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Sample records for reintroduction 2004-2005 annual

  1. Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction; 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavin, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

    2005-09-01

    This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2004-September 2005. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos in 2004 and 2005 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Thirty-five turtles were placed at the Woodland Park Zoo and 53 at the Oregon Zoo. Of these, 77 head-started juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2005. Four were held back to attain more growth in captivity. Eleven were released at the Klickitat ponds, 22 at the Klickitat lake, 39 at the Skamania site, and 5 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 257 for the Klickitat ponds, 136 for the Klickitat lake, 206 for the Skamania pond complex, and 255 at Pierce NWR. In 2005, 34 females from the two Columbia Gorge populations were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Twenty-four nests were located and protected; these produced 90 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and transported to the Oregon and Woodland Park zoos for rearing in the head-start program. During the 2005 field season trapping effort, 486 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 430 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 216 individual painted turtles captured in 2005 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native

  2. Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

    2006-02-01

    In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2004-2005 project year, there were 590 adult summer steelhead, 31 summer steelhead kelts (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 70 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 80 adult and 1 jack spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway video counting window between December 13, 2004, and June 16, 2005. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. In addition, the old ladder trap was operated by ODFW in order to enumerate fish passage. Of the total, 143 adult summer steelhead and 15 summer steelhead kelts were enumerated at the west ladder at Nursery Bridge Dam during the video efforts between February 4 and May 23, 2005. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River

  3. Research on Captive Broodstock Programs for Pacific Salmon, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

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    Berejikian, Barry A. (National Marine Fisheries Service)

    2005-11-01

    The success of captive broodstock programs depends on high in-culture survival, appropriate development of the reproductive system, and the behavior and survival of cultured salmon after release, either as adults or juveniles. Continuing captive broodstock research designed to improve technology is being conducted to cover all major life history stages of Pacific salmon. Accomplishments detailed in this report and those since the last project review period (FY 2003) are listed below by major objective. Objective 1: (i) Developed tools for monitoring the spawning success of captively reared Chinook salmon that can now be used for evaluating the reintroduction success of ESA-listed captive broodstocks in their natal habitats. (ii) Developed an automated temperature controlled rearing system to test the effects of seawater rearing temperature on reproductive success of Chinook salmon. Objective 2: (i) Determined that Columbia River sockeye salmon imprint at multiple developmental stages and the length of exposure to home water is important for successful imprinting. These results can be utilized for developing successful reintroduction strategies to minimize straying by ESA-listed sockeye salmon. (ii) Developed behavioral and physiological assays for imprinting in sockeye salmon. Objective 3: (i) Developed growth regime to reduce age-two male maturation in spring Chinook salmon, (ii) described reproductive cycle of returning hatchery Snake River spring Chinook salmon relative to captive broodstock, and (iii) found delays in egg development in captive broodstock prior to entry to fresh water. (iv) Determined that loss of Redfish Lake sockeye embryos prior to hatch is largely due to lack of egg fertilization rather than embryonic mortality. Objective 4 : (i) Demonstrated safety and efficacy limits against bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in fall Chinook of attenuated R. salmoninarum vaccine and commercial vaccine Renogen, (ii) improved prophylactic and therapeutic

  4. Kootenai River Fisheries Investigation; Stock Status of Burbot, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

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    Paragamian, Vaughn L.; Laude, Dorothy C.

    2006-03-01

    The main objective of this investigation was to monitor movement and spawning activity of burbot Lota lota in the Kootenai River, Idaho and British Columbia, Canada during the winter of 2004-2005. As a secondary objective, we examined the literature to obtain inferential information on how changes in historic water temperature may affect burbot movement and spawning. Discharge from Libby Dam for October 2004 ranged from 133 to 272 m{sup 3}/s, was ramped up to 532 m{sup 3}/s early in November, then was brought down to about 283 m{sup 3}/s through the last 10 days of the month. In early December 2004, discharge was brought up to full powerhouse of about 762 m{sup 3}/s several times but remained above 436 m{sup 3}/s for most of the month. However, with the prospect of a below normal snowpack and a mild winter, discharge was brought down to 113 m{sup 3}/s, minimum flow, for the remainder of January through March 2005. Discharge did not meet the systems operation request as a burbot rehabilitation measure. Mean water temperature of the Kootenai River at Libby Dam from November 1, 2004 through April 5, 2005 was 5.3 C, ranging from 10.45 C on November 1, 2004 to 3.2 C on March 2, 2005. Tributary water temperatures were monitored in Deep, Smith, and Boundary creeks in Idaho and in the Goat River, Corn, and Summit creeks, British Columbia, Canada from November 1, 2004 to about April 18, 2005. Baited hoop nets of 25 and 19 mm bar mesh were fished from November 5, 2004 through April 4, 2005 for 2,046 net d (one net day is a single 24 h set). One hundred twenty-two fish were caught encompassing ten different species of fish. Eighteen burbot (14 different fish) were captured. Sixteen of the captures were at Ambush Rock (rkm 244.5), one was near Nicks Island (rkm 144.5), British Columbia, and the other was downstream of the Goat River (rkm 152.7). Of the 18 burbot captured, one fish escaped from the net overnight, four were recaptures from this year's study, six were

  5. Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement Program, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St. Hilaire, Danny R. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

    2006-02-01

    This annual report is in fulfillment of contractual obligations with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's (ODFW), Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement Program (Program). The Program works cooperatively with private landowners to develop long-term restoration, under which, passive and active Habitat Improvement Projects are conducted. Historically, projects have included livestock exclusion fencing (passive restoration) to protect riparian habitats, along with the installation of instream structures (active restoration) to address erosion and improve fish habitat. In recent years, the focus of active restoration has shifted to bioengineering treatments and, more recently, to channel re-design and reconstruction aimed at improving fish habitat, by restoring stable channel function. This report provides a summary of Program activities for the 2004 calendar year (January 1 through December 31, 2004), within each of the four main project phases, including: (1) Implementation--Pre-Work, (2) Implementation--On Site Development, (3) Operation and Maintenance, and (4) Monitoring and Evaluation. This report also summarizes Program Administrative, Interagency Coordination, and Public Education activities.

  6. Assessment of Native Salmonids Above Hells Canyon Dam, Idaho, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Kevin A.; Lamansky, Jr., James A. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2005-08-01

    In the western United States, exotic brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis frequently have a deleterious effect on native salmonids, and biologists often attempt to remove brook trout in streams using electrofishing. Although the success of electrofishing removal projects typically is low, few studies have assessed the underlying mechanisms of failure, especially in terms of compensatory responses. We evaluated the effectiveness of a three-year removal project in reducing brook trout and enhancing native salmonids in 7.8 km of an Idaho stream and looked for brook trout compensatory responses such as decreased natural mortality, increased growth, increased fecundity at length, or earlier maturation. Due to underestimates of the distribution of brook trout in the first year and personnel shortages in the third year, the multiagency watershed advisory group that performed the project fully treated the stream (i.e. multipass removals over the entire stream) in only one year. In 1998, 1999, and 2000, a total of 1,401, 1,241, and 890 brook trout were removed, respectively. For 1999 and 2000, an estimated 88 and 79% of the total number of brook trout in the stream were removed. For the section of stream that was treated in all years, the abundance of age-1 and older brook trout decreased by 85% from 1998 to 2003. In the same area, the abundance of age-0 brook trout decreased 86% from 1998 to 1999 but by 2003 had rebounded to near the original abundance. Abundance of native redband trout Oncorhynchus mykiss decreased for age-1 and older fish but did not change significantly for age-0 fish. Despite high rates of removal, total annual survival rate for brook trout increased from 0.08 {+-} 0.02 in 1998 to 0.20 {+-} 0.04 in 1999 and 0.21 {+-} 0.04 in 2000. Growth of age-0 brook trout was significantly higher in 2000 (the year after their abundance was lowest) compared to other years, and growth of age-1 and age-2 brook trout was significantly lower following the initial removal

  7. Kootenai River White Sturgeon Investigations; White Sturgeon Spawning and Recruitment Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rust, Pete; Wakkinen, Virginia (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2006-05-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the environmental requirements for successful spawning and recruitment of the Kootenai River white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus population. Annual tasks include monitoring and evaluating the response of various life stages of Kootenai River white sturgeon to mitigation flows supplied by the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). Sampling for adult Kootenai River white sturgeon in 2004 began in March and continued into May. One hundred forty-two adult white sturgeon were captured with 4,146 hours of angling and set-lining effort in the Kootenai River. Kootenai River discharge and stage at Bonners Ferry in 2004 peaked in mid December. Discharge remained below 400 cubic meters per second (cms) until June 1; then, because of a systems operations request (SOR), increased and remained between 480 and 540 cms through the end of June. From July through September, discharge ranged from 360 to 420 cms, decreasing to 168 cms by the end of October. Discharge increased again to above 625 cms by November 4 to increase winter storage in Lake Koocanusa and ranged from 310 to 925 cms through the end of December. We monitored the movements of 31 adult sturgeon in Kootenay Lake, British Columbia (BC) and the Kootenai River from mid-March until late August 2004. All telemetered fish were dual tagged with external sonic and radio transmitters, and some of the fish were tagged in previous years. Eighteen of the 31 telemetered adult white sturgeon were released at Hemlock Bar reach (rkm 260.0) as part of a research project to test the feasibility of moving sexually mature adult white sturgeon to areas with habitat types thought to be more suitable for successful egg hatching and early life stage recruitment. Marked fish were monitored from the time of release until they moved downstream of Bonners Ferry. Sampling for white sturgeon eggs with artificial substrate mats began May 3 and ended June 10, 2004. We sampled 650 mat days

  8. Teatriankeet 2004/2005

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Vastavad Ü. Aaloe, J. Allik, R. Avestik, M. Balbat, K. Eberhart, S. Karja, E. Kekelidze, M. Kolk, G. Kordemets, J. Kulli, V.-S. Maiste, R. Neimar, M. Pesti, P.-R. Purje, J. Rähesoo, A. Saro, I. Sillar, Ü. Tonts, L. Tormis, B. Tuch, V. Vahing. Nimetatud ka parimad lavastused 2004/2005 - "Julia" (Eesti Draamateater, lav. T. Ojasoo), "Tõde ja õigus" (Tallinna Linnateater, lav. E. Nüganen), "Põrgu wärk" (MTÜ R.A.A.A.M., lav. H. Toompere jun)

  9. Yakima River Species Interactions Studies; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Temple, Gabriel M.; Fritts, Anthony L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2005-05-01

    be limited by strong ecological interactions such as predation or competition (Busack et al. 1997). Our work has adapted to new information needs as the YKFP has evolved. Initially, our work focused on interactions between anadromous steelhead and resident rainbow trout (for explanation see Pearsons et al. 1993), then interactions between spring chinook salmon and rainbow trout, and recently interactions between spring chinook salmon and highly valued non-target taxa (NTT; e.g., bull trout); and interactions between strong interactor taxa (e.g., those that may strongly influence the abundance of spring chinook salmon; e.g., smallmouth bass) and spring chinook salmon. The change in emphasis to spring chinook salmon has largely been influenced by the shift in the target species planned for supplementation (Bonneville Power Administration et al. 1996; Fast and Craig 1997). Originally, steelhead and spring chinook salmon were proposed to be supplemented simultaneously (Clune and Dauble 1991). However, due in part to the uncertainties associated with interactions between steelhead and rainbow trout, spring chinook and coho salmon were supplemented before steelhead. This redirection in the species to be supplemented has prompted us to prioritize interactions between spring chinook and rainbow trout, while beginning to investigate other ecological interactions of concern. Prefacility monitoring of variables such as rainbow trout density, distribution, and size structure was continued and monitoring of other NTT was initiated in 1997. This report is organized into five chapters that represent major topics associated with monitoring stewardship, utilization, and strong interactor taxa. Chapter 1 reports the results of non-target taxa monitoring after the sixth release of hatchery salmon smolts in the upper Yakima River Basin. Chapter 2 reports on the impacts of supplementation and reintroduction of salmon to trout. Chapter 2 was submitted as a manuscript to the North American

  10. Israel Seminar 2004-2005

    CERN Document Server

    Schechtman, Gideon

    2007-01-01

    This collection of original papers related to the Israeli GAFA seminar (on Geometric Aspects of Functional Analysis) during the years 2004-2005 follows the long tradition of the previous volumes that reflect the general trends of the Theory and are a source of inspiration for research. Most of the papers deal with different aspects of the Asymptotic Geometric Analysis, ranging from classical topics in the geometry of convex bodies, to inequalities involving volumes of such bodies or, more generally, log-concave measures, to the study of sections or projections of convex bodies. In many of the papers Probability Theory plays an important role; in some limit laws for measures associated with convex bodies, resembling Central Limit Theorems, are derive and in others probabilistic tools are used extensively. There are also papers on related subjects, including a survey on the behavior of the largest eigenvalue of random matrices and some topics in Number Theory.

  11. Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek in Association with Restoration Efforts, US Geological Survey Report, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

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    Allen, M. Brady; Connolly, Patrick J.; Jezorek, Ian G. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA)

    2006-06-01

    This project was designed to document existing habitat conditions and fish populations within the Rattlesnake Creek watershed (White Salmon River subbasin, Washington) before major habitat restoration activities are implemented and prior to the reintroduction of salmon and steelhead above Condit Dam. Returning adult salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead O. mykiss have not had access to Rattlesnake Creek since 1913. An assessment of resident trout populations should serve as a good surrogate for evaluation of factors that would limit salmon and steelhead production in the watershed. Personnel from United States Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) attended to three main objectives of the Rattlesnake Creek project. The first objective was to characterize stream and riparian habitat conditions. This effort included measures of water quality, water quantity, stream habitat, and riparian conditions. The second objective was to determine the status of fish populations in the Rattlesnake Creek drainage. To accomplish this, we derived estimates of salmonid population abundance, determined fish species composition, assessed distribution and life history attributes, obtained tissue samples for genetic analysis, and assessed fish diseases in the watershed. The third objective was to use the collected habitat and fisheries information to help identify and prioritize areas in need of restoration. As this report covers the fourth year of a five-year study, it is largely restricted to describing our efforts and findings for the first two objectives.

  12. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Cook, C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2005-02-01

    This report documents a four-year study(a) to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) at the entrance to the forebay of the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. The work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes). In this report, emphasis is placed on the methodology and results associated with the fourth project year and compared with findings from the previous years to provide an overall project summary. Since 1995, the Colville Confederated Tribes have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams on the Columbia River (Figure S.1). A 42-month investigation from 1996 to 1999 determined that from 211,685 to 576,676 fish, including kokanee and rainbow trout, were entrained annually at Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the data found that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. Because these entrainment rates represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam, they have been judged unacceptable to fishery managers responsible for perpetuating the fishery in Lake Roosevelt. In an effort to reduce fish entrainment rates, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was modified in 2001 to include a multiyear study of the efficacy of using strobe lights to deter fish from entering the third powerplant forebay. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory initiated the four-year study in collaboration with Colville

  13. Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knudsen, Curtis M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA); Schroder, Steven L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Johnston, Mark V. (yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

    2005-05-01

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the fourth in a series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook populations in the Yakima River basin. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2004 and March 31, 2005 and includes analyses of historical baseline data, as well. Supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery Project's (YKFP) spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is defined as increasing natural production and harvest opportunities, while keeping adverse ecological interactions and genetic impacts within acceptable bounds (Busack et al. 1997). Within this context demographics, phenotypic traits, and reproductive ecology have significance because they directly affect natural productivity. In addition, significant changes in locally adapted traits due to hatchery influence, i.e. domestication, would likely be maladaptive resulting in reduced population productivity and fitness (Taylor 1991; Hard 1995). Thus, there is a need to study demographic and phenotypic traits in the YKFP in order to understand hatchery and wild population productivity, reproductive ecology, and the effects of domestication (Busack et al. 1997). Tracking trends in these traits over time is also a critical aspect of domestication monitoring (Busack et al. 2004) to determine whether trait changes have a genetic component and, if so, are they within acceptable limits. The first chapter of this report compares first generation hatchery and wild upper Yakima River spring chinook returns over a suite of life-history, phenotypic and demographic traits. The second

  14. Monitor Criminaliteit Bedrijfsleven 2004-2005 (MCB)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, F.

    2006-01-01

    Samenvatting van resultaten van de Monitor Criminaliteit Bedrijfsleven (MCB) 2004-2005. Met name wordt ingegaan op diefstal in de sectoren: Bouw, Detailhandel, Horeca, Transport, en Financiële en zakelijke dienstverlening. Dit is een uitgaven in de nieuwe WODC-reeks Fact Sheet (nr. 2006-16). De

  15. LULI 2004-2005 activity report; LULI rapport scientifique 2004-2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This document gathers the main results obtained by scientists from the LULI (laboratory for the use of intense lasers) unit in 2004-2005. It is made up of 40 short articles and is organized around 5 topics: 1) laser-matter interaction, 2) hydrodynamics, shocks, material treatment, 3) atom physics, X-ray lasers, 4) progress in optics for power lasers, and 5) instrumentation and other advances.

  16. Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID) 2004-2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID) 2004-2005 consists of terrain-corrected, precision rectified spring, summer, and fall Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM)...

  17. Rubella-epidemie 2004-2005: surveillance van congenitale gevolgen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, Y van der; Hahné, Susan J M; Ruijs, H; Timen, A; Binnendijk, R S van; Loon, T van; Melker, Hester E de

    2006-01-01

    In 2004-2005, the Netherlands experienced an outbreak of rubella. The Centre for Infectious Disease Control (CIb/RIVM) monitors characteristics and the extent of the outbreak and reports on the disease-burden of rubella, congenital rubella-virus infection (CRI) and congenital rubella syndrome (CRS).

  18. Surveillance van respiratoire infectieziekten in 2004/2005.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, F.; Plas, S.M. van der; Wilbrink, B.; Jong, J.C. de; Bartelds, A.I.M.

    2005-01-01

    In order to gain more clear understanding of the epidemiology of a selection of respiratory infectious diseases in The Netherlands in the season 2004/2005, epidemiological data about a selection of respiratory syndromes and pathogens (influenza-like illnesses, other acute respiratory infections,

  19. Wind River Watershed Restoration 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connolly, Patrick J.; Jezorek, Ian G. [U.S. Geological Survey

    2008-11-10

    During 2004, researchers from U.S. Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) collected temperature, flow, and habitat data to characterize physical habitat condition and variation within and among tributaries and mainstem sections in the Wind River subbasin. Juvenile salmonid population surveys were conducted within select study areas throughout the subbasin. We expanded our survey coverage of the mainstem Wind River to a reach in the vicinity of Carson National Fish Hatchery to assess effects of non-indigenous Chinook on native steelhead. These efforts add to a database of habitat and fish data collected in the Wind River since 1996. This research contributes to the Wind River Restoration Project, which includes active stream habitat restoration and monitoring of adult and juvenile steelhead populations. We maintained a network of 32 thermographs in the Wind River subbasin during 2004. Additionally, Underwood Conservation District provided us with data from seven thermographs that they maintained during 2004. Thermograph data are identifying areas with chronic high water temperatures and stream sections where high rates of warming are occurring. During 2004, water temperatures at 26 thermograph sites exceeded the 16 C limit for surface waters set by the Washington Department of Ecology. Water temperatures exceeded 20 C at five sites in the Trout Creek watershed. Our thermograph dataset includes information from as early as 1996 at some sites and has become a valuable long-term dataset, which will be crucial in determining bioenergetic relationships with habitat and life-histories. We have monitored salmonid populations throughout the Wind River subbasin by electrofishing and snorkeling. We electrofished four stream sections for population estimates during 2004. In these sections, and others where we simply collected fish without a population estimate, we tagged juvenile steelhead and Chinook salmon with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags to track growth and movement of individuals. We snorkeled nine stream sections during 2004. Juvenile steelhead populations have varied greatly between streams and between years. Numbers of age-0 steelhead have increased substantially since 2000 within the MINE reach (rkm 35.0-40.0) section of the upper Wind River. Because of potential negative interactions with steelhead, naturally spawned populations of introduced juvenile Chinook salmon are of concern in the mainstem of the Wind River. During 2004, we deployed over 3,000 PIT tags in the Wind River subbasin, primarily in juvenile steelhead, but also in juvenile Chinook. We are compiling a dataset of recapture information on these tagged fish as well as interrogation information from Bonneville Dam and other sites. The habitat and fish data collected have been used in Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment modeling efforts, the Wind River Subbasin Plan, and the Total Maximum Daily Load report from Washington Department of Ecology. Continued monitoring of changes in habitat, combined with data on fish populations, will help guide planning efforts of land and fish managers. As long-term active and passive restoration actions are implemented in the Wind River and its tributaries, these data will provide the ability to measure change. Because the Wind River subbasin has no steelhead hatchery or supplementation, these data will be useful to compare population trends in subbasins with hatchery or supplementation management.

  20. Kalispel Resident Fish Project, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Jason; Andersen, Todd

    2005-06-01

    In 2004 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) implemented a new enhancement monitoring project for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) enhancement projects were also monitored. Additional baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted, in tributaries to the Pend Oreille River.

  1. Aerosol size measurement during the 2004/2005 harmattan season ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aerosol size measurement at Uturu (lat.05.33°N, 06.03°N and long. 07.10"E, 07.29°E) Nigeria during the 2004/2005 harmattan season was carried out. The aerosol size distributions were measured using zeiss micrometer inserted on the diaphragm inside the eye piece of Olympus binocular microscope. The dust ...

  2. Dibujos de Arquitectura. Ejercicios del curso (2004-2005)

    OpenAIRE

    Jaén i Urban, Gaspar; Martínez Ivars, Carlos Salvador; Oliva Bielsa, Juan Carlos (coord.); Allepuz Pedreño, Ángel (coord.)

    2005-01-01

    Se incluyen en este archivo una colección de dibujos de arquitectura realizados por alumnos de la Universidad de Alicante (titulaciones de Arquitectura Técnica y de Arquitectura) en el curso 2004-2005, en los municipios de Alicante, Elche y San Vicente del Raspeig. Las técnicas utilizadas son: mano alzada e instrumental, lapiz, tinta, acuarela, aguada, pastel y lápices de colores. El soporte es papel de distintos gramajes y aptitudes. El formato es en todos los casos DIN A3.

  3. Re-Introduction of Lower Columbia River Chum Salmon into Duncan Creek, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillson, Todd D. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2003-10-15

    silt and provide shade; (4) annual sampling of gravel in the spawning channels to detect changes in gravel composition and sedimentation levels. Tasks associated with the second goal of the recovery strategy for Lower Columbia River chum are detailed in The Monitoring and Evaluation Plan for the Duncan Creek Chum Salmon Reintroduction Program. Four main questions are used to evaluate the success of this program: (1) what egg-to-fry survival rates are being achieved in the renovated channels, (2) what is the survival of the eggs and fry used in the artificial rearing program in Duncan Creek, (3) what is the survival and spawning ground distribution of adult chum salmon produced from the spawning channels and the artificial rearing program, and (4) what is the straying rate of non-program chum salmon into Duncan Creek. The monitoring portion of the Duncan M&E includes documenting and monitoring the physical attributes of the channels.

  4. Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavens, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

    2006-11-01

    This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2005-September 2006. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon zoos in 2005 and 2006 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Twenty-six turtles were placed at the Woodland Park Zoo and 62 at the Oregon Zoo in fall 2005. These turtles joined two that were held back from release in summer 2005 due to their small size. All 90 juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2006. Twenty-eight juvenile turtles were released at the Klickitat ponds, 22 at the Klickitat lake, 21 at the Skamania site, and 19 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 944; 285 for the Klickitat ponds, 158 for the Klickitat lake, 227 for the Skamania pond complex, and 274 at Pierce NWR. In 2006, 20 females from the Klickitat population were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Fifteen nests were located and protected; these produced 55 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and transported to the Oregon and Woodland Park zoos for rearing in the head-start program. One wild hatchling captured in spring 2006 was placed in the head-start program to attain more growth in captivity. During the 2006 field season trapping effort, 414 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 374 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations

  5. Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction; 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavin, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

    2004-09-01

    This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2003-September 2004. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos in 2003 and 2004 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Sixty-nine turtles were over-wintered at the Woodland Park Zoo and 69 at the Oregon Zoo. Of these, 136 head-started juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2004. Two were held back to attain more growth in captivity. Thirty-four were released at the Klickitat ponds, 19 at the Klickitat lake, 21 at the Skamania site, and 62 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 246 for the Klickitat ponds, 114 for the Klickitat lake, 167 for the Skamania pond complex, and 250 at Pierce NWR. In 2004, 32 females from the two Columbia Gorge populations were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Twenty-one of the females nested and produced 85 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and October and transported to the Woodland Park and Oregon zoos for rearing in the head-start program. Data collection for a four-year telemetry study of survival and habitat use by juvenile western pond turtles at Pierce NWR concluded in 2004. Radio transmitters on study animals were replaced as needed until all replacements were in service; afterward, the turtles were monitored until their transmitters failed. The corps of study turtles ranged from 39 in August 2003 to 2 turtles at the end of August 2004. These turtles showed the same seasonal pattern of movements between summer water and upland winter

  6. Reintroduction of Lower Columbia River Chum Salmon into Duncan Creek, 2007 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillson, Todd D. [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2009-06-12

    Bonneville Dam and those spawning in Hamilton and Hardy creeks. Response to the federal ESA listing has been primarily through direct-recovery actions: reducing harvest, hatchery supplementation using local broodstock for populations at catastrophic risk, habitat restoration (including construction of spawning channels) and flow agreements to protect spawning and rearing areas. Both state and federal agencies have built controlled spawning areas. In 1998, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) began a chum salmon supplementation program using native stock on the Grays River. This program was expanded during 1999 - 2001 to include reintroduction into the Chinook River using eggs from the Grays River Supplementation Program. These eggs are incubated at the Grays River Hatchery, reared to release size at the Sea Resources Hatchery on the Chinook River, and the fry are released at the mouth of the Chinook River. Native steelhead, chum, and coho salmon are present in Duncan Creek, and are recognized as subpopulations of the Lower Gorge population, and are focal species in the Lower Columbia Fish Recovery Board (LCFRB) plan. Steelhead, chum and coho salmon that spawn in Duncan Creek are listed as Threatened under the ESA. Duncan Creek is classified by the LCFRB plan as a watershed for intensive monitoring (LCFRB 2004). This project was identified in the 2004 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) revised Biological Opinion (revised BiOp) to increase survival of chum salmon, 'BPA will continue to fund the program to re-introduce Columbia River chum salmon into Duncan Creek as long as NOAA Fisheries determines it to be an essential and effective contribution to reducing the risk of extinction for this ESU'. (USACE et al. 2004, page 85-86). The Governors Forum on Monitoring and Salmon Recovery and Watershed Health recommends one major population from each ESU have adult and juvenile monitoring. Duncan Creek chum salmon are identified in this plan to be

  7. The impact of asthma medication guidelines on asthma controller use and on asthma exacerbation rates comparing 1997-1998 and 2004-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rank, Matthew A; Liesinger, Juliette T; Ziegenfuss, Jeanette Y; Branda, Megan E; Lim, Kaiser G; Yawn, Barbara P; Shah, Nilay D

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between asthma controller medication use and exacerbation rates over time is unclear at the population level. To estimate the change in asthma controller medication use between 2 time periods as measured by the controller-to-total asthma medication ratio and its association with changes in asthma exacerbation rates between 1997-1998 and 2004-2005. The study design was a cross-sectional population-level comparison between individuals from 1997-1998 and 2004-2005. Study participants were individuals aged 5 to 56 years identified as having asthma in the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). The main outcome measures were a controller-to-total asthma medication ratio greater than 0.5 and asthma exacerbation rates (dispensing of systemic corticosteroid or emergency department visit/hospitalization for asthma) in 1997-1998 compared with 2004-2005. The proportion of individuals with a controller-to-total asthma medication ratio greater than 0.5, when adjusted for other demographic factors, has improved by 16.1% (95% CI: 10.8%, 21.3%) for all individuals from 1997-1998 to 2004-2005. Annual asthma exacerbation rates did not change significantly in any group from 1997-1998 to 2004-2005 (0.27/year to 0.23/year). African American and Hispanic individuals with asthma had higher asthma exacerbation rates and a lower proportion with a controller-to-total asthma medication ratio greater than 0.5 than whites in both 1997-1998 and 2004-2005; however, these differences were not statistically significant. An increase in asthma controller-to-total medication ratio in a sample reflective of the US population was not associated with a decreased asthma exacerbation rate comparing 1997-1998 and 2004-2005. Copyright © 2012 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [An analysis of lung cancer mortality in China, 2004 - 2005].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wan-qing; Zhang, Si-wei; Zou, Xiao-nong; Zhao, Ping

    2010-05-01

    To analyze the mortality distribution characteristics and epidemiological trend of lung cancer in 2004 - 2005 in China. A total of 142 660 482 person years (72 970 241 person years in male, 69 690 241 person years in female) was covered in the Third National Retrospective Sampling Survey of Death Causes in China, 2004 - 2005. All death records of cancer of trachea, bronchus and lung were extracted. According to the different variations such as gender, urban or rural areas and three territory regions-Eastern, Central and Western China for lung cancer deaths, crude, age-adjusted, area-adjusted death rate, the constitute proportion to all cancer deaths, age-standardized death rate by Chinese standard population and by world standard population and rank of cancer-specific mortality were calculated. The statistic indexes of mortality were compared with that of previous retrospective death surveys in 1973 - 1975 and 1990 - 1992. In the National Death Survey 2004 - 2005, there were 43 993 deaths caused by lung cancer with crude death rate of 30.84/100 000, age-standardized death rate by Chinese standard population of 20.24/100 000 and 27.62/100 000 by world standard population, accounted for 22.70% of total cancer deaths (193 841 cases). There were a total of 30 167 cancer deaths in male with crude death rate of 41.34/100 000 and 13 826 in female with crude death rate of 19.84/100 000. Lung cancer mortality was increased with age. In urban areas, the lung cancer was ranked the first cancer death causes with crude death rate of 40.98/100 000 (19 628/47 899 806), accounted for 27.29% of all cancer deaths. While in rural areas, the lung cancer was the second cancer death following liver cancer with crude death rate of 25.71/100 000 (24 365/94 760 676), accounted for 19.99% of all cancer deaths (121 905 cases). There were different death rates by different location division. Lung cancer crude death rate in east was the highest with rate of 37.85/100 000 (19 893/52 556 694

  9. Feasibility and Risks of Coho Reintroduction in Mid-Columbia [Tributaries] Monitoring and Evaluation, 1999 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunnigan, James L. (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

    1999-10-01

    The long-term vision for the coho re-introduction project is to reestablish naturally reproducing coho salmon populations in mid-Columbia river basins, with numbers at or near carrying capacity that provide opportunities for significant harvest for Tribal and non-Tribal fishers.

  10. Re-Introduction of Lower Columbia River Chum Salmon into Duncan Creek, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillson, Todd D. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2004-09-01

    Currently, two methods of reintroduction are being simultaneously evaluated at Duncan Creek. Recolonization is occurring by introducing adult chum salmon from the Lower Gorge (LG) population into Duncan Creek and allowing them to naturally reproduce. The supplementation strategy required adults to be collected and artificially spawned, incubated, reared, and released at the mouth of Duncan Creek. All eggs from the artificial crossings at Washougal Hatchery were incubated and the fry reared to release size at the hatchery. The Duncan Creek chum salmon project was very successful in 2003-04, providing knowledge and experience that will improve program execution in future years. The gear used to collect adult brood stock was changed from tangle nets to beach seines. This increased efficiency and the speed at which adults could be processed in the field, and most likely reduced stress on the adults handled. Certain weaknesses exposed in past seasons still exist and new ones were exposed (e.g. inadequate incubation and rearing space at Washougal Hatchery for any large salvage operation and having to move the rearing troughs outside the raceway in 2004). Egg-to-fry survival rates of 64% and 58% showed that the channels are functioning at the upper end of what can be expected from them. Possibly the most important event this season was the ability to strontium mark and release all naturally-produced fry from the spawning channels. Channel and floodplain modifications reduced the likelihood that floods will damage the channels and negatively impact survival rates.

  11. Criminal Victimisation in International Perspective : Key findings from the 2004-2005 ICVS and EU ICS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, J. van; Kesteren, J. van; Smit, P.

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the key results of the crime victim surveys that were carried out as part of the fifth sweep of the International Crime Victim Surveys (ICVS) conducted in 2004/2005. A large portion of the these data are derived from the European Survey on Crime and Safety (EU ICS), organised by

  12. Influenza uitbraken in verpleeghuizen 2004-2005: wat zijn de consequenties voor het komende griepseizoen?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sande, M. van der; Ruijs, H.; Cools, H.; Meijer, A.; Plas, S. van der; Morroy, G.

    2005-01-01

    Voorafgaand aan het influenzaseizoen 2004/2005 verschenen het LCI draaiboek Explosies van luchtweginfecties in instellingen en de NVVA-richtlijn Influenzapreventie in verpleeghuizen en verzorgingshuizen. Beide werden van theoretische commentaren voorzien in onder andere TvT en het Nederlands

  13. Stagnation in body mass index in Denmark from 1997/1998 to 2004/2005, but with geographical diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendstrup, Mathilde; Knudsen, Nils Jacob; Jørgensen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed the trend in body mass index (BMI) as well as in the prevalence of overweight and obesity among Danish adults, mainly women, from 1997/1998 to 2004/2005 and evaluated any regional differences....

  14. Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in Big Canyon Creek Watershed, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Lynn (Nez Perce Soil and Conservation District, Lewiston, ID)

    2006-07-01

    The ''Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Big Canyon Creek Watershed'' is a multi-phase project to enhance steelhead trout in the Big Canyon Creek watershed by improving salmonid spawning and rearing habitat. Habitat is limited by extreme high runoff events, low summer flows, high water temperatures, poor instream cover, spawning gravel siltation, and sediment, nutrient and bacteria loading. Funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the project assists in mitigating damage to steelhead runs caused by the Columbia River hydroelectric dams. The project is sponsored by the Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District. Target fish species include steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Steelhead trout within the Snake River Basin were listed in 1997 as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Accomplishments for the contract period September 1, 2004 through October 31, 2005 include; 2.7 riparian miles treated, 3.0 wetland acres treated, 5,263.3 upland acres treated, 106.5 riparian acres treated, 76,285 general public reached, 3,000 students reached, 40 teachers reached, 18 maintenance plans completed, temperature data collected at 6 sites, 8 landowner applications received and processed, 14 land inventories completed, 58 habitat improvement project designs completed, 5 newsletters published, 6 habitat plans completed, 34 projects installed, 2 educational workshops, 6 displays, 1 television segment, 2 public service announcements, a noxious weed GIS coverage, and completion of NEPA, ESA, and cultural resources requirements.

  15. Evaluation of Fall Chinook and Chum Salmon Spawning below Bonneville Dam; 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van der Naald, Wayne; Duff, Cameron; Friesen, Thomas A. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR)

    2006-02-01

    Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp. populations have declined over the last century due to a variety of human impacts. Chum salmon O. keta populations in the Columbia River have remained severely depressed for the past several decades, while upriver bright (URB) fall Chinook salmon O. tschawytscha populations have maintained relatively healthy levels. For the past seven years we have collected data on adult spawning and juvenile emergence and outmigration of URB fall Chinook and chum salmon populations in the Ives and Pierce islands complex below Bonneville Dam. In 2004, we estimated 1,733 fall Chinook salmon and 336 chum salmon spawned in our study area. Fall Chinook salmon spawning peaked 19 November with 337 redds and chum salmon spawning peaked 3 December with 148 redds. Biological characteristics continue to suggest chum salmon in our study area are similar to nearby stocks in Hardy and Hamilton creeks, and Chinook salmon we observe are similar to upriver bright stocks. Temperature data indicated that 2004 brood URB fall Chinook salmon emergence began on 6 January and ended 27 May 2005, with peak emergence occurring 12 March. Chum salmon emergence began 4 February and continued through 2 May 2005, with peak emergence occurring on 21 March. Between 13 January and 28 June, we sampled 28,984 juvenile Chinook salmon and 1,909 juvenile chum salmon. We also released 32,642 fin-marked and coded-wire tagged juvenile fall Chinook salmon to assess survival. The peak catch of juvenile fall Chinook salmon occurred on 18 April. Our results suggested that the majority of fall Chinook salmon outmigrate during late May and early June, at 70-80 mm fork length (FL). The peak catch of juvenile chum salmon occurred 25 March. Juvenile chum salmon appeared to outmigrate at 40-55 mm FL. Outmigration of chum salmon peaked in March but extended into April and May.

  16. Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, Jay; Garrow, Larry (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

    2005-06-01

    ''Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam'' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan. Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) uses a combination of techniques to collect physical and biological data within the Kootenai River Basin. These data serve several purposes including: the development and refinement of models used in management of water resources and operation of Libby Dam; investigations into the limiting factors of native fish populations, gathering basic life history information, tracking trends in endangered and threatened species, and the assessment of restoration or management activities designed to restore native fishes and their habitats.

  17. Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mensik, Fred; Rapp, Shawn; Ross Doug (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2005-11-01

    The 2004 fish collection season at Lower Granite Dam (LGR) was characterized by above average water temperatures, below average flows and spill, low levels of debris. The number of smolts collected for all species groups (with the exception of clipped and unclipped sockeye/kokanee) exceeded all previous collection numbers. With the continued release of unclipped supplementation chinook, steelhead and sockeye above LGR, we can not accurately distinguish wild chinook, wild steelhead and wild sockeye/kokanee from hatchery reared unclipped chinook and sockeye/kokanee in the sample. Wild steelhead can be identified from hatchery steelhead by the eroded dorsal and pectoral fins exhibited on unclipped hatchery steelhead. The numbers in the wild columns beginning in 1998 include wild and unclipped hatchery origin smolts. This season a total of 11,787,539 juvenile salmonids was collected at LGR. Of these, 11,253,837 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 11,164,132 by barge and 89,705 by truck. An additional 501,395 fish were bypassed to the river due to over-capacity of the raceways and for research purposes. According to the PTAGIS database, 177,009 PIT-tagged fish were detected at LGR in 2004. Of these, 105,894 (59.8%) were bypassed through the PIT-tag diversion system, 69,130 (39.1%) were diverted to the raceways to be transported, 1,640 (0.9%) were diverted to the sample tank, sampled and then transported, 345 (0.2%) were undetected at any of the bypass, raceway or sample exit monitors.

  18. Stagnation in body mass index in Denmark from 1997/1998 to 2004/2005, but with geographical diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendstrup, Mathilde; Knudsen, Nils Jacob; Jørgensen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed the trend in body mass index (BMI) as well as in the prevalence of overweight and obesity among Danish adults, mainly women, from 1997/1998 to 2004/2005 and evaluated any regional differences.......We analyzed the trend in body mass index (BMI) as well as in the prevalence of overweight and obesity among Danish adults, mainly women, from 1997/1998 to 2004/2005 and evaluated any regional differences....

  19. Local health department responses during the 2004-2005 influenza vaccine shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, James; Bashir, Zarnaaz; Phillips, Cynthia

    2007-08-01

    During the 2004-2005 influenza vaccine shortage, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) coordinated distribution of post-October 5th 2004 doses of influenza vaccine to state and local health departments (LHDs), who subsequently distributed vaccine to community providers. The National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) conducted three Web-based surveys throughout the 2004-2005 influenza season to assess in real-time how LHDs were 1) dealing with the vaccine shortage, 2) implementing the interim recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), and 3) making efforts to reallocate and redistribute doses of influenza vaccine toward high-priority populations within their communities. This paper highlights LHD responses that alleviated adverse impacts during this public health emergency. The first survey asked LHDs to quantify their community's vaccine supply; the second survey asked them to describe their specific responses to the crisis; and the third survey asked them to reflect and evaluate the effectiveness of their efforts to vaccinate high-priority groups during the crisis. Six hundred five (605) of 717 (84%) LHDs in 44 states responded to the three surveys. Results show that LHDs leveraged preparedness plans, formed strategic community partnerships, and practiced vaccination drills to address the problems of vaccinating high-priority and hard-to-reach populations that arose out of the vaccine shortage. The practices used by LHDs during this shortage may provide valuable response lessons to minimize the impact of future influenza vaccine shortages and other public health emergencies.

  20. HIV-1 Subtype distribution in morocco based on national sentinel surveillance data 2004-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akrim Mohammed

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about HIV-1 subtype distribution in Morocco. Some data suggest an emergence of new HIV subtypes. We conducted phylogenetic analysis on a nationally representative sample of 60 HIV-1 viral specimens collected during 2004-2005 through the Morocco national HIV sentinel surveillance survey. Results While subtype B is still the most prevalent, 23.3% of samples represented non-B subtypes, the majority of which were classified as CRF02_AG (15%. Molecular clock analysis confirmed that the initial introduction of HIV-1B in Morocco probably came from Europe in the early 1980s. In contrast, the CRF02_AG strain appeared to be introduced from sub-Saharan Africa in two separate events in the 1990s. Conclusions Subtype CRF02_AG has been emerging in Morocco since the 1990s. More information about the factors introducing HIV subtype-specific transmission will inform the prevention strategy in the region.

  1. [Influenza telephone consultation target the general public--2003-2004, 2004-2005].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamadera, Shizuko; Kobune, Fumio; Komatsu, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Kazuyoshi; Nakayama, Mikio; Hagiwara, Toshikatsu; Matsumoto, Miyako; Yamamoto, Kiichi; Renard, Junko; Oya, Akira

    2007-07-01

    The NPO Biomedical Science Association provided telephone consultation, including contacts by fax and email, targeting the general public within the framework of influenza control measures worked out by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW). We received 2,813 inquiries during the 2003-2004 flu season and 2,444 inquiries during the 2004-2005 season. By month, the highest number was in October-November, accounting for 42.6%. The preceding season showed a similar trend. By gender, 72.5% of those seeking advice were women. By area of residence, the highest number was living in metropolitan Tokyo, and the remainder lived in the prefectures of Kanagawa, Chiba, Saitama, Nagano, Shizuoka, and Ibaraki in this order. We received no inquiries from the prefectures of Shimane or Saga. By occupation, housewives accounted for 1,114 inquiries (45.6%), followed by private companies with 447 inquiries (18.3%) and health-care providers with 227 inquiries (9.3%), similar to the 2003-2004 flu season. By subject, 1,545 inquiries concerned vaccines (62.2%) mainly, the pros and cons of vaccination, adverse reactions, and the number of inoculations required. Inquiries about pregnancy, infants and young children, and breast-feeding accounted for 19.2%. Inquiries on vaccine shortages during the 2004-2005 flu season (7), SARS (22), and bird flu (22) decreased compared to the previous season, while the number of consultations on antiviral agents increased (209). In discussing how information on influenza should be communicated to the public, we propose that "Influenza Q & A" provided by the Infectious Diseases Surveillance Center of the NIID, MHLW, should include information on influenza specifically addressing pregnant woman and breast-feeding or child-rearing mothers.

  2. Enrollment trends in American soil science classes: 2004-2005 to 2013-2014 academic years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, Eric C.; Vaughan, Karen L.; Parikh, Sanjai J.; Dolliver, Holly; Lindbo, David; Steffan, Joshua J.; Weindorf, David; McDaniel, Paul; Mbila, Monday; Edinger-Marshall, Susan

    2017-04-01

    Studies indicate that soil science enrollment in the USA was on the decline in the 1990s and into the early 2000s (Baveye et al., 2006; Collins, 2008). However, a recent study indicated that in the seven years from 2007 through 2014 the number of soil science academic majors, at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, was on the increase (Brevik et al., 2014). However, the Brevik et al. (2014) study only looked at the number of soil science majors, it did not look at other important trends in soil science enrollment. Therefore, this study was developed to investigate enrollment numbers in individual soil science classes. To investigate this, we collected data from ten different American universities on the enrollment trends for seven different classes taught at the undergraduate level, introduction to soil science, soil fertility, soil management, pedology, soil biology/microbiology, soil chemistry, and soil physics, over a 10 year time period (2004-2005 to 2013-2014 academic years). Enrollment in each individual class was investigated over five (2009-2010 to 2013-2014) and 10 (2004-2005 to 2013-2014) year trends. All classes showed increasing enrollment over the five year study period except for soil physics, which experienced a modest decline in enrollment (-4.1% per year). The soil chemistry (23.2% per year) and soil management (10.1% per year) classes had the largest percentage gain in enrollment over the five year time period. All classes investigated experienced increased enrollment over the 10 year study period except soil biology/microbiology, which had an essentially stable enrollment (0.8% enrollment gain per year). Soil physics (28.9% per year) and soil chemistry (14.7% per year) had the largest percentage gain in enrollment over the 10 year time period. It is worth noting that soil physics enrollments had a large increase from 2004-2005 through 2009-2010, then dropped to and stabilized at a level that was lower than the 2009-2010 high but much

  3. Estonie 2004-2005 : y a-t-il un pilote dans l'avion? / Antoine Chalvin

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Chalvin, Antoine

    2005-01-01

    Ülevaade sündmustest Eesti poliitikas ja majanduses: valitsuskoalitsiooni lagunemine, sotsiaalpoliitika ning tervishoiu probleemid, Eesti-Vene piirileping, majandusnäitajad, Eesti-Prantsusmaa suhted, EL-iga liitumise mõjud. Tabelid. Lisad: Eesti poliitiliste sündmuste kronoloogia 2004-2005; Valimistulemused alates 2001; Valitsuse koosseis juunis 2005

  4. [Trichomoniasis: prevalence in the female gender in 2004-2005 in Sergipe State, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Mayra Santos; Argôlo, Danilo Souza; Almeida Júnior, José Sodré; Pinheiro, Malone Santos; Brito, Ana Maria Guedes de

    2010-06-01

    Trichomoniasis is a disease caused by the protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis, which initiates a wide variety of clinical manifestations. It may be associated with human immunodeficiency virus, cervical cancer, infertility and other diseases. Its incidence ranges from 20% up to 40% in Brazil. The primary channel of transmission is by sexual contact and laboratorial diagnostic may be performed by chain polymerase reaction (CPR), culture medium isolation, fresh vaginal content exam and/or colored by Giemsa and Papanicolau methods. The later has limitations in the detection of pathologies considered sexually transmissible, like Thricomoniasis. This work deals with prevalence of Thricomoniasis in users of laboratories associated with the Ministry of Health, in the age group from 19 up to 44 years old which were submitted to Papanicolau test in 2004-2005 in Sergipe state, Brazil. Results have revealed that among 206,034 users, 7,349 have shown Thricomoniasis, being 3,788 in 2004 and 3,498 in 2005. It could be observed that the estimated prevalence in Sergipe in the biennium studied did not corroborate with the Brazilian reality, which may be attributed to the diagnostic executed.

  5. Physical activity, watching television, and the risk of obesity in students, Texas, 2004-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Adriana; Hoelscher, Deanna M; Springer, Andrew E; Brown, H Shelton; Barroso, Cristina S; Kelder, Steven H; Castrucci, Brian C

    2011-05-01

    The epidemic of childhood obesity has been well-documented. Prevalence of obesity among students in Texas is higher than the US prevalence. Our objective was to understand the combined influence of physical activity and television viewing on weight status of students in Texas. Students in grades 4, 8, and 11 participated in the School Physical Activity and Nutrition survey during the 2004-2005 academic year. Multinomial logistic regression tested the associations between both being overweight and obese (vs underweight/normal weight) and the combined influence of physical activity and watching television, adjusting for age, grade, race/ethnicity, language spoken at home, and percentage of economically disadvantaged students in the school. We used 5 physical activity indicators to describe students' physical activity. Girls who participated in less than 3 days of exercise per week to strengthen or tone muscles and watched 2 hours or less per day of television had increased odds of being obese (adjusted odds ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.0) compared with girls who participated in 3 or more days per week of exercise to strengthen or tone muscles and watched 2 hours or less per day of television. Boys in our study who watched 3 or more hours per day of television and did not meet physical activity recommendations had increased odds of being obese in all of our 5 physical activity indicators. Although results varied by physical activity indicator and sex, our findings provide further evidence for the combined effect of high television watching and low physical activity engagement on the risk for obesity in children and adolescents.

  6. INJURY PROFILE IN WOMEN SHOTOKAN KARATE CHAMPIONSHIPS IN IRAN(2004-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzin Halabchi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this paper were to record injury rates among Iranian women competitive Shotokan karate athletes and propose possible predisposing factors. A prospective recording of the injuries resulting from all matches in 6 consecutive women national Shotokan Karate Championships in all age groups in Iran (season 2004-2005 was performed. Data recorded included demographic characteristics (Age and Weight, athletic background (rank, years of experience, time spent training and previous injuries, type, location and reason for the injury, and the result of the match. Results indicate 186 recorded injuries from a total of 1139 bouts involving 1019 athletes, therefore there were 0.163 injury per bout [C.I. 95%: 0.142-0.184] and 183 injuries per 1000 athletes [C.I. 95%: 159-205]. Injuries were most commonly located in the head and neck (55.4% followed by the lower limb (21%, upper limb (12.9% and trunk (10.8%. Punches (48. 4% were associated with more injuries than kicks (33.3%. The injuries consisted of muscle strain and contusion (81, 43.6%, hematoma and epistaxis (49, 26.3%, lacerations and abrasions (28, 15. 1%, concussion (13, 7%, tooth avulsion or subluxation (3, 1.6%, joint dislocation (3, 1.6% and fractures (3, 1.6%. In conclusion, as the majority of injuries are minor, and severe or longstanding injuries are uncommon, it can be argued that shotokan karate is a relatively safe for females, despite its image as a combat sport, where ostensibly the aim appears to injure your opponent. Further research is needed to evaluate the effective strategies to minimize the risk of injuries

  7. G8 global partnership. 2004-2005-2006 activity report; Partenariat mondial du G8. Rapport d'activite 2004-2005-2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction was launched by the heads of state and government of the G8 at the G8 summit in Kananaskis in June 2002. Fourteen other countries have since joined this G8 initiative. The aim of this partnership is to 'prevent terrorists, or those who harbor them, from acquiring or developing nuclear, chemical radiological and biological weapons, missiles, and related materials, equipment and technology'. Within the framework of the Partnership, the participants have agreed to support cooperation projects, starting with Russia, to promote non-proliferation, disarmament, the fight against terrorism and nuclear safety. The destruction of chemical weapons, the dismantling of decommissioned nuclear submarines, the disposal of fissile materials and the employment of former weapons scientists are among the priority concerns expressed. Ukraine has also been a beneficiary of this partnership since 2004. The participants in this initiative have agreed to contribute up to 20 billion dollars (up to 750 million euros from France) to support these projects over a period of ten years from 2002. A group of experts from the G8 on the Global Partnership (the GPWG = Global Partnership Working Group) meets regularly and gives an account of the progress made with this initiative in its annual report to the G8. These annual reports are published at the G8 summits. This document is the 2004 to 2006 activity report of the G8 global partnership.

  8. Stagnation in body mass index in Denmark from 1997/1998 to 2004/2005, but with geographical diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendstrup, Mathilde; Knudsen, Nils Jacob; Jørgensen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We analyzed the trend in body mass index (BMI) as well as in the prevalence of overweight and obesity among Danish adults, mainly women, from 1997/1998 to 2004/2005 and evaluated any regional differences. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data were drawn from two cross-sectional population-base...... cities are high which underlines the need for further initiatives to prevent obesity-related health risks in the future....

  9. PERILAKU RISIKO TINGGI PENULARAN HIV PADA REMAJA DI INDONESIA, 2004-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Bisara Lolong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The major routes for HIV transmission in Indonesia are injecting drug use and heterosexual activity. More than halve of the proportion of estimation 2006 of people living with HIV/AIDS were IDUs. Around 70 percent of all reported AIDS cases of IDUs in Indonesia occur among those in the age group of15-29 years. It indicates that young people are not only at high risk of contracting HIV infection but already constitute a significant percentage of people living with HIV/AIDS. This article is examines adolescent risk behavior on HIV transmission in Indonesia. The data were obtained from Behavioral Surveillance Survey 2004-2005 of 6352 female sex workers and 2969 their clients in 14 provinces, 1052 transsexual in four provinces, and 1795 IDUs in five cities as well as 1001 male student and 1159 female student in two cities. This survey reveals that adolescent's high risk behavior on HIV transmission is not only through injecting drug use but also through heterosexual. Of great concern is that 40 percent of the female sex workers and more than halve of IDUs aged 15-24 years. Findings also show that risk behavior is associated with age of respondent. Younger ages of IDUs were more like to have more than one sex partners and sharing needle; and again 27 percent of younger ages 15-19 year have started to be involved in high risk behavior as IDUs age below 15 compared to age 20-24 and 25+ nine and one percent respectively. Furthermore, the younger ages of sex workers and their clients were less likely to use condoms; and around 25-60 percent of them have begun to work as commercial sex workers age below 20.The findings of this survey raise concern about risk behavior of HIV transmission among adolescent. The need to focus more policy and program attention on adolescent sexuality and drug use behavior is compelling. Keywords : adolescence, risk behavior, HIV transmission

  10. Official holidays in 2004 and end-of-year closure 2004/2005

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    (Application of Articles R II 4.33 and R II 4.34 of the Staff Regulations) Official holidays in 2004 (in addition to the end-of-year holidays): - Friday, 9th April (Good Friday) - Monday, 12th April (Easter Monday) - Thursday, 20th May (Ascension Day) - Friday, 21st May Compensation granted for 1st May (Article R II 4.33 of the Staff Regulations) - Monday, 31st May (Whit Monday) - Thursday, 9th September ("Jeûne genevois") Annual closure of the site of the Organization and day of special leave granted by the Director-General: The Laboratory will be closed from Saturday, 17th December 2004 to Sunday, 2nd January 2005 inclusive (without deduction of annual leave). The first working day in the New Year will be Monday, 3rd January 2005. Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  11. White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rien, Thomas A.; Hughes, Michele L.; Kern, J. Chris (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR)

    2006-03-01

    We report on our progress from April 2004 through March 2005 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported.

  12. Energy balances of OECD countries 2004-2005. 2006 ed.; Bilans energetiques des Pays de l'OCDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The volume contains data on the supply and consumption of coal, oil, gas, electricity, heat, renewables and waste. Figures are expressed in million tonnes of oil equivalent. Historical tables summarise key energy and economic indicators as well as production, trade, and final consumption data. The book also includes definitions of products and flows, explanatory notes on individual country data and conversion factors from original units to tonnes of oil equivalent. More detailed data in original units are published in 'Energy statistics of OECD countries 2004-2005'. Multilingual glossaries are included. An on-line data service is available from http://data.iea.org. The CD-ROM and on-line service contain detailed time series back to 1960 for most OECD countries.

  13. Severe maternal morbidity for 2004-2005 in the three Dublin maternity hospitals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Cliona M

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence and causes of severe maternal morbidity in Dublin over a two year period from 2004 to 2005. STUDY DESIGN: A prospective cohort study from January 2004 to December 2005 was undertaken in the three large maternity hospitals in Dublin, which serve a population of 1.5 million people. All are tertiary referral centres for obstetrics and neonatology and have an annual combined delivery rate of circa 23,000 births. Cases of severe maternal morbidity were identified. A systems based classification was used. The primary cause of maternal morbidity and the number of events experienced per patient was recorded. RESULTS: We identified 158 women who fulfilled the definition for severe maternal morbidity, giving a rate of 3.2 per 1000 maternities. There were two maternal deaths during the time period giving mortality to morbidity ratio of 1:79. The commonest cause of severe morbidity was vascular dysfunction related to obstetric haemorrhage. Eclampsia comprised 15.4% of cases. Intensive care or coronary care admission occurred in 12% of cases. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of severe maternal morbidity in this population is 3.2\\/1000 maternities. Obstetric haemorrhage was the main cause of severe maternal morbidity.

  14. National estimates of outdoor recreational injuries treated in emergency departments, United States, 2004-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Adrian H; Haileyesus, Tadesse; Greenspan, Arlene I

    2008-01-01

    To provide national estimates of nonfatal outdoor recreational injuries treated in US emergency departments (EDs). Outdoor recreational injuries from January 2004 through December 2005 were identified using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-All Injury Program, a nationally representative sample of ED visits. National estimates of outdoor recreational injuries were calculated, and activities leading to injury, demographic characteristics, principal diagnoses, and primary body parts affected were described. From January 2004 through December 2005, an estimated 212 708 (95% CI = 113 808- 311 608) persons were treated each year in US EDs for outdoor recreational injuries. The annual rate of injuries was 72.1 per 100 000 population (95% CI = 38.6-105.6). Males accounted for 68.2% of the injuries. The lower limb (27%), upper limb (25%), and head and neck region (23.3%) were the most commonly injured body regions. Fractures (27.4%) and sprains or strains (23.9%) were the most common diagnoses. Traumatic brain injuries were diagnosed in 6.5% of injuries, and 5% of injuries resulted in hospitalization or transfer to another hospital. The results of this study provide a starting point for further research into the epidemiology of outdoor and wilderness injury. The results reinforce many common perceptions about the nature of these injuries while highlighting the potential severity and long-term consequences of the injuries. The general recommendations of proper planning, preparation, and problem anticipation for outdoor and wilderness injury prevention should be followed to reduce both the number and severity of injuries.

  15. Rate, Relative Risk, and Method of Suicide by Students at 4-Year Colleges and Universities in the United States, 2004-2005 through 2008-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Allan J.

    2011-01-01

    A total of 622 suicides were reported among students attending 645 distinct campuses from 2004-2005 through 2008-2009. Adjusting for gender in the population at risk of 14.9 million student-years and for the source of these data, the student suicide rate of 7.0 was significantly and substantially lower than for a matched national sample. Suicide…

  16. [Evolution of food supply (apart from school catering) between 2004/2005 and 2009/2010 in middle- and high-schools of Aquitaine, France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, C; Carriere, C; Delmas, C; Péchaud, M; Barberger-Gateau, P; Maurice, S; Thibault, H

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the evolution of food supply (apart from school catering) between school years 2004/2005 and 2009/2010, in middle- and high-schools from the Aquitaine region (southwest France), in order to evaluate the impact of actions conducted within the framework and the program Nutrition, Prevention and Health of children and adolescents in Aquitaine (southwest France). Two surveys were carried out among all middle- and high-schools of the Aquitaine region in 2004/2005 (n=536) and 2009/2010 (n=539) within the framework of a regional multidisciplinary public health program "Nutrition, prevention and health of children and teenagers in Aquitaine". For both 2004/2005 and 2009/2010, data were collected using the same questionnaire and dealt with school characteristics and modalities of food supply (apart from school catering). Response rate was 84.1% in 2004/2005 and 79.6% in 2009/2010. The proportion of schools offering food to pupils (apart from school catering) significantly decreased in 5 years (from 80.1% to 50.1%, Pcatering) has also been improved: less sweet and fat food, more bread and fruits. This study shows an overall improvement of food supply apart from school catering (food sale, free food and vending machines) in middle- and high-schools from the Aquitaine region (southwest France) between 2004/2005 and 2009/2010. This improvement is related to the proportion of schools offering food (quantitative improvement), as well as to the composition of food supply (qualitative improvement). These results show an improvement of food supply (apart from school catering), suggesting that actions implemented in the framework of the program "Nutrition, prevention and health of children and adolescents in Aquitaine" may have led to these improvements. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. ECIU 2004-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornemann, Birte C.; Nielsen, Kirsten Mølgaard; Bimberg, Christiane

    Programme. The aim of the Report is to review the internal decision-making processes of universities. This topic is one of the central fields of academic research into governance of universities. Some scientific papers and models already exist on such decision-making proc-esses and the second sec...

  18. Tricomoníase: prevalência no gênero feminino em Sergipe no biênio 2004-2005 Trichomoniasis: prevalence in the female gender in 2004-2005 in Sergipe State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Santos Almeida

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A tricomoníase é uma protozoose causada pelo Trichomonas vaginalis, que desencadeia uma ampla variedade de manifestações clínicas, podendo estar associada à transmissão do vírus da imunodeficiência humana, câncer cervical, infertilidade, entre outros. No Brasil, a incidência varia entre 20 e 40%. A via primária de transmissão é pelo contato sexual e o diagnóstico laboratorial pode ser realizado através da Reação de Polimerase em Cadeia (PCR, isolamento em meios de cultura e exame do conteúdo vaginal à fresco e/ou corados pelos métodos de Giemsa e Papanicolau. Esse último possui limitações na detecção de patologias consideradas DST, a exemplo da tricomoníase. Esse artigo trata da prevalência de tricomoníase em mulheres usuárias dos laboratórios conveniados ao Ministério da Saúde, na faixa etária de 19 a 44 anos, que foram submetidas ao teste de Papanicolau, em 2004-2005, no Estado de Sergipe. Os resultados revelaram que, em 206.034 usuárias, 7.349 apresentaram tricomoníase, sendo que 3.788 em 2004 e 3.498 em 2005. Observou-se que a prevalência estimada em Sergipe, no biênio estudado, não corrobora com a realidade brasileira, fato esse que pode estar atrelado ao diagnóstico executado.Trichomoniasis is a disease caused by the protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis, which initiates a wide variety of clinical manifestations. It may be associated with human immunodeficiency virus, cervical cancer, infertility and other diseases. Its incidence ranges from 20% up to 40% in Brazil. The primary channel of transmission is by sexual contact and laboratorial diagnostic may be performed by chain polymerase reaction (CPR, culture medium isolation, fresh vaginal content exam and/or colored by Giemsa and Papanicolau methods. The later has limitations in the detection of pathologies considered sexually transmissible, like Thricomoniasis. This work deals with prevalence of Thricomoniasis in users of laboratories associated with the

  19. [Analysis of liver cancer mortality in the national retrospective sampling survey of death causes in China, 2004 - 2005].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-guo; Zhang, Si-wei; Chen, Wan-qing

    2010-05-01

    To analyze the patterns and changes of liver cancer mortality in China. Data of national retrospective sampling survey for the years of 2004 - 2005 from 158 counties/cities/districts was used for the settings, covering a 2-year's population of 142 660 482 person years, in which 47 899 806 in urban areas, and 94 760 676 in rural areas. Furthermore, the areas of Eastern, Central, and Western were divided into the subsets, with populations of 52 556 694, 49 781 225 and 40 322 563 person years, respectively. The crude rate (CR) and the age-standardized rate by Chinese population of 1982 (CASR) and by world's population of 1985 (WASR) were calculated. The historical comparisons with the national survey data of 1973 - 1975 (First time) and with the sampling survey of 1990 - 1992 (Second time) were made, and the global comparisons with some selected countries were performed. A total of 37 645 death cases with liver cancer were recorded from the 158 samples in the year 2004 - 2005, with the CR of 26.26 per 100 000 (males: 27 398 cases, 37.55 per 100 000, and females: 10 067 cases, 14.45 per 100 000), which ranked the second after lung cancer, accounted for 19.33% of all sites of cancers (37 465/193 841). 93.04% of the sampling districts (147/158) showed the CRs amongst 10.00 to 39.00 per 100 000. The CASR was 17.86 per 100 000 (males: 26.44, females: 9.20), and the WASR was 23.48 per 100 000 (males: 34.61, females: 12.34). In the urban areas, the CR of liver cancer was 24.94 per 100 000 (11 945 cases, CASR: 15.34), and 26.93 per 100 000 (25 520 cases, CASR: 19.32) in the rural areas. The sex ratio of the male to female mortality rate was 2.60:1 (2.68:1 in urban areas, and 2.56:1 in rural areas). The death cases in the Eastern, Central, and Western areas were 14 909, 13 349 and 9 207, with CRs of 28.37, 26.82, and 22.83 per 100 000, respectively. The CR was increased by 89.77% compared with the data from the First time (1973 - 1975: 10.75 per 100 000), and increased by 28

  20. Association between depressed mood and perceived weight in middle and high school age students: Texas 2004-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiefelbein, Emily L; Mirchandani, Gita G; George, Goldy C; Becker, Emilie A; Castrucci, Brian C; Hoelscher, Deanna M

    2012-01-01

    Research exploring the relationship between weight perception and depressed mood among adolescents is limited in the United States. The purpose of this study is to examine the association of perceived versus actual body weight and depressed mood in a representative sample of 8th and 11th grade public school students in Texas. Using data from the 2004-2005 School Physical Activity and Nutrition (SPAN) study, logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the association of weight perception with depressed mood. Healthy weight students who perceived themselves to be a healthy weight were the reference group for all analyses. A high prevalence of misperception of body weight was observed. Overweight and obese 8th grade girls and boys who perceived themselves to be overweight had increased odds of depressed mood [Girls: OR 1.70 (95% CI: 1.07-2.69), Boys: OR 2.05 (95% CI: 1.16-3.62)]. Healthy weight 8th grade girls who perceived themselves to be overweight had 2.5 times greater odds of depressed mood (OR 2.63, 95% CI: 1.54-4.50). Healthy weight boys who perceived themselves to be underweight had more than twice the odds (OR 2.18, 95% CI: 1.23-3.89) of depressed mood. No weight category was significantly associated with depressed mood in boys or girls in 11th grade. The present study suggests that weight misperceptions are associated with depressed mood in young adolescents. Education about healthy body size is necessary to correct the common weight misperceptions observed. The high prevalence rates of depressed mood suggest a greater need for research into understanding factors that may contribute to depressed mood in adolescents.

  1. Olympic Fisher Reintroduction Project: 2010 Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jeffrey C.; Happe, Patti J.; Jenkins, Kurt J.; Manson, David J.

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 progress report is a summary of the reintroduction, monitoring, and research efforts undertaken during the third year of the Olympic fisher reintroduction project. Jeffrey C. Lewis of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Patti J. Happe of Olympic National Park, and Kurt J. Jenkins of U. S. Geological Survey are the principal investigators of the monitoring and research program associated with the reintroduction. David J. Manson of Olympic National Park is the lead biological technician.

  2. Olympic Fisher Reintroduction Project- 2009 Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jeffrey C.; Happe, Patti J.; Jenkins, Kurt J.; Manson, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The 2009 progress report is a summary of the reintroduction, monitoring, and research efforts undertaken during the first two years of the Olympic fisher reintroduction project. Jeffrey C. Lewis of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Patti J. Happe of Olympic National Park, and Kurt J. Jenkins of U. S. Geological Survey are the principal investigators of the monitoring and research program associated with the reintroduction. David J. Manson of Olympic National Park is the lead biological

  3. The academic majors of students taking American soil science classes: 2004-2005 to 2013-2014 academic years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, Eric C.; Vaughan, Karen L.; Parikh, Sanjai J.; Dolliver, Holly; Lindbo, David; Steffan, Joshua J.; Weindorf, David; McDaniel, Paul; Mbila, Monday; Edinger-Marshall, Susan

    2017-04-01

    Many papers have been written in recent years discussing the interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary aspects of soil science. Therefore, it would make sense that soil science courses would be taken by students in a wide array of academic majors. To investigate this, we collected data from eight different American universities on the declared academic majors of students enrolled in soil science courses over a 10 year time period (2004-2005 to 2013-2014 academic years). Data was collected for seven different classes taught at the undergraduate level: introduction to soil science, soil fertility, soil management, pedology, soil biology/microbiology, soil chemistry, and soil physics. Overall trends and trends for each class were evaluated. Generally, environmental science and crop science/horticulture/agronomy students were enrolled in soil science courses in the greatest numbers. Environmental science and engineering students showed rapid increases in enrollment over the 10 years of the study, while the number of crop science/ horticulture/ agronomy students declined. In the introduction to soil science classes, environmental science and crop science/ horticulture/ agronomy students were enrolled in the greatest numbers, while declared soil science majors only made up 6.6% of the average enrollment. The highest enrollments in soil fertility were crop science/ horticulture/ agronomy students and other agricultural students (all agricultural majors except crop science, horticulture, agronomy, or soil science). In both the soil management and pedology classes, environmental science and other agricultural students were the largest groups enrolled. Other agricultural students and students from other majors (all majors not otherwise expressly investigated) were the largest enrolled groups in soil biology/microbiology courses, and environmental science and soil science students were the largest enrolled groups in soil chemistry classes. Soil physics was the only class

  4. The Epidemiology of Stress Fractures in Collegiate Student-Athletes, 2004-2005 Through 2013-2014 Academic Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzone, Katherine H; Ackerman, Kathryn E; Roos, Karen G; Dompier, Thomas P; Kerr, Zachary Y

    2017-10-01

      Stress fractures are injuries caused by cumulative, repetitive stress that leads to abnormal bone remodeling. Specific populations, including female athletes and endurance athletes, are at higher risk than the general athletic population. Whereas more than 460 000 individuals participate in collegiate athletics in the United States, no large study has been conducted to determine the incidence of stress fractures in collegiate athletes.   To assess the incidence of stress fractures in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) athletes and investigate rates and patterns overall and by sport.   Descriptive epidemiology study.   National Collegiate Athletic Association institutions.   National Collegiate Athletic Association athletes.   Data were analyzed from the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program for the academic years 2004-2005 through 2013-2014. We calculated rates and rate ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).   A total of 671 stress fractures were reported over 11 778 145 athlete-exposures (AEs) for an overall injury rate of 5.70 per 100 000 AEs. The sports with the highest rates of stress fractures were women's cross-country ( 28.59/100  000 AEs), women's gymnastics ( 25.58/100  000 AEs), and women's outdoor track ( 22.26/100  000 AEs). Among sex-comparable sports (baseball/softball, basketball, cross-country, ice hockey, lacrosse, soccer, swimming and diving, tennis, indoor track, and outdoor track), stress fracture rates were higher in women (9.13/100 000 AEs) than in men (4.44/100 000 AEs; RR = 2.06; 95% CI = 1.71, 2.47). Overall, stress fracture rates for these NCAA athletes were higher in the preseason (7.30/100 000 AEs) than in the regular season (5.12/100 000 AEs; RR = 1.43; 95% CI = 1.22, 1.67). The metatarsals (n = 254, 37.9%), tibia (n = 147, 21.9%), and lower back/lumbar spine/pelvis (n = 81, 12.1%) were the most common locations of injury. Overall, 21.5% (n = 144) of stress fractures were

  5. Modeling predator habitat to enhance reintroduction planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiloh M. Halsey; William J. Zielinski; Robert M. Scheller

    2015-01-01

    Context The success of species reintroduction often depends on predation risk and spatial estimates of predator habitat. The fisher (Pekania pennanti) is a species of conservation concern and populations in the western United States have declined substantially in the last century. Reintroduction plans are underway, but the ability...

  6. Changes in the regional prevalence of child obesity in 4th, 8th, and 11th grade students in Texas from 2000-2002 to 2004-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoelscher, Deanna M; Kelder, Steven H; Pérez, Adriana; Day, R Sue; Benoit, Julia S; Frankowski, Ralph F; Walker, Joey L; Lee, Eun S

    2010-07-01

    Although national and state estimates of child obesity are available, data at these levels are insufficient to monitor effects of local obesity prevention initiatives. The purpose of this study was to examine regional changes in the prevalence of obesity due to statewide policies and programs among children in grades 4, 8, and 11 in Texas Health Services Regions (HSRs) between 2000-2002 and 2004-2005, and nine selected counties in 2004-2005. A cross-sectional, probability-based sample of 23,190 Texas students in grades 4, 8, and 11 were weighed and measured to obtain BMI. Obesity was >95th percentile for BMI by age/sex using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention growth charts. Child obesity prevalence significantly decreased between 2000-2002 and 2004-2005 for 4th grade students in the El Paso HSR (-7.0%, P = 0.005). A leveling off in the prevalence of obesity was noted for all other regions for grades 4, 8, and 11. County-level data supported the statistically significant decreases noted in the El Paso region. The reduction of child obesity levels observed in the El Paso area is one of the few examples of effective programs and policies based on a population-wide survey: in this region, a local foundation funded extensive regional implementation of community programs for obesity prevention, including an evidence-based elementary school-based health promotion program, adult nutrition and physical activity programs, and a radio and television advertising campaign. Results emphasize the need for sustained school, community, and policy efforts, and that these efforts can result in decreases in child obesity at the population level.

  7. Is Reintroduction Biology an Effective Applied Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Gemma; Canessa, Stefano; Clarke, Rohan H; Ingwersen, Dean; Armstrong, Doug P; Seddon, Philip J; Ewen, John G

    2017-11-01

    Reintroduction biology is a field of scientific research that aims to inform translocations of endangered species. We review two decades of published literature to evaluate whether reintroduction science is evolving in its decision-support role, as called for by advocates of evidence-based conservation. Reintroduction research increasingly addresses a priori hypotheses, but remains largely focused on short-term population establishment. Similarly, studies that directly assist decisions by explicitly comparing alternative management actions remain a minority. A small set of case studies demonstrate full integration of research in the reintroduction decision process. We encourage the use of tools that embed research in decision-making, particularly the explicit consideration of multiple management alternatives because this is the crux of any management decisions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Guidelines on the use of molecular genetics in reintroduction programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael K. Schwartz

    2005-01-01

    The use of molecular genetics can play a key role in reintroduction efforts. Prior to the introduction of any individuals, molecular genetics can be used to identify the most appropriate source population for the reintroduction, ensure that no relic populations exist in the reintroduction area, and guide captive breeding programs. The use of molecular genetics post-...

  9. The reintroduction of the American Chestnut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacy L Clark

    2013-01-01

    Successful reintroduction of the American chestnut will require far more than blight resistance. The greatest challenge will be the ability of blight-resistant seedlings to survive and reproduce in a forest that presents both native and non-native threats

  10. Large-scale reintroduction of ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald. Overton

    2010-01-01

    No strategies currently exist for reintroducing ash; progression of emerald ash borer (EAB) through the eastern United States is likely to be a decades-long process, and extirpation of ash from this area is likely to take even longer. Reintroduction of ash into areas where it has been extirpated by EAB will require addressing technical issues as well as social and...

  11. Pathogen Screening of Naturally Produced Yakima River Spring Chinook Smolts; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Joan B. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2005-05-01

    In the spring of 2004 naturally produced smolts outmigrating from the Yakima River Basin were collected for the sixth year of pathogen screening. This component of the evaluation is to monitor whether introduction of hatchery produced smolts would impact the prevalence of specific pathogens in the naturally produced spring chinook smolts. Increases in prevalence of any of these pathogens could negatively impact the survival of these fish. Since 1999 the Cle Elum Hatchery has been releasing spring chinook salmon smolts into the upper Yakima River to increase natural production. In 1998 and 2000 through 2004 naturally produced smolts were collected for monitoring at the Chandler smolt collection facility on the lower Yakima River. Smolts were collected from mid to late outmigration, with a target of 200 fish each year. The pathogens monitored were infectious hematopoeitic necrosis virus, infectious pancreatic necrosis virus, viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, Flavobacterium psychrophilum, Flavobacterium columnare, Aeromonas salmonicida, Yersinia ruckeri, Edwardsiella ictaluri, Renibacterium salmoninarum and Myxobolus cerebralis. Of these pathogens, only R. salmoninarum was detected in very low levels in the naturally produced smolts outmigrating in 2004. To date, only bacterial pathogens have been detected and prevalences have been low. There have been small variations each year and these changes are attributed to normal fluctuations in prevalence. All of the pathogens detected are widely distributed in Washington State.

  12. Effects of Domestication on Predation Mortality and Competitive Dominance; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Fritts, Anthony L.; Scott, Jennifer L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2005-05-01

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the second of a series of progress reports that address the effects of hatchery domestication on predation mortality and competitive dominance in the upper Yakima River basin (Pearsons et al. 2004). This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004. Raising fish in hatcheries can cause unintended behavioral, physiological, or morphological changes in chinook salmon due to domestication selection. Domestication selection is defined by Busack and Currens 1995 as, ''changes in quantity, variety, or combination of alleles within a captive population or between a captive population and its source population in the wild as a result of selection in an artificial environment''. Selection in artificial environments could be due to intentional or artificial selection, biased sampling during some stage of culture, or unintentional selection (Busack and Currens 1995). Genetic changes can result in lowered survival in the natural environment (Reisenbichler and Rubin 1999). The goal of supplementation or conservation hatcheries is to produce fish that will integrate into natural populations. Conservation hatcheries attempt to minimize intentional or biased sampling so that the hatchery fish are similar to naturally produced fish. However, the selective pressures in hatcheries are dramatically different than in the wild, which can result in genetic differences between hatchery and wild fish. The selective pressures may be particularly prominent during the freshwater rearing stage where most mortality of wild fish occurs. The Yakima Fisheries Project is studying the effects of domestication on a variety of adult and juvenile traits of spring chinook salmon (Busack et al. 2003). The overall experimental design is to compare a variety of traits, across generations, from three lines of Yakima basin chinook, a hatchery control, supplementation line, and a wild control. The hatchery line was derived from wild upper Yakima broodstock and is only allowed to spawn in the hatchery. The supplementation line is upper Yakima stock that spawns in the upper Yakima River. This stock is an integration of wild and hatchery supplementation fish. Starting in 2005, we plan to use a wild control line of fish that will be the offspring of wild broodstock collected in the Naches River system, a tributary to the Yakima River. The Naches River is not stocked with hatchery fish, and there is minimal stray from Upper Yakima supplementation, so we believe that these will serve as a control to compare any genotypic changes in the hatchery and the supplementation line. As generations of fish are tested, we believe we will be able to analyze the data using an analysis of covariance to test the hypothesis that the hatchery line will exhibit greater domestication over generations, the wild line will remain at baseline levels, and the supplementation line will be somewhere in between. In this report, we have used the terms ''hatchery'' or ''supplementation'' to refer to upper Yakima fish that are progeny of fish that spent one generation in the hatchery, and ''wild'' to refer to fish that have had no exposure to the hatchery other than the matings for this experiment. The terms are relative to the parents that produced the fish for these experiments. All progeny of these fish were mated and reared under the same laboratory conditions. This report addresses two juvenile traits: predation mortality, and competitive dominance. Other traits will be presented in other project reports. It is anticipated that it will take at least two to five generations to detect measurable responses in many domestication response variables (Busack et al. 2003). This report addresses domestication after one generation of hatchery rearing. This report is organized into two chapters that represent major topics associated with monitoring hatchery domestication. Chapter 1 reports the results of domestication on predation mortality of juvenile spring chinook salmon. Chapter 2 describes the affects of domestication on competitive dominance of juvenile spring chinook salmon. The chapters in this report are in various stages of development and should be considered preliminary unless they have been published in a peer-reviewed journal. Additional field work and/or analysis is in progress for topics covered in this report. Throughout this report, a premium was placed on presenting data in tables so that other interested parties could have access to the data.

  13. Comparing the Reproductive Success of Yakima River Hatchery- and Wild-Origin Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroder, S.L.; Pearsons, T.N. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Knudsen, C.M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA)

    2005-05-01

    A growing body of literature suggests that adult salmon produced by artificial culture are not as reproductively successful as wild fish when they spawn under natural conditions. Behavioral, morphological, and physiological divergences have been observed between hatchery and wild fish. These disparities are the likely proximate causes of the differences seen in the reproductive success of hatchery and wild salmonids. Two evolutionary paradigms have been proposed to explain why salmonids cultured in hatcheries are genetically and phenotypically different from wild cohorts. The first proposes that natural selection has been significantly relaxed in hatcheries. Consequently, fish that normally would have perished because of the possession of unsuitable traits are able to survive. If these traits have a genetic basis, they may become established in a hatchery population and cause its productivity to be less than expected if the fish are once again exposed to natural selection pressures. The second theorizes that environmental and social conditions in hatcheries are less variable than in the natural environment and that these conditions will remain relatively constant from one generation to the next. In this circumstance, selection for genetic traits that adapt fish to artificial culture will become prevalent in the population. Such traits may be mal-adaptive under natural conditions. Many of the studies that have compared the reproductive success (RS) of hatchery and wild fish, however, have used non-local hatchery fish that have experienced multiple generations of hatchery culture. Few efforts have been made where both the hatchery and wild fish have originated from the same population. When such studies have been performed differences in the competency of the fish to produce offspring have not been detected or are not as great as those expressed when non-local hatchery fish have been used. The hatchery spring Chinook produced by the Yakima Fisheries Project originated from wild fish returning to the upper Yakima River. When they return as adults, almost all of them will spawn naturally in the Yakima River. The offspring they produce are expected to augment the Yakima spring Chinook population. Whether such an increase will occur or how great it may be depends on two factors, the ability of hatchery fish to reproduce under natural conditions and the capacity of their offspring to survive to maturity. One of the objectives of the Yakima Fisheries Project is to determine whether the hatchery-origin adults produced by the project have experienced any reduction in their ability to reproduce under natural conditions. To accomplish that objective an observation stream was built in 2000 on the grounds of the Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility. Beginning in 2001 hatchery and wild spring Chinook from the upper Yakima River stock have been introduced into the stream and allowed to reproduce. Microsatellite DNA is used to establish the genetic relationships between the adults placed into the stream and fry that are produced by each population. Six populations consisting of mixtures of wild and hatchery fish have been placed into the stream. Pedigree assessments have been completed on five of them. These assessments have shown that the reproductive success in males is often twice as variable as that experienced by females. In the five populations so far examined; wild males (age 4 and 5) produced the most offspring. The success of comparable hatchery males relative to wild males ranged from 37% to 113%. Hatchery and wild males maturing as 3-yr-olds (jacks) and as 1- and 0-yr-olds (precocious males) were also used in the study populations. They were not as successful at producing offspring as the larger hatchery and wild males. During 2001 and 2002 two populations of hatchery and wild fish were placed into the observation stream each year. Each one occupied about half of the structure. In these populations wild females exhibited a superior capacity to deposit eggs. In addition, their eggs survived to the fry stage at higher rates. This survival advantage ranged from 1.9 to 11.7%. In 2003 the entire observation stream was made available to a single population of fish in an effort to reduce intrasexual competition among the females for redd locations. In this year, hatchery females were better at depositing eggs (12.5%) and their buried eggs also achieved a higher egg-to-fry survival rate (3.4%). This suggests that at low population levels hatchery females were as competent as wild fish in burying eggs and in producing fry. Although variation in the reproductive success of females was lower than that seen in males it could be quite variable. For example, coefficient of variation values calculated on female RS ranged from 34 to 77% in the populations we examined. Numerous factors may affect RS in females.

  14. Kootenai River White Sturgeon Recovery Implementation Plan and Schedule; 2005-2010, Technical Report 2004-2005.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Paul

    2007-03-01

    Kootenai River white sturgeon have been declining for at least 50 years and extinction of the wild population is now imminent (Paragamian et al. 2005). Only 630 adults were estimated to remain in 2002 from a population ten times that size just 20 years ago. Significant recruitment of young sturgeon has not been observed since the early 1970s and consistent annual recruitment has not been seen since the 1950s. The remaining wild population consists of a cohort of large, old fish that is declining by about 9% per year as fish die naturally and are not replaced. At this rate, the wild population will disappear around the year 2040. Numbers have already reached critical low levels where genetic and demographic risks are acute. The Kootenai River White Sturgeon Recovery Team was convened in 1994, provided a draft Recovery Plan in 1996 and the first complete Recovery Plan for Kootenai River white sturgeon in 1999 (USFWS 1996, 1999). The Plan outlined a four part strategy for recovery, including: (1) measures to restore natural recruitment, (2) use of conservation aquaculture to prevent extinction, (3) monitoring survival and recovery, and (4) updating and revising recovery plan criteria and objectives as new information becomes available. Sturgeon recovery efforts are occurring against a backdrop of a broader ecosystem protection and restoration program for the Kootenai River ecosystem. With abundance halving time of approximately 8 years, the Kootenai River white sturgeon population is rapidly dwindling, leaving managers little time to act. Decades of study consistently indicate that recruitment failure occurs between embryo and larval stages. This assertion is based on four key observations. First, almost no recruitment has occurred during the last 30 years. Second, thousands of naturally produced white sturgeon embryos, most viable, have been collected over the past decade, resulting from an estimated 9 to 20 spawning events each year. Third, Kootenai River white

  15. Clinical evaluation of dermatophytosis in patients referred to dermatologic department of Bu-Ali Sina Hospital in Qazvin in Iran 2004-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Aghamirian

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dermatophytosis is a prevalent mycologic skin disease which is a widespread important health problem in the world. The ecology and etiology of the disease are important issues for its control. Methods: In a descriptive study, 341 patients with suspected dermatophytosis were examined over a period of one year (2004-2005. Skin, hair and nail samples were evaluated by to direct microscopic examination using potassium hydroxide (KOH the specimens were cultured in sabouraud dextrose agar. In some cases, differential tests such as corn meal agar, urease and hair perforation were used for recognizing the isolated dermatophytes. Results: A total of 116 dermatophytes (34% were isolated. Tinea cruris (31.9% was the most common type of infection, followed by tinea corporis (20.7%, tinea pedis (19%, tinea unguium (11.2%, tinea faciei (7.7%, tinea manuum (5.2%, tinea capitis (4.3%. Epidermophyton floccosum was the most frequent isolated dermatophyte (32.8%. Also Dermatophytosis was more frequent in male gender. Conclusion: The anthropophilic species, E. floccosum, was the most common causative dermatophyte of tinea in Qazvin and the most common clinical type of dermatophytosis was Tinea cruris.

  16. Epidemiology of syndesmosis injuries in intercollegiate football: incidence and risk factors from National Collegiate Athletic Association injury surveillance system data from 2004-2005 to 2008-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Kenneth J; George, Elizabeth; Harris, Alex H S; Dragoo, Jason L

    2013-07-01

    To describe the incidence and risk factors for high ankle sprains (ie, syndesmosis injuries) among National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) football players. Descriptive epidemiologic study. Data were examined from the NCAA's Injury Surveillance System (ISS) for 5 football seasons (from 2004-2005 to 2008-2009). All NCAA men's football programs participating in the ISS. No additional risk factors were introduced as a result of this analysis. For partial and complete syndesmosis injuries, outcome measures included incidence, time lost from participation, and requirement for surgical repair. The overall incidence of high ankle sprains in NCAA football players was 0.24 per 1000 athlete exposures, accounting for 24.6% of all ankle sprains. Athletes were nearly 14 times more likely to sustain the injury during games compared with practice; complete syndesmosis injuries resulted in significantly greater time lost compared with partial injuries (31.3 vs 15.8 days). Less than 3% of syndesmosis injuries required surgical intervention. There was a significantly higher injury incidence on artificial surfaces compared with natural grass. The majority of injuries (75.2%) occurred during contact with another player. Our data suggest a significantly higher incidence of syndesmosis injuries during games, during running plays, and to running backs and interior defensive linemen. The wide range in time lost from participation for complete syndesmosis injuries underscores the need for improved understanding of injury mechanism and classification of injury severity such that prevention, safe return to play protocols, and outcomes can be further improved.

  17. Association of equipment worn and concussion injury rates in National Collegiate Athletic Association football practices: 2004-2005 to 2008-2009 academic years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Zachary Y; Hayden, Ross; Dompier, Thomas P; Cohen, Randy

    2015-05-01

    The epidemiology of football-related concussions has been extensively examined. However, although football players experience more at-risk exposure time during practices than competitions, there is a dearth of literature examining the nature of the activities or equipment worn during practice. In particular, varying levels of equipment worn during practices may place players at varying levels of risk for concussion. To describe the epidemiology of NCAA men's football concussions that occurred during practices from the 2004-2005 to 2008-2009 academic years by amount of equipment worn. Descriptive epidemiology study. Men's collegiate football data from the National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System (NCAA ISS) during the 5-year study period were analyzed. Injury rates and injury rate ratios (RRs) were reported with 95% confidence intervals. During the study period, 795 concussions were reported during practices, resulting in an injury rate of 0.39 per 1000 athlete-exposures (AEs) (95% CI, 0.36-0.42). Among NCAA divisions, Division III had the highest concussion rate (0.54/1000 AEs), followed by Division I (0.34/1000 AEs) and Division II (0.24/1000 AEs) (all P values for RRs comparing divisionsaffect concussion risk. In addition, coaching staff should continue to closely monitor player safety during scrimmages. Meanwhile, future surveillance should examine whether removing scrimmages, particularly those that are not fully padded, will meaningfully reduce the incidence and rate of concussions. © 2015 The Author(s).

  18. Baseline and Estimated Trends of Sodium Availability and Food Sources in the Costa Rican Population during 2004-2005 and 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Metzler, Adriana; Moreira Claro, Rafael; Heredia-Blonval, Katrina; Caravaca Rodríguez, Ivannia; Montero-Campos, María de Los A; Legetic, Branka; L'Abbe, Mary R

    2017-09-15

    In 2012, Costa Rica launched a program to reduce salt and sodium consumption to prevent cardiovascular disease and associated risk factors, but little was known about the level of sodium consumption or its sources. Our aim was to estimate the magnitude and time trends of sodium consumption (based on food and beverage acquisitions) in Costa Rica. Data from the National Household Income and Expenditure Surveys carried out in 2004-2005 (n = 4231) and 2012-2013 (n = 5705) were used. Records of food purchases for household consumption were converted into sodium and energy using food composition tables. Mean sodium availability (per person/per day and adjusted for a 2000-kcal energy intake) and the contribution of food groups to this availability were estimated for each year. Sodium availability increased in the period from 3.9 to 4.6 g/person/day (p foods and condiments (with added sodium) (27.4%). Dietary sources of sodium varied within surveys (p < 0.05). Sodium available for consumption in Costa Rican households largely exceeds the World Health Organization-recommended intake levels (<2 g sodium/person/day). These results are essential for the design and implementation of effective policies and interventions.

  19. Animal reintroductions: an innovative assessment of survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muths, Erin L.; Bailey, Larissa L.; Watry, Mary Kay

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative evaluations of reintroductions are infrequent and assessments of milestones reached before a project is completed, or abandoned due to lack of funding, are rare. However, such assessments, which are promoted in adaptive management frameworks, are critical. Quantification can provide defensible estimates of biological success, such as the number of survivors from a released cohort, with associated cost per animal. It is unlikely that the global issues of endangered wildlife and population declines will abate, therefore, assurance colonies and reintroductions are likely to become more common. If such endeavors are to be successful biologically or achieve adequate funding, implementation must be more rigorous and accountable. We use a novel application of a multistate, robust design capture-recapture model to estimate survival of reintroduced tadpoles through metamorphosis (i.e., the number of individuals emerging from the pond) and thereby provide a quantitative measure of effort and success for an "in progress" reintroduction of toads. Our data also suggest that tadpoles released at later developmental stages have an increased probability of survival and that eggs laid in the wild hatched at higher rates than eggs laid by captive toads. We illustrate how an interim assessment can identify problems, highlight successes, and provide information for use in adjusting the effort or implementing a Decision-Theoretic adaptive management strategy.

  20. Reintroduction medicine: whooping cranes in Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Dominique L; Hartup, Barry K

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents veterinary management strategies and diagnostic findings in the reintroduction of the endangered whooping crane (Grus americana). Between 2005 and 2010, 63 (27 male, 36 female) hatchling whooping cranes were assigned to a reintroduction project involving autumn release of costume-reared chicks in Wisconsin. Veterinary care included preventive measures and comprehensive pre-release evaluations to improve fitness and reduce translocation of potential disease agents to native habitats. A total of 44 clinically normal birds were released (70% of assigned individuals). Cases of morbidity were classified according to primary body system affected. Musculoskeletal disorders were described in 57 birds (90%); five birds were removed from the project prior to release (8%), all for abnormalities that prevented normal function. Fourteen birds died or were euthanized prior to release (22%); pre-release mortality was attributed to developmental abnormality, predation, trauma or infectious disease. Chronic respiratory aspergillosis, diagnosed in seven birds (11%), was the most common infectious disease of concern. Predation and trauma were primary causes of post-release mortality; no evidence of infectious disease of captive origin was detected in the study population by the end of 2010. The assessment of data accumulated by this project helped to outline successful health management strategies, as well as identify and mitigate ongoing risks to captive whooping cranes that impede reintroduction efforts and achieving management goals for species recovery. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The application of GIS and RS for epidemics: a case study of the spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza in China in 2004-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Shaobo; Lan, Guiwen; Zhu, Haiguo; Wen, Renqiang; Zhao, Qiansheng; Huang, Quanyi

    2008-12-01

    Because of their inherent advantages, Geographic Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) are extremely useful for dealing with geographically referenced information. In the study of epidemics, most data are geographically referenced, which makes GIS and RS the perfect even necessary tools for processing, analysis, representation of epidemic data. Comprehensively considering the data requirements in the study of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) coupled with the quality of the existing remotely sensed data in terms of the resolution of space, time and spectra, the data sensed by MODIS are chosen and the relevant methods and procedures of data processing from RS and GIS for some environmental factors are proposed. Through using spatial analysis functions and Exploratory Spatial Data Analysis (ESDA) of GIS, some results of relationship between HPAI occurrences and these potential factors are presented. The role played by bird migration is also preliminarily illustrated with some operations such as visualization, overlapping etc. provided by GIS. Through the work of this paper, we conclude: Firstly, the migration of birds causes the spread of HPAI all over the country in 2004-2005. Secondly, the migration of birds is the reason why the spread of HPAI is perturbed. That is, for some classic communicable diseases, their spread exhibits obvious spatial diffusion process. However, the spread of HPAI breaks this general rule. We think leap diffusion and time lag are the probable reasons for this kind of phenomena. Potential distribution of HPAI viruses (corresponding to the distribution of flyways and putative risk sources) is not completely consistent with the occurrences of HPAI. For this phenomenon, we think, in addition to the flyways of birds, all kinds of geographical, climatic factors also have important effect on the occurrences of HPAI. Through the case study of HPAI, we can see that GIS and RS can play very important roles in the study of epidemics.

  2. Prevalence of physical activity and sedentary behaviors by metropolitan status in 4th-, 8th-, and 11th-grade students in Texas, 2004-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Andrew E; Hoelscher, Deanna M; Castrucci, Brian; Perez, Adriana; Kelder, Steven H

    2009-01-01

    Research on geographic differences in children's physical activity (PA) engagement is limited. This study examined the prevalence of PA and sedentary behaviors in a probability sample of children in the 4th (mean age, 9.7 years; n = 7,907), 8th (mean age, 13.7 years; n = 8,827), and 11th (mean age 16.9 years; n = 6,456) grades by urban, suburban, and rural location in Texas. Using data from the 2004-2005 School Physical Activity and Nutrition (SPAN) study, we conducted logistic regression analyses stratified by sex to assess associations of 6 PA indicators and 2 sedentary behavior indicators with metropolitan status. Urban 8th- and 11th-grade students reported the lowest prevalence of PA. Suburban or rural schools were significantly more likely than their urban counterparts to report higher school-based sports team participation in 8th graders (P = .001); higher vigorous PA (P = .01) and strengthening exercise (P = .01) in 11th-grade boys; and higher physical education attendance in 4th (P Sports team (P = .04) and other organized PA participation (P = .04) in urban 4th-grade girls and vigorous PA in urban 8th-grade boys (P = .04) were the only behaviors for which a significantly higher prevalence was reported compared with nonurban counterparts. We observed few significant geographic differences in prevalence of television watching and video game playing. Several significant differences in PA behaviors were found by metropolitan status in this sample of public school students in Texas. Research is needed on availability of PA opportunities and PA barriers by metropolitan status to better understand the lower prevalence estimates reported in older urban children.

  3. Crisis intervention and acute psychiatry in Amsterdam, 20 years of change: a historical comparison of consultations in 1983 and 2004-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Post, L F M; Dekker, J J M; Jonkers, J F J; Beekman, A T F; Mulder, C L; de Haan, L; Mulder, W G; Schoevers, R A

    2010-07-01

    There has been a striking increase in the number of compulsory admission proceedings in the Netherlands since 1992, to such an extent that treatment in Amsterdam's psychiatric clinics is in danger of being dominated by coercive treatment. Our aim was to establish a picture of the changes in emergency psychiatry that have contributed to the increase in the number of acute compulsory admissions. A cohort (N = 460) of psychiatric emergency consultations with the city crisis service in 1983 was compared with a similar cohort (N = 436) in 2004-2005. The study focused on the following variables: patient characteristics, crisis-service procedures and consultation outcomes. Compared with 1983, there are now more services involved in crisis support in the public domain for psychiatric patients. The number of patients referred by the police has risen from 29% to 63%. In 1983, all consultations took place where the patients were located; at present, 60% take place at the crisis service premises. The number of psychotic patients in the cohort has increased from 52.0% and 63.3 %. There has been an increase in the proportion of compulsory admissions and a sharp decrease in the proportion of voluntary admissions from 61% to 28% of all admissions. Overall, the percentage of consultations leading to a psychiatric admission has fallen from 42% to 27%. The front-line outreach service of 1983 has changed into a specialist psychiatric emergency department with a less pronounced outreach component. Voluntary admissions to psychiatric hospitals have almost disappeared as a feature of the crisis service.

  4. Five-day planetary waves in the middle atmosphere from Odin satellite data and ground-based instruments in Northern Hemisphere summer 2003, 2004, 2005 and 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Belova

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies have shown that 5-day planetary waves modulate noctilucent clouds and the closely related Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE at the summer mesopause. Summer stratospheric winds should inhibit wave propagation through the stratosphere and, although some numerical models (Geisler and Dickinson, 1976 do show a possibility for upward wave propagation, it has also been suggested that the upward propagation may in practice be confined to the winter hemisphere with horizontal propagation of the wave from the winter to the summer hemisphere at mesosphere heights causing the effects observed at the summer mesopause. It has further been proposed (Garcia et al., 2005 that 5-day planetary waves observed in the summer mesosphere could be excited in-situ by baroclinic instability in the upper mesosphere. In this study, we first extract and analyze 5-day planetary wave characteristics on a global scale in the middle atmosphere (up to 54 km in temperature, and up to 68 km in ozone concentration using measurements by the Odin satellite for selected days during northern hemisphere summer from 2003, 2004, 2005 and 2007. Second, we show that 5-day temperature fluctuations consistent with westward-traveling 5-day waves are present at the summer mesopause, using local ground-based meteor-radar observations. Finally we examine whether any of three possible sources of the detected temperature fluctuations at the summer mesopause can be excluded: upward propagation from the stratosphere in the summer-hemisphere, horizontal propagation from the winter-hemisphere or in-situ excitation as a result of the baroclinic instability. We find that in one case, far from solstice, the baroclinic instability is unlikely to be involved. In one further case, close to solstice, upward propagation in the same hemisphere seems to be ruled out. In all other cases, all or any of the three proposed mechanisms are consistent with the observations.

  5. Assessment of persistence and residue of diazinon and malathion in three rivers (Mond, Shahpour and Dalaky of Bushehr Province 2004-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansooreh Shayeghi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Water contamination due to insecticides, often generates dangerous results for consumers. Immoderate consumption of insecticides in neighboring farms contaminates rivers. Assessment of residue of phosphorus insecticides which are used in farms near rivers can play a key role in preventing probable poisonings and aquatic ecosystems polution. Methods: In this case control study, water of three permanent rivers in Bushehr province and urban water pipe network of Bushehr city were assessed in different months in 2004-2005 and 216 samples were collected on the whole. In each river,three stations were used for sampling. After the sampling, extraction processes were accomplished using solvents such as: acetone, methylen-chloride and benzene. For detection and measurement of TLC Scanner apparatus was used. Results: Residues of diazinon and malathion were found in water of the three rivers in spring and summer. And in other seasons the rate of residues were very low or zero. The statistical analysis of the results through one-sidedanalysis variance, showed that diazinon and malathion residues in the water of the surveyed rivers in different months had significant difference (p 0.05, while malathion residue was significant (p <0.05. Conclusion: In the first and second months after applying the two insecticides, their residues level in all three rivers of Mond, Shahpour and Dalaky are more than acceptable contamination level, the higher levels belong to diazinon. Precautions must be considered in using the water for drinking purposes and also using aquatic foods which are provided from these rivers.

  6. Critical review on the re-introduction of flagship species Critical review on the re-introduction of flagship species

    OpenAIRE

    Detlev Ingendahl and Peter Beeck

    2011-01-01

    The reintroduction of salmon, wolves and bears has been in the news, but do they represent a true restoration of biodiversity? The authors discuss the advantages and limits to such projects, using as an example the re-introduction of salmon in the Rhine river. The reintroduction of salmon, wolves and bears has been in the news, but do they represent a true restoration of biodiversity? The authors discuss the advantages and limits to such projects, using as an example the re-introduction of sa...

  7. Autocorrelação espacial dos índices ndvi e gvi derivados de imagens landsat/tm para cultura da soja no oeste paranaense e ano agrícola de 2004/2005

    OpenAIRE

    Dalposso, Gustavo H.; Uribe-Opazo, Miguel A.; Mercante, Erivelto; Lamparelli, Rubens A. C.

    2013-01-01

    This research aims at studying spatial autocorrelation of Landsat/TM based on normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and green vegetation index (GVI) of soybean of the western region of the State of Paraná. The images were collected during the 2004/2005 crop season. The data were grouped into five vegetation index classes of equal amplitude, to create a temporal map of soybean within the crop cycle. Moran I and Local Indicators of Spatial Autocorrelation (LISA) indices were applied to ...

  8. Línea de base y medición de impactos tempranos del programa de capacitación para el empleo: 2004-2005 de la Alcaldía de Medellín: Informe Final

    OpenAIRE

    Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo (BID); Econometría Consultores

    2005-01-01

    El objetivo de este documento es presentar los resultados del programa Línea de base y medición de impactos tempranos del programa de capacitación para el empleo: 2004-2005 de la Alcaldía de Medellín. Los capítulos presentan una breve descripción del programa y la metodología utilizada para el análisis.

  9. Epidemiology of Shoulder Dislocations in High School and Collegiate Athletics in the United States: 2004/2005 Through 2013/2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraeutler, Matthew J; Currie, Dustin W; Kerr, Zachary Y; Roos, Karen G; McCarty, Eric C; Comstock, R Dawn

    Shoulder dislocations occur frequently in athletes across a variety of sports. This study provides an updated descriptive epidemiological analysis of shoulder dislocations among high school and college athletes and compares injury rates and patterns across these age groups. There would be no difference in injury rates/patterns between high school and college athletes. Descriptive epidemiology study. Level 3. Shoulder dislocation data from the High School Reporting Information Online (RIO) and the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance Program (ISP) databases were analyzed from the 2004/2005 through 2013/2014 (NCAA) or 2005/2006 through 2013/2014 (RIO) academic years in 11 different sports. Rate ratios (RRs) and injury proportion ratios (IPRs) were calculated to make comparisons between age groups. During the study period, 598 shoulder dislocations were reported during 29,249,482 athlete-exposures (AEs) among high school athletes, for an overall shoulder dislocation rate of 2.04 per 100,000 AEs; 352 shoulder dislocations were reported during 13,629,533 AEs among college athletes, for an overall injury rate of 2.58 per 100,000 AEs. College athletes had a higher rate of shoulder dislocation than high school athletes (RR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.11-1.44). However, the injury rate in football was lower in collegiate than high school athletes (RR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.43-0.62). Surgery was performed to correct 28.0% of high school and 29.6% of college shoulder dislocations. Shoulder dislocations resulted in longer return-to-play times than other shoulder injuries. Overall, shoulder dislocation rates were higher among collegiate than high school athletes. This may be due to greater contact forces involved in sports at higher levels of play, although the increased rate in high school football warrants additional research. Higher shoulder dislocation rates within collegiate athletics are likely due to the higher level of intensity at this level of play, with

  10. Captive breeding, reintroduction, and the conservation of amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Richard A; Pavajeau, Lissette

    2008-08-01

    The global amphibian crisis has resulted in renewed interest in captive breeding as a conservation tool for amphibians. Although captive breeding and reintroduction are controversial management actions, amphibians possess a number of attributes that make them potentially good models for such programs. We reviewed the extent and effectiveness of captive breeding and reintroduction programs for amphibians through an analysis of data from the Global Amphibian Assessment and other sources. Most captive breeding and reintroduction programs for amphibians have focused on threatened species from industrialized countries with relatively low amphibian diversity. Out of 110 species in such programs, 52 were in programs with no plans for reintroduction that had conservation research or conservation education as their main purpose. A further 39 species were in programs that entailed captive breeding and reintroduction or combined captive breeding with relocations of wild animals. Nineteen species were in programs with relocations of wild animals only. Eighteen out of 58 reintroduced species have subsequently bred successfully in the wild, and 13 of these species have established self-sustaining populations. As with threatened amphibians generally, amphibians in captive breeding or reintroduction programs face multiple threats, with habitat loss being the most important. Nevertheless, only 18 out of 58 reintroduced species faced threats that are all potentially reversible. When selecting species for captive programs, dilemmas may emerge between choosing species that have a good chance of surviving after reintroduction because their threats are reversible and those that are doomed to extinction in the wild as a result of irreversible threats. Captive breeding and reintroduction programs for amphibians require long-term commitments to ensure success, and different management strategies may be needed for species earmarked for reintroduction and species used for conservation

  11. Incidência de grãos esverdeados em soja, em seis locais da Região Sul de Mato Grosso do Sul, safra 2004/2005

    OpenAIRE

    Rangel,Marco Antônio Sedrez; Ono,Fábio Benedito; Lobo, Paulo Machado; Cardoso, Paulo César

    2007-01-01

    Com o objetivo de verificar a incidência de grãos esverdeados, foi conduzido o presente trabalho, avaliando-se oito cultivares de soja em seis ambientes de Mato Grosso do Sul, na safra 2004/2005. O delineamento experimental foi em blocos casualizados com três repetições. Os dados de temperatura média e precipitação foram obtidos em estações meteorológicas próximas a dois locais dos experimentos. Avaliou-se o rendimento de grãos e, aos seis meses de armazenamento, o percentual de grãos esverde...

  12. Aspects and implications of bear reintroduction: Chapter 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Joseph D.; Hayward, Matt W.; Somers, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Bear reintroduction has been practiced worldwide with varying degrees of success.  Homing is a significant issue for American black bears, Ursus americanus, and winter-release techniques of females with cubs have been successfully used to improve settling rates and survival. Reintroduction success for all bear species appears to be positively correlated with translocation distance, and success is greater for subadults and females. Animals bred or held in captivity are usually poor candidates for reintroduction, but that may be the only option for some rare species. Habitat analyses are routinely performed, but patch size and configuration may also be important considerations for choosing future reintroduction sites for these wide-ranging species. Biological realities aside, socio-political impediments are more difficult to overcome because of real and perceived threats to human safety and property. Poor public acceptance and understanding were the most important reasons for some bear reintroduction failures, and conservation biologists need to develop methods for identifying areas where co-habitation suitability is high. Citizen-led approaches to develop acceptable restoration strategies may be useful for gaining public acceptance of large-carnivore reintroduction efforts, and public acceptance is where the greatest challenge lies.

  13. Olympic Fisher Reintroduction Project: Progress report 2008-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey C. Lewis,; Patti J. Happe,; Jenkins, Kurt J.; Manson, David J.

    2012-01-01

    This progress report summarizes the final year of activities of Phase I of the Olympic fisher restoration project. The intent of the Olympic fisher reintroduction project is to reestablish a self-sustaining population of fishers on the Olympic Peninsula. To achieve this goal, the Olympic fisher reintroduction project released 90 fishers within Olympic National Park from 2008 to 2010. The reintroduction of fishers to the Olympic Peninsula was designed as an adaptive management project, including the monitoring of released fishers as a means to (1) evaluate reintroduction success, (2) investigate key biological and ecological traits of fishers, and (3) inform future reintroduction, monitoring, and research efforts. This report summarizes reintroduction activities and preliminary research and monitoring results completed through December 2011. The report is non-interpretational in nature. Although we report the status of movement, survival, and home range components of the research, we have not completed final analyses and interpretation of research results. Much of the data collected during the monitoring and research project will be analyzed and interpreted in the doctoral dissertation being developed by Jeff Lewis; the completion of this dissertation is anticipated prior to April 2013. We anticipate that this work, and analyses of other data collected during the project, will result in several peer-reviewed scientific publications in ecological and conservation journals, which collectively will comprise the final reporting of work summarized here. These publications will include papers addressing post-release movements, survival, resource selection, food habits, and age determination of fishers.

  14. Collegiate ACL Injury Rates Across 15 Sports: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System Data Update (2004-2005 Through 2012-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agel, Julie; Rockwood, Todd; Klossner, David

    2016-11-01

    To present data on the rate of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in 15 collegiate sports from 2004 to 2005 through 2012 to 2013 updating the 1988-1989 to 2003-2004 data. Prospectively designed descriptive epidemiology study. National Collegiate Athletic Association Schools. National Collegiate Athletic Association School athletes. Injury rate by year and sport. Most ACL injuries to women occurred by a noncontact mechanism (60%) versus a contact mechanism for men (59%). The highest average annual rate of ACL injury for men was found in football (0.17 per 1000 athlete-exposure [A-E]). The highest average annual rate of ACL injury for women was found in lacrosse (0.23 per 1000 A-E). There were statistically significant increases in average annual injury rate for men's (P = 0.04) and women's soccer (P = 0.01) and a statistically significant decrease in women's gymnastics over the 9 years (=0.009). Controlling for exposures, there were statistically significant increases in the average annual number of injuries for men's and women's basketball, ice hockey, field hockey, football, and volleyball and a decrease in the average annual number of injuries for baseball and women's gymnastics. Women continue to sustain ACL injuries at higher rates than men in the comparable sports of soccer, basketball, and lacrosse. Anterior cruciate ligament injury rates continue to rise in men's and women's soccer. Some sports have shown absolute increases in ACL rates, which persist even after exposure rates are taken into account. Despite extensive research and development of prevention programs before and during the time of this study, very few sports showed a reduction in ACL injury rates in this data set.

  15. A matter of tradeoffs: reintroduction as a multiple objective decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Converse, Sarah J.; Moore, Clinton T.; Folk, Martin J.; Runge, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Decision making in guidance of reintroduction efforts is made challenging by the substantial scientific uncertainty typically involved. However, a less recognized challenge is that the management objectives are often numerous and complex. Decision makers managing reintroduction efforts are often concerned with more than just how to maximize the probability of reintroduction success from a population perspective. Decision makers are also weighing other concerns such as budget limitations, public support and/or opposition, impacts on the ecosystem, and the need to consider not just a single reintroduction effort, but conservation of the entire species. Multiple objective decision analysis is a powerful tool for formal analysis of such complex decisions. We demonstrate the use of multiple objective decision analysis in the case of the Florida non-migratory whooping crane reintroduction effort. In this case, the State of Florida was considering whether to resume releases of captive-reared crane chicks into the non-migratory whooping crane population in that state. Management objectives under consideration included maximizing the probability of successful population establishment, minimizing costs, maximizing public relations benefits, maximizing the number of birds available for alternative reintroduction efforts, and maximizing learning about the demographic patterns of reintroduced whooping cranes. The State of Florida engaged in a collaborative process with their management partners, first, to evaluate and characterize important uncertainties about system behavior, and next, to formally evaluate the tradeoffs between objectives using the Simple Multi-Attribute Rating Technique (SMART). The recommendation resulting from this process, to continue releases of cranes at a moderate intensity, was adopted by the State of Florida in late 2008. Although continued releases did not receive support from the International Whooping Crane Recovery Team, this approach does provide

  16. Amiodarone-Induced Thyrotoxicosis Recurrence After Amiodarone Reintroduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqdasy, Salwan; Batisse-Lignier, Marie; Auclair, Candy; Desbiez, Françoise; Citron, Bernard; Thieblot, Philippe; Roche, Béatrice; Lusson, Jean René; Tauveron, Igor

    2016-04-01

    Reintroduction of amiodarone in patients with a history of amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT) is rarely used. To date, the risk of AIT recurrence after amiodarone reintroduction is unpredicted. The aim of the study was to evaluate the risk of AIT recurrence. Retrospectively, from 2000 to 2011, all euthyroid patients with a history of AIT with amiodarone reintroduction were included. Type and severity of the first AIT, amiodarone chronology, and thyroid function evolution after reintroduction of amiodarone were investigated: 46 of 172 patients with AIT history needed amiodarone reintroduction. At first AIT episode, the mean age was 62.2 ± 16 years with male gender predominance; 65% of patients were classified as type 1 AIT. AIT recurred in 14 patients (30%), 12 patients developed hypothyroidism (26%), and 20 patients remained euthyroid (44%). Characteristics of type 1 AIT during the first episode, namely briefer exposure period to amiodarone and longer duration of treatment to normalize thyroid hormones, were predictive of AIT recurrence; 73% of patients (8 of 11) with previous episode of type 1 AIT, who did not receive a preventive thioamide treatment, developed a second episode of AIT. Thioamide preventive treatment could be useful to prevent type 1 AIT recurrence. In conclusion, AIT recurrence after amiodarone reintroduction is 4 times more frequent in patients with type 1 AIT history. Thyroid ablation before amiodarone reintroduction in patients with a history of type 1 AIT is preferred. Preventive thioamide treatment could be suggested in patients with type 1 AIT history pending for surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. O processo de planejamento e periodização do treino em futebol nos clubes da principal liga portuguesa profissional de futebol na época 2004/2005 The training planning and periodization processes in professional football Portuguese league 2004/2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Santos

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available O planejamento e a periodização são fases cruciais diretamente implicadas na eficácia, consistência e qualidade do jogo das equipes. Foram objetivos deste estudo investigar: 1 a implementação da dinâmica da "carga" e sua relação com os períodos; 2 a importância atribuída às componentes da "carga" e recuperação; 3 a prescrição da intensidade; 4 as componentes do rendimento consideradas no planejamento, sua importância hierárquica e, forma de trabalho; 5 o aspecto considerado central no planejamento; 6 o tipo de planejamento utilizado na preparação da equipe; e 7 a utilização da modelação no processo de treino. O universo estudado foi constituído pelas 18 equipes do principal escalão de Futebol, na época 2004/2005. Foi aplicado um inquérito por questionário validado por sete especialistas. Representando cada um dos clubes em estudo, responderam ao questionário 16 treinadores principais e dois adjuntos, por remessa do respetivo treinador principal. Os resultados sugerem que embora pareça não ser a corrente de treino dominante, o paradigma da dimensão física do treino aparece ainda bastante vincado. Alguns dos pressupostos associados à conceção tradicional do treino permanecem presentes. Parece ser costume operacionalizar um planejamento com base na dimensão tática. Apesar desta ser a "guia" do processo, e "arrastar" a dimensão física, nem sempre tal acontece. Embora surjam situações em que ainda se promove a separação das dimensões do rendimento, a referência passa por trabalhá-las, sempre que possível, simultaneamente. A modelação do jogo é uma tendência na maioria dos clubes. Nem todos os treinadores agem de acordo com as suas convicções expressas.Planning and periodization are assumed to be crucial phases directly implied in the efficiency, consistency and game quality of the teams. The aim of this work is to investigate: 1 the implementation of the "load`s" dynamics and its relation to

  18. Active adaptive management for reintroduction of an animal population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Captive animals are frequently reintroduced to the wild in the face of uncertainty, but that uncertainty can often be reduced over the course of the reintroduction effort, providing the opportunity for adaptive management. One common uncertainty in reintroductions is the short-term survival rate of released adults (a release cost), an important factor because it can affect whether releasing adults or juveniles is better. Information about this rate can improve the success of the reintroduction program, but does the expected gain offset the costs of obtaining the information? I explored this question for reintroduction of the griffon vulture (Gyps fulvus) by framing the management question as a belief Markov decision process, characterizing uncertainty about release cost with 2 information state variables, and finding the solution using stochastic dynamic programming. For a reintroduction program of fixed length (e.g., 5 years of releases), the optimal policy in the final release year resembles the deterministic solution: release either all adults or all juveniles depending on whether the point estimate for the survival rate in question is above or below a specific threshold. But the optimal policy in the earlier release years 1) includes release of a mixture of juveniles and adults under some circumstances, and 2) recommends release of adults even when the point estimate of survival is much less than the deterministic threshold. These results show that in an iterated decision setting, the optimal decision in early years can be quite different from that in later years because of the value of learning. 

  19. Developments in amphibian captive breeding and reintroduction programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Gemma; Griffiths, Richard A; Pavajeau, Lissette

    2016-04-01

    Captive breeding and reintroduction remain high profile but controversial conservation interventions. It is important to understand how such programs develop and respond to strategic conservation initiatives. We analyzed the contribution to conservation made by amphibian captive breeding and reintroduction since the launch of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Amphibian Conservation Action Plan (ACAP) in 2007. We assembled data on amphibian captive breeding and reintroduction from a variety of sources including the Amphibian Ark database and the IUCN Red List. We also carried out systematic searches of Web of Science, JSTOR, and Google Scholar for relevant literature. Relative to data collected from 1966 to 2006, the number of species involved in captive breeding and reintroduction projects increased by 57% in the 7 years since release of the ACAP. However, there have been relatively few new reintroductions over this period; most programs have focused on securing captive-assurance populations (i.e., species taken into captivity as a precaution against extinctions in the wild) and conservation-related research. There has been a shift to a broader representation of frogs, salamanders, and caecilians within programs and an increasing emphasis on threatened species. There has been a relative increase of species in programs from Central and South America and the Caribbean, where amphibian biodiversity is high. About half of the programs involve zoos and aquaria with a similar proportion represented in specialist facilities run by governmental or nongovernmental agencies. Despite successful reintroduction often being regarded as the ultimate milestone for such programs, the irreversibility of many current threats to amphibians may make this an impractical goal. Instead, research on captive assurance populations may be needed to develop imaginative solutions to enable amphibians to survive alongside current, emerging, and future threats. © 2015

  20. The Influence of Classroom Management toward Students’ English Achievement at SMU Muhammadiyah Salatiga (A Case Study of Second Year Students of SMU Muhammadiyah Salatiga in the Academic Year of 2004/2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triyono Triyono

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to find out the influence of classroom management toward students’ achievement in English.  The research was conducted at SMU Muhammadiyah Salatiga, Central Java, Indonesia. The writer focuses on the second year students in the academic year of 2004/2005. It is a Quantitative Research. Questionnaire and direct observation are the instruments used to take the data. The score of classroom management of SMU Muhammadiyah Salatiga is 87.6%, fairly high. While the score level of the second year students of SMU Muhammadiyah Salatiga is 72%. This score level is satisfactory category of achievement level of most students. It means that better classroom management influences better English achievement.

  1. 76 FR 20707 - Cle Elum Dam Fish Passage Facilities and Fish Reintroduction Project; Kittitas County, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Cle Elum Dam Fish Passage Facilities and Fish Reintroduction Project; Kittitas... Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for the Cle Elum Dam Fish Passage Facilities and Fish Reintroduction... FEIS on the proposed Cle Elum Dam Fish Passage Facilities and Fish Reintroduction Project. The...

  2. Spatial occupancy models for predicting metapopulation dynamics and viability following reintroduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Richard B.; Muths, Erin L.; Sigafus, Brent H.; Schwalbe, Cecil R.; Jarchow, Christopher J.; Hossack, Blake R.

    2015-01-01

    The reintroduction of a species into its historic range is a critical component of conservation programmes designed to restore extirpated metapopulations. However, many reintroduction efforts fail, and the lack of rigorous monitoring programmes and statistical models have prevented a general understanding of the factors affecting metapopulation viability following reintroduction.

  3. Standards for documenting and monitoring bird reintroduction projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, W.J.; Armstrong, D.; Butchart, S.H.M.; Earnhardt, J.M.; Ewen, J.; Jamieson, I.; Jones, C.G.; Lee, R.; Newbery, P.; Nichols, J.D.; Parker, K.A.; Sarrazin, F.; Seddon, P.J.; Shah, N.; Tatayah, V.

    2010-01-01

    It would be much easier to assess the effectiveness of different reintroduction methods, and so improve the success of reintroductions, if there was greater standardization in documentation of the methods and outcomes. We suggest a series of standards for documenting and monitoring the methods and outcomes associated with reintroduction projects for birds. Key suggestions are: documenting the planned release before it occurs, specifying the information required on each release, postrelease monitoring occurring at standard intervals of 1 and 5 years (and 10 for long-lived species), carrying out a population estimate unless impractical, distinguishing restocked and existing individuals when supplementing populations, and documenting the results. We suggest these principles would apply, largely unchanged, to other vertebrate classes. Similar methods could be adopted for invertebrates and plants with appropriate modification. We suggest that organizations publically state whether they will adopt these approaches when undertaking reintroductions. Similar standardization would be beneficial for a wide range of topics in environmental monitoring, ecological studies, and practical conservation. ??2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The reintroduction of the bearded vulture Gypaetus barbatus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The reintroduction of the bearded vulture Gypaetus barbatus in Andalusia, southern Spain. ... a helpful Frequently Asked Questions about PDFs. Alternatively, you can download the PDF file directly to your computer, from where it can be opened using a PDF reader. To download the PDF, click the Download link above.

  5. Climate-driven introduction of the Black Death and successive plague reintroductions into Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Boris V; Büntgen, Ulf; Easterday, W Ryan; Ginzler, Christian; Walløe, Lars; Bramanti, Barbara; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2015-03-10

    The Black Death, originating in Asia, arrived in the Mediterranean harbors of Europe in 1347 CE, via the land and sea trade routes of the ancient Silk Road system. This epidemic marked the start of the second plague pandemic, which lasted in Europe until the early 19th century. This pandemic is generally understood as the consequence of a singular introduction of Yersinia pestis, after which the disease established itself in European rodents over four centuries. To locate these putative plague reservoirs, we studied the climate fluctuations that preceded regional plague epidemics, based on a dataset of 7,711 georeferenced historical plague outbreaks and 15 annually resolved tree-ring records from Europe and Asia. We provide evidence for repeated climate-driven reintroductions of the bacterium into European harbors from reservoirs in Asia, with a delay of 15 ± 1 y. Our analysis finds no support for the existence of permanent plague reservoirs in medieval Europe.

  6. Climate-driven introduction of the Black Death and successive plague reintroductions into Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büntgen, Ulf; Easterday, W. Ryan; Ginzler, Christian; Walløe, Lars; Bramanti, Barbara; Stenseth, Nils Chr.

    2015-01-01

    The Black Death, originating in Asia, arrived in the Mediterranean harbors of Europe in 1347 CE, via the land and sea trade routes of the ancient Silk Road system. This epidemic marked the start of the second plague pandemic, which lasted in Europe until the early 19th century. This pandemic is generally understood as the consequence of a singular introduction of Yersinia pestis, after which the disease established itself in European rodents over four centuries. To locate these putative plague reservoirs, we studied the climate fluctuations that preceded regional plague epidemics, based on a dataset of 7,711 georeferenced historical plague outbreaks and 15 annually resolved tree-ring records from Europe and Asia. We provide evidence for repeated climate-driven reintroductions of the bacterium into European harbors from reservoirs in Asia, with a delay of 15 ± 1 y. Our analysis finds no support for the existence of permanent plague reservoirs in medieval Europe. PMID:25713390

  7. Incidence and risk factors for injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament in National Collegiate Athletic Association football: data from the 2004-2005 through 2008-2009 National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoo, Jason L; Braun, Hillary J; Durham, Jennah L; Chen, Michael R; Harris, Alex H S

    2012-05-01

    Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are common in athletic populations, particularly in athletes participating in football, soccer, and skiing. The purpose of this study was to analyze the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance System (ISS) men's football ACL injury database from the playing seasons of 2004-2005 through 2008-2009 to determine the incidence and epidemiology of complete injury to the ACL in NCAA football athletes. Descriptive epidemiology study. The NCAA ISS men's football database was reviewed from the 2004-2005 through 2008-2009 seasons using the specific injury code, "Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) complete tear." The injury rate was computed for competition and practice exposures. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals (CIs) for the incident rates were calculated using assumptions of a Poisson distribution. Pairwise, 2-sample tests of equality of proportions with a continuity correction were used to estimate the associations of risk factors such as event type, playing surface, season segment, and football subdivision. Descriptive data were also described. The ACL injury rate during games (8.06 per 10,000 athlete-exposures [AEs] 95% CI, 6.80-9.42) was significantly greater than the rate during practice (0.8 per 10,000 AEs 95% CI, 0.68-0.93). Players were 10.09 (95% CI, 8.08-12.59) times more likely to sustain an ACL injury in competition when compared with practices. When practice exposures were analyzed separately, the injury rate was significantly greater during scrimmages (3.99 per 10,000 AEs 95% CI, 2.29-5.94) compared with regular practices (0.83 per 10,000 AEs 95% CI, 0.69-0.97) and walk-throughs (0 per 10,000 AEs 95% CI, 0-0.14). There was an incidence rate of 1.73 ACL injuries per 10,000 AEs (95% CI, 1.47-2.0) on artificial playing surfaces compared with a rate of 1.24 per 10,000 AEs (95% CI, 1.05-1.45) on natural grass. The rate of ACL injury on artificial surfaces is 1.39 (95% CI, 1

  8. Liver cancer mortality trends during the last 30 years in Hebei province: comparison results from provincial death surveys conducted in the 1970's, 1980's, 1990's and 2004-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong; He, Yu-Tong; Zhu, Jun-Qing

    2012-01-01

    Liver cancer is a major health problem in low-resource countries. Approximately 55% of all liver cancer occurs in China. Hebei Province is one of the important covering nearly 6% of the population of China. The aim of this paper was to explore liver cancer mortality trends during past 30 years, and provide basic information on prevention strategies. Hebei was covered covered all the three national surveys during 1973-1975, 1990-1992, and 2004-2005 and one provincial survey during 1984-1986. Subjects included all cases dying from liver cancer in Hebei Province. Liver cancer mortality trend and geographic differences across cities and counties were analyzed. There were 82,878 deaths in Hebei Province during 2004-2005 with an average mortality rate was 600.9/10,000, and an age-adjusted rate of 552.3/10,000. Those dying of cancer were 18,424 cases, accounting for 22.2% of all deaths, second only to cerebrovascular disease as a cause of death. Cancer mortality was 133.6/100,000 (age-adjusted rate was 119.2/100,000). Liver cancer ranked fourth in this survey with a mortality rate of 21.0/100,000, 28.4/100,000 in males and 13.35/10,000 in females, accounting for 15.7%, 17.1% and 13.4% of the total number of cancer deaths and in males and females, respectively. The sex ratio was 2.13. Since the 1970s, liver cancer deaths of Hebei province have been increasing slightly. The crude mortality rates in the four surveys were 11.3, 16.0, 17.4, 21.0 per 100,000, respectively, with age-adjusted rates fluctuating during the past 30 years, but the trend also being upwards. There is a tendency for the mortality rates to be higher in coastal than mountain areas, and is relative lower in the plain area, with crude mortality rates of 25.3, 22.1, and 19.1 per 100,000, respectively. There were no notable differences in cride data between urban and rural, but the age-adjusted mortality rate in rural was much higher. Our study indicated that the mortality of liver cancer in Hebei Province is

  9. Restoration, Reintroduction, and Rewilding in a Changing World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlett, Richard T

    2016-06-01

    The increasing abandonment of marginal land creates new opportunities for restoration, reintroduction, and rewilding, but what do these terms mean in a rapidly and irreversibly changing world? The 're' prefix means 'back', but it is becoming clear that the traditional use of past ecosystems as targets and criteria for success must be replaced by an orientation towards an uncertain future. Current opinions in restoration and reintroduction biology range from a defense of traditional definitions, with some modifications, to acceptance of more radical responses, including assisted migration, taxon substitution, de-extinction, and genetic modification. Rewilding attempts to minimize sustained intervention, but this hands-off approach is also threatened by rapid environmental change. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The reintroduction of the Bearded Vulture Gypaetus barbatus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-03-01

    Mar 1, 2007 ... The reintroduction of the Bearded Vulture. Gypaetus barbatus in Andalusia, southern Spain. Miguel Ángel Simón, Sergio Couto, Antonio Lucio Carrasco,. María Jesús García-Baquero, Alfonso Godino, José Eugenio. Gutiérrez, Francisco José Hernández, Esperanza Jiménez,. Mariano Liñán, Mario López, ...

  11. Energy Industry Study, AY 2004-2005

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Almazrouei, Faris K; Anders, Monica; Bagaein, Wael; Deltuva, Janet; Doucette, John W; Hutchison, Mike; Johnson, Thomas; Julhes, Frederic; Leinz, Andreas; Montgomery, Robert

    2005-01-01

    .... The USG should create market incentives to encourage investment, development, and deployment of a broad portfolio of renewable alternative energy supplies and enhanced conservation measures to reduce...

  12. Academic Training: 2004 - 2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    1st Term - 01 October to 17 December 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME New Trends in Fusion Research by A. Fasoli, EPFL, Lausanne, CH 11, 12, 13 October Physics at e+e- linear collider by K. Desch, DESY, Hamburg, D 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS Standard Model by R. Barbieri, CERN-PH-TH 6, 7, 8, 9 10 December The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc) will be published in the CERN Bulletin, the WWW, and by notices before each term and for each series of lectures. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  13. Academic Training: 2004 - 2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    1st Term - 01 October to 17 December 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME New Trends in Fusion Research by A. Fasoli, EPFL, Lausanne, CH 11, 12, 13 October Physics at e+e- linear collider by K. Desch, DESY, Hamburg, D 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS Standard Model by R. Barbieri, CERN-PH-TH 6, 7, 8, 9 10 December The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc) will be published in the CERN Bulletin, the WWW, and by notices before each term and for each series of lectures. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form a...

  14. Academic Training: 2004 - 2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    1st Term - 01 October to 17 December 2004 REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME New Trends in Fusion Research by A. Fasoli, EPFL, Lausanne, CH 11, 12, 13 October Physics at e+e- linear collider by K. Desch, DESY, Hamburg, D 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November LECTURE SERIES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS Standard Model by R. Barbieri, CERN-PH-TH 6, 7, 8, 9 10 December The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc) will be published in the CERN Bulletin, the WWW, and by notices before each term and for each series of lectures.

  15. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project: Short Project Overview of Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation in the Upper Yakima Basin; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, David E.; Bosch, William J.

    2005-09-01

    The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is on schedule to ascertain whether new artificial production techniques can be used to increase harvest and natural production of spring Chinook salmon while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the fish population being supplemented and keeping adverse genetic and ecological interactions with non-target species or stocks within acceptable limits. The Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility (CESRF) collected its first spring chinook brood stock in 1997, released its first fish in 1999, and age-4 adults have been returning since 2001. In these initial years of CESRF operation, recruitment of hatchery origin fish has exceeded that of fish spawning in the natural environment, but early indications are that hatchery origin fish are not as successful at spawning in the natural environment as natural origin fish when competition is relatively high. When competition is reduced, hatchery fish produced similar numbers of progeny as their wild counterparts. Most demographic variables are similar between natural and hatchery origin fish, however hatchery origin fish were smaller-at-age than natural origin fish. Long-term fitness of the target population is being evaluated by a large-scale test of domestication. Slight changes in predation vulnerability and competitive dominance, caused by domestication, were documented. Distribution of spawners has increased as a result of acclimation site location and salmon homing fidelity. Semi-natural rearing and predator avoidance training have not resulted in significant increases in survival of hatchery fish. However, growth manipulations in the hatchery appear to be reducing the number of precocious males produced by the YKFP and consequently increasing the number of migrants. Genetic impacts to non-target populations appear to be low because of the low stray rates of YKFP fish. Ecological impacts to valued non-target taxa were within containment objectives or impacts that were outside of containment objectives were not caused by supplementation activities. Some fish and bird piscivores have been estimated to consume large numbers of salmonids in the Yakima Basin. Natural production of Chinook salmon in the upper Yakima Basin appears to be density dependent under current conditions and may constrain the benefits of supplementation. However, such constraints (if they exist) could be countered by YKFP habitat actions that have resulted in: the protection of over 900 acres of prime floodplain habitat, reconnection and screening of over 15 miles of tributary habitat, substantial water savings through irrigation improvements, and restoration of over 80 acres of floodplain and side channels. Harvest opportunities for tribal and non-tribal fishers have also been enhanced, but are variable among years. The YKFP is still in the early stages of evaluation, and as such the data and findings presented in this report should be considered preliminary until further data is collected and analyses completed. Nonetheless, the YKFP has produced significant findings, and produced methodologies that can be used to evaluate and improve supplementation. A summary table of topical area performance is presented.

  16. Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocious Male Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Johnson, Christopher L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); James, Brenda B. (Cascade Aquatics, Ellensburg, WA)

    2005-05-01

    This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997; James et al. 1999; Pearsons et al., 2003; Pearsons et al. 2004). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Topics of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocious male salmon monitoring (abundance); (4) performance of growth modulation in reducing precocious males during spawning; (5) incidence of predation by residualized chinook salmon; and (6) benefits of salmon carcasses to juvenile salmonids. This report is organized into six chapters to represent these topics of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2004 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Previous results on the topics in this report were reported in James et al. (1999), and Pearsons et al. (2003; 2004). Hatchery-reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

  17. Demography of woody species in a semi-arid African savanna reserve following the re-introduction of elephants

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Timothy G.

    2017-01-01

    The hypothesis that African elephants may cause the local extirpation of selected woody species was evaluated in a medium-sized, semi-arid reserve following their reintroduction at low density. Mortality, state-change, and regeneration of 25 tree and 17 shrub species were studied between 1997 and 2010. Annual mortality of shrub species ranged from 0.2 to 8.0%, with six species experiencing 6-8%. Eight shrub species lost more than half their adult population (range 10-94%). Annual tree mortality ranged from 0.2 to 10.5%. The two dominant dryland tree species experienced Elephants accounted for >63% and stress-related agents >20% of tree deaths. The manner in which elephants induced tree death depended on species. The proportion of individuals of a species killed by pollarding or uprooting ranged from 0 to 74%, and by debarking from 0 to 100%. Complete uprooting was a common cause of death for three shrub species. Regeneration ranged from zero for six tree and one shrub species to a seedling every 7 m2 for Colophospermum mopane and 23 m2 for Dichrostachys cinerea in riparian habitat. Three shrub and eight tree species were identified as vulnerable to local extirpation owing to a combination of high mortality and poor regeneration that is likely to result in a considerably simplified system. Reintroduction of elephants into medium-sized reserves without regulation of their numbers may not be a desirable action.

  18. Estudio descriptivo sobre la situación actual del ejercicio de la pediatría en Antioquia, 2004 - 2005 Descriptive study of the current status of the pediatric practice in Antioquia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johans Edwin Navas Lenis

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: a pesar de que la implementación de la ley 100 de 1993 ha desencadenado profundos cambios en la prestación de servicios de atención médica y en las condiciones laborales del personal asistencial, hay pocos estudios en nuestro medio que exploren este último impacto. El presente trabajo tiene como propósito describir la situación actual de los pediatras generales y subespecialistas en Antioquia en el período 2004-2005, con énfasis en los factores sociales, laborales y económicos. Materiales y métodos: del cruce de las bases de datos de la Sociedad de Pediatría de Antioquia y de algunas casas farmacéuticas se obtuvo un universo de 321 pediatras de los cuales se encuestaron en forma aleatoria 220. Resultados y conclusiones: el perfil resultante muestra un hombre (53,2% o una mujer (46,8% de 44,6 años, egresado predominantemente de la universidad pública local (70,2% que trabaja en el área metropolitana (94%, en una institución de carácter privado (56,8% y en un segundo o tercer nivel de atención. Labora 8,62 horas al día, 5,51 días a la semana y realiza turnos nocturnos en el 55,8% de los casos. El 43% devenga mensualmente menos de $ 4.000.000,00 por su actividad como pediatra y se siente satisfecho con su profesión pero no con el pago que recibe ni con la carga horaria. Su familia le reclama mayor presencia en el hogar, es sedentario y accede en forma irregular a la educación médica continuada. Este estudio constituye un acercamiento a las condiciones específicas de la pediatría en Antioquia y convendría reproducirlo en otras especialidades y regiones del país. Background: Even though the implementation of the Law 100 of 1993 has given rise to profound changes in the medical attention services and working conditions of health service personnel, there are few studies that explore the impact on the latter. The purpose of the present study was to describe the current situation of pediatricians and pediatric

  19. Sex Differences in Reported Concussion Injury Rates and Time Loss From Participation: An Update of the National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance Program From 2004-2005 Through 2008-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covassin, Tracey; Moran, Ryan; Elbin, R J

    2016-03-01

    Epidemiologic studies have identified differences in concussion incidence between the sexes. However, few authors to date have updated injury rates (IRs) and time loss between male and female concussed athletes. To examine sex differences in IRs and time loss in concussed National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) athletes. Descriptive epidemiologic study. National Collegiate Athletic Association athletics. A total of 1702 concusssed NCAA athletes, consisting of 903 females and 779 males participating in soccer, basketball, ice hockey, lacrosse, softball, or baseball over a 5-year period from 2004-2005 through 2008-2009. Using the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program, athletic trainers reported concussions, athlete-exposures (AEs), and time loss across 10 NCAA sports. An IR is the number of injuries in a particular category divided by the number of AEs in that category. During the study period, 1702 concussions were reported during 4 170 427 AEs for an overall total of 5.47 per 10 000 AEs. In sex-comparable sports, females had a 1.4 times higher overall concussion IR than males (IRs = 4.84 and 3.46, respectively), with greater rates in women's baseball/softball, basketball, ice hockey, and soccer than men. Female soccer and basketball players also displayed more time loss after concussion compared with male basketball and soccer players. Female athletes sustained a higher rate of concussion and, in all sports except lacrosse, had greater time loss from concussion than male athletes. Additional research is needed on sex differences in time loss after concussions.

  20. Attitudes toward reintroduction of European bison (Bison bonasus) to Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Bergsten, Axel

    2014-01-01

    The European bison (Bison bonasus) is no longer present in the wild fauna of Sweden. Reintroduction, an attempt to reestablish a viable population of a species in an area to which it is native, has been discussed. To make such an operation successful it is essential to know the attitudes of the stakeholders involved. This study has sensed the attitudes toward reintroducing E. bison to Sweden. It was done through a survey sent to the Wildlife Management Boards (Boards) and to landowners/farmer...

  1. Standard versus rapid food reintroduction after exclusive enteral nutritional therapy in paediatric Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiman, Abi; Mutalib, Mohamed; Moylan, Alexander; Morgan, Natalie; Crespi, Daniel; Furman, Mark; Kader, Ajmal

    2014-03-01

    In paediatric Crohn's disease (PCD), 6-8 weeks of exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) is effective in 60-80% cases. EEN is followed by gradual food reintroduction over variable (1-5 weeks) periods. Currently, there is no recommended duration or method for food reintroduction. The rationale for slow reintroduction is unclear and may be because of concerns about food intolerance or to maintain longer remission. The aims of this study were as follows: to compare relapse rates following standard and rapid reintroduction of food after EEN in PCD and to determine the duration of maintained remission in two groups of PCD patients. Two groups with PCD were compared: group A received standard food reintroduction over 5 weeks and group B received rapid reintroduction over 3 days. Data were collected over two consecutive time periods: group A (2005-2009) and group B (2009-2011). Only patients with a new diagnosis of PCD were included. Those with strictures and those on steroids or biologicals during EEN were excluded. The minimum duration of follow-up was 1 year. Group A included 20 patients and group B included 19 patients. In these groups, EEN led to clinical remission in 80% of the patients in group A and in 76% of the patients in group B. At 6 months, one-third of the patients from each group had developed relapse and a year after EEN, 50% of the patients in group A and 47% of the patients in group B developed relapse. Time to first relapse was 188 days (group A) and 136 days (group B). None of these results were statistically significant. In PCD, rapid food reintroduction following 6-week EEN is safe and equally effective as longer food reintroduction. We propose that a rapid food reintroduction schedule be recommended as the most tolerable approach for food reintroduction. Relapse rate and duration of remission are uninfluenced by the type of food reintroduction.

  2. Reintroduction of locally extinct vertebrates impacts arid soil fungal communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Laurence J; Weyrich, Laura S; Cooper, Alan

    2015-06-01

    Introduced species have contributed to extinction of native vertebrates in many parts of the world. Changes to vertebrate assemblages are also likely to alter microbial communities through coextinction of some taxa and the introduction of others. Many attempts to restore degraded habitats involve removal of exotic vertebrates (livestock and feral animals) and reintroduction of locally extinct species, but the impact of such reintroductions on microbial communities is largely unknown. We used high-throughput DNA sequencing of the fungal internal transcribed spacer I (ITS1) region to examine whether replacing exotic vertebrates with reintroduced native vertebrates led to changes in soil fungal communities at a reserve in arid central Australia. Soil fungal diversity was significantly different between dune and swale (interdune) habitats. Fungal communities also differed significantly between sites with exotic or reintroduced native vertebrates after controlling for the effect of habitat. Several fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs) found exclusively inside the reserve were present in scats from reintroduced native vertebrates, providing a direct link between the vertebrate assemblage and soil microbial communities. Our results show that changes to vertebrate assemblages through local extinctions and the invasion of exotic species can alter soil fungal communities. If local extinction of one or several species results in the coextinction of microbial taxa, the full complement of ecological interactions may never be restored. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Mid-Columbia Coho Salmon Reintroduction Feasibility Project : Environmental Assessment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State) Department of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation

    1999-01-01

    Before the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) decides whether to fund a program to reintroduce coho salmon to mid-Columbia River basin tributaries, research is needed to determine the ecological risks and biological feasibility of such an effort. Since the early 1900s, the native stock of coho has been decimated in the tributaries of the middle reach of the Columbia River. The four Columbia River Treaty Tribes identified coho reintroduction in the mid-Columbia as a priority in the Tribal Restoration Plan. It is a comprehensive plan put forward by the Tribes to restore the Columbia River fisheries. In 1996, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) recommended the tribal mid-Columbia reintroduction project for funding by BPA. It was identified as one of fifteen high-priority supplementation projects for the Columbia River basin, and was incorporated into the NPPC`s Fish and Wildlife Program. The release of coho from lower Columbia hatcheries into mid-Columbia tributaries is also recognized in the Columbia River Fish Management Plan.

  4. The genetic legacy of multiple beaver reintroductions in Central Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Frosch

    Full Text Available The comeback of the Eurasian beaver (Castor fiber throughout western and central Europe is considered a major conservation success. Traditionally, several subspecies are recognised by morphology and mitochondrial haplotype, each linked to a relict population. During various reintroduction programs in the 20th century, beavers from multiple source localities were released and now form viable populations. These programs differed in their reintroduction strategies, i.e., using pure subspecies vs. mixed source populations. This inhomogeneity in management actions generated ongoing debates regarding the origin of present beaver populations and appropriate management plans for the future. By sequencing of the mitochondrial control region and microsatellite genotyping of 235 beaver individuals from five selected regions in Germany, Switzerland, Luxembourg, and Belgium we show that beavers from at least four source origins currently form admixed, genetically diverse populations that spread across the study region. While regional occurrences of invasive North American beavers (n = 20 were found, all but one C. fiber bore the mitochondrial haplotype of the autochthonous western Evolutionary Significant Unit (ESU. Considering this, as well as the viability of admixed populations and the fact that the fusion of different lineages is already progressing in all studied regions, we argue that admixture between different beaver source populations should be generally accepted.

  5. Genetic monitoring to evaluate reintroduction attempts of a highly endangered rodent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haye, la M.J.J.; Reiners, T.E.; Raedts, R.; Verbist, V.; Koelewijn, H.P.

    2017-01-01

    The ultimate strategy to prevent species extinction is captive breeding followed by reintroduction of individuals into the wild. Unfortunately, overall success of reintroductions is poor and in most cases conservation breeding is applied for species where individual numbers, population numbers and

  6. 20 CFR 702.319 - Obtaining documents from the administrative file for reintroduction at formal hearings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obtaining documents from the administrative file for reintroduction at formal hearings. 702.319 Section 702.319 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT....319 Obtaining documents from the administrative file for reintroduction at formal hearings. Whenever...

  7. Science, economics, and rhetoric: environmental advocacy and the wolf reintroduction debate, 1987-1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayle C. Hardy-Short; C. Brant Short

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines the arguments employed in the debate over reintroduction of wolves into Idaho, Montana, and the Yellowstone National Park Ecosystem; and in Arizona and New Mexico. The study reviews common rhetorical themes used by advocates and opponents of wolf reintroduction and identifies a significant rhetorical shift in the debate. Advocates opposed to wolf...

  8. IMPACTS OF LANDSCAPE CHANGE ON WOLF RESTORATION SUCCESS: PLANNING A REINTRODUCTION PROGRAM USING STATIC AND DYNAMIC SPATIAL MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammalian carnivores are increasingly the focus of reintroduction attempts in areas from whichthey have been extirpated by historic persecution. We used static and dynamic spatial models to evaluate whether a proposed wolf reintroduction to the southern Rocky Mountain region ...

  9. High-performance teams in wildlife conservation: A species reintroduction and recovery example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Tim W.; Westrum, Ron

    1989-11-01

    Reintroduction of animals to the wild to establish free-ranging viable populations is a valuable conservation tool, but ecological skills alone are not enough to ensure a successful reintroduction; also needed to do the work are effectively designed and managed programs. This article suggests general guidelines for organizing and managing reintroduction programs, reviews some basic organizational issues, and considers ways to develop high-performance teams The need to integrate reintroduction programs into their larger interorganizational context is discussed. The reintroduction program's structure must be appropriate for its function and should be properly staffed, led, and buffered from its political environment It should process information well, learn rapidly from its own mistakes, and be creative A high-performance team devotes most of its energies to solving external rather than internal problems

  10. 75 FR 5626 - Cle Elum Dam Fish Passage Facilities and Fish Reintroduction Project; Kittitas County, WA INT-DES...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Cle Elum Dam Fish Passage Facilities and Fish Reintroduction Project; Kittitas... Fish Passage Facilities and Fish Reintroduction Project. The Washington State Department of Ecology is... project to reintroduce fish populations above the dam. The reintroduction plan would involve the...

  11. Conservation Education and Environmental Communication in Great Ape Re-Introduction Projects: Two Cases from the Republic of Congo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Barbara J.; Wall, John E.; Kaya, J. A. Placide

    2012-01-01

    Among species recovery tools available, re-introduction of animals to the wild is one of the more complex. Since the mid-1990s two successful great ape re-introductions have taken place in the Republic of Congo, leading some conservationists to revisit re-introduction as a strategy. This research explored the role of conservation education and…

  12. Comparison of reintroduction and enhancement effects on metapopulation viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Samniqueka J; Bell, Timothy J.; McEachern, Kathryn; Pavlovic, Noel B.

    2015-01-01

    Metapopulation viability depends upon a balance of extinction and colonization of local habitats by a species. Mechanisms that can affect this balance include physical characteristics related to natural processes (e.g. succession) as well as anthropogenic actions. Plant restorations can help to produce favorable metapopulation dynamics and consequently increase viability; however, to date no studies confirm this is true. Population viability analysis (PVA) allows for the use of empirical data to generate theoretical future projections in the form of median time to extinction and probability of extinction. In turn, PVAs can inform and aid the development of conservation, recovery, and management plans. Pitcher's thistle (Cirsium pitcheri) is a dune endemic that exhibited metapopulation dynamics. We projected viability of three natural and two restored populations with demographic data spanning 15–23 years to determine the degree the addition of reintroduced population affects metapopulation viability. The models were validated by comparing observed and projected abundances and adjusting parameters associated with demographic and environmental stochasticity to improve model performance. Our chosen model correctly predicted yearly population abundance for 60% of the population-years. Using that model, 50-year projections showed that the addition of reintroductions increases metapopulation viability. The reintroduction that simulated population performance in early-successional habitats had the maximum benefit. In situ enhancements of existing populations proved to be equally effective. This study shows that restorations can facilitate and improve metapopulation viability of species dependent on metapopulation dynamics for survival with long-term persistence of C. pitcheri in Indiana likely to depend on continued active management.

  13. Assessing the feasibility of native fish reintroductions: a framework applied to threatened bull trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Jason B.; Gallo, Kirsten; Shively, Dan; Allen, Chris; Goehring, Brad

    2011-01-01

    Translocations to recover native fishes have resulted in mixed success. One reason for the failure of these actions is inadequate assessments of their feasibility prior to implementation. Here, we provide a framework developed to assess the feasibility of one type of translocation-reintroduction. The framework was founded on two simple components of feasibility: the potential for recipient habitats to support a reintroduction and the potential of available donor populations to support a reintroduction. Within each component, we developed a series of key questions. The final assessment was based on a scoring system that incorporated consideration of uncertainty in available information. The result was a simple yet transparent system for assessing reintroduction feasibility that can be rapidly applied in practice. We applied this assessment framework to the potential reintroduction of threatened bull trout Salvelinus confluentus into the Clackamas River, Oregon. In this case, the assessment suggested that the degree of feasibility for reintroduction was high based on the potential of recipient habitats and available donor populations. The assessment did not provide a comprehensive treatment of all possible factors that would drive an actual decision to implement a reintroduction,

  14. Como pagar to educacion, 2004-2005 (Funding Your Education, 2004-2005).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Federal Student Aid (ED), Washington, DC.

    This publication, written in Spanish, describes financial aid programs of the U.S. Department of Education and advises students about paying for college. It outlines things a student should ask about college and how to obtain financial aid, whether grants, work-study, or loans. Chapters provide information on: (1) "Education after High School";…

  15. Book review: Advances in reintroduction biology of Australian and New Zealand fauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muths, Erin L.

    2016-01-01

    Reintroduction, and other forms of moving animals around the landscape, is an established action that has been used in the contexts of mitigation, conservation, and salvage. Advances in Reintroduction Biology of Australian and New Zealand Fauna is more than an update of its predecessor (Serena 1995). This book not only enumerates advances in reintroduction but also provides a cogent road map for understanding and applying current knowledge, and for developing future strategies.

  16. Evaluating trade-offs in bull trout reintroduction strategies using structured decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brignon, William R.; Peterson, James T.; Dunham, Jason; Schaller, Howard A.; Schreck, Carl B.

    2018-01-01

    Structured decision making allows reintroduction decisions to be made despite uncertainty by linking reintroduction goals with alternative management actions through predictive models of ecological processes. We developed a decision model to evaluate the trade-offs between six bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) reintroduction decisions with the goal of maximizing the number of adults in the recipient population without reducing the donor population to an unacceptable level. Sensitivity analyses suggested that the decision identity and outcome were most influenced by survival parameters that result in increased adult abundance in the recipient population, increased juvenile survival in the donor and recipient populations, adult fecundity rates, and sex ratio. The decision was least sensitive to survival parameters associated with the captive-reared population, the effect of naivety on released individuals, and juvenile carrying capacity of the reintroduced population. The model and sensitivity analyses can serve as the foundation for formal adaptive management and improved effectiveness, efficiency, and transparency of bull trout reintroduction decisions.

  17. Vegetation dynamics prior to wildlife reintroductions in southern umfurudzi park, Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muposhi, V.; Ndlovu, N.; Gandiwa, E.; Muvengwi, J.; Muboko, N.

    2014-01-01

    Vegetation assessments are critical in the status and success of reintroduction programs and are an important aspect in ecological restoration. Vegetation structure and composition influences the suitability and availability of unique habitats for different wildlife species. The objectives of this

  18. Role of genomics and transcriptomics in selection of reintroduction source populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoping; Johansson, Mattias L; Heath, Daniel D

    2016-10-01

    The use and importance of reintroduction as a conservation tool to return a species to its historical range from which it has been extirpated will increase as climate change and human development accelerate habitat loss and population extinctions. Although the number of reintroduction attempts has increased rapidly over the past 2 decades, the success rate is generally low. As a result of population differences in fitness-related traits and divergent responses to environmental stresses, population performance upon reintroduction is highly variable, and it is generally agreed that selecting an appropriate source population is a critical component of a successful reintroduction. Conservation genomics is an emerging field that addresses long-standing challenges in conservation, and the potential for using novel molecular genetic approaches to inform and improve conservation efforts is high. Because the successful establishment and persistence of reintroduced populations is highly dependent on the functional genetic variation and environmental stress tolerance of the source population, we propose the application of conservation genomics and transcriptomics to guide reintroduction practices. Specifically, we propose using genome-wide functional loci to estimate genetic variation of source populations. This estimate can then be used to predict the potential for adaptation. We also propose using transcriptional profiling to measure the expression response of fitness-related genes to environmental stresses as a proxy for acclimation (tolerance) capacity. Appropriate application of conservation genomics and transcriptomics has the potential to dramatically enhance reintroduction success in a time of rapidly declining biodiversity and accelerating environmental change. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  19. Regional stratospheric warmings in the Pacific-Western Canada (PWC sector during winter 2004/2005: implications for temperatures, winds, chemical constituents and the characterization of the Polar vortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Manson

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The vortex during winter 2004/2005 was interesting for several reasons. It has been described as "cold" stratospherically, with relatively strong westerly winds. Losses of ozone until the final warming in March were considerable, and comparable to the cold 1999–2000 winter. There were also modest warming events, indicated by peaks in 10 hPa zonal mean temperatures at high latitudes, near 1 January and 1 February. Events associated with a significant regional stratospheric warming in the Pacific-Western Canada (PWC sector then began and peaked toward the end of February, providing strong longitudinal variations in dynamical characteristics (Chshyolkova et al., 2007; hereafter C07. The associated disturbed vortex of 25 February was displaced from the pole and either elongated (upper or split into two cyclonic centres (lower. Observations from Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS on Aura are used here to study the thermal characteristics of the stratosphere in the Canadian-US (253° E and Scandinavian-Europe (16° E sectors. Undisturbed high latitude stratopause (55 km zonal mean temperatures during the mid-winter (December–February reached 270 K, warmer than empirical-models such as CIRA-86, suggesting that seasonal polar warming due to dynamical influences affects the high altitude stratosphere as well as the mesosphere. There were also significant stratopause differences between Scandinavia and Canada during the warming events of 1 January and 1 February, with higher temperatures near 275 K at 16° E. During the 25 February "PWC" event a warming occurred at low and middle stratospheric heights (10–30 km: 220 K at 253° E and the stratopause cooled; while over Scandinavia-Europe the stratosphere below ~30 km was relatively cold at 195 K and the stratopause became even warmer (>295 K and lower (~45 km. The zonal winds followed the associated temperature gradients so that the vertical and latitudinal gradients of the winds differed strongly between

  20. Regional stratospheric warmings in the Pacific-Western Canada (PWC sector during winter 2004/2005: implications for temperatures, winds, chemical constituents and the characterization of the Polar vortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Manson

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The vortex during winter 2004/2005 was interesting for several reasons. It has been described as "cold" stratospherically, with relatively strong westerly winds. Losses of ozone until the final warming in March were considerable, and comparable to the cold 1999–2000 winter. There were also modest warming events, indicated by peaks in 10 hPa zonal mean temperatures at high latitudes, near 1 January and 1 February. Events associated with a significant regional stratospheric warming in the Pacific-Western Canada (PWC sector then began and peaked toward the end of February, providing strong longitudinal variations in dynamical characteristics (Chshyolkova et al., 2007; hereafter C07. The associated disturbed vortex of 25 February was displaced from the pole and either elongated (upper or split into two cyclonic centres (lower.

    Observations from Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS on Aura are used here to study the thermal characteristics of the stratosphere in the Canadian-US (253° E and Scandinavian-Europe (16° E sectors. Undisturbed high latitude stratopause (55 km zonal mean temperatures during the mid-winter (December–February reached 270 K, warmer than empirical-models such as CIRA-86, suggesting that seasonal polar warming due to dynamical influences affects the high altitude stratosphere as well as the mesosphere. There were also significant stratopause differences between Scandinavia and Canada during the warming events of 1 January and 1 February, with higher temperatures near 275 K at 16° E. During the 25 February "PWC" event a warming occurred at low and middle stratospheric heights (10–30 km: 220 K at 253° E and the stratopause cooled; while over Scandinavia-Europe the stratosphere below ~30 km was relatively cold at 195 K and the stratopause became even warmer (>295 K and lower (~45 km. The zonal winds followed the associated temperature gradients so that the vertical and latitudinal gradients of the winds differed strongly

  1. Population sex ratios: another consideration in the reintroduction - reinforcement debate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio A Lambertucci

    Full Text Available Reintroduction or reinforcement (RorR of wild populations is a common conservation strategy. Many conservation projects involve the release of individuals of poorly studied species. This may lead to inefficient results or negative impacts on the conservation efforts. Here, we provide new insights into the conservation implications and potential consequences of a skew in the sex ratio of released birds and of the number of birds supplemented for the demography of a long-lived dimorphic bird species, the Andean condor (Vulturgryphus. We demonstrate that a RorR conservation program may be less effective in conserving a species if the sex ratios of the releases and the recipient populations are not considered. We also show that releases can reduce population declines but only if carried out over long periods (i.e., several decades. This can mean high costs for release programs and the added challenge of maintaining programs over time. If RorR programs are to be implemented, bearing in mind the importance of properly assessing their effectiveness, we urge conservation researchers and managers to consider the implications of sex ratio biases for wild populations, and particularly for dimorphic species with sexually despotic behaviour.

  2. Final integrated trip report: site visits to Area 50, Andersen Air Force Base, Guam National Wildlife Refuge, War in the Pacific National Historical Park, Guam, Rota and Saipan, CNMI, 2004-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Steven C.; Pratt, Linda W.

    2006-01-01

    . Although the military mission comes first on these lands, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service assists in protecting native species and habitats. The recovery of limestone forest on Guam for forest bird habitat may require intensive management, including reduction of feral herbivores, propagation, out-planting, weed control, and periodic suppression of herbivorous insects. Research to support these techniques may be best accomplished in small areas where potential limiting factors can easily be experimentally manipulated. Area 50, a 24 ha enclosure, contains a relictual patch of relatively undisturbed limestone forest surrounded by tarmac allowing easy access and management opportunities to control alien mammals and snakes. These species have been periodically managed in the past, but recent typhoons have damaged snake-proofing on the enclosure fence. A new concrete barrier is planned to provide more permanent control opportunities within this enclosed area or another similar area, thereby allowing experimental research for various management regimes. Eradication and control of alien vertebrate and plant pests will provide habitat where native communities can be restored in a small, intensively managed area. The stated aim of this project is to "affect ecosystem restoration through the removal and exclusion of introduced species and the reestablishment and propagation of native species, with focus on the reintroduction of native forest bird species." This will be achieved by constructing a multispecies barrier surrounding the area, coordinated eradication of selected alien species within the area, and possible reintroduction of Mariana Crow, Guam Kingfisher, and Guam Rail. This barrier also allows experimental research questions to be addressed within the small enclosure around Area 50 that may be applied to manage and restore the larger areas of limestone forest on northern Guam and also similar forests on other islands of the Marianas.

  3. Benefit of infliximab reintroduction after successive failure of infliximab and adalimumab in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagniere, C; Beaugerie, L; Pariente, B; Seksik, P; Amiot, A; Abitbol, V; Allez, M; Cosnes, J; Sokol, H

    2015-04-01

    Infliximab [IFX] and adalimumab [ADA] are effective in Crohn's disease [CD] for induction and maintenance therapy. However, high annual rate of discontinuation for loss of response or intolerance may lead to a switch to another anti-tumor necrosis factor agent. Patients with successive failure to IFX and ADA are becoming more frequent. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and the tolerance of re-treatment with IFX in CD patients who successively failed IFX and ADA. A total of 61 patients with CD who received and discontinued successively IFX and ADA, and who were re-exposed to IFX, were identified in four French tertiary centers and retrospectively analyzed. Clinical data, follow-up and outcome were abstracted from medical records. Median treatment duration after reintroduction was 16 months, and probability of remaining under IFX was 60% and 51%, respectively, at 12 and 24 months. In all 29 patients discontinued the second IFX treatment due to intolerance [13], primary non-response [8], loss of response [7] or patient's wish [1]. Remission was achieved in 42% at week 6-8 after IFX re-induction, and was predictive of better long-term response [p = 0.006]. In multivariate analysis, receiving co-immunosuppression in both first and second IFX treatments [p = 0.04] and shorter interval between first and second IFX treatments [p = 0.017] were independently associated with longer duration of second IFX treatment. For CD patients who successively failed IFX and ADA, reintroducing IFX is feasible and often clinically efficient, particularly in patients who received co-immunosuppression during both first and second IFX treatments. Copyright © 2014 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Influence of space use on fitness and the reintroduction success of the Laysan teal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, M.H.; Hatfield, J.S.; Laniawe, L.P.; Vekasy, M.S.; Klavitter, J.L.; Berkowitz, P.; Crampton, L.H.; Walters, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Translocation is an important tool for wildlife conservation and biodiversity restoration, but an inefficient one because of the unpredictability of success. Predictors of success such as habitat quality of the release site and number of individuals released have been identified, but the dynamics of successful translocations remain poorly understood. In particular, little is known about the relationship of individual post-release movements to population establishment. In 2004, Laysan teal Anas laysanensis were reintroduced by translocating 20 wild birds from Laysan Island to Midway Atoll. Twenty-two additional wild founders were brought the next year. We monitored the survival, reproductive success and movements of the 42 translocated individuals and their offspring for 4 years. Additionally, we monitored population size from 2004 to 2010. Unlike most translocations, we did not observe elevated post-release mortality despite flight-feather trimming to prevent immediate dispersal off-island: first year survival was > 90% and survival rates until 2009 were 0.65±0.08 for founding adults. Laysan teal flew between the two main islands of Midway Atoll, and offspring had significantly larger maximum movement distances than founders. We monitored 84 nests and observed a significant, negative relationship of home range size to productivity for founding females. Flightless founders did not show fidelity to their release sites, but had strong fidelity to annual home ranges after attaining flight. Although we observed a component Allee effect on mate-finding, this did not translate into a demographic Allee effect, and generally, the high fitness of founders contributed substantially to successful population establishment. Laysan teal abundance increased linearly until 2009, but showed evidence of population regulation afterwards. The population estimate was 473 (95% confidence interval 439–508) in 2010. On the much larger main Hawaiian Islands, we expect greater post

  5. REINTRODUCTION OF ASTACUS ASTACUS L. IN EAST TYROL, AUSTRIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SINT D.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In Tyrolean like in other European freshwaters, crayfish populations decreased in numbers and qualities. They are today regarded as endangered animals. The Astacus astacus (Linnaeus, 1758 population of historical evidence in Tristacher See and its out flowing stream Tristacher Seebach (mentioned already by Emperor Maximilian I in 1504 became extinct in the late 1990s. After the restoration of the stream we started a species conservation programme with various specific protection measures, including breeding and restocking of young-of-the-year and adult A. astacus. Females, after having released their young in the hatchery, were stocked together with males in a 200-m-section of Tristacher Seebach, previously populated by A. astacus. In October, the young-of-theyear crayfish were released in another area of the same stream. To show the importance of habitat diversity and shelter, four sites for introduction were selected describing a gradient of habitat diversity. We monitored general characteristics of the population (sex, size, densities and compared them to habitat conditions. Individual crayfish were tagged with gloss-paint pens to allow an observation of their movements between the different sections over the summer months. We found significant results when migration behaviour, population assemblage and habitat conditions were compared. Males frequently moved longer distances than females. Migration length corresponded to the gradient of available structures and shelter. Heterogeneous riprap was somewhat preferred to artificial shelter like bricks or plastic tubes. Sections without additional shelter showed almost no presence of crayfish. Sex and size distribution within assemblages appeared also to be affected by habitat conditions. Our results indicate the importance of monitoring in species reintroduction projects, as this research demonstrated the immediate effect and importance of habitat structure and affirmed the success of the

  6. Microsites Matter: Improving the Success of Rare Species Reintroductions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter W Dunwiddie

    Full Text Available Our study was undertaken to better understand how to increase the success rates of recovery plantings of a rare hemiparasite, golden paintbrush (Castilleja levisecta-Orobanchaceae. This species is endemic to western Washington and Oregon, USA, and southwestern British Columbia, Canada. Over 5000 golden paintbrush plants were outplanted as plugs in 2007 at six different native prairie sites that were considered to be suitable habitat, based on general evaluations of vegetation and soil conditions. Outplantings were installed at regular intervals along transects up to 1 km long to include a range of conditions occurring at each site. All plantings were re-examined five years later. The patchy distribution of surviving plugs and new recruits within each reintroduction site suggested success is strongly influenced by microsite characteristics. Indicator species analysis of taxa growing in microsites around outplanted golden paintbrush identified species that were positively or negatively associated with paintbrush survival. Species such as Festuca roemeri, Eriophyllum lanatum, and Viola adunca were strong indicators at some sites; non-natives such as Hypochaeris radicata and Teesdalia nudicaulis tended to be frequent negative indicators. Overall, higher richness of native perennial forbs was strongly correlated with both survival and flowering of golden paintbrush, a pattern that may reflect interactions of this hemiparasite with the immediately surrounding plant community. Topographic position also influenced outcomes, with greater survival occurring on mounds and in swales, where soils generally were deeper. Our findings suggest that assessments of site suitability based on vegetation alone, and coarser, site-level assessments that do not characterize heterogeneity at the microsite scale, may not be strong predictors of restoration success over the longer term and in sites with variability in vegetation and soils. By identifying suitable

  7. Gradual reintroduction of oxygen reduces reperfusion injury in cat stomach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, M.A.; Wadhwa, S.S. (Univ. of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia))

    1988-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that oxygen-derived free radicals are responsible for a major portion of ischemia-reperfusion injury in the stomach. The oxygen radicals are produced during perfusion when oxygen delivery to the tissue increases. In the present study the authors investigate the effect on mucosal injury of regulating the rate of reintroduction of oxygen to the stomach after ischemia. Local gastric ischemia was achieved by reducing celiac artery pressure to 30 mmHg for 1 h. Ischemic injury was assessed by measuring the loss of {sup 51}Cr-labeled red blood cells across the gastric mucosa. Mucosal blood loss was negligible before and during the ischemia period but increased during reperfusion. When blood flow to the stomach was gradually returned to normal after ischemia, the mucosal blood loss was reduced. If the stomach was vascularly perfused with low Po{sub 2} blood for 1 h after ischemia before being returned to normal arterial perfusion, the mucosal blood loss was also reduced. When the stomach was made hypoxemic for 1 h rather than ischemic by perfusing the vasculature with low Po{sub 2} blood then reperfused with normoxic blood, there was very little mucosal bleeding. The data indicate that gastric mucosal bleeding after ischemia is reduced if the tissue is returned slowly to a normal Po{sub 2}. These findings support the concept that reperfusion injury is due largely to the production of oxygen radicals. The low level of injury produced by hypoxemia indicates that hypoxia per se makes only a minor contribution to reperfusion injury in the stomach.

  8. Critical steps to ensure the successful reintroduction of the Eurasian red squirrel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vieira, B. P

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Wildlife reintroduction strategies aim to establish viable long–term populations, promote conservation awareness and provide economic benefits for local communities. In Portugal, the Eurasian red squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris became extinct in the 16th century and was reintroduced in urban parks in the 1990s, mainly for aesthetic and leisure purposes. We evaluated the success of this reintroduction in two urban parks and here described the critical steps. We assessed habitat use, population density and abundance, and management steps carried out during reintroduction projects. Reintroductions have been successful to some extent given squirrels are present 20 years after release. However, populations in both parks are declining due to the lack of active management and poor quality habitat. Successful reintroduction of Eurasian red squirrel in areas without competition of alien tree squirrels involves three critical main stages. The pre–project stage includes studies on habitat quality, genetic proximity between donors and closest wild population, and health of donor stocks. In the release stage, the number of individuals released will depend on resource variability, and the hard release technique is an effective and economically viable method. Post–release activities should evaluate adaptation, mitigate mortality, monitor the need for supplementary feeding, provide veterinary support, and promote public awareness and education.

  9. Historical range, extirpation and prospects for reintroduction of saigas in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shaopeng; Milner-Gulland, E. J.; Singh, Navinder J.; Chu, Hongjun; Li, Chunwang; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Zhigang

    2017-03-01

    An assessment of historical distribution patterns and potential reintroduction sites is important for reducing the risk of reintroduction failure of endangered species. The saiga antelope, Saiga tatarica, was extirpated in the mid-20th century in China. A captive population was established in the Wuwei Endangered Wildlife Breeding Centre (WEWBC) in the 1980s. Reintroduction is planned, but so far, no action has been taken. In this study, we delineated the historical distribution and potential reintroduction areas of saigas in China, using a literature review, interviews and predictive modelling. Results suggest that most of the seasonally suitable areas are non-overlapping, and China may have been a peripheral part of the main saiga range. WEWBC is not an ideal reintroduction site due to its low habitat suitability. Furthermore, we infer that two different movement patterns existed historically (regular migration and nomadic wandering). Our results demonstrate the challenges of restoring a free-ranging, self-sustaining saiga population in China. We recommend the setting up of additional breeding centres in protected areas within the potential saiga range in Xinjiang, and the development of a national action plan to provide a framework for the future recovery of the species.

  10. Modelling riverine habitat for robust redhorse: assessment for reintroduction of an imperilled species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisk, J. M.; Kwak, Thomas J.; Heise, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    A critical component of a species reintroduction is assessment of contemporary habitat suitability. The robust redhorse, Moxostoma robustum (Cope), is an imperilled catostomid that occupies a restricted range in the south-eastern USA. A remnant population persists downstream of Blewett Falls Dam, the terminal dam in the Pee Dee River, North Carolina. Reintroduction upstream of Blewett Falls Dam may promote long-term survival of this population. Tillery Dam is the next hydroelectric facility upstream, which includes a 30 rkm lotic reach. Habitat suitability indices developed in the Pee Dee River were applied to model suitable habitat for proposed minimum flows downstream of Tillery Dam. Modelling results indicate that the Tillery reach provides suitable robust redhorse habitat, with spawning habitat more abundant than non-spawning habitat. Sensitivity analyses suggested that suitable water depth and substrate were limiting physical habitat variables. These results can inform decisions on flow regulation and guide planning for reintroduction of the robust redhorse and other species.

  11. What limits the spread of two congeneric butterfly species after their reintroduction: quality or spatial arrangement of habitat?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langevelde, van F.; Wynhoff, I.

    2009-01-01

    Population growth and spread of recently reintroduced species is crucial for the success of their reintroduction. We analysed what limits the spread of two congeneric butterfly species Maculinea teleius and Maculinea nausithous, over 10 years following their reintroduction. During this time, their

  12. Findings from a survey of wildlife reintroduction practitioners [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2or

    OpenAIRE

    Sutton, Alexandra E.; Roel Lopez

    2014-01-01

    Wildlife reintroduction programs are a type of conservation initiative that seek to re-establish viable populations of a species in areas from which they have been extirpated or become extinct. Past efforts to improve the outcomes of reintroduction have focused heavily on overcoming ecological challenges, with little attention paid to the potential influence of leadership, management, and other aspects of reintroduction. This 2009 survey of reintroduction practitioners identified several key ...

  13. Linear shrinkage test: justification for its reintroduction as a standard South African test method

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sampson, LR

    2009-06-04

    Full Text Available Several problems with the linear shrinkage test specified in Method A4 of the THM 1 1979 were addressed as part of this investigation in an effort to improve the alleged poor reproducibility of the test and justify its reintroduction into THM 1. A...

  14. Hospitalizations for intussusception before and after the reintroduction of rotavirus vaccine in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zickafoose, Joseph S; Benneyworth, Brian D; Riebschleger, Meredith P; Espinosa, Claudia M; Davis, Matthew M

    2012-04-01

    To determine whether hospital discharges for intussusception in children younger than 1 year have changed since the reintroduction of rotavirus vaccine in the United States. Serial cross-sectional analysis. US hospitals. Children younger than 1 year with a discharge diagnosis of intussusception identified in the Kids' Inpatient Database, a series of nationally representative data sets of pediatric hospital discharges in the United States with 4 available years prior to vaccine reintroduction (1997, 2000, 2003, and 2006) and 1 year after (2009). Hospital discharge before vs after rotavirus vaccine reintroduction. Total number and rate of hospital discharges for infants younger than 1 year with a diagnosis of intussusception (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code 560.0). From 1997 to 2006, there was no change in the total number of hospital discharges for intussusception, with a small decrease in the rate of intussusception discharges (41.6 [95% CI, 36.7-46.5] to 36.5 [95% CI, 31.7-41.2] per 100,000 infants). Based on the trend, the predicted rate of discharges for intussusception in 2009 was 36.0 (95% CI, 30.2-41.8) per 100,000 infants. The measured rate of hospital discharges for intussusception in 2009 was 33.3 (95% CI, 29.0-37.6) per 100,000 infants. The reintroduction of rotavirus vaccine since 2006 has not resulted in a detectable increase in the number of hospital discharges for intussusception among US infants.

  15. Glucose reintroduction triggers the activation of Nrf2 during experimental ischemia reperfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crean, Daniel; Felice, Luca; Taylor, Cormac T; Rabb, Hamid; Jennings, Paul; Leonard, Martin O

    Reperfusion results in a rapid reintroduction of oxygen, glucose, and other restricted components to an ischemic tissue. It brings with it not only the necessary components for cell survival but also a burst of oxidative stress and cellular damage. In this study, our primary aims were to investigate

  16. Activity-specific ecological niche models for planning reintroductions of California condors (Gymnogyps californianus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse D’Elia; Susan M. Haig; Matthew Johnson; Richard Young; Bruce G. Marcot

    2015-01-01

    Ecological niche models can be a useful tool to identify candidate reintroduction sites for endangered species but have been infrequently used for this purpose. In this paper, we (1) develop activity-specific ecological niche models (nesting, roosting, and feeding) for the critically endangered California condor (Gymnogyps californianus) to aid in...

  17. Historical perspective on the reintroduction of the fisher and American marten in Michigan and Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronwyn W. Williams; Jonathan H. Gilbert; Patrick A. Zollner

    2007-01-01

    Management of mustelid species such as fishers and martens requires an understanding of the history of local populations. This is particularly true in areas where populations were extirpated and restored through reintroduction efforts. During the late 19th and 20th centuries, fishers (Martes pennanti) and American martens (Martes americana...

  18. Mapping habitat suitability for at-risk plants and its implications for restoration and reintroduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Questad; J.R. Kellner; K. Kinney; S. Cordell; G.P. Asner; J. Thaxton; J. Diep; A. Uowolo; S. Brooks; N. Inman-Narahari; S. Evans; B. Tucker

    2014-01-01

    The conservation of species at risk of extinction requires data to support decisions at landscape to regional scales. There is a need for information that can assist with locating suitable habitats in fragmented and degraded landscapes to aid the reintroduction of at-risk plant species. In addition, desiccation and water stress can be significant barriers to the...

  19. Silvicultural and logistical considerations associated with the pending reintroduction of American chestnut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass F. Jacobs

    2010-01-01

    Traditional breeding for blight resistance has led to the potential to restore American chestnut (Castanea dentata (Marsh.) Borkh.) to Eastern United States forests using a blight resistant hybrid chestnut tree. With prospects of pending wide-scale reintroduction, restoration strategies based on ecological and biological characteristics of the...

  20. Timing and synchrony of births in bighorn sheep: implications for reintroduction and conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, Jericho C.; Olson, Daniel D.; Shannon, Justin M.; Bowyer, R. Terry; Klaver, Robert W.; Flinders, Jerran T.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Timing (mean birthdate) and synchrony (variance around that date) of births can influence survival of young and growth in ungulate populations. Some restored populations of ungulates may not adjust these life-history characteristics to environments of release sites until several years after release, which may influence success of reintroductions.

  1. Ecological effects of re-introduction of salmonid spawning gravel in lowland Danish streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Lauge; Kristensen, Esben; Kronvang, Brian

    2009-01-01

    recently been conducted in many streams and rivers. However, systematic monitoring of these spawning gravel restoration projects is limited. The overall aim of this paper was to evaluate gravel reintroduction as a long-term salmonid rehabilitation method in 32 lowland streams. Displacement of gravel...

  2. Modeling habitat connectivity to inform reintroductions: a case study with the Chiricahua Leopard Frog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarchow, Christopher J.; Hossack, Blake R.; Sigafus, Brent H.; Schwalbe, Cecil R.; Muths, Erin L.

    2016-01-01

    Managing species with intensive tools such as reintroduction may focus on single sites or entire landscapes. For vagile species, long-term persistence will require colonization and establishment in neighboring habitats. Therefore, both suitable colonization sites and suitable dispersal corridors between sites are required. Assessment of landscapes for both requirements can contribute to ranking and selection of reintroduction areas, thereby improving management success. Following eradication of invasive American Bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus) from most of Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge (BANWR; Arizona, United States), larval Chiricahua Leopard Frogs (Lithobates chiricahuensis) from a private pond were reintroduced into three stock ponds. Populations became established at all three reintroduction sites followed by colonization of neighboring ponds in subsequent years. Our aim was to better understand colonization patterns by the federally threatened L. chiricahuensis which could help inform other reintroduction efforts. We assessed the influence of four landscape features on colonization. Using surveys from 2007 and information about the landscape, we developed a habitat connectivity model, based on electrical circuit theory, that identified potential dispersal corridors after explicitly accounting for imperfect detection of frogs. Landscape features provided little insight into why some sites were colonized and others were not, results that are likely because of the uniformity of the BANWR landscape. While corridor modeling may be effective in more-complex landscapes, our results suggest focusing on local habitat will be more useful at BANWR. We also illustrate that existing data, even when limited in spatial or temporal resolution, can provide information useful in formulating management actions.

  3. Phoenix flagships: Conservation values and guanaco reintroduction in an anthropogenic landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindon, Adrien; Root-Bernstein, Meredith

    2015-09-01

    Multiple forms of valuation contribute to public acceptance of conservation projects. Here, we consider how esthetic, intrinsic, and utilitarian values contribute to public attitudes toward a proposed reintroduction of guanaco (Lama guanicoe) in a silvopastoral system of central Chile. The nexus among landscape perceptions and valuations, support for reintroductions, and management of anthropogenic habitats is of increasing interest due to the proliferation of conservation approaches combining some or all of these elements, including rewilding and reconciliation ecology, for example. We assessed attitudes and values through an online questionnaire for residents of Santiago, Chile, using multiple methods including photo-montages and Likert scale assessments of value-based statements. We also combined the questionnaire approach with key informant interviews. We find strong support for the reintroduction of guanacos into the Chilean silvopastoral system ('espinal') in terms of esthetic and intrinsic values but less in terms of utilitarian values. Respondents preferred a scenario of espinal with guanacos and expressed interest in visiting it, as well as support for the reintroduction project on the basis that guanacos are native to central Chile. We suggest that reintroduced guanacos could serve as a 'phoenix flagship species' for espinal conservation, that is, a flagship species that has gone regionally extinct and is known but not associated with the region in the cultural memory. We consider how the lack of local cultural identity can both help and weaken phoenix flagships, which we expect to become more common.

  4. Findings from a survey of wildlife reintroduction practitioners [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2or

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra E. Sutton

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wildlife reintroduction programs are a type of conservation initiative that seek to re-establish viable populations of a species in areas from which they have been extirpated or become extinct. Past efforts to improve the outcomes of reintroduction have focused heavily on overcoming ecological challenges, with little attention paid to the potential influence of leadership, management, and other aspects of reintroduction. This 2009 survey of reintroduction practitioners identified several key areas of leadership and management that may deserve further study, including: (i the potential value of reintroduction partnerships for improving programmatic outcomes; (ii the potential management value of autonomy vs. hierarchy in organizational structure; (iii gaps in perceptions of success in reintroduction; and (iv the need for improved evaluations of reintroduction programs and outcomes.

  5. Performance measures for a Mississippi River reintroduction into the forested wetlands of Maurepas Swamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Ken W.; Shaffer, Gary P.; Keim, Richard F.; Chambers, Jim L.; Wood, William B.; Hartley, Stephen B.

    2017-06-09

    The use of freshwater diversions (river reintroductions) from the Mississippi River as a restoration tool to rehabilitate Louisiana coastal wetlands has been promoted widely since the first such diversion at Caernarvon became operational in the early 1990s. To date, aside from the Bonnet Carré Spillway (which is designed and operated for flood control), there are only four operational Mississippi River freshwater diversions (two gated structures and two siphons) in coastal Louisiana, and they all target salinity intrusion, shellfish management, and (or) the enhancement of the integrity of marsh habitat. River reintroductions carry small sediment loads for various design reasons, but they can be effective in delivering fresh­water to combat saltwater intrusion and increase the delivery of nutrients and suspended fine-grained sediments to receiving wetlands. River reintroductions may be an ideal restoration tool for targeting coastal swamp forest habitat; much of the area of swamp forest habitat in coastal Louisiana is undergo­ing saltwater intrusion, high rates of submergence, and lack of riverine flow leading to reduced concentrations of important nutrients and suspended sediments, which sustain growth and regeneration, help to aerate swamp soils, and remove toxic compounds from the rhizosphere.The State of Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restora­tion Authority (CPRA) has made it a priority to establish a small freshwater river diversion into a coastal swamp forest located between Baton Rouge and New Orleans, Louisiana, to reintroduce Mississippi River water to Maurepas Swamp. While a full understanding of how a coastal swamp forest will respond to new freshwater loading through a Mississippi River reintroduction is unknown, this report provides guidance based on the available literature for establishing performance measures that can be used for evaluating the effectiveness of a Mississippi River reintroduction into the forested wetlands of Maurepas Swamp

  6. A new parameterization for integrated population models to document amphibian reintroductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Adam; Pearl, Christopher; Adams, Michael J.; Peterson, James T.

    2017-01-01

    Managers are increasingly implementing reintroduction programs as part of a global effort to alleviate amphibian declines. Given uncertainty in factors affecting populations and a need to make recurring decisions to achieve objectives, adaptive management is a useful component of these efforts. A major impediment to the estimation of demographic rates often used to parameterize and refine decision-support models is that life-stage-specific monitoring data are frequently sparse for amphibians. We developed a new parameterization for integrated population models to match the ecology of amphibians and capitalize on relatively inexpensive monitoring data to document amphibian reintroductions. We evaluate the capability of this model by fitting it to Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa) monitoring data collected from 2007 to 2014 following their reintroduction within the Klamath Basin, Oregon, USA. The number of egg masses encountered and the estimated adult and metamorph abundances generally increased following reintroduction. We found that survival probability from egg to metamorph ranged from 0.01 in 2008 to 0.09 in 2009 and was not related to minimum spring temperatures, metamorph survival probability ranged from 0.13 in 2010–2011 to 0.86 in 2012–2013 and was positively related to mean monthly temperatures (logit-scale slope = 2.37), adult survival probability was lower for founders (0.40) than individuals recruited after reintroduction (0.56), and the mean number of egg masses per adult female was 0.74. Our study is the first to test hypotheses concerning Oregon spotted frog egg-to-metamorph and metamorph-to-adult transition probabilities in the wild and document their response at multiple life stages following reintroduction. Furthermore, we provide an example to illustrate how the structure of our integrated population model serves as a useful foundation for amphibian decision-support models within adaptive management programs. The integration of multiple

  7. Assessing Potential Habitat and Carrying Capacity for Reintroduction of Plains Bison (Bison bison bison) in Banff National Park

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Steenweg, Robin; Hebblewhite, Mark; Gummer, David; Low, Brian; Hunt, Bill

    2016-01-01

    .... Fences and direct management make range expansion by most bison impossible. Reintroduction of bison into previously occupied areas that remain suitable, therefore, is critical for bison recovery in North America...

  8. [Reintroduction of E. granulosus by import of cows in the Netherlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalten, Monique; Züchner, Lothar; Bruinier, Edzart; Holzhauer, Menno; Wouda, Willem; Borgsteede, Fred; Sprong, Hein; van der Giessen, Joke

    2008-11-01

    Since East European countries joined the EU, the import of both dairy and beef cows from these countries increased considerably. Based on the identification and registration system it turned out that in the period from May until December 2007 about 200 cows per month were imported from Romania. These animals were either slaughtered immediately or in autumn. In autumn, cysts were noticed both in slaughtered cows during meat inspection and in deceased animals (originated from Romania) during postmortem investigation performed by the Animal Health Service. Because cysts were strongly reminiscent of Echinococcus granulosus hydatid cysts, samples were sent to the authorized laboratory (National Reference Laboratory of Parasitology), where the reintroduction of this potentially zoonotic parasitic infection has been confirmed. The risks of reintroduction of E. granulosus in the Netherlands are described.

  9. Feasibility study for kulan (Equus hemionus kulan) reintroduction into the central steppe of Kazakhstan

    OpenAIRE

    Kaczensky, Petra; Doldin, Ruslan; Enke, Dag; Linnell, John D. C.; Lukanovsky, Oleg; Salemgareyev, Albert R.; Sidorova, Tetyana V.; Sklyarenko, Sergey; Kisebaev, Talgat; Walzer, Chris; Ward, Stephanie; Zuther, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Kaczensky, P., Doldin, R., Enke, D., Linnell, J. D. C., Lukanovsky, O., Salemgareyev A. R. Sidorova, T. V., Sklyarenko, S., Kisebaev, T., Walzer, C., Ward, S., Zuther, S. 2017. Feasibility study for kulan (Equus hemionus kulan) reintroduction into the central steppe of Kazakhstan. - NINA Report 1366. 69 pp. Asiatic wild ass, or kulan (Equus hemionous), were once a key species in the assemblage of large herbivores (along with saiga antelope, several gazelle species and wild horses) that ra...

  10. Acute Respiratory Disease in US Army Trainees 3 Years after Reintroduction of Adenovirus Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Army Public Health Center (Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD), and the NHRC FRI program have provided...The Army Public Health Center collected weekly ARD-SP data from the Ar- my’s 4 IET sites (Fort Benning, GA; Fort Jackson, SC; Fort Leonard Wood...Disease in US Army Trainees 3 Years after Reintroduction of Adenovirus Vaccine1 Author affiliations: US Army Public Health Center , Aberdeen

  11. An Investment Case to Prevent the Reintroduction of Malaria in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shretta, Rima; Baral, Ranju; Avanceña, Anton L V; Fox, Katie; Dannoruwa, Asoka Premasiri; Jayanetti, Ravindra; Jeyakumaran, Arumainayagam; Hasantha, Rasike; Peris, Lalanthika; Premaratne, Risintha

    2017-03-01

    AbstractSri Lanka has made remarkable gains in reducing the burden of malaria, recording no locally transmitted malaria cases since November 2012 and zero deaths since 2007. The country was recently certified as malaria free by World Health Organization in September 2016. Sri Lanka, however, continues to face a risk of resurgence due to persistent receptivity and vulnerability to malaria transmission. Maintaining the gains will require continued financing to the malaria program to maintain the activities aimed at preventing reintroduction. This article presents an investment case for malaria in Sri Lanka by estimating the costs and benefits of sustaining investments to prevent the reintroduction of the disease. An ingredient-based approach was used to estimate the cost of the existing program. The cost of potential resurgence was estimated using a hypothetical scenario in which resurgence assumed to occur, if all prevention of reintroduction activities were halted. These estimates were used to compute a benefit-cost ratio and a return on investment. The total economic cost of the malaria program in 2014 was estimated at U.S. dollars (USD) 0.57 per capita per year with a financial cost of USD0.37 per capita. The cost of potential malaria resurgence was, however, much higher estimated at 13 times the cost of maintaining existing activities or 21 times based on financial costs alone. This evidence suggests a substantial return on investment providing a compelling argument for advocacy for continued prioritization of funding for the prevention of reintroduction of malaria in Sri Lanka.

  12. Parasite invasion following host reintroduction: a case study of Yellowstone's wolves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almberg, Emily S; Cross, Paul C; Dobson, Andrew P; Smith, Douglas W; Hudson, Peter J

    2012-10-19

    Wildlife reintroductions select or treat individuals for good health with the expectation that these individuals will fare better than infected animals. However, these individuals, new to their environment, may also be particularly susceptible to circulating infections and this may result in high morbidity and mortality, potentially jeopardizing the goals of recovery. Here, using the reintroduction of the grey wolf (Canis lupus) into Yellowstone National Park as a case study, we address the question of how parasites invade a reintroduced population and consider the impact of these invasions on population performance. We find that several viral parasites rapidly invaded the population inside the park, likely via spillover from resident canid species, and we contrast these with the slower invasion of sarcoptic mange, caused by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei. The spatio-temporal patterns of mange invasion were largely consistent with patterns of host connectivity and density, and we demonstrate that the area of highest resource quality, supporting the greatest density of wolves, is also the region that appears most susceptible to repeated disease invasion and parasite-induced declines. The success of wolf reintroduction appears not to have been jeopardized by infectious disease, but now shows signs of regulation or limitation modulated by parasites.

  13. Parasite invasion following host reintroduction: a case of Yellowstone’s wolves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Paul C.; Almberg, Emily S.; Dobson, Andrew P.; Smith, Douglas W.; Hudson, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Wildlife reintroductions select or treat individuals for good health with the expectation that these individuals will fare better than infected animals. However, these individuals, new to their environment, may also be particularly susceptible to circulating infections and this may result in high morbidity and mortality, potentially jeopardizing the goals of recovery. Here, using the reintroduction of the grey wolf (Canis lupus) into Yellowstone National Park as a case study, we address the question of how parasites invade a reintroduced population and consider the impact of these invasions on population performance. We find that several viral parasites rapidly invaded the population inside the park, likely via spillover from resident canid species, and we contrast these with the slower invasion of sarcoptic mange, caused by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei. The spatio-temporal patterns of mange invasion were largely consistent with patterns of host connectivity and density, and we demonstrate that the area of highest resource quality, supporting the greatest density of wolves, is also the region that appears most susceptible to repeated disease invasion and parasite-induced declines. The success of wolf reintroduction appears not to have been jeopardized by infectious disease, but now shows signs of regulation or limitation modulated by parasites.

  14. Parasite invasion following host reintroduction: a case study of Yellowstone's wolves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almberg, Emily S.; Cross, Paul C.; Dobson, Andrew P.; Smith, Douglas W.; Hudson, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Wildlife reintroductions select or treat individuals for good health with the expectation that these individuals will fare better than infected animals. However, these individuals, new to their environment, may also be particularly susceptible to circulating infections and this may result in high morbidity and mortality, potentially jeopardizing the goals of recovery. Here, using the reintroduction of the grey wolf (Canis lupus) into Yellowstone National Park as a case study, we address the question of how parasites invade a reintroduced population and consider the impact of these invasions on population performance. We find that several viral parasites rapidly invaded the population inside the park, likely via spillover from resident canid species, and we contrast these with the slower invasion of sarcoptic mange, caused by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei. The spatio-temporal patterns of mange invasion were largely consistent with patterns of host connectivity and density, and we demonstrate that the area of highest resource quality, supporting the greatest density of wolves, is also the region that appears most susceptible to repeated disease invasion and parasite-induced declines. The success of wolf reintroduction appears not to have been jeopardized by infectious disease, but now shows signs of regulation or limitation modulated by parasites. PMID:22966139

  15. Alternaria-aantasting van aardappelknollen : evaluatie 2004/2005

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, H.T.A.M.; Remijn, J.F.A.; Goorden, P.

    2005-01-01

    In de eerste maanden van 2005 werden diverse aardappeltelers geconfronteerd met veel Alternaria in de knollen. Door zowel DLV Plant, PPO-AGV als Cebeco Agrochemie zijn met name in het Zuid Westen monsters van aardappelen met problemen opgestuurd naar diverse laboratoria waaronder Plant Research

  16. Center for Network Planning Status Report 2004-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Brun; Pedersen, Jens Myrup; Jensen, Michael

    CNP, Center for Network Planning, was founded January 29th in 2004 based on an agree-ment between the Institutes of Business Studies, Electronic Systems, Mathematics and Planning at Aalborg University and hosted by the department of Control Engineering at the Institute of Electronic Systems. CNP ...... an almost complete state of the art technical framework for its activities as well as an international contact network. The CNP status report 2004 – 2005 summarises the main activities conducted, results achieved and outlines the visions and plans for the period to follow....... was established in order to strengthen the base for research, special studies, educa-tion, training and dissemination of results within the field of Network Planning and with special focus on the development of the next generation ICT Infrastructure. CNP is a member of CTIF, Centre for TeleInFrastruktur, ensuring...

  17. End-of-year-closure 2004/2005

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Department

    2004-01-01

    As announced in Weekly Bulletin Nº 3/2004, the Laboratory will be closed from Saturday 18 December 2004 to Sunday 2 January 2005 inclusive. This period consists of 16 days: 4 days' official holiday, i.e. 24, 25 and 31 December 2004 and 1st January 2005; 6 days' special paid leave in accordance with Article R II 4.34 of the Staff Regulations, i.e. 20, 21, 22, 27, 28, and 29 December 2004; 1 Saturday, i.e. 18 December 2004; 2 days, 23 December 2004 to compensate for 25 December 2004 and 30 December 2004 to compensate for 1st January 2005 (Article R II 4.33 of the Staff Regulations); 3 Sundays, i.e. 19 and 26 December 2004 and 2 January 2005. The first working day in the New Year will be Monday 3 January 2005. Further information will be available from Department Secretariats, specifically concerning the conditions applicable to members of the personnel who are required to work during this period. Human Resources Department Tel. 74474

  18. Football injuries during European Championships 2004-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldén, Markus; Hägglund, Martin; Ekstrand, Jan

    2007-09-01

    The risk of injury in football is high, but few studies have compared men's and women's football injuries. The purpose of this prospective study was to analyse the exposure and injury characteristics of European Championships in football and to compare data for men, women and male youth players. The national teams of all 32 countries (672 players) that qualified to the men's European Championship 2004, the women's European Championship 2005 and the men's Under-19 European Championship 2005 were studied. Individual training and match exposure was documented during the tournaments as well as time loss injuries. The overall injury incidence was 14 times higher during match play than during training (34.6 vs. 2.4 injuries per 1000 h, P injuries per 1000 h, P = 0.02). Non-contact mechanisms were ascribed for 41% of the match injuries. One-fifth of all injuries were severe with absence from play longer than 4 weeks. In conclusion, injury incidences during the European Championships studied were very similar and it seems thus that the risk of injury in international football is at least not higher in women than in men. The teams eliminated in the women's championship had a significantly higher match injury incidence than the teams going to the final stage. Finally, the high frequency of non-contact injury is worrying from a prevention perspective and should be addressed in future studies.

  19. Predicting factors for malaria re-introduction: an applied model in an elimination setting to prevent malaria outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Mansour; Shoghli, Alireza; Kolifarhood, Goodarz; Tabatabaei, Seyed Mehdi; Amlashi, Morteza; Mohammadi, Mahdi

    2016-03-02

    Malaria re-introduction is a challenge in elimination settings. To prevent re-introduction, receptivity, vulnerability, and health system capacity of foci should be monitored using appropriate tools. This study aimed to design an applicable model to monitor predicting factors of re-introduction of malaria in highly prone areas. This exploratory, descriptive study was conducted in a pre-elimination setting with a high-risk of malaria transmission re-introduction. By using nominal group technique and literature review, a list of predicting indicators for malaria re-introduction and outbreak was defined. Accordingly, a checklist was developed and completed in the field for foci affected by re-introduction and for cleared-up foci as a control group, for a period of 12 weeks before re-introduction and for the same period in the previous year. Using field data and analytic hierarchical process (AHP), each variable and its sub-categories were weighted, and by calculating geometric means for each sub-category, score of corresponding cells of interaction matrices, lower and upper threshold of different risks strata, including low and mild risk of re-introduction and moderate and high risk of malaria outbreaks, were determined. The developed predictive model was calibrated through resampling with different sets of explanatory variables using R software. Sensitivity and specificity of the model were calculated based on new samples. Twenty explanatory predictive variables of malaria re-introduction were identified and a predictive model was developed. Unpermitted immigrants from endemic neighbouring countries were determined as a pivotal factor (AHP score: 0.181). Moreover, quality of population movement (0.114), following malaria transmission season (0.088), average daily minimum temperature in the previous 8 weeks (0.062), an outdoor resting shelter for vectors (0.045), and rainfall (0.042) were determined. Positive and negative predictive values of the model were 81.8 and

  20. Reintroduction of the European beaver (Castor fiber L. into Serbia and return of its parasite: The case of Stichorchis subtriquetrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćirović D.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available After becoming extinct in the second half of the 20th century, the European beaver (Castor fiber L., 1758 was successfully reintroduced from Bavaria into Serbia during 2004-2005. In the necropsy of an adult female beaver (found dead in December of 2007, we discovered some parasites identified as Stichorchis subtriquetrus in the colon and peritoneal area. This is the first occurrence of the given specific parasite of beavers in Serbia. Decoding of a subcutaneous implanted microchip has confirmed that our specimen was one of the released beavers. We therefore conclude that the parasite in question was reintroduced into Serbia with the beavers originating from Bavaria.

  1. Leadership and management influences the outcome of wildlife reintroduction programs: findings from the Sea Eagle Recovery Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Alexandra E

    2015-01-01

    Wildlife reintroductions and translocations are statistically unlikely to succeed. Nevertheless, they remain a critical part of conservation because they are the only way to actively restore a species into a habitat from which it has been extirpated. Past efforts to improve these practices have attributed the low success rate to failures in the biological knowledge (e.g., ignorance of social behavior, poor release site selection), or to the inherent challenges of reinstating a species into an area where threats have already driven it to local extinction. Such research presumes that the only way to improve reintroduction outcomes is through improved biological knowledge. This emphasis on biological solutions may have caused researchers to overlook the potential influence of other factors on reintroduction outcomes. I employed a grounded theory approach to study the leadership and management of a successful reintroduction program (the Sea Eagle Recovery Project in Scotland, UK) and identify four critical managerial elements that I theorize may have contributed to the successful outcome of this 50-year reintroduction. These elements are: 1. Leadership & Management: Small, dedicated team of accessible experts who provide strong political and scientific advocacy ("champions") for the project. 2. Hierarchy & Autonomy: Hierarchical management structure that nevertheless permits high individual autonomy. 3. Goals & Evaluation: Formalized goal-setting and regular, critical evaluation of the project's progress toward those goals. 4. Adaptive Public Relations: Adaptive outreach campaigns that are open, transparent, inclusive (esp. linguistically), and culturally relevant.

  2. Leadership and management influences the outcome of wildlife reintroduction programs: findings from the Sea Eagle Recovery Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra E. Sutton

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Wildlife reintroductions and translocations are statistically unlikely to succeed. Nevertheless, they remain a critical part of conservation because they are the only way to actively restore a species into a habitat from which it has been extirpated. Past efforts to improve these practices have attributed the low success rate to failures in the biological knowledge (e.g., ignorance of social behavior, poor release site selection, or to the inherent challenges of reinstating a species into an area where threats have already driven it to local extinction. Such research presumes that the only way to improve reintroduction outcomes is through improved biological knowledge. This emphasis on biological solutions may have caused researchers to overlook the potential influence of other factors on reintroduction outcomes. I employed a grounded theory approach to study the leadership and management of a successful reintroduction program (the Sea Eagle Recovery Project in Scotland, UK and identify four critical managerial elements that I theorize may have contributed to the successful outcome of this 50-year reintroduction. These elements are: 1. Leadership & Management: Small, dedicated team of accessible experts who provide strong political and scientific advocacy (“champions” for the project. 2. Hierarchy & Autonomy: Hierarchical management structure that nevertheless permits high individual autonomy. 3. Goals & Evaluation: Formalized goal-setting and regular, critical evaluation of the project’s progress toward those goals. 4. Adaptive Public Relations: Adaptive outreach campaigns that are open, transparent, inclusive (esp. linguistically, and culturally relevant.

  3. Leadership and management influences the outcome of wildlife reintroduction programs: findings from the Sea Eagle Recovery Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Wildlife reintroductions and translocations are statistically unlikely to succeed. Nevertheless, they remain a critical part of conservation because they are the only way to actively restore a species into a habitat from which it has been extirpated. Past efforts to improve these practices have attributed the low success rate to failures in the biological knowledge (e.g., ignorance of social behavior, poor release site selection), or to the inherent challenges of reinstating a species into an area where threats have already driven it to local extinction. Such research presumes that the only way to improve reintroduction outcomes is through improved biological knowledge. This emphasis on biological solutions may have caused researchers to overlook the potential influence of other factors on reintroduction outcomes. I employed a grounded theory approach to study the leadership and management of a successful reintroduction program (the Sea Eagle Recovery Project in Scotland, UK) and identify four critical managerial elements that I theorize may have contributed to the successful outcome of this 50-year reintroduction. These elements are: 1. Leadership & Management: Small, dedicated team of accessible experts who provide strong political and scientific advocacy (“champions”) for the project. 2. Hierarchy & Autonomy: Hierarchical management structure that nevertheless permits high individual autonomy. 3. Goals & Evaluation: Formalized goal-setting and regular, critical evaluation of the project’s progress toward those goals. 4. Adaptive Public Relations: Adaptive outreach campaigns that are open, transparent, inclusive (esp. linguistically), and culturally relevant. PMID:26157602

  4. Conservation and reintroduction of native orchids of Singapore – the next phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim W. Yam

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Some 226 species of native orchids have been recorded in Singapore. However, of these 178 are considered to be extinct, and only five are common. The orchid conservation programme aims to monitor existing species, explore ways to conserve their germplasm, and increase their number for subsequent re-introduction into appropriate habitats, including roadside trees, parks and nature areas. From 1999 to 2008, we carried out experiments and have successfully propagated and re-introduced 5 species of native orchids, namely Grammatophyllum speciosum Blume, Bulbophyllum vaginatum Rchb.f., Bulbophyllum membranaceum Teijsm. and Binn., Cymbidium finlaysonianum Lindl. and Cymbidium bicolor Lindl. spp. pubescens (Lindl. Du Puy and Cribb. More than 80% of the plants are growing well and all that have survived have flowered. From 2009 to 2012, we expanded our reintroduction efforts by planting fifteen species: Bulbophyllum blumei (Lindl. J.J.Sm., Bulbophyllum medusae (Lindl. Rchb.f., Bulbophyllum membranaceum Teijsm. and Binn., Bulbophyllum purpurascens (T. and B. J.J.Sm., Bulbophyllum vaginatum Rchb.f., Coelogyne mayeriana Rchb.f., Coelogyne rochussenii De Vr., Cymbidium finlaysonianum Lindl., Dendrobium aloifolium (Blume Rchb.f., Dendrobium leonis (Lindl. Rchb.f., Grammatophyllum speciosum Blume, Phalaenopsis cornu cervi (Breda Bl. and Rchb.f., Cymbidium bicolor Lindl. spp. pubescens (Lindl. Du Puy and Cribb, Thrixspermum amplexicaule Rchb.f., and Vanilla griffithii Rchb.f. is scheduled to be planted. One of our goals is that the reintroduced species would act as catalysts for the restoration of at least part of the original ecosystem. For example, pollinators may be attracted to sites where orchids have been re-introduced. Subsequently, orchid seeds that are produced from naturally pollinated flowers may be blown to the safe sites where appropriate mycorrhizal fungi are present; thus making germination and subsequent establishment of natural populations in

  5. Experimental reintroduction reveals novel life-history variation in Laysan Ducks (Anas laysanensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Jeffrey R.; Reynolds, Michelle H.

    2013-01-01

    Subfossil remains indicate that the Laysan Duck (Anas laysanensis) formerly occurred throughout the Hawaiian archipelago, but for more than 150 years it has been confined to a single, small atoll in the northwestern chain, Laysan Island. In 2004–2005, 42 ducks were reintroduced from Laysan to Midway Atoll, where they exhibited variation in life history never observed on Laysan. On Laysan, females have never been observed to breed successfully at age 1 year and few attempt it, whereas on Midway, females routinely raised young at reintroductions of this species may provide opportunities to test hypotheses about mechanisms underlying phenotypic plasticity.

  6. Measuring animal welfare within a reintroduction: an assessment of different indices of stress in water voles Arvicola amphibius.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merryl Gelling

    Full Text Available Reintroductions are an increasingly common conservation restoration tool; however, little attention has hitherto been given to different methods for monitoring the stress encountered by reintroduced individuals. We compared ten potential measures of stress within four different categories (neuroendocrine, cell function, body condition and immune system function as proxies for animal welfare in water voles being reintroduced to the Upper Thames region, Oxfordshire, UK. Captive-bred voles were assessed pre-release, and each month post-release for up to five months. Wild-born voles were captured in the field and assessed from two months post-release. Plasma corticosteroid, hydration and body condition of captive-bred voles differed between their pre-release measures and both their first ("short-term" recapture, and their final recapture ("long-term" release, however only body condition and immunocompetence measured using the Nitroblue Tetrazolium (NBT test were significantly different post-release between the first and last recaptures. Captive-bred animals had lower fat reserves, higher weight/length ratios and better immunocompetence (NBT than did wild-born voles. Captive-bred males had higher ectoparasite burdens compared to wild-born males and, as reintroduction site quality decreased, became less hydrated. These observations indicate that some methods can identify changes in the stress response in individuals, highlighting areas of risk in a reintroduction programme. In addition, a single measure may not provide a full picture of the stress experienced; instead, a combination of measures of different physiological systems may give a more complete indication of stress during the reintroduction process. We highlight the need to monitor stress in reintroductions using measures from different physiological systems to inform on possible animal welfare improvements and thus the overall success rate of reintroductions.

  7. Assessing the potential threat landscape of a proposed reintroduction site for carnivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Samantha K; Parker, Daniel M; Peinke, Dean M; Davies-Mostert, Harriet T

    2015-01-01

    This study provides a framework to assess the feasibility of reintroducing carnivores into an area, using African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) as an example. The Great Fish River Nature Reserve in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa, has been identified as a potential reserve to reintroduce wild dogs, and we applied this framework to provide a threat assessment of the surrounding area to determine potential levels of human-wildlife conflict. Although 56% of neighbouring landowners and local communities were positive about a wild dog reintroduction, data collected from questionnaire surveys revealed that human-wild dog conflict is a potential threat to wild dog survival in the area. Additional potential threats include diseases, snaring, poaching and hunting wild dogs for the use of traditional medicine. A threat index was developed to establish which properties harboured the greatest threats to wild dogs. This index was significantly influenced by the respondent's first language (isiXhosa had more positive indices), education level (poorer education was synonymous with more positive threat indices), land use (wildlife ranching being the most negative) and land tenure (community respondents had more positive indices than private landowners). Although threats are present, they can be effectively mitigated through strategies such as carnivore education programs, vaccination campaigns and anti-snare patrols to promote a successful reintroduction of this endangered canid.

  8. Assessing the potential threat landscape of a proposed reintroduction site for carnivores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha K Page

    Full Text Available This study provides a framework to assess the feasibility of reintroducing carnivores into an area, using African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus as an example. The Great Fish River Nature Reserve in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa, has been identified as a potential reserve to reintroduce wild dogs, and we applied this framework to provide a threat assessment of the surrounding area to determine potential levels of human-wildlife conflict. Although 56% of neighbouring landowners and local communities were positive about a wild dog reintroduction, data collected from questionnaire surveys revealed that human-wild dog conflict is a potential threat to wild dog survival in the area. Additional potential threats include diseases, snaring, poaching and hunting wild dogs for the use of traditional medicine. A threat index was developed to establish which properties harboured the greatest threats to wild dogs. This index was significantly influenced by the respondent's first language (isiXhosa had more positive indices, education level (poorer education was synonymous with more positive threat indices, land use (wildlife ranching being the most negative and land tenure (community respondents had more positive indices than private landowners. Although threats are present, they can be effectively mitigated through strategies such as carnivore education programs, vaccination campaigns and anti-snare patrols to promote a successful reintroduction of this endangered canid.

  9. Reintroduction failure is common among adolescents after double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strinnholm, Å; Winberg, A; Hedman, L; Rönmark, E; Lindh, V

    2017-02-01

    There has been a lack of research on adolescents who undergo double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges. The aim of this study was to investigate food allergic adolescents' experiences and consequences of double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges. This qualitative, descriptive interview study included 17 adolescents aged 14-15 years with total elimination of cows' milk, hens' eggs or cod due to food allergies. The participants, who were initially identified from a large population-based cohort study, were interviewed 18 months after completing their challenges. The double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge proved to be a complex experience for the adolescents, involving fear of potential reactions and the hope that the food could be reintroduced. Experiences during the challenge were described in three themes: facing fears in a secure environment, being hesitant but curious about unknown tastes and waiting for unknown food reactions. Experiences after the challenge were described in two themes: gaining control and freedom and continuing old habits. A negative challenge was not consistently associated with the reintroduction of the challenged food. This study highlighted the importance of considering the adolescents' expectations and experiences of the challenge and the reintroduction process to ensure desirable changes in their dietary habits. Follow-ups should be performed regardless of the outcome of challenges. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Gibbon (Hylobates lar) reintroduction success in Phuket, Thailand, and its conservation benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterberg, Petra; Samphanthamit, Phamon; Maprang, Owart; Punnadee, Suwit; Brockelman, Warren Y

    2015-05-01

    We summarize the results from a long-term gibbon reintroduction project in Phuket, Thailand, and evaluate its benefits to conservation. Between October 2002 and November 2012, eight breeding families of white-handed gibbons (Hylobates lar) were returned to the wild in Khao Phra Thaew non-hunting area (KPT). Wild gibbons were extirpated from Phuket Island by the early 1980s, but the illegal wildlife trade has continued to bring young gibbons from elsewhere to the island's popular tourist areas as pets and photo props. The Gibbon Rehabilitation Project (GRP) has rescued and rehabilitated confiscated and donated captive gibbons since 1992 and aims to repopulate the island's last sizable forest area. Following unsuccessful early attempts at translocation in the 1990s, GRP has now developed specific methods for gibbon reintroduction that have led to the establishment of a small independent, reproducing population of captive-raised and wild-born gibbons on Phuket. Eleven infants have been born wild within the reintroduced population, including a second generation wild-born gibbon in September 2012. Benefits of the GRP project include restoration of the gibbon population on Phuket, rescue of illegally kept gibbons, public education, training of personnel in gibbon conservation work, and gaining experience which may prove useful in saving more severely threatened species. It is unlikely that gibbon (and other large primate) translocations will make a significant contribution to conservation of the species as a whole, and primate translocation projects should not be judged solely by this criterion. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. REINTRODUCTION OF NOBLE CRAYFISH ASTACUS ASTACUS AFTER CRAYFISH PLAGUE IN NORWAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAUGBØL T.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Glomma and Halden watercourses in Norway were hit by crayfish plague in 1987 and 1989. Reintroduction of the noble crayfish started in 1989 in the Glomma and in 1995 in the Halden watercourse. Norway has especially good conditions for reintroduction of the native crayfish after crayfish plague, as there is no alien plague-carrying crayfish species in the country. In the Glomma watercourse, approx. 15 000 adult crayfish and 10 000 juveniles have been stocked while in the Halden watercourse the figures are 19 000 adults and 26 500 juveniles. All stocking sites were previously regarded as very good crayfish localities. Four years after stocking, natural recruitment was recorded at all adult crayfish stocking sites in the Glomma watercourse and at most sites in the Halden watercourse. Current crayfish density is, however, much lower than pre-plague densities even at the sites where population development has been in progress for more than 10 years. Extensive post-stocking movements were recorded among adult crayfish. Some sites seemed more suitable for settling, resulting in a great variation in CPUE between the different test-fishing sites. Juveniles seem more appropriate as stocking material if the goal is to re-establish a population in a particular area, due to their stationary behaviour, which seems to remain as they grow larger.

  12. Risk assessment for the reintroduction of anadromous salmonids upstream of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams, Northeastern Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiman, Jill M.; Breyta, Rachel B.; Haskell, Craig A.; Ostberg, Carl O.; Hatten, James R.; Connolly, Patrick J.

    2017-09-12

    The Upper Columbia United Tribes (UCUT; Spokane, Colville, Kootenai, Coeur d’Alene, and Kalispel Tribes) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife want to reintroduce anadromous salmonids to their historical range to restore ecosystem function and lost cultural and spiritual relationships in the upper Columbia River, northeastern Washington. The UCUT contracted with the U.S. Geological Survey to assess risks to resident taxa (existing fish populations in the reintroduction area upstream of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams) and reintroduced salmon associated with reintroduction. We developed a risk assessment framework for reintroduction of anadromous salmonids upstream of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. To accomplish this goal, we applied strategies identified in previous risk assessment frameworks for reintroduction. The risk assessment is an initial step towards an anadromous reintroduction strategy. An initial list of potential donor sources for reintroduction species was developed from previous published sources for Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) donors in the Transboundary Reach of the Columbia River, British Columbia; an ecological risk assessment of upper Columbia River hatchery programs on non-target taxa of concern; and a review of existing hatchery programsDuring two workshops, we further identified and ranked potential donor sources of anadromous Redband Trout (steelhead; O. mykiss), Chinook Salmon, Sockeye Salmon (O. nerka), and Coho Salmon (O. kisutch). We also identified resident fish populations of interest and their primary habitat, location, status, and pathogen concerns to determine the potential risks of reintroduction. Species were deemed of interest based on resource management and potential interactions (that is, genetics, competition, and predation) with introduced species. We developed tables of potential donors by species and characterized potential sources (hatchery and natural origins), populations (individual runs

  13. Thematic Categorization and Analysis of Peer Reviewed Articles in the LISA Database, 2004-2005. A Review of: Gonzalez-Alcaide, Gregorio, Lourdes Castello-Cogolles, Carolina Navarro-Molina, et al. “Library and Information Science Research Areas: Analysis of Journal Articles in LISA.” Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology 59.1 (2008: 150-4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Perryman

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To provide an updated categorization of Library and Information Science (LIS publications and to identify trends in LIS research.Design – Bibliometric study.Setting – The Library and Information Science Abstracts (LISA database via the CSA Illumina interface.Subjects – 11,273 item records published from 2004-2005 and indexed in LISA.Methods – First, a search was set up to retrieve all records from 2004-2005, limited to peer review items (called “arbitrated works” by the authors (150 and excluding book reviews. Second, thematic descriptor terms used for the records were identified. Frequency counts for descriptor term occurrence were compiled using Microsoft Access and Pajek software programs. From the results of this search, the top terms were analyzed using the Kamada-Kawai algorithm in order to eliminate descriptor term co-occurrence frequencies under 30. A cluster analysis was used to depict thematic foci for the remaining records, providing a co-word network that visually identified topic areas of most frequent publication. Conclusions were drawn from these findings, and recommendations for further research were provided.Main Results – The authors identified 18 “thematic research core fields” (152 clustered around three large categories, “World Wide Web”, “Education”, and “Libraries”, plus 12 additional peripheral categories, and provided a schematic of field interrelationships.Conclusion – Domains of greatest focus for research “continue to be of practical and applied nature,” (153 but include increased emphasis on the World Wide Web and communications technologies, as well as on user studies. A table of the most frequently occurring areas of research along with their top three descriptor terms is provided (Table1, 152 (e.g., “World Wide Web” as the top area of research, with “online information retrieval” (268 occurrences, “searching” (132 occurrences, and “web sites” (115

  14. Marking Territory: Legislated Genres, Stakeholder Beliefs, and the Possibilities for Common Ground in the Mexican Wolf Blue Range Reintroduction Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Lynda

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the results of a study analyzing the interaction of administrative genres and stakeholder beliefs in the Mexican Wolf Blue Range Reintroduction Project (MWBRRP) in New Mexico and Arizona. The author examines this interaction through an analysis of a set of 944 recorded public comments (with administrative responses) concerning…

  15. Mixed-source reintroductions lead to outbreeding depression in second-generation descendents of a native North American fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, D.D.; Miller, L.M.; Chizinski, C.J.; Vondracek, B.

    2011-01-01

    Reintroductions are commonly employed to preserve intraspecific biodiversity in fragmented landscapes. However, reintroduced populations are frequently smaller and more geographically isolated than native populations. Mixing genetically, divergent sources are often proposed to attenuate potentially low genetic diversity in reintroduced populations that may result from small effective population sizes. However, a possible negative tradeoff for mixing sources is outbreeding depression in hybrid offspring. We examined the consequences of mixed-source reintroductions on several fitness surrogates at nine slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus) reintroduction sites in south-east Minnesota. We inferred the relative fitness of each crosstype in the reintroduced populations by comparing their growth rate, length, weight, body condition and persistence in reintroduced populations. Pure strain descendents from a single source population persisted in a greater proportion than expected in the reintroduced populations, whereas all other crosstypes occurred in a lesser proportion. Length, weight and growth rate were lower for second-generation intra-population hybrid descendents than for pure strain and first-generation hybrids. In the predominant pure strain, young-of the-year size was significantly greater than any other crosstype. Our results suggested that differences in fitness surrogates among crosstypes were consistent with disrupted co-adapted gene complexes associated with beneficial adaptations in these reintroduced populations. Future reintroductions may be improved by evaluating the potential for local adaptation in source populations or by avoiding the use of mixed sources by default when information on local adaptations or other genetic characteristics is lacking. ?? 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. A priori assessment of reintroduction strategies for a native ungulate: Using HexSim to guide release site selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reintroduction of native species to unoccupied portions of their historical range is a common management strategy to enhance the future viability of animal populations. This approach has met with mixed success, due to unforeseen impacts caused by human or other factors. Some of t...

  17. The reintroduction of the Eurasian otter (Lutra lutra) into the Netherlands: hidden life revealed by noninvasive genetic monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelewijn, H.P.; Pérez-Haro, M.; Jansman, H.A.H.; Boerwinkel, M.C.; Bovenschen, J.; Lammertsma, D.R.; Niewold, F.J.J.; Kuiters, A.T.

    2010-01-01

    The last recorded presence of the Eurasian otter (Lutra lutra) in the Netherlands dates from 1989 and concerned a dead individual. In 2002 a reintroduction programme was started, and between June 2002 and April 2008 a total of 30 individuals (10 males and 20 females) were released into a lowland

  18. 13. The Przewalski’s horse and its reintroduction in the steppe of Hustai National Park, Mongolia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, P. de; Namkhai, B.; Bouman, I.; Staalduinen, M.A. van

    2012-01-01

    The Przewalski’s horse – Takh in Mongolian – is the last surviving genuine wild horse, and a close relative of the domestic horse. The Takh once roamed the steppes of Central Asia and Europe, but since the 1960s has gone extinct from the wild. The Reintroduction Project for the Takh was set up to

  19. Reintroduction of the Eurasian otter (Lutra lutra) in northeastern Spain: trapping, handling, and medical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Morán, Jesus; Saavedra, Deli; Manteca-Vilanova, Xavier

    2002-09-01

    In 1993 a reintroduction project for the Eurasian otter (Lutra lutra) was initiated in northeastern Spain (Girona, Catalonia) to restore extirpated populations. Between 1996 and 2000, 43 otters were captured from southwestern and northern Spain and from Portugal with modified foot-hold traps and transported to Barcelona Zoo. Lesions produced by capture were classified into four categories of increasing severity. Thirty four (79%) animals had category I, three (7%) had category II, five (12%) had category III, and only one (2%) had category IV injuries. During captivity five (11%) animals died, including one from a precapture problem. Radiotransmitter devices were implanted i.p. into 36 otters to monitor postrelease movement and survival. At least three radio-implanted otters have bred successfully in Girona province, Catalonia, after release in that area.

  20. Decision analysis for conservation breeding: Maximizing production for reintroduction of whooping cranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Des H.V.; Converse, Sarah J.; Gibson, Keith; Moehrenschlager, Axel; Link, William A.; Olsen, Glenn H.; Maguire, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    Captive breeding is key to management of severely endangered species, but maximizing captive production can be challenging because of poor knowledge of species breeding biology and the complexity of evaluating different management options. In the face of uncertainty and complexity, decision-analytic approaches can be used to identify optimal management options for maximizing captive production. Building decision-analytic models requires iterations of model conception, data analysis, model building and evaluation, identification of remaining uncertainty, further research and monitoring to reduce uncertainty, and integration of new data into the model. We initiated such a process to maximize captive production of the whooping crane (Grus americana), the world's most endangered crane, which is managed through captive breeding and reintroduction. We collected 15 years of captive breeding data from 3 institutions and used Bayesian analysis and model selection to identify predictors of whooping crane hatching success. The strongest predictor, and that with clear management relevance, was incubation environment. The incubation period of whooping crane eggs is split across two environments: crane nests and artificial incubators. Although artificial incubators are useful for allowing breeding pairs to produce multiple clutches, our results indicate that crane incubation is most effective at promoting hatching success. Hatching probability increased the longer an egg spent in a crane nest, from 40% hatching probability for eggs receiving 1 day of crane incubation to 95% for those receiving 30 days (time incubated in each environment varied independently of total incubation period). Because birds will lay fewer eggs when they are incubating longer, a tradeoff exists between the number of clutches produced and egg hatching probability. We developed a decision-analytic model that estimated 16 to be the optimal number of days of crane incubation needed to maximize the number of

  1. Conservation strategies for orangutans: reintroduction versus habitat preservation and the benefits of sustainably logged forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Howard B; Meijaard, Erik; Venter, Oscar; Ancrenaz, Marc; Possingham, Hugh P

    2014-01-01

    The Sumatran orangutan is currently listed by the IUCN as critically endangered and the Bornean species as endangered. Unless effective conservation measures are enacted quickly, most orangutan populations without adequate protection face a dire future. Two main strategies are being pursued to conserve orangutans: (i) rehabilitation and reintroduction of ex-captive or displaced individuals; and (ii) protection of their forest habitat to abate threats like deforestation and hunting. These strategies are often mirrored in similar programs to save other valued and endangered mega-fauna. Through GIS analysis, collating data from across the literature, and combining this information within a modelling and decision analysis framework, we analysed which strategy or combination of strategies is the most cost-effective at maintaining wild orangutan populations, and under what conditions. We discovered that neither strategy was optimal under all circumstances but was dependent on the relative cost per orangutan, the timescale of management concern, and the rate of deforestation. Reintroduction, which costs twelve times as much per animal as compared to protection of forest, was only a cost-effective strategy at very short timescales. For time scales longer than 10-20 years, forest protection is the more cost-efficient strategy for maintaining wild orangutan populations. Our analyses showed that a third, rarely utilised strategy is intermediate: introducing sustainable logging practices and protection from hunting in timber production forest. Maximum long-term cost-efficiency is achieved by working in conservation forest. However, habitat protection involves addressing complex conservation issues and conflicting needs at the landscape level. We find a potential resolution in that well-managed production forests could achieve intermediate conservation outcomes. This has broad implications for sustaining biodiversity more generally within an economically productive landscape

  2. Conservation strategies for orangutans: reintroduction versus habitat preservation and the benefits of sustainably logged forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard B Wilson

    Full Text Available The Sumatran orangutan is currently listed by the IUCN as critically endangered and the Bornean species as endangered. Unless effective conservation measures are enacted quickly, most orangutan populations without adequate protection face a dire future. Two main strategies are being pursued to conserve orangutans: (i rehabilitation and reintroduction of ex-captive or displaced individuals; and (ii protection of their forest habitat to abate threats like deforestation and hunting. These strategies are often mirrored in similar programs to save other valued and endangered mega-fauna. Through GIS analysis, collating data from across the literature, and combining this information within a modelling and decision analysis framework, we analysed which strategy or combination of strategies is the most cost-effective at maintaining wild orangutan populations, and under what conditions. We discovered that neither strategy was optimal under all circumstances but was dependent on the relative cost per orangutan, the timescale of management concern, and the rate of deforestation. Reintroduction, which costs twelve times as much per animal as compared to protection of forest, was only a cost-effective strategy at very short timescales. For time scales longer than 10-20 years, forest protection is the more cost-efficient strategy for maintaining wild orangutan populations. Our analyses showed that a third, rarely utilised strategy is intermediate: introducing sustainable logging practices and protection from hunting in timber production forest. Maximum long-term cost-efficiency is achieved by working in conservation forest. However, habitat protection involves addressing complex conservation issues and conflicting needs at the landscape level. We find a potential resolution in that well-managed production forests could achieve intermediate conservation outcomes. This has broad implications for sustaining biodiversity more generally within an economically

  3. Demographic outcomes and ecosystem implications of giant tortoise reintroduction to Española Island, Galapagos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Gibbs

    Full Text Available Restoration of extirpated species via captive breeding has typically relied on population viability as the primary criterion for evaluating success. This criterion is inadequate when species reintroduction is undertaken to restore ecological functions and interactions. Herein we report on the demographic and ecological outcomes of a five-decade-long population restoration program for a critically endangered species of "ecosystem engineer": the endemic Española giant Galapagos tortoise (Chelonoidis hoodensis. Our analysis of complementary datasets on tortoise demography and movement, tortoise-plant interactions and Española Island's vegetation history indicated that the repatriated tortoise population is secure from a strictly demographic perspective: about half of tortoises released on the island since 1975 were still alive in 2007, in situ reproduction is now significant, and future extinction risk is low with or without continued repatriation. Declining survival rates, somatic growth rates, and body condition of repatriates suggests, however, that resources for continued population growth are increasingly limited. Soil stable carbon isotope analyses indicated a pronounced shift toward woody plants in the recent history of the island's plant community, likely a legacy of changes in competitive relations between woody and herbaceous plants induced by now-eradicated feral goats and prolonged absence of tortoises. Woody plants are of concern because they block tortoise movement and hinder recruitment of cactus--a critical resource for tortoises. Tortoises restrict themselves to remnant cactus patches and areas of low woody plant density in the center of the island despite an apparent capacity to colonize a far greater range, likely because of a lack of cactus elsewhere on the island. We conclude that ecosystem-level criteria for success of species reintroduction efforts take much longer to achieve than population-level criteria; moreover

  4. Demographic Outcomes and Ecosystem Implications of Giant Tortoise Reintroduction to Española Island, Galapagos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, James P.; Hunter, Elizabeth A.; Shoemaker, Kevin T.; Tapia, Washington H.; Cayot, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of extirpated species via captive breeding has typically relied on population viability as the primary criterion for evaluating success. This criterion is inadequate when species reintroduction is undertaken to restore ecological functions and interactions. Herein we report on the demographic and ecological outcomes of a five-decade-long population restoration program for a critically endangered species of “ecosystem engineer”: the endemic Española giant Galapagos tortoise (Chelonoidis hoodensis). Our analysis of complementary datasets on tortoise demography and movement, tortoise-plant interactions and Española Island’s vegetation history indicated that the repatriated tortoise population is secure from a strictly demographic perspective: about half of tortoises released on the island since 1975 were still alive in 2007, in situ reproduction is now significant, and future extinction risk is low with or without continued repatriation. Declining survival rates, somatic growth rates, and body condition of repatriates suggests, however, that resources for continued population growth are increasingly limited. Soil stable carbon isotope analyses indicated a pronounced shift toward woody plants in the recent history of the island’s plant community, likely a legacy of changes in competitive relations between woody and herbaceous plants induced by now-eradicated feral goats and prolonged absence of tortoises. Woody plants are of concern because they block tortoise movement and hinder recruitment of cactus–a critical resource for tortoises. Tortoises restrict themselves to remnant cactus patches and areas of low woody plant density in the center of the island despite an apparent capacity to colonize a far greater range, likely because of a lack of cactus elsewhere on the island. We conclude that ecosystem-level criteria for success of species reintroduction efforts take much longer to achieve than population-level criteria; moreover, reinstatement of

  5. Predation by Northern Pikeminnow and tiger muskellunge on juvenile salmonids in a high–head reservoir: Implications for anadromous fish reintroductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorel, Mark H.; Hansen, Adam G.; Connelly, Kristin A.; Wilson, Andrew C.; Lowery, Erin D.; Beauchamp, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of reintroducing anadromous salmonids into reservoirs above high-head dams is affected by the suitability of the reservoir habitat for rearing and the interactions of the resident fish with introduced fish. We evaluated the predation risk to anadromous salmonids considered for reintroduction in Merwin Reservoir on the North Fork Lewis River in Washington State for two reservoir use-scenarios: year-round rearing and smolt migration. We characterized the role of the primary predators, Northern Pikeminnow Ptychocheilus oregonensis and tiger muskellunge (Northern Pike Esox lucius × Muskellunge E. masquinongy), by using stable isotopes and stomach content analysis, quantified seasonal, per capita predation using bioenergetics modeling, and evaluated the size and age structures of the populations. We then combined these inputs to estimate predation rates of size-structured population units. Northern Pikeminnow of FL ≥ 300 mm were highly cannibalistic and exhibited modest, seasonal, per capita predation on salmonids, but they were disproportionately much less abundant than smaller, less piscivorous, conspecifics. The annual predation on kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka (in biomass) by a size-structured unit of 1,000 Northern Pikeminnow having a FL ≥ 300 mm was analogous to 16,000–40,000 age-0 spring Chinook Salmon O. tshawytscha rearing year-round, or 400–1,000 age-1 smolts migrating April–June. The per capita consumption of salmonids by Northern Pikeminnow having a FL ≥ 200 mm was relatively low, due in large part to spatial segregation during the summer and the skewed size distribution of the predator population. Tiger muskellunge fed heavily on Northern Pikeminnow, other nonsalmonids, and minimally on salmonids. In addition to cannibalism within the Northern Pikeminnow population, predation by tiger muskellunge likely contributed to the low recruitment of larger (more piscivorous) Northern Pikeminnow, thereby decreasing the risk of predation to

  6. Viability and Risk Assessment in Species Restoration: Planning Reintroductions for the Wild Boar, a Potential Disease Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor Fernández

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The reintroduction of large mammals is often considered a priority conservation action in highly industrialized countries in which many of these species have been depleted. However, species reintroduction after decades of absence may involve important risks for human activities and ecological communities, such as favoring the spread of diseases. An example of a potentially troublesome reintroduction is the wild boar, which may act as a reservoir of diseases, e.g., classical swine fever, and cause high economic losses, and has become a species of concern in several European countries for both ecological and recreational reasons. Failure to prevent the disease consequences of species restoration can negate its conservation benefits. Here we evaluated the probability of both successfully reintroducing wild boar into Denmark and limiting their contact with domestic pig farms to which they might spread disease. For this purpose, we developed a spatially explicit, individual-based population model that incorporates information on boar habitat and demography information from Central European populations. We then compared model predictions with the spatial distribution of farms to achieve a spatial assessment of the contact risk. The most restrictive model scenario predicted that nearly 6% of Denmark provides habitat conditions that would allow wild boar to reproduce. The best habitats for reintroduction were aggregated in seven different areas throughout the country in which the extinction probability was < 5%. However, the expected population expansion was very limited in most of these areas. Both the number of suitable areas and the potential for population expansion greatly increased when we relaxed our habitat assumptions about boar forest requirements; this provided a more conservative scenario for a cautious risk analysis. We additionally found that part of the risk of contact with piggeries was associated with the magnitude of the expansion

  7. Quercus rugosa seedling dynamics in relation to its re-introduction in a disturbed Mexican landscape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfil, C. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico). Facultad de Ciencias; Soberon, J. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico). Inst. de Ecologia

    1999-12-01

    In order to define the 'regeneration niche' and then promote the re-introduction of Quercus rugosa into a disturbed area we studied seed predation, germination, seedling survival and growth of this species at three different sites: the forest interior, the forest border and a disturbed site, along a disturbance gradient. Acorn removal on the ground was high at the sites, with higher removal rates from 25-seed clusters than from 5- and 1 -seed clusters. More seeds were removed at the forest border than at the other two sites, although in all cases some seeds remained in the soil for periods long enough for them to germinate and produce seedlings. Seed germination and seedling establishment were more successful and similar in the forest interior and the forest border, and much less successful at the disturbed site, due to acorn desiccation. Seedling survival was strongly affected by site, with the highest survival at the forest border and the lowest survival at the disturbed site after a year. The subsequent dry season, which was particularly harsh, caused a drop in survival both at the forest border and the disturbed site. In the former, a closer analysis revealed that partially shaded microsites enhanced survival, while in the latter overall survival was very low, with approximately 5 % of the seedlings surviving, compared to 50 % final survival at the other sites. There was a positive correlation between seed size and seedling survival at the forest border. The three size variables measured (seedling height, basal diameter and crown area) did not increase noticeably during the 20-month study period at the forest interior, while growth still occurred at the forest border and the disturbed site. However, during the two dry seasons there were large drops in mean seedling height and crown area at the disturbed site, due to more frequent dieback, causing large variation in seedling size. These results show that extensive re-introduction of this species to the

  8. First Steps into the Wild ? Exploration Behavior of European Bison after the First Reintroduction in Western Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Philip Schmitz; Stephanie Caspers; Paige Warren; Klaudia Witte

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversity is rapidly declining globally. One strategy to help to conserve species is to breed species in captivity and release them into suitable habitats. The way that reintroduced animals explore new habitats and/or disperse from the release site is rarely studied in detail and represents key information for the success of reintroduction projects. The European bison (Bison bonasus L. 1758) was the largest surviving herbivore of the post-glacial megafauna in Europe before it became extinc...

  9. Patterns of genomic variation in Coho salmon following reintroduction to the interior Columbia River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Nathan R; Kamphaus, Cory; Murdoch, Keely; Narum, Shawn R

    2017-12-01

    Coho salmon were extirpated in the mid-20th century from the interior reaches of the Columbia River but were reintroduced with relatively abundant source stocks from the lower Columbia River near the Pacific coast. Reintroduction of Coho salmon to the interior Columbia River (Wenatchee River) using lower river stocks placed selective pressures on the new colonizers due to substantial differences with their original habitat such as migration distance and navigation of six additional hydropower dams. We used restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) to genotype 5,392 SNPs in reintroduced Coho salmon in the Wenatchee River over four generations to test for signals of temporal structure and adaptive variation. Temporal genetic structure among the three broodlines of reintroduced fish was evident among the initial return years (2000, 2001, and 2002) and their descendants, which indicated levels of reproductive isolation among broodlines. Signals of adaptive variation were detected from multiple outlier tests and identified candidate genes for further study. This study illustrated that genetic variation and structure of reintroduced populations are likely to reflect source stocks for multiple generations but may shift over time once established in nature.

  10. The influence of spatiotemporal conditions and personality on survival in reintroductions-evolutionary implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haage, Marianne; Maran, Tiit; Bergvall, Ulrika Alm; Elmhagen, Bodil; Angerbjörn, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Personality exists in non-human animals and can impact fitness. There is, however, a shortage of empirical studies in certain areas within the field, and fundamental evolutionary theory on personality remains largely untested. For example, little is known on how variation in personality is maintained over evolutionary time. Theory suggests that fluctuating selection pressures due to spatiotemporal variation in conditions, e.g. food availability, is a possible mechanism and a few studies have shown that the success of different personality types varies with spatiotemporal conditions. However, it remains unknown whether different mechanisms can maintain personality within a species. Here we use a reintroduction programme for the critically endangered European mink (Mustela lutreola) to test whether multiple personality trait domains (boldness, exploration and sociability) affected survival in two different years and islands. This was done through pre-release personality tests and post-release radio-tracking monitoring. Survival was positively correlated with boldness, whereas the relationship with exploration was either negative or positive depending on year/island. The results show a complex relationship between personality and survival and suggest that exploration can be maintained over evolutionary time via spatiotemporal variation in conditions. However, in contrast to exploration, boldness did not vary spatiotemporally and sociability had no impact on survival. This indicates that different personality trait domains might be maintained by different mechanisms. To date, personality has been studied primarily within behavioural sciences, but through empirical findings we highlight the importance of personality also in ecology and conservation biology.

  11. Evaluation of an Experimental Re-introduction of Sockeye Salmon into Skaha Lake; Year 1 of 3, 2000 Technical Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammell, Larry (University of Prince Edward Island, Atlantic Veterinary College, Charlottetown, PE, Canada); Machin, Deanna; Long, Karilyn (Okanagan National Fisheries Commission, Westbank, BC, Canada)

    2001-06-01

    Historical records indicate that sockeye salmon were once found in most of the lakes in the Okanagan River Basin. Currently, the only sockeye population within the Okanagan River Basin is found in Osoyoos Lake. Abundance of this stock has declined significantly in the last fifty years. The Okanagan Nation and tribes in the U.S. have proposed re-introducing the species into Okanagan Lake, which has a large rearing capacity. However, assessing the potential benefits and risks associated with a reintroduction of sockeye salmon into Okanagan Lake is difficult because of uncertainties about factors that determine production of Okanagan sockeye, and potential interactions with other species in Okanagan Lake. Associated with this proposal are the potential risks of re-introduction of sockeye salmon into Okanagan Lake. One of these is the effects of sockeye on the resident Okanagan Lake kokanee population, which has declined significantly in the past several years because of habitat loss due to human encroachment, competition with introduced mysid shrimp, and the reduction of biological productivity in the lake as municipalities have moved to more complete effluent treatment. Another concern is the possibility of the transmission of diseases that are currently not found in Okanagan and Skaha lakes from re-introduced sockeye to resident fish. An additional concern is the risk that exotic species (e.g. tench, largemouth bass), that have become established in southern Okanagan Lakes (principally as a result of purposeful introductions in the US Columbia/Okanagan river system), may be able to extend their range to Skaha and Okanagan Lakes, through fish ladders provided at the outlets of Vaseaux (McIntyre Dam) and Skaha Lakes (Okanagan Falls Dam), for natural upstream migration of sockeye. A transboundary multi-agency workshop was hosted in November of 1997 to discuss the potential risks and benefits of reintroducing sockeye salmon into Okanagan Lake. These discussions were

  12. Re-introduction of transmembrane serine residues reduce the minimum pore diameter of channelrhodopsin-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Richards

    Full Text Available Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2 is a microbial-type rhodopsin found in the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Under physiological conditions, ChR2 is an inwardly rectifying cation channel that permeates a wide range of mono- and divalent cations. Although this protein shares a high sequence homology with other microbial-type rhodopsins, which are ion pumps, ChR2 is an ion channel. A sequence alignment of ChR2 with bacteriorhodopsin, a proton pump, reveals that ChR2 lacks specific motifs and residues, such as serine and threonine, known to contribute to non-covalent interactions within transmembrane domains. We hypothesized that reintroduction of the eight transmembrane serine residues present in bacteriorhodopsin, but not in ChR2, will restrict the conformational flexibility and reduce the pore diameter of ChR2. In this work, eight single serine mutations were created at homologous positions in ChR2. Additionally, an endogenous transmembrane serine was replaced with alanine. We measured kinetics, changes in reversal potential, and permeability ratios in different alkali metal solutions using two-electrode voltage clamp. Applying excluded volume theory, we calculated the minimum pore diameter of ChR2 constructs. An analysis of the results from our experiments show that reintroducing serine residues into the transmembrane domain of ChR2 can restrict the minimum pore diameter through inter- and intrahelical hydrogen bonds while the removal of a transmembrane serine results in a larger pore diameter. Therefore, multiple positions along the intracellular side of the transmembrane domains contribute to the cation permeability of ChR2.

  13. Microsatellite variation and rare alleles in a bottlenecked Hawaiian Islands endemic: implications for reintroductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Michelle H.; Pearce, John M.; Lavretsky, Philip; Seixas, Pedro P.; Courtot, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Conservation of genetic biodiversity in endangered wildlife populations is an important challenge to address since the loss of alleles and genetic drift may influence future adaptability. Reintroduction aims to re-establish species to restored or protected ecosystems; however, moving a subset of individuals may result in loss of gene variants during the management-induced bottleneck (i.e. translocation). The endangered Laysan teal Anas laysanensis was once widespread across the Hawaiian archipelago, but became isolated on Laysan Island (415 ha) from the mid-1800s until 2004 when a translocation to Midway Atoll (596 ha) was undertaken to reduce extinction risks. We compared genetic diversity and quantified variation at microsatellite loci sampled from 230 individuals from the wild populations at Laysan (1999 to 2009) and Midway (2007 to 2010; n = 133 Laysan, n = 96 Midway birds). We identified polymorphic markers by screening nuclear microsatellites (N = 83). Low nuclear variation was detected, consistent with the species’ insular isolation and historical bottleneck. Six of 83 microsatellites were polymorphic. We found limited but similar estimates of allelic richness (2.58 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity within populations. However, 2 rare alleles found in the Laysan source population were not present in Midway’s reintroduced population, and a unique allele was discovered in an individual on Midway. Differentiation between island populations was low (FST = 0.6%), but statistically significant. Our results indicate that genetic drift had little effect on offspring generations 3 to 6 yr post-release and demonstrate the utility of using known founder events to help quantify genetic capture during translocations and to inform management decisions.

  14. Genomic evidence reveals numerous Salmonella enterica serovar Newport reintroduction events in Suwannee watershed irrigation ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baoguang; Jackson, Scott A; Gangiredla, Jayanthi; Wang, Weimin; Liu, Huanli; Tall, Ben D; Beaubrun, Junia Jean-Gilles; Jay-Russell, Michele; Vellidis, George; Elkins, Christopher A

    2015-12-01

    Our previous work indicated a predominance (56.8%) of Salmonella enterica serovar Newport among isolates recovered from irrigation ponds used in produce farms over a 2-year period (B. Li et al., Appl Environ Microbiol 80:6355-6365, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.02063-14). This observation provided a valuable set of metrics to explore an underaddressed issue of environmental survival of Salmonella by DNA microarray. Microarray analysis correctly identified all the isolates (n = 53) and differentiated the S. Newport isolates into two phylogenetic lineages (S. Newport II and S. Newport III). Serovar distribution analysis showed no instances where the same serovar was recovered from a pond for more than a month. Furthermore, during the study, numerous isolates with an indistinguishable genotype were recovered from different ponds as far as 180 km apart for time intervals as long as 2 years. Although isolates within either lineage were phylogenetically related as determined by microarray analysis, subtle genotypic differences were detected within the lineages, suggesting that isolates in either lineage could have come from several unique hosts. For example, strains in four different subgroups (A, B, C, and D) possessed an indistinguishable genotype within their subgroups as measured by gene differences, suggesting that strains in each subgroup shared a common host. Based on this comparative genomic evidence and the spatial and temporal factors, we speculated that the presence of Salmonella in the ponds was likely due to numerous punctuated reintroduction events associated with several different but common hosts in the environment. These findings may have implications for the development of strategies for efficient and safe irrigation to minimize the risk of Salmonella outbreaks associated with fresh produce. Copyright © 2015 Li et al.

  15. Reintroduction of the European Capercaillie from the Capercaillie Breeding Centre in Wisła Forest District: Genetic Assessments of Captive and Reintroduced Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Strzała

    Full Text Available The Western capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus is a specific bird species, which, despite its very broad distribution and large global population size, is highly endangered in many Western and Central European countries. According to the species situation, in many countries (including Poland, breeding and reintroduction programmes have been started. One of the most complex and large-scale reintroduction programmes was started in Bory Dolnośląskie Forest, and the Capercaillie Breeding Centre in Wisła Forest District was used as one of the sources of individuals for reintroduction. As genetic tools provide essential knowledge about species biodiversity, which is crucially important during the breeding process and reintroduction, both captive and reintroduced grouse populations were genetically analysed. We were particularly interested in genetic diversity of the individuals in both populations and the genetic relationship between them, as well as between them and other capercaillie representatives from their current range. To fulfil these goals we determined nine microsatellite loci along with a fragment of the mitochondrial control region. Genetic diversity parameters were moderate to high compared to populations from other Central and Western European countries. Both populations were clustered into three distinct genetic clades based on microsatellites. Phylogenetic analysis placed all mitochondrial haplotypes we revealed in the Eurasian clade. The present results will play an important role as they will help to preserve and maximize genetic diversity in captive populations, and will provide a basis for future monitoring of the reintroduction process.

  16. Docetaxel reintroduction in patients with metastatic castration-resistant docetaxel-sensitive prostate cancer: a retrospective multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eymard, Jean-Christophe; Oudard, Stéphane; Gravis, Gwenaelle; Ferrero, Jean-Marc; Theodore, Christine; Joly, Florence; Priou, Frank; Krakowski, Ivan; Zannetti, Alain; Thill, Laurence; Beuzeboc, Philippe

    2010-10-01

    To investigate the potential benefit of reintroducing docetaxel chemotherapy in patients with progressive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) who had initially responded to first-line docetaxel-based regimen. Records were evaluated retrospectively from French patients with mCRPC who had been included in seven controlled clinical studies of docetaxel as first-line treatment. We identified patients who were confirmed as responders to first-line treatment, discontinued for reasons other than disease progression or unacceptable toxicity, and who received further docetaxel chemotherapy for disease progression. The primary objective was to assess efficacy in terms of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response after resuming a docetaxel-based chemotherapy. Secondary objectives were overall survival and tolerance. Of the 148 patients who responded to first-line docetaxel, 50 received further therapy with docetaxel and were analysed. The median (range) response duration to first-line docetaxel was 10.3 (4.6-45.7) months and the median docetaxel-free interval was 18.4 (5.0-46.7) months. Docetaxel was reintroduced as second-line therapy in 52% of patients and as further lines in 48%. After docetaxel reintroduction, 24 patients (48%) had a 50% decrease in PSA level (95% confidence interval, CI, 34.1-61.8%). The median (95% CI) overall survival from docetaxel reintroduction was 16 (13-20) months. Re-treatment was well tolerated (6% of grade 3-4 haemotoxicity). Docetaxel reintroduction appears to be effective, with favourable tolerance profiles, in patients with mCRPC having responded to first-line docetaxel, and should be prospectively assessed in clinical trials against alternative therapies or investigational agents given alone or in combination, to define further management. © 2010 THE AUTHORS. JOURNAL COMPILATION © 2010 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  17. Assessing uncertainty in ecological systems using global sensitivity analyses: a case example of simulated wolf reintroduction effects on elk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieberg, J.; Jenkins, Kurt J.

    2005-01-01

    Often landmark conservation decisions are made despite an incomplete knowledge of system behavior and inexact predictions of how complex ecosystems will respond to management actions. For example, predicting the feasibility and likely effects of restoring top-level carnivores such as the gray wolf (Canis lupus) to North American wilderness areas is hampered by incomplete knowledge of the predator-prey system processes and properties. In such cases, global sensitivity measures, such as Sobola?? indices, allow one to quantify the effect of these uncertainties on model predictions. Sobola?? indices are calculated by decomposing the variance in model predictions (due to parameter uncertainty) into main effects of model parameters and their higher order interactions. Model parameters with large sensitivity indices can then be identified for further study in order to improve predictive capabilities. Here, we illustrate the use of Sobola?? sensitivity indices to examine the effect of parameter uncertainty on the predicted decline of elk (Cervus elaphus) population sizes following a hypothetical reintroduction of wolves to Olympic National Park, Washington, USA. The strength of density dependence acting on survival of adult elk and magnitude of predation were the most influential factors controlling elk population size following a simulated wolf reintroduction. In particular, the form of density dependence in natural survival rates and the per-capita predation rate together accounted for over 90% of variation in simulated elk population trends. Additional research on wolf predation rates on elk and natural compensations in prey populations is needed to reliably predict the outcome of predatora??prey system behavior following wolf reintroductions.

  18. The reintroduction of boreal caribou as a conservation strategy: A long-term assessment at the southern range limit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin-Hugues St-Laurent

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Boreal caribou were extirpated from the Charlevoix region (Québec in the 1920s because of hunting and poaching. In 1965, the Québec government initiated a caribou reintroduction program in Charlevoix. During the winters of 1966 and 1967, a total of 48 boreal caribou were captured, translocated by plane, and released within enclosures; only their offspring (82 individuals were released in the wild. Between 1967 and 1980, a wolf control program was applied to support caribou population growth. The caribou population, however, remained relatively stable at 45–55 individuals during this period. During the 1980s, the population grew slowly at a rate of approximately 5% each year to reach a peak of 126 individuals in 1992. At that time, Bergerud & Mercer (1989 reported that the Charlevoix experiment was the only successful attempt at caribou reintroduction in the presence of predators (in North America. Afterwards, the population declined and since then it has been relatively stable at about 80 individuals. Here we reviewed the literature regarding the ecology and population dynamics of the Charlevoix caribou herd since its reintroduction, in an attempt to critically assess the value of reintroduction as a conservation tool for this species. Indeed, the Charlevoix caribou herd is now considered at very high risk of extinction mostly because of its small size, its isolation from other caribou populations, and low recruitment. The Charlevoix region has been heavily impacted by forestry activities since the early 1980s. Recent studies have indicated that these habitat modifications may have benefited populations of wolves and black bears—two predators of caribou—and that caribou range fidelity may have exposed caribou to higher predation risk via maladaptive habitat selection. As females are ageing, and females and calves suffer high predation pressure from wolves and bears respectively, we suggest that the future of this reintroduced herd is in

  19. Management Plan for Experimental Reintroduction of Sockeye into Skaha Lake; Proposed Implementation, Monitoring, and Evaluation, 2004 Technical Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Howie; Smith, Howard (Okanagan Nation Alliance, Fisheries Department, Westbank, BC, Canada)

    2004-01-01

    Okanagan River sockeye salmon, which spawn near the town of Oliver, B.C., have their farther upstream migration limited by several water control and diversion dams. Stock numbers have been declining for many years and the Okanagan Native Alliance Fisheries Department (ONAFD) has been the principal advocate of a program to restore their numbers and range by reintroducing them into upstream waters where they may once have occurred in substantial numbers Some investigators have warned that without effective intervention Okanagan sockeye are at considerable risk of extinction. Among a host of threats, the quality of water in the single nursery areas in Osoyoos Lake. is deteriorating and a sanctuary such as that afforded in larger lakes higher in the system could be essential. Because the proposed reintroduction upstream has implications for other fish species, (particularly kokanee, the so-called ''landlocked sockeye'' which reside in many Okanagan lakes), the proponents undertook a three-year investigation, with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration and the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, to identify possible problem areas, and they committed to an interim experimental reintroduction to Skaha Lake where any problems could be worked out before a more ambitious reintroduction, (e.g. to Okanagan Lake) could be formally considered. The three-year investigation was completed in the spring of 2003. It included an assessment of risks from disease or the possible introduction of unwanted exotic species. It also considered the present quality and quantity of sockeye habitat, and opportunities for expanding or improving it. Finally ecological complexity encouraged the development of a life history model to examine interactions of sockeye with other fishes and their food organisms. While some problem areas were exposed in the course of these studies, they appeared to be manageable and the concept of an experimental reintroduction

  20. Impact of stochasticity in immigration and reintroduction on colonizing and extirpating populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajakaruna, Harshana; Potapov, Alexei; Lewis, Mark

    2013-05-01

    given the environmental and demographic uncertainties at introductions. Similarly, the recovery of declining and extirpated populations through stochastic stocking, translocation, and reintroduction, may also be suitable strategies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. First record of Anopheles stephensi in Sri Lanka: a potential challenge for prevention of malaria reintroduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayan Dharmasiri, A G; Perera, A Yashan; Harishchandra, Jeevanie; Herath, Hemantha; Aravindan, Kandasamy; Jayasooriya, H T R; Ranawaka, Gaya R; Hewavitharane, Mihirini

    2017-08-10

    The major malaria vector in Sri Lanka is reported to be Anopheles culicifacies with Anopheles subpictus, Anopheles annularis, and Anopheles varuna considered as potential vectors. The occurrence of Anopheles stephensi, which is the key vector of urban malaria in India and the Middle East, had never been reported from Sri Lanka. A series of entomological investigations were carried out by the Anti Malaria Campaign, Ministry of Health, Sri Lanka during December 2016 to April 2017 in two localities of the Mannar District in the Northern Province of the country. Adult mosquito collections were done through indoor and outdoor resting collections, animal and human biting collections and emergence traps. Potential mosquito breeding sites were investigated through larval surveys. The larvae and adults of An. stephensi were initially identified using morphological keys, and subsequently confirmed by sequencing the barcode region of the cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) gene. This is the first report of the presence of An. stephensi in the island of Mannar in the Northern Province of Sri Lanka. Anopheles stephensi (36.65%) was the most abundant anopheline species in the larval habitats in Mannar. It was found breeding together with An. culicifacies (20.7%), An. subpictus (13.5%) and An. varuna (28.13%). Anopheles stephensi was found to be abundantly breeding in built wells used for domestic purposes. Adult females of An. stephensi were observed in emergence trap collections (93.9%), human landing catches all night (79.2%), pyrethrum spray sheet collections (38.6%), outdoor collections (8.3%), donkey-baited trap collections (14.3), and cattle-baited net trap collections (0.7%). Sri Lanka was certified as malaria-free by the WHO in September 2016, however, this new finding may pose a serious challenge to the efforts of the Ministry of Health to prevent the re-introduction of malaria transmission in the country, considering the role that An. stephensi could play in urban and high

  2. Demographic variation, reintroduction, and persistence of an island duck (Anas laysanensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Michelle H.; Weiser, Emily; Jamieson, Ian; Hatfield, Jeffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Population variation in life history can be important for predicting successful establishment and persistence of reintroduced populations of endangered species. The Laysan duck (Anas laysanensis) is an endangered bird native to the Hawaiian Archipelago that was extirpated from most islands after the introduction of mammalian predators. Laysan ducks were restricted to a single remote island, Laysan Island (4.1 km2), for nearly 150 years. Since the species is not known to disperse between distant Hawaiian Islands today, 42 wild birds from Laysan Island were translocated to another mammalian predator-free low-lying atoll (Midway Atoll; 6.0 km2) to reduce extinction risk. We explored how variation in demography influences establishment and longer-term retention of genetic diversity (rare alleles) for reintroductions of this species. We observed dramatic differences in population growth between the source (λ = 1.18) and reintroduced (λ = 3.28) population. The number of eggs hatched at Midway Atoll was greater than at Laysan Island, however, we found no difference in hatching success (proportion of clutch hatched) between populations. Adult females produced 3 times as many fledglings per breeding year on Midway Atoll compared to Laysan Island. We estimated population abundance of both populations until 2010 and applied a Gompertz model with a Bayesian approach to infer density dependence, process variation, observation error, and carrying capacity for the Laysan Island and Midway Atoll populations. The carrying capacity from the Gompertz model for Midway Atoll (K = 883 ± 210 SD) was estimated to be greater than that of Laysan Island (K = 598 ± 76 SD). Translocations with small numbers of founders and no immigration can create population bottlenecks, leading to loss of genetic variation over time, and potentially reducing the reintroduced population's viability or its potential to serve as a source for future translocations. Therefore, we

  3. Impact of stochasticity in immigration and reintroduction on colonizing and extirpating populations

    KAUST Repository

    Rajakaruna, Harshana

    2013-05-01

    the environmental and demographic uncertainties at introductions. Similarly, the recovery of declining and extirpated populations through stochastic stocking, translocation, and reintroduction, may also be suitable strategies. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  4. Re-introduction and present status of the lynx (Lynx Lynx in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urs Breitenmoser

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A lynx recovery programme started in Switzerland in 1970. From 1970-76, at least 14 lynx were translocated from the Carpathian Mountains into the Swiss Alps. Another re-introduction took place in the Jura Mountains, but no corridors exist as a connection between these two popula- tions in Switzerland. The development of the populations was not monitored at first. In 1980 systematic research was initiated, which gradually evolved into the Swiss Lynx Project. Not all releases were successful, but the re-introduction in the northern and western Alps founded a population that covered an area of some 4000 km² in 1981. In the western Swiss Alps, lynx moved into Italian and French territory. Towards the eastern Swiss Alps, the expansion was slower and ceased about ten years ago. During the last five years, there even has been a reduction of the area occupied. Today, the population covers an area of about 10000 km² in the Swiss Alps, of which 50% is suitable lynx habitat. Based on size and overlap of average home ranges of radio-tagged lynx, the population was estimated to include some 50 adult residents. At present, the growth rate of the population appears to be too low to allow a further expansion in range. It is uncertain whether recruitment is sufficient to compensate for the high losses among resident adults induced by traffic accidents and illegal killing.

  5. Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction; 2002-2003 Progress Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavin, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

    2004-02-01

    This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of June 2002-September 2003. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos in 2002 and 2003 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. In 2002, 27 females from the two Columbia Gorge populations were equipped with transmitters and monitored until they nested. Four more females carrying old transmitters were also monitored; only one of these transmitters lasted through the nesting season. In 2003, 30 females were monitored. Twenty-three of the females monitored in 2002 nested and produced 84 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in fall 2002 and reared in captivity at the Woodland Park and Oregon zoos in the head-start program. Twenty-seven of the turtles monitored in 2003 nested. Six of the turtles nested twice, producing a total of 33 nests. The nests will be checked in September and October 2003 for hatchlings. Of 121 head-started juvenile western pond turtles collected in the Columbia Gorge during the 2001 nesting season, 119 were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2002, and 2 held over for additional growth. Of 86 turtles reared in the head-start program at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos fall 2002 through summer 2003, 67 were released at sites in the Columbia Gorge in summer of 2003, and 15 held over for more growth. Fifty-nine juveniles were released at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge in July 2002, and 51 released there in July 2003. Sixteen of those released in 2002 and 16 released in 2003 were instrumented with radio transmitters and monitored for varying amounts of time for survival and habitat use between the time of

  6. Reintroduction of Orangutans: A New Approach. A Study on the Behaviour and Ecology of Reintroduced Orangutans in the Sungai Wain Nature Reserve, East Kalimantan Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fredriksson, Gabriella

    1995-01-01

    The reintroduction of ex-captive orangutans Pongo pygmaeus) is part of a comprehensive conservation program to preserve this species and it’s habitat. During the last decades the orangutan has been under severe threat throughout it’s range- Northern Sumatra, Kalimantan and East Malaysia- due to

  7. Conservation and possible reintroduction of an endangered plant based on an analysis of community ecology: a case study of Primulina tabacum Hance in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai Ren; Qianmei Zhang; Zhengfeng Wang; Qinfeng Guo; June Wang; Nan Liu; Kaiming. Liang

    2010-01-01

    The distribution of the rare and endangered perennial herb Primulina tabacum Hance is restricted to eight karst caves in southern China. To conserve P. tabacum and to evaluate possible reintroduction, we studied its historical distribution and conducted field surveys of both its biotic and physical environment. We used detrended...

  8. Annual Interviews

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Department

    2005-01-01

    Annex II, page 1, Section 3 of the Administrative Circular no. 26 (Rev. 5) states that "The annual interview shall usually take place between 15 November of the reference year and 15 February of the following year." Following the meeting of the Executive Board on 7 December 2004 and the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 19 January 2005, it has been decided, for the advancement exercise of 2005, to extend this period until 15 March 2005. Human Resources Department Tel. 73566

  9. Captive breeding and reintroduction of the oriental pied hornbill (Anthracoceros albirostris) in Khao Kheow Open Zoo, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiyarat, Rattanawat; Kongprom, Urarikha; Manathamkamon, Darika; Wanpradab, Sunan; Sangarang, Satean

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses two related issues of the captive breeding and reintroduction of the Oriental pied hornbill (Anthracoceros albirostris) in order to increase its population in the natural habitats. Oriental pied hornbills were bred in Khao Kheow Open Zoo. Three pairs were separated and kept in breeding cages. Females occupied artificial nests between February and April 2005-2007. Eggs were laid and incubated between February and March each year from 2005 to 2007. Nestlings hatched in late March and left the nest in late April 2005-2007. Each breeding pair was fed with approximately 400 g of food each day. All three pairs reproduced resulting in mature offspring of seven in 2005, six in 2006, and five in 2007. Four of sixteen 3-year-old birds were randomly selected and equipped with a GPS receiver on their backs. Activities of the birds attached and unattached with GPS were not significantly different. The first two birds (one female, one male with GPS) were reintroduced on August 5, 2006, and another nine birds (four birds with GPS) were reintroduced on December 26, 2006. The average home range of these reintroduced birds was 0.13 km(2) . Their foods consisted of wild plants and animals in the home range. The first reintroduced pair was able to breed naturally by laying and hatching eggs in an artificial nest. Two juveniles left the nest in April 2008. These results indicate that both captive breeding and reintroduction are potentially important ways to increase the population of the Oriental pied hornbill in natural habitats. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Assessing re-introductions of the African Wild dog (Lycaon pictus) in the Limpopo Valley Conservancy, South Africa, using the stochastic simulation program VORTEX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Lars A.; Pedersen, Rikke B. F.; Hayward, Matt W.

    2010-01-01

    and South Africa). In 1998, a plan was launched in South Africa to manage sub-populations of the African wild dog in several small, geographically isolated, conservation areas. This management program involved the reintroduction of wild dogs into suitable conservation areas and periodic translocations among...... them. We used the stochastic population simulation model VORTEX to evaluate the Limpopo Valley Conservancy in the north of South Africa, as a possible reintroduction site for African wild dogs. The simulations showed that the size of the initial population released only had a small effect......The African wild dog (Lycaon pictus) is one of Africa's most endangered species and therefore classified as endangered by IUCN. Earlier distributions included most of Africa but currently the African wild dog only has populations larger than 300 individuals in three countries (Botswana, Tanzania...

  11. Analysis of oxaliplatin reintroduction in patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) treated with FOLFOX4 or FOLFOX7 in the optimox study

    OpenAIRE

    Buyse, Marc; Quinaux, E.; CORTINAS ABRAHANTES, Jose; Tournigand, C.; Cervantes, A.; Figer, A; André, Thierry; Tabah-Fisch, I; de Gramont, A

    2006-01-01

    Background: In the OPTIMOX1 study, previously untreated patients, (pts) with advanced CRC were randomized to either FOLFOX4 every 2 wks until progressio (arm A), or FOLFOX7 (arm B). There was no difference between arms in response rate, progression-free survival, and overall survival (OS)[Tournigand, JCO 2006;24:394]. The effect of oxaliplatin reintroduction on survival was inconclusive as a significant number of pts received oxaliplatin in both arms after being taken off the study. This r...

  12. A review of the proposed reintroduction program for the Far Eastern leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis) and the role of conservation organizations, veterinarians, and zoos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Paul; Stack, David; Harley, Jessica

    2013-11-01

    The Amur leopard is at the point of extinction. At present there are fewer than 35 in the wild. Their natural habitat ranges from China to the North Korean peninsula to Primorsky Krai in Russia. A reintroduction plan has been proposed to increase the population in the wild; however, this proposed plan still has many questions to be answered as to how effective it will be. The main objective is to reintroduce animals from a select group within the Far Eastern leopard programme or the Species Survival programme, which consist of leopards from select populations in the Northern Hemisphere. Zoos are central to the success of this plan, providing suitable breeding pairs to breed animals for reintroduction and also raising much needed funds to finance the project. Zoos are also central in educating the public about the critical status of the Amur leopard and other endangered animals of the world. Veterinary surgeons, by the very nature of their professional skills, are at the forefront of this seemingly endless battle against extinction of thousands of species that are critical to maintaining the balance of our fragile ecosystem. Veterinarians can analyze the health risks and health implications of reintroduction on the animals to be reintroduced and also on the native population. A world without large cats is a world hard to imagine. If we look closer at the implications of extinction, we see the domino effect of their loss and an ecosystem out of control. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. EXPLORATORY PLASMA BIOCHEMISTRY REFERENCE INTERVALS FOR URAL OWLS (STRIX URALENSIS, PALLAS 1771) FROM THE AUSTRIAN REINTRODUCTION PROJECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scope, Alexandra; Schwendenwein, Ilse; Stanclova, Gabriela; Vobornik, Angela; Zink, Richard

    2016-06-01

    The Ural owl (Strix uralensis) is the biggest forest-living owl in Austria; however, it became extinct in Austria through poaching and habitat loss more than half a century ago. The birds examined in the present study were breeding pairs from the reintroduction project with the aim of determining exploratory plasma biochemistry reference intervals in Ural owls and evaluating the amount of biological variation between seasons, sexes, and ages. A total of 45 birds were sampled, including 13 adult males, 14 adult females, and 18 juvenile birds. Remarkably, almost all of the analytes showed significant differences between the subgroups, primarily between seasons, followed by age and sex. Only creatinkinase, glucose, lactatdehydrogenase, and triglycerides did not show any significant variations. Despite partitioning of reference values into subgroups according to biological variation diminishing the number of reference individuals in the respective groups, the resulting smaller reference intervals will improve medical assessment. The results of the present study once again demonstrate that significant seasonal fluctuations must be expected and considered in the interpretation. It can be assumed that these differences are probably even greater in free-range birds with considerable changes in food quantity and quality during and between years.

  14. PCR-based method for sex identification of Eastern sarus crane (Grus antigone sharpii): implications for reintroduction programs in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insee, Jiranan; Kamolnorranath, Sumate; Baicharoen, Sudarat; Chumpadang, Sriphapai; Sawasu, Wanchai; Wajjwalku, Worawidh

    2014-02-01

    Due to human activity and a reduction in the size and quality of wetland habitats, populations of the Eastern sarus crane (Grus antigone sharpii) have declined dramatically across their range in Southeast Asia. Conservation efforts in Thailand have focused on reintroduction of the founders harboring the highest genetic diversity. One of the most important requirements to ensure the persistence of the reintroduced populations is a balanced sex ratio. In this study we tested three simple PCR-based methods which may be used for reliable sex identification in G. a. sharpii. The first method employs two combined primer sets based on a 0.6 kb EcoRI fragment (EE0.6). The second method is based on the intronic length polymorphism of the chromo-helicase DNA binding protein (CHD). The last technique relies on PCR-RFLP technique. The sex of six known and 24 unknown cranes were successfully identified by all three methods. These PCR-based sex identification methods are also useful for captive breeding management of G. a. sharpii.

  15. Experimental reintroduction of the crayfish species Orconectes virilis into formerly acidified Lake 302S, Experimental Lakes Area, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, I.D. [Saskatchewan Watershed Authority, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Vinebrooke, R.D. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Turner, M.A. [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Winnipeg, MB (Canada). Freshwater Inst.

    2009-11-15

    The sudden reappearance of extirpated species in damaged ecosystems may have adverse ecological impacts. This study reintroduced crayfish (Orconectes virilis) into a formerly acidified Boreal shield lake located in Ontario in order to evaluate the effect of the species on the littoral food web after a 17 year absence. A single factor experimental design consisting of 2 treatment levels was replicated 5 times in order to form a total of 10 littoral cages each measuring 4 m{sup 2}. The study showed that the crayfish significantly suppressed the total biomass of other benthic invertebrates by 70 per cent as a result of declines in larval damselflies and midges. Periphytic biomass was reduced by 90 per cent. Isotopic analyses of the mesocosm food webs demonstrated that the crayfish functioned as an omnivore. The study demonstrated that the re-introduction of crayfish must be balanced with adequate fish predation in order to prevent the species from negatively impacting the productive capacity of Boreal lakes. 67 refs., 2 tabs., 8 figs.

  16. Contribution of the private sector healthcare service providers to malaria diagnosis in a prevention of re-introduction setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Sumadhya Deepika; Dharmawardana, Priyani; Epasinghe, Geethanee; Senanayake, Niroshana; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Premaratne, Risintha; Wickremasinghe, Rajitha

    2016-10-18

    Sri Lanka is currently in the prevention of re-introduction phase of malaria. The engagement of the private sector health care institutions in malaria surveillance is important. The purpose of the study was to determine the number of diagnostic tests carried out, the number of positive cases identified and the referral system for diagnosis in the private sector and to estimate the costs involved. This prospective study of private sector laboratories within the Colombo District of Sri Lanka was carried out over a 6-month period in 2015. The management of registered private sector laboratories was contacted individually and the purpose of the study was explained. A reporting format was developed and introduced for monthly reporting. Forty-one laboratories were eligible to be included in the study and 28 participated by reporting data on a monthly basis. Excluding blood bank samples and routine testing for foreign employment, malaria diagnostic tests were carried out on 973 individuals during the 6-month period and nine malaria cases were identified. In 2015, a total of 36 malaria cases were reported from Sri Lanka. Of these, 24 (67 %) were diagnosed in the Colombo District and 50 % of them were diagnosed in private hospitals. An equal number of cases were diagnosed from the private sector and government sector in the Colombo District in 2015. The private sector being a major contributor in the detection of imported malaria cases in the country should be actively engaged in the national malaria surveillance system.

  17. Post-Transition Violence in Iraq (2004-2005): The Military Perspective of an Insider

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karam, Jabbar N

    2006-01-01

    .... Governing Iraq has been complicated by the violence Iraq is have since suffered. The nature of this violence in the regions north and west of Baghdad must be analyzed to provide a solution for a safe and secure Iraq...

  18. Energy statistics of non-OECD countries 2004-2005. 2007 ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This volume contains data on energy supply and consumption for coal, oil, gas, electricity, heat, renewables and waste for over 100 non-OECD countries. Historical tables summarise data on production, trade and final consumption. The book includes definitions of products and flows and explanatory notes on individual country data. In 'Energy Balances of Non-OECD Countries', the sister volume of this publication, the data are presented as comprehensive energy balances expressed in million tonnes of oil equivalent. Multilingual glossaries are included. A data service is available on the internet. Details are available at http://data.iea.org. In general the CD-ROM and online service contain detailed time series back to 1971.

  19. Dietary behaviour and nutritional status in underprivileged people using food aid (ABENA study, 2004-2005).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castetbon, K; Méjean, C; Deschamps, V; Bellin-Lestienne, C; Oleko, A; Darmon, N; Hercberg, S

    2011-12-01

    Although initiatives are setting up to improve the nutritional status of deprived people, few studies have described the food aid user profile and evaluated their nutritional needs. The contributions of food aid to the food supply, dietary behaviour and nutritional status of food aid users were evaluated in the ABENA study. A cross-sectional study was conducted among food aid users in four urban French zones (n = 1664, age ≥18 years). Sociodemographic and economic characteristics, food insufficiency, food supply and diet behaviours were assessed using standardised questionnaires. A subsample of participants underwent clinical and biochemical examinations. Descriptive and comparative analyses were performed taking into account sample weights. Over 70% of participants used food aid as the only source of supply among numerous food groups, and one-quarter of them (27.2%) were using food aid for 3 years or more. The mean food budget was €70.0 per person per month, and 46.0% of subjects were classified as 'food-insufficient'. Half of the subjects fulfilled the French recommendations for starchy foods (48.7%) and 'meat, fish and eggs' (49.4%); 27.3% met the requirements for seafood. Only a very small proportion of participants met the recommendations for fruits and vegetables (1.2%) and dairy products (9.2%). In addition, 16.7% of subjects were obese, 29.4% had high blood pressure, 14.8% were anaemic, 67.9% were at risk of folate deficiency and 85.6% had vitamin D deficiency. These results provide evidence of an unhealthy diet and poor health profiles in severely disadvantaged persons and highlight the importance of food aid in this population. Thus, this study points to the necessity of improving the nutritional quality of currently distributed food aid. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2011 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  20. Rapid health response, assessment, and surveillance after a tsunami--Thailand, 2004-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-28

    On December 26, 2004, an earthquake triggered a devastating tsunami that caused an estimated 225,000 deaths in eight countries (India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Maldives, Seychelles, Somalia, Sri Lanka, and Thailand) on two continents. In Thailand, six provinces (Krabi, Phang-Nga, Phuket, Ranong, Satun, and Trang) were impacted, including prominent international tourist destinations. The Thai Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) responded with rapid mobilization of local and nonlocal clinicians, public health practitioners, and medical supplies; assessment of health-care needs; identification of the dead, injured, and missing; and active surveillance of syndromic illness. The MOPH response was augmented by technical assistance from the Thai MOPH-U.S. CDC Collaboration (TUC) and the Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences (AFRIMS), with support from the office of the World Health Organization (WHO) representative to Thailand. This report summarizes these activities. The experiences in Thailand underscore the value of written and rehearsed disaster plans, capacity for rapid mobilization, local coordination of relief activities, and active public health surveillance.

  1. NEW SKIING TECHNIQUES – NEW INJURIES? ANALYSIS OF SKI INJURIESIN 2004/2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Veselko

    2008-08-01

    New design of skies and snowboards with carved edges have changed skiing technique.The velocity of skiers has raised, ski-tracking is defined by radius of ski edges and decreasedabillity to decelerate or to change direction in carving have led to new injury patterns. Newmechanisms of injuries dictate changes of security measures such as new release systemsof ski bindings, protection braces, skiing technique improvements and improved resortmanagement and safety

  2. 2004 - 2005 Academic Training Programme: 2nd Term - 03 January to 30 March 2005

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME Medical Physics by U. Amaldi, CERN-PH, M. Gilardi, Univ. di Milano, I M. Scholz, GSI Darmstadt , D O. Jäkel, Krebsforschunzsentrum, Heidelberg, D 24, 25, 26, 27 January A walk through the LHC injector chain by M. Benedikt, and K. Schindl, CERN-AB 14, 15, 16 February Telling the truth with statistics by G. D'Agostini, INFN, Roma, I. 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 February Technological challenges for LHC experiments, the CMS example by P. Sphicas, CERN-PH, P. Fabbricatore, INFN Genova, I, G. Dissertori, ETH Zürich, M. Mannelli, CERN-PH, G. Hall, Imperial College, London 28 February, 1, 2, 3, 4 March Astronomy from space by T. Courvoisier, Observatoire de Genève, CH 14, 15, 16, 17 March The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures, as well as any change to the above information (title, dates, time, place etc) will be published in the CERN Bulletin, the WWW, and by notices before each term and for each se...

  3. LBA-ECO TG-07 Seasonal Trace Gas Profiles in Brazilian Amazon Forests: 2004-2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) from air samples collected at several heights on...

  4. LBA-ECO TG-07 Seasonal Trace Gas Profiles in Brazilian Amazon Forests: 2004-2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) from air samples collected at several heights on towers at...

  5. LBA-ECO CD-34 Landsat Fractional Land Cover Analysis, Manaus, Brazil: 2004-2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides the results of fractional land cover analysis for nonphotosynthetic vegetation (NPV) from two Landsat images of Manaus, Brazil, for October...

  6. Intercomparison of laboratory analyses of radionuclides in environmental samples, 2004-2005[Radioecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Sven P. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    2006-04-15

    An intercomparison exercise of radionuclides in environmental samples and foodstuffs has been carried out. A total of 821 analytical results were received from 38 laboratories. Half of the laboratories are from the Nordic countries and the other half from Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Russia and Hungary. The concentrations of radionuclides in the samples were unknown for what reason the evaluation was based on comparison with median values. However, one of the samples (soil) was a certified reference material (IAEA-375), and for this sample good agreement was found between the median values and the certified values. The comparison shows generally good agreement between laboratories with some exceptions. Results for which the agreement is not good include {sup 90}Sr, {sup 241}Am, {sup 210}Pb and total alpha and total beta. Less than half of the participants meet the evaluation criteria concerning these results. For these analyses there seems to be a particular need for improved analytical quality and testing of the results in international intercomparison exercises. (au)

  7. LBA-ECO CD-34 Landsat Fractional Land Cover Analysis, Manaus, Brazil: 2004-2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides the results of fractional land cover analysis for nonphotosynthetic vegetation (NPV) from two Landsat images of Manaus, Brazil, for...

  8. AFSC/ABL: Lynn Canal Overwinter Acoustic Survey, 2004-2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The acoustic trawl database for Lynn Canals echo-trawl survey was conducted from 2001 to 2004 throughout southern Lynn Canal in southeast Alaska. Acoustic surveys...

  9. Exploration and excavation of shipwrecks in Goa and adjoining waters 2004-2005

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anon

    little elavated. Iron guns and granite stone blocks located earlier were also noticed. The wreck remains has been scattered over 75 to 100 m on the east, northeast and northwest side of the guns but not much artefacts noticed on southern and western sides....

  10. 2004-2005 Academic Training Programme: Electroweak Theory and the Standard Model

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 December LECTURE SERIES 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 December from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 on 6, 7, 8, 10 December, TH Auditorium, bldg. 4 3-006 on 9 December Electroweak Theory and the Standard Model R. BARBIERI / CERN-PH-TH There is a natural splitting in four sectors of the theory of the ElectroWeak (EW) Interactions, at pretty different levels of development /test. Accordingly, the 5 lectures are organized as follows, with an eye to the future: Lecture 1: The basic structure of the theory; Lecture 2: The gauge sector; Lecture 3: The flavor sector; Lecture 4: The neutrino sector; Lecture 5: The EW symmetry breaking sector. Transparencies available at: http://agenda.cern.ch/fullAgenda.php?ida=a042577 ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can ...

  11. Infertility treatment in a population-based sample: 2004-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Sara E; Baksh, Laurie; Stanford, Joseph B

    2012-05-01

    To describe the characteristics of women seeking infertility treatment and the types of fertility treatment sought within a population-based sample. We analyzed data from the cross-sectional Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) of women with a live birth using data from seven states. Logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with infertility treatment utilization. Infertility treatment was reported by 10.5% of women who were trying to become pregnant. The most common treatment reported was fertility enhancing drugs (29%), followed by assisted reproductive technology including in vitro fertilization (21%), and artificial insemination together with fertility enhancing drugs (15%). Some women reported using other types of treatment (23%). The PRAMS data provide insights into the use of infertility treatment among women giving birth in the United States. Further research is needed to understand the true prevalence of infertility, factors that influence treatment choices, and the longitudinal impact of infertility treatment on outcomes.

  12. Clinical Consequences of Rotavirus Acute Gastroenteritis in Europe, 2004-2005: The REVEAL Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carlo Giaquinto; Pierre Van Damme; Frédéric Huet; Leif Gothefors; Melanie Maxwell; Peter Todd; Liviana da Dalt

    2007-01-01

    Background. The availability of comprehensive, up-to-date epidemiologic data would improve the understanding of the disease burden and clinical consequences of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) in Europe. Methods...

  13. 78 FR 50113 - Distribution of 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009 Cable Royalty Funds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... among representatives of the major categories of copyrightable content (movies, sports programming, music, etc.). For broadcast years 2006 through 2009, the parties settled their controversies. The Judges... 2004 through 2009, inclusive. On July 27, 2012, three Phase I participants, Joint Sports Claimants...

  14. AFSC/REFM: Alaska regional economic data collected through surveys 2004, 2005, 2009, Seung

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Commercially available regional economic data for Alaska fisheries [such as IMpact analysis for PLANning (IMPLAN)] are unreliable. Therefore, these data need to be...

  15. Seed propagation and re-introduction of the U.S. federally endangered Hawaiian endemic, Platanthera holochila (Hbd. Krzl. (Orchidaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence W. Zettler

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Platanthera holochila (Hbd. Krzl. [syn = Peristylus holochila (Hbd N. Hallé] is the rarest of three orchids endemic to the Hawaiian Archipelago. As of 2011, 33 individual plants of this U.S. Federally endangered species remained on three islands with only one specimen known to occur on Kauai. This paper presents a summary of experiments aimed at cultivating this species from seed leading to the reintroduction of seedlings. We describe: 1 the mycorrhizal fungi acquired from P. holochila protocorms on Molokai, 2 the role of light vs. dark pretreatment on symbiotic seed germination using a mycorrhizal fungus from Florida, and 3 asymbiotic germination on three media (Murashige and Skoog, Knudson C, P723. Protocorms recovered in situ using seed packets yielded seven strains of a mycorrhizal fungus assignable to the anamorphic genus Epulorhiza Moore, but none of these strains prompted seed germination in vitro. Using the mycorrhizal fungus from Florida, no significant differences were detected between light pre-treatment vs. dark incubation on seed germination or development, but statistical differences were evident among two agar types tested. Seeds sown on acidified (pH 5.0 asymbiotic medium P723 (PhytoTechnology Labs developed to the leaf-bearing stage 351 days after sowing and incubation in darkness at 16–19 °C. Seedlings illuminated 451 days after sowing were eventually established on soil in a greenhouse (ex vitro. A total of 85 seedlings were promptly transported to Hawaii in March 2011. A minimum of 3.1 years is required for the propagation of P. holochila from seed using acidified asymbiotic medium P723.

  16. Annual Summary of the Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, M. I. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States)

    2009-12-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) order on radioactive waste management (DOE 1 999a) as well as the Maintenance Plan for the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment (Mann 2004) require an annual summary on the adequacy of the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment (RLAW PA) in each year in which a performance assessment is not issued. The most recent approved PA is the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Performance Assessment: 2001 Version (Mann et al 2001). The RLAW PA evaluated the adequacy of the ILAW disposal facility, now referred to as the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF), to safely dispose vitrified Hanford Site tank waste. More recently, a preliminary evaluation for the disposal of offsite low-level and mixed low-level waste was considered in the Integrated Disposal Facility Risk Assessment (Mann et al. 2003a). The first phase of IDF construction was completed on April 28, 2006 and included the installation of the cell liners and leachate collection tanks. The IDF is now in a preoperational maintenance mode and will not receive treated tank waste for several years. In view of these circumstances, the RCRA Part B Permit for the Integrated Disposal Facility has been modified to recognize that the facility will not be receiving waste in the near future. A subsequent modification indicated transfer of the IiDF from the DOE Office of River Protection (DOE/ORP) operation to the DOE Richland Operations Field Office (DOE/RL). This summary is the latest in a succession of sumnmaries that have been published since 2000 (Mann, 2000b, 2002, 2003b, 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007) and approved by the Field Manager, Office of River Protection (e.g., Schepens 2005c). This annual summary compares new data collected during Fiscal Year 2008 with the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Performance Assessment: 2001 Version (Mann et al 2001), which has been approved by DOE (DOE 2003a). Most of the data collected during

  17. First Steps into the Wild – Exploration Behavior of European Bison after the First Reintroduction in Western Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Philip; Caspers, Stephanie; Warren, Paige; Witte, Klaudia

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversity is rapidly declining globally. One strategy to help to conserve species is to breed species in captivity and release them into suitable habitats. The way that reintroduced animals explore new habitats and/or disperse from the release site is rarely studied in detail and represents key information for the success of reintroduction projects. The European bison (Bison bonasus L. 1758) was the largest surviving herbivore of the post-glacial megafauna in Europe before it became extinct in the wild, surviving only in captivity since 1919. We investigated the exploration behavior of a herd of European bison reintroduced into the Rothaargebirge, a commercial forest in low range mountain intensively used and densely populated by humans, in the first six months after release. We focused on three questions: (1) how did the European bison move and utilize the habitat on a daily basis, (2) how did the animals explore the new environment, and (3) did their habitat preferences change over time. The European bison dispersed away from their previous enclosure at an average rate of 539 m/month, with their areas of daily use ranging from 70 to 173 ha, their movement ranging from 3.6 km to 5.2 km per day, and their day-to-day use of areas ranged between 389 and 900 m. We could identify three major exploration bouts, when the animals entered and explored areas previously unknown to them. During the birthing phase, the European bison reduced daily walking distances, and the adult bull segregated from the herd for 58 days. Around rut, roaming behavior of the herd increased slightly. The animals preferred spruce forest, wind thrown areas and grassland, all of which are food abundant habitat types, and they avoided beech forest. Habitat preference differed slightly between phases of the study period, probably due to phenological cycles. After six months, the complete summer home range was 42.5 km2. Our study shows that a small free-ranging herd of European bison can live in an

  18. First Steps into the Wild - Exploration Behavior of European Bison after the First Reintroduction in Western Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Philip; Caspers, Stephanie; Warren, Paige; Witte, Klaudia

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversity is rapidly declining globally. One strategy to help to conserve species is to breed species in captivity and release them into suitable habitats. The way that reintroduced animals explore new habitats and/or disperse from the release site is rarely studied in detail and represents key information for the success of reintroduction projects. The European bison (Bison bonasus L. 1758) was the largest surviving herbivore of the post-glacial megafauna in Europe before it became extinct in the wild, surviving only in captivity since 1919. We investigated the exploration behavior of a herd of European bison reintroduced into the Rothaargebirge, a commercial forest in low range mountain intensively used and densely populated by humans, in the first six months after release. We focused on three questions: (1) how did the European bison move and utilize the habitat on a daily basis, (2) how did the animals explore the new environment, and (3) did their habitat preferences change over time. The European bison dispersed away from their previous enclosure at an average rate of 539 m/month, with their areas of daily use ranging from 70 to 173 ha, their movement ranging from 3.6 km to 5.2 km per day, and their day-to-day use of areas ranged between 389 and 900 m. We could identify three major exploration bouts, when the animals entered and explored areas previously unknown to them. During the birthing phase, the European bison reduced daily walking distances, and the adult bull segregated from the herd for 58 days. Around rut, roaming behavior of the herd increased slightly. The animals preferred spruce forest, wind thrown areas and grassland, all of which are food abundant habitat types, and they avoided beech forest. Habitat preference differed slightly between phases of the study period, probably due to phenological cycles. After six months, the complete summer home range was 42.5 km2. Our study shows that a small free-ranging herd of European bison can live in an

  19. First Steps into the Wild - Exploration Behavior of European Bison after the First Reintroduction in Western Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Schmitz

    Full Text Available Biodiversity is rapidly declining globally. One strategy to help to conserve species is to breed species in captivity and release them into suitable habitats. The way that reintroduced animals explore new habitats and/or disperse from the release site is rarely studied in detail and represents key information for the success of reintroduction projects. The European bison (Bison bonasus L. 1758 was the largest surviving herbivore of the post-glacial megafauna in Europe before it became extinct in the wild, surviving only in captivity since 1919. We investigated the exploration behavior of a herd of European bison reintroduced into the Rothaargebirge, a commercial forest in low range mountain intensively used and densely populated by humans, in the first six months after release. We focused on three questions: (1 how did the European bison move and utilize the habitat on a daily basis, (2 how did the animals explore the new environment, and (3 did their habitat preferences change over time. The European bison dispersed away from their previous enclosure at an average rate of 539 m/month, with their areas of daily use ranging from 70 to 173 ha, their movement ranging from 3.6 km to 5.2 km per day, and their day-to-day use of areas ranged between 389 and 900 m. We could identify three major exploration bouts, when the animals entered and explored areas previously unknown to them. During the birthing phase, the European bison reduced daily walking distances, and the adult bull segregated from the herd for 58 days. Around rut, roaming behavior of the herd increased slightly. The animals preferred spruce forest, wind thrown areas and grassland, all of which are food abundant habitat types, and they avoided beech forest. Habitat preference differed slightly between phases of the study period, probably due to phenological cycles. After six months, the complete summer home range was 42.5 km2. Our study shows that a small free-ranging herd of European

  20. A social network analysis of social cohesion in a constructed pride: implications for ex situ reintroduction of the African lion (Panthera leo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, Jackie; Kirzinger, Morgan W B; Gordon, Yvonne; Kirk, Jacqui; Kokeŝ, Rae; Lynas, Kirsty; Mandinyenya, Bob; Youldon, David

    2013-01-01

    Animal conservation practices include the grouping of captive related and unrelated individuals to form a social structure which is characteristic of that species in the wild. In response to the rapid decline of wild African lion (Panthera leo) populations, an array of conservational strategies have been adopted. Ex situ reintroduction of the African lion requires the construction of socially cohesive pride structures prior to wild release. This pilot study adopted a social network theory approach to quantitatively assess a captive pride's social structure and the relationships between individuals within them. Group composition (who is present in a group) and social interaction data (social licking, greeting, play) was observed and recorded to assess social cohesion within a released semi-wild pride. UCINET and SOCPROG software was utilised to represent and analyse these social networks. Results indicate that the pride is socially cohesive, does not exhibit random associations, and the role of socially influential keystone individuals is important for maintaining social bondedness within a lion pride. These results are potentially informative for the structure of lion prides, in captivity and in the wild, and could have implications for captive and wild-founder reintroductions.

  1. A social network analysis of social cohesion in a constructed pride: implications for ex situ reintroduction of the African lion (Panthera leo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackie Abell

    Full Text Available Animal conservation practices include the grouping of captive related and unrelated individuals to form a social structure which is characteristic of that species in the wild. In response to the rapid decline of wild African lion (Panthera leo populations, an array of conservational strategies have been adopted. Ex situ reintroduction of the African lion requires the construction of socially cohesive pride structures prior to wild release. This pilot study adopted a social network theory approach to quantitatively assess a captive pride's social structure and the relationships between individuals within them. Group composition (who is present in a group and social interaction data (social licking, greeting, play was observed and recorded to assess social cohesion within a released semi-wild pride. UCINET and SOCPROG software was utilised to represent and analyse these social networks. Results indicate that the pride is socially cohesive, does not exhibit random associations, and the role of socially influential keystone individuals is important for maintaining social bondedness within a lion pride. These results are potentially informative for the structure of lion prides, in captivity and in the wild, and could have implications for captive and wild-founder reintroductions.

  2. Kosten-baten analyse van herintroductie van verwerkt dierlijk eiwit in voeders voor pluimvee en varkens in een systeem van volledige kanalisatie = Cost-benefit analysis of reintroduction of processed animal protein in diets for poultry and pigs in a completely channelled production system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldkamp, T.

    2012-01-01

    The costs and benefits of reintroduction of processed animal protein in diets for poultry and pigs in a completely channelled production system have been evaluated. It has to be decided in the discussion on reintroduction of processed animal proteins in feed for poultry and pigs, which tolerance

  3. Annual Check-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Annual Check-Up Posted under Health Guides . Updated 24 April 2017. + ... I get ready for my annual medical check-up? If this is your first visit to your ...

  4. Assessment of children's nutritional attitudes before oral food challenges to identify patients at risk of food reintroduction failure: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polloni, L; Ferruzza, E; Ronconi, L; Toniolo, A; Lazzarotto, F; Bonaguro, R; Celegato, N; Muraro, A

    2017-05-01

    Inappropriate dietary eliminations may impair quality of life, affect children's growth and unnecessarily impact on healthcare costs. Previous retrospective studies reported that around 25% of children continue a food-avoidance diet despite a negative oral food challenge (OFC). A definite pattern has not been found yet for patients not reintroducing the food. This study aimed to examine the role of child's nutritional attitudes and maternal anxiety in reintroducing food after a negative OFC. A prospective study was conducted involving 81 mothers of children with IgE-mediated food allergy. They completed a survey on nutritional behaviour and attitudes and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory on the day of OFC and 6 months later. In total, 11.1% of children never or rarely ate the food after a negative OFC. Consumption of the reintroduced food is positively correlated to child's interest in tasting new foods before and after OFC and to changes in child's nutritional habits after OFC. It is negatively correlated to monotony of the diet after OFC. No correlations were found with other participants' characteristics or maternal anxiety. State anxiety significantly decreased after the OFC. A correlation was found between trait and state anxiety and the degree of change in nutritional habits after OFC. Evaluating child's approach towards food before the OFC is a promising approach to identify patients at risk of food reintroduction failure. Furthermore, it underlined the importance of reassessing food consumption in all patients after a negative OFC and supporting patients in the reintroduction of food. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2002 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  6. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2003 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  7. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2001 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  8. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2010 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  9. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2007 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  10. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2016 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  11. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2000 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  12. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2008 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  13. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2006 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  14. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2005 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  15. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2015 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  16. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2004 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  17. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2014 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  18. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2009 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  19. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2011 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  20. CSIR Annual report 1978

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Annual Report_1978.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 78 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Annual Report_1978.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  1. Annual Energy Review, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-06-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international energy; financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversions.

  2. CSIR Annual report 1972

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1972-01-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Annual Report_ 1972.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 95 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Annual Report_ 1972.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  3. 55th Annual

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1990-01-01

    Jan 1, 1990 ... At the invitation of the Madhya Pradesh. Council of Science and Technology, the. Barkatullah University and the Regional. Research laboratory, Bhopal, the 55th Annual. Meeting of the Academy was held at the. Tagore Bhawan, Bhopal from 10 to 13. November 1989. One of the best organized Annual.

  4. Annual Report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golnik, N.; Mika, J.R.; Wieteska, K. [eds.

    1998-12-31

    This Annual Report of the Institute of Atomic Energy describes the results of the research works carried out at the Institute at 1997. As in the preceding years the authors of the individual scientific reports published in this Annual Report are fully responsible for their content and layout. The Report contains the information on other activities of the Institute as well. (author)

  5. Annual Trapping Proposal 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Annual Trapping Plan for the 1984-1985 trapping season at Clarence Cannon NWR outlines rules and regulations for the trapping of beaver and muskrat on the...

  6. Annual Adjustment Factors

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The Department of Housing and Urban Development establishes the rent adjustment factors - called Annual Adjustment Factors (AAFs) - on the basis of Consumer Price...

  7. ASIST 2002 annual meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Peek, R

    2003-01-01

    Review of discussions and presentations at the American Society for Information Science and Technology 2002 annual meeting. Topics covered included new models of scholarly publishing and the development of the semantic web (1 page).

  8. USRDS - Annual Data Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — United States Renal Data System (USRDS) Annual Data Report Comprehensive statistics on chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal diseases in the United States...

  9. 2010 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-01-01

    This annual report includes: an overview of Western; approaches for future hydropower and transmission service; major achievements in FY 2010; FY 2010 customer Integrated Resource Planning, or IRP, survey; and financial data.

  10. SIS - Annual Catch Limit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Annual Catch Limit (ACL) dataset within the Species Information System (SIS) contains information and data related to management reference points and catch data.

  11. Annual General Canvass Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains annual quantities and value for all seafood products that are landed and sold by established seafood dealers and brokers in the Southeast...

  12. Natural gas annual 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-17

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  13. Re-introduction of globally threatened Arabian Gazelles Gazella Arabica (Pallas, 1766 (Mammalia: Bovidae in fenced protected area in central Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Z. Islam

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Arabian Gazelle is a globally threatened antelope (Vulnerable in Saudi Arabia. Small relict populations remain in limited areas, while historically Arabian Gazelles occurred in Mahazat as-Sayd protected area in central Saudi Arabia but were exterminated by anthropogenic and other pressures, including habitat loss and hunting. Important habitat has been lost to agricultural developments, fencing of pasture for livestock and the construction of human settlements and roads. The reintroduction of Arabian Gazelles was undertaken in Mahazat during 2011-2014 to bring back this locally extinct species study its ecology and biology in a fenced protected area. We released a total of 49 (12 males, 37 females animals. A year after release animals started breeding and six calves have been recorded so far with more to come. The gazelles prefer to use more rocky areas where shrubs and acacia trees occur in the reserve, and do not move long distances except for one individual that moved more than 50km. Mahazat is fenced, which prevents local people from entering the reserve to poach or otherwise disturb animals. Management lessons include the need for continued monitor-ing of reintroduced populations. Interactions between Arabian and Sand Gazelles (Gazella subgutturosa marica and Arabian Oryx (Oryx leucoryx were also studied.

  14. Reintroduction of Lake Sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) into the St. Regis River, NY: Post-release assessment of habitat use and growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittman, Dawn E.; Chalupnicki, Marc A.; Johnson, James H.; Snyder, James

    2015-01-01

    One of the depleted endemic fish species of the Great Lakes, Acipenser fulvescens (Lake Sturgeon), has been the target of extensive conservation efforts. One strategy is reintroduction into historically productive waters. The St. Regis River, NY, represents one such adaptive-management effort, with shared management between New York and the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe. Between 1998 and 2004, a total of 4977 young-of-year Lake Sturgeon were released. Adaptive management requires intermediate progress metrics. During 2004 and 2005, we measured growth, habitat use, and survivorship metrics of the released fish. We captured a total of 95 individuals of all stocked ages. Year-class minimal-survival rates ranged from 0.19–2.1%. The size-at-age and length/biomass relationships were comparable to those reported for juveniles in other Great Lakes waters. These intermediate assessment metrics can provide feedback to resource managers who make restoration-program decisions on a much shorter time-scale than the time-frame in which the ultimate goal of a self-sustaining population can be attained.

  15. Sensitivity analysis of environmental changes associated with riverscape evolutions following sediment reintroduction: Application to the Drôme River network, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piégay, H.; Bertrand, M.; Liébault, F.; Pont, D.; Sauquet, E.

    2011-12-01

    The present contribution aims to put into practice the conceptual framework defined in Pont et al. (2009) to the Drôme River Basin (France) in order to test the capacity of functional reach concept to be used to assess risks in environmental changes. The methodology is illustrated by examples focusing on the potential changes in functional reach diversity as a proxy of habitat diversity, and on potential impact on trout distribution at a network scale due to actions of sediment reintroduction. We used remote sensing and GIS methods to provide original data and to analyze them. A cluster analysis performed on the components of a PCA has been done to establish a functional reach typology based on planform parameters, used as a proxy of habitat typology following a review of literature. We calculated for the entire channel network an index of present and 1948 states of the functional reach types diversity to highlight past evolution. Various options of changes in functional reach types diversity were compared in relation to various increases in bedload delivery following planned deforestation. A similar risk assessment procedure is proposed in relation to changes in canopy cover and associated changes in summer temperature to evaluate impacts on brown trout distribution. Two practical examples are used as pilots for evaluating the risk assessment approach based on functional reach typology and its potential applicability for testing management actions for improving aquatic ecology. Limitations and improvements are then discussed.

  16. Natural gas annual 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1997 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1993 to 1997 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. 27 figs., 109 tabs.

  17. International energy annual 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The International Energy Annual presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 220 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy reported in the International Energy Annual includes hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar, and wind electric power, biofuels energy for the US, and biofuels electric power for Brazil. New in the 1996 edition are estimates of carbon dioxide emissions from the consumption of petroleum and coal, and the consumption and flaring of natural gas. 72 tabs.

  18. EPIDEMIOLOGÍA DEL TRAUMA POR QUEMADURAS EN LA POBLACIÓN ATENDIDA EN UN HOSPITAL INFANTIL. MANIZALES 2004-2005 Epidemiological description of burns trauma in a childrend hospital. Manizales (Colombia 2004-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Cardona B

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Antecedentes. Las lesiones por quemaduras se han convertido en un problema de salud pública, especialmente en países en desarrollo. Objetivo. Identificar la epidemiología del trauma por quemaduras en la población que consultó al servicio de urgencias del Hospital Infantil “Rafael Henao Toro” de la ciudad de Manizales en el período comprendido entre el año 2004 y 2005. Material y métodos. Se realizó un estudio descriptivo retrospectivo con base en la revisión de 439 historias clínicas, evaluando las variables de edad, género, seguridad social, procedencia, área geográfica, causa, profundidad, gravedad, extensión en porcentaje, área corporal comprometida, estancia hospitalaria y compañía. Resultados. Se encontró que la mayoría de las quemaduras ocurrieron en pacientes de un año de edad (21,6%, predominó el género masculino (59%. La mayoría no tenía seguridad social (52,2%. El 44,9 por ciento de los pacientes residía en la ciudad de Manizales. La principal etiología fueron los alimentos en 194 pacientes (44,2% predominando el grado I de quemadura en un 78,1 por ciento, con gravedad moderada en 314 pacientes (71,5%. La media de estancia hospitalaria fue 11,99 días. Conclusiones. Se determinó una mayor frecuencia de quemaduras en niños, menores de cinco años, causadas por alimentos, en miembro superior y de gravedad moderada.Background. Burns have become an increasing problem of public health, in developping countries.. Objetive. To identify the epidemiology of burns trauma in the population that consults to the emergency room in children hospital “Rafael Henao Toro” of Manizales the city between 2004 and 2005 years. Materials and methods. A retrospective descriptive study was made based in the revision of 439 clinical histories, evaluating the of age, sex, social security, origin, geographic area, cause, depth, seriousness, percentage, and corporal area concerned. Results. Burns happened in patients of one year old (21,6%, masculine genre (59% predominated. Most of the patients did not have social security, corresponding to 52,2%. 44,9% of patients living in the city. The main etiology were hot foods in 194 patients (44,2%. Burn of first degree in 78.1% was the most frequent, with moderate seriousness in 314 patients (71,5%. The most frequent corporal burned extension was of 2% in 15,3% of the total of the studied population, while the corporal region of greater commitment was the superior member in 111 patients (25,3%. The average of hospitalization was 11,99 days. Conclusions. Burns trauma was of greater frequency in children under, five years old, caused by hot foods, in superior member, and of moderate seriousness.

  19. Universalization in the first course of Medicine studies: Experience during the first semester of 2004- 2005. Universalización en primer año de Medicina: Experiencia durante el primer semestre del curso 2004-2005.

    OpenAIRE

    Raúl López Fernández.; Mayra Gil León; Margarita Roméu Escobar

    2005-01-01

    Background: The sliding of the basic cycle of teaching in Medicine speciality to the Health Primary care inserted in the in the university process of the higher medical education es quite brand new , whose development in the practical field was accurately unknown. Objective: to explore the course of the teaching learning process of 1st academic year of the medicine speciality as well as to assess the opinion stat...

  20. NERSC Annual Report 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hules (Ed.), John

    2006-07-31

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the premier computational resource for scientific research funded by the DOE Office of Science. The Annual Report includes summaries of recent significant and representative computational science projects conducted on NERSC systems as well as information about NERSC's current and planned systems and services.

  1. Annual Report 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) is an international research center using neutrons to probe the microscopic structure and dynamics of a broad range of materials. This annual report presents the ILL activities in 2000: the scientific highlights, the Millennium programme and the new developments, the workshops organized by the ILL, the experimental programme and the publications. (A.L.B.)

  2. FSAI Annual Report 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Food Safety Authority of Ireland

    2016-01-01

    THIS ANNUAL REPORT OUTLINES THE AUTHORITY’S EXTENSIVE WORK PROGRAMME IN 2015. IT DEMONSTRATES THE SIGNIFICANT ROLE THE AUTHORITY PLAYS IN ENCOURAGING THE HIGHEST STANDARDS IN FOOD PROVISION USING A COMBINATION OF SCIENCE BASED ACUMEN AND REGULATORY POWERS TO SAFEGUARD THE HEALTH AND INTERESTS OF CONSUMERS IN RELATION TO FOOD.

  3. Annual Integration Report 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaco Dagevos; Willem Huijnk; Mérove Gijsberts

    2014-01-01

    Original title: Jaarrapport integratie 2013 The theme of the Annual Integration Report 2013 (Jaarrapport integratie 2013) is the participation of migrants on the labour market. The economic downturn is hitting the labour market hard. What does this mean for the labour market and income

  4. CSIR Annual report 1969

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1969-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the twenty fifth annual report of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. The report covers the period from the 1st January, 1969, to the 31st December 1969. Balance sheets and statements of income and expenditure...

  5. CSIR Annual report 1968

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1968-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the twenty fourth annual report of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. The report covers the period from the 1st January, 1968, to the 31st December 1968. Balance sheets and statements of income and expenditure...

  6. Annual report 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The annual report from IKU (Continental Shelf Institute) in Norway deals with the market adjustment of research activities at the institute as a result of offshore cost-cutting policy in the petroleum industry. The market is about to shift focus from volume to competence. In practice, that means buying competence instead of project ideas or proposals

  7. NRCC annual report, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-11-01

    This annual report of the National Research for Computation in Chemistry (NRCC) Division describes the program of research workshops, software development, and scientific research of the Division in 1979. This year marked the first full calendar year of activity of the Division. Initial staffing in the core scientific areas was completed by the addition of a crystallographer.

  8. CSIR Annual report 1967

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1967-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the twenty third annual report of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. The report covers the period from the 1st January, 1967, to the 31st December 1967. Balance sheets and statements of income and expenditure...

  9. CSIR Annual report 1980

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the thirty-sixth annual report of the CSIR. The report covers the period 1 January, 1980 to 31 December 1980. A balance sheet and statements of income and expenditure for the financial year ended 31st March 1980, certified...

  10. CSIR Annual report 1970

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1970-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the twenty sixth annual report of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. The report covers the period from the 1st January, 1970, to the 31st December 1970. Balance sheets and statements of income and expenditure...

  11. CSIR Annual report 1971

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1971-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the twenty seventh annual report of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. The report covers the period from the 1st January, 1971, to the 31st December 1971. Balance sheets and statements of income and expenditure...

  12. NERSC Annual Report 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hules, John

    2003-01-31

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computational resource for scientific research funded by the DOE Office of Science. The Annual Report for FY2002 includes a summary of recent computational science conducted on NERSC systems (with abstracts of significant and representative projects), and information about NERSC's current and planned systems and service

  13. CSIR Annual report 1983

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1983-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the thirty ninth annual report of the CSIR. The report covers the period 1 January, 1983 to 31 December 1983. A balance sheet and statements of income and expenditure for the financial year ended 31st March 1983, certified...

  14. CSIR Annual report 1962

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1962-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the eighteenth annual report of the CSIR. The report covers the period 1 January, 1962 to 31 December 1962. A balance sheet and statements of income and expenditure for the financial year ended 31st March 1962, certified...

  15. Carolinas Communication Annual, 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, David B.

    1998-01-01

    This 1998 issue of "Carolinas Communication Annual" contains the following articles: "Give Me That Old Time Religion?: A Study of Religious Themes in the Rhetoric of the Ku Klux Klan" (John S. Seiter); "The Three Stooges versus the Third Reich" (Roy Schwartzman); "Interdisciplinary Team Teaching: Implementing…

  16. CSIR Annual report 1966

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1966-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the twenty second annual report of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. The report covers the period from the 1st January, 1966, to the 31st December 1966. Balance sheets and statements of income and expenditure...

  17. Mail Office annual closure

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    On the occasion of the annual closure of CERN, there will be no mail distributed on Friday 20 December 2013 but mail will be collected in the morning. Nevertheless, you will still be able to bring your outgoing mail to Building 555-R-002 until 12 noon.  

  18. CSIR Annual report 1963

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1963-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the nineteenth annual report of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. The report covers the period from the 1st January, 1963, to the 31st December 1963. Balance sheets and statements of income and expenditure...

  19. NERSC Annual Report 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hules, John; Bashor, Jon; Yarris, Lynn; McCullough, Julie; Preuss, Paul; Bethel, Wes

    2005-04-15

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the premier computational resource for scientific research funded by the DOE Office of Science. The Annual Report includes summaries of recent significant and representative computational science projects conducted on NERSC systems as well as information about NERSC's current and planned systems and services.

  20. International Energy Annual, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-14

    This report is prepared annually and presents the latest information and trends on world energy production and consumption for petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity. Trade and reserves are shown for petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Prices are included for selected petroleum products. Production and consumption data are reported in standard units as well as British thermal units (Btu) and joules.

  1. CSIR Annual report 1981

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the thirty seventh annual report of the CSIR. The report covers the period 1 January, 1981 to 31 December 1981. A balance sheet and statements of income and expenditure for the financial year ended 31st March 1981, certified...

  2. CSIR Annual report 1982

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the thirty eighth annual report of the CSIR. The report covers the period 1 January, 1982 to 31 December 1982. A balance sheet and statements of income and expenditure for the financial year ended 31st March 1982, certified...

  3. A study to analyze IAEA planning of 2004-2005 programme and to establish cooperation directions with the IAEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, B. W.; Ko, H. S.; Ryu, J. S.; Lee, T. J.; Kim, M. R

    2003-07-01

    The objective of this study is to utilize the IAEA effectively through reflecting Korea's opinion fully for the planning of the Agency's 2004{approx}2005 Programme. This study first analyzed the current status of the IAEA Programme and Budget and reviewed the issues relevant to Korea. Second, this study assessed the IAEA 2004{approx}2005 Programme and drew up Korea's opinion for it. The official document including the opinions was submitted to the Secretariat. In reviewing the Programme, this study considered the strengths of Korea related to the Programme. Also some projects and CRPs, which can be lead by Korea, were proposed. The IAEA 2004{approx}2005 Programme reflected well the technical and social changes and its structure seems to be proper. The budget was proposed to be increased over 10%, violating the zero-real growth principle. This seems to be inevitable considering the increase of safeguards activities. However, there should be prepared some measures to avoid rapid increase of the burdens of the Member States. In the process of the planning of the IAEA 2004{approx}2005 Programme, the following points should be emphasized. First, SMR activities should be given a high priority considering the high interests of developing countries and be set up as a separate project as in the 2002{approx}2003 Programme. Second, more budget should be allocated for Project A.4.04(Support for demonstration of nuclear seawater desalination), considering the highest priority of the project in Program A. Third, it's better to change the title of Subprogram C.3 to 'Nuclear knowledge Preservation' to stick to the original rationale of the subprogram. There is a need for further activities such as establishing and implementing the concept of international nuclear school based on the result of the feasibility study done in 2002{approx}2003. Fourth, further activities needs to be added to the Project D.2.03 for the efficient conversion to high density, low enriched uranium in Member States; for instance, review of those fuels developed in the world and facilitation of the effective transfer of those technologies. Fifth, further activities needs to be added Project J.2.06 such as information and experience exchanges among networks, development of networks further into regional cooperation bodies, etc.

  4. LBA-ECO ND-11 Forest Soil Structure and Nitrate, NW Mato Grosso, Brazil: 2004-2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set reports the results of the analysis of soil samples for Nitrate (NO3) and physical properties that were collected for one year following reduced impact...

  5. LBA-ECO ND-11 Forest Soil Structure and Nitrate, NW Mato Grosso, Brazil: 2004-2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set reports the results of the analysis of soil samples for Nitrate (NO3) and physical properties that were collected for one year following...

  6. Victimización en la perspectiva internacional : Resultados principales de la ENICRIV y ENECRIS 2004-2005

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, J. van; Kesteren, J. van; Smit, P.

    2007-01-01

    Este reporte presenta los principales resultados de las encuestas que fueron realizades como parte del quinto levantamiento de la Encuesta Internacional sobre Criminalidad y Victimización (ENICRIV). Una gran parte de los datos provienen de la Encuesta Europea sobre Criminalidad y Seguridad

  7. Hepatitis A vaccination coverage among children aged 24-35 months--United States, 2004-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-13

    After the licensure of hepatitis A vaccine in 1995 for children aged > or =24 months, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) incrementally expanded the proportion of children for whom it recommended the vaccine. In 1996, ACIP recommended vaccinating children in communities that had high rates of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection, including American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities and selected Hispanic and religious communities. In 1999, ACIP extended the recommendation to include routine vaccination for all children living in states, counties, and communities with incidence rates twice the 1987-1997 national average of 10 cases per 100,000 population (i.e., > or =20 cases per 100,000 population); ACIP also recommended considering vaccination for children living in states, counties, and communities with incidence rates exceeding the 1987-1997 national average (i.e., >10 to hepatitis A vaccination coverage were first made available through the 2003 National Immunization Survey (NIS), which indicated an overall national 1-dose coverage level of 16.0% (range: 6.4%-72.7%) among children aged 24-35 months. The estimates in this report update those findings by including 2 additional years of data (2004 and 2005). National 1-dose vaccination-coverage levels among children aged 24-35 months increased from 17.6% in 2004 to 21.3% in 2005. Coverage in states where vaccination was recommended (overall in 2005: 56.5%; range: 12.9%-71.0%) was below those for other recommended childhood vaccinations, such as varicella (87.5% in 2004). Despite low hepatitis A vaccination-coverage levels compared with other recommended childhood vaccinations, incidence of acute HAV infections have declined to the lowest level ever recorded. The 2005 licensure of the hepatitis A vaccine for use in younger children (aged > or =12 months) and the 2006 ACIP guideline for routine hepatitis A vaccination of all children aged > or =12 months should result in improved vaccination coverage and further reductions in disease incidence.

  8. Windward Community College Heeia Stream and Kaneohe Bay Water Quality Assessment Project 2004-2005 (NODC Accession 0002449)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Measurements of water quality parameters were taken by Windward Community College faculty and students at eight sites in the Heeia Stream and adjacent Kaneohe Bay...

  9. Vigilancia de la resistencia del Mycobacterium tuberculosis a los fármacos antituberculosos, Colombia 2004-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Consuelo Garzón

    2008-09-01

    Conclusiones. Los resultados obtenidos, comparados con estudios previos, demuestran que no ha habido un aumento significativo en la resistencia a los medicamentos ni en la tuberculosis multirresistente. Los hallazgos indican que el esquema proporcionado por el Programa Nacional de Tuberculosis es adecuado para manejar los casos.

  10. Trends in gender diversity American soil science classes: 2004-2005 to 2013-2014 academic years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindbo, David L.; Brevik, Eric C.; Vaughan, Karen L.; Parikh, Sanjai J.; Dilliver, Holly; Steffan, Joshua J.; Weindorf, David; McDaniel, Paul; Mbila, Monday; Edinger-Marshall, Susan; Thomas, Pamela

    2017-04-01

    A diverse workforce has been viewed for a long time as a healthy workforce. Traditionally however Soil Science has been seen as a male dominated field. The total number of female students enrolled showed increasing trends in all classes investigated during this study, but the percentage of female students showed a decline when analyzed by total students enrolled and also declined in four of the seven individual classes investigated. While both total enrollment and female enrollment increased during the study, male enrollment increased more rapidly than female enrollment. Soil biology/microbiology classes had a trend of more than 45% female enrollment throughout the study period, but many classes had less than 40% female enrollment, especially after the 2008-2009 academic year, and some hovered around only 35% female enrollment. The percentage of female soil science students had increased in the USA and Canada from 1992 to 2004 (Baveye et al., 2006) and Miller (2011) reported an increase in the number of female students at Iowa State University in the early 2000s. Therefore, the decrease in percentage of female soil science students found in our study was disappointing, even though absolute numbers of female students increased. It appears there is still a need to find ways to better market soil science coursework to female students. One possible way to accomplish this is to take advantage of the fact that many schools are now focusing efforts on STEM training specifically for females in grades 5-12, whereby science projects, after school programs, and mentorship can substantively influence females to pursue science-based fields in college. Another possibility is to promote the trends in female employment. As an example female employment within the Soil Science Division of the USDA-NRCS has increased over the same period. It should also be noted that the number of females in leadership roles has also increased. As a profession, soil science should look to take advantage of these types of opportunities. Baveye, P., A.R. Jacobson, S.E. Allaire, J.P. Tandarich, and R.B. Bryant. 2006. Whither goes soil science in the United States and Canada? Soil Sci. 171:501-518. Miller, B.A. 2011. Marketing and branding the agronomy major at Iowa State University. J. Nat. Res. Life Sci. Educ. 40:1-9. doi:10.4195/jnrlse.2009.0037u.

  11. Escapement and Productivity of Spring Chinook and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, Technical Report 2004-2005.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Wayne

    2007-04-01

    The objectives are: (1) Estimate number and distribution of spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha redds and spawners in the John Day River subbasin; and (2) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead. Spawning ground surveys for spring (stream-type) Chinook salmon were conducted in four main spawning areas (Mainstem, Middle Fork, North Fork, and Granite Creek System) and seven minor spawning areas (South Fork, Camas Creek, Desolation Creek, Trail Creek, Deardorff Creek, Clear Creek, and Big Creek) in the John Day River basin during August and September of 2005. Census surveys included 298.2 river kilometers (88.2 rkm within index, 192.4 rkm additional within census, and 17.6 rkm within random survey areas) of spawning habitat. We observed 902 redds and 701 carcasses including 227 redds in the Mainstem, 178 redds in the Middle Fork, 420 redds in the North Fork, 62 redds in the Granite Creek System, and 15 redds in Desolation Creek. Age composition of carcasses sampled for the entire basin was 1.6% age 3, 91.2% age 4, and 7.1% age 5. The sex ratio was 57.4% female and 42.6% male. Significantly more females than males were observed in the Granite Creek System. During 2005, 82.3% of female carcasses sampled had released all of their eggs. Significantly more pre-spawn mortalities were observed in Granite Creek. Nine (1.3%) of 701 carcasses were of hatchery origin. Of 298 carcasses examined, 4.0% were positive for the presence of lesions. A significantly higher incidence of gill lesions was found in the Granite Creek System when compared to the rest of the basin. Of 114 kidney samples tested, two (1.8%) had clinical BKD levels. Both infected fish were age-4 females in the Middle Fork. All samples tested for IHNV were negative. To estimate spring Chinook and summer steelhead smolt-to-adult survival (SAR) we PIT tagged 5,138 juvenile Chinook and 4,913 steelhead during the spring of 2005. We estimated that 130,144 (95% CL's 97,133-168,409) Chinook emigrated from the upper John Day subbasin past our seining area in the Mainstem John Day River (river kilometers 274-296) between February 4 and June 16, 2005. We also estimated that 32,601 (95% CL's 29,651 and 36,264) Chinook and 47,921 (95% CL's 35,025 and 67,366) steelhead migrated past our Mainstem rotary screw trap at river kilometer (rkm) 326 between October 4, 2004 and July 6, 2005. We estimated that 20,193 (95% CL's 17,699 and 22,983) Chinook and 28,980 (95% CL's 19,914 and 43,705) steelhead migrated past our Middle Fork trap (rkm 24) between October 6, 2004 and June 17, 2005. Seventy three percent of PIT tagged steelhead migrants were age-2 fish, 13.8% were age-3, 12.7% were age-2, and 0.3% were age 4. Spring Chinook SAR for the 2002 brood year was estimated at 2.5% (100 returns of 4,000 PIT tagged smolts). Preliminary steelhead SAR (excluding 2-ocean fish) for the 2004 tagging year was estimated at 1.61% (60 returns of 3,732 PIT-tagged migrants).

  12. Characterization of atmospheric particulate and metallic elements at Taichung Harbor near Taiwan Strait during 2004-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Guor-Cheng; Wu, Yuh-Shen; Lin, Jum-Bo; Lin, Chi-Kwong; Rau, Jui-Yeh; Huang, Shih-Han

    2006-06-01

    Air aerosol samples for TSP (total suspended particulate), coarse particulate (particle matter with aerodynamical diameter 2.5-10 microm, PM(2.5-10)), fine particulate (particle matter with aerodynamical diameter metallic elements were collected during March 2004 to January 2005 at TH (Taichung Harbor) in central Taiwan. The seasonal variation average concentration of TSP (total suspended particulate), coarse particulate (particle matter with aerodynamical diameter 2.5-10 microm, PM(2.5-10)) and fine particulate (particle matter with aerodynamical diameter metallic elements Cu, Mn, Zn and Fe in the TSP (total suspended particulate) shows that higher concentration was observed during spring. Seasonal variation of metallic elements Pb, Cr and Mg in the TSP (total suspended particulate) shows that higher concentration was observed during winter. The average metallic element TSP (total suspended particulate) concentration order was Fe>Zn>Mg>Cu>Cr>Mn>Pb in spring. In addition, at the TH sampling site, the average concentration variation of TSP (total suspended particulate) displayed the following order: spring>winter>autumn>summer. However, the average concentration variation of coarse particulate (particle matter with aerodynamical diameter 2.5-10 microm, PM(2.5-10)) displayed the following order: spring>winter>summer>autumn. Finally, the average concentration variations of fine particulate (particle matter with aerodynamical diameter spring>summer>autumn at the TH sample site.

  13. Niveles de plomo sanguíneo en recién nacidos de La Oroya, 2004-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godofredo Pebe

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Determinar los niveles de plomo en sangre de los recién nacidos (RN de menos de 12 horas de vida, en la ciudad de La Oroya. Material y métodos. Estudio descriptivo, transversal y prospectivo realizado entre junio de 2004 a junio de 2005 de una muestra de recién nacidos (RN de La Oroya, se usó un cuestionario para la madre gestante y se determinó los niveles de plomo en sangre venosa (2 mL utilizando la espectrofotometría por absorción atómica con llama de aire de acetileno. Los valores se expresan en microgramos de plomo por decilitro de sangre (μg/dL. Resultados. Se evaluσ 93 RN; el nivel promedio de plomo en sangre fue de 8,84 ± 0,57 μg/dL. El 75,3% (70/ RN tuvo niveles de plomo en sangre entre 6 a 10 μg/dL, y 24,7% (23 RN tuvo mαs de 10 μg/dL. Los RN de madres que viven en La Oroya Nueva tienen menos niveles de plomo que los que viven en La Oroya Antigua (p=0,002. Conclusiones. Los RN de la ciudad de La Oroya presentan elevados niveles de plomo en sangre, por lo que se requiere iniciar programas de prevención en las madres gestantes para evitar futuros daños a la salud de los recién nacidos.

  14. A survey of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever in livestock and ticks in Ardabil Province, Iran during 2004-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telmadarraiy, Z; Ghiasi, Seyed Mojtaba; Moradi, Maryam

    2010-01-01

    Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a viral haemorrhagic fever caused by the CCHF virus. It is mainly transmitted to humans and animals by ticks. In recent y, large numbers of livestock have been transported across the border areas of Ardabil Province resulting in an outbreak of CCHF in th...... virus genome in ticks points to a great hidden threat of an outbreak in these districts. Those in high-risk professions in this province should be informed and trained on the risk of CCHF with urgency....

  15. Comparison of HIV prevalence estimates from sentinel surveillance and a national population-based survey in Uganda, 2004-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musinguzi, Joshua; Kirungi, Wilford; Opio, Alex; Montana, Livia; Mishra, Vinod; Madraa, Elizabeth; Biryahwaho, Benon; Mermin, Jonathan; Bunnell, Rebecca; Cross, Anne; Hladik, Wolfgang; McFarland, Willie; Stoneburner, Rand

    2009-05-01

    HIV programs in generalized epidemics have traditionally relied on antenatal clinic (ANC) sentinel surveillance data to guide prevention and to model epidemic trends. ANC data, however, come from a subset of the population, and their representativeness of the population has been debated. Data from a national population-based Uganda HIV/AIDS Sero-Behavioral Survey (UHSBS) were compared with those from ANC sentinel surveillance. Using geographic information system, UHSBS clusters within a 30 km radius of the ANC sites were mapped. Estimates of HIV prevalence from ANC surveillance were compared with those from UHSBS. The ANC-based HIV prevalence, 6.0% [confidence interval (CI) 5.5% to 6.5%], was similar to that from UHSBS, 5.9% (CI 5.4% to 6.4%). The ANC-based estimate correlated with that of UHSBS catchment area women who were pregnant and those who had given birth in the 2 years preceding the survey. ANC data overestimated prevalence in the 15-year to 19-year age group, were similar to UHSBS for ages 20-29 years, and underestimated prevalence in older respondents. ANC data underestimated HIV prevalence among women (6.0% vs. 7.4%; CI 6.6% to 8.2%) and urban women (7.6% vs. 12.7%) but was similar for rural women (5.3% vs. 4.9%). ANC-based surveillance remains an important tool for monitoring HIV/AIDS programs. ANC and UHSBS data were similar overall and for 15-year to 29-year olds, women who were pregnant, and women who had a birth in the 2 years before the survey. ANC estimates were lower in those > or = 30 years and in urban areas. Periodic serosurveys to adjust ANC-based estimates are needed.

  16. 78 FR 50114 - Distribution of 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009 Satellite...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... categories of copyrightable content (e.g., movies, music, and sports programming). At Phase II, the royalties... request are: Joint Sports Claimants (JSC), Program Suppliers, Devotional Claimants, ] Broadcasters Claimants Group (BCG), and the ``Music Claimants'' consisting of Broadcast Music, Inc. (BMI), American...

  17. Changes of population trends and mortality patterns in response to the reintroduction of large predators: The case study of African ungulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grange, Sophie; Owen-Smith, Norman; Gaillard, Jean-Michel; Druce, Dave J.; Moleón, Marcos; Mgobozi, Mandisa

    2012-07-01

    Large predators have been reintroduced to an increasing number of protected areas in South Africa. However, the conditions allowing both prey and predator populations to be sustained in enclosed areas are still unclear as there is a lack of understanding of the consequences of such reintroductions for ungulate population dynamics. Variation in lion numbers, two decades after their first release, offered a special opportunity to test the effects of predation pressure on the population dynamics of seven ungulate species in the 960 km2 Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park (HiP), South Africa. We used two different approaches to examine predator-prey relationships: the population response of ungulates to predation pressure after accounting for possible confounding factors, and the pattern of ungulate adult mortality observed from carcass records. Rainfall patterns affected observed mortalities of several ungulate species in HiP. Although lion predation accounted for most ungulate mortality, it still had no detectable influence on ungulate population trends and mortality patterns, with one possible exception. This evidence suggests that the lion population had not yet attained the maximum abundance potentially supported by their ungulate prey; but following recent increases in lion numbers it will probably occur soon. It remains uncertain whether a quasi-stable balance will be reached between prey and predator populations, or whether favoured prey species will be depressed towards levels potentially generating oscillatory dynamics in this complex large mammal assemblage. We specifically recommend a continuous monitoring of predator and prey populations in HiP since lions are likely to show more impacts on their prey species in the next years.

  18. Annual report of groundwater monitoring at Centralia, Kansas, in 2010.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-03-16

    In September 2005, periodic sampling of groundwater was initiated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Centralia, Kansas. The sampling at Centralia is performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Centralia (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater was sampled twice yearly from September 2005 until September 2007 for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as measurement of selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation processes (reductive dechlorination) in the subsurface environment (Argonne 2006, 2007a, 2008a). The results from the two-year sampling program demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5 {micro}g/L for this compound, in a localized groundwater plume that has shown little movement. The relative concentrations of chloroform, the primary degradation product of carbon tetrachloride, suggested that some degree of reductive dechlorination or natural biodegradation was talking place in situ at the former CCC/USDA facility on a localized scale. The CCC/USDA subsequently developed an Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007b), proposing a pilot test of the Adventus EHC technology for in situ chemical reduction (ISCR). The proposed interim measure (IM) was approved by the KDHE in November 2007 (KDHE 2007). Implementation of the pilot test occurred in November-December 2007. The objective was to create highly reducing conditions that would enhance both chemical and biological

  19. Annual report of groundwater monitoring at Centralia, Kansas, in 2009.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2010-10-19

    In September 2005, periodic sampling of groundwater was initiated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Centralia, Kansas. The sampling at Centralia is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Centralia (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater was sampled twice yearly from September 2005 until September 2007 for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as measurement of selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The results from the two-year sampling program demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5 {micro}g/L for this compound in a localized groundwater plume that has shown little movement. The relative concentrations of chloroform, the primary degradation product of carbon tetrachloride, suggested that some degree of reductive dechlorination or natural biodegradation was taking place in situ at the former CCC/USDA facility on a localized scale. The CCC/USDA subsequently developed an Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007b), proposing a pilot test of the Adventus EHC technology for in situ chemical reduction (ISCR). The proposed interim measure (IM) was approved by the KDHE in November 2007 (KDHE 2007). Implementation of the pilot test occurred in November-December 2007. The objective was to create highly reducing conditions that would enhance both chemical and biological reductive dechlorination

  20. 1988 Annual water management plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Ruby Lake NWR 1987 Annual Water Management Report 1988 Annual Water Management Plan. Includes 1987 weather summary, water availability forecast, summary of 1987...

  1. Annual Energy Review 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiferlein, Katherine E. [USDOE Energy Information Administration (EIA), Washington, DC (United States)

    2008-06-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are data on total energy production, consumption, and trade; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, international energy, as well as financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversion tables. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95–91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the EIA under Section 205(a)(2), which states: “The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information....”

  2. Coal industry annual 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    Coal Industry Annual 1997 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. US Coal production for 1997 and previous years is based on the annual survey EIA-7A, Coal Production Report. This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report includes a national total coal consumption for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

  3. International energy annual 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-01

    The International Energy Annual presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 220 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy reported in the International Energy Annual includes hydroelectric power and geothermal, solar, and wind electric power. Also included are biomass electric power for Brazil and the US, and biomass, geothermal, and solar energy produced in the US and not used for electricity generation. This report is published to keep the public and other interested parties fully informed of primary energy supplies on a global basis. The data presented have been largely derived from published sources. The data have been converted to units of measurement and thermal values (Appendices E and F) familiar to the American public. 93 tabs.

  4. NAGRA Annual report 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-04-15

    This annual report presents the highlights of the activities carried out by the Swiss National Co-operative for the Disposal of Radioactive Wastes NAGRA during the year 2010. These include reviews by various commissions of the NAGRA co-operative's proposals for possible sites for nuclear waste repositories. Also, the enhancements made concerning information facilities for the general public at the co-operative's rock laboratories are mentioned. The operation of initial satellite-based precision measurement systems for movements in the earth's crust is noted. Organisational aspects and international co-operation are discussed. This annual report also looks at NAGRA's organisational structures and its commercial accounts. Appendices provide details on waste inventories and volumes and publications made in 2010. A selection of relevant internet addresses is also provided

  5. Renewable energy annual 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The Renewable Energy Annual 1995 is the first in an expected series of annual reports the Energy Information Administration (EIA) intends to publish to provide a comprehensive assessment of renewable energy. This report presents the following information on the history, status, and prospects of renewable energy data: estimates of renewable resources; characterizations of renewable energy technologies; descriptions of industry infrastructures for individual technologies; evaluations of current market status; and assessments of near-term prospects for market growth. An international section is included, as well as two feature articles that discuss issues of importance for renewable energy as a whole. The report also contains a number of technical appendices and a glossary. The renewable energy sources included are biomass (wood), municipal solid waste, biomass-derived liquid fuels, geothermal, wind, and solar and photovoltaic.

  6. Annual General Asssembly

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    All members and beneficiaries of the Pension Fund are invited to attend the Annual General Asssembly to be held in the CERN Council Chamber on Thursday 13 October 2005 at 14:30 The Agenda comprises: Opening Remarks (J. Bezemer) Results and presentation of the Annual Report 2004 - Role of asset classes in pension funds (C. Cuénoud) Copies of the 2004 Report are available from departmental secretariats. Package of measures aiming at equilibrating the Fund - Proposals by the Governing Board (J.-P. Matheys) Questions from members and beneficiaries Persons wishing to ask questions are encouraged to submit them, where possible, in writing in advance, addressed to Mr C. Cuénoud, Administrator of the Fund. Conclusions (J. Bezemer) As usual, participants are invited to drinks after the assembly. NB The minutes of the 2004 General Assembly are available from the Administration of the Fund (tel.(+4122)767 27 42; e-mail Sophia.Revol@cern.ch)

  7. Annual General Asssembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Pension Fund

    2005-01-01

    All members and beneficiaries of the Pension Fund are invited to attend the Annual General Asssembly to be held in the CERN Council Chamber on Thursday 13 October 2005 at 14:30 The Agenda comprises: Opening Remarks (J. Bezemer) Results and presentation of the Annual Report 2004 - Role of asset classes in pension funds (C. Cuénoud). Copies of the 2004 Report are available from departmental secretariats. Package of measures aiming at equilibrating the Fund - Proposals by the Governing Board (J.-P. Matheys). Questions from members and beneficiaries. Persons wishing to ask questions are encouraged to submit them, where possible, in writing in advance, addressed to Mr C. Cuénoud, Administrator of the Fund. Conclusions (J. Bezemer). As usual, participants are invited to drinks after the assembly. NB The minutes of the 2004 General Assembly are available from the Administration of the Fund (tel.(+4122)767 27 42; e-mail Sophia.Revol@cern.ch)

  8. Annual report 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broda, R.; Lesniak, L.; Malecki, P.; Stachura, Z.; Wojciechowski, H. [eds.

    1992-12-31

    The material presented describing the scientific activities of the Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics in 1991 is the first annual report in several years.The arrangement of the report from various departments reflect the present structure of the Institute and is meant to help in the future task of reconstructing the Institute. Few guidelines proposed by the editorial board gave the individual departments much freedom in selecting the material and choosing the volume and format of presentation. (author).

  9. 2008 annual merit review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The 2008 DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review was held February 25-28, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. The review encompassed all of the work done by the Vehicle Technologies Program: a total of 280 individual activities were reviewed, by a total of just over 100 reviewers. A total of 1,908 individual review responses were received for the technical reviews, and an additional 29 individual review responses were received for the plenary session review.

  10. TIARA annual report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Ryuichi; Saido, Masahiro; Nashiyama, Isamu [eds.] [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment] [and others

    1998-10-01

    This annual report describes research activities which have been performed with the JAERI TIARA (Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application) facilities from April 1, 1997 to March 31, 1998. Summary reports of 90 papers and brief descriptions on the status of TIARA in the period are contained. A list of publications, the type of research collaborations and organization of TIARA are also given as appendices. (author)

  11. TIARA annual report 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-10-01

    This annual report describes research and development activities which have been performed with the JAERI TIARA (Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application) facilities from April 1, 1998 to March 31, 1999. Summary reports of 95 papers and brief descriptions on the status of TIARA in the period are contained. A list of publications, the type of research collaborations and organization of TIARA are also given as appendices. (author)

  12. NSLS annual report 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaffky, R.; Thomlinson, W. (eds.)

    1984-01-01

    The first comprehensive Annual Report of the National Synchrotron Light Source comes at a time of great activity and forward motion for the facility. In the following pages we outline the management changes that have taken place in the past year, the progress that has been made in the commissioning of the x-ray ring and in the enhanced utilization of the uv ring, together with an extensive discussion of the interesting scientific experiments that have been carried out.

  13. TIARA annual report 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saidoh, Masahiro; Toraishi, Akio; Namba, Hideki (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment] [and others

    2001-11-01

    This annual report describes research and development activities which have been performed with the JAERI TIARA (Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application) facilities from April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2001. Summary reports of 103 papers and brief descriptions on the status of TIARA in the period are contained. A list of publications, the type of research collaborations and organization of TIARA are also given as appendices. (author)

  14. TIARA annual report 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saidoh, Masahiro; Ohara, Yoshihiro; Namba, Hideki (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment] [and others

    2002-11-01

    This annual report describes research and development activities which have been performed with the JAERI TIARA (Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application) facilities from April 1, 2001 to March 31, 2002. Summary reports of 109 papers and brief descriptions on the status of TIARA in the period are contained. A list of publications, the type of research collaborations and organization of TIARA are also given as appendices. (author)

  15. TIARA annual report 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saidoh, Masahiro; Toraishi, Akio; Itoh, Hisayoshi [eds.] [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment] [and others

    2000-10-01

    This annual report describes research and development activities which have been performed with the JAERI TIARA (Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application) facilities from April 1, 1999 to March 31, 2000. Summary reports of 106 papers and brief descriptions on the status of TIARA in the period are contained. A list of publications, the type of research collaborations and organization of TIARA are also given as appendices. (author)

  16. NERSC 1998 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hules, John (ed.)

    1999-03-01

    This 1998 annual report from the National Scientific Energy Research Computing Center (NERSC) presents the year in review of the following categories: Computational Science; Computer Science and Applied Mathematics; and Systems and Services. Also presented are science highlights in the following categories: Basic Energy Sciences; Biological and Environmental Research; Fusion Energy Sciences; High Energy and Nuclear Physics; and Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Other Projects.

  17. TIARA annual report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    This annual report describes research activities which have been performed with the JAERI TIARA (Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application) facilities from April 1, 1996 to March 31, 1997. Summary reports of 88 papers and 4 brief descriptions on the status of TIARA in the period are contained. A list of publications, the type of research collaborations and organization of TIARA are also given as appendices. (J.P.N.)

  18. 2012 CPES Annual Report

    OpenAIRE

    Virginia Tech. Center for Power Electronics Systems

    2012-01-01

    The Center for Power Electronics Systems at Virginia Tech is a research center dedicated to improving electrical power processing and distribution that impact systems of all sizes – from battery – operated electronics to vehicles to regional and national electrical distribution systems. Our mission is to provide leadership through global collaborative research and education for creating advanced electric power processing systems of the highest value to society. CPES, with annual research expe...

  19. Uranium industry annual 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-05

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ``Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,`` is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2.

  20. Annual Science and Engineering Technology Conference Presentations (8th)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-19

    2004 2005 2006 Total L-3 Communications 3 4 5 6 18 General Dynamics 6 3 3 4 16 Lockheed Martin 3 2 4 9 Carlyle 2 2 4 BAE Systems 3 3 EDO 2 2 GKN 2 2...etc…) for small, low-cost satellites • Develop integrated software suite covering entire range of needs from mission planning to autonomous, on- orbit ...tactical orbit Inventory for ɛ years Call-up to Operations in Days Tactical Ground Terminal Tactical Operations The S&T Foundation Enabling

  1. Annual Report of Groundwater Monitoring at Centralia, Kansas, in 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Periodic sampling is performed at Centralia, Kansas, on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) by Argonne National Laboratory. The sampling is currently (2009-2012) conducted in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2009). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater sitewide (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a), as well as the response to the interim measure (IM) pilot test that is in progress (Argonne 2007b). This report provides a summary of the findings for groundwater inspection in Centralia.

  2. The SRTR/OPTN Annual Data Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Annual Data Report The SRTR/OPTN Annual Data Report Statistics on donation and transplantation in the United ... US in 2015. The SRTR/OPTN Annual Data Report SRTR/OPTN Annual Data Report Learn more from ...

  3. Continuation or reintroduction of bevacizumab beyond progression to first-line therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer: final results of the randomized BEBYP trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, G; Salvatore, L; Boni, L; Loupakis, F; Cremolini, C; Fornaro, L; Schirripa, M; Cupini, S; Barbara, C; Safina, V; Granetto, C; Fea, E; Antonuzzo, L; Boni, C; Allegrini, G; Chiara, S; Amoroso, D; Bonetti, A; Falcone, A

    2015-04-01

    The combination of bevacizumab with fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is a standard first-line treatment option in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We studied the efficacy of continuing or reintroducing bevacizumab in combination with second-line chemotherapy after progression to bevacizumab-based first-line therapy. In this phase III study, patients with mCRC treated with fluoropyrimidine-based first-line chemotherapy plus bevacizumab were randomized to receive in second-line mFOLFOX-6 or FOLFIRI (depending on first-line regimen) with or without bevacizumab. The primary end point was progression-free survival. To detect a hazard ratio (HR) for progression of 0.70 with an α and β error of 0.05 and 0.20, respectively, 262 patients were required. In consideration of the results of the ML18147 trial, the study was prematurely stopped. Between April 2008 and May 2012, a total of 185 patients were randomized. Bevacizumab-free interval was longer than 3 months in 43% of patients in chemotherapy alone arm and in 50% of patients in the bevacizumab arm. At a median follow-up of 45.3 months, the median progression-free survival was 5.0 months in the chemotherapy group and 6.8 months in the bevacizumab group [adjusted HR = 0.70; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.52-0.95; stratified log-rank P = 0.010]. Subgroup analyses showed a consistent benefit in all subgroups analyzed and in particular in patients who had continued or reintroduced bevacizumab. An improved overall survival was also observed in the bevacizumab arm (adjusted HR = 0.77; 95% CI 0.56-1.06; stratified log-rank P = 0.043). Responses (RECIST 1.0) were similar in the chemotherapy and bevacizumab groups (17% and 21%; P = 0.573). Toxicity profile was consistent with previously reported data. This study demonstrates that the continuation or the reintroduction of bevacizumab with second-line chemotherapy beyond first progression improves the outcome and supports the use of this strategy in the treatment of m

  4. Coxiella burnetii (Q fever) in Rattus norvegicus and Rattus rattus at livestock farms and urban locations in the Netherlands; could Rattus spp. represent reservoirs for (re)introduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusken, Chantal; van der Plaats, Rozemarijn; Opsteegh, Marieke; de Bruin, Arnout; Swart, Arno

    2011-08-01

    The Q fever outbreak in the Netherlands in 2007-2010 prompted government interventions to reduce the human incidence by reduction of Q fever shedding at dairy goat farms. Mandatory hygiene measures were taken, including the control of animal reservoirs. It has been postulated that brown rats, through their commensal nature, form an important factor in the persistent dissemination of endemic circulating Coxiella burnetii in nature to domestic animals, livestock and humans. Here, the occurrence of C. burnetii in rats captured at different types of location during the Q fever outbreak in the Netherlands, viz. urban areas, nature areas and various types of farm has been determined. This is a first step towards the elucidation of the reservoir status of rats in veterinary and human Q fever epidemiology. C. burnetii DNA was detected in the spleen of 4.9% of the brown rats (Rattus norvegicus) and 3.0% of the black rats (Rattus rattus). Evidence for C. burnetii infection was also found in liver, kidney, lung and intestinal tissue but not in heart, brain and pancreas. C. burnetii IgGs were detected in 15.8% of the brown rats. Positive rats were collected at goat, pig, cattle and poultry farms, and urban locations; including locations outside the designated 5km "increased-risk" zones around bulk milk positive goat farms. The percentage of rat-positive locations was the highest for goat farms (50%) and cattle farms (14.3%). The presence of actively infected rats outside the lambing season and at multiple environmental settings including urban locations might suggest that rats are not merely a spill-over host due to infection by a contaminated environment but might represent true reservoirs, capable of independent maintenance of C. burnetii infection cycles and thereby contributing to spread and transmission of the pathogen. If frequent (re)introduction of C. burnetii to small ruminant farms can be caused by rats as maintenance reservoirs, mandatory wildlife control and

  5. Observation versus late reintroduction of letrozole as adjuvant endocrine therapy for hormone receptor-positive breast cancer (ANZ0501 LATER): an open-label randomised, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdenkowski, N; Forbes, J F; Boyle, F M; Kannourakis, G; Gill, P G; Bayliss, E; Saunders, C; Della-Fiorentina, S; Kling, N; Campbell, I; Mann, G B; Coates, A S; Gebski, V; Davies, L; Thornton, R; Reaby, L; Cuzick, J; Green, M

    2016-05-01

    Despite the effectiveness of adjuvant endocrine therapy in preventing breast cancer recurrence, breast cancer events continue at a high rate for at least 10 years after completion of therapy. This randomised open label phase III trial recruited postmenopausal women from 29 Australian and New Zealand sites, with hormone receptor-positive early breast cancer, who had completed ≥4 years of endocrine therapy [aromatase inhibitor (AI), tamoxifen, ovarian suppression, or sequential combination] ≥1 year prior, to oral letrozole 2.5 mg daily for 5 years, or observation. Treatment allocation was by central computerised randomisation, stratified by institution, axillary node status and prior endocrine therapy. The primary outcome was invasive breast cancer events (new invasive primary, local, regional or distant recurrence, or contralateral breast cancer), analysed by intention to treat. The secondary outcomes were disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival, and safety. Between 16 May 2007 and 14 March 2012, 181 patients were randomised to letrozole and 179 to observation (median age 64.3 years). Endocrine therapy was completed at a median of 2.6 years before randomisation, and 47.5% had tumours of >2 cm and/or node positive. At 3.9 years median follow-up (interquartile range 3.1-4.8), 2 patients assigned letrozole (1.1%) and 17 patients assigned observation (9.5%) had experienced an invasive breast cancer event (difference 8.4%, 95% confidence interval 3.8% to 13.0%, log-rank test P = 0.0004). Twenty-four patients (13.4%) in the observation and 14 (7.7%) in the letrozole arm experienced a DFS event (log-rank P = 0.067). Adverse events linked to oestrogen depletion, but not serious adverse events, were more common with letrozole. These results should be considered exploratory, but lend weight to emerging data supporting longer duration endocrine therapy for hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, and offer insight into reintroduction of AI therapy. Australian New

  6. Should chemoprophylaxis be a main strategy for preventing re-introduction of malaria in highly receptive areas? Sri Lanka a case in point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickremasinghe, A Rajitha; Wickremasinghe, Renu; Herath, Hemantha D B; Fernando, S Deepika

    2017-03-04

    Imported malaria cases continue to be reported in Sri Lanka, which was declared 'malaria-free' by the World Health Organization in September 2016. Chemoprophylaxis, a recommended strategy for malaria prevention for visitors travelling to malaria-endemic countries from Sri Lanka is available free of charge. The strategy of providing chemoprophylaxis to visitors to a neighbouring malaria-endemic country within the perspective of a country that has successfully eliminated malaria but is highly receptive was assessed, taking Sri Lanka as a case in point. The risk of a Sri Lankan national acquiring malaria during a visit to India, a malaria-endemic country, was calculated for the period 2008-2013. The cost of providing prophylaxis for Sri Lankan nationals travelling to India for 1, 2 and 4 weeks was estimated for that same period. The risk of a Sri Lankan traveller to India acquiring malaria ranged from 5.25 per 100,000 travellers in 2012 to 13.45 per 100,000 travellers in 2010. If 50% of cases were missed by the Sri Lankan healthcare system, then the risk of acquiring malaria in India among returning Sri Lankans would double. The 95% confidence intervals for both risks are small. As chloroquine is the chemoprophylactic drug recommended for travellers to India by the Anti Malaria Campaign of Sri Lanka, the costs of chemoprophylaxis for travellers for a 1-, 2- and 4-weeks stay in India on average are US$ 41,604, 48,538 and 62,407, respectively. If all Sri Lankan travellers to India are provided with chemoprophylaxis for four weeks, it will comprise 0.65% of the national malaria control programme budget. Based on the low risk of acquiring malaria among Sri Lankan travellers returning from India and the high receptivity in previously malarious areas of the country, chemoprophylaxis should not be considered a major strategy in the prevention of re-introduction. In areas with high receptivity, universal access to quality-assured diagnosis and treatment cannot be

  7. NERSC 2001 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hules, John (editor)

    2001-12-12

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computational resource for scientific research funded by the DOE Office of Science. The Annual Report for FY2001 includes a summary of recent computational science conducted on NERSC systems (with abstracts of significant and representative projects); information about NERSC's current systems and services; descriptions of Berkeley Lab's current research and development projects in applied mathematics, computer science, and computational science; and a brief summary of NERSC's Strategic Plan for 2002-2005.

  8. Nordel annual report 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-06-01

    Nordel is a body for co-operation between the transmission system operators (TSO's) in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden with the primary objective to create conditions for and develop an efficient and harmonised Nordic electricity market, regardless of national borders. Furthermore, Nordel serves as forum for contact between the TSOs and representatives of the market players in the Nordic countries. The statistical part of Nordel's annual report includes data about: Exchange of electricity; Gross consumption; Electricity generation; Installed capacity; Generation of condensing power; Net consumption; Transmission capacity; Pumped storage power; Losses; Occasional power to electric boilers; Total consumption; CHP generation. (BA)

  9. Annual Energy Review 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiferlein, Katherine E. [USDOE Energy Information Administration (EIA), Washington, DC (United States)

    2002-11-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is a statistical history of energy activities in the United States. It documents trends and milestones in U.S. energy production, trade, storage, pricing, and consumption. Each new year of data that is added to the time series—which now reach into 7 decades—extends the story of how Americans have acquired and used energy. It is a story of continual change as the Nation's economy grew, energy requirements expanded, resource availability shifted, and interdependencies developed among nations.

  10. Institute annual report 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    The mission of the ITU (Institute for Transuranium Elements) is to protect the European citizen against risk associated with the handling and storage of highly radioactive elements. The JRC (Joint Research Center) provide customer-driven scientific and technical support for the conception, development, implementation and monitoring of EU policies. In this framework this annual report presents the TU actions in: basic actinide research, spent fuel characterization, safety of nuclear fuels, partitioning and transmutation, alpha-immunotherapy/radiobiology, measurement of radioactivity in the environment, safeguards research and development. (A.L.B.)

  11. Annual Energy Review 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-10-01

    This twenty-ninth edition of the Annual Energy Review (AER) presents the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) most comprehensive look at integrated energy statistics. The summary statistics on the Nation’s energy production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices cover all major energy commodities and all energy-consuming sectors of the U.S. economy from 1949 through 2010. The AER is EIA’s historical record of energy statistics and, because the coverage spans six decades, the statistics in this report are well-suited to long-term trend analysis.

  12. International energy annual 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    The International Energy Annual presents information and trends on world energy production and consumption for petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity. Production and consumption data are reported in standard units as well as British thermal units (Btu). Trade and reserves are shown for petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Data are provided on crude oil refining capacity and electricity installed capacity by type. Prices are included for selected crude oils and for refined petroleum products in selected countries. Population and Gross Domestic Product data are also provided.

  13. Renewable energy annual 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This report presents summary data on renewable energy consumption, the status of each of the primary renewable technologies, a profile of each of the associated industries, an analysis of topical issues related to renewable energy, and information on renewable energy projects worldwide. It is the second in a series of annual reports on renewable energy. The renewable energy resources included in the report are biomass (wood and ethanol); municipal solid waste, including waste-to-energy and landfill gas; geothermal; wind; and solar energy, including solar thermal and photovoltaic. The report also includes various appendices and a glossary.

  14. NPL 1999 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-01-01

    OAK-B135 NPL 1999 Annual Report. The Nuclear Physics Laboratory at the University of Washington in Seattle pursues a broad program of nuclear physics research. Research activities are conducted locally and at remote sites. The current program includes ''in-house'' research on nuclear collisions using the local tandem Van de Graaff and superconducting linac accelerators as well as local and remote non-accelerator research on fundamental symmetries and weak interactions and user-mode research on relativistic heavy ions at large accelerator facilities around the world.

  15. Annual report to Congress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-03-01

    This is the eighth annual report submitted by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) to Congress. It covers activities and expenditures during Fiscal Year 1991, which ended September 30, 1991. Chapter 1 of this report describes OCRWM`s mission and objectives. Chapters 2 through 8 cover the following topics: earning public trust and confidence; geological disposal; monitored retrieval storage; transportation; systems integration and regulatory compliance; international programs; and program management. Financial statements for the Nuclear Waste Fund are presented in Chapter 9.

  16. CMS Annual Report 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de la Rubia, T D; Shang, S P; Rennie, G; Fluss, M; Westbrook, C

    2005-07-29

    Glance at the articles in this report, and you will sense the transformation that is reshaping the landscape of materials science and chemistry. This transformation is bridging the gaps among chemistry, materials science, and biology--ushering in a wealth of innovative technologies with broad scientific impact. The emergence of this intersection is reinvigorating our strategic investment into areas that build on our strength of interdisciplinary science. It is at the intersection that we position our strategic vision into a future where we will provide radical materials innovations and solutions to our national-security programs and other sponsors. Our 2004 Annual Report describes how our successes and breakthroughs follow a path set forward by our strategic plan and four organizing research themes, each with key scientific accomplishments by our staff and collaborators. We have organized this report into two major sections: research themes and our dynamic teams. The research-theme sections focus on achievements arising from earlier investments while addressing future challenges. The dynamic teams section illustrates the directorate's organizational structure of divisions, centers, and institutes that support a team environment across disciplinary and institutional boundaries. The research presented in this annual report gives substantive examples of how we are proceeding in each of these four theme areas and how they are aligned with our national-security mission. By maintaining an organizational structure that offers an environment of collaborative problem-solving opportunities, we are able to nurture the discoveries and breakthroughs required for future successes.

  17. Annual Energy Review 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiferlein, Katherine E. [USDOE Energy Information Administration (EIA), Washington, DC (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are data on total energy production, consumption, and trade; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, international energy, as well as financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversion tables. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95–91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the EIA under Section 205(a)(2), which states: “The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information....” The AER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding data series in the AER and in other EIA publications.

  18. Annual Energy Review 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiferlein, Katherine E. [USDOE Energy Information Administration (EIA), Washington, DC (United States)

    2005-08-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are data on total energy production, consumption, and trade; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, international energy, as well as financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversion tables. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95–91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the EIA under Section 205(a)(2), which states: “The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information....” The AER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding data series in the AER and in other EIA publications.

  19. Annual Energy Review 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiferlein, Katherine E. [USDOE Energy Information Administration (EIA), Washington, DC (United States)

    2007-06-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are data on total energy production, consumption, and trade; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, international energy, as well as financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversion tables. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95–91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the EIA under Section 205(a)(2), which states: “The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information....” The AER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding data series in the AER and in other EIA publications.

  20. Annual Energy Review 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fichman, Barbara T. [USDOE Energy Information Administration (EIA), Washington, DC (United States)

    2010-08-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international energy; financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversions. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95–91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the EIA under Section 205(a)(2), which states: “The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information....” The AER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding the content of the AER and other EIA publications.

  1. Annual Energy Review 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fichman, Barbara T. [USDOE Energy Information Administration (EIA), Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, and renewable energy; financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversions. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95–91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the EIA under Section 205(a)(2), which states: “The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information....” The AER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding the content of the AER and other EIA publications.

  2. ANNUAL GENERAL ASSEMBLY

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    All members and beneficiaries of the Pension Fund are invited to attend the Annual General Asssembly to be held in the CERN Auditorium on Wednesday 3 October 2001 at 14.30 hrs The Agenda comprises:   Opening Remarks (P. Levaux) Some aspects of risk in a pension fund (C. Cuénoud) Annual Report 2000: Presentation and results (C. Cuénoud) Copies of the Report are available from divisional secretariats. Results of the actuarial reviews (G. Maurin) Questions from members and beneficiaries Persons wishing to ask questions are encouraged to submit them, where possible, in writing in advance, addressed to Mr C. Cuénoud, Administrator of the Fund. Conclusions (P. Levaux) As usual, participants are invited to drinks after the assembly. NB The minutes of the 2000 General Assembly are available from the Administration of the Fund (tel. + 41 22 767 91 94; e-mail Graziella.Praire@cern.ch) The English version will be published next week.

  3. Annual Energy Review 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-14

    This twelfth edition of the Annual Energy Review (AER) presents the Energy Information Administration`s historical energy statistics. For most series, statistics are given for every year from 1949 through 1993. Because coverage spans four and a half decades, the statistics in this report are well-suited to long-term trend analyses. The AER is comprehensive. It covers all major energy activities, including consumption, production, trade, stocks, and prices, for all major energy commodities, including fossil fuels and electricity. The AER also presents Energy Information Administration (EIA) statistics on some renewable energy sources. EIA estimates that its consumption series include about half of the renewable energy used in the United States. For a more complete discussion of EIA`s renewables data, see p. xix, ``Introducing Expanded Coverage of Renewable Energy Data Into the Historical Consumption Series.`` Copies of the 1993 edition of the Annual Energy Review may be obtained by using the order form in the back of this publication. Most of the data in the 1993 edition also are available on personal computer diskette. For more information about the diskettes, see the back of this publication. In addition, the data are available as part of the National Economic, Social, and Environmental Data Bank on a CD-ROM. For more information about the data bank, contact the US Department of Commerce Economics and Statistics Administration, on 202-482-1986.

  4. Electric power annual 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-06

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric utility statistics at national, regional and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. ``The US Electric Power Industry at a Glance`` section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; retail sales; revenue; financial statistics; environmental statistics; electric power transactions; demand-side management; and nonutility power producers. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences in US electricity power systems. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. Monetary values in this publication are expressed in nominal terms.

  5. Florida Panther Reintroduction Feasibility Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Summary and final report of a Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission study to evalaute initial stocking of mountain lion populations in northern...

  6. Areva, annual report 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This annual report contains information on AREVA objectives, prospects and strategies, particularly in chapters 4 and 7. This information is a not meant as a presentation of past performance data and should not be interpreted as a guarantee that events or data set forth herein are assured or that objectives will be met. Forward looking statements made in this document also address known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that could, were they to translate into fact, cause AREVA future financial performance, operating performance and production to differ significantly from the objectives presented or suggested herein. Those factors include, in particular, changes in international, economic or market conditions, as well as risk factors presented in Section 4.14.3. Neither AREVA nor the AREVA group is committing to updating forward looking statements or information contained in the annual report. This annual report contains information on the markets, market shares and competitive position of the AREVA group. Unless otherwise indicated, all historical data and forward looking information are based on Group estimates (source: AREVA) and are provided as examples only. To AREVA knowledge, no report is available on the AREVA group markets that is sufficiently complete or objective to serve as a sole reference source. The AREVA group developed estimates based on several sources, including in-house studies and reports, statistics provided by international organizations and professional associations, data published by competitors and information collected by AREVA subsidiaries. The main sources, studies and reports used include (i) the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the International Energy Agency (IEA), the World Nuclear Association (WNA), the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEA), Nuclear Assurance Corporation (NAC), the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom) and the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) for the nuclear business; and (ii

  7. Annual Energy Review 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiferlein, Katherine E. [USDOE Energy Information Administration (EIA), Washington, DC (United States)

    2000-07-01

    A generation ago the Ford Foundation convened a group of experts to explore and assess the Nation’s energy future, and published their conclusions in A Time To Choose: America’s Energy Future (Cambridge, MA: Ballinger, 1974). The Energy Policy Project developed scenarios of U.S. potential energy use in 1985 and 2000. Now, with 1985 well behind us and 2000 nearly on the record books, it may be of interest to take a look back to see what actually happened and consider what it means for our future. The study group sketched three primary scenarios with differing assumptions about the growth of energy use. The Historical Growth scenario assumed that U.S. energy consumption would continue to expand by 3.4 percent per year, the average rate from 1950 to 1970. This scenario assumed no intentional efforts to change the pattern of consumption, only efforts to encourage development of our energy supply. The Technical Fix scenario anticipated a “conscious national effort to use energy more efficiently through engineering know-how." The Zero Energy Growth scenario, while not clamping down on the economy or calling for austerity, incorporated the Technical Fix efficiencies plus additional efficiencies. This third path anticipated that economic growth would depend less on energy-intensive industries and more on those that require less energy, i.e., the service sector. In 2000, total energy consumption was projected to be 187 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in the Historical Growth case, 124 quadrillion Btu in the Technical Fix case, and 100 quadrillion Btu in the Zero Energy Growth case. The Annual Energy Review 1999 reports a preliminary total consumption for 1999 of 97 quadrillion Btu (see Table 1.1), and the Energy Information Administration’s Short-Term Energy Outlook (April 2000) forecasts total energy consumption of 98 quadrillion Btu in 2000. What energy consumption path did the United States actually travel to get from 1974, when the scenarios were drawn

  8. Nuclear Physics Department annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    This annual report presents articles and abstracts published in foreign journals, covering the following subjects: nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, applied physics, instrumentation, nonlinear phenomena and high energy physics

  9. The Medicare Annual Wellness Visit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colburn, Jessica L; Nothelle, Stephanie

    2018-02-01

    The Medicare Annual Wellness Visit is an annual preventive health benefit, which was created in 2011 as part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The visit provides an opportunity for clinicians to review preventive health recommendations and screen for geriatric syndromes. In this article, the authors review the requirements of the Annual Wellness Visit, discuss ways to use the Annual Wellness Visit to improve the care of geriatric patients, and provide suggestions for how to incorporate this benefit into a busy clinic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Acquisition Workforce Annual Report 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — This is the Federal Acquisition Institute's (FAI's) Annual demographic report on the Federal acquisition workforce, showing trends by occupational series, employment...

  11. Acquisition Workforce Annual Report 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — This is the Federal Acquisition Institute's (FAI's) Annual demographic report on the Federal acquisition workforce, showing trends by occupational series, employment...

  12. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-28

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

  13. DANSYNC. Annual report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Als-Nielsen, J.

    1997-02-01

    DANSYNC is an organisation of Danish users of hard X-ray synchrotron facilities, funded by The Danish Natural Science Research Council. It was founded in the beginning of 1996, and this is the first Annual Report from DANSYNC. Users span from basic physics at Risoe National Laboratory, Oersted Laboratory and Denmarks Technical University over materials science from Risoe National Laboratory to chemistry and biology at Aarhus University, Copenhagen University and Denmarks Technical University, as well as industrial research represented by Haldor Topsoee A/S and space research at Danish Space Research Institute. We do not have an X-ray synchrotron facility in Denmark, so all of this work is carried out at facilities abroad. Clearly the facility at DESY in Hamburg (HASYLAB and EMBL) is of the greatest significance for Danish synchrotron research. Home page: http://www.dansync.dk/dansync/. (LN).

  14. Nagra annual report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammann, M. (ed.)

    2008-07-01

    This annual report issued by the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste reviews the co-operative's activities in the year 2007 and presents an overview of developments in energy policy, planning procedures and funding plans. The selection of sites for the disposal of radioactive wastes in Switzerland is discussed. Various technical questions are briefly addressed and work being carried out in the rock laboratories in the Swiss Alps and Jura mountains is discussed. International co-operation is reviewed and public relations issues are discussed. Finally, organisational structures are described and the financial details for the year 2007 are presented. The report is completed with an appendix containing the co-operative's organigram, waste inventories and listings of publications, addresses and a short glossary.

  15. Nagra annual report 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammann, M. (ed.)

    2009-07-01

    This annual report issued by the Swiss National Co-operative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste, Nagra, reviews the co-operative's activities in the year 2008 and presents an overview of developments in energy policy, planning procedures and funding plans. Energy policy and the selection of sites for the disposal of radioactive wastes in Switzerland are discussed. Various technical questions are briefly addressed and work being carried out in the rock laboratories in the Swiss Alps and Jura mountains is discussed. International co-operation is reviewed and public relations issues are discussed. Finally, organisational structures are described and Nagra's financial details for the year 2008 are presented and discussed. The report is completed with an appendix containing the co-operative's organigram, waste inventories and listings of publications, addresses and a short glossary.

  16. Coal industry annual 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-06

    Coal Industry Annual 1993 replaces the publication Coal Production (DOE/FIA-0125). This report presents additional tables and expanded versions of tables previously presented in Coal Production, including production, number of mines, Productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. This report also presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for a wide audience including the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In addition, Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility Power Producers who are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. This consumption is estimated to be 5 million short tons in 1993.

  17. Annual energy review 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This 13th edition presents the Energy Information Administration`s historical energy statistics. For most series, statistics are given for every year from 1949 through 1994; thus, this report is well-suited to long-term trend analyses. It covers all major energy activities, including consumption, production, trade, stocks, and prices for all major energy commodities, including fossil fuels and electricity. Statistics on renewable energy sources are also included: this year, for the first time, usage of renewables by other consumers as well as by electric utilities is included. Also new is a two-part, comprehensive presentation of data on petroleum products supplied by sector for 1949 through 1994. Data from electric utilities and nonutilities are integrated as ``electric power industry`` data; nonutility power gross generation are presented for the first time. One section presents international statistics (for more detail see EIA`s International Energy Annual).

  18. Uranium industry annual 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  19. 1994 MCAP annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmony, S.C.; Boyack, B.E.

    1995-04-01

    VELCOR is an integrated, engineering-level computer code that models the progression of severe accidents in light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plants. The entire spectrum of severe accident phenomena, including reactor coolant system and containment thermal-hydraulic response, core heatup, degradation and relocation, and fission product release and transport is treated in MELCOR in a unified framework for both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Its current uses include the estimation of severe accident source terms and their sensitivities and uncertainties in a variety of applications. Independent assessment efforts have been successfully completed by the US and international MELCOR user communities. Most of these independent assessment efforts have been conducted to support the needs and fulfill the requirements of the individual user organizations. The resources required to perform an extensive set of model and integral code assessments are large. A prudent approach to fostering code development and maturation is to coordinate the individual assessment efforts of the MELCOR user community. While retaining individual control over assessment resources, each organization using the MELCOR code could work with the other users to broaden assessment coverage and minimize duplication. In recognition of these considerations, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) has initiated the MELCOR Cooperative Assessment Program (MCAP), a vehicle for coordinating and standardizing the assessment practices of the various MELCOR users. In addition, the user community will have a forum to better communicate lessons learned regarding MELCOR applications, capabilities, and user guidelines and limitations and to provide a user community perspective on code development needs and priorities. This second Annual Report builds on the foundation laid with the first Annual Report.

  20. SKB Annual Report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This is the annual report of the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB). Part 1 of the report contains an overview of the SKB activities in different fields, and part 2 gives a description of the research and development work on nuclear waste disposal performed during 1996. Lectures and publications as well as reports issued during 1996 are listed in part 3, and summaries of the reports are listed in part 4. The task of SKB is to transport, store and dispose of the spent nuclear fuel and radioactive wastes from the nuclear power plants and to perform the research and development and other measures necessary for this work. SKB is the owner of CLAB, the Central Interim Storage Facility for spent fuel, located at Oskarshamn. CLAB was taken into operation in July 1985 and by the end of 1996 about 2500 tons of spent fuel have been received. At Forsmark the Final Repository for Radioactive Operational Waste (SFR) was taken into operation in April 1988. The repository is situated in crystalline rock under the Baltic Sea. SFR has currently a capacity of about 60000 m{sup 3} or waste. At the end of 1996 at total of 21000 m{sup 3} of waste has been deposited. Transportation from the reactor sites to CLAB and SFR is made by a specially designed ship, M/S Sigyn. The total cost for R,D and D during 1996 amounted to 124 MSEK (about 15 MUSD).

  1. Annual Report 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmielewska, D.; Infeld, E.; Preibisz, Z.; Zupranski, P. [eds.

    1999-10-01

    In the presented ``Annual Report 1998`` the scientific, organizational and educational activities of the Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (SINS) are presented. The document is divided into two parts. First of them consists of the general information about management, scientific council, department of SINS, scientific staff, visiting scientists, list of research project (grants), PhD and DSc theses as well as the information about organized schools and exhibitions. The second one: ``Reports on Research`` describes the research activities of SINS. It is divided into 12 parts - in which the works of SINS departments and establishments are presented (Department of Nuclear Reactions, Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy and Technique, Department of Nuclear Electronics, Department of Radiation Shielding and Dosimetry, Department of Plasma Physics and Technology, Department of High Energy Physics, Department of Cosmic Radiation Physics, Department of Nuclear Theory, Department of Radiation Detectors, Department of Accelerator Physics and Technology, Department of Training an Consulting and Establishment for Nuclear Equipment). Each of these parts are preceded by a short overview given by the head of the given department. The foreword, in which the whole activities of the SINS are summarized, given by head of the Institute professor Z. Sujkowski is also given

  2. Annual Energy Review 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiferlein, Katherine E. [USDOE Energy Information Administration (EIA), Washington, DC (United States)

    2003-10-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) presents the Energy Information Administration’s historical energy statistics. For many series, statistics are given for every year from 1949 through 2002. The statistics, expressed in either physical units or British thermal units, cover all major energy activities, including consumption, production, trade, stocks, and prices, for all major energy commodities, including fossil fuels, electricity, and renewable energy sources. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95–91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) under Section 205(a)(2), which states: “The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information....” The AER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding data series in the AER and in other EIA publications. Related Publication: Readers of the AER may also be interested in EIA’s Monthly Energy Review, which presents monthly updates of many of the data in the AER. Contact our National Energy Information Center for more information.

  3. Annual Energy Review 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiferlein, Katherine E. [USDOE Energy Information Administration (EIA), Washington, DC (United States)

    2001-08-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) presents the Energy Information Administration’s historical energy statistics. For many series, statistics are given for every year from 1949 through 2000. The statistics, expressed in either physical units or British thermal units, cover all major energy activities, including consumption, production, trade, stocks, and prices, for all major energy commodities, including fossil fuels, electricity, and renewable energy sources. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95–91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the Energy Information Administration under Section 205(a)(2), which states: “The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information....” The AER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding data series in the AER and in other EIA publications.

  4. Annual report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmielewska, D.; Infeld, E.; Zupranski, P. [eds.

    1998-12-31

    In the presented ``Annual Report 1997`` the scientific, organizational end educational activities of the Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (SINS) are presented. The document is divided into two parts. First of them consist of the general information about management, scientific council, department of SINS, scientific staff, visiting scientists, list of research project (grants), PhD and DSc theses as well as the information about organized schools and exhibitions. The second one: ``Reports on Research`` describes the research activities of SINS. It is divided into 12 parts - in which the works of SINS departments and establishments are presented (Department of Nuclear Reactions, Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy and Technique, Department of Nuclear Electronics, Department of Radiation Shielding and Dosimetry, Department of Plasma Physics and Technology, Department of High Energy Physics, Department of Cosmic Radiation Physics, Department of Atomic Nucleus Theory, Department of Radiation Detectors, Department of Accelerator Physics and Technology, Department of Training an Consulting and Establishment for Nuclear Equipment). Each of these parts are foreworded by short overview given by the head of appropriate department. The foreword, in which the whole activities of the SINS are summarized, given by head of the Institute professor Z. Sujkowski is also given

  5. ANNUAL INTERVIEWS (MAPS)

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    The calendar for the 2002/2003 annual interview programme is confirmed as normally from 15 November 2002 to 15 February 2002 as foreseen in Administrative Circular N° 26 (rev. 2). However, where it is preferred to be as close as possible to 12 months since the last interview, supervisors and staff concerned may agree to the interview taking place up to 15 March 2003. This may also be necessary due to the roles of different supervisors resulting from the particular situations of divisional re-restructurings and detachments this year. The report form template is as last year available on the HR Division Website. A banner on the internal homepage leads directly to the page with the form. In collaboration with AS Division, the MAPS form including the personal data for the first page can be generated via the Human Resources Toolkit (HRT) application. For this exercise each staff member can now generate his/her own MAPS form. Information about how to do this is available here. Human Resources Division Tel. ...

  6. 2007 LDRD ANNUAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, T

    2008-12-16

    I am pleased to present the fiscal year 2007 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) annual report. This represents the first year that SRNL has been eligible for LDRD participation and our results to date demonstrate we are off to an excellent start. SRNL became a National Laboratory in 2004, and was designated the 'Corporate Laboratory' for the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) in 2006. As you will see, we have made great progress since these designations. The LDRD program is one of the tools SRNL is using to enable achievement of our strategic goals for the DOE. The LDRD program allows the laboratory to blend a strong basic science component into our applied technical portfolio. This blending of science with applied technology provides opportunities for our scientists to strengthen our capabilities and delivery. The LDRD program is vital to help SRNL attract and retain leading scientists and engineers who will help build SRNL's future and achieve DOE mission objectives. This program has stimulated our research staff creativity, while realizing benefits from their participation. This investment will yield long term dividends to the DOE in its Environmental Management, Energy, and National Security missions.

  7. Annual conference SAEE 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    Technical and economic challenges of a 1 t CO{sub 2} society was the topic addressed by the 2008 annual conference of the Swiss Association for Energy Economics. One tonne of carbon dioxide per head and year as a long-term energy strategy is the theme of a presentation made by professor Konstantin Boulouchos from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH in Zurich, Switzerland. Professor Dr. Rainhard Madlener from the Institute for Future Energy Consumer Needs and Behaviour in Aachen, Germany, took a look at the one-ton CO{sub 2} vision as a focus for technical development. Professor Thomas F. Rutherford from the ETH presented an economic analysis of one-ton CO{sub 2} scenarios. Eduard Schumacher, former Chairman of the Board at the IWB utility in Basel, Switzerland, presented examples of how energy policy can be implemented, using the IWB's activities as an example. Hansruedi Kunz, Head of the Energy Department in the Building Department of the Canton of Zurich discussed the chances offered and the problems posed by the implementation of measures that are to lead to the meeting of energy visions for the year 2050. A podium and discussion session completed the conference

  8. Annual Energy Review 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiferlein, Katherine E. [USDOE Energy Information Administration (EIA), Washington, DC (United States)

    1998-07-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) presents the Energy Information Administration’s historical energy statistics. For many series, statistics are given for every year from 1949 through 1997. The statistics, expressed in either physical units or British thermal units, cover all major energy activities, including consumption, production, trade, stocks, and prices, for all major energy commodities, including fossil fuels, electricity, and renewable energy sources. Publication of this report is in keeping with responsibilities given to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in Public Law 95–91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), which states, in part, in Section 205(a)(2) that: “The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information....” The AER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding data series in the AER and in other EIA publications.

  9. 2014 HPC Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, Barbara [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Our commitment is to support you through delivery of an IT environment that provides mission value by transforming the way you use, protect, and access information. We approach this through technical innovation, risk management, and relationships with our workforce, Laboratories leadership, and policy makers nationwide. This second edition of our HPC Annual Report continues our commitment to communicate the details and impact of Sandia’s large-scale computing resources that support the programs associated with our diverse mission areas. A key tenet to our approach is to work with our mission partners to understand and anticipate their requirements and formulate an investment strategy that is aligned with those Laboratories priorities. In doing this, our investments include not only expanding the resources available for scientific computing and modeling and simulation, but also acquiring large-scale systems for data analytics, cloud computing, and Emulytics. We are also investigating new computer architectures in our advanced systems test bed to guide future platform designs and prepare for changes in our code development models. Our initial investments in large-scale institutional platforms that are optimized for Informatics and Emulytics work are serving a diverse customer base. We anticipate continued growth and expansion of these resources in the coming years as the use of these analytic techniques expands across our mission space. If your program could benefit from an investment in innovative systems, please work through your Program Management Unit ’s Mission Computing Council representatives to engage our teams.

  10. 2005 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrzanowski, P; Walter, K

    2006-03-31

    As the cover of our ''2005 Annual Report'' highlights, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory joined the international science community in celebrating the World Year of Physics in 2005, with special events and science outreach and education programs. Einstein's remarkable discoveries in 1905 provided an opportunity to reflect on how physics has changed the world during the last century and on the promise of future beneficial discoveries. For half of the past century, Lawrence Livermore, which was established to meet an urgent national security need, has been contributing to the advancement of science and technology in a very special way. Co-founder Ernest O. Lawrence was the leading proponent in his generation of large-scale, multidisciplinary science and technology teams. That's Livermore's distinctive heritage and our continuing approach as a national laboratory managed and operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA). We focus on important problems that affect our nation's security and seek breakthrough advances in science and technology to achieve mission goals. An event in 2005 exemplifies our focus on science and technology advances in support of mission goals. In October, distinguished visitors came to Livermore to celebrate the tenth anniversary of the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (now called the Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, or ASC). ASC was launched in 1995 by DOE/NNSA to achieve a million-fold increase in computing power in a decade. The goal was motivated by the need to simulate the three-dimensional performance of a nuclear weapon in sufficient resolution and with the appropriately detailed physics models included. This mission-driven goal is a key part of fulfilling Livermore's foremost responsibility to ensure that the nuclear weapons in the nation's smaller 21st-century stockpile remain

  11. Annual energy review 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiferlein, Katherin E. [Energy Information Adminstration (EIA), Washington, DC (United States)

    2004-09-30

    The Annual Energy Review 2003 is a statistical history of energy activities in the United States in modern times. Data are presented for all major forms of energy by production (extraction of energy from the earth, water, and other parts of the environment), consumption by end-user sector, trade with other nations, storage changes, and pricing. Much of the data provided covers the fossil fuels—coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Fossil fuels are nature’s batteries; they have stored the sun’s energy over millennia past. It is primarily that captured energy that we are drawing on today to fuel the activities of the modern economy. Data in this report measure the extraordinary expansion of our use of fossil fuels from 29 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 1949 to 84 quadrillion Btu in 2003. In recent years, fossil fuels accounted for 86 percent of all energy consumed in the United States. This report also records the development of an entirely new energy industry—the nuclear electric power industry. The industry got its start in this country in 1957 when the Shippingport, Pennsylvania, nuclear electric power plant came on line. Since that time, the industry has grown to account for 20 percent of our electrical output and 8 percent of all energy used in the country. Renewable energy is a third major category of energy reported in this volume. Unlike fossil fuels, which are finite in supply, renewable energy is essentially inexhaustible because it can be replenished. Types of energy covered in the renewable category include conventional hydroelectric power, which is power derived from falling water; wood; waste; alcohol fuels; geothermal; solar; and wind. Together, these forms of energy accounted for about 6 percent of all U.S. energy consumption in recent years.

  12. Annual Report, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buettner, Herma G.; Leadbetter, Alan J. [eds.] [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1999-11-01

    In this Annual Report a selection of about 30 scientific achievements are highlighted. These are intended to represent the huge range of high quality research carried out at ILL. In 1998 about 750 experiments were performed in the 225 days of reactor operation. The fields of magnetism and strongly correlated electron systems continue to be fertile and to throw up strong new growth. Remarkable new advances are coming from the applications of both existing and new neutron techniques and the development of new materials. These highlights concern superconductors, nano-magnetic particles, colossal magneto-resistance, magnetic-nuclear correlations, quantum spin systems and more. Novel magnetic measurements are also reported for a quasicrystal and on thin films of both normal and superconducting materials. Thanks to special abilities of neutrons to penetrate matter new results were obtained: following the production of novel intermetallic compounds, pressure dependence of phonon frequencies, the structure of glasses, solutions (in both bulk and thin films) and adsorbed phases; dynamics and relaxation in liquids; the confirmation of reptant motion in linear polymers, self-assembly and shear phenomena in liquid crystals. Three important results from nuclear physics are also included. These involve: fission-produced neutron-rich nuclei, weighing gamma photons in connection with the determination of fundamental constants and the determination of interatomic potentials from the slowing down process of atoms recoiling from gamma-ray emission - a direct link between nuclear and solid-state physics. The neutron experiments of importance for particle physics and biology will be reported next year

  13. 1998 annual review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    The Canadian Petroleum Products Institute (CPPI) is an association of Canadian companies involved in the refining, distribution and marketing of petroleum products. CPPI`s responsibilities include (1) establishing environmental policies, (2) establishing working relationships with governments to develop public policy, (3) developing guidelines for the safe handling of petroleum products, and (4) providing information about the petroleum industry to the public. This annual review summarizes industry operations and trends within the crude oil and petroleum products industry. In 1998, Canada`s 19 CPPI member refineries processed an average of 1.6 million barrels of crude oil per day. The CPPI developed a policy position on climate change and continued its strong support of the Canadian Voluntary Challenge and Registry Program. It initiated a major consumer information campaign regarding gasoline prices. It held a pollution prevention workshop to discuss issues related to air, land and water quality. It launched a website (www.cppi.ca) as another mechanism to provide its audience with information about the industry. Across Canada, CPPI`s regional offices supported a number of industry initiatives, such as the work in Dartmouth, NS, on a Risk-based Correction Action process for the clean-up of sites contaminated with petroleum products, discussions on the development of a used oil program for Quebec, regulatory reform in Ontario, and support by the Calgary office in the implementation of used oil recycling programs in the Prairies. CPPI also participated in discussions concerning the establishment of standards regarding sulphur and benzene in gasoline, and the future regarding the octane enhancing fuel additive MMT for transportation fuels. It was also reported that CPPI members are on track towards achieving a 65 per cent reduction in refinery benzene emissions between 1993 and 2000. tabs., figs.

  14. Annual energy review 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is a historical data report that tells many stories. It describes, in numbers, the changes that have occurred in US energy markets since the midpoint of the 20th century. In many cases, those markets differ vastly from those of a half-century ago. By studying the graphs and data tables presented in this report, readers can learn about past energy supply and usage in the United States and gain an understanding of the issues in energy and the environment now before use. While most of this year`s report content is similar to last year`s, there are some noteworthy developments. Table 1.1 has been restructured into more summarized groupings -- fossil fuels, nuclear electric power, and renewable energy -- to aid analysts in their examination of the basic trends in those broad categories. Readers` attention is also directed to the electricity section, where considerable reformatting of the tables and graphs has been carried out to help clarify past and recent trends in the electric power industry as it enters a period of radical restructuring. Table 9.1, which summarizes US nuclear generating units, has been redeveloped to cover the entire history of the industry in this country and to provide categories relevant in assessing the future of the industry, such as the numbers of ordered generating units that have been canceled and those that were built and later shut down. In general, the AER emphasizes domestic energy statistics. Sections 1 through 10 and Section 12 are devoted mostly to US data; Section 11 reports on international statistics and world totals. 140 figs., 141 tabs.

  15. Nursing Facility Initiative Annual Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This annual report summarizes impacts from the Initiative to Reduce Avoidable Hospitalizations among Nursing Facility Residents in 2014. This initiative is designed...

  16. Florida annual general canvass statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains annual quantities and value for all seafood products that are landed and sold by established seafood dealers and brokers in Florida. These...

  17. An assessment of arthropod prey resources at Nakula Natural Area Reserve, a potential site of reintroduction for Kiwikiu (Pseudonestor xanthophrys) and Maui `Alauahio (Parareomyza montana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banko, Paul C.; Peck, Robert W.; Cappadonna, Justin; Steele, Claire; Leonard, David L.; Mounce, Hanna L.; Becker, Dusti; Swinnerton, Kirsty

    2015-01-01

    Hawaiian forest birds have declined dramatically since humans arrived in the archipelago. Birds from all foraging guilds have been affected but insectivorous species are currently at greatest risk of extinction. On the island of Maui, populations and ranges of the insectivorous kiwikiu (Maui parrotbill; Pseudonestor xanthophrys) and Maui ‘alauahio (Maui creeper; Paroreomyza montana) have declined significantly from historic levels primarily due to habitat loss, predation,disease, and food web disruption, leading to federal listings of endangered species and species of concern, respectively. Recovery plans for these birds include reestablishment of populations in parts of their former range. Nakula Natural Area Reserve on the leeward side of HaleakalāVolcano has been targeted for release of wild-caught or captive-bred individuals. The mesic, montane koa-‘ōhi‘a (Acacia koa-Metrosideros polymorpha) forest at Nakula has been heavily impacted through grazing by feral ungulates, but recent management actions to exclude these animals are promoting forest recovery. The objective of this study was to assess the arthropod prey base at Nakula in preparation for reintroductions of kiwikiu and Maui ‘alauahio. To accomplish that goal, we compared arthropod abundances at Nakula to those at Hanawi Natural Area Reserve and Waikamoi Preserve, areas where kiwikiu and Maui ‘alauahio are currently found. We also identified diets of kiwikiu and Maui ‘alauahio from fecal samples to better understand and evaluate the prey base at Nakula. Assessment methods included clipping branch tips to sample arthropods within the foliage of koa and ‘ōhi‘a, using traps to quantify arthropods on koa and ‘ōhi‘a bark surfaces, counting exit holes to quantify abundances of beetles (Coleoptera) within dead branches of koa, and measuring the density of arthropods within the stems of ‘ākala (Rubus hawaiiensis). The diet of kiwikiu was dominated by caterpillars (Lepidoptera larvae

  18. Annual report 99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    This volume of the Annual Report for the year 1999 provides the best illustration of this attempt: 30 highlights are presented covering a remarkable range of science and technique. As with last year's report, a wide spectrum of neutron science is embraced from biology, through to studies in chemistry, materials science and magnetism, to particle physics. To maintain this excellence, important efforts have been made in instrumentation; they are described in the technical section together with the Millennium Programme. This report is an appropriate illustration of the unique value of neutron methods for the study of a wide range of materials proving the usefulness of large-scale facilities such as the ILL. In 1999, the reactor operated for 208 days and more than 700 experiments were carried out in over 4400 days of scheduled beam time. Unfortunately, there was a failure of the hot source in December 1999 leading to a loss of about 20 days of beam time. Therefore, in 2000 the reactor will operate without the hot source. However, this will only affect 10 % of ILL's instruments. As in previous years, a large number of high-quality experiments was proposed and performed to tackle a broad range of scientific questions. For example in biology, the results presented here demonstrate that the contrast-variation method combined with small-angle scattering and neutron reflectivity techniques is a remarkable and unique tool for the investigation of biological materials. In the field of soft matter and liquids, it is known that confined geometry substantially modifies the properties of systems as diverse as simple water, polymers and quantum fluids. Neutron scattering experiments, presented here, have revealed the static and dynamic characteristics of these materials under conditions of confinement. In materials sciences, the penetration and contrast properties of neutrons are exploited, particularly in the case of small-angle scattering applied to alloys. Finally, the

  19. NERI 2004 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) created the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) in Fiscal Year (FY) 1999 in response to recommendations provided by the President's Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology. The purpose of NERI is to sponsor research and development (R&D) in the nuclear energy sciences to address the principal barriers to the future use of nuclear energy in the United States. NERI is helping to preserve the nuclear science and engineering infrastructure within the Nation's universities, laboratories, and industry, and is advancing the development of nuclear energy technology, enabling the United States to maintain a competitive position in nuclear science and technology. Research under this initiative also addresses issues associated with the maintenance of existing U.S. nuclear plants. The NERI program is managed and funded by DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology. ''The Nuclear Energy Research Initiative 2004 Annual Report'' serves to inform interested parties of progress made in NERI on a programmatic level as well as research progress made on individual NERI projects. Section 2 of this report provides background on the creation and implementation of NERI and on the focus areas for NERI research. Section 3 provides a discussion on NERI's mission, goals and objectives, and work scope. Section 4 highlights the major accomplishments of the NERI projects and provides brief summaries of the NERI research efforts that were completed in 2004. Section 5 provides a discussion on the impact NERI has had on U.S. university nuclear programs. Sections 6 through 8 provide project status reports by research area for each of the fiscal year (FY) 2001 and 2002 projects that were active in FY 2004. Research objectives, progress made over the last year, and activities planned for the next year are described for each project. Sections 9 through 11 present each of the newly awarded 2005

  20. 78 FR 64912 - Annual Retail Trade Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ... survey, the Census Bureau will collect data covering annual sales, annual e-commerce sales, year-end... annual sales, annual e-commerce sales, year-end inventories held inside and outside the United States... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE...

  1. 77 FR 64463 - Annual Retail Trade Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    ..., the Census Bureau will collect data covering annual sales, annual e- commerce sales, year-end..., accounts receivables, and, for selected industries, merchandise line sales, and percent of e-commerce sales..., annual sales, annual e-commerce sales, purchases, total and detailed operating expenses, accounts...

  2. 75 FR 63804 - Annual Retail Trade Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ... survey, the Census Bureau will collect data covering annual sales, annual e-commerce sales, year-end... percent of e-commerce sales to customers located outside the United States. These data are collected to... classification basis, annual sales, annual e-commerce sales, purchases, total operating expenses, accounts...

  3. Reading Ease of Bilingual Annual Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtis, John K.; Hassan, Salleh

    2002-01-01

    Examines reading ease between the English and Chinese versions of 65 corporate annual reports in Hong Kong and the English and Malay versions of 53 annual reports in Malaysia. Notes that the English passages in Malaysian annual reports are easier to read than the English passages in Hong Kong annual reports. Suggests that different language…

  4. FY 1994 Annual Work Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-30

    In accordance with the Inspector General`s Strategic Planning Policy directive, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) annually updates its Strategic Plan with budgetary and program guidance for the next fiscal year. The program guidance identifies and establishes priorities for OIG coverage of important DOE issues and operations, provides the basis for assigning OIG resources, and is the source for issues covered in Assistant Inspectors General annual work plans. The Office of the Assistant Inspector General for Audits (AIGA) publishes an Annual Work Plan in September of each year. The plan includes the OIG program guidance and shows the commitment of resources necessary to accomplish the assigned work and meet our goals. The program guidance provides the framework within which the AIGA work will be planned and accomplished. Audits included in this plan are designed to help insure that the requirements of our stakeholders have been considered and blended into a well balanced audit program.

  5. Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2007.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

    2008-12-22

    . Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

  6. Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

    2009-08-06

    . Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

  7. Hungry Horse Mitigation; Flathead Lake, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Barry (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

    2003-06-09

    , restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of potential mitigation strategies. Only Objective 1 in the workplan is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of Objectives 2-6.

  8. 78th Annual Meeting | Annual Meetings | Events | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    78th Annual Meeting. Dates : 2 to 4 November 2012. Venue : Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology, Dehra Dun. Videos of Talks. The emerging facets of Raman effect: A. K. Sood, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru; Cinema for health: Mohan Agashe, Pune; The challenge of climate change: Shyam Saran, Chairman, ...

  9. 77th Annual Meeting | Annual Meetings | Events | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    77th Annual Meeting. Dates : 18 to 20 November 2011. Venue : Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad. Videos of Talks. Fascinating flow of complex fluids . jamming, order and chaos: A. K. Sood, Chairman, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru; A creative melancholy: the paintings of Rabindranath Tagore: Sudhir ...

  10. Multicenter randomized phase II clinical trial of oxaliplatin reintroduction as a third- or later-line therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer-biweekly versus standard triweekly XELOX (The ORION Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Chu; Honda, Michitaka; Tanaka, Chihiro; Fukunaga, Mutsumi; Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Munemoto, Yoshinori; Hata, Taishi; Bando, Hiroyuki; Oshiro, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Michiya; Tokunaga, Yukihiko; Fujii, Akitomo; Nagata, Naoki; Oba, Koji; Mishima, Hideyuki

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this multicenter, open-label, randomized phase II trial was to evaluate the efficacy of a dose-dense capecitabine and oxaliplatin (XELOX) regimen in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) for whom reintroduction of oxaliplatin had been planned as a third- or later-line regimen. The patients with mCRC who had received prior chemotherapy including oxaliplatin and were scheduled for reintroduction of oxaliplatin were randomized to capecitabine (1,000 mg/m(2)) twice daily on days 1-14 and oxaliplatin (130 mg/m(2)) on day 1 every 21 days (Q3W group) or capecitabine (2,000 mg/m(2)) twice daily on days 1-7 and oxaliplatin (85 mg/m(2)) on day 1 every 14 days (Q2W group). The primary endpoint was the time-to-treatment failure (TTF). Other endpoints included overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS) and other adverse events (AEs). A total of 46 patients were enrolled in the trial-22 patients were randomly assigned to the Q3W group and 23 to the Q2W group. The median TTF was 3.4 months in both groups (hazard ratio [HR] 1.053; p = 0.880). The median PFS and OS were 3.3 and 9.2 months in the Q2W group and 4.3 and 12.1 months in the Q3W group, respectively (HR 1.15; p = 0.153 and 0.672; p = 0.836). The most common grade 3-4 AEs in the Q3W and Q2W groups were fatigue (27.3 vs 21.7), neuropathy (9.1 vs 0 %) and diarrhea (9.1 vs 0 %), respectively. There was no significant inter-group difference in any of the efficacy and safety endpoints, including TTF, OS, RFS and AEs. The results of this clinical trial were convincingly negative.

  11. Tender for printing annual report

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Paper : 130 GSM imported art paper for text. 300 GSM imported art card for cover. Colour Four colour both text & cover. Binding Perfect. Lamination : matt Finish lamination on cover. Input Soft Copy. Quantity : 300 English & 50 Hindi. Packaging : All book Annual Report are first to be shrinked packed in set of 10 books.

  12. FY 1994 Annual Work Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    This is the third Office of Inspector General (OIG)Annual Work Plan. Its purpose is to summarize work completed in Fiscal Year (FY) 1993, identify ongoing projects from previous fiscal years which the OIG intends to continue into FY 1994, and announce planned projects which the OIG intends to begin in FY 19994.

  13. Annual report 1991-92

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    The Agency`s sole objective has been to reduce regional electrical rate disparities by equalizing generation and transmission (upstream) costs province-wide. Operated under the jurisdiction of the Dept. of Energy, this annual report of the Agency covers Agency operations, mandate, pooling process, and shielding of low-cost utilities. A financial statement is included.

  14. 1982 laser program annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendricks, C.D.; Grow, G.R. (eds.)

    1983-08-01

    This annual report covers the following eight sections: (1) laser program review, (2) laser systems and operation, (3) target design, (4) target fabrication, (5) fusion experiments program, (6) Zeus laser project, (7) laser research and development, and (8) energy applications. (MOW)

  15. Annual report 1996; Aarsrapport 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The annual report from the Norwegian Institute for Air Research presents the activities at the institute. The activities cover fields like motor traffic and air quality of urban areas, acid precipitation, the ozone layer, advanced environmental monitoring systems, environmental contamination, and environmental problems in Arctic. 17 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Spinoff 1978: An Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This abstract is the annual report of NASA's Technology Utilization Program, which is charged with promoting and stimulating the practical application of government-sponsored aerospace technology. The report is organized in three sections: (1) aerospace aims; (2) technology twice used; and (3) technology utilization. Section 1 outlines NASA's…

  17. CIEE 1993 annual conference: Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    The California Institute for Energy efficiency`s third annual conference highlights the results of CIEE-sponsored multiyear research in three programs: Building Energy Efficiency, Air Quality Impacts of Energy Efficiency, and End-Use Resource Planning. Results from scoping studies, Director`s discretionary research, and exploratory research are also featured.

  18. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 1997 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kline, Paul A.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Willard, Catherine (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2003-08-01

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 1997 and December 31, 1997 are presented in this report. One hundred twenty-six female sockeye salmon from one captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in 1997. Successful spawn pairings produced approximately 148,781 eyed-eggs with a cumulative mean survival to eyed-egg rate of 57.3%. Approximately 361,600 sockeye salmon were released to Sawtooth basin waters in 1997. Reintroduction strategies included eyed-eggs (brood year 1997), presmolts (brood year 1996), and prespawn adults for volitional spawning (brood year 1994). Release locations included Redfish Lake, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, four broodstocks and two unique production groups were in culture at the Eagle Fish Hatchery. Two of the four broodstocks were incorporated into the 1997 spawning design, and one broodstock was terminated following

  19. Paleontology to policy: the Quaternary history of Southeast Asian tapirs (Tapiridae) in relation to large mammal species turnover, with a proposal for conservation of Malayan tapir by reintroduction to Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranbrook, Earl Of; Piper, Philip J

    2013-03-01

    The Southeast Asian zoogeographical region is divided into Indochinese, Sundaic and Philippine subregions. Two clades of tapirs, Tapirus spp., have been recognized in Quaternary Southeast Asia. A review of sites at which they occurred shows that representatives of both clades, one of which was the ancestral Malayan tapir Tapirus indicus, co-existed with a diversity of other Pleistocene mammal megafauna. The process of replacement of archaic large mammals was progressive and prolonged through the Quaternary. Zooarcheological investigation has extended knowledge of the former occurrence and distribution of tapirs and other large mammals of the region, with discoveries beyond the outer limits of their previously known ranges. These large mammals were subjected to paleoenvironmental changes as a consequence of the Quaternary cycles of glacial and interglacial periods. Archeological evidence suggests that hunting pressure has intensified the effects of altered environments, leading ultimately to the local disappearance of the Malayan tapir in most of Southeast Asia, including Borneo. The survival of the Malayan tapir through the Quaternary until the present shows that the species is both resilient to environmental change and flexible in its ecological re'uirements and, given proper protection, could continue to inhabit tropical Southeast Asia. To assist the species conservation, reintroduction is proposed from the remaining range of Malayan tapir in the wild, to suitable sites of past occurrence in Borneo, where these ancient survivors of the Quaternary megafauna can be accommodated and safeguarded alongside other forms of land usage. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd, ISZS and IOZ/CAS.

  20. Combining Bioenergetic Responses of Fish to Thermal Regimes and Productivity in Reservoirs: Implications for Conservation and Re-Introduction of Anadromous Salmonids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, D.

    2014-12-01

    Temperature, food availability, and predation risk form vertical gradients determining growth and survival for fish in lakes and reservoirs. These gradients change on inter-annual, seasonal, and diel temporal scales and are strongly influenced by climatic variability, conflicting water demands and management. Temperatures associated with optimal growth and energy loss vary both among life stages and species of fish, but the quantity and quality of available food resources can significantly alter these thermal responses. Greater understanding of how water management affects the timing, magnitude, and duration of thermal stratification, and how key species and their supporting aquatic resources respond can improve strategies for development and operation of water storage facilities within the context of localized environmental and ecological constraints. An emerging trend for coldwater reservoirs in the Pacific Northwest has been to re-introduce anadromous salmon above historically impassable dams. Thermal regimes and the existing ecological communities in the reservoirs and tributary habitats above these dams will determine the seasonal importance of lotic and lentic habitats for rearing or migration corridors. The feasibility of reservoir rearing and migration can be evaluated by combining mass- and species-specific thermal growth response curves with temporal dynamics in the vertical and longitudinal thermal structure of reservoirs and associated distribution of food resources (primarily zooplankton). The value of reservoirs as rearing habitats or migration corridors could be compared with coincident tributary conditions to predict the likely temporal-spatial distribution of optimal conditions for growth and survival of different species or life stages of salmonids within the watershed and how these conditions might change under different climatic or water management scenarios.

  1. 2016 Annual Technology Baseline (ATB) - Webinar Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Wesley; Kurup, Parthiv; Hand, Maureen; Feldman, David; Sigrin, Benjamin; Lantz, Eric; Stehly, Tyler; Augustine, Chad; Turchi, Craig; Porro, Gian; O' Connor, Patrick; Waldoch, Connor

    2016-09-13

    This deck was presented for the 2016 Annual Technology Baseline Webinar. The presentation describes the Annual Technology Baseline, which is a compilation of current and future cost and performance data for electricity generation technologies.

  2. U.S. Annual Climatological Summaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Annual Climatological Summary contains historical monthly and annual summaries for over 8000 U.S. locations. Observing stations are located in the United States of...

  3. Secretary's annual report to Congress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    This second annual report of the DOE covers activities of all elements of the department except the independent FERC, which issues its own annual report. Individual chapters concern a posture statement, conservation, solar and other renewable energy, fossil energy, electric energy, nuclear energy, the environment, defense programs, international programs, general science programs, energy information, economic regulation, energy production, and support operations. The following appendixes are also included: foreign direct investments in US energy sources and supplies, exports of energy resources by foreign companies, major recipients of DOE funding, actions taken regarding disclosure of energy assets by DOE employees, financial assistance programs for alternative fuel demonstration facilities, and 1978 budget summary. 16 figures, 56 tables. (RWR)

  4. Annual report to Congress, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-01

    Section 205 of the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 established the Energy Information Administration (EIA). One of the mandates in this legislation is that EIA prepare for Congress an annual report summarizing both activities and information collected and published. EIA`s major 1998 accomplishments are profiled in the body of this edition of the Annual Report to Congress. Appendix A contains abstracts of significant reports issued by EIA in 1998 and a chart of all titles and a list of all feature articles published during the year. Appendix B contains graphs of selected performance measures. Appendix C lists contact information for EIA subject matter specialists. Appendix D lists the major laws which form the basis of EIA`s legislative mandate.

  5. Annual report to Congress 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    Section 205 of the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 established the Energy Information Administration (EIA). One of the mandates in this legislation is that EIA prepare for Congress an annual report summarizing both activities and information collected and published. EIA`s major 1997 accomplishments are profiled in the body of this edition of the Annual Report to Congress. Appendix A contains abstracts of significant reports issued by EIA in 1997, and a chart of all titles and a list of all feature articles published during the year. Appendix B contains graphs of selected performance measures. Appendix C lists contact information for EIA subject matter specialists. Appendix D lists the major laws which form the basis of EIA`s legislative mandate.

  6. Determining Mean Annual Energy Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Folley, Matt

    2016-01-01

    This robust book presents all the information required for numerical modelling of a wave energy converter, together with a comparative review of the different available techniques. The calculation of the mean annual energy production (MAEP) is critical to the assessment of the levelized cost...... of energy for a wave energy converter or wave farm. Fundamentally, the MAEP is equal to the sum of the product of the power capture of a set of sea-states and their average annual occurrence. In general, it is necessary in the calculation of the MAEP to achieve a balance between computational demand...... obtained through system identification. The traditional method for representing the wave climate is using a scatter table, indexed by significant wave height and energy period; however, it has been found that this can lead to high errors in the MAEP due to the necessary assumptions regarding spectral shape...

  7. CAES Annual Report FY 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortny Rolston

    2011-10-01

    The Center for Advanced Energy Studies was created to lead research programs important to the nation, attract students and faculty to the Idaho universities and act as a catalyst for technology-based economic development. CAES is striving to meet those goals by continuing to develop its infrastructure and equipment capabilities, expand its research portfolio and bolster Idaho's energy workforce. This Annual Report details the progress CAES made in FY 2011 toward fulfilling its research, education and economic development missions.

  8. American Psychological Association annual report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Presents the 2009 American Psychological Association annual report. It highlights a very important year for APA and psychology by summarizing activities within each directorate. It describes strides made toward the goal of infusing psychology into the health care marketplace and of bringing psychology-and the unique skills of psychologists-to the attention of the public. This report aims to give insight into the contributions psychologists make to our communities and our country. 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. 55th Annual Fuze Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-26

    supporting piezoresistive elements  Full Wheatstone - bridge  Functional principle:  Inertial forces cause deflection of plate  Straining of...Approval Process Gabe Soto, Chairman, Fuze and Initiation System Technical Review Panel Air Force Safety Approval Process Matt Bridge OPEN SESSIONS...Matt Bridge  11:50 Harry Diamond Fuzing Excellence Award Ceremony  12:00 Lunch May 25, 2011 - General Session (AM) 55th Annual Fuze

  10. 77 FR 61238 - Annual Stress Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... Office of the Comptroller of the Currency 12 CFR Part 46 RIN 1557-AD58 Annual Stress Test AGENCY: Office...'') which requires certain companies to conduct annual stress tests pursuant to regulations prescribed by... ``covered institutions'') to conduct an annual stress test as prescribed by this rule. Under the final rule...

  11. 77 FR 16484 - Annual Stress Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-21

    ... Office of the Comptroller of the Currency 12 CFR Part 46 RIN 1557-AD58 Annual Stress Test AGENCY: Office... with total consolidated assets of more than $10 billion to conduct an annual stress test and comply... consolidated assets in excess of $10 billion to conduct annual stress tests pursuant to regulations prescribed...

  12. Risø annual report 2001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    In this annual report, we present a small selection of Risø’s achievements in 2001. A more detailed review of Risø’s projects can be found in the Risø Annual Accounts for 2001 as well as in the annual progress reports prepared by the individual researchdepartments....

  13. 76 FR 69239 - Annual Retail Trade Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... survey, the Census Bureau will collect data covering annual sales, annual e-commerce sales, year-end... receivables, and, for selected industries, merchandise line sales, and percent of e-commerce sales to..., annual e-commerce sales, purchases, total operating expenses, accounts receivables, and year-end...

  14. 2016 Annual Technology Baseline (ATB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Wesley; Kurup, Parthiv; Hand, Maureen; Feldman, David; Sigrin, Benjamin; Lantz, Eric; Stehly, Tyler; Augustine, Chad; Turchi, Craig; O' Connor, Patrick; Waldoch, Connor

    2016-09-01

    Consistent cost and performance data for various electricity generation technologies can be difficult to find and may change frequently for certain technologies. With the Annual Technology Baseline (ATB), National Renewable Energy Laboratory provides an organized and centralized dataset that was reviewed by internal and external experts. It uses the best information from the Department of Energy laboratory's renewable energy analysts and Energy Information Administration information for conventional technologies. The ATB will be updated annually in order to provide an up-to-date repository of current and future cost and performance data. Going forward, we plan to revise and refine the values using best available information. The ATB includes both a presentation with notes (PDF) and an associated Excel Workbook. The ATB includes the following electricity generation technologies: land-based wind; offshore wind; utility-scale solar PV; concentrating solar power; geothermal power; hydropower plants (upgrades to existing facilities, powering non-powered dams, and new stream-reach development); conventional coal; coal with carbon capture and sequestration; integrated gasification combined cycle coal; natural gas combustion turbines; natural gas combined cycle; conventional biopower. Nuclear laboratory's renewable energy analysts and Energy Information Administration information for conventional technologies. The ATB will be updated annually in order to provide an up-to-date repository of current and future cost and performance data. Going forward, we plan to revise and refine the values using best available information.

  15. 2011 ANNUAL SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, A.; Eddy, T.; Jannik, T.; Terry, B.; Cauthen, K.; Coward, L.; Dunaway-Ackerman, J.; Wilson, M.; Hutchison, J.; O' Quinn, S.

    2012-10-01

    The Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2011 (SRNS-STI-2012-00200) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) according to requirements of DOE Order 231.1 B, “Environment, Safety and Health Reporting." The annual SRS Environmental Report has been produced for more than 50 years. Several hundred copies are and interested individuals. The report’s purpose is to: present summary environmental data that characterize site environmental management performance; describe compliance status with respect to environmental standards and requirements; highlight significant programs and efforts.

  16. Annual report 1993-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The annual report of the Ministry presents the activities of the Ministry`s departments: Corporate (public affairs and communications, employment equity, policy, planning and legislation, management services); BC Environment (environmental protection, fisheries, wildlife and habitat protection, environment regional operations); BC Lands (lands and water management, lands regional operations, lands services, water management); BC Parks (provincial parks, ecological reserves, outdoor recreation); Agencies, Boards, and Commissions (Commission on Waste Reduction, Soils, and Hazardous Wastes, Environmental Appeal Board); and Immigration and Multiculturalism (immigration policy, business immigration, multiculturalism BC, and BC Council of Human Rights). An organizational chart and financial overview are also included.

  17. Annual reports on NMR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Graham A; McCarthy, M J

    1995-01-01

    Over recent years, no other technique has grown to such importance as that of NMR spectroscopy. It is used in all branches of science where precise structural determination is required and where the nature of interactions and reactions in solution is being studied. Annual Reports on NMR Spectroscopy has established itself as a means for the specialist and non-specialist alike to become familiar with new applications of the technique in all branches of chemistry, including biochemistry, and pharmaceutics. This volume focuses on theoretical aspects of NMR nuclear shielding and on applications of

  18. Annual review in automatic programming

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Annual Review in Automatic Programming, Volume 4 is a collection of papers that deals with the GIER ALGOL compiler, a parameterized compiler based on mechanical linguistics, and the JOVIAL language. A couple of papers describes a commercial use of stacks, an IBM system, and what an ideal computer program support system should be. One paper reviews the system of compilation, the development of a more advanced language, programming techniques, machine independence, and program transfer to other machines. Another paper describes the ALGOL 60 system for the GIER machine including running ALGOL pro

  19. Annual review in automatic programming

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Annual Review in Automatic Programming, Volume 2 is a collection of papers that discusses the controversy about the suitability of COBOL as a common business oriented language, and the development of different common languages for scientific computation. A couple of papers describes the use of the Genie system in numerical calculation and analyzes Mercury autocode in terms of a phrase structure language, such as in the source language, target language, the order structure of ATLAS, and the meta-syntactical language of the assembly program. Other papers explain interference or an ""intermediate

  20. Annual review in automatic programming

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Annual Review in Automatic Programming focuses on the techniques of automatic programming used with digital computers. Topics covered range from the design of machine-independent programming languages to the use of recursive procedures in ALGOL 60. A multi-pass translation scheme for ALGOL 60 is described, along with some commercial source languages. The structure and use of the syntax-directed compiler is also considered.Comprised of 12 chapters, this volume begins with a discussion on the basic ideas involved in the description of a computing process as a program for a computer, expressed in

  1. Annual Report 2001; Aarsrapport 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This is the annual report 2001 for the TotalFinaElf oil company. This concern operates in more than 100 countries and covers all aspects of the energy industry, from oil- and gas exploration and production to refining and marketing of refined products and international trade with both unrefined and refined products. Through the Atofina division the concern is also a major player in the chemicals markets. The demonstrated reserves of TotalFinaElf has been calculated to more than ten billion barrels of oil equivalents. At a rate of 2.1 million barrels a day this ensures 14 years of production.

  2. Annual Workshop: Higgs Couplings 2016

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Higgs Couplings 2016 is this year's installment of an annual workshop devoted to new experimental and theoretical results on the Higgs boson. The 2016 workshop will present the latest results from the LHC run 2 on the Higgs boson mass, spin/parity, and couplings and will present new theoretical work devoted to the measurement of Higgs parameters and possibilities for exotic Higgs decays. The workshop will provide an opportunity for critical discussion of the current strategies for studying the Higgs boson at the LHC and the next steps in the LHC program. The workshop will also include discussion of the longer-term Higgs boson program at future facilities.

  3. Presentation at Innoventure Annual Competition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-03-31

    This report documents the components of the workshop presented at the recent annual competition for the Innoventure program. The goal of the workshop was to focus on the delivery of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) concepts in a hands-on experiential learning format to increase interest in national security careers at NNSA, most of which are in the STEM fields. This work is a part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), being performed under a Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grant.

  4. Can captive populations function as sources of genetic variation for reintroductions into the wild? A case study of the Arabian oryx from the Phoenix Zoo and the Shaumari Wildlife Reserve, Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Alexander; Wells, Stuart A.; West, Gary; Al-Smadi, Ma’en; Redondo, Sergio A.; Sexton, Sydnee R.; Culver, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    The Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx) historically ranged across the Arabian Peninsula and neighboring countries until its extirpation in 1972. In 1963–1964 a captive breeding program for this species was started at the Phoenix Zoo (PHX); it ultimately consisted of 11 animals that became known as the ‘World Herd’. In 1978–1979 a wild population was established at the Shaumari Wildlife Reserve (SWR), Jordan, with eight descendants from the World Herd and three individuals from Qatar. We described the mtDNA and nuclear genetic diversity and structure of PHX and SWR. We also determined the long-term demographic and genetic viability of these populations under different reciprocal translocation scenarios. PHX displayed a greater number of mtDNA haplotypes (n = 4) than SWR (n = 2). Additionally, PHX and SWR presented nuclear genetic diversities of N¯AN¯A = 2.88 vs. 2.75, H¯OH¯O = 0.469 vs. 0.387, and H¯EH¯E = 0.501 vs. 0.421, respectively. Although these populations showed no signs of inbreeding (F¯ISF¯IS ≈ 0), they were highly differentiated (G′′STGST′′ = 0.580; P extinction in PHX during 25 generations. Under such scenarios, maximum genetic diversities were achieved in the first generations before the effects of genetic drift became predominant. Although captive populations can function as sources of genetic variation for reintroduction programs, we recommend promoting mutual and continuous gene flow with wild populations to ensure the long-term survival of this species.

  5. LLNL NESHAPs 1996 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallegos, G.M.

    1997-01-06

    This annual report is prepared pursuant to the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) 40 CFR Part 61, Subpart H; Subpart H governs radionuclide emissions to air from Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. NESHAPs limits the emission of radionuclides to the ambient air from DOE facilities to levels resulting in an annual effective dose equivalent (EDE) of 10 mrem (10 microsieverts) to any member of the public. The EDEs for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) site-wide maximally exposed members of the public from 1996 operations were (1) Livermore site: 0. 093 mrem (0.93 microsievert) (52% from point-source emissions, 48% from diffuse-source emissions); (2) Site 300: 0.033 mrem (0.33 microsievert) (99% from point-source, 1% from diffuse-source emissions). The EDEs were generally calculated using the EPA-approved CAP88-PC air-dispersion/dose-assessment model. Site-specific meteorological data, stack flow data, and emissions estimates based on radionuclide inventory data or continuous-monitoring systems data were the specific input to CAP88-PC for each modeled source. 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. Assessment of Invasiveness of the Orange Keyhole Sponge Mycale Armata in Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaii Based on Surveys 2004-2005 (NODC Accession 0002602)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Orange Keyhole Sponge, Mycale armata Thiele, was unknown in Hawaii prior to 1996. First reported in Pearl Harbor, it now occurs in virtually every commercial...

  7. Seroepidemiological study of human cysticercosis with blood samples collected on filter paper, in Lages, State of Santa Catarina, Brazil, 2004-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Márcia Imenes Ishida

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Human serofrequency of antibodies against Taenia solium antigens was determined and risk factors for cysticercosis transmission were identified. METHODS: Individuals (n=878 from periurban and rural locations of Lages, SC, were interviewed to gather demographic, sanitary and health information. Interviews and blood sample collections by finger prick on Whatman filter paper were performed from August 2004 to May 2005. Observation determined that 850 samples were suitable for analysis and were tested by ELISA using vesicular fluid of Taenia crassiceps heterologous antigen. To ensure the reliability of the results, 77 samples of the dried blood were matched with sera. The reactive samples were submitted to a serum confirmatory immunoblot (IB test using purified Taenia crassiceps glycoproteins. RESULTS: The ELISA results for the dried blood and serum samples were statistically consistent. ELISA was positive in 186 (21.9% out of 850 individuals. A group of 213 individuals were asked to collect vein blood for IB (186 with positive result in ELISA and 27 with inappropriate whole blood samples and 130 attended the request. The IB was positive in 29 (3.4% out of 850 individuals. A significant correlation (p = 0.0364 was determined among individuals who tested positive in the IB assay who practiced both pig rearing and kitchen gardening. CONCLUSIONS: ELISA with dried blood eluted from filter paper was suitable for cysticercosis population surveys. In Lages, human infection was associated with pig rearing and kitchen gardening. The prevalence index was compatible with other Latin American endemic areas.

  8. Final Report on Vegetation Community Surveys 2005-2006 and Botanical and Zoological Surveys 2004-2005 for Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 2004 and 2005 the Delaware Natural Heritage Program took an inventory of plants, animals, vegetation communities of Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge. This...

  9. The Effects of Acculturation on Healthy Lifestyle Characteristics among Hispanic Fourth-Grade Children in Texas Public Schools, 2004-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Catherine; Mirchandani, Gita G.; Castrucci, Brian C.; Chavez, Noel; Handler, Arden; Hoelscher, Deanna M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Childhood obesity is a national epidemic that disproportionately affects Hispanic children. Evidence suggests that increased acculturation among this population adversely affects diet and other healthy lifestyle characteristics, leading to higher rates of overweight and obesity. Healthy lifestyle characteristics must be understood in…

  10. Distribution and Abundance of Piping Plovers (Charadrius melodus) and Snowy Plovers (Charadrius alexandrinus) on the West Coast of Florida Before and After the 2004/2005 Hurricane Seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Coastal and Aquatic Managed Areas 1 0.2% 1.0% 0 0.0% 0.0% Guana Tolomato Matanzas National Estuarine 1 0 NPS 0 0.0% 0.0% 1 0.2% 1.6% Fort... Matanzas National Monument 0 1 Central Atlantic Coast 0 0.0% 12 2.8% DEP- State Parks 0 0.0% 0.0% 12 2.8% 100.0% St

  11. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Characterization of Pump Flow at the Grand Coulee Dam Pumping Station for Fish Passage, 2004-2005 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, T.; Duncan, J.; Johnson, R.

    2005-03-01

    This report describes a study conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Bonneville Power Administration to characterize the conditions fish experience when entrained in pump flow at the Grand Coulee Dam. PNNL conducted field studies at Grand Coulee Dam in 2004 using the Sensor Fish to measure the acceleration and pressure conditions that might be experienced by fish that pass through pumps at Grand Coulee Dam's Pump-Generating Plant and are transported up into the feeder canal leading to Banks Lake. The probability that fish would be struck by the Pump-Generating Plant's new nine-bladed turbines was also estimated. Our measurements showed relatively low turbulence except in the immediate vicinity of the runner environment. The lowest and highest pressures experienced by the Sensor Fish were 6.4 and 155 psi (the pressure gauge saturated at 155 psi). The probability of strike was also calculated, based on the average length of hatchery-reared juvenile kokanee (land-locked sockeye). Strike probabilities ranged from 0.0755 for 2.36-inch fish to 0.3890 for 11.8-inch fish. The probability of strike estimates indicate that the majority (77%) of recently released hatchery kokanee would be carried through the test pump without being struck and most likely with low risk of injury resulting from pressure and turbulence exposure. Of the 23% that might be struck it is expected that 60% would arrive in Banks Lake without visible external injuries. Thus more than 90% of entrained fish could be expected to arrive in Banks Lake without significant injury, assuming that no kokanee were injured or killed by pressure exposure during passage.

  12. The relationship between coral reef health, alien algae, and fish biomass at sites on Oahu and the Big Island, Hawaii, during 2004-2005 (NODC Accession 0002619)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data in this set come from two studies: "Ability of protected reefs to resist alien algae" and "How many fish does it take to keep the alien algae out?" Both are...

  13. Diagnostico serologico y molecular de Ehrlichiosis humana en pacientes con sintomatologia clinica compatible con la enfermedad en el estado Zulia Venezuela 2004-2005

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Castro-Morales, Mirtha; Arocha, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    .... E. chaffensis es el agente causal mas relacionado con la Ehrlichiosis Humana, sin embargo, la ehrlichiosis en humanos puede ser causada por ehrlichias propias de los caninos como E. canis y E. ewingii...

  14. Grado de conocimiento y control sobre la dislepimia entre los médicos de la Región de Murcia: (2004-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Lucía García Mancebo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundamento: Debido a que los consensos para el tratamiento y control de las dislipemias no siempre se siguen (incluyendo el cálculo del riesgo cardiovascular global, se realizó el presente estudio con el objetivo de analizar el nivel informativo y las pautas de actuación en la detección, evaluación y control de la dislipemia entre los médicos de atención primaria y especializada hospitalaria de la Región de Murcia. Métodos: Estudio observacional transversal que se realizó con 217 médicos de atención primaria (MAP y 133 médicos de atención hospitalaria (MH, mediante un cuestionario formado por 14 ítems. Resultados: El 80,9% de los médicos decían seguir los consensos internacionales para el control de la dislipemia. El cálculo del riesgo cardiovascular se utilizó de forma ocasional por el 58%. El parámetro objetivo más utilizado para tratar las dislipemias fue el colesterol de LDL (89,7%, colesterol total (57,7, colesterol de HDL (55,7% y triglicéridos (53,1%. El objetivo óptimo de colesterol de LDL en prevención primaria fue <130 mg/dl para el 66,6% de los médicos y en prevención secundaria fue <100 mg/dl para el 81,7%. Ante un paciente dislipémico bien controlado, el 76,6% de los profesionales mantendría el tratamiento y el 22,3% lo reduciría. Ante un paciente mal controlado, el 62,3% reforzarían el tratamiento higiénicodietético y el 66,9% el farmacológico. La estatina mejor valorada fue la atorvastatina. El 69,1% de los médicos valora la tolerancia a las estatinas mediante GOT, GPT y CPK. El 60,6% manifestó que el paciente cumplía bien su tratamiento. Conclusiones: No se observaron diferencias importantes en el conocimiento y actuación entre los médicos de atención primaria y especializada, siendo en ambos casos actual y adecuado

  15. Changes in the concentrations of biochemical indicators of diet and nutritional status of pregnant women across pregnancy trimesters in Trujillo, Peru, 2004-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, D Kevin; Adetona, Olorunfemi; Aguilar-Villalobos, Manuel; Cassidy, Brandon E; Pfeiffer, Christine M; Schleicher, Rosemary L; Caldwell, Kathleen L; Needham, Larry L; Rathbun, Stephen L; Vena, John E; Naeher, Luke P

    2013-06-11

    In developing countries, deficiencies in essential micronutrients are common, particularly in pregnant women. Although, biochemical indicators of diet and nutrition are useful to assess nutritional status, few studies have examined such indicators throughout pregnancy in women in developing countries. The primary objective of this study was to assess the nutritional status of 78 Peruvian women throughout pregnancy for 16 different nutritional indicators including fat-soluble vitamins and carotenoids, iron-status indicators, and selenium. Venous blood samples from which serum was prepared were collected during trimesters one (n = 78), two (n = 65), three (n = 62), and at term via the umbilical cord (n = 52). Questionnaires were completed to determine the demographic characteristics of subjects. Linear mixed effects models were used to study the associations between each maternal indicator and the demographic characteristics. None of the women were vitamin A and E deficient at any stage of pregnancy and only 1/62 women (1.6%) was selenium deficient during the third trimester. However, 6.4%, 44% and 64% of women had ferritin levels indicative of iron deficiency during the first, second and third trimester, respectively. Statistically significant changes (p ≤ 0.05) throughout pregnancy were noted for 15/16 nutritional indicators for this Peruvian cohort, with little-to-no association with demographic characteristics. Three carotenoids (beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin and trans-lycopene) were significantly associated with education status, while trans-lycopene was associated with age and beta-cryptoxanthin with SES (p < 0.05). Concentrations of retinol, tocopherol, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein + zeaxanthin and selenium were lower in cord serum compared with maternal serum (p < 0.05). Conversely, levels of iron status indicators (ferritin, transferrin saturation and iron) were higher in cord serum (p < 0.05). The increasing prevalence of iron deficiency throughout pregnancy in these Peruvian women was expected. It was surprising though not to find deficiencies in other nutrients. The results highlight the importance of continual monitoring of women throughout pregnancy for iron deficiency which could be caused by increasing fetal needs and/or inadequate iron intake as pregnancy progresses.

  16. CRISIS INTERVENTION AND ACUTE PSYCHIATRY IN AMSTERDAM, 20 YEARS OF CHANGE : A HISTORICAL COMPARISON OF CONSULTATIONS IN 1983 AND 2004-2005

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Post, L. F. M.; Dekker, J. J. M.; Jonkers, J. F. J.; Beekman, A. T. F.; Mulder, C. L.; De Haan, L.; Mulder, W. G.; Schoevers, R. A.

    Aim: There has been a striking increase in the number of compulsory admission proceedings in the Netherlands since 1992, to such an extent that treatment in Amsterdam's psychiatric clinics is in danger of being dominated by coercive treatment. Our aim was to establish a picture of the changes in

  17. Crisis intervention and acute psychiatry in Amsterdam, 20 years of change: a historical comparison of consultations in 1983 and 2004-2005

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Post, L. F. M.; Dekker, J. J. M.; Jonkers, J. F. J.; Beekman, A. T. F.; Mulder, C. L.; de Haan, L.; Mulder, W. G.; Schoevers, R. A.

    2010-01-01

    AIM: There has been a striking increase in the number of compulsory admission proceedings in the Netherlands since 1992, to such an extent that treatment in Amsterdam's psychiatric clinics is in danger of being dominated by coercive treatment. Our aim was to establish a picture of the changes in

  18. Acromioclavicular joint injuries in National Collegiate Athletic Association football: data from the 2004-2005 through 2008-2009 National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoo, Jason L; Braun, Hillary J; Bartlinski, Stephen E; Harris, Alex H S

    2012-09-01

    Injuries to the shoulder are common in collegiate football, and injuries to the acromioclavicular (AC) joint have previously accounted for up to 41% of all shoulder injuries. To determine the incidence and epidemiology of injury to the AC joint in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) football athletes. Descriptive epidemiology study. The NCAA Injury Surveillance System (ISS) men's football database was reviewed from the 2004-2009 playing seasons. The exposure data set from the same years was reviewed for the purposes of computing rates of injury per athlete exposure (AE). The injury rate (number of injuries divided by number of AEs) was computed per 10,000 AEs for competition and practice exposures. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals (95% CIs) for the incidence rates were calculated using assumptions of a Poisson distribution. According to the estimates made by the NCAA ISS, a total of 748 injuries to the AC joint occurred in NCAA football players during 2,222,155 AEs, accounting for 4.49% of all injuries sustained during this 5-year surveillance period. The overall rate of injury was 3.34 per 10,000 AEs (95% CI, 3.10-3.59). Players were 11.68 (95% CI, 10.11-13.49) times more likely to sustain an injury in games than practices. Partial sprains (types I or II) accounted for 96.4% of injuries, while complete sprains (≥type III) accounted for the remaining 3.6%. The average amount of time lost per injury was 11.61 days. Complete sprains resulted in a mean time loss of 31.9 days (95% CI, 24.4-39.6) while partial injuries resulted in 11.0 days lost (95% CI, 9.6-12.3). Overall, 2.41% of injuries underwent surgical intervention, with 22.2% of complete sprains and 1.7% of partial injuries resulting in surgery. Complete sprains of the AC joint were 13.5 (95% CI, 4.63-35.26) times more likely to result in surgical intervention than partial sprains. The majority of injuries (71.93%) resulted from contact with another player and 47.09% occurred while tackling or being tackled. Of all injuries, 47.63% occurred during offensive plays, while defense accounted for 20.77%. AC joint injuries in NCAA football players are predominantly low-grade sprains, leading to approximately 12 days of lost competition. The few severe sprains that occurred often resulted in surgery or required approximately 5 weeks of rehabilitation.

  19. Increased lung cancer mortality rates in the Chinese population from 1973-1975 to 2004-2005: An adverse health effect from exposure to smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Xiu-Yi; Zou, Xiao-Nong; Hu, Mu; Jiang, Yuan; Jia, Man-Man; Yang, Gong-Huan

    2015-09-01

    Lung cancer incidence and mortality rates have increased substantially in China despite improvements in clinical diagnosis and treatment approaches as well as significant advances in the implementation of tobacco-control policies in recent decades. Age-standardized mortality rates and age-specific rates of lung cancer in China were estimated for the periods 1973 to 1975, 1990 to 1992, and 2004 to 2005 using data from 3 National Death Surveys. Among patients with lung cancer who were identified from a hospital-based information system, the percentages of ever-smokers were analyzed according to histologic and demographic variables. Age-standardized mortality from lung cancer in China dramatically increased from 7.30 per 100,000 during 1973 through 1975 to 27.62 per 100,000 during 2004 through 2005. Increases in lung cancer age-standardized mortality were consistent among men and women in urban and rural populations. Among men ages 75 to 79 years, lung cancer mortality increased remarkably to 453.67 per 100,000 in 2004 and 2005 (from 246.78 per 100,000 during 1990-1992 and from 53.65 per 100,000 during 1973-1975). Among 6674 patients with lung cancer who were identified from 2003 to 2007 from a hospital-based database, 82.97% of men were ever-smokers (73.35% of men with adenocarcinoma and 91.8% of men with squamous cell carcinoma), and 11.18% of women were ever-smokers (6% of women with adenosquamous carcinoma and 39.02% of women with squamous cell carcinoma). Differences in the numbers of ever-smokers were observed between age groups but not according to the year of diagnosis. The consistent and rapid increases in lung cancer mortality rates observed in the Chinese population and the high prevalence of exposure to smoking in China prompt a strong call for the implementation of a comprehensive tobacco-control policy and specific public health educational strategies. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  20. Brotes de rabia humana transmitida por vampiros en los municipios de Bajo y Alto Baudó, departamento del Chocó, Colombia 2004-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessika Valderrama

    2006-09-01

    Conclusiones. El brote de rabia humana en Bajo Baudó 2004 ha sido el de mayor magnitud reportado en Colombia. Este fue causado por vampiros, demostrando la amenaza que representa la rabia de especies silvestres para la salud pública, y la necesidad de implementar acciones para evitar su impacto en humanos. Se desconoce si existen vínculos entre este brote y el reportado en Alto Baudó seis meses después.

  1. Oblique accretion, slip partitioning, and longitudinal extension on the Aceh Promontory of the Sunda Arc in the 2004-2005 rupture areas, northern Sumatra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeber, L.; Hirata, K.; Rahardiawan, R.; Fujiwara, T.; Misawa, A.; McHugh, C. M.; Cormier, M.

    2011-12-01

    Continental transform boundaries tend to develop on former subduction zones. Pre-existing accretion and collision structures may play key roles in continental transforms. Oblique accretion and strain partitioning in subduction systems may exhibit key structures that transition into a transcurrent regime. Here we examine a portion of the northwestern Sunda Arc, the type example of strain partitioning in oblique convergence. It developed the largest displacement in the 2004 megathrust rupture, one of the largest known. Data of unprecedented resolution on seismicity, structure and morphology offer new opportunities to study oblique subduction tectonics. This work uses selected MCS data from the KH-10-05 cruise by R/V Huhako Maru and a wide assortment of published data to focus on the Sunda arc offshore northern Sumatra. A 3-zone upper plate model fits well most of the arc. A narrow frontal zone of active accretion is marked by the trench slope. Landward is a wider zone of older more consolidated and rigid accreted sediment that provides the 'dynamic backstop'. Landward still is the static backstop, a wedge of pre-forearc basement that floors the forearc basin, and extends oceanward under part of the accretion complex. Between them is an ocean-dipping (West Andaman) fault, which borders the forearc basins. Finally, the basement wedge is decoupled from the Sunda plate along the volcanic belt (Sumatra fault). These two faults share most of the dextral motion of the oblique convergence boundary. The pre-, and post-2004 mainshock seismicity patterns underscore distinct roles for static and dynamic backstops. In a simple 2D accretion model, the frontal accretion zone maintains a constant dimension by transferring as much sediment to the older accretion zone through the dynamic backstop as it receives from an incoming 3 km thick ocean sediment. This model yields a 5.8 mm/y forward growth of the forearc and a 3.4 my residence time of the sediment in the active accretion zone. At these rates, the sediment in the forearc would have accreted in about 1/3 the age of the arc. This is consistent with a late arrival of sediment from the Bengal Fan and with forearc stretching and translation due to the northward increase of subduction obliqueness. Earthquake slip and P-axes orientations below the accretion wedge show that dextral motion is absorbed mostly by the West Andaman and Sumatra faults. But they tend to be normal to the deformation front around the Aceh promontory and the Simeulue reentrant in the outer forearc. This requires 15-20 mm/y of longitudinal extension along the promontory and 9mm of longitudinal contraction across the reentrant. This extension may be accommodated in part by a prominent set of N-S fault zones, which we interpret as shallow-dipping right-extensional faults that overprint the accretion folds on the Aceh promontory.

  2. Ambient air particulate concentrations and metallic elements principal component analysis at Taichung Harbor (TH) and WuChi Traffic (WT) near Taiwan Strait during 2004-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Guor-Cheng; Wu, Yuh-Shen; Wen, Chih-Chung; Huang, Shih-Han; Rau, Jui-Yeh

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize metallic elements associated with atmospheric particulate matter of total suspended particulate (TSP), fine particle (particle matter with aerodynamical diameter metallic elements Fe and Zn. And in WT sampling site, higher correlation coefficients displayed on total suspended particulates of metallic elements Fe and Zn, Fe and Mn. Ambient airborne particle principal component analysis of metallic metals was used to identify the possible pollutant sources in this study. At the TH sampling site, 50.81% of the total variance of the data was observed in factor 1. Higher loading of Fe (0.86), Zn (0.79), Pb (0.76), and Mn (0.68) were contributed by traffic emission and the soil source. At the WT sampling site, factor 1 explained 53.74% of the total variance of the data and had high loading for Zn (0.86) and Cu (0.85), which were identified as industrial/traffic emission sources.

  3. Estado nutricional de niños palúdicos residentes en El Bagre y Turbo, Antioquia, Colombia, 2004-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Magdalena Uscátegui

    2007-12-01

    Resultados. La prevalencia de niños con desnutrición crónica moderada o grave fue de 22,6%; la de desnutrición global moderada o grave de 10,8% y la aguda de 2,3%. Las prevalencias fueron mayores entre varones y residentes en Turbo. Conclusiones. Las prevalencias de desnutrición fueron superiores a las reportadas en la última Encuesta Nacional de Demografía y Salud (2005, y en los residentes en Turbo fueron mayores a las encontradas en el Urabá antioqueño.

  4. Movilizaciones y discursos sobre familia y matrimonio homosexual y su tratamiento en la prensa (Un bienio crucial en España: 2004-2005)

    OpenAIRE

    Braulio Martínez, Mildred

    2016-01-01

    [ES]El 26 de febrero de 2004 se abrió en España la campaña para las elecciones generales que tendrían lugar el 14 de marzo de dicho año y que llevaría al Gobierno a Rodríguez Zapatero, del PSOE, que derrotó a Rajoy, candidato del PP. Las elecciones representaron una “coyuntura de oportunidad” para el movimiento LGTB que venía luchando desde mediados de los años 90 por la igualdad de derechos de todas las opciones sexuales y que en septiembre de 2001 había pasado de reivindic...

  5. Etiología del síndrome febril agudo en la provincia de Jaén, Perú 2004-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinda Troyes R

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Conocer a tiología el Síndrome febril agudo en nacientes que acudieron a tres establecimientos de salud de la provincia de Jaén entre mayo de 2004 y abril de 2005. Materiales y métodos: Estudio descriptivo prospectivo realizado en tres establecimientos de salud: Hospital General de Jaén, Hospital de Apoyo Bellavista y Centro de Salud Morro Solar. Se incluyeron pacientes entre 5 y 65 años con fiebre de menos de ocho días de evolución y sin foco infeccioso aparente. Inicialmente se les realizó gota gruesa para malaria y frotis sanguíneo para Bartonelosis; de los casos negativos se obtuvo una segunda muestra de sangre para la búsqueda de ELISA IgM y microaglutinación para el diagnóstico de leptospirosis, ELISA IgM para dengue, Mayaro, Oropuche y encefalitis equina venezolana, e inmunofluorescencia indirecta para Rickettsiosis. Resultados: De 1039 febriles incluidos, se determinó la etiología en 680 (65,4%casos, malaria por P.falciparum 312 (30,0%, leptospirosis 115 (11,1%, dengue 105 (10,1%, malaria por P. vivax 76 (7,3%,leptospirosis más dengue 30 (2,9%, Rickettsiosis 15 (1,4%,Bartonelosis 17 (1,6%,leptospirosis más Rickettsiosis 7 (0,7%, y leptospirosis, dengue más Rickettsiosis 3 (0,3%. Los serovares de Leptospira más frecuentes fueron varilla (35,7%y bratislava (32,5%. Conclusión: La malaria es la principal causa de síndrome febril agudo en Jaén, se destaca la presencia de la leptospirosis como segunda causa,por delante del dengue; es necesario considerar dentro del diagnóstico diferencial Rickettsiosis y Bartonelosis.

  6. Assessment of invasiveness of the Orange Keyhole Sponge, Mycale Armata, in Kaneohe Bay Oahu, Hawaii, based on surveys 2004-2005 (NODC Accession 0002602)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Orange Keyhole Sponge, Mycale armata Thiele, was unknown in Hawaii prior to 1996. First reported in Pearl Harbor, it now occurs in virtually every commercial...

  7. NOAA Average Annual Salinity (3-Zone)

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The 3-Zone Average Annual Salinity Digital Geography is a digital spatial framework developed using geographic information system (GIS) technology. These salinity...

  8. 2008 annual CERN Road Race

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    Dear runners, The 2008 annual CERN Road Race will be held on Wednesday 24 September at 6.00 p.m. This 5.4 km race consists of 3 laps of a 1.8 km circuit in the West Area of the Meyrin site and is open to everyone working at CERN and their families. Past races have attracted runners of all speeds, with times ranging from under 17 to over 34 minutes. The race is run on a handicap basis, with starting times staggered to ensure that (in theory) all runners finish together. However, if the popularity of the race continues to grow (95 runners took part last year), its format may be modified to a classic single start. For more information and to complete the online entry form, go to http://club-running.web.cern.ch

  9. Annual report 1998-1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    This is the Annual Report of the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the year ending March 31, 1999 and summarizes the activities of AECL during the period 1998-1999. The Activities covered in this Report include the CANDU Reactor Business, with excellent progress reported on the construction of two 700 MWe-class CANDU reactors in Qinshan, China. In the Republic of Korea, Wolsong Unit entered into commercial operation and Wolsong Unit 4 achieved sustained nuclear reaction. The Report also covers AECL's R and D and Waste Management programs. In the R and D section, the report outlines the development of the CANFLEX fuel bundle, Fuel Channels, Reactor Safety, Code Validation, Fuels and Fuel Cycles as well as Heavy Water production. Progress in the Waste Management program is also discussed.

  10. Annual Cycle Energy System (ACES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, A. S.; Abbatiello, L. A.

    1980-05-01

    A single family residence near Knoxville, Tennessee, is being used to demonstrate the energy conserving features of the annual cycle energy system (ACES), an integrated heating and cooling system that utilizes a unidirectional heat pump and low temperature thermal storage. A second house, the control house, is being used to compare the performance of the ACES with that of an electric resistance heating and hot water system combined with a central air conditioning system. The ACES reduced peak utility system demands significantly: a reduction from 11.7 to 3.1 kW was achieved in the winter and from 4.1 to 0.7 kW in the summer. The only problems encountered were a heat leak into the storage bin that was twice the calculated value and control logic errors that produced excessive hot water in the winter, requiring extensive use of the night heat rejection mode in the summer. These problems are currently being corrected.

  11. Laser Program annual report 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rufer, M.L.; Murphy, P.W. (eds.)

    1985-06-01

    The Laser Program Annual Report is part of the continuing series of reports documenting the progress of the unclassified Laser Fusion Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). As in previous years, the report is organized programmatically. The first section is an overview of the basic goals and directions of the LLNL Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, and highlights the year's important accomplishments. Sections 2 through 7 provide the detailed information on the various program elements: Laser Systems and Operations, Target Design, Target Fabrication, Laser Experiments and Advanced Diagnostics, Advanced Laser Development, and Applications of Inertial Confinement Fusion. Individual sections will be indexed separately. 589 refs., 333 figs., 25 tabs.

  12. Annual report to Congress, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-31

    Created by Congress in 1977 as an independent entity within the Department of Energy, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the principal and authoritative source of comprehensive energy data for the Congress, the Federal Government, the States, and the public. With the mandate to ``collect, assemble, evaluate, analyze, and disseminate data and information,`` EIA`s mission has been defined to: maintain a comprehensive data and information program relevant to energy resources and reserves, energy production, energy demand, energy technologies, and related financial and statistical information relevant to the adequacy of energy resources to meet the Nation`s demands in the near and longer term future. Develop and maintain analytical tool and collection and processing systems; provide analyses that are accurate, timely, and objective; and provide information dissemination services. This annual report summarizes EIA`s activities and accomplishments in 1993.

  13. Laser program annual report 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendricks, C.D.; Rufer, M.L.; Murphy, P.W. (eds.)

    1984-06-01

    In the 1983 Laser Program Annual Report we present the accomplishments and unclassified activities of the Laser Program at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) for the year 1983. It should be noted that the report, of necessity, is a summary, and more detailed expositions of the research can be found in the many publications and reports authored by staff members in the Laser Program. The purpose of this report is to present our work in a brief form, but with sufficient depth to provide an overview of the analytical and experimental aspects of the LLNL Inertial-Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program. The format of this report is basically the same as that of previous years. Section 1 is an overview and highlights the important accomplishments and directions of the Program. Sections 2 through 7 provide the detailed information on the various major parts of the Program: Laser Systems and Operations, Target Design, Target Fabrication, Fusion Experiments, Laser Research and Development, and Energy Applications.

  14. LLNL NESHAPs 2014 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bertoldo, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gallegos, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacQueen, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wegrecki, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC operates facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H, which regulates radionuclide emissions to air from Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Specifically, NESHAPs limits the emission of radionuclides to the ambient air to levels resulting in an annual effective dose equivalent of 10 mrem (100 μSv) to any member of the public. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, LLNL personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, Version 4.0.1.17, to calculate the dose to the maximally exposed individual member of the public for the Livermore Site and Site 300.

  15. Spine Tango annual report 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukamp, M; Perler, G; Pigott, T; Munting, E; Aebi, M; Röder, C

    2013-09-01

    Since the Spine Tango registry was founded over a decade ago it has become established internationally. An annual report has been produced using the same format as the SWEspine group to allow for first data comparisons between the two registries. Data was captured with the latest generation of surgery and follow-up forms. Also, the Core Outcome Measures Index (COMI) from interventions performed in the year 2012 with follow-up to June 2013 was analyzed. Groups of patients with the most common degenerative lumbar spine diseases and a single group of patients with degenerative cervical spine diseases were created. The demographics, risk factors, previous treatments, current treatment, short-term outcomes, patient satisfaction and complications were analyzed. Pre- and postoperative pain and function scores were derived from the COMI. About 6,500 procedures were captured with Spine Tango in 2012. The definitions and composition of all the degenerative groups could not completely be matched between the two registries with the consequence that the age and sex distributions were partially different. Preoperative pain levels were similar. The short-term outcomes available did not allow for evaluation of the final result of surgical intervention. This will be possible with the longer term data in the next annual report. There was a distinct disparity in reported complication rates between surgeons and patients. This is a valuable first step in creating comparable reports for SWEspine and Spine Tango. The German spine registry may be able to collaborate in the future because of similar items and data structure as Spine Tango. There needs to be more work on understanding the harmonization of the different degenerative subgroups. The Spine Tango report is weakened by the short and incomplete follow-up. The visual presentation of data may be a useful model for aiding decision making for surgeons and patients in the future.

  16. FY 1996 annual work plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-30

    In April 1994, the Department of Energy (DOE) Strategic Plan was issued. This Plan presents the Department`s strategic outlook in response to a changing world. It discusses the Department`s unique capabilities; its mission, vision, and core values; and key customer and stakeholder considerations. The DOE Strategic Plan lists business strategies and critical success factors which are intended to aid the Department in accomplishing its mission and reaching its vision of itself in the future. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) has an important role in carrying out the goals and objectives of the Secretary`s Strategic Plan. The ultimate goal of the OIG is to facilitate positive change by assisting its customers, responsible Government officials, in taking actions to improve programs and operations. The Inspector General annually issues his own Strategic Plan that contains program guidance for the next fiscal year. As part of its responsibility in carrying out the OIG mission, the Office of the Deputy Inspector General for Audit Services (Office of Audit Services) publishes an Annual Work Plan that sets forth audits that are planned for the next fiscal year. Selection of these audits is based on the overall budget of the Department, analyses of trends in Departmental operations, guidance contained in the agency`s strategic plans, statutory requirements, and the expressed needs and audit suggestions of Departmental program managers and OIG managers and staff. This work plan includes audits that are carried over from FY 1995 and audits scheduled to start during FY 1996. Audits included in the plan will be performed by OIG staff.

  17. 78 FR 68023 - Annual Wholesale Trade Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-13

    ... collect data covering annual sales, e- commerce sales, purchases, total operating expenses, year-end... Census Bureau will collect data covering sales, e-commerce sales, year-end inventories held inside and... offices, the Census Bureau will collect data covering annual sales, e-commerce sales, year-end inventories...

  18. 76 FR 64894 - Annual Wholesale Trade Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ... collect data covering annual sales, e-commerce sales, purchases, total operating expenses, year-end..., e- commerce sales, year-end inventories held inside and outside the United States, purchases, and... data covering annual sales, e-commerce sales, year-end inventories held inside and outside the United...

  19. 75 FR 63805 - Annual Wholesale Trade Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ... Census Bureau will collect data on annual sales, e-commerce sales, purchases, total operating expenses... wholesale distributors, the Census Bureau will collect data covering sales, e-commerce sales, year-end... manufacturers' sales branches and offices, the Census Bureau will collect data covering annual sales, e-commerce...

  20. Cost-efficient staffing under annualized hours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, Egbert; Hans, Elias W.; Veltman, Bart; Berrevoets, Leo M.; Berden, Hubert J.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    We study how flexibility in workforce capacity can be used to efficiently match capacity and demand. Flexibility in workforce capacity is introduced by the annualized hours regime. Annualized hours allow organizations to measure working time per year, instead of per month or per week. An additional