WorldWideScience

Sample records for relative quantum yield

  1. Quantum relations

    CERN Document Server

    Weaver, Nik

    2010-01-01

    We define a "quantum relation" on a von Neumann algebra M \\subset B(H) to be a weak* closed operator bimodule over its commutant M'. Although this definition is framed in terms of a particular representation of M, it is effectively representation independent. Quantum relations on l^\\infty(X) exactly correspond to subsets of X^2, i.e., relations on X. There is also a good definition of a "measurable relation" on a measure space, to which quantum relations partially reduce in the general abelian case. By analogy with the classical setting, we can identify structures such as quantum equivalence relations, quantum partial orders, and quantum graphs, and we can generalize Arveson's fundamental work on weak* closed operator algebras containing a masa to these cases. We are also able to intrinsically characterize the quantum relations on M in terms of families of projections in M \\otimes B(l^2).

  2. Quantum Gauge General Relativity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ning

    2004-01-01

    Based on gauge principle, a new model on quantum gravity is proposed in the frame work of quantum gauge theory of gravity. The model has local gravitational gauge symmetry, and the field equation of the gravitational gauge field is just the famous Einstein's field equation. Because of this reason, this model is called quantum gauge general relativity, which is the consistent unification of quantum theory and general relativity. The model proposed in this paper is a perturbatively renormalizable quantum gravity, which is one of the most important advantage of the quantum gauge general relativity proposed in this paper. Another important advantage of the quantum gauge general relativity is that it can explain both classical tests of gravity and quantum effects of gravitational interactions, such as gravitational phase effects found in COW experiments and gravitational shielding effects found in Podkletnov experiments.

  3. High quantum yield ZnO quantum dots synthesizing via an ultrasonication microreactor method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weimin; Yang, Huafang; Ding, Wenhao; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Le; Wang, Lixi; Yu, Mingxun; Zhang, Qitu

    2016-11-01

    Green emission ZnO quantum dots were synthesized by an ultrasonic microreactor. Ultrasonic radiation brought bubbles through ultrasonic cavitation. These bubbles built microreactor inside the microreactor. The photoluminescence properties of ZnO quantum dots synthesized with different flow rate, ultrasonic power and temperature were discussed. Flow rate, ultrasonic power and temperature would influence the type and quantity of defects in ZnO quantum dots. The sizes of ZnO quantum dots would be controlled by those conditions as well. Flow rate affected the reaction time. With the increasing of flow rate, the sizes of ZnO quantum dots decreased and the quantum yields first increased then decreased. Ultrasonic power changed the ultrasonic cavitation intensity, which affected the reaction energy and the separation of the solution. With the increasing of ultrasonic power, sizes of ZnO quantum dots first decreased then increased, while the quantum yields kept increasing. The effect of ultrasonic temperature on the photoluminescence properties of ZnO quantum dots was influenced by the flow rate. Different flow rate related to opposite changing trend. Moreover, the quantum yields of ZnO QDs synthesized by ultrasonic microreactor could reach 64.7%, which is higher than those synthesized only under ultrasonic radiation or only by microreactor.

  4. Quantum Yield Characterization and Excitation Scheme Optimization of Upconverting Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Haichun; Xu, Can T.; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin

    2014-01-01

    Upconverting nanoparticles suffer from low quantum yield in diffuse optical imaging, especially at low excitation intensities. Here, the power density dependent quantum yield is characterized, and the excitation scheme is optimized based on such characterization......Upconverting nanoparticles suffer from low quantum yield in diffuse optical imaging, especially at low excitation intensities. Here, the power density dependent quantum yield is characterized, and the excitation scheme is optimized based on such characterization...

  5. Quantum Yield Characterization and Excitation Scheme Optimization of Upconverting Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Haichun; Xu, Can T.; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin;

    2014-01-01

    Upconverting nanoparticles suffer from low quantum yield in diffuse optical imaging, especially at low excitation intensities. Here, the power density dependent quantum yield is characterized, and the excitation scheme is optimized based on such characterization......Upconverting nanoparticles suffer from low quantum yield in diffuse optical imaging, especially at low excitation intensities. Here, the power density dependent quantum yield is characterized, and the excitation scheme is optimized based on such characterization...

  6. Relational Quantum Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Vidotto, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The application of quantum theory to cosmology raises a number of conceptual questions, such as the role of the quantum-mechanical notion of "observer" or the absence of a time variable in the Wheeler-DeWitt equation. I point out that a relational formulation of quantum mechanics, and more in general the observation that evolution is always relational, provides a coherent solution to this tangle of problems.

  7. Synthesis of Luminescent Graphene Quantum Dots with High Quantum Yield and Their Toxicity Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Jiang

    Full Text Available High fluorescence quantum yield graphene quantum dots (GQDs have showed up as a new generation for bioimaging. In this work, luminescent GQDs were prepared by an ameliorative photo-Fenton reaction and a subsequent hydrothermal process using graphene oxide sheets as the precursor. The as-prepared GQDs were nanomaterials with size ranging from 2.3 to 6.4 nm and emitted intense green luminescence in water. The fluorescence quantum yield was as high as 24.6% (excited at 340 nm and the fluorescence was strongest at pH 7. Moreover, the influences of low-concentration (12.5, 25 μg/mL GQDs on the morphology, viability, membrane integrity, internal cellular reactive oxygen species level and mortality of HeLa cells were relatively weak, and the in vitro imaging demonstrated GQDs were mainly in the cytoplasm region. More strikingly, zebrafish embryos were co-cultured with GQDs for in vivo imaging, and the results of heart rate test showed the intake of small amounts of GQDs brought little harm to the cardiovascular of zebrafish. GQDs with high quantum yield and strong photoluminescence show good biocompatibility, thus they show good promising for cell imaging, biolabeling and other biomedical applications.

  8. Fluorescence quantum yield of thioflavin T in rigid isotropic solution and incorporated into the amyloid fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna I Sulatskaya

    Full Text Available In this work, the fluorescence of thioflavin T (ThT was studied in a wide range of viscosity and temperature. It was shown that ThT fluorescence quantum yield varies from 0.0001 in water at room temperature to 0.28 in rigid isotropic solution (T/η→0. The deviation of the fluorescence quantum yield from unity in rigid isotropic solution suggests that fluorescence quantum yield depends not only on the ultra-fast oscillation of ThT fragments relative to each other in an excited state as was suggested earlier, but also depends on the molecular configuration in the ground state. This means that the fluorescence quantum yield of the dye incorporated into amyloid fibrils must depend on its conformation, which, in turn, depends on the ThT environment. Therefore, the fluorescence quantum yield of ThT incorporated into amyloid fibrils can differ from that in the rigid isotropic solution. In particular, the fluorescence quantum yield of ThT incorporated into insulin fibrils was determined to be 0.43. Consequently, the ThT fluorescence quantum yield could be used to characterize the peculiarities of the fibrillar structure, which opens some new possibilities in the ThT use for structural characterization of the amyloid fibrils.

  9. Quantum Yield Heterogeneity among Single Nonblinking Quantum Dots Revealed by Atomic Structure-Quantum Optics Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfield, Noah J; McBride, James R; Wang, Feng; Buck, Matthew R; Keene, Joseph D; Reid, Kemar R; Htoon, Han; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A; Rosenthal, Sandra J

    2016-02-23

    Physical variations in colloidal nanostructures give rise to heterogeneity in expressed optical behavior. This correlation between nanoscale structure and function demands interrogation of both atomic structure and photophysics at the level of single nanostructures to be fully understood. Herein, by conducting detailed analyses of fine atomic structure, chemical composition, and time-resolved single-photon photoluminescence data for the same individual nanocrystals, we reveal inhomogeneity in the quantum yields of single nonblinking "giant" CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots (g-QDs). We find that each g-QD possesses distinctive single exciton and biexciton quantum yields that result mainly from variations in the degree of charging, rather than from volume or structure inhomogeneity. We further establish that there is a very limited nonemissive "dark" fraction (<2%) among the studied g-QDs and present direct evidence that the g-QD core must lack inorganic passivation for the g-QD to be "dark". Therefore, in contrast to conventional QDs, ensemble photoluminescence quantum yield is principally defined by charging processes rather than the existence of dark g-QDs.

  10. Relative quantum yield of I-asterisk(2P1/2) in the tunable laser UV photodissociation of i-C3F7I and n-C3F7I - Effect of temperature and exciplex emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedley, J. E.; Leone, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    Wavelength-specific relative quantum yields of metastable I from pulsed laser photodissociation of i-C3F7I and n-C3F7I in the range 265-336 nm are determined by measuring the time-resolved infrared emission from the atomic I(P-2(1/2) P-2(3/2) transition. It is shown that although this yield appears to be unity from 265 to 298 nm, it decreases dramatically at longer wavelengths. Values are also reported for the enhancement of emission from metastable I due to exciplex formation at several temperatures. The exciplex formation emission increases linearly with parent gas pressure, but decreases with increasing temperature. Absorption spectra of i- and n-C3F7I between 303 and 497 K are presented, and the effect of temperature on the quantum yields at selected wavelengths greater than 300 nm, where increasing the temperature enhances the absorption considerably, are given. The results are discussed in regard to the development of solar-pumped iodine lasers.

  11. On the photoelectric quantum yield of small dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Photoelectron emission is crucial to electric charging of dust particles around main-sequence stars and gas heating in various dusty environments. An estimate of the photoelectric processes contains an ill-defined parameter called the photoelectric quantum yield, which is the total number of electrons ejected from a dust particle per absorbed photon. Here we revisit the so-called small particle effect of photoelectron emission and provide an analytical model to estimate photoelectric quantum yields of small dust particles in sizes down to nanometers. We show that the small particle effect elevates the photoelectric quantum yields of nanoparticles up to by a factor of 103 for carbon, water ice, and organics, and a factor of 102 for silicate, silicon carbide, and iron. We conclude the surface curvature of the particles is a quantity of great importance to the small particle effect, unless the particles are submicrometers in radius or larger.

  12. On the photoelectric quantum yield of small dust particles

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Photoelectron emission is crucial to electric charging of dust particles around main-sequence stars and gas heating in various dusty environments. An estimate of the photoelectric processes contains an ill-defined parameter called the photoelectric quantum yield, which is the total number of electrons ejected from a dust particle per absorbed photon. Here we revisit the so-called small particle effect of photoelectron emission and provide an analytical model to estimate photoelectric quantum yields of small dust particles in sizes down to nanometers. We show that the small particle effect elevates the photoelectric quantum yields of nanoparticles up to by a factor of $10^3$ for carbon, water ice, and organics, and a factor of $10^2$ for silicate, silicon carbide, and iron. We conclude the surface curvature of the particles is a quantity of great importance to the small particle effect, unless the particles are submicrometers in radius or larger.

  13. Light propagation and fluorescence quantum yields in liquid scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, C.; Gramlich, B.; Wagner, S.

    2015-09-01

    For the simulation of the scintillation and Cherenkov light propagation in large liquid scintillator detectors a detailed knowledge about the absorption and emission spectra of the scintillator molecules is mandatory. Furthermore reemission probabilities and quantum yields of the scintillator components influence the light propagation inside the liquid. Absorption and emission properties are presented for liquid scintillators using 2,5-Diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 4-bis-(2-Methylstyryl)benzene (bis-MSB) as primary and secondary wavelength shifter. New measurements of the quantum yields for various aromatic molecules are shown.

  14. Light propagation and fluorescence quantum yields in liquid scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Buck, C; Wagner, S

    2015-01-01

    For the simulation of the scintillation and Cherenkov light propagation in large liquid scintillator detectors a detailed knowledge about the absorption and emission spectra of the scintillator molecules is mandatory. Furthermore reemission probabilities and quantum yields of the scintillator components influence the light propagation inside the liquid. Absorption and emission properties are presented for liquid scintillators using 2,5-Diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 4-bis-(2-Methylstyryl)benzene (bis-MSB) as primary and secondary wavelength shifter. New measurements of the quantum yields for various aromatic molecules are shown.

  15. Photosynthetic Quantum Yield Dynamics: From Photosystems to Leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogewoning, S.W.; Wientjes, E.; Douwstra, P.; Trouwborst, G.; Ieperen, van W.; Croce, R.; Harbinson, J.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the wavelength dependence of the quantum yield for CO2 fixation (a) and its acclimation to the growth-light spectrum are quantitatively addressed, combining in vivo physiological and in vitro molecular methods. Cucumber (Cucumis sativus) was grown under an artificial

  16. Photosynthetic Quantum Yield Dynamics : From Photosystems to Leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogewoning, Sander W.; Wientjes, Emilie; Douwstra, Peter; Trouwborst, Govert; van Ieperen, Wim; Croce, Roberta; Harbinson, Jeremy

    The mechanisms underlying the wavelength dependence of the quantum yield for CO2 fixation (alpha) and its acclimation to the growth-light spectrum are quantitatively addressed, combining in vivo physiological and in vitro molecular methods. Cucumber (Cucumis sativus) was grown under an artificial

  17. Fluorescence Quantum Yield Measurements of Fluorescent Proteins: A Laboratory Experiment for a Biochemistry or Molecular Biophysics Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Kathryn P.; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts…

  18. Relating quantum discord with the quantum dense coding capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin; Qiu, Liang, E-mail: lqiu@cumt.edu.cn; Li, Song; Zhang, Chi [China University of Mining and Technology, School of Sciences (China); Ye, Bin [China University of Mining and Technology, School of Information and Electrical Engineering (China)

    2015-01-15

    We establish the relations between quantum discord and the quantum dense coding capacity in (n + 1)-particle quantum states. A necessary condition for the vanishing discord monogamy score is given. We also find that the loss of quantum dense coding capacity due to decoherence is bounded below by the sum of quantum discord. When these results are restricted to three-particle quantum states, some complementarity relations are obtained.

  19. Introducing Relativity into Quantum Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wai-Kee; Blinder, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    It is not often realized by chemists that the special theory of relativity is behind several aspects of quantum chemistry. The Schrdinger equation itself is based on relations between space-time and energy-momentum four vectors. Electron spin is, of course, the most obvious manifestation of relativity. The chemistry of some heavy elements is…

  20. Introducing Relativity into Quantum Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wai-Kee; Blinder, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    It is not often realized by chemists that the special theory of relativity is behind several aspects of quantum chemistry. The Schrdinger equation itself is based on relations between space-time and energy-momentum four vectors. Electron spin is, of course, the most obvious manifestation of relativity. The chemistry of some heavy elements is…

  1. Theory of quantum fluctuations and the Onsager relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goderis, D.; Verbeure, A.; Vets, P. (Universiteit Leuven (Belgium))

    1989-09-01

    A microscopic model is constructed within the theory of normal fluctuations for quantum systems, yielding an irreversible dynamics satisfying the Onsager relations. The property of return to equilibrium and the principle of minimal entropy production are proved.

  2. Associativity relations in quantum cohomology

    OpenAIRE

    Kresch, Andrew

    1997-01-01

    We describe interdependencies among the quantum cohomology associativity relations. We strengthen the first reconstruction theorem of Kontsevich and Manin by identifying a subcollection of the associativity relations which implies the full system of WDVV equations. This provides a tool for identifying non-geometric solutions to WDVV.

  3. Potential Energy Surfaces and Quantum Yields for Photochromic Diarylethene Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Hatakeyama

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Photochromic diarylethenes (DAEs are among the most promising molecular switching systems for future molecular electronics. Numerous derivatives have been synthesized recently, and experimental quantum yields (QYs have been reported for two categories of them. Although the QY is one of the most important properties in various applications, it is also the most difficult property to predict before a molecule is actually synthesized. We have previously reported preliminary theoretical studies on what determines the QYs in both categories of DAE derivatives. Here, reflecting theoretical analyses of potential energy surfaces and recent experimental results, a rational explanation of the general guiding principle for QY design is presented for future molecular design.

  4. Relativistic Quantum Metrology: Exploiting relativity to improve quantum measurement technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmadi, Mehdi; Friis, Nicolai; Sabín, Carlos; Adesso, Gerardo; Fuentes, Ivette

    2013-01-01

    We present a framework for relativistic quantum metrology that is useful for both Earth-based and space-based technologies. Quantum metrology has been so far successfully applied to design precision instruments such as clocks and sensors which outperform classical devices by exploiting quantum properties. There are advanced plans to implement these and other quantum technologies in space, for instance Space-QUEST and Space Optical Clock projects intend to implement quantum communications and quantum clocks at regimes where relativity starts to kick in. However, typical setups do not take into account the effects of relativity on quantum properties. To include and exploit these effects, we introduce techniques for the application of metrology to quantum field theory (QFT). QFT properly incorporates quantum theory and relativity, in particular, at regimes where space-based experiments take place. This framework allows for high precision estimation of parameters that appear in QFT including proper times and acce...

  5. Modern Canonical Quantum General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, Thomas

    2008-11-01

    Preface; Notation and conventions; Introduction; Part I. Classical Foundations, Interpretation and the Canonical Quantisation Programme: 1. Classical Hamiltonian formulation of general relativity; 2. The problem of time, locality and the interpretation of quantum mechanics; 3. The programme of canonical quantisation; 4. The new canonical variables of Ashtekar for general relativity; Part II. Foundations of Modern Canonical Quantum General Relativity: 5. Introduction; 6. Step I: the holonomy-flux algebra [P]; 7. Step II: quantum-algebra; 8. Step III: representation theory of [A]; 9. Step IV: 1. Implementation and solution of the kinematical constraints; 10. Step V: 2. Implementation and solution of the Hamiltonian constraint; 11. Step VI: semiclassical analysis; Part III. Physical Applications: 12. Extension to standard matter; 13. Kinematical geometrical operators; 14. Spin foam models; 15. Quantum black hole physics; 16. Applications to particle physics and quantum cosmology; 17. Loop quantum gravity phenomenology; Part IV. Mathematical Tools and their Connection to Physics: 18. Tools from general topology; 19. Differential, Riemannian, symplectic and complex geometry; 20. Semianalytical category; 21. Elements of fibre bundle theory; 22. Holonomies on non-trivial fibre bundles; 23. Geometric quantisation; 24. The Dirac algorithm for field theories with constraints; 25. Tools from measure theory; 26. Elementary introduction to Gel'fand theory for Abelean C* algebras; 27. Bohr compactification of the real line; 28. Operatir -algebras and spectral theorem; 29. Refined algebraic quantisation (RAQ) and direct integral decomposition (DID); 30. Basics of harmonic analysis on compact Lie groups; 31. Spin network functions for SU(2); 32. + Functional analytical description of classical connection dynamics; Bibliography; Index.

  6. The relations between quantum coherence and quantum correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Pei, Pei; Mei, Di; Li, Chong

    2010-01-01

    We reexamine entanglement and quantum correlation from the point of their consanguineous quantum property, the coherence, and consider the quantum correlation as a kind of nonlocal coherence. We emphasize the importance of specifying the tensor product structure of the total state space before discussing quantum correlation. Utilizing off-diagonal elements of density matrix, a measure of quantum correlation for arbitrary dimension bipartite states is proposed. The relations between the proposed measure and others of quantum correlation are investigated with explicit examples. The close relation between nonlocal coherence and quantum correlation provides theory evidence to experimentally measure the bipartite quantum correlation by means of coherence, and indicates a developing way to measure quantum correlation for states with the presence of local coherence.

  7. Relativistic quantum metrology: exploiting relativity to improve quantum measurement technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Mehdi; Bruschi, David Edward; Sabín, Carlos; Adesso, Gerardo; Fuentes, Ivette

    2014-05-22

    We present a framework for relativistic quantum metrology that is useful for both Earth-based and space-based technologies. Quantum metrology has been so far successfully applied to design precision instruments such as clocks and sensors which outperform classical devices by exploiting quantum properties. There are advanced plans to implement these and other quantum technologies in space, for instance Space-QUEST and Space Optical Clock projects intend to implement quantum communications and quantum clocks at regimes where relativity starts to kick in. However, typical setups do not take into account the effects of relativity on quantum properties. To include and exploit these effects, we introduce techniques for the application of metrology to quantum field theory. Quantum field theory properly incorporates quantum theory and relativity, in particular, at regimes where space-based experiments take place. This framework allows for high precision estimation of parameters that appear in quantum field theory including proper times and accelerations. Indeed, the techniques can be applied to develop a novel generation of relativistic quantum technologies for gravimeters, clocks and sensors. As an example, we present a high precision device which in principle improves the state-of-the-art in quantum accelerometers by exploiting relativistic effects.

  8. Film quantum yields of EUV& ultra-high PAG photoresists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassanein, Elsayed; Higgins, Craig; Naulleau, Patrick; Matyi, Richard; Gallatin, Greg; Denbeaux, Gregory; Antohe, Alin; Thackery, Jim; Spear, Kathleen; Szmanda, Charles; Anderson, Christopher N.; Niakoula, Dimitra; Malloy, Matthew; Khurshid, Anwar; Montgomery, Cecilia; Piscani, Emil C.; Rudack, Andrew; Byers, Jeff; Ma, Andy; Dean, Kim; Brainard, Robert

    2008-01-10

    Base titration methods are used to determine C-parameters for three industrial EUV photoresist platforms (EUV-2D, MET-2D, XP5496) and twenty academic EUV photoresist platforms. X-ray reflectometry is used to measure the density of these resists, and leads to the determination of absorbance and film quantum yields (FQY). Ultrahigh levels ofPAG show divergent mechanisms for production of photo acids beyond PAG concentrations of 0.35 moles/liter. The FQY of sulfonium PAGs level off, whereas resists prepared with iodonium PAG show FQY s that increase beyond PAG concentrations of 0.35 moles/liter, reaching record highs of 8-13 acids generatedlEUV photons absorbed.

  9. Quantum information and general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Peres, A

    2004-01-01

    The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox (1935) is reexamined in the light of Shannon's information theory (1948). The EPR argument did not take into account that the observers' information was localized, like any other physical object. General relativity introduces new problems: there are horizons which act as one-way membranes for the propagation of quantum information, in particular black holes which act like sinks.

  10. Size effects in the quantum yield of Cd Te quantum dots for optimum fluorescence bioimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacinto, C.; Rocha, U.S. [Universidade Federal de Alagoas (UFAL), Maceio, AL (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Grupo de Fotonica e Fluidos Complexos; Maestro, L.M.; Garcia-Sole, J.; Jaque, D. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica de Materiales. Fluorescence Imaging Group

    2011-07-01

    those achievable when using CdSe-QDs. In this work, the size dependence of the fluorescence quantum yield of CdTe Quantum dots has been systematically investigated by Thermal Lens Spectroscopy. It has been found that optimum quantum yield is reached for 3.7 nm quantum dots. The presence of this optimum size has been corroborated by fluorescence experiments. Combination of quantum yield and fluorescence decay time measurements have concluded that the appearance of this optimum size emerges from the interplay between the frequency dependent radiative emission rate and the size dependent coupling strength between bulk exciton and surface trapping states. Our results open a new avenue in the search for new fluorescent 'multifunctional nanoprobes' for high resolution fluorescence imaging at the nanoscale. (author)

  11. Near-unity photoluminescence quantum yield in MoS₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amani, Matin; Lien, Der-Hsien; Kiriya, Daisuke; Xiao, Jun; Azcatl, Angelica; Noh, Jiyoung; Madhvapathy, Surabhi R; Addou, Rafik; KC, Santosh; Dubey, Madan; Cho, Kyeongjae; Wallace, Robert M; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau; Ager, Joel W; Zhang, Xiang; Yablonovitch, Eli; Javey, Ali

    2015-11-27

    Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides have emerged as a promising material system for optoelectronic applications, but their primary figure of merit, the room-temperature photoluminescence quantum yield (QY), is extremely low. The prototypical 2D material molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is reported to have a maximum QY of 0.6%, which indicates a considerable defect density. Here we report on an air-stable, solution-based chemical treatment by an organic superacid, which uniformly enhances the photoluminescence and minority carrier lifetime of MoS2 monolayers by more than two orders of magnitude. The treatment eliminates defect-mediated nonradiative recombination, thus resulting in a final QY of more than 95%, with a longest-observed lifetime of 10.8 ± 0.6 nanoseconds. Our ability to obtain optoelectronic monolayers with near-perfect properties opens the door for the development of highly efficient light-emitting diodes, lasers, and solar cells based on 2D materials.

  12. Quantum dot/plasmonic nanoparticle metachromophores with quantum yields that vary with excitation wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munechika, Keiko; Chen, Yeechi; Tillack, Andreas F; Kulkarni, Abhishek P; Jen-La Plante, Ilan; Munro, Andrea M; Ginger, David S

    2011-07-13

    Coupled plasmonic/chromophore systems are of interest in applications ranging from fluorescent biosensors to solar photovoltaics and photoelectrochemical cells because near-field coupling to metal nanostructures can dramatically alter the optical performance of nearby materials. We show that CdSe quantum dots (QDs) near single silver nanoprisms can exhibit photoluminescence lifetimes and quantum yields that depend on the excitation wavelength, in apparent violation of the Kasha-Vavilov rule. We attribute the variation in QD lifetime with excitation wavelength to the wavelength-dependent coupling of higher-order plasmon modes to different spatial subpopulations of nearby QDs. At the QD emission wavelength, these subpopulations are coupled to far-field radiation with varying efficiency by the nanoprism dipolar resonance. These results offer an easily accessible new route to design metachromophores with tailored optical properties.

  13. Near-unity quantum yields from chloride treated CdTe colloidal quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Robert C; Espinobarro-Velazquez, Daniel; Leontiadou, Marina A; Smith, Charles; Lewis, Edward A; Haigh, Sarah J; Li, Chen; Radtke, Hanna; Pengpad, Atip; Bondino, Federica; Magnano, Elena; Pis, Igor; Flavell, Wendy R; O'Brien, Paul; Binks, David J

    2015-04-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are promising materials for novel light sources and solar energy conversion. However, trap states associated with the CQD surface can produce non-radiative charge recombination that significantly reduces device performance. Here a facile post-synthetic treatment of CdTe CQDs is demonstrated that uses chloride ions to achieve near-complete suppression of surface trapping, resulting in an increase of photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) from ca. 5% to up to 97.2 ± 2.5%. The effect of the treatment is characterised by absorption and PL spectroscopy, PL decay, scanning transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This process also dramatically improves the air-stability of the CQDs: before treatment the PL is largely quenched after 1 hour of air-exposure, whilst the treated samples showed a PL QY of nearly 50% after more than 12 hours.

  14. Fluorescence quantum yield measurements of fluorescent proteins: a laboratory experiment for a biochemistry or molecular biophysics laboratory course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Kathryn P; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts absorbed photons into emitted photons and it is necessary to know for assessing what fluorescent protein is the most appropriate for a particular application. In this work, we have designed an upper-level, biochemistry laboratory experiment where students measure the fluorescence quantum yields of fluorescent proteins relative to a standard organic dye. Four fluorescent protein variants, enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), mCitrine, and mCherry, were used, however the methods described are useful for the characterization of any fluorescent protein or could be expanded to fluorescent quantum yield measurements of organic dye molecules. The laboratory is designed as a guided inquiry project and takes two, 4 hr laboratory periods. During the first day students design the experiment by selecting the excitation wavelength, choosing the standard, and determining the concentration needed for the quantum yield experiment that takes place in the second laboratory period. Overall, this laboratory provides students with a guided inquiry learning experience and introduces concepts of fluorescence biophysics into a biochemistry laboratory curriculum.

  15. High Quantum Yield Blue Emission from Lead-Free Inorganic Antimony Halide Perovskite Colloidal Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Yang, Ying; Deng, Hui; Farooq, Umar; Yang, Xiaokun; Khan, Jahangeer; Tang, Jiang; Song, Haisheng

    2017-09-26

    Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) of lead halide perovskite have recently received great attention owing to their remarkable performances in optoelectronic applications. However, their wide applications are hindered from toxic lead element, which is not environment- and consumer-friendly. Herein, we utilized heterovalent substitution of divalent lead (Pb(2+)) with trivalent antimony (Sb(3+)) to synthesize stable and brightly luminescent Cs3Sb2Br9 QDs. The lead-free, full-inorganic QDs were fabricated by a modified ligand-assisted reprecipitation strategy. A photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) was determined to be 46% at 410 nm, which was superior to that of other reported halide perovskite QDs. The PL enhancement mechanism was unraveled by surface composition derived quantum-well band structure and their large exciton binding energy. The Br-rich surface and the observed 530 meV exciton binding energy were proposed to guarantee the efficient radiative recombination. In addition, we can also tune the inorganic perovskite QD (Cs3Sb2X9) emission wavelength from 370 to 560 nm via anion exchange reactions. The developed full-inorganic lead-free Sb-perovskite QDs with high PLQY and stable emission promise great potential for efficient emission candidates.

  16. Quantum-coherent mixtures of causal relations

    CERN Document Server

    MacLean, Jean-Philippe W; Spekkens, Robert W; Resch, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the causal influences that hold among the parts of a system is critical both to explaining that system's natural behaviour and to controlling it through targeted interventions. In a quantum world, understanding causal relations is equally important, but the set of possibilities is far richer. The two basic ways in which a pair of time-ordered quantum systems may be causally related are by a cause-effect mechanism or by a common cause acting on both. Here, we show that it is possible to have a coherent mixture of these two possibilities. We realize such a nonclassical causal relation in a quantum optics experiment and derive a set of criteria for witnessing the coherence based on a quantum version of Berkson's paradox. The interplay of causality and quantum theory lies at the heart of challenging foundational puzzles, such as Bell's theorem and the search for quantum gravity, but could also provide a resource for novel quantum technologies.

  17. Determination of vis and NIR quantum yields of Nd{sup 3+}-activated garnets sensitized by Ce{sup 3+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Möller, S.; Hoffmann, A.; Knaut, D.; Flottmann, J.; Jüstel, T., E-mail: tj@fh-muenster.de

    2015-02-15

    One of the most important quantities to describe the efficiency of luminescent materials is the external photoluminescence quantum yield (ePLQY) which is defined as the ratio of emitted to absorbed photons and thus describes the conversion efficiency of a given phosphor. In optical spectroscopy two methods of determination are applied: The absolute measurement conducted in an integrating sphere and a relative measurement based on a reference material with a known quantum yield. So far both methods are only described for phosphors in the UV and visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum. By using Nd{sup 3+} sensitized and Ce{sup 3+} activated garnets with the general formula (Y,Lu){sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce{sup 3+},Nd{sup 3+} ((Y,Lu)AG:Ce,Nd) we developed a method for the determination of the quantum yield in the near-infrared region. Therefore samples of different compositions have been synthesized and spectroscopically characterized. Starting point of the determination of the overall quantum yield is the determination of the quantum yield of the Ce{sup 3+} emission in the visible range by well-established methods. For using the proportionality of emission integral to the quantum yield it is necessary to scale and combine the measured spectra (460–1000 nm on the vis detector, and 900–1500 nm on the NIR detector). Furthermore, the accuracy of the method was evaluated not only by statistic calculations comprising the propagation of uncertainty but also by using branching ratio data of Nd{sup 3+} given in literature to check the generated overall emission spectra. - Highlights: • Method for determining the external quantum efficiency in the NIR range. • Sensitization and dopant ratio optimization of (Y,Lu)AG:Nd{sup 3+} by Ce{sup 3+}. • Application of branching ratios for evaluation of experimental ePLQY.

  18. Quantum contextuality emerging from relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Jing-Ling; Wu, Chunfeng; Deng, Dong-Ling; Cabello, Adan; Kwek, L C; Oh, C H

    2012-01-01

    The quantum predictions for a single nonrelativistic spin-1/2 particle can be reproduced by noncontextual hidden variables. Here we show that quantum contextuality naturally emerges if relativistic effects are taken into account. Specifically, we show that the contextuality of a free relativistic electron and of a relativistic electron moving in a Coulomb potential (a relativistic hydrogen atom) can be observed through the violation of noncontextual inequalities. We discuss how to experimentally observe quantum contextuality on a free relativistic electron.

  19. Reduced Quantum General Relativity in Higher Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Glinka, Lukasz Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The higher dimensional Quantum General Relativity of a Riemannian manifold being an embedded space in a space-time being a Lorentzian manifold is investigated. The model of quantum geometrodynamics, based on the Wheeler-DeWitt equation reduced to a first order functional quantum evolution supplemented through an additional eigenequation for the scalar curvature, is formulated. Furthermore, making use of the objective quantum gravity and global one-dimensional conjecture, the general wave function beyond the Feynman path integral technique is derived. The resulting quantum gravity model creates the opportunity of potentially new theoretical and phenomenological applications for astrophysics, cosmology, and physics.

  20. Reciprocal relativity of noninertial frames: quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Low, Stephen G [4301 Avenue D, Austin, Texas, 78751 (United States)

    2007-04-06

    Noninertial transformations on time-position-momentum-energy space {l_brace}t, q, p, e{r_brace} with invariant Born-Green metric ds{sup 2} = -dt{sup 2} + 1/c{sup 2} dq{sup 2} + 1/b{sup 2} (dp{sup 2} = 1/c{sup 2} de{sup 2}) and the symplectic metric -de and dt + dp and dq are studied. This U 1,3) group of transformations contains the Lorentz group as the inertial special case and, in the limit of small forces and velocities, reduces to the expected Hamilton transformations leaving invariant the symplectic metric and the nonrelativistic line element ds{sup 2} -dt{sup 2}. The U(1,3) transformations bound relative velocities by c and relative forces by b. Spacetime is no longer an invariant subspace but is relative to noninertial observer frames. In the limit of b {yields} {infinity}, spacetime is invariant. Born was lead to the metric by a concept of reciprocity between position and momentum degrees of freedom and for this reason we call this reciprocal relativity. For large b, such effects will almost certainly only manifest in a quantum regime. Wigner showed that special relativistic quantum mechanics follows from the projective representations of the inhomogeneous Lorentz group. Projective representations of a Lie group are equivalent to the unitary representations of its central extension. The same method of projective representations for the inhomogeneous U(1,3) group is used to define the quantum theory in the noninertial case. The central extension of the inhomogeneous U(1,3) group is the cover of the quaplectic group Q(1,3) U(1,3) x{sub s} H(4), H(4) is the Weyl-Heisenberg group. The H(4) group, and the associated Heisenberg commutation relations central to quantum mechanics, results directly from requiring projective representations. A set of second-order wave equations result from the representations of the Casimir operators.

  1. Is quantum theory compatible with special relativity?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Bahrami; A Shafiee; M Saravani; M Golshani

    2013-03-01

    How a proposed quantum nonlocal phenomenon could be incompatible with the requirements of special relativity is studied. To show this, the least set of assumptions about the formalism and the interpretation of non-relativistic quantum theory is considered. Then, without any reference to the collapse assumption or any other stochastic processes, an experiment is proposed, involving two quantum systems, that interacted at an arbitrary time, with results which seem to be in conflict with requirements of special relativity.

  2. Super-relativity in the quantum theory

    CERN Document Server

    Leifer, P

    2007-01-01

    The relativity to the measuring device in quantum theory, i.e. the covariance of local dynamical variables relative transformations to moving quantum reference frame in Hilbert space, may be achieved only by the rejection of super-selection rule. In order to avoid the subjective nuance, I emphasis that the notion of "measurement" here, is nothing but the covariant differentiation procedure in the functional quantum phase space $CP(N-1)$, having pure objective sense of evolution. Transition to the local moving quantum reference frame leads to some particle-like solutions of quasi-linear field PDE in the dynamical space-time. Thereby, the functionally covariant quantum dynamics gives the perspective to unify the Einstein relativity and quantum principles which are obviously contradictable under the standard approaches.

  3. Quantum-coherent mixtures of causal relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Jean-Philippe W.; Ried, Katja; Spekkens, Robert W.; Resch, Kevin J.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the causal influences that hold among parts of a system is critical both to explaining that system's natural behaviour and to controlling it through targeted interventions. In a quantum world, understanding causal relations is equally important, but the set of possibilities is far richer. The two basic ways in which a pair of time-ordered quantum systems may be causally related are by a cause-effect mechanism or by a common-cause acting on both. Here we show a coherent mixture of these two possibilities. We realize this nonclassical causal relation in a quantum optics experiment and derive a set of criteria for witnessing the coherence based on a quantum version of Berkson's effect, whereby two independent causes can become correlated on observation of their common effect. The interplay of causality and quantum theory lies at the heart of challenging foundational puzzles, including Bell's theorem and the search for quantum gravity. PMID:28485394

  4. High quantum yield graphene quantum dots decorated TiO2 nanotubes for enhancing photocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ailan; Xie, Haolong; Xu, Xinmei; Zhang, Yangyu; Wen, Shengwu; Cui, Yifan

    2016-07-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) with high quantum yield (about 23.6% at an excitation wavelength of 320 nm) and GQDs/TiO2 nanotubes (GQDs/TiO2 NTs) composites were achieved by a simple hydrothermal method at low temperature. Photoluminescence characterization showed that the GQDs exhibited the down-conversion PL features at excitation from 300 to 420 nm and up-conversion photoluminescence in the range of 600-800 nm. The photocatalytic activity of prepared GQDs/TiO2 NTs composites on the degradation of methyl orange (MO) was significantly enhanced compared with that of pure TiO2 nanotubes (TiO2 NTs). For the composites coupling with 1.5%, 2.5% and 3.5% GQDs, the degradation of MO after 20 min irradiation under UV-vis light irradiation (λ = 380-780 nm) were 80.52%, 94.64% and 51.91%, respectively, which are much higher than that of pure TiO2 NTs (35.41%). It was inferred from the results of characterization that the improved photocatalytic activity of the GQDs/TiO2 NTs composites was attributed to the synergetic effect of up-conversion properties of the GQDs, enhanced visible light absorption and efficient separation of photogenerated electron-holes of the GQDs/TiO2 composite.

  5. Gradient CdSe/CdS Quantum Dots with Room Temperature Biexciton Unity Quantum Yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasilowski, Michel; Spinicelli, Piernicola; Patriarche, Gilles; Dubertret, Benoît

    2015-06-10

    Auger recombination is a major limitation for the fluorescent emission of quantum dots (QDs). It is the main source of QDs fluorescence blinking at the single-particle level. At high-power excitation, when several charge carriers are formed inside a QD, Auger becomes more efficient and severely decreases the quantum yield (QY) of multiexcitons. This limits the efficiency and the use of colloidal QDs in applications where intense light output is required. Here, we present a new generation of thick-shell CdSe/CdS QDs with dimensions >40 nm and a composition gradient between the core and the shell that exhibits 100% QY for the emission of both the monoexciton and the biexciton in air and at room temperature for all the QDs we have observed. The fluorescence emission of these QDs is perfectly Poissonian at the single-particle level at different excitation levels and temperatures, from 30 to 300 K. In these QDs, the emission of high-order (>2) multiexcitons is quite efficient, and we observe white light emission at the single-QD level when high excitation power is used. These gradient thick shell QDs confirm the suppression of Auger recombination in gradient core/shell structures and help further establish the colloidal QDs with a gradient shell as a very stable source of light even under high excitation.

  6. Some applications of uncertainty relations in quantum information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, A. S.; Pramanik, T.

    2016-08-01

    We discuss some applications of various versions of uncertainty relations for both discrete and continuous variables in the context of quantum information theory. The Heisenberg uncertainty relation enables demonstration of the Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen (EPR) paradox. Entropic uncertainty relations (EURs) are used to reveal quantum steering for non-Gaussian continuous variable states. EURs for discrete variables are studied in the context of quantum memory where fine-graining yields the optimum lower bound of uncertainty. The fine-grained uncertainty relation is used to obtain connections between uncertainty and the nonlocality of retrieval games for bipartite and tripartite systems. The Robertson-Schrödinger (RS) uncertainty relation is applied for distinguishing pure and mixed states of discrete variables.

  7. Conformal general relativity contains the quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Bonal, R; Cardenas, R

    2000-01-01

    Based on the de Broglie-Bohm relativistic quantum theory of motion we show that the conformal formulation of general relativity, being linked with a Weyl-integrable geometry, may implicitly contain the quantum effects of matter. In this context the Mach's principle is discussed.

  8. Controlled fabrication of individual silicon quantum rods yielding high intensity, polarized light emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhn, Benjamin; Valenta, Jan; Linnros, Jan

    2009-12-01

    Elongated silicon quantum dots (also referred to as rods) were fabricated using a lithographic process which reliably yields sufficient numbers of emitters. These quantum rods are perfectly aligned and the vast majority are spatially separated well enough to enable single-dot spectroscopy. Not only do they exhibit extraordinarily high linear polarization with respect to both absorption and emission, but the silicon rods also appear to luminesce much more brightly than their spherical counterparts. Significantly increased quantum efficiency and almost unity degree of linear polarization render these quantum rods perfect candidates for numerous applications.

  9. Functional methods underlying classical mechanics, relativity and quantum theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryukov, A.

    2013-04-01

    The paper investigates the physical content of a recently proposed mathematical framework that unifies the standard formalisms of classical mechanics, relativity and quantum theory. In the framework states of a classical particle are identified with Dirac delta functions. The classical space is "made" of these functions and becomes a submanifold in a Hilbert space of states of the particle. The resulting embedding of the classical space into the space of states is highly non-trivial and accounts for numerous deep relations between classical and quantum physics and relativity. One of the most striking results is the proof that the normal probability distribution of position of a macroscopic particle (equivalently, position of the corresponding delta state within the classical space submanifold) yields the Born rule for transitions between arbitrary quantum states.

  10. A general quantitative pH sensor developed with dicyandiamide N-doped high quantum yield graphene quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhu Lian; Gao, Ming Xuan; Wang, Ting Ting; Wan, Xiao Yan; Zheng, Lin Ling; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2014-04-07

    A general quantitative pH sensor for environmental and intracellular applications was developed by the facile hydrothermal preparation of dicyandiamide (DCD) N-doped high quantum yield (QY) graphene quantum dots (GQDs) using citric acid (CA) as the carbon source. The obtained N-doped GQDs have excellent photoluminesence (PL) properties with a relatively high QY of 36.5%, suggesting that N-doped chemistry could promote the QY of carbon nanomaterials. The possible mechanism for the formation of the GQDs involves the CA self-assembling into a nanosheet structure through intermolecular H-bonding at the initial stage of the reaction, and then the pure graphene core with many function groups formed through the dehydration between the carboxyl and hydroxyl of the intermolecules under hydrothermal conditions. These N-doped GQDs have low toxicity, and are photostable and pH-sensitive between 1.81 to 8.96, giving a general pH sensor with a wide range of applications from real water to intracellular contents.

  11. On the Relation Between Quantum Computational Speedup and Retrocausality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Castagnoli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the reason for the quantum speedup (quantum algorithms require fewer computation steps than their classical counterparts. We extend the representation of the quantum algorithm to the process of setting the problem, namely choosing the function computed by the black box. The initial measurement selects a setting at random, Bob (the problem setter unitarily changes it into the desired one. With reference to the observer dependent quantum states of relational quantum mechanics, this representation is with respect to Bob and any external observer, it cannot be with respect to Alice (the problem solver. It would tell her the function computed by the black box, which to her should be hidden. To Alice, the projection of the quantum state due to the initial measurement is retarded at the end of her problem solving action, so that the algorithm input state remains one of complete ignorance of the setting. By black box computations, she unitarily sends it into the output state that, for each possible setting, encodes the corresponding solution, acquired by the final measurement. Mathematically, we can ascribe to the final measurement the selection of any fraction R of the random outcome of the initial measurement. This projects the input state to Alice on one of lower entropy where she knows the corresponding fraction of the problem setting. Given the appropriate value of R, the quantum algorithm is a sum over classical histories in each of which Alice, knowing in advance one of the R-th parts of the setting, performs the black box computations still required to identify the solution. Given a quantum algorithm, this retrocausality model provides the value of R that explains its speed up; in the major quantum algorithms, R is 1/2 or slightly above it. Conversely, given the problem, R=1/2 always yields the order of magnitude of the number of black box computations required to solve it in an optimal quantum way.Quanta 2016; 5: 34–52.

  12. Beyond Quantum Mechanics and General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Gregori, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    In this note I present the main ideas of my proposal about the theoretical framework that could underlie, and therefore "unify", Quantum Mechanics and Relativity, and I briefly summarize the implications and predictions.

  13. SU-E-T-191: First Principle Calculation of Quantum Yield in Photodynamic Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abolfath, R; Guo, F; Chen, Z; Nath, R [Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We present a first-principle method to calculate the spin transfer efficiency in oxygen induced by any photon fields especially in MeV energy range. The optical pumping is mediated through photosensitizers, e.g., porphyrin and/or ensemble of quantum dots. Methods: Under normal conditions, oxygen molecules are in the relatively non-reactive triplet state. In the presence of certain photosensitizer compounds such as porphyrins, electromagnetic radiation of specific wavelengths can excite oxygen to highly reactive singlet state. With selective uptake of photosensitizers by certain malignant cells, photon irradiation of phosensitized tumors can lead to selective killing of cancer cells. This is the basis of photodynamic therapy (PDT). Despite several attempts, PDT has not been clinically successful except in limited superficial cancers. Many parameters such as photon energy, conjugation with quantum dots etc. can be potentially combined with PDT in order to extend the role of PDT in cancer management. The key quantity for this optimization is the spin transfer efficiency in oxygen by any photon field. The first principle calculation model presented here, is an attempt to fill this need. We employ stochastic density matrix description of the quantum jumps and the rate equation methods in quantum optics based on Markov/Poisson processes and calculate time evolution of the population of the optically pumped singlet oxygen. Results: The results demonstrate the feasibility of our model in showing the dependence of the optical yield in generating spin-singlet oxygen on the experimental conditions. The adjustable variables can be tuned to maximize the population of the singlet oxygen hence the efficacy of the photodynamic therapy. Conclusion: The present model can be employed to fit and analyze the experimental data and possibly to assist researchers in optimizing the experimental conditions in photodynamic therapy.

  14. New commutation relations for quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Soo, Chopin

    2016-01-01

    A new set of fundamental commutation relations for quantum gravity is presented. The basic variables are the eight components of the unimodular part of the spatial dreibein and eight SU(3) generators which correspond to Klauder's momentric variables. The commutation relations are not canonical, but they have well defined group theoretical meanings. All fundamental entities are dimensionless; and quantum wave functionals are preferentially selected to be in the dreibein representation.

  15. Unitary Quantum Relativity - (Work in Progress)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, David Ritz

    2016-12-01

    A quantum universe is expressed as a finite unitary relativistic quantum computer network. Its addresses are subject to quantum superposition as well as its memory. It has no exact mathematical model. It Its Hilbert space of input processes is also a Clifford algebra with a modular architecture of many ranks. A fundamental fermion is a quantum computer element whose quantum address belongs to the rank below. The least significant figures of its address define its spin and flavor. The most significant figures of it adress define its orbital variables. Gauging arises from the same quantification as space-time. This blurs star images only slightly, but perhaps measurably. General relativity is an approximation that splits nature into an emptiness with a high symmetry that is broken by a filling of lower symmetry. Action principles result from self-organization pf the vacuum.

  16. Unitary Quantum Relativity. (Work in Progress)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, David Ritz

    2017-01-01

    A quantum universe is expressed as a finite unitary relativistic quantum computer network. Its addresses are subject to quantum superposition as well as its memory. It has no exact mathematical model. It Its Hilbert space of input processes is also a Clifford algebra with a modular architecture of many ranks. A fundamental fermion is a quantum computer element whose quantum address belongs to the rank below. The least significant figures of its address define its spin and flavor. The most significant figures of it adress define its orbital variables. Gauging arises from the same quantification as space-time. This blurs star images only slightly, but perhaps measurably. General relativity is an approximation that splits nature into an emptiness with a high symmetry that is broken by a filling of lower symmetry. Action principles result from self-organization pf the vacuum.

  17. Special relativity at the quantum scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Pui K

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that the space-time structure as described by the theory of special relativity is a macroscopic manifestation of a more fundamental quantum structure (pre-geometry). Efforts to quantify this idea have come mainly from the area of abstract quantum logic theory. Here we present a preliminary attempt to develop a quantum formulation of special relativity based on a model that retains some geometric attributes. Our model is Feynman's "checker-board" trajectory for a 1-D relativistic free particle. We use this model to guide us in identifying (1) the quantum version of the postulates of special relativity and (2) the appropriate quantum "coordinates". This model possesses a useful feature that it admits an interpretation both in terms of paths in space-time and in terms of quantum states. Based on the quantum version of the postulates, we derive a transformation rule for velocity. This rule reduces to the Einstein's velocity-addition formula in the macroscopic limit and reveals an interesting aspect of time. The 3-D case, time-dilation effect, and invariant interval are also discussed in term of this new formulation. This is a preliminary investigation; some results are derived, while others are interesting observations at this point.

  18. Phosphorescence quantum yield determination with time-gated fluorimeter and Tb(III)-acetylacetonate as luminescence reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penzkofer, A., E-mail: alfons.penzkofer@physik.uni-regensburg.de [Fakultät für Physik, Universität Regensburg, Universitätsstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► Procedure for absolute phosphorescence quantum yield measurement is described. ► Experimental setup for absolute luminescence quantum yield standard calibration. ► Tb(acac){sub 3} proposed as phosphorescence quantum yield reference standard. ► Luminescence quantum yield of Tb(acac){sub 3} in cyclohexane measured. ► Luminescence lifetime of Tb(acac){sub 3} in cyclohexane measured. - Abstract: Phosphorescence quantum yield measurements of fluorescent and phosphorescent samples require the use of time-gated fluorimeters in order to discriminate against the fluorescence contribution. As reference standard a non-fluorescent luminescent compound is needed for absolute phosphorescence quantum yield determination. For this purpose the luminescence behavior of the rare earth chelate terbium(III)-acetylacetonate (Tb(acac){sub 3}) was studied (determination of luminescence quantum yield and luminescence lifetime). The luminescence quantum yield of Tb(acac){sub 3} was determined by using an external light source and operating the fluorimeter in chemo/bioluminescence mode with a fluorescent dye (rhodamine 6G in methanol) as reference standard. A procedure is developed for absolute luminescence (phosphorescence) quantum yield determination of samples under investigation with a time-gated fluorimeter using a non-fluorescent luminescent compound of known luminescence quantum yield and luminescence lifetime.

  19. Preparation of carbon quantum dots with a high quantum yield and the application in labeling bovine serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Pengpeng; Zhang, Changchang; Liu, Xiang, E-mail: liuxiang@ahut.edu.cn; Cui, Ping, E-mail: cokecp@sohu.com

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Cheap carbon quantum dots (CQDs) with a high quantum yield were prepared. • The preparation process and surface functionalization on CQDs are rather facile. • Such functionalized CQDs can be attached to BSA covalently. • This predicts that some biomolecules can be labeled by the fluorescent CQDs. - Abstract: An economic and green approach of manufacturing carbon quantum dots (CQDs) with a high quantum yield (denoted with HQY-CQDs) and the application in labeling bovine serum albumin (BSA) were described in detail in this work. Firstly, the cheap resources of citric acid and glycine were pyrolysed in drying oven for preparing the CQDs. Then the product was immersed in tetrahydrofuran for 8 h. HQY-CQDs were obtained by removing tetrahydrofuran from the supernate and were evaluated that they possessed a much higher quantum yield compared with that without dealing with tetrahydrofuran and a wonderful photo-bleaching resistance. Such HQY-CQDs could be functionalized by N-hydroxysuccinimide and successively combined with BSA covalently. Thus fluorescent labeling on BSA was realized. The HQY-CQDs were demonstrated with transmission electron microscopy and the chemical modification with N-hydroxysuccinimide was proved by infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectra. Labeling BSA with the HQY-CQDs was confirmed by gel electrophoresis and fluorescence imaging.

  20. Morphological effects in the quantum yield of cesium iodide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, J. [Ecole Politechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). DP-IPA PH-Ecublens; Barbo, F. [Sincrotrone Trieste SpA, Padriciano 99, 34012 Trieste (Italy); Bertolo, M. [Sincrotrone Trieste SpA, Padriciano 99, 34012 Trieste (Italy); Bianco, A. [Sincrotrone Trieste SpA, Padriciano 99, 34012 Trieste (Italy); Braem, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Div. Particle Physics Experiments; Cerasari, S. [Sincrotrone Trieste SpA, Padriciano 99, 34012 Trieste (Italy); Coluzza, C. [Ecole Politechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). DP-IPA PH-Ecublens; Dell`Orto, T. [Ecole Politechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). DP-IPA PH-Ecublens; Fontana, S. [Sincrotrone Trieste SpA, Padriciano 99, 34012 Trieste (Italy); Margaritondo, G. [Ecole Politechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). DP-IPA PH-Ecublens; Nappi, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bari (Italy); Paic, G. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Div. Particle Physics Experiments; Piuz, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Div. Particle Physics Experiments; Sanjines, R. [Ecole Politechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). DP-IPA PH-Ecublens; Scognetti, T. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bari (Italy); Sgobba, S. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Div. Particle Physics Experiments

    1995-07-15

    We demonstrated that polycrystalline cesium iodide (CsI) on large area Ni/Au coated printed board provides a quantum efficiency (QE) higher by a factor of 2 than the films deposited on the standard Cu/Au printed circuits. This is the most important result of the present systematic study of the QE lateral inhomogeneity for CsI on different substrates. We found a strong correlation between the QE lateral variation and the morphological homogeneity of the films. The QE was measured by UV photoelectron emission microscopy and spatially resolved X-ray photoemission, and the morphology studies were performed by secondary electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy. (orig.).

  1. The Relation between Classical and Quantum Electrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Bacelar Valente

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum electrodynamics presents intrinsic limitations in the description of physical processes that make it impossible to recover from it the type of description we have in classical electrodynamics. Hence one cannot consider classical electrodynamics as reducing to quantum electrodynamics and being recovered from it by some sort of limiting procedure. Quantum electrodynamics has to be seen not as an more fundamental theory, but as an upgrade of classical electrodynamics, which permits an extension of classical theory to the description of phenomena that, while being related to the conceptual framework of the classical theory, cannot be addressed from the classical theory.

  2. Quantum Yield Measurements of Fluorophores in Lipid Bilayers Using a Plasmonic Nanocavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Falk; Ruhlandt, Daja; Gregor, Ingo; Enderlein, Jörg; Chizhik, Alexey I

    2017-03-20

    Precise knowledge of the quantum yield is important for many fluorescence-spectroscopic techniques, for example, for Förster resonance energy transfer. However, to measure it for emitters in a complex environment and at low concentrations is far from being trivial. Using a plasmonic nanocavity, we measure the absolute quantum yield value of lipid-conjugated dyes incorporated into a supported lipid bilayer. We show that for both hydrophobic and hydrophilic molecules the quantum yield of dyes inside the lipid bilayer strongly differs from its value in aqueous solution. This finding is of particular importance for all fluorescence-spectroscopic studies involving lipid bilayers, such as protein-protein or protein-lipid interactions in membranes or direct fluorescence-spectroscopic measurements of membrane physical properties.

  3. Analytical mechanics for relativity and quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Johns, Oliver Davis

    2011-01-01

    Analytical Mechanics for Relativity and Quantum Mechanics is an innovative and mathematically sound treatment of the foundations of analytical mechanics and the relation of classical mechanics to relativity and quantum theory. It is intended for use at the introductory graduate level. A distinguishing feature of the book is its integration of special relativity into teaching of classical mechanics. After a thorough review of the traditional theory, Part II of the book introduces extended Lagrangian and Hamiltonian methods that treat time as a transformable coordinate rather than the fixed parameter of Newtonian physics. Advanced topics such as covariant Langrangians and Hamiltonians, canonical transformations, and Hamilton-Jacobi methods are simplified by the use of this extended theory. And the definition of canonical transformation no longer excludes the Lorenz transformation of special relativity. This is also a book for those who study analytical mechanics to prepare for a critical exploration of quantum...

  4. Quantum yield of photosynthesis in the Baltic: a new mathematical expression for remote sensing applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Woźniak

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Statistical relationships between the quantum yield of photosynthesis Φ and selected environmental factors in the Baltic have been established on the basis of a large quantity of empirical data. The model formula is the product of the theoreticalmaximum quantum yield ΦMAX = 0.125 atomC quantum-1 and five dimensionless factors fi taking values from 0 do 1:Φ = ΦMAX fa fΔ fc(Ca(0 fc(PARinh fE,t.To a sufficiently good approximation, each of these factors fi appears to be dependent on one or at most two environmental factors, such as temperature, underwater irradiance, surface concentration of chlorophyll a, absorption properties of phytoplankton and optical depth. These dependences have been determined for Baltic Case 2 waters. The quantum yield Φ, calculated from known values of these environmental factors, is then applicable in the model algorithmfor the remote sensing of Baltic primary production. The statistical error of the approximate quantum yields Φ is 62%.

  5. Photolysis quantum yield measurements in the near-UV; a critical analysis of 1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl photochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrie, John E T; Kaplan, Jack H; Forbush, Biff; Ogden, David C; Trentham, David R

    2016-05-11

    The photolysis quantum yield, Qp, of 1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl phosphate (caged Pi) measured in the near-UV (342 nm peak with 60 nm half-bandwidth) is 0.53 and is based on results reported in 1978 (Biochemistry, 17, 1929-1935). This article amplifies methodology for determining that Qp in view of different recent estimates. Some general principles together with other examples relating to measurement of Qp values are discussed together with their relevance to biological research.

  6. Uncertainty relations and approximate quantum error correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renes, Joseph M.

    2016-09-01

    The uncertainty principle can be understood as constraining the probability of winning a game in which Alice measures one of two conjugate observables, such as position or momentum, on a system provided by Bob, and he is to guess the outcome. Two variants are possible: either Alice tells Bob which observable she measured, or he has to furnish guesses for both cases. Here I derive uncertainty relations for both, formulated directly in terms of Bob's guessing probabilities. For the former these relate to the entanglement that can be recovered by action on Bob's system alone. This gives an explicit quantum circuit for approximate quantum error correction using the guessing measurements for "amplitude" and "phase" information, implicitly used in the recent construction of efficient quantum polar codes. I also find a relation on the guessing probabilities for the latter game, which has application to wave-particle duality relations.

  7. Investigating energy partitioning during photosynthesis using an expanded quantum yield convention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Tae Kyu; Avenson, Thomas J.; Peers, Graham; Li, Zhirong; Dall'Osto, Luca; Bassi, Roberto; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2009-02-01

    In higher plants, regulation of excess absorbed light is essential for their survival and fitness, as it enables avoidance of a build up of singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species. Regulation processes (known as non-photochemical quenching; NPQ) can be monitored by steady-state fluorescence on intact plant leaves. Pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) measurements of chlorophyll a fluorescence have been used for over 20 years to evaluate the amount of NPQ and photochemistry (PC). Recently, a quantum yield representation of NPQ ( ΦNPQ), which incorporates a variable fraction of open reaction centers, was proposed by Hendrickson et al. [L. Hendrickson, R.T. Furbank, W.S. Chow, Photosynth. Res. 82 (2004) 73]. In this work we extend the quantum yield approach to describe the yields of reversible energy-dependent quenching ( ΦqE), state transitions to balance PC between photosystems II and I ( ΦqT), and photoinhibition quenching associated with damaged reaction centers ( ΦqI). We showed the additivity of the various quantum yield components of NPQ through experiments on wild-type and npq1 strains of Arabidopsis thaliana. The quantum yield approach enables comparison of ΦqE with data from a variety of techniques used to investigate the mechanism of qE. We showed that ΦqE for a series of A. thaliana genotypes scales linearly with the magnitude of zeaxanthin cation formation, suggesting that charge-transfer quenching is largely responsible for qE in plants.

  8. Relating quantum coherence and correlations with entropy-based measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Li; Yue, Qiu-Ling; Yu, Chao-Hua; Gao, Fei; Qin, Su-Juan

    2017-09-21

    Quantum coherence and quantum correlations are important quantum resources for quantum computation and quantum information. In this paper, using entropy-based measures, we investigate the relationships between quantum correlated coherence, which is the coherence between subsystems, and two main kinds of quantum correlations as defined by quantum discord as well as quantum entanglement. In particular, we show that quantum discord and quantum entanglement can be well characterized by quantum correlated coherence. Moreover, we prove that the entanglement measure formulated by quantum correlated coherence is lower and upper bounded by the relative entropy of entanglement and the entanglement of formation, respectively, and equal to the relative entropy of entanglement for all the maximally correlated states.

  9. Control of the external photoluminescent quantum yield of emitters coupled to nanoantenna phased arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Ke; Verschuuren, Marc A. [Philips Research Laboratories, High Tech Campus 4, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lozano, Gabriel [Center for Nanophotonics, FOM Institute AMOLF, c/o Philips Research Laboratories, High Tech Campus 4, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Gómez Rivas, Jaime, E-mail: J.Gomez@amolf.nl [Center for Nanophotonics, FOM Institute AMOLF, c/o Philips Research Laboratories, High Tech Campus 4, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); COBRA Research Institute, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2015-08-21

    Optical losses in metals represent the largest limitation to the external quantum yield of emitters coupled to plasmonic antennas. These losses can be at the emission wavelength, but they can be more important at shorter wavelengths, i.e., at the excitation wavelength of the emitters, where the conductivity of metals is usually lower. We present accurate measurements of the absolute external photoluminescent quantum yield of a thin layer of emitting material deposited over a periodic nanoantenna phased array. Emission and absorptance measurements of the sample are performed using a custom-made setup including an integrating sphere and variable angle excitation. The measurements reveal a strong dependence of the external quantum yield on the angle at which the optical field excites the sample. Such behavior is attributed to the coupling between far-field illumination and near-field excitation mediated by the collective resonances supported by the array. Numerical simulations confirm that the inherent losses associated with the metal can be greatly reduced by selecting an optimum angle of illumination, which boosts the light conversion efficiency in the emitting layer. This combined experimental and numerical characterization of the emission from plasmonic arrays reveals the need to carefully design the illumination to achieve the maximum external quantum yield.

  10. Light dependence of quantum yields for PSII charge separation and oxygen evolution in eucaryotic algae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flameling, I.A.; Kromkamp, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum yields of photosystem II (PSII) charge separation (Phi(P)) and oxygen production (Phi(O2)) were determined by simultaneous measurements of oxygen production and variable fluorescence in four different aquatic microalgae representing three different taxonomic groups: the freshwater alga

  11. Variations in fluorescence quantum yield of basic fuchsin with silver nanoparticles prepared by femtosecond laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathrose, Bini; Sahira, H; Nampoori, V P N; Radhakrishnan, P; Mujeeb, A

    2014-07-15

    Nano structured noble metals have very important applications in diverse fields such as photovoltaics, catalysis, electronic and magnetic devices, etc. In the present work, the application of dual beam thermal lens technique is employed for the determination of the absolute fluorescence quantum yield of the triaminotriphenylmethane dye, basic fuchsin in the presence of silver sol is studied. Silver sol is prepared by femtosecond laser ablation. It is observed that the presence of silver sol decreases the fluorescence quantum efficiency. The observed results are in line with the conclusion that the reduction in quantum yield in the quenching region is essentially due to the non-radiative relaxation of the absorbed energy. It is also observed that the presence of silver sol enhances the thermal lens signal which makes its detection easier at any concentration.

  12. Genomic Distribution of Quantitative Trait Loci for Yield and Yield-related Traits in Common Wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Yi Zhang; Dong-Cheng Liu; Xiao-Li Guo; Wen-Long Yang; Jia-Zhu Sun; Dao-Wen Wang; Aimin Zhang

    2010-01-01

    A major objective of quantitative trait locus(QTL)studies is to find genes/markers that can be used in breeding programs via marker assisted selection(MAS).We surveyed the QTLs for yield and yield related traits and their genomic distributions in common wheat(Triticum aestivum L.)in the available published reports.We then carried out a meta-QTL(MQTL)analysis to identify the major and consistent QTLs for these traits.In total,55 MQTLs were identified,of which 12 significant MQTLs were located on wheat chromosomes 1A,1B,2A,2D,3B,4A,4B,4D and 5A.Our study showed that the genetic control of yield and its components in common wheat involved the important genes such as Rht and Vrn.Furthermore,several significant MQTLs were found in the chromosomal regions corresponding to several rice genomic locations containing important QTLs for yield related traits.Our results demonstrate that meta-QTL analysis is a powerful tool for confirming the major and stable QTLs and refining their chromosomal positions in common wheat,which may be useful for improving the MAS efficiency of yield related traits.

  13. Machine learning with quantum relative entropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuda, Koji [Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Spemannstr. 38, Tuebingen, 72076 (Germany)], E-mail: koji.tsuda@tuebingen.mpg.de

    2009-12-01

    Density matrices are a central tool in quantum physics, but it is also used in machine learning. A positive definite matrix called kernel matrix is used to represent the similarities between examples. Positive definiteness assures that the examples are embedded in an Euclidean space. When a positive definite matrix is learned from data, one has to design an update rule that maintains the positive definiteness. Our update rule, called matrix exponentiated gradient update, is motivated by the quantum relative entropy. Notably, the relative entropy is an instance of Bregman divergences, which are asymmetric distance measures specifying theoretical properties of machine learning algorithms. Using the calculus commonly used in quantum physics, we prove an upperbound of the generalization error of online learning.

  14. Soybean yield in relation to distance from the Itaipu reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Faria, Rogério Teixeira; Junior, Ruy Casão; Werner, Simone Silmara; Junior, Luiz Antônio Zanão; Hoogenboom, Gerrit

    2016-07-01

    Crops close to small water bodies may exhibit changes in yield if the water mass causes significant changes in the microclimate of areas near the reservoir shoreline. The scientific literature describes this effect as occurring gradually, with higher intensity in the sites near the shoreline and decreasing intensity with distance from the reservoir. Experiments with two soybean cultivars were conducted during four crop seasons to evaluate soybean yield in relation to distance from the Itaipu reservoir and determine the effect of air temperature and water availability on soybean crop yield. Fifteen experimental sites were distributed in three transects perpendicular to the Itaipu reservoir, covering an area at approximately 10 km from the shoreline. The yield gradient between the site closest to the reservoir and the sites farther away in each transect did not show a consistent trend, but varied as a function of distance, crop season, and cultivar. This finding indicates that the Itaipu reservoir does not affect the yield of soybean plants grown within approximately 10 km from the shoreline. In addition, the variation in yield among the experimental sites was not attributed to thermal conditions because the temperature was similar within transects. However, the crop water availability was responsible for higher differences in yield among the neighboring experimental sites related to water stress caused by spatial variability in rainfall, especially during the soybean reproductive period in January and February.

  15. Connecting and unmasking relativity and quantum theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, de W.L.; Willigenburg, van L.G.

    2015-01-01

    The answer lies right in front of us, but we refuse to see it. Both relativity and quantum theory, the two pillars of fundamental physics, are modified in this paper to make them also explain the physical phenomena they describe. With this explanation, all current inconsistencies between the two van

  16. From General Relativity to Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Rovelli, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    In general relativity (GR), spacetime geometry is no longer just a background arena but a physical and dynamical entity with its own degrees of freedom. We present an overview of approaches to quantum gravity in which this central feature of GR is at the forefront. However, the short distance dynamics in the quantum theory are quite different from those of GR and classical spacetimes and gravitons emerge only in a suitable limit. Our emphasis is on communicating the key strategies, the main results and open issues. In the spirit of this volume, we focus on a few avenues that have led to the most significant advances over the past 2-3 decades.

  17. Quantum gauge freedom in very special relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Sudhaker, E-mail: sudhakerupadhyay@gmail.com [Centre for Theoretical Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur-721302, West Bengal (India); Panigrahi, Prasanta K., E-mail: pprasanta@iiserkol.ac.in [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Kolkata, Mohanpur 741246, West Bengal (India)

    2017-02-15

    We demonstrate Yokoyama gaugeon formalism for the Abelian one-form gauge (Maxwell) as well as for Abelian two-form gauge theory in the very special relativity (VSR) framework. In VSR scenario, the extended action due to introduction of gaugeon fields also possesses form invariance under quantum gauge transformations. It is observed that the gaugeon field together with gauge field naturally acquire mass, which is different from the conventional Higgs mechanism. The quantum gauge transformation implements a shift in gauge parameter. Further, we analyze the BRST symmetric gaugeon formalism in VSR which embeds only one subsidiary condition rather than two.

  18. Quantum Gauge Freedom in Very Special Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Upadhyay, Sudhaker

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate Yokoyama gaugeon formalism for the Abelian one-form gauge (Maxwell) as well as for Abelian two-form gauge theory in the very special relativity (VSR) framework. In VSR scenario, the extended action due to introduction of gaugeon fields also possesses form invariance under quantum gauge transformations. It is observed that the gaugeon field together with gauge field naturally acquire mass, which is different from the conventional Higgs mechanism. The quantum gauge transformation implements a shift in gauge parameter. Further, we analyse the BRST symmetric gaugeon formalism in VSR which embeds only one subsidiary condition rather than two.

  19. Quantum gauge freedom in very special relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Sudhaker; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate Yokoyama gaugeon formalism for the Abelian one-form gauge (Maxwell) as well as for Abelian two-form gauge theory in the very special relativity (VSR) framework. In VSR scenario, the extended action due to introduction of gaugeon fields also possesses form invariance under quantum gauge transformations. It is observed that the gaugeon field together with gauge field naturally acquire mass, which is different from the conventional Higgs mechanism. The quantum gauge transformation implements a shift in gauge parameter. Further, we analyze the BRST symmetric gaugeon formalism in VSR which embeds only one subsidiary condition rather than two.

  20. Quantum gauge freedom in very special relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhaker Upadhyay

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate Yokoyama gaugeon formalism for the Abelian one-form gauge (Maxwell as well as for Abelian two-form gauge theory in the very special relativity (VSR framework. In VSR scenario, the extended action due to introduction of gaugeon fields also possesses form invariance under quantum gauge transformations. It is observed that the gaugeon field together with gauge field naturally acquire mass, which is different from the conventional Higgs mechanism. The quantum gauge transformation implements a shift in gauge parameter. Further, we analyze the BRST symmetric gaugeon formalism in VSR which embeds only one subsidiary condition rather than two.

  1. Absolute I(asterisk) quantum yields for the ICN A state by diode laser gain-vs-absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Wayne P.; Leone, Stephen R.

    1987-01-01

    Absolute I(asterisk) quantum yields have been measured as a function of wavelength for room temperature photodissociation of the ICN A state continuum. The yields are obtained by the technique of time-resolved diode laser gain-vs-absorption spectroscopy. Quantum yields are evaluated at seven wavelengths from 248 to 284 nm. The yield at 266 nm is 66.0 + or - 2 percent and it falls off to 53.4 + or - 2 percent and 44.0 + or - 4 percent at 284 and 248 nm, respectively. The latter values are significantly higher than those obtained by previous workers using infrared fluorescence. Estimates of I(asterisk) quantum yields obtained from analysis of CN photofragment rotational distributions, as discussed by other workers, are in good agreement with the I(asterisk) yields reported here. The results are considered in conjunction with recent theoretical and experimental work on the CN rotational distributions and with previous I(asterisk) quantum yield results.

  2. BOOK REVIEW: Modern Canonical Quantum General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Claus

    2008-06-01

    The open problem of constructing a consistent and experimentally tested quantum theory of the gravitational field has its place at the heart of fundamental physics. The main approaches can be roughly divided into two classes: either one seeks a unified quantum framework of all interactions or one starts with a direct quantization of general relativity. In the first class, string theory (M-theory) is the only known example. In the second class, one can make an additional methodological distinction: while covariant approaches such as path-integral quantization use the four-dimensional metric as an essential ingredient of their formalism, canonical approaches start with a foliation of spacetime into spacelike hypersurfaces in order to arrive at a Hamiltonian formulation. The present book is devoted to one of the canonical approaches—loop quantum gravity. It is named modern canonical quantum general relativity by the author because it uses connections and holonomies as central variables, which are analogous to the variables used in Yang Mills theories. In fact, the canonically conjugate variables are a holonomy of a connection and the flux of a non-Abelian electric field. This has to be contrasted with the older geometrodynamical approach in which the metric of three-dimensional space and the second fundamental form are the fundamental entities, an approach which is still actively being pursued. It is the author's ambition to present loop quantum gravity in a way in which every step is formulated in a mathematically rigorous form. In his own words: 'loop quantum gravity is an attempt to construct a mathematically rigorous, background-independent, non-perturbative quantum field theory of Lorentzian general relativity and all known matter in four spacetime dimensions, not more and not less'. The formal Leitmotiv of loop quantum gravity is background independence. Non-gravitational theories are usually quantized on a given non-dynamical background. In contrast, due to

  3. Photophysical investigation of (D-π-A) DMHP dye: Dipole moments, photochemical quantum yield and fluorescence quantum yield, by solvatochromic shift methods and DFT studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiri, Abdullah M.; Sobahi, Tariq R.; Osman, Osman I.; Khan, Salman A.

    2017-01-01

    (2E)-3-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (DMHP) was synthesized by the reaction of 3,4-dimethoxy benzaldehyde with 1-(2-hydroxyphenyl) ethanone under microwave irradiation. The structure of DMHP was established experimentally by EI-MS, FT-IR, 1H and 13C NMR spectral studies and elemental analysis and theoretically. Electronic absorption and emission spectra of DMHP were studied in different solvents on the basis of polarities, and the obtain data were used to determine the solvatochromic properties such as extinction coefficient, oscillator strength, transition dipole moment, stokes shift, fluorescence quantum yield and photochemical quantum yield. The absorption and emission maxima were red-shifted when the polarity of the solvent was increased from dioxan to DMSO; in excellent agreement the DFT findings. The DMHP experimental intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) was complemented by a natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Fluorescence intensities of DMHP were increase and decrease in presence of CTAB and SDS, so DMHP was used to find out the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of CTAB and SDS.

  4. Nanomechanical method to gauge emission quantum yield applied to NV-centers in nanodiamond

    CERN Document Server

    Frimmer, Martin; Koenderink, A Femius

    2012-01-01

    We present a technique to nanomechanically vary the distance between a fluorescent source and a mirror, thereby varying the local density of optical states at the source position. Our method can therefore serve to measure the quantum efficiency of fluorophores. Application of our technique to NV defects in diamond nanocrystals shows that their quantum yield can significantly differ from unity. Relying on a lateral scanning mechanism with shear-force probe-sample distance control our technique is straightforwardly implemented in most state-of-the-art near-field microscopes.

  5. Relative yields of radicals produced in deuterated methanol by irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Seiko

    2016-05-01

    The relative yields of radicals produced in four kinds of methanols; i.e., CH3OH, CH3OD, CD3OH and CD3OD, by γ-irradiation have been studied using ESR spin trapping with PBN. Both PBN-H and PBN-D were produced from CH3OD and CD3OH. This means that the proton transfer to the neutral methanol from the cationic one is one of the processes to produce both the methoxy and hydoxy-methyl radicals. The yield of the methoxy radical adduct relative to the hydroxy-methyl radical adduct decreased in the order CD3OH>CD3OD>CH3OH>CH3OD. The difference in the rates of the proton transfer and hydrogen abstraction reactions by substitution with deuterium is the reason for the variation in the relative radical yield.

  6. Investigating energy partitioning during photosynthesis using an expanded quantum yield convention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Tae Kyu [Department of Chemistry, Hildebrand B77, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460 (United States); Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Avenson, Thomas J. [Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, 111 Koshland Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3102 (United States); Peers, Graham; Li Zhirong [Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, 111 Koshland Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3102 (United States); Dall' Osto, Luca; Bassi, Roberto [Department of Science and Technology, University of Verona, Verona 37134 (Italy); Niyogi, Krishna K. [Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, 111 Koshland Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3102 (United States)], E-mail: niyogi@nature.berkeley.edu; Fleming, Graham R. [Department of Chemistry, Hildebrand B77, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460 (United States); Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)], E-mail: GRFleming@lbl.gov

    2009-02-23

    In higher plants, regulation of excess absorbed light is essential for their survival and fitness, as it enables avoidance of a build up of singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species. Regulation processes (known as non-photochemical quenching; NPQ) can be monitored by steady-state fluorescence on intact plant leaves. Pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) measurements of chlorophyll a fluorescence have been used for over 20 years to evaluate the amount of NPQ and photochemistry (PC). Recently, a quantum yield representation of NPQ ({phi}{sub NPQ}), which incorporates a variable fraction of open reaction centers, was proposed by Hendrickson et al. [L. Hendrickson, R.T. Furbank, W.S. Chow, Photosynth. Res. 82 (2004) 73]. In this work we extend the quantum yield approach to describe the yields of reversible energy-dependent quenching ({phi}{sub qE}), state transitions to balance PC between photosystems II and I ({phi}{sub qT}), and photoinhibition quenching associated with damaged reaction centers ({phi}{sub qI}). We showed the additivity of the various quantum yield components of NPQ through experiments on wild-type and npq1 strains of Arabidopsis thaliana. The quantum yield approach enables comparison of {phi}{sub qE} with data from a variety of techniques used to investigate the mechanism of qE. We showed that {phi}{sub qE} for a series of A. thaliana genotypes scales linearly with the magnitude of zeaxanthin cation formation, suggesting that charge-transfer quenching is largely responsible for qE in plants.

  7. Beyond relativity and quantum mechanics: space physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Henry H.

    2011-09-01

    Albert Einstein imposed an observer-based epistemology upon physics. Relativity and Quantum Mechanics limit physics to describing and modeling the observer's sensations and measurements. Their "underlying reality" consists only of ideas that serve to model the observer's experience. These positivistic models cannot be used to form physical theories of Cosmic phenomena. To do this, we must again remove the observer from the center of physics. When we relate motion to Cosmic space instead of to observers and we attempt to explain the causes of Cosmic phenomena, we are forced to admit that Cosmic space is a substance. We need a new physics of space. We can begin by replacing Relativity with a modified Lorentzian-Newtonian model of spatial flow, and Quantum Mechanics with a wave-based theory of light and electrons. Space physics will require the reinterpretation of all known phenomena, concepts, and mathematical models.

  8. Preparation of carbon quantum dots with a high quantum yield and the application in labeling bovine serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengpeng; Zhang, Changchang; Liu, Xiang; Cui, Ping

    2016-04-01

    An economic and green approach of manufacturing carbon quantum dots (CQDs) with a high quantum yield (denoted with HQY-CQDs) and the application in labeling bovine serum albumin (BSA) were described in detail in this work. Firstly, the cheap resources of citric acid and glycine were pyrolysed in drying oven for preparing the CQDs. Then the product was immersed in tetrahydrofuran for 8 h. HQY-CQDs were obtained by removing tetrahydrofuran from the supernate and were evaluated that they possessed a much higher quantum yield compared with that without dealing with tetrahydrofuran and a wonderful photo-bleaching resistance. Such HQY-CQDs could be functionalized by N-hydroxysuccinimide and successively combined with BSA covalently. Thus fluorescent labeling on BSA was realized. The HQY-CQDs were demonstrated with transmission electron microscopy and the chemical modification with N-hydroxysuccinimide was proved by infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectra. Labeling BSA with the HQY-CQDs was confirmed by gel electrophoresis and fluorescence imaging.

  9. Quantum to classical transitions in causal relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ried, Katja; MacLean, Jean-Philippe W.; Spekkens, Robert W.; Resch, Kevin J.

    2017-06-01

    The landscape of causal relations that can hold among a set of systems in quantum theory is richer than in classical physics. In particular, a pair of time-ordered systems can be related as cause and effect or as the effects of a common cause, and each of these causal mechanisms can be coherent or not. Furthermore, one can combine these mechanisms in different ways: by probabilistically realizing either one or the other or by having both act simultaneously (termed a physical mixture). In the latter case, it is possible for the two mechanisms to be combined quantum coherently. Previous work has shown how to experimentally realize one example of each class of possible causal relations. Here, we make a theoretical and experimental study of the transitions between these classes. In particular, for each of the two distinct types of coherence that can exist in mixtures of common-cause and cause-effect relations—coherence in the individual causal pathways and coherence in the way the causal relations are combined—we determine how it degrades under noise and we confirm these expectations in a quantum-optical experiment.

  10. Determining the Photoisomerization Quantum Yield of Photoswitchable Molecules in Solution and in the Solid State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranius, K.; Börjesson, K.

    2017-01-01

    Photoswitchable molecules are able to isomerize between two metastable forms through light stimuli. Originally being studied by photochemists, this type of molecule has now found a wide range of applications within physics, chemistry and biology. The extensive usage of photochromic molecules is due to the two isomers having fundamentally different physical and chemical properties. The most important attribute of a photoswitch is the photoisomerization quantum yield, which defines the efficiency of the photoisomerization event. Here we show how to determine the photoisomerization quantum yield in the solid state and in solution when taking thermal processes into account. The described method together with provided software allows for rapid and accurate determination of the isomerization process for this important class of molecules.

  11. The effect of axial ligands on the quantum yield of singlet oxygen of new silicon phthalocyanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Huafei; Zhang, Xuemei; Yu, Xinxin; Pan, Sujuan; Xie, Shusen; Yang, Hongqin; Peng, Yiru

    2016-10-01

    The singlet oxygen (1O2) production abilitity is an important factor to assess their potential as effective of photosensitizers. In this paper, the 1O2 production rate, production rate constant and quantum yield of silicon(IV) phthalocyanine axially bearing 1-3 generation dendritic substituents were evaluated by a high performance liquid chromatographic method. The results show that the 1O2 production rate and production rate constant of these compounds increase gradually with dendritic generations increase. And the 1O2 quantum yield of silicon(IV) phthalocyanine with first generation dendritic ligand was the highest. This may be due to the isolation effect of the dendritic ligands on the phthalocyanine core. The parameters of the observed 1O2 production properties will provide valuable data for these dendrimer phthalocyanines as promising photosensitizer in PDT application.

  12. Relativity and quantum physics for beginners

    CERN Document Server

    Manly, Steven L

    2009-01-01

    As we humans have expanded our horizons to see things vastly smaller, faster, larger, and farther than ever before, we have been forced to confront preconceptions born of the human experience and create wholly new ways of looking at the world around us. The theories of relativity and quantum physics were developed out of this need and have provided us with phenomenal, mind-twisting insights into the strange and exciting reality show of our universe.Relativity and Quantum Physics For Beginners is an entertaining and accessible introduction to the bizarre concepts that fueled the scientific revolution of the 20th century and led to amazing advances in our understanding of the universe.

  13. Luminescent carbon quantum dots with high quantum yield as a single white converter for white light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, X. T.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, X. G., E-mail: liuxuguang@tyut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Zhang, F.; Wang, Y. L.; Yang, Y. Z., E-mail: yyztyut@126.com [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China)

    2015-11-23

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) with high quantum yield (51.4%) were synthesized by a one-step hydrothermal method using thiosalicylic acid and ethylenediamine as precursor. The CQDs have the average diameter of 2.3 nm and possess excitation-independent emission wavelength in the range from 320 to 440 nm excitation. Under an ultraviolet (UV) excitation, the CQDs aqueous solutions emit bright blue fluorescence directly and exhibit broad emission with a high spectral component ratio of 67.4% (blue to red intensity to total intensity). We applied the CQDs as a single white-light converter for white light emitting diodes (WLEDs) using a UV-LED chip as the excitation light source. The resulted WLED shows superior performance with corresponding color temperature of 5227 K and the color coordinates of (0.34, 0.38) belonging to the white gamut.

  14. Quantum Yield Determination Based on Photon Number Measurement, Protocols for Firefly Bioluminescence Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    Quantum yield (QY), which is defined as the probability of photon production by a single bio/chemiluminescence reaction, is an important factor to characterize luminescence light intensity emitted diffusively from the reaction solution mixture. Here, methods to measure number of photons to determine QY according to the techniques of national radiometry standards are described. As an example, experiments using firefly bioluminescence reactions are introduced.

  15. Identification and mapping of yield and yield related QTLs from an Indian accession of Oryza rufipogon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Sarla

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L. is endowed with a rich genetic variability. In spite of such a great diversity, the modern rice cultivars have narrow genetic base for most of the agronomically important traits. To sustain the demand of an ever increasing population, new avenues have to be explored to increase the yield of rice. Wild progenitor species present potential donor sources for complex traits such as yield and would help to realize the dream of sustained food security. Results Advanced backcross method was used to introgress and map new quantitative trait loci (QTLs relating to yield and its components from an Indian accession of Oryza rufipogon. An interspecific BC2 testcross progeny (IR58025A/O. rufipogon//IR580325B///IR58025B////KMR3 was evaluated for 13 agronomic traits pertaining to yield and its components. Transgressive segregants were obtained for all the traits. Thirty nine QTLs were identified using interval mapping and composite interval mapping. In spite of it's inferiority for most of the traits studied, O. rufipogon alleles contributed positively to 74% of the QTLs. Thirty QTLs had corresponding occurrences with the QTLs reported earlier, indicating that these QTLs are stable across genetic backgrounds. Nine QTLs are novel and reported for the first time. Conclusion The study confirms that the progenitor species constitute a prominent source of still unfolded variability for traits of complex inheritance like yield. With the availability of the complete genome sequence of rice and the developments in the field of genomics, it is now possible to identify the genes underlying the QTLs. The identification of the genes constituting QTLs would help us to understand the molecular mechanisms behind the action of QTLs.

  16. Photoisomerization quantum yield of azobenzene-modified DNA depends on local sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yunqi; Wang, Xin; Chen, Jennifer I L; Ginger, David S

    2013-06-05

    Photoswitch-modified DNA is being studied for applications including light-harvesting molecular motors, photocontrolled drug delivery, gene regulation, and optically mediated assembly of plasmonic metal nanoparticles in DNA-hybridization assays. We study the sequence and hybridization dependence of the photoisomerization quantum yield of azobenzene attached to DNA via the popular d-threoninol linkage. Compared to free azobenzene we find that the quantum yield for photoisomerization from trans to cis form is decreased 3-fold (from 0.094 ± 0.004 to 0.036 ± 0.002) when the azobenzene is incorporated into ssDNA, and is further reduced 15-fold (to 0.0056 ± 0.0008) for azobenzene incorporated into dsDNA. In addition, we find that the quantum yield is sensitive to the local sequence including both specific mismatches and the overall sequence-dependent melting temperature (Tm). These results serve as design rules for efficient photoswitchable DNA sequences tailored for sensing, drug delivery, and energy-harvesting applications, while also providing a foundation for understanding phenomena such as photonically controlled hybridization stringency.

  17. Relation between academic yield and stress in medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Patricia González Peña

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study risk factors that where found as influence in the academic yield (stress, alcohol, friendships, depression and family relations in the students of the Medicine Faculty of the Universidad de Manizales. Materials and methods: Descriptive study integrated by random selected sample, who were attending of II to XI semester of the Medicine faculty. An anonymous survey was conduced about sociodemographic, cultural, academic and motivational characteristics,including stress, depresión, family disfunction and substance abuse. We correlated all variables with academic yield using chi square test, Pearson`s coefficient and lineal regression. Results: 212 students of ages between 17 and 31 years where analyzed, in which the majority where from another city. Some of the factors were detected which affect the academic yield of the students as it is stress, depression, the family function and friendships among others. Conclusions: A significant relation between academic yield and stress was found. In turn, stress variable was influenced by depression, alcohol and family relation.

  18. Acetone photolysis at 248 nm revisited: pressure dependence of the CO and CO2 quantum yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somnitz, H; Ufer, T; Zellner, R

    2009-10-14

    Pressure dependent CO and CO2 quantum yields in the laser pulse photolysis of acetone at 248 nm and T = 298 K have been measured directly using quantitative infrared diode laser absorption. The experiments cover the pressure range from 50 to 900 mbar. It is found that the quantum yields show a significant dependence on total pressure, with Phi(CO) decreasing from around 0.5 at 20 mbar to approximately 0.3 at 900 mbar. The corresponding CO2 yields as observed when O2 exists in the reaction mixture, exhibit exactly the opposite behaviour. For the sum of both a value of 1.05(-0.05)(+0.02) independent of pressure is obtained, showing that the sum of (Phi(CO) + Phi(CO2)) is a measure for the primary quantum yield in the photolysis of acetone. In addition, CO quantum yields and corresponding pressure dependences were measured in experiments using different bath gases including He, Ar, Kr, SF6, and O2 as third body colliders. The theoretical framework in which we discuss these data is based on our previous findings that the pressure dependence of the CO yield is a consequence of a stepwise fragmentation mechanism during which acetone decomposes initially into methyl and a vibrationally 'hot' acetyl radical, with the latter being able to decompose promptly into methyl plus CO. The pressure dependence of the CO yield then originates from the second step and is modelled quantitatively via statistical dynamical calculations using a combination of RRKM theory with a time-dependent master equation (ME) approach. From a comparison of experiment with theory the amount of excess energy in the vibrationally hot acetyl radicals (E* approximately 65 kJ mol(-1)) as well as the characteristic collision parameters for interaction of acetyl with the different bath gases were derived. Values of 90, 280, 310, 545, 550 and 1800 cm(-1) for the average energy transferred per downward collision for the bath gases He, Ar, Kr, O2, N2, and SF6, respectively, are obtained. The calculations also

  19. Acetylene bridged porphyrin-monophthalocyaninato ytterbium(III) hybrids with strong two-photon absorption and high singlet oxygen quantum yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Hanzhong; Li, Wenbin; Zhang, Tao; Zhu, Xunjin; Tam, Hoi-Lam; Hou, Anxin; Kwong, Daniel W J; Wong, Wai-Kwok

    2012-04-21

    Several acetylene bridged porphyrin-monophthalocyaninato ytterbium(III) hybrids, PZn-PcYb, PH(2)-PcYb and PPd-PcYb, have been prepared and characterized by (1)H and (31)P NMR, mass spectrometry, and UV-vis spectroscopy. Their photophysical and photochemical properties, especially the relative singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) quantum yields and the two-photon absorption cross-section (σ(2)), were investigated. These three newly synthesized compounds exhibited very large σ(2) values and substantial (1)O(2) quantum yields upon photo-excitation, making them potential candidates as one- and two-photon photodynamic therapeutic agents.

  20. Measurement method for photoluminescent quantum yields of fluorescent organic dyes in polymethyl methacrylate for luminescent solar concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L R; Richards, B S

    2009-01-10

    A method for measuring the photoluminescent quantum yields (PLQY) of luminescent organic dyes is presented. The self-absorption probability calculated at different dye concentrations is used to determine the absolute quantum yield from the observed values. The results for a range of commercially available dyes show high quantum yields, even at high concentrations, and an absence of quenching. The PLQY of several dye mixtures are also presented. The results indicate an absence of any reduction of PLQY in a dye mixture as compared with the individual PLQY of the dyes.

  1. Correlations between dissolved organic matter optical properties and quantum yields of singlet oxygen and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, Renée M; Carfagno, Amy K; Sharpless, Charles M

    2010-08-01

    Various aquatic dissolved organic matter (DOM) samples produce singlet oxygen (1O2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with quantum yields of 0.59 to 4.5% (1O2 at 365 nm) and 0.017 to 0.053% (H2O2, 300-400 nm integrated). The two species' yields have opposite pH dependencies and strong, but opposite, correlations with the E2/E3 ratio (A254 divided by A365). Linear regressions allow prediction of both quantum yields from E2/E3 in natural water samples with errors ranging from -3% to 60%. Experimental evidence and kinetic calculations indicate that less than six percent of the H2O2 is produced by reaction between 1O2 and DOM. The inverse relationship between the 1O2 and H2O2 yields is thus best explained by a model in which precursors to these species are populated competitively. A model is presented, which proposes that important precursors to H2O2 may be either charge-transfer or triplet states of DOM.

  2. Relation between academic yield and stress in medical students

    OpenAIRE

    María del Mar Durán Ortiz; Camila Escobar Alvira; Adriana Morales Acosta; Samuel Arturo Monroy Castaño; Alexander Ramírez Álvarez; Juliana Ramírez Hoyos; José Luis Trejos Valdés; José Jaime Castaño Castrillón; Sandra Patricia González Peña

    2006-01-01

    Objective. To study risk factors that where found as influence in the academic yield (stress, alcohol, friendships, depression and family relations) in the students of the Medicine Faculty of the Universidad de Manizales. Materials and methods: Descriptive study integrated by random selected sample, who were attending of II to XI semester of the Medicine faculty. An anonymous survey was conduced about sociodemographic, cultural, academic and motivational characteristics,including stress, depr...

  3. Minimal length uncertainty relation and gravitational quantum well

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brau, F.; Buisseret, F.

    2006-01-01

    The dynamics of a particle in a gravitational quantum well is studied in the context of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics with a particular deformation of a two-dimensional Heisenberg algebra. This deformation yields a new short-distance structure characterized by a finite minimal uncertainty in pos

  4. High quantum yield graphene quantum dots decorated TiO{sub 2} nanotubes for enhancing photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Ailan, E-mail: qal67@163.com; Xie, Haolong; Xu, Xinmei; Zhang, Yangyu; Wen, Shengwu; Cui, Yifan

    2016-07-01

    Highlights: • High concentration yellow GQDs and TiO{sub 2} nanotubes were achieved by a simple and green method. • High quantum yield GQDs enhanced the photodegradation capacity of TiO{sub 2} nanotube. • The catalytic performance of GQDs/TiO{sub 2} depends on the GQDs loading. • The improved photocatalytic activity of GQDs/TiO{sub 2} was attributed to three aspects. - Abstract: Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) with high quantum yield (about 23.6% at an excitation wavelength of 320 nm) and GQDs/TiO{sub 2} nanotubes (GQDs/TiO{sub 2} NTs) composites were achieved by a simple hydrothermal method at low temperature. Photoluminescence characterization showed that the GQDs exhibited the down-conversion PL features at excitation from 300 to 420 nm and up-conversion photoluminescence in the range of 600–800 nm. The photocatalytic activity of prepared GQDs/TiO{sub 2} NTs composites on the degradation of methyl orange (MO) was significantly enhanced compared with that of pure TiO{sub 2} nanotubes (TiO{sub 2} NTs). For the composites coupling with 1.5%, 2.5% and 3.5% GQDs, the degradation of MO after 20 min irradiation under UV–vis light irradiation (λ = 380–780 nm) were 80.52%, 94.64% and 51.91%, respectively, which are much higher than that of pure TiO{sub 2} NTs (35.41%). It was inferred from the results of characterization that the improved photocatalytic activity of the GQDs/TiO{sub 2} NTs composites was attributed to the synergetic effect of up-conversion properties of the GQDs, enhanced visible light absorption and efficient separation of photogenerated electron-holes of the GQDs/TiO{sub 2} composite.

  5. Quantum Correlations Relativity for Continuous-Variables Bipartite Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Dugic, M; Jeknic-Dugic, J

    2011-01-01

    Based on the so-called Entanglement Relativity, we point out relativity of the more general non-classical (quantum) correlations for the continuous-variables bipartite systems. Our observation points out that quantum processing resources based on the non-classical correlations (non-zero quantum discord) are ubiquitous in such systems.

  6. Orthogonality and quantum geometry: Towards a relational reconstruction of quantum theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhong, S.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis is an in-depth mathematical study of the non-orthogonality relation between the (pure) states of quantum systems. In Chapter 2, I define quantum Kripke frames, the protagonists of this thesis. A quantum Kripke frame is a Kripke frame in which the binary relation possesses some simple

  7. Size-Dependent Biexciton Quantum Yields and Carrier Dynamics of Quasi-Two-Dimensional Core/Shell Nanoplatelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xuedan; Diroll, Benjamin T; Cho, Wooje; Fedin, Igor; Schaller, Richard D; Talapin, Dmitri V; Gray, Stephen K; Wiederrecht, Gary P; Gosztola, David J

    2017-09-05

    Quasi-two-dimensional nanoplatelets (NPLs) possess fundamentally different excitonic properties from zero-dimensional quantum dots. We study lateral size-dependent photon emission statistics and carrier dynamics of individual NPLs using second-order photon correlation (g((2))(τ)) spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) intensity-dependent lifetime analysis. Room-temperature radiative lifetimes of NPLs can be derived from maximum PL intensity periods in PL time traces. It first decreases with NPL lateral size and then stays constant, deviating from the electric dipole approximation. Analysis of the PL time traces further reveals that the single exciton quantum yield in NPLs decreases with NPL lateral size and increases with protecting shell thickness, indicating the importance of surface passivation on NPL emission quality. Second-order photon correlation (g((2))(τ)) studies of single NPLs show that the biexciton quantum yield is strongly dependent on the lateral size and single exciton quantum yield of the NPLs. In large NPLs with unity single exciton quantum yield, the corresponding biexciton quantum yield can reach unity. These findings reveal that by careful growth control and core-shell material engineering, NPLs can be of great potential for light amplification and integrated quantum photonic applications.

  8. On the "principle of the quantumness", the quantumness of Relativity, and the computational grand-unification

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro

    2010-01-01

    I argue that the program on operational foundations of Quantum Mechanics should have top-priority, and that the Lucien Hardy's program on Quantum Gravity should be paralleled by an analogous program on Quantum Field Theory (QFT), which needs to be reformulated, notwithstanding its experimental success. In this paper, after reviewing recently proposed operational "principles of the quantumness", I address the problem on whether Quantum Mechanics and Special Relativity are unrelated theories, or instead, if the one implies the other. I show how Special Relativity can be indeed derived from Quantum Mechanics, within the computational paradigm "the universe is a huge quantum computer", reformulating QFT as a Quantum-Circuit Field Theory (QCFT). In QCFT Special Relativity emerges from the fabric of the computational network, which also naturally embeds gauge invariance, and even the quantization rule and the Plank constant, which resort to being properties of the underlying causal tapestry of space-time. In this w...

  9. Operational General Relativity: Possibilistic, Probabilistic, and Quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Hardy, Lucien

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we develop an operational formulation of General Relativity similar in spirit to existing operational formulations of Quantum Theory. To do this we introduce an operational space (or op-space) built out of scalar fields. A point in op-space corresponds to some nominated set of scalar fields taking some given values in coincidence. We assert that op-space is the space in which we observe the world. We introduce also a notion of agency (this corresponds to the ability to set knob settings just like in Operational Quantum Theory). The effects of agents' actions should only be felt to the future so we introduce also a time direction field. Agency and time direction can be understood as effective notions. We show how to formulate General Relativity as a possibilistic theory and as a probabilistic theory. In the possibilistic case we provide a compositional framework for calculating whether some operationally described situation is possible or not. In the probabilistic version we introduce probabiliti...

  10. Unification of General Relativity and Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Widmer, H

    2005-01-01

    Physics cannot determine what mass is; it can only normalize it - by a given volume: one liter of water corresponds to one kilogram, and so does everything else that shows the same inertia or weight - whatever mass itself was. In the same manner physics is not able to explain inertia or gravity, or to specify the reasons for a constant speed of light, a fundament of special relativity, or the Einstein-De Broglie relations, the basis of quantum mechanics. Even its very core, the Schroedinger Equation, is introduced into the world of physics as a good guess. Would we picture the universe itself as a continuum in space-time all these questions are solved automatically.

  11. Photoisomerization dynamics of a rhodopsin-based molecule (potential molecular switch) with high quantum yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Roland; Jiang, Chen-Wei; Zhang, Xiu-Xing; Fang, Ai-Ping; Li, Hong-Rong; Xie, Rui-Hua; Li, Fu-Li

    2015-03-01

    It is worthwhile to explore the detailed reaction dynamics of various candidates for molecular switches, in order to understand, e.g., the differences in quantum yields and switching times. Here we report density-functional-based simulations for the rhodopsin-based molecule 4-[4-Methylbenzylidene]-5-p-tolyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrrole (MDP), synthesized by Sampedro et al. We find that the photoisomerization quantum yields are remarkably high: 82% for cis-to-trans, and 68% for trans-to-cis. The lifetimes of the S1 excited state in cis-MDP in our calculations are in the range of 900-1800 fs, with a mean value of 1270 fs, while the range of times required for full cis-to-trans isomerization are 1100-2000 fs, with a mean value of 1530 fs. In trans-MDP, the calculated S1 excited state lifetimes are 860-2140 fs, with a mean value of 1330 fs, and with the full trans-to-cis isomerization completed about 200 fs later. In both cases, the dominant reaction mechanism is rotation around the central C =C bond (connected to the pyrroline ring), and de-excitation occurs at an avoided crossing between the ground state and the lowest singlet state, near the midpoint of the rotational pathway. Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China; Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities; Robert A. Welch Foundation; National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  12. Mathematical optimization approach for estimating the quantum yield distribution of a photochromic reaction in a polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Mirai; Yamashita, Takashi; Sano, Natsuki; Ishigaki, Aya; Suzuki, Tomomichi

    2017-01-01

    The convolution of a series of events is often observed for a variety of phenomena such as the oscillation of a string. A photochemical reaction of a molecule is characterized by a time constant, but materials in the real world contain several molecules with different time constants. Therefore, the kinetics of photochemical reactions of the materials are usually observed with a complexity comparable with those of theoretical kinetic equations. Analysis of the components of the kinetics is quite important for the development of advanced materials. However, with a limited number of exceptions, deconvolution of the observed kinetics has not yet been mathematically solved. In this study, we propose a mathematical optimization approach for estimating the quantum yield distribution of a photochromic reaction in a polymer. In the proposed approach, time-series data of absorbances are acquired and an estimate of the quantum yield distribution is obtained. To estimate the distribution, we solve a mathematical optimization problem to minimize the difference between the input data and a model. This optimization problem involves a differential equation constrained on a functional space as the variable lies in the space of probability distribution functions and the constraints arise from reaction rate equations. This problem can be reformulated as a convex quadratic optimization problem and can be efficiently solved by discretization. Numerical results are also reported here, and they verify the effectiveness of our approach.

  13. Mathematical optimization approach for estimating the quantum yield distribution of a photochromic reaction in a polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirai Tanaka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The convolution of a series of events is often observed for a variety of phenomena such as the oscillation of a string. A photochemical reaction of a molecule is characterized by a time constant, but materials in the real world contain several molecules with different time constants. Therefore, the kinetics of photochemical reactions of the materials are usually observed with a complexity comparable with those of theoretical kinetic equations. Analysis of the components of the kinetics is quite important for the development of advanced materials. However, with a limited number of exceptions, deconvolution of the observed kinetics has not yet been mathematically solved. In this study, we propose a mathematical optimization approach for estimating the quantum yield distribution of a photochromic reaction in a polymer. In the proposed approach, time-series data of absorbances are acquired and an estimate of the quantum yield distribution is obtained. To estimate the distribution, we solve a mathematical optimization problem to minimize the difference between the input data and a model. This optimization problem involves a differential equation constrained on a functional space as the variable lies in the space of probability distribution functions and the constraints arise from reaction rate equations. This problem can be reformulated as a convex quadratic optimization problem and can be efficiently solved by discretization. Numerical results are also reported here, and they verify the effectiveness of our approach.

  14. Quantum Yields from Stationary States: Cis-Trans Isomerization of Model Retinal

    CERN Document Server

    Tscherbul, T V

    2014-01-01

    Cis-trans isomerization in retinal, the first step in vision, is often computationally studied from a time dependent viewpoint. Motivation for such studies lies in coherent pulsed laser experiments that explore the isomerization dynamics. However, such biological processes take place naturally in the presence of incoherent light, which excites a non-evolving mixture of stationary states. Here the isomerization problem is considered from the latter viewpoint and applied to a standard two-state, two-mode linear vibronic coupling model of retinal that explicitly includes a conical intersection between the ground and first excited electronic states. The calculated quantum yield at 500 nm agrees well with both the previous time-dependent calculations of Hahn and Stock (0.63) and with experiment ($0.65\\pm0.01$), as does its wavelength dependence. Significantly, the effects of environmental relaxation on the quantum yield in this well-established model are found to be negligible. The results make clear the connectio...

  15. Functionalization of quinoxalines by using TMP bases: preparation of tetracyclic heterocycles with high photoluminescene quantum yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafe, Julia; Herbert, Simon; Auras, Florian; Karaghiosoff, Konstantin; Bein, Thomas; Knochel, Paul

    2015-01-12

    Tetracyclic heterocycles that exhibit high photoluminescence quantum yields were synthesized by anellation reactions of mono-, di-, and trifunctionalized 2,3-dichloroquinoxalines. Thus, treatment of 2,3-dichloroquinoxaline with TMPLi (TMP = 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidyl) allows a regioselective lithiation in position 5. Quenching with various electrophiles (iodine, (BrCl2 C)2 , allylic bromide, acid chloride, aryl iodide) leads to 5-functionalized 2,3-dichloroquinoxalines. Further functionalization in positions 6 and 8 can be achieved by using TMPLi or TMPMgCl⋅LiCl furnishing a range of new di- and tri-functionalized 2,3-dichloroquinoxalines. The chlorine atoms are readily substituted by anellation with 1,2-diphenols or 1,2-dithiophenols leading to a series of new tetracyclic compounds. These materials exhibit strong, tunable optical absorption and emission in the blue and green spectral region. The substituted O-heterocyclic compounds exhibit particularly high photoluminescence quantum yields of up to 90%, which renders them interesting candidates for fluorescence imaging applications.

  16. Study on Active Oxygen Quantum Yield, Insecticidal Activities and Stability of Diphenylthiophene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiao-jun; XU Han-hong; WANG Yu-jian; HU Shan; ZHANG Zhi-xiang; ZHANG Yao-mou

    2007-01-01

    Active oxygen quantum yield, insecticidal activities and stability of diphenylthiophene were studied for the first time. The results showed that maximum diphenylthiophene absorbency variety was 0.438 after irradiation for 280 min and that of α-terthienyl (α-T) was 0.480 after irradiation for 200 min with UV. LC50 values ofdiphenylthiophene and α-T against 3rd instar larvae of Aedes albopictus were 9.18 × 10-3 and 9.69 × 10-4 μg mL-1 when treated for 24 h, respectively. LC50 values of the two chemicals against the 3rd instar larvae of Plutella xylostella were 267.87 and 222.22 μg mL-1 when treated for 24 h, respectively. The half lives of diphenylthiophene and α-T in methanol were 113.62 and 10.65 h. Difference between quantum yield of diphenylthiophene and α-T was not significant and they all possessed high toxicity to Aedes albopictus and Plutella xylostella, but diphenylthiophene was more stable than α-T. It could be concluded that diphenylthiophene has overcome the deficiency of photoactivated insecticides which degraded quickly in the environment and could not be applied on the field. Diphenylthiophene could kill the insects and accelerate the degradation rate of triazophos. The benefits of diphenylthiophene can be further exploited and applied on the field.

  17. Effect of PMMA impregnation on the fluorescence quantum yield of sol-gel glasses doped with quinine sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses-Nava, M. A.; Barbosa-García, O.; Díaz-Torres, L. A.; Chávez-Cerda, S.; Torres-Cisneros, M.; King, T. A.

    2001-08-01

    The fluorescence quantum yield of quinine sulfate in sol-gel and PMMA impregnated glasses is measured. The observed quantum yield improvement in the sol-gel matrix, compared to ethanol, is interpreted as a reduction of non-radiative relaxation channels by isolation of the molecules by the cage of the glass. PMMA impregnated sol-gel glasses show an extra improvement of the fluorescence yield, which is interpreted as a reduction of the free space and the rigid fixation of the molecules to the matrix.

  18. The problem of time quantum mechanics versus general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Edward

    2017-01-01

    This book is a treatise on time and on background independence in physics. It first considers how time is conceived of in each accepted paradigm of physics: Newtonian, special relativity, quantum mechanics (QM) and general relativity (GR). Substantial differences are moreover uncovered between what is meant by time in QM and in GR. These differences jointly source the Problem of Time: Nine interlinked facets which arise upon attempting concurrent treatment of the QM and GR paradigms, as is required in particular for a background independent theory of quantum gravity. A sizeable proportion of current quantum gravity programs - e.g. geometrodynamical and loop quantum gravity approaches to quantum GR, quantum cosmology, supergravity and M-theory - are background independent in this sense. This book's foundational topic is thus furthermore of practical relevance in the ongoing development of quantum gravity programs. This book shows moreover that eight of the nine facets of the Problem of Time already occur upon ...

  19. Uncertainty relations based on skew information with quantum memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, ZhiHao; Chen, ZhiHua; Fei, Shao-Ming

    2017-01-01

    We present a new uncertainty relation by defining a measure of uncertainty based on skew information. For bipartite systems, we establish uncertainty relations with the existence of a quantum memory. A general relation between quantum correlations and tight bounds of uncertainty has been presented.

  20. Microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthesis of highly luminescent ZnSe-based quantum dots with a quantum yield higher than 90%

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Shin; Nakano, Kaoru; Bu, Hang-Beom; Gwi Kim, Dae

    2017-06-01

    Highly luminescent ZnSe-based quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized by a microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The characteristics of the ZnSe precursor solution strongly influenced the photoluminescence (PL) quantum yields (QYs) of the QDs. The PL QY of ZnSe-core QDs synthesized under the optimum conditions reached 60%. Furthermore, the PL QY further increased to higher than 90% when a ZnS shell was applied to prepare ZnSe/ZnS-core/shell QDs.

  1. Gold Doping of Silver Nanoclusters: A 26-Fold Enhancement in the Luminescence Quantum Yield

    KAUST Repository

    Soldan, Giada

    2016-04-10

    A high quantum yield (QY) of photoluminescence (PL) in nanomaterials is necessary for a wide range of applications. Unfortunately, the weak PL and moderate stability of atomically precise silver nanoclusters (NCs) suppress their utility. Herein, we accomplished a ≥26-fold PL QY enhancement of the Ag29(BDT)12(TPP)4 cluster (BDT: 1,3-benzenedithiol; TPP: triphenylphosphine) by doping with a discrete number of Au atoms, producing Ag29-xAux(BDT)12(TPP)4, x=1-5. The Au-doped clusters exhibit an enhanced stability and an intense red emission around 660nm. Single-crystal XRD, mass spectrometry, optical, and NMR spectroscopy shed light on the PL enhancement mechanism and the probable locations of the Au dopants within the cluster.

  2. Novel fully-BODIPY functionalized cyclotetraphosphazene photosensitizers having high singlet oxygen quantum yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şenkuytu, Elif; Eçik, Esra Tanrıverdi

    2017-07-01

    Novel fully-BODIPY functionalized dendrimeric cyclotetraphosphazenes (FBCP 1 and 2) have been synthesized and characterized by 1H, 13C and 31P NMR spectroscopies. The photophysical and photochemical properties of FBCP 1 and 2 are investigated in dichloromethane solution. The effectiveness of singlet oxygen generation was measured for FBCP 1 and 2 by UV-Vis spectra monitoring of the solution of 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran (DPBF), which is a well-known trapping molecule used in detection of singlet oxygen. FBCP 1 and 2 show high molar extinction coefficients in the NIR region, good singlet oxygen quantum yields and appropriate photo degradation. The data presented in the work indicate that the dendrimeric cyclotetraphosphazenes are effective singlet oxygen photosensitizers that might be used for various areas of applications such as photodynamic therapy and photocatalysis.

  3. Quantum yields for the light adaptations in Anabaena sensory rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Yoichiro; Kawanabe, Akira; Furutani, Yuji; Kandori, Hideki; Ohtani, Hiroyuki

    2008-02-01

    Archael-type rhodopsin has an all- trans or a 13- cis retinal. The light-induced interconversion between these two forms has been found in Anabaena sensory rhodopsin, even though only the photoreaction from the 13- cis form to the all- trans form exists in bacteriorhodopsin. In this study, we obtained the quantum yields for the 13- cis → all- trans and all- trans → 13- cis reactions of Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (0.24 ± 0.03 and 0.38 ± 0.07, respectively) and concluded that these values were independent of the wavelength of the excitation light as well as bacteriorhodopsin. In other words, no excess energy effects can be found in these reactions.

  4. Quantum yield variation across the three pathways of photosynthesis: not yet out of the dark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillman, John B

    2008-01-01

    The convergent quantum yield hypothesis (CQY) assumes that thermodynamics and natural selection jointly limit variation in the maximum energetic efficiency of photosynthesis in low light under otherwise specified conditions (e.g. temperature and CO(2) concentration). A literature survey of photosynthetic quantum yield (phi) studies in terrestrial plants from C(3), C(4), and CAM photosynthetic types was conducted to test the CQY hypothesis. Broad variation in phi values from C(3) plants could partially be explained by accounting for whether the measuring conditions were permissive or restrictive for photorespiration. Assimilatory quotients (AQ), calculated from the CO(2) phi:O(2) phi ratios, indicated that 49% and 29% of absorbed light energy was allocated to carbon fixation and photorespiration in C(3) plants, respectively. The unexplained remainder (22%) may represent diversion to various other energy-demanding processes (e.g. starch synthesis, nitrogen assimilation). Individual and cumulative effects of these other processes on photosynthetic efficiency are poorly quantified. In C(4) plants, little variation in phi values was observed, consistent with the fact that C(4) plants exhibit little photorespiration. As before, AQ values indicate that 22% of absorbed light energy cannot be accounted for by carbon fixation in C(4) plants. Among all three photosynthetic types, the phi of photosynthesis in CAM plants is the least studied, appears to be highly variable, and may present the greatest challenge to the CQY hypothesis. The high amount of energy diverted to processes other than carbon fixation in C(3) and C(4) plants and the poor characterization of photosynthetic efficiency in CAM plants are significant deficiencies in our otherwise robust understanding of the energetics of terrestrial photoautotrophy.

  5. Sedimentation of Reversibly Interacting Macromolecules with Changes in Fluorescence Quantum Yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Sumit K.; Zhao, Huaying; Schuck, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation with fluorescence detection has emerged as a powerful method for the study of interacting systems of macromolecules. It combines picomolar sensitivity with high hydrodynamic resolution, and can be carried out with photoswitchable fluorophores for multi-component discrimination, to determine the stoichiometry, affinity, and shape of macromolecular complexes with dissociation equilibrium constants from picomolar to micromolar. A popular approach for data interpretation is the determination of the binding affinity by isotherms of weight-average sedimentation coefficients, sw. A prevailing dogma in sedimentation analysis is that the weight-average sedimentation coefficient from the transport method corresponds to the signal- and population-weighted average of all species. We show that this does not always hold true for systems that exhibit significant signal changes with complex formation - properties that may be readily encountered in practice, e.g., from a change in fluorescence quantum yield. Coupled transport in the reaction boundary of rapidly reversible systems can make significant contributions to the observed migration in a way that cannot be accounted for in the standard population-based average. Effective particle theory provides a simple physical picture for the reaction-coupled migration process. On this basis we develop a more general binding model that converges to the well-known form of sw with constant signals, but can account simultaneously for hydrodynamic co-transport in the presence of changes in fluorescence quantum yield. We believe this will be useful when studying interacting systems exhibiting fluorescence quenching, enhancement or Forster resonance energy transfer with transport methods.

  6. Quantum yield in blue-emitting anthracene derivatives: vibronic coupling density and transition dipole moment density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uejima, Motoyuki; Sato, Tohru; Yokoyama, Daisuke; Tanaka, Kazuyoshi; Park, Jong-Wook

    2014-07-21

    A theoretical design principle for enhancement of the quantum yield of light-emitting molecules is desired. For the establishment of the principle, we focused on the S1 states of blue-emitting anthracene derivatives: 2-methyl-9,10-di(2'-naphthyl)anthracene (MADN), 4,9,10-bis(3',5'-diphenylphenyl)anthracene (MAM), 9-(3',5'-diphenylphenyl)-10-(3'',5''-diphenylbiphenyl-4''-yl) anthracene (MAT), and 9,10-bis(3''',5'''-diphenylbiphenyl-4'-yl) anthracene (TAT) [Kim et al., J. Mater. Chem., 2008, 18, 3376]. The vibronic coupling constants and transition dipole moments were calculated and analyzed by using the concepts of vibronic coupling density (VCD) and transition dipole moment density (TDMD), respectively. It is found that the driving force of the internal conversions and vibrational relaxations originate mainly from the anthracenylene group. On the other hand, fluorescence enhancement results from the large torsional distortion of the side groups in the S1 state. The torsional distortion is caused by the diagonal vibronic coupling for the lowest-frequency mode in the Franck-Condon (FC) S1 state, which originates from a small portion of the electron density difference on the side groups. These findings lead to the following design principles for anthracene derivatives with a high quantum yield: (1) reduction in the electron density difference and overlap density between the S0 and S1 states in the anthracenylene group to suppress vibrational relaxation and radiationless transitions, respectively; (2) increase in the overlap density in the side group to enhance the fluorescence.

  7. Quantum Yields of OH From the Photolysis of HOOH in Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, L.; Anastasio, C.

    2003-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (HOOH) is a common constituent of snow and cirrus ice clouds. Based on its behavior in aqueous solution, photolysis of HOOH on snow/ice should form hydroxyl radical (OH), a process that might be significant as a loss of HOOH as well as a source of OH. In turn, the formation of OH should lead to the oxidation of organic carbon and halides and subsequent release of these oxidation products (e.g., carbonyls, carboxylic acids, and reactive molecular halogens). Determining the importance and rate of OH generation from HOOH photolysis on snow and ice requires knowing the quantum yields for this process as a function of temperature and other environmental variables (e.g., pH and ionic strength). Since these values have not been previously measured, our goal in this work was to determine these quantum yields (i.e., Φ HOOH->OH). Our first step was to measure the molar absorptivities of HOOH between 274 K to 298 K so that we could extrapolate to ice temperatures. There was no temperature dependence of the HOOH molar absorptivity in our measurements, suggesting that the HOOH molar absorptivity is similar in the quasi-liquid layer of ice at low temperatures. Our initial experiments measuring Φ HOOH->OH as a function of temperature (243 - 268 K) show that the values roughly follow the same temperature dependence previously reported for aqueous solution (Zellner et al., 1990). In addition to these results we will also report how Φ HOOH->OH varies as a function of ionic strength and pH. The implications of our measurements for ice particle and snowpack chemistry will also be discussed. Zellner, R.; Exner, M.; Herrmann, H. J. Atmos. Chem. 1990, 10, 411.

  8. Estimation of rice yield affected by drought and relation between rice yield and TVDI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, C.; Tamura, E.; Sigit, G.

    2016-12-01

    Impact of climate change is not only seen on food production but also on food security and sustainable development of society. Adaptation to climate change is a pressing issue throughout the world to reduce the risks along with the plans and strategies for food security and sustainable development. As a key adaptation to the climate change, agricultural insurance is expected to play an important role in stabilizing agricultural production through compensating the losses caused by the climate change. As the adaptation, the Government of Indonesia has launched agricultural insurance program for damage of rice by drought, flood and pest and disease. The Government started a pilot project in 2013 and this year the pilot project has been extended to 22 provinces. Having the above as background, we conducted research on development of new damage assessment method for rice using remote sensing data which could be used for evaluation of damage ratio caused by drought in West Java, Indonesia. For assessment of the damage ratio, estimation of rice yield is a key. As the result of our study, rice yield affected by drought in dry season could be estimated at level of 1 % significance using SPOT 7 data taken in 2015, and the validation result was 0.8t/ha. Then, the decrease ratio in rice yield about each individual paddy field was calculated using data of the estimated result and the average yield of the past 10 years. In addition, TVDI (Temperature Vegetation Dryness Index) which was calculated from Landsat8 data in heading season indicated the dryness in low yield area. The result suggests that rice yield was affected by irrigation water shortage around heading season as a result of the decreased precipitation by El Nino. Through our study, it becomes clear that the utilization of remote sensing data can be promising for assessment of the damage ratio of rice production precisely, quickly and quantitatively, and also it can be incorporated into the insurance procedures.

  9. Relativity, symmetry and the structure of quantum theory I Galilean quantum theory

    CERN Document Server

    Klink, William H

    2015-01-01

    Quantum theory is one of the most successful of all physical theories. Our everyday world is dominated by devices that function because of knowledge of the quantum world. Yet many, physicists and non-physicists alike, find the theory which explains the behavior of the quantum world baffling and strange. This book is the first in a series of three that argues that relativity and symmetry determine the structure of quantum theory. That is to say, the structure of quantum theory is what it is because of relativity and symmetry. There are different types of relativity, each leading to a particular type of quantum theory. This book deals specifically with what we call Newton relativity, the form of relativity built into Newtonian mechanics, and the quantum theory to which it gives rise, which we call Galilean (often misleadingly called non-relativistic) quantum theory. Key Features: • Meaning and significance of the term of relativity; discussion of the principle of relativity. • Relation of symmetry to relati...

  10. Quantum correlation with sandwiched relative entropies: Advantageous as order parameter in quantum phase transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Avijit; Biswas, Anindya; Pati, Arun K; Sen De, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2015-05-01

    Quantum discord is a measure of quantum correlations beyond the entanglement-separability paradigm. It is conceptualized by using the von Neumann entropy as a measure of disorder. We introduce a class of quantum correlation measures as differences between total and classical correlations, in a shared quantum state, in terms of the sandwiched relative Rényi and Tsallis entropies. We compare our results with those obtained by using the traditional relative entropies. We find that the measures satisfy all the plausible axioms for quantum correlations. We evaluate the measures for shared pure as well as paradigmatic classes of mixed states. We show that the measures can faithfully detect the quantum critical point in the transverse quantum Ising model and find that they can be used to remove an unquieting feature of nearest-neighbor quantum discord in this respect. Furthermore, the measures provide better finite-size scaling exponents of the quantum critical point than the ones for other known order parameters, including entanglement and information-theoretic measures of quantum correlations.

  11. Optimal yield-related attributes of irrigated rice for high yield potential based on path analysis and stability analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganghua Li

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Improvement of yield in rice (Oryza sativa L. is vital for ensuring food security in China. Both rice breeders and growers need an improved understanding of the relationship between yield and yield-related traits. New indica cultivars (53 in 2007 and 48 in 2008 were grown in Taoyuan, Yunnan province, to identify important components contributing to yield. Additionally, two standard indica rice cultivars with similar yield potentials, II You 107 (a large-panicle type and Xieyou 107 (a heavy-panicle type, were planted in Taoyuan, Yunnan province and Nanjing, Jiangsu province, from 2006 to 2008 to evaluate the stability of yield and yield-related attributes. Growth duration (GD, leaf area index (LAI, panicles per m2 (PN, and spikelets per m2 (SM were significantly and positively correlated with grain yield (GY over all years. Sequential path analysis identified PN and panicle weight (PW as important first-order traits that influenced grain yield. All direct effects were significant, as indicated by bootstrap analysis. Yield potential varied greatly across locations but not across years. Plant height (PH, days from heading to maturity (HM, and grain weight (GW were stable traits that showed little variation across sites or years, whereas GD (mainly the pre-heading period, PHP and PN varied significantly across locations. To achieve a yield of 15 t ha− 1, a cultivar should have a PH of 110–125 cm, a long GD with HM of approximately 40 days, a PN of 300–400 m− 2, and a GW of 29–31 mg.

  12. Optimal yield-related attributes of irrigated rice for high yield potential based on path analysis and stability analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ganghua; Li; Jun; Zhang; Congdang; Yang; Yunpan; Song; Chengyan; Zheng; Shaohua; Wang; Zhenghui; Liu; Yanfeng; Ding

    2014-01-01

    Improvement of yield in rice(Oryza sativa L.) is vital for ensuring food security in China. Both rice breeders and growers need an improved understanding of the relationship between yield and yield-related traits. New indica cultivars(53 in 2007 and 48 in 2008) were grown in Taoyuan,Yunnan province, to identify important components contributing to yield. Additionally, two standard indica rice cultivars with similar yield potentials, II You 107(a large-panicle type) and Xieyou 107(a heavy-panicle type), were planted in Taoyuan, Yunnan province and Nanjing,Jiangsu province, from 2006 to 2008 to evaluate the stability of yield and yield-related attributes.Growth duration(GD), leaf area index(LAI), panicles per m2(PN), and spikelets per m2(SM) were significantly and positively correlated with grain yield(GY) over all years. Sequential path analysis identified PN and panicle weight(PW) as important first-order traits that influenced grain yield. All direct effects were significant, as indicated by bootstrap analysis. Yield potential varied greatly across locations but not across years. Plant height(PH), days from heading to maturity(HM), and grain weight(GW) were stable traits that showed little variation across sites or years, whereas GD(mainly the pre-heading period, PHP) and PN varied significantly across locations. To achieve a yield of 15 t ha-1, a cultivar should have a PH of 110–125 cm, a long GD with HM of approximately 40 days, a PN of 300–400 m-2, and a GW of 29–31 mg.

  13. Quantum groups and functional relations for lower rank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirov, Kh. S.; Razumov, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    A detailed construction of the universal integrability objects related to the integrable systems associated with the quantum loop algebra Uq(L(sl2)) is given. The full proof of the functional relations in the form independent of the representation of the quantum loop algebra on the quantum space is presented. The case of the general gradation and general twisting is treated. The specialization of the universal functional relations to the case when the quantum space is the state space of a discrete spin chain is described. This is a digression of the corresponding consideration for the case of the quantum loop algebra Uq(L(sl3)) with an extension to the higher spin case.

  14. Teaching Quantum Mechanical Commutation Relations via an Optical Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Billur, A Alper; Bursal, Murat

    2015-01-01

    The quantum mechanical commutation relations, which are directly related to the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, have a crucial importance for understanding the quantum mechanics of students. During undergraduate level courses, the operator formalisms are generally given theoretically and it is documented that these abstract formalisms are usually misunderstood by the students. Based on the idea that quantum mechanical phenomena can be investigated via geometric optical tools, this study aims to introduce an experiment, where the quantum mechanical commutation relations are represented in a concrete way to provide students an easy and permanent learning. The experimental tools are chosen to be easily accessible and economic. The experiment introduced in this paper can be done with students or used as a demonstrative experiment in laboratory based or theory based courses requiring quantum physics content; particularly in physics, physics education and science education programs.

  15. Can quantum theory and special relativity peacefully coexist?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seevinck, M.P.

    2010-01-01

    This white paper aims to identify an open problem in 'Quantum Physics and the Nature of Reality' --namely whether quantum theory and special relativity are formally compatible--, to indicate what the underlying issues are, and put forward ideas about how the problem might be addressed.

  16. Can quantum theory and special relativity peacefully coexist?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seevinck, M.P.

    2010-01-01

    This white paper aims to identify an open problem in ‘Quantum Physics and the Nature of Reality’—namely whether quantum theory and special relativity are formally compatible—, to indicate what the underlying issues are, and put forward ideas about how the problem might be addressed.

  17. Can quantum theory and special relativity peacefully coexist?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seevinck, M.P.

    This white paper aims to identify an open problem in ‘Quantum Physics and the Nature of Reality’—namely whether quantum theory and special relativity are formally compatible—, to indicate what the underlying issues are, and put forward ideas about how the problem might be addressed.

  18. Can quantum theory and special relativity peacefully coexist?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seevinck, M.P.

    2010-01-01

    This white paper aims to identify an open problem in 'Quantum Physics and the Nature of Reality' --namely whether quantum theory and special relativity are formally compatible--, to indicate what the underlying issues are, and put forward ideas about how the problem might be addressed.

  19. A 200-fold quantum yield boost in the photoluminescence of silver-doped Ag(x)Au(25-x) nanoclusters: the 13th silver atom matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuxin; Meng, Xiangming; Das, Anindita; Li, Tao; Song, Yongbo; Cao, Tiantian; Zhu, Xiuyi; Zhu, Manzhou; Jin, Rongchao

    2014-02-24

    The rod-shaped Au25 nanocluster possesses a low photoluminescence quantum yield (QY=0.1%) and hence is not of practical use in bioimaging and related applications. Herein, we show that substituting silver atoms for gold in the 25-atom matrix can drastically enhance the photoluminescence. The obtained Ag(x)Au(25-x) (x=1-13) nanoclusters exhibit high quantum yield (QY=40.1%), which is in striking contrast with the normally weakly luminescent Ag(x)Au(25-x) species (x=1-12, QY=0.21%). X-ray crystallography further determines the substitution sites of Ag atoms in the Ag(x)Au(25-x) cluster through partial occupancy analysis, which provides further insight into the mechanism of photoluminescence enhancement. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Accounting for the decrease of photosystem photochemical efficiency with increasing irradiance to estimate quantum yield of leaf photosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, X.; Belay, D.; Putten, van der P.E.L.; Struik, P.C.

    2014-01-01

    Maximum quantum yield for leaf CO2 assimilation under limiting light conditions (UCO2LL) is commonly estimated as the slope of the linear regression of net photosynthetic rate against absorbed irradiance over a range of low-irradiance conditions. Methodological errors associated with this estimation

  1. Accounting for the decrease of photosystem photochemical efficiency with increasing irradiance to estimate quantum yield of leaf photosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, X.; Belay, D.; Putten, van der P.E.L.; Struik, P.C.

    2014-01-01

    Maximum quantum yield for leaf CO2 assimilation under limiting light conditions (UCO2LL) is commonly estimated as the slope of the linear regression of net photosynthetic rate against absorbed irradiance over a range of low-irradiance conditions. Methodological errors associated with this estimation

  2. Ultrastable green fluorescence carbon dots with a high quantum yield for bioimaging and use as theranostic carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Chuanxu; Thomsen, Rasmus Peter; Ogaki, Ryosuke

    2015-01-01

    in biomedical applications. Oligoethylenimine (OEI)–β-cyclodextrin (βCD) Cdots were synthesised using a simple and fast heating method in phosphoric acid. The synthesised Cdots showed strong green fluorescence under UV excitation with a 30% quantum yield and exhibited superior stability over a wide pH range. We......Carbon dots (Cdots) have recently emerged as a novel platform of fluorescent nanomaterials. These carbon nanoparticles have great potential in biomedical applications such as bioimaging as they exhibit excellent photoluminescence properties, chemical inertness and low cytotoxicity in comparison...... to widely used semiconductor quantum dots. However, it remains a great challenge to prepare highly stable, water-soluble green luminescent Cdots with a high quantum yield. Herein we report a new synthesis route for green luminescent Cdots imbuing these desirable properties and demonstrate their potential...

  3. Process Physics From Quantum Foam to General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Cahill, R T

    2002-01-01

    Progress in the new information-theoretic process physics is reported in which the link to the phenomenology of general relativity is made. In process physics the fundamental assumption is that reality is to be modelled as self-organising semantic (or internal or relational) information using a self-referentially limited neural network model. Previous progress in process physics included the demonstration that space and quantum physics are emergent and unified, with time a distinct non-geometric process, that quantum phenomena are caused by fractal topological defects embedded in and forming a growing three-dimensional fractal process-space, which is essentially a quantum foam. Other features of the emergent physics were: quantum field theory with emergent flavour and confined colour, limited causality and the Born quantum measurement metarule, inertia, time-dilation effects, gravity and the equivalence principle, a growing universe with a cosmological constant, black holes and event horizons, and the emergen...

  4. The quantum bit from relativity of simultaneity on an interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Garner, Andrew J P; Dahlsten, Oscar C O

    2014-01-01

    The patterns of fringes produced by an interferometer have always been important testbeds for our best contemporary theories of physics. Historically, interference has been used to contrast quantum mechanics to classical physics, but recently experiments have been performed that test quantum theory against even more exotic alternatives. A physically motivated family of theories are those where the state space of a two-level system is given by a sphere of arbitrary dimension. This includes classical bits, and real, complex and quaternionic quantum theory. In this paper, we consider relativity of simultaneity (that observers may disagree about the order of events at different locations) as applied to a two-armed interferometer. We show that this forbids most interference phenomena more complicated than those of standard complex quantum theory. In this sense, special relativity itself can be used to explain why physics should be described by the rules of quantum theory in this setup. Moreover, our result has con...

  5. Properties and relative measure for quantifying quantum synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenlin; Zhang, Wenzhao; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2017-07-01

    Although quantum synchronization phenomena and corresponding measures have been widely discussed recently, it is still an open question how to characterize directly the influence of nonlocal correlation, which is the key distinction for identifying classical and quantum synchronizations. In this paper, we present basic postulates for quantifying quantum synchronization based on the related theory in Mari's work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 103605 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.103605], and we give a general formula of a quantum synchronization measure with clear physical interpretations. By introducing Pearson's parameter, we show that the obvious characteristics of our measure are the relativity and monotonicity. As an example, the measure is applied to describe synchronization among quantum optomechanical systems under a Markovian bath. We also show the potential by quantifying generalized synchronization and discrete variable synchronization with this measure.

  6. grain-filling, chlorophyll content in relation with grain yield ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    The main effect of high temperatures during grain filling is to ... performance, is a crucial determinant of grain yield in cereal crops. ... 6 rows with 0.20 m row spacing, sowing density ... of wheat, corn (Zea mays L.), and other plants. (Wood et al.

  7. CDOM Sources and Photobleaching Control Quantum Yields for Oceanic DMS Photolysis

    KAUST Repository

    Galí, Martí

    2016-11-14

    Photolysis is a major removal pathway for the biogenic gas dimethylsulfide (DMS) in the surface ocean. Here we tested the hypothesis that apparent quantum yields (AQY) for DMS photolysis varied according to the quantity and quality of its photosensitizers, chiefly chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and nitrate. AQY compiled from the literature and unpublished studies ranged across 3 orders of magnitude at the 330 nm reference wavelength. The smallest AQY(330) were observed in coastal waters receiving major riverine inputs of terrestrial CDOM (0.06-0.5 m3 (mol quanta)-1). In open-ocean waters, AQY(330) generally ranged between 1 and 10 m3 (mol quanta)-1. The largest AQY(330), up to 34 m3 (mol quanta)-1), were seen in the Southern Ocean potentially associated with upwelling. Despite the large AQY variability, daily photolysis rate constants at the sea surface spanned a smaller range (0.04-3.7 d-1), mainly because of the inverse relationship between CDOM absorption and AQY. Comparison of AQY(330) with CDOM spectral signatures suggests there is an interplay between CDOM origin (terrestrial versus marine) and photobleaching that controls variations in AQYs, with a secondary role for nitrate. Our results can be used for regional or large-scale assessment of DMS photolysis rates in future studies.

  8. Near-unity photoluminescence quantum yield in MoS2

    KAUST Repository

    Amani, Matin

    2015-11-26

    Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides have emerged as a promising material system for optoelectronic applications, but their primary figure of merit, the room-temperature photoluminescence quantum yield (QY), is extremely low.The prototypical 2D material molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is reported to have a maximum QYof 0.6%, which indicates a considerable defect density. Herewe report on an air-stable, solution-based chemical treatment by an organic superacid, which uniformly enhances the photoluminescence and minority carrier lifetime of MoS2 monolayers by more than two orders of magnitude.The treatment eliminates defect-mediated nonradiative recombination, thus resulting in a finalQYofmore than 95%, with a longest-observed lifetime of 10.8 0.6 nanoseconds. Our ability to obtain optoelectronic monolayers with near-perfect properties opens the door for the development of highly efficient light-emitting diodes, lasers, and solar cells based on 2D materials.

  9. White carbon: Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles with tunable quantum yield in a reproducible green synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiling, Till T.; Cywiński, Piotr J.; Bald, Ilko

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a new reliable, economic, and environmentally-friendly one-step synthesis is established to obtain carbon nanodots (CNDs) with well-defined and reproducible photoluminescence (PL) properties via the microwave-assisted hydrothermal treatment of starch and Tris-acetate-EDTA (TAE) buffer as carbon sources. Three kinds of CNDs are prepared using different sets of above mentioned starting materials. The as-synthesized CNDs: C-CND (starch only), N-CND 1 (starch in TAE) and N-CND 2 (TAE only) exhibit highly homogenous PL and are ready to use without need for further purification. The CNDs are stable over a long period of time (>1 year) either in solution or as freeze-dried powder. Depending on starting material, CNDs with PL quantum yield (PLQY) ranging from less than 1% up to 28% are obtained. The influence of the precursor concentration, reaction time and type of additives on the optical properties (UV-Vis absorption, PL emission spectrum and PLQY) is carefully investigated, providing insight into the chemical processes that occur during CND formation. Remarkably, upon freeze-drying the initially brown CND-solution turns into a non-fluorescent white/slightly brown powder which recovers PL in aqueous solution and can potentially be applied as fluorescent marker in bio-imaging, as a reduction agent or as a photocatalyst.

  10. Girdling effects on fruit set and quantum yield efficiency of PSII in two Citrus cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, F; Gravina, A; Agustí, M

    2007-04-01

    Girdling effects on fruitlet abscission, leaf chlorophyll, chlorophyll a fluorescence and carbohydrate concentration in various flowering and vegetative shoots were studied during natural fruit drop in two Citrus cultivars. Irrespective of shoot type, girdling delayed fruitlet abscission, but only fruitlets borne on leafy shoots had increased final fruit set. Chlorophyll a fluorescence analysis revealed differences in quantum yield efficiency of photosystem II of light adapted leaves (Phi(PSII)) among shoot types and in response to girdling. In young leaves of vegetative shoots, girdling decreased Phi(PSII), whereas Phi(PSII) increased from Day 30 after girdling in young leaves of leafy flowering shoots; however, Phi(PSII) did not change in mature leaves during fruit set in either control or girdled trees. Girdling altered leaf carbohydrate concentrations and the photosynthetic performance of the various shoot types. Our results indicate that, in Citrus, several carbohydrate-based regulatory mechanisms of photosynthesis coexist during carbohydrate accumulation brought about by girdling. It is concluded that the delay in fruitlet abscission and the increase in Phi(PSII )observed in girdled leafy flowering shoots are the mechanisms underlying the enhancement of fruit set after girdling.

  11. Action spectra of photosystems II and I and quantum yield of photosynthesis in leaves in State 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laisk, Agu; Oja, Vello; Eichelmann, Hillar; Dall'Osto, Luca

    2014-02-01

    The spectral global quantum yield (YII, electrons/photons absorbed) of photosystem II (PSII) was measured in sunflower leaves in State 1 using monochromatic light. The global quantum yield of PSI (YI) was measured using low-intensity monochromatic light flashes and the associated transmittance change at 810nm. The 810-nm signal change was calibrated based on the number of electrons generated by PSII during the flash (4·O2 evolution) which arrived at the PSI donor side after a delay of 2ms. The intrinsic quantum yield of PSI (yI, electrons per photon absorbed by PSI) was measured at 712nm, where photon absorption by PSII was small. The results were used to resolve the individual spectra of the excitation partitioning coefficients between PSI (aI) and PSII (aII) in leaves. For comparison, pigment-protein complexes for PSII and PSI were isolated, separated by sucrose density ultracentrifugation, and their optical density was measured. A good correlation was obtained for the spectral excitation partitioning coefficients measured by these different methods. The intrinsic yield of PSI was high (yI=0.88), but it absorbed only about 1/3 of quanta; consequently, about 2/3 of quanta were absorbed by PSII, but processed with the low intrinsic yield yII=0.63. In PSII, the quantum yield of charge separation was 0.89 as detected by variable fluorescence Fv/Fm, but 29% of separated charges recombined (Laisk A, Eichelmann H and Oja V, Photosynth. Res. 113, 145-155). At wavelengths less than 580nm about 30% of excitation is absorbed by pigments poorly connected to either photosystem, most likely carotenoids bound in pigment-protein complexes.

  12. On Global One-Dimensionality proposal in Quantum General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Glinka, L A

    2008-01-01

    Quantum General Relativity, better known as Quantum Gravity with additional epithets, currently is faraway from phenomenology. This mental crisis leads at most to empty hypotheses, but not to realistic physics. However, there exists the way, investigated by Dirac, which is constructive for experimental data predictions in astrophysics, high energy physics, and condensed matter physics. It is Field Theory. This article presents certain proposal for new discussion. General Relativity in 3+1 metric field gauge and its canonical quantization is developed. Reduction of the quantum geometrodynamics to Global One-Dimensional bosonic field theory, its quantization, and some conclusions are presented.

  13. Dispersion Relation of Linear Waves in Quantum Magnetoplasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun

    2016-07-01

    The quantum magnetohydrodynamic (QMHD) model is applied in investigating the propagation of linear waves in quantum magnetoplasmas. Using the QMHD model, the dispersion equation for quantum magnetoplasmas and the dispersion relations of linear waves are deduced. Results show that quantum effects affect the propagation of electron plasma waves and extraordinary waves (X waves). When we select the plasma parameters of the laser-based plasma compression (LBPC) schemes for calculation, the quantum correction cannot be neglected. Meanwhile, the corrections produced by the Fermi degeneracy pressure and Bohm potential are compared under different plasma parameter conditions. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11447125) and the Research Training Program for Undergraduates of Shanxi University of China (Nos. 2014012167, 2015013182)

  14. Biosolar cells: global artificial photosynthesis needs responsive matrices with quantum coherent kinetic control for high yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purchase, R L; de Groot, H J M

    2015-06-06

    This contribution discusses why we should consider developing artificial photosynthesis with the tandem approach followed by the Dutch BioSolar Cells consortium, a current operational paradigm for a global artificial photosynthesis project. We weigh the advantages and disadvantages of a tandem converter against other approaches, including biomass. Owing to the low density of solar energy per unit area, artificial photosynthetic systems must operate at high efficiency to minimize the land (or sea) area required. In particular, tandem converters are a much better option than biomass for densely populated countries and use two photons per electron extracted from water as the raw material into chemical conversion to hydrogen, or carbon-based fuel when CO2 is also used. For the average total light sum of 40 mol m(-2) d(-1) for The Netherlands, the upper limits are many tons of hydrogen or carbon-based fuel per hectare per year. A principal challenge is to forge materials for quantitative conversion of photons to chemical products within the physical limitation of an internal potential of ca 2.9 V. When going from electric charge in the tandem to hydrogen and back to electricity, only the energy equivalent to 1.23 V can be stored in the fuel and regained. A critical step is then to learn from nature how to use the remaining difference of ca 1.7 V effectively by triple use of one overpotential for preventing recombination, kinetic stabilization of catalytic intermediates and finally generating targeted heat for the release of oxygen. Probably the only way to achieve this is by using bioinspired responsive matrices that have quantum-classical pathways for a coherent conversion of photons to fuels, similar to what has been achieved by natural selection in evolution. In appendix A for the expert, we derive a propagator that describes how catalytic reactions can proceed coherently by a convergence of time scales of quantum electron dynamics and classical nuclear dynamics. We

  15. Adaptation to high CO2 concentration in an optimal environment: radiation capture, canopy quantum yield and carbon use efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, O.; Bugbee, B.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of elevated [CO2] on wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Veery 10) productivity was examined by analysing radiation capture, canopy quantum yield, canopy carbon use efficiency, harvest index and daily C gain. Canopies were grown at either 330 or 1200 micromoles mol-1 [CO2] in controlled environments, where root and shoot C fluxes were monitored continuously from emergence to harvest. A rapidly circulating hydroponic solution supplied nutrients, water and root zone oxygen. At harvest, dry mass predicted from gas exchange data was 102.8 +/- 4.7% of the observed dry mass in six trials. Neither radiation capture efficiency nor carbon use efficiency were affected by elevated [CO2], but yield increased by 13% due to a sustained increase in canopy quantum yield. CO2 enrichment increased root mass, tiller number and seed mass. Harvest index and chlorophyll concentration were unchanged, but CO2 enrichment increased average life cycle net photosynthesis (13%, P < 0.05) and root respiration (24%, P < 0.05). These data indicate that plant communities adapt to CO2 enrichment through changes in C allocation. Elevated [CO2] increases sink strength in optimal environments, resulting in sustained increases in photosynthetic capacity, canopy quantum yield and daily C gain throughout the life cycle.

  16. Adaptation to high CO2 concentration in an optimal environment: radiation capture, canopy quantum yield and carbon use efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, O.; Bugbee, B.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of elevated [CO2] on wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Veery 10) productivity was examined by analysing radiation capture, canopy quantum yield, canopy carbon use efficiency, harvest index and daily C gain. Canopies were grown at either 330 or 1200 micromoles mol-1 [CO2] in controlled environments, where root and shoot C fluxes were monitored continuously from emergence to harvest. A rapidly circulating hydroponic solution supplied nutrients, water and root zone oxygen. At harvest, dry mass predicted from gas exchange data was 102.8 +/- 4.7% of the observed dry mass in six trials. Neither radiation capture efficiency nor carbon use efficiency were affected by elevated [CO2], but yield increased by 13% due to a sustained increase in canopy quantum yield. CO2 enrichment increased root mass, tiller number and seed mass. Harvest index and chlorophyll concentration were unchanged, but CO2 enrichment increased average life cycle net photosynthesis (13%, P CO2 enrichment through changes in C allocation. Elevated [CO2] increases sink strength in optimal environments, resulting in sustained increases in photosynthetic capacity, canopy quantum yield and daily C gain throughout the life cycle.

  17. Adaptation to high CO2 concentration in an optimal environment: radiation capture, canopy quantum yield and carbon use efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, O.; Bugbee, B.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of elevated [CO2] on wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Veery 10) productivity was examined by analysing radiation capture, canopy quantum yield, canopy carbon use efficiency, harvest index and daily C gain. Canopies were grown at either 330 or 1200 micromoles mol-1 [CO2] in controlled environments, where root and shoot C fluxes were monitored continuously from emergence to harvest. A rapidly circulating hydroponic solution supplied nutrients, water and root zone oxygen. At harvest, dry mass predicted from gas exchange data was 102.8 +/- 4.7% of the observed dry mass in six trials. Neither radiation capture efficiency nor carbon use efficiency were affected by elevated [CO2], but yield increased by 13% due to a sustained increase in canopy quantum yield. CO2 enrichment increased root mass, tiller number and seed mass. Harvest index and chlorophyll concentration were unchanged, but CO2 enrichment increased average life cycle net photosynthesis (13%, P CO2 enrichment through changes in C allocation. Elevated [CO2] increases sink strength in optimal environments, resulting in sustained increases in photosynthetic capacity, canopy quantum yield and daily C gain throughout the life cycle.

  18. A Novel Method For Predicting Carbon Monoxide Apparent Quantum Yield Spectra in Coastal Water Using Remote Sensing Reflectance Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reader, H. E.; Miller, W. L.

    2010-12-01

    Photochemical oxidation of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is the major source of carbon monoxide to the surface ocean. Bacterial consumption and air-sea exchange comprise the two known sinks for CO in marine systems. Though the two loss terms are relatively efficient, CO remains supersaturated with respect to the atmosphere in the surface ocean. Global oceanic estimates of CO photoproduction range from 30-84Tg CO/year (Zafiriou 2003, Fichot and Miller 2010). The variation in estimates is largely due to the difficulty in predicting the efficiency of photoproduction (i.e. Apparent Quantum Yield; AQY). Though the AQY for CO photoproduction appears to be relatively constant, there is indication that terrestrially derived sources, such as those found in estuarine environments, produce CO more efficiently than marine derived sources (Ziolkowski 2000). Since variation among sources is likely in the global ocean, accurate assignment of AQY to variable water types is required to accurately predict CO photoproduction. Deriving the correct apparent quantum yield from remotely sensed data would lead to better predictions of large scale CO photoproduction from optical data. Thirty-eight (38) AQY spectra for CO photoproduction were determined by monthly sampling during spring tides in three dark water locations on the coast of Georgia, USA, from November 2008 to September 2009. Sapelo Sound, a marine dominated system, receives little to no freshwater input over the year, while Altamaha Sound drains the largest watershed in the state of Georgia, and has largely variably freshwater input. Doboy Sound, situated between Sapelo Sound and Altamaha Sound, is largely marine dominated, though in periods of high flow on the Altamaha River, receives some fresh water overflow. The coast of Georgia is dominated by Spartina alterniflora salt marshes, and thus also has a strong non-point source of terrestrially derived carbon. CO apparent quantum yields were determined by

  19. On the ``principle of the quantumness,'' the quantumness of Relativity, and the computational grand-unification

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro

    2010-05-01

    I will argue that the proposal of establishing operational foundations of Quantum Theory should have top-priority, and that the Lucien Hardy's program on Quantum Gravity should be paralleled by an analogous program on Quantum Field Theory (QFT), which needs to be reformulated, notwithstanding its experimental success. In this paper, after reviewing recently suggested operational "principles of the quantumness," I address the problem on whether Quantum Theory and Special Relativity are unrelated theories, or instead, if the one implies the other. I show how Special Relativity can be indeed derived from causality of Quantum Theory, within the computational paradigm "the universe is a huge quantum computer," reformulating QFT as a Quantum-Computational Field Theory (QCFT). In QCFT Special Relativity emerges from the fabric of the computational network, which also naturally embeds gauge invariance. In this scheme even the quantization rule and the Planck constant can in principle be derived as emergent from the underlying causal tapestry of space-time. In this way Quantum Theory remains the only theory operating the huge computer of the universe. Is the computational paradigm only a speculative tautology (theory as simulation of reality), or does it have a scientific value? The answer will come from Occam's razor, depending on the mathematical simplicity of QCFT. Here I will just start scratching the surface of QCFT, analyzing simple field theories, including Dirac's. The number of problems and unmotivated recipes that plague QFT strongly motivates us to undertake the QCFT project, since QCFT makes all such problems manifest, and forces a re-foundation of QFT.

  20. A principle of relativity for quantum theory

    CERN Document Server

    Zaopo, Marco

    2012-01-01

    In non relativistic physics it is assumed that both chronological ordering and causal ordering of events (telling wether there exists a causal relationship between two events or not) are absolute, observer independent properties. In relativistic physics on the other hand chronological ordering depends on the observer who assigns space-time coordinates to physical events and only causal ordering is regarded as an observer independent property. In this paper it is shown that quantum theory can be considered as a physical theory in which causal (as well as chronological) ordering of probabilistic events happening in experiments may be regarded as an observer dependent property.

  1. Quantum mechanics, gravity and modified quantization relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmet, Xavier

    2015-08-06

    In this paper, we investigate a possible energy scale dependence of the quantization rules and, in particular, from a phenomenological point of view, an energy scale dependence of an effective [Formula: see text] (reduced Planck's constant). We set a bound on the deviation of the value of [Formula: see text] at the muon scale from its usual value using measurements of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. Assuming that inflation has taken place, we can conclude that nature is described by a quantum theory at least up to an energy scale of about 10(16) GeV.

  2. Predicting fluorescence quantum yield for anisole at elevated temperatures and pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Tran, K. H.; Morin, C.; Bonnety, J.; Legros, G.; Guibert, P.

    2017-07-01

    Aromatic molecules are promising candidates for using as a fluorescent tracer for gas-phase scalar parameter diagnostics in a drastic environment like engines. Along with anisole turning out an excellent temperature tracer by Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) diagnostics in Rapid Compression Machine (RCM), its fluorescence signal evolution versus pressure and temperature variation in a high-pressure and high-temperature cell have been reported in our recent paper on Applied Phys. B by Tran et al. Parallel to this experimental study, a photophysical model to determine anisole Fluorescence Quantum Yield (FQY) is delivered in this paper. The key to development of the model is the identification of pressure, temperature, and ambient gases, where the FQY is dominated by certain processes of the model (quenching effect, vibrational relaxation, etc.). In addition to optimization of the vibrational relaxation energy cascade coefficient and the collision probability with oxygen, the non-radiative pathways are mainly discussed. The common non-radiative rate (intersystem crossing and internal conversion) is simulated in parametric form as a function of excess vibrational energy, derived from the data acquired at different pressures and temperatures from the literature. A new non-radiative rate, namely, the equivalent Intramolecular Vibrational Redistribution or Randomization (IVR) rate, is proposed to characterize anisole deactivated processes. The new model exhibits satisfactory results which are validated against experimental measurements of fluorescence signal induced at a wavelength of 266 nm in a cell with different bath gases (N2, CO2, Ar and O2), a pressure range from 0.2 to 4 MPa, and a temperature range from 473 to 873 K.

  3. Bulk Rashba Semiconductors and Related Quantum Phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahramy, Mohammad Saeed; Ogawa, Naoki

    2017-03-29

    Bithmuth tellurohalides BiTeX (X = Cl, Br and I) are model examples of bulk Rashba semiconductors, exhibiting a giant Rashba-type spin splitting among their both valence and conduction bands. Extensive spectroscopic and transport experiments combined with the state-of-the-art first-principles calculations have revealed many unique quantum phenomena emerging from the bulk Rashba effect in these systems. The novel features such as the exotic inter- and intra-band optical transitions, enhanced magneto-optical response, divergent orbital dia-/para-magnetic susceptibility and helical spin textures with a nontrivial Berry's phase in the momentum space are among the salient discoveries, all arising from this effect. Also, it is theoretically proposed and indications have been experimentally reported that bulk Rashba semiconductors such as BiTeI have the capability of becoming a topological insulator under the application of a hydrostatic pressure. Here, we overview these studies and show that BiTeX are an ideal platform to explore the next aspects of quantum matter, which could ultimately be utilized to create spintronic devices with novel functionalities.

  4. Some relations between quantum Turing machines and Turing machines

    CERN Document Server

    Sicard, A; Sicard, Andrés; Vélez, Mario

    1999-01-01

    For quantum Turing machines we present three elements: Its components, its time evolution operator and its local transition function. The components are related with deterministic Turing machines, the time evolution operator is related with reversible Turing machines and the local transition function is related with probabilistic and reversible Turing machines.

  5. Observability of relative phases of macroscopic quantum states

    CERN Document Server

    Pati, A K

    1998-01-01

    After a measurement, to observe the relative phases of macroscopically distinguishable states we have to ``undo'' a quantum measurement. We generalise an earlier model of Peres from two state to N-state quantum system undergoing measurement process and discuss the issue of observing relative phases of different branches. We derive an inequality which is satisfied by the relative phases of macroscopically distinguishable states and consequently any desired relative phases can not be observed in interference setups. The principle of macroscopic complementarity is invoked that might be at ease with the macroscopic world. We illustrate the idea of limit on phase observability in Stern-Gerlach measurements and the implications are discussed.

  6. Structure-Triggered High Quantum Yield Luminescence and Switchable Dielectric Properties in Manganese(II) Based Hybrid Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong-Xia; Li, Peng-Fei; Liao, Wei-Qiang; Tang, Yuanyuan; Ye, Heng-Yun; Zhang, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Two new manganese(II) based organic-inorganic hybrid compounds, C11H21Cl3MnN2 (1) and C11H22Cl4MnN2 (2), with prominent photoluminescence and dielectric properties were synthesized by solvent modulation. Compound 1 with novel trigonal bipyramidal geometry exhibits bright red luminescence with a lifetime of 2.47 ms and high quantum yield of 35.8 %. Compound 2 with tetrahedral geometry displays intense long-lived (1.54 ms) green light emission with higher quantum yield of 92.3 %, accompanied by reversible solid-state phase transition at 170 K and a distinct switchable dielectric property. The better performance of 2 results from the structure, including a discrete organic cation moiety and inorganic metal anion framework, which gives the cations large freedom of motion.

  7. Quantum yield of Cl∗ (21/2) production in the gas phase photolysis of CCl4 in the ultraviolet

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manish Tak; Manabendra Chandra; Dulal Senapati; Puspendu K Das

    2006-07-01

    In this paper, we have probed the dynamics of chlorine atom production from the gas phase photodissociation of carbon tetrachloride at 222 and 235 nm. The quantum yield, * of Cl∗ (21/2) production has been determined by probing the nascent concentrations of both excited (21/2) and ground state (23/2) chlorine atoms by suitable resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) detection schemes. Although at the photolysis wavelengths the absorption of carbon tetrachloride is weak, significant amounts of Cl∗ are produced. Surprisingly, the quantum yield of Cl∗ production does not follow the absorption spectrum closely, which gives rise to the possibility of an indirect dissociation mechanism present in CCl4 along with direct dissociation at these ultraviolet wavelengths.

  8. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meusinger, Carl; Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Erbland, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Post-depositional processes alter nitrate concentration and nitrate isotopic composition in the top layers of snow at sites with low snow accumulation rates, such as Dome C, Antarctica. Available nitrate ice core records can provide input for studying past atmospheres and climate if such processes...... undergoing secondary (recombination) chemistry. Modeled NOx emissions may increase significantly above measured values due to the observed quantum yield in this study. The apparent quantum yield in the 200 nm band was found to be ∼ 1%, much lower than reported for aqueous chemistry. A companion paper...... presents an analysis of the change in isotopic composition of snowpack nitrate based on the same samples as in this study....

  9. Quantum geometry of resurgent perturbative/nonperturbative relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basar, Gökçe; Dunne, Gerald V.; Ünsal, Mithat

    2017-05-01

    For a wide variety of quantum potentials, including the textbook `instanton' examples of the periodic cosine and symmetric double-well potentials, the perturbative data coming from fluctuations about the vacuum saddle encodes all non-perturbative data in all higher non-perturbative sectors. Here we unify these examples in geometric terms, arguing that the all-orders quantum action determines the all-orders quantum dual action for quantum spectral problems associated with a classical genus one elliptic curve. Furthermore, for a special class of genus one potentials this relation is particularly simple: this class includes the cubic oscillator, symmetric double-well, symmetric degenerate triple-well, and periodic cosine potential. These are related to the Chebyshev potentials, which are in turn related to certain \\mathcal{N} = 2 supersymmetric quantum field theories, to mirror maps for hypersurfaces in projective spaces, and also to topological c = 3 Landau-Ginzburg models and `special geometry'. These systems inherit a natural modular structure corresponding to Ramanujan's theory of elliptic functions in alternative bases, which is especially important for the quantization. Insights from supersymmetric quantum field theory suggest similar structures for more complicated potentials, corresponding to higher genus. Our approach is very elementary, using basic classical geometry combined with all-orders WKB.

  10. Quantum yields for OH production from 193 and 248 nm photolysis of HNO3 and H2O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, A.; Nelson, D. D., Jr.; Nesbitt, D. J.

    1993-05-01

    Flash kinetic spectroscopy in a flow tube is used to measure at room temperature the absolute yields for OH production from 193 and 248 nm photolysis of HNO3 and H2O2. The OH radicals are produced by excimer laser photolysis and probed via direct absorption of high resolution tunable IR laser light. The results indicate quantum yields for both precursors at both wavelengths which are less than the maximum possible values of 1 for H2O2. The present measurements are discussed in light of contrasting results suggested from other work.

  11. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meusinger, Carl; Johnson, Matthew S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joel, E-mail: jsavarino@lgge.obs.ujf-grenoble.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, LGGE, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, LGGE, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2014-06-28

    Post-depositional processes alter nitrate concentration and nitrate isotopic composition in the top layers of snow at sites with low snow accumulation rates, such as Dome C, Antarctica. Available nitrate ice core records can provide input for studying past atmospheres and climate if such processes are understood. It has been shown that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack plays a major role in nitrate loss and that the photolysis products have a significant influence on the local troposphere as well as on other species in the snow. Reported quantum yields for the main reaction spans orders of magnitude – apparently a result of whether nitrate is located at the air-ice interface or in the ice matrix – constituting the largest uncertainty in models of snowpack NO{sub x} emissions. Here, a laboratory study is presented that uses snow from Dome C and minimizes effects of desorption and recombination by flushing the snow during irradiation with UV light. A selection of UV filters allowed examination of the effects of the 200 and 305 nm absorption bands of nitrate. Nitrate concentration and photon flux were measured in the snow. The quantum yield for loss of nitrate was observed to decrease from 0.44 to 0.003 within what corresponds to days of UV exposure in Antarctica. The superposition of photolysis in two photochemical domains of nitrate in snow is proposed: one of photolabile nitrate, and one of buried nitrate. The difference lies in the ability of reaction products to escape the snow crystal, versus undergoing secondary (recombination) chemistry. Modeled NO{sub x} emissions may increase significantly above measured values due to the observed quantum yield in this study. The apparent quantum yield in the 200 nm band was found to be ∼1%, much lower than reported for aqueous chemistry. A companion paper presents an analysis of the change in isotopic composition of snowpack nitrate based on the same samples as in this study.

  12. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meusinger, Carl; Berhanu, Tesfaye A; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joel; Johnson, Matthew S

    2014-06-28

    Post-depositional processes alter nitrate concentration and nitrate isotopic composition in the top layers of snow at sites with low snow accumulation rates, such as Dome C, Antarctica. Available nitrate ice core records can provide input for studying past atmospheres and climate if such processes are understood. It has been shown that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack plays a major role in nitrate loss and that the photolysis products have a significant influence on the local troposphere as well as on other species in the snow. Reported quantum yields for the main reaction spans orders of magnitude - apparently a result of whether nitrate is located at the air-ice interface or in the ice matrix - constituting the largest uncertainty in models of snowpack NOx emissions. Here, a laboratory study is presented that uses snow from Dome C and minimizes effects of desorption and recombination by flushing the snow during irradiation with UV light. A selection of UV filters allowed examination of the effects of the 200 and 305 nm absorption bands of nitrate. Nitrate concentration and photon flux were measured in the snow. The quantum yield for loss of nitrate was observed to decrease from 0.44 to 0.003 within what corresponds to days of UV exposure in Antarctica. The superposition of photolysis in two photochemical domains of nitrate in snow is proposed: one of photolabile nitrate, and one of buried nitrate. The difference lies in the ability of reaction products to escape the snow crystal, versus undergoing secondary (recombination) chemistry. Modeled NOx emissions may increase significantly above measured values due to the observed quantum yield in this study. The apparent quantum yield in the 200 nm band was found to be ∼1%, much lower than reported for aqueous chemistry. A companion paper presents an analysis of the change in isotopic composition of snowpack nitrate based on the same samples as in this study.

  13. Can we Predict Quantum Yields Using Excited State Density Functional Theory for New Families of Fluorescent Dyes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Alexander W.; Lin, Zhou; Shepherd, James J.; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2016-06-01

    For a fluorescent dye, the quantum yield characterizes the efficiency of energy transfer from the absorbed light to the emitted fluorescence. In the screening among potential families of dyes, those with higher quantum yields are expected to have more advantages. From the perspective of theoreticians, an efficient prediction of the quantum yield using a universal excited state electronic structure theory is in demand but still challenging. The most representative examples for such excited state theory include time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and restricted open-shell Kohn-Sham (ROKS). In the present study, we explore the possibility of predicting the quantum yields for conventional and new families of organic dyes using a combination of TDDFT and ROKS. We focus on radiative (kr) and nonradiative (knr) rates for the decay of the first singlet excited state (S_1) into the ground state (S_0) in accordance with Kasha's rule. M. Kasha, Discuss. Faraday Soc., 9, 14 (1950). For each dye compound, kr is calculated with the S_1-S_0 energy gap and transition dipole moment obtained using ROKS and TDDFT respectively at the relaxed S_1 geometry. Our predicted kr agrees well with the experimental value, so long as the order of energy levels is correctly predicted. Evaluation of knr is less straightforward as multiple processes are involved. Our study focuses on the S_1-T_1 intersystem crossing (ISC) and the S_1-S_0 internal conversion (IC): we investigate the properties that allow us to model the knr value using a Marcus-like expression, such as the Stokes shift, the reorganization energy, and the S_1-T_1 and S_1-S_0 energy gaps. Taking these factors into consideration, we compare our results with those obtained using the actual Marcus theory and provide explanation for discrepancy. T. Kowalczyk, T. Tsuchimochi, L. Top, P.-T. Chen, and T. Van Voorhis, J. Chem. Phys., 138, 164101 (2013). M. Kasha, Discuss. Faraday Soc., 9, 14 (1950).

  14. Onion seed vigor in relation to plant growth and yield

    OpenAIRE

    Rodo Angélica B.; Marcos-Filho Julio

    2003-01-01

    Research has emphasized the relationship of laboratory germination and vigor to seedling emergence and stand establishment, but information relating seed vigor to plant performance is less available. The reliable procedures to evaluate onion (Allium cepa L.) seed vigor and decided the differences between seed physiological potential influence plant performance in field conditions were identified in two experimental years. Six seed lots of Petroline cultivar were evaluated for germination and ...

  15. Biosolar cells: global artificial photosynthesis needs responsive matrices with quantum coherent kinetic control for high yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purchase, R. L.; de Groot, H. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    This contribution discusses why we should consider developing artificial photosynthesis with the tandem approach followed by the Dutch BioSolar Cells consortium, a current operational paradigm for a global artificial photosynthesis project. We weigh the advantages and disadvantages of a tandem converter against other approaches, including biomass. Owing to the low density of solar energy per unit area, artificial photosynthetic systems must operate at high efficiency to minimize the land (or sea) area required. In particular, tandem converters are a much better option than biomass for densely populated countries and use two photons per electron extracted from water as the raw material into chemical conversion to hydrogen, or carbon-based fuel when CO2 is also used. For the average total light sum of 40 mol m−2 d−1 for The Netherlands, the upper limits are many tons of hydrogen or carbon-based fuel per hectare per year. A principal challenge is to forge materials for quantitative conversion of photons to chemical products within the physical limitation of an internal potential of ca 2.9 V. When going from electric charge in the tandem to hydrogen and back to electricity, only the energy equivalent to 1.23 V can be stored in the fuel and regained. A critical step is then to learn from nature how to use the remaining difference of ca 1.7 V effectively by triple use of one overpotential for preventing recombination, kinetic stabilization of catalytic intermediates and finally generating targeted heat for the release of oxygen. Probably the only way to achieve this is by using bioinspired responsive matrices that have quantum–classical pathways for a coherent conversion of photons to fuels, similar to what has been achieved by natural selection in evolution. In appendix A for the expert, we derive a propagator that describes how catalytic reactions can proceed coherently by a convergence of time scales of quantum electron dynamics and classical nuclear dynamics

  16. Geometry, commutation relations and the quantum fictitious force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Botero, J.; Cirone, M.A.; Dahl, Jens Peder

    2003-01-01

    We express the commutation relation between the operators of the momentum and the radial unit vectors in D dimensions in differential and integral form. We connect this commutator with the quantum fictitious potential emerging in the radial Schrodinger equation of an s-wave.......We express the commutation relation between the operators of the momentum and the radial unit vectors in D dimensions in differential and integral form. We connect this commutator with the quantum fictitious potential emerging in the radial Schrodinger equation of an s-wave....

  17. Tripartite entanglement and quantum relative entropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvao, E.F. [Centre for Quantum Computation, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom). E-mail: e.galvao@physics.ox.ac.uk; Plenio, M.B. [Optics Section, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). E-mail: m.plenio@ic.ac.uk; Virmani, S. [Optics Section, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). E-mail: s.virmani@ic.ac.uk

    2000-12-08

    We establish relations between tripartite pure state entanglement and additivity properties of the bipartite relative entropy of entanglement. Our results pertain to the asymptotic limit of local manipulations on a large number of copies of the state. We show that additivity of the relative entropy would imply that there are at least two inequivalent types of asymptotic tripartite entanglement. The methods used include the application of some useful lemmas that enable us to analytically calculate the relative entropy for some classes of bipartite states. (author)

  18. John Wheeler, relativity, and quantum information

    OpenAIRE

    Misner, Charles W.; Thorne, Kip S.; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    2009-01-01

    In spring 1952, as John Wheeler neared the end of design work for the first thermonuclear explosion, he plotted a radical change of research direction: from particles and atomic nuclei to general relativity.

  19. Deep tissue optical imaging of upconverting nanoparticles enabled by exploiting higher intrinsic quantum yield through use of millisecond single pulse excitation with high peak power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Haichun; Xu, Can T.; Dumlupinar, Gökhan;

    2013-01-01

    quantum yield that is utilized by upconverting nanoparticles for generating this near infrared upconversion emission. The pulsed excitation approach thus promises previously unreachable imaging depths and shorter data acquisition times compared with continuous wave excitation, while simultaneously keeping...

  20. Multiple exciton generation for photoelectrochemical hydrogen evolution reactions with quantum yields exceeding 100%

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yong; Crisp, Ryan W.; Gu, Jing; Chernomordik, Boris D.; Pach, Gregory F.; Marshall, Ashley R.; Turner, John A.; Beard, Matthew C.

    2017-04-01

    Multiple exciton generation (MEG) in quantum dots (QDs) has the potential to greatly increase the power conversion efficiency in solar cells and in solar-fuel production. During the MEG process, two electron-hole pairs (excitons) are created from the absorption of one high-energy photon, bypassing hot-carrier cooling via phonon emission. Here we demonstrate that extra carriers produced via MEG can be used to drive a chemical reaction with quantum efficiency above 100%. We developed a lead sulfide (PbS) QD photoelectrochemical cell that is able to drive hydrogen evolution from aqueous Na2S solution with a peak external quantum efficiency exceeding 100%. QD photoelectrodes that were measured all demonstrated MEG when the incident photon energy was larger than 2.7 times the bandgap energy. Our results demonstrate a new direction in exploring high-efficiency approaches to solar fuels.

  1. On Quantum Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Cleve, R; Henderson, L; Macchiavello, C; Mosca, M

    1998-01-01

    Quantum computers use the quantum interference of different computational paths to enhance correct outcomes and suppress erroneous outcomes of computations. In effect, they follow the same logical paradigm as (multi-particle) interferometers. We show how most known quantum algorithms, including quantum algorithms for factorising and counting, may be cast in this manner. Quantum searching is described as inducing a desired relative phase between two eigenvectors to yield constructive interference on the sought elements and destructive interference on the remaining terms.

  2. Monogamy relation in multipartite continuous-variable quantum teleportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaehak; Ji, Se-Wan; Park, Jiyong; Nha, Hyunchul

    2016-12-01

    Quantum teleportation (QT) is a fundamentally remarkable communication protocol that also finds many important applications for quantum informatics. Given a quantum entangled resource, it is crucial to know to what extent one can accomplish the QT. This is usually assessed in terms of output fidelity, which can also be regarded as an operational measure of entanglement. In the case of multipartite communication when each communicator possesses a part of an N -partite entangled state, not all pairs of communicators can achieve a high fidelity due to the monogamy property of quantum entanglement. We here investigate how such a monogamy relation arises in multipartite continuous-variable (CV) teleportation, particularly when using a Gaussian entangled state. We show a strict monogamy relation, i.e., a sender cannot achieve a fidelity higher than optimal cloning limit with more than one receiver. While this seems rather natural owing to the no-cloning theorem, a strict monogamy relation still holds even if the sender is allowed to individually manipulate the reduced state in collaboration with each receiver to improve fidelity. The local operations are further extended to non-Gaussian operations such as photon subtraction and addition, and we demonstrate that the Gaussian cloning bound cannot be beaten by more than one pair of communicators. Furthermore, we investigate a quantitative form of monogamy relation in terms of teleportation capability, for which we show that a faithful monogamy inequality does not exist.

  3. Basic concepts in relativity and early quantum theory

    CERN Document Server

    Resnick, Robert

    1972-01-01

    In this book, the concepts in relativity and early quantum theory - which form the basis for what is called modern physics - are presented with great clarity by Robert Resnick, well known as a fine expositor. His presentation is lively and interspersed with historical, philosophical, and special topics that arouse and hold the reader's interest.

  4. Quantum Rényi relative entropies affirm universality of thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Avijit; Singh, Uttam; Bera, Manabendra Nath; Rajagopal, A. K.

    2015-10-01

    We formulate a complete theory of quantum thermodynamics in the Rényi entropic formalism exploiting the Rényi relative entropies, starting from the maximum entropy principle. In establishing the first and second laws of quantum thermodynamics, we have correctly identified accessible work and heat exchange in both equilibrium and nonequilibrium cases. The free energy (internal energy minus temperature times entropy) remains unaltered, when all the entities entering this relation are suitably defined. Exploiting Rényi relative entropies we have shown that this "form invariance" holds even beyond equilibrium and has profound operational significance in isothermal process. These results reduce to the Gibbs-von Neumann results when the Rényi entropic parameter α approaches 1. Moreover, it is shown that the universality of the Carnot statement of the second law is the consequence of the form invariance of the free energy, which is in turn the consequence of maximum entropy principle. Further, the Clausius inequality, which is the precursor to the Carnot statement, is also shown to hold based on the data processing inequalities for the traditional and sandwiched Rényi relative entropies. Thus, we find that the thermodynamics of nonequilibrium state and its deviation from equilibrium together determine the thermodynamic laws. This is another important manifestation of the concepts of information theory in thermodynamics when they are extended to the quantum realm. Our work is a substantial step towards formulating a complete theory of quantum thermodynamics and corresponding resource theory.

  5. Quantum Rényi relative entropies affirm universality of thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Avijit; Singh, Uttam; Bera, Manabendra Nath; Rajagopal, A K

    2015-10-01

    We formulate a complete theory of quantum thermodynamics in the Rényi entropic formalism exploiting the Rényi relative entropies, starting from the maximum entropy principle. In establishing the first and second laws of quantum thermodynamics, we have correctly identified accessible work and heat exchange in both equilibrium and nonequilibrium cases. The free energy (internal energy minus temperature times entropy) remains unaltered, when all the entities entering this relation are suitably defined. Exploiting Rényi relative entropies we have shown that this "form invariance" holds even beyond equilibrium and has profound operational significance in isothermal process. These results reduce to the Gibbs-von Neumann results when the Rényi entropic parameter α approaches 1. Moreover, it is shown that the universality of the Carnot statement of the second law is the consequence of the form invariance of the free energy, which is in turn the consequence of maximum entropy principle. Further, the Clausius inequality, which is the precursor to the Carnot statement, is also shown to hold based on the data processing inequalities for the traditional and sandwiched Rényi relative entropies. Thus, we find that the thermodynamics of nonequilibrium state and its deviation from equilibrium together determine the thermodynamic laws. This is another important manifestation of the concepts of information theory in thermodynamics when they are extended to the quantum realm. Our work is a substantial step towards formulating a complete theory of quantum thermodynamics and corresponding resource theory.

  6. Quantum capacitance in monolayers of silicene and related buckled materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, S.; Tahir, M.

    2016-02-01

    Silicene and related buckled materials are distinct from both the conventional two dimensional electron gas and the famous graphene due to strong spin orbit coupling and the buckled structure. These materials have potential to overcome limitations encountered for graphene, in particular the zero band gap and weak spin orbit coupling. We present a theoretical realization of quantum capacitance which has advantages over the scattering problems of traditional transport measurements. We derive and discuss quantum capacitance as a function of the Fermi energy and temperature taking into account electron-hole puddles through a Gaussian broadening distribution. Our predicted results are very exciting and pave the way for future spintronic and valleytronic devices.

  7. Quantum-memory-assisted entropic uncertainty relations under weak measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Wang, Qing-Wen; Shen, Shu-Qian; Li, Ming

    2017-08-01

    We investigate quantum-memory-assisted entropic uncertainty relations (EURs) based on weak measurements. It is shown that the lower bound of EUR revealed by weak measurements is always larger than that revealed by the corresponding projective measurements. A series of lower bounds of EUR under both weak measurements and projective measurements are presented. Interestingly, the quantum-memory-assisted EUR based on weak measurements is a monotonically decreasing function of the strength parameter. Furthermore, some information-theoretic inequalities associated with weak measurements are also derived.

  8. Aqueous synthesis of MPA-capped CdTe nanocrystals emitted in near infrared with high quantum yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yongqiang; Liu, Ning; Yang, Ping; Zhu, Yuanna; Shi, Ruixia; Ma, Qian; Zhang, Aiyu

    2014-07-01

    The high luminescent near infrared (NIR)--emitting CdTe nanocrystals (NCs) with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) as the stabilized molecules had been sucessfully fabricated by a facile and simple water-reflux method. By virtue of the characterizations for the as-prepared MPA-capped CdTe NCs, such as UV-Vis absorption, steady-state photoluminescence (PL), time-resolved PL spectra and PL image, the optical properties, diameters and morphologies of the CdTe NCs were investigated detailedly. With the increase of reflux time, the PL peak wavelength of NCs gradually shifted from red light to NIR spectra range within 7 h, and the PL quantum yield (QY) was increased firstly and then decreased slightly. It was worth noted that the NCs still showed a relative high PL QY of 47% as well as a narrow full width at half maximum (FWHM) of PL spectra even when the NCs emitted at the NIR wavelength of 754 nm. In addition, the average PL lifetime also exhibited an obvious increase as the growth of CdTe NCs due to the formation of thin CdS shell on the surface of CdTe. The PL stabilities for these NIR-emitting NCs (754 nm) in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) buffer solution with various concentrations ranged from 0.005 to 0.1 M were also checked accordingly, and the results indicated that the as-prepared NIR-emitting CdTe NCs had a satisfied PL stability, implying a potential application in the biological field. Hopefully, all the superiority of these NIR-emitting CdTe NCs, such as high PL QY and PL lifetime, narrow FWHM of PL spectra, high PL stability in PBS solution, would make them to be a good candidate for biological applications in future.

  9. Causality, relativity and quantum correlation experiments with moving reference frames

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H Zbinden; J Brendel; W Tittel; N Gisin

    2001-02-01

    Entanglement, one of the most important features of quantum mechanics, is at the core of the famous Einstein–Bohr philosophical debate [1] and is the principal resource for quantum information processing [2]. We report on new experimental investigations of the properties of entangled photon pairs with emphasis on the tension between quantum mechanics and relativity [3,4]. Entangled photons are sent via an optical fiber network to two villages near Geneva, separated by more than 10 km where they are analyzed by interferometers [5]. The photon pair source is set as precisely as possible in the center so that the two photons arrive at the detectors within a time interval of less than 5 ps (corresponding to a path length difference of less than 1 mm). This sets a lower bound on the ‘speed of quantum information’ to 107 times the speed of light. Next, one detector is set in motion [6] so that both detectors, each in its own inertial reference frame, are first to do the measurement! The data always reproduces the quantum correlations.

  10. Relational time in quantum physics; Relationale Zeit in der Quantenphysik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoge, Marc Oliver

    2008-12-15

    In this diploma thesis a relational and intrinsic description of the external time parameter in non-relativistic quantum mechanics is given using two separate methods. Firstly, the dynamics of a system is expressed in terms of a collection of physical observables, so called ''clock'' variables, which are themselves part of the system. In particular it is studied how the position of one particle can be used as a ''clock'' for parameterising the motion of another particle. Secondly, a formal generalisation is developed which implements time as a physical observable into quantum mechanics. This leads to a formalism which is more general than the ''clock'' variable approach. Using this formalism a novel analysis of a particular problem in quantum cosmology is carried out. (orig.)

  11. Experimental bit commitment based on quantum communication and special relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunghi, T; Kaniewski, J; Bussières, F; Houlmann, R; Tomamichel, M; Kent, A; Gisin, N; Wehner, S; Zbinden, H

    2013-11-01

    Bit commitment is a fundamental cryptographic primitive in which Bob wishes to commit a secret bit to Alice. Perfectly secure bit commitment between two mistrustful parties is impossible through asynchronous exchange of quantum information. Perfect security is however possible when Alice and Bob split into several agents exchanging classical and quantum information at times and locations suitably chosen to satisfy specific relativistic constraints. Here we report on an implementation of a bit commitment protocol using quantum communication and special relativity. Our protocol is based on [A. Kent, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 130501 (2012)] and has the advantage that it is practically feasible with arbitrary large separations between the agents in order to maximize the commitment time. By positioning agents in Geneva and Singapore, we obtain a commitment time of 15 ms. A security analysis considering experimental imperfections and finite statistics is presented.

  12. Classical-Quantum Correspondence and Functional Relations for Painleve Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Zabrodin, A

    2012-01-01

    In the light of the Quantum Painleve-Calogero Correspondence established in our previous papers [1,2], we investigate the inverse problem. We imply that this type of the correspondence (Classical-Quantum Correspondence) holds true and find out what kind of potentials arise from the compatibility conditions of the related linear problems. The latter conditions are written as functional equations for the potentials depending on a choice of a single function - the left-upper element of the Lax connection. The conditions of the Correspondence impose restrictions on this function. In particular, it satisfies the heat equation. It is shown that all natural choices of this function (rational, hyperbolic and elliptic) reproduce exactly the Painleve list of equations. In this sense the Classical-Quantum Correspondence can be regarded as an alternative definition of the Painleve equations.

  13. Mapping quantum yield for (Fe-Zn-Sn-Ti)Ox photoabsorbers using a high throughput photoelectrochemical screening system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Chengxiang; Haber, Joel; Marcin, Martin; Mitrovic, Slobodan; Jin, Jian; Gregoire, John M

    2014-03-10

    Combinatorial synthesis and screening of light absorbers are critical to material discoveries for photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical applications. One of the most effective ways to evaluate the energy-conversion properties of a semiconducting light absorber is to form an asymmetric junction and investigate the photogeneration, transport and recombination processes at the semiconductor interface. This standard photoelectrochemical measurement is readily made on a semiconductor sample with a back-side metallic contact (working electrode) and front-side solution contact. In a typical combinatorial material library, each sample shares a common back contact, requiring novel instrumentation to provide spatially resolved and thus sample-resolved measurements. We developed a multiplexing counter electrode with a thin layer assembly, in which a rectifying semiconductor/liquid junction was formed and the short-circuit photocurrent was measured under chopped illumination for each sample in a material library. The multiplexing counter electrode assembly demonstrated a photocurrent sensitivity of sub-10 μA cm(-2) with an external quantum yield sensitivity of 0.5% for each semiconductor sample under a monochromatic ultraviolet illumination source. The combination of cell architecture and multiplexing allows high-throughput modes of operation, including both fast-serial and parallel measurements. To demonstrate the performance of the instrument, the external quantum yields of 1819 different compositions from a pseudoquaternary metal oxide library, (Fe-Zn-Sn-Ti)Ox, at 385 nm were collected in scanning serial mode with a throughput of as fast as 1 s per sample. Preliminary screening results identified a promising ternary composition region centered at Fe0.894Sn0.103Ti0.0034Ox, with an external quantum yield of 6.7% at 385 nm.

  14. Solvent dependence of laser-synthesized blue-emitting Si nanoparticles: Size, quantum yield, and aging performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yunzi; Kitasako, Takumi; Maeda, Makoto; Saitow, Ken-ichi

    2017-04-01

    Pulsed-laser ablation of silicon (Si) was conducted in six different organic solvents using a nanosecond laser. Si nanoparticles (Si-NPs) that exhibited blue photoluminescence (PL) were generated in all the solvents, but a significant solvent dependence emerged: particle size, PL spectra, and PL quantum yield (QY). The results of solvent dependence were well characterized using an atomic ratio in a solvent molecule. The highest QY was observed for the smallest Si-NPs (ca. 2 nm) synthesized in 1-octyne. The QY was enhanced by aging in 1-octyne, and its mechanism was attributed to alkyl passivation of dangling bonds on the Si-NPs.

  15. Quantum molecular dynamics approach to estimate spallation yield from + 208Pb reaction at 800 MeV

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Sarkar; Maitreyee Nandy

    2003-10-01

    The spallation yield of neutrons and other mass fragments produced in 800 MeV proton induced reaction on 208Pb have been calculated in the framework of quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) model. The energy spectra and angular distribution have been calculated. Also, multiplicity distributions of the emitted neutrons and kinetic energy carried away by them have been estimated and compared with the available experimental data. The agreement is satisfactory. A major contribution to the neutron emission comes from statistical decay of the fragments. For mass and charge distributions of spallation productsthe QMD process gives rise to target-like and projectile-like fragments only.

  16. Angularly Deformed Special Relativity and its Results for Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Glinka, Lukasz Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the deformed Special Relativity, which leads to an essentially new theoretical context of quantum mechanics, is presented. The formulation of the theory arises from a straightforward analogy with the Special Relativity, but its foundations are laid through the hypothesis on breakdown of the velocity-momentum parallelism which affects onto the Einstein equivalence principle between mass and energy of a relativistic particle. Furthermore, the derivation is based on the technique of an eikonal equation whose well-confirmed physical role lays the foundations of both optics and quantum mechanics. As a result, we receive the angular deformation of Special Relativity which clearly depicts the new deformation-based theoretical foundations of physics, and, moreover, offers both constructive and consistent phenomenological discussion of the theoretical issues such like imaginary mass and formal superluminal motion predicted in Special Relativity for this case. In the context of the relativistic theory, p...

  17. Scaling Relations for Gaps in Fractional Quantum Hall States

    OpenAIRE

    Murthy, Ganpathy; Park, K.; Shankar, R.; Jain, J. K.

    1998-01-01

    The microscopic approach of Murthy and Shankar, which has recently been used to calculate the transport gaps of quantum Hall states with fractions p/(2ps+1), also implies scaling relations between gaps within a single sequence (fixed s) as well as between gaps of corresponding states in different sequences. This work tests these relations for a system of electrons in the lowest Landau level interacting with a model potential cutoff at high momenta due to sample thickness.

  18. Scaling relations for gaps in fractional quantum Hall states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Ganpathy; Park, K.; Shankar, R.; Jain, J. K.

    1998-12-01

    The microscopic Hamiltonian approach of Murthy and Shankar, which has recently been used to calculate the transport gaps of quantum Hall states with fractions ν=p/(2ps+1), also implies scaling relations between gaps within a single sequence (fixed s) as well as between gaps of corresponding states in different sequences. This work tests these relations for a system of electrons in the lowest Landau level interacting with a model potential cutoff at high momenta due to sample thickness.

  19. Active and silent chromophore isoforms for phytochrome Pr photoisomerization: An alternative evolutionary strategy to optimize photoreaction quantum yields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Photoisomerization of a protein bound chromophore is the basis of light sensing of many photoreceptors. We tracked Z-to-E photoisomerization of Cph1 phytochrome chromophore PCB in the Pr form in real-time. Two different phycocyanobilin (PCB ground state geometries with different ring D orientations have been identified. The pre-twisted and hydrogen bonded PCBa geometry exhibits a time constant of 30 ps and a quantum yield of photoproduct formation of 29%, about six times slower and ten times higher than that for the non-hydrogen bonded PCBb geometry. This new mechanism of pre-twisting the chromophore by protein-cofactor interaction optimizes yields of slow photoreactions and provides a scaffold for photoreceptor engineering.

  20. Influence of soil, plant and meteorological factors on water relations and yield in Hevea brasiliensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, G. Gururaja; Rao, P. Sanjeeva; Rajagopal, R.; Devakumar, A. S.; Vijayakumar, K. R.; Sethuraj, M. R.

    1990-09-01

    Influence of factors governing the soil-plantatmosphere system on components of water relations and yield was studied in two clones of rubber tree, Hevea brasiliensis, viz. RRII 105 and RRII 118. Clonal variations were evident in yield and yield components and associated physiological parameters in response to soil moisture status and meteorological factors. Observations made during different seasons indicatedvariations in yield are attributed to differences in plugging index and initial flow rates, to the major yield components and also variations in components of water relations as influenced by meteorological factors. Among the two clones, RRII 105 was found to be fairly drought tolerant compared to RRII 118. RRII 105 was found to respond well to dry weather through higher stomatal resistances, higher leaf water potentials, lowered transpirational water loss and lower relative transpiration ratios, while RRII 118 was susceptible to stress situations.

  1. Quantum Dynamical Relativity and the Nature of Spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Walstad, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Einstein's special theory of relativity starts with assumptions about how observations conducted in relatively moving inertial frames must compare. From these assumptions, conclusions can be drawn regarding the laws of physics in any one frame. Can we do the reverse, that is, build the correct physics entirely from considerations within a single frame and infer therefrom the results of measurements in moving frames? Can we, in this project, supply the "elementary foundations" that Einstein found lacking in his own theory, thereby converting special relativity from (in Einstein's terminology) a "principle" theory to a "constructive" one? Expanding on the approach suggested by Johns S. Bell, this paper demonstrates that we can progress toward those goals via the introduction of elementary quantum concepts, particularly the idea of matter waves (deBroglie waves) that was unknown to Einstein in 1905. This quantum dynamical approach offers to resolve a recent dispute in philosophy of physics regarding the Minkowsk...

  2. A Treatment of Quantum Electrodynamics as a Model of Interactions between Sizeless Particles in Relational Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Francis, C

    2006-01-01

    A Relational Quantum Theory Incorporating Gravity developed the concept of quantum covariance and argued that this is the correct expression of the fundamental physical principle that the behaviour of matter is everywhere the same in the quantum domain, as well as being the required condition for the unification of general relativity with quantum mechanics for non-interacting particles. This paper considers the interactions of elementary particles. Quantum covariance describes families of finite dimensional Hilbert spaces with an inbuilt cut-off in energy-momentum and using flat space metric (quantum coordinates) between initial and final states. It is shown by direct construction that it is possible to construct a quantum field theory of operators on members of these families, obeying locality, suitable for a description of particle interactions, and leading to a general formulation of particle theoretic field theory incorporating qed. The construction is consistent and effectively identical in the continuum...

  3. Accumulation and distribution of dry matter in relation to root yield of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... as required but no fertilizer was applied. The first and second ... system (SAS) for microsoft windows, Release 6.12. Mixed model procedure ...... distribution in relation to yield of cassava grown in controlled environments. Can.

  4. Factorizations in special relativity and quantum scattering on the line II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezov, Danail S.; Mladenova, Clementina D.; Mladenov, Ivaïlo M.

    2016-12-01

    The present paper may be regarded as a continuation of both [1] and [2]: we discuss the same physical context as in the former, while applying a specific decomposition technique initially proposed in the latter. The method used in [1], however, is completely different (based on repetitive conjugation) and has more in common with the familiar Wigner decomposition [3]. Here we obtain in a dynamical manner a compact two-factor decomposition, which in the Euclidean case allows for convenient parametrizations in rigid body kinematics and quantum-mechanical angular momenta. Applied to the group Spin(2, 1) ≅ SL(2, ℝ), this technique yields numerous applications in hyperbolic geometry and 2 + 1 dimensional special relativity. However, we choose to illustrate it with a particular problem arising in quantum mechanical scattering theory. The extension to SO(3, 1) and SO(2, 2) is discussed as well and numerical examples are provided in the former case.

  5. Quadra-Quantum Dots and Related Patterns of Quantum Dot Molecules: Basic Nanostructures for Quantum Dot Cellular Automata Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsak Panyakeow

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Laterally close-packed quantum dots (QDs called quantum dot molecules (QDMs are grown by modified molecular beam epitaxy (MBE. Quantum dots could be aligned and cross hatched. Quantum rings (QRs created from quantum dot transformation during thin or partial capping are used as templates for the formations of bi-quantum dot molecules (Bi-QDMs and quantum dot rings (QDRs. Preferable quantum dot nanostructure for quantum computation based on quantum dot cellular automata (QCA is laterally close-packed quantum dot molecules having four quantum dots at the corners of square configuration. These four quantum dot sets are called quadra-quantum dots (QQDs. Aligned quadra-quantum dots with two electron confinements work like a wire for digital information transmission by Coulomb repulsion force, which is fast and consumes little power. Combination of quadra-quantum dots in line and their cross-over works as logic gates and memory bits. Molecular Beam Epitaxial growth technique called 'Droplet Epitaxy' has been developed for several quantum nanostructures such as quantum rings and quantum dot rings. Quantum rings are prepared by using 20 ML In-Ga (15:85 droplets deposited on a GaAs substrate at 390'C with a droplet growth rate of 1ML/s. Arsenic flux (7'8'10-6Torr is then exposed for InGaAs crystallization at 200'C for 5 min. During droplet epitaxy at a high droplet thickness and high temperature, out-diffusion from the centre of droplets occurs under anisotropic strain. This leads to quantum ring structures having non-uniform ring stripes and deep square-shaped nanoholes. Using these peculiar quantum rings as templates, four quantum dots situated at the corners of a square shape are regrown. Two of these four quantum dots are aligned either or, which are preferable crystallographic directions of quantum dot alignment in general.

  6. Functional methods underlying classical mechanics, relativity and quantum theory

    OpenAIRE

    Kryukov, Alexey A.

    2013-01-01

    The paper investigates the physical content of a recently proposed mathematical framework that unifies the standard formalisms of classical mechanics, relativity and quantum theory. In the framework states of a classical particle are identified with Dirac delta functions. The classical space is "made" of these functions and becomes a submanifold in a Hilbert space of states of the particle. The resulting embedding of the classical space into the space of states is highly non-trivial and accou...

  7. Classical and Quantum Two-Body Problem in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Maheshwari, Amar; Todorov, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    The two-body problem in general relativity is reduced to the problem of an effective particle (with an energy-dependent relativistic reduced mass) in an external field. The effective potential is evaluated from the Born diagram of the linearized quantum theory of gravity. It reduces to a Schwarzschild-like potential with two different `Schwarzschild radii'. The results derived in a weak field approximation are expected to be relevant for relativistic velocities.

  8. Study on calibration of neutron efficiency and relative photo-yield of plastic scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Peng Tai Ping; Li Ru Rong; Zhang Jian Hua; Luo Xiao Bing; Xia Yi Jun; Yang Zhi Hu

    2002-01-01

    A method used for the calibration of neutron efficiency and the relative photo yield of plastic scintillator is studied. T(p, n) and D(d, n) reactions are used as neutron resources. The neutron efficiencies and the relative photo yields of plastic scintillators 1421 (40 mm in diameter and 5 mm in thickness) and determined in the neutron energy range of 0.655-5 MeV

  9. Role of information theoretic uncertainty relations in quantum theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jizba, Petr, E-mail: p.jizba@fjfi.cvut.cz [FNSPE, Czech Technical University in Prague, Břehová 7, 115 19 Praha 1 (Czech Republic); ITP, Freie Universität Berlin, Arnimallee 14, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Dunningham, Jacob A., E-mail: J.Dunningham@sussex.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton, BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Joo, Jaewoo, E-mail: j.joo@surrey.ac.uk [Advanced Technology Institute and Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    Uncertainty relations based on information theory for both discrete and continuous distribution functions are briefly reviewed. We extend these results to account for (differential) Rényi entropy and its related entropy power. This allows us to find a new class of information-theoretic uncertainty relations (ITURs). The potency of such uncertainty relations in quantum mechanics is illustrated with a simple two-energy-level model where they outperform both the usual Robertson–Schrödinger uncertainty relation and Shannon entropy based uncertainty relation. In the continuous case the ensuing entropy power uncertainty relations are discussed in the context of heavy tailed wave functions and Schrödinger cat states. Again, improvement over both the Robertson–Schrödinger uncertainty principle and Shannon ITUR is demonstrated in these cases. Further salient issues such as the proof of a generalized entropy power inequality and a geometric picture of information-theoretic uncertainty relations are also discussed.

  10. Effects of Bleaching by Nitrogen Deficiency on the Quantum Yield of Photosystem II in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 Revealed by Chl Fluorescence Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Takako; Sonoike, Kintake

    2016-03-01

    Estimation of photosynthesis by Chl fluorescence measurement of cyanobacteria is always problematic due to the interference from respiratory electron transfer and from phycocyanin fluorescence. The interference from respiratory electron transfer could be avoided by the use of DCMU or background illumination by blue light, which oxidizes the plastoquinone pool that tends to be reduced by respiration. On the other hand, the precise estimation of photosynthesis in cells with a different phycobilisome content by Chl fluorescence measurement is difficult. By subtracting the basal fluorescence due to the phycobilisome and PSI, it becomes possible to estimate the precise maximum quantum yield of PSII in cyanobacteria. Estimated basal fluorescence accounted for 60% of the minimum fluorescence, resulting in a large difference between the 'apparent' yield and 'true' yield under high phycocyanin conditions. The calculated value of the 'true' maximum quantum yield of PSII was around 0.8, which was similar to the value observed in land plants. The results suggest that the cause of the apparent low yield reported in cyanobacteria is mainly ascribed to the interference from phycocyanin fluorescence. We also found that the 'true' maximum quantum yield of PSII decreased under nitrogen-deficient conditions, suggesting the impairment of the PSII reaction center, while the 'apparent' maximum quantum yield showed a marginal change under the same conditions. Due to the high contribution of phycocyanin fluorescence in cyanobacteria, it is essential to eliminate the influence of the change in phycocyanin content on Chl fluorescence measurement and to evaluate the 'true' photosynthetic condition.

  11. Assessing the relative importance of climate variables to rice yield variation using support vector machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Wu, Wei; Liu, Hong-Bin

    2016-10-01

    Climate factors have distinct impacts on crop yields. Understanding the relative importance of these factors to crop yield variation could provide valuable information about crop planting and management under climate change condition for policymakers and farmers. The current study investigated the applicability of support vector machines (SVMs) in determining the relative importance of climate factors (mean temperature, rainfall, relative humidity, sunshine hours, daily temperature range, and rainy days) to yield variation of paddy rice in southwestern China. The SVM models were compared with traditional artificial neural networks and multiple linear regression. The performance accuracy was evaluated by mean absolute error (MAE), mean relative absolute error (MRAE), root mean square error (RMSE), relative root mean square error (RRMSE), and coefficient of determination ( R 2). Comparative results showed that SVMs outperformed artificial neural networks and multiple linear regression. The SVM with radial basis function performed best with MAE of 0.06 t ha-1, MRAE of 0.9 %, RMSE of 0.15 t ha-1, RRMSE of 2.23 %, and R 2 of 0.94. The results showed that SVMs are suitable for determining the effects of climate on crop yield variability. The relative importance of the studied climate factors to rice yield variation was in order of sunshine hours > daily temperature range > rainfall > relative humidity > mean temperature > rainy days in the current study area.

  12. Measurement of Quantum Yield, Quantum Requirement, and Energetic Efficiency of the O2-Evolving System of Photosynthesis by a Simple Dye Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros Barcelò, A.; Zapata, J. M.

    1996-11-01

    Photosynthesis is the conversion of absorbed radiant energy from sunlight into various forms of chemical energy by the chloroplasts of higher green plants. The overall process of photosynthesis consists of the oxidation of water (with the release of O2 as a product) and the reduction of CO2 to form carbohydrates. In the test tube electrons produced by the photolytic cleavage of H2) may be deviated from their true acceptor by inserting a suitable dye in the electron chain; i.e.; 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol (DCPIP) (E'o = + 0.217 V), which is blue in the oxidized quinone form and which becomes colorless when reduced to the phenolic form. This dye-electrom acceptor also has the advantage that it accepts electroms directly from the quinone (Qa) electron-acceptor of the photosystem IIsupplied) of the O2-evolving system of photosynthesis. Although values for the quantum yield, the quantum requirement and the energetic efficiency calculated in the classroom laboratory differ widely from those expected theoretically, these calculations are useful for illustrating the transformation of light energy into chemical energy by the chloroplasts of green plants.

  13. In vivo characterization of hair and skin derived carbon quantum dots with high quantum yield as long-term bioprobes in zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing-Hui; Niu, Aping; Li, Jing; Fu, Jian-Wei; Xu, Qun; Pei, De-Sheng

    2016-11-01

    Carbon quantum dots (CDs) were widely investigated because of their tunable fluorescence properties and low toxicity. However, so far there have been no reports on in vivo functional studies of hair and skin derived CDs. Here, hair derived CDs (HCDs) and skin derived CDs (SCDs) were produced by using human hair and pig skin as precursors. The quantum yields (QYs) of HCDs and SCDs were quite high, compared to citric acid derived CDs (CCDs). HCDs and SCDs possess optimal photostability, hypotoxicity and biocompatibility in zebrafish, indicating that HCDs and SCDs possess the capacity of being used as fluorescence probes for in vivo biological imaging. The long-time observation for fluorescence alternation of CDs in zebrafish and the quenching assay of CDs by ATP, NADH and Fe3+ ions demonstrated that the decaying process of CDs in vivo might be induced by the synergistic effect of the metabolism process. All results indicated that large batches and high QYs of CDs can be acquired by employing natural and nontoxic hair and skin as precursors. To our knowledge, this is the first time to report SCDs, in vivo comparative studies of HCDs, SCDs and CCDs as bioprobes, and explore their mechanism of photostability in zebrafish.

  14. A relational solution to the problem of time in quantum mechanics and quantum gravity induces a fundamental mechanism for quantum decoherence

    CERN Document Server

    Gambini, R; Pullin, J; Gambini, Rodolfo; Porto, Rafael; Pullin, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    The use of a relational time in quantum mechanics is a framework in which one promotes to quantum operators all variables in a system, and later chooses one of the variables to operate like a ``clock''. Conditional probabilities are computed for variables of the system to take certain values when the ``clock'' specifies a certain time. This framework is attractive in contexts where the assumption of usual quantum mechanics of the existence of an external, perfectly classical clock, appears unnatural, as in quantum cosmology. Until recently, there were problems with such constructions in ordinary quantum mechanics with additional difficulties in the context of constrained theories like general relativity. A scheme we recently introduced to consistently discretize general relativity removed such obstacles. Since the clock is now an object subject to quantum fluctuations, the resulting evolution in the time is not exactly unitary and pure states decohere into mixed states. Here we work out in detail the type of ...

  15. Scale relativity and fractal space-time a new approach to unifying relativity and quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Nottale, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive survey of the development of the theory of scale relativity and fractal space-time. It suggests an original solution to the disunified nature of the classical-quantum transition in physical systems, enabling the basis of quantum mechanics on the principle of relativity, provided this principle is extended to scale transformations of the reference system. In the framework of such a newly generalized relativity theory (including position, orientation, motion and now scale transformations), the fundamental laws of physics may be given a general form that unifies

  16. Fluctuation-dissipation relation in a resonantly driven quantum medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erukhimova, Maria; Tokman, Mikhail

    2015-06-15

    Noise associated with the spontaneous emission in a coherently driven medium is calculated. The significant field-induced modification of relation between the noise power and damping constant in a thermal reservoir is obtained. The nonlinear noise exchange between different atomic frequencies leads to violation of standard relations dictated by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. The developed general method is applied to the EIT system, attractive for realization of different quantum-information processing devices. It is shown that there is a significant factor defining the thermal noise at operating frequency in the EIT system. It is the averaged number of thermal photons at low frequency of ground state splitting.

  17. Iridium Cyclometalated Complexes in Host-Guest Chemistry: A Strategy for Maximizing Quantum Yield in Aqueous Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrawashdeh, Lubna R; Cronin, Michael P; Woodward, Clifford E; Day, Anthony I; Wallace, Lynne

    2016-07-01

    The weaker emission typically seen for iridium(III) cyclometalated complexes in aqueous medium can be reversed via encapsulation in cucurbit[10]uril (Q[10]). The Q[10] cavity is shown to effectively maximize quantum yields for the complexes, compared to any other medium. This may provide significant advantages for a number of sensor applications. NMR studies show that the complexes are accommodated similarly within the host molecule, even with cationic substituents attached to the ppy ligands, indicating that the hydrophobic effect is the dominant driving force for binding. Cavity-encapsulated 1:1 host-guest species dominate the emission, but 1:2 species are also indicated, which also give some enhancement of intensity. Results demonstrate that the enhancement is due primarily to much lower rates of nonradiative decay but also suggest that the encapsulation can cause a change in character of the emitting state.

  18. Freestanding carbon nanodots/poly (vinyl alcohol) films with high photoluminescent quantum yield realized by inverted-pyramid structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Linna; Ba, Lixiang; Pan, Wei; Shen, Wenzhong

    2017-02-01

    Carbon nanodots (C-dots) have attracted great attention for their biocompatibility and strong tunable photoluminescence (PL). However, aggregation-induced PL quenching blocks their practical application in solid-state optoelectronics. Here, we report a luminescent C-dots freestanding film with a substantially enhanced high quantum yield (QY) of 72.3%. A facile template method, rather than complicate lithography and etching technique is proposed to fabricate the C-dots composite films with large-area (8 inch × 8 inch) ordered micro-scale inverted-pyramid patterns on the surface. The control experiment and theoretical analysis demonstrate the key success to QY enhancement lies in the separation of C-dots and the pattern of surface inverted-pyramid structure. This work realizes the QY enhancement simply by geometrical optics, not the chemical treatment of luminescent particles. It provides a general approach to fabricate large-area freestanding luminescent composite film with high QY.

  19. Photochemistry of UV-excited trifluoroacetylacetone and hexafluoroacetylacetone II: Quantum yield and rate constants of hydrogen fluoride photoelimination forming fluorinated methylfuranones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disselkoen, Kyle R.; Alsum, Joel R.; Thielke, Timothy A.; Muyskens, Mark A.

    2017-03-01

    The photochemistry of gas-phase 1,1,1-trifluoroacetylacetone (TFAA) and 1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoroacetylacetone (HFAA) excited with ultraviolet light involves a significant photoelimination channel producing HF and difluoromethylfuranone or pentafluoromethylfuranone, respectively. We report collisional self-quenching of the experimentally-determined relative quantum yield, and determine rate constants of 0.27 ± 0.03 and 0.33 ± 0.04 μs-1, for HFAA and TFAA respectively. A strong collision model is consistent with the observed quenching. The data suggest that this elimination is the primary photochemical fate at low pressure in both cases. The TFAA rate constant is larger than that for HFAA, in spite of TFAA having half as many fluorine atoms as HFAA.

  20. Phosphorescent Iridium(III) Complexes Bearing Fluorinated Aromatic Sulfonyl Group with Nearly Unity Phosphorescent Quantum Yields and Outstanding Electroluminescent Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiang; Yu, Yue; Yang, Xiaolong; Yan, Xiaogang; Zhang, Huiming; Xu, Xianbin; Zhou, Guijiang; Wu, Zhaoxin; Ren, Yixia; Wong, Wai-Yeung

    2015-11-11

    A series of heteroleptic functional Ir(III) complexes bearing different fluorinated aromatic sulfonyl groups has been synthesized. Their photophysical features, electrochemical behaviors, and electroluminescent (EL) properties have been characterized in detail. These complexes emit intense yellow phosphorescence with exceptionally high quantum yields (ΦP > 0.9) at room temperature, and the emission maxima of these complexes can be finely tuned depending upon the number of the fluorine substituents on the pendant phenyl ring of the sulfonyl group. Furthermore, the electrochemical properties and electron injection/transporting (EI/ET) abilities of these Ir(III) phosphors can also be effectively tuned by the fluorinated aromatic sulfonyl group to furnish some desired characters for enhancing the EL performance. Hence, the maximum luminance efficiency (ηL) of 81.2 cd A(-1), corresponding to power efficiency (ηP) of 64.5 lm W(-1) and external quantum efficiency (ηext) of 19.3%, has been achieved, indicating the great potential of these novel phosphors in the field of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Furthermore, a clear picture has been drawn for the relationship between their optoelectronic properties and chemical structures. These results should provide important information for developing highly efficient phosphors.

  1. Study of quantum correlation swapping with relative entropy methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chuanmei; Liu, Yimin; Chen, Jianlan; Zhang, Zhanjun

    2016-02-01

    To generate long-distance shared quantum correlations (QCs) for information processing in future quantum networks, recently we proposed the concept of QC repeater and its kernel technique named QC swapping. Besides, we extensively studied the QC swapping between two simple QC resources (i.e., a pair of Werner states) with four different methods to quantify QCs (Xie et al. in Quantum Inf Process 14:653-679, 2015). In this paper, we continue to treat the same issue by employing other three different methods associated with relative entropies, i.e., the MPSVW method (Modi et al. in Phys Rev Lett 104:080501, 2010), the Zhang method (arXiv:1011.4333 [quant-ph]) and the RS method (Rulli and Sarandy in Phys Rev A 84:042109, 2011). We first derive analytic expressions of all QCs which occur during the swapping process and then reveal their properties about monotonicity and threshold. Importantly, we find that a long-distance shared QC can be generated from two short-distance ones via QC swapping indeed. In addition, we simply compare our present results with our previous ones.

  2. Reconsideration of the Uncertainty Relations and Quantum Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru S.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Discussions on uncertainty relations (UR and quantum measurements (QMS persisted until nowadays in publications about quantum mechanics (QM. They originate mainly from the conventional interpretation of UR (CIUR. In the most of the QM literarure, it is underestimated the fact that, over the years, a lot of deficiencies regarding CIUR were signaled. As a rule the alluded deficiencies were remarked disparately and dis- cussed as punctual and non-essential questions. Here we approach an investigation of the mentioned deficiencies collected in a conclusive ensemble. Subsequently we expose a reconsideration of the major problems referring to UR and QMS. We reveal that all the basic presumption of CIUR are troubled by insurmountable deficiencies which require the indubitable failure of CIUR and its necessary abandonment. Therefore the UR must be deprived of their statute of crucial pieces for physics. So, the aboriginal versions of UR appear as being in postures of either (i thought-experimental fictions or (ii sim- ple QM formulae and, any other versions of them, have no connection with the QMS. Then the QMS must be viewed as an additional subject comparatively with the usual questions of QM. For a theoretical description of QMS we propose an information- transmission model, in which the quantum observables are considered as random vari- ables. Our approach directs to natural solutions and simplifications for many problems regarding UR and QMS.

  3. Reconsideration of the Uncertainty Relations and Quantum Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru S.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Discussions on uncertainty relations (UR and quantum measurements (QMS persisted until nowadays in publications about quantum mechanics (QM. They originate mainly from the conventional interpretation of UR (CIUR. In the most of the QM literarure, it is underestimated the fact that, over the years, a lot of deficiencies regarding CIUR were signaled. As a rule the alluded deficiencies were remarked disparately and discussed as punctual and non-essential questions. Here we approach an investigation of the mentioned deficiencies collected in a conclusive ensemble. Subsequently we expose a reconsideration of the major problems referring to UR and QMS. We reveal that all the basic presumption of CIUR are troubled by insurmountable deficiencies which require the indubitable failure of CIUR and its necessary abandonment. Therefore the UR must be deprived of their statute of crucialpieces for physics. So, the aboriginal versions of UR appear as being in postures of either (i thought-experimental fictions or (ii simple QM formulae and, any other versions of them, have no connection with the QMS. Then the QMS must be viewed as an additional subject comparatively with the usual questions of QM. For a theoretical description of QMS we propose an information-transmission model, in which the quantum observables are considered as random variables. Our approach directs to natural solutions and simplifications for many problems regarding UR and QMS.

  4. Free standing luminescent silicon quantum dots: evidence of quantum confinement and defect related transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Mallar [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah: 711103, West Bengal (India); Hossain, Syed Minhaz [Department of Physics, Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah: 711103, West Bengal (India); Klie, Robert F [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Banerjee, Koushik; Ghosh, Siddhartha, E-mail: mray@matsc.becs.ac.in [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 60607 (United States)

    2010-12-17

    We report the synthesis of luminescent, free standing silicon quantum dots by dry and wet etching of silicon and silicon oxide core/shell nanostructures, which are synthesized by controlled oxidation of mechanically milled silicon. Dry and wet etching performed with CF{sub 4} plasma and aqueous HF, respectively, result in the removal of the thick oxide shell of the core/shell nanostructures and affect an additional step of size reduction. HF etch is capable of producing isolated, spherical quantum dots of silicon with dimensions {approx} 2 nm. However, the etching processes introduce unsaturated bonds at the surface of the nanocrystals which are subsequently passivated by oxygen on exposure to ambient atmosphere. The photoluminescence spectra of the colloidal suspensions of these nanocrystals are characterized by double peaks and excitation dependent shift of emission energy. Comparison of the structural, absorption and luminescence characteristics of the samples provides evidence for two competing transition processes-quantum confinement induced widened band gap related transitions and oxide associated interface state mediated transitions. The results enable us to experimentally distinguish between the contributions of the two different transition mechanisms, which has hitherto been a challenging problem.

  5. On invariants of graphs related to quantum sl(2) at roots of unity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geer, Nathan; Reshetikhin, Nicolai

    2009-01-01

    We show how to define invariants of graphs related to quantum sl 2 when the graph has more then one connected component and components are colored by blocks of representations with zero quantum dimensions....

  6. Analysis of Yield and Yield Related Traits Variability of Winter Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Cv. Izolda and Double Haploid Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozdój Janusz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The yield-forming potential of winter wheat is determined by several factors, namely total number of shoots per plant and total number of spikelets per spike. The field experiments were conducted during three vegetation seasons at the Plant Breeding and Acclimatization Institute – National Research Institute (PBAI–NRI, located in Radzików, Poland. The objective of this study was a comparative analysis of the structural yield-forming factor levels, which determine grain yield per spike and per plant of the DH lines and standard Izolda cultivar. Results indicate that several DH lines showed some differences in tested morphological structures of plant, yield factor levels and in grain yield per spike and per plant in comparison to standard Izolda, regardless of the year. Mean grain yield per plant of DH lines was 26.5% lower in comparison to standard Izolda only in the second year of study. It was caused by a reduction of productive tillers number. Structural yield-forming potential of DH lines was used in 38% and 59% and in case of Izolda in 47% and 61% (the second and the third year of experiment, respectively. The mean grain yield per spike of DH lines was 14.8% lower than Izolda cultivar only in third year of experiment and it was caused by about 12% lower number of grains per spike. Structural yield-forming potential of DH spikes was used in 82.4%, 85.4% and 84.9% and in case of Izolda in 83.8%, 87% and 89.5% (the first, the second and the third year of experiment, respectively. The grain yield per winter wheat plant (both DH lines and standard Izolda was significantly correlated with the number of productive tillers per plant (r = 0.80. The grain yield per winter wheat spike (both DH lines and Izolda cultivar was significantly and highly correlated with the number of grains per spike (r = 0.96, number of fertile spikelets per spike (r = 0.87 and the spike length (r = 0.80. Variation of spike and plant structural yield-forming factors

  7. Experimental realization of programmable quantum gate array for directly probing commutation relations of Pauli operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xing-Can; Fiurásek, Jaromír; Lu, He; Gao, Wei-Bo; Chen, Yu-Ao; Chen, Zeng-Bing; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2010-09-17

    We experimentally demonstrate an advanced linear-optical programmable quantum processor that combines two elementary single-qubit programmable quantum gates. We show that this scheme enables direct experimental probing of quantum commutation relations for Pauli operators acting on polarization states of single photons. Depending on a state of two-qubit program register, we can probe either commutation or anticommutation relations. Very good agreement between theory and experiment is observed, indicating high-quality performance of the implemented quantum processor.

  8. Extent of the Immirzi Ambiguity in Quantum General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Mena-Marugán, G A

    2002-01-01

    The Ashtekar-Barbero formulation of general relativity admits a one-parameter family of canonical transformations that preserves the expressions of the Gauss and diffeomorphism constraints. The loop quantization of the connection formalism based on each of these canonical sets leads to different predictions. This phenomenon is called the Immirzi ambiguity. It has been recently argued that this ambiguity could be generalized to the extent of a spatially dependent function, instead of a parameter. This would ruin the predictability of loop quantum gravity. We prove that such expectations are not realized, so that the Immirzi ambiguity introduces exclusively a freedom in the choice of a real number.

  9. Relative Intensity Noise in the Single Quantum Well Diode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on the mathematical model of quantum well laser diode(QW-LDs) developed, the paper presents a relative intensity noise(RIN) model, which employs Gaussian form random noise with its average being to zero. It can be straightforwardly used to describe the effect of the noise on the performance of QW-LDs. The RIN becomes notable in the frequency range of interests and therefore affects the device modulation property. The results are in good agreement of the published data. The RIN model proposed and the results can be used for purpose of device technique improvement and performance simulation of optical communication systems and networks.

  10. Minimum length from quantum mechanics and classical general relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmet, Xavier; Graesser, Michael; Hsu, Stephen D H

    2004-11-19

    We derive fundamental limits on measurements of position, arising from quantum mechanics and classical general relativity. First, we show that any primitive probe or target used in an experiment must be larger than the Planck length lP. This suggests a Planck-size minimum ball of uncertainty in any measurement. Next, we study interferometers (such as LIGO) whose precision is much finer than the size of any individual components and hence are not obviously limited by the minimum ball. Nevertheless, we deduce a fundamental limit on their accuracy of order lP. Our results imply a device independent limit on possible position measurements.

  11. Extent of the Immirzi ambiguity in quantum general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marugan, Guillermo A Mena [Centro de Fisica Miguel A Catalan, IMAFF, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2002-04-21

    The Ashtekar-Barbero formulation of general relativity admits a one-parameter family of canonical transformations that preserves the expressions of the Gauss and diffeomorphism constraints. The loop quantization of the connection formalism based on each of these canonical sets leads to different predictions. This phenomenon is called the Immirzi ambiguity. It has been recently argued that this ambiguity could be generalized to the extent of a spatially dependent function instead of a parameter. This would ruin the predictability of loop quantum gravity. We prove that such expectations are not realized, so that the Immirzi ambiguity introduces exclusively a freedom in the choice of a real number. (letter to the edit0008.

  12. Uncertainty relations in quantum optics. Is the photon intelligent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przanowski, Maciej; García-Compeán, Hugo; Tosiek, Jaromir; Turrubiates, Francisco J.

    2016-10-01

    The Robertson-Schrödinger, Heisenberg-Robertson and Trifonov uncertainty relations for arbitrary two functions f1 and f2 depending on the quantum phase and the number of photons respectively, are given. Intelligent states and states which minimize locally the product of uncertainties (Δf1) 2 ṡ(Δf2) 2 or the sum (Δf1) 2 +(Δf2) 2 are investigated for the cases f1 = ϕ , exp(iϕ) , exp(- iϕ) , cos ϕ , sin ϕ and f2 = n.

  13. Spatial variability of soil fertility and its relation with cocoa yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Railton O. dos Santos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The knowledge on the spatial variability of soil properties and crops is important for decision-making on agricultural management. The objective of this study was to evaluate the spatial variability of soil fertility and its relation with cocoa yield. The study was conducted over 14 months in an area cultivated with cocoa. A sampling grid was created to study soil chemical properties and cocoa yield (stratified in season, off-season and annual. The data were analyzed using descriptive and exploratory statistics, and geostatistics. The chemical attributes were classified using fuzzy logic to generate a soil fertility map, which was correlated with maps of crop yield. The soil of the area, except for the western region, showed possibilities ranging from medium to high for cocoa cultivation. Soil fertility showed positive spatial correlation with cocoa yield, and its effect was predominant only for the off-season and annual cocoa.

  14. Quantum corrected Friedmann equations from loop quantum black holes entropy-area relation

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, C A S

    2015-01-01

    The Friedmann equations govern the evolution of space in homogeneous and isotropic models of the universe within the context of general relativity. Such equations can be derived by using Clausius relation to the apparent horizon of Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe, in which entropy is assumed to be proportional to its horizon area \\cite{Cai:2005ra}. Such demonstration follows the spirit of the results obtained by Jacobson that assuming the proportionality between entropy and horizon area, demonstrated that the spacetime can be viewed as a gas of atoms with a related entropy given by the Bekenstein-Hawking formula and the Einstein equation is a equation of state of this gas \\cite{Jacobson:1995ab}. Loop Quantum Gravity is a theory that propose a way to model the atomic behavior of spacetime. One recent prediction of this theory is the existence of sub-Planckian black holes called self-dual black holes. Among the interesting features of loop quantum black holes is the fact that they give rise to a modif...

  15. Experimental verification of reciprocity relations in quantum thermoelectric transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, J.; Battista, F.; Sánchez, D.; Samuelsson, P.; Linke, H.

    2014-10-01

    Fundamental symmetries in thermoelectric quantum transport, beyond Onsagers relations, were predicted two decades ago but have to date not been observed in experiments. Recent works have predicted the symmetries to be sensitive to energy-dependent, inelastic scattering, raising the question whether they exist in practice. Here, we answer this question affirmatively by experimentally verifying the thermoelectric reciprocity relations in a four-terminal mesoscopic device where each terminal can be electrically and thermally biased individually. The linear-response thermoelectric coefficients are found to be symmetric under simultaneous reversal of magnetic field and exchange of injection and emission contacts. We also demonstrate a controllable breakdown of the reciprocity relations by increasing thermal bias, putting in prospect enhanced thermoelectric performance.

  16. Nonequilibrium quantum fluctuation relations for harmonic systems in nonthermal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagel, D.; Nalbach, P.; Alvermann, A.; Fehske, H.; Thorwart, M.

    2013-10-01

    We formulate exact generalized nonequilibrium fluctuation relations for the quantum mechanical harmonic oscillator coupled to multiple harmonic baths. Each of the different baths is prepared in its own individual (in general nonthermal) state. Starting from the exact solution for the oscillator dynamics we study fluctuations of the oscillator position as well as of the energy current through the oscillator under general nonequilibrium conditions. In particular, we formulate a fluctuation-dissipation relation for the oscillator position autocorrelation function that generalizes the standard result for the case of a single bath at thermal equilibrium. Moreover, we show that the generating function for the position operator fulfils a generalized Gallavotti-Cohen-like relation. For the energy transfer through the oscillator, we determine the average energy current together with the current fluctuations. Finally, we discuss the generalization of the cumulant generating function for the energy transfer to nonthermal bath preparations.

  17. Controlling the quantum-memory-assisted entropic uncertainty relation by quantum-jump-based feedback control in dissipative environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Min; Fang, Mao-Fa

    2017-09-01

    The dynamic properties of the quantum-memory-assisted entropic uncertainty relation for a system comprised of a qubit to be measured and a memory qubit are investigated. We explore the behaviors of the entropic uncertainty and its lower bound in three different cases: Only one of the two qubits interacts with an external environment and subjects to quantum-jump-based feedback control, or both of the two qubits independently experience their own environments and local quantum-jump-based feedback control. Our results reveal that the quantum-jump-based feedback control with an appropriate feedback parameter can reduce the entropic uncertainty and its lower bound, and for the three different scenarios, the reduction in the uncertainty relates to different physical quantities. Besides, we find out that the quantum-jump-based feedback control not only can remarkably decrease the entropic uncertainty, but also can make the uncertainty reach its lower bound where the dynamical map becomes unital.

  18. A Recurrence Relation Approach to Higher Order Quantum Superintegrability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernie G. Kalnins

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We develop our method to prove quantum superintegrability of an integrable 2D system, based on recurrence relations obeyed by the eigenfunctions of the system with respect to separable coordinates. We show that the method provides rigorous proofs of superintegrability and explicit constructions of higher order generators for the symmetry algebra. We apply the method to 5 families of systems, each depending on a parameter k, including most notably the caged anisotropic oscillator, the Tremblay, Turbiner and Winternitz system and a deformed Kepler-Coulomb system, and we give proofs of quantum superintegrability for all rational values of k, new for 4 of these systems. In addition, we show that the explicit information supplied by the special function recurrence relations allows us to prove, for the first time in 4 cases, that the symmetry algebra generated by our lowest order symmetries closes and to determine the associated structure equations of the algebras for each k. We have no proof that our generating symmetries are of lowest possible order, but we have no counterexamples, and we are confident we can can always find any missing generators from our raising and lowering operator recurrences. We also get for free, one variable models of the action of the symmetry algebra in terms of difference operators. We describe how the Stäckel transform acts and show that it preserves the structure equations.

  19. Dispersion relations in quantum electrodynamics on the noncommutative Minkowski space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahn, J.W.

    2006-12-15

    We study field theories on the noncommutative Minkowski space with noncommuting time. The focus lies on dispersion relations in quantized interacting models in the Yang-Feldman formalism. In particular, we compute the two-point correlation function of the field strength in noncommutative quantum electrodynamics to second order. At this, we take into account the covariant coordinates that allow the construction of local gauge invariant quantities (observables). It turns out that this does not remove the well-known severe infrared problem, as one might have hoped. Instead, things become worse, since nonlocal divergences appear. We also show that these cancel in a supersymmetric version of the theory if the covariant coordinates are adjusted accordingly. Furthermore, we study the {phi}{sup 3} and the Wess-Zumino model and show that the distortion of the dispersion relations is moderate for parameters typical for the Higgs field. We also discuss the formulation of gauge theories on noncommutative spaces and study classical electrodynamics on the noncommutative Minkowski space using covariant coordinates. In particular, we compute the change of the speed of light due to nonlinear effects in the presence of a background field. Finally, we examine the so-called twist approach to quantum field theory on the noncommutative Minkowski space and point out some conceptual problems of this approach. (orig.)

  20. Relative fission product yield determination in the USGS TRIGA Mark I reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehl, Michael A.

    Fission product yield data sets are one of the most important and fundamental compilations of basic information in the nuclear industry. This data has a wide range of applications which include nuclear fuel burnup and nonproliferation safeguards. Relative fission yields constitute a major fraction of the reported yield data and reduce the number of required absolute measurements. Radiochemical separations of fission products reduce interferences, facilitate the measurement of low level radionuclides, and are instrumental in the analysis of low-yielding symmetrical fission products. It is especially useful in the measurement of the valley nuclides and those on the extreme wings of the mass yield curve, including lanthanides, where absolute yields have high errors. This overall project was conducted in three stages: characterization of the neutron flux in irradiation positions within the U.S. Geological Survey TRIGA Mark I Reactor (GSTR), determining the mass attenuation coefficients of precipitates used in radiochemical separations, and measuring the relative fission products in the GSTR. Using the Westcott convention, the Westcott flux, modified spectral index, neutron temperature, and gold-based cadmium ratios were determined for various sampling positions in the USGS TRIGA Mark I reactor. The differential neutron energy spectrum measurement was obtained using the computer iterative code SAND-II-SNL. The mass attenuation coefficients for molecular precipitates were determined through experiment and compared to results using the EGS5 Monte Carlo computer code. Difficulties associated with sufficient production of fission product isotopes in research reactors limits the ability to complete a direct, experimental assessment of mass attenuation coefficients for these isotopes. Experimental attenuation coefficients of radioisotopes produced through neutron activation agree well with the EGS5 calculated results. This suggests mass attenuation coefficients of molecular

  1. Toward reconstruction of relative state formulation of quantum theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kurita, Y

    2004-01-01

    In quantum theory, it is widely accepted that all experimental results must agree with theoretical predictions based on the Copenhagen interpretation. However the classical system in the Copenhagen interpretation has not been defined yet. On the other hand, although ongoing research of decoherence is trying to elucidate the emergence of the classical world, it cannot answer why we observe one of eigenstates in observed system. These situations show that the relation between what we observe and physical law has not been elucidated. Here I elucidate the relation by developing Everett's suggestion. Further, from this point of view, I point out that today's brain science falls into circular argument because it is trying to assign what we observe in the brain to process of the subjective perception, and I suggest the future research line in brain science.

  2. Use of the fluorescence quantum yield for the determination of the number-average molecular weight of polymers of epicatechin with 4β→8 interflavin bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Cho; W.L. Mattice; L.J. Porter; Richard W. Hemingway

    1989-01-01

    Excitation at 280 nm produces a structureless emission band with a maximum at 321-324 nm for dilute solutions of catechin, epicatechin, and their oligomers in l,4-dioxane or water. The fluorescence quantum yield, Q, has been measured in these two solvents for five dimers, a trimer, a tetramer, a pentamer, a hexamer, and a polymer in which the monomer...

  3. Molar Absorptivity and Concentration-Dependent Quantum Yield of Fe(II) Photo-Formation for the Aqueous Solutions of Fe(III)-Dicarboxylate Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitomi, Y.; Arakaki, T.

    2009-12-01

    Redox cycles of iron in the aquatic environment affect formation of reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals, which in turn determines lifetimes of many organic compounds. Although aqueous Fe(III)-dicarboxylate complexes are considered to be important sources of photo-formed Fe(II), molar absorptivity and quantum yield of Fe(II) formation for individual species are not well understood. We initiated a study to characterize Fe(II) photo-formation from Fe(III)-dicarboxylates with the concentration ranges that are relevant to the natural aquatic environment. The Visual MINTEQ computer program was used to calculate the equilibrium concentrations of individual Fe(III)-dicarboxylate species. The molar absorptivity of Fe(III)-dicarboxylate species was obtained by UV-VIS spectrophotometer, and the product of the quantum yield and the molar absorptivity of Fe(III)-dicarboxylate species were obtained from photochemical experiments. These experimental data were combined with the calculated equilibrium Fe(III)-dicarboxylate concentrations to determine individual molar absorptivity and quantum yield of Fe(II) photo-formation for a specific Fe(III)-dicarboxylate species. We used initial concentrations of less than 10 micromolar Fe(III) to study the photochemical formation of Fe(II). Dicarboxylate compounds studied include oxalate, malonate, succinate, malate, and phthalate. We report molar absorptivity and concentration-dependent quantum yields of Fe(II) photo-formation of individual Fe(III)-dicarboxylates.

  4. High quantum-yield CdSexS1-x/ZnS core/shell quantum dots for warm white light-emitting diodes with good color rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Hongyan; Jiang, Yang; Zhang, Yugang; Sun, Dapeng; Liu, Chao; Huang, Jian; Lan, Xinzheng; Zhou, Hongyang; Chen, Lei; Zhong, Honghai

    2013-07-19

    Composition-controllable ternary CdSe(x)S(1-x) quantum dots (QDs) with multiple emission colors were obtained via a hot-injection-like method at a relatively low injection temperature (230 ° C) in octadecene. Then highly fluorescent CdSe(x)S(1-x)/ZnS core/shell (CS) QDs were synthesized by a facile single-molecular precursor approach. The fluorescent quantum yield of the resulting green (λ(em) = 523 nm), yellow (λ(em) = 565 nm) and red (λ(em) = 621 nm) emission of CS QDs in toluene reached up to 85%, 55% and 39%, respectively. Moreover, a QDs white light-emitting diode (QDs-WLED) was fabricated by hybridizing green-, yellow- and red-emitting CdSe(x)S(1-x)/ZnS CS QDs/epoxy composites on a blue InGaN chip. The resulting four-band RYGB QDs-WLED showed good performance with CIE-1931 coordinates of (0.4137, 0.3955), an R(a) of 81, and a T(c) of 3360 K at 30 mA, which indicated the combination of multiple-color QDs with high fluorescence QYs in LEDs as a promising approach to obtain warm WLEDs with good color rendering.

  5. Interannual and spatial variability of maple syrup yield as related to climatic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Duchesne

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Sugar maple syrup production is an important economic activity for eastern Canada and the northeastern United States. Since annual variations in syrup yield have been related to climate, there are concerns about the impacts of climatic change on the industry in the upcoming decades. Although the temporal variability of syrup yield has been studied for specific sites on different time scales or for large regions, a model capable of accounting for both temporal and regional differences in yield is still lacking. In the present study, we studied the factors responsible for interregional and interannual variability in maple syrup yield over the 2001–2012 period, by combining the data from 8 Quebec regions (Canada and 10 U.S. states. The resulting model explained 44.5% of the variability in yield. It includes the effect of climatic conditions that precede the sapflow season (variables from the previous growing season and winter, the effect of climatic conditions during the current sapflow season, and terms accounting for intercountry and temporal variability. Optimal conditions for maple syrup production appear to be spatially restricted by less favourable climate conditions occurring during the growing season in the north, and in the south, by the warmer winter and earlier spring conditions. This suggests that climate change may favor maple syrup production northwards, while southern regions are more likely to be negatively affected by adverse spring conditions.

  6. Blue-emitting dinuclear N-heterocyclic dicarbene gold(I) complex featuring a nearly unit quantum yield

    KAUST Repository

    Baron, Marco

    2012-02-06

    Dinuclear N-heterocyclic dicarbene gold(I) complexes of general formula [Au 2(RIm-Y-ImR) 2](PF 6) 2 (R = Me, Cy; Y = (CH 2) 1-4, o-xylylene, m-xylylene) have been synthesized and screened for their luminescence properties. All the complexes are weakly emissive in solution whereas in the solid state some of them show significant luminescence intensities. In particular, crystals or powders of the complex with R = Me, Y = (CH 2) 3 exhibit an intense blue emission (λ max = 450 nm) with a high quantum yield (Φ em = 0.96). The X-ray crystal structure of this complex is characterized by a rather short intramolecular Au•••Au distance (3.272 Ǻ). Time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations have been used to calculate the UV/vis properties of the ground state as well as of the first excited state of the complex, the latter featuring a significantly shorter Au•••Au distance. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  7. Controls of the quantum yield and saturation light of isoprene emission in different-aged aspen leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinemets, Ülo; Sun, Zhihong; Talts, Eero

    2015-12-01

    Leaf age alters the balance between the use of end-product of plastidic isoprenoid synthesis pathway, dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP), in prenyltransferase reactions leading to synthesis of pigments of photosynthetic machinery and in isoprene synthesis, but the implications of such changes on environmental responses of isoprene emission have not been studied. Because under light-limited conditions, isoprene emission rate is controlled by DMADP pool size (SDMADP ), shifts in the share of different processes are expected to particularly strongly alter the light dependency of isoprene emission. We examined light responses of isoprene emission in young fully expanded, mature and old non-senescent leaves of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x P. tremuloides) and estimated in vivo SDMADP and isoprene synthase activity from post-illumination isoprene release. Isoprene emission capacity was 1.5-fold larger in mature than in young and old leaves. The initial quantum yield of isoprene emission (αI ) increased by 2.5-fold with increasing leaf age primarily as the result of increasing SDMADP . The saturating light intensity (QI90 ) decreased by 2.3-fold with increasing leaf age, and this mainly reflected limited light-dependent increase of SDMADP possibly due to feedback inhibition by DMADP. These major age-dependent changes in the shape of the light response need consideration in modelling canopy isoprene emission.

  8. Low cost 3D-printing used in an undergraduate project: an integrating sphere for measurement of photoluminescence quantum yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomes, John J.; Finlayson, Chris E.

    2016-09-01

    We report upon the exploitation of the latest 3D printing technologies to provide low-cost instrumentation solutions, for use in an undergraduate level final-year project. The project addresses prescient research issues in optoelectronics, which would otherwise be inaccessible to such undergraduate student projects. The experimental use of an integrating sphere in conjunction with a desktop spectrometer presents opportunities to use easily handled, low cost materials as a means to illustrate many areas of physics such as spectroscopy, lasers, optics, simple circuits, black body radiation and data gathering. Presented here is a 3rd year undergraduate physics project which developed a low cost (£25) method to manufacture an experimentally accurate integrating sphere by 3D printing. Details are given of both a homemade internal reflectance coating formulated from readily available materials, and a robust instrument calibration method using a tungsten bulb. The instrument is demonstrated to give accurate and reproducible experimental measurements of luminescence quantum yield of various semiconducting fluorophores, in excellent agreement with literature values.

  9. Lyman- photodissociation of CH3CFCl2 (HCFC-141b): Quantum yield and translational energy of hydrogen atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Almuth Laeuter; Hans-Robert Volpp; Jai P Mittal; Rajesh K Vatsa

    2007-07-01

    The collision-free, room temperature gas-phase photodissociation dynamics of CH3CFCl2 (HCFC-141b) was studied using Lyman- laser radiation (121.6 nm) by the laser photolysis/laserinduced fluorescence `pump/probe’ technique. Lyman- radiation was used both to photodissociate the parent molecule and to detect the nascent H atom products via (22P → 12S) laser-induced fluorescence. Absolute H atom quantum yield, H = (0.39 ± 0.09) was determined by calibration method in which CH4 photolysis at 121.6 nm was used as a reference source of well-defined H atom concentrations. The line shapes of the measured H atom Doppler profiles indicate a Gaussian velocity distribution suggesting the presence of indirect H atom formation pathways in the Lyman- photodissociation of CH3CFCl2. The average kinetic energy of H atoms calculated from Doppler profiles was found to be T(lab) = (50 ± 3) kJ/mol. The nearly statistical translational energy together with the observed Maxwell-Boltzmann velocity distribution indicates that for CH3CFCl2 the H atom forming dissociation process comes closer to the statistical limit.

  10. Measurements of periods, relative abundances and absolute yields of delayed neutrons from fast neutron induced fission of {sup 237}Np

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piksaikine, V. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    The experimental method for measurements of the delayed neutron yields and period is presented. The preliminary results of the total yield, relative abundances and periods are shown comparing with the previously reported values. (J.P.N.)

  11. Measurements of periods, relative abundances and absolute yields of delayed neutrons from fast neutron induced fission of {sup 237}Np

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piksaikine, V. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    The experimental method for measurements of the delayed neutron yields and period is presented. The preliminary results of the total yield, relative abundances and periods are shown comparing with the previously reported values. (J.P.N.)

  12. Stability of agronomic and yield related traits of Jatropha curcas accessions raised from cuttings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mat, Nurul Hidayah Che; Yaakob, Zahira; Ratnam, Wickneswari

    2016-11-01

    Monitoring stability of agronomic and yield related traits is important for prediction of crop yields. This study was a latter study for the evaluation of 295 J. curcas individuals representing 21 accessions from eight countries at Biodiesel Research Station of Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Pilah planted in December 2012. In this study, 183 J. curcas individuals were selected randomly from the population and their growth performance evaluated from December 2013 to December 2014. All the individual plants were raised from cuttings. The yield related data were recorded periodically and performance of each accession was analyzed using Statistical Analysis System (SAS) 9.4. Five traits which were number of fruits per plant (NFPP), number of fruits per inflorescence (NFPI), hundred seed weight (g) (HSW), number of seeds per plant (NSPP) and yield per plant (g) (YPP) showed significant differences among the accessions after two years of planting. Maximum values for each trait were 208 cm for plant height (PH), 31 for number of branches per plant (BPP), 115 for number of inflorescence per plant (NIPP), 582 for NFPP, 7 for NFPI, 307 for number of flowers per inflorescence (NFI), 17 for number of female flowers per inflorescence (NFFPI), 91.6 g for HSW, 1647.1 for NSPP and 927.6 g for YPP. Most of the plants which had performed well in the first year were among the best performers in the second year.

  13. Relative Entropy and Proximity of Quantum Field Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Balasubramanian, Vijay; Maloney, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We study the question of how reliably one can distinguish two quantum field theories (QFTs). Each QFT defines a probability distribution on the space of fields. The relative entropy provides a notion of proximity between these distributions and quantifies the number of measurements required to distinguish between them. In the case of nearby conformal field theories, this reduces to the Zamolodchikov metric on the space of couplings. Our formulation quantifies the information lost under renormalization group flow from the UV to the IR and leads us to a quantification of fine-tuning. This formalism also leads us to a criterion for distinguishability of low energy effective field theories generated by the string theory landscape.

  14. Preon models, relativity, quantum mechanics and cosmology (I)

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Mestres, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Preons are hypothetic constituents of the standard particles. They were initially assumed to have basically similar properties to those of conventional matter. But this is not necessarily the case: the ultimate constituents of matter may feel a different space-time from that of special relativity and exhibit mechanical properties different from those predicted by standard quantum mechanics. They can also play an important cosmological role (inflation, dark matter, dark energy...). It is even not obvious that energy and momentum would have to be conserved in such a scenario. In this series of papers, we review the subject using the superbradyon model as an example, and suggest new ways to explore possible tests of the preon hypothesis.

  15. Relative entropy and proximity of quantum field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasubramanian, Vijay [David Rittenhouse Laboratories, University of Pennsylvania,Philadelphia (United States); CUNY Graduate Center, Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences,New York (United States); Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, and International Solvay Institutes,Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Heckman, Jonathan J. [Department of Physics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,Chapel Hill (United States); Maloney, Alexander [Department of Physics, McGill University,Montreal (Canada)

    2015-05-20

    We study the question of how reliably one can distinguish two quantum field theories (QFTs). Each QFT defines a probability distribution on the space of fields. The relative entropy provides a notion of proximity between these distributions and quantifies the number of measurements required to distinguish between them. In the case of nearby conformal field theories, this reduces to the Zamolodchikov metric on the space of couplings. Our formulation quantifies the information lost under renormalization group flow from the UV to the IR and leads us to a quantification of fine-tuning. This formalism also leads us to a criterion for distinguishability of low energy effective field theories generated by the string theory landscape.

  16. Relativity stability of quantum gas in a weak magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Men Fu-Dian; Liu Hui; Fan Zhao-Lan; Zhu Hou-Yu

    2009-01-01

    Based on the analytical expression of relativistic free energy for a weakly interacting Fermi gas in a weak magnetic field,by using the method of quantum statistics,the stability conditions of the system at both high and low temperatures axe given,and the effects of magnetic field and interpaxticle interactions on the stability of the system are analysed. It is shown that at high temperatures,the stability conditions of the system are completely the same,no matter whether it is the ultrarelativistic case or nonrelativistic case. At extremely low temperatures,the mechanical stability conditions of the system show a similar rule through a comparison between the ultrarelativistic case and nonrelativistic case. At the same time,thermal stability of a relativistic Bose gas in a weak magnetic field is discussed,and the influence of the effect of relativity on the thermal stability of the system is investigated.

  17. Action spectrum and maximum quantum yield of carbon fixation in natural phytoplankton populations: implications for primary production estimates in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbones, B.; Figueiras, F. G.; Varela, R.

    2000-09-01

    Spectral and non-spectral measurements of the maximum quantum yield of carbon fixation for natural phytoplankton assemblages were compared in order to evaluate their effect on bio-optical models of primary production. Field samples were collected from two different coastal regions of NW Spain in spring, summer and autumn and in a polar environment (Gerlache Strait, Antarctica) during the austral summer. Concurrent determinations were made of spectral phytoplankton absorption coefficient [ aph( λ)], white-light-limited slope of the photosynthesis-irradiance relationships ( αB), carbon uptake action spectra [ αB( λ)], broad-band maximum quantum yields ( φm), and spectral maximum quantum yields [ φm( λ)]. Carbon uptake action spectra roughly followed the shape of the corresponding phytoplankton absorption spectra but with a slight displacement in the blue-green region that could be attributed to imbalance between the two photosystems PS I and PS II. Results also confirmed previous observations of wavelength dependency of maximum quantum yield. The broad-band maximum quantum yield ( φm) calculated considering the measured spectral phytoplankton absorption coefficient and the spectrum of the light source of the incubators was not significantly different form the averaged spectral maximum quantum yield [ overlineφ max(λ) ] ( t-test for paired samples, P=0.34). These results suggest that maximum quantum yield can be estimated with enough accuracy from white-light P- E curves and measured phytoplankton absorption spectra. Primary production at light limiting regimes was compared using four different models with a varying degree of spectral complexity. No significant differences ( t-test for paired samples, P=0.91) were found between a spectral model based on the carbon uptake action spectra [ αB( λ) — model a] and a model which uses the broad-band φm and measured aph( λ) (model b). In addition, primary production derived from constructed action spectra [ ac

  18. Relationships Between the Distribution of Relative Canopy Light Intensity and the Peach Yield and Quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Feng-li; WANG Fei; WEI Qin-ping; WANG Xiao-wei; ZHANG Qiang

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present experiment was to study the relationship between the distribution of relative light intensity in canopy and yield and quality of Wanmi peach.The optimum relative canopy light intensity was judged to be 36.3% for high quality peaches,when canopy volumes of Wanmi peach trees with a relative light intensity<30%accounted for 7.7 and 47.9%of the total canopy volume in June and September,respectively.The canopy volume with a relative light intensity>80%was 27.7 and 3.1%of the total canopy volume in June and September.respectively.Peach canopies were divided into 0.5m×0.5m×0.5m cubes.with the relative light intensity being measured at different positions of the canopy during the growing season.Yield and fruit quality were also measured at these positions at harvest.The results showed that the relative light intensity decreased gradually from outside to inside and from top to bottom of the tree canopy.Fruit were mainly distributed in the upper and middle portions of the canopy,1.5-3.0m above ground. Regression results showed that single fruit weight and soluble solid content were positively related to relative light intensity.

  19. Molecular Mapping of QTLs for Yield and Yield-Related Traits in Oryza sativa cv Swarna × O. nivara (IRGC81848 Backcross Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.P. MALLIKARJUNA SWAMY

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Advanced backcross QTL analysis was used to identify QTLs for seven yield and yield-related traits in a BC2F2 population from the cross between a popular Oryza sativa cv Swarna and O. nivara IRGC81848. Transgressive segregants with more than 15% increased effect over Swarna were observed for all the traits except days to heading and days to 50% flowering. Thirty QTLs were detected for seven yield and yield-related traits using interval and composite interval mapping. Enhancing alleles at 13 (45% of these QTLs were derived from O. nivara, and enhancing alleles at all the QTLs for stem diameter and rachis diameter were derived from O. nivara. Three stem diameter QTLs, two rachis diameter QTLs and one number of secondary branches QTL identified by both Interval and composite interval mapping contributed more than 15% of the total phenotypic variance. The QTL epistasis was significant for stem diameter and plot yield. The most significant QTLs qSD7.2, qSD8.1 and qSD9.1 for stem diameter, qRD9.1 for rachis diameter and qNSB1.1 for number of secondary branches are good targets to evaluate their use in marker-assisted selection. O. nivara is a good source of novel alleles for yield related traits and reveals major effect QTLs suitable for marker-assisted selection.

  20. Line × Tester Mating Design Analysis for Grain Yield and Yield Related Traits in Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zine El Abidine Fellahi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nine bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L. genotypes were crossed in a line × tester mating design. The 20 F1's and their parents were evaluated in a randomized complete block design with three replications at the Field Crop Institute-Agricultural Experimental Station of Setif (Algeria during the 2011/2012 cropping season. The results indicated that sufficient genetic variability was observed for all characters studied. A899 × Rmada, A899 × Wifak, and A1135 × Wifak hybrids had greater grain yield mean than the parents. A901 line and the tester Wifak were good combiners for the number of grains per spike. MD is a good combiner for 1000-kernel weight and number of fertile tillers. HD1220 is a good general combiner to reduce plant height; Rmada is a good general combiner to shorten the duration of the vegetative growth period. A901 × Wifak is a best specific combiner to reduce plant height, to increase 1000-kernel weight and number of grains per spike. AA × MD is a best specific combiner to reduce duration of the vegetative period, plant height and to increase the number of kernels per spike. A899 × Wifak showed the highest heterosis for grain yield, accompanied with positive heterosis for the number of fertile tillers and spike length, and negative heterosis for 1000-kernel weight and the number of days to heading. σgca2/σsca2,  (σD2/σA21/2 low ratios and low to intermediate estimates of h2ns supported the involvement of both additive and nonadditive gene effects. The preponderance of non-additive type of gene actions clearly indicated that selection of superior plants should be postponed to later generation.

  1. Disordered locality and Lorentz dispersion relations: an explicit model of quantum foam

    CERN Document Server

    Caravelli, F

    2012-01-01

    Using the framework of Quantum Graphity, we construct an explicit model of a quantum foam, a quantum spacetime with spatial wormholes. The states depend on two parameters: the minimal size of the wormholes and their density with respect to this length. Macroscopic Lorentz invariance requires that the quantum superposition of spacetimes is suppressed by the length of these wormholes. We parametrize this suppression by the distribution of wormhole lengths in the quantum foam. We discuss the general case and then analyze two specific natural wormhole distributions. Corrections to the Lorentz dispersion relations are calculated using techniques developed in previous work.

  2. Agronomic Characteristics Related to Grain Yield and Nutrient Use Efficiency for Wheat Production in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Huaiguo; Xu, Xinpeng

    2016-01-01

    In order to make clear the recent status and trend of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) production in China, datasets from multiple field experiments and published literature were collected to study the agronomic characteristics related to grain yield, fertilizer application and nutrient use efficiency from the year 2000 to 2011. The results showed that the mean grain yield of wheat in 2000–2011 was 5950 kg/ha, while the N, P2O5 and K2O application rates were 172, 102 and 91 kg/ha on average, respectively. The decrease in N and P2O5 and increase in K2O balanced the nutrient supply and was the main reason for yield increase. The partial factor productivity (PFP, kg grain yield produced per unit of N, P2O5 or K2O applied) values of N (PFP-N), P (PFP-P) and K (PFP-K) were in the ranges of 29.5~39.6, 43.4~74.9 and 44.1~76.5 kg/kg, respectively. While PFP-N showed no significant changes from 2000 to 2010, both PFP-P and PFP-K showed an increased trend over this period. The mean agronomic efficiency (AE, kg grain yield increased per unit of N, P2O5 or K2O applied) values of N (AEN), P (AEP) and K (AEK) were 9.4, 10.2 and 6.5 kg/kg, respectively. The AE values demonstrated marked inter-annual fluctuations, with the amplitude of fluctuation for AEN greater than those for AEP and AEK. The mean fertilizer recovery efficiency (RE, the fraction of nutrient uptake in aboveground plant dry matter to the nutrient of fertilizer application) values of N, P and K in the aboveground biomass were 33.1%, 24.3% and 28.4%, respectively. It was also revealed that different wheat ecological regions differ greatly in wheat productivity, fertilizer application and nutrient use efficiency. In summary, it was suggested that best nutrient management practices, i.e. fertilizer recommendation applied based on soil testing or yield response, with strategies to match the nutrient input with realistic yield and demand, or provided with the 4R’s nutrient management (right time, right rate, right site

  3. Topological quantum groups, star products and their relations

    CERN Document Server

    Flato, M; Flato, M; Sternheimer, D

    1994-01-01

    This short summary of recent developments in quantum compact groups and star products is divided into 2 parts. In the first one we recast star products in a more abstract form as deformations and review its recent developments. The second part starts with a rapid presentation of standard quantum group theory and its problems, then moves to their completion by introduction of suitable Montel topologies well adapted to duality. Preferred deformations (by star products and unchanged coproducts) of Hopf algebras of functions on compact groups and their duals, are of special interest. Connection with the usual models of quantum groups and the quantum double is then presented.

  4. Private quantum computation: an introduction to blind quantum computing and related protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimons, Joseph F.

    2017-06-01

    Quantum technologies hold the promise of not only faster algorithmic processing of data, via quantum computation, but also of more secure communications, in the form of quantum cryptography. In recent years, a number of protocols have emerged which seek to marry these concepts for the purpose of securing computation rather than communication. These protocols address the task of securely delegating quantum computation to an untrusted device while maintaining the privacy, and in some instances the integrity, of the computation. We present a review of the progress to date in this emerging area.

  5. Relating the quantum mechanics of discrete systems to standard canonical quantum mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Hooft, Gerard t

    2012-01-01

    Discrete quantum mechanics is here defined to be a quantum theory of wave functions defined on integers P_i and Q_i, while canonical quantum mechanics is assumed to be based on wave functions on the real numbers, R^n. We study reversible mappings from the position operators q_i and their quantum canonical operators p_i of a canonical theory, onto the discrete, commuting operators Q_i and P_i. In this paper we are particularly interested in harmonic oscillators. In the discrete system, these t...

  6. The Relative Contribution of Non-Foliar Organs of Cotton to Yield and Related Physiological Characteristics Under Water Deifcit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Yuan-yuan; ZHANG Ya-li; YI Xiao-ping; ZHAN Dong-xia; LUO Hong-hai; Chow Wah Soon; ZHANG Wang-feng

    2014-01-01

    Water deifcit is one of the most important causes of decreased yield in cultivated plants. Non-foliar green organs in cotton play an important role in yield formation at the late growth stage. Although better photosynthetic performance was observed in a non-foliar organ (bract) compared with leaves under water deifcit. However, the physiological response of each organ in cotton to water deifcit has not been comprehensively studied in relation to the water status and photosynthesis characteristics. We studied the maintenance of water status of each organ in cotton by measuring their relative water content, proline content and stomatal characteristics. Water deifcit signiifcantly decreased the surface area of each organ, but to a lesser extent in non-foliar organs. Our results showed that the relative contribution of biomass accumulation of non-foliar organs increased under water deifcit. Non-foliar organs (bracts and capsule wall) showed less ontogenetic decrease in O2 evolution capacity and in RuBPC activity (per dry weight) as well as better antioxidant systems than leaves at various days after anthesis. We conclude that the photosynthesis from non-foliar organs is important for increasing cotton yield especially under water deifcit conditions.

  7. Cupriphication of gold to sensitize d(10)-d(10) metal-metal bonds and near-unity phosphorescence quantum yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galassi, Rossana; Ghimire, Mukunda M; Otten, Brooke M; Ricci, Simone; McDougald, Roy N; Almotawa, Ruaa M; Alhmoud, Dieaa; Ivy, Joshua F; Rawashdeh, Abdel-Monem M; Nesterov, Vladimir N; Reinheimer, Eric W; Daniels, Lee M; Burini, Alfredo; Omary, Mohammad A

    2017-06-27

    Outer-shell s(0)/p(0) orbital mixing with d(10) orbitals and symmetry reduction upon cupriphication of cyclic trinuclear trigonal-planar gold(I) complexes are found to sensitize ground-state Cu(I)-Au(I) covalent bonds and near-unity phosphorescence quantum yields. Heterobimetallic Au4Cu2 {[Au4(μ-C(2),N(3)-EtIm)4Cu2(µ-3,5-(CF3)2Pz)2], (4a)}, Au2Cu {[Au2(μ-C(2),N(3)-BzIm)2Cu(µ-3,5-(CF3)2Pz)], (1) and [Au2(μ-C(2),N(3)-MeIm)2Cu(µ-3,5-(CF3)2Pz)], (3a)}, AuCu2 {[Au(μ-C(2),N(3)-MeIm)Cu2(µ-3,5-(CF3)2Pz)2], (3b) and [Au(μ-C(2),N(3)-EtIm)Cu2(µ-3,5-(CF3)2Pz)2], (4b)} and stacked Au3/Cu3 {[Au(μ-C(2),N(3)-BzIm)]3[Cu(µ-3,5-(CF3)2Pz)]3, (2)} form upon reacting Au3 {[Au(μ-C(2),N(3)-(N-R)Im)]3 ((N-R)Im = imidazolate; R = benzyl/methyl/ethyl = BzIm/MeIm/EtIm)} with Cu3 {[Cu(μ-3,5-(CF3)2Pz)]3 (3,5-(CF3)2Pz = 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)pyrazolate)}. The crystal structures of 1 and 3a reveal stair-step infinite chains whereby adjacent dimer-of-trimer units are noncovalently packed via two Au(I)⋯Cu(I) metallophilic interactions, whereas 4a exhibits a hexanuclear cluster structure wherein two monomer-of-trimer units are linked by a genuine d(10)-d(10) polar-covalent bond with ligand-unassisted Cu(I)-Au(I) distances of 2.8750(8) Å each-the shortest such an intermolecular distance ever reported between any two d(10) centers so as to deem it a "metal-metal bond" vis-à-vis "metallophilic interaction." Density-functional calculations estimate 35-43 kcal/mol binding energy, akin to typical M-M single-bond energies. Congruently, FTIR spectra of 4a show multiple far-IR bands within 65-200 cm(-1), assignable to vCu-Au as validated by both the Harvey-Gray method of crystallographic-distance-to-force-constant correlation and dispersive density functional theory computations. Notably, the heterobimetallic complexes herein exhibit photophysical properties that are favorable to those for their homometallic congeners, due to threefold-to-twofold symmetry reduction, resulting in

  8. The relation between Euclidean and Lorentzian 2D quantum gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambjørn, J.; Correia, J.; Kristjansen, C.; Loll, R.

    2006-01-01

    Starting from 2D Euclidean quantum gravity, we show that one recovers 2D Lorentzian quantum gravity by removing all baby universes. Using a peeling procedure to decompose the discrete, triangulated geometries along a one-dimensional path, we explicitly associate with each Euclidean space-time a (gen

  9. Relativity as the quantum mechanics of space-time measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Lieu, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Can a simple microscopic model of space and time demonstrate Special Relativity as the macroscopic (aggregate) behavior of an ensemble ? The question will be investigated in three parts. First, it is shown that the Lorentz transformation formally stems from the First Relativity Postulate (FRP) {\\it alone} if space-time quantization is a fundamental law of physics which must be included as part of the Postulate. An important corollary, however, is that when measuring devices which carry the basic units of lengths and time (e.g. a clock ticking every time quantum) are `moving' uniformly, they appear to be measuring with larger units. Secondly, such an apparent increase in the sizes of the quanta can be attributed to extra fluctuations associated with motion, which are precisely described in terms of a thermally agitated harmonic oscillator by using a temperature parameter. This provides a stringent constraint on the microscopic properties of flat space-time: it is an array of quantized oscillators. Thirdly, sin...

  10. Characterizing quantum correlations. Entanglement, uncertainty relations and exponential families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niekamp, Soenke

    2012-04-20

    This thesis is concerned with different characterizations of multi-particle quantum correlations and with entropic uncertainty relations. The effect of statistical errors on the detection of entanglement is investigated. First, general results on the statistical significance of entanglement witnesses are obtained. Then, using an error model for experiments with polarization-entangled photons, it is demonstrated that Bell inequalities with lower violation can have higher significance. The question for the best observables to discriminate between a state and the equivalence class of another state is addressed. Two measures for the discrimination strength of an observable are defined, and optimal families of observables are constructed for several examples. A property of stabilizer bases is shown which is a natural generalization of mutual unbiasedness. For sets of several dichotomic, pairwise anticommuting observables, uncertainty relations using different entropies are constructed in a systematic way. Exponential families provide a classification of states according to their correlations. In this classification scheme, a state is considered as k-correlated if it can be written as thermal state of a k-body Hamiltonian. Witness operators for the detection of higher-order interactions are constructed, and an algorithm for the computation of the nearest k-correlated state is developed.

  11. Dynamics of cover, UV-protective pigments, and quantum yield in biological soil crust communities of an undisturbed Mojave Desert shrubland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belnap, J.; Phillips, S.L.; Smith, S.D.

    2007-01-01

    Biological soil crusts are an integral part of dryland ecosystems. We monitored the cover of lichens and mosses, cyanobacterial biomass, concentrations of UV-protective pigments in both free-living and lichenized cyanobacteria, and quantum yield in the soil lichen species Collema in an undisturbed Mojave Desert shrubland. During our sampling time, the site received historically high and low levels of precipitation, whereas temperatures were close to normal. Lichen cover, dominated by Collema tenax and C. coccophorum, and moss cover, dominated by Syntrichia caninervis, responded to both increases and decreases in precipitation. This finding for Collema spp. at a hot Mojave Desert site is in contrast to a similar study conducted at a cool desert site on the Colorado Plateau in SE Utah, USA, where Collema spp. cover dropped in response to elevated temperatures, but did not respond to changes in rainfall. The concentrations of UV-protective pigments in free-living cyanobacteria at the Mojave Desert site were also strongly and positively related to rainfall received between sampling times (R2 values ranged from 0.78 to 0.99). However, pigment levels in the lichenized cyanobacteria showed little correlation with rainfall. Quantum yield in Collema spp. was closely correlated with rainfall. Climate models in this region predict a 3.5-4.0 ??C rise in temperature and a 15-20% decline in winter precipitation by 2099. Based on our data, this rise in temperature is unlikely to have a strong effect on the dominant species of the soil crusts. However, the predicted drop in precipitation will likely lead to a decrease in soil lichen and moss cover, and high stress or mortality in soil cyanobacteria as levels of UV-protective pigments decline. In addition, surface-disturbing activities (e.g., recreation, military activities, fire) are rapidly increasing in the Mojave Desert, and these disturbances quickly remove soil lichens and mosses. These stresses combined are likely to lead to

  12. Accurate quantum yields by laser gain vs absorption spectroscopy - Investigation of Br/Br(asterisk) channels in photofragmentation of Br2 and IBr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, H. K.; Weitz, E.; Leone, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    Various techniques have been used to study photodissociation dynamics of the halogens and interhalogens. The quantum yields obtained by these techniques differ widely. The present investigation is concerned with a qualitatively new approach for obtaining highly accurate quantum yields for electronically excited states. This approach makes it possible to obtain an accuracy of 1 percent to 3 percent. It is shown that measurement of the initial transient gain/absorption vs the final absorption in a single time-resolved signal is a very accurate technique in the study of absolute branching fractions in photodissociation. The new technique is found to be insensitive to pulse and probe laser characteristics, molecular absorption cross sections, and absolute precursor density.

  13. Electron Photodetachment from Aqueous Anions. I. Quantum Yields for Generation of Hydrated Electron by 193 and 248 nm Laser Photoexcitation of Miscellaneous Inorganic Anions

    CERN Document Server

    Sauer, M C; Shkrob, I A; Sauer, Myran C.; Shkrob, Ilya A.

    2004-01-01

    Time resolved transient absorption spectroscopy has been used to determine quantum yields for electron photodetachment in 193 nm and (where possible) 248 nm laser excitation of miscellaneous aqueous anions, including hexacyanoferrate(II), sulfate, sulfite, halide anions (Cl-, Br-, and I-), pseudohalide anions (OH-, HS-, CNS-), and several common inorganic anions for which no quantum yields have been reported heretofore: SO3=, NO2-, NO3-, ClO3- and ClO4-. Molar extinction coefficients for these anions and photoproducts of electron detachment from these anions at the excitation wavelengths were also determined. These results are discussed in the context of recent ultrafast kinetic studies and compared with the previous data obtained by product analyses. We suggest using electron photodetachment from the aqueous halide and pseudohalide anions as actinometric standard for time-resolved studies of aqueous photosystems in the UV.

  14. Violet-to-Blue Gain and Lasing from Colloidal CdS Nanoplatelets: Low-Threshold Stimulated Emission Despite Low Photoluminescence Quantum Yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diroll, Benjamin T.; Talapin, Dmitri V.; Schaller, Richard D.

    2017-02-13

    Amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and lasing from solution-processed materials are demonstrated in the challenging violet-to-blue (430–490 nm) spectral region for colloidal nanoplatelets of CdS and newly synthesized core/shell CdS/ZnS nanoplatelets. Despite modest band-edge photoluminescence quantum yields of 2% or less for single excitons, which we show results from hole trapping, the samples exhibit low ASE thresholds. Furthermore, four-monolayer CdS samples show ASE at shorter wavelengths than any reported film of colloidal quantum-confined material. This work underlines that low quantum yields for single excitons do not necessarily lead to a poor gain medium. The low ASE thresholds originate from negligible dispersion in thickness, large absorption cross sections of 2.8 × 10–14 cm–2, and rather slow (150 to 300 ps) biexciton recombination. We show that under higher-fluence excitation, ASE can kinetically outcompete hole trapping. Using nanoplatelets as the gain medium, lasing is observed in a linear optical cavity. This work confirms the fundamental advantages of colloidal quantum well structures as gain media, even in the absence of high photoluminescence efficiency.

  15. Quantum yield for O-atom production in the VUV photodissociation of CO2 using the time-sliced velocity-mapped imaging (TS-VMI) method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, William M.

    2016-10-01

    VUV photodissociation above 10.5 eV is considered the primary region for photochemical destruction of CO2 by solar radiation. There is enough photon energy in this region so that in addition to ground state O(3PJ) and CO(1Σ +) that can be produced during photodissociation excited species such as atomic oxygen O(1D) and O(1S), as well as excited carbon monoxide CO(a3Π, a'3Σ+) also can be formed. Electronic excited oxygen atom and carbon monoxide are the species that are responsible for the airglows in atmospheres of the solar planets and comets. Therefore, detail photodissociation quantum yields for these excited species from CO2 are critical in interpreting the chemistry in these solar system bodies. We have previously shown that the time-sliced velocity-mapped imaging (TS-VMI) technique can provide detailed branching ratio information about photodissociation of diatomic molecules.1, 2 However, to date we have not been able to show how this technique can be use to determine absolute quantum yields for the products produced in the VUV photodissociation of CO2. In this talk we will describe how the known quantum yields for the photodissociation O2 to O(3P2), O(3P1), O(3P0) and O(1D) can be used to determine quantum yields of similar products in the photodissociation of CO2.[1] Yu Song, Hong Gao, Yih Chung Chang, D. Hammouténe, H. Ndome, M. Hochlaf, William M. Jackson, and C. Y. Ng, Ap. J., 819:23 (13pp), 2016; doi:10.3847/0004-637X/819/1/23.[2] Hong Gao, Yu Song, William M. Jackson and C. Y. Ng, J. Chem. Phys, 138, 191102, 2013.

  16. Fluorescence quantum yields of natural organic matter and organic compounds: Implications for the fluorescence-based interpretation of organic matter composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wünsch, Urban; Murphy, Kathleen R.; Stedmon, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy are economical tools for tracing the supply, turnover and fate of dissolved organic matter (DOM). The colored and fluorescent fractions of DOM (CDOM and FDOM, respectively) are linked by the apparent fluorescence quantum yield (AQY) of DOM, which reflects ...... to confirm matches was limited due to multiple compounds exhibiting very similar spectra. This reiterates the fact that spectral similarity alone is insufficient evidence of the presence of particular compounds, and additional evidence is required...

  17. One interpretation for both Quantum Mechanics and General Relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halewijn, Ewoud

    2014-07-01

    In reconciling General Relativity with Quantum Mechanics, it is challenging to resolve the combined mathematical equations and to find an interpretation that makes sense ontologically. Such an interpretation has been developed by quantizing descriptive components in both the theories and other views. The resulting micro-components have been re-integrated within the scope of known gaps between science and 'the real world'. The odd peculiarities in these theories have been made look 'normal' by fully untraditionally answering fundamental questions. The interpretation is suggesting that we define time as a discrete operator and its eigenvalues as constraints on space-time manifolds, in order to reconcile the mathematical equations. Outside the mathematical arena we suggest reconsidering the concepts of Black Holes, the Big Bang, the epistemological problem of perception in philosophy and the supposed clash between scientific and the spiritual worldviews. It is concluded that developing one consistent ontological interpretation for both theorie is possible. It is a weird story, but it is making powerful suggestions for reviewing some of our fundamental convictions.

  18. Increased upconversion quantum yield in photonic structures due to local field enhancement and modification of the local density of states--a simulation-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herter, Barbara; Wolf, Sebastian; Fischer, Stefan; Gutmann, Johannes; Bläsi, Benedikt; Goldschmidt, Jan Christoph

    2013-09-09

    In upconversion processes, two or more low-energy photons are converted into one higher-energy photon. Besides other applications, upconversion has the potential to decrease sub-band-gap losses in silicon solar cells. Unfortunately, upconverting materials known today show quantum yields, which are too low for this application. In order to improve the upconversion quantum yield, two parameters can be tuned using photonic structures: first, the irradiance can be increased within the structure. This is beneficial, as upconversion is a non-linear process. Second, the rates of the radiative transitions between ionic states within the upconverter material can be altered due to a varied local density of photonic states. In this paper, we present a theoretical model of the impact of a photonic structure on upconversion and test this model in a simulation based analysis of the upconverter material β -NaYF(4):20% Er(3+) within a dielectric waveguide structure. The simulation combines a finite-difference time-domain simulation model that describes the variations of the irradiance and the change of the local density of photonic states within a photonic structure, with a rate equation model of the upconversion processes. We find that averaged over the investigated structure the upconversion luminescence is increased by a factor of 3.3, and the upconversion quantum yield can be improved in average by a factor of 1.8 compared to the case without the structure for an initial irradiance of 200 Wm(-2).

  19. Absolute quantum yield measurements for the formation of oxygen atoms after UV laser excitation of SO2 at 222.4 nm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mohammed Abu-Bajeh; Melanie Cameron; Kyung-Hoon Jung; Christoph Kappel; Almuth Läuter; Kyoung-Seok Lee; Hari P Upadhyaya; Rajesh K Vatsa; Hans-Robert Volpp

    2002-12-01

    The dynamics of formation of oxygen atoms after UV photoexcitation of SO2 in the gas-phase was studied by pulsed laser photolysis-laser-induced fluorescence `pump-and-probe' technique in a flow reactor. SO2 at room-temperature was excited at the KrCl excimer laser wavelength (222.4 nm) and O(3P) photofragments were detected under collision-free conditions by vacuum ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence. The use of narrow-band probe laser radiation, generated via resonant third-order sum-difference frequency conversion of dye laser radiation in Krypton, allowed the measurement of the nascent O(3P=2,1,0) fine-structure state distribution: =2/=1/=0 = (0.88 ± 0.02)/(0.10 ± 0.01)/(0.02 ± 0.01). Employing NO2 photolysis as a reference, a value of O(3P) = 0.13 ± 0.05 for the absolute O(3P) atom quantum yield was determined. The measured O(3P) quantum yield is compared with the results of earlier fluorescence quantum yield measurements. A suitable mechanism is suggested in which the dissociation proceeds via internal conversion from high rotational states of the initially excited SO2(∼ 1 B2) (1, 2, 2) vibronic level to nearby continuum states of the electronic ground state.

  20. Molar Absorptivity and Quantum Yield of Fe(II) Photo-formation for the Aqueous Solutions of Fe(III)-Dicarboxylate Comlexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitomi, Y.; Arakaki, T.

    2009-04-01

    Fe(III)/Fe(II) cycle in the environment affects formation of active oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals, which in turn determines lifetimes of many organic compounds. Although aqueous Fe(III)-dicarboxylate complexes are considered to be an important source of photo-chemically formed Fe(II), molar absorptivity and quantum yield of Fe(II) formation for individual species are not well understood. The Visual MINTEQ computer program was used to calculate the equilibrium concentrations of individual Fe(III)-dicarboxylate species in the aqueous solutions of Fe(III)-dicarboxylate complexes. The molar absorptivity and the product of the quantum yield and the molar absorptivity of Fe(III)-dicarboxylate species were obtained by UV-VIS spectrophotometer and photochemical experiments, and these experimental data were combined with the calculated equilibrium Fe(III)-dicarboxylate concentrations to determine individual molar absorptivity and quantum yield of Fe(II) photo-formation for a specific Fe(III)-dicarboxylate species. Dicarboxylate compounds studied were oxalate, malonate, succinate, malate, and phthalate.

  1. Genetic Analysis and Combining Ability Studies for Yield Related Characters in Rapeseed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamar Shehzad

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Combining ability analysis has a key position in rapeseed breeding. To estimate the combining ability effects for yield controlling traits in rapeseed, three testers and five lines were crossed using line × tester design in randomized complete block design with three replications. Mean sum of squares of analysis of variances for genotypes were significant for all of the traits; indicating the presence of significant genetic variation. All the interactions between lines and testers exhibited significant results of mean sum of squares for combining ability. Line ‘Duncled’ was found good general combiner for decreased Plant height (PH:-2.0, Days taken to 50% flowering (DF: -15.8 and Days taken to maturity (DM:-3.4 while tester ‘Punjab Sarson” for increased Number of seed/siliqua (SS: 2.2, Number of siliquae/plant (SP: 2.2 and decreased DF (-3.0 traits. Significant general and specific combining ability effects were observed. The best hybrid combination on the basis of specific combining ability effects was “Durre-NIFA × ZN-M-6” for Seed yield/plant (SY: 2.7, DF (-6.1 and DM (-3.5. PH (-0.2, Siliqua length (SL: -0.1, SS (-0.03 and SY (0.2 showed non-additive genetic effects. The half of the characters revealed additive and remaining half showed non-additive genetic effects. The present study unveiled the importance of both type of genetic effects demanding the application of integrated breeding approaches for exploiting the variability. ‘Punjab Sarson × ZN-M-6’ exposed maximum SS (30 and SP (837. Maximum SY (75.9g and minimum DF (64 were showed by ‘Legend × Duncled’. The present research delivers valuable information of genotypes for promoting yield by means of improving yield related characters.

  2. Relative prolactin-to-progesterone concentrations around farrowing influence colostrum yield in primiparous sows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loisel, F; Farmer, C; van Hees, H; Quesnel, H

    2015-10-01

    In swine, colostrum production is induced by the drop of progesterone (P4) concentrations which leads to the prepartum peak of prolactin (PRL). PRL regulates mammary cell turnover and stimulates lacteal nutrient synthesis. P4 inhibits PRL secretion and downregulates the PRL receptor in the mammary gland. The aim of the present study was to determine if the relative prepartum concentrations of P4 and PRL (PRL/P4 ratio) influence sow colostrum production. The performance of 29 Landrace × Large White primiparous sows was analyzed. Colostrum yield was estimated during 24 h starting at the onset of parturition (T0) using litter weight gains. Colostrum was collected at T0 and 24 h later (T24). Repeated jugular blood samples were collected during the peripartum period, that is, from -72 to +24 h related to farrowing and were assayed for P4 and PRL. Sows were retrospectively categorized in 2 groups according to their PRL/P4 ratio 24 h before farrowing being either 3 (high PRL/P4, n = 13). During the peripartum period, the circulating concentrations of P4 were lower (P Colostrum yield was greater in high PRL/P4 compared with low PRL/P4 sows (4.11 vs 3.48 kg [root mean square error = 0.69], P Colostrum composition (dry matter, energy, protein, lipid, and lactose contents) and IgG and IgA concentrations did not differ between the 2 groups of sows (P > 0.10). The Na/K ratio in colostrum 24 h after the onset of farrowing was lower in high PRL/P4 compared with low PRL/P4 sows (P colostrum yield in primiparous sows.

  3. Colostrum yield and piglet growth during lactation are related to gilt metabolic and hepatic status prepartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loisel, F; Farmer, C; Ramaekers, P; Quesnel, H

    2014-07-01

    It was hypothesized that colostrum production could be influenced by sow peripartum endocrine, metabolic, and hepatic status. The plant extract silymarin was shown to influence endocrine and hepatic status in several species. The aims of the present study were to investigate the effects of silymarin intake during late pregnancy on sow hormonal and hepatic status and to determine whether relations exist between sow hepatic and metabolic status during the peripartum period and colostrum yield and piglet performances during lactation. From d 107 of pregnancy until farrowing, nulliparous sows were either fed 12 g/d of silymarin (SIL; n = 15) or no treatment (Control; n = 12). Piglet BW was recorded directly after birth, 24 h after birth of the first piglet, and at 7, 14, and 21 d of lactation. Blood samples were collected from sows on d 107 and 109 of pregnancy, daily from d 111 of pregnancy until d 2 of lactation, and on d 7 and 21 of lactation. They were assayed for endocrine, metabolic, and hepatic variables. Colostrum yield was estimated during 24 h starting at the onset of farrowing. Silymarin did not influence colostrum yield (3.7 ± 0.3 kg) or gross composition (P > 0.10), nor did it affect serum prolactin concentrations or plasma concentrations of progesterone, estradiol-17β, or cortisol (P > 0.10). Mean litter BW gain was lower (P 0.10). Colostrum yield was positively correlated with urea (r = 0.50; P = 0.01) and creatinine (r = 0.43; P = 0.03) concentrations in sows on the day before farrowing. Mean litter BW gain over 2 wk was negatively correlated with concentrations of β-hydroxybutyric acid (r = -0.50; P = 0.01) and γ-GT (r = -0.42; P = 0.03) on the day before farrowing and was positively correlated with urea concentrations on the day before farrowing (r = 0.54; P = 0.01). In conclusion, at the dose of 12 g/d, silymarin did not influence prolactin concentrations or the hepatic status of sows, had no impact on colostrum production, and decreased litter

  4. Identification of QTL for maize grain yield and kernel-related traits

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CONG YANG; LEI ZHANG; AIMIN JIA; TINGZHAO RONG

    2016-06-01

    Grain yield (GY) is one of the most important and complex quantitative traits in maize (Zea maysL.) breeding practice.Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for GY and three kernel-related traits were detected in a set of recombinant inbred lines (RILs).One hundred and seven simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and 168 insertion/deletion polymorphism markers (Indels) were usedto genotype RILs. Eight QTLs were found to be associated with four yield-related traits: GY, 100-kernel weight (HKW),10-kernel length (KL), and 10-kernel length width (KW). Each QTL explained between 5.96 (qKL2-1) and 13.05 (qKL1-1)per cent of the phenotypic variance. Notably, one common QTL, located at the marker interval betweenbnlg1893andchr2-236477(chromosomal bin 2.09) simultaneously controlled GY and HKW; another common QTL, at bin 2.03 was simulta-neously responsible for HKW and KW. Of the QTLs identified, only one pair of significant epistatic interaction involved inchromosomal region at bin 2.03 was detected for HKW; no significant QTL ×environment interactions were observed. Theseresults provide the common QTLs and for marker-assisted breeding

  5. A Framework of Principles for Quantum General Relativity with Time and Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Maran, Suresh K

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to outline a framework of concepts and principles to combine quantum mechanics and general relativity so that time and measurement (reduction) are present as integral parts of the basic foundations. First, the problem of time in quantum gravity and the measurement problem in quantum mechanics are briefly reviewed and the popular proposals to tackle these two problems are briefly discussed. Next, on the already known foundations of quantum mechanics, a framework of principles of dynamics is built: 1) Self-Time Evolution - Newtons first law is reinterpreted to define time, 2) Local Measurement by Local Reduction - Quantum diffusion theory is adapted, and 3) Global Evolution by Global Reduction. Ideas on how to apply the framework to study quantum general relativistic physics are discussed. Further, more general and modified forms of some of these principles are also discussed. The theoretical elements in the framework to be made concrete by further theoretical and experimental inv...

  6. Statistical Separability of the World and Consistency Between Quantum Theory, Relativity, and Causality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qi-Ren

    2007-01-01

    We show that the quantum world with non-local states and original statistics is statistically separable.According to relativistic dynamics, the super-luminal signal transmission is impossible. The present quantum theory is therefore consistent with the relativity and the causality.

  7. An Introduction to Relativistic Quantum Mechanics. I. From Relativity to Dirac Equation

    CERN Document Server

    De Sanctis, M

    2007-01-01

    By using the general concepts of special relativity and the requirements of quantum mechanics, Dirac equation is derived and studied. Only elementary knowledge of spin and rotations in quantum mechanics and standard handlings of linear algebra are employed for the development of the present work.

  8. Nitrogen and Sulphur Relations in Effecting Yield and Quality of Cereals and Oilseed Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.K. Nad

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen and sulphur, both vital structural elements, are especially needed for the synthesis of proteins and oils. Investigations revealed the required application of sulphur is one half to one third the amount of nitrogen, and the ratio becomes narrower in mustard (Brassica juncea L., followed by wheat and rice. The efficiency of an increased level of nitrogen required a proportionately higher amount of sulphur. A critical investigation on the effective utilization of applied vis-à-vis absorbed nitrogen in wheat and mustard envisaged accumulation of NO3-N in vegetative parts when sulphur remained proportionately low. Application of sulphur hastened the chemical reduction of absorbed NO3– for its effective utilization. The effect was more pronounced in mustard than in wheat. Easily available forms of sulphur, like ammonium sulphate and gypsum, as compared to pyrite or elemental sulphur, maintained adequate N to S ratio in rice, resulting in a reduction in the percent of unfilled grain, a major consideration in rice yield. A narrow N to S ratio, with both at higher levels, increased the oil content but raised the saponification value of the oil, a measure of free fatty acids. Whereas, a proportionately narrow N to S ratio at moderate dose resulted in adequately higher seed and oil yield with relatively low saponification value, associated with increased iodine value of the oil, indicating respectively low free fatty acids and higher proportion of unsaturated fatty acids, an index for better quality of the oil.

  9. High relative humidity increases yield, harvest index, flowering, and gynophore growth of hydroponically grown peanut plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortley, D. G.; Bonsi, C. K.; Loretan, P. A.; Hill, W. A.; Morris, C. E.

    2000-01-01

    Growth chamber experiments were conducted to study the physiological and growth response of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) to 50% and 85% relative humidity (RH). The objective was to determine the effects of RH on pod and seed yield, harvest index, and flowering of peanut grown by the nutrient film technique (NFT). 'Georgia Red' peanut plants (14 days old) were planted into growth channels (0.15 x 0.15 x 1.2 m). Plants were spaced 25 cm apart with 15 cm between channels. A modified half-Hoagland solution with an additional 2 mM Ca was used. Solution pH was maintained between 6.4 and 6.7, and electrical conductivity (EC) ranged between 1100 and 1200 microS cm-1. Temperature regimes of 28/22 degrees C were maintained during the light/dark periods (12 hours each) with photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) at canopy level of 500 micromoles-m-2s-1. Foliage and pod fresh and dry weights, total seed yield, harvest index (HI), and seed maturity were greater at high than at low RH. Plants grown at 85% RH had greater total and individual leaflet area and stomatal conductance, flowered 3 days earlier and had a greater number of flowers reaching anthesis. Gynophores grew more rapidly at 85% than at 50% RH.

  10. High relative humidity increases yield, harvest index, flowering, and gynophore growth of hydroponically grown peanut plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortley, D. G.; Bonsi, C. K.; Loretan, P. A.; Hill, W. A.; Morris, C. E.

    2000-01-01

    Growth chamber experiments were conducted to study the physiological and growth response of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) to 50% and 85% relative humidity (RH). The objective was to determine the effects of RH on pod and seed yield, harvest index, and flowering of peanut grown by the nutrient film technique (NFT). 'Georgia Red' peanut plants (14 days old) were planted into growth channels (0.15 x 0.15 x 1.2 m). Plants were spaced 25 cm apart with 15 cm between channels. A modified half-Hoagland solution with an additional 2 mM Ca was used. Solution pH was maintained between 6.4 and 6.7, and electrical conductivity (EC) ranged between 1100 and 1200 microS cm-1. Temperature regimes of 28/22 degrees C were maintained during the light/dark periods (12 hours each) with photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) at canopy level of 500 micromoles-m-2s-1. Foliage and pod fresh and dry weights, total seed yield, harvest index (HI), and seed maturity were greater at high than at low RH. Plants grown at 85% RH had greater total and individual leaflet area and stomatal conductance, flowered 3 days earlier and had a greater number of flowers reaching anthesis. Gynophores grew more rapidly at 85% than at 50% RH.

  11. Nitrogen- and irradiance-dependent variations of the maximum quantum yield of carbon fixation in eutrophic, mesotrophic and oligotrophic marine systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babin, Marcel; Morel, André; Claustre, Hervé; Bricaud, Annick; Kolber, Zbigniew; Falkowski, Paul G.

    1996-08-01

    Natural variability of the maximum quantum yield of carbon fixation ( φC max), as determined from the initial slope of the photosynthesis-irradiance curve and from light absorption measurements, was studied at three sites in the northeast tropical Atlantic representing typical eutrophic, mesotrophic and oligotrophic regimes. At the eutrophic and mesotrophic sites, where the mixed layer extended deeper than the euphotic layer, all photosynthetic parameters were nearly constant with depth, and φC max averaged between 0.05 and 0.03 molC (mol quanta absorbed) -1, respectively. At the oligotrophic site, a deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) existed and φC max varied from ca 0.005 in the upper nutrient-depleted mixed layer to 0.063 below the DCM in stratified waters. firstly, φC max was found roughly to covary with nitrate concentration between sites and with depth at the oligotrophic site, and secondly, it was found to decrease with increasing relative concentrations of non-photosynthetic pigments. The extent of φC max variations directly related to nitrate concentration was inferred from variations in the fraction of functional PS2 reaction centers ( f), measured using fast repetition rate fluorometry. Covariations between f and nitrate concentration indicate that the latter factor may be responsible for a 2-fold variation in φC max. Moreover, partitioning light absorption between photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic pigments suggests that the variable contribution of the non-photosynthetic absorption may explain a 3-fold variation in φC max, as indicated by variations in the effective absorption cross-section of photosystem 2 ( σPS2). Results confirm the role of nitrate in φC max variation, and emphasize those of light and vertical mixing.

  12. Combining general relativity and quantum theory points of conflict and contact

    CERN Document Server

    Padmanabhan, T

    2001-01-01

    The issues related to bringing together the principles of general relativity and quantum theory are discussed. After briefly summarising the points of conflict between the two formalisms I focus on four specific themes in which some contact has been established in the past between GR and quantum field theory: (i) The role of planck length in the microstructure of spacetime (ii) The role of quantum effects in cosmology and origin of the universe (iii) The thermodynamics of spacetimes with horizons and especially the concept of entropy related to spacetime geometry (iv) The problem of the cosmological constant.

  13. Risk is relative: risk aversion yields cooperation rather than defection in cooperation-friendly environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glöckner, Andreas; Hilbig, Benjamin E

    2012-06-01

    Previous findings concerning the relation of risk aversion and cooperation in repeated prisoner's dilemma games have been inconclusive. We hypothesized that this was due to an interaction between personality and environment. Specifically, we argued that in cooperation-friendly environments--given certain beliefs--defection is more risky than cooperation. The main reason for this is that, in such a situation, defection potentially yields outcomes of higher variance (and vice versa, for cooperation-unfriendly environments). In line with this hypothesis, we showed, in two experiments and a reanalysis of a study by Fudenberg, Rand, and Dreber (American Economic Review, in press), that the degree of cooperation increases with dispositional risk aversion in cooperation-friendly environments, but not in cooperation-unfriendly environments. We also found similar person-situation interactions for neuroticism and extraversion.

  14. Photolysis of CF3CH2CHO in the presence of O2 at 248 and 266 nm: quantum yields, products, and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiñolo, M; Bettinelli, C; Jain, C; Dréan, P; Lemoine, B; Albaladejo, J; Jiménez, E; Fittschen, C

    2013-10-17

    Three different detection techniques, coupled to pulsed laser photolysis (PLP), have been employed to determine the quantum yields of CF3CH2CHO at 248 and 266 nm: CF3CH2CHO + hν → CF3CH2 + HCO (R1a), CF3CH2CHO + hν → CF3CH3 + CO (R1b), and CF3CH2CHO + hν → CF3CH2O + H (R1c). (a) In the presence of air, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was employed at a total pressure of 760 Torr to monitor and quantify the loss of CF3CH2CHO at both wavelengths as well as the build-up of formed products (CO, CF3CH3, CF3CHO, and CF3CH2OH) after various laser pulses. Cyclohexane was added as OH-scavenger in most experiments. CF3CH3 was observed and quantified at both wavelengths, confirming that channel R1b is occurring. Small amounts of HCOOH and COF2 were also detected. (b) Time-resolved cw-cavity ring down spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) at 40 Torr He coupled to photolysis at 248 nm was employed for the detection of HO2 radicals. Varying the O2 concentration allows distinguishing the origin of the HO2 radicals from either R1a or R1c. OH radicals were simultaneously detected by laser-induced fluorescence. (c) Time-resolved tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) at 30 Torr N2 coupled to photolysis at 266 nm was employed for the determination of the quantum yields of CO. By varying the O2 concentration, a distinction can be achieved between the yields of prompt CO R1b or decomposition of highly excited CF3CH2CO from R1c and HCO radicals R1a. Channel R1a has been identified as the major reaction path. The overall quantum yield, Φλ(CF3CH2CHO), at 248 nm was found as Φ248nm = (0.76 ± 0.14) and (0.73 ± 0.20) from cw-CRDS and FTIR experiments, respectively. At 266 nm, the overall quantum yield was found as Φ266nm = (0.55 ± 0.10) and (0.47 ± 0.10) from TDLAS and FTIR experiments, respectively.

  15. Relations among Valencia orange yields with soil and leaf nutrients in Northwestern Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonez Fidalski

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The Valencia orange orchards established on soils of low fertility in the Northwest region of Paraná State, Brazil, have showed symptoms of Mg deficiency and reduced fruit yields. The objective of this study was to verify the relationship between yield with soil and leaf nutrients during 1996/97 growing season. Two sites of low and high productivity were selected in seven orchards. Leaf and soil samples (fertilized rows and interrows were collected in 1996. The results showed that the citrus yields were negatively related with soil Mg/K and Ca+Mg/K ratios in the fertilized rows, and fruit weight positively correlated with leaf Zn in the low productivity orchards. The fruit weight was positively related with leaf Ca and soil Ca in the fertilized rows of the high productivity orchards. The results suggested an adequate lime and K fertilization managements in the fertilized rows, as well as an adequate Zn supply.Os pomares de laranja Valência (Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck estabelecidos em solos de baixa fertilidade da região noroeste do Paraná, tem apresentado sintomas de desequilíbrio nutricional, principalmente deficiência de Mg e redução da produção e do tamanho dos frutos. O objetivo deste trabalho foi verificar as relações da produção e peso dos frutos com os nutrientes das folhas e do solo de sete pomares de laranja Valência na safra de 1996/97, em talhões de produtividade inferior e superior. Em 1996, foram coletadas amostras de folha e de solo nas faixas de adubação e nas entrelinhas. Os resultados mostraram que a produção de frutos correlacionou-se negativamente com as relações dos cátions Mg/K e Ca+Mg/K do solo das faixas de adubação dos pomares de baixa produtividade e, o peso dos frutos, correlacionou-se positivamente com os teores foliares de Zn. Nos pomares de produtividade superior, o peso dos frutos correlacionou-se positivamente com os teores de Ca das folhas e do solo nas faixas de adubação. Estes

  16. Vegetation dynamics using AVHRR/NDVI: Regional climate, carbon dioxide fertilization and crop yield relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chai Kyung

    Vegetation Anomaly Index (VAI), which is not influenced by vegetation type and is almost perfectly correlated with spatially averaged NDVI over any eco-region. Finally, we examined a possibility of utilizing NDVI to forecast crop yield and crop market price. We found that National Agricultural Statistics Service (MASS) corn yield estimate for Iowa and August NDVI averaged over the selected counties of Iowa are fairly well correlated for the past two decades. The Iowa corn market price is better correlated with NASS yield estimate than the average August NDVI over the counties; however, the correlation is more stable with NDVI than the NASS estimates, which indicates a great possibility of utilizing NDVI to forecast crop related access by USDA.

  17. Dealing with quantum weirdness: Holism and related issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elby, Andrew Richard [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Various issues are discussed in interpretation of quantum mechanics. All these explorations point toward the same conclusion, that some systems are holistically connected, i.e., some composite systems have properties that cannot, even in principle, be reduced to the properties of its subsystems. This is argued to be the central metaphysical lesson of quantum theory; this will remain pertinent even if quantum mechanics gets replaced by a superior theory. Chap. 2 discusses nonlocality and rules out hidden-variable theories that approximately reproduce the perfect correlations of quantum mechanics, as well as theories that obey locality conditions weaker than those needed to derive Bell`s inequality. Chap. 3 shows that SQUID experiments can rule out non-invasive measurability if not macrorealism. Chap. 4 looks at interpretational issues surrounding decoherence, the dissipative interaction between a system and its environment. Decoherence klcan help ``modal`` interpretations pick out the desired ``preferred`` basis. Chap. 5 explores what varieties of causation can and cannot ``explain`` EPR correlations. Instead of relying on ``watered down`` causal explanations, we should instead develop new, holistic explanatory frameworks.

  18. Quantum information and information loss in general relativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooft, G. 't

    1996-01-01

    When it comes to performing thought experiments with black holes, Einstein-Bohr like discussions have to be re-opened. For instance one can ask what happens to the quantum state of a black hole when the wave function of a single ingoing particle is replaced by an other one that is orthogonal to the

  19. Quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Khalili, Jim

    2003-01-01

    In this lively look at quantum science, a physicist takes you on an entertaining and enlightening journey through the basics of subatomic physics. Along the way, he examines the paradox of quantum mechanics--beautifully mathematical in theory but confoundingly unpredictable in the real world. Marvel at the Dual Slit experiment as a tiny atom passes through two separate openings at the same time. Ponder the peculiar communication of quantum particles, which can remain in touch no matter how far apart. Join the genius jewel thief as he carries out a quantum measurement on a diamond without ever touching the object in question. Baffle yourself with the bizzareness of quantum tunneling, the equivalent of traveling partway up a hill, only to disappear then reappear traveling down the opposite side. With its clean, colorful layout and conversational tone, this text will hook you into the conundrum that is quantum mechanics.

  20. Dealing with Quantum Weirdness: Holism and Related Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elby, Andrew Richard

    1995-01-01

    I discuss a variety of issues in the interpretation of quantum mechanics. All of these explorations point toward the same conclusion, that some systems are holistically connected. In other words, some composite systems possess properties that cannot, even in principle, be reduced to (or "built up" from) the properties of its subsystems. This, I argue, is a central metaphysical lesson of quantum theory, a lesson that will pertain even if quantum mechanics eventually gets replaced by a superior theory. After outlining this dissertation in chapter 1, I jump into issues of nonlocality in chapter 2. There, I establish a new, probabilistic framework in which to formulate "algebraic" (perfect correlations) nonlocality proofs. Working within that framework, I rule out hidden -variable theories that approximately reproduce the perfect correlations of quantum mechanics, as well as theories that obey locality conditions weaker than those needed to derive Bell's inequality. In chapter 3, I discuss Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs). Contra Leggett, I show that SQUID experiments cannot rule out Macrorealism. What they can rule out is non-invasive measurability, the assumption that it's possible (in principle) to measure a system with arbitrarily small disturbance to its future dynamics. Failure of non-invasive measurability is best explained as resulting from a holistic connection between measuring device and measured system. Chapter 4 looks at the interpretational issues surrounding decoherence, the dissipative interaction between a system and its environment. Decoherence alone neither constitutes nor points to a specific interpretation of the quantum formalism. It can, however, help "modal" interpretations pick out the desired "preferred" basis. After raising some potentially fatal objections to the modal interpretation, I show in detail how decoherence comes to the rescue. Modal interpretations explicitly incorporate holism. Finally, in chapter 5, I

  1. Synthesis of Novel Hyperbranched Polybenzo-Bisthiazole Amide with Donor–Acceptor (D-A Architecture, High Fluorescent Quantum Yield and Large Stokes Shift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobing Hu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Two novel highly fluorescent hyperbranched polybenzobisthiazole amides with a donor–acceptor architecture and large Stokes shift were rationally designed and synthesized. The chemical structures of the prepared hyperbranched polymers were characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR analysis, Hydrogen Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H-NMR analysis, and Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC analysis. These two polymers were soluble in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF, and their DMSO and DMF solutions emitted strong green light (517–537 nm with high quantum yields (QYs and large Stokes shifts. Their relative fluorescence QYs in the DMSO solution were calculated as 77.75% and 81.14% with the Stokes shifts of 137 nm (0.86 eV and 149 nm (0.92 eV for HP–COOH and HP–NH2, respectively, using quinine sulfate as the standard. In the DMF solution, the QYs of HP–COOH and HP–NH2 were calculated as 104.65% and 118.72%, with the Stokes shifts of 128 nm (0.79 eV and 147 nm (0.87 eV, respectively. Their films mainly emitted strong blue light with the maximum emission wavelengths of 436 nm and 480 nm for HP–COOH and HP–NH2, respectively. The Stokes shifts for HP–COOH and HP–NH2 films were 131 nm (0.42 eV and 179 nm (0.86 eV, respectively. They are promising candidates for luminescent solar concentrators and blue light emitting materials.

  2. Genotype × environment interaction effects on early fresh storage root yield and related traits in cassava

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robooni; Tumuhimbise; Rob; Melis; Paul; Shanahan; Robert; Kawuki

    2014-01-01

    Cassava(Manihot esculenta Crantz) is an important root crop worldwide. It exhibits substantial differential genotypic responses to varying environmental conditions, a phenomenon termed genotype × environment interaction(GEI). A significant GEI presents challenges in the selection of superior genotypes. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of genotype,environment and GEI on early fresh storage root yield(FSRY) and related traits in cassava.Accordingly, 12 cassava genotypes were evaluated in a randomised complete block design at three contrasting locations(Jinja, Nakasongola and Namulonge) in Uganda. Trials were harvested nine months after planting and the data collected were analysed using the additive main effects and multiplicative interaction(AMMI) model. The AMMI analysis of variance showed significant variation among genotypes for early FSRY and all other traits assessed.Locations were significantly different for all traits except for cassava brown streak disease root necrosis. The GEI effect was non-significant for early FSRY, but significant for other traits. For early FSRY, 48.5% of the treatment sum of squares was attributable to genotypes, 27.3% to environments, and 24.1% to GEI, indicating a predominance of genotypic variation for this trait.Predominance of genotypic variation was also observed for all the other traits. A majority of the genotypes(67%) had low interaction effects with locations for early FSRY, with Akena, CT2, CT4 and NASE14 being the most stable genotypes for the trait. Significant negative correlation was observed between cassava mosaic disease severity and early FSRY and storage root number,indicating significant negative effects of cassava mosaic disease on early FSRY and stability in cassava. The information generated will inform future selection initiatives for superior early-yielding cassava genotypes combining resistance to cassava mosaic and brown streak diseases in Uganda.

  3. Genotype × environment interaction effects on early fresh storage root yield and related traits in cassava

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robooni Tumuhimbise

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz is an important root crop worldwide. It exhibits substantial differential genotypic responses to varying environmental conditions, a phenomenon termed genotype × environment interaction (GEI. A significant GEI presents challenges in the selection of superior genotypes. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of genotype, environment and GEI on early fresh storage root yield (FSRY and related traits in cassava. Accordingly, 12 cassava genotypes were evaluated in a randomised complete block design at three contrasting locations (Jinja, Nakasongola and Namulonge in Uganda. Trials were harvested nine months after planting and the data collected were analysed using the additive main effects and multiplicative interaction (AMMI model. The AMMI analysis of variance showed significant variation among genotypes for early FSRY and all other traits assessed. Locations were significantly different for all traits except for cassava brown streak disease root necrosis. The GEI effect was non-significant for early FSRY, but significant for other traits. For early FSRY, 48.5% of the treatment sum of squares was attributable to genotypes, 27.3% to environments, and 24.1% to GEI, indicating a predominance of genotypic variation for this trait. Predominance of genotypic variation was also observed for all the other traits. A majority of the genotypes (67% had low interaction effects with locations for early FSRY, with Akena, CT2, CT4 and NASE14 being the most stable genotypes for the trait. Significant negative correlation was observed between cassava mosaic disease severity and early FSRY and storage root number, indicating significant negative effects of cassava mosaic disease on early FSRY and stability in cassava. The information generated will inform future selection initiatives for superior early-yielding cassava genotypes combining resistance to cassava mosaic and brown streak diseases in Uganda.

  4. Heritability and gene effects for yield related quantitative traits in eggplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chintan Mistry

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of gene actions and their relative contribution in expression of characters is of great importance. Therefore, four crosses were made among the six parents viz., Doli-5 × GBL-1 (cross 1, Doli-5 × KS-331 (cross 2, Pusa Uttam × KS-331 (cross 3 and AB 07-02 × GOB 1 (cross 4 to study gene actions responsible for inheritance of twelve fruit yield traits. The generation mean analysis in six populations revealed significant digenic interactions for all the characters in majority of the crosses studied. Character-cross combination revealed the adequacy of simple additive dominance model for plant height (in cross 1, primary branches per plant (in cross 2, secondary branches per plant (in cross 3, fruit length (in cross 2, fruit girth (in cross 3 and pedicel length (in cross 3 indicating the absence of non-allelic interactions. Most of the crosses for all the yield traits showed low magnitude of dominance and environmental variances, revealing higher heritabilities. Duplicate epistasis effects controlled all traits in different cross-combinations suggesting the mild selection intensity in the earlier generations while intense in later generations. However, in few cases average dominance ratio was more than unity indicated the importance of dominance gene effects. These results indicated that for eggplant improvement, additive variation is of great importance and makes it possible to successfully select better individuals in segregating populations, since the selective gains will depend only on gametic variation. For this reason, backcross, pedigree, single-seed descent or gametic selection methods are recommended for advancing the segregating populations.

  5. Relation of Certain Quantum Chemical Parameters to Lubrication Behavior of Solid Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuansheng Jin

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: It is well-documented that certain oxides (such as Re2O7, B2O3, MoO3, V2O5, etc. can provide friction coefficients of 0.1-0.3 to sliding surfaces at elevated temperatures and thus they are often referred to as lubricious oxides in the tribology literature. In a recently proposed crystal chemical model, Erdemir was able to establish a close correlation between the reported friction coefficients of such oxides and their ionic potentials [1]. In the present paper, we expand on this original concept and explore the relevance of two other quantum chemical parameters, electronegativity and chemical hardness, to the lubricity of solid oxides. These parameters have already been used by scientists to explain the nature of tribochemical interactions between various oil additives and sliding surfaces. It is conceivable that electronegativity and chemical hardness may also be strongly related to the extent of adhesive interactions and shear rheology of solid oxides and hence to their lubricity. The new results have confirmed that electronegativity, like ionic potential, is indeed a valid quantum chemistry parameter that can be used in predicting the lubrication behavior of solid oxides. Generally, the higher the electronegativity of the solid oxides is, the lower the friction coefficients will be. However, chemical hardness did not yield a similar trend. In light of these new findings, we propose some guidelines for the formulation of novel oxide or alloy systems that can lead to the formation of lubricious oxides at elevated temperatures. The findings of this study may pave the way for designer-based tribosystems in general and smart tribochemical systems in particular in future tribological applications such as dry machining.

  6. Conceptual tensions between quantum mechanics and general relativity Are there experimental consequences?

    CERN Document Server

    Chiao, R Y

    2003-01-01

    One of the conceptual tensions between quantum mechanics (QM) and general relativity (GR) arises from the clash between the spatial nonseparability of entangled states in QM, and the complete spatial separability of all physical systems in GR, i.e., between the nonlocality implied by the superposition principle, and the locality implied by the equivalence principle. Possible experimental consequences of this conceptual tension will be discussed for macroscopically entangled, coherent quantum fluids, such as superconductors, superfluids, atomic Bose-Einstein condensates, and quantum Hall fluids, interacting with tidal and gravitational radiation fields. A minimal-coupling rule, which arises from the electron spin coupled to curved spacetime, leads to an interaction between electromagnetic (EM) and gravitational (GR) radiation fields mediated by a quantum Hall fluid. This suggests the possibility of a quantum transducer action, in which EM waves are convertible to GR waves, and vice versa.

  7. Conceptual tensions between quantum mechanics and general relativity Are there experimental consequences?

    CERN Document Server

    Chiao, R Y

    2002-01-01

    One of the conceptual tensions between quantum mechanics (QM) and general relativity (GR) arises from the clash between the spatial nonseparability} of entangled states in QM, and the complete spatial separability of all physical systems in GR, i.e., between the nonlocality implied by the superposition principle, and the locality implied by the equivalence principle. Possible experimental consequences of this conceptual tension will be discussed for macroscopically entangled, coherent quantum fluids, such as superconductors, superfluids, atomic Bose-Einstein condensates, and quantum Hall fluids, interacting with tidal and gravitational radiation fields. A minimal-coupling rule, which arises from the electron spin coupled to curved spacetime, leads to an interaction between electromagnetic (EM) and gravitational (GR) radiation fields mediated by a quantum Hall fluid. This suggests the possibility of a quantum transducer action, in which EM waves are convertible to GR waves, and vice versa.

  8. A new theorem relating quantum tomogram to the Fresnel operator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Chuan-Mei; Fan Hong-Yi

    2011-01-01

    According to Fan-Hu's formalism (Fan Hong-Yi and Hu Li-Yun 2009 Opt. Commun. 282 3734) that the tomogram of quantum states can be considered as the module-square of the state wave function in the intermediate coordinatemomentum representation which is just the eigenvector of the Fresnel quadrature phase, we derive a new theorem for calculating quantum tomogram of density operator, i.e., the tomogram of a density operator p is equal to the marginal integration of the classical Weyl correspondence function of F+ρF, where F is the Fresnel operator. Applications of this theorem to evaluating the tomogram of optical chaotic field and squeezed chaotic optical field are presented.

  9. Relating the Resource Theories of Entanglement and Quantum Coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitambar, Eric; Hsieh, Min-Hsiu

    2016-07-01

    Quantum coherence and quantum entanglement represent two fundamental features of nonclassical systems that can each be characterized within an operational resource theory. In this Letter, we unify the resource theories of entanglement and coherence by studying their combined behavior in the operational setting of local incoherent operations and classical communication (LIOCC). Specifically, we analyze the coherence and entanglement trade-offs in the tasks of state formation and resource distillation. For pure states we identify the minimum coherence-entanglement resources needed to generate a given state, and we introduce a new LIOCC monotone that completely characterizes a state's optimal rate of bipartite coherence distillation. This result allows us to precisely quantify the difference in operational powers between global incoherent operations, LIOCC, and local incoherent operations without classical communication. Finally, a bipartite mixed state is shown to have distillable entanglement if and only if entanglement can be distilled by LIOCC, and we strengthen the well-known Horodecki criterion for distillability.

  10. Relating the Resource Theories of Entanglement and Quantum Coherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitambar, Eric; Hsieh, Min-Hsiu

    2016-07-01

    Quantum coherence and quantum entanglement represent two fundamental features of nonclassical systems that can each be characterized within an operational resource theory. In this Letter, we unify the resource theories of entanglement and coherence by studying their combined behavior in the operational setting of local incoherent operations and classical communication (LIOCC). Specifically, we analyze the coherence and entanglement trade-offs in the tasks of state formation and resource distillation. For pure states we identify the minimum coherence-entanglement resources needed to generate a given state, and we introduce a new LIOCC monotone that completely characterizes a state's optimal rate of bipartite coherence distillation. This result allows us to precisely quantify the difference in operational powers between global incoherent operations, LIOCC, and local incoherent operations without classical communication. Finally, a bipartite mixed state is shown to have distillable entanglement if and only if entanglement can be distilled by LIOCC, and we strengthen the well-known Horodecki criterion for distillability.

  11. Quantum walks, deformed relativity and Hopf algebra symmetries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo

    2016-05-28

    We show how the Weyl quantum walk derived from principles in D'Ariano & Perinotti (D'Ariano & Perinotti 2014Phys. Rev. A90, 062106. (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.90.062106)), enjoying a nonlinear Lorentz symmetry of dynamics, allows one to introduce Hopf algebras for position and momentum of the emerging particle. We focus on two special models of Hopf algebras-the usual Poincaré and theκ-Poincaré algebras.

  12. Unification of General Relativity with Quantum Field Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Jun

    2011-01-01

    In the frame of quantum field theory, instead of using the action principle, we deduce the Einstein equation from purely the general covariant principle and the homogeneity of spacetime. The Einstein equation is shown to be the gauge equation to guarantee the local symmetry of spacetime translation. Gravity is an apparent force due to the curvature of spacetime resulted from the conservation of energy-momentum. In the action of quantum field theory, only electroweak-strong interactions should be considered with the curved spacetime metric determined by the Einstein equation.%In the frame of quantum field theory,instead of using the action principle,we deduce the Einstein equation trom purely the general covariant principle and the homogeneity of spacetime.The Einstein equation is shown to be the gauge equation to guarantee the local symmetry of spacetime translation.Gravity is an apparent force due to the curvature of spacetime resulted from the conservation of energy-momentum.In the action of quantum field theory,only electroweak-strong interactions should be considered with the curved spacetime metric determined by the Einstein equation.An unified physical theory of all interactions is a long pursued goal for physicists.The unification of electricity and magnetism by Maxwell was a great step in this direction.It is believed that in nature,there are four types of fundamental interactions:the electromagnetic interaction,weak interaction,strong interaction and gravity.Now the electromagnetic,weak and strong interactions are unified using the so-called standard model,[1] based on the Yang-Mills gauge field theory.[2] However,researchers are still not be able to unify gravitation with the other three interactions.

  13. Bohr's Relational Holism and the classical-quantum Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Dorato, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    In this paper I present and critically discuss the main strategies that Bohr used and could have used to fend off the charge that his interpretation does not provide a clear-cut distinction between the classical and the quantum domain. In particular, in the first part of the paper I reassess the main arguments used by Bohr to advocate the indispensability of a classical framework to refer to quantum phenomena. In this respect, by using a distinction coming from an apparently unrelated philosophical corner, we could say that Bohr is not a revisionist philosopher of physics but rather a descriptivist one in the sense of Strawson. I will then go on discussing the nature of the holistic link between classical measurement apparatuses and observed system that he also advocated. The oft-repeated conclusion that Bohr's interpretation of the quantum formalism is untenable can only be established by giving his arguments as much force as possible, which is what I will try to do in the following by remaining as faithful ...

  14. The interface between quantum mechanics and general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiao, R. Y.

    The generation, as well as the detection, of gravitational radiation by means of charged superfluids is considered. One example of such a “charged superfluid” consists of a pair of Planck-mass-scale, ultracold “Millikan oil drops”, each with a single electron on its surface in a strong magnetic field, in which the oil of the drop is replaced by superfluid helium. When levitated in a magnetic trap, and subjected to microwave-frequency electromagnetic radiation, a pair of such “Millikan oil drops” separated by a microwave wavelength can become an efficient quantum transducer between quadrupolar electromagnetic and gravitational radiation. This leads to the possibility of a Hertz-like experiment, in which the source of microwave-frequency gravitational radiation consists of one pair of “Millikan oil drops” driven by microwaves, and the receiver of such radiation consists of another pair of “Millikan oil drops” in the far field driven by the gravitational radiation generated by the first pair. The second pair then back-converts the gravitational radiation into detectable microwaves. The enormous enhancement of the conversion efficiency for these quantum transducers over that for electrons arises from the fact that there exists macroscopic quantum phase coherence in these charged superfluid systems.

  15. Probing the charged Higgs quantum numbers through the decay H{sup +}{sub {alpha}} {yields} W{sup +}h{sup 0}{sub s}s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Cruz, J L [Cuerpo Academico de PartIculas, Campos y Relatividad de la BUAP (Mexico); Felix-Beltran, O [Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 20-364, Mexico 01000 D.F. (Mexico); Hernandez-Sanchez, J [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Carretera a Pachuca Tulancingo Km. 4.5, C. U., C.P. 42020, Pachuca Hidalgo (Mexico); Barradas-Guevara, E [Cuerpo Academico de PartIculas, Campos y Relatividad de la BUAP (Mexico)

    2006-05-15

    The vertex H{sup +}{sub {alpha}} {yields} W{sup -}h{sup 0}{sub s}s, involving the gauge boson W{sup {+-}} and the charged (H{sup {+-}}{sub {alpha}}) and neutral Higgs bosons (h{sup 0}{sub s}s), arises within the context of many extensions of the SM, and it can be used to probe the quantum numbers of the Higgs multiplet. After presenting a general discussion for the expected form of this vertex for arbitrary Higgs representations, we discuss its strength for an extended MSSM with one complex triplet. We find that in this model, there are regions of parameters where the decay H{sup +}{sub {alpha}} {yields} W{sup +}h{sup 0}{sub s}s, is kinematically allowed, and reaches Branching Ratios (BR) that may be detectable, thus allowing to test the properties of the Higgs sector.

  16. Quantum input-output relations for lossy and anisotropic multilayer magnetodielectric meta-material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Hoseinzadeh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we quantize electromagnetic field in, lossy, dispersive and anisotropic magnetodielectric media by using phenomenological approach. We obtain quantum input– output relations for anisotropic multilayer metamaterials. As an application of our approach, we investigate the dissipative and anisotropic effects of an anisotropic magnetodielectric slab on the quantum properties of incident input states. For this purpose, quadrature squeezing and Mandel parameter of output states has been calculated by modeling the anisotropic magnetodielectric slab through Lorentz model for a situation in which the incident states on the right and left side of the magnetodielectric slab are two- mode coherent states and quantum vacuum state, respectively

  17. Quantum Mechanical Version of z-Transform Related to Eigenkets of Boson Creation Operator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANHong-Yi; FULiang; A.Wiinsche

    2004-01-01

    Using the completeness relation composed of the coherent state and of the eigenket of bosonic creation operator, we establish a one-to-one correspondence between the z-transform and the quantum-mechanical transform from the representation by number states |n) to the representation by coherent states |(z)) (Bargmann representation).In this way, the quantum-mechanical version of the various properties of z-transform are obtained and the operators for embodying these properties in the Fock space are derived, which may find applications in quantum states engineering.

  18. Application of the Generalized Work Relation for an N-level Quantum System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junichi Ishikawa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An efficient periodic operation to obtain the maximum work from a nonequilibrium initial state in an N–level quantum system is shown. Each cycle consists of a stabilization process followed by an isentropic restoration process. The instantaneous time limit can be taken in the stabilization process from the nonequilibrium initial state to a stable passive state. In the restoration process that preserves the passive state a minimum period is needed to satisfy the uncertainty relation between energy and time. An efficient quantum feedback control in a symmetric two–level quantum system connected to an energy source is proposed.

  19. On fractional partial differential equations related to quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, S. D.; Kalla, S. L.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the solutions of generalized fractional partial differential equations involving the Caputo time-fractional derivative and the Liouville space-fractional derivatives. The solutions of these equations are obtained by employing the joint Laplace and Fourier transforms. Several special cases as solutions of one-dimensional non-homogeneous fractional equations occurring in quantum mechanics are presented in the concluding section. The results given earlier by Debnath (2003 Fract. Calc. Appl. Anal. 6 119-55), Saxena et al (2010 Appl. Math. Comput. 216 1412-7) and Pagnini and Mainardi (2010 J. Comput. Appl. Math. 233 1590-5) follow as special cases of our findings.

  20. On fractional partial differential equations related to quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purohit, S D [Department of Basic-Sciences (Mathematics), College of Technology and Engineering, M.P. University of Agriculture and Technology, Udaipur-313001 (India); Kalla, S L, E-mail: sunil_a_purohit@yahoo.com, E-mail: shyamkalla@gmail.com [Institute of Mathematics, VIHE, 15 B, Pal-Link Road, Jodhpur-342008 (India)

    2011-01-28

    In this paper, we investigate the solutions of generalized fractional partial differential equations involving the Caputo time-fractional derivative and the Liouville space-fractional derivatives. The solutions of these equations are obtained by employing the joint Laplace and Fourier transforms. Several special cases as solutions of one-dimensional non-homogeneous fractional equations occurring in quantum mechanics are presented in the concluding section. The results given earlier by Debnath (2003 Fract. Calc. Appl. Anal. 6 119-55), Saxena et al (2010 Appl. Math. Comput. 216 1412-7) and Pagnini and Mainardi (2010 J. Comput. Appl. Math. 233 1590-5) follow as special cases of our findings.

  1. The relation between majorization theory and quantum information from entanglement monotones perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erol, V. [Department of Computer Engineering, Institute of Science, Okan University, Istanbul (Turkey); Netas Telecommunication Inc., Istanbul (Turkey)

    2016-04-21

    Entanglement has been studied extensively for understanding the mysteries of non-classical correlations between quantum systems. In the bipartite case, there are well known monotones for quantifying entanglement such as concurrence, relative entropy of entanglement (REE) and negativity, which cannot be increased via local operations. The study on these monotones has been a hot topic in quantum information [1-7] in order to understand the role of entanglement in this discipline. It can be observed that from any arbitrary quantum pure state a mixed state can obtained. A natural generalization of this observation would be to consider local operations classical communication (LOCC) transformations between general pure states of two parties. Although this question is a little more difficult, a complete solution has been developed using the mathematical framework of the majorization theory [8]. In this work, we analyze the relation between entanglement monotones concurrence and negativity with respect to majorization for general two-level quantum systems of two particles.

  2. The relation between majorization theory and quantum information from entanglement monotones perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, V.

    2016-04-01

    Entanglement has been studied extensively for understanding the mysteries of non-classical correlations between quantum systems. In the bipartite case, there are well known monotones for quantifying entanglement such as concurrence, relative entropy of entanglement (REE) and negativity, which cannot be increased via local operations. The study on these monotones has been a hot topic in quantum information [1-7] in order to understand the role of entanglement in this discipline. It can be observed that from any arbitrary quantum pure state a mixed state can obtained. A natural generalization of this observation would be to consider local operations classical communication (LOCC) transformations between general pure states of two parties. Although this question is a little more difficult, a complete solution has been developed using the mathematical framework of the majorization theory [8]. In this work, we analyze the relation between entanglement monotones concurrence and negativity with respect to majorization for general two-level quantum systems of two particles.

  3. Approximating relational observables by absolute quantities: a quantum accuracy-size trade-off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyadera, Takayuki; Loveridge, Leon; Busch, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The notion that any physical quantity is defined and measured relative to a reference frame is traditionally not explicitly reflected in the theoretical description of physical experiments where, instead, the relevant observables are typically represented as ‘absolute’ quantities. However, the emergence of the resource theory of quantum reference frames as a new branch of quantum information science in recent years has highlighted the need to identify the physical conditions under which a quantum system can serve as a good reference. Here we investigate the conditions under which, in quantum theory, an account in terms of absolute quantities can provide a good approximation of relative quantities. We find that this requires the reference system to be large in a suitable sense.

  4. Upconversion in a Bragg structure: photonic effects of a modified local density of states and irradiance on luminescence and upconversion quantum yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Clarissa L M; Herter, Barbara; Fischer, Stefan; Gutmann, Johannes; Goldschmidt, Jan Christoph

    2016-06-27

    In this paper, we present a comprehensive simulation-based analysis of the two photonic effects of a Bragg stack - a modified local density of photon states (LDOS) and an enhanced local irradiance - on the upconversion (UC) luminescence and quantum yield of the upconverter β-NaYF4 doped with 25% Er3+. The investigated Bragg stack consists of alternating layers of TiO2 and Poly(methylmethacrylate), the latter containing upconverter nanoparticles. Using experimentally determined input parameters, the photonic effects are first simulated separately and subsequently coupled in a rate equation model, describing the dynamics of the UC processes within β-NaYF4:25% Er3+. With this integrated simulation model, the Bragg stack design is optimized to maximize either the UC quantum yield (UCQY) or UC luminescence. We find that in an optimized Bragg stack, due to the modified LDOS, the maximum UCQY is enhanced from 14% to 16%, compared to an unstructured layer of upconverter material. Additionally, this maximum UCQY can already be reached at an incident irradiance as low as 100 W/m2. With a Bragg stack design that maximizes UC luminescence, enhancement factors of up to 480 of the UC luminescence can be reached.

  5. ENSO and PDO-related climate variability impacts on Midwestern United States crop yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Chasity; Market, Patrick; Lupo, Anthony; Guinan, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    An analysis of crop yields for the state of Missouri was completed to determine if an interannual or multidecadal variability existed as a result of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). Corn and soybean yields were recorded in kilograms per hectare for each of the six climate regions of Missouri. An analysis using the Mokhov "method of cycles" demonstrated interannual, interdecadal, and multidecadal variations in crop yields. Cross-spectral analysis was used to determine which region was most impacted by ENSO and PDO influenced seasonal (April-September) temperature and precipitation. Interannual (multidecadal) variations found in the spectral analysis represent a relationship to ENSO (PDO) phase, while interdecadal variations represent a possible interaction between ENSO and PDO. Average crop yields were then calculated for each combination of ENSO and PDO phase, displaying a pronounced increase in corn and soybean yields when ENSO is warm and PDO is positive. Climate regions 1, 2, 4, and 6 displayed significant differences (p value of 0.10 or less) in yields between El Niño and La Niña years, representing 55-70 % of Missouri soybean and corn productivity, respectively. Final results give the opportunity to produce seasonal predictions of corn and soybean yields, specific to each climate region in Missouri, based on the combination of ENSO and PDO phases.

  6. Effect of hydrostatic stress on yield function and plastic constitutive relations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    盖秉政

    2001-01-01

    A new yield function taking effect of hydrostatic stress into account is presented through establishing and solving the functional equation satisfied by the yield function, and its characteristic is simple in form and strong in generality. In order to reveal its availability, a comparison is made between the results obtained with it and the experimental results of grey cast iron has be done, both seem to be in good agreement. At the same time, taking the yield function obtained here as a potential function, a new associative plastic constitutive equation taking effect of hydrostatic stress into account is built, and the plastic volume change ratio of plastic deformation is given.

  7. Spatial variability of soil attributes and sugarcane yield in relation to topographic location

    OpenAIRE

    de Souza, Zigomar M.; Domingos G. P. Cerri; Paulo S. G. Magalhães; Siqueira, Diego S.

    2010-01-01

    Soils submitted to the same management system in places with little variation of landscape, manifest differentiated spatial variability of their attributes and crop yield. The aim of this work was to investigate the correlation between spatial variability of the soil attributes and sugarcane yield as a result of soil topography. To achieve this objective, a test area of 42 ha located at the São João Sugar Mill, in Araras, in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, was selected. Sugarcane yield was me...

  8. General relativity as classical limit of evolutionary quantum gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montani, Giovanni; Cianfrani, Francesco [ICRA-International Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, Dipartimento di Fisica (G9), Universita di Roma, ' La Sapienza' , Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy)], E-mail: montani@icra.it, E-mail: francesco.cianfrani@icra.it

    2008-03-21

    We analyze the dynamics of the gravitational field when the covariance is restricted to a synchronous gauge. In the spirit of the Noether theorem, we determine the conservation law associated with the Lagrangian invariance and outline that non-vanishing behaviour of the Hamiltonian comes out. We then interpret such resulting non-zero 'energy' of the gravitational field in terms of a dust fluid. This new matter contribution is co-moving to the slicing and it accounts for the 'materialization' of a synchronous reference from the corresponding gauge condition. Furthermore, we analyze the quantum dynamics of a generic inhomogeneous universe as described by this evolutionary scheme, asymptotically to the singularity. We show how the phenomenology of such a model overlaps the corresponding Wheeler-DeWitt picture. Finally, we study the possibility of a Schroedinger dynamics of the gravitational field as a consequence of the correspondence inferred between the ensemble dynamics of stochastic systems and the WKB limit of their quantum evolution. We demonstrate that the time dependence of the ensemble distribution is associated with the first-order correction in {Dirac_h} to the WKB expansion of the energy spectrum.

  9. Information Tradeoff Relations for Finite-Strength Quantum Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, C; Fuchs, Christopher A.; Jacobs, Kurt

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we give a new way to quantify the folklore notion that quantum measurements bring a disturbance to the system being measured. We consider two observers who initially assign identical mixed-state density operators to a two-state quantum system. The question we address is to what extent one observer can, by measurement, increase the purity of his density operator without affecting the purity of the other observer's. If there were no restrictions on the first observer's measurements, then he could carry this out trivially by measuring the initial density operator's eigenbasis. If, however, the allowed measurements are those of finite strength---i.e., those measurements strictly within the interior of the convex set of all measurements---then the issue becomes significantly more complex. We find that for a large class of such measurements the first observer's purity increases the most precisely when there is some loss of purity for the second observer. More generally the tradeoff between the two pur...

  10. Improvement of Yield and Its Related Traits for Backbone Hybrid Rice Parent Minghui 86 Using Advanced Backcross Breeding Strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong-jun; LI Zhi-kang; WANG Hui; YE Guo-you; QIAN Yi-liang; SHI Ying-yao; XIA Jia-fa; LI Ze-fu; ZHU Ling-hua; GAO Yong-ming

    2013-01-01

    How to overcome yield stagnation is a big challenge to rice breeders. An effective method for quickly developing new cultivars is to further improve an outstanding cultivar. In this study, three advanced backcross populations under yield selection that consist of 123 BC2F2:4 introgression lines (ILs) were developed by crossing Minghui 86 (recurrent parent, RP) with three high-yielding varieties (donors), namely, ZDZ057, Fuhui 838, and Teqing, respectively. The progeny testing allowed the identification of 12 promising ILs that had significantly higher mean grain yields than Minghui 86 in two environments. A total of 55 QTLs that affect grain yield and its related traits were identified, which included 50 QTLs that were detected using the likelihood ratio test based on stepwise regression (RSTEP-LRT) method, and eight grain yield per plant (GY) QTLs were detected using chi-squared (c2) test. Among these QTLs, five QTLs were simultaneously detected in different populations and 22 QTLs were detected in both environments. The beneficial donor alleles for increased GY and its related traits were identified in 63.6%(35 out of 55) of the QTLs. These promising ILs and QTLs identified will provide the elite breeding materials and genetic information for further improvement of the grain yield for Minghui 86 through pyramiding breeding.

  11. Photoactive yellow protein from the purple phototrophic bacterium, Ectothiorhodospira halophila. Quantum yield of photobleaching and effects of temperature, alcohols, glycerol, and sucrose on kinetics of photobleaching and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, T E; Tollin, G; Hazzard, J H; Cusanovich, M A

    1989-09-01

    A water-soluble yellow protein from E. halophila was previously shown to be photoactive (Meyer, T. E., E. Yakali, M. A. Cusanovich, and G. Tollin. 1987. Biochemistry. 26:418-423). Pulsed laser excitation in the protein visible absorption band (maximum at 445 nm) causes a rapid bleach of color (k = 7.5 x 10(3) s-1) followed by a slower dark recovery (k = 2.6 s-1). This is analogous to the photocycle of sensory rhodopsin II from Halobacterium (which also has k = 2.6 s-1 for recovery). We have now determined the quantum yield of the photobleaching process to be 0.64, which is comparable with that of bacteriorhodopsin (0.25), and is thus large enough to be biologically significant. Although the photoreactions of yellow protein were previously shown to be relatively insensitive to pH, ionic strength and the osmoregulator betaine, the present experiments demonstrate that temperature, glycerol, sucrose, and various alcohol-water mixtures strongly influence the kinetics of photobleaching and recovery. The effect of temperature follows normal Arrhenius behavior for the bleach reaction (Ea = 15.5 kcal/mol). The rate constant for the recovery reaction increases with temperature between 5 degrees C and 35 degrees C, but decreases above 35 degrees C indicating alternate conformations with differing kinetics. There is an order of magnitude decrease in the rate constant for photobleaching in both glycerol and sucrose solutions that can be correlated with the changes in viscosity. We conclude from this that the protein undergoes a conformational change as a consequence of the photoinduced bleach. Recovery kinetics are affected by glycerol and sucrose to a much smaller extent and in a more complicated manner. Aliphatic, monofunctional alcohol-water solutions increase the rate constant for the bleach reaction and decrease the rate constant for the recovery reaction, each by an order of magnitude. These effects do not correlate with dielectric constant, indicating that the photocycle

  12. Regression relation for pure quantum states and its implications for efficient computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, Tarek A; Fine, Boris V

    2013-02-15

    We obtain a modified version of the Onsager regression relation for the expectation values of quantum-mechanical operators in pure quantum states of isolated many-body quantum systems. We use the insights gained from this relation to show that high-temperature time correlation functions in many-body quantum systems can be controllably computed without complete diagonalization of the Hamiltonians, using instead the direct integration of the Schrödinger equation for randomly sampled pure states. This method is also applicable to quantum quenches and other situations describable by time-dependent many-body Hamiltonians. The method implies exponential reduction of the computer memory requirement in comparison with the complete diagonalization. We illustrate the method by numerically computing infinite-temperature correlation functions for translationally invariant Heisenberg chains of up to 29 spins 1/2. Thereby, we also test the spin diffusion hypothesis and find it in a satisfactory agreement with the numerical results. Both the derivation of the modified regression relation and the justification of the computational method are based on the notion of quantum typicality.

  13. Fuzzy electron density fragments in macromolecular quantum chemistry, combinatorial quantum chemistry, functional group analysis, and shape-activity relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezey, Paul G

    2014-09-16

    Conspectus Just as complete molecules have no boundaries and have "fuzzy" electron density clouds approaching zero density exponentially at large distances from the nearest nucleus, a physically justified choice for electron density fragments exhibits similar behavior. Whereas fuzzy electron densities, just as any fuzzy object, such as a thicker cloud on a foggy day, do not lend themselves to easy visualization, one may partially overcome this by using isocontours. Whereas a faithful representation of the complete fuzzy density would need infinitely many such isocontours, nevertheless, by choosing a selected few, one can still obtain a limited pictorial representation. Clearly, such images are of limited value, and one better relies on more complete mathematical representations, using, for example, density matrices of fuzzy fragment densities. A fuzzy density fragmentation can be obtained in an exactly additive way, using the output from any of the common quantum chemical computational techniques, such as Hartree-Fock, MP2, and various density functional approaches. Such "fuzzy" electron density fragments properly represented have proven to be useful in a rather wide range of applications, for example, (a) using them as additive building blocks leading to efficient linear scaling macromolecular quantum chemistry computational techniques, (b) the study of quantum chemical functional groups, (c) using approximate fuzzy fragment information as allowed by the holographic electron density theorem, (d) the study of correlations between local shape and activity, including through-bond and through-space components of interactions between parts of molecules and relations between local molecular shape and substituent effects, (e) using them as tools of density matrix extrapolation in conformational changes, (f) physically valid averaging and statistical distribution of several local electron densities of common stoichiometry, useful in electron density databank mining, for

  14. Quantum electrodynamical corrections to a magnetic dipole in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Pétri, J

    2015-01-01

    Magnetized neutron stars are privileged places where strong electromagnetic fields as high as $\\BQ=4.4\\times10^9$~T exist, giving rise to non-linear corrections to Maxwell equations described by quantum electrodynamics (QED). These corrections need to be included to the general relativistic (GR) description of a magnetic dipole supposed to be anchored in the neutron star. In this paper, these QED and GR perturbations to the standard flat space-time dipole are calculated to the lowest order in the fine structure constant~$\\alpha_{\\rm sf}$ and to any order in the ratio $\\Rs/R$ where $R$ is the neutron star radius and $\\Rs$ its Schwarzschild radius. Following our new 3+1~formalism developed in a previous work, we compute the multipolar non-linear corrections to this dipole and demonstrate the presence of a small dipolar~$\\ell=1$ and hexapolar~$\\ell=3$ component.

  15. Quantum yield measurements of short-lived photoactivation intermediates in DNA photolyase: toward a detailed understanding of the triple tryptophan electron transfer chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrdin, Martin; Lukacs, Andras; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Eker, André P M; Brettel, Klaus; Vos, Marten H

    2010-03-11

    The light-dependent DNA repair enzyme photolyase contains a unique evolutionary conserved triple tryptophan electron transfer chain (W382-W359-W306 in photolyase from E. coli) that bridges the approximately 15 A distance between the buried flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor and the surface of the protein. Upon excitation of the semireduced flavin (FADH(o)), electron transfer through the chain leads to formation of fully reduced flavin (FADH(-); required for DNA repair) and oxidation of the most remote tryptophan residue W306, followed by its deprotonation. The thus-formed tryptophanyl radical W306(o)(+) is reduced either by an extrinsic reductant or by reverse electron transfer from FADH(-). Altogether the kinetics of these charge transfer reactions span 10 orders of magnitude, from a few picoseconds to tens of milliseconds. We investigated electron transfer processes in the picosecond-nanosecond time window bridging the time domains covered by ultrafast pump-probe and "classical" continuous probe techniques. Using a recent dedicated setup, we directly show that virtually no absorption change between 300 ps and 10 ns occurs in wild-type photolyase, implying that no charge recombination takes place in this time window. In contrast, W306F mutant photolyase showed a partial absorption recovery with a time constant of 0.85 ns. In wild-type photolyase, the quantum yield of FADH(-) W306(o)(+) was found at 19 +/- 4%, in reference to the established quantum yield of the long-lived excited state of [Ru(bpy)(3)](2+). With this yield, the optical spectrum of the excited state of FADH(o) can be constructed from ultrafast spectroscopic data; this spectrum is dominated by excited state absorption extending from below 450 to 850 nm. The new experimental results, taken together with previous data, allow us to propose a detailed kinetic and energetic scheme of the electron transfer chain.

  16. Soil Water Availability Modulation Over Estimated Relative Yield Losses in Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Due to Ozone Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel De la Torre

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The approach developed by Fuhrer in 1995 to estimate wheat yield losses induced by ozone and modulated by the soil water content (SWC was applied to the data on Catalonian wheat yields. The aim of our work was to apply this approach and adjust it to Mediterranean environmental conditions by means of the necessary corrections. The main objective pursued was to prove the importance of soil water availability in the estimation of relative wheat yield losses as a factor that modifies the effects of tropospheric ozone on wheat, and to develop the algorithms required for the estimation of relative yield losses, adapted to the Mediterranean environmental conditions. The results show that this is an easy way to estimate relative yield losses just using meteorological data, without using ozone fluxes, which are much more difficult to calculate. Soil water availability is very important as a modulating factor of the effects of ozone on wheat; when soil water availability decreases, almost twice the amount of accumulated exposure to ozone is required to induce the same percentage of yield loss as in years when soil water availability is high.

  17. Changes of Chlorophyll Index (SPAD, Relative Water Content, Electrolyte Leakage and Seed Yield in Spring Safflower Genotypes under Irrigation Termination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.E. Moosavifar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the effect of irrigation termination and genotype on chlorophyll index (SPAD, relative water content, electrolyte leakage and seed yield in spring safflower, an experiment was conducted, in a spilt plot arrangement based on randomized complete block design with four replications at Research Farm, Faculty of Agriculture, the University of Birjand, during 2008. Irrigation regimes (full irrigation (whole season irrigation, irrigation until grain filling, flowering and heading-bud and genotypes (Mahali Isfahan (a local variety, Isfahan28 and IL111 were arranged in main and subplots, respectively. Results showed chlorophyll content, relative water content, cell membrane stability and seed yield were influenced by irrigation termination. Provided that with terminating irrigation at an earlier stage, an increase in electrolyte leakage and reduction in relative water content and seed yield was observed in plants. There were negative relations between electrolyte leakage from plants leaf cells and seed yield. Plants which experienced irrigation termination in an earlier growth stage, suffered more damage to their cell membranes, leading to depression of their production potential. Based on the results, Mahali Isfahan and Isfahan28 can be introduced as drought resistant genotypes, because of their lower electrolyte leakage and higher relative water content. But, in general, Mahali Isfahan had the highest seed yield due to its nativeness and high adaptation to arid conditions southern of Khorasan, and therefore this genotype suggests for planting in the region.

  18. Renormalization of the global quantum correlation and monogamy relation in the anisotropic Heisenberg XXZ model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Meng; Ren, Zhong-Zhou; Zhang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the global quantum correlation, monogamy relation and quantum phase transition of the Heisenberg XXZ model are investigated by the method of quantum renormalization group. We obtain, analytically, the expressions of the global negativity, the global measurement-induced disturbance and the monogamy relation for the system. The result shows that for a three-site block state, the partial transpose of an asymmetric block can get stronger entanglement than that of the symmetric one. The residual entanglement and the difference of the monogamy relation of measurement-induced disturbance show a scaling behavior with the size of the system becoming large. Moreover, the monogamy nature of entanglement measured by negativity exists in the model, while the nonclassical correlation quantified by measurement-induced disturbance violates the monogamy relation and demonstrates polygamy.

  19. Relativity with Respect to Measurement: Collapse and Quantum Events from Fock to Cramer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Chiatti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Some observations are presented starting with the well-known article by Vladimir Fock “Quantum Physics and Philosophical Problems”, published in 1971. In this article, which summarizes for Western readers a long and complicated reflection of the foundations of quantum mechanics (QM, Fock illustrates his “minimal” interpretation of this theory. By minimal, we mean that it only uses concepts related to the operational aspects of the measurement procedures, avoiding any mention of definite quantum ontologies (Bell’s beables. It is argued that, by taking into account the time reversal invariance of the microscopic processes and introducing the notion of irreversibility in an appropriate manner, Fock’s description becomes an anticipation of the “transaction” notion introduced by Cramer a decade later. So, the concept of “collapse” does retain the features of a QM “freak” postulate to become a new way to look at the elementary quantum processes.

  20. Strategy of specification of management areas: rice grain yield as related to soil fertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Carlos Dalchiavon

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available It is well-known nowadays that soil variability can influence crop yields. Therefore, to determine specific areas of soil management, we studied the Pearson and spatial correlations of rice grain yield with organic matter content and pH of an Oxisol (Typic Acrustox under no- tillage, in the 2009/10 growing season, in Selvíria, State of Mato Grosso do Sul, in the Brazilian Cerrado (longitude 51º24' 21'' W, latitude 20º20' 56'' S. The upland rice cultivar IAC 202 was used as test plant. A geostatistical grid was installed for soil and plant data collection, with 120 sampling points in an area of 3.0 ha with a homogeneous slope of 0.055 m m-1. The properties rice grain yield and organic matter content, pH and potential acidity and aluminum content were analyzed in the 0-0.10 and 0.10-0.20 m soil layers. Spatially, two specific areas of agricultural land management were discriminated, differing in the value of organic matter and rice grain yield, respectively with fertilization at variable rates in the second zone, a substantial increase in agricultural productivity can be obtained. The organic matter content was confirmed as a good indicator of soil quality, when spatially correlated with rice grain yield.

  1. Relation between irrigation method, sediment yields, and losses of pesticides and nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbert, J.C.; Kim, M.H.

    1998-01-01

    Yields of suspended sediment from watersheds in the Quincy and Pasco Basins of Washington State have been reduced by the use of sprinkler irrigation on cropland previously in furrow irrigation. Mean daily yields of suspended sediment from nine watersheds sampled during April and May 1994 ranged from 0.4 kg/ha of irrigated cropland in a watershed with no furrow irrigation to 19 kg/ha in a watershed where 58% of irritated cropland was in furrow irrigation. About 67% of the variation in the yields can be attributed to irrigation method. Temporal trends also indicated that use of sprinkler irrigation reduced sediment yields. Mean daily yields of suspended solids from one of the watersheds decreased from 0.3 kg/ha in 1975 to <0.2 kg/ha in 1988, corresponding with a decrease from about 65% to <50% in the use of furrow irrigation. Sampling in two watersheds suggests that the use of sprinkler irrigation reduces runoff losses of pesticides and N. For 10 of 13 pesticides and N, runoff losses from a watershed with mostly furrow irrigation exceeded runoff losses from a watershed with mostly sprinkler irrigation.

  2. phi. yields K sup + K sup minus. gamma. and its relation to. phi. yields K sup 0 K sup 0. gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarado, J.J. (Seccion de Metrologic, Dept. de Ing. Electrica, Centro de Investigacion y Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apdo, Postal 14-740, Mexico D.F., C.P. 07000 (MX)); Lucio, J.L.M.; Vargas, M. (Dept. di Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740, Mexico D.F., C.P. 07000 (MX))

    1992-05-10

    In this paper, the authors calculate {Gamma} ({phi} {yields} K{sup +}k{sup {minus}} {gamma}) using Low's soft photon theorem and compare it with a model dependent calculation in which the process proceeds through the chain of decays {phi} {yields} K{sup +} K{sup {minus}} {yields} f{sub 0} + {gamma} {yields} K{sup +} K{sup {minus}} {gamma}.

  3. phi. yields K sup + K sup minus. gamma. and its relation to. phi. yields K sup 0 K sup 0. gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarado, J.J. (Seccion de Metrologia, Dept. de Ing. Electrica, Centro de Investigacion y Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740, Mexico D.F., C.P. 07000 (MX)); Lucio, J.L.M.; Vargas, M. (Dept. de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740, Mexico D.F., C.P. 07000 (MX))

    1992-05-10

    In this paper, the authors calculate {Gamma}({phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup {minus}}{gamma}) using Low's soft photon theorem and compare it with a model dependent calculation in which the process proceeds through the chain of decays {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} {yields} f{sub 0} + {gamma} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup {minus}}{gamma}.

  4. How the instant collapse of a spatially-extended quantum state is consistent with relativity of simultaneity

    CERN Document Server

    Fayngold, Moses

    2016-01-01

    A thought experiment is considered on observation of instantaneous collapse of an extended wave packet. According to relativity of simultaneity, such a collapse being instantaneous in some reference frame must be a lasting process in other frames. But according to quantum mechanics, collapse is instantaneous in any frame. Mathematical structure of quantum mechanics eliminates any contradictions between these two apparently conflicting statements. Here the invariance of quantum-mechanical collapse is shown to follow directly from the Born postulate, without any use of mathematical properties of quantum operators. The consistency of quantum mechanics with Relativity is also shown for instant disentanglement of a composite system.

  5. Simple model relating recombination rates and non-proportional light yield in scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, William W.; Bizarri, Gregory; Singh, Jai; Vasil' ev, Andrey N.; Williams, Richard T.

    2008-09-24

    We present a phenomenological approach to derive an approximate expression for the local light yield along a track as a function of the rate constants of different kinetic orders of radiative and quenching processes for excitons and electron-hole pairs excited by an incident {gamma}-ray in a scintillating crystal. For excitons, the radiative and quenching processes considered are linear and binary, and for electron-hole pairs a ternary (Auger type) quenching process is also taken into account. The local light yield (Y{sub L}) in photons per MeV is plotted as a function of the deposited energy, -dE/dx (keV/cm) at any point x along the track length. This model formulation achieves a certain simplicity by using two coupled rate equations. We discuss the approximations that are involved. There are a sufficient number of parameters in this model to fit local light yield profiles needed for qualitative comparison with experiment.

  6. Teaching the relation between solar cell efficiency and annual energy yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sark, Wilfried G J H M van [Department of Science, Technology and Society, Copernicus Institute for Sustainable Development and Innovation, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2007-05-16

    To reach a sustainable world the use of renewable energy sources is imperative. Photovoltaics (PV) is but one of the technologies that use the power of the sun and its deployment is growing very fast. Several master programs have been developed over the world, including Utrecht University, that teach these technologies. Within the framework of a course on energy conversion technologies, we have developed a classroom problem that focuses on the difference between PV efficiency and annual yield for the two locations: the Utrecht University campus and the African Sahara desert. In spreadsheet format, students calculate annual yield, and they find a best method to do so. The exercise can be done in about three hours, and students will learn that the annual yield in the Sahara is only twice that at Utrecht University,.

  7. Parameters-related uncertainty in modeling sugar cane yield with an agro-Land Surface Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valade, A.; Ciais, P.; Vuichard, N.; Viovy, N.; Ruget, F.; Gabrielle, B.

    2012-12-01

    Agro-Land Surface Models (agro-LSM) have been developed from the coupling of specific crop models and large-scale generic vegetation models. They aim at accounting for the spatial distribution and variability of energy, water and carbon fluxes within soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum with a particular emphasis on how crop phenology and agricultural management practice influence the turbulent fluxes exchanged with the atmosphere, and the underlying water and carbon pools. A part of the uncertainty in these models is related to the many parameters included in the models' equations. In this study, we quantify the parameter-based uncertainty in the simulation of sugar cane biomass production with the agro-LSM ORCHIDEE-STICS on a multi-regional approach with data from sites in Australia, La Reunion and Brazil. First, the main source of uncertainty for the output variables NPP, GPP, and sensible heat flux (SH) is determined through a screening of the main parameters of the model on a multi-site basis leading to the selection of a subset of most sensitive parameters causing most of the uncertainty. In a second step, a sensitivity analysis is carried out on the parameters selected from the screening analysis at a regional scale. For this, a Monte-Carlo sampling method associated with the calculation of Partial Ranked Correlation Coefficients is used. First, we quantify the sensitivity of the output variables to individual input parameters on a regional scale for two regions of intensive sugar cane cultivation in Australia and Brazil. Then, we quantify the overall uncertainty in the simulation's outputs propagated from the uncertainty in the input parameters. Seven parameters are identified by the screening procedure as driving most of the uncertainty in the agro-LSM ORCHIDEE-STICS model output at all sites. These parameters control photosynthesis (optimal temperature of photosynthesis, optimal carboxylation rate), radiation interception (extinction coefficient), root

  8. Perturbative Quantum Gravity and its Relation to Gauge Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bern Zvi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review we describe a non-trivial relationship between perturbative gauge theory and gravity scattering amplitudes. At the semi-classical or tree-level, the scattering amplitudes of gravity theories in flat space can be expressed as a sum of products of well defined pieces of gauge theory amplitudes. These relationships were first discovered by Kawai, Lewellen, and Tye in the context of string theory, but hold more generally. In particular, they hold for standard Einstein gravity. A method based on $D$-dimensional unitarity can then be used to systematically construct all quantum loop corrections order-by-order in perturbation theory using as input thegravity tree amplitudes expressed in terms of gauge theory ones. More generally, the unitarity method provides a means for perturbatively quantizing massless gravity theories without the usual formal apparatus associated with the quantization of constrained systems. As one application, this method was used to demonstrate that maximally supersymmetric gravity is less divergent in the ultraviolet than previously thought.

  9. The Interface between Quantum Mechanics and General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Chiao, R Y

    2006-01-01

    The generation, as well as the detection, of gravitational radiation by means of charged superfluids is considered. One example of such a "charged superfluid" consists of a pair of Planck-mass-scale, ultracold "Millikan oil drops," each with a single electron on its surface, in which the oil of the drop is replaced by superfluid helium. When levitated in a magnetic trap, and subjected to microwave-frequency electromagnetic radiation, such a pair of "Millikan oil drops" separated by a microwave wavelength can become an efficient quantum transducer between quadrupolar electromagnetic and gravitational radiation. This leads to the possibility of a Hertz-like experiment, in which the source of microwave-frequency gravitational radiation consists of one pair of "Millikan oil drops" driven by microwaves, and the receiver of such radiation consists of another pair of "Millikan oil drops" in the far field driven by the gravitational radiation generated by the first pair. The second pair then back-converts the graviti...

  10. Future yields assessment of bioenergy crops in relation to climate change and technological development in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore L. Cosentino

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Bioenergy crops are expected to play an important role in reducing CO2 emission, in energy supply and in European energy policy. However, a sustainable bioenergy supply must be resilient to climate change and the impacts on agriculture at both global and regional scale. The purpose of this study was to forecast the potential distribution of several bioenergy crops based on agronomic and environmental constrains under current conditions and future scenarios (2020 and 2030 in European Union. Potential biomass yield, according to the category end use product achievable in each environmental zone of Europe at present and in the future available land have been also studied. Future yields were assessed according to two factors: technological development and climate change: the former was based on prospect of DG-Agriculture for conventional crops and expert judgments for bioenergy crops, while the latter based on relevant research papers and literature reviews which used site-specific crop growth models. Yields are expected to increase in northern Europe due to climate change and technological development, while in southerneastern Europe the negative effect of climate change will be mitigated by the technological development. The estimated total biomass production in Europe, on the basis of future yields and surplus land made available for energy crops, may not be sufficient to meet the needs of bioenergy supply as claimed in the European directive 2009/28/EC.

  11. Irrigation frequencies and corn (Zea mays L.) yield relation in northern Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Tekin; Biber, Cigdem

    2008-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted during summer season of 2005 at the Research Station (altitude 180 m above sea level, 41 degrees 21' N and 36 degrees 15'E) Faculty of Agriculture, Ondokuz Mayis University, Samsun, Turkey. Experiment consisted of three irrigation levels and a non-irrigation level. Drip irrigation treatments consisted of three soil water deficits in the 90 cm soil profile depth was replenished to field capacity. Irrigation treatments were A: no irrigation, B: irrigation at 50% of available soil water capacity, C: irrigation at 30% of available soil water capacity, D: irrigation at 15% of available soil water capacity. The average seasonal water use values ranged from 257.14 to 285.71 mm in corn treatments. Irrigation frequencies (intervals) significantly affected corn crop yields. The average corn grain yields varied from 7.98 to 29.16 t ha(-1). The treatment D was recorded significantly higher corn grain yield 29.16 t ha(-1) compared to B (21.59 t ha(-1)); C (19.15 t ha(-1)) and A (7.98 t ha(-1)), respectively. According to research results, the maximum corn grain yield was obtained when the corn plants were irrigated at 15% of available soil water capacity to field capacity.

  12. Remote sensing in dryland cotton: relation to yield potential and soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, John J.; Iqbal, Javed; Thomasson, John A.; Willers, Jeffrey L.; Jenkins, Johnie N.

    2004-01-01

    The use of soil and topography information to explain crop yield variation across fields is often applied for crop management purposes. Remote sensed data is a potential source of information for site-specific crop management, providing both spatial and temporal information about soil and crop condition. Studies were conducted in a 104-acre (42-hectare) dryland cotton field in 2001 and 2002 in order to (1) qualitatively assess the spatial variability of soil physical properties from kriged estimates, (2) compare actual yields with normalized difference vegetation reflectance indices (NDVI) obtained from multispectral imagery and from in situ radiometer data, and (3) predict site-specific cotton yields using a crop simulation model, GOSSYM. An NDVI map of soybean in 2000 obtained from a multispectral image was used to establish four sites in each low, medium and high NDVI class. These 12 sites were studied in 2001 and 12 more sites selected at random were studied in 2002 (n = 24). Site-specific measurements included leaf area index (LAI), canopy hyperspectral reflectance, and three-band multispectral image data for green, red, and near-infrared reflectance wavebands at spatial resolutions of 2 m in 2001 and 0.5 m in 2002. Imagery was imported into the image analysis software Imagine (ERDAS, v. 8.5) for georegistration and image analysis. A 6x6 pixels (144 m2) area of interest was established on top of each field plot site and digital numbers (DN) from reflectance imagery were extracted from each band for derivation of NDVI maps for each of four sampling dates. Lint yield from each plot site was collected by hand and also by a cotton picker equipped with AgLeader yield monitor and OmniStar differential global positioning system. We found plant height, leaf area index, and lint yield were closely associated with NDVI maps and with NIR band values acquired from either an aircraft or handheld (GER-1500) sensor during peak bloom in mid July. Results indicate NDVI and NIR

  13. Oxalyl chloride, ClC(O)C(O)Cl: UV/vis spectrum and Cl atom photolysis quantum yields at 193, 248, and 351 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Buddhadeb; Papanastasiou, Dimitrios K; Burkholder, James B

    2012-10-28

    Oxalyl chloride, (ClCO)(2), has been used as a Cl atom photolytic precursor in numerous laboratory kinetic and photochemical studies. In this study, the UV/vis absorption spectrum of (ClCO)(2) and the Cl atom quantum yields in its photolysis at 193, 248, and 351 nm are reported. The UV∕vis spectrum was measured between 200 and 450 nm at 296 K using diode array spectroscopy in conjunction with an absolute cross section obtained at 213.9 nm. Our results are in agreement with the spectrum reported by Baklanov and Krasnoperov [J. Phys. Chem. A 105, 97-103 (2001)], which was obtained at 11 discrete wavelengths between 193.3 and 390 nm. Cl atom quantum yields, Φ(λ), were measured using pulsed laser photolysis coupled with time resolved atomic resonance fluorescence detection of Cl. The UV photolysis of (ClCO)(2) has been shown in previous studies to occur via an impulsive three-body dissociation mechanism, (COCl)(2) + hv → ClCO* + Cl + CO (2), where the excited ClCO radical, ClCO*, either dissociates or stabilizes ClCO* → Cl + CO (3a), → ClCO (3b). ClCO is thermally unstable at the temperatures (253-298 K) and total pressures (13-128 Torr) used in our experiments ClCO + M → Cl + CO + M (4) leading to the formation of a secondary Cl atom that was resolvable in the Cl atom temporal profiles obtained in the 248 and 351 nm photolysis of (ClCO)(2). Φ(193 nm) was found to be 2.07 ± 0.37 independent of bath gas pressure (25.8-105.7 Torr, N(2)), i.e., the branching ratio for channel 2a or the direct formation of 2Cl + 2CO in the photolysis of (ClCO)(2) is >0.95. At 248 nm, the branching ratio for channel 2a was determined to be 0.79 ± 0.15, while the total Cl atom yield, i.e., following the completion of reaction (4), was found to be 1.98 ± 0.26 independent of bath gas pressure (15-70 Torr, N(2)). Φ(351 nm) was found to be pressure dependent between 7.8 and 122.4 Torr (He, N(2)). The low-pressure limit of the total Cl atom quantum yield, Φ(0)(351 nm), was 2

  14. Structural and physicochemical aspects of silica encapsulated ZnO quantum dots with high quantum yield and their natural uptake in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depan, D; Misra, R D K

    2014-09-01

    Photoluminescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are of significant interest for bioimaging and fluorescence labeling. In this regard, we describe here the design of high sensitivity and high specificity non-toxic ZnO QDs (∼5 nm) with long-term stability of up to 12 months. The embedding of ZnO QDs on silica nanospheres led to significant increase in photoluminescence intensity rendering them highly bright QD-based probes. The QDs were characterized in vitro with respect to cancer cells (HeLa) and evaluated in terms of viability, fluorescence and cytoskeletal organization. The immobilization of ZnO QDs on silica nanospheres promoted the internalization and enhanced fluorescence emission of HeLa cells. The fluorescence emission from QDs was stable for 3 days, indicating excellent stability toward photobleaching. Cytoskeletal reorganization was observed after internalization of QDs such that the ZnO QDS on silica nanospheres resulted in broadening of the actin cytoskeleton. The study underscores that ZnO QDs immobilized on Si nanospheres are promising for tracking cancer cells in cell therapy.

  15. On the Role of Information Theoretic Uncertainty Relations in Quantum Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Jizba, Petr; Dunningham, Jacob A.; Joo, Jaewoo

    2014-01-01

    Uncertainty relations based on information theory for both discrete and continuous distribution functions are briefly reviewed. We extend these results to account for (differential) R\\'{e}nyi entropy and its related entropy power. This allows us to find a new class of information-theoretic uncertainty relations (ITURs). The potency of such uncertainty relations in quantum mechanics is illustrated with a simple two-energy-level model where they outperform both the usual Robertson-Schr\\"{o}ding...

  16. Viscosity of liquid {sup 4}He and quantum of circulation: Are they related?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L’vov, Victor S., E-mail: victor.lvov@gmail.com, E-mail: skrbek@fzu.cz, E-mail: krs3@nyu.edu [Department of Chemical Physics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Skrbek, Ladislav, E-mail: victor.lvov@gmail.com, E-mail: skrbek@fzu.cz, E-mail: krs3@nyu.edu [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 3, 12116 Prague (Czech Republic); Sreenivasan, Katepalli R., E-mail: victor.lvov@gmail.com, E-mail: skrbek@fzu.cz, E-mail: krs3@nyu.edu [Departments of Physics and Mechanical Engineering, and Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    In the vicinity of the superfluid transition in liquid {sup 4}He, we explore the relation between two apparently unrelated physical quantities—the kinematic viscosity, ν, in the normal state and the quantum of circulation, κ, in the superfluid state. The model developed here leads to the simple relationship ν ≈ κ/6, and links the classical and quantum flow properties of liquid {sup 4}He. We critically examine available data relevant to this relation and find that the prediction holds well at the saturated vapor pressure. Additionally, we predict the kinematic viscosity for liquid {sup 4}He along the λ-line at negative pressures.

  17. Improved photoluminescence quantum yield and stability of CdSe-TOP, CdSe-ODA-TOPO, CdSe/CdS and CdSe/EP nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shutian; Zhu, Zhilin; Wang, Zhixiao; Wei, Gugangfen; Wang, Pingjian; Li, Hai; Hua, Zhen; Lin, Zhonghai

    2016-07-01

    Size-controllable monodisperse CdSe nanocrystals with different organic capping were prepared based on the hot-injection method. The effective separation of nucleation and growth was achieved by rapidly mixing two highly reactive precursors. As a contrast, we prepared CdSe/CdS nanocrystals (NCs) successfully based on the selective ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) technique. This inorganic capping obtained higher photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) of 59.3% compared with organic capping of 40.8%. Furthermore, the CdSe-epoxy resin (EP) composites were prepared by adopting a flexible ex situ method, and showed excellent stability in the ambient environment for one year. So the composites with both high PLQY of nanocrystals and excellent stability are very promising to device application.

  18. Perturbation of planarity as the possible mechanism of solvent-dependent variations of fluorescence quantum yield in 2-aryl-3-hydroxychromones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klymchenko, Andrey S.; Pivovarenko, Vasyl G.; Demchenko, Alexander P.

    2003-03-01

    In order to understand the unexpectedly low quantum yields of 3-hydroxyflavones (3-HFs) in certain solvents, such as acetonitrile or ethyl acetate, the comparative study of solvent-dependent properties of parent 3-HF, 2-furyl-3-hydroxychromone and 2-benzofuryl-3-hydroxychromone derivatives have been performed. The results suggest that the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bond of 3-hydroxy group with the solvent favors non-planar conformations of phenyl group with respect to chromone system. This steric hindrance is not observed in the case of furan- and benzofuran-substituted 3-hydroxychromones (3-HCs). These results suggesting a new strategy for dramatic improvement of fluorescence properties of 3-HCs as two-wavelength ratiometric fluorescence probes.

  19. Determination of Quantum Yield for the Photochemical Decomposition of Dichloramine-B and Dibromamine-B in Aqueous Acetic Acid Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. N. Mohana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The photolysis of dihaloamines (RNX2, viz., dichloramine-B (DCB and dibromamine-B (DBB in aqueous acetic acid (1:1 v/v solutions has been studied with the UV light source (λ= 2537 Å. The experimental rate law obtained is - d [RNX2] / dt = k' Io / [RNX2], where Io is the intensity of incident light. The addition of benzenesulphonamide, the product of photolysis or uranyl ion had no significant effect on the rate of photochemical decomposition. A slight decrease in the rate has been observed by the addition of NaCl / NaBr to DCB / DBB solutions. The quantum yield (Φ for the photolytic decomposition has been computed. A suitable photolytic mechanism and a rate law consistent with the observed results have been proposed.

  20. Slow-Injection Growth of Seeded CdSe/CdS Nanorods with Unity Fluorescence Quantum Yield and Complete Shell to Core Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coropceanu, Igor; Rossinelli, Aurelio; Caram, Justin R; Freyria, Francesca S; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2016-03-22

    A two-step process has been developed for growing the shell of CdSe/CdS core/shell nanorods. The method combines an established fast-injection-based step to create the initial elongated shell with a second slow-injection growth that allows for a systematic variation of the shell thickness while maintaining a high degree of monodispersity at the batch level and enhancing the uniformity at the single-nanorod level. The second growth step resulted in nanorods exhibiting a fluorescence quantum yield up to 100% as well as effectively complete energy transfer from the shell to the core. This improvement suggests that the second step is associated with a strong suppression of the nonradiative channels operating both before and after the thermalization of the exciton. This hypothesis is supported by the suppression of a defect band, ubiquitous to CdSe-based nanocrystals after the second growth.

  1. Absorption and Quantum Yield of Single Conjugated Polymer Poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    We simultaneously measured the absorption and emission of single conjugated polymer poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) molecules in a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrix using near-critical xenon to enhance the photothermal contrast for direct absorption measurements. We directly measured the number of monomers and the quantum yield of single conjugated polymer molecules. Simultaneous absorption and emission measurements provided new insight into the photophysics of single conjugated polymers under optical excitation: quenching in larger molecules is more efficient than in smaller ones. Photoinduced traps and defects formed under prolonged illumination lead to decrease of both polymer fluorescence and absorption signals with the latter declining slower. PMID:28221806

  2. Luminescent pincer platinum(II) complexes with emission quantum yields up to almost unity: photophysics, photoreductive C-C bond formation, and materials applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Pui-Keong; Cheng, Gang; Tong, Glenna So Ming; To, Wai-Pong; Kwong, Wai-Lun; Low, Kam-Hung; Kwok, Chi-Chung; Ma, Chensheng; Che, Chi-Ming

    2015-02-09

    Luminescent pincer-type Pt(II)  complexes supported by C-deprotonated π-extended tridentate RC^N^NR' ligands and pentafluorophenylacetylide ligands show emission quantum yields up to almost unity. Femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence measurements and time-dependent DFT calculations together reveal the dependence of excited-state structural distortions of [Pt(RC^N^NR')(CC-C6 F5 )] on the positional isomers of the tridentate ligand. Pt complexes [Pt(R-C^N^NR')(CC-Ar)] are efficient photocatalysts for visible-light-induced reductive CC bond formation. The [Pt(R-C^N^NR')(CC-C6 F5 )] complexes perform strongly as phosphorescent dopants for green- and red-emitting organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with external quantum efficiency values over 22.1 %. These complexes are also applied in two-photon cellular imaging when incorporated into mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs).

  3. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis ameliorates the optimum quantum yield of photosystem II and reduces non-photochemical quenching in rice plants subjected to salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcel, Rosa; Redondo-Gómez, Susana; Mateos-Naranjo, Enrique; Aroca, Ricardo; Garcia, Rosalva; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel

    2015-08-01

    Rice is the most important food crop in the world and is a primary source of food for more than half of the world population. However, salinity is considered the most common abiotic stress reducing its productivity. Soil salinity inhibits photosynthetic processes, which can induce an over-reduction of the reaction centres in photosystem II (PSII), damaging the photosynthetic machinery. The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis may improve host plant tolerance to salinity, but it is not clear how the AM symbiosis affects the plant photosynthetic capacity, particularly the efficiency of PSII. This study aimed at determining the influence of the AM symbiosis on the performance of PSII in rice plants subjected to salinity. Photosynthetic activity, plant gas-exchange parameters, accumulation of photosynthetic pigments and rubisco activity and gene expression were also measured in order to analyse comprehensively the response of the photosynthetic processes to AM symbiosis and salinity. Results showed that the AM symbiosis enhanced the actual quantum yield of PSII photochemistry and reduced the quantum yield of non-photochemical quenching in rice plants subjected to salinity. AM rice plants maintained higher net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and transpiration rate than nonAM plants. Thus, we propose that AM rice plants had a higher photochemical efficiency for CO2 fixation and solar energy utilization and this increases plant salt tolerance by preventing the injury to the photosystems reaction centres and by allowing a better utilization of light energy in photochemical processes. All these processes translated into higher photosynthetic and rubisco activities in AM rice plants and improved plant biomass production under salinity.

  4. Some Eco-Physiological Characteristics at R4-R5 Stage in Relation to Soybean Yield Differing in Maturities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Jian; LIU Xiao-bing; WANG Guang-hua; S J Herbert

    2004-01-01

    Digital plant canopy imager and photosynthesis analyzer system were used to analyze the characteristics of canopy structure, photosynthetic physiology and micro-environmental factors at R4-R5 stage in different yielding soybean cultivars or lines with different maturities. The results showed that the common characteristics of high yielding soybean cultivars were high LAI, uniform foliage distribution in all horizontal directions, less variance of photosynthetic rate between top and bottom leaves in canopy and relatively higher photosynthetic rate of the whole canopy. All these characters combined in all resulted in higher canopy photosynthetic productivity, and pod number, seed number and seed weight per plant, especially pod and seed number in top and middle canopy were increased. The characters of high yielding canopy varied among maturities. Light interception was more important to early cultivars. Less foliage inclination angle was benefit to intercept more solar energy during yield formation. As late soybean cultivars had a more closure canopy and higher LAI, greater foliage inclination angle in all layers of high yielding canopy made more solar radiation penetrate into canopy, which was beneficial to yield formation.

  5. Ketosis treatment and milk yield in dairy cows related to milk acetoacetate levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simensen, E; Halse, K; Gillund, P; Lutnaes, B

    1990-01-01

    Milk yield and milk acetoacetate (M-acac) were measured weekly for the first 6 weeks of lactation in 5 herds with a ketosis problem. Ketosis treatments and the corresponding ketotest score, were also recorded. The treatment rate was highest 7-16 days after calving. Most of these early cases were associated with low ketone levels in milk, whereas the treatment rate for cows with high ketone levels was highest 17-31 days after calving. Nearly half of the treated cows were low-ketone animals. They were classified as ketosis cases in the cow health card records, although probably suffering from other post partum disturbances in many instances. About 40% of the cows with high ketone levels recovered spontaneously. Reduction in milk yield associated with peak M-acac levels was transient and moderate. It was concluded that health card statistics overestimates the severity of the ketosis problem in Norway.

  6. {mu}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{gamma} and related rare decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, M.D.

    1997-02-01

    The connection of rare decays to supersymmetric grand unification is highlighted, and a brief review of the status of rare decay experiments is given. The status of the MEGA experiment, a search for {mu}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{gamma}, is reported. Some ideas for a new experimental arrangement that has the potential to reach a sensitivity of 10{sup {minus}14} are presented.

  7. Analysis of variability, heritability, and interrelationships among grain yield and related characters in barley advanced lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi Jafar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this study was to improve pure lines for low input agricultural areas of the semi-arid region of Iran and similar environmental conditions. Forty barley pure lines provided from ICARDA along with three check cultivars were evaluated under rain-fed conditions in a semi-arid region of Iran during two years (2011-2013. The experiments were conducted in a randomized complete block design with four replications to estimate genetic variation and heritability for agro-morphological traits. The highest values of phenotypic and genotypic coefficients of variation were observed for the number of grains per spike followed by peduncle length, early vigor and grain yield. The broad heritability estimates ranged from 24% for grain yield to 96% for the number of grains per spike. The highest and lowest expected genetic advance, observed for days to physiological maturity and the number of grains per spike, respectively. Results of stepwise regression and path analysis showed that hectoliter grain weight and thousand grain weight exhibited the highest direct effects on grain yield, respectively. Comparisons between the pure lines and check cultivars indicated that out of 40 pure lines, 27 lines had a higher grain yield. Also, the pure lines No. 29, 13, 9 and 33 were identified as the superior lines for semi-arid environmental conditions. Our results indicate that check cultivars could be improved by selecting for pure lines with taller peduncle and the number of grains per spike, but with heavier grains. Therefore, these lines can be used as genetic material to broaden the genetic basis of barley breeding programs all over the world.

  8. Analysis of relations between crop temperature indices and yield of different sunflower hybrids foliar treated by biopreparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovár Marek

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The application of biological active preparations (BAPs and remote-sensing control in the management of agronomic intervention are an important part of successful crop cultivation. The effects of foliar application of two BAPs (containing amino acids or Abiestins® on yield and yield-forming, as well eco-physiological traits calculated from infrared thermographs data (crop water stress index, CWSI and index of stomatal conductance, Ig of three hybrids of sunflower were studied in field poly-factorial experiments, realised during two years (2012 and 2013. The results showed that the application of selected BAPs has contributed to an increase of the sunflower yield, in particular through an increase in the weight of thousand seeds (rp = 0.761, P < 0.001. Similarly, oil content in achenes was significantly higher in treatments with BAPs, mainly with preparation containing free amino acids. The study describes the quantitative relationship between yield and quality of sunflower production (rp = −0.41, P < 0.01. Selected hybrids of sunflower in two growth stages showed the significant differences in CWSI and Ig (both at P < 0.01, respectively. An analysis of negative linear relation between the yield of achenes and CWSI (rp = −0.654, P < 0.001 confirmed that higher value of plant stress resulted in a smaller yield and vice-versa. The opposite trend was observed between yield and Ig index (rp = 0.576, P < 0.001. The data obtained from IR thermography can be used for monitoring the physiological health of sunflower plants, as well in potential prediction and control of yield.

  9. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) seed yield in relation to phosphorus fertilization and honeybee pollination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kahtani, Saad Naser; Taha, El-Kazafy Abdou; Al-Abdulsalam, Mohammed

    2017-07-01

    This investigation was conducted at the Agricultural and Veterinary Training and Research Station, King Faisal University, Al-Ahsa, Saudi Arabia, during the alfalfa growing season in 2014. The study aimed to evaluate the impact of phosphorus fertilization and honeybee pollination on alfalfa seed production. The experiment was divided into 9 treatments of open pollination, honeybee pollination, and non-pollination with three different levels (0, 300 or 600 kg P2O5/ha/year) of triple super phosphate. All vegetative growth attributes of Hassawi alfalfa were significantly higher in the non-insect pollination plots, while the yield and yield component traits were significantly higher with either open pollination or honeybee pollination in parallel with the increasing level of phosphorus fertilizer up to 600 kg P2O5/ha/year in light salt-affected loamy sand soils. There was no seed yield in Hassawi alfalfa without insect pollination. Therefore, placing honeybee colonies near the fields of Hassawi alfalfa and adding 600 kg P2O5/ha/year can increase seed production.

  10. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. seed yield in relation to phosphorus fertilization and honeybee pollination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Naser Al-Kahtani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This investigation was conducted at the Agricultural and Veterinary Training and Research Station, King Faisal University, Al-Ahsa, Saudi Arabia, during the alfalfa growing season in 2014. The study aimed to evaluate the impact of phosphorus fertilization and honeybee pollination on alfalfa seed production. The experiment was divided into 9 treatments of open pollination, honeybee pollination, and non-pollination with three different levels (0, 300 or 600 kg P2O5/ha/year of triple super phosphate. All vegetative growth attributes of Hassawi alfalfa were significantly higher in the non-insect pollination plots, while the yield and yield component traits were significantly higher with either open pollination or honeybee pollination in parallel with the increasing level of phosphorus fertilizer up to 600 kg P2O5/ha/year in light salt-affected loamy sand soils. There was no seed yield in Hassawi alfalfa without insect pollination. Therefore, placing honeybee colonies near the fields of Hassawi alfalfa and adding 600 kg P2O5/ha/year can increase seed production.

  11. RELATIVE IMPORTANCE OF WOOD DENSITY AND CARBOHYDRATE CONTENT ON PULPING YIELD AND PRODUCT QUALITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Colodette, J.L.; Mokfienski, A.; Gomide,J.L.; Oliveira, R.C.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate basic density, chemical composition and fiber dimensions of ten Eucalyptus sp wood samples and verify the impact of this set of parameters and their combination on the Kraft pulping process yield and on bleached pulp quality. Ten eucalypt woods of different species, with basic densities varying from 365 to 544 kg/m3 and total wood carbohydrate contents varying from 70.0 to 74.5%, were transformed into kraft pulp of kappa number 17-18and bleached to 90% ISO brightness by the sequenceOD (PO)D. Wood basic density showed strongercorrelations with fiber dimensions, pulping yield and pulp quality than did chemical composition. Lighter woods resulted in higher yields. However, wood specific consumption was lower for denser woods,even though these demanded more drastic pulping conditions to achieve a given kappa number. The pulp quality results suggest that lower density woods should be directed towards fabrication of refined paper (printing and writing grades) while the denser woods be directed to the sanitary papers segment (tissue grades).

  12. RELATIVE IMPORTANCE OF WOOD DENSITY AND CARBOHYDRATE CONTENT ON PULPING YIELD AND PRODUCT QUALITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Colodette,J.L.; Mokfienski; Gomide; J.L.; Oliveiral; R.C.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate basicdensity, chemical composition and fiber dimensionsof ten Eucalyptus sp wood samples and verify theimpact of this set of parameters and theii"combination on the Kraft pulping process yield andon bleached pulp quality. Ten eucalypt woods ofdifferent species, with basic densities varying from365 to 544 kg/m3 and total wood carbohydratecontents varying from 70.0 to 74.5% , weretransformed into kraft pulp of kappa number 17-18and bleached to 90% ISO brightness by the sequenceOD (PO)D. Wood basic density showed strongercorrelations with fiber dimensions, pulping yield andpulp quality than did chemical composition. Lighterwoods resulted in higher yields. However, woodspecific consumption was lower for denser woods,even though these demanded more drastic pulpingconditions to achieve a given kappa number. Thepulp quality results suggest that lower density woodsshould be directed towards fabrication of refinedpaper (printing and writing grades) while the denserwoods be directed to the sanitary papers segment(tissue grades).

  13. Spin-related transport phenomena in HgTe-based quantum well structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, Markus

    2007-12-15

    Within the scope of this thesis, spin related transport phenomena have been investigated in HgTe/Hg{sub 0.3}Cd{sub 0.7}Te quantum well structures. In our experiments, the existence of the quantum spin Hall (QSH) state was successfully demonstrated for the first time and the presented results provide clear evidence for the charge transport properties of the QSH state. Our experiments provide the first direct observation of the Aharonov-Casher (AC) effect in semiconductor structures. In conclusion, HgTe quantum well structures have proven to be an excellent template for studying spin-related transport phenomena: The QSH relies on the peculiar band structure of the material and the existence of both the spin Hall effect and the AC effect is a consequence of the substantial spin-orbit interaction. (orig.)

  14. A New Conformal Theory of Semi-Classical Quantum General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhendro I.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider a new four-dimensional formulation of semi-classical quantum general relativity in which the classical space-time manifold, whose intrinsic geometric properties give rise to the effects of gravitation, is allowed to evolve microscopically by means of a conformal function which is assumed to depend on some quantum mechanical wave function. As a result, the theory presented here produces a unified field theory of gravitation and (microscopic electromagnetism in a somewhat simple, effective manner. In the process, it is seen that electromagnetism is actually an emergent quantum field originating in some kind of stochastic smooth extension (evolution of the gravitational field in the general theory of relativity.

  15. Bibliography of Publications related to Classical Self-dual variables and Loop Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Corichi, A; Corichi, Alejandro; Hauser, Alberto

    2005-01-01

    This bibliography attempts to give a comprehensive overview of all the literature related to what is known as the Ashtekar-Sen connection and the Rovelli-Smolin loop variables, from which the program currently known as Loop Quantum Gravity emerged. The original version was compiled by Peter Huebner in 1989, and it has been subsequently updated by Gabriela Gonzalez, Bernd Bruegmann, Monica Pierri, Troy Schilling, Christopher Beetle, Alejandro Corichi and Alberto Hauser. The criteria for inclusion in this list are the following: A paper in the classical theory is included if it deals with connection variables for gravity. If the paper is in the quantum domain, it is included when it is related directly with gravity using connection/loop variables, with mathematical aspects of connections, or when it introduces techniques that might be useful for the construction of the (loop) quantum theory of gravity. Information about additional literature, new preprints, and especially corrections are always welcome.

  16. Position-momentum uncertainty relations in the presence of quantum memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furrer, Fabian; Berta, Mario; Tomamichel, Marco

    2014-01-01

    A prominent formulation of the uncertainty principle identifies the fundamental quantum feature that no particle may be prepared with certain outcomes for both position and momentum measurements. Often the statistical uncertainties are thereby measured in terms of entropies providing a clear...... operational interpretation in information theory and cryptography. Recently, entropic uncertainty relations have been used to show that the uncertainty can be reduced in the presence of entanglement and to prove security of quantum cryptographic tasks. However, much of this recent progress has been focused....... As an illustration, we evaluate the uncertainty relations for position and momentum measurements, which is operationally significant in that it implies security of a quantum key distribution scheme based on homodyne detection of squeezed Gaussian states....

  17. Double-slit experiment with single wave-driven particles and its relation to quantum mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Madsen, Jacob; Reichelt, Christian Günther

    2015-01-01

    even though it is possible to determine unambiguously which slit the walking droplet passes. Here we argue, however, that the single-particle statistics in such an experiment will be fundamentally different from the single-particle statistics of quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanical interference takes...... place between different classical paths with precise amplitude and phase relations. In the double-slit experiment with walking droplets, these relations are lost since one of the paths is singled out by the droplet. To support our conclusions, we have carried out our own double-slit experiment, and our...... results, in particular the long and variable slit passage times of the droplets, cast strong doubt on the feasibility of the interference claimed by Couder and Fort. To understand theoretically the limitations of wave-driven particle systems as analogs to quantum mechanics, we introduce a Schro...

  18. Introduction to the basic concepts of modern physics special relativity, quantum and statistical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Becchi, Carlo Maria

    2016-01-01

    This is the third edition of a well-received textbook on modern physics theory. This book provides an elementary but rigorous and self-contained presentation of the simplest theoretical framework that will meet the needs of undergraduate students. In addition, a number of examples of relevant applications and an appropriate list of solved problems are provided.Apart from a substantial extension of the proposed problems, the new edition provides more detailed discussion on Lorentz transformations and their group properties, a deeper treatment of quantum mechanics in a central potential, and a closer comparison of statistical mechanics in classical and in quantum physics. The first part of the book is devoted to special relativity, with a particular focus on space-time relativity and relativistic kinematics. The second part deals with Schrödinger's formulation of quantum mechanics. The presentation concerns mainly one-dimensional problems, but some three-dimensional examples are discussed in detail. The third...

  19. Quantitative trait loci for rice yield-related traits using recombinant inbred lines derived from two diverse cultivars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xu Feng Bai; Li Jun Luo; Wen Hao Yan; Mallikarjuna Rao Kovi; Yong Zhong Xing

    2011-08-01

    The thousand-grain weight and spikelets per panicle directly contribute to rice yield. Heading date and plant height also greatly influence the yield. Dissection of genetic bases of yield-related traits would provide tools for yield improvement. In this study, quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping for spikelets per panicle, thousand-grain weight, heading date and plant height was performed using recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross between two diverse cultivars, Nanyangzhan and Chuan7. In total, 20 QTLs were identified for four traits. They were located to 11 chromosomes except on chromosome 4. Seven and five QTLs were detected for thousand-grain weight and spikelets per panicle, respectively. Four QTLs were identified for both heading date and plant height. About half the QTLs were commonly detected in both years, 2006 and 2007. Six QTLs are being reported for the first time. Two QTL clusters were identified in regions flanked by RM22065 and RM5720 on chromosome 7 and by RM502 and RM264 on chromosome 8, respectively. The parent, Nanyangzhan with heavy thousand-grain weight, carried alleles with increased effects on all seven thousand-grain weight QTL, which explained why there was no transgressive segregation for thousand-grain weight in the population. In contrast, Chuan7 with more spikelets per panicle carried positive alleles at all five spikelets per panicle QTL except qspp5. Further work on distinction between pleiotropic QTL and linked QTL is needed in two yield-related QTL clusters.

  20. Do new production concepts and a new management of employment relations, yield higher employee performance and low job strain?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, K.; Oeij, P.

    2006-01-01

    In this article old versus new production concepts (NPCs) and employment relation instruments, are studied, separately and in combination, to find out which yield high employee performance and low job strain. Therefore, in 2005, TNO conducted coupled surveys among 149 supervisors and employees. In t

  1. Leptin concentrations in relation to energy balance, milk yield, intake, live weight and estrus in dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liefers, S.C.; Veerkamp, R.F.; Pas, te M.F.W.; Delavaud, C.; Chilliard, Y.; Lende, van der T.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe fluctuations in leptin concentrations during late pregnancy and lactation and to investigate how those fluctuations are related to energy balance, milk yield, milk components, dry matter intake, live weight, first postpartum luteal activity, and first obse

  2. Do new production concepts and a new management of employment relations, yield higher employee performance and low job strain?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, K.; Oeij, P.

    2006-01-01

    In this article old versus new production concepts (NPCs) and employment relation instruments, are studied, separately and in combination, to find out which yield high employee performance and low job strain. Therefore, in 2005, TNO conducted coupled surveys among 149 supervisors and employees. In

  3. A convergence: special relativity, zitterbewegung, and new models for the subcomponent structure of quantum particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Michael J.

    2015-09-01

    Hestenes has presented an integration of Schrödinger's zitterbewegung with the spin matrices of the Dirac equation, suggesting the electron can be modeled by a rapidly rotating dipole moment and a frequency related to the de Broglie frequency. He presents an elegant spacetime algebra that provides a reformulation of the Dirac equation that incorporates these real spin characteristics. A similar heuristic model for quantum particles has been derived by this author from a different, quasi-classical premise: That the most fundamental subcomponents of quantum particles all travel at a constant speed of light. Time is equated with the spatial displacement of these subcomponents - the speed of light is the speed of time. This approach suggests a means of integrating special relativity and quantum mechanics with the same concept of time. The relativistic transformation of spinning quantum particles create the appearance of additional, compactified spatial dimensions that can be correlated with the complex phase of the spin matrices as in the Dirac formalism. This paper further examines the convergence on such new models for quantum particles built on this rapid motion of particle subcomponents. The modeling leverages a string-like heuristic for particle subcomponents and a revised description for the wave-like properties of particles. This examination provides useful insights to the real spatial geometries and interactions of electrons and photons.

  4. Hormonal and metabolic regulation of source-sink relations under salinity and drought: from plant survival to crop yield stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albacete, Alfonso A; Martínez-Andújar, Cristina; Pérez-Alfocea, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Securing food production for the growing population will require closing the gap between potential crop productivity under optimal conditions and the yield captured by farmers under a changing environment, which is termed agronomical stability. Drought and salinity are major environmental factors contributing to the yield gap ultimately by inducing premature senescence in the photosynthetic source tissues of the plant and by reducing the number and growth of the harvestable sink organs by affecting the transport and use of assimilates between and within them. However, the changes in source-sink relations induced by stress also include adaptive changes in the reallocation of photoassimilates that influence crop productivity, ranging from plant survival to yield stability. While the massive utilization of -omic technologies in model plants is discovering hundreds of genes with potential impacts in alleviating short-term applied drought and salinity stress (usually measured as plant survival), only in relatively few cases has an effect on crop yield stability been proven. However, achieving the former does not necessarily imply the latter. Plant survival only requires water status conservation and delayed leaf senescence (thus maintaining source activity) that is usually accompanied by growth inhibition. However, yield stability will additionally require the maintenance or increase in sink activity in the reproductive structures, thus contributing to the transport of assimilates from the source leaves and to delayed stress-induced leaf senescence. This review emphasizes the role of several metabolic and hormonal factors influencing not only the source strength, but especially the sink activity and their inter-relations, and their potential to improve yield stability under drought and salinity stresses.

  5. Origin of the Photoluminescence Quantum Yields Enhanced by Alkane-Termination of Freestanding Silicon Nanocrystals: Temperature-Dependence of Optical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Batu; Takeguchi, Masaki; Nakamura, Jin; Nemoto, Yoshihiro; Hamaoka, Takumi; Chandra, Sourov; Shirahata, Naoto

    2016-11-01

    On the basis of the systematic study on temperature dependence of photoluminescence (PL) properties along with relaxation dynamics we revise a long-accepted mechanism for enhancing absolute PL quantum yields (QYs) of freestanding silicon nanocrystals (ncSi). A hydrogen-terminated ncSi (ncSi:H) of 2.1 nm was prepared by thermal disproportination of (HSiO1.5)n, followed by hydrofluoric etching. Room-temperature PL QY of the ncSi:H increased twentyfold only by hydrosilylation of 1-octadecene (ncSi-OD). A combination of PL spectroscopic measurement from cryogenic to room temperature with structural characterization allows us to link the enhanced PL QYs with the notable difference in surface structure between the ncSi:H and the ncSi-OD. The hydride-terminated surface suffers from the presence of a large amount of nonradiative relaxation channels whereas the passivation with alkyl monolayers suppresses the creation of the nonradiative relaxation channels to yield the high PL QY.

  6. Genetic Gains in Yield and Yield Related Traits under Drought Stress and Favorable Environments in a Maize Population Improved Using Marker Assisted Recurrent Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folusho Bankole

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of marker assisted recurrent selection (MARS is to increase the frequency of favorable marker alleles in a population before inbred line extraction. This approach was used to improve drought tolerance and grain yield (GY in a biparental cross of two elite drought tolerant lines. The testcrosses of randomly selected 50 S1 lines from each of the three selection cycles (C0, C1, C2 of the MARS population, parental testcrosses and the cross between the two parents (F1 were evaluated under drought stress (DS and well watered (WW well as under rainfed conditions to determine genetic gains in GY and other agronomic traits. Also, the S1 lines derived from each selection types were genotyped with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers. Testcrosses derived from C2 produced significantly higher grain field under DS than those derived from C0 with a relative genetic gain of 7% per cycle. Also, the testcrosses of S1 lines from C2 showed an average genetic gain of 1% per cycle under WW condition and 3% per cycle under rainfed condition. Molecular analysis revealed that the frequency of favorable marker alleles increased from 0.510 at C0 to 0.515 at C2, while the effective number of alleles (Ne per locus decreased from C0 (1.93 to C2 (1.87. Our results underscore the effectiveness of MARS for improvement of GY under DS condition.

  7. Quantum physics meets the philosophy of mind new essays on the mind-body relation in quantum-theoretical perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Meixner, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Quantum physics, unlike classical physics, suggests a non-physicalistic metaphysics. Whereas physicalism implies a reductive position in the philosophy of mind, quantum physics is compatible with non-reductionism, and actually seems to support it. The essays in this book explore, from various points of view, the possibilities of basing a non-reductive philosophy of mind on quantum physics.

  8. Relativity, Quantum Physics and Philosophy in the Upper Secondary Curriculum: Challenges, Opportunities and Proposed Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Ellen K.; Bungum, Berit; Angell, Carl; Tellefsen, Catherine W.; Frågåt, Thomas; Bøe, Maria Vetleseter

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we discuss how quantum physics and relativity can be taught in upper secondary school, in ways that promote conceptual understanding and philosophical reflections. We present the ReleQuant project, in which web-based teaching modules have been developed. The modules address competence aims in the Norwegian national curriculum for…

  9. The Green-Kubo formula and the Onsager reciprocity relations in quantum statistical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Jaksic, V; Pillet, C

    2005-01-01

    We study linear response theory in the general framework of algebraic quantum statistical mechanics and prove the Green-Kubo formula and the Onsager reciprocity relations for heat fluxes generated by temperature differentials. Our derivation is axiomatic and the key assumptions concern ergodic properties of non-equilibrium steady states.

  10. Relative states and the existential interpretation: einselection, envariance and quantum Darwinism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurek, Wojciech H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    This is a brief 'guide to ideas' aimed at illuminating various developments that are based on the recognition of the role of the environment in the transition from quantum to dassical, and that are relevant to Everett's 'Relative State Interpretation' .

  11. Relativity, Quantum Physics and Philosophy in the Upper Secondary Curriculum: Challenges, Opportunities and Proposed Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Ellen K.; Bungum, Berit; Angell, Carl; Tellefsen, Catherine W.; Frågåt, Thomas; Bøe, Maria Vetleseter

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we discuss how quantum physics and relativity can be taught in upper secondary school, in ways that promote conceptual understanding and philosophical reflections. We present the ReleQuant project, in which web-based teaching modules have been developed. The modules address competence aims in the Norwegian national curriculum for…

  12. Consistency of certain constitutive relations with quantum electromagnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsley, S. A. R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    Recent work by Philbin [New J. Phys. 12, 123008 (2010)] has provided a Lagrangian theory that establishes a general method for the canonical quantization of the electromagnetic field in any dispersive, lossy, linear dielectric. Working from this theory, we extend the Lagrangian description to reciprocal and nonreciprocal magnetoelectric (bianisotropic) media, showing that some versions of the constitutive relations are inconsistent with a real Lagrangian, and hence with quantization. This amounts to a restriction on the magnitude of the magnetoelectric coupling. Moreover, from the point of view of quantization, moving media are shown to be fundamentally different from stationary magnetoelectrics, despite the formal similarity in the constitutive relations.

  13. Inter-relation between soybean yield and soil compaction under degraded pasture in Brazilian Savannah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rienni de Paula Queiroz

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Cerrado (Brazilian Savannah plays an important economic and financial role in the nation, since the pastures of this biome feed cattle for half of the domestic bovine meat productivity, and its agricultural fields produce a third of the country's grain. The variability and spatial dependence between the soil physical attributes and soybean yield were evaluated in a crop rotation planted on a degraded brachiaria pasture, on a dystroferric Red Latosol of an experimental farm of the State University of São Paulo (UNESP, in the 2005/2006 growing season. The linear and spatial correlations between these attributes were also studied, to determine conditions that would allow increased agricultural productivity. In the above pasture area, a grid was installed with 124 plots, spaced 10.0 x 10.0 m and 5.0 x 5.0 m apart, in a total area of 7,500 m². From the linear and spatial point of view, the high grain yield can be explained by the number of grains per plant and soil macroporosity. The high variability observed for most soil properties indicated that the crop - livestock integration system results in environmental heterogeneity of the soil.

  14. Relating different quantum generalizations of the conditional Rényi entropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomamichel, Marco [Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney 2006 (Australia); Berta, Mario [Institute for Quantum Information and Matter, Caltech, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Hayashi, Masahito [Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Graduate School of Mathematics, Nagoya University, Furocho, Chikusaku, Nagoya, 464-860 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Recently a new quantum generalization of the Rényi divergence and the corresponding conditional Rényi entropies was proposed. Here, we report on a surprising relation between conditional Rényi entropies based on this new generalization and conditional Rényi entropies based on the quantum relative Rényi entropy that was used in previous literature. Our result generalizes the well-known duality relation H(A|B) + H(A|C) = 0 of the conditional von Neumann entropy for tripartite pure states to Rényi entropies of two different kinds. As a direct application, we prove a collection of inequalities that relate different conditional Rényi entropies and derive a new entropic uncertainty relation.

  15. Quantum non-locality and relativity metaphysical intimations of modern physics

    CERN Document Server

    Maudlin, Tim

    2011-01-01

    The third edition of Quantum Non-Locality and Relativity has been carefully updated to reflect significant developments, including a new chapter covering important recent work in the foundations of physics. A new edition of the premier philosophical study of Bell's Theorem and its implication for the relativistic account of space and timeDiscusses Roderich Tumiulka's explicit, relativistic theory that can reproduce the quantum mechanical violation of Bell's inequality. Discusses the "Free Will Theorem" of John Conway and Simon KochenIntroduces philosophers to the relevant physics and demonstra

  16. N-acetylcysteine increased rice yield

    OpenAIRE

    NOZULAIDI, MOHD; JAHAN, MD SARWAR; KHAIRI, MOHD; Khandaker, Mohammad Moneruzzaman; Mat NASHRIYAH; KHANIF, YUSOP MOHD

    2015-01-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC) biosynthesized reduced glutathione (GSH), which maintains redox homeostasis in plants under normal and stressful conditions. To justify the effects of NAC on rice production, we measured yield parameters, chlorophyll (Chl) content, minimum Chl fluorescence (Fo), maximum Chl fluorescence (Fm), quantum yield (Fv/Fm), net photosynthesis rate (Pn), photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), and relative water content (RWC). Four treatments, N1G0 (nitrogen (N) with no NAC), ...

  17. Scaling relations of three-dimensional random-exchange quantum antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Deng-Ruei; Jiang, Fu-Jiun

    2015-11-01

    The thermal and ground state properties of a class of three-dimensional (3D) random-exchange spin-1/2 antiferromagnets are studied using first principles quantum Monte Carlo method. Our motivation is to examine whether the newly discovered universal scaling properties, which connect the Néel temperature and the staggered magnetization density, for the clean 3D quantum dimerized Heisenberg models remain valid for the random-exchange models considered here. Remarkably, similar to the clean systems, our Monte Carlo results indicate that these scaling relations also emerge for the considered models with the introduced antiferromagnetic randomness. The scope of the validity of these scaling properties for the 3D quantum antiferromagnets is investigated as well.

  18. Quantum general relativity and the classification of smooth manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Pfeiffer, H

    2004-01-01

    The gauge symmetry of classical general relativity under space-time diffeomorphisms implies that any path integral quantization which can be interpreted as a sum over space-time geometries, gives rise to a formal invariant of smooth manifolds. This is an opportunity to review results on the classification of smooth, piecewise-linear and topological manifolds. It turns out that differential topology distinguishes the space-time dimension d=3+1 from any other lower or higher dimension and relates the sought-after path integral quantization of general relativity in d=3+1 with an open problem in topology, namely to construct non-trivial invariants of smooth manifolds using their piecewise-linear structure. In any dimension d<=5+1, the classification results provide us with triangulations of space-time which are not merely approximations nor introduce any physical cut-off, but which rather capture the full information about smooth manifolds up to diffeomorphism. Conditions on refinements of these triangulations...

  19. The Linguistic Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Ishikawa, Shiro

    2012-01-01

    About twenty years ago, we proposed the mathematical formulation of Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and further, we concluded that Heisenberg's uncertainty principle and EPR-paradox are not contradictory. This is true, however we now think that we should have argued about it under a certain firm interpretation of quantum mechanics. Recently we proposed the linguistic quantum interpretation (called quantum and classical measurement theory), which was characterized as a kind of metaphysical and linguistic turn of the Copenhagen interpretation. This turn from physics to language does not only extend quantum theory to classical systems but also yield the quantum mechanical world view (i.e., the philosophy of quantum mechanics, in other words, quantum philosophy). In fact, we can consider that traditional philosophies have progressed toward quantum philosophy. In this paper, we first review the linguistic quantum interpretation, and further, clarify the relation between EPR-paradox and Heisenberg's uncertainty...

  20. Double-slit experiment with single wave-driven particles and its relation to quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Anders; Madsen, Jacob; Reichelt, Christian; Rosenlund Ahl, Sonja; Lautrup, Benny; Ellegaard, Clive; Levinsen, Mogens T; Bohr, Tomas

    2015-07-01

    In a thought-provoking paper, Couder and Fort [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 154101 (2006)] describe a version of the famous double-slit experiment performed with droplets bouncing on a vertically vibrated fluid surface. In the experiment, an interference pattern in the single-particle statistics is found even though it is possible to determine unambiguously which slit the walking droplet passes. Here we argue, however, that the single-particle statistics in such an experiment will be fundamentally different from the single-particle statistics of quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanical interference takes place between different classical paths with precise amplitude and phase relations. In the double-slit experiment with walking droplets, these relations are lost since one of the paths is singled out by the droplet. To support our conclusions, we have carried out our own double-slit experiment, and our results, in particular the long and variable slit passage times of the droplets, cast strong doubt on the feasibility of the interference claimed by Couder and Fort. To understand theoretically the limitations of wave-driven particle systems as analogs to quantum mechanics, we introduce a Schrödinger equation with a source term originating from a localized particle that generates a wave while being simultaneously guided by it. We show that the ensuing particle-wave dynamics can capture some characteristics of quantum mechanics such as orbital quantization. However, the particle-wave dynamics can not reproduce quantum mechanics in general, and we show that the single-particle statistics for our model in a double-slit experiment with an additional splitter plate differs qualitatively from that of quantum mechanics.

  1. Exchangeable sodium induced changes in yield, water relation and cation composition of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, V K; Singh, P K; Pushpangadan, P

    2005-06-01

    A pot experiment was conducted with the objectives to assess the adaptation potential of fennel crop grown at 10, 20, 25, 35 and 40 ESP (exchangeable sodium percentage) levels. Results showed that the rate of seed germination, plant growth including branching pattern, umbels per plant and 1000 test seed weight were adversely affected by sodic soils. Assuming that fifty percent reduction in seed yield and Na+/K+ ratio in leaf tissue as an index of alkali tolerance revealed that fennel was tolerant up to 25 ESP. The cell sap pH and EC reflected optimum osmoticum maintenance to withstand sodicity stress at this level and beyond this leaf water potential decreased (negatively) more to impede water uptake.

  2. Ray and Wave Aberrations Revisited: A Huygens Construction yields Exact Relations

    CERN Document Server

    Restrepo, John; Ihrke, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    The optical aberrations of a system can be described in terms of the wave aberrations, defined as the departure from the ideal spherical wavefront; or the ray aberrations, which are in turn the deviations from the paraxial ray intersection measured in the image plane. The classical connection between the two descriptions is an approximation, the error of which has, so far, not been quantified analytically. We derive exact analytical equations for computing the wavefront surface, the aberrated ray directions, and the transverse ray aberrations in terms of the wave aberrations (OPD) and the reference sphere. We introduce precise conditions for a function to be an OPD function, show that every such function has an associated wavefront, and study the error arising from the classical approximation. We establish strict conditions for the error to be small. We illustrate our results with numerical simulations. Our results show that large numerical apertures and high-frequency OPD functions yield larger approximation...

  3. Ray and wave aberrations revisited: a Huygens-like construction yields exact relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, John; Stoerck, Pawel J; Ihrke, Ivo

    2016-02-01

    The aberrations of an optical system can be described in terms of the wave aberrations, defined as the departure from the ideal spherical wavefront; or the ray aberrations, which are in turn the deviations from the paraxial ray intersections measured in the image plane. The classical connection between the two descriptions is an approximation, the error of which has, to our knowledge, so far not been quantified analytically. We derive exact analytical equations for computing the wavefront surface, the aberrated ray directions, and the transverse ray aberrations in terms of the wave aberrations (OPD) and the reference sphere. We introduce precise conditions for a function to be an OPD function, show that every such function has an associated wavefront, and study the error arising from the classical approximation. We establish strict conditions for the error to be small. We illustrate our results with numerical simulations. Our results show that large numerical apertures and OPD functions with strong gradients yield larger approximation errors.

  4. Some Clarifications on the Relation Between Bohmian Quantum Potential and Mach's Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Faramarz; Golshani, Mehdi

    2017-07-01

    Mach's principle asserts that the inertial mass of a body is related to the distribution of other distant bodies. This means that in the absence of other bodies, a single body has no mass. In this case, talking about motion is not possible, because the detection of motion is possible only relative to other bodies. But in physics we are faced with situations that are not fully Machian. As in the case of general theory of relativity where geodesics exist in the absence of any matter, the motion has meaning. Another example which is the main topic of our discussion, refers to Bohmian quantum mechanics, where the inertial mass of a single particle does not vanish, but is modified. We can call such situations in which motion or mass of a single particle has meaning, pseudo-Machian situations. In this paper, we use the Machian or pseudo-Machian considerations to clarify under what circumstances and how a Machian effect leads us to Bohmian quantum mechanics. Then, we shall get the Bohmian quantum potential and its higher order terms for the Klein-Gordon particle through Machian considerations, without using any quantum mechanical postulate or operator formalism.

  5. Some Clarifications on the Relation Between Bohmian Quantum Potential and Mach's Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Faramarz; Golshani, Mehdi

    2017-10-01

    Mach's principle asserts that the inertial mass of a body is related to the distribution of other distant bodies. This means that in the absence of other bodies, a single body has no mass. In this case, talking about motion is not possible, because the detection of motion is possible only relative to other bodies. But in physics we are faced with situations that are not fully Machian. As in the case of general theory of relativity where geodesics exist in the absence of any matter, the motion has meaning. Another example which is the main topic of our discussion, refers to Bohmian quantum mechanics, where the inertial mass of a single particle does not vanish, but is modified. We can call such situations in which motion or mass of a single particle has meaning, pseudo-Machian situations. In this paper, we use the Machian or pseudo-Machian considerations to clarify under what circumstances and how a Machian effect leads us to Bohmian quantum mechanics. Then, we shall get the Bohmian quantum potential and its higher order terms for the Klein-Gordon particle through Machian considerations, without using any quantum mechanical postulate or operator formalism.

  6. On the relative abundance of LiH and LiH+ molecules in the early universe: new results from quantum reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Bovino, Stefano; Gianturco, Franco A; Galli, Daniele; Palla, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    The relative efficiencies of the chemical pathways that can lead to the destruction of LiH and LiH+ molecules, conjectured to be present in the primordial gas and to control molecular cooling processes in the gravitational collapse of the post-recombination era, are revisited by using accurate quantum calculations for the several reactions involved. The new rates are employed to survey the behavior of the relative abundance of these molecules at redshifts of interest for early universe conditions. We find significant differences with respect to previous calculations, the present ones yielding LIH abundances higher than LiH+ at all redshifts.

  7. Major Gene Identiifcation and Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping for Yield-Related Traits in Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Zhe; ZHANG Xin; LIU Yang-yang; JIA Zi-fang; ZHAO Hai-hong; LI Cheng-qi; WANG Qing-lian

    2014-01-01

    Segregation analysis of the mixed genetic model of major gene plus polygene was used to identify the major genesfor cotton yield-related traits using six generations P1, P2, F1, B1, B2, and F2 generated from the cross of Baimian 1×TM-1. In addition to boll size and seed index, the major genes for the other ifve traits were detected:one each for seed yield, lint percentage, boll number, lint index; and two for lint yield. Quantitative trait locus/loci (QTL) mapping was performed in the F2 and F2:3 populations of above cross through molecular marker technology, and a total of 50 QTL (26 suggestive and 24 signiifcant) for yield-related traits were detected. Four common QTL were discovered: qLP-3b(F2)/qLP-3(F2:3)andqLP-19b (F2)/qLP-19(F2:3) for lint percentage, qBN-17(F2)/qBN-17(F2:3)for boll number, and qBS-26b(F2)/qBS-26(F2:3) for boll size. Especially, qLP-3b(F2)/qLP-3(F2:3), not only had LOD scores>3 but also exceeded the permutation threshold (5.13 and 5.29, respectively), correspondingly explaining 23.47 and 29.55% of phenotypic variation. This QTL should be considered preferentially in marker assisted selection (MAS). Segregation analysis and QTL mapping could mutually complement and verify, which provides a theoretical basis for genetic improvement of cotton yield-related traits by using major genes (QTL).

  8. Preservation of a quantum Rényi relative entropy implies existence of a recovery map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenčová, Anna

    2017-02-01

    It is known that a necessary and sufficient condition for equality in the data processing inequality (DPI) for the quantum relative entropy is the existence of a recovery map. We show that equality in DPI for a sandwiched Rényi relative α-entropy with α >1 is also equivalent to this property. For the proof, we use an interpolating family of L p -norms with respect to a state.

  9. On the renormalization procedure for quantum fields with modified dispersion relation in curved spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Nacir, Diana López

    2009-01-01

    We review our recent results on the renormalization procedure for a free quantum scalar field with modified dispersion relations in curved spacetimes. For dispersion relations containing up to $2s$ powers of the spatial momentum, the subtraction necessary to renormalize $$ and $$ depends on $s$. We first describe our previous analysis for spatially flat Friedman-Robertson-Walker and Bianchi type I metrics. Then we present a new power counting analysis for general background metrics in the weak field approximation.

  10. Weight loss and its relation to fat aspiration yields in liposuction: a survey in 48 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeni, R

    2012-01-01

    Liposuction surgeons often observe individually fluctuating amounts of aspirated fat. In patients with sagging skin due to previous weight loss there is a tendency of decreased fat aspiration volumes. To study the influence of weight loss on fat aspiration volumes in a series of 48 patients. We matched individuals of the same gender, but with a different weight history from a vast number of patients who had undergone liposuction surgery. The aspirated fat to wetting solution ratio (FWR) of the circumferential abdominal region was evaluated in three groups: A - patients with no weight loss (n = 16; 8 males/ 8 females), B - patients with a history of moderate weight loss (weight loss 5-10% of body weight; n = 16; 8 males/8 females), and C - patients who had a massive weight loss prior to surgery (weight loss exceeding 15% of body weight; n = 16; 8 males/8 females). The aspirated FWR was 3.4 ± 0.5, 1.0 ± 0.3 and 0.4 ± 0.2 in groups A, B and C, respectively. The differences between the groups were statistically significant (p loss in regard to fat aspiration volumes compared to patients without prior weight loss. These findings point to the importance of a weight loss history prior to surgery. Regardless of lower fat aspiration yields in patients with massive weight loss, good results are still achievable. This is not only due to volume reduction but to skin tightening. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Holography, mass area relation and discrete quantum spectrum of black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Lochan, Kinjalk

    2015-01-01

    The quantum genesis of Hawking radiation is a long-standing puzzle in black hole physics. Semi-classically one can argue that the spectrum of radiation emitted by a black hole look very much sparse unlike what is expected from a thermal object. It was demonstrated through a simple quantum model that a quantum black hole will retain a discrete profile, at least in the weak energy regime. However, it was suggested that this discreteness might be an artifact of the simplicity of eigenspectrum of the model considered. Different quantum theories can, in principle, give rise to different complicated spectra and make the radiation from black hole dense enough in transition lines, to make them look continuous in profile. We show that such a hope from a geometry-quantized black hole is not realized as long as large enough black holes are dubbed with holographic relation which tells that the entropy of the black hole can be obtained from the area of the horizon and they have a classical mass area relation. We show that...

  12. New identities from quantum-mechanical sum rules of parity-related potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Ayorinde, O A; Belloni, M; Robinett, R W

    2010-01-01

    We apply quantum mechanical sum rules to pairs of one-dimensional systems defined by potential energy functions related by parity. Specifically, we consider symmetric potentials, $V(x) = V(-x)$, and their parity-restricted partners, ones with $V(x)$, but defined only on the positive half-line. We extend recent discussions of sum rules for the quantum bouncer by considering the parity-extended version of this problem, defined by the symmetric linear potential, $V(z) = F|z|$ and find new classes of constraints on the zeros of the Airy function, $Ai(z)$, and its derivative $Ai'(z)$. We also consider the parity-restricted version of the harmonic oscillator and find completely new classes of mathematical relations, unrleated to those of the ordinary oscillator problem. These two soluble quantum-mechanical systems defined by power-law potentials provide examples of how the form of the potential (both parity and continuity properties) affects the convergence of quantum-mechanical sum rules. We also discuss semi-clas...

  13. New identities from quantum-mechanical sum rules of parity-related potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayorinde, O A; Chisholm, K; Belloni, M [Physics Department, Davidson College, Davidson, NC 28035 (United States); Robinett, R W, E-mail: seayorinde@davidson.ed, E-mail: kechisholm@davidson.ed, E-mail: mabelloni@davidson.ed, E-mail: rick@phys.psu.ed [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2010-06-11

    We apply quantum-mechanical sum rules to pairs of one-dimensional systems defined by potential energy functions related by parity. Specifically, we consider symmetric potentials, V(x) = V(- x), and their parity-restricted partners, ones with V(x) but defined only on the positive half-line. We extend recent discussions of sum rules for the quantum bouncer by considering the parity-extended version of this problem, defined by the symmetric linear potential, V(z) = F|z| and find new classes of constraints on the zeros of the Airy function, Ai({zeta}), and its derivative, Ai'({zeta}). We also consider the parity-restricted version of the harmonic oscillator and find completely new classes of mathematical relations, unrelated to those of the ordinary oscillator problem. These two soluble quantum-mechanical systems defined by power-law potentials provide examples of how the form of the potential (both parity and continuity properties) affects the convergence of quantum-mechanical sum rules. We also discuss semi-classical predictions for expectation values and the Stark effect for these systems.

  14. New identities from quantum-mechanical sum rules of parity-related potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayorinde, O. A.; Chisholm, K.; Belloni, M.; Robinett, R. W.

    2010-06-01

    We apply quantum-mechanical sum rules to pairs of one-dimensional systems defined by potential energy functions related by parity. Specifically, we consider symmetric potentials, V(x) = V(- x), and their parity-restricted partners, ones with V(x) but defined only on the positive half-line. We extend recent discussions of sum rules for the quantum bouncer by considering the parity-extended version of this problem, defined by the symmetric linear potential, V(z) = F|z| and find new classes of constraints on the zeros of the Airy function, Ai(ζ), and its derivative, Ai'(ζ). We also consider the parity-restricted version of the harmonic oscillator and find completely new classes of mathematical relations, unrelated to those of the ordinary oscillator problem. These two soluble quantum-mechanical systems defined by power-law potentials provide examples of how the form of the potential (both parity and continuity properties) affects the convergence of quantum-mechanical sum rules. We also discuss semi-classical predictions for expectation values and the Stark effect for these systems.

  15. A comparison of yield-related traits of Coriandrum sativum var. microcarpum DC. and Coriandrum sativum var. sativum

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolay Dyulgerov; Boryana Dyulgerova

    2014-01-01

    In this investigation we studied how yield-related traits of large-fruited (var. sativum) and small-fruited (var. microcarpum DC.) coriander differ at the Southeastern Bulgaria climatic conditions during 2010-2012. For this purpose, 20 genotypes from var. microcarpum and 20 genotypes from var. sativum were tested using a randomized complete block design with three replications at the Institute of Agriculture – Karnobat. Plant height, number of primary branches per plant, number of umbels per ...

  16. Predawn and high intensity application of supplemental blue light decreases the quantum yield of PSII and enhances the amount of phenolic acids, flavonoids, and pigments in Lactuca sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounis, Theoharis; Razi Parjikolaei, Behnaz; Fretté, Xavier; Rosenqvist, Eva; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of blue light intensity and timing, two cultivars of lettuce [Lactuca sativa cv. "Batavia" (green) and cv. "Lollo Rossa" (red)] were grown in a greenhouse compartment in late winter under natural light and supplemental high pressure sodium (SON-T) lamps yielding 90 (±10) μmol m(-2) s(-1) for up to 20 h, but never between 17:00 and 21:00. The temperature in the greenhouse compartments was 22/11°C day/night, respectively. The five light-emitting diode (LED) light treatments were Control (no blue addition), 1B 06-08 (Blue light at 45 μmol m(-2) s(-1) from 06:00 to 08:00), 1B 21-08 (Blue light at 45 μmol m(-2) s(-1) from 21:00 to 08:00), 2B 17-19 (Blue at 80 μmol m(-2) s(-1) from 17:00 to 19:00), and 1B 17-19 (Blue at 45 μmol m(-2) s(-1) from 17:00 to 19:00). Total fresh and dry weight was not affected with additional blue light; however, plants treated with additional blue light were more compact. The stomatal conductance in the green lettuce cultivar was higher for all treatments with blue light compared to the Control. Photosynthetic yields measured with chlorophyll fluorescence showed different response between the cultivars; in red lettuce, the quantum yield of PSII decreased and the yield of non-photochemical quenching increased with increasing blue light, whereas in green lettuce no difference was observed. Quantification of secondary metabolites showed that all four treatments with additional blue light had higher amount of pigments, phenolic acids, and flavonoids compared to the Control. The effect was more prominent in red lettuce, highlighting that the results vary among treatments and compounds. Our results indicate that not only high light level triggers photoprotective heat dissipation in the plant, but also the specific spectral composition of the light itself at low intensities. However, these plant responses to light are cultivar dependent.

  17. Experimental Test of the State Estimation-Reversal Tradeoff Relation in General Quantum Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Chen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available When a measurement has limited strength, only partial information, regarding the initial state, is extracted, and, correspondingly, there is a probability to reverse its effect on the system and retrieve the original state. Recently, a clear and direct quantitative description of this complementary relationship, in terms of a tradeoff relation, was developed by Y. K. Cheong and S. W. Lee. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 150402 (2012]. Here, this tradeoff relation is experimentally verified using polarization-encoded single photons from a quantum dot. Measurement operators representing a complete range, from not affecting the system to a projection to a single polarization state, are realized. In addition, for each measurement operator, an optimal reversal operator is also implemented. The upper bound of the tradeoff relation is mapped to experimental parameters representing the measurement strength. Our results complement the theoretical work and provide a hands-on characterization of general quantum measurements.

  18. Mathematica® for Theoretical Physics Electrodynamics, Quantum Mechanics, General Relativity and Fractals

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, Gerd

    2005-01-01

    Mathematica for Theoretical Physics: Electrodynamics, Quantum Mechanics, General Relativity, and Fractals This second edition of Baumann's Mathematica® in Theoretical Physics shows readers how to solve physical problems and deal with their underlying theoretical concepts while using Mathematica® to derive numeric and symbolic solutions. Each example and calculation can be evaluated by the reader, and the reader can change the example calculations and adopt the given code to related or similar problems. The second edition has been completely revised and expanded into two volumes: The first volume covers classical mechanics and nonlinear dynamics. Both topics are the basis of a regular mechanics course. The second volume covers electrodynamics, quantum mechanics, relativity, and fractals and fractional calculus. New examples have been added and the representation has been reworked to provide a more interactive problem-solving presentation. This book can be used as a textbook or as a reference work, by student...

  19. Genetic analysis of yield and yield related traits in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. under well-watered and water-stressed conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darvishzadeh Reza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Drought stress is one of the factors which influence sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. production. Breeding for tolerance to drought stress has become a major focus. In the present investigation, combining ability, gene action and genetic analysis of several characteristics were studied in six pure lines of sunflower and their 15 hybrids. The materials were evaluated in two separate experiments using a randomized complete block design (RCBD with three replications in two states (well-watered and water-stressed under controlled conditions. Comparison of mean values exhibited that under water- stressed condition the average performance of sunflower genotypes were decreased for all studied traits. In well-watered condition the highest value for seed yield per plant (SY was observed in the cross 'LR4´LR25', whereas in water-stressed condition the highest value for this trait was observed in the hybrid 'C104´LR25'. Combining ability analysis revealed that most of agronomical traits such as head diameter, number of achene per head, head weight and seed yield inherited differently in stressed and non-stressed conditions. In water-stressed conditions, the non-additive effects played a more important role for controlling the number of achene per head (NA, seed yield per plant (SY, head diameter (HD, and days from flowering to physiological maturity (DFM than additive. Based on results yield improvement for water-stressed conditions requires selection under drought conditions. In well-watered condition, the cross 'LR4´C10' showed the best SCA value for seed yield per plant (SY. In water-stressed conditions, 'RHA266´C100' had the highest SCA for seed yield per plant (SY and number of achene (NA per head.

  20. Effect of relative humidity and temperature on PVC degradation under gamma irradiation: Evolution of HCl production Yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labed, V.; Obeid, H.; Ressayre, K.

    2013-03-01

    The separate and combined effects of the relative humidity and temperature were investigated on the HCl production yields arising from two types of PVC subjected to gamma irradiation (pure PVC and PVC formulated with plasticizing additives). The test procedure developed included experiments performed at different dose rates (400 Gy h-1 and 4 kGy h-1), temperatures (room temperature and 70 °C) and relative humidity values (plasticized PVC at low dose rates, raising the temperature increases the HCl production by a factor of about 1.3, with either low or high relative humidity. For pure PVC, depending on the humidity and dose rate, G(HCl) varies differently with the temperature: at low humidity and low dose rates, G(HCl) increases by a factor of 1.7 for a 45 °C temperature increase; at high humidity, the same temperature increase does not result in a significant increase of G(HCl). The influence of the relative humidity on HCl production has not been clearly identified and interpreted. The relative humidity appears to be a factor limiting the effects of temperature on the formation of HCl from pure PVC at high dose rates. The G values remain constant and even diminish under some experimental conditions. For plasticized PVC, the relative humidity has no influence on the HCl production yields.

  1. Determination of the relative branching ratios for panti p yields. pi. sup +. pi. sup - and panti p yields K sup + K sup -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, R.; Angelopoulos, A.; Apostolakis, A.; Aslanides, E.; Backenstoss, G.; Bee, C.P.; Bennet, J.; Bloch, P.; Bula, C.; Burgun, C.; Carlson, P.; Carvalho, J.; Chardalas, M.; Charalambous, S.; Cobbaert, H.; Dedoussis, S.; Dejardin, M.; Derre, J.; Dodgson, M.; Dousse, J.C.; Duclos, J.; Ealet, A.; Eckart, B.; Faravel, L.; Fassnacht, P.; Faure, J.L.; Felder, C.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fetscher, W.; Fidecaro, M.; Filipcic, A.; Francis, D.; Fry, J.R.; Fuglesang, C.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Garreta, D.; Geralis, T.; Gerber, H.J.; Go, A.; Gumplinger, P.; Guyot, C.; Harrison, P.F.; Hayman, P.J.; Heyes, W.G.; Hollander, R.W.; Johner, H.U.; Jon-And, K.; Jansson, K.; Kerek, A.; Kern, J.; Kettle, P.R.; Kochowski, C.; Kokkas, P.; Kossionides, E.; Kreuger, R.; Lawry, T.; Le Gac, R.; Machado, E.; Maley, P.; Manthos, N.; Marel, G.; Marotte, P.; Mikuz, M.; Miller, J.; Montanet, F.; Nakada, T.; Onofre, A.; Pagels, B.; Paradelis, T.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Pelucchi, F.; Pinto da Cunha, J.; Policarpo, A.; Po; CPLEAR Collaboration

    1991-09-05

    The ratio of the branching fractions for panti p{yields}K{sup +}K{sup -} and panti p{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} was determined with the CPLEAR detector, by stopping antiprotons in a gaseous hydrogen target at 15 bar pressure. It was found to be BR (K{sup +}K{sup -})/BR({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})=0.205{+-}0.016. The fraction of P-wave annihilation at rest at this target density was deduced to be (38{+-}9)%. (orig.).

  2. Intrinsic Time Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hoi Lai

    2016-01-01

    Correct identification of the true gauge symmetry of General Relativity being 3d spatial diffeomorphism invariant(3dDI) (not the conventional infinite tensor product group with principle fibre bundle structure), together with intrinsic time extracted from clean decomposition of the canonical structure yields a self-consistent theory of quantum gravity. A new set of fundamental commutation relations is also presented. The basic variables are the eight components of the unimodular part of the spatial dreibein and eight SU(3) generators which correspond to Klauder's momentric variables that characterize a free theory of quantum gravity. The commutation relations are not canonical, but have well defined group theoretical meanings. All fundamental entities are dimensionless; and the quantum wave functionals are preferentially in the dreibein representation. The successful quantum theory of gravity involves only broad spectrum of knowledge and deep insights but no exotic idea.

  3. Exact mass-coupling relation of the simplest multi-scale quantum integrable model

    CERN Document Server

    Bajnok, Zoltan; Ito, Katsushi; Satoh, Yuji; Tóth, Gábor Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    We derive the exact mass-coupling relation of the simplest multi-scale quantum integrable model, i.e., the homogeneous sine-Gordon model with two mass scales. The relation is obtained by comparing the perturbed conformal field theory description of the model valid at short distances to the large distance bootstrap description based on the model's integrability. In particular, we find a differential equation for the relation by constructing conserved tensor currents which satisfy a generalization of the $\\Theta$ sum rule Ward identity. The mass-coupling relation is written in terms of hypergeometric functions.

  4. Development of heat and drought related extreme weather events and their effect on winter wheat yields in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüttger, Andrea B.; Feike, Til

    2017-02-01

    Climate change constitutes a major challenge for high productivity in wheat, the most widely grown crop in Germany. Extreme weather events including dry spells and heat waves, which negatively affect wheat yields, are expected to aggravate in the future. It is crucial to improve the understanding of the spatiotemporal development of such extreme weather events and the respective crop-climate relationships in Germany. Thus, the present study is a first attempt to evaluate the historic development of relevant drought and heat-related extreme weather events from 1901 to 2010 on county level (NUTS-3) in Germany. Three simple drought indices and two simple heat stress indices were used in the analysis. A continuous increase in dry spells over time was observed over the investigated periods from 1901-1930, 1931-1960, 1961-1990 to 2001-2010. Short and medium dry spells, i.e., precipitation-free periods longer than 5 and 8 days, respectively, increased more strongly compared to longer dry spells (longer than 11 days). The heat-related stress indices with maximum temperatures above 25 and 28 °C during critical wheat growth phases showed no significant increase over the first three periods but an especially sharp increase in the final 1991-2010 period with the increases being particularly pronounced in parts of Southwestern Germany. Trend analysis over the entire 110-year period using Mann-Kendall test revealed a significant positive trend for all investigated indices except for heat stress above 25 °C during flowering period. The analysis of county-level yield data from 1981 to 2010 revealed declining spatial yield variability and rather constant temporal yield variability over the three investigated (1981-1990, 1991-2000, and 2001-2010) decades. A clear spatial gradient manifested over time with variability in the West being much smaller than in the east of Germany. Correlating yield variability with the previously analyzed extreme weather indices revealed strong

  5. QTL analysis of novel genomic regions associated with yield and yield related traits in new plant type based recombinant inbred lines of rice (Oryza sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marathi Balram

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rice is staple food for more than half of the world’s population including two billion Asians, who obtain 60-70% of their energy intake from rice and its derivatives. To meet the growing demand from human population, rice varieties with higher yield potential and greater yield stability need to be developed. The favourable alleles for yield and yield contributing traits are distributed among two subspecies i.e., indica and japonica of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.. Identification of novel favourable alleles in indica/japonica will pave way to marker-assisted mobilization of these alleles in to a genetic background to break genetic barriers to yield. Results A new plant type (NPT based mapping population of 310 recombinant inbred lines (RILs was used to map novel genomic regions and QTL hotspots influencing yield and eleven yield component traits. We identified major quantitative trait loci (QTLs for days to 50% flowering (R2 = 25%, LOD = 14.3, panicles per plant (R2 = 19%, LOD = 9.74, flag leaf length (R2 = 22%, LOD = 3.05, flag leaf width (R2 = 53%, LOD = 46.5, spikelets per panicle (R2 = 16%, LOD = 13.8, filled grains per panicle (R2 = 22%, LOD = 15.3, percent spikelet sterility (R2 = 18%, LOD = 14.24, thousand grain weight (R2 = 25%, LOD = 12.9 and spikelet setting density (R2 = 23%, LOD = 15 expressing over two or more locations by using composite interval mapping. The phenotypic variation (R2 ranged from 8 to 53% for eleven QTLs expressing across all three locations. 19 novel QTLs were contributed by the NPT parent, Pusa1266. 15 QTL hotpots on eight chromosomes were identified for the correlated traits. Six epistatic QTLs effecting five traits at two locations were identified. A marker interval (RM3276-RM5709 on chromosome 4 harboring major QTLs for four traits was identified. Conclusions The present study reveals that favourable alleles for

  6. Development of Oryza rufipogon and O. sativa Introgression Lines and Assessment for Yield-related Quantitative Trait Loci

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lubin Tan; Fengxia Liu; Wei Xue; Guijuan Wang; Sheng Ye; Zuofeng Zhu; Yongcai Fu; Xiangkun Wang; Chuanqing Sun

    2007-01-01

    Introgression lines population was effectively used in mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs), identifying favorable genes, discovering hidden genetic variation, evaluating the action or interaction of QTLs in multiple conditions and providing the favorable experimental materials for plant breeding and genetic research. In this study, an advanced backcross and consecutive selfing strategy was used to develop introgression lines (ILs), which derived from an accession of Oryza rufipogon Griff, collected from Yuanjiang County, Yunnan Province of China, as the donor, and an elite indica cultivar Teqing (O. sativa L.), as the recipient. Introgression segments from O. rufipogon were screened using 179 polymorphic simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers in the genome of each IL. Introgressed segments carried by the introgression lines population contained 120 ILs covering the whole O. rufipogon genome. The mean number of homozygous O. rufipogon segments per introgression line was about 3.88. The average length of introgressed segments was approximate 25.5 cM, and about 20.8% of these segments had sizes less than 10 cM. The genome of each IL harbored the chromosomal fragments of O. rufipogon ranging from 0.54% to 23.7%, with an overall average of 5.79%. At each locus, the ratio of substitution of O. rufipogon alleles had a range of 1.67-9.33, with an average of 5.50. A wide range of alterations in morphological and yield-related traits were also found in the introgression lines population. Using single-point analysis, a total of 37 putative QTLs for yield and yield components were detected at two sites with 7%-20% explaining the phenotypic variance. Nineteen QTLs (51.4%) were detected at both sites, and the alleles from O. rufipogon at fifteen loci (40.5%) improved the yield and yield components in the Teqing background. These O. rufipogon-O. sativa introgression lines will serve as genetic materials for identifying and using favorable genes from common wild rice.

  7. Integrability of a family of quantum field theories related to sigma models

    CERN Document Server

    Ridout, D

    2011-01-01

    A method is introduced for constructing lattice discretizations of large classes of integrable quantum field theories. The method proceeds in two steps: The quantum algebraic structure underlying the integrability of the model is determined from the algebra of the interaction terms in the light-cone representation. The representation theory of the relevant quantum algebra is then used to construct the basic ingredients of the quantum inverse scattering method, the lattice Lax matrices and R-matrices. This method is illustrated with four examples: The Sinh-Gordon model, the affine sl(3) Toda model, a model called the fermionic sl(2|1) Toda theory, and the N=2 supersymmetric Sine-Gordon model. These models are all related to sigma models in various ways. The N=2 supersymmetric Sine-Gordon model, in particular, describes the Pohlmeyer reduction of string theory on AdS_2 x S^2, and is dual to a supersymmetric non-linear sigma model with a sausage-shaped target space.

  8. Integrability of a family of quantum field theories related to sigma models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridout, David, E-mail: david.ridout@anu.edu.au [Department of Theoretical Physics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Theory Group, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603, Hamburg (Germany); Teschner, Joerg [Theory Group, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603, Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-12-11

    A method is introduced for constructing lattice discretizations of large classes of integrable quantum field theories. The method proceeds in two steps: The quantum algebraic structure underlying the integrability of the model is determined from the algebra of the interaction terms in the light-cone representation. The representation theory of the relevant quantum algebra is then used to construct the basic ingredients of the quantum inverse scattering method, the lattice Lax matrices and R-matrices. This method is illustrated with four examples: The sinh-Gordon model, the affine sl(3) Toda model, a model called the fermionic sl(2|1) Toda theory, and the N=2 supersymmetric sine-Gordon model. These models are all related to sigma models in various ways. The N=2 supersymmetric sine-Gordon model, in particular, describes the Pohlmeyer reduction of string theory on AdS{sub 2}xS{sup 2}, and is dual to a supersymmetric non-linear sigma model with a sausage-shaped target space.

  9. Integrability of a family of quantum field theories related to sigma models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridout, David [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Dept. of Theoretical Physics; DESY, Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Teschner, Joerg [DESY, Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group

    2011-03-15

    A method is introduced for constructing lattice discretizations of large classes of integrable quantum field theories. The method proceeds in two steps: The quantum algebraic structure underlying the integrability of the model is determined from the algebra of the interaction terms in the light-cone representation. The representation theory of the relevant quantum algebra is then used to construct the basic ingredients of the quantum inverse scattering method, the lattice Lax matrices and R-matrices. This method is illustrated with four examples: The Sinh-Gordon model, the affine sl(3) Toda model, a model called the fermionic sl(2 vertical stroke 1) Toda theory, and the N=2 supersymmetric Sine-Gordon model. These models are all related to sigma models in various ways. The N=2 supersymmetric Sine-Gordon model, in particular, describes the Pohlmeyer reduction of string theory on AdS{sub 2} x S{sup 2}, and is dual to a supersymmetric non-linear sigma model with a sausage-shaped target space. (orig.)

  10. A Facile and Low-Cost Method to Enhance the Internal Quantum Yield and External Light-Extraction Efficiency for Flexible Light-Emitting Carbon-Dot Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Z. C.; Lin, T. N.; Lin, H. T.; Talite, M. J.; Tzeng, T. T.; Hsu, C. L.; Chiu, K. P.; Lin, C. A. J.; Shen, J. L.; Yuan, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Solution-processed, non-toxic carbon dots (CDs) have attracted much attention due to their unique photoluminescence (PL) properties. They are promising emissive layers for flexible light-emitting devices. To this end, the CDs in pristine aqueous solutions need to be transferred to form solid-state thin films without sacrificing their original PL characteristics. Unfortunately, solid-state PL quenching induced by extra non-radiative (NR) energy transfer among CDs would significantly hinder their practical applications in optoelectronics. Here, a facile, low-cost and effective method has been utilized to fabricate high-performance CD/polymer light-emitting flexible films with submicron-structured patterns. The patterned polymers can serve as a solid matrix to disperse and passivate CDs, thus achieving high internal quantum yields of 61%. In addition, they can act as an out-coupler to mitigate the waveguide-mode losses, approximately doubling the external light-extraction efficiency. Such CD/polymer composites also exhibit good photo-stability, and thus can be used as eco-friendly, low-cost phosphors for solid-state lighting.

  11. Host-Guest Chemistry between Perylene Diimide (PDI) Derivatives and 18-Crown-6: Enhancement in Luminescence Quantum Yield and Electrical Conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasitha, P; Prasad, Edamana

    2016-07-18

    Perylene diimide (PDI) derivatives exhibit a high propensity for aggregation, which causes the aggregation-induced quenching of emission from the system. Host-guest chemistry is one of the best-known methods for preventing aggregation through the encapsulation of guest molecules. Herein we report the use of 18-crown-6 (18-C-6) as a host system to disaggregate suitably substituted PDI derivatives in methanol. 18-C-6 formed complexes with amino-substituted PDIs in methanol, which led to disaggregation and enhanced emission from the systems. Furthermore, the embedding of the PDI⋅18-C-6 complexes in poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) films generated remarkably high emission quantum yields (60-70 %) from the PDI derivatives. More importantly, the host-guest systems were tested for their ability to conduct electricity in PVA films. The electrical conductivities of the self-assembled systems in PVA were measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and the highest conductivity observed was 2.42×10(-5)  S cm(-1) .

  12. Synthesis and characterization of (3-Aminopropyl)trimethoxy-silane (APTMS) functionalized Gd2O3:Eu3+ red phosphor with enhanced quantum yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Akhil; Hirata, G. A.; Farías, M. H.; Castillón, F. F.

    2016-02-01

    We report the surface modification of nanocrystalline Gd2O3:Eu3+ phosphor by (3-Aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane (APTMS). The nanoparticles were first coated with silica using the Stöber process, and then annealed at 650 °C for 2 h. Afterwards, APTMS was functionalized onto the silica layer to obtain Gd2O3:Eu3+ nanoparticles bearing amine groups on the surface. The effect of silica coating, and the subsequent annealing process on the crystallization of the nanophosphor were analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) confirmed the presence of a silica layer of ∼45 nm thickness. X-ray photoelectron (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy confirmed the presence of silica and the amine groups. Photoluminescence (PL) analysis demonstrated an increased emission after functionalization of nanoparticles. Absolute quantum yield (QY) measurements revealed an 18% enhancement in QY in functionalized nanoparticles compared with unmodified nanoparticles, which is of great importance for their biomedical applications.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of (3-Aminopropyl)trimethoxy-silane (APTMS) functionalized Gd2O3:Eu(3+) red phosphor with enhanced quantum yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Akhil; Hirata, G A; Farías, M H; Castillón, F F

    2016-02-12

    We report the surface modification of nanocrystalline Gd2O3:Eu(3+) phosphor by (3-Aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane (APTMS). The nanoparticles were first coated with silica using the Stöber process, and then annealed at 650 °C for 2 h. Afterwards, APTMS was functionalized onto the silica layer to obtain Gd2O3:Eu(3+) nanoparticles bearing amine groups on the surface. The effect of silica coating, and the subsequent annealing process on the crystallization of the nanophosphor were analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) confirmed the presence of a silica layer of ∼45 nm thickness. X-ray photoelectron (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy confirmed the presence of silica and the amine groups. Photoluminescence (PL) analysis demonstrated an increased emission after functionalization of nanoparticles. Absolute quantum yield (QY) measurements revealed an 18% enhancement in QY in functionalized nanoparticles compared with unmodified nanoparticles, which is of great importance for their biomedical applications.

  14. A Brown Mesoporous TiO2-x /MCF Composite with an Extremely High Quantum Yield of Solar Energy Photocatalysis for H2 Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Mingyang; Zhang, Jinlong; Qiu, Bocheng; Tian, Baozhu; Anpo, Masakazu; Che, Michel

    2015-04-24

    A brown mesoporous TiO2-x /MCF composite with a high fluorine dopant concentration (8.01 at%) is synthesized by a vacuum activation method. It exhibits an excellent solar absorption and a record-breaking quantum yield (Φ = 46%) and a high photon-hydrogen energy conversion efficiency (η = 34%,) for solar photocatalytic H2 production, which are all higher than that of the black hydrogen-doped TiO2 (Φ = 35%, η = 24%). The MCFs serve to improve the adsorption of F atoms onto the TiO2 /MCF composite surface, which after the formation of oxygen vacancies by vacuum activation, facilitate the abundant substitution of these vacancies with F atoms. The decrease of recombination sites induced by high-concentration F doping and the synergistic effect between lattice Ti(3+)-F and surface Ti(3+)-F are responsible for the enhanced lifetime of electrons, the observed excellent absorption of solar light, and the photocatalytic production of H2 for these catalysts. The as-prepared F-doped composite is an ideal solar light-driven photocatalyst with great potential for applications ranging from the remediation of environmental pollution to the harnessing of solar energy for H2 production.

  15. How the instant collapse of a spatially-extended quantum state is consistent with the relativity of simultaneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayngold, Moses

    2016-11-01

    A thought experiment is considered on the observation of the instantaneous collapse of an extended wave packet. According to the relativity of simultaneity, such a collapse being instantaneous in some reference frame must be a lasting process in other frames. But according to quantum mechanics, collapse is instantaneous in any frame. The probabilistic nature of quantum-mechanical phenomena eliminates any contradictions between these two apparently conflicting statements. It is shown that the consistency of quantum collapse with relativity follows directly from the Born postulate without any use of mathematical properties of quantum operators, which allows us to discuss this topic in an introductory course of modern physics. The consistency of quantum mechanics with relativity is also shown for instant disentanglement of an extended composite system.

  16. Impurity-related nonlinear optical properties in delta-doped quantum rings: Electric field effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Restrepo, R.L., E-mail: rrestre@gmail.com [Escuela de Ingeniería de Antioquia-EIA, Medellín (Colombia); Grupo de Materia Condensada-UdeA, Instituto de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Morales, A.L. [Grupo de Materia Condensada-UdeA, Instituto de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Martínez-Orozco, J.C. [Unidad Académica de Física, Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, CP 98060, Zacatecas (Mexico); Baghramyan, H.M.; Barseghyan, M.G. [Department of Solid State Physics, Yerevan State University, Al. Manookian 1, 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Mora-Ramos, M.E. [Grupo de Materia Condensada-UdeA, Instituto de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Ave. Universidad 1001, CP 62209, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Duque, C.A. [Grupo de Materia Condensada-UdeA, Instituto de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia)

    2014-11-15

    Using a variational procedure within the effective mass approximation, we have calculated the donor impurity binding energy for the ground (1s-like) and the excited (2p{sub z}-like) states as well as the impurity-related nonlinear optical absorption and relative changes in the refraction index in a GaAs single quantum ring with axial n-type delta-doping. The delta-like potential along the z-direction is an approximate model analytically described using a Lorentzian function with two parameters. Additionally we consider the application of an electric field along the z-direction. It is found that the changes in the geometry of the quantum ring, the change in the 2D impurity density of the delta-like doping, and different values of the electric field lead to a shifting of the resonant peaks of the optical responses spectrum.

  17. Relative locality in a quantum spacetime and the pregeometry of $\\kappa$-Minkowski

    CERN Document Server

    Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni; Rosati, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    We develop a new description of the much-studied $\\kappa$-Minkowski noncommutative spacetime, centered on representing on a single Hilbert space not only the $\\kappa$-Minkowski coordinates, but also the associated differential calculus and the $\\kappa$-Poincar\\'e symmetry generators. In this "pregeometric" representation the relevant operators act on the kinematical Hilbert space of the covariant formulation of quantum mechanics, which we argue is the natural framework for studying the implications of the step from commuting spacetime coordinates to the $\\kappa$-Minkowski case, where the spatial coordinates do not commute with the time coordinate. The empowerment provided by this kinematical-Hilbert space representation allows us to give a crisp characterization of the "fuzziness" of $\\kappa$-Minkowski spacetime, whose most striking aspect is a relativity of spacetime locality. We show that relative locality, which had been previously formulated exclusively in classical-spacetime setups, for a quantum spaceti...

  18. A strong astrophysical constraint on the violation of special relativity by quantum gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, T; Liberati, S; Mattingly, D

    2003-08-28

    Special relativity asserts that physical phenomena appear the same to all unaccelerated observers. This is called Lorentz symmetry and relates long wavelengths to short ones: if the symmetry is exact it implies that space-time must look the same at all length scales. Several approaches to quantum gravity, however, suggest that there may be a microscopic structure of space-time that leads to a violation of Lorentz symmetry. This might arise because of the discreteness or non-commutivity of space-time, or through the action of extra dimensions. Here we determine a very strong constraint on a type of Lorentz violation that produces a maximum electron speed less than the speed of light. We use the observation of 100-MeV synchrotron radiation from the Crab nebula to improve the previous limit by a factor of 40 million, ruling out this type of Lorentz violation, and thereby providing an important constraint on theories of quantum gravity.

  19. Dynamical Relation between Quantum Squeezing and Entanglement in Coupled Harmonic Oscillator System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lock Yue Chew

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate into the numerical and analytical relationship between the dynamically generated quadrature squeezing and entanglement within a coupled harmonic oscillator system. The dynamical relation between these two quantum features is observed to vary monotically, such that an enhancement in entanglement is attained at a fixed squeezing for a larger coupling constant. Surprisingly, the maximum attainable values of these two quantum entities are found to consistently equal to the squeezing and entanglement of the system ground state. In addition, we demonstrate that the inclusion of a small anharmonic perturbation has the effect of modifying the squeezing versus entanglement relation into a nonunique form and also extending the maximum squeezing to a value beyond the system ground state.

  20. a Topological Extension of General Relativity to Explore the Nature of Quantum Spacetime, Dark Energy and Inflation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaans, M.

    2013-01-01

    General Relativity is extended into the quantum domain. A thought experiment is explored to derive a specific topological build-up for Planckian spacetime. The presented arguments are inspired by Feynman's path integral for superposition and Wheeler's quantum foam of Planck mass mini black holes (BH

  1. A Topological Extension of General Relativity to Explore the Nature of Quantum Spacetime, Dark Energy and Inflation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaans, M.

    2013-01-01

    General Relativity is extended into the quantum domain. A thought experiment is explored to derive a specific topological build-up for Planckian spacetime. The presented arguments are inspired by Feynman's path integral for superposition and Wheeler's quantum foam of Planck mass mini black holes (BH

  2. Deficit irrigation and rootstock: their effects on water relations, vegetative development, yield, fruit quality and mineral nutrition of Clemenules mandarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, P; Navarro, J M; Pérez-Pérez, J; García-Sánchez, F; Gómez-Gómez, A; Porras, I; Martinez, V; Botía, P

    2006-12-01

    Differences between rootstocks, 'Cleopatra' mandarin and 'Carrizo' citrange, in soil-plant water relations and the influence of these factors on vigor, crop yield, fruit quality and mineral nutrition were evaluated in field-grown Clemenules mandarin trees irrigated at 100% of potential seasonal evaporation (ET(c)) (control treatment), or irrigated at 100% ET(c), except during Phases I and III of fruit growth and post-harvest when no irrigation was applied (deficit irrigation (DI) treatment), for 3 years. Differences between rootstocks in plant-soil water relations were the primary cause of differences among trees in vegetative development and fruit yield. After 3 years of DI treatment, trees on 'Cleopatra' showed more efficient soil water extraction than trees on 'Carrizo', and maintained a higher plant water status, a higher gas exchange rate during periods of water stress and achieved faster recovery in gas exchange following irrigation after water stress. The DI treatment reduced vegetative development more in trees on 'Carrizo' than in trees on 'Cleopatra'. Cumulative fruit yield decreased more in DI trees on 'Carrizo' (40%) than on 'Cleopatra' (27%). The yield component most affected by DI in 'Cleopatra' was the number of fruit, whereas in 'Carrizo' it depended on the severity of water stress reached in each phase (severe water stress in Phase I affected mainly the number of fruit, whereas it affected fruit size the most in Phase III). In the third year of DI treatment, water-use efficiency decreased sharply in trees on 'Carrizo' (70%) compared to trees on 'Cleopatra' (30%). Thus, trees on 'Cleopatra' were able to tolerate moderate water stress, whereas trees on 'Carrizo' were more sensitive to changes in soil water content.

  3. Bounds for reference-frame independent protocols in quantum cryptography using generalized uncertainty relations

    CERN Document Server

    Le, Thinh Phuc; Scarani, Valerio

    2011-01-01

    We define a family of reference-frame-independent quantum cryptography protocols for arbitrary dimensional signals. The generalized entropic uncertainty relations [M. Tomamichel and R. Renner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 110506 (2011)] are used for the first time to derive security bounds for protocols which use more than two measurements and combine the statistics in a non-linear parameter. This shows the power and versatility of this technique compared to the heavier, though usually tighter, conventional techniques.

  4. Transverse Ward-Takahashi Relation for the Vector Vertex in Quantum Field Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Han-Xin

    2001-01-01

    The transverse Ward-Takahashi (W-T) relation for the vector vertex in quantum field theory is derived by calculating the curl of the time-ordered product of the three-point function including the vector current operator. This provides the constraint on the transverse part of the vertex. By combining the transverse and normal (longitudinal)W-T identities, we obtain the expression for the full vector vertex function.``

  5. Position-momentum uncertainty relations in the presence of quantum memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furrer, Fabian, E-mail: furrer@eve.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Berta, Mario [Institute for Quantum Information and Matter, Caltech, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 27, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Tomamichel, Marco [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney 2006 (Australia); Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Scholz, Volkher B. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 27, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Christandl, Matthias [Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 27, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2014-12-15

    A prominent formulation of the uncertainty principle identifies the fundamental quantum feature that no particle may be prepared with certain outcomes for both position and momentum measurements. Often the statistical uncertainties are thereby measured in terms of entropies providing a clear operational interpretation in information theory and cryptography. Recently, entropic uncertainty relations have been used to show that the uncertainty can be reduced in the presence of entanglement and to prove security of quantum cryptographic tasks. However, much of this recent progress has been focused on observables with only a finite number of outcomes not including Heisenberg’s original setting of position and momentum observables. Here, we show entropic uncertainty relations for general observables with discrete but infinite or continuous spectrum that take into account the power of an entangled observer. As an illustration, we evaluate the uncertainty relations for position and momentum measurements, which is operationally significant in that it implies security of a quantum key distribution scheme based on homodyne detection of squeezed Gaussian states.

  6. Relational evolution of effectively interacting group field theory quantum gravity condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pithis, Andreas G. A.; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2017-03-01

    We study the impact of effective interactions onto relationally evolving group field theory (GFT) condensates based on real-valued fields. In a first step we show that a free condensate configuration in an isotropic restriction settles dynamically into a low-spin configuration of the quantum geometry. This goes hand in hand with the accelerated and exponential expansion of its volume, as well as the vanishing of its relative uncertainty which suggests the classicalization of the quantum geometry. The dynamics of the emergent space can then be given in terms of the classical Friedmann equations. In contrast to models based on complex-valued fields, solutions avoiding the singularity problem can only be found if the initial conditions are appropriately chosen. We then turn to the analysis of the influence of effective interactions on the dynamics by studying in particular the Thomas-Fermi regime. In this context, at the cost of fine-tuning, an epoch of inflationary expansion of quantum geometric origin can be implemented. Finally, and for the first time, we study anisotropic GFT condensate configurations and show that such systems tend to isotropize quickly as the value of the relational clock grows. This paves the way to a more systematic investigation of anisotropies in the context of GFT condensate cosmology.

  7. Comparison of humus balance methods in relation with yields of monoculture spring barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Dubec

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Long term stationary field experiments with continuous spring barley were conducted in the maize-growing region on heavy gleic fluvisol from 1974 to 2002. Two variants of straw management (straw harvested and incorporated into soil, two variants of soil tillage (conventional plough tillage to 0.22 m, shallow disc tillage to 0.12–0.15 m and three variants of fertilization (30, 60 and 90 kg. N ha–1 were studied. The results of organic matter balance in the examinated period according to particular methods were related to trends of real humus content which is presented in Cox in particular experiment variants. The examinated method by LEITHOLD et al. (1997, used in model Repro, answers most accurate in given conditions according to hypothesys defined in scientific literature. On the base of this result we can confirm significancy of the result. Other verification of method is appropriate for its using in real conditions in context of agricultural sustainability assesment.

  8. Investigations of mammary and uterine blood flow in relation to milk yield, postpartum disease, and pregnancy result in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, H; Lietzau, M; Tichy, A; Herzog, K

    2016-11-01

    The objective was to determine the blood flow variables in the uterine arteries and the pudendoepigastric trunks, which supply the mammary gland, and relate these variables to the occurrence of uterine disease, milk yield, and pregnancy result. To achieve this, 119 multiparous German Holstein cows were examined using color Doppler sonography once during the dry period and on Days 7, 14, 28, 42, 56, 66, 76, 86, and 96 postpartum (pp). Cows with retained fetal membranes or metritis had a higher blood flow volume and time-averaged maximum velocity and a lower pulsatility index in the uterine arteries on Days 7, 14 and 28 pp (P blood flow volume in the pudendoepigastric trunks on examination Days 7 to 96 pp with the exception of Day 76 (P perfusion. Increased uterine perfusion in cows with retained fetal membrane and metritis may be due to increased uterine size attributable to delayed involution. High mammary perfusion in high-yielding cows is due to an increased demand for nutrients and oxygen. Color Doppler sonography is a useful method for the investigation of the effect of uterine disease on uterine blood flow and of the effect of milk yield on mammary perfusion.

  9. Comparative analysis of mycobacterium and related actinomycetes yields insight into the evolution of mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGuire Abigail

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sequence of the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb strain H37Rv has been available for over a decade, but the biology of the pathogen remains poorly understood. Genome sequences from other Mtb strains and closely related bacteria present an opportunity to apply the power of comparative genomics to understand the evolution of Mtb pathogenesis. We conducted a comparative analysis using 31 genomes from the Tuberculosis Database (TBDB.org, including 8 strains of Mtb and M. bovis, 11 additional Mycobacteria, 4 Corynebacteria, 2 Streptomyces, Rhodococcus jostii RHA1, Nocardia farcinia, Acidothermus cellulolyticus, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Propionibacterium acnes, and Bifidobacterium longum. Results Our results highlight the functional importance of lipid metabolism and its regulation, and reveal variation between the evolutionary profiles of genes implicated in saturated and unsaturated fatty acid metabolism. It also suggests that DNA repair and molybdopterin cofactors are important in pathogenic Mycobacteria. By analyzing sequence conservation and gene expression data, we identify nearly 400 conserved noncoding regions. These include 37 predicted promoter regulatory motifs, of which 14 correspond to previously validated motifs, as well as 50 potential noncoding RNAs, of which we experimentally confirm the expression of four. Conclusions Our analysis of protein evolution highlights gene families that are associated with the adaptation of environmental Mycobacteria to obligate pathogenesis. These families include fatty acid metabolism, DNA repair, and molybdopterin biosynthesis. Our analysis reinforces recent findings suggesting that small noncoding RNAs are more common in Mycobacteria than previously expected. Our data provide a foundation for understanding the genome and biology of Mtb in a comparative context, and are available online and through TBDB.org.

  10. Prediction of the competitive effects of weeds on crop yields based on the relative leaf area of weeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lotz, L. A. P.; Christensen, Svend; Cloutier, D.

    1996-01-01

    L.) and in 11 experiments in spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Most data sets were heller described by a model based on the relative leaf area of the weed than by a hyperbolic model based on weed density. This leaf area model accounted for (part of) the effect of different emerging times of the S....... alba whereas the density model did not. A parameter that allows the maximum yield loss to be smaller than 100% was mostly not needed to describe the effects of weed competition. The parameter that denotes the competitiveness of the weed species with respect to the crop decreased the later the relative...... leaf area of the mustard was determined. This decrease could be estimated from the differences in relative growth rate of the leaf area of crop and S. alba. However, the accuracy of this estimation was poor. The parameter value of the leaf area model varied considerably between sites and years...

  11. Tight Uniform Continuity Bounds for Quantum Entropies: Conditional Entropy, Relative Entropy Distance and Energy Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    We present a bouquet of continuity bounds for quantum entropies, falling broadly into two classes: first, a tight analysis of the Alicki-Fannes continuity bounds for the conditional von Neumann entropy, reaching almost the best possible form that depends only on the system dimension and the trace distance of the states. Almost the same proof can be used to derive similar continuity bounds for the relative entropy distance from a convex set of states or positive operators. As applications, we give new proofs, with tighter bounds, of the asymptotic continuity of the relative entropy of entanglement, E R , and its regularization {E_R^{∞}}, as well as of the entanglement of formation, E F . Using a novel "quantum coupling" of density operators, which may be of independent interest, we extend the latter to an asymptotic continuity bound for the regularized entanglement of formation, aka entanglement cost, {E_C=E_F^{∞}}. Second, we derive analogous continuity bounds for the von Neumann entropy and conditional entropy in infinite dimensional systems under an energy constraint, most importantly systems of multiple quantum harmonic oscillators. While without an energy bound the entropy is discontinuous, it is well-known to be continuous on states of bounded energy. However, a quantitative statement to that effect seems not to have been known. Here, under some regularity assumptions on the Hamiltonian, we find that, quite intuitively, the Gibbs entropy at the given energy roughly takes the role of the Hilbert space dimension in the finite-dimensional Fannes inequality.

  12. Quantum field theory with a preferred direction: The very special relativity framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-Yang

    2016-02-01

    The theory of very special relativity (VSR) proposed by Cohen and Glashow contains an intrinsic preferred direction. Starting from the irreducible unitary representation of the inhomogeneous VSR group I S I M (2 ), we present a rigorous construction of quantum field theory with a preferred direction. We find that although the particles and their quantum fields between the VSR and Lorentz sectors are physically different, they share many similarities. The massive spin-half and spin-one vector fields are local and satisfy the Dirac and Proca equations, respectively. This result can be generalized to higher-spin field theories. By studying the Yukawa and standard gauge interactions, we obtain a qualitative understanding on the effects of the preferred direction. Its effect is manifest for polarized processes but are otherwise absent.

  13. Lagrangian quantum field theory in momentum picture. IV. Commutation relations for free fields

    CERN Document Server

    Iliev, Bozhidar Z

    2007-01-01

    Possible (algebraic) commutation relations in the Lagrangian quantum theory of free (scalar, spinor and vector) fields are considered from mathematical view-point. As sources of these relations are employed the Heisenberg equations/relations for the dynamical variables and a specific condition for uniqueness of the operators of the dynamical variables (with respect to some class of Lagrangians). The paracommutation relations or some their generalizations are pointed as the most general ones that entail the validity of all Heisenberg equations. The simultaneous fulfillment of the Heisenberg equations and the uniqueness requirement turn to be impossible. This problem is solved via a redefinition of the dynamical variables, similar to the normal ordering procedure and containing it as a special case. That implies corresponding changes in the admissible commutation relations. The introduction of the concept of the vacuum makes narrow the class of the possible commutation relations; in particular, the mentioned re...

  14. Non-locality in quantum field theory due to general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmet, Xavier; Croon, Djuna; Fritz, Christopher [University of Sussex, Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    We show that general relativity coupled to a quantum field theory generically leads to non-local effects in the matter sector. These non-local effects can be described by non-local higher dimensional operators which remarkably have an approximate shift symmetry. When applied to inflationary models, our results imply that small non-Gaussianities are a generic feature of models based on general relativity coupled to matter fields. However, these effects are too small to be observable in the cosmic microwave background. (orig.)

  15. Equivalence of Quantum Field Theories related by the theta-exact Seiberg-Witten map

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Carmelo P; You, Jiangyang

    2016-01-01

    The equivalence of the noncommutative U(N) quantum field theories related by the theta-exact Seiberg-Witten maps is in this letter proven to all orders in the perturbation theory with respect to the coupling constant. We show that this duality holds for Super Yang-Mills theories with N=0,1,2,4 Supersymmetry. A direct check of this equivalence relation is performed at the one-loop in the noncommutative U(1) gauge theory with N=0,1,2,4 Supersymmetry.

  16. Non-locality in quantum field theory due to general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmet, Xavier, E-mail: x.calmet@sussex.ac.uk; Croon, Djuna, E-mail: d.croon@sussex.ac.uk; Fritz, Christopher, E-mail: c.fritz@sussex.ac.uk [Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Falmer, BN1 9QH, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-19

    We show that general relativity coupled to a quantum field theory generically leads to non-local effects in the matter sector. These non-local effects can be described by non-local higher dimensional operators which remarkably have an approximate shift symmetry. When applied to inflationary models, our results imply that small non-Gaussianities are a generic feature of models based on general relativity coupled to matter fields. However, these effects are too small to be observable in the cosmic microwave background.

  17. Biomass yield and energy analysis of soybean production in relation to fertilizer-NPK and organic manure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, K.G.; Hati, K.M.; Misra, A.K. [Division of Soil Physics, Indian Institute of Soil Science (ICAR), Nabibagh, Berasia Road, Bhopal 462 038, Madhya Pradesh (India)

    2009-12-15

    The study attempts to quantify the root biomass and density, nodulation, crop biomass and grain yield of soybean, to analyze crop growth and energy (renewable and non-renewable) inputs in relation to fertilizer-NPK and organic manure. Observations were recorded from soybean grown with no fertilizer, NPK and NPK + FYM (farmyard manure). The root biomass (BM{sub root}) increased significantly with NPK + FYM compared to NPK and control. The trend of BM{sub root} was best fitted with a third order polynomial. Root length density was higher in NPK + FYM. Biomass of stem, petiole and leaf were significantly greater in NPK + FYM than other treatments, relative contribution to total biomass at physiological maturity were stem 29%, petiole 9%, leaf 17% and pod 46%; quadratic regression models best represented the stem, petiole and leaf biomass data. A maximum LAI of 4.88, total biomass of 633 g m{sup -2} at maturity, CGR of 18.4 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} were recorded in NPK + FYM. Grain yields increased by 72.5 and 98.5%, and stover yields by 56.0 and 94.8% in NPK and NPK + FYM, respectively over control. Though the total energy input in NPK + FYM was greater than those in NPK and control, the share of renewable energy was much higher with greater net energy output and non-renewable energy productivity in NPK + FYM than NPK. The use efficiency of non-renewable energy was also higher in NPF + FYM. Thus, a combination of NPK-fertilizer and organic manure (FYM) could be the viable nutrient management option for soybean production. (author)

  18. Cupriphication of gold to sensitize d10–d10 metal–metal bonds and near-unity phosphorescence quantum yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galassi, Rossana; Ghimire, Mukunda M.; Otten, Brooke M.; Ricci, Simone; McDougald, Roy N.; Almotawa, Ruaa M.; Alhmoud, Dieaa; Ivy, Joshua F.; Rawashdeh, Abdel-Monem M.; Nesterov, Vladimir N.; Reinheimer, Eric W.; Daniels, Lee M.; Burini, Alfredo; Omary, Mohammad A.

    2017-01-01

    Outer-shell s0/p0 orbital mixing with d10 orbitals and symmetry reduction upon cupriphication of cyclic trinuclear trigonal-planar gold(I) complexes are found to sensitize ground-state Cu(I)–Au(I) covalent bonds and near-unity phosphorescence quantum yields. Heterobimetallic Au4Cu2 {[Au4(μ-C2,N3-EtIm)4Cu2(µ-3,5-(CF3)2Pz)2], (4a)}, Au2Cu {[Au2(μ-C2,N3-BzIm)2Cu(µ-3,5-(CF3)2Pz)], (1) and [Au2(μ-C2,N3-MeIm)2Cu(µ-3,5-(CF3)2Pz)], (3a)}, AuCu2 {[Au(μ-C2,N3-MeIm)Cu2(µ-3,5-(CF3)2Pz)2], (3b) and [Au(μ-C2,N3-EtIm)Cu2(µ-3,5-(CF3)2Pz)2], (4b)} and stacked Au3/Cu3 {[Au(μ-C2,N3-BzIm)]3[Cu(µ-3,5-(CF3)2Pz)]3, (2)} form upon reacting Au3 {[Au(μ-C2,N3-(N-R)Im)]3 ((N-R)Im = imidazolate; R = benzyl/methyl/ethyl = BzIm/MeIm/EtIm)} with Cu3 {[Cu(μ-3,5-(CF3)2Pz)]3 (3,5-(CF3)2Pz = 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)pyrazolate)}. The crystal structures of 1 and 3a reveal stair-step infinite chains whereby adjacent dimer-of-trimer units are noncovalently packed via two Au(I)⋯Cu(I) metallophilic interactions, whereas 4a exhibits a hexanuclear cluster structure wherein two monomer-of-trimer units are linked by a genuine d10–d10 polar-covalent bond with ligand-unassisted Cu(I)–Au(I) distances of 2.8750(8) Å each—the shortest such an intermolecular distance ever reported between any two d10 centers so as to deem it a “metal–metal bond” vis-à-vis “metallophilic interaction.” Density-functional calculations estimate 35–43 kcal/mol binding energy, akin to typical M–M single-bond energies. Congruently, FTIR spectra of 4a show multiple far-IR bands within 65–200 cm−1, assignable to vCu-Au as validated by both the Harvey–Gray method of crystallographic-distance-to-force-constant correlation and dispersive density functional theory computations. Notably, the heterobimetallic complexes herein exhibit photophysical properties that are favorable to those for their homometallic congeners, due to threefold-to-twofold symmetry reduction, resulting in cuprophilic

  19. Loop Quantum Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rovelli Carlo

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of finding the quantum theory of the gravitational field, and thus understanding what is quantum spacetime, is still open. One of the most active of the current approaches is loop quantum gravity. Loop quantum gravity is a mathematically well-defined, non-perturbative and background independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Research in loop quantum gravity today forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained are: (i The computation of the physical spectra of geometrical quantities such as area and volume, which yields quantitative predictions on Planck-scale physics. (ii A derivation of the Bekenstein-Hawking black hole entropy formula. (iii An intriguing physical picture of the microstructure of quantum physical space, characterized by a polymer-like Planck scale discreteness. This discreteness emerges naturally from the quantum theory and provides a mathematically well-defined realization of Wheeler's intuition of a spacetime ``foam''. Long standing open problems within the approach (lack of a scalar product, over-completeness of the loop basis, implementation of reality conditions have been fully solved. The weak part of the approach is the treatment of the dynamics: at present there exist several proposals, which are intensely debated. Here, I provide a general overview of ideas, techniques, results and open problems of this candidate theory of quantum gravity, and a guide to the relevant literature.

  20. A chlorophyll fluorescence analysis of photosynthetic efficiency, quantum yield and photon energy dissipation in PSII antennae of Lactuca sativa L. leaves exposed to cinnamic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, M Iftikhar; Reigosa, Manuel J

    2011-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of cinnamic acid (CA) on growth, biochemical and physiological responses of Lactuca sativa L. CA (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mM) treatments decreased plant height, root length, leaf and root fresh weight, but it did not affect the leaf water status. CA treatment (1.5 mM) significantly reduced F(v), F(m), photochemical efficiency of PSII (F(v)/F(m)) and quantum yield of PSII (ΦPSII) photochemistry in L. sativa. The photochemical fluorescence quenching (qP) and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) were reduced after treatment with 1.5 mM CA. Fraction of photon energy absorbed by PS II antennae trapped by "open" PS II reaction centers (P) was reduced by CA (1.5 mM) while, portion of absorbed photon energy thermally dissipated (D) and photon energy absorbed by PSII antennae and trapped by "closed" PSII reaction centers (E) was increased. Carbon isotope composition ratios (δ(13)C) was less negative (-27.10) in CA (1.5 mM) treated plants as compared to control (-27.61). Carbon isotope discrimination (Δ(13)C) and ratio of intercellular CO(2) concentration (ci/ca) from leaf to air were also less in CA treated plants. CA (1.5 mM) also decreased the leaf protein contents of L. sativa as compared to control.

  1. X-ray induced singlet oxygen generation by nanoparticle-photosensitizer conjugates for photodynamic therapy: determination of singlet oxygen quantum yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Sandhya; Deng, Wei; Camilleri, Elizabeth; Wilson, Brian C.; Goldys, Ewa M.

    2016-01-01

    Singlet oxygen is a primary cytotoxic agent in photodynamic therapy. We show that CeF3 nanoparticles, pure as well as conjugated through electrostatic interaction with the photosensitizer verteporfin, are able to generate singlet oxygen as a result of UV light and 8 keV X-ray irradiation. The X-ray stimulated singlet oxygen quantum yield was determined to be 0.79 ± 0.05 for the conjugate with 31 verteporfin molecules per CeF3 nanoparticle, the highest conjugation level used. From this result we estimate the singlet oxygen dose generated from CeF3-verteporfin conjugates for a therapeutic dose of 60 Gy of ionizing radiation at energies of 6 MeV and 30 keV to be (1.2 ± 0.7) × 108 and (2.0 ± 0.1) × 109 singlet oxygen molecules per cell, respectively. These are comparable with cytotoxic doses of 5 × 107-2 × 109 singlet oxygen molecules per cell reported in the literature for photodynamic therapy using light activation. We confirmed that the CeF3-VP conjugates enhanced cell killing with 6 MeV radiation. This work confirms the feasibility of using X- or γ- ray activated nanoparticle-photosensitizer conjugates, either to supplement the radiation treatment of cancer, or as an independent treatment modality.

  2. The Present Situation in Quantum Theory and its Merging with General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2017-08-01

    We discuss the problems of quantum theory (QT) complicating its merging with general relativity (GR). QT is treated as a general theory of micro-phenomena—a bunch of models. Quantum mechanics (QM) and quantum field theory (QFT) are the most widely known (but, e.g., Bohmian mechanics is also a part of QT). The basic problems of QM and QFT are considered in interrelation. For QM, we stress its nonrelativistic character and the presence of spooky action at a distance. For QFT, we highlight the old problem of infinities. And this is the main point of the paper: it is meaningless to try to unify QFT so heavily suffering of infinities with GR. We also highlight difficulties of the QFT-treatment of entanglement. We compare the QFT and QM based measurement theories by presenting both theoretical and experimental viewpoints. Then we discuss two basic mathematical constraints of both QM and QFT, namely, the use of real (and, hence, complex) numbers and the Hilbert state space. We briefly present non-archimedean and non-hilbertian approaches to QT and their consequences. Finally, we claim that, in spite of the Bell theorem, it is still possible to treat quantum phenomena on the basis of a classical-like causal theory. We present a random field model generating the QM and QFT formalisms. This emergence viewpoint can serve as the basis for unification of novel QT (may be totally different from presently powerful QM and QFT) and GR. (It may happen that the latter would also be revolutionary modified.)

  3. Impact of shortened crop rotation of oilseed rape on soil and rhizosphere microbial diversity in relation to yield decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Sally; Bennett, Amanda J; Keane, Gary; Bending, Gary D; Chandler, David; Stobart, Ron; Mills, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Oilseed rape (OSR) grown in monoculture shows a decline in yield relative to virgin OSR of up to 25%, but the mechanisms responsible are unknown. A long term field experiment of OSR grown in a range of rotations with wheat was used to determine whether shifts in fungal and bacterial populations of the rhizosphere and bulk soil were associated with the development of OSR yield decline. The communities of fungi and bacteria in the rhizosphere and bulk soil from the field experiment were profiled using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) and sequencing of cloned internal transcribed spacer regions and 16S rRNA genes, respectively. OSR cropping frequency had no effect on rhizosphere bacterial communities. However, the rhizosphere fungal communities from continuously grown OSR were significantly different to those from other rotations. This was due primarily to an increase in abundance of two fungi which showed 100% and 95% DNA identity to the plant pathogens Olpidium brassicae and Pyrenochaeta lycopersici, respectively. Real-time PCR confirmed that there was significantly more of these fungi in the continuously grown OSR than the other rotations. These two fungi were isolated from the field and used to inoculate OSR and Brassica oleracea grown under controlled conditions in a glasshouse to determine their effect on yield. At high doses, Olpidium brassicae reduced top growth and root biomass in seedlings and reduced branching and subsequent pod and seed production. Pyrenochaeta sp. formed lesions on the roots of seedlings, and at high doses delayed flowering and had a negative impact on seed quantity and quality.

  4. Adiposopathy, metabolic syndrome, quantum physics, general relativity, chaos and the Theory of Everything.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bays, Harold

    2005-05-01

    Excessive fat (adiposity) and dysfunctional fat (adiposopathy) constitute the most common worldwide epidemics of our time -- and perhaps of all time. Ongoing efforts to explain how the micro (adipocyte) and macro (body organ) biologic systems interact through function and dysfunction in promoting Type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension and dyslipidemia are not unlike the mechanistic and philosophical thinking processes involved in reconciling the micro (quantum physics) and macro (general relativity) theories in physics. Currently, the term metabolic syndrome refers to a constellation of consequences often associated with excess body fat and is an attempt to unify the associations known to exist between the four fundamental metabolic diseases of obesity, hyperglycemia (including Type 2 diabetes mellitus), hypertension and dyslipidemia. However, the association of adiposity with these metabolic disorders is not absolute and the metabolic syndrome does not describe underlying causality, nor does the metabolic syndrome necessarily reflect any reasonably related pathophysiologic process. Just as with quantum physics, general relativity and the four fundamental forces of the universe, the lack of an adequate unifying theory of micro causality and macro consequence is unsatisfying, and in medicine, impairs the development of agents that may globally improve both obesity and obesity-related metabolic disease. Emerging scientific and clinical evidence strongly supports the novel concept that it is not adiposity alone, but rather it is adiposopathy that is the underlying cause of most cases of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Adiposopathy is a plausible Theory of Everything for mankind's greatest metabolic epidemics.

  5. On the relation of the theoretical foundations of quantum theory and general relativity theory; Ueber die Beziehung der begrifflichen Grundlagen der Quantentheorie und der Allgemeinen Relativitaetstheorie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kober, Martin

    2010-07-01

    The specific content of the present thesis is presented in the following way. First the most important contents of quantum theory and general relativity theory are presented. In connection with the general relativity theory the mathematical property of the diffeomorphism invariance plays the deciding role, while concerning the quantum theory starting from the Copenhagen interpretation first the measurement problem is treated, before basing on the analysis of concrete phenomena and the mathematical apparatus of quantum theory the nonlocality is brought into focus as an important property. This means that both theories suggest a relationalistic view of the nature of the space. This analysis of the theoretical foundations of quantum theory and general relativity theory in relation to the nature of the space obtains only under inclusion of Kant's philosophy and his analysis of the terms space and time as fundamental forms of perception its full persuasive power. Then von Weizsaeckers quantum theory of the ur-alternatives is presented. Finally attempts are made to apply the obtained knowledge to the question of the quantum-theoretical formulation of general relativity theory.

  6. Quantum-chemical calculations of the metallofullerene yields in the X@C{sub 74}, L@C{sub 74}, and Z@C{sub 82} series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlík, Filip [Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Albertov 6, 128 43 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Slanina, Zdeněk; Nagase, Shigeru [Department of Theoretical Molecular Science, Institute for Molecular Science, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585, Aichi (Japan)

    2015-01-22

    The contribution reports computations for Al@C{sub 82}, Sc@C{sub 82}, Y@C{sub 82} and La@C{sub 82} based on encapsulation into the IPR (isolated pentagon rule) C{sub 2ν} C{sub 82} cage and also on Mg@C{sub 74}, Ca@C{sub 74}, Sr@C{sub 74} and Ba@C{sub 74} based on encapsulation into the only C{sub 74} IPR cage as well as for three selected lanthanoids La@C{sub 74}, Yb@C{sub 74}, and Lu@C{sub 74}. Their structural and energetic characteristics are used for evaluations of the relative production yields, using the encapsulation Gibbs-energy and saturated metal pressures. It is shown that the results can be well related to the ionization potentials of the free metal atoms.

  7. On the mass-coupling relation of multi-scale quantum integrable models

    CERN Document Server

    Bajnok, Zoltan; Ito, Katsushi; Satoh, Yuji; Toth, Gabor Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    We determine exactly the mass-coupling relation for the simplest multi-scale quantum integrable model, the homogenous sine-Gordon model with two independent mass-scales. We first reformulate its perturbed coset CFT description in terms of the perturbation of a projected product of minimal models. This representation enables us to identify conserved tensor currents on the UV side. These UV operators are then mapped via form factor perturbation theory to operators on the IR side, which are characterized by their form factors. The relation between the UV and IR operators is given in terms of the sought-for mass-coupling relation. By generalizing the $\\Theta$ sum rule Ward identity we are able to derive differential equations for the mass-coupling relation, which we solve in terms of hypergeometric functions. We check these results against the data obtained by numerically solving the thermodynamic Bethe Ansatz equations, and find a complete agreement.

  8. Quantum State Reduction by Matter-Phase-Related Measurements in Optical Lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlowski, Wojciech; Mekhov, Igor B

    2016-01-01

    A many-body atomic system coupled to quantized light is subject to weak measurement. Instead of coupling light to the on-site density, we consider the quantum backaction due to the measurement of matter-phase-related variables such as global phase coherence. We show how this unconventional approach opens up new opportunities to affect system evolution and demonstrate how this can lead to a new class of measurement projections, thus extending the measurement postulate for the case of strong competition with the system's own evolution.

  9. Practical and fast quantum random number generation based on photon arrival time relative to external reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, You-Qi; Zhang, Jun, E-mail: zhangjun@ustc.edu.cn; Pan, Jian-Wei [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zhang, Hong-Fei; Wang, Jian [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zhang, Zhen; Ma, Xiongfeng [Center for Quantum Information, Institute for Interdisciplinary Information Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2014-02-03

    We present a practical high-speed quantum random number generator, where the timing of single-photon detection relative to an external time reference is measured as the raw data. The bias of the raw data can be substantially reduced compared with the previous realizations. The raw random bit rate of our generator can reach 109 Mbps. We develop a model for the generator and evaluate the min-entropy of the raw data. Toeplitz matrix hashing is applied for randomness extraction, after which the final random bits are able to pass the standard randomness tests.

  10. Practical and fast quantum random number generation based on photon arrival time relative to external reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, You-Qi; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Jian; Ma, Xiongfeng; Zhang, Jun; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2014-02-01

    We present a practical high-speed quantum random number generator, where the timing of single-photon detection relative to an external time reference is measured as the raw data. The bias of the raw data can be substantially reduced compared with the previous realizations. The raw random bit rate of our generator can reach 109 Mbps. We develop a model for the generator and evaluate the min-entropy of the raw data. Toeplitz matrix hashing is applied for randomness extraction, after which the final random bits are able to pass the standard randomness tests.

  11. Loop Quantum Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rovelli Carlo

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The problem of describing the quantum behavior of gravity, and thus understanding quantum spacetime, is still open. Loop quantum gravity is a well-developed approach to this problem. It is a mathematically well-defined background-independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Today research in loop quantum gravity forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained so far are: (i The computation of the spectra of geometrical quantities such as area and volume, which yield tentative quantitative predictions for Planck-scale physics. (ii A physical picture of the microstructure of quantum spacetime, characterized by Planck-scale discreteness. Discreteness emerges as a standard quantum effect from the discrete spectra, and provides a mathematical realization of Wheeler’s “spacetime foam” intuition. (iii Control of spacetime singularities, such as those in the interior of black holes and the cosmological one. This, in particular, has opened up the possibility of a theoretical investigation into the very early universe and the spacetime regions beyond the Big Bang. (iv A derivation of the Bekenstein–Hawking black-hole entropy. (v Low-energy calculations, yielding n-point functions well defined in a background-independent context. The theory is at the roots of, or strictly related to, a number of formalisms that have been developed for describing background-independent quantum field theory, such as spin foams, group field theory, causal spin networks, and others. I give here a general overview of ideas, techniques, results and open problems of this candidate theory of quantum gravity, and a guide to the relevant literature.

  12. Relative locality in a quantum spacetime and the pregeometry of {kappa}-Minkowski

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni; Astuti, Valerio [Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Roma (Italy); Sez. Roma1, INFN, Roma (Italy); Rosati, Giacomo [Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Roma (Italy); Sez. Roma1, INFN, Roma (Italy); University of Wroclaw, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Wroclaw (Poland)

    2013-08-15

    We develop a description of the much-studied {kappa}-Minkowski noncommutative spacetime, centered on representing on a single Hilbert space not only the {kappa}-Minkowski coordinates, but also the {kappa}-Poincare symmetry generators and some suitable relativistic-transformation parameters. In this representation the relevant operators act on the kinematical Hilbert space of the covariant formulation of quantum mechanics, which we argue is the natural framework for studying the implications of the step from commuting spacetime coordinates to the {kappa}-Minkowski case, where the spatial coordinates do not commute with the time coordinate. Within this kinematical-Hilbert-space representation we can give a crisp characterization of the ''fuzziness'' of points in {kappa}-Minkowski spacetime, also allowing us to describe how the same fuzzy point is seen by different relativistic observers. The most striking finding of our analysis is a relativity of spacetime locality in {kappa}-Minkowski. While previous descriptions of relative locality had been formulated exclusively in classical-spacetime setups, our analysis shows how relative locality in a quantum spacetime takes the shape of a dependence of the fuzziness of a spacetime point on the distance at which an observer infers properties of the event that marks the point. (orig.)

  13. Plant physiological, morphological and yield-related responses to night temperature changes across different species and plant functional types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panpan Jing

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Land surface temperature over the past decades has shown a faster warming trend during the night than during the day. Extremely low night temperatures have occurred frequently due to the influence of land-sea thermal difference, topography and climate change. This asymmetric night temperature change is expected to affect plant ecophysiology and growth, as the plant carbon consumption processes could be affected more than the assimilation processes because photosynthesis in most plants occurs during the daytime whereas plant respiration occurs throughout the day. The effects of high night temperature (HNT and low night temperature (LNT on plant ecophysiological and growing processes and how the effects vary among different plant functional types (PFTs have not been analyzed extensively. In this meta-analysis, we examined the effect of HNT and LNT on plant physiology and growth across different PFTs and experimental settings. Plant species were grouped according to their photosynthetic pathways (C3, C4 and CAM, growth forms (herbaceous, woody, and economic purposes (crop, non-crop. We found that HNT and LNT both had a negative effect on plant yield, but the effect of HNT on plant yield was primarily related to a reduction in biomass allocation to reproduction organs and the effect of LNT on plant yield was more related to a negative effect on total biomass. Leaf growth was stimulated at HNT and suppressed at LNT. HNT accelerated plants ecophysiological processes, including photosynthesis and dark respiration, while LNT slowed these processes. Overall, the results showed that the effects of night temperature on plant physiology and growth varied between HNT and LNT, among the response variables and PFTs, and depended on the magnitude of temperature change and experimental design. These findings suggest complexities and challenges in seeking general patterns of terrestrial plant growth in HNT and LNT. The PFT specific responses of plants are

  14. Relative yield-per-recruit and management strategies for Cynoscion acoupa (Perciformes: Sciaenidae in Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando José Ferrer Montaño

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Acoupa weakfish, Cynoscion acoupa, in Lake Maracaibo is subject to intense commercial fishing by an artisanal fleet, and a recent decrease in fish size observed from landings is of concern. This fishery has not yet been modeled, and its assessment and the establishment of management practices to overcome the current overfished condition are urgently needed. To address this, we used recent and past empirical growth estimates to model relative yield-per-recruit under different lengths at first capture. Our results from relative yield-perrecruit analysis showed evidence that growth and recruitment overfishing occur under current fishing practices in Lake Maracaibo. Particular attention was given to fishing practices in El Tablazo Bay where young, small fish predominate in the commercial catches (mean total length=33.7cm, well below the length at first sexual maturity (~40cm TL for both sexes. As management strategies, we propose to set a mesh size limit at or above 8.89cm (3.5in, which will reduce fishing mortality of immature fish, increase yield-per-recruit, and will result in an increase of Acoupa weakfish recruitment for the long term in Lake Maracaibo.La curvina, Cynoscion acoupa, en el Lago de Maracaibo se encuentra sometida a una intensa actividad pesquera comercial. No obstante, antes de este estudio no se había examinado el potencial efecto de la sobrepesca a través del modelado. Utilizamos estimados empíricos de crecimiento actuales y pasados para modelar el rendimiento-por-recluta relativo bajo diferentes longitudes de primera captura. Presentamos evidencia a partir de resultados de rendimiento-por-recluta relativo que indica que existe sobrepesca por crecimiento y reclutamiento bajo las prácticas pesqueras actuales en el Lago de Maracaibo. Se puso particular atención a las pesquerías en la Bahía El Tablazo donde predominan peces jóvenes pequeños en las capturas (longitud total promedio=33.7cm, muy por debajo de la longitud de

  15. The general dispersion relation of induced streaming instabilities in quantum outflow systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehdian, H., E-mail: mehdian@khu.ac.ir; Hajisharifi, K.; Hasanbeigi, A. [Department of Physics and Institute for Plasma Research, Kharazmi University, 49 Dr Mofatteh Avenue, Tehran 15614 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    In this manuscript the dispersion relations of streaming instabilities, by using the unique property (neutralized in charge and current by default) of plasma shells colliding, have been generalized and studied. This interesting property for interpenetrating beams enables one to find the general dispersion relations without any restrictions used in the previous works in this area. In our previous work [H. Mehdian et al., ApJ. 801, 89 (2015)], employing the plasma shell concept and boost frame method, the general dispersion relation for filamentation instability has been derived in the relativistic classical regime. But in this paper, using the above mentioned concepts, the general dispersion relations (for each of streaming instabilities, filamentation, two-stream and multi-stream) in the non-relativistic quantum regime have been derived by employing the quantum fluid equations together with Maxwell equations. The derived dispersion relations enable to describe any arbitrary system of interacting two and three beams, justified neutralization condition, by choosing the inertial reference frame embedded on the one of the beams. Furthermore, by the numerical and analytical study of these dispersion relations, many new features of streaming instabilities (E.g. their cut-off wave numbers and growth rates) in terms of all involved parameters have been illustrated. The obtained results in this paper can be used to describe many astrophysical systems and laboratory astrophysics setting, such as collision of non-parallel plasma shells over a background plasma or the collision of three neutralized plasma slabs, and justifying the many plasma phenomena such as particle accelerations and induced fields.

  16. A historically correct didactic first step in the quantum world stressing the interplay of relativity, thermodynamics and quantum physics

    CERN Document Server

    Margaritondo, G

    2003-01-01

    Quantum physics is the backbone of modern science: therefore, a correct first step is essential for students' success in many different disciplines. Unfortunately, many didactic approaches are still complicated, potentially confusing and often historically wrong. An alternate, simple, stimulating and historically correct approach is outlined here.

  17. A historically correct didactic first step in the quantum world: stressing the interplay of relativity, thermodynamics and quantum physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaritondo, G [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2003-01-01

    Quantum physics is the backbone of modern science: therefore, a correct first step is essential for students' success in many different disciplines. Unfortunately, many didactic approaches are still complicated, potentially confusing and often historically wrong. An alternate, simple, stimulating and historically correct approach is outlined here.

  18. Relativity, quantum physics and philosophy in the upper secondary curriculum: challenges, opportunities and proposed approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Ellen K.; Bungum, Berit; Angell, Carl; Tellefsen, Cathrine W.; Frågåt, Thomas; Vetleseter Bøe, Maria

    2014-11-01

    In this article, we discuss how quantum physics and relativity can be taught in upper secondary school, in ways that promote conceptual understanding and philosophical reflections. We present the ReleQuant project, in which web-based teaching modules have been developed. The modules address competence aims in the Norwegian national curriculum for physics (final year of upper secondary education), which is unique in that it includes general relativity, entangled photons and the epistemological consequences of modern physics. These topics, with their high demands on students’ understanding of abstract and counter-intuitive concepts and principles, are challenging for teachers to teach and for students to learn. However, they also provide opportunities to present modern physics in innovative ways that students may find motivating and relevant both in terms of modern technological applications and in terms of contributions to students’ intellectual development. Beginning with these challenges and opportunities, we briefly present previous research and theoretical perspectives with relevance to student learning and motivation in modern physics. Based on this, we outline the ReleQuant teaching approach, where students use written and oral language and a collaborative exploration of animations and simulations as part of their learning process. Finally, we present some of the first experiences from classroom tests of the quantum physics modules.

  19. The Problem of Time and Quantum Cosmology in the Relational Particle Mechanics Arena

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Most readers' main interest in this article will be its reviews of the problem of time (POT) in quantum gravity (QG) in Secs 11, 16. Namely, that `time' in GR and in ordinary QM are mutually incompatible notions, which is problematic in trying to put these 2 theories together to form a theory of QG. I also establish relational particle models (RPM's) as useful for the study of the POT and of quantum cosmology (QC). I also unlock RPMs' configuration spaces, classical dynamics and QM in simple concrete examples. I use these to further our understanding of the histories, records, semiclassical, naive Schrodinger interpretation and hidden time strategies toward resolving the POT, alongside considering Halliwell's combination of the first 3. My relational whole-universe models are comparable to minisuperspace in amount of resemblance to full GR, but with a number of different resemblances including various midisuperspace-like ones which render RPM's appropriate as POT models. One point of view is that the best one...

  20. Identification of Resistance Gene to PVY and Its Relation to Marketable Tuber Yield of PVY Resistant Potato Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Hassanabadi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the Rysto gene, originaly found in wild potato (Solanum stoloniferum, confers extreme resistance against PVY. It was identified in 21 potato clones and varieties and they were evaluated for some agronomic traits. For this purpose five trials were conducted. In first trial 320 potato genotypes were planted on the farm and 55 symptomless clone and cultivars were selected. In second trial, 55 genotypes along with sensitive control genotype (Desireh were planted in 20 cm pots in the greenhouse at 15-20 °C with three replications. After five weeks, upper leaves were infected artificially with sap from tobacco fresh leaves checked for infection with PVYNTN and additional infections were repeated after 48 hours. Symptoms were recorded and all plants were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA about 4 weeks after inoculation. Plants that showed visual symptoms or/and gave at least a positive ELISA result were considered as susceptible and symptomless response with negative ELISA results were considered as resistant. In third trial, 23 genotypes were planted in the greenhouse and the PVY infected young tobacco shoots were grafted to symptomless genotypes with negative ELISA results with three replications and were selected as resistance genotypes. In fourth trial, all the PVY resistant genotypes were checked by molecular marker (STM0003 for detection of Rysto gene. Finally four potato varieties (Jelly, Sante, White Lady and Savalan cultivars and 19 advanced clones were regarded as carriers of Rysto gene. In the fifth experiment genotypes were evaluated for marketable tuber yield of varieties and clones resistant to virus PVY in field conditions and 397009-8 clone was selected as high-yielding and tolerant genotype to PVY virus. Also, This clone did also have appropriate quality traits like oval-round tuber shape, uniform tubers, short stolon length, light yellow flesh color, yellow skin color, good tuber dry matter percent

  1. Technical note: A mathematical function to predict daily milk yield of dairy cows in relation to the interval between milkings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopčič, M; Koops, W J; Kuipers, A

    2013-09-01

    The milk production of a dairy cow is characterized by lactation production, which is calculated from daily milk yields (DMY) during lactation. The DMY is calculated from one or more milkings a day collected at the farm. Various milking systems are in use today, resulting in one or many recorded milk yields a day, from which different calculations are used to determine DMY. The primary objective of this study was to develop a mathematical function that described milk production of a dairy cow in relation to the interval between 2 milkings. The function was partly based on the biology of the milk production process. This function, called the 3K-function, was able to predict milk production over an interval of 12h, so DMY was twice this estimate. No external information is needed to incorporate this function in methods to predict DMY. Application of the function on data from different milking systems showed a good fit. This function could be a universal tool to predict DMY for a variety of milking systems, and it seems especially useful for data from robotic milking systems. Further study is needed to evaluate the function under a wide range of circumstances, and to see how it can be incorporated in existing milk recording systems. A secondary objective of using the 3K-function was to compare how much DMY based on different milking systems differed from that based on a twice-a-day milking. Differences were consistent with findings in the literature. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Quantum Cat's Dilemma

    CERN Document Server

    Makowski, M; Makowski, Marcin; Piotrowski, Edward W.

    2005-01-01

    We study a quantum version of the sequential game illustrating problems connected with making rational decisions. We compare the results that the two models (quantum and classical) yield. In the quantum model intransitivity gains importance significantly. We argue that the quantum model describes our spontaneously shown preferences more precisely than the classical model, as these preferences are often intransitive.

  3. Dynamic optimization and its relation to classical and quantum constrained systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Mauricio; Pellicer, Rely; Villena, Marcelo

    2017-08-01

    We study the structure of a simple dynamic optimization problem consisting of one state and one control variable, from a physicist's point of view. By using an analogy to a physical model, we study this system in the classical and quantum frameworks. Classically, the dynamic optimization problem is equivalent to a classical mechanics constrained system, so we must use the Dirac method to analyze it in a correct way. We find that there are two second-class constraints in the model: one fix the momenta associated with the control variables, and the other is a reminder of the optimal control law. The dynamic evolution of this constrained system is given by the Dirac's bracket of the canonical variables with the Hamiltonian. This dynamic results to be identical to the unconstrained one given by the Pontryagin equations, which are the correct classical equations of motion for our physical optimization problem. In the same Pontryagin scheme, by imposing a closed-loop λ-strategy, the optimality condition for the action gives a consistency relation, which is associated to the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation of the dynamic programming method. A similar result is achieved by quantizing the classical model. By setting the wave function Ψ(x , t) =e iS(x , t) in the quantum Schrödinger equation, a non-linear partial equation is obtained for the S function. For the right-hand side quantization, this is the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation, when S(x , t) is identified with the optimal value function. Thus, the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation in Bellman's maximum principle, can be interpreted as the quantum approach of the optimization problem.

  4. Effective matter dispersion relation in quantum covariant Ho\\v{r}ava-Lifshitz gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandre, Jean

    2015-01-01

    We study how quantum fluctuations of the metric in covariant Ho\\v{r}ava-Lifshitz gravity influence the propagation of classical fields (complex scalar and photon). The effective Lorentz-symmetry violation induced by the breaking of 4-dimensional diffeomorphism is then evaluated, by comparing the dressed dispersion relations for both external fields. The constraint of vanishing 3-dimensional Ricci scalar is imposed in the path integral, which therefore explicitly depends on two propagating gravitational degrees of freedom only. Because the matter fields are classical, the present model contains only logarithmic divergences. Furthermore, it imposes the characteristic Ho\\v{r}ava-Lifshitz scale, above which General Relativity is no-longer valid, to be smaller than $10^{10}$ GeV, if one wishes not to violate the current bounds on Lorentz symmetry violation.

  5. A scientometric study of General Relativity and Quantum Cosmology from 2000 to 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Fay, Stephane

    2015-01-01

    2015 is the centennial of Einstein General Relativity. On this occasion, we examine the General Relativity and Quantum Cosmology (GRQC) field of research by analysing 38291 papers uploaded on the electronic archives arXiv.org from 2000 to 2012. We establish a map of the countries contributing to GRQC in 2012. We determine the main journals publishing GRQC papers and which countries publish in which journals. We find that more and more papers are written by groups (instead of single) of authors with more and more international collaborations. There are huge differences between countries. Hence Russia is the country where most of papers are written by single authors whereas Canada is one of the countries where the most of papers are written with international collaborations. We also study mobility of researchers, determining how some groups of authors spread worldwide with time for different countries. The largest mobilities (as well as international collaborations) are between USA-UK and USA-Germany. Countries...

  6. Quantum entanglement and quantum operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    It is a simple introduction to quantum entanglement and quantum operations. The authors focus on some applications of quantum entanglement and relations between two-qubit entangled states and unitary operations. It includes remote state preparation by using any pure entangled states, nonlocal operation implementation using entangled states, entanglement capacity of two-qubit gates and two-qubit gates construction.

  7. Quantum Coherence Quantifiers Based on Rényi α-Relative Entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Lian-He; Li, Yong-Ming; Luo, Yu; Xi, Zheng-Jun

    2017-06-01

    The resource theories of quantum coherence attract a lot of attention in recent years. Especially, the monotonicity property plays a crucial role here. In this paper we investigate the monotonicity property for the coherence measures induced by the Rényi α-relative entropy, which present in [Phys. Rev. A 94 (2016) 052336]. We show that the Rényi α-relative entropy of coherence does not in general satisfy the monotonicity requirement under the subselection of measurements condition and it also does not satisfy the extension of monotonicity requirement, which presents in [Phys. Rev. A 93 (2016) 032136]. Due to the Rényi α-relative entropy of coherence can act as a coherence monotone quantifier, we examine the trade-off relations between coherence and mixedness. Finally, some properties for the single qubit of Rényi 2-relative entropy of coherence are derived. Supported by by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11271237, 11671244, 61671280, and the Higher School Doctoral Subject Foundation of Ministry of Education of China under Grant No. 20130202110001, and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (GK201502004 and 2016CBY003), and the Academic Leaders and Academic Backbones, Shaanxi Normal University under Grant No. 16QNGG013

  8. A recursion relation for matrix elements of the quantum bouncer. Comment on "A quantum bouncing ball," by Julio Gea-Banacloche [Am. J. Phys. 67 (9), 776-782 (1999)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodmanson, David M.

    2000-09-01

    This paper describes a recursion relation for matrix elements of the quantum bouncer. The relation provides an exact expression for the normalization integral, and allows recursive calculation of matrix elements of the form , where z is the spatial coordinate and |m>,|n> are quantum bouncer eigenstates.

  9. Consistent Cosmology, Dynamic Relativity and Causal Quantum Mechanics as Unified Manifestations of the Symmetry of Complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Kirilyuk, A P

    2006-01-01

    The universal symmetry, or conservation, of complexity underlies any law or principle of system dynamics and describes the unceasing transformation of dynamic information into dynamic entropy as the unique way to conserve their sum, the total dynamic complexity. Here we describe the real world structure emergence and dynamics as manifestation of the universal symmetry of complexity of initially homogeneous interaction between two protofields. It provides the unified complex-dynamic, causally complete origin of physically real, 3D space, time, elementary particles, their properties (mass, charge, spin, etc.), quantum, relativistic, and classical behaviour, as well as fundamental interaction forces, including naturally quantized gravitation. The old and new cosmological problems (including "dark" mass and energy) are basically solved for this explicitly emerging, self-tuning world structure characterised by strictly positive (and large) energy-complexity. A general relation is obtained between the numbers of wo...

  10. Relations between low-lying quantum wave functions and solutions of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation

    CERN Document Server

    Friedberg, R; Zhao Wei Qin

    1999-01-01

    We discuss a new relation between the low lying Schroedinger wave function of a particle in a one-dimentional potential V and the solution of the corresponding Hamilton-Jacobi equation with -V as its potential. The function V is $\\geq 0$, and can have several minina (V=0). We assume the problem to be characterized by a small anhamornicity parameter $g^{-1}$ and a much smaller quantum tunneling parameter $\\epsilon$ between these different minima. Expanding either the wave function or its energy as a formal double power series in $g^{-1}$ and $\\epsilon$, we show how the coefficients of $g^{-m}\\epsilon^n$ in such an expansion can be expressed in terms of definite integrals, with leading order term determined by the classical solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. A detailed analysis is given for the particular example of quartic potential $V={1/2}g^2(x^2-a^2)^2$.

  11. Quantum State Reduction by Matter-Phase-Related Measurements in Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, Wojciech; Caballero-Benitez, Santiago F.; Mekhov, Igor B.

    2017-01-01

    A many-body atomic system coupled to quantized light is subject to weak measurement. Instead of coupling light to the on-site density, we consider the quantum backaction due to the measurement of matter-phase-related variables such as global phase coherence. We show how this unconventional approach opens up new opportunities to affect system evolution. We demonstrate how this can lead to a new class of final states different from those possible with dissipative state preparation or conventional projective measurements. These states are characterised by a combination of Hamiltonian and measurement properties thus extending the measurement postulate for the case of strong competition with the system’s own evolution. PMID:28225012

  12. Quantum anomaly, universal relations, and breathing mode of a two-dimensional Fermi gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Johannes

    2012-05-01

    In this Letter, we show that the classical SO(2,1) symmetry of a harmonically trapped Fermi gas in two dimensions is broken by quantum effects. The anomalous correction to the symmetry algebra is given by a two-body operator that is well known as the contact. Taking into account this modification, we are able to derive the virial theorem for the system and a universal relation for the pressure of a homogeneous gas. The existence of an undamped breathing mode is associated with the classical symmetry. We provide an estimate for the anomalous frequency shift of this oscillation at zero temperature and compare the result with a recent experiment by [E. Vogt et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 070404 (2012)]. Discrepancies are attributed to finite temperature effects.

  13. A Mathematicians' View of Geometrical Unification of General Relativity and Quantum Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Vaugon, Michel

    2015-01-01

    This document contains a description of physics entirely based on a geometric presentation: all of the theory is described giving only a pseudo-riemannian manifold (M, g) of dimension n > 5 for which the g tensor is, in studied domains, almost everywhere of signature (-, -, +, ..., +). No object is added to this space-time, no general principle is supposed. The properties we impose to some domains of (M, g) are only simple geometric constraints, essentially based on the concept of "curvature". These geometric properties allow to define, depending on considered cases, some objects (frequently depicted by tensors) that are similar to the classical physics ones, they are however built here only from the g tensor. The links between these objects, coming from their natural definitions, give, applying standard theorems from the pseudo-riemannian geometry, all equations governing physical phenomena usually described by classical theories, including general relativity and quantum physics. The purely geometric approac...

  14. Charge sensing and spin-related transport property of p-channel silicon quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Yu; Iwasaki, Kazuma; Oda, Shunri; Kodera, Tetsuo

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate the detection of single hole tunneling through physically defined silicon quantum dots (QDs) by charge sensing. We estimate capacitive couplings between the QDs and tuning gates by simulation based on the Monte Carlo method. In addition, an investigation of spin-related transport is presented. Pauli spin blockade is observed in double QDs, where hole transport is blocked by forbidden transitions between triplet and singlet states. The magnetic field dependence of the leakage current in Pauli spin blockade shows a dip characteristic at zero field, which is explained by spin relaxation due to spin–orbit coupling with phonons. We extract the dip width B C ∼ 65 mT and a spin relaxation rate Γrel ∼ 55 MHz. The small dip width and high spin relaxation rate reflect a strong spin–orbit coupling.

  15. Relation between photocurrent and DLTS signals observed for quantum dot systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruszewski, P., E-mail: Piotr.Kruszewski@ifpan.edu.p [Institute of Physics Polish Academy of Science, al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Dobaczewski, L. [Institute of Physics Polish Academy of Science, al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Microelectronics and Nanostructure Group, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Mesli, A. [Institut d' Electronique du Solide et des Systemes, CNRS/ULP, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Markevich, V.P.; Mitchell, C.; Missous, M.; Peaker, A.R. [Microelectronics and Nanostructure Group, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-15

    The electro-optical properties of InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QD) are presented. It is shown that they can contribute to the photocurrent at temperatures where photo-generated excitons can split. This happens if the carrier binding energies are not too large to prevent the carrier emission process. At lower temperatures, the exciton recombination process can effectively compete with the carrier emission processes and no photocurrent signal is observed. The Laplace DLTS technique has been used in a wide temperature range to analyze the electron and hole emission separately and combine them with the observed temperature dependence of the photocurrent. The photocurrent measurements also showed that with an increase in temperature the dot-related photocurrent peaks shift to lower energies with a rate similar to GaAs band gap shrinkage.

  16. Relation between photocurrent and DLTS signals observed for quantum dot systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruszewski, P.; Dobaczewski, L.; Mesli, A.; Markevich, V. P.; Mitchell, C.; Missous, M.; Peaker, A. R.

    2009-12-01

    The electro-optical properties of InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QD) are presented. It is shown that they can contribute to the photocurrent at temperatures where photo-generated excitons can split. This happens if the carrier binding energies are not too large to prevent the carrier emission process. At lower temperatures, the exciton recombination process can effectively compete with the carrier emission processes and no photocurrent signal is observed. The Laplace DLTS technique has been used in a wide temperature range to analyze the electron and hole emission separately and combine them with the observed temperature dependence of the photocurrent. The photocurrent measurements also showed that with an increase in temperature the dot-related photocurrent peaks shift to lower energies with a rate similar to GaAs band gap shrinkage.

  17. Scale relativity theory and integrative systems biology: 2. Macroscopic quantum-type mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottale, Laurent; Auffray, Charles

    2008-05-01

    In these two companion papers, we provide an overview and a brief history of the multiple roots, current developments and recent advances of integrative systems biology and identify multiscale integration as its grand challenge. Then we introduce the fundamental principles and the successive steps that have been followed in the construction of the scale relativity theory, which aims at describing the effects of a non-differentiable and fractal (i.e., explicitly scale dependent) geometry of space-time. The first paper of this series was devoted, in this new framework, to the construction from first principles of scale laws of increasing complexity, and to the discussion of some tentative applications of these laws to biological systems. In this second review and perspective paper, we describe the effects induced by the internal fractal structures of trajectories on motion in standard space. Their main consequence is the transformation of classical dynamics into a generalized, quantum-like self-organized dynamics. A Schrödinger-type equation is derived as an integral of the geodesic equation in a fractal space. We then indicate how gauge fields can be constructed from a geometric re-interpretation of gauge transformations as scale transformations in fractal space-time. Finally, we introduce a new tentative development of the theory, in which quantum laws would hold also in scale space, introducing complexergy as a measure of organizational complexity. Initial possible applications of this extended framework to the processes of morphogenesis and the emergence of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cellular structures are discussed. Having founded elements of the evolutionary, developmental, biochemical and cellular theories on the first principles of scale relativity theory, we introduce proposals for the construction of an integrative theory of life and for the design and implementation of novel macroscopic quantum-type experiments and devices, and discuss their potential

  18. Quantum correlations and distinguishability of quantum states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spehner, Dominique

    2014-07-01

    A survey of various concepts in quantum information is given, with a main emphasis on the distinguishability of quantum states and quantum correlations. Covered topics include generalized and least square measurements, state discrimination, quantum relative entropies, the Bures distance on the set of quantum states, the quantum Fisher information, the quantum Chernoff bound, bipartite entanglement, the quantum discord, and geometrical measures of quantum correlations. The article is intended both for physicists interested not only by collections of results but also by the mathematical methods justifying them, and for mathematicians looking for an up-to-date introductory course on these subjects, which are mainly developed in the physics literature.

  19. Comparative mapping reveals similar linkage of functional genes to QTL of yield-related traits between Brassica napus and Oryza sativa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fupeng Li; Chaozhi Ma; Qingfang Chen; Touming Liu; Jinxiong Shen; Jinxing Tu; Yongzhong Xing; Tingdong Fu

    2012-08-01

    Oryza sativa and Brassica napus—two important crops for food and oil, respectively—share high seed yield as a common breeding goal. As a model plant, O. sativa genomics have been intensively investigated and its agronomic traits have been advanced. In the present study, we used the available information on O. sativa to conduct comparative mapping between O. sativa and B. napus, with the aim of advancing research on seed-yield and yield-related traits in B. napus. Firstly, functional markers (from 55 differentially expressed genes between a hybrid and its parents) were used to detect B. napus genes that co-localized with yield-related traits in an F2∶3 population. Referring to publicly available sequences of 55 B. napus genes, 53 homologous O. sativa genes were subsequently detected by screening, and their chromosomal locations were determined using silico mapping. Comparative location of yield-related QTL between the two species showed that a total of 37 O. sativa and B. napus homologues were located in similar yield-related QTL between species. Our results indicate that homologous genes between O. sativa and B. napus may have consistent function and control similar traits, which may be helpful for agronomic gene characterization in B. napus based on what is known in O. sativa.

  20. Quantum rms error and Heisenberg’s error-disturbance relation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busch Paul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reports on experiments recently performed in Vienna [Erhard et al, Nature Phys. 8, 185 (2012] and Toronto [Rozema et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 100404 (2012] include claims of a violation of Heisenberg’s error-disturbance relation. In contrast, a Heisenberg-type tradeoff relation for joint measurements of position and momentum has been formulated and proven in [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 160405 (2013]. Here I show how the apparent conflict is resolved by a careful consideration of the quantum generalization of the notion of root-mean-square error. The claim of a violation of Heisenberg’s principle is untenable as it is based on a historically wrong attribution of an incorrect relation to Heisenberg, which is in fact trivially violated. We review a new general trade-off relation for the necessary errors in approximate joint measurements of incompatible qubit observables that is in the spirit of Heisenberg’s intuitions. The experiments mentioned may directly be used to test this new error inequality.