WorldWideScience

Sample records for relevant chemical fields

  1. Mathematical Properties Relevant to Geomagnetic Field Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabaka, Terence J.; Hulot, Gauthier; Olsen, Nils

    2010-01-01

    be directly measured. In this chapter, the mathematical foundation of global (as opposed to regional) geomagnetic field modeling is reviewed, and the spatial modeling of the field in spherical coordinates is focussed. Time can be dealt with as an independent variable and is not explicitly considered......Geomagnetic field modeling consists in converting large numbers of magnetic observations into a linear combination of elementary mathematical functions that best describes those observations.The set of numerical coefficients defining this linear combination is then what one refers.......The relevant elementary mathematical functions are introduced, their properties are reviewed, and how they can be used to describe the magnetic field in a source-free (such as the Earth’s neutral atmosphere) or source-dense (such as the ionosphere) environment is explained. Completeness and uniqueness...

  2. Mathematical Properties Relevant to Geomagnetic Field Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabaka, Terence J.; Hulot, Gauthier; Olsen, Nils

    2014-01-01

    be directly measured. In this chapter, the mathematical foundation of global (as opposed to regional) geomagnetic field modeling is reviewed, and the spatial modeling of the field in spherical coordinates is focused. Time can be dealt with as an independent variable and is not explicitly considered......Geomagnetic field modeling consists in converting large numbers of magnetic observations into a linear combination of elementary mathematical functions that best describes those observations. The set of numerical coefficients defining this linear combination is then what one refers....... The relevant elementary mathematical functions are introduced, their properties are reviewed, and how they can be used to describe the magnetic field in a source-free (such as the Earth’s neutral atmosphere) or source-dense (such as the ionosphere) environment is explained. Completeness and uniqueness...

  3. Low Level Chemical Toxicity: Relevance to Chemical Agent Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    or confirm a diagnosis of chemical sensitivity and suggest novel approaches in managing this malady. Project 4: Studies of gene expression...Lindberg I, Ugleholdt R, Holst J & Steiner DF 2002b Disruption of PC1/3 expression in mice causes dwarfism and multiple neuroendocrine peptide processing...2004;1:32- 34. [10] Diederich S,Eckmanns,T,Exner,P,Al-Saadi,N,Bahr,V,Oelkers,W. Differential diagnosis of polyuric/polydipsic syndromes with the aid

  4. Electromagnetic fields - introduction to relevant issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueggemeyer, H.; Csicsaky, M.

    1993-01-01

    This introductory paper surveys potential sources of electric magnetic, and electro-magnetic fields. Various cases are discussed to exemplify the total frequency range: nuclear magnetic resonance tomography, high-voltage transmission lines, transformer stations, effect lighting balls, military transmitters, transmitter towers of the Postal Services and other operators, mobile radiotelephone equipment, large broadcasting transmitters, radar radiation, high-frequency heat therapy. There is evidence suggesting that electric, magnetic and electro-magnetic fields may possibly represent a certain nuisance or health hazard even at field strength occuring in equipment used for every-day-life purposes, with an emphasis on their possible actions and effects in children and adolescents. The author discusses, in conclusion, the aerial equipment ordinance issued by Lower Saxony. (Uhe) [de

  5. Personalized Education Approaches for Chemical Engineering and Relevant Majors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Feng-qing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Personalized education has drawn increasing attention in universities these years. With the purpose of improving the studentss’ comprehensive ability and developing teaching strategies to ensure students’ education is tailored to their needs, we proposed Three-Stage Approach (TSA to enhance personalized education for chemical engineering and relevant majors: professional tutorial system--equipping with professional guidance teachers for freshman students to guide their learning activities and provide professional guidance; open experimental project--setting up open experimental projects for sophomore and junior students to choose freely; individualized education module--setting up 10 different individualized education modules for senior students to select. After years of practice, the personalized education model is improved day by day and proved effective and fruitful.

  6. Conceptual DFT: the chemical relevance of higher response functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerlings, P; De Proft, F

    2008-06-07

    .g. on the local and global polarizability. Its derivatives may govern the influence of charge on the polarizability, the R-analogues being the nuclear Fukui function and the quadratic and cubic force constants. Although some of the higher order derivatives may be difficult to evaluate a comparison with the energy expansion used in spectroscopy in terms of nuclear displacements, nuclear magnetic moments, electric and magnetic fields leads to the conjecture that, certainly cross terms may contain new, intricate information for understanding chemical reactivity.

  7. Field theoretical methods in chemical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, R.

    1982-01-01

    Field theory will become an important tool for the chemist, and this book presents a clear and thorough account of the theory itself and its applications for solving a wide variety of chemical problems. The author has brought together the foundations upon which the many and varied applications of field theory have been built, giving more intermediate steps than is usual in the derivations. This makes the book easily accessible to anyone with a background of calculus, statistical thermodynamics and elementary quantum chemistry. (orig./HK)

  8. Chemical and microbiological effects in the near field: current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewart, F.T.; Pugh, S.Y.R.; Wisbey, S.J.; Woodwark, D.R.

    1988-12-01

    The radionuclide inventory of a radioactive waste repository, influenced by the chemical conditions in the near-field, determines the source term for radionuclides entering the geosphere. The research described in this report is focussed on providing the information necessary to quantify this source term. The processes which interact to determine near field behaviour over a long period of time are complex and a simplified representation is required for radiological assessment modelling. The assumptions made in formulating the near field assessment methodology are discussed and justified in this report. The techniques for acquiring the necessary large body of data for a wide range of relevant radionuclides are also described and the values used in the CASCADE I exercise are given. (author)

  9. Chemical effects in the near-field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewart, F.T.; Tasker, P.W.

    1987-01-01

    A research program is described which is designed to investigate the chemical conditions in the near-field of a concrete based repository and the behavior of the radiologically important nuclides under these conditions. The chemical conditions are determined by the corrosion of the iron components of the repository and by the soluble components of the concrete. Both of these have been investigated experimentally and models developed which have been validated by further experiment. The effect of these reactions on the repository pH and Eh, and how these develop in time and space have been modelled using a new coupled chemical equilibrium and transport code. The solubility of the important nuclides are being studied experimentally under these conditions, and under sensible variations. Results are reported for plutonium, americium, neptunium and lead; these results have been under to refine the thermodynamic data base used for the geochemical code PHREEQE. The sorption behavior of plutonium and americium, under the same conditions, have been studied, the sorption coefficients were found to be large and independent of the concrete formulation, particle size and solid liquid ratio

  10. Changing struggles for relevance in eight fields of natural science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessels, L.K.; Lente, H. van; Smits, R.E.H.M.; Grin, J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the consequences of institutional changes on academic research practices in eight fields of natural science in the Netherlands. The authors analyse the similarities and differences among the dynamics of these different fields and reflect on possible explanations for the

  11. Enhanced Field Emission Studies on Niobium Surfaces Relevant to High Field Superconducting Radio-Frequency Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Wang

    2002-01-01

    Enhanced field emission (EFE) presents the main impediment to higher acceleration gradients in superconducting niobium (Nb) radio frequency cavities for particle accelerators. The strength, number and sources of EFE sites strongly depend on surface preparation and handling. The main objective of this thesis project is to systematically investigate the sources of EFE from Nb, to evaluate the best available surface preparation techniques with respect to resulting field emission, and to establish an optimized process to minimize or eliminate EFE. To achieve these goals, a scanning field emission microscope (SFEM) was designed and built as an extension to an existing commercial scanning electron microscope (SEM). In the SFEM chamber of ultra high vacuum, a sample is moved laterally in a raster pattern under a high voltage anode tip for EFE detection and localization. The sample is then transferred under vacuum to the SEM chamber equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for individual emitting site characterization. Compared to other systems built for similar purposes, this apparatus has low cost and maintenance, high operational flexibility, considerably bigger scan area, as well as reliable performance. EFE sources from planar Nb have been studied after various surface preparation, including chemical etching and electropolishing, combined with ultrasonic or high-pressure water rinse. Emitters have been identified, analyzed and the preparation process has been examined and improved based on EFE results. As a result, field-emission-free or near field-emission-free surfaces at ∼140 MV/m have been consistently achieved with the above techniques. Characterization on the remaining emitters leads to the conclusion that no evidence of intrinsic emitters, i.e., no fundamental electric field limit induced by EFE, has been observed up to ∼140 MV/m. Chemically etched and electropolished Nb are compared and no significant difference is observed up to ∼140 MV

  12. Enhanced Field Emission Studies on Niobium Surfaces Relevant to High Field Superconducting Radio-Frequency Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tong [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2002-09-18

    Enhanced field emission (EFE) presents the main impediment to higher acceleration gradients in superconducting niobium (Nb) radiofrequency cavities for particle accelerators. The strength, number and sources of EFE sites strongly depend on surface preparation and handling. The main objective of this thesis project is to systematically investigate the sources of EFE from Nb, to evaluate the best available surface preparation techniques with respect to resulting field emission, and to establish an optimized process to minimize or eliminate EFE. To achieve these goals, a scanning field emission microscope (SFEM) was designed and built as an extension to an existing commercial scanning electron microscope (SEM). In the SFEM chamber of ultra high vacuum, a sample is moved laterally in a raster pattern under a high voltage anode tip for EFE detection and localization. The sample is then transferred under vacuum to the SEM chamber equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for individual emitting site characterization. Compared to other systems built for similar purposes, this apparatus has low cost and maintenance, high operational flexibility, considerably bigger scan area, as well as reliable performance. EFE sources from planar Nb have been studied after various surface preparation, including chemical etching and electropolishing, combined with ultrasonic or high-pressure water rinse. Emitters have been identified, analyzed and the preparation process has been examined and improved based on EFE results. As a result, field-emission-free or near field-emission-free surfaces at ~140 MV/m have been consistently achieved with the above techniques. Characterization on the remaining emitters leads to the conclusion that no evidence of intrinsic emitters, i.e., no fundamental electric field limit induced by EFE, has been observed up to ~140 MV/m. Chemically etched and electropolished Nb are compared and no significant difference is observed up to ~140 MV/m. To

  13. On Study of Application of Micro-reactor in Chemistry and Chemical Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunshen

    2018-02-01

    Serving as a micro-scale chemical reaction system, micro-reactor is characterized by high heat transfer efficiency and mass transfer, strictly controlled reaction time and good safety performance; compared with the traditional mixing reactor, it can effectively shorten reaction time by virtue of these advantages and greatly enhance the chemical reaction conversion rate. However, problems still exist in the process where micro-reactor is used for production in chemistry and chemical field, and relevant researchers are required to optimize and perfect the performance of micro-reactor. This paper analyzes specific application of micro-reactor in chemistry and chemical field.

  14. Environmental mixtures of nanomaterials and chemicals: The Trojan-horse phenomenon and its relevance for ecotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naasz, Steffi; Altenburger, Rolf; Kühnel, Dana

    2018-04-22

    The usage of engineered nanomaterials (NM) offers many novel products and applications with advanced features, but at the same time raises concerns with regard to potential adverse biological effects. Upon release and emission, NM may interact with chemicals in the environment, potentially leading to a co-exposure of organisms and the occurrence of mixture effects. A prominent idea is that NM may act as carriers of chemicals, facilitating and enhancing the entry of substances into cells or organisms, subsequently leading to an increased toxicity. In the literature, the term 'Trojan-horse effect' describes this hypothesis. The relevance of this mechanism for organisms is, however, unclear as yet. Here, a review has been performed to provide a more systematic picture on existing evidence. It includes 151 experimental studies investigating the exposure of various NM and chemical mixtures in ecotoxicological in vitro and in vivo model systems. The papers retrieved comprised studies investigating (i) uptake, (ii) toxicity and (iii) investigations considering both, changes in substance uptake and toxicity upon joint exposure of a chemical with an NM. A closer inspection of the studies demonstrated that the existing evidence for interference of NM-chemical mixture exposure with uptake and toxicity points into different directions compared to the original Trojan-horse hypothesis. We could discriminate at least 7 different categories to capture the evidence ranging from no changes in uptake and toxicity to an increase in uptake and toxicity upon mixture exposure. Concluding recommendations for the consideration of relevant processes are given, including a proposal for a nomenclature to describe NM-chemical mixture interactions in consistent terms. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Silicon Nanowire Field-effect Chemical Sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, S.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes the work that has been done on the project “Design and optimization of silicon nanowire for chemical sensing‿, including Si-NW fabrication, electrical/electrochemical modeling, the application as ISFET, and the build-up of Si- NW/LOC system for automatic sample delivery. A

  16. Physical, chemical, and biological properties of radiocerium relevant to radiation protection guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Present knowledge of the relevant physical, chemical, and biological properties of radiocerium as a basis for establishing radiation protection guidelines is summarized. The first section of the report reviews the chemical and physical properties of radiocerium relative to the biological behavior of internally-deposited cerium and other lanthanides. The second section of the report gives the sources of radiocerium in the environment and the pathways to man. The third section of the report describes the metabolic fate of cerium in several mammalian species as a basis for predicting its metabolic fate in man. The fourth section of the report considers the biomedical effects of radiocerium in light of extensive animal experimentation. The last two sections of the report describe the history of radiation protection guidelines for radiocerium and summarize data required for evaluating the adequacy of current radiation protection guidelines. Each section begins with a summary of the most important findings that follow

  17. Silicon Nanowire Field-effect Chemical Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, S.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes the work that has been done on the project “Design and optimization of silicon nanowire for chemical sensing‿, including Si-NW fabrication, electrical/electrochemical modeling, the application as ISFET, and the build-up of Si- NW/LOC system for automatic sample delivery. A novel top-down fabrication technique was presented for single-crystal Si-NW fabrication realized with conventional microfabrication technique. High quality triangular Si-NWs were made with high wafer-s...

  18. Out-of-Field Dose Equivalents Delivered by Passively Scattered Therapeutic Proton Beams for Clinically Relevant Field Configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wroe, Andrew; Clasie, Ben; Kooy, Hanne; Flanz, Jay; Schulte, Reinhard; Rosenfeld, Anatoly

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Microdosimetric measurements were performed at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, to assess the dose equivalent external to passively delivered proton fields for various clinical treatment scenarios. Methods and Materials: Treatment fields evaluated included a prostate cancer field, cranial and spinal medulloblastoma fields, ocular melanoma field, and a field for an intracranial stereotactic treatment. Measurements were completed with patient-specific configurations of clinically relevant treatment settings using a silicon-on-insulator microdosimeter placed on the surface of and at various depths within a homogeneous Lucite phantom. The dose equivalent and average quality factor were assessed as a function of both lateral displacement from the treatment field edge and distance downstream of the beam's distal edge. Results: Dose-equivalent value range was 8.3-0.3 mSv/Gy (2.5-60-cm lateral displacement) for a typical prostate cancer field, 10.8-0.58 mSv/Gy (2.5-40-cm lateral displacement) for the cranial medulloblastoma field, 2.5-0.58 mSv/Gy (5-20-cm lateral displacement) for the spinal medulloblastoma field, and 0.5-0.08 mSv/Gy (2.5-10-cm lateral displacement) for the ocular melanoma field. Measurements of external field dose equivalent for the stereotactic field case showed differences as high as 50% depending on the modality of beam collimation. Average quality factors derived from this work ranged from 2-7, with the value dependent on the position within the phantom in relation to the primary beam. Conclusions: This work provides a valuable and clinically relevant comparison of the external field dose equivalents for various passively scattered proton treatment fields

  19. THE CURRENT STATE OF KNOWLEDGE IN THE VALUE RELEVANCE RESEARCH FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen- Alexandra BALTARIU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to assess the scientific literature referring to the value relevance of reported accounting information over a twelve year period starting from 2002. The approach of the paper is a theoretical (conceptual one. In order to complete the purpose of the paper we selected as research method the longitudinal qualitative analysis. The qualitative analysis carried out presents a deductive character. Our conclusions regarding the general characteristics of the research field pertaining to the value relevance of reported accounting information are drawn based on the main results and scientific contributions identified in the research field of interest.

  20. Nonthermal plasmas around black holes, relevant collective modes, new configurations, and magnetic field amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppi, B., E-mail: coppi@mit.edu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)

    2017-03-15

    The radiation emission from Shining Black Holes is most frequently observed to have nonthermal features. It is therefore appropriate to consider relevant collective processes in plasmas surrounding black holes that contain high energy particles with nonthermal distributions in momentum space. A fluid description with significant temperature anisotropies is the simplest relevant approach. These anisotropies are shown to have a critical influence on: (a) the existence and characteristics of stationary plasma and field ring configurations, (b) the excitation of “thermo-gravitational modes” driven by temperature anisotropies and gradients that involve gravity and rotation, (c) the generation of magnetic fields over macroscopic scale distances, and (d) the transport of angular momentum.

  1. The collection and field chemical analysis of water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korte, N.E.; Ealey, D.T.; Hollenbach, M.H.

    1984-01-01

    A successful water sampling program requires a clear understanding of appropriate measurement and sampling procedures in order to obtain reliable field data and representative samples. It is imperative that the personnel involved have a thorough knowledge of the limitations of the techniques being used. Though this seems self-evident, many sampling and field-chemical-analysis programs are still not properly conducted. Recognizing these problems, the Department of Energy contracted with Bendix Field Engineering Corporation through the Technical Measurements Center to develop and select procedures for water sampling and field chemical analysis at waste sites. The fundamental causese of poor field programs are addressed in this paper, largely through discussion of specific field-measurement techniques and their limitations. Recommendations for improvement, including quality-assurance measures, are also presented

  2. The Intestinal Microbiome in Infectious Diseases: The Clinical Relevance of a Rapidly Emerging Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harris, Vanessa C.; Haak, Bastiaan W.; Boele van Hensbroek, Michaël; Wiersinga, Willem J.

    2017-01-01

    The field of infectious disease is undergoing a paradigm shift as the intestinal microbiome is becoming understood. The aim of this review is to inform infectious disease physicians of the potential relevance of the intestinal microbiome to their practice. We searched Medline using both index and

  3. Evaluating amber force fields using computed NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koes, David R; Vries, John K

    2017-10-01

    NMR chemical shifts can be computed from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using a template matching approach and a library of conformers containing chemical shifts generated from ab initio quantum calculations. This approach has potential utility for evaluating the force fields that underlie these simulations. Imperfections in force fields generate flawed atomic coordinates. Chemical shifts obtained from flawed coordinates have errors that can be traced back to these imperfections. We use this approach to evaluate a series of AMBER force fields that have been refined over the course of two decades (ff94, ff96, ff99SB, ff14SB, ff14ipq, and ff15ipq). For each force field a series of MD simulations are carried out for eight model proteins. The calculated chemical shifts for the 1 H, 15 N, and 13 C a atoms are compared with experimental values. Initial evaluations are based on root mean squared (RMS) errors at the protein level. These results are further refined based on secondary structure and the types of atoms involved in nonbonded interactions. The best chemical shift for identifying force field differences is the shift associated with peptide protons. Examination of the model proteins on a residue by residue basis reveals that force field performance is highly dependent on residue position. Examination of the time course of nonbonded interactions at these sites provides explanations for chemical shift differences at the atomic coordinate level. Results show that the newer ff14ipq and ff15ipq force fields developed with the implicitly polarized charge method perform better than the older force fields. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Connecting Organic Aerosol Climate-Relevant Properties to Chemical Mechanisms of Sources and Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, Joel [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-01-26

    The research conducted on this project aimed to improve our understanding of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in the atmosphere, and how the properties of the SOA impact climate through its size, phase state, and optical properties. The goal of this project was to demonstrate that the use of molecular composition information to mechanistically connect source apportionment and climate properties can improve the physical basis for simulation of SOA formation and properties in climate models. The research involved developing and improving methods to provide online measurements of the molecular composition of SOA under atmospherically relevant conditions and to apply this technology to controlled simulation chamber experiments and field measurements. The science we have completed with the methodology will impact the simulation of aerosol particles in climate models.

  5. Communication: Control of chemical reactions using electric field gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshmukh, Shivaraj D.; Tsori, Yoav, E-mail: tsori@bgu.ac.il [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2016-05-21

    We examine theoretically a new idea for spatial and temporal control of chemical reactions. When chemical reactions take place in a mixture of solvents, an external electric field can alter the local mixture composition, thereby accelerating or decelerating the rate of reaction. The spatial distribution of electric field strength can be non-trivial and depends on the arrangement of the electrodes producing it. In the absence of electric field, the mixture is homogeneous and the reaction takes place uniformly in the reactor volume. When an electric field is applied, the solvents separate and the reactants are concentrated in the same phase or separate to different phases, depending on their relative miscibility in the solvents, and this can have a large effect on the kinetics of the reaction. This method could provide an alternative way to control runaway reactions and to increase the reaction rate without using catalysts.

  6. Communication: Control of chemical reactions using electric field gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Shivaraj D; Tsori, Yoav

    2016-05-21

    We examine theoretically a new idea for spatial and temporal control of chemical reactions. When chemical reactions take place in a mixture of solvents, an external electric field can alter the local mixture composition, thereby accelerating or decelerating the rate of reaction. The spatial distribution of electric field strength can be non-trivial and depends on the arrangement of the electrodes producing it. In the absence of electric field, the mixture is homogeneous and the reaction takes place uniformly in the reactor volume. When an electric field is applied, the solvents separate and the reactants are concentrated in the same phase or separate to different phases, depending on their relative miscibility in the solvents, and this can have a large effect on the kinetics of the reaction. This method could provide an alternative way to control runaway reactions and to increase the reaction rate without using catalysts.

  7. Extraction and derivatization of chemical weapons convention relevant aminoalcohols on magnetic cation-exchange resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Varoon; Garg, Prabhat; Chinthakindi, Sridhar; Tak, Vijay; Dubey, Devendra Kumar

    2014-02-14

    Analysis and identification of nitrogen containing aminoalcohols is an integral part of the verification analysis of chemical weapons convention (CWC). This study was aimed to develop extraction and derivatization of aminoalcohols of CWC relevance by using magnetic dispersive solid-phase extraction (MDSPE) in combination with on-resin derivatization (ORD). For this purpose, sulfonated magnetic cation-exchange resins (SMRs) were prepared using magnetite nanoparticles as core, styrene and divinylbenzene as polymer coat and sulfonic acid as acidic cation exchanger. SMRs were successfully employed as extractant for targeted basic analytes. Adsorbed analytes were derivatized with hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) on the surface of extractant. Derivatized (silylated) compounds were analyzed by GC-MS in SIM and full scan mode. The linearity of the method ranged from 5 to 200ngmL(-1). The LOD and LOQ ranged from 2 to 6ngmL(-1) and 5 to 19ngmL(-1) respectively. The relative standard deviation for intra-day repeatability and inter-day intermediate precision ranged from 5.1% to 6.6% and 0.2% to 7.6% respectively. Recoveries of analytes from spiked water samples from different sources varied from 28.4% to 89.3%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Durable chemical sensors based on field-effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhoudt, David

    1995-01-01

    The design of durable chemical sensors based on field-effect transistors (FETs) is described. After modification of an ion-sensitive FET (ISFET) with a polysiloxane membrane matrix, it is possible to attach all electroactive components covalently. Preliminary results of measurements with a

  9. Using novel descriptor accounting for ligand-receptor interactions to define and visually explore biologically relevant chemical space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabal, Obdulia; Oyarzabal, Julen

    2012-05-25

    The definition and pragmatic implementation of biologically relevant chemical space is critical in addressing navigation strategies in the overlapping regions where chemistry and therapeutically relevant targets reside and, therefore, also key to performing an efficient drug discovery project. Here, we describe the development and implementation of a simple and robust method for representing biologically relevant chemical space as a general reference according to current knowledge, independently of any reference space, and analyzing chemical structures accordingly. Underlying our method is the generation of a novel descriptor (LiRIf) that converts structural information into a one-dimensional string accounting for the plausible ligand-receptor interactions as well as for topological information. Capitalizing on ligand-receptor interactions as a descriptor enables the clustering, profiling, and comparison of libraries of compounds from a chemical biology and medicinal chemistry perspective. In addition, as a case study, R-groups analysis is performed to identify the most populated ligand-receptor interactions according to different target families (GPCR, kinases, etc.), as well as to evaluate the coverage of biologically relevant chemical space by structures annotated in different databases (ChEMBL, Glida, etc.).

  10. Pollen Contaminated With Field-Relevant Levels of Cyhalothrin Affects Honey Bee Survival, Nutritional Physiology, and Pollen Consumption Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolezal, Adam G; Carrillo-Tripp, Jimena; Miller, W Allen; Bonning, Bryony C; Toth, Amy L

    2016-02-01

    Honey bees are exposed to a variety of environmental factors that impact their health, including nutritional stress, pathogens, and pesticides. In particular, there has been increasing evidence that sublethal exposure to pesticides can cause subtle, yet important effects on honey bee health and behavior. Here, we add to this body of knowledge by presenting data on bee-collected pollen containing sublethal levels of cyhalothrin, a pyrethroid insecticide, which, when fed to young honey bees, resulted in significant changes in lifespan, nutritional physiology,and behavior. For the first time, we show that when young, nest-aged bees are presented with pollen containing field-relevant levels of cyhalothrin, they reduce their consumption of contaminated pollen. This indicates that, at least for some chemicals, young bees are able to detect contamination in pollen and change their behavioral response, even if the contamination levels do not prevent foraging honey bees from collecting the contaminated pollen.

  11. Recent developments in chemical treatment of roughages and their relevance to animal production in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, E.

    1989-01-01

    Recent research in developed regions, at laboratory level, has investigated acids, amines and the oxidizing agents sulphur dioxide, ozone and alkaline hydrogen peroxide as reagents for upgrading roughages. In vivo experiments with sheep show improvements in digestibility from treating with 40 g SO 2 per kg wheat straw DM for 3 d at 70 deg. C, comparable to responses normally gained by treating with NaOH. Alkaline H 2 O 2 (pH11.5) treatment in one study increased wheat straw DM digestibility in sheep fed ad libitum, from 467 to 659 g/kg. However this treatment used large inputs (260 g H 2 O 2 and 180 g NaOH/kg straw DM in 26 L solution for 16 h, followed by drying); subsequent studies showed possible input reductions. The techniques are not relevant for use in developing countries except possibly at centralized processing plants, but greater commercial viability will need to be demonstrated before then. The NaOH dip method is the most effective current, low technology upgrading technique and is capable of further development to produce treated roughage of improved digestibility and optimum content of N and required minerals. There are no major new developments in urea ammonia treatment. The recent 'AGRI-AM' method produces NH 3 by hydrating a mixture of CaO and (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 fertilizers, but the method requires much chemical input. 'Ensiling' barley straw for 60 d with 60 g Ca(OH) 2 and 30 g urea per kg straw DM improves intake and digestibility in sheep, with little loss of N from the system. This is due to reduced urea hydrolysis caused by high pH. Other research shows that the quantity of straw needing to be treated can be halved by allowing goats (or sheep) to 'graze' untreated straw (to allow 50% refusals) followed by treatment and refeeding. 92 refs, 11 tabs

  12. Comprehensive multipathway risk assessment of chemicals associated with recycled ("crumb") rubber in synthetic turf fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Michael K; Lemay, Julie C; Pacheco Shubin, Sara; Prueitt, Robyn L

    2018-01-01

    Thousands of synthetic turf fields in the US are regularly used by millions of individuals (particularly children and adolescents). Although many safety assessments have concluded that there are low or negligible risks related to exposure to chemicals found in the recycled rubber used to make these fields, concerns remain about the safety of this product. Existing studies of recycled rubber's potential health risks have limitations such as small sample sizes and limited evaluation of relevant exposure pathways and scenarios. Conduct a comprehensive multipathway human health risk assessment (HHRA) of exposure to chemicals found in recycled rubber. All available North American data on the chemical composition of recycled rubber, as well as air sampling data collected on or near synthetic turf fields, were identified via a literature search. Ingestion, dermal contact, and inhalation pathways were evaluated according to US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) guidance, and exposure scenarios for adults, adolescents, and children were considered. Estimated non-cancer hazards and cancer risks for all the evaluated scenarios were within US EPA guidelines. In addition, cancer risk levels for users of synthetic turf field were comparable to or lower than those associated with natural soil fields. This HHRA's results add to the growing body of literature that suggests recycled rubber infill in synthetic turf poses negligible risks to human health. This comprehensive assessment provides data that allow stakeholders to make informed decisions about installing and using these fields. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. In Silico Prediction of Toxicokinetic Parameters for Environmentally Relevant Chemicals for Risk-Based Prioritization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxicokinetic (TK) models can address an important component of chemical risk assessments by helping bridge the gap between chemical exposure and measured toxicity endpoints. The metabolic clearance rate (CLint) and fraction of a chemical unbound by plasma proteins (Fub) are crit...

  14. Using Horizontal Wells for Chemical EOR: Field Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Delamaide

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Primary production of heavy oil in general only achieves a recovery of less than 10% OOIP. Waterflooding has been applied for a number of years in heavy oil pools and can yield much higher recovery but the efficiency of the process diminishes when viscosity is above a few hundreds cp with high water-cuts and the need to recycle significant volumes of water; in addition, significant quantities of oil are still left behind. To increase recovery beyond that, Enhanced Oil Recovery methods are needed. Thermal methods such as steam injection or Steam-Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD are not always applicable, in particular when the pay is thin and in that case chemical EOR can be an alternative. The two main chemical EOR processes are polymer and Alkali-Surfactant-Polymer (ASP flooding. The earlier records of field application of polymer injection in heavy oil fields date from the 1970’s however; the process had seen very few applications until recently. ASP in heavy oil has seen even fewer applications. A major specificity of chemical EOR in heavy oil is that the highly viscous oil bank is difficult to displace and that injectivity with vertical wells can be limited, particularly in thin reservoirs which are the prime target for chemical EOR. This situation has changed with the development of horizontal drilling and as a result, several chemical floods in heavy oil have been implemented in the past 10 years, using horizontal wells. The goal of this paper is to present some of the best documented field cases. The most successful and largest of these is the Pelican Lake polymer flood in Canada, operated by CNRL and Cenovus which is currently producing over 60,000 bbl/d. The Patos Marinza polymer flood by Bankers Petroleum in Albania and the Mooney project (polymer, ASP by BlackPearl (again in Canada are also worthy of discussion.

  15. Thermodynamic properties for applications in chemical industry via classical force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara-Carrion, Gabriela; Hasse, Hans; Vrabec, Jadran

    2012-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties of fluids are of key importance for the chemical industry. Presently, the fluid property models used in process design and optimization are mostly equations of state or G (E) models, which are parameterized using experimental data. Molecular modeling and simulation based on classical force fields is a promising alternative route, which in many cases reasonably complements the well established methods. This chapter gives an introduction to the state-of-the-art in this field regarding molecular models, simulation methods, and tools. Attention is given to the way modeling and simulation on the scale of molecular force fields interact with other scales, which is mainly by parameter inheritance. Parameters for molecular force fields are determined both bottom-up from quantum chemistry and top-down from experimental data. Commonly used functional forms for describing the intra- and intermolecular interactions are presented. Several approaches for ab initio to empirical force field parameterization are discussed. Some transferable force field families, which are frequently used in chemical engineering applications, are described. Furthermore, some examples of force fields that were parameterized for specific molecules are given. Molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods for the calculation of transport properties and vapor-liquid equilibria are introduced. Two case studies are presented. First, using liquid ammonia as an example, the capabilities of semi-empirical force fields, parameterized on the basis of quantum chemical information and experimental data, are discussed with respect to thermodynamic properties that are relevant for the chemical industry. Second, the ability of molecular simulation methods to describe accurately vapor-liquid equilibrium properties of binary mixtures containing CO(2) is shown.

  16. Genome-wide Escherichia coli stress response and improved tolerance towards industrially relevant chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rau, Martin Holm; Calero Valdayo, Patricia; Lennen, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Economically viable biobased production of bulk chemicals and biofuels typically requires high product titers. During microbial bioconversion this often leads to product toxicity, and tolerance is therefore a critical element in the engineering of production strains. Here, a systems biology...... approach was employed to understand the chemical stress response of Escherichia coli, including a genome-wide screen for mutants with increased fitness during chemical stress. Twelve chemicals with significant production potential were selected, consisting of organic solvent-like chemicals (butanol......, hydroxy-γ-butyrolactone, 1,4-butanediol, furfural), organic acids (acetate, itaconic acid, levulinic acid, succinic acid), amino acids (serine, threonine) and membrane-intercalating chemicals (decanoic acid, geraniol). The transcriptional response towards these chemicals revealed large overlaps...

  17. X-ray chemical analyzer for field applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamba, O.O.M.

    1977-01-01

    A self-supporting portable field multichannel x-ray chemical analyzer system is claimed. It comprises a lightweight, flexibly connected, remotely locatable, radioisotope-excited sensing probe utilizing a cryogenically-cooled solid state semi-conductor crystal detector for fast in situ non-destructive, qualitative and quantitative analysis of elements in solid, powder, liquid or slurried form, utilizing an x-ray energy dispersive spectrometry technique

  18. Electro-Analytical Study of Material Interfaces Relevant for Chemical Mechanical Planarization and Lithium Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Michael C.

    galvanic corrosions in chemically controlled low-pressure CMP. The CMP specific functions of the slurry components are characterized in the tribo-electro-analytical approach by using voltammetry, open circuit potential (OCP) measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in the presence as well as in the absence of surface abrasion, both with and without the inclusion of colloidal silica (SiO2) abrasives. The results are used to understand the reaction mechanisms responsible for supporting material removal and corrosion suppression. The project carried out in the area of Li ion batteries (LIBs) uses electro-analytical techniques to probe electrolyte characteristics as well as electrode material performance. The investigation concentrates on optimizing a tactically chosen set of electrolyte compositions for low-to-moderate temperature applications of lithium titanium oxide (LTO), a relatively new anode material for such batteries. For this application, mixtures of non-aqueous carbonate based solvents are studied in combination with lithium perchlorate. The temperature dependent conductivities of the electrolytes are rigorously measured and analyzed using EIS. The experimental considerations and the working principle of this EIS based approach are carefully examined and standardized in the course of this study. These experiments also investigate the effects of temperature variations (below room temperature) on the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation characteristics of LTO in the given electrolytes. This dissertation is organized as follows: Each experimental system and its relevance for practical applications are briefly introduced in each chapter. The experimental approach and the motivation for carrying out the investigation are also noted in that context. The experimental details specific to the particular study are described. This is followed by the results and their discussion, and subsequently, by the specific conclusions drawn from the given

  19. Relevance of leaf surface contamination for assessing chemical composition of bromeliads in a restinga forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, C; Fernandes, E A.N.; Franca, E J; Bacchi, M A; Tagliaferro, F S [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2008-11-15

    Resuspended soil and other airborne particles adhered to the leaf surface affect the chemical composition of the plant. A well-defined cleaning procedure is necessary to avoid this problem, providing a correct assessment of the inherent chemical composition of bromeliads. To evaluate the influence of a washing procedure, INAA was applied for determining chemical elements in the leaves of bromeliads from Vriesea carinata species, both non-washed and washed with Alconox, EDTA and bi-distilled water. Br, Ce, Hg, La, Sc, Se, Sm and Th showed higher mass fractions in nonwashed leaves. The washing procedure removed the exogenous material without leaching chemical elements from inside the tissues. (author)

  20. Relevance of leaf surface contamination for assessing chemical composition of bromeliads in a restinga forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, C.; Fernandes, E.A.N.; Franca, E.J.; Bacchi, M.A.; Tagliaferro, F.S.

    2008-01-01

    Resuspended soil and other airborne particles adhered to the leaf surface affect the chemical composition of the plant. A well-defined cleaning procedure is necessary to avoid this problem, providing a correct assessment of the inherent chemical composition of bromeliads. To evaluate the influence of a washing procedure, INAA was applied for determining chemical elements in the leaves of bromeliads from Vriesea carinata species, both non-washed and washed with Alconox, EDTA and bi-distilled water. Br, Ce, Hg, La, Sc, Se, Sm and Th showed higher mass fractions in nonwashed leaves. The washing procedure removed the exogenous material without leaching chemical elements from inside the tissues. (author)

  1. Transfer of radioactive and chemical pollutants into irrigated rice fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myttenaere, C.; Mousny, J.-M.; Dabin, P.; Bittel, R.

    1975-01-01

    In a general study on the consequences of radioactive and chemical releases in continental waters, flooded rice fields must be considered as a very important ecosystem due to the very large quantities of water used. In order to approach as much as possible to the natural conditions (irrigated rice fields of Northern Italy) ''mini-rice fields'' were built and local practices were respected. The behavior of activation and fission products ( 137 Cs, 60 Co, 65 Zn, 51 Cr...) and heavy metals pollutants (Cd, Cr, Sn) was studied and the transfer from water to soil and plant was followed. Concentration factors were calculated for the different organs of the plant and the impact of rice ingested to the dose delivered to man was evaluated [fr

  2. Identification of environmentally relevant chemicals in bibliographic databases: a comparative analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Ole; Wallin, Johan Albert

    2013-01-01

    takes as its starting point environmentally important chemicals and the retrieval of selectively chosen substances in the four databases: SciFinder, Web of Science (WoS), Scopus and Google Scholar. The way chemical data are stored in the databases plays a major role in the recovery process...

  3. Mixtures of environmentally relevant endocrine disrupting chemicals affect mammary gland development in female and male rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Karen Riiber; Johansson, Hanna Katarina Lilith; Boberg, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Estrogenic chemicals are able to alter mammary gland development in female rodents, but little is known on the effects of anti-androgens and mixtures of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) with dissimilar modes of action. Pregnant rat dams were exposed during gestation and lactation to mixtures...

  4. Environmentally relevant chemical mixtures of concern in waters of United States tributaries to the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Sarah M.; Brigham, Mark E.; Kiesling, Richard L.; Schoenfuss, Heiko L.; Jorgenson, Zachary G.

    2018-01-01

    The North American Great Lakes are a vital natural resource that provide fish and wildlife habitat, as well as drinking water and waste assimilation services for millions of people. Tributaries to the Great Lakes receive chemical inputs from various point and nonpoint sources, and thus are expected to have complex mixtures of chemicals. However, our understanding of the co‐occurrence of specific chemicals in complex mixtures is limited. To better understand the occurrence of specific chemical mixtures in the US Great Lakes Basin, surface water from 24 US tributaries to the Laurentian Great Lakes was collected and analyzed for diverse suites of organic chemicals, primarily focused on chemicals of concern (e.g., pharmaceuticals, personal care products, fragrances). A total of 181 samples and 21 chemical classes were assessed for mixture compositions. Basin wide, 1664 mixtures occurred in at least 25% of sites. The most complex mixtures identified comprised 9 chemical classes and occurred in 58% of sampled tributaries. Pharmaceuticals typically occurred in complex mixtures, reflecting pharmaceutical‐use patterns and wastewater facility outfall influences. Fewer mixtures were identified at lake or lake‐influenced sites than at riverine sites. As mixture complexity increased, the probability of a specific mixture occurring more often than by chance greatly increased, highlighting the importance of understanding source contributions to the environment. This empirically based analysis of mixture composition and occurrence may be used to focus future sampling efforts or mixture toxicity assessments. 

  5. Chemical, Biological, and Explosive Sensors for Field Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyle, Kevin; Manard, Manuel; Weeks, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) is developing handheld chemical, biological, and explosive (CBE) detection systems and sensor motes for wireless networked field operations. The CBE sensors are capable of detecting and identifying multiple targeted toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) and high-explosive vapor components. The CBE devices are based on differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) coupled with fast gas chromatography (GC) or mass spectrometry. The systems all include the concepts of: (1) Direct air/particulate 'smart' sampling; (2) Selective, continuous real-time (∼1 sec) alert monitoring using DMS; and (3) Highly selective, rapid dual technology separation/verification analysis The biosensor technology is based on Raman aerosol particle flow cytometry for target detection and identification. Monitoring and identifying trace level chemical vapors directly from ambient air will allow First Responders to quickly adapt situational response strategies and personal protective equipment needs to the specific response scenario being encountered. First Responders require great confidence in the measurements and ability of a given system to detect CBE below threshold levels without interferences. The concept of determining the background matrix in near real-time to allow subsequent automated field-programmable method selection and cueing of high-value assets in a wide range of environs will be presented. This provides CBE information for decisions prior to First Responders entering the response site or sending a portable mobile unit for a remote site survey of the hazards. The focus is on real-time information needed by those responsible for emergency response and national security

  6. Chemical cues mediate species recognition in field crickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances eTyler

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs are important in mate choice in many insects, and may be used for species recognition if CHC profiles differ between potentially hybridizing species. In the sibling field cricket species Gryllus campestris and G. bimaculatus, females of G. bimaculatus are tolerant towards G. campestris males and can mate with them. However, G. campestris females are highly aggressive towards heterospecific G. bimaculatus males, and matings between them never happen. We examined whether cricket females might use CHCs to determine the species identity of their potential mates. We firstly analyzed the cuticular chemical profile by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry to assess the potential of CHCs to be used for species recognition in these crickets. We then manipulated females’ ability to detect chemical cues by carrying out chemical ablation of the antennae, and measured changes in aggressive responses to heterospecific males. We show that there are significant interspecies differences in CHC expression for both sexes, and that females with chemically ablated antennae reduce aggressive behavior towards heterospecific males. Our findings support the prediction that cuticular semiochemicals can play a key role in reproductive isolation between closely related insect species.

  7. Field experience with KWU SG chemical cleaning process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odar, S.

    1989-01-01

    The ingress of corrosion products into PWR steam generators (SG's) their deposition and the subsequent concentration of salt impurities can induce a variety of mechanisms for corrosion attack on SG tubing. Already, some plants have had to replace their steam generators due to severe corrosion damage and others are seriously considering the same costly action in the near future. One of the most effective ways to counteract corrosion mechanisms and thus to reduce the likelihood of SG replacement becoming necessary is to clean the SG's and to keep them clean. For many years, the industry has been involved in developing different types of cleaning techniques. Among these, chemical cleaning has been shown to be especially effective. In this article, the KWU chemical cleaning process, for which there is considerable application experience, is described. The results of field applications will be presented together with material compatibility data and information on cleaning effectiveness. (author)

  8. Evaluation of food-relevant chemicals in the ToxCast high-throughput screening program

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Thousands of chemicals are directly added to or come in contact with food, many of which have undergone little to no toxicological evaluation. The landscape of the...

  9. A Chemically Relevant Model for Teaching the Second Law of Thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Bryce E.; Morikawa, Tetsuo

    2002-01-01

    Introduces a chemical model illustrating the aspects of the second law of thermodynamics which explains concepts such as reversibility, path dependence, and extrapolation in terms of electrochemistry and calorimetry. Presents a thought experiment using an ideal galvanic electrochemical cell. (YDS)

  10. Method for extracting relevant electrical parameters from graphene field-effect transistors using a physical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boscá, A.; Pedrós, J.; Martínez, J.; Calle, F.

    2015-01-01

    Due to its intrinsic high mobility, graphene has proved to be a suitable material for high-speed electronics, where graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) has shown excellent properties. In this work, we present a method for extracting relevant electrical parameters from GFET devices using a simple electrical characterization and a model fitting. With experimental data from the device output characteristics, the method allows to calculate parameters such as the mobility, the contact resistance, and the fixed charge. Differentiated electron and hole mobilities and direct connection with intrinsic material properties are some of the key aspects of this method. Moreover, the method output values can be correlated with several issues during key fabrication steps such as the graphene growth and transfer, the lithographic steps, or the metalization processes, providing a flexible tool for quality control in GFET fabrication, as well as a valuable feedback for improving the material-growth process

  11. Method for extracting relevant electrical parameters from graphene field-effect transistors using a physical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boscá, A., E-mail: alberto.bosca@upm.es [Instituto de Sistemas Optoelectrónicos y Microtecnología, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Dpto. de Ingeniería Electrónica, E.T.S.I. de Telecomunicación, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Pedrós, J. [Instituto de Sistemas Optoelectrónicos y Microtecnología, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Campus de Excelencia Internacional, Campus Moncloa UCM-UPM, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Martínez, J. [Instituto de Sistemas Optoelectrónicos y Microtecnología, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Dpto. de Ciencia de Materiales, E.T.S.I de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Calle, F. [Instituto de Sistemas Optoelectrónicos y Microtecnología, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Dpto. de Ingeniería Electrónica, E.T.S.I. de Telecomunicación, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Campus de Excelencia Internacional, Campus Moncloa UCM-UPM, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2015-01-28

    Due to its intrinsic high mobility, graphene has proved to be a suitable material for high-speed electronics, where graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) has shown excellent properties. In this work, we present a method for extracting relevant electrical parameters from GFET devices using a simple electrical characterization and a model fitting. With experimental data from the device output characteristics, the method allows to calculate parameters such as the mobility, the contact resistance, and the fixed charge. Differentiated electron and hole mobilities and direct connection with intrinsic material properties are some of the key aspects of this method. Moreover, the method output values can be correlated with several issues during key fabrication steps such as the graphene growth and transfer, the lithographic steps, or the metalization processes, providing a flexible tool for quality control in GFET fabrication, as well as a valuable feedback for improving the material-growth process.

  12. Synthesis of Co/Co3O4 Nanocomposite Particles Relevant to Magnetic Field Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srivastava, A.K.; Madhavi, S.; Menon, Mohan

    2010-01-01

    Co/Co3O4 nanocomposite particles of various morphologies were synthesized by the reverse micelle technique. Equiaxed, rod and faceted crystals with rectangular, pentagonal and hexagonal cross sections were observed. Annealing resulted in the formation of a composite of cobalt oxide (Co3O4) and fc...... cobalt (Co). Removal of boron residues from the final product was established by surface characterization. Magnetic moment of these nanocomposite particles is relevant to magnetic field processing.......Co/Co3O4 nanocomposite particles of various morphologies were synthesized by the reverse micelle technique. Equiaxed, rod and faceted crystals with rectangular, pentagonal and hexagonal cross sections were observed. Annealing resulted in the formation of a composite of cobalt oxide (Co3O4) and fcc...

  13. Identification of chemicals relevant to the Chemical Weapons Convention using the novel sample-preparation methods and strategies of the Mobile Laboratory of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terzic, O.; Gregg, H.; de Voogt, P.

    2015-01-01

    The standard approach to on-site sample preparation for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of chemicals relevant to the Chemical Weapons Convention provides relatively good coverage of the target analytes, but it suffers from a number of drawbacks, such as low sample throughput, use of

  14. State waste discharge permit application, 200-E chemical drain field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations (Ecology et al. 1994), the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect ground would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered into Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177, (Ecology and DOE-RL 1991). The Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177 requires a series of permitting activities for liquid effluent discharges. This document presents the State Waste Discharge Permit (SWDP) application for the 200-E Chemical Drain Field. Waste water from the 272-E Building enters the process sewer line directly through a floor drain, while waste water from the 2703-E Building is collected in two floor drains, (north and south) that act as sumps and are discharged periodically. The 272-E and 2703-E Buildings constitute the only discharges to the process sewer line and the 200-E Chemical Drain Field

  15. State waste discharge permit application, 200-E chemical drain field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations (Ecology et al. 1994), the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect ground would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered into Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177, (Ecology and DOE-RL 1991). The Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177 requires a series of permitting activities for liquid effluent discharges. This document presents the State Waste Discharge Permit (SWDP) application for the 200-E Chemical Drain Field. Waste water from the 272-E Building enters the process sewer line directly through a floor drain, while waste water from the 2703-E Building is collected in two floor drains, (north and south) that act as sumps and are discharged periodically. The 272-E and 2703-E Buildings constitute the only discharges to the process sewer line and the 200-E Chemical Drain Field.

  16. Exponential growth of new chemicals and evolution of information relevant to risk control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binetti, Roberto; Costamagna, Francesca Marina; Marcello, Ida

    2008-01-01

    The number of new chemicals synthesized and marketed increases exponentially. The database CAS REGISTRY at present contains more than 33 million organic and inorganic substances. However, the little information regarding the potential hazard associated with a large amount of chemicals is an old known problem in the European Union and also in the United States. This critical problem may find a solution in the collaboration of the different involved countries and in a planned task setting at international level. Both in the United States (e.g., the "Gore Initiative") and in European Union (the REACH policy) a big effort has been dedicated to this solution, within standardized procedures and an appropriate collaboration.

  17. Chemical Compounds Toxic to Invertebrates Isolated from Marine Cyanobacteria of Potential Relevance to the Agricultural Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essack, Magbubah; Alzubaidy, Hanin S.; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Archer, John A. C.

    2014-01-01

    In spite of advances in invertebrate pest management, the agricultural industry is suffering from impeded pest control exacerbated by global climate changes that have altered rain patterns to favour opportunistic breeding. Thus, novel naturally derived chemical compounds toxic to both terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates are of interest, as potential pesticides. In this regard, marine cyanobacterium-derived metabolites that are toxic to both terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates continue to be a promising, but neglected, source of potential pesticides. A PubMed query combined with hand-curation of the information from retrieved articles allowed for the identification of 36 cyanobacteria-derived chemical compounds experimentally confirmed as being toxic to invertebrates. These compounds are discussed in this review. PMID:25356733

  18. Chemical Compounds Toxic to Invertebrates Isolated from Marine Cyanobacteria of Potential Relevance to the Agricultural Industry

    KAUST Repository

    Essack, Magbubah

    2014-10-29

    In spite of advances in invertebrate pest management, the agricultural industry is suffering from impeded pest control exacerbated by global climate changes that have altered rain patterns to favour opportunistic breeding. Thus, novel naturally derived chemical compounds toxic to both terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates are of interest, as potential pesticides. In this regard, marine cyanobacterium-derived metabolites that are toxic to both terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates continue to be a promising, but neglected, source of potential pesticides. A PubMed query combined with hand-curation of the information from retrieved articles allowed for the identification of 36 cyanobacteria-derived chemical compounds experimentally confirmed as being toxic to invertebrates. These compounds are discussed in this review.

  19. Chemical Compounds Toxic to Invertebrates Isolated from Marine Cyanobacteria of Potential Relevance to the Agricultural Industry

    KAUST Repository

    Essack, Magbubah; Alzubaidy, Hanin S.; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Archer, John A.C.

    2014-01-01

    In spite of advances in invertebrate pest management, the agricultural industry is suffering from impeded pest control exacerbated by global climate changes that have altered rain patterns to favour opportunistic breeding. Thus, novel naturally derived chemical compounds toxic to both terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates are of interest, as potential pesticides. In this regard, marine cyanobacterium-derived metabolites that are toxic to both terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates continue to be a promising, but neglected, source of potential pesticides. A PubMed query combined with hand-curation of the information from retrieved articles allowed for the identification of 36 cyanobacteria-derived chemical compounds experimentally confirmed as being toxic to invertebrates. These compounds are discussed in this review.

  20. Chemical dependency: An occupational hazard in the field of anaesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, S.

    2010-01-01

    The medical personnel are vulnerable to substance abuse and dependence due to ready access to substance of abuse. Addiction is considered as an occupational hazard for those involved in the practice of anaesthesia for the same reason. Substance abuse is defined as a psychosocial biogenetic disease, which results from dynamic interplay between a susceptible host and favourable environment. According to the fifth and the last National Survey on Drug Abuse (NSDA) in 1993 by Pakistan Narcotic Control, there are nearly three million drug dependants Review Article Chemical dependency: An occupational hazard in the field of anaesthesia Samina Ismail Department of Anaesthesia, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. in Pakistan, but no data is available to determine the prevalence among medical or anaesthesia personnel. In order to handle the rising trend of chemical abuse, we need to have more surveys and studies on this subject, written policy and educational programme in postgraduate training with proper control and frequent checking of narcotic dispensing. Reporting of drug abuse and rehabilitation of affected doctors are areas which need to be worked upon. (author)

  1. [Telematics equipment for poison control surveillance. Its applications in the health management of relevant chemical incidents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butera, R; Locatelli, C; Gandini, C; Minuco, G; Mazzoleni, M C; Giordano, A; Zanuti, M; Varango, C; Petrolini, V; Candura, S M; Manzo, L

    1997-01-01

    Health management of major chemical incidents requires a close collaboration between rescuers (on the disaster site and in the emergency department) and the poison center. The study tested telematic technologies allowing telepresence and teleconsulting, a real time and continuous connection among health care personnel and toxicologists involved in the management of the emergency. The link between the poison center (PC) and the emergency department in the local hospital is provided by a ISDN operating video conferencing system, while the data transmission from the site of the accident to the PC is achieved with a personal computer and GSM cellular data transmission. Toxicological databases and risk assessment software are integrated in the system, to support information sharing. To test such instruments in operative nearly realistic conditions, the main phase of the study has implemented simulated chemical disasters in different locations in Italy. Instruments for telepresence and teleconsulting have been effectively utilized to evaluate from a remote location the scenario and the severity of the accident, by inspecting either specific details or the whole scene, to enable PC guiding the triage of the victims before and after hospitalization, to utilize and share data, such as intervention protocols or patient records, and to document all the activities. In summary, this experience shows that the telematic link allows the toxicologists of the poison center to rapidly understand the situation, and to correctly learn about the conditions of patients with the help of images. The results of this study indicate the valuable benefits of telematic instruments for the health care in case of major chemical disasters occurring in a remote geographical location or in an area which lacks local toxicological experts, where specialized expertise can be achieved by the use of telematic technologies.

  2. Role of knowledge based engineering in Heavy Water Plants and its relevance to chemical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonde, R.R.

    2002-01-01

    The development of heavy water technology under the Department of Atomic Energy in India is carried out based on a mission oriented programme and this was backed up by a committed and highly trained manpower with a single minded pursuit to achieve the goal of making India self-sufficient in this challenging area. The paper gives step by step methodology followed in completion of the above mission which has become a benchmark in the chemical industry. A large sized chemical industry (Heavy Water plant being once such industry) has many features which are similar. The process design typically includes design of reactors, distillation columns, heat exchange networks, fluid transfer machinery, support utility systems etc. Besides, there are other issues like safety engineering, selection of materials, commissioning strategies and operating philosophies which are quite common to almost all chemical industries. Heavy water board has engineered and set up large scale heavy water plants and the technology for production of heavy water is completely assimilated in India and this paper tries to bring about some of the strategies which were instrumental in achieving this. The story of success in this technology can most certainly be followed in development of any other process technology. The important factors in the development of this technology is based on integration of R and D, process design, engineering backup, safety features, role of good construction and project management and good operating practices. One more important fact in this technology development is continuous improvement in operation and use of knowledge based engineering for debottlenecking. (author)

  3. Terpenoids in Buddleja: relevance to chemosystematics, chemical ecology and biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Peter J; Mensah, Abraham Y; Iessa, Noha; Hong, Liao Yong

    2003-09-01

    The terpenoids reported from Buddleja species are described. The antifungal activity of chloroform extracts of B. cordata and B. davidii stembark against the soil fungi Fusarium culmorum and Sordari fimicola is reported, with buddledin A shown to be the major compound responsible. The terpenoids present support the view that the Buddlejaceae should be classified in a taxon with Scrophulariaceae rather than Loganiaceae. Ecological aspects of the terpenoids are considered in relation to insects and soil fungi and the role of terpenoids in the chemical basis of the use of Buddleja in traditional medicine is also discussed, especially with regard to their anti-inflammatory properties.

  4. Nature and prevalence of non-additive toxic effects in industrially relevant mixtures of organic chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvez, Shahid; Venkataraman, Chandra; Mukherji, Suparna

    2009-06-01

    The concentration addition (CA) and the independent action (IA) models are widely used for predicting mixture toxicity based on its composition and individual component dose-response profiles. However, the prediction based on these models may be inaccurate due to interaction among mixture components. In this work, the nature and prevalence of non-additive effects were explored for binary, ternary and quaternary mixtures composed of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs). The toxicity of each individual component and mixture was determined using the Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence inhibition assay. For each combination of chemicals specified by the 2(n) factorial design, the percent deviation of the predicted toxic effect from the measured value was used to characterize mixtures as synergistic (positive deviation) and antagonistic (negative deviation). An arbitrary classification scheme was proposed based on the magnitude of deviation (d) as: additive (50%, class-IV) antagonistic/synergistic. Naphthalene, n-butanol, o-xylene, catechol and p-cresol led to synergism in mixtures while 1, 2, 4-trimethylbenzene and 1, 3-dimethylnaphthalene contributed to antagonism. Most of the mixtures depicted additive or antagonistic effect. Synergism was prominent in some of the mixtures, such as, pulp and paper, textile dyes, and a mixture composed of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. The organic chemical industry mixture depicted the highest abundance of antagonism and least synergism. Mixture toxicity was found to depend on partition coefficient, molecular connectivity index and relative concentration of the components.

  5. On-matrix derivatization extraction of chemical weapons convention relevant alcohols from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinthakindi, Sridhar; Purohit, Ajay; Singh, Varoon; Dubey, D K; Pardasani, Deepak

    2013-10-11

    Present study deals with the on-matrix derivatization-extraction of aminoalcohols and thiodiglycols, which are important precursors and/or degradation products of VX analogues and vesicants class of chemical warfare agents (CWAs). The method involved hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) mediated in situ silylation of analytes on the soil. Subsequent extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of derivatized analytes offered better recoveries in comparison to the procedure recommended by the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW). Various experimental conditions such as extraction solvent, reagent and catalyst amount, reaction time and temperature were optimized. Best recoveries of analytes ranging from 45% to 103% were obtained with DCM solvent containing 5%, v/v HMDS and 0.01%, w/v iodine as catalyst. The limits of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) with selected analytes ranged from 8 to 277 and 21 to 665ngmL(-1), respectively, in selected ion monitoring mode. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Chemical characterization of materials relevant to nuclear technology using neutron and proton based nuclear analytical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, R.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear analytical techniques (NATs), utilizing neutron and proton based nuclear reactions and subsequent measurement of gamma rays, are capable of chemical characterization of various materials at major to trace concentration levels. The present article deals with the recent developments and applications of conventional and k0-based internal monostandard (i) neutron activation analysis (NAA) and (ii) prompt gamma ray NAA (PGNAA) methods as well as (iii) in situ current normalized particle induced gamma ray emission (PIGE). The materials that have been analyzed by NAA and PGNAA include (i) nuclear reactor structural materials like zircaloys, stainless steels, Ni alloys, high purity aluminium and graphite and (ii) uranium oxide, U-Th mixed oxides, uranium ores and minerals. Internal monostandard NAA (IM-NAA) method with in situ detection efficiency was used to analyze large and non-standard geometry samples and standard-less compositional characterization was carried out for zircaloys and stainless steels. PIGE methods using proton beams were standardized for quantification of low Z elements (Li to Ti) and applied for compositional analysis of borosilicate glass and lithium titanate (Li 2 TiO 3 ) samples and quantification of total B and its isotopic composition of B ( 10 B/ 11 B) in boron based neutron absorbers like B 4 C. (author)

  7. Effect of drug precursors and chemicals relevant to clandestine laboratory investigation on plastic bags used for collection and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelot, Harmonie; Fu, Shanlin; Stuart, Barbara; Shimmon, Ronald; Raymond, Tony; Crandell, Tony; Roux, Claude

    2017-04-01

    In the area of clandestine laboratory investigations, plastic bags are used to collect and store evidence, such as solvents, precursors, and other compounds usually employed for the manufacturing of drugs (although liquids may be stored in glass containers within the bags first). In this study, three different types of plastic bags were provided by the NSW Police Force and investigated for their suitability for evidence collection: two different types of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) bags and one type of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) bag. Three different experiments were carried out: (1) storing relevant chemicals in the bags for up to three months; (2) exposing the bags including their content to accelerated conditions using a weatherometer, and (3) simulating an expected real case scenario. This study indicates that drugs and related chemicals stored in plastic bags may lead to a change in the composition of the chemical and an alteration or degradation of the plastic bag. All experiments led to the same conclusion: the polyvinyl chloride bags appeared to be the most affected. LDPE bags seem to be more appropriate for routine use, although it has been established they are not suitable for the collection of liquids (unless pre-packaged in, for instance, a glass container). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. THE USE OF CHEMICALS IN THE FIELD OF FARM ANIMAL HEALTH (NUTRITION, ENTOMOLOGY, PATHOLOGY). AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS TECHNOLOGY, NUMBER 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center for Vocational and Technical Education.

    DEVELOPED BY A NATIONAL TASK FORCE ON THE BASIS OF STATE STUDIES, THIS MODULE IS ONE OF A SERIES DESIGNED TO ASSIST TEACHERS IN PREPARING POST-SECONDARY STUDENTS FOR AGRICULTURAL CHEMICAL OCCUPATIONS. THE SPECIFIC OBJECTIVE OF THIS MODULE IS TO PREPARE TECHNICIANS IN THE FIELD OF THE USE OF CHEMICALS FOR ANIMAL HEALTH. SECTIONS INCLUDE -- (1)…

  9. Does location congruence matter? : a field study on the effects of location based advertising on perceived adintrusiveness, relevance and value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hühn, A.E.; Khan, J.V.; Ketelaar, P.; van t Riet, J.J.; Batalas, N.; König, R.; Rozendaal, E.; Markopoulos, P.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the effect of location-congruent mobile messages on perceived intrusiveness, value, and relevance through a field experiment using the Experience Sampling Method (ESM). We developed a mobile application for undergraduate students, featuring campus news and information concerning class

  10. Evaluation of a scattered radiation field in a cluster relevant for multiple-energy X-ray holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonda, L.

    1996-09-01

    We analyze theoretically a recent proposal of utilizing synchrotron radiation to generate an electromagnetic scattering field at a specific target atom inside a material sample. The direct wave coming from a wiggler interferes there with the waves scattered by the surrounding atoms. The suggestion is relevant for obtaining atomic holographic images. (author). 23 refs, 2 figs

  11. SHEDS-HT: an integrated probabilistic exposure model for prioritizing exposures to chemicals with near-field and dietary sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Kristin K; Glen, W Graham; Egeghy, Peter; Goldsmith, Michael-Rock; Smith, Luther; Vallero, Daniel; Brooks, Raina; Grulke, Christopher M; Özkaynak, Halûk

    2014-11-04

    United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) researchers are developing a strategy for high-throughput (HT) exposure-based prioritization of chemicals under the ExpoCast program. These novel modeling approaches for evaluating chemicals based on their potential for biologically relevant human exposures will inform toxicity testing and prioritization for chemical risk assessment. Based on probabilistic methods and algorithms developed for The Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model for Multimedia, Multipathway Chemicals (SHEDS-MM), a new mechanistic modeling approach has been developed to accommodate high-throughput (HT) assessment of exposure potential. In this SHEDS-HT model, the residential and dietary modules of SHEDS-MM have been operationally modified to reduce the user burden, input data demands, and run times of the higher-tier model, while maintaining critical features and inputs that influence exposure. The model has been implemented in R; the modeling framework links chemicals to consumer product categories or food groups (and thus exposure scenarios) to predict HT exposures and intake doses. Initially, SHEDS-HT has been applied to 2507 organic chemicals associated with consumer products and agricultural pesticides. These evaluations employ data from recent USEPA efforts to characterize usage (prevalence, frequency, and magnitude), chemical composition, and exposure scenarios for a wide range of consumer products. In modeling indirect exposures from near-field sources, SHEDS-HT employs a fugacity-based module to estimate concentrations in indoor environmental media. The concentration estimates, along with relevant exposure factors and human activity data, are then used by the model to rapidly generate probabilistic population distributions of near-field indirect exposures via dermal, nondietary ingestion, and inhalation pathways. Pathway-specific estimates of near-field direct exposures from consumer products are also modeled

  12. A review of models for near-field exposure pathways of chemicals in consumer products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Lei; Ernstoff, Alexi; Fantke, Peter

    2017-01-01

    able to quantify the multiple transfers of chemicals from products used near-field to humans. The present review therefore aims at an in-depth overview of modeling approaches for near-field chemical release and human exposure pathways associated with consumer products. It focuses on lower......-tier, mechanistic models suitable for life cycle assessments (LCA), chemical alternative assessment (CAA) and high-throughput screening risk assessment (HTS). Chemicals in a product enter the near-field via a defined “compartment of entry”, are transformed or transferred to adjacent compartments, and eventually end......Exposure to chemicals in consumer products has been gaining increasing attention, with multiple studies showing that near-field exposures from products is high compared to far-field exposures. Regarding the numerous chemical-product combinations, there is a need for an overarching review of models...

  13. Diagnostic relevance of high field MRI in clinical neuroradiology: the advantages and challenges of driving a sports car

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wattjes, Mike P.; Barkhof, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    High field MRI operating at 3 T is increasingly being used in the field of neuroradiology on the grounds that higher magnetic field strength should theoretically lead to a higher diagnostic accuracy in the diagnosis of several disease entities. This Editorial discusses the exhaustive review by Wardlaw and colleagues of research comparing 3 T MRI with 1.5 T MRI in the field of neuroradiology. Interestingly, the authors found no convincing evidence of improved image quality, diagnostic accuracy, or reduced total examination times using 3 T MRI instead of 1.5 T MRI. These findings are highly relevant since a new generation of high field MRI systems operating at 7 T has recently been introduced. (orig.)

  14. Chemical Weed Control in Saffron (Crocus sativus Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    majid abbaspoor

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Saffron is derived from the stigmas of the saffron (Crocus sativus L. It is the world’s most expensive spice and has been widely used in many countries. It is also increasingly used for medicinal purposes. Weed control in this perennial, small and low growing crop, needs a lot of labor work. Chemical approach is one of the most effective methods for weed control in saffron. Currently, some herbicide options are available for applications in saffron. For example, satisfactory broadleaved weed control would be achieved by post-emergence application of metribuzin and ioxynil after harvesting saffron flowers. Application of glyphosate and/or 2, 4-D / 2, 4-DB are used to clean up the beds prior to the new season’s flowering and growth of saffron in New Zealand. The selective weed control of weeds in saffron has not been widely reported elsewhere but some in Iran. The choice of herbicide(s depends on the kind of weeds present. In some literatures metribuzin showed promising results for weed control in saffron fields. It is selectively used for control of annual grasses and numerous broad-leaved weeds. The objective of this study was the evaluation of the efficacy of 15 herbicides with different mode of actions, selected on the basis of dominant weed flora and previous studies, on weeds grown in saffron fields. Materials and Methods A field study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of herbicides for weed control in saffron (Crocus sativus in Agricultural and Natural Resources Research and Education Center of Khorasan Razavi Province, Mashhad, in 2014-2015 growing season. The experiment was conducted in a completely randomized block design with three replications. Treatments were consisted of metsulfuron-methyl + sulfosulfuron (Total® at dose of 40 g ha-1, sulfosulfuron (Apirus® at dose of 26.6 g ha-1, oxadiazon (Ronestar® at dose of 2 l ha-1, oxyflurofen (Goal® at dose of 2 l ha-1, mesosulfuron + idosulfuron + diflufenican

  15. THE CURRENT STATE OF KNOWLEDGE IN THE VALUE RELEVANCE RESEARCH FIELD

    OpenAIRE

    Carmen- Alexandra BALTARIU

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the scientific literature referring to the value relevance of reported accounting information over a twelve year period starting from 2002. The approach of the paper is a theoretical (conceptual) one. In order to complete the purpose of the paper we selected as research method the longitudinal qualitative analysis. The qualitative analysis carried out presents a deductive character. Our conclusions regarding the general characteristics of the research fi...

  16. Field selection of chemical protective clothing and respiratory protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinette, S.; Dodgen, C.; Morley, M.

    1991-01-01

    Safety professionals who must choose appropriate personal protective equipment for hazardous substance response or hazardous waste sites require useable information about the effectiveness of the various products available. Each hazardous waste operation involves a unique combination of chemical hazards requiring a unique combination of protective apparel. A chemical protective suit or respirator must be chosen for each site and each operation on the site. No single protective suit is effective against all chemical hazards. No single respirator is the best choice in every situation. Various sources of information on the effectiveness of protective clothing products will be discussed. Site-specific permeation testing of the proposed protective clothing options will also be discussed. It is both possible and practical to obtain specific information about the degree of protection afforded by a particular suit against a particular chemical mixture. It is also important to know how long the suit will last. Choosing adequate respiratory protection is a complex process. Respirator cartridge performance depends on various environmental factors as well as upon the combination and concentration of chemicals in the air. Once characterization of the air at a site has been accomplished, it may be appropriate to select an alternative to airline respirators and SCBAs. Respirator cartridges can be tested against specific chemical mixtures using worse case environmental factors. The results can be used to predict both the effectiveness and duration of protection afforded by respirator cartridges which can reduce costs and worker fatigue

  17. Test of piezo-ceramic motor technology in ITER relevant high magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monti, Chiara, E-mail: chiara.monti@enea.it [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Besi Vetrella, Ugo; Mugnaini, Giampiero; Neri, Carlo; Rossi, Paolo; Viola, Rosario [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Dubus, Gregory; Damiani, Carlo [Fusion for Energy, c/ Josep Pla, 2 Torres Diagonal Litoral, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-10-15

    In the framework of a Fusion for Energy (F4E) grant, a test campaign started in 2012 in order to assess the performance of the in-vessel viewing system (IVVS) probe concept and to verify its compatibility when exposed to ITER typical working conditions. ENEA laboratories went through with several tests simulating high magnetic fields, high temperature, high vacuum, gamma radiation and neutron radiation. A customized motor has been adopted to study the performances of ultrasonic piezo motors technology in high magnetic field conditions. This paper reports on the testing activity performed on the motor in a multi Tesla magnetic field. The job was carried out in a test facility of ENEA laboratories able to achieve 14 T. A maximum field of 10 T, fully compliant with ITER requirements (8 T), was applied. A specific mechanical assembly has been designed and manufactured to hold the motor in the region with high homogeneity of the field. Results obtained so far indicate that the motor is compatible with high magnetic fields, and are presented in the paper.

  18. Near-field environment research at PNL relevant to brine migration phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pederson, L.R.; Gray, W.J.; Hodges, F.N.

    1987-01-01

    Heat and radiation resulting from emplacement of a high level nuclear waste package in a repository in salt will cause physical and chemical changes in the host rock and any brines present. These changes may alter the performance of waste package materials. Gamma radiolysis decomposes water into hydrogen and oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, and various other free radical and ionic species. Gamma ray irradiation of rock salt decomposes that salt to sodium metal colloids and neutral chlorine (unknown form), changing both its physical and chemical properties. Sodium metal will react, if contacted by water, to form sodium hydroxide plus hydrogen gas, while chlorine will react to form hydrochloric plus hypochlorous acids. If irradiated salts are completely dissolved, little impact on the chemical environment is expected because the acids and bases formed will neutralize each other. Heat from the waste package can alter the chemistry of the host rock. Changes in temperature can also alter the chemistry of brines by precipitation of phases with retrograde solubility, addition of more soluble salt components to the brine, and by reaction with clays and other impurities in the salt. Some of these reactions could be accompanied by significant shifts in the pH. In experiments to date, no important changes in chemistry have been observed when typical Permian Basin intrusion or inclusion brines were heated up to 150 0 C with no excess site-specific salt present. When excess salt was included, acidic shifts were noted, increasing with brine-salt interaction time and temperature

  19. [Test Reviews in Child Psychology: Test Users Wish to Obtain Practical Information Relevant to their Respective Field of Work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Gerolf; Irblich, Dieter

    2016-11-01

    Test Reviews in Child Psychology: Test Users Wish to Obtain Practical Information Relevant to their Respective Field of Work This study investigated to what extent diagnosticians use reviews of psychometric tests for children and adolescents, how they evaluate their quality, and what they expect concerning content. Test users (n = 323) from different areas of work (notably social pediatrics, early intervention, special education, speech and language therapy) rated test reviews as one of the most important sources of information. Readers of test reviews value practically oriented descriptions and evaluations of tests that are relevant to their respective field of work. They expect independent reviews that critically discuss opportunities and limits of the tests under scrutiny. The results show that authors of test reviews should not only have a background in test theory but should also be familiar with the practical application of tests in various settings.

  20. In Silico Prediction of Toxicokinetic Parameters for Environmentally Relevant Chemicals with Application to Risk-Based Prioritization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxicokinetic (TK) models can help bridge the gap between chemical exposure and measured toxicity endpoints, thereby addressing an important component of chemical risk assessments. The fraction of a chemical unbound by plasma proteins (Fub) and metabolic clearance rate (CLint) ar...

  1. Physico-chemical properties of manufactured nanomaterials - Characterisation and relevant methods. An outlook based on the OECD Testing Programme.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasmussen, Kirsten; Rauscher, Hubert; Mech, Agnieszka; Riego Sintes, Juan; Gilliland, Douglas; González, Mar; Kearns, Peter; Moss, Kenneth; Visser, Maaike; Groenewold, Monique; Bleeker, Eric A J

    Identifying and characterising nanomaterials require additional information on physico-chemical properties and test methods, compared to chemicals in general. Furthermore, regulatory decisions for chemicals are usually based upon certain toxicological properties, and these effects may not be

  2. Exploratory studies of flowing liquid metal divertor options for fusion-relevant magnetic fields in the MTOR facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, A.Y.; Abdou, M.A.; Morley, N.; Sketchley, T.; Woolley, R.; Burris, J.; Kaita, R.; Fogarty, P.; Huang, H.; Lao, X.; Narula, M.; Smolentsev, S.; Ulrickson, M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports on experimental findings on liquid metal (LM) free surface flows crossing complex magnetic fields. The experiments involve jet and film flows using GaInSn and are conducted at the UCLA MTOR facility. The goal of this study is to understand the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) features associated with such a free surface flow in a fusion-relevant magnetic field environment, and determine what LM free surface flow option is most suitable for lithium divertor particle pumping and surface heat removal applications in a near-term experimental plasma device, such as NSTX. Experimental findings indicate that a steady transverse magnetic field, even with gradients typical of NSTX outer divertor conditions, stabilizes a LM jet flow--reducing turbulent disturbances and delaying jet breakup. Important insights into the MHD behavior of liquid metal films under NSTX-like environments are also presented. It is possible to establish an uphill liquid metal film flow on a conducting substrate, although the MHD drag experienced by the flow could be strong and cause the flow to pile-up under simulated NSTX magnetic field conditions. The magnetic field changes the turbulent film flow so that wave structures range from 2D column-type surface disturbances at regions of high magnetic field, to ordinary hydrodynamic turbulence wave structures at regions of low field strength at the outboard. Plans for future work are also presented

  3. A practical guide to manuscript writing with particular relevance to the field of pediatric hospital medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teufel, Ronald J; Andrews, Anne L; Williams, Derek J

    2014-11-01

    Publishing manuscripts in peer-reviewed journals, such as Hospital Pediatrics, is critical for both the academic development of practitioners in pediatric hospital medicine and the scientific advancement of our field. Understanding the purpose of scientific writing and developing a structured approach to the writing process is essential. Doing so will improve the clarity of your work and likely the ease at which your research is published and disseminated throughout the scientific community. The purposes of this article are to detail the structure of a scientific manuscript, to highlight specific writing strategies, and to provide writing tips that may help or hinder publication. Our ultimate goal is to advance the field of pediatric hospital medicine and its growing membership by promoting the dissemination of high-quality research. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. Factors relevant to control of out-of-core radiation fields in BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comley, G.C.W.

    1983-08-01

    Based on operating experience of BWRs around the world this report reviews major factors which appear to govern the problem of growth and intensity of radiation fields on out-of-core surfaces. While no one factor is dominant there is considerable evidence which links system chemistry, crud input and cobalt-rich sources to this problem. The report provides advice to BWR operators and system designers aimed at minimising doserates due to activity retention on coolant circuitry. (author)

  5. Relevance of wide-field autofluorescence imaging in Birdshot retinochoroidopathy: descriptive analysis of 76 eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piffer, Anne-Laure Le; Boissonnot, Michèle; Gobert, Frédéric; Zenger, Anita; Wolf, Sebastian; Wolf, Ute; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Rougier, Marie-Bénédicte

    2014-09-01

    To study and classify retinal lesions in patients with birdshot disease using wide-field autofluorescence imaging and correlate them according to patients' visual status. A multicentre study was carried out on 76 eyes of 39 patients with birdshot disease, analysing colour images and under autofluorescence using the wide-field Optomap(®) imaging system. This was combined with a complete clinical exam and analysis of the macula with OCT. In over 80% of the eyes, a chorioretinal lesion has been observed under autofluorescence with a direct correlation between the extent of the lesion and visual status. The presence of macular hypo-autofluorescence was correlated with a decreased visual acuity, due to the presence of a macular oedema, active clinical inflammation or an epiretinal membrane. The hypo-autofluorescence observed correlated with the duration of the disease and the degree of inflammation in the affected eye, indicating a secondary lesion in the pigment epithelium in relation to the choroid. The pigment epithelium was affected in a diffuse manner, as in almost 50% of the eyes the wider peripheral retina was affected. Wide-field autofluorescence imaging could appear to be a useful examination when monitoring patients, to look for areas of macular hypo-autofluorescence responsible for an irreversible loss of vision. © 2013 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Exposure to Chemicals in Consumer Products: The Role of the Near-Field Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fantke, Peter; Ernstoff, Alexi; Huang, L.

    2016-01-01

    Humans can be exposed to chemicals in consumer products during product use and environmental releases with inhalation, ingestion, and dermal uptake as typical exposure routes. Nevertheless, chemical exposure modeling has traditionally focused on the far-field with near-field indoor models only...... recently gaining attention. Further, models that are mostly emissions-based, may not necessarily be applicable to all types of chemical release from consumer products. To address this gap, we (1) define a framework to simultaneously account for exposure to chemicals in the near- and far-field, (2......) determine chemical product concentrations for various functional use categories, (3) introduce a quantitative metric linking exposure to chemical mass in products, the Product Intake Fraction (PiF), and (4) demonstrate our framework for various consumer product categories. This framework lends itself...

  7. Effects of clinically relevant doses of methyphenidate on spatial memory, behavioral sensitization and open field habituation: a time related study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem, Darakhshan Jabeen; Inam, Qurrat-ul-Aen; Haleem, Muhammad Abdul

    2015-03-15

    The psychostimulant methylphenidate (MPD) is a first-line drug for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Despite acceptable therapeutic efficacy, there is limited data regarding the long-term consequences of MPD exposure over extended periods. The present study concerns effects of clinically relevant doses of MPD, administered orally to rats for an extended period, on spatial memory, behavioral sensitization and habituation to an open field. Water maze test was used to monitor memory acquisition (2 h after training), retention (day next to training), extinction (1 week after training) and reconsolidation (weekly for 4 weeks). Administration of MPD at doses of 0.25-1.0 mg/kg improved memory acquisition, retention, reconsolidation and impaired memory extinction. Treatment with 0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg MPD for 6 weeks produced a sustained increase in motor activity but higher dose (1.0 mg/kg) elicited behavioral sensitization. High as well as low doses MPD impaired open field habituation. We conclude that clinically relevant doses of MPD enhance memory even if used for extended period. It is suggested that higher (1.0 mg/kg) clinically relevant doses of MPD, if used for extended period, may exacerbate hyperactivity and impulsivity associated with the disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Diving physiology of seabirds and marine mammals: Relevance, challenges and some solutions for field studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Russel D; Enstipp, Manfred R

    2016-12-01

    To fully understand how diving seabirds and marine mammals balance the potentially conflicting demands of holding their breath while living their lives underwater (and maintaining physiological homeostasis during exercise, feeding, growth, and reproduction), physiological studies must be conducted with animals in their natural environments. The purpose of this article is to review the importance of making physiological measurements on diving animals in field settings, while acknowledging the challenges and highlighting some solutions. The most extreme divers are great candidates for study, especially in a comparative and mechanistic context. However, physiological data are also required of a wide range of species for problems relating to other disciplines, in particular ecology and conservation biology. Physiological data help with understanding and predicting the outcomes of environmental change, and the direct impacts of anthropogenic activities. Methodological approaches that have facilitated the development of field-based diving physiology include the isolated diving hole protocol and the translocation paradigm, and while there are many techniques for remote observation, animal-borne biotelemetry, or "biologging", has been critical. We discuss issues related to the attachment of instruments, the retrieval of data and sensing of physiological variables, while also considering negative impacts of tagging. This is illustrated with examples from a variety of species, and an in-depth look at one of the best studied and most extreme divers, the emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri). With a variety of approaches and high demand for data on the physiology of diving seabirds and marine mammals, the future of field studies is bright. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Preliminary thoughts on the relevance of the research field of cognition for Practical Theology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdi P. Kruger

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this research from the vantage point of Practical Theology, the author focusses on the importance and the possible value of the concept of cognition for further research. The philosophical roots of the concepts of knowledge and understanding are highlighted in a qualitative manner by means of a short selection from the insights of philosophers from the era of the Greek Philosophy to the nineteenth century. The insights of Plato, Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, Descartes and Kant are utilised. The purpose was to indicate the importance of the concepts of knowing and cognition from an early stage. Research from the field of cognitive science also received attention in this research. The purpose of this discussion is to indicate that cognition is not a mere intellectual activity. Cognition is important in the processes of perspective-making and moral choices. Cognitive distortions could possibly endanger people�s ability to have the right cognition about people, events and life itself. The concept of phronesis, as the concept that comes the nearest to the essence of cognition, is also investigated from the vantage point of Philippians 2:5 and Romans 12:3. Wisdom thinking is really important in research on the acts of people from a practical theological vantage point. Cognition must be regarded as people�s attempt to make sense out what they already know and also out of what they are observing. In the final part of the article, fields for possible further investigation are highlighted in order to make the statement that practical theologians can consider the fact to reclaim the field of investigation on cognition in further research. The importance of cognition for liturgy, homiletics, pastoral care and youth ministry is indicated.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: This article is undertaken from a practical theological vantage point in order to highlight the importance of the concept of cognition for further research. In

  10. Magnetic field topology and chemical abundance distributions of the young, rapidly rotating, chemically peculiar star HR 5624

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochukhov, O.; Silvester, J.; Bailey, J. D.; Landstreet, J. D.; Wade, G. A.

    2017-09-01

    Context. The young, rapidly rotating Bp star HR 5624 (HD 133880) shows an unusually strong non-sinusoidal variability of its longitudinal magnetic field. This behaviour was previously interpreted as the signature of an exceptionally strong, quadrupole-dominated surface magnetic field geometry. Aims: We studied the magnetic field structure and chemical abundance distributions of HR 5624 with the aim to verify the unusual quadrupolar nature of its magnetic field and to investigate correlations between the field topology and chemical spots. Methods: We analysed high-resolution, time series Stokes parameter spectra of HR 5624 with the help of a magnetic Doppler imaging inversion code based on detailed polarised radiative transfer modelling of the line profiles. Results: We refined the stellar parameters, revised the rotational period, and obtained new longitudinal magnetic field measurements. Our magnetic Doppler inversions reveal that the field structure of HR 5624 is considerably simpler and the field strength is much lower than proposed by previous studies. We find a maximum local field strength of 12 kG and a mean field strength of 4 kG, which is about a factor of three weaker than predicted by quadrupolar field models. Our model implies that overall large-scale field topology of HR 5624 is better described as a distorted, asymmetric dipole rather than an axisymmetric quadrupole. The chemical abundance maps of Mg, Si, Ti, Cr, Fe, and Nd obtained in our study are characterised by large-scale, high-contrast abundance patterns. These structures correlate weakly with the magnetic field geometry and, in particular, show no distinct element concentrations in the horizontal field regions predicted by theoretical atomic diffusion calculations. Conclusions: We conclude that the surface magnetic field topology of HR 5624 is not as unusual as previously proposed. Considering these results together with other recent magnetic mapping analyses of early-type stars suggests that

  11. DIGITAL HUMANISTIC PEDAGOGY: RELEVANT PROBLEMS OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH IN THE FIELD OF USING ICT IN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriy Yu. Bykov

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the article theoretical and methodological principles of digital humanistic pedagogy – the science about the laws of creating a positive integrated educational reality as a result of the convergence of physical and virtual (created using ICT training spaces (environments are determined. Based on the use of modern ICT learning activity (formal, nonformal and informal is at the intersection of two worlds: the real and the virtual. Methodology and research methods of classical pedagogy require review and improvement in the context of current realities of the educational process, needs and interests of all its subjects. The development of digital humanities in the international educational space is analyzed; the content of the new field of pedagogical knowledge as part of digital humanistic is outlined; research methods and directions of current scientific research are defined.

  12. NMR chemical shifts in amino acids: Effects of environments, electric field, and amine group rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Pfrommer, Bernd G.; Louie, Steven G.; Canning, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    The authors present calculations of NMR chemical shifts in crystalline phases of some representative amino acids such as glycine, alanine, and alanyl-alanine. To get an insight on how different environments affect the chemical shifts, they study the transition from the crystalline phase to completely isolated molecules of glycine. In the crystalline limit, the shifts are dominated by intermolecular hydrogen-bonds. In the molecular limit, however, dipole electric field effects dominate the behavior of the chemical shifts. They show that it is necessary to average the chemical shifts in glycine over geometries. Tensor components are analyzed to get the angle dependent proton chemical shifts, which is a more refined characterization method

  13. Relativistic electron-atom scattering in an extremely powerful laser field: Relevance of spin effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panek, P.; Kaminski, J.Z.; Ehlotzky, F.

    2002-01-01

    We reconsider the relativistic scattering of electrons by an atom, being approximated by a static potential, in an extremely powerful electromagnetic plane wave of frequency ω and linear polarization ε. Since to a first order of approximation spin effects can be neglected, we first describe the scattered electron by the Gordon solution of the Klein-Gordon equation. Then we investigate the same scattering process by including the spin effects, using for the electron the Volkov solution of the Dirac equation. For sufficiently energetic electrons, the first-order Born approximation can be employed to represent the corresponding scattering matrix element. We compare the results of the differential cross sections of induced and inverse bremsstrahlung, evaluated from both approximations, for various parameter values and angular configurations and we find that in most cases the spin effects are marginal, even at very high laser power. On the other hand, we recover the various asymmetries in the angular distributions of the scattered electrons and their respective energies due to the laser-induced drift motion of the electrons in the direction of propagation of the radiation field, thus confirming the findings of our previous work [Phys. Rev. A 59, 2105 (1999); Laser Physics 10, 163 (2000)

  14. Chemical dependency: an occupational hazard in the field of anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Samina

    2010-10-01

    The medical personnel are vulnerable to substance abuse and dependence due to ready access to substance of abuse. Addiction is considered as an occupational hazard for those involved in the practice of anaesthesia for the same reason. Substance abuse is defined as a psychosocial biogenetic disease, which results from dynamic interplay between a susceptible host and favourable environment. According to the 5th and the last National Survey on Drug Abuse (NSDA) in 1993 by Pakistan Narcotic Control, there are nearly three million drug dependants in Pakistan, but no data is available to determine the prevalence among medical or anaesthesia personnel. In order to handle the rising trend of chemical abuse, we need to have more surveys and studies on this subject, written policy and educational programme in postgraduate training with proper control and frequent checking of narcotic dispensing. Reporting of drug abuse and rehabilitation of affected doctors are areas which need to be worked upon.

  15. CFD analysis of hypersonic, chemically reacting flow fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, T. A.

    1993-01-01

    Design studies are underway for a variety of hypersonic flight vehicles. The National Aero-Space Plane will provide a reusable, single-stage-to-orbit capability for routine access to low earth orbit. Flight-capable satellites will dip into the atmosphere to maneuver to new orbits, while planetary probes will decelerate at their destination by atmospheric aerobraking. To supplement limited experimental capabilities in the hypersonic regime, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is being used to analyze the flow about these configurations. The governing equations include fluid dynamic as well as chemical species equations, which are being solved with new, robust numerical algorithms. Examples of CFD applications to hypersonic vehicles suggest an important role this technology will play in the development of future aerospace systems. The computational resources needed to obtain solutions are large, but solution adaptive grids, convergence acceleration, and parallel processing may make run times manageable.

  16. [Measurement of chemical agents in metallurgy field: electric steel plant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottica, D; Grignani, E; Ghitti, R; Festa, D; Apostoli, P

    2012-01-01

    The steel industry maintains its important position in the context of the Italian production involving thousands of workers. The iron and steel processes are divided into primary steel industry, production of intermediate minerals, and secondary steel, scrap from the production of semi-finished industrial and consumer sector (metal inserted into components and metal used for dissipative uses, primarily coatings) and industrial waste. The paper presents the results of environmental monitoring carried out in some electric steel plant for the measurement of airborne chemicals that characterize the occupational exposure of workers employed in particular area like electric oven, to treatment outside the furnace, continuous casting area. For the sampling of the pollutants were used both personal and in fixed positions samplers. The pollutants measured are those typical of steel processes inhalable dust, metals, respirable dust, crystalline silica, but also Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorinated dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs).

  17. Procedures for field chemical analyses of water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korte, N.; Ealey, D.

    1983-12-01

    A successful water-quality monitoring program requires a clear understanding of appropriate measurement procedures in order to obtain reliable field data. It is imperative that the responsible personnel have a thorough knowledge of the limitations of the techniques being used. Unfortunately, there is a belief that field analyses are simple and straightforward. Yet, significant controversy as well as misuse of common measurement techniques abounds. This document describes procedures for field measurements of pH, carbonate and bicarbonate, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, nitrate, Eh, and uranium. Each procedure section includes an extensive discussion regarding the limitations of the method as well as brief discussions of calibration procedures and available equipment. A key feature of these procedures is the consideration given to the ultimate use of the data. For example, if the data are to be used for geochemical modeling, more precautions are needed. In contrast, routine monitoring conducted merely to recognize gross changes can be accomplished with less effort. Finally, quality assurance documentation for each measurement is addressed in detail. Particular attention is given to recording sufficient information such that decisions concerning the quality of the data can be easily made. Application of the procedures and recommendations presented in this document should result in a uniform and credible water-quality monitoring program. 22 references, 4 figures, 3 tables

  18. Biological and chemical assessments of zinc ageing in field soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donner, Erica; Broos, Kris; Heemsbergen, Diane; Warne, Michael St. J.; McLaughlin, Mike J.; Hodson, Mark E.; Nortcliff, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    As zinc (Zn) is both an essential trace element and potential toxicant, the effects of Zn fixation in soil are of practical significance. Soil samples from four field sites amended with ZnSO 4 were used to investigate ageing of soluble Zn under field conditions over a 2-year period. Lability of Zn measured using 65 Zn radioisotope dilution showed a significant decrease over time and hence evidence of Zn fixation in three of the four soils. However, 0.01 M CaCl 2 extractions and toxicity measurements using a genetically modified lux-marked bacterial biosensor did not indicate a decrease in soluble/bioavailable Zn over time. This was attributed to the strong regulatory effect of abiotic properties such as pH on these latter measurements. These results also showed that Zn ageing occurred immediately after Zn spiking, emphasising the need to incubate freshly spiked soils before ecotoxicity assessments. - Ageing effects were detected in Zn-amended field soils using 65 Zn isotopic dilution as a measure of lability, but not with either CaCl 2 extractions or a lux-marked bacterial biosensor.

  19. Accounting for chemical kinetics in field scale transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, N.D.

    2005-01-01

    The modelling of column experiments has shown that the humic acid mediated transport of metal ions is dominated by the non-exchangeable fraction. Metal ions enter this fraction via the exchangeable fraction, and may transfer back again. However, in both directions these chemical reactions are slow. Whether or not a kinetic description of these processes is required during transport calculations, or an assumption of local equilibrium will suffice, will depend upon the ratio of the reaction half-time to the residence time of species within the groundwater column. If the flow rate is sufficiently slow or the reaction sufficiently fast then the assumption of local equilibrium is acceptable. Alternatively, if the reaction is sufficiently slow (or the flow rate fast), then the reaction may be 'decoupled', i.e. removed from the calculation. These distinctions are important, because calculations involving chemical kinetics are computationally very expensive, and should be avoided wherever possible. In addition, column experiments have shown that the sorption of humic substances and metal-humate complexes may be significant, and that these reactions may also be slow. In this work, a set of rules is presented that dictate when the local equilibrium and decoupled assumptions may be used. In addition, it is shown that in all cases to a first approximation, the behaviour of a kinetically controlled species, and in particular its final distribution against distance at the end of a calculation, depends only upon the ratio of the reaction first order rate to the residence time, and hence, even in the region where the simplifications may not be used, the behaviour is predictable. In this way, it is possible to obtain an estimate of the migration of these species, without the need for a complex transport calculation. (orig.)

  20. Exploring liquid metal plasma facing component (PFC) concepts-Liquid metal film flow behavior under fusion relevant magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narula, M.; Abdou, M.A.; Ying, A.; Morley, N.B.; Ni, M.; Miraghaie, R.; Burris, J.

    2006-01-01

    The use of fast moving liquid metal streams or 'liquid walls' as a plasma contact surface is a very attractive option and has been looked upon with considerable interest over the past several years, both by the plasma physics and fusion engineering programs. Flowing liquid walls provide an ever replenishing contact surface to the plasma, leading to very effective particle pumping and surface heat flux removal. A key feasibility issue for flowing liquid metal plasma facing component (PFC) systems, pertains to their magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) behavior under the spatially varying magnetic field environment, typical of a fusion device. MHD forces hinder the development of a smooth and controllable liquid metal flow needed for PFC applications. The present study builds up on the ongoing research effort at UCLA, directed towards providing qualitative and quantitative data on liquid metal free surface flow behavior under fusion relevant magnetic fields

  1. Soil properties relevant to land degradation in abandoned sloping fields in Aisa valley, Central Pyrenees (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardini, G.

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available A multi-approach characterization of soil properties in abandoned fields in the Aisa valley, at mid mountain in the Central Spanish Pyrenees, demonstrated that the soil's own peculiar characteristics are concerned with conservation problems. Aggregate stability and shrinkage tests pointed to a relatively good soil performance due to the aggregating role of organic matter and calcium carbonates, although calcium ions, in some instances, may exert and additional antagonistic role for a sealed surface, increasing runoff. On the other hand, soil micromorphology suggests that the poor condition of the soils is in some contradiction to paedogenic activity. These findings, together with the presence of ashes, support the hypothesis that land degradation in these areas is mainly related to human activity thought unsuitable management after land abandonment.

    [es] La caracterización de diversas propiedades del suelo en campos abandonados del valle de Aisa, montaña media del Pirineo Central, ha mostrado que dichos suelos presentan algunos caracteres de interés desde el punto de vista de la conservación. La estabilidad de los agregados y los test de agrietamiento evidencian un comportamiento aceptable, gracias al papel agregante de la materia orgánica y carbonatos de calcio, a pesar que los iones calcio, en algunas ocasiones, pueden ejercer un papel antagonista adicional y favorecer el sellado de la superficie del suelo, aumentando la escorrentía superficial. Por otra parte, la micromorfología sugiere que el estado de degradación de los suelos contrasta con la actividad pedogénica. Estos resultados, juntamente con la presencia de cenizas, apoyan la hipótesis de que el estado de degradación en estas áreas es consecuencia principalmente de una utilización incorrecta después del abandono de los cultivos.
    [fr] Un étude des propriétés des sois dans une zone à cultures en pente abandonnées dans la vallée d'Aisa (Pyr

  2. Demonstration of high current carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic field effect transistors at industrially relevant voltages

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Mitchell

    The display market is presently dominated by the active matrix liquid crystal display (LCD). However, the active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) display is argued to become the successor to the LCD, and is already beginning its way into the market, mainly in small size displays. But, for AMOLED technology to become comparable in market share to LCD, larger size displays must become available at a competitive price with their LCD counterparts. A major issue preventing low-cost large AMOLED displays is the thin-film transistor (TFT) technology. Unlike the voltage driven LCD, the OLEDs in the AMOLED display are current driven. Because of this, the mature amorphous silicon TFT backplane technology used in the LCD must be upgraded to a material possessing a higher mobility. Polycrystalline silicon and transparent oxide TFT technologies are being considered to fill this need. But these technologies bring with them significant manufacturing complexity and cost concerns. Carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic field effect transistors (CN-VFETs) offer a unique solution to this problem (now known as the AMOLED backplane problem). The CN-VFET allows the use of organic semiconductors to be used for the semiconductor layer. Organics are known for their low-cost large area processing compatibility. Although the mobility of the best organics is only comparable to that of amorphous silicon, the CN-VFET makes up for this by orienting the channel vertically, as opposed to horizontally (like in conventional TFTs). This allows the CN-VFET to achieve sub-micron channel lengths without expensive high resolution patterning. Additionally, because the CN-VFET can be easily converted into a light emitting transistor (called the carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic light emitting transistor---CN-VOLET) by essentially stacking an OLED on top of the CN-VFET, more potential benefits can be realized. These potential benefits include, increased aperture ratio, increased OLED

  3. Model for screening-level assessment of near-field human exposure to neutral organic chemicals released indoors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianming; Arnot, Jon A; Wania, Frank

    2014-10-21

    Screening organic chemicals for hazard and risk to human health requires near-field human exposure models that can be readily parametrized with available data. The integration of a model of human exposure, uptake, and bioaccumulation into an indoor mass balance model provides a quantitative framework linking emissions in indoor environments with human intake rates (iRs), intake fractions (iFs) and steady-state concentrations in humans (C) through consideration of dermal permeation, inhalation, and nondietary ingestion exposure pathways. Parameterized based on representative indoor and adult human characteristics, the model is applied here to 40 chemicals of relevance in the context of human exposure assessment. Intake fractions and human concentrations (C(U)) calculated with the model based on a unit emission rate to air for these 40 chemicals span 2 and 5 orders of magnitude, respectively. Differences in priority ranking based on either iF or C(U) can be attributed to the absorption, biotransformation and elimination processes within the human body. The model is further applied to a large data set of hypothetical chemicals representative of many in-use chemicals to show how the dominant exposure pathways, iF and C(U) change as a function of chemical properties and to illustrate the capacity of the model for high-throughput screening. These simulations provide hypotheses for the combination of chemical properties that may result in high exposure and internal dose. The model is further exploited to highlight the role human contaminant uptake plays in the overall fate of certain chemicals indoors and consequently human exposure.

  4. Characterizing the variability in chemical composition of flowback and produced waters - results from lab and field studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieth-Hillebrand, Andrea; Wilke, Franziska D. H.; Schmid, Franziska E.; Zhu, Yaling; Lipińska, Olga; Konieczyńska, Monika

    2017-04-01

    The huge volumes and unknown composition of flowback and produced waters cause major public concerns about the environmental and social compatibility of hydraulic fracturing and the exploitation of gas from unconventional reservoirs. Flowback and produced waters contain not only residues of fracking additives but also chemical species that are dissolved from the target shales themselves. Shales are a heterogeneous mixture of minerals, organic matter, and formation water and little is actually understood about the fluid-rock interactions occurring during hydraulic fracturing of the shales and their effects on the chemical composition of flowback and produced water. To overcome this knowledge gap, interactions of different shales with different artificial stimulation fluids were studied in lab experiments under ambient and elevated temperature and pressure conditions. These lab experiments showed clearly that fluid-rock interactions change the chemical composition of the initial stimulation fluid and that geochemistry of the fractured shale is relevant for understanding flowback water composition. In addition, flowback water samples were taken after hydraulic fracturing of one horizontal well in Pomeranian region, Poland and investigated for their chemical composition. With this presentation, results from lab and field studies will be presented and compared to decipher possible controls on chemical compositions of flowback and produced water.

  5. Performance of in situ chemical oxidation field demonstrations at DOE sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, S.R.; West, O.R.; Siegrist, R.L.; Holden, W.L.

    1997-01-01

    Researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been investigating the use of in situ chemical oxidation to remediate organic contaminants (VOCs, SVOCs, and PCBs) in soils and groundwater at the laboratory and field scales. Field scale design parameters (e.g., oxidant loading rates and oxidant delivery techniques) are often dictated by site conditions (e.g., soil properties and initial contaminant concentrations). Chemical destruction of organic compounds can be accomplished using a variety of oxidants. Recent research has involved field scale in situ chemical oxidation demonstrations using H 2 O 2 and KMnO 4 in conjunction with soil mixing as the oxidant delivery mechanism. A description of some of these fields activities and future field-scale work is presented here

  6. Coupled near-field and far-field exposure assessment framework for chemicals in consumer products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fantke, Peter; Ernstoff, Alexi; Huang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Humans can be exposed to chemicals in consumer products through product use and environmental emissions over the product life cycle. Exposure pathways are often complex, where chemicals can transfer directly from products to humans during use or exchange between various indoor and outdoor...... compartments until sub-fractions reach humans. To consistently evaluate exposure pathways along product life cycles, a flexible mass balance-based assessment framework is presented structuring multimedia chemical transfers in a matrix of direct inter-compartmental transfer fractions. By matrix inversion, we...

  7. Reactor-relevant quiescent H-mode operation using torque from non-axisymmetric, non-resonant magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrell, K. H.; Garofalo, A. M; Osborne, T. H.; Schaffer, M. J.; Snyder, P. B.; Solomon, W. M.; Park, J.-K.; Fenstermacher, M. E.

    2012-01-01

    Results from recent experiments demonstrate that quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) sustained by magnetic torque from non-axisymmetric magnetic fields is a promising operating mode for future burning plasmas. Using magnetic torque from n=3 fields to replace counter-I p torque from neutral beam injection (NBI), we have achieved long duration, counter-rotating QH-mode operation with NBI torque ranging from counter-I p to up to co-I p values of 1-1.3 Nm. This co-I p torque is 3 to 4 times the scaled torque that ITER will have. These experiments utilized an ITER-relevant lower single-null plasma shape and were done with ITER-relevant values of ν ped * and β N ped . These discharges exhibited confinement quality H 98y2 =1.3, in the range required for ITER. In preliminary experiments using n=3 fields only from a coil outside the toroidal coil, QH-mode plasmas with low q 95 =3.4 have reached fusion gain values of G=β N H 89 /q 95 2 =0.4, which is the desired value for ITER. Shots with the same coil configuration also operated with net zero NBI torque. The limits on G and co-I p torque have not yet been established for this coil configuration. QH-mode work to has made significant contact with theory. The importance of edge rotational shear is consistent with peeling-ballooning mode theory. Qualitative and quantitative agreements with the predicted neoclassical toroidal viscosity torque is seen.

  8. Chemically bonded phosphate ceramic sealant formulations for oil field applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Arun S [Naperville, IL; Jeong, Seung-Young [Taejon, KR; McDaniel, Richard [Crest Hill, IL

    2008-10-21

    A sealant for an oil or geothermal well capable of setting within about 3 to about 6 hours at temperatures less than about 250.degree. F. for shallow wells less than about 10,000 feet and deep wells greater than about 10,000 feet having MgO present in the range of from about 9.9 to about 14.5%, KH.sub.2PO.sub.4 present in the range of from about 29.7 to about 27.2%, class C fly ash present in the range of from about 19.8 to about 36.3%, class F fly ash present in the range of from about 19.8 to about 0%, boric acid or borax present in the range of from about 0.39 to about 1.45%, and water present in the range of from about 20.3 to about 21.86% by weight of the sealant.A method of sealing wells is disclosed as are compositions for very high temperature wells is disclosed as is a composition for treating oil field wastes.

  9. Field sampling for monitoring, migration and defining the areal extent of chemical contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.M.; Skalski, J.R.; Eberhardt, L.L.; Simmons, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    As part of two studies funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the USEPA, the authors have investigated field sampling strategies and compositing as a means of detecting spills or migration at commercial low-level radioactive and chemical waste disposal sites and bioassays for detecting contamination at chemical waste sites. Compositing (pooling samples) for detection is discussed first, followed by the development of a statistical test to determine whether any component of a composite exceeds a prescribed maximum acceptable level. Subsequently, the authors explore the question of optimal field sampling designs and present the features of a microcomputer program designed to show the difficulties in constructing efficient field designs and using compositing schemes. Finally, they propose the use of bioassays as an adjunct or replacement for chemical analysis as a means of detecting and defining the areal extent of chemical migration

  10. Contaminant mixtures and repoductive health: Developmental toxicity effects in rats after mixed exposure to environmentally relevant endocrine disrupting chemicals, with focus on effects in females

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Pernille Rosenskjold; Christiansen, Sofie; Hass, Ulla

    proposed that a similar syndrome, called the ovarian dysgenesis syndrome (ODS), exists for females. This syndrome encompasses alterations in reproductive development caused by chemical exposure in sensitive windows of development that may result in fecundity impairments, gravid diseases, gynecological...... disorders or later onset adult diseases. However, experimental evidence on the effects of developmental exposure to environmentally relevant endocrine disrupting chemicals in females has been missing attention. Since chemical exposure can affect female reproductive development it is important to investigate......, mixtures were modeled based on high end human intakes, and the project involved two developmental mixture studies in rats, called Contamed 1 and 2. In these studies 13 chemicals where data on in vivo endocrine disrupting effects and information on human exposures was available, were selected. The tested...

  11. Human health and the environment: Predicting plasma protein binding and metabolic clearance rates of environmentally relevant chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In silico methods provide a rapid, inexpensive means of screening a wide array of environmentally relevant pollutants, pesticides, fungicides and consumer products for further toxicity testing. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models bridge the gap between in vitro as...

  12. High resolution studies of the effects of magnetic fields on chemical reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, C. A.; Hewitt, J. P.; McLauchlan, Keith A.; Steiner, Ulrich

    1988-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive experiment is described which detects magnetic field effects on chemical reactions with high signal-to-noise ratio and high resolution. It consists in applying a small modulation field to the sample, whilst the main field it experiences is varied, with optical detection at the modulation frequency. It consequently measures the derivative of the normal MARY spectrum. It is shown by theoretical analysis that when using this method it is better to monitor reaction interm...

  13. The effect of microplastic on chemical uptake by the lugworm Arenicola marina (L.) under environmentally relevant conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besseling, E.; Foekema, E.M.; Heuvel-Greve, van den M.J.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2017-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that ingestion of microplastic increases exposure of aquatic organisms to hydrophobic contaminants. To date, most laboratory studies investigated chemical transfer from ingested microplastic without taking other exposure pathways into account. Therefore we studied the effect

  14. Evolution of near-field physico-chemical characteristics of the SFR repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, D.; Stenhouse, M.; Benbow, S.

    2000-08-01

    The evaluation of the post-closure performance of the SFR repository needs to consider time dependent evolution of the repository environment. Time-dependent reaction of near-field barriers (cement, steel, bentonite) with saturating groundwater will lead to the development of hyper alkaline repository pore fluids, chemically reducing conditions, and ultimately, the generation of gas through anaerobic corrosion of metals. Cement and concrete will act as chemical conditioning agents to minimise metal corrosion and ultimately, maximise radioelement sorption. The chemical and physical evolution of cement and concrete through reaction with ambient groundwater will thus affect sorption processes through changes in pH, complexing ligands, and solid surface properties. It is desirable that these changes be incorporated into the safety assessment. The sorption behaviour of radionuclides in cementitious systems has been reviewed in detail. The available evidence from experimental work carried out on the influence of organic materials on the sorption behaviour of radionuclides, indicates that most organic degradation products will not affect sorption significantly at the concentrations expected in a cementitious repository. The notable exception to this conclusion involves the degradation products of cellulose and, in particular, polycarboxylic acids represented by iso-saccharinic acid (ISA). Results using ISA indicate a significant reduction in sorption of Pu, by several orders of magnitude, for an ISA concentration of about 10 -3 M. More recent data indicate that the negative effect is not as great, though still significant. Therefore, some scoping calculations are advisable to determine how realistic an ISA concentration of about 10 -3 M would be for the SFR repository and to estimate concentrations of other relevant organic compounds, in particular EDTA, for comparison. Scoping calculations relevant to the longevity of hyper alkaline pore fluid conditions at SFR have been

  15. The Equipment of Czech Firefighters for the Detection and Field Analyses of Chemical Warfare Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Krykorkova

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the requirements for the devices of detection, chemical reconnaissance and field analyses of chemical warfare agents (CWA and divides them into simple devices of detection, universal detectors, selective analyzers, multi-component analyzers and mobile laboratories. It also describes the devices of detection available within the Fire and Rescue Service of the Czech Republic (FRS CR and compares them with some prospective trends of further development.

  16. Role of structural relaxations and chemical substitutions on piezoelectric fields and potential lineup in GaN/Al junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picozzi, S.; Profeta, G.; Continenza, A.; Massidda, S.; Freeman, A. J.

    2002-04-01

    First-principles full-potential linearized augmented plane wave calculations are performed to clarify the role of the interface geometry on piezoelectric fields and potential lineups in [0001] wurtzite and [111]-zincblende GaN/Al junctions. The electric field (polarity and magnitude) is found to be strongly affected by atomic relaxations in the interface region. A procedure is used to evaluate the Schottky-barrier height in the presence of electric fields, showing that their effect is relatively small (a few tenths of an eV). These calculations assess the rectifying behavior of the GaN/Al contact, in agreement with experimental values for the barrier. We disentangle chemical and structural effects on the relevant properties (such as the potential discontinuity and the electric field) by studying unrelaxed ideal nitride/metal systems. Using simple electronegativity arguments, we outline the leading mechanisms that define the values of the electric field and Schottky barrier in these ideal systems. Finally, the transitivity rule is proved to be well satisfied.

  17. Magnetic field of massive chemically peculiar stars in the Orion OB1 association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanyuk, I. I.; Semenko, E. A.; Kudryavtsev, D. O.; Yakunin, I. A.

    2018-01-01

    Spectropolarimetric observations of 55 chemically peculiar stars in the Orion OB1 association were obtained at the 6 m telescope of the Russian Academy of Sciences with the aim of searching for the presence of stellar magnetic fields. We found 8 new magnetic stars in addition to 20 previously known objects. The frequency of chemically peculiar A and B-type stars among normal A and B-type stars and the frequency of magnetic stars among all chemically peculiar stars decreases with age in the Orion OB1 association.

  18. Chemical Distances for Percolation of Planar Gaussian Free Fields and Critical Random Walk Loop Soups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jian; Li, Li

    2018-06-01

    We initiate the study on chemical distances of percolation clusters for level sets of two-dimensional discrete Gaussian free fields as well as loop clusters generated by two-dimensional random walk loop soups. One of our results states that the chemical distance between two macroscopic annuli away from the boundary for the random walk loop soup at the critical intensity is of dimension 1 with positive probability. Our proof method is based on an interesting combination of a theorem of Makarov, isomorphism theory, and an entropic repulsion estimate for Gaussian free fields in the presence of a hard wall.

  19. Evolution of near-field physico-chemical characteristics of the SFR repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, D [Quintessa Ltd., Nottingham (United Kingdom); Stenhouse, M [Monitor Scientific LLC, Denver, CO (United States); Benbow, S [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2000-08-01

    The evaluation of the post-closure performance of the SFR repository needs to consider time dependent evolution of the repository environment. Time-dependent reaction of near-field barriers (cement, steel, bentonite) with saturating groundwater will lead to the development of hyper alkaline repository pore fluids, chemically reducing conditions, and ultimately, the generation of gas through anaerobic corrosion of metals. Cement and concrete will act as chemical conditioning agents to minimise metal corrosion and ultimately, maximise radioelement sorption. The chemical and physical evolution of cement and concrete through reaction with ambient groundwater will thus affect sorption processes through changes in pH, complexing ligands, and solid surface properties. It is desirable that these changes be incorporated into the safety assessment. The sorption behaviour of radionuclides in cementitious systems has been reviewed in detail. The available evidence from experimental work carried out on the influence of organic materials on the sorption behaviour of radionuclides, indicates that most organic degradation products will not affect sorption significantly at the concentrations expected in a cementitious repository. The notable exception to this conclusion involves the degradation products of cellulose and, in particular, polycarboxylic acids represented by iso-saccharinic acid (ISA). Results using ISA indicate a significant reduction in sorption of Pu, by several orders of magnitude, for an ISA concentration of about 10{sup -3} M. More recent data indicate that the negative effect is not as great, though still significant. Therefore, some scoping calculations are advisable to determine how realistic an ISA concentration of about 10{sup -3} M would be for the SFR repository and to estimate concentrations of other relevant organic compounds, in particular EDTA, for comparison. Scoping calculations relevant to the longevity of hyper alkaline pore fluid conditions at SFR

  20. On transient electric fields observed in chemical release experiments by rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marklund, G.; Brenning, N.; Holmgren, G.; Haerendel, G.

    1986-06-01

    As a follow-up to the successful chemical release experiment Trigger in 1977, the TOR (Trigger Optimized Repetition) rocket was launched from Esrange on Oct. 24, 1984. Like in the Trigger experiment a large amplitude electric field pulse of 200 mV/m was detected shortly after the explosion. The central part of the pulse was found to be clearly correlated with an intense layer of swept up ambient particles behind a propagating shock-front. The field was directed towards the centre of the expanding ionized cloud, which is indicative of a polarisation electric field source. Expressions for this radial polarisation field and the much weaker azimuthal induced electric field are derived from a simple cylindrical model for the field and the expanding neutral cloud. Time profiles of the radial electric field are shown to be in good agreement with observations. (authors)

  1. Book of abstracts Chemical Engineering: IV All-Russian Conference on chemical engineering, All-Russian Youth Conference on chemical engineering, All-Russian school on chemical engineering for young scientists and specialists. Chemical engineering of nanomaterials. Energy- and resource-saving chemical-engineering processes and problems of their intensification. Processes and apparatuses of chemical engineering, chemical cybernetics. Ecological problems of chemical engineering and related fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakhodyaeva, Yu.A.; Belova, V.V.

    2012-01-01

    In the given volume of abstracts of the IV All-Russian Conference on chemical engineering, All-Russian Youth Conference on chemical engineering, All-Russian school on chemical engineering for young scientists and specialists (Moscow, March 18-23, 2012) there are the abstracts of the reports concerning chemical engineering of nanomaterials, energy- and resource-saving chemical-engineering processes, processes and apparatuses of chemical engineering, chemical cybernetics, ecological problems of chemical engineering and related fields. The abstracts deal with state-of-the-art and future development of theoretical and experimental investigations as well as with experience in practical realization of development works in the field of chemical engineering and relative areas [ru

  2. The Alexandria library, a quantum-chemical database of molecular properties for force field development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahremanpour, Mohammad M; van Maaren, Paul J; van der Spoel, David

    2018-04-10

    Data quality as well as library size are crucial issues for force field development. In order to predict molecular properties in a large chemical space, the foundation to build force fields on needs to encompass a large variety of chemical compounds. The tabulated molecular physicochemical properties also need to be accurate. Due to the limited transparency in data used for development of existing force fields it is hard to establish data quality and reusability is low. This paper presents the Alexandria library as an open and freely accessible database of optimized molecular geometries, frequencies, electrostatic moments up to the hexadecupole, electrostatic potential, polarizabilities, and thermochemistry, obtained from quantum chemistry calculations for 2704 compounds. Values are tabulated and where available compared to experimental data. This library can assist systematic development and training of empirical force fields for a broad range of molecules.

  3. The Alexandria library, a quantum-chemical database of molecular properties for force field development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahremanpour, Mohammad M.; van Maaren, Paul J.; van der Spoel, David

    2018-04-01

    Data quality as well as library size are crucial issues for force field development. In order to predict molecular properties in a large chemical space, the foundation to build force fields on needs to encompass a large variety of chemical compounds. The tabulated molecular physicochemical properties also need to be accurate. Due to the limited transparency in data used for development of existing force fields it is hard to establish data quality and reusability is low. This paper presents the Alexandria library as an open and freely accessible database of optimized molecular geometries, frequencies, electrostatic moments up to the hexadecupole, electrostatic potential, polarizabilities, and thermochemistry, obtained from quantum chemistry calculations for 2704 compounds. Values are tabulated and where available compared to experimental data. This library can assist systematic development and training of empirical force fields for a broad range of molecules.

  4. Current-current correlation function in presence of chemical potential and external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apresyan, E.A.

    2017-01-01

    The (2+1)-dimensional electron system was observed, where relation between the Green functions and conductivity was used. The current-current correlation function Π_μ_ν(B) for the fermion system was calculated in presence of non-quantizing magnetic field B, chemical potential η and gap m. From this function it is possible to obtain the equation for polarization operator calculated without the magnetic field. The result is also applicable for graphene

  5. Field studies on long term ecosystem consequences of ionising radiation and chemical pollutants (EANOR Project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oughton, D. [Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD (Norway); Evseeva, T. [Institute of Biology RAS (Russian Federation); Erenturk, S. [Istanbul Technical University (Turkey)

    2014-07-01

    Chernobyl and other nuclear accidents have demonstrated that high levels of ionizing radiation can result in impacts on plants and animals, however little is known about the long-term effects of chronic exposure on biodiversity or other population and ecosystem level effects. The issue of ecological impact has been addressed after the Fukushima accident, which has raised questions about the impacts of radioactivity not only on human health, but also on wildlife. The overall aim of the EANOR project (2012-2015) is to assess the impacts of chronic exposure to enhanced radioactivity and chemical pollutants by studying the diversity of plant and soil invertebrate populations at two field sites. The first is a radium contaminated site in the Vodny area of the Komi Republic, Russia. Between 1931 and 1956, this was the main location of Soviet radium production. Wastes from the industry caused contamination of the environment, leading to high levels of radionuclides, heavy metals and rare-earth elements in the surroundings. The prolonged exposure of the ecosystem, combined with relatively low human activities, makes the site an excellent field laboratory for investigating the long-term effects of pollution. The second site is metal mining (Fe, Au, Ag, Mn, Mo, Cu, Pb and Zn) and industrial area on the Eastern Black Sea Region, Turkey, having elevated levels of both heavy metals and radionuclides for many decades. Eastern Black Sea Region is a mountainous area covered with dense forests, where numerous rivers and torrents flow through gorges and is characterized by heavy rainfall, humid summers, and mild winters. Based on these conditions, the region is rich in biological diversity. Joint field expeditions have been carried out in 2012 and 2013 with the objective of documenting levels of radionuclides and other chemical contaminants in soils and organisms, and assessing plant and soil invertebrate biodiversity. Measurement of a range of biomarkers, including soil meta

  6. Hydrogeologic and chemical data for the O-Field area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoff, P.R.; Vroblesky, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    O-Field, located at the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, was periodically used for disposal of munitions, waste chemicals, and chemical-warfare agents from World War II through the 1950's. This report includes various physical, geologic, chemical, and hydrologic data obtained from well-core, groundwater, surface water, and bottom-sediment sampling sites at and near the O-Field disposal area. The data are presented in tables and hydrographs. Three site-location maps are also included. Well-core data include lithologic logs for 11 well-cluster sites, grain-size distributions, various chemical characteristics, and confining unit characteristics. Groundwater data include groundwater chemistry, method blanks for volatile organic carbon, available data on volatile and base/neutral organics, and compilation of corresponding method blanks, chemical-warfare agents, explosive-related products, radionuclides, herbicides, and groundwater levels. Surface-water data include field-measured characteristics; concentrations of various inorganic constituents including arsenic; selected organic constituents with method blanks; detection limits of organics; and a compilation of information on corresponding acids, volatiles, and semivolatiles; and method blanks corresponding to acids, volatiles, and semivolatiles. A set of 15 water-level hydrographs for the period March 1986 through September 1987 also is included in the report. 3 refs., 18 figs., 24 tabs

  7. Exploring Chemical Routes Relevant to the Toxicity of Paracetamol and Its meta-Analogue at a Molecular Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Arriaga, Romina; Galano, Annia

    2017-06-19

    Several chemical routes related to the toxicity of paracetamol (APAP, also known as acetaminophen), its analogue N-acetyl-m-aminophenol (AMAP), and their deacetylated derivatives, were investigated using the density functional theory. It was found that AMAP is more resilient to chemical oxidation than APAP. The chemical degradation of AMAP into radical intermediates is predicted to be significant only when it is induced by strong oxidants. This might explain the apparent contradictions among experimental evidence regarding AMAP toxicity. All of the investigated species are incapable of oxidizing DNA, but they can damage lipids by H atom transfer (HAT) from the bis-allylic site, with the phenoxyl radical of AMAP being the most threatening to the lipids' chemical integrity. Regarding protein damage, Cys residues were identified as the most likely targets. The damage in this case may involve two different routes: (i) HAT from the thiol site by phenoxyl radicals and (ii) protein arylation by the quinone imine (QI) derivatives. Both are not only thermochemically viable, but also are very fast reactions. According to the mechanism identified here as the most likely one for protein arylation, a rather large concentration of QI would be necessary for this damage to be significant. This might explain why APAP is nontoxic in therapeutic doses, while overdoses can result in hepatic toxicity. In addition, the QI derived from both APAP and AMAP were found to be capable of inflicting this kind of damage. In addition, it is proposed that they might increase • OH production via the Fenton reaction, which would contribute to their toxicity.

  8. Recent Progress in Molecular Simulation of Aqueous Electrolytes: Force Fields, Chemical Potentials and Solubility.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nezbeda, Ivo; Moučka, F.; Smith, W.R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 114, č. 11 (2016), s. 1665-1690 ISSN 0026-8976 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-19542S Grant - others:NSERC(CA) OGP1041 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : force fields * chemical potentials * aqueous electrolytes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.870, year: 2016

  9. Chemical composition of the horizontal-branch stars of globular clusters in the galactic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klochkova, V.G.; Panchuk, V.E.

    1987-01-01

    Chemical abundance is calculated for 6 field stars: HD 2857, 64488, 93329, 105262, HDE 281679, BD+20 deg 5009, using 12 spectra with a reciprocal dispersion of 9 A/mm, obtained on the 6-m telescope. Fundamental characteristics for 7 stars of the horizontal branch are found

  10. /sup 1/H-NMR chemical shift imaging suitable for low field systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Etsuji; Onodera, Takashi; Shiono, Hidemi; Kohno, Hideki

    1986-12-01

    An echo-time encoding proton NMR chemical shift imaging proposed by Dixon is extended to be applicable to low filed systems. The method utilizes the small phase angle between magnetic vectors of water and lipid protons to decrease the signal decays with spin-spin relaxation. The inevitable phase error caused by the static field inhomogeneity is corrected by using phase images of phantom measured under the same conditions as the actual measurements. The experiments were carried out using CuSO/sub 4/ doped water and vegetable oil at 0.5 T. Two chemical shift images could be clearly resolved with only one scan when the field inhomogeneity was larger than the chemical shift difference.

  11. Studies of physical-chemical properties of phosphorites of the northwest part of the Dzhanatas field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyumebayev, O T; Bashayeva, L A; Galuzo, V N; Koldobskaya, K V; Ospanov, Ye S; Zhantasov, K T

    1983-01-01

    The Karatau basin includes dozens of phosphorite fields which are distinguished both in chemical composition and in mineralogy. The main factors which influence the technological properties of the ores are chemical-mineralogical composition and structural-textural features of the phosphorites. Changes are examined in the physical chemical properties during thermal treatment of phosphorite of the Dzhanats field, northwest section. It was established as a result of the studies that the sample of phosphorite of Dzhanatas of the northwest section contains 3 main components: phosphate substance, silica and carbonates. Of the mineral admixtures, oxides and hydroxides of iron, alumosilicates, mica and organic substance are present. In the dominance of a certain mineral, the northwest section belongs to the silicon-phosphatecarbonate type.

  12. Savannah River Site management response plan for chemical safety vulnerability field assessment. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahal, E.J.; Murphy, S.L.; Salaymeh, S.R.

    1994-09-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative to identify potential chemical safety vulnerabilities in the DOE complex, the Chemical Safety Vulnerability Core Working Group issued a field verification assessment report. While the report concluded that Savannah River Site (SRS) is moving in a positive direction, the report also identified five chemical safety vulnerabilities with broad programmatic impact that are not easily nor quickly remedied. The May 1994 SRS Management Response Plan addressed the five SRS vulnerabilities identified in the field assessment report. The SRS response plan listed observations supporting the vulnerabilities and any actions taken or planned toward resolution. Many of the observations were resolved by simple explanations, such as the existence of implementation plans for Safety Analysis Report updates. Recognizing that correcting individual observations does not suffice in remedying the vulnerabilities, a task team was assembled to address the broader programmatic issues and to recommend corrective actions

  13. Chemical Alteration of Soils on Earth as a Function of Precipitation: Insights Into Weathering Processes Relevant to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundson, R.; Chadwick, O.; Ewing, S.; Sutter, B.; Owen, J.; McKay, C.

    2004-12-01

    Soils lie at the interface of the atmosphere and lithosphere, and the rates of chemical and physical processes that form them hinge on the availability of water. Here we quantify the effect of these processes on soil volume and mass in different rainfall regimes. We then use the results of this synthesis to compare with the growing chemical dataset for soils on Mars in order to identify moisture regimes on Earth that may provide crude analogues for past Martian weathering conditions. In this synthesis, the rates of elemental gains/losses, and corresponding volumetric changes, were compared for soils in nine soil chronosequences (sequences of soils of differing ages) - sequences formed in climates ranging from ~1 to ~4500 mm mean annual precipitation (MAP). Total elemental chemistry of soils and parent materials were determined via XRF, ICP-MS, and/or ICP-OES, and the absolute elemental gains or losses (and volume changes) were determined by normalizing data to an immobile index element. For the chronosequences examined, the initial stages of soil formation (103^ to 104^ yr), regardless of climate, generally show volumetric expansion due to (1) reduction in bulk density by biological/physical turbation, (2) addition of organic matter, (3) accumulation of water during clay mineral synthesis, and/or (4) accumulation of atmospheric salts and dust. Despite large differences in parent materials (basalt, sandstone, granitic alluvium), there was a systematic relationship between long-term (105^ to 106^ yr) volumetric change and rainfall, with an approximate cross-over point between net expansion (and accumulation of atmospheric solutes and dust) and net collapse (net losses of Si, Al, and alkaline earths and alkali metals) between approximately 20 and 100 mm MAP. Recently published geochemical data of soils at Gusev Crater (Gellert et al. 2004. Science 305:829), when normalized to Ti, show apparent net losses of Si and Al that range between 5 and 50% of values relative to

  14. Magnetic field effects on the chemical equilibrium in LaCo5-H system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Isao; Yamaguchi, Masuhiro; Deguchi, Noritaka; Miura, Shigeto.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic field effects on the chemical equilibrium were investigated for a ferromagnetic metal hydride-hydrogen system. The equilibrium hydrogen pressure, measured in the β+γ region for LaCo 5 H x , changed significantly with the applied magnetic fields up to 15 T in the temperature range between 293 and 343 K. Namely, the measured hydrogen pressure increased with increasing magnetic fields. However, such a change in the equilibrium pressure became less remarkable with increasing temperature. These experimental results agreed with the thermodynamic calculation based on magnetic data. (author)

  15. Diuron-induced rat urinary bladder carcinogenesis: mode of action and human relevance evaluations using the International Programme on Chemical Safety framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Rocha, Mitscheli Sanches; Arnold, Lora L; De Oliveira, Maria Luiza Cotrim Sartor; Catalano, Shadia M Ihlaseh; Cardoso, Ana Paula Ferragut; Pontes, Merielen G N; Ferrucio, Bianca; Dodmane, Puttappa R; Cohen, Samuel M; De Camargo, João Lauro V

    2014-05-01

    Diuron, a high volume substituted urea herbicide, induced high incidences of urinary bladder carcinomas and low incidences of kidney pelvis papillomas and carcinomas in rats exposed to high doses (2500 ppm) in a 2-year bioassay. Diuron is registered for both occupational and residential uses and is used worldwide for more than 30 different crops. The proposed rat urothelial mode of action (MOA) for this herbicide consists of metabolic activation to metabolites that are excreted and concentrated in the urine, leading to cytotoxicity, urothelial cell necrosis and exfoliation, regenerative hyperplasia, and eventually tumors. We show evidence for this MOA for diuron using the International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS) conceptual framework for evaluating an MOA for chemical carcinogens, and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and IPCS framework for assessing human relevance.

  16. Computational studies of atmospherically-relevant chemical reactions in water clusters and on liquid water and ice surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, R Benny; Varner, Mychel E; Hammerich, Audrey D; Riikonen, Sampsa; Murdachaew, Garold; Shemesh, Dorit; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Reactions on water and ice surfaces and in other aqueous media are ubiquitous in the atmosphere, but the microscopic mechanisms of most of these processes are as yet unknown. This Account examines recent progress in atomistic simulations of such reactions and the insights provided into mechanisms and interpretation of experiments. Illustrative examples are discussed. The main computational approaches employed are classical trajectory simulations using interaction potentials derived from quantum chemical methods. This comprises both ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) and semiempirical molecular dynamics (SEMD), the latter referring to semiempirical quantum chemical methods. Presented examples are as follows: (i) Reaction of the (NO(+))(NO3(-)) ion pair with a water cluster to produce the atmospherically important HONO and HNO3. The simulations show that a cluster with four water molecules describes the reaction. This provides a hydrogen-bonding network supporting the transition state. The reaction is triggered by thermal structural fluctuations, and ultrafast changes in atomic partial charges play a key role. This is an example where a reaction in a small cluster can provide a model for a corresponding bulk process. The results support the proposed mechanism for production of HONO by hydrolysis of NO2 (N2O4). (ii) The reactions of gaseous HCl with N2O4 and N2O5 on liquid water surfaces. Ionization of HCl at the water/air interface is followed by nucleophilic attack of Cl(-) on N2O4 or N2O5. Both reactions proceed by an SN2 mechanism. The products are ClNO and ClNO2, precursors of atmospheric atomic chlorine. Because this mechanism cannot result from a cluster too small for HCl ionization, an extended water film model was simulated. The results explain ClNO formation experiments. Predicted ClNO2 formation is less efficient. (iii) Ionization of acids at ice surfaces. No ionization is found on ideal crystalline surfaces, but the process is efficient on

  17. Monitoring remediation of trichloroethylene using a chemical fiber optic sensor: Field studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colston, B.W.; Brown, S.B.; Langry, K.; Daley, P.; Milanovich, F.P.

    1994-06-01

    Current US Department of Energy (DOE) policy requires characterization and subsequent remediation of areas where trichloroethylene (TCE) has been discharged into the soil and groundwater. Technology that allows trace quantities of this contaminant to be measured in situ on a continuous basis is needed. Fiber optic chemical sensors offer a promising low cost solution. Field tests of such a fiber optic chemical sensor for TCE have recently been completed. Sensors have been used to measure TCE contamination at Savannah River Site (SRS) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300 (S300) in the groundwater and vadose zones. Both sites are currently undergoing remediation processes

  18. Chemically doped three-dimensional porous graphene monoliths for high-performance flexible field emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho Young; Jeong, Sooyeon; Jeong, Seung Yol; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Han, Joong Tark; Jeong, Mun Seok; Lee, Geon-Woong; Jeong, Hee Jin

    2015-03-12

    Despite the recent progress in the fabrication of field emitters based on graphene nanosheets, their morphological and electrical properties, which affect their degree of field enhancement as well as the electron tunnelling barrier height, should be controlled to allow for better field-emission properties. Here we report a method that allows the synthesis of graphene-based emitters with a high field-enhancement factor and a low work function. The method involves forming monolithic three-dimensional (3D) graphene structures by freeze-drying of a highly concentrated graphene paste and subsequent work-function engineering by chemical doping. Graphene structures with vertically aligned edges were successfully fabricated by the freeze-drying process. Furthermore, their number density could be controlled by varying the composition of the graphene paste. Al- and Au-doped 3D graphene emitters were fabricated by introducing the corresponding dopant solutions into the graphene sheets. The resulting field-emission characteristics of the resulting emitters are discussed. The synthesized 3D graphene emitters were highly flexible, maintaining their field-emission properties even when bent at large angles. This is attributed to the high crystallinity and emitter density and good chemical stability of the 3D graphene emitters, as well as to the strong interactions between the 3D graphene emitters and the substrate.

  19. Chemical reactions in the nitrogen-acetone ice induced by cosmic ray analogues: relevance for the Solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, A. L. F.; Andrade, D. P. P.; da Silveira, E. F.; Alcantara, K. F.; Boduch, P.; Rothard, H.

    2018-02-01

    The radiolysis of 10:1 nitrogen:acetone mixture, condensed at 11 K, by 40 MeV 58Ni11 + ions is studied. These results are representative of studies concerning Solar system objects, such as transneptunian objects, exposed to cosmic rays. Bombardment by cosmic rays triggers chemical reactions leading to synthesis of larger molecules. In this work, destruction cross-sections of acetone and nitrogen molecules in solid phase are determined and compared with those for pure acetone. The N2 column density decreases very fast indicating that, under irradiation, nitrogen leaves quickly a porous sample. The most abundant molecular species formed in the radiolysis are C3H6, C2H6, N3, CO, CH4 and CO2. Some N-bearing species are also formed, but with low production yield. Dissolving acetone in nitrogen decreases the formation cross-sections of CH4, CO2 and H2CO, while increases those for CO and C2H6 species. This fact may explain the presence of C2H6 in Pluto's surface where CH4 is not pure, but diluted in an N2 matrix. The formation of more complex molecules, such as HNCO and, possibly, glycine is observed, suggesting the formation of small prebiotic species in objects beyond Neptune from acetone diluted in a N2 matrix irradiated by cosmic rays.

  20. Conducting Polymers in the Fields of Energy, Environmental Remediation, and Chemical-Chiral Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanez, Jorge G; Rincón, Marina E; Gutierrez-Granados, Silvia; Chahma, M'hamed; Jaramillo-Quintero, Oscar A; Frontana-Uribe, Bernardo A

    2018-05-09

    Conducting polymers (CPs), thanks to their unique properties, structures made on-demand, new composite mixtures, and possibility of deposit on a surface by chemical, physical, or electrochemical methodologies, have shown in the last years a renaissance and have been widely used in important fields of chemistry and materials science. Due to the extent of the literature on CPs, this review, after a concise introduction about the interrelationship between electrochemistry and conducting polymers, is focused exclusively on the following applications: energy (energy storage devices and solar cells), use in environmental remediation (anion and cation trapping, electrocatalytic reduction/oxidation of pollutants on CP based electrodes, and adsorption of pollutants) and finally electroanalysis as chemical sensors in solution, gas phase, and chiral molecules. This review is expected to be comprehensive, authoritative, and useful to the chemical community interested in CPs and their applications.

  1. Numerical solutions of several reflected shock-wave flow fields with nonequilibrium chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, R. K.; Presley, L. L.; Williams, E. V.

    1972-01-01

    The method of characteristics for a chemically reacting gas is used in the construction of the time-dependent, one-dimensional flow field resulting from the normal reflection of an incident shock wave at the end wall of a shock tube. Nonequilibrium chemical reactions are allowed behind both the incident and reflected shock waves. All the solutions are evaluated for oxygen, but the results are generally representative of any inviscid, nonconducting, and nonradiating diatomic gas. The solutions clearly show that: (1) both the incident- and reflected-shock chemical relaxation times are important in governing the time to attain steady state thermodynamic properties; and (2) adjacent to the end wall, an excess-entropy layer develops wherein the steady state values of all the thermodynamic variables except pressure differ significantly from their corresponding Rankine-Hugoniot equilibrium values.

  2. ANALYSIS OF THE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN THE FIELD OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION OF RUSSIAN CHEMICAL COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Makarov

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Since 2007, many chemical industrial companies in the Russian Federation have been actively involved in the Responsible Care® international voluntary program. To implement this program, vast bodies of data on environmental impact assessments needs to be collected. This allows us to analyse the environment-oriented trends in economic and social activities, and to record the achievements and problems in this field. The collected large bodies of data are in many cases heterogeneous, since the report has been a voluntary initiative. To analyse the existing trends in business processes, authors applied the methodology for system analysis of large bodies of data and used their own heuristic approximation algorithm for the treatment of accumulated data. This algorithm gives us the unique possibility of evaluating the performance of both individual chemical companies in the framework of the Responsible Care® program and the Russian chemical industry as a whole.

  3. Time-resolved and steady-state studies of biologically and chemically relevant systems using laser, absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Charles Ashley [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-12-20

    In Chapter 2 several experimental and data analysis methods used in this thesis are described. In Chapter 3 steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine the concentration of the efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs), pheophorbide a and pyropheophorbide a, in the feces of animals and it was found that their levels far exceed those reported to be inhibitory to efflux pumps. In Chapter 4 the solvation dynamics of 6-Propionyl-2-(N,Ndimethyl) aminonaphthalene (PRODAN) was studied in reverse micelles. The two fluorescent states of PRODAN solvate on different time scales and as such care must be exercised in solvation dynamic studies involving it and its analogs. In Chapter 5 we studied the experimental and theoretical solvation dynamics of coumarin 153 (C153) in wild-type (WT) and modified myoglobins. Based on the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence studies, we have concluded that it is important to thoroughly characterize the structure of a protein and probe system before comparing the theoretical and experimental results. In Chapter 6 the photophysical and spectral properties of a derivative of the medically relevant compound curcumin called cyclocurcumin was studied. Based on NMR, fluorescence, and absorption studies, the ground- and excited-states of cyclocurcumin are complicated by the existence of multiple structural isomers. In Chapter 7 the hydrolysis of cellulose by a pure form of cellulase in an ionic liquid, HEMA, and its aqueous mixtures at various temperatures were studied with the goal of increasing the cellulose to glucose conversion for biofuel production. It was found that HEMA imparts an additional stability to cellulase and can allow for faster conversion of cellulose to glucose using a pre-treatment step in comparison to only buffer.

  4. Combined Docking with Classical Force Field and Quantum Chemical Semiempirical Method PM7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Sulimov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of the combined use of the classical force field and the recent quantum chemical PM7 method for docking are presented. Initially the gridless docking of a flexible low molecular weight ligand into the rigid target protein is performed with the energy function calculated in the MMFF94 force field with implicit water solvent in the PCM model. Among several hundred thousand local minima, which are found in the docking procedure, about eight thousand lowest energy minima are chosen and then energies of these minima are recalculated with the recent quantum chemical semiempirical PM7 method. This procedure is applied to 16 test complexes with different proteins and ligands. For almost all test complexes such energy recalculation results in the global energy minimum configuration corresponding to the ligand pose near the native ligand position in the crystalized protein-ligand complex. A significant improvement of the ligand positioning accuracy comparing with MMFF94 energy calculations is demonstrated.

  5. Combined Docking with Classical Force Field and Quantum Chemical Semiempirical Method PM7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulimov, A V; Kutov, D C; Katkova, E V; Sulimov, V B

    2017-01-01

    Results of the combined use of the classical force field and the recent quantum chemical PM7 method for docking are presented. Initially the gridless docking of a flexible low molecular weight ligand into the rigid target protein is performed with the energy function calculated in the MMFF94 force field with implicit water solvent in the PCM model. Among several hundred thousand local minima, which are found in the docking procedure, about eight thousand lowest energy minima are chosen and then energies of these minima are recalculated with the recent quantum chemical semiempirical PM7 method. This procedure is applied to 16 test complexes with different proteins and ligands. For almost all test complexes such energy recalculation results in the global energy minimum configuration corresponding to the ligand pose near the native ligand position in the crystalized protein-ligand complex. A significant improvement of the ligand positioning accuracy comparing with MMFF94 energy calculations is demonstrated.

  6. Vastly enhancing the chemical stability of phosphorene by employing an electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Junfeng; Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2017-03-23

    Currently, a major hurdle preventing phosphorene from various electronic applications is its rapid oxidation under ambient conditions. Thus how to enhance its chemical stability by suppressing oxidation becomes an urgent task. Here, we reveal a highly effective procedure to suppress the oxidation of phosphorene by employing a suitable van der Waals (vdW) substrate and a vertical electric field. Our first-principles study shows that the phosphorene-MoSe 2 vdW heterostructure is able to reverse the stability of physisorption and chemisorption of molecular O 2 on phosphorene. With further application of a vertical electric field of -0.6 V Å -1 , the energy barrier for oxidation is able to further increase to 0.91 eV, leading to a 10 5 times enhancement in its lifetime compared with that without using the procedure at room temperature. Our work presents a viable strategy to vastly enhance the chemical stability of phosphorene in air.

  7. Field-level sublethal effects of approved bee hive chemicals on Honey Bees (Apis mellifera L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Jennifer A; Hood, W Michael; Pietravalle, Stéphane; Delaplane, Keith S

    2013-01-01

    In a study replicated across two states and two years, we tested the sublethal effects on honey bees of the miticides Apistan (tau fluvalinate) and Check Mite+ (coumaphos) and the wood preservative copper naphthenate applied at label rates in field conditions. A continuous covariate, a colony Varroa mite index, helped us disambiguate the effects of the chemicals on bees while adjusting for a presumed benefit of controlling mites. Mite levels in colonies treated with Apistan or Check Mite+ were not different from levels in non-treated controls. Experimental chemicals significantly decreased 3-day brood survivorship and increased construction of queen supercedure cells compared to non-treated controls. Bees exposed to Check Mite+ as immatures had higher legacy mortality as adults relative to non-treated controls, whereas bees exposed to Apistan had improved legacy mortality relative to non-treated controls. Relative to non-treated controls, Check Mite+ increased adult emergence weight. Although there was a treatment effect on a test of associative learning, it was not possible to statistically separate the treatment means, but bees treated with Apistan performed comparatively well. And finally, there were no detected effects of bee hive chemical on colony bee population, amount of brood, amount of honey, foraging rate, time required for marked released bees to return to their nest, percentage of released bees that return to the nest, and colony Nosema spore loads. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine sublethal effects of bee hive chemicals applied at label rates under field conditions while disambiguating the results from mite control benefits realized from the chemicals. Given the poor performance of the miticides at reducing mites and their inconsistent effects on the host, these results defend the use of bee health management practices that minimize use of exotic hive chemicals.

  8. Field-level sublethal effects of approved bee hive chemicals on Honey Bees (Apis mellifera L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Berry

    Full Text Available In a study replicated across two states and two years, we tested the sublethal effects on honey bees of the miticides Apistan (tau fluvalinate and Check Mite+ (coumaphos and the wood preservative copper naphthenate applied at label rates in field conditions. A continuous covariate, a colony Varroa mite index, helped us disambiguate the effects of the chemicals on bees while adjusting for a presumed benefit of controlling mites. Mite levels in colonies treated with Apistan or Check Mite+ were not different from levels in non-treated controls. Experimental chemicals significantly decreased 3-day brood survivorship and increased construction of queen supercedure cells compared to non-treated controls. Bees exposed to Check Mite+ as immatures had higher legacy mortality as adults relative to non-treated controls, whereas bees exposed to Apistan had improved legacy mortality relative to non-treated controls. Relative to non-treated controls, Check Mite+ increased adult emergence weight. Although there was a treatment effect on a test of associative learning, it was not possible to statistically separate the treatment means, but bees treated with Apistan performed comparatively well. And finally, there were no detected effects of bee hive chemical on colony bee population, amount of brood, amount of honey, foraging rate, time required for marked released bees to return to their nest, percentage of released bees that return to the nest, and colony Nosema spore loads. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine sublethal effects of bee hive chemicals applied at label rates under field conditions while disambiguating the results from mite control benefits realized from the chemicals. Given the poor performance of the miticides at reducing mites and their inconsistent effects on the host, these results defend the use of bee health management practices that minimize use of exotic hive chemicals.

  9. Effects of ion-neutral chemical reactions on dynamics of lightning-induced electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraki, Yasutaka

    2009-01-01

    Secondary lightning phenomena in the upper atmosphere called sprites attract interest from the viewpoint of atomic-molecular and plasma physics. Lightning-induced electric field accelerates the ionospheric electrons up to tens of electron-volts, inducing electrical breakdown as well as strong optical emissions, through electron impact ionization of molecules. A large-scale structure of sprites is constructed by collective dynamics of filamentary streamer discharges in a rarified gas, which in turn is controlled by the distribution of the background electric field. In this paper, we firstly reanalyze the relationship between quasi-static field formation and local ion chemistry with first-order perturbation techniques. Secondly, we investigate with a full ion chemical model the effects of electron attachment to oxygen molecules on its density in moderate cases of undervoltage lightning electric fields rather than the cases of intense ionization in streamers. We estimate the minimum values that are provided by the chemical balance with electron detachment from negative ions. We also investigate the recovery timescale of the electron density and find that the scale (≥1 s) is occasionally much larger than the interval of each lightning stroke (∼10 ms). We suggest that the subsequent sprite event as well as the field formation could be well affected by the ghost of the primary event. We discuss further the negative ion chemistry triggered by electron attachment in the nighttime mesosphere.

  10. Unsteady Bioconvection Squeezing Flow in a Horizontal Channel with Chemical Reaction and Magnetic Field Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingkai Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The time-dependent mixed bioconvection flow of an electrically conducting fluid between two infinite parallel plates in the presence of a magnetic field and a first-order chemical reaction is investigated. The fully coupled nonlinear systems describing the total mass, momentum, thermal energy, mass diffusion, and microorganisms equations are reduced to a set of ordinary differential equations via a set of new similarity transformations. The detailed analysis illustrating the influences of various physical parameters such as the magnetic, squeezing, and chemical reaction parameters and the Schmidt and Prandtl numbers on the distributions of temperature and microorganisms as well as the skin friction and the Nusselt number is presented. The conclusion is drawn that the flow field, temperature, and chemical reaction profiles are significantly influenced by magnetic parameter, heat generation/absorption parameter, and chemical parameter. Some examples of potential applications of such bioconvection could be found in pharmaceutical industry, microfluidic devices, microbial enhanced oil recovery, modeling oil, and gas-bearing sedimentary basins.

  11. E-SovTox: An online database of the main publicly-available sources of toxicity data concerning REACH-relevant chemicals published in the Russian language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Blinova, Irina; Aruoja, Villem; Dubourguier, Henri-Charles; Legrand, Nicolas; Kahru, Anne

    2010-08-01

    A new open-access online database, E-SovTox, is presented. E-SovTox provides toxicological data for substances relevant to the EU Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) system, from publicly-available Russian language data sources. The database contains information selected mainly from scientific journals published during the Soviet Union era. The main information source for this database - the journal, Gigiena Truda i Professional'nye Zabolevania [Industrial Hygiene and Occupational Diseases], published between 1957 and 1992 - features acute, but also chronic, toxicity data for numerous industrial chemicals, e.g. for rats, mice, guinea-pigs and rabbits. The main goal of the abovementioned toxicity studies was to derive the maximum allowable concentration limits for industrial chemicals in the occupational health settings of the former Soviet Union. Thus, articles featured in the database include mostly data on LD50 values, skin and eye irritation, skin sensitisation and cumulative properties. Currently, the E-SovTox database contains toxicity data selected from more than 500 papers covering more than 600 chemicals. The user is provided with the main toxicity information, as well as abstracts of these papers in Russian and in English (given as provided in the original publication). The search engine allows cross-searching of the database by the name or CAS number of the compound, and the author of the paper. The E-SovTox database can be used as a decision-support tool by researchers and regulators for the hazard assessment of chemical substances. 2010 FRAME.

  12. Composition, standardization and chemical profiling of Banisteriopsis caapi, a plant for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders relevant to Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Hong; Samoylenko, Volodymyr; Tekwani, Babu L; Khan, Ikhlas A; Miller, Loren S; Chaurasiya, Narayan D; Rahman, Md Mostafizur; Tripathi, Lalit M; Khan, Shabana I; Joshi, Vaishali C; Wigger, Frank T; Muhammad, Ilias

    2010-04-21

    Banisteriopsis caapi, a woody vine from the Amazonian basin, is popularly known as an ingredient of a sacred drink ayahuasca, widely used throughout the Amazon as a medicinal tea for healing and spiritual exploration. The usefulness of Banisteriopsis caapi has been established for alleviating symptoms of neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease. Primary objective of this study was to develop the process for preparing standardized extracts of Banisteriopsis caapi to achieve high potency for inhibition of human monoamine oxidases (MAO) and antioxidant properties. The aqueous extracts prepared from different parts of the plant collected from different geographical locations and seasons were analyzed by HPLC for principal bioactive markers. The extracts were simultaneously tested in vitro for inhibition of human MAOs and antioxidant activity for analysis of correlation between phytochemical composition of the extracts and bioactivities. Reversed-phase HPLC with photodiode array detection was employed to profile the alkaloidal and non-alkaloidal components of the aqueous extract of Banisteriopsis caapi. The Banisteriopsis caapi extracts and standardized compositions were tested in vitro for inhibition of recombinant preparations of human MAO-A and MAO-B. In vitro cell-based assays were employed for evaluation of antioxidant property and mammalian cell cytotoxicity of these preparations. Among the different aerial parts, leaves, stems/large branches and stem bark of Banisteriopsis caapi, HPLC analysis revealed that most of the dominant chemical and bioactive markers (1, 2, 5, 7-9) were present in high concentrations in dried bark of large branch. A library of HPLC chromatograms has also been generated as a tool for fingerprinting and authentication of the studied Banisteriopsis caapi species. The correlation between potency of MAO inhibition and antioxidant activity with the content of the main active constituents of the aqueous Banisteriopsis caapi extracts

  13. Does location congruence matter? A field study on the effects of location-based advertising on perceived AD intrusiveness, relevance & value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hühn, A.E.; Khan, V.J.; Ketelaar, P.E.; Riet, J.P. van 't; Konig, R.P.; Rozendaal, E.; Batalas, N.; Markopoulos, P.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the effect of location-congruent mobile messages on perceived intrusiveness, value, and relevance through a field experiment using the Experience Sampling Method (ESM). We developed a mobile application for undergraduate students, featuring campus news and information concerning class

  14. The landsnail Cepaea nemoralis regulates internal Cd levels when fed on Cd-enriched stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) leaves at low, field-relevant concentrations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notten, M.J.M.; Oosthoek, A.; Rozema, J.; Aerts, R.

    2006-01-01

    We studied Cd accumulation in Cepaea nemoralis snails at low, but field-relevant Cd concentrations in the diet (Urtica dioica leaves). Six treatments of U. dioica plants were grown, resulting in leaf Cd concentrations between 0 and 2.6 μg g

  15. Patch testing with a new fragrance mix - reactivity to the individual constituents and chemical detection in relevant cosmetic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frosch, Peter J; Rastogi, Suresh C; Pirker, Claudia; Brinkmeier, Thomas; Andersen, Klaus E; Bruze, Magnus; Svedman, Cecilia; Goossens, An; White, Ian R; Uter, Wolfgang; Arnau, Elena Giménez; Lepoittevin, Jean-Pierre; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Menne, Torkil

    2005-04-01

    A new fragrance mix (FM II), with 6 frequently used chemicals not present in the currently used fragrance mix (FM I), was evaluated in 6 dermatological centres in Europe, as previously reported. In this publication, test results with the individual constituents and after repeated open application test (ROAT) of FM II are described. Furthermore, cosmetic products which had caused a contact dermatitis in patients were analysed for the presence of the individual constituents. In 1701 patients, the individual constituents of the medium (14%) and the highest (28%) concentration of FM II were simultaneously applied with the new mix at 3 concentrations (break-down testing for the lowest concentration of FM II (2.8%) was performed only if the mix was positive). ROAT was performed with the concentration of the FM II which had produced a positive or doubtful (+ or ?+) patch test reaction. Patients' products were analysed for the 6 target compounds by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). 50 patients (2.9%) showed a positive reaction to 14% FM II and 70 patients (4.1%) to 28% FM II. 24/50 (48%) produced a positive reaction to 1 or more of the individual constituents of 14% FM II and 38/70 (54.3%) to 28% FM II, respectively. If doubtful reactions to individual constituents are included, the break-down testing was positive in 74% and 70%, respectively. Patients with a positive reaction to 14% FM II showed a higher rate of reactions to the individual constituent of the 28% FM II: 36/50 (72%). Positive reactions to individual constituents in patients negative to FM II were exceedingly rare. If doubtful reactions are regarded as negative, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for the medium concentration of FM II towards at least 1 individual constituent was 92.3% (exact 95% confidence interval 74.9-99.1%), 98.4% (97.7-99.0%), 48% (33.7-62.6%) and 99.9% (99.6-"100.0%), respectively. For the high concentration, the figures

  16. The effects of a stress field and chemical diffusion on electronic behaviour in InAs/GaAs quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xu; Wang Chongyu

    2006-01-01

    The effects of a stress field and chemical diffusion on electronic behaviour in self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QD) are investigated by using first-principle calculations. We find that a potential well appears in a QD without a lattice misfit and chemical diffusion, and both stress field and Ga chemical diffusion can induce the formation of a potential barrier, which strongly affects the electronic behaviour within the QD. The stress field can localize electrons to the base of the QD. And associated with Ga diffusion, the stress field will induce an inverted electronic alignment. The electronic behaviour in the QD without a stress field does not present the confined or localized characteristics caused by a lattice misfit, atomic size and Ga diffusion. This study provides useful information for modulating electronic behaviour by introducing a stress field and chemical diffusion

  17. A field survey of chemicals and biological products used in shrimp farming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graeslund, S.; Holmstroem, K.; Wahlstroem, A.

    2003-01-01

    This study documented the use of chemicals and biological products in marine and brackish water shrimp farming in Thailand, the world's top producer of farmed shrimp. Interviews were conducted with 76 shrimp farmers in three major shrimp producing regions, the eastern Gulf coast, the southern Gulf coast and the Andaman coast area. Farmers in the study used on average 13 different chemicals and biological products. The most commonly used products were soil and water treatment products, pesticides and disinfectants. Farmers in the southern Gulf coast area used a larger number of products than farmers in the other two areas. In the study, the use of more than 290 different chemicals and biological products was documented. Many of the pesticides, disinfectants and antibiotics used by the farmers could have negative effects on the cultured shrimps, cause a risk for food safety, occupational health, and/or have negative effects on adjacent ecosystems. Manufacturers and retailers of the products often neglected to provide farmers with necessary information regarding active ingredient and relevant instructions for safe and efficient use

  18. CHANGES IN SOIL CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF ORGANIC PADDY FIELD WITH AZOLLA APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jauhari Syamsiyah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of organic fertilizer is a way to improve soil fertility. Azolla can be used as organic fertilizer. This study aims to determine the effect of Azolla (Azolla mycrophylla. L on some soil chemical properties on organic paddy field. The field experiments used factorial complete randomized block design of three factors, namely Azolla (0 and 2 tons/ha, Manure (0 and 10 tons/ha and Rice Varieties (Mira1, Mentik Wangi and Merah Putih, with three times replication. Using Azolla on an organic paddy field does not significantly increase the levels of soil N, organic C, Cation Exchange Capacity and soil pH. However Azolla’s influence on soil available P is significant.

  19. Teaching earth science in the field: GPS-based educational trails as a practically relevant, empirical verified approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisser, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    GPS devices are common use in the daily life and are used in geography classes increasingly often. Presently, specialist literature is merely descriptive and thematically reduced to the function of orientation. The questions whether they are an applicable tool for teaching earth science circumstances and if the lasting learning success shows any differences compared to normal lessons hold in a class room haven't been answered. Neurobiological and teaching psychological knowledge support the idea that students completing the GPS-based educational trail will learn more successful compared to students in a "normal" class: A successful contextualization of modern geomedia stimulates the motivation. Geocaches are also suitable for didactical structuration. The order of "Geopoints" is chosen in a way that the structure of the landscape is being displayed adequate. The students feel addressed affectively due to the real-life encounters and experience their environment consciously. The presented concept "GPS-based educational trail" is different from a normal geocache, which is merely a hide-and-seek-game. Here, the main focus lays on the field work and earth science. The GPS-decvices are used for the orientation between the Geopoints. In order to get two groups with characteristics as different as possible, due to their developmental psychology, age-related education of cognitive and methodical competence, classes from grade 5 (11 years old) and 11 (17 years old) have been chosen. The different cognitive states of development require different didactical approaches. For the 11 grade the topic "rearrangements of fluvial topography" is a possible one. Using the example of anthropogenic rearrangements of the Rheinaue wetlands near Karlsruhe the interdependency between human and environment can be shown. The "Nördlinger Ries" between the Swabian and the Franconian Jura has been chosen for grade 5. The typical elements of the Swabian Jura (karst formation, hydrogeology

  20. Chemical management in fungicide sensivity of Mycosphaerella fijiensis collected from banana fields in México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Aguilar-Barragan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical management of the black leaf streak disease in banana caused by Mycosphaerella fijiensis (Morelet requires numerous applications of fungicides per year. However this has led to fungicide resistance in the field. The present study evaluated the activities of six fungicides against the mycelial growth by determination of EC50 values of strains collected from fields with different fungicide management programs: Rustic management (RM without applications and Intensive management (IM more than 25 fungicide application/year. Results showed a decreased sensitivity to all fungicides in isolates collected from IM. Means of EC50 values in mg L-1 for RM and IM were: 13.25 ± 18.24 and 51.58 ± 46.14 for azoxystrobin, 81.40 ± 56.50 and 1.8575 ± 2.11 for carbendazim, 1.225 ± 0.945 and 10.01 ± 8.55 for propiconazole, 220 ± 67.66 vs. 368 ± 62.76 for vinclozolin, 9.862 ± 3.24 and 54.5 ± 21.08 for fludioxonil, 49.2125 ± 34.11 and 112.25 ± 51.20 for mancozeb. A molecular analysis for β-tubulin revealed a mutation at codon 198 in these strains having an EC50 greater than 10 mg L-1 for carbendazim. Our data indicate a consistency between fungicide resistance and intensive chemical management in banana fields, however indicative values for resistance were also found in strains collected from rustic fields, suggesting that proximity among fields may be causing a fungus interchange, where rustic fields are breeding grounds for development of resistant strains. Urgent actions are required in order to avoid fungicide resistance in Mexican populations of M. fijiensis due to fungicide management practices.

  1. Chemical management in fungicide sensitivity of Mycosphaerella fijiensis collected from banana fields in México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Barragan, Alejandra; García-Torres, Ana Elisa; Odriozola-Casas, Olga; Macedo-Raygoza, Gloria; Ogura, Tetsuya; Manzo-Sánchez, Gilberto; James, Andrew C; Islas-Flores, Ignacio; Beltrán-García, Miguel J

    2014-01-01

    The chemical management of the black leaf streak disease in banana caused by Mycosphaerella fijiensis (Morelet) requires numerous applications of fungicides per year. However this has led to fungicide resistance in the field. The present study evaluated the activities of six fungicides against the mycelial growth by determination of EC50 values of strains collected from fields with different fungicide management programs: Rustic management (RM) without applications and Intensive management (IM) more than 25 fungicide application/year. Results showed a decreased sensitivity to all fungicides in isolates collected from IM. Means of EC50 values in mg L(-1) for RM and IM were: 13.25 ± 18.24 and 51.58 ± 46.14 for azoxystrobin, 81.40 ± 56.50 and 1.8575 ± 2.11 for carbendazim, 1.225 ± 0.945 and 10.01 ± 8.55 for propiconazole, 220 ± 67.66 vs. 368 ± 62.76 for vinclozolin, 9.862 ± 3.24 and 54.5 ± 21.08 for fludioxonil, 49.2125 ± 34.11 and 112.25 ± 51.20 for mancozeb. A molecular analysis for β-tubulin revealed a mutation at codon 198 in these strains having an EC50 greater than 10 mg L(-1) for carbendazim. Our data indicate a consistency between fungicide resistance and intensive chemical management in banana fields, however indicative values for resistance were also found in strains collected from rustic fields, suggesting that proximity among fields may be causing a fungus interchange, where rustic fields are breeding grounds for development of resistant strains. Urgent actions are required in order to avoid fungicide resistance in Mexican populations of M. fijiensis due to fungicide management practices.

  2. Chemical management in fungicide sensivity of Mycosphaerella fijiensis collected from banana fields in México

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Barragan, Alejandra; García-Torres, Ana Elisa; Odriozola-Casas, Olga; Macedo-Raygoza, Gloria; Ogura, Tetsuya; Manzo-Sánchez, Gilberto; James, Andrew C.; Islas-Flores, Ignacio; Beltrán-García, Miguel J.

    2014-01-01

    The chemical management of the black leaf streak disease in banana caused by Mycosphaerella fijiensis (Morelet) requires numerous applications of fungicides per year. However this has led to fungicide resistance in the field. The present study evaluated the activities of six fungicides against the mycelial growth by determination of EC50 values of strains collected from fields with different fungicide management programs: Rustic management (RM) without applications and Intensive management (IM) more than 25 fungicide application/year. Results showed a decreased sensitivity to all fungicides in isolates collected from IM. Means of EC50 values in mg L−1 for RM and IM were: 13.25 ± 18.24 and 51.58 ± 46.14 for azoxystrobin, 81.40 ± 56.50 and 1.8575 ± 2.11 for carbendazim, 1.225 ± 0.945 and 10.01 ± 8.55 for propiconazole, 220 ± 67.66 vs. 368 ± 62.76 for vinclozolin, 9.862 ± 3.24 and 54.5 ± 21.08 for fludioxonil, 49.2125 ± 34.11 and 112.25 ± 51.20 for mancozeb. A molecular analysis for β-tubulin revealed a mutation at codon 198 in these strains having an EC50 greater than 10 mg L−1 for carbendazim. Our data indicate a consistency between fungicide resistance and intensive chemical management in banana fields, however indicative values for resistance were also found in strains collected from rustic fields, suggesting that proximity among fields may be causing a fungus interchange, where rustic fields are breeding grounds for development of resistant strains. Urgent actions are required in order to avoid fungicide resistance in Mexican populations of M. fijiensis due to fungicide management practices. PMID:24948956

  3. Comparison of chemical inputs consumption in saffron and wheat fields in Qaenat region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Yaghoubi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Commercialization of agricultural operations and use of pesticides and chemical fertilizers in agricultural production has been created serious environmental impacts. Due to this issue and in order to assess the amount of chemical fertilizer and pesticide inputs in saffron and wheat production systems, a study was conducted in Qaenat region (South Khorasan province, 50 wheat fields and 48 saffron fields were investigated during 2011-12. The results showed that average nitrogen fertilizer consumption was 222.38 and 57.83 kg.ha-1 in wheat and saffron production systems, respectively, which from sstatistically point of view the difference was significant. In addition, unlike wheat, the use of pesticides very low in saffron cultivation and in many saffron farms it was zero. Therefore, the results can be considered saffron is an healthier product and have greater potential to organic product. Also, the amounts of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium fertilizers which were using in wheat in the study area were significantly different with recommended values. While in saffron production there was no significant difference between the values of consumed and recommended. Therefore, it seems, performing soil testing in each region and providing appropriate fertilizer formulas and required promotional-educational services in this regard, and raising public awareness is a good strategy for reducing the use of chemical inputs.

  4. Jorge A. Swieca's contributions to quantum field theory in the 60s and 70s and their relevance in present research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroer, Bert [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Freie Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2010-02-15

    After revisiting some high points of particle physics and QFT of the two decades from 1960 to 1980, I comment on the work by Jorge Andre Swieca. I explain how it fits into the quantum field theory during these two decades and draw attention to its relevance to the ongoing particle physics research. A particular aim of this article is to draw attention to the relevance of what at the time of Swieca was called 'the Schwinger Higgs screening mechanism'. which, together with recent ideas which generalize the concept of gauge theories, have all the ingredients to revolutionize the issue of gauge theories and the standard model. (author)

  5. Jorge A. Swieca's contributions to quantum field theory in the 60s and 70s and their relevance in present research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroer, Bert [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Freie Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2010-02-15

    After revisiting some high points of particle physics and QFT of the two decades from 1960 to 1980, I comment on the work by Jorge Andre Swieca. I explain how it fits into the quantum field theory during these two decades and draw attention to its relevance to the ongoing particle physics research. A particular aim of this article is to draw attention to the relevance of what at the time of Swieca was called 'the Schwinger Higgs screening mechanism'. which, together with recent ideas which generalize the concept of gauge theories, have all the ingredients to revolutionize the issue of gauge theories and the standard model. (author)

  6. Jorge A. Swieca's contributions to quantum field theory in the 60's and 70's and their relevance in present research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroer, Bert

    2010-01-01

    After revisiting some high points of particle physics and QFT of the two decades from 1960 to 1980, I comment on the work by Jorge Andre Swieca. I explain how it fits into the quantum field theory during these two decades and draw attention to its relevance to the ongoing particle physics research. A particular aim of this article is to draw attention to the relevance of what at the time of Swieca was called t he Schwinger Higgs screening mechanism . which, together with recent ideas which generalize the concept of gauge theories, have all the ingredients to revolutionize the issue of gauge theories and the standard model. (author)

  7. Jorge A. Swieca's contributions to quantum field theory in the 60s and 70s and their relevance in present research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroer, Bert; Freie Universitaet, Berlin

    2010-02-01

    After revisiting some high points of particle physics and QFT of the two decades from 1960 to 1980, I comment on the work by Jorge Andre Swieca. I explain how it fits into the quantum field theory during these two decades and draw attention to its relevance to the ongoing particle physics research. A particular aim of this article is to draw attention to the relevance of what at the time of Swieca was called 'the Schwinger Higgs screening mechanism'. which, together with recent ideas which generalize the concept of gauge theories, have all the ingredients to revolutionize the issue of gauge theories and the standard model. (author)

  8. High yield fabrication of chemically reduced graphene oxide field effect transistors by dielectrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joung, Daeha; Chunder, A; Zhai, Lei; Khondaker, Saiful I

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate high yield fabrication of field effect transistors (FET) using chemically reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets. The RGO sheets suspended in water were assembled between prefabricated gold source and drain electrodes using ac dielectrophoresis. With the application of a backgate voltage, 60% of the devices showed p-type FET behavior, while the remaining 40% showed ambipolar behavior. After mild thermal annealing at 200 deg. C, all ambipolar RGO FET remained ambipolar with increased hole and electron mobility, while 60% of the p-type RGO devices were transformed to ambipolar. The maximum hole and electron mobilities of the devices were 4.0 and 1.5 cm 2 V -1 s -1 respectively. High yield assembly of chemically derived RGO FET will have significant impact in scaled up fabrication of graphene based nanoelectronic devices.

  9. The Chemical Percolation Devolatilization Model Applied to the Devolatilization of Coal in High Intensity Acoustic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veras Carlos A. G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical percolation devolatilization model (CPD was extended for the prediction of drying and devolatilization of coal particles in high intensity acoustic fields found in Rijke tube reactors. The acoustic oscillations enhance the heat and mass transfer processes in the fuel bed as well as in the freeboard, above the grate. The results from simulations in a Rijke tube combustor have shown an increase in the rate of water evaporation and thermal degradation of the particles. The devolatilization model, based on chemical percolation, applied in pulsating regime allowed the dynamic prediction on the yields of CO, CO2, CH4, H2O, other light gases as well as tar which are important on ignition and stabilization of flames. The model predicted the quantity and form of nitrogen containing species generated during devolatilization, for which knowledge is strategically indispensable for reducing pollutant emissions (NOx in flames under acoustic excitation .

  10. Radiated flow of chemically reacting nanoliquid with an induced magnetic field across a permeable vertical plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mahanthesh

    Full Text Available Impact of induced magnetic field over a flat porous plate by utilizing incompressible water-copper nanoliquid is examined analytically. Flow is supposed to be laminar, steady and two-dimensional. The plate is subjected to a regular free stream velocity as well as suction velocity. Flow formulation is developed by considering Maxwell–Garnetts (MG and Brinkman models of nanoliquid. Impacts of thermal radiation, viscous dissipation, temperature dependent heat source/sink and first order chemical reaction are also retained. The subjected non-linear problems are non-dimensionalized and analytic solutions are presented via series expansion method. The graphs are plotted to analyze the influence of pertinent parameters on flow, magnetism, heat and mass transfer fields as well as friction factor, current density, Nusselt and Sherwood numbers. It is found that friction factor at the plate is more for larger magnetic Prandtl number. Also the rate of heat transfer decayed with increasing nanoparticles volume fraction and the strength of magnetism. Keywords: Induced magnetic field, Nanoliquids, Heat source/sink, Series expansion method, Chemical reaction, Thermal radiation

  11. Rethinking Partnerships with the Aim of Producing Knowledge with Practical Relevance: a Case Study in the Field of Ecological Restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héloïse Gonzalo-Turpin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Researchers in conservation biology and restoration ecology often work in partnership with local actors to increase the practical relevance of the knowledge they produce. Although an academic mode of knowledge production is essential in research for a better understanding of biological systems, it often fails to produce frameworks and methodologies having practical relevance that can be used in conservation and restoration programs. The involvement of researchers in collective plans of action is supposed to contribute to the production of a more contextualized form of knowledge. In this paper, we report our experience of partnership research in an ecological restoration project. We show that changing our mode of knowledge production to one that produces knowledge having more practical relevance requires a particular spectrum of partners and reflexive communication between all the partners. We advocate the need for participatory approaches that favor collective and reflexive processes of problem finding and problem solving in conservation and restoration projects. Putting such processes into practice is not only a challenge for researchers but also for their partners, and presupposes a profound transformation of their roles.

  12. Numerical simulations of heterogeneous chemical reactions coupled to fluid flow in varying thermal fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnahan, C.L.

    1991-11-01

    A numerical simulator of reactive chemical transport with coupling from precipitation-dissolution reactions to fluid flow, via changes of porosity and permeability, is applied to precipitation-dissolution of quartz and calcite in spatially and temporally variable fields of temperature. Significant effects on fluid flow are found in the quartz-silicic acid system in the presence of persistent, strong gradient of temperature. Transient heat flow in the quartz-silicic acid system and in a calcite-calcium ion-carbonato species system produces vanishingly small effects on fluid flow

  13. Field sampling for monitoring migration and defining the areal extent of chemical contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.M.; Skalski, J.R.; Eberhardt, L.L.; Simmons, M.A.

    1984-11-01

    Initial research on compositing, field designs, and site mapping oriented toward detecting spills and migration at commercial low-level radioactive or chemical waste sites is summarized. Results indicate that the significance test developed to detect samples containing high levels of contamination when they are mixed with several other samples below detectable limits (composites), will be highly effective with large sample sizes when contaminant levels frequently or greatly exceed a maximum acceptable level. These conditions of frequent and high contaminant levels are most likely to occur in regions of a commercial waste site where the priors (previous knowledge) about a spill or migration are highest. Conversely, initial investigations of Bayes sampling strategies suggest that field sampling efforts should be inversely proportional to the priors (expressed as probabilities) for the occurrence of contamination

  14. Field electron emission characteristics of chemical vapour deposition diamond films with controlled sp2 phase concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, X.; Yang, Q.; Xiao, C.; Hirose, A.

    2008-01-01

    Diamond films were synthesized in a microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition reactor. The microstructure and surface morphology of deposited films were characterized by Raman spectroscope and scanning electron microscope. The sp 2 phase concentration in diamond films was varied and its effect on the field electron emission (FEE) properties was investigated. Diamond films deposited under higher methane concentration exhibit better FEE property including lower turn-on electric field and larger emission current. The predominating factor modifying the FEE property is presumed to be the increase of sp 2 phase concentration. The influence of bias voltage on the FEE property of diamond films is not monotonic. Postgrowth acid treatment reduces the sp 2 phase content in diamond films without changing diamond grain sizes. The corresponding FEE property was degraded

  15. Role of ghrelin in drug abuse and reward-relevant behaviors: a burgeoning field and gaps in the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revitsky, A R; Klein, L C

    2013-09-01

    Ghrelin is a gut-brain hormone that regulates energy balance through food consumption. While ghrelin is well known for its role in hypothalamic activation and homeostatic feeding, more recent evidence suggests that ghrelin also is involved in hedonic feeding through the dopaminergic reward pathway. This paper investigated how ghrelin administration (intraperitoneal, intracerebroventricular, or directly into dopaminergic reward-relevant brain regions) activates the dopaminergic reward pathway and associated reward-relevant behavioral responses in rodents. A total of 19 empirical publications that examined one or more of these variables were included in this review. Overall, ghrelin administration increases dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens, as well as reward-relevant behaviors such as food (both standard chow and palatable foods) and alcohol consumption. Ghrelin administration also increases operant responding for sucrose, and conditioned place preference. Following a review of the small body of literature examining the effects of ghrelin administration on the dopamine reward pathway, we present a model of the relationship between ghrelin and dopaminergic reward activation. Specifically, ghrelin acts on ghrelin receptors (GHS-R1A) in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and lateral dorsal tegmental nucleus (LDTg) to stimulate the mesolimbic dopamine reward pathway, which results in increased rewarding behaviors in rodents. Results from this review suggest that selective antagonism of the ghrelin system may serve as potential treatment for addictive drug use. This review highlights gaps in the literature, including a lack of examination of sex- or age-related differences in the effects of ghrelin on dopamine reward processes. In light of vulnerability to drug abuse among female and adolescent populations, future studies should target these individual difference factors.

  16. Chemical Atmosphere-Snow-Sea Ice Interactions: defining future research in the field, lab and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Markus

    2015-04-01

    The air-snow-sea ice system plays an important role in the global cycling of nitrogen, halogens, trace metals or carbon, including greenhouse gases (e.g. CO2 air-sea flux), and therefore influences also climate. Its impact on atmospheric composition is illustrated for example by dramatic ozone and mercury depletion events which occur within or close to the sea ice zone (SIZ) mostly during polar spring and are catalysed by halogens released from SIZ ice, snow or aerosol. Recent field campaigns in the high Arctic (e.g. BROMEX, OASIS) and Antarctic (Weddell sea cruises) highlight the importance of snow on sea ice as a chemical reservoir and reactor, even during polar night. However, many processes, participating chemical species and their interactions are still poorly understood and/or lack any representation in current models. Furthermore, recent lab studies provide a lot of detail on the chemical environment and processes but need to be integrated much better to improve our understanding of a rapidly changing natural environment. During a 3-day workshop held in Cambridge/UK in October 2013 more than 60 scientists from 15 countries who work on the physics, chemistry or biology of the atmosphere-snow-sea ice system discussed research status and challenges, which need to be addressed in the near future. In this presentation I will give a summary of the main research questions identified during this workshop as well as ways forward to answer them through a community-based interdisciplinary approach.

  17. GoAmazon 2014/15 Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, JN [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) deployment to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility T3 site in Manacapuru, Brazil, was motivated by two main scientific objectives of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon) 2014/15 field campaign. 1) Study the interactions between anthropogenic and biogenic emissions by determining important molecular species in ambient nanoparticles. To address this, TDCIMS data will be combined with coincident measurements such as gas-phase sulfuric acid to determine the contribution of sulfuric acid condensation to nucleation and growth. We can then compare that result to TDCIMS-derived nanoparticle composition to determine the fraction of growth that can be attributed to the uptake of organic compounds. The molecular composition of sampled particles will also be used to attribute specific chemical species and mechanisms to growth, such as the condensation of low-volatility species or the oligomerization of α-dicarbonyl compounds. 2) Determine the source of new ambient nanoparticles in the Amazon. The hypothesis prior to measurements was that potassium salts formed from the evaporation of primary particles emitted by fungal spores can provide a unique and important pathway for new particle production in the Amazon basin. To explore this hypothesis, the TDCIMS recorded the mass spectra of sampled ambient particles using a protonated water cluster Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS). Laboratory tests performed using potassium salts show that the TDCIMS can detect potassium with high sensitivity with this technique.

  18. Analysis of a Stochastic Chemical System Close to a SNIPER Bifurcation of Its Mean-Field Model

    KAUST Repository

    Erban, Radek; Chapman, S. Jonathan; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.; Vejchodský , Tomá š

    2009-01-01

    A framework for the analysis of stochastic models of chemical systems for which the deterministic mean-field description is undergoing a saddle-node infinite period (SNIPER) bifurcation is presented. Such a bifurcation occurs, for example

  19. Relevance of southward magnetic fields in the neutral sheet to anisotropic distribution of energetic electrons and substorm activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lui, A.T.Y.; Meng, C.

    1979-01-01

    The implications of southward magnetic fields at the magnetotail neutral sheet to the development of streaming anisotropy of energetic electrons and magnetospheric substorm activity are examined. Magnetic field and energetic particle measurements from the Imp 6 spacecraft, the AE index, and global auroral images from DMSP spacecraft are utilized in this study. Criteria are developed to identify events of southward magnetic fields at the neutral sheet which imply the presence of X-type magnetic neutral lines. Several features of the observations suggest that the southward magnetic fields and the implied X-type neutral lines are associated with magnetic bubbles in the neutral sheet region. It is found that the signatures of magnetic bubbles are sometimes detected in association with tailward streaming and flux enhancement of energetic electrons (47 keV< E<350keV). A cigar-shaped anisotropy in the energetic electron distribution is frequently but not always observed before the onset of tailward streaming of energetic electrons. The tailward streaming is magnetic field-aligned and occurs in the form of bursts, suggestic electrons. The tailward streaming is magnetic field-aligned and occurs in the form of bursts, suggesting that the generating process is activated somewhat quasi-periodically and is not in a steady state. Signatures of magnetic bubbles are also detected without any substantial enhancement or detectable tailward streaming of energetic electrons. By comparing Imp 6 observations with the AW index and global auroral images from DMSP spacecraft. It is found that signatures of magnetic bubbles in the neutral sheet are observed during substorms as well as during quiet geomagnetic conditions, indicating that magnetic bubbles are intrinsic features of the neutral sheet in the magnetotail regardless of substorm activity

  20. Experimental and numerical reaction analysis on sodium-water chemical reaction field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Takata, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Akira; Kikuchi, Shin; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    In a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), liquid sodium is used as a heat transfer fluid because of its excellent heat transport capability. On the other hand, it has strong chemical reactivity with water vapor. One of the design basis accidents of the SFR is the water leakage into the liquid sodium flow by a breach of heat transfer tubes. This process ends up damages on the heat transport equipment in the SFR. Therefore, the study on sodium-water chemical reactions is of paramount importance for security reasons. This study aims to clarify the sodium-water reaction mechanisms using an elementary reaction analysis. A quasi one-dimensional flame model is applied to a sodium-water counter-flow reaction field. The analysis contains 25 elementary reactions, which consist of 17 H_2-O_2 and 8 Na-H_2O reactions. Temperature and species concentrations in the counter-flow reaction field were measured using laser diagnostics such as LIF and CARS. The main reaction in the experimental conditions is Na+H_2O → NaOH+H and OH is produced by H_2O+H → H_2+OH. It is demonstrated that the reaction model in this study well explains the structure of the sodium-water counter-flow diffusion flame. (author)

  1. Properties of recent IBAD-MOCVD Coated Conductors relevant to their high field, low temperature magnet use

    OpenAIRE

    Braccini, V; Xu, A; Jaroszynski, J; Xin, Y; Larbalestier, D C; Chen, Y; Carota, G; Dackow, J; Kesgin, I; Yao, Y; Guevara, A; Shi, T; Selvamanickam, V

    2010-01-01

    BaZrO3 (BZO) nanorods are now incorporated into production IBAD-MOCVD coated conductors. Here we compare several examples of both BZO-free and BZO-containing coated conductors using critical current (Ic) characterizations at 4.2 K over their full angular range up to fields of 31 T. We find that BZO nanorods do not produce any c-axis distortion of the critical current density Jc(theta) curve at 4.2 K at any field, but also that pinning is nevertheless strongly enhanced compared to the non-BZO ...

  2. Human Exposure Model (HEM): A modular, web-based application to characterize near-field chemical exposures and releases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA’s Chemical Safety and Sustainability research program is developing the Human Exposure Model (HEM) to assess near-field exposures to chemicals that occur in various populations over the entire life cycle of a consumer product. The model will be implemented as a...

  3. Field Artillery and the Combined Arms Team: A Case for the Continued Relevance of American Fire Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-23

    97 Alfred D. Chandler , ed., The Papers of Dwight David Eisenhower, the War Years: II (Baltimore: The John Hopkins Press, 1970), 1111-12...Observer on Guadalcanal.” Field Artillery Journal (August 1943): 563-68. Chandler , Alfred D., ed. The Papers of Dwight David Eisenhower, the War Years

  4. Effects of Field-Relevant Concentrations of Clothianidin on Larval Development of the Butterfly Polyommatus icarus (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basley, Kate; Goulson, Dave

    2018-04-03

    Arable field margins are often sown with wildflowers to encourage pollinators and other beneficial or desirable insects such as bees and butterflies. Concern has been raised that these margins may be contaminated with systemic pesticides such as neonicotinoids used on the adjacent crop, and that this may negatively impact beneficial insects. The use of neonicotinoids has been linked to butterfly declines, and species such as the common blue butterfly ( Polyommatus icarus) that feed upon legumes commonly sown in arable field margins, may be exposed to such toxins. Here, we demonstrate that the larval food plants of P. icarus growing in an arable field margin adjacent to a wheat crop treated with the neonicotinoid clothianidin not only contain the pesticide at concentrations comparable to and sometimes higher than those found in foliage of treated crops (range 0.2-48 ppb) but also remain detectable at these levels for up to 21 months after sowing of the crop. Overall, our study demonstrates that nontarget herbivorous organisms in arable field margins are likely to be chronically exposed to neonicotinoids. Under laboratory conditions, exposure to clothianidin at 15 ppb (a field-realistic dose) or above reduced larval growth for the first 9 days of the experiment. Although there was evidence of clothianidin inducing mortality in larvae, with highest survival in control groups, the dose-response relationship was unclear. Our study suggests that larvae of this butterfly exhibit some deleterious sublethal and sometimes lethal impacts of exposure to clothianidin, but many larvae survive to adulthood even when exposed to high doses.

  5. Influence of external magnetic field, finite-size effects and chemical potential on the phase transition of a complex scalar field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalcanti, E.; Castro, E.; Malbouisson, A.P.C. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas/MCTI, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Linhares, C.A. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-10-15

    A scalar model is built, as a quantum field theory defined on a toroidal topology, to describe a phase transition in films subjected to periodic boundary conditions and influenced by an external and constant magnetic field. Criticality is studied and the relations between the critical temperature, the film thickness, the magnetic field strength and the chemical potential are investigated. Since the model describes a second-order phase transition a comparison with the Ginzburg-Landau theory is made. (orig.)

  6. Calibration and field evaluation of polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) for monitoring pharmaceuticals in hospital wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailly, Emilie; Levi, Yves; Karolak, Sara

    2013-01-01

    The Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler (POCIS) is a new tool for the sampling of organic pollutants in water. We tested this device for the monitoring of pharmaceuticals in hospital wastewater. After calibration, a field application was carried out in a French hospital for six pharmaceutical compounds (Atenolol, Prednisolone, Methylprednisolone, Sulfamethoxazole, Ofloxacin, Ketoprofen). POCIS were calibrated in tap water and wastewater in laboratory conditions close to relevant environmental conditions (temperature, flow velocity). Sampling rates (R s ) were determined and we observed a significant increase with flow velocity and temperature. Whatever the compound, the R s value was lower in wastewater and the linear phase of uptake was shorter. POCIS were deployed in a hospital sewage pipe during four days and the estimated water concentrations were close to those obtained with twenty-four hour composite samples. -- Highlights: ► Calibration of POCIS for the monitoring of pharmaceuticals in hospital wastewater. ► Uptake profile presents a shorter linear phase in wastewater than in tap water. ► Influence of R s values by temperature, flow velocity and bio-fouling. ► Correlation between concentrations estimated from POCIS or measured in TWA samples. ► Deployment period should be no longer than five days. -- After calibration in tap water and hospital wastewater, POCIS were used to monitor pharmaceuticals in hospital sewage and were compared to TWA sampling

  7. Precision Viticulture : is it relevant to manage the vineyard according to the within field spatial variability of the environment ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisseyre, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    For more than 15 years, research projects are conducted in the precision viticulture (PV) area around the world. These research projects have provided new insights into the within-field variability in viticulture. Indeed, access to high spatial resolution data (remote sensing, embedded sensors, etc.) changes the knowledge we have of the fields in viticulture. In particular, the field which was until now considered as a homogeneous management unit, presents actually a high spatial variability in terms of yield, vigour an quality. This knowledge will lead (and is already causing) changes on how to manage the vineyard and the quality of the harvest at the within field scale. From the experimental results obtained in various countries of the world, the goal of the presentation is to provide figures on: - the spatial variability of the main parameters (yield, vigor, quality), and how this variability is organized spatially, - the temporal stability of the observed spatial variability and the potential link with environmental parameters like soil, topography, soil water availability, etc. - information sources available at a high spatial resolution conventionally used in precision agriculture likely to highlight this spatial variability (multi-spectral images, soil electrical conductivity, etc.) and the limitations that these information sources are likely to present in viticulture. Several strategies are currently being developed to take into account the within field variability in viticulture. They are based on the development of specific equipments, sensors, actuators and site specific strategies with the aim of adapting the vineyard operations at the within-field level. These strategies will be presented briefly in two ways : - Site specific operations (fertilization, pruning, thinning, irrigation, etc.) in order to counteract the effects of the environment and to obtain a final product with a controlled and consistent wine quality, - Differential harvesting with the

  8. The basement control on Xiazhuang uranium ore field in south sector of Wuyi tumescence and relevant geological problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Dazhong; Xue Zhenhua

    1994-01-01

    Based on the two rift-trench tectonic framework in Wuyi as well as its adjacent areas proposed previously, this study takes Yingtan-Nancheng-Anyuan-Heyuan tenacity fracture belt as the geological boundary between two types of uranium deposits (granite and volcanic rock). It is noted that the distinct function of Caledonian movement in this area is the formation of the linear migmatization and granitization on the basis of rift and tumescence basement. Simultaneously, according to the new discovery of hypometamorphic rock and large scaled ductile mylonitized zone in Xiazhuang uranium ore field and its adjacent area, it is concluded that the Xiazhuang uranium ore field is the result of multiple tectonism and magmatic activations on the Caledonian hot dome on the basis of ancient basement. Because the uranium mineralization is present in two kinds of rocks (ductile and brittle), it is suggested that the types of mineralization in Xiazhuang can be considered in order to guide the further prospecting

  9. A survey on trace organic chemicals in a German water protection area and the proposal of relevant indicators for anthropogenic influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Wolfram; Winzenbacher, Rudi

    2017-06-01

    A comprehensive monitoring programme of trace organic chemicals (TOrC) was conducted for a German water protection area in karstic ground. The aim of this survey was to detect the potential anthropogenic influences of point sources such as wastewater treatment plants and diffuse pollution such as runoff water from roads on the raw water used for drinking water treatment. The programme comprised seven sampling campaigns within 2 years each with up to 20 sampling sites. In total, the programme included 84 anthropogenic compounds from pharmaceuticals, iodinated X-ray contrast media, sweeteners, industrial chemicals (benzotriazoles, melamines and benzothiazoles) and pesticide metabolites. Cyclamate occurred with the highest median concentration of 44 μg l -1 in untreated wastewater and acesulfame occurred with a concentration of 20 μg l -1 in treated wastewater. In runoff water from roads, the most relevant compounds were tolyltriazole with 2.3 μg l -1 and the desphenyl-chloridazon with 1.2 μg l -1 . In the stream waters, the highest median concentrations were found for melamine and acesulfame both at 0.61 μg l -1 . High elimination during conventional wastewater treatment was observed for 5 out of 49 compounds. These are acetyl-sulfamethoxazole, aciclovir, cyclamate, ibuprofen and saccharin. Based on the survey results, we propose a set of nine compounds to be used as indicators for wastewater, untreated wastewater and runoff water from roads for an efficient surveillance. The indicators are intended to detect anthropogenic influences in surface, ground and drinking water.

  10. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  11. Fabrication of Chemically Doped, High Upper Critical Field Magnesium Diboride Superconducting Wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzik, James, V.

    2005-10-13

    Controlled chemical doping of magnesium diboride (MgB2) has been shown to substantially improve its superconducting properties to the levels required for high field magnets, but the doping is difficult to accomplish through the usual route of solid state reaction and diffusion. Further, superconducting cables of MgB2 are difficult to fabricate because of the friable nature of the material. In this Phase I STTR project, doped and undoped boron fibers were made by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Several >100m long batches of doped and undoped fiber were made by CVD codeposition of boron plus dopants. Bundles of these fibers infiltrated with liquid magnesium and subsequently converted to MgB2 to form Mg-MgB2 metal matrix composites. In a parallel path, doped boron nano-sized powder was produced by a plasma synthesis technique, reacted with magnesium to produce doped MgB2 superconducting ceramic bodies. The doped powder was also fabricated into superconducting wires several meters long. The doped boron fibers and powders made in this program were fabricated into fiber-metal composites and powder-metal composites by a liquid metal infiltration technique. The kinetics of the reaction between boron fiber and magnesium metal was investigated in fiber-metal composites. It was found that the presence of dopants had significantly slowed the reaction between magnesium and boron. The superconducting properties were measured for MgB2 fibers and MgB2 powders made by liquid metal infiltration. Properties of MgB2 products (Jc, Hc2) from Phase I are among the highest reported to date for MgB2 bulk superconductors. Chemically doped MgB2 superconducting magnets can perform at least as well as NbTi and NbSn3 in high magnetic fields and still offer an improvement over the latter two in terms of operating temperature. These characteristics make doped MgB2 an effective material for high magnetic field applications, such as magnetic confined fusion, and medical MRI devices. Developing

  12. Fabrication of Chemically Doped, High Upper Critical Field Magnesium Diboride Superconducting Wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzik, James V.

    2005-01-01

    Controlled chemical doping of magnesium diboride (MgB2) has been shown to substantially improve its superconducting properties to the levels required for high field magnets, but the doping is difficult to accomplish through the usual route of solid state reaction and diffusion. Further, superconducting cables of MgB2 are difficult to fabricate because of the friable nature of the material. In this Phase I STTR project, doped and undoped boron fibers were made by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Several >100m long batches of doped and undoped fiber were made by CVD codeposition of boron plus dopants. Bundles of these fibers infiltrated with liquid magnesium and subsequently converted to MgB2 to form Mg-MgB2 metal matrix composites. In a parallel path, doped boron nano-sized powder was produced by a plasma synthesis technique, reacted with magnesium to produce doped MgB2 superconducting ceramic bodies. The doped powder was also fabricated into superconducting wires several meters long. The doped boron fibers and powders made in this program were fabricated into fiber-metal composites and powder-metal composites by a liquid metal infiltration technique. The kinetics of the reaction between boron fiber and magnesium metal was investigated in fiber-metal composites. It was found that the presence of dopants had significantly slowed the reaction between magnesium and boron. The superconducting properties were measured for MgB2 fibers and MgB2 powders made by liquid metal infiltration. Properties of MgB2 products (Jc, Hc2) from Phase I are among the highest reported to date for MgB2 bulk superconductors. Chemically doped MgB2 superconducting magnets can perform at least as well as NbTi and NbSn3 in high magnetic fields and still offer an improvement over the latter two in terms of operating temperature. These characteristics make doped MgB2 an effective material for high magnetic field applications, such as magnetic confined fusion, and medical MRI devices. Developing

  13. Relevance of near-Earth magnetic field modeling in deriving SEP properties using ground-based data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanellakopoulos, Anastasios; Plainaki, Christina; Mavromichalaki, Helen; Laurenza, Monica; Gerontidou, Maria; Storini, Marisa; Andriopoulou, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs) are short-term increases observed in cosmic ray intensity records of ground-based particle detectors such as neutron monitors (NMs) or muon detectors; they are related to the arrival of solar relativistic particles in the terrestrial environment. Hence, GLE events are related to the most energetic class of solar energetic particle (SEP) events. In this work we investigate how the use of different magnetospheric field models can influence the derivation of the relativistic SEP properties when modeling GLE events. As a case study, we examine the event of 2012 May 17 (also known as GLE71), registered by ground-based NMs. We apply the Tsyganenko 89 and the Tsyganenko 96 models in order to calculate the trajectories of the arriving SEPs in the near-Earth environment. We show that the intersection of the SEP trajectories with the atmospheric layer at ~20 km from the Earth's surface (i.e., where the flux of the generated secondary particles is maximum), forms for each ground-based neutron monitor a specified viewing region that is dependent on the magnetospheric field configuration. Then, we apply the Neutron Monitor Based Anisotropic GLE Pure Power Law (NMBANGLE PPOLA) model (Plainaki et al. 2010, Solar Phys, 264, 239), in order to derive the spectral properties of the related SEP event and the spatial distributions of the SEP fluxes impacting the Earth's atmosphere. We examine the dependence of the results on the used magnetic field models and evaluate their range of validity. Finally we discuss information derived by modeling the SEP spectrum in the frame of particle acceleration scenarios.

  14. Chemically etched fiber tips for near-field optical microscopy: a process for smoother tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambelet, P; Sayah, A; Pfeffer, M; Philipona, C; Marquis-Weible, F

    1998-11-01

    An improved method for producing fiber tips for scanning near-field optical microscopy is presented. The improvement consists of chemically etching quartz optical fibers through their acrylate jacket. This new method is compared with the previous one in which bare fibers were etched. With the new process the meniscus formed by the acid along the fiber does not move during etching, leading to a much smoother surface of the tip cone. Subsequent metallization is thus improved, resulting in better coverage of the tip with an aluminum opaque layer. Our results show that leakage can be avoided along the cone, and light transmission through the tip is spatially limited to an optical aperture of a 100-nm dimension.

  15. Interaction between benzenedithiolate and gold: Classical force field for chemical bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Yongsheng; Krstić, Predrag S.; Wells, Jack C.; Cummings, Peter T.; Dean, David J.

    2005-06-01

    We have constructed a group of classical potentials based on ab initio density-functional theory (DFT) calculations to describe the chemical bonding between benzenedithiolate (BDT) molecule and gold atoms, including bond stretching, bond angle bending, and dihedral angle torsion involved at the interface between the molecule and gold clusters. Three DFT functionals, local-density approximation (LDA), PBE0, and X3LYP, have been implemented to calculate single point energies (SPE) for a large number of molecular configurations of BDT-1, 2 Au complexes. The three DFT methods yield similar bonding curves. The variations of atomic charges from Mulliken population analysis within the molecule/metal complex versus different molecular configurations have been investigated in detail. We found that, except for bonded atoms in BDT-1, 2 Au complexes, the Mulliken partial charges of other atoms in BDT are quite stable, which significantly reduces the uncertainty in partial charge selections in classical molecular simulations. Molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate the structure of BDT self-assembled monolayer (SAM) and the adsorption geometry of S adatoms on Au (111) surface. We found that the bond-stretching potential is the most dominant part in chemical bonding. Whereas the local bonding geometry of BDT molecular configuration may depend on the DFT functional used, the global packing structure of BDT SAM is quite independent of DFT functional, even though the uncertainty of some force-field parameters for chemical bonding can be as large as ˜100%. This indicates that the intermolecular interactions play a dominant role in determining the BDT SAMs global packing structure.

  16. Atmospheric parameters and chemical properties of red giants in the CoRoT asteroseismology fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, T.; Miglio, A.; Lagarde, N.; Montalbán, J.; Rainer, M.; Poretti, E.; Eggenberger, P.; Hekker, S.; Kallinger, T.; Mosser, B.; Valentini, M.; Carrier, F.; Hareter, M.; Mantegazza, L.

    2014-04-01

    A precise characterisation of the red giants in the seismology fields of the CoRoT satellite is a prerequisite for further in-depth seismic modelling. High-resolution FEROS and HARPS spectra were obtained as part of the ground-based follow-up campaigns for 19 targets holding great asteroseismic potential. These data are used to accurately estimate their fundamental parameters and the abundances of 16 chemical species in a self-consistent manner. Some powerful probes of mixing are investigated (the Li and CNO abundances, as well as the carbon isotopic ratio in a few cases). The information provided by the spectroscopic and seismic data is combined to provide more accurate physical parameters and abundances. The stars in our sample follow the general abundance trends as a function of the metallicity observed in stars of the Galactic disk. After an allowance is made for the chemical evolution of the interstellar medium, the observational signature of internal mixing phenomena is revealed through the detection at the stellar surface of the products of the CN cycle. A contamination by NeNa-cycled material in the most massive stars is also discussed. With the asteroseismic constraints, these data will pave the way for a detailed theoretical investigation of the physical processes responsible for the transport of chemical elements in evolved, low- and intermediate-mass stars. Based on observations collected at La Silla Observatory, ESO (Chile) with the FEROS and HARPS spectrograph at the 2.2 and 3.6-m telescopes under programs LP178.D-0361, LP182.D-0356, and LP185.D-0056.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgTables A.2 to A.6 are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/564/A119

  17. Formation of CdS thin films in a chemical bath environment under the action of an external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaskes-Luna, Kh.G.; Zekhe, A.; Nhukhil'o-Garsiya, M.P.; Starostenko, O.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of external magnetic field on obtaining thin CdS films on glass sub layers through the method of chemical deposition from the cadmium chloride aqueous solution is studied. The intensity and direction of the magnetic field during deposition obviously affect the number of physical properties of polycrystalline films: thickness, grain size and optical quality. The films characteristics are studied through an atomic-power microscope, light absorption spectroscopy and conductometry in darkness. The results obtained are interpreted on the basis of notions on the cadmium and sulfur specific interaction in the chemical bath with a magnetic field [ru

  18. Effects of chemical smokes on flora and fauna under field and laboratory exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, D J; Novak, E W; Lower, W R; Yanders, A; Kapila, S; Wang, R

    1987-06-01

    Various types of obscurant smokes are used routinely in training by the U.S. Army. Because continued routine use of the smokes could be detrimental to the native flora and fauna at training sites, a preliminary biological and chemical field study of fogoil, hexachloroethane, and tank diesel smokes was conducted. Smoke plumes were sampled and chemically analyzed at distances of 15-150 m from the smoke source where Tradescantia clones 4430 and 03 and the native plant Ambrosia dumosa and the native rodent Dipodomys merriami were exposed for 30 min. In addition, Tradescantia clone 4430 was exposed to tank diesel in the laboratory at concentration levels equivalent to exposure at 15 and 50 m. Tradescantia clones were examined for mutagenic effects indicated by micronuclei induction in developing pollen and pink somatic mutations in stamen hairs. Photosynthetic perturbations were measured in Tradescantia and A. dumosa using variable fluorescence induction. Animals were examined for sister chromatid exchanges and chromosome aberrations. It was found that all of the smokes tested exerted varying degrees of physiological and mutagenic effects in one or more assay system at one or more exposure distance. The studies reported here indicate that exposed ecological systems, or at least components of these systems, are at a higher risk than are unexposed components (e.g., organisms) for several types of damage attributed to obscurant smoke exposure.

  19. A field-scale test of in situ chemical oxidation through recirculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, O.R.; Cline, S.R.; Holden, W.L.; Gardner, F.G.; Schlosser, B.M.; Siegrist, R.L.; Houk, T.C.

    1998-01-01

    In situ chemical oxidation is a developing class of remediation technologies in which organic contaminants are degraded in place by powerful oxidants. Successful implementation of this technology requires an effective means for dispersing the oxidant to contaminated regions in the subsurface. An oxidant delivery technique has been developed wherein the treatment solution is made by adding an oxidant to extracted groundwater. The oxidant-laden groundwater is then injected and recirculated into a contaminated aquifer through multiple horizontal and/or vertical wells. This technique, referred to as in situ chemical oxidation through recirculation (ISCOR), can be applied to saturated and hydraulically conductive formations and used with relatively stable oxidants such as potassium permanganate (KMnO 4 ). A field-scale test of ISCOR was conducted at a site (Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant) where groundwater in a 5-ft thick silty gravel aquifer is contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) at levels that indicate the presence of residual dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). The field test was implemented using a pair of parallel horizontal wells with 200-ft screened sections. For approximately one month, groundwater was extracted from one horizontal well, dosed with crystalline KMnO 4 , and re-injected into the other horizontal well 90 ft away. Post-treatment characterization showed that ISCOR was effective at removing TCE in the saturated region. Lateral and vertical heterogeneities within the treatment zone impacted the uniform delivery of the oxidant solution. However, TCE was not detected in groundwater samples collected from monitoring wells and soil samples from borings in locations where the oxidant had permeated

  20. Properties of recent IBAD-MOCVD coated conductors relevant to their high field, low temperature magnet use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braccini, V; Xu, A; Jaroszynski, J; Xin, Y; Larbalestier, D C; Chen, Y; Carota, G; Dackow, J; Kesgin, I; Yao, Y; Guevara, A; Shi, T; Selvamanickam, V

    2011-01-01

    BaZrO 3 (BZO) nanorods are now incorporated into production IBAD-MOCVD coated conductors. Here we compare several examples of both BZO-free and BZO-containing coated conductors using critical current (I c ) characterizations at 4.2 K over their full angular range up to fields of 31 T. We find that BZO nanorods do not produce any c-axis distortion of the critical current density J c (θ) curve at 4.2 K at any field, but also that pinning is nevertheless strongly enhanced compared to the non-BZO conductors. We also find that the tendency of the ab-plane J c (θ) peak to become cusp-like is moderated by BZO and we define a new figure of merit that may be helpful for magnet design-the OADI (off-axis double I c ), which clearly shows that BZO broadens the ab-plane peak and thus raises J c 5 0 -30 0 away from the tape plane, where the most critical approach to I c occurs in many coil designs. We describe some experimental procedures that may make critical current I c tests of these very high current tapes more tractable at 4.2 K, where I c exceeds 1000 A even for 4 mm wide tape with only 1 μm thickness of superconductor. A positive conclusion is that BZO is very beneficial for the J c characteristics at 4.2 K, just as it is at higher temperatures, where the correlated c-axis pinning effects of the nanorods are much more obvious.

  1. Properties of recent IBAD-MOCVD coated conductors relevant to their high field, low temperature magnet use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braccini, V; Xu, A; Jaroszynski, J; Xin, Y; Larbalestier, D C [Applied Superconductivity Center, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, 2031 E Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Chen, Y; Carota, G; Dackow, J [SuperPower Inc., 450 Duane Avenue, Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States); Kesgin, I; Yao, Y; Guevara, A; Shi, T; Selvamanickam, V, E-mail: braccini@asc.magnet.fsu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering and the Texas Center for Superconductivity at the University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun Road, Houston, TX 77204 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    BaZrO{sub 3} (BZO) nanorods are now incorporated into production IBAD-MOCVD coated conductors. Here we compare several examples of both BZO-free and BZO-containing coated conductors using critical current (I{sub c}) characterizations at 4.2 K over their full angular range up to fields of 31 T. We find that BZO nanorods do not produce any c-axis distortion of the critical current density J{sub c}({theta}) curve at 4.2 K at any field, but also that pinning is nevertheless strongly enhanced compared to the non-BZO conductors. We also find that the tendency of the ab-plane J{sub c}({theta}) peak to become cusp-like is moderated by BZO and we define a new figure of merit that may be helpful for magnet design-the OADI (off-axis double I{sub c}), which clearly shows that BZO broadens the ab-plane peak and thus raises J{sub c} 5{sup 0}-30{sup 0} away from the tape plane, where the most critical approach to I{sub c} occurs in many coil designs. We describe some experimental procedures that may make critical current I{sub c} tests of these very high current tapes more tractable at 4.2 K, where I{sub c} exceeds 1000 A even for 4 mm wide tape with only 1 {mu}m thickness of superconductor. A positive conclusion is that BZO is very beneficial for the J{sub c} characteristics at 4.2 K, just as it is at higher temperatures, where the correlated c-axis pinning effects of the nanorods are much more obvious.

  2. Chemical evolution of formation waters in the Palm Valley gas field, Northern Territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrew, A.S.; Giblin, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    The chemical composition and evolution of formation waters associated with gas production in the Palm Valley field, Northern Territory, has important implications for reservoir management, saline water disposal, and gas reserve calculations. Historically, the occurrence of saline formation water in gas fields has been the subject of considerable debate. A better understanding of the origin, chemical evolution and movement of the formation water at Palm Valley has important implications for future reservoir management, disposal of highly saline water and accurate gas reserves estimation. Major and trace element abundance data suggest that a significant component of the highly saline water from Palm Valley has characteristics that may have been derived from a modified evaporated seawater source such as an evaporite horizon. The most dilute waters probably represent condensate and the variation in the chemistry of the intermediate waters suggests they were derived from a mixture of the condensate with the highly saline brine. The chemical and isotopic results raise several interrelated questions; the ultimate source of the high salinity and the distribution of apparently mixed compositions. In this context several key observation are highlighted. Strontium concentrations are extremely high in the brines; although broadly similar in their chemistry, the saline fluids are neither homogeneous nor well mixed; the 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios in the brines are higher than the signatures preserved in the evaporitic Bitter Springs Formation, and all other conceivably marine-related evaporites (Strauss, 1993); the 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios in the brines are lower than those measured from groundmass carbonates in the host rocks, and that the 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios of the brines are similar, but still somewhat higher than those measured in vein carbonates from the reservoir. It is concluded that the high salinity brine entered the reservoir during the Devonian uplift and was subsequently

  3. Engineering Rugged Field Assays to Detect Hazardous Chemicals Using Spore-Based Bacterial Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Daniel; Deo, Sapna; Daunert, Sylvia

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial whole cell-based biosensors have been genetically engineered to achieve selective and reliable detection of a wide range of hazardous chemicals. Although whole-cell biosensors demonstrate many advantages for field-based detection of target analytes, there are still some challenges that need to be addressed. Most notably, their often modest shelf life and need for special handling and storage make them challenging to use in situations where access to reagents, instrumentation, and expertise are limited. These problems can be circumvented by developing biosensors in Bacillus spores, which can be engineered to address all of these concerns. In its sporulated state, a whole cell-based biosensor has a remarkably long life span and is exceptionally resistant to environmental insult. When these spores are germinated for use in analytical techniques, they show no loss in performance, even after long periods of storage under harsh conditions. In this chapter, we will discuss the development and use of whole cell-based sensors, their adaptation to spore-based biosensors, their current applications, and future directions in the field. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Computer Oriented Scheme for Coding Chemicals in the Field of Biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobka, Marilyn E.; Subramaniam, J.B.

    The chemical coding scheme of the Medical Coding Scheme (MCS), developed for use in the Comparative Systems Laboratory (CSL), is outlined and evaluated in this report. The chemical coding scheme provides a classification scheme and encoding method for drugs and chemical terms. Using the scheme complicated chemical structures may be expressed…

  5. Characterization of Silver Nanoparticles under Environmentally Relevant Conditions Using Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Hee Jang

    Full Text Available The development of methods to monitor manufactured nanomaterials in the environment is one of the crucial areas for the assessment of their risk. More specifically, particle size analysis is a key element, because many properties of nanomaterial are size dependent. The sizing of nanomaterials in real environments is challenging due to their heterogeneity and reactivity with other environmental components. In this study, the fractionation and characterization of a mixture of polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silver nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs of three different sizes were investigated using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4 coupled with UV-Vis spectrophotometry. In particular, the effects of electrolyte composition and natural organic matter (NOM on the particle size and stability were evaluated. The fractogram peaks (i.e., stability of three different AgNPs decreased in the presence of both 10 mM NaCl and 10 mM CaCl2, while increased with increasing concentration of humic acid (HA. In addition, the hydrodynamic diameters of AgNPs in both electrolytes slightly increased with an increase of HA concentration, suggesting the adsorption (coating of HA onto the particle surface. It is also interesting to note that an increase in the particle size depended on the types of electrolyte, which could be explained by the conformational characteristics of the adsorbed HA layers. Consistent these results, AgNPs suspended in lake water containing relatively high concentration of organic carbon (TOC showed higher particle stability and larger particle size (i.e., by approximately 4 nm than those in river water. In conclusion, the application of AF4 coupled with highly sensitive detectors could be a powerful method to characterize nanoparticles in natural waters.

  6. Characterization of Silver Nanoparticles under Environmentally Relevant Conditions Using Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Min-Hee; Lee, Seungho; Hwang, Yu Sik

    2015-01-01

    The development of methods to monitor manufactured nanomaterials in the environment is one of the crucial areas for the assessment of their risk. More specifically, particle size analysis is a key element, because many properties of nanomaterial are size dependent. The sizing of nanomaterials in real environments is challenging due to their heterogeneity and reactivity with other environmental components. In this study, the fractionation and characterization of a mixture of polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silver nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs) of three different sizes were investigated using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled with UV-Vis spectrophotometry. In particular, the effects of electrolyte composition and natural organic matter (NOM) on the particle size and stability were evaluated. The fractogram peaks (i.e., stability) of three different AgNPs decreased in the presence of both 10 mM NaCl and 10mM CaCl2, while increased with increasing concentration of humic acid (HA). In addition, the hydrodynamic diameters of AgNPs in both electrolytes slightly increased with an increase of HA concentration, suggesting the adsorption (coating) of HA onto the particle surface. It is also interesting to note that an increase in the particle size depended on the types of electrolyte, which could be explained by the conformational characteristics of the adsorbed HA layers. Consistent these results, AgNPs suspended in lake water containing relatively high concentration of organic carbon (TOC) showed higher particle stability and larger particle size (i.e., by approximately 4nm) than those in river water. In conclusion, the application of AF4 coupled with highly sensitive detectors could be a powerful method to characterize nanoparticles in natural waters. PMID:26575993

  7. A field investigation of the basaltic ring structures of the Channeled Scabland and the relevance to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kestay, Laszlo P.; Jaeger, Windy L.

    2015-01-01

    The basaltic ring structure (BRS) is a class of peculiar features only reported in the Channeled Scabland of eastern Washington State. They have been suggested to be good analogs, however, for some circular features on Mars. BRSs are found where Pleistocene floods scoured the Columbia River Basin, stripping off the uppermost part of the Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group and exposing structures that were previously embedded in the lava. The “Odessa Craters,” near Odessa, WA, are 50–500-m-wide BRSs that are comprised of discontinuous, concentric outcrops of subvertically-jointed basalt and autointrusive dikes. Detailed field investigation of the Odessa Craters in planform and a cross-sectional exposure of a similar structure above Banks Lake, WA, lead us to propose that BRSs formed by concurrent phreatovolcanism and lava flow inflation. In this model, phreatovolcanic (a.k.a., “rootless”) cones formed on a relatively thin, active lava flow; the lava flow inflated around the cones, locally inverting topography; tensile stresses caused concentric fracturing of the lava crust; lava from within the molten interior of the flow exploited the fractures and buried the phreatovolcanic cones; and subsequent erosive floods excavated the structures. Another population of BRSs near Tokio Station, WA, consists of single-ringed, raised-rimmed structures that are smaller and more randomly distributed than the Odessa Craters. We find evidence for a phreatovolcanic component to the origin as well, and hypothesize that they are either flood-eroded phreatovolcanic cones or Odessa Crater-like BRSs. This work indicates that BRSs are not good analogs to the features on Mars because the martian features are found on the uneroded surfaces. Despite this, the now superseded concepts for BRS formation are useful for understanding the formation of the martian features.

  8. Characterization of soil chemical properties of strawberry fields using principal component analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gláucia Oliveira Islabão

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the largest strawberry-producing municipalities of Rio Grande do Sul (RS is Turuçu, in the South of the State. The strawberry production system adopted by farmers is similar to that used in other regions in Brazil and in the world. The main difference is related to the soil management, which can change the soil chemical properties during the strawberry cycle. This study had the objective of assessing the spatial and temporal distribution of soil fertility parameters using principal component analysis (PCA. Soil sampling was based on topography, dividing the field in three thirds: upper, middle and lower. From each of these thirds, five soil samples were randomly collected in the 0-0.20 m layer, to form a composite sample for each third. Four samples were taken during the strawberry cycle and the following properties were determined: soil organic matter (OM, soil total nitrogen (N, available phosphorus (P and potassium (K, exchangeable calcium (Ca and magnesium (Mg, soil pH (pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC at pH 7.0, soil base (V% and soil aluminum saturation(m%. No spatial variation was observed for any of the studied soil fertility parameters in the strawberry fields and temporal variation was only detected for available K. Phosphorus and K contents were always high or very high from the beginning of the strawberry cycle, while pH values ranged from very low to very high. Principal component analysis allowed the clustering of all strawberry fields based on variables related to soil acidity and organic matter content.

  9. Field studies and modeling of chemical processes in the unsaturated zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polzer, W.L.; Fuentes, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    Technical assistance is being provided to Nuclear Materials Safety and Safeguards of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to evaluate the validity of several guidelines listed in 10 CFR Part 61 for the future burial of low-level radioactive waste. Those guidelines include the requirement that the burial site shall be capable of being modeled. Both laboratory- and field-scale studies are being conducted under unsaturated moisture conditions and under steady-state and unsteady-state flow conditions. This paper reviews the kinds of present experiments in low-level radioactive waste disposal in development at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Major emphasis is on some of the initial analyses of data for laboratory sorption experiments and for field transport tests. Brief reference is made to leaching and transport studies. Laboratory batch equilibrium sorption studies suggest that adsorption of nonconservative tracers can be described in terms of two empirical constants; one gives an indication of the average K/sub d/ for all adsorption sites and the other gives an indication of the spread of individual K/sub d/'s about the average K/sub d/. This information can be translated into a ''chemical dispersion'' under dynamic flow and equilibrium sorption conditions that is in addition to the traditionally accepted physical dispersion. Laboratory nonequilibrium sorption studies suggest that nonequilibrium models may be needed to model the transport of the nonconservative tracers cobalt and cesium; equilibrium models should be suitable to model strontium transport. Analyses from field-scale studies indicate that conservative tracers can reasonably be modeled with a one-dimensional advective-dispersive equation for steady flow. 12 figs., 1 tab

  10. The landsnail Cepaea nemoralis regulates internal Cd levels when fed on Cd-enriched stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) leaves at low, field-relevant concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notten, M.J.M.; Oosthoek, A.J.P.; Rozema, J.; Aerts, R.

    2006-01-01

    We studied Cd accumulation in Cepaea nemoralis snails at low, but field-relevant Cd concentrations in the diet (Urtica dioica leaves). Six treatments of U. dioica plants were grown, resulting in leaf Cd concentrations between 0 and 2.6 μg g -1 dw. Seven snails per treatment were fed for 38 days. Leaf Cd concentrations did not affect food consumption rates, and consequently Cd intake rates increased with increasing leaf concentrations. No differences were detected among treatments in the final soft tissue Cd concentrations and body burdens in the snails. Regression analyses showed no positive relationship between either snail Cd concentrations or body burdens and total Cd intake. This suggests a regulation of internal Cd concentrations at low food Cd concentrations. Our data suggest that Cd excretion via the mucus plays a substantial role in this regulation, in addition to Cd excretion via the faeces. Snail shells were no sinks for Cd. - Cd excretion via the mucus plays a substantial role in the regulation of C. nemoralis soft tissue Cd concentrations at low, but field-relevant Cd concentrations in the food

  11. The landsnail Cepaea nemoralis regulates internal Cd levels when fed on Cd-enriched stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) leaves at low, field-relevant concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Notten, M.J.M. [Institute of Ecological Science, Department of Systems Ecology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV, Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: martje.notten@ecology.falw.vu.nl; Oosthoek, A.J.P. [Institute of Ecological Science, Department of Systems Ecology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rozema, J. [Institute of Ecological Science, Department of Systems Ecology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Aerts, R. [Institute of Ecological Science, Department of Systems Ecology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2006-01-15

    We studied Cd accumulation in Cepaea nemoralis snails at low, but field-relevant Cd concentrations in the diet (Urtica dioica leaves). Six treatments of U. dioica plants were grown, resulting in leaf Cd concentrations between 0 and 2.6 {mu}g g{sup -1} dw. Seven snails per treatment were fed for 38 days. Leaf Cd concentrations did not affect food consumption rates, and consequently Cd intake rates increased with increasing leaf concentrations. No differences were detected among treatments in the final soft tissue Cd concentrations and body burdens in the snails. Regression analyses showed no positive relationship between either snail Cd concentrations or body burdens and total Cd intake. This suggests a regulation of internal Cd concentrations at low food Cd concentrations. Our data suggest that Cd excretion via the mucus plays a substantial role in this regulation, in addition to Cd excretion via the faeces. Snail shells were no sinks for Cd. - Cd excretion via the mucus plays a substantial role in the regulation of C. nemoralis soft tissue Cd concentrations at low, but field-relevant Cd concentrations in the food.

  12. Near-field photochemical and radiation-induced chemical fabrication of nanopatterns of a self-assembled silane monolayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich C. Fischer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A general concept for parallel near-field photochemical and radiation-induced chemical processes for the fabrication of nanopatterns of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM of (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES is explored with three different processes: 1 a near-field photochemical process by photochemical bleaching of a monomolecular layer of dye molecules chemically bound to an APTES SAM, 2 a chemical process induced by oxygen plasma etching as well as 3 a combined near-field UV-photochemical and ozone-induced chemical process, which is applied directly to an APTES SAM. All approaches employ a sandwich configuration of the surface-supported SAM, and a lithographic mask in form of gold nanostructures fabricated through colloidal sphere lithography (CL, which is either exposed to visible light, oxygen plasma or an UV–ozone atmosphere. The gold mask has the function to inhibit the photochemical reactions by highly localized near-field interactions between metal mask and SAM and to inhibit the radiation-induced chemical reactions by casting a highly localized shadow. The removal of the gold mask reveals the SAM nanopattern.

  13. Evidence for chemical interference effect of an allelopathic plant on neighboring plant species: A field study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio I Arroyo

    Full Text Available Many studies have reported the phytotoxicity of allelopathic compounds under controlled conditions. However, more field studies are required to provide realistic evidences for the significance of allelopathic interference in natural communities. We conducted a 2-years field experiment in a semiarid plant community (NE Spain. Specifically, we planted juvenile individuals and sowed seeds of Salsola vermiculata L., Lygeum spartum L. and Artemisia herba-alba Asso. (three co-dominant species in the community beneath adult individuals of the allelopathic shrub A. herba-alba, and assessed the growth, vitality, seed germination and seedling survival of those target species with and without the presence of chemical interference by the incorporation of activated carbon (AC to the soil. In addition, juveniles and seeds of the same three target species were planted and sown beneath the canopy of adults of S. vermiculata (a shrub similar to A. herba-alba, but non-allelopathic and in open bare soil to evaluate whether the allelopathic activity of A. herba-alba modulates the net outcome of its interactions with neighboring plants under contrasting abiotic stress conditions. We found that vitality of A. herba-alba juveniles was enhanced beneath A. herba-alba individuals when AC was present. Furthermore, we found that the interaction outcome in A. herba-alba microsite was neutral, whereas a positive outcome was found for S. vermiculata microsite, suggesting that allelopathy may limit the potential facilitative effects of the enhanced microclimatic conditions in A. herba-alba microsite. Yet, L. spartum juveniles were facilitated in A. herba-alba microsite. The interaction outcome in A. herba-alba microsite was positive under conditions of very high abiotic stress, indicating that facilitative interactions predominated over the interference of allelopathic plants under those conditions. These results highlight that laboratory studies can overestimate the

  14. Evidence for chemical interference effect of an allelopathic plant on neighboring plant species: A field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Antonio I; Pueyo, Yolanda; Giner, M Luz; Foronda, Ana; Sanchez-Navarrete, Pedro; Saiz, Hugo; Alados, Concepción L

    2018-01-01

    Many studies have reported the phytotoxicity of allelopathic compounds under controlled conditions. However, more field studies are required to provide realistic evidences for the significance of allelopathic interference in natural communities. We conducted a 2-years field experiment in a semiarid plant community (NE Spain). Specifically, we planted juvenile individuals and sowed seeds of Salsola vermiculata L., Lygeum spartum L. and Artemisia herba-alba Asso. (three co-dominant species in the community) beneath adult individuals of the allelopathic shrub A. herba-alba, and assessed the growth, vitality, seed germination and seedling survival of those target species with and without the presence of chemical interference by the incorporation of activated carbon (AC) to the soil. In addition, juveniles and seeds of the same three target species were planted and sown beneath the canopy of adults of S. vermiculata (a shrub similar to A. herba-alba, but non-allelopathic) and in open bare soil to evaluate whether the allelopathic activity of A. herba-alba modulates the net outcome of its interactions with neighboring plants under contrasting abiotic stress conditions. We found that vitality of A. herba-alba juveniles was enhanced beneath A. herba-alba individuals when AC was present. Furthermore, we found that the interaction outcome in A. herba-alba microsite was neutral, whereas a positive outcome was found for S. vermiculata microsite, suggesting that allelopathy may limit the potential facilitative effects of the enhanced microclimatic conditions in A. herba-alba microsite. Yet, L. spartum juveniles were facilitated in A. herba-alba microsite. The interaction outcome in A. herba-alba microsite was positive under conditions of very high abiotic stress, indicating that facilitative interactions predominated over the interference of allelopathic plants under those conditions. These results highlight that laboratory studies can overestimate the significance of

  15. Monitoring chemical reactions by low-field benchtop NMR at 45 MHz: pros and cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Elipe, Maria Victoria; Milburn, Robert R

    2016-06-01

    Monitoring chemical reactions is the key to controlling chemical processes where NMR can provide support. High-field NMR gives detailed structural information on chemical compounds and reactions; however, it is expensive and complex to operate. Conversely, low-field NMR instruments are simple and relatively inexpensive alternatives. While low-field NMR does not provide the detailed information as the high-field instruments as a result of their smaller chemical shift dispersion and the complex secondary coupling, it remains of practical value as a process analytical technology (PAT) tool and is complimentary to other established methods, such as ReactIR and Raman spectroscopy. We have tested a picoSpin-45 (currently under ThermoFisher Scientific) benchtop NMR instrument to monitor three types of reactions by 1D (1) H NMR: a Fischer esterification, a Suzuki cross-coupling, and the formation of an oxime. The Fischer esterification is a relatively simple reaction run at high concentration and served as proof of concept. The Suzuki coupling is an example of a more complex, commonly used reaction involving overlapping signals. Finally, the oxime formation involved a reaction in two phases that cannot be monitored by other PAT tools. Here, we discuss the pros and cons of monitoring these reactions at a low-field of 45 MHz by 1D (1) H NMR. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Do Training Programs Work? An Assessment of Pharmacists Activities in the Field of Chemical Dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Valerie G.; Brock, Tina Penick; Ahn, Jungeun

    2001-01-01

    Seeks to determine if pharmacists who attended a chemical dependency training program were performing more chemical dependency related activities. Results reveal that participants were more likely to perform the following activities: lecture to community groups about chemical dependency; participate in a pharmacists' recovery program; provide…

  17. Microbial, physical and chemical properties of irrigation water in rice fields of Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA HELENA L.R. RECHE

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This paper presents the results of the statistical analysis of microbiological, physical and chemical parameters related to the quality of the water used in rice fields in Southern Brazil. Data were collected during three consecutive crop years, within structure of a comprehensive monitoring program. The indicators used were: potential hydrogen, electrical conductivity, turbidity, nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, total and fecal coliforms. Principal Component and Discriminant Analysis showed consistent differences between the water irrigation and drainage, as the temporal variation demonstrated a clear reduction in the concentration of most of the variables analyzed. The pattern of this reduction is not the same in the two regions - that is, the importance of each of the different variables in the observed differentiation is modified in two locations. These results suggested that the variations in the water quality utilized for rice irrigation was influenced by certain specific aspects of each rice region in South Brazilian - such as anthropic action or soil/climate conditions in each hydrographic basin.

  18. Developmental effects of magnetic field (50 Hz) in combination with ionizing radiation and chemical teratogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pafková, H; Jerábek, J; Tejnorová, I; Bednár, V

    1996-11-01

    The influence of a 50 Hz magnetic field (MF) on avian and mammalian embryogenesis, the MF level and vector, as well as the effect of exposure to MF (50 Hz, 10 mT) in combination with X-rays has been recently reported [2,3]. No significant alterations of chick or rat embryogenesis were found after repeated exposures to 50 Hz MF at 10 mT or 6 microT or with different vectors. However, X-ray chick embryotoxicity was significantly affected by repeated exposures of developing organisms to MF. A strong dependence of effect on the type of interaction was revealed. A decrease of X-ray induced teratogenicity was observed when MF preceded X-ray exposure (indirect interaction), while MF exposure applied immediately after X-ray radiation (direct interaction) non-significantly potentiated adverse developmental effects of ionizing radiation. This study deals with the effects of MF in combination with insulin or tetracycline. Exposure of chick embryos to MF influenced the sensitivity of embryonic morphogenetic systems to the subsequently administered chemical teratogens, insulin and/or tetracycline. A protective effect of MF was detected similarly as in the case of indirect interaction with ionizing radiation.

  19. Chemical stabilization of subgrade soil for the strategic expeditionary landing field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conaway, M. H.

    1983-06-01

    The Strategic Expeditionary Landing Field (SELF) is a military expeditionary-type airfield with an aluminum matted surface that is designed for sustained tactical and cargo airlift operations in an amphibious objective area. Because of the operational traffic parameters such as loads of the various types of aircraft, tire pressures and volume of traffic, a base layer must be constructed over subgrade soil support conditions which may be only marginal. The base layer could be constructed with conventional soil construction techniques (compaction) and yield the required strength. It would be difficult, however, to maintain this strength for the required one-year service life under many climatic conditions due to the degrading effects of water on the support capacity of many soils. Chemical soil stabilization with lime, portland cement and asphalt stabilizing agents could be used to treat the soil. These additives, when properly mixed with certain types of soils, initiate reactions which will increase soil support strength and enhance durability (resistance to the degrading effects of water). Technically, this procedure is quite viable but logistically, it may not be feasible.

  20. Peroxy Radical Measurements during the IRRONIC Field Project by C2H6 - NO Chemical Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, E. C. D.; Kundu, S.; Deming, B.; Lew, M.; Stevens, P. S.; Sklaveniti, S.; Dusanter, S.

    2015-12-01

    We present measurements of total peroxy radicals (HO2 + RO2) during the Indiana Radical, Reactivity and Ozone Production Intercomparison (IRRONIC) field project in Bloomington, Indiana during July 2015. Peroxy radicals were measured by chemical amplification using ethane and nitric oxide in dual PFA reaction chambers, and the amplification product NO2 was quantified by cavity attenuated phase shift spectroscopy. On sunny days mid-day peroxy radical mixing ratios were typically between 20 and 70 ppt and were well correlated with "HO2*" measured by the Indiana University Laser-Induced Fluorescence with Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion (IU-FAGE) instrument. The ratio of total peroxy radicals (UMass) to the IU-FAGE HO2* measurements was greater than two. We also describe results from an informal intercomparison of the two instruments' calibration sources, which are based on acetone photolysis (UMass) and water photolysis (IU). In addition to sampling the IU calibration source in "amplification" mode, the UMass instrument also separately quantified the HO2 mixing ratio in the IU calibration gas by reaction with excess NO and subsequent quantification of the NO2 produced.

  1. Increasing Student Motivation and the Perception of Chemistry's Relevance in the Classroom by Learning about Tattooing from a Chemical and Societal View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckey, Marc; Eilks, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a study on tattooing as a topic for chemistry education. The selection of the topic was inspired by a newly suggested framework, which focuses on the question of relevance of science education. The aim of this case was to get evidence on how topics selected based on the suggested model of relevance of science education affect…

  2. The relevance of the food production chain with regard to the population exposure to chemical substances and its role in contaminated sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Francesca Romana; Busani, Luca; Tait, Sabrina; La Rocca, Cinzia

    2016-01-01

    Food may be contaminated with many chemical substances at any level along the production chain. Chemicals that may be found in food items can simultaneously be present in other matrices, as air, water, soil and dust; therefore, human exposure to chemicals via food has to be summed to the exposure through all the other possible routes. The role played by the food production chain with regard to the population exposure to chemicals assumes amplified proportions when considering contaminated sites. Indeed the link between environment and food production is undeniable and consequently, when population chemical exposure is considered, an integrated approach assessing the contribution of the different routes of exposure, including dietary exposure, is needed. Such integrated approach allows a realistic and comprehensive risk assessment of chemical substances in order to identify and deploy effective prevention and intervention measures to protect human health.

  3. Chemically-resolved aerosol volatility measurements from two megacity field studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Huffman

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The volatilities of different chemical species in ambient aerosols are important but remain poorly characterized. The coupling of a recently developed rapid temperature-stepping thermodenuder (TD, operated in the range 54–230°C with a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS during field studies in two polluted megacities has enabled the first direct characterization of chemically-resolved urban particle volatility. Measurements in Riverside, CA and Mexico City are generally consistent and show ambient nitrate as having the highest volatility of any AMS standard aerosol species while sulfate showed the lowest volatility. Total organic aerosol (OA showed volatility intermediate between nitrate and sulfate, with an evaporation rate of 0.6%·K−1 near ambient temperature, although OA dominates the residual species at the highest temperatures. Different types of OA were characterized with marker ions, diurnal cycles, and positive matrix factorization (PMF and show significant differences in volatility. Reduced hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, a surrogate for primary OA, POA, oxygenated OA (OOA, a surrogate for secondary OA, SOA, and biomass-burning OA (BBOA separated with PMF were all determined to be semi-volatile. The most aged OOA-1 and its dominant ion, CO2+, consistently exhibited the lowest volatility, with HOA, BBOA, and associated ions for each among the highest. The similar or higher volatility of HOA/POA compared to OOA/SOA contradicts the current representations of OA volatility in most atmospheric models and has important implications for aerosol growth and lifetime. A new technique using the AMS background signal was demonstrated to quantify the fraction of species up to four orders-of-magnitude less volatile than those detectable in the MS mode, which for OA represent ~5% of the non-refractory (NR OA signal. Our results strongly imply that all OA types should be considered

  4. Chemical and engineering approaches to enable organic field-effect transistors for electronic skin applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Anatoliy N; Tee, Benjamin C-K; Bettinger, Christopher J; Tok, Jeffrey B-H; Bao, Zhenan

    2012-03-20

    Skin is the body's largest organ and is responsible for the transduction of a vast amount of information. This conformable material simultaneously collects signals from external stimuli that translate into information such as pressure, pain, and temperature. The development of an electronic material, inspired by the complexity of this organ is a tremendous, unrealized engineering challenge. However, the advent of carbon-based electronics may offer a potential solution to this long-standing problem. In this Account, we describe the use of an organic field-effect transistor (OFET) architecture to transduce mechanical and chemical stimuli into electrical signals. In developing this mimic of human skin, we thought of the sensory elements of the OFET as analogous to the various layers and constituents of skin. In this fashion, each layer of the OFET can be optimized to carry out a specific recognition function. The separation of multimodal sensing among the components of the OFET may be considered a "divide and conquer" approach, where the electronic skin (e-skin) can take advantage of the optimized chemistry and materials properties of each layer. This design of a novel microstructured gate dielectric has led to unprecedented sensitivity for tactile pressure events. Typically, pressure-sensitive components within electronic configurations have suffered from a lack of sensitivity or long mechanical relaxation times often associated with elastomeric materials. Within our method, these components are directly compatible with OFETs and have achieved the highest reported sensitivity to date. Moreover, the tactile sensors operate on a time scale comparable with human skin, making them ideal candidates for integration as synthetic skin devices. The methodology is compatible with large-scale fabrication and employs simple, commercially available elastomers. The design of materials within the semiconductor layer has led to the incorporation of selectivity and sensitivity within

  5. Star Formation, Quenching And Chemical Enrichment In Local Galaxies From Integral Field Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfiore, Francesco

    2017-08-01

    Within the currently well-established ΛCDM cosmological framework we still lack a satisfactory understanding of the processes that trigger, regulate and eventually quench star formation on galactic scales. Gas flows (including inflows from the cosmic web and supernovae-driven outflows) are considered to act as self-regulatory mechanisms, generating the scaling relations between stellar mass, star formation rate and metallicity observed in the local Universe by large spectroscopic surveys. These surveys, however, have so far been limited by the availability of only one spectrum per galaxy. The aim of this dissertation is to expand the study of star formation and chemical abundances to resolved scales within galaxies by using integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data, mostly from the ongoing SDSS-IV MaNGA survey. In the first part of this thesis I demonstrate the ubiquitous presence of extended low ionisation emission-line regions (LIERs) in both late- and early-type galaxies. By studying the Hα equivalent width and diagnostic line ratios radial profiles, together with tracers of the underlying stellar population, I show that LIERs are not due to a central point source but to hot evolved (post-asymptotic giant branch) stars. In light of this, I suggest a new classification scheme for galaxies based on their line emission. By analysing the colours, star formation rates, morphologies, gas and stellar kinematics and environmental properties of galaxies with substantial LIER emission, I identify two distinct populations. Galaxies where the central regions are LIER-like, but show star formation at larger radii are late types in which star formation is slowly quenched inside-out. This transformation is associated with massive bulges. Galaxies dominated by LIER emission at all radii, on the other hand, are red-sequence galaxies harbouring a residual cold gas component, acquired mostly via external accretion. Quiescent galaxies devoid of line emission reside in denser

  6. Carbon nanostructure-based field-effect transistors for label-free chemical/biological sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, PingAn; Zhang, Jia; Li, Le; Wang, Zhenlong; O'Neill, William; Estrela, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, electrical detection of chemical and biological species using novel nanostructure-based devices has attracted significant attention for chemical, genomics, biomedical diagnostics, and drug discovery applications. The use of nanostructured devices in chemical/biological sensors in place of conventional sensing technologies has advantages of high sensitivity, low decreased energy consumption and potentially highly miniaturized integration. Owing to their particular structure, excellent electrical properties and high chemical stability, carbon nanotube and graphene based electrical devices have been widely developed for high performance label-free chemical/biological sensors. Here, we review the latest developments of carbon nanostructure-based transistor sensors in ultrasensitive detection of chemical/biological entities, such as poisonous gases, nucleic acids, proteins and cells.

  7. Seawater-sediment interaction at elevated temperatures and pressures: implications for the near field chemical environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyfried, W.E. Jr.; Thornton, E.C.; Janecky, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    Results of four experiments are reported which document chemical exchange and mineralogic modification during seawater-sediment interaction at 200 0 to 300 0 C, 500 bars. Sediments used for this study are from MPG-1 (central North Pacific). Experimental conditions (T, P, W/R) were chosen to be reasonably analogous to conditions which will characterize the near field environment; that is a zone within approximately 1 m of the buried waste canister. In general, the major element chemistry of seawater was similarly modified in all experiments. The aqueous concentrations of Ca, Mg, Sr, and SO 4 decreased and SiO 2 /sub (aq)/, Na, K, and ΣCO 2 increased relative to values in seawater prior to reaction with sediments. pH decreased and remained distinctly acid. Con comitantly significant concentrations of heavy metals entered seawater from the sediments during reaction. Dissolution of Mn-rich phases profoundly affected alteration processes. For example, reaction of MnO 2 components of the smectite-rich sediment (Pacific smectite) with seawater created an unusually oxidizing milieu (fO 2 = 10 -7 74 ), and resulted in dissolution of significant quantities of Au from the reaction cell. Although illite-quartz-Fe-chlorite (sediment B)-seawater interaction also created a relatively oxidizing environment, this environment was not capable of oxidizing Au. Thus, in this regard (oxidation potential) sediment mineralogy exerts a strong influence. Mineralogic modification of sediment B at 200 0 and 300 0 C was minor and characterized by partial dissolution of illite and exchange of Fe for Mg in chlorite. In contrast the smectite-rich sediment, which, prior to reaction with seawater contained a poorly crystalline smectite phase, clinoptilolite, and amorphous material, recrystallized totally to a well defined smectite mineral. Anhydrite was abundantly present amongst the alteration products of all experiments

  8. Field-relevant doses of the systemic insecticide fipronil and fungicide pyraclostrobin impair mandibular and hypopharyngeal glands in nurse honeybees (Apis mellifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaluski, Rodrigo; Justulin, Luis Antonio; Orsi, Ricardo de Oliveira

    2017-11-09

    Global decreases in bee populations emphasize the importance of assessing how environmental stressors affect colony maintenance, especially considering the extreme task specialization observed in honeybee societies. Royal jelly, a protein secretion essential to colony nutrition, is produced by nurse honeybees, and development of bee mandibular glands, which comprise a reservoir surrounded by secretory cells and hypopharyngeal glands that are shaped by acini, is directly associated with production of this secretion. Here, we examined individual and combined effects of the systemic fungicide pyraclostrobin and insecticide fipronil in field-relevant doses (850 and 2.5 ppb, respectively) on mandibular and hypopharyngeal glands in nurse honeybees. Six days of pesticide treatment decreased secretory cell height in mandibular glands. When pyraclostrobin and fipronil were combined, the reservoir volume in mandibular glands also decreased. The total number of acini in hypopharyngeal glands was not affected, but pesticide treatment reduced the number of larger acini while increasing smaller acini. These morphological impairments appeared to reduce royal jelly secretion by nurse honeybees and consequently hampered colony maintenance. Overall, pesticide exposure in doses close to those experienced by bees in the field impaired brood-food glands in nurse honeybees, a change that could negatively influence development, survival, and colony maintenance.

  9. Chemical Analysis of Whale Breath Volatiles: A Case Study for Non-Invasive Field Health Diagnostics of Marine Mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Cumeras

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We explored the feasibility of collecting exhaled breath from a moribund gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus for potential non-invasive health monitoring of marine mammals. Biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC profiling is a relatively new field of research, in which the chemical composition of breath is used to non-invasively assess the health and physiological processes on-going within an animal or human. In this study, two telescopic sampling poles were designed and tested with the primary aim of collecting whale breath exhalations (WBEs. Once the WBEs were successfully collected, they were immediately transferred onto a stable matrix sorbent through a custom manifold system. A total of two large volume WBEs were successfully captured and pre-concentrated onto two Tenax®-TA traps (one exhalation per trap. The samples were then returned to the laboratory where they were analyzed using solid phase micro extraction (SPME and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS. A total of 70 chemicals were identified (58 positively identified in the whale breath samples. These chemicals were also matched against a database of VOCs found in humans, and 44% of chemicals found in the whale breath are also released by healthy humans. The exhaled gray whale breath showed a rich diversity of chemicals, indicating the analysis of whale breath exhalations is a promising new field of research.

  10. Chemical analysis of whale breath volatiles: a case study for non-invasive field health diagnostics of marine mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumeras, Raquel; Cheung, William H K; Gulland, Frances; Goley, Dawn; Davis, Cristina E

    2014-09-12

    We explored the feasibility of collecting exhaled breath from a moribund gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus) for potential non-invasive health monitoring of marine mammals. Biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) profiling is a relatively new field of research, in which the chemical composition of breath is used to non-invasively assess the health and physiological processes on-going within an animal or human. In this study, two telescopic sampling poles were designed and tested with the primary aim of collecting whale breath exhalations (WBEs). Once the WBEs were successfully collected, they were immediately transferred onto a stable matrix sorbent through a custom manifold system. A total of two large volume WBEs were successfully captured and pre-concentrated onto two Tenax®-TA traps (one exhalation per trap). The samples were then returned to the laboratory where they were analyzed using solid phase micro extraction (SPME) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). A total of 70 chemicals were identified (58 positively identified) in the whale breath samples. These chemicals were also matched against a database of VOCs found in humans, and 44% of chemicals found in the whale breath are also released by healthy humans. The exhaled gray whale breath showed a rich diversity of chemicals, indicating the analysis of whale breath exhalations is a promising new field of research.

  11. Composition, Standardization and Chemical Profiling of Banisteriopsis caapi, a Plant for the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disorders Relevant to Parkinson’s Disease†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Hong; Samoylenko, Volodymyr; Tekwani, Babu L.; Khan, Ikhlas A.; Miller, Loren S.; Chaurasiya, Narayan D.; Rahman, Md. Mostafizur; Tripathi, Lalit M.; Khan, Shabana I.; Joshi, Vaishali C.; Wigger, Frank T.; Muhammad, Ilias

    2010-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Banisteriopsis caapi, a woody vine from the Amazonian basin, is popularly known as an ingredient of a sacred drink ayahuasca, widely used throughout the Amazon as a medicinal tea for healing and spiritual exploration. The usefulness of B. caapi has been established for alleviating symptoms of neurological disorders including Parkinson’s disease. Aim of the study Primary objective of this study was to develop the process for preparing standardized extracts of B. caapi to achieve high potency for inhibition of human monoamine oxidases (MAO) and antioxidant properties. The aqueous extracts prepared from different parts of the plant collected from different geographical locations and seasons were analyzed by HPLC for principal bioactive markers. The extracts were simultaneously tested in vitro for inhibition of human MAOs and antioxidant activity for analysis of correlation between phytochemical composition of the extracts and bioactivities. Materials and methods Reversed-phase HPLC with photodiode array detection was employed to profile the alkaloidal and non-alkaloidal components of the aqueous extract of B. caapi. The B. caapi extracts and standardized compositions were tested in vitro for inhibition of recombinant preparations of human MAO-A and MAO-B. In vitro cell-based assays were employed for evaluation of antioxidant property and mammalian cell cytotoxicity of these preparations. Results Among the different aerial parts, leaves, stems/large branches and stem bark of B. caapi, HPLC analysis revealed that most of the dominant chemical and bioactive markers (1, 2, 5, 7-9) were present in high concentrations in dried bark of large branch. A library of HPLC chromatograms has also been generated as a tool for fingerprinting and authentication of the studied B. caapi species. The correlation between potency of MAO inhibition and antioxidant activity with the content of the main active constituents of the aqueous B. caapi extracts and

  12. Donor–Acceptor Copolymers of Relevance for Organic Photovoltaics: A Theoretical Investigation of the Impact of Chemical Structure Modifications on the Electronic and Optical Properties

    KAUST Repository

    Pandey, Laxman; Risko, Chad; Norton, Joseph E.; Bré das, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    We systematically investigate at the density functional theory level how changes to the chemical structure of donor-acceptor copolymers used in a number of organic electronics applications influences the intrinsic geometric, electronic, and optical

  13. Empirical Force Fields for Mechanistic Studies of Chemical Reactions in Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, A K; Meuwly, M

    2016-01-01

    Following chemical reactions in atomistic detail is one of the most challenging aspects of current computational approaches to chemistry. In this chapter the application of adiabatic reactive MD (ARMD) and its multistate version (MS-ARMD) are discussed. Both methods allow to study bond-breaking and bond-forming processes in chemical and biological processes. Particular emphasis is put on practical aspects for applying the methods to investigate the dynamics of chemical reactions. The chapter closes with an outlook of possible generalizations of the methods discussed. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Investigation of geothermal fields in himalayan range in pakistan using isotope and chemical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, M.; Sheikh, M.R.; Akram, W.; Tasneem, M.A.; Iqbal, N.; Latif, Z.

    2007-07-01

    There are many geothermal sites in Himalayan belt of Pakistan having low to high temperatures(boiling water). Isotopes and geochemical techniques were applied to investigate the origin, subsurface history and reservoir temperatures of geothermal fields at Tatta Pani and Tato lying along Main Mantle Thrust, Murtazabad along Main Karakoram Thrust and Kotli in the area of overlapping thrusts: Punjal Thrust, Main Boundary Thrust and the Himalaya Frontal Thrust. Discharge of the springs varies from 30 to 2000 liters per minute with the surface temperature from 47.3 to 92 degree C. Two sets of water samples were collected from these fields. The samples were analyzed for various isotopes (O/sup 18/, H/sup 2/ and H/sup 3/ of water; C/sup 13/ of dissolved inorganic carbon; S/sup 34/ and O/sup 18/ of dissolved sulphates); and water chemistry. The thermal waters of the Northern Areas of Pakistan are generally neutral to slightly alkaline and have low dissolved contents. Sodium is the dominant cation in all the cases. In terms of anions, HCO/sub 3/ is dominating. Source of recharge is meteoric water (rains and/or snow-melt). The dominant process of cooling is conduction at Tatta Pani, Tato, and Murtazabad. Shallow groundwater is mixing with the thermal springs in different proportions at Murtazabad, while there is no mixing in the thermal waters of Tatta Pani and Tato. The equilibrium temperature of the thermal end-member at Murtazabad is in the range of 185- 225 degree C and the isochemical-mixing model based on the Na-K and quartz geothermometers estimates 227 degree C temperature. O/sup 18/ (SO/sub 4/-H/sub 2/O) geothermometer indicates equilibrium temperatures (before mixing) above I85 degree C. The dissolved silica vs. enthalpy plot suggests heat losses through conduction from the original temperature about 245 degree C. The reservoir temperatures of Tatta Pani (100-130 degree C) determined by the Na-K, K-Mg and quartz geothermometers are in good agreement. O/sup 18/ (SO

  15. Utilização de regressão multivariada para avaliação espectrofotométrica da demanda química de oxigênio em amostras de relevância ambiental Use of multivariate regression in spectrophotometric evaluation of chemical oxigen demand in samples of environmental relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricio Peralta-Zamora

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a partial least squares regression routine was used to develop a multivariate calibration model to predict the chemical oxygen demand (COD in substrates of environmental relevance (paper effluents and landfill leachates from UV-Vis spectral data. The calibration models permit the fast determination of the COD with typical relative errors lower by 10% with respect to the conventional methodology.

  16. Portable Chemical Sterilizer for Microbial Decontamination of Surgical Instruments, Fruits and Vegetables, and Field Feeding Equipment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Doona, C. J; Feeherry, F. E; Kustin, K; Curtin, M. A; Baer, D. G

    2006-01-01

    The Portable Chemical Sterilizer (PCS) is a revolutionary biomedical sterilization technology that provides the capability for portable, power-free, point-of-use sterilization to meet the Army's Far-Forward Surgical Teams (FSTs...

  17. Radiochemical problems of radiation chemical synthesis in n, γ-field of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mironov, V.P.; Frejdus, N.V.; Bugaenko, L.T.; Kalyazin, E.P.; Petryaev, E.P.

    1981-01-01

    A wide applicability of products of radiation chemical synthesis (RCS), using n, γ-irradiation, is limited by possible contamination of the latter with long-lived radioactive isotopes of chemical elements included in the composition of the reagent and compounds syntesized (chemically non-separable radionuclides - CNR). A technique of the determination of the limit accumulation CNR on the basis of radiation chemical parameters of the synthesis (radiation-chemical yield, the dose rate absorbed, singleness of purpose of RCS etc.) and radiochemical parameters of formation and accumulation of CNR (radiochemical yields of CNR in the products of radiolysis, neutron fluence, the reagent purity etc.) is suggested. The radiochemical evaluation of CNR accumulation (tritium and carbon-14), formed at the expense of activation with neutrons of chemical elements of water and organic substances, consisting of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen has shown that at relatively low yields of final products (> or approximately 3 molecules/100 eV) no accumulation of radionuclides in concentrations reaching the average admissible concentration takes place [ru

  18. Quantum mechanical model for the anticarcinogenic effect of extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic fields on early chemical hepatocarcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godina-Nava, Juan José; Torres-Vega, Gabino; López-Riquelme, Germán Octavio; López-Sandoval, Eduardo; Samana, Arturo Rodolfo; García Velasco, Fermín; Hernández-Aguilar, Claudia; Domínguez-Pacheco, Arturo

    2017-02-01

    Using the conventional Haberkorn approach, it is evaluated the recombination of the radical pair (RP) singlet spin state to study theoretically the cytoprotective effect of an extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) on early stages of hepatic cancer chemically induced in rats. The proposal is that ELF-EMF modulates the interconversion rate of singlet and triplet spin states of the RP populations modifying the products from the metabolization of carcinogens. Previously, we found that the daily treatment with ELF-EMF 120 Hz inhibited the number and area of preneoplastic lesions in chemical carcinogenesis. The singlet spin population is evaluated diagonalizing the spin density matrix through the Lanczos method in a radical pair mechanism (RPM). Using four values of the interchange energy, we have studied the variations over the singlet population. The low magnetic field effect as a test of the influence over the enzymatic chemical reaction is evaluated calculating the quantum yield. Through a bootstrap technique the range is found for the singlet decay rate for the process. Applying the quantum measurements concept, we addressed the impact toward hepatic cells. The result contributes to improving our understanding of the chemical carcinogenesis process affected by charged particles that damage the DNA.

  19. Analysis of a Stochastic Chemical System Close to a SNIPER Bifurcation of Its Mean-Field Model

    KAUST Repository

    Erban, Radek

    2009-01-01

    A framework for the analysis of stochastic models of chemical systems for which the deterministic mean-field description is undergoing a saddle-node infinite period (SNIPER) bifurcation is presented. Such a bifurcation occurs, for example, in the modeling of cell-cycle regulation. It is shown that the stochastic system possesses oscillatory solutions even for parameter values for which the mean-field model does not oscillate. The dependence of the mean period of these oscillations on the parameters of the model (kinetic rate constants) and the size of the system (number of molecules present) are studied. Our approach is based on the chemical Fokker-Planck equation. To gain some insight into the advantages and disadvantages of the method, a simple one-dimensional chemical switch is first analyzed, and then the chemical SNIPER problem is studied in detail. First, results obtained by solving the Fokker-Planck equation numerically are presented. Then an asymptotic analysis of the Fokker-Planck equation is used to derive explicit formulae for the period of oscillation as a function of the rate constants and as a function of the system size. © 2009 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  20. Functionalized Magnetic Resonance Contrast Agent Selectively Binds to Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa on Activated Human Platelets under Flow Conditions and Is Detectable at Clinically Relevant Field Strengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin von zur Mühlen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress in molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI provides the opportunity to image cells and cellular receptors using microparticles of iron oxide (MPIOs. However, imaging targets on vessel walls remains challenging owing to the quantity of contrast agents delivered to areas of interest under shear stress conditions. We evaluated ex vivo binding characteristics of a functional MRI contrast agent to ligand-induced binding sites (LIBSs on activated glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptors of human platelets, which were lining rupture-prone atherosclerotic plaques and could therefore facilitate detection of platelet-mediated pathology in atherothrombotic disease. MPIOs were conjugated to anti-LIBS single-chain antibodies (LIBS-MPIO or control antibodies (control MPIO. Ex vivo binding to human platelet-rich clots in a dose-dependent manner was confirmed on a 3 T clinical MRI scanner and by histology (p < .05 for LIBS-MPIO vs control MPIO. By using a flow chamber setup, significant binding of LIBS-MPIO to a platelet matrix was observed under venous and arterial flow conditions, but not for control MPIO (p < .001. A newly generated MRI contrast agent detects activated human platelets at clinically relevant magnetic field strengths and binds to platelets under venous and arterial flow conditions, conveying high payloads of contrast to specific molecular targets. This may provide the opportunity to identify vulnerable, rupture-prone atherosclerotic plaques via noninvasive MRI.

  1. Correlation between γ-ray-induced DNA double-strand breakage and cell killing after biologically relevant doses: analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, D.

    1994-01-01

    We examined the degree of correlation between γ-ray-induced lethality and DNA double-strand breaks (dsbs) after biologically relevant doses of radiation. Radiation lethality was modified by treating 14 C-labelled Chinese hamster ovary cells with either of two aminothiols (WR-1065 or WR-255591) and the associated effect on dsb induction was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The use of phosphorimaging to analyse the distribution of 14 C-activity in the gel greatly improved the low-dose resolution of the PFGE assay. Both WR-1065 and WR-255591 protected against dsb induction and lethality to a similar extent after low doses of radiation. although this correlation broke down when supralethal doses were used to induce dsbs. Thus, the level of dsbs induced in these cells as measured by PFGE after survival-curve doses of γ-radiation is consistently predictive of the degree of lethality obtained, implying a cause-effect relationship between these two parameters and confirming previous results obtained using the neutral filter elution assay for dsbs. (author)

  2. Microfluidic Device for Controllable Chemical Release via Field-Actuated Membrane Incorporating Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a robust magnetic-membrane-based microfluidic platform for controllable chemical release. The magnetic membrane was prepared by mixing polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS and carbonyl-iron nanoparticles together to obtain a flexible thin film. With combined, simultaneous regulation of magnetic stimulus and mechanical pumping, the desired chemical release rate can easily be realized. For example, the dose release experimental data was well fitted by a mathematical sigmoidal model, exhibiting a typical dose-response relationship, which shows promise in providing significant guidance for on-demand drug delivery. To test the platform’s feasibility, our microfluidic device was employed in an experiment involving Escherichia coli culture under controlled antibiotic ciprofloxacin exposure, and the expected outcomes were successfully obtained. Our experimental results indicate that such a microfluidic device, with high accuracy and easy manipulation properties, can legitimately be characterized as active chemical release system.

  3. Microfluidic Device for Controllable Chemical Release via Field-Actuated Membrane Incorporating Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xiang; Li, Shunbo; Wang, Limu; Yi, Xin; Hui, Yu Sanna; Qin, Jianhua; Wen, Weijia

    2013-01-01

    We report a robust magnetic-membrane-based microfluidic platform for controllable chemical release. The magnetic membrane was prepared by mixing polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and carbonyl-iron nanoparticles together to obtain a flexible thin film. With combined, simultaneous regulation of magnetic stimulus and mechanical pumping, the desired chemical release rate can easily be realized. For example, the dose release experimental data was well fitted by a mathematical sigmoidal model, exhibiting a typical dose-response relationship, which shows promise in providing significant guidance for on-demand drug delivery. To test the platform’s feasibility, our microfluidic device was employed in an experiment involving Escherichia coli culture under controlled antibiotic ciprofloxacin exposure, and the expected outcomes were successfully obtained. Our experimental results indicate that such a microfluidic device, with high accuracy and easy manipulation properties, can legitimately be characterized as active chemical release system.

  4. Microfluidic Device for Controllable Chemical Release via Field-Actuated Membrane Incorporating Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    We report a robust magnetic-membrane-based microfluidic platform for controllable chemical release. The magnetic membrane was prepared by mixing polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and carbonyl-iron nanoparticles together to obtain a flexible thin film. With combined, simultaneous regulation of magnetic stimulus and mechanical pumping, the desired chemical release rate can easily be realized. For example, the dose release experimental data was well fitted by a mathematical sigmoidal model, exhibiting a typical dose-response relationship, which shows promise in providing significant guidance for on-demand drug delivery. To test the platform’s feasibility, our microfluidic device was employed in an experiment involving Escherichia coli culture under controlled antibiotic ciprofloxacin exposure, and the expected outcomes were successfully obtained. Our experimental results indicate that such a microfluidic device, with high accuracy and easy manipulation properties, can legitimately be characterized as active chemical release system.

  5. Optical, physical and chemical characteristics of Australian continental aerosols: results from a field experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Radhi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dust is one of the major components of the world's aerosol mix, having a number of impacts within the Earth system. However, the climate forcing impact of mineral dust is currently poorly constrained, with even its sign uncertain. As Australian deserts are more reddish than those in the Northern Hemisphere, it is important to better understand the physical, chemical and optical properties of this important aerosol. We have investigated the properties of Australian desert dust at a site in SW Queensland, which is strongly influenced by both dust and biomass burning aerosol.

    Three years of ground-based monitoring of spectral optical thickness has provided a statistical picture of gross aerosol properties. The aerosol optical depth data showed a clear though moderate seasonal cycle with an annual mean of 0.06 ± 0.03. The Angstrom coefficient showed a stronger cycle, indicating the influence of the winter-spring burning season in Australia's north. AERONET size distributions showed a generally bimodal character, with the coarse mode assumed to be mineral dust, and the fine mode a mixture of fine dust, biomass burning and marine biogenic material.

    In November 2006 we undertook a field campaign which collected 4 sets of size-resolved aerosol samples for laboratory analysis – ion beam analysis and ion chromatography. Ion beam analysis was used to determine the elemental composition of all filter samples, although elemental ratios were considered the most reliable output. Scatter plots showed that Fe, Al and Ti were well correlated with Si, and Co reasonably well correlated with Si, with the Fe/Al ratio somewhat higher than values reported from Northern Hemisphere sites (as expected. Scatter plots for Ca, Mn and K against Si showed clear evidence of a second population, which in some cases could be identified with a particular sample day or size fraction. These data may be used to attempt to build a signature of soil in this

  6. New generation of docking programs: Supercomputer validation of force fields and quantum-chemical methods for docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulimov, Alexey V; Kutov, Danil C; Katkova, Ekaterina V; Ilin, Ivan S; Sulimov, Vladimir B

    2017-11-01

    Discovery of new inhibitors of the protein associated with a given disease is the initial and most important stage of the whole process of the rational development of new pharmaceutical substances. New inhibitors block the active site of the target protein and the disease is cured. Computer-aided molecular modeling can considerably increase effectiveness of new inhibitors development. Reliable predictions of the target protein inhibition by a small molecule, ligand, is defined by the accuracy of docking programs. Such programs position a ligand in the target protein and estimate the protein-ligand binding energy. Positioning accuracy of modern docking programs is satisfactory. However, the accuracy of binding energy calculations is too low to predict good inhibitors. For effective application of docking programs to new inhibitors development the accuracy of binding energy calculations should be higher than 1kcal/mol. Reasons of limited accuracy of modern docking programs are discussed. One of the most important aspects limiting this accuracy is imperfection of protein-ligand energy calculations. Results of supercomputer validation of several force fields and quantum-chemical methods for docking are presented. The validation was performed by quasi-docking as follows. First, the low energy minima spectra of 16 protein-ligand complexes were found by exhaustive minima search in the MMFF94 force field. Second, energies of the lowest 8192 minima are recalculated with CHARMM force field and PM6-D3H4X and PM7 quantum-chemical methods for each complex. The analysis of minima energies reveals the docking positioning accuracies of the PM7 and PM6-D3H4X quantum-chemical methods and the CHARMM force field are close to one another and they are better than the positioning accuracy of the MMFF94 force field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of pulsed electric fields on microbial inactivation and physico-chemical properties of whole porcine blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulaaba, Annika; Egen, Nathalie; Klein, Günter

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the lethal effectiveness of pulsed electric fields on the inactivation of the porcine blood endogenous microflora. Furthermore, the impact of pulsed electric field application on physico-chemical and sensory properties in this medium should be proved. Blood samples from a commercial abattoir in Germany were processed by a continuous pilot plant-pulsed electric field system at electric field strength of 11 kV/cm for treatment times of 163 and 209 µs. The applied pulse frequencies of 134 and 175 Hz correspond to an energy input of 91 and 114 kJ/kg, respectively. In these conditions, the effectiveness of pulsed electric field processing on microbial inactivation was limited: 1.35 log10 CFU/mL reduction of total aerobic plate count (p pulsed electric field-treated blood samples. Pulsed electric field processing leads to a complete hemolysis of the red blood cells, in addition significant decreased L* (lightness), a* (redness) and b* (yellowness) values (p < 0.0001) were observed. Furthermore, changes in the sensory attributes color (changed from red to dark brown) and odor (changed from fresh to musty and tangy) were noticed.

  8. Comparison of Chemical Compositions in Pseudostellariae Radix from Different Cultivated Fields and Germplasms by NMR-Based Metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujiao Hua

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pseudostellariae Radix (PR is an important traditional Chinese medicine (TCM, which is consumed commonly for its positive health effects. However, the chemical differences of PR from different cultivated fields and germplasms are still unknown. In order to comprehensively compare the chemical compositions of PR from different cultivated fields, in this study, 1H-NMR-based metabolomics coupled with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC were used to investigate the different metabolites in PR from five germplasms (jr, zs1, zs2, sb, and xc cultivated in traditional fields (Jurong, Jiangsu, JSJR and cultivated fields (Zherong, Fujian, FJZR. A total of 34 metabolites were identified based on 1H-NMR data, and fourteen of them were found to be different in PR from JSJR and FJZR. The relative contents of alanine, lactate, lysine, taurine, sucrose, tyrosine, linolenic acid, γ-aminobutyrate, and hyperoside in PR from JSJR were higher than that in PR from FJZR, while PR from FJZR contained higher levels of glutamine, raffinose, xylose, unsaturated fatty acid, and formic acid. The contents of Heterophyllin A and Heterophyllin B were higher in PR from FJZR. This study will provide the basic information for exploring the influence law of ecological environment and germplasm genetic variation on metabolite biosynthesis of PR and its quality formation mechanism.

  9. HD 185330 — chemically peculiar 3He star in the Kepler field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemczura, E.; Vennes, S.; Różański, T.; Pigulski, A.; Hełminiak, K.; Lehmann, H.

    2018-01-01

    We analyzed high-resolution spectra of the chemically peculiar 3He star HD 185330. We determined its atmospheric parameters (Teff, log g, ξ) and constrained its rotation velocity and abundance pattern. In particular, we found a large (×100) phosphorus abundance excess and evidence of 3He and 4He abundance stratification in the atmosphere.

  10. Stability fields of smectites and illites as a function of temperature and chemical composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tardy, Y.; Duplay, J.; Fritz, B.; Strasbourg-1 Univ., 67

    1987-04-01

    A thermodynamic ideal solid solution analogue is proposed which accounts the correlations which clearly reflect the temperatures at which the nonmineralic population are supposed to have been formed. The solid solution is considered, at a particle scale, as an ideal mixture of individual layers, weakly bent each to the next. Each layer presents the chemical composition of a given end member, so that the proportions of the different end members change from one particle to another. Considering one particle of a given chemical composition, the multipole solid solution theory allows to calculate the wheighted contributions of each end member into the ideal clay solid solution along with the chemical composition of the aqueous solutions in equilibrium with the considered particle in its independent microenvironment. This model is able to predict the nature of the chemical correlations which are expected, at a given temperature, within a given population. This model is also applied to the prediction of the temperature required for the conversion of smectite into illite during the burial diagenesis. (orig./HP)

  11. Spatial distribution of the chemical properties of the soil and of soybean yield in the field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Gazolla-Neto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatial dependence between chemical properties of the soil and yield components in the soybean using precision farming techniques. Samples of the soil and plants were taken from georeferenced points to determine the chemical properties of the soil and the yield components. The results were submitted to Pearson correlation analysis, descriptive statistics and geostatistics. The coefficient of variation showed a wide range of distribution for the chemical attributes of the soil, with the highest indices being found for the levels of available phosphorus (102% and potassium (72.65%. Soil pH and organic matter showed a coefficient of variation of 5.96 and 15.93% respectively. Semivariogram analysis of the yield components (productivity, 1,000-seed weight and number of seeds and the chemical properties of the soil (organic matter, pH, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, boron, manganese and zinc fitted the spherical model with moderate spatial dependence, with values ranging from 200 to 700 m. Spatial distribution by means of map interpolation was efficient in evaluating spatial variability, allowing the identification and quantification of regions of low and high productivity in the production area, together with the distribution of soil attributes and their respective levels of availability to the soybean plants.

  12. Experimental Investigation of Electro-chemical Processes Controlled by High Magnetic Fields.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mathon, Ph.; Nouri, A.; Alemany, A.; Chopart, J.P.; Sobolík, Václav

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 42, 4 (2006) , s. 363-369 ISSN 0024-998X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : lorentz and magnetic force * diffusion-controlled regime * electrical current Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  13. Brownian motion in a field of force and the diffusion theory of chemical reactions. II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, H.C.

    1956-01-01

    H. A. Kramers has studied the rate of chemical reactions in view of the Brownian forces caused by a surrounding medium in temperature equilibrium. In a previous paper 3) the author gave a solution of Kramers' diffusion equation in phase space by systematic development. In this paper the general

  14. Donor–Acceptor Copolymers of Relevance for Organic Photovoltaics: A Theoretical Investigation of the Impact of Chemical Structure Modifications on the Electronic and Optical Properties

    KAUST Repository

    Pandey, Laxman

    2012-08-28

    We systematically investigate at the density functional theory level how changes to the chemical structure of donor-acceptor copolymers used in a number of organic electronics applications influences the intrinsic geometric, electronic, and optical properties. We consider the combination of two distinct donors, where a central five-membered ring is fused on both sides by either a thiophene or a benzene ring, with 12 different acceptors linked to the donor either directly or through thienyl linkages. The interplay between the electron richness/deficiency of the subunits as well as the evolution of the frontier electronic levels of the isolated donors/acceptors plays a significant role in determining the electronic and optical properties of the copolymers. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  15. Distribution of Pb and Zn and their chemical specieisations in the paddy soils from the Kochani field (Macedonia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogan, Nastja; Todor, Serafimovski; Tasev, Goran; Dolenec, Tadej; Dolenec, Matej

    2009-01-01

    The distribution and chemical specifications of Pb and Zn in the paddy soils of Kochani Field, Macedonia, were investigated using a sequential extraction procedure. This study was carried out in order to develop an understanding of the metal contamination found in the area which is due to historical and recent mining operations around Kochani Field. The paddy soil sample from location VII-2 in the vicinity of Zletovo mine in the western part of Kochani Field was found to contain highly elevated concentrations of Pb and Zn which are under reduction conditions very unstable and mobile. According to the total Pb and Zn concentrations, their mobility characteristics and the index of geo accumulation for all studied soil samples, it is observable that the paddy soil sample from location VII-2 represents a potential environmental risk.

  16. The calculation of radiation fields of chemical contamination of nature with the use of a digital model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehtiev, D.S.; Sultanov, D.A.; Azizov, B.M.

    2008-01-01

    Danger of contamination of the environment by convection of air and fluid transport in porous media arise while disposing of waste radioactive isotopes and chemical industry waste in underground deep-seated horizons. As a result there is eventually observed the formation of radioactive fields of local character. A lot of methods using for defining of radioactive fields of objects of the similar type, basically are based on the registration particles and quantum, emitted by nuclear of the corresponding elements in their radioactive decay. This is especially important for objects intended for placement in the mass of low permeable rocks, such as rock type. On the base of complex using of modern information basis created the model of induced radiation field of environment

  17. Enhanced field emission characteristics of boron doped diamond films grown by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koinkar, Pankaj M. [Center for International Cooperation in Engineering Education (CICEE), University of Tokushima, 2-1 Minami-josanjima-cho, Tokushima 770-8506 (Japan); Patil, Sandip S. [Center for Advanced Studies in Materials Science and Condensed Matter Physics, Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Kim, Tae-Gyu [Department of Nano System and Process Engineering, Pusan National University, 50 Cheonghak-ri, Samrangjin-eup, Miryang, Gyeongnam, Pusan 627-706 (Korea, Republic of); Yonekura, Daisuke [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tokushima, 2-1 Minami-josanjima-cho, Tokushima 770-8506 (Japan); More, Mahendra A., E-mail: mam@physics.unipune.ac.in [Center for Advanced Studies in Materials Science and Condensed Matter Physics, Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Joag, Dilip S. [Center for Advanced Studies in Materials Science and Condensed Matter Physics, Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Murakami, Ri-ichi, E-mail: murakami@me.tokushima-u.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tokushima, 2-1 Minami-josanjima-cho, Tokushima 770-8506 (Japan)

    2011-01-01

    Boron doped diamond films were synthesized on silicon substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) technique. The effect of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration varied from 1000 to 5000 ppm on the field emission characteristics was examined. The surface morphology and quality of films were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The surface morphology obtained by SEM showed variation from facetted microcrystal covered with nanometric grains to cauliflower of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) particles with increasing B{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration. The Raman spectra confirm the formation of NCD films. The field emission properties of NCD films were observed to improve upon increasing boron concentration. The values of the onset field and threshold field are observed to be as low as 0.36 and 0.08 V/{mu}m, respectively. The field emission current stability investigated at the preset value of {approx}1 {mu}A is observed to be good, in each case. The enhanced field emission properties are attributed to the better electrical conductivity coupled with the nanometric features of the diamond films.

  18. A scale-up field experiment for the monitoring of a burning process using chemical, audio, and video sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrakakis, P; Agapiou, A; Mikedi, K; Karma, S; Statheropoulos, M; Pallis, G C; Pappa, A

    2014-01-01

    Fires are becoming more violent and frequent resulting in major economic losses and long-lasting effects on communities and ecosystems; thus, efficient fire monitoring is becoming a necessity. A novel triple multi-sensor approach was developed for monitoring and studying the burning of dry forest fuel in an open field scheduled experiment; chemical, optical, and acoustical sensors were combined to record the fire spread. The results of this integrated field campaign for real-time monitoring of the fire event are presented and discussed. Chemical analysis, despite its limitations, corresponded to the burning process with a minor time delay. Nevertheless, the evolution profile of CO2, CO, NO, and O2 were detected and monitored. The chemical monitoring of smoke components enabled the observing of the different fire phases (flaming, smoldering) based on the emissions identified in each phase. The analysis of fire acoustical signals presented accurate and timely response to the fire event. In the same content, the use of a thermographic camera, for monitoring the biomass burning, was also considerable (both profiles of the intensities of average gray and red component greater than 230) and presented similar promising potentials to audio results. Further work is needed towards integrating sensors signals for automation purposes leading to potential applications in real situations.

  19. Some aspects of theory and mathematics of thermal runaway in reacting chemical systems that may be relevant to critical behaviour in confined plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R. The

    1999-01-01

    The concept of an endothermally stabilised chemical reactor as an enthalpy coupled thermokinetic system is introduced, and given precise mathematical expression in the form of a four-dimensional dynamical system. Criteria are defined for which the system is free of all kinds of thermal misbehaviour. This important dynamical result defines bounds for a large region of the parameter space within which the reactor may be operated safely. The formalism of singularity theory is extended to bifurcation surfaces in a studio of multiplicity and stability in the CSTR problem

  20. Application of Solid Phase Microextraction Coupled with Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry as a Rapid Method for Field Sampling and Analysis of Chemical Warfare Agents and Toxic Industrial Chemicals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hook, Gary L

    2003-01-01

    ..., is: What chemicals are present? In order to answer this question rapidly, there is increasing demand for field analysis of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds with instrumentation that provides definitive identification...

  1. Magnetic field-dependent molecular and chemical processes in biochemistry, genetics and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchachenko, A L

    2014-01-01

    The molecular concept (paradigm) in magnetobiology seems to be most substantiated and significant for explaining the biomedical effects of electromagnetic fields, for the new medical technology of transcranial magnetic stimulation of cognitive activity, for the nuclear magnetic control of biochemical processes and for the search of new magnetic effects in biology and medicine. The key structural element of the concept is a radical ion pair as the receiver of magnetic fields and the source of magnetic effects. The existence of such pairs was recently detected in the two life-supporting processes of paramount importance — in enzymatic ATP and DNA syntheses. The bibliography includes 80 references

  2. Controlling the diameters and field emission properties of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Yool; Kang, Young Il; Cho, Kyoung Ik; Choi, Kyu Seok; Kim, Do Jin

    2001-01-01

    We report here the synthesis of vertically well-aligned carbon nanotubes and the effect of catalytic metal layer on the diameter of grown carbon nanotubes and the field emission characteristics of them, The carbon nanotubes were grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition at temperatures below 900 .deg. C on Fe metal catalytic layer, deposited by sputtering process on a Si substrate and pretreated by heat and NH 3 gas. We found that the thickness of metal layers could be an important parameter in controlling the diameters of carbon nanotubes. With varying the thickness of the metal layers the grain sizes of them also vary so that the diameters of the nanotubes could be controlled. Field emission measurement has been made on the carbon nanotube field emitters at room temperature in a vacuum chamber below 10 -6 Torr. Our vertically aligned carbon nanotube field emitter of the smallest diameter emits a current density about 10 mA/cm 2 at 7.2 V/μm. The field emission property of the carbon nanotubes shows strong dependence on the nanotube diameters as expected

  3. Chemical and biological sensors based on defect-engineered graphene mesh field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seunghee H; Kwon, Sun Sang; Yi, Jaeseok; Park, Won Il

    2016-01-01

    Graphene has been intensively studied for applications to high-performance sensors, but the sensing characteristics of graphene devices have varied from case to case, and the sensing mechanism has not been satisfactorily determined thus far. In this review, we describe recent progress in engineering of the defects in graphene grown by a silica-assisted chemical vapor deposition technique and elucidate the effect of the defects upon the electrical response of graphene sensors. This review provides guidelines for engineering and/or passivating defects to improve sensor performance and reliability.

  4. Evaluation of Doped Phthalocyanines and a Chemically-Sensitive Field Effect Transistor for Detecting Nitrogen Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-04

    exposure. Muller, et al., attempted to correct a problem with their simple arrays. With a simple array, each individual detector within the array would be...tna! relates fundamental material and geometrica ! considerations in the development of a chemically-sensitive microsensor based upon the IGEFET. Also...MEASUREMENT 5600 P-RINT * 5650 PRINT "SET-UP THE ELECTROMETER FOR ZERO CORRECT " 5660 INPUT ’ENTER RETURN WHEN READY", M’ULL$ 5700 S$="F1" ’SET 10 MEASURE

  5. Characterization of aromatic organosulfur model compounds relevant to fossil fuels by using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization with CS2 and high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Weijuan; Sheng, Huaming; Jin, Chunfen; Riedeman, James S; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2016-04-15

    The chemistry of desulfurization involved in processing crude oil is greatly dependent on the forms of sulfur in the oil. Sulfur exists in different chemical bonding environments in fossil fuels, including those in thiophenes and benzothiophenes, thiols, sulfides, and disulfides. In this study, the fragmentation behavior of the molecular ions of 17 aromatic organosulfur compounds with various functionalities was systematically investigated by using high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. Multiple-stage tandem mass spectrometric experiments were carried out using a linear quadrupole ion trap (LQIT) equipped with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source. (+)APCI/CS2 was used to generate stable dominant molecular ions for all the compounds studied except for three sulfides that also showed abundant fragment ions. The LQIT coupled with an orbitrap mass spectrometer was used for elemental composition analysis, which facilitated the identification of the neutral molecules lost during fragmentation. The characteristic fragment ions generated in MS(2) and MS(3) experiments provide clues for the chemical bonding environment of sulfur atoms in the examined compounds. Upon collision-induced dissociation (CID), the molecular ions can lose the sulfur atom in a variety of ways, including as S (32 Da), HS(•) (33 Da), H2 S (34 Da), CS (44 Da), (•) CHS (45 Da) and CH2 S (46 Da). These neutral fragments are not only indicative of the presence of sulfur, but also of the type of sulfur present in the compound. Generally, losses of HS(•) and H2 S were found to be associated with compounds containing saturated sulfur functionalities, while losses of S, CS and (•) CHS were more common for heteroaromatic sulfur compounds. High-resolution tandem mass spectrometry with APCI/CS2 ionization is a viable approach to determining the types of organosulfur compounds. It can potentially be applied to analysis of complex mixtures, which is beneficial to improving the

  6. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES IN FIELD RED GIANTS FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION H-BAND SPECTRA USING THE APOGEE SPECTRAL LINELIST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Verne V.; Cunha, Katia; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Garcìa Pèrez, Ana; Majewski, Steven R.; Schiavon, Ricardo; Holtzman, Jon; Johnson, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution H-band spectra of five bright field K, M, and MS giants, obtained from the archives of the Kitt Peak National Observatory Fourier transform spectrometer, are analyzed to determine chemical abundances of 16 elements. The abundances were derived via spectrum synthesis using the detailed linelist prepared for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Apache Point Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), which is a high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopic survey to derive detailed chemical abundance distributions and precise radial velocities for 100,000 red giants sampling all Galactic stellar populations. The red giant sample studied here was chosen to probe which chemical elements can be derived reliably from the H-band APOGEE spectral region. These red giants consist of two K-giants (α Boo and μ Leo), two M-giants (β And and δ Oph), and one thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) star of spectral type MS (HD 199799). Measured chemical abundances include the cosmochemically important isotopes 12 C, 13 C, 14 N, and 16 O, along with Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu. The K and M giants exhibit the abundance signature of the first dredge-up of CN-cycle material, while the TP-AGB star shows clear evidence of the addition of 12 C synthesized during 4 He-burning thermal pulses and subsequent third dredge-up. A comparison of the abundances derived here with published values for these stars reveals consistent results to ∼0.1 dex. The APOGEE spectral region and linelist is thus well suited for probing both Galactic chemical evolution, as well as internal nucleosynthesis and mixing in populations of red giants via high-resolution spectroscopy.

  7. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES IN FIELD RED GIANTS FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION H-BAND SPECTRA USING THE APOGEE SPECTRAL LINELIST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Verne V.; Cunha, Katia [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Shetrone, Matthew D. [Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Meszaros, Szabolcs; Allende Prieto, Carlos [Instituto d' Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Bizyaev, Dmitry [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Garcia Perez, Ana; Majewski, Steven R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Schiavon, Ricardo [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 5UX (United Kingdom); Holtzman, Jon [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Johnson, Jennifer A., E-mail: vsmith@noao.edu [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2013-03-01

    High-resolution H-band spectra of five bright field K, M, and MS giants, obtained from the archives of the Kitt Peak National Observatory Fourier transform spectrometer, are analyzed to determine chemical abundances of 16 elements. The abundances were derived via spectrum synthesis using the detailed linelist prepared for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Apache Point Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), which is a high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopic survey to derive detailed chemical abundance distributions and precise radial velocities for 100,000 red giants sampling all Galactic stellar populations. The red giant sample studied here was chosen to probe which chemical elements can be derived reliably from the H-band APOGEE spectral region. These red giants consist of two K-giants ({alpha} Boo and {mu} Leo), two M-giants ({beta} And and {delta} Oph), and one thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) star of spectral type MS (HD 199799). Measured chemical abundances include the cosmochemically important isotopes {sup 12}C, {sup 13}C, {sup 14}N, and {sup 16}O, along with Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu. The K and M giants exhibit the abundance signature of the first dredge-up of CN-cycle material, while the TP-AGB star shows clear evidence of the addition of {sup 12}C synthesized during {sup 4}He-burning thermal pulses and subsequent third dredge-up. A comparison of the abundances derived here with published values for these stars reveals consistent results to {approx}0.1 dex. The APOGEE spectral region and linelist is thus well suited for probing both Galactic chemical evolution, as well as internal nucleosynthesis and mixing in populations of red giants via high-resolution spectroscopy.

  8. Heavy metals in paddy fields in Taiwan: chemical behavior in soil and uptake by brown rice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chu, C.L.; Romkens, P.F.A.M.; Guo, H.Y.

    2009-01-01

    Levels of cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) were measured in 19 individual paddy fields in Taiwan. Total, reactive, and available metal levels were measured using Aqua Regia, 0.43 N HNO3, 0.1 M HCl, 0.05 M EDTA and 0.01 M CaCl2. Total metal levels ranged

  9. Chemical and Physical Analysis Methods for Characterizing Tire Crumb Rubber Used in Synthetic Turf Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tire crumb rubber from recycled tires is widely used as infill material in synthetic turf fields in the United States. Recycled crumb rubber is a complex and potentially variable matrix with many metal, VOC, and SVOC constituents, presenting challenges for characterization and ex...

  10. Application of laser diagnostics to sodium-water chemical reaction field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Tamura, Kenta; Muranaka, Ryota; Kusano, Koji; Kikuchi, Shin; Kurihara, Akikazu

    2013-01-01

    In a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), liquid sodium is used as a heat transfer fluid because of its excellent heat transport capability. On the other hand, it has strong chemical reactivity with water vapor. One of the design basis accidents of the SFR is the water leakage into the liquid sodium flow by a breach of heat transfer tubes in a steam generator. Therefore the study on sodium-water chemical reactions is of paramount importance for safety reasons. This study aims to clarify the sodium-water reaction mechanisms using laser diagnostics. The sodium-water counter-flow reactions were measured using laser diagnostics such as laser induced fluorescence, CARS, Raman scattering and photo-fragmentation. The measurement results show that the sodium-water reaction proceeds mainly by the reaction Na + H 2 O → NaOH + H and the main product is NaOH in this reaction. Its forward and backward reaction rates tend to balance with each other and the whole reaction rate reduces as temperature increases. (author)

  11. Chemical pollutants in field-collected canvasback tissues, eggs, and food materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D.H.; Dieter, M.P.; Stendell, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    In 1972 studies began on the levels of environmental pollutants in canvasback tissues, eggs, and food items. The purpose of the studies were to determine if the levels of toxic chemicals found in canvasbacks were of the magnitude to cause problems affecting reproduction and survival. Overall, levels of organochlorine pesticides and PCB's were low in canvasbacks and their eggs. Some individual birds, however, laid eggs with elevated residues of DDE (12.1 ppm) or PCB's (28.6 ppm). There was no significant difference between eggshell thicknesses of 1972-73 and pre-1946 collections. About 12% of the canvasbacks analyzed had elevated levels of blood lead with reduced ALAD enzyme activity. Adult canvasbacks collected from the Chesapeake Bay in 1975 had moderate to high levels of cadmium in their kidneys. Cadmium, in excessive amounts is very toxic and can curtail spermatogenesis in male birds. Although no single toxic chemical found in wild canvasbacks appears to be a major factor in population declines, the cumulative effects of sublethal levels of all the pollutants may render birds susceptible to disease, hunting pressure or predation.

  12. THE RESULTS OF PHYSICO-CHEMICAL STUDIES OF BENTONITE OF DASHUKOVSKІУ FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е. M. Nikipelova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Thus, the basic physical and chemical properties ( moisture content (57,19 %, unit weight (1,31, shear stress (821,59 Pa, stickiness (1839,81 Pa, debris particles with a diameter of more than 250 mkm (0,34 %, specific heat (2,75 kG/(kg · K bentonite deposits Dashukovskoho Cherkasy region meets the eligibility criteria of the Therapeutic muds (peloids. The chemical composition of the aqueous extract of clay deposits Dashukovskoho refers to magnesium sulphate-bicarbonate-calcium-sodium type or complex cation composition with mineralization of 0,26 g/dm3. pH of the extract of clay is 7,95 m. pH is characterized by slightly alkaline reaction. Positive values oxidation -reduction potential of the extract of clay (+ 465 mV indicate the presence of oxidative processes. This is because the clay extraction in the preparation of the latter was in contact with oxygen. It should be noted that the calculation of the structural formulabentonite is great information because it allows to introduce the character of isomorphic substitutions in the structure, efficiently detect the composition of exchange cations, which makes it possible to predict the behavior of the sample during its processing technology.

  13. A general intermolecular force field based on tight-binding quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimme, Stefan; Bannwarth, Christoph; Caldeweyher, Eike; Pisarek, Jana; Hansen, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    A black-box type procedure is presented for the generation of a molecule-specific, intermolecular potential energy function. The method uses quantum chemical (QC) information from our recently published extended tight-binding semi-empirical scheme (GFN-xTB) and can treat non-covalently bound complexes and aggregates with almost arbitrary chemical structure. The necessary QC information consists of the equilibrium structure, Mulliken atomic charges, charge centers of localized molecular orbitals, and also of frontier orbitals and orbital energies. The molecular pair potential includes model density dependent Pauli repulsion, penetration, as well as point charge electrostatics, the newly developed D4 dispersion energy model, Drude oscillators for polarization, and a charge-transfer term. Only one element-specific and about 20 global empirical parameters are needed to cover systems with nuclear charges up to radon (Z = 86). The method is tested for standard small molecule interaction energy benchmark sets where it provides accurate intermolecular energies and equilibrium distances. Examples for structures with a few hundred atoms including charged systems demonstrate the versatility of the approach. The method is implemented in a stand-alone computer code which enables rigid-body, global minimum energy searches for molecular aggregation or alignment.

  14. Effects of potassium hydroxide post-treatments on the field-emission properties of thermal chemical vapor deposited carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Li-Ying; Lee, Shih-Fong; Chang, Yung-Ping; Hsiao, Wei-Shao

    2011-12-01

    In this study, a simple potassium hydroxide treatment was applied to functionalize the surface and to modify the structure of multi-walled carbon nanotubes grown on silicon substrates by thermal chemical vapor deposition. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and energy dispersive spectrometry were employed to investigate the mechanism causing the modified field-emission properties of carbon nanotubes. From our experimental data, the emitted currents of carbon nanotubes after potassium hydroxide treatment are enhanced by more than one order of magnitude compared with those of untreated carbon nanotubes. The emitted current density of carbon nanotubes increases from 0.44 mA/cm2 to 7.92 mA/cm2 after 30 minutes KOH treatment. This technique provides a simple, economical, and effective way to enhance the field-emission properties of carbon nanotubes.

  15. Surface properties and field emission characteristics of chemical vapor deposition diamond grown on Fe/Si substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirakuri, Kenji; Yokoyama, Takahiro; Enomoto, Hirofumi; Mutsukura, Nobuki; Friedbacher, Gernot

    2001-01-01

    Electron field emission characteristics of diamond grains fabricated on iron dot-patterned silicon (Fe/Si) substrates at different methane concentrations have been investigated. The characteristics of the samples could be improved by control of the methane concentration during diamond fabrication. Etching treatment of the as-grown diamond has enhanced the emission properties both with respect to current and threshold voltage. In order to study the influence of etching effects on the field emission characteristics, the respective surfaces were studied by Raman spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). ESCA revealed intensive graphite and FeO x peaks on the sample surface grown at high methane concentration. For the etched samples, the peaks of diamond and silicon carbide were observed, and the peaks of nondiamond carbon disappeared. The experimental results show that the etching process removes graphitic and nondiamond carbon components. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  16. Transport properties of field effect transistors with randomly networked single walled carbon nanotubes grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Un Jeong; Park, Wanjun

    2009-01-01

    The transport properties of randomly networked single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) transistors with different channel lengths of L c = 2-10 μm were investigated. Randomly networked SWNTs were directly grown for the two different densities of ρ ∼ 25 μm -2 and ρ ∼ 50 μm -2 by water plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition. The field effect transport is governed mainly by formation of the current paths that is related to the nanotube density. On the other hand, the off-state conductivity deviates from linear dependence for both nanotube density and channel length. The field effect mobility of holes is estimated as 4-13 cm 2 V -1 s -1 for the nanotube transistors based on the simple MOS theory. The mobility is increased for the higher density without meaningful dependence on the channel lengths.

  17. Physical and chemical evaluation of the effect of a magnetic field on the electrodeposition of Ni in low carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campo G, G. A.

    2015-01-01

    In this study nickel coatings were obtained, with and without the presence of magnetic field at 60 degrees Celsius for 7, 12 and 17 minutes on substrates of AISI 1018 carbon steel, from a classical type Watts solution. The properties of the coatings were studied by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, hardness tester and roughness tester, the electrochemical behavior of the films was also studied through RP and EIE and also capacitance calculations, corrosion rate and thickness were made. In general, the magnetic field has a negative influence on the physical and chemical properties of an electrodeposited Ni steel AISI 1018. The details are discussed in this research. (Author)

  18. Experimental Study of Improved Loess High Embankment Foundation Jointly by Chemical Materials and Electric Field Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin He

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electric field treatment is a kind of new technology that improves and reinforces soil. Proper amounts of lime and sodium sulfate were added to the soil as stabilizers. Compacted the mixture to meet the predetermined dry density and then imposed a certain intensity of electric field on it. After curing, unconfined compression tests, direct shear tests, high pressure compression tests and collapsibility tests were carried out. The results show that the engineering properties of the improved soils, such as its unconfined compressive strength, shear strength, compressibility, are better than that of the backfill compacted loess. Moreover, collapsibility under the different degree of compaction has been removed. The microstructure and improving mechanism of the improved soils are analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM, and the results can provide references for further study and engineering application.

  19. Spatial Control of Photoacid Diffusion in Chemically Amplified Resist (CAR) via External Electric Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinok; Yoo, Gwangwe; Park, Jin; Park, Jin-Hong

    2018-09-01

    We investigated the effect of an electric field-based post exposure bake (EF-PEB) process on photoacid diffusion and pattern formation. To investigate the control of photoacid diffusion experimentally, the EF-PEB processes was performed at various temperatures. Cross sectional images of various EF-PEB processed samples were obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after ion beam milling. In addition, we conducted a numerical analysis of photoacid distribution and diffusion with following Fick's second law and compared the experimental results with our theoretical model. The drift distance was theoretically predicted by multiplying drift velocity and EF-PEB time, and the experimental values were obtained by finding the difference in pattern depths of PEB/EFPEB samples. Finally, an EF-PEB temperature of 85 °C was confirmed as the optimum condition to maximize photoacid drift distance using the electric field.

  20. Red cherries (Prunus avium var. Stella) processed by pulsed electric field - Physical, chemical and microbiological analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, Kristine A G; Hamid, Nazimah; Oey, Indrawati; Pook, Chris; Gutierrez-Maddox, Noemi; Ma, Qianli; Ying Leong, Sze; Lu, Jun

    2018-02-01

    This study examined, for the first time, the effect of mild or moderate intensity pulsed electric field (PEF) processing on cherries, in particular changes in physicochemical properties, release of anthocyanins and polyphenols, and the potential growth of lactic acid bacteria. Cherry samples were treated at a constant pulse frequency of 100Hz and a constant pulse width of 20μs with different electric field strengths between 0.3 and 2.5kV/cm. Titratable acidity and total soluble solids values of most PEF samples stored for 24h significantly decreased compared to other samples. Stored samples also had increased cyanidin glucoside content. However, concentration of rutin, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and isorhamnetin rutinoside significantly decreased in samples stored for 24h. In conclusion, sweet cherries were only influenced by storage after PEF processing. PEF processing did not affect the growth of probiotic bacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Laboratory and field investigation of chemical disinfection of combined sewer overflow in Copenhagen area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chhetri, Ravi Kumar; Thornberg, Dines; Berner, Jesper

    We investigated the possibility to apply performic acid (PFA) and peracetic acid (PAA) for disinfection of combined sewer overflow (CSO) in existing CSO management infrastructures. The disinfection power of PFA and PAA to Escherichia coli (E. coli) and enterococcus were studied in batch scale...... and pre-field experiment. In batch scale experiment 2.5 mg·L -1 PAA removed around 4 log unit of E. coli and enterococcus from CSO with long contact time. Removal of E. coli and enterococcus from CSO were always around or above 3 log unit using 2-4 mg·L -1 PFA with short contact time in batch scale...... and pre-field experiment. There were no toxicological effect measured by Vibrio fischeri when CSO was disinfected with PFA, slight toxicological effect was observed on CSO disinfected with PAA. When the design for PFA based disinfection was applied to CSO collected from an authentic event. Disinfection...

  2. Observation of high coercive fields in chemically synthesized coated Fe-Pt nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalavi, Shankar B.; Panda, Rabi N., E-mail: rnp@goa.bits-pilani.ac.in

    2017-04-15

    Nanocrystalline Fe-Pt alloys have been synthesized via chemical reduction route using various capping agents; such as: oleic acid/oleylamine (route-1) and oleic acid/CTAB (route-2). We could able to synthesize Fe50Pt and Fe54Pt alloys via route 1 and 2, respectively. As-prepared Fe-Pt alloys crystallize in disordered fcc phase with crystallite sizes of 2.3 nm and 6 nm for route-1 and route-2, respectively. Disordered Fe-Pt alloys were transformed to ordered fct phase after annealing at 600 °C. SEM studies confirm the spherical shape morphologies of annealed Fe-Pt nanoparticles with SEM particle sizes of 24.4 nm and 21.2 nm for route-1 and route-2, respectively. TEM study confirms the presence of 4.6 nm particles for annealed Fe50Pt alloys with several agglomerating clusters of bigger size and appropriately agrees well with the XRD study. Room temperature magnetization studies of as-prepared Fe-Pt alloys (fcc) show ferromagnetism with negligible coercivities. Average magnetic moments per particle for as-prepared Fe-Pt alloys were estimated to be 753 μ{sub B} and 814 μ{sub B}, for route 1 and 2, respectively. Ordered fct Fe-Pt alloys show high values of coercivities of 10,000 Oe and 10,792 Oe for route-1 and route-2, respectively. Observed magnetic properties of the fct Fe-Pt alloys nps were interpreted with the basis of order parameters, size, surface, and composition effects. - Highlights: • Synthesis of capped nanocrystalline Fe-Pt alloys via chemical routes. • Ordered fct phase were obtained at 600 °C. • Microstructural studies were carried out using SEM and TEM. • Investigation on evolution of magnetic properties from fcc to fct state. • Maximum values of coercivities up to 10,792 Oe were observed.

  3. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCE ANALYSIS OF A NEUTRON-CAPTURE ENHANCED RED GIANT IN THE BULGE PLAUT FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Christian I.; Rich, R. Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, 430 Portola Plaza, Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); McWilliam, Andrew, E-mail: cijohnson@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: rmr@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: cjohnson@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: andy@obs.carnegiescience.edu [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2013-09-20

    We present chemical abundances for 27 elements ranging from oxygen to erbium in the metal-poor ([Fe/H] = –1.67) bulge red giant branch star 2MASS 18174532-3353235. The results are based on equivalent width and spectrum synthesis analyses of a high-resolution (R ∼ 30, 000) spectrum obtained with the Magellan-MIKE spectrograph. While the light (Z ∼< 30) element abundance patterns match those of similar metallicity bulge and halo stars, the strongly enhanced heavy element abundances are more similar to 'r-II' halo stars (e.g., CS 22892-052) typically found at [Fe/H] ∼< – 2.5. We find that the heaviest elements (Z ≥ 56) closely follow the scaled-solar r-process abundance pattern. We do not find evidence supporting significant s-process contributions; however, the intermediate mass elements (e.g., Y and Zr) appear to have been produced through a different process than the heaviest elements. The light and heavy element abundance patterns of 2MASS 18174532-3353235 are in good agreement with the more metal-poor r-process enhanced stars CS 22892-052 and BD +17{sup o}3248. 2MASS 18174532-3353235 also shares many chemical characteristics with the similar metallicity but comparatively α-poor Ursa Minor dwarf galaxy giant COS 82. Interestingly, the Mo and Ru abundances of 2MASS 18174532-3353235 are also strongly enhanced and follow a similar trend recently found to be common in moderately metal-poor main-sequence turn-off halo stars.

  4. POSSIBLE NATURE OF THE RADIATION-INDUCED SIGNAL IN NAILS: HIGH-FIELD EPR, CONFIRMING CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS, AND QUANTUM CHEMICAL CALCULATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipikin, Dmitriy S; Swarts, Steven G; Sidabras, Jason W; Trompier, François; Swartz, Harold M

    2016-12-01

    Exposure of finger- and toe-nails to ionizing radiation generates an Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) signal whose intensity is dose dependent and stable at room temperature for several days. The dependency of the radiation-induced signal (RIS) on the received dose may be used as the basis for retrospective dosimetry of an individual's fortuitous exposure to ionizing radiation. Two radiation-induced signals, a quasi-stable (RIS2) and stable signal (RIS5), have been identified in nails irradiated up to a dose of 50 Gy. Using X-band EPR, both RIS signals exhibit a singlet line shape with a line width around 1.0 mT and an apparent g-value of 2.0044. In this work, we seek information on the exact chemical nature of the radiation-induced free radicals underlying the signal. This knowledge may provide insights into the reason for the discrepancy in the stabilities of the two RIS signals and help develop strategies for stabilizing the radicals in nails or devising methods for restoring the radicals after decay. In this work an analysis of high field (94 GHz and 240 GHz) EPR spectra of the RIS using quantum chemical calculations, the oxidation-reduction properties and the pH dependence of the signal intensities are used to show that spectroscopic and chemical properties of the RIS are consistent with a semiquinone-type radical underlying the RIS. It has been suggested that semiquinone radicals formed on trace amounts of melanin in nails are the basis for the RIS signals. However, based on the quantum chemical calculations and chemical properties of the RIS, it is likely that the radicals underlying this signal are generated from the radiolysis of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) amino acids in the keratin proteins. These DOPA amino acids are likely formed from the exogenous oxidation of tyrosine in keratin by the oxygen from the air prior to irradiation. We show that these DOPA amino acids can work as radical traps, capturing the highly reactive and unstable sulfur

  5. POSSIBLE NATURE OF THE RADIATION-INDUCED SIGNAL IN NAILS: HIGH-FIELD EPR, CONFIRMING CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS, AND QUANTUM CHEMICAL CALCULATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipikin, Dmitriy S.; Swarts, Steven G.; Sidabras, Jason W.; Trompier, François; Swartz, Harold M.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of finger- and toe-nails to ionizing radiation generates an Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) signal whose intensity is dose dependent and stable at room temperature for several days. The dependency of the radiation-induced signal (RIS) on the received dose may be used as the basis for retrospective dosimetry of an individual's fortuitous exposure to ionizing radiation. Two radiation-induced signals, a quasi-stable (RIS2) and stable signal (RIS5), have been identified in nails irradiated up to a dose of 50 Gy. Using X-band EPR, both RIS signals exhibit a singlet line shape with a line width around 1.0 mT and an apparent g-value of 2.0044. In this work, we seek information on the exact chemical nature of the radiation-induced free radicals underlying the signal. This knowledge may provide insights into the reason for the discrepancy in the stabilities of the two RIS signals and help develop strategies for stabilizing the radicals in nails or devising methods for restoring the radicals after decay. In this work an analysis of high field (94 GHz and 240 GHz) EPR spectra of the RIS using quantum chemical calculations, the oxidation–reduction properties and the pH dependence of the signal intensities are used to show that spectroscopic and chemical properties of the RIS are consistent with a semiquinone-type radical underlying the RIS. It has been suggested that semiquinone radicals formed on trace amounts of melanin in nails are the basis for the RIS signals. However, based on the quantum chemical calculations and chemical properties of the RIS, it is likely that the radicals underlying this signal are generated from the radiolysis of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) amino acids in the keratin proteins. These DOPA amino acids are likely formed from the exogenous oxidation of tyrosine in keratin by the oxygen from the air prior to irradiation. We show that these DOPA amino acids can work as radical traps, capturing the highly reactive and unstable

  6. Studies and activities in the field of chemical toxicology carried out by the service d'hygiene industrielle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalabreysse, J.; Archimbaud, M.; Teulon, F.

    1988-02-01

    The Service d'Hygiene Industrielle (Industrial hygiene service, Institute of protection and nuclear safety, Department of health protection - IPSN-DPS) has acquired an unquestionable proficiency in chemical toxicology on account of 1) its missions of research on and monitoring of workers, working conditions and the environment on the Tricastin industrial complex and 2) of its actions of technical assistance to the CEA group and of valorization outside the group. The report presents how toxicological hazards originated from the use of chemical products by the nuclear industry are taken into consideration. A global methodology of assessment of chemical-toxicological hazards has been developed; it is based on the experience gained in various occupational branches (nuclear and non-nuclear industry, agriculture, administrations,...). The Service d'hygiene industrielle is developing R and D studies in the field of biology and analytical chemistry based on the present knowledge and doctrine in radiotoxicology (uranium especially). The contribution of radiation protection and radiotoxicology to non-nuclear industrial hygiene can thus be appreciated [fr

  7. Atypical Mg-poor Milky Way Field Stars with Globular Cluster Second-generation-like Chemical Patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández-Trincado, J. G.; Geisler, D.; Tang, B.; Villanova, S.; Mennickent, R. E. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Zamora, O.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Dell’Agli, F.; Prieto, Carlos Allende [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Souto, Diogo; Cunha, Katia [Observatório Nacional, Rua Gal. José Cristino 77, Rio de Janeiro, RJ—20921-400 (Brazil); Schiavon, R. P. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Hasselquist, Sten [New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Shetrone, M. [University of Texas at Austin, McDonald Observatory, Fort Davis, TX 79734 (United States); Vieira, K. [Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomía, AP 264, Mérida 5101-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Zasowski, G. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Sobeck, J.; Hayes, C. R.; Majewski, S. R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Placco, V. M., E-mail: jfernandezt@astro-udec.cl, E-mail: jfernandezt87@gmail.com [Department of Physics and JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); and others

    2017-09-01

    We report the peculiar chemical abundance patterns of 11 atypical Milky Way (MW) field red giant stars observed by the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE). These atypical giants exhibit strong Al and N enhancements accompanied by C and Mg depletions, strikingly similar to those observed in the so-called second-generation (SG) stars of globular clusters (GCs). Remarkably, we find low Mg abundances ([Mg/Fe] < 0.0) together with strong Al and N overabundances in the majority (5/7) of the metal-rich ([Fe/H] ≳ −1.0) sample stars, which is at odds with actual observations of SG stars in Galactic GCs of similar metallicities. This chemical pattern is unique and unprecedented among MW stars, posing urgent questions about its origin. These atypical stars could be former SG stars of dissolved GCs formed with intrinsically lower abundances of Mg and enriched Al (subsequently self-polluted by massive AGB stars) or the result of exotic binary systems. We speculate that the stars Mg-deficiency as well as the orbital properties suggest that they could have an extragalactic origin. This discovery should guide future dedicated spectroscopic searches of atypical stellar chemical patterns in our Galaxy, a fundamental step forward to understanding the Galactic formation and evolution.

  8. Capture of Nontarget Flies (Diptera: Lauxaniidae, Chloropidae, and Anthomyiidae on Traps Baited with Volatile Chemicals in Field-Crop Habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis S. Hesler

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Volatile chemicals increased trap catch of flies from the families Lauxaniidae [Homoneura bispina (Loew and Camptoprosopella borealis Shewell], Chloropidae (Olcella sp., and Anthomyiidae (Delia spp. in field crops. With lauxaniids, baiting with 2-phenylethanol on cotton-roll dispensers increased catch of H. bispina in two corn plot tests, and methyl salicylate increased trap catch in one test. Traps baited with methyl salicylate increased the catch of C. borealis. When using plastic-sachet dispensers, traps baited with methyl salicylate caught more H. bispina than ones baited with 2-phenylethanol, whereas traps baited with 2-phenylethanol caught more C. borealis than those with methyl salicylate. For chloropids, traps baited with 2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine greatly increased catch of Olcella flies in corn and soybean. With anthomyiids, catch of male Delia flies in wheat increased with 2-phenylethanol on cotton rolls and with either 2-phenylethanol or methyl salicylate using plastic dispensers. In soybean, 2-phenylethanol formulated on cotton rolls or in plastic dispensers increased catch of male Delia flies, but methyl salicylate did not affect trap catch. Trap catch of female Delia flies did not vary among chemicals. In another test in soybean, trap catch of both male and female Delia flies was greater with 2-phenylethanol than with other volatile chemicals.

  9. Relevance of various nitrogen fixing microorganisms in ecology and plant productivity as a basis for evaluating their damage by environmental chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagnow, G

    1981-01-01

    To evaluate detrimental side-effects of environmental chemicals on the biological N/sub 2/-fixation the relative importance of the N/sub 2/-fixation of legume and non-legume root nodules, of symbiotic and free living blue-green algae, of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic rhizosphere bacteria and of anaerobic bacteria is discussed on the basis of their fixation rate and their contribution to the conservation of ecosystems. From an agricultural and ecological point of view the symbiotic N/sub 2/-fixation of legumes and non-legumes takes the first place, being followed by that of blue-green algae and rhizosphere bacteria. Compared with these, the strictly anaerobic N/sub 2/-fixation has only a minor importance. Variable side-effects of herbicides on N/sub 2/-fixing bacteria are cited to stress the necessity of testing representatives of various ecological groups. Suitable test systems are proposed with soybeans, white clover, Rhizobium cultures, N/sub 2/-fixing blue-green algae and with Azospirillum species.

  10. Beyond mean-field approximations for accurate and computationally efficient models of on-lattice chemical kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, M.; Stamatakis, M.

    2017-07-01

    Modeling the kinetics of surface catalyzed reactions is essential for the design of reactors and chemical processes. The majority of microkinetic models employ mean-field approximations, which lead to an approximate description of catalytic kinetics by assuming spatially uncorrelated adsorbates. On the other hand, kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) methods provide a discrete-space continuous-time stochastic formulation that enables an accurate treatment of spatial correlations in the adlayer, but at a significant computation cost. In this work, we use the so-called cluster mean-field approach to develop higher order approximations that systematically increase the accuracy of kinetic models by treating spatial correlations at a progressively higher level of detail. We further demonstrate our approach on a reduced model for NO oxidation incorporating first nearest-neighbor lateral interactions and construct a sequence of approximations of increasingly higher accuracy, which we compare with KMC and mean-field. The latter is found to perform rather poorly, overestimating the turnover frequency by several orders of magnitude for this system. On the other hand, our approximations, while more computationally intense than the traditional mean-field treatment, still achieve tremendous computational savings compared to KMC simulations, thereby opening the way for employing them in multiscale modeling frameworks.

  11. Galactic Doppelgängers: The Chemical Similarity Among Field Stars and Among Stars with a Common Birth Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, M.; Rix, H.-W.; Hogg, David W.; Casey, A. R.; Holtzman, J.; Fouesneau, M.; Zasowski, G.; Geisler, D.; Shetrone, M.; Minniti, D.; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre

    2018-02-01

    We explore to what extent stars within Galactic disk open clusters resemble each other in the high-dimensional space of their photospheric element abundances and contrast this with pairs of field stars. Our analysis is based on abundances for 20 elements, homogeneously derived from APOGEE spectra (with carefully quantified uncertainties of typically 0.03 dex). We consider 90 red giant stars in seven open clusters and find that most stars within a cluster have abundances in most elements that are indistinguishable (in a {χ }2-sense) from those of the other members, as expected for stellar birth siblings. An analogous analysis among pairs of > 1000 field stars shows that highly significant abundance differences in the 20 dimensional space can be established for the vast majority of these pairs, and that the APOGEE-based abundance measurements have high discriminating power. However, pairs of field stars whose abundances are indistinguishable even at 0.03 dex precision exist: ∼0.3% of all field star pairs and ∼1.0% of field star pairs at the same (solar) metallicity [Fe/H] = 0 ± 0.02. Most of these pairs are presumably not birth siblings from the same cluster, but rather doppelgängers. Our analysis implies that “chemical tagging” in the strict sense, identifying birth siblings for typical disk stars through their abundance similarity alone, will not work with such data. However, our approach shows that abundances have extremely valuable information for probabilistic chemo-orbital modeling, and combined with velocities, we have identified new cluster members from the field.

  12. Li depletion effects on Li2TiO3 reaction with H2 in thermo-chemical environment relevant to breeding blanket for fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvani, Carlo; Casadio, Sergio; Contini, Vittoria; Giorgi, Rossella; Mancini, Maria Rita; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2005-07-01

    This is a report of the Working Group in the Subtask on Solid Breeder Blankets under the Implementing Agreement on a Co-operative Programme on Nuclear Technology of Fusion Reactors (International Energy Agency (IEA)). This Working Group (Task F and WG-F) was performed from 2000 to 2004 by a collaboration of European Union (EU) and Japan (JA). In this report, lithium depletion effects on the reaction of lithium titanate (Li 2 TiO 3 ) with hydrogen (H 2 ) in thermo-chemical environment were discussed. The reaction of Li 2 TiO 3 ceramics with H 2 was studied in a thermo-chemical environment simulating (excepting irradiation) that of the hottest pebble-bed zone of breeding-blanket actually designed for fusion power plants. This 'reduction' as performed at 900degC in Ar+0.1%H, purge gas (He+0.1%H 2 being the designed reference') was found to be enhanced by TiO 2 doping of the specimens of simulate 6 Li-burn-up expected to reach 20% at their end-of-life. The reaction rates, however, were so slow to be not significantly extrapolated to the breeder material service time (years). In Ar+3%H 2 , faster reaction rates allowed a better identification of the process evolution (kinetics) by Temperature-Programmed Reduction' (TPR) and 'Oxidation' (TPO), and combined TG-DTA thermal analysis. The reduction of pure Li 4/5 TiO 12/5 spinel phase to Li 4/5 TiO 12/5-y was found to reach in one day the steady state at the O-vacancy concentration y=0.2. Complimentary microscopy (SEM) and spectroscopy (XRD, XPS) techniques were used to characterize the reaction products among which the presence of the orthorhombic Li v TiO 2 (0 ≤ v ≤ 1/2) and Li 2 TiO 3 could be diagnosed. So that the complete spinel reduction to Li 1/2 TiO 2 was obtained according to a scheme involving the Li 1/2 TiO 2 -Li 4/5 TiO 12/5 spinel phase solid solution for which y=3v/(10-5v). The reduction rate of pure meta-titanate to Li 2 TiO 3-x was found much lower (x approx. = 0.01) and even possibly due to the presence

  13. The discrepancy between human peripheral nerve chronaxie times as measured using magnetic and electric field stimuli: the relevance to MRI gradient coil safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recoskie, Bryan J; Chronik, Blaine A; Scholl, Timothy J

    2009-01-01

    Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) resulting from electric fields induced from the rapidly changing magnetic fields of gradient coils is a concern in MRI. Nerves exposed to either electric fields or changing magnetic fields would be expected to display consistent threshold characteristics, motivating the direct application of electric field exposure criteria from the literature to guide the development of gradient magnetic field exposure criteria for MRI. The consistency of electric and magnetic field exposures was tested by comparing chronaxie times for electric and magnetic PNS curves for 22 healthy human subjects. Electric and magnetic stimulation thresholds were measured for exposure of the forearm using both surface electrodes and a figure-eight magnetic coil, respectively. The average chronaxie times for the electric and magnetic field conditions were 109 ± 11 μs and 651 ± 53 μs (±SE), respectively. We do not propose that these results call into question the basic mechanism, namely that rapidly switched gradient magnetic fields induce electric fields in human tissues, resulting in PNS. However, this result does motivate us to suggest that special care must be taken when using electric field exposure data from the literature to set gradient coil PNS safety standards in MRI.

  14. Development and Field Trial of Dimpled-Tube Technology for Chemical Industry Process Heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaroslav Chudnovsky; Aleksandr Kozlov

    2006-10-12

    Most approaches to increasing heat transfer rates in the convection sections of gas-fired process heaters involve the incorporation of fins, baffles, turbulizers, etc. to increase either the heat transfer surface area or turbulence or both. Although these approaches are effective in increasing the heat transfer rates, this increase is invariably accompanied by an associated increase in convection section pressure drop as well as, for heaters firing ‘dirty’ fuel mixtures, increased fouling of the tubes – both of which are highly undesirable. GTI has identified an approach that will increase heat transfer rates without a significant increase in pressure drop or fouling rate. Compared to other types of heat transfer enhancement approaches, the proposed dimpled tube approach achieves very high heat transfer rates at the lowest pressure drops. Incorporating this approach into convection sections of chemical industry fired process heaters may increase energy efficiency by 3-5%. The energy efficiency increase will allow reducing firing rates to provide the required heating duty while reducing the emissions of CO2 and NOx.

  15. Evaluation of Physic-chemical Parameters of Water Quality on Agricultural Fields of Western Bahia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enoc Lima do Rego

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available For the diagnosis of the quality of water it is necessary to execute a set of analyzes (physical and chemical of the body of water that will provide information that integrate biotic and abiotic factors that govern the functioning of the ecosystem. The objective of this study is to evaluate the quality of water from wells and rivers of Urucuia aquifer region for investigation of contamination or contamination risks. Were realize collections in nine (9 areas of western Bahia, which were collect in each area, two points of well water samples and a river, and determining the electrical conductivity, pH, dissolved ions and metals. The results were compare with the maximum permissible values (MPV for human consumption by Ordinance No. 2914/11 of the Ministry of Health and National Environment Counsel - CONAMA (Resolution 357 and supplementary resolutions. The quantitative results of the analysis showed that the surface and well waters that are part of the aquifer Urucuia within the parameters investigated are below the values recommended by the legislation showing that the agricultural activities in the region has not affected to the evaluated parameters, the quality of water for human consumption. However, it is necessary a monitoring of surface and groundwater in the region with expansion parameters evaluated. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v9i2.880

  16. Thermo-hydrological and chemical (THC) modeling to support Field Test Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauffer, Philip H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jordan, Amy B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Harp, Dylan Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zyvoloski, George Anthony [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boukhalfa, Hakim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Caporuscio, Florie Andre [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Miller, Terry Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Robinson, Bruce Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-30

    This report summarizes ongoing efforts to simulate coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes occurring within a hypothetical high-level waste (HLW) repository in bedded salt. The report includes work completed since the last project deliverable, “Coupled model for heat and water transport in a high level waste repository in salt”, a Level 2 milestone submitted to DOE in September 2013 (Stauffer et al., 2013). Since the last deliverable, there have been code updates to improve the integration of the salt module with the pre-existing code and development of quality assurance (QA) tests of constitutive functions and precipitation/dissolution reactions. Simulations of bench-scale experiments, both historical and currently in the planning stages have been performed. Additional simulations have also been performed on the drift-scale model that incorporate new processes, such as an evaporation function to estimate water vapor removal from the crushed salt backfill and isotopic fractionation of water isotopes. Finally, a draft of a journal paper on the importance of clay dehydration on water availability is included as Appendix I.

  17. Quantitation of chemical exchange rates using pulsed-field-gradient diffusion measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrec, Michael; Prestegard, James H.

    1997-01-01

    A new approach to the quantitation of chemical exchange rates is presented, and its utility is illustrated with application to the exchange of protein amide protons with bulk water. The approach consists of a selective-inversion exchange HMQC experiment in which a short spin echo diffusion filter has been inserted into the exchange period. In this way, the kinetics of exchange are encoded directly in an apparent diffusion coefficient which is a function of the position of the diffusion filter in the pulse sequence. A detailed theoretical analysis of this experiment indicates that, in addition to the measurement of simple exchange rates, the experiment is capable of measuring the effect of mediated exchange, e.g. the transfer of magnetization from bulk water to an amide site mediated by an internal bound water molecule or a labile protein side-chain proton in fast exchange with bulk water. Experimental results for rapid water/amide exchange in acyl carrier protein are shown to be quantitatively consistent with the exchange rates measured using a selective-inversion exchange experiment

  18. Temperature field calculation with allowance for heat of chemical reactions under electroexplosion nickel plating of aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Denis A.; Semina, Olga A.; Stepikov, Maksim A.; Gromov, Victor E.

    2017-01-01

    The analysis of stress-strained state at the boundary «faced surface layer - substrate» is performed by methods of elasticity theory of inhomogeneous media, on exposure to the load distributed in a circle. The fundamental aspects of Kelvin - Helmholtz and Richtmayer - Meshkov instabilities are considered. The following methods are used for the research. The analytical method of solution is used for finding the temperature distribution of substrate and coating material as well as distribution of speed of material motion in deposition of the coating. Finite element method is required in accounting for the parameters of convective mixing. For the analysis of the proposed thickness and dispersion of the coating the concepts of hydrodynamic Kelvin - Helmholtz and Richtmayer - Meshkov instabilities are used. Using the mass, energy and momentum conservation laws, with allowance for the possible exothermal reactions, the system of equations of the mathematical model of electroexplosion synthesis on the basis of thermoreacting components of Ni-Al system is formulated. The degree of effect of model's parameters on dispersion and thickness of the coating is determined. The comparison of the modeling and experimental data is carried out. It is established that the due regard to the thermal effect of chemical reaction increases considerably the time of existence of the reacting elements in the liquid state and it facilitates the participation of the entire nickel in the reaction. The increased time of heat effect enables the other processes to occur more completely.

  19. A field study of physico-chemical states of artificial radionuclides in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaya, Yutaka; Nakamura, Kiyoshi

    1974-01-01

    The physico-chemical states of artificial radionuclides, 90 Sr, 137 Cs and 144 Ce in seawater were investigated by radiochemical analysis of filtered and unfiltered seawater. The difference of radionuclide concentrations between unfiltered and filtered seawaters was defined as the ''particulate form'' radioisotope and its ''particle ratio'' was discussed. Practically no particulate 90 Sr, greater than 0.22 μ in size, was observed in both coastal and open seawaters, but some of 137 Cs seemed to be insoluble in some circumstances, especially in coastal waters. A considerable amount of 144 Ce was found to be particulate. An estimation of the radionuclides in particulate form was made for Kashima-nada seawaters collected in 1970 to 1972, and it was shown that the possible occurrence of particulate radionuclides, greater than 0.22 μ in size, were 1% or less for 90 Sr and 6% for 137 Cs. In the coastal water, 80% of 144 Ce were seemed to be in particulate form, but in the open seawater only a few %. The influences of suspended materials to 137 Cs and 144 Ce concentration levels in seawater were not negligible and further investigations are desirable. (auth.)

  20. Control of radiation fields in BWRs after noble metal chemical addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, R.L.; Wood, C.J. [EPRI, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2002-07-01

    Hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) was developed to mitigate the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) that can occur in the welded piping and internal components of boiling water reactors (BWRs). HWC is practiced by adding hydrogen gas to the feedwater to reduce the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) of the component to be protected to below -0.230 V(SHE). Unfortunately, only a few BWR owners implemented HWC for internals component IGSCC protection because of the factor of 4 to 5 increase in operating dose rates that accompanies its use. Noble metal chemical addition (NMCA) was developed to address this shortcoming. NMCA is a process in which Pt and Rh chemicals are added to a shutdown Boiling Water Reactor while the reactor water temperature is maintained in the range of 120 C to 150 C for 48 hours. During that time, a target concentration of Pt and Rh is maintained in the reactor water. At the end of the 48 hour period the plant then either goes back to power or enters into a refueling outage. The end result of the NMCA process is a uniform deposit of Pt and Rh metal at very low concentrations, on the order of 0.5 to 1.0 mg/cm{sup 2}, on the reactor wetted surfaces. During subsequent operation, when a small amount of hydrogen is added to the feedwater (less than 0.4 ppm), very low ECPs will be developed on the wetted catalytic surfaces, on the order of -0.500 V(SHE), and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of components will be mitigated. Since NMCA with hydrogen changes the surface chemistry and not the bulk chemistry, there is little or no increase in operating dose rate. See References 1 through 5 for a more complete discussion of HWC and NMCA fundamentals. To date, 26 BWRs worldwide have applied NMCA. As operating plants have completed their first full operating cycle after NMCA application, it has become apparent that NMCA can have a significant impact on shutdown dose rates, as can be seen in Table 1. (The shut down dose rates

  1. Field evaluation of a new particle concentrator- electrostatic precipitator system for measuring chemical and toxicological properties of particulate matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakbin Payam

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A newly designed electrostatic precipitator (ESP in tandem with Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System (VACES was developed by the University of Southern California to collect ambient aerosols on substrates appropriate for chemical and toxicological analysis. The laboratory evaluation of this sampler is described in a previous paper. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of the new VACES-ESP system in the field by comparing the chemical characteristics of the PM collected in the ESP to those of reference samplers operating in parallel. Results The field campaign was carried out in the period from August, 2007 to March, 2008 in a typical urban environment near downtown Los Angeles. Each sampling set was restricted to 2–3 hours to minimize possible sampling artifacts in the ESP. The results showed that particle penetration increases and ozone concentration decreases with increasing sampling flow rate, with highest particle penetration observed between 100 nm and 300 nm. A reference filter sampler was deployed in parallel to the ESP to collect concentration-enriched aerosols, and a MOUDI sampler was used to collect ambient aerosols. Chemical analysis results showed very good agreement between the ESP and MOUDI samplers in the concentrations of trace elements and inorganic ions. The overall organic compound content of PM collected by the ESP, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, hopanes, steranes, and alkanes, was in good agreement with that of the reference sampler, with an average ESP -to -reference concentration ratio of 1.07 (± 0.38. While majority of organic compound ratios were close to 1, some of the semi-volatile organic species had slightly deviated ratios from 1, indicating the possibility of some sampling artifacts in the ESP due to reactions of PM with ozone and radicals generated from corona discharge, although positive and negative sampling artifacts in the

  2. Growth-substrate induced performance degradation in chemically synthesized monolayer MoS{sub 2} field effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amani, Matin; Chin, Matthew L.; Mazzoni, Alexander L.; Burke, Robert A.; Dubey, Madan, E-mail: madan.dubey.civ@mail.mil [Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, US Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, Maryland 20723 (United States); Najmaei, Sina; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Lou, Jun [Department of Materials Science and Nanoengineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States)

    2014-05-19

    We report on the electronic transport properties of single-layer thick chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) field-effect transistors (FETs) on Si/SiO{sub 2} substrates. MoS{sub 2} has been extensively investigated for the past two years as a potential semiconductor analogue to graphene. To date, MoS{sub 2} samples prepared via mechanical exfoliation have demonstrated field-effect mobility values which are significantly higher than that of CVD-grown MoS{sub 2}. In this study, we will show that the intrinsic electronic performance of CVD-grown MoS{sub 2} is equal or superior to that of exfoliated material and has been possibly masked by a combination of interfacial contamination on the growth substrate and residual tensile strain resulting from the high-temperature growth process. We are able to quantify this strain in the as-grown material using pre- and post-transfer metrology and microscopy of the same crystals. Moreover, temperature-dependent electrical measurements made on as-grown and transferred MoS{sub 2} devices following an identical fabrication process demonstrate the improvement in field-effect mobility.

  3. CHEMICAL COMPOSITIONS OF THIN-DISK, HIGH-METALLICITY RED HORIZONTAL-BRANCH FIELD STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afşar, M.; Sneden, C.; For, B.-Q.

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed abundance analysis and atmospheric parameters of 76 stars from a survey to identify field Galactic red horizontal-branch (RHB) stars. High-resolution echelle spectra (R ≅ 60,000, S/N ≥ 100) were obtained with the 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory. The target stars were selected only by color and parallax information. Overall metallicities and relative abundances of proton-capture elements (C, N, O, Li), α-elements (Ca and Si), and neutron-capture elements (Eu and La) were determined by either equivalent width or synthetic spectrum analyses. We used CN features at the λλ7995-8040 region in order to determine the 12 C/ 13 C ratios of our targets. Investigation of the evolutionary stages, using spectroscopic T eff and log g values along with derived 12 C/ 13 C ratios, revealed the presence of 18 probable RHB stars in our sample. We also derived kinematics of the stars with available distance information. Taking into account both the kinematics and probable evolutionary stages, we conclude that our sample contains 5 thick-disk and 13 thin-disk RHB stars. Up until now, RHB stars have been considered as members of the thick disk, and were expected to have large space velocities and sub-solar metallicities. However, our sample is dominated by low-velocity solar-metallicity RHB stars; their existence cannot be easily explained with standard stellar evolution.

  4. The solubility of uranium in cementitious near-field chemical conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baston, G.M.N.; Brownsword, M.; Cross, J.E.; Hobley, J.; Moreton, A.D.; Smith-Briggs, J.L.; Thomason, H.P. [AEA Decommissioning and Waste Management, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1993-05-01

    Tetravalent and hexavalent uranium solubilities have been measured in cement-equilibriated water for pH values from 4 to 13. Tetravalent uranium solubilities at pH 12 have been measured by three experimental techniques: oversaturation, undersaturation and by the use of an electrochemical cell which controlled the redox conditions. The experimentally obtained data have been simulated using the thermodynamic equilibrium program HARPHRQ in conjunction with three different sets of thermodynamic data for uranium. In each case, differences were found between the predicted and measured uranium behaviour. For hexavalent uranium at high pH values the model suggested the formation of anionic hydrolysis products which led to the prediction of uranium solubilities significantly higher than those observed. Refinement of the thermodynamic data used in the model enabled the derivation of maximum values for the formation constants of these species under cementitious conditions. Similarly, the experimental data have been used to refine a model of tetravalent uranium solubility under cementitious near-field conditions. (author).

  5. Chemical Kinetics in the expansion flow field of a rotating detonation-wave engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kailasanath, Kazhikathra; Schwer, Douglas

    2014-11-01

    Rotating detonation-wave engines (RDE) are a form of continuous detonation-wave engines. They potentially provide further gains in performance than an intermittent or pulsed detonation-wave engine (PDE). The overall flow field in an idealized RDE, primarily consisting of two concentric cylinders, has been discussed in previous meetings. Because of the high pressures involved and the lack of adequate reaction mechanisms for this regime, previous simulations have typically used simplified chemistry models. However, understanding the exhaust species concentrations in propulsion devices is important for both performance considerations as well as estimating pollutant emissions. A key step towards addressing this need will be discussed in this talk. In this approach, an induction parameter model is used for simulating the detonation but a more detailed finite-chemistry model is used in the expansion flow region, where the pressures are lower and the uncertainties in the chemistry model are greatly reduced. Results show that overall radical concentrations in the exhaust flow are substantially lower than from earlier predictions with simplified models. The performance of a baseline hydrogen/air RDE increased from 4940 s to 5000 s with the expansion flow chemistry, due to recombination of radicals and more production of H2O, resulting in additional heat release.

  6. The solubility of uranium in cementitious near-field chemical conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baston, G.M.N.; Brownsword, M.; Cross, J.E.; Hobley, J.; Moreton, A.D.; Smith-Briggs, J.L.; Thomason, H.P.

    1993-05-01

    Tetravalent and hexavalent uranium solubilities have been measured in cement-equilibriated water for pH values from 4 to 13. Tetravalent uranium solubilities at pH 12 have been measured by three experimental techniques: oversaturation, undersaturation and by the use of an electrochemical cell which controlled the redox conditions. The experimentally obtained data have been simulated using the thermodynamic equilibrium program HARPHRQ in conjunction with three different sets of thermodynamic data for uranium. In each case, differences were found between the predicted and measured uranium behaviour. For hexavalent uranium at high pH values the model suggested the formation of anionic hydrolysis products which led to the prediction of uranium solubilities significantly higher than those observed. Refinement of the thermodynamic data used in the model enabled the derivation of maximum values for the formation constants of these species under cementitious conditions. Similarly, the experimental data have been used to refine a model of tetravalent uranium solubility under cementitious near-field conditions. (author)

  7. Analysis rbs of CdS thin films grown by cbd to different intensities of the magnetic field and temperature of the chemical bath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrero, E.; Vigil, O.

    1999-01-01

    Depth and composition of CdS thin films grown by chemical bath deposition under different temperature and magnetic DC field conditions, were determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry. The above parameters were evaluated as a function of the bath temperature and the intensity of the induction magnetic field applied

  8. Effect of harvest time and field retting duration on the chemical composition, morphology and mechanical properties of hemp fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ming; Fernando, Dinesh; Daniel, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    tThe large variability in the mechanical properties of hemp fibers is an issue in relation to their use inhigh-grade composites. The objective of the present study was to determine the optimal growth stage forharvesting hemp fibers for use in composites and to evaluate the effect of field retting......% at seed maturity.A highly significant reduction in cellulose deposition in fiber cell walls was reflected by reduced fiberwall thickness with plant maturity and was related to the development and ripening of hemp seeds.A statistically significant increase in lignin deposition and a slight decrease...... in pectins in hemp fibercell walls were also noted with stem maturity. Microscopy observations and histochemical analyzescorroborated the results from the chemical analyzes and revealed variations in morphological aspectsand spatial micro-distributions of carbohydrates and lignin within the cell structure...

  9. Chemical and physical reservoir parameters at initial conditions in Berlin geothermal field, El Salvador: a first assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Amore, F. [CNR, Pisa (Italy). International Institute for Geothermal Research ; Mejia, J.T. [Comision Ejuctiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa, El Salvador (El Salvador)

    1999-02-01

    A study has been made to obtain the main chemical and physical reservoir conditions of the Berlin field (El Salvador), before the commencement of large-scale exploitation of the geothermal resource. The upflow zone and the main flow path within the geothermal system have been determined from the area distribution of chemical parameters such as Cl concentrations, ratios such as Na/K, K/Mg, K/Ca, and temperatures computed from silica concentrations and cation ratios. Gas compositions have been used to calculate reservoir parameters such as temperature, steam fraction and P{sub CO{sub 2}}. The computer code WATCH (new edition 1994) has been used to evaluate the temperature of equilibrium between the aqueous species and selected alteration minerals in the reservoir. The fluid in Berlin flows to the exploited reservoir from the south, entering it in the vicinity of well TR-5. Along its flow-path (south-north direction), the fluid is cooled by boiling and conductive cooling. The chloride-enthalpy diagram indicates the existence of a parent water, with a chemical composition similar to well TR-5, that boils and the residual brine produces the fluid of well TR-3, which is very concentrated in salts. The fluid of TR-5 is probably produced from this parent water, generating the fluids of wells TR-2 and TR-9 by boiling, and the fluids of wells TR-1 and TR-4 by conductive cooling. The computed values for the deep steam fraction clearly indicate that this is a liquid-dominated system, with computed temperature values decreasing from 310{sup o}C (upflow zone) to about 230{sup o}C, from south to north. (author)

  10. SHIFTING WEED COMPOSITIONS AND BIOMASS PRODUCTION IN SWEET CORN FIELD TREATED WITH ORGANIC COMPOSTS AND CHEMICAL WEED CONTROLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marulak Simarmata

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the research were to study the shift of weed compositions in sweet corn field treated with organic compost and chemical weed controls and to compare the effect of treatment combinations on weed growth, weed biomass and sweet corn biomass. The research was conducted in Bengkulu, Indonesia, from April to July 2014. Results showed that the number of weed species decreased after the trials from 14 to 13. There was a shift in weed compositions because 5 species of weeds did not emerge after the trials, but 4 new species were found. Chemical weed control used a herbiside mixture of atrazine and mesotrione applied during postemergence was the most effective method to control weeds, which was observed on decreased weed emergence and weed biomass down to 22.33 and 25.00 percent of control, respectively. Subsequently, biomass production of sweet corn increased up to 195.64 percent at the same trials. Biomass of weeds and sweet corn were also affected by the organic composts. Weed biomass was inhibited by treatment of composted empty fruith bunches of oil palm, whereas significantly increased of sweet corn biomass were observed in the plots of organic manure.

  11. Olive oil pilot-production assisted by pulsed electric field: impact on extraction yield, chemical parameters and sensory properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puértolas, Eduardo; Martínez de Marañón, Iñigo

    2015-01-15

    The impact of the use of pulsed electric field (PEF) technology on Arroniz olive oil production in terms of extraction yield and chemical and sensory quality has been studied at pilot scale in an industrial oil mill. The application of a PEF treatment (2 kV/cm; 11.25 kJ/kg) to the olive paste significantly increased the extraction yield by 13.3%, with respect to a control. Furthermore, olive oil obtained by PEF showed total phenolic content, total phytosterols and total tocopherols significantly higher than control (11.5%, 9.9% and 15.0%, respectively). The use of PEF had no negative effects on general chemical and sensory characteristics of the olive oil, maintaining the highest quality according to EU legal standards (EVOO; extra virgin olive oil). Therefore, PEF could be an appropriate technology to improve olive oil yield and produce EVOO enriched in human-health-related compounds, such as polyphenols, phytosterols and tocopherols. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Chemical and biological monitoring of MIOR on the pilot area of Vyngapour oil field, West Sibera, Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arinbasarov, M.U.; Murygina, V.P.; Mats, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    The pilot area of the Vyngapour oil field allotted for MIOR tests contains three injection and three producing wells. These wells were treated in summer 1993 and 1994. Before, during, and after MIOR treatments on the pilot area the chemical compounds of injected and formation waters were studied, as well as the amount and species of microorganisms entering the stratum with the injected water and indigenous bacteria presented in bottomhole zones of the wells. The results of monitoring showed that the bottomhole zone of the injection well already had biocenosis of heterotrophic, hydrocarbon-oxidizing, methanogenic, and sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were besides permanently introduced into the reservoir during the usual waterflooding. The nutritious composition activated vital functions of all bacterial species presented in the bottomhole zone of the injection well. The formation waters from producing wells showed the increase of the content of nitrate, sulfate, phosphate, and bicarbonate ions by the end of MIOR. The amount of hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria in formation waters of producing wells increased by one order. The chemical and biological monitoring revealed the activation of the formation microorganisms, but no transport of food industry waste bacteria through the formation from injection to producing wells was found.

  13. Testing insecticidal activity of novel chemically synthesized siRNA against Plutella xylostella under laboratory and field conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Gong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Over the last 60 years, synthetic chemical pesticides have served as a main tactic in the field of crop protection, but their availability is now declining as a result of the development of insect resistance. Therefore, alternative pest management agents are needed. However, the demonstration of RNAi gene silencing in insects and its successful usage in disrupting the expression of vital genes opened a door to the development of a variety of novel, environmentally sound approaches for insect pest management. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Six small interfering RNAs (siRNAs were chemically synthesized and modified according to the cDNA sequence of P. xylostella acetylcholine esterase genes AChE1 and AChE2. All of them were formulated and used in insecticide activity screening against P. xylostella. Bioassay data suggested that Si-ace1_003 and Si-ace2_001 at a concentration of 3 µg cm(-2 displayed the best insecticidal activity with 73.7% and 89.0%, mortality, respectively. Additional bioassays were used to obtain the acute lethal concentrations of LC50 and LC90 for Si-ace2_001, which were 53.66 µg/ml and 759.71 µg/ml, respectively. Quantitative Real-time PCR was used to confirm silencing and detected that the transcript levels of P. xylostella AChE2 (PxAChE2 were reduced by 5.7-fold compared to the control group. Consequently, AChE activity was also reduced by 1.7-fold. Finally, effects of the siRNAs on treated plants of Brassica oleracea and Brassica alboglabra were investigated with different siRNA doses. Our results showed that Si-ace2_001 had no negative effects on plant morphology, color and growth of vein under our experimental conditions. CONCLUSIONS: The most important finding of this study is the discovery that chemically synthesized and modified siRNA corresponding to P. xylostella AChE genes cause significant mortality of the insect both under laboratory and field conditions, which provides a novel strategy to control P

  14. Description of relevant scenarios in the field of agricultural, environmental and climate policy and energy prices for the preliminary study on a Roadmap for the 'SuikerUnie'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plomp, A.J.

    2011-11-01

    In the Dutch Long Term Agreements on energy efficiency (MJA3 and MEE)the Dutch government and industry agreed to strive for a 30% energy efficiency improvement in 2020 compared to 2005. To reach more than 30%, it is not enough to optimize; instead larger process changes will be needed. An important instrument is the realization of preliminary studies and roadmaps, which are supported by the government. This memo offers an overview of relevant developments and scenarios from Agricultural, climate and environmental policy and energy prices for the Dutch sugar industry. This memo serves as input for the Preliminary study Roadmap SuikerUnie. [nl

  15. Toxicity of proton-metal mixtures in the field: Linking stream macroinvertebrate species diversity to chemical speciation and bioavailability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockdale, Anthony [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Tipping, Edward, E-mail: et@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Lofts, Stephen [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Ormerod, Stephen J. [Catchment Research Group, Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3US (United Kingdom); Clements, William H. [Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Blust, Ronny [Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology Group, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2010-10-01

    Understanding metal and proton toxicity under field conditions requires consideration of the complex nature of chemicals in mixtures. Here, we demonstrate a novel method that relates streamwater concentrations of cationic metallic species and protons to a field ecological index of biodiversity. The model WHAM-F{sub TOX} postulates that cation binding sites of aquatic macroinvertebrates can be represented by the functional groups of natural organic matter (humic acid), as described by the Windermere Humic Aqueous Model (WHAM6), and supporting field evidence is presented. We define a toxicity function (F{sub TOX}) by summing the products: (amount of invertebrate-bound cation) x (cation-specific toxicity coefficient, {alpha}{sub i}). Species richness data for Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera (EPT), are then described with a lower threshold of F{sub TOX}, below which all organisms are present and toxic effects are absent, and an upper threshold above which organisms are absent. Between the thresholds the number of species declines linearly with F{sub TOX}. We parameterised the model with chemistry and EPT data for low-order streamwaters affected by acid deposition and/or abandoned mines, representing a total of 412 sites across three continents. The fitting made use of quantile regression, to take into account reduced species richness caused by (unknown) factors other than cation toxicity. Parameters were derived for the four most common or abundant cations, with values of {alpha}{sub i} following the sequence (increasing toxicity) H{sup +} < Al < Zn < Cu. For waters affected mainly by H{sup +} and Al, F{sub TOX} shows a steady decline with increasing pH, crossing the lower threshold near to pH 7. Competition effects among cations mean that toxicity due to Cu and Zn is rare at lower pH values, and occurs mostly between pH 6 and 8.

  16. Analysis Of Convective Plane Stagnation Point Chemically Reactive Mhd Flow Past A Vertical Porous Plate With A Convective Boundary Condition In The Presence Of A Uniform Magnetic Field.

    OpenAIRE

    Adeniyan, A.,

    2013-01-01

    The numerical investigation of a stagnation point boundary layer flow , mass and heat transfer of a steady two dimensional , incompressible , viscous electrically conducting, chemically reacting laminar fluid over a vertical convectively heated , electrically neutral flat plate exposed to a transverse uniform magnetic field has been carried out to examine the influence of the simultaneous presence of the effects of a convective boundary condition, chemical reaction, heat transfer and suctio...

  17. Perspectives on chemical oceanography in the 21st century: Participants of the COME ABOARD Meeting examine aspects of the field in the context of 40 years of DISCO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassbender, Andrea J.; Palevsky, Hilary I.; Martz, Todd R.; Ingalls, Anitra E.; Gledhill, Martha; Fawcett, Sarah E.; Brandes, Jay; Aluwihare, Lihini; Anderson, Robert M.; Bender, Sara; Boyle, Ed; Bronk, Debbie; Buesseler, Ken; Burdige, David J.; Casciotti, Karen; Close, Hilary; Conte, Maureen; Cutter, Greg; Estapa, Meg; Fennel, Katja; Ferron, Sara; Glazer, Brian; Goni, Miguel; Grand, Max; Guay, Chris; Hatta, Mariko; Hayes, Chris; Horner, Tristan; Ingall, Ellery; Johnson, Kenneth G.; Juranek, Laurie; Knapp, Angela; Lam, Phoebe; Luther, George; Matrai, Paty; Nicholson, David; Paytan, Adina; Pellenbarg, Robert; Popendorf, Kim; Reddy, Christopher M.; Ruttenberg, Kathleen; Sabine, Chris; Sansone, Frank; Shaltout, Nayrah; Sikes, Liz; Sundquist, Eric T.; Valentine, David; Wang, Zhao (Aleck); Wilson, Sam; Barrett, Pamela; Behrens, Melanie; Belcher, Anna; Biermann, Lauren; Boiteau, Rene; Clarke, Jennifer; Collins, Jamie; Coppola, Alysha; Ebling, Alina M.; Garcia-Tigreros, Fenix; Goldman, Johanna; Guallart, Elisa F.; Haskell, William; Hurley, Sarah; Janssen, David; Johnson, Winn; Lennhartz, Sinikka; Liu, Shuting; Rahman, Shaily; Ray, Daisy; Sarkar, Amit; Steiner, Zvika; Widner, Brittany; Yang, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The questions that chemical oceanographers prioritize over the coming decades, and the methods we use to address these questions, will define our field's contribution to 21st century science. In recognition of this, the U.S. National Science Foundation and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration galvanized a community effort (the Chemical Oceanography MEeting: A BOttom-up Approach to Research Directions, or COME ABOARD) to synthesize bottom-up perspectives on selected areas of research in Chemical Oceanography. Representing only a small subset of the community, COME ABOARD participants did not attempt to identify targeted research directions for the field. Instead, we focused on how best to foster diverse research in Chemical Oceanography, placing emphasis on the following themes: strengthening our core chemical skillset; expanding our tools through collaboration with chemists, engineers, and computer scientists; considering new roles for large programs; enhancing interface research through interdisciplinary collaboration; and expanding ocean literacy by engaging with the public. For each theme, COME ABOARD participants reflected on the present state of Chemical Oceanography, where the community hopes to go and why, and actionable pathways to get there. A unifying concept among the discussions was that dissimilar funding structures and metrics of success may be required to accommodate the various levels of readiness and stages of knowledge development found throughout our community. In addition to the science, participants of the concurrent Dissertations Symposium in Chemical Oceanography (DISCO) XXV, a meeting of recent and forthcoming Ph.D. graduates in Chemical Oceanography, provided perspectives on how our field could show leadership in addressing long-standing diversity and early-career challenges that are pervasive throughout science. Here we summarize the COME ABOARD Meeting discussions, providing a synthesis of reflections and perspectives on the

  18. Application of the finite-field coupled-cluster method to calculate molecular properties relevant to electron electric-dipole-moment searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, M.; Prasannaa, V. S.; Das, B. P.

    2018-03-01

    Heavy polar diatomic molecules are currently among the most promising probes of fundamental physics. Constraining the electric dipole moment of the electron (e EDM ), in order to explore physics beyond the standard model, requires a synergy of molecular experiment and theory. Recent advances in experiment in this field have motivated us to implement a finite-field coupled-cluster (FFCC) approach. This work has distinct advantages over the theoretical methods that we had used earlier in the analysis of e EDM searches. We used relativistic FFCC to calculate molecular properties of interest to e EDM experiments, that is, the effective electric field (Eeff) and the permanent electric dipole moment (PDM). We theoretically determine these quantities for the alkaline-earth monofluorides (AEMs), the mercury monohalides (Hg X ), and PbF. The latter two systems, as well as BaF from the AEMs, are of interest to e EDM searches. We also report the calculation of the properties using a relativistic finite-field coupled-cluster approach with single, double, and partial triples' excitations, which is considered to be the gold standard of electronic structure calculations. We also present a detailed error estimate, including errors that stem from our choice of basis sets, and higher-order correlation effects.

  19. Chemical and biological characterization of products of incomplete combustion from the simulated field burning of agricultural plastic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linak, W P; Ryan, J V; Perry, E; Williams, R W; DeMarini, D M

    1989-06-01

    Chemical and biological analyses were performed to characterize products of incomplete combustion emitted during the simulated open field burning of agricultural plastic. A small utility shed equipped with an air delivery system was used to simulate pile burning and forced-air-curtain incineration of a nonhalogenated agricultural plastic that reportedly consisted of polyethylene and carbon black. Emissions were analyzed for combustion gases; volatile, semi-volatile, and particulate organics; and toxic and mutagenic properties. Emission samples, as well as samples of the used (possibly pesticide-contaminated) plastic, were analyzed for the presence of several pesticides to which the plastic may have been exposed. Although a variety of alkanes, alkenes, and aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds were identified in the volatile, semi-volatile, and particulate fractions of these emissions, a substantial fraction of higher molecular weight organic material was not identified. No pesticides were identified in either combustion emission samples or dichloromethane washes of the used plastic. When mutagenicity was evaluated by exposing Salmonella bacteria (Ames assay) to whole vapor and vapor/particulate emissions, no toxic or mutagenic effects were observed. However, organic extracts of the particulate samples were moderately mutagenic. This mutagenicity compares approximately to that measured from residential wood heating on a revertant per unit heat release basis. Compared to pile burning, forced air slightly decreased the time necessary to burn a charge of plastic. There was not a substantial difference, however, in the variety or concentrations of organic compounds identified in samples from these two burn conditions. This study highlights the benefits of a combined chemical/biological approach to the characterization of complex, multi-component combustion emissions. These results may not reflect those of other types of plastic that may be used

  20. Effective Responder Communication Improves Efficiency and Psychological Outcomes in a Mass Decontamination Field Experiment: Implications for Public Behaviour in the Event of a Chemical Incident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Holly; Drury, John; Amlôt, Richard; Rubin, G. James; Williams, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The risk of incidents involving mass decontamination in response to a chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear release has increased in recent years, due to technological advances, and the willingness of terrorists to use unconventional weapons. Planning for such incidents has focused on the technical issues involved, rather than on psychosocial concerns. This paper presents a novel experimental study, examining the effect of three different responder communication strategies on public experiences and behaviour during a mass decontamination field experiment. Specifically, the research examined the impact of social identity processes on the relationship between effective responder communication, and relevant outcome variables (e.g. public compliance, public anxiety, and co-operative public behaviour). All participants (n = 111) were asked to visualise that they had been involved in an incident involving mass decontamination, before undergoing the decontamination process, and receiving one of three different communication strategies: 1) ‘Theory-based communication’: Health-focused explanations about decontamination, and sufficient practical information; 2) ‘Standard practice communication’: No health-focused explanations about decontamination, sufficient practical information; 3) ‘Brief communication’: No health-focused explanations about decontamination, insufficient practical information. Four types of data were collected: timings of the decontamination process; observational data; and quantitative and qualitative self-report data. The communication strategy which resulted in the most efficient progression of participants through the decontamination process, as well as the fewest observations of non-compliance and confusion, was that which included both health-focused explanations about decontamination and sufficient practical information. Further, this strategy resulted in increased perceptions of responder legitimacy and increased

  1. Effective responder communication improves efficiency and psychological outcomes in a mass decontamination field experiment: implications for public behaviour in the event of a chemical incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Holly; Drury, John; Amlôt, Richard; Rubin, G James; Williams, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The risk of incidents involving mass decontamination in response to a chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear release has increased in recent years, due to technological advances, and the willingness of terrorists to use unconventional weapons. Planning for such incidents has focused on the technical issues involved, rather than on psychosocial concerns. This paper presents a novel experimental study, examining the effect of three different responder communication strategies on public experiences and behaviour during a mass decontamination field experiment. Specifically, the research examined the impact of social identity processes on the relationship between effective responder communication, and relevant outcome variables (e.g. public compliance, public anxiety, and co-operative public behaviour). All participants (n = 111) were asked to visualise that they had been involved in an incident involving mass decontamination, before undergoing the decontamination process, and receiving one of three different communication strategies: 1) 'Theory-based communication': Health-focused explanations about decontamination, and sufficient practical information; 2) 'Standard practice communication': No health-focused explanations about decontamination, sufficient practical information; 3) 'Brief communication': No health-focused explanations about decontamination, insufficient practical information. Four types of data were collected: timings of the decontamination process; observational data; and quantitative and qualitative self-report data. The communication strategy which resulted in the most efficient progression of participants through the decontamination process, as well as the fewest observations of non-compliance and confusion, was that which included both health-focused explanations about decontamination and sufficient practical information. Further, this strategy resulted in increased perceptions of responder legitimacy and increased identification with

  2. Effective responder communication improves efficiency and psychological outcomes in a mass decontamination field experiment: implications for public behaviour in the event of a chemical incident.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly Carter

    Full Text Available The risk of incidents involving mass decontamination in response to a chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear release has increased in recent years, due to technological advances, and the willingness of terrorists to use unconventional weapons. Planning for such incidents has focused on the technical issues involved, rather than on psychosocial concerns. This paper presents a novel experimental study, examining the effect of three different responder communication strategies on public experiences and behaviour during a mass decontamination field experiment. Specifically, the research examined the impact of social identity processes on the relationship between effective responder communication, and relevant outcome variables (e.g. public compliance, public anxiety, and co-operative public behaviour. All participants (n = 111 were asked to visualise that they had been involved in an incident involving mass decontamination, before undergoing the decontamination process, and receiving one of three different communication strategies: 1 'Theory-based communication': Health-focused explanations about decontamination, and sufficient practical information; 2 'Standard practice communication': No health-focused explanations about decontamination, sufficient practical information; 3 'Brief communication': No health-focused explanations about decontamination, insufficient practical information. Four types of data were collected: timings of the decontamination process; observational data; and quantitative and qualitative self-report data. The communication strategy which resulted in the most efficient progression of participants through the decontamination process, as well as the fewest observations of non-compliance and confusion, was that which included both health-focused explanations about decontamination and sufficient practical information. Further, this strategy resulted in increased perceptions of responder legitimacy and increased

  3. Application of industrial hygiene techniques for work-place exposure assessment protocols related to petro-chemical exploration and production field activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehn, J.

    1995-01-01

    Standard industrial hygiene techniques for recognition, evaluation, and control can be directly applied to development of technical protocols for workplace exposure assessment activities for a variety of field site locations. Categories of occupational hazards include chemical and physical agents. Examples of these types of hazards directly related to oil and gas exploration and production workplaces include hydrocarbons, benzene, oil mist, hydrogen sulfide, Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM), asbestos-containing materials, and noise. Specific components of well process chemicals include potential hazardous chemical substances such as methanol, acrolein, chlorine dioxide, and hydrochloric acid. Other types of exposure hazards may result from non-routine conduct of sandblasting and painting operations

  4. SHEDS-HT: An Integrated Probabilistic Exposure Model for Prioritizing Exposures to Chemicals with Near-Field and Dietary Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) researchers are developing a strategy for highthroughput (HT) exposure-based prioritization of chemicals under the ExpoCast program. These novel modeling approaches for evaluating chemicals based on their potential for biologi...

  5. Variations of geothermometry and chemical-isotopic compositions of hot spring fluids in the Rehai geothermal field, southwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jianguo; Liu, Congqiang; Fu, Bihong; Ninomiya, Yoshiki; Zhang, Youlian; Wang, Chuanyuan; Wang, Hualiu; Sun, Zigang

    2005-04-01

    Geothermal variations, origins of carbon-bearing components and reservoir temperatures in the Rehai geothermal field (RGF) of Tengchong volcanic area, Yunnan Province, southwestern China, are discussed on the basis of carbon isotope compositions, combined with helium isotope ratios and geothermal data from 1973 to 2000. δ 13C values of CO 2, CH 4, HCO 3-, CO 3= and travertine in the hot springs range from -7.6‰ to -1.18‰, -56.9‰ to -19.48‰, -6.7‰ to -4.2‰, -6.4‰ to -4.2‰ and -27.1‰ to +0.6‰, respectively. The carbon dioxide probably has a mantle/magma origin, but CH 4 and He have multiple origins. HCO 3- and CO 3= in RGF thermal fluids are predominantly derived from igneous carbon dioxide, but other ions originate from rocks through which the fluids circulate. The 13C values of CO 2, HCO 3- (aq) and CO 3= (aq) illustrate that isotopic equilibriums between CO 2 and HCO 3- (aq), and CO 3= (aq) and between DIC and travertine were not achieved, and no carbon isotope fractionation between HCO 3- (aq) and CO 3= (aq) of the hot springs in RGF was found. Using various geothermometers, temperatures of the geothermal reservoirs are estimated in a wide range from 69 °C to 450 °C that fluctuated from time to time. The best estimate of subsurface reservoir temperature may be 250-300 °C. Contributions of mantle fluids and shallow crust fluids in Rehai geothermal field varied with time, which resulted in variations of chemical and isotopic compositions and reservoir temperatures.

  6. Chemical shift-selective snapshot FLASH MR imaging in combination with inversion-recovery T1 contrast at different field strengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthaei, D.; Haase, A.; Henrich, D.; Duhmke, E.

    1991-01-01

    With fast MR imaging, chemical shift contract becomes available to the clinician in seconds. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the combination of chemical shift selective (CHESS) MR imaging using the snapshot FLASH MR method with the inversion-recovery technique and to obtain information concerning the signal-to-noise and chemical shift with the presaturation method at different field strengths. Investigations with volunteers and experimental animals were done at 2 and 3 T (whole body) and in a 4.7-T animal image. For the inversion-recovery experiments, saturation was done before every snapshot FLASH image. With increasing field strength due to signal-to-noise and chemical shift advantages, the method performs better. Increasing T1 values are also important at high field strengths. The combined technique is useful only for T1 water images with fat saturation. It also allows fast quantification of T1 in water-containing organs and pathologic processes. At high field strengths, fast CHESS and T1 imaging promise fast quantitative information. This is a possible argument for clinical high-field-strength MR imagining along with MR spectroscopy

  7. Field Air Sampling and Simultaneous Chemical and Sensory Analysis of Livestock Odorants with Sorbent Tube GC-MS/Olfactometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shicheng; Cai Lingshuang; Koziel, Jacek A.; Hoff, Steven; Clanton, Charles; Schmidt, David; Jacobson, Larry; Parker, David; Heber, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Characterization and quantification of livestock odorants is one of the most challenging analytical tasks because odor-causing gases are very reactive, polar and often present at very low concentrations in a complex matrix of less important or irrelevant gases. The objective of this research was to develop a novel analytical method for characterization of the livestock odorants including their odor character, odor intensity, and hedonic tone and to apply this method for quantitative analysis of the key odorants responsible for livestock odor. Sorbent tubes packed with Tenax TA were used for field sampling. The automated one-step thermal desorption module coupled with multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry system was used for simultaneous chemical and odor analysis. Fifteen odorous VOCs and semi-VOCs identified from different livestock species operations were quantified. Method detection limits ranges from 40 pg for skatole to 3590 pg for acetic acid. In addition, odor character, odor intensity and hedonic tone associated with each of the target odorants are also analyzed simultaneously. We found that the mass of each VOCs in the sample correlates well with the log stimulus intensity. All of the correlation coefficients (R 2 ) are greater than 0.74, and the top 10 correlation coefficients were greater than 0.90.

  8. Experimental studies on the weathering of chemicals in a field trial to predict their behaviour in case of a spill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamaca, E.; Merlin, F.X.; Le Floch, S.

    2004-01-01

    Most of the world's production of vegetable oil is transported by sea. In 2001, nearly 850,000 tons of vegetable oil entered and left harbours in France. This trend increases the risk of accidental spills at sea. The physical state of vegetable oil changes when it is spilled at sea, turning this non-toxic product into a pollutant that damages the marine ecosystem. This study demonstrated how vegetable oil could react when spilled at sea. A series of field studies were conducted to obtain experimental data on the behaviour of vegetable oil both on the surface of water and in the water column. Castor oil, soybean oil, oleic acid and dioctylphtalate were released at sea and the dispersion of the oil in the water was monitored with a fluorimeter. Measurements were taken to a depth of 1 metre. Emulsification and viscosity kinetics were monitored. The study showed that the behaviour of the 4 products depends on the nature of the product and weather conditions such as wind and sea surface state. Vegetable oil spilled at sea behaves differently from spilled chemical products in terms of solubility. It was suggested that in the case of an accidental spill at sea, emergency responders should first pump the oil and then use dispersants. 6 refs., 2 tabs., 11 figs

  9. The chemical and microbial degradation of cellulose in the near field of a repository for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askarieh, M.M.; Chambers, A.V.; Daniel, F.B.D.; FitzGerald, P.L.; Holtom, G.J.; Pilkington, N.J.; Rees, J.H.

    2000-01-01

    This paper focuses on one aspect of the calculations of risk in performance assessments of the deep disposal of radioactive wastes in the UK, namely the apparent contradiction regarding the representation of microbial activity in performance assessments of the release of gases and of dissolved radionuclides. A discussion is presented of the current understanding of the microbial and chemical degradation of cellulose. The assumptions made in recent performance assessment calculations of the Nirex disposal concept are then stated. For the release of gases, it was assumed that the complete conversion of cellulosic wastes to gases by the action of microbes, was, in principle, permitted. However, concerning migration of radionuclides by the groundwater pathway, all the cellulose was assumed to be converted to complexants that could increase the solubility and decrease the sorption of radionuclides in the near field. This contradiction in the approach of the groundwater and gas pathway assessments stems from the consistent need to provide a cautious approach in the face of uncertainty about the actual evolution of microbial activity in the repository. Therefore, no credit is currently taken for possible beneficial effects of the microbial destruction of complexants, whereas the complete conversion of cellulose to gaseous products is assumed

  10. Field pilot testing for chemical oxidation at the former Nitchequon meteorological station : decontamination project in isolated areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peisajovich, A. [Transport Canada, Montreal, PQ (Canada); Bergeron, E. [Golder Associates Ltd., Montreal, PQ (Canada); Barbeau, M. [Golder Associates Innovative Applications, Montreal, PQ (Canada); Lajoie, G. [Cree Regional Authority, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Field pilot testing for chemical oxidation at the former Nitchequon meteorological station was discussed. This presentation described the site location and provided an aerial view and cross section of the site. The historical background and condition of the site were then identified. Photographs and illustrations of the site and the source of the problem were provided. Photographs were also provided of the logistics, temporary camp, dismantling of tanks, equipment, pipeline dismantling, residues, methodology as well as a graphical representation of how to solve the problem. Other topics included technologies tested on site, full-scale remediation plans, remediation goals, step by step process, and costs distribution. Among the steps discussed was: vegetation removal; excavation of the first two feet of soil; transfer of contaminated soil on high-density polyethylene (HDPE) lining prior to treatment; cell construction; cell lining insulation; transfer of treated soil from the mixers to the curing cells; installation of HDPE top cover lining over the treated soil; and the addition of 12 inches of clean soil over the top cover lining. tabs., figs.

  11. Comparison of Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Field Ionization Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Large Saturated Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chunfen; Viidanoja, Jyrki; Li, Mingzhe; Zhang, Yuyang; Ikonen, Elias; Root, Andrew; Romanczyk, Mark; Manheim, Jeremy; Dziekonski, Eric; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2016-11-01

    Direct infusion atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) was compared to field ionization mass spectrometry (FI-MS) for the determination of hydrocarbon class distributions in lubricant base oils. When positive ion mode APCI with oxygen as the ion source gas was employed to ionize saturated hydrocarbon model compounds (M) in hexane, only stable [M - H] + ions were produced. Ion-molecule reaction studies performed in a linear quadrupole ion trap suggested that fragment ions of ionized hexane can ionize saturated hydrocarbons via hydride abstraction with minimal fragmentation. Hence, APCI-MS shows potential as an alternative of FI-MS in lubricant base oil analysis. Indeed, the APCI-MS method gave similar average molecular weights and hydrocarbon class distributions as FI-MS for three lubricant base oils. However, the reproducibility of APCI-MS method was found to be substantially better than for FI-MS. The paraffinic content determined using the APCI-MS and FI-MS methods for the base oils was similar. The average number of carbons in paraffinic chains followed the same increasing trend from low viscosity to high viscosity base oils for the two methods.

  12. The Impact of Biofilms upon Surfaces Relevant to an Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste Geological Disposal Facility under Simulated Near-Field Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Charles

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The ability of biofilms to form on a range of materials (cementious backfill (Nirex Reference Vault Backfill (NRVB, graphite, and stainless steel relevant to potential UK intermediate level radioactive waste (ILW disposal concepts was investigated by exposing these surfaces to alkaliphilic flocs generated by mature biofilm communities. Flocs are aggregates of biofilm material that are able to act as a transport vector for the propagation of biofilms. In systems where biofilm formation was observed there was also a decrease in the sorption of isosaccharinic acids to the NRVB. The biofilms were composed of cells, extracellular DNA (eDNA, proteins, and lipids with a smaller polysaccharide fraction, which was biased towards mannopyranosyl linked carbohydrates. The same trend was seen with the graphite and stainless steel surfaces at these pH values, but in this case the biofilms associated with the stainless steel surfaces had a distinct eDNA basal layer that anchored the biofilm to the surface. At pH 13, no structured biofilm was observed, rather all the surfaces accumulated an indistinct organic layer composed of biofilm materials. This was particularly the case for the stainless steel coupons which accumulated relatively large quantities of eDNA. The results demonstrate that there is the potential for biofilm formation in an ILW-GDF provided an initiation source for the microbial biofilm is present. They also suggest that even when conditions are too harsh for biofilm formation, exposed surfaces may accumulate organic material such as eDNA.

  13. Calculation of the NMR chemical shift for a 4d1 system in a strong crystal field environment of trigonal symmetry with a threefold axis of quantization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sang Woon; Oh, Se Woung; Ro, Seung Woo

    1986-01-01

    The NMR chemical shift arising from 4d electron angular momentum and 4d electron angular momentum and 4d electron spin dipolar-nuclear spin angular momentum interactions for a 4d 1 system in a strong crystal field environment of trigonal symmetry, where the threefold axis is chosen to be the axis of quantization axis, has been examined. A general expression using the nonmultipole expansion method (exact method) is derived for the NMR chemical shift. From this expression all the multipolar terms are determined. we observe that along the (100), (010), (110), and (111) axes the NMR chemical shifts are positive while along the (001) axis, it is negative. We observe that the dipolar term (1/R 3 ) is the dominant contribution to the NMR chemical shift except for along the (111) axis. A comparison of the multipolar terms with the exact values shows also that the multipolar results are exactly in agreement with the exact values around R≥0.2 nm. The temperature dependence analysis on the NMR chemical shifts may imply that along the (111) axis the contribution to the NMR chemical shift is dominantly pseudo contact interaction. Separation of the contributions of the Fermi and the pseudo contact interactions would correctly imply that the dipolar interaction is the dominant contribution to the NMR chemical shifts along the (100), (010), (001), and (110) axes, but along the (111) axis the Fermi contact interaction is incorrectly the dominant contribution to the NMR chemical shift. (Author)

  14. The interaction of a flowing plasma with a dipole magnetic field: measurements and modelling of a diamagnetic cavity relevant to spacecraft protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamford, R; Bradford, J; Bingham, R; Gargate, L; Hapgood, M; Stamper, R; Gibson, K J; Thornton, A J; Silva, L O; Fonseca, R A; Norberg, C; Todd, T

    2008-01-01

    Here we describe a new experiment to test the shielding concept of a dipole-like magnetic field and plasma, surrounding a spacecraft forming a 'mini magnetosphere'. Initial laboratory experiments have been conducted to determine the effectiveness of a magnetized plasma barrier to be able to expel an impacting, low beta, supersonic flowing energetic plasma representing the solar wind. Optical and Langmuir probe data of the plasma density, the plasma flow velocity and the intensity of the dipole field clearly show the creation of a narrow transport barrier region and diamagnetic cavity virtually devoid of energetic plasma particles. This demonstrates the potential viability of being able to create a small 'hole' in a solar wind plasma, of the order of the ion Larmor orbit width, in which an inhabited spacecraft could reside in relative safety. The experimental results have been quantitatively compared with a 3D particle-in-cell 'hybrid' code simulation that uses kinetic ions and fluid electrons, showing good qualitative agreement and excellent quantitative agreement. Together the results demonstrate the pivotal role of particle kinetics in determining generic plasma transport barriers.

  15. A new survey method of tsunami inundation area using chemical analysis of soil. Application to the field survey on the 2010 Chilean tsunami at Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Takumi; Matsuyama, Masafumi; Koshimura, Shunichi; Mas, Erick; Matsuoka, Masashi; Jimenez, Cesar

    2011-01-01

    The severe earthquake of Mw 8.8 occurred on 27 Feb. 2010 at the center of Chile. The tsunami generated by the earthquake attacked the coast of Chile and it propagated to the Pacific Ocean coastline. The field survey on the disaster damages due to the tsunami was conducted near Talcahuano in Chile to prepare for the great tsunamis accompanied by the earthquakes predicted to occur near Japan within several decades. The aims of this field survey were to survey disaster damages especially relevant to electric equipments and to develop the survey method based on a chemical analysis of the inundated soil which supplies objective data with high accuracy compared to the conventional methods. In the survey area, the average of inundation heights was 6 m, however it locally reached up to 25 m. The maximum sea-level height of the series of the tsunamis was recorded in the third or fourth wave (roughly 3 hours after the earthquake occurrence). The first floors of houses were severely destroyed and some ships were carried and left on land by the tsunamis. Furthermore, the large amount of sediment was deposited in towns. Removing the drifted ships and tsunami deposit is important consideration for quick recovery from a disaster due to a tsunami. The soil samples were obtained from both the inundated and the not-inundated position. The stirred solution was made by the soil and ultrapure water, then, the content of water-soluble ions, electric conductivity (EC), and pH were measured. The soil obtained in the tsunami inundated area contains much water-soluble ions (Na + , Mg 2+ , Cl - , Br - , SO 4 2- ) compared to the samples obtained in the not-inundated area. The discriminant analysis of the tsunami inundation was conducted using the amount of ions in the soil. High discriminant accuracy (over 90%) was obtained with Na + , Mg 2+ , Cl - , Br - , SO 4 2- and EC. Br - , Cl - , Na + are believed to be suitable for the discriminant analysis about tsunamis considering the contaminant

  16. fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad J. Arnold

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface irrigation, such as flood or furrow, is the predominant form of irrigation in California for agronomic crops. Compared to other irrigation methods, however, it is inefficient in terms of water use; large quantities of water, instead of being used for crop production, are lost to excess deep percolation and tail runoff. In surface-irrigated fields, irrigators commonly cut off the inflow of water when the water advance reaches a familiar or convenient location downfield, but this experience-based strategy has not been very successful in reducing the tail runoff water. Our study compared conventional cutoff practices to a retroactively applied model-based cutoff method in four commercially producing alfalfa fields in Northern California, and evaluated the model using a simple sensor system for practical application in typical alfalfa fields. These field tests illustrated that the model can be used to reduce tail runoff in typical surface-irrigated fields, and using it with a wireless sensor system saves time and labor as well as water.

  17. Comparing equivalent thermal, high pressure and pulsed electric field processes for mild pasteurization of orange juice: Part II: Impact on specific chemical and biochemical quality parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoort, L.; Plancken, van der I.; Grauwet, T.; Timmermans, R.A.H.; Mastwijk, H.C.; Matser, A.M.; Hendrickx, M.E.; Loey, van A.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of thermal, high pressure (HP) and pulsed electric field (PEF) processing for mild pasteurization of orange juice was compared on a fair basis, using processing conditions leading to an equivalent degree of microbial inactivation. Examining the effect on specific chemical and biochemical

  18. The summertime Boreal forest field measurement intensive (HUMPPA-COPEC-2010): an overview of meteorological and chemical influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J.; Petäjä, T.

    2012-04-01

    This submission describes the background, instrumentation, goals, and the regional influences on the HUMPPA-COPEC intensive field measurement campaign, conducted at the Boreal forest research station SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relation) in Hyytiälä, Finland from 12th July-12th August 2010. The prevailing meteorological conditions during the campaign are examined and contrasted with those of the past six years. Back trajectory analyses show that meteorological conditions at the site in 2010 were characterized by a higher proportion of southerly flow than in the other years studied. As a result the summer of 2010 was anomalously warm and high in ozone making the campaign relevant for the analysis of possible future climates. A comprehensive land use analysis, provided on both 5 and 50 km scales, shows that the main vegetation types surrounding the site on both the regional and local scales are: coniferous forest (Scots pine and/or Norway spruce); mixed forest (Birch and conifers); and woodland scrub (e.g. Willows, Aspen); indicating that the campaign results can be taken as representative of the Boreal forest ecosystem. In addition to the influence of biogenic emissions, the measurement site was occasionally impacted by sources other than vegetation. Specific tracers have been used here to identify the time periods when such sources have impacted the site namely: biomass burning (acetonitrile and CO), urban anthropogenic pollution (pentane and SO2) and the nearby Korkeakoski sawmill (enantiomeric ratio of chiral monoterpenes). None of these sources dominated the study period, allowing the Boreal forest summertime emissions to be assessed and contrasted with various other source signatures.

  19. The summertime Boreal forest field measurement intensive (HUMPPA-COPEC-2010: an overview of meteorological and chemical influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Williams

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the background, instrumentation, goals, and the regional influences on the HUMPPA-COPEC intensive field measurement campaign, conducted at the Boreal forest research station SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relation in Hyytiälä, Finland from 12 July–12 August 2010. The prevailing meteorological conditions during the campaign are examined and contrasted with those of the past six years. Back trajectory analyses show that meteorological conditions at the site in 2010 were characterized by a higher proportion of southerly flow than in the other years studied. As a result the summer of 2010 was anomalously warm and high in ozone making the campaign relevant for the analysis of possible future climates. A comprehensive land use analysis, provided on both 5 and 50 km scales, shows that the main vegetation types surrounding the site on both the regional and local scales are: coniferous forest (Scots pine and/or Norway spruce; mixed forest (Birch and conifers; and woodland scrub (e.g. Willows, Aspen; indicating that the campaign results can be taken as representative of the Boreal forest ecosystem. In addition to the influence of biogenic emissions, the measurement site was occasionally impacted by sources other than vegetation. Specific tracers have been used here to identify the time periods when such sources have impacted the site namely: biomass burning (acetonitrile and CO, urban anthropogenic pollution (pentane and SO2 and the nearby Korkeakoski sawmill (enantiomeric ratio of chiral monoterpenes. None of these sources dominated the study period, allowing the Boreal forest summertime emissions to be assessed and contrasted with various other source signatures.

  20. The nuclear magnetic moment of 208Bi and its relevance for a test of bound-state strong-field QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, S.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M. L.; Blaum, K.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Heylen, H.; Malbrunot-Ettenauer, S.; Neyens, G.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Plunien, G.; Sailer, S.; Shabaev, V. M.; Skripnikov, L. V.; Tupitsyn, I. I.; Volotka, A. V.; Yang, X. F.

    2018-04-01

    The hyperfine structure splitting in the 6p3 3/2 4S → 6p2 7 s 1/2 4P transition at 307 nm in atomic 208Bi was measured with collinear laser spectroscopy at ISOLDE, CERN. The hyperfine A and B factors of both states were determined with an order of magnitude improved accuracy. Based on these measurements, theoretical input for the hyperfine structure anomaly, and results from hyperfine measurements on hydrogen-like and lithium-like 209Bi80+,82+, the nuclear magnetic moment of 208Bi has been determined to μ (208Bi) = + 4.570 (10)μN. Using this value, the transition energy of the ground-state hyperfine splitting in hydrogen-like and lithium-like 208Bi80+,82+ and their specific difference of -67.491(5)(148) meV are predicted. This provides a means for an experimental confirmation of the cancellation of nuclear structure effects in the specific difference in order to exclude such contributions as the cause of the hyperfine puzzle, the recently reported 7-σ discrepancy between experiment and bound-state strong-field QED calculations of the specific difference in the hyperfine structure splitting of 209Bi80+,82+.

  1. Design of a Data Catalogue for Perdigão-2017 Field Experiment: Establishing the Relevant Parameters, Post-Processing Techniques and Users Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, J. L.; Belo-Pereira, M.; Leo, L. S.; Fernando, J.; Wildmann, N.; Gerz, T.; Rodrigues, C. V.; Lopes, A. S.; Lopes, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    Perdigão is the largest of a series of wind-mapping studies embedded in the on-going NEWA (New European Wind Atlas) Project. The intensive observational period of the Perdigão field experiment resulted in an unprecedented volume of data, covering several wind conditions through 46 consecutive days between May and June 2017. For researchers looking into specific events, it is time consuming to scrutinise the datasets looking for appropriate conditions. Such task becomes harder if the parameters of interest were not measured directly, instead requiring their computation from the raw datasets. This work will present the e-Science platform developed by University of Porto for the Perdigao dataset. The platform will assist scientists of Perdigao and the larger scientific community in extrapolating the datasets associated to specific flow regimes of interest as well as automatically performing post-processing/filtering operations internally in the platform. We will illustrate the flow regime categories identified in Perdigao based on several parameters such as weather type classification, cloud characteristics, as well as stability regime indicators (Brunt-Väisälä frequency, Scorer parameter, potential temperature inversion heights, dimensionless Richardson and Froude numbers) and wind regime indicators. Examples of some of the post-processing techniques available in the e-Science platform, such as the Savitzky-Golay low-pass filtering technique, will be also presented.

  2. Why relevance theory is relevant for lexicography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bothma, Theo; Tarp, Sven

    2014-01-01

    This article starts by providing a brief summary of relevance theory in information science in relation to the function theory of lexicography, explaining the different types of relevance, viz. objective system relevance and the subjective types of relevance, i.e. topical, cognitive, situational...... that is very important for lexicography as well as for information science, viz. functional relevance. Since all lexicographic work is ultimately aimed at satisfying users’ information needs, the article then discusses why the lexicographer should take note of all these types of relevance when planning a new...... dictionary project, identifying new tasks and responsibilities of the modern lexicographer. The article furthermore discusses how relevance theory impacts on teaching dictionary culture and reference skills. By integrating insights from lexicography and information science, the article contributes to new...

  3. The unique field experiments on the assessment of accident consequences at industrial enterprises of gas-chemical complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, N.S.; Trebin, I.S.; Sorokovikova, O.

    1998-01-01

    Sour natural gas fields are the unique raw material base for setting up such large enterprises as gas chemical complexes. The presence of high toxic H 2 S in natural gas results in widening a range of dangerous and harmful factors for biosphere. Emission of such gases into atmosphere during accidents at gas wells and gas pipelines is of especial danger for environment and first of all for people. Development of mathematical forecast models for assessment of accidents progression and consequences is one of the main elements of works on safety analysis and risk assessment. The critical step in development of such models is their validation using the experimental material. Full-scale experiments have been conducted by the All-Union Scientific-Research institute of Natural Gases and Gas Technology (VNIIGAZ) for grounding of sizes of hazard zones in case of the severe accidents with the gas pipelines. The source of emergency gas release was the working gas pipelines with 100 mm dia. And 110 km length. This pipeline was used for transportation of natural gas with significant amount of hydrogen sulphide. During these experiments significant quantities of the gas including H 2 S were released into the atmosphere and then concentrations of gas and H 2 S were measured in the accident region. The results of these experiments are used for validation of atmospheric dispersion models including the new Lagrangian trace stochastic model that takes into account a wide range of meteorological factors. This model was developed as a part of computer system for decision-making support in case of accident release of toxic gases into atmosphere at the enterprises of Russian gas industry. (authors)

  4. Sampling in the Snow: High School Winter Field Experiences Provide Relevant, Real World Connections Between Scientific Practices and Disciplinary Core Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, E. W.; Burakowski, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    For much of the northern United States, the months surrounding the winter solstice are times of increased darkness, low temperatures, and frozen landscapes. It's a time when many high school science educators, who otherwise would venture outside with their classes, hunker down and are wary of the outdoors. However, a plethora of learning opportunities lies just beyond the classroom. Working collaboratively, a high school science teacher and a snow scientist have developed multiple activities to engage students in the scientific process of collecting, analyzing and interpreting the winter world using snow data to (1) learn about the insulative properties of snow, and (2) to learn about the role of snow cover on winter climate through its reflective properties while participating in a volunteer network that collects snow depth, albedo (reflectivity), and density data. These outdoor field-based snow investigations incorporate Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and disciplinary core ideas, including ESS2.C: The roles of water in Earth's surface processes and ESS2.D: Weather and Climate. Additionally, the lesson plans presented address Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in Mathematics, including the creation and analysis of bar graphs and time series plots (CCSS.Math.HSS-ID.A.1) and xy scatter plots (CCSS.Math.HSS-ID.B.6). High school students participating in the 2013/2014 snow sampling season described their outdoor learning experience as "authentic" and "hands-on" as compared to traditional class indoors. They emphasized that learning outdoors was essential to their understanding of underlying content and concepts because they "learn through actual experience."

  5. Laboratory and Field Testing of Commercially Available Detectors for the Identification of Chemicals of Interest in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle for the Detection of Undeclared Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carla Miller; Mary Adamic; Stacey Barker; Barry Siskind; Joe Brady; Warren Stern; Heidi Smartt; Mike McDaniel; Mike Stern; Rollin Lakis

    2014-07-01

    then identified commercial off the shelf (COTS) chemical detectors that may detect the chemicals of interest. Three chemical detectors were selected and tested both in laboratory settings and in field operations settings at Idaho National Laboratory. The instruments selected are: Thermo Scientific TruDefender FT (FTIR), Thermo Scientific FirstDefender RM (Raman), and Bruker Tracer III SD (XRF). Functional specifications, operability, and chemical detectability, selectivity, and limits of detection were determined. Results from the laboratory and field tests will be presented. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nonproliferation and International Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  6. Theoretical and experimental study on solid chemical reaction between BaCO3 and TiO2 in microwave field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hanxing; Guo, Liling; Zou Long; Cao Minhe; Zhou Jian; Ouyang Shixi

    2004-01-01

    Solid-state chemical reaction mechanism for the reaction between BaCO 3 and TiO 2 in microwave field was investigated based on X-ray power diffraction (XRD) data and theory of diffusion. The compositions of the resultant after reaction under different conditions were studied by employing XRD. The quantitative analyses based on XRD data showed the reaction in microwave field was quite different from that in the conventional method. A model was proposed to explain the change of the ratio between the reactant BaCO 3 , TiO 2 and the resultant BaTiO 3 for the chemical reaction. The formation kinetic of BaTiO 3 from the BaCO 3 and TiO 2 was calculated by employing this theoretical model. The reaction rate between BaCO 3 and TiO 2 in microwave field was much higher than that in conventional method. The activation energy of the atomic diffusions in this solid chemical reaction is only 58 kJ/mol, which was only about 1/4 of 232 kJ/mol in the conventional value. The result suggests that the microwave field enhance atomic diffusion during the reaction

  7. Deep learning relevance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lioma, Christina; Larsen, Birger; Petersen, Casper

    2016-01-01

    train a Recurrent Neural Network (RNN) on existing relevant information to that query. We then use the RNN to "deep learn" a single, synthetic, and we assume, relevant document for that query. We design a crowdsourcing experiment to assess how relevant the "deep learned" document is, compared...... to existing relevant documents. Users are shown a query and four wordclouds (of three existing relevant documents and our deep learned synthetic document). The synthetic document is ranked on average most relevant of all....

  8. Field emission properties of nano-structured cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) synthesized by low-temperature chemical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, S. M.; Suryawanshi, S. R.; More, M. A.; Sen, Debasis; Kolekar, Y. D.; Ramana, C. V.

    2018-06-01

    We report on the field-emission properties of structure-morphology controlled nano-CoFe2O4 (CFO) synthesized via a simple and low-temperature chemical method. Structural analyses indicate that the spongy-CFO (approximately, 2.96 nm) is nano-structured, spherical, uniformly-distributed, cubic-structured and porous. Field emission studies reveal that CFO exhibit low turn-on field (4.27 V/μm) and high emission current-density (775 μA/cm2) at a lower applied electric field of 6.80 V/μm. In addition, extremely good emission current stability is obtained at a pre-set value of 1 μA and high emission spot-density over large area (2 × 2 cm2) suggesting the applicability of these materials for practical applications in vacuum micro-/nano-electronics.

  9. Characterizing Slow Chemical Exchange in Nucleic Acids by Carbon CEST and Low Spin-Lock Field R1ρ NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Hansen, Alexandar L.; Zhang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative characterization of dynamic exchange between various conformational states provides essential insights into the molecular basis of many regulatory RNA functions. Here, we present an application of nucleic-acid-optimized carbon chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and low spin-lock field R1ρ relaxation dispersion (RD) NMR experiments in characterizing slow chemical exchange in nucleic acids that is otherwise difficult if not impossible to be quantified by the ZZ-exchange NMR experiment. We demonstrated the application on a 47-nucleotide fluoride riboswitch in the ligand-free state, for which CEST and R1ρ RD profiles of base and sugar carbons revealed slow exchange dynamics involving a sparsely populated (p ~ 10%) and shortly lived (τ ~ 10 ms) NMR “invisible” state. The utility of CEST and low spin-lock field R1ρ RD experiments in studying slow exchange was further validated in characterizing an exchange as slow as ~60 s−1. PMID:24299272

  10. Characterizing slow chemical exchange in nucleic acids by carbon CEST and low spin-lock field R(1ρ) NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Hansen, Alexandar L; Zhang, Qi

    2014-01-08

    Quantitative characterization of dynamic exchange between various conformational states provides essential insights into the molecular basis of many regulatory RNA functions. Here, we present an application of nucleic-acid-optimized carbon chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and low spin-lock field R(1ρ) relaxation dispersion (RD) NMR experiments in characterizing slow chemical exchange in nucleic acids that is otherwise difficult if not impossible to be quantified by the ZZ-exchange NMR experiment. We demonstrated the application on a 47-nucleotide fluoride riboswitch in the ligand-free state, for which CEST and R(1ρ) RD profiles of base and sugar carbons revealed slow exchange dynamics involving a sparsely populated (p ~ 10%) and shortly lived (τ ~ 10 ms) NMR "invisible" state. The utility of CEST and low spin-lock field R(1ρ) RD experiments in studying slow exchange was further validated in characterizing an exchange as slow as ~60 s(-1).

  11. Low temperature carrier transport study of monolayer MoS{sub 2} field effect transistors prepared by chemical vapor deposition under an atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xinke, E-mail: xkliu@szu.edu.cn, E-mail: wujing026@gmail.com; He, Jiazhu; Tang, Dan; Lu, Youming; Zhu, Deliang; Liu, Wenjun; Cao, Peijiang; Han, Sun [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenzhen Engineering Laboratory for Advanced Technology of Ceramics, Nanshan District Key Lab for Biopolymer and Safety Evaluation, Shenzhen University, 3688 Nanhai Ave, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Liu, Qiang; Wen, Jiao; Yu, Wenjie [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, CAS, 865 Chang Ning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Liu, Wenjun [State Key Laboratory of ASIC and System, Department of Microelectronics, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wu, Jing, E-mail: xkliu@szu.edu.cn, E-mail: wujing026@gmail.com [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 21 Lower Kent Ridge Road, 117576 Singapore (Singapore); He, Zhubing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, South University of Science and Technology of China, 1088 Xueyuan Road, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Ang, Kah-Wee [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, 117583 Singapore (Singapore)

    2015-09-28

    Large size monolayer Molybdenum disulphide (MoS{sub 2}) was successfully grown by chemical vapor deposition method under an atmospheric pressure. The electrical transport properties of the fabricated back-gate monolayer MoS{sub 2} field effect transistors (FETs) were investigated under low temperatures; a peak field effect mobility of 59 cm{sup 2}V{sup −1}s{sup −1} was achieved. With the assist of Raman measurement under low temperature, this work identified the mobility limiting factor for the monolayer MoS{sub 2} FETs: homopolar phonon scattering under low temperature and electron-polar optical phonon scattering at room temperature.

  12. Chemical Concentrations in Field Mice from Open-Detonation Firing Sites TA-36 Minie and TA-39 Point 6 at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fresquez, Philip R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    Field mice (mostly Peromyscus spp.) were collected at two open-detonation (high explosive) firing sites - Minie at Technical Area (TA) 36 and Point 6 at TA-39 - at Los Alamos National Laboratory in August of 2010 and in February of 2011 for chemical analysis. Samples of whole body field mice from both sites were analyzed for target analyte list elements (mostly metals), dioxin/furans, polychlorinated biphenyl congeners, high explosives, and perchlorate. In addition, uranium isotopes were analyzed in a composite sample collected from TA-36 Minie. In general, all constituents, with the exception of lead at TA-39 Point 6, in whole body field mice samples collected from these two open-detonation firing sites were either not detected or they were detected below regional statistical reference levels (99% confidence level), biota dose screening levels, and/or soil ecological chemical screening levels. The amount of lead in field mice tissue collected from TA-39 Point 6 was higher than regional background, and some lead levels in the soil were higher than the ecological screening level for the field mouse; however, these levels are not expected to affect the viability of the populations over the site as a whole.

  13. Chemical composition and antioxidant activity of geopropolis produced by Melipona fasciculata (Meliponinae) in flooded fields and cerrado areas of Maranhão State, northeastern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    BATISTA,Marisa Cristina Aranha; ABREU,Bruno Vinicius de Barros; DUTRA,Richard Pereira; CUNHA,Mayara Soares; AMARAL,Flavia Maria Mendonça do; TORRES,Luce Maria Brandão; RIBEIRO,Maria Nilce de Sousa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Geopropolis, a mixture of plant resin, wax, soil and salivary secretion, is produced by the stingless bee Melipona fasciculata. This aim of this study was to investigate the chemical composition and antioxidant activity of geopropolis collected from beehives in two phytogeographical regions, flooded fields and cerrado, in the municipalities of Palmeirândia and Fernando Falcão, Maranhão State, northeastern Brazil. The geopropolis compounds were identified by gas chromatography-mass sp...

  14. Relevance: An Interdisciplinary and Information Science Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Greisdorf

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Although relevance has represented a key concept in the field of information science for evaluating information retrieval effectiveness, the broader context established by interdisciplinary frameworks could provide greater depth and breadth to on-going research in the field. This work provides an overview of the nature of relevance in the field of information science with a cursory view of how cross-disciplinary approaches to relevance could represent avenues for further investigation into the evaluative characteristics of relevance as a means for enhanced understanding of human information behavior.

  15. Electromagnetic fields and the issue of biological effects from a chemical-physical perspective; Elektromagnetiska faelt ('EMF') och fraagan om biologiska effekter utifraan ett kemiskt-fysikaliskt perspektiv

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cedervall, Bjoern (Unit of Med. Radiation Physics and Med. Radiation Biology, Dept. Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-06-15

    The question of whether electric and/or magnetic fields in various respects are dangerous or not is of interdisciplinary character. That high electric or magnetic fields may give rise to dangerous currents is well known. More controversial is the topic of genotoxic effects, i.e. effects which have their origin in changes in DNA or effects on other parts of the molecular machinery of the cell and which if extended could result is some form of disease (e.g. neurological disorders). One may see this as a chain of possible events according to: 'Exposure->antenna->interaction between EMF and atoms or molecules->molecular biology/biochemistry->->disease'. The topics that have been discussed in this report have often been neglected but may shed light on the complexity of relevant laboratory experiments and theoretical interpretations. This report includes: descriptions of an exposure, what is meant by dose, what is relevant from a molecular aspect at various frequency ranges, thermal and non-thermal effects respectively, and ferromagnetic particles as a contaminant in the laboratory environment as well as in Nature. One way of approaching the scientific questions is to analyze the energy density of electric and magnetic fields and then put these into the context of the natural environment in single cells or whole individuals. Of particular interest is the order of magnitude for forces and energies as they occur naturally in cells (e.g. for pulling apart chromosomes during cell division). As is clear from the corresponding sections of this report, it seems improbable that EMF can break chemical bonds (and thereby cause DNA strand breaks) if we restrict ourselves to EMF contexts of daily exposures in the home or most workplaces. DNA damage is generally classified into half a dozen major categories. Among these damage categories the DNA double-strand breaks are considered to be among the most severe as these may give rise to mutations, chromosomal aberrations

  16. Infection Density Dynamics of the Citrus Greening Bacterium “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” in Field Populations of the Psyllid Diaphorina citri and Its Relevance to the Efficiency of Pathogen Transmission to Citrus Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukuda-Hosokawa, Rie; Sadoyama, Yasutsune; Kishaba, Misaki; Kuriwada, Takashi; Anbutsu, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Huanglongbing, or citrus greening, is a devastating disease of citrus plants recently spreading worldwide, which is caused by an uncultivable bacterial pathogen, “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus,” and vectored by a phloem-sucking insect, Diaphorina citri. We investigated the infection density dynamics of “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” in field populations of D. citri with experiments using field-collected insects to address how “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” infection density in the vector insect is relevant to pathogen transmission to citrus plants. Of 500 insects continuously collected from “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus”-infected citrus trees with pathological symptoms in the spring and autumn of 2009, 497 (99.4%) were “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” positive. The infections were systemic across head-thorax and abdomen, ranging from 103 to 107 bacteria per insect. In spring, the infection densities were low in March, at ∼103 bacteria per insect, increasing up to 106 to 107 bacteria per insect in April and May, and decreasing to 105 to 106 bacteria per insect in late May, whereas the infection densities were constantly ∼106 to 107 bacteria per insect in autumn. Statistical analysis suggested that several factors, such as insect sex, host trees, and collection dates, may be correlated with “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” infection densities in field D. citri populations. Inoculation experiments with citrus seedlings using field-collected “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus”-infected insects suggested that (i) “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus”-transmitting insects tend to exhibit higher infection densities than do nontransmitting insects, (ii) a threshold level (∼106 bacteria per insect) of “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” density in D. citri is required for successful transmission to citrus plants, and (iii) D. citri attaining the threshold infection level transmits “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” to citrus plants in a stochastic manner. These

  17. Associating Changes in Endogenous Metabolite Profiles of Field-Deployed Fish with Chemical Contaminants and Other Stressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assessing risk from contaminant exposure in the aquatic environment typically begins (and often ends) with identification of “listed” chemicals in water samples. While providing useful information about potential exposures, this approach to monitoring – in the absence of site-spe...

  18. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube field emitter arrays with Ohmic base contact to silicon by Fe-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morassutto, M.; Tiggelaar, Roald M.; Smithers, M.A.; Smithers, M.A.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this study, dense arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes are obtained by thermal catalytic chemical vapor deposition, using Fe catalyst dispersed on a thin Ta layer. Alignment of the carbon nanotubes depends on the original Fe layer thickness from which the catalyst dispersion is obtained by

  19. The Red Queen in a potato field: integrated pest management versus chemical dependency in Colorado potato beetle control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyokhin, Andrei; Mota-Sanchez, David; Baker, Mitchell; Snyder, William E; Menasha, Sandra; Whalon, Mark; Dively, Galen; Moarsi, Wassem F

    2015-03-01

    Originally designed to reconcile insecticide applications with biological control, the concept of integrated pest management (IPM) developed into the systems-based judicious and coordinated use of multiple control techniques aimed at reducing pest damage to economically tolerable levels. Chemical control, with scheduled treatments, was the starting point for most management systems in the 1950s. Although chemical control is philosophically compatible with IPM practices as a whole, reduction in pesticide use has been historically one of the main goals of IPM practitioners. In the absence of IPM, excessive reliance on pesticides has led to repeated control failures due to the evolution of resistance by pest populations. This creates the need for constant replacement of failed chemicals with new compounds, known as the 'insecticide treadmill'. In evolutionary biology, a similar phenomenon is known as the Red Queen principle - continuing change is needed for a population to persevere because its competitors undergo constant evolutionary adaptation. The Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say), is an insect defoliator of potatoes that is notorious for its ability to develop insecticide resistance. In the present article, a review is given of four case studies from across the United States to demonstrate the importance of using IPM for sustainable management of a highly adaptable insect pest. Excessive reliance on often indiscriminate insecticide applications and inadequate use of alternative control methods, such as crop rotation, appear to expedite evolution of insecticide resistance in its populations. Resistance to IPM would involve synchronized adaptations to multiple unfavorable factors, requiring statistically unlikely genetic changes. Therefore, integrating different techniques is likely to reduce the need for constant replacement of failed chemicals with new ones. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Linking field-based metabolomics and chemical analyses to prioritize contaminants of emerging concern in the Great Lakes basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, John M.; Ekman, Drew R.; Teng, Quincy; Ankley, Gerald T.; Berninger, Jason P.; Cavallin, Jenna E.; Jensen, Kathleen M.; Kahl, Michael D.; Schroeder, Anthony L.; Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Jorgenson, Zachary G.; Lee, Kathy E.; Collette, Timothy W.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to focus on the most biologically relevant contaminants affecting aquatic ecosystems can be challenging because toxicity-assessment programs have not kept pace with the growing number of contaminants requiring testing. Because it has proven effective at assessing the biological impacts of potentially toxic contaminants, profiling of endogenous metabolites (metabolomics) may help screen out contaminants with a lower likelihood of eliciting biological impacts, thereby prioritizing the most biologically important contaminants. The authors present results from a study that utilized cage-deployed fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) at 18 sites across the Great Lakes basin. They measured water temperature and contaminant concentrations in water samples (132 contaminants targeted, 86 detected) and used 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure endogenous metabolites in polar extracts of livers. They used partial least-squares regression to compare relative abundances of endogenous metabolites with contaminant concentrations and temperature. The results indicated that profiles of endogenous polar metabolites covaried with at most 49 contaminants. The authors identified up to 52% of detected contaminants as not significantly covarying with changes in endogenous metabolites, suggesting they likely were not eliciting measurable impacts at these sites. This represents a first step in screening for the biological relevance of detected contaminants by shortening lists of contaminants potentially affecting these sites. Such information may allow risk assessors to prioritize contaminants and focus toxicity testing on the most biologically relevant contaminants. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2493–2502.

  1. Using different assumptions of aerosol mixing state and chemical composition to predict CCN concentrations based on field measurements in urban Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jingye; Zhang, Fang; Wang, Yuying; Collins, Don; Fan, Xinxin; Jin, Xiaoai; Xu, Weiqi; Sun, Yele; Cribb, Maureen; Li, Zhanqing

    2018-05-01

    Understanding the impacts of aerosol chemical composition and mixing state on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity in polluted areas is crucial for accurately predicting CCN number concentrations (NCCN). In this study, we predict NCCN under five assumed schemes of aerosol chemical composition and mixing state based on field measurements in Beijing during the winter of 2016. Our results show that the best closure is achieved with the assumption of size dependent chemical composition for which sulfate, nitrate, secondary organic aerosols, and aged black carbon are internally mixed with each other but externally mixed with primary organic aerosol and fresh black carbon (external-internal size-resolved, abbreviated as EI-SR scheme). The resulting ratios of predicted-to-measured NCCN (RCCN_p/m) were 0.90 - 0.98 under both clean and polluted conditions. Assumption of an internal mixture and bulk chemical composition (INT-BK scheme) shows good closure with RCCN_p/m of 1.0 -1.16 under clean conditions, implying that it is adequate for CCN prediction in continental clean regions. On polluted days, assuming the aerosol is internally mixed and has a chemical composition that is size dependent (INT-SR scheme) achieves better closure than the INT-BK scheme due to the heterogeneity and variation in particle composition at different sizes. The improved closure achieved using the EI-SR and INT-SR assumptions highlight the importance of measuring size-resolved chemical composition for CCN predictions in polluted regions. NCCN is significantly underestimated (with RCCN_p/m of 0.66 - 0.75) when using the schemes of external mixtures with bulk (EXT-BK scheme) or size-resolved composition (EXT-SR scheme), implying that primary particles experience rapid aging and physical mixing processes in urban Beijing. However, our results show that the aerosol mixing state plays a minor role in CCN prediction when the κorg exceeds 0.1.

  2. Effect of oxygen plasma on field emission characteristics of single-wall carbon nanotubes grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Avshish; Parveen, Shama; Husain, Samina; Ali, Javid; Zulfequar, Mohammad [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), New Delhi 110025 (India); Harsh [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India); Husain, Mushahid, E-mail: mush-reslab@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), New Delhi 110025 (India); Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India)

    2014-02-28

    Field emission properties of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) grown on iron catalyst film by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system were studied in diode configuration. The results were analysed in the framework of Fowler-Nordheim theory. The grown SWCNTs were found to be excellent field emitters, having emission current density higher than 20 mA/cm{sup 2} at a turn-on field of 1.3 V/μm. The as grown SWCNTs were further treated with Oxygen (O{sub 2}) plasma for 5 min and again field emission characteristics were measured. The O{sub 2} plasma treated SWCNTs have shown dramatic improvement in their field emission properties with emission current density of 111 mA/cm{sup 2} at a much lower turn on field of 0.8 V/μm. The as grown as well as plasma treated SWCNTs were also characterized by various techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy before and after O{sub 2} plasma treatment and the findings are being reported in this paper.

  3. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy - An emerging chemical sensor technology for real-time field-portable, geochemical, mineralogical, and environmental applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, Russell S.; DeLucia, Frank C.; McManus, Catherine E.; McMillan, Nancy J.; Jenkins, Thomas F.; Walsh, Marianne E.; Miziolek, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a simple spark spectrochemical sensor technology in which a laser beam is directed at a sample surface to create a high-temperature microplasma and a detector used to collect the spectrum of light emission and record its intensity at specific wavelengths. LIBS is an emerging chemical sensor technology undergoing rapid advancement in instrumentation capability and in areas of application. Attributes of a LIBS sensor system include: (i) small size and weight; (ii) technologically mature, inherently rugged, and affordable components; (iii) real-time response; (iv) in situ analysis with no sample preparation required; (v) a high sensitivity to low atomic weight elements which are difficult to determine by other field-portable sensor techniques, and (vi) point sensing or standoff detection. Recent developments in broadband LIBS provide the capability for detection at very high resolution (0.1 nm) of all elements in any unknown target material because all chemical elements emit in the 200-980 nm spectral region. This progress portends a unique potential for the development of a rugged and reliable field-portable chemical sensor that has the potential to be utilized in variety of geochemical, mineralogical, and environmental applications

  4. Waveguide analysis of heat-drawn and chemically etched probe tips for scanning near-field optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moar, Peter N; Love, John D; Ladouceur, François; Cahill, Laurence W

    2006-09-01

    We analyze two basic aspects of a scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) probe's operation: (i) spot-size evolution of the electric field along the probe with and without a metal layer, and (ii) a modal analysis of the SNOM probe, particularly in close proximity to the aperture. A slab waveguide model is utilized to minimize the analytical complexity, yet provides useful quantitative results--including losses associated with the metal coating--which can then be used as design rules.

  5. Chemical radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, G.

    1979-01-01

    A reivew of the problems and progress in the field of chemical radioprotection is given. After defining the field of research, the practical significance of radioprotective substances and the requirements for a utilizable radioprotective preparation are presented. Trends of development of this field of research, the state of the art, and resulting conclusions for the future development of radioprotective substances of practical value are discussed. (author)

  6. Conceptual Framework To Extend Life Cycle Assessment Using Near-Field Human Exposure Modeling and High-Throughput Tools for Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csiszar, Susan A; Meyer, David E; Dionisio, Kathie L; Egeghy, Peter; Isaacs, Kristin K; Price, Paul S; Scanlon, Kelly A; Tan, Yu-Mei; Thomas, Kent; Vallero, Daniel; Bare, Jane C

    2016-11-01

    Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a decision-making tool that accounts for multiple impacts across the life cycle of a product or service. This paper presents a conceptual framework to integrate human health impact assessment with risk screening approaches to extend LCA to include near-field chemical sources (e.g., those originating from consumer products and building materials) that have traditionally been excluded from LCA. A new generation of rapid human exposure modeling and high-throughput toxicity testing is transforming chemical risk prioritization and provides an opportunity for integration of screening-level risk assessment (RA) with LCA. The combined LCA and RA approach considers environmental impacts of products alongside risks to human health, which is consistent with regulatory frameworks addressing RA within a sustainability mindset. A case study is presented to juxtapose LCA and risk screening approaches for a chemical used in a consumer product. The case study demonstrates how these new risk screening tools can be used to inform toxicity impact estimates in LCA and highlights needs for future research. The framework provides a basis for developing tools and methods to support decision making on the use of chemicals in products.

  7. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES IN RELATION WITH SOIL PERMEABILITY IN THE AREA OF VELIKA GORICA WELL FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Kovač

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic parameters affects behaviour of various ions in soils. The goal of this paper was to get better understanding of relationship between physical and chemical properties and soil permeability at the location of case study profile Velika Gorica, based on the physical and chemical data. Soil profile is situated in the Eutric Cambisol of the Zagreb aquifer, Croatia. Zagreb aquifer represents the only source of potable water for inhabitants of the City of Zagreb and Zagreb County. Based on the data obtained from particle size analysis, soil hydraulic parameters and measured water content, unsaturated hydraulic conductivity values were calculated for the estimation of soil profile permeability. Soil water retention curves and unsaturated hydraulic conductivities are very similar for all depths because soil content does not change significantly through the depth. Determination of anions and cations on soil samples was performed using the method of ion chromatography. Results showed decrease of ions concentrations after 0.6 m depth. SAR distribution in the soil profile shows that SAR values are not significantly changing at the soil profile. The highest CEC and EC values are determined in horizon Bw developed in 0.6 m depth which is consistent with highest SAR value and ions concentrations. All results suggest that physical and chemical properties of investigated profile are in relationship with soil permeability.

  8. Early perception of stink bug damage in developing seeds of field-grown soybean induces chemical defences and reduces bug attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacometti, Romina; Barneto, Jesica; Barriga, Lucia G; Sardoy, Pedro M; Balestrasse, Karina; Andrade, Andrea M; Pagano, Eduardo A; Alemano, Sergio G; Zavala, Jorge A

    2016-08-01

    Southern green stink bugs (Nezara viridula L.) invade field-grown soybean crops, where they feed on developing seeds and inject phytotoxic saliva, which causes yield reduction. Although leaf responses to herbivory are well studied, no information is available about the regulation of defences in seeds. This study demonstrated that mitogen-activated protein kinases MPK3, MPK4 and MPK6 are expressed and activated in developing seeds of field-grown soybean and regulate a defensive response after stink bug damage. Although 10-20 min after stink bug feeding on seeds induced the expression of MPK3, MPK6 and MPK4, only MPK6 was phosphorylated after damage. Herbivory induced an early peak of jasmonic acid (JA) accumulation and ethylene (ET) emission after 3 h in developing seeds, whereas salicylic acid (SA) was also induced early, and at increasing levels up to 72 h after damage. Damaged seeds upregulated defensive genes typically modulated by JA/ET or SA, which in turn reduced the activity of digestive enzymes in the gut of stink bugs. Induced seeds were less preferred by stink bugs. This study shows that stink bug damage induces seed defences, which is perceived early by MPKs that may activate defence metabolic pathways in developing seeds of field-grown soybean. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Analysis of the mechanical behavior of single wall carbon nanotubes by a modified molecular structural mechanics model incorporating an advanced chemical force field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Oliver; Wallmersperger, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    The outstanding properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) keep attracting the attention of researchers from different fields. CNTs are promising candidates for applications e.g. in lightweight construction but also in electronics, medicine and many more. The basis for the realization of the manifold applications is a detailed knowledge of the material properties of the carbon nanotubes. In particular for applications in lightweight constructions or in composites, the knowledge of the mechanical behavior of the CNTs is of vital interest. Hence, a lot of effort is put into the experimental and theoretical determination of the mechanical material properties of CNTs. Due to their small size, special techniques have to be applied. In this research, a modified molecular structural mechanics model for the numerical determination of the mechanical behavior of carbon nanotubes is presented. It uses an advanced approach for the geometrical representation of the CNT structure while the covalent bonds in the CNTs are represented by beam elements. Furthermore, the model is specifically designed to overcome major drawbacks in existing molecular structural mechanics models. This includes energetic consistency with the underlying chemical force field. The model is developed further to enable the application of a more advanced chemical force field representation. The developed model is able to predict, inter alia, the lateral and radial stiffness properties of the CNTs. The results for the lateral stiffness are given and discussed in order to emphasize the progress made with the presented approach.

  10. Comparative Mapping of Soil Physical-Chemical and Structural Parameters at Field Scale to Identify Zones of Enhanced Leaching Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Trine; Møldrup, Per; Olsen, Preben

    2013-01-01

    Preferential flow and particle-facilitated transport through macropores contributes significantly to the transport of strongly sorbing substances such as pesticides and phosphorus. The aim of this study was to perform a field-scale characterization of basic soil physical properties like clay...... and organic carbon content and investigate whether it was possible to relate these to derived structural parameters such as bulk density and conservative tracer parameters and to actual particle and phosphorus leaching patterns obtained from laboratory leaching experiments. Sixty-five cylindrical soil columns...... of 20 cm height and 20 cm diameter and bulk soil were sampled from the topsoil in a 15 m  15 m grid in an agricultural loamy field. Highest clay contents and highest bulk densities were found in the northern part of the field. Leaching experiments with a conservative tracer showed fast 5% tracer...

  11. Evaluating model performance of an ensemble-based chemical data assimilation system during INTEX-B field mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Arellano Jr.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a global chemical data assimilation system using a global atmosphere model, the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM3 with simplified chemistry and the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART assimilation package. DART is a community software facility for assimilation studies using the ensemble Kalman filter approach. Here, we apply the assimilation system to constrain global tropospheric carbon monoxide (CO by assimilating meteorological observations of temperature and horizontal wind velocity and satellite CO retrievals from the Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT satellite instrument. We verify the system performance using independent CO observations taken on board the NSF/NCAR C-130 and NASA DC-8 aircrafts during the April 2006 part of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment (INTEX-B. Our evaluations show that MOPITT data assimilation provides significant improvements in terms of capturing the observed CO variability relative to no MOPITT assimilation (i.e. the correlation improves from 0.62 to 0.71, significant at 99% confidence. The assimilation provides evidence of median CO loading of about 150 ppbv at 700 hPa over the NE Pacific during April 2006. This is marginally higher than the modeled CO with no MOPITT assimilation (~140 ppbv. Our ensemble-based estimates of model uncertainty also show model overprediction over the source region (i.e. China and underprediction over the NE Pacific, suggesting model errors that cannot be readily explained by emissions alone. These results have important implications for improving regional chemical forecasts and for inverse modeling of CO sources and further demonstrate the utility of the assimilation system in comparing non-coincident measurements, e.g. comparing satellite retrievals of CO with in-situ aircraft measurements.

  12. Enhanced and uniform in-field performance in long (Gd, Y)-Ba-Cu-O tapes with zirconium doping fabricated by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvamanickam, V; Guevara, A; Zhang, Y; Kesgin, I; Xie, Y; Carota, G; Chen, Y; Dackow, J; Zhang, Y; Zuev, Y; Cantoni, C; Goyal, A; Coulter, J; Civale, L

    2010-01-01

    The influence of Zr doping in (Gd, Y)-Ba-Cu-O ((Gd, Y)BCO) tapes made by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition has been studied with a specific objective of uniform and reproducible enhancement in in-field critical current (I c ) over long lengths. 50 m long tapes with 7.5 and 10 at.% Zr doping in 1 μm thick (Gd, Y)BCO films have been found to exhibit a sharply enhanced peak in I c in the orientation of field parallel to the c-axis and retain 28% of their self-field I c value at 77 K and 1 T. BaZrO 3 (BZO) nanocolumn density in the cross-sectional microstructure was found to increase with increasing Zr addition. The end segments of the 50 m long tapes were found to display nearly identical angular dependence of critical current at 77 K and 1 T, indicative of the uniformity in in-field performance over this length. A 610 m long tape was fabricated with 10% Zr doping and a 130 m segment showed a 3.2% uniformity in critical current measured every meter in the orientation of B || c-axis. A retention factor of 36% of the zero-field I c value measured at 0.52 T over the 130 m is consistent with that obtained in short samples.

  13. Enhanced and uniform in-field performance in long (Gd, Y)-Ba-Cu-O tapes with zirconium doping fabricated by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvamanickam, V; Guevara, A; Zhang, Y; Kesgin, I [Texas Center for Superconductivity and Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77059 (United States); Xie, Y; Carota, G; Chen, Y; Dackow, J [SuperPower Incorporated, 450 Duane Avenue Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States); Zhang, Y; Zuev, Y; Cantoni, C; Goyal, A [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Coulter, J; Civale, L [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    The influence of Zr doping in (Gd, Y)-Ba-Cu-O ((Gd, Y)BCO) tapes made by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition has been studied with a specific objective of uniform and reproducible enhancement in in-field critical current (I{sub c}) over long lengths. 50 m long tapes with 7.5 and 10 at.% Zr doping in 1 {mu}m thick (Gd, Y)BCO films have been found to exhibit a sharply enhanced peak in I{sub c} in the orientation of field parallel to the c-axis and retain 28% of their self-field I{sub c} value at 77 K and 1 T. BaZrO{sub 3} (BZO) nanocolumn density in the cross-sectional microstructure was found to increase with increasing Zr addition. The end segments of the 50 m long tapes were found to display nearly identical angular dependence of critical current at 77 K and 1 T, indicative of the uniformity in in-field performance over this length. A 610 m long tape was fabricated with 10% Zr doping and a 130 m segment showed a 3.2% uniformity in critical current measured every meter in the orientation of B || c-axis. A retention factor of 36% of the zero-field I{sub c} value measured at 0.52 T over the 130 m is consistent with that obtained in short samples.

  14. Enhanced and Uniform in-Field Performance in Long (Gd,Y)-Ba-Cu-O Tapes with Zirconium Doping Fabricated by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvamanickam, V. [SuperPower Incorporated, Schenectady, New York; Guevara, A. [University of Houston, Houston; Zhang, Y. [University of Houston, Houston; Kesign, I. [University of Houston, Houston; Xie, Y. Y. [SuperPower Incorporated, Schenectady, New York; Carota, G. [SuperPower Incorporated, Schenectady, New York; Chen, Y. [SuperPower Incorporated, Schenectady, New York; Dackow, J. [SuperPower Incorporated, Schenectady, New York; Zhang, Yifei [ORNL; Zuev, Yuri L [ORNL; Cantoni, Claudia [ORNL; Goyal, Amit [ORNL; Coulter, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Civale, L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2010-01-01

    The influence of Zr doping in (Gd, Y)-Ba-Cu-O ((Gd, Y)BCO) tapes made by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition has been studied with a specific objective of uniform and reproducible enhancement in in-field critical current (I{sub c}) over long lengths. 50 m long tapes with 7.5 and 10 at.% Zr doping in 1 {mu}m thick (Gd, Y)BCO films have been found to exhibit a sharply enhanced peak in I{sub c} in the orientation of field parallel to the c-axis and retain 28% of their self-field I{sub c} value at 77 K and 1 T. BaZrO{sub 3} (BZO) nanocolumn density in the cross-sectional microstructure was found to increase with increasing Zr addition. The end segments of the 50 m long tapes were found to display nearly identical angular dependence of critical current at 77 K and 1 T, indicative of the uniformity in in-field performance over this length. A 610 m long tape was fabricated with 10% Zr doping and a 130 m segment showed a 3.2% uniformity in critical current measured every meter in the orientation of {beta} {parallel} c-axis. A retention factor of 36% of the zero-field I{sub c} value measured at 0.52 T over the 130 m is consistent with that obtained in short samples.

  15. ZnO nanorod arrays prepared by chemical bath deposition combined with rapid thermal annealing: structural, photoluminescence and field emission characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hung-Wei; He, Hsin-Min; Lee, Yi-Mu; Yang, Hsi-Wen

    2016-01-01

    ZnO nanorod arrays were prepared by low temperature chemical bath deposition (CBD) combined with rapid thermal annealing (RTA) under different ambient conditions. The structure and morphology of the synthesized ZnO have been characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The obtained ZnO samples are highly crystalline with a hexagonal wurtzite phase and also display well-aligned array structure. A pronounced effect on increased nanorod length was found for the RTA-treated ZnO as compared to the as-grown ZnO. Analysis of XRD indicates that the (0 0 2) feature peak of the as-grown ZnO was shifted towards a lower angle as compared to the peaks of RTA-treated ZnO samples due to the reduction of tensile strain along the c-axis by RTA. Photoluminescence (PL) studies reveal that the ZnO nanorod arrays receiving RTA in an O 2 environment have the sharpest UV emission band and greatest intensity ratio of near band-edge emission (NBE) to deep level emission (DLE). Additionally, the effects of RTA on the field emission properties were evaluated. The results demonstrate that RTA an O 2 environment can lower the turn-on field and improve the field enhancement factor. The stability of the field emission current was also tested for 4 h. (paper)

  16. A randomised, placebo-controlled trial of transcranial pulsed electromagnetic fields in patients with multiple chemical sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Marie Thi Dao; Skovbjerg, Sine; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    was the Life Impact Scale (LIS) of the Quick Environmental Exposure and Sensitivity Inventory (QEESI). Secondary outcomes were the Symptom Severity Scale (SSS) and the Chemical Intolerance Scale of QEESI. RESULTS: A total of 39 participants were randomised to PEMF or placebo treatment. No significant...... difference was observed on QEESI LIS between groups with a mean change score of -5.9 in the PEMF group compared with -1.5 in the placebo group (p=0.35, effect size=-0.31). However, a significant decrease was detected on QEESI SSS within and between groups with a mean change score of -11.3 in the PEMF group...

  17. Chemical research projects office functions accomplishments programs. [applied research in the fields of polymer chemistry and polymeric composites with emphasis on fire safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimbuch, A. H.; Parker, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Basic and applied research in the fields of polymer chemistry, polymeric composites, chemical engineering, and biophysical chemistry is summarized. Emphasis is placed on fire safety and human survivability as they relate to commercial and military aircraft, high-rise buildings, mines and rapid transit transportation. Materials systems and other fire control systems developed for aerospace applications and applied to national domestic needs are described along with bench-scale and full-scale tests conducted to demonstrate the improvements in performance obtained through the utilization of these materials and fire control measures.

  18. The summertime Boreal forest field measurement intensive (HUMPPA-COPEC-2010): an overview of meteorological and chemical influences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, J.; Crowley, J.; Fischer, H.; Harder, H.; Martinez, M.; Ouwersloot, H.G.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Lelieveld, J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the background, instrumentation, goals, and the regional influences on the HUMPPACOPEC intensive field measurement campaign, conducted at the Boreal forest research station SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relation) in Hyyti¨al¨a, Finland from 12 July–12

  19. Infection Density Dynamics of the Citrus Greening Bacterium "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" in Field Populations of the Psyllid Diaphorina citri and Its Relevance to the Efficiency of Pathogen Transmission to Citrus Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukuda-Hosokawa, Rie; Sadoyama, Yasutsune; Kishaba, Misaki; Kuriwada, Takashi; Anbutsu, Hisashi; Fukatsu, Takema

    2015-06-01

    Huanglongbing, or citrus greening, is a devastating disease of citrus plants recently spreading worldwide, which is caused by an uncultivable bacterial pathogen, "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus," and vectored by a phloem-sucking insect, Diaphorina citri. We investigated the infection density dynamics of "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus" in field populations of D. citri with experiments using field-collected insects to address how "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus" infection density in the vector insect is relevant to pathogen transmission to citrus plants. Of 500 insects continuously collected from "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus"-infected citrus trees with pathological symptoms in the spring and autumn of 2009, 497 (99.4%) were "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus" positive. The infections were systemic across head-thorax and abdomen, ranging from 10(3) to 10(7) bacteria per insect. In spring, the infection densities were low in March, at ∼ 10(3) bacteria per insect, increasing up to 10(6) to 10(7) bacteria per insect in April and May, and decreasing to 10(5) to 10(6) bacteria per insect in late May, whereas the infection densities were constantly ∼ 10(6) to 10(7) bacteria per insect in autumn. Statistical analysis suggested that several factors, such as insect sex, host trees, and collection dates, may be correlated with "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus" infection densities in field D. citri populations. Inoculation experiments with citrus seedlings using field-collected "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus"-infected insects suggested that (i) "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus"-transmitting insects tend to exhibit higher infection densities than do nontransmitting insects, (ii) a threshold level (∼ 10(6) bacteria per insect) of "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus" density in D. citri is required for successful transmission to citrus plants, and (iii) D. citri attaining the threshold infection level transmits "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus" to citrus plants in a stochastic manner. These findings provide

  20. Dissipative charged fluid in a magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, Navid; Davody, Ali, E-mail: davody.phy@gmail.com

    2016-05-10

    We study the collective excitations in a dissipative charged fluid at zero chemical potential when an external magnetic field is present. While in the absence of magnetic field, four collective excitations appear in the fluid, we find five hydrodynamic modes here. This implies that the magnetic field splits the degeneracy between the transverse shear modes. Using linear response theory, we then compute the retarded response functions. In particular, it turns out that the correlation between charge and the energy fluctuations will no longer vanish, even at zero chemical potential. By use of the response functions, we also derive the relevant Kubo formulas for the transport coefficients.

  1. Field application of the Numobag as a portable disposable isolation unit and for treating chemical, radiological or biologically induced wounds.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Keith A.; Felton, Robert; Vaughan, Courtenay Thomas

    2005-04-01

    Numotech Inc. has developed the Numobag{trademark}, a disposable, lightweight, wound healing device which produces Topical Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (THOT). The Numobag{trademark} is cost effective and has been clinically validated to heal large skin lesions rapidly and has proven to arrest wound advancement from several insidious forms of biological attack including dermal anthrax, small pox, necrotizing fasciitis etc. The Numobag{trademark} can treat mass casualties wounded by chemical/radiological burns or damaging biological exposures. The Numobag{trademark} can be a frontline tool as an isolation unit, reducing cross-contamination and infection of medical personnel. The heightened oxygen content kills organisms on the skin and in the wound, avoids expensive hospital trash disposal procedures, and helps the flesh heal. The Numobag{trademark} requires high purity oxygen. Numotech Inc. is teaming with Sandia National Laboratories and Spektr Conversion in Russia to develop a cost effective, portable, low power oxygen generator.

  2. Change of physical and chemical composition of soil washing out during vegetation season from differently used fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryła, A.; Pierzgalski, E.; Karczmarczyk, A.

    2009-04-01

    oil losses due to water erosion not only decrease of soil fertility but also influence on pollution of water bodies. One of the method for limitation of water erosion process is protected soil management and choose suitable plants which requires knowledge about effect and mechanism of erosion under different environmental conditions. The results of measurements of quantity and quality of soil losses from three experimental plots are given in the article. Plots were located in Experimental Agricultural Station Puczniew in central part of Poland. Surface soil layer on the plots had mechanical composition of medium loam soil. On two plots grass and barley were planted. Third plot was used as fallow and tilled land. Measurements were carried out four times in the period May-October 2007. Physical and chemical composition of washed soil material was analyzed.

  3. Studying the synergistic damage effects induced by 1.8 GHz radiofrequency field radiation (RFR) with four chemical mutagens on human lymphocyte DNA using comet assay in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Baohong; He Jiliang; Jin Lifen; Lu Deqiang; Zheng Wei; Lou Jianlin; Deng Hongping

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study the synergistic DNA damage effects in human lymphocytes induced by 1.8 GHz radiofrequency field radiation (RFR, SAR of 3 W/kg) with four chemical mutagens, i.e. mitomycin C (MMC, DNA crosslinker), bleomycin (BLM, radiomimetic agent), methyl methanesulfonate (MMS, alkylating agent), and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO, UV-mimetic agent). The DNA damage of lymphocytes exposed to RFR and/or with chemical mutagens was detected at two incubation time (0 or 21 h) after treatment with comet assay in vitro. Three combinative exposure ways were used. Cells were exposed to RFR and chemical mutagens for 2 and 3 h, respectively. Tail length (TL) and tail moment (TM) were utilized as DNA damage indexes. The results showed no difference of DNA damage indexes between RFR group and control group at 0 and 21 h incubation after exposure (P > 0.05). There were significant difference of DNA damage indexes between MMC group and RFR + MMC co-exposure group at 0 and 21 h incubation after treatment (P 0.05). The experimental results indicated 1.8 GHz RFR (SAR, 3 W/kg) for 2 h did not induce the human lymphocyte DNA damage effects in vitro, but could enhance the human lymphocyte DNA damage effects induced by MMC and 4NQO. The synergistic DNA damage effects of 1.8 GHz RFR with BLM or MMS were not obvious

  4. Double agents and secret agents: the emerging fields of exogenous chemical exchange saturation transfer and T2-exchange magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryaei, Iman; Pagel, Mark D

    2015-01-01

    Two relatively new types of exogenous magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents may provide greater impact for molecular imaging by providing greater specificity for detecting molecular imaging biomarkers. Exogenous chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) agents rely on the selective saturation of the magnetization of a proton on an agent, followed by chemical exchange of a proton from the agent to water. The selective detection of a biomarker-responsive CEST signal and an unresponsive CEST signal, followed by the ratiometric comparison of these signals, can improve biomarker specificity. We refer to this improvement as a "double-agent" approach to molecular imaging. Exogenous T 2 -exchange agents also rely on chemical exchange of protons between the agent and water, especially with an intermediate rate that lies between the slow exchange rates of CEST agents and the fast exchange rates of traditional T 1 and T 2 agents. Because of this intermediate exchange rate, these agents have been relatively unknown and have acted as "secret agents" in the contrast agent research field. This review exposes these secret agents and describes the merits of double agents through examples of exogenous agents that detect enzyme activity, nucleic acids and gene expression, metabolites, ions, redox state, temperature, and pH. Future directions are also provided for improving both types of contrast agents for improved molecular imaging and clinical translation. Therefore, this review provides an overview of two new types of exogenous contrast agents that are becoming useful tools within the armamentarium of molecular imaging.

  5. 1H NMR spectra. Part 30(+): 1H chemical shifts in amides and the magnetic anisotropy, electric field and steric effects of the amide group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Raymond J; Griffiths, Lee; Perez, Manuel

    2013-03-01

    The (1)H spectra of 37 amides in CDCl(3) solvent were analysed and the chemical shifts obtained. The molecular geometries and conformational analysis of these amides were considered in detail. The NMR spectral assignments are of interest, e.g. the assignments of the formamide NH(2) protons reverse in going from CDCl(3) to more polar solvents. The substituent chemical shifts of the amide group in both aliphatic and aromatic amides were analysed using an approach based on neural network data for near (≤3 bonds removed) protons and the electric field, magnetic anisotropy, steric and for aromatic systems π effects of the amide group for more distant protons. The electric field is calculated from the partial atomic charges on the N.C═O atoms of the amide group. The magnetic anisotropy of the carbonyl group was reproduced with the asymmetric magnetic anisotropy acting at the midpoint of the carbonyl bond. The values of the anisotropies Δχ(parl) and Δχ(perp) were for the aliphatic amides 10.53 and -23.67 (×10(-6) Å(3)/molecule) and for the aromatic amides 2.12 and -10.43 (×10(-6) Å(3)/molecule). The nitrogen anisotropy was 7.62 (×10(-6) Å(3)/molecule). These values are compared with previous literature values. The (1)H chemical shifts were calculated from the semi-empirical approach and also by gauge-independent atomic orbital calculations with the density functional theory method and B3LYP/6-31G(++) (d,p) basis set. The semi-empirical approach gave good agreement with root mean square error of 0.081 ppm for the data set of 280 entries. The gauge-independent atomic orbital approach was generally acceptable, but significant errors (ca. 1 ppm) were found for the NH and CHO protons and also for some other protons. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Transcranial pulsed electromagnetic fields for multiple chemical sensitivity: Study protocol for a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Marie Thi Dao; Skovbjerg, Sine; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    . The symptoms may have severe impact on patients' lives, but an evidence-based treatment for the condition is nonexisting. The pathophysiology is unclarified, but several indicators point towards abnormal processing of sensory signals in the central nervous system. Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) offer...... follow-up according to a predefined timetable. The primary outcome will be a measurement of the impact of MCS on everyday life. The secondary outcomes will be measurements of MCS symptoms, psychological distress (stress, anxiety or depressive symptoms), capsaicin-induced secondary punctate hyperalgesia...

  7. Radiological and chemical studies of the ground water at Enewetak Atoll. 1. Sampling, field measurements, and analytical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, K.V.; Wong, K.M.; Holladay, G.; Noshkin, V.E.; Buddemeier, R.

    1975-01-01

    A research program to study the ground water on several of the islets in the Enewetak Atoll is being conducted jointly by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and the University of Hawaii under the sponsorship of ERDA Division of Biology and Environmental Research. The purpose is to provide data characterizing the ground water for possible use by returning Marshallese and to investigate the hydrology and recycling of radionuclides in an atoll environment. This first of a series of reports describes the sampling locations, field operations, and methods of analysis

  8. Making Deferred Taxes Relevant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Arjan; Naarding, Ewout

    2018-01-01

    We analyse the conceptual problems in current accounting for deferred taxes and provide solutions derived from the literature in order to make International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) deferred tax numbers value-relevant. In our view, the empirical results concerning the value relevance of

  9. Parsimonious relevance models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meij, E.; Weerkamp, W.; Balog, K.; de Rijke, M.; Myang, S.-H.; Oard, D.W.; Sebastiani, F.; Chua, T.-S.; Leong, M.-K.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a method for applying parsimonious language models to re-estimate the term probabilities assigned by relevance models. We apply our method to six topic sets from test collections in five different genres. Our parsimonious relevance models (i) improve retrieval effectiveness in terms of

  10. Recent advancement on chemical arsenal of Bt toxin and its application in pest management system in agricultural field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Pritam; Banerjee, Goutam

    2018-04-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis ( Bt ) is a Gram-positive, spore-forming, soil bacterium, which is very popular bio-control agent in agricultural and forestry. In general, B. thuringiensis secretes an array of insecticidal proteins including toxins produced during vegetative growth phase (such as secreted insecticidal protein, Sip; vegetative insecticidal proteins, Vip), parasporal crystalline δ-endotoxins produced during vegetative stationary phase (such as cytolytic toxin, Cyt; and crystal toxin, Cry), and β-exotoxins. Till date, a wide spectrum of Cry proteins has been reported and most of them belong to three-domain-Cry toxins, Bin-like toxin, and Etx_Mtx2-like toxins. To the best of our knowledge, neither Bt insecticidal toxins are exclusive to Bt nor all the strains of Bt are capable of producing insecticidal Bt toxins. The lacuna in their latest classification has also been discussed. In this review, the updated information regarding the insecticidal Bt toxins and their different mode of actions were summarized. Before applying the Bt toxins on agricultural field, the non-specific effects of toxins should be investigated. We also have summarized the problem of insect resistance and the strategies to combat with this problem. We strongly believe that this information will help a lot to the budding researchers in the field of modern pest control biotechnology.

  11. Achievements and research programs of the Institute for Chemical Coal Processing in the field of conventional coking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cieslar, R.; Kaziszyn, I.; Zawistowksi, J.

    1986-11-01

    This paper describes research programs of the Institute for Chemical Coal Processing in Zabrze on black coal coking and coke use in metallurgy from 1955 to 1990. In 1955-1970 the programs concentrated on coal mixture composition (selective crushing), optimization of coking conditions, mechanical coke treatment. In 1971-1980 research concentrated on coal preparation prior to coking and new coking systems for the Katowice steel plant (heat treatments, design of large coke ovens). The following research programs were implemented in 1981-1985: partial coal charge briquetting, production of foundry coke, coal charge preheating, production of blast furnace coke from black coal from Dobiensko, reducing coke consumption of blast furnaces. In 1986-1990 the Institute will concentrate on the following research programs: coal preparation schemes and coking schemes for coking low-quality weakly caking coals, optimization of coke oven design (e.g. use of packed charge), reducing coke consumption in metallurgy and heating systems, reducing air pollution from coking.

  12. Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.H.; Li, L.; Zheng, L.; Houseworth, J.E.; Rutqvist, J.

    2011-01-01

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of radioactive waste. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA.

  13. Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H.H.; Li, L.; Zheng, L.; Houseworth, J.E.; Rutqvist, J.

    2011-06-20

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of radioactive waste. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA.

  14. Field-Effect Transistors Based on Networks of Highly Aligned, Chemically Synthesized N = 7 Armchair Graphene Nanoribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passi, Vikram; Gahoi, Amit; Senkovskiy, Boris V; Haberer, Danny; Fischer, Felix R; Grüneis, Alexander; Lemme, Max C

    2018-03-28

    We report on the experimental demonstration and electrical characterization of N = 7 armchair graphene nanoribbon (7-AGNR) field effect transistors. The back-gated transistors are fabricated from atomically precise and highly aligned 7-AGNRs, synthesized with a bottom-up approach. The large area transfer process holds the promise of scalable device fabrication with atomically precise nanoribbons. The channels of the FETs are approximately 30 times longer than the average nanoribbon length of 30 nm to 40 nm. The density of the GNRs is high, so that transport can be assumed well-above the percolation threshold. The long channel transistors exhibit a maximum I ON / I OFF current ratio of 87.5.

  15. Functional group analysis by H NMR/chemical derivatization for the characterization of organic aerosol from the SMOCC field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Tagliavini

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Water soluble organic compounds (WSOC in aerosol samples collected in the Amazon Basin in a period encompassing the middle/late dry season and the beginning of the wet season, were investigated by H NMR spectroscopy. HiVol filter samples (PM2.5 and PM>2.5 and size-segregated samples from multistage impactor were subjected to H NMR characterization. The H NMR methodology, recently developed for the analysis of organic aerosol samples, has been improved by exploiting chemical methylation of carboxylic groups with diazomethane, which allows the direct determination of the carboxylic acid content of WSOC. The content of carboxylic carbons for the different periods and sizes ranged from 12% to 20% of total measured carbon depending on the season and aerosol size, with higher contents for the fine particles in the transition and wet periods with respect to the dry period. A comprehensive picture is presented of WSOC functional groups in aerosol samples representative of the biomass burning period, as well as of transition and semi-clean atmospheric conditions. A difference in composition between fine (PM2.5 and coarse (PM>2.5 size fractions emerged from the NMR data, the former showing higher alkylic content, the latter being largely dominated by R-O-H (or R-O-R' functional groups. Very small particles (<0.14 μm, however, present higher alkyl-chain content and less oxygenated carbons than larger fine particles (0.42–1.2 μm. More limited variations were found between the average compositions in the different periods of the campaign.

  16. The chemical link Brazil/Portugal. Abstracts of the 23. annual meeting of the Brazilian Chemical Society. v. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This volume 3 is part of the 23. annual meeting of the Brazilian Chemical Society, and contains subjects about new technologies in the field of relevance for nuclear interest, including environmental aspects, analytical chemistry and electrochemistry. The chemistry of elements of nuclear interest has been presented. Studies about materials, as alloys, composites, ceramics, and other materials, including their preparation, physical-chemical properties, structure studies, if they are associated to the nuclear area, has been comprehended

  17. Study on recent research trends in the chemical fields; Kagaku bun`ya ni okeru saikin no kenkyu doko ni kansuru chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This research is conducted to search study themes of chemistry expected towards the 21st century. The complex compound in the fundamental chemistry field and the bio-medical materials in the applied chemistry field are taken up. Bio-medical materials are used for the restoration, rehabilitation, and treatment of the organ and the improvement of its functions. For implants such as hearts, anti-thrombin and anti-calcium precipitation effects and high endurance are required. In this field, special copolymers and bio-membrane-emulating surfaces are studied. For artificial organs, hybrid type materials combining cells, and physiologically active and artificial materials are also studied. There are studies on the missile therapy of drugs and DDS (drug delivery system). The complex compounds contain metallic elements, such as Fe, Mn, Co and Cu, and groups known as ligands which combine these metal elements. They can have a variety of stereo-structures and physical properties. They also exhibit a diversity of functions including electron donor bonding, molecular recognition, chemical substitution, and pharmaceutical activity. These features open up a promising potential for their prospective use as physiologically active substances, cancerostats, new materials, artificial photosynthesis, memory elements, and complex catalysts. 88 refs., 35 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15: Hydroxyl Radical (OH) Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Saewung [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The University of California, Irvine, science team (Dr. Saewung Kim, Dr. Roger Seco, Dr. Alex Guenther, and Dr. Jim Smith) deployed a chemical ionization mass spectrometer system for hydroxyl radical (OH) and sulfuric acid quantifications. As part of the GoAmazon 2014/15 field campaign. Hydroxyl radical determines tropospheric oxidation capacity and had been expected to be very low in the pristine rain forest region such as the Brazilian Amazon because of the presence of significant levels of highly reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds and very low levels of NO, which is an OH recycling agent. However, several recent in situ OH observations provided by a laser-induced fluorescence system reported unaccountably high OH concentrations. To address this discrepancy, a series of laboratory and theoretical studies has postulated chemical reaction mechanisms of isoprene that may regenerate OH in photo-oxidation processes. Along with these efforts, potential artifacts on the laser induced fluorescence system from isoprene and its oxidation products also have been explored. Therefore, the first chemical ionization mass spectrometer observations at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s T3 site in Manacapuru, Brazil, are expected to provide a critical experimental constraint to address uncertainty in constraining oxidation capacity over pristine rain forest environments. In addition, we deployed a National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer to characterize atmospheric volatile organic compound levels, especially isoprene and its oxidation products, which are critical input parameters for box modeling to simulate OH with different isoprene photo-oxidation schemes. As there has been no report on noticeable new particle formation events, our first in situ sulfuric acid observations in the Amazon rain forest were expected to constrain the

  19. Path to Impact for Autonomous Field Deployable Chemical Sensors: A Case Study of in Situ Nitrite Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierenbeck, Tim M; Smith, Matthew C

    2017-05-02

    Natural freshwater systems have been severely affected by excess loading of macronutrients (e.g., nitrogen and phosphorus) from fertilizers, fossil fuels, and human and livestock waste. In the USA, impacts to drinking water quality, biogeochemical cycles, and aquatic ecosystems are estimated to cost US$210 billion annually. Field-deployable nutrient sensors (FDS) offer potential to support research and resource management efforts by acquiring higher resolution data than are currently supported by expensive conventional sampling methods. Following nearly 40 years of research and development, FDS instruments are now starting to penetrate commercial markets. However, instrument uncertainty factors (high cost, reliability, accuracy, and precision) are key drivers impeding the uptake of FDS by the majority of users. Using nitrite sensors as a case study, we review the trends, opportunities, and challenges in producing and implementing FDS from a perspective of innovation and impact. We characterize the user community and consumer needs, identify trends in research approaches, tabulate state-of-the-art examples and specifications, and discuss data life cycle considerations. With further development of FDS through prototyping and testing in real-world applications, these tools can deliver information for protecting and restoring natural waters, enhancing process control for industrial operations and water treatment, and providing novel research insights.

  20. Influence of the physical–chemical properties of polyaniline thin films on the final sensitivity of varied field effect sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, Hugo José Nogueira Pedroza Dias; Heimfarth, Tobias; Mulato, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the use of electrodeposited polyaniline (PANI) thin sensing films in pH sensors. Two configurations of the Extended Gate Field Effect Transistor (EGFET) sensor were studied: the Single EGFET (S-EGFET) and the Instrumental Amplifier EGFET (IA-EGFET) setups. The films were analyzed in both systems and the sensitivity and linearity of each sensor were compared. Initial sensitivities (70–80 mV/pH) measured in the IA-EGFET were reduced due to polymer bulk protonation after a prior measurement in the S-EGFET system. Films with high amount of deposited polymer had their sensitivities least reduced. Bulk protonation occurred due to the step potential applied to the reference electrode in the S-EGFET system. These changes were also analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), visible reflectance spectroscopy and evaluation of CIE L*a*b* color scale. PANI pH EGFET sensors exhibited good linearity and stability that along with their high sensitivity, easy processing and low cost film production have large potential applications. - Highlights: • Electrodeposited polyaniline thin films were analyzed in two EGFET setups. • Polymer protonation provided changeable sensitivities. • Color and morphological variation confirm polymer aggregation and electrical changes

  1. Influence of the physical–chemical properties of polyaniline thin films on the final sensitivity of varied field effect sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, Hugo José Nogueira Pedroza Dias, E-mail: hugodiasmello@usp.br; Heimfarth, Tobias; Mulato, Marcelo

    2015-06-15

    We investigated the use of electrodeposited polyaniline (PANI) thin sensing films in pH sensors. Two configurations of the Extended Gate Field Effect Transistor (EGFET) sensor were studied: the Single EGFET (S-EGFET) and the Instrumental Amplifier EGFET (IA-EGFET) setups. The films were analyzed in both systems and the sensitivity and linearity of each sensor were compared. Initial sensitivities (70–80 mV/pH) measured in the IA-EGFET were reduced due to polymer bulk protonation after a prior measurement in the S-EGFET system. Films with high amount of deposited polymer had their sensitivities least reduced. Bulk protonation occurred due to the step potential applied to the reference electrode in the S-EGFET system. These changes were also analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), visible reflectance spectroscopy and evaluation of CIE L*a*b* color scale. PANI pH EGFET sensors exhibited good linearity and stability that along with their high sensitivity, easy processing and low cost film production have large potential applications. - Highlights: • Electrodeposited polyaniline thin films were analyzed in two EGFET setups. • Polymer protonation provided changeable sensitivities. • Color and morphological variation confirm polymer aggregation and electrical changes.

  2. Spatial Distribution of Field Physico-Chemical Parameters in the Vulcano Island (Italy Coastal Aquifer: Volcanological and Hydrogeological Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Madonia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Vulcano, the southernmost of the Aeolian island arc (Italy, is characterized by a shallow coastal aquifer resulting from the mixing of seawater, meteoric recharge and volcanogenic fluids. The aquifer has been intensively studied during the last decades, but a comprehensive hydrogeological model has never been developed due to the lack of direct information about the litho-stratigraphic columns of the wells and the depth of water bearing levels. We present and discuss here the time and spatial analysis of water table elevation, temperature and electric conductivity data, acquired during the last 20 years in 33 wells located at Vulcano Island, with the aim of developing a groundwater circulation scheme able to fit the field observations. We retrieved a circulation scheme characterized by an intricate geometry of flow paths driven by horizontal and vertical permeability variations, accounting for the strong variability of geochemical data evidenced in this area by the related scientific literature. Extending these results to a general context, particular care must be taken in approaching the study of aquifers in volcanic islands, because a strong, small spatial scale variability of the hydrogeochemical parameters is expected, and a reliable knowledge of the local conditions is required for developing successful groundwater circulation schemes.

  3. CBRN Weapons of Mass Destruction: The Relevance of the United States Armys Chemical Corps in the Support of Homeland Security and Defense against State and Non-State Actors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    unacceptable counteraction and-or belief that the cost of action outweighs the perceived benefits .15 Doctrine, Organization, Training, Material, Leadership...1346. In 1495, the Spanish drank wine infected by the French with leprosy patients’ blood. In 1650 Siemenowics, a Polish artillery general, put...that the Corps is ready for the present and future operational environment; giving a positive perception benefiting the Chemical Corps and its

  4. A comparative study of nitrogen plasma effect on field emission characteristics of single wall carbon nanotubes synthesized by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Avshish; Parveen, Shama; Husain, Samina; Ali, Javid [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), New Delhi 110025 (India); Zulfequar, Mohammad [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), New Delhi 110025 (India); Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), New Delhi 110025 (India); Harsh [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), New Delhi 110025 (India); Husain, Mushahid, E-mail: mush_reslab@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), New Delhi 110025 (India); Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), New Delhi 110025 (India)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been successfully grown on nickel (Ni) deposited silicon substrate. • The diameter distribution of the grown (SWCNTs) is in the range 1–2 nm. • A current density of 25.0 mA/cm{sup 2} at 1.9 V/μm of the grown SWCNTs is observed with a high turn-on field (E{sub to}) of 1.3 V/μm. • After N{sub 2} nitrogen plasma treatment, huge current density of 81.5 mA/cm{sup 2} at 2.0 V/μm was recorded with low E{sub to} of 1.2 V/μm. • The comparison of these two typical results indicates a drastic enhancement in the field emission properties after plasma treatments. - Abstract: Vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with large scale control of diameter, length and alignment have successfully been grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. The nickel (Ni) as catalyst deposited on silicon (Si) substrate was used to grow the SWCNTs. Field emission (FE) characteristics of the as grown SWCNTs were measured using indigenously designed setup in which a diode is configured in such a way that by applying negative voltage on the copper plate (cathode) with respect to stainless steel anode plate, current density can be recorded. To measure the FE characteristics, SWCNTs film pasted on the copper plate with silver epoxy was used as electron emitter source. The effective area of anode was ∼78.5 mm{sup 2} for field emission measurements. The emission measurements were carried out under high vacuum pressure of the order of 10{sup −6} Torr to minimize the electron scattering and degradation of the emitters. The distance between anode and cathode was kept 500 μm (constant) during entire field emission studies. The grown SWCNTs are excellent field emitters, having emission current density higher than 25 mA/cm{sup 2} at turn-on field 1.3 V/μm. In order to enhance the field emission characteristics, the as grown SWCNTs have been treated under nitrogen (N{sub 2

  5. Culturally Relevant Cyberbullying Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Gregory John

    2017-01-01

    In this action research study, I, along with a student intervention committee of 14 members, developed a cyberbullying intervention for a large urban high school on the west coast. This high school contained a predominantly African American student population. I aimed to discover culturally relevant cyberbullying prevention strategies for African American students. The intervention committee selected video safety messages featuring African American actors as the most culturally relevant cyber...

  6. Solar UV-B radiation modulates chemical defenses against Anticarsia gemmatalis larvae in leaves of field-grown soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Francisco M; Chludil, Hugo D; Zavala, Jorge A

    2017-09-01

    Although it is well known that solar ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation enhances plant defenses, there is less knowledge about traits that define insect resistance in field-grown soybean. Here we study the effects of solar UV-B radiation on: a) the induction of phenolic compounds and trypsin proteinase inhibitors (TPI) in soybean undamaged leaves or damaged by Anticarsia gemmatalis neonates during six days, and b) the survival and mass gain of A. gemmatalis larvae that fed on soybean foliage. Two soybean cultivars (cv.), Charata and Williams, were grown under plastic with different transmittance to solar UV-B radiation, which generated two treatments: ambient UV-B (UVB+) and reduced UV-B (UVB-) radiation. Solar UV-B radiation decreased survivorship by 30% and mass gain by 45% of larvae that fed on cv. Charata, but no effect was found in those larvae that fed on cv. Williams. TPI activity and malonyl genistin were induced by A. gemmatalis damage in both cultivars, but solar UV-B radiation and damage only synergistically increased the induction of these compounds in cv. Williams. Although TPI activity and genistein derivatives were induced by herbivory, these results did not explain the differences found in survivorship and mass gain of larvae that fed on cv. Charata. However, we found a positive association between lower larval performance and the presence of two quercetin triglycosides and a kaempferol triglycoside in foliage of cv. Charata, which were identified by HPLC-DAD/MS 2 . We conclude that exclusion of solar UV-B radiation reduce resistance to A. gemmatalis, due to a reduction in flavonol concentration in a cultivar that has low levels of genistein derivatives like cv. Charata. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Testing phenotypic trade-offs in the chemical defence strategy of Scots pine under growth-limiting field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villari, Caterina; Faccoli, Massimo; Battisti, Andrea; Bonello, Pierluigi; Marini, Lorenzo

    2014-09-01

    Plants protect themselves from pathogens and herbivores through fine-tuned resource allocation, including trade-offs among resource investments to support constitutive and inducible defences. However, empirical research, especially concerning conifers growing under natural conditions, is still scarce. We investigated the complexity of constitutive and induced defences in a natural Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stand under growth-limiting conditions typical of alpine environments. Phenotypic trade-offs at three hierarchical levels were tested by investigating the behaviour of phenolic compounds and terpenoids of outer bark and phloem. We tested resource-derived phenotypic correlations between (i) constitutive and inducible defences vs tree ring growth, (ii) different constitutive defence metabolites and (iii) constitutive concentration and inducible variation of individual metabolites. Tree ring growth was positively correlated only with constitutive concentration of total terpenoids, and no overall phenotypic trade-offs between different constitutive defensive metabolites were found. At the lowest hierarchical level tested, i.e., at the level of relationship between constitutive and inducible variation of individual metabolites, we found that different compounds displayed different behaviours; we identified five different defensive metabolite response types, based on direction and strength of the response, regardless of tree age and growth rate. Therefore, under growth-limiting field conditions, Scots pine appears to utilize varied and complex outer bark and phloem defence chemistry, in which only part of the constitutive specialized metabolism is influenced by tree growth, and individual components do not appear to be expressed in a mutually exclusive manner in either constitutive or inducible metabolism. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Effect of gamma rays and chemical mutagens on induction of polygenic variability in field bean (Dolichos lablab)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakanth, R.S.; Seetharam, A.; Patil, N.M.

    1977-01-01

    Polygenic variability induced for 3 quantitative characters viz., flowering time, seed yield and 100 grain weight was studied in one of the local varieties (L 1 ) following treatments with gamma rays, NMU and NMG in M 2 generation. In all there were 16 treatments, five each in gamma rays (10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 Krad), NMU(0.01, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04 and 0.05 percent) and NMG(0.002, 0.003, 0.004, 0.005 and 0.006 percent) and one control. A polygenic trail was laid out with all the 16 treatments in a randomised block deisgn with 4 replications. Mean and variance were calculated for all the 3 characters and the values were significantly different compared to control. Mean values were significantly higher than the control in several treatments for seed yield per plant and grain weight, besides flowering was also earlier in many treatments. Similarly variance was also found to be significantly higher in many treatments. Out of 15 treatments, 9 showed significantly higher variance value than control for seed yield and grain weight while 14 out of 15 treatments showed enlarged variance for flowering time. In case of gamma rays, variance was maximum at 30 Krad for seed yield and flowering time whereas for grain weight maximum variance was at 40 Krad. Among NMU treatments, maximum variance was induced at 0.04 and 0.05 percent treatments. With regard to NMG treatments 0.005 and 0.006 percent were the most effective. The results obtained in this study are suggestive of the fact that the field bean responds favourably for the induction of polyqenic variability. Since the induced variability is more towards the positive side there is a greater scope for selection and subsequent improvement of this crop species. (author)

  9. Characteristics of the NO-NO2-O3 system in different chemical regimes during the MIRAGE-Mex field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shon, Z.-H.; Madronich, S.; Song, S.-K.; Flocke, F. M.; Knapp, D. J.; Anderson, R. S.; Shetter, R. E.; Cantrell, C. A.; Hall, S. R.; Tie, X.

    2008-12-01

    The NO-NO2 system was analyzed in different chemical regimes/air masses based on observations of reactive nitrogen species and peroxy radicals made during the intensive field campaign MIRAGE-Mex (4 to 29 March 2006). The air masses were categorized into 5 groups based on combinations of macroscopic observations, geographical location, meteorological parameters, models, and observations of trace gases: boundary layer (labeled as "BL"), biomass burning ("BB"), free troposphere (continental, "FTCO" and marine, "FTMA"), and Tula industrial complex ("TIC"). In general, NO2/NO ratios in different air masses are near photostationary state. Analysis of this ratio can be useful for testing current understanding of tropospheric chemistry. The ozone production efficiency (OPE) for the 5 air mass categories ranged from 4.5 (TIC) to 8.5 (FTMA), consistent with photochemical aging of air masses exiting the Mexico City Metropolitan Area.

  10. Chemically reacting fluid flow induced by an exponentially accelerated infinite vertical plate in a magnetic field and variable temperature via LTT and FEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa Raju R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research paper, we found both numerical and analytical solutions for the effect of chemical reaction on unsteady, incompressible, viscous fluid flow past an exponentially accelerated vertical plate with heat absorption and variable temperature in a magnetic field. The flow problem is governed by a system of coupled non-linear partial differential equations with suitable boundary conditions. We have solved the governing equations by an efficient, accurate, powerful finite element method (FEM as well as Laplace transform technique (LTT. The evaluation of the numerical results are performed and graphical results for the velocity, temperature and concentration profiles within the boundary layer are discussed. Also, the expressions for the skin-friction, Nusselt number and the Sherwood number coefficients have been derived and discussed through graphs and tabular forms for different values of the governing parameters.

  11. Characteristics of the NO-NO2-O3 system in different chemical regimes during the MIRAGE-Mex field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Tie

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The NO-NO2 system was analyzed in different chemical regimes/air masses based on observations of reactive nitrogen species and peroxy radicals made during the intensive field campaign MIRAGE-Mex (4 to 29 March 2006. The air masses were categorized into 5 groups based on combinations of macroscopic observations, geographical location, meteorological parameters, models, and observations of trace gases: boundary layer (labeled as "BL", biomass burning ("BB", free troposphere (continental, "FTCO" and marine, "FTMA", and Tula industrial complex ("TIC". In general, NO2/NO ratios in different air masses are near photostationary state. Analysis of this ratio can be useful for testing current understanding of tropospheric chemistry. The ozone production efficiency (OPE for the 5 air mass categories ranged from 4.5 (TIC to 8.5 (FTMA, consistent with photochemical aging of air masses exiting the Mexico City Metropolitan Area.

  12. Using laboratory flow experiments and reactive chemical transport modeling for designing waterflooding of the Agua Fria Reservoir, Poza Rica-Altamira Field, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkle, P.; Pruess, K.; Xu, T.; Figueroa, R.A. Hernandez; Lopez, M. Diaz; Lopez, E. Contreras

    2008-10-01

    Waterflooding for enhanced oil recovery requires that injected waters must be chemically compatible with connate reservoir waters, in order to avoid mineral dissolution-and-precipitation cycles that could seriously degrade formation permeability and injectivity. Formation plugging is a concern especially in reservoirs with a large content of carbonates, such as calcite and dolomite, as such minerals typically react rapidly with an aqueous phase, and have strongly temperature-dependent solubility. Clay swelling can also pose problems. During a preliminary waterflooding pilot project, the Poza Rica-Altamira oil field, bordering the Gulf coast in the eastern part of Mexico, experienced injectivity loss after five months of reinjection of formation waters into well AF-847 in 1999. Acidizing with HCl restored injectivity. We report on laboratory experiments and reactive chemistry modeling studies that were undertaken in preparation for long-term waterflooding at Agua Frma. Using analogous core plugs obtained from the same reservoir interval, laboratory coreflood experiments were conducted to examine sensitivity of mineral dissolution and precipitation effects to water composition. Native reservoir water, chemically altered waters, and distilled water were used, and temporal changes in core permeability, mineral abundances and aqueous concentrations of solutes were monitored. The experiments were simulated with the multi-phase, nonisothermal reactive transport code TOUGHREACT, and reasonable to good agreement was obtained for changes in solute concentrations. Clay swelling caused an additional impact on permeability behavior during coreflood experiments, whereas the modeled permeability depends exclusively on chemical processes. TOUGHREACT was then used for reservoir-scale simulation of injecting ambient-temperature water (30 C, 86 F) into a reservoir with initial temperature of 80 C (176 F). Untreated native reservoir water was found to cause serious porosity and

  13. The questa magmatic system: Petrologic, chemical and isotopic variations in cogenetic volcanic and plutonic rocks of the latir volcanic field and associated intrusives, northern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    Field, chemical and isotopic data demonstrate that nearly all igneous rocks at Questa resulted from interactions between mantle-derived parental magmas and the crust. Strontium, neodymium and lead isotope ratios of early andesites to rhyolites (28 to 26 Ma) indicate that these magmas assimilated > 25% lower crust. Injection of basaltic magmas extensively modified the strontium and neodymium but not the lead isotope compositions of the lower crust. Eruption of comendite magmas and the peralkaline Amalia Tuff 26 Ma is correlated with inception of regional extension. Lead isotope ratios identify different sources for the metaluminous granites and the peralkaline rocks. 26 Ma metaluminous granite to granodiorite intrusions have chemical and isotopic compositions to those of the precaldera intermediate-composition rocks, and are interpreted as representing the solidified equivalents of the precaldera magmatic episode. However, both conventional and ion-microprobe isotopic data prohibit significant assimilation of crustal rocks at the level of exposure, suggesting that the plutons were emplaced a relatively crystal-rich mushes which did not have sufficient heat to assimilate country rocks. This suggest that in some cases plutonic rocks are better than volcanic rocks in representing the isotopic compositions of their source regions, because the assimilation potential of crystal-rich magmas is significantly less than that of largely liquid magmas

  14. Metabolomics in chemical ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlisch, Constanze; Pohnert, Georg

    2015-07-01

    Chemical ecology elucidates the nature and role of natural products as mediators of organismal interactions. The emerging techniques that can be summarized under the concept of metabolomics provide new opportunities to study such environmentally relevant signaling molecules. Especially comparative tools in metabolomics enable the identification of compounds that are regulated during interaction situations and that might play a role as e.g. pheromones, allelochemicals or in induced and activated defenses. This approach helps overcoming limitations of traditional bioassay-guided structure elucidation approaches. But the power of metabolomics is not limited to the comparison of metabolic profiles of interacting partners. Especially the link to other -omics techniques helps to unravel not only the compounds in question but the entire biosynthetic and genetic re-wiring, required for an ecological response. This review comprehensively highlights successful applications of metabolomics in chemical ecology and discusses existing limitations of these novel techniques. It focuses on recent developments in comparative metabolomics and discusses the use of metabolomics in the systems biology of organismal interactions. It also outlines the potential of large metabolomics initiatives for model organisms in the field of chemical ecology.

  15. A monitoring of chemical contaminants in waters used for field irrigation and livestock watering in the Veneto region (Italy), using bioassays as a screening tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Liguoro, Marco; Bona, Mirco Dalla; Gallina, Guglielmo; Capolongo, Francesca; Gallocchio, Federica; Binato, Giovanni; Di Leva, Vincenzo

    2014-03-01

    In this study, 50 livestock watering sources (ground water) and 50 field irrigation sources (surface water) from various industrialised areas of the Veneto region were monitored for chemical contaminants. From each site, four water samples (one in each season) were collected during the period from summer 2009 through to spring 2010. Surface water samples and ground water samples were first screened for toxicity using the growth inhibition test on Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and the immobilisation test on Daphnia magna, respectively. Then, based on the results of these toxicity tests, 28 ground water samples and 26 surface water samples were submitted to chemical analysis for various contaminants (insecticides/acaricides, fungicides, herbicides, metals and anions) by means of UPLC-MS(n) HPLC-MS(n), AAS and IEC. With the exception of one surface water sample where the total pesticides concentration was greater than 4 μg L(-1), positive samples (51.9 %) showed only traces (nanograms per liter) of pesticides. Metals were generally under the detection limit. High concentrations of chlorines (up to 692 mg L(-1)) were found in some ground water samples while some surface water samples showed an excess of nitrites (up to 336 mg L(-1)). Detected levels of contamination were generally too low to justify the toxicity recorded in bioassays, especially in the case of surface water samples, and analytical results painted quite a reassuring picture, while tests on P. subcapitata showed a strong growth inhibition activity. It was concluded that, from an ecotoxicological point of view, surface waters used for field irrigation in the Veneto region cannot be considered safe.

  16. Chemical composition of deep hydrothermal fluids in the Ribeira Grande geothermal field (São Miguel, Azores)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, M. R.; Forjaz, V. H.; Almeida, C.

    2006-08-01

    The Ribeira Grande geothermal field is a water-dominated geothermal system, located within Água de Pau/Fogo Volcano in the central part of the São Miguel Island. This geothermal system is exploited for energy production by wells sustaining two power plants. The wells produce from a formation of pillow lavas divided into different aquifers, with a fairly isothermal zone from 800 to 1300 m in depth, where reservoir temperature reaches 230 to 245 °C. Below the depth of 1300 m there is a slight temperature reversal. The fluid produced has excess enthalpy and, separated at atmospheric pressure, is characterized by mineralization of sodium-chloride type up to 6-7 g/l, the concentration of dissolved silica varies between 450 and 650 mg/l and the pH ranges between 8 and 8.6. The gas phase is dominantly CO 2, at a concentration of 98% of NCG. The composition of the deep geothermal fluid was obtained by computer simulation, using the WATCH program, and was compared with the composition of the bottom-hole samples. The approximations, in this simulation, were considered the single- and multi-step steam separation. The reference temperatures were based on: (i) the measured temperature in wells; (ii) the Na/K geothermometric temperature and (iii) the enthalpy-saturation temperature. According to both the measured and geothermometric temperatures, the deep fluid of the wells has two phases with a steam fraction up to 0.34, at higher well discharges. The measured enthalpy is always greater than the calculated enthalpy. The calcite equilibrium indicates scaling, since the fluid is flashing, around 2.28 mg/l CaCO 3 at the maximum discharge. The geothermal wells exploit three different aquifers, the lower of which is liquid and slightly colder than the upper ones. The intermediate is a two-phase aquifer with a steam fraction up to 0.081. The upper aquifer is probably of steam phase. The main differences between the aquifers are the temperature and boiling; both enthalpy and

  17. Evaluation of Chemical and Mineralogical Transformation of Iron in Different Soils in Saturated and Field Capacity Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saadatpour Mogaddam

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Redox potential is one of the most important factors affecting on the solubility of iron minerals in soil. Decreasing redox potential in soil reduces Fe3+ to Fe2+, thereby affecting on solubility of Fe minerals. Application of organic matter to soil under waterlogging condition, decrease redox potential and as a consequence, accelerate the transformation of Fe minerals. The objectives of this study were: 1- The effect of waterlogging on the soluble total Fe concentration and transformation of Fe minerals in different soil pH values. 2- The indirect effects of organic matter on solubility of Fe minerals by changing the redox potential of the soils. Materials and Methods: A study was conducted to determine the effects of redox potential on solubility of Fe and transformation of Fe minerals during the time. Four agricultural soils were selected from different regions of Iran. The soil samples were treated with 0 (Cand 2% (O alfalfa powder and then incubated for 12 weeks under 60% Field capacity (F and waterlogged conditions (S. Subsamples were taken after 1and 12 weeks of incubation and the redox potential, pH value, electrical conductivity (EC, soluble cations (such as Ca2+, Mg2+, K+ and Na+ and anions (such as Cl-, SO42-, PO43- and NO3- and soluble Fe concentrations in the subsamples were measured. Concentrations of Fe2+ and Fe3+ species in soil solution were also predicted using Visual MINTEQ speciation program. Mineralogical transformation of Fe minerals was also determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD technique. Results and Discussion: The results in 60% Field capacity condition showed that pH value by organic matter (alfalfa powder application (OF increased significantly (p≤ 0.05 in acid and neutral soils and decreased in calcareous soils when compared to the control (CF. Organic matter is usually capable of lowering pH of alkaline soils by releasing hydrogen ions associated with organic anions or by nitrification in an open

  18. A meteorological and chemical overview of the DACCIWA field campaign in West Africa in June–July 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Knippertz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In June and July 2016 the Dynamics–Aerosol–Chemistry–Cloud Interactions in West Africa (DACCIWA project organised a major international field campaign in southern West Africa (SWA including measurements from three inland ground supersites, urban sites in Cotonou and Abidjan, radiosondes, and three research aircraft. A significant range of different weather situations were encountered during this period, including the monsoon onset. The purpose of this paper is to characterise the large-scale setting for the campaign as well as synoptic and mesoscale weather systems affecting the study region in the light of existing conceptual ideas, mainly using objective and subjective identification algorithms based on (re-analysis and satellite products. In addition, it is shown how the described synoptic variations influence the atmospheric composition over SWA through advection of mineral dust, biomass burning and urban pollution plumes.The boreal summer of 2016 was characterised by Pacific La Niña, Atlantic El Niño and warm eastern Mediterranean conditions, whose competing influences on precipitation led to an overall average rainy season. During the relatively dusty pre-onset Phase 1 (1–21 June 2016, three westward-propagating coherent cyclonic vortices between 4 and 13° N modulated winds and rainfall in the Guinea coastal area. The monsoon onset occurred in connection with a marked extratropical trough and cold surge over northern Africa, leading to a breakdown of the Saharan heat low and African easterly jet and a suppression of rainfall. During this period, quasi-stationary low-level vortices associated with the trough transformed into more tropical, propagating disturbances resembling an African easterly wave (AEW. To the east of this system, moist southerlies penetrated deep into the continent. The post-onset Phase 2 (22 June–20 July 2016 was characterised by a significant increase in low-level cloudiness, unusually dry conditions

  19. Chemical sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, C.W.; Gordon, R.L.

    1987-05-01

    The revolution in analytical chemistry promised by recent developments in the field of chemical sensors has potential for significant positive impact on both research and production activities conducted by and for the Department of Energy. Analyses which were, in the past, performed only with a roomful of expensive equipment can now be performed with miniature solid-state electronic devices or small optical probes. Progress in the development of chemical sensors has been rapid, and the field is currently growing at a great rate. In accordance, Pacific Northwest Laboratory initiated a survey of recent literature so that contributors to active programs in research on analytical methods could be made aware of principles and applications of this new technology. This report presents the results of that survey. The sensors discussed here are divided into three types: micro solid-state devices, optical sensors, and piezoelectric crystal devices. The report is divided into three corresponding sections. The first section, ''Micro Solid-State Devices,'' discusses the design, operation, and application of electronic sensors that are produced in much the same way as standard solid-state electronic devices. The second section, ''Optrodes,'' covers the design and operation of chemical sensors that use fiber optics to detect chemically induced changes in optical properties. The final section, ''Piezoelectric Crystal Detectors,'' discusses two types of chemical sensors that depend on the changes in the properties of an oscillating piezoelectric crystal to detect the presence of certain materials. Advantages and disadvantages of each type of sensor are summarized in each section

  20. The Limits to Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averill, M.; Briggle, A.

    2006-12-01

    Science policy and knowledge production lately have taken a pragmatic turn. Funding agencies increasingly are requiring scientists to explain the relevance of their work to society. This stems in part from mounting critiques of the "linear model" of knowledge production in which scientists operating according to their own interests or disciplinary standards are presumed to automatically produce knowledge that is of relevance outside of their narrow communities. Many contend that funded scientific research should be linked more directly to societal goals, which implies a shift in the kind of research that will be funded. While both authors support the concept of useful science, we question the exact meaning of "relevance" and the wisdom of allowing it to control research agendas. We hope to contribute to the conversation by thinking more critically about the meaning and limits of the term "relevance" and the trade-offs implicit in a narrow utilitarian approach. The paper will consider which interests tend to be privileged by an emphasis on relevance and address issues such as whose goals ought to be pursued and why, and who gets to decide. We will consider how relevance, narrowly construed, may actually limit the ultimate utility of scientific research. The paper also will reflect on the worthiness of research goals themselves and their relationship to a broader view of what it means to be human and to live in society. Just as there is more to being human than the pragmatic demands of daily life, there is more at issue with knowledge production than finding the most efficient ways to satisfy consumer preferences or fix near-term policy problems. We will conclude by calling for a balanced approach to funding research that addresses society's most pressing needs but also supports innovative research with less immediately apparent application.

  1. Relevant Subspace Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Emmanuel; Assent, Ira; Günnemann, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Subspace clustering aims at detecting clusters in any subspace projection of a high dimensional space. As the number of possible subspace projections is exponential in the number of dimensions, the result is often tremendously large. Recent approaches fail to reduce results to relevant subspace...... clusters. Their results are typically highly redundant, i.e. many clusters are detected multiple times in several projections. In this work, we propose a novel model for relevant subspace clustering (RESCU). We present a global optimization which detects the most interesting non-redundant subspace clusters...... achieves top clustering quality while competing approaches show greatly varying performance....

  2. Influence of magnetic field, chemical pressure and hydrostatic pressure on the structural and magnetocaloric properties of the Mn-Ni-Ge system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubel, Andreas; Gottschall, Tino; Fries, Maximilian; Faske, Tom; Skokov, Konstantin P.; Gutfleisch, Oliver

    2017-11-01

    The magnetic, structural and thermomagnetic properties of the MM’X material system of MnNiGe are evaluated with respect to their utilization in magnetocaloric refrigeration. The effects of separate and simultaneous substitution of Fe for Mn and Si on the Ge site are analysed in detail to highlight the benefits of the isostructural alloying method. A large range of compounds with precisely tunable structural and magnetic properties and the tuning of the phase transition by chemical pressure are compared to the effect of hydrostatic pressure on the martensitic transition. We obtained very large isothermal entropy changes Δ S_iso of up to -37.8 J kg-1 K-1 based on magnetic measurements for (Mn,Fe)NiGe in moderate fields of 2 T. The enhanced magnetocaloric properties for transitions around room temperature are demonstrated for samples with reduced Ge, a resource critical element. An adiabatic temperature change of 1.3 K in a magnetic field change of 1.93 T is observed upon direct measurement for a sample with Fe and Si substitution. However, the high volume change of 2.8% results in an embrittlement of large particles into several smaller fragments and leads to a sensitivity of the magnetocaloric properties towards sample shape and size. On the other hand, this large volume change enables to induce the phase transition with a large shift of the transition temperature by application of hydrostatic pressure (72 K GPa-1 ). Thus, the effect of 1.88 GPa is equivalent to a substitution of 10% Fe for Mn and can act as an additional stimulus to induce the phase transition and support the low magnetic field dependence of the phase transition temperature for multicaloric applications.

  3. Is Information Still Relevant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The term "information" in information science does not share the characteristics of those of a nomenclature: it does not bear a generally accepted definition and it does not serve as the bases and assumptions for research studies. As the data deluge has arrived, is the concept of information still relevant for information…

  4. THE BNL ASTD FIELD LAB - NEAR - REAL - TIME CHARACTERIZATION OF BNL STOCKPILED SOILS TO ACCELERATE COMPLETION OF THE EM CHEMICAL HOLES PROJECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOWERMAN, B.S.; ADAMS, J.W.; HEISER, J.; KALB, P.D.; LOCKWOOD, A.

    2003-01-01

    bottom. Field personnel collected eight 100-gram samples, plus quality assurance (QA) duplicates for chemical analysis, and a 1-liter jar of material for gamma spectroscopy. After analyses were completed and reviewed, the stockpiles were reconstructed for later disposal as discrete entities within a disposal site profile. A field lab was set up in a trailer close to the stockpile site, equipped with instrumentation to test for mercury, RCRA metals, and gamma spectroscopy, and a tumbler for carrying out a modified Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) protocol. Chemical analysis included X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to screen for high (>260 ppm) total mercury concentrations, and modified TCLP tests to verify that the soils were not RCRA hazardous. The modified TCLP tests were 1/10th scale, to minimize secondary (leachate) waste and maximize tumbler capacity and sampler throughput. TCLP leachate analysis was accomplished using a Milestone Direct Mercury Analyzer (DMA80). Gamma spectroscopy provided added assurance of previously measured Am-241, Cs-137, and Co-60 contamination levels

  5. Sensitivity analysis in molecular dynamics and chemical kinetics and a theory of intramolecular energy transfer in the presence of intense radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eslava, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    This thesis is an investigation of two topics in the area of molecular and chemical dynamics phenomena. The first topic, Sensitivity Analysis in Molecular Dynamics and Chemical Kinetics, explores the response of the numerical solutions to variation in the input information. After a brief consideration of elementary sensitivity coefficients (i.e. partial derivatives of observables with respect to model parameters), attention is focused on an entire new family of derived coefficients capable of exhibiting important aspects of the underlying dynamics. Each derived sensitivity coefficient has a unique physical interpretation in terms of an experiment or modeling calculation. Also, a fitting model for rotationally inelastic cross sections that accurately predicts cross sections away from the region of parameter space used in the fitting is presented. The global behavior of cross sections in parameter space is examined, and a nonlinear interpolation formula is suggested which utilizes sensitivity information. The second topic, A Theory of Intramolecular Energy Transfer in the Presence of Intense Radiation Fields, represents a theoretical formulation of energy redistribution based on stochastic considerations. The fundamental assumption is that a random phase approximation is valid at specific time intervals. This results in the replacement of the Schrodinger equation by a master-type equation, which is further approximated by a Fokker-Planck diffusion like equation. Energy transfer is described as a flow of probability among the quantum states, and the dissociation of dynamics are embodied in the boundary conditions. By virtue of the continuous character of the Fokker-Planck equation, the computational difficulty of its numerical solution depends only on the number of degrees of freedom and not on the number of states

  6. Determination of iodine at ppt level in a nitric acid medium by inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry: influence of the chemical forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langlois, B.

    2001-01-01

    Inductively Coupled Plasma Sector Field Mass Spectrometry (ICP/SFMS) was used to determine several chemical forms of iodine, at ppt level, in a nitric acid media. Ascorbic acid was added as a reducing agent in order to maintain iodine as iodide. In a preliminary approach, the influence of the chemical form was studied by comparing inorganic iodine (NaI) and organic iodine (CH3I). Different signal responses were observed. With a conventional sample introduction system, sensitivities obtained for iodo-methane could differ by a factor of 5. This was not caused by a problem of atomization or by a change in the ionization efficiency of the iodo-compound into the plasma. The low volatilization temperature of iodo-methane (315.5 K) seemed to be the main explanation of this phenomena. Actually, nebulization resulted in the volatilization of a 2% nitric acid solution containing iodo-methane. As a result, the transport efficiency of iodo-methane between the nebulizer and the torch was approaching 100%. A Direct Injection High Efficiency Nebulizer (DIHEN) allowed us to minimize the behavior difference between the two iodine species, but the sensitivity ratio was inverted and still differed by 20 - 40%. Moreover, the association of a guard electrode and the direct injection system was studied in order to apply these equipments to the determination of iodine. This association allowed us to improve the sensitivity by a factor of 10 and to minimize memory effects, when compared with a conventional system. Further studies indicated that signal responses obtained with different iodine-containing species, except for iodo-methane, were found to be similar. (author)

  7. Competing risks and the development of adaptive management plans for water resources: Field reconnaissance investigation of risks to fishes and other aquatic biota exposed to endocrine disrupting chemicals (edcs) in lake mead, Nevada USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, G.; Little, E.E.

    2009-01-01

    The analysis and characterization of competing risks for water resources rely on a wide spectrum of tools to evaluate hazards and risks associated with their management. For example, waters of the lower Colorado River stored in reservoirs such as Lake Mead present a wide range of competing risks related to water quantity and water quality. These risks are often interdependent and complicated by competing uses of source waters for sustaining biological resources and for supporting a range of agricultural, municipal, recreational, and industrial uses. USGS is currently conducting a series of interdisciplinary case-studies on water quality of Lake Mead and its source waters. In this case-study we examine selected constituents potentially entering the Lake Mead system, particularly endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Worldwide, a number of environmental EDCs have been identified that affect reproduction, development, and adaptive behaviors in a wide range of organisms. Many EDCs are minimally affected by current treatment technologies and occur in treated sewage effluents. Several EDCs have been detected in Lake Mead, and several substances have been identified that are of concern because of potential impacts to the aquatic biota, including the sport fishery of Lake Mead and endangered razorback suckers (Xyrauchen texanus) that occur in the Colorado River system. For example, altered biomarkers relevant to reproduction and thyroid function in fishes have been observed and may be predictive of impaired metabolism and development. Few studies, however, have addressed whether such EDC-induced responses observed in the field have an ecologically significant effect on the reproductive success of fishes. To identify potential linkages between EDCs and species of management concern, the risk analysis and characterization in this reconnaissance study focused on effects (and attendant uncertainties) that might be expressed by exposed populations. In addition, risk reduction

  8. Nanoscale structural and chemical analysis of F-implanted enhancement-mode InAlN/GaN heterostructure field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fengzai; Lee, Kean B.; Guiney, Ivor; Frentrup, Martin; Barnard, Jonathan S.; Divitini, Giorgio; Zaidi, Zaffar H.; Martin, Tomas L.; Bagot, Paul A.; Moody, Michael P.; Humphreys, Colin J.; Houston, Peter A.; Oliver, Rachel A.; Wallis, David J.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the impact of a fluorine plasma treatment used to obtain enhancement-mode operation on the structure and chemistry at the nanometer and atomic scales of an InAlN/GaN field effect transistor. The fluorine plasma treatment is successful in that enhancement mode operation is achieved with a +2.8 V threshold voltage. However, the InAlN barrier layers are observed to have been damaged by the fluorine treatment with their thickness being reduced by up to 50%. The treatment also led to oxygen incorporation within the InAlN barrier layers. Furthermore, even in the as-grown structure, Ga was unintentionally incorporated during the growth of the InAlN barrier. The impact of both the reduced barrier thickness and the incorporated Ga within the barrier on the transistor properties has been evaluated theoretically and compared to the experimentally determined two-dimensional electron gas density and threshold voltage of the transistor. For devices without fluorine treatment, the two-dimensional electron gas density is better predicted if the quaternary nature of the barrier is taken into account. For the fluorine treated device, not only the changes to the barrier layer thickness and composition, but also the fluorine doping needs to be considered to predict device performance. These studies reveal the factors influencing the performance of these specific transistor structures and highlight the strengths of the applied nanoscale characterisation techniques in revealing information relevant to device performance.

  9. Advances in chemical engineering in nuclear and process industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-06-01

    Symposium on Advances in Chemical Engineering in Nuclear and Process Industries dealt with a wide spectrum of areas encompassing various industries such as nuclear, fertilizer, petrochemical, refinery and cement. The topics covered in the symposium dealt with the advancements in the existing fields of science and technologies as well as in some of the emerging technologies such as membrane technology, bio-chemical and photo-chemical engineering etc. with a special emphasis on nuclear related aspects. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately.

  10. Advances in chemical engineering in nuclear and process industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    Symposium on Advances in Chemical Engineering in Nuclear and Process Industries dealt with a wide spectrum of areas encompassing various industries such as nuclear, fertilizer, petrochemical, refinery and cement. The topics covered in the symposium dealt with the advancements in the existing fields of science and technologies as well as in some of the emerging technologies such as membrane technology, bio-chemical and photo-chemical engineering etc. with a special emphasis on nuclear related aspects. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  11. Clinical Relevance of Adipokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Blüher

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of obesity has increased dramatically during recent decades. Obesity increases the risk for metabolic and cardiovascular diseases and may therefore contribute to premature death. With increasing fat mass, secretion of adipose tissue derived bioactive molecules (adipokines changes towards a pro-inflammatory, diabetogenic and atherogenic pattern. Adipokines are involved in the regulation of appetite and satiety, energy expenditure, activity, endothelial function, hemostasis, blood pressure, insulin sensitivity, energy metabolism in insulin sensitive tissues, adipogenesis, fat distribution and insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. Therefore, adipokines are clinically relevant as biomarkers for fat distribution, adipose tissue function, liver fat content, insulin sensitivity, chronic inflammation and have the potential for future pharmacological treatment strategies for obesity and its related diseases. This review focuses on the clinical relevance of selected adipokines as markers or predictors of obesity related diseases and as potential therapeutic tools or targets in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Information Needs/Relevance

    OpenAIRE

    Wildemuth, Barbara M.

    2009-01-01

    A user's interaction with a DL is often initiated as the result of the user experiencing an information need of some kind. Aspects of that experience and how it might affect the user's interactions with the DL are discussed in this module. In addition, users continuously make decisions about and evaluations of the materials retrieved from a DL, relative to their information needs. Relevance judgments, and their relationship to the user's information needs, are discussed in this module. Draft

  13. Growth, microstructure, and field-emission properties of synthesized diamond film on adamantane-coated silicon substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, Rajanish N.; Chang Li

    2010-01-01

    Diamond nucleation on unscratched Si surface is great importance for its growth, and detailed understanding of this process is therefore desired for many applications. The pretreatment of the substrate surface may influence the initial growth period. In this study, diamond films have been synthesized on adamantane-coated crystalline silicon {100} substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition from a gaseous mixture of methane and hydrogen gases without the application of a bias voltage to the substrates. Prior to adamantane coating, the Si substrates were not pretreated such as abraded/scratched. The substrate temperature was ∼530 deg. C during diamond deposition. The deposited films are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectrometry, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These measurements provide definitive evidence for high-crystalline quality diamond film, which is synthesized on a SiC rather than clean Si substrate. Characterization through atomic force microscope allows establishing fine quality criteria of the film according to the grain size of nanodiamond along with SiC. The diamond films exhibit a low-threshold (55 V/μm) and high current-density (1.6 mA/cm 2 ) field-emission (FE) display. The possible mechanism of formation of diamond films and their FE properties have been demonstrated.

  14. Trials on the Timing of Chemical Control of Lentil weevil, Bruchus lentis Frӧlich (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae in Lentil Field in Gachsaran Region (Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Saeidi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The lentil weevil, Bruchus lentis Frӧlich, (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae is the most serious pest of lentil in Iran. Economic losses due to this pest reach up to 40% of the lentil crop. Over a two-year study (2012 and 2013 in Agricultural Research Station of Gachsaran Region, best timing of chemical control of B. lentis was determined. A field experiment with cultivation of lentil Sina variety Lens culinaris Medik was conducted in a randomized complete block design with five treatments and three replications. The treatments consisted of spraying four times (respectively, during the early flowering, 10 days after the first spraying, 10 days after the second spraying; 10 days after the third spraying and control (without spraying. For the spraying from Endosulfan insecticide EC50% at ratio one liter per hectare was used. Three samples were taken from the pods and totally 150 pods from each replicate for contaminations of seeds were investigated. After the determination of the percent of seeds contamination, results were statistically analysed. Based on the results obtained, first spray treatment, with the mean contamination of 15.45% and second spray treatment with the mean contamination of 12.25% had the highest impact on reducing contamination lentil seeds to B. lentis and between them there was no statistically significant difference and were in one group. Therefore, spraying one time during the early flowering until 15 days after it was the best time to control of B. lentis.

  15. Modification of chemical properties, Cu fractionation and enzymatic activities in an acid vineyard soil amended with winery wastes: A field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Salgado, Isabel; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paula; Gómez-Armesto, Antía; Díaz-Raviña, Montserrat; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias-Estévez, Manuel; Fernández-Calviño, David

    2017-11-01

    The effects of adding two winery wastes, perlite waste (PW) and bentonite waste (BW), to an acid vineyard soil were assessed using some chemical and biological soil properties in a field study that lasted 18 months. The addition of PW (up to 81 Mg ha -1 ) had neither significant nor permanent effects on soil characteristics such as the pH, organic matter content or nutrient concentrations, the amounts of copper or zinc, or the electrical conductivity. Moreover, no persistent negative effects were found on the enzymatic activities after PW application. In contrast, soil that was amended with up to 71 Mg BW ha -1 showed increases in its soil pH values, exchangeable potassium and water soluble potassium and phosphorus contents. In addition, it caused significant increases in the electrical conductivity and water-soluble Cu. In addition, the phosphomonoesterase enzymatic activity decreased significantly (up to 28%) in response to the amendment with 71 Mg BW ha -1 . These results showed that adding BW and PW to the soil may be a good agronomic practice for recycling these types of wastes. However, in the case of PW, its use as a soil amendment must be performed with caution to control its possible harmful effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Relevant public health enteropathogens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveros, Maribel; Ochoa, Theresa J

    2015-01-01

    Diarrhea remains the third leading cause of death in children under five years, despite recent advances in the management and prevention of this disease. It is caused by multiple pathogens, however, the prevalence of each varies by age group, geographical area and the scenario where cases (community vs hospital) are recorded. The most relevant pathogens in public health are those associated with the highest burden of disease, severity, complications and mortality. In our country, norovirus, Campylobacter and diarrheagenic E. coli are the most prevalent pathogens at the community level in children. In this paper we review the local epidemiology and potential areas of development in five selected pathogens: rotavirus, norovirus, Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), Shigella and Salmonella. Of these, rotavirus is the most important in the pediatric population and the main agent responsible for child mortality from diarrhea. The introduction of rotavirus vaccination in Peru will have a significant impact on disease burden and mortality from diarrhea. However, surveillance studies are needed to determine the impact of vaccination and changes in the epidemiology of diarrhea in Peru following the introduction of new vaccines, as well as antibiotic resistance surveillance of clinical relevant bacteria.

  17. Other relevant numerical modelling papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chartier, M.

    1989-01-01

    The ocean modelling is a rapidly evolving science and a large number of results have been published. Several categories of papers are of particular interest for this review: the papers published by the international atomic institutions, such as the NEA (for the CRESP or Subseabed Programs), the IAEA (for example the Safety Series, the Technical Report Series or the TECDOC), and the ICRP, and the papers concerned by more fundamental research, which are published in specific scientific literature. This paper aims to list some of the most relevant publications for the CRESP purposes. It means by no way to be exhaustive, but informative on the incontestable progress recently achieved in that field. One should note that some of these papers are so recent that their final version has not yet been published

  18. Chemical Peels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care Kids’ zone Video library Find a dermatologist Chemical peels Overview Chemical peels: Overview Also called chemexfoliation , derma peeling Do ... Overview Chemical peels: FAQs Chemical peels: Preparation FAQs Chemical peels: FAQs To help you decide whether this ...

  19. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2012-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series-the cutting edge of research in chemical physics The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics field with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study of chemical physics. This volume explores: Quantum Dynamical Resonances in Ch

  20. [Effects of combined applications of pig manure and chemical fertilizers on CH4 and N2O emissions and their global warming potentials in paddy fields with double-rice cropping].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Shen, Jian-Lin; Zheng, Liang; Liu, Jie-Yun; Qin, Hong-Ling; Li, Yong; Wu, Jin-Shui

    2014-08-01

    A field experiment was carried out to study the effects of combined applications of pig manure and chemical fertilizers on CH4 and N2O emissions, which were measured using the static chamber/gas chromatography method, and their global warming potentials in typical paddy fields with double-rice cropping in Hunan province. The results showed that the combined applications of pig manure and chemical fertilizers did not change the seasonal patterns of CH4 and N2O emissions from paddy soils, but significantly changed the magnitudes of CH4 and N2O fluxes in rice growing seasons as compared with sole application of chemical fertilizers. During the two rice growing seasons, the cumulative CH4 emissions for the pig manure and chemical nitrogen (N) fertilizer each contributing to 50% of the total applied N (1/2N + PM) treatment were higher than those for the treatments of no N fertilizer (ON), half amount of chemical N fertilizer (1/2N) and 100% chemical N fertilizer (N) by 54.83%, 33.85% and 43.30%, respectively (P global warming potential (GWP) in both rice growing seasons, which contributed more than 99% to the integrated GWP of CH4 and N2O emissions for all the four treatments. Both GWP and yield-scaled GWP for the treatment of 1/2N + PM were significantly higher than the other three treatments. The yield-scaled GWP for the treatment of 1/2N + PM was higher than those for the N, 1/2N and ON treatments by 58.21%, 26.82% and 20. 63%, respectively. Therefore, combined applications of pig manure and chemical fertilizers in paddy fields would increase the GWP of CH4 and N2O emissions during rice growing seasons and this effect should be considered in regional greenhouse gases emissions inventory.

  1. Other relevant biological papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, M.

    1989-01-01

    A considerable number of CRESP-relevant papers concerning deep-sea biology and radioecology have been published. It is the purpose of this study to call attention to them. They fall into three general categories. The first is papers of general interest. They are mentioned only briefly, and include text references to the global bibliography at the end of the volume. The second are papers that are not only mentioned and referenced, but for various reasons are described in abstract form. The last is a list of papers compiled by H.S.J. Roe specifically for this volume. They are listed in bibliographic form, and are also included in the global bibliography at the end of the volume

  2. Analysis of chemical warfare agents in food products by atmospheric pressure ionization-high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolakowski, Beata M; D'Agostino, Paul A; Chenier, Claude; Mester, Zoltán

    2007-11-01

    Flow injection high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS)-mass spectrometry (MS) methodology was developed for the detection and identification of chemical warfare (CW) agents in spiked food products. The CW agents, soman (GD), sarin (GB), tabun (GA), cyclohexyl sarin (GF), and four hydrolysis products, ethylphosphonic acid (EPA), methylphosphonic acid (MPA), pinacolyl methylphosphonic acid (Pin MPA), and isopropyl methylphosphonic acid (IMPA) were separated and detected by positive ion and negative ion atmospheric pressure ionization-FAIMS-MS. Under optimized conditions, the compensation voltages were 7.2 V for GD, 8.0 V for GA, 7.2 V for GF, 7.6 V for GB, 18.2 V for EPA, 25.9 V for MPA, -1.9 V for PinMPA, and +6.8 V for IMPA. Sample preparation was kept to a minimum, resulting in analysis times of 3 min or less per sample. The developed methodology was evaluated by spiking bottled water, canola oil, cornmeal, and honey samples at low microgram per gram (or microg/mL) levels with the CW agents or CW agent hydrolysis products. The detection limits observed for the CW agents in the spiked food samples ranged from 3 to 15 ng/mL in bottled water, 1-33 ng/mL in canola oil, 1-34 ng/g in cornmeal, and 13-18 ng/g in honey. Detection limits were much higher for the CW agent hydrolysis products, with only MPA being detected in spiked honey samples.

  3. Seeking Relevance: American Political Science and America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranto, Robert; Woessner, Matthew C.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors talk about the relevance of American political science and America. Political science has enormous strengths in its highly talented practitioners and sophisticated methods. However, its disconnection from its host society, while not so severe as for fields like English and sociology, nonetheless poses an existential…

  4. Other Perspectives for Developing Exposure Estimates: “SHEDS-Lite: Rapid Scenario-Based ExposurePredictions for Chemicals with Near-Field and Dietary Pathways”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creative advances in exposure science are needed to support efficient and effective evaluation and management of chemical risks, particularly for chemicals in consumer products. This presentation will describe the development of EPA’s screening-level, probabilistic SHEDS-Li...

  5. User perspectives on relevance criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maglaughlin, Kelly L.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2002-01-01

    , partially relevant, or not relevant to their information need; and explained their decisions in an interview. Analysis revealed 29 criteria, discussed positively and negatively, that were used by the participants when selecting passages that contributed or detracted from a document's relevance......This study investigates the use of criteria to assess relevant, partially relevant, and not-relevant documents. Study participants identified passages within 20 document representations that they used to make relevance judgments; judged each document representation as a whole to be relevant...... matter, thought catalyst), full text (e.g., audience, novelty, type, possible content, utility), journal/publisher (e.g., novelty, main focus, perceived quality), and personal (e.g., competition, time requirements). Results further indicate that multiple criteria are used when making relevant, partially...

  6. Preparation of Chemical Samples On Relevant Surfaces Using Inkjet Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    printer. For the results in Section 3.1, 32 g/L of potassium chlorate was printed on a 2 × 2 in. pattern of aluminum substrate. All of the printed...maintained at 80 °C. Figures 6 and 7 are photographs of potassium chlorate crystals deposited with and without heating. Both photographs are at the...submicron size range. Figures B-1 and B-2 shows potassium chlorate crystals deposited with and without heating. Both photographs are at the same

  7. Relevant Spatial Scales of Chemical Variation in Aplysina aerophoba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriol Sacristan-Soriano

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the scale at which natural products vary the most is critical because it sheds light on the type of factors that regulate their production. The sponge Aplysina aerophoba is a common Mediterranean sponge inhabiting shallow waters in the Mediterranean and its area of influence in Atlantic Ocean. This species contains large concentrations of brominated alkaloids (BAs that play a number of ecological roles in nature. Our research investigates the ecological variation in BAs of A. aerophoba from a scale of hundred of meters to thousand kilometers. We used a nested design to sample sponges from two geographically distinct regions (Canary Islands and Mediterranean, over 2500 km, with two zones within each region (less than 50 km, two locations within each zone (less than 5 km, and two sites within each location (less than 500 m. We used high-performance liquid chromatography to quantify multiple BAs and a spectrophotometer to quantify chlorophyll a (Chl a. Our results show a striking degree of variation in both natural products and Chl a content. Significant variation in Chl a content occurred at the largest and smallest geographic scales. The variation patterns of BAs also occurred at the largest and smallest scales, but varied depending on which BA was analyzed. Concentrations of Chl a and isofistularin-3 were negatively correlated, suggesting that symbionts may impact the concentration of some of these compounds. Our results underline the complex control of the production of secondary metabolites, with factors acting at both small and large geographic scales affecting the production of multiple secondary metabolites.

  8. Chemical Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  9. Roots and Relevance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gumucio-Dagron, Alfonso; Tufte, Thomas

    This anthology, the result of 3 years of review of 1000+ articles, now assembles 150 authors with 200 contributions - full articles, excerpts and quotes - ranging from 1927 to 2005. The articles all have been selected upon the criteria of contributing conceptually to the field of communication fo...... Participation, 3) Power, Media and the Public Sphere, 4) Paradigms in Communication for Development, 5) Information Society & Communication Rights....... for social change. The book is organised in two parts: the first part being cronological, from 1927-1995, and the second part containing 'the contemporary debate' in communication for social change, organised in 5 sub-themes: 1) Popular Culture, Narrative and Identity, 2) Social Movements & Community...

  10. Advances in chemical Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2011-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series-the cutting edge of research in chemical physics The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics and physical chemistry fields with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series offers contributions from internationally renowned chemists and serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study of che

  11. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2014-01-01

    Advances in Chemical Physics is the only series of volumes available that explores the cutting edge of research in chemical physics. This is the only series of volumes available that presents the cutting edge of research in chemical physics.Includes contributions from experts in this field of research.Contains a representative cross-section of research that questions established thinking on chemical solutions.Structured with an editorial framework that makes the book an excellent supplement to an advanced graduate class in physical chemistry or chemical physics.

  12. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2011-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series-the cutting edge of research in chemical physics The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics and physical chemistry fields with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series offers contributions from internationally renowned chemists and serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study of che

  13. Antagonism at combined effects of chemical fertilizers and carbamate insecticides on the rice-field N2-fixing cyanobacterium Cylindrospermum sp. in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Padhy Rabindra N.; Nayak Nabakishore; Rath Shakti

    2014-01-01

    Effects of chemical fertilizers (urea, super phosphate and potash) on toxicities of two carbamate insecticides, carbaryl and carbofuran, individually to the N2-fixing cyanobacterium, Cylindrospermum sp. were studied in vitro at partially lethal levels (below highest permissive concentrations) of each insecticide. The average number of vegetative cells between two polar heterocysts was 16.3 in control cultures, while the mean value of filament length increased in the presence of chemical ferti...

  14. Controle químico da mancha-bacteriana do tomate para processamento industrial em campo Field chemical control of bacterial spot on tomato for industrial processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abadia dos R Nascimento

    2013-03-01

    cloretos de benzalcônio. ASM e famoxadona + mancozebe foram os que promoveram uma relação benefício/custo superior a 1.In order to evaluate chemical control of bacterial spot on tomato for industrial processing, two field trials were carried out at the Unilever Bestfoods experimental station, in Goiânia, Goias state, Brazil. The first trial was in a randomized complete block design, with 15 treatments and three replications, using the hybrid Heinz 9992 inoculated with Xanthomonas perforans. The second trial was in a split-plot randomized complete block design with chemical foliar applications (10 treatments and hybrids (Hypeel 108 and U2006 as factors. Plants were inoculated with X. perforans and X. gardneri. In both trials the chemicals, in different number of applications and combinations, were: acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM; famoxadone + mancozeb; metiram + pyraclostrobin; phosphite PK; benzalkonium chlorides; cuprous oxide, and copper hydroxide (SC, WP and WG. For both trials, disease severity on leaves, number of fruits with symptoms and yield were evaluated. In the second one, sunscald was also evaluated. For the first trial, significant severity differences (p>0.05 among treatments were observed only in the first two evaluations, but none of them differed from the water check control. In the second trial, significant differences were detected only in foliar severity in first evaluation for hybrids. For number of fruits with symptoms and sunscald, besides hybrids, interaction among factors was also significant. 'U2006' was more resistant than 'Hypeel 108', which also had highest sunscald values, but concerning fruits with symptoms, the opposite was observed. The two factors were significant for yield data, 'U2006' yielded better than 'Hypeel 108'. Despite none of the treatments have differed in yield from the water control, famoxadone + mancozeb, which resulted in the highest yield, differed from copper hydroxide, ASM - famoxadone + mancozeb, and benzalkonium

  15. Field performance of transgenic citrus trees: assessment of the long-term expression of uidA and nptII transgenes and its impact on relevant agronomic and phenotypic characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Elsa; Peris, Josep E; Peña, Leandro

    2012-07-15

    The future of genetic transformation as a tool for the improvement of fruit trees depends on the development of proper systems for the assessment of unintended effects in field-grown GM lines. In this study, we used eight transgenic lines of two different citrus types (sweet orange and citrange) transformed with the marker genes β-glucuronidase (uidA) and neomycin phosphotransferase II (nptII) as model systems to study for the first time in citrus the long-term stability of transgene expression and whether transgene-derived pleiotropic effects occur with regard to the morphology, development and fruit quality of orchard-grown GM citrus trees. The stability of the integration and expression of the transgenes was confirmed in 7-year-old, orchard-grown transgenic lines by Southern blot analysis and enzymatic assays (GUS and ELISA NPTII), respectively. Little seasonal variation was detected in the expression levels between plants of the same transgenic line in different organs and over the 3 years of analysis, confirming the absence of rearrangements and/or silencing of the transgenes after transferring the plants to field conditions. Comparisons between the GM citrus lines with their non-GM counterparts across the study years showed that the expression of these transgenes did not cause alterations of the main phenotypic and agronomic plant and fruit characteristics. However, when comparisons were performed between diploid and tetraploid transgenic citrange trees and/or between juvenile and mature transgenic sweet orange trees, significant and consistent differences were detected, indicating that factors other than their transgenic nature induced a much higher phenotypic variability. Our results indicate that transgene expression in GM citrus remains stable during long-term agricultural cultivation, without causing unexpected effects on crop characteristics. This study also shows that the transgenic citrus trees expressing the selectable marker genes that are most

  16. Aerosol chemical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marlow, W.H.

    1982-01-01

    A classification of the research fields in the chemical physics of aerosol microparticles is given. The emphasis lies on the microphysics of isolated particles and clusters and on physical transformations and thermodynamics. (LDN)

  17. Passage relevance models for genomics search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frieder Ophir

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a passage relevance model for integrating syntactic and semantic evidence of biomedical concepts and topics using a probabilistic graphical model. Component models of topics, concepts, terms, and document are represented as potential functions within a Markov Random Field. The probability of a passage being relevant to a biologist's information need is represented as the joint distribution across all potential functions. Relevance model feedback of top ranked passages is used to improve distributional estimates of query concepts and topics in context, and a dimensional indexing strategy is used for efficient aggregation of concept and term statistics. By integrating multiple sources of evidence including dependencies between topics, concepts, and terms, we seek to improve genomics literature passage retrieval precision. Using this model, we are able to demonstrate statistically significant improvements in retrieval precision using a large genomics literature corpus.

  18. Whole system chemical geothermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang Zhonghe

    1999-01-01

    Chemical and isotopic geothermometers are equations or models based on temperature dependent chemical reactions or isotope equilibrium fractionation reactions from which equilibrium temperatures of these reactions can be calculated. The major drawback of all the conventional geothermometry methods lies in their incapability on making a judgement on the equilibrium status of the studied systems. This review will focus on two of recent approaches in this field. Zhangzhou Geothermal Field in SE China will be used as an example to demonstrate the applications

  19. Low-temperature transport properties of chemical solution deposited polycrystalline La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 ferromagnetic films under a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Junyu; Chen, Ying; Xu, Wenfei; Yang, Jing; Bai, Wei; Wang, Genshui; Duan, Chungang; Tang, Zheng; Tang, Xiaodong

    2011-01-01

    Polycrystalline La 0.7 Sr 0.3 MnO 3 (LSMO) films were prepared on SiO 2 /Si (001) substrates by chemical solution deposition technique. Electrical and magnetic properties of LSMO were investigated. A minimum phenomenon in resistivity is found at the low temperature ( 0.7 Sr 0.3 MnO 3 films were grown by a modified chemical solution deposition route. → High quality LSMO thin films were prepared directly onto SiO 2 /Si substrates. → Abnormality in resistivity of LSMO films at low temperatures was studied in detail. → The abnormality was mainly attributed to Kondo-like spin dependent scattering.

  20. Chemical warfare agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayaraghavan R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the Weapons of Mass Destruction, chemical warfare (CW is probably one of the most brutal created by mankind in comparison with biological and nuclear warfare. Chemical weapons are inexpensive and are relatively easy to produce, even by small terrorist groups, to create mass casualties with small quantities. The characteristics of various CW agents, general information relevant to current physical as well as medical protection methods, detection equipment available and decontamination techniques are discussed in this review article. A brief note on Chemical Weapons Convention is also provided.

  1. Chemical warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, K.; Raza, S. K.; Vijayaraghavan, R.

    2010-01-01

    Among the Weapons of Mass Destruction, chemical warfare (CW) is probably one of the most brutal created by mankind in comparison with biological and nuclear warfare. Chemical weapons are inexpensive and are relatively easy to produce, even by small terrorist groups, to create mass casualties with small quantities. The characteristics of various CW agents, general information relevant to current physical as well as medical protection methods, detection equipment available and decontamination techniques are discussed in this review article. A brief note on Chemical Weapons Convention is also provided. PMID:21829312

  2. Hydrogen interaction with fusion-relevant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caorlin, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is an outline of the work carried out at JRC Ispra in the Tritium-materials Interaction Laboratory, on the interaction of gaseous hydrogen with several materials of interest in the field of fusion technology. Experimental work is reported and a concise review of relevant theoretical and numerical supporting activity is given as well. A period of about seven years is covered since 1982. Current work and possible future extensions are also briefly mentioned. 11 figs., 18 refs

  3. Acquisition of chemical remanent magnetization during experimental ferrihydrite-hematite conversion in Earth-like magnetic field-implications for paleomagnetic studies of red beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, Zhaoxia; Liu, Qingsong; Dekkers, Mark J.; Tauxe, Lisa; Qin, Huafeng; Barrón, Vidal; Torrent, José

    2015-01-01

    Hematite-bearing red beds are renowned for their chemical remanent magnetization (CRM). If the CRM was acquired substantially later than the sediment was formed, this severely compromises paleomagnetic records. To improve our interpretation of the natural remanent magnetization, the intricacies of

  4. Global Controllability of Chemical Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Drexler, Dániel András; Tóth, János

    2015-01-01

    Controllability of chemical reactions is an important problem in chemical engineering science. In control theory, analysis of the controllability of linear systems is well-founded, however the dynamics of chemical reactions is usually nonlinear. Global controllability properties of chemical reactions are analyzed here based on the Lie-algebra of the vector fields associated to elementary reactions. A chemical reaction is controllable almost everywhere if all the reaction rate coefficients can...

  5. On relevant boundary perturbations of unitary minimal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recknagel, A.; Roggenkamp, D.; Schomerus, V.

    2000-01-01

    We consider unitary Virasoro minimal models on the disk with Cardy boundary conditions and discuss deformations by certain relevant boundary operators, analogous to tachyon condensation in string theory. Concentrating on the least relevant boundary field, we can perform a perturbative analysis of renormalization group fixed points. We find that the systems always flow towards stable fixed points which admit no further (non-trivial) relevant perturbations. The new conformal boundary conditions are in general given by superpositions of 'pure' Cardy boundary conditions

  6. Introduction to chemical kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Soustelle, Michel

    2013-01-01

    This book is a progressive presentation of kinetics of the chemical reactions. It provides complete coverage of the domain of chemical kinetics, which is necessary for the various future users in the fields of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry, Materials Science, Chemical Engineering, Macromolecular Chemistry and Combustion. It will help them to understand the most sophisticated knowledge of their future job area. Over 15 chapters, this book present the fundamentals of chemical kinetics, its relations with reaction mechanisms and kinetic properties. Two chapters are then devoted to experimental re

  7. Chemical sensors based on surface charge transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtasebi, Amirmasoud; Kruse, Peter

    2018-02-01

    The focus of this review is an introduction to chemiresistive chemical sensors. The general concept of chemical sensors is briefly introduced, followed by different architectures of chemiresistive sensors and relevant materials. For several of the most common systems, the fabrication of the active materials used in such sensors and their properties are discussed. Furthermore, the sensing mechanism, advantages, and limitations of each group of chemiresistive sensors are briefly elaborated. Compared to electrochemical sensors, chemiresistive sensors have the key advantage of a simpler geometry, eliminating the need for a reference electrode. The performance of bulk chemiresistors can be improved upon by using freestanding ultra-thin films (nanomaterials) or field effect geometries. Both of those concepts have also been combined in a gateless geometry, where charge transport though a percolation network of nanomaterials is modulated via adsorbate doping.

  8. Constructing Contracts: Making Discrete Mathematics Relevant to Beginning Programmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegg-Harrison, Timothy S.

    2005-01-01

    Although computer scientists understand the importance of discrete mathematics to the foundations of their field, computer science (CS) students do not always see the relevance. Thus, it is important to find a way to show students its relevance. The concept of program correctness is generally taught as an activity independent of the programming…

  9. Antagonism at combined effects of chemical fertilizers and carbamate insecticides on the rice-field N2-fixing cyanobacterium Cylindrospermum sp. in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padhy Rabindra N.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Effects of chemical fertilizers (urea, super phosphate and potash on toxicities of two carbamate insecticides, carbaryl and carbofuran, individually to the N2-fixing cyanobacterium, Cylindrospermum sp. were studied in vitro at partially lethal levels (below highest permissive concentrations of each insecticide. The average number of vegetative cells between two polar heterocysts was 16.3 in control cultures, while the mean value of filament length increased in the presence of chemical fertilizers, individually. Urea at the 10 ppm level was growth stimulatory and at the 50 ppm level it was growth inhibitory in control cultures, while at 100 ppm it was antagonistic, i.e. toxicity-enhancing along with carbaryl, individually to the cyanobacterium, antagonism was recorded. Urea at 50 ppm had toxicity reducing effect with carbaryl or carbofuran. At 100 and 250 ppm carbofuran levels, 50 ppm urea only had a progressive growth enhancing effect, which was marked well at 250 ppm carbofuran level, a situation of synergism. Super phosphate at the 10 ppm level only was growth promoting in control cultures, but it was antagonistic at its higher levels (50 and 100 ppm along with both insecticides, individually. Potash (100, 200, 300 and 400 ppm reduced toxicity due to carbaryl 20 and carbofuran 250 ppm levels, but potash was antagonistic at the other insecticide levels. The data clearly showed that the chemical fertilizers used were antagonistic with both the insecticides during toxicity to Cylindrospermum sp.

  10. Antagonism at combined effects of chemical fertilizers and carbamate insecticides on the rice-field N2-fixing cyanobacterium Cylindrospermum sp. in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Nabakishore; Rath, Shakti

    2014-01-01

    Effects of chemical fertilizers (urea, super phosphate and potash) on toxicities of two carbamate insecticides, carbaryl and carbofuran, individually to the N2-fixing cyanobacterium, Cylindrospermum sp. were studied in vitro at partially lethal levels (below highest permissive concentrations) of each insecticide. The average number of vegetative cells between two polar heterocysts was 16.3 in control cultures, while the mean value of filament length increased in the presence of chemical fertilizers, individually. Urea at the 10 ppm level was growth stimulatory and at the 50 ppm level it was growth inhibitory in control cultures, while at 100 ppm it was antagonistic, i.e. toxicity-enhancing along with carbaryl, individually to the cyanobacterium, antagonism was recorded. Urea at 50 ppm had toxicity reducing effect with carbaryl or carbofuran. At 100 and 250 ppm carbofuran levels, 50 ppm urea only had a progressive growth enhancing effect, which was marked well at 250 ppm carbofuran level, a situation of synergism. Super phosphate at the 10 ppm level only was growth promoting in control cultures, but it was antagonistic at its higher levels (50 and 100 ppm) along with both insecticides, individually. Potash (100, 200, 300 and 400 ppm) reduced toxicity due to carbaryl 20 and carbofuran 250 ppm levels, but potash was antagonistic at the other insecticide levels. The data clearly showed that the chemical fertilizers used were antagonistic with both the insecticides during toxicity to Cylindrospermum sp. PMID:26038669

  11. The influence of oscillating electromagnetic fields on membrane structure and function: Synthetic liposome and natural membrane bilayer systems with direct application to the controlled delivery of chemical agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liburdy, R.P.; de Manincor, D.; Fingado, B.

    1989-09-01

    Investigations have been conducted to determine if an imposed electromagnetic field can influence membrane transport, and ion and drug permeability in both synthetic and natural cell membrane systems. Microwave fields enhance accumulation of sodium in the lymphocyte and induce protein shedding at Tc. Microwaves also trigger membrane permeability of liposome systems under specific field exposure conditions. Sensitivity varies in a defined way in bilayers displaying a membrane structural phase transition temperature, Tc; maximal release was observed at or near Tc. Significantly, liposome systems without a membrane phase transition were also found to experience permeability increases but, in contrast, this response was temperature independent. The above results indicate that field-enhanced drug release occurs in liposome vesicles that possess a Tc as well as non-Tc liposomes. Additional studies extend non-Tc liposome responses to the in vivo case in which microwaves trigger Gentamicin release from a liposome ''depot'' placed subcutaneously in the rat hind leg. In addition, evidence is provided that cell surface sequestered liposomes can be triggered by microwave fields to release drugs directly into target cells. 24 refs., 6 figs

  12. New methods for field collection of human skin volatiles and perspectives for their application in the chemical ecology of human-pathogen-vector interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormont, Laurent; Bessière, Jean-Marie; McKey, Doyle; Cohuet, Anna

    2013-08-01

    Odours emitted by human skin are of great interest to biologists in many fields, with practical applications in forensics, health diagnostic tools and the ecology of blood-sucking insect vectors of human disease. Convenient methods are required for sampling human skin volatiles under field conditions. We experimentally compared four modern methods for sampling skin odours: solvent extraction, headspace solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME), and two new techniques not previously used for the study of mammal volatiles, contact SPME and dynamic headspace with a chromatoprobe design. These methods were tested and compared both on European subjects under laboratory conditions and on young African subjects under field conditions. All four methods permitted effective trapping of skin odours, including the major known human skin volatile compounds. In both laboratory and field experiments, contact SPME, in which the time of collection was restricted to 3 min, provided results very similar to those obtained with classical headspace SPME, a method that requires 45 min of collection. Chromatoprobe sampling also proved to be very sensitive, rapid and convenient for the collection of human-produced volatiles in natural settings. Both contact SPME and chromatoprobe design may considerably facilitate the study of human skin volatiles under field conditions, opening new possibilities for examining the olfactory cues mediating the host-seeking behaviour of mosquito vectors implicated in the transmission of major diseases.

  13. Changes in growth and yield attributes of two selected maize varieties as influenced by application of chemical (npk) and organic (bat's manure) fertilizers in pala (chad) grown field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridine, W.; Ngakou, A.; Mbaiguinam, M.; Namba, F.; Anna, P

    2014-01-01

    The present experiment was conducted in Pala, region of the Mayo-Kebi West division, in a contribution to improve maize production in Chad. The work was oriented towards the evaluation of the interactions between chemical (NPK) and organic (bat's manure) fertilizers on growth and yield attributes of TZEE-W and IB selected maize varieties. The experimental design was a (5x2)x4 factorial design in which the main factor was the proportion of organic/chemical fertilizer (%), and the maize variety as the secondary factor, comprising the following six treatments repeated four times: control (T0) with 0 % NPK and 0 % bat's manure; T1 with 100% NPK; T2 with 100% bat's manure; T3 with 75% NPK and 25% bat's manure; T4 with 75% bat's manure and 25% NPK; T5 with 50% bat's manure and 50% NPK. Results show a variation in experimental soils pH of treatments from 5.91 to 7.92, depending on the proportion of the fertilizers applied. There were significant yield differences among treatments, as well as maize varieties. The 50% NPK+50% bat's manure was found as the best treatment to significantly (p<0.0001) enhance the yield of IB (51.2 t/ha) and TZEE-W (37.9 t/ha) maize varieties compared to their respective controls (7.25 t/ha and 6.76 t/ha). These results suggest that the combination at equal proportion of NPK and bat's manure could be recommended to sustainably improve maize production in Pala-Chad, thus with a considerable alleviation of the pollution risks that have been attributed to chemical fertilizer. (author)

  14. Profiles of Dialogue for Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Walton

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses argument diagrams, argumentation schemes, and some tools from formal argumentation systems developed in artificial intelligence to build a graph-theoretic model of relevance shown to be applicable (with some extensions as a practical method for helping a third party judge issues of relevance or irrelevance of an argument in real examples. Examples used to illustrate how the method works are drawn from disputes about relevance in natural language discourse, including a criminal trial and a parliamentary debate.

  15. Effect of Rashba and Dresselhaus interactions on the energy spectrum, chemical potential, addition energy and spin-splitting in a many-electron parabolic GaAs quantum dot in a magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, D. Sanjeev [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Mukhopadhyay, Soma [H & S Department of Physics, CMR College of Engineering and Technology, Kandlakoya, Medchal Road, Hyderabad 501 401 (India); Chatterjee, Ashok [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India)

    2016-11-15

    The effect of electron–electron interaction and the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin–orbit interactions on the electronic properties of a many-electron system in a parabolically confined quantum dot placed in an external magnetic field is studied. With a simple and physically reasonable model potential for electron–electron interaction term, the problem is solved exactly to second-order in the spin–orbit coupling constants to obtain the energy spectrum, the chemical potential, addition energy and the spin-splitting energy.

  16. Effect of Rashba and Dresselhaus interactions on the energy spectrum, chemical potential, addition energy and spin-splitting in a many-electron parabolic GaAs quantum dot in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, D. Sanjeev; Mukhopadhyay, Soma; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    The effect of electron–electron interaction and the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin–orbit interactions on the electronic properties of a many-electron system in a parabolically confined quantum dot placed in an external magnetic field is studied. With a simple and physically reasonable model potential for electron–electron interaction term, the problem is solved exactly to second-order in the spin–orbit coupling constants to obtain the energy spectrum, the chemical potential, addition energy and the spin-splitting energy.

  17. Field efficacy of Heterorhabditis bacteriophora (Nematoda: Heterorhabditidae), Metarhizium brunneum (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae), and chemical insecticide combinations for Diabrotica virgifera virgifera larval management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauch, Hannes; Steinwender, Bernhardt Michael; Mayerhofer, Johanna

    2017-01-01

    A two-year field study using a blend of entomopathogens in conjunction with chemical insecticides was carried out to determine to which extent they affect western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, survival, maize root damages, and grain yield and to assess the potential for sid...... is considerably higher than the stipulated economic threshold under favourable growing conditions, but a systematic crop rotation is recommended as an integral part of the WCR management both as a prophylaxis and as a background for the best treatment....

  18. Use of chemical flocculation and nested PCR for Heterodera glycines detection in DNA extracts from field soils with low population densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    The soybean cyst nematode (SCN) Heterodera glycines is a major pathogen of soybean world-wide. Distinction between SCN and other members of H. schachtii sensu stricto group based on morphology is a tedious task. A molecular assay was developed to detect SCN in field soils with low population densiti...

  19. Modeling the photochemical attenuation of down-the-drain chemicals during river transport by stochastic methods and field measurements of pharmaceuticals and personal care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanamoto, Seiya; Nakada, Norihide; Yamashita, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    Existing stochastic models for predicting concentrations of down-the-drain chemicals in aquatic environments do not account for the diurnal variation of direct photolysis by sunlight, despite its being an important factor in natural attenuation. To overcome this limitation, we developed a stochastic model incorporating temporal variations in direct photolysis. To verify the model, we measured 57 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in a 7.6-km stretch of an urban river, and determined their physical and biological properties in laboratory experiments. During transport along the river, 8 PPCPs, including ketoprofen and azithromycin, were attenuated by >20%, mainly owing to direct photolysis and adsorption to sediments. The photolabile PPCPs attenuated significantly in the daytime but persisted in the nighttime. The observations were similar to the values predicted by the photolysis model for the photolabile PPCPs (i.e., ketoprofen, diclofenac and furosemide) but not by the existing model. The stochastic model developed in this study was suggested to be a novel and useful stochastic model for evaluating direct photolysis of down-the-drain chemicals, which occurs during the river transport.

  20. Potassium selective chemically modified field effect transistors based on AlGaN/GaN two-dimensional electron gas heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alifragis, Y; Volosirakis, A; Chaniotakis, N A; Konstantinidis, G; Adikimenakis, A; Georgakilas, A

    2007-06-15

    We investigate the use of the AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) as a novel transducer for the development of ion-selective chemically modified HEMT sensors (ChemHEMTs). For this, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) membrane doped with ion-selective ionophores is deposited onto the area of the gate for the chemical recognition step, while the AlGaN/GaN HEMT is used as the transducer. In particular, the use of a valinocycin doped membrane with thickness of 50 microm generates a sensor with excellent analytical characteristics for the monitoring of K(+). The K(+)-ChemHEMT has sensitivity of 52.4 mV/pK(+)in the linear range of 10(-5) to 10(-2)M, while the detection limit is in the order of 3.1 x 10(-6)M. Also, the sensor shows selectivity similar to valinomycin-based ISEs, while the signal stability over time and the measurement to measurement reproducibility are very good.

  1. Relevance theory: pragmatics and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wearing, Catherine J

    2015-01-01

    Relevance Theory is a cognitively oriented theory of pragmatics, i.e., a theory of language use. It builds on the seminal work of H.P. Grice(1) to develop a pragmatic theory which is at once philosophically sensitive and empirically plausible (in both psychological and evolutionary terms). This entry reviews the central commitments and chief contributions of Relevance Theory, including its Gricean commitment to the centrality of intention-reading and inference in communication; the cognitively grounded notion of relevance which provides the mechanism for explaining pragmatic interpretation as an intention-driven, inferential process; and several key applications of the theory (lexical pragmatics, metaphor and irony, procedural meaning). Relevance Theory is an important contribution to our understanding of the pragmatics of communication. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Mean field interaction in biochemical reaction networks

    KAUST Repository

    Tembine, Hamidou; Tempone, Raul; Vilanova, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we establish a relationship between chemical dynamics and mean field game dynamics. We show that chemical reaction networks can be studied using noisy mean field limits. We provide deterministic, noisy and switching mean field limits

  3. Clinical relevance in anesthesia journals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jakob; Møller, Ann M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to present the latest knowledge and research on the definition and distribution of clinically relevant articles in anesthesia journals. It will also discuss the importance of the chosen methodology and outcome of articles.......The purpose of this review is to present the latest knowledge and research on the definition and distribution of clinically relevant articles in anesthesia journals. It will also discuss the importance of the chosen methodology and outcome of articles....

  4. Physical and chemical evaluation of the effect of a magnetic field on the electrodeposition of Ni in low carbon steel; Evaluacion fisica y quimica del efecto de un campo magnetico en la electrodeposicion de Ni en acero bajo carbono

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campo G, G. A.

    2015-07-01

    In this study nickel coatings were obtained, with and without the presence of magnetic field at 60 degrees Celsius for 7, 12 and 17 minutes on substrates of AISI 1018 carbon steel, from a classical type Watts solution. The properties of the coatings were studied by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, hardness tester and roughness tester, the electrochemical behavior of the films was also studied through RP and EIE and also capacitance calculations, corrosion rate and thickness were made. In general, the magnetic field has a negative influence on the physical and chemical properties of an electrodeposited Ni steel AISI 1018. The details are discussed in this research. (Author)

  5. Evaluation of the field relevance of several injury risk functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Priya; Mertz, Harold J; Dalmotas, Danius J; Augenstein, Jeffrey S; Diggs, Kennerly

    2010-11-01

    An evaluation of the four injury risk curves proposed in the NHTSA NCAP for estimating the risk of AIS>= 3 injuries to the head, neck, chest and AIS>=2 injury to the Knee-Thigh-Hip (KTH) complex has been conducted. The predicted injury risk to the four body regions based on driver dummy responses in over 300 frontal NCAP tests were compared against those to drivers involved in real-world crashes of similar severity as represented in the NASS. The results of the study show that the predicted injury risks to the head and chest were slightly below those in NASS, and the predicted risk for the knee-thigh-hip complex was substantially below that observed in the NASS. The predicted risk for the neck by the Nij curve was greater than the observed risk in NASS by an order of magnitude due to the Nij risk curve predicting a non-zero risk when Nij = 0. An alternative and published Nte risk curve produced a risk estimate consistent with the NASS estimate of neck injury. Similarly, an alternative and published chest injury risk curve produced a risk estimate that was within the bounds of the NASS estimates. No published risk curve for femur compressive load could be found that would give risk estimates consistent with the range of the NASS estimates. Additional work on developing a femur compressive load risk curve is recommended.

  6. Method and device for thermal control of biological and chemical reactions using magnetic particles or magnetic beads and variable magnetic fields

    OpenAIRE

    Zilch, C.; Gerdes, W.; Bauer, J.; Holschuh, K.

    2009-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for the thermal control of at least one temperature-dependent enzymatic reaction in the presence of magnetic particles, particularly nanoparticles, or magnetic beads, in vitro by heating the magnetic beads or magnetic particles to at least one defined target temperature using alternating magnetic fields. The thermally controllable enzymatic reaction carried out with the method according to the invention is preferably a PCR reaction or another reaction for elo...

  7. Metallic 1T phase source/drain electrodes for field effect transistors from chemical vapor deposited MoS{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappera, Rajesh; Voiry, Damien; Jen, Wesley; Acerce, Muharrem; Torrel, Sol; Chhowalla, Manish, E-mail: manish1@rci.rutgers.edu [Materials Science and Engineering, Rutgers University, 607 Taylor Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Yalcin, Sibel Ebru; Branch, Brittany; Gupta, Gautam; Mohite, Aditya D. [MPA-11 Materials Synthesis and Integrated Devices, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Lei, Sidong; Chen, Weibing; Najmaei, Sina; Lou, Jun; Ajayan, Pulickel M. [Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science Department, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Two dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (2D TMDs) offer promise as opto-electronic materials due to their direct band gap and reasonably good mobility values. However, most metals form high resistance contacts on semiconducting TMDs such as MoS{sub 2}. The large contact resistance limits the performance of devices. Unlike bulk materials, low contact resistance cannot be stably achieved in 2D materials by doping. Here we build on our previous work in which we demonstrated that it is possible to achieve low contact resistance electrodes by phase transformation. We show that similar to the previously demonstrated mechanically exfoliated samples, it is possible to decrease the contact resistance and enhance the FET performance by locally inducing and patterning the metallic 1T phase of MoS{sub 2} on chemically vapor deposited material. The device properties are substantially improved with 1T phase source/drain electrodes.

  8. A surface chemical model of the bentonite-water interface and its implications for modelling the near field chemistry in a repository for spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieland, E.; Wanner, H.; Albinsson, Y.; Wersin, P.; Karnland, O.

    1994-07-01

    Understanding the surface chemical properties of montmorillonite in near-neutral and alkaline media is essential for establishing a chemical model of the bentonite/water interaction applicable for repository conditions. A pretreated and well-characterised Wyoming MX-80 bentonite has been used for investigating the acid/base characteristics of Na-montmorillonite. The CEC of Na-montmorillonite was determined to 108 meq/100 g for pretreated bentonite and to 85 meq/100 g for the bulk material. The BET surface area was (31.53±0.16)m 2 /g. Potentiometric titrations of montmorillonite suspensions at ionic strengths I=0.005 M, 0.05 M and 0.5 M were conducted as batch-type experiments. Deprotonation of surface OH groups possibly exposed at the edge surface causes an overall negative charge on the surface of montmorillonite in the alkaline pH range. In this pH range, the protolysis degree of OH groups increases with increasing pH and ionic strength. The proton density on the surface of montmorillonite increases with decreasing pH in the acidic pH range (pH + at the structural-charge sites. The experimental results are interpreted in terms of a two-site model with structural-charge surface sites (X layer sites) and variable-charge surface sites (edge OH groups) as the reactive surface functionalities. The total population of the surface sites are estimated to TOT-OH=2.84*10 -5 mol/g, TOT-X=2.22*10 -5 mol/g. The intrinsic acidity constants for the OH groups are determined to pK int al = (5.4±0.1) and pK int a2 =(6-7±0.1), respectively, using th configuration of the diffuse double layer model (DDLM). 43 refs, 18 figs, 11 tabs

  9. Stochastic processes in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Shuler, K E

    2009-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics and physical chemistry fields with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study of chemical physics.

  10. Heterogeneous reaction mechanisms and kinetics relevant to the CVD of semiconductor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creighton, J.R.; Coltrin, M.E.

    1994-03-01

    This report documents the state of the art in experimental and theoretical techniques for determining reaction mechanisms and chemical kinetics of heterogeneous reactions relevant to the chemical vapor deposition of semiconductor materials. It summarizes the most common ultra-high vacuum experimental techniques that are used and the types of rate information available from each. Several case studies of specific chemical systems relevant to the microelectronics industry are described. Theoretical methods for calculating heterogeneous reaction rate constants are also summarized.

  11. Chemical Peels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products In This Section Dermatologic Surgery What is dermatologic ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products Chemical Peels Uses for Chemical Peels Learn more ...

  12. Chemical Oscillations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IMTECH),. Chandigarh. Praveen Kumar is pursuing his PhD in chemical dynamics at. Panjab University,. Chandigarh. Keywords. Chemical oscillations, autoca-. talYSis, Lotka-Volterra model, bistability, hysteresis, Briggs-. Rauscher reaction.

  13. Chemical ecotoxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paasivirta, J.

    1991-01-01

    This book discusses risk assessment, chemical cycles, structure-activity relations, organohalogens, oil residues, mercury, sampling and analysis of trace chemicals, and emissions from the forestry industry. Topics include: Cycles of chemicals in the environment. Rick assessment and management, strucuture and toxicity, sampling and analysis of trace chemicals in environment, interpretation of the environmental analysis results, mercury in the environment, organohalogen compounds in the environment, emissions from forestry industry, oil residues in the environment: oil spills in the marine environment

  14. Geothermal areas as analogues to chemical processes in the near-field and altered zone of the potential Yucca Mountain, Nevada repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruton, C.J.; Glassley, W.E.; Meike, A.

    1995-02-01

    The need to bound system performance of the potential Yucca Mountain repository for thousands of years after emplacement of high-level nuclear waste requires the use of computer codes. The use of such codes to produce reliable bounds over such long time periods must be tested using long-lived natural and historical systems as analogues. The geothermal systems of the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) in New Zealand were selected as the site most amenable to study. The rocks of the TVZ are silicic volcanics that are similar in composition to Yucca Mountain. The area has been subjected to temperatures of 25 to 300 C which have produced a variety of secondary minerals similar to those anticipated at Yucca Mountain. The availability of rocks, fluids and fabricated materials for sampling is excellent because of widespread exploitation of the systems for geothermal power. Current work has focused on testing the ability of the EQ3/6 code and thermodynamic data base to describe mineral-fluid relations at elevated temperatures. Welfare starting long-term dissolution/corrosion tests of rocks, minerals and manufactured materials in natural thermal features in order to compare laboratory rates with field-derived rates. Available field data on rates of silica precipitation from heated fluids have been analyzed and compared to laboratory rates. New sets of precipitation experiments are being planned. The microbially influenced degradation of concrete in the Broadlands-Ohaaki geothermal field is being characterized. The authors will continue to work on these projects in FY 1996 and expand to include the study of naturally occurring uranium and thorium series radionuclides, as a prelude to studying radionuclide migration in heated silicic volcanic rocks. 32 refs

  15. Chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, R. David (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A sensor for detecting a chemical substance includes an insertion element having a structure which enables insertion of the chemical substance with a resulting change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element under conditions sufficient to permit effective insertion; the change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element is detected as an indication of the presence of the chemical substance.

  16. A surface chemical model of the bentonite-water interface and its implications for modelling the near field chemistry in a repository for spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieland, E; Wanner, H [MBT Umwelttechnik AG, Zuerich, (Switzerland); Albinsson, Y [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Wersin, P [MBT Tecnologia Ambiental, Cerdanyola (Spain); Karnland, O [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    1994-07-01

    Understanding the surface chemical properties of montmorillonite in near-neutral and alkaline media is essential for establishing a chemical model of the bentonite/water interaction applicable for repository conditions. A pretreated and well-characterised Wyoming MX-80 bentonite has been used for investigating the acid/base characteristics of Na-montmorillonite. The CEC of Na-montmorillonite was determined to 108 meq/100 g for pretreated bentonite and to 85 meq/100 g for the bulk material. The BET surface area was (31.53{+-}0.16)m{sup 2}/g. Potentiometric titrations of montmorillonite suspensions at ionic strengths I=0.005 M, 0.05 M and 0.5 M were conducted as batch-type experiments. Deprotonation of surface OH groups possibly exposed at the edge surface causes an overall negative charge on the surface of montmorillonite in the alkaline pH range. In this pH range, the protolysis degree of OH groups increases with increasing pH and ionic strength. The proton density on the surface of montmorillonite increases with decreasing pH in the acidic pH range (pH<7.5). In this pH range, two simultaneously occurring surface reactions account for the observed proton density on montmorillonite: Protonation of edge OH groups and ion exchange of the major cations for H{sup +} at the structural-charge sites. The experimental results are interpreted in terms of a two-site model with structural-charge surface sites (X layer sites) and variable-charge surface sites (edge OH groups) as the reactive surface functionalities. The total population of the surface sites are estimated to TOT-OH=2.84*10{sup -5} mol/g, TOT-X=2.22*10{sup -5} mol/g. The intrinsic acidity constants for the OH groups are determined to pK{sup int}{sub al}= (5.4{+-}0.1) and pK{sup int}{sub a2}=(6-7{+-}0.1), respectively, using th configuration of the diffuse double layer model (DDLM). 43 refs, 18 figs, 11 tabs.

  17. Chemical bond fundamental aspects of chemical bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Frenking, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    This is the perfect complement to ""Chemical Bonding - Across the Periodic Table"" by the same editors, who are two of the top scientists working on this topic, each with extensive experience and important connections within the community. The resulting book is a unique overview of the different approaches used for describing a chemical bond, including molecular-orbital based, valence-bond based, ELF, AIM and density-functional based methods. It takes into account the many developments that have taken place in the field over the past few decades due to the rapid advances in quantum chemica

  18. Atmospheric measurements of gas-phase HNO3 and SO2 using chemical ionization mass spectrometry during the MINATROC field campaign 2000 on Monte Cimone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hanke

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The EU-project MINATROC (MINeral dust And TROpospheric Chemistry aims at enabling an estimation of the influence of mineral dust, a major, but to date largely ignored component of tropospheric aerosol, on tropospheric oxidant cycles. Within the scope of this project continuous atmospheric measurements of gas-phase HNO3 and SO2 were conducted in June and July 2000 at the CNR WMO station, situated on Monte Cimone (MTC (44°11' N --10°42' E, 2165 m asl, Italy. African air transporting dust is occasionally advected over the Mediterranean Sea to the site, thus mineral aerosol emitted from Africa will encounter polluted air masses and provide ideal conditions to study their interactions. HNO3 and SO2 were measured with an improved CIMS (chemical ionization mass spectrometry system for ground-based measurements that was developed and built at MPI-K Heidelberg. Since HNO3  is a very sticky compound special care was paid for the air-sampling and background-measurement system. Complete data sets could be obtained before, during and after major dust intrusions. For the first time these measurements might provide a strong observational indication of efficient uptake of gas-phase HNO3 by atmospheric mineral-dust aerosol particles.

  19. Chemical and microbiological water quality of subsurface agricultural drains during a field trial of liquid dairy manure effluent application rate and varying tillage practices, Upper Tiffin Watershed, southeastern Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Sheridan Kidd; Duris, Joseph W.

    2008-01-01

    A field trial was done in the Upper Tiffin River Watershed, in southeastern Michigan, to determine the influence of liquid dairy manure effluent (LDME) management practices on the quality of agricultural subsurface-drain water. Samples from subsurface drains were analyzed for nutrients, fecal-coliform and Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria, antibiotics, chemicals typically detected in wastewater, and the occurrence of genes indicating the presence of shiga-toxin-producing E. coli, or of bovine-specific Bacteroidetes bacteria. Samples were collected from November 2, 2006, to March 20, 2007, from eight subsurface drains under field plots that received no LDME and no tillage (controls) or received 4,000 or 8,000 gallons per acre (gal/acre) of LDME and either no tillage or two different types of tillage. The two types of tillage tested were (1) ground-driven, rotary, subsurface cultivation and (2) rolling-tine aeration. Samples were collected before LDME application and at 4 hours, and 1, 2, 6, 7, and 14 days post-application. Nutrient concentrations were high in subsurface-drain water throughout the field-trial period and could not be attributed to the field-trial LDME application. Of the 59 drain-water samples, including those collected before LDME application and control samples for each date, 56 had concentrations greater than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), Ecoregion VI recommended surface-water criterion for total phosphorus, and all samples had concentrations greater than the recommended total nitrogen criterion. Nitrate + nitrite nitrogen concentration exceeded 20 milligrams per liter for every sample and contributed most to the total nitrogen concentrations. Substantial increases in drain-water concentrations of organic and ammonia nitrogen and total phosphorus were found for all treatments, including controls, at 14 days post-application after 0.84 inch of rainfall over 2 days. E. coli concentrations exceeded the USEPA recreational

  20. Shippingport: A relevant decommissioning project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crimi, F.P.

    1988-01-01

    Because of Shippingport's low electrical power rating (72 MWe), there has been some misunderstanding on the relevancy of the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP) to a modern 1175 MWe commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR) power station. This paper provides a comparison of the major components of the reactor plant of the 72 MWe Shippingport Atomic Power Station and an 1175 MWe nuclear plant and the relevancy of the Shippingport decommissioning as a demonstration project for the nuclear industry. For the purpose of this comparison, Portland General Electric Company's 1175 MWe Trojan Nuclear Plant at Rainier, Oregon, has been used as the reference nuclear power plant. 2 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab