WorldWideScience

Sample records for related traps induced

  1. Current drive induced by intermittent trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakach, R. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/Cadarache, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee (DRFC), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Gell, Y. [CET, Israel (Israel)

    1999-02-01

    We propose a mechanism for driving a current in a dispersive plasma based on intermittent trapping of electrons in a ponderomotive well generated by two- counterpropagating electron cyclotron waves. By choosing properly the parameters of the system, this mechanism is expected to induce a high efficiency current drive. (authors)

  2. Coherent population trapping (CPT) versus Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Sumanta; Chanu, Sapam Ranjita; Bharti, Vineet; Natarajan, Vasant

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the differences between two well-studied and related phenomena---coherent population trapping (CPT) and electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). We show experimentally that one does not observe EIT in a Rb vapor cell filled with buffer gas, a kind of cell that is used commonly in CPT experiments because it results in significant linewidth reduction of the resonance.

  3. Trapped Electron Precession Shear Induced Fluctuation Decorrelation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.S. Hahm; P.H. Diamond; E.-J. Kim

    2002-07-29

    We consider the effects of trapped electron precession shear on the microturbulence. In a similar way the strong E x B shear reduces the radial correlation length of ambient fluctuations, the radial variation of the trapped electron precession frequency can reduce the radial correlation length of fluctuations associated with trapped electrons. In reversed shear plasmas, with the explicit dependence of the trapped electron precession shearing rate on B(subscript)theta, the sharp radial gradient of T(subscript)e due to local electron heating inside qmin can make the precession shearing mechanism more effective, and reduce the electron thermal transport constructing a positive feedback loop for the T(subscript)e barrier formation.

  4. Electric-field induced quantum broadening of the characteristic energy level of traps in semiconductors and oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Mazharuddin; Verhulst, Anne S.; Verreck, Devin; Van de Put, Maarten; Simoen, Eddy; Sorée, Bart; Kaczer, Ben; Degraeve, Robin; Mocuta, Anda; Collaert, Nadine; Thean, Aaron; Groeseneken, Guido

    2016-12-01

    The trap-assisted tunneling (TAT) current in tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs) is one of the crucial factors degrading the sub-60 mV/dec sub-threshold swing. To correctly predict the TAT currents, an accurate description of the trap is required. Since electric fields in TFETs typically reach beyond 106 V/cm, there is a need to quantify the impact of such high field on the traps. We use a quantum mechanical implementation based on the modified transfer matrix method to obtain the trap energy level. We present the qualitative impact of electric field on different trap configurations, locations, and host materials, including both semiconductors and oxides. We determine that there is an electric-field related trap level shift and level broadening. We find that these electric-field induced quantum effects can enhance the trap emission rates.

  5. Trap-related injuries to gray wolves in Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, D.W.; Fuller, T.K.; Mech, L.D.; Paul, W.J.; Fritts, S.H.; Berg, W.E.

    1986-01-01

    Gray wolves (Canis lupus) captured in traps with toothed jaws offset 1.8 cm incurred fewer injuries than those captured in 3 other types of steel traps. Few wolves seriously damaged canine or carnassial teeth while in traps.

  6. Charge induced closing of Dionaea muscipula Ellis trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Alexander G; Adesina, Tejumade; Jovanov, Emil

    2008-11-01

    In terms of bioelectrochemistry, Venus flytrap responses can be considered in three stages: stimulus perception, electrical signal transmission, and induction of mechanical and biochemical responses. When an insect touches the trigger hairs, these mechanosensors generate receptor potentials, which induce solitary waves activating the motor cells. We found that the electrical charge injected between a midrib and a lobe closes the Venus flytrap leaf by activating motor cells without mechanical stimulation of trigger hairs. The mean electrical charge required for the closure of the Venus flytrap leaf is 13.6 muC. To close the trap, electrical charge can be submitted as a single charge or applied cumulatively by small portions during a short period of time. Ion channel blocker such as Zn(2+) as well as an uncoupler CCCP, dramatically decreases the speed of the trap closing a few hours after treatment of the soil. This effect is reversible. After soil washing by distilled water, the closing time of Venus flytrap treated by CCCP or ZnCl(2) decreases back from 2-5 s to 0.3 s, but higher electrical charge is needed for trap closure. The mechanism behind closing the upper leaf of Venus flytrap is discussed.

  7. Coherent Population Trapping Induced by Phase Modulated and Fluctuating Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian; HU Xiang-Ming

    2007-01-01

    We examine the effects of cross correlated phase fluctuations on the coherent population trapping (CPT) induced by a pair of phase-modulated fields with equal modulation frequencies in a three-level A system. The maximal coherence of -0.5, which appears when CPT occurs for equal modulation indices, is preserved in the presence of the critically cross-correlated fluctuations. Unexpectedly, the non-maximal coherence, which is established when CPT is obtained for different modulation indices, is significantly enhanced due to the critically cross-correlated fluctuations.

  8. Cavity cooling of a trapped atom using Electromagnetically-Induced Transparency

    CERN Document Server

    Bienert, Marc

    2011-01-01

    A cooling scheme for trapped atoms is proposed, which combines cavity-enhanced scattering and electromagnetically induced transparency. The cooling dynamics exploits a three-photon resonance, which combines laser and cavity excitations. It is shown that relatively fast ground-state cooling can be achieved in the Lamb-Dicke regime and for large cooperativity. Efficient ground-state cooling is found for parameters of ongoing experiments.

  9. Negative bias temperature instability of SiC MOSFET induced by interface trap assisted hole trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Cheng-Tyng; Hung, Chien-Chung; Hung, Hsiang-Ting; Lee, Chwan-Ying; Lee, Lurng-Shehng; Huang, Yao-Feng; Hsu, Fu-Jen

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) characteristics of 4H-SiC metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) and metal oxide semiconductor capacitor (MOSCAP). The shift of threshold voltage approached saturation with time, and the different magnitude of mid-gap voltage shift with different starting biases observed in capacitance-voltage (CV) curves taken from MOSCAP and MOSFET suggested that the hole trapping was the primary mechanism contributing to the NBTI in this study. The trend of mid-gap voltage shift with starting bias and threshold voltage shift with stress bias showed steep change before -10 V and approached saturation after -10 V which can be explained by a process where the hole trapping was assisted by positively charged interface states. The positively charged interface states may have acted as an intermediate state which reduced the overall energy barrier and facilitated the process of hole trapping. The split-CV sweeps with 0 s and 655 s of hold time were essentially overlapped which was consistent with the time evolution characteristic of hole trapping and supported the interface trap assisted hole trapping mechanism.

  10. Charge Trapping in Photovoltaically Active Perovskites and Related Halogenoplumbate Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Marin, Timothy W

    2014-04-01

    Halogenoplumbate perovskites (MeNH3PbX3, where X is I and/or Br) have emerged as promising solar panel materials. Their limiting photovoltaic efficiency depends on charge localization and trapping processes that are presently insufficiently understood. We demonstrate that in halogenoplumbate materials the holes are trapped by organic cations (that deprotonate from their oxidized state) and Pb(2+) cations (as Pb(3+) centers), whereas the electrons are trapped by several Pb(2+) cations, forming diamagnetic lead clusters that also serve as color centers. In some cases, paramagnetic variants of these clusters can be observed. We suggest that charge separation in the halogenoplumbates resembles latent image formation in silver halide photography. Electron and hole trapping by lead clusters in extended dislocations in the bulk may be responsible for accumulation of trapped charge observed in this photovoltaic material.

  11. Phylogenic analysis of adhesion related genes Mad1 revealed a positive selection for the evolution of trapping devices of nematode-trapping fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Liu, Yue; Zhu, Hongyan; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2016-03-04

    Adhesions, the major components of the extracellular fibrillar polymers which accumulate on the outer surface of adhesive traps of nematode-trapping fungi, are thought to have played important roles during the evolution of trapping devices. Phylogenetic analyses based on the genes related to adhesive materials can be of great importance for understanding the evolution of trapping devices. Recently, AoMad1, one homologous gene of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae cell wall protein MAD1, has been functionally characterized as involved in the production of adhesions in the nematode-trapping fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora. In this study, we cloned Mad1 homologous genes from nematode-trapping fungi with various trapping devices. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that species which formed nonadhesive constricting ring (CR) traps more basally placed and species with adhesive traps evolved along two lineages. Likelihood ratio tests (LRT) revealed that significant positive selective pressure likely acted on the ancestral trapping devices including both adhesive and mechanical traps, indicating that the Mad1 genes likely played important roles during the evolution of nematode-trapping fungi. Our study provides new insights into the evolution of trapping devices of nematode-trapping fungi and also contributes to understanding the importance of adhesions during the evolution of nematode-trapping fungi.

  12. Fast thermometry for trapped atoms using recoil-induced resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan-Ting; Su, Dian-Qiang; Ji, Zhong-Hua; Zhang, Hong-Shan; Xiao, Lian-Tuan; Jia, Suo-Tang

    2015-09-01

    We have employed recoil-induced resonance (RIR) with linewidth on the order of 10 kHz to demonstrate the fast thermometry for ultracold atoms. We theoretically calculate the absorption spectrum of RIR which agrees well with the experimental results. The temperature of the ultracold sample derived from the RIR spectrum is T = 84±4.5 μK, which is close to 85 μK that measured by the method of time-of-flight absorption imaging. To exhibit the fast measurement advantage in applying RIR to the ultracold atom thermometry, we study the dependence of ultracold sample temperature on the trapping beam frequency detuning. This method can be applied to determine the translational temperature of molecules in photoassociation dynamics. Project supported by the National Basic Research Development Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921603), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2011AA010801), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61275209, 11304189, 61378015, and 11434007), and Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in Universities of China (Grant No. IRT13076).

  13. Chemical characterization of single micro- and nano-particles by optical catapulting-optical trapping-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, Francisco J.; Fernández-Bravo, Angel; Javier Laserna, J.

    2014-10-01

    Spectral identification of individual micro- and nano-sized particles by the sequential intervention of optical catapulting, optical trapping and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is presented. The three techniques are used for different purposes. Optical catapulting (OC) serves to put the particulate material under inspection in aerosol form. Optical trapping (OT) permits the isolation and manipulation of individual particles from the aerosol, which are subsequently analyzed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Once catapulted, the dynamics of particle trapping depends both on the laser beam characteristics (power and intensity gradient) and on the particle properties (size, mass and shape). Particles are stably trapped in air at atmospheric pressure and can be conveniently manipulated for a precise positioning for LIBS analysis. The spectra acquired from the individually trapped particles permit a straightforward identification of the material inspected. Variability of LIBS signal for the inspection of Ni microspheres was 30% relative standard deviation. OC-OT-LIBS permits the separation of particles in a heterogeneous mixture and the subsequent analysis of the isolated particle of interest. In order to evaluate the sensitivity of the approach, the number of absolute photons emitted by a single trapped particle was calculated. The limit of detection (LOD) for Al2O3 particles was calculated to be 200 attograms aluminium.

  14. Effect of radiation induced deep level traps on Si detector performance

    CERN Document Server

    Eremin, V; Li, Z

    2002-01-01

    The main factor, which leads to semiconductor detector degradation in high-energy physics experiments, is the introduction of lattice defects in the detector material produced by radiation. Based on the spectrum of radiation induced defects in the silicon bulk, the overview of effects and mechanisms responsible for the changes in the main detector parameters such as effective concentration of the space charge in the depleted region, space charge sign inversion, charge collection efficiency, and detector breakdown voltage are considered. Special attention is paid to the electric field distortion related with high concentration of radiation induced deep traps, which is the key question for the design of detectors operating at cryogenic temperature. In particular, the charge collection recovery at low temperature, often refereed as the Lazarus effect, and the limitation for the detection rate related to the polarization effect are considered.

  15. A gene-trap strategy identifies quiescence-induced genes in synchronized myoblasts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ramkumar Sambasivan; Grace K Pavlath; Jyotsna Dhawan

    2008-03-01

    Cellular quiescence is characterized not only by reduced mitotic and metabolic activity but also by altered gene expression. Growing evidence suggests that quiescence is not merely a basal state but is regulated by active mechanisms. To understand the molecular programme that governs reversible cell cycle exit, we focused on quiescence-related gene expression in a culture model of myogenic cell arrest and activation. Here we report the identification of quiescence-induced genes using a gene-trap strategy. Using a retroviral vector, we generated a library of gene traps in C2C12 myoblasts that were screened for arrest-induced insertions by live cell sorting (FACS-gal). Several independent genetrap lines revealed arrest-dependent induction of gal activity, confirming the efficacy of the FACS screen. The locus of integration was identified in 15 lines. In three lines, insertion occurred in genes previously implicated in the control of quiescence, i.e. EMSY – a BRCA2-interacting protein, p8/com1– a p300HAT-binding protein and MLL5 – a SET domain protein. Our results demonstrate that expression of chromatin modulatory genes is induced in G0, providing support to the notion that this reversibly arrested state is actively regulated.

  16. Observations of FRC Trapped Flux Lifetime Relative to Its Prolateness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Chris; Degnan, James; Domonkos, Matthew; Amdahl, David; Ruden, Edward; Wurden, Glen; Weber, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The Field-Reversed Configuration Heating Experiment (FRCHX) explored scientific issues associated with HED laboratory plasmas (HEDLPs) and phenomena relevant to magneto-inertial fusion in a closed-field-line plasma. To create the HEDLP conditions, a field-reversed configuration (FRC) of moderate density was formed via reversed-field theta pinch, translated into a solid liner where it was trapped between two magnetic mirrors, and then adiabatically compressed by solid liner implosion. Shortly following formation, the FRCs typically had a separatrix radius of 3 3.5 cm, peak density of 1017 cm-3, and temperature of 200 eV. The lifetime of trapped flux within the plasma was initially 13-16 μs following formation, or 8-11 μs once the FRC settled within the capture region. This was too short to allow complete compression by the solid liner, even when starting implosion before FRC formation. By moving the mirror coils 10 cm further apart, the magnetic well width increased by 6 8 cm, which resulted in an increase in the trapped flux lifetime by 4 5 μs. This presentation describes characteristics of the FRC plasmas prior to and following the lengthening of the capture region. From the literature, conclusions are made linking FRC stability and prolateness to FRC trapped flux lifetime. This work was supported by DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences.

  17. Quench-induced trapping of magnetic flux in annular

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaroe, M.; Monaco, R.; Rivers, R.;

    2008-01-01

    over 4 orders of magnitude. After the quench the result of the spontaneous production of topological defects, trapped fluxons, is unambiguously observed as zero-field steps in the DC I-V characteristic of the junction. A power-law scaling behavior of trapping probability versus quench rate is found...... with a critical exponent of 0.5 (within experimental error). The main experimental challenges are to generate many identical quenches with accurate cooling rate, to automate data analysis and acquisition, and to suppress external magnetic fields and noise by passive magnetic shielding and compensation....

  18. The Rajahmundry Traps, Andhra Pradesh: Evaluation of their petrogenesis relative to the Deccan Traps

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ajoy K Baksi

    2001-12-01

    Geochemical and geochronological data for rocks from the Rajahmundry Traps, are evaluated for possible correlation with the main Deccan province. Lava flows are found on both banks of the Godavari River and contain an intertrappean sedimentary layer. Based on 40Ar/39Ar age data, rocks on the east bank are post K-T boundary, show normal magnetic polarity, and belong to chron 29N. Their chemistry is identical to lavas in the Mahabaleshwar Formation in the Western Ghats, ∼1000 km away. It was suggested earlier that the genetic link between these geographically widely separated rocks resulted from lava owing down freshly incised river canyons at ∼64 Ma. For the west bank rocks, recent paleomagnetic work indicates lava flows below and above the intertrappean (sedimentary) layer show reversed and normal magnetic polarity, respectively. The chemical composition of the west bank ow above the intertrappean layer is identical to rocks on the east bank. The west bank lava lying below the sedimentary layer, shows chemistry similar to Ambenali Formation lava ows in the western Deccan. 40Ar/39Ar dating and complete chemical characterization of this ow is required to elucidate its petrogenesis with respect to the main Deccan Province.

  19. Laser-induced acoustic desorption coupled with a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habicht, Steven C; Amundson, Lucas M; Duan, Penggao; Vinueza, Nelson R; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2010-01-15

    In recent years, laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) coupled with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer has been demonstrated to provide a valuable technique for the analysis of a wide variety of nonvolatile, thermally labile compounds, including analytes that could not previously be analyzed by mass spectrometry. Although FT-ICR instruments are very powerful, they are also large and expensive and, hence, mainly used as research instruments. In contrast, linear quadrupole ion trap (LQIT) mass spectrometers are common due to several qualities that make these instruments attractive for both academic and industrial settings, such as high sensitivity, large dynamic range, and experimental versatility. Further, the relatively small size of the instruments, comparatively low cost, and the lack of a magnetic field provide some distinct advantages over FT-ICR instruments. Hence, we have coupled the LIAD technique with a commercial LQIT, the Thermo Fischer Scientific LTQ mass spectrometer. The LQIT was modified for a LIAD probe by outfitting the removable back plate of the instrument with a 6 in. ConFlat flange (CFF) port, gate valve, and sample lock. Reagent ions were created using the LQIT's atmospheric pressure ionization source and trapped in the mass analyzer for up to 10 s to allow chemical ionization reactions with the neutral molecules desorbed via LIAD. These initial experiments focused on demonstrating the feasibility of performing LIAD in the LQIT. Hence, the results are compared to those obtained using an FT-ICR mass spectrometer. Despite the lower efficiency in the transfer of desorbed neutral molecules into the ion trap, and the smaller maximum number of available laser pulses, the intrinsically higher sensitivity of the LQIT resulted in a higher sensitivity relative to the FT-ICR.

  20. Shrink-induced sorting using integrated nanoscale magnetic traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawarathna, Dharmakeerthi; Norouzi, Nazila; McLane, Jolie; Sharma, Himanshu; Sharac, Nicholas; Grant, Ted; Chen, Aaron; Strayer, Scott; Ragan, Regina; Khine, Michelle

    2013-02-11

    We present a plastic microfluidic device with integrated nanoscale magnetic traps (NSMTs) that separates magnetic from non-magnetic beads with high purity and throughput, and unprecedented enrichments. Numerical simulations indicate significantly higher localized magnetic field gradients than previously reported. We demonstrated >20 000-fold enrichment for 0.001% magnetic bead mixtures. Since we achieve high purity at all flow-rates tested, this is a robust, rapid, portable, and simple solution to sort target species from small volumes amenable for point-of-care applications. We used the NSMT in a 96 well format to extract DNA from small sample volumes for quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR).

  1. A report on trapped raptors in relation to furbearer trapping in north central North Dakota during the 1975 and 1976 trapping seasons

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Report on eagle mortality caused by hanging bait traps and recommendations on how to prevent them. A detailed breakdown of trapped raptors is included in this report...

  2. FORWARD GATED—DIODE METHOD FOR DIRECTLY MEASURING STRESS—INDUCED INTERFACE TRAPS IN NMOSFET/SOI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuangAihua; YuShan; 等

    2002-01-01

    Forward gated-diode Recombination-Generation(R-G) current method is applied to an NMOSFET/SOI to measure the stress-induced interface traps in this letter.This easy but accurate experimental method can directly give stress-induced average interface traps for characterizing the device's hot carrier characteristics.For the tested device, an expected power law relationship of Δnit-t0.787 between pure stress-induced interface traps and accumulated stressing time is obtained.

  3. Characteristics of Ion Activation and Collision Induced Dissociation Using Digital Ion Trap Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fuxing; Dang, Qiankun; Dai, Xinhua; Fang, Xiang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ding, Li; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2016-08-01

    Collision induced dissociation (CID) is one of the most established techniques for tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The CID of mass selected ion could be realized by ion resonance excitation with a digital rectangular waveform. The method is simple, and highly efficient CID result could be obtained by optimizing the experimental parameters, such as digital waveform voltage, frequency, and q value. In this work, the relationship between ion trapping waveform voltage and frequency at preselected q value, the relationship between waveform frequency and the q value at certain ion trapping voltage for optimum CID efficiency were investigated. Experiment results showed that the max CID efficiency of precursor reserpine ions can be obtained at different trapping waveform voltage and frequency when q and β are different. Based on systematic experimental analysis, the optimum experimental conditions for high CID efficiency can be calculated at any selected β or q. By using digital ion trap technology, the CID process and efficient fragmentation of parent ions can be realized by simply changing the trapping waveform amplitude, frequency, and the β values in the digital ion trap mass spectrometry. The technology and method are simple. It has potential use in ion trap mass spectrometry.

  4. Deep-Trap Stress Induced Leakage Current Model for Nominal and Weak Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamohara, Shiro; Hu, Chenming; Okumura, Tsugunori

    2008-08-01

    We have developed a model of the stress-induced leakage current (SILC) based on the inelastic trap-assisted tunneling (ITAT) by introducing a trap with a deep energy level of 3.6 eV from the bottom of the conduction band. This model can explain both of two field dependencies, i.e., a field dependence of the direct tunneling (DT) for A-mode SILC and that of the Fowler-Nordheim (FN) tunneling for B-mode SILC by analytical equations of a common form. For simple analytical equations, we introduce the most favorable trap position (MFTP), which gives the largest contribution to the leakage current. The trap area density for A-mode SILC of around 1×1010 cm-2 and the area density of the leakage paths for B-mode SILC of 1×102 cm-2 were obtained by comparisons between the experimental results and the present model.

  5. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and infection-related vascular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Elizabeth E; Andrews, Robert K

    2012-11-01

    The innate immune system orchestrated by leukocytes primarily neutrophils, serves to remove dead and dying host cells and to provide protection against invasion by pathogens. Failure of this system results in the onset of sepsis leading to grave consequences for the host. Together with mechanical methods to physically isolate and remove the pathogen, neutrophils also release an important set of proinflammatory biological modulators that mediate recruitment of additional cells to a site of infection and amplify the innate protective response. Additionally, neutrophils release highly charged mixtures of DNA and nuclear proteins named neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These electrostatically-charged adhesive networks trigger intrinsic coagulation, limit dispersion and entrap the pathogens. NETs also contain the neutrophil secretary granule-derived serine proteases, neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G, known to regulate the reactivity of both neutrophils and platelets. Since the characterization of NETs in 2004, new studies of their functional effect in vivo continue to expand upon unexpected extracellular roles for DNA, and in doing so renew attention to the haemostatic role of the leukocyte. This review will provide a basic description of NETs and examine current knowledge of this important system of defense, including recent work illustrating a role for NETs in activation of thrombosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular characterization of a new Babesia bovis thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (BbTRAP2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Alaa Terkawi

    Full Text Available A gene encoding a Babesia bovis protein that shares significant degree of similarity to other apicomplexan thrombospondin-related anonymous proteins (TRAPs was found in the genomic database and designated as BbTRAP2. Recombinant protein containing a conserved region of BbTRAP2 was produced in E. coli. A high antigenicity of recombinant BbTRAP2 (rBbTRAP2 was observed with field B. bovis-infected bovine sera collected from geographically different regions of the world. Moreover, antiserum against rBbTRAP2 specifically reacted with the authentic protein by Western blot analysis and an indirect fluorescent antibody test. Three bands corresponding to 104-, 76-, and 44-kDa proteins were identified in the parasite lysates and two bands of 76- and 44-kDa proteins were detected in the supernatant of cultivated parasites, indicating that BbTRAP2 was proteolytically processed and shed into the culture. Apical and surface localizations of BbTRAP2 were observed in the intracellular and extracellular parasites, respectively, by confocal laser microscopic examination. Moreover, native BbTRAP2 was precipitated by bovine erythrocytes, suggesting its role in the attachment to erythrocytes. Furthermore, the specific antibody to rBbTRAP2 inhibited the growth of B. bovis in a concentration-dependent manner. Consistently, pre-incubation of the free merozoites with the antibody to rBbTRAP2 resulted in an inhibition of the parasite invasion into host erythrocytes. Interestingly, the antibody to rBbTRAP2 was the most inhibitive for the parasite's growth as compared to those of a set of antisera produced against different recombinant proteins, including merozoite surface antigen 2c (BbMSA-2c, rhoptry-associated protein 1 C-terminal (BbRAP-1CT, and spherical body protein 1 (BbSBP-1. These results suggest that BbTRAP2 might be a potential candidate for development of a subunit vaccine against B. bovis infection.

  7. Light-induced evaporative cooling in a magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Hong-Yu; Cheng Hua-Dong; Wang Yu-Zhu; Liu Liang

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental demonstration of light-induced evaporative cooling in a magneto-optical trap.An additional laser is used to interact with atoms at the edge of the atomic cloud in the trap.These atoms get an additional force and evaporated away from the trap by both the magnetic field and laser fields.The remaining atoms have lower kinetic energy and thus are cooled.It reports the measurements on the temperature and atomic number after the evaporative cooling with different parameters including the distance between the laser and the centre of the atomic cloud,the detuning,the intensity.The results show that the light-induced evaporative cooling is a way to generate an ultra-cold atom source.

  8. Radiation damping induced electron trapping and positron creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yanjun; Klimo, Ondrej; Weber, Stefan; Korn, Georg

    2016-10-01

    High power laser facilities with intensities up to 1022 W /cm2 have been realized and the forthcoming installations are expected to reach 10 22 - 24 W /cm2 or even higher. At these intensities, the radiation effects and quantum electrodynamics description come into play. The emitted photon momentum becomes comparable to the momentum of the emitting electrons. In this work, we propose a regime of electron self-injection and trapping in the ultra-high intensity laser-plasma interaction. The electrons accumulated at the head of the laser pulse are injected into the pulse centre due to the strong longitudinal electrostatic field created by the high density shell. These electrons, which experience a restoring force provided by the emitted photons, can be confined in the laser pulse for a long time. The corresponding photons are produced in the region where the laser field is strong. High energy and well collimated positron bunches are produced. This regime may be beneficial for the potential experiments to be carried out on large laser facilities such as ELI. This work was supported by the project ELI: Extreme Light Infrastructure (CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162) from European Regional Development.

  9. Influence of complement on neutrophil extracellular trap release induced by bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmer, Lisa Joanne; Damgaard, Christian; Holmstrup, Palle;

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) release has generally been studied in the absence of serum, or at low concentrations of untreated or heat-inactivated serum. The influence of serum complement on NET release therefore remains unclear. We examined the DNA release induce...

  10. Rotating Magnetohydrodynamic and Trapped Hot-Ion Induced Internal Kinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadarajan, V.

    1993-01-01

    As a new and significant contribution to the tokamak literature, the linear internal MHD kink modes in finite aspect-ratio axisymmetric toroidally rotating tokamak equilibria and their kinetic modifications owing to the presence of hot ions are computationally studied herein using a bilinear form derived using a Lagrangian perturbation procedure. As a practical application, the rotating MHD and kinetic internal kinks are calculated in finite aspect-ratio TFTR- and ITER -like geometries. The MHD and kinetic modes of the rotating tokamak plasmas are found to be significantly destabilized by the centrifugal effects at rotation speeds in the range of 10^4-10^5 rad/s at normal discharge densities. The kinetic instability model provides a unified description of several features of the 'fishbone'-like oscillations such as the slow mode rotating at the plasma rotation frequency, the fast mode with high rotation frequency, and variation of the slow as well as fast mode frequencies with plasma rotation. The slow kinetic modes rotate close to mean plasma rotation speeds, and the fast kinetic modes rotate at about 10 ^5 rad/s. The fast mode rotation frequencies are in the range of the magnetic-precession frequencies of the deeply trapped ions. Also, the kinetic kink modes are found to be excitable in ITER-like ignited tokamak configurations owing to hot fusion products such as alphas. Also, a feasibility study of adaptive distributed parameter control of thermokinetics is demonstrated. Fast transport simulation and control are explored using a nonlinear Galerkin procedure, and a MIMO self-tuning control algorithm. It is found that only the density control can achieve reasonable power set-point follow-up, and that more popular control schemes such as auxiliary power control are not adequate to provide real-world power swings greater than 50-100 MW around the set point. The several computational modules developed for this thesis are as follows. The equilibrium calculations are

  11. Gap-related trapped magnetic flux dependence between single and combined bulk superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Z., E-mail: zgdeng@gmail.co [Laboratory of Applied Physics, Department of Marine Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Tokyo 135-8533 (Japan); Miki, M.; Felder, B.; Tsuzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.; Uetake, T.; Izumi, M. [Laboratory of Applied Physics, Department of Marine Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Tokyo 135-8533 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: {yields} Rectangular YBCO bulks to realize a compact combination. {yields} The gap effect was added to consider in the trapped flux density mapping. {yields} The trapped-flux dependence between single and combined bulks is gap related. {yields} It is possible to estimate the total magnetic flux of bulk combinations. - Abstract: Aiming at examining the trapped-flux dependence between single and combined bulk superconductors for field-pole applications, three rectangular Y{sub 1.65}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} (YBCO) bulks with a possibly compact combination were employed to investigate the trapped-flux characteristics of single and combined bulks with a field-cooling magnetization (FCM) method. A gap-related dependence was found between them. At lower gaps of 1 mm and 5 mm, the peak trapped fields and total magnetic flux of combined bulks are both smaller than the additive values of each single bulk, which can be ascribed to the demagnetization influences of the field around the bulk generated by the adjacent ones. While, at larger gaps like 10 mm, the situation becomes reversed. The combined bulks can attain bigger peak trapped fields as well as total magnetic flux, which indicates that the magnetic field by the bulk combination can reach higher gaps, thanks to the bigger magnetic energy compared with the single bulk. The presented results show that, on one hand, it is possible to estimate the total trapped magnetic flux of combined bulks by an approximate additive method of each single bulk while considering a demagnetization factor; on the other hand, it also means that the performance of combined bulks will be superior to the addition of each single bulk at larger gaps, thus preferable for large-scaled magnet applications.

  12. Signals induced by charge-trapping in EDELWEISS FID detectors: analytical modeling and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Arnaud, Q; Augier, C; Benoît, A; Bergé, L; Billard, J; Blümer, J; de Boissière, T; Broniatowski, A; Camus, P; Cazes, A; Chapellier, M; Charlieux, F; Dumoulin, L; Eitel, K; Foerster, N; Fourches, N; Gascon, J; Giuliani, A; Gros, M; Hehn, L; Heuermann, G; Juillard, A; De Jésus, M; Kleifges, M; Kozlov, V; Kraus, H; Kudryavtsev, V A; Kéfélian, C; Le-Sueur, H; Lin, J; Marnieros, S; Navick, X -F; Nones, C; Olivieri, E; Pari, P; Paul, B; Piro, M -C; Poda, D; Queguiner, E; Rozov, S; Sanglard, V; Schmidt, B; Scorza, S; Siebenborn, B; Tcherniakhovski, D; Vagneron, L; Weber, M; Yakushev, E

    2016-01-01

    The EDELWEISS-III direct dark matter search experiment uses cryogenic HP-Ge detectors Fully covered with Inter-Digitized electrodes (FID). They are operated at low fields ($<1\\;\\mathrm{V/cm}$), and as a consequence charge-carrier trapping significantly affects both the ionization and heat energy measurements. This paper describes an analytical model of the signals induced by trapped charges in FID detectors based on the Shockley-Ramo theorem. It is used to demonstrate that veto electrodes, initially designed for the sole purpose of surface event rejection, can be used to provide a sensitivity to the depth of the energy deposits, characterize the trapping in the crystals, perform heat and ionization energy corrections and improve the ionization baseline resolutions. These procedures are applied successfully to actual data.

  13. Vacuum-Induced Quantum Interference in a Trapped ∧-Configuration Three-Level System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zheng-Ling; YIN Jian-Ping

    2005-01-01

    @@ In consideration of quantization of centre-of-mass motion, we derive the second-order solution of the dynamic equation of a ∧-configuration three-level atom confined in an approximately harmonic trap by using the timedependent perturbation theory. It is found that there are a series of dark lines in the second-order probability spectrum with multi-peak structures, which is the result of the quantum interference from the same vacuum mode in the spontaneous decay process of the trapped atom from the upper level to the two nearby lower levels. Our study shows that the second-order spectrum may be modified by the oscillation frequency Ω of the trap and the frequency difference △ between two lower levels of the three-level atom, and the depth of the dark lines from the vacuum-induced quantum interference effect is strongly dependent on the above two parameters (Ω and △).

  14. Trappings of technology: casting palliative care nursing as legal relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Ann-Claire

    2012-12-01

    Community palliative care nurses in Perth have joined the throng of healthcare workers relying on personal digital assistants (PDAs) to store, access and send client information in 'real time'. This paper is guided by Heidegger's approach to technologies and Habermas' insights into the role of law in administering social welfare programs to reveal how new ethical and legal understandings regarding patient information add to nursing's professional responsibilities. This qualitative research interprets data from interviews with twenty community palliative care nurses about clients' legal rights to informational privacy and confidentiality. It explores nurses' views of their nursing responsibilities regarding clients' legal rights, liability issues, bureaucratic monitoring and enforcement procedures. It concludes that nurses and clients are construed as legal subjects entrenched in legal relations that have magnified since these nurses began using PDAs in 2005/2006. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Trapped-ion probing of light-induced charging effects on dielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlander, M; Brownnutt, M; Haensel, W; Blatt, R, E-mail: max.harlander@uibk.ac.a [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Innsbruck, Technikerstrasse 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2010-09-15

    We use a string of confined {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ions to measure perturbations to a trapping potential which are caused by the light-induced charging of an antireflection-coated window and of insulating patches on the ion-trap electrodes. The electric fields induced at the ions' position are characterized as a function of distance to the dielectric and as a function of the incident optical power and wavelength. The measurement of the ion-string position is sensitive to as few as 40 elementary charges per {radical}(Hz) on the dielectric at distances of the order of millimetres, and perturbations are observed for illuminations with light of wavelengths as large as 729 nm. This has important implications for the future of miniaturized ion-trap experiments, notably with regard to the choice of electrode material and the optics that must be integrated in the vicinity of the ion. The method presented here can be readily applied to the investigation of charging effects beyond the context of ion-trap experiments.

  16. Micro-Raman Spectroscopy of Silver Nanoparticle Induced Stress on Optically-Trapped Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankapur, Aseefhali; Krishnamurthy, R. Sagar; Zachariah, Elsa; Santhosh, Chidangil; Chougule, Basavaraj; Praveen, Bhavishna; Valiathan, Manna; Mathur, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    We report here results of a single-cell Raman spectroscopy study of stress effects induced by silver nanoparticles in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). A high-sensitivity, high-resolution Raman Tweezers set-up has been used to monitor nanoparticle-induced biochemical changes in optically-trapped single cells. Our micro-Raman spectroscopic study reveals that hMSCs treated with silver nanoparticles undergo oxidative stress at doping levels in excess of 2 µg/ml, with results of a statistical analysis of Raman spectra suggesting that the induced stress becomes more dominant at nanoparticle concentration levels above 3 µg/ml. PMID:22514708

  17. Localization of ionization-induced trapping in a laser wakefield accelerator using a density down-ramp

    CERN Document Server

    Hansson, M.; Ekerfelt, H.; Aurand, B.; Gallardo Ganzalez, I.; Desforges, F. G.; Davoine, X.; Maitrallain, A.; Reymond, S.; Monot, P.; Persson, A.; Dobosz Dufrénoy S.; Wahlström C-G.; Cros, B.; Lundh, O.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a study on controlled trapping of electrons, by field ionization of nitrogen ions, in laser wakefield accelerators in variable length gas cells. In addition to ionization-induced trapping in the density plateau inside the cells, which results in wide, but stable, electron energy spectra, a regime of ionization-induced trapping localized in the density down-ramp at the exit of the gas cells, is found. The resulting electron energy spectra are peaked, with 10% shot-to-shot fluctuations in peak energy. Ionization-induced trapping of electrons in the density down-ramp is a way to trap and accelerate a large number of electrons, thus improving the efficiency of the laser-driven wakefield acceleration.

  18. Boron induced charge traps near the interface of Si/SiO{sub 2} probed by second harmonic generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Heungman; Varga, Kalman; Tolk, Norman [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Qi, Jingbo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Xu, Ying [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Zomega Terahertz Corporation, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Weiss, Sharon M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Rogers, Bridget R. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Nashville, Vanderbilt University, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Luepke, Gunter [Department of Applied Science, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia 23187 (United States)

    2010-08-15

    We review recent second harmonic generation (SHG) measurements for highly boron-doped Si/SiO{sub 2} systems. Using electric field sensitive time-dependent SHG (TD-SHG), we determined that the direction of the initial DC electric field at the interface induced by boron induced charge traps is from oxide to silicon thus demonstrating that the boron induced charge traps in the oxide are positively charged. For a thin oxide ({proportional_to}2 nm) both boron traps and O{sub 2} surface oxide traps contribute. However, for a highly boron-doped Si/SiO{sub 2} sample with a thick thermally grown oxide (thickness: 12 nm), the TD-SHG signal exhibits a monotonic decrease arising from filling only the boron charge traps. By fitting our data, we show that the interface effective susceptibility vertical stroke {chi}{sup (2)} vertical stroke is heavily dependent on doping concentration. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. Substrate-induced activation of a trapped IMC-mediated protein folding intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, M; Fu, X; Shinde, U

    2001-04-01

    While several unfolded proteins acquire native structures through distinct folding intermediates, the physiological relevance and importance of such states in the folding kinetics remain controversial. The intramolecular chaperone (IMC) of subtilisin was used to trap a partially folded, stable crosslinked intermediate conformer (CLIC) through a disulfide bond between mutated IMC and subtilisin. The trapped CLIC contains non-native interactions. Here we show that CLIC can be induced into a catalytically active form by incubating it with small peptide substrates. The structure and catalytic properties of the activated crosslinked intermediate conformer (A-CLIC) differ from those of the fully folded enzyme in that A-CLIC lacks any endopeptidase activity toward a large protein substrate. Our results show that a disulfide-linked partially folded protein can be induced to acquire catalytic activity with a substrate specificity that is different from completely folded subtilisin. These results also suggest that protein folding intermediates may also participate in catalytic reactions.

  20. Capillary-driven microfluidic chips with evaporation-induced flow control and dielectrophoretic microbead trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temiz, Yuksel; Skorucak, Jelena; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2014-07-01

    This work reports our efforts on developing simple-to-use microfluidic devices for point-of-care diagnostic applications with recent extensions that include the trapping of microbeads using dielectrophoresis (DEP) and the modulation of the liquid flow using integrated microheaters. DEP serves the purpose of trapping microbeads coated with receptors and analytes for detection of a fluorescent signal. The microheater is actuated once the chip is filled by capillarity, creating an evaporation-induced flow tuned according to assay conditions. The chips are composed of a glass substrate patterned with 50-nm-thick Pd electrodes and microfluidic structures made using a 20-μm-thick dry-film resist (DFR). Chips are covered/sealed by low temperature (50°C) lamination of a 50-μm-thick DFR layer having excellent optical and mechanical properties. To separate cleaned and sealed chips from the wafer, we used an effective chip singulation technique which we informally call the "chip-olate" process. In the experimental section, we first studied dielectrophoretic trapping of 10-μm beads for flow rates ranging from 80 pL s-1 to 2.5 nL s-1 that are generated by an external syringe pump. Then, we characterized the embedded microheater in DFR-covered chips. Flow rates as high as 8 nL s-1 were generated by evaporation-induced flow when the heater was biased by 10 V, corresponding to 270-mW power. Finally, DEP-based trapping and fluorescent detection of functionalized beads were demonstrated as the flow was generated by evaporation-induced flow after the microfluidic structures were filled by capillarity.

  1. Olive fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) populations in relation to region, trap type, season, and availability of fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Victoria Y; Miller, Gina T; Stewart-Leslie, Judy; Rice, Richard E; Phillips, Phil A

    2006-12-01

    Olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae (Gmelin), was monitored with adult captures by season and trap type, and was related to fruit volume and nonharvested fruit to elucidate the occurrence of the newly introduced pest in California. The highest numbers of adults captured in ChamP traps in olive trees, Olea europaea, were in October in an inland valley location, and in September in a coastal location. Comparisons of trap types showed that the number of olive fruit fly adults captured in Pherocon AM traps in a commercial orchard was significantly greater than in ChamP traps. A significantly greater number of females were captured in Pherocon AM traps with bait packets and pheromone lures than traps with pheromone lures alone, while a significantly greater number of adults and males were captured in traps with pheromone lures alone. Significantly more adults were captured in ChamP traps with bait packets and pheromone lures versus traps with bait packets alone. Fruit volume increased by four times from mid-June to mid-November. Olive fruit fly was found to oviposit on small olive fruit fruit set, the maximum number of ovipositional sites per fruit occurred in October, and the greatest number of pupae and adults were reared from fruit collected in September and October. The highest numbers of pupae were collected from nonharvested fruit in March when high numbers of adults were captured in the same orchard.

  2. [Mammals' camera-trapping in Sierra Nanchititla, Mexico: relative abundance and activity patterns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroy-Vilchis, Octavio; Zarco-González, Martha M; Rodríguez-Soto, Clarita; Soria-Díaz, Leroy; Urios, Vicente

    2011-03-01

    Species conservation and their management depend on the availability of their population behavior and changes in time. This way, population studies include aspects such as species abundance and activity pattern, among others, with the advantage that nowadays new technologies can be applied, in addition to common methods. In this study, we used camera-traps to obtain the index of relative abundance and to establish activity pattern of medium and large mammals in Sierra Nanchititla, Mexico. The study was conducted from December 2003 to May 2006, with a total sampling effort of 4 305 trap-days. We obtained 897 photographs of 19 different species. Nasua narica, Sylvilagus floridanus and Urocyon cinereoargenteus were the most abundant, in agreement with the relative abundance index (RAI, number of independent records/100 trap-days), and according to previous studies with indirect methods in the area. The activity patterns of the species showed that 67% of them are nocturnal, except Odocoileus virginianus, Nasua narica and others. Some species showed differences with previously reported patterns, which are related with seasonality, resources availability, organism sex, principally. The applied method contributed with reliable data about relative abundance and activity patterns.

  3. Resonant Trapping in the Galactic Disc and Halo and its Relation with Moving Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Moreno, Edmundo; Schuster, William

    2015-01-01

    With the use of a detailed Milky Way nonaxisymmetric potential, observationally and dynamically constrained, the e?ects of the bar and the spiral arms in the Galaxy are studied in the disc and in the stellar halo. Especially the trapping of stars in the disc and Galactic halo by resonances on the Galactic plane, induced by the Galactic bar, has been analysed in detail. To this purpose, a new method is presented to delineate the trapping regions using empirical diagrams of some orbital properties obtained in the Galactic potential. In these diagrams we plot in the inertial Galactic frame a characteristic orbital energy versus a characteristic orbital angular momentum, or versus the orbital Jacobi constant in the reference frame of the bar, when this is the only nonaxisymmetric component in the Galactic potential. With these diagrams some trapping regions are obtained in the disc and halo using a sample of disc stars and halo stars in the solar neighbourhood. We compute several families of periodic orbits on th...

  4. Trap states induced by reactive ion etching in AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jun; Zhao, Sheng-Lei; Mi, Min-Han; Hou, Bin; Yang, Xiao-Lei; Zhang, Jin-Cheng; Ma, Xiao-Hua; Hao, Yue

    2015-11-01

    Frequency-dependent conductance measurements were carried out to investigate the trap states induced by reactive ion etching in AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) quantitatively. For the non-recessed HEMT, the trap state density decreases from 2.48 × 1013 cm-2·eV-1 at an energy of 0.29 eV to 2.79 × 1012 cm-2·eV-1 at ET = 0.33 eV. In contrast, the trap state density of 2.38 × 1013-1.10 × 1014 cm-2·eV-1 is located at ET in a range of 0.30-0.33 eV for the recessed HEMT. Thus, lots of trap states with shallow energy levels are induced by the gate recess etching. The induced shallow trap states can be changed into deep trap states by 350 °C annealing process. As a result, there are two different types of trap sates, fast and slow, in the annealed HEMT. The parameters of the annealed HEMT are ET = 0.29-0.31 eV and DT = 8.16 × 1012-5.58 × 1013 cm-2·eV-1 for the fast trap states, and ET = 0.37-0.45 eV and DT = 1.84 × 1013 - 8.50 × 1013 cm-2·eV-1 for the slow trap states. The gate leakage currents are changed by the etching and following annealing process, and this change can be explained by the analysis of the trap states. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61334002 and 61106106).

  5. Trap states induced by reactive ion etching in AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗俊; 赵胜雷; 宓珉瀚; 侯斌; 杨晓蕾; 张进成; 马晓华; 郝跃

    2015-01-01

    Frequency-dependent conductance measurements were carried out to investigate the trap states induced by reactive ion etching in AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) quantitatively. For the non-recessed HEMT, the trap state density decreases from 2.48 × 1013 cm−2·eV−1 at an energy of 0.29 eV to 2.79 × 1012 cm−2·eV−1 at ET=0.33 eV. In contrast, the trap state density of 2.38 × 1013–1.10 × 1014 cm−2·eV−1 is located at ET in a range of 0.30–0.33 eV for the recessed HEMT. Thus, lots of trap states with shallow energy levels are induced by the gate recess etching. The induced shallow trap states can be changed into deep trap states by 350 ◦C annealing process. As a result, there are two different types of trap sates, fast and slow, in the annealed HEMT. The parameters of the annealed HEMT are ET=0.29–0.31 eV and DT=8.16 × 1012–5.58 × 1013 cm−2·eV−1 for the fast trap states, and ET=0.37–0.45 eV and DT=1.84 × 1013–8.50 × 1013 cm−2·eV−1 for the slow trap states. The gate leakage currents are changed by the etching and following annealing process, and this change can be explained by the analysis of the trap states.

  6. Aflatoxin B1 Induces Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Autophagy and Extracellular Trap Formation in Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yanan; Shi, Xiaochen; Tang, Xudong; Wang, Yang; Shen, Fengge; Zhang, Qiaoli; Wang, Chao; Jiang, Mingguo; Liu, Mingyuan; Yu, Lu

    2017-01-01

    Aflatoxins are a group of highly toxic mycotoxins with high carcinogenicity that are commonly found in foods. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is the most toxic member of the aflatoxin family. A recent study reported that AFB1 can induce autophagy, but whether AFB1 can induce extracellular traps (ETs) and the relationships among innate immune responses, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and autophagy and the ETs induced by AFB1 remain unknown. Here, we demonstrated that AFB1 induced a complete autophagic process in macrophages (MΦ) (THP-1 cells and RAW264.7 cells). In addition, AFB1 induced the generation of MΦ ETs (METs) in a dose-dependent manner. In particular, the formation of METs significantly reduced the AFB1 content. Further analysis using specific inhibitors showed that the inhibition of either autophagy or ROS prevented MET formation caused by AFB1, indicating that autophagy and ROS were required for AFB1-induced MET formation. The inhibition of ROS prevented autophagy, indicating that ROS generation occurred upstream of AFB1-induced autophagy. Taken together, these data suggest that AFB1 induces ROS-mediated autophagy and ETs formation and an M1 phenotype in MΦ. PMID:28280716

  7. Long Working-Distance Optical Trap for in Situ Analysis of Contact-Induced Phase Transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ryan D; Lance, Sara; Gordon, Joshua A; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2015-06-16

    A novel optical trapping technique is described that combines an upward propagating Gaussian beam and a downward propagating Bessel beam. Using this optical arrangement and an on-demand droplet generator makes it possible to rapidly and reliably trap particles with a wide range of particle diameters (∼1.5-25 μm), in addition to crystalline particles, without the need to adjust the optical configuration. Additionally, a new image analysis technique is described to detect particle phase transitions using a template-based autocorrelation of imaged far-field elastically scattered laser light. The image analysis allows subtle changes in particle characteristics to be quantified. The instrumental capabilities are validated with observations of deliquescence and homogeneous efflorescence of well-studied inorganic salts. Then, a novel collision-based approach to seeded crystal growth is described in which seed crystals are delivered to levitated aqueous droplets via a nitrogen gas flow. To our knowledge, this is the first account of contact-induced phase changes being studied in an optical trap. This instrument offers a novel and simple analytical technique for in situ measurements and observations of phase changes and crystal growth processes relevant to atmospheric science, industrial crystallization, pharmaceuticals, and many other fields.

  8. Piezoelectrically-induced trap-depth reduction model of elastico-mechanoluminescent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, B. P.; Chandra, V. K.; Jha, Piyush

    2015-03-01

    Considering the detrapping of charge carriers due to reduction in trap-depth caused by piezoelectric field produced by applied pressure, an expression is derived for the detrapping rate of electrons. Then, an expression is obtained for the rate of generation of excited ions produced during capture of detrapped electrons by Eu3+ ions in persistent luminescent materials or by the energy released during electron-hole recombination in ZnS:Mn crystals. Finally, an expression is explored for the elastico-mechanoluminescence (EML) intensity, which is able to explain satisfactorily the characteristics of EML for the application of static pressure as well as for impact pressure. The total number of detrapped electrons and the total EML intensity are found to increase linearly with the electrostatic energy of the crystals in piezoelectric field. It is shown that the EML intensity should increase with the EML efficiency, number of crystallites (volume of sample), concentration of local piezoelectric regions in crystallites, piezoelectric constant of local piezoelectric regions, average length of the local piezoelectric regions, total number of electron traps, pressing rate, and applied pressure, and it should be higher for the materials having low value of threshold pressure and low value of trap-depth in unstressed condition. On the basis of the piezoelectrically-induced trap-depth reduction model of EML reported in the present investigation novel intense elastico mechanoluminescent materials having repetitive EML with undiminished intensity for successive loadings can be tailored which may find applications in sensing, imaging, lighting, colored displays, and other mechano-optical devices.

  9. Measurement of magic-wavelength optical dipole trap by using the laser-induced fluorescence spectra of trapped single cesium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bei; Jin, Gang; Sun, Rui; He, Jun; Wang, Junmin

    2017-07-01

    Based on the multi-level model, we have calculated light shifts for Zeeman states of hyperfine levels of cesium (Cs) 6S1/2 ground state and 6P3/2 excited state.The magic-wavelength linearly-polarized optical dipole trap (ODT) for Cs 6S1/2 F=4, mF=+4 - 6P3/2 F'=5, mF=+5 transition is experimentally constructed and characterized by using the laser-induced fluorescence spectra of trapped single Cs atoms. The magic wavelength is 937.7 nm which produces almost the same light shift for 6S1/2 F=4, mF=+4 ground state and 6P3/2 F'=5, mF=+5 excited state with linearly-polarized ODT laser beam. Compared to undisturbed Cs 6S1/2 F=4, mF=+4 - 6P3/2 F'=5, mF=+5 transition frequency in free space, the differential light shift is less than 0.7 MHz in a linearly-polarized 937.7 nm ODT, which is less than 1.2% of the trap depth. We also discussed influence of the trap depth and the bias magnetic field on the measurement results.

  10. Thermally induced structural modifications and O{sub 2} trapping in highly porous silica nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alessi, A., E-mail: antonino.alessi@unipa.it; Agnello, S.; Iovino, G.; Buscarino, G.; Melodia, E.G.; Cannas, M.; Gelardi, F.M.

    2014-12-15

    In this work we investigate by Raman spectroscopy the effect of isochronal (2 h) thermal treatments in air in the temperature range 200–1000 °C of amorphous silicon dioxide porous nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 5 up to 15 nm and specific surface 590–690 m{sup 2}/g. Our results indicate that the amorphous structure changes similarly to other porous systems previously investigated, in fact superficial SiOH groups are removed, Si–O–Si linkages are created and the ring statistic is modified, furthermore these data evidence that the three membered rings do not contribute significantly to the Raman signal detected at about 495 cm{sup −1}. In addition, after annealing at 900 and 1000 °C we noted the appearance of the O{sub 2} emission at 1272 nm, absent in the not treated samples. The measure of the O{sub 2} emission has been combined with electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of the γ irradiation induced HO{sup ·}{sub 2} radicals to investigate the O{sub 2} content per mass unit of thin layers of silica. Our data reveal that the porous nanoparticles have a much lower ability to trap O{sub 2} molecules per mass units than nonporous silica supporting a model by which O{sub 2} trapping inside a surface layer of about 1 nm of silica is always limited. - Highlights: • O{sub 2} emission and HO{sup ·}{sub 2} electron paramagnetic resonance signals are investigated. • Silica surface ability to trap O{sub 2} molecules is explored by thermal treatments. • Raman study of thermally induced structural changes in porous silica nanoparticles. • Raman signal attributable to the three membered rings in silica.

  11. Anthropogenic impacts to the recovery of the Mexican gray wolf with a focus on trapping-related incidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Trey T.; Cain, James W.; Roemer, Gary W.

    2013-01-01

    Concerns regarding the potential negative impacts of regulated furbearer trapping to reintroduced Mexican gray wolves (Canis lupus baileyi), led to an executive order prohibiting trapping in the New Mexico, USA, portion of the Blue Range Wolf Recovery Area. This ban was to last for 6 months and required an evaluation of the risk posed to wolves by traps and snares legally permitted in New Mexico. We reviewed potential threats to wolves in the Blue Range Wolf Recovery Area, including threats associated with regulated furbearer trapping. One hundred Mexican gray wolf mortalities have been documented during the reintroduction effort (1998–2011). Of those mortalities with a known cause, >81% were human-caused resulting from illegal shooting (n = 43), vehicle collisions (n = 14), lethal removal by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS; n = 12), non-project-related trapping (n = 2), project-related trapping (n = 1), and legal shooting by the public (n = 1). Ten wolves died due to unknown causes. The remaining 17 mortalities were a result of natural causes (e.g., starvation, disease). An additional 23 wolves were permanently, but non-lethally, removed from the wild by the USFWS. Of 13 trapping incidents in New Mexico that involved non-project trappers (i.e., trappers not associated with USFWS or U.S. Department of Agriculture-Wildlife Services), 7 incidents are known to have resulted in injuries to wolves: 2 wolves sustained injuries severe enough to result in leg amputations and 2 additional wolves died as a result of injuries sustained. Foothold traps with rubber-padded jaws and properly set snares may reduce trap-related injuries to Mexican gray wolves; however, impacts caused by trapping are overshadowed by other anthropogenic impacts (e.g., illegal shooting, non-lethal permanent removal, and vehicle collisions).

  12. Direct observation of 0.57 eV trap-related RF output power reduction in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arehart, A. R.; Sasikumar, A.; Rajan, S.; Via, G. D.; Poling, B.; Winningham, B.; Heller, E. R.; Brown, D.; Pei, Y.; Recht, F.; Mishra, U. K.; Ringel, S. A.

    2013-02-01

    This paper reports direct evidence for trap-related RF output power loss in GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) through increased concentration of a specific electron trap at EC-0.57 eV that is located in the drain access region, as a function of accelerated life testing (ALT). The trap is detected by constant drain current deep level transient spectroscopy (CID-DLTS) and the CID-DLTS thermal emission time constant precisely matches the measured drain lag. Both drain lag and CID-DLTS measurements show this state to already exist in pre-stressed devices, which coupled with its strong increase in concentration as a function of stress in the absence of significant increases in concentrations of other detected traps, imply its role in causing degradation, in particular knee walkout. This study reveals EC-0.57 eV trap concentration tracks degradation induced by ALT for MOCVD-grown HEMTs supplied by several commercial and university sources. The results suggest this defect has a common source and may be a key degradation pathway in AlGaN/GaN HEMTs and/or an indicator to predict device lifetime.

  13. Canine Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Release Induced by the Apicomplexan Parasite Neospora caninum In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhengkai; Hermosilla, Carlos; Taubert, Anja; He, Xuexiu; Wang, Xiaocen; Gong, Pengtao; Li, Jianhua; Yang, Zhengtao; Zhang, Xichen

    2016-01-01

    Neosporosis is considered as one of the main causes of abortion and severe economic losses in dairy industry. The Canis genus serving as one of the confirmed definitive hosts of the apicomplexan parasite Neospora caninum (N. caninum) plays a critical role in its life cycle. However, the effects of N. caninum on its definitive hosts of neutrophils extracellular traps (NETs) formation remain unclear. In the present study, N. caninum tachyzoite-induced canine NETs formation was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Visualization of DNA decorated with H3, neutrophil elastase (NE), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) within N. caninum tachyzoite-induced NETs were examined using fluorescence confocal microscopy analyses. Furthermore, the formation of canine NETs was quantified using Sytox Green staining, and the LDH levels in supernatants were examined by an LDH Cytotoxicity Assay® kit. The results clearly showed that NETs-like structures were induced by N. caninum tachyzoites, and the major components within these structures induced by N. caninum tachyzoite were further confirmed by fluorescence confocal microscopy visualization. These results suggest that N. caninum tachyzoites strongly induced NETs formation in canine polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN). In functional inhibition assays, the blockings of NADPH oxidase, NE, MPO, SOCE, ERK 1/2, and p38 MAPK signaling pathways significantly inhibited N. caninum tachyzoite-induced NETs formation. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report the formation of NETs in canine PMN against N. caninum infection. PMID:27843440

  14. Canine Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Release Induced by the Apicomplexan Parasite Neospora caninum In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhengkai; Hermosilla, Carlos; Taubert, Anja; He, Xuexiu; Wang, Xiaocen; Gong, Pengtao; Li, Jianhua; Yang, Zhengtao; Zhang, Xichen

    2016-01-01

    Neosporosis is considered as one of the main causes of abortion and severe economic losses in dairy industry. The Canis genus serving as one of the confirmed definitive hosts of the apicomplexan parasite Neospora caninum (N. caninum) plays a critical role in its life cycle. However, the effects of N. caninum on its definitive hosts of neutrophils extracellular traps (NETs) formation remain unclear. In the present study, N. caninum tachyzoite-induced canine NETs formation was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Visualization of DNA decorated with H3, neutrophil elastase (NE), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) within N. caninum tachyzoite-induced NETs were examined using fluorescence confocal microscopy analyses. Furthermore, the formation of canine NETs was quantified using Sytox Green staining, and the LDH levels in supernatants were examined by an LDH Cytotoxicity Assay(®) kit. The results clearly showed that NETs-like structures were induced by N. caninum tachyzoites, and the major components within these structures induced by N. caninum tachyzoite were further confirmed by fluorescence confocal microscopy visualization. These results suggest that N. caninum tachyzoites strongly induced NETs formation in canine polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN). In functional inhibition assays, the blockings of NADPH oxidase, NE, MPO, SOCE, ERK 1/2, and p38 MAPK signaling pathways significantly inhibited N. caninum tachyzoite-induced NETs formation. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report the formation of NETs in canine PMN against N. caninum infection.

  15. A role for muscarinic receptors in neutrophil extracellular trap formation and levamisole-induced autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Purmalek, Monica M.; Moore, Erica; Waldman, Meryl; Walter, Peter J.; Garraffo, H. Martin; Phillips, Karran A.; Preston, Kenzie L.; Graf, Jonathan; Grayson, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    Levamisole, an anthelmintic drug with cholinergic properties, has been implicated in cases of drug-induced vasculitis when added to cocaine for profit purposes. Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation is a cell death mechanism characterized by extrusion of chromatin decorated with granule proteins. Aberrant NET formation and degradation have been implicated in idiopathic autoimmune diseases that share features with levamisole-induced autoimmunity as well as in drug-induced autoimmunity. This study’s objective was to determine how levamisole modulates neutrophil biology and its putative effects on the vasculature. Murine and human neutrophils exposed to levamisole demonstrated enhanced NET formation through engagement of muscarinic subtype 3 receptor. Levamisole-induced NETosis required activation of Akt and the RAF/MEK/ERK pathway, ROS induction through the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, and peptidylarginine deiminase activation. Sera from two cohorts of patients actively using levamisole-adulterated cocaine displayed autoantibodies against NET components. Cutaneous biopsy material obtained from individuals exposed to levamisole suggests that neutrophils produce NETs in areas of vasculitic inflammation and thrombosis. NETs generated by levamisole were toxic to endothelial cells and impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. Stimulation of muscarinic receptors on neutrophils by cholinergic agonists may contribute to the pathophysiology observed in drug-induced autoimmunity through the induction of inflammatory responses and neutrophil-induced vascular damage. PMID:28194438

  16. A role for muscarinic receptors in neutrophil extracellular trap formation and levamisole-induced autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Purmalek, Monica M; Moore, Erica; Waldman, Meryl; Walter, Peter J; Garraffo, H Martin; Phillips, Karran A; Preston, Kenzie L; Graf, Jonathan; Kaplan, Mariana J; Grayson, Peter C

    2017-02-09

    Levamisole, an anthelmintic drug with cholinergic properties, has been implicated in cases of drug-induced vasculitis when added to cocaine for profit purposes. Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation is a cell death mechanism characterized by extrusion of chromatin decorated with granule proteins. Aberrant NET formation and degradation have been implicated in idiopathic autoimmune diseases that share features with levamisole-induced autoimmunity as well as in drug-induced autoimmunity. This study's objective was to determine how levamisole modulates neutrophil biology and its putative effects on the vasculature. Murine and human neutrophils exposed to levamisole demonstrated enhanced NET formation through engagement of muscarinic subtype 3 receptor. Levamisole-induced NETosis required activation of Akt and the RAF/MEK/ERK pathway, ROS induction through the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, and peptidylarginine deiminase activation. Sera from two cohorts of patients actively using levamisole-adulterated cocaine displayed autoantibodies against NET components. Cutaneous biopsy material obtained from individuals exposed to levamisole suggests that neutrophils produce NETs in areas of vasculitic inflammation and thrombosis. NETs generated by levamisole were toxic to endothelial cells and impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. Stimulation of muscarinic receptors on neutrophils by cholinergic agonists may contribute to the pathophysiology observed in drug-induced autoimmunity through the induction of inflammatory responses and neutrophil-induced vascular damage.

  17. Weyl spin-orbit-coupling-induced interactions in uniform and trapped atomic quantum fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Reena; Singh, G. S.; Bosse, Jürgen

    2013-11-01

    We establish through analytical and numerical studies of thermodynamic quantities for noninteracting atomic gases that the isotropic three-dimensional spin-orbit coupling, the Weyl coupling, induces interaction which counters “effective” attraction (repulsion) of the exchange symmetry present in zero-coupling Bose (Fermi) gas. The exact analytical expressions for the grand potential and hence for several thermodynamic quantities have been obtained for this purpose in both uniform and trapped cases. It is enunciated that many interesting features of spin-orbit-coupled systems revealed theoretically can be understood in terms of coupling-induced modifications in statistical interparticle potential. The temperature dependence of the chemical potential, specific heat, and isothermal compressibility for a uniform Bose gas is found to have signature of the incipient Bose-Einstein condensation in the very weak coupling regime although the system does not really go in the Bose-condensed phase. The transition temperature in the harmonically trapped case decreases with an increase of coupling strength consistent with the weakening of the statistical attractive interaction. Anomalous behavior of some thermodynamic quantities, partly akin to that in dimensions less than two, appears for uniform fermions as soon as the Fermi level goes down the Dirac point on increasing the coupling strength. It is suggested that the fluctuation-dissipation theorem can be utilized to verify anomalous behaviors from studies of long-wavelength fluctuations in bunching and antibunching effects.

  18. Reversible photo-induced trap formation in mixed-halide hybrid perovskites for photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoke, Eric T; Slotcavage, Daniel J; Dohner, Emma R; Bowring, Andrea R; Karunadasa, Hemamala I; McGehee, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    We report on reversible, light-induced transformations in (CH3NH3)Pb(Br x I1-x )3. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of these perovskites develop a new, red-shifted peak at 1.68 eV that grows in intensity under constant, 1-sun illumination in less than a minute. This is accompanied by an increase in sub-bandgap absorption at ∼1.7 eV, indicating the formation of luminescent trap states. Light soaking causes a splitting of X-ray diffraction (XRD) peaks, suggesting segregation into two crystalline phases. Surprisingly, these photo-induced changes are fully reversible; the XRD patterns and the PL and absorption spectra revert to their initial states after the materials are left for a few minutes in the dark. We speculate that photoexcitation may cause halide segregation into iodide-rich minority and bromide-enriched majority domains, the former acting as a recombination center trap. This instability may limit achievable voltages from some mixed-halide perovskite solar cells and could have implications for the photostability of halide perovskites used in optoelectronics.

  19. Particle rotational trapping on a floating electrode by rotating induced-charge electroosmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yukun; Liu, Weiyu; Liu, Jiangwei; Tao, Ye; Guo, Yongbo; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2016-09-01

    We describe a novel rotating trait of induced-charge electroosmotic slip above a planar metal surface, a phenomenon termed "Rotating induced-charge electro-osmosis" (ROT-ICEO), in the context of a new microfluidic technology for tunable particle rotation or rotational trap. ROT-ICEO has a dynamic flow stagnation line (FSL) that rotates synchronously with a background circularly polarized electric field. We reveal that the rotating FSL of ROT-ICEO gives rise to a net hydrodynamic torque that is responsible for rotating fluids or particles in the direction of the applied rotating electric field either synchronously or asynchronously, the magnitude of which is adjusted by a balance between rotation of FSL and amplitude of angular-direction flow component oscillating at twice the field frequency. Supported by experimental observation, our physical demonstration with ROT-ICEO proves invaluable for the design of flexible electrokinetic framework in modern microfluidic system.

  20. Destabilization of beta-induce Alfvén eigenmodes by energetic trapped ions in low-magnetic-shear plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ruirui; Chen, Wei; He, Hongda; Yu, Liming; Ding, Xuantong

    2017-10-01

    The dispersion relation for high toroidal mode number n beta-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (BAEs) excited by magnetically trapped energetic ions generated with ion-cyclotron resonance heating via precessional resonance in low magnetic shear (s) tokamak plasma is investigated analytically and numerically. The dynamics of the energetic particles (EPs) is treated non-perturbatively and finite drift orbit width (FOW) effects are taken into account. It is found that, depending on the plasma parameters, the most unstable mode can be either the BAE mode or the energetic particle mode (EPM). Both modes can resonate with the trapped-particles' magnetic precessional drifts and become unstable. The mode frequencies and growth rates depend strongly on the EP parameters. FOW can stabilize high-n BAE modes by reducing the wave-particle interaction. Magnetic shear has an important effect on the growth rate of the modes. For BAE, the growth rate presents the trend of first increase and following decrease with the increase of s. The peak positions of the mode growth rate move towards small s with increasing EPs' density. Besides, the BAE growth rate increases with n for small kϑρLE , and decreases for kϑρLE>0.34 . On the other hand, the EPM becomes stable for sufficiently large s and enters into the second stability regime.

  1. A sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) sex pheromone mixture increases trap catch relative to a single synthesized component in specific environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas S.; Tix, John A.; Hlina, Benjamin L.; Wagner, C. Michael; Siefkes, Michael J.; Wang, Huiyong; Li, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    Spermiating male sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) release a sex pheromone, of which a component, 7α, 12α, 24-trihydoxy-3-one-5α-cholan-24-sulfate (3kPZS), has been identified and shown to induce long distance preference responses in ovulated females. However, other pheromone components exist, and when 3kPZS alone was used to control invasive sea lamprey populations in the Laurentian Great Lakes, trap catch increase was significant, but gains were generally marginal. We hypothesized that free-ranging sea lamprey populations discriminate between a partial and complete pheromone while migrating to spawning grounds and searching for mates at spawning grounds. As a means to test our hypothesis, and to test two possible uses of sex pheromones for sea lamprey control, we asked whether the full sex pheromone mixture released by males (spermiating male washings; SMW) is more effective than 3kPZS in capturing animals in traditional traps (1) en route to spawning grounds and (2) at spawning grounds. At locations where traps target sea lampreys en route to spawning grounds, SMW-baited traps captured significantly more sea lampreys than paired 3kPZS-baited traps (~10 % increase). At spawning grounds, no difference in trap catch was observed between 3kPZS and SMW-baited traps. The lack of an observed difference at spawning grounds may be attributed to increased pheromone competition and possible involvement of other sensory modalities to locate mates. Because fishes often rely on multiple and sometimes redundant sensory modalities for critical life history events, the addition of sex pheromones to traditionally used traps is not likely to work in all circumstances. In the case of the sea lamprey, sex pheromone application may increase catch when applied to specifically designed traps deployed in streams with low adult density and limited spawning habitat.

  2. New Evidence for Hydroxyalkyl Radicals and Light- and Thermally Induced Trapped Electron Reactions in Rhamnose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalbergsjø, Siv G; Sagstuen, Einar

    2015-08-01

    Radical formation and trapping of radicals in X-irradiated crystals of rhamnose at 6 K were investigated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and ENDOR-induced EPR (EIE) techniques, complemented with periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The two major radical species at 6 K were the O4-centered alkoxy radical and the intermolecularly trapped electron (IMTE), previously also detected by other authors. The current experimental results provided hyperfine coupling constants for these two species in good agreement with the previous data, thus providing a consistency check that improves their credibility. In addition to the O4-centered alkoxy radical and the IMTE, the C3-centered and C5-centered hydroxyalkyl radicals are the most prominent primary species at 6 K. The C3-centered radical appears in two slightly different conformations at 6 K, designated C and D. The C5-centered radical exhibits a coupling to a methyl group with tunneling rotation at 6 K, and analysis of one of the rotational substates (A) of the spin system yielded an understanding of the structure of this radical. Visible light bleaching of the IMTE at 6 K led to the C3-centered radical C, and thermal annealing above 6 K resulted in a conversion of the C to the D conformation. In addition, thermal annealing releases the IMTE, apparently resulting in the formation of the C2-centered radical. It is possible that the thermal decay of the IMTE also contributes to a small part of the C3-centered radical (D) population at 85 K. There are several other products trapped in rhamnose crystals directly after irradiation at 6 K, among which are resonance lines due to the C2 H-abstraction product. However, these other products are minority species and were not fully characterized in the current work.

  3. Absorption spectroscopy of single red blood cells in the presence of mechanical deformations induced by optical traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojdyla, Michal; Raj, Saurabh; Petrov, Dmitri

    2012-09-01

    The electronic properties of single human red blood cells under mechanical deformations were investigated using a combination of dual beam optical tweezers and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The mechanical deformations were induced by two near-infrared optical traps with different trapping powers and trap configurations. The deformations were applied in two ways: locally, due to the mechanical forces around the traps, and by stretching the cell by moving the traps in opposite directions. In the presence of local deformations, the single cell undergoes a transition from an oxygenated state to a partially deoxygenated state. This process was found to be reversible and strongly power-dependent. Stretching the cell caused an opposite effect, indicating that the electronic response of the whole cell is dominated by the local interaction with the trapping beams. Results are discussed considering light-induced local heating, the Stark effect, and biochemical alterations due to mechanical forces, and are compared with reports of previous Raman spectroscopy studies. The information gained by the analysis of a single red blood cell's electronic response facilitates the understanding of fundamental physiological processes and sheds further light on the cell's mechanochemistry. This information may offer new opportunities for the diagnosis and treatment of blood diseases.

  4. Semiconductor photocatalysis. Cis-trans photoisomerization of simple alkenes induced by trapped holes at surface states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagida, S.; Mizumoto, K.; Pac, C.

    1986-02-19

    The use of ZnS or CdS as photocatalysts induces an efficient cis-trans photoisomerization of simple alkenes, e.g., the 2-octenes, 3-hexen-1-ols, and methyl 9-octadecenoates in photostationary cis-trans ratios almost identical with the thermodynamic equilibrium ratios achieved by the phenylthio radical. Quantum yields for the cis-trans photoisomerization, phi/sub c-t/, exceed largely over unity. Mechanistic studies involving Stern-Volmer analyses, quenching effect of oxygen, and ESR analyses under band-gap irradiation of ZnS in methanol demonstrate that the photoisomerizations take place with high turnover numbers at active sites where trapped holes at surface states, i.e., sulfur radicals arising from Zn vacancies and/or interstitial sulfur on sulfide semiconductors, play decisive roles. A highly efficient catalysis occurs with ZnS sols prepared from polysulfide-containing Na/sub 2/S solution. The trapped-hole mechanism is further supported by the enhanced effect of water acting as a good electron acceptor as well as the quenching effect of diethylamine acting as an electron donor.

  5. Canine neutrophil extracellular traps release induced by the apicomplexan parasite Neospora Caninum in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengkai Wei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Neosporosis is considered as one of the main causes of abortion and severe economic losses in dairy industry. The Canis genus serving as one of the confirmed definitive hosts of the apicomplexan parasite Neospora caninum (N. caninum plays a critical role in its life cycle. However, the effects of N. caninum on its definitive hosts of neutrophils extracellular traps (NETs formation remain unclear. In the present study, N. caninum tachyzoite-induced canine NETs formation was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Visualization of DNA decorated with H3, NE and MPO within N. caninum tachyzoite-induced NETs were examined using fluorescence confocal microscopy analyses. Furthermore, the formation of canine NETs was quantified using Sytox Green staining, and the LDH levels in supernatants were examined by an LDH Cytotoxicity Assay® kit. The results clearly showed that NETs-like structures were induced by N. caninum tachyzoites, and the major components within these structures induced by N. caninum tachyzoite were further confirmed by fluorescence confocal microscopy visualization. These results suggest that N. caninum tachyzoites strongly induced NETs formation in canine PMN. In functional inhibition assays, the blockings of NADPH oxidase, NE, MPO, SOCE, ERK 1/2 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways significantly inhibited N. caninum tachyzoite-induced NETs formation, which suggests that N. caninum tachyzoite-induced NETs formation is a NADPH oxidase-, NE-, MPO-, SOCE-, ERK 1/2- and p38 MAPK-dependent cell death process. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report the formation of NETs in canine PMN against N. caninum infection.

  6. Impact of isovalent doping on the trapping of vacancy and interstitial related defects in Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sgourou, E. N.; Londos, C. A.; Aliprantis, D. [University of Athens, Solid State Physics Section, Panepistimiopolis Zografos, Athens 157 84 (Greece); Timerkaeva, D. [Laboratoire de Simulation Atomistique (L-Sim), SP2M, INAC, CEA-UJF, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Kazan Federal University, 18 Kremlevskaya St., Kazan, 420018 (Russian Federation); Chroneos, A. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Materials Engineering, Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Caliste, D.; Pochet, P. [Laboratoire de Simulation Atomistique (L-Sim), SP2M, INAC, CEA-UJF, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2013-03-21

    We investigate the impact of isovalent (in particular lead (Pb)) doping on the production and thermal stability of the vacancy-related (VO) and the interstitial-related (C{sub i}O{sub i} and C{sub i}C{sub s}) pairs in 2 MeV electron irradiated Si samples. We compare the Cz-Si samples with high and low carbon concentration, as well as with Pb-C and Ge-C codoped samples. Using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), we first determine that under the examined conditions the production of VO decreases with the increase of the covalent radius of the prevalent dopant. Moreover, the production of the VO, C{sub i}O{sub i}, and C{sub i}C{sub s} pairs is quite suppressed in Pb-doped Si. In addition, we conclude to an enhanced trapping of both C{sub i} and C{sub s} by Pb impurity under irradiation. The results are further discussed in view of density functional theory calculations. The relative thermodynamic stability of carbon and interstitial related complexes was estimated through the calculations of binding energies of possible defect pairs. This allows to investigate the preferred trapping of vacancies in Pb-doped samples and interstitials in the Ge-doped samples. The different behavior is revealed by considering the analysis of the ratio of vacancy-related to interstitial-related clusters derived from the FTIR measurements. The presence of PbV complexes is confirmed due to the mentioned analysis.

  7. Autophagy is induced by anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic Abs and promotes neutrophil extracellular traps formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Li-Li; Wang, Huan; Wang, Chen; Peng, Hong-Ying; Chen, Min; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2016-11-01

    Dysregulated neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) formation contributes to the pathogenesis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic Ab (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV). Increasing evidence indicates that autophagy is involved in the process of NETs formation. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether ANCA could induce autophagy in the process of NETs formation. Autophagy was detected using live cell imaging, microtubule-associated protein light chain 3B (LC3B) accumulation and Western blotting. The results showed that autophagy vacuolization was detected in neutrophils treated with ANCA-positive IgG by live cell imaging. This effect was enhanced by rapamycin, the autophagy inducer, and weakened by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), the autophagy inhibitor. In line with these results, the autophagy marker, LC3B, showed a punctate distribution pattern in the neutrophils stimulated with ANCA-positive IgG. In the presence of rapamycin, LC3B accumulation was further increased; however, this effect was attenuated by 3-MA. Moreover, incubated with ANCA-positive IgG, the NETosis rate significantly increased compared with the unstimulated group. And, the rate significantly increased or decreased in the neutrophils pretreated with rapamycin or 3-MA, respectively, as compared with the cells incubated with ANCA-positive IgG. Overall, this study demonstrates that autophagy is induced by ANCA and promotes ANCA-induced NETs formation.

  8. Superoxide Induces Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation in a TLR-4 and NOX-Dependent Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khafaji, Ahmed B; Tohme, Samer; Yazdani, Hamza Obaid; Miller, David; Huang, Hai; Tsung, Allan

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils constitute the early innate immune response to perceived infectious and sterile threats. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are a novel mechanism to counter pathogenic invasion and sequelae of ischemia, including cell death and oxidative stress. Superoxide is a radical intermediate of oxygen metabolism produced by parenchymal and nonparenchymal hepatic cells, and is a hallmark of oxidative stress after liver ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). While extracellular superoxide recruits neutrophils to the liver and initiates sterile inflammatory injury, it is unknown whether superoxide induces the formation of NETs. We hypothesize that superoxide induces NET formation through a signaling cascade involving Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) and neutrophil NADPH oxidase (NOX). We treated neutrophils with extracellular superoxide and observed NET DNA release, histone H3 citrullination and increased levels of MPO-DNA complexes occurring in a TLR-4–dependent manner. Inhibition of superoxide generation by allopurinol and inhibition of NOX by diphenyleneiodonium prevented NET formation. When mice were subjected to warm liver I/R, we found significant NET formation associated with liver necrosis and increased serum ALT in TLR-4 WT but not TLR-4 KO mice. To reduce circulating superoxide, we pretreated mice undergoing I/R with allopurinol and N-acetylcysteine, which resulted in decreased NETs and ameliorated liver injury. Our study demonstrates a requirement for TLR-4 and NOX in superoxide-induced NETs, and suggests involvement of superoxide-induced NETs in pathophysiologic settings. PMID:27453505

  9. Neutrophil extracellular traps directly induce epithelial and endothelial cell death: a predominant role of histones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Saffarzadeh

    Full Text Available Neutrophils play an important role in innate immunity by defending the host organism against invading microorganisms. Antimicrobial activity of neutrophils is mediated by release of antimicrobial peptides, phagocytosis as well as formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NET. These structures are composed of DNA, histones and granular proteins such as neutrophil elastase and myeloperoxidase. This study focused on the influence of NET on the host cell functions, particularly on human alveolar epithelial cells as the major cells responsible for gas exchange in the lung. Upon direct interaction with epithelial and endothelial cells, NET induced cytotoxic effects in a dose-dependent manner, and digestion of DNA in NET did not change NET-mediated cytotoxicity. Pre-incubation of NET with antibodies against histones, with polysialic acid or with myeloperoxidase inhibitor but not with elastase inhibitor reduced NET-mediated cytotoxicity, suggesting that histones and myeloperoxidase are responsible for NET-mediated cytotoxicity. Although activated protein C (APC did decrease the histone-induced cytotoxicity in a purified system, it did not change NET-induced cytotoxicity, indicating that histone-dependent cytotoxicity of NET is protected against APC degradation. Moreover, in LPS-induced acute lung injury mouse model, NET formation was documented in the lung tissue as well as in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. These data reveal the important role of protein components in NET, particularly histones, which may lead to host cell cytotoxicity and may be involved in lung tissue destruction.

  10. CysLT2 receptor activation is involved in LTC4-induced lung air-trapping in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekioka, Tomohiko; Kadode, Michiaki; Yonetomi, Yasuo; Kamiya, Akihiro; Fujita, Manabu; Nabe, Takeshi; Kawabata, Kazuhito

    2017-01-05

    CysLT1 receptors are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of asthma. However, the functional roles of CysLT2 receptors in this condition have not been determined. The purpose of this study is to develop an experimental model of CysLT2 receptor-mediated LTC4-induced lung air-trapping in guinea pigs and use this model to clarify the mechanism underlying response to such trapping. Because LTC4 is rapidly converted to LTD4 by γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (γ-GTP) under physiological conditions, S-hexyl GSH was used as a γ-GTP inhibitor. In anesthetized artificially ventilated guinea pigs with no S-hexyl GSH treatment, i.v. LTC4-induced bronchoconstriction was almost completely inhibited by montelukast, a CysLT1 receptor antagonist, but not by BayCysLT2RA, a CysLT2 receptor antagonist. The inhibitory effect of montelukast was diminished by treatment with S-hexyl GSH, whereas the effect of BayCysLT2RA was enhanced with increasing dose of S-hexyl GSH. Macroscopic and histological examination of lung tissue isolated from LTC4-/S-hexyl-GSH-treated guinea pigs revealed air-trapping expansion, particularly at the alveolar site. Inhaled LTC4 in conscious guinea pigs treated with S-hexyl GSH increased both airway resistance and airway hyperinflation. On the other hand, LTC4-induced air-trapping was only partially suppressed by treatment with the bronchodilator salmeterol. Although montelukast inhibition of LTC4-induced air-trapping was weak, treatment with BayCysLT2RA resulted in complete suppression of this air-trapping. Furthermore, BayCysLT2RA completely suppressed LTC4-induced airway vascular hyperpermeability. In conclusion, we found in this study that CysLT2 receptors mediate LTC4-induced bronchoconstriction and air-trapping in S-hexyl GSH-treated guinea pigs. It is therefore believed that CysLT2 receptors contribute to asthmatic response involving air-trapping.

  11. Different mechanics of snap-trapping in the two closely related carnivorous plants Dionaea muscipula and Aldrovanda vesiculosa

    CERN Document Server

    Poppinga, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The carnivorous aquatic Waterwheel Plant (Aldrovanda vesiculosa L.) and the closely related terrestrial Venus Flytrap (Dionaea muscipula SOL. EX J. ELLIS) both feature elaborate snap-traps, which shut after reception of an external mechanical stimulus by prey animals. Traditionally, Aldrovanda is considered as a miniature, aquatic Dionaea, an assumption which was already established by Charles Darwin. However, videos of snapping traps from both species suggest completely different closure mechanisms. Indeed, the well-described snapping mechanism in Dionaea comprises abrupt curvature inversion of the two trap lobes, while the closing movement in Aldrovanda involves deformation of the trap midrib but not of the lobes, which do not change curvature. In this paper, we present the first detailed mechanical models for these plants, which are based on the theory of thin solid membranes and explain this difference by showing that the fast snapping of Aldrovanda is due to kinematic amplification of the bending deforma...

  12. Comparing relative abundance, lengths, and habitat of temperate reef fishes using simultaneous underwater visual census, video, and trap sampling

    KAUST Repository

    Bacheler, NM

    2017-04-28

    Unbiased counts of individuals or species are often impossible given the prevalence of cryptic or mobile species. We used 77 simultaneous multi-gear deployments to make inferences about relative abundance, diversity, length composition, and habitat of the reef fish community along the southeastern US Atlantic coast. In total, 117 taxa were observed by underwater visual census (UVC), stationary video, and chevron fish traps, with more taxa being observed by UVC (100) than video (82) or traps (20). Frequency of occurrence of focal species was similar among all sampling approaches for tomtate Haemulon aurolineatum and black sea bass Centropristis striata, higher for UVC and video compared to traps for red snapper Lutjanus campechanus, vermilion snapper Rhomboplites aurorubens, and gray triggerfish Balistes capriscus, and higher for UVC compared to video or traps for gray snapper L. griseus and lionfish Pterois spp. For 6 of 7 focal species, correlations of relative abundance among gears were strongest between UVC and video, but there was substantial variability among species. The number of recorded species between UVC and video was correlated (ρ = 0.59), but relationships between traps and the other 2 methods were weaker. Lengths of fish visually estimated by UVC were similar to lengths of fish caught in traps, as were habitat characterizations from UVC and video. No gear provided a complete census for any species in our study, suggesting that analytical methods accounting for imperfect detection are necessary to make unbiased inferences about fish abundance.

  13. An analysis of point defects induced by In, Al, Ni, and Sn dopants in Bridgman-grown CdZnTe detectors and their influence on trapping of charge carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, R.; Roy, U. N.; James, R. B.

    2017-03-01

    In this research, we studied point defects induced in Bridgman-grown CdZnTe detectors doped with Indium (In), Aluminium (Al), Nickel (Ni), and Tin (Sn). Point defects associated with different dopants were observed, and these defects were analyzed in detail for their contributions to electron/hole (e/h) trapping. We also explored the correlations between the nature and abundance of the point defects with their influence on the resistivity, electron mobility-lifetime (μτe) product, and electron trapping time. We used current-deep level transient spectroscopy to determine the energy, capture cross-section, and concentration of each trap. Furthermore, we used the data to determine the trapping and de-trapping times for the charge carriers. In In-doped CdZnTe detectors, uncompensated Cd vacancies (VCd-) were identified as a dominant trap. The VCd- were almost compensated in detectors doped with Al, Ni, and Sn, in addition to co-doping with In. Dominant traps related to the dopant were found at Ev + 0.36 eV and Ev + 1.1 eV, Ec + 76 meV and Ev + 0.61 eV, Ev + 36 meV and Ev + 0.86 eV, Ev + 0.52 eV and Ec + 0.83 eV in CZT:In, CZT:In + Al, CZT:In + Ni, and CZT:In + Sn, respectively. Results indicate that the addition of other dopants with In affects the type, nature, concentration (Nt), and capture cross-section (σ) and hence trapping (tt) and de-trapping (tdt) times. The dopant-induced traps, their corresponding concentrations, and charge capture cross-section play an important role in the performance of radiation detectors, especially for devices that rely solely on electron transport.

  14. Soliton Trains Induced by Adaptive Shaping with Periodic Traps in Four-Level Ultracold Atom Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djouom Tchenkoue, M. L.; Welakuh Mbangheku, D.; Dikandé, Alain M.

    2017-06-01

    It is well known that an optical trap can be imprinted by a light field in an ultracold-atom system embedded in an optical cavity, and driven by three different coherent fields. Of the three fields coexisting in the optical cavity there is an intense control field that induces a giant Kerr nonlinearity via electromagnetically-induced transparency, and another field that creates a periodic optical grating of strength proportional to the square of the associated Rabi frequency. In this work elliptic-soliton solutions to the nonlinear equation governing the propagation of the probe field are considered, with emphasis on the possible generation of optical soliton trains forming a discrete spectrum with well defined quantum numbers. The problem is treated assuming two distinct types of periodic optical gratings and taking into account the negative and positive signs of detunings (detuning above or below resonance). Results predict that the competition between the self-phase and cross-phase modulation nonlinearities gives rise to a rich family of temporal soliton train modes characterized by distinct quantum numbers.

  15. β2 integrin mediates hantavirus-induced release of neutrophil extracellular traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, Martin J; Lalwani, Pritesh; Krautkrӓmer, Ellen; Peters, Thorsten; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Krüger, Renate; Hofmann, Jörg; Seeger, Karl; Krüger, Detlev H; Schönrich, Günther

    2014-06-30

    Rodent-borne hantaviruses are emerging human pathogens that cause severe human disease. The underlying mechanisms are not well understood, as hantaviruses replicate in endothelial and epithelial cells without causing any cytopathic effect. We demonstrate that hantaviruses strongly stimulated neutrophils to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Hantavirus infection induced high systemic levels of circulating NETs in patients and this systemic NET overflow was accompanied by production of autoantibodies to nuclear antigens. Analysis of the responsible mechanism using neutrophils from β2 null mice identified β2 integrin receptors as a master switch for NET induction. Further experiments suggested that β2 integrin receptors such as complement receptor 3 (CR3) and 4 (CR4) may act as novel hantavirus entry receptors. Using adenoviruses, we confirmed that viral interaction with β2 integrin induced strong NET formation. Collectively, β2 integrin-mediated systemic NET overflow is a novel viral mechanism of immunopathology that may be responsible for characteristic aspects of hantavirus-associated disease such as kidney and lung damage.

  16. Attraction of dispersing boll weevils from surrounding habitats relative to simulated pheromone diffusion from traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability to detect populations of boll weevils, Anthonomus grandis (Boheman), with pheromone traps has contributed significantly in progress toward eradication of the boll weevil. However, new information is needed to aid in the interpretation of trap captures, such as identification of habitats...

  17. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-associated Protein 1 (TRAP1) Mutation and TRAP1 Inhibitor Gamitrinib-triphenylphosphonium (G-TPP) Induce a Forkhead Box O (FOXO)-dependent Cell Protective Signal from Mitochondria*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunjin; Yang, Jinsung; Kim, Min Ju; Choi, Sekyu; Chung, Ju-Ryung; Kim, Jong-Min; Yoo, Young Hyun; Chung, Jongkyeong; Koh, Hyongjong

    2016-01-01

    TRAP1 (tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1), a mitochondrial Hsp90 family chaperone, has been identified as a critical regulator of cell survival and bioenergetics in tumor cells. To discover novel signaling networks regulated by TRAP1, we generated Drosophila TRAP1 mutants. The mutants successfully developed into adults and produced fertile progeny, showing that TRAP1 is dispensable in development and reproduction. Surprisingly, mutation or knockdown of TRAP1 markedly enhanced Drosophila survival under oxidative stress. Moreover, TRAP1 mutation ameliorated mitochondrial dysfunction and dopaminergic (DA) neuron loss induced by deletion of a familial Parkinson disease gene PINK1 (Pten-induced kinase 1) in Drosophila. Gamitrinib-triphenylphosphonium, a mitochondria-targeted Hsp90 inhibitor that increases cell death in HeLa and MCF7 cells, consistently inhibited cell death induced by oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by PINK1 mutation in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells and DA cell models such as SH-SY5Y and SN4741 cells. Additionally, gamitrinib-triphenylphosphonium also suppressed the defective locomotive activity and DA neuron loss in Drosophila PINK1 null mutants. In further genetic analyses, we showed enhanced expression of Thor, a downstream target gene of transcription factor FOXO, in TRAP1 mutants. Furthermore, deletion of FOXO almost nullified the protective roles of TRAP1 mutation against oxidative stress and PINK1 mutation. These results strongly suggest that inhibition of the mitochondrial chaperone TRAP1 generates a retrograde cell protective signal from mitochondria to the nucleus in a FOXO-dependent manner. PMID:26631731

  18. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-associated Protein 1 (TRAP1) Mutation and TRAP1 Inhibitor Gamitrinib-triphenylphosphonium (G-TPP) Induce a Forkhead Box O (FOXO)-dependent Cell Protective Signal from Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunjin; Yang, Jinsung; Kim, Min Ju; Choi, Sekyu; Chung, Ju-Ryung; Kim, Jong-Min; Yoo, Young Hyun; Chung, Jongkyeong; Koh, Hyongjong

    2016-01-22

    TRAP1 (tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1), a mitochondrial Hsp90 family chaperone, has been identified as a critical regulator of cell survival and bioenergetics in tumor cells. To discover novel signaling networks regulated by TRAP1, we generated Drosophila TRAP1 mutants. The mutants successfully developed into adults and produced fertile progeny, showing that TRAP1 is dispensable in development and reproduction. Surprisingly, mutation or knockdown of TRAP1 markedly enhanced Drosophila survival under oxidative stress. Moreover, TRAP1 mutation ameliorated mitochondrial dysfunction and dopaminergic (DA) neuron loss induced by deletion of a familial Parkinson disease gene PINK1 (Pten-induced kinase 1) in Drosophila. Gamitrinib-triphenylphosphonium, a mitochondria-targeted Hsp90 inhibitor that increases cell death in HeLa and MCF7 cells, consistently inhibited cell death induced by oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by PINK1 mutation in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells and DA cell models such as SH-SY5Y and SN4741 cells. Additionally, gamitrinib-triphenylphosphonium also suppressed the defective locomotive activity and DA neuron loss in Drosophila PINK1 null mutants. In further genetic analyses, we showed enhanced expression of Thor, a downstream target gene of transcription factor FOXO, in TRAP1 mutants. Furthermore, deletion of FOXO almost nullified the protective roles of TRAP1 mutation against oxidative stress and PINK1 mutation. These results strongly suggest that inhibition of the mitochondrial chaperone TRAP1 generates a retrograde cell protective signal from mitochondria to the nucleus in a FOXO-dependent manner. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. CO2-induced shift in microbial activity affects carbon trapping and water quality in anoxic bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Matthew F.; Santillan, Eugenio F. U.; Sanford, Robert A.; Altman, Susan J.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial activity is a potentially important yet poorly understood control on the fate and environmental impact of CO2 that leaks into aquifers from deep storage reservoirs. In this study we examine how variation in CO2 abundance affected competition between Fe(III) and SO42--reducers in anoxic bioreactors inoculated with a mixed-microbial community from a freshwater aquifer. We performed two sets of experiments: one with low CO2 partial pressure (∼0.02 atm) in the headspace of the reactors and one with high CO2 partial pressure (∼1 atm). A fluid residence time of 35 days was maintained in the reactors by replacing one-fifth of the aqueous volume with fresh medium every seven days. The aqueous medium was composed of groundwater amended with small amounts of acetate (250 μM), phosphate (1 μM), and ammonium (50 μM) to stimulate microbial activity. Synthetic goethite (1 mmol) and SO42- (500 μM influent concentration) were also available in each reactor to serve as electron acceptors. Results of this study show that higher CO2 abundance increased the ability of Fe(III) reducers to compete with SO42- reducers, leading to significant shifts in CO2 trapping and water quality. Mass-balance calculations and pyrosequencing results demonstrate that SO42- reducers were dominant in reactors with low CO2 content. They consumed 85% of the acetate after acetate consumption reached steady state while Fe(III) reducers consumed only 15% on average. In contrast, Fe(III) reducers were dominant during that same interval in reactors with high CO2 content, consuming at least 90% of the acetate while SO42- reducers consumed a negligible amount (bioreactors enhanced CO2 solubility trapping relative to the low-CO2 bioreactors by increasing alkalinity generation (6X). Hence, the shift in microbial activity we observed was a positive feedback on CO2 trapping. More rapid Fe(III) reduction degraded water quality, however, by leading to high Fe(II) concentration.

  20. Self-induced light trapping in nonlinear Fabry-Perot resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichugin, K. N.; Sadreev, A. F.

    2016-10-01

    In the framework of the coupled mode theory we consider light trapping between two off-channel resonators which serve as self-adjusted Fano mirrors due to the Kerr effect. By inserting an auxiliary nonlinear resonator between the mirrors we achieve self-tuning of phase shift between the mirrors. That allows for the light trapping for arbitrary distance between the mirrors.

  1. Stability and dispersion relations of three-dimensional solitary waves in trapped Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Mateo, A.; Brand, J.

    2015-12-01

    We analyse the dynamical properties of three-dimensional solitary waves in cylindrically trapped Bose-Einstein condensates. Families of solitary waves bifurcate from the planar dark soliton and include the solitonic vortex, the vortex ring and more complex structures of intersecting vortex lines known collectively as Chladni solitons. The particle-like dynamics of these guided solitary waves provides potentially profitable features for their implementation in atomtronic circuits, and play a key role in the generation of metastable loop currents. Based on the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation we calculate the dispersion relations of moving solitary waves and their modes of dynamical instability. The dispersion relations reveal a complex crossing and bifurcation scenario. For stationary structures we find that for μ /{\\hslash }{ω }\\perp \\gt 2.65 the solitonic vortex is the only stable solitary wave. More complex Chladni solitons still have weaker instabilities than planar dark solitons and may be seen as transient structures in experiments. Fully time-dependent simulations illustrate typical decay scenarios, which may result in the generation of multiple separated solitonic vortices.

  2. Thermodynamically induced particle transport: Order-by-induction and entropic trapping at the nano-scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patitsas, S. N.

    2015-10-01

    A theory for thermodynamic induction (TI) under isothermal conditions is presented. This includes a treatment of the Helmholtz free energy budget available for a gate variable to utilize towards aiding another variable's approach towards thermodynamic equilibrium. This energy budget could be used to help create interesting physical structures and examples of order-by-induction. I also show how to treat TI in the continuum limit which can be obtained from a variational principle. Several important examples of isothermal TI have been discussed, including a type of electromigration that may be detectable in electrolytes, superfluids and semiconductors. As an example of a bottlenecked system exhibiting enhanced TI, manipulation of atoms and molecules by STM has been discussed in detail. My considerations provide strong support for microscopic bond-breaking mechanisms being governed by a general thermodynamic principle. In particular, I show that induced entropy trapping can explain the level of control that sliding-type manipulations demonstrate. The most reasonable choices for the parameters input into the simple formula give a threshold condition for STM manipulations that is strikingly close to what is required to match results reported in the literature. My continuum model predicts the shape of the adsorbate potential well for the STM case and from this I predict a level of force detectable by AFM. A final proposal, and example of order-by-induction, predict a long tether may be constructed between sample and tip that is just one atom thick.

  3. Neutrophil extracellular traps downregulate lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Lorena; Bignon, Alexandre; Gueguen, Claire; de Chaisemartin, Luc; Gorges, Roseline; Sandré, Catherine; Mascarell, Laurent; Balabanian, Karl; Kerdine-Römer, Saadia; Pallardy, Marc; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Chollet-Martin, Sylvie

    2014-12-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) play a central role in inflammation and participate in its control, notably by modulating dendritic cell (DC) functions via soluble mediators or cell-cell contacts. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) released by PMN could play a role in this context. To evaluate NET effects on DC maturation, we developed a model based on monocyte-derived DC (moDC) and calibrated NETs isolated from fresh human PMN. We found that isolated NETs alone had no discernable effect on moDC. In contrast, they downregulated LPS-induced moDC maturation, as shown by decreased surface expression of HLA-DR, CD80, CD83, and CD86, and by downregulated cytokine production (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12, IL-23), with no increase in the expression of tolerogenic DC genes. Moreover, the presence of NETs during moDC maturation diminished the capacity of these moDC to induce T lymphocyte proliferation in both autologous and allogeneic conditions, and modulated CD4(+) T lymphocyte polarization by promoting the production of Th2 cytokines (IL-5 and IL-13) and reducing that of Th1 and Th17 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-17). Interestingly, the expression and activities of the lymphoid chemokine receptors CCR7 and CXCR4 on moDC were not altered when moDC matured in the presence of NETs. Together, these findings reveal a new role for NETs in adaptive immune responses, modulating some moDC functions and thereby participating in the control of inflammation.

  4. Interspecies collision-induced losses in a dual species 7Li-85Rb magneto-optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sourav; Altaf, Adeel; Lorenz, John; Elliott, D. S.; Chen, Yong P.

    2014-05-01

    In this article, we report the measurement of collision-induced loss rate coefficients βLi, Rb and βRb, Li, and also discuss means to significantly suppress such collision-induced losses. We first describe our dual-species magneto-optical trap (MOT) that allows us to simultaneously trap ≥5 × 108 7Li atoms loaded from a Zeeman slower and ≥2 × 108 85Rb atoms loaded from a dispenser. We observe strong interspecies collision-induced losses in the MOTs which dramatically reduce the maximum atom number achievable in the MOTs. We measure the trap loss rate coefficients βLi, Rb and βRb, Li, and, from a study of their dependence on the MOT parameters, determine the cause for the losses observed. Our results provide valuable insights into ultracold collisions between 7Li and 85Rb, guide our efforts to suppress collision-induced losses, and also pave the way for the production of ultracold 7Li85Rb molecules.

  5. Interspecies collision-induced losses in a dual species 7Li-85Rb magneto-optical trap

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, Sourav; Lorenz, John; Elliott, D S; Chen, Yong P

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we report the measurement of collision-induced loss coefficients \\beta_{Li,Rb} and \\beta_{Rb,Li}, and also discuss means to significantly suppress such collision induced losses. We first describe our dual-species magneto-optical trap (MOT) that allows us to simultaneously trap > 5x10^8 7Li atoms loaded from a Zeeman slower and > 2x10^8 85Rb atoms loaded from a dispenser. We observe strong interspecies collision-induced losses in the MOTs which dramatically reduce the maximum atom number achievable in the MOTs. We measure the trap loss rate coefficients \\beta_{Li,Rb} and \\beta_{Rb,Li}, and, from a study of their dependence on the MOT parameters, determine the cause for the losses observed. Our results provide valuable insights into ultracold collisions between 7Li and 85Rb, guide our efforts to suppress collision induced losses, and also pave the way for the production of ultracold 7Li85Rb molecules.

  6. Dielectrophoretic trapping of multilayer DNA origami nanostructures and DNA origami-induced local destruction of silicon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Boxuan; Linko, Veikko; Dietz, Hendrik; Toppari, J Jussi

    2015-01-01

    DNA origami is a widely used method for fabrication of custom-shaped nanostructures. However, to utilize such structures, one needs to controllably position them on nanoscale. Here we demonstrate how different types of 3D scaffolded multilayer origamis can be accurately anchored to lithographically fabricated nanoelectrodes on a silicon dioxide substrate by DEP. Straight brick-like origami structures, constructed both in square (SQL) and honeycomb lattices, as well as curved "C"-shaped and angular "L"-shaped origamis were trapped with nanoscale precision and single-structure accuracy. We show that the positioning and immobilization of all these structures can be realized with or without thiol-linkers. In general, structural deformations of the origami during the DEP trapping are highly dependent on the shape and the construction of the structure. The SQL brick turned out to be the most robust structure under the high DEP forces, and accordingly, its single-structure trapping yield was also highest. In addition, the electrical conductivity of single immobilized plain brick-like structures was characterized. The electrical measurements revealed that the conductivity is negligible (insulating behavior). However, we observed that the trapping process of the SQL brick equipped with thiol-linkers tended to induce an etched "nanocanyon" in the silicon dioxide substrate. The nanocanyon was formed exactly between the electrodes, that is, at the location of the DEP-trapped origami. The results show that the demonstrated DEP-trapping technique can be readily exploited in assembling and arranging complex multilayered origami geometries. In addition, DNA origamis could be utilized in DEP-assisted deformation of the substrates onto which they are attached.

  7. Giant Goos-Hänchen shifts and radiation-induced trapping of Helmholtz solitons at nonlinear interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Curto, Julio; Chamorro-Posada, Pedro; McDonald, Graham S

    2011-09-15

    Giant Goos-Hänchen shifts and radiation-induced trapping are studied at the planar boundary separating two focusing Kerr media within the framework of the Helmholtz theory. The analysis, valid for all angles of incidence, reveals that interfaces exhibiting linear external refraction can also accommodate both phenomena. Numerical evidence of these effects is provided, based on analytical predictions derived from a generalized Snell's law.

  8. Anti-Citrullinated Protein Antibodies Are Associated With Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in the Sputum in Relatives of Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoruelle, M Kristen; Harrall, Kylie K; Ho, Linh; Purmalek, Monica M; Seto, Nickie L; Rothfuss, Heather M; Weisman, Michael H; Solomon, Joshua J; Fischer, Aryeh; Okamoto, Yuko; Kelmenson, Lindsay B; Parish, Mark C; Feser, Marie; Fleischer, Chelsie; Anderson, Courtney; Mahler, Michael; Norris, Jill M; Kaplan, Mariana J; Cherrington, Brian D; Holers, V Michael; Deane, Kevin D

    2017-06-01

    Studies suggest that rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-related autoimmunity is initiated at a mucosal site. However, the factors associated with the mucosal generation of this autoimmunity are unknown, especially in individuals who are at risk of future RA. Therefore, we tested anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibodies in the sputum of RA-free first-degree relatives (FDRs) of RA patients and patients with classifiable RA. We evaluated induced sputum and serum samples from 67 FDRs and 20 RA patients for IgA anti-CCP and IgG anti-CCP, with cutoff levels for positivity determined in a control population. Sputum was also evaluated for cell counts, neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) using sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for protein/nucleic acid complexes, and total citrulline. Sputum was positive for IgA and/or IgG anti-CCP in 14 of 20 RA patients (70%) and 17 of 67 FDRs (25%), including a portion of FDRs who were serum anti-CCP negative. In the FDRs, elevations of sputum IgA and IgG anti-CCP were associated with elevated sputum cell counts and NET levels. IgA anti-CCP was associated with ever smoking and with elevated sputum citrulline levels. Anti-CCP is elevated in the sputum of FDRs, including seronegative FDRs, suggesting that the lung may be a site of anti-CCP generation in this population. The association of anti-CCP with elevated cell counts and NET levels in FDRs supports a hypothesis that local airway inflammation and NET formation may drive anti-CCP production in the lung and may promote the early stages of RA development. Longitudinal studies are needed to follow the evolution of these processes relative to the development of systemic autoimmunity and articular RA. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  9. Ultraviolet Photodissociation Induced by Light-Emitting Diodes in a Planar Ion Trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Dustin D; Makarov, Alexander; Schwartz, Jae C; Sanders, James D; Zhuk, Eugene; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2016-09-26

    The first application of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) mass spectrometry is reported. LEDs provide a compact, low cost light source and have been incorporated directly into the trapping cell of an Orbitrap mass spectrometer. MS/MS efficiencies of over 50 % were obtained using an extended irradiation period, and UVPD was optimized by modulating the ion trapping parameters to maximize the overlap between the ion cloud and the irradiation volume.

  10. Optically induced conical intersections in traps for ultracold atoms and molecules.

    OpenAIRE

    Wallis, A.O.G.; Hutson, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    We show that conical intersections can be created in laboratory coordinates by dressing a parabolic trap for ultracold atoms or molecules with a combination of optical and static magnetic fields. The resulting ring trap can support single-particle states with half-integer rotational quantization and many-particle states with persistent flow. Two well-separated atomic or molecular states are brought into near-resonance by an optical field and tuned across each other with an inhomogeneous magne...

  11. Identification of a Residue (Glu60) in TRAP Required for Inducing Efficient Transcription Termination at the trp Attenuator Independent of Binding Tryptophan and RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, Natalie M; Patterson, Andrea; Gollnick, Paul

    2017-03-15

    Transcription of the tryptophan (trp) operon in Bacillus subtilis is regulated by an attenuation mechanism. Attenuation is controlled by the trpRNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP). TRAP binds to a site in the 5' leader region of the nascent trp transcript in response to the presence of excess intracellular tryptophan. This binding induces transcription termination upstream of the structural genes of the operon. In prior attenuation models, the role of TRAP was only to alter the secondary structure of the leader region RNA so as to promote formation of the trp attenuator, which was presumed to function as an intrinsic terminator. However, formation of the attenuator alone has been shown to be insufficient to induce efficient termination, indicating that TRAP plays an additional role in this process. To further examine the function of TRAP, we performed a genetic selection for mutant TRAPs that bind tryptophan and RNA but show diminished termination at the trp attenuator. Five such TRAP mutants were obtained. Four of these have substitutions at Glu60, three of which are Lys (E60K) substitutions and the fourth of which is a Val (E60V) substitution. The fifth mutant obtained contains a substitution at Ile63, which is on the same β-strand of TRAP as Glu60. Purified E60K TRAP binds tryptophan and RNA with properties similar to those of the wild type but is defective at inducing termination at the trp attenuator in vitroIMPORTANCE Prior models for attenuation control of the B. subtilis trp operon suggested that the only role for TRAP is to bind to the leader region RNA and alter its folding to induce formation of an intrinsic terminator. However, several recent studies suggested that TRAP plays an additional role in the termination mechanism. We hypothesized that this function could involve residues in TRAP other than those required to bind tryptophan and RNA. Here we obtained TRAP mutants with alterations at Glu60 that are deficient at inducing termination in the

  12. Atomization efficiency and photon yield in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of single nanoparticles in an optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Pablo; Fortes, Francisco J.; Laserna, J. Javier

    2017-04-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was employed for investigating the influence of particle size on the dissociation efficiency and the absolute production of photons per mass unit of airborne solid graphite spheres under single-particle regime. Particles of average diameter of 400 nm were probed and compared with 2 μm particles. Samples were first catapulted into aerosol form and then secluded in an optical trap set by a 532 nm laser. Trap stability was quantified before subjecting particles to LIBS analysis. Fine alignment of the different lines comprising the optical catapulting-optical trapping-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument and tuning of excitation parameters conditioning the LIBS signal such as fluence and acquisition delay are described in detail with the ultimate goal of acquiring clear spectroscopic data on masses as low as 75 fg. The atomization efficiency and the photon yield increase as the particle size becomes smaller. Time-resolved plasma imaging studies were conducted to elucidate the mechanisms leading to particle disintegration and excitation.

  13. Different mechanics of snap-trapping in the two closely related carnivorous plants Dionaea muscipula and Aldrovanda vesiculosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppinga, Simon; Joyeux, Marc

    2011-10-01

    The carnivorous aquatic waterwheel plant (Aldrovanda vesiculosa L.) and the closely related terrestrial venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula Sol. ex J. Ellis) both feature elaborate snap-traps, which shut after reception of an external mechanical stimulus by prey animals. Traditionally, Aldrovanda is considered as a miniature, aquatic Dionaea, an assumption which was already established by Charles Darwin. However, videos of snapping traps from both species suggest completely different closure mechanisms. Indeed, the well-described snapping mechanism in Dionaea comprises abrupt curvature inversion of the two trap lobes, while the closing movement in Aldrovanda involves deformation of the trap midrib but not of the lobes, which do not change curvature. In this paper, we present detailed mechanical models for these plants, which are based on the theory of thin solid membranes and explain this difference by showing that the fast snapping of Aldrovanda is due to kinematic amplification of the bending deformation of the midrib, while that of Dionaea unambiguously relies on the buckling instability that affects the two lobes.

  14. The effect of radiation-induced traps on the WFIRST coronagraph detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, Bijan; Effinger, Robert; Demers, Richard; Harding, Leon; Morrissey, Patrick; Bush, Nathan; Hall, David; Skottfelt, Jesper

    2016-08-01

    The WFIRST Coronagraph will be the most sensitive instrument ever built for direct imaging and characterization of extra-solar planets. With a design contrast expected to be better than 1e-9 after post processing, this instrument will directly image gas giants as far in as Jupiter's orbit. Direct imaging places high demand on optical detectors, not only in noise performance, but also in the need to be resistant to traps. Since the typical scene flux is measured in millielectrons per second, the signal collected in each practicable frame will be at most a few electrons. At such extremely small signal levels, traps and their effects on the image become extremely important. To investigate their impact on the WFIRST coronagraph mission science yield, we have constructed a detailed model of the coronagraph sensor performance in the presence of traps. Built in Matlab, this model incorporates the expected and measured trap capture and emission times and cross-sections, as well as occurrence densities after exposure to irradiation in the WFIRST space environment. The model also includes the detector architecture and operation as applicable to trapping phenomena. We describe the model, the results, and implications on sensing performance.

  15. Captures of boll weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in relation to trap distance from cotton fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Once populations of the boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman) are suppressed, eradication programs rely on pheromone trap-based monitoring for timely detection of weevil populations in cotton (Gossypium spp.). Delayed detection may increase the costs of remedial treatments, and permit rep...

  16. Tempo of the Deccan Traps eruptions in relation to events at the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renne, Paul; Sprain, Courtney; Pande, Kanchan; Richards, Mark; Vanderkluysen, Loyc; Self, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    It has been known for decades that the Deccan Traps (DT) continental flood basalts were erupted over an interval spanning the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary (KPB). Paleomagnetic data clearly show that the volumetric majority of preserved DT lavas were erupted during geomagnetic polarity chron 29r, hence over an interval 100 ka. A sharp increase in mean volumetric eruption rate commencing within the Poladpur or uppermost Bushe Fm., near the base of the laterally extensive Wai Subgroup, is now well-documented. Based on recent area-weighted volume estimates [Richards et al., 2015], the eruption rate tripled from 0.2 to 0.6 km^3/year at this transition. The transition coincided with increased mantle relative to crustal melt contributions and much larger volume, albeit seemingly more episodic, individual eruptive events. Prior to the transition, lavas were erupted dominantly as compound flows, whereas afterwards fields of inflated sheet flows are more abundant. These changes in magma chemistry, eruptive style, and tempo imply a fundamental change in the DT magma plumbing system, which is consistent with enlargement and/or consolidation of magma chambers. The timing and abruptness of the transition occurred within ~50 ka of the KPB, supporting a causal relationship to the Chicxulub impact whose synchrony with the KPB at 66.04 ±0.01 Ma [Sprain et al., 2015] is unambiguous. Further 40Ar/39Ar dating (in progress) will refine the tempo of DT eruptions and will test for synchrony of geochemically-defined formations on a regional scale. Improving volume estimates for each formation remains a significant challenge. Quantifying volatile release as a function of time is also challenging but critical to providing realistic constraints on the role of DT volcanism in ecosystem stress around the KPB. New high-precision geochronological and geochemical constraints on large "outlying" regions such as the Malwa Plateau, Mandla Lobe, and Kutch Peninsula will be crucial to a more complete

  17. Quench-induced trapping of magnetic flux in annular Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarøe, Morten; Monaco, R.; Rivers, R.;

    2008-01-01

    over 4 orders of magnitude. After the quench the result of the spontaneous production of topological defects, trapped fluxons, is unambiguously observed as zero-field steps in the DC I-V characteristic of the junction. A power-law scaling behavior of trapping probability versus quench rate is found...... with a critical exponent of 0.5 (within experimental error). The main experimental challenges are to generate many identical quenches with accurate cooling rate, to automate data analysis and acquisition, and to suppress external magnetic fields and noise by passive magnetic shielding and compensation....

  18. Photoluminescence study of time- and spatial-dependent light induced trap de-activation in CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiao; Jacobs, Daniel A; Beck, Fiona J; Duong, The; Shen, Heping; Catchpole, Kylie R; White, Thomas P

    2016-08-10

    Organometal halide perovskite-based solar cells have rapidly achieved high efficiency in recent years. However, many fundamental recombination mechanisms underlying the excellent performance are still not well understood. Here we apply confocal photoluminescence microscopy to investigate the time and spatial characteristics of light-induced trap de-activation in CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite films. Trap de-activation is characterized by a dramatic increase in PL emission during continuous laser illumination accompanied by a lateral expansion of the PL enhancement far beyond the laser spot. These observations are attributed to an oxygen-assisted trap de-activation process associated with carrier diffusion. To model this effect, we add a trap de-activation term to the standard semiconductor carrier recombination and diffusion models. With this approach we are able to reproduce the observed temporal and spatial dependence of laser induced PL enhancement using realistic physical parameters. Furthermore, we experimentally investigate the role of trap diffusion in this process, and demonstrate that the trap de-activation is not permanent, with the traps appearing again once the illumination is turned off. This study provides new insights into recombination and trap dynamics in perovskite films that could offer a better understanding of perovskite solar cell performance.

  19. Neutrophil extracellular trap formation is associated with IL-1β and autophagy-related signaling in gout.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Mitroulis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gout is a prevalent inflammatory arthritis affecting 1-2% of adults characterized by activation of innate immune cells by monosodium urate (MSU crystals resulting in the secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β. Since neutrophils play a major role in gout we sought to determine whether their activation may involve the formation of proinflammatory neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs in relation to autophagy and IL-1β. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Synovial fluid neutrophils from six patients with gout crisis and peripheral blood neutrophils from six patients with acute gout and six control subjects were isolated. MSU crystals, as well as synovial fluid or serum obtained from patients with acute gout, were used for the treatment of control neutrophils. NET formation was assessed using immunofluorescence microscopy. MSU crystals or synovial fluid or serum from patients induced NET formation in control neutrophils. Importantly, NET production was observed in neutrophils isolated from synovial fluid or peripheral blood from patients with acute gout. NETs contained the alarmin high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 supporting their pro-inflammatory potential. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling or phagolysosomal fusion prevented NET formation, implicating autophagy in this process. NET formation was driven at least in part by IL-1β as demonstrated by experiments involving IL-1β and its inhibitor anakinra. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings document for the first time that activation of neutrophils in gout is associated with the formation of proinflammatory NETs and links this process to both autophagy and IL-1β. Modulation of the autophagic machinery may represent an additional therapeutic study in crystalline arthritides.

  20. Magnetic multipole induced zero-rotation frequency bounce-resonant loss in a Penning-Malmberg trap used for antihydrogen trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, G. B.; Bertsche, W.; Bray, C. C.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Fajans, J.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kerrigan, S. J.; Keller, J.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lambo, R.; Madsen, N.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; El Nasr, S. Seif; Silveira, D. M.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2009-10-01

    In many antihydrogen trapping schemes, antiprotons held in a short-well Penning-Malmberg trap are released into a longer well. This process necessarily causes the bounce-averaged rotation frequency Ω¯r of the antiprotons around the trap axis to pass through zero. In the presence of a transverse magnetic multipole, experiments and simulations show that many antiprotons (over 30% in some cases) can be lost to a hitherto unidentified bounce-resonant process when Ω¯r is close to zero.

  1. Magnetic multipole induced zero-rotation frequency bounce-resonant loss in a Penning–Malmberg trap used for antihydrogen trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bray, C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jørgensen, L V; Kerrigan, S J; Keller, J; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2009-01-01

    In many antihydrogen trapping schemes, antiprotons held in a short-well Penning–Malmberg trap are released into a longer well. This process necessarily causes the bounce-averaged rotation frequency $\\overline{\\Omega}_r$ of the antiprotons around the trap axis to pass through zero. In the presence of a transverse magnetic multipole, experiments and simulations show that many antiprotons (over 30% in some cases) can be lost to a hitherto unidentified bounce-resonant process when $\\overline{\\Omega}_r$ is close to zero.

  2. Trapping induced N{sub eff} and electrical field transformation at different temperatures in neutron irradiated high resistivity silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eremin, V.; Li, Z.; Iljashenko, I.

    1994-02-01

    The trapping of both non-equilibrium electrons and holes by neutron induced deep levels in high resistivity silicon planar detectors have been observed. In the experiments Transient Current and Charge Techniques, with short laser light pulse excitation have been applied at temperature ranges of 77--300 k. Light pulse illumination of the front (p{sup +}) and back (n{sup +}) contacts of the detectors showed effective trapping and detrapping, especially for electrons. At temperatures lower than 150 k, the detrapping becomes non-efficient, and the additional negative charge of trapped electrons in the space charge region (SCR) of the detectors leads to dramatic transformations of the electric field due to the distortion of the effective space charge concentration N{sub eff}. The current and charge pulses transformation data can be explained in terms of extraction of electric field to the central part of the detector from the regions near both contacts. The initial field distribution may be recovered immediately by dropping reverse bias, which injects both electrons and holes into the space charge region. In the paper, the degree of the N{sub eff} distortions among various detectors irradiated by different neutron fluences are compared.

  3. Observation of trapped light induced by Dwarf Dirac-cone in out-of-plane condition for photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Subir; Biswas, Tushar; Bhadra, Shaymal K.

    2016-10-01

    Existence of out-of-plane conical dispersion for a triangular photonic crystal lattice is reported. It is observed that conical dispersion is maintained for a number of out-of-plane wave vectors (k z ). We study a case where Dirac like linear dispersion exists but the photonic density of states is not vanishing, called Dwarf Dirac cone (DDC) which does not support localized modes. We demonstrate the trapping of such modes by introducing defects in the crystal. Interestingly, we find by k-point sampling as well as by tuning trapped frequency that such a conical dispersion has an inherent light confining property and it is governed by neither of the known wave confining mechanisms like total internal reflection, band gap guidance. Our study reveals that such a conical dispersion in a non-vanishing photonic density of states induces unexpected intense trapping of light compared with those at other points in the continuum. Such studies provoke fabrication of new devices with exciting properties and new functionalities. Project supported by Director, CSIR-CGCRI, the DST, Government of India, and the CSIR 12th Plan Project (GLASSFIB), India.

  4. Coherence in Microchip Traps

    CERN Document Server

    Treutlein, P; Steinmetz, T; Hänsch, T W; Reichel, J; Treutlein, Philipp; Hommelhoff, Peter; Steinmetz, Tilo; H\\"ansch, Theodor W.; Reichel, Jakob

    2003-01-01

    We report the coherent manipulation of internal states of neutral atoms in a magnetic microchip trap. Coherence lifetimes exceeding 1 s are observed with atoms at distances of $4-130 \\mu$m from the microchip surface. The coherence lifetime in the microtrap is independent of atom-surface distance and agrees well with the results of similar measurements in macroscopic magnetic traps. Due to the absence of surface-induced decoherence, a miniaturized atomic clock with a relative stability in the $10^{-13}$ range can be realized. For applications in quantum information processing, we propose to use microwave near-fields in the proximity of chip wires to create potentials that depend on the internal state of the atoms.

  5. Identifying the tobacco related free radicals by UPCC-QTOF-MS with radical trapping method in mainstream cigarette smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Misha; Zhu, Yingjing; Cheng, Kuan; Da Wu; Liu, Baizhan; Li, Fengting

    2016-11-01

    Tobacco related free radicals (TFRs) in the cigarette smoke are specific classes of hazardous compounds that merit concern. In this study, we developed a hybrid method to identify TFRs directly based on ultra-performance convergence chromatography with a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPCC-QTOF MS) combined spin trapping technique. The short-lived TFRs were stabilized successfully in situ through spin trapping procedure and UPCC was applied to facilitate efficient separation of complex derivative products. Coupling of orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), UPCC-QTOF MS system enabled us to identify specific potential TFRs with exact chemical formula. Moreover, computational stimulations have been carried out to evaluate the optimized stability of TFRs. This work is a successful demonstration for the application of an advanced hyphenated technique for separation of TFRs with short detection time (less than 7min) and high throughput.

  6. Diamonds levitating in a Paul trap under vacuum: Measurements of laser-induced heating via NV center thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delord, T.; Nicolas, L.; Bodini, M.; Hétet, G.

    2017-07-01

    We present measurements of the electronic spin resonance (ESR) of nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamonds that are levitating in a ring Paul trap under vacuum. We observe ESR spectra of NV centers embedded in micron-sized diamonds at vacuum pressures of 2 × 10-1 mbar and the NV photoluminescence down to 10-2 mbar. Further, we use the ESR to measure the temperature of the levitating diamonds and show that the green laser induces heating of the diamond at these pressures. We finally discuss the steps required to control the NV spin under ultra-high vacuum.

  7. Damage induced in red blood cells by infrared optical trapping: an evaluation based on elasticity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Marcos A. S.; Moura, Diógenes S.; Fontes, Adriana; de Araujo, Renato E.

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated the damage caused to optically trapped red blood cells (RBCs) after 1 or 2 min of exposure to near-infrared (NIR) laser beams at 785 or 1064 nm. Damage was quantified by measuring cell elasticity using an automatic, real-time, homemade, optical tweezer system. The measurements, performed on a significant number (hundreds) of cells, revealed an overall deformability decrease up to ˜104% after 2 min of light exposure, under 10 mW optical trapping for the 785-nm wavelength. Wavelength dependence of the optical damage is attributed to the light absorption by hemoglobin. The results provided evidence that RBCs have their biomechanical properties affected by NIR radiation. Our findings establish limits for laser applications with RBCs.

  8. He cluster dynamics in W in the presence of cluster induced formation of He traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Smirnov, R. D.

    2016-02-01

    The theoretical model describing spatiotemporal dynamics of He clusters in tungsten, which takes into account He trap generation associated with the growth of He clusters, is presented. Application of this model to the formation of the layer of nano-bubbles underneath of the surface of thick He irradiated sample, before surface morphology starts to change, gives very good agreement with currently available experimental data. The role of thermophoresis in a long-term evolution of nano-bubble containing structures is discussed.

  9. Experimental determination of the light-trapping-induced absorption enhancement factor in DSSC photoanodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Gagliardi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available For dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC, the fundamental process that determines the maximum short-circuit current is the absorption of light. In such devices, this is produced by the concurrent phenomena of light absorption by dye molecules and light trapping in the mesoporous, titania photoanode structure. The decoupling of these two phenomena is important for device characterization and the design of novel photoelectrode geometries with increased optical performance. In this paper, this task is addressed by introducing a spectral absorption enhancement factor as a parameter to quantify the light trapping effect. The experimental value of this parameter was obtained by comparing the experimentally determined fraction of absorbed light by a dye-sensitized photoanode with the light absorbed by the dye without the mesoporous titania structure. In order to gain more insight from this result, the fraction of light absorbed in the photoanode (on the basis of the dye loading capacity of the titania nanospheres was also calculated by an optical model for the two extreme cases of the absence of light trapping and maximum light trapping. Accordingly, the photocurrent was calculated under the assumption of solar irradiation, which defined two useful boundaries. Using the experimentally derived values of the spectral absorption enhancement factor in the photoanode optical model, the DSSC short-circuit current can be calculated with good agreement with the value measured in practical devices based on the same photoanode structures. Therefore, our approach provides a realistic description of a practical device and can be exploited as an useful tool to assess the optical functionality of novel photoanode structures.

  10. Flow visualization of the trapping induced by vortex breakdown at a junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigolo, Daniele; Riccomi, Marco; Alberini, Federico; Brunazzi, Elisabetta; Ault, Jesse; Stone, Howard

    2016-11-01

    Here we present experimental investigations of the vortex breakdown happening at a T-, Y- or "arrow" shaped junction responsible for the trapping of light material suspended in solution. Considering the ubiquitous nature of T-junctions and bifurcation in general, in industrial as well as biological environments, it is extremely interesting to better understand how this trapping phenomenon happens. In particular, we observed the flow profiles at different sections in order to perform a three-dimensional study of complex structures, such as vortices and recirculation zones, that develop at a bifurcation. We explored Reynolds number ranging from 50 to about 500 for different milli-fluidic devices. Thus we compared standard micro-PIV and a novel optical technique, the Ghost Particle Velocimetry (GPV), that was recently introduced, to investigate the onset of vortex breakdown. Moreover, the experimental results were compared with single-phase OpenFoam numerical simulations performed in the same flow conditions. Finally, we studied the mutual influence of a trapped particle on the flow field inside the recirculation zone by fully exploiting the capability of GPV to produce 3D flow field with a spatial resolution of few tens of microns. This work was partially supported by the Wellcome Trust [1516ISSFFIRA23].

  11. Tritium trapping states induced by lithium-depletion in Li2TiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Makoto; Oya, Yasuhisa; Okuno, Kenji

    2017-04-01

    Identifications of tritium trapping states in neutron-irradiated Li1.8TiO2.9 (lithium-depleted Li2TiO3) were carried out by the out-of-pile tritium release behavior. Tritium release behaviors for neutron-irradiated Li2TiO3 and tritium gas-exposed TiO2 were also measured for comparison. Among the tritium release spectra for these samples, three tritium release peaks were appeared. By the kinetic analyses of tritium release behaviors, the Arrhenius parameters for three peaks were evaluated. Especially for Li1.8TiO2.9, there were two tritium release peaks, and the peak in lower temperature region was assigned to the tritium release controlled by the diffusion process in Li2TiO3 structure. The other tritium release peak, which was hardly appeared for Li2TiO3, was assigned to the release of tritium trapped as hydroxyl groups in Li1.8TiO2.9, indicating that lithium-depletion would result in the formation of hydroxyl groups in Li2TiO3. Lithium vacancies existed in Li2TiO3 crystal structure would promote the tritium trapping as hydroxyl groups due to the decreased charge repulsion between lithium ions and tritium ion, resulting in the difficulty of recovering tritium from Li2TiO3 effectively.

  12. Neutral atom traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  13. Use of enhancer trapping to identify pathogen-induced regulatory events spatially restricted to plant-microbe interaction sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Mercedes; Tsuchiya, Tokuji; He, Shuilin; Eulgem, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Plant genes differentially expressed during plant-pathogen interactions can be important for host immunity or can contribute to pathogen virulence. Large-scale transcript profiling studies, such as microarray- or mRNA-seq-based analyses, have revealed hundreds of genes that are differentially expressed during plant-pathogen interactions. However, transcriptional responses limited to a small number of cells at infection sites can be difficult to detect using these approaches, as they are under-represented in the whole-tissue datasets typically generated by such methods. This study examines the interactions between Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) and the pathogenic oomycete Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa) by enhancer trapping to uncover novel plant genes involved in local infection responses. We screened a β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter-based enhancer-trap population for expression patterns related to Hpa infection. Several independent lines exhibited GUS expression in leaf mesophyll cells surrounding Hpa structures, indicating a regulatory response to pathogen infection. One of these lines contained a single enhancer-trap insertion in an exon of At1g08800 (MyoB1, Myosin Binding Protein 1) and was subsequently found to exhibit reduced susceptibility to Hpa. Two additional Arabidopsis lines with T-DNA insertions in exons of MyoB1 also exhibited approximately 30% fewer spores than wild-type plants. This study demonstrates that our enhancer-trapping strategy can result in the identification of functionally relevant pathogen-responsive genes. Our results further suggest that MyoB1 either positively contributes to Hpa virulence or negatively affects host immunity against this pathogen.

  14. Signals induced by charge-trapping in EDELWEISS FID detectors: analytical modeling and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Q.; Armengaud, E.; Augier, C.; Benoît, A.; Bergé, L.; Billard, J.; Blümer, J.; de Boissière, T.; Broniatowski, A.; Camus, P.; Cazes, A.; Chapellier, M.; Charlieux, F.; Dumoulin, L.; Eitel, K.; Foerster, N.; Fourches, N.; Gascon, J.; Giuliani, A.; Gros, M.; Hehn, L.; Heuermann, G.; De Jésus, M.; Jin, Y.; Juillard, A.; Kleifges, M.; Kozlov, V.; Kraus, H.; Kéfélian, C.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Le-Sueur, H.; Marnieros, S.; Navick, X.-F.; Nones, C.; Olivieri, E.; Pari, P.; Paul, B.; Piro, M.-C.; Poda, D.; Queguiner, E.; Rozov, S.; Sanglard, V.; Schmidt, B.; Scorza, S.; Siebenborn, B.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Vagneron, L.; Weber, M.; Yakushev, E.

    2016-10-01

    The EDELWEISS-III direct dark matter search experiment uses cryogenic HP-Ge detectors Fully covered with Inter-Digitized electrodes (FID). They are operated at low fields (FID detectors based on the Shockley-Ramo theorem. It is used to demonstrate that veto electrodes, initially designed for the sole purpose of surface event rejection, can be used to provide a sensitivity to the depth of the energy deposits, characterize the trapping in the crystals, perform heat and ionization energy corrections and improve the ionization baseline resolutions. These procedures are applied successfully to actual data.

  15. Virtual-photon-induced quantum phase gates for two distant atoms trapped in separate cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Shi-Biao

    2012-01-01

    We propose a scheme for implementing quantum gates for two atoms trapped in distant cavities connected by an optical fiber. The effective long-distance coupling between the two distributed qubits is achieved without excitation and transportation of photons through the optical fiber. Since the cavity modes and fiber mode are never populated and the atoms undergo no transitions, the gate operation is insensitive to the decoherence effect when the thermal photons in the environment are negligible. The scheme opens promising perspectives for networking quantum information processors and implementing distributed and scalable quantum computation.

  16. Improved modeling of GaN HEMTs for predicting thermal and trapping-induced-kink effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarndal, Anwar; Ghannouchi, Fadhel M.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, an improved modeling approach has been developed and validated for GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). The proposed analytical model accurately simulates the drain current and its inherent trapping and thermal effects. Genetic-algorithm-based procedure is developed to automatically find the fitting parameters of the model. The developed modeling technique is implemented on a packaged GaN-on-Si HEMT and validated by DC and small-/large-signal RF measurements. The model is also employed for designing and realizing a switch-mode inverse class-F power amplifier. The amplifier simulations showed a very good agreement with RF large-signal measurements.

  17. Relative deformability of red blood cells in sickle cell trait and sickle cell anemia by trapping and dragging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Rance; Cooper, James; Welker, Gabriel; Aguilar, Elaura; Flanagan, Brooke; Pennycuff, Chelsey; Scott, David; Farone, Anthony; Farone, Mary; Erenso, Daniel; Mushi, Robert; del Pilar Aguinaga, Maria

    2013-06-01

    Genetic mutation of the β-globin gene or inheritance of this mutated gene changes the chemical composition of the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin molecule that could lead to either the heterozygote genotype, resulting in sickle cell trait (SCT), or the homozygote genotype, resulting in sickle cell anemia (SCA). These mutations could affect the reversible elastic deformations of the red blood cells (RBCs) which are vital for biological functions. We have investigated this effect by studying the differences in the deformability of RBCs from blood samples of an individual with SCT and an untreated patient with SCA along with hemoglobin quantitation of each blood sample. Infrared 1064 nm laser trap force along with drag shear force are used to induce deformation in the RBCs. Ultra2-High Performance Liquid Chromatography (UHPLC) is used for the hemoglobin quantitation.

  18. Decomposition of cyclohexane ion induced by intense femtosecond laser fields by ion-trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, Takao; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kanya, Reika [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Yamanouchi, Kaoru, E-mail: kaoru@chem.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); NANOQUINE, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2016-01-14

    Decomposition of cyclohexane cations induced by intense femtosecond laser fields at the wavelength of 800 nm is investigated by ion-trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry in which cyclohexane cations C{sub 6}H{sub 12}{sup +} stored in an ion trap are irradiated with intense femtosecond laser pulses and the generated fragment ions are recorded by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The various fragment ion species, C{sub 5}H{sub n}{sup +} (n = 7, 9), C{sub 4}H{sub n}{sup +} (n = 5–8), C{sub 3}H{sub n}{sup +} (n = 3–7), C{sub 2}H{sub n}{sup +} (n = 2–6), and CH{sub 3}{sup +}, identified in the mass spectra show that decomposition of C{sub 6}H{sub 12}{sup +} proceeds efficiently by the photo-irradiation. From the laser intensity dependences of the yields of the fragment ion species, the numbers of photons required for producing the respective fragment ions are estimated.

  19. Shape-induced asymmetric diffusion in dendritic spines allows efficient synaptic AMPA receptor trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusters, Remy; Kapitein, Lukas C; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Storm, Cornelis

    2013-12-17

    Dendritic spines are the primary postsynaptic sites of excitatory neurotransmission in the brain. They exhibit a remarkable morphological variety, ranging from thin protrusions, to stubby shapes, to bulbous mushroom shapes. The remodeling of spines is thought to regulate the strength of the synaptic connection, which depends vitally on the number and the spatial distribution of AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs). We present numerical and analytical analyses demonstrating that this shape strongly affects AMPAR diffusion. We report a pronounced suppression of the receptor exit rate out of spines with decreasing neck radius. Thus, mushroomlike spines become highly effective at retaining receptors in the spine head. Moreover, we show that the postsynaptic density further enhances receptor trapping, particularly in mushroomlike spines local exocytosis in the spine head, in contrast to release at the base, provides rapid and specific regulatory control of AMPAR concentration at synapses.

  20. Zinc induces unfolding and aggregation of dimeric arginine kinase by trapping reversible unfolding intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Taotao; Wang, Xicheng

    2010-11-01

    Arginine kinase plays an important role in the cellular energy metabolism of invertebrates. Dimeric arginine kinase (dAK) is unique in some marine invertebrates. The effects of Zn²(+) on the unfolding and aggregation of dAK from the sea cucumber Stichopus japonicus were investigated. Our results indicated that Zn²(+) caused dAK inactivation accompanied by conformational unfolding, the exposure of hydrophobic surface, and aggregation. Kinetic studies showed the inactivation and unfolding of dAK followed biphasic kinetic courses. Zn²(+) can affect unfolding and refolding of dAK by trapping the reversible intermediate. Our study provides important information regarding the effect of Zn²(+) on metabolic enzymes in marine invertebrates.

  1. Biotic and abiotic factors influencing growth rate and production of traps by the nematode-trapping fungus Duddingtonia flagrans when induced by Cooperia oncophora larvae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønvold, J.; Wolstrup, J.; Nansen, P.

    1999-01-01

    A series of experiments on corn meal agar was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of the nematode-trapping fungus Duddingtonia flagrans in different abiotic and biotic conditions which occur in cow pats. Above a concentration of 50 parasitic larvae (L-3) cm(-2) the fungus produced a maximum...... of between 500 and 600 nets cm(-2) at 20 degrees C in 2 days on the surface of corn meal agar. There were no differences in the trap-producing capacity of three strains of D. flagrans (CIII4, CI3 and Trol A). On agar at 30 degrees and 20 degrees C, the fungus responded to Coaperia oncophora L-3 very quickly...... will be ready to attack parasitic larvae, when the oxygen tension increases as a result of, for example the activity of the coprophilic fauna. Artificial light giving 3000-3400 Lux on the surface of the agar significantly depressed the growth rate and the production of trapping nets in D, flagrans (CI3...

  2. Trap-induced charge transfer/transport at energy harvesting assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seongeun; Paik, Hanjong; Kim, Tae Wan; Park, Byoungnam

    2017-02-01

    Understanding interfacial electronic properties between electron donors and acceptors in hybrid optoelectronic solar cells is crucial in governing the device parameters associated with energy harvesting. To probe the electronic localized states at an electron donor/acceptor interface comprising a representative hybrid solar cell, we investigated the electrical contact properties between Al-doped zinc oxide (AZO) and poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) using AZO as the source and drain electrodes, pumping carriers from AZO into P3HT. The injection efficiency was evaluated using the transmission line method (TLM) in combination with field effect transistor characterizations. Highly conductive AZO films worked as the source and drain electrodes in the devices for TLM and field effect measurements. A comparable contact resistance difference between AZO/P3HT/AZO and Au/P3HT/Au structures contradicts the fact that a far larger energy barrier exists for electrons and holes between AZO and P3HT compared with between P3HT and Au based on the Schottky-Mott model. It is suggested that band to band tunneling accounts for the contradiction through the initial hop from AZO to P3HT for hole injection. The involvement of the tunneling mechanism in determining the contact resistance implies that there is a high density of electronic traps in the organic side.

  3. Cytokines induced neutrophil extracellular traps formation: implication for the inflammatory disease condition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi S Keshari

    Full Text Available Neutrophils (PMNs and cytokines have a critical role to play in host defense and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs have been shown to extracellularly kill pathogens, and inflammatory potential of NETs has been shown. Microbial killing inside the phagosomes or by NETs is mediated by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS. The present study was undertaken to assess circulating NETs contents and frequency of NETs generation by isolated PMNs from SIRS patients. These patients displayed significant augmentation in the circulating myeloperoxidase (MPO activity and DNA content, while PMA stimulated PMNs from these patients, generated more free radicals and NETs. Plasma obtained from SIRS patients, if added to the PMNs isolated from healthy subjects, enhanced NETs release and free radical formation. Expressions of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNFα and IL-8 in the PMNs as well as their circulating levels were significantly augmented in SIRS subjects. Treatment of neutrophils from healthy subjects with TNFα, IL-1β, or IL-8 enhanced free radicals generation and NETs formation, which was mediated through the activation of NADPH oxidase and MPO. Pre-incubation of plasma from SIRS with TNFα, IL-1β, or IL-8 antibodies reduced the NETs release. Role of IL-1β, TNFα and IL-8 thus seems to be involved in the enhanced release of NETs in SIRS subjects.

  4. Modulation of surface trap induced resistive switching by electrode annealing in individual PbS micro/nanowire-based devices for resistance random access memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jianping; Cheng, Baochang; Wu, Fuzhang; Su, Xiaohui; Xiao, Yanhe; Guo, Rui; Lei, Shuijin

    2014-12-10

    Bipolar resistive switching (RS) devices are commonly believed as a promising candidate for next generation nonvolatile resistance random access memory (RRAM). Here, two-terminal devices based on individual PbS micro/nanowires with Ag electrodes are constructed, whose electrical transport depends strongly on the abundant surface and bulk trap states in micro/nanostructures. The surface trap states can be filled/emptied effectively at negative/positive bias voltage, respectively, and the corresponding rise/fall of the Fermi level induces a variation in a degenerate/nondegenerate state, resulting in low/high resistance. Moreover, the filling/emptying of trap states can be utilized as RRAM. After annealing, the surface trap state can almost be eliminated completely; while most of the bulk trap states can still remain. In the devices unannealed and annealed at both ends, therefore, the symmetrical back-to-back Fowler-Nordheim tunneling with large ON/OFF resistance ratio and Poole-Frenkel emission with poor hysteresis can be observed under cyclic sweep voltage, respectively. However, a typical bipolar RS behavior can be observed effectively in the devices annealed at one end. The acquirement of bipolar RS and nonvolatile RRAM by the modulation of electrode annealing demonstrates the abundant trap states in micro/nanomaterials will be advantageous to the development of new type electronic components.

  5. The Paired-box Homeodomain Transcription Factor Pax6 Binds to the Upstream Region of the TRAP Gene Promoter and Suppresses Receptor Activator of NF-κB Ligand (RANKL)-induced Osteoclast Differentiation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogawa, Masakazu; Hisatake, Koji; Atkins, Gerald J.; Findlay, David M.; Enoki, Yuichiro; Sato, Tsuyoshi; Gray, Peter C.; Kanesaki-Yatsuka, Yukiko; Anderson, Paul H.; Wada, Seiki; Kato, Naoki; Fukuda, Aya; Katayama, Shigehiro; Tsujimoto, Masafumi; Yoda, Tetsuya; Suda, Tatsuo; Okazaki, Yasushi; Matsumoto, Masahito

    2013-01-01

    Osteoclast formation is regulated by balancing between the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) expressed in osteoblasts and extracellular negative regulatory cytokines such as interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interferon-β (IFN-β), which can suppress excessive bone destruction. However, relatively little is known about intrinsic negative regulatory factors in RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation. Here, we show the paired-box homeodomain transcription factor Pax6 acts as a negative regulator of RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation. Electrophoretic mobility shift and reporter assays found that Pax6 binds endogenously to the proximal region of the tartrate acid phosphatase (TRAP) gene promoter and suppresses nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1)-induced TRAP gene expression. Introduction of Pax6 retrovirally into bone marrow macrophages attenuates RANKL-induced osteoclast formation. Moreover, we found that the Groucho family member co-repressor Grg6 contributes to Pax6-mediated suppression of the TRAP gene expression induced by NFATc1. These results suggest that Pax6 interferes with RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation together with Grg6. Our results demonstrate that the Pax6 pathway constitutes a new aspect of the negative regulatory circuit of RANKL-RANK signaling in osteoclastogenesis and that the augmentation of Pax6 might therefore represent a novel target to block pathological bone resorption. PMID:23990468

  6. Rydberg-induced optical nonlinearities from a cold atomic ensemble trapped inside a cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddeda, R.; Usmani, I.; Bimbard, E.; Grankin, A.; Ourjoumtsev, A.; Brion, E.; Grangier, P.

    2016-04-01

    We experimentally characterize the optical nonlinear response of a cold atomic medium placed inside an optical cavity, and excited to Rydberg states. The excitation to S and D Rydberg levels is carried out via a two-photon transition in an electromagnetically induced transparency configuration, with a weak (red) probe beam on the lower transition, and a strong (blue) coupling beam on the upper transition. The observed optical nonlinearities induced by S states for the probe beam can be explained using a semi-classical model with van der Waals’ interactions. For the D states, it appears necessary to take into account a dynamical decay of Rydberg excitations into a long-lived dark state. We show that the measured nonlinearities can be explained by using a Rydberg bubble model with a dynamical decay.

  7. Rydberg-induced optical nonlinearities from a cold atomic ensemble trapped inside a cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Boddeda, Rajiv; Bimbard, Erwan; Grankin, Andrey; Ourjoumtsev, Alexei; Brion, Etienne; Grangier, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally characterize the optical nonlinear response of a cold atomic medium placed inside an optical cavity, and excited to Rydberg states. The excitation to S and D Rydberg levels is carried out via a two-photon transition in an EIT (electromagnetically induced transparency) configuration, with a weak (red) probe beam on the lower transition, and a strong (blue) coupling beam on the upper transition. The observed optical nonlinearities induced by S states for the probe beam can be explained using a semi-classical model with van der Waals' interactions. For the D states, it appears necessary to take into account a dynamical decay of Rydberg excitations into a long-lived dark state. We show that the measured nonlinearities can be explained by using a Rydberg bubble model with a dynamical decay.

  8. Giant Poole-Frenkel effect for the shallow dislocation-related hole traps in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trushin, M; Kittler, M [Joint Lab IHP/BTU, Konrad-Wachsmann-Allee 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany); Vyvenko, O; Vdovin, V, E-mail: vyvenko@gmail.com [V.A. Fok Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, Ulyanovskaya 1, 198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2011-02-01

    The results of a theoretical calculation of the Pool-Frenkel effect due to the strain field of screw and 60{sup 0} dislocations upon the valence band in silicon, and of a detailed DLTS study of the electrical field impact on carrier emission from the dislocation-related states of two types of bonded samples are presented and discussed. A good agreement between the theory and experiment was established. It is concluded that the large Pool-Frenkel coefficient value that significantly exceeds the value for a Coulomb-like potential is a new distinguishing feature of the hole thermo-emission from dislocation-related levels in silicon.

  9. Resonance activation and collision-induced-dissociation of ions using rectangular wave dipolar potentials in a digital ion trap mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fuxing; Wang, Liang; Dai, Xinhua; Fang, Xiang; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2014-04-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of ions by resonance activation in a quadrupole ion trap is usually accomplished by resonance exciting the ions to higher kinetic energy, whereby the high kinetic energy ions collide with a bath gas, such as helium or argon, inside the trap and dissociate to fragments. A new ion activation method using a well-defined rectangular wave dipolar potential formed by dividing down the trapping rectangular waveform is developed and examined herein. The mass-selected parent ions are resonance excited to high kinetic energies by simply changing the frequency of the rectangular wave dipolar potential and dissociation proceeds. A relationship between the ion mass and the activation waveform frequency is also identified and described. This highly efficient (CID) procedure can be realized by simply changing the waveform frequency of the dipolar potential, which could certainly simplify tandem mass spectrometry analysis methods.

  10. Relative Contribution of Crust and Mantle to Flood Basalt Magmatism, Mahabaleshwar Area, Deccan Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, K. G.; Hawkesworth, C. J.

    1984-04-01

    The 1200 m section of flat-lying basalts in the Mahabaleshwar area is divided into three formations on the basis of the trace elements Sr, Ba, Rb, Zr and Nb. The lowermost unit, the Poladpur Formation, is characterized by high Ba, Rb, and Zr/Nb, and low Sr. These features are accompained by high K and Si, high and variable 87Sr/86Sr initial ratios (0.7043-0.7196), and low and variable ɛ Nd values (+2.6 to -17.4). The formation is interpreted as having developed by contamination of the overlying Ambenali magma-type with ancient granitic crust, with simultaneous fractionation of a gabbroic mineral assemblage. The more basic members of the formation are found towards the base of the succession and are more contaminated than the upper flows. The succeeding Ambenali Formation, characterized by the Ambenali magma type, has low Ba, Rb, Sr and Zr/Nb, and low and rather uniform 87Sr/86Sr initial ratios (0.7038-0.7043) coupled with high and relatively uniform ɛ Nd (+4.7 to +6.4). It is interpreted as being essentially uncontaminated and derived from a mantle source with a history of slight trace-element enrichment relative to m.o.r.b.-source. The uppermost group of flows, the Mahabaleshwar Formation, is, like the Poladpur, enriched in Ba, Rb, K and Si relative to the Ambenali, but has lower Zr/Nb and higher Sr. 87Sr/86Sr initial ratios (0.7040-0.7056) are slightly higher than in the Ambenali, and ɛ Nd lies in the range +7.1 to -3.0. In this formation Sr correlates positively with the other incompatible elements and with 87Sr/86Sr initial ratios. This is in strong contrast to the relations observed in the Poladpur, and we believe that the behaviour of Sr may be a simple pointer to the distinction between mantle and crustal contributions. Assuming that late-stage crystal fractionation processes can be allowed for, if Sr correlates positively with elements such as K, Rb and Ba then mantle enrichment processes are clearly implied. Conversely, as for example in the Poladpur

  11. Anisotropy-Induced Quantum Interference and Population Trapping between Orthogonal Quantum Dot Exciton States in Semiconductor Cavity Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen; Agarwal, Girish S

    2017-02-10

    We describe how quantum dot semiconductor cavity systems can be engineered to realize anisotropy-induced dipole-dipole coupling between orthogonal dipole states in a single quantum dot. Quantum dots in single-mode cavity structures as well as photonic crystal waveguides coupled to spin states or linearly polarized excitons are considered. We demonstrate how the dipole-dipole coupling can control the radiative decay rate of excitons and form pure entangled states in the long time limit. We investigate both field-free entanglement evolution and coherently pumped exciton regimes, and show how a double-field pumping scenario can completely eliminate the decay of coherent Rabi oscillations and lead to population trapping. In the Mollow triplet regime, we explore the emitted spectra from the driven dipoles and show how a nonpumped dipole can take on the form of a spectral triplet, quintuplet, or a singlet, which has applications for producing subnatural linewidth single photons and more easily accessing regimes of high-field quantum optics and cavity-QED.

  12. Electronic properties of traps induced by gamma-irradiation in CdTe and CdZnTe detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cavallini, A; Chirco, P; Morigi, M P; Zanarini, M; Auricchio, N; Caroli, E; Dusi, W; Fougeres, P; Hage-Ali, M; Siffert, P

    2000-01-01

    The knowledge of a detector response to different types of radiation sources is becoming a key issue for its employment in many medical, space and scientific applications. Nevertheless, a clear understanding of the effects of irradiation on the material properties is still a long way ahead and, therefore, we have started a thorough investigation of room temperature CdTe and CdZnTe detectors exposed to gamma-ray irradiation. As-grown detectors have been exposed to increasing gamma-ray doses, up to the virtual death of the detector, which occurs at a dose of 30 kGy. The modifications in the detector performance have been investigated by dark-current measurements and quantitative spectroscopic analyses at low and medium energies. The deep levels present in the material have been identified by means of Photo-Induced Current Transient Spectroscopy (PICTS) analyses. The evolution of the trap parameters with increasing irradiation dose has been monitored and a comparison of the results obtained from CdTe and CdZnTe ...

  13. Crossover from band-like to thermally activated charge transport in organic transistors due to strain-induced traps

    KAUST Repository

    Mei, Yaochuan

    2017-08-02

    The temperature dependence of the charge-carrier mobility provides essential insight into the charge transport mechanisms in organic semiconductors. Such knowledge imparts critical understanding of the electrical properties of these materials, leading to better design of high-performance materials for consumer applications. Here, we present experimental results that suggest that the inhomogeneous strain induced in organic semiconductor layers by the mismatch between the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of the consecutive device layers of field-effect transistors generates trapping states that localize charge carriers. We observe a universal scaling between the activation energy of the transistors and the interfacial thermal expansion mismatch, in which band-like transport is observed for similar CTEs, and activated transport otherwise. Our results provide evidence that a high-quality semiconductor layer is necessary, but not sufficient, to obtain efficient charge-carrier transport in devices, and underline the importance of holistic device design to achieve the intrinsic performance limits of a given organic semiconductor. We go on to show that insertion of an ultrathin CTE buffer layer mitigates this problem and can help achieve band-like transport on a wide range of substrate platforms.

  14. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS): definition, semiology, prognosis, pathogenesis, treatment, and place relative to other periodic joint diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Charles; Simon, Virginie; Hoppé, Emmanuel; Insalaco, Paolo; Cissé, Idrissa; Audran, Maurice

    2004-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is an autosomal dominant inherited condition of periodic fever and pain. Most patients are of northern European descent. The attacks manifest as fever and pain in the joints, abdomen, muscles, skin, or eyes, with variations across patients. An acute-phase response occurs during the attacks. Patients with TRAPS are at risk for AA amyloidosis, the most common targets being the kidneys and liver. Soluble TNFRSF1A is usually low between the attacks and may be normal during the attacks, when TNF levels are high. TNFRSF1A is found in abnormally high numbers on leukocyte cell membranes. TRAPS is the first condition for which naturally occurring mutations in a TNF receptor were found; the mutations affect the soluble TNFRSF1A gene in the 12p13 region. In some patients, the pathogenesis involves defective TNFRSF1A shedding from cell membranes in response to a given stimulus. Thus, TRAPS is a model for a novel pathogenic concept characterized by failure to shed a cytokine receptor. This review compares TRAPS to other inherited periodic febrile conditions, namely, familial Mediterranean fever, Muckle-Wells syndrome, cold urticaria, and hyper-IgD syndrome. The place of TRAPS relative to other intermittent systemic joint diseases is discussed. Colchicine neither relieves nor prevents the attacks, whereas oral glucocorticoid therapy is effective when used in dosages greater than 20 mg/day. The pathogenic hypothesis involving defective TNFRSF1A shedding suggests that medications targeting TNF may be effective in TRAPS.

  15. Appropriate choice of collision-induced dissociation energy for qualitative analysis of notoginsenosides based on liquid chromatography hybrid ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guang-Ji; Fu, Han-Xu; Xiao, Jing-Cheng; Ye, Wei; Rao, Tai; Shao, Yu-Hao; Kang, Dian; Xie, Lin; Liang, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Liquid chromatography hybrid ion trap/time-of-flight mass spectrometry possessesd both the MS(n) ability of ion trap and the excellent resolution of a time-of-flight, and has been widely used to identify drug metabolites and determine trace multi-components for in natural products. Collision energy, one of the most important factors in acquiring MS(n) information, could be set freely in the range of 10%-400%. Herein, notoginsenosides were chosen as model compounds to build a novel methodology for the collision energy optimization. Firstly, the fragmental patterns of the representatives for the authentic standards of protopanaxadiol-type and protopanaxatriol-type notoginsenosides authentic standards were obtained based on accurate MS(2) and MS(3) measurements via liquid chromatography hybrid ion trap/time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Then the extracted ion chromatograms of characteristic product ions of notoginsenosides in Panax Notoginseng Extract, which were produced under a series of collision energies and, were compared to screen out the optimum collision energies values for MS(2) and MS(3). The results demonstrated that the qualitative capability of liquid chromatography hybrid ion trap/time-of-flight mass spectrometry was greatly influenced by collision energies, and 50% of MS(2) collision energy was found to produce the highest collision-induced dissociation efficiency for notoginsenosides. BesidesAddtionally, the highest collision-induced dissociation efficiency appeared when the collision energy was set at 75% in the MS(3) stage.

  16. Effects of electron trapping and interface state generation on bias stress induced in indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Sang-Sub; Kim, Kwang-Ryul; Baek, Do-Hyun; Kim, Sang-Soo; Choi, Byoung-Deog

    2014-08-01

    The electrical characteristics of bias temperature stress (BTS) induced in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistors (a-IGZO TFTs) were studied. We analyzed the threshold voltage (VTH) shift on the basis of the effects of positive bias temperature stress (PBTS) and negative bias temperature stress (NBTS), and applied it to the stretched-exponential model. Both stress temperature and bias are considered as important factors in the electrical instabilities of a-IGZO TFTs, and the stretched-exponential equation is well fitted to the stress condition. VTH for the drain current-gate voltage (IDS-VGS) curve and flat-band voltage (VFB) for the capacitance-voltage (C-V) curve move in the positive direction when PBTS is induced. However, in the case of NBTS, they move slightly in the negative direction. To clarify the VTH shift phenomenon by electron and hole injection, the average effective energy barrier (Eτ) is extracted, and the extracted values of Eτ under PBTS and NBTS are about 1.33 and 2.25 eV, respectively. The oxide trap charges (Not) of PBTS and NBTS calculated by C-V measurement are 4.4 × 1011 and 1.49 × 1011 cm-2, respectively. On the other hand, the border trap charges of PBTS and NBTS are 6.7 × 108 and 1.7 × 109 cm-2, respectively. This indicates that the increased interface trap charge, after PBTS is induced, captures electrons during detrap processing from the border trap to the conduction band, valence band, and interface trap.

  17. Dark decay behaviours of photorefractive grating induced by two deep-trap levels in Ce:BaTiO3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Ming; Xu Ying; Hong Zhi

    2005-01-01

    Dark decay behaviours of photorefractive grating in Ce:BaTiO3 crystal are studied experimentally. It is observed that two deep-trap levels, i.e. Fe-ion deep level and Ce-ion deep level, both participate in the photorefractive process. A simplified two-deep model is presented based on the one-deep trap model and the shallow-deep trap model, with which we analyse quantitatively the contribution of each deep level to the whole space-electric field and thus the photorefractive grating varying with the different grating wave vectors and different writing intensities.

  18. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-associated Protein 1 (TRAP1) Mutation and TRAP1 Inhibitor Gamitrinib-triphenylphosphonium (G-TPP) Induce a Forkhead Box O (FOXO)-dependent Cell Protective Signal from Mitochondria*

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyunjin; Yang, Jinsung; Kim, Min Ju; Choi, Sekyu; Chung, Ju-Ryung; Kim, Jong-Min; Yoo, Young Hyun; Chung, Jongkyeong; Koh, Hyongjong

    2015-01-01

    TRAP1 (tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1), a mitochondrial Hsp90 family chaperone, has been identified as a critical regulator of cell survival and bioenergetics in tumor cells. To discover novel signaling networks regulated by TRAP1, we generated Drosophila TRAP1 mutants. The mutants successfully developed into adults and produced fertile progeny, showing that TRAP1 is dispensable in development and reproduction. Surprisingly, mutation or knockdown of TRAP1 markedly enhance...

  19. Atomic Coherent Trapping and Properties of Trapped Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Guo-Jian; XIA Li-Xin; XIE Min

    2006-01-01

    Based on the theory of velocity-selective coherent population trapping, we investigate an atom-laser system where a pair of counterpropagating laser fields interact with a three-level atom. The influence of the parametric condition on the properties of the system such as velocity at which the atom is selected to be trapped, time needed for finishing the coherent trapping process, and possible electromagnetically induced transparency of an altrocold atomic medium,etc., is studied.

  20. Trapping and chaining self-assembly of colloidal polystyrene particles over a floating electrode by using combined induced-charge electroosmosis and attractive dipole-dipole interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiyu; Shao, Jinyou; Jia, Yankai; Tao, Ye; Ding, Yucheng; Jiang, Hongyuan; Ren, Yukun

    2015-11-01

    We propose a novel low-frequency strategy to trap 10 μm colloidal polystyrene (PS) particles of small buoyancy velocity on the surface of a floating electrode, on the basis of combined induced-charge electroosmotic (ICEO) flow and dipole-dipole chaining phenomenon. For field frequencies of 5-50 Hz, much lower than the reciprocal RC time scale, double-layer polarization makes electric field lines pass around the 'insulating' surface of the ideally polarizable floating electrode. Once the long-range ICEO convective micro-vortexes transport particles quickly from the bulk fluid to the electrode surface, neighbouring particles aligned along the local horizontal electric field attract one another by attractive dipolar interactions, and form arrays of particle chains that are almost parallel with the applied electric field. Most importantly, this low-frequency trapping method takes advantage of the dielectrophoretic (DEP) particle-particle interaction to enhance the downward buoyancy force of this dipolar chaining assembly structure, in order to overcome the upward ICEO fluidic drag and realize stable particle trapping around the flow stagnation region. For the sake of comparison, the field frequency is further raised far above the DC limit. At the intermediate frequencies of 200 Hz-2 kHz, this trapping method fails to work, since the normal electric field component emanates from the conducting electrode surface. Besides, at high field frequencies (>3 kHz), particles can be once again effectively trapped at the electrode center, though with a compact (3 kHz) or disordered (10 kHz) 2D packing state on the electrode surface and mainly governed by the short-range negative DEP force field, resulting in requiring a much longer trapping time. To gain a better interpretation of the various particle behaviours observed in experiments, we develop a theoretical framework that takes into account both Maxwell-Wagner interfacial charge relaxation at the particle

  1. Spatial variation in genetic diversity and natural selection on the thrombospondin-related adhesive protein locus of Plasmodium vivax (PvTRAP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rattiporn Kosuwin

    Full Text Available Thrombospondin-related adhesive protein (TRAP of malaria parasites is essential for sporozoite motility and invasions into mosquito's salivary gland and vertebrate's hepatocyte; thereby, it is a promising target for pre-erythrocytic vaccine. TRAP of Plasmodium vivax (PvTRAP exhibits sequence heterogeneity among isolates, an issue relevant to vaccine development. To gain insights into variation in the complete PvTRAP sequences of parasites in Thailand, 114 vivax malaria patients were recruited in 2006-2007 from 4 major endemic provinces bordering Myanmar (Tak in the northwest, n = 30 and Prachuap Khirikhan in the southwest, n = 25, Cambodia (Chanthaburi in the east, n = 29 and Malaysia (Yala and Narathiwat in the south, n = 30. In total, 26 amino acid substitutions were detected and 9 of which were novel, resulting in 44 distinct haplotypes. Haplotype and nucleotide diversities were lowest in southern P. vivax population while higher levels of diversities were observed in other populations. Evidences of positive selection on PvTRAP were demonstrated in domains II and IV and purifying selection in domains I, II and VI. Genetic differentiation was significant between each population except that between populations bordering Myanmar where transmigration was common. Regression analysis of pairwise linearized Fst and geographic distance suggests that P. vivax populations in Thailand have been isolated by distance. Sequence diversity of PvTRAP seems to be temporally stable over one decade in Tak province based on comparison of isolates collected in 1996 (n = 36 and 2006-2007. Besides natural selection, evidences of intragenic recombination have been supported in this study that could maintain and further generate diversity in this locus. It remains to be investigated whether amino acid substitutions in PvTRAP could influence host immune responses although several predicted variant T cell epitopes drastically altered the epitope

  2. A Metabolic Shift toward Pentose Phosphate Pathway Is Necessary for Amyloid Fibril- and Phorbol 12-Myristate 13-Acetate-induced Neutrophil Extracellular Trap (NET) Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Estefania P; Rochael, Natalia C; Guimarães-Costa, Anderson B; de Souza-Vieira, Thiago S; Ganilho, Juliana; Saraiva, Elvira M; Palhano, Fernando L; Foguel, Debora

    2015-09-01

    Neutrophils are the main defense cells of the innate immune system. Upon stimulation, neutrophils release their chromosomal DNA to trap and kill microorganisms and inhibit their dissemination. These chromatin traps are termed neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and are decorated with granular and cytoplasm proteins. NET release can be induced by several microorganism membrane components, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate as well as by amyloid fibrils, insoluble proteinaceous molecules associated with more than 40 different pathologies among other stimuli. The intracellular signaling involved in NET formation is complex and remains unclear for most tested stimuli. Herein we demonstrate that a metabolic shift toward the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is necessary for NET release because glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), an important enzyme from PPP, fuels NADPH oxidase with NADPH to produce superoxide and thus induce NETs. In addition, we observed that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, which are NADPH-independent, are not effective in producing NETs. These data shed new light on how the PPP and glucose metabolism contributes to NET formation.

  3. Trapped antihydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, E.; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jonsell, S.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kemp, S. L.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C. Ø.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Seif el Nasr, S.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only ˜1 T (˜0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be `born' inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 104 times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been trapped for at least 172 ms and then released—the first instance of a purely antimatter atomic system confined for any length of time (Andresen et al., Nature 468:673, 2010). We present a description of the main components of the ALPHA traps and detectors that were key to realising this result. We discuss how the antihydrogen atoms were identified and how they were discriminated from the background processes. Since the results published in Andresen et al. (Nature 468:673, 2010), refinements in the antihydrogen production technique have allowed many more antihydrogen atoms to be trapped, and held for much longer times. We have identified antihydrogen atoms that have been trapped for at least 1,000 s in the apparatus (Andresen et al., Nature Physics 7:558, 2011). This is more than sufficient time to interrogate the atoms spectroscopically, as well as to ensure that they have relaxed to their ground state.

  4. Optical limiting of niobic tellurite glass induced by self-trapped exciton absorption of the AgCl nanocrystal dopant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO ZhenYu; LIN Jian; JIA TianQin; SUN ZhenRong; WANG ZuGeng

    2009-01-01

    Nioblc tellurite glass doped by silver chloride nanocrystal was prepared with the melting-quenching and heat treatment method, and the self-trapped exciton absorption band of the silver chloride nanocrystal was observed at 532 nm in the UV-visible absorption spectrum. The glass structure chara-cteristics were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, and the mechanism of self-trapped exciton was analyzed by Jahn-Teller model. Its optical limiting was measured with 532 nm picosecond laser pulses, and the corresponding nonlinear absorption coefficient was measured with open-aperture Z-scan. The experimental results showed that optical limiting at 532 nm was attributed to free carrier absorption between the self-trapped state and the continuum band.

  5. Cell Membrane Deformation Induced by a Fibronectin-Coated Polystyrene Microbead in a 200-MHz Acoustic Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Lee, Changyang; Lam, Kwok Ho; Kim, Hyung Ham; Lee, Jungwoo; Shung, K. Kirk

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of cell mechanics is crucial for a better understanding of cellular responses during the progression of certain diseases and for the identification of the cell’s nature. Many techniques using optical tweezers, atomic force microscopy, and micro-pipettes have been developed to probe and manipulate cells in the spatial domain. In particular, we recently proposed a two-dimensional acoustic trapping method as an alternative technique for small particle manipulation. Although the proposed method may have advantages over optical tweezers, its applications to cellular mechanics have not yet been vigorously investigated. This study represents an initial attempt to use acoustic tweezers as a tool in the field of cellular mechanics in which cancer cell membrane deformability is studied. A press-focused 193-MHz single-element lithium niobate (LiNbO3) transducer was designed and fabricated to trap a 5-µm polystyrene microbead near the ultrasound beam focus. The microbeads were coated with fibronectin, and trapped before being attached to the surface of a human breast cancer cell (MCF-7). The cell membrane was then stretched by remotely pulling a cell-attached microbead with the acoustic trap. The maximum cell membrane stretched lengths were measured to be 0.15, 0.54, and 1.41 µm at input voltages to the transducer of 6.3, 9.5, and 12.6 Vpp, respectively. The stretched length was found to increase nonlinearly as a function of the voltage input. No significant cytotoxicity was observed to result from the bead or the trapping force on the cell during or after the deformation procedure. Hence, the results convincingly demonstrated the possible application of the acoustic trapping technique as a tool for cell manipulation. PMID:24569245

  6. Preventing infective complications relating to induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary, Nirmala; Mahmood, Tahir A

    2010-08-01

    Infective complications following induced abortions are still a common cause of morbidity and mortality. This review focusses on defining the strategies to improve care of women seeking an induced abortion and to reduce infective complications. We have considered the evidence for screening and cost-effectiveness for antibiotic prophylaxis. Current evidence suggests that treating all women with prophylactic antibiotics in preference to screening and treating is the most cost-effective way of reducing infective complications following induced abortions. The final strategy to prevent infective complications should be individualized for each region/area depending on the prevalence of organisms causing pelvic infections and the resources available.

  7. How does relativity affect magnetically induced currents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, R J F; Repisky, M; Komorovsky, S

    2015-09-21

    Magnetically induced probability currents in molecules are studied in relativistic theory. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) enhances the curvature and gives rise to a previously unobserved current cusp in AuH or small bulge-like distortions in HgH2 at the proton positions. The origin of this curvature is magnetically induced spin-density arising from SOC in the relativistic description.

  8. Quantitative analysis of SILCs (stress-induced leakage currents) based on the inelastic trap-assisted tunneling model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamohara, Shiro; Okuyama, Yutaka; Manabe, Yukiko; Okuyama, Kosuke; Kubota, Katsuhiko; Park, Donggun; Hu, Chenming

    1999-09-01

    We have successfully developed a new quantitative analytical ITAT-based SILC model which can explain both of the two field dependencies, i.e. Fowler-Nordheim (FN)-field and the direct tunneling (DT)-field dependent of A-mode and B-mode SILCs. While DT-field dependence of A-mode comes from the single trap assisted tunneling, FN-field dependence of B- mode originates at the tunneling via the multi-trap leakage path. We have also developed an analytical model for the anomalous SILC of the flash memory cell and investigate the properties of retention lifetime of failure bits. The anomalous SILC shows the DT-field dependence because of the tunneling via the incomplete multi-trap path. A remarkable behavior of retention characteristics predicted by our models is a nearly logarithmic time dependence. The Fowler- Nordheim tunneling model leads to an overestimation of lifetime at low Vth region. To take into account a position of each trap and clarify the detail characteristics of SILC, we have proposed a new Monte Carlo like approach for hopping conduction and successfully explained the anomalous SILC using only physical based parameters.

  9. On relation between mid-latitude ionospheric ionization and quasi-trapped energetic electrons during 15 December 2006 magnetic storm

    CERN Document Server

    Suvorova, A V; Dmitriev, A V

    2011-01-01

    We report simultaneous observations of intense fluxes of quasi-trapped energetic electrons and substantial enhancements of ionospheric electron concentration (EC) at low and middle latitudes over Pacific region during geomagnetic storm on 15 December 2006. Electrons with energy of tens of keV were measured at altitude of ~800 to 900 km by POES and DMSP satellites. Experimental data from COSMIC/FS3 satellites and global network of ground-based GPS receivers were used to determine height profiles of EC and vertical total EC, respectively. A good spatial and temporal correlation between the electron fluxes and EC enhancements was found. This fact allows us to suggest that the quasi-trapped energetic electrons can be an important source of ionospheric ionization at middle latitudes during magnetic storms.

  10. Reactions of nitroxide radicals in aqueous solutions exposed to non-thermal plasma: limitations of spin trapping of the plasma induced species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbanev, Yury; Stehling, Nicola; O'Connell, Deborah; Chechik, Victor

    2016-10-01

    Low temperature (‘cold’) atmospheric pressure plasmas have gained much attention in recent years due to their biomedical effects achieved through the interactions of plasma-induced species with the biological substrate. Monitoring of the radical species in an aqueous biological milieu is usually performed via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy using various nitrone spin traps, which form persistent radical adducts with the short-lived radicals. However, the stability of these nitroxide radical adducts in the plasma-specific environment is not well known. In this work, chemical transformations of nitroxide radicals in aqueous solutions using a model nitroxide 4-oxo-TEMPO were studied using EPR and LC-MS. The kinetics of the nitroxide decay when the solution was exposed to plasma were assessed, and the reactive pathways proposed. The use of different scavengers enabled identification of the types of reactive species which cause the decay, indicating the predominant nitroxide group reduction in oxygen-free plasmas. The 2H adduct of the PBN spin trap (PBN-D) was shown to decay similarly to the model molecule 4-oxo-TEMPO. The decay of the spin adducts in plasma-treated solutions must be considered to avoid rendering the spin trapping results unreliable. In particular, the selectivity of the decay indicated the limitations of the PTIO/PTI nitroxide system in the detection of nitric oxide.

  11. The release of trapped gases from amorphous solid water films. I. "Top-down" crystallization-induced crack propagation probed using the molecular volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, R Alan; Smith, R Scott; Kay, Bruce D

    2013-03-14

    In this (Paper I) and the companion paper (Paper II; R. May, R. Smith, and B. Kay, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 104502 (2013)), we investigate the mechanisms for the release of trapped gases from underneath amorphous solid water (ASW) films. In prior work, we reported the episodic release of trapped gases in concert with the crystallization of ASW, a phenomenon that we termed the "molecular volcano." The observed abrupt desorption is due to the formation of cracks that span the film to form a connected pathway for release. In this paper, we utilize the "molecular volcano" desorption peak to characterize the formation of crystallization-induced cracks. We find that the crack length distribution is independent of the trapped gas (Ar, Kr, Xe, CH4, N2, O2, or CO). Selective placement of the inert gas layer is used to show that cracks form near the top of the film and propagate downward into the film. Isothermal experiments reveal that, after some induction time, cracks propagate linearly in time with an Arrhenius dependent velocity corresponding to an activation energy of 54 kJ∕mol. This value is consistent with the crystallization growth rates reported by others and establishes a direct connection between crystallization growth rate and the crack propagation rate. A two-step model in which nucleation and crystallization occurs in an induction zone near the top of the film followed by the propagation of a crystallization∕crack front into the film is in good agreement with the temperature programmed desorption results.

  12. Symmetry breaking and light-induced spin-state trapping in a mononuclear FeII complex with the two-step thermal conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buron-Le Cointe, M.; Ould Moussa, N.; Trzop, E.; Moréac, A.; Molnar, G.; Toupet, L.; Bousseksou, A.; Létard, J. F.; Matouzenko, G. S.

    2010-12-01

    Crystallographic, magnetic, and Raman investigations of the mononuclear [FeII(Hpy-DAPP)](BF4)2 complex are presented. Its particular feature is a two-step thermal spin conversion in spite of a unique symmetry-independent iron site per unit cell. The plateau around 140 K is associated with a symmetry breaking visible by the appearance of weak (0k0) k odd Bragg peaks. Symmetries of the high-temperature high-spin state and of the low-temperature low-spin state are both monoclinic P21/c , so that the symmetry breaking on the plateau is associated with a reentrant phase transition. It is discussed in relation with Ising-type microscopic models. At the plateau level, the two symmetry-independent molecules differ both by their spin state and the conformation (chair versus twist-boat) of one metallocycle. At low-temperature photoinduced phenomena have been investigated: a partial phototransformation [light-induced excited spin-state trapping (LIESST) effect] is observed under visible red irradiation. Raman spectroscopy shows that the molecular photoinduced state is the high-spin one. Nevertheless, as no macroscopic symmetry breaking is observed, the unique average cationic [FeII(Hpy-DAPP)] state of the unit cell is intermediate between pure low-spin and high-spin states and presents a conformational disorder for one metallocycle. Reverse-LIESST has also been evidenced using near infrared excitation. Thus, the mononuclear [Fe(Hpy-DAPP)](BF4)2 compound offers the opportunity to discuss the interplay between spin conversion, molecular conformational change, and ordering processes.

  13. Electron--electron double resonance study of magnetic energy transfer between trapped electrons and radicals in organic glasses: Relation between dipolar cross relaxation times and dipolar interaction distances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, D.P.; Feng, D.F.; Ngo, F.Q.H.; Kevan, L.

    1976-11-15

    Electron--electron double resonance (ELDOR) has been used to measure cross-relaxation times between trapped electrons and trapped radicals produced by ..gamma.. irradiation of 2-methyltetrahydrofuran and 3-methylhexane organic glasses. The cross-relaxation times are measured as a function of temperature, radiation dose, and the frequency difference ..delta..f of the microwave frequencies used. The cross-relaxation times are nearly temperature independent and depend on ..delta..f/sup 2/ at doses where the spin concentrations approach uniformity; these features indicate the dominance of single step over multistep cross-relaxation processes. Equations have been derived to relate the dipolar cross-relaxation distance to the measured cross-relaxation times, and it is suggested that the cross-relaxation line shape is Lorentzian in magnetically dilute systems. Typical electron--radical correlation distances in these organic glasses are 10 A. (AIP)

  14. Trap induction and trapping in eight nematode-trapping fungi (Orbiliaceae) as affected by juvenile stage of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hongyan; Aminuzzaman, F M; Xu, Lingling; Lai, Yiling; Li, Feng; Liu, Xingzhong

    2010-06-01

    This study measured trap induction and trapping on agar disks as affected by juvenile stages (J1, J2, J3, and J4) of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and by species of nematode-trapping fungi. Eight species of nematode-trapping fungi belonging to the family Orbiliaceae and producing four kinds of traps were studied: adhesive network-forming Arthrobotrys oligospora, A. vermicola, and A. eudermata, constricting ring-forming Drechslerella brochopaga, and Dr. stenobrocha, adhesive column-forming Dactylellina cionopaga, and adhesive knob-forming Da. ellipsospora, and Da. drechsleri. The number of traps induced generally increased with increasing juvenile stages of C. elegans. The ability to capture the juveniles tended to be similar among isolates that produced the same kind of trap but differed among species that produced different kinds of traps. Trapping by Dr. stenobrocha and Da. cionopaga was correlated with trap number and with juvenile stage. A. oligospora and A. vermicola respectively captured more than 92 and 88% of the J1, J3, and J4 but captured a lower percentage of J2. The knob-producing isolates captured more younger than elder juveniles. Partial correlation analyses demonstrated that the trap induction of the most fungal species positively correlated with the juvenile size and motility, which was juvenile stage dependent. Overall, trap induction and trapping correlated with C. elegans juvenile stage (size and motility) in six species of trapping fungi.

  15. Trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, E; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jonsell, S; Jørgensen, L V; Kemp, S L; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif el Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki,Y

    2012-01-01

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only ∼1 T (∼0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be ‘born’ inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 104 times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been ...

  16. Evolution of Minor Phases in a 9PctCr Steel: Effect of Tempering Temperature and Relation with Hydrogen Trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado-Noreña, Carolina; Danón, Claudio Ariel; Luppo, María Inés; Bruzzoni, Pablo

    2015-09-01

    The evolution of minor phases in ASTM A335 P91 steel has been studied on specimens submitted to different thermal treatments including a tempering step. Particular emphasis has been put on the tempering temperature range 573 K to 873 K (300 °C to 600 °C), which has not been yet intensively studied. The techniques used in this investigation were X-ray diffraction with synchrotron light, scanning electron microscopy with field emission gun and transmission electron microscopy. In the low tempering temperature range [573 K to 673 K (300 °C to 400 °C)], retained austenite, Fe3C and MX precipitates are observed. In the high tempering temperature range [773 K to 1053 K (500 °C to 780 °C)], M23C6-type carbides, MX-type carbonitrides and M2X precipitates are observed. The effect of the microstructure on hydrogen trapping is analyzed. The distorted matrix around the M2X and MX particles provides the most important trap sites in the P91 steel.

  17. Earth history. U-Pb geochronology of the Deccan Traps and relation to the end-Cretaceous mass extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoene, Blair; Samperton, Kyle M; Eddy, Michael P; Keller, Gerta; Adatte, Thierry; Bowring, Samuel A; Khadri, Syed F R; Gertsch, Brian

    2015-01-09

    The Chicxulub asteroid impact (Mexico) and the eruption of the massive Deccan volcanic province (India) are two proposed causes of the end-Cretaceous mass extinction, which includes the demise of nonavian dinosaurs. Despite widespread acceptance of the impact hypothesis, the lack of a high-resolution eruption timeline for the Deccan basalts has prevented full assessment of their relationship to the mass extinction. Here we apply uranium-lead (U-Pb) zircon geochronology to Deccan rocks and show that the main phase of eruptions initiated ~250,000 years before the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary and that >1.1 million cubic kilometers of basalt erupted in ~750,000 years. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the Deccan Traps contributed to the latest Cretaceous environmental change and biologic turnover that culminated in the marine and terrestrial mass extinctions.

  18. VACUUM TRAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, H.S.

    1959-09-15

    An improved adsorption vacuum trap for use in vacuum systems was designed. The distinguishing feature is the placement of a plurality of torsionally deformed metallic fins within a vacuum jacket extending from the walls to the central axis so that substantially all gas molecules pass through the jacket will impinge upon the fin surfaces. T fins are heated by direct metallic conduction, thereby ol taining a uniform temperature at the adeorbing surfaces so that essentially all of the condensible impurities from the evacuating gas are removed from the vacuum system.

  19. Severe signal loss in diamond beam loss monitors in high particle rate environments by charge trapping in radiation-induced defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassel, Florian; Boer, Wim de [Institute for Experimental Nuclear Physics (IEKP), KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Guthoff, Moritz; Dabrowski, Anne [CERN, Meyrin (Switzerland)

    2016-10-15

    The beam condition monitoring leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the compact muon solenoid (CMS) experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC). As detectors 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors are positioned in rings around the beam pipe. Here, high particle rates occur from the colliding beams scattering particles outside the beam pipe. These particles cause defects, which act as traps for the ionization, thus reducing the charge collection efficiency (CCE). However, the loss in CCE was much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements and simulations, especially in single-crystalline (sCVD) diamonds, which have a low initial concentration of defects. After an integrated luminosity of a few fb{sup -1} corresponding to a few weeks of LHC operation, the CCE of the sCVD diamonds dropped by a factor of five or more and quickly approached the poor CCE of pCVD diamonds. The reason why in real experiments the CCE is much worse than in laboratory experiments is related to the ionization rate. At high particle rates the trapping rate of the ionization is so high compared with the detrapping rate, that space charge builds up. This space charge reduces locally the internal electric field, which in turn increases the trapping rate and recombination and hence reduces the CCE in a strongly non-linear way. A diamond irradiation campaign was started to investigate the rate-dependent electrical field deformation with respect to the radiation damage. Besides the electrical field measurements via the transient current technique (TCT), the CCE was measured. The experimental results were used to create an effective deep trap model that takes the radiation damage into account. Using this trap model, the rate-dependent electrical field deformation and the CCE were simulated with the software SILVACO TCAD. The simulation, tuned to rate-dependent measurements from a strong radioactive source, was able to predict the non-linear decrease of the

  20. Trapped phonons

    CERN Document Server

    Mannarelli, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the effect of restricted geometries on the contribution of Nambu-Goldstone bosons (phonons) to the shear viscosity, $\\eta$, of a superfluid. For illustrative purpose we examine a simplified system consisting of a circular boundary of radius $R$, confining a two-dimensional rarefied gas of phonons. Considering the Maxwell-type conditions, we show that phonons that are not in equilibrium with the boundary and that are not specularly reflected exert a shear stress on the boundary. In this case it is possible to define an effective (ballistic) shear viscosity coefficient $\\eta \\propto \\rho_{\\rm ph} \\chi R$, where $\\rho_{\\rm ph}$ is the density of phonons and $\\chi$ is a parameter which characterizes the type of scattering at the boundary. For an optically trapped superfluid our results corroborate the findings of Refs. \\cite{Mannarelli:2012su, Mannarelli:2012eg}, which imply that at very low temperature the shear viscosity correlates with the size of the optical trap and decreases with decreasing tempe...

  1. Zolpidem-induced sleep-related eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Chang-Ho; Ji, Ki-Hwan

    2010-01-15

    An association between zolpidem administration and sleep-related eating disorder (SRED) has been suggested. The authors observed zolpidem-induced SRED in restless legs syndrome (RLS). With the review of previous reports, we identified a common occurrence of RLS in zolpidem-induced SRED.

  2. Group B Streptococcus Induces Neutrophil Recruitment to Gestational Tissues and Elaboration of Extracellular Traps and Nutritional Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothary, Vishesh; Doster, Ryan S.; Rogers, Lisa M.; Kirk, Leslie A.; Boyd, Kelli L.; Romano-Keeler, Joann; Haley, Kathryn P.; Manning, Shannon D.; Aronoff, David M.; Gaddy, Jennifer A.

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae, or Group B Streptococcus (GBS), is a gram-positive bacterial pathogen associated with infection during pregnancy and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates. Infection of the extraplacental membranes surrounding the developing fetus, a condition known as chorioamnionitis, is characterized histopathologically by profound infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs, neutrophils) and greatly increases the risk for preterm labor, stillbirth, or neonatal GBS infection. The advent of animal models of chorioamnionitis provides a powerful tool to study host-pathogen relationships in vivo and ex vivo. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the innate immune response elicited by GBS and evaluate how antimicrobial strategies elaborated by these innate immune cells affect bacteria. Our work using a mouse model of GBS ascending vaginal infection during pregnancy reveals that clinically isolated GBS has the capacity to invade reproductive tissues and elicit host immune responses including infiltration of PMNs within the choriodecidua and placenta during infection, mirroring the human condition. Upon interacting with GBS, murine neutrophils elaborate DNA-containing extracellular traps, which immobilize GBS and are studded with antimicrobial molecules including lactoferrin. Exposure of GBS to holo- or apo-forms of lactoferrin reveals that the iron-sequestration activity of lactoferrin represses GBS growth and viability in a dose-dependent manner. Together, these data indicate that the mouse model of ascending infection is a useful tool to recapitulate human models of GBS infection during pregnancy. Furthermore, this work reveals that neutrophil extracellular traps ensnare GBS and repress bacterial growth via deposition of antimicrobial molecules, which drive nutritional immunity via metal sequestration strategies. PMID:28217556

  3. Ethanol Induced Urine Acidification is Related with Early Acetaldehyde Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon Kil Kwon

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: In conclusion, urine acidification after ethanol ingestion is related with serum acetaldehyde concentration. Early elevation of acetaldhyde could induce urine acidification, but the urine pH was elevated after a few hours, that might make prolonged acidemia.

  4. Carrier trapping induced abnormal temperature dependent photoluminescence properties of novel sandwiched structure InGaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Juan; Li, Ding; Rajabi, K.; Yang, Wei; Hu, Xiaodong [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructure and Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Liu, Lei [Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, CAS, Suzhou 215125 (China)

    2014-04-15

    A dual-wavelength LED sample with novel sandwiched structure in high-In-content MQWs is studied by temperature dependent photoluminescence (TDPL) and the abnormal temperature dependence of emission intensity is obtained. The novel MQWs structure which contains staggered quantum wells and an ultra-thin InN interlayer in the wells shows better luminescence property than the reference sample which has conventional quantum wells. Under 325 nm continuous wave laser excitation the LED sample of novel structure exhibits unexpected increasing luminescence intensity as temperature goes up from 140 K to 220 K and reaches its maximum at 220 K. This could be attributed to (1) the carrier redistribution and the novel sandwiched MQWs' high carrier trapping capability; (2) the intrinsic emission property of the MQWs enhanced by improvement of electron-hole overlap and reduction of quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) and compositional fluctuation. TDPL under 405 nm laser excitation is also measured to support this view. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. Free radical generation induced by ultrasound in red wine and model wine: An EPR spin-trapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-An; Shen, Yuan; Fan, Xue-hui; Martín, Juan Francisco García; Wang, Xi; Song, Yun

    2015-11-01

    Direct evidence for the formation of 1-hydroxylethyl radicals by ultrasound in red wine and air-saturated model wine is presented in this paper. Free radicals are thought to be the key intermediates in the ultrasound processing of wine, but their nature has not been established yet. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping with 5,5-dimethyl-l-pyrrolin N-oxide (DMPO) was used for the detection of hydroxyl free radicals and 1-hydroxylethyl free radicals. Spin adducts of hydroxyl free radicals were detected in DMPO aqueous solution after sonication while 1-hydroxylethyl free radical adducts were observed in ultrasound-processed red wine and model wine. The latter radical arose from ethanol oxidation via the hydroxyl radical generated by ultrasound in water, thus providing the first direct evidence of the formation of 1-hydroxylethyl free radical in red wine exposed to ultrasound. Finally, the effects of ultrasound frequency, ultrasound power, temperature and ultrasound exposure time were assessed on the intensity of 1-hydroxylethyl radical spin adducts in model wine.

  6. Cation-induced kinetic trapping and enhanced hydrogen adsorption in a modulated anionic metal-organic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sihai; Lin, Xiang; Blake, Alexander J; Walker, Gavin S; Hubberstey, Peter; Champness, Neil R; Schröder, Martin

    2009-09-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)--microporous materials constructed by bridging metal centres with organic ligands--show promise for applications in hydrogen storage, which is a key challenge in the development of the 'hydrogen economy'. Their adsorption capacities, however, have remained insufficient for practical applications, and thus strategies to enhance hydrogen-MOF interactions are required. Here we describe an anionic MOF material built from In(III) centres and tetracarboxylic acid ligands (H(4)L) in which kinetic trapping behaviour--where hydrogen is adsorbed at high pressures but not released immediately on lowering the pressure--is modulated by guest cations. With piperazinium dications in its pores, the framework exhibits hysteretic hydrogen adsorption. On exchange of these dications with lithium cations, no hysteresis is seen, but instead there is an enhanced adsorption capacity coupled to an increase in the isosteric heat of adsorption. This is rationalized by the different locations of the cations within the pores, determined with precision by X-ray crystallography.

  7. Significance of inducible defense-related proteins in infected plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, L.C. van; Rep, M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Inducible defense-related proteins have been described in many plant species upon infection with oomycetes, fungi, bacteria, or viruses, or insect attack. Several types of proteins are common and have been classified into 17 families of pathogenesis-related proteins (PRs). Others have so far been fo

  8. Significance of inducible defense-related proteins in infected plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, L.C. van; Rep, M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Inducible defense-related proteins have been described in many plant species upon infection with oomycetes, fungi, bacteria, or viruses, or insect attack. Several types of proteins are common and have been classified into 17 families of pathogenesis-related proteins (PRs). Others have so far been

  9. Significance of inducible defense-related proteins in infected plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, L.C. van; Rep, M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Inducible defense-related proteins have been described in many plant species upon infection with oomycetes, fungi, bacteria, or viruses, or insect attack. Several types of proteins are common and have been classified into 17 families of pathogenesis-related proteins (PRs). Others have so far been fo

  10. Annual Trapping Proposal 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Annual Trapping Plan for the 1984-1985 trapping season at Clarence Cannon NWR outlines rules and regulations for the trapping of beaver and muskrat on the...

  11. Severe signal loss in diamond beam loss monitors in high particle rate environments by charge trapping in radiation-induced defects

    CERN Document Server

    Kassel, Florian; Dabrowski, Anne; de Boer, Wim

    2016-01-01

    The beam condition monitoring leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the compact muon solenoid (CMS) experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC). As detectors 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors are positioned in rings around the beam pipe. Here, high particle rates occur from the colliding beams scattering particles outside the beam pipe. These particles cause defects, which act as traps for the ionization, thus reducing the charge collection efficiency (CCE). However, the loss in CCE was much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements and simulations, especially in single-crystalline (sCVD) diamonds, which have a low initial concentration of defects. The reason why in real experiments the CCE is much worse than in laboratory experiments is related to the ionization rate. At high particle rates the trapping rate of the ionization is so high compared with the detrapping rate, that space charge builds up. This space charge reduces locally the internal electric field,...

  12. Kinetic validation of the models for P-glycoprotein ATP hydrolysis and vanadate-induced trapping. Proposal for additional steps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ramón Lugo

    Full Text Available P-Glycoprotein, a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC superfamily, is a multidrug transporter responsible for cellular efflux of hundreds of structurally unrelated compounds, including natural products, many clinically used drugs and anti-cancer agents. Expression of P-glycoprotein has been linked to multidrug resistance in human cancers. ABC transporters are driven by ATP hydrolysis at their two cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding domains, which interact to form a closed ATP-bound sandwich dimer. Intimate knowledge of the catalytic cycle of these proteins is clearly essential for understanding their mechanism of action. P-Glycoprotein has been proposed to hydrolyse ATP by an alternating mechanism, for which there is substantial experimental evidence, including inhibition of catalytic activity by trapping of ortho-vanadate at one nucleotide-binding domain, and the observation of an asymmetric occluded state. Despite many studies of P-glycoprotein ATPase activity over the past 20 years, no comprehensive kinetic analysis has yet been carried out, and some puzzling features of its behaviour remain unexplained. In this work, we have built several progressively more complex kinetic models, and then carried out simulations and detailed analysis, to test the validity of the proposed reaction pathway employed by P-glycoprotein for ATP hydrolysis. To establish kinetic parameters for the catalytic cycle, we made use of the large amount of published data on ATP hydrolysis by hamster P-glycoprotein, both purified and in membrane vesicles. The proposed kinetic scheme(s include a high affinity priming reaction for binding of the first ATP molecule, and an independent pathway for ADP binding outside the main catalytic cycle. They can reproduce to varying degrees the observed behavior of the protein's ATPase activity and its inhibition by ortho-vanadate. The results provide new insights into the mode of action of P-glycoprotein, and some hypotheses about the

  13. P2Y6 Receptor Antagonist MRS2578 Inhibits Neutrophil Activation and Aggregated Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation Induced by Gout-Associated Monosodium Urate Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sil, Payel; Hayes, Craig P; Reaves, Barbara J; Breen, Patrick; Quinn, Shannon; Sokolove, Jeremy; Rada, Balázs

    2017-01-01

    Human neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes [PMNs]) generate inflammatory responses within the joints of gout patients upon encountering monosodium urate (MSU) crystals. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are found abundantly in the synovial fluid of gout patients. The detailed mechanism of MSU crystal-induced NET formation remains unknown. Our goal was to shed light on possible roles of purinergic signaling and neutrophil migration in mediating NET formation induced by MSU crystals. Interaction of human neutrophils with MSU crystals was evaluated by high-throughput live imaging using confocal microscopy. We quantitated NET levels in gout synovial fluid supernatants and detected enzymatically active neutrophil primary granule enzymes, myeloperoxidase, and human neutrophil elastase. Suramin and PPADS, general P2Y receptor blockers, and MRS2578, an inhibitor of the purinergic P2Y6 receptor, blocked NET formation triggered by MSU crystals. AR-C25118925XX (P2Y2 antagonist) did not inhibit MSU crystal-stimulated NET release. Live imaging of PMNs showed that MRS2578 represses neutrophil migration and blocked characteristic formation of MSU crystal-NET aggregates called aggregated NETs. Interestingly, the store-operated calcium entry channel inhibitor (SK&F96365) also reduced MSU crystal-induced NET release. Our results indicate that the P2Y6/store-operated calcium entry/IL-8 axis is involved in MSU crystal-induced aggregated NET formation, but MRS2578 could have additional effects affecting PMN migration. The work presented in the present study could lead to a better understanding of gouty joint inflammation and help improve the treatment and care of gout patients.

  14. Phenol-Soluble Modulin α Peptide Toxins from Aggressive Staphylococcus aureus Induce Rapid Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps through a Reactive Oxygen Species-Independent Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björnsdottir, Halla; Dahlstrand Rudin, Agnes; Klose, Felix P.; Elmwall, Jonas; Welin, Amanda; Stylianou, Marios; Christenson, Karin; Urban, Constantin F.; Forsman, Huamei; Dahlgren, Claes; Karlsson, Anna; Bylund, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils have the ability to capture and kill microbes extracellularly through the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These are DNA and protein structures that neutrophils release extracellularly and are believed to function as a defense mechanism against microbes. The classic NET formation process, triggered by, e.g., bacteria, fungi, or by direct stimulation of protein kinase C through phorbol myristate acetate, is an active process that takes several hours and relies on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are further modified by myeloperoxidase (MPO). We show here that NET-like structures can also be formed by neutrophils after interaction with phenol-soluble modulin α (PSMα) that are cytotoxic membrane-disturbing peptides, secreted from community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA). The PSMα-induced NETs contained the typical protein markers and were able to capture microbes. The PSMα-induced NET structures were disintegrated upon prolonged exposure to DNase-positive S. aureus but not on exposure to DNase-negative Candida albicans. Opposed to classic NETosis, PSMα-triggered NET formation occurred very rapidly, independently of ROS or MPO, and was also manifest at 4°C. These data indicate that rapid NETs release may result from cytotoxic membrane disturbance by PSMα peptides, a process that may be of importance for CA-MRSA virulence. PMID:28337204

  15. Enhanced vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell responses to malaria antigen ME-TRAP by fusion to MHC class ii invariant chain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra J Spencer

    Full Text Available The orthodox role of the invariant chain (CD74; Ii is in antigen presentation to CD4+ T cells, but enhanced CD8+ T cells responses have been reported after vaccination with vectored viral vaccines encoding a fusion of Ii to the antigen of interest. In this study we assessed whether fusion of the malarial antigen, ME-TRAP, to Ii could increase the vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell response. Following single or heterologous prime-boost vaccination of mice with a recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus vector, ChAd63, or recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA, higher frequencies of antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were observed, with the largest increases observed following a ChAd63-MVA heterologous prime-boost regimen. Studies in non-human primates confirmed the ability of Ii-fusion to augment the T cell response, where a 4-fold increase was maintained up to 11 weeks after the MVA boost. Of the numerous different approaches explored to increase vectored vaccine induced immunogenicity over the years, fusion to the invariant chain showed a consistent enhancement in CD8+ T cell responses across different animal species and may therefore find application in the development of vaccines against human malaria and other diseases where high levels of cell-mediated immunity are required.

  16. ENERGY RELATIONS BETWEEN RUSSIA AND UKRAINE AFTER THE EUROMAIDAN: TRAPPED BETWEEN THE CONTRACTUAL SPACE AND THE SPACE OF SPACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric PARDO SAUVAGEOT

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Russia-Ukraine energy relations have been mired in constant tension and contract renegotiations since the fall of the Soviet Union. Major examples of the conflict ridden character of mutual energy relations are the big disputes of January 2006 and January 2009 which translated into grave disruptions of energy flows to other European countries further west. The new period opening with the contract signed in January 2009 and later with Viktor Yanukovich´s presidency seemed to have ushered Ukraine and Russia into a period of relative stability. That situation floundered with the onset of the Euromaidan, the ousting of Ukraine´s President Viktor Yanukovich and the arrival in Kiev of new authorities which Moscow perceived as hostile. Energy relations were necessarily affected by a new context where both countries entered a period of armed confrontation. In this presentation, I will analyze energy relations between Russia and Ukraine since the Euromaidan using as analytical tools the characterization made by Katja Yafimava of four different spaces to understand how energy relations unfold in the post-Soviet space: regulatory space, space of flows, contractual space and space of places. This seems particularly warranted as in our case we find that particular changes (or lack thereof in both the contractual space and the space of spaces determined to which degree energy relations between our two countries moved towards a pattern of conflict. This way, we may extract valuable lessons as for the way mutual relations are constructed and either politicized or de-politicized depending on the circumstances. This may provide a guide to consider how energy relations may evolve in the coming future, especially if diplomatic relations stay in their current stage since Russia decided to annex the Peninsula of Crimea and support separatist militias in the Donbass region.

  17. Shrew trap efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gambalemoke, Mbalitini; Mukinzi, Itoka; Amundala, Drazo

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of four trap types (pitfall, Sherman LFA, Victor snap and Museum Special snap traps) to capture shrews. This experiment was conducted in five inter-riverine forest blocks in the region of Kisangani. The total trapping effort was 6,300, 9,240, 5,280 and 5,460 trap-ni...

  18. A Minireview of the Natures of Radiation-Induced Point Defects in Pure and Doped Silica Glasses and Their Visible/Near-IR Absorption Bands, with Emphasis on Self-Trapped Holes and How They Can Be Controlled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Griscom

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The natures of most radiation-induced point defects in amorphous silicon dioxide (a-SiO2 are well known on the basis of 56 years of electron spin resonance (ESR and optical studies of pure and doped silica glass in bulk, thin-film, and fiber-optic forms. Many of the radiation-induced defects intrinsic to pure and B-, Al-, Ge-, and P-doped silicas are at least briefly described here and references are provided to allow the reader to learn still more about these, as well as some of those defects not mentioned. The metastable self-trapped holes (STHs, intrinsic to both doped and undoped silicas, are argued here to be responsible for most transient red/near-IR optical absorption bands induced in low-OH silica-based optical fibers by ionizing radiations at ambient temperatures. However, accelerated testing of a-SiO2-based optical devices slated for space applications must take into account the highly supralinear dependence on ionizing-dose-rate of the initial STH creation rate, which if not recognized would lead to false negatives. Fortunately, however, it is possible to permanently reduce the numbers of environmentally or operationally created STHs by long-term preirradiation at relatively low dose rates. Finally, emphasis is placed on the importance and utility of rigorously derived fractal-kinetic formalisms that facilitate reliable extrapolation of radiation-induced optical attenuations in silica-based photonics recorded as functions of dose rate backward into time domains unreachable in practical laboratory times and forward into dose-rate regimes for which there are no present-day laboratory sources.

  19. Trapping conformational states along ligand-binding dynamics of peptide deformylase: the impact of induced fit on enzyme catalysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Fieulaine

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available For several decades, molecular recognition has been considered one of the most fundamental processes in biochemistry. For enzymes, substrate binding is often coupled to conformational changes that alter the local environment of the active site to align the reactive groups for efficient catalysis and to reach the transition state. Adaptive substrate recognition is a well-known concept; however, it has been poorly characterized at a structural level because of its dynamic nature. Here, we provide a detailed mechanism for an induced-fit process at atomic resolution. We take advantage of a slow, tight binding inhibitor-enzyme system, actinonin-peptide deformylase. Crystal structures of the initial open state and final closed state were solved, as well as those of several intermediate mimics captured during the process. Ligand-induced reshaping of a hydrophobic pocket drives closure of the active site, which is finally "zipped up" by additional binding interactions. Together with biochemical analyses, these data allow a coherent reconstruction of the sequence of events leading from the encounter complex to the key-lock binding state of the enzyme. A "movie" that reconstructs this entire process can be further extrapolated to catalysis.

  20. Falling in the traps of your thoughts: The impact of body image-related cognitive fusion on inflexible eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Inês A; Ferreira, Cláudia

    2015-12-01

    Literature has shown that young women present high rates of body dissatisfaction, independently of their weight. Therefore, dieting may emerge as a strategy to control one's body image. Nonetheless, it also seems to be a source of great suffering rather than a solution. The aim of the present study was to explore what variables explain the inflexible engagement in eating rules. Our hypothesis is that an inflexible eating pattern results not exclusively from weight and body dissatisfaction and shame but mainly from emotional regulation processes (such as body image-related cognitive fusion). The sample of the present study comprised 659 female college students, aged between 18 and 25 years old, who completed self-report measures. Results revealed that the majority of the normal-weight participants desired to lose weight and to have a thinner body shape. Findings from the path analyses demonstrated that the effects of weight dissatisfaction and shame on the inflexible adhesion to eating rules were fully mediated through the mechanism of body image-related cognitive fusion. Furthermore, the effect of body dissatisfaction was partially operated by this process. This model was controlled by BMI and explained a total of 36% of inflexible adhesion to eating rules. In conclusion, these findings suggest that it is when a woman gets fused and entangled with her body image-related thoughts that these unwanted inner events most impact on her eating rules. This study thus offers important new data for research and clinical practise in the field of body image and eating difficulties.

  1. Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli strain C1845 induces neutrophil extracellular traps that kill bacteria and damage human enterocyte-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Turbica, Isabelle; Dufour, Guillaume; Semiramoth, Nicolas; Gleizes, Aude; Gorges, Roseline; Beau, Isabelle; Servin, Alain L; Lievin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Sandré, Catherine; Chollet-Martin, Sylvie

    2012-05-01

    We recently documented the neutrophil response to enterovirulent diffusely adherent Escherichia coli expressing Afa/Dr fimbriae (Afa/Dr DAEC), using the human myeloid cell line PLB-985 differentiated into fully mature neutrophils. Upon activation, particularly during infections, neutrophils release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), composed of a nuclear DNA backbone associated with antimicrobial peptides, histones, and proteases, which entrap and kill pathogens. Here, using fluorescence microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy, we observed NET production by PLB-985 cells infected with the Afa/Dr wild-type (WT) E. coli strain C1845. We found that these NETs were able to capture, immobilize, and kill WT C1845 bacteria. We also developed a coculture model of human enterocyte-like Caco-2/TC7 cells and PLB-985 cells previously treated with WT C1845 and found, for the first time, that the F-actin cytoskeleton of enterocyte-like cells is damaged in the presence of bacterium-induced NETs and that this deleterious effect is prevented by inhibition of protease release. These findings provide new insights into the neutrophil response to bacterial infection via the production of bactericidal NETs and suggest that NETs may damage the intestinal epithelium, particularly in situations such as inflammatory bowel diseases.

  2. Dominant Rio1 kinase/ATPase catalytic mutant induces trapping of late pre-40S biogenesis factors in 80S-like ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Cerca, Sébastien; Kiburu, Irene; Thomson, Emma; LaRonde, Nicole; Hurt, Ed

    2014-07-01

    During eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis, members of the conserved atypical serine/threonine protein kinase family, the RIO kinases (Rio1, Rio2 and Rio3) function in small ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Structural analysis of Rio2 indicated a role as a conformation-sensing ATPase rather than a kinase to regulate its dynamic association with the pre-40S subunit. However, it remained elusive at which step and by which mechanism the other RIO kinase members act. Here, we have determined the crystal structure of the human Rio1-ATP-Mg(2+) complex carrying a phosphoaspartate in the active site indicative of ATPase activity. Structure-based mutations in yeast showed that Rio1's catalytic activity regulates its pre-40S association. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Rio1 associates with a very late pre-40S via its conserved C-terminal domain. Moreover, a rio1 dominant-negative mutant defective in ATP hydrolysis induced trapping of late biogenesis factors in pre-ribosomal particles, which turned out not to be pre-40S but 80S-like ribosomes. Thus, the RIO kinase fold generates a versatile ATPase enzyme, which in the case of Rio1 is activated following the Rio2 step to regulate one of the final 40S maturation events, at which time the 60S subunit is recruited for final quality control check.

  3. Algae commensal community in Genlisea traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Wołowski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The community of algae occurring in Genlisea traps and on the external traps surface in laboratory conditions were studied. A total of 29 taxa were found inside the traps, with abundant diatoms, green algae (Chlamydophyceae and four morphotypes of chrysophytes stomatocysts. One morphotype is described as new for science. There are two ways of algae getting into Genlisea traps. The majority of those recorded inside the traps, are mobile; swimming freely by flagella or moving exuding mucilage like diatoms being ablate to colonize the traps themselves. Another possibility is transport of algae by invertebrates such as mites and crustaceans. In any case algae in the Genlisea traps come from the surrounding environment. Two dominant groups of algae (Chladymonas div. and diatoms in the trap environment, show ability to hydrolyze phosphomonoseters. We suggest that algae in carnivorous plant traps can compete with plant (host for organic phosphate (phosphomonoseters. From the spectrum and ecological requirements of algal species found in the traps, environment inside the traps seems to be acidic. However, further studies are needed to test the relations between algae and carnivorous plants both in laboratory conditions and in the natural environment. All the reported taxa are described briefly and documented with 74 LM and SEM micrographs.

  4. Broad-band FT-ICR detection at the Penning trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuth, Konstantin; Eibach, Martin; Ketelaer, Jens; Ketter, Jochen; Sturm, Sven [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Blaum, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg Heidelberg (Germany); Block, Michael; Herfurth, Frank [GSI, Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Eberhardt, Klaus [Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Nagy, Szilard [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Repp, Julia [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Smorra, Christian [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg Heidelberg (Germany); Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Ulmer, Stefan [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg Heidelberg (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The double Penning trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP will perform high-precision mass measurements on exotic neutron-rich nuclides, which are produced via neutron-induced fission of actinide targets at the research reactor TRIGA Mainz. In order to determine which ion species are present in the ion bunch delivered to the Penning trap system, a non-destructive ion detection technique will be implemented in the cylindrical purification trap. This so called broad-band Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) detection technique is based on the detection of image currents, induced by the ions in the trap electrodes. To this end, a new cryogenic low-noise broad-band amplifier is being designed and tested. With this system the identification of contaminations will be possible without the need to eject ions from the trap as usually done at other facilities. The setup as well as its present status are presented.

  5. In trap fragmentation and optical characterization of rotaxanes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijs, A. M.; Compagnon, I.; Silva, A.; Hannam, J. S.; Leigh, D. A.; Kay, E. R.; Dugourd, P.

    2010-01-01

    The first experiments on trapped rotaxanes are presented, combining collision induced fragmentation and in-trap laser spectroscopy. The intrinsic optical properties of three rotaxanes and their non-interlocked building blocks (thread and macrocycle) isolated in a quadrupolar ion trap are

  6. Evaluation of funnel traps for characterizing the bark beetle (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) communities in ponderosa pine forests of north-central Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Christopher J; DeGomez, Tom E; Clancy, Karen M; Williams, Kelly K; McMillin, Joel D; Anhold, John A

    2008-08-01

    Lindgren funnel traps baited with aggregation pheromones are widely used to monitor and manage populations of economically important bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae). This study was designed to advance our understanding of how funnel trap catches assess bark beetle communities and relative abundance of individual species. In the second year (2005) of a 3-yr study of the bark beetle community structure in north-central Arizona pine (Pinus spp.) forests, we collected data on stand structure, site conditions, and local bark beetle-induced tree mortality at each trap site. We also collected samples of bark from infested (brood) trees near trap sites to identify and determine the population density of bark beetles that were attacking ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex Lawson, in the area surrounding the traps. Multiple regression models indicated that the number of Dendroctonus and Ips beetles captured in 2005 was inversely related to elevation of the trap site, and positively associated with the amount of ponderosa pine in the stand surrounding the site. Traps located closer to brood trees also captured more beetles. The relationship between trap catches and host tree mortality was weak and inconsistent in forest stands surrounding the funnel traps, suggesting that trap catches do not provide a good estimate of local beetle-induced tree mortality. However, pheromone-baited funnel trap data and data from gallery identification in bark samples produced statistically similar relative abundance profiles for the five species of bark beetles that we examined, indicating that funnel trap data provided a good assessment of species presence and relative abundance.

  7. Evaluation of trap-induced systematic frequency shifts for a multi-ion optical clock at the $10^{-19}$ level

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, J; Kalincev, D; Kiethe, J; Mehlstäubler, T E

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the short-term stability of trapped-ion optical clocks, we are developing a frequency standard based on ${}^{115}$In${}^+$ / ${}^{172}$Yb${}^+$ Coulomb crystals. For this purpose, we have developed scalable segmented Paul traps which allow a high level of control for multiple ion ensembles. In this article, we detail on our recent results regarding the reduction of the leading sources of frequency uncertainty introduced by the ion trap: 2nd-order Doppler shifts due to micromotion and the heating of secular motion, as well as the black-body radiation shift due to warming of the trap. We show that the fractional frequency uncertainty due to each of these effects can be reduced to well below $10^{-19}$.

  8. Small Mammal Trapping 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Small mammal traps were placed in the Baring division and in the Edmunds division of Moosehom National Wildlife Refuge. There were a total of 98 traps set for up to...

  9. St. Croix trap study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data set contains detailed information about the catch from 600 trap stations around St. Croix. Data fields include species caught, size data, trap location...

  10. Global Liquidity Trap

    OpenAIRE

    Fujiwara, Ippei; NAKAJIMA Tomoyuki; Sudo, Nao; Teranishi, Yuki

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider a two-country New Open Economy Macroeconomics model, and analyze the optimal monetary policy when countries cooperate in the face of a "global liquidity trap" -- i.e., a situation where the two countries are simultaneously caught in liquidity traps. The notable features of the optimal policy in the face of a global liquidity trap are history dependence and international dependence. The optimality of history dependent policy is confirmed as in local liquidity trap. A ...

  11. Structure of the HIV-1 Full-Length Capsid Protein in a Conformationally Trapped Unassembled State Induced by Small-Molecule Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Shoucheng; Betts, Laurie; Yang, Ruifeng; Shi, Haibin; Concel, Jason; Ahn, Jinwoo; Aiken, Christopher; Zhang, Peijun; Yeh, Joanne I. (Pitt); (Vanderbilt); (UNC)

    2012-11-26

    The capsid (CA) protein plays crucial roles in HIV infection and replication, essential to viral maturation. The absence of high-resolution structural data on unassembled CA hinders the development of antivirals effective in inhibiting assembly. Unlike enzymes that have targetable, functional substrate-binding sites, the CA does not have a known site that affects catalytic or other innate activity, which can be more readily targeted in drug development efforts. We report the crystal structure of the HIV-1 CA, revealing the domain organization in the context of the wild-type full-length (FL) unassembled CA. The FL CA adopts an antiparallel dimer configuration, exhibiting a domain organization sterically incompatible with capsid assembly. A small compound, generated in situ during crystallization, is bound tightly at a hinge site ('H site'), indicating that binding at this interdomain region stabilizes the ADP conformation. Electron microscopy studies on nascent crystals reveal both dimeric and hexameric lattices coexisting within a single condition, in agreement with the interconvertibility of oligomeric forms and supporting the feasibility of promoting assembly-incompetent dimeric states. Solution characterization in the presence of the H-site ligand shows predominantly unassembled dimeric CA, even under conditions that promote assembly. Our structure elucidation of the HIV-1 FL CA and characterization of a potential allosteric binding site provides three-dimensional views of an assembly-defective conformation, a state targeted in, and thus directly relevant to, inhibitor development. Based on our findings, we propose an unprecedented means of preventing CA assembly, by 'conformationally trapping' CA in assembly-incompetent conformational states induced by H-site binding.

  12. IgA Complexes in Plasma and Synovial Fluid of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Induce Neutrophil Extracellular Traps via FcαRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleyd, Esil; Al, Marjon; Tuk, Cornelis W; van der Laken, Conny J; van Egmond, Marjolein

    2016-12-15

    Autoantibodies, including rheumatoid factor (RF), are an important characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Interestingly, several studies reported a correlation between the presence of IgA autoantibodies and worse disease course. We demonstrated previously that triggering the IgA Fc receptor (FcαRI) on neutrophils results in neutrophil recruitment and the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Because this can lead to tissue damage, we investigated whether IgA immune complexes in plasma and synovial fluid of RA patients activate neutrophils. RF isotypes were measured with ELISA, and immune complexes were precipitated using polyethylene glycol 6000. Isolated neutrophils were incubated with immune complexes, and activation and release of NETs were determined in the presence or absence of FcαRI-blocking Abs. Plasma and SF of RA patients contained IgM, IgG, and IgA RFs. Patient plasma IgA RF and IgM RF showed a strong correlation. No uptake of IgM and minimal endocytosis of IgG immune complexes by neutrophils was observed, in contrast to avid uptake of IgA complexes. Incubation of neutrophils with immune complexes resulted in the production of reactive oxygen species, as well as the release of NETs, lactoferrin, and chemotactic stimuli. Importantly, activation of neutrophils was reduced when FcαRI was blocked. Neutrophils were activated by IgA immune complexes, which suggests that neutrophils play a role in inducing joint damage in RA patients who have IgA autoantibody complexes, thereby increasing the severity of disease. Blocking FcαRI inhibited neutrophil activation and, as such, may represent an additional attractive novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of RA.

  13. Ion trap simulation tools.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlet, Benjamin Roger

    2009-02-01

    Ion traps present a potential architecture for future quantum computers. These computers are of interest due to their increased power over classical computers stemming from the superposition of states and the resulting capability to simultaneously perform many computations. This paper describes a software application used to prepare and visualize simulations of trapping and maneuvering ions in ion traps.

  14. Scaling Relations for Intercalation Induced Damage in Electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chien-Fan; Barai, Pallab; Smith, Kandler; Mukherjee, Partha P.

    2016-06-01

    Mechanical degradation, owing to intercalation induced stress and microcrack formation, is a key contributor to the electrode performance decay in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). The stress generation and formation of microcracks are caused by the solid state diffusion of lithium in the active particles. In this work, scaling relations are constructed for diffusion induced damage in intercalation electrodes based on an extensive set of numerical experiments with a particle-level description of microcrack formation under disparate operating and cycling conditions, such as temperature, particle size, C-rate, and drive cycle. The microcrack formation and evolution in active particles is simulated based on a stochastic methodology. A reduced order scaling law is constructed based on an extensive set of data from the numerical experiments. The scaling relations include combinatorial constructs of concentration gradient, cumulative strain energy, and microcrack formation. The reduced order relations are further employed to study the influence of mechanical degradation on cell performance and validated against the high order model for the case of damage evolution during variable current vehicle drive cycle profiles.

  15. Spontaneously induced general relativity with holographic interior and general exterior

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Xiao-Qing; Yang, Guo-Hong

    2012-01-01

    The general relativity (GR) might be viewed as a spontaneously induced theory from the scalar-tensor gravity, in which the would-have-been horizon connects the exterior solution of GR with a novel core of vanishing spatial volume. Using a simple but robust analytic method, we give the nontrivial core metric for the general exterior. Then we show that all the nontrivial features of the core, including the locally holographic entropy packing, are not influenced by the general exterior. We also investigate whether other modified theories of gravity can permit the nontrivial core.

  16. Superconducting microfabricated ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shannon X; Labaziewicz, Jaroslaw; Dauler, Eric; Berggren, Karl; Chuang, Isaac L

    2010-01-01

    We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single 88Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the resistance and critical current using a 4-wire measurement on the trap structure, and observing change in the rf reflection. The lowest observed heating rate is 2.1(3) quanta/sec at 800 kHz at 6 K and shows no significant change across the superconducting transition, suggesting that anomalous heating is primarily caused by noise sources on the surface. This demonstration of superconducting ion traps opens up possibilities for integrating trapped ions and molecular ions with superconducting devices.

  17. Anopheles darlingi (Diptera: Culicidae) Dynamics in Relation to Meteorological Data in a Cattle Farm Located in the Coastal Region of French Guiana: Advantage of Mosquito Magnet Trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezenegho, Samuel B; Carinci, Romuald; Gaborit, Pascal; Issaly, Jean; Dusfour, Isabelle; Briolant, Sebastien; Girod, Romain

    2015-06-01

    Information on dynamics of anopheline mosquitoes is limited in the coastal zone of French Guiana compared with inland endemic areas. Importantly, improvement of surveillance techniques for assessing malaria transmission indicators and comprehension of impact of meteorological factors on Anopheles darlingi Root, the main malaria vector, are necessary. Anopheline mosquitoes were collected continuously during 2012 and 2013 using Mosquito Magnet traps baited with octenol and human landing catches. The two methods were compared based on trends in abundance and parity rate of An. darlingi. Impact of meteorological factors on An. darlingi density estimates was investigated using Spearman's correlation and by binomial negative regression analysis. In all, 11,928 anopheline mosquitoes were collected, and 90.7% (n = 10,815) were identified consisting of four species, with An. darlingi making up 94.9% (n = 10,264). An. darlingi specimens collected by the two methods were significantly correlated, and no difference in parity rate was observed. The abundance of this species peaked in September (dry season) and variations along the years were influenced by relative humidity, temperature, rainfall, and wind speed. Number of mosquitoes collected during peak aggression period was influenced by wind speed and rainfall. Data gathered in this study provide fundamental information about An. darlingi, which can facilitate the design of vector control strategies and construction of models for predicting malaria risk. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Climate-induced range overlap among closely related species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krosby, Meade; Wilsey, Chad B.; McGuire, Jenny L.; Duggan, Jennifer M.; Nogeire, Theresa M.; Heinrichs, Julie A.; Tewksbury, Joshua J.; Lawler, Joshua J.

    2015-09-01

    Contemporary climate change is causing large shifts in biotic distributions, which has the potential to bring previously isolated, closely related species into contact. This has led to concern that hybridization and competition could threaten species persistence. Here, we use bioclimatic models to show that future range overlap by the end of the century is predicted for only 6.4% of isolated, congeneric species pairs of New World birds, mammals and amphibians. Projected rates of climate-induced overlap are higher for birds (11.6%) than for mammals (4.4%) or amphibians (3.6%). As many species will have difficulty tracking shifting climates, actual rates of future overlap are likely to be far lower, suggesting that hybridization and competition impacts may be relatively modest.

  19. Jealousy increased by induced relative left frontal cortical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Nicholas J; Eastwick, Paul W; Harmon-Jones, Eddie; Schmeichel, Brandon J

    2015-10-01

    Asymmetric frontal cortical activity may be one key to the process linking social exclusion to jealous feelings. The current research examined the causal role of asymmetric frontal brain activity in modulating jealousy in response to social exclusion. Transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) over the frontal cortex to manipulate asymmetric frontal cortical activity was combined with a modified version of the Cyberball paradigm designed to induce jealousy. After receiving 15 min of tDCS, participants were excluded by a desired partner and reported how jealous they felt. Among individuals who were excluded, tDCS to increase relative left frontal cortical activity caused greater levels of self-reported jealousy compared to tDCS to increase relative right frontal cortical activity or sham stimulation. Limitations concerning the specificity of this effect and implications for the role of the asymmetric prefrontal cortical activity in motivated behaviors are discussed.

  20. Heating and ion transport in a Y-junction surface-electrode trap

    CERN Document Server

    Shu, G; Volin, C; Buikema, A; Nichols, C S; Stick, D; Brown, Kenneth R

    2014-01-01

    We measure ion heating following transport throughout a Y-junction surface-electrode ion trap. By carefully selecting the trap voltage update rate during adiabatic transport along a trap arm, we observe minimal heating relative to the anomalous heating background. Transport through the junction results in an induced heating between 37 and 150 quanta in the axial direction per traverse. To reliably measure heating in this range, we compare the experimental sideband envelope, including up to fourth-order sidebands, to a theoretical model. The sideband envelope method allows us to cover the intermediate heating range inaccessible to the first-order sideband and Doppler recooling methods. We conclude that quantum information processing in this ion trap will likely require sympathetic cooling in order to support high fidelity gates after junction transport.

  1. Effect of OFF-state stress induced electric field on trapping in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on Si (111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, M. J.; Ng, G. I.; Arulkumaran, S.; Manoj Kumar, C. M.; Ranjan, K.; Vicknesh, S.; Foo, S. C.; Syamal, B.; Zhou, X.

    2015-02-01

    The influence of electric field (EF) on the dynamic ON-resistance (dyn-RDS[ON]) and threshold-voltage shift (ΔVth) of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on Si has been investigated using pulsed current-voltage (IDS-VDS) and drain current (ID) transients. Different EF was realized with devices of different gate-drain spacing (Lgd) under the same OFF-state stress. Under high-EF (Lgd = 2 μm), the devices exhibited higher dyn-RDS[ON] degradation but a small ΔVth (˜120 mV). However, at low-EF (Lgd = 5 μm), smaller dyn-RDS[ON] degradation but a larger ΔVth (˜380 mV) was observed. Our analysis shows that under OFF-state stress, the gate electrons are injected and trapped in the AlGaN barrier by tunnelling-assisted Poole-Frenkel conduction mechanism. Under high-EF, trapping spreads towards the gate-drain access region of the AlGaN barrier causing dyn-RDS[ON] degradation, whereas under low-EF, trapping is mostly confined under the gate causing ΔVth. A trap with activation energy 0.33 eV was identified in the AlGaN barrier by ID-transient measurements. The influence of EF on trapping was also verified by Silvaco TCAD simulations.

  2. Accretion discs trapped near corotation

    OpenAIRE

    D'Angelo, C.R.; Spruit, H.C.

    2012-01-01

    We show that discs accreting on to the magnetosphere of a rotating star can end up in a trapped state, in which the inner edge of the disc stays near the corotation radius, even at low and varying accretion rates. The accretion in these trapped states can be steady or cyclic; we explore these states over a wide range of parameter space. We find two distinct regions of instability: one related to the buildup and release of mass in the disc outside corotation, and the other to mass storage with...

  3. Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, G. B.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Bray, C. C.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Fajans, J.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Funakoshi, R.; Gill, D. R.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lambo, R.; Madsen, N.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Seif El Nasr, S.; Silveira, D. M.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2008-05-01

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report the first detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile and its relation to that of the electron plasma.

  4. Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report the first detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile and its relation to that of the electron plasma.

  5. Locust induced trapping experiment based on coupling effect of air disturbance stimulation and spectrum light source%气扰刺激与波谱光源耦合作用下蝗虫的诱导捕集试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王立新; 牛虎力; 周强

    2014-01-01

    Control for locusts traditionally replies on chemical insecticide. However, the chemical insecticide has lead to serious environment pollution. A growing awareness of the environmental issues associated with insecticide control has expanded the demand for technologies that can not only control the plague locusts but also avoid the pollution. One of the recently proposed technologies is photoelectric inducing-trapping plague locust based on the phototaxis property of locusts. For the application of this technology, to obtain a light source that can induce high phototaxis efficiency for locusts is a key to high efficiency of locust trap. Therefore, this study compared phototaxis behaviors of locusts with respect to different wavelengths (465 nm, 520 nm, 630 nm, and 395-720 nm) using Light Emitting Diode (LED) arrays as light sources and the photoelectric inducing-trapping plague locust machine designed by ourselves in a locust phototactic behavior experiment and a locust inducing-trapping experiment in order to provide optimized parameters for design of light source. The experiments were carried out at 20:00-21:00 pm (60 min) in a locust (Locusta migratoria manilensis) breeding area of Shijiazhuang, China. During the test of locust phototactic behaviors, an air disturbance stimulation source (air blower) was utilized as supplementary of the light sources. Phototactic moving displacement, average phototactic moving velocity, inducing ratio, inducing efficiency and capturing ratio were determined to evaluate the phototactic property of locust and the trapping efficiency of photoelectric inducing-trapping plague locust machine with stimulations of different-spectra light source and air disturbance source. Results showed that compared with the other light sources, blue (465 nm) and white (395-720 nm) light had induced locust movement in a clearer direction and at a higher velocity, and hence more locusts gathered around the light sources. Air disturbance stimulation

  6. Trap style influences wild pig behavior and trapping success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B.L.; Holtfreter, R.W.; Ditchkoff, S.S.; Grand, J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the efforts of many natural resource professionals, wild pig (Sus scrofa) populations are expanding in many areas of the world. Although many creative techniques for controlling pig populations are being explored, trapping has been and still is themost commonly usedmethod of population control formany public and private land managers. We conducted an observational study to examine the efficiency of 2 frequently used trap styles: a small, portable box-style trap and a larger, semi-permanent, corral-style trap.We used game cameras to examine patterns of trap entry by wild pigs around each style of trap, and we conducted a trapping session to compare trapping success between trap styles. Adult female and juvenile wild pigs entered both styles of trap more readily than did adult males, and adult males seemed particularly averse to entering box traps. Less than 10% of adult male visits to box traps resulted in entries, easily the least percentage of any class at any style of trap. Adult females entered corral traps approximately 2.2 times more often per visit than box traps and re-entered corral traps >2 times more frequently. Juveniles entered and reentered both box and corral traps at similar rates. Overall (all-class) entry-per-visit rates at corral traps (0.71) were nearly double that of box traps (0.37). Subsequent trapping data supported these preliminary entry data; the capture rate for corral traps was >4 times that of box traps. Our data suggest that corral traps are temporally and economically superior to box traps with respect to efficiency; that is, corral traps effectively trap more pigs per trap night at a lower cost per pig than do box traps. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  7. Monitoring Spruce Budworm with Light Traps: The Effect of Trap Position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Rhainds

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Daily records of adult spruce budworms, Choristoneura fumiferana (Clemens (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae, captured at light traps at multiple locations in New Brunswick in the 1970s, are analyzed in relation to the physical position of light traps (tree canopies or forest clearings. Captures at light traps deployed in tree canopies were 4–400 times greater than those in forest clearings, especially for males. The phenology of captures (median date or duration of flight period did not differ in relation to trap location. Captures of both males and females in tree canopies were highly correlated with egg densities, whereas no significant relationship was observed for either sex in forest clearings. Monitoring programs for spruce budworm adults using light traps should be standardized by deploying traps in tree canopies.

  8. Microfabricated ion trap array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, Matthew G.; Fleming, James G.

    2006-12-26

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  9. Towards trapped antihydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, L. V.; Andresen, G.; Bertsche, W.; Boston, A.; Bowe, P. D.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Fajans, J.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Funakoshi, R.; Gill, D. R.; Hangst, J. S.; Hayano, R. S.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Page, R. D.; Povilus, A.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Alpha Collaboration

    2008-02-01

    Substantial progress has been made in the last few years in the nascent field of antihydrogen physics. The next big step forward is expected to be the trapping of the formed antihydrogen atoms using a magnetic multipole trap. ALPHA is a new international project that started to take data in 2006 at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator facility. The primary goal of ALPHA is stable trapping of cold antihydrogen atoms to facilitate measurements of its properties. We discuss the status of the ALPHA project and the prospects for antihydrogen trapping.

  10. Towards trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Jorgensen, L V; Bertsche, W; Boston, A; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page, R D; Povilus, A; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in the last few years in the nascent field of antihydrogen physics. The next big step forward is expected to be the trapping of the formed antihydrogen atoms using a magnetic multipole trap. ALPHA is a new international project that started to take data in 2006 at CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator facility. The primary goal of ALPHA is stable trapping of cold antihydrogen atoms to facilitate measurements of its properties. We discuss the status of the ALPHA project and the prospects for antihydrogen trapping.

  11. Effect of OFF-state stress induced electric field on trapping in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on Si (111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anand, M. J., E-mail: anand2@e.ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: eging@ntu.edu.sg; Ng, G. I., E-mail: anand2@e.ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: eging@ntu.edu.sg; Syamal, B.; Zhou, X. [School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Arulkumaran, S.; Manoj Kumar, C. M.; Ranjan, K.; Vicknesh, S.; Foo, S. C. [Temasek Laboratories@NTU, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Drive, Research Techno Plaza, Singapore 637553 (Singapore)

    2015-02-23

    The influence of electric field (EF) on the dynamic ON-resistance (dyn-R{sub DS[ON]}) and threshold-voltage shift (ΔV{sub th}) of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on Si has been investigated using pulsed current-voltage (I{sub DS}-V{sub DS}) and drain current (I{sub D}) transients. Different EF was realized with devices of different gate-drain spacing (L{sub gd}) under the same OFF-state stress. Under high-EF (L{sub gd} = 2 μm), the devices exhibited higher dyn-R{sub DS[ON]} degradation but a small ΔV{sub th} (∼120 mV). However, at low-EF (L{sub gd} = 5 μm), smaller dyn-R{sub DS[ON]} degradation but a larger ΔV{sub th} (∼380 mV) was observed. Our analysis shows that under OFF-state stress, the gate electrons are injected and trapped in the AlGaN barrier by tunnelling-assisted Poole-Frenkel conduction mechanism. Under high-EF, trapping spreads towards the gate-drain access region of the AlGaN barrier causing dyn-R{sub DS[ON]} degradation, whereas under low-EF, trapping is mostly confined under the gate causing ΔV{sub th}. A trap with activation energy 0.33 eV was identified in the AlGaN barrier by I{sub D}-transient measurements. The influence of EF on trapping was also verified by Silvaco TCAD simulations.

  12. Infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy of ions in Penning traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyler, John R

    2009-01-01

    The ability of Paul and Penning traps to contain ions for time periods ranging from milliseconds to minutes allows the trapped ions to be subjected to laser irradiation for extended lengths of time. In this way, relatively low-powered tunable infrared lasers can be used to induce ion fragmentation when a sufficient number of infrared photons are absorbed, a process known as infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). If ion fragmentation is monitored as a function of laser wavelength, a photodissociation action spectrum can be obtained. The development of widely tunable infrared laser sources, in particular free electron lasers (FELs) and optical parametric oscillators/amplifiers (OPO/As), now allows spectra of trapped ions to be obtained for the entire "chemically relevant" infrared spectral region. This review describes experiments in which tunable infrared lasers have been used to irradiate ions in Penning traps. Early studies which utilized tunable carbon dioxide lasers with a limited output range are first reviewed. More recent studies with either FEL or OPO/A irradiation sources are then covered. The ionic systems examined have ranged from small hydrocarbons to multiply charged proteins, and they are discussed in approximate order of increasing complexity.

  13. Nematode-trapping fungi eavesdrop on nematode pheromones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Yen-Ping; Mahanti, Parag; Schroeder, Frank C; Sternberg, Paul W

    2013-01-07

    The recognition of molecular patterns associated with specific pathogens or food sources is fundamental to ecology and plays a major role in the evolution of predator-prey relationships. Recent studies showed that nematodes produce an evolutionarily highly conserved family of small molecules, the ascarosides, which serve essential functions in regulating nematode development and behavior. Here, we show that nematophagous fungi, natural predators of soil-dwelling nematodes, can detect and respond to ascarosides. Nematophagous fungi use specialized trapping devices to catch and consume nematodes, and previous studies demonstrated that most fungal species do not produce traps constitutively but rather initiate trap formation in response to their prey. We found that ascarosides, which are constitutively secreted by many species of soil-dwelling nematodes, represent a conserved molecular pattern used by nematophagous fungi to detect prey and trigger trap formation. Ascaroside-induced morphogenesis is conserved in several closely related species of nematophagous fungi and occurs only under nutrient-deprived conditions. Our results demonstrate that microbial predators eavesdrop on chemical communication among their metazoan prey to regulate morphogenesis, providing a striking example of predator-prey coevolution. We anticipate that these findings will have broader implications for understanding other interkingdom interactions involving nematodes, which are found in almost any ecological niche on Earth.

  14. Radiation-induced defects in LiAlO{sub 2} crystals: Holes trapped by lithium vacancies and their role in thermoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holston, M.S.; McClory, J.W.; Giles, N.C. [Department of Engineering Physics, Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States); Halliburton, L.E., E-mail: Larry.Halliburton@mail.wvu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is used to identify the primary hole trap in undoped lithium aluminate (LiAlO{sub 2}) crystals. Our interest in this material arises because it is a candidate for radiation detection applications involving either optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) or thermoluminescence (TL). During an x-ray irradiation at room temperature, holes are trapped at oxygen ions adjacent to lithium vacancies. Large concentrations of these lithium vacancies are introduced into the crystal during growth. With the magnetic field along the [001] direction, the EPR spectrum from these trapped-hole centers consists of eleven lines, evenly spaced but with varying intensities, caused by nearly equal hyperfine interactions with two {sup 27}Al nuclei (I=5/2, 100% abundant). The g matrix is determined from the angular dependence of the EPR spectrum and has principal values of 2.0130, 2.0675, and 2.0015. These g shifts strongly support the model of a hole in a p orbital on an oxygen ion. The adjacent lithium vacancy stabilizes the hole on the oxygen ion. A sequence of pulsed thermal anneals above room temperature shows that the EPR spectrum from the holes trapped adjacent to the lithium vacancies disappears in the 90–120 °C range. The thermal decay of these hole centers directly correlates with an intense TL peak near 105 °C. Signals at lower magnetic field in the 9.4 GHz EPR spectra suggest that the electron trap associated with this TL peak at 105 °C may be a transition-metal-ion impurity, most likely Fe, located at a cation site. Additional less intense TL peaks are observed near 138, 176, and 278 °C. - Highlights: • Undoped LiAlO{sub 2} crystals are irradiated at room temperature with x-rays. • EPR is used to identify holes trapped at oxygen ions adjacent to lithium vacancies. • Thermal decay of the EPR spectrum correlates with an intense TL peak at 105 °C.

  15. Truly trapped rainbow by utilizing nonreciprocal waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kexin; He, Sailing

    2016-07-01

    The concept of a “trapped rainbow” has generated considerable interest for optical data storage and processing. It aims to trap different frequency components of the wave packet at different positions permanently. However, all the previously proposed structures cannot truly achieve this effect, due to the difficulties in suppressing the reflection caused by strong intermodal coupling and distinguishing different frequency components simultaneously. In this article, we found a physical mechanism to achieve a truly “trapped rainbow” storage of electromagnetic wave. We utilize nonreciprocal waveguides under a tapered magnetic field to achieve this and such a trapping effect is stable even under fabrication disorders. We also observe hot spots and relatively long duration time of the trapped wave around critical positions through frequency domain and time domain simulations. The physical mechanism we found has a variety of potential applications ranging from wave harvesting and storage to nonlinearity enhancement.

  16. Truly trapped rainbow by utilizing nonreciprocal waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Kexin

    2016-01-01

    The concept of a "trapped rainbow" has generated considerable interest for optical data storage and processing. It aims to trap different frequency components of the wave packet at different positions permanently. However, all the previously proposed structures cannot truly achieve this effect, due to the difficulties in suppressing the reflection caused by strong intermodal coupling and distinguishing different frequency components simultaneously. In this article, we found a physical mechanism to achieve a truly "trapped rainbow" storage of electromagnetic wave. We utilize nonreciprocal waveguides under a tapered magnetic field to achieve this and such a trapping effect is stable even under fabrication disorders. We also observe hot spots and relatively long duration time of the trapped wave around critical positions through frequency domain and time domain simulations. The physical mechanism we found has a variety of potential applications ranging from wave harvesting and storage to nonlinearity enhancement...

  17. Search for trapped antihydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Bray, C. C.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jonsell, S.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lambo, R.; Madsen, N.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Seif El Nasr, S.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wilding, D.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Alpha Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of an experiment to search for trapped antihydrogen atoms with the ALPHA antihydrogen trap at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator. Sensitive diagnostics of the temperatures, sizes, and densities of the trapped antiproton and positron plasmas have been developed, which in turn permitted development of techniques to precisely and reproducibly control the initial experimental parameters. The use of a position-sensitive annihilation vertex detector, together with the capability of controllably quenching the superconducting magnetic minimum trap, enabled us to carry out a high-sensitivity and low-background search for trapped synthesised antihydrogen atoms. We aim to identify the annihilations of antihydrogen atoms held for at least 130 ms in the trap before being released over ∼30 ms. After a three-week experimental run in 2009 involving mixing of 10 7 antiprotons with 1.3×10 positrons to produce 6×10 antihydrogen atoms, we have identified six antiproton annihilation events that are consistent with the release of trapped antihydrogen. The cosmic ray background, estimated to contribute 0.14 counts, is incompatible with this observation at a significance of 5.6 sigma. Extensive simulations predict that an alternative source of annihilations, the escape of mirror-trapped antiprotons, is highly unlikely, though this possibility has not yet been ruled out experimentally.

  18. Coherent population trapping: its physics and historical roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalagin A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There presented basic information on coherent population trapping (CPT and related phenomenon of electromagnetically induced transparence, ‘dark’ and ‘bright’ (anomalous absorption states is presented. Spectrum transformation is considered in probe field spectroscopy for Λ-scheme in various settings. The close relation is revealed between the effect of CPT in the manifold of magnetic sublevels and the phenomenon of optical pumping (optical orientation and optical alignment. CPT is shown to be generalized to the case of several transitions with a common upper level and with the corresponding number of light fields each being in quasiresonance with its ‘own’ transition.

  19. Trapping radioactive ions

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, Heinz-Jürgen

    2004-01-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning.

  20. Development of device for trapping a superheated liquid drop and life-time measurements of the drop by radiation-induced evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawamura, Teruko; Sugiyama, Noriyuki; Homma, Akira; Narita, Masakuni [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-08-01

    In this study a detection sensitivity evaluation was made by measuring the life time of a single liquid drop. A device trapping a superheated drop was developed, where a single drop of test liquid was trapped at a specified position and then irradiated. Therefore, the volume of the drop can be measured before the irradiation. Wakeshima originally developed the device, in which a test liquid drop was injected and superheated in a supporting liquid, to measure the limit of superheat of the liquid. Apfel modified Wakeshima's device by applying an acoustic field to be able to trap and decompress a superheated liquid drop. The device in the present study is similar to Apfel's. But the inlet part is cooled because the boiling point of the test liquid is lower than room temperature. In this device the superheated drop of trans-2-butene (C{sub 4}H{sub 8}, boiling point=0.8degC) was exposed to Am-Be neutrons and {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays and its life time was measured. (author)

  1. Steady state performance, photo-induced performance degradation and their relation to transient hysteresis in perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Ajay Kumar; Kulkarni, Ashish; Ikegami, Masashi; Miyasaka, Tsutomu

    2016-03-01

    Hysteresis in current-voltage curves of perovskite solar cells is a serious concern as it creates confusions about actual cell performance and raises questions on its reliability. Although a lot of effort has been made to understand the origin of hysteresis, knowing whether hysteresis affects the cell performance while they are in practical use (operated constantly at maximum power point) is not yet examined. In the present study, we investigate steady state performance and performance stability of perovskite solar cells (planar architecture with varying perovskite film thickness and TiO2 mesoscopic structure with different TiO2 compact layer thickness exhibiting hysteresis of different magnitudes) operating across an external load in relation to hysteresis. The planar cells with larger hysteresis exhibit a steady state current that closely matches the value determined on forward voltage scan. Cyclic photocurrent-dark current measurements on cells with hysteresis of different magnitudes reveal that photo-induced electrical instability (not material degradation), which might be originated from ion migration or photo-induced traps formation, is not related to hysteresis. Performance of the cells is recovered partially or fully, depending on the device structure, on storage in dark. TiO2 meso-structure cells tend to show complete recovery while the planar cells recover partially.

  2. Mechanical and hydraulic properties of rocks related to induced seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherspoon, P.A.; Gale, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Witherspoon, P.A. and Gale, J.E., 1977. Mechanical and hydraulic properties of rocks related to induced seismicity. Eng. Geol., 11(1): 23-55. The mechanical and hydraulic properties of fractured rocks are considered with regard to the role they play in induced seismicity. In many cases, the mechanical properties of fractures determine the stability of a rock mass. The problems of sampling and testing these rock discontinuities and interpreting their non-linear behavior are reviewed. Stick slip has been proposed as the failure mechanism in earthquake events. Because of the complex interactions that are inherent in the mechanical behavior of fractured rocks, there seems to be no simple way to combine the deformation characteristics of several sets of fractures when there are significant perturbations of existing conditions. Thus, the more important fractures must be treated as individual components in the rock mass. In considering the hydraulic properties, it has been customary to treat a fracture as a parallel-plate conduit and a number of mathematical models of fracture systems have adopted this approach. Non-steady flow in fractured systems has usually been based on a two-porosity model, which assumes the primary (intergranular) porosity contributes only to storage and the secondary (fracture) porosity contributes only to the overall conductivity. Using such a model, it has been found that the time required to achieve quasi-steady state flow in a fractured reservoir is one or two orders of magnitude greater than it is in a homogeneous system. In essentially all of this work, the assumption has generally been made that the fractures are rigid. However, it is clear from a review of the mechanical and hydraulic properties that not only are fractures easily deformed but they constitute the main flow paths in many rock masses. This means that one must consider the interaction of mechanical and hydraulic effects. A considerable amount of laboratory and field data is now

  3. Trapped particle destabilization of the internal kink mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, R.B.; Chen, L.; Romanelli, F.; Hay, R.

    1984-06-01

    The internal kink mode is destabilized by trapped high energy particles, leading to a new branch of the internal kink dispersion relation with a real frequency near the average trapped particle precession frequency and a growth rate of the same magnitude. This trapped particle branch of the dispersion relation is investigated numerically for a variety of particle distributions. Mode growth rate and frequency are found as a function of plasma ..beta.., density, and trapped particle energy and distribution. The high energy trapped particle sources considered are neutral beam injection, ion cyclotron heating, and fusion alpha particles. Relevance for various plasma heating schemes is discussed.

  4. Observation and mitigation of ion trapping in Indus-2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saroj Jena; A D Ghodke

    2015-12-01

    The presence of trapped ions in electron storage rings causes considerable degradation in the performances of the beam, such as increase in beam size, reduction in beam lifetime, shifting of betatron tune, beam instabilities etc. This paper discusses the effects of ion trapping and its mitigation in Indus-2 electron storage ring. Ion-induced instability generating partial beam loss is one of the main barriers in higher beam current accumulation in any electron storage ring. Though there are several techniques to clear the ions from the electron beam path, in Indus-2, it is addressed mainly by filling the storage ring in partial bunch filling pattern. In order to improve the electron beam performance and to mitigate the ion-related problem, a suitable bunch filling pattern has been determined. The theoretical prediction and the result of optimal bunch filling pattern are presented in this paper.

  5. Trapped-Ion State Detection through Coherent Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Hume, D B; Leibrandt, D R; Thorpe, M J; Wineland, D J; Rosenband, T

    2011-01-01

    Quantum-limited experiments with trapped atomic ions rely on sensitive methods of detecting an ion's state. Current detection techniques are applicable only to relatively simple systems, which precludes most atomic and molecular species. Here, we demonstrate a technique that can be applied to a larger class of ion systems. We couple a "spectroscopy" ion (Al+) to a "control" ion (Mg+) in the same trap and perform state detection through off-resonant laser excitation of the spectroscopy ion that induces coherent motion. The motional amplitude, dependent on the spectroscopy ion state, is measured either by time-resolved photon counting, or by resolved sideband excitations. The first method provides a simplified way to distinguish "clock" states in Al+, which avoids ground state cooling and sideband transitions. The second method reduces spontaneous emission and optical pumping on the spectroscopy ion, which we demonstrate by nondestructively distinguishing Zeeman sublevels in the 1S0 ground state of Al+.

  6. Interchange mode excited by trapped energetic ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Seiya, E-mail: n-seiya@kobe-kosen.ac.jp [Kobe City College of Technology, Kobe, Hyogo 651-2194 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    The kinetic energy principle describing the interaction between ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes with trapped energetic ions is revised. A model is proposed on the basis of the reduced ideal MHD equations for background plasmas and the bounce-averaged drift-kinetic equation for trapped energetic ions. The model is applicable to large-aspect-ratio toroidal devices. Specifically, the effect of trapped energetic ions on the interchange mode in helical systems is analyzed. Results show that the interchange mode is excited by trapped energetic ions, even if the equilibrium states are stable to the ideal interchange mode. The energetic-ion-induced branch of the interchange mode might be associated with the fishbone mode in helical systems.

  7. Charged nanodiamonds in a Paul trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streed, Erik

    2015-05-01

    Colloidal nanodiamonds were ionized with atmospheric electrospray and loaded into a Paul trap. Fluorescence from atom-like NV0 and NV- colour centres has been observed. The very low intrinsic absorption of bulk diamond is favourable for reducing the heating of cooled, trapped, nanodiamond ions from the surrounding blackbody radiation of the trapping apparatus. The isolated environment of the ion trap is also favourable for in-situ modification of nanodiamond to reduce absorption inducing defects through either physical or chemical processes. The presence or intentional introduction of high luminescence atom-like colour centre defects such as NV or SiV offer the prospect of direct laser cooling in nanodiamonds with low emissivity. Such laser cooled nano-ions are of interest for sympathetically cooling ions of similar charge/mass ratios that lack closed optical transitions, such as large biomolecules. ARC Future Fellow.

  8. Cold Trapped Ions as Quantum Information Processors

    CERN Document Server

    Sasura, M; Sasura, Marek; Buzek, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    In this tutorial we review physical implementation of quantum computing using a system of cold trapped ions. We discuss systematically all the aspects for making the implementation possible. Firstly, we go through the loading and confining of atomic ions in the linear Paul trap, then we describe the collective vibrational motion of trapped ions. Further, we discuss interactions of the ions with a laser beam. We treat the interactions in the travelling-wave and standing-wave configuration for dipole and quadrupole transitions. We review different types of laser cooling techniques associated with trapped ions. We address Doppler cooling, sideband cooling in and beyond the Lamb-Dicke limit, sympathetic cooling and laser cooling using electromagnetically induced transparency. After that we discuss the problem of state detection using the electron shelving method. Then quantum gates are described. We introduce single-qubit rotations, two-qubit controlled-NOT and multi-qubit controlled-NOT gates. We also comment on...

  9. Unraveling the optomechanical nature of plasmonic trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Mestres, Pau; Quidant, Romain

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive and ultra accurate optical manipulation of nanometer objects has recently gained a growing interest as a powerful enabling tool in nanotechnology and biophysics. In this context, Self-Induced Back-Action (SIBA) trapping in nano-optical cavities has shown a unique potential for trapping and manipulating nanometer-sized objects under low optical intensities. Yet, the existence of the SIBA effect has that far only been evidenced indirectly through its enhanced trapping performances. By enhancing the optomechanical interaction between the nano-cavity and the trapped object, we show for the first time direct evidence of the self-reconfiguration of the optical potential. Our observations enable us gaining further understanding of the SIBA mechanism and determine the optimum conditions to boost the performances of SIBA-based nano-optical tweezers.

  10. 1985-86 Trapping Proposal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Annual Trapping Plan for the 1985-1986 trapping season at Clarence Cannon NWR outlines rules and regulations for the trapping of beaver and muskrat on the...

  11. Reactive Transport Modeling of Geologic CO{sub 2} Sequestration in Saline Aquifers: The Influence of Intra-Aquifer Shales and the Relative Effectiveness of Structural, Solubility, and Mineral Trapping During Prograde and Retrograde Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J W; Nitao, J J; Steefel, C I; Knauss, K G

    2001-04-24

    In this study, we address a series of fundamental questions regarding the processes and effectiveness of geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration in saline aquifers. We begin with the broadest: what is the ultimate fate of CO{sub 2} injected into these environments? Once injected, it is immediately subject to two sets of competing processes: migration processes and sequestration processes. In terms of migration, the CO{sub 2} moves by volumetric displacement of formation waters, with which it is largely immiscible; by gravity segregation, which causes the immiscible CO{sub 2} plume to rise owing to its relatively low density; and by viscous fingering, owing to its relatively low viscosity. In terms of sequestration, some fraction of the rising plume will dissolve into formation waters (solubility trapping); some fraction may react with formation minerals to precipitate carbonates (mineral trapping); and the remaining portion eventually reaches the cap rock, where it migrates up-dip, potentially accumulating in local topographic highs (structural trapping). Although this concept of competing migration/sequestration processes is intuitively obvious, identifying those sub-processes that dominate the competition is by no means straightforward. Hence, at present there are large uncertainties associated with the ultimate fate of injected CO{sub 2} (Figure 1). Principal among these: can a typical shale cap rock provide a secure seal? Because gravity segregation will always keep the immiscible CO{sub 2} plume moving towards the surface, caprock integrity is the single most important variable influencing isolation security. An extremely thick shale cap rock exists at Sleipner (several 100 m); here, however, we examine the performance of a 25-m-thick cap, which is more representative of the general case. Although the cap rock represents the final barrier to vertical CO{sub 2} migration, what is the effect of intra-aquifer permeability structure? Because this structure directs the

  12. Nematode-Trapping Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Meichun; Liu, Xingzhong

    2017-01-01

    Nematode-trapping fungi are a unique and intriguing group of carnivorous microorganisms that can trap and digest nematodes by means of specialized trapping structures. They can develop diverse trapping devices, such as adhesive hyphae, adhesive knobs, adhesive networks, constricting rings, and nonconstricting rings. Nematode-trapping fungi have been found in all regions of the world, from the tropics to Antarctica, from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems. They play an important ecological role in regulating nematode dynamics in soil. Molecular phylogenetic studies have shown that the majority of nematode-trapping fungi belong to a monophyletic group in the order Orbiliales (Ascomycota). Nematode-trapping fungi serve as an excellent model system for understanding fungal evolution and interaction between fungi and nematodes. With the development of molecular techniques and genome sequencing, their evolutionary origins and divergence, and the mechanisms underlying fungus-nematode interactions have been well studied. In recent decades, an increasing concern about the environmental hazards of using chemical nematicides has led to the application of these biological control agents as a rapidly developing component of crop protection.

  13. Phase-controlled coherent population trapping in superconducting quantum circuits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程广玲; 王一平; 陈爱喜

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the influences of the-applied-field phases and amplitudes on the coherent population trapping behavior in superconducting quantum circuits. Based on the interactions of the microwave fields with a single∆-type three-level fluxonium qubit, the coherent population trapping could be obtainable and it is very sensitive to the relative phase and amplitudes of the applied fields. When the relative phase is tuned to 0 orπ, the maximal atomic coherence is present and coherent population trapping occurs. While for the choice ofπ/2, the atomic coherence becomes weak. Meanwhile, for the fixed relative phaseπ/2, the value of coherence would decrease with the increase of Rabi frequency of the external field coupled with two lower levels. The responsible physical mechanism is quantum interference induced by the control fields, which is indicated in the dressed-state representation. The microwave coherent phenomenon is present in our scheme, which will have potential applications in optical communication and nonlinear optics in solid-state devices.

  14. TRAP SYNDROME: A RARE ENTITY

    OpenAIRE

    Varsha; Kanan; Chanda,, Abhra; Qazi,, S.

    2014-01-01

    TRAP (Twin Reversed Arterial Perfusion) sequence is a rare complication of monozygotic twin pregnancy. It is due to defect in early pregnancy where there is defective arterial anastomosis in placenta. This results in a fetus with an absent heart (acardiac twin). This acardiac twin has a poorly developed upper body and head also. The pump twin (with a normal heart) is also at a risk of heart failure and problems related to preterm birth1.

  15. TRAP SYNDROME: A RARE ENTITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available TRAP (Twin Reversed Arterial Perfusion sequence is a rare complication of monozygotic twin pregnancy. It is due to defect in early pregnancy where there is defective arterial anastomosis in placenta. This results in a fetus with an absent heart (acardiac twin. This acardiac twin has a poorly developed upper body and head also. The pump twin (with a normal heart is also at a risk of heart failure and problems related to preterm birth1.

  16. Fluorine plasma treatment induced deep level traps and their effect on current transportation in Al0.83In0.17N/AlN/GaN Schottky barrier diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yong; Yu, Tongjun; Ji, Cheng; Cheng, Yutian; Yang, Xuelin; Kang, Xiangning; Shen, Bo; Zhang, Guoyi

    2016-08-01

    The deep level traps and the electrical properties of fluorine plasma treated (F-treated) and non-treated Al0.83In0.17N/AlN/GaN Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) were investigated by the temperature-dependent current-voltage (I-V) and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements. Three deep level traps were detected in the SBD after F-treatment at ~E c  -  0.17 eV, ~E c  -  0.27 eV and ~E c  -  1.14 eV. One of the deep level traps at ~E c  -  1.14 eV is mainly located in the Al0.83In0.17N barrier layer with a captured cross section (σ) of ~6.50  ×  10-18 cm2. This F-related deep level trap has 3-4 orders of magnitude of the larger σ and ~0.46 eV greater active energy than that of the dislocation-related one at ~E c  -  0.68 eV with σ of ~1.92  ×  10-21 cm2. Meanwhile, the leakage current of F-treated SBD at  -5 V is reduced by ~2 orders of magnitude compared with that of the non-treated one. This leakage current reduction is mainly attributed to the increase of the Poole-Frenkel emission barrier height from ~0.09 eV in non-treated SBD to ~0.46 eV in the F-treated one. It is believed that the main reverse current transportation is the Poole-Frenkel emission from the F-related deep level trap states into the continuum states of the dislocations in F-treated Al0.83In0.17N/AlN/GaN SBD.

  17. Exercise-induced albuminuria is related to metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Sharon; Shenhar-Tsarfaty, Shani; Rogowski, Ori; Shapira, Itzhak; Zeltser, David; Weinstein, Talia; Lahav, Dror; Vered, Jaffa; Tovia-Brodie, Oholi; Arbel, Yaron; Berliner, Shlomo; Milwidsky, Assi

    2016-06-01

    Microalbuminuria (MA) is a known marker for endothelial dysfunction and future cardiovascular events. Exercise-induced albuminuria (EiA) may precede the appearance of MA. Associations between EiA and metabolic syndrome (MS) have not been assessed so far. Our aim was to investigate this association in a large sample of apparently healthy individuals with no baseline albuminuria. This was a cross-sectional study of 2,027 adults with no overt cardiovascular diseases who took part in a health survey program and had no baseline MA. Diagnosis of MS was based on harmonized criteria. All patients underwent an exercise test (Bruce protocol), and urinary albumin was measured before and after the examination. Urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) values before and after exercise were 0.40 (0.21-0.89) and 1.06 (0.43-2.69) mg/g for median (interquartile range) respectively. A total of 394 (20%) subjects had EiA; ACR rose from normal rest values (0.79 mg/g) to 52.28 mg/g after exercise (P metabolic equivalents (P < 0.001), higher baseline blood pressure (P < 0.001), and higher levels of fasting plasma glucose, triglycerides, and body mass index (P < 0.001). Multivariate binary logistic regression model showed that subjects with MS were 98% more likely to have EiA (95% confidence interval: 1.13-3.46, P = 0.016). In conclusion, EiA in the absence of baseline MA is independently related to MS.

  18. Attractiveness of black Shannon trap for phlebotomines

    OpenAIRE

    Galati EAB; VLB Nunes; MEC Dorval; Cristaldo,G; HC Rocha; RM Gonçalves-Andrade; Naufel,G

    2001-01-01

    A white Shannon-type trap was used for captures of female sand flies in the search for natural infection with flagellates, however, due to its low productivity and as a large number of phlebotomines settled on the researchers' black clothes, we decided to compare the relative attractiveness of black and white Shannon-type traps for sand flies. Several pairs of black and white traps were placed side by side in front of caves in four areas in the Serra da Bodoquena, Bonito county, State of Mato...

  19. Cold atom trap with zero residual magnetic field: the ac magneto-optical trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Matthew; Murray, Andrew James

    2008-10-24

    A novel atom trap is described using alternating current to generate the magnetic B field, together with high speed polarization switching of the damping laser field. This combination produces a trap as effective as a standard magneto-optical trap (MOT), with the advantage that the average B field is zero. No net current is hence induced in surrounding conductive elements, and the B field produced by the ac MOT is found to switch off >300 times faster than a conventional MOT. New experiments can hence be performed, including charged particle probing or detection of the cold target ensemble.

  20. On the trap depth of the IR-sensitive trap in Na- and K-feldspar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kars, Romée H.; Poolton, Nigel R.J.; Jain, Mayank;

    2013-01-01

    Feldspars are natural radiation dosimeters used in geological dating. The processes that underlie the measured natural- and laboratory induced infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signals are, however, not fully understood. In this study we aim to determine the optical depth of the electron trap......, the trap depth is tentatively estimated to be ∼2.1 and ∼2.5 eV for Na- and K-feldspar, respectively. The fast phosphorescence following IRSL in both crystals is likely the result of tunnelling from bandtail states in the vicinity of the excited state of the IR-trap. The post-OSL phosphorescence decay...

  1. Probing Ir-Induced Isomerization of a Model Pentapeptide in a Cryo-Cooled Ion Trap Using Ir-Uv Double Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrilal, Christopher P.; DeBlase, Andrew F.; Fischer, Joshua L.; Lawler, John T.; McLuckey, Scott A.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2017-06-01

    In the past decade, infrared and ultraviolet spectroscopy in cryo-cooled ion traps have become workhorse techniques to characterize the gas-phase 3D structures of biological ions. Often, multiple conformers of a single molecular ion are observed. While slow collisional cooling should result in funneling of many structures into a single minimum, recent studies show evidence for the kinetic trapping of entropically-favored structures near room temperature when these species are cooled to about 10K. In order to elucidate how the initial population fractionates during the cooling process, we use a variety of conformer specific IR-UV double resonance techniques to measure population distributions of the peptide ion [YGPAA+H]^{+} in the gas phase at 10K. Previous studies conducted in our lab show the YGPAA peptide adopts two spectroscopically distinct conformers which differ principally in the cis/trans configuration of the carboxylic acid group at the C-terminus. By using IR-UV hole filing spectroscopy (HFS) and population transfer spectroscopy (PTS) we demonstrate the ability to selectively excite and interconvert between conformations and to quantitatively measure the distribution of conformer populations within the ion trap. Experimentally, we find a 65:35 ratio for the trans:cis conformer population. These conformers are connected through a single calculated transition state, allowing intramolecular isomerization rates and equilibrium population distributions to be calculated by Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) theory. The relationship between the observed population ratio and the temperature-dependent equilibrium constant will be discussed.

  2. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Contributes to Pancreatic Tumorigenesis by Inducing Tumor-Related Gene Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawai, Yugo; Kodama, Yuzo; Shimizu, Takahiro; Ota, Yuji; Maruno, Takahisa; Eso, Yuji; Kurita, Akira; Shiokawa, Masahiro; Tsuji, Yoshihisa; Uza, Norimitsu; Matsumoto, Yuko; Masui, Toshihiko; Uemoto, Shinji; Marusawa, Hiroyuki; Chiba, Tsutomu

    2015-08-15

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) develops via an accumulation of various gene mutations. The mechanism underlying the mutations in PDAC development, however, is not fully understood. Recent insight into the close association between the mutation pattern of various cancers and specific mutagens led us to investigate the possible involvement of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a DNA editing enzyme, in pancreatic tumorigenesis. Our immunohistochemical findings revealed AID protein expression in human acinar ductal metaplasia, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and PDAC. Both the amount and intensity of the AID protein expression increased with the progression from precancerous to cancerous lesions in human PDAC tissues. To further assess the significance of ectopic epithelial AID expression in pancreatic tumorigenesis, we analyzed the phenotype of AID transgenic (AID Tg) mice. Consistent with our hypothesis that AID is involved in the mechanism of the mutations underlying pancreatic tumorigenesis, we found precancerous lesions developing in the pancreas of AID Tg mice. Using deep sequencing, we also detected Kras and c-Myc mutations in our analysis of the whole pancreas of AID Tg mice. In addition, Sanger sequencing confirmed the presence of Kras, c-Myc, and Smad4 mutations, with the typical mutational footprint of AID in precancerous lesions in AID Tg mice separated by laser capture microdissection. Taken together, our findings suggest that AID contributes to the development of pancreatic precancerous lesions by inducing tumor-related gene mutations. Our new mouse model without intentional manipulation of specific tumor-related genes provides a powerful system for analyzing the mutations involved in PDAC.

  3. Microfabricated Waveguide Atom Traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu

    2017-09-01

    A nano - scale , microfabricated waveguide structure can in - principle be used to trap atoms in well - defined locations and enable strong photon - atom interactions . A neutral - atom platf orm based on this microfabrication technology will be pre - aligned , which is especially important for quantum - control applications. At present, there is still no reported demonstration of evanescent - field atom trapping using a microfabricated waveguide structure. We described the capabilities established by our team for future development of the waveguide atom - trapping technology at SNL and report our studies to overcome the technical challenges of loading cold atoms into the waveguide atom traps, efficient and broadband optical coupling to a waveguide, and the waveguide material for high - power optical transmission. From the atomic - physics and the waveguide modeling, w e have shown that a square nano - waveguide can be utilized t o achieve better atomic spin squeezing than using a nanofiber for first time.

  4. Pressure-related activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A lot of reports suggested that inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) has a very different nature from constitutive NOS including endothelial NOS (eNOS) and neural NOS (nNOS). When exposed to cytokines or bacterial products, iNOS could be greatly activated and produces hundreds or thousands fold more NO than it does usually. Whether iNOS activation is arterial pressure related is not clear. In the present experiment, we studied three groups(n=6) of Sprague Dawley (SD) rats with implanted aorta and venous catheters that were maintained on 1 mEq/d, 12.5 mEq/d and 25 mEq/d of sodium intake respectively. Pulsatile arterial pressure signals from the amplifier were sent to a digital computer and the urine samples were taken every other day for nitrate/nitrite excretion (UNOx) assay using Greiss Reaction. After 6 days infusion, the rats were euthanized with an overdose of sodium pentobarbital, and the renal medullas were rapidly removed and frozen on dry ice for iNOS activity assay. Morever separate groups of hypertensive rats including spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR, n=6) and High NaCl-induced hypertensive rat (NaHR, n=6) were used to measure renal iNOS protein by Western Blotting. The results showed that the mean arterial pressure (MAP) were significantly increased with the increase intake of sodium, the MAP (mmHg) at day 6 were 99.6±3.5,116.65±4.2 and 125.43±4.5, and the iNOS activity (nmol*g-1 protein*min-1) were 122.3±23.4, 342.4±35.6 and 623.9±65.4 in 1 mEq/d, 12.5 mEq/d and 25 mEq/d of sodium intake-rats respectively. At the same time, UNOx at day 6 were also increased, in turn, to 5 865.6±343.0 (for 12.5 mEq/d intake-rats) and (9 642.8±1 045.3) (for 25 mEq/d sodium intake-rats) nmol/d from (3 834.9±234.8) nmol/d of 1 mEq/d sodium intake-rats respectively. Western blotting showed that the renal medullary iNOS protein in SHR and NaHR were increased by 178%±13% and 104%±9% of normal Wistar rats. The data indicates that elevated arterial pressure

  5. Managing resonant trapped orbits in our Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Binney, James

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy modelling is greatly simplified by assuming the existence of a global system of angle-action coordinates. Unfortunately, global angle-action coordinates do not exist because some orbits become trapped by resonances, especially where the radial and vertical frequencies coincide. We show that in a realistic Galactic potential such trapping occurs only on thick-disc and halo orbits (speed relative to the guiding centre >~80 km/s). We explain how the Torus Mapper code (TM) behaves in regions of phase space in which orbits are resonantly trapped, and we extend TM so trapped orbits can be manipulated as easily as untrapped ones. The impact that the resonance has on the structure of velocity space depends on the weights assigned to trapped orbits. The impact is everywhere small if each trapped orbit is assigned the phase space density equal to the time average along the orbit of the DF for untrapped orbits. The impact could be significant with a different assignment of weights to trapped orbits.

  6. Attractiveness of black Shannon trap for phlebotomines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galati, E A; Nunes, V L; Dorval, M E; Cristaldo, G; Rocha, H C; Gonçalves-Andrade, R M; Naufel, G

    2001-07-01

    A white Shannon-type trap was used for captures of female sand flies in the search for natural infection with flagellates, however, due to its low productivity and as a large number of phlebotomines settled on the researchers' black clothes, we decided to compare the relative attractiveness of black and white Shannon-type traps for sand flies. Several pairs of black and white traps were placed side by side in front of caves in four areas in the Serra da Bodoquena, Bonito county, State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, for a total of 12 observations and 44 h of capture. The experiment resulted in 889 phlebotomines captured, 801 on the black and 88 on the white trap, representing 13 species. The hourly Williams' means were 8.67 and 1.24, respectively, and the black/white ratio was 7.0:1.0. Lutzomyia almerioi, an anthropophilic species closely associated with caves, was predominant (89%). Only two other species, Nyssomyia whitmani and Psathyromyia punctigeniculata, also anthropophilic, were significantly attracted to the black rather than to the white trap (chi(2) test; p < or = 0.01). The difference between the diversity index of the two traps was not significant at level 0.05. The black trap in these circumstances was much more productive than the white, especially for anthropophilic species.

  7. Attractiveness of black Shannon trap for phlebotomines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galati EAB

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A white Shannon-type trap was used for captures of female sand flies in the search for natural infection with flagellates, however, due to its low productivity and as a large number of phlebotomines settled on the researchers' black clothes, we decided to compare the relative attractiveness of black and white Shannon-type traps for sand flies. Several pairs of black and white traps were placed side by side in front of caves in four areas in the Serra da Bodoquena, Bonito county, State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, for a total of 12 observations and 44 h of capture. The experiment resulted in 889 phlebotomines captured, 801 on the black and 88 on the white trap, representing 13 species. The hourly Williams' means were 8.67 and 1.24, respectively, and the black/white ratio was 7.0:1.0. Lutzomyia almerioi, an anthropophilic species closely associated with caves, was predominant (89%. Only two other species, Nyssomyia whitmani and Psathyromyia punctigeniculata, also anthropophilic, were significantly attracted to the black rather than to the white trap (chi2 test; p <= 0.01. The difference between the diversity index of the two traps was not significant at level 0.05. The black trap in these circumstances was much more productive than the white, especially for anthropophilic species.

  8. Purge-and-trap isothermal multicapillary gas chromatographic sample introduction accessory for speciation of mercury by microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Pereiro, I; Wasik, A; Lobiński, R

    1998-10-01

    A compact device based on purge-and-trap multicapillary gas chromatography was developed for sensitive species-selective analysis of methylmercury and Hg2+ by atomic spectrometry. The operating mode includes in situ conversion of the analyte species to MeEtHg and HgEt2 and cryotrapping of the derivatives formed in a 0.53-mm-i.d. capillary, followed by their flash ( 60 mL min-1) compatible with an MIP AES detector (no dilution with a makeup gas is required). Developments regarding each of the steps of the analytical procedure and effects of operational variables (sample volume, purge flow, trap temperature, separation conditions) are discussed. The device allows speciation of MeHg+ and Hg2+ down to 5 pg g-1 in urine and, after a rapid microwave-assisted hydrolysis, down to 0.1 ng g-1 in solid biological samples with a throughput of 6 samples/h. The analytical protocols developed were validated by the analysis of DORM-1 (dogfish muscle), TORT-1 (lobster hepatopancreas), and Seronorm urine certified reference materials.

  9. Search For Trapped Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, Gorm B; Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo; Bertsche, William; Bowe, Paul D; Bray, Crystal C; Butler, Eoin; Cesar, Claudio L; Chapman, Steven; Charlton, Michael; Fajans, Joel; Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C; Gill, David R; Hangst, Jeffrey S; Hardy, Walter N; Hayano, Ryugo S; Hayden, Michael E; Humphries, Andrew J; Hydomako, Richard; Jonsell, Svante; Jørgensen, Lars V; Kurchaninov, Lenoid; Lambo, Ricardo; Madsen, Niels; Menary, Scott; Nolan, Paul; Olchanski, Konstantin; Olin, Art; Povilus, Alexander; Pusa, Petteri; Robicheaux, Francis; Sarid, Eli; Nasr, Sarah Seif El; Silveira, Daniel M; So, Chukman; Storey, James W; Thompson, Robert I; van der Werf, Dirk P; Wilding, Dean; Wurtele, Jonathan S; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of an experiment to search for trapped antihydrogen atoms with the ALPHA antihydrogen trap at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator. Sensitive diagnostics of the temperatures, sizes, and densities of the trapped antiproton and positron plasmas have been developed, which in turn permitted development of techniques to precisely and reproducibly control the initial experimental parameters. The use of a position-sensitive annihilation vertex detector, together with the capability of controllably quenching the superconducting magnetic minimum trap, enabled us to carry out a high-sensitivity and low-background search for trapped synthesised antihydrogen atoms. We aim to identify the annihilations of antihydrogen atoms held for at least 130 ms in the trap before being released over ~30 ms. After a three-week experimental run in 2009 involving mixing of 10^7 antiprotons with 1.3 10^9 positrons to produce 6 10^5 antihydrogen atoms, we have identified six antiproton annihilation events that are consist...

  10. Microfabricated cylindrical ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, Matthew G.

    2005-03-22

    A microscale cylindrical ion trap, having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale cylindrical ion trap to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The microscale CIT has a reduced ion mean free path, allowing operation at higher pressures with less expensive and less bulky vacuum pumping system, and with lower battery power than conventional- and miniature-sized ion traps. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microscale cylindrical ion trap with on-chip integrated circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of microscale cylindrical ion traps can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  11. Formation of Ni Diffusion-Induced Surface Traps in GaN/Al x Ga1- x N/GaN Heterostructures on Silicon Substrate During Gate Metal Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajen, R. S.; Bera, L. K.; Tan, H. R.; Dolmanan, S. B.; Cheong, Z. W.; Tripathy, S.

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion of the Schottky metal (Ni) in GaN is known to occur at elevated temperatures and as a result of prolonged electric field-driven stress. This leads to device degradation and reliability issues in Al x Ga1- x N/GaN-on-silicon high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). In this study, we have investigated the formation of Ni-induced deep level traps across the Ni-GaN interface in Al x Ga1- x N/GaN HEMT-based Schottky diodes on Si substrates during the Schottky metal deposition process prior to any gate/Schottky metal annealing step. Two deep level traps were detected at 0.14 eV and 0.54 eV using Fourier deep level transient spectroscopy, which correlated well with nitrogen vacancies and nitrogen antisite defects, respectively. Our results are further supported by transmission electron microscopy-based energy dispersive x-ray analysis and electron energy loss spectroscopy measurements which confirm the interdiffusion of Ga and Ni across the Ni/GaN interface on the HEMT structure. Understanding the nature of such defects may help to employ suitable growth or passivation schemes for development of improved GaN-based electronic devices.

  12. The functional relation between partial discharges and induced charge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Aage; Crichton, George C; McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1995-01-01

    Analytical expressions are deduced for the quantitative evaluation of the charge induced on an electrode by a partial discharge (PD) within a dielectric body. Two approaches have been employed to effect this evaluation. These are characterized by the λ function and the φ function, and the essenti...

  13. Possible mechanism for enhancing the trapping and cooling of antihydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesar, C. L.; Robicheaux, F.; Zagury, N.

    2009-10-01

    We propose a usage of microwave radiation in a magnetic trap for improving the cooling and trapping of cold antihydrogen atoms which are initially produced in high magnetic moment states. Inducing transitions toward lower magnetic moments near the turning points of the atom in the trap, followed by spontaneous emission, should enhance the number of trappable atoms. We present results of simulations based on a typical experimental condition of the antihydrogen experiments at CERN. This technique should also be applicable to other trapped high magnetic moment Rydberg atoms.

  14. Investigations into properties of charge traps created in CCDs by neutron and electron irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    James E Brau; Olga Igonkina; Nikolai B Sinev; Jan Strube

    2007-12-01

    Our group has been investigating the effects related to radiation damage of CCDs since 1998. In a series of measurements in 2003 we found the puzzling effect of very slow filling of charge traps created by radiation damage of the silicon device. In 2005 we intended to study this phenomenon in detail. However, while in 2003 we could see all the traps created by neutron irradiation in 1998-1997 unchanged, such traps unexpectedly almost completely disappeared in 2005. We explain this as an effect of annealing induced by electron irradiation, as in 2003 we irradiated with electrons the same device irradiated with neutrons in 1997-1998. Results of the 2005 measurements are presented.

  15. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1–100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed. PMID:28373994

  16. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, Balázs

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1-100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed.

  17. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balázs Rada

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1–100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed.

  18. Advances in the use of trapping systems for Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae): traps and attractants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacas, S; Primo, J; Navarro-Llopis, V

    2013-08-01

    Given the social importance related to the red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus Olivier (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), efforts are being made to develop new control methods, such as the deployment of trapping systems. In this work, the efficacy of a new black pyramidal trap design (Picusan) has been verified in comparison with white and black buckets. In addition, the attractant and synergistic effect of ethyl acetate (EtAc) at different release levels has been evaluated under field conditions. The results show that Picusan traps captured 45% more weevils than bucket-type traps, offering significantly better trapping efficacy. The addition of water to traps baited with palm tissues was found to be essential, with catches increasing more than threefold compared with dry traps. EtAc alone does not offer attractant power under field conditions, and the release levels from 57 mg/d to 1 g/d have no synergistic effect with ferrugineol. Furthermore, significantly fewer females were captured when EtAc was released at 2 g/d. The implications of using EtAc dispensers in trapping systems are discussed.

  19. Novel radio-frequency ion trap with spherical geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Noshad, Houshyar

    2014-01-01

    Confinement of single ions in a novel radio-frequency (RF) quadrupole ion trap with spherical shape is investigated. An optimization of this spherical ion trap (SIT) is carried out in order to suppress its nonlinearity substantially by eliminating the electric octupole moment. Hence, a trapping potential and consequently an electric field very similar to the ideal quadrupole ion trap (QIT) are obtained. Afterwards, three stability regions for the optimized SIT are numerically computed. The regions coincide well with those reported in the literature for the ideal QIT. The reason is attributed to the zero electric octupole moment of our proposed trap. The SIT simple geometry and relative ease of fabrication along with its increased trapping volume compared to the conventional hyperbolic quadrupole ion trap, make it an appropriate choice for miniaturization.

  20. Nanofiber-based optical trapping of cold neutral atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Vetsch, Eugen; Mitsch, Rudolf; Reitz, Daniel; Schneeweiss, Philipp; Rauschenbeutel, Arno

    2012-01-01

    We present experimental techniques and results related to the optimization and characterization of our nanofiber-based atom trap [Vetsch et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 203603 (2010)]. The atoms are confined in an optical lattice which is created using a two-color evanescent field surrounding the optical nanofiber. For this purpose, the polarization state of the trapping light fields has to be properly adjusted. We demonstrate that this can be accomplished by analyzing the light scattered by the nanofiber. Furthermore, we show that loading the nanofiber trap from a magneto-optical trap leads to sub-Doppler temperatures of the trapped atomic ensemble and yields a sub-Poissonian distribution of the number of trapped atoms per trapping site.

  1. EARTHQUAKE-INDUCED DEFORMATION STRUCTURES AND RELATED TO EARTHQUAKE MAGNITUDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savaş TOPAL

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Earthquake-induced deformation structures which are called seismites may helpful to clasify the paleoseismic history of a location and to estimate the magnitudes of the potention earthquakes in the future. In this paper, seismites were investigated according to the types formed in deep and shallow lake sediments. Seismites are observed forms of sand dikes, introduced and fractured gravels and pillow structures in shallow lakes and pseudonodules, mushroom-like silts protruding laminites, mixed layers, disturbed varved lamination and loop bedding in deep lake sediments. Earthquake-induced deformation structures, by benefiting from previous studies, were ordered according to their formations and earthquake magnitudes. In this order, the lowest eartquake's record is loop bedding and the highest one is introduced and fractured gravels in lacustrine deposits.

  2. Thrombin Receptor-Activating Protein (TRAP-Activated Akt Is Involved in the Release of Phosphorylated-HSP27 (HSPB1 from Platelets in DM Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruhiko Tokuda

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available It is generally known that heat shock protein 27 (HSP27 is phosphorylated through p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase. We have previously reported that HSP27 is released from human platelets associated with collagen-induced phosphorylation. In the present study, we conducted an investigation into the effect of thrombin receptor-activating protein (TRAP on the release of HSP27 in platelets in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM patients. The phosphorylated-HSP27 levels induced by TRAP were directly proportional to the aggregation of platelets. The levels of phosphorylated-HSP27 (Ser-78 were correlated with the levels of phosphorylated-p38 MAP kinase and phosphorylated-Akt in the platelets stimulated by 10 µM TRAP but not with those of phosphorylated-p44/p42 MAP kinase. The levels of HSP27 released from the TRAP (10 µM-stimulated platelets were correlated with the levels of phosphorylated-HSP27 in the platelets. The released platelet-derived growth factor-AB (PDGF-AB levels were in parallel with the HSP27 levels released from the platelets stimulated by 10 µM TRAP. Although the area under the curve (AUC of small aggregates (9–25 µm induced by 10 µM TRAP showed no significant correlation with the released HSP27 levels, AUC of medium aggregates (25–50 µm, large aggregates (50–70 µm and light transmittance were significantly correlated with the released HSP27 levels. TRAP-induced phosphorylation of HSP27 was truly suppressed by deguelin, an inhibitor of Akt, in the platelets from a healthy subject. These results strongly suggest that TRAP-induced activation of Akt in addition to p38 MAP kinase positively regulates the release of phosphorylated-HSP27 from human platelets, which is closely related to the platelet hyper-aggregation in type 2 DM patients.

  3. Evaluation of multiple reaction monitoring cubed for the analysis of tachykinin related peptides in rat spinal cord using a hybrid triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pailleux, Floriane; Beaudry, Francis

    2014-02-01

    Targeted peptide methods generally use HPLC-MS/MRM approaches. Although dependent on the instrumental resolution, interferences may occur while performing analysis of complex biological matrices. HPLC-MS/MRM(3) is a technique, which provides a significantly better selectivity, compared with HPLC-MS/MRM assay. HPLC-MS/MRM(3) allows the detection and quantitation by enriching standard MRM with secondary product ions that are generated within the linear ion trap. Substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA) are tachykinin peptides playing a central role in pain transmission. The objective of this study was to verify whether HPLC-MS/MRM(3) could provide significant advantages over a more traditional HPLC-MS/MRM assay for the quantification of SP and NKA in rat spinal cord. The results suggest that reconstructed MRM(3) chromatograms display significant improvements with the nearly complete elimination of interfering peaks but the sensitivity (i.e. signal-to-noise ratio) was severely reduced. The precision (%CV) observed was between 3.5% and 24.1% using HPLC-MS/MRM and in the range of 4.3-13.1% with HPLC-MS/MRM(3), for SP and NKA. The observed accuracy was within 10% of the theoretical concentrations tested. HPLC-MS/MRM(3) may improve the assay sensitivity to detect difference between samples by reducing significantly the potential of interferences and therefore reduce instrumental errors.

  4. Penning trap at IGISOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szerypo, J. E-mail: jerzy.szerypo@phys.jyu.fi; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V.S.; Nieminen, A.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Aeystoe, J

    2002-04-22

    The IGISOL facility at the Department of Physics of the University of Jyvaeskylae (JYFL) is delivering radioactive beams of short-lived exotic nuclei, in particular the neutron-rich isotopes from the fission reaction. These nuclei are studied with the nuclear spectroscopy methods. In order to substantially increase the quality and sensitivity of such studies, the beam should undergo beam handling: cooling, bunching and isobaric purification. The first two processes are performed with the use of an RFQ cooler/buncher. The isobaric purification will be made by a Penning trap placed after the RF-cooler element. This contribution describes the current status of the Penning trap project and its future prospects. The latter comprise the precise nuclear mass measurements, nuclear spectroscopy in the Penning trap interior as well as the laser spectroscopy on the extracted beams.

  5. CD-REST: a system for extracting chemical-induced disease relation in literature

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Jun; Wu, Yonghui; Zhang, Yaoyun; Wang, Jingqi; Lee, Hee-jin; Xu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Mining chemical-induced disease relations embedded in the vast biomedical literature could facilitate a wide range of computational biomedical applications, such as pharmacovigilance. The BioCreative V organized a Chemical Disease Relation (CDR) Track regarding chemical-induced disease relation extraction from biomedical literature in 2015. We participated in all subtasks of this challenge. In this article, we present our participation system Chemical Disease Relation Extraction SysTem (CD-RE...

  6. Trapping molecules on chips

    CERN Document Server

    Santambrogio, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, it was demonstrated that neutral molecules can be loaded on a microchip directly from a supersonic beam. The molecules are confined in microscopic traps that can be moved smoothly over the surface of the chip. Once the molecules are trapped, they can be decelerated to a standstill, for instance, or pumped into selected quantum states by laser light or microwaves. Molecules are detected on the chip by time-resolved spatial imaging, which allows for the study of the distribution in the phase space of the molecular ensemble.

  7. The Reusable Astronomy Portal (TRAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, T.; Rogers, A.; Wallace, G.

    2012-09-01

    The Reusable Astronomy Portal (TRAP) aims to provide a common platform for rapidly deploying Astronomy Archives to the web. TRAP is currently under development for both the VAO Data Discovery Portal and the MAST Multi-Mission Portal (Figure 1). TRAP consists of 2 major software packages: the TRAP Client and the TRAP Server. The TRAP framework allows developers to deploy the Server, connect to data resources, then focus on building custom tools for the Client. TRAP is built upon proven industry technologies including the Ext/JS JavaScript Component Library, Mono.NET Web Services, and JSON message based APIs. The multi-layered architecture of TRAP decouples each layer: Client, Service and Data Access, enabling each to evolve independently over time. Although currently deployed to provide astronomy science data access, the TRAP architecture is flexible enough to thrive in any distributed data environment.

  8. Study on MCP-1 related to inflammation induced by biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Tingting [Ninth People' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University/Shanghai Biomaterials Research and Testing Center, Shanghai 200023 (China); Sun Jiao [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Shanghai 200023 (China); Zhang Ping, E-mail: jiaosun59@yahoo.co [School of Life Science, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2009-06-15

    The study of inflammation is important for understanding the reaction between biomaterials and the human body, in particular, the interaction between biomaterials and immune system. In the current study, rat macrophages were induced by multiple biomaterials with different biocompatibilities, including polyvinyl chloride (PVC) containing 8% of organic tin, a positive control material with cellular toxicity. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (ECV-304), cultured with PRMI-1640, were detached from cells cultured with the supernatant of macrophages containing TNF-alpha and IL-1beta because of stimulation by biomaterials. The cells were then treated with different biomaterials. Then both TNF-alpha and IL-1beta in macrophages were detected by ELISA. Levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were measured by RT-PCR. The results suggested that the expression of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta was elevated by polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) and American NPG alloy (p < 0.001). The level of MCP-1 cultured in supernatant of macrophages was higher than in PRMI-1640 with the same biomaterials. And the exposure to PTFE, PLGA and NPG resulted in the high expression of MCP-1 (p < 0.001) following cytokine stimulation. MCP-1 was also significantly expressed in beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) and calcium phosphate cement samples (CPC) (p < 0.01). Thus, TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and MCP-1 had played an important role in the immune reaction induced by biomaterials and there was a close relationship between the expression of cytokines and biomcompatibility of biomaterials. Furthermore, these data suggested that MCP-1 was regulated by TNF-alpha and IL-1beta, and activated by both cytokines and biomaterials. The data further suggested that the expression of MCP-1 could be used as a marker to indicate the degree of immune reaction induced by biomaterials.

  9. P-selectin promotes neutrophil extracellular trap formation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etulain, Julia; Martinod, Kimberly; Wong, Siu Ling; Cifuni, Stephen M; Schattner, Mirta; Wagner, Denisa D

    2015-07-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) can be released in the vasculature. In addition to trapping microbes, they promote inflammatory and thrombotic diseases. Considering that P-selectin induces prothrombotic and proinflammatory signaling, we studied the role of this selectin in NET formation. NET formation (NETosis) was induced by thrombin-activated platelets rosetting with neutrophils and was inhibited by anti-P-selectin aptamer or anti-P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) inhibitory antibody but was not induced by platelets from P-selectin(-/-) mice. Moreover, NETosis was also promoted by P-selectin-immunoglobulin fusion protein but not by control immunoglobulin. We isolated neutrophils from mice engineered to overproduce soluble P-selectin (P-selectin(ΔCT/ΔCT) mice). Although the levels of circulating DNA and nucleosomes (indicative of spontaneous NETosis) were normal in these mice, basal neutrophil histone citrullination and presence of P-selectin on circulating neutrophils were elevated. NET formation after stimulation with platelet activating factor, ionomycin, or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate was significantly enhanced, indicating that the P-selectin(ΔCT/ΔCT) neutrophils were primed for NETosis. In summary, P-selectin, cellular or soluble, through binding to PSGL-1, promotes NETosis, suggesting that this pathway is a potential therapeutic target for NET-related diseases.

  10. Trapping Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yuqiao; Aoyagi-Scharber, Mika; Wang, Bing

    2015-06-01

    Recent findings indicate that a major mechanism by which poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors kill cancer cells is by trapping PARP1 and PARP2 to the sites of DNA damage. The PARP enzyme-inhibitor complex "locks" onto damaged DNA and prevents DNA repair, replication, and transcription, leading to cell death. Several clinical-stage PARP inhibitors, including veliparib, rucaparib, olaparib, niraparib, and talazoparib, have been evaluated for their PARP-trapping activity. Although they display similar capacity to inhibit PARP catalytic activity, their relative abilities to trap PARP differ by several orders of magnitude, with the ability to trap PARP closely correlating with each drug's ability to kill cancer cells. In this article, we review the available data on molecular interactions between these clinical-stage PARP inhibitors and PARP proteins, and discuss how their biologic differences might be explained by the trapping mechanism. We also discuss how to use the PARP-trapping mechanism to guide the development of PARP inhibitors as a new class of cancer therapy, both for single-agent and combination treatments. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  11. Induction of traps by Ostertagia ostertagi larvae, chlamydospore production and growth rate in the nematode-trapping fungus Duddingtonia flagrans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønvold, J.; Nansen, P.; Henriksen, S. A.;

    1996-01-01

    Biological control of parasitic nematodes of domestic animals can be achieved by feeding host animals chlamydospores of the nematode-trapping fungus Duddingtonia flagrans. In the host faeces, D. flagrans develop traps that may catch nematode larvae. In experiments on agar, D. flagrans had a growth...... rate between 15 and 60 mm/week at temperatures between 20 and 30 degrees C. The presence of nematodes induces the fungus to produce traps. The rate of trap formation in D. flagrans has an optimum at 30 degrees C, producing 700-800 traps/cm(2)/2 days, when induced by 20 nematodes/cm(2) on agar....... Approaching 10 and 35 degrees C the ability to produce traps is gradually reduced. The response of chlamydospore production on agar to changes in temperature is the same as that for trap formation. On agar, at 10, 20 and 30 degrees C D. flagrans loses its trap inducibility after 2-3 weeks. During the ageing...

  12. Asymptotic behavior of marginally trapped tubes in spherically symmetric black hole spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Catherine M.

    We begin by reviewing some fundamental features of general relativity, then outline the mathematical definitions of black holes, trapped surfaces, and marginally trapped tubes, first in general terms, then rigorously in the context of spherical symmetry. We describe explicitly the reduction of Einstein's equation on a spherically symmetric 4-dimensional Lorentzian manifold to a system of partial differential equations on a subset of 2-dimensional Minkowski space. We discuss the asymptotic behavior of marginally trapped tubes in the Schwarzschild, Vaidya, and Reisner-Nordstrom solutions to Einstein's equations in spherical symmetry, as well as in Einstein-Maxwell-scalar field black hole spacetimes generated by evolving certain classes of asymptotically flat initial data. Our first main result gives conditions on a general stress-energy tensor Talphabeta in a spherically symmetric black hole spacetime that are sufficient to guarantee that the black hole will contain a marginally trapped tube which is eventually achronal, connected, and asymptotic to the event horizon. Here "general" means that the matter model is arbitrary, subject only to a certain positive energy condition. A certain matter field decay rate, known as Price law decay in the literature, is not required per se for this asymptotic result, but such decay does imply that the marginally trapped tube has finite length with respect to the induced metric. In our second main result, we give two separate applications of the first theorem to self-gravitating Higgs field spacetimes, one using weak Price law decay, the other certain strong smallness and monotonicity assumptions.

  13. Carbon cluster mass calibration at the double Penning trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smorra, Christian [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Blaum, Klaus [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Eberhardt, Klaus [Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Eibach, Martin; Ketelaer, Jens; Ketter, Jochen; Knuth, Konstantin [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Herfurth, Frank [GSI, Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Nagy, Szilard [Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    TRIGA-TRAP is a facility which aims for mass measurements on neutron-rich short-lived fission products and actinides with relative mass uncertainties of 10{sup -7} and below. To this end the cyclotron frequency of a stored ion in a Penning trap is determined. In high-precision mass spectrometry the investigation of systematic errors is of utmost importance. In order to demonstrate the accuracy of the measured values, various carbon cluster ions have been used in cross reference measurements. The results are presented and the accuracy limit of TRIGA-TRAP is discussed.

  14. Induction of trap formation in nematode-trapping fungi by bacteria-released ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, H N; Xu, Y Y; Wang, X; Zhang, K Q; Li, G H

    2016-04-01

    A total of 11 bacterial strains were assayed for bacteria-induced trap formation in the nematode-trapping fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora YMF1·01883 with two-compartmented Petri dish. These strains were identified on the basis of their 16S rRNA gene sequences. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of eight isolates were extracted using solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME) and their structures were identified based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). At the same time, all isolates were used for quantitative measurement of ammonia by the indophenol blue method. The effects of pure commercial compounds on inducement of trap formation in A. oligospora were tested. Taken together, results demonstrated that the predominant bacterial volatile compound inducing trap formation was ammonia. Meanwhile, ammonia also played a role in other nematode-trapping fungi, including Arthrobotrys guizhouensis YMF1·00014, producing adhesive nets; Dactylellina phymatopaga YMF1·01474, producing adhesive knobs; Dactylellina cionopaga YMF1·01472, producing adhesive columns and Drechslerella brochopaga YMF1·01829, producing constricting rings.

  15. Redesigning octopus traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduarda Gomes

    2014-06-01

    In order to minimise the identified problems in the actual traps, the present work proposes a new design with the aim of reducing the volume and weight during transport, and also during onshore storage. Alternative materials to avoid corrosion and formation of encrustations were also proposed.

  16. Polarization dependent particle dynamics in simple traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yifat, Yuval; Sule, Nishant; Figliozzi, Patrick; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2016-09-01

    Optical trapping has proved to be a valuable research tool in a wide range of fields including physics, chemistry, biological and materials science. The ability to precisely localize individual colloidal particles in a three-dimensional location has been highly useful for understanding soft matter phenomena and inter-particle interactions. It also holds great promise for nanoscale fabrication and ultra-sensitive sensing by enabling precise positioning of specific material building blocks. In this presentation we discuss our research on the effect of the polarization state of the incident laser on the trapping of nanoscale particles. The polarization of the incident light has a pronounced effect on particle behavior even for the simple case of two plasmonic silver nano-particles in a Gaussian trap,. When the incident light is linearly polarized, the particles form an optically induced dimer that is stably oriented along the direction of polarization. However, nanoparticle dimers and trimmers exhibit structural instabilities and novel dynamics when trapped with focused beams of circularly polarized light. The observed dynamics suggest electrodynamic and hydrodynamic coupling. We explore the electrodynamic phenomena experimentally and theoretically and discuss further examples of polarization controlled trapping.

  17. Roscovitine sensitizes leukemia and lymphoma cells to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-induced apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Molinsky, J.; Klánová, M.; Koc, M; Beranová, L. (Lenka); Anděra, L. (Ladislav); Ludvíková, Z.; Bohmova, M.; Gasova, Z.; Strnad, M.; Ivánek, R. (Robert); Trněný, M.; Nečas, E.; Živný, J.; Klener, P.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a death ligand with selective antitumor activity. However, many primary tumors are TRAIL resistant. Previous studies reported that roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, sensitized various solid cancer cells to TRAIL. We show that roscovitine and TRAIL demonstrate synergistic cytotoxicity in hematologic malignant cell lines and primary cells. Pretreatment of TRAIL-resistant leukemia cells with roscovitine induced en...

  18. Contribution of manipulable and non-manipulable environmental factors to trapping efficiency of invasive sea lamprey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Heather A.; Bravener, Gale; Beaulaurier, Joshua; Johnson, Nicholas S.; Twohey, Michael; McLaughlin, Robert L.; Brenden, Travis O.

    2017-01-01

    We identified aspects of the trapping process that afforded opportunities for improving trap efficiency of invasive sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in a Great Lake's tributary. Capturing a sea lamprey requires it to encounter the trap, enter, and be retained until removed. Probabilities of these events depend on the interplay between sea lamprey behavior, environmental conditions, and trap design. We first tested how strongly seasonal patterns in daily trap catches (a measure of trapping success) were related to nightly rates of trap encounter, entry, and retention (outcomes of sea lamprey behavior). We then tested the degree to which variation in rates of trap encounter, entry, and retention were related to environmental features that control agents can manipulate (attractant pheromone addition, discharge) and features agents cannot manipulate (water temperature, season), but could be used as indicators for when to increase trapping effort. Daily trap catch was most strongly associated with rate of encounter. Relative and absolute measures of predictive strength for environmental factors that managers could potentially manipulate were low, suggesting that opportunities to improve trapping success by manipulating factors that affect rates of encounter, entry, and retention are limited. According to results at this trap, more sea lamprey would be captured by increasing trapping effort early in the season when sea lamprey encounter rates with traps are high. The approach used in this study could be applied to trapping of other invasive or valued species.

  19. Optical trapping assembling of clusters and nanoparticles in solution by CW and femtosecond lasers

    KAUST Repository

    Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2015-02-01

    Laser trapping of molecular systems in solution is classified into three cases: JUST TRAPPING, EXTENDED TRAPPING, and NUCLEATION and GROWTH. The nucleation in amino acid solutions depends on where the 1064-nm CW trapping laser is focused, and crystallization and liquid–liquid phase separation are induced by laser trapping at the solution/air surface and the solution/glass interface, respectively. Laser trapping crystallization is achieved even in unsaturated solution, on which unique controls of crystallization are made possible. Crystal size is arbitrarily controlled by tuning laser power for a plate-like anhydrous crystal of l-phenylalanine. The α- or γ-crystal polymorph of glycine is selectively prepared by changing laser power and polarization. Further efficient trapping of nanoparticles and their following ejection induced by femtosecond laser pulses are introduced as unique trapping phenomena and finally future perspective is presented.

  20. Study of mosquito attractants for photo catalytic mosquito trap

    OpenAIRE

    Dewi Tristantini; Slamet -; Angela Jessica Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Photo catalytic mosquito trap is made of TiO2-Activated Carbon (AC) with a certain composition of AC. Research concerns on the heat spectrum which is produced by combination process of existing CO2 and humid air. The purpose of performance testing is to observe capability of this device in trapping mosquitoes related to the air temperature profile for heat spectrum is play important role for attracting mosquitoes. Result shows photo catalytic mosquito trap is more effective than devices which...

  1. d(− Lactic Acid-Induced Adhesion of Bovine Neutrophils onto Endothelial Cells Is Dependent on Neutrophils Extracellular Traps Formation and CD11b Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Alarcón

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bovine ruminal acidosis is of economic importance as it contributes to reduced milk and meat production. This phenomenon is mainly attributed to an overload of highly fermentable carbohydrate, resulting in increased d(− lactic acid levels in serum and plasma. Ruminal acidosis correlates with elevated acute phase proteins in blood, along with neutrophil activation and infiltration into various tissues leading to laminitis and aseptic polysynovitis. Previous studies in bovine neutrophils indicated that d(− lactic acid decreased expression of L-selectin and increased expression of CD11b to concentrations higher than 6 mM, suggesting a potential role in neutrophil adhesion onto endothelia. The two aims of this study were to evaluate whether d(− lactic acid influenced neutrophil and endothelial adhesion and to trigger neutrophil extracellular trap (NET production (NETosis in exposed neutrophils. Exposure of bovine neutrophils to 5 mM d(− lactic acid elevated NET release compared to unstimulated neutrophil negative controls. Moreover, this NET contains CD11b and histone H4 citrullinated, the latter was dependent on PAD4 activation, a critical enzyme in DNA decondensation and NETosis. Furthermore, NET formation was dependent on d(− lactic acid plasma membrane transport through monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1. d(− lactic acid enhanced neutrophil adhesion onto endothelial sheets as demonstrated by in vitro neutrophil adhesion assays under continuous physiological flow conditions, indicating that cell adhesion was a NET- and a CD11b/ICAM-1-dependent process. Finally, d(− lactic acid was demonstrated for the first time to trigger NETosis in a PAD4- and MCT1-dependent manner. Thus, d(− lactic acid-mediated neutrophil activation may contribute to neutrophil-derived pro-inflammatory processes, such as aseptic laminitis and/or polysynovitis in animals suffering acute ruminal acidosis.

  2. P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor, FR167653, inhibits parathyroid hormone related protein-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiren Tao

    Full Text Available p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK acts downstream in the signaling pathway that includes receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK, a powerful inducer of osteoclast formation and activation. We investigated the role of p38 MAPK in parathyroid hormone related protein (PTHrP-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and PTHrP-induced bone resorption in vivo. The ability of FR167653 to inhibit osteoclast formation was evaluated by counting the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase positive multinucleated cells (TRAP-positive MNCs in in vitro osteoclastgenesis assays. Its mechanisms were evaluated by detecting the expression level of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1 in bone marrow macrophages (BMMs stimulated with sRANKL and M-CSF, and by detecting the expression level of osteoprotegerin (OPG and RANKL in bone marrow stromal cells stimulated with PTHrP in the presence of FR167653. The function of FR167653 on bone resorption was assessed by measuring the bone resorption area radiographically and by counting osteoclast number per unit bone tissue area in calvaria in a mouse model of bone resorption by injecting PTHrP subcutaneously onto calvaria. Whole blood ionized calcium levels were also recorded. FR167653 inhibited PTHrP-induced osteoclast formation and PTHrP-induced c-Fos and NFATc1 expression in bone marrow macrophages, but not the expression levels of RANKL and OPG in primary bone marrow stromal cells treated by PTHrP. Furthermore, bone resorption area and osteoclast number in vivo were significantly decreased by the treatment of FR167653. Systemic hypercalcemia was also partially inhibited. Inhibition of p38 MAPK by FR167653 blocks PTHrP-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and PTHrP-induced bone resorption in vivo, suggesting that the p38 MAPK signaling pathway plays a fundamental role in PTHrP-induced osteoclastic bone resorption.

  3. Characterizing optical dipole trap via fluorescence of trapped cesium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Tao; GENG Tao; YAN Shubin; LI Gang; ZHANG Jing; WANG Junmin; PENG Kunchi; ZHANG Tiancai

    2006-01-01

    Optical dipole trap (ODT) is becoming an important tool of manipulating neutral atoms. In this paper ODT is realized with a far-off resonant laser beam strongly focused in the magneto-optical trap (MOT) of cesium atoms. The light shift is measured by simply monitoring the fluorescence of the atoms in the magneto-optical trap and the optical dipole trap simultaneously. The advantages of our experimental scheme are discussed, and the effect of the beam waist and power on the potential of dipole trap as well as heating rate is analyzed.

  4. Receptor response in Venus's fly-trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, S L

    1965-09-01

    The insect-trapping movement of the plant Dionaea muscipula (Venus's fly-trap) is mediated by the stimulation of mechanosensory hairs located on the surface of the trap. It is known that stimulation of the hairs is followed by action potentials which are propagated over the surface of the trap. It has been reported that action potentials always precede trap closure. The occurrence of non-propagated receptor potentials is reported here. Receptor potentials always precede the action potentials. The receptor potential appears to couple the mechanical stimulation step to the action potential step of the preying sequence. Receptor potentials elicited by mechanical stimulation of a sensory hair were measured by using the hair as an integral part of the current-measuring path. The tip of the hair was cut off exposing the medullary tissue; this provided a natural extension of the measuring electrode into the receptor region at the base of the hair. A measuring pipette electrode was slipped over the cut tip of the hair. Positive and negative receptor potentials were measured. Evidence is presented which supports the hypothesis that the positive and negative receptor potentials originate from independent sources. An analysis is made of (a) the relation of the parameters of mechanical stimuli to the magnitude of the receptor potential, and (b) the relation of the receptor potentials to the action potential. The hypothesis that the positive receptor potential is the generator of the action potential is consistent with these data.

  5. Traps for neutral radioactive atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Sprouse, G D; Grossman, J S; Orozco, L A; Pearson, M R

    2002-01-01

    We describe several methods for efficiently injecting a small number of radioactive atoms into a laser trap. The characteristics of laser traps that make them desirable for physics experiments are discussed and several different experimental directions are described. We describe recent experiments with the alkali element Fr and point to future directions of the neutral atom trapping program.

  6. Millikelvin cooling of an optically trapped microsphere in vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Tongcang; Raizen, Mark G

    2011-01-01

    The apparent conflict between general relativity and quantum mechanics remains one of the unresolved mysteries of the physical world. According to recent theories, this conflict results in gravity-induced quantum state reduction of "Schr\\"odinger cats", quantum superpositions of macroscopic observables. In recent years, great progress has been made in cooling micromechanical resonators towards their quantum mechanical ground state. This work is an important step towards the creation of Schr\\"odinger cats in the laboratory, and the study of their destruction by decoherence. A direct test of the gravity-induced state reduction scenario may therefore be within reach. However, a recent analysis shows that for all systems reported to date, quantum superpositions are destroyed by environmental decoherence long before gravitational state reduction takes effect. Here we report optical trapping of glass microspheres in vacuum with high oscillation frequencies, and cooling of the center-of-mass motion from room tempera...

  7. Effects of TRAP-1-like protein (TLP gene on collagen synthesis induced by TGF-β/Smad signaling in human dermal fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypertrophic scars are pathologic proliferations of the dermal skin layer resulting from excessive collagen deposition during the healing process of cutaneous wounds. Current research suggests that the TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway is closely associated with normal scar and hypertrophic scar formation. TRAP-1-like protein (TLP, a cytoplasmic protein, has been reported to efficiently regulate Smad2- and Smad3-dependent signal expression in the TGF-β pathway. The relationship between TLP and Type I/III collagen (Col I/III synthesis explored in the present study provides an effective target for wound healing and gene therapy of hypertrophic scarring. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of TLP on collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts. METHODS: Lentiviral vectors encoding TLP was constructed to transfect fibroblasts derived from normal human skin. The expression of Col I/III and phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3 in fibroblasts were examined after TLP treatment. In addition, the comparison of TLP expression in normal skin tissues and in hypertrophic scar tissues was performed, and the effect of TLP on cell viability was analyzed by MTT assay. RESULTS: TLP expression in hypertrophic scar tissue was markedly higher than in normal skin tissue. The Real Time PCR and Western blot test results both revealed that the synthesis of Col I/III was positively correlated with the expression of TLP. TLP also facilitate Smad2 phosphorylation while, conversely, inhibiting Smad3 phosphorylation. TLP may play a cooperative role, along with the cytokine TGF-β1, in improving the overall cell viability of skin fibroblasts. CONCLUSIONS: TLP likely acts as a molecular modulator capable of altering the balance of Smad3- and Smad2-dependent signaling through regulation of phosphorylation, thus facilitating collagen synthesis in fibroblasts. Based on genetic variation in TLP levels in different tissues, these results suggest that TLP plays a key role

  8. Wavelength Dependence of Nanosecond IR Laser-Induced Breakdown in Water: Evidence for Multiphoton Initiation via an Intermediate State

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-29

    breakdown threshold in water for nanosecond (ns) IR laser pulses . Avalanche ionization (AI) is the most powerful mechanism driving IR ns laser-induced...acknowledged that femtosecond (fs) and picosecond (ps) IR breakdown is initiated by photoionization because ultrashort pulses are sufficiently...formation depends critically on the density of pre-existing traps, χtrap. An estimate of χtrap can be obtained by relating the initial quantum efficiency

  9. Detection of Trapped Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Hydomako, Richard Allan

    The ALPHA experiment is an international effort to produce, trap, and perform precision spectroscopic measurements on antihydrogen (the bound state of a positron and an antiproton). Based at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility at CERN, the ALPHA experiment has recently magnetically confined antihydrogen atoms for the first time. A crucial element in the observation of trapped antihydrogen is ALPHA’s silicon vertexing detector. This detector contains sixty silicon modules arranged in three concentric layers, and is able to determine the three-dimensional location of the annihilation of an antihydrogen atom by reconstructing the trajectories of the produced annihilation products. This dissertation focuses mainly on the methods used to reconstruct the annihilation location. Specifically, the software algorithms used to identify and extrapolate charged particle tracks are presented along with the routines used to estimate the annihilation location from the convergence of the identified tracks. It is shown...

  10. Trapping ions with lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Cormick, Cecilia; Morigi, Giovanna

    2010-01-01

    This work theoretically addresses the trapping an ionized atom with a single valence electron by means of lasers, analyzing qualitatively and quantitatively the consequences of the net charge of the particle. In our model, the coupling between the ion and the electromagnetic field includes the charge monopole and the internal dipole, within a multipolar expansion of the interaction Hamiltonian. Specifically, we perform a Power-Zienau-Woolley transformation, taking into account the motion of the center of mass. The net charge produces a correction in the atomic dipole which is of order $m_e/M$ with $m_e$ the electron mass and $M$ the total mass of the ion. With respect to neutral atoms, there is also an extra coupling to the laser field which can be approximated by that of the monopole located at the position of the center of mass. These additional effects, however, are shown to be very small compared to the dominant dipolar trapping term.

  11. Genomic and proteomic analyses of the fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora provide insights into nematode-trap formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinkui Yang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Nematode-trapping fungi are "carnivorous" and attack their hosts using specialized trapping devices. The morphological development of these traps is the key indicator of their switch from saprophytic to predacious lifestyles. Here, the genome of the nematode-trapping fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora Fres. (ATCC24927 was reported. The genome contains 40.07 Mb assembled sequence with 11,479 predicted genes. Comparative analysis showed that A. oligospora shared many more genes with pathogenic fungi than with non-pathogenic fungi. Specifically, compared to several sequenced ascomycete fungi, the A. oligospora genome has a larger number of pathogenicity-related genes in the subtilisin, cellulase, cellobiohydrolase, and pectinesterase gene families. Searching against the pathogen-host interaction gene database identified 398 homologous genes involved in pathogenicity in other fungi. The analysis of repetitive sequences provided evidence for repeat-induced point mutations in A. oligospora. Proteomic and quantitative PCR (qPCR analyses revealed that 90 genes were significantly up-regulated at the early stage of trap-formation by nematode extracts and most of these genes were involved in translation, amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, cell wall and membrane biogenesis. Based on the combined genomic, proteomic and qPCR data, a model for the formation of nematode trapping device in this fungus was proposed. In this model, multiple fungal signal transduction pathways are activated by its nematode prey to further regulate downstream genes associated with diverse cellular processes such as energy metabolism, biosynthesis of the cell wall and adhesive proteins, cell division, glycerol accumulation and peroxisome biogenesis. This study will facilitate the identification of pathogenicity-related genes and provide a broad foundation for understanding the molecular and evolutionary mechanisms underlying fungi-nematodes interactions.

  12. A time-resolved current method and TSC under vacuum conditions of SEM: Trapping and detrapping processes in thermal aged XLPE insulation cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukezzi, L.; Rondot, S.; Jbara, O.; Boubakeur, A.

    2017-03-01

    Thermal aging of cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) can cause serious concerns in the safety operation in high voltage system. To get a more detailed picture on the effect of thermal aging on the trapping and detrapping process of XLPE in the melting temperature range, Thermal Stimulated Current (TSC) have been implemented in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with a specific arrangement. The XLPE specimens are molded and aged at two temperatures (120 °C and 140 °C) situated close to the melting temperature of the material. The use of SEM allows us to measure both leakage and displacement currents induced in samples under electron irradiation. The first represents the conduction process of XLPE and the second gives information on the trapping of charges in the bulk of the material. TSC associated to the SEM leads to show spectra of XLPE discharge under thermal stimulation using both currents measured after electron irradiation. It was found that leakage current in the charging process may be related to the physical defects resulting in crystallinity variation under thermal aging. However the trapped charge can be affected by the carbonyl groups resulting from the thermo-oxidation degradation and the disorder in the material. It is evidenced from the TSC spectra of unaged XLPE that there is no detrapping charge under heat stimulation. Whereas the presence of peaks in the TSC spectra of thermally aged samples indicates that there is some amount of trapped charge released by heating. The detrapping behavior of aged XLPE is supported by the supposition of the existence of two trap levels: shallow traps and deep traps. Overall, physico-chemical reactions under thermal aging at high temperatures leads to the enhancement of shallow traps density and changes in range of traps depth. These changes induce degradation of electrical properties of XLPE.

  13. A time-resolved current method and TSC under vacuum conditions of SEM: Trapping and detrapping processes in thermal aged XLPE insulation cables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boukezzi, L. [Materials Science and Informatics Laboratory, MSIL, University of Djelfa, Djelfa (Algeria); Rondot, S., E-mail: sebastien.rondot@univ-reims.fr [Laboratoire d’Ingénierie & Sciences des Matériaux, UFR Sciences, BP1039, 51687 Reims cedex 2 (France); Jbara, O. [Laboratoire d’Ingénierie & Sciences des Matériaux, UFR Sciences, BP1039, 51687 Reims cedex 2 (France); Boubakeur, A. [L.R.E./Laboratory of High Voltage, Polytechnic National School, BP182, EL-Harrach, Algiers (Algeria)

    2017-03-01

    Thermal aging of cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) can cause serious concerns in the safety operation in high voltage system. To get a more detailed picture on the effect of thermal aging on the trapping and detrapping process of XLPE in the melting temperature range, Thermal Stimulated Current (TSC) have been implemented in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with a specific arrangement. The XLPE specimens are molded and aged at two temperatures (120 °C and 140 °C) situated close to the melting temperature of the material. The use of SEM allows us to measure both leakage and displacement currents induced in samples under electron irradiation. The first represents the conduction process of XLPE and the second gives information on the trapping of charges in the bulk of the material. TSC associated to the SEM leads to show spectra of XLPE discharge under thermal stimulation using both currents measured after electron irradiation. It was found that leakage current in the charging process may be related to the physical defects resulting in crystallinity variation under thermal aging. However the trapped charge can be affected by the carbonyl groups resulting from the thermo-oxidation degradation and the disorder in the material. It is evidenced from the TSC spectra of unaged XLPE that there is no detrapping charge under heat stimulation. Whereas the presence of peaks in the TSC spectra of thermally aged samples indicates that there is some amount of trapped charge released by heating. The detrapping behavior of aged XLPE is supported by the supposition of the existence of two trap levels: shallow traps and deep traps. Overall, physico-chemical reactions under thermal aging at high temperatures leads to the enhancement of shallow traps density and changes in range of traps depth. These changes induce degradation of electrical properties of XLPE.

  14. Ion Trap Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    an inspiring speech at the MIT Physics of Computation 1st Conference in 1981, Feynman proposed the development of a computer that would obey the...on ion trap based 36 quantum computing for physics and computer science students would include lecture notes, slides, lesson plans, a syllabus...reading lists, videos, demonstrations, and laboratories. 37 LIST OF REFERENCES [1] R. P. Feynman , “Simulating physics with computers,” Int. J

  15. Allergen-induced changes in airway responsiveness are related to baseline airway responsiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deBruinWeller, MS; Weller, FR; RijssenbeekNouwens, LHM; Jansen, HM; deMonchy, JGR

    1996-01-01

    In the literature, bronchial allergen challenge is usually reported to result in an increase in histamine-induced airway responsiveness (AR). The present study investigated the relation between baseline AR and allergen-induced changes in AR. The effect of allergen challenge on AR was investigated in

  16. Induced systemic resistance in radish is not associated with accumulation of pathogenesis-related proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffland, E.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Bik, L.; Pelt, J.A. van den

    1995-01-01

    The non-pathogenic Pseudomonas fluorescens strain WCS417r has been shown to induce systemic resistance in radish against Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. raphani. In this paper we investigate the involvement of pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins in this Pseudomonas-induced resistance. For comparison, salicy

  17. Allergen-induced changes in airway responsiveness are related to baseline airway responsiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deBruinWeller, MS; Weller, FR; RijssenbeekNouwens, LHM; Jansen, HM; deMonchy, JGR

    1996-01-01

    In the literature, bronchial allergen challenge is usually reported to result in an increase in histamine-induced airway responsiveness (AR). The present study investigated the relation between baseline AR and allergen-induced changes in AR. The effect of allergen challenge on AR was investigated in

  18. Allergen-induced changes in airway responsiveness are related to baseline airway responsiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deBruinWeller, MS; Weller, FR; RijssenbeekNouwens, LHM; Jansen, HM; deMonchy, JGR

    In the literature, bronchial allergen challenge is usually reported to result in an increase in histamine-induced airway responsiveness (AR). The present study investigated the relation between baseline AR and allergen-induced changes in AR. The effect of allergen challenge on AR was investigated in

  19. Water-Trapped Worlds

    CERN Document Server

    Menou, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Although tidally-locked habitable planets orbiting nearby M-dwarf stars are among the best astronomical targets to search for extrasolar life, they may also be deficient in volatiles and water. Climate models for this class of planets show atmospheric transport of water from the dayside to the nightside, where it is precipitated as snow and trapped as ice. Since ice only slowly flows back to the dayside upon accumulation, the resulting hydrological cycle can trap a large amount of water in the form of nightside ice. Using ice sheet dynamical and thermodynamical constraints, I illustrate how planets with less than about a quarter the Earth's oceans could trap most of their surface water on the nightside. This would leave their dayside, where habitable conditions are met, potentially dry. The amount and distribution of residual liquid water on the dayside depend on a variety of geophysical factors, including the efficiency of rock weathering at regulating atmospheric CO2 as dayside ocean basins dry-up. Water-tr...

  20. Tunnel ionization, population trapping, filamentation and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leang Chin, See; Xu, Huailiang

    2016-11-01

    The advances in femtosecond Ti-sapphire laser technology have led to the discovery of a profusion of new physics. This review starts with a brief historical account of the experimental realization of tunnel ionization, followed by high harmonic generation and the prediction of attosecond pulses. Then, the unique phenomenon of dynamic population trapping during the ionization of atoms and molecules in intense laser fields is introduced. One of the consequences of population trapping in the highly excited states is the neutral dissociation into simple molecular fragments which fluoresce. Such fluorescence could be amplified in femtosecond laser filamentation in gases. The experimental observations of filament-induced fluorescence and lasing in the atmosphere and combustion flames are given. Excitation of molecular rotational wave packets (molecular alignment) and their relaxation and revival in a gas filament are described. Furthermore, filament-induced condensation and precipitation inside a cloud chamber is explained. Lastly, a summary and future outlook is given.

  1. Microfabricated surface trap for scalable ion-photon interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Herskind, Peter F; Shi, Molu; Ge, Yufei; Cetina, Marko; Chuang, Isaac L

    2010-01-01

    The combination of high-finesse optical mirrors and ion traps is attractive for quantum light-matter interfaces, which represents an enabling resource for large scale quantum information processing. We report on a scalable approach to ion-photon interfaces based on a surface electrode ion trap that is microfabricated on top of a dielectric mirror, with additional losses due to fabrication as low as 80 ppm for light at 422 nm. Stable trapping of single 88 Sr+ ions is demonstrated and the functionality of the mirror is verified by light collection from, and imaging of, the ion $169 \\pm 4 \\mu$m above the mirror. Sensitivity to laser induced charging of the trap and substrate as well as anomalous heating of the ion at 15 K is evaluated and found comparable to similar traps fabricated on conventional substrates without dielectric mirror coatings.

  2. Gravity Affects the Closure of the Traps in Dionaea muscipula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Pandolfi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula Ellis is a carnivorous plant known for its ability to capture insects thanks to the fast snapping of its traps. This fast movement has been long studied and it is triggered by the mechanical stimulation of hairs, located in the middle of the leaves. Here we present detailed experiments on the effect of microgravity on trap closure recorded for the first time during a parabolic flight campaign. Our results suggest that gravity has an impact on trap responsiveness and on the kinetics of trap closure. The possible role of the alterations of membrane permeability induced by microgravity on trap movement is discussed. Finally we show how the Venus flytrap could be an easy and effective model plant to perform studies on ion channels and aquaporin activities, as well as on electrical activity in vivo on board of parabolic flights and large diameter centrifuges.

  3. Gravity affects the closure of the traps in Dionaea muscipula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandolfi, Camilla; Masi, Elisa; Voigt, Boris; Mugnai, Sergio; Volkmann, Dieter; Mancuso, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula Ellis) is a carnivorous plant known for its ability to capture insects thanks to the fast snapping of its traps. This fast movement has been long studied and it is triggered by the mechanical stimulation of hairs, located in the middle of the leaves. Here we present detailed experiments on the effect of microgravity on trap closure recorded for the first time during a parabolic flight campaign. Our results suggest that gravity has an impact on trap responsiveness and on the kinetics of trap closure. The possible role of the alterations of membrane permeability induced by microgravity on trap movement is discussed. Finally we show how the Venus flytrap could be an easy and effective model plant to perform studies on ion channels and aquaporin activities, as well as on electrical activity in vivo on board of parabolic flights and large diameter centrifuges.

  4. Light trapping structures in wing scales of butterfly Trogonoptera brookiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhiwu; Niu, Shichao; Shang, Chunhui; Liu, Zhenning; Ren, Luquan

    2012-04-01

    The fine optical structures in wing scales of Trogonoptera brookiana, a tropical butterfly exhibiting efficient light trapping effect, were carefully examined and the reflectivity was measured using reflectance spectrometry. The optimized 3D configuration of the coupling structure was determined using SEM and TEM data, and the light trapping mechanism of butterfly scales was studied. It is found that the front and back sides of butterfly wings possess different light trapping structures, but both can significantly increase the optical path and thus result in almost total absorption of all incident light. An optical model was created to check the properties of this light trapping structure. The simulated reflectance spectra are in concordance with the experimental ones. The results reliably confirm that these structures induce efficient light trapping effect. This functional ``biomimetic structure'' would have a potential value in wide engineering and optical applications.

  5. Light-induced nonlinear effects on dispersion relation of ultracold Bose gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡正峰; 杜春光; 李师群

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the optical properties of A-configuration ultracold dense Bose gas interacting with two laser pulses, which usually result in electromagnetically induced transparency. With the nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics and taking into account the atomic dipole-dipole interaction and local field effect, we have derived the Maxwell-Bloch equations of the system. The dispersion relation of an ultracold Bose gas has been obtained and the light-induced nonlinear effects have been analysed. The light-induced nonlinear effects are different from the effects induced by two-body collision of Bose-Einstein condensation atoms which have a frequency shift of transparent window.

  6. Light—induced nonlinear effects of dispersion relation of ultracold Bose gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuZheng-Feng; DuChunGuang; LiShi-Qun

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the optical properties of A-configuration ultracold dense Bose gas interacting with two laser pulses, which usually result in electromagnetically induced transparency. With the nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics and taking into account the atomic dipole-dipole interaction and local field effect, we have derived the Maxwell-Bloch equations of the system. The dispersion relation of an ultracold Bose gas has been obtained and the light-induced nonlinear effects have been analysed. The light-induced nonlinear effects are different from the effects induced by two-body collision of Bose-Einstein condensation atoms which have a frequency shift of transparent window.

  7. Oxygen-Induced Degradation in C60-Based Organic Solar Cells: Relation Between Film Properties and Device Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, João P; Voroshazi, Eszter; Fron, Eduard; Brammertz, Guy; Vangerven, Tim; Van der Auweraer, Mark; Poortmans, Jef; Cheyns, David

    2016-04-20

    Fullerene-based molecules are the archetypical electron-accepting materials for organic photovoltaic devices. A detailed knowledge of the degradation mechanisms that occur in C60 layers will aid in the development of more stable organic solar cells. Here, the impact of storage in air on the optical and electrical properties of C60 is studied in thin films and in devices. Atmospheric exposure induces oxygen-trap states that are 0.19 eV below the LUMO of the fullerene C60. Moreover, oxygen causes a 4-fold decrease of the exciton lifetime in C60 layers, resulting in a 40% drop of short-circuit current from optimized planar heterojunction solar cells. The presence of oxygen-trap states increases the saturation current of the device, resulting in a 20% loss of open-circuit voltage. Design guidelines are outlined to improve air stability for fullerene-containing devices.

  8. Microstructured segmented Paul trap with tunable magnet field gradient; Mikrostrukturierte segmentierte Paul-Falle mit einstellbarem Magnetfeldgradienten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufmann, Delia

    2012-02-03

    Strings of laser cooled ions stored in microstructured Paul traps (microtraps) have promising potential for quantum information science. They provide a system which can be screened from a decohering environment, accurately prepared, manipulated and state selectively detected with efficiency close to unity. Magnetic field gradients allow for addressing trapped ions in frequency space. Furthermore, coupling of the ions' motional and spin states and long range spin-spin coupling of the ions' internal states are induced by such a gradient. This method is called Magnetic Gradient Induced Coupling, MAGIC. In this thesis, the design, construction and first characterization of a novel microtrap with an integrated solenoid is reported. The solenoid is designed to create a high magnetic field gradient per dissipated heat. The microtrap consists of three layers stacked onto each other. The outer layers provide a trapping potential, while the inner layer creates the switchable magnetic field gradient. Another specialty of this trap is the 33 pairs of DC-electrodes, allowing to move the ions along the trap axis and to adjust the range and the strength of the ions' spin-spin interactions. The microtrap is fixed on top of a ceramic block that provides the necessary electrical connections via thick film printed wires, a technique adopted in the context of microtraps for the first time, and in addition acts as a vacuum interface. The volume of the vacuum chamber is quite small, allowing for pressures in the low 10{sup -11} mbar range. In this microtrap, {sup 172}Yb{sup +}-ions are trapped, cooled and shuttled over a distance of about 2 mm. Trapped ions are used as magnetic field gradient probes, with a relative magnetic field precision of {delta}B/B{sub 0}=7.10{sup -6}. The addressing of two ions with the MAGIC method in the solenoid's magnetic field gradient is demonstrated.

  9. Electron Traps at the Ice Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockstedte, Michel; Auburger, Philipp; Michl, Anja

    Water, water clusters and ice possess the fascinating ability to solvate electrons. On the surface of water cluster1 and thin crystalline ice structures on a metal substrate2 long-living solvated electron states were observed that evolve from pre-existing surface traps. The identification of such traps provides important insight into the electronic structure of the water or ice surface, and the dissociative interaction of electrons with adsorbates. Models2,3 based on the bilayer terminated Ih-(0001) surface related such traps to orientational defects or vacancies. So far, the understanding of the electronic structure of the ice surface with the electron traps is incomplete. Here we address this issue including also water ad-structures4 within hybrid density functional theory and many-body perturbation theory (G0W0). We identify a hierachy of traps with increasing vertical electron affinity, ranging from hexagon adrows to clusters of orientational defects and vacancies with dangling OH-groups. Siefermann and Abel, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 50, 5264 (2011). Bovensiepen et al., J. Chem. Phys. C 113, 979 (2013). Hermann et al., J. Phys.: cond. matter 20, 225003 (2008). Mehlhorn and Morgenstern, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 246101 (2007)

  10. Polaronic trapping in magnetic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raebiger, Hannes

    2012-02-01

    GaN doped with iron is an interesting candidate material for magnetic semiconductors, as p-d coupling between the localized Fe-d and extended N-p hole states is expected to facilitate long-range ferromagnetic alignment of the Fe spins [1]. This picture of extended states in GaN:Fe, however, falls apart due to a polaronic localization of the hole carriers nearby the Fe impurities. To elucidate the carrier localization in GaN:Fe and related iron doped III-V semiconductors, I present a systematic study using self-interaction corrected density-functional calculations [2]. These calculations predict three distinct scenarios. (i) Some systems do sustain extended host-like hole states, (ii) some exhibit polaronic trapping, (iii) and some exhibit carrier trapping at Fe-d orbitals. These behaviors are described in detail to give an insight as to how to distinguish them experimentally. I thank T. Fujita, C. Echeverria-Arrondo, and A. Ayuela for their collaboration.[4pt] [1] T. Dietl et al, Science, 287, 1019 (2000).[0pt] [2] S. Lany and A. Zunger, Phys. Rev. B, 80, 085202 (2009).

  11. Nematode-trapping fungi and fungus-associated bacteria interactions: the role of bacterial diketopiperazines and biofilms on Arthrobotrys oligospora surface in hyphal morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Yang, Min; Luo, Jun; Qu, Qing; Chen, Ying; Liang, Lianming; Zhang, Keqin

    2016-11-01

    In soil, nematode-trapping fungi and bacteria often share microhabitats and interact with each other, but effects of fungus-associated bacteria on its trap formation are underestimated. We have ascertained the presence of Stenotrophomonas and Rhizobium genera associated with A. oligospora GJ-1. After A. oligospora GJ-1 without associated bacteria (cured Arthrobotrys) was co-cultivated with Stenotrophomonas and its supernatant extract, microscopic study of hyphae from co-cultivation indicated that bacterial biofilm formation on hyphae was related to trap formation in fungi and Stenotrophomonas supernatant extract. Four diketopiperazines (DKPs) were purified from Stenotrophomonas supernatant extract that could not induce traps in the cured Arthrobotrys. When cured Arthrobotrys was cultured with Stenotrophomonas and one of DKPs, polar attachment, bacterial biofilms on hyphae and trap formation in fungi were observed. After cured Arthrobotrys with bacterial biofilms was consecutively transferred several times on nutrient poor medium, trap formation disappeared with the disappearance of bacterial biofilms on hyphae. DKPs could facilitate chemotaxis of Stenotrophomonas towards fungal extract which was suggested to contribute to bacterial biofilms on hyphae. Furthermore, when cured Arthrobotrys was cultured with Stenotrophomonas and DKPs in soil, trap formation in fungi and bacterial biofilms on hyphae were also observed, and the fungal activity against nematode was enhanced.

  12. Nanostructured optical nanofibres for atom trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Daly, Mark; Phelan, Ciarán; Deasy, Kieran; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    We propose an optical dipole trap for cold neutral atoms based on the electric field produced from the evanescent fields in a hollow rectangular slot cut through an optical nanofibre. In particular, we discuss the trap performance in relation to laser-cooled rubidium atoms and show that a far off-resonance, blue-detuned field combined with the attractive surface-atom interaction potential from the dielectric material forms a stable trapping configuration. With the addition of a red-detuned field, we demonstrate how three dimensional confinement of the atoms at a distance of 140 - 200 nm from the fibre surface within the slot can be accomplished. This scheme facilitates optical coupling between the atoms and the nanofibre that could be exploited for quantum communication schemes using ensembles of laser-cooled atoms.

  13. Nanostructured optical nanofibres for atom trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, M.; Truong, V. G.; Phelan, C. F.; Deasy, K.; Chormaic, S. Nic

    2014-05-01

    We propose an optical dipole trap for cold, neutral atoms based on the electric field produced from the evanescent fields in a hollow, rectangular slot cut through an optical nanofibre. In particular, we discuss the trap performance in relation to laser-cooled rubidium atoms and show that a far off-resonance, blue-detuned field combined with the attractive surface-atom interaction potential from the dielectric material forms a stable trapping configuration. With the addition of a red-detuned field, we demonstrate how three dimensional confinement of the atoms at a distance of 140-200 nm from the fibre surface within the slot can be accomplished. This scheme facilitates optical coupling between the atoms and the nanofibre that could be exploited for quantum communication schemes using ensembles of laser-cooled atoms.

  14. Spontaneous symmetry breaking of self-trapped and leaky modes in quasi-double-well potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Zegadlo, Krzysztof B; Trippenbach, Marek; Karpierz, Miroslaw A; Malomed, Boris A

    2016-01-01

    We investigate competition between two phase transitions of the second kind induced by the self-attractive nonlinearity, viz., self-trapping of the leaky modes, and spontaneous symmetry breaking (SSB) of both fully trapped and leaky states. We use a one-dimensional mean-field model, which combines the cubic nonlinearity and a double-well-potential (DWP) structure with an elevated floor, which supports leaky modes (quasi-bound states) in the linear limit. The setting can be implemented in nonlinear optics and BEC. The order in which the SSB and self-trapping transitions take place with the growth of the nonlinearity strength depends on the height of the central barrier of the DWP: the SSB happens first if the barrier is relatively high, while self-trapping comes first if the barrier is lower. The SSB of the leaky modes is characterized by specific asymmetry of their radiation tails, which, in addition, feature a resonant dependence on the relation between the total size of the system and radiation wavelength. ...

  15. Effect of vesicle traps on traffic jam formation in fast axonal transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, A V

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a model for simulation of the formation of organelle traps in fast axonal transport. Such traps may form in the regions of microtubule polar mismatching. Depending on the orientation of microtubules pointing toward the trap region, these traps can accumulate either plus-end or minus-end oriented vesicles. The model predicts that the maximum concentrations of organelles occur at the boundaries of the trap regions; the overall concentration of organelles in the axon with traps is greatly increased compared to that in a healthy axon, which is expected to contribute to mechanical damages of the axon. The organelle traps induce hindrance to organelle transport down the axon; the total organelle flux down the axon with traps is found to be significantly reduced compared to that in a healthy axon.

  16. Cryogenic resonator design for trapped ion experiments in Paul traps

    CERN Document Server

    Brandl, Matthias F; Monz, Thomas; Blatt, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Trapping ions in Paul traps requires high radio-frequency voltages, which are generated using resonators. When operating traps in a cryogenic environment, an in-vacuum resonator showing low loss is crucial to limit the thermal load to the cryostat. In this study, we present a guide for the design and production of compact, shielded cryogenic resonators. We produced and characterized three different types of resonators and furthermore demonstrate efficient impedance matching of these resonators at cryogenic temperatures.

  17. Efficacy of trap modifications for increasing capture rates of aquatic snakes in floating aquatic funnel traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Brian J.; Wylie, Glenn D.; Casazza, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing detection and capture probabilities of rare or elusive herpetofauna of conservation concern is important to inform the scientific basis for their management and recovery. The Giant Gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) is an example of a secretive, wary, and generally difficult-to-sample species about which little is known regarding its patterns of occurrence and demography. We therefore evaluated modifications to existing traps to increase the detection and capture probabilities of the Giant Gartersnake to improve the precision with which occurrence, abundance, survival, and other demographic parameters are estimated. We found that adding a one-way valve constructed of cable ties to the small funnel opening of traps and adding hardware cloth extensions to the wide end of funnels increased capture rates of the Giant Gartersnake by 5.55 times (95% credible interval = 2.45–10.51) relative to unmodified traps. The effectiveness of these modifications was insensitive to the aquatic habitat type in which they were deployed. The snout-vent length of the smallest and largest captured snakes did not vary among trap modifications. These trap modifications are expected to increase detection and capture probabilities of the Giant Gartersnake, and show promise for increasing the precision with which demographic parameters can be estimated for this species. We anticipate that the trap modifications found effective in this study will be applicable to a variety of aquatic and semi-aquatic reptiles and amphibians and improve conservation efforts for these species.

  18. Nonresonance adiabatic photon trap

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, S S; Burdakov, A V; Ushkova, M Yu

    2016-01-01

    Concept of high efficiency photon storage based on adiabatic confinement between concave mirrors is presented and experimentally investigated. The approach is insensitive to typical for Fabri-Perot cells requirements on quality of accumulated radiation, tolerance of resonator elements and their stability. Experiments have been carried out with the trap, which consists from opposed concave cylindrical mirrors and conjugated with them spherical mirrors. In result, high efficiency for accumulation of radiation with large angular spread and spectrum width has been confirmed. As radiation source a commercial fiber laser has been used.

  19. Atom trap trace analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O' Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-05-25

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications.

  20. Staphylococcus aureus - induced tumor necrosis factor - related apoptosis - inducing ligand expression mediates apoptosis and caspase-8 activation in infected osteoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bost Kenneth L

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus infection of normal osteoblasts induces expression of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL. Results Normal osteoblasts were incubated in the presence of purified bacterial products over a range of concentrations. Results demonstrate that purified surface structures and a selected superantigen present in the extracellular environment are not capable of inducing TRAIL expression by osteoblasts. Osteoblasts were co-cultured with S. aureus at various multiplicities of infection utilizing cell culture chamber inserts. Results of those experiments suggest that direct contact between bacteria and osteoblasts is necessary for optimal TRAIL induction. Finally, S. aureus infection of osteoblasts in the presence of anti-TRAIL antibody demonstrates that TRAIL mediates caspase-8 activation and apoptosis of infected cells. Conclusions Collectively, these findings suggest a mechanism whereby S. aureus mediates bone destruction via induction of osteoblast apoptosis.

  1. TRIGA-TRAP: A penning trap mass spectrometer at the research reactor TRIGA Mainz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smorra, Christian [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Blaum, Klaus [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Block, Michael; Herfurth, Frank [GSI, Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Eberhardt, Klaus [Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Eibach, Martin; Ketelaer, Jens; Ketter, Jochen; Knuth, Konstantin; Repp, Julia [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Nagy, Szilard [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Nuclear masses represent the binding energies and, therefore, the sum of all interactions in the nucleus. They provide an important input parameter to nuclear structure models. Presently, a tremendous interest in masses of very exotic neutron-rich nuclides exists to support theoretical models for the nucleosynthesis via the rapid neutron capture process. The research reactor TRIGA Mainz provides access to a large variety of neutron-rich nuclides produced by thermal-neutron induced fission of an actinide target. The double-Penning trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP will perform high-precision mass measurements in this region of the nuclear chart as well as on actinides from uranium to californium. It also serves as a test facility for the development of new techniques that will be implemented in future facilities like MATS at FAIR (GSI, Darmstadt). The layout of TRIGA-TRAP as well as recent mass measurements are presented.

  2. Is there a speed limit for trapped ion quantum computers?

    CERN Document Server

    Lau, Hoi-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    We investigate a speed limit for quantum processing for trapped ion quantum computers using the Kielpinski-Monroe-Wineland (KMW) architecture. The limiting speed for single-ion shuttling between a storage trap and a logic trap is constrained by the need to avoid excessive ion heating, excessive dephasing and decoherence due to the D.C. Stark effect. We estimate the relative significance of these errors and find that dephasing is dominant. We find that the minimum magnitude of dephasing is quadratic in the time of flight, and an inverse cubic in the operational time scale; from these relations, a limit on the operational speed of ion-trap quantum computers is deduced. Without subsequent phase correction, the maximum speed a qubit can be transferred across a 100 micron-long trap, without excessive error, in about 10 ns for calcium ion and 50 ps for beryllium ion.

  3. Roscovitine sensitizes leukemia and lymphoma cells to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinsky, Jan; Klanova, Magdalena; Koc, Michal; Beranova, Lenka; Andera, Ladislav; Ludvikova, Zdenka; Bohmova, Martina; Gasova, Zdenka; Strnad, Miroslav; Ivanek, Robert; Trneny, Marek; Necas, Emanuel; Zivny, Jan; Klener, Pavel

    2013-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a death ligand with selective antitumor activity. However, many primary tumors are TRAIL resistant. Previous studies reported that roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, sensitized various solid cancer cells to TRAIL. We show that roscovitine and TRAIL demonstrate synergistic cytotoxicity in hematologic malignant cell lines and primary cells. Pretreatment of TRAIL-resistant leukemia cells with roscovitine induced enhanced cleavage of death-inducing signaling complex-bound proximal caspases after exposure to TRAIL. We observed increased levels of both pro- and antiapoptotic BCL-2 proteins at the mitochondria following exposure to roscovitine. These results suggest that roscovitine induces priming of cancer cells for death by binding antiapoptotic BCL-2 proteins to proapoptotic BH3-only proteins at the mitochondria, thereby decreasing the threshold for diverse proapoptotic stimuli. We propose that the mitochondrial priming and enhanced processing of apical caspases represent major molecular mechanisms of roscovitine-induced sensitization to TRAIL in leukemia/lymphoma cells.

  4. Nanofriction in cold ion traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benassi, A; Vanossi, A; Tosatti, E

    2011-01-01

    Sliding friction between crystal lattices and the physics of cold ion traps are so far non-overlapping fields. Two sliding lattices may either stick and show static friction or slip with dynamic friction; cold ions are known to form static chains, helices or clusters, depending on the trapping conditions. Here we show, based on simulations, that much could be learnt about friction by sliding, through, for example, an electric field, the trapped ion chains over a corrugated potential. Unlike infinite chains, in which the theoretically predicted Aubry transition to free sliding may take place, trapped chains are always pinned. Yet, a properly defined static friction still vanishes Aubry-like at a symmetric-asymmetric structural transition, found for decreasing corrugation in both straight and zig-zag trapped chains. Dynamic friction is also accessible in ringdown oscillations of the ion trap. Long theorized static and dynamic one-dimensional friction phenomena could thus become accessible in future cold ion tribology.

  5. Effects of biased irradiation on charge trapping in HfO2 dielectric thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yifei; Zhao, Ce Zhou; Lu, Qifeng; Zhao, Chun; Qi, Yanfei; Lam, Sang; Mitrovic, Ivona Z.; Taylor, Stephen; Chalker, Paul R.

    2017-09-01

    This paper reports the low-dose-rate radiation response of Al-HfO2/SiO2-Si MOS devices, in which the gate dielectric was formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with 5-nm equivalent oxide thickness. The degradation of the devices was characterized by a pulse capacitance-voltage (CV) and on-site radiation response technique under continuous gamma (γ) ray exposure at a relatively low dose rate of 0.116 rad (HfO2)/s. Compared with conventional CV measurements, the proposed measurements extract significant variations of flat-band voltage shift of the hafnium based MOS devices. The large flat-band voltage shift is mainly attributed to the radiation-induced oxide trapped charges, which are not readily compensated by bias-induced charges produced over the measurement timescales (for timescales less than 5 ms). A negative flat-band voltage shift up to -1.02 V was observed under a positive biased irradiation with the total dose up to 40 krad (HfO2) and with the electric field of 0.5 MV/cm. This is attributed to net positive charge generation in the HfO2 oxide layer. The generated charges are transported towards the HfO2/SiO2 interface, and then form effective trapped holes in the HfO2. Similarly, a positive flat-band voltage shift up to 1.1 V was observed from irradiation under negative bias with an electric field of -0.5 MV/cm. The positive shift is mainly due to the accumulation of trapped electrons. Analyses of the experimental results suggest that both hole and electron trapping can dominate the radiation response performance of the HfO2-based MOS devices depending upon the applied bias. It was also found there was no distinct border traps with irradiation in all cases.

  6. An ultracold, optically trapped mixture of {87}Rb and metastable {4}He atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Flores, Adonis Silva; Vassen, Wim; Knoop, Steven

    2016-01-01

    We report on the realization of an ultracold (<25~muK) mixture of rubidium ({87}Rb) and metastable triplet helium ({4}He) in an optical dipole trap. Our scheme involves laser cooling in a dual-species magneto-optical trap, simultaneous MW- and RF-induced forced evaporative cooling in a quadrupole magnetic trap, and transfer to a single-beam optical dipole trap. We observe long trapping lifetimes for the doubly spin-stretched spin-state mixture and measure much shorter lifetimes for other spin-state combinations. We discuss prospects for realizing quantum degenerate mixtures of alkali-metal and metastable helium atoms.

  7. Resonant quantum transitions in trapped antihydrogen atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Donnan, P H; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Shields, C R; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-03-07

    The hydrogen atom is one of the most important and influential model systems in modern physics. Attempts to understand its spectrum are inextricably linked to the early history and development of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom's stature lies in its simplicity and in the accuracy with which its spectrum can be measured and compared to theory. Today its spectrum remains a valuable tool for determining the values of fundamental constants and for challenging the limits of modern physics, including the validity of quantum electrodynamics and--by comparison with measurements on its antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen--the validity of CPT (charge conjugation, parity and time reversal) symmetry. Here we report spectroscopy of a pure antimatter atom, demonstrating resonant quantum transitions in antihydrogen. We have manipulated the internal spin state of antihydrogen atoms so as to induce magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine levels of the positronic ground state. We used resonant microwave radiation to flip the spin of the positron in antihydrogen atoms that were magnetically trapped in the ALPHA apparatus. The spin flip causes trapped anti-atoms to be ejected from the trap. We look for evidence of resonant interaction by comparing the survival rate of trapped atoms irradiated with microwaves on-resonance to that of atoms subjected to microwaves that are off-resonance. In one variant of the experiment, we detect 23 atoms that survive in 110 trapping attempts with microwaves off-resonance (0.21 per attempt), and only two atoms that survive in 103 attempts with microwaves on-resonance (0.02 per attempt). We also describe the direct detection of the annihilation of antihydrogen atoms ejected by the microwaves.

  8. Retrospective accident dosimetry using trapped charges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. I.; Kim, J. L.; Chang, I.; Kim, B. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Dicentric chromosome aberrations technique scoring of aberrations in metaphases prepared from human lymphocytes is most commonly used. This is considered as a reliable technique because the sample is extracted from the individual human body itself. There are other techniques in biological dosimetry such as Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) using translocations, premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and micronucleus assay. However the minimum detectable doses (MDD) are relatively high and sample preparation time is also relatively longer. Therefore, there is limitation in use of these techniques for the purpose of triage in a short time in case of emergency situation relating large number of persons. Electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique is based on the signal from unpaired electrons such as free radicals in irradiated materials especially tooth enamel, however it has also limitation for the purpose of triage because of difficulty of sample taking and its high MDD. Recently as physical methods, thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique have been attracted due to its lower MDD and simplicity of sample preparation. Density of the trapped charges is generally proportional to the radiation dose absorbed and the intensity of emitting light is also proportional to the density of trapped charges, thus it can be applied to measure radiation dose retrospectively. In this presentation, TL and OSL techniques are going to introduced and discussed as physical methods for retrospective accident dosimetry using trapped charges especially in electronic component materials. As a tool for dose reconstruction for emergency situation, thermoluminescece and optically stimulated luminescence techniques which are based on trapped charges during exposure of material are introduced. These techniques have several advantages such as high sensitivity, fast evaluation and ease to sample collection over common biological dosimetry and EPR

  9. Electron traps in semiconducting polymers: exponential versus Gaussian trap distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolai, H.T.; Mandoc, M.M.; Blom, P.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    The low electron currents in poly(dialkoxy-p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) derivatives and their steep voltage dependence are generally explained by trap-limited conduction in the presence of an exponential trap distribution. Here we demonstrate that the electron transport of several PPV derivatives can

  10. Electron traps in semiconducting polymers : Exponential versus Gaussian trap distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolai, H. T.; Mandoc, M. M.; Blom, P. W. M.

    2011-01-01

    The low electron currents in poly(dialkoxy-p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) derivatives and their steep voltage dependence are generally explained by trap-limited conduction in the presence of an exponential trap distribution. Here we demonstrate that the electron transport of several PPV derivatives can

  11. Resonance methods in quadrupole ion traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Dalton T.; Peng, Wen-Ping; Cooks, R. Graham

    2017-01-01

    The quadrupole ion trap is widely used in the chemical physics community for making measurements on dynamical systems, both intramolecular (e.g. ion fragmentation reactions) and intermolecular (e.g. ion/molecule reactions). In this review, we discuss linear and nonlinear resonances in quadrupole ion traps, an understanding of which is critical for operation of these devices and interpretation of the data which they provide. The effect of quadrupole field nonlinearity is addressed, with important implications for promoting fragmentation and achieving unique methods of mass scanning. Methods that depend on ion resonances (i.e. matching an external perturbation with an ion's induced frequency of motion) are discussed, including ion isolation, ion activation, and ion ejection.

  12. The Honey Trap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Michael

    Michael F. Wagner: The Honey Trap –The democratization of leisure through automobilism The automobile has achieved a central position in modern everyday life as an essential artefact to mobility. This raises the question how automobiles have been mediated for mass consumption? The central thesis...... in the article is that the culture of Danish automobilism was constructed around and appropriated through leisure activities conducted primarily by the automobile consumer’s organisation Touring Club de Danemark (FDM). The general purpose for the consumer organisation has been to create a cultural identity...... and a material reality of democratic participation linking ‘Car and Leisure’, a term that has been a central motto for the organization during many decades. The keyword in this activity was ‘Free’ celebrating the manner in which the privately owned automobile secured a maximum of freedom to the owner. The paper...

  13. CD-REST: a system for extracting chemical-induced disease relation in literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Wu, Yonghui; Zhang, Yaoyun; Wang, Jingqi; Lee, Hee-Jin; Xu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Mining chemical-induced disease relations embedded in the vast biomedical literature could facilitate a wide range of computational biomedical applications, such as pharmacovigilance. The BioCreative V organized a Chemical Disease Relation (CDR) Track regarding chemical-induced disease relation extraction from biomedical literature in 2015. We participated in all subtasks of this challenge. In this article, we present our participation system Chemical Disease Relation Extraction SysTem (CD-REST), an end-to-end system for extracting chemical-induced disease relations in biomedical literature. CD-REST consists of two main components: (1) a chemical and disease named entity recognition and normalization module, which employs the Conditional Random Fields algorithm for entity recognition and a Vector Space Model-based approach for normalization; and (2) a relation extraction module that classifies both sentence-level and document-level candidate drug–disease pairs by support vector machines. Our system achieved the best performance on the chemical-induced disease relation extraction subtask in the BioCreative V CDR Track, demonstrating the effectiveness of our proposed machine learning-based approaches for automatic extraction of chemical-induced disease relations in biomedical literature. The CD-REST system provides web services using HTTP POST request. The web services can be accessed from http://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr. The online CD-REST demonstration system is available at http://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr/cdr.html. Database URL: http://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr; http://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr/cdr.html PMID:27016700

  14. Fragmentation energy index for universalization of fragmentation energy in ion trap mass spectrometers for the analysis of chemical weapon convention related chemicals by atmospheric pressure ionization-tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palit, Meehir; Mallard, Gary

    2009-04-01

    The use of mass spectra generated at 70 eV in electron ionization (EI) as a universal standard for EI has helped in the generation of searchable library databases and had a profound influence on the analytical applications of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), similarly for liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), suggesting a novel method to normalize the collisional energy for the universalization of fragmentation energy for the analysis of Chemical Weapon Convention (CWC)-related chemicals by atmospheric pressure ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (API-MS(n)) using three-dimensional (3D) ion trap instruments. For normalizing fragmentation energy a "fragmentation energy index" (FEI) is proposed which is an arbitrary scale based on the fact of specific MS/MS fragmentation obtained at different collisional energies for the reference chemicals which are not CWC scheduled compounds. FEI 6 for the generation of an MS(n) library-searchable mass spectral database is recommended.

  15. Use of a hand-portable gas chromatograph-toroidal ion trap mass spectrometer for self-chemical ionization identification of degradation products related to O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methyl phosphonothiolate (VX).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Philip A; Lepage, Carmela R Jackson; Savage, Paul B; Bowerbank, Christopher R; Lee, Edgar D; Lukacs, Michael J

    2011-04-01

    The chemical warfare agent O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methyl phosphonothiolate (VX) and many related degradation products produce poorly diagnostic electron ionization (EI) mass spectra by transmission quadrupole mass spectrometry. Thus, chemical ionization (CI) is often used for these analytes. In this work, pseudomolecular ([M+H](+)) ion formation from self-chemical ionization (self-CI) was examined for four VX degradation products containing the diisopropylamine functional group. A person-portable toroidal ion trap mass spectrometer with a gas chromatographic inlet was used with EI, and both fixed-duration and feedback-controlled ionization time. With feedback-controlled ionization, ion cooling (reaction) times and ion formation target values were varied. Evidence for protonation of analytes was observed under all conditions, except for the largest analyte, bis(diisopropylaminoethyl)disulfide which yielded [M+H](+) ions only with increased fixed ionization or ion cooling times. Analysis of triethylamine-d(15) provided evidence that [M+H](+) production was likely due to self-CI. Analysis of a degraded VX sample where lengthened ion storage and feedback-controlled ionization time were used resulted in detection of [M+H](+) ions for VX and several relevant degradation products. Dimer ions were also observed for two phosphonate compounds detected in this sample.

  16. Ion traps in nuclear physics-Recent results and achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eronen, Tommi; Kankainen, Anu; Äystö, Juha

    2016-11-01

    Ion traps offer a way to determine nuclear binding energies through atomic mass measurements with a high accuracy and they are routinely used to provide isotopically or even isomerically pure beams of short-living ions for post-trap decay spectroscopy experiments. In this review, different ion-trapping techniques and progresses in recent nuclear physics experiments employing low-energy ion traps are discussed. The main focus in this review is on the benefit of recent high accuracy mass measurements to solve some key problems in physics related to nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics as well as neutrinos. Also, several cases of decay spectroscopy experiments utilizing trap-purified ion samples are summarized.

  17. Voltage-controlled domain wall traps in ferromagnetic nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Uwe; Emori, Satoru; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2013-06-01

    Electrical control of magnetism has the potential to bring about revolutionary new spintronic devices, many of which rely on efficient manipulation of magnetic domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires. Recently, it has been shown that voltage-induced charge accumulation at a metal-oxide interface can influence domain wall motion in ultrathin metallic ferromagnets, but the effects have been relatively modest and limited to the slow, thermally activated regime. Here we show that a voltage can generate non-volatile switching of magnetic properties at the nanoscale by modulating interfacial chemistry rather than charge density. Using a solid-state ionic conductor as a gate dielectric, we generate unprecedentedly strong voltage-controlled domain wall traps that function as non-volatile, electrically programmable and switchable pinning sites. Pinning strengths of at least 650 Oe can be readily achieved, enough to bring to a standstill domain walls travelling at speeds of at least ~20 m s-1. We exploit this new magneto-ionic effect to demonstrate a prototype non-volatile memory device in which voltage-controlled domain wall traps facilitate electrical bit selection in a magnetic nanowire register.

  18. Light Trapping, Absorption and Solar Energy Harvesting by Artificial Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, Sajeev [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-06-04

    We have studied light trapping in conical pore silicon photonic crystal architectures. We find considerable improvement in solar absorption (relative to nanowires) in a square lattice of conical nano-pores.

  19. Quantum computing with trapped ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  20. The ALPHA antihydrogen trapping apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amole, C.; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Butler, E.; Capra, A.; Carpenter, P. T.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Escallier, J.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hurt, J. L.; Hydomako, R.; Isaac, C. A.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jonsell, S.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kerrigan, S. J.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Marone, A.; McKenna, J. T. K.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Parker, B.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Seddon, D.; Seif El Nasr, S.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; Thornhill, J.; Wells, D.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The ALPHA collaboration, based at CERN, has recently succeeded in confining cold antihydrogen atoms in a magnetic minimum neutral atom trap and has performed the first study of a resonant transition of the anti-atoms. The ALPHA apparatus will be described herein, with emphasis on the structural aspects, diagnostic methods and techniques that have enabled antihydrogen trapping and experimentation to be achieved.

  1. Cryogenic silicon surface ion trap

    CERN Document Server

    Niedermayr, Michael; Kumph, Muir; Partel, Stefan; Edlinger, Johannes; Brownnutt, Michael; Blatt, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Trapped ions are pre-eminent candidates for building quantum information processors and quantum simulators. They have been used to demonstrate quantum gates and algorithms, quantum error correction, and basic quantum simulations. However, to realise the full potential of such systems and make scalable trapped-ion quantum computing a reality, there exist a number of practical problems which must be solved. These include tackling the observed high ion-heating rates and creating scalable trap structures which can be simply and reliably produced. Here, we report on cryogenically operated silicon ion traps which can be rapidly and easily fabricated using standard semiconductor technologies. Single $^{40}$Ca$^+$ ions have been trapped and used to characterize the trap operation. Long ion lifetimes were observed with the traps exhibiting heating rates as low as $\\dot{\\bar{n}}=$ 0.33 phonons/s at an ion-electrode distance of 230 $\\mu$m. These results open many new avenues to arrays of micro-fabricated ion traps.

  2. Accretion discs trapped near corotation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Angelo, C.R.; Spruit, H.C.

    2012-01-01

    We show that discs accreting on to the magnetosphere of a rotating star can end up in a trapped state, in which the inner edge of the disc stays near the corotation radius, even at low and varying accretion rates. The accretion in these trapped states can be steady or cyclic; we explore these states

  3. The ALPHA antihydrogen trapping apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amole, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto ON Canada, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Andresen, G.B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Ashkezari, M.D. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC Canada, V5A 1S6 (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Bertsche, W. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Bowe, P.D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Butler, E. [Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Capra, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto ON Canada, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Carpenter, P.T. [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5311 (United States); Cesar, C.L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972 (Brazil); Chapman, S. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Escallier, J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Fajans, J. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Friesen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary AB, Canada, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Fujiwara, M.C.; Gill, D.R. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver BC, Canada V6T 2A3 (Canada); Gutierrez, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada V6T 1Z4 (Canada); and others

    2014-01-21

    The ALPHA collaboration, based at CERN, has recently succeeded in confining cold antihydrogen atoms in a magnetic minimum neutral atom trap and has performed the first study of a resonant transition of the anti-atoms. The ALPHA apparatus will be described herein, with emphasis on the structural aspects, diagnostic methods and techniques that have enabled antihydrogen trapping and experimentation to be achieved.

  4. Gold nanoparticle trapping and delivery for therapeutic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz MS

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available MS Aziz1, Nathaporn Suwanpayak3,4, Muhammad Arif Jalil2, R Jomtarak4, T Saktioto2, Jalil Ali1, PP Yupapin41Institute of Advanced Photonics Science, 2Ibnu Sina Institute of Fundamental Science Studies, Nanotechnology Research Alliance, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru, Malaysia; 3King Mongkut's Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Chump on Campus, Chumphon, 4Nanoscale Science and Engineering Research Alliance (N'SERA, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut's Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Bangkok, ThailandAbstract: A new optical trapping design to transport gold nanoparticles using a PANDA ring resonator system is proposed. Intense optical fields in the form of dark solitons controlled by Gaussian pulses are used to trap and transport nanoscopic volumes of matter to the desired destination via an optical waveguide. Theoretically, the gradient and scattering forces are responsible for this trapping phenomenon, where in practice such systems can be fabricated and a thin-film device formed on the specific artificial medical materials, for instance, an artificial bone. The dynamic behavior of the tweezers can be tuned by controlling the optical pulse input power and parameters of the ring resonator system. Different trap sizes can be generated to trap different gold nanoparticles sizes, which is useful for gold nanoparticle therapy. In this paper, we have shown the utility of gold nanoparticle trapping and delivery for therapy, which may be useful for cosmetic therapy and related applications.Keywords: gold nanoparticle trapping, particle trapping, therapy, transport

  5. Kinetics and mechanism of Dionaea muscipula trap closing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Alexander G; Adesina, Tejumade; Markin, Vladislav S; Jovanov, Emil

    2008-02-01

    The Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) possesses an active trapping mechanism to capture insects with one of the most rapid movements in the plant kingdom, as described by Darwin. This article presents a detailed experimental investigation of trap closure by mechanical and electrical stimuli and the mechanism of this process. Trap closure consists of three distinctive phases: a silent phase with no observable movement; an accelerated movement of the lobes; and the relaxation of the lobes in their closed state, resulting in a new equilibrium. Uncouplers and blockers of membrane channels were used to investigate the mechanisms of different phases of closing. Uncouplers increased trap closure delay and significantly decreased the speed of trap closure. Ion channel blockers and aquaporin inhibitors increased time of closing. Transmission of a single electrical charge between a lobe and the midrib causes closure of the trap and induces an electrical signal propagating between both lobes and midrib. The Venus flytrap can accumulate small subthreshold charges, and when the threshold value is reached, the trap closes. Repeated application of smaller charges demonstrates the summation of stimuli. The cumulative character of electrical stimuli points to the existence of electrical memory in the Venus flytrap. The observed fast movement can be explained by the hydroelastic curvature model without invoking buckling instability. The new hydroelastic curvature mechanism provides an accurate description of the authors' experimental data.

  6. Water drinking-related muscle contraction induces the pressor response via mechanoreceptors in conscious rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Chikara; Iwata, Chihiro; Morita, Hironobu

    2013-01-01

    Water drinking is known to induce the pressor response. The efferent pathway in this response involves sympathoexcitation, because the pressor response was completely abolished by ganglionic blockade or an α(1)-adrenergic antagonist. However, the afferent pathway in this response has not been identified. In the present study, we hypothesized that water itself stimulates the upper digestive tract to induce the pressor response, and/or drinking-related muscle contraction induces the pressor response via mechanoreceptors. To examine this hypothesis, we evaluated the pressor response induced by spontaneous or passive water drinking in conscious rats. Since the baroreflex modulates and obscures the pressor response, the experiments were conducted using rats with sinoaortic denervation. The pressor response was not suppressed by 1) transient oral surface anesthesia using lidocaine, 2) bilateral denervation of the glossopharyngeal nerve and sensory branch of the superior laryngeal nerve, or 3) denervation of the tunica adventitia in the esophagus. However, the pressor response was significantly suppressed (by -52%) by intravenous gadolinium chloride administration. Electrical stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve induced the pressor response, which was significantly suppressed (by -57%) by intravenous gadolinium chloride administration and completely abolished by severing the distal end of this nerve. These results indicate that afferent signals from mechanoreceptors in drinking-related muscles are involved in the water drinking-induced pressor response.

  7. BRD4 regulates fructose-inducible lipid accumulation-related genes in the mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Aki; Honma, Kazue; Mochizuki, Kazuki; Goda, Toshinao

    2016-10-01

    Fructose intake induces hepatic steatosis by activating fat synthesis. In this study, we searched for genes that showed acute induction in the livers of mice force-fed with fructose, and examined how this induction is regulated. We identified genes induced at 6h after the fructose force-feeding using a microarray and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Histone acetylation and an acetylated histone binding protein bromodomain containing (BRD)4 binding around the fructose-inducible genes were examined using a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. We examined whether (+)-JQ1, an inhibitor of the binding between the BRD4 and acetylated histones, inhibited the expressions of fructose-inducible genes, histone acetylation and BRD4 binding around the genes. We identified upregulated genes related to lipid accumulation, such as Cyp8b1, Dak and Plin5, in mice force-fed with fructose compared with those force-fed with glucose. Acetylation of histones H3 and H4, and BRD4 binding around the transcribed region of those fructose-inducible genes, were enhanced by fructose force-feeding. Meanwhile, (+)-JQ1 treatment reduced expressions of fructose-inducible genes, histone acetylation and BRD4 binding around these genes. Acute induction of genes related to lipid accumulation in the livers of mice force-fed with fructose is associated with the induction of histone acetylation and BRD4 binding around these genes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Secreted Frizzled-Related Protein 2 and Inflammation-Induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoxi; Kny, Melanie; Schmidt, Franziska; Hahn, Alexander; Wollersheim, Tobias; Kleber, Christian; Weber-Carstens, Steffen; Fielitz, Jens

    2017-02-01

    In sepsis, the disease course of critically ill patients is often complicated by muscle failure leading to ICU-acquired weakness. The myokine transforming growth factor-β1 increases during inflammation and mediates muscle atrophy in vivo. We observed that the transforming growth factor-β1 inhibitor, secreted frizzled-related protein 2, was down-regulated in skeletal muscle of ICU-acquired weakness patients. We hypothesized that secreted frizzled-related protein 2 reduction enhances transforming growth factor-β1-mediated effects and investigated the interrelationship between transforming growth factor-β1 and secreted frizzled-related protein 2 in inflammation-induced atrophy. Observational study and prospective animal trial. Two ICUs and research laboratory. Twenty-six critically ill patients with Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores greater than or equal to 8 underwent a skeletal muscle biopsy from the vastus lateralis at median day 5 in ICU. Four patients undergoing elective orthopedic surgery served as controls. To search for signaling pathways enriched in muscle of ICU-acquired weakness patients, a gene set enrichment analysis of our recently published gene expression profiles was performed. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry were used to analyze secreted frizzled-related protein 2 expression and protein content. A mouse model of inflammation-induced skeletal muscle atrophy due to polymicrobial sepsis and cultured myocytes were used for mechanistic analyses. None. Gene set enrichment analysis uncovered transforming growth factor-β1 signaling activation in vastus lateralis from ICU-acquired weakness patients. Muscular secreted frizzled-related protein 2 expression was reduced after 5 days in ICU. Likewise, muscular secreted frizzled-related protein 2 expression was decreased early and continuously in mice with inflammation-induced atrophy. In muscle, secreted frizzled-related protein 2

  9. Trapped charge-driven degradation of perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Namyoung; Kwak, Kwisung; Jang, Min Seok; Yoon, Heetae; Lee, Byung Yang; Lee, Jong-Kwon; Pikhitsa, Peter V.; Byun, Junseop; Choi, Mansoo

    2016-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells have shown unprecedent performance increase up to 22% efficiency. However, their photovoltaic performance has shown fast deterioration under light illumination in the presence of humid air even with encapulation. The stability of perovskite materials has been unsolved and its mechanism has been elusive. Here we uncover a mechanism for irreversible degradation of perovskite materials in which trapped charges, regardless of the polarity, play a decisive role. An experimental setup using different polarity ions revealed that the moisture-induced irreversible dissociation of perovskite materials is triggered by charges trapped along grain boundaries. We also identified the synergetic effect of oxygen on the process of moisture-induced degradation. The deprotonation of organic cations by trapped charge-induced local electric field would be attributed to the initiation of irreversible decomposition. PMID:27830709

  10. Trapped charge-driven degradation of perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Namyoung; Kwak, Kwisung; Jang, Min Seok; Yoon, Heetae; Lee, Byung Yang; Lee, Jong-Kwon; Pikhitsa, Peter V.; Byun, Junseop; Choi, Mansoo

    2016-11-01

    Perovskite solar cells have shown unprecedent performance increase up to 22% efficiency. However, their photovoltaic performance has shown fast deterioration under light illumination in the presence of humid air even with encapulation. The stability of perovskite materials has been unsolved and its mechanism has been elusive. Here we uncover a mechanism for irreversible degradation of perovskite materials in which trapped charges, regardless of the polarity, play a decisive role. An experimental setup using different polarity ions revealed that the moisture-induced irreversible dissociation of perovskite materials is triggered by charges trapped along grain boundaries. We also identified the synergetic effect of oxygen on the process of moisture-induced degradation. The deprotonation of organic cations by trapped charge-induced local electric field would be attributed to the initiation of irreversible decomposition.

  11. Quantum entanglement in a two-dimensional ion trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王成志; 方卯发

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the quantum entanglement in a two-dimensional ion trap system. We discuss the quantum entanglement between the ion and phonons by using reduced entropy, and that between two degrees of freedom of the vibrational motion along x and y directions by using quantum relative entropy. We discuss also the influence of initial state of the system on the quantum entanglement and the relation between two entanglements in the trapped ion system.

  12. Quantum entanglement in a two—dimensional ion trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王成志; 方卯发

    2003-01-01

    In this paper,we investigate the quantum entanglement in a two-dimensional ion trap system.we discuss the quantum entanglement between the ion and phonons by using reduced entropy,and that between two degrees of freedom of the vibrational motion along x and y directions by using quantum relative entropy.We discuss also the influence of initial state of the system on the quantum entanglement and the relation between two entanglements in the trapped ion system.

  13. Separation and analysis of phenolic acids from Salvia miltiorrhiza and its related preparations by off-line two-dimensional hydrophilic interaction chromatography×reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled with ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wanyang; Tong, Ling; Miao, Jingzhuo; Huang, Jingyi; Li, Dongxiang; Li, Yunfei; Xiao, Hongting; Sun, Henry; Bi, Kaishun

    2016-01-29

    Salvia miltiorrhiza (SM) is one of the most widely used Traditional Chinese Medicine. Active constituents of SM mainly contain hydrophilic phenolic acids (PAs) and lipophilic tanshinones. However, due to the existing of multiple ester bonds and unsaturated bonds in the structures, PAs have numerous chemical conversion products. Many of them are so low-abundant that hard to be separated using conventional methods. In this study, an off-line two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D-LC) method was developed to separate PAs in SM and its related preparations. In the first dimension, samples were fractionated by hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) (Acchrom×Amide, 4.6×250mm, 5μm) mainly based on the hydrogen bonding effects. The fractions were then separated on reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RP-LC) (Acquity HSS T3, 2.1×50mm, 1.7μm) according to hydrophobicity. For the selective identification of PAs, diode array detector (DAD) and electrospray ionization tandem ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-IT-TOF-MS) were employed. Practical and effective peak capacities of all the samples were greater than 2046 and 1130, respectively, with the orthogonalities ranged from 69.7% to 92.8%, which indicated the high efficiency and versatility of this method. By utilizing the data post-processing techniques, including mass defect filter, neutral loss filter and product ion filter, a total of 265 compounds comprising 196 potentially new PAs were tentatively characterized. Twelve kinds of derivatives, mainly including glycosylated compounds, O-alkylated compounds, condensed compounds and hydrolyzed compounds, constituted the novelty of the newly identified PAs. The HILIC×RP-LC/TOF-MS system expanded our understanding on PAs of S. miltiorrhiza and its related preparations, which could also benefit the separation and characterization of polar constituents in complicated herbal extracts.

  14. Optical trapping by Laguerre-Gaussian beams: Symmetries, stability and equilibria

    CERN Document Server

    Kiselev, Alexei D

    2016-01-01

    We use the T-matrix formalism in combination with the method of far-field matching to evaluate the optical force exerted by Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) light beams on a spherical (Mie) particle. For both non-vortex and optical vortex LG beams, the theoretical results are used to analyze the optical-force-induced dynamics of the scatterer near the trapping points represented by the equilibrium (zero-force) positions. The regimes of linearized dynamics are described in terms of the stiffness matrix spectrum and the damping constant of the ambient medium. For the purely azimuthal LG beams, the dynamics is found to be locally non-conservative and is characterized by the presence of conditionally stable equilibria (unstable zero-force points that can be stabilized by the ambient damping). The effects related to the Mie resonances that under certain conditions manifest themselves as the points changing the trapping properties of the particles are discussed.

  15. Developing Density of Laser-Cooled Neutral Atoms and Molecules in a Linear Magnetic Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, Joe, III; Walstrom, Peter; di Rosa, Michael

    2013-05-01

    In this poster we show that neutral particle injection and accumulation using laser-induced spin flips may be used to form dense ensembles of ultracold magnetic particles, i.e., laser-cooled paramagnetic atoms and molecules. Particles are injected in a field-seeking state, are switched by optical pumping to a field-repelled state, and are stored in the minimum-B trap. The analogous process in high-energy charged-particle accumulator rings is charge-exchange injection using stripper foils. The trap is a linear array of sextupoles capped by solenoids. Particle-tracking calculations and design of our linear accumulator along with related experiments involving 7Li will be presented. We test these concepts first with atoms in preparation for later work with selected molecules. Finally, we present our preliminary results with CaH, our candidate molecule for laser cooling. This project is funded by the LDRD program of Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  16. Rotational state detection of electrically trapped polyatomic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Glöckner, Rosa; Rempe, Gerhard; Zeppenfeld, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Detecting the internal state of polar molecules is a substantial challenge when standard techniques such as resonance-enhanced multi photon ionization (REMPI) or laser-induced fluorescense (LIF) do not work. As this is the case for most polyatomic molecule species, we here investigate an alternative based on state selective removal of molecules from an electrically trapped ensemble. Specifically, we deplete molecules by driving rotational and/or vibrational transitions to untrapped states. Fully resolving the rotational state with this method can be a considerable challenge as the frequency differences between various transitions is easily substantially less than the Stark broadening in an electric trap. However, making use of a unique trap design providing homogeneous fields in a large fraction of the trap volume, we successfully discriminate all rotational quantum numbers, including the rotational M-substate.

  17. Micromanipulation of sperm by a laser generated optical trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadir, Y.; Wright, W.H.; Vafa, O.; Ord, T.; Asch, R.H.; Berns, M.W. (Univ. of California, Irvine (USA))

    1989-11-01

    The force generated by the radiation pressure of a low power laser beam induces an optical trap which may be used to manipulate sperm. We studied the effect of the optical trap on sperm motility. A Nd:YAG laser beam was coupled to a conventional microscope and focused into the viewing plane by the objective lens. Sperm were caught in the trap and manipulated by a joy stick controlled motorized stage. After different exposure periods, the velocity and patterns were analysed by a computerized image processor. There were minor changes in sperm velocity when exposed to the trap for 30 seconds or less. A gradual decrease in the mean linear velocity was observed after 45 seconds of exposure. This optical micromanipulator may also be useful for studying the force generated by a single spermatozoa and evaluating the influence of drugs on motility.

  18. Single Microwave Photon Detection with a Trapped Electron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April Cridland

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate theoretically the use of an electron in a Penning trap as a detector of single microwave photons. At the University of Sussex we are developing a chip Penning trap technology, designed to be integrated within quantum circuits. Microwave photons are guided into the trap and interact with the electron’s quantum cyclotron motion. This is an electric dipole transition, where the near field of the microwave radiation induces quantum jumps of the cyclotron harmonic oscillator. The quantum jumps can be monitored using the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect, providing the quantum non demolition signal of the microwave quanta. We calculate the quantum efficiency of photon detection and discuss the main features and technical challenges for the trapped electron as a quantum microwave sensor.

  19. Bacteria can mobilize nematode-trapping fungi to kill nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Li, Guo-Hong; Zou, Cheng-Gang; Ji, Xing-Lai; Liu, Tong; Zhao, Pei-Ji; Liang, Lian-Ming; Xu, Jian-Ping; An, Zhi-Qiang; Zheng, Xi; Qin, Yue-Ke; Tian, Meng-Qing; Xu, You-Yao; Ma, Yi-Cheng; Yu, Ze-Fen; Huang, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Shu-Qun; Niu, Xue-Mei; Yang, Jin-Kui; Huang, Ying; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2014-12-16

    In their natural habitat, bacteria are consumed by bacterivorous nematodes; however, they are not simply passive preys. Here we report a defensive mechanism used by certain bacteria to mobilize nematode-trapping fungi to kill nematodes. These bacteria release urea, which triggers a lifestyle switch in the fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora from saprophytic to nematode-predatory form; this predacious form is characterized by formation of specialized cellular structures or 'traps'. The bacteria significantly promote the elimination of nematodes by A. oligospora. Disruption of genes involved in urea transport and metabolism in A. oligospora abolishes the urea-induced trap formation. Furthermore, the urea metabolite ammonia functions as a signal molecule in the fungus to initiate the lifestyle switch to form trap structures. Our findings highlight the importance of multiple predator-prey interactions in prey defense mechanisms.

  20. Radiation-induced apoptosis in relation to acute impairment of rat salivary gland function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paardekooper, GMRM; Cammelli, S; Zeilstra, LJW; Coppes, RP; Konings, AWT

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To find an answer to the question: Are the acute radiation effects on salivary gland function, as seen in earlier studies, causally related to radiation-induced apoptosis? Materials and methods: Rat parotid and submandibular glands were X-irradiated with doses up to 25 Gy and morphological

  1. Induced Cognitive Dissonance as a Means of Effecting Changes in School-Related Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Robert L.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a study designed to effect a change in school-related attitudes (towards science and school lunch) using cognitive dissonance theory. Results support the idea that inducing students to engage in behavior considered desirable by others but not necessarily by the students themselves might change the attitude in question. (CS)

  2. Dissociated vertical deviation and eye torsion: Relation to disparity-induced vertical vergence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. van Rijn; H.J. Simonsz (Huib); M.P.M. ten Tusscher

    1997-01-01

    textabstractWe studied the relation between vertical eye movements and binocular torsion in five subjects with dissociated vertical deviation (DVD). During trials, subject viewed a well illuminated Snellen letter chart, with both eyes uncovered during 4 seconds. Subsequently, DVD was induced by

  3. Sexual dysfunction in nonseminoma testicular cancer patients is related to chemotherapy-induced angiopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanBasten, JPA; Hoekstra, HJ; vanDriel, MF; Droste, JHJ; JankerPool, G; vandeWiel, HBM; Sleijfer, DT; Schraffordt Koops, H.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To establish the prevalence of sexual dysfunctions after different treatment modalities for non-seminomatous testicular germ cell tumor (NSTGCT) and to investigate whether treatment-induced angiopathy and neuropathy is related to sexual dysfunction. Patient and Methods: A questionnaire asse

  4. Relative workload determines exercise-induced increases in PGC-1alpha mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup; Lundby, Carsten; Leick, Lotte;

    2010-01-01

    trial. No change in HIF1alpha, PFK, CS, LDH-A or LDH-B mRNA expression was detected after any of the exercise trials. CONCLUSION:: The relative intensity of brief intermittent exercise is of major importance for the exercise induced increase of several mRNA's, including PGC-1alpha....

  5. Influence of trap placement and design on capture of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francese, Joseph A; Oliver, Jason B; Fraser, Ivich; Lance, David R; Youssef, Nadeer; Sawyer, Alan J; Mastro, Victor C

    2008-12-01

    The key to an effective pest management program for the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera Buprestidae), is a survey program equipped with tools for detecting and delimiting populations. We studied the effects of trap design, color, and placement on the efficacy of sticky traps for capturing the emerald ash borer. There were significant differences in trap catch along a transect gradient from wooded to open field conditions, with most beetles being caught along the edge, or in open fields, 15-25 m outside an ash (Fraxinus spp. L.) (Oleaceae) woodlot. Greater emerald ash borer catch occurred on purple traps than on red or white traps. Traps placed in the mid-canopy of ash trees (13 m) caught significantly more beetles than those placed at ground level. We also describe a new trap design, a three-sided prism trap, which is relatively easy to assemble and deploy.

  6. Microbially enhanced carbon capture and storage by mineral-trapping and solubility-trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Andrew C; Dideriksen, Knud; Spangler, Lee H; Cunningham, Alfred B; Gerlach, Robin

    2010-07-01

    The potential of microorganisms for enhancing carbon capture and storage (CCS) via mineral-trapping (where dissolved CO(2) is precipitated in carbonate minerals) and solubility trapping (as dissolved carbonate species in solution) was investigated. The bacterial hydrolysis of urea (ureolysis) was investigated in microcosms including synthetic brine (SB) mimicking a prospective deep subsurface CCS site with variable headspace pressures [p(CO(2))] of (13)C-CO(2). Dissolved Ca(2+) in the SB was completely precipitated as calcite during microbially induced hydrolysis of 5-20 g L(-1) urea. The incorporation of carbonate ions from (13)C-CO(2) ((13)C-CO(3)(2-)) into calcite increased with increasing p((13)CO(2)) and increasing urea concentrations: from 8.3% of total carbon in CaCO(3) at 1 g L(-1) to 31% at 5 g L(-1), and 37% at 20 g L(-1). This demonstrated that ureolysis was effective at precipitating initially gaseous [CO(2)(g)] originating from the headspace over the brine. Modeling the change in brine chemistry and carbonate precipitation after equilibration with the initial p(CO(2)) demonstrated that no net precipitation of CO(2)(g) via mineral-trapping occurred, since urea hydrolysis results in the production of dissolved inorganic carbon. However, the pH increase induced by bacterial ureolysis generated a net flux of CO(2)(g) into the brine. This reduced the headspace concentration of CO(2) by up to 32 mM per 100 mM urea hydrolyzed because the capacity of the brine for carbonate ions was increased, thus enhancing the solubility-trapping capacity of the brine. Together with the previously demonstrated permeability reduction of rock cores at high pressure by microbial biofilms and resilience of biofilms to supercritical CO(2), this suggests that engineered biomineralizing biofilms may enhance CCS via solubility-trapping, mineral formation, and CO(2)(g) leakage reduction.

  7. The trapped human experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, R; Agapiou, A; Bocos-Bintintan, V; Brown, L J; Burns, C; Creaser, C S; Devenport, N A; Gao-Lau, B; Guallar-Hoyas, C; Hildebrand, L; Malkar, A; Martin, H J; Moll, V H; Patel, P; Ratiu, A; Reynolds, J C; Sielemann, S; Slodzynski, R; Statheropoulos, M; Turner, M A; Vautz, W; Wright, V E; Thomas, C L P

    2011-12-01

    This experiment observed the evolution of metabolite plumes from a human trapped in a simulation of a collapsed building. Ten participants took it in turns over five days to lie in a simulation of a collapsed building and eight of them completed the 6 h protocol while their breath, sweat and skin metabolites were passed through a simulation of a collapsed glass-clad reinforced-concrete building. Safety, welfare and environmental parameters were monitored continuously, and active adsorbent sampling for thermal desorption GC-MS, on-line and embedded CO, CO(2) and O(2) monitoring, aspirating ion mobility spectrometry with integrated semiconductor gas sensors, direct injection GC-ion mobility spectrometry, active sampling thermal desorption GC-differential mobility spectrometry and a prototype remote early detection system for survivor location were used to monitor the evolution of the metabolite plumes that were generated. Oxygen levels within the void simulator were allowed to fall no lower than 19.1% (v). Concurrent levels of carbon dioxide built up to an average level of 1.6% (v) in the breathing zone of the participants. Temperature, humidity, carbon dioxide levels and the physiological measurements were consistent with a reproducible methodology that enabled the metabolite plumes to be sampled and characterized from the different parts of the experiment. Welfare and safety data were satisfactory with pulse rates, blood pressures and oxygenation, all within levels consistent with healthy adults. Up to 12 in-test welfare assessments per participant and a six-week follow-up Stanford Acute Stress Response Questionnaire indicated that the researchers and participants did not experience any adverse effects from their involvement in the study. Preliminary observations confirmed that CO(2), NH(3) and acetone were effective markers for trapped humans, although interactions with water absorbed in building debris needed further study. An unexpected observation from the NH(3

  8. 1986-87 Annual Trapping Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Annual Trapping Plan for the 1986-87 trapping season at Clarence Cannon NWR outlines rules and regulations for the trapping of beaver, muskrat, raccoon,...

  9. Entanglement dynamics of a strongly driven trapped atom

    CERN Document Server

    Roghani, Maryam; Breuer, Heinz-Peter

    2011-01-01

    We study the entanglement between the internal electronic and the external vibrational degrees of freedom of a trapped atom which is driven by two lasers into electromagnetically-induced transparency. It is shown that basic features of the intricate entanglement dynamics can be traced to Landau-Zener splittings (avoided crossings) in the spectrum of the atom-laser field Hamiltonian. We further construct an effective Hamiltonian that describes the behavior of entanglement under dissipation induced by spontaneous emission processes. The proposed approach is applicable to a broad range of scenarios for the control of entanglement between electronic and translational degrees of freedom of trapped atoms through suitable laser fields.

  10. Influence of small scale heterogeneity on CO2 trapping processes in deep saline aquifers

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenzon, Naum I; Ritzi, Robert W; Dominic, David F

    2014-01-01

    The physical mechanism of CO2 trapping in porous media by capillary trapping (pore scale) incorporates a number of related processes, i.e. residual trapping, trapping due to hysteresis of the relative permeability, and trapping due to hysteresis of the capillary pressure. Additionally CO2 may be trapped in heterogeneous media due to difference in capillary pressure entry points for different materials (facies scale). The amount of CO2 trapped by these processes depends upon a complex system of non-linear and hysteretic relationships including how relative permeability and capillary pressure vary with brine and CO2 saturation, and upon the spatial variation in these relationships as caused by geologic heterogeneity. Geological heterogeneities affect the dynamics of CO2 plumes in subsurface environments. Recent studies have led to new conceptual and quantitative models for sedimentary architecture in fluvial deposits over a range of scales that are relevant to the performance of some deep saline reservoirs. We ...

  11. A study of trapped mode resonances in asymmetric X-shape resonator for frequency selective surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kejian; Liu, Hong; Wang, Yiqi; Zhu, Yiming

    2013-08-01

    FSS is a two-dimensional periodic array of resonating metallic-dielectric structures, When FSS device steps into Terahertz range from microwave range, it is studied as THz functional components (such as Terahertz filter, Terahertz biochemical sensor, etc.) to promote the functionality of the THz spectroscopy/imaging system. When the device requires a narrow band transmission window for frequency selecting or a high electric field concentration in certain area to improve its sensitivity for sensing, normally, a high quality (Q) resonant structure can give helps. Recently, high-Q resonance induced by trapped mode resonance i studied widely in FSS research areas. To induce trapped mode resonance, one can simply break the symmetric of the unit structure of FSS. In this paper, several asymmetric X-shaped resonators for FSS working in terahertz range have been studied numerically. To compare the behaviour of X-shape resonator under different conditions (with additional part: Heart lines, Shoulder lines, Wrap or Shoes squares), a common platform (θ=60, θis angle of X shape) which is suitable for most of cases was used to make the study more meaningful. As the field enhancement behaviour is related to the trapped mode introduced by the asymmetric structure, we propose such kind of device to be used as a high quality filter or as a sensing element for biochemical samples.

  12. Different effects of bleeding and soft-tissue trauma on pulmonary platelet trapping in pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomquist, S.; Thoerne, J.E.; Elmer, O.

    1989-06-01

    Immediate reactions to different types of trauma have been the object of several studies recently. It has been shown that pulmonary platelet trapping (PPT) occurs within minutes after both septic shock and soft-tissue trauma. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether hypovolemia induced by hypoperfusion might trigger platelet trapping in the lungs in the same way as soft-tissue trauma. Platelets labelled with indium-oxine were reinfused in anesthetized and mechanically ventilated pigs 4 hours before either induction of standardized hypovolemia caused by bleeding to the amount of 20% of the estimated blood volume (n = 6) or a standardized soft-tissue trauma to the hind limbs (n = 7). Platelet sequestration in the lungs was recorded dynamically by means of scintigraphy for 15 minutes before and 90 min after the start of the trauma and bleeding episodes. Central hemodynamics were recorded using a Swan-Ganz catheter. Soft-tissue trauma induced a marked PPT; in the animals subjected to bleeding alone there was no such effect despite a hemodynamic deterioration of greater magnitude than in the trauma group. The PPT was accompanied by a reduction in the number of platelets and leukocytes in peripheral blood. Our results indicate that immediate trapping of platelets in the lungs after trauma occurs as a response to factors other than those related to simple hypovolemic hypoperfusion.

  13. First Attempts at Antihydrogen Trapping in ALPHA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, G. B.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Bray, C. C.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Fajans, J.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Funakoshi, R.; Gill, D. R.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lambo, R.; Madsen, N.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Page, R. D.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; El Nasr, S. Seif; Silveira, D. M.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2008-08-01

    The ALPHA apparatus is designed to produce and trap antihydrogen atoms. The device comprises a multifunction Penning trap and a superconducting, neutral atom trap having a minimum-B configuration. The atom trap features an octupole magnet for transverse confinement and solenoidal mirror coils for longitudinal confinement. The magnetic trap employs a fast shutdown system to maximize the probability of detecting the annihilation of released antihydrogen. In this article we describe the first attempts to observe antihydrogen trapping.

  14. Feedback traps for virtual potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Gavrilov, Momčilo

    2016-01-01

    Feedback traps are tools for trapping and manipulating single charged objects, such as molecules in solution. An alternative to optical tweezers and other single-molecule techniques, they use feedback to counteract the Brownian motion of a molecule of interest. The trap first acquires information about a molecule's position and then applies an electric feedback force to move the molecule. Since electric forces are stronger than optical forces at small scales, feedback traps are the best way to trap single molecules without "touching" them. Feedback traps can do more than trap molecules: They can also subject a target object to forces that are calculated to be the gradient of a desired potential function U(x). If the feedback loop is fast enough, it creates a virtual potential whose dynamics will be very close to those of a particle in an actual potential U(x). But because the dynamics are entirely a result of the feedback loop--absent the feedback, there is only an object diffusing in a fluid--we are free to ...

  15. An Atomic Abacus: Trapped ion quantum computing experiments at NIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarco, Brian

    2003-03-01

    Trapped atomic ions are an ideal system for exploring quantum information science because deterministic state preparation and efficient state detection are possible and coherent manipulation of atomic systems is relatively advanced. In our experiment, a few singly charged Be ions are confined by static and radio-frequency electric fields in a micro-machined linear Paul trap. The internal and motional states of the ions are coherently manipulated using applied laser light. Our current work focuses on demonstrating the necessary ingredients to produce a scalable quantum computing scheme and on simplifying and improving quantum logic gates. I will speak about a new set of experiments that was made possible by recent improvements in trap technology. A novel trap with multiple trapping regions was used to demonstrate the first steps towards a fully scalable quantum computing scheme. Single ions were ``shuttled" between trapping regions without disturbing the ion's motional and internal state, and two ions were separated from a single to two different trapping zones. Improvements in the trap manufacturing process has led to a reduction of nearly two orders of magnitude in the ion's motional heating rate, making possible two new improved logic gates. The first gate utilizes the wave-packet nature of the ions to tune the laser-atom interaction and achieve a controlled-NOT gate between a single ion's spin and motional states. The second, a two-ion phase gate, uses phase-space dynamics to produce a state-sensitive geometric phase. I will end with a quick look at experiments using a Mg ion to sympathetically cool a simultaneously trapped Be ion and a glimpse of the next generation of ions traps currently under construction.

  16. Trapped or Spurred by the Home Region?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Keld; Masciarelli, Francesca; Prencipe, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on social capital theory and the international business literature, we argue that domestic geography, in terms of localized potential social capital, facilitates individual firms’ awareness of business opportunities, including knowledge related to involvement in the foreign markets...... for goods and technology, thereby enhancing firms’ involvement in those foreign markets. When potential social capital reaches a certain threshold, it may work to trap firms into operating only within their home regions, thus reducing involvement in foreign markets. We conjecture that firms’ research...

  17. Metabolic requirements for neutrophil extracellular traps formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Espinosa, Oscar; Rojas-Espinosa, Oscar; Moreno-Altamirano, María Maximina Bertha; López-Villegas, Edgar Oliver; Sánchez-García, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    As part of the innate immune response, neutrophils are at the forefront of defence against infection, resolution of inflammation and wound healing. They are the most abundant leucocytes in the peripheral blood, have a short lifespan and an estimated turnover of 1010 to 1011 cells per day. Neutrophils efficiently clear microbial infections by phagocytosis and by oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent mechanisms. In 2004, a new neutrophil anti-microbial mechanism was described, the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) composed of DNA, histones and anti-microbial peptides. Several microorganisms, bacterial products, as well as pharmacological stimuli such as PMA, were shown to induce NETs. Neutrophils contain relatively few mitochondria, and derive most of their energy from glycolysis. In this scenario we aimed to analyse some of the metabolic requirements for NET formation. Here it is shown that NETs formation is strictly dependent on glucose and to a lesser extent on glutamine, that Glut-1, glucose uptake, and glycolysis rate increase upon PMA stimulation, and that NET formation is inhibited by the glycolysis inhibitor, 2-deoxy-glucose, and to a lesser extent by the ATP synthase inhibitor oligomycin. Moreover, when neutrophils were exposed to PMA in glucose-free medium for 3 hr, they lost their characteristic polymorphic nuclei but did not release NETs. However, if glucose (but not pyruvate) was added at this time, NET release took place within minutes, suggesting that NET formation could be metabolically divided into two phases; the first, independent from exogenous glucose (chromatin decondensation) and, the second (NET release), strictly dependent on exogenous glucose and glycolysis. PMID:25545227

  18. Trapping tsetse flies on water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laveissière C.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Riverine tsetse flies such as Glossina palpalis gambiensis and G. tachinoides are the vectors of human and animal trypanosomoses in West Africa. Despite intimate links between tsetse and water, to our knowledge there has never been any attempt to design trapping devices that would catch tsetse on water. In mangrove (Guinea one challenging issue is the tide, because height above the ground for a trap is a key factor affecting tsetse catches. The trap was mounted on the remains of an old wooden dugout, and attached with rope to nearby branches, thereby allowing it to rise and fall with the tide. Catches showed a very high density of 93.9 flies/”water-trap”/day, which was significantly higher (p < 0.05 than all the catches from other habitats where the classical trap had been used. In savannah, on the Comoe river of South Burkina Faso, the biconical trap was mounted on a small wooden raft anchored to a stone, and catches were compared with the classical biconical trap put on the shores. G. p. gambiensis and G. tachinoides densities were not significantly different from those from the classical biconical one. The adaptations described here have allowed to efficiently catch tsetse on the water, which to our knowledge is reported here for the first time. This represents a great progress and opens new opportunities to undertake studies on the vectors of trypanosomoses in mangrove areas of Guinea, which are currently the areas showing the highest prevalences of sleeping sickness in West Africa. It also has huge potential for tsetse control using insecticide impregnated traps in savannah areas where traps become less efficient in rainy season. The Guinean National control programme has already expressed its willingness to use such modified traps in its control campaigns in Guinea, as has the national PATTEC programme in Burkina Faso during rainy season.

  19. Electric field-induced acoustic emission phenomena in ferroelectric and related ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aburatani, Hideaki

    Field induced AE phenomena in bulk ferroelectric and related ceramics as well as multilayer ceramic actuators were investigated in this work. Concerning the field induced AE measurement technique, it was shown that commonly used voltage application units can excite sample vibrations electromechanically through their voltage stabilization processes and generate extrinsic AE signals. In order to detect intrinsic AE signals from within piezoelectric samples, a modified voltage application unit with a long time constant tau was proposed. For the study of origins of field induced AE, a ferroelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT-5A), an electrostrictive lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (0.9PMN-0.1PT) and a field-enhanced ferroelectric type lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT(9/65/35)) ceramics were selected. Pre-applied maximum field dependence on the AE generation were observed for ferroelectric PZT-5A and electrostrictive 0.9PMN-0.1PT ceramics. The study showed that there are two origins for the field induced AE of the ferroelectric PZT-5A: deformation related to domain reorientation processes and piezoelectric deformation unrelated to domain reorientation processes. The stress induction/relaxation process simply caused by the electrostrictive deformation was found to be the origin of AE in the electrostrictive 0.9PMN-0.1PT ceramics. The electric field induced non-ferroelectric to ferroelectric transition, reorientation process of the induced ferroelectric domains and induced internal stress were found to be the origins of AE in the field-enhanced ferroelectric PLZT (9/65/35). The potential use of the AE method in production was explored using a Multilayer Ceramic Actuator (MCA) fabricated by a tape casting method.

  20. Evaluation of the oxidative potential of urban Pm and its relation to in vitro induced DNA damage: a spatial and temporal comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintana B, R. O.; Alfaro M, E.; Garcia C, C. M.; Vazquez L, I. [Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Laboratorio de Toxicologia Ambiental, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Col. Seccion 16, 14080 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Rosas P, I. [UNAM, Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Gomez V, V.; Salmon S, M. de J. [UNAM, Instituto de Quimica, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Osornio V, A. R., E-mail: qbro@hotmail.com [University of Alberta, Edmonton Clinic Health Academy, 11405 87 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1C9 (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Some toxic effects of particulate matter (Pm) are related to the oxidative potential (Op) of the particles. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique was used to evaluate the intensity of paramagnetic species (Ps) and EPR plus spin trapping, to evaluate the Op of Pm. We evaluated, in parallel, the DNA degradation potential of PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} collected from three regions of Mexico City in 1991 and 2003. Each region had different sources of pollution; industrial, commercial or residential. Both techniques evaluated Fenton-type reactions in the presence and absence of deferoxamine. PM{sub 10} samples from the industrial region presented similar high Op, independently of sampling year. PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} collected in the commercial and residential regions in 2003 had similarly low Op. The Op induced by PM{sub 10} from the industrial region was completely inhibited by Dfo, and Dfo partially inhibited the Op induced by PM{sub 10} from other regions. PM{sub 2.5} Op was not inhibited by Dfo. Pm from the industrial region was the most potent inductor of DNA degradation, while Pm from residential region was the least potent, correlating with the Op. Dfo inhibited the degradation of DNA induced by Pm. The Op of Pm collected in the industrial and residential region correlated with the DNA degradation. The region, size and year of Pm collection are linked to observed Op variations and DNA degradation induced by Pm. (Author)

  1. Differentially Gene Expression Profile Related to Inflammation in Endometrial Cells Induce by Lipopolysaccharide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-hua QIN; Ruo-guang WANG; Sheng LI; Chun-mei LI

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate differentially expressed genes related to inflammation in endometrial cells induced by Lipopolysaccharide(LPS).Methods Normal endometrium in the proliferative phase of specimen from 3 cases for the experiment was collected. The LPS group were treated with 50 μg/ml LPS. Total RNA was extracted using Trizol reagent from cells. RNA quality was assessed by determining the OD260/280 ratio by agarose gel electrophoresis, the chip was scanned by laser scanner. The acquired was analyzed. Results A total of differentially expressed genes were found, these genes were relative to many aspects. Among them, the expression of genes involved in inflammation were up-regulated by LPS, such as overexpression of lL-lβ, 8, etc.Conclusion The results indicates that inflammation-related genes may be one of the mechanisms of abnormal uterine bleeding by LPS-induced.

  2. A reservoir trap for antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Smorra, Christian; Franke, Kurt; Nagahama, Hiroki; Schneider, Georg; Higuchi, Takashi; Van Gorp, Simon; Blaum, Klaus; Matsuda, Yasuyuki; Quint, Wolfgang; Walz, Jochen; Yamazaki, Yasunori; Ulmer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We have developed techniques to extract arbitrary fractions of antiprotons from an accumulated reservoir, and to inject them into a Penning-trap system for high-precision measurements. In our trap-system antiproton storage times > 1.08 years are estimated. The device is fail-safe against power-cuts of up to 10 hours. This makes our planned comparisons of the fundamental properties of protons and antiprotons independent from accelerator cycles, and will enable us to perform experiments during long accelerator shutdown periods when background magnetic noise is low. The demonstrated scheme has the potential to be applied in many other precision Penning trap experiments dealing with exotic particles.

  3. Pattern formation with trapped ions

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Tony E

    2010-01-01

    We propose an experiment to study collective behavior in a nonlinear medium of trapped ions. Using laser cooling and heating and an anharmonic trap potential, one can turn an ion into a nonlinear van der Pol-Duffing oscillator. A chain of ions interacting electrostatically has stable plane waves for all parameters. The system also behaves like an excitable medium, since a sufficiently large perturbation generates a travelling pulse. Small chains exhibit multistability and limit cycles. We account for noise from spontaneous emission in the amplitude equation and find that the patterns are observable for realistic experimental parameters. The tunability of ion traps makes them an exciting setting to study nonequilibrium statistical physics.

  4. OVERCOMING POVERTY TRAP: THE CASE OF WATER & SANITATION IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda Leilani Masniarita Pohan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Overcoming Poverty Trap : The Case of  Water & Sanitation in Indonesia. Poverty trap is a cycle in which poor individuals exhibit low health quality due to malnutrition and limited access to health related facilities. Poor health causes low productivity which eventually cycles back to low income. Indonesia significantly reduced poverty from 15.6% in 1990 to 3.3% in 2010. However, this achievement is not conveyed equally across regions. Using data form RAND Corporation, estimations showed that access to sanitation and clean water play a crucial role in improving one’s health quality.   Keywords: poverty trap, productivity, income, health facility.

  5. Analysis of the diamagnetic effect in multipole Galatea traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishaev, A. M.; Bugrova, A. I.; Gavrikov, M. B.; Kozintseva, M. V.; Lipatov, A. S.; Savel'ev, V. V.; Sigov, A. S.; Smirnov, P. G.; Tarelkin, I. A.; Khramtsov, P. P.

    2013-04-01

    The toroidal current emerging after the injection of a plasmoid through the magnetic shell of the Trimyx-3M (microwave) multipole trap is measured using the Rogowski loop. This current is due to diamagnetism of the plasma. The relation between the diamagnetic current and the maximal plasma pressure produced at the magnetic field separatrix is obtained. It is shown hence that magnetic measurements in a multi-pole trap for a known concentration make it possible to determine the plasma temperature in the trap and the energy confinement time.

  6. Cold atom-ion experiments in hybrid traps

    CERN Document Server

    Härter, Arne

    2013-01-01

    In the last 5 years, a novel field of physics and chemistry has developed in which cold trapped ions and ultracold atomic gases are brought into contact with each other. Combining ion traps with traps for neutral atoms yields a variety of new possibilities for research and experiments. These range from studies of cold atom-ion collisions and atom-ion chemistry to applications in quantum information science and condensed matter related research. In this article we give a brief introduction into this new field and describe some of the perspectives for its future development.

  7. Controlling crisis-induced intermittency using its relation with a boundary crisis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zambrano, Samuel; Marino, Ines P; Sanjuan, Miguel A F [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: samuel.zambrano@urjc.es, E-mail: ines.perez@urjc.es, E-mail: miguel.sanjuan@urjc.es

    2009-02-15

    In this paper, we show that there is a simple and intuitive relation between crisis-induced intermittency and a boundary crisis in unimodal maps and in a family of chaotic flows with strong volume contraction. This point of view allows us to identify a set of 'target points' directly from the time series of the considered system that can be used to tame crisis-induced intermittency. To do this, we use an advantageous adaptation of a control scheme that was typically used in the context of control of transient chaos. We illustrate here these ideas with the quadratic map and Roessler flow.

  8. Kinematic changes during running-induced fatigue and relations with core endurance in novice runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koblbauer, Ian F; van Schooten, Kimberley S; Verhagen, Evert A; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate kinematic changes experienced during running-induced fatigue. Further, the study examined relations between kinematic changes and core endurance. Repeated measures and correlation. Seventeen novice runners participated in a running-induced fatigue protocol and underwent core endurance assessment. Participants ran at a steady state corresponding to an intensity of 13 on the Borg scale and continued until 2min after a Borg score of 17 or 90% of maximum heart rate was reached. Kinematic data were analyzed for the lower extremities and trunk throughout a running protocol and, on separate days, core endurance measures were recorded. Changes in pre- and post-fatigue running kinematics and their relations with core endurance measures were analyzed. Analysis of peak joint angles revealed significant increases in trunk flexion (4°), decreases in trunk extension (3°), and increases in non-dominant ankle eversion (1.6°) as a result of running-induced fatigue. Post-fatigue increased trunk flexion changes displayed a strong to moderate positive relation with trunk extensor core endurance measures, in contrast to expected negative relations. Novice runners displayed an overall increase in trunk inclination and increased ankle eversion peak angles when fatigued utilizing a running-induced fatigue protocol. As most pronounced changes were found for the trunk, trunk kinematics appear to be significantly affected during fatigued running and should not be overlooked. Core endurance measures displayed unexpected relations with running kinematics and require further investigation to determine the significance of these relations. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Relative Efficacy of CDC and UV Light-traps for Indoor Collection of Culex (Cx.) tritaeniorhychus in Yunnan, P.R.China%云南人房三带喙库蚊CDC和UV诱蚊灯捕捉效果观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周红宁; Sarah Pettifor; Nigel Hill; 肖育江; 杜尊伟; 李鸿宾; 张再兴

    2004-01-01

    目的评估CDC和UV诱蚊灯夜间人房三带喙库蚊捕捉效果.方法根据拉丁方设计方案,把诱蚊灯置于寝室和客厅,每晚轮流置灯.结果共捕获库蚊属蚊虫6种624只.其中三带喙库蚊属于最常见的蚊种(419只);CDC和UV灯捕捉蚊虫效果差异无显著性,但当地降雨量与CDC捕捉效果存在较强的正相关关系,而与UV灯捕蚊效果呈弱的负相关.结论无论是CDC诱蚊灯还是UV诱蚊灯都可以作为云南省三带喙库蚊种群密度监测的有效方法.%Objective The efficacy of CDC and UV traps for the coll ection of Culex (Cx.) tritaeniorhynchus was evaluated in overnight in door c ollection. Method The traps were placed in bedrooms and sittin g rooms and rotated nightly approximately following a Latin square design. Results A total of 624 mosquitoes of the genera Culex were trapped comprising 6 species. Most common was Cx.tritaeniorhynchus with 419 individuals trapped. There was no significant difference in the efficiency of CDC and UV traps although there was a stronger positive correlati on between mosquitoes collected in CDC lamps and rainfall, whereas, there was a weak negative correlation between UV lamps and local rainfall. Conclusio n We suggest that either CDC or UV light traps provide an efficient met hod to monitor the population of Cx.tritaniorhychus in Yunnan province.

  10. Precision mass measurements at THe-trap and the FSU trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoecker, Martin Juergen

    2016-07-26

    THe-Trap is a Penning-trap mass spectrometer at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany, that aims to measure the T/{sup 3}He mass ratio with a relative uncertainty of 10{sup -11}. Improvements of the measurement technique, in particular the measurement of systematic shifts, enabled measurements of mass ratios with relative uncertainties of 7.10{sup -11}, as demonstrated by a cyclotron frequency ratio determination on {sup 12}C{sup 4+}/{sup 16}O{sup 5+}. This uncertainty was limited by the lineshape. An improved theoretical model based on a rotating wave approximation can be used to describe dynamical interactions between the detection system and the ion, in order to better understand the lineshape and to further reduce the uncertainty. The Florida State University trap is a Penning-trap mass spectrometer located in Tallahassee, Florida (USA). In the context of this thesis, three mass ratios were measured, and further 20 mass ratio measurements analyzed, which resulted in the publication of the masses of {sup 82,83}Kr, {sup 131,134}Xe, {sup 86-88}Sr, and {sup 170-174,176}Yb with relative uncertainties between (0.9 - 1.3).10{sup -10}. These masses serve as reference masses for other experiments and have applications in the determination of the fine-structure constant alpha via the photon-recoil method.

  11. Flexible, light trapping substrates for organic photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoonseok; Berger, Jana; Tang, Zheng; Müller-Meskamp, Lars; Lasagni, Andrés Fabián; Vandewal, Koen; Leo, Karl

    2016-08-01

    Micro-structured organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices on polyethylene terephthalate substrates are produced using direct laser interference patterning (DLIP). The performance of organic solar cells on these substrates is improved by a factor of 1.16, and a power conversion efficiency of 7.70% is achieved. We show that a shorter spatial period of the pattern allows for a stronger light trapping effect in solar cell, as it leads to a longer light path. Moreover, since the patterned structures are located on the outside of the fully encapsulated OPV devices, there are no problems with the roughness induced shunts.

  12. Population redistribution in optically trapped polar molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Deiglmayr, J; Dulieu, O; Wester, R; Weidemüller, M

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the rovibrational population redistribution of polar molecules in the electronic ground state induced by spontaneous emission and blackbody radiation. As a model system we use optically trapped LiCs molecules formed by photoassociation in an ultracold two-species gas. The population dynamics of vibrational and rotational states is modeled using an ab-initio electric dipole moment function and experimental potential energy curves. Comparison with the evolution of the v"=3 electronic ground state yields good qualitative agreement. The analysis provides important input to assess applications of ultracold LiCs molecules in quantum simulation and ultracold chemistry.

  13. A New Atom Trap The Annular Shell Atom Trap (ASAT)

    CERN Document Server

    Pilloff, H S; Pilloff, Herschel S.; Horbatsch, Marko

    2002-01-01

    In the course of exploring some aspects of atom guiding in a hollow, optical fiber, a small negative potential energy well was found just in front of the repulsive or guiding barrier. This results from the optical dipole and the van der Waals potentials. The ground state for atoms bound in this negative potential well was determined by numerically solving the Schrodinger eq. and it was found that this negative well could serve as an atom trap. This trap is referred to as the Annular Shell Atom Trap or ASAT because of the geometry of the trapped atoms which are located in the locus of points defining a very thin annular shell just in front of the guiding barrier. A unique feature of the ASAT is the compression of the atoms from the entire volume to the volume of the annular shell resulting in a very high density of atoms in this trap. This trap may have applications to very low temperatures using evaporative cooling and possibly the formation of BEC. Finally, a scheme is discussed for taking advantage of the d...

  14. Risk factors for legal induced abortion-related mortality in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Linda A; Berg, Cynthia J; Shulman, Holly B; Zane, Suzanne B; Green, Clarice A; Whitehead, Sara; Atrash, Hani K

    2004-04-01

    To assess risk factors for legal induced abortion-related deaths. This is a descriptive epidemiologic study of women dying of complications of induced abortions. Numerator data are from the Abortion Mortality Surveillance System. Denominator data are from the Abortion Surveillance System, which monitors the number and characteristics of women who have legal induced abortions in the United States. Risk factors examined include age of the woman, gestational length of pregnancy at the time of termination, race, and procedure. Main outcome measures include crude, adjusted, and risk factor-specific mortality rates. During 1988-1997, the overall death rate for women obtaining legally induced abortions was 0.7 per 100000 legal induced abortions. The risk of death increased exponentially by 38% for each additional week of gestation. Compared with women whose abortions were performed at or before 8 weeks of gestation, women whose abortions were performed in the second trimester were significantly more likely to die of abortion-related causes. The relative risk (unadjusted) of abortion-related mortality was 14.7 at 13-15 weeks of gestation (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.2, 34.7), 29.5 at 16-20 weeks (95% CI 12.9, 67.4), and 76.6 at or after 21 weeks (95% CI 32.5, 180.8). Up to 87% of deaths in women who chose to terminate their pregnancies after 8 weeks of gestation may have been avoidable if these women had accessed abortion services before 8 weeks of gestation. Although primary prevention of unintended pregnancy is optimal, among women who choose to terminate their pregnancies, increased access to surgical and nonsurgical abortion services may increase the proportion of abortions performed at lower-risk, early gestational ages and help further decrease deaths. II-2

  15. Innovation: the classic traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2006-11-01

    these traps.

  16. Trapping Triatominae in Silvatic Habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noireau François

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale trials of a trapping system designed to collect silvatic Triatominae are reported. Live-baited adhesive traps were tested in various ecosystems and different triatomine habitats (arboreal and terrestrial. The trials were always successful, with a rate of positive habitats generally over 20% and reaching 48.4% for palm trees of the Amazon basin. Eleven species of Triatominae belonging to the three genera of public health importance (Triatoma, Rhodnius and Panstrongylus were captured. This trapping system provides an effective way to detect the presence of triatomines in terrestrial and arboreal silvatic habitats and represents a promising tool for ecological studies. Various lines of research are contemplated to improve the performance of this trapping system.

  17. Magneto optical trapping of Barium

    CERN Document Server

    De, S; Jungmann, K; Willmann, L

    2008-01-01

    First laser cooling and trapping of the heavy alkaline earth element barium has been achieved based on the strong 6s$^2$ $^1$S$_0$ - 6s6p $^1$P$_1$ transition for the main cooling. Due to the large branching into metastable D-states several additional laser driven transitions are required to provide a closed cooling cycle. A total efficiency of $0.4(1) \\cdot 10^{-2}$ for slowing a thermal atomic beam and capturing atoms into a magneto optical trap was obtained. Trapping lifetimes of more than 1.5 s were observed. This lifetime is shortened at high laser intensities by photo ionization losses. The developed techniques will allow to extend significantly the number of elements that can be optically cooled and trapped.

  18. Seismic fault zone trapped noise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hillers, G; Campillo, M; Ben‐Zion, Y; Roux, P

    2014-01-01

    Systematic velocity contrasts across and within fault zones can lead to head and trapped waves that provide direct information on structural units that are important for many aspects of earthquake and fault mechanics...

  19. In trap fragmentation and optical characterization of rotaxanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijs, Anouk M; Compagnon, Isabelle; Silva, Alissa; Hannam, Jeffrey S; Leigh, David A; Kay, Euan R; Dugourd, Philippe

    2010-10-21

    The first experiments on trapped rotaxanes are presented, combining collision induced fragmentation and in-trap laser spectroscopy. The intrinsic optical properties of three rotaxanes and their non-interlocked building blocks (thread and macrocycle) isolated in a quadrupolar ion trap are investigated. The excitation and relaxation processes under thermal activation as well as under photo-activation are addressed. The light and collision induced fragmentation pathways show that the degradation mechanisms occurring in the rotaxane are highly dependent on the nature of the thread. In the prospective of operating photoswitchable molecules, photo-activation is achieved in a controlled way by depositing photo-energy in the desired sub-unit of a mechanically interlocked structure.

  20. Comparison of clinical features between primary and drug-induced sleep-related eating disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komada Y

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yoko Komada,1 Yoshikazu Takaesu,2 Kentaro Matsui,3 Masaki Nakamura,3 Shingo Nishida,3 Meri Kanno,3,† Akira Usui,3 Yuichi Inoue1,3 1Department of Somnology, 2Department of Psychiatry, Tokyo Medical University, 3Japan Somnology Center, Institute of Neuropsychiatry, Tokyo, Japan †Meri Kanno passed away on March 1, 2016 Purpose: The aim of this study was to ascertain the clinical characteristics of drug-induced sleep-related eating disorder (SRED. Patients and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 30 patients with primary SRED (without any comorbid sleep disorders and who were not taking any possible causative medications, and ten patients with drug-induced SRED (occurrence of SRED episodes after starting nightly medication of sedative drugs, which completely resolved after dose reduction or discontinuation of the sedatives. Results: All patients with drug-induced SRED took multiple types of sedatives, such as benzodiazepines or benzodiazepine receptor agonists. Clinical features of drug-induced SRED compared with primary SRED were as follows: higher mean age of onset (40 years old in drug-induced SRED vs 26 years old in primary SRED, significantly higher rate of patients who had total amnesia during most of their SRED episodes (75.0% vs 31.8%, significantly lower rate of comorbidity of night eating syndrome (0% vs 63.3%, and significantly lower rate of history of sleepwalking (10.0% vs 46.7%. Increased doses of benzodiazepine receptor agonists may be responsible for drug-induced SRED. Conclusion: The clinical features of drug-induced SRED were different from those of primary SRED, possibly reflecting differences in the underlying mechanisms between these two categories of SREDs. Keywords: nocturnal eating syndrome, night eating, eating disorder, hypnotics, amnesia, sleepwalking, benzodiazepine

  1. Trap-assisted tunneling in AlGaN avalanche photodiodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. G. Shao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We fabricated AlGaN solar-blind avalanche photodiodes (APDs that were based on separate absorption and multiplication (SAM structures. It was determined experimentally that the dark current in these APDs is rapidly enhanced when the applied voltage exceeds 52 V. Theoretical analyses demonstrated that the breakdown voltage at 52 V is mainly related to the local trap-assisted tunneling effect. Because the dark current is mainly dependent on the trap states as a result of modification of the lifetimes of the electrons in the trap states, the tunneling processes can be modulated effectively by tuning the trap energy level, the trap density, and the tunnel mass.

  2. Trap-assisted tunneling in AlGaN avalanche photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Z. G.; Gu, Q. J.; Yang, X. F.; Zhang, J.; Kuang, Y. W.; Zhang, D. B.; Yu, H. L.; Hong, X. K.; Feng, J. F.; Liu, Y. S.

    2017-06-01

    We fabricated AlGaN solar-blind avalanche photodiodes (APDs) that were based on separate absorption and multiplication (SAM) structures. It was determined experimentally that the dark current in these APDs is rapidly enhanced when the applied voltage exceeds 52 V. Theoretical analyses demonstrated that the breakdown voltage at 52 V is mainly related to the local trap-assisted tunneling effect. Because the dark current is mainly dependent on the trap states as a result of modification of the lifetimes of the electrons in the trap states, the tunneling processes can be modulated effectively by tuning the trap energy level, the trap density, and the tunnel mass.

  3. Managing resonant-trapped orbits in our Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binney, James

    2016-11-01

    Galaxy modelling is greatly simplified by assuming the existence of a global system of angle-action coordinates. Unfortunately, global angle-action coordinates do not exist because some orbits become trapped by resonances, especially where the radial and vertical frequencies coincide. We show that in a realistic Galactic potential such trapping occurs only on thick-disc and halo orbits (speed relative to the guiding centre ≳ 80 km s- 1). We explain how the TORUS MAPPER code (TM) behaves in regions of phase space in which orbits are resonantly trapped, and we extend TM so that trapped orbits can be manipulated as easily as untrapped ones. The impact that the resonance has on the structure of velocity space depends on the weights assigned to trapped orbits. The impact is everywhere small if each trapped orbit is assigned the phase space density equal to the time average along the orbit of the DF for untrapped orbits. The impact could be significant with a different assignment of weights to trapped orbits.

  4. Field capture of Thyanta perditor with pheromone-baited traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Alberto Laumann

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the field attractiveness of Thyanta perditor synthetic sex pheromone-baited traps, its attractivity to other stink bug species, and the response of T. perditor to a geometric isomer of the sex pheromone. Two-liter transparent plastic bottles traps were baited with rubber septa impregnated with the treatments: 1 mg of methyl-(2E,4Z,6Z-decatrienoate [(2E,4Z,6Z-10:COOMe], the male sex pheromone of T. perditor; 1 mg of (2E,4Z,6Z-10:COOMe protected from sunlight in standard PVC plumbing pipe; 1 mg of its geometric isomer [(2E,4E,6Z-10:COOMe]; and traps with rubber septa impregnated with hexane (control. The experiment was carried out in field during the soybean reproductive stages. Traps were monitored weekly, and the captures were compared to the population density estimated by the sampling cloth and visual inspection monitoring techniques. Traps baited with the sex pheromone, protected or not, were more effective in capturing T. perditor than traps baited with the isomer or the hexane. Thyanta perditor sex pheromone showed cross-attraction to other stink bug species, such as Euschistus heros, Edessa meditabunda, Piezodorus guildinii and Nezara viridula. Pheromone-baited traps can be used in population monitoring and to identify the relative composition of stink bug guilds.

  5. Preliminary Design of IHTS Cold Trap for PGSFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jewhan; Lee, Taeho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The main impurities in liquid sodium of the IHTS are oxygen and hydrogen. These impurities form oxides and hydrides with sodium and cause various problems. In order to eliminate the impurities the Cold Trap is installed in the loop. The life and capacity of the IHTS cold Trap depends the amount of impurities. For IHTS loop, the hydrogen has been identified as the major contamination from Steam Generator (SG) during the normal operation. In this study, the sizing of cold trap based on the source rate of hydrogen from SG from past experiences was conducted. Empirical relations among different variables were adopted to establish the temperature distribution, pressure drops, flow rates and geometries for the cold trap and its associated component. In this study, the IHTS cold trap for normal operation has been analyzed and the preliminary design of corresponding cold trap and economizer has been carried out. For further detailed design, R and D on basic sodium technology will be essential to optimize the Cold Trap.

  6. Trap density of states in n-channel organic transistors: variable temperature characteristics and band transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joung-min Cho

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated trap density of states (trap DOS in n-channel organic field-effect transistors based on N,N ’-bis(cyclohexylnaphthalene diimide (Cy-NDI and dimethyldicyanoquinonediimine (DMDCNQI. A new method is proposed to extract trap DOS from the Arrhenius plot of the temperature-dependent transconductance. Double exponential trap DOS are observed, in which Cy-NDI has considerable deep states, by contrast, DMDCNQI has substantial tail states. In addition, numerical simulation of the transistor characteristics has been conducted by assuming an exponential trap distribution and the interface approximation. Temperature dependence of transfer characteristics are well reproduced only using several parameters, and the trap DOS obtained from the simulated characteristics are in good agreement with the assumed trap DOS, indicating that our analysis is self-consistent. Although the experimentally obtained Meyer-Neldel temperature is related to the trap distribution width, the simulation satisfies the Meyer-Neldel rule only very phenomenologically. The simulation also reveals that the subthreshold swing is not always a good indicator of the total trap amount, because it also largely depends on the trap distribution width. Finally, band transport is explored from the simulation having a small number of traps. A crossing point of the transfer curves and negative activation energy above a certain gate voltage are observed in the simulated characteristics, where the critical VG above which band transport is realized is determined by the sum of the trapped and free charge states below the conduction band edge.

  7. Trap density of states in n-channel organic transistors: variable temperature characteristics and band transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Joung-min, E-mail: cho.j.ad@m.titech.ac.jp; Akiyama, Yuto; Kakinuma, Tomoyuki [Department of Organic and Polymeric Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-okayama, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Mori, Takehiko [Department of Organic and Polymeric Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-okayama, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); ACT-C, JST, Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    We have investigated trap density of states (trap DOS) in n-channel organic field-effect transistors based on N,N ’-bis(cyclohexyl)naphthalene diimide (Cy-NDI) and dimethyldicyanoquinonediimine (DMDCNQI). A new method is proposed to extract trap DOS from the Arrhenius plot of the temperature-dependent transconductance. Double exponential trap DOS are observed, in which Cy-NDI has considerable deep states, by contrast, DMDCNQI has substantial tail states. In addition, numerical simulation of the transistor characteristics has been conducted by assuming an exponential trap distribution and the interface approximation. Temperature dependence of transfer characteristics are well reproduced only using several parameters, and the trap DOS obtained from the simulated characteristics are in good agreement with the assumed trap DOS, indicating that our analysis is self-consistent. Although the experimentally obtained Meyer-Neldel temperature is related to the trap distribution width, the simulation satisfies the Meyer-Neldel rule only very phenomenologically. The simulation also reveals that the subthreshold swing is not always a good indicator of the total trap amount, because it also largely depends on the trap distribution width. Finally, band transport is explored from the simulation having a small number of traps. A crossing point of the transfer curves and negative activation energy above a certain gate voltage are observed in the simulated characteristics, where the critical V{sub G} above which band transport is realized is determined by the sum of the trapped and free charge states below the conduction band edge.

  8. Mitochondria related peptide MOTS-c suppresses ovariectomy-induced bone loss via AMPK activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming, Wei, E-mail: weiming@xiyi.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Pharmacogenomics, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China); Department of Pharmacology, Xi’an Medical University, Xi’an 710021 (China); Lu, Gan, E-mail: leonming99@163.com [Department of Gynecology of Shaanxi Provincial People’s Hospital, Xi’an, 710068 (China); Xin, Sha, E-mail: 248967979@qq.com [Institute of Orthopedic Surgery, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China); Huanyu, Lu, E-mail: 2366927258@qq.com [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health and the Ministry of Education Key Lab of Hazard Assessment and Control in Special Operational Environment, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China); Yinghao, Jiang, E-mail: jiangyh@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Pharmacogenomics, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China); Xiaoying, Lei, E-mail: leixiaoy@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Pharmacogenomics, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China); Chengming, Xu, E-mail: chengmingxu@yeah.net [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Pharmacogenomics, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China); Banjun, Ruan, E-mail: running@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Pharmacogenomics, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China); Li, Wang, E-mail: wanglifw@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Pharmacogenomics, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China); and others

    2016-08-05

    Therapeutic targeting bone loss has been the focus of the study in osteoporosis. The present study is intended to evaluate whether MOTS-c, a novel mitochondria related 16 aa peptide, can protect mice from ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis. After ovary removal, the mice were injected with MOTS-c at a dose of 5 mg/kg once a day for 12 weeks. Our results showed that MOTS-c treatment significantly alleviated bone loss, as determined by micro-CT examination. Mechanistically, we found that the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) induced osteoclast differentiation was remarkably inhibited by MOTS-c. Moreover, MOTS-c increased phosphorylated AMPK levels, and compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, could partially abrogate the effects of the MOTS-c on osteoclastogenesis. Thus, our findings provide evidence that MOTS-c may exert as an inhibitor of osteoporosis via AMPK dependent inhibition of osteoclastogenesis. -- Highlights: •MOTS-c decreases OVX-induced bone loss in vivo. •MOTS-c inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast formation. •MOTS-c inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast-specific gene expression. •MOTS-c represses osteoclast differentiation via the activation of AMPK.

  9. About Black Holes Without Trapping Interior

    CERN Document Server

    Cabo-Montes de Oca, Alejandro; Cabo, Alejandro; Ayon, Eloy

    1999-01-01

    Physical arguments related with the existence of black hole solutions having a non trapping interior are discussed. Massive scalar fields interacting with gravity are considered. Interior asymptotic solutions showing a scalar field approaching a constant value at the horizon are given. It is argued that the coupled Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations can be satisfied in the sense of the generalized functions after removing a particular regularization designed for matching the interior solution with an external Scwartzschild spacetime. The scalar field appears as just avoiding the appearance of closed trapped surfaces while coming from the exterior region. It also follows that the usual space integral over the temporal- temporal components of energy-momnetum tensor in the internal region just gives the total proper mass associated to the external Schwartzschild solution, as it should be expected.

  10. Boson Josephson Junction with Trapped Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, S.; Smerzi, A.; Fantoni, S.; Shenoy, S. R.

    We consider coherent atomic tunneling between two weakly coupled Bose-Einstein condensates at T=0 in a double-well trap. The condensate dynamics of the macroscopic amplitudes in the two wells is modeled by two Gross-Pitaevskii equations (GPE) coupled by a tunneling matrix element. Analytic elliptic function solutions are obtained for the time evolution of the inter-well fractional population imbalance z(t) (related to the condensate phase difference) of the Boson Josephson junction (BJJ). Surprisingly, the neutral-atom BJJ shows (non-sinusoidal generalizations of) effects seen in charged-electron superconductor Josephson junctions (SJJ). The BJJ elliptic-function behavior has a singular dependence on a GPE parameter ratio Λ at a critical ratio Λ=Λc, beyond which a novel 'macroscopic quantum self-trapping' effect sets in with a non-zero time-averaged imbalance ≠0.

  11. One and Two Photon Excitation of Radiofrequency Trapped Ca+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C. Zumsteg; C. Champenois; D. Guyomarc'h; G. Hagel; M. Houssin; M. Knoop

    2009-01-01

    Radiofrequency (rf) trapped ions are versatile candidates for a large panel of applications ranging from quantum information to the creation of cold molecules. Sample size can range from a single to 106 ions, and the internal and external energy states of the atoms can be controlled with high precision. In the experiment, we focus on different protocols related to frequency metrology using rf trapped Ca+.

  12. Nanoantennas for enhanced light trapping in transparent organic solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Voroshilov, Pavel M; Belov, Pavel A

    2014-01-01

    We propose a light-trapping structure offering a significant enhancement of photovoltaic absorption in transparent organic solar cells operating at infrared while the visible light transmission keeps sufficiently high. The main mechanism of light trapping is related with the excitation of collective oscillations of the metal nanoantenna arrays, characterized by advantageous field distribution in the volume of the solar cell. It allows more than triple increase of infrared photovoltaic absorption.

  13. Ion cyclotron resonance detection techniques at TRIGA-TRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuth, K.; Eberhardt, K.; Ketelaer, J. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany); Beyer, T.; Blaum, K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet, Heidelberg (Germany); Block, M.; Herfurth, F. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Eibach, M.; Smorra, C. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany); Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet, Heidelberg (Germany); Nagy, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    In Penning trap mass spectrometry the mass of stored ions is obtained via a determination of the cyclotron frequency ({nu}{sub c}=qB/(2 {pi} m)), for which two different techniques are available. The destructive time-of-flight ion cyclotron resonance (TOF-ICR) technique, based on the measurement of the flight time of excited ions, is the established method for measurements on short-lived radionuclides. It is not ideally suited for rarely produced ion species, since typically some hundred ions are required for a single resonance spectrum. At the Penning trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP therefore a non-destructive narrow-band Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) detection system is being developed. It is based on the detection of the image currents induced by the stored ions in the trap electrodes and will ultimately reach single ion sensitivity. TRIGA-TRAP also features broad-band FT-ICR detection for the coarse identification of the trap content. Additionally, the TOF-ICR detection system has been recently improved to utilize the Ramsey excitation technique to gain in precision, and the position information of the ion impact to further suppress background events in the final time-of-flight spectrum.

  14. Topiramate-induced maculopathy in IgG4-related disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DaCosta J

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Joanna DaCosta,1,2 Saad Younis1 1Ophthalmology Department, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Western Eye Hospital, 2Barts Health NHS Trust, Whipps Cross University Hospital, London, UK Abstract: This report describes a case of reversible topiramate-induced maculopathy in a 32-year-old female patient with IgG4-related disease. The patient presented with decreased vision associated with anterior uveitis and cystoid macula edema, which was unresponsive to oral and topical steroids. Following topiramate cessation, both cystoid macula edema and vision improved. The ocular side effects of topiramate and putative pharmacological mechanisms for topiramate-induced maculopathy in the context of IgG4-related disease are discussed. This report highlights that neurologists and ophthalmologists should be aware that patients presenting with topiramate-associated maculopathy should be advised to discontinue topiramate promptly to prevent irreversible loss of vision. Keywords: IgG4 disease, maculopathy, topiramate

  15. The trap line as a measure of small mammal populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, L.F.

    1948-01-01

    SUMMARY: The value of a line of traps as a measure of relative abundance of small mammals was studied by field trials on Peromyscus leucopus populations. Comparisons were made between the numbers of mice captured by a line of live traps and the numbers captured in intensive live trapping of a larger area surrounding the line. Trials were made in bottomland woods where mice were numerous and in upland woods where mice were less common. It was found that wood mice living in upland woods had significantly larger cruising ranges than those living in bottomland woods. Consequently, a line of traps in the bottomlands captured mice from a smaller surrounding territory than in the uplands. Therefore, comparisons of relative size of the mouse population in these two areas on the basis of line-trapping showed an erroneously large number for the upland woods. As a result of these trials and the studies of other workers, it is concluded that lines of traps are not fully reliable means of measuring relative abundance of small mammals.

  16. LDPC Codes from Latin Squares Free of Small Trapping Sets

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Dung Viet; Marcellin, Michael W; Vasic, Bane

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the construction of low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes with low error floors. Two main contributions are made. First, a new class of structured LDPC codes is introduced. The parity check matrices of these codes are arrays of permutation matrices which are obtained from Latin squares and form a finite field under some matrix operations. Second, a method to construct LDPC codes with low error floors on the binary symmetric channel (BSC) is presented. Codes are constructed so that their Tanner graphs are free of certain small trapping sets. These trapping sets are selected from the Trapping Set Ontology for the Gallager A/B decoder. They are selected based on their relative harmfulness for a given decoding algorithm. We evaluate the relative harmfulness of different trapping sets for the sum product algorithm (SPA) by using the topological relations among them and by analyzing the decoding failures on one trapping set in the presence or absence of other trapping sets.

  17. Tubes, tables and traps: great apes solve two functionally equivalent trap tasks but show no evidence of transfer across tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Ordas, Gema; Call, Josep; Colmenares, Fernando

    2008-07-01

    Previous studies on tool using have shown that presenting subjects with certain modifications in the experimental setup can substantially improve their performance. However, procedural modifications (e.g. trap table task) may not only remove task constraints but also simplify the problem conceptually. The goal of this study was to design a variation of the trap-table that was functionally equivalent to the trap-tube task. In this new task, the subjects had to decide where to insert the tool and in which direction the reward should be pushed. We also administered a trap-tube task that allowed animals to push or rake the reward with the tool to compare the subjects' performance on both tasks. We used a larger sample of subjects than in previous studies and from all the four species of great apes (Gorilla gorilla, Pan troglodytes, Pan paniscus, and Pongo pygmaeus). The results showed that apes performed better in the trap-platform task than in the trap-tube task. Subjects solved the tube task faster than in previous studies and they also preferred to rake in rather than to push the reward out. There was no correlation in the level of performance between both tasks, and no indication of interspecies differences. These data are consistent with the idea that apes may possess some specific causal knowledge of traps but may lack the ability to establish analogical relations between functional equivalent tasks.

  18. How to catch more prey with less effective traps: explaining the evolution of temporarily inactive traps in carnivorous pitcher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Ulrike; Federle, Walter; Seidel, Hannes; Grafe, T Ulmar; Ioannou, Christos C

    2015-02-22

    Carnivorous Nepenthes pitcher plants capture arthropods with specialized slippery surfaces. The key trapping surface, the pitcher rim (peristome), is highly slippery when wetted by rain, nectar or condensation, but not when dry. As natural selection should favour adaptations that maximize prey intake, the evolution of temporarily inactive traps seems paradoxical. Here, we show that intermittent trap deactivation promotes 'batch captures' of ants. Prey surveys revealed that N. rafflesiana pitchers sporadically capture large numbers of ants from the same species. Continuous experimental wetting of the peristome increased the number of non-recruiting prey, but decreased the number of captured ants and shifted their trapping mode from batch to individual capture events. Ant recruitment was also lower to continuously wetted pitchers. Our experimental data fit a simple model that predicts that intermittent, wetness-based trap activation should allow safe access for 'scout' ants under dry conditions, thereby promoting recruitment and ultimately higher prey numbers. The peristome trapping mechanism may therefore represent an adaptation for capturing ants. The relatively rare batch capture events may particularly benefit larger plants with many pitchers. This explains why young plants of many Nepenthes species additionally employ wetness-independent, waxy trapping surfaces.

  19. Episcleritis Related to Drug-Induced Lupus Erythematosus following Infliximab Therapy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irini P. Chatziralli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced lupus erythematosus is defined as a lupus-like syndrome temporally related to continuous drug exposure which resolves after discontinuation of the offending drug. Herein, we describe a patient with distinct clinical manifestations of anti-TNF-associated DILE related to infliximab therapy. The patient exhibited clinical and laboratory findings of lupus-like illnesses as well as ocular disorders, such as episcleritis. The main message is that the symptoms of DILE should not be overlooked, although sometimes other systematic conditions may underlie them. As a result, it is very important for the clinicians to evaluate the symptoms of DILE and manage appropriately these cases.

  20. Using malaise traps to sample ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulyshen, Michael D., James L. Hanula, and Scott Horn

    2005-01-01

    Pitfall traps provide an easy and inexpensive way to sample ground-dwelling arthropods (Spence and Niemela 1994; Spence et al. 1997; Abildsnes and Tommeras 2000) and have been used exclusively in many studies of the abundance and diversity of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae). Despite the popularity of this trapping technique, pitfall traps have many disadvantages. For example, they often fail to collect both small (Spence and Niemela 1994) and trap-shy species (Benest 1989), eventually deplete the local carabid population (Digweed et al. 1995), require a species to be ground-dwelling in order to be captured (Liebherr and Mahar 1979), and produce different results depending on trap diameter and material, type of preservative used, and trap placement (Greenslade 1964; Luff 1975; Work et al. 2002). Further complications arise from seasonal patterns of movement among the beetles themselves (Maelfait and Desender 1990), as well as numerous climatic factors, differences in plant cover, and variable surface conditions (Adis 1979). Because of these limitations, pitfall trap data give an incomplete picture of the carabid community and should be interpreted carefully. Additional methods, such as use of Berlese funnels and litter washing (Spence and Niemela 1994), collection from lights (Usis and MacLean 1998), and deployment of flight intercept devices (Liebherr and Mahar 1979; Paarmann and Stork 1987), should be incorporated in surveys to better ascertain the species composition and relative numbers of ground beetles. Flight intercept devices, like pitfall traps, have the advantage of being easy to use and replicate, but their value to carabid surveys is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of Malaise traps for sampling ground beetles in a bottomland hardwood forest.

  1. Using malaise traps to sample ground beetles (Coleoptera. Carabidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulyshen, Michael D. [USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, New Ellenton, SC (United States); Hanula, James L. [USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, New Ellenton, SC (United States); Horn, Scott [USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, New Ellenton, SC (United States)

    2012-04-02

    Pitfall traps provide an easy and inexpensive way to sample ground-dwelling arthropods (Spence and Niemela 1994; Spence et al. 1997; Abildsnes and Tommeras 2000) and have been used exclusively in many studies of the abundance and diversity of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae). Despite the popularity of this trapping technique, pitfall traps have many disadvantages. For example, they often fail to collect both small (Spence and Niemela 1994) and trap-shy species (Benest 1989), eventually deplete the local carabid population (Digweed et al. 1995), require a species to be ground-dwelling in order to be captured (Liebherr and Mahar 1979), and produce different results depending on trap diameter and material, type of preservative used, and trap placement (Greenslade 1964; Luff 1975; Work et al. 2002). Further complications arise from seasonal patterns of movement among the beetles themselves (Maelfait and Desender 1990), as well as numerous climatic factors, differences in plant cover, and variable surface conditions (Adis 1979). Because of these limitations, pitfall trap data give an incomplete picture of the carabid community and should be interpreted carefully. Additional methods, such as use of Berlese funnels and litter washing (Spence and Niemela 1994), collection from lights (Usis and MacLean 1998), and deployment of flight intercept devices (Liebherr and Mahar 1979; Paarmann and Stork 1987), should be incorporated in surveys to better ascertain the species composition and relative numbers of ground beetles. Flight intercept devices, like pitfall traps, have the advantage of being easy to use and replicate, but their value to carabid surveys is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of Malaise traps for sampling ground beetles in a bottomland hardwood forest.

  2. Microinstrument gradient-force optical trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, S D; Baskin, R J; Howitt, D G

    1999-10-01

    A micromachined fiber-optic trap is presented. The trap consists of four single-mode, 1064-nm optical intersection. The beam fibers mounted in a micromachined silicon and glass housing. Micromachining provides the necessary precision to align the four optical fibers so that the outputs have a common intersection forms a strong three-dimensional gradient-force trap with trapping forces comparable with that of optical tweezers. Characterization of the multibeam fiber trap is illustrated for capture of polystyrene microspheres, computer simulations of the trap stiffness, and experimental determination of the trapping forces.

  3. Microparticle-Induced Coagulation Relates to Coronary Artery Atherosclerosis in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Horn

    Full Text Available Circulating microparticles (MPs derived from endothelial cells and blood cells bear procoagulant activity and promote thrombin generation. Thrombin exerts proinflammatory effects mediating the progression of atherosclerosis. Aortic valve stenosis may represent an atherosclerosis-like process involving both the aortic valve and the vascular system. The aim of this study was to investigate whether MP-induced thrombin generation is related to coronary atherosclerosis and aortic valve calcification.In a cross-sectional study of 55 patients with severe aortic valve stenosis, we assessed the coronary calcification score (CAC as indicator of total coronary atherosclerosis burden, and aortic valve calcification (AVC by computed tomography. Thrombin-antithrombin complex (TATc levels were measured as a marker for thrombin formation. Circulating MPs were characterized by flow cytometry according to the expression of established surface antigens and by measuring MP-induced thrombin generation.Patients with CAC score below the median were classified as patients with low CAC, patients with CAC Score above the median as high CAC. In patients with high CAC compared to patients with low CAC we detected higher levels of TATc, platelet-derived MPs (PMPs, endothelial-derived MPs (EMPs and MP-induced thrombin generation. Increased level of PMPs and MP-induced thrombin generation were independent predictors for the severity of CAC. In contrast, AVC Score did not differ between patients with high and low CAC and did neither correlate with MPs levels nor with MP-induced thrombin generation.In patients with severe aortic valve stenosis MP-induced thrombin generation was independently associated with the severity of CAC but not AVC indicating different pathomechanisms involved in coronary artery and aortic valve calcification.

  4. Problems associated with the seed-trap method when measuring seed dispersal in forests inhabited by Japanese macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujino, Riyou; Yumoto, Takakazu

    2014-04-01

    Despite the widespread use of seed/litter traps in seed dispersal ecology, several problems have arisen when using this method in forests inhabited by semi-terrestrial monkeys. The first issue is the height of the trap relative to the location where macaques spit seeds and/or defecate. For Japanese macaques in the lowland forests of Yakushima Island, southern Japan, 30-50% of the seeds emitted from cheek pouches and faeces will not be caught by seed traps, leading to underestimation of seed fall. The second issue is the attractiveness of seed traps. Macaques sometimes play with the traps, potentially affecting the results of the seed-trap method in complex ways, including both negative and positive effects. To obtain reasonable estimates of total seed dispersal, we recommend that researchers conduct the seed-trap method concurrently with monkey observations, and that they should affix traps more securely to prevent macaques from destroying the traps.

  5. Live trapping of hawks and owls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, R.E.; Cope, J.B.; Robbins, C.S.

    1945-01-01

    1. Hawks of six species (80 individuals) and owls of five species (37 individuals) were trapped for banding from November 1, 1943, to. May 26,1944. 2. In general, pole traps proved better than hand-operated traps or automatic traps using live bait. 3. Verbail pole traps proved very efficient, and were much more humane than padded steel traps because they rarely injured a captured bird. 4: Unbaited Verbail traps took a variety of raptors, in rough proportion to their local abundance, although slightly more of beneficial species were caught than of harmful types. 5. Hawks and owls were retrapped more readily in Verbail traps than in other types tried. 6. The number of song birds caught in Verbail traps was negligible. 7. Crows and vultures were not taken in Verbail traps, but possibly could be caught with bait.

  6. Dose- and time- effect responses of DNA methylation and histone H3K9 acetylation changes induced by traffic-related air pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Rui; Jin, Yongtang; Liu, Xinneng; Ye, Huaizhuang; Zhu, Ziyi; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Ting; Xu, Yinchun

    2017-01-01

    As an important risk factor of respiratory disorders, traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) has caused extensive concerns. Epigenetic change has been considered a link between TRAP and respiratory diseases. However, the exact effects of TRAP on epigenetic changes are still unclear. Here we investigated the dose- and time- effect responses of TRAP on DNA methylations and H3K9 acetylation (H3K9ac) in both blood and lung tissues of rats. The findings showed that every 1 μg/m3 increase of TRAP components were associated with changes in %5 mC (95% CI) in LINE-1, iNOS, p16CDKN2A, and APC ranging from −0.088% (−0.150, −0.026) to 0.102 (0.049, 0.154), as well as 0.276 (0.053, 0.498) to 0.475 (0.103, 0.848) ng/mg increase of H3K9ac. In addition, every 1 more day exposure at high level of TRAP (in tunnel) also significantly changed the levels of DNA methylation (ranging from −0.842% to 0.248%) and H3K9ac (16.033 and 15.718 ng/mg pro in PBMC and lung tissue, respectively) changes. Season and/or sex could interact with air pollutants in affecting DNA methylation and H3K9ac. The findings showed that TRAP exposure is dose- and time- dependently associated with the changes of DNA methylation and H3K9ac. PMID:28256616

  7. Glutamatergic mechanisms associated with stress-induced amygdala excitability and anxiety-related behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masneuf, Sophie; Lowery-Gionta, Emily; Colacicco, Giovanni; Pleil, Kristen E; Li, Chia; Crowley, Nicole; Flynn, Shaun; Holmes, Andrew; Kash, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    The neural factors underlying individual differences in susceptibility to chronic stress remain poorly understood. Preclinical studies demonstrate that mouse strains vary greatly in anxiety-related responses to chronic stress in a manner paralleled by differential stress-induced changes in glutamatergic signaling in the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Previous work has also shown that alterations in the amygdala gene expression of the GluN1 NMDA and the GluK1 kainate receptors are associated with stress-induced alterations in anxiety-like behavior in the C57BL/6J mouse strain. Using in vivo behavioral pharmacological and ex vivo physiological approaches, the aim of the current study was to further elucidate changes in glutamate neurotransmission in the BLA caused by stress and to test the functional roles of GluN1 and GluK1 in mediating stress-related changes in behavior. Results showed that stress-induced alterations in anxiety-like behavior (light/dark exploration test) were absent following bilateral infusion of the GluK1 agonist ATPA into the BLA. Intra-BLA infusion of the competitive NMDA antagonist AP5 produced a generalized behavioral disinhibition/locomotor hyperactivity, irrespective of stress. Slice electrophysiological recordings showed that ATPA augmented BLA GABAergic neurotransmission and that stress increased the amplitude of network-dependent spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents and amplitude of GABAergic miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in BLA. These findings could indicate stress-induced BLA glutamatergic neuronal network hyperexcitability and a compensatory increase in GABAergic neurotransmission, suggesting that GluK1 agonism augmented GABAergic inhibition to prevent behavioral sequelae of stress. Current data could have implications for developing novel therapeutic approaches, including GluK1 agonists, for stress-related anxiety disorders.

  8. Pressure-voltage trap for DNA near a solid-state nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogerheide, David P; Lu, Bo; Golovchenko, Jene A

    2014-07-22

    We report the formation of a tunable single DNA molecule trap near a solid-state nanopore in an electrolyte solution under conditions where an electric force and a pressure-induced viscous flow force on the molecule are nearly balanced. Trapped molecules can enter the pore multiple times before escaping the trap by passing through the pore or by diffusing away. Statistical analysis of many individually trapped molecules yields a detailed picture of the fluctuation phenomena involved, which are successfully modeled by a one-dimensional first passage approach.

  9. A magnetic particle micro-trap for large trapping surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.

    2012-01-08

    Manipulation of micron-size magnetic particles of the superparamagnetic type contributes significantly in many applications like controlling the antibody/antigen binding process in immunoassays. Specifically, more target biomolecules can be attached/tagged and analyzed since the three dimensional structure of the magnetic particles increases the surface to volume ratio. Additionally, such biomolecular-tagged magnetic particles can be easily manipulated by an external magnetic field due to their superparamagnetic behavior. Therefore, magnetic particle- based immunoassays are extensively applied in micro-flow cytometry. The design of a square-loop micro-trap as a magnetic particle manipulator as well as numerical and experimental analysis is presented. Experimental results showed that the micro-trap could successfully trap and concentrate magnetic particles from a large to a small area with a high spatial range.

  10. Process-dependent residual trapping of CO2 in sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Lin; Benson, Sally M.

    2014-04-01

    This paper demonstrates that the nature and extent of residual CO2 trapping depend on the process by which the CO2 phase is introduced into the rock. We compare residual trapping of CO2 in Berea Sandstone by imbibing water into a core containing either exsolved CO2 or CO2 introduced by drainage. X-ray computed tomography measurements are used to map the spatial distribution of CO2 preimbibition and postimbibition. Unlike during drainage where the CO2 distribution is strongly influenced by the heterogeneity of the rock, the distribution of exsolved CO2 is comparatively uniform. Postimbibition, the CO2 distribution retained the essential features for both the exsolved and drainage cases, but twice as much residual trapping is observed for exsolved CO2 even with similar preimbibition gas saturations. Residually trapped exsolved gas also disproportionately reduced water relative permeability. Development of process-dependent parameterization will help better manage subsurface flow processes and unlock benefits from gas exsolution.

  11. Determining isotopic distributions of fission products with a penning trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penttilae, H.; Karvonen, P.; Eronen, T.; Elomaa, V.V.; Hager, U.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Moore, I.D.; Peraejaervi, K.; Rahaman, S.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Saastamoinen, A.; Sonoda, T.; Aeystoe, J. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Rubchenya, V. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2010-04-15

    A novel method to determine independent yields in particle-induced fission employing the ion guide technique and ion counting after a Penning trap has been developed. The method takes advantage of the fact that a Penning trap can be used as a precision mass filter, which allows an unambiguous identification of the fission fragments. The method was tested with 25MeV and 50MeV proton-induced fission of {sup 238}U. The data is internally reproducible with an accuracy of a few per cent. A satisfactory agreement was obtained with older ion guide yield measurements in 25MeV proton-induced fission. The results for Rb and Cs yields in 50MeV proton-induced fission agree with previous measurements performed at an isotope separator equipped with a chemically selective ion source. (orig.)

  12. The Role of TNF Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.Huang; N.Erdmann; H.Peng; Y.Zhao

    2005-01-01

    A hallmark of all forms of neurodegenerative diseases is impairment of neuronal functions, and in many cases neuronal cell death. Although the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases may be distinct, different diseases display a similar pathogenesis, for example abnormal immunity within the central nervous system (CNS), activation of macrophage/microglia and the involvement of proinflammatory cytokines. Recent studies show that neurons in a neurodegenerative state undergo a highly regulated programmed cell death, also called apoptosis. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), a member of the TNF family, has been shown to be involved in apoptosis during many diseases. As one member of a death ligand family, TRAIL was originally thought to target only tumor cells and was not present in CNS. However, recent data showed that TRAIL was unregulated in HIV-l-infected and immune-activated macrophages, a major disease inducing cell during HIV-l-associated dementia (HAD). TRAIL is also induced on neuron by [$-amyloid protein, an important pathogen for Alzheimer's disease. In this review, we summarize the possible common aspects that TRAIL involved those neurodegenerative diseases, TRAIL induced apoptosis signaling in the CNS cells, and specific role of TRAIL in individual diseases. Cellular & MolecularImmunology. 2005;2(2):113-122.

  13. The Role of TNF Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.Huang; N.Erdmann; H.Peng; Y.Zhao; Jialin Zheng

    2005-01-01

    A hallmark of all forms of neurodegenerative diseases is impairment of neuronal functions, and in many cases neuronal cell death. Although the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases may be distinct, different diseases display a similar pathogenesis, for example abnormal immunity within the central nervous system (CNS), activation of macrophage/microglia and the involvement of proinflammatory cytokines. Recent studies show that neurons in a neurodegenerative state undergo a highly regulated programmed cell death, also called apoptosis. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), a member of the TNF family, has been shown to be involved in apoptosis during many diseases. As one member of a death ligand family, TRAIL was originally thought to target only tumor cells and was not present in CNS. However, recent data showed that TRAIL was unregulated in HIV-1-infected and immune-activated macrophages, a major disease inducing cell during HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD). TRAIL is also induced on neuron by β-amyloid protein, an important pathogen for Alzheimer's disease. In this review, we summarize the possible common aspects that TRAIL involved those neurodegenerative diseases, TRAIL induced apoptosis signaling in the CNS cells, and specific role of TRAIL in individual diseases. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(2):113-122.

  14. Desferrioxamine-induced long bone changes in thalassaemic patients - Radiographic features, prevalence and relations with growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Y.L.; Li, C.K.; Pang, L.M.; Chik, K.W

    2000-08-01

    AIM: To study the radiographic findings of desferrioxamine-induced bone dysplasia, its prevalence and relation to growth in thalassaemic patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed in 35 thalassaemic patients on a hypertransfusion scheme and chelation therapy at a dose not exceeding 50 mg/kg/day. Radiographs of the left hand taken for bone age assessment in consecutive patients over the past 12 months were evaluated for signs of desferrioxamine-induced bone dysplasia. The findings were correlated with data on growth, chelation and body iron content. RESULTS: Twelve of 35 patients had evidence of desferrioxamine-induced long bone dysplasia. There was no significant difference in the groups with and without radiographic evidence of bone dysplasia with respect to the height percentile at time of initiation of therapy, height percentile at time of radiography, skeletal age delay, age at starting chelation, chelation dose and duration, units of blood transfused, average chelation dose, and serum ferritin levels at time of radiography. Both groups showed a reduced percentile growth with a significantly greater reduction (P = 0.03) in the patients with dysplastic change. CONCLUSION: Desferrioxamine-induced bone dysplasia is associated with height reduction and can be seen in patients receiving desferrioxamine chelation therapy at doses of less than 50 mg/kg/day. Awareness of the diagnosis is of importance as reduction of the desferrioxamine dose may improve bone growth. Chan, Y. L. (2000)

  15. Pb2+ exposure induced microsatellite instability in Pisum sativum in a locus related with glutamine metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, E; Azevedo, R; Moreira, H; Souto, L; Santos, Conceição

    2013-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a toxic element, but its putative mutagenic effects in plant cells, using molecular markers, remain to unveil. To evaluate if Pb induces mutagenicity, Pisum sativum L. seedlings were exposed to Pb(2+) (up to 2000 mg L(-1)) for 28 days and the instability of microsatellites (or Simple Sequence Repeats, SSR) was analyzed in leaves and roots. The analysis of eight selected microsatellites (SSR1-SSR8) demonstrated that only at the highest dosage microsatellite instability (MSI) occurred, at a frequency of 4.2%. Changes were detected in one microsatellite (SSR6) that is inserted in the locus for glutamine synthetase. SSR6 products of roots exposed to the highest concentration of Pb were 3 bp larger than those of the control. Our data demonstrate that: (a) SSR technique is sensitive to detect Pb-induced mutagenicity in plants. MSI instability is Pb dose dependent and organ dependent (roots are more sensitive); (b) the Pb-sensitive SSR6 is inserted in the glutamine synthetase locus, with still unknown relation with functional changes of this enzyme; (c) Pb levels inducing MSI are much above the maximum admitted levels in some European Union countries for agricultural purpose waters. In conclusion, we propose here the potential use of SSR to evaluate Pb(2+)-induced mutagenicity, in combination with other genetic markers.

  16. A randomised, double-blind, controlled vaccine efficacy trial of DNA/MVA ME-TRAP against malaria infection in Gambian adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasee S Moorthy

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many malaria vaccines are currently in development, although very few have been evaluated for efficacy in the field. Plasmodium falciparum multiple epitope (ME- thrombospondin-related adhesion protein (TRAP candidate vaccines are designed to potently induce effector T cells and so are a departure from earlier malaria vaccines evaluated in the field in terms of their mechanism of action. ME-TRAP vaccines encode a polyepitope string and the TRAP sporozoite antigen. Two vaccine vectors encoding ME-TRAP, plasmid DNA and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA, when used sequentially in a prime-boost immunisation regime, induce high frequencies of effector T cells and partial protection, manifest as delay in time to parasitaemia, in a clinical challenge model. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A total of 372 Gambian men aged 15-45 y were randomised to receive either DNA ME-TRAP followed by MVA ME-TRAP or rabies vaccine (control. Of these men, 296 received three doses of vaccine timed to coincide with the beginning of the transmission season (141 in the DNA/MVA group and 155 in the rabies group and were followed up. Volunteers were given sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine 2 wk before the final vaccination. Blood smears were collected weekly for 11 wk and whenever a volunteer developed symptoms compatible with malaria during the transmission season. The primary endpoint was time to first infection with asexual P. falciparum. Analysis was per protocol. DNA ME-TRAP and MVA ME-TRAP were safe and well-tolerated. Effector T cell responses to a non-vaccine strain of TRAP were 50-fold higher postvaccination in the malaria vaccine group than in the rabies vaccine group. Vaccine efficacy, adjusted for confounding factors, was 10.3% (95% confidence interval, -22% to +34%; p = 0.49. Incidence of malaria infection decreased with increasing age and was associated with ethnicity. CONCLUSIONS: DNA/MVA heterologous prime-boost vaccination is safe and highly immunogenic for

  17. Workshop on induced Seismicity due to fluid injection/production from Energy-Related Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majer, E.L.; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Rueter, Horst; Stump, Brian; Segall, Paul; Zoback, Mark; Nelson, Jim; Frohlich, Cliff; Rutledge, Jim; Gritto, Roland; Baria, Roy; Hickman, Steve; McGarr, Art; Ellsworth, Bill; Lockner, Dave; Oppenheimer, David; Henning, Peter; Rosca, Anca; Hornby, Brian; Wang, Herb; Beeler, Nick; Ghassemi, Ahmad; Walters, Mark; Robertson-Tait, Ann; Dracos, Peter; Fehler, Mike; Abou-Sayed, Ahmed; Ake, Jon; Vorobiev, Oleg; Julian, Bruce

    2011-04-01

    that was necessary not only to make fluid injections safe, but an economic asset, DOE organized a series of workshops. The first workshop was held on February 4, 2010, at Stanford University. A second workshop will be held in mid-2010 to address the critical elements of a 'best practices/protocol' that industry could use as a guide to move forward with safe implementation of fluid injections/production for energy-related applications, i.e., a risk mitigation plan, and specific recommendations for industry to follow. The objectives of the first workshop were to identify critical technology and research needs/approaches to advance the understanding of induced seismicity associated with energy related fluid injection/production, such that: (1) The risk associated with induced seismicity can be reduced to a level that is acceptable to the public, policy makers, and regulators; and (2) Seismicity can be utilized/controlled to monitor, manage, and optimize the desired fluid behavior in a cost effective fashion. There were two primary goals during the workshop: (1) Identify the critical roadblocks preventing the necessary understanding of human-induced seismicity. These roadblocks could be technology related (better imaging of faults and fractures, more accurate fluid tracking, improved stress measurements, etc.), research related (fundamental understanding of rock physical properties and geochemical fluid/rock interactions, development of improved constitutive relations, improved understanding of rock failure, improved data processing and modeling, etc.), or a combination of both. (2) After laying out the roadblocks the second goal was to identify technology development and research needs that could be implemented in the near future to address the above objectives.

  18. Efficient thermoelectric trap for metal vapours suitable for high-vacuum system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwinski, Mariusz; Klosowski, Lukasz; Dziczek, Darek; Chwirot, Stanislaw

    2016-09-01

    Atomic beams are widely used in various collisional experiments. Typically, cold traps are used to prevent the investigated atoms from spreading within the vacuum chamber and contaminating the system. Usually such a trap consists of a vacuum feedthrough with metal element cooled with liquid nitrogen or dry ice on the atmosphere side and a metal trap in the vacuum. Using liquid nitrogen or dry ice is relatively inconvenient due to high costs of operation and a need of periodically refilling the reservoir of the cold medium. We present a new thermoelectric cold trap composed of water-cooled vacuum feedthrough with Peltier modules placed at the high vacuum end. The present system ensures the cold trap temperature below -20°C, low enough to efficiently catch the atoms of interest. The new cold trap was characterised and compared with typical LN2 trap.

  19. 6th International Conference on Trapped Charged Particles and Fundamental Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Schury, Peter; Ichikawa, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    This volume presents the proceedings of the International Conference on Trapped Charged Particles and Fundamental Physics (TCP 14). It presents recent developments in the theoretical and experimental research on trapped charged particles and related fundamental physics and applications. The content has been divided topic-wise covering basic questions of Fundamental Physics, Quantum and QED Effects, Plasmas and Collective Behavior and Anti-Hydrogen. More technical issues include Storage Ring Physics, Precision Spectroscopy and Frequency Standards, Highly Charged Ions in Traps, Traps for Radioactive Isotopes and New Techniques and Facilities. An applied aspect of ion trapping is discussed in section devoted to Applications of Particle Trapping including Quantum Information and Processing. Each topic has a more general introduction, but also more detailed contributions are included. A selection of contributions exemplifies the interdisciplinary nature of the research on trapped charged particles worldwide. Repri...

  20. LET spectra of trapped anomalous cosmic rays in low-Earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylka, A. J.; Boberg, P. R.; Adams, J. H., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Observations aboard Cosmos satelites discovered trapped anomalous cosmic rays (ACRs), tracked the variation in their intensity in 1986-1988, and measured their fluence, spectrum, and composition at solar minimum in the previous solar cycle. The MAST instrument aboard the SAMPEX satellite has observed trapped anomalous cosmic rays in the present solar cycle, confirmed the general features of the Cosmos data, and provided the first detailed observations of trapped ACRs. In this paper we apply theoretical modeling of trapped ACRs, which is shown to provide a reasonably good description of both the Cosmos and SAMPEX data, to calculate the integral linear-energy-transfer (LET) spectra due to trapped ACRs in typical low-Earth orbits. We compare these calculations with the LET spectra produced by galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and non-trapped ACRs in order to assess the relative radiation hazard posed by trapped ACRs.

  1. Recent Operational Experience with the Internal Thermal Control System Dual-Membrane Gas Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Lukens, Clark; Reeves, Daniel R.; Holt, James M.

    2004-01-01

    A dual-membrane gas trap is currently used to remove gas bubbles from the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) coolant on board the International Space Station. The gas trap consists of concentric tube membrane pairs, comprised of outer hydrophilic tubes and inner hydrophobic fibers. Liquid coolant passes through the outer hydrophilic membrane, which traps the gas bubbles. The inner hydrophobic fiber allows the trapped gas bubbles to pass through and vent to the ambient atmosphere in the cabin. The gas removal performance and operational lifetime of the gas trap have been affected by contamination in the ITCS coolant. However, the gas trap has performed flawlessly with regard to its purpose of preventing gas bubbles from causing depriming, overspeed, and shutdown of the ITCS pump. This paper discusses on-orbit events over the course of the last year related to the performance and functioning of the gas trap.

  2. Shortening-induced torque depression in old men: implications for age-related power loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Geoffrey A; Makrakos, Demetri P; Stevens, Daniel E; Herzog, Walter; Rice, Charles L; Vandervoort, Anthony A

    2014-09-01

    Following active muscle shortening, the steady-state isometric torque at the final muscle length is lower than the steady-state torque obtained for a purely isometric contraction at that same final muscle length. This well-documented property of skeletal muscle is termed shortening-induced torque depression (TD). Despite many investigations into the mechanisms of weakness and power loss in old age, the influence of muscle shortening on the history dependence of isometric torque production remains to be elucidated. Thus, it is unclear whether older adults are disadvantaged for torque and power production following a dynamic shortening contraction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate shortening-induced TD in older adults, and to determine whether shortening-induced TD is related to power loss. Maximal voluntary isometric dorsiflexion contractions (MVC; 10s) in 8 young (25.5±3.7years) and 9 old (76.1±5.4years) men were performed on a HUMAC NORM dynamometer as a reference, and then again following an active shortening of 40° joint excursion (40°PF-0°PF) at angular velocities of 15°/s and 120°/s. Work and instantaneous power were derived during shortening. Shortening-induced TD was calculated and expressed as a percentage by determining the mean torque value over 1s during the isometric steady state of the MVC following shortening, divided by the mean torque value for the same 1s time period during the isometric reference MVC. To assess muscle activation, electromyography (root mean square; EMGRMS) of the tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL) was calculated at identical time points used in assessing shortening-induced TD, and voluntary activation (VA) was assessed using the interpolated twitch technique. Old were 18% weaker than young for MVC, and ~40% less powerful for 15°/s and 120°/s of shortening. Old produced 37% and 21% less work for 15°/s and 120°/s than young, respectively. Furthermore, old experienced 60% and 70% greater shortening-induced TD

  3. How long is enough to detect terrestrial animals? Estimating the minimum trapping effort on camera traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingfeng Si

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Camera traps is an important wildlife inventory tool for estimating species diversity at a site. Knowing what minimum trapping effort is needed to detect target species is also important to designing efficient studies, considering both the number of camera locations, and survey length. Here, we take advantage of a two-year camera trapping dataset from a small (24-ha study plot in Gutianshan National Nature Reserve, eastern China to estimate the minimum trapping effort actually needed to sample the wildlife community. We also evaluated the relative value of adding new camera sites or running cameras for a longer period at one site. The full dataset includes 1727 independent photographs captured during 13,824 camera days, documenting 10 resident terrestrial species of birds and mammals. Our rarefaction analysis shows that a minimum of 931 camera days would be needed to detect the resident species sufficiently in the plot, and c. 8700 camera days to detect all 10 resident species. In terms of detecting a diversity of species, the optimal sampling period for one camera site was c. 40, or long enough to record about 20 independent photographs. Our analysis of evaluating the increasing number of additional camera sites shows that rotating cameras to new sites would be more efficient for measuring species richness than leaving cameras at fewer sites for a longer period.

  4. How long is enough to detect terrestrial animals? Estimating the minimum trapping effort on camera traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Xingfeng; Kays, Roland; Ding, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Camera traps is an important wildlife inventory tool for estimating species diversity at a site. Knowing what minimum trapping effort is needed to detect target species is also important to designing efficient studies, considering both the number of camera locations, and survey length. Here, we take advantage of a two-year camera trapping dataset from a small (24-ha) study plot in Gutianshan National Nature Reserve, eastern China to estimate the minimum trapping effort actually needed to sample the wildlife community. We also evaluated the relative value of adding new camera sites or running cameras for a longer period at one site. The full dataset includes 1727 independent photographs captured during 13,824 camera days, documenting 10 resident terrestrial species of birds and mammals. Our rarefaction analysis shows that a minimum of 931 camera days would be needed to detect the resident species sufficiently in the plot, and c. 8700 camera days to detect all 10 resident species. In terms of detecting a diversity of species, the optimal sampling period for one camera site was c. 40, or long enough to record about 20 independent photographs. Our analysis of evaluating the increasing number of additional camera sites shows that rotating cameras to new sites would be more efficient for measuring species richness than leaving cameras at fewer sites for a longer period.

  5. Morphing structures of the Dionaea muscipula Ellis during the trap opening and closing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Alexander G; Forde-Tuckett, Victoria; Volkova, Maya I; Markin, Vladislav S

    2014-01-01

    The Venus flytrap is a marvelous plant that has intrigued scientists since the times of Charles Darwin. This carnivorous plant is capable of very fast movements to catch a prey. We found that the maximal speed of the trap closing in the Dionaea muscipula Ellis is about 130,000 times faster than the maximal speed of the trap opening. The mechanism and kinetics of this movement was debated for a long time. Here, the most recent Hydroelastic Curvature Model is applied to the analysis of this movement during closing and opening of the trap with or without a prey. Equations describing the trap movement were derived and verified with experimental data. Chloroform and ether, both anesthetic agents, induce action potentials and close the trap without the mechanical stimulation of trigger hairs. We tested this by dropping 10 μL of ether on the midrib inside the trap without touching any of the mechanosensitive trigger hairs. The trap closed slowly in 10 s. This is at least 20 times slower than the closing of the trap mechanically or electrically. The similar effect can be induced by placing 10 μL of chloroform on the midrib inside the trap, however, the lobes closing time in this case is as fast as closing after mechanical stimulation of the trigger hairs.

  6. Pain-related mediators underlie incision-induced mechanical nociception in the dorsal root ganglia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiuhong Yuan; Xiangyan Liu; Qiuping Tang; Yunlong Deng

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 50-70% of patients experience incision-induced mechanical nociception after sur-gery. However, the mechanism underlying incision-induced mechanical nociception is stil unclear. Interleukin-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are important pain mediators, but whether in-terleukin-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are involved in incision-induced mechanical no-ciception remains uncertain. In this study, forty rats were divided randomly into the incision surgery (n=32) and sham surgery (n=8) groups. Plantar incision on the central part of left hind paw was performed under anesthesia in rats from the surgery group. Rats in the sham surgery group re-ceived anesthesia, but not an incision. Von Frey test results showed that, compared with the sham surgery group, incision surgery decreased the withdrawal threshold of rats at 0.5, 3, 6 and 24 hours after incision. Immunofluorescence staining in the dorsal root ganglia of the spinal cord (L 3-5 ) showed that interleukin-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor were expressed mainly on smal-and medium-sized neurons (diameter40μm) at 6 and 24 hours after incision surgery, which corresponded to the decreased mechanical withdrawal threshold of rats in the surgery group. These experimental findings suggest that expression pattern shift of interleukin-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor induced by inci-sion surgery in dorsal root ganglia of rats was closely involved in lowering the threshold to me-chanical stimulus in the hind paw fol owing incision surgery. Pain-related mediators induced by in-cision surgery in dorsal root ganglia of rats possibly underlie mechanical nociception in ipsilateral hind paws.

  7. Cannabidivarin (CBDV suppresses pentylenetetrazole (PTZ-induced increases in epilepsy-related gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Amada

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available To date, anticonvulsant effects of the plant cannabinoid, cannabidivarin (CBDV, have been reported in several animal models of seizure. However, these behaviourally observed anticonvulsant effects have not been confirmed at the molecular level. To examine changes to epilepsy-related gene expression following chemical convulsant treatment and their subsequent control by phytocannabinoid administration, we behaviourally evaluated effects of CBDV (400 mg/kg, p.o. on acute, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ: 95 mg/kg, i.p.-induced seizures, quantified expression levels of several epilepsy-related genes (Fos, Casp 3, Ccl3, Ccl4, Npy, Arc, Penk, Camk2a, Bdnf and Egr1 by qPCR using hippocampal, neocortical and prefrontal cortical tissue samples before examining correlations between expression changes and seizure severity. PTZ treatment alone produced generalised seizures (median: 5.00 and significantly increased expression of Fos, Egr1, Arc, Ccl4 and Bdnf. Consistent with previous findings, CBDV significantly decreased PTZ-induced seizure severity (median: 3.25 and increased latency to the first sign of seizure. Furthermore, there were correlations between reductions of seizure severity and mRNA expression of Fos, Egr1, Arc, Ccl4 and Bdnf in the majority of brain regions in the CBDV+PTZ treated group. When CBDV treated animals were grouped into CBDV responders (criterion: seizure severity ≤3.25 and non-responders (criterion: seizure severity >3.25, PTZ-induced increases of Fos, Egr1, Arc, Ccl4 and Bdnf expression were suppressed in CBDV responders. These results provide the first molecular confirmation of behaviourally observed effects of the non-psychoactive, anticonvulsant cannabinoid, CBDV, upon chemically-induced seizures and serve to underscore its suitability for clinical development.

  8. Franck-Condon Physics in a Single Trapped Ion

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Y M; Xu, Y Y; Zhou, F; Chen, L; Gao, Kelin; Feng, Mang; Lee, Chaohong

    2010-01-01

    We explore the Franck-Condon physics in a single ion confined in a spin-dependent potential, formed by the combination of a Paul trap and a gradient magnetic field. The correlation between electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom called as electron-vibron coupling is induced by a nonzero gradient. The strong electron-vibron coupling could be employed to suppress or even block some quantum vibrational transitions of the trapped ion. This collective phenomenon is known as the Franck-Condon blockade. Furthermore, we propose how to apply the ionic Franck-Condon physics for quantum logic operation, preparation of motional Fock state and sideband cooling.

  9. The phenomenology of trapped inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Pearce, Lauren; Sorbo, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Trapped inflation is a mechanism in which particle production from the moving inflaton is the main source of friction in the inflaton equation of motion. The produced fields source inflaton perturbations, which dominate over the vacuum ones. We employ the set of equations for the inflaton zero mode and its perturbations which was developed in the original work on trapped inflation, and which we extend to second order in the perturbations. We build on this study by updating the experimental constraints, and by replacing the existing approximate solutions with more accurate ones. We obtain a different numerical value for the amplitude of the scalar power spectrum, and a parametrically different result for the bispectrum. This has implications for the allowed region of parameter space in models of trapped inflation, and for some of the phenomenological results obtained in this region. The main results in the allowed region are the following: monomial inflaton potentials, such as $V \\propto \\varphi,\\, \\varphi^2$ ...

  10. Promoter trapping in Magnaporthe grisea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiao-hong; LU Jian-ping; WANG Jiao-yu; MIN Hang; LIN Fu-cheng

    2006-01-01

    Application of promoter trapping based on transformation in Magnaporthe grisea is reported in this paper. Two promoter-trapping vectors, designated as pCBGFP and pEGFPHPH, were constructed and transformed into protoplasts of M.grisea. A library of 1077 transformants resistant to hygromycin B was generated. Of which, 448 transformants were found to express eGFP gene in different structures ofM. grisea. Three transformants grew slowly, 5 transformants decreased in conidiafion and 7 transformants reduced in pathogenicity greatly among these 448 transformants. Eleven transformants were checked by genomic southern blot randomly, and 9 of which were single-copy insertions. The promoter trapping technique has been applied successfully in M. grisea and can be used as a tool for functional genomic analysis.

  11. A comparison of two common flight interception traps to survey tropical arthropods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Lamarre

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Tropical forests are predicted to harbor most of the insect diversity on earth, but few studies have been conducted to characterize insect communities in tropical forests. One major limitation is the lack of consensus on methods for insect collection. Deciding which insect trap to use is an important consideration for ecologists and entomologists, yet to date few study has presented a quantitative comparison of the results generated by standardized methods in tropical insect communities. Here, we investigate the relative performance of two flight interception traps, the windowpane trap, and the more widely used malaise trap, across a broad gradient of lowland forest types in French Guiana. The windowpane trap consistently collected significantly more Coleoptera and Blattaria than the malaise trap, which proved most effective for Diptera, Hymenoptera, and Hemiptera. Orthoptera and Lepidoptera were not well represented using either trap, suggesting the need for additional methods such as bait traps and light traps. Our results of contrasting trap performance among insect orders underscore the need for complementary trapping strategies using multiple methods for community surveys in tropical forests.

  12. DLTS and MCTS analysis of the influence of growth pressure on trap generation in MOCVD GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, P. B.; Dedhia, R. H.; Tompkins, R. P.; Viveiros, E. A.; Jones, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate with DLTS and MCTS how changing growth pressure during MOCVD growth of GaN affects the majority and minority carrier trap signatures. Results indicate which specific traps are most strongly connected with the increased carbon concentration that lower growth pressure has led to. Carbon concentration is also verified with SIMS measurements. DLTS and MCTS measurements, related to carrier thermalization from traps, made up to a temperature of 450 K have found four majority carrier and two minority carrier traps. Using a lower growth pressures, at which greater incorporation of carbon is possible, has lead to larger concentrations of most of the traps; just as others have observed. However, the trap at EC - 0.48 eV is the least affected by the growth pressure. We relate all the traps found from DLTS and MCTS to those identified by others and mention the constituent atoms that the research community identifies with these traps.

  13. Dysprosium magneto-optical traps

    CERN Document Server

    Youn, Seo Ho; Ray, Ushnish; Lev, Benjamin L

    2010-01-01

    Magneto-optical traps (MOTs) of highly magnetic lanthanides open the door to explorations of novel phases of strongly correlated matter such as lattice supersolids and quantum liquid crystals. We recently reported the first MOTs of the five high abundance isotopes of the most magnetic atom, dysprosium. Described here are details of the experimental technique employed for repumper-free Dy MOTs containing up to half a billion atoms. Extensive characterization of the MOTs' properties---population, temperature, loading, metastable decay dynamics, trap dynamics---is provided.

  14. Feedback traps for virtual potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, Momčilo; Bechhoefer, John

    2017-03-01

    Feedback traps are tools for trapping and manipulating single charged objects, such as molecules in solution. An alternative to optical tweezers and other single-molecule techniques, they use feedback to counteract the Brownian motion of a molecule of interest. The trap first acquires information about a molecule's position and then applies an electric feedback force to move the molecule. Since electric forces are stronger than optical forces at small scales, feedback traps are the best way to trap single molecules without `touching' them (e.g. by putting them in a small box or attaching them to a tether). Feedback traps can do more than trap molecules: they can also subject a target object to forces that are calculated to be the gradient of a desired potential function U(x). If the feedback loop is fast enough, it creates a virtual potential whose dynamics will be very close to those of a particle in an actual potential U(x). But because the dynamics are entirely a result of the feedback loop-absent the feedback, there is only an object diffusing in a fluid-we are free to specify and then manipulate in time an arbitrary potential U(x,t). Here, we review recent applications of feedback traps to studies on the fundamental connections between information and thermodynamics, a topic where feedback plays an even more fundamental role. We discuss how recursive maximum-likelihood techniques allow continuous calibration, to compensate for drifts in experiments that last for days. We consider ways to estimate work and heat, using them to measure fluctuating energies to a precision of ±0.03 kT over these long experiments. Finally, we compare work and heat measurements of the costs of information erasure, the Landauer limit of kT ln 2 per bit of information erased. We argue that, when you want to know the average heat transferred to a bath in a long protocol, you should measure instead the average work and then infer the heat using the first law of thermodynamics. This

  15. Rotation sensing with trapped ions

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, W C

    2016-01-01

    We present a protocol for using trapped ions to measure rotations via matter-wave Sagnac interferometry. The trap allows the interferometer to enclose a large area in a compact apparatus through repeated round-trips in a Sagnac geometry. We show how a uniform magnetic field can be used to close the interferometer over a large dynamic range in rotation speed and measurement bandwidth without losing contrast. Since this technique does not require the ions to be confined in the Lamb-Dicke regime, thermal states with many phonons should be sufficient for operation.

  16. Induced liquefaction experiment in relatively dense, clay-rich sand deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzor, Yossef H.; Gvirtzman, Haim; Wainshtein, Ilia; Orian, Itay

    2009-02-01

    In this paper we report results from a controlled blast-induced liquefaction experiment at the field scale. The physical and mechanical properties of the materials at the subsurface are characterized by a suite of in situ and laboratory tests, including the Standard Penetration Test (SPT); downhole and cross-hole seismic velocity tests; density, porosity, and gradation tests; and direct shear tests. Since the blast experiment was performed above groundwater table, the subsurface was saturated by a sequence of controlled infiltration tests. A 50-kg TNT charge was detonated at a depth of 10 m, and seismic ground motions were recorded in a vertical geophone array positioned at a horizontal distance of 30 m from the blast borehole. Obtained liquefaction features include a water fountain that erupted from the blast borehole, prolonged bubbling of the water surface inside the infiltration trench (a process equivalent to "sand boils" typically observed at sites which have experienced liquefaction), lateral spreading, and surface settlement. We argue that in contrast to conventional predictions, liquefaction may be induced in relatively dense silty and clayey sands (shear wave velocity >300 m s-1; relative density = 63-89%) relatively rich in clays (fines content >30%) and that the driving mechanism should not necessarily be restricted to cyclic shear stress loading.

  17. Epistaxis related to exercise-induced pulmonary haemorrhage in South African Thoroughbreds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Weideman

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated if environmental factors had an effect on the incidence of epistaxis related to exercise-induced pulmonary haemorrhage (EIPH among racehorses in southern Africa. Data covering the period 1986-2001 and involving 778 532 race runs were analysed. This included the following information : date of race, age, sex, name of breeder, trainer, distance, jockey, state of going, weight carried, racing centre and altitude. Veterinarians employed by the Jockey Club suspended officially entered horses that presented with epistaxis (frank bleeding from the nostrils after racing. On-course endoscopy is not performedas a standard practice at any southern African racetrack. Epistaxis was identified in 1287 horses (0.165 %. More horses presented with EIPH-related epistaxis (a at sea level, (b from May to October, (c when older (> 3 years, (d after 1995, (e on Fridays and Sundays, and (f more in geldings than in mares or entire males. No association could be established between epistaxis and breeder, trainer, distance run, jockey, state of going and weight carried. It is concluded that the frequency of EIPH-related epistaxis is associated with altitude, winter and spring, sex and age. It is suggested that racing at lower altitudes may increase the probability of exercise-induced pulmonary haemorrhage.

  18. Polaprezinc attenuates cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis and related bladder pain in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Murakami-Nakayama

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Cav3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels targeted by H2S, a gasotransmitter, participate in cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis and bladder pain. Given that zinc selectively inhibits Cav3.2 among T-channel isoforms and also exhibits antioxidant activity, we examined whether polaprezinc (zinc-l-carnosine, a medicine for peptic ulcer treatment and zinc supplementation, reveals preventive or therapeutic effects on bladder inflammation and/or pain in the mouse with cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis, a model for interstitial cystitis. Systemic administration of cyclophosphamide caused cystitis-related symptoms including increased bladder weight and vascular permeability, and histological signs of bladder edema, accompanied by bladder pain-like nociceptive behavior/referred hyperalgesia. All these symptoms were significantly attenuated by oral preadministration of polaprezinc at 400 mg/kg. The same dose of polaprezinc also prevented the increased malondialdehyde level, an indicator of lipid peroxidation, and protein upregulation of cystathionine-γ-lyase, an H2S-generating enzyme, but not occludin, a tight junction-related membrane protein, in the bladder tissue of cyclophosphamide-treated mice. Oral posttreatment with polaprezinc at 30–100 mg/kg reversed the nociceptive behavior/referred hyperalgesia in a dose-dependent manner without affecting the increased bladder weight. Together, our data show that zinc supplementation with polaprezinc prevents the cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis probably through the antioxidant activity, and, like T-channel blockers, reverses the established cystitis-related bladder pain in mice, suggesting novel therapeutic usefulness of polaprezinc.

  19. Evidence that tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) inhibits angiogenesis by inducing vascular endothelial cell apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Pei-Lin, E-mail: pchen@dal.ca [Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Easton, Alexander S., E-mail: alexander.easton@dal.ca [Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2010-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and its related ligands TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) and Fas ligand (FasL) play roles in the regulation of vascular responses, but their effect on the formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) is unclear. Therefore, we have examined the effects of these ligands on angiogenesis modeled with primary cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). To examine angiogenesis in the context of the central nervous system, we have also modeled cerebral angiogenesis with the human brain endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3. Parameters studied were bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and cell number (MTT) assay (to assess endothelial proliferation), scratch assay (migration) and networks on Matrigel (tube formation). In our hands, neither TRAIL nor FasL (1, 10, and 100 ng/ml) had an effect on parameters of angiogenesis in the HUVEC model. In hCMEC/D3 cells by contrast, TRAIL inhibited all parameters (10-100 ng/ml, 24 h). This was due to apoptosis, since its action was blocked by the pan-caspase inhibitor zVADfmk (5 x 10{sup -5} mol/l) and TRAIL increased caspase-3 activity 1 h after application. However FasL (100 ng/ml) increased BrdU uptake without other effects. We conclude that TRAIL has different effects on in vitro angiogenesis depending on which model is used, but that FasL is generally ineffective when applied in vitro. The data suggest that TRAIL primarily influences angiogenesis by the induction of vascular endothelial apoptosis, leading to vessel regression.

  20. Sex-related differences in cadmium-induced alteration of drug action in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnell, R.C.; Pence, D.H.; Prosser, T.D.; Miya, T.S.

    1976-01-01

    Three days after pretreatment of rats of both sexes with cadmium (2 mg/kg, i.p.), the duration of hypnosis induced by hexobarbital (75 mg/kg, i.p.) was potentiated in males but not females. Likewise, similar treatment with cadmium leads to significant inhibition of the metabolism of hexobarbital by hepatic microsomal enzymes obtained from male but not female animals. These data suggest that there is a sex-related difference in the ability of cadmium to alter drug action in rats.

  1. Parathyroid hormone-related protein-induced hypercalcemia due to osteosarcoma in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuki, Masashi; Nitta, Makiko; Omachi, Tetsuo

    2015-03-01

    A 15-year-old castrated male mixed-breed cat was presented with a history of sarcoma of the distal right hind limb. Biochemical analysis revealed increased concentrations of blood urea, creatinine, total calcium, ionized calcium, and parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP). The mass was removed surgically by amputation of the hind limb. Osteosarcoma was diagnosed based on histopathologic examination. All abnormal serum analyte concentrations improved immediately after surgery, including azotemia, total calcium, ionized calcium, and PTHrP. The biochemical results were attributed to osteosarcoma causing PTHrP-induced hypercalcemia. © 2015 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  2. Comparison of clinical features between primary and drug-induced sleep-related eating disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Komada Y; Takaesu Y; Matsui K.; Nakamura M; Nishida S; Kanno M; Usui A; Inoue Y

    2016-01-01

    Yoko Komada,1 Yoshikazu Takaesu,2 Kentaro Matsui,3 Masaki Nakamura,3 Shingo Nishida,3 Meri Kanno,3,† Akira Usui,3 Yuichi Inoue1,3 1Department of Somnology, 2Department of Psychiatry, Tokyo Medical University, 3Japan Somnology Center, Institute of Neuropsychiatry, Tokyo, Japan †Meri Kanno passed away on March 1, 2016 Purpose: The aim of this study was to ascertain the clinical characteristics of drug-induced sleep-related eating disorder (SRED). Patients and me...

  3. Trap configuration and spacing influences parameter estimates in spatial capture-recapture models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine C Sun

    Full Text Available An increasing number of studies employ spatial capture-recapture models to estimate population size, but there has been limited research on how different spatial sampling designs and trap configurations influence parameter estimators. Spatial capture-recapture models provide an advantage over non-spatial models by explicitly accounting for heterogeneous detection probabilities among individuals that arise due to the spatial organization of individuals relative to sampling devices. We simulated black bear (Ursus americanus populations and spatial capture-recapture data to evaluate the influence of trap configuration and trap spacing on estimates of population size and a spatial scale parameter, sigma, that relates to home range size. We varied detection probability and home range size, and considered three trap configurations common to large-mammal mark-recapture studies: regular spacing, clustered, and a temporal sequence of different cluster configurations (i.e., trap relocation. We explored trap spacing and number of traps per cluster by varying the number of traps. The clustered arrangement performed well when detection rates were low, and provides for easier field implementation than the sequential trap arrangement. However, performance differences between trap configurations diminished as home range size increased. Our simulations suggest it is important to consider trap spacing relative to home range sizes, with traps ideally spaced no more than twice the spatial scale parameter. While spatial capture-recapture models can accommodate different sampling designs and still estimate parameters with accuracy and precision, our simulations demonstrate that aspects of sampling design, namely trap configuration and spacing, must consider study area size, ranges of individual movement, and home range sizes in the study population.

  4. Trap configuration and spacing influences parameter estimates in spatial capture-recapture models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Catherine C; Fuller, Angela K; Royle, J Andrew

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of studies employ spatial capture-recapture models to estimate population size, but there has been limited research on how different spatial sampling designs and trap configurations influence parameter estimators. Spatial capture-recapture models provide an advantage over non-spatial models by explicitly accounting for heterogeneous detection probabilities among individuals that arise due to the spatial organization of individuals relative to sampling devices. We simulated black bear (Ursus americanus) populations and spatial capture-recapture data to evaluate the influence of trap configuration and trap spacing on estimates of population size and a spatial scale parameter, sigma, that relates to home range size. We varied detection probability and home range size, and considered three trap configurations common to large-mammal mark-recapture studies: regular spacing, clustered, and a temporal sequence of different cluster configurations (i.e., trap relocation). We explored trap spacing and number of traps per cluster by varying the number of traps. The clustered arrangement performed well when detection rates were low, and provides for easier field implementation than the sequential trap arrangement. However, performance differences between trap configurations diminished as home range size increased. Our simulations suggest it is important to consider trap spacing relative to home range sizes, with traps ideally spaced no more than twice the spatial scale parameter. While spatial capture-recapture models can accommodate different sampling designs and still estimate parameters with accuracy and precision, our simulations demonstrate that aspects of sampling design, namely trap configuration and spacing, must consider study area size, ranges of individual movement, and home range sizes in the study population.

  5. PYRAMIDAL-HOLLOW-BEAM DIPOLE TRAP FOR ALKALI ATOMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN JIAN-PING; GAO WEI-JIAN; WANG YU-ZHU; ZHU YI-FU; WANG YI-QIU

    2000-01-01

    We propose a dark gravito-optical dipole trap, for alkali atoms, consisting of a blue-detuned, pyramidal-hollow laser beam propagating upward and the gravity field. When cold atoms from a magneto-optical trap are loaded into the pyramidal-hollow beam and bounce inside the pyramidal-hollow beam, they experience efficient Sisyphus cooling and geometric cooling induced by the pyramidal-hollow beam and the weak repumping beam propagating downward. Our study shows that an ultracold and dense atomic sample with an equilibrium 3D momentum of ~ 3hk and an atomic density above the point of Bose-Einstein condensation may be obtained in this pure optical trap.

  6. Relative efficacy of some prokinetic drugs in morphine-induced gastrointestinal transit delay in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AD Suchitra; SA Dkhar; DG Shewade; CH Shashindran

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the relative efficacy of cisapride,metoclopramide, domperidone, erythromycin and mosapride on gastric emptying (GE) and small intestinal transit (SIT)in morphine treated mice.METHODS: Phenol red marker meal was employed to estimate GE and SIT in Swiss albino mice of either sex. The groups included were control, morphine 1 mg/kg (s.c. 15min before test meal) alone or with (45 min before test meal p.o.) cisapride 10 mg/kg, metoclopramide 20 mg/kg,domperidone 20 mg/kg, erythromycin 6 mg/kg and mosapride 20 mg/kg.RESULTS: Cisapride, metoclopramide and mosapride were effective in enhancing gastric emptying significantly (P<0.001)whereas other prokinetic agents failed to do so in normal mice. Metoclopramide completely reversed morphine induced delay in gastric emptying followed by mosapride.Metoclopramide alone was effective when given to normal mice in increasing the SIT. Cisapride, though it did not show any significant effect on SIT in normal mice, was able to reverse morphine induced delay in SIT significantly (P<0.001)followed by metoclopramide and mosapride.CONCLUSION: Metoclopramide and cisapride are most effective in reversing morphine-induced delay in gastric emptying and small intestinal transit in mice respectively.

  7. Expression of human TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand extracellular region in E.coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐蓓; HE; Fengtian; 等

    2002-01-01

    This study is conducted to clone the cDNA encoding human TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand(hTRAIL)extracellular region(amino acids 41-281,hTRAIL41-281)and to express it in E.coli.The hTRAIL41-281 cDNA is amplified by reverse transcription(RT)PCR from total RNA derived from human acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60.After sequenced,the cDNA is cloned into the vector pQE-80L and transformed into E.coli DH5α to express the recombinant hTRAIL41-281(rhTRAIL41-281)induced by IPTG.The recombinant protein is analyzed by SDS-PAGE.The cloned cDNA is consistent with the cDNA sequence encoding hTRAIL41-281 reported in GenBankTM.After inducing.the hTRAIL41-281 protein is expressed,and the mass of the recombinant protein is about 30% of total bacteria protein,which demonstrates that the cDNA encoding hTRAIL41-281 is successfully cloned and expressed in E.coli.

  8. Kallikrein-related peptidase 8 is expressed in myocardium and induces cardiac hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Buqing; Yu, Qing; Zhao, Wei; Tang, Zhiping; Cong, Binghai; Du, Jiankui; Lu, Jianqiang; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Ni, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The tissue kallikrein-related peptidase family (KLK) is a group of trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like serine proteases that share a similar homology to parent tissue kallikrein (KLK1). KLK1 is identified in heart and has anti-hypertrophic effects. However, whether other KLK family members play a role in regulating cardiac function remains unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated for the first time that KLK8 was expressed in myocardium. KLK8 expression was upregulated in left ventricle of cardiac hypertrophy models. Both intra-cardiac adenovirus-mediated and transgenic-mediated KLK8 overexpression led to cardiac hypertrophy in vivo. In primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, KLK8 knockdown inhibited phenylephrine (PE)-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, whereas KLK8 overexpression promoted cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via a serine protease activity-dependent but kinin receptor-independent pathway. KLK8 overexpression increased epidermal growth factor (EGF) production, which was blocked by the inhibitors of serine protease. EGF receptor (EGFR) antagonist and EGFR knockdown reversed the hypertrophy induced by KLK8 overexpression. KLK8-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was also significantly decreased by blocking the protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) or PAR2 pathway. Our data suggest that KLK8 may promote cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through EGF signaling- and PARs-dependent but a kinin receptor-independent pathway. It is implied that different KLK family members can subtly regulate cardiac function and remodeling. PMID:26823023

  9. Analysis of factors related to man-induced hazard for nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Soon; Jung, Jea Hee; Lee, Keun O; Son, Ki Sang; Wang, Sang Chul; Lee, Chang Jin; Ku, Min Ho; Park, Nam Young [Seoul National Univ. of Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-15

    This study is to show a guide for installing hazardous facilities adjoined atomic power plant after finding out how much these facilities could impact to the atomic plant. Nuclear power plant is an important facility which is closely connected with public life, industrial activity, and the conduct of public business, so it should not be damaged. Therefore, if there are hazardous and harmful facilities near the plant, then they must be evaluated by the size, the type, and the shape. First of all, any factors that could cause man induced accident must be investigated. And they must be exactly evaluated from how much it will damage the plant facilities. The purpose of this study is to set a technical standard for the installation of these facilities by evaluating the man induced accident. Also, it is to make out the evaluation methods by investigating the hazardous facilities which are placed near the plant. Our country is now using CFR standard : reg. guide and IAEA safety series. However, not only the standard of technology which is related to man induced accident but also the evaluation methods for facilities are not yet layed down. As It was mentioned above, we should evaluate these facilities adequately, and these methods must be made out.

  10. Microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Michael A.; Blain, Matthew G.; Tigges, Chris P.; Linker, Kevin L.

    2011-04-19

    An array of microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion traps can be used for mass spectrometric applications. Each ion trap comprises two parallel inner RF electrodes and two parallel outer DC control electrodes symmetric about a central trap axis and suspended over an opening in a substrate. Neighboring ion traps in the array can share a common outer DC control electrode. The ions confined transversely by an RF quadrupole electric field potential well on the ion trap axis. The array can trap a wide array of ions.

  11. First Attempts at Antihydrogen Trapping in ALPHA

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page, R D; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wasilenko, L; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y; Fujiwara, M C

    2008-01-01

    We discuss aspects of antihydrogen studies, that relate to particle physics ideas and techniques, within the context of the ALPHA experiment at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator facility. We review the fundamental physics motivations for antihydrogen studies, and their potential physics reach. We argue that initial spectroscopy measurements, once antihydrogen is trapped, could provide competitive tests of CPT, possibly probing physics at the Planck Scale. We discuss some of the particle detection techniques used in ALPHA. Preliminary results from commissioning studies of a partial system of the ALPHA Si vertex detector are presented, the results of which highlight the power of annihilation vertex detection capability in antihydrogen studies.

  12. Duality between random trap and barrier models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack, Robert L [Department of Chemistry, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Sollich, Peter [Department of Mathematics, King' s College London, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom)

    2008-08-15

    We discuss the physical consequences of a duality between two models with quenched disorder, in which particles propagate in one dimension among random traps or across random barriers. We derive an exact relation between their diffusion fronts at fixed disorder and deduce from this that their disorder-averaged diffusion fronts are exactly equal. We use effective dynamics schemes to isolate the different physical processes by which particles propagate in the models and discuss how the duality arises from a correspondence between the rates for these different processes.

  13. Instant detection and identification of concealed explosive-related compounds: Induced Stokes Raman versus infrared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbasuney, Sherif; El-Sherif, Ashraf F

    2017-01-01

    The instant detection of explosives and explosive-related compounds has become an urgent priority in recent years for homeland security and counter-terrorism applications. Modern techniques should offer enhancement in selectivity, sensitivity, and standoff distances. Miniaturisation, portability, and field-ruggedisation are crucial requirements. This study reports on instant and standoff identification of concealed explosive-related compounds using customized Raman technique. Stokes Raman spectra of common explosive-related compounds were generated and spectrally resolved to create characteristic finger print spectra. The scattered Raman emissions over the band 400:2000cm(-1) were compared to infrared absorption using FTIR. It has been demonstrated that the two vibrational spectroscopic techniques were opposite and completing each other. Molecular vibrations with strong absorption in infrared (those involve strong change in dipole moments) induced weak signals in Raman and vice versa. The tailored Raman offered instant detection, high sensitivity, and standoff detection capabilities. Raman demonstrated characteristic fingerprint spectra with stable baseline and sharp intense peaks. Complete correlations of absorption/scattered signals to certain molecular vibrations were conducted to generate an entire spectroscopic profile of explosive-related compounds. This manuscript shades the light on Raman as one of the prevailing technologies for instantaneous detection of explosive-related compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand deficiency enhances survival in murine colon ascendens stent peritonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyer K

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Katharina Beyer,1 Laura Stollhof,1 Christian Poetschke,2 Wolfram von Bernstorff,1 Lars Ivo Partecke,1 Stephan Diedrich,1 Stefan Maier,1 Barbara M Bröker,2 Claus-Dieter Heidecke1 1Department of General, Visceral, Thoracic, and Vascular Surgery, 2Institute of Immunology, University of Greifswald, Greifswald, GermanyBackground: Apart from inducing apoptosis in tumor cells, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL influences inflammatory reactions. Murine colon ascendens stent peritonitis (CASP represents a model of diffuse peritonitis. Recently, it has been demonstrated that administration of exogenous TRAIL not only induces apoptosis in neutrophils but also enhances survival in this model. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of genetic TRAIL deficiency on the course of CASP.Methods: Peritonitis was induced in 6- to 8-week-old female TRAIL−/− mice as well as in wild-type mice. The sepsis severity score and survival of mice were monitored. Bacterial loads in blood as well as in the lymphoid organs were examined. Additionally, the number of apoptotic cells within the lymphoid organs was determined.Results: As early as 8 hours postinduction of CASP, TRAIL−/− mice were significantly more affected by sepsis than wild-type mice, as measured by the sepsis severity score. However, during the further course of sepsis, TRAIL deficiency led to significantly decreased sepsis severity scores, resulting in an enhanced overall survival in TRAIL−/− mice. The better survival of TRAIL−/− mice was accompanied by a decreased bacterial load within the blood. In marked contrast, the number of apoptotic cells within the lymphoid organs was highly increased in TRAIL−/− mice 20 hours after induction of CASP.Conclusion: Hence, exogenous and endogenous TRAIL is protective during the early phase of sepsis, while endogenous TRAIL appears to be detrimental in the later course of this disease.Keywords: CASP, mice

  15. Numerical simulation of four-wave mixing efficiency and its induced relative intensity noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Wei; Meng Zhou; Zhou Hui-Juan; Luo Hong

    2012-01-01

    Four-wave mixing,as well as its induced intensity noise,is harmful to wavelength division multiplexing systems.The efficiency and the relative intensity noise of four-wave mixing are numerically simulated for the two-wave and the three-wave fiber transmissions.It is found that the efficiency decreases with the increase of both the frequency spacing and the fiber length,which can be explained using the quasi-phase-matching condition.Furthermore,the relative intensity noise decreases with the increase of frequency spacing,while it increases with the increase of fiber length,which is due to the considerable power loss of the pump light.This investigation presents a good reference for the practical application of wavelength division multiplexing systems.

  16. Structure of complex networks: Quantifying edge-to-edge relations by failure-induced flow redistribution

    CERN Document Server

    Schaub, Michael T; Yaliraki, Sophia N; Barahona, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of complex networks has so far revolved mainly around the role of nodes and communities of nodes. However, the dynamics of interconnected systems is commonly focalised on edge processes, and a dual edge-centric perspective can often prove more natural. Here we present graph-theoretical measures to quantify edge-to-edge relations inspired by the notion of flow redistribution induced by edge failures. Our measures, which are related to the pseudo-inverse of the Laplacian of the network, are global and reveal the dynamical interplay between the edges of a network, including potentially non-local interactions. Our framework also allows us to define the embeddedness of an edge, a measure of how strongly an edge features in the weighted cuts of the network. We showcase the general applicability of our edge-centric framework through analyses of the Iberian Power grid, traffic flow in road networks, and the C. elegans neuronal network.

  17. Mass Trapping for Anastrepha suspensa

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT In field tests conducted in south Florida to test grape juice as an alternative inexpensive bait for Anastrepha suspensa Loew, high numbers of Zaprionus indianus Gupta were captured in traps baited with aqueous grape juice. These experiments included comparisons of grape juice with standard...

  18. Evading the joint decision trap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenbæk, Jørgen; Jensen, Mads Christian Dagnis

    2016-01-01

    is applied, including the concept of the joint-decision trap. The paper finds that the outcome was made possible by compensating the member states that were worst affected by the policy changes. A coalition of net contributors, centered on Germany and the United Kingdom, was influential regarding the overall...

  19. Quantum Games in ion traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buluta, Iulia Maria [Department of Quantum Engineering and Systems Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)]. E-mail: noa@lyman.q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Fujiwara, Shingo [Department of Quantum Engineering and Systems Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)]. E-mail: fujiwara@lyman.q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Hasegawa, Shuichi [Department of Quantum Engineering and Systems Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)]. E-mail: hasegawa@q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2006-10-09

    We propose a general, scalable framework for implementing two-choices-multiplayer Quantum Games in ion traps. In particular, we discuss two famous examples: the Quantum Prisoners' Dilemma and the Quantum Minority Game. An analysis of decoherence due to intensity fluctuations in the applied laser fields is also provided.

  20. Optical trapping of gold aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Regina K.; Pedersen, Liselotte Jauffred; Taheri, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol trapping has proven challenging and was only recently demonstrated.1 This was accomplished by utilizing an air chamber designed to have a minimum of turbulence and a laser beam with a minimum of aberration. Individual gold nano-particles with diameters between 80 nm and 200 nm were trappe...

  1. Optical trapping of coated microspheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bormuth, V.; Jannasch, A.; Ander, M.; van Kats, C.M.; van Blaaderen, A.; Howard, J.; Schäffer, E.

    2008-01-01

    In an optical trap, micron-sized dielectric particles are held by a tightly focused laser beam. The optical force on the particle is composed of an attractive gradient force and a destabilizing scattering force. We hypothesized that using anti-reflection-coated microspheres would reduce scattering a

  2. Optical trapping of coated microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormuth, Volker; Jannasch, Anita; Ander, Marcel; van Kats, Carlos M; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Howard, Jonathon; Schäffer, Erik

    2008-09-01

    In an optical trap, micron-sized dielectric particles are held by a tightly focused laser beam. The optical force on the particle is composed of an attractive gradient force and a destabilizing scattering force. We hypothesized that using anti-reflection-coated microspheres would reduce scattering and lead to stronger trapping. We found that homogeneous silica and polystyrene microspheres had a sharp maximum trap stiffness at a diameter of around 800 nm--the trapping laser wavelength in water--and that a silica coating on a polystyrene microsphere was a substantial improvement for larger diameters. In addition, we noticed that homogeneous spheres of a correct size demonstrated anti-reflective properties. Our results quantitatively agreed with Mie scattering calculations and serve as a proof of principle. We used a DNA stretching experiment to confirm the large linear range in detection and force of the coated microspheres and performed a high-force motor protein assay. These measurements show that the surfaces of the coated microspheres are compatible with biophysical assays.

  3. Methylfolate Trap Promotes Bacterial Thymineless Death by Sulfa Drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marissa B Guzzo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The methylfolate trap, a metabolic blockage associated with anemia, neural tube defects, Alzheimer's dementia, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer, was discovered in the 1960s, linking the metabolism of folate, vitamin B12, methionine and homocysteine. However, the existence or physiological significance of this phenomenon has been unknown in bacteria, which synthesize folate de novo. Here we identify the methylfolate trap as a novel determinant of the bacterial intrinsic death by sulfonamides, antibiotics that block de novo folate synthesis. Genetic mutagenesis, chemical complementation, and metabolomic profiling revealed trap-mediated metabolic imbalances, which induced thymineless death, a phenomenon in which rapidly growing cells succumb to thymine starvation. Restriction of B12 bioavailability, required for preventing trap formation, using an "antivitamin B12" molecule, sensitized intracellular bacteria to sulfonamides. Since boosting the bactericidal activity of sulfonamides through methylfolate trap induction can be achieved in Gram-negative bacteria and mycobacteria, it represents a novel strategy to render these pathogens more susceptible to existing sulfonamides.

  4. Magneto-optical Trapping of a Diatomic Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demille, Dave

    2014-05-01

    The magneto-optical trap (MOT) is the workhorse technique for atomic physics in the ultracold regime, serving as the starting point in applications from optical clocks to quantum-degenerate gases. Although MOTs have been used with a wide array of atomic species, realization of a molecular MOT was long considered infeasible. In this talk we will describe the first magneto-optical trap for a molecule, strontium monofluoride (SrF). Our MOT produces the coldest trapped sample of directly-cooled molecules to date, with temperature T ~2.5 mK. The SrF MOT is loaded from a cryogenic buffer-gas beam slowed by laser radiation pressure. Images of laser-induced fluorescence allow us to characterize the trap's properties. Although magneto-optical trapping of diatomic molecules is in its infancy, our results indicate that access to the ultracold regime may be possible for several molecular species, with potential applications from quantum simulation to tests of fundamental symmetries to ultracold chemistry.

  5. The conduction mechanism of stress induced leakage current through ultra-thin gate oxide under constant voltage stresses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yan-Gang; Xu Ming-Zhen; Tan Chang-Hua; Zhang Zhang J.F; Duan Xiao-Rong

    2005-01-01

    The conduction mechanism of stress induced leakage current (SILC) through 2nm gate oxide is studied over a gate voltage range between 1.7V and stress voltage under constant voltage stress (CVS). The simulation results show that the SILC is formed by trap-assisted tunnelling (TAT) process which is dominated by oxide traps induced by high field stresses. Their energy levels obtained by this work are approximately 1.9eV from the oxide conduction band, and the traps are believed to be the oxygen-related donor-like defects induced by high field stresses. The dependence of the trap density on stress time and oxide electric field is also investigated.

  6. Interaction of collagen-related genes and susceptibility to betel quid-induced oral submucous fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chung-Jung; Chang, Min-Lee; Chiang, Chun-Pin; Hahn, Liang-Jiunn; Hsieh, Ling-Ling; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2002-07-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is a precancerous condition of the oral cavity. It is a collagen-related disorder induced by betel quid chewing, a habit that is common in Taiwan. However, the cumulative exposure to betel quids varies in OSF patients. It seems that there is individual susceptibility to betel quid-induced OSF. This study compared the association of OSF and polymorphisms of six collagen-related genes, collagen 1A1 and 1A2 (COL1A1 and COL1A2), collagenase-1 (COLase), transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1), lysyl oxidase (LYOXase), and cystatin C (CST3), between patients with low and high exposure to betel quids. A total of 166 patients with OSF from a medical center and 284 betel quid chewers who were free of OSF and oral cancer, from the same hospital and five townships, were recruited. PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism assays were used to determine the genotypes of the six collagen-related genes situated on different chromosomes. We found that the genotypes associated with the highest OSF risk for collagen 1A1, collagen 1A2, collagenase-1, transforming growth factor beta1, lysyl oxidase, and cystatin C were CC, AA, TT, CC, AA, and AA, respectively, for the low-exposure group, and TT, BB, AA, CC, GG, and AA, respectively, for the high-exposure group. A trend was noted for an increased risk of OSF with increasing number of high-risk alleles for those with both high and low exposures for betel quid. The cell selection mechanism of oral fibroblasts is proposed to explain the effect of the modification of cumulative betel quid exposure on the risk profiles of collagen-related genes. These results imply that susceptibility to OSF could involve multigenic mechanisms modified by the betel quid-exposure dose.

  7. Photo-reactive charge trapping memory based on lanthanide complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Jiaqing; Lo, Wai-Sum; Zhou, Li; Sun, Qi-Jun; Chan, Chi-Fai; Zhou, Ye; Han, Su-Ting; Yan, Yan; Wong, Wing-Tak; Wong, Ka-Leung; Roy, V A L

    2015-10-09

    Traditional utilization of photo-induced excitons is popularly but restricted in the fields of photovoltaic devices as well as photodetectors, and efforts on broadening its function have always been attempted. However, rare reports are available on organic field effect transistor (OFET) memory employing photo-induced charges. Here, we demonstrate an OFET memory containing a novel organic lanthanide complex Eu(tta)3ppta (Eu(tta)3 = Europium(III) thenoyltrifluoroacetonate, ppta = 2-phenyl-4,6-bis(pyrazol-1-yl)-1,3,5-triazine), in which the photo-induced charges can be successfully trapped and detrapped. The luminescent complex emits intense red emission upon ultraviolet (UV) light excitation and serves as a trapping element of holes injected from the pentacene semiconductor layer. Memory window can be significantly enlarged by light-assisted programming and erasing procedures, during which the photo-induced excitons in the semiconductor layer are separated by voltage bias. The enhancement of memory window is attributed to the increasing number of photo-induced excitons by the UV light. The charges are stored in this luminescent complex for at least 10(4) s after withdrawing voltage bias. The present study on photo-assisted novel memory may motivate the research on a new type of light tunable charge trapping photo-reactive memory devices.

  8. Postnatal dexamethasone-induced programmed hypertension is related to the regulation of melatonin and its receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsin-Yu; Tain, You-Lin

    2016-04-01

    Adulthood hypertension can be programmed by glucocorticoid exposure in early life. We found that maternal melatonin therapy prevents postnatal dexamethasone (DEX)-induced programmed hypertension. Melatonin acts through specific receptors, including MT1 and MT2 membrane receptors, and retinoid related orphan nuclear receptors of the RZR/ROR family. Thus we tested whether postnatal DEX-induced hypertension is related to changes of melatonin receptors in the kidney and heart, which was preserved by maternal melatonin therapy. Male neonates were assigned to four groups (n=6-8/group): control, DEX, control+melatonin (MEL), and DEX+MEL. Male rat pups were injected i.p. with DEX on d 1 (0.5 mg/kg BW), d 2 (0.3 mg/kg BW), and d 3 (0.1 mg/kg BW) after birth. Melatonin was administered in drinking water (0.01%) during the lactation period. We found DEX group developed hypertension at 16 weeks of age, which melatonin therapy prevented. Postnatal DEX treatment increased mRNA expression of MT1 and MT2, while decreased RORα and RZRβ in the kidney. These changes were prevented by melatonin therapy. Postnatal DEX decreased protein level of MT2 in the kidney, which was attenuated by melatonin therapy. Renal protein level of RORα was higher in DEX+MEL group compared to control and DEX group. Renal melatonin level was higher in the MEL and DEX+MEL groups compared to control. We concluded that melatonin therapy has long-term protection on postnatal DEX-induced programmed hypertension, which is associated with regulation on melatonin receptors in the kidney. Our findings would offer potential therapeutic approaches to prevent programmed hypertension in premature baby receiving glucocorticoids.

  9. Lateralized differences in tympanic membrane temperature, but not induced mood, are related to episodic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Propper, Ruth E; Barr, Taylor D; Brunyé, Tad T

    2015-03-01

    The present research examined the effects of pre-encoding and pre-recall induced mood on episodic memory. It was hypothesized that happy and/or angry mood prior to encoding (increasing left hemisphere activity), in tandem with fearful mood prior to recall (increasing right hemisphere activity) would be associated with superior episodic memory. It was also hypothesized that tympanic membrane measures (TMT), indicative of hemispheric activity, would change as a function of induced mood. Although subjectively-experienced mood induction was successful, pre-encoding and pre-recall mood did not alter memory, and only altered TMT in the pre-encoding fear and pre-recall angry mood induction conditions. Interestingly, baseline absolute difference between left and right TMT, a measure of differential hemispheric activity, regardless of the direction of that activity, was significantly positively related to number of total words written, number of correctly recalled words, and corrected recall score. This same TMT measure pre-encoding, regardless of specific mood, was significantly negatively related to false recall. Results are discussed in terms the HERA model of episodic memory, and in the nature of interhemispheric interaction involved in episodic recall.

  10. Ovariectomy-induced chronic abdominal hypernociception in rats: Relation with brain oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara B. Garrido-Suárez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Context: Ovarian hormone deficiency observed in menopausal women increases the production of reactive oxygen species, which could be implicated in central sensitization subjacent in chronic functional pain syndromes. Aims: To examine the hyperalgesic state induced by ovariectomy in adult rats and its relation to some oxidative stress outcomes. Methods: The female Wistar rats were divided into normal, sham ovariectomized (OVX and OVX groups, which were tested for mechanical and thermal hypernociception during 6 weeks and a single acetic acid-induced test 6 weeks after surgery. Redox biomarkers determinations of superoxide dismutase (SOD enzyme activity, glutathione (GSH and nitrates/nitrites as an indicator of nitric oxide (NO concentrations were determined in the brain and cerebellum of 6 animals of each group. Results: Exclusivity OVX rats developed a robust state of mechanical hypernociception and allodynia in the abdomen, hindlimbs and proximal tail. Besides, thermal pain thresholds (hot plate decreased. That was established 3-4 weeks after OVX and lasted for the 6 weeks of the experiment. Increases in visceral sensitivity were also observed in OVX rats. SOD enzyme activity decreased in OVX rats, which showed major deficit for this enzymatic defense under visceral inflammatory injury. However GSH concentrations were increased in brain of OVX animals that allow the balance during acute inflammation. NO concentrations were raised only in OVX rats exposure to chemical inflammatory injury. Conclusions: OVX in rats provide a useful model, which mimics the functional pain in females that could be related with brain oxidative stress.

  11. Abdominal Respiration Induces Hemodilution and Related Reduction in ADH Concentration of Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Yoshiko; Ajima, Kumiko; Nagai, Takashi; Yokoyama, Yumiko; Kaidoh, Maki; Seto, Emi; Honda, Takayuki; Ohhashi, Toshio

    2015-09-01

    To establish effective lymph drainage methods and develop concise and accurate clinical techniques for evaluating lymph drainage in healthy individuals and patients with cancer treatment-related lymph edema, we investigated the numbers of red (RBC) and white (WBC) blood cells, and platelets (PLT) in blood, hematocrit (Ht), and the blood concentrations of total protein (TP), albumin (Alb), and anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) before and after 5 min manual lymph drainage, followed by 30 min rest with or without abdominal respiration in the supine or sitting position in 48 healthy volunteers. The 5 min facial, upper and lower extremities lymph drainage, followed by 30 min rest in the supine position induced significant reductions of the TP and Alb in all subjects, and their RBC and Ht levels in some subjects. The 30 min rest only in the supine position without lymph drainage produced also significant reductions of blood TP and Alb. In addition, abdominal respiration in the supine position without manual lymph drainage caused more significant hemodilution, being significant reductions of TP, Alb, RBC, Ht, and ADH in all volunteers. These findings may be related to effective lymph drainage from the chylocyst. Furthermore, it also resulted in a significantly increased micturition desire. In conclusion, abdominal respiration during 30 min rest in the supine position is effective at inducing lymph drainage, and the associated induction of hemodilution and lowering of the blood ADH concentration (and increased micturition desire in some cases) can be used to accurately assess the extent of lymph drainage.

  12. Lipophilic β-Cyclodextrin Cyclic-Nitrone Conjugate: Synthesis and Spin Trapping Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yongbin; Liu, Yangping; Rockenbauer, Antal; Zweier, Jay L.; Durana, Grégory; Villamena, Frederick A.

    2009-01-01

    Nitrone spin traps are commonly employed as probes for the identification of transient radicals in chemical and biological systems using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Nitrones have also found applications as therapeutic agent in the treatment of radical-mediated diseases. Therefore, spin trap that incorporates high reactivity to superoxide radical anion (O2•−), more persistent superoxide adduct, enhanced bioavailability and selective targeting in one molecular design is desirable. In this work, the synthesis of a nitrone spin trap, 4, that is tethered via amide bonds to a β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and a dodecyl chain was achieved with the expectation that the β-cyclodextrin would lead to persistent spin adduct while the lipophilic chain would impart membrane targeting property. The two constitutional racemic isomers, 4a and 4b, were separated using preparative HPLC and structural analysis as well as self-aggregations properties were carried out using NMR, induced circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and computational approach. EPR spin trapping of 02•− by 4a and 4b was only successful in DMSO and not in aqueous system due most likely to the amphiphilic character of 4 that can favor conformations (or aggregation) hindering radical addition to nitrone. Kinetics of formation and decay of 4a–O2H adduct in polar aprotic solvents show faster reactivity to O2•− and more persistent O2•− adduct compared to nitrones not conjugated to β-CD. Computational analysis of 4a and 4b as well as 4a–OOH and 4b–OOH adducts were carried out and results show that isomerism, both constitutional and stereochemical, affects the orientations of aminoxyl-NO and/or hydroperoxyl groups relative to the β-CD annulus for optimal H-bond interaction and stability. PMID:19530689

  13. Funnel traps capture a higher proportion of juvenile Great Tits Parus major than automatic traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senar, J.C.; Domenech, J.; Conroy, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    We compared capture rates of Great Tits at funnel traps, where several birds can be captured at once so that some decoy effect may appear, to those obtained at automatic traps, where only one bird can be trapped at a time, at trapping stations in northeastern Spain. Juvenile birds were mainly captured at funnel traps (79% of juvenile captures), whereas adult plumaged birds were captured at both types of traps (51% of captures were at the funnel traps) (test between ages, PTits had lower body condition as measured by ptilochronology (P<0.01). These birds are more easily trapped in funnel traps, which may be acting as decoy traps, and thus are vulnerable to the same kinds of biases (eg age or body condition) that have been previously documented for decoy traps.

  14. 50 CFR 697.19 - Trap limits and trap tag requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... vessels fishing with lobster traps. 697.19 Section 697.19 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... requirements for vessels fishing with lobster traps. (a) Trap limits for vessels fishing or authorized to fish... management area designation certificate or valid limited access American lobster permit specifying one...

  15. Effect of the interaction among traps on the shape of thermoluminescence glow curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcazzo, J. [IFAS, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, 7000 Tandil (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Santiago, M. [IFAS, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, 7000 Tandil (Argentina) and Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: msantiag@exa.unicen.edu.ar; Spano, F. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Av. del Libertador 8250, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Lester, M. [IFAS, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, 7000 Tandil (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ortega, F. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Av. del Valle 5737, 7400 Olavarria (Argentina); Molina, P. [IFAS, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, 7000 Tandil (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Caselli, E. [IFAS, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, 7000 Tandil (Argentina); Comision de Investigaciones Cientificas de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (CICPBA), calle 526 entre 10 y 11, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2007-09-15

    The effect of the interaction among traps on the structure of thermoluminescence glow curves has been investigated by generating numerically simulated glow curves for a wide range of trap parameters. The results reported in this paper provide useful insights which assist in the analysis of experimental glow curves. The most important result shows that it is incorrect to assume beforehand that each peak is related to a specific trapping state. The validity of the quasiequilibrium approximation is briefly discussed.

  16. Reversible photo-induced trap formation in mixed-halide hybrid perovskites for photovoltaics† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, PL, PDS spectra and XRD patterns. See DOI: 10.1039/c4sc03141e Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoke, Eric T.; Slotcavage, Daniel J.; Dohner, Emma R.; Bowring, Andrea R.

    2015-01-01

    We report on reversible, light-induced transformations in (CH3NH3)Pb(BrxI1–x)3. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of these perovskites develop a new, red-shifted peak at 1.68 eV that grows in intensity under constant, 1-sun illumination in less than a minute. This is accompanied by an increase in sub-bandgap absorption at ∼1.7 eV, indicating the formation of luminescent trap states. Light soaking causes a splitting of X-ray diffraction (XRD) peaks, suggesting segregation into two crystalline phases. Surprisingly, these photo-induced changes are fully reversible; the XRD patterns and the PL and absorption spectra revert to their initial states after the materials are left for a few minutes in the dark. We speculate that photoexcitation may cause halide segregation into iodide-rich minority and bromide-enriched majority domains, the former acting as a recombination center trap. This instability may limit achievable voltages from some mixed-halide perovskite solar cells and could have implications for the photostability of halide perovskites used in optoelectronics. PMID:28706629

  17. Effects of the chronic restraint stress induced depression on reward-related learning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pan; Wang, Kezhu; Lu, Cong; Dong, Liming; Chen, Yixi; Wang, Qiong; Shi, Zhe; Yang, Yanyan; Chen, Shanguang; Liu, Xinmin

    2017-03-15

    Chronic mild or unpredictability stress produces a persistent depressive-like state. The main symptoms of depression include weight loss, despair, anhedonia, diminished motivation and mild cognition impairment, which could influence the ability of reward-related learning. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of chronic restraint stress on the performance of reward-related learning of rats. We used the exposure of repeated restraint stress (6h/day, for 28days) to induce depression-like behavior in rats. Then designed tasks including Pavlovian conditioning (magazine head entries), acquisition and maintenance of instrumental conditioning (lever pressing) and goal directed learning (higher fixed ratio schedule of reinforcement) to study the effects of chronic restraint stress. The results indicated that chronic restraint stress influenced rats in those aspects including the acquisition of a Pavlovian stimulus-outcome (S-O) association, the formation and maintenance of action-outcome (A-O) causal relation and the ability of learning in higher fixed ratio schedule. In conclusion, depression could influence the performances in reward-related learning obviously and the series of instrumental learning tasks may have potential as a method to evaluate cognitive changes in depression.

  18. Illusions and delusions: relating experimentally-induced false memories to anomalous experiences and ideas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip R Corlett

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The salience hypothesis of psychosis rests on a simple but profound observation that subtle alterations in the way that we perceive and experience stimuli have important consequences for how important these stimuli become for us, how much they draw our attention, how they embed themselves in our memory and, ultimately, how they shape our beliefs. We put forward the idea that a classical memory illusion – the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM effect – offers a useful way of exploring processes related to such aberrant belief formation. The illusion occurs when, as a consequence of its relationship to previous stimuli, a stimulus is asserted to be remembered even when has not been previously presented. Such illusory familiarity is thought to be generated by the surprising fluency with which the stimulus is processed. In this respect, the illusion relates directly to the salience hypothesis and may share common cognitive underpinnings with aberrations of perception and attribution that are found in psychosis. In this paper, we explore the theoretical importance of this experimentally-induced illusion in relation to the salience model of psychosis. We present data showing that, in healthy volunteers, the illusion relates directly to self reported anomalies of experience and magical thinking. We discuss this finding in terms of the salience hypothesis and of a broader Bayesian framework of perception and cognition which emphasizes the salience both of predictable and unpredictable experiences..

  19. In-trap decay spectroscopy for {beta}{beta} decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, Thomas

    2011-01-18

    The presented work describes the implementation of a new technique to measure electron-capture (EC) branching ratios (BRs) of intermediate nuclei in {beta}{beta} decays. This technique has been developed at TRIUMF in Vancouver, Canada. It facilitates one of TRIUMF's Ion Traps for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN), the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) that is used as a spectroscopy Penning trap. Radioactive ions, produced at the radioactive isotope facility ISAC, are injected and stored in the spectroscopy Penning trap while their decays are observed. A key feature of this technique is the use of a strong magnetic field, required for trapping. It radially confines electrons from {beta} decays along the trap axis while X-rays, following an EC, are emitted isotropically. This provides spatial separation of X-ray and {beta} detection with almost no {beta}-induced background at the X-ray detector, allowing weak EC branches to be measured. Furthermore, the combination of several traps allows one to isobarically clean the sample prior to the in-trap decay spectroscopy measurement. This technique has been developed to measure ECBRs of transition nuclei in {beta}{beta} decays. Detailed knowledge of these electron capture branches is crucial for a better understanding of the underlying nuclear physics in {beta}{beta} decays. These branches are typically of the order of 10{sup -5} and therefore difficult to measure. Conventional measurements suffer from isobaric contamination and a dominating {beta} background at theX-ray detector. Additionally, X-rays are attenuated by the material where the radioactive sample is implanted. To overcome these limitations, the technique of in-trap decay spectroscopy has been developed. In this work, the EBIT was connected to the TITAN beam line and has been commissioned. Using the developed beam diagnostics, ions were injected into the Penning trap and systematic studies on injection and storage optimization were performed. Furthermore, Ge

  20. Scaling ion traps for quantum computing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Uys, H

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The design, fabrication and preliminary testing of a chipscale, multi-zone, surface electrode ion trap is reported. The modular design and fabrication techniques used are anticipated to advance scalability of ion trap quantum computing architectures...