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Sample records for relativity gyroscope experiment

  1. The Gravity-Probe-B relativity gyroscope experiment - Development of the prototype flight instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turneaure, J. P.; Everitt, C. W. F.; Parkinson, B. W.; Bardas, D.; Breakwell, J. V.

    1989-01-01

    The Gravity-Probe-B relativity gyroscope experiment (GP-B) will measure the geodetic and frame-dragging precession rates of gyroscopes in a 650 km high polar orbit about the earth. The goal is to measure these two effects, which are predicted by Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, to 0.01 percent (geodetic) and 1 percent (frame-dragging). This paper presents the development progress for full-size prototype flight hardware including the gyroscopes, gyro readout and magnetic shielding system, and an integrated ground test instrument.

  2. A superconducting gyroscope to test Einstein's general theory of relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, C. W. F.

    1978-01-01

    Schiff (1960) proposed a new test of general relativity based on measuring the precessions of the spin axes of gyroscopes in earth orbit. Since 1963 a Stanford research team has been developing an experiment to measure the two effects calculated by Schiff. The gyroscope consists of a uniform sphere of fused quartz 38 mm in diameter, coated with superconductor, electrically suspended and spinning at about 170 Hz in vacuum. The paper describes the proposed flight apparatus and the current state of development of the gyroscope, including techniques for manufacturing and measuring the gyro rotor and housing, generating ultralow magnetic fields, and mechanizing the readout.

  3. Relative Pose Estimation Algorithm with Gyroscope Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Wei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel vision and inertial fusion algorithm S2fM (Simplified Structure from Motion for camera relative pose estimation. Different from current existing algorithms, our algorithm estimates rotation parameter and translation parameter separately. S2fM employs gyroscopes to estimate camera rotation parameter, which is later fused with the image data to estimate camera translation parameter. Our contributions are in two aspects. (1 Under the circumstance that no inertial sensor can estimate accurately enough translation parameter, we propose a translation estimation algorithm by fusing gyroscope sensor and image data. (2 Our S2fM algorithm is efficient and suitable for smart devices. Experimental results validate efficiency of the proposed S2fM algorithm.

  4. Gyroscope precession in special and general relativity from basic principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Rickard M.

    2007-05-01

    In special relativity a gyroscope that is suspended in a torque-free manner will precess as it is moved along a curved path relative to an inertial frame S. We explain this effect, which is known as Thomas precession, by considering a real grid that moves along with the gyroscope, and that by definition is not rotating as observed from its own momentary inertial rest frame. From the basic properties of the Lorentz transformation we deduce how the form and rotation of the grid (and hence the gyroscope) will evolve relative to S. As an intermediate step we consider how the grid would appear if it were not length contracted along the direction of motion. We show that the uncontracted grid obeys a simple law of rotation. This law simplifies the analysis of spin precession compared to more traditional approaches based on Fermi transport. We also consider gyroscope precession relative to an accelerated reference frame and show that there are extra precession effects that can be explained in a way analogous to the Thomas precession. Although fully relativistically correct, the entire analysis is carried out using three-vectors. By using the equivalence principle the formalism can also be applied to static spacetimes in general relativity. As an example, we calculate the precession of a gyroscope orbiting a static black hole.

  5. Vibration properties of a rotating piezoelectric energy harvesting device that experiences gyroscopic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haohui; Chai, Tan; Cooley, Christopher G.

    2018-03-01

    This study investigates the vibration of a rotating piezoelectric device that consists of a proof mass that is supported by elastic structures with piezoelectric layers. Vibration of the proof mass causes deformation in the piezoelectric structures and voltages to power the electrical loads. The coupled electromechanical equations of motion are derived using Newtonian mechanics and Kirchhoff's circuit laws. The free vibration behavior is investigated for devices with identical (tuned) and nonidentical (mistuned) piezoelectric support structures and electrical loads. These devices have complex-valued, speed-dependent eigenvalues and eigenvectors as a result of gyroscopic effects caused by their constant rotation. The characteristics of the complex-valued eigensolutions are related to physical behavior of the device's vibration. The free vibration behaviors differ significantly for tuned and mistuned devices. Due to gyroscopic effects, the proof mass in the tuned device vibrates in either forward or backward decaying circular orbits in single-mode free response. This is proven analytically for all tuned devices, regardless of the device's specific parameters or operating speed. For mistuned devices, the proof mass has decaying elliptical forward and backward orbits. The eigenvalues are shown to be sensitive to changes in the electrical load resistances. Closed-form solutions for the eigenvalues are derived for open and close circuits. At high rotation speeds these devices experience critical speeds and instability.

  6. Topological Gyroscopic Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Lisa Michelle

    Topological materials are generally insulating in their bulk, with protected conducting states on their boundaries that are robust against disorder and perturbation of material property. The existence of these conducting edge states is characterized by an integer topological invariant. Though the phenomenon was first discovered in electronic systems, recent years have shown that topological states exist in classical systems as well. In this thesis we are primarily concerned with the topological properties of gyroscopic materials, which are created by coupling networks of fast-spinning objects. Through a series of simulations, numerical calculations, and experiments, we show that these materials can support topological edge states. We find that edge states in these gyroscopic metamaterials bear the hallmarks of topology related to broken time reversal symmetry: they transmit excitations unidirectionally and are extremely robust against experimental disorder. We also explore requirements for topology by studying several lattice configurations and find that topology emerges naturally in gyroscopic systems.A simple prescription can be used to create many gyroscopic lattices. Though many of our gyroscopic networks are periodic, we explore amorphous point-sets and find that topology also emerges in these networks.

  7. The prototype design of the Stanford Relativity Gyro Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Bradford W.; Everitt, C. W. Francis; Turneaure, John P.; Parmley, Richard T.

    1987-01-01

    The Stanford Relativity Gyroscope Experiment constitutes a fundamental test of Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, probing such heretofore untested aspects of the theory as those that relate to spin by means of drag-free satellite-borne gyroscopes. General Relativity's prediction of two orthogonal precessions (motional and geodetic) for a perfect Newtonian gyroscope in polar orbit has not yet been experimentally assessed, and will mark a significant advancement in experimental gravitation. The technology employed in the experiment has been under development for 25 years at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Four fused quartz gyroscopes will be used.

  8. Optical gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifollahi, Alireza

    It is said that future of the world is based on space exploration which leads us to think more about low cost and light weight instruments. Cheap and sensitive instruments should be de-signed and replace the expensive ones. One of the required instruments in space ships is gyroscope controls the direction of space ship. In this article I am going to give an idea to use optical properties in a new gyroscope which will be cheaper as well as more sensitive in com-pare with most of the being used normal gyroscope nowadays. This instrument uses an optical system to measure the angular changes in the direction of a space craft movements in any of the three axels. Any movement, even very small one, will move a crystal bulb which is lashed by some narrow elastic bands in a fixed box surrounded by three optical sources and light meters. Light meters measure the attitude and the angel of changes in the light beams going through the bulb which is related to the amount of changes in the space craft directions. The system will be very sensitive even against movement around its access. As an electro digital device in connection to a Main Process Unit (MPU) it can be used in Stability Augmentation System (SAS) in a space ship. The sensitivity rate of the instrument will be based on the quality and sensitivity of the light meters.

  9. Investigation of a geodesy coexperiment to the Gravity Probe B relativity gyroscope program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, C. W. F.; Parkinson, Bradford W.; Tapley, Mark

    1993-01-01

    Geodesy is the science of measuring the gravitational field of and positions on the Earth. Estimation of the gravitational field via gravitation gradiometry, the measurement of variations in the direction and magnitude of gravitation with respect to position, is this dissertation's focus. Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is a Stanford satellite experiment in gravitational physics. GP-B will measure the precession the rotating Earth causes on the space time around it by observing the precessions of four gyroscopes in a circular, polar, drag-free orbit at 650 km altitude. The gyroscopes are nearly perfect niobium-coated spheres of quartz, operating at 1.8 K to permit observations with extremely low thermal noise. The permissible gyroscope drift rate is miniscule, so the torques on the gyros must be tiny. A drag-free control system, by canceling accelerations caused by nongravitational forces, minimizes the support forces and hence torques. The GP-B system offers two main possibilities for geodesy. One is as a drag-free satellite to be used in trajectory-based estimates of the Earth's gravity field. We described calculations involving that approach in our previous reports, including comparison of laser only, GPS only, and combined tracking and a preliminary estimate of the possibility of estimating relativistic effects on the orbit. The second possibility is gradiometry. This technique has received a more cursory examination in previous reports, so we concentrate on it here. We explore the feasibility of using the residual suspension forces centering the GP-B gyros as gradiometer signals for geodesy. The objective of this work is a statistical prediction of the formal uncertainty in an estimate of the Earth's gravitation field using data from GP-B. We perform an instrument analysis and apply two mathematical techniques to predict uncertainty. One is an analytical approach using a flat-Earth approximation to predict geopotential information quality as a function of spatial

  10. Microelectromechanical gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ernest J.

    1999-01-01

    A gyroscope powered by an engine, all fabricated on a common substrate in the form of an integrated circuit. Preferably, both the gyroscope and the engine are fabricated in the micrometer domain, although in some embodiments of the present invention, the gyroscope can be fabricated in the millimeter domain. The engine disclosed herein provides torque to the gyroscope rotor for continuous rotation at varying speeds and direction. The present invention is preferably fabricated of polysilicon or other suitable materials on a single wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or millimachining techniques that are well known in the art. Fabrication of the present invention is preferably accomplished without the need for assembly of multiple wafers which require alignment and bonding, and without piece-part assembly.

  11. Gravity Probe B Gyroscope Rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. This photograph is a close up of a niobium-coated gyroscope motor and its housing halves. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004 , the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Don Harley.)

  12. Gravity Probe B: Examining Einstein's Spacetime with Gyroscopes. An Educator's Guide with Activities in Space Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Range, Shannon K'doah; Mullins, Jennifer

    This teaching guide introduces a relativity gyroscope experiment aiming to test two unverified predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. An introduction to the theory includes the following sections: (1) "Spacetime, Curved Spacetime, and Frame-Dragging"; (2) "'Seeing' Spacetime with Gyroscopes"; (3)…

  13. Non-driven micromechanical gyroscopes and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Fuxue; Wang, Guosheng

    2018-01-01

    This book comprehensively and systematically introduces readers to the theories, structures, performance and applications of non-driven mechanical and non-driven micromechanical gyroscopes. The book is divided into three parts, the first of which mainly addresses mathematic models, precision, performance and operating error in non-driven mechanical gyroscopes. The second part focuses on the operating theory, error, phase shift and performance experiments involving non-driven micromechanical gyroscopes in rotating flight carriers, while the third part shares insights into the application of non-driven micromechanical gyroscopes in control systems for rotating flight carriers. The book offers a unique resource for all researchers and engineers who are interested in the use of inertial devices and automatic control systems for rotating flight carriers.  It can also serve as a reference book for undergraduates, graduates and instructors in related fields at colleges and universities.

  14. Influences of optical-spectrum errors on excess relative intensity noise in a fiber-optic gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yue; Zhang, Chunxi; Li, Lijing

    2018-03-01

    The excess relative intensity noise (RIN) generated from broadband sources degrades the angular-random-walk performance of a fiber-optic gyroscope dramatically. Many methods have been proposed and managed to suppress the excess RIN. However, the properties of the excess RIN under the influences of different optical errors in the fiber-optic gyroscope have not been systematically investigated. Therefore, it is difficult for the existing RIN-suppression methods to achieve the optimal results in practice. In this work, the influences of different optical-spectrum errors on the power spectral density of the excess RIN are theoretically analyzed. In particular, the properties of the excess RIN affected by the raised-cosine-type ripples in the optical spectrum are elaborately investigated. Experimental measurements of the excess RIN corresponding to different optical-spectrum errors are in good agreement with our theoretical analysis, demonstrating its validity. This work provides a comprehensive understanding of the properties of the excess RIN under the influences of different optical-spectrum errors. Potentially, it can be utilized to optimize the configurations of the existing RIN-suppression methods by accurately evaluating the power spectral density of the excess RIN.

  15. The Gravity Probe B gyroscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchman, S; Lipa, J A; Keiser, G M; Muhlfelder, B; Turneaure, J P

    2015-01-01

    The Gravity Probe B (GP-B) gyroscope, a unique cryogenically operated mechanical sensor, was used on-orbit to independently test two predictions of general relativity (GR). Here, we describe the development and performance of the GP-B gyroscope, its geometry and fabrication, spin-up and vacuum approach, magnetic considerations, and static charge management. The history of electrically suspended gyroscopes puts the current work in context. Fabrication and ground testing of the GP-B gyroscope are detailed, followed by a review of on-orbit initialization, calibration, operation, and performance. We find that the performance was degraded relative to the mission goals, but was still sufficient to provide excellent new tests of GR. The degradation is partially due to the existence of gyroscope torques due to an unanticipated interaction between patch potentials on the rotor and the housing. We discuss these patch potentials and describe the effect of related torques on gyro drift. It was essential to include models for the effects due to the patch potentials in the complete data analysis model to yield determinations of the two GR effects. (paper)

  16. GINGER (Gyroscopes IN General Relativity), a ring lasers array to measure the Lense-Thirring effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Virgilio, Angela D. V.

    The purpose of the GINGER is to perform the first test of general relativity (not considering the gravitational redshift measurements) in a terrestrial laboratory, using light as a probe. The experiment will complement the ones in space, performed or under way, with an entirely different technique and at a far lower cost. The methodology is based on ring-lasers, which are extremely accurate rotation sensors and can not only sense purely kinematical rotations (Sagnac effect accounting for the Earth rotation, polar motion of the terrestrial axis, local rotational movements of the laboratory due to the Earth crust dynamics...), but also general relativistic contributions such as the de Sitter effect (coupling between the gravito-electric field of the earth and the kinematical rotation) and the Lense-Thirring effect (inertial frame dragging due to the angular momentum of the earth). In order to reveal the latter effects, ring-laser response must be improved to be able to measure the effective rotation vector (kinematic plus GR terms) with an accuracy of 1 part in 109 or better. This is a challenging technological aspect, which however has been accurately taken into account by designing a system of ring lasers that will be implemented in this project. A ring laser have been installed inside the underground laboratory of GranSasso, with the purpose to see if an underground location is the right choice for GINGER. The apparatus and the preliminary results will be discussed.

  17. Fabrication of a novel quartz micromachined gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Liqiang; Xing, Jianchun; Wang, Haoxu; Wu, Xuezhong

    2015-04-01

    A novel quartz micromachined gyroscope is proposed in this paper. The novel gyroscope is realized by quartz anisotropic wet etching and 3-dimensional electrodes deposition. In the quartz wet etching process, the quality of Cr/Au mask films affecting the process are studied by experiment. An excellent mask film with 100 Å Cr and 2000 Å Au is achieved by optimization of experimental parameters. Crystal facets after etching seriously affect the following sidewall electrodes deposition process and the structure's mechanical behaviours. Removal of crystal facets is successfully implemented by increasing etching time based on etching rate ratios between facets and crystal planes. In the electrodes deposition process, an aperture mask evaporation method is employed to prepare electrodes on 3-dimensional surfaces of the gyroscope structure. The alignments among the aperture masks are realized by the ABM™ Mask Aligner System. Based on the processes described above, a z-axis quartz gyroscope is fabricated successfully.

  18. Silicon micromachined vibrating gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Ralf

    1997-09-01

    This work gives an overview of silicon micromachined vibrating gyroscopes. Market perspectives and fields of application are pointed out. The advantage of using silicon micromachining is discussed and estimations of the desired performance, especially for automobiles are given. The general principle of vibrating gyroscopes is explained. Vibrating silicon gyroscopes can be divided into seven classes. for each class the characteristic principle is presented and examples are given. Finally a specific sensor, based on a tuning fork for automotive applications with a sensitivity of 250(mu) V/degrees is described in detail.

  19. Model Design of Piezoelectric Micromachined Modal Gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Hu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a novel kind of solid-state microgyroscope, which is called piezoelectric micromachined modal gyroscope (PMMG. PMMG has large stiffness and robust resistance to shake and strike because there is no evident mass-spring component in its structure. This work focused on quantitative optimization of the gyroscope, which is still blank for such gyroscope. The modal analysis by the finite element method (FEM was firstly conducted. A set of quantitative indicators were developed to optimize the operation mode. By FEM, the harmonic analysis was conducted to find the way to efficiently actuate the operational mode needed. The optimal configuration of driving electrodes was obtained. At last, the Coriolis analysis was conducted to show the relation between angular velocity and differential output voltage by the Coriolis force under working condition. The results obtained in this paper provide theoretical basis for realizing this novel kind of micromachined gyroscope.

  20. Gyroscope Technology and Applications: A Review in the Industrial Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio M. N. Passaro

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an overview of current gyroscopes and their roles based on their applications. The considered gyroscopes include mechanical gyroscopes and optical gyroscopes at macro- and micro-scale. Particularly, gyroscope technologies commercially available, such as Mechanical Gyroscopes, silicon MEMS Gyroscopes, Ring Laser Gyroscopes (RLGs and Fiber-Optic Gyroscopes (FOGs, are discussed. The main features of these gyroscopes and their technologies are linked to their performance.

  1. GYROSCOPIC MANAGEMENT AND GENERATION Y

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhei Loredana

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the professional field of business and management there is still little research done on the possibility if the Generation Y members (born between 1980 and 2000, which are the managers off the future, need a different approach in education and training to be prepared for the future. The authors will explain how a new didactical approach in business and management called “Gyroscopic Management” can prepare these new managers to be of added value for the business. This specific approach was the start in 2007 of a specific (international HRQM Bachelor study programme at Arnhem Business School, HAN University in the Netherlands. During this study programme, students are confronting this specific training and didactical approach with characteristics as self-reliance, self-study, and Socratic dialogue, ethical and “gyroscopic” management. The programme has a clear vision and mission and didactical approach that triggers the above-mentioned elements. The approach focuses on the need for development of specific competencies like “Intercultural adaptability”, “International business awareness” and “Social entrepreneurship” as added to the existing competencies needed for a Bachelor level in business and management education. As researchers, lecturers and trainers, the authors used and researched this approach during many lectures, seminars, trainings and workshops in the last years at Universities in Romania and The Netherlands. The authors present the characteristics of the members of the new Y generation and relate them to main elements of gyroscopic management as practice and the results of this practice for students. For this, the authors did a so-called “Grounded action research”, from 2009 until 2012, among students of business and management studies. Further, the research was supported by focus groups over the same period. The authors have the opinion that this research is

  2. The development of micro-gyroscope technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Kai; Zhang, Weiping; Chen, Wenyuan; Li, Kai; Dai, Fuyan; Cui, Feng; Wu, Xiaosheng; Ma, Gaoyin; Xiao, Qijun

    2009-01-01

    This review reports an overview and development of micro-gyroscope. The review first presents different types of micro-gyroscopes. Micro-gyroscopes in this review are categorized into Coriolis gyroscope, levitated rotor gyroscope, Sagnac gyroscope, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) gyroscope according to the working principle. Different principles, structures, materials, fabrications and control technologies of micro-gyroscopes are analyzed. This review compares different classes of gyroscopes in the aspects such as fabrication method, detection axis, materials, size and so on. Finally, the review evaluates the key technologies on how to improve the precision and anti-jamming ability and to extend the available applications of the gyroscopes in the market and patents as well. (topical review)

  3. Ring mirror fiber laser gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaby, Mohamed Y.; Khalil, Kamal; Afifi, Abdelrahman E.; Khalil, Diaa

    2017-02-01

    In this work we present a new architecture for a laser gyroscope based on the use of a Sagnac fiber loop mirror. The proposed system has the unique property that its scale factor can be increased by increasing the gain of the optical amplifier used in the system as demonstrated experimentally using standard single mode fiber and explained physically by the system operation. The proposed gyroscope system is also capable of identifying the direction of rotation. This new structure opens the door for a new category of low cost optical gyroscopes.

  4. Fiberless Optical Gyroscope, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a radical new approach for to the design and fabrication of a fiber-less Interferometric Optical Gyroscope (IOG) that enables the production of a...

  5. Coriolis vibratory gyroscopes theory and design

    CERN Document Server

    Apostolyuk, Vladislav

    2016-01-01

    This book provides the latest theoretical analysis and design methodologies of different types of Coriolis vibratory gyroscopes (CVG). Together, the chapters analyze different types of sensitive element designs and their kinematics, derivation of motion equations, analysis of sensitive elements dynamics in modulated and demodulated signals, calculation and optimization of main performance characteristics, and signal processing and control. Essential aspects of numerical simulation of CVG using Simulink® are also covered. This is an ideal book for graduate students, researchers, and engineers working in fields that require gyroscope application, including but not limited to: inertial sensors and systems, automotive and consumer electronics, small unmanned aircraft control systems, personal mobile navigation systems and related software development, and augmented and virtual reality systems.

  6. What forces act in relativistic gyroscope precession?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semerák, Oldrich

    1996-11-01

    The translation of the relativistic motion into the language of forces, proposed by the author (1995, Nuovo Cimento B 110 973), is employed to interpret the gyroscope precession in general relativity. The precession is referred to the comoving Frenet triad built up along the projection of the gyroscope's trajectory onto the 3-space of the local hypersurface-orthogonal observer. The contributions of the centrifugal, the gravitational and the dragging + Coriolis forces are identified respectively with the Thomas, the geodetic, and the gravitomagnetic components of precession. Explicit expressions are given for several simple types of motion in the Kerr (or simpler) field in order to show that the general formulae obtained are not only very simple, but also yield clear results in accord with intuition in concrete situations.

  7. Engineering aspects of the Stanford relativity gyro experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, C. W. F.; Debra, D. B.

    1981-01-01

    According to certain theoretical predictions, the Newtonian laws of motion must be corrected for the effect of a gravitational field. Schiff (1960) proposed an experiment which would demonstrate the effect predicted by Einstein's Theory of General Relativity on a gyroscope. The experiment has been under development at Stanford University since 1961. The requirements involved make it necessary that the test be performed in a satellite to take advantage of weightlessness in space. In a discussion of engineering developments related to the experiment, attention is given to the development of proportional helium thrusters, the simulation of the attitude control system, aspects of inner loop control, the mechanization of the two-loop attitude control system, the effects of helium slosh on spacecraft pointing, and the data instrumentation system.

  8. General relativity and experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Damour, T.

    1994-01-01

    The confrontation between Einstein's theory of gravitation and experiment is summarized. Although all current experimental data are compatible with general relativity, the importance of pursuing the quest for possible deviations from Einstein's theory is emphasized.

  9. Fast Light Optical Gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation space missions are currently constrained by existing spacecraft navigation systems which are not fully autonomous. These systems suffer from accumulated dead-reckoning errors and must therefore rely on periodic corrections provided by supplementary technologies that depend on line-of-sight signals from Earth, satellites, or other celestial bodies for absolute attitude and position determination, which can be spoofed, incorrectly identified, occluded, obscured, attenuated, or insufficiently available. These dead-reckoning errors originate in the ring laser gyros themselves, which constitute inertial measurement units. Increasing the time for standalone spacecraft navigation therefore requires fundamental improvements in gyroscope technologies. One promising solution to enhance gyro sensitivity is to place an anomalous dispersion or fast light material inside the gyro cavity. The fast light essentially provides a positive feedback to the gyro response, resulting in a larger measured beat frequency for a given rotation rate as shown in figure 1. Game Changing Development has been investing in this idea through the Fast Light Optical Gyros (FLOG) project, a collaborative effort which began in FY 2013 between NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), and Northwestern University. MSFC and AMRDEC are working on the development of a passive FLOG (PFLOG), while Northwestern is developing an active FLOG (AFLOG). The project has demonstrated new benchmarks in the state of the art for scale factor sensitivity enhancement. Recent results show cavity scale factor enhancements of approx.100 for passive cavities.

  10. The Development of Micromachined Gyroscope Structure and Circuitry Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunzhu Xia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review surveys micromachined gyroscope structure and circuitry technology. The principle of micromachined gyroscopes is first introduced. Then, different kinds of MEMS gyroscope structures, materials and fabrication technologies are illustrated. Micromachined gyroscopes are mainly categorized into micromachined vibrating gyroscopes (MVGs, piezoelectric vibrating gyroscopes (PVGs, surface acoustic wave (SAW gyroscopes, bulk acoustic wave (BAW gyroscopes, micromachined electrostatically suspended gyroscopes (MESGs, magnetically suspended gyroscopes (MSGs, micro fiber optic gyroscopes (MFOGs, micro fluid gyroscopes (MFGs, micro atom gyroscopes (MAGs, and special micromachined gyroscopes. Next, the control electronics of micromachined gyroscopes are analyzed. The control circuits are categorized into typical circuitry and special circuitry technologies. The typical circuitry technologies include typical analog circuitry and digital circuitry, while the special circuitry consists of sigma delta, mode matching, temperature/quadrature compensation and novel special technologies. Finally, the characteristics of various typical gyroscopes and their development tendency are discussed and investigated in detail.

  11. Gravity Probe B: final results of a space experiment to test general relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, C W F; DeBra, D B; Parkinson, B W; Turneaure, J P; Conklin, J W; Heifetz, M I; Keiser, G M; Silbergleit, A S; Holmes, T; Kolodziejczak, J; Al-Meshari, M; Mester, J C; Muhlfelder, B; Solomonik, V G; Stahl, K; Worden, P W; Bencze, W; Buchman, S; Clarke, B; Al-Jadaan, A; Al-Jibreen, H; Li, J; Lipa, J A; Lockhart, J M; Al-Suwaidan, B; Taber, M; Wang, S

    2011-06-03

    Gravity Probe B, launched 20 April 2004, is a space experiment testing two fundamental predictions of Einstein's theory of general relativity (GR), the geodetic and frame-dragging effects, by means of cryogenic gyroscopes in Earth orbit. Data collection started 28 August 2004 and ended 14 August 2005. Analysis of the data from all four gyroscopes results in a geodetic drift rate of -6601.8±18.3  mas/yr and a frame-dragging drift rate of -37.2±7.2  mas/yr, to be compared with the GR predictions of -6606.1  mas/yr and -39.2  mas/yr, respectively ("mas" is milliarcsecond; 1  mas=4.848×10(-9)  rad).

  12. Fibre optic gyroscopes for space use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faussot, Nicolas; Cottreau, Yann; Hardy, Guillaume; Simonpietri, Pascal; Gaiffe, Thierry

    2017-11-01

    Among the technologies available for gyroscopes usable in space, the Fibre Optic Gyroscope (FOG) technology appears to be the most suitable: no moving parts, very good lifetime, low power consumption, very low random walk, arbitrarily low angular resolution and very good behaviour in radiations and vacuum. Benefiting from more than ten years of experience with this technology, Ixsea (formerly the Navigation Division of Photonetics) is developing space FOG under both CNES and ESA contracts since many years. In the 1996-1998 period, two space FOG demonstrators in the 0,01°/h class were manufactured, including an optical head (optic and optoelectronic part) designed for space use and a standard ground electronics. Beyond the demonstration of the specified FOG performances, the behaviour of the optical head has been validated for use in typical space environment: vibrations, shocks, radiations (up to 50 krad) and thermal vacuum. Since the beginning of 1999, Ixsea is developing a space electronics in order to manufacture two complete space FOG. The first one entered in qualification in October. The second one will be delivered beginning of next year, it will be used in a CNES attitude measurement experiment (MAGI) onboard the FrenchBrazilian Microsatellite (FBM) partly dedicated to technology evaluation.

  13. GEC Ferranti piezo vibratory gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttall, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    Prototypes of a piezo-electric vibratory angular rate transducer (gyroscope) (PVG) have been constructed and evaluated. The construction is on the lines suggested by Burdess. The sensitive element is a cylinder of radially poled piezo-electric ceramic. The cylinder is metallized inside and out, and the outer metallization is divided into eight electrodes. The metallization on the inside is earthed. A phase locked loop, using pairs of the electrodes, causes the cylinder to vibrate in one of its two fundamental, degenerate modes. In the presence of rotation, some of the vibration is coupled into the outer mode. This can be detected, or suppressed with a closed-up technique and provides a measure of rotation rate. The gyroscope provides a number of advantages over rotating mass and optical instruments: low size and mass, lower power consumption, potentially high reliability, potentially good dormancy, low cost and high maximum rate.

  14. FPGA platform for MEMS Disc Resonance Gyroscope (DRG) control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keymeulen, Didier; Peay, Chris; Foor, David; Trung, Tran; Bakhshi, Alireza; Withington, Phil; Yee, Karl; Terrile, Rich

    2008-04-01

    Inertial navigation systems based upon optical gyroscopes tend to be expensive, large, power consumptive, and are not long lived. Micro-Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) based gyros do not have these shortcomings; however, until recently, the performance of MEMS based gyros had been below navigation grade. Boeing and JPL have been cooperating since 1997 to develop high performance MEMS gyroscopes for miniature, low power space Inertial Reference Unit applications. The efforts resulted in demonstration of a Post Resonator Gyroscope (PRG). This experience led to the more compact Disc Resonator Gyroscope (DRG) for further reduced size and power with potentially increased performance. Currently, the mass, volume and power of the DRG are dominated by the size of the electronics. This paper will detail the FPGA based digital electronics architecture and its implementation for the DRG which will allow reduction of size and power and will increase performance through a reduction in electronics noise. Using the digital control based on FPGA, we can program and modify in real-time the control loop to adapt to the specificity of each particular gyro and the change of the mechanical characteristic of the gyro during its life time.

  15. Modeling of Thermal Phase Noise in a Solid Core Photonic Crystal Fiber-Optic Gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ningfang; Ma, Kun; Jin, Jing; Teng, Fei; Cai, Wei

    2017-10-26

    A theoretical model of the thermal phase noise in a square-wave modulated solid core photonic crystal fiber-optic gyroscope has been established, and then verified by measurements. The results demonstrate a good agreement between theory and experiment. The contribution of the thermal phase noise to the random walk coefficient of the gyroscope is derived. A fiber coil with 2.8 km length is used in the experimental solid core photonic crystal fiber-optic gyroscope, showing a random walk coefficient of 9.25 × 10 -5 deg/√h.

  16. MEMS Gyroscopes Based on Acoustic Sagnac Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Yu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the design, fabrication and preliminary test results of a novel microelectromechanical systems (MEMS device—the acoustic gyroscope. The unique operating mechanism is based on the “acoustic version” of the Sagnac effect in fiber-optic gyros. The device measures the phase difference between two sound waves traveling in opposite directions, and correlates the signal to the angular velocity of the hosting frame. As sound travels significantly slower than light and develops a larger phase change within the same path length, the acoustic gyro can potentially outperform fiber-optic gyros in sensitivity and form factor. It also promises superior stability compared to vibratory MEMS gyros as the design contains no moving parts and is largely insensitive to mechanical stress or temperature. We have carried out systematic simulations and experiments, and developed a series of processes and design rules to implement the device.

  17. Gyroscopic management as added value for management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    John Vinke

    2012-01-01

    In recent publications in International Journals in 2010 and 2011, I described the phenomenon of a new approach to education and training called ‘Gyroscopic Management’ (See list publications). To give the reader an insight and overview of this, I will introduce and explain this gyroscopic

  18. ATMOSPHERE PRESSURE EFFECT ON THE FIBER OPTIC GYROSCOPE OUTPUT SYGNAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya A. Sharkov

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes research results of the atmospheric pressure effect on the output signal of a fiber optic gyroscope (FOG. In the course of experiments, FOG was placed into a hermetic chamber. The atmosphere pressure was varying in the range from 0.8 to 1.5 atm. All the data, including the FOG output signal, temperature, and data from the pressure sensor installed inside the FOG, were synchronously registered with the computer software. The separation of scale factor change from zero offset in the experiment was carried out by setting the sensitive FOG axis at 0°, 90° and 270° relative to the East (the FOG was set perpendicular to the horizon. After the data processing it was concluded that the FOG signal error associated with the pressure affects mainly on the additive component. The pressure effect on the multiplicative component appeared to be negligible at rotational velocities used in the experiment (0 - 130 /h. At the same time, the FOG signal has a high linear correlation coefficient with the derivative of pressure over time (in some cases, more than 0.9. The experiment was repeated several times and the high degree of the drift repeatability was shown. That makes it possible to implement the compensation algorithm. Application of the simplest algorithmic compensation based on the polynomial of the first degree (ax + b enabled to reduce the root-mean-square (RMS and drift of the signal by 2-9 times.

  19. Viking relativity experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, I.I.; Reasenberg, R.D.; MacNeil, P.E.; Goldstein, R.B.; Brenkle, J.P.; Cain, D.L.; Komarek, T.; Zygielbaum, A.I.; Cuddihy, W.F.; Michael, W.H. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of the round-trip time of flight of radio signals transmitted from the earth to the Viking spacecraft are being analyzed to test the predictions of Einstein's theory of general relativity. According to this theory the signals will be delayed by up to approx.250 μs owing to the direct effect of solar gravity on the propagation. A very preliminary qualitative analysis of the Viking data obtained near the 1976 superior conjunction of Mars indicates agreement with the predictions to within the estimated uncertainty of 0.5%

  20. The Viking Relativity Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, I. I.; Reasenberg, R. D.; Macneil, P. E.; Goldstein, R. B.; Brenkle, J. P.; Cain, D. L.; Komarek, T.; Zygielbaum, A. I.; Cuddihy, W. F.; Michael, W. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of the round-trip time of flight of radio signals transmitted from the earth to the Viking spacecraft are being analyzed to test the predictions of Einstein's theory of general relativity. According to this theory the signals will be delayed by up to approximately 250 microsec owing to the direct effect of solar gravity on the propagation. A very preliminary qualitative analysis of the Viking data obtained near the 1976 superior conjunction of Mars indicates agreement with the predictions to within the estimated uncertainty of 0.5%.

  1. The Gyroscope Sensor Test by Using Arduino Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jen Mon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The gyroscope has ability to get accurate data of motions for space of three dimensions such as axes of x y and z. Its applications are covered very widely such as in mobile phone consumer electronics etc. due to the robust sense abilities of direction and motion. In this paper it is used to get data from motion and these data are shown in window and LCD screen. The experiment results show that it has good performance.

  2. Carbon Nanotube Tape Vibrating Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis Stephen (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A vibrating gyroscope includes a piezoelectric strip having length and width dimensions. The piezoelectric strip includes a piezoelectric material and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) substantially aligned and polled along the strip's length dimension. A spindle having an axis of rotation is coupled to the piezoelectric strip. The axis of rotation is parallel to the strip's width dimension. A first capacitance sensor is mechanically coupled to the spindle for rotation therewith. The first capacitance sensor is positioned at one of the strip's opposing ends and is spaced apart from one of the strip's opposing faces. A second capacitance sensor is mechanically coupled to the spindle for rotation therewith. The second capacitance sensor is positioned at another of the strip's opposing ends and is spaced apart from another of the strip's opposing faces. A voltage source applies an AC voltage to the piezoelectric strip.

  3. Servo Platform Circuit Design of Pendulous Gyroscope Based on DSP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lilong; Wang, Pengcheng; Zhong, Qiyuan; Zhang, Cui; Liu, Yunfei

    2018-03-01

    In order to solve the problem when a certain type of pendulous gyroscope in the initial installation deviation more than 40 degrees, that the servo platform can not be up to the speed of the gyroscope in the rough north seeking phase. This paper takes the digital signal processor TMS320F28027 as the core, uses incremental digital PID algorithm, carries out the circuit design of the servo platform. Firstly, the hardware circuit is divided into three parts: DSP minimum system, motor driving circuit and signal processing circuit, then the mathematical model of incremental digital PID algorithm is established, based on the model, writes the PID control program in CCS3.3, finally, the servo motor tracking control experiment is carried out, it shows that the design can significantly improve the tracking ability of the servo platform, and the design has good engineering practice.

  4. Integrated microelectromechanical gyroscope under shock loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterenko, T. G.; Koleda, A. N.; Barbin, E. S.

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents a new design of a shock-proof two-axis microelectromechanical gyroscope. Without stoppers, the shock load enables the interaction between the silicon sensor elements. Stoppers were installed in the gyroscope to prevent the contact interaction between electrodes and spring elements with fixed part of the sensor. The contact of stoppers occurs along the plane, thereby preventing the system from serious contact stresses. The shock resistance of the gyroscope is improved by the increase in its eigenfrequency at which the contact interaction does not occur. It is shown that the shock load directed along one axis does not virtually cause the movement of sensing elements along the crosswise axes. Maximum stresses observed in the proposed gyroscope at any loading direction do not exceed the value allowable for silicon.

  5. MEMS Gyroscope with Interferometric Detection, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a novel MEMS gyroscope that uses micro-interferometric detection to measure the motion of the proof mass. Using an interferometric...

  6. Nonlinear oscillations in coriolis based gyroscopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dag Kristiansen

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we model and analyze nonlinear oscillations which are known to exist in some Coriolis based gyroscopes due to large amplitude excitation in the drive loop. A detailed derivation of a dynamic model for a cylinder gyroscope which includes geometric nonlinearities is given, and energy transfer between the system's modes are analyzed using perturbation theory and by proposing a simplified model. The model is also simulated, and the results are shown to give an accurate description of the experimental results. This work is done in order to gain a better understanding of the gyroscope's dynamics, and is intended to be a starting point for designing nonlinear observers and vibration controllers for the gyroscope in order to increase the performance.

  7. Molecular gyroscopes and biological effects of weak extremely low-frequency magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binhi, V.N.; Savin, A.V.

    2002-01-01

    Extremely low-frequency magnetic fields are known to affect biological systems. In many cases, biological effects display 'windows' in biologically effective parameters of the magnetic fields: most dramatic is the fact that the relatively intense magnetic fields sometimes do not cause appreciable effect, while smaller fields of the order of 10-100 μT do. Linear resonant physical processes do not explain the frequency windows in this case. Amplitude window phenomena suggest a nonlinear physical mechanism. Such a nonlinear mechanism has been proposed recently to explain those 'windows'. It considers the quantum-interference effects on the protein-bound substrate ions. Magnetic fields cause an interference of ion quantum states and change the probability of ion-protein dissociation. This ion-interference mechanism predicts specific magnetic-field frequency and amplitude windows within which the biological effects occur. It agrees with a lot of experiments. However, according to the mechanism, the lifetime Γ -1 of ion quantum states within a protein cavity should be of unrealistic value, more than 0.01 s for frequency band 10-100 Hz. In this paper, a biophysical mechanism has been proposed, which (i) retains the attractive features of the ion interference mechanism, i.e., predicts physical characteristics that might be experimentally examined and (ii) uses the principles of gyroscopic motion and removes the necessity to postulate large lifetimes. The mechanism considers the dynamics of the density matrix of the molecular groups, which are attached to the walls of protein cavities by two covalent bonds, i.e., molecular gyroscopes. Numerical computations have shown almost free rotations of the molecular gyroscopes. The relaxation time due to van der Waals forces was about 0.01 s for the cavity size of 28 Aa

  8. High resolution capacitance detection circuit for rotor micro-gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yuan Ren

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional methods for rotor position detection of micro-gyroscopes include common exciting electrodes (single frequency and common sensing electrodes (frequency multiplex, but they have encountered some problems. So we present a high resolution and low noise pick-off circuit for micro-gyroscopes which utilizes the time multiplex method. The detecting circuit adopts a continuous-time current sensing circuit for capacitance measurement, and its noise analysis of the charge amplifier is introduced. The equivalent output noise power spectral density of phase-sensitive demodulation is 120 nV/Hz1/2. Tests revealed that the whole circuitry has a relative capacitance resolution of 1 × 10−8.

  9. Design, Fabrication, and Modeling of a Novel Dual-Axis Control Input PZT Gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cheng-Yang; Chen, Tsung-Lin

    2017-10-31

    Conventional gyroscopes are equipped with a single-axis control input, limiting their performance. Although researchers have proposed control algorithms with dual-axis control inputs to improve gyroscope performance, most have verified the control algorithms through numerical simulations because they lacked practical devices with dual-axis control inputs. The aim of this study was to design a piezoelectric gyroscope equipped with a dual-axis control input so that researchers may experimentally verify those control algorithms in future. Designing a piezoelectric gyroscope with a dual-axis control input is more difficult than designing a conventional gyroscope because the control input must be effective over a broad frequency range to compensate for imperfections, and the multiple mode shapes in flexural deformations complicate the relation between flexural deformation and the proof mass position. This study solved these problems by using a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) material, introducing additional electrodes for shielding, developing an optimal electrode pattern, and performing calibrations of undesired couplings. The results indicated that the fabricated device could be operated at 5.5±1 kHz to perform dual-axis actuations and position measurements. The calibration of the fabricated device was completed by system identifications of a new dynamic model including gyroscopic motions, electromechanical coupling, mechanical coupling, electrostatic coupling, and capacitive output impedance. Finally, without the assistance of control algorithms, the "open loop sensitivity" of the fabricated gyroscope was 1.82 μV/deg/s with a nonlinearity of 9.5% full-scale output. This sensitivity is comparable with those of other PZT gyroscopes with single-axis control inputs.

  10. Design, Fabrication, and Modeling of a Novel Dual-Axis Control Input PZT Gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yang Chang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Conventional gyroscopes are equipped with a single-axis control input, limiting their performance. Although researchers have proposed control algorithms with dual-axis control inputs to improve gyroscope performance, most have verified the control algorithms through numerical simulations because they lacked practical devices with dual-axis control inputs. The aim of this study was to design a piezoelectric gyroscope equipped with a dual-axis control input so that researchers may experimentally verify those control algorithms in future. Designing a piezoelectric gyroscope with a dual-axis control input is more difficult than designing a conventional gyroscope because the control input must be effective over a broad frequency range to compensate for imperfections, and the multiple mode shapes in flexural deformations complicate the relation between flexural deformation and the proof mass position. This study solved these problems by using a lead zirconate titanate (PZT material, introducing additional electrodes for shielding, developing an optimal electrode pattern, and performing calibrations of undesired couplings. The results indicated that the fabricated device could be operated at 5.5±1 kHz to perform dual-axis actuations and position measurements. The calibration of the fabricated device was completed by system identifications of a new dynamic model including gyroscopic motions, electromechanical coupling, mechanical coupling, electrostatic coupling, and capacitive output impedance. Finally, without the assistance of control algorithms, the “open loop sensitivity” of the fabricated gyroscope was 1.82 μV/deg/s with a nonlinearity of 9.5% full-scale output. This sensitivity is comparable with those of other PZT gyroscopes with single-axis control inputs.

  11. Hemispherical Resonator Gyroscope Accuracy Analysis Under Temperature Influence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boran LI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Frequency splitting of hemispherical resonator gyroscope will change as system operating temperature changes. This phenomenon leads to navigation accuracy of hemispherical resonator gyroscope reduces. By researching on hemispherical resonator gyroscope dynamical model and its frequency characteristic, the frequency splitting formula and the precession angle formula of gyroscope vibrating mode based on hemispherical resonator gyroscope dynamic equation parameters are derived. By comparison, gyroscope precession angle deviation caused by frequency splitting can be obtained. Based on analysis of temperature variation against gyroscope resonator, the design of hemispherical resonator gyroscope feedback controller under temperature variation conditions is researched and the maximum theoretical fluctuation of gyroscope dynamical is determined by using a numerical analysis example.

  12. Effects of Polarization–Maintaining Fibre Degrading on Precision of Fibre Optic Gyroscopes in Radiation Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Xiao; De-Wen, Liu; Yang, Liu; Xiao-Su, Yi; Lin, Cong

    2008-01-01

    In the space environment, the precision of fibre optic gyroscopes (FOGs) degrades because of space radiation. Photonic components of FOGs are affected by radiation, especially the polarization-maintaining (PM) fibre coil. In relation to the space radiation environment characteristic, we have carried out a series of radiation experiments on a PM fibre coil with 60 Co radiation source at different dose rates. Based on the experimental results, the formula between the PM-fibre loss and radiation dose rate is built, and the relation between the precision of FOG and radiation dose is obtained accordingly. The results strongly show that the precision of our FOG degrades owing to the attenuation of the polarization-maintaining fibre, which provides theoretical foundation for the radiation-resistant design of the FOG

  13. A novel differential frequency micro-gyroscope

    KAUST Repository

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Abdel-Rahman, E. M.; Ghommem, M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a frequency-domain method to measure angular speeds using electrostatic micro-electro-mechanical system actuators. Towards this end, we study a single-axis gyroscope made of a micro-cantilever and a proof-mass coupled to two fixed

  14. An adaptive compensation algorithm for temperature drift of micro-electro-mechanical systems gyroscopes using a strong tracking Kalman filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yibo; Li, Xisheng; Zhang, Xiaojuan

    2015-05-13

    We present an adaptive algorithm for a system integrated with micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) gyroscopes and a compass to eliminate the influence from the environment, compensate the temperature drift precisely, and improve the accuracy of the MEMS gyroscope. We use a simplified drift model and changing but appropriate model parameters to implement this algorithm. The model of MEMS gyroscope temperature drift is constructed mostly on the basis of the temperature sensitivity of the gyroscope. As the state variables of a strong tracking Kalman filter (STKF), the parameters of the temperature drift model can be calculated to adapt to the environment under the support of the compass. These parameters change intelligently with the environment to maintain the precision of the MEMS gyroscope in the changing temperature. The heading error is less than 0.6° in the static temperature experiment, and also is kept in the range from 5° to -2° in the dynamic outdoor experiment. This demonstrates that the proposed algorithm exhibits strong adaptability to a changing temperature, and performs significantly better than KF and MLR to compensate the temperature drift of a gyroscope and eliminate the influence of temperature variation.

  15. An Adaptive Compensation Algorithm for Temperature Drift of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems Gyroscopes Using a Strong Tracking Kalman Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibo Feng

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We present an adaptive algorithm for a system integrated with micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS gyroscopes and a compass to eliminate the influence from the environment, compensate the temperature drift precisely, and improve the accuracy of the MEMS gyroscope. We use a simplified drift model and changing but appropriate model parameters to implement this algorithm. The model of MEMS gyroscope temperature drift is constructed mostly on the basis of the temperature sensitivity of the gyroscope. As the state variables of a strong tracking Kalman filter (STKF, the parameters of the temperature drift model can be calculated to adapt to the environment under the support of the compass. These parameters change intelligently with the environment to maintain the precision of the MEMS gyroscope in the changing temperature. The heading error is less than 0.6° in the static temperature experiment, and also is kept in the range from 5° to −2° in the dynamic outdoor experiment. This demonstrates that the proposed algorithm exhibits strong adaptability to a changing temperature, and performs significantly better than KF and MLR to compensate the temperature drift of a gyroscope and eliminate the influence of temperature variation.

  16. Bifurcation Analysis and Spatiotemporal Patterns in Unidirectionally Delay-Coupled Vibratory Gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Xu, Jian

    Time delay is inevitable in unidirectionally coupled drive-free vibratory gyroscope system. The effect of time delay on the gyroscope system is studied in this paper. To this end, amplitude death and Hopf bifurcation induced by small time delay are first investigated by analyzing the related characteristic equation. Then, the direction of Hopf bifurcations and stability of Hopf-bifurcating periodic oscillations are determined by calculating the normal form on the center manifold. Next, spatiotemporal patterns of these Hopf-bifurcating periodic oscillations are analyzed by using the symmetric bifurcation theory of delay differential equations. Finally, it is found that numerical simulations agree with the associated analytic results. These phenomena could be induced although time delay is very small. Therefore, it is shown that time delay is an important factor which influences the sensitivity and accuracy of the gyroscope system and cannot be neglected during the design and manufacture.

  17. Null result for violation of the equivalence principle with free-fall rotating gyroscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, J.; Zhou, Z.B.; Nie, Y.X.; Zhang, Y.Z.

    2002-01-01

    The differential acceleration between a rotating mechanical gyroscope and a nonrotating one is directly measured by using a double free-fall interferometer, and no apparent differential acceleration has been observed at the relative level of 2x10 -6 . It means that the equivalence principle is still valid for rotating extended bodies, i.e., the spin-gravity interaction between the extended bodies has not been observed at this level. Also, to the limit of our experimental sensitivity, there is no observed asymmetrical effect or antigravity of the rotating gyroscopes as reported by Hayasaka et al

  18. Optimal Design of a Center Support Quadruple Mass Gyroscope (CSQMG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a more complete description of the design process of the Center Support Quadruple Mass Gyroscope (CSQMG, a gyro expected to provide breakthrough performance for flat structures. The operation of the CSQMG is based on four lumped masses in a circumferential symmetric distribution, oscillating in anti-phase motion, and providing differential signal extraction. With its 4-fold symmetrical axes pattern, the CSQMG achieves a similar operation mode to Hemispherical Resonant Gyroscopes (HRGs. Compared to the conventional flat design, four Y-shaped coupling beams are used in this new pattern in order to adjust mode distribution and enhance the synchronization mechanism of operation modes. For the purpose of obtaining the optimal design of the CSQMG, a kind of applicative optimization flow is developed with a comprehensive derivation of the operation mode coordination, the pseudo mode inhibition, and the lumped mass twisting motion elimination. The experimental characterization of the CSQMG was performed at room temperature, and the center operation frequency is 6.8 kHz after tuning. Experiments show an Allan variance stability 0.12°/h (@100 s and a white noise level about 0.72°/h/√Hz, which means that the CSQMG possesses great potential to achieve navigation grade performance.

  19. Quantum gyroscope based on Berry phase of spins in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xuerui; Wang, Liujun; Diao, Wenting; Duan, Chongdi

    2018-02-01

    Gyroscope is the crucial sensor of the inertial navigation system, there is always high demand to improve the sensitivity and reduce the size of the gyroscopes. Using the NV center electronic spin and nuclear spin qubits in diamond, we introduce the research of new types of quantum gyroscopes based on the Berry phase shifts of the spin states during the rotation of the sensor systems. Compared with the performance of the traditional MEMS gyroscope, the sensitivity of the new types of quantum gyroscopes was highly improved and the spatial resolution was reduced to nano-scale. With the help of micro-manufacturing technology in the semiconductor industry, the quantum gyroscopes introduced here can be further integrated into chip-scale sensors.

  20. Optimization of the geometrical stability in square ring laser gyroscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santagata, R; Beghi, A; Cuccato, D; Belfi, J; Beverini, N; Virgilio, A Di; Ortolan, A; Porzio, A; Solimeno, S

    2015-01-01

    Ultra-sensitive ring laser gyroscopes are regarded as potential detectors of the general relativistic frame-dragging effect due to the rotation of the Earth. Our project for this goal is called GINGER (gyroscopes in general relativity), and consists of a ground-based triaxial array of ring lasers aimed at measuring the rotation rate of the Earth with an accuracy of 10 −14 rad s −1 . Such an ambitious goal is now within reach, as large-area ring lasers are very close to the required sensitivity and stability. However, demanding constraints on the geometrical stability of the optical path of the laser inside the ring cavity are required. Thus, we have begun a detailed study of the geometry of an optical cavity in order to find a control strategy for its geometry that could meet the specifications of the GINGER project. As the cavity perimeter has a stationary point for the square configuration, we identify a set of transformations on the mirror positions that allows us to adjust the laser beam steering to the shape of a square. We show that the geometrical stability of a square cavity strongly increases by implementing a suitable system to measure the mirror distances, and that the geometry stabilization can be achieved by measuring the absolute lengths of the two diagonals and the perimeter of the ring. (paper)

  1. Scale factor measure method without turntable for angular rate gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Fangyi; Han, Xuefei; Yao, Yanqing; Xiong, Yuting; Huang, Yuqiong; Wang, Hua

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, a scale factor test method without turntable is originally designed for the angular rate gyroscope. A test system which consists of test device, data acquisition circuit and data processing software based on Labview platform is designed. Taking advantage of gyroscope's sensitivity of angular rate, a gyroscope with known scale factor, serves as a standard gyroscope. The standard gyroscope is installed on the test device together with a measured gyroscope. By shaking the test device around its edge which is parallel to the input axis of gyroscope, the scale factor of the measured gyroscope can be obtained in real time by the data processing software. This test method is fast. It helps test system miniaturized, easy to carry or move. Measure quarts MEMS gyroscope's scale factor multi-times by this method, the difference is less than 0.2%. Compare with testing by turntable, the scale factor difference is less than 1%. The accuracy and repeatability of the test system seems good.

  2. The Anatomy of the Gyroscope. Part 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    parts of the optical train by gyroscopic means; one of the first is that of JENSEN 1JS 2829557 (1958) who proposes a Porro - prism binocular telescope...to the ideas of JENSEN using Porro - prisms but we have neglected until now to refer to the work of KAESTNER who using porro - prisms and counterweights...CLEMENCE G.M. DYNAMICS OP THE SOLAR SYSTEM IBID pp. 2.60-2.68 ** See N.M.R. nuclear magnetic resonance , discovered 1945. ABRAGAM. A and GOLDMAN. M

  3. Fiber optic gyroscopes for vehicle navigation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Tatsuya; Soekawa, Hirokazu; Yuhara, Toshiya; Kajioka, Hiroshi; Oho, Shigeru; Sonobe, Hisao

    1994-03-01

    Fiber optic gyroscopes (FOGs) have been developed for vehicle navigation systems and are used in Toyota Motor Corporation models Mark II, Chaser and Cresta in Japan. Use of FOGs in these systems requires high reliability under a wide range of conditions, especially in a temperature range between -40 and 85 degree(s)C. In addition, a high cost-performance ratio is needed. We have developed optical and electrical systems that are inexpensive and can perform well. They are ready to be mass-produced. FOGs have already been installed in luxury automobiles, and will soon be included in more basic vehicles. We have developed more inexpensive FOGs for this purpose.

  4. Dynamics and control of vibratory gyroscopes with special spherical symmetry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Shatalov, M

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available It was shown in 1985 by Acad. V. Zhuravlev that the angular rate of a pure vibrating mode excited in a vibratory gyroscope with spherical symmetry is proportional to an inertial angular rate of the gyroscope. The effect is three dimensional...

  5. Uncertainty Relations and Possible Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregg Jaeger

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The uncertainty principle can be understood as a condition of joint indeterminacy of classes of properties in quantum theory. The mathematical expressions most closely associated with this principle have been the uncertainty relations, various inequalities exemplified by the well known expression regarding position and momentum introduced by Heisenberg. Here, recent work involving a new sort of “logical” indeterminacy principle and associated relations introduced by Pitowsky, expressable directly in terms of probabilities of outcomes of measurements of sharp quantum observables, is reviewed and its quantum nature is discussed. These novel relations are derivable from Boolean “conditions of possible experience” of the quantum realm and have been considered both as fundamentally logical and as fundamentally geometrical. This work focuses on the relationship of indeterminacy to the propositions regarding the values of discrete, sharp observables of quantum systems. Here, reasons for favoring each of these two positions are considered. Finally, with an eye toward future research related to indeterminacy relations, further novel approaches grounded in category theory and intended to capture and reconceptualize the complementarity characteristics of quantum propositions are discussed in relation to the former.

  6. Structure optimization and simulation analysis of the quartz micromachined gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuezhong Wu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Structure optimization and simulation analysis of the quartz micromachined gyroscope are reported in this paper. The relationships between the structure parameters and the frequencies of work mode were analysed by finite element analysis. The structure parameters of the quartz micromachined gyroscope were optimized to reduce the difference between the frequencies of the drive mode and the sense mode. The simulation results were proved by testing the prototype gyroscope, which was fabricated by micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS technology. Therefore, the frequencies of the drive mode and the sense mode can match each other by the structure optimization and simulation analysis of the quartz micromachined gyroscope, which is helpful in the design of the high sensitivity quartz micromachined gyroscope.

  7. A novel differential frequency micro-gyroscope

    KAUST Repository

    Nayfeh, A. H.

    2013-07-10

    We present a frequency-domain method to measure angular speeds using electrostatic micro-electro-mechanical system actuators. Towards this end, we study a single-axis gyroscope made of a micro-cantilever and a proof-mass coupled to two fixed electrodes. The gyroscope possesses two orthogonal axes of symmetry and identical flexural mode shapes along these axes. We develop the equations of motion describing the coupled bending modes in the presence of electrostatic and Coriolis forces. Furthermore, we derive a consistent closed-form higher-order expression for the natural frequencies of the coupled flexural modes. The closed-form expression is verified by comparing its results to those obtained from numerical integration of the equations of motion. We find that rotations around the beam axis couple each pair of identical bending modes to produce a pair of global modes. They also split their common natural frequency into a pair of closely spaced natural frequencies. We propose the use of the difference between this pair of frequencies, which is linearly proportional to the speed of rotation around the beam axis, as a detector for the angular speed.

  8. On the Interpretation of 3D Gyroscope Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Stančin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that the common interpretation of angular velocities measured by a 3D gyroscope as being sequential Euler rotations introduces a systematic error in the sensor orientation calculated during motion tracking. For small rotation angles, this systematic error is relatively small and can be mistakenly attributed to different sources of sensor inaccuracies, including output bias drift, inaccurate sensitivities, and alignments of the sensor sensitivity axes as well as measurement noise. However, even for such small angles, due to accumulation over time, the erroneous rotation interpretation can have a significant negative impact on the accuracy of the computed angular orientation. We confirm our findings using real-case measurements in which the described systematic error just worsens the deleterious effects typically attributed to an inaccurate sensor and random measurement noise. We demonstrate that, in general, significant improvement in the angular orientation accuracy can be achieved if the measured angular velocities are correctly interpreted as simultaneous and not as sequential rotations.

  9. Solid-state ring laser gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, S.

    The ring laser gyroscope is a rotation sensor used in most kinds of inertial navigation units. It usually consists in a ring cavity filled with a mixture of helium and neon, together with high-voltage pumping electrodes. The use of a gaseous gain medium, while resulting naturally in a stable bidirectional regime enabling rotation sensing, is however the main industrially limiting factor for the ring laser gyroscopes in terms of cost, reliability and lifetime. We study in this book the possibility of substituting for the gaseous gain medium a solid-state medium (diode-pumped Nd-YAG). For this, a theoretical and experimental overview of the lasing regimes of the solid-state ring laser is reported. We show that the bidirectional emission can be obtained thanks to a feedback loop acting on the states of polarization and inducing differential losses proportional to the difference of intensity between the counterpropagating modes. This leads to the achievement of a solid-state ring laser gyroscope, whose frequency response is modified by mode coupling effects. Several configurations, either mechanically or optically based, are then successively studied, with a view to improving the quality of this frequency response. In particular, vibration of the gain crystal along the longitudinal axis appears to be a very promising technique for reaching high inertial performances with a solid-state ring laser gyroscope. Gyrolaser à état solide. Le gyrolaser est un capteur de rotation utilisé dans la plupart des centrales de navigation inertielle. Dans sa forme usuelle, il est constitué d'une cavité laser en anneau remplie d'un mélange d'hélium et de néon pompé par des électrodes à haute tension. L'utilisation d'un milieu amplificateur gazeux, si elle permet de garantir naturellement le fonctionnement bidirectionnel stable nécessaire à la mesure des rotations, constitue en revanche la principale limitation industrielle des gyrolasers actuels en termes de coût, fiabilit

  10. A Novel Artificial Fish Swarm Algorithm for Recalibration of Fiber Optic Gyroscope Error Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanbin Gao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The artificial fish swarm algorithm (AFSA is one of the state-of-the-art swarm intelligent techniques, which is widely utilized for optimization purposes. Fiber optic gyroscope (FOG error parameters such as scale factors, biases and misalignment errors are relatively unstable, especially with the environmental disturbances and the aging of fiber coils. These uncalibrated error parameters are the main reasons that the precision of FOG-based strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS degraded. This research is mainly on the application of a novel artificial fish swarm algorithm (NAFSA on FOG error coefficients recalibration/identification. First, the NAFSA avoided the demerits (e.g., lack of using artificial fishes’ pervious experiences, lack of existing balance between exploration and exploitation, and high computational cost of the standard AFSA during the optimization process. To solve these weak points, functional behaviors and the overall procedures of AFSA have been improved with some parameters eliminated and several supplementary parameters added. Second, a hybrid FOG error coefficients recalibration algorithm has been proposed based on NAFSA and Monte Carlo simulation (MCS approaches. This combination leads to maximum utilization of the involved approaches for FOG error coefficients recalibration. After that, the NAFSA is verified with simulation and experiments and its priorities are compared with that of the conventional calibration method and optimal AFSA. Results demonstrate high efficiency of the NAFSA on FOG error coefficients recalibration.

  11. A novel artificial fish swarm algorithm for recalibration of fiber optic gyroscope error parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yanbin; Guan, Lianwu; Wang, Tingjun; Sun, Yunlong

    2015-05-05

    The artificial fish swarm algorithm (AFSA) is one of the state-of-the-art swarm intelligent techniques, which is widely utilized for optimization purposes. Fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) error parameters such as scale factors, biases and misalignment errors are relatively unstable, especially with the environmental disturbances and the aging of fiber coils. These uncalibrated error parameters are the main reasons that the precision of FOG-based strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) degraded. This research is mainly on the application of a novel artificial fish swarm algorithm (NAFSA) on FOG error coefficients recalibration/identification. First, the NAFSA avoided the demerits (e.g., lack of using artificial fishes' pervious experiences, lack of existing balance between exploration and exploitation, and high computational cost) of the standard AFSA during the optimization process. To solve these weak points, functional behaviors and the overall procedures of AFSA have been improved with some parameters eliminated and several supplementary parameters added. Second, a hybrid FOG error coefficients recalibration algorithm has been proposed based on NAFSA and Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) approaches. This combination leads to maximum utilization of the involved approaches for FOG error coefficients recalibration. After that, the NAFSA is verified with simulation and experiments and its priorities are compared with that of the conventional calibration method and optimal AFSA. Results demonstrate high efficiency of the NAFSA on FOG error coefficients recalibration.

  12. Videometrics-based Detection of Vibration Linearity in MEMS Gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhou

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available MEMS gyroscope performs as a sort of sensor to detect angular velocity, with diverse applications in engineering including vehicle and intelligent traffic etc. A balanced vibration of driving module excited by electrostatic driving signal is the base MEMS gyroscope's performance. In order to analyze the linear property of vibration in MEMS Gyroscope, a method of computer vision measuring is applied with the help of high-speed vidicon to obtain video of linear vibration of driving module in gyroscope, under the driving voltage signal of inherent frequency and amplitude linearly increasing. By means of image processing, target identifying, and motion parameter extracting from the obtained video, vibration curve with time variation is acquired. And then, linearity of this vibration system can be analyzed by focusing on the amplitude value of vibration responding to the amplitude variation of driving voltage signal.

  13. Vibratory gyroscopes : identification of mathematical model from test data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Shatalov, MY

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Simple mathematical model of vibratory gyroscopes imperfections is formulated, which includes anisotropic damping and variation of mass-stiffness parameters and their harmonics. The method of identification of parameters of the mathematical model...

  14. Fast-light Enhanced Fiber Gyroscope, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Current state-of-the-art navigation systems incorporate optical gyroscopes and optical accelerometers as inertial sensors. These devices contain no moving parts and...

  15. Resonant microsphere gyroscope based on a double Faraday rotator system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chengfeng; Tang, Jun; Cui, Danfeng; Wu, Dajin; Zhang, Chengfei; Li, Chunming; Zhen, Yongqiu; Xue, Chenyang; Liu, Jun

    2016-10-15

    The resonant microsphere gyroscope is proposed based on a double Faraday rotator system for the resonant microsphere gyroscope (RMSG) that is characterized by low insertion losses and does not destroy the reciprocity of the gyroscope system. Use of the echo suppression structure and the orthogonal polarization method can effectively inhibit both the backscattering noise and the polarization error, and reduce them below the system sensitivity limit. The resonance asymmetry rate dropped from 34.2% to 2.9% after optimization of the backscattering noise and the polarization noise, which greatly improved the bias stability and the scale factor linearity of the proposed system. Additionally, based on the optimum parameters for the double Faraday rotator system, a bias stability of 0.04°/s has been established for an integration time of 10 s in 1000 s in a resonator microsphere gyroscope using a microsphere resonator with a diameter of 1 mm and a Q of 7.2×106.

  16. From space qualified fiber optic gyroscope to generic fiber optic solutions available for space application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buret, Thomas; Ramecourt, David; Napolitano, Fabien

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this article is to present how the qualification of the Fiber Optic Gyroscope technology from IXSEA has been achieved through the qualification of a large range of optical devices and related manufacturing processes. These qualified optical devices and processes, that are now fully mastered by IXSEA through vertical integration of the technology, can be used for other space optical sensors. The example of the SWARM project will be discussed.

  17. Development of thin film encapsulation process for piezoresistive MEMS gyroscope with wide gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayanoor-Vitikkate, Vipin

    The gyroscope is an inertial sensor used to measure the angular rate of a rotating object. This helps to determine the pitch and yaw rate of any moving body. A number of applications have been developed for consumer and automotive markets, for e.g. vehicle stability control, navigation assist, roll over detection. These are primarily used in high-end cars, where cost is not a major factor. Other areas where a MEMS Gyro can be used are robotics, camcorder stabilization, virtual reality, and more. Primarily due to cost and the size most of these applications have not reached any significant volume. One reason for this is the relatively high cost of MEMS gyros compared to other MEMS sensors like accelerometers or pressure sensors. Generally the cost of packaging a MEMS sensor is about 85-90% of the total cost. Currently most MEMS based gyroscopes are made using bulk or surface micromachining, after which they are packaged using wafer bonding. This unfortunately leads to wastage of silicon and increase in the package size, thus reducing the yield. One way to reduce the cost of packaging is by wafer scale thin film encapsulation of MEMS gyroscopes. The goal of the present work is to fabricate a rate grade MEMS gyroscope and encapsulate it by modifying an existing thin-film encapsulation technique. Packaging is an important step towards commercialization of the device and we plan to use thin wafer scale encapsulation technique developed previously in our group to package these devices. The silicon micro machined gyroscope will be fabricated on SOI (Silicon-on-Insulator) wafers using Bosch DRIE etching techniques. The encapsulation of the device is carried out using epitaxial polysilicon in order to provide a high vacuum inside the device chamber. The advantages offered by this technique are the reduction in area of the die and thus less silicon surface is wasted. In addition to this the encapsulation technique helps in creating a vacuum inside the micro device, which

  18. Reproducibility of a 3-dimensional gyroscope in measuring shoulder anteflexion and abduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penning Ludo I F

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have investigated the use of a 3-dimensional gyroscope for measuring the range of motion (ROM in the impaired shoulder. Reproducibility of digital inclinometer and visual estimation is poor. This study aims to investigate the reproducibility of a tri axial gyroscope in measurement of anteflexion, abduction and related rotations in the impaired shoulder. Methods Fifty-eight patients with either subacromial impingement (27 or osteoarthritis of the shoulder (31 participated. Active anteflexion, abduction and related rotations were measured with a tri axial gyroscope according to a test retest protocol. Severity of shoulder impairment and patient perceived pain were assessed by the Disability of Arm Shoulder and Hand score (DASH and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. VAS scores were recorded before and after testing. Results In two out of three hospitals patients with osteoarthritis (n = 31 were measured, in the third hospital patients with subacromial impingement (n = 27. There were significant differences among hospitals for the VAS and DASH scores measured before and after testing. The mean differences between the test and retest means for anteflexion were −6 degrees (affected side, 9 (contralateral side and for abduction 15 degrees (affected side and 10 degrees (contralateral side. Bland & Altman plots showed that the confidence intervals for the mean differences fall within −6 up to 15 degrees, individual test - retest differences could exceed these limits. A simulation according to ‘Generalizability Theory’ produces very good coefficients for anteflexion and related rotation as a comprehensive measure of reproducibility. Optimal reproducibility is achieved with 2 repetitions for anteflexion. Conclusions Measurements were influenced by patient perceived pain. Differences in VAS and DASH might be explained by different underlying pathology. These differences in shoulder pathology however did not alter

  19. Relative costs to nuclear plants: international experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Jair Albo Marques de

    1992-03-01

    This work approaches the relative costs to nuclear plants in the Brazil. It also presents the calculation methods and its hypothesis to determinate the costs, and the nacional experience in costs of investment, operating and maintenance of the nuclear plants

  20. A new systematic calibration method of ring laser gyroscope inertial navigation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guo; Gao, Chunfeng; Wang, Qi; Wang, Qun; Xiong, Zhenyu; Long, Xingwu

    2016-10-01

    Inertial navigation system has been the core component of both military and civil navigation systems. Before the INS is put into application, it is supposed to be calibrated in the laboratory in order to compensate repeatability error caused by manufacturing. Discrete calibration method cannot fulfill requirements of high-accurate calibration of the mechanically dithered ring laser gyroscope navigation system with shock absorbers. This paper has analyzed theories of error inspiration and separation in detail and presented a new systematic calibration method for ring laser gyroscope inertial navigation system. Error models and equations of calibrated Inertial Measurement Unit are given. Then proper rotation arrangement orders are depicted in order to establish the linear relationships between the change of velocity errors and calibrated parameter errors. Experiments have been set up to compare the systematic errors calculated by filtering calibration result with those obtained by discrete calibration result. The largest position error and velocity error of filtering calibration result are only 0.18 miles and 0.26m/s compared with 2 miles and 1.46m/s of discrete calibration result. These results have validated the new systematic calibration method and proved its importance for optimal design and accuracy improvement of calibration of mechanically dithered ring laser gyroscope inertial navigation system.

  1. Structural-acoustic coupling effects on the non-vacuum packaging vibratory cylinder gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Xiang; Wu, Xuezhong; Wu, Yulie; Zhang, Yongmeng; Tao, Yi; Zheng, Yu; Xiao, Dingbang

    2013-12-13

    The resonant shells of vibratory cylinder gyroscopes are commonly packaged in metallic caps. In order to lower the production cost, a portion of vibratory cylinder gyroscopes do not employ vacuum packaging. However, under non-vacuum packaging conditions there can be internal acoustic noise leading to considerable acoustic pressure which is exerted on the resonant shell. Based on the theory of the structural-acoustic coupling, the dynamical behavior of the resonant shell under acoustic pressure is presented in this paper. A finite element (FE) model is introduced to quantitatively analyze the effect of the structural-acoustic coupling. Several main factors, such as sealing cap sizes and degree of vacuum which directly affect the vibration of the resonant shell, are studied. The results indicate that the vibration amplitude and the operating frequency of the resonant shell will be changed when the effect of structural-acoustic coupling is taken into account. In addition, an experiment was set up to study the effect of structural-acoustic coupling on the sensitivity of the gyroscope. A 32.4 mV/°/s increase of the scale factor and a 6.2 Hz variation of the operating frequency were observed when the radial gap size between the resonant shell and the sealing cap was changed from 0.5 mm to 20 mm.

  2. Structural-Acoustic Coupling Effects on the Non-Vacuum Packaging Vibratory Cylinder Gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Xi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The resonant shells of vibratory cylinder gyroscopes are commonly packaged in metallic caps. In order to lower the production cost, a portion of vibratory cylinder gyroscopes do not employ vacuum packaging. However, under non-vacuum packaging conditions there can be internal acoustic noise leading to considerable acoustic pressure which is exerted on the resonant shell. Based on the theory of the structural-acoustic coupling, the dynamical behavior of the resonant shell under acoustic pressure is presented in this paper. A finite element (FE model is introduced to quantitatively analyze the effect of the structural-acoustic coupling. Several main factors, such as sealing cap sizes and degree of vacuum which directly affect the vibration of the resonant shell, are studied. The results indicate that the vibration amplitude and the operating frequency of the resonant shell will be changed when the effect of structural-acoustic coupling is taken into account. In addition, an experiment was set up to study the effect of structural-acoustic coupling on the sensitivity of the gyroscope. A 32.4 mV/°/s increase of the scale factor and a 6.2 Hz variation of the operating frequency were observed when the radial gap size between the resonant shell and the sealing cap was changed from 0.5 mm to 20 mm.

  3. The Confrontation between General Relativity and Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Will Clifford

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The status of experimental tests of general relativity and of theoretical frameworks for analysing them are reviewed. Einstein's equivalence principle (EEP is well supported by experiments such as the Eötvös experiment, tests of special relativity, and the gravitational redshift experiment. Future tests of EEP and of the inverse square law will search for new interactions arising from unification or quantum gravity. Tests of general relativity at the post-Newtonian level have reached high precision, including the light deflection, the Shapiro time delay, the perihelion advance of Mercury, and the Nordtvedt effect in lunar motion. Gravitational wave damping has been detected in an amount that agrees with general relativity to half a percent using the Hulse-Taylor binary pulsar, and new binary pulsar systems may yield further improvements.When direct observation of gravitational radiation from astrophysical sources begins, new tests of general relativity will be possible.

  4. Relativity experiment on Helios - A status report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J. D.; Melbourne, W. G.; Cain, D. L.; Lau, E. K.; Wong, S. K.; Kundt, W.

    1975-01-01

    The relativity experiment on Helios (Experiment 11) uses S-band and Doppler data, and spacecraft-solar-orbital data to measure the effects of general relativity in the solar system and the quadrupole moment in the solar gravitational field. Specifically, Experiment 11 is converned with measuring the following effects: (1) relativistic orbital corrections described by two parameters of the space-time metric which are both equal to unity in Einstein's theory; (2) orbital perturbations caused by a finite quadrupole moment of an oblate sun, described by zonal harmonics in the solar gravitational field.

  5. Design, Construction, and Analysis of an Ultra-Low Expansion Quartz Resonant Cavity Passive Ring Resonator Laser Gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    Gyroscopes .... ....... 2 1.2 Sagnac’s Interferometer ....... ........ . . 4 1.3 Harress ’ Ring Interferometer ....... ...... 5 1.4 Michelson & Gale...graduate student, Harress , performed an experi- ment in which he attempted to measure the dispersion properties of glass. Figure 1.3 shows Harress ...8217 experiment. The results from his experiment did not agree-with data obtained from other methods, and Harress did not live long enough to find the discrepancy

  6. The Confrontation between General Relativity and Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Clifford M

    2014-01-01

    The status of experimental tests of general relativity and of theoretical frameworks for analyzing them is reviewed and updated. Einstein's equivalence principle (EEP) is well supported by experiments such as the Eötvös experiment, tests of local Lorentz invariance and clock experiments. Ongoing tests of EEP and of the inverse square law are searching for new interactions arising from unification or quantum gravity. Tests of general relativity at the post-Newtonian level have reached high precision, including the light deflection, the Shapiro time delay, the perihelion advance of Mercury, the Nordtvedt effect in lunar motion, and frame-dragging. Gravitational wave damping has been detected in an amount that agrees with general relativity to better than half a percent using the Hulse-Taylor binary pulsar, and a growing family of other binary pulsar systems is yielding new tests, especially of strong-field effects. Current and future tests of relativity will center on strong gravity and gravitational waves.

  7. Signal Quality Improvement Algorithms for MEMS Gyroscope-Based Human Motion Analysis Systems: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaying Du

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Motion sensors such as MEMS gyroscopes and accelerometers are characterized by a small size, light weight, high sensitivity, and low cost. They are used in an increasing number of applications. However, they are easily influenced by environmental effects such as temperature change, shock, and vibration. Thus, signal processing is essential for minimizing errors and improving signal quality and system stability. The aim of this work is to investigate and present a systematic review of different signal error reduction algorithms that are used for MEMS gyroscope-based motion analysis systems for human motion analysis or have the potential to be used in this area. A systematic search was performed with the search engines/databases of the ACM Digital Library, IEEE Xplore, PubMed, and Scopus. Sixteen papers that focus on MEMS gyroscope-related signal processing and were published in journals or conference proceedings in the past 10 years were found and fully reviewed. Seventeen algorithms were categorized into four main groups: Kalman-filter-based algorithms, adaptive-based algorithms, simple filter algorithms, and compensation-based algorithms. The algorithms were analyzed and presented along with their characteristics such as advantages, disadvantages, and time limitations. A user guide to the most suitable signal processing algorithms within this area is presented.

  8. Signal Quality Improvement Algorithms for MEMS Gyroscope-Based Human Motion Analysis Systems: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jiaying; Gerdtman, Christer; Lindén, Maria

    2018-04-06

    Motion sensors such as MEMS gyroscopes and accelerometers are characterized by a small size, light weight, high sensitivity, and low cost. They are used in an increasing number of applications. However, they are easily influenced by environmental effects such as temperature change, shock, and vibration. Thus, signal processing is essential for minimizing errors and improving signal quality and system stability. The aim of this work is to investigate and present a systematic review of different signal error reduction algorithms that are used for MEMS gyroscope-based motion analysis systems for human motion analysis or have the potential to be used in this area. A systematic search was performed with the search engines/databases of the ACM Digital Library, IEEE Xplore, PubMed, and Scopus. Sixteen papers that focus on MEMS gyroscope-related signal processing and were published in journals or conference proceedings in the past 10 years were found and fully reviewed. Seventeen algorithms were categorized into four main groups: Kalman-filter-based algorithms, adaptive-based algorithms, simple filter algorithms, and compensation-based algorithms. The algorithms were analyzed and presented along with their characteristics such as advantages, disadvantages, and time limitations. A user guide to the most suitable signal processing algorithms within this area is presented.

  9. Modeling and optimizing of the random atomic spin gyroscope drift based on the atomic spin gyroscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quan, Wei; Lv, Lin, E-mail: lvlinlch1990@163.com; Liu, Baiqi [School of Instrument Science and Opto-Electronics Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2014-11-15

    In order to improve the atom spin gyroscope's operational accuracy and compensate the random error caused by the nonlinear and weak-stability characteristic of the random atomic spin gyroscope (ASG) drift, the hybrid random drift error model based on autoregressive (AR) and genetic programming (GP) + genetic algorithm (GA) technique is established. The time series of random ASG drift is taken as the study object. The time series of random ASG drift is acquired by analyzing and preprocessing the measured data of ASG. The linear section model is established based on AR technique. After that, the nonlinear section model is built based on GP technique and GA is used to optimize the coefficients of the mathematic expression acquired by GP in order to obtain a more accurate model. The simulation result indicates that this hybrid model can effectively reflect the characteristics of the ASG's random drift. The square error of the ASG's random drift is reduced by 92.40%. Comparing with the AR technique and the GP + GA technique, the random drift is reduced by 9.34% and 5.06%, respectively. The hybrid modeling method can effectively compensate the ASG's random drift and improve the stability of the system.

  10. Online technique for detecting state of onboard fiber optic gyroscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao, Zhiyong; He, Kunpeng; Pang, Shuwan; Xu, Dingjie; Tian, Chunmiao

    2015-01-01

    Although angle random walk (ARW) of fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) has been well modeled and identified before being integrated into the high-accuracy attitude control system of satellite, aging and unexpected failures can affect the performance of FOG after launch, resulting in the variation of ARW coefficient. Therefore, the ARW coefficient can be regarded as an indicator of “state of health” for FOG diagnosis in some sense. The Allan variance method can be used to estimate ARW coefficient of FOG, however, it requires a large amount of data to be stored. Moreover, the procedure of drawing slope lines for estimation is painful. To overcome the barriers, a weighted state-space model that directly models the ARW to obtain a nonlinear state-space model was established for FOG. Then, a neural extended-Kalman filter algorithm was implemented to estimate and track the variation of ARW in real time. The results of experiment show that the proposed approach is valid to detect the state of FOG. Moreover, the proposed technique effectively avoids the storage of data

  11. Online technique for detecting state of onboard fiber optic gyroscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Zhiyong; He, Kunpeng, E-mail: pengkhe@126.com; Pang, Shuwan [Department of Automation, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150000 (China); Xu, Dingjie [School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150000 (China); Tian, Chunmiao [Department of Information and Communication Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150000 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Although angle random walk (ARW) of fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) has been well modeled and identified before being integrated into the high-accuracy attitude control system of satellite, aging and unexpected failures can affect the performance of FOG after launch, resulting in the variation of ARW coefficient. Therefore, the ARW coefficient can be regarded as an indicator of “state of health” for FOG diagnosis in some sense. The Allan variance method can be used to estimate ARW coefficient of FOG, however, it requires a large amount of data to be stored. Moreover, the procedure of drawing slope lines for estimation is painful. To overcome the barriers, a weighted state-space model that directly models the ARW to obtain a nonlinear state-space model was established for FOG. Then, a neural extended-Kalman filter algorithm was implemented to estimate and track the variation of ARW in real time. The results of experiment show that the proposed approach is valid to detect the state of FOG. Moreover, the proposed technique effectively avoids the storage of data.

  12. Magnetometer and Gyroscope Calibration Method with Level Rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongkai Wu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Micro electro mechanical system (MEMS gyroscopes and magnetometers are usually integrated into a sensor module or chip and widely used in a variety of applications. In existing integrated gyroscope and magnetometer calibration methods, rotation in all possible orientations is a necessary condition for a good calibration result. However, rotation around two or more axes is difficult to attain, as it is limited by the range of movement of vehicles such as cars, ships, or planes. To solve this problem, this paper proposes an integrated magnetometer and gyroscope calibration method with level rotation. The proposed method presents a redefined magnetometer output model using level attitude. New gyroscope and magnetometer calibration models are then deduced. In addition, a simplified cubature Kalman filter (CKF is established to estimate calibration parameters. This method possesses important value for application in actual systems, as it only needs level rotation for real-time calibration of gyroscopes and magnetometers. Theoretical analysis and test results verify the validity and feasibility of this method.

  13. Compact fiber optic gyroscopes for platform stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, William C.; Yee, Ting K.; Coward, James F.; McClaren, Andrew; Pechner, David A.

    2013-09-01

    SA Photonics has developed a family of compact Fiber Optic Gyroscopes (FOGs) for platform stabilization applications. The use of short fiber coils enables the high update rates required for stabilization applications but presents challenges to maintain high performance. We are able to match the performance of much larger FOGs by utilizing several innovative technologies. These technologies include source noise reduction to minimize Angular Random Walk (ARW), advanced digital signal processing that minimizes bias drift at high update rates, and advanced passive thermal packaging that minimizes temperature induced bias drift while not significantly affecting size, weight, or power. In addition, SA Photonics has developed unique distributed FOG packaging technologies allowing the FOG electronics and photonics to be packaged remotely from the sensor head or independent axis heads to minimize size, weight, and power at the sensing location(s). The use of these technologies has resulted in high performance, including ARW less than 0.001 deg/rt-hr and bias drift less than 0.004 deg/hr at an update rate of 10 kHz, and total packaged volume less than 30 cu. in. for a 6 degree of freedom FOG-based IMU. Specific applications include optical beam stabilization for LIDAR and LADAR, beam stabilization for long-range free-space optical communication, Optical Inertial Reference Units for HEL stabilization, and Ka band antenna pedestal pointing and stabilization. The high performance of our FOGs also enables their use in traditional navigation and positioning applications. This paper will review the technologies enabling our high-performance compact FOGs, and will provide performance test results.

  14. A comparative analysis of modal motions for the gyroscopic and non-gyroscopic two degree-of-freedom conservative systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Dong; An, Hua-Zhen; Qian, Ying-Jing; Zhang, Wei; Melnik, Roderick V. N.

    2016-12-01

    The synchronous in-unison motions in vibrational mechanics and the non-synchronous out-of-unison motions are the most frequently found periodic motions in every fields of science and everywhere in the universe. In contrast to the in-unison normal modes, the out-of-unison complex modes feature a π/2 phase difference. By the complex mode analysis we classify the out-of-unison planar motion into two types, gyroscopic motions and elliptic motions. It is found that the gyroscopic and elliptic motions have different characteristics for a two degree-of-freedom (2DOF) system. The gyroscopic motion involves two distinct frequencies with, respectively, two corresponding complex modes. However, the elliptic motion the nonlinear non-gyroscopic 2DOF system with repeated frequencies involves only single frequency with corresponding two complex modes. The study of the differences and similarities of the gyroscopic and elliptic modes sheds new light on the in-depth mechanism of the planar motions in the universe and the man-made engineering systems.

  15. Thermal and Quantum Mechanical Noise of a Superfluid Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Talso; Penanen, Konstantin

    2004-01-01

    A potential application of a superfluid gyroscope is for real-time measurements of the small variations in the rotational speed of the Earth, the Moon, and Mars. Such rotational jitter, if not measured and corrected for, will be a limiting factor on the resolution potential of a GPS system. This limitation will prevent many automation concepts in navigation, construction, and biomedical examination from being realized. We present the calculation of thermal and quantum-mechanical phase noise across the Josephson junction of a superfluid gyroscope. This allows us to derive the fundamental limits on the performance of a superfluid gyroscope. We show that the fundamental limit on real-time GPS due to rotational jitter can be reduced to well below 1 millimeter/day. Other limitations and their potential mitigation will also be discussed.

  16. The Confrontation between General Relativity and Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Will Clifford M.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The status of experimental tests of general relativity and of theoretical frameworks for analyzing them is reviewed. Einstein’s equivalence principle (EEP is well supported by experiments such as the Eötvös experiment, tests of special relativity, and the gravitational redshift experiment. Ongoing tests of EEP and of the inverse square law are searching for new interactions arising from unification or quantum gravity. Tests of general relativity at the post-Newtonian level have reached high precision, including the light deflection, the Shapiro time delay, the perihelion advance of Mercury, and the Nordtvedt effect in lunar motion. Gravitational wave damping has been detected in an amount that agrees with general relativity to better than half a percent using the Hulse-Taylor binary pulsar, and other binary pulsar systems have yielded other tests, especially of strong-field effects. When direct observation of gravitational radiation from astrophysical sources begins, new tests of general relativity will be possible.

  17. Microfibrous metallic cloth for acoustic isolation of a MEMS gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Robert; Burch, Nesha; Black, Meagan; Beal, Aubrey; Flowers, George

    2011-04-01

    The response of a MEMS device that is exposed to a harsh environment may range from an increased noise floor to a completely erroneous output to temporary or even permanent device failure. One such harsh environment is high power acoustic energy possessing high frequency components. This type of environment sometimes occurs in small aerospace vehicles. In this type of operating environment, high frequency acoustic energy can be transferred to a MEMS gyroscope die through the device packaging. If the acoustic noise possesses a sufficiently strong component at the resonant frequency of the gyroscope, it will overexcite the motion of the proof mass, resulting in the deleterious effect of corrupted angular rate measurement. Therefore if the device or system packaging can be improved to sufficiently isolate the gyroscope die from environmental acoustic energy, the sensor may find new applications in this type of harsh environment. This research effort explored the use of microfibrous metallic cloth for isolating the gyroscope die from environmental acoustic excitation. Microfibrous cloth is a composite of fused, intermingled metal fibers and has a variety of typical uses involving chemical processing applications and filtering. Specifically, this research consisted of experimental evaluations of multiple layers of packed microfibrous cloth composed of sintered nickel material. The packed cloth was used to provide acoustic isolation for a test MEMS gyroscope, the Analog Devices ADXRS300. The results of this investigation revealed that the intermingling of the various fibers of the metallic cloth provided a significant contact area between the fiber strands and voids, which enhanced the acoustic damping of the material. As a result, the nickel cloth was discovered to be an effective acoustic isolation material for this particular MEMS gyroscope.

  18. Studying rotational dynamics with a smartphone—accelerometer versus gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braskén, Mats; Pörn, Ray

    2017-07-01

    The wide-spread availability of smartphones makes them a valuable addition to the measurement equipment of both the physics classroom and the instructional physics laboratory, encouraging an active interaction between measurements and modeling activities. Two useful sensors, available in most modern smartphones and tablets, are the 3-axis acceleration sensor and the 3-axis gyroscope. We explore the strengths and weaknesses of each type of sensor and use them to study the rotational dynamics of objects rotating about a fixed axis. Care has to be taken when interpreting acceleration sensor data, and in some cases the gyroscope will allow for rotational measurements not easily replicated using the acceleration sensor.

  19. Construction of Lyapunov Function for Dissipative Gyroscopic System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Wei; Ao Ping; Yuan Bo

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a force decomposition to construct a potential function in deterministic dynamics described by ordinary differential equations in the context of dissipative gyroscopic systems. Such a potential function serves as the corresponding Lyapunov function for the dynamics, hence it gives both quantitative and qualitative descriptions for stability of motion. As an example we apply our force decomposition to a four-dimensional dissipative gyroscopic system. We explicitly obtain the potential function for all parameter regimes in the linear limit, including those regimes where the Lyapunov function was previously believed not to exist. (general)

  20. Isolated resonator gyroscope with a drive and sense plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The present invention discloses a resonator gyroscope comprising a vibrationally isolated resonator including a proof mass, a counterbalancing plate having an extensive planar region, and one or more flexures interconnecting the proof mass and counterbalancing plate. A baseplate is affixed to the resonator by the one or more flexures and sense and drive electrodes are affixed to the baseplate proximate to the extensive planar region of the counterbalancing plate for exciting the resonator and sensing movement of the gyroscope. The isolated resonator transfers substantially no net momentum to the baseplate when the resonator is excited.

  1. The Confrontation between General Relativity and Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clifford M. Will

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The status of experimental tests of general relativity and of theoretical frameworks for analyzing them is reviewed and updated. Einstein’s equivalence principle (EEP is well supported by experiments such as the Eötvös experiment, tests of local Lorentz invariance and clock experiments. Ongoing tests of EEP and of the inverse square law are searching for new interactions arising from unification or quantum gravity. Tests of general relativity at the post-Newtonian level have reached high precision, including the light deflection, the Shapiro time delay, the perihelion advance of Mercury, the Nordtvedt effect in lunar motion, and frame-dragging. Gravitational wave damping has been detected in an amount that agrees with general relativity to better than half a percent using the Hulse–Taylor binary pulsar, and a growing family of other binary pulsar systems is yielding new tests, especially of strong-field effects. Current and future tests of relativity will center on strong gravity and gravitational waves.

  2. Uncertainty of angular displacement measurement with a MEMS gyroscope integrated in a smartphone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Campos Porath, Maurício; Dolci, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Low-cost inertial sensors have recently gained popularity and are now widely used in electronic devices such as smartphones and tablets. In this paper we present the results of a set of experiments aiming to assess the angular displacement measurement errors of a gyroscope integrated in a smartphone of a recent model. The goal is to verify whether these sensors could substitute dedicated electronic inclinometers for the measurement of angular displacement. We estimated a maximum error of 0.3° (sum of expanded uncertainty and maximum absolute bias) for the roll and pitch axes, for a measurement time without referencing up to 1 h. (paper)

  3. The effect of broadened linewidth induced by dispersion on the performance of resonant optical gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Wenxiu; Han, Peng; Chang, Xiaoyang; Liu, Jiaming; Lin, Jian; Xue, Xia; Zhu, Fang; Yang, Yang; Liu, Xiaojing; Zhang, Xiaofu; Huang, Anping; Xiao, Zhisong; Fang, Jiancheng

    2018-01-01

    Anomalous dispersion enhancement physical mechanism for Sagnac effect is described by special relativity derivation, and three kinds of definitions of minimum detectable angular rate of resonance optical gyroscope (ROG) are compared and the relations among them are investigated. The effect of linewidth broadening induced by anomalous dispersion on the sensitivity of ROG is discussed in this paper. Material dispersion-broadened resonance linewidth deteriorates the performance of a passive ROG and dispersion enhancement effect, while the sensitivity of a structural dispersion ROG is enhanced by two orders of magnitude even considering the dispersion-broadened resonance linewidth.

  4. Coupled electromechanical model of an imperfect piezoelectric vibrating cylinder gyroscope

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Loveday, PW

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available which is closed at one end with discrete piezoceramic actuation and sensing elements bonded close to the open end. The operation of the gyroscope and the effect of imperfections are briefly described. The model allows direct comparison with experimental...

  5. General problems of dynamics and control of vibratory gyroscopes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Shatalov, MY

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A general model of operation of vibratory gyroscopes, which is applicable to a broad class of instruments, including cylindrical, disc and micro-machined gyros, is formulated on the basis of analysis of dynamics and control of a hemispherical...

  6. Understanding Organizational Culture and Communication through a Gyroscope Metaphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisel, Ryan S.; Messersmith, Amber S.; Keyton, Joann

    2010-01-01

    To fill a critical void in organizational culture pedagogy, the authors present an instructional system that employs the metaphor of a gyroscope to help students understand implicit assumptions in culture research. Working from Martin's nexus approach to organizational culture and Fairhurst and Putnam's tripartite theory of organizational…

  7. Implementation of a smartphone as a wireless gyroscope platform for quantifying reduced arm swing in hemiplegie gait with machine learning classification by multilayer perceptron neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMoyne, Robert; Mastroianni, Timothy

    2016-08-01

    Natural gait consists of synchronous and rhythmic patterns for both the lower and upper limb. People with hemiplegia can experience reduced arm swing, which can negatively impact the quality of gait. Wearable and wireless sensors, such as through a smartphone, have demonstrated the ability to quantify various features of gait. With a software application the smartphone (iPhone) can function as a wireless gyroscope platform capable of conveying a gyroscope signal recording as an email attachment by wireless connectivity to the Internet. The gyroscope signal recordings of the affected hemiplegic arm with reduced arm swing arm and the unaffected arm are post-processed into a feature set for machine learning. Using a multilayer perceptron neural network a considerable degree of classification accuracy is attained to distinguish between the affected hemiplegic arm with reduced arm swing arm and the unaffected arm.

  8. The Gravity Probe B Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    This presentation briefly describes the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) Experiment which is designed to measure parts of Einstein's general theory of relativity by monitoring gyroscope orientation relative to a distant guide star. To measure the miniscule angles predicted by Einstein's theory, it was necessary to build near-perfect gyroscopes that were approximately 50 million times more precise than the best navigational gyroscopes. A telescope mounted along the central axis of the dewar and spacecraft provided the experiment's pointing reference to a guide star. The telescope's image divide precisely split the star's beam into x-axis and y-axis components whose brightness could be compared. GP-B's 650-gallon dewar, kept the science instrument inside the probe at a cryogenic temperature for 17.3 months and also provided the thruster propellant for precision attitude and translation control. Built around the dewar, the GP-B spacecraft was a total-integrated system, comprising both the space vehicle and payload, dedicated as a single entity to experimentally testing predictions of Einstein's theory.

  9. The Gravity Probe B experiment and early results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conklin, John W [Stanford University (United States)], E-mail: johnwc@stanford.edu

    2008-11-01

    The NASA Gravity Probe B orbiting gyroscope test of General Relativity, launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base on 20 April, 2004 tests two consequences of Einstein's theory: 1) the predicted 6.6 arcs/yr geodetic effect due to the motion of the gyroscope through the curved space-time around the Earth; 2) the predicted 0.039 arcs/yr frame-dragging effect due to the rotating Earth. The mission required the development of many technologies that did not exist when experiment was conceived in 1960. Cryogenic gyroscopes with drift-rates 7 orders of magnitude better than the best inertial navigation gyroscopes, a < 1 marcs star tracking telescope, and other essential technologies were developed as a result of an intensive collaboration between Stanford physicists and engineers, NASA and industry. Gravity Probe B collected science data from August 27, 2004 through September 29, 2005. Analysis of the data began during the mission and is on-going. This paper describes the main features and challenges of the experiment and presents the preliminary results to date.

  10. The Gravity Probe B experiment and early results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, John W

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Gravity Probe B orbiting gyroscope test of General Relativity, launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base on 20 April, 2004 tests two consequences of Einstein's theory: 1) the predicted 6.6 arcs/yr geodetic effect due to the motion of the gyroscope through the curved space-time around the Earth; 2) the predicted 0.039 arcs/yr frame-dragging effect due to the rotating Earth. The mission required the development of many technologies that did not exist when experiment was conceived in 1960. Cryogenic gyroscopes with drift-rates 7 orders of magnitude better than the best inertial navigation gyroscopes, a < 1 marcs star tracking telescope, and other essential technologies were developed as a result of an intensive collaboration between Stanford physicists and engineers, NASA and industry. Gravity Probe B collected science data from August 27, 2004 through September 29, 2005. Analysis of the data began during the mission and is on-going. This paper describes the main features and challenges of the experiment and presents the preliminary results to date.

  11. Using commodity accelerometers and gyroscopes to improve speed and accuracy of JanusVF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Malcolm; Reiners, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Several critical limitations exist in the currently available commercial tracking technologies for fully-enclosed virtual reality (VR) systems. While several 6DOF solutions can be adapted to work in fully-enclosed spaces, they still include elements of hardware that can interfere with the user's visual experience. JanusVF introduced a tracking solution for fully-enclosed VR displays that achieves comparable performance to available commercial solutions but without artifacts that can obscure the user's view. JanusVF employs a small, high-resolution camera that is worn on the user's head, but faces backwards. The VR rendering software draws specific fiducial markers with known size and absolute position inside the VR scene behind the user but in view of the camera. These fiducials are tracked by ARToolkitPlus and integrated by a single-constraint-at-a-time (SCAAT) filter to update the head pose. In this paper we investigate the addition of low-cost accelerometers and gyroscopes such as those in Nintendo Wii remotes, the Wii Motion Plus, and the Sony Sixaxis controller to improve the precision and accuracy of JanusVF. Several enthusiast projects have implemented these units as basic trackers or for gesture recognition, but none so far have created true 6DOF trackers using only the accelerometers and gyroscopes. Our original experiments were repeated after adding the low-cost inertial sensors, showing considerable improvements and noise reduction.

  12. SCALE FACTOR DETERMINATION METHOD OF ELECTRO-OPTICAL MODULATOR IN FIBER-OPTIC GYROSCOPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Aleynik

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. We propose a method for dynamic measurement of half-wave voltage of electro-optic modulator as part of a fiber optic gyroscope. Excluding the impact of the angular acceleration o​n measurement of the electro-optical coefficient is achieved through the use of homodyne demodulation method that allows a division of the Sagnac phase shift signal and an auxiliary signal for measuring the electro-optical coefficient in the frequency domain. Method. The method essence reduces to decomposition of step of digital serrodyne modulation in two parts with equal duration. The first part is used for quadrature modulation signals. The second part comprises samples of the auxiliary signal used to determine the value of the scale factor of the modulator. Modeling is done in standalone model, and as part of a general model of the gyroscope. The applicability of the proposed method is investigated as well as its qualitative and quantitative characteristics: absolute and relative accuracy of the electro-optic coefficient, the stability of the method to the effects of angular velocities and accelerations, method resistance to noise in actual devices. Main Results. The simulation has showed the ability to measure angular velocity changing under the influence of angular acceleration, acting on the device, and simultaneous measurement of electro-optical coefficient of the phase modulator without interference between these processes. Practical Relevance. Featured in the paper the ability to eliminate the influence of the angular acceleration on the measurement accuracy of the electro-optical coefficient of the phase modulator will allow implementing accurate measurement algorithms for fiber optic gyroscopes resistant to a significant acceleration in real devices.

  13. Fibre Optic Gyroscope Developments Using Integrated Optic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minford, W. J.; DePaula, R. M.

    1988-09-01

    The sensing of rotation using counterpropagating optical beams in a fiber loop (the SAGNAC effect) has gone through extensive developments and demonstrations since first proved feasible by Vali and Shorthilll in 1976. The interferometric fiber gyroscope minimum configuration2 which uses a common input-output port and single-mode filter was developed to provide the extreme high stability necessary to reach the sensitivities at low rotation rates attainable with current state-of-the-art detectors. The simplicity and performance of this configuration has led to its acceptance and wide-spread use. In order to increase the mechanical stability of this system, all single-mode fiber components are employed and a further advancement to integrated optics has enabled most of the optical functions to be placed on a single mass-producible substrate. Recent improvements in the components (eg polarization maintaining fiber and low coherence sources) have further enhanced the performance of the minimum configuration gyro. This presentation focused on the impact of LiNbO3 integrated optic components on gyroscope developments. The use of Ti-indiffused LiNbO3 waveguide optical circuits in interferometric fiber optic gyroscopes has taken two directions: to utilize only the phase modulator, or to combine many of the minimum configuration optical functions on the electro-optic substrate. The high-bandwidth phase modulator is the driving force for using LiNbO3 waveguide devices. This device allows both biasing the gyro for maximum sensitivity and closing the loop via frequency shifting, for example, thus increasing the dynamic range of the gyro and the linearity of the scale factor. Efforts to implement most of the minimum configuration optical functions onto a single LiNbO3 substrate have been led by Thomson CSF.3 They have demonstrated an interferometric gyroscope with excellent performance using a LiNbO3 optical circuit containing a Y-splitter, phase modulator, and surface

  14. Optimization of an Accelerometer and Gyroscope-Based Fall Detection Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quoc T. Huynh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Falling is a common and significant cause of injury in elderly adults (>65 yrs old, often leading to disability and death. In the USA, one in three of the elderly suffers from fall injuries annually. This study’s purpose is to develop, optimize, and assess the efficacy of a falls detection algorithm based upon a wireless, wearable sensor system (WSS comprised of a 3-axis accelerometer and gyroscope. For this study, the WSS is placed at the chest center to collect real-time motion data of various simulated daily activities (i.e., walking, running, stepping, and falling. Tests were conducted on 36 human subjects with a total of 702 different movements collected in a laboratory setting. Half of the dataset was used for development of the fall detection algorithm including investigations of critical sensor thresholds and the remaining dataset was used for assessment of algorithm sensitivity and specificity. Experimental results show that the algorithm detects falls compared to other daily movements with a sensitivity and specificity of 96.3% and 96.2%, respectively. The addition of gyroscope information enhances sensitivity dramatically from results in the literature as angular velocity changes provide further delineation of a fall event from other activities that may also experience high acceleration peaks.

  15. A Fully Symmetric and Completely Decoupled MEMS-SOI Gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhameed SHARAF

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a novel MEMS gyroscope that is capable of exciting the drive mode differentially. The structure also decouples the drive and sense modes via an intermediate mass and decoupling beams. Both drive and sense modes are fully differential enabling control over the zero-rate-output for the former and maximizing output sensitivity using a bridge circuit for the latter. Further, the structure is fully symmetric about the x- and y- axes which results in minimizing the temperature sensitivity problem. Complete analytical analysis based on the equations of motion was performed and verified using two commercially available finite element software packages. Results from both methods are in good agreement. The analysis of the sensor shows an electrical sensitivity of 1.14 (mV/(º/s. The gyroscope was fabricated using single mask and deep reactive ion etching. The measurement of the resonance frequency performed showing a good agreement with the analytical and numerical analysis.

  16. Collision avoidance for multiple Lagrangian dynamical systems with gyroscopic forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Sabattini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces a novel methodology for dealing with collision avoidance for groups of mobile robots. In particular, full dynamics are considered, since each robot is modeled as a Lagrangian dynamical system moving in a three-dimensional environment. Gyroscopic forces are utilized for defining the collision avoidance control strategy: This kind of forces leads to avoiding collisions, without interfering with the convergence properties of the multi-robot system’s desired control law. Collision avoidance introduces, in fact, a perturbation on the nominal behavior of the system: We define a method for choosing the direction of the gyroscopic force in an optimal manner, in such a way that perturbation is minimized. Collision avoidance and convergence properties are analytically demonstrated, and simulation results are provided for validation purpose.

  17. Characterization and Modeling of a Control Moment Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    pre- conditioner for the input state before passing into the inner loop, as shown in Figure 30. In Figure 30, m is the motor angle and x is the state...Characterization and Modeling of a Control Moment Gyroscope THESIS 2d Lt, Dylan Penn, B.S. AFIT-ENY-MS-15-M-235 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR ...UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION

  18. OPTIMIZATION OF HEMISPHERICAL RESONATOR GYROSCOPE STANDING WAVE PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Sergeevna Khalyutina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, the problem of autonomous navigation is solved by dead reckoning navigation flight parameters (NFP of the aircraft (AC. With increasing requirements to accuracy of definition NFP improved the sensors of the prima- ry navigation information: gyroscopes and accelerometers. the gyroscopes of a new type, the so-called solid-state wave gyroscopes (SSVG are currently developed and put into practice. The work deals with the problem of increasing the accu- racy of measurements of angular velocity of the hemispherical resonator gyroscope (HRG. The reduction in the accuracy characteristics of HRG is caused by the presence of defects in the distribution of mass in the volume of its design. The syn- thesis of control system for optimal damping of the distortion parameters of the standing wave due to the influence of the mass defect resonator is adapted. The research challenge was: to examine and analytically offset the impact of the standing wave (amplitude and frequency parameters defect. Research was performed by mathematical modeling in the environment of SolidWorks Simulation for the case when the characteristics of the sensitive element of the HRG met the technological drawings of a particular type of resonator. The method of the inverse dynamics was chosen for synthesis. The research re- sults are presented in graphs the amplitude-frequency characteristics (AFC of the resonator output signal. Simulation was performed for the cases: the perfect distribution of weight; the presence of the mass defect; the presence of the mass defects are shown using the synthesized control action. Evaluating the effectiveness of the proposed control algorithm is deter- mined by the results of the resonator output signal simulation provided the perfect constructive and its performance in the presence of a mass defect in it. It is assumed that the excitation signals are standing waves in the two cases are identical in both amplitude and frequency. In this

  19. Self-induced parametric amplification arising from nonlinear elastic coupling in a micromechanical resonating disk gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzan, Sarah H; Zega, Valentina; Li, Mo; Ahn, Chae H; Corigliano, Alberto; Kenny, Thomas W; Horsley, David A

    2015-03-12

    Parametric amplification, resulting from intentionally varying a parameter in a resonator at twice its resonant frequency, has been successfully employed to increase the sensitivity of many micro- and nano-scale sensors. Here, we introduce the concept of self-induced parametric amplification, which arises naturally from nonlinear elastic coupling between the degenerate vibration modes in a micromechanical disk-resonator, and is not externally applied. The device functions as a gyroscope wherein angular rotation is detected from Coriolis coupling of elastic vibration energy from a driven vibration mode into a second degenerate sensing mode. While nonlinear elasticity in silicon resonators is extremely weak, in this high quality-factor device, ppm-level nonlinear elastic effects result in an order-of-magnitude increase in the observed sensitivity to Coriolis force relative to linear theory. Perfect degeneracy of the primary and secondary vibration modes is achieved through electrostatic frequency tuning, which also enables the phase and frequency of the parametric coupling to be varied, and we show that the resulting phase and frequency dependence of the amplification follow the theory of parametric resonance. We expect that this phenomenon will be useful for both fundamental studies of dynamic systems with low dissipation and for increasing signal-to-noise ratio in practical applications such as gyroscopes.

  20. Estimating orientation with gyroscopes and accelerometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luinge, Hendrik J.; Veltink, Petrus H.; Baten, Christian T.M.

    1999-01-01

    Many systems for recording human movement need some reference from beacons near the subject, such as video cameras. Our goal is to measure human kinematics with sensors that are placed on the segments of interest. This way, experiments in which human movement is recorded are not restricted to a lab.

  1. Study on phase noise induced by 1/f noise of the modulator drive circuit in high-sensitivity fiber optic gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Fei; Jin, Jing; Li, Yong; Zhang, Chunxi

    2018-05-01

    The contribution of modulator drive circuit noise as a 1/f noise source to the output noise of the high-sensitivity interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG) was studied here. A noise model of closed-loop IFOG was built. By applying the simulated 1/f noise sequence into the model, a gyroscope output data series was acquired, and the corresponding power spectrum density (PSD) and the Allan variance curve were calculated to analyze the noise characteristic. The PSD curve was in the spectral shape of 1/f, which verifies that the modulator drive circuit induced a low frequency 1/f phase noise into the gyroscope. The random walk coefficient (RWC), a standard metric to characterize the noise performance of the IFOG, was calculated according to the Allan variance curve. Using an operational amplifier with an input 1/f noise of 520 nV/√Hz at 1 Hz, the RWC induced by this 1/f noise was 2 × 10-4°/√h, which accounts for 63% of the total RWC. To verify the correctness of the noise model we proposed, a high-sensitivity gyroscope prototype was built and tested. The simulated Allan variance curve gave a good rendition of the prototype actual measured curve. The error percentage between the simulated RWC and the measured value was less than 13%. According to the model, a noise reduction method is proposed and the effectiveness is verified by the experiment.

  2. Temperature Dependence of Faraday Effect-Induced Bias Error in a Fiber Optic Gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuyou; Liu, Pan; Guang, Xingxing; Xu, Zhenlong; Guan, Lianwu; Li, Guangchun

    2017-09-07

    Improving the performance of interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG) in harsh environments, such as magnetic field and temperature field variation, is necessary for its practical applications. This paper presents an investigation of Faraday effect-induced bias error of IFOG under varying temperature. Jones matrix method is utilized to formulize the temperature dependence of Faraday effect-induced bias error. Theoretical results show that the Faraday effect-induced bias error changes with the temperature in the non-skeleton polarization maintaining (PM) fiber coil. This phenomenon is caused by the temperature dependence of linear birefringence and Verdet constant of PM fiber. Particularly, Faraday effect-induced bias errors of two polarizations always have opposite signs that can be compensated optically regardless of the changes of the temperature. Two experiments with a 1000 m non-skeleton PM fiber coil are performed, and the experimental results support these theoretical predictions. This study is promising for improving the bias stability of IFOG.

  3. Possible Experiments to test Einstein's Special Relativity Theory

    OpenAIRE

    de Haan, Victor Otto

    2011-01-01

    All of the experiments supporting Einstein's Special Relativity Theory are also supportive of the Lorentz ether theory, or many other ether theories. However, a growing number of experiments show deviations from Einstein's Special Relativity Theory, but are supporting more extended theories. Some of these experiments are reviewed and analyzed. Unfortunately, many experiments are not of high quality, never repeated and mostly both. It is proposed that the most promising experiments should be r...

  4. Indefinite damping in mechanical systems and gyroscopic stabilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kliem, Wolfhard; Pommer, Christian

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with gyroscopic stabilization of the unstable system Mx + D(x) over dot + K-x = 0, with positive definite mass and stiffness matrices M and K, respectively, and an indefinite damping matrix D. The main question if for which skew-symmetric matrices G the system Mx (D+ G)(x) over dot...... + K-x = 0 can become stable? After investigating special cases we find an appropriat solution of the Lyapunov matrix equation for the general case. Examples show the deviation of the stability limit found by the Lyapunov method from the exact value....

  5. On dynamics and control of vibratory gyroscopes with special spherical symmetry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Shatalov, M

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available It was shown in 1985 by Acad. V. Zhuravlev that the angular rate of a pure vibrating mode excited in a vibratory gyroscope with spherical symmetry is proportional to an inertial angular rate of the gyroscope. The effect is three dimensional...

  6. Stability analysis of the Gyroscopic Power Take-Off wave energy point absorber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Zhang, Zili; Kramer, Morten Mejlhede

    2015-01-01

    The Gyroscopic Power Take-Off (GyroPTO) wave energy point absorber consists of a float rigidly connected to a lever. The operational principle is somewhat similar to that of the so-called gyroscopic hand wrist exercisers, where the rotation of the float is brought forward by the rotational particle...

  7. Design and fabrication of a biomimetic gyroscope inspired by the fly's haltere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droogendijk, H.; Brookhuis, Robert Anton; de Boer, Meint J.; Sanders, Remco G.P.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the design and fabrication of a MEMS-based gyroscopic system inspired by the fly's haltere system. Two types of so-called biomimetic gyroscopes have been designed, fabricated and their drive mode has been characterized. First measurements indicate excitable gyropscopes with natural

  8. Design and fabrication of a biomimetic gyroscope inspired by the fly’s haltere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droogendijk, H.; Brookhuis, Robert Anton; de Boer, Meint J.; Sanders, Remco G.P.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the design and fabrication of a MEMS-based gyroscopic system inspired by the fly’s haltere system. Two types of so-called biomimetic gyroscopes have been designed, fabricated and partially characterized. First measurements indicate excitable gyropscopes with natural frequencies in the

  9. United Kingdom: Procurement Related Nuclear Experience (Operating Experience)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Procurement of nuclear facilities in the United Kingdom is subject to nuclear site licence conditions issued by the Government through the Office for Nuclear Regulation (ONR). Each nuclear facility in the United Kingdom must have a nuclear site licence and must comply with the 36 general conditions that are set out in the Licence Condition Handbook (October 2014). In addition, the ONR has published a technical assessment guide for the procurement of nuclear safety related items or services; a guide on intelligent customers and a guide on records management also apply to the procurement phase, and ONR interventions look across all three of these documents. Procurement governance arrangements need to be developed (including a policy, manual, procedures and template documents) and approved within the utility company. The ONR monitors the arrangements via interventions and deems the arrangements to be ‘adequate’. Some procurement contracts become lifetime records for nuclear safety related systems and need to be retained while the plant is in place. A formal record retention schedule needs to be created and managed by the procurement organization. The utility company may elect to set hold points during the various procurement stages and, importantly, obtain approval for the contract and its content from all technical stakeholders (with particular emphasis on the engineering, project management and design authority quality functions before contract award). For contracts with high nuclear safety significance, the ONR may enforce additional hold points before and/or after contract award. There is a general requirement that the utility puts in place adequate arrangements to ensure that suitably qualified and experienced personnel are employed to implement adequate management arrangements and to act as an intelligent customer. This includes being able to demonstrate that any contractor or supplier is suitable, capable and experienced, and has the necessary processes and

  10. Circuit, especially for digital nuclear gyroscope systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowdenslager, J.R.

    1974-01-01

    The circuit with at least one or two spin generator shows a digital phase synchronizing loop in solid-state construction without movable mechanical parts. It is stable, may be turned in one direction any number of times without saturation, and also remains phase-synchronized when input signals are turned off. For this purpose, crystal oscillators with certain resonance frequencies are used. The spin generators are coupled at the outled side with filtering, squaring, and differential connections generating control impulses synchronous to the spin generators. Step divider circuits are connected to the oscillators, which act upon flip-flop registers. This is controlled by the filtering, squaring, and differential connections. Furthermore, field proportional control circuits with registers, advancing and delay circuits are provided, the registers being connected at the outlet side with digital adders and subtractors. The digital adder serves inertial-related purposes. (DG) [de

  11. Relativity experiment on helios: a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.D.; Melbourne, W.G.; Cain, D.L.; Lau, E.K.; Wong, S.K.; Kundt, W.

    1975-01-01

    The S-band range and Doppler data and the orbit of the spacecraft in the gravitational field of the sun are used to measure the effects of general relativity in the solar system and to measure the quadrupole moment in the gravity field of the sun. (BJG)

  12. Public relations policy: The Electronuclear experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Luiz

    2000-01-01

    This presentation discusses the following topics: Historical and Cultural Aspects of Electrical Sector in Brazil; Nuclear Power and Public Acceptance in Brazil; The chances decision of Angra 3; Community Activities of the ELETRONUCLEAR Regional Programs and Emergency Planning Department whose function is to promote activities with or for the communities of Angra dos Reis region; Public Relations Actions

  13. The confrontation between general relativity and experiment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... and tests of gravity at short distance to look for extra spatial dimensions could further constrain alternatives to general relativity. Laser Interferometric Gravitational Wave Observatories on Earth and in space may provide new tests of scalar–tensor gravity and graviton-mass theories via the properties of gravitational waves.

  14. Track Detection in Railway Sidings Based on MEMS Gyroscope Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broquetas, Antoni; Comerón, Adolf; Gelonch, Antoni; Fuertes, Josep M.; Castro, J. Antonio; Felip, Damià; López, Miguel A.; Pulido, José A.

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents a two-step technique for real-time track detection in single-track railway sidings using low-cost MEMS gyroscopes. The objective is to reliably know the path the train has taken in a switch, diverted or main road, immediately after the train head leaves the switch. The signal delivered by the gyroscope is first processed by an adaptive low-pass filter that rejects noise and converts the temporal turn rate data in degree/second units into spatial turn rate data in degree/meter. The conversion is based on the travelled distance taken from odometer data. The filter is implemented to achieve a speed-dependent cut-off frequency to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. Although direct comparison of the filtered turn rate signal with a predetermined threshold is possible, the paper shows that better detection performance can be achieved by processing the turn rate signal with a filter matched to the rail switch curvature parameters. Implementation aspects of the track detector have been optimized for real-time operation. The detector has been tested with both simulated data and real data acquired in railway campaigns. PMID:23443376

  15. Topological dynamics of gyroscopic and Floquet lattices from Newton's laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching Hua; Li, Guangjie; Jin, Guliuxin; Liu, Yuhan; Zhang, Xiao

    2018-02-01

    Despite intense interest in realizing topological phases across a variety of electronic, photonic, and mechanical platforms, the detailed microscopic origin of topological behavior often remains elusive. To bridge this conceptual gap, we show how hallmarks of topological modes—boundary localization and chirality—emerge from Newton's laws in mechanical topological systems. We first construct a gyroscopic lattice with analytically solvable edge modes, and show how the Lorentz and spring restoring forces conspire to support very robust "dangling bond" boundary modes. The chirality and locality of these modes intuitively emerges from microscopic balancing of restoring forces and cyclotron tendencies. Next, we introduce the highlight of this work, an experimentally realistic mechanical nonequilibrium (Floquet) Chern lattice driven by ac electromagnets. Through appropriate synchronization of the ac driving protocol, the Floquet lattice is "pushed around" by a rotating potential analogous to an object washed ashore by water waves. Besides hosting "dangling bond" chiral modes analogous to the gyroscopic boundary modes, our Floquet Chern lattice also supports peculiar half-period chiral modes with no static analog, i.e., analogs of anomalous Floquet Chern insulators edge modes. With key parameters controlled electronically, our setup has the advantage of being dynamically tunable for applications involving arbitrary Floquet modulations. The physical intuition gleaned from our two prototypical topological systems is applicable not just to arbitrarily complicated mechanical systems, but also photonic and electrical topological setups.

  16. Three-Axis Attitude Estimation Using Rate-Integrating Gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crassidis, John L.; Markley, F. Landis

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, attitude estimation has been performed using a combination of external attitude sensors and internal three-axis gyroscopes. There are many studies of three-axis attitude estimation using gyros that read angular rates. Rate-integrating gyros measure integrated rates or angular displacements, but three-axis attitude estimation using these types of gyros has not been as fully investigated. This paper derives a Kalman filtering framework for attitude estimation using attitude sensors coupled with rate- integrating gyroscopes. In order to account for correlations introduced by using these gyros, the state vector must be augmented, compared with filters using traditional gyros that read angular rates. Two filters are derived in this paper. The first uses an augmented state-vector form that estimates attitude, gyro biases, and gyro angular displacements. The second ignores correlations, leading to a filter that estimates attitude and gyro biases only. Simulation comparisons are shown for both filters. The work presented in this paper focuses only on attitude estimation using rate-integrating gyros, but it can easily be extended to other applications such as inertial navigation, which estimates attitude and position.

  17. Thought experiments at superluminal relative velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corben, H.C.

    1976-01-01

    It is imagined that our World is being examined from a similar world which is moving relative to us with a velocity greater than that of light. The two worlds are supposed to be similar in that the particles in each appear to any observer in that world to have real measurable properties. However, the enormous relative velocity so distorts the observations that each world makes on the other that the squares of certain real quantities appear to the other observer to be negative. Neglect of this fact has led to the erroneous belief that a free charged tachyon would emit Cherenkov radiation and that the existence of tachyons would lead to logical paradoxes. (author)

  18. Parallel Relational Universes – experiments in modularity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagliarini, Luigi; Lund, Henrik Hautop

    2015-01-01

    : We here describe Parallel Relational Universes, an artistic method used for the psychological analysis of group dynamics. The design of the artistic system, which mediates group dynamics, emerges from our studies of modular playware and remixing playware. Inspired from remixing modular playware......, where users remix samples in the form of physical and functional modules, we created an artistic instantiation of such a concept with the Parallel Relational Universes, allowing arts alumni to remix artistic expressions. Here, we report the data emerged from a first pre-test, run with gymnasium’s alumni....... We then report both the artistic and the psychological findings. We discuss possible variations of such an instrument. Between an art piece and a psychological test, at a first cognitive analysis, it seems to be a promising research tool...

  19. ICF related experiments at CEL-V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andre, M.; Coutant, J.; Dautray, R.; Decroisette, M.; Duborgel, B.; Lachkar, J.; Ouvry, J.; Schurtz, G.; Watteau, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    Implosion experiments performed at Centre d'Etudes de Limeil-Valenton in the indirect drive scheme using the two-beams Nd glass laser facility Phebus at the energy level ≅ 6 kJ (blue light) are presented. A final density of compressed DT close to 100 ρ 0 has been obtained. Phebus has also been equipped with an optical fibre oscillator, to study the effect of a smoothing technique on coupling processes: at 0.53 μm, absorption efficiency is increased by ≅15-20%. With the eight beams Octal laser, hydrodynamic instabilities development in accelerated planar targets has been investigated both for direct and indirect drive. Atomic physics in laser plasmas is also deeply studied; a particular effort has been made on absorption spectroscopy which is a powerful diagnostic of ionization dynamics in cold and dense plasmas. In order to reach fuel ignition conditions, much powerful lasers, in the range of megajoule, will be needed. Their design needs further technological developments in order to reduce the capital cost. At Limeil, we work mainly on high damage threshold optical coatings, using the sol-gel process, high quality - low cost mirror fabrication, using the replica technics and incoherent laser pulse generation for beam smoothing

  20. A complete solution for GP-B's gyroscopic precession by retarded gravitational theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Keyun

    Mainstream physicists generally believe that Mercury’s Perihelion precession and GP-B’ gyroscopic precession are two of the strongest evidences supporting Einstein’ curved spacetime and general relativity. However, most classical literatures and textbooks (e.g. Ohanain: Gravitation and Spacetime) paint an incorrect picture of Mercury’s orbit anomaly, namely Mercury’s perihelion precessed 43 arc-seconds per century; a correct picture should be that Mercury rotated 43 arc-seconds per century more than along Newtonian theoretical orbit. The essence of Le Verrier’s and Newcomb’s observation and analysis is that the angular speed of Mercury is slightly faster than the Newtonian theoretical value. The complete explanation to Mercury’s orbit anomaly should include two factors, perihelion precession is one of two factors, in addition, the change of orbital radius will also cause a change of angular speed, which is another component of Mercury's orbital anomaly. If Schwarzschild metric is correct, then the solution of the Schwarzschild orbit equation must contain three non-ignorable items. The first corresponds to Newtonian ellipse; the second is a nonlinear perturbation with increasing amplitude, which causes the precession of orbit perihelion; this is just one part of the angular speed anomaly of Mercury; the third part is a linear perturbation, corresponding to a similar figure of the Newton's ellipse, but with a minimal radius; this makes no contribution to the perihelion precession of the Schwarzschild orbit, but makes the Schwarzschild orbital radius slightly smaller, leading to a slight increase in Mercury’s angular speed. All classical literatures of general relativity ignored this last factor, which is a gross oversight. If you correctly take all three factors into consideration, the final result is that the difference between the angles rotated along Schwarzschild’s orbit and the angle rotated along Newton’s orbit for one hundred years should

  1. Behavior of a test gyroscope moving towards a rotating traversable wormhole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Chandrachur [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai, 400005 India (India); Pradhan, Parthapratim, E-mail: chandrachur.chakraborty@tifr.res.in, E-mail: pppradhan77@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Vivekananda Satabarshiki Mahavidyalaya, Manikpara, West Midnapur, 721513 India (India)

    2017-03-01

    The geodesic structure of the Teo wormhole is briefly discussed and some observables are derived that promise to be of use in detecting a rotating traversable wormhole indirectly, if it does exist. We also deduce the exact Lense-Thirring (LT) precession frequency of a test gyroscope moving toward a rotating traversable Teo wormhole. The precession frequency diverges on the ergoregion, a behavior intimately related to and governed by the geometry of the ergoregion, analogous to the situation in a Kerr spacetime. Interestingly, it turns out that here the LT precession is inversely proportional to the angular momentum ( a ) of the wormhole along the pole and around it in the strong gravity regime, a behavior contrasting with its direct variation with a in the case of other compact objects. In fact, divergence of LT precession inside the ergoregion can also be avoided if the gyro moves with a non-zero angular velocity in a certain range. As a result, the spin precession frequency of the gyro can be made finite throughout its whole path, even very close to the throat, during its travel to the wormhole. Furthermore, it is evident from our formulation that this spin precession not only arises due to curvature or rotation of the spacetime but also due to the non-zero angular velocity of the spin when it does not move along a geodesic in the strong gravity regime. If in the future, interstellar travel indeed becomes possible through a wormhole or at least in its vicinity, our results would prove useful in determining the behavior of a test gyroscope which is known to serve as a fundamental navigation device.

  2. Experience related to the safety of advanced LMFBR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1975-07-01

    Experiments and experience relative to the safety of advanced fuel elements for the liquid metal fast breeder reactor are reviewed. The design and operating parameters and some of the unique features of advanced fuel elements are discussed breifly. Transient and steady state overpower operation and loss of sodium bond tests and experience are discussed in detail. Areas where information is lacking are also mentioned

  3. Subjective Relational Experiences and Employee Innovative Behaviors in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinarski-Peretz, Hedva; Binyamin, Galy; Carmeli, Abraham

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents two studies that explore the implications of subjective relational experiences (positive regard, mutuality and vitality) on employee engagement in innovative behaviors at work. Data collected at two points in time were used to test two mediation models that link subjective relational experiences and innovative behaviors. The…

  4. Spherical gyroscopic moment stabilizer for attitude control of microsatellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshtkar, Sajjad; Moreno, Jaime A.; Kojima, Hirohisa; Uchiyama, Kenji; Nohmi, Masahiro; Takaya, Keisuke

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents a new and improved concept of recently proposed two-degrees of freedom spherical stabilizer for triaxial orientation of microsatellites. The analytical analysis of the advantages of the proposed mechanism over the existing inertial attitude control devices are introduced. The extended equations of motion of the stabilizing satellite including the spherical gyroscope, for control law design and numerical simulations, are studied in detail. A new control algorithm based on continuous high-order sliding mode algorithms, for managing the torque produced by the stabilizer and therefore the attitude control of the satellite in the presence of perturbations/uncertainties, is presented. Some numerical simulations are carried out to prove the performance of the proposed mechanism and control laws.

  5. Realization of a topological phase transition in a gyroscopic lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Noah P.; Nash, Lisa M.; Irvine, William T. M.

    2018-03-01

    Topological metamaterials exhibit unusual behaviors at their boundaries, such as unidirectional chiral waves, that are protected by a topological feature of their band structures. The ability to tune such a material through a topological phase transition in real time could enable the use of protected waves for information storage and readout. Here we dynamically tune through a topological phase transition by breaking inversion symmetry in a metamaterial composed of interacting gyroscopes. Through the transition, we track the divergence of the edge modes' localization length and the change in Chern number characterizing the topology of the material's band structure. This Rapid Communication provides a new axis with which to tune the response of mechanical topological metamaterials.

  6. Design and Simulation of A Novel Piezoelectric AlN-Si Cantilever Gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Yang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A novel design of piezoelectric aluminum nitride (AlN-Si composite cantilever gyroscope is proposed in this paper. The cantilever is stimulated to oscillate in plane by two inverse voltages which are applied on the two paralleled drive electrodes, respectively. The whole working principles are deduced, which based on the piezoelectric equation and elastic vibration equation. In this work, a cantilever gyroscope has been simulated and optimized by COMSOL Multiphysics 5.2a. The drive mode frequency is 87.422 kHz, and the sense mode frequency is 87.414 kHz. The theoretical sensitivity of this gyroscope is 0.145 pm/◦/s. This gyroscope has a small size and simple structure. It will be a better choice for the consumer electronics.

  7. Relativity time-delay experiments utilizing 'Mariner' spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, P. B.; Anderson, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    Relativity predicts that the transit time of a signal propagated from the earth to a spacecraft and retransmitted back to earth ought to exhibit an additional, variable time delay. The present work describes some of the analytical techniques employed in experiments using Mariner spacecraft designed to test the accuracy of this prediction. Two types of data are analyzed in these relativity experiments; these include phase-coherent, two-way Doppler shift and round-trip, transit-time measurements. Results of Mariner 6 and 7 relativistic time-delay experiments are in agreement with Einstein's theory of general relativity with an uncertainty of 3%.

  8. Analysis of the gyroscopic stabilization of a system of rigid bodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kliem, Wolfhard; Seyranian, Alexander P.

    1997-01-01

    We study the gyroscopic stability of a three-body system. A new method of finding stability regions, based on mechanism and criteria for gyroscopic stabilization, is presented. Of particular interest in this connection is the theory of interaction of eigenvalues. This leads to a complete 3......-dimensional analysis, which shows the regions of stability, divergence, and flutter of a simple model of a rotating spaceship....

  9. Design and Implementation of a Dual-Mass MEMS Gyroscope with High Shock Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Huang, Libin; Ding, Xukai; Li, Hongsheng

    2018-03-30

    This paper presents the design and implementation of a dual-mass MEMS gyroscope with high shock resistance by improving the in-phase frequency of the gyroscope and by using a two-stage elastic stopper mechanism and proposes a Simulink shock model of the gyroscope equipped with the two-stage stopper mechanism, which is a very efficient method to evaluate the shock resistance of the gyroscope. The structural design takes into account both the mechanical sensitivity and the shock resistance. The design of the primary structure and the analysis of the stopper mechanism are first introduced. Based on the expression of the restoring force of the stopper beam, the analytical shock response model of the gyroscope is obtained. By this model, the shock response of the gyroscope is theoretically analyzed, and the appropriate structural parameters are obtained. Then, the correctness of the model is verified by finite element (FE) analysis, where the contact collision analysis is introduced in detail. The simulation results show that the application of the two-stage elastic stopper mechanism can effectively improve the shock resistance by more than 1900 g and 1500 g in the x - and y -directions, respectively. Finally, experimental verifications are carried out by using a machete hammer on the micro-gyroscope prototype fabricated by the deep dry silicon on glass (DDSOG) technology. The results show that the shock resistance of the prototype along the x -, y - and z -axes all exceed 10,000 g. Moreover, the output of the gyroscope can return to normal in about 2 s.

  10. Review on experiments relating to primary containment vessel failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Okada, Hidetoshi; Uchida, Sunsuke; Naitoh, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Experiments regarding failures of primary containment vessels (PCVs) are reviewed and remained issues to be investigated in the future are discussed. Experiments are categorized as those relating to criteria of PCV failures and to FP releases through breaches on PCV boundaries. In the experiments categorized as those relating to criteria of PCV failures, experiments with full-scale, scale models, and compounds used for sealing are surveyed. Experiments relating to an amount of radioactive fission products (FPs) trapped at breaches on PCV boundaries are also reviewed. As remained issues to be investigated in the future, two items are pointed out: Evaluating degradation behavior of PCV boundaries exposed to temperature and pressure from the failure onset criteria to far above them, and evaluating an amount of FPs trapped at breaches on PCV boundaries. (author)

  11. Feedback of safety - related operational experience: Lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, D [Commonwealth Edison Co. (United States)

    1997-09-01

    The presentation considers the following aspects of feedback of safety-related operational experience: lessons learned program, objectives, personnel characteristics; three types of documents for transmitting lessons learned issues.

  12. On experiments to detect possible failures on relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues Junior, W.A.; Tiomno, J.

    1982-01-01

    Conditions under which is expected the failure of Einstein's Relativity are analysed. A complete analysis of a recently proposed experiment by Kolen-Torr is also given showing that it must give a negative result. (Author) [pt

  13. Feedback of safety - related operational experience: Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, D.

    1997-01-01

    The presentation considers the following aspects of feedback of safety-related operational experience: lessons learned program, objectives, personnel characteristics; three types of documents for transmitting lessons learned issues

  14. Does the Fizeau Experiment Really Test Special Relativity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Gerard

    1980-01-01

    The motivation and interpretation of the Fizeau experiment are reviewed, and its status as a test of special relativity is discussed. It is shown, with the aid of a simplified, purely mechanical model of the propagation of light in matter, that the experiment actually cannot discriminate between Galilean and relativistic kinematics. (Author/SK)

  15. Experiments in Special Relativity Using Compton Scattering of Gamma Rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egelstaff, P. A.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Some simple undergraduate laboratory experiments are described, which verify the energy-momentum relationship of special relativity. These experiments have been designed either to be used as classroom demonstrations or to be carried out by second-year students. (Author/JN)

  16. Dynamics of Molecular Gyroscopes Created by Strong Optical Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Amy

    2015-03-01

    We explore the behavior of molecules in ultra-high angular momentum states prepared in an optical centrifuge and detected with transient IR absorption spectroscopy. In the optical centrifuge, the polarizable electron cloud of molecules interacts with the electric field of linearly polarized light that angularly accelerates over the time of the optical pulse. The centrifuge pulse is generated by combining oppositely chirped pulsed of light. Trapped molecules are driven into high angular momentum states that are spatially oriented with the optical field and have energies far above the average at 300 K. High resolution transient IR spectroscopy reveals the dynamics of collisional energy transfer for the super-rotors. Polarization-dependent studies show that the initial angular momentum orientation persists for many collisions, indicating that molecules in an optical centrifuge behave as quantum gyroscopes. Time-dependent population and energy profiles for individual J- states give information about the dynamics of super-rotors. Research support provided by NSF and the University of Maryland.

  17. Atrial Fibrillation Detection via Accelerometer and Gyroscope of a Smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahdenoja, Olli; Hurnanen, Tero; Iftikhar, Zuhair; Nieminen, Sami; Knuutila, Timo; Saraste, Antti; Kiviniemi, Tuomas; Vasankari, Tuija; Airaksinen, Juhani; Pankaala, Mikko; Koivisto, Tero

    2018-01-01

    We present a smartphone-only solution for the detection of atrial fibrillation (AFib), which utilizes the built-in accelerometer and gyroscope sensors [inertial measurement unit, (IMU)] in the detection. Depending on the patient's situation, it is possible to use the developed smartphone application either regularly or occasionally for making a measurement of the subject. The smartphone is placed on the chest of the patient who is adviced to lay down and perform a noninvasive recording, while no external sensors are needed. After that, the application determines whether the patient suffers from AFib or not. The presented method has high potential to detect paroxysmal ("silent") AFib from large masses. In this paper, we present the preprocessing, feature extraction, feature analysis, and classification results of the envisioned AFib detection system based on clinical data acquired with a standard mobile phone equipped with Google Android OS. Test data was gathered from 16 AFib patients (validated against ECG), as well as a control group of 23 healthy individuals with no diagnosed heart diseases. We obtained an accuracy of 97.4% in AFib versus healthy classification (a sensitivity of 93.8% and a specificity of 100%). Due to the wide availability of smart devices/sensors with embedded IMU, the proposed methods could potentially also scale to other domains such as embedded body-sensor networks.

  18. A Micro Dynamically Tuned Gyroscope with Adjustable Static Capacitance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun Kong

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel micro dynamically tuned gyroscope (MDTG with adjustable static capacitance. First, the principle of MDTG is theoretically analyzed. Next, some simulations under the optimized structure parameters are given as a reference for the mask design of the rotor wafer and electrode plates. As two key components, the process flows of the rotor wafer and electrode plates are described in detail. All the scanning electron microscopy (SEM photos show that the fabrication process is effective and optimized. Then, an assembly model is designed for the static capacitance adjustable MDTG, whose static capacitance can be changed by rotating the lower electrode plate support and substituting gasket rings of different thicknesses. Thus, the scale factor is easily changeable. Afterwards, the digitalized closed-loop measurement circuit is simulated. The discrete correction and decoupling modules are designed to make the closed-loop stable and cross-coupling effect small. The dual axis closed-loop system bandwidths can reach more than 60 Hz and the dual axis scale factors are completely symmetrical. All the simulation results demonstrate the proposed fabrication of the MDTG can meet the application requirements. Finally, the paper presents the test results of static and dynamic capacitance values which are consistent with the simulation values.

  19. Gyroscopic stimulation of the semicircular canals during sensory deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsom, B. D.; Brady, J. F.; Stumm, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    A static object revolving at a constant velocity is stationary with respect to that environment. When the object is rotated outside the plane of spin, a gyroscopic or cross-coupled acceleration is produced orthogonal to the two planes of rotation. In this situation, a man feels himself moving in a direction other than that which his visual or proprioceptive sensors perceive. The conflict in spatial orientation is the cross-coupled acceleration imposed on the semicircular canals. This perceptual conflict and the thresholds involved were studied by partial isolation of the physiological stimuli through sensory deprivation. Subjects weighted to neutral buoyancy were submerged in 94 F water in the dark. The subjects were then rotated while being revolved about a displaced axis. Thresholds for detection of angular acceleration were higher than those reported in the literature for detection of acceleration of a single plane. This discrepancy may be attributable to the length of time the stimuli are imposed to each of the canals and the cupular response periods.

  20. Free vibration of elastically supported thin cylinders including gyroscopic effects

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Loveday, PW

    1998-10-29

    Full Text Available [ The equations D[R[ 747723 JSV 106:2 "Issue# MS 1560 VIBRATION OF THIN CYLINDERS 442 required for this procedure\\ including the gyroscopic terms\\ are included in Appendix A[ The displacement functions can then be written as follows] W"x# C0 cosh a0xa C1 sinh a0... xa C2 cos g1xa C3 sin g1xa epx:a0C4 cos qxa C5 sin qxa 1 e px:a0C6 cos qxa C7 sin qxa 1 "6a# V"x# A0C0 cosh a0xa A0C1 sinh a0xa A2C2 cos g1xa A2C3 sin g1xa epx:a$"A4C4 A5C5# cos qxa "A4C5 A5C4# sin qxa % e px:a$"A4C6 A5C7# cos...

  1. Ethics and quality care in nursing homes: Relatives' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Rita; Sellevold, Gerd Sylvi; Egede-Nissen, Veslemøy; Sørlie, Venke

    2017-01-01

    A total of 71,000 people in Norway suffer from some form of dementia in 2013, of whom approximately 30,000 are in nursing homes. Several studies focus on the experiences of those who have close relatives and who are staying in a nursing home. Results show that a greater focus on cooperation between nursing staff and relatives is a central prerequisite for an increased level of care. Benefits of developing systematic collaboration practices include relief for nursing staff, less stress, and greater mutual understanding. Going through studies focusing on the experiences of nursing home patients' relatives, negative experiences are in the majority. In this study, relatives are invited to share positive experiences regarding the care of their loved ones; a slightly different perspective, in other words. The aim of the study is to investigate relatives of persons with dementia's experiences with quality care in nursing homes. The study is a part of a larger project called Hospice values in the care for persons with dementia and is based on a qualitative design where data are generated through narrative interviews. The chosen method of analysis is the phenomenological-hermeneutical method for the study of lived experiences. Participants and research context: Participants in the project were eight relatives of persons with dementia who were living in nursing homes, long-term residences. The sampling was targeted, enrolment happened through collective invitation. All relatives interested were included. Ethical considerations: The Norwegian Regional Ethics Committee and the Norwegian Social Science Data Services approve the study. Findings show that relatives have certain expectations as to how their loved ones ought to be met and looked after at the nursing home. The results show that in those cases where the expectations were met, the relatives' experiences were associated with engagement, inclusion and a good atmosphere. When the expectations were not met, the relatives

  2. Super-large optical gyroscopes for applications in geodesy and seismology: state-of-the-art and development prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velikoseltsev, A A; Luk'yanov, D P; Vinogradov, V I; Shreiber, K U

    2014-01-01

    A brief survey of the history of the invention and development of super-large laser gyroscopes (SLLGs) is presented. The basic results achieved using SLLGs in geodesy, seismology, fundamental physics and other fields are summarised. The concept of SLLG design, specific features of construction and implementation are considered, as well as the prospects of applying the present-day optical technologies to laser gyroscope engineering. The possibilities of using fibre-optical gyroscopes in seismologic studies are analysed and the results of preliminary experimental studies are presented. (laser gyroscopes)

  3. Super-large optical gyroscopes for applications in geodesy and seismology: state-of-the-art and development prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velikoseltsev, A A; Luk' yanov, D P [St. Petersburg Electrotechnical University ' ' LETI' ' , St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Vinogradov, V I [OJSC Tambov factory Elektropribor (Russian Federation); Shreiber, K U [Forschungseinrichtung Satellitengeodaesie, Technosche Universitaet Muenchen, Geodaetisches Observatorium Wettzell, Sackenrieder str. 25, 93444 Bad Koetzting (Germany)

    2014-12-31

    A brief survey of the history of the invention and development of super-large laser gyroscopes (SLLGs) is presented. The basic results achieved using SLLGs in geodesy, seismology, fundamental physics and other fields are summarised. The concept of SLLG design, specific features of construction and implementation are considered, as well as the prospects of applying the present-day optical technologies to laser gyroscope engineering. The possibilities of using fibre-optical gyroscopes in seismologic studies are analysed and the results of preliminary experimental studies are presented. (laser gyroscopes)

  4. Application of the gyroscopic method in subterranean orientation. Comparison with conventional methods. Aplicacion del metodo gyroscopic en la orientacion subterranea. Comparacion con los metodos convencionales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saez Garcia, E.; Fuente Martin, P.L. (HUNOSA, Madrid (Spain))

    1988-01-01

    This entry tries to revise the most used method for the direction transition what with exterior and interior using plumbs in connected with vertical shaft coalmines. A technical and economic cooperation was also realized between the indicated method and the gyroscope.

  5. Analysis and Optimization of Dynamic Measurement Precision of Fiber Optic Gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the dynamic performance of high precision interferometer fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG, the influencing factors of the fast response characteristics are analyzed based on a proposed assistant design setup, and a high dynamic detection method is proposed to suppress the adverse effects of the key influencing factors. The assistant design platform is built by using the virtual instrument technology for IFOG, which can monitor the closed-loop state variables in real time for analyzing the influence of both the optical components and detection circuit on the dynamic performance of IFOG. The analysis results indicate that nonlinearity of optical Sagnac effect, optical parameter uncertainty, dynamic characteristics of internal modules and time delay of signal detection circuit are the major causes of dynamic performance deterioration, which can induce potential system instability in practical control systems. By taking all these factors into consideration, we design a robust control algorithm to realize the high dynamic closed-loop detection of IFOG. Finally, experiments show that the improved 0.01 deg/h high precision IFOG with the proposed control algorithm can achieve fast tracking and good dynamic measurement precision.

  6. Two Novel Measurements for the Drive-Mode Resonant Frequency of a Micromachined Vibratory Gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ancheng Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the drive-mode resonance frequency of a micromachined vibratory gyroscope (MVG, one needs to measure it accurately and efficiently. The conventional approach to measure the resonant frequency is by performing a sweep frequency test and spectrum analysis. The method is time-consuming and inconvenient because of the requirements of many test points, a lot of data storage and off-line analyses. In this paper, we propose two novel measurement methods, the search method and track method, respectively. The former is based on the magnitude-frequency characteristics of the drive mode, utilizing a one-dimensional search technique. The latter is based on the phase-frequency characteristics, applying a feedback control loop. Their performances in precision, noise resistivity and efficiency are analyzed through detailed simulations. A test system is implemented based on a field programmable gate array (FPGA and experiments are carried out. By comparing with the common approach, feasibility and superiorities of the proposed methods are validated. In particular, significant efficiency improvements are achieved whereby the conventional frequency method consumes nearly 5,000 s to finish a measurement, while only 5 s is needed for the track method and 1 s for the search method.

  7. Fathers' birth experience in relation to midwifery care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildingsson, Ingegerd; Cederlöf, Linnea; Widén, Sara

    2011-09-01

    The aim was to identify the proportion of fathers having a positive experience of a normal birth and to explore factors related to midwifery care that were associated with a positive experience. Research has mainly focused on the father's supportive role during childbirth rather than his personal experiences of birth. 595 new fathers living in a northern part of Sweden, whose partner had a normal birth, were included in the study. Data was collected by questionnaires. Odds Ratios with 95% confidence interval and logistic regression analysis were used. The majority of fathers (82%) reported a positive birth experience. The strongest factors associated with a positive birth experience were midwife support (OR 4.0; 95 CI 2.0-8.1), the midwife's ongoing presence in the delivery room (OR 2.0; 1.1-3.9), and information about the progress of labour (OR 3.1; 1.6-5.8). Most fathers had a positive birth experience. Midwifery support, the midwife's presence and sufficient information about the progress of labour are important aspects in a father's positive birth experience. The role of the midwife during birth is important to the father, and his individual needs should be considered in order to enhance a positive birth experience. Copyright © 2010 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. MEMS 3-DoF gyroscope design, modeling and simulation through equivalent circuit lumped parameter model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mian, Muhammad Umer; Khir, M. H. Md.; Tang, T. B.; Dennis, John Ojur; Riaz, Kashif; Iqbal, Abid; Bazaz, Shafaat A.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-fabrication, behavioural and performance analysis with computer aided design (CAD) tools is a common and fabrication cost effective practice. In light of this we present a simulation methodology for a dual-mass oscillator based 3 Degree of Freedom (3-DoF) MEMS gyroscope. 3-DoF Gyroscope is modeled through lumped parameter models using equivalent circuit elements. These equivalent circuits consist of elementary components which are counterpart of their respective mechanical components, used to design and fabricate 3-DoF MEMS gyroscope. Complete designing of equivalent circuit model, mathematical modeling and simulation are being presented in this paper. Behaviors of the equivalent lumped models derived for the proposed device design are simulated in MEMSPRO T-SPICE software. Simulations are carried out with the design specifications following design rules of the MetalMUMPS fabrication process. Drive mass resonant frequencies simulated by this technique are 1.59 kHz and 2.05 kHz respectively, which are close to the resonant frequencies found by the analytical formulation of the gyroscope. The lumped equivalent circuit modeling technique proved to be a time efficient modeling technique for the analysis of complex MEMS devices like 3-DoF gyroscopes. The technique proves to be an alternative approach to the complex and time consuming couple field analysis Finite Element Analysis (FEA) previously used

  9. MEMS 3-DoF gyroscope design, modeling and simulation through equivalent circuit lumped parameter model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mian, Muhammad Umer, E-mail: umermian@gmail.com; Khir, M. H. Md.; Tang, T. B. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Dennis, John Ojur [Department of Fundamental & Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Riaz, Kashif; Iqbal, Abid [Faculty of Electronics Engineering, GIK Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Topi, Khyber Pakhtunkhaw (Pakistan); Bazaz, Shafaat A. [Department of Computer Science, Center for Advance Studies in Engineering, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2015-07-22

    Pre-fabrication, behavioural and performance analysis with computer aided design (CAD) tools is a common and fabrication cost effective practice. In light of this we present a simulation methodology for a dual-mass oscillator based 3 Degree of Freedom (3-DoF) MEMS gyroscope. 3-DoF Gyroscope is modeled through lumped parameter models using equivalent circuit elements. These equivalent circuits consist of elementary components which are counterpart of their respective mechanical components, used to design and fabricate 3-DoF MEMS gyroscope. Complete designing of equivalent circuit model, mathematical modeling and simulation are being presented in this paper. Behaviors of the equivalent lumped models derived for the proposed device design are simulated in MEMSPRO T-SPICE software. Simulations are carried out with the design specifications following design rules of the MetalMUMPS fabrication process. Drive mass resonant frequencies simulated by this technique are 1.59 kHz and 2.05 kHz respectively, which are close to the resonant frequencies found by the analytical formulation of the gyroscope. The lumped equivalent circuit modeling technique proved to be a time efficient modeling technique for the analysis of complex MEMS devices like 3-DoF gyroscopes. The technique proves to be an alternative approach to the complex and time consuming couple field analysis Finite Element Analysis (FEA) previously used.

  10. Towards a fully integrated optical gyroscope using whispering gallery modes resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrane, T.; Jager, J.-B.; Jager, T.; Calvo, V.; Léger, J.-M.

    2017-11-01

    Since the developments of lasers and the optical fibers in the 70s, the optical gyroscopes have been subject to an intensive research to improve both their resolution and stability performances. However the best optical gyroscopes currently on the market, the ring laser gyroscope and the interferometer fiber optic gyroscope are still macroscopic devices and cannot address specific applications where size and weight constraints are critical. One solution to overcome these limitations could be to use an integrated resonator as a sensitive part to build a fully Integrated Optical Resonant Gyroscope (IORG). To keep a high rotation sensitivity, which is usually degraded when downsizing this kind of optical sensors based on the Sagnac effect, the resonator has to exhibit a very high quality factor (Q): as detailed in equation (1) where the minimum rotation rate resolution for an IORG is given as a function of the resonator characteristics (Q and diameter D) and of the global system optical system characteristics (i.e. SNR and bandwidth B), the higher the Q×D product, the lower the resolution.

  11. The design of photoelectric signal processing system for a nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope based on FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian; Zhou, Binquan; Li, Hong; Zhao, Xinghua; Mu, Weiwei; Wu, Wenfeng

    2017-10-01

    Navigation technology is crucial to the national defense and military, which can realize the measurement of orientation, positioning, attitude and speed for moving object. Inertial navigation is not only autonomous, real-time, continuous, hidden, undisturbed but also no time-limited and environment-limited. The gyroscope is the core component of the inertial navigation system, whose precision and size are the bottleneck of the performance. However, nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope is characteristic of the advantage of high precision and small size. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope can meet the urgent needs of high-tech weapons and equipment development of new generation. This paper mainly designs a set of photoelectric signal processing system for nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope based on FPGA, which process and control the information of detecting laser .The photoelectric signal with high frequency carrier is demodulated by in-phase and quadrature demodulation method. Finally, the processing system of photoelectric signal can compensate the residual magnetism of the shielding barrel and provide the information of nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope angular velocity.

  12. Student Teachers' Experiences of Relation Building in Teaching Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Maj; Laursen, Per Fibæk

    The study explores how 22 student teachers in a Danish college of education experience and interpret their own becoming a teacher and the implied attitudes to pupils. The student teachers attending mainstream teacher education and a course in mindful awareness and relational competencies have...... – to a larger extend than the mainstream educated student teachers - learned a reflexive attitude to their state of being in teaching practice and to their relational interaction with children in class....

  13. Knowledge, experience & attitudes concerning electroconvulsive therapy among patients & their relatives

    OpenAIRE

    Rajagopal, R.; Chakrabarti, S.; Grover, S.; Khehra, N.

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is used frequently in developing countries, but investigations of patients’ awareness and perception of ECT are rare. The present study thus attempted a comprehensive examination of knowledge, experience and attitudes concerning ECT among patients treated with brief-pulse, bilateral, modified ECT, and their relatives. Methods: Of the 153 recipients of ECT, 77 patients and relatives were eventually assessed using questionnaires designed ...

  14. Fostering new relational experience: clinical process in couple psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmarosh, Cheri L

    2014-03-01

    One of the most critical goals for couple psychotherapy is to foster a new relational experience in the session where the couple feels safe enough to reveal more vulnerable emotions and to explore their defensive withdrawal, aggressive attacking, or blaming. The lived intimate experience in the session offers the couple an opportunity to gain integrative insight into their feelings, expectations, and behaviors that ultimately hinder intimacy. The clinical processes that are necessary include empathizing with the couple and facilitating safety within the session, looking for opportunities to explore emotions, ruptures, and unconscious motivations that maintain distance in the relationship, and creating a new relational experience in the session that has the potential to engender integrative insight. These clinical processes will be presented with empirical support. Experts from a session will be used to highlight how these processes influence the couple and promote increased intimacy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. An experiment designed to verify the general theory of relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surdin, Maurice

    1960-01-01

    The project for an experiment which uses the effect of gravitation on Maser-type clocks placed on the ground at two different heights and which is designed to verify the general theory of relativity. Reprint of a paper published in Comptes rendus des seances de l'Academie des Sciences, t. 250, p. 299-301, sitting of 11 January 1960 [fr

  16. On 'Reinterpreting the famous train/embankment experiment of relativity'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallinckrodt, A John

    2004-01-01

    Nelson contends that Einstein's train/embankment gedanken experiment is incomplete and inadequate to demonstrate the relativity of simultaneity. However, the contradictions he points to in support of this contention arise entirely from his attempt to perform an unnecessary reconciliation using a logically inconsistent framework. (letters and comments)

  17. Exploring the stigma related experiences of family members of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The stigma of families is seen in the form of assignment of blame, social isolation and rejection. This stigma subsequently perpetuates a cycle of disability on the part of the patient and family. Purpose: To explore the stigma related experiences of family members of persons with mental illness in a selected community in the ...

  18. Dynamic Incentive Effects of Relative Performance Pay: A Field Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Delfgaauw (Josse); A.J. Dur (Robert); J.A. Non (Arjan); W.J.M.I. Verbeke (Willem)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractWe conduct a field experiment among 189 stores of a retail chain to study dynamic incentive effects of relative performance pay. Employees in the randomly selected treatment stores could win a bonus by outperforming three comparable stores from the control group over the course of four

  19. Model experiments related to outdoor propagation over an earth berm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karsten Bo

    1994-01-01

    A series of scale model experiments related to outdoor propagation over an earth berm is described. The measurements are performed with a triggered spark source. The results are compared with data from an existing calculation model based upon uniform diffraction theory. Comparisons are made...

  20. Are Psychotic Experiences Related to Poorer Reflective Reasoning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J. Mækelæ

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cognitive biases play an important role in the formation and maintenance of delusions. These biases are indicators of a weak reflective mind, or reduced engaging in reflective and deliberate reasoning. In three experiments, we tested whether a bias to accept non-sense statements as profound, treat metaphorical statements as literal, and suppress intuitive responses is related to psychotic-like experiences.Methods: We tested deliberate reasoning and psychotic-like experiences in the general population and in patients with a former psychotic episode. Deliberate reasoning was assessed with the bullshit receptivity scale, the ontological confabulation scale and the cognitive reflection test (CRT. We also measured algorithmic performance with the Berlin numeracy test and the wordsum test. Psychotic-like experiences were measured with the Community Assessment of Psychic Experience (CAPE-42 scale.Results: Psychotic-like experiences were positively correlated with a larger receptivity toward bullshit, more ontological confabulations, and also a lower score on the CRT but not with algorithmic task performance. In the patient group higher psychotic-like experiences significantly correlated with higher bullshit receptivity.Conclusion: Reduced deliberate reasoning may contribute to the formation of delusions, and be a general thinking bias largely independent of a person's general intelligence. Acceptance of bullshit may be facilitated the more positive symptoms a patient has, contributing to the maintenance of the delusions.

  1. The GINGERino ring laser gyroscope, seismological observations at one year from the first light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonelli, Andreino; Belfi, Jacopo; Beverini, Nicolò; Di Virgilio, Angela; Carelli, Giorgio; Maccioni, Enrico; De Luca, Gaetano; Saccorotti, Gilberto

    2016-04-01

    The GINGERino ring laser gyroscope (RLG) is a new large observatory-class RLG located in Gran Sasso underground laboratory (LNGS), one national laboratory of the INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). The GINGERino apparatus funded by INFN in the context of a larger project of fundamental physics is intended as a pathfinder instrument to reach the high sensitivity needed to observe general relativity effects; more details are found at the URL (https://web2.infn.it/GINGER/index.php/it/). The sensitivity reached by our instrument in the first year after the set up permitted us to acquire important seismological data of ground rotations during the transit of seismic waves generated by seisms at different epicentral distances. RLGs are in fact the best sensors for capturing the rotational motions associated with the transit of seismic waves, thanks to the optical measurement principle, these instruments are in fact insensitive to translations. Ground translations are recorded by two seismometers: a Nanometrics Trillium 240 s and Guralp CMG 3T 360 s, the first instrument is part of the national earthquake monitoring program of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) and provides the ground translation data to be compared to the RLG rotational data. We report the waveforms and the seismological analysis of some seismic events recorded during our first year of activity inside the LNGS laboratory.

  2. High-Q microsphere resonators for angular velocity sensing in gyroscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Panlong; Zheng, Yongqiu; Yan, Shubin; Xue, Chenyang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Wanjun

    2015-01-01

    A resonator gyroscope based on the Sagnac effect is proposed using a core unit that is generated by water-hydrogen flame melting. The relationship between the quality factor Q and diameter D is revealed. The Q factor of the spectral lines of the microsphere cavity coupling system, which uses tapered fibers, is found to be 10 6 or more before packaging with a low refractive curable ultraviolet polymer, although it drops to approximately 10 5 after packaging. In addition, a rotating test platform is built, and the transmission spectrum and discriminator curves of a microsphere cavity with Q of 3.22×10 6 are measured using a semiconductor laser (linewidth less than 1 kHz) and a real-time proportional-integral circuit tracking and feedback technique. Equations fitting the relation between the voltage and angular rotation rate are obtained. According to the experimentally measured parameters, the sensitivity of the microsphere-coupled system can reach 0.095 ∘ /s

  3. Special relativity and the Michelson-Morley experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, B.R.

    1979-01-01

    It is stated that contrary to most textbook statements about the origins of relativity, there is no real evidence to support the existence of a causal relationship between Michelson's 'crucial' experiment on ether drift and Einstein's enunciation of special relativity. Selective but, it is believed by the author, representative evidence elating to the genesis of the theory of special relativity is presented. Since this evidence contradicts both the substance and the spirit of most textbook references to that genesis, it is thought by the author to have some pedagogic significance for those attempting to teach both the process and the content of physics. (U.K.)

  4. Adaptive Global Sliding Mode Control for MEMS Gyroscope Using RBF Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yundi Chu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An adaptive global sliding mode control (AGSMC using RBF neural network (RBFNN is proposed for the system identification and tracking control of micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS gyroscope. Firstly, a new kind of adaptive identification method based on the global sliding mode controller is designed to update and estimate angular velocity and other system parameters of MEMS gyroscope online. Moreover, the output of adaptive neural network control is used to adjust the switch gain of sliding mode control dynamically to approach the upper bound of unknown disturbances. In this way, the switch item of sliding mode control can be converted to the output of continuous neural network which can weaken the chattering in the sliding mode control in contrast to the conventional fixed gain sliding mode control. Simulation results show that the designed control system can get satisfactory tracking performance and effective estimation of unknown parameters of MEMS gyroscope.

  5. A low noise photoelectric signal acquisition system applying in nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qilin; Zhang, Xian; Zhao, Xinghua; Yang, Dan; Zhou, Binquan; Hu, Zhaohui

    2017-10-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope serves as a new generation of strong support for the development of high-tech weapons, it solves the core problem that limits the development of the long-playing seamless navigation and positioning. In the NMR gyroscope, the output signal with atomic precession frequency is detected by the probe light, the final crucial photoelectric signal of the probe light directly decides the quality of the gyro signal. But the output signal has high sensitivity, resolution and measurement accuracy for the photoelectric detection system. In order to detect the measured signal better, this paper proposed a weak photoelectric signal rapid acquisition system, which has high SNR and the frequency of responded signal is up to 100 KHz to let the weak output signal with high frequency of the NMR gyroscope can be detected better.

  6. Multifrequency Excitation Method for Rapid and Accurate Dynamic Test of Micromachined Gyroscope Chips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Deng

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel multifrequency excitation (MFE method is proposed to realize rapid and accurate dynamic testing of micromachined gyroscope chips. Compared with the traditional sweep-frequency excitation (SFE method, the computational time for testing one chip under four modes at a 1-Hz frequency resolution and 600-Hz bandwidth was dramatically reduced from 10 min to 6 s. A multifrequency signal with an equal amplitude and initial linear-phase-difference distribution was generated to ensure test repeatability and accuracy. The current test system based on LabVIEW using the SFE method was modified to use the MFE method without any hardware changes. The experimental results verified that the MFE method can be an ideal solution for large-scale dynamic testing of gyroscope chips and gyroscopes.

  7. Enhanced sensitivity in a butterfly gyroscope with a hexagonal oblique beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Dingbang; Cao, Shijie; Hou, Zhanqiang, E-mail: houzhanqiang@nudt.edu.cn; Chen, Zhihua; Wang, Xinghua; Wu, Xuezhong [College of Mechatronics Engineering and Automation, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan, 410073 (China)

    2015-04-15

    A new approach to improve the performance of a butterfly gyroscope is developed. The methodology provides a simple way to improve the gyroscope’s sensitivity and stability, by reducing the resonant frequency mismatch between the drive and sense modes. This method was verified by simulations and theoretical analysis. The size of the hexagonal section oblique beam is the major factor that influences the resonant frequency mismatch. A prototype, which has the appropriately sized oblique beam, was fabricated using precise, time-controlled multilayer pre-buried masks. The performance of this prototype was compared with a non-tuned gyroscope. The scale factor of the prototype reaches 30.13 mV/ °/s, which is 15 times larger than that obtained from the non-tuned gyroscope. The bias stability of the prototype is 0.8 °/h, which is better than the 5.2 °/h of the non-tuned devices.

  8. Consideration of Gyroscopic Effect in Fault Detection and Isolation for Unbalance Excited Rotor Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhentao Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fault detection and isolation (FDI in rotor systems often faces the problem that the system dynamics is dependent on the rotor rotary frequency because of the gyroscopic effect. In unbalance excited rotor systems, the continuously distributed unbalances are hard to be determined or estimated accurately. The unbalance forces as disturbances make fault detection more complicated. The aim of this paper is to develop linear time invariant (LTI FDI methods (i.e., with constant parameters for rotor systems under consideration of gyroscopic effect and disturbances. Two approaches to describe the gyroscopic effect, that is, as unknown inputs and as model uncertainties, are investigated. Based on these two approaches, FDI methods are developed and the results are compared regarding the resulting FDI performances. Results are obtained by the application in a rotor test rig. Restrictions for the application of these methods are discussed.

  9. Significance of size dependent and material structure coupling on the characteristics and performance of nanocrystalline micro/nano gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, K.; Ghommem, M.; Abdelkefi, A.

    2018-05-01

    Capacitive-based sensing microelectromechanical (MEMS) and nanoelectromechanical (NEMS) gyroscopes have significant advantages over conventional gyroscopes, such as low power consumption, batch fabrication, and possible integration with electronic circuits. However, inadequacies in the modeling of these inertial sensors have presented issues of reliability and functionality of micro-/nano-scale gyroscopes. In this work, a micromechanical model is developed to represent the unique microstructure of nanocrystalline materials and simulate the response of micro-/nano-gyroscope comprising an electrostatically-actuated cantilever beam with a tip mass at the free end. Couple stress and surface elasticity theories are integrated into the classical Euler-Bernoulli beam model in order to derive a size-dependent model. This model is then used to investigate the influence of size-dependent effects on the static pull-in instability, the natural frequencies and the performance output of gyroscopes as the scale decreases from micro-to nano-scale. The simulation results show significant changes in the static pull-in voltage and the natural frequency as the scale of the system is decreased. However, the differential frequency between the two vibration modes of the gyroscope is observed to drastically decrease as the size of the gyroscope is reduced. As such, the frequency-based operation mode may not be an efficient strategy for nano-gyroscopes. The results show that a strong coupling between the surface elasticity and material structure takes place when smaller grain sizes and higher void percentages are considered.

  10. Airy's and Klinkerfues' experiments incompatible with special relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilczyn'ski, J.

    1986-01-01

    One Airy's and two Klinkerfues' experiments and their results are analysed in details; the mistakes committed by Klinkerfues in his consideration and derivation are corrected. Each of these results finds no explanation in Einstein's special theory of relativity (STR). The so-called relativistic 'aberrational refraction' in the aberration effect ought to be rejected with further consequences in STR. Each of the experiments confirms the explanation given by classical physics but with the drag co-efficient K equal to k 2 =1-1/n instead of to k=1-1/n 2 (n-the refractive index). And, in agreement with this author's derivation for K=k 2 , the independence of t he starlight aberration of filling really exists only in Airy's telescope and does not exist in Klinkerfues' lunette. Because K not equal to k in the experiments, the method used in the first Klinkerfues experiment is a one to measure the absolute values of both aberration and Earth's speed V at one point of the Earth's orbit. The value of 30 km/s, received in the experiment, finds its explanation in a new model of ether and light. The singularity of the instrument with broken tube is revealed. The deflection effect at reflection of starlight from a moving mirror is confirmed in Klinkerfues' experiments. (author). 58 refs

  11. Kurdish men's experiences of migration-related mental health issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taloyan, Marina; Al-Windi, Ahmad; Johansson, Leena Maria; Saleh-Stattin, Nuha

    2011-10-01

    The migration process may impose stress on the mental health of immigrants. To describe the experiences of immigrant men of Kurdish ethnicity during and after migration to Sweden with regard to mental health issues. Using the grounded theory method, we conducted a focus group interview with four Kurdish men and in-depth individual interviews with 10 other Kurdish men. A model with two major themes and interlinked categories was developed. The themes were (1) protective factors for good mental health (sense of belonging, creation and re-creation of Kurdish identity, sense of freedom, satisfaction with oneself) and (2) risk factors for poor mental health (worry about current political situation in the home country, yearning, lack of sense of freedom, dissatisfaction with Swedish society). The study provides insights into the psychological and emotional experiences of immigrant men of Kurdish ethnicity during and after migration to Sweden. It is important for primary health care providers to be aware of the impact that similar migration-related and life experiences have on the health status of immigrants, and also to be aware that groups are comprised of unique individuals with differing experiences and reactions to these experiences. The findings highlight the common themes of the men's experiences and suggest ways to ameliorate mental health issues, including feeling like one is seen as an individual, is a full participant in society, and can contribute to one's own culture.

  12. Optimization and Experimentation of Dual-Mass MEMS Gyroscope Quadrature Error Correction Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huiliang; Li, Hongsheng; Kou, Zhiwei; Shi, Yunbo; Tang, Jun; Ma, Zongmin; Shen, Chong; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-07

    This paper focuses on an optimal quadrature error correction method for the dual-mass MEMS gyroscope, in order to reduce the long term bias drift. It is known that the coupling stiffness and demodulation error are important elements causing bias drift. The coupling stiffness in dual-mass structures is analyzed. The experiment proves that the left and right masses' quadrature errors are different, and the quadrature correction system should be arranged independently. The process leading to quadrature error is proposed, and the Charge Injecting Correction (CIC), Quadrature Force Correction (QFC) and Coupling Stiffness Correction (CSC) methods are introduced. The correction objects of these three methods are the quadrature error signal, force and the coupling stiffness, respectively. The three methods are investigated through control theory analysis, model simulation and circuit experiments, and the results support the theoretical analysis. The bias stability results based on CIC, QFC and CSC are 48 °/h, 9.9 °/h and 3.7 °/h, respectively, and this value is 38 °/h before quadrature error correction. The CSC method is proved to be the better method for quadrature correction, and it improves the Angle Random Walking (ARW) value, increasing it from 0.66 °/√h to 0.21 °/√h. The CSC system general test results show that it works well across the full temperature range, and the bias stabilities of the six groups' output data are 3.8 °/h, 3.6 °/h, 3.4 °/h, 3.1 °/h, 3.0 °/h and 4.2 °/h, respectively, which proves the system has excellent repeatability.

  13. Multidimensional gray-wavelet processing in interferometric fiber-optic gyroscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yi; Wang, Zinan; Peng, Chao; Li, Zhengbin

    2013-01-01

    A multidimensional signal processing method for a single interferometric fiber-optic gyroscope (IFOG) is proposed, to the best of our knowledge, for the first time. The proposed method, based on a novel IFOG structure with quadrature demodulation, combines a multidimensional gray model (GM) and a wavelet compression technique for noise suppression and sensitivity enhancement. In the IFOG, two series of measured rotation rates are obtained simultaneously: an in-phase component and a quadrature component. Together with the traditionally measured rate, the three measured rates are processed by the combined gray-wavelet method. Simulations show that the intensity noise and non-reciprocal phase fluctuations are effectively suppressed by this method. Experimental comparisons with a one-dimensional GM(1, 1) model show that the proposed three-dimensional method achieves much better denoising performance. This advantage is validated by the Allan variance analysis: in a low-SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) experiment, our method reduces the angle random walk (ARW) and the bias instability (BI) from 1 × 10 −2  deg h −1/2 and 3 × 10 −2  deg h −1 to 1 × 10 −3  deg h −1/2 and 3 × 10 −3  deg h −1 , respectively; in a high-SNR experiment, our method reduces the ARW and the BI from 9 × 10 −4  deg h −1/2 and 5 × 10 −3  deg h −1 to 4 × 10 −4  deg h −1/2 and 3 × 10 −3  deg h −1 , respectively. Further, our method increases the dimension of the state-of-the-art IFOG technique from one to three, thus obtaining higher IFOG sensitivity and stability by exploiting the increase in available information. (paper)

  14. Multidimensional gray-wavelet processing in interferometric fiber-optic gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Wang, Zinan; Peng, Chao; Li, Zhengbin

    2013-11-01

    A multidimensional signal processing method for a single interferometric fiber-optic gyroscope (IFOG) is proposed, to the best of our knowledge, for the first time. The proposed method, based on a novel IFOG structure with quadrature demodulation, combines a multidimensional gray model (GM) and a wavelet compression technique for noise suppression and sensitivity enhancement. In the IFOG, two series of measured rotation rates are obtained simultaneously: an in-phase component and a quadrature component. Together with the traditionally measured rate, the three measured rates are processed by the combined gray-wavelet method. Simulations show that the intensity noise and non-reciprocal phase fluctuations are effectively suppressed by this method. Experimental comparisons with a one-dimensional GM(1, 1) model show that the proposed three-dimensional method achieves much better denoising performance. This advantage is validated by the Allan variance analysis: in a low-SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) experiment, our method reduces the angle random walk (ARW) and the bias instability (BI) from 1 × 10-2 deg h-1/2 and 3 × 10-2 deg h-1 to 1 × 10-3 deg h-1/2 and 3 × 10-3 deg h-1, respectively; in a high-SNR experiment, our method reduces the ARW and the BI from 9 × 10-4 deg h-1/2 and 5 × 10-3 deg h-1 to 4 × 10-4 deg h-1/2 and 3 × 10-3 deg h-1, respectively. Further, our method increases the dimension of the state-of-the-art IFOG technique from one to three, thus obtaining higher IFOG sensitivity and stability by exploiting the increase in available information.

  15. Optimization and Experimentation of Dual-Mass MEMS Gyroscope Quadrature Error Correction Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiliang Cao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on an optimal quadrature error correction method for the dual-mass MEMS gyroscope, in order to reduce the long term bias drift. It is known that the coupling stiffness and demodulation error are important elements causing bias drift. The coupling stiffness in dual-mass structures is analyzed. The experiment proves that the left and right masses’ quadrature errors are different, and the quadrature correction system should be arranged independently. The process leading to quadrature error is proposed, and the Charge Injecting Correction (CIC, Quadrature Force Correction (QFC and Coupling Stiffness Correction (CSC methods are introduced. The correction objects of these three methods are the quadrature error signal, force and the coupling stiffness, respectively. The three methods are investigated through control theory analysis, model simulation and circuit experiments, and the results support the theoretical analysis. The bias stability results based on CIC, QFC and CSC are 48 °/h, 9.9 °/h and 3.7 °/h, respectively, and this value is 38 °/h before quadrature error correction. The CSC method is proved to be the better method for quadrature correction, and it improves the Angle Random Walking (ARW value, increasing it from 0.66 °/√h to 0.21 °/√h. The CSC system general test results show that it works well across the full temperature range, and the bias stabilities of the six groups’ output data are 3.8 °/h, 3.6 °/h, 3.4 °/h, 3.1 °/h, 3.0 °/h and 4.2 °/h, respectively, which proves the system has excellent repeatability.

  16. Optimization and Experimentation of Dual-Mass MEMS Gyroscope Quadrature Error Correction Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huiliang; Li, Hongsheng; Kou, Zhiwei; Shi, Yunbo; Tang, Jun; Ma, Zongmin; Shen, Chong; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on an optimal quadrature error correction method for the dual-mass MEMS gyroscope, in order to reduce the long term bias drift. It is known that the coupling stiffness and demodulation error are important elements causing bias drift. The coupling stiffness in dual-mass structures is analyzed. The experiment proves that the left and right masses’ quadrature errors are different, and the quadrature correction system should be arranged independently. The process leading to quadrature error is proposed, and the Charge Injecting Correction (CIC), Quadrature Force Correction (QFC) and Coupling Stiffness Correction (CSC) methods are introduced. The correction objects of these three methods are the quadrature error signal, force and the coupling stiffness, respectively. The three methods are investigated through control theory analysis, model simulation and circuit experiments, and the results support the theoretical analysis. The bias stability results based on CIC, QFC and CSC are 48 °/h, 9.9 °/h and 3.7 °/h, respectively, and this value is 38 °/h before quadrature error correction. The CSC method is proved to be the better method for quadrature correction, and it improves the Angle Random Walking (ARW) value, increasing it from 0.66 °/√h to 0.21 °/√h. The CSC system general test results show that it works well across the full temperature range, and the bias stabilities of the six groups’ output data are 3.8 °/h, 3.6 °/h, 3.4 °/h, 3.1 °/h, 3.0 °/h and 4.2 °/h, respectively, which proves the system has excellent repeatability. PMID:26751455

  17. International experience in the use of leasing relations in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Mikhalchuk

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the market of leasing relations in the UK, Germany, France, the USA. Comparative analysis of development of leasing in foreign countries has been carried out in order to use international experience of leasing relations in Ukraine at the present stage of development of state economy. In spite of prevalence of leasing in developed countries, this kind of relationship is still uncommon in the economic environment of Ukraine because of its novelty and lack of experience. Relevance of leasing development in Ukraine, including the formation of leasing market, primarily is caused by a significant proportion of obsolete equipment and low efficiency of its use. One of solutions to these problems can be leasing which brings together all the elements of international trade, credit, and investment operations.

  18. Converging coolness and investigating its relation to user experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raptis, Dimitrios; Bruun, Anders; Kjeldskov, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    Recently a number of studies appeared that operationalised coolness and explored its relation to digital products. Literature suggests that perceived coolness is another factor of user experience, and this adds to an existing explosion of dimensions related to aesthetics, hedonic quality, pragmatic...... quality, attractiveness, etc. A critical challenge highlighted in prior research is to study the relationships among those factors and so far, no studies have empirically examined the relationship between coolness and other established user experience factors. In this paper, we address this challenge...... cool and UX factors converge into 5 for the case of mobile devices. Our findings are important for researchers, as we demonstrate through a validated model that coolness is part of UX research, as well as for practitioners, by developing a questionnaire that can reliably measure both perceived inner...

  19. Mission definition study for Stanford relativity satellite. Volume 2: Engineering flight test program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-01-01

    The need is examined for orbital flight tests of gyroscope, dewar, and other components, in order to reduce the technical and financial risk in performing the relativity experiment. A program is described that would generate engineering data to permit prediction of final performance. Two flight tests are recommended. The first flight would test a dewar smaller than that required for the final flight, but of size and form sufficient to allow extrapolation to the final design. The second flight would use the same dewar design to carry a set of three gyroscopes, which would be evaluated for spinup and drift characteristics for a period of a month or more. A proportional gas control system using boiloff helium gas from the dewar, and having the ability to prevent sloshing of liquid helium, would also be tested.

  20. Design and analysis of a novel dual-mass MEMS resonant output gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Gao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and analysis of a novel dual-mass microelectromechanical systems (MEMS resonant output gyroscope (ROG, which can effectively eliminate the influence of common-mode disturbance, such as the linear acceleration, on the gyroscope working mode by the design of dual-mass form, as well as on the frequency outputs of the double-ended tuning fork (DETF resonators by the differential arrangement. The concept of the ROG is introduced first. Then the dynamics of the gyroscope and the force-frequency characteristics of the DETF resonator are theoretically analyzed. By establishing the distribution coefficient of force and the reasonable equivalent of the force-frequency characteristics of the DETF resonator, the accurate expression of the device sensitivity is obtained. Based on the analysis results, the leverage mechanism and the DETF resonator are designed in detail. Then the configuration of the gyroscope, a dual-mass structure, is given. Finally, the validity of the analysis and design are verified by numerical simulations.

  1. Cascaded Kalman and particle filters for photogrammetry based gyroscope drift and robot attitude estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadaghzadeh N, Nargess; Poshtan, Javad; Wagner, Achim; Nordheimer, Eugen; Badreddin, Essameddin

    2014-03-01

    Based on a cascaded Kalman-Particle Filtering, gyroscope drift and robot attitude estimation method is proposed in this paper. Due to noisy and erroneous measurements of MEMS gyroscope, it is combined with Photogrammetry based vision navigation scenario. Quaternions kinematics and robot angular velocity dynamics with augmented drift dynamics of gyroscope are employed as system state space model. Nonlinear attitude kinematics, drift and robot angular movement dynamics each in 3 dimensions result in a nonlinear high dimensional system. To reduce the complexity, we propose a decomposition of system to cascaded subsystems and then design separate cascaded observers. This design leads to an easier tuning and more precise debugging from the perspective of programming and such a setting is well suited for a cooperative modular system with noticeably reduced computation time. Kalman Filtering (KF) is employed for the linear and Gaussian subsystem consisting of angular velocity and drift dynamics together with gyroscope measurement. The estimated angular velocity is utilized as input of the second Particle Filtering (PF) based observer in two scenarios of stochastic and deterministic inputs. Simulation results are provided to show the efficiency of the proposed method. Moreover, the experimental results based on data from a 3D MEMS IMU and a 3D camera system are used to demonstrate the efficiency of the method. © 2013 ISA Published by ISA All rights reserved.

  2. GNSS Signal Tracking Performance Improvement for Highly Dynamic Receivers by Gyroscopic Mounting Crystal Oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, Maryam; Jin, Tian; Sun, Kewen

    2015-08-31

    In this paper, the efficiency of the gyroscopic mounting method is studied for a highly dynamic GNSS receiver's reference oscillator for reducing signal loss. Analyses are performed separately in two phases, atmospheric and upper atmospheric flights. Results show that the proposed mounting reduces signal loss, especially in parts of the trajectory where its probability is the highest. This reduction effect appears especially for crystal oscillators with a low elevation angle g-sensitivity vector. The gyroscopic mounting influences frequency deviation or jitter caused by dynamic loads on replica carrier and affects the frequency locked loop (FLL) as the dominant tracking loop in highly dynamic GNSS receivers. In terms of steady-state load, the proposed mounting mostly reduces the frequency deviation below the one-sigma threshold of FLL (1σ(FLL)). The mounting method can also reduce the frequency jitter caused by sinusoidal vibrations and reduces the probability of signal loss in parts of the trajectory where the other error sources accompany this vibration load. In the case of random vibration, which is the main disturbance source of FLL, gyroscopic mounting is even able to suppress the disturbances greater than the three-sigma threshold of FLL (3σ(FLL)). In this way, signal tracking performance can be improved by the gyroscopic mounting method for highly dynamic GNSS receivers.

  3. Analysis of the Gyroscopic Stabilization of a System of Rigid Bodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kliem, Wolfhard; Kliem, Wolfhard

    1996-01-01

    We study the gyroscopic of a three-body system. A new method offinding stability regions, based on mechanism and criteria for gyroscopicstabilization, is presented. Of particular interest in this connection isthe theory of interaction of eigenvalues. This leads to a complete 3-dimensionalanalysis......, which shows the regions of stability, divergence, and flutter ofa simple model of a rotating spaceship....

  4. Application of MEMS Accelerometers and Gyroscopes in Fast Steering Mirror Control Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Tian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In a charge-coupled device (CCD-based fast steering mirror (FSM tracking control system, high control bandwidth is the most effective way to enhance the closed-loop performance. However, the control system usually suffers a great deal from mechanical resonances and time delays induced by the low sampling rate of CCDs. To meet the requirements of high precision and load restriction, fiber-optic gyroscopes (FOGs are usually used in traditional FSM tracking control systems. In recent years, the MEMS accelerometer and gyroscope are becoming smaller and lighter and their performance have improved gradually, so that they can be used in a fast steering mirror (FSM to realize the stabilization of the line-of-sight (LOS of the control system. Therefore, a tentative approach to implement a CCD-based FSM tracking control system, which uses MEMS accelerometers and gyroscopes as feedback components and contains an acceleration loop, a velocity loop and a position loop, is proposed. The disturbance suppression of the proposed method is the product of the error attenuation of the acceleration loop, the velocity loop and the position loop. Extensive experimental results show that the MEMS accelerometers and gyroscopes can act the similar role as the FOG with lower cost for stabilizing the LOS of the FSM tracking control system.

  5. A universal gyroscope driving circuit with 70dB amplitude control range

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelghany, Mohamed A.

    2010-08-01

    A CMOS variable gain driving circuit with output signal amplitude control for gyroscopes with wide range of quality factors is presented. The driving circuit can be used for gyroscopes with Q values higher than 500. The circuit uses a current-commutating switching mixer to control the gyroscope driving signal level. Conventional driving circuits use automatic gain control (AGC) which suffers from limited linear range and the need for an off-chip capacitor for the peak detector and loop filter. Two stage variable gain amplifier is used in the proposed design to ensure enough gain for oscillation for such a wide range of quality factors. Analog and digital amplitude control methods are used to cover wide range of driving signal amplitude with enough accuracy to hit the maximum driving signal level without sacrificing gyroscope linearity. Due to the high DC gain of the amplifier chain, DC offset resulting from mismatches might saturate the amplifier output. DC offset correction is employed using a secondary negative feedback loop. The proposed driving circuit is being fabricated in 0.6μm CMOS technology. © 2010 IEEE.

  6. Study on VCSEL laser heating chip in nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaoyang; Zhou, Binquan; Wu, Wenfeng; Jia, Yuchen; Wang, Jing

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, atomic gyroscope has become an important direction of inertial navigation. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope has a stronger advantage in the miniaturization of the size. In atomic gyroscope, the lasers are indispensable devices which has an important effect on the improvement of the gyroscope performance. The frequency stability of the VCSEL lasers requires high precision control of temperature. However, the heating current of the laser will definitely bring in the magnetic field, and the sensitive device, alkali vapor cell, is very sensitive to the magnetic field, so that the metal pattern of the heating chip should be designed ingeniously to eliminate the magnetic field introduced by the heating current. In this paper, a heating chip was fabricated by MEMS process, i.e. depositing platinum on semiconductor substrates. Platinum has long been considered as a good resistance material used for measuring temperature The VCSEL laser chip is fixed in the center of the heating chip. The thermometer resistor measures the temperature of the heating chip, which can be considered as the same temperature of the VCSEL laser chip, by turning the temperature signal into voltage signal. The FPGA chip is used as a micro controller, and combined with PID control algorithm constitute a closed loop control circuit. The voltage applied to the heating resistor wire is modified to achieve the temperature control of the VCSEL laser. In this way, the laser frequency can be controlled stably and easily. Ultimately, the temperature stability can be achieved better than 100mK.

  7. On experiments to detect possible failures of relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues Junior, W.A.; Tiomno, J.

    1985-01-01

    Two recently proposed experiments by Kolen and Torr, designed to show failures of Einstein's Special Relativity (SR) are analysed. It is pointed out that these papers contain a number of imprecisions and misconceptions which are cleared out. Also the very spread misconception about anysotropy of propagation of light in vacuum in Lorentz Aether Theory (LAT) is analysed showing that the anysotropy is only a coordinate effect. Comparison of the correct results in LAT theory, leading to violation of SR, with new theoretical and experimental results of Torr et al is made. Some of these new results are shown to be incorrect and/or inconsistent with both SR and LAT. (Author) [pt

  8. Dynamical Behavior of a Rigid Body with One Fixed Point (Gyroscope. Basic Concepts and Results. Open Problems: a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetoslav Ganchev Nikolov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The study of the dynamic behavior of a rigid body with one fixed point (gyroscope has a long history. A number of famous mathematicians and mechanical engineers have devoted enormous time and effort to clarify the role of dynamic effects on its movement (behavior – stable, periodic, quasi-periodic or chaotic. The main objectives of this review are: 1 to outline the characteristic features of the theory of dynamical systems and 2 to reveal the specific properties of the motion of a rigid body with one fixed point (gyroscope.This article consists of six sections. The first section addresses the main concepts of the theory of dynamical systems. Section two presents the main theoretical results (obtained so far concerning the dynamic behavior of a solid with one fixed point (gyroscope. Section three examines the problem of gyroscopic stabilization. Section four deals with the non-linear (chaotic dynamics of the gyroscope. Section five is a brief analysis of the gyroscope applications in engineering. The final section provides conclusions and generalizations on why the theory of dynamical systems should be used in the study of the movement of gyroscopic systems.

  9. Fabrication and analysis of a micro-machined tri-axis gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Nan-Chyuan; Sue, Chung-Yang

    2008-11-01

    This paper presents an innovative micro-gyroscope design. Solely by SOI (silicon on insulator) fabrication technology and wet etching, the proposed micro-gyroscope can be produced in batch and is capable of detecting three-axis angular rates. The induced motions of all individual seismic mass modules are designed to respond in the directions orthogonal to each other in order to decouple the obtained measurements. In our work, three pairs of high-resolution differential capacitors with signal processing circuits are employed to measure the angular velocity components in three axes. On the other hand, the drive electrode comb is used to constantly vibrate the outer-ring in the tangential direction by a sinusoidal voltage. The signal bandwidth is increased by distributed translational proof masses (DTPM), placed 90° apart orderly. Each individual proof mass of DTPM is designed with natural frequency discrepancy and constrained to move in the radial direction so that the superior mode matching can be easily, to some extent, achieved. The suspension flexures are particularly designed to resist planar displacements in the drive mode but increase the stroke of tilting angular displacement in the sense mode. By considering the complicated geometry of the suspension flexures, FEM (finite element method) is employed to examine the potential maximum induced mechanical stress. The dynamic equations of the proposed gyroscope are established so that the embedded gyroscopic effects are explicitly unveiled. More importantly, the efficacy of the drive and sense circuit modules are verified by commercial softwares Hspice and Multisim. By intensive computer simulations and preliminary experimental studies, the resolution, bandwidth and decoupling capability of the tri-axis gyroscope are expected to be fairly enhanced if a certain degree of trade-off is preset.Corrections were made to figure 5 in this article on 3 October 2008. The corrected electronic version is identical to the

  10. Fabrication and analysis of a micro-machined tri-axis gyroscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Nan-Chyuan; Sue, Chung-Yang

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an innovative micro-gyroscope design. Solely by SOI (silicon on insulator) fabrication technology and wet etching, the proposed micro-gyroscope can be produced in batch and is capable of detecting three-axis angular rates. The induced motions of all individual seismic mass modules are designed to respond in the directions orthogonal to each other in order to decouple the obtained measurements. In our work, three pairs of high-resolution differential capacitors with signal processing circuits are employed to measure the angular velocity components in three axes. On the other hand, the drive electrode comb is used to constantly vibrate the outer-ring in the tangential direction by a sinusoidal voltage. The signal bandwidth is increased by distributed translational proof masses (DTPM), placed 90° apart orderly. Each individual proof mass of DTPM is designed with natural frequency discrepancy and constrained to move in the radial direction so that the superior mode matching can be easily, to some extent, achieved. The suspension flexures are particularly designed to resist planar displacements in the drive mode but increase the stroke of tilting angular displacement in the sense mode. By considering the complicated geometry of the suspension flexures, FEM (finite element method) is employed to examine the potential maximum induced mechanical stress. The dynamic equations of the proposed gyroscope are established so that the embedded gyroscopic effects are explicitly unveiled. More importantly, the efficacy of the drive and sense circuit modules are verified by commercial softwares Hspice and Multisim. By intensive computer simulations and preliminary experimental studies, the resolution, bandwidth and decoupling capability of the tri-axis gyroscope are expected to be fairly enhanced if a certain degree of trade-off is preset. Corrections were made to figure 5 in this article on 3 October 2008. The corrected electronic version is identical to the

  11. A comprehensive comparison of simple step counting techniques using wrist- and ankle-mounted accelerometer and gyroscope signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhudy, Matthew B; Mahoney, Joseph M

    2018-04-01

    The goal of this work is to compare the differences between various step counting algorithms using both accelerometer and gyroscope measurements from wrist and ankle-mounted sensors. Participants completed four different conditions on a treadmill while wearing an accelerometer and gyroscope on the wrist and the ankle. Three different step counting techniques were applied to the data from each sensor type and mounting location. It was determined that using gyroscope measurements allowed for better performance than the typically used accelerometers, and that ankle-mounted sensors provided better performance than those mounted on the wrist.

  12. Nanoscale quantum gyroscope using a single 13C nuclear spin coupled with a nearby NV center in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xuerui; Wang, Liujun; Feng, Fupan; Lou, Liren; Diao, Wenting; Duan, Chongdi

    2018-03-01

    Developing gyroscopes based on quantum systems are important for inertial sensing applications, and its underlying physics is of fundamental interest. In this paper, we proposed a new type of gyroscope based on the Berry phase generated during rotation of the quantum system by using a single 13C nuclear spin coupled with a nearby nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond. Due to the atom-scale size of the quantum system, rotation information can be obtained with high spatial resolution. The gyroscope can be manipulated at room temperature and without the need for a strong magnetic field, which is also beneficial to its further applications.

  13. Interface circuit for a multiple-beam tuning-fork gyroscope with high quality factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ren

    This research work presents the design, theoretical analysis, fabrication, interface electronics, and experimental results of a Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) based Multiple-Beam Tuning-Fork Gyroscope (MB-TFG). Based on a numerical model of Thermo-Elastic Damping (TED), a Multiple-Beam Tuning-Fork Structure (MB-TFS) is designed with high Quality factors (Qs) in its two operation modes. A comprehensive theoretical analysis of the MB-TFG design is conducted to relate the design parameters to its operation parameters and further performance parameters. In conjunction with a mask that defines the device through trenches to alleviate severe fabrication effect on anchor loss, a simple one-mask fabrication process is employed to implement this MB-TFG design on SOI wafers. The fabricated MB-TFGs are tested with PCB-level interface electronics and a thorough comparison between the experimental results and a theoretical analysis is conducted to verify the MB-TFG design and accurately interpret the measured performance. The highest measured Qs of the fabricated MB-TFGs in vacuum are 255,000 in the drive-mode and 103,000 in the sense-mode, at a frequency of 15.7kHz. Under a frequency difference of 4Hz between the two modes (operation frequency is 16.8kHz) and a drive-mode vibration amplitude of 3.0um, the measured rate sensitivity is 80mVpp/°/s with an equivalent impedance of 6MQ. The calculated overall rate resolution of this device is 0.37/hrhiElz, while the measured Angle Random Walk (ARW) and bias instability are 6.67°/'vhr and 95°/hr, respectively.

  14. Development and evaluation of a gyroscope-based wheel rotation monitor for manual wheelchair users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiremath, Shivayogi V; Ding, Dan; Cooper, Rory A

    2013-07-01

    To develop and evaluate a wireless gyroscope-based wheel rotation monitor (G-WRM) that can estimate speeds and distances traveled by wheelchair users during regular wheelchair propulsion as well as wheelchair sports such as handcycling, and provide users with real-time feedback through a smartphone application. The speeds and the distances estimated by the G-WRM were compared with the criterion measures by calculating absolute difference, mean difference, and percentage errors during a series of laboratory-based tests. Intraclass correlations (ICC) and the Bland-Altman plots were also used to assess the agreements between the G-WRM and the criterion measures. In addition, battery life and wireless data transmission tests under a number of usage conditions were performed. The percentage errors for the angular velocities, speeds, and distances obtained from three prototype G-WRMs were less than 3% for all the test trials. The high ICC values (ICC (3,1) > 0.94) and the Bland-Altman plots indicate excellent agreement between the estimated speeds and distances by the G-WRMs and the criterion measures. The battery life tests showed that the device could last for 35 hours in wireless mode and 139 hours in secure digital card mode. The wireless data transmission tests indicated less than 0.3% of data loss. The results indicate that the G-WRM is an appropriate tool for tracking a spectrum of wheelchair-related activities from regular wheelchair propulsion to wheelchair sports such as handcycling. The real-time feedback provided by the G-WRM can help wheelchair users self-monitor their everyday activities.

  15. Elite athletes experiences with risk related to cardiac screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jonas Schmidt; Thing, Lone Friis

    Society of Cardiology as well as major sports federations such as the International Olympic Committee, however, these recommendations seem to be based on an inadequate empirical foundation, just as the costs of performing cardiac screening on a larger scale seem out of proportion. Additionally, the field...... perspective on risk (Foucault 1988). For most elite athletes participation in cardiac screening is done out of a wish to obtain an acquittal from risks. Symptomatic of the risk society cardiac screening can from an athlete perspective at the same time be seen as an attempt to gain control over......Elite Athletes experiences with risks related to Cardiac Screening Jonas Schmidt Christensen1, Lone Friis Thing1 1University of Copenhagen - Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports (NEXS), Cardiac screening of elite athletes are recommended by both the American Heart Association & the European...

  16. The San Andreas fault experiment. [gross tectonic plates relative velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. E.; Vonbun, F. O.

    1973-01-01

    A plan was developed during 1971 to determine gross tectonic plate motions along the San Andreas Fault System in California. Knowledge of the gross motion along the total fault system is an essential component in the construction of realistic deformation models of fault regions. Such mathematical models will be used in the future for studies which will eventually lead to prediction of major earthquakes. The main purpose of the experiment described is the determination of the relative velocity of the North American and the Pacific Plates. This motion being so extremely small, cannot be measured directly but can be deduced from distance measurements between points on opposite sites of the plate boundary taken over a number of years.

  17. Leadership Behaviors and Its Relation with Principals’ Management Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vali Mehdinezhad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at studying the leadership behaviors reported by principals and observed by teachers and its relationship with management experience of principals. A quantitative method was used in this study. The target population included all principals and teachers of guidance schools and high schools in the Dashtiari District, Iran. A sample consisting of 46 principals and 129 teachers was selected by stratified sampling and simple random sampling methods. A leadership Behavior Description Questionnaire (LBDQ developed by Kozes and Posner (2001 was used for data collection. The obtained data were analyzed using one sample and independent t-test, correlation coefficient and crosstabs pearson Chi-square test. The results showed that teachers describe leadership behaviors of their principals relatively well. However, principals themselves evaluated their leadership behaviors as very well. Comparing between leadership behaviors self-reported by principals and those observed by teachers, a significant difference was found between the views and evaluations of teachers and principals on all components of leadership behaviors of principals, except that regarding empowerment. In fact, principals described their leadership behaviors better and at a more appropriate level than teachers. From the perspective of both teachers and principals, there was no significant relationship between any of the components of leadership behaviors and management experience of principals.

  18. Numerical analysis of two experiments related to thermal fatigue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieder, Ulrich; Errante, Paolo [DEN-STMF, Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, Universite Paris-Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2017-06-15

    Jets in cross flow are of fundamental industrial importance and play an important role in validating turbulence models. Two jet configurations related to thermal fatigue phenomena are investigated: • T-junction of circular tubes where a heated jet discharges into a cold main flow and • Rectangular jet marked by a scalar discharging into a main flow in a rectangular channel. The T-junction configuration is a classical test case for thermal fatigue phenomena. The Vattenfall T-junction experiment was already subject of an OECD/NEA benchmark. A LES modelling and calculation strategy is developed and validated on this data. The rectangular-jet configuration is important for basic physical understanding and modelling and has been analyzed experimentally at CEA. The experimental work was focused on turbulent mixing between a slightly heated rectangular jet which is injected perpendicularly into the cold main flow of a rectangular channel. These experiments are analyzed for the first time with LES. The overall results show a good agreement between the experimental data and the CFD calculation. Mean values of velocity and temperature are well captured by both RANS calculation and LES. The range of critical frequencies and their amplitudes, however, are only captured by LES.

  19. Lived experience of economic and political trends related to globalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushon, Jennifer A; Muhajarine, Nazeem; Labonte, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    A multi-method case study examined how the economic and political processes of globalization have influenced the determinants of health among low-income children in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. This paper presents the results from the qualitative interview component of the case study. The purpose of the interviews was to uncover the lived experience of low-income families and their children in Saskatoon with regards to political and economic trends related to globalization, an important addition to the usual globalization and health research that relies primarily on cross-country regressions in which the personal impacts remain hidden. In-depth phenomenological interviews with 26 low-income parents of young children (aged zero to five) who were residents of Saskatoon. A combination of volunteer and criterion sampling was used. Interview questions were open-ended and based upon an analytical framework. Analysis proceeded through immersion in the data, a process of open coding, and finally through a process of selective coding. The larger case study and interviews indicate that globalization has largely not been benefiting low-income parents with young children. Low-income families with young children were struggling to survive, despite the tremendous economic growth occurring in Saskatchewan and Saskatoon at the time of the interviews. This often led to participants expressing a sense of helplessness, despair, isolation, and/or anger. Respondents' experiences suggest that globalization-related changes in social conditions and public policies and programs have great potential to negatively affect family health through either psychosocial effects in individuals and/or decreased levels of social cohesion in the community.

  20. Situating experiences of HIV-related stigma in Swaziland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, R

    2010-01-01

    With the world's highest antenatal HIV prevalence rate (39.2%), Swaziland has also been described as among the most stigmatising. Yet, only recently was an anti-HIV stigma and discrimination (S&D) platform included in the government's National Multisectoral HIV and AIDS Policy. This study draws on a medical anthropological project in rural Swaziland to examine experiences of stigma among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH). Qualitative methods included a semi-structured questionnaire and interviews (n=40) to identify patterns of stigma across three domains: verbal, physical and social. Key informant interviews (n=5) were conducted with health personnel and support group leaders. Descriptive statistics were situated within a thematic analysis of open-ended content. Among the findings, participants reported extensive HIV-related rumouring (36.4%) and pejorative name-calling (37.5%). Nearly one in five (18.2%) could no longer partake of family meals. Homesteads, which are an organising principle of Swazi life, were often markedly stigmatising environments. In contrast to documented discrimination in health care settings, the health centre emerged as a space where PLWH could share information and support. Given the UNAIDS call for national partners to 'know your epidemic' by tracking the prevalence of HIV-related S&D, results from this study suggested that unless 'knowing your epidemic' includes the lived experiences of HIV stigma that blister into discernible patterns, effectiveness of national initiatives is likely to be limited. Multidisciplinary and locale-specific studies are especially well suited in examining the cultural dynamics of HIV stigma and in providing grounded data that deepen the impact of comprehensive HIV/AIDS policies and programming.

  1. Calibration of atomic trajectories in a large-area dual-atom-interferometer gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhan-Wei; Lu, Si-Bin; Li, Run-Bing; Luo, Jun; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Ming-Sheng

    2018-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a method for calibrating atomic trajectories in a large-area dual-atom-interferometer gyroscope. The atom trajectories are monitored by modulating and delaying the Raman transition, and they are precisely calibrated by controlling the laser orientation and the bias magnetic field. To improve the immunity to the gravity effect and the common phase noise, the symmetry and the overlap of two large-area atomic interference loops are optimized by calibrating the atomic trajectories and by aligning the Raman-laser orientations. The dual-atom-interferometer gyroscope is applied in the measurement of the Earth's rotation. The sensitivity is 1.2 ×10-6 rad s -1 Hz-1/2, and the long-term stability is 6.2 ×10-8 rad/s at 2000 s.

  2. Application of the vector modulation method to the north finder capability gyroscope as a directional sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celikel, Oguz

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the application of the vector modulation method (VMM) to an open-loop interferometric fiber optic gyroscope, called the north finder capability gyroscope (NFCG), designed and assembled in TUBITAK UME (National Metrology Institute of Turkey). The method contains a secondary modulation/demodulation circuit with an AD630 chip, depending on the periodic variation of the orientation of the sensing coil sensitive surface vector with respect to geographic north at a laboratory latitude and collection of dc voltage at the secondary demodulation circuit output in the time domain. The resultant dc voltage proportional to the first-kind Bessel function based on Sagnac phase shift for the first order is obtained as a result of vector modulation together with the Earth's rotation. A new model function is developed and introduced to evaluate the angular errors of the NFCG with VMM in finding geographic north

  3. A single-ended CMOS sensing circuit for MEMS gyroscope with noise cancellation

    KAUST Repository

    Elsayed, Mohannad Yomn

    2010-06-01

    In this work, a complete single-ended readout circuit for capacitive MEMS gyroscope using chopper stabilization technique is presented. A novel noise cancellation technique is used to get rid of the bias noise. The circuit offers superior performance over state of the art readout circuits in terms of cost, gain, and noise for the given area and power consumption. The full circuit exhibits a gain of 58dB, a power dissipation of 1.3mW and an input referred noise of 12nV/√Hz. This would significantly improve the overall sensitivity of the gyroscope. The full circuit has been fabricated in 0.6um CMOS technology and it occupies an area of 0.4mm × 1mm. © 2010 IEEE.

  4. Generalized projective chaos synchronization of gyroscope systems subjected to dead-zone nonlinear inputs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yau, H.-T.

    2008-01-01

    This Letter presents a robust control scheme to generalized projective synchronization between two identical two-degrees-of-freedom heavy symmetric gyroscopes with dead zone nonlinear inputs. Because of the nonlinear terms of the gyroscope system, the system exhibits complex and chaotic motions. By the Lyapunov stability theory with control terms, two suitable sliding surfaces are proposed to ensure the stability of the controlled closed-loop system in sliding mode. Then, two sliding mode controllers (SMC) are designed to guarantee the hitting of the sliding surfaces even when the control inputs contain dead-zone nonlinearity. This method allows us to arbitrarily direct the scaling factor onto a desired value. Numerical simulations show that this method works very well for the proposed controller

  5. A single-ended CMOS sensing circuit for MEMS gyroscope with noise cancellation

    KAUST Repository

    Elsayed, Mohannad Yomn; Emira, Ahmed; Sedky, Sherif M.; Habib, S. E. D.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a complete single-ended readout circuit for capacitive MEMS gyroscope using chopper stabilization technique is presented. A novel noise cancellation technique is used to get rid of the bias noise. The circuit offers superior performance over state of the art readout circuits in terms of cost, gain, and noise for the given area and power consumption. The full circuit exhibits a gain of 58dB, a power dissipation of 1.3mW and an input referred noise of 12nV/√Hz. This would significantly improve the overall sensitivity of the gyroscope. The full circuit has been fabricated in 0.6um CMOS technology and it occupies an area of 0.4mm × 1mm. © 2010 IEEE.

  6. Noise Reduction of MEMS Gyroscope Based on Direct Modeling for an Angular Rate Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Xue

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel approach for processing the outputs signal of the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS gyroscopes was presented to reduce the bias drift and noise. The principle for the noise reduction was presented, and an optimal Kalman filter (KF was designed by a steady-state filter gain obtained from the analysis of KF observability. In particular, the true angular rate signal was directly modeled to obtain an optimal estimate and make a self-compensation for the gyroscope without needing other sensor’s information, whether in static or dynamic condition. A linear fit equation that describes the relationship between the KF bandwidth and modeling parameter of true angular rate was derived from the analysis of KF frequency response. The test results indicated that the MEMS gyroscope having an ARW noise of 4.87°/h0.5 and a bias instability of 44.41°/h were reduced to 0.4°/h0.5 and 4.13°/h by the KF under a given bandwidth (10 Hz, respectively. The 1σ estimated error was reduced from 1.9°/s to 0.14°/s and 1.7°/s to 0.5°/s in the constant rate test and swing rate test, respectively. It also showed that the filtered angular rate signal could well reflect the dynamic characteristic of the input rate signal in dynamic conditions. The presented algorithm is proved to be effective at improving the measurement precision of the MEMS gyroscope.

  7. Chip-Scale Combinatorial Atomic Navigator (C-SCAN) Low Drift Nuclear Spin Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    suggestions for reducing this burden, to Department of Defense, Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports (0704...spin-exchange relaxation in a finite magnetic field. We operated the gyroscope using a Ramsey-type interrogation sequence with nuclear spin precession...shift by a factor of 105. Here we use the approach of a Ramsey clock interrogation scheme, where the optical pumping, free evolution, and measurement

  8. Project of a laser gyroscope to determine continuously the Earth's rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinov, N. S.; Zharov, V. E.; Sazhin, M. V.; Fedoseev, E. N.; Vlasov, B. I.; Rusakov, V. K.

    The Time Service of the Sternberg State Astronomical Institute together with specialists of VNIIFTRI began to work at the project of the laser gyroscope to determine continuously the Earth's rotation. It is assumed to measure both the high-frequency variations with periods of 100 - 1000 sec and the low-frequency variations with periods of a few days. It gives the opportunity to combine these data with the VLBI data.

  9. Regional Community and International Relations: the Volgograd Region Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danakari Richard A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the complex and controversial problems of the new regional communities’ formation and the impact of the interethnic relations sphere on them. The author notes that the processes of interaction between representatives of different cultures and civilizations, ethnic groups and religions have become increasingly controversial and tense in the context of continuous social dynamics. Similarly to the Russian society as a whole, regional communities are in a state of transitivity. They get transformed, they acquire new qualities such as multicasting and heterogeneity, multi-ethnicity and multi-confessionalism, fragmentarity and multiculturality. This fact increases the risks and uncertainties, problematizes future prospects. National non-governmental organizations are increasingly positioning themselves as civil society institutions at the present stage of social development at the regional level. They perform a difficult dual task: on the one hand, they ensure the preservation and development of history, native language, culture, ethnic traditions, and on the other hand, they work on the integration, on the common identity and the Russian nation formation. On the territory of the Volgograd region, largely due to the active cooperation of regional authorities and local authorities with national public associations, international and inter-confessional relations are stable. The basis of such activity is respect for history, native language, culture, tradition, religion, national dignity of all people in the region, regardless of their belonging to a certain ethnic group or religion. Over two decades of accumulated considerable experience of joint inter-ethnic dialogue and cooperation, provided tolerance and peace, harmony and mutual understanding between people of different ethnicities and religions in the country.

  10. Relating stick-slip friction experiments to earthquake source parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarr, Arthur F.

    2012-01-01

    Analytical results for parameters, such as static stress drop, for stick-slip friction experiments, with arbitrary input parameters, can be determined by solving an energy-balance equation. These results can then be related to a given earthquake based on its seismic moment and the maximum slip within its rupture zone, assuming that the rupture process entails the same physics as stick-slip friction. This analysis yields overshoots and ratios of apparent stress to static stress drop of about 0.25. The inferred earthquake source parameters static stress drop, apparent stress, slip rate, and radiated energy are robust inasmuch as they are largely independent of the experimental parameters used in their estimation. Instead, these earthquake parameters depend on C, the ratio of maximum slip to the cube root of the seismic moment. C is controlled by the normal stress applied to the rupture plane and the difference between the static and dynamic coefficients of friction. Estimating yield stress and seismic efficiency using the same procedure is only possible when the actual static and dynamic coefficients of friction are known within the earthquake rupture zone.

  11. Emotional pain: surviving mental health problems related to childhood experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, A L; Bégat, I; Severinsson, E

    2009-09-01

    Emotional pain is described as intense by women who suffer from borderline personality disorder (BPD), and a high prevalence of reported childhood abuse was found in the literature and in research. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of women suffering from BPD with focus on emotional pain related to childhood. An explorative design was used. Data were collected from in-depth interviews consisting of women suffering from BPD (n = 13) and an interpretive content analysis was used to analyse the text. The findings revealed two main themes: 'Power' and 'Assessment of vulnerability'. The main theme 'Power' resulted in two categories: 'Surviving the feeling of being forced' and 'Surviving the feeling of having to assume responsibility'. The other main theme 'Assessment of vulnerability' had two categories: 'Surviving the feeling of being victimized' and 'Surviving the feeling of not being loved'. The findings suggest that nursing care need to develop an understanding of how these women endure their emotional pain, and try to survive as fighting spirits and how struggling became their way of life.

  12. Relations among hypnagogic and hypnopompic experiences associated with sleep paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheyne, J A; Newby-Clark, I R; Rueffer, S D

    1999-12-01

    The Waterloo Sleep Experiences Scale was developed to assess the prevalence of sleep paralysis and a variety of associated hypnagogic and hypnopompic hallucinoid experiences: sensed presence, felt pressure, floating sensations, auditory and visual hallucinations, and fear. Consistent with results of recent surveys, almost 30% of 870 university students reported at least one experience of sleep paralysis. Approximately three-quarters of those also reported at least one hallucinoid experience, and slightly more than 10% experienced three or more. Fear was positively associated with hallucinoid experiences, most clearly with sensed presence. Regression analyses lend support to the hypothesis that sensed presence and fear are primitive associates of sleep paralysis and contribute to the elaboration of further hallucinoid experiences, especially those involving visual experiences.

  13. Analysis of Dynamic Performance of a Kalman Filter for Combining Multiple MEMS Gyroscopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Xue

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the dynamic performance of a Kalman filter (KF was analyzed, which is used to combine multiple measurements of a gyroscopes array to reduce the noise and improve the accuracy of the individual sensors. A principle for accuracy improvement by the KF was briefly presented to obtain an optimal estimate of input rate signal. In particular, the influences of some crucial factors on the KF dynamic performance were analyzed by simulations such as the factors input signal frequency, signal sampling, and KF filtering rate. Finally, a system that was comprised of a six-gyroscope array was designed and implemented to test the dynamic performance. Experimental results indicated that the 1σ error for the combined rate signal was reduced to about 0.2°/s in the constant rate test, which was a reduction by a factor of more than eight compared to the single gyroscope. The 1σ error was also reduced from 1.6°/s to 0.48°/s in the swing test. It showed that the estimated angular rate signal could well reflect the dynamic characteristic of the input signal in dynamic conditions.

  14. EVALUATION METHOD FOR PARASITIC EFFECTS OF THE ELECTRO-OPTICAL MODULATOR IN A FIBER OPTIC GYROSCOPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Volkovskiy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research.The paper proposes an original method for studying the parasitic effects in the electro-optic modulator of the fiber optic gyroscope. Proposed method is based on the usage of a special waveform phase modulation signal. Method. The essence of the proposed method lies in modification of serrodyne modulation signal, thereby providing a periodic displacement of the phase difference signal to the maximum of the interference curve. In this case, the intensity level reflects the influence of parasitic effects with the degree of manifestation being determined by the sequence of voltage control signals applied to the modulator. Enumeration of combinations of control signals and the corresponding intensity levels gives the possibility to observe an empirical dependence of the parasitic effects and use it later for compensation. Main Results. The efficiency of the proposed method is demonstrated by the program model of the fiber optic gyroscope. The results of the method application on a production sample of the device were obtained. Comparison with the results of direct estimate of the parasitic intensity modulation effect testifies to the effectiveness of the proposed method. Practical Relevance. The method can be used as a diagnostic tool to quantify the influence of parasitic effects in the electro-optic modulator of the fiber optic gyroscope as well as for their subsequent compensation.

  15. Modification of piezoelectric vibratory gyroscope resonator parameters by feedback control

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Loveday, PW

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available and labs with practical hands-on experience that will give them valuable experiences upon graduation. Another topic Dr. Rogers has made a priority is the introduction of engineering concepts into the science curriculum in the elementary schools. His belief... vibration modes have the same natural frequency, Manuscript received September 4, 1997; accepted December 18, 1997. P. W. Loveday is with Sensor Systems, Division of Material Science and Technology, CSIR, Pretoria, South Africa (e-mail: ploveday...

  16. Experiments for habitation-related technologies in closed system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Tsuyoshi; Tako, Yasuhiro

    2006-01-01

    Preliminary habitation experiments, including facility implementation tests, investigation of work load and psychological and physiological effect of human subjects, environmental monitoring tests, and integrated implementation tests were performed in Closed Ecology Experiment Facilities (CEEF). Results showed insufficient ability of CO 2 separator, issues of overtime work of subjects and inadequate communication between subjects and supporting staff outside the modules. Countermeasures for these issues were developed. Results show that habitation experiments from fiscal year 2005 on the CEEF were judged to be feasible. (author)

  17. Relating triggering processes in lab experiments with earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baro Urbea, J.; Davidsen, J.; Kwiatek, G.; Charalampidou, E. M.; Goebel, T.; Stanchits, S. A.; Vives, E.; Dresen, G.

    2016-12-01

    Statistical relations such as Gutenberg-Richter's, Omori-Utsu's and the productivity of aftershocks were first observed in seismology, but are also common to other physical phenomena exhibiting avalanche dynamics such as solar flares, rock fracture, structural phase transitions and even stock market transactions. All these examples exhibit spatio-temporal correlations that can be explained as triggering processes: Instead of being activated as a response to external driving or fluctuations, some events are consequence of previous activity. Although different plausible explanations have been suggested in each system, the ubiquity of such statistical laws remains unknown. However, the case of rock fracture may exhibit a physical connection with seismology. It has been suggested that some features of seismology have a microscopic origin and are reproducible over a vast range of scales. This hypothesis has motivated mechanical experiments to generate artificial catalogues of earthquakes at a laboratory scale -so called labquakes- and under controlled conditions. Microscopic fractures in lab tests release elastic waves that are recorded as ultrasonic (kHz-MHz) acoustic emission (AE) events by means of piezoelectric transducers. Here, we analyse the statistics of labquakes recorded during the failure of small samples of natural rocks and artificial porous materials under different controlled compression regimes. Temporal and spatio-temporal correlations are identified in certain cases. Specifically, we distinguish between the background and triggered events, revealing some differences in the statistical properties. We fit the data to statistical models of seismicity. As a particular case, we explore the branching process approach simplified in the Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model. We evaluate the empirical spatio-temporal kernel of the model and investigate the physical origins of triggering. Our analysis of the focal mechanisms implies that the occurrence

  18. Manufacturing and testing experience for FFTF major safety related components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peckinpaugh, C.L.

    1976-01-01

    Experience with FFTF Heat Transport System components during design, manufacturing, and prototype testing is dscussed. Specifically the special design features and the results of the testing performed to assure that the designs provide for safe operation are outlined. Particular emphasis is placed on the full size prototype testing programs and the valuable experience gained

  19. Analysis of Correlation in MEMS Gyroscope Array and its Influence on Accuracy Improvement for the Combined Angular Rate Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Xue

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining a correlation factor is a prerequisite for fusing multiple outputs of a mircoelectromechanical system (MEMS gyroscope array and evaluating accuracy improvement. In this paper, a mathematical statistics method is established to analyze and obtain the practical correlation factor of a MEMS gyroscope array, which solves the problem of determining the Kalman filter (KF covariance matrix Q and fusing the multiple gyroscope signals. The working principle and mathematical model of the sensor array fusion is briefly described, and then an optimal estimate of input rate signal is achieved by using of a steady-state KF gain in an off-line estimation approach. Both theoretical analysis and simulation show that the negative correlation factor has a favorable influence on accuracy improvement. Additionally, a four-gyro array system composed of four discrete individual gyroscopes was developed to test the correlation factor and its influence on KF accuracy improvement. The result showed that correlation factors have both positive and negative values; in particular, there exist differences for correlation factor between the different units in the array. The test results also indicated that the Angular Random Walk (ARW of 1.57°/h0.5 and bias drift of 224.2°/h for a single gyroscope were reduced to 0.33°/h0.5 and 47.8°/h with some negative correlation factors existing in the gyroscope array, making a noise reduction factor of about 4.7, which is higher than that of a uncorrelated four-gyro array. The overall accuracy of the combined angular rate signal can be further improved if the negative correlation factors in the gyroscope array become larger.

  20. Improved Kennedy-Thorndike experiment to test special relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hils, Dieter; Hall, J. L.

    1990-01-01

    A modern version of the Kennedy-Thorndike experiment was carried out by searching for sidereal variations between the frequency of a laser locked to an I2 reference line and a laser locked to the resonance frequency of a highly stable cavity. No variations were found at the level of 2 x 10 to the -12th. This represents a 300-fold improvement over the original Kennedy-Thorndike experiment and allows the Lorentz transformations to be deduced entirely from experiment at an accuracy level of 70 ppm.

  1. Improved Kennedy-Thorndike experiment to test special relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hils, Dieter; Hall, J. L.

    1990-04-01

    A modern version of the Kennedy-Thorndike experiment was carried out by searching for sidereal variations between the frequency of a laser locked to an I2 reference line and a laser locked to the resonance frequency of a highly stable cavity. No variations were found at the level of 2 x 10 to the -12th. This represents a 300-fold improvement over the original Kennedy-Thorndike experiment and allows the Lorentz transformations to be deduced entirely from experiment at an accuracy level of 70 ppm.

  2. Gyroscopic behavior exhibited by the optical Kerr effect in bimetallic Au–Pt nanoparticles suspended in ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández-Valdés, D.; Torres-Torres, C., E-mail: ctorrest@ipn.mx, E-mail: crstorres@yahoo.com.mx; Martínez-González, C. L. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Sección de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigación, Escuela Superior de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica Unidad Zacatenco (Mexico); Trejo-Valdez, M. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Escuela Superior de Ingeniería Química e Industrias Extractivas (Mexico); Hernández-Gómez, L. H. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Sección de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigación, Escuela Superior de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica Unidad Zacatenco (Mexico); Torres-Martínez, R. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada Unidad Querétaro (Mexico)

    2016-07-15

    The modification in the third-order nonlinear optical response exhibited by rotating bimetallic Au–Pt nanoparticles in an ethanol solution was analyzed. The samples were prepared by a sol–gel processing route. The anisotropy associated to the elemental composition of the nanoparticles was confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements. The size of the nanoparticles varies in the range from 9 to 13 nm, with an average size of 11 nm. Changes in the spatial orientation of the nanomaterials automatically generated a variation in their plasmonic response evaluated by UV–Vis spectroscopy. A two-wave mixing experiment was conducted to explore an induced birefringence at 532 nm wavelength with nanosecond pulses interacting with the samples. A strong optical Kerr effect was identified to be the main responsible effect for the third-order nonlinear optical phenomenon exhibited by the nanoparticles. It was estimated that the rotation of inhomogeneous nanostructures can provide a remarkable change in the participation of different surface plasmon resonances, if they correspond to multimetallic nanoparticles. Potential applications for developing low-dimensional gyroscopic systems can be contemplated.

  3. Gyroscopic behavior exhibited by the optical Kerr effect in bimetallic Au–Pt nanoparticles suspended in ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández-Valdés, D.; Torres-Torres, C.; Martínez-González, C. L.; Trejo-Valdez, M.; Hernández-Gómez, L. H.; Torres-Martínez, R.

    2016-01-01

    The modification in the third-order nonlinear optical response exhibited by rotating bimetallic Au–Pt nanoparticles in an ethanol solution was analyzed. The samples were prepared by a sol–gel processing route. The anisotropy associated to the elemental composition of the nanoparticles was confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements. The size of the nanoparticles varies in the range from 9 to 13 nm, with an average size of 11 nm. Changes in the spatial orientation of the nanomaterials automatically generated a variation in their plasmonic response evaluated by UV–Vis spectroscopy. A two-wave mixing experiment was conducted to explore an induced birefringence at 532 nm wavelength with nanosecond pulses interacting with the samples. A strong optical Kerr effect was identified to be the main responsible effect for the third-order nonlinear optical phenomenon exhibited by the nanoparticles. It was estimated that the rotation of inhomogeneous nanostructures can provide a remarkable change in the participation of different surface plasmon resonances, if they correspond to multimetallic nanoparticles. Potential applications for developing low-dimensional gyroscopic systems can be contemplated.

  4. Special Relativity and the Michelson-Morley Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Bryan R.

    1979-01-01

    Presents selective and representative evidence relating to the genesis of the theory of special relativity. The evidence seems to defy most of the philosophic preconceptions which many physics teachers appear to have about the nature of physics. (GA)

  5. Analysis of Acousto-Optic Errors in Laser Gyroscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    2 2 Sagnac’s Interferometer ................................ 4 3 Harress ’ Prism Ring.................................... 5 4...years before Sagnac’s experiment, Harress , a German graduate student formed a ring of partially reflecting prisms to measure the dispersive properties of...glass (Figure 3). Harress noticed a fringe shift when he rotated the ring, and he assumed that the shift was caused by the *dragging" of the light

  6. Experiences of psychosocial and programme-related barriers to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kathryn van Boom

    recovery in lifestyle interventions for noncommunicable diseases. P Skowno, PhD1 ... 3Department of Psychiatry and MRC Unit on Anxiety and Stress Disorders, ... key risk factors such as unhealthy diet, physical inactivity ... work to enhance the sharing of experiences[7]. .... caused, and the other is completely self-induced.

  7. The challenges and related strategies of planning for wilderness experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerri Cahill

    2012-01-01

    Planning is where science, public interests and management of wilderness areas come together. Unfortunately, science and information specifically supporting wilderness experiences, if any exists, is often perceived by managers as subjective, value laden, and hard to defend. This can sometimes lead to the tough decisions about providing high quality wilderness...

  8. Leadership Behaviors and Its Relation with Principals' Management Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdinezhad, Vali; Sardarzahi, Zaid

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims at studying the leadership behaviors reported by principals and observed by teachers and its relationship with management experience of principals. A quantitative method was used in this study. The target population included all principals and teachers of guidance schools and high schools in the Dashtiari District, Iran. A sample…

  9. Experience-based attenuation of age-related differences in music cognition tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinz, E J

    2000-06-01

    Pianists of a wide experience and age range were tested on measures of musical memory and musical perceptual speed to better understand the effects of experience on age-cognition relations. Experience-related attenuation might be in the form of an Age x Experience interaction or in the form of a "confounding" of age and experience such that positive age-experience relations offset negative age-cognition relations. It was predicted that the former, considered evidence for disuse interpretations of aging, would be likely to emerge in tasks with strong experience effects and strong age-related declines among inexperienced individuals. However, in no case were the interactions of age and experience on the memory or perceptual speed variables significant. There was, however, evidence that high levels of experience in the older participants partially attenuated the negative effects of age on the memory and perceptual speed tasks.

  10. The Pedagogical Relation Past and Present: Experience, Subjectivity and Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Norm

    2017-01-01

    The pedagogical relation, the idea of a special relationship between teacher and child, has long been a central theme or "problem" in interpretive studies of education, with the term having been established in English some 25 years ago by Max van Manen. Speaking more broadly, themes of "student-teacher relations" and…

  11. Experience and Sentence Processing: Statistical Learning and Relative Clause Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Justine B.; Christiansen, Morten H.; Race, David S.; Acheson, Daniel J.; MacDonald, Maryellen C.

    2009-01-01

    Many explanations of the difficulties associated with interpreting object relative clauses appeal to the demands that object relatives make on working memory. MacDonald and Christiansen [MacDonald, M. C., & Christiansen, M. H. (2002). "Reassessing working memory: Comment on Just and Carpenter (1992) and Waters and Caplan (1996)." "Psychological…

  12. A novel oscillation control for MEMS vibratory gyroscopes using a modified electromechanical amplitude modulation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Wei; Lin, Yiyu; Liu, Siqi; Zheng, Xudong; Jin, Zhonghe

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports a novel oscillation control algorithm for MEMS vibratory gyroscopes using a modified electromechanical amplitude modulation (MEAM) technique, which enhances the robustness against the frequency variation of the driving mode, compared to the conventional EAM (CEAM) scheme. In this approach, the carrier voltage exerted on the proof mass is frequency-modulated by the drive resonant frequency. Accordingly, the pick-up signal from the interface circuit involves a constant-frequency component that contains the amplitude and phase information of the vibration displacement. In other words, this informational detection signal is independent of the mechanical resonant frequency, which varies due to different batches, imprecise micro-fabrication and changing environmental temperature. In this paper, the automatic gain control loop together with the phase-locked loop are simultaneously analyzed using the averaging method and Routh–Hurwitz criterion, deriving the stability condition and the parameter optimization rules of the transient response. Then, a simulation model based on the real system is set up to evaluate the control algorithm. Further, the proposed MEAM method is tested using a field-programmable-gate-array based digital platform on a capacitive vibratory gyroscope. By optimizing the control parameters, the transient response of the drive amplitude reveals a settling time of 45.2 ms without overshoot, according well with the theoretical prediction and simulation results. The first measurement results show that the amplitude variance of the drive displacement is 12 ppm in an hour while the phase standard deviation is as low as 0.0004°. The mode-split gyroscope operating under atmospheric pressure demonstrates an outstanding performance. By virtue of the proposed MEAM method, the bias instability and angle random walk are measured to be 0.9° h −1 (improved by 2.4 times compared to the CEAM method) and 0.068° (√h) −1 (improved by 1

  13. A dynamic system matching technique for improving the accuracy of MEMS gyroscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubberud, Peter A., E-mail: stubber@ee.unlv.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Stubberud, Stephen C., E-mail: scstubberud@ieee.org [Oakridge Technology, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Stubberud, Allen R., E-mail: stubberud@att.net [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    A classical MEMS gyro transforms angular rates into electrical values through Euler's equations of angular rotation. Production models of a MEMS gyroscope will have manufacturing errors in the coefficients of the differential equations. The output signal of a production gyroscope will be corrupted by noise, with a major component of the noise due to the manufacturing errors. As is the case of the components in an analog electronic circuit, one way of controlling the variability of a subsystem is to impose extremely tight control on the manufacturing process so that the coefficient values are within some specified bounds. This can be expensive and may even be impossible as is the case in certain applications of micro-electromechanical (MEMS) sensors. In a recent paper [2], the authors introduced a method for combining the measurements from several nominally equal MEMS gyroscopes using a technique based on a concept from electronic circuit design called dynamic element matching [1]. Because the method in this paper deals with systems rather than elements, it is called a dynamic system matching technique (DSMT). The DSMT generates a single output by randomly switching the outputs of several, nominally identical, MEMS gyros in and out of the switch output. This has the effect of 'spreading the spectrum' of the noise caused by the coefficient errors generated in the manufacture of the individual gyros. A filter can then be used to eliminate that part of the spread spectrum that is outside the pass band of the gyro. A heuristic analysis in that paper argues that the DSMT can be used to control the effects of the random coefficient variations. In a follow-on paper [4], a simulation of a DSMT indicated that the heuristics were consistent. In this paper, analytic expressions of the DSMT noise are developed which confirm that the earlier conclusions are valid. These expressions include the various DSMT design parameters and, therefore, can be used as design

  14. A dynamic system matching technique for improving the accuracy of MEMS gyroscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubberud, Peter A.; Stubberud, Stephen C.; Stubberud, Allen R.

    2014-01-01

    A classical MEMS gyro transforms angular rates into electrical values through Euler's equations of angular rotation. Production models of a MEMS gyroscope will have manufacturing errors in the coefficients of the differential equations. The output signal of a production gyroscope will be corrupted by noise, with a major component of the noise due to the manufacturing errors. As is the case of the components in an analog electronic circuit, one way of controlling the variability of a subsystem is to impose extremely tight control on the manufacturing process so that the coefficient values are within some specified bounds. This can be expensive and may even be impossible as is the case in certain applications of micro-electromechanical (MEMS) sensors. In a recent paper [2], the authors introduced a method for combining the measurements from several nominally equal MEMS gyroscopes using a technique based on a concept from electronic circuit design called dynamic element matching [1]. Because the method in this paper deals with systems rather than elements, it is called a dynamic system matching technique (DSMT). The DSMT generates a single output by randomly switching the outputs of several, nominally identical, MEMS gyros in and out of the switch output. This has the effect of 'spreading the spectrum' of the noise caused by the coefficient errors generated in the manufacture of the individual gyros. A filter can then be used to eliminate that part of the spread spectrum that is outside the pass band of the gyro. A heuristic analysis in that paper argues that the DSMT can be used to control the effects of the random coefficient variations. In a follow-on paper [4], a simulation of a DSMT indicated that the heuristics were consistent. In this paper, analytic expressions of the DSMT noise are developed which confirm that the earlier conclusions are valid. These expressions include the various DSMT design parameters and, therefore, can be used as design

  15. A dynamic system matching technique for improving the accuracy of MEMS gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubberud, Peter A.; Stubberud, Stephen C.; Stubberud, Allen R.

    2014-12-01

    A classical MEMS gyro transforms angular rates into electrical values through Euler's equations of angular rotation. Production models of a MEMS gyroscope will have manufacturing errors in the coefficients of the differential equations. The output signal of a production gyroscope will be corrupted by noise, with a major component of the noise due to the manufacturing errors. As is the case of the components in an analog electronic circuit, one way of controlling the variability of a subsystem is to impose extremely tight control on the manufacturing process so that the coefficient values are within some specified bounds. This can be expensive and may even be impossible as is the case in certain applications of micro-electromechanical (MEMS) sensors. In a recent paper [2], the authors introduced a method for combining the measurements from several nominally equal MEMS gyroscopes using a technique based on a concept from electronic circuit design called dynamic element matching [1]. Because the method in this paper deals with systems rather than elements, it is called a dynamic system matching technique (DSMT). The DSMT generates a single output by randomly switching the outputs of several, nominally identical, MEMS gyros in and out of the switch output. This has the effect of 'spreading the spectrum' of the noise caused by the coefficient errors generated in the manufacture of the individual gyros. A filter can then be used to eliminate that part of the spread spectrum that is outside the pass band of the gyro. A heuristic analysis in that paper argues that the DSMT can be used to control the effects of the random coefficient variations. In a follow-on paper [4], a simulation of a DSMT indicated that the heuristics were consistent. In this paper, analytic expressions of the DSMT noise are developed which confirm that the earlier conclusions are valid. These expressions include the various DSMT design parameters and, therefore, can be used as design tools for DSMT

  16. Psychotic Experiences and Overhasty Inferences Are Related to Maladaptive Learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiner Stuke

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical accounts suggest that an alteration in the brain's learning mechanisms might lead to overhasty inferences, resulting in psychotic symptoms. Here, we sought to elucidate the suggested link between maladaptive learning and psychosis. Ninety-eight healthy individuals with varying degrees of delusional ideation and hallucinatory experiences performed a probabilistic reasoning task that allowed us to quantify overhasty inferences. Replicating previous results, we found a relationship between psychotic experiences and overhasty inferences during probabilistic reasoning. Computational modelling revealed that the behavioral data was best explained by a novel computational learning model that formalizes the adaptiveness of learning by a non-linear distortion of prediction error processing, where an increased non-linearity implies a growing resilience against learning from surprising and thus unreliable information (large prediction errors. Most importantly, a decreased adaptiveness of learning predicted delusional ideation and hallucinatory experiences. Our current findings provide a formal description of the computational mechanisms underlying overhasty inferences, thereby empirically substantiating theories that link psychosis to maladaptive learning.

  17. Berkeley Experiments on Superfluid Macroscopic Quantum Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packard, Richard

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides a brief history of the evolution of the Berkeley experiments on macroscopic quantum effects in superfluid helium. The narrative follows the evolution of the experiments proceeding from the detection of single vortex lines to vortex photography to quantized circulation in 3He to Josephson effects and superfluid gyroscopes in both 4He and 3He

  18. Interactive modeling activities in the classroom—rotational motion and smartphone gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pörn, Ray; Braskén, Mats

    2016-11-01

    The wide-spread availability of smartphones makes them a valuable addition to the measurement equipment in both the physics classroom and the instructional laboratory, encouraging an active interaction between measurements and modeling activities. In this paper we illustrate this interaction by making use of the internal gyroscope of a smartphone to study and measure the rotational dynamics of objects rotating about a fixed axis. The workflow described in this paper has been tested in a classroom setting and found to encourage an exploratory approach to both data collecting and modeling.

  19. Minimal-Learning-Parameter Technique Based Adaptive Neural Sliding Mode Control of MEMS Gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates an adaptive neural sliding mode controller for MEMS gyroscopes with minimal-learning-parameter technique. Considering the system uncertainty in dynamics, neural network is employed for approximation. Minimal-learning-parameter technique is constructed to decrease the number of update parameters, and in this way the computation burden is greatly reduced. Sliding mode control is designed to cancel the effect of time-varying disturbance. The closed-loop stability analysis is established via Lyapunov approach. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method.

  20. Establishment and analysis of coupled dynamic model for dual-mass silicon micro-gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhanghui; Qiu, Anping; Shi, Qin; Zhang, Taoyuan

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a coupled dynamic model for a dual-mass silicon micro-gyroscope (DMSG). It can quantitatively analyze the influence of left-right stiffness difference on the natural frequencies, modal matrix and modal coupling coefficient of the DMSG. The analytic results are verified by using the finite element method (FEM) simulation. The model shows that with the left-right stiffness difference of 1%, the modal coupling coefficient is 12% in the driving direction and 31% in the sensing direction. It also shows that in order to achieve good separation, the stiffness of base beam should be small enough in both the driving and sensing direction.

  1. Efficiency of a gyroscopic device for conversion of mechanical wave energy to electrical energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Martin; Darula, Radoslav; Gravesen, Jens

    2011-01-01

    We consider a recently proposed gyroscopic device for conversion of mechanical ocean wave energy to electrical energy. Two models of the device derived from standard engineering mechanics from the literature are analysed, and a model is derived from analytical mechanics considerations. From...... these models, estimates of the power production, eciency, forces and moments are made. We nd that it is possible to extract a signicant amount of energy from an ocean wave using the described device. Further studies are required for a full treatment of the device....

  2. A novel Cs-(129)Xe atomic spin gyroscope with closed-loop Faraday modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wan, Shuangai; Qin, Jie; Zhang, Chen; Quan, Wei; Yuan, Heng; Dong, Haifeng

    2013-08-01

    We report a novel Cs-(129)Xe atomic spin gyroscope (ASG) with closed-loop Faraday modulation method. This ASG requires approximately 30 min to start-up and 110 °C to operate. A closed-loop Faraday modulation method for measurement of the optical rotation was used in this ASG. This method uses an additional Faraday modulator to suppress the laser intensity fluctuation and Faraday modulator thermal induced fluctuation. We theoretically and experimentally validate this method in the Cs-(129)Xe ASG and achieved a bias stability of approximately 3.25 °∕h.

  3. The rotational velocities evaluation for the engine mounts gyroscopic loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan BOGOS

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The default values for the maximum pitch and yaw speeds from CS 23.371, seem to be too conservative that would result in overstressing of the structure.A simplified dynamic simulation is proposed to evaluate more confident velocities for a specific aircraft. The yawing condition is related to the “sudden rudder deflection” and a maneuver with “lateral gust”. The pitching conditions are a result of a “sudden elevator deflection”. The model takes into account the nonlinear effects of the aerodynamic coefficients and controls efficiencies.

  4. Cost related to nuclear power plants: the international experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This report about the international costs of nuclear electricity generations is divided in two distinct parts: the first one shows the competitiveness of the main sources of electricity generation for base load operation according to studies carried on by OECD and UNIPEDE since 1983; the second one discusses the most recent OECD study about the different types of power plants to be constructed in its number states, based on the experience of each country and the technology evolution of the different fuels used. (F.E.). 4 refs, 2 figs, 27 tab

  5. Relativity effects for space-based coherent lidar experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudimetla, V. S. Rao

    1996-01-01

    An effort was initiated last year in the Astrionics Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center to examine and incorporate, if necessary, the effects of relativity in the design of space-based lidar systems. A space-based lidar system, named AEOLUS, is under development at Marshall Space Flight Center and it will be used to accurately measure atmospheric wind profiles. Effects of relativity were also observed in the performance of space-based systems, for example in case of global positioning systems, and corrections were incorporated into the design of instruments. During the last summer, the effects of special relativity on the design of space-based lidar systems were studied in detail, by analyzing the problem of laser scattering off a fixed target when the source and a co-located receiver are moving on a spacecraft. Since the proposed lidar system uses a coherent detection system, errors even in the order of a few microradians must be corrected to achieve a good signal-to-noise ratio. Previous analysis assumed that the ground is flat and the spacecraft is moving parallel to the ground, and developed analytical expressions for the location, direction and Doppler shift of the returning radiation. Because of the assumptions used in that analysis, only special relativity effects were involved. In this report, that analysis is extended to include general relativity and calculate its effects on the design.

  6. Being a team leader: newly registered nurses relate their experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekström, Louise; Idvall, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study that explores how newly qualified registered nurses experience their leadership role in the ward-based nursing care team. A nurse's clinical leadership affects the quality of care provided. Newly qualified nurses experience difficulties during the transition period from student to qualified professional and find it challenging to lead nursing care. Twelve nurses were interviewed and the transcribed texts analysed using qualitative content analysis to assess both manifest and latent content. Five themes were identified: feeling stranded; forming well-functioning teams; learning to lead; having the courage, strength, and desire to lead; and ensuring appropriate care. The findings indicate that many factors limit nurses' leadership but some circumstances are supportive. The leadership prerequisites for newly registered nurses need to improve, emphasizing different ways to create a supportive atmosphere that promotes professional development and job satisfaction. To increase nurse retention and promote quality of care, nurse managers need to clarify expectations and guide and support newly qualified nurses in a planned way. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Higher Education Relations: Iranian and the United States Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereshteh, M. Hussein

    This review examined the views of 35 higher education professionals in order to explore the history of higher education relations between Iran and the United States particularly before and after the revolution in Iran. The study used interviews with participants, correspondence, and published material from journals, monographs, and newspapers. All…

  8. Exploring the stigma related experiences of family members of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Celenkosini Thembelenkosini Nxumalo

    a cycle of disability on the part of the patient and family. Purpose: To explore the stigma .... prevention of stigmatisation of people with mental illness and their families in rural ... as a family member's accounts of stigma related feelings, situations or ..... ishment from the family as a reason for the bad behaviour. The participants ...

  9. Volvo drivers' experiences with advanced crash avoidance and related technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, Angela H; McCartt, Anne T

    2014-01-01

    Crash avoidance technologies can potentially prevent or mitigate many crashes, but their success depends in part on driver acceptance. Owners of 2010-2012 model Volvo vehicles with several technologies were interviewed about their experiences. Interviews were conducted in summer 2012 with 155 owners of vehicles with City Safety as a standard feature; 145 owners with an optional technology package that included adaptive cruise control, distance alert, collision warning with full auto brake (and pedestrian detection on certain models), driver alert control, and lane departure warning; and 172 owners with both City Safety and the technology package. The survey response rates were 21 percent for owners with City Safety, 30 percent for owners with the technology package, and 27 percent for owners with both. Ten percent of owners opted out before the telephone survey began, and 18 percent declined to participate when called. Despite some annoyance, most respondents always leave the systems on, although fewer do so for lane departure warning (59%). For each of the systems, at least 80 percent of respondents with the system would want it on their next vehicle. Many respondents reported safer driving habits with the systems (e.g., following less closely with adaptive cruise control, using turn signals more often with lane departure warning). Fewer respondents reported potentially unsafe behavior, such as allowing the vehicle to brake for them at least some of the time. About one third of respondents experienced autonomous braking when they believed they were at risk of crashing, and about one fifth of respondents thought it had prevented a crash. About one fifth of respondents with the technology package reported that they were confused or misunderstood which safety system had activated in their vehicle. Consistent with the results for early adopters in the previous survey of Volvo and Infiniti owners, the present survey found that driver acceptance of the technologies

  10. The influence of nonideal factors on the capacitance permittivity in a liquid-suspended rotor micro-gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yuan Ren

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The nonideal factors of a liquid-suspended rotor micro-gyroscope include the gas-liquid two-phase flow voids, medium temperature and its dielectric relaxation, in which the role of the nonideal factors on the capacitor dielectric constant is altered, thereby affecting the capacitance detection precision of the micro-gyroscope. By comparing four different liquid media, the experimental results reveal the nonideal character of the capacitor dielectric constant. The 7# white oil is suitable for use as the liquid-suspended gyro cavity liquid medium.

  11. Solidarity through shared disadvantage: Highlighting shared experiences of discrimination improves relations between stigmatized groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortland, Clarissa I; Craig, Maureen A; Shapiro, Jenessa R; Richeson, Jennifer A; Neel, Rebecca; Goldstein, Noah J

    2017-10-01

    Intergroup relations research has largely focused on relations between members of dominant groups and members of disadvantaged groups. The small body of work examining intraminority intergroup relations, or relations between members of different disadvantaged groups, reveals that salient experiences of ingroup discrimination promote positive relations between groups that share a dimension of identity (e.g., 2 different racial minority groups) and negative relations between groups that do not share a dimension of identity (e.g., a racial minority group and a sexual minority group). In the present work, we propose that shared experiences of discrimination between groups that do not share an identity dimension can be used as a lever to facilitate positive intraminority intergroup relations. Five experiments examining relations among 4 different disadvantaged groups supported this hypothesis. Both blatant (Experiments 1 and 3) and subtle (Experiments 2, 3, and 4) connections to shared experiences of discrimination, or inducing a similarity-seeking mindset in the context of discrimination faced by one's ingroup (Experiment 5), increased support for policies benefiting the outgroup (Experiments 1, 2, and 4) and reduced intergroup bias (Experiments 3, 4, and 5). Taken together, these experiments provide converging evidence that highlighting shared experiences of discrimination can improve intergroup outcomes between stigmatized groups across dimensions of social identity. Implications of these findings for intraminority intergroup relations are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Technical workshop on safeguards, verification technologies, and other related experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the Technical Workshop on safeguards was to encourage a clearer understanding of the IAEA Safeguards System, its origins and evolution and the present state of the art. Presentations held by the IAEA officials and outside experts examined as well other components of the non-proliferation regime, the current practices and procedures, and the future prospects. A series of presentations described the characteristics of the interaction between global and regional verification systems and described relevant past and present experience. Prominence given to such state of the art verification technologies as environmental sampling, satellite imaging and monitoring thorough remote and unattended techniques demonstrated, beyond any doubt, the essentially dynamic nature of verification. It is generally acknowledged that there have been major achievements in preventing spread of nuclear weapons, but no verification system can in itself prevent proliferation

  13. Technical workshop on safeguards, verification technologies, and other related experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-12-31

    The aim of the Technical Workshop on safeguards was to encourage a clearer understanding of the IAEA Safeguards System, its origins and evolution and the present state of the art. Presentations held by the IAEA officials and outside experts examined as well other components of the non-proliferation regime, the current practices and procedures, and the future prospects. A series of presentations described the characteristics of the interaction between global and regional verification systems and described relevant past and present experience. Prominence given to such state of the art verification technologies as environmental sampling, satellite imaging and monitoring thorough remote and unattended techniques demonstrated, beyond any doubt, the essentially dynamic nature of verification. It is generally acknowledged that there have been major achievements in preventing spread of nuclear weapons, but no verification system can in itself prevent proliferation Refs, figs, tabs

  14. Limits to relational autonomy--the Singaporean experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Lalit Kumar Radha; Watkinson, Deborah S; Beng, Ng Lee

    2015-05-01

    Recognition that the Principle of Respect for Autonomy fails to work in family-centric societies such as Singapore has recently led to the promotion of relational autonomy as a suitable framework within which to place healthcare decision making. However, empirical data, relating to patient and family opinions and the practices of healthcare professionals in Confucian-inspired Singapore, demonstrate clear limitations on the ability of a relational autonomy framework to provide the anticipated compromise between prevailing family decision-making norms and adopted Western led atomistic concepts of autonomy. Evidence suggests that despite a growing infusion of Western influence, there is still little to indicate any major shift to individual decision making, particularly in light of the way society and healthcare are structured. Similarly, the lack of employing a shared decision-making model and data that discredit the notion that the complex psychosocial and cultural factors that affect the decision making may be considered "content neutral" not only prevents the application of relational autonomy but questions the viability of the values behind the Principle of Respect for Autonomy. Taking into account local data and drawing upon a wider concept of personhood that extends beyond prevailing family-centric ideals along with the complex interests that are focused upon the preservation of the unique nature of personhood that arises from the Ring Theory of Personhood, we propose and "operationalize" the employing of an authoritative welfare-based approach, within the confines of best interest decision making, to better meet the current care needs within Singapore. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. External relations on the classroom: Experiences area Andina University Foundation

    OpenAIRE

    Belén Leal Hurtado; Ruth Betty Aragón Aguilar

    2017-01-01

    This article is the result of a research project conducted in the academic context. Its aim was to analyze how the students of the Area Andina University Foundation conceive relations of friendship, relationships and management of conflicts outside the classroom. It was developed under a psychosocial approach of qualitative and exploratory, not comparative, type with application of the method of mixed focus groups with a population of 48 students, between 18 and 25 years, enrolled in the thir...

  16. How Angular Velocity Features and Different Gyroscope Noise Types Interact and Determine Orientation Estimation Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasciuto, Ilaria; Ligorio, Gabriele; Bergamini, Elena; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Sabatini, Angelo Maria; Cappozzo, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    In human movement analysis, 3D body segment orientation can be obtained through the numerical integration of gyroscope signals. These signals, however, are affected by errors that, for the case of micro-electro-mechanical systems, are mainly due to: constant bias, scale factor, white noise, and bias instability. The aim of this study is to assess how the orientation estimation accuracy is affected by each of these disturbances, and whether it is influenced by the angular velocity magnitude and 3D distribution across the gyroscope axes. Reference angular velocity signals, either constant or representative of human walking, were corrupted with each of the four noise types within a simulation framework. The magnitude of the angular velocity affected the error in the orientation estimation due to each noise type, except for the white noise. Additionally, the error caused by the constant bias was also influenced by the angular velocity 3D distribution. As the orientation error depends not only on the noise itself but also on the signal it is applied to, different sensor placements could enhance or mitigate the error due to each disturbance, and special attention must be paid in providing and interpreting measures of accuracy for orientation estimation algorithms. PMID:26393606

  17. PENGENDALIAN PID PADA ROBOT MIROSOT UPN “VETERAN” YOGYAKARTA BERBASIS SENSOR GYROSCOPE DAN ACCELEROMETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awang Hendrianto Pratomo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available MiRoSoT Robot movement is influenced by the speed control from right and left wheels. Wheels speed control on MiroSot robot is determined by parameter PID (Proportional Integral and Derevative value. PID value determined by robot position and angle. MiroSot robot movement is still not stable and can not move in accordance with the instruction have been made. Instability of the robot movement in the game is affected by friction wheels against the ground, friction gear and robot load. In this study, implemented a gyroscope and accelerometer sensors to stabilize robot movement. Based on both sensors are controlled by using a microcontroller ATmega64. Speed control system based on gyroscope and accelerometer sensor is obtained that the robot is able to face a certain angle more precisely. The accelerometer sensor is used as a parameter for the braking system, so the robot is able to move more stable without the loss of power from the motor during a reduction speed from the strategy control.

  18. Markerless Augmented Reality Utilizing Gyroscope to Demonstrate the Position of Dewata Nawa Sanga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Wayan Andis Indrawan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dewata Nawa Sanga in Hinduism has an important role as the foundation of the religious concept implemented by Hindus in Bali, Indonesia. It has the meaning of nine deities or manifestations of Ida Sang Hyang Widhi Wasa (God Almighty  that guard or control the nine wind direction. Dewata Nawa Sanga in terms of education in Bali has been learned by the elementary school students. However, in social life the concept of Dewata Nawa Sanga itself has not been attached and understood by all Balinese Hinduism yet. Based on the problem in social life, there is an idea to develop Markerless Augmented Reality Utilizing Gyroscope to Demonstrate the Position of Dewata Nawa Sanga. This application is designed to know, recognize, and understand the characteristics of Dewata Nawa Sanga using gyroscope. This sensor serves to fulfill the object of the deities in the coordinates to be determined. Furthermore, it serves to provide information about Dewata Nawa Sanga along with the innovative and informative 3D animation. The result of usefulness questionnaire of this application percentage value average is 88.4%. It can be concluded that AR Dewata Nawa Sanga is very useful and helpful for learners in exploring the Dewata Nawa Sanga position in a real-world environment. The result of usability and satisfaction questionnaire of this application percentage value average is 84.8%. It shows that the application is very useful for the participants to learn Dewata Nawa Sanga and very satisfied to use.

  19. Error Correction of Measured Unstructured Road Profiles Based on Accelerometer and Gyroscope Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhua Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a noncontact acquisition system composed of several time synchronized laser height sensors, accelerometers, gyroscope, and so forth in order to collect the road profiles of vehicle riding on the unstructured roads. A method of correcting road profiles based on the accelerometer and gyroscope data is proposed to eliminate the adverse impacts of vehicle vibration and attitudes change. Because the power spectral density (PSD of gyro attitudes concentrates in the low frequency band, a method called frequency division is presented to divide the road profiles into two parts: high frequency part and low frequency part. The vibration error of road profiles is corrected by displacement data obtained through two times integration of measured acceleration data. After building the mathematical model between gyro attitudes and road profiles, the gyro attitudes signals are separated from low frequency road profile by the method of sliding block overlap based on correlation analysis. The accuracy and limitations of the system have been analyzed, and its validity has been verified by implementing the system on wheeled equipment for road profiles’ measuring of vehicle testing ground. The paper offers an accurate and practical approach to obtaining unstructured road profiles for road simulation test.

  20. How Angular Velocity Features and Different Gyroscope Noise Types Interact and Determine Orientation Estimation Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasciuto, Ilaria; Ligorio, Gabriele; Bergamini, Elena; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Sabatini, Angelo Maria; Cappozzo, Aurelio

    2015-09-18

    In human movement analysis, 3D body segment orientation can be obtained through the numerical integration of gyroscope signals. These signals, however, are affected by errors that, for the case of micro-electro-mechanical systems, are mainly due to: constant bias, scale factor, white noise, and bias instability. The aim of this study is to assess how the orientation estimation accuracy is affected by each of these disturbances, and whether it is influenced by the angular velocity magnitude and 3D distribution across the gyroscope axes. Reference angular velocity signals, either constant or representative of human walking, were corrupted with each of the four noise types within a simulation framework. The magnitude of the angular velocity affected the error in the orientation estimation due to each noise type, except for the white noise. Additionally, the error caused by the constant bias was also influenced by the angular velocity 3D distribution. As the orientation error depends not only on the noise itself but also on the signal it is applied to, different sensor placements could enhance or mitigate the error due to each disturbance, and special attention must be paid in providing and interpreting measures of accuracy for orientation estimation algorithms.

  1. Modeling and Implementation of Multi-Position Non-Continuous Rotation Gyroscope North Finder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Luo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Even when the Global Positioning System (GPS signal is blocked, a rate gyroscope (gyro north finder is capable of providing the required azimuth reference information to a certain extent. In order to measure the azimuth between the observer and the north direction very accurately, we propose a multi-position non-continuous rotation gyro north finding scheme. Our new generalized mathematical model analyzes the elements that affect the azimuth measurement precision and can thus provide high precision azimuth reference information. Based on the gyro’s principle of detecting a projection of the earth rotation rate on its sensitive axis and the proposed north finding scheme, we are able to deduct an accurate mathematical model of the gyro outputs against azimuth with the gyro and shaft misalignments. Combining the gyro outputs model and the theory of propagation of uncertainty, some approaches to optimize north finding are provided, including reducing the gyro bias error, constraining the gyro random error, increasing the number of rotation points, improving rotation angle measurement precision, decreasing the gyro and the shaft misalignment angles. According them, a north finder setup is built and the azimuth uncertainty of 18” is obtained. This paper provides systematic theory for analyzing the details of the gyro north finder scheme from simulation to implementation. The proposed theory can guide both applied researchers in academia and advanced practitioners in industry for designing high precision robust north finder based on different types of rate gyroscopes.

  2. How Angular Velocity Features and Different Gyroscope Noise Types Interact and Determine Orientation Estimation Accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Pasciuto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In human movement analysis, 3D body segment orientation can be obtained through the numerical integration of gyroscope signals. These signals, however, are affected by errors that, for the case of micro-electro-mechanical systems, are mainly due to: constant bias, scale factor, white noise, and bias instability. The aim of this study is to assess how the orientation estimation accuracy is affected by each of these disturbances, and whether it is influenced by the angular velocity magnitude and 3D distribution across the gyroscope axes. Reference angular velocity signals, either constant or representative of human walking, were corrupted with each of the four noise types within a simulation framework. The magnitude of the angular velocity affected the error in the orientation estimation due to each noise type, except for the white noise. Additionally, the error caused by the constant bias was also influenced by the angular velocity 3D distribution. As the orientation error depends not only on the noise itself but also on the signal it is applied to, different sensor placements could enhance or mitigate the error due to each disturbance, and special attention must be paid in providing and interpreting measures of accuracy for orientation estimation algorithms.

  3. Use of Earth's magnetic field for mitigating gyroscope errors regardless of magnetic perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Muhammad Haris; Renaudin, Valérie; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2011-01-01

    Most portable systems like smart-phones are equipped with low cost consumer grade sensors, making them useful as Pedestrian Navigation Systems (PNS). Measurements of these sensors are severely contaminated by errors caused due to instrumentation and environmental issues rendering the unaided navigation solution with these sensors of limited use. The overall navigation error budget associated with pedestrian navigation can be categorized into position/displacement errors and attitude/orientation errors. Most of the research is conducted for tackling and reducing the displacement errors, which either utilize Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR) or special constraints like Zero velocity UPdaTes (ZUPT) and Zero Angular Rate Updates (ZARU). This article targets the orientation/attitude errors encountered in pedestrian navigation and develops a novel sensor fusion technique to utilize the Earth's magnetic field, even perturbed, for attitude and rate gyroscope error estimation in pedestrian navigation environments where it is assumed that Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) navigation is denied. As the Earth's magnetic field undergoes severe degradations in pedestrian navigation environments, a novel Quasi-Static magnetic Field (QSF) based attitude and angular rate error estimation technique is developed to effectively use magnetic measurements in highly perturbed environments. The QSF scheme is then used for generating the desired measurements for the proposed Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) based attitude estimator. Results indicate that the QSF measurements are capable of effectively estimating attitude and gyroscope errors, reducing the overall navigation error budget by over 80% in urban canyon environment.

  4. Observability analysis of a MEMS INS/GPS integration system with gyroscope G-sensitivity errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chen; Hu, Xiaoping; He, Xiaofeng; Tang, Kanghua; Luo, Bing

    2014-08-28

    Gyroscopes based on micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) technology suffer in high-dynamic applications due to obvious g-sensitivity errors. These errors can induce large biases in the gyroscope, which can directly affect the accuracy of attitude estimation in the integration of the inertial navigation system (INS) and the Global Positioning System (GPS). The observability determines the existence of solutions for compensating them. In this paper, we investigate the observability of the INS/GPS system with consideration of the g-sensitivity errors. In terms of two types of g-sensitivity coefficients matrix, we add them as estimated states to the Kalman filter and analyze the observability of three or nine elements of the coefficient matrix respectively. A global observable condition of the system is presented and validated. Experimental results indicate that all the estimated states, which include position, velocity, attitude, gyro and accelerometer bias, and g-sensitivity coefficients, could be made observable by maneuvering based on the conditions. Compared with the integration system without compensation for the g-sensitivity errors, the attitude accuracy is raised obviously.

  5. Observability Analysis of a MEMS INS/GPS Integration System with Gyroscope G-Sensitivity Errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Fan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Gyroscopes based on micro-electromechanical system (MEMS technology suffer in high-dynamic applications due to obvious g-sensitivity errors. These errors can induce large biases in the gyroscope, which can directly affect the accuracy of attitude estimation in the integration of the inertial navigation system (INS and the Global Positioning System (GPS. The observability determines the existence of solutions for compensating them. In this paper, we investigate the observability of the INS/GPS system with consideration of the g-sensitivity errors. In terms of two types of g-sensitivity coefficients matrix, we add them as estimated states to the Kalman filter and analyze the observability of three or nine elements of the coefficient matrix respectively. A global observable condition of the system is presented and validated. Experimental results indicate that all the estimated states, which include position, velocity, attitude, gyro and accelerometer bias, and g-sensitivity coefficients, could be made observable by maneuvering based on the conditions. Compared with the integration system without compensation for the g-sensitivity errors, the attitude accuracy is raised obviously.

  6. Human-centred automation programme: review of experiment related studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimstad, Tone; Andresen, Gisle; Skjerve, Ann Britt Miberg

    2000-04-01

    Twenty-three empirical studies concerning automation and performance have been reviewed. The purposes of the review are to support experimental studies in the Human-Centred Automation (HCA) programme and to develop a general theory on HCA. Each study was reviewed with regard to twelve study characteristics: domain, type of study, purpose, definition of automation, variables, theoretical basis, models of operator performance, methods applied, experimental design, outcome, stated scope of results, strengths and limitations. Seven of the studies involved domain experts, the rest used students as participants. The majority of the articles originated from the aviation domain: only the study conducted in HAMMLAB considered process control in power plants. In the experimental studies, the independent variable was level of automation, or reliability of automation, while the most common dependent variables were workload, situation awareness, complacency, trust, and criteria of performance, e.g., number of correct responses or response time. Although the studies highlight important aspects of human-automation interaction, it is still unclear how system performance is affected. Nevertheless, the fact that many factors seem to be involved is taken as support for the system-oriented approach of the HCA programme. In conclusion, the review provides valuable input both to the design of experiments and to the development of a general theory. (Author). refs

  7. Stratospheric controlled perturbation experiment (SCoPEx): overview, status, and results from related laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, D.; Dykema, J. A.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2017-12-01

    Stratospheric Controlled Perturbation Experiment (SCoPEx), is a scientific experiment to advance understanding of stratospheric aerosols. It aims to make quantitative measurements of aerosol microphysics and atmospheric chemistry to improve large-scale models used to assess the risks and benefits of solar geoengineering. A perturbative experiment requires: (a) means to create a well-mixed, small perturbed volume, and (b) observation of time evolution of chemistry and aerosols in the volume. SCoPEx will used a propelled balloon gondola containing all instruments and drive system. The propeller wake forms a well-mixed volume (roughly 1 km long and 100 meters in diameter) that serves as an experimental `beaker' into which aerosols (e.g., budget, etc; (d) results from CFD simulation of propeller wake and simulation of chemistry and aerosol microphysics; and finally (e) proposed concept of operations and schedule. We will also provide an overview of the plans for governance including management of health safety and environmental risks, transparency, public engagement, and larger questions about governance of solar geoengineering experiments. Finally, we will briefly present results of laboratory experiments of the interaction of chemical such as ClONO2 and HCl on particle surfaces relevant for stratospheric solar geoengineering.

  8. Viking relativity experiment: Verification of signal retardation by solar gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reasenberg, R.D.; Shapiro, I.I.; MacNeil, P.E.; Goldstein, R.B.; Breidenthal, J.C.; Brenkle, J.P.; Cain, D.L.; Kaufman, T.M.; Komarek, T.A.; Zygielbaum, A.I.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of 14 months of data obtained from radio ranging to the Viking spacecraft verified, to an estimated accuracy of 0.1%, the prediction of the general theory of relativity that the round-trip times of light signals traveling between the Earth and Mars are increased by the direct effect of solar gravity. The correspondig value for the metric parameter γ is 1.000 +- 0.002, where the quoted uncertainty, twice the formal standard deviation, allows for possible systematic errors

  9. The Doppler effect and the three most famous experiments for special relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukri Klinaku

    Full Text Available Using the general formula for the Doppler effect at any arbitrary angle, the three famous experiments for special theory of relativity will be examined. Explanation of the experiments of Michelson, Kennedy–Thorndike and Ives–Stilwell will be given in a precise and elegant way without postulates, arbitrary assumptions or approximations. Keywords: Doppler effect, Michelson experiment, Kennedy–Thorndike experiment, Ives–Stilwell experiment

  10. Safety related experience in FFTF startup and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, R.E.; Halverson, T.G.; Daughtry, J.W.

    1982-06-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is a 400 MW(t) sodium cooled fast reactor operating at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, Richland, Washington, to conduct fuels and materials testing in support of the US LMFBR program. Startup and initial power ascension testing of the facility involved a comprehensive series of readiness reviews and acceptance tests, many of which relate to the inherent safety of the plant. Included are physics measurements, natural circulation, integrated containment leakage, shielding effectiveness, fuel failure detection, and plant protection system tests. Described are the measurements taken to confirm the design safety margins upon which the operating authorization of the plant was based. These measurements demonstrate that large margins of safety are available in the FFTF design

  11. Experiments related to marine environmental science using a tandem Pelletron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, A.; Hamamoto, S.; Ohtani, Y.; Furuyama, Y.; Taniike, A.; Kubota, N.; Yamauchi, T.; Mimura, H.

    2003-01-01

    Activities related to marine environmental science, which have been made in our laboratory using a 1.7MV Pelletron 5SDH2 accelerator, are reviewed. One is successful application of proton beams to radiation-induced graft polymerization for making amidoxime-type adsorbents that are very effective for collecting doubly charged ions of metal elements, such as uranium and vanadium, abundantly dissolved in seawater. The other is effective application of accelerator analyses to investigation of interaction of tributyltin (TBT) chloride, which had been used in self-polishing antifouling paints and are endocrine disrupter having mutagenicity, with a TBT resistant marine microorganism newly isolated from sediment of a ship's ballast water tank. (author)

  12. Suicide in Relation to the Experience of Stressful Life Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjeldsted, Rita; Teasdale, Thomas William; Jensen, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Stressful life events have been associated with high risk of suicidal behavior. The aim of this study was to examine whether persons who died by suicide in Denmark had more frequently been exposed to stressful life events, specifically divorce, death of a close relative, exposure to violence......, and imprisonment, when compared to gender and age-matched controls. Data from Danish national registers were obtained for the period of 2000-2010 and a nested case-control design was applied. The association between exposure to stressful life events and suicide was examined using logistic regression analysis...... compared to controls. People who died by suicide had 1.5-fold (CI-95%: 1.3-1.6) higher risk of having experienced a divorce. Stressful life events, such as divorce and imprisonment, were more frequent in temporal proximity to the date of death among the suicide cases than for end of exposure for controls...

  13. Special relativity effects for space-based coherent lidar experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raogudimetla, V. S.

    1994-01-01

    There is a great need to develop a system that can measure accurately atmospheric wind profiles because an accurate data of wind profiles in the atmosphere constitutes single most input for reliable simulations of global climate numerical methods. Also such data helps us understand atmospheric circulation and climate dynamics better. Because of this need for accurate wind measurements, a space-based Laser Atmospheric Winds Sounder (LAWS) is being designed at MSFC to measure wind profiles in the lower atmosphere of the earth with an accuracy of 1 m/s at lower altitudes to 5m/s at higher altitudes. This system uses an orbiting spacecraft with a pulsed laser source and measures the Doppler shift between the transmitted and received frequencies to estimate the atmospheric wind velocities. If a significant return from the ground (sea) is possible, the spacecraft speed and height are estimated from it and these results and the Doppler shift are then used to estimate the wind velocities in the atmosphere. It is expected that at the proposed wavelengths, there will be enough backscatter from the aerosols but there may no be significant return from the ground. So a coherent (heterodyne) detection system is being proposed for signal processing because it can provide high signal to noise ratio and sensitivity and thus make the best use of low ground return. However, for a heterodyne detection scheme to provide the best results, it is important that the receiving aperture be aligned properly for the proposed wind sounder, this amounts to only a few microradians tolerance in alignment. It is suspected that the satellite motion relative to the ground may introduce errors in the order of a few microradians because of special relativity. Hence, the problem of laser scattering off a moving fixed target when the source and receiver are moving, which was not treated in the past in the literature, was analyzed in the following, using relativistic electrodynamics and applied to the

  14. Experiments on transference in interpersonal relations: Implications for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Susan M; Przybylinski, Elizabeth

    2012-09-01

    Ordinary interpersonal encounters with new people involve more than what meets the eye, and transference readily arises in such encounters, affecting everyday social perception and interpersonal responding, as well as perceptions of the self. Transference provides a mechanism whereby past relationships can play out in new ones. Research on the social-cognitive process of transference and the relational self clearly shows that transference occurs as a "normal" nonclinical process outside of the therapy setting. In this article, we review the theoretical framework and research approach to understanding transference, as well as what the evidence says about what triggers transference, how, why, and what the consequences of transference are as they occur, for better or for worse, in the context of daily living and in treatment. The clinical implications of the findings are also addressed, with a focus on how problematic transference patterns might be changed if they lead to personal suffering for the individual. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. External relations on the classroom: Experiences area Andina University Foundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Leal Hurtado

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is the result of a research project conducted in the academic context. Its aim was to analyze how the students of the Area Andina University Foundation conceive relations of friendship, relationships and management of conflicts outside the classroom. It was developed under a psychosocial approach of qualitative and exploratory, not comparative, type with application of the method of mixed focus groups with a population of 48 students, between 18 and 25 years, enrolled in the third semester of the Faculty of Health Sciences: Nursing, Respiratory Therapy Optometry programs and the School of Design, Communication and Fine Arts, with programs: Graphic Design, Fashion Design, Culinary and Gastronomy in Bogotá. It was divided in three investigation phases. The first phase is about, conceptual approach to the subject. The second phase is about, analysis and interpretation of results decanted through the voices of young people, determining the categories of friendship, family and conflict management. In the last phase, discussion, conclusions and recommendations.

  16. The experience of SARS-related stigma at Amoy Gardens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sing; Chan, Lydia Y Y; Chau, Annie M Y; Kwok, Kathleen P S; Kleinman, Arthur

    2005-11-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) possesses characteristics that render it particularly prone to stigmatization. SARS-related stigma, despite its salience for public health and stigma research, has had little examination. This study combines survey and case study methods to examine subjective stigma among residents of Amoy Gardens (AG), the first officially recognized site of community outbreak of SARS in Hong Kong. A total of 903 residents of AG completed a self-report questionnaire derived from two focus groups conducted toward the end of the 3-month outbreak. Case studies of two residents who lived in Block E, the heart of the SARS epidemic at AG, complement the survey data. Findings show that stigma affected most residents and took various forms of being shunned, insulted, marginalized, and rejected in the domains of work, interpersonal relationships, use of services and schooling. Stigma was also associated with psychosomatic distress. Residents' strategies for diminishing stigma varied with gender, age, education, occupation, and proximity to perceived risk factors for SARS such as residential location, previous SARS infection and the presence of ex-SARS household members. Residents attributed stigma to government mismanagement, contagiousness of the mysterious SARS virus, and alarmist media reporting. Stigma clearly decreased, but never completely disappeared, after the outbreak. The findings confirm and add to existing knowledge on the varied origins, correlates, and impacts of stigma. They also highlight the synergistic roles of inconsistent health policy responses and risk miscommunication by the media in rapidly amplifying stigma toward an unfamiliar illness. While recognizing the intrinsically stigmatizing nature of public health measures to control SARS, we recommend that a consistent inter-sectoral approach is needed to minimize stigma and to make an effective health response to future outbreaks.

  17. A Lever Coupling Mechanism in Dual-Mass Micro-Gyroscopes for Improving the Shock Resistance along the Driving Direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Gao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and application of a lever coupling mechanism to improve the shock resistance of a dual-mass silicon micro-gyroscope with drive mode coupled along the driving direction without sacrificing the mechanical sensitivity. Firstly, the mechanical sensitivity and the shock response of the micro-gyroscope are theoretically analyzed. In the mechanical design, a novel lever coupling mechanism is proposed to change the modal order and to improve the frequency separation. The micro-gyroscope with the lever coupling mechanism optimizes the drive mode order, increasing the in-phase mode frequency to be much larger than the anti-phase one. Shock analysis results show that the micro-gyroscope structure with the designed lever coupling mechanism can notably reduce the magnitudes of the shock response and cut down the stress produced in the shock process compared with the traditional elastic coupled one. Simulations reveal that the shock resistance along the drive direction is greatly increased. Consequently, the lever coupling mechanism can change the gyroscope’s modal order and improve the frequency separation by structurally offering a higher stiffness difference ratio. The shock resistance along the driving direction is tremendously enhanced without loss of the mechanical sensitivity.

  18. Professional development in sport psychology : relating learning experiences to learning outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hutter, R. I. (Vana); Oldenhof-Veldman, Tanja; Pijpers, J. R. (Rob); Oudejans, Raôul R.D.

    2017-01-01

    To enhance the training of sport psychology consultants, it is important to know which learning experiences are useful for which components of professional development. We interviewed 15 novice consultants on their learning experiences related to 13 different topics. Traditional learning experiences

  19. Modeling and Compensation of Random Drift of MEMS Gyroscopes Based on Least Squares Support Vector Machine Optimized by Chaotic Particle Swarm Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Haifeng; Hou, Bo; Lin, Zhihui; Guo, Meifeng

    2017-10-13

    MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical System) gyroscopes have been widely applied to various fields, but MEMS gyroscope random drift has nonlinear and non-stationary characteristics. It has attracted much attention to model and compensate the random drift because it can improve the precision of inertial devices. This paper has proposed to use wavelet filtering to reduce noise in the original data of MEMS gyroscopes, then reconstruct the random drift data with PSR (phase space reconstruction), and establish the model for the reconstructed data by LSSVM (least squares support vector machine), of which the parameters were optimized using CPSO (chaotic particle swarm optimization). Comparing the effect of modeling the MEMS gyroscope random drift with BP-ANN (back propagation artificial neural network) and the proposed method, the results showed that the latter had a better prediction accuracy. Using the compensation of three groups of MEMS gyroscope random drift data, the standard deviation of three groups of experimental data dropped from 0.00354°/s, 0.00412°/s, and 0.00328°/s to 0.00065°/s, 0.00072°/s and 0.00061°/s, respectively, which demonstrated that the proposed method can reduce the influence of MEMS gyroscope random drift and verified the effectiveness of this method for modeling MEMS gyroscope random drift.

  20. Life Experience with Death: Relation to Death Attitudes and to the Use of Death-Related Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluck, Susan; Dirk, Judith; Mackay, Michael M.; Hux, Ashley

    2008-01-01

    The study examines the relation of death experience to death attitudes and to autobiographical memory use. Participants (N = 52) completed standard death attitude measures and wrote narratives about a death-related autobiographical memory and (for comparison) a memory of a low point. Self-ratings of the memory narratives were used to assess their…

  1. Chaos control and generalized projective synchronization of heavy symmetric chaotic gyroscope systems via Gaussian radial basis adaptive variable structure control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farivar, Faezeh; Aliyari Shoorehdeli, Mahdi; Nekoui, Mohammad Ali; Teshnehlab, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A systematic procedure for GPS of unknown heavy chaotic gyroscope systems. ► Proposed methods are based on Lyapunov stability theory. ► Without calculating Lyapunov exponents and Eigen values of the Jacobian matrix. ► Capable to extend for a variety of chaotic systems. ► Useful for practical applications in the future. - Abstract: This paper proposes the chaos control and the generalized projective synchronization methods for heavy symmetric gyroscope systems via Gaussian radial basis adaptive variable structure control. Because of the nonlinear terms of the gyroscope system, the system exhibits chaotic motions. Occasionally, the extreme sensitivity to initial states in a system operating in chaotic mode can be very destructive to the system because of unpredictable behavior. In order to improve the performance of a dynamic system or avoid the chaotic phenomena, it is necessary to control a chaotic system with a periodic motion beneficial for working with a particular condition. As chaotic signals are usually broadband and noise like, synchronized chaotic systems can be used as cipher generators for secure communication. This paper presents chaos synchronization of two identical chaotic motions of symmetric gyroscopes. In this paper, the switching surfaces are adopted to ensure the stability of the error dynamics in variable structure control. Using the neural variable structure control technique, control laws are established which guarantees the chaos control and the generalized projective synchronization of unknown gyroscope systems. In the neural variable structure control, Gaussian radial basis functions are utilized to on-line estimate the system dynamic functions. Also, the adaptation laws of the on-line estimator are derived in the sense of Lyapunov function. Thus, the unknown gyro systems can be guaranteed to be asymptotically stable. Also, the proposed method can achieve the control objectives. Numerical simulations are presented to

  2. Experience-Based Mitigation of Age-Related Performance Declines: Evidence from Air Traffic Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Ashley; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research has found age-related deficits in a variety of cognitive processes. However, some studies have demonstrated age-related sparing on tasks where individuals have substantial experience, often attained over many decades. Here, the authors examined whether decades of experience in a fast-paced demanding profession, air traffic…

  3. Experiences, considerations and emotions relating to cardiogenetic evaluation in relatives of young sudden cardiac death victims

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, Christian; Onderwater, Astrid T.; van Langen, Irene M.; Smets, Ellen M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Relatives of young sudden cardiac death (SCD) victims are at increased risk of carrying a potentially fatal inherited cardiac disease. Hence, it is recommended to perform an autopsy on the victim and to refer his or her relatives to a cardiogenetics clinic for a full evaluation to identify those at

  4. Adaptive Sliding Mode Control of MEMS Gyroscope Based on Neural Network Approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzheng Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An adaptive sliding controller using radial basis function (RBF network to approximate the unknown system dynamics microelectromechanical systems (MEMS gyroscope sensor is proposed. Neural controller is proposed to approximate the unknown system model and sliding controller is employed to eliminate the approximation error and attenuate the model uncertainties and external disturbances. Online neural network (NN weight tuning algorithms, including correction terms, are designed based on Lyapunov stability theory, which can guarantee bounded tracking errors as well as bounded NN weights. The tracking error bound can be made arbitrarily small by increasing a certain feedback gain. Numerical simulation for a MEMS angular velocity sensor is investigated to verify the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive neural control scheme and demonstrate the satisfactory tracking performance and robustness.

  5. Anisotropic kinetic energy release and gyroscopic behavior of CO2 super rotors from an optical centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Matthew J.; Ogden, Hannah M.; Mullin, Amy S.

    2017-10-01

    An optical centrifuge is used to generate an ensemble of CO2 super rotors with oriented angular momentum. The collision dynamics and energy transfer behavior of the super rotor molecules are investigated using high-resolution transient IR absorption spectroscopy. New multipass IR detection provides improved sensitivity to perform polarization-dependent transient studies for rotational states with 76 ≤ J ≤ 100. Polarization-dependent measurements show that the collision-induced kinetic energy release is spatially anisotropic and results from both near-resonant energy transfer between super rotor molecules and non-resonant energy transfer between super rotors and thermal molecules. J-dependent studies show that the extent and duration of the orientational anisotropy increase with rotational angular momentum. The super rotors exhibit behavior akin to molecular gyroscopes, wherein molecules with larger amounts of angular momentum are less likely to change their angular momentum orientation through collisions.

  6. Modified Cross Feedback Control for a Magnetically Suspended Flywheel Rotor with Significant Gyroscopic Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Ren

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For magnetically suspended rigid rotors (MSRs with significant gyroscopic effects, phase lag of the control channel is the main factor influencing the system nutation stability and decoupling performance. At first, this paper proves that the phase lag of the cross channel instead of the decentralized channel is often the main factor influencing the system nutation stability at high speeds. Then a modified cross feedback control strategy based on the phase compensation of cross channel is proposed to improve the stability and decoupling performances. The common issues associated with the traditional control methods have been successfully resolved by this method. Analysis, simulation, and experimental results are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and superiority of the proposed control method.

  7. Vernier effect-based multiplication of the Sagnac beating frequency in ring laser gyroscope sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib, George A.; Sabry, Yasser M.; Khalil, Diaa

    2018-02-01

    A multiplication method of the Sagnac effect scale factor in ring laser gyroscopes is presented based on the Vernier effect of a dual-coupler passive ring resonator coupled to the active ring. The multiplication occurs when the two rings have comparable lengths or integer multiples and their scale factors have opposite signs. In this case, and when the rings have similar areas, the scale factor is multiplied by ratio of their length to their length difference. The scale factor of the presented configuration is derived analytically and the lock-in effect is analyzed. The principle is demonstrated using optical fiber rings and semiconductor optical amplifier as gain medium. A scale factor multiplication by about 175 is experimentally measured, demonstrating larger than two orders of magnitude enhancement in the Sagnac effect scale factor for the first time in literature, up to the authors' knowledge.

  8. A Statistical Parameter Analysis and SVM Based Fault Diagnosis Strategy for Dynamically Tuned Gyroscopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Gyro's fault diagnosis plays a critical role in inertia navigation systems for higher reliability and precision. A new fault diagnosis strategy based on the statistical parameter analysis (SPA) and support vector machine(SVM) classification model was proposed for dynamically tuned gyroscopes (DTG). The SPA, a kind of time domain analysis approach, was introduced to compute a set of statistical parameters of vibration signal as the state features of DTG, with which the SVM model, a novel learning machine based on statistical learning theory (SLT), was applied and constructed to train and identify the working state of DTG. The experimental results verify that the proposed diagnostic strategy can simply and effectively extract the state features of DTG, and it outperforms the radial-basis function (RBF) neural network based diagnostic method and can more reliably and accurately diagnose the working state of DTG.

  9. Relation of tolerance of ambiguity to global and specific paranormal experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houran, J; Williams, C

    1998-12-01

    We examined the relationship of tolerance of ambiguity to severe global factors and specific types of anomalous or paranormal experience. 107 undergraduate students completed MacDonald's 1970 AT-20 and the Anomalous Experiences Inventory of Kumar, Pekala, and Gallagher. Scores on the five subscales of the Anomalous Experiences Inventory correlated differently with tolerance of ambiguity. Global paranormal beliefs, abilities, experiences, and drug use were positively associated with tolerance of ambiguity, whereas a fear of paranormal experience showed a negative relation. The specific types of anomalous experiences that correlated with tolerance of ambiguity often involved internal or physiological experience, e.g., precognitive dreams, memories of reincarnation, visual apparitions, and vestibular alterations. We generally found no effects of age of sex. These results are consistent with the idea that some paranormal experiences are misattributions of internal experience to external ('paranormal') sources, a process analogous to mechanisms underpinning delusions and hallucinations.

  10. A Novel Temperature Compensation Method for a MEMS Gyroscope Oriented on a Periphery Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiliang Cao

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates temperature compensation methods used for the scale factor and bias of the MEMS gyroscope within the temperature range from − 40°C to 60°C. The structure and periphery monitor circuit are introduced. Then the determinant elements of the MEMS gyroscope's scale factor are analysed and the results indicate that scale factor is directly proportional to drive amplitude and sense loop gain and is inversely proportional to the frequency gap between two modes. After that, the compensation methods are proposed, the thermal resistor's positive temperature coefficient (tempco is utilized to calibrate the scale factor's tempco through regulating the drive mode amplitude and the sense loop gain, and each method is applied respectively and the results are contrasted. The test results of the two specimens express that the most effective compensation method could decrease the scale factor's tempco from 693ppm/°C (640ppm/°C to 250ppm/°C (257ppm/°C, improving it by 63.9% (59.8%. Finally, a method of declining bias's tempco is investigated and implemented after scale factor compensation. A summator with a thermal resistor is utilized at the output level and decreases the bias's tempco from 103.89°/h/°C (100.78°/h/°C to 9.70°/h/°C (12°/h/°C improving it by 90.7% (88%. Repeat tests are performed based on two specimens to prove the repeatability and reproducibility of the methods.

  11. The relation between driving experience and recognition of road signs relative to their locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowsky, Avinoam; Shinar, David; Parmet, Yisrael

    2008-04-01

    Examine how driving experience and expectations affect the ability of experienced drivers to identify traffic signs--specifically, no right turn (NRT) and no left turn (NLT) at intersections. Failure to heed signs is a frequent cause of accidents, and the authors focused on the contributions of experience and expectancy to sign identification. Inexperienced and experienced drivers were connected to an eye tracker system and briefly exposed to various traffic scenes. Some of the pictures included an NRT sign at the expected location (on the right), and some included the same sign at an unexpected location (on the left). The same procedure was used with an NLT traffic sign. Experienced drivers identified traffic signs better than inexperienced drivers did when the signs were posted at the expected location but identified them worse than did inexperienced drivers when they were at unexpected locations. With experience, drivers' expectations regarding the expected location of traffic signs become so strong that violating these expectancies results in more identification errors among experienced drivers than among inexperienced drivers. To optimize experienced drivers' traffic sign identification, signs must be located in accordance with drivers' expectations--specifically, on the right side of the road. When signs are misplaced, crashes can be caused by inappropriate placement rather than inappropriate driving. Highway designers should ensure that their design conforms to standards that shape experienced drivers' expectations.

  12. Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Facility 10CFR830 Safety Basis Related to Facility Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomberlin, T.A.

    2002-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), a DOE Category A reactor, was designed to provide an irradiation test environment for conducting a variety of experiments. The ATR Safety Analysis Report, determined by DOE to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, provides versatility in types of experiments that may be conducted. This paper addresses two general types of experiments in the ATR facility and how safety analyses for experiments are related to the ATR safety basis. One type of experiment is more routine and generally represents greater risks; therefore this type of experiment is addressed with more detail in the safety basis. This allows individual safety analyses for these experiments to be more routine and repetitive. The second type of experiment is less defined and is permitted under more general controls. Therefore, individual safety analyses for the second type of experiment tend to be more unique from experiment to experiment. Experiments are also discussed relative to ''major modifications'' and DOE-STD-1027-92. Application of the USQ process to ATR experiments is also discussed

  13. 'Making the move': relatives' experiences of the transition to a care home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Sue; Nolan, Mike

    2004-11-01

    Despite a growing awareness of the significance of helping a relative to relocate to a care home as a key phase in the caregiving career, relatively few studies in the UK have explored this experience in depth. The research on which the present paper is based sought to better understand experiences of nursing home placement from the viewpoint of relatives. The study was informed by a constructivist perspective. Data were collected in 37 semi-structured interviews involving 48 people who had assisted a close relative to move into a nursing home. Data analysis revealed three phases of the transition from the relatives' perspective: 'making the best of it'; 'making the move'; and 'making it better'. The relatives' experiences across these phases were understood in terms of five continua, reflecting the extent to which they felt they were: operating 'under pressure' or not; 'working together' or 'working alone'; 'supported' or 'unsupported', both practically and emotionally; 'in the know' or 'working in the dark'; and 'in control of events' or not. This paper reports on the findings which relate to the second phase of the transition, 'making the move', which relates to experiences around the time of relocation to the care home environment. The findings suggest that health and social care practitioners have enormous potential to influence relatives' experiences of nursing home entry. Experiences are enhanced if family carers perceive that they are able to work in partnership with care staff in order to ease the transition for the older person.

  14. Action Video Game Experience Related to Altered Large-Scale White Matter Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Diankun; Ma, Weiyi; Gong, Jinnan; He, Hui; Dong, Li; Zhang, Dan; Li, Jianfu; Luo, Cheng; Yao, Dezhong

    2017-01-01

    With action video games (AVGs) becoming increasingly popular worldwide, the cognitive benefits of AVG experience have attracted continuous research attention over the past two decades. Research has repeatedly shown that AVG experience can causally enhance cognitive ability and is related to neural plasticity in gray matter and functional networks in the brain. However, the relation between AVG experience and the plasticity of white matter (WM) network still remains unclear. WM network modulates the distribution of action potentials, coordinating the communication between brain regions and acting as the framework of neural networks. And various types of cognitive deficits are usually accompanied by impairments of WM networks. Thus, understanding this relation is essential in assessing the influence of AVG experience on neural plasticity and using AVG experience as an interventional tool for impairments of WM networks. Using graph theory, this study analyzed WM networks in AVG experts and amateurs. Results showed that AVG experience is related to altered WM networks in prefrontal networks, limbic system, and sensorimotor networks, which are related to cognitive control and sensorimotor functions. These results shed new light on the influence of AVG experience on the plasticity of WM networks and suggested the clinical applicability of AVG experience.

  15. Action Video Game Experience Related to Altered Large-Scale White Matter Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diankun Gong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With action video games (AVGs becoming increasingly popular worldwide, the cognitive benefits of AVG experience have attracted continuous research attention over the past two decades. Research has repeatedly shown that AVG experience can causally enhance cognitive ability and is related to neural plasticity in gray matter and functional networks in the brain. However, the relation between AVG experience and the plasticity of white matter (WM network still remains unclear. WM network modulates the distribution of action potentials, coordinating the communication between brain regions and acting as the framework of neural networks. And various types of cognitive deficits are usually accompanied by impairments of WM networks. Thus, understanding this relation is essential in assessing the influence of AVG experience on neural plasticity and using AVG experience as an interventional tool for impairments of WM networks. Using graph theory, this study analyzed WM networks in AVG experts and amateurs. Results showed that AVG experience is related to altered WM networks in prefrontal networks, limbic system, and sensorimotor networks, which are related to cognitive control and sensorimotor functions. These results shed new light on the influence of AVG experience on the plasticity of WM networks and suggested the clinical applicability of AVG experience.

  16. Brain death: close relatives' use of imagery as a descriptor of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frid, Ingvar; Haljamäe, Hengo; Ohlén, Joakim; Bergbom, Ingegerd

    2007-04-01

    This paper is a report of a study to explore the use of imagery to describe the experience of confronting brain death in a close relative. The brain death of a loved one has been described as an extremely difficult experience for close relatives, evoking feelings of anger, emotional pain, disbelief, guilt and suffering. It can also be difficult for relatives to distinguish brain death from the state of coma and thus difficult to apprehend information about the diagnosis. Narrative theory and a hermeneutic phenomenological method guided the interpretation of 17 narratives from close relatives of brain dead patients. All narratives were scrutinized for experiences of brain death. Data were primarily collected in 1999. The primary analysis related to close relatives' experience of brain death in a loved one. A secondary analysis of the imagery they used to describe their experience was carried out in 2003. Six categories of imagery used to describe the experience of confronting a diagnosis of brain death in a loved one emerged: chaotic unreality; inner collapse; sense of forlornness; clinging to the hope of survival; reconciliation with the reality of death; receiving care which gives comfort. Participants also identified two pairs of dimensions to describe their feelings about the relationship between their brain dead relative's body and personhood: presence-absence and divisibility-indivisibility. Being confronted with brain death meant entering into the anteroom of death, facing a loved one who is 'living-dead', and experiencing a chaotic drama of suffering. It is very important for members of the intensive care unit team to recognize, face and respond to these relatives' chaotic experiences, which cause them to need affirmation, comfort and caring. Relatives' use of imagery could be the starting point for a caring conversation about their experiences, either in conversations at the time of the death or when relatives are contacted in a later follow-up.

  17. A comment on a proposed ''crucial experiment'' to test Einstein's special theory of relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues Jr, W.A.; Buonamano, V.

    1976-01-01

    A proposed ''crucial experiment'' to test Einstein's special theory of relativity is analysed and it is shown that it falls into the set of unsatisfactory proposals that attempt to make an experimental distinction between Einstein's special theory of relativity and a ''Lorentzian type'' special theory of relativity

  18. Comment on a proposed ''crucial experiment'' to test Einstein's special theory of relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Jr, W A [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Brazil); Buonamano, V [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Brazil). Instituto de Matematica

    1976-08-11

    A proposed ''crucial experiment'' to test Einstein's special theory of relativity is analysed and it is shown that it falls into the set of unsatisfactory proposals that attempt to make an experimental distinction between Einstein's special theory of relativity and a ''Lorentzian type'' special theory of relativity.

  19. Inventory of Safety-related Codes and Standards for Energy Storage Systems with some Experiences related to Approval and Acceptance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conover, David R.

    2014-09-11

    The purpose of this document is to identify laws, rules, model codes, codes, standards, regulations, specifications (CSR) related to safety that could apply to stationary energy storage systems (ESS) and experiences to date securing approval of ESS in relation to CSR. This information is intended to assist in securing approval of ESS under current CSR and to identification of new CRS or revisions to existing CRS and necessary supporting research and documentation that can foster the deployment of safe ESS.

  20. Work-related behaviour and experience pattern in nurses: impact on physical and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, M; Damkröger, A; Voltmer, E; Löwe, B; Driessen, M; Ward, M; Wingenfeld, K

    2011-06-01

    Nursing is associated with high levels of emotional strain and heavy workloads. Changing working conditions raise the importance of investigating job satisfaction, stress and burnout and its consequences for nurses. The aim of the study was to investigate whether work-related behaviour and experience patterns are associated with mental and physical health status in nurses. A sample of 356 nurses in four German hospitals were interviewed using questionnaires regarding work-related behaviour and experience patterns, work stress, depression, anxiety and physical symptoms ('Work-related Behaviour and Experience Pattern'--AVEM and ERI). The main result of this study is that unhealthy work-related behaviour and experience patterns (i.e. the excessive ambitious type and the resigned type) are associated with reduced mental and physical health. Preventive, as well as intervention, strategies are needed that focus both on the individual as well as on working conditions. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing.

  1. Professionals’ Experiences of the Relations between Personal History and Professional Role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hege Sjølie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explore whether and how workers in a crisis resolution home treatment (CRHT team experience the relationship between their personal history and professional role. This paper is based on 13 in-depth interviews with health professionals working in CRHT. The interviews were analysed using a hermeneutic-phenomenological approach. Participants expressed that there is a relationship between their personal history and professional role, and three themes are highlighted as particularly important in, namely experiences related to the participants as individuals, work-related experiences and family-related experiences. The participants write meaning into the relationship between their personal history and professional role. By relating and exploring their own life stories in the interviews, they work on forming meaning and identity.

  2. The Relations of Mothers' Negative Expressivity to Children's Experience and Expression of Negative Emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente, Carlos; Eisenberg, Nancy; Shepard, Stephanie A.; Fabes, Richard A.; Cumberland, Amanda J.; Losoya, Sandra H.; Spinrad, Tracy L.

    2004-01-01

    Guided by the heuristic model proposed by Eisenberg et al. [Psychol. Inq. 9 (1998) 241], we examined the relations of mothers' reported and observed negative expressivity to children's (N = 159; 74 girls; M age = 7.67 years) experience and expression of emotion. Children's experience and/or expression of emotion in response to a distressing film…

  3. Writing Activities of Public Relations Practitioners: The Relationship between Experience and Writing Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Philip M.; Taylor, Maureen; Powers, Gerald

    1999-01-01

    Surveys 200 public relations practitioners and investigates whether the type of writing and over-all time spent writing vary with years of experience. Finds that higher levels of writing efficiency come with writing experience, and shows that female practitioners spend a higher percentage of their workday on writing tasks than do their male…

  4. Work-related experiences of head and neck cancer survivors: an exploratory and descriptive qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewa, Carolyn S.; Trojanowski, Lucy; Tamminga, Sietske J.; Ringash, Jolie; McQuestion, Maurene; Hoch, Jeffrey S.

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory and descriptive study contributes to the growing knowledge about the return-to-work (RTW) experience of head and neck cancer (HNC) survivors. Viewing RTW as a process, participants were asked to consider the work-related experience with HNC at different phases: (1) at

  5. The Doppler effect and the three most famous experiments for special relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinaku, Shukri

    Using the general formula for the Doppler effect at any arbitrary angle, the three famous experiments for special theory of relativity will be examined. Explanation of the experiments of Michelson, Kennedy-Thorndike and Ives-Stilwell will be given in a precise and elegant way without postulates, arbitrary assumptions or approximations.

  6. Gyroscope-driven mouse pointer with an EMOTIV® EEG headset and data analysis based on Empirical Mode Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Cholula, Gerardo; Ramirez-Cortes, Juan Manuel; Alarcon-Aquino, Vicente; Gomez-Gil, Pilar; Rangel-Magdaleno, Jose de Jesus; Reyes-Garcia, Carlos

    2013-08-14

    This paper presents a project on the development of a cursor control emulating the typical operations of a computer-mouse, using gyroscope and eye-blinking electromyographic signals which are obtained through a commercial 16-electrode wireless headset, recently released by Emotiv. The cursor position is controlled using information from a gyroscope included in the headset. The clicks are generated through the user's blinking with an adequate detection procedure based on the spectral-like technique called Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD). EMD is proposed as a simple and quick computational tool, yet effective, aimed to artifact reduction from head movements as well as a method to detect blinking signals for mouse control. Kalman filter is used as state estimator for mouse position control and jitter removal. The detection rate obtained in average was 94.9%. Experimental setup and some obtained results are presented.

  7. Gyroscope-Driven Mouse Pointer with an EMOTIV® EEG Headset and Data Analysis Based on Empirical Mode Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Reyes-Garcia

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a project on the development of a cursor control emulating the typical operations of a computer-mouse, using gyroscope and eye-blinking electromyographic signals which are obtained through a commercial 16-electrode wireless headset, recently released by Emotiv. The cursor position is controlled using information from a gyroscope included in the headset. The clicks are generated through the user’s blinking with an adequate detection procedure based on the spectral-like technique called Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD. EMD is proposed as a simple and quick computational tool, yet effective, aimed to artifact reduction from head movements as well as a method to detect blinking signals for mouse control. Kalman filter is used as state estimator for mouse position control and jitter removal. The detection rate obtained in average was 94.9%. Experimental setup and some obtained results are presented.

  8. Workplace bullying in Serbia: The relation of self-labeling and behavioral experience with job-related behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Ivana B.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Workplace bullying has been identified as a widespread problem in contemporary organizational research. The aim of the paper was to acquire theoretically based and comparable findings about workplace bullying in Serbia: to explore the behavioral experience and self-labeling approaches (applying the Negative Acts Questionnaire - Revised, NAQ-R and their relationship with job-related behaviors. The sample comprised 1,998 employees. Prevalence rates of workplace bullying based on self-labeling and behavior experience approaches overlap significantly (70% of employees operationally identified as bullied had also labeled themselves as bullied. Both the self-labeling and behavioral experience approach showed significant correlations with job-related behaviors (perceived threat to a total job, absenteeism, intention to leave, and perceived productivity. Previously bullied, presently bullied and non-bullied employees differed significantly on all four job-related behaviors, with large effect size for the intention to leave and medium effect size for the perceived threat to a total job. The findings support combining self-labeling and behavioral experience approaches in workplace bullying research. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179018

  9. The role of herbivore- and plant-related experiences in intraspecific host preference of a relatively specialized parasitoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawo, Tolulope; Fadamiro, Henry

    2017-09-06

    Parasitoids use odor cues from infested plants and herbivore hosts to locate their hosts. Specialist parasitoids of generalist herbivores are predicted to rely more on herbivore-derived cues than plant-derived cues. Microplitis croceipes (Cresson) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is a relatively specialized larval endoparasitoid of Heliothis virescens (F.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), which is a generalist herbivore on several crops including cotton and soybean. Using M. croceipes/H. virescens as a model system, we tested the following predictions about specialist parasitoids of generalist herbivores: (i) naive parasitoids will show innate responses to herbivore-emitted kairomones, regardless of host plant identity and (ii) herbivore-related experience will have a greater influence on intraspecific oviposition preference than plant-related experience. Inexperienced (naive) female M. croceipes did not discriminate between cotton-fed and soybean-fed H. virescens in oviposition choice tests, supporting our first prediction. Oviposition experience alone with either host group influenced subsequent oviposition preference while experience with infested plants alone did not elicit preference in M. croceipes, supporting our second prediction. Furthermore, associative learning of oviposition with host-damaged plants facilitated host location. Interestingly, naive parasitoids attacked more soybean-fed than cotton-fed host larvae in two-choice tests when a background of host-infested cotton odor was supplied, and vice versa. This suggests that plant volatiles may have created an olfactory contrast effect. We discussed ecological significance of the results and concluded that both plant- and herbivore-related experiences play important role in parasitoid host foraging. © 2017 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  10. CTBT verification-related technologies for peaceful purposes: the French experiences of international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massinon, B.

    1999-01-01

    The French experience concerning CTBT verification-related technologies for peaceful purposes as well a the international cooperation in this field are presented. Possible objectives and cooperation program needs are cited. French experience in international cooperation is related to seismology and seismic hazards in Bolivia, Madagascar, Nepal and Indonesia and is considered as very constructive, meaning that technical experience is developed, consistent scientific results are obtained, and a considerable yield to the CTBT task is achieved. Large scientific benefits are expected from the CTBTO

  11. Complement the touch information given by the smartphone's capacitive screens with the information received by the accelerometer and gyroscope

    OpenAIRE

    Joaquim José Silva Faria Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Currently it only is possible to obtain information about a tap on the smartphone's screen using the touch sensor. The goal of this project is to complement the information given by the smartphones touch screen with information given by the accelerometer and gyroscope and this way to extend the smartphone's touch capabilities with data such as tap strength, smartphone's holding position while taping (if it is on the users hands or laying on a hard surface) or which finger the touch was perfor...

  12. Gyroscopic sensing in the wings of the hawkmoth Manduca sexta: the role of sensor location and directional sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, Brian T; Morgansen, Kristi A

    2015-10-06

    The wings of the hawkmoth Manduca sexta are lined with mechanoreceptors called campaniform sensilla that encode wing deformations. During flight, the wings deform in response to a variety of stimuli, including inertial-elastic loads due to the wing flapping motion, aerodynamic loads, and exogenous inertial loads transmitted by disturbances. Because the wings are actuated, flexible structures, the strain-sensitive campaniform sensilla are capable of detecting inertial rotations and accelerations, allowing the wings to serve not only as a primary actuator, but also as a gyroscopic sensor for flight control. We study the gyroscopic sensing of the hawkmoth wings from a control theoretic perspective. Through the development of a low-order model of flexible wing flapping dynamics, and the use of nonlinear observability analysis, we show that the rotational acceleration inherent in wing flapping enables the wings to serve as gyroscopic sensors. We compute a measure of sensor fitness as a function of sensor location and directional sensitivity by using the simulation-based empirical observability Gramian. Our results indicate that gyroscopic information is encoded primarily through shear strain due to wing twisting, where inertial rotations cause detectable changes in pronation and supination timing and magnitude. We solve an observability-based optimal sensor placement problem to find the optimal configuration of strain sensor locations and directional sensitivities for detecting inertial rotations. The optimal sensor configuration shows parallels to the campaniform sensilla found on hawkmoth wings, with clusters of sensors near the wing root and wing tip. The optimal spatial distribution of strain directional sensitivity provides a hypothesis for how heterogeneity of campaniform sensilla may be distributed.

  13. How to Deal With Relatives of Patients Dying in the Hospital? Qualitative Content Analysis of Relatives' Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkamp, Erica; Droger, Mirjam; Janssens, Rien; van Zuylen, Lia; van der Heide, Agnes

    2016-08-01

    Hospital care and communication tend to be focused on the individual patient, and decision making is typically based on the principle of individual autonomy. It can be questioned whether this approach is adequate when a patient is terminally ill. Our aim was to explore the involvement and experiences of relatives in the hospital during the patient's last phase of life. This study was embedded in a retrospective questionnaire study on the quality of dying of a consecutive sample of patients who died in a general university hospital in The Netherlands. We performed a secondary qualitative analysis of relatives' comments and answers to open questions. Relatives of 951 deceased adult patients were asked to complete a questionnaire; 451 questionnaires were returned and analyzed for this study. Relatives expressed a need for 1) comprehensible, timely, and sensitive information and communication, 2) involvement in decision making, 3) acknowledgment of their position, 4) being able to trust health care staff, and 5) rest and privacy. When relatives felt that their role had sufficiently been acknowledged by health care professionals (HCPs), their experiences were more positive. Relatives emphasized their relation with the patient and their involvement in care of the patient dying in the hospital. An approach of HCPs to care based on the concept of individual autonomy seems inadequate. The role of relatives might be better addressed by the concept of relational autonomy, which provides HCPs with opportunities to create a relationship with relatives in care that optimally addresses the needs of patients. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Novel Gyroscopic Mounting for Crystal Oscillators to Increase Short and Medium Term Stability under Highly Dynamic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, Maryam; Jin, Tian; Sun, Kewen

    2015-06-17

    In this paper, a gyroscopic mounting method for crystal oscillators to reduce the impact of dynamic loads on their output stability has been proposed. In order to prove the efficiency of this mounting approach, each dynamic load-induced instability has been analyzed in detail. A statistical study has been performed on the elevation angle of the g-sensitivity vector of Stress Compensated-cut (SC-cut) crystals. The analysis results show that the proposed gyroscopic mounting method gives good performance for host vehicle attitude changes. A phase noise improvement of 27 dB maximum and 5.7 dB on average can be achieved in the case of steady state loads, while under sinusoidal vibration conditions, the maximum and average phase noise improvement are as high as 24 dB and 7.5 dB respectively. With this gyroscopic mounting method, random vibration-induced phase noise instability is reduced 30 dB maximum and 8.7 dB on average. Good effects are apparent for crystal g-sensitivity vectors with low elevation angle φ and azimuthal angle β. under highly dynamic conditions, indicating the probability that crystal oscillator instability will be significantly reduced by using the proposed mounting approach.

  15. The importance of being "me": The relation between authentic identity expression and transgender employees' work-related attitudes and experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Larry R; Sawyer, Katina B; Thoroughgood, Christian N; Ruggs, Enrica N; Smith, Nicholas A

    2017-02-01

    The present research examined the relation between authentic identity expression and transgender employees' work-related attitudes and experiences. Drawing on Kernis' (2003) theoretical conceptualization of authenticity and expanding on current workplace identity management research, we predicted that employees who had taken steps to reduce the discrepancy between their inner gender identities and their outward manifestations of gender would report more positive job attitudes and workplace experiences, in part because the reduction of this discrepancy is related to greater feelings of authenticity. In Study 1, we found that the extent to which one has transitioned was related to higher job satisfaction and perceived person-organization (P-O) fit and lower perceived discrimination. In Study 2, we replicate and extend these results by showing that the extent to which employees felt that others at work perceived them in a manner consistent with how they perceived themselves (relational authenticity) mediated the relations between extent of transition and all 3 of these outcomes. However, perceptions of alignment between one's felt and expressed identity (action authenticity) only mediated this link for job satisfaction. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of our results, as well as avenues for future research on authenticity in the workplace. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. The experiences of relatives with the practice of palliative sedation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruinsma, Sophie M; Rietjens, Judith A C; Seymour, Jane E; Anquinet, Livia; van der Heide, Agnes

    2012-09-01

    Guidelines about palliative sedation typically include recommendations to protect the well-being of relatives. The aim of this study was to systematically review evidence on the experiences of relatives with the practice of palliative sedation. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, PsycINFO, and CINAHL were searched for empirical studies on relatives' experiences with palliative sedation. We investigated relatives' involvement in the decision-making and sedation processes, whether they received adequate information and support, and relatives' emotions. Of the 564 studies identified, 39 were included. The studies (30 quantitative, six qualitative, and three mixed methods) were conducted in 16 countries; three studies were based on relatives' reports, 26 on physicians' and nurses' proxy reports, seven on medical records, and three combined different sources. The 39 studies yielded a combined total of 8791 respondents or studied cases. Caregivers involved relatives in the decision making in 69%-100% of all cases (19 quantitative studies), and in 60%-100% of all cases, relatives were reported to have received adequate information (five quantitative studies). Only two quantitative studies reported on relatives' involvement in the provision of sedation. Despite the fact that the majority of relatives were reported to be comfortable with the use of palliative sedation (seven quantitative studies, four qualitative studies), several studies found that relatives were distressed by the use of sedation (five quantitative studies, five qualitative studies). No studies reported specifically about the support provided to the relatives. Relatives' experiences with palliative sedation are mainly studied from the perspective of proxies, mostly professional caregivers. The majority of relatives seems to be comfortable with the use of palliative sedation; however, they may experience substantial distress by the use of sedation. Copyright © 2012 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published

  17. Do age-related increases in tip-of-the-tongue experiences signify episodic memory impairments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salthouse, Timothy A; Mandell, Arielle R

    2013-12-01

    Tip-of-the-tongue experiences (TOTs), in which a name is known but cannot be immediately retrieved from memory, can be a cause of concern if these experiences are viewed as a sign of memory decline. The current study was conducted to investigate the relation between age and TOT frequency, and the influence of episodic memory, which is the type of memory most often assessed to detect memory problems, on that relation. In a sample of adults, increased age was found to be associated with more TOTs across different types of materials, and additional analyses suggested that these relations between age and TOT frequency were not attributable to the use of different response criteria or to different amounts of knowledge. Because statistical control of a measure of episodic memory had little effect on the relation between age and TOT frequency, age-related increases in TOTs and age-related decreases in episodic memory appear to be at least partially independent phenomena.

  18. From Gyroscopic to Thermal Motion: A Crossover in the Dynamics of Molecular Superrotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, A. A.; Korobenko, A.; Rezaiezadeh, K.; Milner, V.

    2015-07-01

    Localized heating of a gas by intense laser pulses leads to interesting acoustic, hydrodynamic, and optical effects with numerous applications in science and technology, including controlled wave guiding and remote atmosphere sensing. Rotational excitation of molecules can serve as the energy source for raising the gas temperature. Here, we study the dynamics of energy transfer from the molecular rotation to heat. By optically imaging a cloud of molecular superrotors, created with an optical centrifuge, we experimentally identify two separate and qualitatively different stages of its evolution. The first nonequilibrium "gyroscopic" stage is characterized by the modified optical properties of the centrifuged gas—its refractive index and optical birefringence, owing to the ultrafast directional molecular rotation, which survives tens of collisions. The loss of rotational directionality is found to overlap with the release of rotational energy to heat, which triggers the second stage of thermal expansion. The crossover between anisotropic rotational and isotropic thermal regimes is in agreement with recent theoretical predictions and our hydrodynamic calculations.

  19. Limit of detection of a fiber optics gyroscope using a super luminescent radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandoval R, G.E.; Nikolaev, V.A.

    2003-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to establish the dependence of characteristics of the fiber optics gyroscope (FOG) with respect to the parameters of the super luminescent emission source based on doped optical fiber with rare earth elements (Super luminescent Fiber Source, SFS), argument the pumping rate election of the SFS to obtain characteristics limits of the FOG sensibility. By using this type of emission source in the FOG is recommend to use the rate when the direction of the pumping signal coincide with the super luminescent signal. The most results are the proposition and argumentation of the SFS election as emission source to be use in the FOG of the phase type. Such a decision allow to increase the characteristics of the FOG sensibility in comparison with the use of luminescent source of semiconductors emission which are extensively used in the present time. The use of emission source of the SFS type allow to come closer to the threshold of the obtained sensibility limit (detection limit) which is determined with the shot noise. (Author)

  20. Real-time monitoring system for elderly people in detecting falling movement using accelerometer and gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siregar, B.; Andayani, U.; Bahri, R. P.; Seniman; Fahmi, F.

    2018-03-01

    Most of the elderly people is experiencing a decrease in physical quality, especially the weakness in the legs. This will cause elderly easy to fall and can have a serious impact on their health if not getting help very quickly. It is, therefore, necessary to take immediate action against the falling cases experienced by the elderly. One such action is by developing supervision and detecting of falling movements in real-time, which is then the connection to a member of the family. In this research, we used Arduino Uno as a microcontroller, sensor accelerometer, and gyroscope that serves to measure falling movement of the elderly person and supported by GPS technology Ublox Neo 6M to provide information about coordinates. The result was the high accuracy of delivering notification data to server and accuracy of data delivery to family notification equal to 93,75%. The system successfully detects the direction of falling: forward, backward, left or right and able to distinguish between unintentional falling and conscious falling like a bow or prostrate position.

  1. THERMAL PROTECTION AND THERMAL STABILIZATION OF FIBER-OPTICAL GYROSCOPE INCLUDED IN STRAPDOWN INERTIAL NAVIGATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Gromov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It is known, that temperature perturbations and thermal modes have significant influence on the accuracy of a fiber-optical gyroscope. Nowadays, thermal perturbations are among the main problems in the field of navigation accuracy. Review of existing methods for decrease of temperature influences on the accuracy of a strapdown inertial navigation system with fiberoptical gyros showed, that the usage of constructive and compensation methods only is insufficient and, therefore, thermostabilization is required. Reversible thermostabilization system is offered, its main executive elements are thermoelectric modules (Peltier’s modules, heat transfer from which is provided by heatsinks at work surfaces of modules. This variant of thermostabilization maintenance is considered; Peltier’s modules and temperature sensors for the system are chosen. Parameters of heatsinks for heat transfer intensification are calculated. Fans for necessary air circulation in the device are chosen and thickness of thermal isolation is calculated. Calculations of thermal modes of navigation system with thermostabilization are made in modern software Autodesk Simulation CFD. Comparison of results for present and previous researches and calculations shows essential decrease in gradients of temperature on gyro surfaces and better uniformity of temperature field in the whole device. Conclusions about efficiency of the given method usage in view of accuracy improvement of navigation system are made. Thermostabilization provision of a strapdown inertial navigation system with fiberoptical gyros is proved. Thermostabilization application in combination with compensational methods can reach a necessary accuracy of navigation system.

  2. AMA- and RWE- Based Adaptive Kalman Filter for Denoising Fiber Optic Gyroscope Drift Signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gongliu; Liu, Yuanyuan; Li, Ming; Song, Shunguang

    2015-10-23

    An improved double-factor adaptive Kalman filter called AMA-RWE-DFAKF is proposed to denoise fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) drift signal in both static and dynamic conditions. The first factor is Kalman gain updated by random weighting estimation (RWE) of the covariance matrix of innovation sequence at any time to ensure the lowest noise level of output, but the inertia of KF response increases in dynamic condition. To decrease the inertia, the second factor is the covariance matrix of predicted state vector adjusted by RWE only when discontinuities are detected by adaptive moving average (AMA).The AMA-RWE-DFAKF is applied for denoising FOG static and dynamic signals, its performance is compared with conventional KF (CKF), RWE-based adaptive KF with gain correction (RWE-AKFG), AMA- and RWE- based dual mode adaptive KF (AMA-RWE-DMAKF). Results of Allan variance on static signal and root mean square error (RMSE) on dynamic signal show that this proposed algorithm outperforms all the considered methods in denoising FOG signal.

  3. Robust trajectory tracking control of a dual-arm space robot actuated by control moment gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yinghong; Misra, Arun K.

    2017-08-01

    It is a new design concept to employ control moment gyroscopes (CMGs) as reactionless actuators for space robots. Such actuation has several noticeable advantages such as weak dynamical coupling and low power consumption over traditional joint motor actuation. This paper presents a robust control law for a CMG-actuated space robot in presence of system uncertainties and closed-chain constraints. The control objective is to make the manipulation variables to track the desired trajectories, and reduce the possibility of CMG saturation simultaneously. A reduced-order dynamical equation in terms of independent motion variables is derived using Kane's equations. Desired trajectories of the independent motion variables are derived by minimum-norm trajectory planning algorithm, and an adaptive sliding mode controller with improved adaptation laws is proposed to drive the independent motion variables tracking the desired trajectories. Uniformly ultimate boundedness of the closed loop system is proven using Lyapunov method. The redundancy of the full-order actual control torques is utilized to generate a null torque vector which reduces the possibility of CMG angular momentum saturation while producing no effect on the reduced-order control input. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms and the advantage of weak dynamical coupling of the CMG-actuated system.

  4. Vibration-Induced Errors in MEMS Tuning Fork Gyroscopes with Imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiang; Dong, Linxi; Zhao, Wen-Sheng; Yan, Haixia; Teh, Kwok Siong; Wang, Gaofeng

    2018-05-29

    This paper discusses the vibration-induced error in non-ideal MEMS tuning fork gyroscopes (TFGs). Ideal TFGs which are thought to be immune to vibrations do not exist, and imbalance between two gyros of TFGs is an inevitable phenomenon. Three types of fabrication imperfections (i.e., stiffness imbalance, mass imbalance, and damping imbalance) are studied, considering different imbalance radios. We focus on the coupling types of two gyros of TFGs in both drive and sense directions, and the vibration sensitivities of four TFG designs with imbalance are simulated and compared. It is found that non-ideal TFGs with two gyros coupled both in drive and sense directions (type CC TFGs) are the most insensitive to vibrations with frequencies close to the TFG operating frequencies. However, sense-axis vibrations with in-phase resonant frequencies of a coupled gyros system result in severe error outputs to TFGs with two gyros coupled in the sense direction, which is mainly attributed to the sense capacitance nonlinearity. With increasing stiffness coupled ratio of the coupled gyros system, the sensitivity to vibrations with operating frequencies is cut down, yet sensitivity to vibrations with in-phase frequencies is amplified.

  5. Key Processes of Silicon-On-Glass MEMS Fabrication Technology for Gyroscope Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhibo; Wang, Yinan; Shen, Qiang; Zhang, Han; Guo, Xuetao

    2018-04-17

    MEMS fabrication that is based on the silicon-on-glass (SOG) process requires many steps, including patterning, anodic bonding, deep reactive ion etching (DRIE), and chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). The effects of the process parameters of CMP and DRIE are investigated in this study. The process parameters of CMP, such as abrasive size, load pressure, and pH value of SF1 solution are examined to optimize the total thickness variation in the structure and the surface quality. The ratio of etching and passivation cycle time and the process pressure are also adjusted to achieve satisfactory performance during DRIE. The process is optimized to avoid neither the notching nor lag effects on the fabricated silicon structures. For demonstrating the capability of the modified CMP and DRIE processes, a z-axis micro gyroscope is fabricated that is based on the SOG process. Initial test results show that the average surface roughness of silicon is below 1.13 nm and the thickness of the silicon is measured to be 50 μm. All of the structures are well defined without the footing effect by the use of the modified DRIE process. The initial performance test results of the resonant frequency for the drive and sense modes are 4.048 and 4.076 kHz, respectively. The demands for this kind of SOG MEMS device can be fulfilled using the optimized process.

  6. Particle Filter with Novel Nonlinear Error Model for Miniature Gyroscope-Based Measurement While Drilling Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The derivation of a conventional error model for the miniature gyroscope-based measurement while drilling (MGWD system is based on the assumption that the errors of attitude are small enough so that the direction cosine matrix (DCM can be approximated or simplified by the errors of small-angle attitude. However, the simplification of the DCM would introduce errors to the navigation solutions of the MGWD system if the initial alignment cannot provide precise attitude, especially for the low-cost microelectromechanical system (MEMS sensors operated in harsh multilateral horizontal downhole drilling environments. This paper proposes a novel nonlinear error model (NNEM by the introduction of the error of DCM, and the NNEM can reduce the propagated errors under large-angle attitude error conditions. The zero velocity and zero position are the reference points and the innovations in the states estimation of particle filter (PF and Kalman filter (KF. The experimental results illustrate that the performance of PF is better than KF and the PF with NNEM can effectively restrain the errors of system states, especially for the azimuth, velocity, and height in the quasi-stationary condition.

  7. Particle Filter with Novel Nonlinear Error Model for Miniature Gyroscope-Based Measurement While Drilling Navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Yuan, Gannan; Li, Wang

    2016-03-15

    The derivation of a conventional error model for the miniature gyroscope-based measurement while drilling (MGWD) system is based on the assumption that the errors of attitude are small enough so that the direction cosine matrix (DCM) can be approximated or simplified by the errors of small-angle attitude. However, the simplification of the DCM would introduce errors to the navigation solutions of the MGWD system if the initial alignment cannot provide precise attitude, especially for the low-cost microelectromechanical system (MEMS) sensors operated in harsh multilateral horizontal downhole drilling environments. This paper proposes a novel nonlinear error model (NNEM) by the introduction of the error of DCM, and the NNEM can reduce the propagated errors under large-angle attitude error conditions. The zero velocity and zero position are the reference points and the innovations in the states estimation of particle filter (PF) and Kalman filter (KF). The experimental results illustrate that the performance of PF is better than KF and the PF with NNEM can effectively restrain the errors of system states, especially for the azimuth, velocity, and height in the quasi-stationary condition.

  8. Limit of detection of a fiber optics gyroscope using a super luminescent radiation source

    CERN Document Server

    Sandoval, G E

    2003-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to establish the dependence of characteristics of the fiber optics gyroscope (FOG) with respect to the parameters of the super luminescent emission source based on doped optical fiber with rare earth elements (Super luminescent Fiber Source, SFS), argument the pumping rate election of the SFS to obtain characteristics limits of the FOG sensibility. By using this type of emission source in the FOG is recommend to use the rate when the direction of the pumping signal coincide with the super luminescent signal. The most results are the proposition and argumentation of the SFS election as emission source to be use in the FOG of the phase type. Such a decision allow to increase the characteristics of the FOG sensibility in comparison with the use of luminescent source of semiconductors emission which are extensively used in the present time. The use of emission source of the SFS type allow to come closer to the threshold of the obtained sensibility limit (detection limit) which i...

  9. Flavours of Thought: Towards A Phenomenology of Food-Related Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fransisca Hok-Eng Tan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Phenomenology, as the study of structures of subjective experiences and consciousness, finds itself in the persistent struggle to claim its rightful place in contemporary research. Accordingly, this article will point out the relevance of first person reports for interdisciplinary investigations of the brain and mind. This is done by exploring the multidisciplinary field of food studies as a novel platform for discussion. The phenomenological inquiry is thus proposed as the vehicle and method to access food-related experience. By highlighting the important surplus, essential to grasping the process of pristine inner experience we adjoin a new perspective to the common focus on the content of experience. Consequently, this will extend the current insights pertinent to food-related research and moreover, give vital implications to our overall construction of concepts in science.

  10. 25 years of live related renal transplantation in children: The Buenos Aires experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Ruiz

    2007-01-01

    Here we report our experience with Tx for the last 25 years, specially our long experience of live related donor transplantation in children and adolescents with emphasis on technical issues in small children and pediatric patients with severe urologic malformations and bladder dysfunction. We′ll make special considerations on the improvement in short and long follow-up with the actual prevention and treatment of graft rejection, due to the new immunosuppressive agents and protocols.

  11. Remembering and knowing personality traits: figure/ground asymmetries in person-related retrieval experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehr, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    In two experiments, the effect of category salience on retrieval experience was investigated. In Experiment 1, participants rated typicality or concreteness of personality traits that differed in stereotype reference (i.e., consistent, inconsistent, and neutral in relation to the age stereotype). More remember judgments were given for consistent and inconsistent traits in contrast to neutral traits, thereby indicating a figure/ground asymmetry. In Experiment 2, neutral traits were excluded and a classical figure/ground phenomenon was demonstrated for the retrieval experience of traits (i.e., reversibility of an ambiguous figure after typicality and untypicality ratings). Altogether, the results suggest that metacognitive trait representations depend on principles of figure/ground asymmetries rather than on functional principles of social information processing.

  12. Great Expectations: How Role Expectations and Role Experiences Relate to Perceptions of Group Cohesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Alex J; Eys, Mark A; Irving, P Gregory

    2016-04-01

    Many athletes experience a discrepancy between the roles they expect to fulfill and the roles they eventually occupy. Drawing from met expectations theory, we applied response surface methodology to examine how role expectations, in relation to role experiences, influence perceptions of group cohesion among Canadian Interuniversity Sport athletes (N = 153). On the basis of data from two time points, as athletes approached and exceeded their role contribution expectations, they reported higher perceptions of task cohesion. Furthermore, as athletes approached and exceeded their social involvement expectations, they reported higher perceptions of social cohesion. These response surface patterns-pertaining to task and social cohesion-were driven by the positive influence of role experiences. On the basis of the interplay between athletes' role experiences and their perception of the group environment, efforts to improve team dynamics may benefit from focusing on improving the quality of role experiences, in conjunction with developing realistic role expectations.

  13. Dentists' leadership-related educational experiences, attitudes, and past and current behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichman, L Susan; Taichman, Russell S; Inglehart, Marita R

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess practicing dentists' perceptions of their leadership-related educational experiences during predoctoral education and after graduation, to investigate if these perceptions differed as a function of the respondents' graduation year and gender, and to explore the relationships between educational experiences and the respondents' understanding/perceptions of leadership, leadership-related attitudes, self-perceived effectiveness, and past and current leadership- related behavior. Of the 3,000 general dentist members of the American Dental Association who were invited to participate, 593 returned the survey for a response rate of 20 percent. Between 37 and 65 percent of the respondents indicated that their predoctoral dental education had not prepared them well on a series of factors related to being leaders in their practice, community, state, or at the national level. However, 33 to 77 percent of these dentists responded that educational experiences after graduation prepared them well for different types of leadership activities. Overall, respondents rated their predoctoral experiences significantly less positively than their experiences after graduation for each content area. The more recently the respondents had graduated, the higher they rated their leadership-related educational experiences. The better their educational experiences, the more important the respondents evaluated leadership activities in their practice, organized dentistry, and research/teaching, the more important they assessed leadership to be, and the more effective they evaluated themselves to be as leaders. The perceived quality of the respondents' predoctoral education was not correlated with their past and current leadership activities. The results of this study may suggest that improving leadership training during predoctoral education could positively affect future dentists' attitudes about leadership and ratings of their own effectiveness as leaders.

  14. The Relation Between Supervisors' Big Five Personality Traits and Employees' Experiences of Abusive Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, Jeroen; Stouten, Jeroen; Euwema, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the relation between supervisors' personality traits and employees' experiences of supervisory abuse, an area that - to date - remained largely unexplored in previous research. Field data collected from 103 supervisor-subordinate dyads showed that contrary to our expectations supervisors' agreeableness and neuroticism were not significantly related to abusive supervision, nor were supervisors' extraversion or openness to experience. Interestingly, however, our findings revealed a positive relation between supervisors' conscientiousness and abusive supervision. That is, supervisors high in conscientiousness were more likely to be perceived as an abusive supervisor by their employees. Overall, our findings do suggest that supervisors' Big Five personality traits explain only a limited amount of the variability in employees' experiences of abusive supervision.

  15. An Intersectional Analysis of Women's Experiences of Smoking-Related Stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triandafilidis, Zoi; Ussher, Jane M; Perz, Janette; Huppatz, Kate

    2017-08-01

    In this article, we explore how young women encounter and counter discourses of smoking-related stigma. Twenty-seven young Australian women, smokers and ex-smokers, took part in interviews. A sub-sample of 18 participants took photographs to document their smoking experience, and took part in a second interview. Data were analyzed through Foucauldian discourse analysis. Four discourses were identified: "smoking as stigmatized," "the smoking double standard," "smoking as lower class," and "smokers as bad mothers." The women negotiated stigma in a variety of ways, shifting between agreeing, disagreeing, challenging, and displacing stigma onto "other" smokers. These experiences and negotiations of smoking-related stigma were shaped by intersecting identities, including gender, cultural background, social class, and mothering, which at times, compounded levels of stigmatization. It is concluded that tobacco control measures should consider the negative implications of smoking-related stigma, and the potential for women to experience compounding levels of stigma.

  16. The Relation Between Supervisors’ Big Five Personality Traits and Employees’ Experiences of Abusive Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, Jeroen; Stouten, Jeroen; Euwema, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the relation between supervisors’ personality traits and employees’ experiences of supervisory abuse, an area that – to date – remained largely unexplored in previous research. Field data collected from 103 supervisor-subordinate dyads showed that contrary to our expectations supervisors’ agreeableness and neuroticism were not significantly related to abusive supervision, nor were supervisors’ extraversion or openness to experience. Interestingly, however, our findings revealed a positive relation between supervisors’ conscientiousness and abusive supervision. That is, supervisors high in conscientiousness were more likely to be perceived as an abusive supervisor by their employees. Overall, our findings do suggest that supervisors’ Big Five personality traits explain only a limited amount of the variability in employees’ experiences of abusive supervision. PMID:26903919

  17. Event-by-event simulation of single-neutron experiments to test uncertainty relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raedt, H De; Michielsen, K

    2014-01-01

    Results from a discrete-event simulation of a recent single-neutron experiment that tests Ozawa's generalization of Heisenberg's uncertainty relation are presented. The event-based simulation algorithm reproduces the results of the quantum theoretical description of the experiment but does not require the knowledge of the solution of a wave equation, nor does it rely on detailed concepts of quantum theory. In particular, the data from these non-quantum simulations satisfy uncertainty relations derived in the context of quantum theory. (paper)

  18. Do Age-Related Increases in Tip-of-the-Tongue Experiences Signify Episodic Memory Impairments?

    OpenAIRE

    Salthouse, Timothy A.; Mandell, Arielle R.

    2013-01-01

    Tip-of-the-tongue experiences (TOTs), in which a name is known but cannot be immediately retrieved from memory, can be a cause of concern if these experiences are viewed as a sign of memory decline. The current study was conducted to investigate the relation between age and TOT frequency, and the influence of episodic memory, which is the type of memory most often assessed to detect memory problems, on that relation. In a sample of adults, increased age was found to be associated with more TO...

  19. Frequency characteristic measurement of a fiber optic gyroscope using a correlation spectrum analysis method based on a pseudo-random sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yang; Chen, Xingfan; Liu, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The frequency characteristic is an important indicator of a system’s dynamic performance. The identification of a fiber optic gyroscope (FOG)’s frequency characteristic using a correlation spectrum analysis method based on a pseudo-random sequence is proposed. Taking the angle vibrator as the source of the test rotation stimulation and a pseudo-random sequence as the test signal, the frequency characteristic of a FOG is calculated according to the power spectral density of the rotation rate signal and the cross-power spectral density of the FOG’s output signal and rotation rate signal. A theoretical simulation is done to confirm the validity of this method. An experiment system is built and the test results indicate that the measurement error of the normalized amplitude–frequency response is less than 0.01, that the error of the phase–frequency response is less than 0.3 rad, and the overall measurement accuracy is superior to the traditional frequency-sweep method. By using this method, the FOG’s amplitude–frequency response and phase–frequency response can be measured simultaneously, quickly, accurately, and with a high frequency resolution. The described method meets the requirements of engineering applications. (paper)

  20. Life adverse experiences in relation with obesity and binge eating disorder: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmisano, Giovanni Luca; Innamorati, Marco; Vanderlinden, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Several studies report a positive association between adverse life experiences and adult obesity. Despite the high comorbidity between binge eating disorder (BED) and obesity, few authors have studied the link between trauma and BED. In this review the association between exposure to adverse life experiences and a risk for the development of obesity and BED in adulthood is explored. Methods Based on a scientific literature review in Medline, PubMed and PsycInfo databases, the results of 70 studies (N = 306,583 participants) were evaluated including 53 studies on relationship between adverse life experiences and obesity, 7 studies on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in relation to obesity, and 10 studies on the association between adverse life experiences and BED. In addition, mediating factors between the association of adverse life experiences, obesity and BED were examined. Results The majority of studies (87%) report that adverse life experiences are a risk factor for developing obesity and BED. More precisely a positive association between traumatic experiences and obesity and PTSD and obesity were found, respectively, in 85% and 86% of studies. Finally, the great majority of studies (90%) between trauma and the development of BED in adulthood strongly support this association. Meanwhile, different factors mediating between the trauma and obesity link were identified. Discussion and conclusions Although research data show a strong association between life adverse experiences and the development of obesity and BED, more research is needed to explain this association. PMID:28092189

  1. Understanding Medical Students' Experience with Stress and Its Related Constructs: A Focus Group Study from Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, Julia; Lie, Desiree; Chan, Angelique; Ow, Mandy; Vidyarthi, Arpana

    2018-02-01

    In order to protect medical students from burnout and its untoward psychiatric effects, it is imperative to understand their stress, burnout, coping, and resilience experiences. This study aimed to derive collective definitions from the medical student perspective, to identify common themes of students' experiences, and to distinguish pre-clinical and clinical year students' experiences relating to these four constructs. The authors conducted focus groups of medical students in Singapore across 4 years using a semi-structured question guide. Participants shared their understanding, experiences, and the relationships between stress, burnout, coping, and resilience. Coders independently evaluated construct definitions and derived common themes through an iterative process, and compared transcripts of pre-clinical and clinical year students to determine differences in experience over time. Nine focus groups (54 students, 28 females, mean age 24.3) were conducted. Students identified common definitions for each construct. Nine themes emerged within three domains: (1) relating constructs to personal experience, (2) interrelating stress, burnout, coping, and resilience, and (3) understanding the necessity of stress. Compared to clinical students, pre-clinical students reported theory-based rather than reality-based experiences and exam-induced stress, defined constructs using present rather than future situations, and described constructs as independent rather than interrelated. This sample of medical students in Singapore shares a common understanding of stress, burnout, coping, and resilience, but experiences these uniquely. They perceive a positive role for stress. These findings build upon prior literature, suggesting an interrelationship between stress and its related constructs and adding the novel perspective of students from an Asian country.

  2. [Work-related behaviour and experience patterns and mental health: a study in psychotherapy trainees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundmann, Johanna; Sude, Kerstin; Löwe, Bernd; Wingenfeld, Katja

    2013-03-01

    In view of the fact that many reports have been published that emphasize the difficult conditions of the German psychotherapy training, the aim of this study was to investigate psychotherapy trainees´ work stress as well as work-related psychosocial risks and resources. Variables of interest were work-related behaviour and experience patterns (AVEM), effort-reward-imbalance, chronic stress and health-related quality of life. 321 participants completed an online survey. The distribution of work-related behaviour and experience patterns as well as the results regarding work overload and mental health are evidence of psychotherapy trainees' strain. AVEM-risk patterns are associated with effort-reward-imbalance, chronic stress and reduced mental health. These results clearly support claims for a modification of the psychotherapy training in Germany. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Palliative sedation: a focus group study on the experiences of relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruinsma, Sophie; Rietjens, Judith; van der Heide, Agnes

    2013-04-01

    Most studies that have investigated the practice of palliative sedation have focused on physicians' practices and attitudes. The aim of this study was to explore relatives' experiences with palliative sedation and to gain more insight in positive and negative elements in their evaluation of palliative sedation. Focus groups and individual interviews. Various care settings in the Netherlands. A total of 14 relatives of patients who received palliative sedation until death participated. Most relatives evaluated the provision of palliative sedation of their dying family member positively. Positive experiences were related to: the beneficial impact of palliative sedation on the patient's suffering, the opportunity that was offered to prepare for the patient's death, their involvement in the decision-making and care for the patient, and the pleasant care environment. However, the majority of the relatives were unsatisfied with one or more aspects of how information was being provided for. Some relatives were frustrated about the fact that nurses were not authorized to make decisions about the care for the patient and about the absence of physicians during weekends. None of the relatives mentioned the loss of the ability to communicate with the patient during the sedation and the possibility of "hastening death" as disadvantages of palliative sedation. Relatives tend to evaluate the provision of palliative sedation to their severely suffering family member positively because it contributes to a peaceful dying process. However, relatives indicated discontent with how information was being provided and with the communication in general.

  4. Double-slit experiment with single wave-driven particles and its relation to quantum mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Madsen, Jacob; Reichelt, Christian Günther

    2015-01-01

    even though it is possible to determine unambiguously which slit the walking droplet passes. Here we argue, however, that the single-particle statistics in such an experiment will be fundamentally different from the single-particle statistics of quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanical interference takes...... place between different classical paths with precise amplitude and phase relations. In the double-slit experiment with walking droplets, these relations are lost since one of the paths is singled out by the droplet. To support our conclusions, we have carried out our own double-slit experiment, and our...... results, in particular the long and variable slit passage times of the droplets, cast strong doubt on the feasibility of the interference claimed by Couder and Fort. To understand theoretically the limitations of wave-driven particle systems as analogs to quantum mechanics, we introduce a Schro...

  5. Experiences of women with stress-related ill health in a therapeutic gardening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Therese; Westerberg, Yvonne; Jonsson, Hans

    2011-12-01

    Stress-related ill health, e.g. burnout, is of great concern worldwide. Effective rehabilitation programs need to be developed and their therapeutic aspects understood. To explore and describe how women with stress-related ill health who are on sick leave experience the rehabilitation process in a therapeutic garden and how these experiences connect to their everyday lives. This longitudinal study used methods from grounded theory. Five women completed three semi-structured interviews at three weekly intervals during rehabilitation and one interview three months after. Data were analyzed using a constant comparative approach. A secure environment facilitated engagement in activities that provided feelings of enjoyment. These experiences inspired participants to add enjoyable activities in their everyday lives, contributing to occupational balance, despite worries of not be able to continue performing enjoyable activities. Implications. Effective rehabilitation programs need to focus on enjoyable activities in a protective environment to support achievement of occupational balance.

  6. Depersonalization experiences in undergraduates are related to heightened stress cortisol responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesbrecht, Timo; Smeets, Tom; Merckelbach, Harald; Jelicic, Marko

    2007-04-01

    The relationship between dissociative tendencies, as measured with the Dissociative Experiences Scale and its amnesia, absorption/imaginative involvement, and depersonalization/derealization subscales, and HPA axis functioning was studied in 2 samples of undergraduate students (N = 58 and 67). Acute stress was induced by means of the Trier Social Stress Test. Subjective and physiological stress (i.e., cortisol) responses were measured. Individuals high on the depersonalization/derealization subscale of the Dissociative Experiences Scale exhibited more pronounced cortisol responses, while individuals high on the absorption subscale showed attenuated responses. Interestingly, subjective stress experiences, as indicated by the Tension-Anxiety subscale of the Profile of Mood States, were positively related to trait dissociation. The present findings illustrate how various types of dissociation (i.e., depersonalization/derealization, absorption) are differentially related to cortisol stress responses.

  7. Experiences of Second-Class Citizenship Related to Continued Poor Academic Performance of Minority Xhosa Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Lorna M.; Singh, Suzanne A. M.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the subjective life experiences of racial minority Xhosa speakers and the factors that contribute to their continued poor academic performance in a previously Whites-only school in South Africa. Vygotskian sociocultural perspective in relation to creating a democratic educational system and Bronfenbrenner's biosystemic theory…

  8. Art in time and space: context modulates the relation between art experience and viewing time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieber, David; Nadal, Marcos; Leder, Helmut; Rosenberg, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    The experience of art emerges from the interaction of various cognitive and affective processes. The unfolding of these processes in time and their relation with viewing behavior, however, is still poorly understood. Here we examined the effect of context on the relation between the experience of art and viewing time, the most basic indicator of viewing behavior. Two groups of participants viewed an art exhibition in one of two contexts: one in the museum, the other in the laboratory. In both cases viewing time was recorded with a mobile eye tracking system. After freely viewing the exhibition, participants rated each artwork on liking, interest, understanding, and ambiguity scales. Our results show that participants in the museum context liked artworks more, found them more interesting, and viewed them longer than those in the laboratory. Analyses with mixed effects models revealed that aesthetic appreciation (compounding liking and interest), understanding, and ambiguity predicted viewing time for artworks and for their corresponding labels. The effect of aesthetic appreciation and ambiguity on viewing time was modulated by context: Whereas art appreciation tended to predict viewing time better in the laboratory than in museum context, the relation between ambiguity and viewing time was positive in the museum and negative in the laboratory context. Our results suggest that art museums foster an enduring and focused aesthetic experience and demonstrate that context modulates the relation between art experience and viewing behavior.

  9. School-Related Stress Experience as a Risk Factor for Bullying Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natvig, Gerd Karin; Albrektsen, Grethe; Qvarnstrom, Ulla

    2001-01-01

    Studied associations between bullying behavior and school-related stress experience, self-efficacy, social support, and decision control in a sample of 885 Norwegian adolescents aged 13-15 years. Increasing school alienation was associated with an increased risk of bullying, while increasing support from teachers and peers decreased the risk.…

  10. Implicit Beliefs about Emotion Regulation and Their Relations with Emotional Experiences among Chinese Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xinmei; Sang, Biao; Chen, Xinyin

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest in understanding how beliefs about emotion regulation are related to individual emotional experiences. Extant studies have mainly focused on explicit beliefs about emotion regulation among individuals in Western societies. The current study examined implicit emotion regulation and explored their contributions to emotional…

  11. A conjoint choice experiment to study attributes related to the selection of stores in shopping centres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oppewal, H.; Louviere, J.J.; Timmermans, H.J.P.; Chias, J.; Sureda, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper first reviews approaches to modeHing consumer choice of shopping destination and argues that models typically have included only few attributes related to the selection or variety of stores in a shopping centre. Next a conjoint choice experiment is described in which profiles of

  12. High/Scope Preschool Key Experiences: Initiative and Social Relations. [with] Curriculum Videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Michelle

    As preschoolers develop the ability to carry out their ideas and play alone and with others, they are developing the foundation for social competence. This booklet and a companion videotape help teachers and parents recognize and support nine High/Scope key experiences in initiative and social relations: (1) making and expressing choices, plans,…

  13. Changing State-University Relations: The Experiences of Japan and Lessons for Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirat, Morshidi; Kaur, Sarjit

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the changing state-university relations in Japan and Malaysia. Its main objective is to identify and examine possible lessons for Malaysia, based on the Japanese experience. Notably, since the late 1970s, Malaysia has been looking towards Japan as a model for socio-economic development (the "look-east" Policy)…

  14. Math Anxiety Is Related to Some, but Not All, Experiences with Math.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Krystle; Fitzpatrick, Cheryll L; Hallett, Darcy

    2017-01-01

    Math anxiety has been defined as unpleasant feelings of tension and anxiety that hinder the ability to deal with numbers and math in a variety of situations. Although many studies have looked at situational and demographic factors associated with math anxiety, little research has looked at the self-reported experiences with math that are associated with math anxiety. The present study used a mixed-methods design and surveyed 131 undergraduate students about their experiences with math through elementary school, junior high, and high school, while also assessing math anxiety, general anxiety, and test anxiety. Some reported experiences (e.g., support in high school, giving students plenty of examples) were significantly related to the level of math anxiety, even after controlling for general and test anxiety, but many other factors originally thought to be related to math anxiety did not demonstrate a relation in this study. Overall, this study addresses a gap in the literature and provides some suggestive specifics of the kinds of past experiences that are related to math anxiety and those that are not.

  15. Math Anxiety Is Related to Some, but Not All, Experiences with Math

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystle O'Leary

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Math anxiety has been defined as unpleasant feelings of tension and anxiety that hinder the ability to deal with numbers and math in a variety of situations. Although many studies have looked at situational and demographic factors associated with math anxiety, little research has looked at the self-reported experiences with math that are associated with math anxiety. The present study used a mixed-methods design and surveyed 131 undergraduate students about their experiences with math through elementary school, junior high, and high school, while also assessing math anxiety, general anxiety, and test anxiety. Some reported experiences (e.g., support in high school, giving students plenty of examples were significantly related to the level of math anxiety, even after controlling for general and test anxiety, but many other factors originally thought to be related to math anxiety did not demonstrate a relation in this study. Overall, this study addresses a gap in the literature and provides some suggestive specifics of the kinds of past experiences that are related to math anxiety and those that are not.

  16. The Psychologist's Troubled Background: Major Related Life Experiences of Psychology and Law Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werz, Janina; Buechner, Vanessa L.

    2017-01-01

    This study explores major-related life experiences (MRLE) of psychology and law students to examine the stereotype of the wounded psychology student. Previous studies have shown that psychology students know people with mental disorders and are seeking treatment themselves. However, these studies do not allow drawing conclusions about the…

  17. How Do Simulated Error Experiences Impact Attitudes Related to Error Prevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitkreuz, Karen R; Dougal, Renae L; Wright, Melanie C

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this project was to determine whether simulated exposure to error situations changes attitudes in a way that may have a positive impact on error prevention behaviors. Using a stratified quasi-randomized experiment design, we compared risk perception attitudes of a control group of nursing students who received standard error education (reviewed medication error content and watched movies about error experiences) to an experimental group of students who reviewed medication error content and participated in simulated error experiences. Dependent measures included perceived memorability of the educational experience, perceived frequency of errors, and perceived caution with respect to preventing errors. Experienced nursing students perceived the simulated error experiences to be more memorable than movies. Less experienced students perceived both simulated error experiences and movies to be highly memorable. After the intervention, compared with movie participants, simulation participants believed errors occurred more frequently. Both types of education increased the participants' intentions to be more cautious and reported caution remained higher than baseline for medication errors 6 months after the intervention. This study provides limited evidence of an advantage of simulation over watching movies describing actual errors with respect to manipulating attitudes related to error prevention. Both interventions resulted in long-term impacts on perceived caution in medication administration. Simulated error experiences made participants more aware of how easily errors can occur, and the movie education made participants more aware of the devastating consequences of errors.

  18. Differences in cannabis-related experiences between patients with a first episode of psychosis and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianconi, F; Bonomo, M; Marconi, A; Kolliakou, A; Stilo, S A; Iyegbe, C; Gurillo Muñoz, P; Homayoun, S; Mondelli, V; Luzi, S; Dazzan, P; Prata, D; La Cascia, C; O'Connor, J; David, A; Morgan, C; Murray, R M; Lynskey, M; Di Forti, M

    2016-04-01

    Many studies have reported that cannabis use increases the risk of a first episode of psychosis (FEP). However, only a few studies have investigated the nature of cannabis-related experiences in FEP patients, and none has examined whether these experiences are similar in FEP and general populations. The aim of this study was to explore differences in self-reported cannabis experiences between FEP and non-psychotic populations. A total of 252 subjects, who met International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10 criteria for FEP, and 217 controls who reported cannabis use were selected from the Genetics and Psychosis (GAP) study. The Medical Research Council Social Schedule and the Cannabis Experience Questionnaire were used to collect sociodemographic data and cannabis use information, respectively. Both 'bad' and 'enjoyable' experiences were more commonly reported by FEP subjects than controls. Principal components factor analysis identified four components which explained 62.3% of the variance. Linear regression analysis on the whole sample showed that the type of cannabis used and beliefs about the effect of cannabis on health all contributed to determining the intensity and frequency of experiences. Linear regression analysis on FEP subjects showed that the duration of cannabis use and amount of money spent on cannabis were strongly related to the intensity and frequency of enjoyable experiences in this population. These results suggest a higher sensitivity to cannabis effects among people who have suffered their first psychotic episode; this hypersensitivity results in them reporting both more 'bad' and 'enjoyable' experiences. The greater enjoyment experienced may provide an explanation of why FEP patients are more likely to use cannabis and to continue to use it despite experiencing an exacerbation of their psychotic symptoms.

  19. Fibre optical gyroscopes in borehole logging; Einsatz faseroptischer Kreisel Technologien in der Bohrlochgeophysik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoll, J.B. [BGR, Hannover (Germany); Leven, M.; Steveling, E. [Inst. fuer Geophysik, Goettingen (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    A fibre optical gyroscope was installed in a borehole magnetometer in the framework of a DFG-funded pilot project carried out in co-operation with the Institute of Geophysics of Goettingen University. The measuring system was used in an ocean log in the NW Pacific for measuring the remnant section of the magnetic field of the strongly magnetic ocean crust and its direction. the system is completely independent of the magnetic field, which is not required as an orientation aid. Further applications are envisaged in online measuring of borehole or cavern geometries and subsequent orientation of borehole wall images using imaging procedures like FMS, FMI, or borehole televiewer. [German] Um die Drehwinkel eines im Raum rotierenden Messsystems zu erfassen, gibt es verschiedene Messtechniken, mit denen die Raumlage eines Messsystems gegenueber einem Inertialsystem bestimmt werden kann. Eine Gruppe von Drehratensensoren sind die sogenannten optischen Kreisel, die im folgenden naeher besprochen werden. Ein solcher faseroptischer Drehratensensor wurde im Rahmen eines von der DFG gefoerderten Pilotprojektes in Zusammenarbeit mit dem Geophysikalischen Institut der Universitaet Goettingen in ein Bohrlochmagnetometer eingebaut. Ziel des Pilotprojektes war es zu testen, mit welcher Genauigkeit die Horizontalkomponenten des Magnetometers mithilfe des faseroptischen Kreisels in Bezug auf ein erdfestes Koordinatensystem ausgerichtet werden koennen. Dieses Messsystem wurde in einer Ozeanbohrung im NW-Pazifik eingesetzt, mit dem Ziel den remanente Anteil des Magnetfeldes der stark magnetischen ozeanischen Kruste und dessen Richtung zu bestimmen. Mit diesem Sensor steht ein Messverfahren zur Verfuegung, das vom Magnetfeld als Orientierungshilfe vollstaendig unabhaengig ist. Weitere Anwendungsmoeglichkeiten dieser Messtechnik sind die online Vermessung der Geometrie von Bohrungen oder Kavernen und die nachtraegliche Orientierung von Abbildungen der Bohrlochwand mittels bildgebender

  20. Design and Simulation of a MEMS Control Moment Gyroscope for the Sub-Kilogram Spacecraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weizheng Yuan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel design of a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS control moment gyroscope (MCMG was proposed in this paper in order to generate a torque output with a magnitude of 10-6 N∙m. The MCMG consists of two orthogonal angular vibration systems, i.e., the rotor and gimbal; the coupling between which is based on the Coriolis effect and will cause a torque output in the direction perpendicular to the two vibrations. The angular rotor vibration was excited by the in-plane electrostatic rotary comb actuators, while the angular gimbal vibration was driven by an out-of-plane electrostatic parallel plate actuator. A possible process flow to fabricate the structure was proposed and discussed step by step. Furthermore, an array configuration using four MCMGs as an effective element, in which the torque was generated with a phase difference of 90 degrees between every two MCMGs, was proposed to smooth the inherent fluctuation of the torque output for a vibrational MCMG. The parasitic torque was cancelled by two opposite MCMGs with a phase difference of 180 degrees. The designed MCMG was about 1.1 cm × 1.1 cm × 0.04 cm in size and 0.1 g in weight. The simulation results showed that the maximum torque output of a MCMG, the resonant frequency of which was approximately 1,000 Hz, was about 2.5 × 10-8 N∙m. The element with four MCMGs could generate a torque of 5 × 10-8 N∙m. The torque output could reach a magnitude of 10-6 N∙m when the frequency was improved from 1,000 Hz to 10,000 Hz. Using arrays of 4 × 4 effective elements on a 1 kg spacecraft with a standard form factor of 10 cm × 10 cm × 10 cm, a 10 degrees attitude change could be achieved in 26.96s.

  1. Musical experience, auditory perception and reading-related skills in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banai, Karen; Ahissar, Merav

    2013-01-01

    The relationships between auditory processing and reading-related skills remain poorly understood despite intensive research. Here we focus on the potential role of musical experience as a confounding factor. Specifically we ask whether the pattern of correlations between auditory and reading related skills differ between children with different amounts of musical experience. Third grade children with various degrees of musical experience were tested on a battery of auditory processing and reading related tasks. Very poor auditory thresholds and poor memory skills were abundant only among children with no musical education. In this population, indices of auditory processing (frequency and interval discrimination thresholds) were significantly correlated with and accounted for up to 13% of the variance in reading related skills. Among children with more than one year of musical training, auditory processing indices were better, yet reading related skills were not correlated with them. A potential interpretation for the reduction in the correlations might be that auditory and reading-related skills improve at different rates as a function of musical training. Participants' previous musical training, which is typically ignored in studies assessing the relations between auditory and reading related skills, should be considered. Very poor auditory and memory skills are rare among children with even a short period of musical training, suggesting musical training could have an impact on both. The lack of correlation in the musically trained population suggests that a short period of musical training does not enhance reading related skills of individuals with within-normal auditory processing skills. Further studies are required to determine whether the associations between musical training, auditory processing and memory are indeed causal or whether children with poor auditory and memory skills are less likely to study music and if so, why this is the case.

  2. Musical experience, auditory perception and reading-related skills in children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Banai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The relationships between auditory processing and reading-related skills remain poorly understood despite intensive research. Here we focus on the potential role of musical experience as a confounding factor. Specifically we ask whether the pattern of correlations between auditory and reading related skills differ between children with different amounts of musical experience. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Third grade children with various degrees of musical experience were tested on a battery of auditory processing and reading related tasks. Very poor auditory thresholds and poor memory skills were abundant only among children with no musical education. In this population, indices of auditory processing (frequency and interval discrimination thresholds were significantly correlated with and accounted for up to 13% of the variance in reading related skills. Among children with more than one year of musical training, auditory processing indices were better, yet reading related skills were not correlated with them. A potential interpretation for the reduction in the correlations might be that auditory and reading-related skills improve at different rates as a function of musical training. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Participants' previous musical training, which is typically ignored in studies assessing the relations between auditory and reading related skills, should be considered. Very poor auditory and memory skills are rare among children with even a short period of musical training, suggesting musical training could have an impact on both. The lack of correlation in the musically trained population suggests that a short period of musical training does not enhance reading related skills of individuals with within-normal auditory processing skills. Further studies are required to determine whether the associations between musical training, auditory processing and memory are indeed causal or whether children with poor auditory and

  3. Complementarity and the Nature of Uncertainty Relations in Einstein–Bohr Recoiling Slit Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shogo Tanimura

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A model of the Einstein–Bohr recoiling slit experiment is formulated in a fully quantum theoretical setting. In this model, the state and dynamics of a movable wall that has two slits in it, as well as the state of a particle incoming to the two slits, are described by quantum mechanics. Using this model, we analyzed complementarity between exhibiting an interference pattern and distinguishing the particle path. Comparing the Kennard–Robertson type and the Ozawa-type uncertainty relations, we conclude that the uncertainty relation involved in the double-slit experiment is not the Ozawa-type uncertainty relation but the Kennard-type uncertainty relation of the position and the momentum of the double-slit wall. A possible experiment to test the complementarity relation is suggested. It is also argued that various phenomena which occur at the interface of a quantum system and a classical system, including distinguishability, interference, decoherence, quantum eraser, and weak value, can be understood as aspects of entanglement. Quanta 2015; 4: 1–9.

  4. Daily stress interacts with trait dissociation to predict sleep-related experiences in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffer-Dudek, Nirit; Shahar, Golan

    2011-08-01

    Building on the previously documented effects of stress and dissociation on sleep and dreaming, we examined their interactive role in general sleep-related experiences (GSEs; e.g., nightmares, falling dreams, hypnagogic hallucinations; see Watson, 2001). Stress, sleep quality, and GSEs were assessed daily for 14 days among young adults. Baseline assessment included life stress, sleep quality, psychopathology, dissociation, and related dimensions. Multilevel analyses indicated that daily stress brings about GSEs among highly dissociative young adults. Additionally, baseline trait dissociation predicted within-subject elevation in GSEs when daily stress was high. Flawed sleep-wake transitions, previously linked to dissociation and sleep-related experiences, might account for this effect. © 2011 American Psychological Association

  5. Assessment of magneto-optic Faraday effect-based drift on interferometric single-mode fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG) as a function of variable degree of polarization (DOP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Çelikel, Oğuz; Sametoğlu, Ferhat

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a novel interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG), which has a different depolarizer structure, is designed in TUBITAK UME (National Metrology Institute of Turkey) to experimentally and relatively evaluate the effect of the degree of polarization on the Faraday effect-based drift of the light waves injected into both arms of a Sagnac interferometer. In order to observe whether or not any change occurs in the Faraday-based drift, depending on the variations in degree of polarization (DOP), a triple structure-depolarizer IFOG possessing adjustable DOP is firstly designed and prototyped. The minimum DOP achieved with triple structure-depolarizers is typically 0.15% for both clockwise (CW) and counterclockwise (CCW) light waves at both arms of the Sagnac interferometer. The experimental evaluations about the drift are given for DOP changes extending from 78.00% to 0.15% together with two main and different theoretical approaches in the literature. According to the experimental evaluations given herein, it is experimentally proved that the Faraday-based drift does not change depending on DOP values of both CW and CCW light waves injected into the single-mode (SM) sensing coil and it is impossible to state a concept of a depolarized IFOG by considering the polarization state at the entrance arms of the SM sensing coil. (paper)

  6. Depression and Anxiety Symptoms Relate to Distinct Components of Pain Experience among Patients with Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K. Galloway

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a leading cancer diagnosis among women worldwide, with more than 210,000 new cases and 40,000 deaths per year in the United States. Pain, anxiety, and depression can be significant factors during the course of breast cancer. Pain is a complex experience with sensory, affective, and cognitive dimensions. While depression and anxiety symptoms are relatively common among breast cancer patients, little is known about the relation between these psychiatric factors and distinct components of the pain experience. In the present study 60 females presenting to an NCI-designated Cancer Center with newly diagnosed breast cancer completed the Center for Epidemiological Studies 10-item Depression Scale, the State Instrument of the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Findings indicate that anxiety and depression are common among newly diagnosed breast cancer patients; furthermore, patients experience an appreciable amount of pain even before oncologic treatment starts. State anxiety serves as a predictor of the sensory dimension of the pain experience, whereas depression serves as a predictor of the affective dimension of the pain experience.

  7. Studying the social construction of cancer-related fatigue experience: the heuristic value of Ethnoscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffigna, Guendalina; Vegni, Elena; Barello, Serena; Olson, Karin; Bosio, Claudio A

    2011-03-01

    Patients' lived experience of illness and health is receiving increased attention in the medical field. Understanding patients' perspective and experiences is an undoubted asset for efficient health interventions and improved clinical concordance. Patients' experiences of care and cure, however, are influenced by the cultural setting in which these experiences take place. This implies that health interventions should be "ecological" and attuned to the specific sociocultural context of the patients. Our research group is conducting a cross-cultural qualitative study aimed ad exploring how fatigue (a symptom very common in cancer) is perceived and manifested by patients in different countries (Canada, Thailand, England and Italy). In order to achieve this, the study was design according to the method of Ethnoscience, that appeared to us the best suited to explore the meanings that patients attribute to their state and the linguistic patterns they use to describe it. In this paper we will describe in details the process of Ethnoscience and will discuss the heuristic value of this research approach. Ethnoscience was an effective research strategy for exploring how beliefs and values shape symptoms and the behavioural manifestations of cancer related fatigue. This paper discusses the heuristic value of Ethnoscience and its applicability to the study of health relate topics, particularly those where issues of social construction are important. Ethnoscience is a promising and innovative research approach, able to cast light on the way people experience and make sense of their illness. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The principle of relativity, superluminality and EPR experiments. "Riserratevi sotto coverta ..."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocciaro, B.

    2015-07-01

    The principle of relativity claims the invariance of the results for experiments carried out in inertial reference frames if the system under examination is not in interaction with the outside world. In this paper it is analysed a model suggested by J. S. Bell, and later developed by P. H. Eberhard, D. Bohm and B. Hiley on the basis of which the EPR correlations would be due to superluminal exchanges between the various parts of the entangled system under examination. In the model the existence of a privileged reference frame (PF) for the propagation of superluminal signals is hypothesized so that these superluminal signals may not give rise to causal paradoxes. According to this model, in an EPR experiment, the entangled system interacts with the outer world since the result of the experiment depends on an entity (the reference frame PF) that is not prepared by the experimenter. The existence of this privileged reference frame makes the model non invariant for Lorentz transformations. In this paper, in opposition to what claimed by the authors mentioned above, the perfect compatibility of the model with the theory of relativity is strongly maintained since, as already said, the principle of relativity does not require that the results of experiments carried out on systems interacting with the outside world should be invariant.

  9. [Differences in practice among physicians staffing an emergency department in relation to years of experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busca, Pablo; Inchaurza, Estibaliz; Illarramendi, Aiora; Urbina, Ohiana; González, Laura; Miró, Òscar

    2015-06-01

    To determine differences in certain variables reflecting clinical practice in a group of emergency physicians with varying levels of experience and to explore whether differences are associated with experience. Retrospective observational study of differences in variables reflecting emergency physicians' practice between 2005 and 2012. We studied work variables (months worked, patients treated, caseload distribution according to triage levels), patient management variables (consultation with other specialists, admissions, ambulance requests), diagnostic procedures ordered (simple radiographs, laboratory tests, ultrasound or computed tomography imaging), and time patients discharged home spent in the department (arrival to discharge). We explored relationships between these variables and the emergency physician's experience using linear regression analysis, followed by the construction of multivariable models to adjust for physician characteristics. Data for 50 emergency medicine physicians, in 291 years of work, were analyzed. The specialists' experience ranged from 1 to 22 years (mean [SD], 9.5 [5.8] years). They attended between 47 and 158 patients monthly (mean, 86 [19] patients). The physicians' experience was inversely and independently related to the mean number of patients attended monthly and the percentage of patients assigned a triage level of 1 or 2. Experience was directly and independently related to discharged patients' time spent in the emergency department and number of simple radiographs ordered. All associations were small (R2<0.010), however. Those variables continued to show statistically significant associations after increasingly complex modeling to adjust for the following physician variables: physician, age, sex, specialty, residency training in the same hospital). The practice of emergency physicians with more accumulated experience shows slight but significant differences from the practice of less experienced physicians.

  10. Love waves trains observed after the MW 8.1 Tehuantepec earthquake by an underground ring laser gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonelli, A.; Belfi, J.; Beverini, N.; Di Virgilio, A.; Giacomelli, U.; De Luca, G.; Igel, H.

    2017-12-01

    We report the observation and analysis of the MW 8.1 Tehuantepec earthquake-induced rotational ground motion as observed by the Gingerino ring laser gyroscope (RLG).This instrument is located inside the National laboratory of the "Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare" in Gran Sasso (Italy) in a deep underground environment.We compare the vertical rotation rate with the horizontal acceleration measured by a co-located broadband seismometer. This analysis, performed by means of a wavelet-based correlation method, permits to identify the G1,G2,G3,G4 onsets of the surface Love waves in the 120 to 280 seconds period range.

  11. Illusions and delusions: relating experimentally-induced false memories to anomalous experiences and ideas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip R Corlett

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The salience hypothesis of psychosis rests on a simple but profound observation that subtle alterations in the way that we perceive and experience stimuli have important consequences for how important these stimuli become for us, how much they draw our attention, how they embed themselves in our memory and, ultimately, how they shape our beliefs. We put forward the idea that a classical memory illusion – the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM effect – offers a useful way of exploring processes related to such aberrant belief formation. The illusion occurs when, as a consequence of its relationship to previous stimuli, a stimulus is asserted to be remembered even when has not been previously presented. Such illusory familiarity is thought to be generated by the surprising fluency with which the stimulus is processed. In this respect, the illusion relates directly to the salience hypothesis and may share common cognitive underpinnings with aberrations of perception and attribution that are found in psychosis. In this paper, we explore the theoretical importance of this experimentally-induced illusion in relation to the salience model of psychosis. We present data showing that, in healthy volunteers, the illusion relates directly to self reported anomalies of experience and magical thinking. We discuss this finding in terms of the salience hypothesis and of a broader Bayesian framework of perception and cognition which emphasizes the salience both of predictable and unpredictable experiences..

  12. Bereaved relatives' experiences during the incurable phase of cancer: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnhoven, Marleen N; Terpstra, Wim E; van Rossem, Ronald; Haazer, Carolien; Gunnink-Boonstra, Nicolette; Sonke, Gabe S; Buiting, Hilde M

    2015-11-25

    To examine bereaved relatives' experiences from time of diagnosis of incurable cancer until death with specific emphasis on their role in the (end-of-life) decision-making concerning chemotherapy. Qualitative interview study. Hospital-based. In-depth interviews with 15 close relatives of patients who died from non-small cell lung cancer or pancreatic cancer, using a thematic content analysis. All relatives reported that patients' main reason to request chemotherapy was the possibility to prolong life. Relatives reported that patients receiving chemotherapy had more difficulty to accept the incurable nature of their disease than patients who did not. They mostly followed the patients' treatment wish and only infrequently suggested ceasing chemotherapy (because of side effects) despite sometimes believing that this would be a better option. Relatives continuously tried to support the patient in either approaching the death or in attaining hope to continue life satisfactorily. Most relatives considered the chemotherapy period meaningful, since it sparked patients' hope and was what patients wanted. Cessation of chemotherapy caused a relief but coincided with physical deterioration and an increased caregivers' role; many relatives recalled this latter period as more burdensome. Relatives tend to follow patients' wish to continue or cease chemotherapy, without expressing their own feelings, although they were more inclined to opt cessation. They experience a greater caregiver role after cessation and their feelings of responsibility associated with the disease can be exhausting. More attention is needed to reduce relatives' distress at the end of life, also to fully profit from this crucial form of (informal) healthcare. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Double-slit experiment with single wave-driven particles and its relation to quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Anders; Madsen, Jacob; Reichelt, Christian; Rosenlund Ahl, Sonja; Lautrup, Benny; Ellegaard, Clive; Levinsen, Mogens T; Bohr, Tomas

    2015-07-01

    In a thought-provoking paper, Couder and Fort [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 154101 (2006)] describe a version of the famous double-slit experiment performed with droplets bouncing on a vertically vibrated fluid surface. In the experiment, an interference pattern in the single-particle statistics is found even though it is possible to determine unambiguously which slit the walking droplet passes. Here we argue, however, that the single-particle statistics in such an experiment will be fundamentally different from the single-particle statistics of quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanical interference takes place between different classical paths with precise amplitude and phase relations. In the double-slit experiment with walking droplets, these relations are lost since one of the paths is singled out by the droplet. To support our conclusions, we have carried out our own double-slit experiment, and our results, in particular the long and variable slit passage times of the droplets, cast strong doubt on the feasibility of the interference claimed by Couder and Fort. To understand theoretically the limitations of wave-driven particle systems as analogs to quantum mechanics, we introduce a Schrödinger equation with a source term originating from a localized particle that generates a wave while being simultaneously guided by it. We show that the ensuing particle-wave dynamics can capture some characteristics of quantum mechanics such as orbital quantization. However, the particle-wave dynamics can not reproduce quantum mechanics in general, and we show that the single-particle statistics for our model in a double-slit experiment with an additional splitter plate differs qualitatively from that of quantum mechanics.

  14. Double-slit experiment with single wave-driven particles and its relation to quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Anders; Madsen, Jacob; Reichelt, Christian; Rosenlund Ahl, Sonja; Lautrup, Benny; Ellegaard, Clive; Levinsen, Mogens T.; Bohr, Tomas

    2015-07-01

    In a thought-provoking paper, Couder and Fort [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 154101 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.154101] describe a version of the famous double-slit experiment performed with droplets bouncing on a vertically vibrated fluid surface. In the experiment, an interference pattern in the single-particle statistics is found even though it is possible to determine unambiguously which slit the walking droplet passes. Here we argue, however, that the single-particle statistics in such an experiment will be fundamentally different from the single-particle statistics of quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanical interference takes place between different classical paths with precise amplitude and phase relations. In the double-slit experiment with walking droplets, these relations are lost since one of the paths is singled out by the droplet. To support our conclusions, we have carried out our own double-slit experiment, and our results, in particular the long and variable slit passage times of the droplets, cast strong doubt on the feasibility of the interference claimed by Couder and Fort. To understand theoretically the limitations of wave-driven particle systems as analogs to quantum mechanics, we introduce a Schrödinger equation with a source term originating from a localized particle that generates a wave while being simultaneously guided by it. We show that the ensuing particle-wave dynamics can capture some characteristics of quantum mechanics such as orbital quantization. However, the particle-wave dynamics can not reproduce quantum mechanics in general, and we show that the single-particle statistics for our model in a double-slit experiment with an additional splitter plate differs qualitatively from that of quantum mechanics.

  15. Measuring medicine-related experiences from the patient perspective: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katusiime, Barbra; Corlett, Sarah; Reeve, Joanne; Krska, Janet

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing drive to measure and so improve patients' experiences and outcomes of health care. This also applies to medicines, given their ubiquity as health care interventions. Patients' experiences of using medicines vary, and instruments which measure these are seen as an essential component to improve care. We aimed to identify generic measures of patients' experiences of using prescription medicines and to examine their properties and suitability for use in research or practice. Multiple electronic databases were searched: MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES, CINHAL Plus, PROQOLID ® , and Google Scholar. We identified, critically appraised, and summarized generic questionnaires assessing one or more aspects of the medicine use experience among adult patients using prescription medicines for chronic conditions, and the process of questionnaire development, degree of patient involvement, and/or validation processes. Fifteen questionnaires were included. Of these, nine measures were multidimensional, covering various aspects of medicine use. Six instruments covered only a single domain, assessing a specific facet of using medicines. Domains covered were the following: effectiveness; convenience, practicalities, and/or managing medicines; information, knowledge, and/or understanding; side effects; relationships and/or communication with health professionals; impact on daily living and/or social life; general satisfaction; attitudes; beliefs, concerns, and/or perceptions; medical follow-up and/or adherence-related issues; treatment- and/or medicine-related burden, perceived control, or autonomy; self-confidence about medicine use; availability and accessibility; and medicine-related quality of life. None of the identified questionnaires covered all domains. Instruments varied in the extent of patient involvement in both their development and validation. There is a scarcity of psychometrically sound, comprehensive, and generic measures of experiences

  16. A Novel Offset Cancellation Based on Parasitic-Insensitive Switched-Capacitor Sensing Circuit for the Out-of-Plane Single-Gimbaled Decoupled CMOS-MEMS Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ming-Hui; Huang, Han-Pang

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel parasitic-insensitive switched-capacitor (PISC) sensing circuit design in order to obtain high sensitivity and ultra linearity and reduce the parasitic effect for the out-of-plane single-gimbaled decoupled CMOS-MEMS gyroscope (SGDG). According to the simulation results, the proposed PISC circuit has better sensitivity and high linearity in a wide dynamic range. Experimental results also show a better performance. In addition, the PISC circuit can use signal processing to cancel the offset and noise. Thus, this circuit is very suitable for gyroscope measurement. PMID:23493122

  17. Work-related subjective experiences among community residents with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghorn, Geoff; Chant, David; King, Robert

    2005-04-01

    To develop a self-report scale of subjective experiences of illness perceived to impact on employment functioning, as an alternative to a diagnostic perspective, for anticipating the vocational assistance needs of people with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorders. A repeated measures pilot study (n(1) = 26, n(2) = 21) of community residents with schizophrenia identified a set of work-related subjective experiences perceived to impact on employment functioning. Items with the best psychometric properties were applied in a 12 month longitudinal survey of urban residents with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (n(1) = 104; n(2) = 94; n(3) = 94). Construct validity, factor structure, responsiveness, internal consistency, stability, and criterion validity investigations produced favourable results. Work-related subjective experiences provide information about the intersection of the person, the disorder, and expectations of employment functioning, which suggest new opportunities for vocational professionals to explore and discuss individual assistance needs. Further psychometric investigations of test-retest reliability, discriminant and predictive validity, and research applications in supported employment and vocational rehabilitation, are recommended. Subject to adequate psychometric properties, the new measure promises to facilitate exploring: individuals' specific subjective experiences; how each is perceived to contribute to employment restrictions; and the corresponding implications for specialized treatment, vocational interventions and workplace accommodations.

  18. The experience of acculturative stress-related growth from immigrants’ perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Junhyoung; Kim, Hakjun

    2013-01-01

    Previous literature has mainly focused on the positive effects of stress associated with disability and illness, called stressrelated growth. Little research has explored positive changes as a result of acculturative stress among a group of immigrants. In particular, older Asian immigrants may experience a high level of stress related to acculturation because they may face more challenges to adapt to and navigate a new culture. This study was designed to capture the characteristics of stress-...

  19. LETTERS AND COMMENTS: Comment on 'Reinterpreting the famous train/embankment experiment of relativity'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, David R.

    2004-09-01

    Nelson (2003 Eur. J. Phys. 24 379) recently claimed on logical grounds that Einstein's train and embankment thought experiment cannot be used to prove the relativity of simultaneity prior to knowledge of the Lorentz transformations as it is purported to do. It is argued in this comment that Nelson's claim is based on premises which are incorrect, thus invalidating his conclusions. It is also argued that Nelson's article furnishes a 'proof by contradiction' of the desired result, thus also invalidating his claim.

  20. Age-related change in emotional experience in a sample of Chinese adults: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhanbiao; Wang, Li; Li, Huanhuan

    2009-08-01

    Age-related change in emotional experience was explored in a Chinese community sample. 968 healthy adults (483 women, 485 men) ranging in age from 18 to 66 years (M = 37.5, SD = 12.3) took part. The frequency of experiencing negative and positive emotion was self-reported on the general dimension scales of Positive and Negative Affect Scale-Expanded Form (PANAS-X). Regression analyses indicated that the frequency of negative affect decreased with age, and the frequency of positive affect was not significantly associated with age. These findings are similar to those found in Western samples, as discussed in relation to socioemotional selectivity theory.

  1. Children's experiences of domestic violence and abuse: Siblings' accounts of relational coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, Jane E M; Alexander, Joanne H; Sixsmith, Judith; Fellin, Lisa C

    2016-10-01

    This article explores how children see their relationships, particularly their sibling relationships, in families affected by domestic violence (DV) and how relationality emerges in their accounts as a resource to build an agentic sense of self. The 'voice' of children is largely absent from the DV literature, which typically portrays them as passive, damaged and relationally incompetent. Children's own understandings of their relational worlds are often overlooked, and consequently, existing models of children's social interactions give inadequate accounts of their meaning-making-in-context. Drawn from a larger study of children's experiences of DV and abuse, this article uses two case studies of sibling relationships to explore young people's use of relational resources, for coping with violence in the home. The article explores how relationality and coping intertwine in young people's accounts and disrupts the taken-for-granted assumption that children's 'premature caring' or 'parentification' is (only) pathological in children's responses to DV. This has implications for understanding young people's experiences in the present and supporting their capacity for relationship building in the future. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. A Methodological Study of Order Effects in Reporting Relational Aggression Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serico, Jennifer M; NeMoyer, Amanda; Goldstein, Naomi E S; Houck, Mark; Leff, Stephen S

    2018-03-01

    Unlike the overt nature of physical aggression, which lends itself to simpler and more direct methods of investigation, the often-masked nature of relational aggression has led to difficulties and debate regarding the most effective tools of study. Given concerns with the accuracy of third-party relational aggression reports, especially as individuals age, self-report measures may be particularly useful when assessing experiences with relational aggression. However, it is important to recognize validity concerns-in particular, the potential effects of item order presentation-associated with self-report of relational aggression perpetration and victimization. To investigate this issue, surveys were administered and completed by 179 young adults randomly assigned to one of four survey conditions reflecting manipulation of item order. Survey conditions included presentation of (a) perpetration items only, (b) victimization items only, (c) perpetration items followed by victimization items, and (d) victimization items followed by perpetration items. Results revealed that participants reported perpetrating relational aggression significantly more often when asked only about perpetration or when asked about perpetration before victimization, compared with participants who were asked about victimization before perpetration. Item order manipulation did not result in significant differences in self-reported victimization experiences. Results of this study indicate a need for greater consideration of item order when conducting research using self-report data and the importance of additional investigation into which form of item presentation elicits the most accurate self-report information.

  3. Midwifery students experience of teamwork projects involving mark-related peer feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Carolyn R; Fahy, Kathleen M; Parratt, Jenny A; Grace, Sandra

    2016-06-01

    Lack of teamwork skills among health care professionals endangers patients and enables workplace bullying. Individual teamwork skills are increasingly being assessed in the undergraduate health courses but rarely defined, made explicit or taught. To remedy these deficiencies we introduced a longitudinal educational strategy across all three years of the Bachelor of Midwifery program. To report on students' experiences of engaging in team based assignments which involved mark-related peer feedback. Stories of midwifery students' experiences were collected from 17 participants across the three years of the degree. These were transcribed and analysed thematically and interpreted using feminist collaborative conversations. Most participants reported being in well-functioning teams and enjoyed the experience; they spoke of 'we' and said 'Everyone was on Board'. Students in poorly functioning teams spoke of 'I' and 'they'. These students complained about the poor performance of others but they didn't speak up because they 'didn't want to make waves' and they didn't have the skills to be able to confidently manage conflict. All participants agreed 'Peer-related marks cause mayhem'. Teamwork skills should be specifically taught and assessed. These skills take time to develop. Students, therefore, should be engaged in a teamwork assignment in each semester of the entire program. Peer feedback should be moderated by the teacher and not directly related to marks. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of Music and Tonal Language Experience on Relative Pitch Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Mary Kim; Vu, Kim-Phuong L; Strybel, Thomas Z

    2016-01-01

    We examined the interaction between music and tone language experience as related to relative pitch processing by having participants judge the direction and magnitude of pitch changes in a relative pitch task. Participants' performance on this relative pitch task was assessed using the Cochran-Weiss-Shanteau (CWS) index of expertise, based on a ratio of discrimination over consistency in participants' relative pitch judgments. Testing took place in 2 separate sessions on different days to assess the effects of practice on participants' performance. Participants also completed the Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA), an existing measure comprising subtests aimed at evaluating relative pitch processing abilities. Musicians outperformed nonmusicians on both the relative pitch task, as measured by the CWS index, and the MBEA, but tonal language speakers outperformed non-tonal language speakers only on the MBEA. A closer look at the discrimination and consistency component scores of the CWS index revealed that musicians were better at discriminating different pitches and more consistent in their assessments of the direction and magnitude of relative pitch change.

  5. Experience on environmental qualification of safety-related components for Darlington Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, A.S.; Kukreti, B.M.

    1987-01-01

    The proliferation of Nuclear Power Plant safety concerns has lead to increasing attention over the Environmental Qualification (EQ) of Nuclear Power Plant Safety-Related Components to provide the assurance that the safety related equipment will meet their intended functions during normal operation and postulated accident conditions. The environmental qualification of these components is also a Licensing requirement for Darlington Nuclear Generating Station. This paper provides an overview of EQ and the experience of a pilot project, in the qualification of the Main Moderator System safety-related functions for the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station currently under construction. It addresses the various phases of qualification from the identification of the EQ Safety-Related Components List, definition of location specific service conditions (normal, adbnormal and accident), safety-related functions, Environmental Qualification Assessments and finally, an EQ system summary report for the Main Moderator System. The results of the pilot project are discussed and the methodology reviewed. The paper concludes that the EQ Program developed for Darlington Nuclear Generating Station, as applied to the qualification of the Main Moderator System, contained all the elements necessary in the qualification of safety-related equipment. The approach taken in the qualification of the Moderator safety-related equipment proves to provide a sound framework for the qualification of other safety-related components in the station

  6. Effect of Space Vehicle Structure Vibration on Control Moment Gyroscope Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrinskaya, Tatiana

    2008-01-01

    Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs) are used for non-propulsive attitude control of satellites and space stations, including the International Space Station (ISS). CMGs could be essential for future long duration space missions due to the fact that they help to save propellant. CMGs were successfully tested on the ground for many years, and have been successfully used on satellites. However, operations have shown that the CMG service life on the ISS is significantly shorter than predicted. Since the dynamic environment of the ISS differs greatly from the nominal environment of satellites, it was important to analyze how operations specific to the station (dockings and undockings, huge solar array motion, crew exercising, robotic operations, etc) can affect the CMG performance. This task became even more important since the first CMG failure onboard the ISS. The CMG failure resulted in the limitation of the attitude control capabilities, more propellant consumption, and additional operational issues. Therefore, the goal of this work was to find out how the vibrations of a space vehicle structure, caused by a variety of onboard operations, can affect the CMG dynamics and performance. The equations of CMG motion were derived and analyzed for the case when the gyro foundation can vibrate in any direction. The analysis was performed for unbalanced CMG gimbals to match the CMG configuration on ISS. The analysis showed that vehicle structure vibrations can amplify and significantly change the CMG motion if the gyro gimbals are unbalanced in flight. The resonance frequencies were found. It was shown that the resonance effect depends on the magnitude of gimbal imbalance, on the direction of a structure vibration, and on gimbal bearing friction. Computer modeling results of CMG dynamics affected by the external vibration are presented. The results can explain some of the CMG vibration telemetry observed on ISS. This work shows that balancing the CMG gimbals decreases the effect

  7. Magnetic, Acceleration Fields and Gyroscope Quaternion (MAGYQ-Based Attitude Estimation with Smartphone Sensors for Indoor Pedestrian Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Renaudin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of proposed pedestrian navigation solutions on a dedicated infrastructure is a limiting factor to the deployment of location based services. Consequently self-contained Pedestrian Dead-Reckoning (PDR approaches are gaining interest for autonomous navigation. Even if the quality of low cost inertial sensors and magnetometers has strongly improved, processing noisy sensor signals combined with high hand dynamics remains a challenge. Estimating accurate attitude angles for achieving long term positioning accuracy is targeted in this work. A new Magnetic, Acceleration fields and GYroscope Quaternion (MAGYQ-based attitude angles estimation filter is proposed and demonstrated with handheld sensors. It benefits from a gyroscope signal modelling in the quaternion set and two new opportunistic updates: magnetic angular rate update (MARU and acceleration gradient update (AGU. MAGYQ filter performances are assessed indoors, outdoors, with dynamic and static motion conditions. The heading error, using only the inertial solution, is found to be less than 10° after 1.5 km walking. The performance is also evaluated in the positioning domain with trajectories computed following a PDR strategy.

  8. Patients' attitudes and experiences of relational continuity in semi-urban general practices in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azri, Mohammed; Al-Ramadhani, Ruqaiya; Al-Rawahi, Nada; Al-Shafee, Kawther; Al-Hinai, Mustafa; Al-Maniri, Abdullah

    2014-06-01

    Relational continuity is a cornerstone of primary care. In developing countries, however, little research has been conducted to determine the perception and experiences of patients in view of relational continuity in primary care. To study the role of relational continuity in primary care settings and its effect on patients' perceptions and experiences. A questionnaire-based survey was conducted at eight primary care health centres (PCHCs) in Al-Seeb province, Muscat, the capital city of Oman. All Omani patients aged 18 years and above attending their PCHCs during the study period were invited to participate in the study. From a total of 1300 patients invited, 958 Omani patients agreed to participate in the study (response rate = 74%). More than half of the patients (61%) expressed the preference of consulting the same primary care physician (PCP) to whom they were accustomed. This increased to 69% if the patients had psychosocial problems and to 71% if the patients had chronic medical conditions. A significant proportion of the respondents (72%) felt comfortable and relaxed when consulting the same PCP and 67% expressed an interest in maintaining continuity with the same PCP. The general perspective held by the majority of the studied patients (61%) indicated that relational continuity improved both the patients' medical conditions (51%) and the quality of services (61%). In actuality, however, only 18% experienced relational continuity in their PCHCs. The preference for relational continuity was significantly increased among patients who identified a favourite PCP (P = 0.029) and among educated patients (P = 0.023). Although it is relatively difficult to consult with the same PCP, the majority of Omani patients have experienced several benefits from relational continuity within the context of patient-physician relationship. The preference for relational continuity was highly expressed by patients with chronic or psychosocial problems, patients who were educated

  9. Measuring medicine-related experiences from the patient perspective: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katusiime B

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Barbra Katusiime,1 Sarah Corlett,1 Joanne Reeve,2 Janet Krska1 1Medway School of Pharmacy, The Universities of Kent and Greenwich, Chatham, Maritime, Kent, UK; 2Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK Background: There is an increasing drive to measure and so improve patients’ experiences and outcomes of health care. This also applies to medicines, given their ubiquity as health care interventions. Patients’ experiences of using medicines vary, and instruments which measure these are seen as an essential component to improve care. We aimed to identify generic measures of patients’ experiences of using prescription medicines and to examine their properties and suitability for use in research or practice. Methods: Multiple electronic databases were searched: MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES, CINHAL Plus, PROQOLID®, and Google Scholar. We identified, critically appraised, and summarized generic questionnaires assessing one or more aspects of the medicine use experience among adult patients using prescription medicines for chronic conditions, and the process of questionnaire development, degree of patient involvement, and/or validation processes. Results: Fifteen questionnaires were included. Of these, nine measures were multidimensional, covering various aspects of medicine use. Six instruments covered only a single domain, assessing a specific facet of using medicines. Domains covered were the following: effectiveness; convenience, practicalities, and/or managing medicines; information, knowledge, and/or understanding; side effects; relationships and/or communication with health professionals; impact on daily living and/or social life; general satisfaction; attitudes; beliefs, concerns, and/or perceptions; medical follow-up and/or adherence-related issues; treatment- and/or medicine-related burden, perceived control, or autonomy; self-confidence about medicine use; availability and accessibility; and medicine-related

  10. End-of-life expectations and experiences among nursing home patients and their relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosse, Anette; Schaufel, Margrethe Aase; Ruths, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    . CONCLUSION: Nursing home patients and their relatives wanted doctors more involved in end-of-life care. They expected doctors to acknowledge their preferences and provide guidance and symptom relief. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: High-quality end-of-life care in nursing homes relies on organization, funding......OBJECTIVE: Synthesize research about patients' and relatives' expectations and experiences on how doctors can improve end-of-life care in nursing homes. METHODS: We systematically searched qualitative studies in English in seven databases (Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Ageline, Cochrane...... decision-makers reported uncertainty and distress when guidance from health personnel was lacking. They worried about staff shortage and emphasized doctor availability. Relatives and health personnel seldom recognized patients' ability to consent, and patients' preferences were not always recognized...

  11. The Structured Trauma-Related Experiences and Symptoms Screener (STRESS): Development and Preliminary Psychometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Damion J; Felton, Julia W; Reid-Quiñones, Kathryn

    2015-08-01

    The Structured Trauma-Related Experiences and Symptoms Screener (STRESS) is a self-report instrument for youth of age 7-18 that inventories 25 adverse childhood experiences and potentially traumatic events and assesses symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder using the revised criteria published in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5). The STRESS can be administered by computer such that questions are read aloud and automatic scoring and feedback are provided. Data were collected on a sample of 229 children and adolescents of age 7-17 undergoing a forensic child abuse and neglect evaluation. The purpose of the current study was to examine preliminary psychometric characteristics of the computer-administered STRESS as well as its underlying factor structure in relation to the four-factor DSM-5 model. Results provide initial support for the use of the STRESS in assessing adverse and potentially traumatic experiences and traumatic stress in children and adolescents. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Correlation of microdosimetric measurements with relative biological effectiveness from clinical experience for two neutron therapy beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinchcomb, T.G.; Kuchnir, F.T.; Myrianthopoulos, L.C.; Horton, J.L. Jr.; Roberts, W.K.

    1986-01-01

    Microdosimetric measurements were made for the neutron therapy beams at the University of Chicago and at the Cleveland Clinic with the same geometry and phantom material using the same tissue-equivalent spherical proportional counter and standard techniques. The energy deposition spectra (dose distributions in lineal energy) are compared for these beams and for their scattered components (direct beam blocked). The model of dual radiation action (DRA) of Kellerer and Rossi is employed to interpret these data in terms of biological effectiveness over this limited range of radiation qualities. The site-diameter parameter of the DRA theory is determined for the Cleveland beam by setting the biological effectiveness (relative to 60 Co gamma radiation) equal to the relative biological effectiveness value deduced from radiobiology experiments and clinical experience. The resulting value of this site-diameter parameter is then used to predict the biological effectiveness of the Chicago beam. The prediction agrees with the value deduced from radiobiology and clinical experience. The biological effectiveness of the scattered components of both beams is also estimated using the model

  13. Methodological considerations related to nurse researchers using their own experience of a phenomenon within phenomenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Colleen M; Wallis, Marianne; Oprescu, Florin I; Gray, Marion

    2017-03-01

    This paper summarizes phenomenology and discusses how nurses can use their own experiences as data and maintain rigour within the method. It explores how data from researchers experiencing the phenomenon of interest could be used to explicate assumptions and pre-understandings and may also be used as data. While the ethnographic concept of insider research has gained popularity, the notion of researcher as participant in phenomenology is relatively new. The lived experience of a phenomenon is unique to each person and utilization of the nurse researcher's experiences of the phenomenon should be considered for inclusion as data. Discussion paper. Articles from 2001 - 2015 in the CINAHL and PubMed databases were identified using keywords such as 'insider research', 'phenomenology', 'bracketing' and 'qualitative research'. In addition, reference lists from articles used were examined to identify additional literature. Phenomenology is a valuable research method. Usability, credibility, trustworthiness and auditability of data collected must be considered to ensure rigour and maintain orientation to the phenomenon under investigation. Nurse researchers may be interviewed as participants if these four principles are considered and methods used are made explicit. Utilizing appropriate research methods are as important as getting clinical practice correct to advance knowledge and benefit those under our care. We recommend using the researchers' experience as a data source to gain a complete picture of the phenomenon under investigation. Using the approach proposed here, nurses can ensure they are incorporating all data sources available while maintaining research rigour. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Symptoms of ADHD are related to education and work experience among incarcerated adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arve Egil Asbjørnsen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Several reports document increased prevalence of attention deficit and hyperactivity (ADHD and similar symptoms in incarcerated members of the community, but little is known about how the symptoms are related to education and work experience. An ongoing study among Norwegian inmates reveals that 60 % report signs of ADHD. In the present study a sample of 600 inmates incarcerated in Norway filled out a questionnaire including the WURS-k (Wender Utah Rating Scale, short form and questions to survey completed education level and work experience. A clear relationship was found between the WURS-k score and earlier job-experience, with increased probability of ADHD with work experience from low socio-economic status jobs. The scale was also found to share variance with the inmates’ reported education history, as higher education reduces the probability of ADHD among the incarcerated adults. Thus, the WURS-k could be a useful screening instrument in education assessment among inmates. The link between the present findings and development of anti-social behaviour is discussed.

  15. Acting with dedication and expertise: Relatives' experience of nurses' provision of care in a palliative unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grøthe, Å; Biong, Stian; Grov, E K

    2015-12-01

    Admission of a cancer patient to a palliative unit when near the final stage of their disease trajectory undoubtedly impacts their relatives. The aim of our study was to illuminate and interpret relatives' lived experiences of health personnel's provision of care in a palliative ward. A phenomenological/hermeneutic approach was employed that was inspired by the philosophical tradition of Heidegger and Ricoeur and further developed by Lindseth and Nordberg. The perspectives of the narrator and the text were interpreted by highlighting relatives' views on a situation in which they have to face existential challenges. The analysis was undertaken in three steps: naïve reading, structural analysis, and comprehensive understanding, including the authors' professional experiences and theoretical background. Six subthemes appeared: the dying person, the bubble, the sight, the cover, the provision for children's needs, and the availability of immediate help. These components were further constructed into three themes: the meaning of relating, the meaning of action, and the meaning of resources. Our comprehensive understanding of the results suggests that the most important theme is "acting with dedication and expertise." The following aspects are crucial for relatives of cancer patients hospitalized in a palliative ward: time and existence, family dynamics, and care adjusted to the situation. Our study results led to reflections on the impact of how nurses behave when providing care to patients during the palliative phase, and how they interact with relatives in this situation. We found that cancer patients in a palliative unit most appreciate nurses who act with dedication and expertise.

  16. Issues relating to the siting of tritium-fueled fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, H.J.; Holland, D.F.

    1985-01-01

    A preconceptual design study and safety analysis of the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) was conducted in 1984 for the Department of Energy. This paper summarizes the calculations and comparisons related to TFCX siting and environmental issues such as radiological doses to the public living near the facility. Included are discussions of (a) routine and accidental releases of tritium, (b) routine releases of activated air, (c) direct radiation (including ''skyshine''), and (d) seismic criteria. Other potential issues are also discussed including the amount of tritium that might be retained in the graphite armor in the torus, the possible severity of magnet accidents, and the extent of damage due to plasma disruptions. The conclusions drawn from these calculations should be applicable to some of the other planned ignited core experiments that have operating parameters similar to those of TFCX

  17. Issues relating to the siting of tritium-fueled fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, H.J.; Holland, D.F.

    1985-01-01

    A preconceptual design study and safety analysis of the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) was conducted in 1984 for the Department of Energy. This paper summarizes the calculations and comparisons related to TFCX siting and environmental issues such as radiological doses to the public living near the facility. Included are discussions of (a) routine and accidental releases of tritium, (b) routine releases of activated air, (c) direct radiation (including skyshine), and (d) seismic criteria. Other potential issues are also discussed including the amount of tritium that might be retained in the graphite armor in the torus, the possible severity of magnet accidents, and the extent of damage due to plasma disruptions. The conclusions drawn from these calculations should be applicable to some of the other planned ignited core experiments that have operating parameters similar to those of TFCX

  18. Drift compression experiments on MBE-4 and related emittance growth phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eylon, S.; Faltens, A.; Fawley, W.; Garvey, T.; Hahn, K.; Henestroza, E.; Smith, L.

    1991-04-01

    We have recently conducted a series of experiments on the MBE-4 heavy ion accelerator in which a velocity tilt was placed on the beam in the first accelerating section beyond the injector, followed by drift compression over the remaining 11 meters. Depending upon the magnitude of the velocity tilt and the accompanying mismatch in the focusing lattice, emittance growth was observed, manifested by ''butterfly'' shapes in x - x' phase space. We discuss various analytical limits on ion beam compression and relate them to these experiments and also to a driver for a heavy ion fusion reactor. We also present numerical simulations which investigate various aspects of compression and consequent emittance growth. 2 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  19. The relative benefits of green versus lean office space: three field experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuis, Marlon; Knight, Craig; Postmes, Tom; Haslam, S Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Principles of lean office management increasingly call for space to be stripped of extraneous decorations so that it can flexibly accommodate changing numbers of people and different office functions within the same area. Yet this practice is at odds with evidence that office workers' quality of life can be enriched by office landscaping that involves the use of plants that have no formal work-related function. To examine the impact of these competing approaches, 3 field experiments were conducted in large commercial offices in The Netherlands and the U.K. These examined the impact of lean and "green" offices on subjective perceptions of air quality, concentration, and workplace satisfaction as well as objective measures of productivity. Two studies were longitudinal, examining effects of interventions over subsequent weeks and months. In all 3 experiments enhanced outcomes were observed when offices were enriched by plants. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Fall-related experiences of stroke survivors: a meta-ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Mary; Galvin, Rose; Horgan, N Frances

    2017-04-01

    Health professionals view falls after stroke as common adverse events with both physical and psychological consequences. Stroke survivors' experiences are less well understood. The aim of this systematic review was to explore the perception of falls-risk within the stroke recovery experience from the perspective of people with stroke. A systematic literature search was conducted. Papers that used qualitative methods to explore the experiences of individuals with stroke around falls, falls-risk and fear of falling were included. Two reviewers independently assessed the methodological quality of papers. Meta-ethnography was conducted. Concepts from each study were translated into each other to form theories that were combined through a "lines-of-argument" synthesis. Four themes emerged from the six included qualitative studies: (i) Fall circumstances, (ii) perception of fall consequences, (iii) barriers to community participation and (iv) coping strategies. The synthesis revealed that stroke survivors' perceived consequences of falls exist on a continuum. Cognitive and emotional adjustment may be required in the successful adoption of coping strategies to overcome fall-related barriers to participation. Stroke survivors' fall-related experiences appear to exist within the context of activity and community participation. Further research is warranted due to the small number of substantive studies available for synthesis. Implications for Rehabilitation Health care professionals should recognize that cognitive and emotional adjustment may berequired for stroke survivors to accept strategies for overcoming falls-risk, including dependenceon carers and assistive devices. Several factors in addition to physical interventions may be needed to minimize falls-risk whileincreasing activity participation. These factors could include increasing public awareness about the effects of stroke and falls-risk,and ensuring access to psychological services for stroke survivors

  1. Women's experience of SLE-related fatigue: a focus group interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Susanne; Möller, Sonia; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Gunnarsson, Iva; Welin Henriksson, Elisabet

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe women's experience of SLE-related fatigue, how they express the feeling of fatigue, impact on life and strategies developed to manage fatigue in daily living. Seven, semi-structured focus group discussions with 33 women were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim and analysed according to qualitative content analysis. Perceptions of SLE-related fatigue were sorted into four themes. Nature of Fatigue, involved the sensation, occurrence and character. Aspects Affected by Fatigue described emotions that arose together with fatigue as well as aspects of work, family life, social contacts and leisure activities that were affected by fatigue. Striving Towards Power and Control concluded the array of ways used to manage daily life and were categorized into the mental struggle, structure, restrict and provide. Factors Influencing the Perception of Fatigue described understanding from their surroundings and pain as strongly influencing the experience and perception of fatigue. SLE-related fatigue was portrayed as an overwhelming phenomenon with an unpredictable character, resulting in the feeling that fatigue dominates and controls most situations in life. The choice of strategies was described as a balance with implications for how fatigue limited a person's life. Health care professionals are advised to take a more active role to empower people with SLE to find their own balance as a way to achieve a feeling of being in control.

  2. Patients' experience of outsourcing and care related to magnetic resonance examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakol Olofsson, Parvin; Aspelin, Peter; Bergstrand, Lott; Blomqvist, Lennart

    2014-11-01

    Outsourcing radiological examinations from public university hospitals affects the patient, who has to attend a different clinic or hospital for the radiological examination. We currently have a limited understanding of how patients view outsourcing and their care related to MR examinations. To examine the experiences of patients who are sent to private radiology units when their referrals for MR examinations are outsourced from a university hospital, as well as to explore factors which influence patient satisfaction regarding the quality of care related to the MR examination. A group of patients (n = 160) referred for MR examinations and either examined at a university hospital or at an external private unit were interviewed. The interview was designed as a verbal questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Student's t test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Pearson's correlation. Sixty-nine percent of the patients could neither choose nor influence the location at which they were examined. For those who could, aspects that influenced the patient's choice of radiology department were: short waiting time 79% (127/160), ease of traveling to the radiology department 68% (110/160), and short distance to their home or work 58% (93/160). For 40% (60/160) of the patients, a short time in the waiting room was related to a positive experience of the MR examination. If patients were informed about outsourcing and could also choose where to have their examination, key factors contributing to patient satisfaction could be met even when MR examinations are outsourced.

  3. Influence of depressive symptoms on distress related to positive psychotic-like experiences in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brañas, Antía; Barrigón, María Luisa; Lahera, Guillermo; Canal-Rivero, Manuel; Ruiz-Veguilla, Miguel

    2017-12-01

    The Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE) is an effective instrument for detection of the presence of psychotic symptoms and associated distress in the general population. However, little research has studied distress associated with positive psychotic-like experiences (PLEs). Our aim is to study PLE-related distress using the CAPE. In this study we analysed factors associated with differences in PLE-related distress in a sample of 200 non-clinical participants recruited by snowball sampling. Presence of PLEs and related psychological distress was measured using the CAPE questionnaire. The influence of age, gender, educational level and drug use was studied. In univariate analysis we found that gender and CAPE positive, depressive and negative scores, were associated with CAPE positive distress. Using multiple linear regression, we found that only the effect of gender, and the interaction between frequency of depression and gender, remained statistically significant. In our sample interaction between gender and depressive symptoms is a determining factor in distress associated with positive PLEs. The results of this study may be useful for the implementation of prevention programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Oral health-related quality-of-life scores differ by socioeconomic status and caries experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffee, Benjamin W; Rodrigues, Priscila Humbert; Kramer, Paulo Floriani; Vítolo, Márcia Regina; Feldens, Carlos Alberto

    2017-06-01

    (i) Quantify the relative association between child dental caries experience and maternal-reported child oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL); (ii) examine whether that association differed according to family socioeconomic status (SES); and (iii) explore whether absolute OHRQoL varied by family SES at similar levels of child caries experience. This study was a cross-sectional analysis of children in southern Brazil (n=456, mean age: 38 months) participating in an existing health centre-based intervention study. OHRQoL impact was quantified as mean score on the Brazilian Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS) and compared over categories of caries experience (dmft: 0, dmft: 1-4, dmft: ≥5). Adjusted ECOHIS ratios between caries categories were calculated using regression modelling, overall and within socioeconomic strata defined by maternal education, social class and household income. Caries prevalence (dmft >0) was 39.7%, mean ECOHIS score was 2.0 (SD: 3.5), and 44.3% of mothers reported OHRQoL impact (ECOHIS score >0). Increasing child caries experience was associated with worsening child and family quality of life: ECOHIS scores were 3.0 times greater (95% CI: 2.0, 4.4) for children with dmft ≥5 vs dmft=0, a pattern that persisted regardless of family socioeconomic status (P for interaction: all >0.3). However, adjusted for dental status and sociodemographic characteristics, mean ECOHIS scores were lower when reported by mothers of less educational attainment (ratio: 0.7; 95% CI: 0.5, 1.0), lower social class (ratio: 0.7; 95% CI: 0.5, 1.0) or in lower income households (ratio: 0.8; 95% CI: 0.6, 1.3). Dental caries was associated with negative child and family experiences and lower OHRQoL across all social groups; yet, families facing greater disadvantage may report lesser quality-of-life impact at the same level of disease experience. Thus, subjective quality-of-life measures may differ under varying social contexts, with possible

  5. The Contribution of Death-Related Experiences to Health Care Providers' Attitudes toward Dying Patients: II. Medical and Nursing Students with No Professional Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent, Sandor B.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Compared attitudes toward care of dying patients of beginning medical and nursing students with no professional death-related experience. On five of six attitude measures, female nursing students expressed more positive attitude than either male or female medical students. Hours of death-and-dying coursework and general life experience exerted…

  6. Development of a New Surface Acoustic Wave Based Gyroscope on a X-112°Y LiTaO3 Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shitang He

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A new micro gyroscope based on the surface acoustic wave (SAW gyroscopic effect was developed. The SAW gyroscopic effect is investigated by applying the surface effective permittivity method in the regime of small ratios of the rotation velocity and the frequency of the SAW. The theoretical analysis indicates that the larger velocity shift was observed from the rotated X-112°Y LiTaO3 substrate. Then, two SAW delay lines with reverse direction and an operation frequency of 160 MHz are fabricated on a same X-112°Y LiTaO3 chip as the feedback of two SAW oscillators, which act as the sensor element. The single-phase unidirectional transducer (SPUDT and combed transducers were used to structure the delay lines to improve the frequency stability of the oscillator. The rotation of a piezoelectric medium gives rise to a shift of the propagation velocity of SAW due to the Coriolis force, resulting in the frequency shift of the SAW device, and hence, the evaluation of the sensor performance. Meanwhile, the differential structure was performed to double the sensitivity and compensate for the temperature effects. Using a precise rate table, the performance of the fabricated SAW gyroscope was evaluated experimentally. A sensitivity of 1.332 Hz deg−1 s at angular rates of up to 1,000 deg s−1 and good linearity are observed.

  7. Comment on 'Reinterpreting the famous train/embankment experiment of relativity'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowland, David R

    2004-01-01

    Nelson (2003 Eur. J. Phys. 24 379) recently claimed on logical grounds that Einstein's train and embankment thought experiment cannot be used to prove the relativity of simultaneity prior to knowledge of the Lorentz transformations as it is purported to do. It is argued in this comment that Nelson's claim is based on premises which are incorrect, thus invalidating his conclusions. It is also argued that Nelson's article furnishes a 'proof by contradiction' of the desired result, thus also invalidating his claim. (letters and comments)

  8. The Relation Between Valence and Arousal in Subjective Experience Varies With Personality and Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppens, Peter; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Yik, Michelle; Koval, Peter; Coosemans, Joachim; Zeng, Kevin J; Russell, James A

    2017-08-01

    While in general arousal increases with positive or negative valence (a so-called V-shaped relation), there are large differences among individuals in how these two fundamental dimensions of affect are related in people's experience. In two studies, we examined two possible sources of this variation: personality and culture. In Study 1, participants (Belgian university students) recalled a recent event that was characterized by high or low valence or arousal and reported on their feelings and their personality in terms of the Five-Factor Model. In Study 2, participants from Canada, China/Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, and Spain reported on their feelings in a thin slice of time and on their personality. In Study 1, we replicated the V-shape as characterizing the relation between valence and arousal, and identified personality correlates of experiencing particular valence-arousal combinations. In Study 2, we documented how the V-shaped relation varied as a function of Western versus Eastern cultural background and personality. The results showed that the steepness of the V-shaped relation between valence and arousal increases with Extraversion within cultures, and with a West-East distinction between cultures. Implications for the personality-emotion link and research on cultural differences in affect are discussed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The Quality of Experience of Students with and without Special Educational Needs in Everyday Life and When Relating to Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurbriggen, Carmen L. A.; Venetz, Martin; Hinni, Chantal

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the quality of experience of students with and without SEN in everyday life in general and when relating to peers in particular: (1) How do they experience everyday school life vs. leisure time? (2) How much time per week do they spend with peers outside school? and (3) How do they experience those peer…

  10. Evolution of the use of relational and NoSQL databases in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Barberis, Dario; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment used for many years a large database infrastructure based on Oracle to store several different types of non-event data: time-dependent detector configuration and conditions data, calibrations and alignments, configurations of Grid sites, catalogues for data management tools, job records for distributed workload management tools, run and event metadata. The rapid development of “NoSQL” databases (structured storage services) in the last five years allowed an extended and complementary usage of traditional relational databases and new structured storage tools in order to improve the performance of existing applications and to extend their functionalities using the possibilities offered by the modern storage systems. The trend is towards using the best tool for each kind of data, separating for example the intrinsically relational metadata from payload storage, and records that are frequently updated and benefit from transactions from archived information. Access to all components has to...

  11. Evolution of the use of relational and NoSQL databases in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00064378; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment used for many years a large database infrastructure based on Oracle to store several different types of non-event data: time-dependent detector configuration and conditions data, calibrations and alignments, configurations of Grid sites, catalogues for data management tools, job records for distributed workload management tools, run and event metadata. The rapid development of “NoSQL” databases (structured storage services) in the last five years allowed an extended and complementary usage of traditional relational databases and new structured storage tools in order to improve the performance of existing applications and to extend their functionalities using the possibilities offered by the modern storage systems. The trend is towards using the best tool for each kind of data, separating for example the intrinsically relational metadata from payload storage, and records that are frequently updated and benefit from transactions from archived information. Access to all components has to...

  12. Dutch Cyberbullying Victims’ Experiences, Perceptions, Attitudes and Motivations Related to (Coping with Cyberbullying: Focus Group Interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels C.L. Jacobs

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the negative effects of cyberbullying; and because of its unique characteristics; interventions to stop cyberbullying are needed. For this purpose, more insightful information is needed about cyberbullying victims’ (i.e., the target group experiences, perceptions, attitudes and motivations related to (coping with cyberbullying. Five schools with 66 low-educated Dutch adolescents between 12 and 15 (53% female participated in 10 focus group interviews. Results show that victims do not perceive all behaviors as cyberbullying and traditional bullying is generally perceived as worse than cyberbullying. Cyberbullies are perceived as sad, cowards and embarrassing themselves. Victims are perceived as easy targets; they wear strange clothes, act in a provocative manner and have a bad appearance. These perceptions often depend on context, the level of anonymity, being in a fight or not, the person sending the message and his/her behavior. Further, victims reacted to cyberbullying by acting nonchalant, by not actually saying anything and seeking help from others (i.e., parents are not often asked for help because they do not want to bother them; fear of restricted Internet privileges. It can be concluded that asking cyberbullying victims about their experiences in an open manner, and allowing them to discuss these experiences, likely results in new and insightful information compared to using self-reports. In this questioning the perception of adolescents is key to see what is perceived as cyberbullying.

  13. Remarks relating to field experiments to measure the wet scavenging of tracer aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stensland, G.J.

    1977-12-01

    An important question is whether or not the wet deposition of debris from a single (or multiple) airburst of a nuclear device poses a significant hazard to people on the ground. To answer this question for various scenarios, a basic understanding of the aerosol attachment rates to cloud water and raindrops is needed. The attachment rates can then be incorporated into the cloud physics scavenging models to make intelligent assessments. In order to gain an initial impression as to the importance (order of magnitude) of the wet scavenging effects and to provide the data to validate the cloud scavenging models, tracer release field experiments are useful and necessary. The major purpose of this report is to address questions related to the operation and interpretation of such field tracer efforts and in particular to consider the results from the August 3, 1972, Battelle Northwest Laboratory tracer experiment in St. Louis. The Battelle experiment involved the release of several aerosol tracers at 10,000 to 13,000 feet, near rain clouds, and the measurement of the resulting tracer in the rain collected at the ground level sampling sites

  14. Modes of relating to contingency: An exploration of experiences in advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruizinga, Renske; Hartog, Iris D; Scherer-Rath, Michael; Schilderman, Hans; Van Laarhoven, Hanneke

    2017-08-01

    Throughout their lives, people are confronted with unexpected life events, which can be difficult to incorporate into their life narratives. Such a confrontation can result in an experience of contingency. Different ways of relating to contingency have been described by Wuchterl: denying, acknowledging, and "encounter with the Other." In the present article, we aim to trace these theoretical distinctions in real-life experiences of patients. We analyzed 45 interviews using the constant comparative method with a directed content analysis approach in the Atlas.ti coding program. The interviews originated from a randomized controlled trial evaluating an assisted reflection on life events and ultimate life goals. Seven spiritual counselors from six hospitals in the Netherlands conducted the interviews from July of 2014 to March of 2016. All 45 patients had advanced cancer. We found four different modes into which relating to contingency can be classified: denying, acknowledging, accepting, and receiving. With denying, patients did not mention any impact of the life event on their lives. In acknowledging, the impact was recognized and a start was made to incorporate the event into their life. In accepting, patients went through a process of reinterpretation of the event. In receiving, patients talked about receiving insights from their illness and living a more conscious life. Our study is the first to investigate the different ways of relating to contingency in clinical practice. The defined modes will improve our understanding of the various ways in which cancer patients relate to their disease, allowing caregivers to better target and shape individual care.

  15. Improving Student Commitment to Healthcare-Related Design Practice by Improving the Studio Learning Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lindsay; Hong, Miyoung; Albert, Taneshia West

    2017-10-01

    This case study explores the influence of the healthcare design studio experience on students' short-term professional goals as measured through rates of healthcare-related certification and internship/employment. The value and relevance of interior design is evident in the healthcare design sector. However, interior design students may not perceive this value if it is not communicated through their design education. Students' experience in the design studio plays a crucial role in determining career choices, and students may be more committed to career goals when there is clear connection between major coursework and professional practice. The authors compared healthcare-related certification and internship/employment levels between two student cohorts in a capstone undergraduate interior design healthcare design studio course. The first cohort was led by the existing curriculum. The second cohort was led by the revised curriculum that specifically aimed at encouraging students to commit to healthcare-related design practice. When measured at 3 months from graduation, the second cohort, led by the revised curriculum, saw a 30% increase in Evidence-based Design Accreditation and Certification exam pass rates and a 40% increase in healthcare-related internship/employment. The challenge of interior design education is to instill in emerging professionals not only professional competence but also those professional attitudes that will make them better prepared to design spaces that improve quality of life, particularly in healthcare environments. The results exceeded the project goals, and so this could be considered a promising practice for courses focused on healthcare design education.

  16. Sexual experience and HIV-related knowledge among Belgian university students: a questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degroote, Sophie; Vogelaers, Dirk; Liefhooghe, Griet; Vermeir, Peter; Vandijck, Dominique M

    2014-05-15

    Adolescents are a risk group for acquiring sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV. Correct knowledge about transmission mechanisms is a prerequisite to taking appropriate precautions to avoid infection. This study aimed at assessing the level of HIV-related knowledge among university students as a first step in developing targeted interventions. We used a self-developed HIV knowledge questionnaire, supplemented with socio-demographic and sexual behaviour questions. The questionnaire was composed of 59 items from different existing questionnaires. It included general statements and statements about prevention, transmission and treatment of HIV. There were 357 (79.7%) female and 93 (20.3%) male participants and their median age was 20 (IQR 19-21). On average 42/59 (71.2%) questions were answered correctly, 5/59 (8.5%) were answered incorrectly and 12/59 (20.3%) were unknown . The best and worse scores were seen on the prevention questions and the treatment questions, respectively. HIV-related knowledge is higher in older students and in students with a health-related education. Students with sexual experience, with five or more partners and students who have been tested on STDs have a higher HIV-related knowledge. Knowledge on prevention and transmission of HIV is fairly good among university students and knowledge is higher among students with more sexual experience. They still have some misconceptions (e.g. HIV is spread by mosquitoes) and they are ignorant of a substantial number of statements (e.g. risk for infection through oral sex).

  17. Influence of Ethnic-Related Diversity Experiences on Intercultural Sensitivity of Students at a Public University in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamam, Ezhar; Abdullah, Ain Nadzimah

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the authors examine the influence of ethnic-related diversity experiences on intercultural sensitivity among Malaysian students at a multiethnic, multicultural and multilingual Malaysian public university. Results reveal a significant differential level of ethnic-related diversity experiences (but not at the level of intercultural…

  18. Special relativity and superluminal motions: a discussion of some recent experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recami, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan (Italy)]|[Bergamo Univ., Bergamo (Italy). Fac. di Ingegneria]|[State Univ. of Campinas, Campinas (Brazil); Fontana, F. [Pirelli Cavi, Milan (Italy). R and D sector; Garavaglia, R. [Milan Univ., Milan (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze dell' Informazione

    2000-03-01

    Some experiments, performed at Berkeley, Cologne, Florence, Vienna, Orsay and Rennes led to the claim that something seems to travel with a group velocity larger than the speed c of light in vacuum. Various other experimental results seem to point in the same direction. For instance, localized wavelet-type solutions of Maxwell equations have been found, both theoretically and experimentally, that travel with superluminal speed. Even mounic and electronic neutrinos - it has been proposed - might be tachyons, since their square mass appears to be negative. With regard to the first mentioned experiments, it was very recently claimed by Guenter Nimtz that those results with evanescent waves or tunnelling photons - implying superluminal signal and impulse transmission - violate Einstein causality. This note, on the contrary, discusses that all such results do not place relativistic causality in jeopardy, even if they refer to actual tachyonic motions. In fact, special relativity can cope even with also the known paradoxes , devised for faster than light motion, even if this is not widely recognized. Here the paper shows, in detail and rigorously, how to solve the oldest casual paradox. originally proposed by Tolman, which is the kernel of many further tachyon paradoxes. The key to the solution is a careful application of tachyon mechanics, as it unambiguously follows from special relativity.

  19. Special relativity and superluminal motions: a discussion of some recent experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recami, E.; Fontana, F.; Garavaglia, R.

    2000-03-01

    Some experiments, performed at Berkeley, Cologne, Florence, Vienna, Orsay and Rennes led to the claim that something seems to travel with a group velocity larger than the speed c of light in vacuum. Various other experimental results seem to point in the same direction. For instance, localized wavelet-type solutions of Maxwell equations have been found, both theoretically and experimentally, that travel with superluminal speed. Even muonic and electronic neutrinos - it has been proposed - might be tachyons, since their square mass appears to be negative. With regard to the first mentioned experiments, it was very recently claimed by Guenter Nimtz that those results with evanescent waves or tunnelling photons - implying superluminal signal and impulse transmission - violate Einstein causality. This note, on the contrary, discusses that all such results do not place relativistic causality in jeopardy, even if they refer to actual tachyonic motions. In fact, special relativity can cope even with also the known paradoxes , devised for faster than light motion, even if this is not widely recognized. Here the paper shows, in detail and rigorously, how to solve the oldest casual paradox. originally proposed by Tolman, which is the kernel of many further tachyon paradoxes. The key to the solution is a careful application of tachyon mechanics, as it unambiguously follows from special relativity

  20. First year doctors experience of work related wellbeing and implications for educational provision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyear, Helen M

    2014-06-01

    To explore factors which affect newly qualified doctors' wellbeing and look at the implications for educational provision. Data were collected by free association narrative interviews of nine Foundation doctors and analysed using a grounded theory approach. Two Foundation programme directors were interviewed to verify data validity. Two main themes emerged: newly qualified doctors' wellbeing is affected by 1) personal experience and 2) work related factors. They start work feeling unprepared by medical school, work experience ("shadowing") or induction programmes at the beginning of the post. Senior colleague support and feedback are much valued but often lacking with little discussion of critical incidents and difficult issues. Challenges include sick patients, prescribing, patient/relative communication and no consistent team structure. Working shift patterns affects personal and social life. Enjoyment and reward come from helping patients, feelings of making a difference or teaching medical students. Whilst becoming familiar with their roles, newly qualified doctors search for identity and build up resilience. The support given during this process affects their wellbeing including coping with day to day challenges, whether posts are experienced as rewarding and how work influences their personal and social lives.

  1. Work-related behaviour and experience patterns of physicians compared to other professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voltmer, Edgar; Kieschke, Ulf; Spahn, Claudia

    2007-08-11

    To identify health risk factors and resources of physicians in comparison with other professions. Data of cross-sectional mail surveys conducted among German physicians (n = 344), teachers (n = 5169), policemen (n = 851), prison officers (n = 3653), and starting entrepreneurs (n = 632) were analysed regarding eleven health-relevant dimensions and four behaviour patterns examined by the questionnaire "Work-Related Behaviour and Experience Pattern (AVEM)". Only 17% of the physicians showed healthy behaviour and experience patterns. With 43%, they scored highest in terms of reduced working motivation. Together with the teachers, they also had the highest scores for resignation and burnout (27%). Satisfaction with life and work as well as social support showed medium scores. Starting entrepreneurs showed the healthiest patterns (45%), but also the highest risk pattern for overexertion (38%). It was possible to identify clear risk patterns for profession-related psychosocial symptoms and impairments. The high scores for reduced working motivation demonstrate the need for interventions to improve organisation of health care and individual coping strategies.

  2. Estimation of relative permeability and capillary pressure from mass imbibition experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyafei, Nayef; Blunt, Martin J.

    2018-05-01

    We perform spontaneous imbibition experiments on three carbonates - Estaillades, Ketton, and Portland - which are three quarry limestones that have very different pore structures and span wide range of permeability. We measure the mass of water imbibed in air saturated cores as a function of time under strongly water-wet conditions. Specifically, we perform co-current spontaneous experiments using a highly sensitive balance to measure the mass imbibed as a function of time for the three rocks. We use cores measuring 37 mm in diameter and three lengths of approximately 76 mm, 204 mm, and 290 mm. We show that the amount imbibed scales as the square root of time and find the parameter C, where the volume imbibed per unit cross-sectional area at time t is Ct1/2. We find higher C values for higher permeability rocks. Employing semi-analytical solutions for one-dimensional flow and using reasonable estimates of relative permeability and capillary pressure, we can match the experimental data. We finally discuss how, in combination with conventional measurements, we can use theoretical solutions and imbibition measurements to find or constrain relative permeability and capillary pressure.

  3. The perception and experience of gender-based discrimination related to professional advancement among Japanese physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, Kosuke; Nomura, Kyoko

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies from the US have found that female physicians often experience gender-based discrimination related to professional advancement. In Japan, female physicians are underrepresented in leadership positions but little is known about the prevalence of gender discrimination. We investigated the perception and prevalence of gender-based career obstacles and discrimination among Japanese physicians. The study was based on surveys of alumnae from 13 medical schools and alumni from 3 medical schools. In total, 1,684 female and 808 male physicians completed a self-administered questionnaire (response rate 83% and 58%). More women than men had the perception of gender-based career obstacles for women (77% vs. 55%; p gender discrimination related to professional advancement (21% vs. 3%; p gender discrimination included age (p gender discrimination compared with younger women (OR 5.77, 95% CI: 1.83-18.24 for women above 50, and OR 3.2, 95% CI: 1.48-7.28 for women between 40 and 49) and women with PhD were more likely to experience gender discrimination (OR 4.23, 95% CI: 1.81-9.89). Our study demonstrated that a significant proportion of Japanese women experienced gender-based discrimination and perceived gender-based career obstacles compared with male physicians.

  4. Humanoid infers Archimedes' principle: understanding physical relations and object affordances through cumulative learning experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Emerging studies indicate that several species such as corvids, apes and children solve ‘The Crow and the Pitcher’ task (from Aesop's Fables) in diverse conditions. Hidden beneath this fascinating paradigm is a fundamental question: by cumulatively interacting with different objects, how can an agent abstract the underlying cause–effect relations to predict and creatively exploit potential affordances of novel objects in the context of sought goals? Re-enacting this Aesop's Fable task on a humanoid within an open-ended ‘learning–prediction–abstraction’ loop, we address this problem and (i) present a brain-guided neural framework that emulates rapid one-shot encoding of ongoing experiences into a long-term memory and (ii) propose four task-agnostic learning rules (elimination, growth, uncertainty and status quo) that correlate predictions from remembered past experiences with the unfolding present situation to gradually abstract the underlying causal relations. Driven by the proposed architecture, the ensuing robot behaviours illustrated causal learning and anticipation similar to natural agents. Results further demonstrate that by cumulatively interacting with few objects, the predictions of the robot in case of novel objects converge close to the physical law, i.e. the Archimedes principle: this being independent of both the objects explored during learning and the order of their cumulative exploration. PMID:27466440

  5. [Harassment experiences among students of health-related professional careers in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Hernández, Luis; Compeán-Dardón, María Sandra; Gallardo-Hernández, Georgina; Támez-González, Silvia; Pérez-Salgado, Diana; Verde-Flota, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on the frequency with which students of health-related professional careers have perceived themselves as victims of sexual harassment, how this has occurred, and the characteristics of those students associated with that experience. Cross-sectional descriptive study, with a sample of 530 students from health-related schools at the Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Xochimilco in Mexico City. Statistical analysis was stratified by sex, age, race, perception of physical attractiveness, transgression of gender stereotypes, and sexual orientation. Experiences of sexual harassment were assessed based on a scale of 19 questions. Five components were identified by factor analysis: verbal and/or physical harassment by inadequate staring/glancing, inadequate proposals, and comments. In general, women were more harassed by inadequate staring/glancing; those who perceived themselves as being more physically attractive were more verbally harassed, whereas those who transgressed gender stereotypes were more exposed to physical harassment and harrassing glances as compared to men who were seen themselves as being less attractive and who did not transgressed the gender stereotype. Sexual harassment is an existing situation occurring among students. It is necessary to detect and recognize the forms of presentation of gender inequalities to avoid imposing sanctions on conducts that are not adhered to gender stereotypes.

  6. Humanoid infers Archimedes' principle: understanding physical relations and object affordances through cumulative learning experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Ajaz Ahmad; Mohan, Vishwanathan; Sandini, Giulio; Morasso, Pietro

    2016-07-01

    Emerging studies indicate that several species such as corvids, apes and children solve 'The Crow and the Pitcher' task (from Aesop's Fables) in diverse conditions. Hidden beneath this fascinating paradigm is a fundamental question: by cumulatively interacting with different objects, how can an agent abstract the underlying cause-effect relations to predict and creatively exploit potential affordances of novel objects in the context of sought goals? Re-enacting this Aesop's Fable task on a humanoid within an open-ended 'learning-prediction-abstraction' loop, we address this problem and (i) present a brain-guided neural framework that emulates rapid one-shot encoding of ongoing experiences into a long-term memory and (ii) propose four task-agnostic learning rules (elimination, growth, uncertainty and status quo) that correlate predictions from remembered past experiences with the unfolding present situation to gradually abstract the underlying causal relations. Driven by the proposed architecture, the ensuing robot behaviours illustrated causal learning and anticipation similar to natural agents. Results further demonstrate that by cumulatively interacting with few objects, the predictions of the robot in case of novel objects converge close to the physical law, i.e. the Archimedes principle: this being independent of both the objects explored during learning and the order of their cumulative exploration. © 2016 The Author(s).

  7. HL-2A experiment and ITER-related activity at SWIP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Xuru

    2007-01-01

    In this overview the recent progress on HL-2A tokamak experiment and ITER-related activity at SWIP is summarized. Experiment on HL-2A is one of the important research activities at SWIP. In the last two years, some new hardware had been developed, these include four sets of ECRH system with a total power up to 2 MW, new diagnostics such as 8-channel laser interferometer. The studied subjects were focused on plasma auxiliary heating, fuelling, transport, edge plasma physics and turbulence, etc. Progress in these fields has been obtained. For example, the toroidal symmetry of the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM), the oscillating branch of zonal flows has been demonstrated for the first time using a novel 3-step Langmuir Probe, and the poloidal and radial structure of the low frequency electric potential and field were simultaneously observed. During ECRH experiments under different discharge conditions, the MHD instability excited by high energetic electrons was investigated. Besides, non-local heat transport due to SMBI during ECRH was studied. Another important fusion activity at SWIP is the ITER relevant technology. The R and D of four ITER procurements (first wall and shielding blanket, magnet gravity support, gas injection and glow discharge cleaning system, neutron flux measurement) has been undertaken. Progress has been made, e.g. the technology for manufacturing high purity (>99%) ITER specified Be plate and CuCrZr alloy is obtained, their major mechanical and physical properties were measured. For ITER-TBM, a structural material named as CLF-1, a type of reduced activation ferritic/martenstic steel, was developed. Besides, some progress in fusion reactor design and related technology was achieved. (authors)

  8. Dental enamel defects, caries experience and oral health-related quality of life: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrow, P

    2017-06-01

    The impact of enamel defects of the first permanent molars on caries experience and child oral health-related quality of life was evaluated in a cohort study. Children who participated in a study of enamel defects of the first permanent molars 8 years earlier were invited for a follow-up assessment. Consenting children completed the Child Perception Questionnaire and the faces Modified Child Dental Anxiety Scale, and were examined by two calibrated examiners. ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, negative binomial and logistic regression were used for data analyses. One hundred and eleven children returned a completed questionnaire and 91 were clinically examined. Negative binomial regression found that oral health impacts were associated with gender (boys, risk ratio (RR) = 0.73, P = 0.03) and decayed, missing or filled permanent teeth (DMFT) (RR = 1.1, P = 0.04). The mean DMFT of children were sound (0.9, standard deviation (SD) = 1.4), diffuse defects (0.8, SD = 1.7), demarcated defects (1.5, SD = 1.4) and pit defects (1.3, SD = 2.3) (Kruskal-Wallis, P = 0.05). Logistic regression of first permanent molar caries found higher odds of caries experience with baseline primary tooth caries experience (odds ratio (OR) = 1.5, P = 0.01), the number of teeth affected by enamel defects (OR = 1.9, P = 0.05) and lower odds with the presence of diffuse enamel defects (OR = 0.1, P = 0.04). The presence of diffuse enamel defects was associated with lower odds of caries experience. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  9. Cross-Cultural Differences in the Experience of Grandparent-Grandchild Relationships and Related Psychosocial Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayslip, Bert; Toledo, Ray M; Henderson, Craig E; Rodriguez, R Mishelle; Caballero Vela, Daniela M

    2018-01-01

    This study examined grandchildren's perceptions of the quality of their relationship with their grandmothers and how these perceptions relate to psychosocial outcomes. Eighty-two youth from Mexico and 99 youth from the United States aged between 13 and 16 participated. Results suggested that both cultures benefit in unique ways from positive relationship with their grandmothers. Yet, there were also differences in the relational experience of grandmother-grandchild relationships across cultures. Specifically, grandchildren in the U.S. sample reported higher relationship quality, relational competency, and self-efficacy than the grandchildren in the Mexico sample. Within the U.S. sample, relationship quality was associated with grandchildren's relational competence, while in the Mexico sample, relationship quality was associated with self-efficacy. Limitations of the present study include restricted generalizability to other age groups and to grandfathers and that only one element of the grandparent-grandchild dyad was sampled. Longitudinal research will improve our understanding of the causal dynamics of grandparent-grandchild relationships.

  10. Young adults' experiences of their parents caring for a relative with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Pik Yi; Lai, Claudia Kam Yuk; Chung, Ching Sum; Sham, Amy Kin Kwan; Yeung, Ching Lai

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the experiences and perceptions young adults had of family members who are caring for a relative with dementia. An exploratory qualitative study with semi-structured interviews was carried out and data were collected from 24 young adults recruited through purposive sampling. The participants had to have a close relative who was caring for an elderly family member with dementia. A content analysis approach was used for the verbatim transcription. The findings showed that caring for a relative with dementia was perceived as a time-consuming, exhausting and long-term task. The participants experienced stress and strain, although they were not the primary caregivers. Despite their negative perceptions of the task, they were willing to take on the responsibility of becoming a primary caregiver in the future. However, they intended to seek assistance in meeting their caregiving roles and responsibilities. Seeing how their close relative cared for a dependent older adult led them to reflect on what they would become in the future. Interestingly, although the participants expected their future offspring to take care of them when they became old, they did not want to be a burden to their children. Young adults are the caregivers of tomorrow. Knowing their perspective on caregiving is important if health professionals are to help them evolve into a caregiving role. It has implications for realizing the goal of aging in place. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; 16: 873-879. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  11. Functional coupling networks inferred from prefrontal cortex activity show experience-related effective plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaia Tavoni

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Functional coupling networks are widely used to characterize collective patterns of activity in neural populations. Here, we ask whether functional couplings reflect the subtle changes, such as in physiological interactions, believed to take place during learning. We infer functional network models reproducing the spiking activity of simultaneously recorded neurons in prefrontal cortex (PFC of rats, during the performance of a cross-modal rule shift task (task epoch, and during preceding and following sleep epochs. A large-scale study of the 96 recorded sessions allows us to detect, in about 20% of sessions, effective plasticity between the sleep epochs. These coupling modifications are correlated with the coupling values in the task epoch, and are supported by a small subset of the recorded neurons, which we identify by means of an automatized procedure. These potentiated groups increase their coativation frequency in the spiking data between the two sleep epochs, and, hence, participate to putative experience-related cell assemblies. Study of the reactivation dynamics of the potentiated groups suggests a possible connection with behavioral learning. Reactivation is largely driven by hippocampal ripple events when the rule is not yet learned, and may be much more autonomous, and presumably sustained by the potentiated PFC network, when learning is consolidated. Cell assemblies coding for memories are widely believed to emerge through synaptic modification resulting from learning, yet their identification from activity is very arduous. We propose a functional-connectivity-based approach to identify experience-related cell assemblies from multielectrode recordings in vivo, and apply it to the prefrontal cortex activity of rats recorded during a task epoch and the preceding and following sleep epochs. We infer functional couplings between the recorded cells in each epoch. Comparisons of the functional coupling networks across the epochs allow us

  12. Nonequilibrium statistical physics in a dithered ring laser gyroscope or quantum noise in pure and applied physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleich, W.; Dobiasch, P.

    1986-01-01

    A brief review is given of quantum noise in ring laser gyroscopes. Some the basic elements of ring laser theory, such as the Sagnac effect, the locking effect, and the influence of quantumnoise on the mean beat frequency versus rotation rate are discussed. The Langevin equation for the ase difference between the counterpropagating waves in the presence of any periodic and time symmetric dither is cast into a form which alows a qualitative discussion of the resulting lock-in curve as well as an exact expression in terms of infinite matrix continued fractions. The details of the transformation of the stochastic variable and the derivation of the exact expression for f>t may be found in appendices. Exact results are presented for two special cases of the dithering function: the harmonic and the square-wave bias

  13. PhysioSpace: relating gene expression experiments from heterogeneous sources using shared physiological processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lenz

    Full Text Available Relating expression signatures from different sources such as cell lines, in vitro cultures from primary cells and biopsy material is an important task in drug development and translational medicine as well as for tracking of cell fate and disease progression. Especially the comparison of large scale gene expression changes to tissue or cell type specific signatures is of high interest for the tracking of cell fate in (trans- differentiation experiments and for cancer research, which increasingly focuses on shared processes and the involvement of the microenvironment. These signature relation approaches require robust statistical methods to account for the high biological heterogeneity in clinical data and must cope with small sample sizes in lab experiments and common patterns of co-expression in ubiquitous cellular processes. We describe a novel method, called PhysioSpace, to position dynamics of time series data derived from cellular differentiation and disease progression in a genome-wide expression space. The PhysioSpace is defined by a compendium of publicly available gene expression signatures representing a large set of biological phenotypes. The mapping of gene expression changes onto the PhysioSpace leads to a robust ranking of physiologically relevant signatures, as rigorously evaluated via sample-label permutations. A spherical transformation of the data improves the performance, leading to stable results even in case of small sample sizes. Using PhysioSpace with clinical cancer datasets reveals that such data exhibits large heterogeneity in the number of significant signature associations. This behavior was closely associated with the classification endpoint and cancer type under consideration, indicating shared biological functionalities in disease associated processes. Even though the time series data of cell line differentiation exhibited responses in larger clusters covering several biologically related patterns, top scoring

  14. Patients’ experience of outsourcing and care related to magnetic resonance examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspelin, Peter; Bergstrand, Lott; Blomqvist, Lennart

    2014-01-01

    Background Outsourcing radiological examinations from public university hospitals affects the patient, who has to attend a different clinic or hospital for the radiological examination. We currently have a limited understanding of how patients view outsourcing and their care related to MR examinations. Aim Aim. To examine the experiences of patients who are sent to private radiology units when their referrals for MR examinations are outsourced from a university hospital, as well as to explore factors which influence patient satisfaction regarding the quality of care related to the MR examination. Methods A group of patients (n = 160) referred for MR examinations and either examined at a university hospital or at an external private unit were interviewed. The interview was designed as a verbal questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Student’s t test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Pearson’s correlation. Results Sixty-nine percent of the patients could neither choose nor influence the location at which they were examined. For those who could, aspects that influenced the patient’s choice of radiology department were: short waiting time 79% (127/160), ease of traveling to the radiology department 68% (110/160), and short distance to their home or work 58% (93/160). For 40% (60/160) of the patients, a short time in the waiting room was related to a positive experience of the MR examination. Conclusion Conclusion. If patients were informed about outsourcing and could also choose where to have their examination, key factors contributing to patient satisfaction could be met even when MR examinations are outsourced. PMID:25142133

  15. Parent experiences and information needs relating to procedural pain in children: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Allison; Shave, Kassi; Featherstone, Robin; Buckreus, Kelli; Ali, Samina; Scott, Shannon; Hartling, Lisa

    2017-06-06

    There exist many evidence-based interventions available to manage procedural pain in children and neonates, yet they are severely underutilized. Parents play an important role in the management of their child's pain; however, many do not possess adequate knowledge of how to effectively do so. The purpose of the planned study is to systematically review and synthesize current knowledge of the experiences and information needs of parents with regard to the management of their child's pain and distress related to medical procedures in the emergency department. We will conduct a systematic review using rigorous methods and reporting based on the PRISMA statement. We will conduct a comprehensive search of literature published between 2000 and 2016 reporting on parents' experiences and information needs with regard to helping their child manage procedural pain and distress. Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid PsycINFO, CINAHL, and PubMed will be searched. We will also search reference lists of key studies and gray literature sources. Two reviewers will screen the articles following inclusion criteria defined a priori. One reviewer will then extract the data from each article following a data extraction form developed by the study team. The second reviewer will check the data extraction for accuracy and completeness. Any disagreements with regard to study inclusion or data extraction will be resolved via discussion. Data from qualitative studies will be summarized thematically, while those from quantitative studies will be summarized narratively. The second reviewer will confirm the overarching themes resulting from the qualitative and quantitative data syntheses. The Critical Appraisal Skills Programme Qualitative Research Checklist and the Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies will be used to assess the quality of the evidence from each included study. To our knowledge, no published review exists that comprehensively reports on the experiences and information needs of parents

  16. The testing effect for mediator final test cues and related final test cues in online and laboratory experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppens, Leonora C; Verkoeijen, Peter P J L; Bouwmeester, Samantha; Rikers, Remy M J P

    2016-05-31

    The testing effect is the finding that information that is retrieved during learning is more often correctly retrieved on a final test than information that is restudied. According to the semantic mediator hypothesis the testing effect arises because retrieval practice of cue-target pairs (mother-child) activates semantically related mediators (father) more than restudying. Hence, the mediator-target (father-child) association should be stronger for retrieved than restudied pairs. Indeed, Carpenter (2011) found a larger testing effect when participants received mediators (father) than when they received target-related words (birth) as final test cues. The present study started as an attempt to test an alternative account of Carpenter's results. However, it turned into a series of conceptual (Experiment 1) and direct (Experiment 2 and 3) replications conducted with online samples. The results of these online replications were compared with those of similar existing laboratory experiments through small-scale meta-analyses. The results showed that (1) the magnitude of the raw mediator testing effect advantage is comparable for online and laboratory experiments, (2) in both online and laboratory experiments the magnitude of the raw mediator testing effect advantage is smaller than in Carpenter's original experiment, and (3) the testing effect for related cues varies considerably between online experiments. The variability in the testing effect for related cues in online experiments could point toward moderators of the related cue short-term testing effect. The raw mediator testing effect advantage is smaller than in Carpenter's original experiment.

  17. War-related penile injuries in Libya: Single-institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etabbal, Abdalla M; Hussain, Fathi F; Benkhadoura, Mohamed O; Banni, Abdalla M

    2018-06-01

    To report on our initial experience in the management of war-related penile injuries; proper diagnosis and immediate treatment of penile injuries is essential to gain satisfactory results. Besides treating primary wounds and restoring penile function, the cosmetic result is also an important issue for the surgeon. The study was conducted in the Department of Urology at Benghazi Medical Center and comprised all patients who presented with a shotgun, gunshot or explosive penile injury between February 2011 and August 2017. The patient's age, cause of injury, site and severity of injuries, management, postoperative complications, and hospital stay, were recorded. In all, 29 males with war-related penile injuries were enrolled in the study. The mean (SD) age of these patients was 31.3 (10.5) years. The glans, urethra, and corporal bodies were involved in four (13.7%), 10 (34.4%), and 20 (68.9%) of the patients, respectively. According to the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma Penis Injury Scale, Grade III penile injuries were the most common (11 patients, 37.9%). The most common post-intervention complications were urethral stricture with or without proximal urethrocutaneous fistula (eight patients, 27.5%), followed by permanent erectile dysfunction (five patients, 17.2%). In patients who sustain war-related penile injuries the surgeon's efforts should not only be directed to restoring normal voiding and erectile function but also on the cosmetic appearance of the penis.

  18. On the relationship between convex bodies related to correlation experiments with dichotomic observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avis, David [School of Computer Science, McGill University, 3480 University, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2A7 (Canada); Imai, Hiroshi [Department of Computer Science, Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ito, Tsuyoshi [Department of Computer Science, Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2006-09-08

    In this paper we explore further the connections between convex bodies related to quantum correlation experiments with dichotomic variables and related bodies studied in combinatorial optimization, especially cut polyhedra. Such a relationship was established in Avis et al (2005 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 38 10971-87) with respect to Bell inequalities. We show that several well-known bodies related to cut polyhedra are equivalent to bodies such as those defined by Tsirelson (1993 Hadronic J. Suppl. 8 329-45) to represent hidden deterministic behaviours, quantum behaviours and no-signalling behaviours. Among other things, our results allow a unique representation of these bodies, give a necessary condition for vertices of the no-signalling polytope, and give a method for bounding the quantum violation of Bell inequalities by means of a body that contains the set of quantum behaviours. Optimization over this latter body may be performed efficiently by semidefinite programming. In the second part of the paper we apply these results to the study of classical correlation functions. We provide a complete list of tight inequalities for the two party case with (m, n) dichotomic observables when m = 4, n = 4 and when min{l_brace}m, n{r_brace} {<=} 3, and give a new general family of correlation inequalities.

  19. Internal Medicine Residents' Beliefs, Attitudes, and Experiences Relating to Palliative Care: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, S; Mirza, R; Nissim, R; Ridley, J

    2017-05-01

    Internal medicine residents are frequently called upon to provide palliative care to hospitalized patients, but report feeling unprepared to do so effectively. Curricular development to enhance residents' palliative care skills and competencies requires an understanding of current beliefs, attitudes and learning priorities. We conducted a qualitative study consisting of semi-structured interviews with ten internal medicine residents to explore their understanding of and experiences with palliative care. All of the residents interviewed had a sound theoretical understanding of palliative care, but faced many challenges in being able to provide care in practice. The challenges described by residents were system-related, patient-related and provider-related. They identified several priority areas for further learning, and discussed ways in which their current education in palliative care could be enhanced. Our findings provide important insights to guide curricular development for internal medicine trainees. The top five learning priorities in palliative care that residents identified in our study were: 1) knowing how and when to initiate a palliative approach, 2) improving communication skills, 3) improving symptom management skills, 4) identifying available resources, and 5) understanding the importance of palliative care. Residents felt that their education in palliative care could be improved by having a mandatory rotation in palliative care, more frequent didactic teaching sessions, more case-based teaching from palliative care providers, opportunities to be directly observed, and increased support from palliative care providers after-hours.

  20. The experience of acculturative stress-related growth from immigrants’ perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhyoung Kim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous literature has mainly focused on the positive effects of stress associated with disability and illness, called stress-related growth. Little research has explored positive changes as a result of acculturative stress among a group of immigrants. In particular, older Asian immigrants may experience a high level of stress related to acculturation because they may face more challenges to adapt to and navigate a new culture. This study was designed to capture the characteristics of stress-related growth associated with acculturative stress. Using in-depth interviews among 13 older Korean immigrants, three main themes associated with the stress-coping strategies were identified: (a the development of mental toughness, (b engagement in meaningful activities, and (c promotion of cultural understanding. These themes indicate that by following the stressful acculturation process, participants developed a better understanding of the new culture, engaged in various leisure activities, and enhanced mental strength. This finding provides information on how immigrants deal with acculturative stress and have positive psychological changes, which results in a sense of happiness and psychological well-being.

  1. The experience of acculturative stress-related growth from immigrants’ perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junhyoung; Kim, Hakjun

    2013-01-01

    Previous literature has mainly focused on the positive effects of stress associated with disability and illness, called stress-related growth. Little research has explored positive changes as a result of acculturative stress among a group of immigrants. In particular, older Asian immigrants may experience a high level of stress related to acculturation because they may face more challenges to adapt to and navigate a new culture. This study was designed to capture the characteristics of stress-related growth associated with acculturative stress. Using in-depth interviews among 13 older Korean immigrants, three main themes associated with the stress-coping strategies were identified: (a) the development of mental toughness, (b) engagement in meaningful activities, and (c) promotion of cultural understanding. These themes indicate that by following the stressful acculturation process, participants developed a better understanding of the new culture, engaged in various leisure activities, and enhanced mental strength. This finding provides information on how immigrants deal with acculturative stress and have positive psychological changes, which results in a sense of happiness and psychological well-being. PMID:24070225

  2. Assessment of Field Experience Related to Pressurized Water Reactor Primary System Leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.; Hsu, C.; Atwood, C.L.; Sattison, M.B.; Hartley, R.S.; Shah, V.N.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents our assessment of field experience related to pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary system leaks in terms of their number and rates, how aging affects frequency of leak events, the safety significance of such leaks, industry efforts to reduce leaks, and effectiveness of current leak detection systems. We have reviewed the licensee event reports to identify the events that took place during 1985 to the third quarter of 1996, and reviewed related technical literature and visited PWR plants to analyze these events. Our assessment shows that USNRC licensees have taken effective actions to reduce the number of leak events. One main reason for this decreasing trend was the elimination or reportable leakages from valve stem packing after 1991. Our review of leak events related to vibratory fatigue reveals a statistically significant decreasing trend with age (years of operation), but not in calendar time. Our assessment of worldwide data on leakage caused by thermal fatigue cracking is that the fatigue of aging piping is a safety significant issue. Our review of leak events has identified several susceptible sites in piping having high safety significance; but the inspection of some of these sites is not required by the ASME Code. These sites may be included in the risk-informed inspection programs

  3. Assessment of Field Experience Related to Pressurized Water Reactor Primary System Leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Vikram Naginbhai; Ware, Arthur Gates; Atwood, Corwin Lee; Sattison, Martin Blaine; Hartley, Robert Scott; Hsu, C.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents our assessment of field experience related to pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary system leaks in terms of their number of rates, how aging affects frequency of leak events, the safety significance of such leaks, industry efforts to reduce leaks, and effectiveness of current leak detection systems. We have reviewed the licensee event reports to identify the events that took place during 1985 to the third quarter of 1996, and reviewed related technical literature and visited PWR plants to analyze these events. Our assessment shows that USNRC licensees have taken effective actions to reduce the number of leak events. One main reason for this decreasing trend was the elimination or reportable leakages from valve stem packing after 1991. Our review of leak events related to vibratory fatigue reveals a statistically significant decreasing trend with age (years of operation), but not in calendar time. Our assessment of worldwide data on leakage caused by thermal fatigue cracking is that the fatigue of aging piping is a safety significant issue. Our review of leak events has identified several susceptible sites in piping having high safety significance; but the inspection of some of these sites is not required by the ASME Code. These sites may be included in the risk-informed inspection programs

  4. Longitudinal effects of disaster-related experiences on mental health among Fukushima nuclear plant workers: The Fukushima NEWS Project Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, A; Tanigawa, T; Charvat, H; Wada, H; Shigemura, J; Kawachi, I

    2017-08-01

    The Fukushima Nuclear Energy Workers' Support (NEWS) Project Study previously showed that experiences related to the Fukushima nuclear disaster on 11 March 2011 had a great impact on psychological states, including post-traumatic stress response (PTSR) and general psychological distress (GPD), among the Fukushima nuclear plant workers. To determine the causal relationship between disaster-related experiences and levels of psychological states, we conducted a 3-year longitudinal study from 2011 to 2014. PTSR and GPD of the nuclear plant workers were assessed by annual questionnaires conducted from 2011 to 2014. The present study included a total of 1417 workers who provided an assessment at baseline (2011). A total of 4160 observations were used in the present analysis. The relationship between disaster-related experiences and psychological states over time was analysed using mixed-effects logistic regression models. A declining influence of disaster-related experiences on PTSR over time was found. However, the impact on PTSR remained significantly elevated even 3 years after the disaster in several categories of exposure including the experience of life-threatening danger, experiences of discrimination, the witnessing of plant explosion, the death of a colleague and home evacuation. The associations between GPD and disaster-related experiences showed similar effects. The effects of disaster-related experiences on psychological states among the nuclear plant workers reduced over time, but remained significantly high even 3 years after the event.

  5. The speed of gravity in general relativity and theoretical interpretation of the Jovian deflection experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopeikin, Sergei M

    2004-01-01

    According to Einstein, the notions of geodesic, parallel transport (affine connection) and curvature of the spacetime manifold have a pure geometric origin and do not correlate with any electromagnetic concepts. At the same time, curvature is generated by matter which is not affiliated with the spacetime geometric concepts. For this reason, the fundamental constant c entering the geometric and matter sectors of the general theory of relativity has different conceptual meanings. Specifically, the letter c on the left-hand side of the Einstein equations (geometric sector) entering the Christoffel symbols and its time derivatives is the ultimate speed of gravity characterizing the upper limit on the speed of its propagation as well as the maximal rate of change of time derivatives of the metric tensor, that is gravitational field. The letter c on the right-hand side of the Einstein equations (matter sector) is the maximal speed of propagation of any other field rather than gravity. Einstein's general principle of relativity extends his principle of special relativity and equates the numerical value of the ultimate speed of gravity to that of the speed of light in the special theory of relativity but this general principle must be tested experimentally. To this end, we work out the speed of gravity parametrization of the Einstein equations (c g -parametrization) to keep track of the time-dependent effects associated with the geometric sector of general relativity and to separate them from the time-dependent effects of the matter sector. Parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) approximation of the Einstein equations is derived in order to explain the gravitational physics of the Jovian deflection VLBI experiment conducted on 8 September 2002. The post-Newtonian series expansion in the c g -parametrized general relativity is with respect to a small parameter that is proportional to the ratio of the characteristic velocity of the bodies to the speed of propagation of the

  6. Journey to confidence: women's experiences of pain in labour and relational continuity of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leap, Nicky; Sandall, Jane; Buckland, Sara; Huber, Ulli

    2010-01-01

    An evaluation carried out at King's College Hospital Foundation National Health Service Trust in London identified that women who received continuity of carer from the Albany Midwifery Practice were significantly less likely to use pharmacological pain relief when comparisons were made with eight other midwifery group practices and the local maternity service as a whole. This study was designed to explore women's views of this phenomenon. We conducted a thematic analysis of semistructured, audiotaped, in-depth interviews with 10 women who reflected on their experiences of preparation and support for pain in labour and midwifery continuity of carer with Albany midwives, using a qualitative descriptive methodological approach. Women reflected positively on how, throughout pregnancy and labour, their midwives promoted a sense of their ability to cope with the challenge of labour pain. This building of confidence was enabled through a relationship of trust that developed with their midwives and the value of hearing other women's stories during antenatal groups. These experiences enhanced women's ability to overcome fears and self-doubt about coping with pain and led to feelings of pride, elation, and empowerment after birth. Women valued being encouraged and supported to labour without using pharmacological pain relief by midwives with whom they developed a trusting relationship throughout pregnancy. Features of midwifery approaches to pain in labour and relational continuity of care have important implications for promoting normal birth and a positive experience of pregnancy, labour, and birth for women. Copyright (c) 2010 American College of Nurse-Midwives. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Relation between contemplative exercises and an enriched psychology students' experience in a neuroscience course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levit Binnun, Nava; Tarrasch, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the relation of contemplative exercises with enhancement of students' experience during neuroscience studies. Short contemplative exercises inspired by the Buddhist tradition of self-inquiry were introduced in an undergraduate neuroscience course for psychology students. At the start of the class, all students were asked to participate in short “personal brain investigations” relevant to the topic presented. These investigations were aimed at bringing stable awareness to a specific perceptual, emotional, attentional, or cognitive process and observing it in a non-judgmental, non-personal way. In addition, students could choose to participate, for bonus credit, in a longer exercise designed to expand upon the weekly class activity. In the exercise, students continued their “personal brain investigations” for 10 min a day, 4 days a week. They wrote “lab reports” on their daily observations, obtained feedback from the teacher, and at the end of the year reviewed their reports and reflected upon their experiences during the semester. Out of 265 students, 102 students completed the bonus track and their final reflections were analyzed using qualitative methodology. In addition, 91 of the students answered a survey at the end of the course, 43 students participated in a quiz 1 year after course graduation, and the final grades of all students were collected and analyzed. Overall, students reported satisfaction from the exercises and felt they contributed to their learning experience. In the 1-year follow-up, the bonus-track students were significantly more likely than their peers to remember class material. The qualitative analysis of bonus-track students' reports revealed that the bonus-track process elicited positive feelings, helped students connect with class material and provided them with personal insights. In addition, students acquired contemplative skills, such as increased awareness and attention, non-judgmental attitudes, and

  8. Advanced technologies related to a high temperature superconductor for small laboratory experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yuichi; Mito, Toshiyuki; Yanagi, Nagato

    2006-01-01

    Advanced technologies related to a high temperature superconductor materials and small refrigerator are reviewed. Mini-RT/RT-1 is designed and constructed as a plasma examination device. The element technology of low temperature apparatus, the results of performance tests and application examples are explained. The superconductors such as Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 (Bi-2212) for the low temperature phase, Bi 2 Sr 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 10 (Bi-2223) for the high temperature phase, and YBa 2 Cu 3 O y (YBCO or Y123) are described. Advanced 4K-Giford-Mcmahon (GM) refrigerator on the market put superconductor coil made of low temperature superconductor metals to practical use and extends its application field. Small laboratory is able to experiment on the high temperature superconductor materials. (S.Y.)

  9. Experience of Use of Knowledge Relative Assessment System for Training in Area of Civil Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanova Elena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays E-Learning is becoming more and more relevant in training civil engineers. Electronic resources are used for classroom activities and for independent work. It allows allocating extra time for development of practical skills. Experience of remote knowledge control application in the educational process of Moscow State University of Civil Engineering is presented in the article. The control system is called Knowledge Relative Assessment System using Bekker's method. The following steps of system using are described in detail in the article: loading test material, action of users, protection from wrong acts and calculation of rating. The main merits and demerits from the point of view of teachers and students are listed.

  10. Peplau's Theory of Interpersonal Relations: An Alternate Factor Structure for Patient Experience Data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagerty, Thomas A; Samuels, William; Norcini-Pala, Andrea; Gigliotti, Eileen

    2017-04-01

    A confirmatory factor analysis of data from the responses of 12,436 patients to 16 items on the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems-Hospital survey was used to test a latent factor structure based on Peplau's middle-range theory of interpersonal relations. A two-factor model based on Peplau's theory fit these data well, whereas a three-factor model also based on Peplau's theory fit them excellently and provided a suitable alternate factor structure for the data. Though neither the two- nor three-factor model fit as well as the original factor structure, these results support using Peplau's theory to demonstrate nursing's extensive contribution to the experiences of hospitalized patients.

  11. Further Experiments with Lok-Test and Ultrasonic Test in Relation to Fresh and Hardened Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Kristian Jehrbo

    Lok-test is mainly a non-destructive pull-out test for determination of concrete strength. The method is deseribed in (l) and it is detailed discussed in theory (2). The method is welknown in practice. Ultrasonic is commonly used for investigations of several materials, especially concrete. In a ....... In a project (3) about non-destructive testing of concrete different methods and the relations to concrete are discussed in theory and practice. This paper point out some interesting results from further experiments in this area.......Lok-test is mainly a non-destructive pull-out test for determination of concrete strength. The method is deseribed in (l) and it is detailed discussed in theory (2). The method is welknown in practice. Ultrasonic is commonly used for investigations of several materials, especially concrete...

  12. The Experience of SME Managers in Relation to Integrated Marketing Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabricia Durieux Zucco

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to contribute to the discussion about the changes generated substantially by the integration of marketing communications in micro, small and medium enterprises of Blumenau and region. The objective is to analyze the entrepreneur's experience in relation to the communications applied to his company and to identify the interrelation between the variables that compose the communication management, to describe the similarities and to present new dimensions of common variability. For the accomplishment of the objectives, an exploratory and descriptive research with quantitative approach was carried out. It was observed that entrepreneurs feel a greater need to invest in communication at the beginning or launch of the company or products, aiming at increasing sales and increasing positive perception about the brand. On the other hand, there is little investment in the area of corporate communication.

  13. Analysis of animal experiments of radiation dependent tumor regression in relation to different parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinzel, F.; Mueller-Duysing, W.; Blattman, H.; Bacesa, L.; Rao, K.R.; Mindek, G.

    In order to be able to test the therapeutic value of the pions in comparison with conventional X-rays, analyses of animal experiments with induced tumors, transplantation tumors, and comparative cellular kinetic studies of tissue cultures will be performed. So that differences in radiation effect and a possible superiority of the pion therapy be objectively acknowledged, the reaction systems to be tested must be as homogenous as possible. For this purpose, the dependence of the radiation related regression on various parameters such as sex, age of hosts, environmental factors radiation conditions (intensity, fractionation, and so on), tumor size, and so on, must be investigated on sterile animals in a sterile environment. The experiments should be conducted under conditions as close as possible to clinical ones. For comparison, the reaction of normal tissue (in vitro and in vivo) and of malignant cells in short-time tissue cultures will be analysed. Cellular kinetics, alteration of chromosomes and metabolic activity of the cells will be studied

  14. Short-term experiments for determination of the relative phytotoxicity of nitrogen dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Haut, H.

    1975-01-01

    In short-term experiments, the relative phytotoxicity of nitrogen dioxide was determined for 60 types of plants by comparing it with that of sulfur dioxide. The plants, which included crop and garden plants such as alfalfa, clover, barley, lettuce, carrots, parsley, radishes, onions, beans, and tobacco; ornamental plants, such as roses, dahlias, and gladioli; and coniferous and deciduous trees, such as pines, spruces, birches, and maples, were exposed to the two gases in parallel experiments. The exposure concentrations were 5 to 20 mg NO/sub 2/ cu/m air and 1.5 to 4 mg SO/sub 2//cu m air. Taking the average concentration ratio of SO/sub 2/ to NO/sub 2/ of 1/3.5 and an SO/sub 2/ long-term value of 0.1 mg SO/sub 2//cu m, an average value of 0.35 mg NO/sub 2//cu m of air was obtained for the vegetation half-year. The average value obtained for a 30-min period was 0.80 mg NO/sub 2//cu m of air.

  15. Anxiety and depression related to the hospitalization experience of patients receiving radioiodine ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koc, Z.; Karaboc, A.; Balci, T.; Kepenek, F.; Atmaca, M.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Objective: the hospital rooms for radioiodine ablation of differentiated thyroid carcinoma are designed according to radiation safety lows where patients have to remain isolated. The aim of the present study is to investigate depression and anxiety levels of the patients associated with hospitalization experience for radioiodine ablation. Methods: 30 patients (8 M, 22 F; mean: 45±13 years old) with differentiated thyroid carcinoma were included into study. After withdrawal of thyroid hormone replacement at least for 3 weeks, the patients were subject of the ablation treatment. After routine psychiatric examination Hamilton Anxiety and Depression scales were administered to the patients before and after complement of hospitalization for 1-3 days. Results: according to the statistical analysis there was not any significant difference between Hamilton depression and anxiety scores and state and trait anxiety scores of the patients before and after treatment (P>0.05). However, 18 patients had depression, with major depression of six, and 21 had high anxiety levels, according to Hamilton Depression and Anxiety Scales. Conclusion: Although the patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma do not experience anxiety or depression related to the hospitalization itself for radioiodine ablation they might frequently have depression or anxiety just before the treatment. (authors)

  16. Relations between educational research, policy, planning and implementation: The Thai experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketudat, Sippanondha; Fry, Gerald

    1981-06-01

    The relations between educational research, policy, planning and implementation in Thailand are the topic of this paper. The major focus is on the research/policy linkage. A complex educational administrative structure and a pluralistic informal power structure characterize the Thai research context. A tetrahedral model of linkages provides the conceptual framework for the analysis. Details are then provided with respect to the actual operationalization of the model in terms of the Thai approach in practice. Major elements in the Thai approach include the use of expert policy committees, joint committees involving both administrators and researchers, problem-oriented seminars, and commissioned research. Actual examples of research efforts described are an educational reform study, local level school mapping, a school cluster experiment, a budget exercise to improve the equity of primary school resource allocations, and a policy evaluation of sub-district secondary schools. Finally, lessons to be learned from the Thai experience are summarized. Thailand has experienced some success in building analytical educational research capacity and ensuring its utilization. Key elements in this success have been an emphasis on strengthening human capacities; judging political will in a timely, flexible manner; creatively utilizing bureaucratic forms such as committees; and remaining both politically detached and sensitive.

  17. Corrective relational experiences in psychodynamic-interpersonal psychotherapy: Antecedents, types, and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Teresa Chen-Chieh; Hill, Clara E; Strauss, Nicole; Heyman, Michelle; Hussain, Mahum

    2016-03-01

    In posttherapy interviews with 31 clients who had recently terminated from individual open-ended psychodynamic-interpersonal psychotherapy, 18 reported having had at least 1 corrective relational experience (CRE) during psychotherapy, whereas 13 did not report any CREs. CREs typically occurred in the context of therapeutic relationships that were primarily positive but also had minor difficulties. Therapists typically facilitated CREs by identifying or questioning client behavior patterns and conveying trustworthiness. Corrective shifts for clients typically involved a new understanding of the therapy experience and variantly involved gaining a new understanding of behavior patterns. Consequences generally included improvements in the therapy relationship and intrapersonal well-being. Qualitatively, the 13 non-CRE clients more frequently reported wishing the therapist's theoretical orientation was a better match than did the 18 CRE clients. Quantitatively, the CRE clients rated themselves as having more interpersonal problems at intake on the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems-32 (Barkham, Hardy, & Startup, 1996), had marginally significant improvements in interpersonal functioning over time, rated their therapy alliances higher on the Working Alliance Inventory-Short Revised (Hatcher & Gillaspy, 2006) midtherapy, and rated their therapy alliances higher over time compared with the non-CRE clients. Implications for practice and research are discussed. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Activity Engagement and Activity-Related Experiences: The Role of Personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Nicky J; Pladevall-Guyer, Jana; Gonzalez, Richard; Smith, Jacqui

    2016-08-12

    The associations of personality with activity participation and well-being have been well studied. However, less is known concerning the relationship between personality and specific aspects of activity engagement in older adults. We conducted a fine-grained examination of the effects of extraversion and conscientiousness on reported activity engagement-which we define as participation, time allocated, and affective experience-during 8 everyday activities. Data were obtained using a day reconstruction measure from a subgroup of participants in the 2012 Health and Retirement Study (HRS: N = 5,484; mean age = 67.98 years). We found mixed support for hypotheses suggesting that specific personality traits would be associated with activity participation, time allocated, and activity-affective experience. For example, extraverts were more likely to socialize and experienced higher socializing-related positive affect, but did not spend more time socializing. Results are discussed in light of the value of including personality in, and its contribution to, studies of activity engagement in later life. In addition, the need to acknowledge the complexity of the concept of activity engagement in future research is highlighted. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Falls From Agricultural Machinery: Risk Factors Related to Work Experience, Worked Hours, and Operators' Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffaro, Federica; Roccato, Michele; Micheletti Cremasco, Margherita; Cavallo, Eugenio

    2018-02-01

    Objective We investigated the risk factors for falls when egressing from agricultural tractors, analyzing the role played by worked hours, work experience, operators' behavior, and near misses. Background Many accidents occur within the agricultural sector each year. Among them, falls while dismounting the tractor represent a major source of injuries. Previous studies pointed out frequent hazardous movements and incorrect behaviors adopted by operators to exit the tractor cab. However, less is known about the determinants of such behaviors. In addition, near misses are known to be important predictors of accidents, but they have been under-investigated in the agricultural sector in general and as concerns falls in particular. Method A questionnaire assessing dismounting behaviors, previous accidents and near misses, and participants' relation with work was administered to a sample of Italian tractor operators ( n = 286). Results A mediated model showed that worked hours increase unsafe behaviors, whereas work experience decreases them. Unsafe behaviors in turn show a positive association with accidents, via the mediation of near misses. Conclusions We gave a novel contribution to the knowledge of the chain of events leading to fall accidents in the agricultural sector, which is one of the most hazardous industries. Applications Besides tractor design improvements, preventive training interventions may focus on the redesign of the actual working strategies and the adoption of engaging training methods in the use of machinery to optimize the learning of safety practices and safe behaviors.

  20. Experiences Related to Urinary Incontinence of Stroke Patients: A Qualitative Descriptive Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkan, Gulcihan; Beser, Ayse; Ozturk, Vesile

    2018-02-01

    Poststroke urinary incontinence is a common problem, with a prevalence ranging from 32% to 79%. Urinary incontinence after stroke has negative physiological, psychological, and economic effects, which lead to lifestyle changes for both patients and caregivers. Nurses play an important role in preventing and improving incontinence, understanding the experiences of individuals experiencing incontinence, providing healthcare for them, and implementing behavioral therapy methods. The aim of this study was to determine the experience related to urinary incontinence of stroke patients. In this qualitative descriptive study, using semistructured interviews, 15 participants with urinary incontinence after stroke selected through purposeful sampling were interviewed. Data were collected with a semistructured interview form prepared within the framework of the Health Belief Model. All data were analyzed using content analysis. Three main themes were identified: "perception of urinary incontinence," "effects of urinary incontinence," and "management of urinary incontinence." The respondents explained that urinary incontinence also adversely affected their caregivers. They experienced many daily life and psychological problems because of urinary incontinence. In addition, they made several changes to management urinary incontinence such as limiting fluid intake, changing underwear frequently, using waterproof mattress protectors, applying traditional practice, and taking medicine. This study revealed that stroke patients needed help and support for urinary incontinence management. Nurses should provide information about management and urinary incontinence after stroke.

  1. The Beam Dynamics and Beam Related Uncertainties in Fermilab Muon $g-2$ Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wanwei [Mississippi U.

    2018-05-01

    The anomaly of the muon magnetic moment, $a_{\\mu}\\equiv (g-2)/2$, has played an important role in constraining physics beyond the Standard Model for many years. Currently, the Standard Model prediction for $a_{\\mu}$ is accurate to 0.42 parts per million (ppm). The most recent muon $g-2$ experiment was done at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and determined $a_{\\mu}$ to 0.54 ppm, with a central value that differs from the Standard Model prediction by 3.3-3.6 standard deviations and provides a strong hint of new physics. The Fermilab Muon $g-2$ Experiment has a goal to measure $a_{\\mu}$ to unprecedented precision: 0.14 ppm, which could provide an unambiguous answer to the question whether there are new particles and forces that exist in nature. To achieve this goal, several items have been identified to lower the systematic uncertainties. In this work, we focus on the beam dynamics and beam associated uncertainties, which are important and must be better understood. We will discuss the electrostatic quadrupole system, particularly the hardware-related quad plate alignment and the quad extension and readout system. We will review the beam dynamics in the muon storage ring, present discussions on the beam related systematic errors, simulate the 3D electric fields of the electrostatic quadrupoles and examine the beam resonances. We will use a fast rotation analysis to study the muon radial momentum distribution, which provides the key input for evaluating the electric field correction to the measured $a_{\\mu}$.

  2. Brain network segregation and integration during an epoch-related working memory fMRI experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransson, Peter; Schiffler, Björn C; Thompson, William Hedley

    2018-05-17

    The characterization of brain subnetwork segregation and integration has previously focused on changes that are detectable at the level of entire sessions or epochs of imaging data. In this study, we applied time-varying functional connectivity analysis together with temporal network theory to calculate point-by-point estimates in subnetwork segregation and integration during an epoch-based (2-back, 0-back, baseline) working memory fMRI experiment as well as during resting-state. This approach allowed us to follow task-related changes in subnetwork segregation and integration at a high temporal resolution. At a global level, the cognitively more taxing 2-back epochs elicited an overall stronger response of integration between subnetworks compared to the 0-back epochs. Moreover, the visual, sensorimotor and fronto-parietal subnetworks displayed characteristic and distinct temporal profiles of segregation and integration during the 0- and 2-back epochs. During the interspersed epochs of baseline, several subnetworks, including the visual, fronto-parietal, cingulo-opercular and dorsal attention subnetworks showed pronounced increases in segregation. Using a drift diffusion model we show that the response time for the 2-back trials are correlated with integration for the fronto-parietal subnetwork and correlated with segregation for the visual subnetwork. Our results elucidate the fast-evolving events with regard to subnetwork integration and segregation that occur in an epoch-related task fMRI experiment. Our findings suggest that minute changes in subnetwork integration are of importance for task performance. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Work-related behavior and experience patterns of entrepreneurs compared to teachers and physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voltmer, Edgar; Spahn, Claudia; Schaarschmidt, Uwe; Kieschke, Ulf

    2011-06-01

    This study examined the status of health-related behavior and experience patterns of entrepreneurs in comparison with teachers and physicians to identify specific health risks and resources. Entrepreneurs (n = 632), teachers (n = 5,196), and physicians (n = 549) were surveyed in a cross-sectional design. The questionnaire Work-related Behavior and Experience Patterns (AVEM) was used for all professions and, in addition, two scales (health prevention and self-confidence) from the Checklist for Entrepreneurs in the sample of entrepreneurs. The largest proportion of the entrepreneurs (45%) presented with a healthy pattern (compared with 18.4% teachers and 18.3% physicians). Thirty-eight percent of entrepreneurs showed a risk pattern of overexertion and stress, followed by teachers (28.9%) and physicians (20.6%). Unambitious or burnout patterns were seen in only 9.3/8.2% of entrepreneurs, respectively, and 25.3/27.3% of teachers, and 39.6/21.5% of physicians. While the distribution of patterns in teachers and physicians differed significantly between genders, a gender difference was not found among entrepreneurs. Entrepreneurs with the risk pattern of overexertion scored significantly (P successful enterprise depends, in part, on the health of the entrepreneur. The large proportion of entrepreneurs with the healthy pattern irrespective of gender may support the notion that self-selection effects of healthy individuals in this special career might be important. At the same time, a large proportion was at risk for overexertion and might benefit from measures to cope with professional demands and stress and promote a healthy behavior pattern.

  4. Women's experiences of pregnancy related pelvic girdle pain: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Jo; Murray, Esther; Lusher, Joanne

    2018-01-01

    to systematically review the available studies which relay the experience of pregnancy related pelvic girdle pain and how this affects women psychologically and emotionally. a systematic review and meta-synthesis of the experiences of pregnancy related pelvic girdle pain was conducted for qualitative studies dated between 2005 and 2016. Predefined terms were used to search nine central databases and hand searches of two reference lists of identified studies were carried out. 614 records were identified, eight studies met the inclusion criteria for review. Pain from pelvic girdle pain impacted on women's daily lives both at home and the workplace. This had a negative emotional and psychological impact on women as it took away their feeling of independence. Women reported feelings of frustration, guilt, irritability and upset at being unable to carry out their normal roles. Pelvic girdle pain also affected the women's sense of identity and ability to care for their children. Health professionals working with pregnant and postnatal women need to be aware of the anger, frustration and negative emotions resulting from PGP. These women may become socially isolated and there is a risk they could abuse analgesics in attempt to manage the pain especially if they do not have the social support. For women with young children, it is important to be aware of safety issues they face with carrying babies and controlling toddlers. It is therefore important that health professionals recognise PGP as a serious health issue, approach this condition sensitively and refer to appropriate treatment as soon as PGP is suspected. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Social Inequalities and Gender Differences in the Experience of Alcohol-Related Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grittner, Ulrike; Kuntsche, Sandra; Graham, Kathryn; Bloomfield, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To examine the influence of country-level characteristics and individual socio-economic status (SES) on individual alcohol-related consequences. Methods: Data from 42,655 men and women collected by cross-sectional surveys in 25 countries of the Gender, Alcohol and Culture: An International Study study were used. The individual SES was measured by the highest attained educational level. Alcohol-related consequences were defined as the self-report of at least one internal or one external consequence in the last year. The relationship between individuals’ education and alcohol-related consequences was examined by meta-analysis. In a second step, the individual level data and country data were combined in multilevel models. As country-level indicators, we used the purchasing power parity of the gross national income (GNI), the Gini coefficient and the Gender Gap Index. Results: Lower educated men and women were more likely to report consequences than higher educated men and women even after controlling for drinking patterns. For men, this relation was significant for both internal and external problems. For women, it was only significant for external problems. The GNI was significantly associated with reporting external consequences for men such that in lower income countries men were more likely to report social problems. Conclusion: The fact that problems accrue more quickly for lower educated persons even if they drink in the same manner can be linked to the social or environmental dimension surrounding problems. That is, those of fewer resources are less protected from the experience of a problem or the impact of a stressful life event. PMID:22542707

  6. Maternal affect and quality of parenting experiences are related to amygdala response to infant faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Jennifer; Wonch, Kathleen E; Gonzalez, Andrea; Ali, Nida; Steiner, Meir; Hall, Geoffrey B; Fleming, Alison S

    2012-01-01

    We examined how individual differences in mood and anxiety in the early postpartum period are related to brain response to infant stimuli during fMRI, with particular focus on regions implicated in both maternal behavior and mood/anxiety, that is, the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) and the amygdala. At approximately 3 months postpartum, 22 mothers completed an affect-rating task (ART) during fMRI, where their affective response to infant stimuli was explicitly probed. Mothers viewed/rated four infant face conditions: own positive (OP), own negative (ON), unfamiliar positive (UP), and unfamiliar negative (UN). Mood and anxiety were measured by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EDPS) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-Trait Version (STAI-T); maternal factors related to parental stress and attachment were also assessed. Brain-imaging data underwent a random-effects analysis, and cluster-based statistical thresholding was applied to the following contrasts: OP-UP, ON-UN, OP-ON, and UP-UN. Our main finding was that poorer quality of maternal experience was significantly related to reduced amygdala response to OP compared to UP infant faces. Our results suggest that, in human mothers, infant-related amygdala function may be an important factor in maternal anxiety/mood, in quality of mothering, and in individual differences in the motivation to mother. We are very grateful to the staff at the Imaging Research Center of the Brain-Body Institute for their contributions to this project. This work was supported by an Ontario Mental Health Foundation operating grant awarded to Alison Fleming and a postdoctoral fellowship awarded to Jennifer Barrett.

  7. Social inequalities and gender differences in the experience of alcohol-related problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grittner, Ulrike; Kuntsche, Sandra; Graham, Kathryn; Bloomfield, Kim

    2012-01-01

    To examine the influence of country-level characteristics and individual socio-economic status (SES) on individual alcohol-related consequences. Data from 42,655 men and women collected by cross-sectional surveys in 25 countries of the Gender, Alcohol and Culture: An International Study study were used. The individual SES was measured by the highest attained educational level. Alcohol-related consequences were defined as the self-report of at least one internal or one external consequence in the last year. The relationship between individuals' education and alcohol-related consequences was examined by meta-analysis. In a second step, the individual level data and country data were combined in multilevel models. As country-level indicators, we used the purchasing power parity of the gross national income (GNI), the Gini coefficient and the Gender Gap Index. Lower educated men and women were more likely to report consequences than higher educated men and women even after controlling for drinking patterns. For men, this relation was significant for both internal and external problems. For women, it was only significant for external problems. The GNI was significantly associated with reporting external consequences for men such that in lower income countries men were more likely to report social problems. The fact that problems accrue more quickly for lower educated persons even if they drink in the same manner can be linked to the social or environmental dimension surrounding problems. That is, those of fewer resources are less protected from the experience of a problem or the impact of a stressful life event.

  8. Changes in patient satisfaction related to hospital renovation: experience with a new clinical building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Zishan K; Zuccarelli, Rebecca; Durkin, Nowella; Wu, Albert W; Brotman, Daniel J

    2015-03-01

    There is an increasing trend toward designing hospitals with patient-centered features like reduced noise, improved natural light, visitor friendly facilities, well-decorated rooms, and hotel-like amenities. It has also been suggested that because patients cannot reliably distinguish positive experiences with the physical environment from positive experience with care, an improved hospital environment leads to higher satisfaction with physicians, nursing, food service, housekeeping, and higher overall satisfaction. To characterize changes in patient satisfaction that occurred when clinical services (comprised of stable nursing, physician, and unit teams) were relocated to a new clinical building with patient-centered features. We hypothesized that new building features would positively impact provider, ancillary staff, and overall satisfaction, as well as improved satisfaction with the facility. Natural experiment utilizing a pre-post design with concurrent controls. Academic tertiary care hospital. We included all patients discharged from 12 clinical units that relocated to the new clinical building who returned surveys in the 7.5-month period following the move. Premove baseline data were captured from the year prior to the move. Patients on unmoved clinical units who returned satisfaction surveys served as concurrent controls. Patient-centered design features incorporated into the new clinical building. All patients during the baseline period and control patients during the study period were located in usual patient rooms with standard hospital amenities. The primary outcome was satisfaction scores on the Press Ganey and Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey, dichotomized at highest category versus lower categories. We performed logistic regression to identify predictors of "top-box" scores. The move was associated with improved room- and visitor-related satisfaction without significant improvement in satisfaction with clinical

  9. How Patients and Relatives Experience a Visit from a Consulting Physician in the Euthanasia Procedure: A Study among Relatives and Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen-van der Weide, Marijke C.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D.; van der Heide, Agnes; van der Wal, Gerrit

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of a visit from a consulting physician on the patient and the relatives during the euthanasia procedure in The Netherlands. Data on experiences with the consultant's visit were collected from 86 relatives and 3,614 general practitioners, who described their most recent request for euthanasia or physician-assisted…

  10. Evolution of the use of relational and NoSQL databases in the ATLAS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberis, D.

    2016-09-01

    The ATLAS experiment used for many years a large database infrastructure based on Oracle to store several different types of non-event data: time-dependent detector configuration and conditions data, calibrations and alignments, configurations of Grid sites, catalogues for data management tools, job records for distributed workload management tools, run and event metadata. The rapid development of "NoSQL" databases (structured storage services) in the last five years allowed an extended and complementary usage of traditional relational databases and new structured storage tools in order to improve the performance of existing applications and to extend their functionalities using the possibilities offered by the modern storage systems. The trend is towards using the best tool for each kind of data, separating for example the intrinsically relational metadata from payload storage, and records that are frequently updated and benefit from transactions from archived information. Access to all components has to be orchestrated by specialised services that run on front-end machines and shield the user from the complexity of data storage infrastructure. This paper describes this technology evolution in the ATLAS database infrastructure and presents a few examples of large database applications that benefit from it.

  11. Uncovering young children's emerging identities related to their literacy experiences: Suggestions to strengthen language education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moen, Melanie Carmen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study explored how young children’s identities emerged from their drawings and accounts of their favourite stories as we argue the importance of understanding children in the context of school and language education. Sixty-six (n=66 children of two urban schools in Pretoria, South Africa were asked to write about and draw their favourite story. The participants were between the ages of six and seven years. Vygotsky’s socio-cultural theory and Chen’s theory of the construction of identity in a social context were used as conceptual framework. This conceptual framework could be linked to the findings which suggested that the children related their drawings and versions of their favourite stories to their interpretations of their life worlds. The prominent themes from the data could be associated with the self, the family, familiar objects and known animals. Their literacy experiences and the socio-cultural influences on the children’s construction of their identities were apparent in their work. We argue that teachers need to better understand how children understand themselves in relation to the world around them when making decisions about effective language education.

  12. Task-related Functional Connectivity Dynamics in a Block-designed Visual Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin eDi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Studying task modulations of brain connectivity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is critical to understand brain functions that support cognitive and affective processes. Existing methods such as psychophysiological interaction (PPI and dynamic causal modelling (DCM usually implicitly assume that the connectivity patterns are stable over a block-designed task with identical stimuli. However, this assumption lacks empirical verification on high-temporal resolution fMRI data with reliable data-driven analysis methods. The present study performed a detailed examination of dynamic changes of functional connectivity (FC in a simple block-designed visual checkerboard experiment with a sub-second sampling rate (TR = 0.645 s by estimating time-varying correlation coefficient (TVCC between BOLD responses of different brain regions. We observed reliable task-related FC changes (i.e., FCs were transiently decreased after task onset and went back to the baseline afterward among several visual regions of the bilateral middle occipital gyrus (MOG and the bilateral fusiform gyrus (FuG. Importantly, only the FCs between higher visual regions (MOG and lower visual regions (FuG exhibited such dynamic patterns. The results suggested that simply assuming a sustained FC during a task block may be insufficient to capture distinct task-related FC changes. The investigation of FC dynamics in tasks could improve our understanding of condition shifts and the coordination between different activated brain regions.

  13. Theory and experiments in general relativity and other metric theories of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciufolini, I.

    1984-01-01

    In Chapter I, after an introduction to theories of gravity alternative to general relativity, metric theories, and the post-Newtonian parameterized (PNN) formalism, a new class of metric theories of gravity is defined. As a result the post-Newtonian approximation of the new theories is not described by the PPN formalism. In fact under the weak field and slow motion hypothesis, the post-Newtonian expression of the metric tensor contains an infinite set of new terms and correspondingly an infinite set of new PPN parameters. Chapter II, III, and IV are devoted to new experiments to test general relativity and other metric theories of gravity. In particular, in chapter IV, it is shown that two general relativistics effects, the Lense-Thirring and De Sitter-Fokker precessions of the nodal lines of an Earth artificial satellite are today detectable using high altitude laser ranged artificial satellites such as Lageos. The orbit of this satellite is known with unprecedented accuracy. The author then describes a method of measuring these relativistic precessions using Lageos together with another high altitude laser ranged similar satellite with appropriately chosen orbital parameters

  14. Living Related Donor Kidney Transplantation in Libya: A Single Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elusta Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to report the experience from a single center in Libya, on the prevailing live-related kidney transplantation program. The results of three years work on kidney transplantation at the Tripoli Central Hospital (National Organ Transplant Program in Libya were evaluated. The transplant program was launched on 17 th August, 2004 and 135 patients have been transplanted since then till 17 th August, 2007. All donors and recipients were screened thoroughly prior to transplant and monitored closely in the post-transplant period. Our immuno-suppressive protocol was cyclosporine-based. Among the 135 accepted pairs, donors and reci-pients were genetically-related in 133 cases (98.5% and emotionally-related in two others. The mean donor age was 37 ± 9.5 years (range 18-56 years and recipient age 37 ± 13.6 years (range 7-67 years. There were 95 males (70.4% and 40 females (29.6% among the recipients while among the donors, there were 102 males (75.6% and 33 females (24.4%. Delayed graft function was seen in three patients (2.2%, acute rejection in six (4.4%, post-transplant urinary tract infection in six (4.4%, pneumonia in three (2.2%, ureteric kink in two (1.5% and urine leak in four (3.0%. Graft survival at 36 months was 93.3% while patient survival at the same period was 96.3%. This report indicates that the results of our transplant program are good and comparable with other international programs.

  15. Long-term Disability Associated With War-related Experience Among Vietnam Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Robert; Salomon, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent combat operations have involved large numbers of personnel. Long-term health effects of military deployment remain largely unknown. Objectives: To examine patterns and trends in long-term disability among combat veterans and to relate disability to aspects of wartime experience. Participants: A total of 60,228 Australian military personnel deployed between 1962 and 1975 during the Vietnam War, and 82,877 military personnel who were not deployed overseas. Outcome Measures: Accepted physician-assessed disability claims were evaluated over follow-up periods up to 50 years after deployment, and compared with age-matched controls. Multivariable analysis was used to examine differences by service branch, rank, age, and deployment duration. Results: The steepest rise in disability incidence was observed among Vietnam veterans starting in the 1990s, around 20–30 years after deployment for most veterans. After 1994, when Statements of Principles were introduced to guide evaluation of disability claims, the hazard ratio for disability incidence was 1.53 (95% confidence interval, 1.32–1.77) compared with the prior period. By January 2011, after an average follow-up of 42.5 years, 69.7% (95% confidence interval, 69.4%–70.1%) of veterans had at least 1 war-related disability. Many veterans had multiple disabilities, with leading causes being eye and ear disorders (48.0%), mental health conditions (47.9%), and musculoskeletal disorders (18.4%). For specific categories of disability, relative risks for accepted claims among veterans compared with controls were highest for mental health disorders, at 22.9 (21.9–24.0) and lowest for injuries, at 1.5 (1.4–1.6) with a relative risk for any disability of 3.7 (3.7–3.8). Veterans with service of >1 year were 2.5 (2.2–2.7) times more likely to have a mental health disability than those who served war-related disability is associated with service history. If similar patterns follow from more recent

  16. Long-term disability associated with war-related experience among Vietnam veterans: retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Philip M; Gregory, Robert; Salomon, Joshua A

    2015-05-01

    Recent combat operations have involved large numbers of personnel. Long-term health effects of military deployment remain largely unknown. To examine patterns and trends in long-term disability among combat veterans and to relate disability to aspects of wartime experience. A total of 60,228 Australian military personnel deployed between 1962 and 1975 during the Vietnam War, and 82,877 military personnel who were not deployed overseas. Accepted physician-assessed disability claims were evaluated over follow-up periods up to 50 years after deployment, and compared with age-matched controls. Multivariable analysis was used to examine differences by service branch, rank, age, and deployment duration. The steepest rise in disability incidence was observed among Vietnam veterans starting in the 1990s, around 20-30 years after deployment for most veterans. After 1994, when Statements of Principles were introduced to guide evaluation of disability claims, the hazard ratio for disability incidence was 1.53 (95% confidence interval, 1.32-1.77) compared with the prior period. By January 2011, after an average follow-up of 42.5 years, 69.7% (95% confidence interval, 69.4%-70.1%) of veterans had at least 1 war-related disability. Many veterans had multiple disabilities, with leading causes being eye and ear disorders (48.0%), mental health conditions (47.9%), and musculoskeletal disorders (18.4%). For specific categories of disability, relative risks for accepted claims among veterans compared with controls were highest for mental health disorders, at 22.9 (21.9-24.0) and lowest for injuries, at 1.5 (1.4-1.6) with a relative risk for any disability of 3.7 (3.7-3.8). Veterans with service of >1 year were 2.5 (2.2-2.7) times more likely to have a mental health disability than those who served war-related disability is associated with service history. If similar patterns follow from more recent conflicts, significant additional resources will be needed to prevent and treat long

  17. Operating experience relating to on-site electric power sources. Proceedings of a Specialist Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-02-01

    The reliability of on-site electric power sources of nuclear power plants usually consisting of diesel generators, gas turbine generators and DC power sources, has been a matter of concern during reactor operations. The frequent recurrence and the important consequences of failures relating to on-site electric power sources have led to a general consensus that they form one of the most significant features influencing the total performance of the safety Systems. This has also been confirmed by surveys performed on the incidents reported through the NEA Incident Reporting System (IRS). Accordingly, a recommendation to organise a Specialist Meeting on the subject was made at the third annual meeting of CSNI Principal Working Group No. 1 (Operating Experience and Human Factors). At the 12. meeting of the CSNI held in November 1984. the Committee endorsed the proposal and accepted an offer by the United Kingdom to host and organise the Specialist Meeting. The Specialist Meeting, sponsored by the CSNI, was held in London, United Kingdom from 16 to 18 October 1985. It was hosted by H.M. Nuclear Installations Inspectorate of the Health and Safety Executive. The purpose of the meeting was to promote the exchange of Information on operating experience relating to on-site electric power sources and to look for measures to further improve their reliability In the areas of design, operation and licensing. The meeting was organised by a Programme Group which included nominated members of CSNI PWG No. 1. the Programme Group met in May and June 1985 in Paris to agree on the programme and practical arrangements for the meeting. As a result of the review of the abstracts which had been contributed in response to the Call for Papers, 28 papers were accepted for presentation during the meeting. Approximately 60 delegates from 13 Member countries, and the NEA Secretariat, attended the meeting. Session summaries prepared by the respective session chairmen are Included prior to the

  18. Operating experience relating to on-site electric power sources. Proceedings of a Specialist Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-02-15

    The reliability of on-site electric power sources of nuclear power plants usually consisting of diesel generators, gas turbine generators and DC power sources, has been a matter of concern during reactor operations. The frequent recurrence and the important consequences of failures relating to on-site electric power sources have led to a general consensus that they form one of the most significant features influencing the total performance of the safety Systems. This has also been confirmed by surveys performed on the incidents reported through the NEA Incident Reporting System (IRS). Accordingly, a recommendation to organise a Specialist Meeting on the subject was made at the third annual meeting of CSNI Principal Working Group No. 1 (Operating Experience and Human Factors). At the 12. meeting of the CSNI held in November 1984. the Committee endorsed the proposal and accepted an offer by the United Kingdom to host and organise the Specialist Meeting. The Specialist Meeting, sponsored by the CSNI, was held in London, United Kingdom from 16 to 18 October 1985. It was hosted by H.M. Nuclear Installations Inspectorate of the Health and Safety Executive. The purpose of the meeting was to promote the exchange of Information on operating experience relating to on-site electric power sources and to look for measures to further improve their reliability In the areas of design, operation and licensing. The meeting was organised by a Programme Group which included nominated members of CSNI PWG No. 1. the Programme Group met in May and June 1985 in Paris to agree on the programme and practical arrangements for the meeting. As a result of the review of the abstracts which had been contributed in response to the Call for Papers, 28 papers were accepted for presentation during the meeting. Approximately 60 delegates from 13 Member countries, and the NEA Secretariat, attended the meeting. Session summaries prepared by the respective session chairmen are Included prior to the

  19. Factors Related to the Developmental Experiences of Youth Serving as 4-H Camp Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, David N.; Kotrlik, Joe W.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the developmental experiences of high-school-aged 4-H youth volunteering as counselors at Louisiana 4-H summer camps. A total of 288 counselors from 10 different camping sessions participated in the study. The Youth Experiences Survey 2.0 and the Developmental Experience Survey measured the personal…

  20. Precollege and in-college bullying experiences and health-related quality of life among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Ying; Huang, Jiun-Hau

    2015-01-01

    Bullying is a commonly occurring problem behavior in youths that could lead to long-term health effects. However, the impact of school bullying experiences on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among college students has been relatively underexplored. This study aimed to describe school bullying experiences and to empirically examine their associations with HRQOL among college students in Taiwan. Self-administered survey data (response rate 84.2%) were collected from 1452 college students in 2013 by using proportional stratified cluster sampling. Different types of bullying experiences (ie, physical, verbal, relational, and cyber) before and in college, for bullies and victims, were measured. HRQOL was assessed by the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF) Taiwan version. College students with cyber bullying-victimization experiences before college (β 0.060) reported significantly higher HRQOL in physical health. Regarding social relationships, those with verbal (β -0.086) and relational (β -0.056) bullying-victimization experiences, both before and in college, reported significantly lower HRQOL, whereas those with verbal (β 0.130) and relational (β 0.072) bullying-perpetration experiences in both periods reported significantly higher HRQOL. Students with cyber bullying-victimization experiences in college (β 0.068) reported significantly higher HRQOL in the environment domain. Last, the effects of verbal and relational bullying-victimization experiences on psychological HRQOL could be mediated and manifested through depression. Various types of bullying experiences occurring before and in college were differentially associated with HRQOL in different domains. These findings underscore the importance of developing school policies and health education initiatives to prevent school bullying and ameliorate its short-term and long-term effects on HRQOL. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.