highest level found in monkey liver microsomes. The MMB4 DMS exhibited reversible inhibition in a concentration-dependent manner toward cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2), CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4 in human liver microsomes showing the highest inhibition for CYP2D6. Human recombinant CYPs were used to evaluate inhibitory curves more adequately and determine detailed kinetic constants for reversible inhibition and potential time-dependent inhibition (TDI). The MMB4 DMS exhibited reversible inhibition toward human-recombinant CYP2D6 with an inhibition constant (K i) value of 66.6 µmol/L. Based on the k inact/K I values, MMB4 DMS was found to exhibit the most potent TDI toward CYP2D6. The MMB4 DMS at 5 different concentrations was incubated in plasma for 5 hours using an equilibrium dialysis device. For all species tested, there were no concentration-dependent changes in plasma protein binding, ranging from 10% to 17%. These results suggest that MMB4 was not extensively bound to plasma protein, and there were no overt species-related differences in the extent of MMB4 bound to plasma protein.

  16. Signalling possible drug-drug interactions in a spontaneous reporting system : delay of withdrawal bleeding during concomitant use of oral contraceptives and itraconazole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Puijenbroek, E P; Egberts, A C; Meyboom, R H; Leufkens, H G

    AIMS: In spontaneous adverse drug reaction reporting systems, there is a growing need for methods facilitating the automated detection of signals concerning possible adverse drug reactions. In addition, special attention is needed for the detection of adverse drug reactions resulting from possible

  17. Deep learning relevance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lioma, Christina; Larsen, Birger; Petersen, Casper

    2016-01-01

    train a Recurrent Neural Network (RNN) on existing relevant information to that query. We then use the RNN to "deep learn" a single, synthetic, and we assume, relevant document for that query. We design a crowdsourcing experiment to assess how relevant the "deep learned" document is, compared...... to existing relevant documents. Users are shown a query and four wordclouds (of three existing relevant documents and our deep learned synthetic document). The synthetic document is ranked on average most relevant of all....

  18. Nanoparticles with high payloads of pipemidic acid, a poorly soluble crystalline drug: drug-initiated polymerization and self-assembly approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Pancani

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, biodegradable polymers such as poly(lactic acid (PLA, poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA and poly(ε-caprolactone (PCL remain the most common biomaterials to produce drug-loaded nanoparticles (NPs. Pipemidic acid (PIP is a poorly soluble antibiotic with a strong tendency to crystallize. PIP incorporation in PLA/PLGA NPs was challenging because of PIP crystals formation and burst release. As PIP had a poor affinity for the NPs, an alternative approach to encapsulation was used, consisting in coupling PIP to PCL. Thus, a PCL–PIP conjugate was successfully synthesized by an original drug-initiated polymerization in a single step without the need of catalyst. PCL–PIP was characterized by NMR, IR, SEC and mass spectrometry. PCL–PIP was used to prepare self-assembled NPs with PIP contents as high as 27% (w/w. The NPs were characterized by microscopy, DLS, NTA and TRPS. This study paves the way towards the production of NPs with high antibiotic payloads by drug-initiated polymerization. Further studies will deal with the synthesis of novel polymer–PIP conjugates with ester bonds between the drug and PCL. PIP can be considered as a model drug and the strategy developed here could be extended to other challenging antibiotics or anticancer drugs and employed to efficiently incorporate them in NPs. KEY WORDS: Pipemidic acid, Nanoparticle, Antibiotic, Nanoprecipitation, Crystalline drug, Drug-initiated   polymerization

  19. Role of cytochrome P450 in drug interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibi Zakia

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Drug-drug interactions have become an important issue in health care. It is now realized that many drug-drug interactions can be explained by alterations in the metabolic enzymes that are present in the liver and other extra-hepatic tissues. Many of the major pharmacokinetic interactions between drugs are due to hepatic cytochrome P450 (P450 or CYP enzymes being affected by previous administration of other drugs. After coadministration, some drugs act as potent enzyme inducers, whereas others are inhibitors. However, reports of enzyme inhibition are very much more common. Understanding these mechanisms of enzyme inhibition or induction is extremely important in order to give appropriate multiple-drug therapies. In future, it may help to identify individuals at greatest risk of drug interactions and adverse events.

  20. WAr on DrugS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-04-12

    Apr 12, 2009 ... ABStrAct. Since drugs became both a public and social issue in Nigeria, fear about both the real and .... drugs as being morally reprehensible, and ..... tice system (see for instance, Shaw, 1995; ..... A cut throat business:.

  1. Interaction of reelin and stress on immobility in the forced swim test but not dopamine-mediated locomotor hyperactivity or prepulse inhibition disruption: Relevance to psychotic and mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notaras, Michael J; Vivian, Billie; Wilson, Carey; van den Buuse, Maarten

    2017-07-13

    Psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia, as well as some mood disorders, such as bipolar disorder, have been suggested to share common biological risk factors. One such factor is reelin, a large extracellular matrix glycoprotein that regulates neuronal migration during development as well as numerous activity-dependent processes in the adult brain. The current study sought to evaluate whether a history of stress exposure interacts with endogenous reelin levels to modify behavioural endophenotypes of relevance to psychotic and mood disorders. Heterozygous Reeler Mice (HRM) and wildtype (WT) controls were treated with 50mg/L of corticosterone (CORT) in their drinking water from 6 to 9weeks of age, before undergoing behavioural testing in adulthood. We assessed methamphetamine-induced locomotor hyperactivity, prepulse inhibition (PPI) of acoustic startle, short-term spatial memory in the Y-maze, and depression-like behaviour in the Forced-Swim Test (FST). HRM genotype or CORT treatment did not affect methamphetamine-induced locomotor hyperactivity, a model of psychosis-like behaviour. At baseline, HRM showed decreased PPI at the commonly used 100msec interstimulus interval (ISI), but not at the 30msec ISI or following challenge with apomorphine. A history of CORT exposure potentiated immobility in the FST amongst HRM, but not WT mice. In the Y-maze, chronic CORT treatment decreased novel arm preference amongst HRM, reflecting reduced short-term spatial memory. These data confirm a significant role of endogenous reelin levels on stress-related behaviour, supporting a possible role in both bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. However, an interaction of reelin deficiency with dopaminergic regulation of psychosis-like behaviour remains unclear. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Aerosol-Radiation-Cloud Interactions in the South-East Atlantic: Model-Relevant Observations and the Beneficiary Modeling Efforts in the Realm of the EVS-2 Project ORACLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redemann, Jens

    2018-01-01

    Globally, aerosols remain a major contributor to uncertainties in assessments of anthropogenically-induced changes to the Earth climate system, despite concerted efforts using satellite and suborbital observations and increasingly sophisticated models. The quantification of direct and indirect aerosol radiative effects, as well as cloud adjustments thereto, even at regional scales, continues to elude our capabilities. Some of our limitations are due to insufficient sampling and accuracy of the relevant observables, under an appropriate range of conditions to provide useful constraints for modeling efforts at various climate scales. In this talk, I will describe (1) the efforts of our group at NASA Ames to develop new airborne instrumentation to address some of the data insufficiencies mentioned above; (2) the efforts by the EVS-2 ORACLES project to address aerosol-cloud-climate interactions in the SE Atlantic and (3) time permitting, recent results from a synergistic use of A-Train aerosol data to test climate model simulations of present-day direct radiative effects in some of the AEROCOM phase II global climate models.

  3. Evaluation of potential interactions between mycophenolic acid derivatives and proton pump inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabardi, Steven; Olyaei, Ali

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of gastrointestinal (GI) complications in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients, impact of the complications on transplant outcomes, and the potential interactions between mycophenolic acid (MPA) derivatives and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). An unrestricted literature search (1980-January 2012) was performed with MEDLINE and EMBASE using the following key words: drug-drug interaction, enteric-coated mycophenolic acid, GI complications, mycophenolate mofetil, solid organ transplant, and proton pump inhibitor, including individual agents within the class. Abstracts from scientific meetings were also evaluated. Additionally, reference citations from identified publications were reviewed. Relevant English-language, original research articles and review articles were evaluated if they focused on any of the topics identified in the search or included substantial content addressing GI complications in SOT recipients or drug interactions. GI complications are frequent among SOT recipients, with some studies showing prevalence rates as high as 70%. Transplant outcomes among renal transplant recipients are significantly impacted by GI complications, especially in patients requiring immunosuppressant dosage reductions or premature discontinuation. To this end, PPI use among patients receiving transplants is common. Recent data demonstrate that PPIs significantly reduce the overall exposure to MPA after oral administration of mycophenolate mofetil. Similar studies show this interaction does not exist between PPIs and enteric-coated mycophenolic acid (EC-MPA). Unfortunately, most of the available data evaluating this interaction are pharmacokinetic analyses that do not investigate the clinical impact of this interaction. A significant interaction exists between PPIs and mycophenolate mofetil secondary to reduced dissolution of mycophenolate mofetil in higher pH environments. EC-MPA is not absorbed in the stomach; therefore, low intragastric acidity

  4. Making Deferred Taxes Relevant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Arjan; Naarding, Ewout

    2018-01-01

    We analyse the conceptual problems in current accounting for deferred taxes and provide solutions derived from the literature in order to make International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) deferred tax numbers value-relevant. In our view, the empirical results concerning the value relevance of

  5. Parsimonious relevance models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meij, E.; Weerkamp, W.; Balog, K.; de Rijke, M.; Myang, S.-H.; Oard, D.W.; Sebastiani, F.; Chua, T.-S.; Leong, M.-K.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a method for applying parsimonious language models to re-estimate the term probabilities assigned by relevance models. We apply our method to six topic sets from test collections in five different genres. Our parsimonious relevance models (i) improve retrieval effectiveness in terms of

  6. Absence of clinically relevant cardiovascular interaction upon add-on of mirabegron or tamsulosin to an established tamsulosin or mirabegron treatment in healthy middle-aged to elderly men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gelderen, Marcel; Tretter, Reiner; Meijer, John; Dorrepaal, Caroline; Gangaram-Panday, Shanti; Brooks, Ashley; Krauwinkel, Walter; Dickinson, James

    2014-08-01

    Tamsulosin and mirabegron may be used concomitantly in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms. Since alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists are associated with cardiovascular side effects, potential pharmacokinetic and cardiovascular interactions were evaluated. This was an open-label, randomized, 2-arm, 2-sequence study in 48 healthy men (24/arm) aged 44 - 72 years. In arm 1, subjects received single-dose tamsulosin hydrochloride modified release capsules (0.4 mg) alone and with steady-state mirabegron oral controlled absorption system tablets (100 mg once daily) in random sequence. In arm 2, subjects received single-dose mirabegron alone and with steady-state tamsulosin. Samples for mirabegron and tamsulosin plasma concentrations were collected. Blood pressure (BP) and pulse rate (PR) were measured and orthostatic stress tests were performed. Mirabegron increased tamsulosin C(max) to 159% (90% confidence interval (CI) 143 - 177%), AUC(∞) to 161% (90% CI 149 - 173%), and t(1/2) to 116%. Tamsulosin reduced mirabegron C(max) to 85% (90% CI 71 - 103%) and AUC(∞) to 84% (90% CI 74 - 95%) without effect on t1/2. Mirabegron and tamsulosin co-treatment caused no statistically significant changes (p > 0.05) in PR or systolic BP versus mono-treatment up to 12 hours post-dose. Mean diastolic BP decreases of -2.1 (95% CI -4.1, -0.1) to -4.2 (-7.5, -0.9) mmHg in arm 1 and -3.0 (-5.7, -0.3) to -4.2 (-7.4, -1.0) mmHg in arm 2 were observed, statistically significant (p tamsulosin to existing tamsulosin or mirabegron therapy did not cause clinically relevant changes in cardiovascular safety or safety profiles.

  7. Identification of Relevant Phytochemical Constituents for Characterization and Authentication of Tomatoes by General Linear Model Linked to Automatic Interaction Detection (GLM-AID) and Artificial Neural Network Models (ANNs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Suárez, Marcos; Astray Dopazo, Gonzalo; Larios López, Dina; Espinosa, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    There are a large number of tomato cultivars with a wide range of morphological, chemical, nutritional and sensorial characteristics. Many factors are known to affect the nutrient content of tomato cultivars. A complete understanding of the effect of these factors would require an exhaustive experimental design, multidisciplinary scientific approach and a suitable statistical method. Some multivariate analytical techniques such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) or Factor Analysis (FA) have been widely applied in order to search for patterns in the behaviour and reduce the dimensionality of a data set by a new set of uncorrelated latent variables. However, in some cases it is not useful to replace the original variables with these latent variables. In this study, Automatic Interaction Detection (AID) algorithm and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) models were applied as alternative to the PCA, AF and other multivariate analytical techniques in order to identify the relevant phytochemical constituents for characterization and authentication of tomatoes. To prove the feasibility of AID algorithm and ANN models to achieve the purpose of this study, both methods were applied on a data set with twenty five chemical parameters analysed on 167 tomato samples from Tenerife (Spain). Each tomato sample was defined by three factors: cultivar, agricultural practice and harvest date. General Linear Model linked to AID (GLM-AID) tree-structured was organized into 3 levels according to the number of factors. p-Coumaric acid was the compound the allowed to distinguish the tomato samples according to the day of harvest. More than one chemical parameter was necessary to distinguish among different agricultural practices and among the tomato cultivars. Several ANN models, with 25 and 10 input variables, for the prediction of cultivar, agricultural practice and harvest date, were developed. Finally, the models with 10 input variables were chosen with fit's goodness between 44 and 100

  8. Identification of Relevant Phytochemical Constituents for Characterization and Authentication of Tomatoes by General Linear Model Linked to Automatic Interaction Detection (GLM-AID and Artificial Neural Network Models (ANNs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Hernández Suárez

    Full Text Available There are a large number of tomato cultivars with a wide range of morphological, chemical, nutritional and sensorial characteristics. Many factors are known to affect the nutrient content of tomato cultivars. A complete understanding of the effect of these factors would require an exhaustive experimental design, multidisciplinary scientific approach and a suitable statistical method. Some multivariate analytical techniques such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA or Factor Analysis (FA have been widely applied in order to search for patterns in the behaviour and reduce the dimensionality of a data set by a new set of uncorrelated latent variables. However, in some cases it is not useful to replace the original variables with these latent variables. In this study, Automatic Interaction Detection (AID algorithm and Artificial Neural Network (ANN models were applied as alternative to the PCA, AF and other multivariate analytical techniques in order to identify the relevant phytochemical constituents for characterization and authentication of tomatoes. To prove the feasibility of AID algorithm and ANN models to achieve the purpose of this study, both methods were applied on a data set with twenty five chemical parameters analysed on 167 tomato samples from Tenerife (Spain. Each tomato sample was defined by three factors: cultivar, agricultural practice and harvest date. General Linear Model linked to AID (GLM-AID tree-structured was organized into 3 levels according to the number of factors. p-Coumaric acid was the compound the allowed to distinguish the tomato samples according to the day of harvest. More than one chemical parameter was necessary to distinguish among different agricultural practices and among the tomato cultivars. Several ANN models, with 25 and 10 input variables, for the prediction of cultivar, agricultural practice and harvest date, were developed. Finally, the models with 10 input variables were chosen with fit's goodness

  9. NSAID-antihypertensive drug interactions: Which outpatients are at risk for a rise in systolic blood pressure?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Floor-Schreudering, Annemieke; De Smet, Peter Agm; Buurma, Henk; Kramers, Cornelis; Tromp, P. Chris; Belitser, Svetlana V.; Bouvy, Marcel L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Management guidelines for drug-drug interactions between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and antihypertensives recommend blood pressure monitoring in hypertensive patients. We measured the short-term effect of initiating NSAIDs on systolic blood pressure (SBP) in users of

  10. NSAID-antihypertensive drug interactions: which outpatients are at risk for a rise in systolic blood pressure?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Floor-Schreudering, A.; Smet, P.A.G.M. de; Buurma, H.; Kramers, C.; Tromp, P.C.; Belitser, S.V.; Bouvy, M.L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Management guidelines for drug-drug interactions between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and antihypertensives recommend blood pressure monitoring in hypertensive patients. We measured the short-term effect of initiating NSAIDs on systolic blood pressure (SBP) in users of

  11. Culturally Relevant Cyberbullying Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Gregory John

    2017-01-01

    In this action research study, I, along with a student intervention committee of 14 members, developed a cyberbullying intervention for a large urban high school on the west coast. This high school contained a predominantly African American student population. I aimed to discover culturally relevant cyberbullying prevention strategies for African American students. The intervention committee selected video safety messages featuring African American actors as the most culturally relevant cyber...

  12. The effect of paracetamol on 5 fluorouracil and bovine serum albumin interaction: A biophysical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Vandana; Pal, Samanwita

    2018-05-01

    Serum Albumin is a major carrier protein and its binding with drugs is important to examine the change in pharmacokinetic properties due to interaction amongst drugs. In the present study we have attempted to understand the relevant drug-drug interaction (DDI) between two common drugs viz, paracetamol, an anti-inflammatory and fluorouracil, an anti-cancer drug. In-vitro spectroscopic methods viz., fluorescence quenching and UV-vis absorption have been employed for the drug-bovine serum albumin (BSA) complexes studies. The binding parameters and quenching constants have been determined for BSA-Paracetamol and BSA-5Fluorouracil complex according to literature models. It is also predicted from the quenching studies that BSA-5Fluorouracil is a stronger complex than BSA-Paracetamol. On the other hand paracetamol can alter binding affinity of 5Fluorouracil towards BSA. Hence it becomes clear that although the drugs could be administered simultaneously but they influence each other's binding with protein in a concentration dependent fashion. Further these results also indicate that availability of free 5Fluorouracil in blood may increase in presence of paracetamol.

  13. The Limits to Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averill, M.; Briggle, A.

    2006-12-01

    Science policy and knowledge production lately have taken a pragmatic turn. Funding agencies increasingly are requiring scientists to explain the relevance of their work to society. This stems in part from mounting critiques of the "linear model" of knowledge production in which scientists operating according to their own interests or disciplinary standards are presumed to automatically produce knowledge that is of relevance outside of their narrow communities. Many contend that funded scientific research should be linked more directly to societal goals, which implies a shift in the kind of research that will be funded. While both authors support the concept of useful science, we question the exact meaning of "relevance" and the wisdom of allowing it to control research agendas. We hope to contribute to the conversation by thinking more critically about the meaning and limits of the term "relevance" and the trade-offs implicit in a narrow utilitarian approach. The paper will consider which interests tend to be privileged by an emphasis on relevance and address issues such as whose goals ought to be pursued and why, and who gets to decide. We will consider how relevance, narrowly construed, may actually limit the ultimate utility of scientific research. The paper also will reflect on the worthiness of research goals themselves and their relationship to a broader view of what it means to be human and to live in society. Just as there is more to being human than the pragmatic demands of daily life, there is more at issue with knowledge production than finding the most efficient ways to satisfy consumer preferences or fix near-term policy problems. We will conclude by calling for a balanced approach to funding research that addresses society's most pressing needs but also supports innovative research with less immediately apparent application.

  14. Relevant Subspace Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Emmanuel; Assent, Ira; Günnemann, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Subspace clustering aims at detecting clusters in any subspace projection of a high dimensional space. As the number of possible subspace projections is exponential in the number of dimensions, the result is often tremendously large. Recent approaches fail to reduce results to relevant subspace...... clusters. Their results are typically highly redundant, i.e. many clusters are detected multiple times in several projections. In this work, we propose a novel model for relevant subspace clustering (RESCU). We present a global optimization which detects the most interesting non-redundant subspace clusters...... achieves top clustering quality while competing approaches show greatly varying performance....

  15. Is Information Still Relevant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The term "information" in information science does not share the characteristics of those of a nomenclature: it does not bear a generally accepted definition and it does not serve as the bases and assumptions for research studies. As the data deluge has arrived, is the concept of information still relevant for information…

  16. Clinical Relevance of Adipokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Blüher

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of obesity has increased dramatically during recent decades. Obesity increases the risk for metabolic and cardiovascular diseases and may therefore contribute to premature death. With increasing fat mass, secretion of adipose tissue derived bioactive molecules (adipokines changes towards a pro-inflammatory, diabetogenic and atherogenic pattern. Adipokines are involved in the regulation of appetite and satiety, energy expenditure, activity, endothelial function, hemostasis, blood pressure, insulin sensitivity, energy metabolism in insulin sensitive tissues, adipogenesis, fat distribution and insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. Therefore, adipokines are clinically relevant as biomarkers for fat distribution, adipose tissue function, liver fat content, insulin sensitivity, chronic inflammation and have the potential for future pharmacological treatment strategies for obesity and its related diseases. This review focuses on the clinical relevance of selected adipokines as markers or predictors of obesity related diseases and as potential therapeutic tools or targets in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases.

  17. In vitro interaction of a novel neutrophil growth factor with human liver microsomal cytochromes P450 and the contribution of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases to its metabolism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Siller, M.; Anzenbacher, P.; Anzenbacherová, E.; Doležal, Karel; Strnad, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 11 (2011), s. 934-944 ISSN 0049-8254 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/08/1649 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : DRUG-DRUG INTERACTION S * SUBSTRATE-SPECIFICITY * R-ROSCOVITINE * GLUCURONIDATION * CELLS Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.791, year: 2011

  18. Final Technical Report for Award DESC0011912, "Trimodal Tapping Mode Atomic Force Microscopy: Simultaneous 4D Mapping of Conservative and Dissipative Probe-Sample Interactions of Energy-Relevant Materials”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solares, Santiago D. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    2017-09-22

    The final project report covering the period 7/1/14-6/30/17 provides an overview of the technical accomplishments in the areas of (i) fundamental viscoelasticity, (ii) multifrequency atomic force microscopy, and (iii) characterization of energy-relevant materials with atomic force microscopy. A list of publications supported by the project is also provided.

  19. [Relevant public health enteropathogens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveros, Maribel; Ochoa, Theresa J

    2015-01-01

    Diarrhea remains the third leading cause of death in children under five years, despite recent advances in the management and prevention of this disease. It is caused by multiple pathogens, however, the prevalence of each varies by age group, geographical area and the scenario where cases (community vs hospital) are recorded. The most relevant pathogens in public health are those associated with the highest burden of disease, severity, complications and mortality. In our country, norovirus, Campylobacter and diarrheagenic E. coli are the most prevalent pathogens at the community level in children. In this paper we review the local epidemiology and potential areas of development in five selected pathogens: rotavirus, norovirus, Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), Shigella and Salmonella. Of these, rotavirus is the most important in the pediatric population and the main agent responsible for child mortality from diarrhea. The introduction of rotavirus vaccination in Peru will have a significant impact on disease burden and mortality from diarrhea. However, surveillance studies are needed to determine the impact of vaccination and changes in the epidemiology of diarrhea in Peru following the introduction of new vaccines, as well as antibiotic resistance surveillance of clinical relevant bacteria.

  20. [Pharmacokinetic interactions of telaprevir with other drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenguer Berenguer, Juan; González-García, Juan

    2013-07-01

    Telaprevir is a new direct-acting antiviral drug for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and is both a substrate and an inhibitor of cytochrome P450 (CYP450) isoenzymes. With the introduction of this new drug, assessment of drug-drug interactions has become a key factor in the evaluation of patients under treatment for HCV infection. During the treatment of this infection, many patients require other drugs to mitigate the adverse effects of anti-HCV drugs and to control other comorbidities. Moreover, most patients coinfected with HIV and HCV require antiretroviral therapy during treatment for HCV. Physicians should therefore be familiar with the pharmacokinetic properties of direct-acting antivirals for HCV treatment and their potential drug-drug interactions. The present article reviews the available information to date on the interactions of telaprevir with other drugs and provides recommendations for daily clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  1. [Validation of interaction databases in psychopharmacotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, M; Roll, S C

    2018-03-01

    Drug-drug interaction databases are an important tool to increase drug safety in polypharmacy. There are several drug interaction databases available but it is unclear which one shows the best results and therefore increases safety for the user of the databases and the patients. So far, there has been no validation of German drug interaction databases. Validation of German drug interaction databases regarding the number of hits, mechanisms of drug interaction, references, clinical advice, and severity of the interaction. A total of 36 drug interactions which were published in the last 3-5 years were checked in 5 different databases. Besides the number of hits, it was also documented if the mechanism was correct, clinical advice was given, primary literature was cited, and the severity level of the drug-drug interaction was given. All databases showed weaknesses regarding the hit rate of the tested drug interactions, with a maximum of 67.7% hits. The highest score in this validation was achieved by MediQ with 104 out of 180 points. PsiacOnline achieved 83 points, arznei-telegramm® 58, ifap index® 54 and the ABDA-database 49 points. Based on this validation MediQ seems to be the most suitable databank for the field of psychopharmacotherapy. The best results in this comparison were achieved by MediQ but this database also needs improvement with respect to the hit rate so that the users can rely on the results and therefore increase drug therapy safety.

  2. Other relevant biological papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, M.

    1989-01-01

    A considerable number of CRESP-relevant papers concerning deep-sea biology and radioecology have been published. It is the purpose of this study to call attention to them. They fall into three general categories. The first is papers of general interest. They are mentioned only briefly, and include text references to the global bibliography at the end of the volume. The second are papers that are not only mentioned and referenced, but for various reasons are described in abstract form. The last is a list of papers compiled by H.S.J. Roe specifically for this volume. They are listed in bibliographic form, and are also included in the global bibliography at the end of the volume

  3. Topology of the interactions pattern in pharmaceutically relevant polymorphs of methylxanthines (caffeine, theobromine, and theophiline): combined experimental (¹H-¹⁴N nuclear quadrupole double resonance) and computational (DFT and Hirshfeld-based) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latosińska, Jolanta Natalia; Latosińska, Magdalena; Olejniczak, Grzegorz A; Seliger, Janez; Žagar, Veselko

    2014-09-22

    Three anhydrous methylxanthines: caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine; 1,3,7-trimethyl-1H-purine-2,6-(3H,7H)-dione) and its two metabolites theophylline (1,3-dimethylxanthine; 1,3-dimethyl-7H-purine-2,6-dione) and theobromine (3,7-dimethyl-xanthine; 3,7-dimethyl-7H-purine-2,6-dione), which reveal multifaceted therapeutic potential, have been studied experimentally in solid state by (1)H-(14)N NMR-NQR (nuclear magnetic resonance-nuclear quadrupole resonance) double resonance (NQDR). For each compound the complete NQR spectrum consisting of 12 lines was recorded. The multiplicity of NQR lines indicates the presence of a stable β form of anhydrous caffeine at 233 K and stable form II of anhydrous theobromine at 213 K. The assignment of signals detected in NQR experiment to particular nitrogen atoms was made on the basis of quantum chemistry calculations performed for monomer, cluster, and solid at the DFT/GGA/BLYP/DPD level. The shifts due to crystal packing interactions were evaluated, and the multiplets detected by NQR were assigned to N(9) in theobromine and N(1) and N(9) in caffeine. The ordering theobromine > theophylline > caffeine site and theophylline theobromine theobromine) to π···π stacking (caffeine). Substantial differences in the intermolecular interactions in stable forms of methylxanthines differing in methylation (site or number) were analyzed within the Hirshfeld surface-based approach. The analysis of local environment of the nitrogen nucleus permitted drawing some conclusions on the nature of the interactions required for effective processes of recognition and binding of a given methylxanthine to A1-A(2A) receptor (target for caffeine in the brain). Although the interactions responsible for linking neighboring methylxanthines molecules in crystals and methylxanthines with targets in the human organism can differ significantly, the knowledge of the topology of interactions provides reliable preliminary information about the nature of this binding.

  4. User perspectives on relevance criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maglaughlin, Kelly L.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2002-01-01

    , partially relevant, or not relevant to their information need; and explained their decisions in an interview. Analysis revealed 29 criteria, discussed positively and negatively, that were used by the participants when selecting passages that contributed or detracted from a document's relevance......This study investigates the use of criteria to assess relevant, partially relevant, and not-relevant documents. Study participants identified passages within 20 document representations that they used to make relevance judgments; judged each document representation as a whole to be relevant...... matter, thought catalyst), full text (e.g., audience, novelty, type, possible content, utility), journal/publisher (e.g., novelty, main focus, perceived quality), and personal (e.g., competition, time requirements). Results further indicate that multiple criteria are used when making relevant, partially...

  5. Communication and interaction with the society inside of a construction process of waste disposal - relevant aspects; Comunicacao e interacao com a sociedade dentro de um processo de construcao de repositorio de rejeitos - aspectos relevantes. Projeto CIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Ivan Pedro Salati de

    2010-07-01

    The CIS Project was established in order to analyze aspects related to the process of communication and interaction with society in the construction of a waste disposal and to propose measures that can improve the performance of organs responsible of this undertaking. This document is the first product of the discussion of a multidisciplinary group consisting of representatives from CNEN - Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission, INB - Brazilian Nuclear Industries, ELETRONUCLEAR and CTMSP - Navy Technology Center. This document aims to provide a data base to the responsible about radioactive waste disposals decision. Therefore tries to illustrate and to characterize the situation related to the subject Communication and Interaction with Society, based on works about the subject and examples of national or other countries

  6. Identity theory and personality theory: mutual relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryker, Sheldon

    2007-12-01

    Some personality psychologists have found a structural symbolic interactionist frame and identity theory relevant to their work. This frame and theory, developed in sociology, are first reviewed. Emphasized in the review are a multiple identity conception of self, identities as internalized expectations derived from roles embedded in organized networks of social interaction, and a view of social structures as facilitators in bringing people into networks or constraints in keeping them out, subsequently, attention turns to a discussion of the mutual relevance of structural symbolic interactionism/identity theory and personality theory, looking to extensions of the current literature on these topics.

  7. A fluvoxamine-caffeine interaction study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, U; Loft, S; Poulsen, H E

    1996-01-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluvoxamine is a very potent inhibitor of the liver enzyme CYP1A2, which is the major P450 catalysing the biotransformation of caffeine. Thus, a pharmacokinetic study was undertaken with the purpose of documenting a drug-drug interaction between fluvoxam......The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluvoxamine is a very potent inhibitor of the liver enzyme CYP1A2, which is the major P450 catalysing the biotransformation of caffeine. Thus, a pharmacokinetic study was undertaken with the purpose of documenting a drug-drug interaction between...... fluvoxamine and caffeine. The study was carried out as a randomized, in vivo, cross-over study including eight healthy volunteers. In Period A of the study, each subject took 200 mg caffeine orally, and in Period B, the subjects took fluvoxamine 50 mg per day for 4 days and 100 mg per day for 8 days. On day 8...... fluvoxamine treatment may lead to caffeine intoxication. Finally, our study provides additional evidence that fluvoxamine can be used to probe CYP1A2 in drug metabolism....

  8. The burden and management of cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6)-mediated drug–drug interaction (DDI) : Co-medication of metoprolol and paroxetine or fluoxetine in the elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bahar, Muh Akbar; Hak, Eelko; Bos, Jens H. J.; Borgsteede, Sander D.; Wilffert, Bob

    Purpose: Metoprolol and paroxetine/fluoxetine are inevitably co-prescribed because cardiovascular disorders and depression often coexist in the elderly. This leads to CYP2D6-mediated drug-drug interactions (DDI). Because systematic evaluations are lacking, we assessed the burden of

  9. Interaction and Transport of Methamphetamine and its Primary Metabolites by Organic Cation and Multidrug and Toxin Extrusion Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, David J; Sager, Jennifer E; Duan, Haichuan; Isoherranen, Nina; Wang, Joanne

    2017-07-01

    Methamphetamine is one of the most abused illicit drugs with roughly 1.2 million users in the United States alone. A large portion of methamphetamine and its metabolites is eliminated by the kidney with renal clearance larger than glomerular filtration clearance. Yet the mechanism of active renal secretion is poorly understood. The goals of this study were to characterize the interaction of methamphetamine and its major metabolites with organic cation transporters (OCTs) and multidrug and toxin extrusion (MATE) transporters and to identify the major transporters involved in the disposition of methamphetamine and its major metabolites, amphetamine and para -hydroxymethamphetamine ( p -OHMA). We used cell lines stably expressing relevant transporters to show that methamphetamine and its metabolites inhibit human OCTs 1-3 (hOCT1-3) and hMATE1/2-K with the greatest potencies against hOCT1 and hOCT2. Methamphetamine and amphetamine are substrates of hOCT2, hMATE1, and hMATE2-K, but not hOCT1 and hOCT3. p -OHMA is transported by hOCT1-3 and hMATE1, but not hMATE2-K. In contrast, organic anion transporters 1 and 3 do not interact with or transport these compounds. Methamphetamine and its metabolites exhibited complex interactions with hOCT1 and hOCT2, suggesting the existence of multiple binding sites. Our studies suggest the involvement of the renal OCT2/MATE pathway in tubular secretion of methamphetamine and its major metabolites and the potential of drug-drug interactions with substrates or inhibitors of the OCTs. This information may be considered when prescribing medications to suspected or known abusers of methamphetamine to mitigate the risk of increased toxicity or reduced therapeutic efficacy. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  10. In vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies of tedizolid to assess the potential for peripheral or central monoamine oxidase interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, S; Bartizal, K; Minassian, S L; Fang, E; Prokocimer, P

    2013-07-01

    Tedizolid phosphate is a novel oxazolidinone prodrug whose active moiety, tedizolid, has improved potency against Gram-positive pathogens and pharmacokinetics, allowing once-daily administration. Given linezolid warnings for drug-drug and drug-food interactions mediated by monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition, including sporadic serotonergic toxicity, these studies evaluated tedizolid for potential MAO interactions. In vitro, tedizolid and linezolid were reversible inhibitors of human MAO-A and MAO-B; the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for tedizolid was 8.7 μM for MAO-A and 5.7 μM for MAO-B and 46.0 and 2.1 μM, respectively, with linezolid. Tedizolid phosphate was negative in the mouse head twitch model of serotonergic activity. Two randomized placebo-controlled crossover clinical studies assessed the potential of 200 mg/day tedizolid phosphate (at steady state) to enhance pressor responses to coadministered oral tyramine or pseudoephedrine. Sensitivity to tyramine was determined by comparing the concentration of tyramine required to elicit a ≥ 30-mmHg increase in systolic blood pressure (TYR30) when administered with placebo versus tedizolid phosphate. The geometric mean tyramine sensitivity ratio (placebo TYR30/tedizolid phosphate TYR30) was 1.33; a ratio of ≥ 2 is considered clinically relevant. In the pseudoephedrine study, mean maximum systolic blood pressure was not significantly different when pseudoephedrine was coadministered with tedizolid phosphate versus placebo. In summary, tedizolid is a weak, reversible inhibitor of MAO-A and MAO-B in vitro. Provocative testing in humans and animal models failed to uncover significant signals that would suggest potential for hypertensive or serotonergic adverse consequences at the therapeutic dose of tedizolid phosphate. Clinical studies are registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01539473 (tyramine interaction study conducted at Covance Clinical Research Center, Evansville, IN) and NCT01577459

  11. Hyperthermic radiosensitization : mode of action and clinical relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampinga, HH; Dikomey, E

    Purpose: To provide an update on the recent knowledge about the molecular mechanisms of thermal radiosensitization and its possible relevance to thermoradiotherapy. Summary: Hyperthermia is probably the most potent cellular radiosensitizer known to date. Heat interacts with radiation and potentiates

  12. Identification of relevant conditions and experiments for fuel-coolant interactions in nuclear power plants - SERENA Co-ordinated Programme (Steam Explosion Resolution for Nuclear Applications) Phase 1, Task 1 - Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magallon, D.; Scott de Martinville, E.; Chaumont, B.; Filippi, M.; Meignen, R.; Berthoud, G.; Ratel, G.; Melikhov, O.I.; Melikhov, V.I.; Jacobs, H.; Buerger, Manfred; Buck, Michael; Moriyama, K.; Nakamura, H.; Hirano, M.; Muramatsu, K.; Ishikawa, J.; Song, Jinho; Bang, Kwanghyun; Suh, Namduk; Sairanen, Risto; Lindholm, Ilona

    2004-01-01

    SERENA (Steam Explosion Resolution for Nuclear Applications) is an international OECD programme for the resolution of FCI remaining issues. The programme has origin the concerns expressed by the Senior Group Experts on Nuclear Safety Research and Programme (SESAR/FAP) about de-emphasis of FCI research all over the world, while uncertainties still exist on some aspects of FCI. After an evaluation of remaining needs by FCI experts in a meeting October 2000, a proposal was matured during 2001 following CSNI recommendations that existing knowledge should be carefully assessed before carrying out new experiments, and reactor application should be the focus of any new action. The work programme was approved by CSNI December 2001. The programme started January 2002. The overall objective of SERENA is to obtain convergence on the understanding of FCI processes and energetics, as well as on method(s) for reliable estimate of the magnitude of loadings for realistic reactor conditions, in order to bring understanding and predictability of FCI energetics to desirable levels for risk management. The work is performed in two phases: - Phase 1 analyses and evaluates knowledge and data on FCI by using available tools with the aim to identify areas where large uncertainties/ discrepancies still subsist and are important for predicting loads in reactors with a sufficient level of confidence, and work to be done, if any, to reduce these uncertainties/discrepancies. - Phase 2 will implement analytical and experimental actions to resolve these uncertainties/ discrepancies, if required. The objective of Phase 1 is reached through comparative calculations by available tools of existing experiments and reactor cases. It is divided into five tasks: 1. Identification of relevant conditions for FCI in reactor, 2. Comparison of various approaches for calculating jet break-up and pre-mixing, 3. Comparison of various approaches for calculating the explosion phase, 4. Reactor applications, 5

  13. Displacement of ethene from the decamethyltitanocene-ethene complex with internal alkynes, substituent-dependent alkyne-to-allene rearrangement, and the electronic transition relevant to the back-bonding interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkas, Jiří; Gyepes, Róbert; Císařová, Ivana; Kubišta, Jiří; Horáček, Michal; Mach, Karel

    2015-04-28

    The titanocene-ethene complex [Ti(II)(η(2)-C2H4)(η(5)-C5Me5)2] (1) with simple internal alkynes R(1)C≡CR(2) gives complexes [Ti(II)(η(2)-R(1)C≡CR(2))(η(5)-C5Me5)2] {R(1), R(2): Ph, Ph (3), Ph, Me (4), Me, SiMe3 (5), Ph, SiMe3 (6), t-Bu, SiMe3 (7), and SiMe3, SiMe3 (8). In contrast, alkynes with R(1) = Me and R(2) = t-Bu or i-Pr afford allene complexes [Ti(II)(η(2)-CH2=C=CHR(2))(η(5)-C5Me5)2] (11) and (12), whereas for R(2) = Et a mixture of alkyne complex (13A) and minor allene (13) is obtained. Crystal structures of 4, 6, 7 and 11 have been determined; the latter structure proved the back-bonding interaction of the allene terminal double bond. Only the synthesis of 8 from 1 was inefficient because the equilibrium constant for the reaction [1] + [Me3SiC≡CSiMe3] ⇌ [8] + [C2H4] approached 1. Compound 9 (R(1), R(2): Me), not obtainable from 1, together with compounds 3–6 and 10 (R(1), R(2): Et) were also prepared by alkyne exchange with 8, however this reaction did not take place in attempts to obtain 7. Compounds 1 and 3–9 display the longest-wavelength electronic absorption band in the range 670-940 nm due to the HOMO → LUMO transition. The assignment of the first excitation to be of predominantly a b2 → a1 transition was confirmed by DFT calculations. The calculated first excitation energies for 3–9 followed the order of hypsochromic shifts of the absorption band relative to 8 that were induced by acetylene substituents: Me > Ph ≫ SiMe3. Computational results have also affirmed the back-bonding nature in the alkyne-to-metal coordination.

  14. Avaliação dos medicamentos utilizados e possíveis interações medicamentosas em doentes renais crônicos = Assessment of used medications and drug-drug interactions among chronic renal failure patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sgnaolin, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Conclusões: A prevalência de potenciais interações medicamentosas nos pacientes em hemodiálise foi elevada e esteve intimamente ligada ao número de medicamentos utilizados por cada paciente. A população com doença renal crônica necessita do uso de vários medicamentos, portanto é importante a seleção cuidadosa de alternativas terapêuticas, através da assistência farmacêutica, para o uso eficaz, racional e seguro de medicamentos

  15. Predicting transporter-mediated drug interactions: Commentary on: "Pharmacokinetic evaluation of a drug transporter cocktail consisting of digoxin, furosemide, metformin and rosuvastatin" and "Validation of a microdose probe drug cocktail for clinical drug interaction assessments for drug transporters and CYP3A".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Sparreboom, A

    2017-04-01

    Transporters, expressed in various tissues, govern the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs, and consequently their inherent safety and efficacy profiles. Drugs may interact with a transporter as a substrate and/or an inhibitor. Understanding transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions (DDIs), in addition to enzyme-mediated DDIs, is an integral part of risk assessment in drug development and regulatory review because the concomitant use of more than one medication in patients is common. © 2016 ASCPT.

  16. Pharmacokinetic interactions between contraceptives and antiepileptic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabers, A.

    2008-01-01

    The occurrence of bi-directional drug interactions between antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and combined oral contraceptives (M) pose potential risks of unintended pregnancy and as well as seizure deterioration. It is well established that several of the older AEDs (carbamazepine, phenytoin...... AEDs, which undergoes glucuronidation processes, such as valproate and oxcarbazepine, may be affected by OCs. The magnitude of the drug-drug interactions show in general wide inter-individual variability and the change in the elimination rate is often unpredictable and can be influenced by a number...... of co-variants such as co-medication of other drugs, as well as genetic and environmental factors. It is therefore recommended that change in OC use is assisted by AED monitoring whenever possible. (C) 2007 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2008/3...

  17. Drug interactions evaluation: An integrated part of risk assessment of therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Lei; Reynolds, Kellie S.; Zhao, Ping; Huang, Shiew-Mei

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug interactions can lead to serious adverse events or decreased drug efficacy. The evaluation of a new molecular entity's (NME's) drug-drug interaction potential is an integral part of risk assessment during drug development and regulatory review. Alteration of activities of enzymes or transporters involved in the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or excretion of a new molecular entity by concomitant drugs may alter drug exposure, which can impact response (safety or efficacy). The recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) draft drug interaction guidance ( (http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/Guidances/ucm072101.pdf)) highlights the methodologies and criteria that may be used to guide drug interaction evaluation by industry and regulatory agencies and to construct informative labeling for health practitioner and patients. In addition, the Food and Drug Administration established a 'Drug Development and Drug Interactions' website to provide up-to-date information regarding evaluation of drug interactions ( (http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/DevelopmentResources/DrugInteractionsLabeling/ucm080499.htm)). This review summarizes key elements in the FDA drug interaction guidance and new scientific developments that can guide the evaluation of drug-drug interactions during the drug development process.

  18. Drug-Target Interaction Prediction through Label Propagation with Linear Neighborhood Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Chen, Yanlin; Li, Dingfang

    2017-11-25

    Interactions between drugs and target proteins provide important information for the drug discovery. Currently, experiments identified only a small number of drug-target interactions. Therefore, the development of computational methods for drug-target interaction prediction is an urgent task of theoretical interest and practical significance. In this paper, we propose a label propagation method with linear neighborhood information (LPLNI) for predicting unobserved drug-target interactions. Firstly, we calculate drug-drug linear neighborhood similarity in the feature spaces, by considering how to reconstruct data points from neighbors. Then, we take similarities as the manifold of drugs, and assume the manifold unchanged in the interaction space. At last, we predict unobserved interactions between known drugs and targets by using drug-drug linear neighborhood similarity and known drug-target interactions. The experiments show that LPLNI can utilize only known drug-target interactions to make high-accuracy predictions on four benchmark datasets. Furthermore, we consider incorporating chemical structures into LPLNI models. Experimental results demonstrate that the model with integrated information (LPLNI-II) can produce improved performances, better than other state-of-the-art methods. The known drug-target interactions are an important information source for computational predictions. The usefulness of the proposed method is demonstrated by cross validation and the case study.

  19. Profiles of Dialogue for Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Walton

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses argument diagrams, argumentation schemes, and some tools from formal argumentation systems developed in artificial intelligence to build a graph-theoretic model of relevance shown to be applicable (with some extensions as a practical method for helping a third party judge issues of relevance or irrelevance of an argument in real examples. Examples used to illustrate how the method works are drawn from disputes about relevance in natural language discourse, including a criminal trial and a parliamentary debate.

  20. Relevance theory: pragmatics and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wearing, Catherine J

    2015-01-01

    Relevance Theory is a cognitively oriented theory of pragmatics, i.e., a theory of language use. It builds on the seminal work of H.P. Grice(1) to develop a pragmatic theory which is at once philosophically sensitive and empirically plausible (in both psychological and evolutionary terms). This entry reviews the central commitments and chief contributions of Relevance Theory, including its Gricean commitment to the centrality of intention-reading and inference in communication; the cognitively grounded notion of relevance which provides the mechanism for explaining pragmatic interpretation as an intention-driven, inferential process; and several key applications of the theory (lexical pragmatics, metaphor and irony, procedural meaning). Relevance Theory is an important contribution to our understanding of the pragmatics of communication. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Clinical relevance in anesthesia journals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jakob; Møller, Ann M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to present the latest knowledge and research on the definition and distribution of clinically relevant articles in anesthesia journals. It will also discuss the importance of the chosen methodology and outcome of articles.......The purpose of this review is to present the latest knowledge and research on the definition and distribution of clinically relevant articles in anesthesia journals. It will also discuss the importance of the chosen methodology and outcome of articles....

  2. The Relevance of Social Interactions on Housing Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Toscano, Esperanza; Ateca-Amestoy, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    For most individuals, housing is the largest consumption and investment item of their lifetime and, as a result, housing satisfaction is an important component of their quality of life. The purpose of this paper then is to investigate the determinants of individual housing satisfaction as a particular domain of satisfaction with life as a whole,…

  3. Relevance of mast cell-nerve interactions in intestinal nociception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diest, Sophie A.; Stanisor, Oana I.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; de Jonge, Wouter J.; van den Wijngaard, René M.

    2012-01-01

    Cross-talk between the immune- and nervous-system is considered an important biological process in health and disease. Because mast cells are often strategically placed between nerves and surrounding (immune)cells they may function as important intermediate cells. This review summarizes the current

  4. The Integrin Receptor in Biologically Relevant Bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalli, Antreas C.; Róg, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2017-01-01

    /talin complex was inserted in biologically relevant bilayers that resemble the cell plasma membrane containing zwitterionic and charged phospholipids, cholesterol and sphingolipids to study the dynamics of the integrin receptor and its effect on bilayer structure and dynamics. The results of this study...... demonstrate the dynamic nature of the integrin receptor and suggest that the presence of the integrin receptor alters the lipid organization between the two leaflets of the bilayer. In particular, our results suggest elevated density of cholesterol and of phosphatidylserine lipids around the integrin....../talin complex and a slowing down of lipids in an annulus of ~30 Å around the protein due to interactions between the lipids and the integrin/talin F2–F3 complex. This may in part regulate the interactions of integrins with other related proteins or integrin clustering thus facilitating signal transduction...

  5. Food-drug interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lars E; Dalhoff, Kim

    2002-01-01

    Interactions between food and drugs may inadvertently reduce or increase the drug effect. The majority of clinically relevant food-drug interactions are caused by food-induced changes in the bioavailability of the drug. Since the bioavailability and clinical effect of most drugs are correlated......, the bioavailability is an important pharmacokinetic effect parameter. However, in order to evaluate the clinical relevance of a food-drug interaction, the impact of food intake on the clinical effect of the drug has to be quantified as well. As a result of quality review in healthcare systems, healthcare providers...... are increasingly required to develop methods for identifying and preventing adverse food-drug interactions. In this review of original literature, we have tried to provide both pharmacokinetic and clinical effect parameters of clinically relevant food-drug interactions. The most important interactions are those...

  6. Shippingport: A relevant decommissioning project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crimi, F.P.

    1988-01-01

    Because of Shippingport's low electrical power rating (72 MWe), there has been some misunderstanding on the relevancy of the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP) to a modern 1175 MWe commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR) power station. This paper provides a comparison of the major components of the reactor plant of the 72 MWe Shippingport Atomic Power Station and an 1175 MWe nuclear plant and the relevancy of the Shippingport decommissioning as a demonstration project for the nuclear industry. For the purpose of this comparison, Portland General Electric Company's 1175 MWe Trojan Nuclear Plant at Rainier, Oregon, has been used as the reference nuclear power plant. 2 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  7. Dramatic lives and relevant becomings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ann-Karina; Miller, Jody

    2012-01-01

    of marginality into positions of relevance. The analysis builds on empirical data from Copenhagen, Denmark, gained through ethnographic fieldwork with the participation of 20 female informants aged 13–22. The theoretical contribution proposes viewing conflicts as multi-linear, multi-causal and non...

  8. Regularization in Matrix Relevance Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, Petra; Bunte, Kerstin; Stiekema, Han; Hammer, Barbara; Villmann, Thomas; Biehl, Michael

    A In this paper, we present a regularization technique to extend recently proposed matrix learning schemes in learning vector quantization (LVQ). These learning algorithms extend the concept of adaptive distance measures in LVQ to the use of relevance matrices. In general, metric learning can

  9. Effects of drug pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties, characteristics of medication use, and relevant pharmacological interventions on fall risk in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Zhu, Ling-Ling; Zhou, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Falls among the elderly are an issue internationally and a public health problem that brings substantial economic and quality-of-life burdens to individuals and society. Falls prevention is an important measure of nursing quality and patient safety. Numerous studies have evaluated the association of medication use with fall risk in elderly patients. However, an up-to-date review has not been available to summarize the multifaceted pharmaceutical concerns in the prevention of medication-related falls. Relevant literature was identified by performing searches in PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library, covering the period until February 2014. We included studies that described an association between medications and falls, and effects of drug pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties, characteristics of medication use, and pharmacological interventions on fall risk in elderly patients. The full text of each included article was critically reviewed, and data interpretation was performed. Fall-risk-increasing drugs (FRIDs) include central nervous system-acting agents, cough preparations, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anti-Alzheimer's agents, antiplatelet agents, calcium antagonists, diuretics, α-blockers, digoxin, hypoglycemic drugs, neurotoxic chemotherapeutic agents, nasal preparations, and antiglaucoma ophthalmic preparations. The degree of medication-related fall risk was dependent on one or some of the following factors: drug pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties (eg, elimination half-life, metabolic pathway, genetic polymorphism, risk rating of medications despite belonging to the same therapeutic class) and/or characteristics of medication use (eg, number of medications and drug-drug interactions, dose strength, duration of medication use and time since stopping, medication change, prescribing appropriateness, and medication adherence). Pharmacological interventions, including withdrawal of FRIDs, pharmacist-conducted clinical medication

  10. Triplet excited States as a source of relevant (bio)chemical information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, M Consuelo; Miranda, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    The properties of triplet excited states are markedly medium-dependent, which turns this species into valuable tools for investigating the microenvironments existing in protein binding pockets. Monitoring of the triplet excited state behavior of drugs within transport proteins (serum albumins and α1-acid glycoproteins) by laser flash photolysis constitutes a valuable source of information on the strength of interaction, conformational freedom and protection from oxygen or other external quenchers. With proteins, formation of spatially confined triplet excited states is favored over competitive processes affording ionic species. Remarkably, under aerobic atmosphere, the triplet decay of drug@protein complexes is dramatically longer than in bulk solution. This offers a convenient dynamic range for assignment of different triplet populations or for stereochemical discrimination. In this review, selected examples of the application of the laser flash photolysis technique are described, including drug distribution between the bulk solution and the protein cavities, or between two types of proteins, detection of drug-drug interactions inside proteins, and enzyme-like activity processes mediated by proteins. Finally, protein encapsulation can also modify the photoreactivity of the guest. This is illustrated by presenting an example of retarded photooxidation.

  11. The Improved Relevance Voxel Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganz, Melanie; Sabuncu, Mert; Van Leemput, Koen

    The concept of sparse Bayesian learning has received much attention in the machine learning literature as a means of achieving parsimonious representations of features used in regression and classification. It is an important family of algorithms for sparse signal recovery and compressed sensing....... Hence in its current form it is reminiscent of a greedy forward feature selection algorithm. In this report, we aim to solve the problems of the original RVoxM algorithm in the spirit of [7] (FastRVM).We call the new algorithm Improved Relevance Voxel Machine (IRVoxM). Our contributions...... and enables basis selection from overcomplete dictionaries. One of the trailblazers of Bayesian learning is MacKay who already worked on the topic in his PhD thesis in 1992 [1]. Later on Tipping and Bishop developed the concept of sparse Bayesian learning [2, 3] and Tipping published the Relevance Vector...

  12. Tacrolimus interaction with nafcillin resulting in significant decreases in tacrolimus concentrations: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wungwattana, Minkey; Savic, Marizela

    2017-04-01

    Tacrolimus (TAC) is subject to many drug interactions as a result of its metabolism primarily via CYP450 isoenzyme 3A4. Numerous case reports of TAC and CYP3A4 inducers and inhibitors have been described including antimicrobials, calcium channel antagonists, and antiepileptic drugs. We present the case of a 13-year-old patient with cystic fibrosis and a history of liver transplantation, where subtherapeutic TAC concentrations were suspected to be a result of concomitant TAC and nafcillin (NAF) therapy. The observed drug interaction occurred on two separate hospital admissions, during both of which the patient exhibited therapeutic TAC concentrations prior to exposure to NAF, a CYP3A4 inducer. Upon discontinuation of NAF, TAC concentrations recovered in both instances. This case represents a drug-drug interaction between TAC and NAF that has not previously been reported to our knowledge. Despite the lack of existing reports of interaction between these two agents, this case highlights the importance of therapeutic drug monitoring and assessing for any potential drug-drug or drug-food interactions in patients receiving TAC therapy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Microdosing: Concept, application and relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Tewari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of microdose pharmacokinetic studies as an essential tool in drug development is still to catch on. While this approach promises potential cost savings and a quantum leap in efficiencies of the drug development process, major hurdles still need to be overcome before the technique becomes commonplace and part of routine practice. Clear regulations in Europe and the USA have had an enabling effect. The lack of enabling provisions for microdosing studies in Indian regulation, despite low risk and manifest relevance for the local drug development industry, is inconsistent with the country′s aspirations to be among the leaders in pharmaceutical research.

  14. Some aspects of research relevant to environment radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shi; Ma Mingxie

    1997-01-01

    The authors suggest some research aspects relevant to environmental radiochemistry from the view point of environmental protection and radiation protection: the migration behavior of radionuclides, their interaction with environment medium and their speciation in environment. The status and prospect of these aspects and the relationship between them are discussed

  15. Interaction of coenzyme Q10 with the intestinal drug transporter P-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itagaki, Shirou; Ochiai, Akiko; Kobayashi, Masaki; Sugawara, Mitsuru; Hirano, Takeshi; Iseki, Ken

    2008-08-27

    In clinical trials, patients usually take many kinds of drugs at the same time. Thus, drug-drug interactions can often directly affect the therapeutic safety and efficacy of many drugs. Oral delivery is the most desirable means of drug administration. Changes in the activity of drug transporters may substantially influence the absorption of administered drugs from the intestine. However, there have been a few studies on food-drug interactions involving transporters. It is important to be aware of the potential of food-drug interactions and to act in order to prevent undesirable and harmful clinical consequences. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is very widely consumed by humans as a food supplement because of its recognition by the public as an important nutrient in supporting human health. Since intestinal efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is one of the major factors in drug-drug interactions, we focused on this transporter. We report here for the first time that CoQ10, which is widely used as a food supplement, affects the transport activity of P-gp.

  16. The LAILAPS Search Engine: Relevance Ranking in Life Science Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lange Matthias

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Search engines and retrieval systems are popular tools at a life science desktop. The manual inspection of hundreds of database entries, that reflect a life science concept or fact, is a time intensive daily work. Hereby, not the number of query results matters, but the relevance does. In this paper, we present the LAILAPS search engine for life science databases. The concept is to combine a novel feature model for relevance ranking, a machine learning approach to model user relevance profiles, ranking improvement by user feedback tracking and an intuitive and slim web user interface, that estimates relevance rank by tracking user interactions. Queries are formulated as simple keyword lists and will be expanded by synonyms. Supporting a flexible text index and a simple data import format, LAILAPS can easily be used both as search engine for comprehensive integrated life science databases and for small in-house project databases.

  17. Task-relevant information is prioritized in spatiotemporal contextual cueing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Yoko; Ueda, Yoshiyuki; Ogawa, Hirokazu; Saiki, Jun

    2016-11-01

    Implicit learning of visual contexts facilitates search performance-a phenomenon known as contextual cueing; however, little is known about contextual cueing under situations in which multidimensional regularities exist simultaneously. In everyday vision, different information, such as object identity and location, appears simultaneously and interacts with each other. We tested the hypothesis that, in contextual cueing, when multiple regularities are present, the regularities that are most relevant to our behavioral goals would be prioritized. Previous studies of contextual cueing have commonly used the visual search paradigm. However, this paradigm is not suitable for directing participants' attention to a particular regularity. Therefore, we developed a new paradigm, the "spatiotemporal contextual cueing paradigm," and manipulated task-relevant and task-irrelevant regularities. In four experiments, we demonstrated that task-relevant regularities were more responsible for search facilitation than task-irrelevant regularities. This finding suggests our visual behavior is focused on regularities that are relevant to our current goal.

  18. Other relevant numerical modelling papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chartier, M.

    1989-01-01

    The ocean modelling is a rapidly evolving science and a large number of results have been published. Several categories of papers are of particular interest for this review: the papers published by the international atomic institutions, such as the NEA (for the CRESP or Subseabed Programs), the IAEA (for example the Safety Series, the Technical Report Series or the TECDOC), and the ICRP, and the papers concerned by more fundamental research, which are published in specific scientific literature. This paper aims to list some of the most relevant publications for the CRESP purposes. It means by no way to be exhaustive, but informative on the incontestable progress recently achieved in that field. One should note that some of these papers are so recent that their final version has not yet been published

  19. Industrial relevance of thermophilic Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, Ksenia; Antranikian, Garabed

    2005-12-01

    The dramatic increase of newly isolated extremophilic microorganisms, analysis of their genomes and investigations of their enzymes by academic and industrial laboratories demonstrate the great potential of extremophiles in industrial (white) biotechnology. Enzymes derived from extremophiles (extremozymes) are superior to the traditional catalysts because they can perform industrial processes even under harsh conditions, under which conventional proteins are completely denatured. In particular, enzymes from thermophilic and hyperthermophilic Archaea have industrial relevance. Despite intensive investigations, our knowledge of the structure-function relationships of their enzymes is still limited. Information concerning the molecular properties of their enzymes and genes has to be obtained to be able to understand the mechanisms that are responsible for catalytic activity and stability at the boiling point of water.

  20. The Relevance of Hegel's Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W Burbidge

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Hegel defines his Logic as the science that thinks about thinking.nbsp; But when we interpret that work as outlining what happens when we reason we are vulnerable to Fregersquo;s charge of psychologism.nbsp; I use Hegelrsquo;s tripartite distinction among understanding, dialectical and speculative reason as operations of pure thought to suggest how thinking can work with objective concepts.nbsp; In the last analysis, however, our ability to move from the subjective contingency of representations and ideas to the pure concepts we think develops from mechanical memory, which separates sign from sense so hat we can focus simply on the latter.nbsp; By becoming aware of the connections that underlie our thinking processes we may be able to both move beyond the abstractions of symbolic logic and clarify what informal logicians call relevance.

  1. Design principles for cancer therapy guided by changes in complexity of protein-protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzekry, Sebastian; Tuszynski, Jack A; Rietman, Edward A; Lakka Klement, Giannoula

    2015-05-28

    The ever-increasing expanse of online bioinformatics data is enabling new ways to, not only explore the visualization of these data, but also to apply novel mathematical methods to extract meaningful information for clinically relevant analysis of pathways and treatment decisions. One of the methods used for computing topological characteristics of a space at different spatial resolutions is persistent homology. This concept can also be applied to network theory, and more specifically to protein-protein interaction networks, where the number of rings in an individual cancer network represents a measure of complexity. We observed a linear correlation of R = -0.55 between persistent homology and 5-year survival of patients with a variety of cancers. This relationship was used to predict the proteins within a protein-protein interaction network with the most impact on cancer progression. By re-computing the persistent homology after computationally removing an individual node (protein) from the protein-protein interaction network, we were able to evaluate whether such an inhibition would lead to improvement in patient survival. The power of this approach lied in its ability to identify the effects of inhibition of multiple proteins and in the ability to expose whether the effect of a single inhibition may be amplified by inhibition of other proteins. More importantly, we illustrate specific examples of persistent homology calculations, which correctly predict the survival benefit observed effects in clinical trials using inhibitors of the identified molecular target. We propose that computational approaches such as persistent homology may be used in the future for selection of molecular therapies in clinic. The technique uses a mathematical algorithm to evaluate the node (protein) whose inhibition has the highest potential to reduce network complexity. The greater the drop in persistent homology, the greater reduction in network complexity, and thus a larger

  2. Impact of Drug Metabolism/Pharmacokinetics and Their Relevance upon Taxus-based Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Da-Cheng; Ge, Guang-Bo; Wang, Ping; Yang, Ling

    2018-05-22

    Drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic (DMPK) studies of Taxus natural products, their semi-synthetic derivatives and analogs are indispensable in the optimization of lead compounds and clinical therapy. These studies can lead to development of new drug entities with improved absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADME/T) profiles. To date, there have been no comprehensive reviews of the DMPK features of Taxus derived medicinal compounds.Natural and semi-synthetic taxanes may cause and could be affected by drug-drug interaction (DDI). Hence ADME/T studies of various taxane-containing formulations are important; to date these studies indicate that the role of cytochrome p450s and drug transporters is more prominent than phase II drug metabolizing enzymes. Mechanisms of taxane DMPK mediated by nuclear receptors, microRNAs, and single nucleotide polymorphisms are being revealed. Herein we review the latest knowledge on these topics, as well as the gaps in knowledge of the DMPK issues of Taxus compounds. DDIs significantly impact the PK/pharmacodynamics performance of taxanes and co-administered chemicals, which may inspire researchers to develop novel formula. While the ADME/T profiles of some taxanes are well defined, DMPK studies should be extended to more Taxus compounds, species, and Taxus -involved formulations, which would be streamlined by versatile omics platforms and computational analyses. Further biopharmaceutical investigations will be beneficial tothe translation of bench findings to the clinical applications. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Vygotsky's Crisis: Argument, context, relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, Ludmila

    2012-06-01

    Vygotsky's The Historical Significance of the Crisis in Psychology (1926-1927) is an important text in the history and philosophy of psychology that has only become available to scholars in 1982 in Russian, and in 1997 in English. The goal of this paper is to introduce Vygotsky's conception of psychology to a wider audience. I argue that Vygotsky's argument about the "crisis" in psychology and its resolution can be fully understood only in the context of his social and political thinking. Vygotsky shared the enthusiasm, widespread among Russian leftist intelligentsia in the 1920s, that Soviet society had launched an unprecedented social experiment: The socialist revolution opened the way for establishing social conditions that would let the individual flourish. For Vygotsky, this meant that "a new man" of the future would become "the first and only species in biology that would create itself." He envisioned psychology as a science that would serve this humanist teleology. I propose that The Crisis is relevant today insofar as it helps us define a fundamental problem: How can we systematically account for the development of knowledge in psychology? I evaluate how Vygotsky addresses this problem as a historian of the crisis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Relevance of equilibrium in multifragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Takuya; Ono, Akira

    2009-01-01

    The relevance of equilibrium in a multifragmentation reaction of very central 40 Ca + 40 Ca collisions at 35 MeV/nucleon is investigated by using simulations of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). Two types of ensembles are compared. One is the reaction ensemble of the states at each reaction time t in collision events simulated by AMD, and the other is the equilibrium ensemble prepared by solving the AMD equation of motion for a many-nucleon system confined in a container for a long time. The comparison of the ensembles is performed for the fragment charge distribution and the excitation energies. Our calculations show that there exists an equilibrium ensemble that well reproduces the reaction ensemble at each reaction time t for the investigated period 80≤t≤300 fm/c. However, there are some other observables that show discrepancies between the reaction and equilibrium ensembles. These may be interpreted as dynamical effects in the reaction. The usual static equilibrium at each instant is not realized since any equilibrium ensemble with the same volume as that of the reaction system cannot reproduce the fragment observables

  5. Proxemic Mobile Collocated Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porcheron, Martin; Lucero, Andrés; Quigley, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    and their digital devices (i.e. the proxemic relationships). Building on the ideas of proxemic interactions, this workshop is motivated by the concept of ‘proxemic mobile collocated interactions’, to harness new or existing technologies to create engaging and interactionally relevant experiences. Such approaches......Recent research on mobile collocated interactions has been looking at situations in which collocated users engage in collaborative activities using their mobile devices. However, existing practices fail to fully account for the culturally-dependent spatial relationships between people...... in exploring proxemics and mobile collocated interactions....

  6. Statistical significance versus clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijn, Marieke H C; Bech, Anneke; Bouyer, Jean; van den Brand, Jan A J G

    2017-04-01

    In March this year, the American Statistical Association (ASA) posted a statement on the correct use of P-values, in response to a growing concern that the P-value is commonly misused and misinterpreted. We aim to translate these warnings given by the ASA into a language more easily understood by clinicians and researchers without a deep background in statistics. Moreover, we intend to illustrate the limitations of P-values, even when used and interpreted correctly, and bring more attention to the clinical relevance of study findings using two recently reported studies as examples. We argue that P-values are often misinterpreted. A common mistake is saying that P < 0.05 means that the null hypothesis is false, and P ≥0.05 means that the null hypothesis is true. The correct interpretation of a P-value of 0.05 is that if the null hypothesis were indeed true, a similar or more extreme result would occur 5% of the times upon repeating the study in a similar sample. In other words, the P-value informs about the likelihood of the data given the null hypothesis and not the other way around. A possible alternative related to the P-value is the confidence interval (CI). It provides more information on the magnitude of an effect and the imprecision with which that effect was estimated. However, there is no magic bullet to replace P-values and stop erroneous interpretation of scientific results. Scientists and readers alike should make themselves familiar with the correct, nuanced interpretation of statistical tests, P-values and CIs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  7. Does relevance matter in academic policy research?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dredge, Dianne

    2015-01-01

    A reflection on whether relevance matters in tourism policy research. A debate among tourism scholars.......A reflection on whether relevance matters in tourism policy research. A debate among tourism scholars....

  8. Ligand Exchange Kinetics of Environmentally Relevant Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panasci, Adele Frances [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    The interactions of ground water with minerals and contaminants are of broad interest for geochemists but are not well understood. Experiments on the molecular scale can determine reaction parameters (i.e. rates of ligand exchange, activation entropy, activation entropy, and activation volume) that can be used in computations to gain insight into reactions that occur in natural groundwaters. Experiments to determine the rate of isotopic ligand exchange for three environmentally relevant metals, rhodium (Rh), iron (Fe), and neptunium (Np), are described. Many environmental transformations of metals (e.g. reduction) in soil occur at trivalent centers, Fe(III) in particular. Contaminant ions absorb to mineral surfaces via ligand exchange, and the reversal of this reaction can be dangerous, releasing contaminants into the environment. Ferric iron is difficult to study spectroscopically because most of its complexes are paramagnetic and are generally reactive toward ligand exchange; therefore, Rh(III), which is diamagnetic and less reactive, was used to study substitution reactions that are analogous to those that occur on mineral oxide surfaces. Studies on both Np(V) and Np(VI) are important in their own right, as 237Np is a radioactive transuranic element with a half-life of 2 million years.

  9. Media and mental illness: Relevance to India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Padhy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Media has a complex interrelationship with mental illnesses. This narrative review takes a look at the various ways in which media and mental illnesses interact. Relevant scientific literature and electronic databases were searched, including Pubmed and GoogleScholar, to identify studies, viewpoints and recommendations using keywords related to media and mental illnesses. This review discusses both the positive and the negative portrayals of mental illnesses through the media. The portrayal of mental health professionals and psychiatric treatment is also discussed. The theories explaining the relationship of how media influences the attitudes and behavior are discussed. Media has also been suggested to be a risk factor for the genesis or exacerbation of mental illnesses like eating disorders and substance use disorders. The potential use of media to understand the psychopathology and plight of those with psychiatric disorders is referred to. The manner in which media can be used as a tool for change to reduce the stigma surrounding mental illnesses is explored.

  10. Science and the struggle for relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessels, L.K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304832863

    2010-01-01

    This thesis deals with struggles for relevance of university researchers, their efforts to make their work correspond with ruling standards of relevance and to influence these standards. Its general research question is: How to understand changes in the struggle for relevance of Dutch academic

  11. The Personal Relevance of the Social Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanSickle, Ronald L.

    1990-01-01

    Conceptualizes a personal-relevance framework derived from Ronald L. VanSickle's five areas of life integrated with four general motivating goals from Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs and Richard and Patricia Schmuck's social motivation theory. Illustrates ways to apply the personal relevance framework to make social studies more relevant to…

  12. The Development of Relevance in Information Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu-hsuan Huang

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available This article attempts to investigate the notion of relevance in information retrieval. It discusses various definitions for relevance from historical viewpoints and the characteristics of relevance judgments. Also, it introduces empirical results of important related researches.[Article content in Chinese

  13. Measurements at LHC and their relevance for cosmic ray physics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Many LHC measurements are already used to improve hadronic interaction models used in cosmic ray analyses. This already had a positive effect on the model dependence of crucial data analyses. Some of the data and the model tuning is reviewed. However, the LHC still has a lot more potential to provide crucial information. Since the start of Run2 the highest accelerator beam energies are reached and no further increase can be expected for a long time. First data of Run2 are published and the fundamental performance of cosmic ray hadronic interaction models can be scrutinized. The relevance of LHC data in general for cosmic ray data analyses is demonstrated.

  14. Nostalgia's place among self-relevant emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tilburg, Wijnand A P; Wildschut, Tim; Sedikides, Constantine

    2017-07-24

    How is nostalgia positioned among self-relevant emotions? We tested, in six studies, which self-relevant emotions are perceived as most similar versus least similar to nostalgia, and what underlies these similarities/differences. We used multidimensional scaling to chart the perceived similarities/differences among self-relevant emotions, resulting in two-dimensional models. The results were revealing. Nostalgia is positioned among self-relevant emotions characterised by positive valence, an approach orientation, and low arousal. Nostalgia most resembles pride and self-compassion, and least resembles embarrassment and shame. Our research pioneered the integration of nostalgia among self-relevant emotions.

  15. Relevance as process: judgements in the context of scholarly research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa D. Anderson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This paper discusses how exploring the research process in-depth and over time contributes to a fuller understanding of interactions with various representations of information. Method. A longitudinal ethnographic study explored decisions made by two informants involved in scholarly research. Relevance assessment and information seeking were observed as part of informants' own ongoing research projects. Fieldwork used methods of discovery that allowed informants to shape the exploration of the practices surrounding the evolving understandings of their topics. Analysis. Inductive analysis was carried out on the qualitative data collected over a two-year period of judgements observed on a document-by-document basis. The paper introduces broad categories that point to the variability and richness of the ways that informants used representations of information resources to make relevance judgements. Results. Relevance judgements appear to be drivers of the search and research processes informants moved through during the observations. Focusing on research goals rather than on retrieval tasks brings us to a fuller understanding of the relationship between ultimate research goals and the articulation of those goals in interactions with information systems. Conclusion. Relevance assessment is a process that unfolds in the doing of a search, the making of judgements and the using of texts and representations of information.

  16. Elucidating Dynamical Processes Relevant to Flow Encountering Abrupt Topography (FLEAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Encountering Abrupt Topography (FLEAT) Bo Qiu Dept of Oceanography, University of Hawaii at Manoa 1000 Pope Rd. Honolulu, HI 96822 phone: (808) 956...c) to explore relevant dynamics by using both simplified models and OGCM output with realistic topography and surface boundary conditions...scale abyssal circulation, we propose to use the Hallberg Isopycnal Model (HIM). The HIM allows sloping isopycnals to interact with bottom topography

  17. Interaction of radiation with matter

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nikjoo, Hooshang; Uehara, Shuzo; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    ... basis of radiological physics and radiation dosimetry. The authors first present the relevant atomic physics and then describe the interactions, emphasizing practical applications in health/medical physics and radiation biology...

  18. Cure of chronic hepatitis C virus infection in an HIV-coinfected patient with multiple comorbidities and drug interaction challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Hortensia; Mariño, Ana; Valcarce, Nieves; Khoo, Saye; Bhagani, Sanjay; Schapiro, Jonathan; Llibre, Josep M

    2018-01-01

    Curing hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in patients harbouring multiple severe comorbidities is a medical challenge. Evidence-based data are lacking regarding HCV treatment with direct-acting antiviral regimens in particular populations of HCV/HIV-coinfected patients with cirrhosis and chronic kidney disease on haemodialysis. Here, we present the HCV treatment challenges facing a patient with HIV coinfection, prior failure of both HIV-1 and HCV therapy, cirrhosis, end-stage renal failure on haemodialysis, as well as management of drug-drug interactions, especially given the need to receive long-term amiodarone therapy.

  19. Grasp interaction with tablets

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    This book presents guidelines for a future device type: a tablet that allows ergonomic front- and back-of-device interaction. These guidelines help designers and developers of user interfaces to build ergonomic applications for tablet devices, in particular for devices that enable back-of-device interaction. In addition, manufacturers of tablet devices obtain arguments that back-of-device interaction is a promising extension of the interaction design space and results in increased input capabilities, enriched design possibilities, and proven usability. The guidelines are derived from empirical studies and developed to fit the users’ skills to the way the novel device type is held. Three particular research areas that are relevant to develop design guidelines for tablet interaction are investigated: ergonomic gestures, interaction areas, and pointing techniques.

  20. Software Helps Retrieve Information Relevant to the User

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathe, Natalie; Chen, James

    2003-01-01

    The Adaptive Indexing and Retrieval Agent (ARNIE) is a code library, designed to be used by an application program, that assists human users in retrieving desired information in a hypertext setting. Using ARNIE, the program implements a computational model for interactively learning what information each human user considers relevant in context. The model, called a "relevance network," incrementally adapts retrieved information to users individual profiles on the basis of feedback from the users regarding specific queries. The model also generalizes such knowledge for subsequent derivation of relevant references for similar queries and profiles, thereby, assisting users in filtering information by relevance. ARNIE thus enables users to categorize and share information of interest in various contexts. ARNIE encodes the relevance and structure of information in a neural network dynamically configured with a genetic algorithm. ARNIE maintains an internal database, wherein it saves associations, and from which it returns associated items in response to a query. A C++ compiler for a platform on which ARNIE will be utilized is necessary for creating the ARNIE library but is not necessary for the execution of the software.

  1. Relevance: An Interdisciplinary and Information Science Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Greisdorf

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Although relevance has represented a key concept in the field of information science for evaluating information retrieval effectiveness, the broader context established by interdisciplinary frameworks could provide greater depth and breadth to on-going research in the field. This work provides an overview of the nature of relevance in the field of information science with a cursory view of how cross-disciplinary approaches to relevance could represent avenues for further investigation into the evaluative characteristics of relevance as a means for enhanced understanding of human information behavior.

  2. TargetNet: a web service for predicting potential drug-target interaction profiling via multi-target SAR models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhi-Jiang; Dong, Jie; Che, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Min-Feng; Wen, Ming; Wang, Ning-Ning; Wang, Shan; Lu, Ai-Ping; Cao, Dong-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Drug-target interactions (DTIs) are central to current drug discovery processes and public health fields. Analyzing the DTI profiling of the drugs helps to infer drug indications, adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of actions. Therefore, it is of high importance to reliably and fast predict DTI profiling of the drugs on a genome-scale level. Here, we develop the TargetNet server, which can make real-time DTI predictions based only on molecular structures, following the spirit of multi-target SAR methodology. Naïve Bayes models together with various molecular fingerprints were employed to construct prediction models. Ensemble learning from these fingerprints was also provided to improve the prediction ability. When the user submits a molecule, the server will predict the activity of the user's molecule across 623 human proteins by the established high quality SAR model, thus generating a DTI profiling that can be used as a feature vector of chemicals for wide applications. The 623 SAR models related to 623 human proteins were strictly evaluated and validated by several model validation strategies, resulting in the AUC scores of 75-100 %. We applied the generated DTI profiling to successfully predict potential targets, toxicity classification, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of action, which sufficiently demonstrated the wide application value of the potential DTI profiling. The TargetNet webserver is designed based on the Django framework in Python, and is freely accessible at http://targetnet.scbdd.com .

  3. TargetNet: a web service for predicting potential drug-target interaction profiling via multi-target SAR models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhi-Jiang; Dong, Jie; Che, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Min-Feng; Wen, Ming; Wang, Ning-Ning; Wang, Shan; Lu, Ai-Ping; Cao, Dong-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Drug-target interactions (DTIs) are central to current drug discovery processes and public health fields. Analyzing the DTI profiling of the drugs helps to infer drug indications, adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of actions. Therefore, it is of high importance to reliably and fast predict DTI profiling of the drugs on a genome-scale level. Here, we develop the TargetNet server, which can make real-time DTI predictions based only on molecular structures, following the spirit of multi-target SAR methodology. Naïve Bayes models together with various molecular fingerprints were employed to construct prediction models. Ensemble learning from these fingerprints was also provided to improve the prediction ability. When the user submits a molecule, the server will predict the activity of the user's molecule across 623 human proteins by the established high quality SAR model, thus generating a DTI profiling that can be used as a feature vector of chemicals for wide applications. The 623 SAR models related to 623 human proteins were strictly evaluated and validated by several model validation strategies, resulting in the AUC scores of 75-100 %. We applied the generated DTI profiling to successfully predict potential targets, toxicity classification, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of action, which sufficiently demonstrated the wide application value of the potential DTI profiling. The TargetNet webserver is designed based on the Django framework in Python, and is freely accessible at http://targetnet.scbdd.com.

  4. Does relevance matter in academic policy research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dredge, Dianne

    2015-01-01

    A reflection on whether relevance matters in tourism policy research, and if so, to whom/what should it matter......A reflection on whether relevance matters in tourism policy research, and if so, to whom/what should it matter...

  5. Inoculating Relevance Feedback Against Poison Pills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dehghani, Mostafa; Azarbonyad, Hosein; Kamps, Jaap; Hiemstra, Djoerd; Marx, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    Relevance Feedback is a common approach for enriching queries, given a set of explicitly or implicitly judged documents to improve the performance of the retrieval. Although it has been shown that on average, the overall performance of retrieval will be improved after relevance feedback, for some

  6. Relevant cost information for order acceptance decisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, M.J.F.

    1997-01-01

    Some economic considerations for order acceptance decisions are discussed. The relevant economic considerations for order acceptance are widely discussed in the literature: only those costs are relevant which would be avoidable by not accepting the order incremental costs plus opportunity costs .

  7. Android Smartphone Relevance to Military Weather Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    lithium -ion battery that may be replaced by the user (unlike Apple iPod Touch devices), thus spare batteries can be carried. If there is only sporadic...Android Smartphone Relevance to Military Weather Applications by David Sauter ARL-TR-5793 October 2011...Android Smartphone Relevance to Military Weather Applications David Sauter Computational and Information Sciences Directorate, ARL

  8. Using small XML elements to support relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Ramirez Camps (Georgina); T.H.W. Westerveld (Thijs); A.P. de Vries (Arjen)

    2006-01-01

    htmlabstractSmall XML elements are often estimated relevant by the retrieval model but they are not desirable retrieval units. This paper presents a generic model that exploits the information obtained from small elements. We identify relationships between small and relevant elements and use this

  9. Translation as secondary communication. The relevance theory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ernst-August Gutt started one of the greatest translation debates of the past ten years when he suggested that relevance theory holds the key to providing a unified account of translation. The bulk of the debate has been between practitioners of functional equivalence and advocates of a relevance theoretic approach to ...

  10. Evolutionary relevance facilitates visual information processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Russell E; Calvillo, Dusti P

    2013-11-03

    Visual search of the environment is a fundamental human behavior that perceptual load affects powerfully. Previously investigated means for overcoming the inhibitions of high perceptual load, however, generalize poorly to real-world human behavior. We hypothesized that humans would process evolutionarily relevant stimuli more efficiently than evolutionarily novel stimuli, and evolutionary relevance would mitigate the repercussions of high perceptual load during visual search. Animacy is a significant component to evolutionary relevance of visual stimuli because perceiving animate entities is time-sensitive in ways that pose significant evolutionary consequences. Participants completing a visual search task located evolutionarily relevant and animate objects fastest and with the least impact of high perceptual load. Evolutionarily novel and inanimate objects were located slowest and with the highest impact of perceptual load. Evolutionary relevance may importantly affect everyday visual information processing.

  11. Evolutionary Relevance Facilitates Visual Information Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell E. Jackson

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Visual search of the environment is a fundamental human behavior that perceptual load affects powerfully. Previously investigated means for overcoming the inhibitions of high perceptual load, however, generalize poorly to real-world human behavior. We hypothesized that humans would process evolutionarily relevant stimuli more efficiently than evolutionarily novel stimuli, and evolutionary relevance would mitigate the repercussions of high perceptual load during visual search. Animacy is a significant component to evolutionary relevance of visual stimuli because perceiving animate entities is time-sensitive in ways that pose significant evolutionary consequences. Participants completing a visual search task located evolutionarily relevant and animate objects fastest and with the least impact of high perceptual load. Evolutionarily novel and inanimate objects were located slowest and with the highest impact of perceptual load. Evolutionary relevance may importantly affect everyday visual information processing.

  12. The clinical relevance of omega-3 fatty acids in the management of hypertriglyceridemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, James; Anzalone, Deborah; Hilleman, Daniel; Catini, Julia

    2016-07-22

    Hypertriglyceridemia (triglycerides > 150 mg/dL) affects ~25 % of the United States (US) population and is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Severe hypertriglyceridemia (≥ 500 mg/dL) is also a risk factor for pancreatitis. Three omega-3 fatty acid (OM3FA) prescription formulations are approved in the US for the treatment of adults with severe hypertriglyceridemia: (1) OM3FA ethyl esters (OM3EE), a mixture of OM3FA ethyl esters, primarily eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (Lovaza®, Omtryg™, and generics); (2) icosapent ethyl (IPE), EPA ethyl esters (Vascepa®); and (3) omega-3 carboxylic acids (OM3CA), a mixture of OM3FAs in free fatty acid form, primarily EPA, DHA, and docosapentaenoic acid (Epanova®). At approved doses, all formulations substantially reduce triglyceride and very-low-density lipoprotein levels. DHA-containing formulations may also increase low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. However, this is not accompanied by increased non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, which is thought to provide a better indication of cardiovascular risk in this patient population. Proposed mechanisms of action of OM3FAs include inhibition of diacylglycerol acyltransferase, increased plasma lipoprotein lipase activity, decreased hepatic lipogenesis, and increased hepatic β-oxidation. OM3CA bioavailability (area under the plasma concentration-time curve from zero to the last measurable concentration) is up to 4-fold greater than that of OM3FA ethyl esters, and unlike ethyl esters, the absorption of OM3CA is not dependent on pancreatic lipase hydrolysis. All three formulations are well tolerated (the most common adverse events are gastrointestinal) and demonstrate a lack of drug-drug interactions with other lipid-lowering drugs, such as statins and fibrates. OM3FAs appear to be an effective treatment option for patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia.

  13. Infrared photothermal imaging of trace explosives on relevant substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendziora, Christopher A.; Furstenberg, Robert; Papantonakis, Michael; Nguyen, Viet; Borchert, James; Byers, Jeff; McGill, R. Andrew

    2013-06-01

    We are developing a technique for the stand-off detection of trace explosives on relevant substrate surfaces using photo-thermal infrared (IR) imaging spectroscopy (PT-IRIS). This approach leverages one or more compact IR quantum cascade lasers, tuned to strong absorption bands in the analytes and directed to illuminate an area on a surface of interest. An IR focal plane array is used to image the surface and detect small increases in thermal emission upon laser illumination. The PT-IRIS signal is processed as a hyperspectral image cube comprised of spatial, spectral and temporal dimensions as vectors within a detection algorithm. The ability to detect trace analytes on relevant substrates is critical for stand-off applications, but is complicated by the optical and thermal analyte/substrate interactions. This manuscript describes recent PT-IRIS experimental results and analysis for traces of RDX, TNT, ammonium nitrate (AN) and sucrose on relevant substrates (steel, polyethylene, glass and painted steel panels). We demonstrate that these analytes can be detected on these substrates at relevant surface mass loadings (10 μg/cm2 to 100 μg/cm2) even at the single pixel level.

  14. Clustering Trajectories by Relevant Parts for Air Traffic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrienko, Gennady; Andrienko, Natalia; Fuchs, Georg; Garcia, Jose Manuel Cordero

    2018-01-01

    Clustering of trajectories of moving objects by similarity is an important technique in movement analysis. Existing distance functions assess the similarity between trajectories based on properties of the trajectory points or segments. The properties may include the spatial positions, times, and thematic attributes. There may be a need to focus the analysis on certain parts of trajectories, i.e., points and segments that have particular properties. According to the analysis focus, the analyst may need to cluster trajectories by similarity of their relevant parts only. Throughout the analysis process, the focus may change, and different parts of trajectories may become relevant. We propose an analytical workflow in which interactive filtering tools are used to attach relevance flags to elements of trajectories, clustering is done using a distance function that ignores irrelevant elements, and the resulting clusters are summarized for further analysis. We demonstrate how this workflow can be useful for different analysis tasks in three case studies with real data from the domain of air traffic. We propose a suite of generic techniques and visualization guidelines to support movement data analysis by means of relevance-aware trajectory clustering.

  15. Deep-Learning-Based Drug-Target Interaction Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ming; Zhang, Zhimin; Niu, Shaoyu; Sha, Haozhi; Yang, Ruihan; Yun, Yonghuan; Lu, Hongmei

    2017-04-07

    Identifying interactions between known drugs and targets is a major challenge in drug repositioning. In silico prediction of drug-target interaction (DTI) can speed up the expensive and time-consuming experimental work by providing the most potent DTIs. In silico prediction of DTI can also provide insights about the potential drug-drug interaction and promote the exploration of drug side effects. Traditionally, the performance of DTI prediction depends heavily on the descriptors used to represent the drugs and the target proteins. In this paper, to accurately predict new DTIs between approved drugs and targets without separating the targets into different classes, we developed a deep-learning-based algorithmic framework named DeepDTIs. It first abstracts representations from raw input descriptors using unsupervised pretraining and then applies known label pairs of interaction to build a classification model. Compared with other methods, it is found that DeepDTIs reaches or outperforms other state-of-the-art methods. The DeepDTIs can be further used to predict whether a new drug targets to some existing targets or whether a new target interacts with some existing drugs.

  16. PXR as a mediator of herb-drug interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogle, Brett C; Guan, Xiudong; Folan, M Maggie; Xie, Wen

    2018-04-01

    Medicinal herbs have been a part of human medicine for thousands of years. The herb-drug interaction is an extension of drug-drug interaction, in which the consumptions of herbs cause alterations in the metabolism of drugs the patients happen to take at the same time. The pregnane X receptor (PXR) has been established as one of the most important transcriptional factors that regulate the expression of phase I enzymes, phase II enzymes, and drug transporters in the xenobiotic responses. Since its initial discovery, PXR has been implicated in multiple herb-drug interactions that can lead to alterations of the drug's pharmacokinetic properties and cause fluctuating therapeutic efficacies, possibly leading to complications. Regions of the world that heavily incorporate herbalism into their primary health care and people turning to alternative medicines as a personal choice could be at risk for adverse reactions or unintended results from these interactions. This article is intended to highlight our understanding of the PXR-mediated herb-drug interactions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Iatrogenic cushing syndrome secondary to a probable interaction between voriconazole and budesonide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Whitney; Chastain, Cody A; Wright, Patty W

    2014-07-01

    Oral budesonide is commonly used for the management of Crohn's disease given its high affinity for glucocorticoid receptors and low systemic activity due to extensive first-pass metabolism through hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4. Voriconazole, a second-generation triazole antifungal agent, is both a substrate and potent inhibitor of CYP isoenzymes, specifically CYP2C19, CYP2C9, and CYP3A4; thus, the potential for drug-drug interactions with voriconazole is high. To our knowledge, drug-drug interactions between voriconazole and corticosteroids have not been specifically reported in the literature. We describe a 48-year-old woman who was receiving oral budesonide 9 mg/day for the management of Crohn's disease and was diagnosed with fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans esophagitis; oral voriconazole 200 mg every 12 hours for 3 weeks was prescribed for treatment. Because the patient experienced recurrent symptoms of dysphagia, a second 3-week course of voriconazole therapy was taken. Seven weeks after originally being prescribed voriconazole, she came to her primary care clinic with elevated blood pressure, lower extremity edema, and weight gain; she was prescribed a diuretic and evaluated for renal dysfunction. At a follow-up visit 6 weeks later with her specialty clinic, the patient's blood pressure was elevated, and her physical examination was notable for moon facies, posterior cervical fat pad prominence, and lower extremity pitting edema. Iatrogenic Cushing syndrome due to a drug-drug interaction between voriconazole and budesonide was suspected, and voriconazole was discontinued. Budesonide was continued as previously prescribed for her Crohn's disease. On reevaluation 2 months later, the patient's Cushingoid features had markedly regressed. To our knowledge, this is the first published case report of iatrogenic Cushing syndrome due to a probable interaction between voriconazole and oral budesonide. In patients presenting with Cushingoid features who

  18. Laboratory exercises to teach clinically relevant chemistry of antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, Khalid A; Chelette, Candace T

    2014-03-12

    To design, implement, and evaluate student performance on clinically relevant chemical and spectral laboratory exercises on antibiotics. In the first of 2 exercises, second-year pharmacy students enrolled in an integrated laboratory sequence course studied the aqueous stability of ß-lactam antibiotics using a spectral visual approach. In a second exercise, students studied the tendency of tetracycline, rifamycins, and fluoroquinolones to form insoluble chelate complexes (turbidity) with polyvalent metals. On a survey to assess achievement of class learning objectives, students agreed the laboratory activities helped them better retain important information concerning antibiotic stability and interactions. A significant improvement was observed in performance on examination questions related to the laboratory topics for 2012 and 2013 students compared to 2011 students who did not complete the laboratory. A 1-year follow-up examination question administered in a separate course showed >75% of the students were able to identify rifamycins-food interactions compared with laboratory exercises. The use of spectral visual approaches allowed students to investigate antibiotic stability and interactions, thus reinforcing the clinical relevance of medicinal chemistry. Students' performance on questions at the 1-year follow-up suggested increased retention of the concepts learned as a result of completing the exercises.

  19. Dynamic Effects of Self-Relevance and Task on the Neural Processing of Emotional Words in Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Eric C; Kuperberg, Gina R

    2015-01-01

    We used event-related potentials (ERPs) to examine the interactions between task, emotion, and contextual self-relevance on processing words in social vignettes. Participants read scenarios that were in either third person (other-relevant) or second person (self-relevant) and we recorded ERPs to a neutral, pleasant, or unpleasant critical word. In a previously reported study (Fields and Kuperberg, 2012) with these stimuli, participants were tasked with producing a third sentence continuing the scenario. We observed a larger LPC to emotional words than neutral words in both the self-relevant and other-relevant scenarios, but this effect was smaller in the self-relevant scenarios because the LPC was larger on the neutral words (i.e., a larger LPC to self-relevant than other-relevant neutral words). In the present work, participants simply answered comprehension questions that did not refer to the emotional aspects of the scenario. Here we observed quite a different pattern of interaction between self-relevance and emotion: the LPC was larger to emotional vs. neutral words in the self-relevant scenarios only, and there was no effect of self-relevance on neutral words. Taken together, these findings suggest that the LPC reflects a dynamic interaction between specific task demands, the emotional properties of a stimulus, and contextual self-relevance. We conclude by discussing implications and future directions for a functional theory of the emotional LPC.

  20. Dynamic effects of self-relevance and task on the neural processing of emotional words in context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C. Fields

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We used event-related potentials (ERPs to examine the interactions between task, emotion, and contextual self-relevance on processing words in social vignettes. Participants read scenarios that were in either third person (other-relevant or second person (self-relevant and we recorded ERPs to a neutral, pleasant, or unpleasant critical word. In a previously reported study (Fields & Kuperberg, 2012 with these stimuli, participants were tasked with producing a third sentence continuing the scenario. We observed a larger LPC to emotional words than neutral words in both the self-relevant and other-relevant scenarios, but this effect was smaller in the self-relevant scenarios because the LPC was larger on the neutral words (i.e., a larger LPC to self-relevant than other-relevant neutral words. In the present work, participants simply answered comprehension questions that did not refer to the emotional aspects of the scenario. Here we observed quite a different pattern of interaction between self-relevance and emotion: the LPC was larger to emotional versus neutral words in the self-relevant scenarios only, and there was no effect of self-relevance on neutral words. Taken together, these findings suggest that the LPC reflects a dynamic interaction between specific task demands, the emotional properties of a stimulus, and contextual self-relevance. We conclude by discussing implications and future directions for a functional theory of the emotional LPC.

  1. Astrophysical relevance of γ transition energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauscher, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The relevant γ energy range is explicitly identified where additional γ strength must be located to have an impact on astrophysically relevant reactions. It is shown that folding the energy dependences of the transmission coefficients and the level density leads to maximal contributions for γ energies of 2≤E γ ≤4 unless quantum selection rules allow isolated states to contribute. Under this condition, electric dipole transitions dominate. These findings allow us to more accurately judge the relevance of modifications of the γ strength for astrophysics

  2. Neutrophil programming dynamics and its disease relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Taojing; Geng, Shuo; Li, Liwu

    2017-11-01

    Neutrophils are traditionally considered as first responders to infection and provide antimicrobial host defense. However, recent advances indicate that neutrophils are also critically involved in the modulation of host immune environments by dynamically adopting distinct functional states. Functionally diverse neutrophil subsets are increasingly recognized as critical components mediating host pathophysiology. Despite its emerging significance, molecular mechanisms as well as functional relevance of dynamically programmed neutrophils remain to be better defined. The increasing complexity of neutrophil functions may require integrative studies that address programming dynamics of neutrophils and their pathophysiological relevance. This review aims to provide an update on the emerging topics of neutrophil programming dynamics as well as their functional relevance in diseases.

  3. Drug interactions between common illicit drugs and prescription therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Wesley T; Stewart, David; Childress, Darrell

    2012-07-01

    The aim was to summarize the clinical literature on interactions between common illicit drugs and prescription therapies. Medline, Iowa Drug Information Service, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, EBSCO Academic Search Premier, and Google Scholar were searched from date of origin of database to March 2011. Search terms were cocaine, marijuana, cannabis, methamphetamine, amphetamine, ecstasy, N-methyl-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, methylenedioxymethamphetamine, heroin, gamma-hydroxybutyrate, sodium oxybate, and combined with interactions, drug interactions, and drug-drug interactions. This review focuses on established clinical evidence. All applicable full-text English language articles and abstracts found were evaluated and included in the review as appropriate. The interactions of illicit drugs with prescription therapies have the ability to potentiate or attenuate the effects of both the illicit agent and/or the prescription therapeutic agent, which can lead to toxic effects or a reduction in the prescription agent's therapeutic activity. Most texts and databases focus on theoretical or probable interactions due to the kinetic properties of the drugs and do not fully explore the pharmacodynamic and clinical implications of these interactions. Clinical trials with coadministration of illicit drugs and prescription drugs are discussed along with case reports that demonstrate a potential interaction between agents. The illicit drugs discussed are cocaine, marijuana, amphetamines, methylenedioxymethamphetamine, heroin, and sodium oxybate. Although the use of illicit drugs is widespread, there are little experimental or clinical data regarding the effects of these agents on common prescription therapies. Potential drug interactions between illicit drugs and prescription drugs are described and evaluated on the Drug Interaction Probability Scale by Horn and Hansten.

  4. Characterization of Schizophrenia Adverse Drug Interactions through a Network Approach and Drug Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingchun Sun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Antipsychotic drugs are medications commonly for schizophrenia (SCZ treatment, which include two groups: typical and atypical. SCZ patients have multiple comorbidities, and the coadministration of drugs is quite common. This may result in adverse drug-drug interactions, which are events that occur when the effect of a drug is altered by the coadministration of another drug. Therefore, it is important to provide a comprehensive view of these interactions for further coadministration improvement. Here, we extracted SCZ drugs and their adverse drug interactions from the DrugBank and compiled a SCZ-specific adverse drug interaction network. This network included 28 SCZ drugs, 241 non-SCZs, and 991 interactions. By integrating the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC classification with the network analysis, we characterized those interactions. Our results indicated that SCZ drugs tended to have more adverse drug interactions than other drugs. Furthermore, SCZ typical drugs had significant interactions with drugs of the “alimentary tract and metabolism” category while SCZ atypical drugs had significant interactions with drugs of the categories “nervous system” and “antiinfectives for systemic uses.” This study is the first to characterize the adverse drug interactions in the course of SCZ treatment and might provide useful information for the future SCZ treatment.

  5. The foundation of the concept of relevance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjørland, Birger

    2010-01-01

    that what was regarded as the most fundamental view by Saracevic in 1975 has not since been considered (with very few exceptions). Other views, which are based on less fruitful assumptions, have dominated the discourse on relevance in information retrieval and information science. Many authors have...... reexamined the concept of relevance in information science, but have neglected the subject knowledge view, hence basic theoretical assumptions seem not to have been properly addressed. It is as urgent now as it was in 1975 seriously to consider “the subject knowledge view” of relevance (which may also...... be termed “the epistemological view”). The concept of relevance, like other basic concepts, is influenced by overall approaches to information science, such as the cognitive view and the domain-analytic view. There is today a trend toward a social paradigm for information science. This paper offers...

  6. Exploring Educational Quality and Relevance through Integrating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Exploring Educational Quality and Relevance through Integrating Environmental and Social Issues in Science Education. ... However, the new contextualised concept of learning and teaching was applied only to one of them. A post-test was ...

  7. Has Financial Statement Information become Less Relevant?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thinggaard, Frank; Damkier, Jesper

    This paper presents insights into the question of whether accounting information based on the EU’s Accounting Directives has become less value-relevant to investors over time. The study is based on a research design first used by Francis and Schipper (1999), where value-relevance is measured......? The sample is based on non-financial companies listed on the Copenhagen Stock Exchange in the period 1984-2002. Our analyses show that all the applied accounting measures are value-relevant as investment strategies based on the information earn positive market-adjusted returns in our sample period....... The results provide some indication of a decline in the value-relevance of earnings information in the 1984-2001 period, and mixed, but not statistically reliable, evidence for accounting measures where book value information and asset values are also extracted from financial statements. The results seem...

  8. Natural brain-information interfaces: Recommending information by relevance inferred from human brain signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugster, Manuel J. A.; Ruotsalo, Tuukka; Spapé, Michiel M.; Barral, Oswald; Ravaja, Niklas; Jacucci, Giulio; Kaski, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Finding relevant information from large document collections such as the World Wide Web is a common task in our daily lives. Estimation of a user’s interest or search intention is necessary to recommend and retrieve relevant information from these collections. We introduce a brain-information interface used for recommending information by relevance inferred directly from brain signals. In experiments, participants were asked to read Wikipedia documents about a selection of topics while their EEG was recorded. Based on the prediction of word relevance, the individual’s search intent was modeled and successfully used for retrieving new relevant documents from the whole English Wikipedia corpus. The results show that the users’ interests toward digital content can be modeled from the brain signals evoked by reading. The introduced brain-relevance paradigm enables the recommendation of information without any explicit user interaction and may be applied across diverse information-intensive applications. PMID:27929077

  9. Phenytoin toxicity secondary to an oxcarbazepine-phenytoin 2C19 interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soskin, David P; Kane, Ari J; Stern, Theodore A

    2010-01-01

    Polytherapy is common in the management of bipolar disorder, as are the side effects associated with this treatment strategy. The authors review the literature on drug-drug interactions involving oxcarbazepine and identify specific mechanisms that may have clinical importance. The authors provide a case report of a patient who developed phenytoin toxicity associated with an oxcarbazepine-phenytoin interaction. Co-administration of phenytoin and oxcarbazepine resulted in toxic levels of phenytoin. Therefore, the patient's daily dosage of oxcarbazepine and phenytoin were reduced. Although oxcarbazepine is an inducer of the 3A4 isoenzyme, it acts as an inhibitor of the 2C19 isoenzyme, and it can raise levels of other agents, for example, phenytoin, that are also metabolized by this isoenzyme.

  10. Multiactivity in Social Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doing more than one thing at the same time – a phenomenon that is often called ‘multitasking’ – is characteristic to many situations in everyday and professional life. Although we all experience it, its real time features remain understudied. Multiactivity in Social Interaction: Beyond multitasking...... offers a fresh view to the phenomenon by presenting studies that explore how two or more activities can be related and made co-relevant as people interact with one another. The studies build on the basis that multiactivity is a social, verbal and embodied phenomenon. They investigate multiactivity...... by using video recordings of real-life interactions from a range of different contexts, such as medical settings, office workplaces and car driving. With the companion collection Interacting with Objects: Language, materiality, and social activity, the book advances understanding of the complex...

  11. Opioid analgesics-related pharmacokinetic drug interactions: from the perspectives of evidence based on randomized controlled trials and clinical risk management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng XQ

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Xiu-qin Feng,1 Ling-ling Zhu,2 Quan Zhou3 1Nursing Administration Office, Division of Nursing, 2VIP Care Ward, Division of Nursing, 3Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China Background: Multimorbidity results in complex polypharmacy which may bear a risk of drug interactions. A better understanding of opioid analgesics combination therapy used for pain management could help warrant medication safety, efficacy, and economic relevance. Until now there has been no review summarizing the opioid analgesics-related pharmacokinetic drug interactions from the perspective of evidence based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs. Method: A literature search was performed using PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Library, using a PRISMA flowchart. Results: Fifty-two RCTs were included for data interpretation. Forty-two RCTs (80.8% were conducted in healthy volunteers, whereas 10 RCTs (19.2% enrolled true patients. None of the opioid–drug/herb pairs was listed as contraindications of opioids involved in this review. Circumstances in which opioid is comedicated as a precipitant drug include morphine–P2Y12 inhibitors, morphine–gabapentin, and methadone–zidovudine. Circumstances in which opioid is comedicated as an object drug include rifampin–opioids (morphine, tramadol, oxycodone, methadone, quinidine–opioids (morphine, fentanyl, oxycodone, codeine, dihydrocodeine, methadone, antimycotics–opioids (buprenorphine, fentanyl, morphine, oxycodone, methadone, tilidine, tramadol, protease inhibitors–opioids (ritonavir, ritonavir/lopinavir–oxycodone, ritonavir–fentanyl, ritonavir–tilidine, grapefruit juice–opioids (oxycodone, fentanyl, methadone, antidepressants–opioids (paroxetine–tramadol, paroxetine–hydrocodone, paroxetine–oxycodone, escitalopram–tramadol, metoclopramide–morphine, amantadine–morphine, sumatriptan

  12. Interacting binary stars

    CERN Document Server

    Sahade, Jorge; Ter Haar, D

    1978-01-01

    Interacting Binary Stars deals with the development, ideas, and problems in the study of interacting binary stars. The book consolidates the information that is scattered over many publications and papers and gives an account of important discoveries with relevant historical background. Chapters are devoted to the presentation and discussion of the different facets of the field, such as historical account of the development in the field of study of binary stars; the Roche equipotential surfaces; methods and techniques in space astronomy; and enumeration of binary star systems that are studied

  13. Adverse effects and Drug Interactions Associated with Inhaled Recreational and Medical Marijuana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maisha Kelly Freeman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To provide an overview of the addiction potential; adverse effects (e.g., cardiovascular, immune dysfunction, respiratory system, mental health disorders; drug interactions; effects of accidental exposure; crime statistics; and pharmacist’s considerations for the use of inhaled medical marijuana. Methods: A PubMed search was conducted from 1966 to March 2016 to identify articles in which the safety of inhaled medical marijuana was assessed. Key MeSH search terms included medical marijuana with a subheading for adverse effect. Only articles in adult patients were considered. In addition, medical marijuana or cannabis plus one of the following search terms were searched: drug interactions, herb-drug interactions, drug-related side effects and adverse drug reactions, substance-related disorders, addiction, and abuse. A free-text search was also conducted to identify articles not included in the MeSH term search. A bibliographic search was also conducted. Articles were included if they addressed adverse effects of medical marijuana for the treatment of a condition. Meta-analyses, randomized controlled clinical trials, and case reports were included in the review if the primary focus of the article related to the adverse effect profile of inhaled medical marijuana. Medical marijuana efficacy studies were not assessed. In the absence of this information, case reports or reports of inhaled recreational marijuana use was used. Studies were excluded if published in languages other than English. In addition, studies highlighting mechanisms of action, studies of pharmacodynamics or pharmacokinetic effects were excluded, unless these effects were due to drug-drug interactions. Prescription products containing marijuana or derivatives were excluded from evaluation. An Internet search was conducted to locate the most up-to-date information on the laws concerning medical marijuana. Key findings: A PubMed search revealed 58 articles and 28 of

  14. Instrumental interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Luciani , Annie

    2007-01-01

    International audience; The expression instrumental interaction as been introduced by Claude Cadoz to identify a human-object interaction during which a human manipulates a physical object - an instrument - in order to perform a manual task. Classical examples of instrumental interaction are all the professional manual tasks: playing violin, cutting fabrics by hand, moulding a paste, etc.... Instrumental interaction differs from other types of interaction (called symbolic or iconic interactio...

  15. Inferring relevance in a changing world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reinforcement learning models of human and animal learning usually concentrate on how we learn the relationship between different stimuli or actions and rewards. However, in real world situations stimuli are ill-defined. On the one hand, our immediate environment is extremely multi-dimensional. On the other hand, in every decision-making scenario only a few aspects of the environment are relevant for obtaining reward, while most are irrelevant. Thus a key question is how do we learn these relevant dimensions, that is, how do we learn what to learn about? We investigated this process of representation learning experimentally, using a task in which one stimulus dimension was relevant for determining reward at each point in time. As in real life situations, in our task the relevant dimension can change without warning, adding ever-present uncertainty engendered by a constantly changing environment. We show that human performance on this task is better described by a suboptimal strategy based on selective attention and serial hypothesis testing rather than a normative strategy based on probabilistic inference. From this, we conjecture that the problem of inferring relevance in general scenarios is too computationally demanding for the brain to solve optimally. As a result the brain utilizes approximations, employing these even in simplified scenarios in which optimal representation learning is tractable, such as the one in our experiment.

  16. A content relevance model for social media health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prybutok, Gayle Linda; Koh, Chang; Prybutok, Victor R

    2014-04-01

    Consumer health informatics includes the development and implementation of Internet-based systems to deliver health risk management information and health intervention applications to the public. The application of consumer health informatics to educational and interventional efforts such as smoking reduction and cessation has garnered attention from both consumers and health researchers in recent years. Scientists believe that smoking avoidance or cessation before the age of 30 years can prevent more than 90% of smoking-related cancers and that individuals who stop smoking fare as well in preventing cancer as those who never start. The goal of this study was to determine factors that were most highly correlated with content relevance for health information provided on the Internet for a study group of 18- to 30-year-old college students. Data analysis showed that the opportunity for convenient entertainment, social interaction, health information-seeking behavior, time spent surfing on the Internet, the importance of available activities on the Internet (particularly e-mail), and perceived site relevance for Internet-based sources of health information were significantly correlated with content relevance for 18- to 30-year-old college students, an educated subset of this population segment.

  17. Potential drug interactions in patients given antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Wendel Mombaque Dos; Secoli, Silvia Regina; Padoin, Stela Maris de Mello

    2016-11-21

    to investigate potential drug-drug interactions (PDDI) in patients with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy. a cross-sectional study was conducted on 161 adults with HIV infection. Clinical, socio demographic, and antiretroviral treatment data were collected. To analyze the potential drug interactions, we used the software Micromedex(r). Statistical analysis was performed by binary logistic regression, with a p-value of ≤0.05 considered statistically significant. of the participants, 52.2% were exposed to potential drug-drug interactions. In total, there were 218 potential drug-drug interactions, of which 79.8% occurred between drugs used for antiretroviral therapy. There was an association between the use of five or more medications and potential drug-drug interactions (p = 0.000) and between the time period of antiretroviral therapy being over six years and potential drug-drug interactions (p central nervous and cardiovascular systems, but also can interfere in tests used for detection of HIV resistance to antiretroviral drugs. investigar potenciais interações droga-droga (PDDI) em pacientes infectados com HIV em terapia de antirretroviral. um estudo de corte transversal foi conduzido em 161 pessoas infectadas com o HIV. Dados de tratamentos clínicos, sociodemográficos e antirretrovirais foram coletados. Para analisar a possível interação medicamentosa, nós usamos o software Micromedex(r). A análise estatística foi feita por regressão logística binária, com um valor P de ≤0.05, considerado estatisticamente significativo. dos participantes, 52.2% foram expostos a potenciais interações droga-droga. No total, houve 218 interações droga-droga, das quais 79.8% ocorreram entre drogas usadas para a terapia antirretroviral. Houve uma associação entre o uso de cinco ou mais medicamentos e possíveis interações droga-droga (p = 0.000), e entre o período de tempo de terapia antirretroviral acima de seis anos e possíveis interações droga

  18. Passage relevance models for genomics search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frieder Ophir

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a passage relevance model for integrating syntactic and semantic evidence of biomedical concepts and topics using a probabilistic graphical model. Component models of topics, concepts, terms, and document are represented as potential functions within a Markov Random Field. The probability of a passage being relevant to a biologist's information need is represented as the joint distribution across all potential functions. Relevance model feedback of top ranked passages is used to improve distributional estimates of query concepts and topics in context, and a dimensional indexing strategy is used for efficient aggregation of concept and term statistics. By integrating multiple sources of evidence including dependencies between topics, concepts, and terms, we seek to improve genomics literature passage retrieval precision. Using this model, we are able to demonstrate statistically significant improvements in retrieval precision using a large genomics literature corpus.

  19. The brain's default network: anatomy, function, and relevance to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, Randy L; Andrews-Hanna, Jessica R; Schacter, Daniel L

    2008-03-01

    Thirty years of brain imaging research has converged to define the brain's default network-a novel and only recently appreciated brain system that participates in internal modes of cognition. Here we synthesize past observations to provide strong evidence that the default network is a specific, anatomically defined brain system preferentially active when individuals are not focused on the external environment. Analysis of connectional anatomy in the monkey supports the presence of an interconnected brain system. Providing insight into function, the default network is active when individuals are engaged in internally focused tasks including autobiographical memory retrieval, envisioning the future, and conceiving the perspectives of others. Probing the functional anatomy of the network in detail reveals that it is best understood as multiple interacting subsystems. The medial temporal lobe subsystem provides information from prior experiences in the form of memories and associations that are the building blocks of mental simulation. The medial prefrontal subsystem facilitates the flexible use of this information during the construction of self-relevant mental simulations. These two subsystems converge on important nodes of integration including the posterior cingulate cortex. The implications of these functional and anatomical observations are discussed in relation to possible adaptive roles of the default network for using past experiences to plan for the future, navigate social interactions, and maximize the utility of moments when we are not otherwise engaged by the external world. We conclude by discussing the relevance of the default network for understanding mental disorders including autism, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease.

  20. A pharmacoepidemiologic study of drug interactions in a Brazilian teaching hospital Um estudo farmacoepidemiológico de interações medicamentosas em um hospital universitário brasileiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joice Mara Cruciol-Souza

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Although drug-drug interactions constitute only a small proportion of adverse drug reactions, they are often predictable and therefore avoidable or manageable. There are few studies on drug-drug interactions from Brazil. This study aimed to assess the frequency of drug-drug interactions in prescriptions and their potential clinical significance in patients of a Brazilian teaching hospital. METHODS: From January to April 2004, a sample of 1785 drug prescriptions was drawn from a total of 11,250. Drug-drug interactions were identified by using Micromedex® DrugReax® System. Patients'records with major drug-drug interactions were reviewed by a pharmacist and a medical doctor looking for signs, symptoms, and lab tests that could indicate adverse drug reactions due to such interactions. RESULTS: From the 1785 prescriptions examined, 1089 (61% were from the male adult ward. Patients' average age was 52.7 years (SD = 18.9; range, 12-98. The median number of drugs in each prescription was 7 (range, 2-26. At least 1 drug-drug interactions was present in 887 (49.7% prescriptions. Regarding the severity of the clinical result, the interactions were classified as minor (20; 2.3%, moderate (184; 20.7%, major (30; 3.4%, and undetermined because of an incidence of more than 1 interaction in a single patient (653; 73.6%. From the 30 patients with major interactions, 17 (56.7% presented adverse drug reactions induced by exposure to a major drug-drug interaction. CONCLUSIONS: Patients did suffer adverse drug reactions from major drug-drug interactions. Many physicians may be unaware of drug-drug interactions. Education, computerized prescribing systems and drug information, collaborative drug selection, and pharmaceutical care are strongly encouraged for physicians and pharmacists.INTRODUÇÃO: Embora as interações medicamentosas constituam uma pequena parcela das reações adversas a medicamentos, elas geralmente são previsíveis e às vezes podem

  1. Bible Translation And Relevance Theory | Deist | Stellenbosch ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stellenbosch Papers in Linguistics Plus. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 22 (1992) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Bible Translation And Relevance Theory. F Deist ...

  2. Relevant Scatterers Characterization in SAR Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaabouni, Houda; Datcu, Mihai

    2006-11-01

    Recognizing scenes in a single look meter resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images, requires the capability to identify relevant signal signatures in condition of variable image acquisition geometry, arbitrary objects poses and configurations. Among the methods to detect relevant scatterers in SAR images, we can mention the internal coherence. The SAR spectrum splitted in azimuth generates a series of images which preserve high coherence only for particular object scattering. The detection of relevant scatterers can be done by correlation study or Independent Component Analysis (ICA) methods. The present article deals with the state of the art for SAR internal correlation analysis and proposes further extensions using elements of inference based on information theory applied to complex valued signals. The set of azimuth looks images is analyzed using mutual information measures and an equivalent channel capacity is derived. The localization of the "target" requires analysis in a small image window, thus resulting in imprecise estimation of the second order statistics of the signal. For a better precision, a Hausdorff measure is introduced. The method is applied to detect and characterize relevant objects in urban areas.

  3. Seeking Relevance: American Political Science and America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranto, Robert; Woessner, Matthew C.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors talk about the relevance of American political science and America. Political science has enormous strengths in its highly talented practitioners and sophisticated methods. However, its disconnection from its host society, while not so severe as for fields like English and sociology, nonetheless poses an existential…

  4. Is Enterprise Education Relevant to Social Enterprise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Both enterprise education and social enterprise have become fashionable but what, if any, should be the connections between them? The purpose of this paper is to explore those connections and to reflect on what relevance the two concepts might have for each other. Design/methodology/approach: Both enterprise education and social…

  5. The Relevant Physical Trace in Criminal Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durdica Hazard

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A criminal investigation requires the forensic scientist to search and to interpret vestiges of a criminal act that happened in the past. The forensic scientist is one of the many stakeholders who take part in the information quest within the criminal justice system. She reads the investigation scene in search of physical traces that should enable her to tell the story of the offense/crime that allegedly occurred. The challenge for any investigator is to detect and recognize relevant physical traces in order to provide clues for investigation and intelligence purposes, and that will constitute sound and relevant evidence for the court. This article shows how important it is to consider the relevancy of physical traces from the beginning of the investigation and what might influence the evaluation process. The exchange and management of information between the investigation stakeholders are important. Relevancy is a dimension that needs to be understood from the standpoints of law enforcement personnel and forensic scientists with the aim of strengthening investigation and ultimately the overall judicial process.

  6. Interpersonal communication: It's relevance to nursing practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper is aimed at highlighting how essential interpersonal communication is necessary for establishing rapport, understanding the needs of the patients and planning effective intervention for meeting holistic health care. To be continually relevant, Nurses have to improve on their communication skills to meet the ...

  7. Inferring feature relevances from metric learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, Alexander; Mokbel, Bassam; Biehl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Powerful metric learning algorithms have been proposed in the last years which do not only greatly enhance the accuracy of distance-based classifiers and nearest neighbor database retrieval, but which also enable the interpretability of these operations by assigning explicit relevance weights...

  8. The Relevance of Causal Social Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marques Teresa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Social constructionist claims are surprising and interesting when they entail that presumably natural kinds are in fact socially constructed. The claims are interesting because of their theoretical and political importance. Authors like Díaz-León argue that constitutive social construction is more relevant for achieving social justice than causal social construction. This paper challenges this claim. Assuming there are socially salient groups that are discriminated against, the paper presents a dilemma: if there were no constitutively constructed social kinds, the causes of the discrimination of existing social groups would have to be addressed, and understanding causal social construction would be relevant to achieve social justice. On the other hand, not all possible constitutively socially constructed kinds are actual social kinds. If an existing social group is constitutively constructed as a social kind K, the fact that it actually exists as a K has social causes. Again, causal social construction is relevant. The paper argues that (i for any actual social kind X, if X is constitutively socially constructed as K, then it is also causally socially constructed; and (ii causal social construction is at least as relevant as constitutive social construction for concerns of social justice. For illustration, I draw upon two phenomena that are presumed to contribute towards the discrimination of women: (i the poor performance effects of stereotype threat, and (ii the silencing effects of gendered language use.

  9. The economic lot size and relevant costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbeij, M.H.; Jansen, R.A.; Grübström, R.W.; Hinterhuber, H.H.; Lundquist, J.

    1993-01-01

    In many accounting textbooks it is strongly argued that decisions should always be evaluated on relevant costs; that is variable costs and opportunity costs. Surprisingly, when it comes to Economic Order Quantities or Lot Sizes, some textbooks appear to be less straightforward. The question whether

  10. Bootstrapping Visual Categorization with Relevant Negatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X.; Snoek, C.G.M.; Worring, M.; Koelma, D.; Smeulders, A.W.M.

    Learning classifiers for many visual concepts are important for image categorization and retrieval. As a classifier tends to misclassify negative examples which are visually similar to positive ones, inclusion of such misclassified and thus relevant negatives should be stressed during learning.

  11. Why ritual plant use has ethnopharmacological relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quiroz, Diana; Sosef, Marc; Andel, Van Tinde

    2016-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Although ritual plant use is now recognised both for its socio-cultural importance and for its contribution to nature conservation, its potential pharmacological effects remain overlooked. Aim of the study Our objective was to see whether ritual plant use could have

  12. Bradford's Law and Its Relevance to Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenton, Andrew K.; Hay-Gibson, Naomi V.

    2009-01-01

    Bradford's Law has been the subject of much discussion and analysis in library and information science since its formulation in the 1930s and remains frequently debated to this day. It has been applied to various practices within the discipline, especially with regard to collection development, but its relevance to researchers and the potential it…

  13. The relevance of cosmopolitanism for moral education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merry, M.S.; de Ruyter, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we defend a moral conception of cosmopolitanism and its relevance for moral education. Our moral conception of cosmopolitanism presumes that persons possess an inherent dignity in the Kantian sense and therefore they should be recognised as ends-in-themselves. We argue that

  14. Ranking Music Data by Relevance and Importance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruxanda, Maria Magdalena; Nanopoulos, Alexandros; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    2008-01-01

    Due to the rapidly increasing availability of audio files on the Web, it is relevant to augment search engines with advanced audio search functionality. In this context, the ranking of the retrieved music is an important issue. This paper proposes a music ranking method capable of flexibly fusing...

  15. Fast multi-output relevance vector regression

    OpenAIRE

    Ha, Youngmin

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to decrease the time complexity of multi-output relevance vector regression from O(VM^3) to O(V^3+M^3), where V is the number of output dimensions, M is the number of basis functions, and V

  16. Pragmatic inferences and self-relevant judgments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puente-Diaz, Rogelio; Cavazos Arroyo, Judith; Brem, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Three studies examined the influence of type of scale on self-relevant judgments and the moderating role of age, prevention, focus, and need for cogni- tion. Participants were randomly assigned to a bipolar or a unipolar scale condition in all three studies. Results from study 1 with a representa...

  17. Making Chemistry Relevant to the Engineering Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu-Dutt, Sharmistha; Slappey, Charles; Bartley, Julie K.

    2010-01-01

    As part of a campus-wide, externally funded project to increase performance in, enthusiasm for, and retention within STEM disciplines, we developed an interdisciplinary, team-taught first-year seminar course. The construction and delivery of this course was designed to show the relevance of selected general chemistry topics such as matter and…

  18. Contingent Attentional Capture by Conceptually Relevant Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyble, Brad; Folk, Charles; Potter, Mary C.

    2013-01-01

    Attentional capture is an unintentional shift of visuospatial attention to the location of a distractor that is either highly salient, or relevant to the current task set. The latter situation is referred to as contingent capture, in that the effect is contingent on a match between characteristics of the stimuli and the task-defined…

  19. The Relevance Aura of Bibliographic Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Terrence A.

    1997-01-01

    Analyzes relevance assessments of topical descriptors for bibliographic records for two dimensions: (1) a vertical conceptual hierarchy of broad to narrow descriptors, and (2) a horizontal linkage of related terms. The data were analyzed for a semantic distance and semantic direction effect as postulated by the Semantic Distance Model. (Author/LRW)

  20. The Relevance of Cosmopolitanism for Moral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merry, Michael S.; de Ruyter, Doret J.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we defend a moral conception of cosmopolitanism and its relevance for moral education. Our moral conception of cosmopolitanism presumes that persons possess an inherent dignity in the Kantian sense and therefore they should be recognised as ends-in-themselves. We argue that cosmopolitan ideals can inspire moral educators to awaken…

  1. Weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanda, R.

    1981-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental evidences to form a basis for Lagrangian Quantum field theory for Weak Interactions are discussed. In this context, gauge invariance aspects of such interactions are showed. (L.C.) [pt

  2. Intermolecular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, I.G.; Rodimova, O.B.; AN SSSR, Tomsk. Inst. Optiki Atmosfery)

    1978-01-01

    The present state of the intermolecular interaction theory is described. The general physical picture of the molecular interactions is given, the relative contributions of interactions of different types are analyzed (electrostatic, resonance, induction, dispersion, relativistic, magnetostatic and exchange), and the main ones in each range of separations are picked out. The methods of the potential curve calculations are considered, specific for definite separations between the interacting systems. The special attention is paid to the analysis of approximations used in different theoretical calculation methods

  3. Effects of self-relevant cues and cue valence on autobiographical memory specificity in dysphoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Noboru; Mochizuki, Satoshi

    2017-04-01

    Reduced autobiographical memory specificity (rAMS) is a characteristic memory bias observed in depression. To corroborate the capture hypothesis in the CaRFAX (capture and rumination, functional avoidance, executive capacity and control) model, we investigated the effects of self-relevant cues and cue valence on rAMS using an adapted Autobiographical Memory Test conducted with a nonclinical population. Hierarchical linear modelling indicated that the main effects of depression and self-relevant cues elicited rAMS. Moreover, the three-way interaction among valence, self-relevance, and depression scores was significant. A simple slope test revealed that dysphoric participants experienced rAMS in response to highly self-relevant positive cues and low self-relevant negative cues. These results partially supported the capture hypothesis in nonclinical dysphoria. It is important to consider cue valence in future studies examining the capture hypothesis.

  4. Interactive Information Retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borlund, Pia

    2013-01-01

    The paper introduces the research area of interactive information retrieval (IIR) from a historical point of view. Further, the focus here is on evaluation, because much research in IR deals with IR evaluation methodology due to the core research interest in IR performance, system interaction...... and satisfaction with retrieved information. In order to position IIR evaluation, the Cranfield model and the series of tests that led to the Cranfield model are outlined. Three iconic user-oriented studies and projects that all have contributed to how IIR is perceived and understood today are presented......: The MEDLARS test, the Book House fiction retrieval system, and the OKAPI project. On this basis the call for alternative IIR evaluation approaches motivated by the three revolutions (the cognitive, the relevance, and the interactive revolutions) put forward by Robertson & Hancock-Beaulieu (1992) is presented...

  5. Electrical in situ and post-irradiation properties of ceramics relevant to fusion irradiation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikama, Tatsuo; Zinkle, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    Electrical properties of ceramic candidate materials for the next-generation nuclear fusion devices under relevant irradiation conditions are reviewed. A main focal point is placed on the degradation behavior of the electrical insulating ability during and after irradiation. Several important radiation induced effects play important roles: radiation induced conductivity, thermally stimulated electrical conductivity, radiation induced electrical charge separation, and radiation induced electromotive force. These phenomena will interact with each other under fusion relevant irradiation conditions. The design of electrical components for the next-generation fusion devices should take into account these complicated interactions among the radiation induced phenomena

  6. Effective interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    This chapter attempts to describe and compare some of the more important nucleon-nucleon interactions that have been used in nuclear structure calculations, and to relate them where possible to the real nucleon-nucleon interaction. Explains that different interactions have been used depending on whether one is fitting to total binding energies and densities with a Hartree Fock (HF) calculation or fitting to spectra and spectroscopic data in a shell model calculation. Examines both types of calculation after two preliminary sections concerned with notation and with the philosophy underlying the use of model spaces and effective interactions. Discusses Skyrme interactions, finite range interactions, small model space, large model space, and the Sussex potential matrix elements. Focuses on the more empirical approaches in which a simple form is chosen for the effective interaction in a given model space and the parameters are deduced from fitting many-body data

  7. Possible pharmacological interactions in hypertensive and/or diabetic elderly in family health units at Blumenau (SC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Codagnone Neto

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the possible adverse drug-drug interactions in the elderly population (>60 years diagnosed either with diabetes, arterial hypertension or both, at a Family Health Unit (FHU clinic in Blumenau, state of Santa Catarina, Brazil. For this purpose 318 subjects were interviewed using a pretested form with social and demographic aspects regarding their disease and its complications. All drugs used by this population were grouped, and the drug-drug interactions were detected by using the "Drug Interaction Checker" software, and classified for frequency and severity. The average age of patients was 70.6 years, with a higher number of female patients (216; 67.9%. Most subjects were being treated for both diseases (149; 46.86%. Out of a total of 1,541 medications prescribed, the most prevalent were: hydrochlorothiazide (131; 8.4% and enalapril maleate (130; 8.4%. A total of 295 possible drug-drug interactions were detected in 152 patients (1.9 interactions per subject, 275 (93.2% moderate and 20 (6.8% severe or highly severe. The possible interaction prevalence was 0.93 (0.55 to 1.40 depending on health unit. The most frequent possible interaction was that between acetylsalicylic acid and enalapril maleate (37; 12.5%. Patients had an average consumption of 6.6 drugs and 9.8% of subjects reported physical discomfort when using medicines. Elderly patients use many medications that could cause adverse reactions and possible drug-drug interactions, where this issue warrants closer attention of prescribers and health providers.Buscou-se identificar possíveis interações medicamentosas em pessoas idosas com diabetes melito (DM e/ou hipertensão arterial sistêmica (HAS sendo atendidas em unidades de Saúde da Família, em Blumenau (SC. Entrevistaram-se 318 pessoas com 60 e mais anos, portadoras de DM e/ou HAS, mediante questionário estruturado pré-testado, com variáveis sócio-demográficas da doença e do tratamento. As

  8. Tomographic diagnosis and relevant aspects of otosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaiotti, Juliana Oggioni; Gomes, Natalia Delage; Costa, Ana Maria Doffemond; Villela, Caroline Laurita Batista Couto; Moreira, Wanderval; Diniz, Renata Lopes Furletti Caldeira

    2013-01-01

    A literature review and pictorial essay were developed to discuss the importance of knowing the main findings and locations of otosclerosis at multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The authors performed a retrospective review of cases of otosclerosis diagnosed in their institution by means of high resolution multidetector computed tomography. Otosclerosis corresponds to otic capsule dysplasia characterized by metabolic derangement of its endochondral layer. Such condition constitutes a relevant cause of sensorineural hearing loss, affecting about 7% to 10% of the general population. The diagnosis is usually clinical, but imaging methods play a significant role in the anatomical detailing, differential diagnosis, surgical planning and evaluation of postoperative complications. Among such methods, the relevance of MDCT is highlighted. Radiologists should be familiar with the MDCT findings of otosclerosis, as well as with the temporal bone anatomy to assist in the appropriate clinical management of this disease. (author)

  9. Tomographic diagnosis and relevant aspects of otosclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaiotti, Juliana Oggioni; Gomes, Natalia Delage; Costa, Ana Maria Doffemond; Villela, Caroline Laurita Batista Couto; Moreira, Wanderval; Diniz, Renata Lopes Furletti Caldeira, E-mail: jugaiotti@gmail.com [Hospital Mater Dei-Mater Imagem, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    A literature review and pictorial essay were developed to discuss the importance of knowing the main findings and locations of otosclerosis at multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The authors performed a retrospective review of cases of otosclerosis diagnosed in their institution by means of high resolution multidetector computed tomography. Otosclerosis corresponds to otic capsule dysplasia characterized by metabolic derangement of its endochondral layer. Such condition constitutes a relevant cause of sensorineural hearing loss, affecting about 7% to 10% of the general population. The diagnosis is usually clinical, but imaging methods play a significant role in the anatomical detailing, differential diagnosis, surgical planning and evaluation of postoperative complications. Among such methods, the relevance of MDCT is highlighted. Radiologists should be familiar with the MDCT findings of otosclerosis, as well as with the temporal bone anatomy to assist in the appropriate clinical management of this disease. (author)

  10. EOG feature relevance determination for microsleep detection

    OpenAIRE

    Golz Martin; Wollner Sebastian; Sommer David; Schnieder Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Automatic relevance determination (ARD) was applied to two-channel EOG recordings for microsleep event (MSE) recognition. 10 s immediately before MSE and also before counterexamples of fatigued, but attentive driving were analysed. Two type of signal features were extracted: the maximum cross correlation (MaxCC) and logarithmic power spectral densities (PSD) averaged in spectral bands of 0.5 Hz width ranging between 0 and 8 Hz. Generalised learn-ing vector quantisation (GRLVQ) was used as ARD...

  11. Is QCD relevant to nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, A.W.

    1985-01-01

    A review is given of recent work on baryon structure in a number of QCD-motivated models. After establishing a prima facie case that the quark model should be relevant in a consistent description of the nucleus over a wide range of momentum transfer, the author looks for experimental confirmation. The discussion includes the search for exotic states, for a six quark component of the deuteron, and an up to date report on the interpretation of the EMC effect. (Auth.)

  12. Trade Off Relevance Dan Reliability: Isu Ifrs

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmudah, Hadi

    2013-01-01

    Financial reports containing qualitative characteristic that are useful for usernya.For a long time believed to be the existence of trade off between characteristic of qualitative relevance and reliability. Trade off due to the fact that the use of the method of measurement historical cost and fair value. Trade off occur because of the interests of for the purpose of the preparation of reports on finance. Accountability for the purpose of the measurement of the cost of historical still reliab...

  13. Nanostructure symmetry: Relevance for physics and computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupertuis, Marc-André; Oberli, D. Y.; Karlsson, K. F.; Dalessi, S.; Gallinet, B.; Svendsen, G.

    2014-01-01

    We review the research done in recent years in our group on the effects of nanostructure symmetry, and outline its relevance both for nanostructure physics and for computations of their electronic and optical properties. The exemples of C3v and C2v quantum dots are used. A number of surprises and non-trivial aspects are outlined, and a few symmetry-based tools for computing and analysis are shortly presented

  14. Nanostructure symmetry: Relevance for physics and computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupertuis, Marc-André; Oberli, D. Y. [Laboratory for Physics of Nanostructure, EPF Lausanne (Switzerland); Karlsson, K. F. [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology (IFM), Linköping University (Sweden); Dalessi, S. [Computational Biology Group, Department of Medical Genetics, University of Lausanne (Switzerland); Gallinet, B. [Nanophotonics and Metrology Laboratory, EPF Lausanne (Switzerland); Svendsen, G. [Dept. of Electronics and Telecom., Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    2014-03-31

    We review the research done in recent years in our group on the effects of nanostructure symmetry, and outline its relevance both for nanostructure physics and for computations of their electronic and optical properties. The exemples of C3v and C2v quantum dots are used. A number of surprises and non-trivial aspects are outlined, and a few symmetry-based tools for computing and analysis are shortly presented.

  15. Monochloramine Cometabolism by Nitrifying Biofilm Relevant ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, biological monochloramine removal (i.e., cometabolism) by a pure culture ammonia–oxidizing bacteria, Nitrosomonas europaea, and a nitrifying mixed–culture have been shown to increase monochloramine demand. Although important, these previous suspended culture batch kinetic experiments were not representative of drinking water distribution systems where bacteria grow predominantly as biofilm attached to pipe walls or sediments and physiological differences may exist between suspension and biofilm growth. Therefore, the current research was an important next step in extending the previous results to investigate monochloramine cometabolism by biofilm grown in annular reactors under drinking water relevant conditions. Estimated monochloramine cometabolism kinetics were similar to those of ammonia metabolism, and monochloramine cometabolism was a significant loss mechanism (25–40% of the observed monochloramine loss). These results demonstrated that monochloramine cometabolism occurred in drinking water relevant nitrifying biofilm; thus, cometabolism may be a significant contribution to monochloramine loss during nitrification episodes in distribution systems. Investigate whether or not nitrifying biofilm can biologically transform monochloramine under drinking water relevant conditions.

  16. Selection of relevant dietary indicators for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steingrímsdóttir, L; Ovesen, L; Moreiras, O; Jacob, S

    2002-05-01

    To define a set of dietary components that are relevant determinants for health in Europe. The selected components are intended to serve as nutrition indicators for health in the European Health Monitoring Programme and, as such, must be limited in number, relevant to health in Europe and practical for all involved countries with respect to data gathering and comparability of data. Major nutrition factors were determined by reviewing relevant epidemiological and clinical literature in nutrition and health as well as referring to reports from international expert groups, including the report from the project Nutrition and Diet for Healthy Lifestyles in Europe. The selection of factors was also based on the relative ease and cost involved for participating countries to obtain comparable and valid data. The selected factors include foods or food groups as well as individual nutrients. Biomarkers are suggested for selected nutrients that pose the greatest difficulty in obtaining valid and comparable data from dietary studies. The following list of diet indicators for health monitoring in Europe was agreed upon by the EFCOSUM group in 2001, in order of priority: vegetables, fruit, bread, fish, saturated fatty acids as percentage of energy (%E), total fat as %E, and ethanol in grams per day. Biomarkers were suggested for the following nutrients: folate, vitamin D, iron, iodine and sodium. Energy has to be assessed in order to calculate %E from total fat and saturated fatty acids.

  17. The value relevance of environmental emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda Lydia Nelwan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examines whether environmental performance has value relevance by investigating the relations between environmental emissions and stock prices for the U.S. public companies. The previous studies argued that the conjectured relations between accounting performance measures and environmental performance do not have a strong theoretical basis, and the modeling of relations between market per-formance measures and environmental performance do not adequately consider the relevance of accounting performance to market value. Therefore, this study examines whether publicly reported environmental emissions provide incremental information to accounting earnings in pricing companies stocks. It is done among the complete set of industries covered by Toxics Release Inventory (TRI reporting for the period 2007 to 2010. Using Ohlson model but modified to include different types of emis-sions, it is found that ground emissions (underground injection and land emissions are value relevant but other emission types (air and water and transferred-out emis-sions appear to not provide incremental information in the valuation model. The result in this study raise concerns that different types of emissions are assessed differently by the market, confirming that studies should not aggregate such measures.

  18. EOG feature relevance determination for microsleep detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golz Martin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Automatic relevance determination (ARD was applied to two-channel EOG recordings for microsleep event (MSE recognition. 10 s immediately before MSE and also before counterexamples of fatigued, but attentive driving were analysed. Two type of signal features were extracted: the maximum cross correlation (MaxCC and logarithmic power spectral densities (PSD averaged in spectral bands of 0.5 Hz width ranging between 0 and 8 Hz. Generalised learn-ing vector quantisation (GRLVQ was used as ARD method to show the potential of feature reduction. This is compared to support-vector machines (SVM, in which the feature reduction plays a much smaller role. Cross validation yielded mean normalised relevancies of PSD features in the range of 1.6 – 4.9 % and 1.9 – 10.4 % for horizontal and vertical EOG, respectively. MaxCC relevancies were 0.002 – 0.006 % and 0.002 – 0.06 %, respectively. This shows that PSD features of vertical EOG are indispensable, whereas MaxCC can be neglected. Mean classification accuracies were estimated at 86.6±b 1.3 % and 92.3±b 0.2 % for GRLVQ and SVM, respectively. GRLVQ permits objective feature reduction by inclusion of all processing stages, but is not as accurate as SVM.

  19. EOG feature relevance determination for microsleep detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golz Martin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Automatic relevance determination (ARD was applied to two-channel EOG recordings for microsleep event (MSE recognition. 10 s immediately before MSE and also before counterexamples of fatigued, but attentive driving were analysed. Two type of signal features were extracted: the maximum cross correlation (MaxCC and logarithmic power spectral densities (PSD averaged in spectral bands of 0.5 Hz width ranging between 0 and 8 Hz. Generalised learn-ing vector quantisation (GRLVQ was used as ARD method to show the potential of feature reduction. This is compared to support-vector machines (SVM, in which the feature reduction plays a much smaller role. Cross validation yielded mean normalised relevancies of PSD features in the range of 1.6 - 4.9 % and 1.9 - 10.4 % for horizontal and vertical EOG, respectively. MaxCC relevancies were 0.002 - 0.006 % and 0.002 - 0.06 %, respectively. This shows that PSD features of vertical EOG are indispensable, whereas MaxCC can be neglected. Mean classification accuracies were estimated at 86.6±b 1.3 % and 92.3±b 0.2 % for GRLVQ and SVM, respec-tively. GRLVQ permits objective feature reduction by inclu-sion of all processing stages, but is not as accurate as SVM.

  20. Functional dyspepsia: Are psychosocial factors of relevance?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sandra Barry; Timothy G Dinan

    2006-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Functional Dyspepsia (FD) remains unclear, appears diverse and is thus inadequately understood. Akin to other functional gastrointestinal disorders, research has demonstrated an association between this common diagnosis and psychosocial factors and psychiatric morbidity. Conceptualising the relevance of these factors within the syndrome of FD requires application of the biopsychosocial model of disease.Using this paradigm, dysregulation of the reciprocal communication between the brain and the gut is central to symptom generation, interpretation and exacerbation.Appreciation and understanding of the neurobiological correlates of various psychological states is also relevant.The view that psychosocial factors exert their influence in FD predominantly through motivation of health care seeking also persists. This appears too one-dimensional an assertion in light of the evidence available supporting a more intrinsic aetiological link. Evolving understanding of pathogenic mechanisms and the heterogeneous nature of the syndrome will facilitate effective management.Co-morbid psychiatric illness warrants treatment with conventional therapies. Acknowledging the relevance of psychosocial variables in FD, the degree of which is subject to variation, has implications for assessment and management. Available evidence suggests psychological therapies may benefit FD patients particularly those with chronic symptoms. The rationale for use of psychotropic medications in FD is apparent but the evidence base to support the use of antidepressant pharmacotherapy is to date limited.

  1. Frequency, Levels and Predictors of Potential Drug-Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    administration to carry out this study in hospital. The following information items were collected: patient's age, gender, date of admission, date of discharge, diagnosis and detail of medication therapy provided in the hospital. All regular and. PRN (pro-re-nata, means as required) medications were included, however, topical.

  2. Exploring pathway interactions in insulin resistant mouse liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelder, T.; Eijssen, L.; Kleemann, R.; Erk, M. van; Kooistra, T.; Evelo, C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Complex phenotypes such as insulin resistance involve different biological pathways that may interact and influence each other. Interpretation of related experimental data would be facilitated by identifying relevant pathway interactions in the context of the dataset.Results: We

  3. Correlation between drug–drug interaction-induced Stevens–Johnson syndrome and related deaths in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Jen Cheng

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Concomitant use of some drugs can lead to interactions between them resulting in severe adverse effects. To date, there are few reports of incidences of Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS associated with combination drug administration. Therefore, we studied the relationship between drug combinations and SJS-related mortality, with the hope that a retrospective study of this nature would provide information crucial for the prevention of future drug-drug interaction related deaths attributable to SJS. This retrospective longitudinal study used mortality cases from 1999 to 2008 that were diagnosed as erythema multiforme (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification 695.1 from the National Health Insurance database in Taiwan. Statistical comparisons of the results were performed using analysis of variance (ANOVA, independent sample t-tests, and odds ratio (OR. In this way, the relationship between combinations of SJS-inducing drugs and mortality could be determined. A total of 111 patients who had died, including 63 males and 48 females (66.0 ± 20 and 70.0 ± 17.7 years, respectively, were suspected of having experienced drug-drug interaction-related adverse effects. The associated drug combinations included allopurinol and ampicillin (p = 0.049, carbamazepine and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (TMP (p < 0.0001, carbamazepine and phenytoin (p < 0.0001, sulfamethoxazole/TMP and phenytoin (p = 0.015, sulfadoxine and piroxicam (p = 0.045, phenobarbital and cephalexin (p < 0.0001, ampicillin and erythromycin (p < 0.0001, erythromycin and minocycline (p < 0.0001, and vancomycin and ethambutol (p < 0.0001 administered 1 month before the patients' deaths. Caution should be exercised when administering any drugs that may possibly induce SJS. In addition, attention should be paid to ensure prompt identification of possible drug-drug interactions, and patients should be closely monitored. Furthermore

  4. A User-Centered Approach to Adaptive Hypertext Based on an Information Relevance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathe, Nathalie; Chen, James

    1994-01-01

    Rapid and effective to information in large electronic documentation systems can be facilitated if information relevant in an individual user's content can be automatically supplied to this user. However most of this knowledge on contextual relevance is not found within the contents of documents, it is rather established incrementally by users during information access. We propose a new model for interactively learning contextual relevance during information retrieval, and incrementally adapting retrieved information to individual user profiles. The model, called a relevance network, records the relevance of references based on user feedback for specific queries and user profiles. It also generalizes such knowledge to later derive relevant references for similar queries and profiles. The relevance network lets users filter information by context of relevance. Compared to other approaches, it does not require any prior knowledge nor training. More importantly, our approach to adaptivity is user-centered. It facilitates acceptance and understanding by users by giving them shared control over the adaptation without disturbing their primary task. Users easily control when to adapt and when to use the adapted system. Lastly, the model is independent of the particular application used to access information, and supports sharing of adaptations among users.

  5. Weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogava, S.; Savada, S.; Nakagava, M.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of the use of weak interaction laws to study models of elementary particles is discussed. The most typical examples of weak interaction is beta-decay of nucleons and muons. Beta-interaction is presented by quark currents in the form of universal interaction of the V-A type. Universality of weak interactions is well confirmed using as examples e- and μ-channels of pion decay. Hypothesis on partial preservation of axial current is applicable to the analysis of processes with pion participation. In the framework of the model with four flavours lepton decays of hadrons are considered. Weak interaction without lepton participation are also considered. Properties of neutral currents are described briefly

  6. Floor interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Krogh, Peter; Ludvigsen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Within architecture, there is a long tradition of careful design of floors. The design has been concerned with both decorating floors and designing floors to carry information. Ubiquitous computing technology offers new opportunities for designing interactive floors. This paper presents three...... different interactive floor concepts. Through an urban perspective it draws upon the experiences of floors in architecture, and provides a set of design issues for designing interactive floors....

  7. RELEVANCE OF ECONOMIC INSTRUMENTS USED IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SORINA-GEANINA MĂRGĂRIT (STĂNESCU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between environmental, economic and social factors influences the ecological balance and generates the change of living conditions and those of socio-economic development. One of the essential conditions for building a sustainable economic development is the identification and implementation of active or voluntary instruments to influence economic and social activity towards ensuring their sustainability. In this paper, we intend to introduce the tools used in the process of sustainable development, which have a key role in adopting an environmentally responsible behavior. The results of this study are represented by the drafting of the advantages and disadvantages of using these economic and financial instruments. The purpose of this paper is to present the evolution of costs for environmental protection and the relevance of instruments used at the national level in environmental protection.

  8. Playful Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    The video Playful Interaction describes a future architectural office, and envisions ideas and concepts for playful interactions between people, materials and appliances in a pervasive and augmented working environment. The video both describes existing developments, technologies and designs...... as well as ideas not yet implemented such as playful modes of interaction with an augmented ball. Playful Interaction has been used as a hybrid of a vision video and a video prototype (1). Externally the video has been used to visualising our new ideas, and internally the video has also worked to inspire...

  9. The impact of positive, negative and topical relevance feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaptein, Rianne; Kamps, Jaap; Hiemstra, Djoerd

    2008-01-01

    This document contains a description of experiments for the 2008 Relevance Feedback track. We experiment with different amounts of feedback, including negative relevance feedback. Feedback is implemented using massive weighted query expansion. Parsimonious query expansion using only relevant

  10. Summary: fundamental interactions and processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koltun, D.S.

    1982-01-01

    The subjects of the talks of the first day of the workshop are discussed in terms of fundamental interactions, dynamical theory, and relevant degrees of freedom. Some general considerations are introduced and are used to confront the various approaches taken in the earlier talks

  11. Interactions of commonly used dietary supplements with cardiovascular drugs: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanji Salmaan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this systematic review was to examine the benefits, harms and pharmacokinetic interactions arising from the co-administration of commonly used dietary supplements with cardiovascular drugs. Many patients on cardiovascular drugs take dietary supplements for presumed benefits and may be at risk for adverse supplement-drug interactions. Methods The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, International Bibliographic Information on Dietary Supplements and MEDLINE were searched from the inception of the review to October 2011. Grey literature was also reviewed. Two reviewers independently screened records to identify studies comparing a supplement plus cardiovascular drug(s with the drug(s alone. Reviewers extracted data using standardized forms, assessed the study risk of bias, graded the strength of evidence and reported applicability. Results Evidence was obtained from 65 randomized clinical trials, 2 controlled clinical trials and 1 observational study. With only a few small studies available per supplement, evidence was insufficient for all predefined gradable clinical efficacy and harms outcomes, such as mortality and serious adverse events. One long-term pragmatic trial showed no benefit from co-administering vitamin E with aspirin on a composite cardiovascular outcome. Evidence for most intermediate outcomes was insufficient or of low strength, suggesting no effect. Incremental benefits were noted for triglyceridemia with omega-3 fatty acid added to statins; and there was an improvement in levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol with garlic supplementation when people also consumed nitrates Conclusions Evidence of low-strength indicates benefits of omega-3 fatty acids (plus statin, or calcium channel blockers and antiplatelets and garlic (plus nitrates or warfarin on triglycerides and HDL-C, respectively. Safety concerns, however, persist.

  12. FIRST experiment: Fragmentation of Ions Relevant for Space and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agodi, C.; Abou-Haidar, Z.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Aumann, T.; Balestra, F.; Battistoni, G.; Bocci, A.; Bohlen, T. T.; Bondì, M.; Boudard, A.; Brunetti, A.; Carpinelli, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cavallaro, M.; Carbone, D.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cortes-Giraldo, M. A.; Cuttone, G.; De Napoli, M.; Durante, M.; Fernandez-Garcia, J. P.; Finck, C.; Foti, A.; Gallardo, M. I.; Golosio, B.; Iarocci, E.; Iazzi, F.; Ickert, G.; Introzzi, R.; Juliani, D.; Krimmer, J.; Kurz, N.; Labalme, M.; Lavagno, A.; Leifels, Y.; Le Fevre, A.; Leray, S.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Morone, M. C.; Nicolosi, D.; Oliva, P.; Paoloni, A.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Pleskac, R.; Quesada, J. M.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Rossi, D.; Rosso, V.; Rousseau, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sala, P.; Sarti, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schuy, C.; Sciubba, A.; Sfienti, C.; Simon, H.; Sipala, V.; Spiriti, E.; Stuttge, L.; Tropea, S.; Younis, H.

    2013-03-01

    Nuclear fragmentation processes are relevant in different fields of basic research and applied physics and are of particular interest for tumor therapy and for space radiation protection applications. The FIRST (Fragmentation of Ions Relevant for Space and Therapy) experiment at SIS accelerator of GSI laboratory in Darmstadt, has been designed for the measurement of different ions fragmentation cross sections at different energies between 100 and 1000 MeV/nucleon. The experiment is performed by an international collaboration made of institutions from Germany, France, Italy and Spain. The experimental apparatus is partly based on an already existing setup made of the ALADIN magnet, the MUSIC IV TPC, the LAND2 neutron detector and the TOFWALL scintillator TOF system, integrated with newly designed detectors in the interaction Region (IR) around the carbon removable target: a scintillator Start Counter, a Beam Monitor drift chamber, a silicon Vertex Detector and a Proton Tagger for detection of light fragments emitted at large angles (KENTROS). The scientific program of the FIRST experiment started on summer 2011 with the study of the 400 MeV/nucleon 12C beam fragmentation on thin (8mm) carbon target.

  13. FIRST experiment: Fragmentation of Ions Relevant for Space and Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agodi, C; Bondì, M; Cavallaro, M; Carbone, D; Cirrone, G A P; Cuttone, G; Abou-Haidar, Z; Alvarez, M A G; Bocci, A; Aumann, T; Durante, M; Balestra, F; Battistoni, G; Bohlen, T T; Boudard, A; Brunetti, A; Carpinelli, M; Cappuzzello, F; Cortes-Giraldo, M A; Napoli, M De

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear fragmentation processes are relevant in different fields of basic research and applied physics and are of particular interest for tumor therapy and for space radiation protection applications. The FIRST (Fragmentation of Ions Relevant for Space and Therapy) experiment at SIS accelerator of GSI laboratory in Darmstadt, has been designed for the measurement of different ions fragmentation cross sections at different energies between 100 and 1000 MeV/nucleon. The experiment is performed by an international collaboration made of institutions from Germany, France, Italy and Spain. The experimental apparatus is partly based on an already existing setup made of the ALADIN magnet, the MUSIC IV TPC, the LAND2 neutron detector and the TOFWALL scintillator TOF system, integrated with newly designed detectors in the interaction Region (IR) around the carbon removable target: a scintillator Start Counter, a Beam Monitor drift chamber, a silicon Vertex Detector and a Proton Tagger for detection of light fragments emitted at large angles (KENTROS). The scientific program of the FIRST experiment started on summer 2011 with the study of the 400 MeV/nucleon 12C beam fragmentation on thin (8 mm) carbon target.

  14. Streptococcus pyogenes biofilms – formation, biology,and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas eFiedler

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci, GAS is an exclusive human bacterial pathogen. The virulence potential of this species is tremendous. Interactions with humans range from asymptomatic carriage over mild and superficial infections of skin and mucosal membranes up to systemic purulent toxic-invasive disease manifestations. Particularly the latter are a severe threat for predisposed patients and lead to significant death tolls worldwide. This places GAS among the most important Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. Many recent reviews have highlighted the GAS repertoire of virulence factors, regulators and regulatory circuits/networks that enable GAS to colonize the host and to deal with all levels of the host immune defense. This covers in vitro and in vivo studies, including animal infection studies based on mice and more relevant, macaque monkeys. It is now appreciated that GAS, like many other bacterial species, do not necessarily exclusively live in a planktonic lifestyle. GAS is capable of microcolony and biofilm formation on host cells and tissues. We are now beginning to understand that this feature significantly contributes to GAS pathogenesis. In this review we will discuss the current knowledge on GAS biofilm formation, the biofilm-phenotype associated virulence factors, regulatory aspects of biofilm formation, the clinical relevance, and finally contemporary treatment regimens and future treatment options.

  15. Scaffolding scientific discussion using socially relevant representations in networked multimedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Christopher M.

    1999-11-01

    How do students make use of social cues when learning on the computer? This work examines how students in a middle-school science course learned through on-line peer discussion. Cognitive accounts of collaboration stress interacting with ideas, while socially situated accounts stress the interpersonal context. The design of electronic environments allows investigation into the interrelation of cognitive and social dimensions. I use on-line peer discussion to investigate how socially relevant representations in interfaces can aid learning. First, I identify some of the variables that affect individual participation in on-line discussion, including interface features. Individual participation is predicted by student attitudes towards learning from peers. Second, I describe the range of group outcomes for these on-line discussions. There is a large effect of discussion group on learning outcomes which is not reducible to group composition or gross measures of group process. Third, I characterize how students (individually) construct understanding from these group discussions. Learning in the on-line discussions is shown to be a result of sustained interaction over time, not merely encountering or expressing ideas. Experimental manipulations in the types of social cues available to students suggest that many students do use socially relevant representations to support their understanding of multiple viewpoints and science reasoning. Personalizing scientific disputes can afford reflection on the nature of scientific discovery and advance. While there are many individual differences in how social representations are used by students in learning, overall learning benefits for certain social representations can be shown. This work has profound implications for design of collaborative instructional methods, equitable access to science learning, design of instructional technology, and understanding of learning and cognition in social settings.

  16. Identifying Relevant Studies in Software Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, He; Ali Babar, Muhammad; Tell, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Context: Systematic literature review (SLR) has become an important research methodology in software engineering since the introduction of evidence-based software engineering (EBSE) in 2004. One critical step in applying this methodology is to design and execute appropriate and effective search....... Objective: The main objective of the research reported in this paper is to improve the search step of undertaking SLRs in software engineering (SE) by devising and evaluating systematic and practical approaches to identifying relevant studies in SE. Method: We have systematically selected and analytically...

  17. Happiness: origins, forms, and technical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Salman

    2010-09-01

    By critically reviewing Freud's views on happiness, and also those of Helene Deutsch, Bertram Lewin, Melanie Klein, and Heinz Kohut, the author evolves a complex and multilayered perspective on the phenomenon. He categorizes happiness into four related and occasionally overlapping varieties: pleasure-based happiness (elation), assertion-based happiness (joy), merger-based happiness (ecstasy), and fulfillment-based happiness (contentment). After entering some caveats and drawing from his clinical experience, the author then demonstrates the relevance of these ideas to the conduct of psychotherapy and psychoanalysis.

  18. Relevance of physics to the pharmacy major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Richard P

    2007-08-15

    To offer a physics course that is relevant to pharmacy students, yet still contains many of the fundamental principles of physics. The course was modified over a period of several years to include activities and examples that were related to other courses in the curriculum. Course evaluations were given to assess student attitudes about the importance of physics in the pharmacy curriculum. Students' attitudes have changed over time to appreciate the role that physics plays in their studies. Students gained confidence in their ability to learn in other courses.

  19. Are Learning Styles Relevant to Virtual Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chwen Jen; Toh, Seong Chong; Ismail, Wan Mohd Fauzy Wan

    2005-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of a virtual reality (VR)-based learning environment on learners with different learning styles. The findings of the aptitude-by-treatment interaction study have shown that learners benefit most from the VR (guided exploration) mode, irrespective of their learning styles. This shows that the VR-based…

  20. Aesthetic interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Krogh, Peter

    2004-01-01

    , as it promotes aesthetics of use, rather than aesthetics of appearance. We coin this approach in the perspective of aesthetic interaction. Finally we make the point that aesthetics is not re-defining everything known about interactive systems. We provide a framework placing this perspective among other...

  1. Interactive benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawson, Lartey; Nielsen, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    We discuss individual learning by interactive benchmarking using stochastic frontier models. The interactions allow the user to tailor the performance evaluation to preferences and explore alternative improvement strategies by selecting and searching the different frontiers using directional...... in the suggested benchmarking tool. The study investigates how different characteristics on dairy farms influences the technical efficiency....

  2. Explicit Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löwgren, Jonas; Eriksen, Mette Agger; Linde, Per

    2006-01-01

    We report an ongoing study of palpable computing to support surgical rehabilitation, in the general field of interaction design for ubiquitous computing. Through explorative design, fieldwork and participatory design techniques, we explore the design principle of explicit interaction as an interp...

  3. Analysis of Biological Interactions by Affinity Chromatography: Clinical and Pharmaceutical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hage, David S

    2017-06-01

    The interactions between biochemical and chemical agents in the body are important in many clinical processes. Affinity chromatography and high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC), in which a column contains an immobilized biologically related binding agent, are 2 methods that can be used to study these interactions. This review presents various approaches that can be used in affinity chromatography and HPAC to characterize the strength or rate of a biological interaction, the number and types of sites that are involved in this process, and the interactions between multiple solutes for the same binding agent. A number of applications for these methods are examined, with an emphasis on recent developments and high-performance affinity methods. These applications include the use of these techniques for fundamental studies of biological interactions, high-throughput screening of drugs, work with modified proteins, tools for personalized medicine, and studies of drug-drug competition for a common binding agent. The wide range of formats and detection methods that can be used with affinity chromatography and HPAC for examining biological interactions makes these tools attractive for various clinical and pharmaceutical applications. Future directions in the development of small-scale columns and the coupling of these methods with other techniques, such as mass spectrometry or other separation methods, should continue to increase the flexibility and ease with which these approaches can be used in work involving clinical or pharmaceutical samples. © 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  4. Parental Behaviors in a Memory Relevant Setting: How Parents "Teach" Children to Remember.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Elaine M.; Coley, Denise D.

    The behavior of mothers interacting with their preschoolers in a memory-relevant situation was examined. Ten 3-year-olds and their mothers were videotaped playing a game requiring memory for the location of hidden pictures. Frequency of nine categories of parental behavior was scored: naming, verbal orienting, physical orienting, physical…

  5. Term Relevance Feedback and Mediated Database Searching: Implications for Information Retrieval Practice and Systems Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spink, Amanda

    1995-01-01

    This study uses the human approach to examine the sources and effectiveness of search terms selected during 40 mediated interactive database searches and focuses on determining the retrieval effectiveness of search terms identified by users and intermediaries from retrieved items during term relevance feedback. (Author/JKP)

  6. Interaction of radiation with matter

    CERN Document Server

    Nikjoo, Hooshang; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    Written for students approaching the subject for the first time, this text provides a solid grounding in the physics of the interactions of photons and particles with matter, which is the basis of radiological physics and radiation dosimetry. The authors first present the relevant atomic physics and then describe the interactions, emphasizing practical applications in health/medical physics and radiation biology. They cover such important topics as microdosimetry, interaction of photons with matter, electron energy loss, and dielectric response. Each chapter includes exercises and a summary.

  7. Kinesthetic Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogtmann, Maiken Hillerup; Fritsch, Jonas; Kortbek, Karen Johanne

    2008-01-01

    Within the Human-Computer Interaction community there is a growing interest in designing for the whole body in interaction design. The attempts aimed at addressing the body have very different outcomes spanning from theoretical arguments for understanding the body in the design process, to more...... practical examples of designing for bodily potential. This paper presents Kinesthetic Interaction as a unifying concept for describing the body in motion as a foundation for designing interactive systems. Based on the theoretical foundation for Kinesthetic Interaction, a conceptual framework is introduced...... to reveal bodily potential in relation to three design themes – kinesthetic development, kinesthetic means and kinesthetic disorder; and seven design parameters – engagement, sociality, movability, explicit motivation, implicit motivation, expressive meaning and kinesthetic empathy. The framework is a tool...

  8. Other relevant papers in physical oceanography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyffeler, F.

    1989-01-01

    During the past few years, significant progress has occurred in the field of physical oceanography partly as a consequence of developing cooperation and international participation in well-coordinated ocean research programmes. Although these programs were not designed specifically to address CRESP problems, many have proved to be directly relevant to CRESP objectives. For example, MODE, POLYMODE, and Tourbillon were intensive site-specific experiments that included studies of dispersion processes throughout the water column. NOAMP and GME were also site specific, involved the entire water column, and even stressed near-bottom and suspended-sediment processes. Others, (e.g., WOCE) are larger in scope and include extensive observations of the general circulation of entire ocean basins. As a whole, they contribute immensely to improving the data base for exchange and transport processes and thereby for the verification and validation of both regional-scale and general-circulation ocean models. That, in turn, is directly relevant to radiological assessments. Selected papers deriving from experiments such as these are discussed and referenced below

  9. Relevance of randomised controlled trials in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannock, Ian F; Amir, Eitan; Booth, Christopher M; Niraula, Saroj; Ocana, Alberto; Seruga, Bostjan; Templeton, Arnoud J; Vera-Badillo, Francisco

    2016-12-01

    Well-designed randomised controlled trials (RCTs) can prevent bias in the comparison of treatments and provide a sound basis for changes in clinical practice. However, the design and reporting of many RCTs can render their results of little relevance to clinical practice. In this Personal View, we discuss the limitations of RCT data and suggest some ways to improve the clinical relevance of RCTs in the everyday management of patients with cancer. RCTs should ask questions of clinical rather than commercial interest, avoid non-validated surrogate endpoints in registration trials, and have entry criteria that allow inclusion of all patients who are fit to receive treatment. Furthermore, RCTs should be reported with complete accounting of frequency and management of toxicities, and with strict guidelines to ensure freedom from bias. Premature reporting of results should be avoided. The bar for clinical benefit should be raised for drug registration, which should require publication and review of mature data from RCTs, post-marketing health outcome studies, and value-based pricing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Heat transfer education : Keeping it relevant and vibrant.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khounsary, A. M.

    1998-08-14

    The motivation for a fresh look at heat transfer education, both in content and in methodology, is generated by a number of trends in engineering practice. These include the increasing demand for engineers with interdisciplinary skills, rapid integration of technology, emergence of computerized and interactive problem-solving tools, shortening time of concept-to-market, availability of new technologies, and an increasing number of new or redesigned products and processes in which heat transfer plays a part. Examination of heat transfer education in this context can be aided by considering the changes, both qualitatively and quantitatively, in the student, educator, and researcher populations, employment opportunities, in the needs of corporations, government, industry, and universities, and in the relevant technical problems and issues of the day. Such an overview provides the necessary background for charting a response to the difficult question of how to maintain excellence and continuity in heat transfer education in the face of rapid, widespread, and complex changes. The present paper addresses how to make heat transfer education more relevant and stimulating. This paper represents a written summary of a 1996 panel discussion at the 1996 International Mechanical Engineering Conference and Exhibition (IMECE) of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) in Atlanta, Georgia, on ''Heat Transfer Education: Keeping it Relevant and Vibrant,'' with significant expansion and amplification by the authors and the panelists in the 1997-98 period. The consensus of the participants is that the steps necessary to ensure the desired outcome in heat transfer education should include: (1) a better understanding of the interaction between the student, course content, and market needs; (2) an appreciation of the need in multidisciplinary industrial environments for engineers trained with a broad background: (3) a revision of the introductory heat

  11. Polypharmacology in HIV inhibition: can a drug with simultaneous action against two relevant targets be an alternative to combination therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Sonia; Camarasa, María-José

    2018-04-25

    HIV infection still has a serious health and socio-economical impact and is one of the primary causes of morbidity and mortality all over the world. HIV infection and the AIDS pandemic are still matters of great concern, especially in less developed countries where the access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is limited. Patient compliance is another serious drawback. Nowadays, HAART is the treatment of choice although it is not the panacea. Despite the fact that it suppresses viral replication at undetectable viral loads and prevents progression of HIV infection into AIDS HAART has several pitfalls, namely, long-term side-effects, drug resistance development, emergence of drug-resistant viruses, low compliance and the intolerance of some patients to these drugs. Moreover, another serious health concern is the event of co-infection with more than one pathogen at the same time (e.g. HIV and HCV, HBV, herpes viruses, etc). Currently, the multi-target drug approach has become an exciting strategy to address complex diseases and overcome drug resistance development. Such multifunctional molecules combine in their structure pharmacophores that may simultaneously interfere with multiple targets and their use may eventually be more safe and efficacious than that involving a mixture of separate molecules because of avoidance or delay of drug resistance, lower incidence of unwanted drug-drug interactions and improved compliance. In this review we focus on multifunctional molecules with dual activity against different targets of the HIV life cycle or able to block replication, not only of HIV but also of other viruses that are often co-pathogens of HIV. The different approaches are documented by selected examples. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  12. Relevance-based control over visual attention is fast and interdependent with stimulus-driven capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordfang, Maria; Bundesen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    or distractor) was a color singleton, but the probability that the singleton was a target was just the same as the probability that a nonsingleton was a target. Participants showed significant effects of both feature contrast and task relevance. The probability of correctly reporting a singleton target...... that high local feature contrast attracts attention independently of task-relevance. Yet, recent studies have provided evidence that effects of task-irrelevant feature contrast interact with the task-relevance of the object in question (Nordfang, 2011). In a new experiment, display size was kept constant...... was significantly higher than the probability of reporting a nonsingleton target. The probability of correctly reporting a given target also was significantly higher for the displays with 2 targets and 6 distractors than for the 8-target displays, revealing selectivity based on task-relevance. This effect...

  13. Calculation of Rydberg interaction potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Sebastian; Büchler, Hans Peter; Tresp, Christoph; Urvoy, Alban; Hofferberth, Sebastian; Menke, Henri; Firstenberg, Ofer

    2017-01-01

    The strong interaction between individual Rydberg atoms provides a powerful tool exploited in an ever-growing range of applications in quantum information science, quantum simulation and ultracold chemistry. One hallmark of the Rydberg interaction is that both its strength and angular dependence can be fine-tuned with great flexibility by choosing appropriate Rydberg states and applying external electric and magnetic fields. More and more experiments are probing this interaction at short atomic distances or with such high precision that perturbative calculations as well as restrictions to the leading dipole–dipole interaction term are no longer sufficient. In this tutorial, we review all relevant aspects of the full calculation of Rydberg interaction potentials. We discuss the derivation of the interaction Hamiltonian from the electrostatic multipole expansion, numerical and analytical methods for calculating the required electric multipole moments and the inclusion of electromagnetic fields with arbitrary direction. We focus specifically on symmetry arguments and selection rules, which greatly reduce the size of the Hamiltonian matrix, enabling the direct diagonalization of the Hamiltonian up to higher multipole orders on a desktop computer. Finally, we present example calculations showing the relevance of the full interaction calculation to current experiments. Our software for calculating Rydberg potentials including all features discussed in this tutorial is available as open source. (tutorial)

  14. The relevance of security: A latent domain of attachment relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannarini, Stefania; Boffo, Marilisa

    2014-02-01

    In the present study an adult attachment dimension, latent to the constructs of security, anxiety, and avoidance, was hypothesized, wherein security was expected to occupy the most relevant position. Furthermore, the reciprocal functioning of attachment constructs and their interactions with self-esteem were explored. Four hundreds and thirty-four Italian university students responded to two adult attachment questionnaires (Attachment Style Questionnaire and Adult Attachment Questionnaire) and to the Rosenberg Self-esteem scale. A Many-Facet Rasch Measurement modeling approach was adopted. The main results can be summarized as follows: (a) security, anxiety, and avoidance are nested under one latent attachment dimension; (b) security occupies the most prominent position on the dimension; (c) security is positively associated with a moderate level of attachment anxiety and negatively related to avoidance; and (d) a positive interaction between self-esteem and security, and a negative relation between self-esteem and anxiety, were detected. Theoretical, clinical, and empirical implications of the results are further discussed. © 2013 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Fluconazole-Warfarin Interaction: A case report with deadly consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliot V Hersh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Adverse drug-drug interactions are more common in the elderly because of the commonality of polypharmacy. When one of the interacting drugs has a low therapeutic index, the consequences can be life-threatening or fatal. This case describes a fatal cerebral haemorrhage in an 80-year old male on stable doses of warfarin prescribed by his cardiologist, who was prescribed fluconazole 200mg, once daily, for 14 days by an oral and maxillofacial surgeon to treat an intraoral fungal infection. The oral surgeon was aware that the patient was on warfarin and his INR two days prior to the appointment was 2.4. While a drug interaction alert was sent to the patient’s primary care family physician regarding fluconazole and the simvastatin she had been prescribing, the interaction was not reviewed by her for another 9- days. She then informed the patient that “it was fine” to finish the fluconazole. However, this phone conversation prompted the patient to discontinue the fluconazole after 8 doses. Two days later, the patient was confused and driving his car erratically. His son rushed him to the hospital where a CAT scan revealed a large frontal intraparenchymal haemorrhage. His INR was a 9.6. This event illustrates that this well-documented adverse drug interaction needs to be better highlighted in dental and medical training. Warfarin’s primary metabolic pathway involves the cytochrome P-450 2C9 isoform and fluconazole is a strong inhibitor of this enzyme, with the potential outcome being excessive warfarin blood levels. Frequent INR monitoring with potential warfarin dosage adjustments downward if fluconazole is prescribed, or the complete avoidance of fluconazole is recommended in patients taking warfarin. The importance of communication and coordinated care between different health care providers cannot be overstated.

  16. Intelligent Interactive Multimedia

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, Toyohide; Takahashi, Naohisa; 5th International Conference on Intelligent Interactive Multimedia Systems and Services

    2012-01-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Intelligent Interactive Multimedia Systems and Services (KES-IIMSS-12).  The Conference was jointly organised by Nagoya University in Japan and the KES International organisation, and held in the attractive city of Gifu.   The KES-IIMSS conference series, (series chairs Prof. Maria Virvou and Prof. George Tsihrintzis), presents novel research in various areas of intelligent multimedia system relevant to the development of a new generation of interactive, user-centric devices and systems.  The aim of the conference is to provide an internationally respected forum for scientific research in the technologies and applications of this new and dynamic research area.

  17. Programming Interactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Ready to create rich interactive experiences with your artwork, designs, or prototypes? This is the ideal place to start. With this hands-on guide, you'll explore several themes in interactive art and design-including 3D graphics, sound, physical interaction, computer vision, and geolocation-and learn the basic programming and electronics concepts you need to implement them. No previous experience is necessary. You'll get a complete introduction to three free tools created specifically for artists and designers: the Processing programming language, the Arduino microcontroller, and the openFr

  18. DRUG INTERACTIONS WITH DIAZEPAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Bojanić

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Diazepam is a benzodiazepine derivative with anxyolitic, anticonvulsant, hypnotic, sedative, skeletal muscle relaxant, antitremor, and amnestic activity. It is metabolized in the liver by the cytochrome P (CYP 450 enzyme system. Diazepam is N-demethylated by CYP3A4 and CYP2C19 to the active metabolite N-desmethyldiazepam, and is hydroxylated by CYP3A4 to the active metabolite temazepam. N-desmethyl-diazepam and temazepam are both further metabolized to oxazepam. Concomitant intake of inhibitors or inducers of the CYP isozymes involved in the biotransformation of diazepam may alter plasma concentrations of this drug, although this effect is unlikely to be associated with clinically relevant interactions.The goal of this article was to review the current literature on clinically relevant pharmacokinetic drug interactions with diazepam.A search of MEDLINE and EMBASE was conducted for original research and review articles published in English between January 1971. and May 2011. Among the search terms were drug interactions, diazepam, pharmacokinetics, drug metabolism, and cytochrome P450. Only articles published in peer-reviewed journals were included, and meeting abstracts were excluded. The reference lists of relevant articles were hand-searched for additional publications.Diazepam is substantially sorbed by the plastics in flexible containers, volume control set chambers, and tubings of intravenous administration sets. Manufacturers recommend not mixing with any other drug or solution in syringe or solution, although diazepam is compatible in syringe with cimetidine and ranitidine, and in Y-site with cisatracurium, dobutamine, fentanyl, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, nafcillin, quinidine gluconate, remifentanil, and sufentanil. Diazepam is compatible with: dextrose 5% in water, Ringers injection, Ringers injection lactated and sodium chloride 0.9%. Emulsified diazepam is compatible with Intralipid and Nutralipid.Diazepam has low potential

  19. Constitutional relevance of atomic energy law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lettow, S.

    1980-01-01

    In a decision publicized on December 20, 1979 the German Federal Constitutional Court rejected a claim of unconstitutionality in connection with the licensing procedure of the Muelheim-Kaerlich Nuclear Power Station currently under construction. This constitutes confirmation, by the 1st Department of the Court, of a decision in 1978 by the 2nd Department about the Kalkar fast breeder power plant, in which the peaceful utilization of nuclear energy had been found to be constitutional. However, the new decision by the Federal Constitutional Court particularly emphasizes the constitutional relevance of the rules of procedure under the Atomic Energy Act and their function with respect to the protection of civil rights. (orig.) [de

  20. Mirror neurons and their clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzolatti, Giacomo; Fabbri-Destro, Maddalena; Cattaneo, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    One of the most exciting events in neurosciences over the past few years has been the discovery of a mechanism that unifies action perception and action execution. The essence of this 'mirror' mechanism is as follows: whenever individuals observe an action being done by someone else, a set of neurons that code for that action is activated in the observers' motor system. Since the observers are aware of the outcome of their motor acts, they also understand what the other individual is doing without the need for intermediate cognitive mediation. In this Review, after discussing the most pertinent data concerning the mirror mechanism, we examine the clinical relevance of this mechanism. We first discuss the relationship between mirror mechanism impairment and some core symptoms of autism. We then outline the theoretical principles of neurorehabilitation strategies based on the mirror mechanism. We conclude by examining the relationship between the mirror mechanism and some features of the environmental dependency syndromes.