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Sample records for regulating androgen activity

  1. Up-Regulation of Hepatic Alpha-2-HS-Glycoprotein Transcription by Testosterone via Androgen Receptor Activation

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    Jakob Voelkl

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Fetuin-A (alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, AHSG, a liver borne plasma protein, contributes to the prevention of soft tissue calcification, modulates inflammation, reduces insulin sensitivity and fosters weight gain following high fat diet or ageing. In polycystic ovary syndrome, fetuin-A levels correlate with free androgen levels, an observation pointing to androgen sensitivity of fetuin-A expression. The present study thus explored whether the expression of hepatic fetuin-A is modified by testosterone. Methods: HepG2 cells were treated with testosterone and androgen receptor antagonist flutamide, and were silenced with androgen receptor siRNA. To test the in vivo relevance, male mice were subjected to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT for 7 weeks. AHSG mRNA levels were determined by quantitative RT-PCR and fetuin-A protein abundance by Western blotting. Results: In HepG2 cells, AHSG mRNA expression and fetuin-A protein abundance were both up-regulated following testosterone treatment. The human alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein gene harbors putative androgen receptor response elements in the proximal 5 kb promoter sequence relative to TSS. The effect of testosterone on AHSG mRNA levels was abrogated by silencing of the androgen receptor in HepG2 cells. Moreover, treatment of HepG2 cells with the androgen receptor antagonist flutamide in presence of endogenous ligands in the medium significantly down-regulated AHSG mRNA expression and fetuin-A protein abundance. In addition, ADT of male mice was followed by a significant decrease of hepatic Ahsg mRNA expression and fetuin-A protein levels. Conclusions: Testosterone participates in the regulation of hepatic fetuin-A expression, an effect mediated, at least partially, by androgen receptor activation.

  2. Up-regulation of hepatic alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein transcription by testosterone via androgen receptor activation.

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    Voelkl, Jakob; Pakladok, Tatsiana; Lin, Yun; Viereck, Robert; Lebedeva, Aleksandra; Kukuk, Damaris; Pichler, Bernd J; Alesutan, Ioana; Lang, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Fetuin-A (alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, AHSG), a liver borne plasma protein, contributes to the prevention of soft tissue calcification, modulates inflammation, reduces insulin sensitivity and fosters weight gain following high fat diet or ageing. In polycystic ovary syndrome, fetuin-A levels correlate with free androgen levels, an observation pointing to androgen sensitivity of fetuin-A expression. The present study thus explored whether the expression of hepatic fetuin-A is modified by testosterone. HepG2 cells were treated with testosterone and androgen receptor antagonist flutamide, and were silenced with androgen receptor siRNA. To test the in vivo relevance, male mice were subjected to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for 7 weeks. AHSG mRNA levels were determined by quantitative RT-PCR and fetuin-A protein abundance by Western blotting. In HepG2 cells, AHSG mRNA expression and fetuin-A protein abundance were both up-regulated following testosterone treatment. The human alpha- 2-HS-glycoprotein gene harbors putative androgen receptor response elements in the proximal 5 kb promoter sequence relative to TSS. The effect of testosterone on AHSG mRNA levels was abrogated by silencing of the androgen receptor in HepG2 cells. Moreover, treatment of HepG2 cells with the androgen receptor antagonist flutamide in presence of endogenous ligands in the medium significantly down-regulated AHSG mRNA expression and fetuin-A protein abundance. In addition, ADT of male mice was followed by a significant decrease of hepatic Ahsg mRNA expression and fetuin-A protein levels. Testosterone participates in the regulation of hepatic fetuin-A expression, an effect mediated, at least partially, by androgen receptor activation.

  3. Androgens Regulate Ovarian Gene Expression Through Modulation of Ezh2 Expression and Activity.

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    Ma, Xiaoting; Hayes, Emily; Biswas, Anindita; Seger, Christina; Prizant, Hen; Hammes, Stephen R; Sen, Aritro

    2017-09-01

    A substantial amount of evidence suggests that androgen signaling through classical androgen receptors is critical for both normal and pathologic ovarian physiology. Specifically, we and others have shown that, in mouse granulosa cells, androgen actions through both extranuclear and nuclear androgen receptor signaling are critical for normal follicle development and ovulation. Here, we show that androgens through the PI3K/Akt pathway rapidly (within minutes) phosphorylate and inhibit activity of the Polycomb group protein enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2). Over the course of 24 to 48 hours, androgens then induce expression of the microRNA miR-101, which targets Ezh2 messenger RNA (mRNA), leading to a nearly complete loss of Ezh2 protein expression. This long-term androgen-induced loss of Ezh2 actions ultimately results in sustained reduction of the H3K27me3-repressive mark in the promoter region of the Runt-related transcription factor-1 (Runx1) gene, a luteinizing hormone (LH)-induced transcription factor essential for ovulation, leading to increased Runx1 mRNA expression. Accordingly, blocking androgen-induced inhibition of Ezh2 in vivo adversely affects LH-induced Runx1 mRNA expression and subsequent ovulation. Importantly, although estrogen treatment of granulosa cells similarly causes rapid activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway and short-term phosphorylation of Ezh2, it does not induce miR-101 expression and thereby does not reduce overall Ezh2 expression, demonstrating the androgen specificity of long-term Ezh2 suppression. Thus, this study provides insight regarding how androgen-induced extranuclear kinase signaling and intranuclear transcription through Ezh2 modifications may influence the expression pattern of genes, ultimately affecting various downstream physiological processes. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  4. The Regulation of Spermatogenesis by Androgens

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    Smith, Lee B.

    2014-01-01

    Testosterone is essential for maintaining spermatogenesis and male fertility. However, the molecular mechanisms by which testosterone acts have not begun to be revealed until recently. With the advances obtained from the use of transgenic mice lacking or overexpressing the androgen receptor, the cell specific targets of testosterone action as well as the genes and signaling pathways that are regulated by testosterone are being identified. In this review, the critical steps of spermatogenesis that are regulated by testosterone are discussed as well as the intracellular signaling pathways by which testosterone acts. We also review the functional information that has been obtained from the knock out of the androgen receptor from specific cell types in the testis and the genes found to be regulated after altering testosterone levels or androgen receptor expression. PMID:24598768

  5. The co-regulators SRC-1 and SMRT are involved in interleukin-6-induced androgen receptor activation.

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    Wang, Qi; Wang, Hui; Ju, Qiang; Ding, Zhen; Ge, Xing; Shi, Qiao-Mei; Zhou, Ji-Long; Zhou, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Jin-Peng; Zhang, Mei-Rong; Yu, Hong-Min; Xu, Li-Chun

    2016-11-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) can be stimulated by interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the absence of androgens to induce prostate cancer progression. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the co-activator steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) and co-repressor silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT) are involved in IL-6-induced AR activation. The effects of IL-6 on LNCaP cell proliferation were monitored using real-time cell analysis (RTCA) iCELLigence system. The impacts of IL-6 on the association of the AR with SRC-1 and SMRT were investigated using the mammalian two-hybrid assay. IL-6 increased the proliferation of LNCaP cells with maximal induction at 50 ng/mL. The AR-SRC-1interaction was enhanced by IL-6, with maximal induction at the concentration of 50 ng/mL (P<0.05). IL-6 decreased the AR-SMRT interaction and a marked reduction was detected at 50 ng/mL (P<0.05). IL-6 enhances LNCaP cells proliferation, which suggests that IL-6 might cause AR-positive prostate cancer growth through activation of the AR. The mechanism of IL-6-induced AR activation is mediated through enhancing AR-SRC-1 interaction and inhibiting AR-SMRT interaction. We have shown a significant role for SRC-1 and SMRT in modulating IL-6-induced AR transactivation.

  6. Gonadotropin regulation of in vitro androgen production by reptilian testes.

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    Wo Tsui, H; Licht, P

    1977-04-01

    The hormonal regulation of in vitro androgen production by minced testes from 7 species of reptiles representing the 3 major orders was studied using purified follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) from tetrapod species. Androgen content was measured by radioimmunoassay. All 7 species showed a dose-dependent response to all preparations of FSH and LH tested. However, variations were found depending on the species tested and the source of the hormone. All snake hormones were particularly inactive in turtles. Some of the variation in relative potencies of hormone reflect phylogenetic specificity in the testes. Synergism between FSH and LH was tested in the sea turtle. While subliminal doses of FSH and LH produced a small stimulation of androgen production, each alone was ineffective. Both gonadotropins have intrinsic activity with regard to the stimulation of steroidogenesis.

  7. ANDROGENS REGULATE T47D CELLS MOTILITY AND INVASION THROUGH ACTIN CYTOSKELETON REMODELLING

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    Maria Magdalena Montt-Guevara

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between androgens and breast cancer is controversial. Androgens have complex effects on breast cancer progression and metastasis. Moreover, androgens receptor (AR is expressed in approximately 70% to 90% of invasive breast carcinomas, which has prognostic relevance in basal-like cancers and in triple negative breast cancers. Recent studies have associated the actin-binding proteins of the Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM family with metastasis in endocrine-sensitive cancers. We studied on T47D breast cancer cells whether androgens with different characteristics, such as testosterone (T, dihydrotestosterone (DHT and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA may regulate breast cancer cell motility and invasion through the control of actin remodelling. We demonstrate that androgens promote migration and invasion in T47D via Moesin activation. We show that T and DHEA exert their actions via the AR and estrogen receptor (ER, while the non aromatizable androgen – DHT only recruits AR. We further report that androgen induced significant changes in actin organization with pseudopodia along with membrane ruffles formation, and this process is mediated by Moesin. Our work identifies novel mechanisms of action of androgens on breast cancer cells. Through the modulation of Moesin, androgens alter the architecture of cytoskeleton in T47D breast cancer cell and promote cell migration and invasion. These results could help to understand the biological actions of androgens on breast cancer, and eventually to develop new strategies for treatment of breast cancer.

  8. Identification of novel genes that regulate androgen receptor signaling and growth of androgen-deprived prostate cancer cells.

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    Levina, Elina; Ji, Hao; Chen, Mengqiang; Baig, Mirza; Oliver, David; Ohouo, Patrice; Lim, Chang-uk; Schools, Garry; Carmack, Steven; Ding, Ye; Broude, Eugenia V; Roninson, Igor B; Buttyan, Ralph; Shtutman, Michael

    2015-05-30

    Prostate cancer progression to castration refractory disease is associated with anomalous transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor (AR) in an androgen-depleted milieu. To identify novel gene products whose downregulation transactivates AR in prostate cancer cells, we performed a screen of enzymatically-generated shRNA lenti-libraries selecting for transduced LNCaP cells with elevated expression of a fluorescent reporter gene under the control of an AR-responsive promoter. The shRNAs present in selected populations were analyzed using high-throughput sequencing to identify target genes. Highly enriched gene targets were then validated with siRNAs against selected genes, testing first for increased expression of luciferase from an AR-responsive promoter and then for altered expression of endogenous androgen-regulated genes in LNCaP cells. We identified 20 human genes whose silencing affected the expression of exogenous and endogenous androgen-responsive genes in prostate cancer cells grown in androgen-depleted medium. Knockdown of four of these genes upregulated the expression of endogenous AR targets and siRNAs targeting two of these genes (IGSF8 and RTN1) enabled androgen-independent proliferation of androgen-dependent cells. The effects of IGSF8 appear to be mediated through its interaction with a tetraspanin protein, CD9, previously implicated in prostate cancer progression. Remarkably, homozygous deletions of IGSF8 are found almost exclusively in prostate cancers but not in other cancer types. Our study shows that androgen independence can be achieved through the inhibition of specific genes and reveals a novel set of genes that regulate AR signaling in prostate cancers.

  9. Membrane Androgen Receptor Down-Regulates c-Src-Activity and Beta-Catenin Transcription and Triggers GSK-3beta-Phosphorylation in Colon Tumor Cells

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    Shuchen Gu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Functional membrane androgen receptors (mARs have recently been described in colon tumor cells and tissues. Their activation by specific testosterone albumin conjugates (TAC down-regulates the PI-3K/Akt pro-survival signaling and triggers potent pro-apoptotic responses both, in vitro and in vivo. The present study explored the mAR-induced regulation of gene products implicated in the tumorigenic activity of Caco2 colon cancer cells. Methods: In Caco2 human colon cancer cells transcript levels were determined by RT-PCR, protein abundance and phosphorylation by Western blotting and confocal microscopy, as well as cytoskeletal architecture by confocal microscopy. Results: We report time dependent significant decrease in Tyr-416 phosphorylation of c-Src upon mAR activation. In line with the reported late down-regulation of the PI-3K/Akt pathway in testosterone-treated colon tumors, GSK-3beta was phosphorylated at Tyr-216 after long term stimulation of the cells with TAC, a finding supporting the role of this kinase to promote apoptosis. PCR analysis revealed significant decrease of beta-catenin and cyclin D1 transcript levels following TAC treatment. Moreover, confocal laser scanning microscopic analysis disclosed co-localization of beta-catenin with actin cytoskeleton. It is thus conceivable that beta-catenin may participate in the reported modulation of cytoskeletal dynamics in mAR stimulated Caco2 cells. Conclusions: Our results provide strong evidence that mAR activation regulates late expression and/or activity of the tumorigenic gene products c-Src, GSK-3beta, and beta-catenin thus facilitating the pro-apoptotic response in colon tumor cells.

  10. Androgen-Dependent Regulation of Human MUC1 Mucin Expression

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    Stephen Mitchell

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available MUC1 mucin is transcriptionally regulated by estrogen, progesterone, and glucocorticoids. Our objective was to determine whether androgen receptor. (20AR activation regulates expression of MUC1. The following breast and prostatic cell lines were phenotyped and grouped according to AR and MUC1protein expression: 1 AR+MUCi + [DAR17+19. (20AR transfectants of DU-145, ZR-75-1, MDA-MB-453, and T47D]; 2 AR-MUCi+ [DZeoi. (20AR- vector control, DU-145, BT20, MDA-MB231, and MCF7]; 3 AIR +MUCi -. (20LNCaP and LNCaP-r. Cell proliferation was determined using the MTT assay in the presence of synthetic androgen R1881, 0.1 pM to 1 µM. Cell surface MUC1expression was determined by flow cytometry in the presence or absence of oestradiol, medroxy progesterone acetate or R1881, with and without 4 hydroxy-flutamide. (204-OH, a nonsteroidal AR antagonist. The functional significance of MUC1expression was investigated with a cell-cell aggregation assay. Only AR+ MUC1 + cell lines showed a significant increase in MUC1expression with AR activation. (20P. (20range =.01 to .0001, reversed in the presence of 4-OHF. Cell proliferation was unaffected. Increased expression of MUC1was associated with a significant. (20P. (20range =.002 to .001 reduction in cell-cell adhesion. To our knowledge, this is the first description of androgen-dependent regulation of MUC1mucin. This is also functionally associated with decreased cell-cell adhesion, a recognised feature of progressive malignancy. These findings have important implications for physiological and pathological processes.

  11. Expression of Androgen Receptor Is Negatively Regulated By p53

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    Fatouma Alimirah

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased expression of androgen receptor (AR in prostate cancer (PC is associated with transition to androgen independence. Because the progression of PC to advanced stages is often associated with the loss of p53 function, we tested whether the p53 could regulate the expression of AR gene. Here we report that p53 negatively regulates the expression of AR in prostate epithelial cells (PrECs. We found that in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells that express the wild-type p53 and AR and in human normal PrECs, the activation of p53 by genotoxic stress or by inhibition of p53 nuclear export downregulated the expression of AR. Furthermore, forced expression of p53 in LNCaP cells decreased the expression of AR. Conversely, knockdown of p53 expression in LNCaP cells increased the AR expression. Consistent with the negative regulation of AR expression by p53, the p53-null HCT116 cells expressed higher levels of AR compared with the isogenic HCT116 cells that express the wildtype p53. Moreover, we noted that in etoposide treated LNCaP cells p53 bound to the promoter region of the AR gene, which contains a potential p53 DNA-binding consensus sequence, in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Together, our observations provide support for the idea that the loss of p53 function in prostate cancer cells contributes to increased expression of AR.

  12. Sphingosine kinase-1 is central to androgen-regulated prostate cancer growth and survival.

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    Audrey Dayon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1 is an oncogenic lipid kinase notably involved in response to anticancer therapies in prostate cancer. Androgens regulate prostate cancer cell proliferation, and androgen deprivation therapy is the standard of care in the management of patients with advanced disease. Here, we explored the role of SphK1 in the regulation of androgen-dependent prostate cancer cell growth and survival. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Short-term androgen removal induced a rapid and transient SphK1 inhibition associated with a reduced cell growth in vitro and in vivo, an event that was not observed in the hormono-insensitive PC-3 cells. Supporting the critical role of SphK1 inhibition in the rapid effect of androgen depletion, its overexpression could impair the cell growth decrease. Similarly, the addition of dihydrotestosterone (DHT to androgen-deprived LNCaP cells re-established cell proliferation, through an androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt dependent stimulation of SphK1, and inhibition of SphK1 could markedly impede the effects of DHT. Conversely, long-term removal of androgen support in LNCaP and C4-2B cells resulted in a progressive increase in SphK1 expression and activity throughout the progression to androgen-independence state, which was characterized by the acquisition of a neuroendocrine (NE-like cell phenotype. Importantly, inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway--by negatively impacting SphK1 activity--could prevent NE differentiation in both cell models, an event that could be mimicked by SphK1 inhibitors. Fascinatingly, the reversability of the NE phenotype by exposure to normal medium was linked with a pronounced inhibition of SphK1 activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We report the first evidence that androgen deprivation induces a differential effect on SphK1 activity in hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cell models. These results also suggest that SphK1 activation upon chronic androgen deprivation may serve as a

  13. Molecular cloning and characterization of a nuclear androgen receptor activated by 11-ketotestosterone

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    Karlsson Johnny

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although 11-ketotestosterone is a potent androgen and induces male secondary sex characteristics in many teleosts, androgen receptors with high binding affinity for 11-ketotestosterone or preferential activation by 11-ketotestosterone have not been identified. So, the mechanism by which 11-ketotestosterone exhibits such high potency remains unclear. Recently we cloned the cDNA of an 11-ketotestosterone regulated protein, spiggin, from three-spined stickleback renal tissue. As spiggin is the only identified gene product regulated by 11-ketotestosterone, the stickleback kidney is ideal for determination of the mechanism of 11-ketotestosterone gene regulation. A single androgen receptor gene with two splicing variants, belonging to the androgen receptor-β subfamily was cloned from stickleback kidney. A high affinity, saturable, single class of androgen specific binding sites, with the characteristics of an androgen receptor, was identified in renal cytosolic and nuclear fractions. Measurement of ligand binding moieties in the cytosolic and nuclear fractions as well as to the recombinant receptor revealed lower affinity for 11-ketotestosterone than for dihydrotestosterone. Treatment with different androgens did not up-regulate androgen receptor mRNA level or increase receptor abundance, suggesting that auto-regulation is not involved in differential ligand activation. However, comparison of the trans-activation potential of the stickleback androgen receptor with the human androgen receptor, in both human HepG2 cells and zebrafish ZFL cells, revealed preferential activation by 11-ketotestosterone of the stickleback receptor, but not of the human receptor. These findings demonstrate the presence of a receptor preferentially activated by 11-ketotestosterone in the three-spined stickleback, so far the only one known in any animal.

  14. Differential regulation of metabolic pathways by androgen receptor (AR) and its constitutively active splice variant, AR-V7, in prostate cancer cells.

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    Shafi, Ayesha A; Putluri, Vasanta; Arnold, James M; Tsouko, Efrosini; Maity, Suman; Roberts, Justin M; Coarfa, Cristian; Frigo, Daniel E; Putluri, Nagireddy; Sreekumar, Arun; Weigel, Nancy L

    2015-10-13

    Metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) is primarily an androgen-dependent disease, which is treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Tumors usually develop resistance (castration-resistant PCa [CRPC]), but remain androgen receptor (AR) dependent. Numerous mechanisms for AR-dependent resistance have been identified including expression of constitutively active AR splice variants lacking the hormone-binding domain. Recent clinical studies show that expression of the best-characterized AR variant, AR-V7, correlates with resistance to ADT and poor outcome. Whether AR-V7 is simply a constitutively active substitute for AR or has novel gene targets that cause unique downstream changes is unresolved. Several studies have shown that AR activation alters cell metabolism. Using LNCaP cells with inducible expression of AR-V7 as a model system, we found that AR-V7 stimulated growth, migration, and glycolysis measured by ECAR (extracellular acidification rate) similar to AR. However, further analyses using metabolomics and metabolic flux assays revealed several differences. Whereas AR increased citrate levels, AR-V7 reduced citrate mirroring metabolic shifts observed in CRPC patients. Flux analyses indicate that the low citrate is a result of enhanced utilization rather than a failure to synthesize citrate. Moreover, flux assays suggested that compared to AR, AR-V7 exhibits increased dependence on glutaminolysis and reductive carboxylation to produce some of the TCA (tricarboxylic acid cycle) metabolites. These findings suggest that these unique actions represent potential therapeutic targets.

  15. Expression of Androgen Receptor Is Negatively Regulated By p53

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    Fatouma Alimirah; Ravichandran Panchanathan; Jianming Chen; Xiang Zhang; Shuk-Mei Ho; Divaker Choubey

    2007-01-01

    Increased expression of androgen receptor (AR) in prostate cancer (PC) is associated with transition to androgen independence. Because the progression of PC to advanced stages is often associated with the loss of p53 function, we tested whether the p53 could regulate the expression of AR gene. Here we report that p53 negatively regulates the expression of AR in prostate epithelial cells (PrECs). We found that in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells that express the wild-type p53 and AR and in hu...

  16. Structural characteristics of anabolic androgenic steroids contributing to binding to the androgen receptor and to their anabolic and androgenic activities. Applied modifications in the steroidal structure.

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    Fragkaki, A G; Angelis, Y S; Koupparis, M; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, A; Kokotos, G; Georgakopoulos, C

    2009-02-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic derivatives of testosterone introduced for therapeutic purposes providing enhanced anabolic potency with reduced androgenic effects. Androgens mediate their action through their binding to the androgen receptor (AR) which is mainly expressed in androgen target tissues, such as the prostate, skeletal muscle, liver and central nervous system. This paper reviews some of the wide spectrum of testosterone and synthetic AAS structure modifications related to the intended enhancement in anabolic activity. The structural features of steroids necessary for effective binding to the AR and those which contribute to the stipulation of the androgenic and anabolic activities are also presented.

  17. ASSESSMENT OF IN VITRO ANDROGENIC ACTIVITY IN KRAFT MILL EFFLUENT

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    Detection of In Vitro Androgenic Activity in Feedlot Effluent. Lambright, CS 1 , Guillette, LJ, Jr.2, Gray, LE, Jr.1 , 1USEPA, NHEERL, RTP, NC, 2 University of Florida, Dept. of Zoology, Gainesville FLRecent studies have shown the presence of androgenic activity in water...

  18. Differentially expressed androgen-regulated genes in androgen-sensitive tissues reveal potential biomarkers of early prostate cancer.

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    Altintas, Dogus Murat; Allioli, Nathalie; Decaussin, Myriam; de Bernard, Simon; Ruffion, Alain; Samarut, Jacques; Vlaeminck-Guillem, Virginie

    2013-01-01

    Several data favor androgen receptor implication in prostate cancer initiation through the induction of several gene activation programs. The aim of the study is to identify potential biomarkers for early diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) among androgen-regulated genes (ARG) and to evaluate comparative expression of these genes in normal prostate and normal prostate-related androgen-sensitive tissues that do not (or rarely) give rise to cancer. ARG were selected in non-neoplastic adult human prostatic epithelial RWPE-1 cells stably expressing an exogenous human androgen receptor, using RNA-microarrays and validation by qRT-PCR. Expression of 48 preselected genes was quantified in tissue samples (seminal vesicles, prostate transitional zones and prostate cancers, benign prostatic hypertrophy obtained from surgical specimens) using TaqMan® low-density arrays. The diagnostic performances of these potential biomarkers were compared to that of genes known to be associated with PCa (i.e. PCA3 and DLX1). By crossing expression studies in 26 matched PCa and normal prostate transitional zone samples, and 35 matched seminal vesicle and PCa samples, 14 genes were identified. Similarly, 9 genes were overexpressed in 15 benign prostatic hypertrophy samples, as compared to PCa samples. Overall, we selected 8 genes of interest to evaluate their diagnostic performances in comparison with that of PCA3 and DLX1. Among them, 3 genes: CRYAB, KCNMA1 and SDPR, were overexpressed in all 3 reference non-cancerous tissues. The areas under ROC curves of these genes reached those of PCA3 (0.91) and DLX1 (0.94). We identified ARG with reduced expression in PCa and with significant diagnostic values for discriminating between cancerous and non-cancerous prostatic tissues, similar that of PCA3. Given their expression pattern, they could be considered as potentially protective against prostate cancer. Moreover, they could be complementary to known genes overexpressed in PCa and included along

  19. Metformin Inhibits Androgen-Induced IGF-IR Up-Regulation in Prostate Cancer Cells by Disrupting Membrane-Initiated Androgen Signaling

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    Malaguarnera, Roberta; Sacco, Antonella; Morcavallo, Alaide; Squatrito, Sebastiano; Migliaccio, Antimo; Morrione, Andrea; Maggiolini, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that, in prostate cancer cells, androgens up-regulate IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) by inducing cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) activation and CREB-dependent IGF-IR gene transcription through androgen receptor (AR)-dependent membrane-initiated effects. This IGF-IR up-regulation is not blocked by classical antiandrogens and sensitizes cells to IGF-I-induced biological effects. Metformin exerts complex antitumoral functions in various models and may inhibit CREB activation in hepatocytes. We, therefore, evaluated whether metformin may affect androgen-dependent IGF-IR up-regulation. In the AR+ LNCaP prostate cancer cells, we found that metformin inhibits androgen-induced CRE activity and IGF-IR gene transcription. CRE activity requires the formation of a CREB-CREB binding protein-CREB regulated transcription coactivator 2 (CRTC2) complex, which follows Ser133-CREB phosphorylation. Metformin inhibited Ser133-CREB phosphorylation and induced nuclear exclusion of CREB cofactor CRTC2, thus dissociating the CREB-CREB binding protein-CRTC2 complex and blocking its transcriptional activity. Similarly to metformin action, CRTC2 silencing inhibited IGF-IR promoter activity. Moreover, metformin blocked membrane-initiated signals of AR to the mammalian target of rapamycin/p70S6Kinase pathway by inhibiting AR phosphorylation and its association with c-Src. AMPK signals were also involved to some extent. By inhibiting androgen-dependent IGF-IR up-regulation, metformin reduced IGF-I-mediated proliferation of LNCaP cells. These results indicate that, in prostate cancer cells, metformin inhibits IGF-I-mediated biological effects by disrupting membrane-initiated AR action responsible for IGF-IR up-regulation and suggest that metformin could represent a useful adjunct to the classical antiandrogen therapy. PMID:24437490

  20. Inhibition of the androgen receptor activity by Coprinus comatus substances.

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    Dotan, Nesly; Wasser, Solomon P; Mahajna, Jamal

    2011-11-01

    Prostatic adenocarcinoma is the second leading cause of death from cancer in Western men. The common prostate cancer treatments are effective in the early stages; however, advanced prostate cancer is resilient to most of these treatments. Altered androgen receptor (AR) activity caused by point mutations or signaling mechanisms that regulate AR function has been proposed as a key mechanism in the transition to the androgen-independent stage. Our previous results demonstrated that hexane extract prepared from Coprinus comatus (C. comatus) strain 734 was able to interfere with AR activity. The current study was made to further evaluate the antiandrogenic activity of the C. comatus mushroom strain 734. Activity-guided chromatography was conducted and 2 active fractions, F-32-and F-33, were found to contain substances that were able to inhibit AR-mediated reporter activity and reduce the levels of AR and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) transcripts in LNCaP cells. Fraction F-32 also inhibited the proliferation and clonigenicity of LNCaP cells. Furthermore, F-32 was able to inhibit the binding of AR to the PSA enhancer region and to inhibit Akt-mediated AR phosphorylation at Ser 213. This study illustrated the potential of substances from the C. comatus mushroom to serve as natural antiandrogenic modulators for the treatment of prostatic disorders.

  1. Identification of an anabolic selective androgen receptor modulator that actively induces death of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells.

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    Schmidt, Azriel; Meissner, Robert S; Gentile, Michael A; Chisamore, Michael J; Opas, Evan E; Scafonas, Angela; Cusick, Tara E; Gambone, Carlo; Pennypacker, Brenda; Hodor, Paul; Perkins, James J; Bai, Chang; Ferraro, Damien; Bettoun, David J; Wilkinson, Hilary A; Alves, Stephen E; Flores, Osvaldo; Ray, William J

    2014-09-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) initially responds to inhibition of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, but inevitably progresses to hormone ablation-resistant disease. Much effort is focused on optimizing this androgen deprivation strategy by improving hormone depletion and AR antagonism. However we found that bicalutamide, a clinically used antiandrogen, actually resembles a selective AR modulator (SARM), as it partially regulates 24% of endogenously 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-responsive genes in AR(+) MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells. These data suggested that passive blocking of all AR functions is not required for PCa therapy. Hence, we adopted an active strategy that calls for the development of novel SARMs, which induce a unique gene expression profile that is intolerable to PCa cells. Therefore, we screened 3000 SARMs for the ability to arrest the androgen-independent growth of AR(+) 22Rv1 and LNCaP PCa cells but not AR(-) PC3 or DU145 cells. We identified only one such compound; the 4-aza-steroid, MK-4541, a potent and selective SARM. MK-4541 induces caspase-3 activity and cell death in both androgen-independent, AR(+) PCa cell lines but spares AR(-) cells or AR(+) non-PCa cells. This activity correlates with its promoter context- and cell-type dependent transcriptional effects. In rats, MK-4541 inhibits the trophic effects of DHT on the prostate, but not the levator ani muscle, and triggers an anabolic response in the periosteal compartment of bone. Therefore, MK-4541 has the potential to effectively manage prostatic hypertrophic diseases owing to its antitumor SARM-like mechanism, while simultaneously maintaining the anabolic benefits of natural androgens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Androgen Depletion Induces Senescence in Prostate Cancer Cells through Down-regulation of Skp2

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    Zuzana Pernicová

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Although the induction of senescence in cancer cells is a potent mechanism of tumor suppression, senescent cells remain metabolically active and may secrete a broad spectrum of factors that promote tumorigenicity in neighboring malignant cells. Here we show that androgen deprivation therapy (ADT, a widely used treatment for advanced prostate cancer, induces a senescence-associated secretory phenotype in prostate cancer epithelial cells, indicated by increases in senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, heterochromatin protein 1β foci, and expression of cathepsin B and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3. Interestingly, ADT also induced high levels of vimentin expression in prostate cancer cell lines in vitro and in human prostate tumors in vivo. The induction of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype by androgen depletion was mediated, at least in part, by down-regulation of S-phase kinase-associated protein 2, whereas the neuroendocrine differentiation of prostate cancer cells was under separate control. These data demonstrate a previously unrecognized link between inhibition of androgen receptor signaling, down-regulation of S-phase kinase-associated protein 2, and the appearance of secretory, tumor-promoting senescent cells in prostate tumors. We propose that ADT may contribute to the development of androgen-independent prostate cancer through modulation of the tissue microenvironment by senescent cells.

  3. Adaptive Auto-Regulation of Androgen Receptor Provides a Paradigm Shifting Rationale for Bipolar Androgen Therapy (BAT) for Castrate Resistant Human Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Isaacs, John T.; D’Antonio, Jason M; Chen, Shuangling; Antony, Lizamma; Dalrymple, Susan P.; Ndikuyeze, Georges H.; Luo, Jun; Denmeade, Samuel R.

    2012-01-01

    Cell culture/xenograft and gene arrays of clinical material document that development of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cells involves acquisition of adaptive auto-regulation resulting in > 25 fold increase in Androgen Receptor (AR) protein expression in a low androgen environment. Such adaptive AR increase paradoxically is a liability in castrated hosts; however, when supraphysiologic androgen is acutely replaced. Cell synchronization/anti-androgen response document this is due ...

  4. Androgen-androgen receptor system improves chronic inflammatory conditions by suppressing monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 gene expression in adipocytes via transcriptional regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morooka, Nobukatsu, E-mail: amorooka@gunma-u.ac.jp [Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 371-8512 (Japan); Ueguri, Kei [Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 371-8512 (Japan); Yee, Karen Kar Lye [Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 371-8512 (Japan); Human Resources Cultivation Center, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryushi, Gunma, 376-8515 (Japan); Yanase, Toshihiko [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes Mellitus, School of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka, 814-0180 (Japan); Sato, Takashi [Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 371-8512 (Japan)

    2016-09-02

    Age-related decreases in sex hormones are closely related to chronic inflammation in obesity and metabolic diseases. Particularly, the molecular basis of androgen activity in regulating inflammation and controlling metabolism remains largely unknown. Obese adipocytes secrete monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a key chemokine that promotes the infiltration of monocytes/macrophages into adipose tissue, thereby leading to metabolic disorders. Here, we studied the role of androgen-androgen receptor (AR) action in regulating MCP-1 expression in adipose tissue. We observed the induction of Mcp-1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes co-cultured with RAW264.7 macrophages. Additionally, Mcp-1 expression was upregulated by culturing in conditioned medium derived from inflammatory macrophages (M1-Mφ) containing tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). We found that sex hormones downregulated TNF-α-induced Mcp-1 and interleukin (Il)-6 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Furthermore, luciferase-reporter analysis indicated that MCP-1 promoter activity was predominantly suppressed by dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-AR interactions through functional canonical nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) sites, whereas non-canonical NF-κB site containing important flanking sequences exhibited minor contributions to DHT-AR transcriptional repression. These findings suggested that androgen-AR suppressed obesity-induced chronic inflammation in adipose tissue. - Highlights: • DHT, non-aromatizable androgen suppresses Mcp-1 expression in adipocytes. • Mcp-1 transcription was negatively regulated by DHT-AR action. • DHT-AR selectively regulates Mcp-1 transcription through distinct NF-κB sites.

  5. Differentially expressed androgen-regulated genes in androgen-sensitive tissues reveal potential biomarkers of early prostate cancer.

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    Dogus Murat Altintas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several data favor androgen receptor implication in prostate cancer initiation through the induction of several gene activation programs. The aim of the study is to identify potential biomarkers for early diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa among androgen-regulated genes (ARG and to evaluate comparative expression of these genes in normal prostate and normal prostate-related androgen-sensitive tissues that do not (or rarely give rise to cancer. METHODS: ARG were selected in non-neoplastic adult human prostatic epithelial RWPE-1 cells stably expressing an exogenous human androgen receptor, using RNA-microarrays and validation by qRT-PCR. Expression of 48 preselected genes was quantified in tissue samples (seminal vesicles, prostate transitional zones and prostate cancers, benign prostatic hypertrophy obtained from surgical specimens using TaqMan® low-density arrays. The diagnostic performances of these potential biomarkers were compared to that of genes known to be associated with PCa (i.e. PCA3 and DLX1. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: By crossing expression studies in 26 matched PCa and normal prostate transitional zone samples, and 35 matched seminal vesicle and PCa samples, 14 genes were identified. Similarly, 9 genes were overexpressed in 15 benign prostatic hypertrophy samples, as compared to PCa samples. Overall, we selected 8 genes of interest to evaluate their diagnostic performances in comparison with that of PCA3 and DLX1. Among them, 3 genes: CRYAB, KCNMA1 and SDPR, were overexpressed in all 3 reference non-cancerous tissues. The areas under ROC curves of these genes reached those of PCA3 (0.91 and DLX1 (0.94. CONCLUSIONS: We identified ARG with reduced expression in PCa and with significant diagnostic values for discriminating between cancerous and non-cancerous prostatic tissues, similar that of PCA3. Given their expression pattern, they could be considered as potentially protective against prostate cancer. Moreover, they could

  6. A role for androgens in regulating circadian behavior and the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatsoreos, Ilia N; Wang, Alice; Sasanian, Jasmine; Silver, Rae

    2007-11-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is the locus of a master circadian clock controlling behavioral and physiological rhythms, including rhythmic secretion of gonadal hormones. Gonadectomy results in marked alteration of circadian behaviors, including lengthened free-running period, decreased precision of daily onset of running, and elimination of early-evening but not late-night activity bouts. Androgen replacement restores these responses. These aspects of rhythmicity are thought to be regulated by the brain clock, although the site of androgen action remains unknown. Anatomically, the rodent SCN is composed of a ventrolateral core and a dorsomedial shell, and the present studies show that androgen receptors (AR) are localized to the ventrolateral core SCN. Using a transgenic mouse bearing dual reporter molecules driven by the AR targeted to both membrane and nucleus, we find that projections of AR-containing cells form a dense plexus in the core, with their fibers appearing to exit the SCN dorsally. In a second transgenic strain, in which the retinorecipient gastrin-releasing peptide cells express a green fluorescent protein reporter, we show that gastrin-releasing peptide cells contain AR. Through immunocytochemistry, we also show that SCN AR cells express FOS after a light pulse. Importantly, gonadectomy reduces the FOS response after a phase-shifting light pulse, whereas androgen replacement restores levels to those in intact animals. Taken together, the results support previous findings of a hypothalamic neuroendocrine feedback loop. As such, the SCN regulates circadian rhythms in gonadal hormone secretion, and in turn, androgens act on their receptors within the SCN to alter circadian function.

  7. A novel selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) MK-4541 exerts anti-androgenic activity in the prostate cancer xenograft R-3327G and anabolic activity on skeletal muscle mass & function in castrated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisamore, Michael J; Gentile, Michael A; Dillon, Gregory Michael; Baran, Matthew; Gambone, Carlo; Riley, Sean; Schmidt, Azriel; Flores, Osvaldo; Wilkinson, Hilary; Alves, Stephen E

    2016-10-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor super family of transcription factors. Androgens play an essential role in the development, growth, and maintenance of male sex organs, as well as the musculoskeletal and central nervous systems. Yet with advancing age, androgens can drive the onset of prostate cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death in males within the United States. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) by pharmacologic and/or surgical castration induces apoptosis of prostate cells and subsequent shrinkage of the prostate and prostate tumors. However, ADT is associated with significant musculoskeletal and behavioral adverse effects. The unique pharmacological activity of selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) MK-4541 recently has been reported as an AR antagonist with 5α-reductase inhibitor function. The molecule inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in AR positive, androgen dependent prostate cancer cells. Importantly, MK-4541 inhibited androgen-dependent prostate growth in male rats yet maintained lean body mass and bone formation following ovariectomy in female rats. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of SARM MK-4541 in the androgen-dependent Dunning R3327-G prostate carcinoma xenograft mouse model as well as on skeletal muscle mass and function, and AR-regulated behavior in mice. MK-4541 significantly inhibited the growth of R3327-G prostate tumors, exhibited anti-androgen effects on the seminal vesicles, reduced plasma testosterone concentrations in intact males, and inhibited Ki67 expression. MK-4541 treated xenografts appeared similar to xenografts in castrated mice. Importantly, we demonstrate that MK-4541 exhibited anabolic activity in androgen deficient conditions, increasing lean body mass and muscle function in adult castrated mice. Moreover, MK-4541 treatment restored general activity levels in castrated mice. Thus, MK-4541 exhibits an optimum profile as an adjuvant therapy to ADT

  8. Glycosylation is an Androgen-Regulated Process Essential for Prostate Cancer Cell Viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Munkley

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Steroid androgen hormones play a key role in the progression and treatment of prostate cancer, with androgen deprivation therapy being the first-line treatment used to control cancer growth. Here we apply a novel search strategy to identify androgen-regulated cellular pathways that may be clinically important in prostate cancer. Using RNASeq data, we searched for genes that showed reciprocal changes in expression in response to acute androgen stimulation in culture, and androgen deprivation in patients with prostate cancer. Amongst 700 genes displaying reciprocal expression patterns we observed a significant enrichment in the cellular process glycosylation. Of 31 reciprocally-regulated glycosylation enzymes, a set of 8 (GALNT7, ST6GalNAc1, GCNT1, UAP1, PGM3, CSGALNACT1, ST6GAL1 and EDEM3 were significantly up-regulated in clinical prostate carcinoma. Androgen exposure stimulated synthesis of glycan structures downstream of this core set of regulated enzymes including sialyl-Tn (sTn, sialyl LewisX (SLeX, O-GlcNAc and chondroitin sulphate, suggesting androgen regulation of the core set of enzymes controls key steps in glycan synthesis. Expression of each of these enzymes also contributed to prostate cancer cell viability. This study identifies glycosylation as a global target for androgen control, and suggests loss of specific glycosylation enzymes might contribute to tumour regression following androgen depletion therapy.

  9. Cell Cycle Regulation of Estrogen and Androgen Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    hypersensitivity as- the transiently transfected MMTV promoter as shown say was performed as described previously [18]. In brief, cells were previously [3, 41...per 1 F 108 cells, in 10 mM his tris propane , pH 7, 10 mM MgC12, 1 mM DTT) significant increase of CAT activity was observed. Pre- and incubated for 15...within nucleosome B, which is remodeled and becomes hypersensitive to restriction enzyme (SstI) cleavage during androgen that at no time point during the

  10. Identification of novel androgen-regulated pathways and mRNA isoforms through genome-wide exon-specific profiling of the LNCaP transcriptome.

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    Prabhakar Rajan

    Full Text Available Androgens drive the onset and progression of prostate cancer (PCa by modulating androgen receptor (AR transcriptional activity. Although several microarray-based studies have identified androgen-regulated genes, here we identify in-parallel global androgen-dependent changes in both gene and alternative mRNA isoform expression by exon-level analyses of the LNCaP transcriptome. While genome-wide gene expression changes correlated well with previously-published studies, we additionally uncovered a subset of 226 novel androgen-regulated genes. Gene expression pathway analysis of this subset revealed gene clusters associated with, and including the tyrosine kinase LYN, as well as components of the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, which is commonly dysregulated in cancer. We also identified 1279 putative androgen-regulated alternative events, of which 325 (∼25% mapped to known alternative splicing events or alternative first/last exons. We selected 30 androgen-dependent alternative events for RT-PCR validation, including mRNAs derived from genes encoding tumour suppressors and cell cycle regulators. Of seven positively-validating events (∼23%, five events involved transcripts derived from alternative promoters of known AR gene targets. In particular, we found a novel androgen-dependent mRNA isoform derived from an alternative internal promoter within the TSC2 tumour suppressor gene, which is predicted to encode a protein lacking an interaction domain required for mTOR inhibition. We confirmed that expression of this alternative TSC2 mRNA isoform was directly regulated by androgens, and chromatin immunoprecipitation indicated recruitment of AR to the alternative promoter region at early timepoints following androgen stimulation, which correlated with expression of alternative transcripts. Together, our data suggest that alternative mRNA isoform expression might mediate the cellular response to androgens, and may have roles in clinical

  11. Hedgehog/Gli supports androgen signaling in androgen deprived and androgen independent prostate cancer cells

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    Shtutman Michael

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC develops as a consequence of hormone therapies used to deplete androgens in advanced prostate cancer patients. CRPC cells are able to grow in a low androgen environment and this is associated with anomalous activity of their endogenous androgen receptor (AR despite the low systemic androgen levels in the patients. Therefore, the reactivated tumor cell androgen signaling pathway is thought to provide a target for control of CRPC. Previously, we reported that Hedgehog (Hh signaling was conditionally activated by androgen deprivation in androgen sensitive prostate cancer cells and here we studied the potential for cross-talk between Hh and androgen signaling activities in androgen deprived and androgen independent (AI prostate cancer cells. Results Treatment of a variety of androgen-deprived or AI prostate cancer cells with the Hh inhibitor, cyclopamine, resulted in dose-dependent modulation of the expression of genes that are regulated by androgen. The effect of cyclopamine on endogenous androgen-regulated gene expression in androgen deprived and AI prostate cancer cells was consistent with the suppressive effects of cyclopamine on the expression of a reporter gene (luciferase from two different androgen-dependent promoters. Similarly, reduction of smoothened (Smo expression with siRNA co-suppressed expression of androgen-inducible KLK2 and KLK3 in androgen deprived cells without affecting the expression of androgen receptor (AR mRNA or protein. Cyclopamine also prevented the outgrowth of AI cells from androgen growth-dependent parental LNCaP cells and suppressed the growth of an overt AI-LNCaP variant whereas supplemental androgen (R1881 restored growth to the AI cells in the presence of cyclopamine. Conversely, overexpression of Gli1 or Gli2 in LNCaP cells enhanced AR-specific gene expression in the absence of androgen. Overexpressed Gli1/Gli2 also enabled parental LNCaP cells to

  12. Calcium regulation of androgen receptor expression in the human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. Blok (Leen); J.E. Perry; J.K. Lindzey; D.J. Tindall; Y. Gong (Yuewen)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractElevation of intracellular calcium levels in the presence of normal androgen levels has been implicated in apoptotic prostate cell death. Since the androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in the regulation of growth and differentiation of the prostate, it was of

  13. Androgen regulated genes in human prostate xenografts in mice: relation to BPH and prostate cancer.

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    Harold D Love

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and prostate carcinoma (CaP are linked to aging and the presence of androgens, suggesting that androgen regulated genes play a major role in these common diseases. Androgen regulation of prostate growth and development depends on the presence of intact epithelial-stromal interactions. Further, the prostatic stroma is implicated in BPH. This suggests that epithelial cell lines are inadequate to identify androgen regulated genes that could contribute to BPH and CaP and which could serve as potential clinical biomarkers. In this study, we used a human prostate xenograft model to define a profile of genes regulated in vivo by androgens, with an emphasis on identifying candidate biomarkers. Benign transition zone (TZ human prostate tissue from radical prostatectomies was grafted to the sub-renal capsule site of intact or castrated male immunodeficient mice, followed by the removal or addition of androgens, respectively. Microarray analysis of RNA from these tissues was used to identify genes that were; 1 highly expressed in prostate, 2 had significant expression changes in response to androgens, and, 3 encode extracellular proteins. A total of 95 genes meeting these criteria were selected for analysis and validation of expression in patient prostate tissues using quantitative real-time PCR. Expression levels of these genes were measured in pooled RNAs from human prostate tissues with varying severity of BPH pathologic changes and CaP of varying Gleason score. A number of androgen regulated genes were identified. Additionally, a subset of these genes were over-expressed in RNA from clinical BPH tissues, and the levels of many were found to correlate with disease status. Our results demonstrate the feasibility, and some of the problems, of using a mouse xenograft model to characterize the androgen regulated expression profiles of intact human prostate tissues.

  14. The agonistic adrenal: melatonin elicits female aggression via regulation of adrenal androgens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Lauren M.; Sengelaub, Dale R.; Demas, Gregory E.

    2015-01-01

    Classic findings have demonstrated an important role for sex steroids as regulators of aggression, but this relationship is lacking within some environmental contexts. In mammals and birds, the adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a non-gonadal precursor of biologically active steroids, has been linked to aggression. Although females, like males, use aggression when competing for limited resources, the mechanisms underlying female aggression remain understudied. Here, we propose a previously undescribed endocrine mechanism regulating female aggression via direct action of the pineal hormone melatonin on adrenal androgens. We examined this in a solitary hamster species, Phodopus sungorus, in which both sexes are highly territorial across the seasons, and display increased aggression concomitant with decreased serum levels of sex steroids in short ‘winter-like' days. Short- but not long-day females had increased adrenal DHEA responsiveness co-occurring with morphological changes in the adrenal gland. Further, serum DHEA and total adrenal DHEA content were elevated in short days. Lastly, melatonin increased DHEA and aggression and stimulated DHEA release from cultured adrenals. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that DHEA is a key peripheral regulator of aggression and that melatonin coordinates a ‘seasonal switch’ from gonadal to adrenal regulation of aggression by direct action on the adrenal glands. PMID:26582025

  15. Prenatal androgen exposure and children's aggressive behavior and activity level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Debra; Pasterski, Vickie; Neufeld, Sharon; Glover, Vivette; O'Connor, Thomas G; Hindmarsh, Peter C; Hughes, Ieuan A; Acerini, Carlo L; Hines, Melissa

    2017-11-01

    Some human behaviors, including aggression and activity level, differ on average for males and females. Here we report findings from two studies investigating possible relations between prenatal androgen and children's aggression and activity level. For study 1, aggression and activity level scores for 43 girls and 38 boys, aged 4 to 11years, with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH, a genetic condition causing increased adrenal androgen production beginning prenatally) were compared to those of similarly-aged, unaffected relatives (41 girls, 31 boys). Girls with CAH scored higher on aggression than unaffected girls, d=0.69, and unaffected boys scored higher on activity level than unaffected girls, d=0.50. No other group differences were significant. For study 2, the relationship of amniotic fluid testosterone to aggression and activity level was investigated in typically-developing children (48 girls, 44 boys), aged 3 to 5years. Boys scored higher than girls on aggression, d=0.41, and activity level, d=0.50. However, amniotic fluid testosterone was not a significant predictor of aggression or activity level for either sex. The results of the two studies provide some support for an influence of prenatal androgen exposure on children's aggressive behavior, but not activity level. The within-sex variation in amniotic fluid testosterone may not be sufficient to allow reliable assessment of relations to aggression or activity level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Repressive effects of resveratrol on androgen receptor transcriptional activity.

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    Wen-feng Shi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The chemopreventive effects of resveratrol (RSV on prostate cancer have been well established; the androgen receptor (AR plays pivotal roles in prostatic tumorigenesis. However, the exact underlying molecular mechanisms about the effects of RSV on AR have not been fully elucidated. A model system is needed to determine whether and how RSV represses AR transcriptional activity. METHODOLOGY: The AR cDNA was first cloned into the retroviral vector pOZ-N and then integrated into the genome of AR-negative HeLa cells to generate the AR(+ cells. The constitutively expressed AR was characterized by monitoring hormone-stimulated nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation, with the AR(- cells serving as controls. AR(+ cells were treated with RSV, and both AR protein levels and AR transcriptional activity were measured simultaneously. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays were used to detect the effects of RSV on the recruitment of AR to its cognate element (ARE. RESULTS: AR in the AR (+ stable cell line functions in a manner similar to that of endogenously expressed AR. Using this model system we clearly demonstrated that RSV represses AR transcriptional activity independently of any effects on AR protein levels. However, neither the hormone-mediated nucleus translocation nor the AR/ARE interaction was affected by RSV treatment. CONCLUSION: We demonstrated unambiguously that RSV regulates AR target gene expression, at least in part, by repressing AR transcriptional activity. Repressive effects of RSV on AR activity result from mechanisms other than the affects of AR nuclear translocation or DNA binding.

  17. Androgenic regulation of ventral epithelial bud number and pattern in mouse urogenital sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgeier, Sarah H; Lin, Tien-Min; Moore, Robert W; Vezina, Chad M; Abler, Lisa L; Peterson, Richard E

    2010-02-01

    The ventral urogenital sinus (UGS) of control male mice has two rows of 3-4 prostatic buds at birth, but how androgens regulate ventral bud (VB) number and patterning is unclear. VBs in both sexes appeared to be a mixture of prostatic and urethral buds. UGSs from Tfm male and antiandrogen (flutamide)-exposed mice had small VBs, suggesting that initiation of some VBs is androgen independent. Tfm male mice are widely considered completely androgen insensitive yet their UGSs were 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT)- responsive. VBs (6-8) were generally distributed bimodally on the left-right axis at both minimal and normal male androgen signaling. Yet control females and DHT-exposed Tfm males had 13-14 VBs, whose left-right distribution was fairly uniform. These results suggest that VB number and distribution respond biphasically as androgen signaling increases from minimal, and that androgens regulate bud specification. Complete VB agenesis by the selective budding inhibitor 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) required high androgen signaling.

  18. Adaptive auto-regulation of androgen receptor provides a paradigm shifting rationale for bipolar androgen therapy (BAT) for castrate resistant human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, John T; D'Antonio, Jason M; Chen, Shuangling; Antony, Lizamma; Dalrymple, Susan P; Ndikuyeze, Georges H; Luo, Jun; Denmeade, Samuel R

    2012-10-01

    Cell culture/xenograft and gene arrays of clinical material document that development of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cells involves acquisition of adaptive auto-regulation resulting in >25-fold increase in Androgen Receptor (AR) protein expression in a low androgen environment. Such adaptive AR increase paradoxically is a liability in castrated hosts, however, when supraphysiologic androgen is acutely replaced. Cell synchronization/anti-androgen response is due to AR binding to replication complexes (RC) at origin of replication sites (ORS) in early G1 associated with licensing/restricting DNA for single round of duplication during S-phase. When CRPC cells are acutely exposed to supraphysiologic androgen, adaptively increased nuclear AR is over-stabilized, preventing sufficient degradation in mitosis, inhibiting DNA re-licensing, and thus death in the subsequent cell cycle. These mechanistic results and the fact that AR/RC binding occurs in metastatic CRPCs directly from patients provides a paradigm shifting rationale for bipolar androgen therapy (BAT) in patient progressing on chronic androgen ablation. BAT involves giving sequential cycles alternating between periods of acute supraphysiologic androgen followed by acute ablation to take advantage of vulnerability produced by adaptive auto-regulation and binding of AR to RC in CRPC cells. BAT therapy is effective in xenografts and based upon positive results has entered clinical testing. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Evaluation of androgenic activity of Mucuna pruriens in male rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methanolic extract of Mucuna pruriens seed was tested for their possible androgenic activity in Wister male albino rats. The methanolic extract of M. pruriens plant was gavaged separately into 2 group of rat at similar doses of 1000 mg/kg b.wt and 1500 mg/kg b.wt for 30 days. At the end of the treatment, the animals were ...

  20. Minireview: Alternative activation pathways for the androgen receptor in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Kristin R; Tindall, Donald J

    2011-06-01

    Advanced prostate tumors, which are androgen dependent, are often initially treated in the clinic with hormone ablation therapy, either through surgical castration or administration of small-molecule antiandrogens. Most tumors respond favorably to these treatments, exhibiting regression of the tumor, amelioration of symptoms, and a decrease of prostate-specific antigen in patient sera. However, with time, the majority of tumors recur in a more aggressive, castration-resistant (CR) phenotype. Currently, no effective treatment exists for this stage of the cancer, and patients ultimately succumb to metastatic disease. The androgen receptor (AR), which is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of proteins, is the transcription factor that is responsible for mediating the effects of androgens upon target tissues, and it has been demonstrated to play a central role in the development and progression of prostate cancer. Despite CR tumor cells being able to continue to grow after hormonal therapy in which testosterone and dihydrotestosterone are markedly reduced, they still require the expression and activity of the AR. The AR can become transactivated in this low-androgen environment through a number of different mechanisms, including amplification and mutation of the receptor, cross talk with other signaling pathways, and altered regulation by coregulatory proteins. This review will summarize the most current data regarding non-ligand-mediated activation of the AR in prostate cancer cells. Developing work in this field aims to more clearly elucidate the signals that drive AR activity independently of androgens in CR disease so that better therapeutic targets can be developed for patients with this stage of highly aggressive prostate carcinoma.

  1. Androgen receptor regulation of the seladin-1/DHCR24 gene: altered expression in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccorsi, Lorella; Luciani, Paola; Nesi, Gabriella; Mannucci, Edoardo; Deledda, Cristiana; Dichiara, Francesca; Paglierani, Milena; Rosati, Fabiana; Masieri, Lorenzo; Serni, Sergio; Carini, Marco; Proietti-Pannunzi, Laura; Monti, Salvatore; Forti, Gianni; Danza, Giovanna; Serio, Mario; Peri, Alessandro

    2008-10-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) represents a major leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Elevated cholesterol levels, resulting from altered cholesterol metabolism, have been found in CaP cells. Seladin-1 (SELective Alzheimer Disease INdicator-1)/DHCR24 is a recently described gene involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Here, we demonstrated the androgen regulation of seladin-1/DHCR24 expression, due to the presence of androgen responsive element sequences in its promoter region. In metastatic androgen receptor-negative CaP cells seladin-1/DHCR24 expression and cholesterol amount were reduced compared to androgen receptor-positive cells. In tumor samples from 61 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy the expression of seladin-1/DHCR24 was significantly higher with respect to normal tissues. In addition, in cancer tissues mRNA levels were positively related to T stage. In tumor specimens from 23 patients who received androgen ablation treatment for 3 months before surgery seladin-1/DHCR24 expression was significantly lower with respect to patients treated by surgery only. In conclusion, our study demonstrated for the first time the androgen regulation of the seladin-1/DHCR24 gene and the presence of a higher level of expression in CaP tissues, compared to the normal prostate. These findings, together with the results previously obtained in metastatic disease, suggest an involvement of this gene in CaP.

  2. Androgen (dihydrotestosterone)-mediated regulation of food intake and obesity in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaya, Noriko; Vonderfecht, Steven; Chen, Shiuan

    2013-11-01

    To better understand how elevated androgen levels regulate food intake and obesity in females, we treated ovariectomized female mice with dihydrotestosterone (DHT) (non-aromatazable androgen), measured food intake and body weight, and evaluated physiological changes in liver function, glucose tolerance, and leptin resistance. Ovariectomized mice were treated with DHT or placebo. Mice were then fed a high fat diet under free-feeding or pair-feeding conditions for 3 months. We found that when DHT-treated ovariectomized mice had free access to food (free-feeding), they had increased food intake and higher body weight compared with control animals. These mice also had a significantly greater accumulation of fat in the liver and exhibited increased fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, and resistance to leptin. However, when these mice were placed on a restricted diet and fed the same caloric amounts as controls (pair-feeding), their body weight increased at the same rate as control animals. This suggests that androgen regulates food intake through altered leptin sensitivity, and this increase of food intake could significantly contribute to an obesity phenotype. In summary, we demonstrated a role for androgen in the regulation of food intake and weight gain in females using a mouse model. This model will be useful to further elucidate the role of elevated androgen in females. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Non-Genomic Action of Androgens is Mediated by Rapid Phosphorylation and Regulation of Androgen Receptor Trafficking

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    Qiong Deng

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Testosterone is critical for maintaining spermatogenesis and male fertility. The accomplishment of these processes requires the synergistic actions of the classical and non-classical signaling pathways of androgens. Methods: A murine testicular Sertoli cell line, TM4 cell was used to examine androgen actions in Sertoli cells. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence assay were employed to study the testosterone-induced Androgen receptor (AR translocation. Protein phosphorylation antibody array was applied to identify the phosphorylation sites under testosterone treatment, and these findings were verified by Western blot analysis. Results: We found that a physiological dose of testosterone induced fast membrane association of AR. By using a phosphorylation antibody array, several phosphorylation sites, such as MEK1/2 (Ser217/221, Akt (Ser473, and Erk1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204 were rapidly phosphorylated within 5 min of testosterone treatment. Inhibition of the MEK and Akt signaling pathways prevented AR trafficking. Blocking of AR by flutamide eliminated the stimulation effect of testosterone on kinase phosphorylation. Testosterone induced kinase Src phosphorylation, and inhibition of Src restricted AR translocation to the membrane and the nucleus. Conclusion: Findings suggested that the membrane association of AR was mediated by the MEK and Akt phosphorylation signaling pathways, which resulted in Src activation and was initiated by testosterone binding to the membrane-localized AR. This study provides new insights into the testosterone signaling pathway in Sertoli cells, which mediate spermatogenesis. In addition, the study can be used in the diagnosis and treatment of male infertility caused by disorders in spermatogenesis.

  4. Androgen regulation of 5α-reductase isoenzymes in prostate cancer: implications for prostate cancer prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Li

    Full Text Available The enzyme 5α-reductase, which converts testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT, performs key functions in the androgen receptor (AR signaling pathway. The three isoenzymes of 5α-reductase identified to date are encoded by different genes: SRD5A1, SRD5A2, and SRD5A3. In this study, we investigated mechanisms underlying androgen regulation of 5α-reductase isoenzyme expression in human prostate cells. We found that androgen regulates the mRNA level of 5α-reductase isoenzymes in a cell type-specific manner, that such regulation occurs at the transcriptional level, and that AR is necessary for this regulation. In addition, our results suggest that AR is recruited to a negative androgen response element (nARE on the promoter of SRD5A3 in vivo and directly binds to the nARE in vitro. The different expression levels of 5α-reductase isoenzymes may confer response or resistance to 5α-reductase inhibitors and thus may have importance in prostate cancer prevention.

  5. Lxrα regulates the androgen response in prostate epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viennois, Emilie; Esposito, Teresa; Dufour, Julie; Pommier, Aurélien; Fabre, Stephane; Kemeny, Jean-Louis; Guy, Laurent; Morel, Laurent; Lobaccaro, Jean-Marc; Baron, Silvère

    2012-07-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia is a nonmalignant enlargement of the prostate that commonly occurs in older men. We show that liver X receptor (Lxr)-α knockout mice (lxrα(-/-)) develop ventral prostate hypertrophy, correlating with an overaccumulation of secreted proteins in prostatic ducts and an alteration of vesicular trafficking in epithelial cells. In the fluid of the lxrα(-/-) prostates, spermine binding protein is highly accumulated and shows a 3000-fold increase of its mRNA. This overexpression is mediated by androgen hypersensitivity in lxrα(-/-) mice, restricted to the ventral prostate. Generation of chimeric recombinant prostates demonstrates that Lxrα is involved in the establishment of the epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in the mouse prostate. Altogether these results point out the crucial role of Lxrα in the homeostasis of the ventral prostate and suggest lxrα(-/-) mice may be a good model to investigate the molecular mechanisms of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  6. Localization and androgen regulation of metastasis-associated protein 1 in mouse epididymis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1, the founding member of the MTA family of genes, can modulate transcription by influencing the status of chromatin remodeling. Despite its strong correlation with the metastatic potential of cancer cells, MTA1 can also regulate crucial cellular pathways by modifying the acetylation status. We have previously reported the presence of MTA1/MTA1 in human and mouse testes, providing the evidence for its involvement in the regulation of testicular function during murine spermatogenesis. The objective of present study was to further assess the localization of MTA1 in mouse epididymis on both transcriptional and translational level, and then to explore whether MTA1 expression is regulated by androgens and postnatal epididymal development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice were deprived of circulating androgen by bilaterally castration and were then supplemented with exogenous testosterone propionate for one week. MTA1 was immunolocalized in the epithelium of the entire epididymis with the maximal expression in the nuclei of principal cells and of clear cells in proximal region. Its expression decreased gradually after castration, whereas testosterone treatment could restore the expression, indicating that the expression of this gene is dependent on androgen. During postnatal development, the protein expression in the epididymis began to appear from day 7 to day 14, increased dramatically from postnatal day 28, and peaked at adulthood onwards, coinciding with both the well differentiated status of epididymis and the mature levels of circulating androgens. This region- and cell-specific pattern was also conservative in normal human epididymis. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that the expression of MTA1 protein could be regulated by androgen pathway and its expression level is closely associated with the postnatal development of the epididymis, giving rise to the possibility that this gene plays a

  7. DETECTION OF ANDROGENIC ACTIVITY IN EMISSIONS FROM DIESEL FUEL AND BIOMASS COMBUSTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study evaluated both diesel fuel exhaust and biomass (wood) burn extracts for androgen receptor¿mediated activity using MDA-kb2 cells, which contain an androgen-responsive promoter-luciferase reporter gene construct. This assay and analytical fractionization of the sa...

  8. Androgen and PARP-1 regulation of TRPM2 channels after ischemic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takeru; Macey, Tara A; Quillinan, Nidia; Klawitter, Jelena; Perraud, Anne-Laure L; Traystman, Richard J; Herson, Paco S

    2013-10-01

    The calcium-permeable transient receptor potential M2 (TRPM2) ion channel was recently demonstrated to have a sexually dimorphic contribution to ischemic brain injury, with inhibition or knockdown of the channel protecting male brain preferentially. We tested the hypothesis that androgen signaling is required for this male-specific cell-death pathway. Additionally, we tested the hypothesis that differential activation of the enzyme poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is responsible for male-specific TRPM2 channel activation and neuronal injury. We observed that administration of the TRPM2 inhibitor clotrimazole (CTZ) 2 hours after onset of ischemia reduced infarct volume in male mice and that protection from ischemic damage by CTZ was abolished by removal of testicular androgens (castration; CAST) and rescued by androgen replacement. Male PARP-1 knockout mice had reduced ischemic damage compared with WT mice and inhibition of TRPM2 with CTZ failed to reduce infarct size. Lastly, we observed that ischemia increased PARP activity in the peri-infarct region of male mice to a greater extent than female mice and the difference was abolished in CAST male mice. Data presented in the current study indicate that TRPM2-mediated neuronal death in the male brain requires intact androgen signaling and PARP-1 activity.

  9. Cryptotanshinone Regulates Androgen Synthesis through the ERK/c-Fos/CYP17 Pathway in Porcine Granulosa Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danfeng Ye

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to investigate the molecular mechanism behind androgen reduction in porcine granulosa cells (pGCs with Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge extract cryptotanshinone. PGCs were isolated from porcine ovaries and identified. Androgen excess model of the pGCs was induced with the MAPK inhibitor PD98059 and then treated with cryptotanshinone. The testosterone level was measured by radioimmunoassay in the culture media. The protein levels of P-ERK1/2, c-Fos, and CYP17 in the cells were measured by western blot. Cryptotanshinone decreased the concentration of testosterone and the protein level of CYP17 and increased the protein levels of P-ERK1/2 and c-Fos in the androgen excess mode. After the c-Fos gene was silenced by infection with c-Fos shRNA lentivirus, we measured the mRNA expression by quantitative RT-PCR and protein level by western blot of P-ERK1/2, c-Fos, and CYP17. This showed that the mRNA expression and protein level of P-ERK1/2 and c-Fos were significantly reduced in the shRNA–c-Fos group compared to the scrambled group, while those of CYP17 were significantly increased. So we concluded that cryptotanshinone can significantly reduce the androgen excess induced by PD98059 in pGCs. The possible molecular mechanism for this activity is regulating the ERK/c-Fos/CYP17 pathway.

  10. GATA3 in the urinary bladder: suppression of neoplastic transformation and down-regulation by androgens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Ishiguro, Hitoshi; Kawahara, Takashi; Miyamoto, Yurina; Izumi, Koji; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests the involvement of sex hormone receptors in bladder cancer initiation, while precise functions of androgens and estrogens in the carcinogenesis step remain poorly understood. We recently found down-regulation of GATA3, a zinc-finger transcription factor and a new urothelial marker, in bladder cancer, which also correlated with expression status of androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptors (ERs). We here assessed whether GATA3 acted as a suppressor of bladder tumorigenesis and sex hormones exerted an influence on GATA3 in non-neoplastic urothelial cells. Androgen (R1881, dihydrotestosterone) treatment in SVHUC immortalized normal urothelial cells stably expressing AR (SVHUC-AR) decreased GATA3 expression at both mRNA and protein levels, which was abolished by anti-androgens. Conversely, 17β-estradiol treatment increased it in SVHUC-control endogenously expressing ERβ. GATA3 levels were also found to be higher in intact female mouse bladders compared with intact males, and orchiectomy/ovariectomy augmented/reduced GATA3 expression, respectively, which was at least partially restored by dihydrotestosterone/17β-estradiol supplement. Additionally, GATA3 silencing via short hairpin RNA (shRNA) promoted cell proliferation of SVHUC with exposure to a chemical carcinogen 3-methylcholanthrene. In vitro transformation assay with 3-methylcholanthrene then showed a significantly higher number of colonies in SVHUC-AR/GATA3-shRNA, compared with control SVHUC, and R1881 further induced colony formation. GATA3 knockdown also resulted in down-regulation of the molecules that play a protective role in bladder tumorigenesis (i.e. UGT1A, PTEN, p53, p21) and up-regulation of oncogenic genes (i.e. c-myc, cyclin D1, cyclin D3, cyclin E, FGFR3). Thus, GATA3 likely prevented neoplastic transformation of urothelial cells. Furthermore, sex hormone signals contrary regulated GATA3 in the bladder. These findings may offer not only a molecular basis for the gender

  11. Transcriptional regulation of myotrophic actions by testosterone and trenbolone on androgen-responsive muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fan; McCoy, Sean C; Ross, Heather H; Bernardo, Joseph A; Beharry, Adam W; Senf, Sarah M; Judge, Andrew R; Beck, Darren T; Conover, Christine F; Cannady, Darryl F; Smith, Barbara K; Yarrow, Joshua F; Borst, Stephen E

    2014-09-01

    Androgens regulate body composition and skeletal muscle mass in males, but the molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. Recently, we demonstrated that trenbolone (a potent synthetic testosterone analogue that is not a substrate for 5-alpha reductase or for aromatase) induces myotrophic effects in skeletal muscle without causing prostate enlargement, which is in contrast to the known prostate enlarging effects of testosterone. These previous results suggest that the 5α-reduction of testosterone is not required for myotrophic action. We now report differential gene expression in response to testosterone versus trenbolone in the highly androgen-sensitive levator ani/bulbocavernosus (LABC) muscle complex of the adult rat after 6weeks of orchiectomy (ORX), using real time PCR. The ORX-induced expression of atrogenes (Muscle RING-finger protein-1 [MuRF1] and atrogin-1) was suppressed by both androgens, with trenbolone producing a greater suppression of atrogin-1 mRNA compared to testosterone. Both androgens elevated expression of anabolic genes (insulin-like growth factor-1 and mechano-growth factor) after ORX. ORX-induced increases in expression of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA were suppressed by trenbolone treatment, but not testosterone. In ORX animals, testosterone promoted WNT1-inducible-signaling pathway protein 2 (WISP-2) gene expression while trenbolone did not. Testosterone and trenbolone equally enhanced muscle regeneration as shown by increases in LABC mass and in protein expression of embryonic myosin by western blotting. In addition, testosterone increased WISP-2 protein levels. Together, these findings identify specific mechanisms by which testosterone and trenbolone may regulate skeletal muscle maintenance and growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Predicting anti-androgenic activity of bisphenols using molecular docking and quantitative structure-activity relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xianhai; Liu, Huihui; Yang, Qian; Liu, Jining; Chen, Jingwen; Shi, Lili

    2016-11-01

    Both in vivo and in vitro assay indicated that bisphenols can inhibit the androgen receptor. However, the underlying antagonistic mechanism is unclear. In this study, molecular docking was employed to probe the interaction mechanism between bisphenols and human androgen receptor (hAR). The binding pattern of ligands in hAR crystal structures was also analyzed. Results show that hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions are the dominant interactions between the ligands and hAR. The critical amino acid residues involved in forming hydrogen bonding between bisphenols and hAR is Asn 705 and Gln 711. Furthermore, appropriate molecular structural descriptors were selected to characterize the non-bonded interactions. Stepwise multiple linear regressions (MLR) analysis was employed to develop quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models for predicting the anti-androgenic activity of bisphenols. Based on the QSAR development and validation guideline issued by OECD, the goodness-of-fit, robustness and predictive ability of constructed QSAR model were assessed. The model application domain was characterized by the Euclidean distance and Williams plot. The mechanisms of the constructed model were also interpreted based on the selected molecular descriptors i.e. the number of hydroxyl groups (nROH), the most positive values of the molecular surface potential (Vs,max) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy (ELUMO). Finally, based on the model developed, the data gap for other twenty-six bisphenols on their anti-androgenic activity was filled. The predicted results indicated that the anti-androgenic activity of seven bisphenols was higher than that of bisphenol A. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Selective Gene Regulation by Androgen Receptor in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    cell lines immortalized by human papillomavirus 18. Carcinogenesis. 1997;18(6):1215-23. 7. Korenchuk S, Lehr JE, L MC, Lee YG, Whitney S, Vessella...shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number...differentiated phenotype. Identifying compounds that control AR activity at certain promoters may allow more precision over its cellular responses. Many AR

  14. Testosterone regulates the autophagic clearance of androgen binding protein in rat Sertoli cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yi; Yang, Hao-Zheng; Xu, Long-Mei; Huang, Yi-Ran; Dai, Hui-Li; Kang, Xiao-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of androgen-binding protein (ABP) is associated with a number of endocrine and andrology diseases. However, the ABP metabolism in Sertoli cells is largely unknown. We report that autophagy degrades ABP in rat Sertoli cells, and the autophagic clearance of ABP is regulated by testosterone, which prolongs the ABP biological half-life by inhibiting autophagy. Further studies identified that the autophagic clearance of ABP might be selectively regulated by testosterone, independent of stress (hypoxia)-induced autophagic degradation. These data demonstrate that testosterone up-regulates ABP expression at least partially by suppressing the autophagic degradation. We report a novel finding with respect to the mechanisms by which ABP is cleared, and by which the process is regulated in Sertoli cells. PMID:25745956

  15. Environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons affect androgen receptor activation in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hnida, Christina; Larsen, John Christian

    2000-01-01

    Nine structurally different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were tested for their ability to either agonize or antagonize the human androgen receptor (hAR) in a sensitive reporter gene assay based on CHO cells transiently cotransfected with a hAR vector and an MMTV-LUC vector. Benz...

  16. HOXB13 promotes androgen independent growth of LNCaP prostate cancer cells by the activation of E2F signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Chan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Androgen signaling plays a critical role in the development of prostate cancer and its progression. However, androgen-independent prostate cancer cells emerge after hormone ablation therapy, resulting in significant clinical problems. We have previously demonstrated that the HOXB13 homeodomain protein functions as a prostate cancer cell growth suppressor by inhibiting androgen-mediated signals. However, the role of the HOXB13 in androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells remains unexplained. Results In this report, we first demonstrated that HOXB13 was highly overexpressed in hormone-refractory tumors compared to tumors without prostate-specific antigen after initial treatment. Functionally, in an androgen-free environment minimal induction of HOXB13 in LNCaP prostate cancer cells, to the level of the normal prostate, markedly promoted cell proliferation while suppression inhibited cell proliferation. The HOXB13-mediated cell growth promotion in the absence of androgen, appears to be mainly accomplished through the activation of RB-E2F signaling by inhibiting the expression of the p21waf tumor suppressor. Indeed, forced expression of HOXB13 dramatically decreased expression of p21waf; this inhibition largely affected HOXB13-mediated promotion of E2F signaling. Conclusions Taken together, the results of this study demonstrated the presence of a novel pathway that helps understand androgen-independent survival of prostate cancer cells. These findings suggest that upregulation of HOXB13 is associated with an additive growth advantage of prostate cancer cells in the absence of or low androgen concentrations, by the regulation of p21-mediated E2F signaling.

  17. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubham Dayal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1 to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene.

  18. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Shubham; Zhou, Jun; Manivannan, Praveen; Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Ahmad, Omaima Farid; Clark, Matthew; Awadia, Sahezeel; Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Shemshedini, Lirim; Malathi, Krishnamurthy

    2017-01-01

    The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1) to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src) pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase) activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene. PMID:28257035

  19. Sex hormones regulate cerebral drug metabolism via brain miRNAs: down-regulation of brain CYP2D by androgens reduces the analgesic effects of tramadol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Xie, Mengmeng; Wang, Xiaoshuang; Ouyang, Xiufang; Wan, Yu; Dong, Guicheng; Yang, Zheqiong; Yang, Jing; Yue, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Brain cytochrome P450 2D (CYP2D) metabolises exogenous neurotoxins, endogenous substances and neurotransmitters. Brain CYP2D can be regulated in an organ-specific manner, but the possible regulatory mechanisms are poorly understood. We investigated the involvement of miRNAs in the selective regulation of brain CYP2D by testosterone and the corresponding alteration of the pharmacological profiles of tramadol by testosterone. Experimental Approach The regulation of CYP2D and brain-enriched miRNAs by testosterone was investigated using SH-SY5Y cells, U251 cells, and HepG2 cells as well as orchiectomized growth hormone receptor knockout (GHR-KO) mice and rats. Concentration–time curves of tramadol in rat brain were determined using a microdialysis technique. The analgesic action of tramadol was assessed by the tail-flick test in rats. Key Results miR-101 and miR-128-2 bound the 3′-untranslated region of the CYP2D6 mRNA and decreased its level. Testosterone decreased CYP2D6 catalytic function via the up-regulation of miR-101 and miR-128-2 in SH-SY5Y and U251 cells, but not in HepG2 cells. Orchiectomy decreased the levels of miR-101 and miR-128-2 in the hippocampus of male GHR-KO mice, indicating that androgens regulate miRNAs directly, not via the alteration of growth hormone secretion patterns. Changes in the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of tramadol by orchiectomy was attenuated by either testosterone supplementation or a specific brain CYP2D inhibitor. Conclusions and Implications The selective regulation of brain CYP2D via brain-enriched miRNAs, following changes in androgen levels, such as in testosterone therapy, androgen deprivation therapy and/or ageing may alter the response to centrally active substances. PMID:26031356

  20. Masking effect of anti-androgens on androgenic activity in European river sediment unveiled by effect-directed analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiss, J.M.; Hamers, T.; Thomas, K.; van der Linden, S.C.; Leonards, P.E.G.; Lamoree, M.H.

    2009-01-01

    This study shows that the androgen receptor agonistic potency is clearly concealed by the effects of androgen receptor antagonists in a total sediment extract, demonstrating that toxicity screening of total extracts is not enough to evaluate the full in vitro endocrine disrupting potential of a

  1. Ligand Activation of the Androgen Receptor Downregulates E-Cadherin-Mediated Cell Adhesion and Promotes Apoptosis of Prostatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Nightingale

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Androgen independence is the major cause of endocrine therapy failure in advanced prostate cancer (PC. To examine the effects of human androgen receptor (AR expression on growth of human PC cells, transfection of full-length AR cDNA in an androgen-insensitive human prostatic adenocarcinoma cell line (DU145 was performed. Transcriptional activity of AR was confirmed by the MMTV luciferase assay and AR expression was assessed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunocytochemistry. Two stable transfectant cell lines expressing functional AR were established and passaged over 60 times. Under standard culture conditions, AR expression in transfected cells was predominantly cytoplasmic. Exposure to dihydrotestosterone (DHT; 60 pM-10 nM resulted in a rapid (maximal at 30 minutes translocation of AR to the nucleus. Treatment with DHT (5 nM caused a significant reduction in cell-cell adhesion and aggregation accompanied by a decrease in E-cadherin expression. This was associated with up to 40% inhibition of proliferation and approximately two-fold increase in apoptosis. These results suggest that gene transfer-mediated AR expression in DU145 cells confers sensitivity to DHT, modulates cell-cell adhesion through E-cadherin, and suppresses cell growth by inhibiting proliferation and promoting apoptosis. This provides a model for studies of AR-regulated cell signalling and identification of novel androgenregulated genes in PC.

  2. Effects of currently used pesticides in assays for estrogenicity, androgenicity, and aromatase activity in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Helle Raun; Vinggaard, Anne; Rasmussen, Thomas Høj

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-four pesticides were tested for interactions with the estrogen receptor (ER) and the androgen receptor (AR) in transactivation assays. Estrogen-like effects on MCF-7 cell proliferation and effects on CYP19 aromatase activity in human placental microsomes were also investigated. Pesticides...... to their frequent use in Danish greenhouses. In addition, the metabolite mercaptodimethur sulfoxide, the herbicide tribenuron-methyl, and the organochlorine dieldrin, were included. Several of the pesticides, dieldrin, endosulfan, methiocarb, and fenarimol, acted both as estrogen agonists and androgen antagonists...

  3. Aqueous extract of Carpolobia lutea root ameliorates paroxetine-induced anti-androgenic activity in male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Toyin Yakubu

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: The reversibility and/or enhanced synthesis of testosterone and androgen dependent parameters by the C. lutea root which confers anabolic and androgenic activities on the plant may explain the rationale for its use in the management of sexual dysfunction and fertility in animals.

  4. Androgenic activity in surface water samples detected using the AR-LUX assay: Indications for mixture effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankvoort, B.M.G.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Murk, A.J.; Koeman, J.H.; Schilt, R.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the screening of 22 extracts from 18 different aquatic environmental samples for androgenic activity, including indirect and interactive effects on androgen receptor (AR)-mediated signal transduction, using the AR-LUX bioassay. Four samples, originating from an industrial

  5. Interlaboratory comparison of four in vitro assays for assessing androgenic and antiandrogenic activity of environmental chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Körner, Wolfgang; Vinggaard, Anne; Terouanne, B.

    2004-01-01

    ) values ranging from 1.1 x 10(-7) M to 4.7 x 10(-7) M]. In assays 2 and 3, vinclozolin showed partial androgenic activity at the highest concentrations tested. For vinclozolin, calculated antiandrogenic potencies relative to bicalutamide (RAAPs) differed no more than a factor of 10, and IC50 values...

  6. IN VITRO ANDROGENIC ACTIVITY OF KRAFT MILL EFFLUENT IS ASSOCIATED WITH MASCULINIZATION OF FEMALE FISH

    Science.gov (United States)

    In Vitro Androgenic Activity of Kraft Mill Effluent is Associated with Masculinization of Female Fish. Lambright, CS 1 , Parks, LG 1, Orlando, E 2, Guillette, LJ, Jr.2, Ankley, G 3, Gray, LE, Jr.1 , 1USEPA, NHEERL, RTP, NC, 2 University of Florida, Dept. of Zoology, Gainesville ...

  7. PTTG1, A novel androgen responsive gene is required for androgen-induced prostate cancer cell growth and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zheng [Department of Urology, First Hospital, Peking University & Institute of Urology, Peking University, Beijing 100034 (China); Jin, Bo [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China); Jin, Yaqiong [Biobank for Clinical Data and Samples in Pediatric, Beijing Pediatric Research Institute, Beijing Children' s Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100045 (China); Huang, Shengquan; Niu, Xiaohua [Department of Urology, First Hospital, Peking University & Institute of Urology, Peking University, Beijing 100034 (China); Mao, Zebin [The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Health Science Center, Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Xin, Dianqi, E-mail: xin-dianqi@163.com [Department of Urology, First Hospital, Peking University & Institute of Urology, Peking University, Beijing 100034 (China)

    2017-01-01

    Androgens (AR) play an important role in initiation and progression of prostate cancer. It has been shown that AR exert their effects mainly through the androgen-activated AR which binds to androgen response elements (AREs) in the regulatory regions of target genes to regulate the transcription of androgen-responsive genes, thus, identification of AR downstream target gene is critical to understand androgen function in prostate cancer. In this study, our results showed that androgen treatment of LNCaP cells induced PTTG1 expression, which was blocked by the androgen receptor antagonist, Casodex. Bioinformatics analysis and experiments using PTTG1 promoter deletion mutants showed that the PTTG1 promoter contains a putative androgen response element (ARE), which localizes in the −851 to −836 region of the promoter. Androgen activated androgen receptor (AR) binding to this ARE was confirmed by Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. Furthermore, Knockdown of PTTG1 expression using short hairpin RNA significantly reduced androgen-induced LNCaP cell growth and invasion. In addition, we showed PTTG1 is highly expressed in metastasis prostate cancer tissue. These results suggest that PTTG1 is a novel downstream target gene of androgen receptor and take part in prostate cancer proliferation and metastasis. - Highlights: • Androgen treatment of LNCaP cells induced PTTG1 expression. • Knockdown of PTTG1 expression significantly reduced androgen-induced LNCaP cell growth and invasion. • PTTG1 is highly expressed in metastasis prostate cancer tissue. • PTTG1 is a novel downstream target gene of androgen receptor.

  8. Androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Ieuan A; Davies, John D; Bunch, Trevor I; Pasterski, Vickie; Mastroyannopoulou, Kiki; MacDougall, Jane

    2012-10-20

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome in its complete form is a disorder of hormone resistance characterised by a female phenotype in an individual with an XY karyotype and testes producing age-appropriate normal concentrations of androgens. Pathogenesis is the result of mutations in the X-linked androgen receptor gene, which encodes for the ligand-activated androgen receptor--a transcription factor and member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. This Seminar describes the clinical manifestations of androgen insensitivity syndrome from infancy to adulthood, reviews the mechanism of androgen action, and shows examples of how mutations of the androgen receptor gene cause the syndrome. Management of androgen insensitivity syndrome should be undertaken by a multidisciplinary team and include gonadectomy to avoid gonad tumours in later life, appropriate sex-hormone replacement at puberty and beyond, and an emphasis on openness in disclosure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Androgen receptor is overexpressed in boys with severe hypospadias, and ZEB1 regulates androgen receptor expression in human foreskin cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Liang; Tasian, Gregory E.; Zhang, Haiyang; Cao, Mei; Ferretti, Max; Cunha, Gerald R.; Baskin, Laurence S.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION ZEB1 is overexpressed in patients with severe hypospadias. We examined the interaction between ZeB1 and the androgen receptor (AR) in vitro and the expression of AR in boys with hypospadias. RESULTS ZEB1 and AR colocalize to the nucleus. Estrogen upregulated ZEB1 and AR expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) demonstrated that ZEB1 binds to an E-box sequence in the AR gene promoter. AR expression is higher in subjects with severe hypospadias than those with mild hypospadias and control subjects (P hypospadias. Environmental estrogenic compounds may increase the risk of hypospadias by facilitating the interaction between ZEB1 and AR. METHODS Hs68 cells, a fibroblast cell line derived from neonatal human foreskin, were exposed to 0, 10, and 100 nmol/l of estrogen, after which the cellular localization of ZEB1 and AR was assessed using immunocytochemistry. To determine if ZEB1 interacted with the AR gene, ChIP was performed using ZEB1 antibody and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for AR. Second, AR expression was quantified using real-time PcR and western blot in normal subjects (n = 32), and subjects with mild (n = 16) and severe hypospadia (n = 16). PMID:22391641

  10. Proteomic analysis of androgen-regulated protein expression in a mouse fetal vas deferens cell line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Umar (Arzu); T.M. Luider (Theo); C.A. Berrevoets (Cor); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractDuring sex differentiation, androgens are essential for development of the male genital tract. The Wolffian duct is an androgen-sensitive target tissue that develops into the epididymis, vas deferens, and seminal vesicle. The present study aimed to identify

  11. ERG Cooperates with Androgen Receptor in Regulating Trefoil Factor 3 in Prostate Cancer Disease Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Rickman

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available To elucidate the role of ETS gene fusions in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC, we characterized the transcriptome of 54 CRPC tumor samples from men with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3 emerged as the most highly differentially regulated gene with respect to ERG rearrangement status and resistance to hormone ablation therapy. Conventional chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-polymerase chain reaction and ChIP followed by DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq revealed direct binding of ERG to ETS binding sites in the TFF3 promoter in ERG-rearranged prostate cancer cell lines. These results were confirmed in ERG-rearranged hormone-naive prostate cancer (HNPC and CRPC tissue samples. Functional studies demonstrated that ERG has an inhibitory effect on TFF3 expression in hormone-naive cancer but not in the castration-resistant state. In addition, we provide evidence suggesting an effect of androgen receptor signaling on ERG-regulated TFF3 expression. Furthermore, TFF3 overexpression enhances ERG-mediated cell invasion in CRPC prostate cancer cells. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel mechanism for enhanced tumor cell aggressiveness resulting from ERG rearrangement in the castration-resistant setting through TFF3 gene expression.

  12. A 6-kb promoter fragment mimics in transgenic mice the prostate-specific and androgen-regulated expression of the endogenous prostate-specific antigen gene in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.B.J.M. Cleutjens (Kitty); H.A.G.M. van der Korput (Hetty); C.C.E.M. Ehren-van Eekelen (Conny); R.A. Sikes; C. Fasciana (Claudia); L.W. Chung; J. Trapman (Jan)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractProstate-specific antigen (PSA) is a kallikrein-like serine protease, which is almost exclusively synthesized in the luminal epithelial cells of the human prostate. PSA expression is androgen regulated. Previously, we characterized in vitro the proximal

  13. Androgen-mediated cholesterol metabolism in LNCaP and PC-3 cell lines is regulated through two different isoforms of acyl-coenzyme A:Cholesterol Acyltransferase (ACAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Jennifer A; Wasan, Kishor M; Nelson, Colleen C; Guns, Emma S; Leon, Carlos G

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the effect of an androgen agonist, R1881, on intracellular cholesterol synthesis and esterification in androgen-sensitive (AS) prostate cancer (LNCaP) cells. We investigated the activity and expression of cholesterol metabolism enzymes, HMG-CoA-reductase and ACAT in the LNCaP and PC-3 (androgen-independent control) models. Microsomal PC-3 HMG-CoA-reductase activity was increased with R1881 despite having similar cholesterol levels while increased cholesterol levels in microsomes from LNCaPs treated with R1881 (L+) were associated with increased HMG-CoA reductase activity. Increased intracellular cholesteryl esters (CE) found in (L+) were not associated with an increased ACAT1 activity. There was no effect from androgen treatment on ACAT1 protein expression in theses cells; however, ACAT2 expression was induced upon R1881 treatment. In contrast, we found an increase in the in vitro ACAT1 activity in PC-3 cells treated with androgen (P+). Only ACAT1 expression was induced in P+. We further assessed the expression of STAT1 alpha, a transcriptional activator that modulates ACAT1 expression. STAT1 alpha expression and phosphorylation were induced in P+. To determine the role of the AR on ACAT1 expression and esterification, we treated PC-3 cells overexpressing the androgen receptor with R1881 (PAR+). AR expression was decreased in PAR+ cells; ACAT1 protein expression and cholesterol ester levels were also decreased, however, ACAT2 remained unchanged. STAT1 alpha expression was decreased in PAR+. Overall, these findings support the importance of cholesterol metabolism regulation within prostate cancer cells and unravel a novel role for STAT1 alpha in prostate cancer metabolism. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Inability of NCoR/SMRT to repress androgen receptor transcriptional activity in prostate cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laschak, Martin; Bechtel, Marina; Spindler, Klaus-Dieter; Hessenauer, Andrea

    2011-10-01

    The molecular mechanisms leading to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are poorly understood. Among several mechanisms leading to CRPC growth a dysregulation of androgen receptor (AR) co-regulators (i.e. up-regulation of co-activators or down-regulation of co-repressors) is discussed. There are numerous reports demonstrating an increased expression of co-activators during prostate cancer progression. On the contrary, the impact of co-repressors on tumor growth and development is less clear. In this study we compared the effects of two known co-repressors, NCoR and SMRT, on AR transcriptional activity in prostate cancer (PCa) cell lines and compared them to that in COS-1 cells. Interestingly, we found that NCoR/SMRT overexpression did not repress AR-dependent gene expression in the PCa cell lines, but rather activated it. This finding is probably due to an impaired AR-co-repressor interaction in the prostate cancer cell lines. In conclusion, we provide evidence that up-regulation of NCoR or SMRT may increase transcriptional activity of the AR in a cell type-specific context.

  15. Tributyltin distribution and producing androgenic activity in water, sediment, and fish muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shue, Meei-Fang; Chen, Ting-Chien; Bellotindos, Luzvisminda M; Lu, Ming-Chun

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the concentrations of Tributyltin (TBT) in water, sediment, and fish muscle samples taken from Kaohsiung Harbor and Kaoping River estuary, Taiwan. TBT concentrations in water and sediment samples ranged from less than 18.5 to 34.1 ng Sn L(-1) and from 2.44 to 29.7 ng Sn g(-1) weight per weight (w/w), respectively. Concentrations in the TBT-contaminated fish muscle samples ranged from 10.8 to 79.6 ng Sn g(-1) w/w. The TBT concentrations in fish muscle were higher than those in water and sediment samples. The fish muscle/water TBT bioconcentration factor (BCF) ranged from 590 to 3363 L kg(-1). Additionally, the water samples were assessed for androgenic activity with an MCF7-AR1 human breast cancer cell line. The androgenic activity ranged from 0.94 to 3.1 ng-dihydrotestosterone per litre water (ng-DHT L(-1)). Higher concentrations of TBT in water and sediment samples occurred in the dry season, but the androgenic activity had higher values in the rainy season.

  16. A novel androgen signalling pathway uses dihydrotestosterone, but not testosterone, to activate the EGF receptor signalling cascade in prostate stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, V L; Poulios, K; Ventura, S; Haynes, J M

    2013-10-01

    Human prostate growth and function are tightly controlled by androgens that are generally thought to exert their effects by regulating gene transcription. However, a rapid, non-genomic steroid action, often involving an elevation of intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+) ]i ), has also been described in a number of cell types. In this study we investigate whether androgens acutely regulate [Ca(2+) ]i in stromal cells derived from the human prostate. Human-cultured prostatic stromal cells (HCPSCs) were loaded with the calcium-sensitive fluorophore, fura-2-acetoxymethyl ester (FURA-2AM) (10 μM). Changes in [Ca(2+) ]i in response to the androgens, dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and testosterone, as well as EGF were measured by fluorescence microscopy. DHT, but not testosterone (0.03-300 nM), elicited concentration-dependent elevations of [Ca(2+) ]i within 1 min of addition. These responses were blocked by the androgen receptor antagonist, flutamide (10 μM); the sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase pump inhibitor, thapsigargin (1 μM); the inositol trisphosphate receptor inhibitor, 2-aminoethyldiphenyl borate (50 μM) and the PLC inhibitor, U-73122 (1 μM). Responses were also blocked by the L-type calcium channel blocker, nifedipine (1 μM), and by removal of extracellular calcium. A similar transient elevation of [Ca(2+) ]i was elicited by EGF (100 ng·mL(-1) ). The EGF receptor inhibitor, AG 1478 (30 nM), and the MMP inhibitor, marimastat (100 nM), blocked the DHT-induced elevation of [Ca(2+) ]i . These studies show that DHT elicits an androgen receptor-dependent acute elevation of [Ca(2+) ]i in HCPSC, most likely by activating EGF receptor signalling. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  17. Androgen therapy in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlt, Wiebke

    2006-01-01

    Androgens in women either derive from direct ovarian production or from peripheral conversion of the adrenal sex steroid precursor, dehydroepiandrosterone, towards active androgens. Therefore, loss of adrenal or ovarian function, caused by Addison's disease or consequent to bilateral oophorectomy, results in severe androgen deficiency, clinically often associated with a loss of libido and energy. Importantly, physiological menopause does not necessarily lead to androgen deficiency, as androgen synthesis in the ovaries may persist despite the decline in estrogen production. However, the definition of female androgen deficiency, as recently provided by the Princeton consensus statement, is not precise enough and may lead to over-diagnosis due to the high prevalence of its diagnostic criteria: androgen levels below or within the lower quartile of the normal range and concurrent sexual dysfunction. Importantly, physiological menopause is not necessarily associated with androgen deficiency and therefore does not routinely require androgen therapy. Current replacement options include transdermal testosterone administration or dehydroepiandrosterone treatment, both of which have been shown to result in significant improvements, in particular in libido and mood, while effects on body composition and muscular function are not well documented. It is important to keep in mind that the number of randomized controlled trials is still limited and that currently none of the available preparations is officially approved for use in women. Currently, androgen replacement should be reserved for women with severe androgen deficiency due to an established cause and matching clinical signs and symptoms.

  18. Activational action of testosterone on androgen receptors protects males preventing temporomandibular joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanton, L E; Macedo, C G; Torres-Chávez, K E; Fischer, L; Tambeli, C H

    2017-01-01

    Testosterone protects male rats from Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) pain. This study investigated whether this protective effect is mediated by an organizational action of testosterone during nervous system development, by central estrogen and androgen receptors and by the 5α-reduced metabolite of testosterone, dihydrotestosterone. A pharmacological approach was used to assess the ability of the androgen receptor antagonist flutamide, the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182 780 and the 5-α reductase inhibitor dutasteride to block the protective effect of testosterone, evaluated through the behavioral response induced by a TMJ injection of 0.5% formalin. Flutamide and ICI 182 780 were injected into the medullary subarachnoid space, and dutasteride and testosterone were systemically administered. The TMJ injection of 0.5% formalin induced a significant nociceptive behavioral response in gonadectomized male and naïve female, but not in sham gonadectomized male rats, confirming that endogenous testosterone prevents TMJ nociception in males. Testosterone administration prevented formalin-induced TMJ nociception in males gonadectomized either in the neonatal (at the day of birth) or adult period and in naïve female rats, suggesting that the protective effect of testosterone on TMJ nociception does not depend on its organizational actions during critical periods of development. The administration of flutamide and dutasteride but not of ICI 182 780 blocked the protective effect of testosterone. We conclude that the protective effect of testosterone on TMJ nociception depends on activational actions of dihydrotestosterone on androgen receptors rather than on organizational androgenic actions during central nervous system development or estrogenic actions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Testosterone regulates keratin 33B expression in rat penis growth through androgen receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan-Min; Wu, Kai-Jie; Dang, Qiang; Shi, Qi; Gao, Yang; Guo, Peng; Xu, Shan; Wang, Xin-Yang; He, Da-Lin; Gong, Yong-Guang

    2014-01-01

    Androgen therapy is the mainstay of treatment for the hypogonadotropic hypogonadal micropenis because it obviously enhances penis growth in prepubescent microphallic patients. However, the molecular mechanisms of androgen treatment leading to penis growth are still largely unknown. To clarify this well-known phenomenon, we successfully generated a castrated male Sprague Dawley rat model at puberty followed by testosterone administration. Interestingly, compared with the control group, testosterone treatment stimulated a dose-dependent increase of penis weight, length, and width in castrated rats accompanied with a dramatic recovery of the pathological changes of the penis. Mechanistically, testosterone administration substantially increased the expression of androgen receptor (AR) protein. Increased AR protein in the penis could subsequently initiate transcription of its target genes, including keratin 33B (Krt33b). Importantly, we demonstrated that KRT33B is generally expressed in the rat penis and that most KRT33B expression is cytoplasmic. Furthermore, AR could directly modulate its expression by binding to a putative androgen response element sequence of the Krt33b promoter. Overall, this study reveals a novel mechanism facilitating penis growth after testosterone treatment in precastrated prepubescent animals, in which androgen enhances the expression of AR protein as well as its target genes, such as Krt33b.

  20. The direct inhibitory effect of dutasteride or finasteride on androgen receptor activity is cell line specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhipa, Rishi Raj; Halim, Danny; Cheng, Jinrong; Zhang, Huan Yi; Mohler, James L; Ip, Clement; Wu, Yue

    2013-10-01

    Finasteride and dutasteride were developed originally as 5α-reductase inhibitors to block the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT). These drugs may possess off-target effects on the androgen receptor (AR) due to their structural similarity to DHT. A total of four human prostate cancer cell models were examined: LNCaP (T877A mutant AR), 22Rv1 (H874Y mutant AR), LAPC4 (wild-type AR), and VCaP (wild-type AR). Cells were cultured in 10% charcoal-stripped fetal bovine serum, either with or without DHT added to the medium. AR activity was evaluated using the ARE-luciferase assay or the expression of AR regulated genes. Dutasteride was more potent than finasteride in interfering with DHT-stimulated AR signaling. Disruption of AR function was accompanied by decreased cell growth. Cells that rely on DHT for protection against death were particularly vulnerable to dutasteride. Different prostate cancer cell models exhibited different sensitivities to dutasteride and finasteride. LNCaP was most sensitive, LAPC4 and VCaP were intermediate, while 22Rv1 was least sensitive. Regardless of the AR genotype, if AR was transfected into drug-sensitive cells, AR was inhibited by drug treatment; and if AR was transfected into drug-resistant cells, AR was not inhibited. The direct inhibitory effect of dutasteride or finasteride on AR signaling is cell line specific. Mutations in the ligand binding domain of AR do not appear to play a significant role in influencing the AR antagonistic effect of these drugs. Subcellular constituent is an important factor in determining the drug effect on AR function. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Bioluminescence Microscopy as a Method to Measure Single Cell Androgen Receptor Activity Heterogeneous Responses to Antiandrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Pallavi; Neveu, Bertrand; Velot, Lauriane; Wu, Lily; Fradet, Yves; Pouliot, Frédéric

    2016-09-28

    Cancer cell heterogeneity is well-documented. Therefore, techniques to monitor single cell heterogeneous responses to treatment are needed. We developed a highly translational and quantitative bioluminescence microscopy method to measure single cell androgen receptor (AR) activity modulation by antiandrogens from fluid biopsies. We showed that this assay can detect heterogeneous cellular response to drug treatment and that the sum of single cell AR activity can mirror the response in the whole cell population. This method may thus be used to monitor heterogeneous dynamic treatment responses in cancer cells.

  2. Resveratrol, piceatannol and analogs inhibit activation of both wild-type and T877A mutant androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, Johan; Tringali, Corrado; Oskarsson, Agneta

    2017-11-01

    Prostate cancer growth and progression are mainly dependent on androgens and many current prostate cancer treatment options target the synthesis or function of androgens. We have previously reported that resveratrol and synthetic analogs of resveratrol with a higher bioavailability inhibit the synthesis of androgens in human adrenocortical H295R cells. Now we have studied the antiandrogenic properties of resveratrol, piceatannol and analogs in two different prostate cell lines; LNCaP and RWPE. LNCaP carry a T877A mutation in the androgen receptor while RWPE has a wild-type androgen receptor. We found that resveratrol, piceatannol and all studied analogs were able to inhibit a dihydrotestosterone-induced activation of the androgen receptor, showing that they act as antiandrogens. In LNCaP cells, all studied compounds were able to statistically significantly decrease the androgenic signaling in concentrations ≥1μM and the synthetic analogs trimethylresveratrol (RSVTM) and tetramethylpiceatannol (PICTM) were the most potent compounds. RWPE cells were not as responsive to the studied compounds as the LNCaP cells. A statistically significant decrease in the androgenic signaling was observed at concentrations ≤5μM for most compounds and RSVTM was found to be the most potent compound. Further, we studied the effects of resveratrol, piceatannol and analogs on the levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in LNCaP cells and found that all studied compounds decreased the level of PSA and that the synthetic analogs diacetylresveratrol (RSVDA), triacetylresveratrol (RSVTA) and RSVTM were the most potent compounds, decreasing the PSA level by approx. 50% at concentrations ≥10μM. In a cell-free receptor binding assay we were unable to show binding of resveratrol or analogs to the ligand binding domain of the androgen receptor, indicating that the observed effects are mediated via other mechanisms than direct ligand competition. We conclude that the resveratrol

  3. Prenatal androgen receptor activation determines adult alcohol and water drinking in a sex-specific way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Sabine E; Zoicas, Iulia; Reichel, Martin; Mühle, Christiane; Büttner, Christian; Ekici, Arif B; Eulenburg, Volker; Lenz, Bernd; Kornhuber, Johannes; Müller, Christian P

    2017-08-04

    Alcohol use disorders are major psychiatric disorders. Correlational studies in humans suggested organizational hormonal effects during embryonic development as a risk factor for adult alcohol dependence. Permanent changes can be induced by the activity of sex hormones, like testosterone. Here, we demonstrate a relationship between prenatal androgen receptor (AR)-activation and adult alcohol as well as water drinking in mice in a sex-dependent fashion. Prenatal AR inhibition using the antagonist flutamide decreased adult male alcohol consumption. In contrast, prenatal AR activation by dihydrotestosterone (DHT) led to an increase in adult alcohol consumption in females. These effects were different in adult water drinking, flutamide increased water consumption in females and DHT increased water consumption in males. Prenatal flutamide reduced locomotion and anxiety in adult males but was ineffective in females. We found that prenatal AR activation controls adult levels of monoaminergic modulatory transmitters in the brain and blood hormone levels in a sex-specific way. RNA-Seq analysis confirmed a prenatal AR mediated control of adult expression of alcohol drinking-related genes like Bdnf and Per2. These findings demonstrate that prenatal androgen activity is a risk factor for the establishment of alcohol consumption in adults by its organizational effects. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  4. Androgens in pregnancy: roles in parturition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makieva, Sofia; Saunders, Philippa T.K.; Norman, Jane E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Understanding the physiology of pregnancy enables effective management of pregnancy complications that could otherwise be life threatening for both mother and fetus. A functional uterus (i) retains the fetus in utero during pregnancy without initiating stretch-induced contractions and (ii) is able to dilate the cervix and contract the myometrium at term to deliver the fetus. The onset of labour is associated with successful cervical remodelling and contraction of myometrium, arising from concomitant activation of uterine immune and endocrine systems. A large body of evidence suggests that actions of local steroid hormones may drive changes occurring in the uterine microenvironment at term. Although there have been a number of studies considering the potential role(s) played by progesterone and estrogen at the time of parturition, the bio-availability and effects of androgens during pregnancy have received less scrutiny. The aim of this review is to highlight potential roles of androgens in the biology of pregnancy and parturition. METHODS A review of published literature was performed to address (i) androgen concentrations, including biosynthesis and clearance, in maternal and fetal compartments throughout gestation, (ii) associations of androgen concentrations with adverse pregnancy outcomes, (iii) the role of androgens in the physiology of cervical remodelling and finally (iv) the role of androgens in the physiology of myometrial function including any impact on contractility. RESULTS Some, but not all, androgens increase throughout gestation in maternal circulation. The effects of this increase are not fully understood; however, evidence suggests that increased androgens might regulate key processes during pregnancy and parturition. For example, androgens are believed to be critical for cervical remodelling at term, in particular cervical ripening, via regulation of cervical collagen fibril organization. Additionally, a number of studies highlight

  5. Identification of an AR mutation-negative class of androgen insensitivity by determining endogenous AR activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hornig, N.C.; Ukat, M.; H.U. Schweikert (H.); O. Hiort (Olaf); Werner, R.; S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert); M.L. Cools (Martine); I.A. Hughes (Ieuan A.); L. Audí (Laura); S.F. Ahmed (Faisal); Demiri, J.; Rodens, P.; Worch, L.; Wehner, G.; Kulle, A.E.; Dunstheimer, D.; Müller-Roßberg, E.; T. Reinehr (Thomas); Hadidi, A.T.; Eckstein, A.K.; Van Der Horst, C.; Seif, C.; R. Siebert (Reiner); O. Ammerpohl (Ole); P-M. Holterhus (Paul-Martin)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractContext: Only approximately 85%of patients with a clinical diagnosis complete androgen insensitivity syndrome and less than 30%with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome can be explained by inactivating mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Objective: The objective of the study

  6. Conazole fungicides inhibit Leydig cell testosterone secretion and androgen receptor activation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarke J.E. Roelofs

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Conazole fungicides are widely used in agriculture despite their suspected endocrine disrupting properties. In this study, the potential (anti-androgenic effects of ten conazoles were assessed and mutually compared with existing data. Effects of cyproconazole (CYPRO, fluconazole (FLUC, flusilazole (FLUS, hexaconazole (HEXA, myconazole (MYC, penconazole (PEN, prochloraz (PRO, tebuconazole (TEBU, triadimefon (TRIA, and triticonazole (TRIT were examined using murine Leydig (MA-10 cells and human T47D-ARE cells stably transfected with an androgen responsive element and a firefly luciferase reporter gene. Six conazoles caused a decrease in basal testosterone (T secretion by MA-10 cells varying from 61% up to 12% compared to vehicle-treated control. T secretion was concentration-dependently inhibited after exposure of MA-10 cells to several concentrations of FLUS (IC50 = 12.4 μM or TEBU (IC50 = 2.4 μM in combination with LH. The expression of steroidogenic and cholesterol biosynthesis genes was not changed by conazole exposure. Also, there were no changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS formation that could explain the altered T secretion after exposure to conazoles. Nine conazoles decreased T-induced AR activation (IC50s ranging from 10.7 to 71.5 μM and effect potencies (REPs were calculated relative to the known AR antagonist flutamide (FLUT. FLUC had no effect on AR activation by T. FLUS was the most potent (REP = 3.61 and MYC the least potent (REP = 0.03 AR antagonist. All other conazoles had a comparable REP from 0.12 to 0.38. Our results show distinct in vitro anti-androgenic effects of several conazole fungicides arising from two mechanisms: inhibition of T secretion and AR antagonism, suggesting potential testicular toxic effects. These effects warrant further mechanistic investigation and clearly show the need for accurate exposure data in order to perform proper (human risk assessment of this class of compounds.

  7. Metabolomics for informing adverse outcome pathways: Androgen receptor activation and the pharmaceutical spironolactone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, J.M., E-mail: davis.john@epa.gov [U.S. EPA, National Exposure Research Laboratory, 960 College Station Rd., Athens, GA 30605 (United States); Ekman, D.R., E-mail: ekman.drew@epa.gov [U.S. EPA, National Exposure Research Laboratory, 960 College Station Rd., Athens, GA 30605 (United States); Skelton, D.M. [U.S. EPA, National Exposure Research Laboratory, 960 College Station Rd., Athens, GA 30605 (United States); LaLone, C.A.; Ankley, G.T.; Cavallin, J.E.; Villeneuve, D.L. [U.S. EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, 6201 Congdon Blvd., Duluth, MN 55804 (United States); Collette, T.W. [U.S. EPA, National Exposure Research Laboratory, 960 College Station Rd., Athens, GA 30605 (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Metabolomics identified potential key events in an androgen receptor activation AOP. • Metabolomics indicate spironolactone may elicit effects via multiple nuclear receptors. • Spironolactone exposure may elicit interactive effects in multi-stressor environments. - Abstract: One objective in developing adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) is to connect biological changes that are relevant to risk assessors (i.e., fecundity) to molecular and cellular-level alterations that might be detectable at earlier stages of a chemical exposure. Here, we examined biochemical responses of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to inform an AOP relevant to spironolactone’s activation of the androgen receptor, as well as explore other biological impacts possibly unrelated to this receptor. Liquid chromatography with high resolution mass spectrometry (LC–MS) was used to measure changes in endogenous polar metabolites in livers of male and female fish that were exposed to five water concentrations of spironolactone (0, 0.05, 0.5, 5, or 50 μg L{sup −1}) for 21 days. Metabolite profiles were affected at the two highest concentrations (5 and 50 μg L{sup −1}), but not in the lower-level exposures, which agreed with earlier reported results of reduced female fecundity and plasma vitellogenin (VTG) levels. We then applied partial least squares regression to assess whether metabolite alterations covaried with changes in fecundity, VTG gene expression and protein concentrations, and plasma 17β-estradiol and testosterone concentrations. Metabolite profiles significantly covaried with all measured endpoints in females, but only with plasma testosterone in males. Fecundity reductions occurred in parallel with changes in metabolites important in osmoregulation (e.g., betaine), membrane transport (e.g., L-carnitine), and biosynthesis of carnitine (e.g., methionine) and VTG (e.g., glutamate). Based on a network analysis program (i.e., mummichog), spironolactone also

  8. Androgen stimulates glycolysis for de novo lipid synthesis by increasing the activities of hexokinase 2 and 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase 2 in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jong-Seok; Jin, Won-Ji; Kwak, Jin-Hye; Kim, Hyo-Jeong; Yun, Mi-Jin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Park, Sahng Wook; Kim, Kyung-Sup

    2011-01-01

    Up-regulation of lipogenesis by androgen is one of the most characteristic metabolic features of LNCaP prostate cancer cells. The present study revealed that androgen increases glucose utilization for de novo lipogenesis in LNCaP cells through the activation of HK2 (hexokinase 2) and activation of the cardiac isoform of PFKFB2 (6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase). Activation of PKA (cAMP-dependent protein kinase) by androgen increased phosphorylation of CREB [CRE (cAMP-response element)-binding protein], which in turn bound to CRE on the promoter of the HK2 gene resulting in transcriptional activation of the HK2 gene. Up-regulation of PFKFB2 expression was mediated by the direct binding of ligand-activated androgen receptor to the PFKFB2 promoter. The activated PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/Akt signalling pathway in LNCaP cells contributes to the phosphorylation of PFKFB2 at Ser466 and Ser483, resulting in the constitutive activation of PFK-2 (6-phosphofructo-2-kinase) activity. Glucose uptake and lipogenesis were severely blocked by knocking-down of PFKFB2 using siRNA (small interfering RNA) or by inhibition of PFK-2 activity with LY294002 treatment. Taken together, our results suggest that the induction of de novo lipid synthesis by androgen requires the transcriptional up-regulation of HK2 and PFKFB2, and phosphorylation of PFKFB2 generated by the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway to supply the source for lipogenesis from glucose in prostate cancer cells.

  9. Gendered Peer Involvement in Girls with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia: Effects of Prenatal Androgens, Gendered Activities, and Gender Cognitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenbaum, Sheri A; Beltz, Adriene M; Bryk, Kristina; McHale, Susan

    2018-01-09

    A key question in understanding gender development concerns the origins of sex segregation. Children's tendencies to interact with same-sex others have been hypothesized to result from gender identity and cognitions, behavioral compatibility, and personal characteristics. We examined whether prenatal androgen exposure was related to time spent with boys and girls, and how that gendered peer involvement was related to sex-typed activities and gender identity and cognitions. We studied 54 girls with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) aged 10-13 years varying in degree of prenatal androgen exposure: 40 girls with classical CAH (C-CAH) exposed to high prenatal androgens and 14 girls with non-classical CAH (NC-CAH) exposed to low, female-typical, prenatal androgens. Home interviews and questionnaires provided assessments of gendered activity interests and participation, gender identity, and gender cognitions. Daily phone calls over 7 days assessed time spent in gendered activities and with peers. Girls with both C-CAH and NC-CAH interacted more with girls than with boys, with no significant group differences. The groups did not differ significantly in gender identity or gender cognitions, but girls with C-CAH spent more time in male-typed activities and less time in female-typed activities than did girls with NC-CAH. Time spent with girls reflected direct effects of gender identity/cognitions and gender-typed activities, and an indirect effect of prenatal androgens (CAH type) through gender-typed activities. Our results extend findings that prenatal androgens differentially affect gendered characteristics and that gendered peer interactions reflect combined effects of behavioral compatibility and feelings and cognitions about gender. The study also shows the value of natural experiments for testing hypotheses about gender development.

  10. Altered corepressor SMRT expression and recruitment to target genes as a mechanism that change the response to androgens in prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Alejandro S; Sotomayor, Paula C; Villagran, Marcelo; Yacoub, Rami; Montecinos, Viviana P; McNerney, Eileen M; Moser, Michael; Foster, Barbara A; Onate, Sergio A

    2012-07-06

    Androgen receptor (AR) is required for the development and progression of prostate cancer (CaP) from androgen-dependence to androgen-resistance. Both corepressors and coactivators regulate AR-mediated transcriptional activity, and aberrant expression or activity due to mutation(s) contributes to changes in AR function in the progression to androgen resistance acquired during hormonal ablation therapies. Primary culture of epithelial cells from androgen-dependent CWR22 and androgen-resistant CWR22R xenograft tumors were used to evaluate the effect of androgens on AR function, and the association with coactivators (SRC-1 and TIF-2) and corepressors (SMRT and NCoR). Both androgen-dependent CWR22 and androgen-resistant CWR22R cells expressed functional AR as the receptor bind ligand with high affinity and increased trafficking to the nuclei in the presence of androgens. However, in the presence of androgens, AR-mediated transcriptional activity in androgen-sensitive CWR22 cells was limited to a 2-fold increase, as compared to a 6-fold increase in androgen-resistance CWR22R cells. In androgen-sensitive CWR22 cells, immunoblot, confocal microscopy, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that the androgen bound AR transcriptional initiation complex in the PSA promoter contained corepressor SMRT, resulting in limited receptor transcriptional activity. In contrast, increased AR-mediated transcriptional activity in the CWR22R cells was consistent with decreased expression and recruitment of the corepressors SMRT/NCoR, as well as increased recruitment of the coactivator TIF-2 to the receptor complex. Similar changes in the response to androgens were observed in the LNCaP/C4-2 model of androgen resistance prostate cancer. Thus, altered recruitment and loss of corepressors SMRT/NCoR may provide a mechanism that changes the response of AR function to ligands and contributes to the progression of the advanced stages of human prostate cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier

  11. Novel Small Molecule Antagonists of the Interaction of the Androgen Receptor and Transcriptional Co-regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Luminescence Counter (Packard Instrument Company). All data were analyzed using GraphPad Prism 4.03 (GraphPad Software, San Diego, CA); IC50 values...DP: Single-step purification of full- length human androgen receptor. Nucl Recept Signal 2005;3:e001. 5. Matias PM, Donner P, Coelho R, Thomaz M...Feau4, R. Kiplin Guy4, Keith R. Yamamoto2, Byron Hann5, Marc I. Diamond1,2 1_Department of Neurology, UCSF, San Francisco, CA 2_Department of

  12. Survival Signaling in Prostate Cancer: Role of Androgen Receptor and Integrins in Regulating Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    content/full/123/2/266/DC1 References Alarid, E. T., Rubin, J. S., Young, P., Chedid, M., Ron , D., Aaronson, S. A. and Cunha, G. R. (1994). Keratinocyte...W. K., Hsieh , J.-T., Tu, S.-M. and Campbell, M. L. (1992). Expression of the protooncogene bcl-2 in the prostate and its association with emergence... Hsieh JT, Gleave ME, Brown NM, Pathak S, Chung LW. Derivation of androgen- independent human LNCaP prostatic cancer cell sublines: role of bone

  13. Androgen Receptor Exon 1 Mutation Causes Androgen Insensitivity by Creating Phosphorylation Site and Inhibiting Melanoma Antigen-A11 Activation of NH2- and Carboxyl-terminal Interaction-dependent Transactivation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagarde, William H.; Blackwelder, Amanda J.; Minges, John T.; Hnat, Andrew T.; French, Frank S.; Wilson, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Naturally occurring germ line mutations in the X-linked human androgen receptor (AR) gene cause incomplete masculinization of the external genitalia by disrupting AR function in males with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Almost all AR missense mutations that cause androgen insensitivity syndrome are located in the highly structured DNA and ligand binding domains. In this report we investigate the functional defect associated with an AR exon 1 missense mutation, R405S, that caused partial androgen insensitivity. The 46,XX heterozygous maternal carrier had a wild-type Arg-405 CGC allele but transmitted an AGC mutant allele coding for Ser-405. At birth, the 46,XY proband had a bifid scrotum, hypospadias, and micropenis consistent with clinical stage 3 partial androgen insensitivity. Androgen-dependent transcriptional activity of AR-R405S expressed in CV1 cells was less than wild-type AR and refractory in androgen-dependent AR NH2- and carboxyl interaction transcription assays that depend on the coregulator effects of melanoma antigen-A11. This mutation created a Ser-405 phosphorylation site evident by the gel migration of an AR-R405S NH2-terminal fragment as a double band that converted to the wild-type single band after treatment with λ-phosphatase. Detrimental effects of the R405S mutation were related to the proximity of the AR WXXLF motif 433WHTLF437 required for melanoma antigen-A11 and p300 to stimulate transcriptional activity associated with the AR NH2- and carboxyl-terminal interaction. We conclude that the coregulator effects of melanoma antigen-A11 on the AR NH2- and carboxyl-terminal interaction amplify the androgen-dependent transcriptional response to p300 required for normal human male sex development in utero. PMID:22334658

  14. Androgen receptor exon 1 mutation causes androgen insensitivity by creating phosphorylation site and inhibiting melanoma antigen-A11 activation of NH2- and carboxyl-terminal interaction-dependent transactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagarde, William H; Blackwelder, Amanda J; Minges, John T; Hnat, Andrew T; French, Frank S; Wilson, Elizabeth M

    2012-03-30

    Naturally occurring germ line mutations in the X-linked human androgen receptor (AR) gene cause incomplete masculinization of the external genitalia by disrupting AR function in males with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Almost all AR missense mutations that cause androgen insensitivity syndrome are located in the highly structured DNA and ligand binding domains. In this report we investigate the functional defect associated with an AR exon 1 missense mutation, R405S, that caused partial androgen insensitivity. The 46,XX heterozygous maternal carrier had a wild-type Arg-405 CGC allele but transmitted an AGC mutant allele coding for Ser-405. At birth, the 46,XY proband had a bifid scrotum, hypospadias, and micropenis consistent with clinical stage 3 partial androgen insensitivity. Androgen-dependent transcriptional activity of AR-R405S expressed in CV1 cells was less than wild-type AR and refractory in androgen-dependent AR NH(2)- and carboxyl interaction transcription assays that depend on the coregulator effects of melanoma antigen-A11. This mutation created a Ser-405 phosphorylation site evident by the gel migration of an AR-R405S NH(2)-terminal fragment as a double band that converted to the wild-type single band after treatment with λ-phosphatase. Detrimental effects of the R405S mutation were related to the proximity of the AR WXXLF motif (433)WHTLF(437) required for melanoma antigen-A11 and p300 to stimulate transcriptional activity associated with the AR NH(2)- and carboxyl-terminal interaction. We conclude that the coregulator effects of melanoma antigen-A11 on the AR NH(2)- and carboxyl-terminal interaction amplify the androgen-dependent transcriptional response to p300 required for normal human male sex development in utero.

  15. Linking Prenatal Androgens to Gender-Related Attitudes, Identity, and Activities : Evidence From Girls With Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endendijk, Joyce J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/330190865; Beltz, Adriene M.; McHale, Susan M.; Bryk, Kristina; Berenbaum, Sheri A.

    2016-01-01

    Key questions for developmentalists concern the origins of gender attitudes and their implications for behavior. We examined whether prenatal androgen exposure was related to gender attitudes, and whether and how the links between attitudes and gendered activity interest and participation were

  16. Immune activation is inversely related to, but does not cause variation in androgen levels in a cichlid fish species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ros, Albert F. H.; Oliveira, Rui F.; Dijkstra, Peter D.; Groothuis, Ton G. G.

    Studies on birds and mammals indicate that sexual traits may signal superior health because active immunity, like inflammatory responses to infections, is suppressive to the production of androgens that facilitate the expression of these traits. Here we test this possible pathway for honest

  17. Synergic prodegradative activity of Bicalutamide and trehalose on the mutant androgen receptor responsible for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giorgetti, Elise; Rusmini, Paola; Crippa, Valeria; Cristofani, Riccardo; Boncoraglio, Alessandra; Cicardi, Maria E.; Galbiati, Mariarita; Poletti, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked motoneuron disease due to a CAG triplet-repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, which is translated into an elongated polyglutamine (polyQ) tract in AR protein (ARpolyQ). ARpolyQ toxicity is activated by the AR ligand testosterone

  18. Androgens and Hypertension in Men and Women: a Unifying View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Costanzo; Lanzolla, Giulia; Moretti, Marta; Gnessi, Lucio; Carmina, Enrico

    2017-05-01

    This review was designed to revaluate the androgen role on the mechanisms of hypertension and cardiovascular risks in both men and women. Sex steroids are involved in the regulation of blood pressure, but pathophysiological mechanism is not well understood. Androgens have an important effect on metabolism, adipose and endothelial cell function, and cardiovascular risk in both men and women. A focal point in this contest is represented by the possible gender-specific regulation of different tissues and in particular of the adipose cell. Available data confirm that androgen deficiency is linked to increased prevalence of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Adipocyte dysfunction seems to be the main involved mechanism. Androgen replacement reduces inflammation state in man, protecting by metabolic syndrome progression. In women, androgen excess has been considered as promoting factor of cardiovascular risk. However, recent data suggest that excessive androgen production has little effect per se in inducing hypertension in young women of reproductive age. Also in postmenopausal women, data on relative androgen excess and hypertension are missing, while adrenal androgen deficiency has been associated to increased mortality. Molecular mechanisms linking androgen dysregulation to hypertension are almost Unknown, but they seem to be related to increased visceral fat, promoting a chronic inflammatory state through different mechanisms. One of these may involve the recruitment and over-activation of NF-kB, a ubiquitous transcription factor also expressed in adipose cells, where it may cause the production of cytokines and other immune factors. The NF-kB signalling pathway may also influence brown adipogenesis leading to the preferential enlargement of visceral adipocytes. Chronic inflammation and adipocyte dysfunction may alter endothelial function leading to hypertension. Both in men and in women, particularly in the post-menopausal period, hypoandrogenism seems to be

  19. Bone corticalization requires local SOCS3 activity and is promoted by androgen action via interleukin-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Dae-Chul; Brennan, Holly J; Johnson, Rachelle W; Poulton, Ingrid J; Gooi, Jonathan H; Tonkin, Brett A; McGregor, Narelle E; Walker, Emma C; Handelsman, David J; Martin, T J; Sims, Natalie A

    2017-10-09

    Long bone strength is determined by its outer shell (cortical bone), which forms by coalescence of thin trabeculae at the metaphysis (corticalization), but the factors that control this process are unknown. Here we show that SOCS3-dependent cytokine expression regulates bone corticalization. Young male and female Dmp1Cre.Socs3 f/f mice, in which SOCS3 has been ablated in osteocytes, have high trabecular bone volume and poorly defined metaphyseal cortices. After puberty, male mice recover, but female corticalization is still impaired, leading to a lasting defect in bone strength. The phenotype depends on sex-steroid hormones: dihydrotestosterone treatment of gonadectomized female Dmp1Cre.Socs3 f/f mice restores normal cortical morphology, whereas in males, estradiol treatment, or IL-6 deletion, recapitulates the female phenotype. This suggests that androgen action promotes metaphyseal corticalization, at least in part, via IL-6 signaling.The strength of long bones is determined by coalescence of trabeculae during corticalization. Here the authors show that this process is regulated by SOCS3 via a mechanism dependent on IL-6 and expression of sex hormones.

  20. Micro-RNA-204 Participates in TMPRSS2/ERG Regulation and Androgen Receptor Reprogramming in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorova, Krassimira; Metodiev, Metodi V; Metodieva, Gergana; Mincheff, Milcho; Fernández, Nelson; Hayrabedyan, Soren

    2017-02-01

    Cancer progression is driven by genome instability incurred rearrangements such as transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2)/v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene (ERG) that could possibly turn some of the tumor suppressor micro-RNAs into pro-oncogenic ones. Previously, we found dualistic miR-204 effects, acting either as a tumor suppressor or as an oncomiR in ERG fusion-dependent manner. Here, we provided further evidence for an important role of miR-204 for TMPRSS2/ERG and androgen receptor (AR) signaling modulation and fine tuning that prevents TMPRSS2/ERG overexpression in prostate cancer. Based on proximity-based ligation assay, we designed a novel method for detection of TMPRSS2/ERG protein products. We found that miR-204 is TMPRSS2/ERG oncofusion negative regulator, and this was mediated by DNA methylation of TMPRSS2 promoter. Transcriptional factors runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and ETS proto-oncogene 1 (ETS1) were positive regulators of TMPRSS2/ERG expression and promoter hypo-methylation. Clustering of patients' sera for fusion protein, transcript expression, and wild-type ERG transcript isoforms, demonstrated not all patients harboring fusion transcripts had fusion protein products, and only few fusion positive ones exhibited increased wild-type ERG transcripts. miR-204 upregulated AR through direct promoter hypo-methylation, potentiated by the presence of ERG fusion and RUNX2 and ETS1. Proteomics studies provided evidence that miR-204 has dualistic role in AR cancer-related reprogramming, promoting prostate cancer-related androgen-responsive genes and AR target genes, as well as AR co-regulatory molecules. miR-204 methylation regulation was supported by changes in molecules responsible for chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation, and its regulation. In summary, miR-204 is a mild regulator of the AR function during the phase of preserved AR sensitivity as the latter one is required for ERG-fusion translocation.

  1. Estrogen and androgen receptor activities of hydraulic fracturing chemicals and surface and ground water in a drilling-dense region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassotis, Christopher D.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Davis, J. Wade; Hormann, Anette M.; Nagel, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    The rapid rise in natural gas extraction using hydraulic fracturing increases the potential for contamination of surface and ground water from chemicals used throughout the process. Hundreds of products containing more than 750 chemicals and components are potentially used throughout the extraction process, including more than 100 known or suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals. We hypothesized thataselected subset of chemicalsusedin natural gas drilling operationsandalso surface and ground water samples collected in a drilling-dense region of Garfield County, Colorado, would exhibit estrogen and androgen receptor activities. Water samples were collected, solid-phase extracted, and measured for estrogen and androgen receptor activities using reporter gene assays in human cell lines. Of the 39 unique water samples, 89%, 41%, 12%, and 46% exhibited estrogenic, antiestrogenic, androgenic, and antiandrogenic activities, respectively. Testing of a subset of natural gas drilling chemicals revealed novel antiestrogenic, novel antiandrogenic, and limited estrogenic activities. The Colorado River, the drainage basin for this region, exhibited moderate levels of estrogenic, antiestrogenic, and antiandrogenic activities, suggesting that higher localized activity at sites with known natural gas–related spills surrounding the river might be contributing to the multiple receptor activities observed in this water source. The majority of water samples collected from sites in a drilling-dense region of Colorado exhibited more estrogenic, antiestrogenic, or antiandrogenic activities than reference sites with limited nearby drilling operations. Our data suggest that natural gas drilling operationsmayresult in elevated endocrine-disrupting chemical activity in surface and ground water.

  2. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 modulates STAT3 and androgen receptor activation through phosphorylation of Ser⁷²⁷ on STAT3 in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Fu-Ning; Chen, Mei-Chih; Lin, Kuan-Chia; Peng, Yu-Ting; Li, Pei-Chi; Lin, Eugene; Chiang, Ming-Ching; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Lin, Ho

    2013-10-15

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is known to regulate prostate cancer metastasis. Our previous results indicated that Cdk5 activates androgen receptor (AR) and supports prostate cancer growth. We also found that STAT3 is a target of Cdk5 in promoting thyroid cancer cell growth, whereas STAT3 may play a role as a regulator to AR activation under cytokine control. In this study, we investigated the regulation of Cdk5 and its activator p35 on STAT3/AR signaling in prostate cancer cells. Our results show that Cdk5 biochemically interacts with STAT3 and that this interaction depends on Cdk5 activation in prostate cancer cells. The phosphorylation of STAT3 at Ser⁷²⁷ (p-Ser⁷²⁷-STAT3) is regulated by Cdk5 in cells and xenograft tumors. The mutant of STAT3 S727A reduces its interaction with Cdk5. We further show that the nuclear distribution of p-Ser⁷²⁷-STAT3 and the expression of STAT3-regulated genes (junB, c-fos, c-myc, and survivin) are regulated by Cdk5 activation. STAT3 mutant does not further decrease cell proliferation upon Cdk5 inhibition, which implies that the role of STAT3 regulated by Cdk5 correlates to cell proliferation control. Interestingly, Cdk5 may regulate the interaction between STAT3 and AR through phosphorylation of Ser⁷²⁷-STAT3 and therefore upregulate AR protein stability and transactivation. Correspondingly, clinical evidence shows that the level of p-Ser⁷²⁷-STAT3 is significantly correlated with Gleason score and the levels of upstream regulators (Cdk5 and p35) as well as downstream protein (AR). In conclusion, this study demonstrates that Cdk5 regulates STAT3 activation through Ser⁷²⁷ phosphorylation and further promotes AR activation by protein-protein interaction in prostate cancer cells.

  3. Avicequinone C Isolated from Avicennia marina Exhibits 5α-Reductase-Type 1 Inhibitory Activity Using an Androgenic Alopecia Relevant Cell-Based Assay System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchy Jain

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Avicennia marina (AM exhibits various biological activities and has been traditionally used in Egypt to cure skin diseases. In this study, the methanolic heartwood extract of AM was evaluated for inhibitory activity against 5α-reductase (5α-R [E.C.1.3.99.5], the enzyme responsible for the over-production of 5α-dihydrotestosterone (5α-DHT causing androgenic alopecia (AGA. An AGA-relevant cell-based assay was developed using human hair dermal papilla cells (HHDPCs, the main regulator of hair growth and the only cells within the hair follicle that are the direct site of 5α-DHT action, combined with a non-radioactive thin layer chromatography (TLC detection technique. The results revealed that AM is a potent 5α-R type 1 (5α-R1 inhibitor, reducing the 5α-DHT production by 52% at the final concentration of 10 µg/mL. Activity-guided fractionation has led to the identification of avicequinone C, a furanonaphthaquinone, as a 5α-R1 inhibitor with an IC50 of 9.94 ± 0.33 µg/mL or 38.8 ± 1.29 µM. This paper is the first to report anti-androgenic activity through 5α-R1 inhibition of AM and avicequinone C.

  4. A Combined Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Research of Quinolinone Derivatives as Androgen Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuwei; Bai, Fang; Cao, Hong; Li, Jiazhong; Liu, Huanxiang; Gramatica, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Antiandrogens bicalutamide, flutamide and enzalutamide etc. have been used in clinical trials to treat prostate cancer by binding to and antagonizing androgen receptor (AR). Although initially effective, the drug resistance problem will emerge eventually, which results in a high medical need for novel AR antagonist exploitation. Here in this work, to facilitate the rational design of novel AR antagonists, we studied the structure-activity relationships of a series of 2-quinolinone derivatives and investigated the structural requirements for their antiandrogenic activities. Different modeling methods, including 2D MLR, 3D CoMFA and CoMSIA, were implemented to evolve QSAR models. All these models, thoroughly validated, demonstrated satisfactory results especially for the good predictive abilities. The contour maps from 3D CoMFA and CoMSIA models provide visualized explanation of key structural characteristics relevant to the antiandrogenic activities, which is summarized to a position-specific conclusion at the end. The obtained results from this research are practically useful for rational design and screening of promising chemicals with high antiandrogenic activities.

  5. Discovery of Novel Lipid Profiles in PCOS: Do Insulin and Androgen Oppositely Regulate Bioactive Lipid Production?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengxian; Chu, Qianqian; Ma, Jing; Sun, Yun; Tao, Tao; Huang, Rong; Liao, Yu; Yue, Jiang; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Lihua; Xue, Xinli; Zhu, Mingjiang; Kang, Xiaonan; Yin, Huiyong; Liu, Wei

    2017-03-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex syndrome showing clinical features of an endocrine/metabolic disorder, including hyperinsulinemia and hyperandrogenism. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and their derivatives, both tightly linked to PCOS and obesity, play important roles in inflammation and reproduction. This study aimed to investigate serum lipid profiles in newly diagnosed patients with PCOS using lipidomics and correlate these features with the hyperinsulinemia and hyperandrogenism associated with PCOS and obesity. Thirty-two newly diagnosed women with PCOS and 34 controls were divided into obese and lean subgroups. A PCOS rat model was used to validate results of the human studies. Serum lipid profiles, including phospholipids, free fatty acids (FFAs), and bioactive lipids, were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (MS) and liquid chromatography-MS. Elevation in phosphatidylcholine and a concomitant decrease in lysophospholipid were found in obese patients with PCOS vs lean controls. Obese patients with PCOS had decreased PUFA levels and increased levels of long-chain saturated fatty acids vs lean controls. Serum bioactive lipids downstream of arachidonic acid were increased in obese controls, but reduced in both obese and lean patients with PCOS vs their respective controls. Patients with PCOS showed abnormal levels of phosphatidylcholine, FFAs, and PUFA metabolites. Circulating insulin and androgens may have opposing effects on lipid profiles in patients with PCOS, particularly on the bioactive lipid metabolites derived from PUFAs. These clinical observations warrant further studies of the molecular mechanisms and clinical implications of PCOS and obesity.

  6. Glycogen synthesis correlates with androgen-dependent growth arrest in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorin Frederic A

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Androgen withdrawal in normal prostate or androgen-dependent prostate cancer is associated with the downregulation of several glycolytic enzymes and with reduced glucose uptake. Although glycogen metabolism is known to regulate the intracellular glucose level its involvement in androgen response has not been studied. Methods We investigated the effects of androgen on glycogen phosphorylase (GP, glycogen synthase (GS and on glycogen accumulation in the androgen-receptor (AR reconstituted PC3 cell line containing either an empty vector (PC3-AR-V or vector with HPV-E7 (PC3-AR-E7 and the LNCaP cell line. Results Androgen addition in PC3 cells expressing the AR mimics androgen ablation in androgen-dependent prostate cells. Incubation of PC3-AR-V or PC3-AR-E7 cells with the androgen R1881 induced G1 cell cycle arrest within 24 hours and resulted in a gradual cell number reduction over 5 days thereafter, which was accompanied by a 2 to 5 fold increase in glycogen content. 24 hours after androgen-treatment the level of Glucose-6-P (G-6-P had increased threefold and after 48 hours the GS and GP activities increased twofold. Under this condition inhibition of glycogenolysis with the selective GP inhibitor CP-91149 enhanced the increase in glycogen content and further reduced the cell number. The androgen-dependent LNCaP cells that endogenously express AR responded to androgen withdrawal with growth arrest and increased glycogen content. CP-91149 further increased glycogen content and caused a reduction of cell number. Conclusion Increased glycogenesis is part of the androgen receptor-mediated cellular response and blockage of glycogenolysis by the GP inhibitor CP-91149 further increased glycogenesis. The combined use of a GP inhibitor with hormone therapy may increase the efficacy of hormone treatment by decreasing the survival of prostate cancer cells and thereby reducing the chance of cancer recurrence.

  7. Regulation of neuronal and endothelial nitric oxide synthase by anabolic-androgenic steroid in skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Karina; Rocha, Thalita; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice

    2012-11-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) and exercise share comparable effects on myogenic differentiation, force development, fiber growth and skeletal muscle plasticity. The participation of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) on these effects was only demonstrated in response to exercise. Using immunohistochemistry and western blotting we examined the effect of AAS on the expression of NOS I and III isoforms in three muscles, distinct metabolically and physiologically: soleus (SOL), tibialis anterioris (TA) and gastrocnemius (GAS). Mice with a lipid profile akin to humans were used. Sedentary mice (Sed-C) or exercised, submitted to six-weeks of aerobic treadmill running (one hour/day, 5 days/week) were administered mesterolone (Sed-M and Ex-M, respectively) or gum arabic (vehicle, Ex-C) during the last three weeks, three alternate days per week. Consistently, The TA showed the strongest labeling and the SOL the weakest with NOS III predominating over NOS I. Mesterolone administered to sedentary mice (Sed-C x Sed-M) significantly upregulated NOS I in TA and SOL and NOS III in all three muscles. Mesterolone administered to exercised mice (Ex-C x Ex-M) upregulated NOS I in all three muscles and NOS III in TA and SOL. The exercise to mesterolone-treated mice (Sed-M x Ex-M) produced a strong increase in NOS I expression in GAS; in contrast it antagonized the mesterolone-induced upregulation of NOS I in TA muscle and NOS III in SOL and GAS. The data show nitric oxide (NO) as a potential signaling mediator of AAS effects in skeletal muscle and that NOS I and NOS III upregulations were muscle phenotype-specific. These may be regarded as an indication of the complex NOS/NO signaling mechanism related with AAS effects vs. metabolic/physiological muscle characteristics.

  8. Characterization of estrogenic and androgenic activity of phthalates by the XenoScreen YES/YAS in vitro assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czernych, Radosław; Chraniuk, Milena; Zagożdżon, Paweł; Wolska, Lidia

    2017-07-01

    The presented study investigates and compares the estrogenic and androgenic activities of commonly used diesters of phthalic acid (phthalates) using the XenoScreen YES/YAS assay. Phthalates are commonly used plasticizers in polymers dedicated for i.e. food and drug containers. Since phthalates are not chemically bonded to the polymer, they can leach or migrate from the polymer. Therefore, phthalates are identified as contaminants in a variety of consumer products. Investigation of estrogenic and androgenic activities of phthalates (DEP, DBP, BBP, DEHP and DINP) showed no significant effect of tested substances either on hERα or hAR receptors. Phthalates exhibited strong anti-estrogenic (IC50 for BBP=8.66μM, IC50 for DEHP=3.61μM and IC50 for DINP=0.065μM) and anti-androgenic (IC50 for BBP=5.30μM, IC50 for DEHP=2.87μM and IC50 for DINP=0.068μM) activities. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. In vitro metabolism of cis- and trans-permethrin by rat liver microsomes, and its effect on estrogenic and anti-androgenic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tange, Satoko; Fujimoto, Nariaki; Uramaru, Naoto; Sugihara, Kazumi; Ohta, Shigeru; Kitamura, Shigeyuki

    2014-05-01

    Permethrin is a widely applied broad-spectrum pyrethroid insecticide that consists of a mixture of cis- and trans-isomers. We examined the changes of estrogenic and anti-androgenic activities resulting from metabolism of the isomers. Both cis- and trans-permethrin were hydrolyzed to 3-phenoxybenzyl alcohol (PBAlc) by rat liver microsomes, but the extent of hydrolysis of trans-permethrin was much greater than that of the cis-isomer. In the presence of NADPH, PBAlc was further transformed to 4'-hydroxylated PBAlc (4'-OH PBAlc), 3-phenoxybenzaldehyde (PBAld) and 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (PBAcid). cis-Permethrin, but not trans-permethrin, also afforded its 4'-hydroxylated derivative (4'-OH cis-permethrin). trans-Permethrin was an anti-androgen, but also showed weak estrogenic activity, while cis-permethrin was a weak estrogen and a weak anti-androgen. After incubation with rat liver microsomes in the presence of NADPH, cis-permethrin but not trans-permethrin was metabolically activated for estrogenic activity. On the other hand, estrogenic activity of trans-permethrin was not changed, but its anti-androgenic activity was enhanced after incubation. 4'-OH PBAlc and PBAlc showed estrogenic activity, while PBAld and PBAlc showed anti-androgenic activity. PBAcid showed neither activity. 4'-OH cis-permethrin showed both estrogenic and anti-androgenic activities. Overall, our results indicate that permethrin is metabolically activated for estrogenic and anti-androgen activities, and the microsomal transformation of permethrin to 4'-OH cis-permethrin, 4'-OH PBAlc and PBAlc contributes to the both metabolic activations. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Fenofibrate down-regulates the expressions of androgen receptor (AR) and AR target genes and induces oxidative stress in the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Hu; Zhu, Chen; Qin, Chao [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Tao, Tao [Department of Neurosurgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Li, Jie; Cheng, Gong; Li, Pu; Cao, Qiang; Meng, Xiaoxin; Ju, Xiaobing; Shao, Pengfei; Hua, Lixin [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Gu, Min, E-mail: medzhao1980@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Yin, Changjun, E-mail: drcjyin@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China)

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► Fenofibrate induces cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and apoptosis in LNCaP cells. ► Fenofibrate reduces the expressions of androgen receptor in LNCaP cells. ► Fenofibrate induces oxidative stress in the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. -- Abstract: Fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-androgen receptor-alpha agonist, is widely used in treating different forms of hyperlipidemia and hypercholesterolemia. Recent reports have indicated that fenofibrate exerts anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties. This study aims to investigate the effects of fenofibrate on the prostate cancer (PCa) cell line LNCaP. The effects of fenofibrate on LNCaP cells were evaluated by flow cytometry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blot analysis, and dual-luciferase reporter assay. Fenofibrate induces cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and apoptosis in LNCaP cells, reduces the expressions of androgen receptor (AR) and AR target genes (prostate-specific antigen and TMPRSS2), and inhibits Akt phosphorylation. Fenofibrate can induce the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde, and decrease the activities of total anti-oxidant and superoxide dismutase in LNCaP cells. Fenofibrate exerts an anti-proliferative property by inhibiting the expression of AR and induces apoptosis by causing oxidative stress. Therefore, our data suggest fenofibrate may have beneficial effects in fenofibrate users by preventing prostate cancer growth through inhibition of androgen activation and expression.

  11. Anabolic and androgenic activity of 19-norandrostenedione after oral and subcutaneous administration--analysis of side effects and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, M K; Laudenbach-Leschowsky, U; Höfer, Nicola; Schänzer, W; Diel, P

    2009-07-24

    One of the most frequently misused steroid precursors (prohormones) is 19-norandrostenedione (estr-4-ene-3,17-dione, NOR). Recently we have show that NOR stimulates skeletal muscle growth after s.c. administration in a highly selective manner but exhibits only weak androgenic activity in rats. Because most abusers take NOR orally, the aim of this study was to compare the anabolic and androgenic potency of NOR between s.c. and oral application. Orchiectomised rats were treated with NOR either s.c. (1 mg/kg BW/day) or orally (0.1, 1 and 10 mg/kg BW/day). The tissue weights of the levator ani, the seminal vesicle and the prostate were analysed to determine the anabolic and androgenic activity. Heart and liver wet weights were examined to identify side effects. Serum concentrations of NOR and its metabolite nandrolone (NT) were determined. GCMC analysis revealed that free and glucuronidated NOR and NT were detectable in the serum after oral and s.c. administration and that NOR was converted to NT in comparable amounts independent of the route of administration. In agreement to our previous study s.c. application of NOR stimulates skeletal muscle growth but has only weak androgenic effects. In contrast, after oral administration of NOR neither stimulation of the prostate nor the levator ani could be observed in the doses administered in this study. Interestingly, and in contrast to s.c. treatment, oral administration of NOR resulted in a dose-dependent decrease of body weight. In summary, oral administration of NOR, at least in the rat, seems to be a very ineffective strategy for stimulating skeletal muscle mass increases but may be associated with side effects.

  12. Differential effects of androgens on coronary blood flow regulation and arteriolar diameter in intact and castrated swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O’Connor Erin K

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low endogenous testosterone levels have been shown to be a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular benefits associated with testosterone replacement therapy are being advocated; however, the effects of endogenous testosterone levels on acute coronary vasomotor responses to androgen administration are not clear. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of acute androgen administration on in vivo coronary conductance and in vitro coronary microvascular diameter in intact and castrated male swine. Methods Pigs received intracoronary infusions of physiologic levels (1–100 nM of testosterone, the metabolite 5α-dihydrotestosterone, and the epimer epitestosterone while left anterior descending coronary blood flow and mean arterial pressure were continuously monitored. Following sacrifice, coronary arterioles were isolated, cannulated, and exposed to physiologic concentrations (1–100 nM of testosterone, 5α-dihydrotestosterone, and epitestosterone. To evaluate effects of the androgen receptor on acute androgen dilation responses, real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry for androgen receptor were performed on conduit and resistance coronary vessels. Results In vivo, testosterone and 5α-dihydrotestosterone produced greater increases in coronary conductance in the intact compared to the castrated males. In vitro, percent maximal dilation of microvessels was similar between intact and castrated males for testosterone and 5α-dihydrotestosterone. In both studies epitestosterone produced significant increases in conductance and microvessel diameter from baseline in the intact males. Androgen receptor mRNA expression and immunohistochemical staining were similar in intact and castrated males. Conclusions Acute coronary vascular responses to exogenous androgen administration are increased by endogenous testosterone, an effect unrelated to changes in androgen receptor expression.

  13. Androgen receptor regulated microRNA miR-182-5p promotes prostate cancer progression by targeting the ARRDC3/ITGB4 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Jingjing [Department of Urology, Shanghai Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Xu, Chen [Research Center of Developmental Biology, Second Military Medical University, 800th Xiangyin Road, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Department of Orthopedics, Changzheng Hospital Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, 415th Feng Yang Road, Shanghai, 200003 (China); Fang, Ziyu; Li, Yaoming [Department of Urology, Shanghai Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Liu, Houqi; Wang, Yue [Research Center of Developmental Biology, Second Military Medical University, 800th Xiangyin Road, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Translational Medicine Center, Second Military Medical University, 800th Xiangyin Road, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Xu, Chuanliang [Department of Urology, Shanghai Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Sun, Yinghao, E-mail: sunyh@medmail.com.cn [Department of Urology, Shanghai Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, 200433 (China)

    2016-05-20

    Abstracts: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important endogenous gene regulators that play key roles in prostate cancer development and metastasis. However, specific miRNA expression patterns in prostate cancer tissues from Chinese patients remain largely unknown. In this study, we compared miRNA expression patterns in 65 pairs of prostate cancer and para-cancer tissues by RNA sequencing and found that miR-182-5p was the most up-regulated miRNA in prostate cancer tissues. The result was validated using realtime PCR in 18 pairs of prostate cancer and para-cancer tissues. In in vitro analysis, it was confirmed that miR-182-5p promotes prostate cancer cell proliferation, invasion and migration and inhibit apoptosis. In addition, the androgen receptor directly regulated the transcription of miR-182-5p, which could target to the 3′UTR of ARRDC3 mRNA and affect the expression of ARRDC3 and its downstream gene ITGB4. For the in vivo experiment, miR-182-5p overexpression also promoted the growth and progression of prostate cancer tumors. In this regard, we suggest that miR-182-5p may be a key androgen receptor-regulated factor that contributes to the development and metastasis of Chinese prostate cancers and may be a potential target for the early diagnosis and therapeutic studies of prostate cancer. -- Highlights: •miR-182-5p is the mostly up-regulated miRNA in Chinese prostate cancer. •miR-182-5p is regulated by androgen receptor. •miR-182-5p promotes prostate cancer progression. •miR-182-5p regulates ARRDC3/ITGB4 pathway.

  14. miR-1207-3p regulates the androgen receptor in prostate cancer via FNDC1/fibronectin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Dibash K. [Department of Biological Sciences, Hunter College of The City University of New York, New York, NY 10065 (United States); The Graduate Center Departments of Biology and Biochemistry, The City University of New York, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, Cornell University, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Naidoo, Michelle; Ilboudo, Adeodat [Department of Biological Sciences, Hunter College of The City University of New York, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Park, Jong Y. [Department of Cancer Epidemiology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Ali, Thahmina [Department of Biological Sciences, Hunter College of The City University of New York, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Krampis, Konstantinos [Department of Biological Sciences, Hunter College of The City University of New York, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Institute for Computational Biomedicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, Cornell University, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Robinson, Brian D. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, Cornell University, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Department of Urology, Weill Cornell Medicine, Cornell University, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Osborne, Joseph R. [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Ogunwobi, Olorunseun O., E-mail: ogunwobi@genectr.hunter.cuny.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Hunter College of The City University of New York, New York, NY 10065 (United States); The Graduate Center Departments of Biology and Biochemistry, The City University of New York, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, Cornell University, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is frequently diagnosed in men, and dysregulation of microRNAs is characteristic of many cancers. MicroRNA-1207-3p is encoded at the non-protein coding gene locus PVT1 on the 8q24 human chromosomal region, an established PCa susceptibility locus. However, the role of microRNA-1207-3p in PCa is unclear. We discovered that microRNA-1207-3p is significantly underexpressed in PCa cell lines in comparison to normal prostate epithelial cells. Increased expression of microRNA-1207-3p in PCa cells significantly inhibits proliferation, migration, and induces apoptosis via direct molecular targeting of FNDC1, a protein which contains a conserved protein domain of fibronectin (FN1). FNDC1, FN1, and the androgen receptor (AR) are significantly overexpressed in PCa cell lines and human PCa, and positively correlate with aggressive PCa. Prostate tumor FN1 expression in patients that experienced PCa-specific death is significantly higher than in patients that remained alive. Furthermore, FNDC1, FN1 and AR are concomitantly overexpressed in metastatic PCa. Consequently, these studies have revealed a novel microRNA-1207-3p/FNDC1/FN1/AR regulatory pathway in PCa. - Graphical abstract: miR-1207-3p/FNDC1/FN1/AR is a novel regulatory pathway in prostate cancer. - Highlights: • Expression of microRNA-1207-3p is significantly lost in prostate cancer (PCa) cells. • MicroRNA-1207-3p regulates proliferation, apoptosis, and migration via direct molecular targeting of the 3′UTR of FNDC1. • MicroRNA-1207-3p regulates proliferation, apoptosis, and migration via direct molecular targeting of the 3′UTR of FNDC1. • FNDC1, FN1, and AR are concurrently overexpressed in metastatic PCa.

  15. Cabazitaxel Remains Active in Patients Progressing After Docetaxel Followed by Novel Androgen Receptor Pathway Targeted Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Nakouzi, Nader; Le Moulec, Sylvestre; Albigès, Laurence; Wang, Chris; Beuzeboc, Philippe; Gross-Goupil, Marine; de La Motte Rouge, Thibault; Guillot, Aline; Gajda, Dorota; Massard, Christophe; Gleave, Martin; Fizazi, Karim; Loriot, Yohann

    2015-08-01

    Cabazitaxel, abiraterone acetate (AA), and enzalutamide have been approved for the treatment of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) following docetaxel chemotherapy. Whether taxanes and next-generation androgen receptor (AR) axis inhibitors are cross-resistant or not is a subject of debate. To evaluate the antitumour activity of cabazitaxel in mCRPC pretreated with abiraterone or enzalutamide. The antitumour activity of cabazitaxel was assessed in patients with mCRPC and progressive disease after treatment with docetaxel and AA. In parallel, cabazitaxel antitumour activity was studied in enzalutamide-resistant models. Changes in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and progression-free survival were used to determine the activity of cabazitaxel treatment. Cell proliferation, immunofluorescence, and AR transactivation assay were used in enzalutamide-resistant models. A total of 79 patients who had progressive mCRPC after docetaxel (median: 8 cycles; range: 4-12 mo), and AA (median: 4.8 mo; range:1-55 mo) received cabazitaxel 25mg/m(2) every 3 weeks (median: 6 cycles; range:1-15 cycles). A PSA decline ≥30% was achieved in 48 patients (62%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 51-73), and a decline ≥50% was achieved in 28 patients (35%; 95% CI, 25-47). The median progression-free survival and overall survival were 4.4 and 10.9 mo, respectively. In vitro, cabazitaxel decreased cell viability in both enzalutamide-sensitive and enzalutamide-resistant prostate cancer cells within the same range of concentrations. PC3, an AR-negative cell line, exhibited similar sensitivity to cabazitaxel. Cabazitaxel and AR-pathway inhibitors are not cross-resistant. Preclinical data suggest that cabazitaxel activity does not act mainly through AR axis inhibition. The antitumour activity of cabazitaxel, a chemotherapy agent, was studied in prostate cancer resistant to conventional hormonal therapy and to more recent endocrine therapies (abiraterone or

  16. Telomerase as an Androgen Receptor-Regulated Target in Selenium Chemoprevention of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    and Vita- min E Chemoprevention Trial (SELECT) indicated that supplementation of healthy individuals with nutritional dose of selenium did not reduce...were conducted by using pharmacologic doses of selenium , not the nutritional dose that was used in the SELECT. Therefore, the negative SELECT finding...Regulated Target in Selenium Chemoprevention of Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Shuang Liu, Ph.D

  17. Dihydrotestostenone increase the gene expression of androgen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The actions of androgens are mediated through an androgen receptor (AR), and AR activity is modulated by coregulators. The aim of this study was to assess the action of androgens in the expression of AR and the coregulators FHL-2 and SHP-1 in human non-transformed epithelial prostatic cells (HNTEP) treated with ...

  18. Selective Androgen Receptor Down-Regulators (SARDs): A New Prostate Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    dominant-negative techniques ICI, as an already approved drug, can be rapidly moved to clinical trials in PCa patients. A therapy that down-regulates...Mancini, M. G., Dutertre, M., Smith, C. L., O’Malley, B. W., and Mancini, M. A. FRAP reveals that mobility of oestrogen receptor-alpha is ligand- and...ribozyme, antisense, small interfering RNA, or dominant-negative techniques, ICI, as an already approved drug, can be rapidly moved to clinical trials in

  19. The Rab27a-binding protein, JFC1, regulates androgen-dependent secretion of prostate-specific antigen and prostatic-specific acid phosphatase1

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Jennifer L.; Ellis, Beverly A.; Noack, Deborah; Seabra, Miguel C.; Catz, Sergio D.

    2005-01-01

    Two of the major proteins secreted by the prostate epithelium secretory cells are PSA (prostate-specific antigen) and PSAP (prostatic-specific acid phosphatase). The molecules involved in the secretory machinery of PSA and PSAP, and the regulation of this machinery, remain unknown. In the present paper, we provide evidence that JFC1 [synaptotagmin-like protein (slp1)], a Rab27a- and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-binding protein, regulates the androgen-dependent secretion of PSAP and PSA in human LNCaP pros...

  20. A study of the prostate, androgens and sexual activity of male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia Luis I

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prostate is a sexual gland that produces important substances for the potency of sperm to fertilize eggs within the female reproductive tract, and is under complex endocrine control. Taking advantage of the peculiar behavioral pattern of copulating male rats, we developed experimental paradigms to determine the influence of sexual behavior on the level of serum testosterone, prostate androgen receptors, and mRNA for androgen receptors in male rats displaying up to four consecutive ejaculations. Methods The effect of four consecutive ejaculations was investigated by determining levels of (i testosterone in serum by solid phase RIA, (ii androgen receptors at the ventral prostate with Western Blots, and (iii androgen receptors-mRNA with RT-PCR. Data were analyzed with a one-way ANOVA followed by a post hoc application of Dunnett's test if required. Results The constant execution of sexual behavior did not produce any change in the weight of the ventral prostate. Serum testosterone increased after the second ejaculation, and remained elevated even after four ejaculations. The androgen receptor at the ventral prostate was higher after the first to third ejaculations, but returned suddenly to baseline levels after the fourth ejaculation. The level of mRNA increased after the first ejaculation, continued to increase after the second, and reached the highest peak after the third ejaculation; however, it returned suddenly to baseline levels after the fourth ejaculation. Conclusion Four consecutive ejaculations by sexually experienced male rats had important effects on the physiological responses of the ventral prostate. Fast responses were induced as a result of sexual behavior that involved an increase and decrease in androgen receptors after one and four ejaculations, respectively. However, a progressive response was observed in the elevation of mRNA for androgen receptors, which also showed a fast decrease after four

  1. A study of the prostate, androgens and sexual activity of male rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Maria Elena; Soto-Cid, Abraham; Aranda-Abreu, Gonzalo E; Díaz, Rosaura; Rojas, Fausto; Garcia, Luis I; Toledo, Rebeca; Manzo, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    Background The prostate is a sexual gland that produces important substances for the potency of sperm to fertilize eggs within the female reproductive tract, and is under complex endocrine control. Taking advantage of the peculiar behavioral pattern of copulating male rats, we developed experimental paradigms to determine the influence of sexual behavior on the level of serum testosterone, prostate androgen receptors, and mRNA for androgen receptors in male rats displaying up to four consecutive ejaculations. Methods The effect of four consecutive ejaculations was investigated by determining levels of (i) testosterone in serum by solid phase RIA, (ii) androgen receptors at the ventral prostate with Western Blots, and (iii) androgen receptors-mRNA with RT-PCR. Data were analyzed with a one-way ANOVA followed by a post hoc application of Dunnett's test if required. Results The constant execution of sexual behavior did not produce any change in the weight of the ventral prostate. Serum testosterone increased after the second ejaculation, and remained elevated even after four ejaculations. The androgen receptor at the ventral prostate was higher after the first to third ejaculations, but returned suddenly to baseline levels after the fourth ejaculation. The level of mRNA increased after the first ejaculation, continued to increase after the second, and reached the highest peak after the third ejaculation; however, it returned suddenly to baseline levels after the fourth ejaculation. Conclusion Four consecutive ejaculations by sexually experienced male rats had important effects on the physiological responses of the ventral prostate. Fast responses were induced as a result of sexual behavior that involved an increase and decrease in androgen receptors after one and four ejaculations, respectively. However, a progressive response was observed in the elevation of mRNA for androgen receptors, which also showed a fast decrease after four ejaculations. All of these changes

  2. Regulating prefrontal cortex activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, Susana; Klein, Anders Bue

    2013-01-01

    is highly expressed in the prefrontal cortex areas, playing an important role in modulating cortical activity and neural oscillations (brain waves). This makes it an interesting potential pharmacological target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric modes characterized by lack of inhibitory control...

  3. Androgen receptor: structure, role in prostate cancer and drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, MH Eileen; Li, Jun; Xu, H Eric; Melcher, Karsten; Yong, Eu-leong

    2015-01-01

    Androgens and androgen receptors (AR) play a pivotal role in expression of the male phenotype. Several diseases, such as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and prostate cancer, are associated with alterations in AR functions. Indeed, androgen blockade by drugs that prevent the production of androgens and/or block the action of the AR inhibits prostate cancer growth. However, resistance to these drugs often occurs after 2–3 years as the patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In CRPC, a functional AR remains a key regulator. Early studies focused on the functional domains of the AR and its crucial role in the pathology. The elucidation of the structures of the AR DNA binding domain (DBD) and ligand binding domain (LBD) provides a new framework for understanding the functions of this receptor and leads to the development of rational drug design for the treatment of prostate cancer. An overview of androgen receptor structure and activity, its actions in prostate cancer, and how structural information and high-throughput screening have been or can be used for drug discovery are provided herein. PMID:24909511

  4. Androgen Deprivation Accelerates the Prostatic Urethra Wound Healing After Thulium Laser Resection of the Prostate by Promoting Re-Epithelialization and Regulating the Macrophage Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing-Jie; Zhuo, Jian; Luo, Guang-Heng; Zhu, Yi-Ping; Yu, Dian-Jun; Zhao, Rui-Zhe; Jiang, Chen-Yi; Shi, Yun-Feng; Li, Hao; Chen, Lei; Hao, Kui-Yuan; Han, Xia; Zhao, Sheng; Bei, Xiao-Yu; Jing, Yi-Feng; Xia, Shu-Jie

    2017-05-01

    Complications after a thulium laser resection of the prostate (TmLRP) are related to re-epithelialization of the prostatic urethra. Since prostate growth and development are induced by androgen, the aim of this study was to determine the role and explore the mechanism of androgen in wound healing of the prostatic urethra. Beagles that received TmLRPs were randomly distributed into a castration group, a testosterone undecanoate (TU) group, and a control group. The prostate wound was assessed once a week using a cystoscope. Histological analysis was then carried out to study the re-epithelialization of the prostatic urethra in each group. The inflammatory response in the wound tissue and urine was also investigated. The healing of the prostatic urethra after a TmLRP was more rapid in the castration group and slower in the TU group than that in the control group. Castration accelerated re-epithelialization by promoting basal cell proliferation in the wound surface and beneath the wound and by accelerating the differentiation of basal cells into urothelial cells. Castration reduced the duration of the inflammatory phase and induced the conversion of M1 macrophages to M2 macrophages, thus accelerating the maturation of the wound. By contrast, androgen supplementation enhanced the inflammatory response and prolonged the inflammatory phase. Moreover, the anti-inflammatory phase was delayed and weakened. Androgen deprivation promotes re-epithelialization of the wound, regulates the inflammatory response, and accelerates wound healing of the prostatic urethra after a TmLRP. Prostate 77:708-717, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. TPL2/COT/MAP3K8 (TPL2 activation promotes androgen depletion-independent (ADI prostate cancer growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph H Jeong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite its initial positive response to hormone ablation therapy, prostate cancers invariably recur in more aggressive, treatment resistant forms. The lack of our understanding of underlying genetic alterations for the transition from androgen-dependent (AD to ADI prostate cancer growth hampers our ability to develop target-driven therapeutic strategies for the efficient treatment of ADI prostate cancer.By screening a library of activated human kinases, we have identified TPL2, encoding a serine/threonine kinase, as driving ADI prostate cancer growth. TPL2 activation by over-expressing either wild-type or a constitutively activated form of TPL2 induced ADI growth, whereas the suppression of TPL2 expression and its kinase activity in ADI prostate cancer cells inhibited cell proliferation under androgen-depleted conditions. Most importantly, TPL2 is upregulated in ADI prostate cancers of both the Pten deletion mouse model and the clinical prostate cancer specimens.Together these data suggest that TPL2 kinase plays a critical role in the promotion of ADI prostate cancer progression. Furthermore, the suppression of TPL2 diminishes ADI prostate cancer growth and a high frequency of TPL2 overexpression in human ADI prostate cancer samples validates TPL2 as a target for the treatment of this deadly disease.

  6. Mechanism and Regulation of Gene Expression by Androgen Receptor in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-01

    similarly inter- dependent transcription. These results are consistent with the acts directly and genetically with histories H3 and H4 (10, 38), fact that... histories H3 and H4. 36. Oelgeschlager, T., Y. Tao, Y. K. Kang, and R. G. Roeder. 1998. Transcription Genes Dev. 10:1247-1259. activation via enhanced... phytochemical component of soy, has been vectors (NpT7-5 ERKlwt and pBB131 MEKKc) were implicated in the prevention of hormone-sensitive kindly provided by

  7. A Recurrent Germline Mutation in the 5'UTR of the Androgen Receptor Causes Complete Androgen Insensitivity by Activating Aberrant uORF Translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine C Hornig

    Full Text Available A subset of patients with monogenic disorders lacks disease causing mutations in the protein coding region of the corresponding gene. Here we describe a recurrent germline mutation found in two unrelated patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS generating an upstream open reading frame (uORF in the 5' untranslated region (5'-UTR of the androgen receptor (AR gene. We show in patient derived primary genital skin fibroblasts as well as in cell-based reporter assays that this mutation severely impacts AR function by reducing AR protein levels without affecting AR mRNA levels. Importantly, the newly generated uORF translates into a polypeptide and the expression level of this polypeptide inversely correlates with protein translation from the primary ORF of the AR thereby providing a model for AR-5'UTR mediated translational repression. Our findings not only add a hitherto unrecognized genetic cause to complete androgen insensitivity but also underline the importance of 5'UTR mutations affecting uORFs for the pathogenesis of monogenic disorders in general.

  8. Estrogenic and androgenic activities in total plasma measured with reporter-gene bioassays: relevant exposure measures for endocrine disruptors in epidemiologic studies?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, M.M.; Besselink, H.; Bretveld, R.W.; Anzion, R.B.M.; Scheepers, P.T.J.; Brouwer, A.; Roeleveld, N.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of estrogenic and androgenic activities in total plasma with Chemically Activated LUciferase gene eXpression (CALUX(R)) bioassays could provide biologically relevant measures for exposure to endocrine disruptors in epidemiologic studies. The objective of this study was to explore the

  9. A Competitive Inhibitor That Reduces Recruitment of Androgen Receptor to Androgen-responsive Genes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Milu T.; Wilson, Elizabeth M.; Shapiro, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) has a critical role in the growth and progression of androgen-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancers. To identify novel inhibitors of AR transactivation that block growth of prostate cancer cells, a luciferase-based high-throughput screen of ∼160,000 small molecules was performed in cells stably expressing AR and a prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-luciferase reporter. CPIC (1-(3-(2-chlorophenoxy) propyl)-1H-indole-3-carbonitrile) was identified as a small molecule that blocks AR transactivation to a greater extent than other steroid receptors. CPIC inhibited AR-mediated proliferation of androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cell lines, with minimal toxicity in AR-negative cell lines. CPIC treatment also reduced the anchorage-independent growth of LAPC-4 prostate cancer cells. CPIC functioned as a pure antagonist by inhibiting the expression of AR-regulated genes in LAPC-4 cells that express wild-type AR and exhibited weak agonist activity in LNCaP cells that express the mutant AR-T877A. CPIC treatment did not reduce AR levels or alter its nuclear localization. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify the site of action of CPIC. CPIC inhibited recruitment of androgen-bound AR to the PSA promoter and enhancer sites to a greater extent than bicalutamide. CPIC is a new therapeutic inhibitor that targets AR-mediated gene activation with potential to arrest the growth of prostate cancer. PMID:22589544

  10. Cloning of an insulin-like androgenic gland factor (IAG) from the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus: implications for eyestalk regulation of IAG expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, J Sook; Manor, R; Sagi, A

    2011-08-01

    In malacostracan crustaceans, sex differentiation is uniquely regulated by a hormone secreted by the male-specific androgenic gland (AG). An isopod AG hormone was the first to be structurally elucidated and was found to belong to the insulin superfamily of proteins. Recently, it has been found that the AGs of several decapod crustaceans express insulin-like androgenic gland factors (IAGs), whose function is believed to be similar to that of the isopod AG hormone. Here we report the isolation from the blue crab Callinectes sapidus of the full-length cDNA encoding a candidate insulin-like AG hormone, termed Cas-IAG. The predicted protein Cas-IAG was encoded as a precursor consisting of a signal peptide, the B chain, the C peptide, and the A chain in that order. While the AG was the main source of Cas-IAG expression, as found in other decapod species, the hepatopancreas of male Callinectes sapidus crabs displayed minor Cas-IAG expression. Eyestalk ablation confirmed the presence of a possible endocrine axis between the eyestalk ganglia and the AG, implying that Cas-IAG expression is negatively regulated by (a) substance(s) present in the eyestalk ganglia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs negatively regulate triple-negative breast cancer growth and epithelial:mesenchymal stem cell signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Narayanan

    Full Text Available The androgen receptor (AR is the most highly expressed steroid receptor in breast cancer with 75-95% of estrogen receptor (ER-positive and 40-70% of ER-negative breast cancers expressing AR. Though historically breast cancers were treated with steroidal androgens, their use fell from favor because of their virilizing side effects and the emergence of tamoxifen. Nonsteroidal, tissue selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs may provide a novel targeted approach to exploit the therapeutic benefits of androgen therapy in breast cancer.Since MDA-MB-453 triple-negative breast cancer cells express mutated AR, PTEN, and p53, MDA-MB-231 triple-negative breast cancer cells stably expressing wildtype AR (MDA-MB-231-AR were used to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo anti-proliferative effects of SARMs. Microarray analysis and epithelial:mesenchymal stem cell (MSC co-culture signaling studies were performed to understand the mechanisms of action.Dihydrotestosterone and SARMs, but not bicalutamide, inhibited the proliferation of MDA-MB-231-AR. The SARMs reduced the MDA-MB-231-AR tumor growth and tumor weight by greater than 90%, compared to vehicle-treated tumors. SARM treatment inhibited the intratumoral expression of genes and pathways that promote breast cancer development through its actions on the AR. SARM treatment also inhibited the metastasis-promoting paracrine factors, IL6 and MMP13, and subsequent migration and invasion of epithelial:MSC co-cultures.1. AR stimulation inhibits paracrine factors that are important for MSC interactions and breast cancer invasion and metastasis. 2. SARMs may provide promise as novel targeted therapies to treat AR-positive triple-negative breast cancer.

  12. Co regulation of srGAP1 by Wnt and androgen receptor signaling: a new target for treatment of CRPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Epigenetics conference hosted by the Center for Epigenetics and Metabolism at UCI in January of 2015 and February 2016. - I have attended seminar and...native molecular mechanisms [6, 10]. When prostate cancer cells have been adapted to the low androgen environment , β-catenin has been shown to act...Res 2008; 68: 4709-18. [92] Zong Y, Huang J, Sankarasharma D, Morikawa T, Fukayama M, Epstein JI, Chada KK, Witte ON. Stromal epigenetic

  13. Comparative study on transcriptional activity of 17 parabens mediated by estrogen receptor α and β and androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yoko; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Shinji; Uramaru, Naoto; Ohta, Shigeru; Kitamura, Shigeyuki

    2013-07-01

    The structure-activity relationships of parabens which are widely used as preservatives for transcriptional activities mediated by human estrogen receptor α (hERα), hERβ and androgen receptor (hAR) were investigated. Fourteen of 17 parabens exhibited hERα and/or hERβ agonistic activity at concentrations of ≤ 1 × 10(-5)M, whereas none of the 17 parabens showed AR agonistic or antagonistic activity. Among 12 parabens with linear alkyl chains ranging in length from C₁ to C₁₂, heptylparaben (C₇) and pentylparaben (C₅) showed the most potent ERα and ERβ agonistic activity in the order of 10(-7)M and 10(-8)M, respectively, and the activities decreased in a stepwise manner as the alkyl chain was shortened to C₁ or lengthened to C₁₂. Most parabens showing estrogenic activity exhibited ERβ-agonistic activity at lower concentrations than those inducing ERα-agonistic activity. The estrogenic activity of butylparaben was markedly decreased by incubation with rat liver microsomes, and the decrease of activity was blocked by a carboxylesterase inhibitor. These results indicate that parabens are selective agonists for ERβ over ERα; their interactions with ERα/β are dependent on the size and bulkiness of the alkyl groups; and they are metabolized by carboxylesterases, leading to attenuation of their estrogenic activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of the effect of cortisol on aromatase activity and androgen metabolism in two human fibroblast cell lines derived from the same individual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenstrup, B; Brünner, N; Dombernowsky, P

    1990-01-01

    The effect of preincubation with cortisol on estrogen and androgen metabolism was investigated in human fibroblast monolayers grown from biopsies of genital and non-genital skin of the same person. The activity in the cells of aromatase, 5 alpha-reductase, 17 beta-hydroxysteroid oxidoreductase...... and 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid oxidoreductase was investigated by isolating estrone, estradiol, estriol, dihydrotestosterone, androstanedione, androsterone, 3 alpha-androstanediol, testosterone and androstenedione after incubation of the cells with [14C]testosterone or [14C]androstenedione. For experiments.......5-1.0 x 10(-6) M in both cell lines. When preincubation with cortisol was omitted no estrogen synthesis was detected. The formation of androgen was not altered after preincubation with cortisol. Pronounced differences were found in estrogen and in androgen metabolism in the two cell lines suggesting...

  15. Structural basis for androgen receptor interdomain and coactivator interactions suggests a transition in nuclear receptor activation function dominance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bin; Gampe, Robert T; Kole, Adam J; Hnat, Andrew T; Stanley, Thomas B; An, Gang; Stewart, Eugene L; Kalman, Rebecca I; Minges, John T; Wilson, Elizabeth M

    2004-11-05

    The androgen receptor (AR) is required for male sex development and contributes to prostate cancer cell survival. In contrast to other nuclear receptors that bind the LXXLL motifs of coactivators, the AR ligand binding domain is preferentially engaged in an interdomain interaction with the AR FXXLF motif. Reported here are crystal structures of the ligand-activated AR ligand binding domain with and without bound FXXLF and LXXLL peptides. Key residues that establish motif binding specificity are identified through comparative structure-function and mutagenesis studies. A mechanism in prostate cancer is suggested by a functional AR mutation at a specificity-determining residue that recovers coactivator LXXLL motif binding. An activation function transition hypothesis is proposed in which an evolutionary decline in LXXLL motif binding parallels expansion and functional dominance of the NH(2)-terminal transactivation domain in the steroid receptor subfamily.

  16. Androgen Restored Contraception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmerman, X.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) reduce androgen levels, especially testosterone (T), by inhibiting ovarian and adrenal androgen synthesis and by increasing levels of sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). Possible consequences of this androgen loss are diminished sexual function and mood

  17. Androgen deprivation of the PC-310 [correction of prohormone convertase-310] human prostate cancer model system induces neuroendocrine differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Jongsma (Johan); M.H. Oomen; M.A. Noordzij (Marinus); W.M. van Weerden (Wytske); G.J. Martens; Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo); F.H. Schröder (Fritz); G.J. van Steenbrugge (Gert Jan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractNeuroendocrine (NE) cells are androgen-independent cells and secrete growth-modulating neuropeptides via a regulated secretory pathway (RSP). We studied NE differentiation after androgen withdrawal in the androgen-dependent prostate cancer xenograft PC-310.

  18. Advantages and Limitations of Androgen Receptor-Based Methods for Detecting Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Abuse as Performance Enhancing Drugs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bailey, Kathy; Yazdi, Tahmineh; Masharani, Umesh; Tyrrell, Blake; Butch, Anthony; Schaufele, Fred

    2016-01-01

    .... Since AASs achieve their anabolic effects by activating the Androgen Receptor (AR), cell-based bioassays that measure the effect of a urine sample on AR activity are under investigation as complementary, pan-androgen detection methods...

  19. Effect of highly bioaccumulated polychlorinated biphenyl congeners on estrogen and androgen receptor activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld-Jørgensen, E.C.; Andersen, H. R.; Rasmussen, T.H.

    2001-01-01

    pleiotropic effects on the estrogen- and androgen-receptor. In MCF-7 cells a slightly increased cell proliferation was observed at low concentrations (1-10 nM) in cells co-treated with 0.01 nM 17 beta -Estradiol. whereas the compounds inhibited cell growth significantly at 1 and 10 muM. In reporter gene (ERE...... in transiently co-transfected Chinese Hamster Ovary cells with an IC50, of 6.2 muM. In summary, this study indicate that the di-ortho, multiple-chloro substituted biphenyls, PCB # 138, PCB # 153 and PCB # 180, can compete with the binding of the natural ligand to two nuclear receptors and thus possess...

  20. Bone stroma-derived cells change coregulators recruitment to androgen receptor and decrease cell proliferation in androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villagran, Marcelo A.; Gutierrez-Castro, Francisco A.; Pantoja, Diego F.; Alarcon, Jose C.; Fariña, Macarena A.; Amigo, Romina F.; Muñoz-Godoy, Natalia A. [Molecular Endocrinology and Oncology Laboratory, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Pinilla, Mabel G. [Department of Medical Specialties, School of Medicine, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Peña, Eduardo A.; Gonzalez-Chavarria, Ivan; Toledo, Jorge R.; Rivas, Coralia I.; Vera, Juan C. [Department of Physiopathology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); McNerney, Eileen M. [Molecular Endocrinology and Oncology Laboratory, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Onate, Sergio A., E-mail: sergio.onate@udec.cl [Molecular Endocrinology and Oncology Laboratory, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Department of Medical Specialties, School of Medicine, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Department of Urology, State University of New York at Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2015-11-27

    Prostate cancer (CaP) bone metastasis is an early event that remains inactive until later-stage progression. Reduced levels of circulating androgens, due to andropause or androgen deprivation therapies, alter androgen receptor (AR) coactivator expression. Coactivators shift the balance towards enhanced AR-mediated gene transcription that promotes progression to androgen-resistance. Disruptions in coregulators may represent a molecular switch that reactivates latent bone metastasis. Changes in AR-mediated transcription in androgen-sensitive LNCaP and androgen-resistant C4-2 cells were analyzed for AR coregulator recruitment in co-culture with Saos-2 and THP-1. The Saos-2 cell line derived from human osteosarcoma and THP-1 cell line representing human monocytes were used to display osteoblast and osteoclast activity. Increased AR activity in androgen-resistant C4-2 was due to increased AR expression and SRC1/TIF2 recruitment and decreased SMRT/NCoR expression. AR activity in both cell types was decreased over 90% when co-cultured with Saos-2 or THP-1 due to dissociation of AR from the SRC1/TIF2 and SMRT/NCoR coregulators complex, in a ligand-dependent and cell-type specific manner. In the absence of androgens, Saos-2 decreased while THP-1 increased proliferation of LNCaP cells. In contrast, both Saos-2 and THP-1 decreased proliferation of C4-2 in absence and presence of androgens. Global changes in gene expression from both CaP cell lines identified potential cell cycle and androgen regulated genes as mechanisms for changes in cell proliferation and AR-mediated transactivation in the context of bone marrow stroma cells. - Highlights: • Decreased corepressor expression change AR in androgen-resistance prostate cancer. • Bone stroma-derived cells change AR coregulator recruitment in prostate cancer. • Bone stroma cells change cell proliferation in androgen-resistant cancer cells. • Global gene expression in CaP cells is modified by bone stroma cells in co

  1. PDE7B is involved in nandrolone decanoate hydrolysis in liver cytosol and its transcription is up-regulated by androgens in HepG2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel eStrahm

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Most androgenic drugs are available as esters for a prolonged depot action. However the enzymes involved in the hydrolysis of the esters have not been identified. There is one study indicating that PDE7B may be involved in the activation of testosterone enanthate. The aims are to identify the cellular compartments where the hydrolysis of testosterone enanthate and nandrolone decanoate occurs, and to investigate the involvement of PDE7B in the activation. We also determined if testosterone and nandrolone affect the expression of the PDE7B gene. The hydrolysis studies were performed in isolated human liver cytosolic and microsomal preparations with and without specific PDE7B inhibitor. The gene expression was studied in human hepatoma cells (HepG2 exposed to testosterone and nandrolone. We show that PDE7B serves as a catalyst of the hydrolysis of testosterone enanthate and nandrolone decanoate in liver cytosol. The gene expression of PDE7B was significantly induced 3- and 5- fold after 2 hours exposure to 1 µM testosterone enanthate and nandrolone decanoate, respectively. These results show that PDE7B is involved in the activation of esterified nandrolone and testosterone and that the gene expression of PDE7B is induced by supra-physiological concentrations of androgenic drugs.

  2. Side effects of anabolic androgenic steroids: pathological findings and structure-activity relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büttner, Andreas; Thieme, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Side effects of anabolic steroids with relevance in forensic medicine are mainly due to life-threatening health risks with potential fatal outcome and cases of uncertain limitations of criminal liability after steroid administration. Both problems are typically associated with long-term abuse and excessive overdose of anabolic steroids. Side effects may be due to direct genomic or nongenomic activities (myotrophic, hepatotoxic), can result from down-regulation of endogenous biosynthesis (antiandrogenic) or be indirect consequence of steroid biotransformation (estrogenic).Logically, there are no systematic clinical studies available and the number of causally determined fatalities is fairly limited. The following compilation reviews typical abundant observations in cases where nonnatural deaths (mostly liver failure and sudden cardiac death) were concurrent with steroid abuse. Moreover, frequent associations between structural characteristics and typical side effects are summarized.

  3. Simvastatin Up-Regulates Annexin A10 That Can Inhibit the Proliferation, Migration, and Invasion in Androgen-Independent Human Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Yoshiyuki; Sekine, Yoshitaka; Kato, Haruo; Furuya, Yosuke; Koike, Hidekazu; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    2017-03-01

    Statins have recently been studied for their proapoptotic and antimetastatic effects. However, the exact mechanisms of their anticancer actions remain unclear. Using microarrays, we discovered up-regulation of annexin A10 (ANXA10) in PC-3 cells after simvastatin treatment. ANXA10 reportedly has antitumor effects. In this study, we evaluated the effects of simvastatin on ANXA10 signaling in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells. PC-3, LNCaP-LA (which were derived from LNCaP cells and cultured in 10% charcoal-stripped fetal bovine serum for 3 months), and DU145 human prostate cancer cell lines were used. Prostate tissues were collected from 60 patients (benign prostatic hyperplasia [BPH], n = 20; prostate cancer with a Gleason score of 7, n = 20; prostate cancer with a Gleason score of 8-10, n = 20) at the time of prostate biopsies performed. We used a nude mouse tumor xenograft model with administration of simvastatin or phosphate-buffered saline via intraperitoneal injection. Simvastatin inhibited the proliferation, migration, and invasion of PC-3, LNCaP-LA, and DU145 cells. The expression level of ANXA10 was up-regulated by simvastatin in PC-3, LNCaP-LA, and DU145 cells. Transfection with ANXA10 inhibited PC-3 and LNCaP-LA cells proliferation, migration, and invasion. Knockdown of ANXA10 by siRNA increased the proliferation of PC-3 and LNCaP-LA cells. In a nude mouse xenograft model of PC-3 cells, simvastatin induced both reduction in the tumor size and up-regulation of ANXA10 expression. In human prostate biopsy samples, ANXA10 mRNA expression was significantly lower in the prostate cancer group than in the BPH group. Next, we found that up-regulation of ANXA10 in PC-3 resulted in down-regulation of S100 calcium binding protein A4 (S100A4), which is reportedly correlated with aggressiveness and a worse prognosis for patients with different types of carcinomas. Expression of S100A4 was down-regulated by simvastatin. In PC-3 cells, knockdown of S

  4. In vivo anti-androgenic, anti-estrogenic and antioxidant activities of the aqueous extract of Eremomastax speciosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Simo Tagne

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the in vivo anti-androgenic, antioxidant activity and anti-estrogenic activities of Eremomastax speciosa (E. speciosa in order to find new method for fighting against chronic diseases such as cancer. Methods: Evaluations of antiandrogenic and antioxidant activities were carried out on male rate receiving simultaneous daily administration of testosterone and different doses of aqueous extract of E. speciosa, during a period of 10 d. The evaluation of antiestrogenic activity was carried out on mature ovariectomized female rats receiving simultaneous daily administration of estradiol and different doses of extract, for a week. Then reproductive organs were weighted, levels of prostatic acid phosphatase, superoxide dismutase and catalase as well as some hematologic parameters were measured. Results: The treatment significantly reduced (P<0.01 the weight of ventral prostate, penis, Cowper’s gland and the level of serum prostatic acid phosphatase; while a significant decrease (P<0.01 of the catalase activity was observed. A significant increase (P<0.05 in the lymphocyte number and significant decrease of monocyte (P<0.05 were noticed. The uterine relative weight were significantly reduced (P<0.01. Conclusions: Generally, these results denote the antiandrogenic, antiestrogenic and immunomodulatory potential of E. speciosa.

  5. Conversion of androgen receptor signaling from a growth suppressor in normal prostate epithelial cells to an oncogene in prostate cancer cells involves a gain of function in c-Myc regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Griend, Donald J; Litvinov, Ivan V; Isaacs, John T

    2014-01-01

    In normal prostate, androgen-dependent androgen receptor (AR) signaling within prostate stromal cells induces their secretion of paracrine factors, termed "andromedins" which stimulate growth of the epithelial cells. The present studies demonstrate that androgen-dependent andromedin-driven growth stimulation is counter-balanced by androgen-induced AR signaling within normal adult prostate epithelial cells resulting in terminal G0 growth arrest coupled with terminal differentiation into ΔNp63-negative, PSA-expressing secretory luminal cells. This cell autonomous AR-driven terminal differentiation requires DNA-binding of the AR protein, is associated with decreases in c-Myc m-RNA and protein, are coupled with increases in p21, p27, and SKP-2 protein expression, and does not require functional p53. These changes result in down-regulation of Cyclin D1 protein and RB phosphoryation. shRNA knockdown documents that neither RB, p21, p27 alone or in combination are required for such AR-induced G0 growth arrest. Transgenic expression of a constitutive vector to prevent c-Myc down-regulation overrides AR-mediated growth arrest in normal prostate epithelial cells, which documents that AR-induced c-Myc down-regulation is critical in terminal growth arrest of normal prostate epithelial cells. In contrast, in prostate cancer cells, androgen-induced AR signaling paradoxically up-regulates c-Myc expression and stimulates growth as documented by inhibition of both of these responses following exposure to the AR antagonist, bicalutamide. These data document that AR signaling is converted from a growth suppressor in normal prostate epithelial cells to an oncogene in prostate cancer cells during prostatic carcinogenesis and that this conversion involves a gain of function for regulation of c-Myc expression.

  6. Structure and function of the androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, A O; Klaasen, P; Kuiper, G G; van der Korput, J A; Bolt, J; de Boer, W; Smit, A; Faber, P W; van Rooij, H C; Geurts van Kessel, A

    1989-01-01

    The androgen receptor in several species (human, rat, calf) is a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 100-110 kDa. The steroid binding domain is confined to a region of 30 kDa, while the DNA-binding domain has the size of approx. 10 kDa. A 40 kDa fragment containing both the DNA and steroid binding domain displayed a higher DNA binding activity than did the intact 100 kDa molecule. cDNA encoding the major part of the human androgen receptor was isolated. The cDNA contains an open reading frame of 2,277 bp but still lacks part of the 5'-coding sequence. Homology with the progesterone and glucocorticoid receptor was about 80% in the DNA binding domain and 50% in the steroid binding domain. The present data provide evidence that the androgen receptor belongs to the superfamily of ligand responsive transcriptional regulators and consists of three distinct domains each with a specialized function.

  7. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Escape Mechanism from Androgen Ablation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-31

    except that no salmon sperm DNA was used as blocking reagent. The immunoprecipitated DNA and un- enriched input DNA were treated with RNase A and purified...A, Wang Y, Suzuki K, Mirosevich J, et al. (2005) Foxa1 and Foxa2 interact with the androgen receptor to regulate prostate and epididymal genes

  8. EPI-001 is a selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma modulator with inhibitory effects on androgen receptor expression and activity in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Lucas J.; Olson, Margaret E.; Ravindranathan, Preethi; Guo, Hong; Kempema, Aaron M.; Andrews, Timothy E.; Chen, Xiaoli; Raj, Ganesh V.; Harki, Daniel A.; Dehm, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a driver of prostate cancer (PCa) cell growth and disease progression. Therapies for advanced PCa exploit AR dependence by blocking the production or action of androgens, but these interventions inevitably fail via multiple mechanisms including mutation or deletion of the AR ligand binding domain (LBD). Thus, the development of new inhibitors which act through non-LBD interfaces is an unmet clinical need. EPI-001 is a bisphenol A-derived compound shown to bind covalently and inhibit the AR NH2-terminal domain (NTD). Here, we demonstrate that EPI-001 has general thiol alkylating activity, resulting in multilevel inhibitory effects on AR in PCa cell lines and tissues. At least one secondary mechanism of action associated with AR inhibition was found to be selective modulation of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ). These multi-level effects of EPI-001 resulted in inhibition of transcriptional activation units (TAUs) 1 and 5 of the AR NTD, and reduced AR expression. EPI-001 inhibited growth of AR-positive and AR-negative PCa cell lines, with the highest sensitivity observed in LNCaP cells. Overall, this study provides new mechanistic insights to the chemical biology of EPI-001, and raises key issues regarding the use of covalent inhibitors of the intrinsically unstructured AR NTD. PMID:25669987

  9. [Effect of epidermal growth factor and testosterone on androgen receptor activation in urethral plate fibroblasts in hypospadias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Junshan; Xie, Cheng; Chen, Ruiqing; Li, Dumiao

    2016-05-01

    To investigate androgen receptor (AR) expression and the effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and testosterone on AR expression level.
 EGF or different concentrations of testosterone were incubated with the primary urethral plate fibroblasts from patients with hypospadias. The levels of AR expression in the fibroblasts were detected by immunocytochemical assays and graphical analysis.
 There was no significant difference in AR activation under physiological concentrations (3×10(-8) mol/L) of testosterone between the control and the distal hypospadias group (P>0.05). However, there was a significant decrease in AR activation in the proximal hypospadias group compared to that in the control group (Pdistal hypospadias group>proximal hypospadias group, Phypospadias was improved most obviously when EGF and physiological concentration of testosterone were employed in the urethral plate fibroblasts from hypospadias patients (Phypospadias group than that in the control group (P=0.02).
 AR expression and activation in the urethral plate fibroblasts from hypospadias patients are abnormal. EGF can be used to improve AR activation in fibroblasts from different types of hypospadias, especially in the proximal type.

  10. Disruption of the Interaction of the Androgen Receptor with Chromatin: A Novel Therapeutic Approach in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    level. KEYWORDS: Prostate cancer, Androgen Receptor, FOXA1, androgen receptor co- regulators , Protein-protein interactions, peptides...peptidomimetics ACCOMPLISHMENTS: What were the major goals of the project? Aim 1: Select and evaluate peptides/peptidomimetics in models of PCa. Based on...will be tested for its stability, pharmacologic properties, toxicity, efficacy in disrupting AR/FoxA1 PPI, and for activity on AR- driven gene

  11. Localization of the androgen-synthesizing enzymes, androgen receptor, and sex steroids in the vagina: possible implications for the treatment of postmenopausal sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Jonathan; Dury, Alain Y; Ouellet, Johanne; Pelletier, Georges; Labrie, Fernand

    2014-08-01

    To better understand the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of the intravaginal administration of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) observed in postmenopausal women on sexual dysfunction. To identify the distribution of the androgen-synthesizing enzymes as well as androgen receptor (AR) and measure steroid levels in the monkey vagina. The cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis), the closest model to the human, has been used to measure the expression levels of steroidogenic enzymes and androgen receptor by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (n=4), confirmed by immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence (n=3). DHEA and its androgenic metabolites were quantified by LC-MS/MS (n=4). The presence of SRD5A1, SRD5A2, HSD17B3, AR as well as nerve fibers (PGP 9.5) was investigated, and steroid levels were measured. AR is widely distributed within the vaginal epithelium and also in the lamina propria with a lower expression in the muscularis layer and blood vessel walls. Androgen-forming enzymes, on the other hand, are expressed in the vaginal stratified squamous epithelium at a relatively high level where they are uniformly distributed from the basal membrane up to the superficial keratinized cells. The enzymes are at a lower level in blood vessel walls and zona muscularis where nerve fibers are localized. DHEA and its androgen metabolites are present at biologically significant concentrations in the monkey vagina. The enzymes responsible for androgen formation as well as AR are at the highest level in the superficial layer of the stratified epithelium and muscularis layers of the vagina. These data provide a potential explanation for the described role of androgens in regulating vaginal lubrication, smooth muscle activity, blood flow, and the neuronal activity potentially involved in the correction of sexual dysfunction. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  12. Combined effects of androgen anabolic steroids and physical activity on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengevoss, Jonas; Piechotta, Marion; Müller, Dennis; Hanft, Fabian; Parr, Maria Kristina; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Diel, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    Analysing effects of pharmaceutical substances and training on feedback mechanisms of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis may be helpful to quantify the benefit of strategies preventing loss of muscle mass, and in the fight against doping. In this study we analysed combined effects of anabolic steroids and training on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Therefore intact male Wistar rats were dose-dependently treated with metandienone, estradienedione and the selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) S-1. In serum cortisol, testosterone, 17β-estradiol (E2), prolactin, inhibin B, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and thyroxine (T4) concentrations were determined. Six human volunteers were single treated with 1-androstenedione. In addition abusing and clean body builders were analysed. Serum concentrations of inhibin B, IGF-1, cortisol, prolactin, T4, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), testosterone and LH were determined. In rats, administration of metandienone, estradienedione and S-1 resulted in an increase of muscle fiber diameter. Metandienone and estradienedione but not S-1 administration significantly decreases LH and inhibin B serum concentration. Administration of estradienedione resulted in an increase of E2 and S-1 in an increase of cortisol. Single administration of 1-androstenedione in humans decreased cortisol and inhibin B serum concentrations. LH was not affected. In abusing body builders a significantly decrease of LH, TSH and inhibin B and an increase of prolactin, IGF-1 and T4 was detected. In clean body builders only T4 and TSH were affected. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Androgen priming using aromatase inhibitor and hCG during early-follicular-phase GnRH antagonist down-regulation in modified antagonist protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løssl, Kristine; Andersen, A N; Loft, A

    2006-01-01

    Temporary exposure of follicles to increased levels of androgens may enhance their sensitivity to FSH. The aim of this study was to increase the intraovarian androgen level using aromatase inhibitors and hCG before controlled ovarian stimulation (COH) and to test this concept clinically.......Temporary exposure of follicles to increased levels of androgens may enhance their sensitivity to FSH. The aim of this study was to increase the intraovarian androgen level using aromatase inhibitors and hCG before controlled ovarian stimulation (COH) and to test this concept clinically....

  14. Expression of androgen receptor target genes in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesha Rana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to determine the mechanisms of the anabolic actions of androgens in skeletal muscle by investigating potential androgen receptor (AR-regulated genes in in vitro and in vivo models. The expression of the myogenic regulatory factor myogenin was significantly decreased in skeletal muscle from testosterone-treated orchidectomized male mice compared to control orchidectomized males, and was increased in muscle from male AR knockout mice that lacked DNA binding activity (ARΔZF2 versus wildtype mice, demonstrating that myogenin is repressed by the androgen/AR pathway. The ubiquitin ligase Fbxo32 was repressed by 12 h dihydrotestosterone treatment in human skeletal muscle cell myoblasts, and c-Myc expression was decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle, and increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle. The expression of a group of genes that regulate the transition from myoblast proliferation to differentiation, Tceal7 , p57 Kip2, Igf2 and calcineurin Aa, was increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle, and the expression of all but p57 Kip2 was also decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle. We conclude that in males, androgens act via the AR in part to promote peak muscle mass by maintaining myoblasts in the proliferative state and delaying the transition to differentiation during muscle growth and development, and by suppressing ubiquitin ligase-mediated atrophy pathways to preserve muscle mass in adult muscle.

  15. Androgen Receptor Antagonists and Anti-Prostate Cancer Activities of Some Newly Synthesized Substituted Fused Pyrazolo-, Triazolo- and Thiazolo-Pyrimidine Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh A. Bahashwan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A series of substituted pyrazole, triazole and thiazole derivatives (2–13 were synthesized from 1-(naphtho[1,2-d]thiazol-2-ylhydrazine as starting material and evaluated as androgen receptor antagonists and anti-prostate cancer agents. The newly synthesized compounds showed potent androgen receptor antagonists and anti-prostate cancer activities with low toxicity (lethal dose 50 (LD50 comparable to Bicalutamide as reference drug. The structures of newly synthesized compounds were confirmed by IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, and MS spectral data and elemental analysis. The detailed synthesis, spectroscopic data, LD50 values and pharmacological activities of the synthesized compounds are reported.

  16. Enhancer RNAs participate in androgen receptor-driven looping that selectively enhances gene activation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen-Lin Hsieh; Teng Fei; Yiwen Chen; Tiantian Li; Yanfei Gao; Xiaodong Wang; Tong Sun; Christopher J. Sweeney; Gwo-Shu Mary Lee; Shaoyong Chen; Steven P. Balk; Xiaole Shirley Liu; Myles Brown; Philip W. Kantoff

    2014-01-01

    .... Kallikrein-related peptidase 3 (KLK3), which codes for prostate-specific antigen (PSA), is a well-known AR-regulated gene and its upstream enhancers produce bidirectional enhancer RNAs (eRNAs), termed KLK3e...

  17. In Vitro Androgen Bioassays as a Detection Method for Designer Androgens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison K. Heather

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Androgens are the class of sex steroids responsible for male sexual characteristics, including increased muscle mass and decreased fat mass. Illicit use of androgen doping can be an attractive option for those looking to enhance sporting performance and/or physical appearance. The use of in vitro bioassays to detect androgens, especially designer or proandrogens, is becoming increasingly important in combating androgen doping associated with nutritional supplements. The nutritional sports supplement market has grown rapidly throughout the past decade. Many of these supplements contain androgens, designer androgens or proandrogens. Many designer or proandrogens cannot be detected by the standard highly-sensitive screening methods such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry because their chemical structure is unknown. However, in vitro androgen bioassays can detect designer and proandrogens as these assays are not reliant on knowing the chemical structure but instead are based on androgen receptor activation. For these reasons, it may be advantageous to use routine androgen bioassay screening of nutraceutical samples to help curb the increasing problem of androgen doping.

  18. In vitro androgen bioassays as a detection method for designer androgens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Elliot R; McGrath, Kristine C Y; Heather, Alison K

    2013-02-06

    Androgens are the class of sex steroids responsible for male sexual characteristics, including increased muscle mass and decreased fat mass. Illicit use of androgen doping can be an attractive option for those looking to enhance sporting performance and/or physical appearance. The use of in vitro bioassays to detect androgens, especially designer or proandrogens, is becoming increasingly important in combating androgen doping associated with nutritional supplements. The nutritional sports supplement market has grown rapidly throughout the past decade. Many of these supplements contain androgens, designer androgens or proandrogens. Many designer or proandrogens cannot be detected by the standard highly-sensitive screening methods such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry because their chemical structure is unknown. However, in vitro androgen bioassays can detect designer and proandrogens as these assays are not reliant on knowing the chemical structure but instead are based on androgen receptor activation. For these reasons, it may be advantageous to use routine androgen bioassay screening of nutraceutical samples to help curb the increasing problem of androgen doping.

  19. Androgen priming using aromatase inhibitor and hCG during early-follicular-phase GnRH antagonist down-regulation in modified antagonist protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løssl, Kristine; Andersen, A N; Loft, A

    2006-01-01

    Temporary exposure of follicles to increased levels of androgens may enhance their sensitivity to FSH. The aim of this study was to increase the intraovarian androgen level using aromatase inhibitors and hCG before controlled ovarian stimulation (COH) and to test this concept clinically....

  20. Does the Androgen Receptor (AR)-Regulated Map Kinase Phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) Enhance Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Survival under Therapeutic Stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    in breast cancer models, and is inversely associated with apoptosis in preclinical prostate cancer models. Androgen and glucocorticoid signaling can...with apoptosis in preclinical prostate cancer models. Androgen and glucocorticoid signaling can induce MKP-1 expression; as mCRPC remains driven by

  1. In vitro evaluation of oestrogenic/androgenic activity of the serum organochlorine pesticide mixtures previously described in a breast cancer case–control study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivero, Javier; Luzardo, Octavio P., E-mail: octavio.perez@ulpgc.es; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis A.; Machín, Rubén P.; Pestano, José; Zumbado, Manuel; Boada, Luis D.; Camacho, María; Valerón, Pilar F.

    2015-12-15

    Some organochlorine pesticides (OCs) have been individually linked to breast cancer (BC) because they exert oestrogenic effects on mammary cells. However, humans are environmentally exposed to more or less complex mixtures of these organochlorines, and the biological effects of these mixtures must be elucidated. In this work we evaluated the in vitro effects exerted on human BC cells by the OC mixtures that were most frequently detected in two groups of women who participated in a BC case–control study developed in Spain: healthy women and women diagnosed with BC. The cytotoxicity, oestrogenicity, and androgenicity of the most prevalent OC mixtures found in healthy women (H-mixture) and in BC patients (BC-mixture) were tested at concentrations that resembled those found in the serum of the evaluated women. Our results showed that both OC mixtures presented a similar oestrogenic activity and effect on cell viability, but BC-mixture showed an additional anti-androgenic effect. These results indicate that although the proliferative effect exerted by these mixtures on human breast cells seems to depend mainly on their oestrogenic action, the BC-mixture might additionally induce cell proliferation due to its anti-androgenic activity, therefore increasing the carcinogenic potential of this mixture. The findings of this study demonstrate that subtle variations in the composition of a mixture may induce relevant changes in its biological action. - Highlights: • E-screen and A-screen of two mixtures of organochlorine pesticides (OCP) • Assay concentrations based on a previous breast cancer case–control study • Only non-cytotoxic concentrations assayed • Both OCP mixtures induce proliferation mediated by oestrogen receptor. • OCP mixture of breast cancer patients exhibits additional androgenic activity.

  2. Estrogen-, androgen- and aryl hydrocarbon receptor mediated activities in passive and composite samples from municipal waste and surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jálová, V; Jarošová, B; Bláha, L; Giesy, J P; Ocelka, T; Grabic, R; Jurčíková, J; Vrana, B; Hilscherová, K

    2013-09-01

    Passive and composite sampling in combination with in vitro bioassays and identification and quantification of individual chemicals were applied to characterize pollution by compounds with several specific modes of action in urban area in the basin of two rivers, with 400,000 inhabitants and a variety of industrial activities. Two types of passive samplers, semipermeable membrane devices (SPMD) for hydrophobic contaminants and polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) for polar compounds such as pesticides and pharmaceuticals, were used to sample wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) influent and effluent as well as rivers upstream and downstream of the urban complex and the WWTP. Compounds with endocrine disruptive potency were detected in river water and WWTP influent and effluent. Year-round, monthly assessment of waste waters by bioassays documented estrogenic, androgenic and dioxin-like potency as well as cytotoxicity in influent waters of the WWTP and allowed characterization of seasonal variability of these biological potentials in waste waters. The WWTP effectively removed cytotoxic compounds, xenoestrogens and xenoandrogens. There was significant variability in treatment efficiency of dioxin-like potency. The study indicates that the WWTP, despite its up-to-date technology, can contribute endocrine disrupting compounds to the river. Riverine samples exhibited dioxin-like, antiestrogenic and antiandrogenic potencies. The study design enabled characterization of effects of the urban complex and the WWTP on the river. Concentrations of PAHs and contaminants and specific biological potencies sampled by POCIS decreased as a function of distance from the city. © 2013.

  3. Molecular basis of androgen insensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, A O

    2001-06-20

    Androgens are important steroid hormones for expression of the male phenotype. They have characteristic roles during male sexual differentiation, during development and maintenance of secondary male characteristics, and during the initiation and maintenance of spermatogenesis. The two most important androgens in this respect are testosterone and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone. Each androgen has its own specific role during male sexual differentiation, testosterone is involved in the development and differentiation of Wolffian duct derived structures, whereas 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone, a metabolite of testosterone, is the active ligand in the urogenital sinus and tubercle and their derived structures. The actions of androgens are mediated by the androgen receptor. This ligand dependent transcription factor belongs to the superfamily of nuclear receptors, including those for the other steroid hormones. The androgen receptor gene is located on the X-chromosome at Xq11--12 and codes for a protein with a molecular mass of approximately 110 kDa. Only one androgen receptor cDNA has been identified sofar, despite two different ligands. It is generally accepted that defects in the androgen receptor gene prevent the normal development of both internal and external male structures in 46, XY individuals. The end-organ resistance to androgens has been designated as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and is distinct from other forms of male pseudohermaphroditism like 17 beta-hydroxy-steroid dehydrogenase type 3 deficiency, leydig cell hypoplasia due to inactivating LH receptor mutations or 5 alpha-reductase type 2 deficiency. Furthermore, two additional pathological situations are associated with abnormal androgen receptor structure and function -- spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA, or Kennedy's disease) and prostate cancer. In the AR gene, four different types of mutations have been detected in DNA from individuals with AIS -- (i) single point mutations resulting in

  4. Androgens trigger different growth responses in genetically identical human hair follicles in organ culture that reflect their epigenetic diversity in life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Benjamin H; Charlesworth, Matthew R; Tobin, Desmond J; Sharpe, David T; Randall, Valerie A

    2017-10-18

    Male sex hormones-androgens-regulate male physique development. Without androgen signaling, genetic males appear female. During puberty, increasing androgens harness the hair follicle's unique regenerative ability to replace many tiny vellus hairs with larger, darker terminal hairs (e.g., beard). Follicle response is epigenetically varied: some remain unaffected (e.g., eyelashes) or are inhibited, causing balding. How sex steroid hormones alter such developmental processes is unclear, despite high incidences of hormone-driven cancer, hirsutism, and alopecia. Unfortunately, existing development models are not androgen sensitive. Here, we use hair follicles to establish an androgen-responsive human organ culture model. We show that women's intermediate facial follicles respond to men's higher androgen levels by synthesizing more hair over several days, unlike donor-matched, androgen-insensitive, terminal follicles. We demonstrate that androgen receptors-androgen-activated gene transcription regulators-are required and are present in vivo within these follicles. This is the first human organ that involves multiple cell types that responds appropriately to hormones in prolonged culture, in a way which mirrors its natural behavior. Thus, intermediate hair follicles offer a hormone-switchable human model with exceptional, unique availability of genetically identical, but epigenetically hormone-insensitive, terminal follicles. This should enable advances in understanding sex steroid hormone signaling, gene regulation, and developmental and regenerative systems and facilitate better therapies for hormone-dependent disorders.-Miranda, B. H., Charlesworth, M. R., Tobin, D. J., Sharpe, D. T., Randall, V. A. Androgens trigger different growth responses in genetically identical human hair follicles in organ culture that reflect their epigenetic diversity in life. © FASEB.

  5. Subgroups of Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Bone Metastases Defined Through an Inverse Relationship Between Androgen Receptor Activity and Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylitalo, Erik Bovinder; Thysell, Elin; Jernberg, Emma; Lundholm, Marie; Crnalic, Sead; Egevad, Lars; Stattin, Pär; Widmark, Anders; Bergh, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla

    2017-05-01

    Novel therapies for men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are needed, particularly for cancers not driven by androgen receptor (AR) activation. To identify molecular subgroups of PC bone metastases of relevance for therapy. Fresh-frozen bone metastasis samples from men with CRPC (n=40), treatment-naïve PC (n=8), or other malignancies (n=12) were characterized using whole-genome expression profiling, multivariate principal component analysis (PCA), and functional enrichment analysis. Expression profiles were verified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in an extended set of bone metastases (n=77) and compared to levels in malignant and adjacent benign prostate tissue from patients with localized disease (n=12). Selected proteins were evaluated using immunohistochemistry. A cohort of PC patients (n=284) diagnosed at transurethral resection with long follow-up was used for prognostic evaluation. The majority of CRPC bone metastases (80%) was defined as AR-driven based on PCA analysis and high expression of the AR, AR co-regulators (FOXA1, HOXB13), and AR-regulated genes (KLK2, KLK3, NKX3.1, STEAP2, TMPRSS2); 20% were non-AR-driven. Functional enrichment analysis indicated high metabolic activity and low immune responses in AR-driven metastases. Accordingly, infiltration of CD3(+) and CD68(+) cells was lower in AR-driven than in non-AR-driven metastases, and tumor cell HLA class I ABC immunoreactivity was inversely correlated with nuclear AR immunoreactivity. RT-PCR analysis showed low MHC class I expression (HLA-A, TAP1, and PSMB9 mRNA) in PC bone metastases compared to benign and malignant prostate tissue and bone metastases of other origins. In primary PC, low HLA class I ABC immunoreactivity was associated with high Gleason score, bone metastasis, and short cancer-specific survival. Limitations include the limited number of patients studied and the single metastasis sample studied per patient. Most CRPC bone metastases show

  6. Synaptic long-term potentiation and depression in the rat medial vestibular nuclei depend on neural activation of estrogenic and androgenic signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangela Scarduzio

    Full Text Available Estrogenic and androgenic steroids can be synthesised in the brain and rapidly modulate synaptic transmission and plasticity through direct interaction with membrane receptors for estrogens (ERs and androgens (ARs. We used whole cell patch clamp recordings in brainstem slices of male rats to explore the influence of ER and AR activation and local synthesis of 17β-estradiol (E2 and 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT on the long-term synaptic changes induced in the neurons of the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN. Long-term depression (LTD and long-term potentiation (LTP caused by different patterns of high frequency stimulation (HFS of the primary vestibular afferents were assayed under the blockade of ARs and ERs or in the presence of inhibitors for enzymes synthesizing DHT (5α-reductase and E2 (P450-aromatase from testosterone (T. We found that LTD is mediated by interaction of locally produced androgens with ARs and LTP by interaction of locally synthesized E2 with ERs. In fact, the AR block with flutamide prevented LTD while did not affect LTP, and the blockade of ERs with ICI 182,780 abolished LTP without influencing LTD. Moreover, the block of P450-aromatase with letrozole not only prevented the LTP induction, but inverted LTP into LTD. This LTD is likely due to the local activation of androgens, since it was abolished under blockade of ARs. Conversely, LTD was still induced in the presence of finasteride the inhibitor of 5α-reductase demonstrating that T is able to activate ARs and induce LTD even when DHT is not synthesized. This study demonstrates a key and opposite role of sex neurosteroids in the long-term synaptic changes of the MVN with a specific role of T-DHT for LTD and of E2 for LTP. Moreover, it suggests that different stimulation patterns can lead to LTD or LTP by specifically activating the enzymes involved in the synthesis of androgenic or estrogenic neurosteroids.

  7. The 11S Proteasomal Activator REGγ Impacts Polyglutamine-Expanded Androgen Receptor Aggregation and Motor Neuron Viability through Distinct Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill M. Yersak

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA is caused by expression of a polyglutamine (polyQ-expanded androgen receptor (AR. The inefficient nuclear proteasomal degradation of the mutant AR results in the formation of nuclear inclusions containing amino-terminal fragments of the mutant AR. PA28γ (also referred to as REGγ is a nuclear 11S-proteasomal activator with limited proteasome activation capabilities compared to its cytoplasmic 11S (PA28α, PA28β counterparts. To clarify the role of REGγ in polyQ-expanded AR metabolism, we carried out genetic and biochemical studies in cell models of SBMA. Overexpression of REGγ in a PC12 cell model of SBMA increased polyQ-expanded AR aggregation and contributed to polyQ-expanded AR toxicity in the presence of dihydrotestosterone (DHT. These effects of REGγ were independent of its association with the proteasome and may be due, in part, to the decreased binding of polyQ-expanded AR by the E3 ubiquitin-ligase MDM2. Unlike its effects in PC12 cells, REGγ overexpression rescued transgenic SBMA motor neurons from DHT-induced toxicity in a proteasome binding-dependent manner, suggesting that the degradation of a specific 11S proteasome substrate or substrates promotes motor neuron viability. One potential substrate that we found to play a role in mutant AR toxicity is the splicing factor SC35. These studies reveal that, depending on the cellular context, two biological roles for REGγ impact cell viability in the face of polyQ-expanded AR; a proteasome binding-independent mechanism directly promotes mutant AR aggregation while a proteasome binding-dependent mechanism promotes cell viability. The balance between these functions likely determines REGγ effects on polyQ-expanded AR-expressing cells.

  8. Androgen dependent mechanisms of pro-angiogenic networks in placental and tumor development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzler, Veronika M.; de Brot, Simone; Robinson, Robert S.

    2017-01-01

    . In this review we focus on the well-established role of androgen regulation of angiogenesis in cancer and relate these mechanisms to placental angiogenesis. The physiological actions of androgens are mediated by the androgen receptor (AR), a ligand dependent transcription factor. Androgens and the AR...... molecular mechanisms of androgen regulation of angiogenesis and infer the potential significance of these pathways to normal and pathogenic placental function. Finally, we offer potential research applications of androgen-targeting molecules developed to treat cancer as investigative tools to help further...

  9. Early androgens, activity levels and toy choices of children in the second year of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Gerianne M; Saenz, Janet

    2012-09-01

    The hypothesis that stronger preferences for active play styles contribute to stronger preferences for male-typical toys was examined in 47 boys and 37 girls at 19-months of age using ambulatory monitoring technology (i.e., actigraphy) to measure activity levels during contact with male-typical, female-typical, and gender-neutral toys. Digit ratios and salivary testosterone levels were measured earlier in children at 3-4 months of age. There were no significant sex differences in digit ratios, salivary testosterone levels, or overall activity levels during toy play. In contrast, contact times showed large sex differences in infants' toy preferences. The within-sex comparisons showed that infant girls had significant preferences for female-typical toys over male-typical toys, whereas infant boys showed only a small preference for male-typical toys over female-typical toys. More male-typical digit ratios in early infancy predicted higher activity counts during toy play and less female-typical toy preferences in girls. However, in both sexes, activity levels were unrelated to toy preferences suggesting that factors other than activity level preferences contribute to the early emergence of gender-linked toy preferences. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Screening of synthetic and plant-derived compounds for (anti)estrogenic and (anti)androgenic activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bovee, T.F.H.; Schoonen, W.G.E.J.; Hamers, A.R.M.; Bento, M.J.; Peijnenburg, A.A.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Recently we constructed yeast cells that either express the human estrogen receptor ¿ or the human androgen receptor in combination with a consensus ERE or ARE repeat in the promoter region of a green fluorescent protein (yEGFP) read-out system. These bioassays were proven to be highly specific for

  11. Screening for estrogen and androgen receptor activities in 200 pesticides by in vitro reporter gene assays using Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Hiroyuki; Katsura, Eiji; Takeuchi, Shinji; Niiyama, Kazuhito; Kobayashi, Kunihiko

    2004-01-01

    We tested 200 pesticides, including some of their isomers and metabolites, for agonism and antagonism to two human estrogen receptor (hER) subtypes, hERalpha and hERbeta, and a human androgen receptor (hAR) by highly sensitive transactivation assays using Chinese hamster ovary cells. The test compounds were classified into nine groups: organochlorines, diphenyl ethers, organophosphorus pesticides, pyrethroids, carbamates, acid amides, triazines, ureas, and others. These pesticides were tested at concentrations methiocarb were predominantly hERbeta rather than hERalpha agonistic. Weak antagonistic effects toward hERalpha and hERbeta were shown in five and two pesticides, respectively. On the other hand, none of tested pesticides showed hAR-mediated androgenic activity, but 66 of 200 pesticides exhibited inhibitory activity against the transcriptional activity induced by 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone. In particular, the antiandrogenic activities of two diphenyl ether herbicides, chlornitrofen and chlomethoxyfen, were higher than those of vinclozolin and p,p -dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethylene, known AR antagonists. The results of our ER and AR assays show that 34 pesticides possessed both estrogenic and antiandrogenic activities, indicating pleiotropic effects on hER and hAR. We also discussed chemical structures related to these activities. Taken together, our findings suggest that a variety of pesticides have estrogenic and/or antiandrogenic potential via ER and/or AR, and that numerous other manmade chemicals may also possess such estrogenic and antiandrogenic activities. PMID:15064155

  12. Comparison of in vitro and in vivo screening models for androgenic and estrogenic activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, E.; Jansen, H.J.; Man, S.; Jonas, A.J.G.; Brouwer, A.; van der Burg, B.

    2006-01-01

    Identification of nuclear receptor-mediated endocrine activities is important in a variety of fields, ranging from pharmacological and clinical screening, to food and feed safety, toxicological monitoring, and risk assessment. Traditionally animal studies such as the Hershberger and Allen-Doisy

  13. Androgens and estrogens synergistically regulate the expression of doublecortin and enhance neuronal recruitment in the song system of adult female canaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, Takashi; Barker, Jennifer M; Balthazart, Jacques; Ball, Gregory F

    2011-06-29

    Vocal control nuclei in songbirds display seasonal changes in volume that are regulated by testosterone (T) and its androgenic (5α-dihydrotestosterone; DHT) or estrogenic (17β-estradiol; E(2)) metabolites. In male canaries, T regulates expression of the microtubule-associated protein doublecortin (DCX), a marker of neurogenesis. We examined the effect of T and its two metabolites alone or in combination on DCX expression in adult female canaries. Treatment with T or with DHT+E(2) increased HVC volume and neuron numbers as well as the total numbers of fusiform (migrating) and round (differentiating) DCX neurons in the nucleus but generally not in adjacent areas. DHT or E(2) alone did not increase these measures but increased the density of fusiform DCX cells per section. Similar results were observed in area X, although some effects did not reach significance, presumably because plasticity in X is mediated transsynaptically and follows HVC changes with some delay. There was no effect of any treatment on the total number of neurons in area X, and no change in DCX cell densities was detected in the lateral magnocellular nucleus of the anterior nidopallium, nor in other parts of the nidopallium. DHT and E(2) by themselves thus increase density of DCX cells migrating through HVC but are not sufficient in isolation to induce the recruitment of these newborn neurons in the nucleus. These effects are generally not observed in the rest of the nidopallium, implying that steroids only act on the attraction and recruitment of new neurons in HVC without having any major effects on their production at the ventricle wall.

  14. Obstructing Androgen Receptor Activation in Prostate Cancer Cells Through Post-translational Modification by NEDD8

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    control lentivirus were cultured with stripped growth media for 48 hours. After treatment with 10 nM DHT or ethanol for 30 minutes, endogenous protein...co-activator pocket of liganded RARa. The involvement of ADA3 in NR signaling was first demonstrated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae when yeast ADA3 was...histone acetyltransferase complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae . Mol. Cell. Biol., 19, 6621–6631. 20. Wang,T., Kobayashi,T., Takimoto,R., Denes,A.E

  15. 50 CFR 404.7 - Regulated activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Regulated activities. 404.7 Section 404.7... MARINE NATIONAL MONUMENT § 404.7 Regulated activities. Except as provided in §§ 404.8, 404.9 and 404.10, the following activities are prohibited and thus unlawful for any person to conduct or cause to be...

  16. Brain masculinization requires androgen receptor function

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Takashi; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Kawano, Hirotaka; Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Uematsu, Yoshikatsu; Sekine, Keisuke; Fukuda, Toru; Aihara, Ken-ichi; Krust, Andrée; Yamada, Takashi; NAKAMICHI, YUKO; Yamamoto, Yoko; Nakamura, Takashi; Yoshimura, Kimihiro; Yoshizawa, Tatsuya

    2004-01-01

    Testicular testosterone produced during a critical perinatal period is thought to masculinize and defeminize the male brain from the inherent feminization program and induce male-typical behaviors in the adult. These actions of testosterone appear to be exerted not through its androgenic activity, but rather through its conversion by brain aromatase into estrogen, with the consequent activation of estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated signaling. Thus, the role of androgen receptor (AR) in perinatal...

  17. Diethylstilbestrol and docetaxel: a Phase II study of tubulin active agents in patients with metastatic, androgen-independent prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, R Bruce; Nelson, Peter S; Lin, Daniel; Ryan, Christopher W; Garzotto, Mark; Beer, Tomasz M

    2007-09-01

    The addition of diethylstilbestrol to docetaxel modified tubulin composition and improved the response of prostate cancer to chemotherapy in preclinical models. An attempt was made to recapitulate the observations in a clinical trial. Twenty-nine patients with progressive, metastatic, chemotherapy-naive androgen-independent prostate cancer were treated with diethylstilbestrol 1 mg daily and 5 mg on the day before docetaxel and docetaxel 36 mg/m(2) intravenously weekly for 3 weeks of a 4-week cycle. Prophylactic anticoagulation was used in all patients. Patients were assessed by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) monthly and computed tomography (CT) and bone scans every 3 cycles. The Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria and PSA decline by >50% maintained for 4 weeks were used to assess activity. The median age was 68 years (range, 56-84 years), Southwest Oncology Group performance status 0 (score range, 0-2), alkaline phosphatase 120 U/L (range, 49-523), hemoglobin (Hgb) 12.6 g/dL (range, 9.2-16.3), PSA 66 ng/dL (range, 4-1962). The median number of cycles administered was 6. Soft tissue metastases were present in 51% of patients and bone metastases in 93%. Twenty-nine patients are evaluable for response. Of these, 20 patients (69%, 95% confidence interval [CI], 49%-85%) had a PSA decline of >50% and the PSA declined by >90% in 12 patients (41%, 95% CI, 23.1%-58.9%). Of 15 patients with measurable disease, 6 (40%, 95% CI, 23.5%-61%) had a partial response. Median time to progression was 6 months (range, 3-19 months). Fifteen patients (51%) suffered grade 3/4 toxicity. Two patients died of causes unrelated to therapy and another died from a steroid-induced ulcer. Six patients developed thrombosis and of those tested 75% had Factor V mutations. Pretreatment PSA, performance status, Hgb, and alkaline phosphatase had no impact on the likelihood of response. The combination of diethylstilbestrol and docetaxel produces a significant level of

  18. Evaluation of androgenic activity of allium cepa on spermatogenesis in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaki, A; Fathiazad, F; Nouri, M; Khaki, A A; Khamenehi, H J; Hamadeh, M

    2009-02-01

    Allium cepa (onion) has a beneficial effect on disease treatment worldwide and has been used since ancient times as a medicinal and food source. Recently several reports have shown that onion has high antioxidant activity. As antioxidants have an essential effect on sperm health parameters, we investigated the effect of the fresh juice of onion bulbs on the spermatogenesis cycle in rats. Wistar male rats (n = 30) were allocated into 3 groups, control (n = 10) and two test groups (each of 10). The animals in the test groups were subdivided into groups of 2 that received fresh onion juice equivalent to 0.5 and 1 g/rat/ /day of fresh onion. The fresh onion juice was administered by gavage for 20 consecutive days. The animals were kept in standard conditions. On the twentieth day, the testes of rats in all groups were removed and sperm was collected from the epididymis and was prepared for analysis. Serum total testosterone significantly increased in all the test groups (p onion juice (p onion juice (p onion juice significantly affected the sperm number, percentage of viability, and motility; it seems that using 4 g/kg of freshly prepared onion juice is effective in sperm health parameters.

  19. Androgen-induced cell migration: role of androgen receptor/filamin A association.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Castoria

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Androgen receptor (AR controls male morphogenesis, gametogenesis and prostate growth as well as development of prostate cancer. These findings support a role for AR in cell migration and invasiveness. However, the molecular mechanism involved in AR-mediated cell migration still remains elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mouse embryo NIH3T3 fibroblasts and highly metastatic human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells harbor low levels of transcriptionally incompetent AR. We now report that, through extra nuclear action, AR triggers migration of both cell types upon stimulation with physiological concentrations of the androgen R1881. We analyzed the initial events leading to androgen-induced cell migration and observed that challenging NIH3T3 cells with 10 nM R1881 rapidly induces interaction of AR with filamin A (FlnA at cytoskeleton. AR/FlnA complex recruits integrin beta 1, thus activating its dependent cascade. Silencing of AR, FlnA and integrin beta 1 shows that this ternary complex controls focal adhesion kinase (FAK, paxillin and Rac, thereby driving cell migration. FAK-null fibroblasts migrate poorly and Rac inhibition by EHT impairs motility of androgen-treated NIH3T3 cells. Interestingly, FAK and Rac activation by androgens are independent of each other. Findings in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells strengthen the role of Rac in androgen signaling. The Rac inhibitor significantly impairs androgen-induced migration in these cells. A mutant AR, deleted of the sequence interacting with FlnA, fails to mediate FAK activation and paxillin tyrosine phosphorylation in androgen-stimulated cells, further reinforcing the role of AR/FlnA interaction in androgen-mediated motility. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present report, for the first time, indicates that the extra nuclear AR/FlnA/integrin beta 1 complex is the key by which androgen activates signaling leading to cell migration. Assembly of this ternary complex may control organ development

  20. Regulation of ROCK Activity in Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan-Fisher, Marie; Wewer, Ulla M; Yoneda, Atsuko

    2013-01-01

    regulators of the actin cytoskeleton acting downstream of the small GTPase Rho. ROCK is associated with cancer progression, and ROCK protein expression is elevated in several types of cancer. ROCKs exist in a closed, inactive conformation under quiescent conditions, which is changed to an open, active......, these findings demonstrate additional modes to regulate ROCK activity. This review describes the molecular mechanisms of ROCK activity regulation in cancer, with emphasis on ROCK isoform-specific regulation and interaction partners, and discusses the potential of ROCKs as therapeutic targets in cancer.......Cancer-associated changes in cellular behavior, such as modified cell-cell contact, increased migratory potential, and generation of cellular force, all require alteration of the cytoskeleton. Two homologous mammalian serine/threonine kinases, Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCK I and II), are key...

  1. Androgen and Estrogen Receptors in Breast Cancer Coregulate Human UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases 2B15 and 2B17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dong G; Selth, Luke A; Tarulli, Gerard A; Meech, Robyn; Wijayakumara, Dhilushi; Chanawong, Apichaya; Russell, Roslin; Caldas, Carlos; Robinson, Jessica L L; Carroll, Jason S; Tilley, Wayne D; Mackenzie, Peter I; Hickey, Theresa E

    2016-10-01

    Glucuronidation is an enzymatic process that terminally inactivates steroid hormones, including estrogens and androgens, thereby influencing carcinogenesis in hormone-dependent cancers. While estrogens drive breast carcinogenesis via the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), androgens play a critical role as prohormones for estrogen biosynthesis and ligands for the androgen receptor (AR). In this study, the expression and regulation of two androgen-inactivating enzymes, the UDP-glucuronosyltransferases UGT2B15 and UGT2B17, was assessed in breast cancer. In large clinical cohorts, high UGT2B15 and UGT2B17 levels positively influenced disease-specific survival in distinct molecular subgroups. Expression of these genes was highest in cases positive for ERα. In cell line models, ERα, AR, and the transcription factor FOXA1 cooperated to increase transcription via tandem binding events at their proximal promoters. ERα activity was dependent on FOXA1, facilitated by AR activation, and potently stimulated by estradiol as well as estrogenic metabolites of 5α-dihydrotestosterone. AR activity was mediated via binding to an estrogen receptor half-site 3' to the FOXA1 and ERα-binding sites. Although AR and FOXA1 bound the UGT promoters in AR-positive/ERα-negative breast cancer cell lines, androgen treatment did not influence basal transcription levels. Ex vivo culture of human breast tissue and ERα(+) tumors provided evidence for upregulation of UGT2B15 and UGT2B17 by estrogen or androgen treatment. ERα binding was evident at the promoters of these genes in a small cohort of primary tumors and distant metastases. Collectively, these data provide insight into sex steroid receptor-mediated regulation of androgen-inactivating enzymes in ERα(+) breast cancer, which may have subtype-specific consequences for disease progression and outcomes. Cancer Res; 76(19); 5881-93. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Rapid reduction in blood flow to the rat ventral prostate gland after castration: preliminary evidence that androgens influence prostate size by regulating blood flow to the prostate gland and prostatic endothelial cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabsigh, A; Chang, D T; Heitjan, D F; Kiss, A; Olsson, C A; Puchner, P J; Buttyan, R

    1998-08-01

    Androgenic steroids regulate the development and size of the mammalian prostate gland. The mechanism(s) for this growth control might involve a direct effect on prostate cell proliferation and survival as well as more complex effects on the tissue environment supporting nourishment and oxygenation. In this study, we evaluated an animal model of androgen action on the prostate, the rat ventral prostate gland, to determine whether acute androgen withdrawal, by means of castration, might alter the primary blood flow to the prostate gland and for the effects of castration on prostatic endothelial cell viability. Groups of rats studied included intact control males, males that had been surgically castrated, or males that received a sham-surgical castration. Relative blood flow (RBF) to the rat ventral prostate glands and rat bladders were measured at 18 and 24 hr after castration or sham castration using a fluorescent microsphere infusion technique. Thin sections from fixed and embedded rat ventral prostate glands obtained from unoperated or 12-hr castrated rats were analyzed by the TUNEL immunostaining technique to microscopically identify and quantify apoptotic epithelial, stromal, and endothelial cells. RBF to the rat ventral prostate was reduced by 38%, at 18 hr after castration when compared with intact or sham-operated rats and by 45% at 24 hr after castration (P=0.038 unoperated/0.025 sham operated). In contrast, RBF to the bladder was not significantly different between any of the groups in the 24-hr castrate experiment. TUNEL staining analysis of ventral prostate tissues obtained from 12-hr castrated rats showed only rare TUNEL-positive epithelial cells similar to the control tissue but significantly increased TUNEL labeling for endothelial and other ventral prostate stromal cells. Castration resulted in a rapid and significant reduction of blood flow to the mature rat ventral prostate gland that was not seen in the bladder. This reduction precedes the

  3. Study of RNA interference inhibiting rat ovarian androgen biosynthesis by depressing 17alpha-hydroxylase/17, 20-lyase activity in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xing

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 17alpha-hydroxylase/17, 20-lyase encoded by CYP17 is the key enzyme in androgen biosynthesis pathway. Previous studies demonstrated the accentuation of the enzyme in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS was the most important mechanism of androgen excess. We chose CYP17 as the therapeutic target, trying to suppress the activity of 17alpha-hydroxylase/17, 20-lyase and inhibit androgen biosynthesis by silencing the expression of CYP17 in the rat ovary. Methods Three CYP17-targeting and one negative control oligonucleotides were designed and used in the present study. The silence efficiency of lentivirus shRNA was assessed by qRT-PCR, Western blotting and hormone assay. After subcapsular injection of lentivirus shRNA in rat ovary, the delivery efficiency was evaluated by GFP fluorescence and qPCR. Total RNA was extracted from rat ovary for CYP17 mRNA determination and rat serum was collected for hormone measurement. Results In total, three CYP17-targeting lentivirus shRNAs were synthesized. The results showed that all of them had a silencing effect on CYP17 mRNA and protein. Moreover, androstenedione secreted by rat theca interstitial cells (TIC in the RNAi group declined significantly compared with that in the control group. Two weeks after rat ovarian subcapsular injection of chosen CYP17 shRNA, the GFP fluorescence of frozen ovarian sections could be seen clearly under fluorescence microscope. It also showed that the GFP DNA level increased significantly, and its relative expression level was 7.42 times higher than that in the control group. Simultaneously, shRNA treatment significantly decreased CYP17 mRNA and protein levels at 61% and 54%, respectively. Hormone assay showed that all the levels of androstenedione, 17-hydroxyprogesterone and testosterone declined to a certain degree, but progesterone levels declined significantly. Conclusion The present study proves for the first time that ovarian androgen

  4. Androgen receptor abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George); C. Ris-Stalpers (Carolyn); H.C.J. van Rooij (Henri); G. Romalo (G.); G. Trifiro (Gianluca); E. Mulder (Eppo); L. Pinsky (L.); H.U. Schweikert (H.); J. Trapman (Jan)

    1991-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The human androgen receptor is a member of the superfamily of steroid hormone receptors. Proper functioning of this protein is a prerequisite for normal male sexual differentiation and development. The cloning of the human androgen receptor cDNA and the elucidation of

  5. Expression of androgen receptor splice variants in clinical breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Theresa E; Irvine, Connie M; Dvinge, Heidi; Tarulli, Gerard A; Hanson, Adrienne R; Ryan, Natalie K; Pickering, Marie A; Birrell, Stephen N; Hu, Dong Gui; Mackenzie, Peter I; Russell, Roslin; Caldas, Carlos; Raj, Ganesh V; Dehm, Scott M; Plymate, Stephen R; Bradley, Robert K; Tilley, Wayne D; Selth, Luke A

    2015-12-29

    The importance of androgen receptor (AR) signaling is increasingly being recognized in breast cancer, which has elicited clinical trials aimed at assessing the efficacy of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for metastatic disease. In prostate cancer, resistance to ADT is frequently associated with the emergence of androgen-independent splice variants of the AR (AR variants, AR-Vs) that lack the LBD and are constitutively active. Women with breast cancer may be prone to a similar phenomenon. Herein, we show that in addition to the prototypical transcript, the AR gene produces a diverse range of AR-V transcripts in primary breast tumors. The most frequently and highly expressed variant was AR-V7 (exons 1/2/3/CE3), which was detectable at the mRNA level in > 50% of all breast cancers and at the protein level in a subset of ERα-negative tumors. Functionally, AR-V7 is a constitutively active and ADT-resistant transcription factor that promotes growth and regulates a transcriptional program distinct from AR in ERα-negative breast cancer cells. Importantly, we provide ex vivo evidence that AR-V7 is upregulated by the AR antagonist enzalutamide in primary breast tumors. These findings have implications for treatment response in the ongoing clinical trials of ADT in breast cancer.

  6. Androgen deprivation-induced senescence promotes outgrowth of androgen-refractory prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominick G A Burton

    Full Text Available Androgen deprivation (AD is an effective method for initially suppressing prostate cancer (PC progression. However, androgen-refractory PC cells inevitably emerge from the androgen-responsive tumor, leading to incurable disease. Recent studies have shown AD induces cellular senescence, a phenomenon that is cell-autonomously tumor-suppressive but which confers tumor-promoting adaptations that can facilitate the advent of senescence-resistant malignant cell populations. Because androgen-refractory PC cells emerge clonally from the originally androgen-responsive tumor, we sought to investigate whether AD-induced senescence (ADIS affects acquisition of androgen-refractory behavior in androgen-responsive LNCaP and LAPC4 prostate cancer cells. We find that repeated exposure of these androgen-responsive cells to senescence-inducing stimuli via cyclic AD leads to the rapid emergence of ADIS-resistant, androgen-refractory cells from the bulk senescent cell population. Our results show that the ADIS phenotype is associated with tumor-promoting traits, notably chemoresistance and enhanced pro-survival mechanisms such as inhibition of p53-mediated cell death, which encourage persistence of the senescent cells. We further find that pharmacologic enforcement of p53/Bax activation via Nutlin-3 prior to establishment of ADIS is required to overcome the associated pro-survival response and preferentially trigger pervasive cell death instead of senescence during AD. Thus our study demonstrates that ADIS promotes outgrowth of androgen-refractory PC cells and is consequently a suboptimal tumor-suppressor response to AD.

  7. The Three Dimensional Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (3D-QSAR and Docking Studies of Curcumin Derivatives as Androgen Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor antagonists have been proved to be effective anti-prostate cancer agents. 3D-QSAR and Molecular docking methods were performed on curcumin derivatives as androgen receptor antagonists. The bioactive conformation was explored by docking the potent compound 29 into the binding site of AR. The constructed Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA and Comparative Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA models produced statistically significant results with the cross-validated correlation coefficients q2 of 0.658 and 0.567, non-cross-validated correlation coefficients r2 of 0.988 and 0.978, and predicted correction coefficients r2pred of 0.715 and 0.793, respectively. These results ensure the CoMFA and CoMSIA models as a tool to guide the design of novel potent AR antagonists. A set of 30 new analogs were proposed by utilizing the results revealed in the present study, and were predicted with potential activities in the developed models.

  8. Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II and Androgen Signaling Pathways Modulate MEF2 Activity in Testosterone-Induced Cardiac Myocyte Hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Duran

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Testosterone is known to induce cardiac hypertrophy through androgen receptor (AR-dependent and -independent pathways, but the molecular underpinnings of the androgen action remain poorly understood. Previous work has shown that Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII and myocyte-enhancer factor 2 (MEF2 play key roles in promoting cardiac myocyte growth. In order to gain mechanistic insights into the action of androgens on the heart, we investigated how testosterone affects CaMKII and MEF2 in cardiac myocyte hypertrophy by performing studies on cultured rat cardiac myocytes and hearts obtained from adult male orchiectomized (ORX rats. In cardiac myocytes, MEF2 activity was monitored using a luciferase reporter plasmid, and the effects of CaMKII and AR signaling pathways on MEF2C were examined by using siRNAs and pharmacological inhibitors targeting these two pathways. In the in vivo studies, ORX rats were randomly assigned to groups that were administered vehicle or testosterone (125 mg⋅kg-1⋅week-1 for 5 weeks, and plasma testosterone concentrations were determined using ELISA. Cardiac hypertrophy was evaluated by measuring well-characterized hypertrophy markers. Moreover, western blotting was used to assess CaMKII and phospholamban (PLN phosphorylation, and MEF2C and AR protein levels in extracts of left-ventricle tissue from control and testosterone-treated ORX rats. Whereas testosterone treatment increased the phosphorylation levels of CaMKII (Thr286 and phospholambam (PLN (Thr17 in cardiac myocytes in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, testosterone-induced MEF2 activity and cardiac myocyte hypertrophy were prevented upon inhibition of CaMKII, MEF2C, and AR signaling pathways. Notably, in the hypertrophied hearts obtained from testosterone-administered ORX rats, both CaMKII and PLN phosphorylation levels and AR and MEF2 protein levels were increased. Thus, this study presents the first evidence indicating that

  9. Androgens and the ageing male

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Anders; Skakkebaek, Niels E

    2002-01-01

    Hypogonadal men share a variety of signs and symptoms such as decreased muscle mass, osteopoenia, increased fat mass, fatigue, decreased libido and cognitive dysfunctions. Controlled trials have demonstrated favourable effects of androgen substitution therapy on these signs and symptoms in men...... 'andropause' has been suggested. However, testosterone levels show no or only modest variation with age in men; with large prospective studies suggesting a maximal decline of total testosterone of 1.6% per year. Thus, in contrast to the sudden arrest of gonadal activity in females around menopause, men do...... not have an andropause. As large placebo-controlled studies of androgen treatment in elderly males are lacking, proper risk assessment of adverse effects such as prostate cancer following testosterone treatment in elderly males is completely lacking. In the future, testosterone therapy may prove beneficial...

  10. Transfection of Sertoli cells with androgen receptor alters gene expression without androgen stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fietz, D; Markmann, M; Lang, D; Konrad, L; Geyer, J; Kliesch, S; Chakraborty, T; Hossain, H; Bergmann, M

    2015-12-29

    Androgens play an important role for the development of male fertility and gained interest as growth and survival factors for certain types of cancer. Androgens act via the androgen receptor (AR/Ar), which is involved in various cell biological processes such as sex differentiation. To study the functional mechanisms of androgen action, cell culture systems and AR-transfected cell lines are needed. Transfection of AR into cell lines and subsequent gene expression analysis after androgen treatment is well established to investigate the molecular biology of target cells. However, it remains unclear how the transfection with AR itself can modulate the gene expression even without androgen stimulation. Therefore, we transfected Ar-deficient rat Sertoli cells 93RS2 by electroporation using a full length human AR. Transfection success was confirmed by Western Blotting, immunofluorescence and RT-PCR. AR transfection-related gene expression alterations were detected with microarray-based genome-wide expression profiling of transfected and non-transfected 93RS2 cells without androgen stimulation. Microarray analysis revealed 672 differentially regulated genes with 200 up- and 472 down-regulated genes. These genes could be assigned to four major biological categories (development, hormone response, immune response and metabolism). Microarray results were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR analysis for 22 candidate genes. We conclude from our data, that the transfection of Ar-deficient Sertoli cells with AR has a measurable effect on gene expression even without androgen stimulation and cause Sertoli cell damage. Studies using AR-transfected cells, subsequently stimulated, should consider alterations in AR-dependent gene expression as off-target effects of the AR transfection itself.

  11. Regulation of ROCK Activity in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan-Fisher, Marie; Wewer, Ulla M.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer-associated changes in cellular behavior, such as modified cell-cell contact, increased migratory potential, and generation of cellular force, all require alteration of the cytoskeleton. Two homologous mammalian serine/threonine kinases, Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCK I and II), are key regulators of the actin cytoskeleton acting downstream of the small GTPase Rho. ROCK is associated with cancer progression, and ROCK protein expression is elevated in several types of cancer. ROCKs exist in a closed, inactive conformation under quiescent conditions, which is changed to an open, active conformation by the direct binding of guanosine triphosphate (GTP)–loaded Rho. In recent years, a number of ROCK isoform-specific binding partners have been found to modulate the kinase activity through direct interactions with the catalytic domain or via altered cellular localization of the kinases. Thus, these findings demonstrate additional modes to regulate ROCK activity. This review describes the molecular mechanisms of ROCK activity regulation in cancer, with emphasis on ROCK isoform-specific regulation and interaction partners, and discusses the potential of ROCKs as therapeutic targets in cancer. PMID:23204112

  12. Regulation of p21ras activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lowy, D R; Zhang, K; DeClue, J E

    1992-01-01

    The ras genes encode GTP/GDP-binding proteins that participate in mediating mitogenic signals from membrane tyrosine kinases to downstream targets. The activity of p21ras is determined by the concentration of GTP-p21ras, which is tightly regulated by a complex array of positive and negative control...

  13. C-terminally truncated constitutively active androgen receptor variants and their biologic and clinical significance in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoitei, Anca; Merseburger, Axel S; Godau, Beate; Hoda, M Raschid; Schmid, Evi; Cronauer, Marcus V

    2017-02-01

    A mechanism allowing castration resistant prostate cancer cells to escape the effects of conventional anti-hormonal treatments is the synthesis of constitutively active, C-terminally truncated androgen receptor (AR)-variants. Lacking the entire or vast parts of the ligand binding domain, the intended target of traditional endocrine therapies, these AR-variants (termed ARΔLBD) are insensitive to all traditional treatments including second generation compounds like abiraterone, enzalutamide or ARN-509. Although ARΔLBD are predominantly products of alternative splicing, they can also be products of nonsense mutations or proteolytic cleavage. In this review, we will discuss the etiology and function of c-terminally truncated AR-variants and their clinical significance as markers/targets for the treatment of castration resistant prostate cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Androgen therapy with dehydroepiandrosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buvat, Jacques

    2003-11-01

    The physiological role of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulphate (DHEAS) is poorly understood. It depends in a large part on their transformation into testosterone and estradiol. The capacity of DHEA as a neurosteroid, the recent discovery of putative specific DHEA receptors on endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells, the steady decrease of DHEA production from the 40s on, together with certain human epidemiologic data as well as various beneficial effects of DHA supplementation in rodents have suggested the possibility that this steroid is involved in cognitive and memory, metabolic and vascular, immune and sexual functions and in their aging. However, epidemiologic studies are conflicting, and no well-designed clinical trials have definitely substantiated the role of DHEA in these functions in humans, or the utility and safety of DHEA supplementation. However, beneficial effects seem plausible in women with several conditions according to the results of double-blind placebo-controlled trials: the dose of 30 to 50 mg seems beneficial to the mood, sense of well being and sexual desire and activity of women with adrenal insufficiency. The only long-term trial of supplementation devoted to women over 60 reported significant increases in bone mineral density and, in the 70-79-year-old subgroup, in sexual desire, arousal, activity and satisfaction. The dose of 200 mg also proved to decrease disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus. Lastly, high DHEA doses have improved mood in various groups of patients of any age and gender with depressive symptoms. The use of DHEA therapy may also be discussed in women of any age when a trial of androgen supplementation seems justified because of the existence of an inhibited sexual desire or a sexual arousal disorder associated with documented androgen deficiency. The rather weak conversion of DHEA into testosterone protects from the risk of overdosing associated with testosterone preparations. However, it must

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL ANDROGENS AND ANTIANDROGENS: AN EXPANDING CHEMICAL UNIVERSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Within the last ten years, awareness has grown about environmental chemicals that display antiandrogenic or androgenic activity. While studies in the early 1990s focused on pesticides that acted as androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, it soon became evident that this was not the ...

  16. Dynamic Nucleosome-Depleted Regions at Androgen Receptor Enhancers in the Absence of Ligand in Prostate Cancer Cells ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu-Vieyra, Claudia; Lai, John; Berman, Benjamin P.; Frenkel, Baruch; Jia, Li; Jones, Peter A.; Coetzee, Gerhard A.

    2011-01-01

    Nucleosome positioning at transcription start sites is known to regulate gene expression by altering DNA accessibility to transcription factors; however, its role at enhancers is poorly understood. We investigated nucleosome positioning at the androgen receptor (AR) enhancers of TMPRSS2, KLK2, and KLK3/PSA in prostate cancer cells. Surprisingly, a population of enhancer modules in androgen-deprived cultures showed nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs) in all three loci. Under androgen-deprived conditions, NDRs at the TMPRSS2 enhancer were maintained by the pioneer AR transcriptional collaborator GATA-2. Androgen treatment resulted in AR occupancy, an increased number of enhancer modules with NDRs without changes in footprint width, increased levels of histone H3 acetylation (AcH3), and dimethylation (H3K4me2) at nucleosomes flanking the NDRs. Our data suggest that, in the absence of ligand, AR enhancers exist in an equilibrium in which a percentage of modules are occupied by nucleosomes while others display NDRs. We propose that androgen treatment leads to the disruption of the equilibrium toward a nucleosome-depleted state, rather than to enhancer de novo “remodeling.” This allows the recruitment of histone modifiers, chromatin remodelers, and ultimately gene activation. The “receptive” state described here could help explain AR signaling activation under very low ligand concentrations. PMID:21969603

  17. Src regulates the activity of SIRT2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, You Hee [College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Drug Development, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hangun [College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Life and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sunchon National University, Sunchon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Ho [College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Drug Development, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Yun-Hye, E-mail: jinyune@hanmail.net [College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Drug Development, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwang Youl, E-mail: kwanglee@chonnam.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Drug Development, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • Src decreases the protein levels of Sirt2. • Src inhibitor and knockdown of Src increase the protein levels of Sirt2. • Src interacts with and phosphorylates Sirt2. • Src regulate the activity of Sirt2. - Abstract: SIRT2 is a mammalian member of the Sirtuin family of NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylases. The tyrosine kinase Src is involved in a variety of cellular signaling pathways, leading to the induction of DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, and cytoskeletal reorganization. The function of SIRT2 is modulated by post-translational modifications; however, the precise molecular signaling mechanism of SIRT2 through interactions with c-Src has not yet been established. In this study, we investigated the potential regulation of SIRT2 function by c-Src. We found that the protein levels of SIRT2 were decreased by c-Src, and subsequently rescued by the addition of a Src specific inhibitor, SU6656, or by siRNA-mediated knockdown of c-Src. The c-Src interacts with and phosphorylates SIRT2 at Tyr104. c-Src also showed the ability to regulate the deacetylation activity of SIRT2. Investigation on the phosphorylation of SIRT2 suggested that this was the method of c-Src-mediated SIRT2 regulation.

  18. Complement activation and regulation in preeclamptic placenta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Inkeri eLokki

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia (PE is a common disorder of pregnancy originating in the placenta. We examined whether excessive activation or poor regulation of the complement system at the maternal-fetal interface could contribute to the development of PE. Location and occurrence of complement components and regulators in placentae were analyzed. Cryostat sections of placentae were processed from 7 early-onset PE (diagnosis <34 weeks of gestation, 5 late-onset PE and 10 control pregnancies and immunostained for 6 complement activators and 6 inhibitors. Fluorescence was quantified and compared between PE and control placentae. Gene copy numbers of complement components C4A and C4B were assessed by a quantitative PCR method. Maternal C4 deficiencies (≥1 missing or non-functional C4 were most common in the early-onset PE group (71%, and more frequent in late-onset PE compared to healthy controls (60% vs. 38%. Complement C1q deposition differed significantly between control and patient groups: controls and early-onset PE patients had more C1q than late-onset PE patients (mean p=0.01 and p=0.005, respectively. C3 activation was analyzed by staining for C3b/iC3b and C3d. C3d was mostly specific to the basal syncytium and C3b/iC3b diffuse in other structures, but there were no clear differences between the study groups. Activated C4 and membrane-bound regulators CD55, CD46 and CD59 were observed abundantly in the syncytiotrophoblast. Syncytial knots, structures enriched in PE, stained specifically for the classical pathway inhibitor C4bp, whereas the key regulator alternative pathway, Factor H showed a wider distribution in the placenta. Differences in C1q deposition between late- and early-onset PE groups may be indicative of the different aetiology of PE symptoms in these patients. Irregular distribution of the complement regulators C4bp and FH in the PE placenta and a higher frequency of C4A deficiencies suggest a disturbed balance between complement activation

  19. XIAP Regulates Caspase Activity in Degenerating Axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Unsain

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Our knowledge of the destructive events that regulate axonal degeneration is rudimentary. Here, we examine the role of caspases and their endogenous inhibitor, the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP, in axonal degeneration of dorsal root ganglion (DRG axons. We show that caspase-3, caspase-6, and caspase-9 are present in axons and are cleaved upon nerve growth factor (NGF withdrawal. We observed that caspase-3 activity is high in NGF-withdrawn axons and that CASP3−/− axons are protected from degeneration. XIAP−/− DRG sensory neurons degenerate more rapidly and contain more active caspase-3 than their wild-type counterparts, indicating that axonal caspases are normally regulated by XIAP. Importantly, axonal XIAP levels drop sharply after NGF withdrawal; if XIAP levels are maintained by overexpression, axonal caspase-3 activation and axonal degeneration are suppressed. Finally, we show that XIAP−/− embryos have stunted dermal innervation. We propose that XIAP-mediated caspase inhibition plays an important role in regulating morphogenic events that shape the nervous system during development.

  20. Transforming growth factor-β-stimulated clone-22 (TSC-22) is an androgen regulated gene that enhances apoptosis in prostate cancer following IGF-IR inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, Cynthia C. T.; Haugk, Kathleen; Sun, Shihua; Coleman, Ilsa; Nelson, Peter S.; Vessella, Robert L.; Ludwig, Dale L.; Wu, Jennifer D.; Plymate, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Inhibition of IGF signaling using the human IGF-IR monoclonal antibody A12 is most effective at inducing apoptosis in prostate cancer xenografts in the presence of androgen. We undertook this study to determine mechanisms for increased apoptosis by A12 in the presence of androgens. Experimental Methods The castrate-resistant human xenograft LuCaP 35V was implanted into intact or castrate SCID mice and treated with A12 weekly. After six weeks of tumor growth animals were sacrificed and tumors removed and analyzed for cell cycle distribution/apoptosis and cDNA arrays were performed. Results In castrate mice the tumors were delayed in G2 with no apoptosis; in contrast tumors from intact mice underwent apoptosis with either a G1 or G2 delay. TSC-22 was significantly elevated in tumors from the intact mice compared to castrate mice, especially in those tumors with the highest levels of apoptosis. In order to further determine the function of TSC-22, we transfected various human prostate cancer cell lines with a plasmid expressing TSC-22. Cell lines overexpressing TSC-22 demonstrated an increase in apoptosis and a delay in G1. When these cell lines were placed subcutaneously in SCID mice a decreased number of animals formed tumors and the rate of tumor growth was decreased compared to control tumors. Conclusions These data indicate that IGF-IR inhibition in the presence of androgen has an enhanced effect on decreasing tumor growth, in part, through increased expression of the tumor suppressor gene TSC-22. PMID:19996218

  1. Androgenic and estrogenic regulation of Atrogin-1, MuRF1 and myostatin expression in different muscle types of male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Naeyer, H; Lamon, S; Russell, A P; Everaert, I; De Spaey, A; Vanheel, B; Taes, Y; Derave, W

    2014-04-01

    The molecular factors targeted by androgens and estrogens on muscle mass are not fully understood. The current study aimed to explore gene and protein expression of Atrogin-1, MuRF1, and myostatin in an androgen deprivation-induced muscle atrophy model. We examined the effects of Orx either with or without testosterone (T) or estradiol (E2) administration on Atrogin-1 gene expression, and MuRF1 and myostatin gene and protein expression. Measurements were made in soleus (SOL), extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and levator ani/bulbocavernosus (LA/BC) of male C57BL/6 mice. Thirty days of Orx resulted in a reduction in weight gain and muscle mass. These effects were prevented by T. In LA/BC, Atrogin-1 and MuRF1 mRNA was increased throughout 30 days of Orx, which was fully reversed by T and partially by E2 administration. In EDL and SOL, a less pronounced upregulation of both genes was only detectable at the early stages of Orx. Myostatin mRNA levels were downregulated in LA/BC and upregulated in EDL following Orx. T, but not E2, reversed these effects. No changes in protein levels of MuRF1 and myostatin were found in EDL at any time point following Orx. The atrophy in SOL and EDL in response to androgen deprivation, and its restoration by T, is accompanied by only minimal changes in atrogenes and myostatin gene expression. The marked differences in muscle atrophy and atrogene and myostatin mRNA between LA/BC and the locomotor muscles suggest that the murine LA/BC is not an optimal model to study Orx-induced muscle atrophy.

  2. Low androgen induced penile maldevelopment involves altered gene expression of biomarkers of smooth muscle differentiation and a key enzyme regulating cavernous smooth muscle cell tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumu, Lilian A; Braden, Tim D; Vail, Krystal; Simon, Liz; Goyal, Hari Om

    2014-07-01

    We determined the effects of low androgens in the neonatal period on biomarkers of smooth muscle cell differentiation, Myh11 and Acta2, and on Pde5A expression in the penis. One-day-old pups were treated daily with the gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist antide with or without dihydrotestosterone for 1 to 6 days. Tissues were collected at age day 7 and at adulthood at age 120 days. Penes were examined by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Testes were assayed for the intratesticular testosterone and steroidogenic enzymes Cyp17α1 and StAR. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist exposure suppressed the neonatal testicular testosterone surge 70% to 80%. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed 80% to 90% reductions in Cyp17α1 and StAR protein, and 40% to 60% reductions in Myh11 and ACTA2 as a result of gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist compared to controls. Dihydrotestosterone co-administration mitigated these decreases. Western blot confirmed the Myh11 decrease at the protein level. Immunohistochemistry of Acta2 confirmed cavernous smooth muscle cell loss at the tissue level. Also, gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist exposure decreased Pde5a expression and dihydrotestosterone co-administration mitigated the decrease. Comparison of data between 2 parts of the penis body (corpora cavernosa and corpus spongiosum) showed that antagonist induced decreases in Myh11, Acta2 and Pde5a expression occurred only in the corpora cavernosa, implying that the latter is the target site of low androgen action. As evidenced by gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist induced suppression of the neonatal testosterone surge and reduced steroidogenesis, low androgens in the neonatal period altered gene expression of biomarkers of smooth muscle cell differentiation. This led to loss of cavernous smooth muscle cells and consequently to penile maldevelopment. Copyright

  3. Selective androgen receptor modulator RAD140 is neuroprotective in cultured neurons and kainate-lesioned male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Anusha; Christensen, Amy; Moser, V Alexandra; Vest, Rebekah S; Miller, Chris P; Hattersley, Gary; Pike, Christian J

    2014-04-01

    The decline in testosterone levels in men during normal aging increases risks of dysfunction and disease in androgen-responsive tissues, including brain. The use of testosterone therapy has the potential to increase the risks for developing prostate cancer and or accelerating its progression. To overcome this limitation, novel compounds termed "selective androgen receptor modulators" (SARMs) have been developed that lack significant androgen action in prostate but exert agonist effects in select androgen-responsive tissues. The efficacy of SARMs in brain is largely unknown. In this study, we investigate the SARM RAD140 in cultured rat neurons and male rat brain for its ability to provide neuroprotection, an important neural action of endogenous androgens that is relevant to neural health and resilience to neurodegenerative diseases. In cultured hippocampal neurons, RAD140 was as effective as testosterone in reducing cell death induced by apoptotic insults. Mechanistically, RAD140 neuroprotection was dependent upon MAPK signaling, as evidenced by elevation of ERK phosphorylation and inhibition of protection by the MAPK kinase inhibitor U0126. Importantly, RAD140 was also neuroprotective in vivo using the rat kainate lesion model. In experiments with gonadectomized, adult male rats, RAD140 was shown to exhibit peripheral tissue-specific androgen action that largely spared prostate, neural efficacy as demonstrated by activation of androgenic gene regulation effects, and neuroprotection of hippocampal neurons against cell death caused by systemic administration of the excitotoxin kainate. These novel findings demonstrate initial preclinical efficacy of a SARM in neuroprotective actions relevant to Alzheimer's disease and related neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Androgen receptor and histone lysine demethylases in ovine placenta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellane R Cleys

    Full Text Available Sex steroid hormones regulate developmental programming in many tissues, including programming gene expression during prenatal development. While estradiol is known to regulate placentation, little is known about the role of testosterone and androgen signaling in placental development despite the fact that testosterone rises in maternal circulation during pregnancy and in placenta-induced pregnancy disorders. We investigated the role of testosterone in placental gene expression, and focused on androgen receptor (AR. Prenatal androgenization decreased global DNA methylation in gestational day 90 placentomes, and increased placental expression of AR as well as genes involved in epigenetic regulation, angiogenesis, and growth. As AR complexes with histone lysine demethylases (KDMs to regulate AR target genes in human cancers, we also investigated if the same mechanism is present in the ovine placenta. AR co-immunoprecipitated with KDM1A and KDM4D in sheep placentomes, and AR-KDM1A complexes were recruited to a half-site for androgen response element (ARE in the promoter region of VEGFA. Androgenized ewes also had increased cotyledonary VEGFA. Finally, in human first trimester placental samples KDM1A and KDM4D immunolocalized to the syncytiotrophoblast, with nuclear KDM1A and KDM4D immunostaining also present in the villous stroma. In conclusion, placental androgen signaling, possibly through AR-KDM complex recruitment to AREs, regulates placental VEGFA expression. AR and KDMs are also present in first trimester human placenta. Androgens appear to be an important regulator of trophoblast differentiation and placental development, and aberrant androgen signaling may contribute to the development of placental disorders.

  5. A randomised controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of a 6 month dietary and physical activity intervention for prostate cancer patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haseen Farhana

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment with Androgen Deprivation Therapy (ADT for prostate cancer is associated with changes in body composition including increased fat and decreased lean mass; increased fatigue, and a reduction in quality of life. No study to date has evaluated the effect of dietary and physical activity modification on the side-effects related to ADT. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of a 6-month dietary and physical activity intervention for prostate cancer survivors receiving ADT to minimise the changes in body composition, fatigue and quality of life, typically associated with ADT. Methods Men are recruited to this study if their treatment plan is to receive ADT for at least 6 months. Men who are randomised to the intervention arm receive a home-based tailored intervention to meet the following guidelines a ≥ 5 servings vegetables and fruits/day; b 30%-35% of total energy from fat, and Discussion The results of this study will provide detailed information on diet and physical activity levels in prostate cancer patients treated with ADT and will test the feasibility and efficacy of a diet and physical activity intervention which could provide essential information to develop guidelines for prostate cancer patients to minimise the side effects related to ADT. Trial registration ISRCTN trial number ISCRTN75282423

  6. Molecular mechanisms regulating NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Eun-Kyeong; Kim, Jin Kyung; Shin, Dong-Min; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are multi-protein signaling complexes that trigger the activation of inflammatory caspases and the maturation of interleukin-1β. Among various inflammasome complexes, the NLRP3 inflammasome is best characterized and has been linked with various human autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Thus, the NLRP3 inflammasome may be a promising target for anti-inflammatory therapies. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the mechanisms by which the NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in the cytosol. We also describe the binding partners of NLRP3 inflammasome complexes activating or inhibiting the inflammasome assembly. Our knowledge of the mechanisms regulating NLRP3 inflammasome signaling and how these influence inflammatory responses offers further insight into potential therapeutic strategies to treat inflammatory diseases associated with dysregulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:26549800

  7. A clinical syndrome of mild androgen insensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migeon, C J; Brown, T R; Lanes, R; Palacios, A; Amrhein, J A; Schoen, E J

    1984-10-01

    We studied four patients from three kindreds who had normal male body habitus and external genitalia except for short penile length and gynecomastia. Prostate size was small in all patients and spermatogenesis was decreased markedly in one and absent in three. Testicular biopsies in two patients revealed normal histology but evidence of spermatogenic arrest at the spermatocyte stage. Circulating levels of testosterone and LH were increased and the testosterone-dihydrotestosterone ratios were normal. Plasma estradiol was elevated in three of the four patients. Serum FSH levels were significantly elevated in only one patient. The response of LH and FSH to LHRH stimulation was normal in the two patients who were tested. Despite the normal male phenotype, the laboratory studies suggested the diagnosis of androgen insensitivity. This was confirmed in two patients by finding decreased dihydrotestosterone-binding capacity in genital skin fibroblasts. Two of the patients had normal levels of androgen receptor binding, suggesting that their defect represented a mild form of androgen insensitivity with normal receptor activity. These results demonstrated that mild forms of androgen insensitivity exist in which the only obvious clinical manifestations may be the presence of reduced penile length, gynecomastia, and/or infertility. The incidence of androgen insensitivity among men with these subtle phenotypic abnormalities, including infertility, remains to be determined.

  8. Androgens and the ageing male

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Anders; Skakkebaek, Niels E

    2002-01-01

    'andropause' has been suggested. However, testosterone levels show no or only modest variation with age in men; with large prospective studies suggesting a maximal decline of total testosterone of 1.6% per year. Thus, in contrast to the sudden arrest of gonadal activity in females around menopause, men do...... with severe primary or secondary hypogonadism. Thus, androgen substitution therapy is warranted in men with true hypogonadism at all ages. Symptoms experienced by otherwise healthy ageing males are non-specific and vague, although some may be similar to symptoms of hypogonadism. Therefore, the term...

  9. Regulation of pokemon 1 activity by sumoylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Hee-Eun; Lee, Min-Nyung; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Choi, Won-Il; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Yu, Mi-Young; Hur, Man-Wook

    2007-01-01

    Pokemon 1 is a proto-oncogenic transcriptional regulator that contains a POZ domain at the N-terminus and four Kruppel-like zinc fingers at the C-terminus. Pokemon 1 plays an important role in adipogenesis, osteogenesis, oncogenesis, and transcription of NF-kB responsive genes. Recent reports have shown that biological activities of transcription factors are regulated by sumolylation. We investigated whether Pokemon 1 is post-translationally modified by sumoylation and whether the modification affects Pokemon 1's transcriptional properties. We found that Pokemon 1 is sumoylated in vitro and in vivo. Upon careful analysis of the amino acid sequence of Pokemon 1, we found ten potential sumoylation sites located at lysines 61, 354, 371, 379, 383, 396, 486, 487, 536 and 539. We mutated each of these amino acids into arginine and tested whether the mutation could affect the transcriptional properties of Pokemon 1 on the Pokemon 1 responsive genes, such as ADH5/FDH and pG5-FRE-Luc. Wild-type Pokemon 1 potently represses transcription of ADH5/FDH. Most of the mutants, however, were weaker transcription repressors and repressed transcription 1.3-3.3 fold less effective. Although potential sumoylation sites were located close to the DNA binding domain or the nuclear localization sequence, the mutations did not alter nuclear localization or DNA binding activity. In addition, on the pG5-FRE-Luc test promoter construct, ectopic SUMO-1 repressed transcription in the presence of Pokemon 1. The sumoylation target lysine residue at amino acid 61, which is located in the middle of the POZ-domain, is important because K61R mutation resulted in a much weaker molecular interaction with corepressors. Our data suggest that Pokemon 1's activity as a transcription factor may involve sumoylation, and that sumoylation might be important in the regulation of transcription by Pokemon 1.

  10. Sex differences in neuromuscular androgen receptor expression and sociosexual behavior in a sex changing fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric R Schuppe

    Full Text Available Androgen signaling, via receptor binding, is critical for regulating the physiological and morphological foundations of male-typical reproductive behavior in vertebrates. Muscles essential for male courtship behavior and copulation are highly sensitive to androgens. Differences in the distribution and density of the androgen receptor (AR are important for maintaining dimorphic musculature and thus may provide for anatomical identification of sexually selected traits. In Lythrypnus dalli, a bi-directional hermaphroditic teleost fish, both sexes produce agonistic approach displays, but reproductive behavior is sexually dimorphic. The male-specific courtship behavior is characterized by rapid jerky movements (involving dorsal fin erection towards a female or around their nest. Activation of the supracarinalis muscle is involved in dorsal fin contributions to both agonistic and sociosexual behavior in other fishes, suggesting that differences in goby sexual behavior may be reflected in sexual dimorphism in AR signaling in this muscle. We examined sex differences in the local distribution of AR in supracarinalis muscle and spinal cord. Our results demonstrate that males do express more AR in the supracarinalis muscle relative to females, but there was no sex difference in the number of spinal motoneurons expressing AR. Interestingly, AR expression in the supracarinalis muscle was also related to rates of sociosexual behavior in males, providing evidence that sexual selection may influence muscle androgenic sensitivity to enhance display vigor. Sex differences in the distribution and number of cells expressing AR in the supracarinalis muscle may underlie the expression of dimorphic behaviors in L. dalli.

  11. Sex differences in neuromuscular androgen receptor expression and sociosexual behavior in a sex changing fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuppe, Eric R; Pradhan, Devaleena S; Thonkulpitak, Kevin; Drilling, Cathleen; Black, Michael; Grober, Matthew S

    2017-01-01

    Androgen signaling, via receptor binding, is critical for regulating the physiological and morphological foundations of male-typical reproductive behavior in vertebrates. Muscles essential for male courtship behavior and copulation are highly sensitive to androgens. Differences in the distribution and density of the androgen receptor (AR) are important for maintaining dimorphic musculature and thus may provide for anatomical identification of sexually selected traits. In Lythrypnus dalli, a bi-directional hermaphroditic teleost fish, both sexes produce agonistic approach displays, but reproductive behavior is sexually dimorphic. The male-specific courtship behavior is characterized by rapid jerky movements (involving dorsal fin erection) towards a female or around their nest. Activation of the supracarinalis muscle is involved in dorsal fin contributions to both agonistic and sociosexual behavior in other fishes, suggesting that differences in goby sexual behavior may be reflected in sexual dimorphism in AR signaling in this muscle. We examined sex differences in the local distribution of AR in supracarinalis muscle and spinal cord. Our results demonstrate that males do express more AR in the supracarinalis muscle relative to females, but there was no sex difference in the number of spinal motoneurons expressing AR. Interestingly, AR expression in the supracarinalis muscle was also related to rates of sociosexual behavior in males, providing evidence that sexual selection may influence muscle androgenic sensitivity to enhance display vigor. Sex differences in the distribution and number of cells expressing AR in the supracarinalis muscle may underlie the expression of dimorphic behaviors in L. dalli.

  12. Regulation of polymorphonuclear cell activation by thrombopoietin.

    OpenAIRE

    Brizzi, M F; Battaglia, E; Rosso, A; Strippoli, P; Montrucchio, G; Camussi, G; Pegoraro, L

    1997-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) regulates early and late stages of platelet formation as well as platelet activation. TPO exerts its effects by binding to the receptor, encoded by the protooncogene c-mpl, that is expressed in a large number of cells of hematopoietic origin. In this study, we evaluated the expression of c-Mpl and the effects of TPO on human polymorphonuclear cells (PMN). We demonstrate that PMN express the TPO receptor c-Mpl and that TPO induces STAT1 tyrosine phosphorylation and the for...

  13. Spontaneous EEG activity and spontaneous emotion regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortella-Feliu, M; Morillas-Romero, A; Balle, M; Llabrés, J; Bornas, X; Putman, P

    2014-12-01

    Variability in both frontal and parietal spontaneous EEG activity, using α and β band power and θ/β and δ/β ratios, was explored in a sample of 96 healthy volunteers as a potential correlate of individual differences in spontaneous emotion regulation (SER). Following a baseline EEG recording, participants were asked to continuously rate their discomfort while looking at affective pictures, as well as for a period of time after exposure. Greater spontaneous β band power in parietal locations, lower frontal and parietal δ/β ratios, and lower parietal θ/β ratio were associated with lower ratings of discomfort after the offset of unpleasant pictures. Moreover, lower parietal δ/β ratio was also related to less time needed to recover from discomfort after exposure to aversive pictures, while only a greater frontal and parietal α band power appeared to be associated with faster recovery from discomfort induced by normative-neutral pictures. However, parietal δ/β ratio was the only predictor of both minimum discomfort ratings and time needed to downregulate following exposure to unpleasant pictures, and frontal α band power the only spontaneous EEG index that predicted variability in spontaneous down-regulation after the exposure to normative-neutral pictures. Results are discussed focusing on the utility of diverse spontaneous EEG measures in several cortical regions when capturing trait-like individual differences in emotion regulation capabilities and processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Modelling Proteasome and Proteasome Regulator Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Liepe

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Proteasomes are key proteases involved in a variety of processes ranging from the clearance of damaged proteins to the presentation of antigens to CD8+ T-lymphocytes. Which cleavage sites are used within the target proteins and how fast these proteins are degraded have a profound impact on immune system function and many cellular metabolic processes. The regulation of proteasome activity involves different mechanisms, such as the substitution of the catalytic subunits, the binding of regulatory complexes to proteasome gates and the proteasome conformational modifications triggered by the target protein itself. Mathematical models are invaluable in the analysis; and potentially allow us to predict the complex interactions of proteasome regulatory mechanisms and the final outcomes of the protein degradation rate and MHC class I epitope generation. The pioneering attempts that have been made to mathematically model proteasome activity, cleavage preference variation and their modification by one of the regulatory mechanisms are reviewed here.

  15. Advantages and Limitations of Androgen Receptor-Based Methods for Detecting Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Abuse as Performance Enhancing Drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy Bailey

    Full Text Available Testosterone (T and related androgens are performance enhancing drugs (PEDs abused by some athletes to gain competitive advantage. To monitor unauthorized androgen abuse, doping control programs use mass spectrometry (MS to detect androgens, synthetic anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs and their metabolites in an athlete's urine. AASs of unknown composition will not be detected by these procedures. Since AASs achieve their anabolic effects by activating the Androgen Receptor (AR, cell-based bioassays that measure the effect of a urine sample on AR activity are under investigation as complementary, pan-androgen detection methods. We evaluated an AR BioAssay as a monitor for androgen activity in urine pre-treated with glucuronidase, which releases T from the inactive T-glucuronide that predominates in urine. AR BioAssay activity levels were expressed as 'T-equivalent' concentrations by comparison to a T dose response curve. The T-equivalent concentrations of androgens in the urine of hypogonadal participants supplemented with T (in whom all androgenic activity should arise from T were quantitatively identical to the T measurements conducted by MS at the UCLA Olympic Analytical Laboratory (0.96 ± 0.22. All 17 AASs studied were active in the AR BioAssay; other steroids were inactive. 12 metabolites of 10 commonly abused AASs, which are used for MS monitoring of AAS doping because of their prolonged presence in urine, had reduced or no AR BioAssay activity. Thus, the AR BioAssay can accurately and inexpensively monitor T, but its ability to monitor urinary AASs will be limited to a period immediately following doping in which the active AASs remain intact.

  16. Advantages and Limitations of Androgen Receptor-Based Methods for Detecting Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Abuse as Performance Enhancing Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kathy; Yazdi, Tahmineh; Masharani, Umesh; Tyrrell, Blake; Butch, Anthony; Schaufele, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone (T) and related androgens are performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) abused by some athletes to gain competitive advantage. To monitor unauthorized androgen abuse, doping control programs use mass spectrometry (MS) to detect androgens, synthetic anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) and their metabolites in an athlete’s urine. AASs of unknown composition will not be detected by these procedures. Since AASs achieve their anabolic effects by activating the Androgen Receptor (AR), cell-based bioassays that measure the effect of a urine sample on AR activity are under investigation as complementary, pan-androgen detection methods. We evaluated an AR BioAssay as a monitor for androgen activity in urine pre-treated with glucuronidase, which releases T from the inactive T-glucuronide that predominates in urine. AR BioAssay activity levels were expressed as ‘T-equivalent’ concentrations by comparison to a T dose response curve. The T-equivalent concentrations of androgens in the urine of hypogonadal participants supplemented with T (in whom all androgenic activity should arise from T) were quantitatively identical to the T measurements conducted by MS at the UCLA Olympic Analytical Laboratory (0.96 ± 0.22). All 17 AASs studied were active in the AR BioAssay; other steroids were inactive. 12 metabolites of 10 commonly abused AASs, which are used for MS monitoring of AAS doping because of their prolonged presence in urine, had reduced or no AR BioAssay activity. Thus, the AR BioAssay can accurately and inexpensively monitor T, but its ability to monitor urinary AASs will be limited to a period immediately following doping in which the active AASs remain intact. PMID:26998755

  17. Advantages and Limitations of Androgen Receptor-Based Methods for Detecting Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Abuse as Performance Enhancing Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kathy; Yazdi, Tahmineh; Masharani, Umesh; Tyrrell, Blake; Butch, Anthony; Schaufele, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone (T) and related androgens are performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) abused by some athletes to gain competitive advantage. To monitor unauthorized androgen abuse, doping control programs use mass spectrometry (MS) to detect androgens, synthetic anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) and their metabolites in an athlete's urine. AASs of unknown composition will not be detected by these procedures. Since AASs achieve their anabolic effects by activating the Androgen Receptor (AR), cell-based bioassays that measure the effect of a urine sample on AR activity are under investigation as complementary, pan-androgen detection methods. We evaluated an AR BioAssay as a monitor for androgen activity in urine pre-treated with glucuronidase, which releases T from the inactive T-glucuronide that predominates in urine. AR BioAssay activity levels were expressed as 'T-equivalent' concentrations by comparison to a T dose response curve. The T-equivalent concentrations of androgens in the urine of hypogonadal participants supplemented with T (in whom all androgenic activity should arise from T) were quantitatively identical to the T measurements conducted by MS at the UCLA Olympic Analytical Laboratory (0.96 ± 0.22). All 17 AASs studied were active in the AR BioAssay; other steroids were inactive. 12 metabolites of 10 commonly abused AASs, which are used for MS monitoring of AAS doping because of their prolonged presence in urine, had reduced or no AR BioAssay activity. Thus, the AR BioAssay can accurately and inexpensively monitor T, but its ability to monitor urinary AASs will be limited to a period immediately following doping in which the active AASs remain intact.

  18. Assessment of androgen receptor agonistic/antagonistic effects on 25 chemicals in household applicants by OECD in vitro stably transfected transcriptional activation assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee-Seok; Park, Eun-Jung; Han, Songyi; Oh, Gyeong-Yong; Kang, Hui-Seung; Suh, Jin-Hyang; Shin, Min-Ki; Oh, Hyun-Suk; Hwang, Myung-Sil; Moon, Guiim; Koh, Young-Ho; Park, Yooheon; Hong, Jin-Hwan; Koo, Yong Eui

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the androgen receptor (AR) agonistic/antagonistic effects on various chemicals, which are used in household products including cleaning agents and wetted tissues by in vitro OECD test guideline No. 458 (using AR-EcoScreen™ cell line) and the me-too test method (using 22Rv1cell line), which was adopted as OECD project No. 4.99. All chemicals were not determined as AR agonists. However α-dodecyl-ω-hydroxypoly (oxyethylene) and 3-iodo-2-propynyl butylcarbamate have shown a weak AR antagonistic effects with IC 50 values of 2.18 ± 0.12 and 4.26 ± 0.17 μg/ml via binding affinity to AR in only 22Rv1/mouse mammary tumor virus using AR transcriptional activation assay, because of their different cytotoxicity on each applied cell line. This report firstly provides information about agonistic/antagonistic effects against human AR of various chemicals including surfactants and biocides by OECD in vitro stably transfected transcriptional activation assays. However, further in vivo and human model studies are needed to confirm their adverse effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Phosphorylation regulates coilin activity and RNA association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna J. Broome

    2013-02-01

    The Cajal body (CB is a domain of concentrated components found within the nucleus of cells in an array of species that is functionally important for the biogenesis of telomerase and small nuclear ribonucleoproteins. The CB is a dynamic structure whose number and size change during the cell cycle and is associated with other nuclear structures and gene loci. Coilin, also known as the marker protein for the CB, is a phosphoprotein widely accepted for its role in maintaining CB integrity. Recent studies have been done to further elucidate functional activities of coilin apart from its structural role in the CB in an attempt to explore the rationale for coilin expression in cells that have few CBs or lack them altogether. Here we show that the RNA association profile of coilin changes in mitosis with respect to that during interphase. We provide evidence of transcriptional and/or processing dysregulation of several CB-related RNA transcripts as a result of ectopic expression of both wild-type and phosphomutant coilin proteins. We also show apparent changes in transcription and/or processing of these transcripts upon coilin knockdown in both transformed and primary cell lines. Additionally, we provide evidence of specific coilin RNase activity regulation, on both U2 and hTR transcripts, by phosphorylation of a single residue, serine 489. Collectively, these results point to additional functions for coilin that are regulated by phosphorylation.

  20. Evolutionary history and functional characterization of androgen receptor genes in jawed vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Yukiko; Katoh, Hironori; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Yamada, Gen

    2009-12-01

    Vertebrates show diverse sexual characters in sexually attractive and reproductive organs, which are regulated by steroid hormones, particularly androgens. However, the evolutionary history of androgen receptor (AR) gene remains largely unknown on the basis of phylogenic and functional analyses. To elucidate the evolutionary history and functional diversification of AR genes in vertebrates, we cloned the AR cDNAs from a shark, basal ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii), namely bichir and sturgeon (Acipenseriformes), and teleosts including a basal teleost, arowana (Osteoglossiformes). Molecular phylogenetic analysis revealed that the gene duplication event that gave rise to two different teleost ARs (alpha and beta) likely occurred in the actinopterygian lineage leading to teleosts after the divergence of Acipenseriformes but before the split of Osteoglossiformes, which is compatible with the phylogenetic timing of teleost-specific genome duplication. Searching for AR genes in the medaka genome indicated that the teleost AR gene duplication has been associated with the duplication between chromosomes 10 and 14. Our functional analysis revealed that the shark AR activates the target gene via androgen response element by classical androgens. The teleost ARalpha showed the unique intracellular localization with a significantly higher transactivating capacity than that by teleost ARbeta. These findings indicate that the most ancient type of AR, as activated by the classical androgens as ligands, emerged before the Chondrichthyes-Osteichthyes split, and the AR gene was duplicated during the teleost-specific genome duplication event. We report here for the first time the accurate evolutionary history of AR gene and functional characterization of AR duplicates in teleost lineage.

  1. Impact of male hormonal contraception on prostate androgens and androgen action in healthy men: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaghel, Elahe A; Lin, Daniel W; Amory, John K; Wright, Jonathan L; Marck, Brett T; Nelson, Peter S; Matsumoto, Alvin M; Bremner, William J; Page, Stephanie T

    2012-08-01

    Male hormonal contraception (MHC) combines hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis blockade with exogenous androgen delivery to maintain extragonadal androgen end-organ effects. Concern exists that MHC may adversely impact prostate health. The objective of the study was to determine the molecular impact of MHC on intraprostatic androgen concentrations and androgen action. This was a single-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. The study was conducted at an academic medical center. 32 healthy men aged 25-55 yr participated in the study. Interventions included placebo, daily transdermal testosterone (T) (T-gel), T-gel + depomedroxyprogesterone acetate (T+DMPA), or T-gel + dutasteride daily (T+D) for 12 wk, and prostate biopsy during treatment wk 10. Serum and prostate androgen concentrations and prostate epithelial-cell gene expression were measured. Thirty men completed the study. Serum T levels were significantly increased in T-gel and T+D groups compared with baseline (P < 0.05) but were decreased with the addition of DMPA. Intraprostatic androgens were no different from placebo with T-gel treatment. Addition of DMPA to T resulted in 40% lower intraprostatic dihydrotestosterone (DHT) concentration (P = 0.0273 vs. placebo), whereas combining dutasteride with T resulted in a 90% decrease in intraprostatic DHT (P = 0.0012), 11-fold increased intraprostatic T (P = 0.0011), and 7-fold increased intraprostatic androstenedione (P = 0.0011). Significant differences in global or androgen-regulated prostate epithelial-cell gene expression were not observed. Androgen-regulated gene expression correlated with epithelial-cell androgen receptor and prostatic DHT in placebo, T-gel, and T+DMPA arms and with T and androstenedione levels in the T+D arm. MHC regimens do not markedly alter gene expression in benign prostate epithelium, suggesting they may not alter risk of prostate disease. Longer-term studies examining the impact of MHC on prostate health are needed.

  2. New insights into androgen treatment of erectile dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Gooren

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Erectile response in mammals is centrally and peripherally regulated by androgens. Severe hypogonadism in men usually results in loss of libido and potency which can be restored by androgen administration. The original insights into the mechanisms of action of androgens on sexual function indicated that androgens particularly exert effects on libido and that sleep-related erections were androgen-sensitive but erections in response to erotic stimuli were relatively androgen-independent. There are a number of recent developments which shed new light on testosterone treatment of erectile dysfunction in aging men. There is growing insight that testosterone has profound effects on tissues of the penis involved in the mechanism of erection and that testosterone deficiency impairs the anatomical and physiological/biochemical substrate of erectile capacity, reversible upon androgen treatment. Several studies have indicated that the administration of PDE-5-inhibitors is not always sufficient to restore erectile potency in men and that administration of testosterone improves the therapeutical response to PDE-5-inhibitors considerably. There is increasing insight not to view erectile dysfunction (ED as a single entity but as part of the aging process. Circulating levels of testosterone are closely related to manifestations of other etiological factors in ED, such as atherosclerotic disease and diabetes mellitus. The latter are correlated with lower-than-normal testosterone levels.

  3. Cytokinins are central regulators of cambial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto-Kitano, Miho; Kusumoto, Takami; Tarkowski, Petr; Kinoshita-Tsujimura, Kaori; Václavíková, Katerina; Miyawaki, Kaori; Kakimoto, Tatsuo

    2008-12-16

    The roots and stems of dicotyledonous plants thicken by the cell proliferation in the cambium. Cambial proliferation changes in response to environmental factors; however, the molecular mechanisms that regulate cambial activity are largely unknown. The quadruple Arabidopsis thaliana mutant atipt1;3;5;7, in which 4 genes encoding cytokinin biosynthetic isopentenyltransferases are disrupted by T-DNA insertion, was unable to form cambium and showed reduced thickening of the root and stem. The atipt3 single mutant, which has moderately decreased levels of cytokinins, exhibited decreased root thickening without any other recognizable morphological changes. Addition of exogenously supplied cytokinins to atipt1;3;5;7 reactivated the cambium in a dose-dependent manner. When an atipt1;3;5;7 shoot scion was grafted onto WT root stock, both the root and shoot grew normally and trans-zeatin-type (tZ-type) cytokinins in the shoot were restored to WT levels, but isopentenyladenine-type cytokinins in the shoot remained unchanged. Conversely, when a WT shoot was grafted onto an atipt1;3;5;7 root, both the root and shoot grew normally and isopentenyladenine-type cytokinins in the root were restored to WT levels, but tZ-type cytokinins were only partially restored. Collectively, it can be concluded that cytokinins are important regulators of cambium development and that production of cytokinins in either the root or shoot is sufficient for normal development of both the root and shoot.

  4. Cellular androgen content influences enzalutamide agonism of F877L mutant androgen receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Daniel J.; Van Hook, Kathryn; King, Carly J.; Schwartzman, Jacob; Lisac, Robert; Urrutia, Joshua; Sehrawat, Archana; Woodward, Josha; Wang, Nicholas J.; Gulati, Roman; Thomas, George V.; Beer, Tomasz M.; Gleave, Martin; Korkola, James E.; Gao, Lina; Heiser, Laura M.; Alumkal, Joshi J.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed and second-most lethal cancer among men in the United States. The vast majority of prostate cancer deaths are due to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) – the lethal form of the disease that has progressed despite therapies that interfere with activation of androgen receptor (AR) signaling. One emergent resistance mechanism to medical castration is synthesis of intratumoral androgens that activate the AR. This insight led to the development of the AR antagonist enzalutamide. However, resistance to enzalutamide invariably develops, and disease progression is nearly universal. One mechanism of resistance to enzalutamide is an F877L mutation in the AR ligand-binding domain that can convert enzalutamide to an agonist of AR activity. However, mechanisms that contribute to the agonist switch had not been fully clarified, and there were no therapies to block AR F877L. Using cell line models of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), we determined that cellular androgen content influences enzalutamide agonism of mutant F877L AR. Further, enzalutamide treatment of AR F877L-expressing cell lines recapitulated the effects of androgen activation of F877L AR or wild-type AR. Because the BET bromodomain inhibitor JQ-1 was previously shown to block androgen activation of wild-type AR, we tested JQ-1 in AR F877L-expressing CRPC models. We determined that JQ-1 suppressed androgen or enzalutamide activation of mutant F877L AR and suppressed growth of mutant F877L AR CRPC tumors in vivo, demonstrating a new strategy to treat tumors harboring this mutation. PMID:27276681

  5. Effects of Androgen Ablation on Anti-Tumor Immunity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kast, W

    2003-01-01

    ... prostate. Castration of mice stimulates B and T lymphopoiesis, thymic and bone marrow hyperplasia. The induction of apoptotic cell death following androgen ablation is accompanied by an inflammatory infiltrate comprised predominantly of activated T cells...

  6. Synthetic androgens as designer supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jan Felix; Parr, Maria Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are some of the most common performance enhancing drugs (PED) among society. Despite the broad spectrum of adverse effects and legal consequences, AAS are illicitly marketed and distributed in many countries. To circumvent existing laws, the chemical structure of AAS is modified and these designer steroids are sold as nutritional supplements mainly over the Internet. Several side effects are linked with AAS abuse. Only little is known about the pharmacological effects and metabolism of unapproved steroids due to the absence of clinical studies. The large number of designer steroid findings in dietary supplements and the detection of new compounds combined with legal loopholes for their distribution in many countries show that stricter regulations and better information policy are needed.

  7. Synthetic Androgens as Designer Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jan Felix; Parr, Maria Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are some of the most common performance enhancing drugs (PED) among society. Despite the broad spectrum of adverse effects and legal consequences, AAS are illicitly marketed and distributed in many countries. To circumvent existing laws, the chemical structure of AAS is modified and these designer steroids are sold as nutritional supplements mainly over the Internet. Several side effects are linked with AAS abuse. Only little is known about the pharmacological effects and metabolism of unapproved steroids due to the absence of clinical studies. The large number of designer steroid findings in dietary supplements and the detection of new compounds combined with legal loopholes for their distribution in many countries show that stricter regulations and better information policy are needed. PMID:26074745

  8. Anabolic Androgenic Steroids and Intracellular Calcium Signaling: A Mini Review on Mechanisms and Physiological Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicencio, J.M.; Estrada, M.; Galvis, D.; Bravo, R.; Contreras, A.E.; Rotter, D.; Szabadkai, G.; Hill, J.A.; Rothermel, B.A.; Jaimovich, E.; Lavandero, S.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that nongenomic effects of testosterone and anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) operate concertedly with genomic effects. Classically, these responses have been viewed as separate and independent processes, primarily because nongenomic responses are faster and appear to be mediated by membrane androgen receptors, whereas long-term genomic effects are mediated through cytosolic androgen receptors regulating transcriptional activity. Numerous studies have demonstrated increases in intracellular Ca2+ in response to AAS. These Ca2+ mediated responses have been seen in a diversity of cell types, including osteoblasts, platelets, skeletal muscle cells, cardiac myocytes and neurons. The versatility of Ca2+ as a second messenger provides these responses with a vast number of pathophysiological implications. In cardiac cells, testosterone elicits voltage-dependent Ca2+ oscillations and IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release from internal stores, leading to activation of MAPK and mTOR signaling that promotes cardiac hypertrophy. In neurons, depending upon concentration, testosterone can provoke either physiological Ca2+ oscillations, essential for synaptic plasticity, or sustained, pathological Ca2+ transients that lead to neuronal apoptosis. We propose therefore, that Ca2+ acts as an important point of crosstalk between nongenomic and genomic AAS signaling, representing a central regulator that bridges these previously thought to be divergent responses. PMID:21443511

  9. Contributions by the CAG-repeat Polymorphism of the Androgen Receptor Gene and Circulating Androgens to Muscle Size. Odense Androgen Study - A Population-based Study of 20-29 Year-old Danish Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Leo; Hagen, Claus; Wraae, Kristian

    2007-01-01

    Context: The number of CAG-repeats within the CAG-repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene is inversely correlated with the transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor. Objective: To study the effect of the CAG-repeat number and circulating androgens on muscle size, to examine the ...... muscle size increased exponentially with decreasing androgen levels and was tripled at total testosterone levels...... the CAG-repeat number in relation to body fat mass and circulating androgens, and to identify the best hormonal marker of low muscle size amongst total testosterone, bioavailable testosterone, and dihydrotestosterone. Design, Setting, and Participants: Population-based study of 783 Danish men aged 20......, chronic disease, and age. The CAG-repeat number correlated positively with total body fat mass adjusted for weight, but not with the concentration of any of the circulating androgens. Total testosterone and dihydrotestosterone correlated positively with all outcomes of muscle size. The prevalence of low...

  10. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β counteracts ligand-independent activity of the androgen receptor in castration resistant prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie V Schütz

    Full Text Available In order to generate genomic signals, the androgen receptor (AR has to be transported into the nucleus upon androgenic stimuli. However, there is evidence from in vitro experiments that in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC cells the AR is able to translocate into the nucleus in a ligand-independent manner. The recent finding that inhibition of the glycogen-synthase-kinase 3β (GSK-3β induces a rapid nuclear export of the AR in androgen-stimulated prostate cancer cells prompted us to analyze the effects of a GSK-3β inhibition in the castration-resistant LNCaP sublines C4-2 and LNCaP-SSR. Both cell lines exhibit high levels of nuclear AR in the absence of androgenic stimuli. Exposure of these cells to the maleimide SB216763, a potent GSK-3β inhibitor, resulted in a rapid nuclear export of the AR even under androgen-deprived conditions. Moreover, the ability of C4-2 and LNCaP-SSR cells to grow in the absence of androgens was diminished after pharmacological inhibition of GSK-3β in vitro. The ability of SB216763 to modulate AR signalling and function in CRPC in vivo was additionally demonstrated in a modified chick chorioallantoic membrane xenograft assay after systemic delivery of SB216763. Our data suggest that inhibition of GSK-3β helps target the AR for export from the nucleus thereby diminishing the effects of mislocated AR in CRPC cells. Therefore, inhibition of GSK-3β could be an interesting new strategy for the treatment of CRPC.

  11. Sex differences in the effects of androgens acting in the central nervous system on metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morford, Jamie; Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck

    2016-01-01

    One of the most sexually dimorphic aspects of metabolic regulation is the bidirectional modulation of glucose and energy homeostasis by testosterone in males and females. Testosterone deficiency predisposes men to metabolic dysfunction, with excess adiposity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, whereas androgen excess predisposes women to insulin resistance, adiposity, and type 2 diabetes. This review discusses how testosterone acts in the central nervous system, and especially the hypothalamus, to promote metabolic homeostasis or dysfunction in a sexually dimorphic manner. We compare the organizational actions of testosterone, which program the hypothalamic control of metabolic homeostasis during development, and the activational actions of testosterone, which affect metabolic function after puberty. We also discuss how the metabolic effect of testosterone is centrally mediated via the androgen receptor. PMID:28179813

  12. Gene expression profile of androgen modulated genes in the murine fetal developing lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Côté Mélissa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accumulating evidences suggest that sex affects lung development. Indeed, a higher incidence of respiratory distress syndrome is observed in male compared to female preterm neonates at comparable developmental stage and experimental studies demonstrated an androgen-related delay in male lung maturation. However, the precise mechanisms underlying these deleterious effects of androgens in lung maturation are only partially understood. Methods To build up a better understanding of the effect of androgens on lung development, we analyzed by microarrays the expression of genes showing a sexual difference and those modulated by androgens. Lungs of murine fetuses resulting from a timely mating window of 1 hour were studied at gestational day 17 (GD17 and GD18, corresponding to the period of surge of surfactant production. Using injections of the antiandrogen flutamide to pregnant mice, we hunted for genes in fetal lungs which are transcriptionally modulated by androgens. Results Results revealed that 1844 genes were expressed with a sexual difference at GD17 and 833 at GD18. Many genes were significantly modulated by flutamide: 1597 at GD17 and 1775 at GD18. Datasets were analyzed by using in silico tools for reconstruction of cellular pathways. Between GD17 and GD18, male lungs showed an intensive transcriptional activity of proliferative pathways along with the onset of lung differentiation. Among the genes showing a sex difference or an antiandrogen modulation of their expression, we specifically identified androgen receptor interacting genes, surfactant related genes in particularly those involved in the pathway leading to phospholipid synthesis, and several genes of lung development regulator pathways. Among these latter, some genes related to Shh, FGF, TGF-beta, BMP, and Wnt signaling are modulated by sex and/or antiandrogen treatment. Conclusion Our results show clearly that there is a real delay in lung maturation between

  13. Structure-activity relationships of 3-deoxy androgens as aromatase inhibitors. Synthesis and biochemical studies of 4-substituted 4-ene and 5-ene steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Masao; Watari, Yoko; Yajima, Hiromi; Tsukioka, Kaoru; Muroi, Yasuyo; Yamada, Keiko; Numazawa, Mitsuteru

    2003-08-01

    As part of our investigation into the structure-activity relationship of a novel class of aromatase inhibitors, two series of 3-deoxy androgens, androst-5-en-17-ones with a non-polar alkoxy (5 and 6), alkyl (20-22), or phenylalkyl (23 and 24) group at C-4beta and 4-acyloxyandrost-4-en-17-ones (29-32, and 34) were synthesized and evaluated. The 4beta-alkyl and 4beta-phenylalkyl compounds were obtained through reaction of 4alpha,5alpha-epoxy steroid (8) with RMgBr (R: alkyl and phenylalkyl) followed by dehydration of the 4beta-substituted 5alpha-hydroxy products (15-19) with SOCl(2) as key reactions. Acylation of 4alpha,5alpha-diol (25) with (RCO)(2)O in pyridine and subsequent dehydration with SOCl(2) gave the 4-acyloxy steroids. All of the steroids studied, except for 4-acetoxy-19-ol (34) that was a non-competitive inhibitor of human placental aromatase, blocked aromatase activity in a competitive manner. 4-Benzoyloxy- and 4-acetoxy steroids (31) and (32) were the most powerful inhibitors of aromatase (K(i)=70 and 60nM, respectively). Elongation of an acetoxy group in a series of 4-acyloxy steroids or a methyl group in a series of 4beta-alkyl steroids decreased affinity for aromatase principally in relation to carbon number of the acyl or alkyl function. The present findings are potentially useful for understanding the spatial and electronic nature of the binding site of aromatase as well as for developing effective aromatase inhibitors.

  14. Football training in men with prostate cancer undergoing androgen deprivation therapy: activity profile and short-term skeletal and postural balance adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uth, Jacob; Hornstrup, Therese; Christensen, Jesper F; Christensen, Karl B; Jørgensen, Niklas R; Helge, Eva W; Schmidt, Jakob F; Brasso, Klaus; Helge, Jørn W; Jakobsen, Markus D; Andersen, Lars L; Rørth, Mikael; Midtgaard, Julie; Krustrup, Peter

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the activity profile of football training and its short-term effects on bone mass, bone turnover markers (BTMs) and postural balance in men with prostate cancer (PCa) undergoing androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). This was a randomised 12-week study in which men with PCa undergoing ADT were assigned to a football intervention group [FTG, n = 29, 67 ± 7 (±SD) years] training 2‒3 times per week for 45‒60 min or to a control group (n = 28, 66 ± 5 years). The activity profile was measured using a 5-Hz GPS. The outcomes were total body and leg bone mineral content (BMC) and density, BTMs and postural balance. In the last part of the 12 weeks, FTG performed 194 ± 41 accelerations and 296 ± 65 decelerations at >0.6 m/s/s and covered a distance of 905 ± 297 m at speeds >6 km/h and 2646 ± 705 m per training session. Analysis of baseline-to-12-week change scores showed between-group differences in favour of FTG in total body BMC [26.4 g, 95 % confidence interval (CI): 5.8-46.9 g, p = 0.013], leg BMC (13.8 g, 95 % CI: 7.0‒20.5 g, p Football training involves numerous runs, accelerations and decelerations, which may be linked to marked increases in bone formation markers and preserved bone mass in middle-aged and elderly men with PCa undergoing ADT. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01711892.

  15. Plasma androgens in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tordjman, S; Anderson, G M; McBride, P A; Hertzig, M E; Snow, M E; Hall, L M; Ferrari, P; Cohen, D J

    1995-06-01

    Plasma levels of testosterone and the adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) were measured in male autistic subjects (31 prepubertal, 8 postpubertal), mentally retarded/cognitively impaired subjects (MR, 12 prepubertal), and normal control subjects (NC, 10 prepubertal, 11 postpubertal). Mean levels of plasma testosterone were similar in the postpubertal autistic (4.54 +/- 1.12 ng/ml) and postpubertal NC (5.02 +/- 1.87 ng/ml) groups. Plasma DHEA-S levels in postpubertal autistic (2170 +/- 1020 ng/ml) and postpubertal NC (1850 +/- 777 ng/ml) groups also were not significantly different. Similarly, no significant group differences were seen for testosterone or DHEA-S in the prepubertal autistic, MR, or NC individuals, although prepubertal MR individuals with cerebral palsy did have increased plasma DHEA-S levels compared to age-matched MR or NC individuals. Significant negative correlations were found between testosterone and whole blood serotonin (5-HT) levels in the combined (all subjects, all ages) groups and in the autistic group, suggesting that the effect of puberty on whole blood 5-HT may deserve further study. Data indicate that altered secretion of the androgens is not a common feature of autism. However, abnormalities of adrenal androgen secretion may be present in individuals with cerebral palsy.

  16. Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer: Potential Role of Androgen and ErbB Receptor Signal Transduction Crosstalk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soha Salama El Sheikh

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available In prostate cancer (PC, increasing evidence suggests that androgen receptor (AR signalling is functional under conditions of maximal androgen blockade. PC cells survive and proliferate in the altered hormonal environment possibly by interactions between growth factor-activated pathways and AR signalling. The present review article summarizes the current evidence of this crosstalk and focuses on the interactions among the ErbB receptor network, its downstream pathways, the AR. The potential role of this crosstalk in the development of androgen independence and in relation to antiandrogen therapy is discussed. Such interactions provide insight into possible complementary or additional strategies in the management of PC.

  17. Screening of 397 chemicals and development of a quantitative structure-activity relationship model for androgen receptor antagonism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Annemarie; Niemelä, Jay Russell; Wedebye, Eva Bay

    2008-01-01

    , plastizicers, plastic additives, brominated flame retardants, and roast mutagens). In addition, the intention was to obtain an equal number of positive and negative chemicals. Among our own data for the training set, 45.7% exhibited inhibitory activity against the transcriptional activity induced...

  18. Adipose Stem Cell-Based Therapeutic Targeting of Residual Androgens in African Americans with Bone-Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    by: (a) investigate if “intracrine” production of testosterone by osteotropic ASCAA modulates growth and metastatic potential of CaP cells under ADT...18–20 months, with median survival of 1–2 years. Importantly, large body of evidence indicate that in the setting of ‘castrate’ serum testosterone ...androgen- metabolizing genes within castration-resistant metastatic tumors [29] strongly suggests that up-regulated activity of endogenous steroidogenic

  19. Characterization of estrogen and androgen activity of food contact materials by different in vitro bioassays (YES, YAS, ERα and AR CALUX and chromatographic analysis (GC-MS, HPLC-MS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Mertl

    Full Text Available Endocrine active substances (EAS show structural similarities to natural hormones and are suspected to affect the human endocrine system by inducing hormone dependent effects. Recent studies with in vitro tests suggest that EAS can leach from packaging into food and may therefore pose a risk to human health. Sample migrates from food contact materials were tested for estrogen and androgen agonists and antagonists with different commonly used in vitro tests. Additionally, chemical trace analysis by GC-MS and HPLC-MS was used to identify potential hormone active substances in sample migrates. A GC-MS method to screen migrates for 29 known or potential endocrine active substances was established and validated. Samples were migrated according to EC 10/2011, concentrated by solid phase extraction and tested with estrogen and androgen responsive reporter gene assays based on yeast cells (YES and YAS or human osteoblast cells (ERα and AR CALUX. A high level of agreement between the different bioassays could be observed by screening for estrogen agonists. Four out of 18 samples tested showed an estrogen activity in a similar range in both, YES and ERα CALUX. Two more samples tested positive in ERα CALUX due to the lower limits of detection in this assay. Androgen agonists could not be detected in any of the tested samples, neither with YAS nor with AR CALUX. When testing for antagonists, significant differences between yeast and human cell-based bioassays were noticed. Using YES and YAS many samples showed a strong antagonistic activity which was not observed using human cell-based CALUX assays. By GC-MS, some known or supposed EAS were identified in sample migrates that showed a biological activity in the in vitro tests. However, no firm conclusions about the sources of the observed hormone activity could be obtained from the chemical results.

  20. Sensitization of androgen refractory prostate cancer cells to anti-androgens through re-expression of epigenetically repressed androgen receptor - Synergistic action of quercetin and curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vikas; Kumar, Lokesh; Mohanty, Sujit K; Maikhuri, Jagdamba P; Rajender, Singh; Gupta, Gopal

    2016-08-15

    Epigenetic repression of Androgen Receptor (AR) gene by hypermethylation of its promoter causes resistance in prostate cancer (CaP) to androgen deprivation therapy with anti-androgens. Some dietary phytocompounds like quercetin (Q) and curcumin (C) with reported DNMT-inhibitory activity were tested for their ability to re-express the AR in AR-negative CaP cell lines PC3 and DU145. Combined treatment with Q+C was much more effective than either Q or C in inhibiting DNMT, causing global hypomethylation, restoring AR mRNA and protein levels and causing apoptosis via mitochondrial depolarization of PC3 and DU145. The functional AR protein expressed in Q+C treated cells sensitized them to dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-induced proliferation, bicalutamide-induced apoptosis, bound to androgen response element to increase luciferase activity in gene reporter assay and was susceptible to downregulation by AR siRNA. Bisulfite sequencing revealed high methylation of AR promoter CpG sites in AR-negative DU145 and PC3 cell lines that was significantly demethylated by Q+C treatment, which restored AR expression. Notable synergistic effects of Q+C combination in re-sensitizing androgen refractory CaP cells to AR-mediated apoptosis, their known safety in clinical use, and epidemiological evidences relating their dietary consumption with lower cancer incidences indicate their potential for use in chemoprevention of androgen resistance in prostate cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Metabolic syndrome in androgenic alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Hima; Upadya, Gatha M

    2016-01-01

    Androgenic alopecia has been associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease in various studies. The relationship between androgenic alopecia and metabolic syndrome, a known risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, is still poorly understood. To study the association between metabolic syndrome and early-onset androgenic alopecia. A hospital-based analytical cross-sectional study was done on men in the age group of 18-55 years. Eighty five clinically diagnosed cases with early-onset (alopecia of Norwood grade III or above, and 85 controls without androgenic alopecia were included. Data collected included anthropometric measurements, arterial blood pressure and history of chronic diseases. Fasting blood and lipid profile were determined. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed as per the new International Diabetes Federation criteria. Chi-square and Student's t-test were used for statistical analysis using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 17.00. Metabolic syndrome was seen in 19 (22.4%) patients with androgenic alopecia and 8 (9.4%) controls (P = 0.021). Abdominal obesity, hypertension and lowered high-density lipoprotein were significantly higher in patients with androgenic alopecia versus their respective controls. The limitations of our study include small sample size in subgroups and the lack of evidence of a temporal relationship between metabolic syndrome and androgenic alopecia. A higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome is seen in men with early-onset androgenic alopecia. Early screening for metabolic syndrome and its components is beneficial in patients with early-onset androgenic alopecia.

  2. Selective androgen receptor modulators in preclinical and clinical development

    OpenAIRE

    Narayanan, Ramesh; Mohler, Michael L.; Bohl, Casey E.; Miller, Duane D.; Dalton, James T.

    2008-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in the function of several organs including primary and accessory sexual organs, skeletal muscle, and bone, making it a desirable therapeutic target. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) bind to the AR and demonstrate osteo- and myo-anabolic activity; however, unlike testosterone and other anabolic steroids, these nonsteroidal agents produce less of a growth effect on prostate and other secondary sexual organs. SARMs provide therapeutic o...

  3. p68/DdX5 supports β-catenin & RNAP II during androgen receptor mediated transcription in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma L Clark

    Full Text Available The DEAD box RNA helicase p68 (Ddx5 is an important androgen receptor (AR transcriptional co-activator in prostate cancer (PCa and is over-expressed in late stage disease. β-Catenin is a multifunctional protein with important structural and signalling functions which is up-regulated in PCa and similar to p68, interacts with the AR to co-activate expression of AR target genes. Importantly, p68 forms complexes with nuclear β-Catenin and promotes gene transcription in colon cancer indicating a functional interplay between these two proteins in cancer progression. In this study, we explore the relationship of p68 and β-Catenin in PCa to assess their potential co-operation in AR-dependent gene expression, which may be of importance in the development of castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPCa. We use immunoprecipitation to demonstrate a novel interaction between p68 and β-Catenin in the nucleus of PCa cells, which is androgen dependent in LNCaP cells but androgen independent in a hormone refractory derivative of the same cell line (representative of the CRPCa disease type. Enhanced AR activity is seen in androgen-dependent luciferase reporter assays upon transient co-transfection of p68 and β-Catenin as an additive effect, and p68-depleted Chromatin-Immunoprecipitation (ChIP showed a decrease in the recruitment of the AR and β-Catenin to androgen responsive promoter regions. In addition, we found p68 immunoprecipitated with the processive and non-processive form of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II and show p68 recruited to elongating regions of the AR mediated PSA gene, suggesting a role for p68 in facilitating RNAP II transcription of AR mediated genes. These results suggest p68 is important in facilitating β-Catenin and AR transcriptional activity in PCa cells.

  4. Prenatal exposure of the ovine fetus to androgens reduces the proportion of neurons in the ventromedial and arcuate nucleus that are activated by short-term exposure to estrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jane E; Grindrod, Jo; Jeurissen, Suzanne; Taylor, James A; Unsworth, William P

    2010-01-01

    In sheep, the steroid control of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH) release is sexually differentiated such that estrogen can trigger a GNRH surge and attendant reproductive behaviors in the female, but not the male. Furthermore, female lambs that have been exposed to testosterone during a critical window of in utero development are also unable to generate a GNRH surge. This study tests the hypothesis that exposure of the ovine fetus to androgens alters the development of key steroid-receptive neuronal inputs to the GNRH neurons. In adulthood, this results in reduced activation of specific neurons by estrogen in the male and testosterone-treated female. To make this determination, groups of ewes, rams, and testosterone-exposed ewes were treated with estrogen, and the activation of neurons in the mediobasal hypothalamus and brain stem determined by immunocytochemistry. A lower percentage of neurons in the ventrolateral aspect of the ventromedial nucleus (vlVMN) and the caudal arcuate nucleus (cARC), but not the brainstem, was activated by a 6-h exposure to estrogen in the androgenized and male animals. In the vlVMN, some of these neurons contain somatostatin; however, the phenotype of activated neurons in the cARC remains unknown. These data suggest that specific neural populations in these brain regions are involved in the estrogen feedback control of GNRH release in the sheep, and that the defeminization of the surge-generating system by in utero androgen exposure results, in part, from a failure of estrogen to activate key neural phenotypes.

  5. Activation and Regulation of Cellular Eicosanoid Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G. Brock

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing appreciation for the wide variety of physiological responses that are regulated by lipid messengers. One particular group of lipid messengers, the eicosanoids, plays a central role in regulating immune and inflammatory responses in a receptor-mediated fashion. These mediators are related in that they are all derived from one polyunsaturated fatty acid, arachidonic acid. However, the various eicosanoids are synthesized by a wide variety of cell types by distinct enzymatic pathways, and have diverse roles in immunity and inflammation. In this review, the major pathways involved in the synthesis of eicosanoids, as well as key points of regulation, are presented.

  6. Piperine, a Bioactive Component of Pepper Spice Exerts Therapeutic Effects on Androgen Dependent and Androgen Independent Prostate Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Abhilash Samykutty; Aditya Vittal Shetty; Gajalakshmi Dakshinamoorthy; Mary Margaret Bartik; Gary Leon Johnson; Brian Webb; Guoxing Zheng; Aoshuang Chen; Ramaswamy Kalyanasundaram; Gnanasekar Munirathinam

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common solid malignancy in men, with 32,000 deaths annually. Piperine, a major alkaloid constituent of black pepper, has previously been reported to have anti-cancer activity in variety of cancer cell lines. The effect of piperine against prostate cancer is not currently known. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the anti-tumor mechanisms of piperine on androgen dependent and androgen independent prostate cancer cells. Here, we show that piperine inhibited th...

  7. Probing the functional link between androgen receptor coactivator and ligand-binding sites in prostate cancer and androgen insensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bin; Gampe, Robert T; Hnat, Andrew T; Faggart, Jonathan L; Minges, John T; French, Frank S; Wilson, Elizabeth M

    2006-03-10

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor required for male sex development and virilization and contributes to prostate cancer initiation and progression. High affinity androgen binding triggers conformational changes required for AR transactivation. Here we characterized naturally occurring AR gene mutations in the region of activation function 2 (AF2) that decrease or increase AR transcriptional activity by altering the region bounded by AF2 and the ligand binding pocket without affecting equilibrium androgen binding affinity. In the androgen insensitivity syndrome, germ line AR mutations increase the androgen dissociation rate and reduce AR FXXLF motif binding and the recruitment of steroid receptor coactivator (SRC)/p160 coactivator LXXLL motifs. In prostate cancer, somatic AR mutations in AF2 or near the bound ligand slow androgen dissociation and increase AR stabilization and coactivator recruitment. Crystal structures of the AR ligand binding domain bound to R1881 and FXXLF or LXXLL motif peptide indicate the mutations are proximal to the AF2 bound peptide, adjacent to the ligand pocket, or in a putative ligand gateway. The results suggest a bidirectional structural relay between bound ligand and coactivator that establishes AR functional potency in vivo.

  8. Super-Penetrant Androgen Receptor: Overcoming Enzalutamide Sensitivity in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    AR, a versatile transcriptional co-activator, seems to adapt to androgen-deprived environment by distinct modifications. This proposal will use an...Chen Z, Sinha CK, Malik R, Shukla S, Kim J, Coppola D, Lawrence N and Mahajan NP. Epigenetic Reprogramming of Androgen Receptor by Histone H4 Tyr88...Prostate Cancer Research Symposium- Prostate Cancer Epigenetic Reprogramming of the Androgen Receptor in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer, May19

  9. Bioassay of Plant Growth Regulator Activity on Aquatic Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-07-01

    I COPY AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM .q TECHNICAL REPORT A-90-7 >AD-A226 125 BIOASSAY OF PLANT GROWTH REGULATOR ACTIVITY ON AQUATIC PLANTS... Plant Growth Regulator Activity on Aquatic Plants 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Lembi, Carole A.; Netherland, Michael D. 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14...OF THIS PAGE 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continued). Aquatic plants Hydrilla Bensulfuron methyl Paclobutrazol Bioassay Plant growth regulator Eurasian

  10. Commentary on "integrative genomic analyses reveal an androgen-driven somatic alteration landscape in early-onset prostate cancer." Weischenfeldt J, Simon R, Feuerbach L, Schlangen K, Weichenhan D, Minner S, Wuttig D, Warnatz HJ, Stehr H, Rausch T, Jäger N, Gu L, Bogatyrova O, Stütz AM, Claus R, Eils J, Eils R, Gerhäuser C, Huang PH, Hutter B, Kabbe R, Lawerenz C, Radomski S, Bartholomae CC, Fälth M, Gade S, Schmidt M, Amschler N, Haß T, Galal R, Gjoni J, Kuner R, Baer C, Masser S, von Kalle C, Zichner T, Benes V, Raeder B, Mader M, Amstislavskiy V, Avci M, Lehrach H, Parkhomchuk D, Sultan M, Burkhardt L, Graefen M, Huland H, Kluth M, Krohn A, Sirma H, Stumm L, Steurer S, Grupp K, Sültmann H, Sauter G, Plass C, Brors B, Yaspo ML, Korbel JO, Schlomm T, Genome Biology Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Heidelberg, Germany.: Cancer Cell 2013;23(2):159-70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olumi, Aria F

    2014-02-01

    Early-onset prostate cancer (EO-PCA) represents the earliest clinical manifestation of prostate cancer. To compare the genomic alteration landscapes of EO-PCA with "classical" (elderly-onset) PCA, we performed deep sequencing-based genomics analyses in 11 tumors diagnosed at young age, and pursued comparative assessments with seven elderly-onset PCA genomes. Remarkable age-related differences in structural rearrangement (SR) formation became evident, suggesting distinct disease pathomechanisms. Whereas EO-PCAs harbored a prevalence of balanced SRs, with a specific abundance of androgen-regulated ETS gene fusions including TMPRSS2:ERG, elderly-onset PCAs displayed primarily non-androgen-associated SRs. Data from a validation cohort of>10,000 patients showed age-dependent androgen receptor levels and a prevalence of SRs affecting androgen-regulated genes, further substantiating the activity of a characteristic "androgen-type" pathomechanism in EO-PCA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Androgen Receptor in Laryngeal Carcinoma: Could There Be an Androgen-Refractory Tumor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulioumis, Anastasios K.; Varakis, John; Goumas, Panos; Papadaki, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Androgen receptors (ARs) which are implicated in the pathogenesis of several malignancies can also be a possible downstream effector in laryngeal cancer. In the present study, 97 invasive squamous laryngeal carcinomas were studied by immunohistochemistry for protein expression of AR. Androgen receptors were expressed in 52.6% of tumor specimens, suggesting their implication in the pathogenesis of this tumor. Our study's aim was to investigate the hypothetical scenario of an androgen refractory laryngeal carcinoma where androgen receptors can be activated by nodal molecules in the course of an Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenomenon. In line with this we correlated AR expression with the expression of ILK, p-Akt, E-cadherin, β-catenin in our sample as well as with tumor grade and TNM stage. A reverse correlation between nuclear AR and cytoplasmic ILK expression was evidenced, indicating an interaction of those molecules in laryngeal carcinoma. Finally in our material, in those carcinomas that were expressing ARs, stronger nuclear expression of the receptor was characterized by poorer cell differentiation and correlated with the acquisition of EMT features like E-cadherin loss and β-catenin translocation raising a question whether activated ARs can drive an EMT procedure. PMID:22191056

  12. With a little help from my friends: androgens tap BDNF signaling pathways to alter neural circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottem, E N; Bailey, D J; Jordan, C L; Breedlove, S M

    2013-06-03

    Gonadal androgens are critical for the development and maintenance of sexually dimorphic regions of the male nervous system, which is critical for male-specific behavior and physiological functioning. In rodents, the motoneurons of the spinal nucleus of the bulbocavernosus (SNB) provide a useful example of a neural system dependent on androgen. Unless rescued by perinatal androgens, the SNB motoneurons will undergo apoptotic cell death. In adulthood, SNB motoneurons remain dependent on androgen, as castration leads to somal atrophy and dendritic retraction. In a second vertebrate model, the zebra finch, androgens are critical for the development of several brain nuclei involved in song production in males. Androgen deprivation during a critical period during postnatal development disrupts song acquisition and dimorphic size-associated nuclei. Mechanisms by which androgens exert masculinizing effects in each model system remain elusive. Recent studies suggest that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) may play a role in androgen-dependent masculinization and maintenance of both SNB motoneurons and song nuclei of birds. This review aims to summarize studies demonstrating that BDNF signaling via its tyrosine receptor kinase (TrkB) receptor may work cooperatively with androgens to maintain somal and dendritic morphology of SNB motoneurons. We further describe studies that suggest the cellular origin of BDNF is of particular importance in androgen-dependent regulation of SNB motoneurons. We review evidence that androgens and BDNF may synergistically influence song development and plasticity in bird species. Finally, we provide hypothetical models of mechanisms that may underlie androgen- and BDNF-dependent signaling pathways. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Discovery and biological characterization of a novel series of androgen receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, C; Wu, G; Feng, Y; Li, Q; Su, H; Mais, D E; Zhu, Y; Li, N; Deng, Y; Yang, D; Wang, M-W

    2008-05-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators are of great value in the treatment of prostate cancer. The purpose of this study was to provide a preliminary characterization of a new class of non-steroidal androgen receptor modulators discovered in a high-throughput screening campaign. Competitive receptor binding, luciferase-based reporter methods, cell proliferation and in vivo assays were employed to evaluate an initial set of compounds from chemistry efforts. Forty-nine analogues from the chemistry efforts showed high affinity binding to androgen receptors, agonist and/or antagonist activities in both CV-1 and MDA-MB-453 transfection assays. A proliferation assay in LNCaP cells also exhibited this profile. A representative of these non-steroidal compounds (compound 21) was devoid of activity at other nuclear receptors (oestrogen, progesterone, glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors) in the CV-1 co-transfection assay. At the same time, in an immature castrated rat model, it behaved as an androgen receptor antagonist against the growth of prostate, seminal vesicles and levator ani induced by exogenous androgen. Separation of compound 21 into its enantiomers showed that nearly all the androgen receptor modulating activity and binding resided in the dextrorotatory compound (23) while the laevorotatory isomer (22) possessed weak or little effect depending on the cell type studied. These non-steroidal compounds may represent a new class of androgen receptor modulators for the treatment of not only prostate cancer but other clinical conditions where androgens and androgen receptors are involved in the pathological processes.

  14. Bypass mechanisms of the androgen receptor pathway in therapy-resistant prostate cancer cell models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rute B Marques

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer is initially dependent on androgens for survival and growth, making hormonal therapy the cornerstone treatment for late-stage tumors. However, despite initial remission, the cancer will inevitably recur. The present study was designed to investigate how androgen-dependent prostate cancer cells eventually survive and resume growth under androgen-deprived and antiandrogen supplemented conditions. As model system, we used the androgen-responsive PC346C cell line and its therapy-resistant sublines: PC346DCC, PC346Flu1 and PC346Flu2. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Microarray technology was used to analyze differences in gene expression between the androgen-responsive and therapy-resistant PC346 cell lines. Microarray analysis revealed 487 transcripts differentially-expressed between the androgen-responsive and the therapy-resistant cell lines. Most of these genes were common to all three therapy-resistant sublines and only a minority (∼5% was androgen-regulated. Pathway analysis revealed enrichment in functions involving cellular movement, cell growth and cell death, as well as association with cancer and reproductive system disease. PC346DCC expressed residual levels of androgen receptor (AR and showed significant down-regulation of androgen-regulated genes (p-value = 10(-7. Up-regulation of VAV3 and TWIST1 oncogenes and repression of the DKK3 tumor-suppressor was observed in PC346DCC, suggesting a potential AR bypass mechanism. Subsequent validation of these three genes in patient samples confirmed that expression was deregulated during prostate cancer progression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Therapy-resistant growth may result from adaptations in the AR pathway, but androgen-independence may also be achieved by alternative survival mechanisms. Here we identified TWIST1, VAV3 and DKK3 as potential players in the bypassing of the AR pathway, making them good candidates as biomarkers and novel therapeutical targets.

  15. Bone vs. fat: embryonic origin of progenitors determines response to androgen in adipocytes and osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiren, Kristine M; Hashimoto, Joel G; Semirale, Anthony A; Zhang, Xiao-Wei

    2011-10-01

    Although androgen is considered an anabolic hormone, the consequences of androgen receptor (AR) overexpression in skeletally-targeted AR-transgenic lines highlight the detrimental effect of enhanced androgen sensitivity on cortical bone quality. A compartment-specific anabolic response is observed only in male and not in female AR3.6-transgenic (tg) mice, with increased periosteal bone formation and calvarial thickening. To identify anabolic signaling cascades that have the potential to increase bone formation, qPCR array analysis was employed to define expression differences between AR3.6-tg and wild-type (WT) periosteal tissue. Notably, categories that were significantly different between the two genotypes included axonal guidance, CNS development and negative regulation of Wnt signaling with a node centered on stem cell pathways. Further, fine mapping of AR3.6-tg calvaria revealed that anabolic thickening in vivo is not uniform across the calvaria, occurring only in frontal and in not parietal bones. Multipotent fraction 1 progenitor populations from both genotypes were cultured separately as frontal bone neural crest stem-like cells (fNCSC) and parietal bone mesenchymal stem-like cells (pMSC). Both osteoblastic and adipogenic differentiation in these progenitor populations was influenced by embryonic lineage and by genotype. Adipogenesis was enhanced in WT fNCSC compared to pMSC, but transgenic cultures showed strong suppression of lipid accumulation only in fNCSC cells. Osteoblastogenesis was significantly increased in transgenic fNCSC cultures compared to WT, with elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and induction of mineralization and nodule formation assessed by alizarin red and von Kossa staining. Osteocalcin (OC) and ALP mRNA levels were also increased in fNCSC cultures from AR3.6-tg vs. WT, but in pMSC cultures ALP mRNA levels, mineralization and nodule formation were decreased in AR3.6-tg cells. Expression differences identified by array in long

  16. Improved androgen specificity of AR-EcoScreen by CRISPR based glucocorticoid receptor knockout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Nick; Andringa, Dave; de Leeuw, Willem-Jan; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Iida, Mitsuru; Houtman, Corine J; de Boer, Jacob; Kool, Jeroen; Lamoree, Marja H; Hamers, Timo

    2017-12-01

    The AR-EcoScreen is a widely used reporter assay for the detection of androgens and anti-androgens. Endogenous expression of glucocorticoid receptors and their affinity for the androgen responsive element that drives reporter expression, however, makes the reporter cells sensitive to interference by glucocorticoids and less specific for (anti-)androgens. To create a glucocorticoid insensitive derivative of the AR-EcoScreen, CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing was used to develop glucocorticoid receptor knockout mutants by targeting various sites in the glucocorticoid gene. Two mutant cell lines were further characterized and validated against the unmodified AR-EcoScreen with a set of 19 environmentally relevant chemicals and a series of environmental passive sampler extracts with (anti-)androgenic activity. Sequencing of the targeted sites revealed premature stop codons following frame-shift mutations, leading to an absence of functional glucocorticoid receptor expression. The introduced mutations rendered cell lines insensitive to glucocorticoid activation and caused no significant difference in the responsiveness towards (anti-)androgens, compared to the unmodified AR-EcoScreen cells, allowing the selective, GR-independent, determination of (anti-)androgenicity in environmental passive sampler extracts. The increase in selectivity for (anti-)androgens improves reliability of the AR-EcoScreen and will provide higher accuracy in determining (anti-)androgenic potential when applied in toxicity screening and environmental monitoring of both single compounds and mixtures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Androgen receptor function links human sexual dimorphism to DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerpohl, Ole; Bens, Susanne; Appari, Mahesh; Werner, Ralf; Korn, Bernhard; Drop, Stenvert L S; Verheijen, Frans; van der Zwan, Yvonne; Bunch, Trevor; Hughes, Ieuan; Cools, Martine; Riepe, Felix G; Hiort, Olaf; Siebert, Reiner; Holterhus, Paul-Martin

    2013-01-01

    Sex differences are well known to be determinants of development, health and disease. Epigenetic mechanisms are also known to differ between men and women through X-inactivation in females. We hypothesized that epigenetic sex differences may also result from sex hormone functions, in particular from long-lasting androgen programming. We aimed at investigating whether inactivation of the androgen receptor, the key regulator of normal male sex development, is associated with differences of the patterns of DNA methylation marks in genital tissues. To this end, we performed large scale array-based analysis of gene methylation profiles on genomic DNA from labioscrotal skin fibroblasts of 8 males and 26 individuals with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) due to inactivating androgen receptor gene mutations. By this approach we identified differential methylation of 167 CpG loci representing 162 unique human genes. These were significantly enriched for androgen target genes and low CpG content promoter genes. Additional 75 genes showed a significant increase of heterogeneity of methylation in AIS compared to a high homogeneity in normal male controls. Our data show that normal and aberrant androgen receptor function is associated with distinct patterns of DNA-methylation marks in genital tissues. These findings support the concept that transcription factor binding to the DNA has an impact on the shape of the DNA methylome. These data which derived from a rare human model suggest that androgen programming of methylation marks contributes to sexual dimorphism in the human which might have considerable impact on the manifestation of sex-associated phenotypes and diseases.

  18. Androgen receptor function links human sexual dimorphism to DNA methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Ammerpohl

    Full Text Available Sex differences are well known to be determinants of development, health and disease. Epigenetic mechanisms are also known to differ between men and women through X-inactivation in females. We hypothesized that epigenetic sex differences may also result from sex hormone functions, in particular from long-lasting androgen programming. We aimed at investigating whether inactivation of the androgen receptor, the key regulator of normal male sex development, is associated with differences of the patterns of DNA methylation marks in genital tissues. To this end, we performed large scale array-based analysis of gene methylation profiles on genomic DNA from labioscrotal skin fibroblasts of 8 males and 26 individuals with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS due to inactivating androgen receptor gene mutations. By this approach we identified differential methylation of 167 CpG loci representing 162 unique human genes. These were significantly enriched for androgen target genes and low CpG content promoter genes. Additional 75 genes showed a significant increase of heterogeneity of methylation in AIS compared to a high homogeneity in normal male controls. Our data show that normal and aberrant androgen receptor function is associated with distinct patterns of DNA-methylation marks in genital tissues. These findings support the concept that transcription factor binding to the DNA has an impact on the shape of the DNA methylome. These data which derived from a rare human model suggest that androgen programming of methylation marks contributes to sexual dimorphism in the human which might have considerable impact on the manifestation of sex-associated phenotypes and diseases.

  19. Androgen receptor drives cellular senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelena Mirochnik

    Full Text Available The accepted androgen receptor (AR role is to promote proliferation and survival of prostate epithelium and thus prostate cancer progression. While growth-inhibitory, tumor-suppressive AR effects have also been documented, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we for the first time link AR anti-cancer action with cell senescence in vitro and in vivo. First, AR-driven senescence was p53-independent. Instead, AR induced p21, which subsequently reduced ΔN isoform of p63. Second, AR activation increased reactive oxygen species (ROS and thereby suppressed Rb phosphorylation. Both pathways were critical for senescence as was proven by p21 and Rb knock-down and by quenching ROS with N-Acetyl cysteine and p63 silencing also mimicked AR-induced senescence. The two pathways engaged in a cross-talk, likely via PML tumor suppressor, whose localization to senescence-associated chromatin foci was increased by AR activation. All these pathways contributed to growth arrest, which resolved in senescence due to concomitant lack of p53 and high mTOR activity. This is the first demonstration of senescence response caused by a nuclear hormone receptor.

  20. Differential targeting of androgen and glucocorticoid receptors induces ER stress and apoptosis in prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Pankaj; Yang, Ximing; Ugolkov, Andrey; Iwadate, Kenichi; Karseladze, Apollon; Budunova, Irina

    2012-01-01

    Androgen (AR) and glucocorticoid (GR) receptor signaling play opposing roles in prostate tumorigenesis: in prostate, AR acts as an oncogene, and GR is a tumor suppressor. Recently, we found that non-steroidal phyto-chemical compound A (CpdA) is AR/GR modulator acting as anti-inflammatory anti-androgen. CpdA inhibits AR and prevents GR transactivation while enhancing GR transrepression. GR and AR are controlled by proteasomal degradation. We found that prolonged exposure of LNCaP, LNCaP-GR, DU145 and PC3 prostate carcinoma (PCa) cells to proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib (BZ) caused AR degradation and GR accumulation. BZ enhanced CpdA ability to inhibit AR and to augment GR transrepression. We also found that CpdA+BZ differentially regulated GR/AR to cooperatively suppress PCa cell growth and survival and to induce endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS). Importantly, CpdA+BZ differentially regulated GR-responsive genes. CpdA+BZ blocked activation of glucocorticoid-responsive pro-survival genes, including SGK1, but activated BZ-induced ERS-related genes BIP/HSPA5 and CHOP/GADD153. Using ChIP, we showed that SGK1, BIP/HSPA5 and CHOP regulation was due to effects of CpdA and CpdA+BZ on GR loading on their promoters. We also found that AR and GR are abundant in advanced PCa from patients treated by androgen ablation and/or chemotherapy: 56% of carcinomas from treated patients expressed both receptors, and the other 27% expressed either GR or AR. Overall, our data validate the concept of dual AR/GR targeting in prostate cancer (PC) and suggest that BZ combination with dual-target steroid receptor modulator CpdA has high potential for PC therapy. PMID:22223138

  1. In Silico and In Vitro Investigation of the Piperine's Male Contraceptive Effect: Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulation Studies in Androgen-Binding Protein and Androgen Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinta, Gopichand; Ramya Chandar Charles, Mariasoosai; Klopčič, Ivana; Sollner Dolenc, Marija; Periyasamy, Latha; Selvaraj Coumar, Mohane

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanism of action of traditional medicines is an important step towards developing marketable drugs from them. Piperine, an active constituent present in the Piper species, is used extensively in Ayurvedic medicines (practiced on the Indian subcontinent). Among others, piperine is known to possess a male contraceptive effect; however, the molecular mechanism of action for this effect is not very clear. In this regard, detailed docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies of piperine with the androgen-binding protein and androgen receptors were carried out. Androgen receptors control male sexual behavior and fertility, while the androgen-binding protein binds testosterone and maintains its concentration at optimal levels to stimulate spermatogenesis in the testis. It was found that piperine docks to the androgen-binding protein, similar to dihydrotestosterone, and to androgen receptors, similar to cyproterone acetate (antagonist). Also, the piperine-androgen-binding protein and piperine-androgen receptors interactions were found to be stable throughout 30 ns of molecular dynamics simulation. Further, two independent simulations for 10 ns each also confirmed the stability of these interactions. Detailed analysis of the piperine-androgen-binding protein interactions shows that piperine interacts with Ser42 of the androgen-binding protein and could block the binding with its natural ligands dihydrotestosterone/testosterone. Moreover, piperine interacts with Thr577 of the androgen receptors in a manner similar to the antagonist cyproterone acetate. Based on the in silico results, piperine was tested in the MDA-kb2 cell line using the luciferase reporter gene assay and was found to antagonize the effect of dihydrotestosterone at nanomolar concentrations. Further detailed biochemical experiments could help to develop piperine as an effective male contraceptive agent in the future. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Self-regulation as a type of managerial activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Algazina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available УДК 342.9The subject. In the context of the ongoing administrative reform in the Russian Federation the issue of self-regulation is becoming increasingly important.Introduction of Institute of self-regulation is intended to reduce the degree of state intervention in private spheres of professional activity, to eliminate excessive administrative barriers, reduce government expenditures on regulation and control in their respective areas of operation, which is especially important in the current economic conditions.However, in Russian legal science is no recognized definition of "self-regulation", but a unity of views on the question of the relationship between self-regulation and state regulation of business relations.In this regard, the author attempts to examine the concept of "self-regulation" through the prism of knowledge about public administration.The purpose of the article is to identify the essential features and to articulate the concept of self-regulation by comparing it with other varieties of regulation.Methodology. The methodological basis for the study: general scientific methods (analysis, synthesis, comparison, description; private and academic (interpretation, formal-legal.Results, scope. Based on the analysis allocated in the science of administrative law approaches to the system of public administration justifies the conclusion that the notion "regulation" is specific in relation to the generic concept of "management" and is a kind of management, consisting in the drafting of rules of conduct and sanctions for non-compliance or inadequate performance.In addition, the article highlights the problem of the genesis of self-regulation, building a system of principles of self-regulation, comparison of varieties of self-regulatory organizations among themselves.Conclusions. The comparison of self-regulation other types of regulation (such as state regulation and co-regulation highlighted the essential features of this phenomenon

  3. ANDROGEN REPLACEMENT THERAPY IN POSTMENOPAUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Meden Vrtovec

    2008-12-01

    Scientific studies and clinical experiences have not provided until now the answers to thequestion: »Whom to treat, when, why and for how long should androgens be used for HRTin postmenopausal women?«

  4. Androgen response element of the glycine N-methyltransferase gene is located in the coding region of its first exon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-Ming; Yen, Chia-Hung; Tzeng, Tsai-Yu; Huang, Yu-Zen; Chou, Kuan-Hsien; Chang, Tai-Jay; Arthur Chen, Yi-Ming

    2013-09-17

    Androgen plays an important role in the pathogenesis of PCa (prostate cancer). Previously, we identified GNMT (glycine N-methyltransferase) as a tumour susceptibility gene and characterized its promoter region. Besides, its enzymatic product-sarcosine has been recognized as a marker for prognosis of PCa. The goals of this study were to determine whether GNMT is regulated by androgen and to map its AREs (androgen response elements). Real-time PCR analyses showed that R1881, a synthetic AR (androgen receptor) agonist induced GNMT expression in AR-positive LNCaP cells, but not in AR-negative DU145 cells. In silico prediction showed that there are four putative AREs in GNMT-ARE1, ARE2 and ARE3 are located in the intron 1 and ARE4 is in the intron 2. Consensus ARE motif deduced from published AREs was used to identify the fifth ARE-ARE5 in the coding region of exon 1. Luciferase reporter assay found that only ARE5 mediated the transcriptional activation of R1881. ARE3 overlaps with a YY1 [Yin and Yang 1 (motif (CaCCATGTT, +1118/+1126)] that was further confirmed by antibody supershift and ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) assays. EMSA (electrophoretic mobility shift assay) and ChIP assay confirmed that AR interacts with ARE5 in vitro and in vivo. In summary, GNMT is an AR-targeted gene with its functional ARE located at +19/+33 of the first exon. These results are valuable for the study of the influence of androgen on the gene expression of GNMT especially in the pathogenesis of cancer.

  5. Dietary methanol regulates human gene activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia V Shindyapina

    Full Text Available Methanol (MeOH is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA, which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling.

  6. Dietary Methanol Regulates Human Gene Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    Methanol (MeOH) is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA), which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC) from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling. PMID:25033451

  7. Endogenous Methanol Regulates Mammalian Gene Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Petrunia, Igor V.; Shindyapina, Anastasia V.; Silachev, Denis N.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that methanol emitted by wounded plants might function as a signaling molecule for plant-to-plant and plant-to-animal communications. In mammals, methanol is considered a poison because the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) converts methanol into toxic formaldehyde. However, the detection of methanol in the blood and exhaled air of healthy volunteers suggests that methanol may be a chemical with specific functions rather than a metabolic waste product. Using a genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain, we demonstrated that an increase in blood methanol concentration led to a change in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes primarily involved in detoxification processes and regulation of the alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenases gene cluster. To test the role of ADH in the maintenance of low methanol concentration in the plasma, we used the specific ADH inhibitor 4-methylpyrazole (4-MP) and showed that intraperitoneal administration of 4-MP resulted in a significant increase in the plasma methanol, ethanol and formaldehyde concentrations. Removal of the intestine significantly decreased the rate of methanol addition to the plasma and suggested that the gut flora may be involved in the endogenous production of methanol. ADH in the liver was identified as the main enzyme for metabolizing methanol because an increase in the methanol and ethanol contents in the liver homogenate was observed after 4-MP administration into the portal vein. Liver mRNA quantification showed changes in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes involved in cell signalling and detoxification processes. We hypothesized that endogenous methanol acts as a regulator of homeostasis by controlling the mRNA synthesis. PMID:24587296

  8. Active Power Regulation based on Droop for AC Microgrid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Chendan; Coelho, Ernane A. A.; Firoozabadi, Mehdi Savaghebi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, two different control strategies are proposed to address the active power regulation issue in AC microgrids. The principle of power regulation in the droop controller is firstly introduced. Frequency scheduling and droop gain scheduling on top of droop control is proposed to succes...

  9. Notch 1 signaling regulates peripheral T cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagar, Todd N; Tang, Qizhi; Wolfe, Michael; He, Yiping; Pear, Warren S; Bluestone, Jeffrey A

    2004-04-01

    Notch signaling has been identified as an important regulator of leukocyte differentiation and thymic maturation. Less is known about the role of Notch signaling in regulating mature T cells. We examined the role of Notch 1 in regulating peripheral T cell activity in vitro and in vivo. Coligation of Notch 1 together with TCR and CD28 resulted in a dramatic inhibition of T cell activation, proliferation, and cytokine production. This effect was dependent on presenilin activity and induced the expression of HES-1, suggestive of Notch 1 signaling. Biochemical analysis demonstrated an inhibition of AKT and GSK3beta phosphorylation following Notch 1 engagement while other biochemical signals such as TCR and ERK phosphorylation remained intact. Similar effects were observed in vivo in an adoptive transfer model. Therefore, Notch 1 signaling may play an important role in regulating naive T cell activation and homeostasis.

  10. A Small Group Activity About Bacterial Regulation And Complementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Merkel

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available As teachers, we well understand the need for activities that help develop critical-thinking skills in microbiology. In our experience, one concept that students have difficulty understanding is transcriptional regulation of bacterial genes. To help with this, we developed and evaluated a paper-based activity to help students understand and apply the concepts of bacterial transcriptional regulation. While we don't identify it as such, we use a complementation experiment to assess student understanding of how regulation changes when new DNA is introduced. In Part 1 of this activity, students complete an open book, take-home assignment that asks them to define common terminology related to regulation, and draw the regulatory components of different scenarios involving positive and negative regulation. In Part 2, students work in small groups of 3-4 to depict the regulatory components for a different scenario. They are asked to explain the results of a complementation experiment based on this scenario. They then predict the results of a slightly different experiment. Students who completed the Regulation Activity did significantly better on post-test questions related to regulation, compared to pre-test questions.

  11. A small group activity about bacterial regulation and complementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Susan; Hanson, Buck; Parks, Adam

    2010-01-01

    As teachers, we well understand the need for activities that help develop critical-thinking skills in microbiology. In our experience, one concept that students have difficulty understanding is transcriptional regulation of bacterial genes. To help with this, we developed and evaluated a paper-based activity to help students understand and apply the concepts of bacterial transcriptional regulation. While we don't identify it as such, we use a complementation experiment to assess student understanding of how regulation changes when new DNA is introduced. In Part 1 of this activity, students complete an open-book, take-home assignment that asks them to define common terminology related to regulation, and draw the regulatory components of different scenarios involving positive and negative regulation. In Part 2, students work in small groups of 3-4 to depict the regulatory components for a different scenario. They are asked to explain the results of a complementation experiment based on this scenario. They then predict the results of a slightly different experiment. Students who completed the Regulation Activity did significantly better on post-test questions related to regulation, compared to pre-test questions.

  12. Up-Regulated Expression of LAMP2 and Autophagy Activity during Neuroendocrine Differentiation of Prostate Cancer LNCaP Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morell, Cecilia; Bort, Alicia; Vara-Ciruelos, Diana; Ramos-Torres, Ágata; Altamirano-Dimas, Manuel; Díaz-Laviada, Inés; Rodríguez-Henche, Nieves

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine (NE) prostate cancer (PCa) is a highly aggressive subtype of prostate cancer associated with resistance to androgen ablation therapy. In this study, we used LNCaP prostate cancer cells cultured in a serum-free medium for 6 days as a NE model of prostate cancer. Serum deprivation increased the expression of NE markers such as neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and βIII tubulin (βIII tub) and decreased the expression of the androgen receptor protein in LNCaP cells. Using cDNA microarrays, we compared gene expression profiles of NE cells and non-differentiated LNCaP cells. We identified up-regulation of 155 genes, among them LAMP2, a lysosomal membrane protein involved in lysosomal stability and autophagy. We then confirmed up-regulation of LAMP2 in NE cells by qRT-PCR, Western blot and confocal microscopy assays, showing that mRNA up-regulation correlated with increased levels of LAMP2 protein. Subsequently, we determined autophagy activity in NE cells by assessing the protein levels of SQSTM/p62 and LC3 by Western blot and LC3 and Atg5 mRNAs content by qRT-PCR. The decreased levels of SQSTM/p62 was accompanied by an enhanced expression of LC3 and ATG5, suggesting activation of autophagy in NE cells. Blockage of autophagy with 1μM AKT inhibitor IV, or by silencing Beclin 1 and Atg5, prevented NE cell differentiation, as revealed by decreased levels of the NE markers. In addition, AKT inhibitor IV as well as Beclin1 and Atg5 kwockdown attenuated LAMP2 expression in NE cells. On the other hand, LAMP2 knockdown by siRNA led to a marked blockage of autophagy, prevention of NE differentiation and decrease of cell survival. Taken together, these results suggest that LAMP2 overexpression assists NE differentiation of LNCaP cells induced by serum deprivation and facilitates autophagy activity in order to attain the NE phenotype and cell survival. LAMP2 could thus be a potential biomarker and potential target for NE prostate cancer.

  13. Supported Liquid Membrane Extraction of Anabolic Androgenic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    Anabolic androgenic compounds, supported liquid membrane, liquid chromatography, electrospray ionization, mass spectrometry. 1. Introduction ... monitoring of some of the anabolic hormones in muscles via pentafluoropropionyl derivatization and ... androgenic steroid hormones involve the use of solid phase extraction ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 12(4):373-87. Review. Citation on PubMed Gottlieb B, Pinsky L, Beitel LK, Trifiro M. Androgen ... 89(4):210-7. Review. Citation on PubMed Gottlieb B, Trifiro MA. Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome. 1999 Mar ...

  15. Refinement of the androgen response element based on ChIP-Seq in androgen-insensitive and androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stephen; Qi, Jianfei; Filipp, Fabian V

    2016-09-14

    Sequence motifs are short, recurring patterns in DNA that can mediate sequence-specific binding for proteins such as transcription factors or DNA modifying enzymes. The androgen response element (ARE) is a palindromic, dihexameric motif present in promoters or enhancers of genes targeted by the androgen receptor (AR). Using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) we refined AR-binding and AREs at a genome-scale in androgen-insensitive and androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines. Model-based searches identified more than 120,000 ChIP-Seq motifs allowing for expansion and refinement of the ARE. We classified AREs according to their degeneracy and their transcriptional involvement. Additionally, we quantified ARE utilization in response to somatic copy number amplifications, AR splice-variants, and steroid treatment. Although imperfect AREs make up 99.9% of the motifs, the degree of degeneracy correlates negatively with validated transcriptional outcome. Weaker AREs, particularly ARE half sites, benefit from neighboring motifs or cooperating transcription factors in regulating gene expression. Taken together, ARE full sites generate a reliable transcriptional outcome in AR positive cells, despite their low genome-wide abundance. In contrast, the transcriptional influence of ARE half sites can be modulated by cooperating factors.

  16. Indole-3-carbinol and 3’, 3’-diindolylmethane modulate androgen effect up-regulation on C-C chemokine ligand 2 and monocyte attraction to prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inflammation has a role in prostate tumorigenesis. Recruitment of inflammatory monocytes to the tumor site is mediated by C-C chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) through binding to its receptor CCR2. We hypothesized that androgen could modulate CCL2 expression in hormone-responsive prostate cancer cells, and ...

  17. Regulation of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase activity in leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leegood, R C; Walker, D A

    1982-12-01

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11) activity increased markedly (greater than 10-fold) upon illumination of wheat leaves. Darkening caused a relatively slow but complete reversal of light activation. The effects of O2 and CO2 concentration and light intensity on fructose-bisphosphatase activation were measured. In ratelimiting light, 2% O2 stimulated enzyme activity, whereas varying the CO2 concentration had little effect. In saturating light, lowering the oxygen tension had no effect, but CO2 at near-saturating concentrations for photosynthesis inhibited enzyme activity. Dark inactivation of the enzyme was completely prevented by incubation of leaves in N2, but was facilitated by O2, indicating that O2 is the major oxidant in darkened leaves. It is argued that while fructose bisphosphatase is redox-regulated in leaves, modulation of enzyme activity by this mechanism is unlikely to contribute to the regulation of CO2 fixation in leaves.

  18. An Update on Plant Derived Anti-Androgens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Paul; Ramasamy, Shamin

    2012-01-01

    Anti-androgens are an assorted group of drugs and compounds that reduce the levels or activity of androgen hormones within the human body. Disease states in which this is relevant include polycystic ovarian syndrome, hirsutism, acne, benign prostatic hyperplasia, and endocrine related cancers such as carcinoma of the prostate. We provide an overview and discussion of the use of anti-androgen medications in clinical practice and explore the increasing recognition of the benefits of plant-derived anti-androgens, for example, spearmint tea in the management of PCOS, for which some evidence about efficacy is beginning to emerge. Other agents covered include red reishi, which has been shown to reduce levels 5-alpha reductase, the enzyme that facilitates conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT); licorice, which has phytoestrogen effects and reduces testosterone levels; Chinese peony, which promotes the aromatization of testosterone into estrogen; green tea, which contains epigallocatechins and also inhibits 5-alpha reductase, thereby reducing the conversion of normal testosterone into the more potent DHT; black cohosh, which has been shown to kill both androgenresponsive and non-responsive human prostate cancer cells; chaste tree, which has a reduces prolactin from the anterior pituitary; and saw palmetto extract, which is used as an anti-androgen although it shown no difference in comparison to placebo in clinical trials. PMID:23843810

  19. Regulation of CDP-diacylglycerol synthase activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Homann, M J; Henry, S A; Carman, G M

    1985-01-01

    The addition of ethanolamine or choline to inositol-containing growth medium resulted in a reduction of CTP:phosphatidate cytidylyltransferase (CDP-diacylglycerol synthase; EC 2.7.7.41) activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The reduction of activity did not occur in the absence of inositol. CDP-diacylglycerol synthase activity was not regulated in a S. cerevisiae mutant strain (opi1; an inositol biosynthesis regulatory mutant) by the addition of phospholipid precursors to the growth medium.

  20. Post-translational regulation of Oct4 transcriptional activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan P Saxe

    Full Text Available Oct4 is a key component of the molecular circuitry which regulates embryonic stem cell proliferation and differentiation. It is essential for maintenance of undifferentiated, pluripotent cell populations, and accomplishes these tasks by binding DNA in multiple heterodimer and homodimer configurations. Very little is known about how formation of these complexes is regulated, or the mechanisms through which Oct4 proteins respond to complex extracellular stimuli which regulate pluripotency. Here, we provide evidence for a phosphorylation-based mechanism which regulates specific Oct4 homodimer conformations. Point mutations of a putative phosphorylation site can specifically abrogate transcriptional activity of a specific homodimer assembly, with little effect on other configurations. Moreover, we performed bioinformatic predictions to identify a subset of Oct4 target genes which may be regulated by this specific assembly, and show that altering Oct4 protein levels affects transcription of Oct4 target genes which are regulated by this assembly but not others. Finally, we identified several signaling pathways which may mediate this phosphorylation and act in combination to regulate Oct4 transcriptional activity and protein stability. These results provide a mechanism for rapid and reversible alteration of Oct4 transactivation potential in response to extracellular signals.

  1. Lack of anti-androgenic effects of equol on reproductive neuroendocrine function in the adult male rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loutchanwoot, Panida; Srivilai, Prayook; Jarry, Hubertus

    2014-01-01

    Equol (EQ), a metabolite of the soy isoflavone daidzein, has well known estrogenic properties. Data from animal studies suggested that EQ may act also as an anti-androgen. However, data regarding how EQ may affect brain functions like the regulation of neuroendocrine activity and reproductive outcomes in adult male rats are still lacking. We therefore investigated the effects of EQ on sex-steroid regulated gene expression in the brain [medial preoptic area/anterior hypothalamus (MPOA/AH) and medial basal hypothalamus/median eminence (MBH/ME)], pituitary, and prostate as a reference androgen-dependent organ. Furthermore reproductive outcomes were evaluated. The anti-androgen flutamide (FLUT) served as reference compound. Male rats (n=12 per group) were treated by gavage for 5 days with either EQ (100 or 250 mg/kgBW/day), or FLUT 100 mg/kgBW/day. All vehicle- and EQ-treated males showed successful reproductive outcomes, whereas FLUT-exposed males had severe reproductive impairments resulted in infertility. FLUT decreased relative weights of prostate, seminal vesicles and epididymides, and increased serum levels of luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, testosterone and 5α-dihydrotestosterone without altering prolactin levels, whereas EQ exerted opposite effects. Both EQ and FLUT decreased gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) expression in the MPOA/AH. Only FLUT upregulated levels of GnRH receptor expression both in the MBH/ME and pituitary. While EQ downregulated the hypothalamic ERα and ERβ expressions, but FLUT did not. In the prostate, only FLUT upregulated both ERα and AR mRNA expression levels. Taken together, our findings are the first data that EQ did not induce anti-androgenic effects on brain, prostate and male reproductive parameters, however, estrogenic neuroendocrine and reproductive effects of EQ were observed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Endocrine disrupting potentials of Bisphenol A, Bisphenol A dimethacrylate, 4-n-Nonyl-phenol and 4-Octylphenol assessed in cell model systems for effects on the estrogen-, androgen-, aryl hydrocarbon-receptor and aromatase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie; Long, Manhai; Hofmeister, Marlene V

      An array of plastic components is known to possess endocrine disruption (ED) potentials. Bisphenol A (BPA) and BPA-Dimethacrylate (BPA-DM) are monomers used to high extent in the plastic industry and as dental sealants. Alkylphenols such as 4-n-nonylphenol (NP) and 4-octylphenol (OP) are widely...... used as surfactants. We have investigated the effect in vitro of these four plasticizers in four cell culture model systems.The estrogenic potencies were analyzed using the stable ERE-luciferase transfected cell line MVLN measuring the relative estrogen receptor (ER) transactivated luciferase units...... (RLU). Effects on the Androgen receptor (AR) trans-activation were investigated by co-transfection of the CHO-K1 hamster cells using the reporter vector MMTV-LUC and the AR expression vector pSVAR0. Effects on the CYP19 aromatase, an important enzyme in the steroid synthesis pathway involved...

  3. Regulation of xylanase activity in cellulomonas Sp. IIbc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, H.; Alea, F. (Cuban Research Inst. for Sugar Cane By-Products (ICIDCA), La Habana (Cuba))

    1992-01-01

    The regulation mechanism governing the xylanolytic activity in the strain Cellulomonas sp. IIbc was studied. High levels of activity were detected during the cultivation on cellulose as the only carbon source. No activity was produced with glucose, xylose or cellobiose cultures, but in the last one, the synthesis was de-repressed when the sugar concentration dropped to 0.2%. The activity was not inhibited by glucose, cellobiose and xylose up to 1% concentration. A basal constitutive synthesis was detected in nutrient broth cultures. At the same time, xylose and cellobiose acted as inducers of the xylanase activity. (orig.).

  4. Androgen receptor roles in insulin resistance and obesity in males: the linkage of androgen-deprivation therapy to metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, I-Chen; Lin, Hung-Yun; Sparks, Janet D; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most frequently diagnosed malignancies in men. Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) is the first-line treatment and fundamental management for men with advanced PCa to suppress functions of androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signaling. ADT is effective at improving cancer symptoms and prolonging survival. However, epidemiological and clinical studies support the notion that testosterone deficiency in men leads to the development of metabolic syndrome that increases cardiovascular disease risk. The underlying mechanisms by which androgen/AR signaling regulates metabolic homeostasis in men are complex, and in this review, we discuss molecular mechanisms mediated by AR signaling that link ADT to metabolic syndrome. Results derived from various AR knockout mouse models reveal tissue-specific AR signaling that is involved in regulation of metabolism. These data suggest that steps be taken early to manage metabolic complications associated with PCa patients receiving ADT, which could be accomplished using tissue-selective modulation of AR signaling and by treatment with insulin-sensitizing agents. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  5. Epigenetic regulator Lid maintains germline stem cells through regulating JAK-STAT signaling pathway activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lama Tarayrah

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Signaling pathways and epigenetic mechanisms have both been shown to play essential roles in regulating stem cell activity. While the role of either mechanism in this regulation is well established in multiple stem cell lineages, how the two mechanisms interact to regulate stem cell activity is not as well understood. Here we report that in the Drosophila testis, an H3K4me3-specific histone demethylase encoded by little imaginal discs (lid maintains germline stem cell (GSC mitotic index and prevents GSC premature differentiation. Lid is required in germ cells for proper expression of the Stat92E transcription factor, the downstream effector of the Janus kinase signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT signaling pathway. Our findings support a germ cell autonomous role for the JAK-STAT pathway in maintaining GSCs and place Lid as an upstream regulator of this pathway. Our study provides new insights into the biological functions of a histone demethylase in vivo and sheds light on the interaction between epigenetic mechanisms and signaling pathways in regulating stem cell activities.

  6. Repression of androgen receptor transcription through the E2F1/DNMT1 axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrad David Valdez

    Full Text Available Although androgen receptor (AR function has been extensively studied, regulation of the AR gene itself has been much less characterized. In this study, we observed a dramatic reduction in the expression of androgen receptor mRNA and protein in hyperproliferative prostate epithelium of keratin 5 promoter driven E2F1 transgenic mice. To confirm an inhibitory function for E2F1 on AR transcription, we showed that E2F1 inhibited the transcription of endogenous AR mRNA, subsequent AR protein, and AR promoter activity in both human and mouse epithelial cells. E2F1 also inhibited androgen-stimulated activation of two AR target gene promoters. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of E2F-mediated inhibition of AR, we evaluated the effects of two functional E2F1 mutants on AR promoter activity and found that the transactivation domain appears to mediate E2F1 repression of the AR promoter. Because DNMT1 is a functional intermediate of E2F1 we examined DNMT1 function in AR repression. Repression of endogenous AR in normal human prostate epithelial cells was relieved by DNMT1 shRNA knock down. DNMT1 was shown to be physically associated within the AR minimal promoter located 22 bps from the transcription start site; however, methylation remained unchanged at the promoter regardless of DNMT1 expression. Taken together, our results suggest that DNMT1 operates either as a functional intermediary or in cooperation with E2F1 inhibiting AR gene expression in a methylation independent manner.

  7. AMPK negatively regulates tensin-dependent integrin activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadou, Maria; Lilja, Johanna; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Guzmán, Camilo; Rafaeva, Maria; Alibert, Charlotte; Yan, Yan; Sahgal, Pranshu; Lerche, Martina; Manneville, Jean-Baptiste; Mäkelä, Tomi P; Ivaska, Johanna

    2017-04-03

    Tight regulation of integrin activity is paramount for dynamic cellular functions such as cell matrix adhesion and mechanotransduction. Integrin activation is achieved through intracellular interactions at the integrin cytoplasmic tails and through integrin-ligand binding. In this study, we identify the metabolic sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as a β1-integrin inhibitor in fibroblasts. Loss of AMPK promotes β1-integrin activity, the formation of centrally located active β1-integrin- and tensin-rich mature fibrillar adhesions, and cell spreading. Moreover, in the absence of AMPK, cells generate more mechanical stress and increase fibronectin fibrillogenesis. Mechanistically, we show that AMPK negatively regulates the expression of the integrin-binding proteins tensin1 and tensin3. Transient expression of tensins increases β1-integrin activity, whereas tensin silencing reduces integrin activity in fibroblasts lacking AMPK. Accordingly, tensin silencing in AMPK-depleted fibroblasts impedes enhanced cell spreading, traction stress, and fibronectin fiber formation. Collectively, we show that the loss of AMPK up-regulates tensins, which bind β1-integrins, supporting their activity and promoting fibrillar adhesion formation and integrin-dependent processes. © 2017 Georgiadou et al.

  8. Finasteride treatment alters tissue specific androgen receptor expression in prostate tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Tyler M; Sehgal, Priyanka D; Johnson, Karen A; Pier, Thomas; Bruskewitz, Reginald C; Ricke, William A; Huang, Wei

    2014-06-01

    Normal and pathologic growth of the prostate is dependent on the synthesis of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) from testosterone by 5α-reductase. Finasteride is a selective inhibitor of 5α-reductase 2, one isozyme of 5α-reductase found in abundance in the human prostate. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of finasteride on androgen receptor expression and tissue morphology in human benign prostatic hyperplasia specimens. Patients undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate and either treated or not treated with finasteride between 2004 and 2010 at the University of Wisconsin-Hospital were retrospectively identified using an institutional database. Prostate specimens from each patient were triple-stained for androgen receptor, prostate-specific antigen, and basal marker cytokeratin 5. Morphometric analysis was performed using the multispectral imaging, and results were compared between groups of finasteride treated and non-treated patients. Epithelial androgen receptor but not stromal androgen receptor expression was significantly lower in patients treated with finasteride than in non-treated patients. Androgen receptor-regulated prostate-specific antigen was not significantly decreased in finasteride-treated patients. Significant luminal epithelial atrophy and basal cell hyperplasia were prevalent in finasteride treated patients. Epithelial androgen receptor expression was highly correlated to the level of luminal epithelial atrophy. In this study, finasteride decreased the expression of epithelial androgen receptor in a tissue specific manner. The correlation between epithelial androgen receptor and the extent of luminal epithelial atrophy suggests that epithelial androgen receptor may be directly regulating the atrophic effects observed with finasteride treatment. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The androgen receptor controls expression of the cancer-associated sTn antigen and cell adhesion through induction of ST6GalNAc1 in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkley, Jennifer; Oltean, Sebastian; Vodák, Daniel; Wilson, Brian T; Livermore, Karen E; Zhou, Yan; Star, Eleanor; Floros, Vasileios I; Johannessen, Bjarne; Knight, Bridget; McCullagh, Paul; McGrath, John; Crundwell, Malcolm; Skotheim, Rolf I; Robson, Craig N; Leung, Hing Y; Harries, Lorna W; Rajan, Prabhakar; Mills, Ian G; Elliott, David J

    2015-10-27

    Patterns of glycosylation are important in cancer, but the molecular mechanisms that drive changes are often poorly understood. The androgen receptor drives prostate cancer (PCa) development and progression to lethal metastatic castration-resistant disease. Here we used RNA-Seq coupled with bioinformatic analyses of androgen-receptor (AR) binding sites and clinical PCa expression array data to identify ST6GalNAc1 as a direct and rapidly activated target gene of the AR in PCa cells. ST6GalNAc1 encodes a sialytransferase that catalyses formation of the cancer-associated sialyl-Tn antigen (sTn), which we find is also induced by androgen exposure. Androgens induce expression of a novel splice variant of the ST6GalNAc1 protein in PCa cells. This splice variant encodes a shorter protein isoform that is still fully functional as a sialyltransferase and able to induce expression of the sTn-antigen. Surprisingly, given its high expression in tumours, stable expression of ST6GalNAc1 in PCa cells reduced formation of stable tumours in mice, reduced cell adhesion and induced a switch towards a more mesenchymal-like cell phenotype in vitro. ST6GalNAc1 has a dynamic expression pattern in clinical datasets, beingsignificantly up-regulated in primary prostate carcinoma but relatively down-regulated in established metastatic tissue. ST6GalNAc1 is frequently upregulated concurrently with another important glycosylation enzyme GCNT1 previously associated with prostate cancer progression and implicated in Sialyl Lewis X antigen synthesis. Together our data establishes an androgen-dependent mechanism for sTn antigen expression in PCa, and are consistent with a general role for the androgen receptor in driving important coordinate changes to the glycoproteome during PCa progression.

  10. The androgen receptor controls expression of the cancer-associated sTn antigen and cell adhesion through induction of ST6GalNAc1 in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkley, Jennifer; Oltean, Sebastian; Vodák, Daniel; Wilson, Brian T.; Livermore, Karen E.; Zhou, Yan; Star, Eleanor; Floros, Vasileios I.; Johannessen, Bjarne; Knight, Bridget; McCullagh, Paul; McGrath, John; Crundwell, Malcolm; Skotheim, Rolf I.; Robson, Craig N.; Leung, Hing Y.; Harries, Lorna W.; Rajan, Prabhakar; Mills, Ian G.; Elliott, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Patterns of glycosylation are important in cancer, but the molecular mechanisms that drive changes are often poorly understood. The androgen receptor drives prostate cancer (PCa) development and progression to lethal metastatic castration-resistant disease. Here we used RNA-Seq coupled with bioinformatic analyses of androgen-receptor (AR) binding sites and clinical PCa expression array data to identify ST6GalNAc1 as a direct and rapidly activated target gene of the AR in PCa cells. ST6GalNAc1 encodes a sialytransferase that catalyses formation of the cancer-associated sialyl-Tn antigen (sTn), which we find is also induced by androgen exposure. Androgens induce expression of a novel splice variant of the ST6GalNAc1 protein in PCa cells. This splice variant encodes a shorter protein isoform that is still fully functional as a sialyltransferase and able to induce expression of the sTn-antigen. Surprisingly, given its high expression in tumours, stable expression of ST6GalNAc1 in PCa cells reduced formation of stable tumours in mice, reduced cell adhesion and induced a switch towards a more mesenchymal-like cell phenotype in vitro. ST6GalNAc1 has a dynamic expression pattern in clinical datasets, being significantly up-regulated in primary prostate carcinoma but relatively down-regulated in established metastatic tissue. ST6GalNAc1 is frequently upregulated concurrently with another important glycosylation enzyme GCNT1 previously associated with prostate cancer progression and implicated in Sialyl Lewis X antigen synthesis. Together our data establishes an androgen-dependent mechanism for sTn antigen expression in PCa, and are consistent with a general role for the androgen receptor in driving important coordinate changes to the glycoproteome during PCa progression. PMID:26452038

  11. Extracellular Matrix Stiffness Regulates Osteogenic Differentiation through MAPK Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Ha Hwang

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC differentiation is regulated by the extracellular matrix (ECM through activation of intracellular signaling mediators. The stiffness of the ECM was shown to be an important regulatory factor for MSC differentiation, and transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ was identified as an effector protein for MSC differentiation. However, the detailed underlying mechanism regarding the role of ECM stiffness and TAZ in MSC differentiation is not yet fully understood. In this report, we showed that ECM stiffness regulates MSC fate through ERK or JNK activation. Specifically, a stiff hydrogel matrix stimulates osteogenic differentiation concomitant with increased nuclear localization of TAZ, but inhibits adipogenic differentiation. ERK and JNK activity was significantly increased in cells cultured on a stiff hydrogel. TAZ activation was induced by ERK or JNK activation on a stiff hydrogel because exposure to an ERK or JNK inhibitor significantly decreased the nuclear localization of TAZ, indicating that ECM stiffness-induced ERK or JNK activation is important for TAZ-driven osteogenic differentiation. Taken together, these results suggest that ECM stiffness regulates MSC differentiation through ERK or JNK activation.

  12. Unraveling the Complex Epigenetic Mechanisms that Regulate Gene Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, Marian

    2018-01-01

    Our understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms that regulate gene expression has been largely increased in recent years by the development and refinement of different techniques. This has revealed that gene transcription is highly influenced by epigenetic mechanisms, i.e., those that do not involve changes in the genome sequence, but rather in nuclear architecture, chromosome conformation and histone and DNA modifications. Our understanding of how these different levels of epigenetic regulation interact with each other and with classical transcription-factor based gene regulation to influence gene transcription has just started to emerge. This review discusses the latest advances in unraveling the complex interactions between different types of epigenetic regulation and transcription factor activity, with special attention to the approaches that can be used to study these interactions.

  13. Intracerebroventricular injection of adiponectin regulates locomotor activity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatake, Yumiko; Shiuchi, Tetsuya; Ueta, Tomoyo; Taniguchi, Yasuko; Futami, Akari; Sato, Fukiko; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Tsutsumi, Rie; Harada, Nagakatsu; Nakaya, Yutaka; Sakaue, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing exercise motivation is the best way to prevent obesity and diabetes. In this study, we examined whether adiponectin affects locomotion activity in Wister and Spontaneously-Running Tokushima-Shikoku (SPORTS) rats using two types of behavioral assays: home cage and wheel running activity. SPORTS rats were established from an original line from Wister strain that had shown high level of wheel running activity in our laboratory. Injection of adiponectin into the lateral ventricle of Wister rats and SPORTS rats decreased home cage activity, but no change was observed in the food intake and oxygen consumption. This result indicates the possibility that adiponectin can reduce non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) and physical activity via the central nervous system. In contrast, injection of adiponectin did not change wheel running activity in SPORTS rats. We produced hypothalamus-destructed model rat using monosodium glutamate (MSG) to elucidate the regulation site of adiponectin. Injection of adiponectin into MSG-treated SPORTS rats did not change amount of home cage activity and food intake, suggesting that adiponectin action on home cage activity was in the hypothalamic area. These results suggest that adiponectin regulates locomotion activity through mediobasal hypothalamus.

  14. Activity Dependency and Aging in the Regulation of Adult Neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempermann, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Age and activity might be considered the two antagonistic key regulators of adult neurogenesis. Adult neurogenesis decreases with age but remains present, albeit at a very low level, even in the oldest individuals. Activity, be it physical or cognitive, increases adult neurogenesis and thereby seems to counteract age effects. It is, thus, proposed that activity-dependent regulation of adult neurogenesis might contribute to some sort of “neural reserve,” the brain’s ability to compensate functional loss associated with aging or neurodegeneration. Activity can have nonspecific and specific effects on adult neurogenesis. Mechanistically, nonspecific stimuli that largely affect precursor cell stages might be related by the local microenvironment, whereas more specific, survival-promoting effects take place at later stages of neuronal development and require the synaptic integration of the new cell and its particular synaptic plasticity. PMID:26525149

  15. Mechanism and regulation of NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuan; Hara, Hideki; Núñez, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Members of the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing (NLR) family and the pyrin and HIN-domain (PYHIN) family can form multiprotein complexes termed “inflammasomes”. The biochemical function of inflammasomes is to activate caspase-1, which leads to the maturation of interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 and induction of pyroptosis, a form of cell death. Unlike other inflammasomes, the NLRP3 inflammasome can be activated by diverse stimuli. The importance of the NLRP3 inflammasome in immunity and human diseases has been well documented, but the mechanism and regulation of NLRP3 inflammasome activation remains unclear. In this review we summarize current understanding of the mechanism and regulation of NLRP3 inflammasome activation, as well as recent advances in the non-canonical and alternative inflammasome pathways. PMID:27669650

  16. THE EUROPEAN MODEL OF STATE REGULATION OF TOURISM ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. Davydova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the article the existing model of state regulation of the development of tourism. Expediency of the European model of state regulation of tourism development in Ukraine. It is noted that the European model of state regulation of tourism activities based on the coordination of marketing activities and the development of cooperation between the public and private sectors. The basic forms of public-private partnerships and the advantages of using cluster model of development of tourism, namely, contracts, production sharing agreement, lease, joint venture. Promising areas of application of the PPP identified the transport sector, housing and utilities, energy and tourism sector. The features of cluster formations in the country and the prospects for tourism clusters.

  17. The molecular regulation of Janus kinase (JAK) activation

    OpenAIRE

    Babon, Jeffrey J.; Lucet, Isabelle S; Murphy, James M.; Nicola, Nicos A.; Varghese, Leila N.

    2014-01-01

    The Janus Kinase (JAK) family members serve essential roles as the intracellular signalling effectors of cytokine receptors. This family, comprising JAK1, JAK2, JAK3 and TYK2, was first described more than 20 years ago, but the complexities underlying their activation, regulation and pleiotropic signalling functions are still being explored. Here, we review the current knowledge of their physiological functions and the causative role of activating and inactivating JAK mutations in human disea...

  18. Commission for Energy regulation (CRE) - Activity report June 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    CRE is the French commission for energy regulation. CRE's remit is to assist in ensuring the proper operation of the electricity and natural gas markets for the benefit of the end-user. In particular, CRE ensures that the conditions of access to electricity and natural gas transmission and distribution systems do not hinder the development of competition. It monitors, for the electricity and natural gas sectors, all transactions made between suppliers, traders and producers, all transactions made on the organised markets and cross-border trading. It ensures that suppliers, traders and producers propose offers that are consistent with their financial and technical constraints. It monitors the implementation of and compliance with regulations giving consumers the right to choose their supplier in a competitive market, and allowing new suppliers to enter the market. This document is the 2004 activity report of CRE. Content: A - Opening of the gas and electricity markets for professional customers on 1 July 2004; B - Regulation of the gas market: Gas markets and players (The European environment, The French gas market); Regulation of the gas market (Implementing regulation, Works planned for the coming year; C - Regulation of the electricity market: The electricity markets and players (The European electricity markets, The French electricity market, Monitoring the electricity market); Regulation of the French electricity market (Access to public grid, Cross-border exchanges, Un-bundled accounting principles); The public electricity service in the regulated market (Content of the public service, Public service charges, Electricity production public service financing, Electricity sales tariffs) D - The working of CRE: How CRE exercises its jurisdiction, Tools; E - Appendices: Glossary, Units and conversions, Council of European Energy Regulators, Index of tables and figures.

  19. How is AMPK activity regulated in skeletal muscles during exercise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Sebastian Beck; Rose, Adam John

    2008-01-01

    discuss the influence of reactive oxygen species produced within the muscle as well as muscle glycogen and TAK1 in regulating AMPK during exercise. Currently, during intensive contraction, activation of alpha2-AMPK seems mainly to rely on AMP accumulating from ATP-hydrolysis whereas calcium signaling may...

  20. Using Regulation Activities to Improve Undergraduate Collaborative Writing on Wikis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Moon-Heum; Lim, Seongmi

    2017-01-01

    Although wikis have been widely adopted to support collaborative writing in undergraduate classrooms, educators remain concerned about the level of student participation. Using regulation theories to design interventions in the form of activities, we examined their effects on collaborative writing on wikis. Results demonstrate that with the…

  1. 76 FR 12364 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-07

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse... Bonded Warehouse Regulations. This request for comment is being made pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction... information (a total capital/ startup costs and operations and maintenance costs). The comments that are...

  2. Plasma concentration of thymus and activation-regulated chemokine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) is responsible for trafficking of T helper 2 lymphocytes into sites of allergic inflammation. However, its role in assessing the severity of acute asthma in children is still unclear. Objective: We sought to evaluate plasma TARC as a marker for monitoring asthma ...

  3. 76 FR 28801 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-18

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse... following information collection request to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Bonded Warehouse Regulations. This is a proposed...

  4. Insight into Nek2A activity regulation and its pharmacological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ambuj Kumar

    2012-11-28

    Nov 28, 2012 ... phatase 1 interaction, mitotic degradation, microtubule bind- ing, and centrosome localization [22]. ... congression and causes persistent activation of the spindle checkpoint [24]. Hec1 is shown to be an ... hydrogen bond and salt bridge formations whereas the entropy corresponds to regulating the losses of ...

  5. Why Control Activity? Evolutionary Selection Pressures Affecting the Development of Physical Activity Genetic and Biological Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Timothy Lightfoot

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature strongly suggests that daily physical activity is genetically and biologically regulated. Potential identities of the responsible mechanisms are unclear, but little has been written concerning the possible evolutionary selection pressures leading to the development of genetic/biological controls of physical activity. Given the weak relationship between exercise endurance and activity levels and the differential genomic locations associated with the regulation of endurance and activity, it is probable that regulation of endurance and activity evolved separately. This hypothesis paper considers energy expenditures and duration of activity in hunter/gatherers, pretechnology farmers, and modern Western societies and considers the potential of each to selectively influence the development of activity regulation. Food availability is also considered given the known linkage of caloric restriction on physical activity as well as early data relating food oversupply to physical inactivity. Elucidating the selection pressures responsible for the genetic/biological control of activity will allow further consideration of these pressures on activity in today’s society, especially the linkages between food and activity. Further, current food abundance is removing the cues for activity that were present for the first 40,000 years of human evolution, and thus future research should investigate the effects of this abundance upon the mechanisms regulating activity.

  6. Sequential Androgen Receptor Pathway Inhibitor in Prostate Cancer: Piling-Up The Benefits or a Case for Cross-Resistance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Tombal

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last 10 years, there has been accumulating evidence that, even in a low serum testosterone environment, the androgen receptor (AR remains the main driver of prostate cancer progression. This has led to the discovery and clinical development of new anti-androgens and androgen biosynthesis inhibitors. Enzalutamide and abiraterone acetate are the lead compounds of this new generation of agents, but multiple other agents are on their way. Because they both target the ligand-dependent regulation of AR activity, it is plausible that cross-resistance may exist when both drugs are used sequentially, and that the benefit of these agents may fade away when sequencing them. As the exact mechanisms for cross- resistance between AR-targeted agents remain unclear at this point, additional clinical studies are crucial to define the exact combination or sequencing order that could yield highest clinical benefits. Moreover, new molecular targets are needed in order to address these resistances, as well as establishing biomarkers to improve patient selection that could most benefit from AR-targeted therapies, but also help develop novel agents to improve and optimise the management of castration-resistant prostate cancer and metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  7. Anabolic androgenic steroids abuse and liver toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, M; Bello, S; Bonsignore, A; Cantatore, S; Riezzo, I; Turillazzi, E; Fineschi, V

    2011-05-01

    In the athletes the wide use of Anabolic Androgenic Steroids (AAS) cause series damage in various organs, in particular, analyzing the liver, elevation on the levels of liver enzymes, cholestatic jaundice, liver tumors, both benign and malignant, and peliosis hepatis are described. A prolonged AAS administration provokes an increase in the activities of liver lysosomal hydrolases and a decrease in some components of the microsomal drug-metabolizing system and in the activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes without modifying classical serum indicators of hepatic function. Liver is a key organ actively involved in numerous metabolic and detoxifying functions. As a consequence, it is continuously exposed to high levels of endogenous and exogenous oxidants that are by-products of many biochemical pathways and, in fact, it has been demonstrated that intracellular oxidant production is more active in liver than in tissues, like the increase of inflammatory cytokines, apoptosis and the inhibitors of apoptosis NF- κB and Heat Shock Proteins.

  8. Ovarian overproduction of androgens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body shape Decrease in breast size Increase in body hair in a male pattern, such as on the ... to decrease hair production in women with excess body hair, or to regulate menstrual cycles. In some cases, ...

  9. Impact of circulating cholesterol levels on growth and intratumoral androgen concentration of prostate tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe A Mostaghel

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is the second most common cancer in men. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT leads to tumor involution and reduction of tumor burden. However, tumors eventually reemerge that have overcome the absence of gonadal androgens, termed castration resistant PCa (CRPC. Theories underlying the development of CRPC include androgen receptor (AR mutation allowing for promiscuous activation by non-androgens, AR amplification and overexpression leading to hypersensitivity to low androgen levels, and/or tumoral uptake and conversion of adrenally derived androgens. More recently it has been proposed that prostate tumor cells synthesize their own androgens through de novo steroidogenesis, which involves the step-wise synthesis of androgens from cholesterol. Using the in vivo LNCaP PCa xenograft model, previous data from our group demonstrated that a hypercholesterolemia diet potentiates prostatic tumor growth via induction of angiogenesis. Using this same model we now demonstrate that circulating cholesterol levels are significantly associated with tumor size (R = 0.3957, p = 0.0049 and intratumoral levels of testosterone (R = 0.41, p = 0.0023 in LNCaP tumors grown in hormonally intact mice. We demonstrate tumoral expression of cholesterol uptake genes as well as the spectrum of steroidogenic enzymes necessary for androgen biosynthesis from cholesterol. Moreover, we show that circulating cholesterol levels are directly correlated with tumoral expression of CYP17A, the critical enzyme required for de novo synthesis of androgens from cholesterol (R = 0.4073, p = 0.025 Since hypercholesterolemia does not raise circulating androgen levels and the adrenal gland of the mouse synthesizes minimal androgens, this study provides evidence that hypercholesterolemia increases intratumoral de novo steroidogenesis. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that cholesterol-fueled intratumoral androgen synthesis may accelerate the

  10. Androgen deprivation modulates the inflammatory response induced by irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Paul-Yang

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to determine whether radiation (RT-induced inflammatory responses and organ damage might be modulated by androgen deprivation therapies. Methods The mRNA and tissue sections obtained from the lungs, intestines and livers of irradiated mice with or without androgen deprivation were analyzed by real-time PCR and histological analysis. Activation of NF-kappa B was examined by measuring nuclear protein levels in the intestine and lung 24 h after irradiation. We also examined the levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, TGF-β1 and p-AKT to elucidate the related pathway responsible to irradiation (RT -induced fibrosis. Results We found androgen deprivation by castration significantly augmented RT-induced inflammation, associated with the increase NF-κB activation and COX-2 expression. However, administration of flutamide had no obvious effect on the radiation-induced inflammation response in the lung and intestine. These different responses were probably due to the increase of RT-induced NF-κB activation and COX-2 expression by castration or lupron treatment. In addition, our data suggest that TGF-β1 and the induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway may contribute to RT-induced fibrosis. Conclusion When irradiation was given to patients with total androgen deprivation, the augmenting effects on the RT-induced inflammation and fibrosis should take into consideration for complications associated with radiotherapy.

  11. Palmitoylation of caspase-6 by HIP14 regulates its activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotte, Niels H; Sanders, Shaun S; Singaraja, Roshni R; Ehrnhoefer, Dagmar E; Vaid, Kuljeet; Qiu, Xiaofan; Kannan, Srinivasaragavan; Verma, Chandra; Hayden, Michael R

    2017-03-01

    Caspase-6 (CASP6) has an important role in axonal degeneration during neuronal apoptosis and in the neurodegenerative diseases Alzheimer and Huntington disease. Decreasing CASP6 activity may help to restore neuronal function in these and other diseases such as stroke and ischemia, where increased CASP6 activity has been implicated. The key to finding approaches to decrease CASP6 activity is a deeper understanding of the mechanisms regulating CASP6 activation. We show that CASP6 is posttranslationally palmitoylated by the palmitoyl acyltransferase HIP14 and that the palmitoylation of CASP6 inhibits its activation. Palmitoylation of CASP6 is decreased both in Hip14-/- mice, where HIP14 is absent, and in YAC128 mice, a model of Huntington disease, where HIP14 is dysfunctional and where CASP6 activity is increased. Molecular modeling suggests that palmitoylation of CASP6 may inhibit its activation via steric blockage of the substrate-binding groove and inhibition of CASP6 dimerization, both essential for CASP6 function. Our studies identify palmitoylation as a novel CASP6 modification and as a key regulator of CASP6 activity.

  12. Androgenic effect of honeybee drone milk in castrated rats: roles of methyl palmitate and methyl oleate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seres, A B; Ducza, E; Báthori, M; Hunyadi, A; Béni, Z; Dékány, M; Hajagos-Tóth, J; Verli, J; Gáspár, Róbert

    2014-04-28

    Numerous honeybee (Apis mellifera) products have been used in traditional medicine to treat infertility and to increase vitality in both men and women. Drone milk (DM) is a relatively little-known honeybee product with a putative sexual hormone effect. The oestrogenic effect of a fraction of DM has recently been reported in rats. However, no information is available on the androgenic effects of DM. The purpose of the present study was to determine the androgen-like effect of DM in male rats and to identify effective compounds. A modified Hershberger assay was used to investigate the androgenic effect of crude DM, and the plasma level of testosterone was measured. The prostatic mRNA and protein expression of Spot14-like androgen-inducible protein (SLAP) were also examined with real-time PCR and Western blot techniques. GC-MS and NMR spectroscopic investigations were performed to identify the active components gained by bioactivity-guided fractionation. The crude DM increased the relative weights of the androgen-dependent organs and the plasma testosterone level in castrated rats and these actions were flutamide-sensitive. DM increased the tissue mRNA and protein level of SLAP, providing further evidence of its androgen-like character. After bioactivity-guided fractionation, two fatty acid esters, methyl palmitate (MP) and methyl oleate (MO), were identified as active compounds. MP alone showed an androgenic effect, whereas MO increased the weight of androgen-sensitive tissues and the plasma testosterone level only in combination. The experimental data of DM and its active compounds (MO and MP) show androgenic activity confirming the traditional usage of DM. DM or MP or/and MO treatments may project a natural mode for the therapy of male infertility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. DUB3 Deubiquitylating Enzymes Regulate Hippo Pathway Activity by Regulating the Stability of ITCH, LATS and AMOT Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Thanh Hung; Kugler, Jan-Michael; Cohen, Stephen Michael

    2017-01-01

    deubiquitylating enzymes as regulators of Hippo pathway activity. We provide evidence that DUB3 proteins regulate YAP/TAZ activity by controlling the stability of the E3 ligase ITCH, the LATS kinases and the AMOT family proteins. As a novel Hippo pathway regulator, DUB3 has the potential to act a tumor suppressor...

  14. Cyclin-dependent kinase 9 activity regulates neutrophil spontaneous apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keqing Wang

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocyte and play a central role in the immune defense against rapidly dividing bacteria. However, they are also the shortest lived cell in the blood with a lifespan in the circulation of 5.4 days. The mechanisms underlying their short lifespan and spontaneous entry into apoptosis are poorly understood. Recently, the broad range cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK inhibitor R-roscovitine was shown to increase neutrophil apoptosis, implicating CDKs in the regulation of neutrophil lifespan. To determine which CDKs were involved in regulating neutrophil lifespan we first examined CDK expression in human neutrophils and found that only three CDKs: CDK5, CDK7 and CDK9 were expressed in these cells. The use of CDK inhibitors with differing selectivity towards the various CDKs suggested that CDK9 activity regulates neutrophil lifespan. Furthermore CDK9 activity and the expression of its activating partner cyclin T1 both declined as neutrophils aged and entered apoptosis spontaneously. CDK9 is a component of the P-TEFb complex involved in transcriptional regulation and its inhibition will preferentially affect proteins with short half-lives. Treatment of neutrophils with flavopiridol, a potent CDK9 inhibitor, increased apoptosis and caused a rapid decline in the level of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1, whilst Bcl2A was unaffected. We propose that CDK9 activity is a key regulator of neutrophil lifespan, preventing apoptosis by maintaining levels of short lived anti-apoptotic proteins such as Mcl-1. Furthermore, as inappropriate inhibition of neutrophil apoptosis contributes to chronic inflammatory diseases such as Rheumatoid Arthritis, CDK9 represents a novel therapeutic target in such diseases.

  15. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 9 Activity Regulates Neutrophil Spontaneous Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazeldine, Jon; Krystof, Vladimir; Strnad, Miroslav; Pechan, Paul; M., Janet

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocyte and play a central role in the immune defense against rapidly dividing bacteria. However, they are also the shortest lived cell in the blood with a lifespan in the circulation of 5.4 days. The mechanisms underlying their short lifespan and spontaneous entry into apoptosis are poorly understood. Recently, the broad range cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor R-roscovitine was shown to increase neutrophil apoptosis, implicating CDKs in the regulation of neutrophil lifespan. To determine which CDKs were involved in regulating neutrophil lifespan we first examined CDK expression in human neutrophils and found that only three CDKs: CDK5, CDK7 and CDK9 were expressed in these cells. The use of CDK inhibitors with differing selectivity towards the various CDKs suggested that CDK9 activity regulates neutrophil lifespan. Furthermore CDK9 activity and the expression of its activating partner cyclin T1 both declined as neutrophils aged and entered apoptosis spontaneously. CDK9 is a component of the P-TEFb complex involved in transcriptional regulation and its inhibition will preferentially affect proteins with short half-lives. Treatment of neutrophils with flavopiridol, a potent CDK9 inhibitor, increased apoptosis and caused a rapid decline in the level of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1, whilst Bcl2A was unaffected. We propose that CDK9 activity is a key regulator of neutrophil lifespan, preventing apoptosis by maintaining levels of short lived anti-apoptotic proteins such as Mcl-1. Furthermore, as inappropriate inhibition of neutrophil apoptosis contributes to chronic inflammatory diseases such as Rheumatoid Arthritis, CDK9 represents a novel therapeutic target in such diseases. PMID:22276149

  16. The Biological and Clinical Significance of Androgen Receptor Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    specimen with similar cell composition and histology among control and experimental samples in an in vivo setting. The authentic response ofTSGs to ADT...mice retained the histology and biomarker expression of parent tumors, and whether androgen deprivation affected cell proliferation, AR-regulated...skin between the shoulder blades . Castration of mice Castration of mice was performed one month after subrenal implantation as previously described

  17. Intracellular regulation of TNF activity in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varfolomeev, Eugene; Vucic, Domagoj

    2018-01-01

    Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFα, TNF) is a key mediator and regulator of mammalian immune responses in healthy organisms and in diseased conditions. TNF governs development of the immune system, cell survival signaling pathways, proliferation and regulates metabolic processes. Whereas TNF-induced NF-κB and MAP pro-survival kinase activities constitute its major biochemical functions, TNF can also stimulate cell death in certain pathological situations. TNF-induced signal transduction pathways are tightly regulated through ubiquitination and phosphorylation of molecules partaking in all TNF-dependent membrane-associated and intracellular protein signaling complexes. Deregulated TNF signaling in individuals carrying naturally occurring genetic mutations in proteins that mediate TNF signaling, or in corresponding genetically modified animal models, results in severe pathologies. In this review we will describe the current knowledge of TNF signaling and its relevance for human health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthetic anabolic agents: steroids and nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2010-01-01

    The central role of testosterone in the development of male characteristics, as well as its beneficial effects on physical performance and muscle growth, has led to the search for synthetic alternatives with improved pharmacological profiles. Hundreds of steroidal analogs have been prepared with a superior oral bioavailability, which should also possess reduced undesirable effects. However, only a few entered the pharmaceutical market due to severe toxicological incidences that were mainly attributed to the lack of tissue selectivity. Prominent representatives of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are for instance methyltestosterone, metandienone and stanozolol, which are discussed as model compounds with regard to general pharmacological aspects of synthetic AAS. Recently, nonsteroidal alternatives to AAS have been developed that selectively activate the androgen receptor in either muscle tissue or bones. These so-called selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are currently undergoing late clinical trials (IIb) and will be prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency from January 2008. Their entirely synthetic structures are barely related to steroids, but particular functional groups allow for the tissue-selective activation or inhibition of androgen receptors and, thus, the stimulation of muscle growth without the risk of severe undesirable effects commonly observed in steroid replacement therapies. Hence, these compounds possess a high potential for misuse in sports and will be the subject of future doping control assays.

  19. Androgens and obesity in male adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandewalle, Sara; De Schepper, Jean; Kaufman, Jean-Marc

    2015-06-01

    Data on sex steroid levels and pubertal development in obese adolescent boys are scarce and contrasting. The present review summarizes the most recent results obtained with improved methodology to measure low sex steroid levels in children. Obese pubertal boys have lower serum sex hormone-binding globulin and consequently lower total testosterone levels compared to normal-weight peers. However, during pubertal development, free testosterone levels in obese adolescents are not different from controls, indicating preserved androgen exposure as is additionally suggested by similar clinical genital staging (Tanner), serum gonadotropins levels, and serum prostate-specific antigen concentrations compared to nonobese adolescents. In pre and early puberty, total testosterone levels is not decreased, notwithstanding low sex hormone-binding globulin, and free testosterone is slightly increased in obese boys. This may result from increased adrenal activity as revealed by elevated serum androstenedione and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate. In obese adolescent boys, increased aromatization of testosterone to estradiol tends to accelerate skeletal maturation. In obese adolescent boys, free testosterone is a better index than total testosterone levels of androgen status, which is not different from nonobese controls. Increased aromatization of testosterone to estradiol underlies the dissociation between normal clinical sexual maturation and advanced skeletal maturation in the obese adolescent.

  20. Alexithymia influences brain activation during emotion perception but not regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velde, Jorien; Gromann, Paula M; Swart, Marte; Wiersma, Durk; de Haan, Lieuwe; Bruggeman, Richard; Krabbendam, Lydia; Aleman, André

    2015-02-01

    Alexithymia is a psychological construct that can be divided into a cognitive and affective dimension. The cognitive dimension is characterized by difficulties in identifying, verbalizing and analysing feelings. The affective dimension comprises reduced levels of emotional experience and imagination. Alexithymia is widely regarded to arise from an impairment of emotion regulation. This is the first functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study to critically evaluate this by investigating the neural correlates of emotion regulation as a function of alexithymia levels. The aim of the current study was to investigate the neural correlates underlying the two alexithymia dimensions during emotion perception and emotion regulation. Using fMRI, we scanned 51 healthy subjects while viewing, reappraising or suppressing negative emotional pictures. The results support the idea that cognitive alexithymia, but not affective alexithymia, is associated with lower activation in emotional attention and recognition networks during emotion perception. However, in contrast with several theories, no alexithymia-related differences were found during emotion regulation (neither reappraisal nor suppression). These findings suggest that alexithymia may result from an early emotion processing deficit rather than compromised frontal circuits subserving higher-order emotion regulation processes. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Neuronal activity-induced regulation of Lingo-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifunovski, Alexandra; Josephson, Anna; Ringman, Andreas; Brené, Stefan; Spenger, Christian; Olson, Lars

    2004-10-25

    Axonal regeneration after injury can be limited in the adult CNS by the presence of inhibitory proteins such as Nogo. Nogo binds to a receptor complex that consists of Nogo receptor (NgR), p75NTR, and Lingo-1. Nogo binding activates RhoA, which inhibits axonal outgrowth. Here we assessed Lingo-1 and NgR mRNA levels after delivery of BDNF into the rat hippocampal formation, Lingo-1 mRNA levels in rats subjected to kainic acid (KA) and running in running wheels. Lingo-1 mRNA was not changed by running. However, we found that Lingo-1 mRNA was strongly up-regulated while NgR mRNA was down-regulated in the dentate gyrus in both the BDNF and the KA experiments. Our data demonstrate inverse regulation of NgR and Lingo-1 in these situations, suggesting that Lingo-1 up-regulation is one characteristic of activity-induced neural plasticity responses.

  2. Regulation of tissue factor coagulant activity on cell surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, L V M; Pendurthi, U R

    2012-11-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is a transmembrane glycoprotein and an essential component of the factor VIIa-TF enzymatic complex that triggers activation of the coagulation cascade. Formation of TF-FVIIa complexes on cell surfaces not only trigger the coagulation cascade but also transduce cell signaling via activation of protease-activated receptors. Tissue factor is expressed constitutively on cell surfaces of a variety of extravascular cell types, including fibroblasts and pericytes in and surrounding blood vessel walls and epithelial cells, but is generally absent on cells that come into contact with blood directly. However, TF expression could be induced in some blood cells, such as monocytes and endothelial cells, following an injury or pathological stimuli. Tissue factor is essential for hemostasis, but aberrant expression of TF leads to thrombosis. Therefore, a proper regulation of TF activity is critical for the maintenance of hemostatic balance and health in general. TF-FVIIa coagulant activity at the cell surface is influenced not only by TF protein expression levels but also independently by a variety of mechanisms, including alterations in membrane phospholipid composition and cholesterol content, thiol-dependent modifications of TF allosteric disulfide bonds, and other post-translational modifications of TF. In this article, we critically review the key literature on mechanisms by which TF coagulant activity is regulated at the cell surface in the absence of changes in TF protein levels with specific emphasis on recently published data and provide the authors' perspective on the subject. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  3. Commission for Energy regulation (CRE) - Activity report June 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    CRE is the French commission for energy regulation. CRE's remit is to assist in ensuring the proper operation of the electricity and natural gas markets for the benefit of the end-user. In particular, CRE ensures that the conditions of access to electricity and natural gas transmission and distribution systems do not hinder the development of competition. It monitors, for the electricity and natural gas sectors, all transactions made between suppliers, traders and producers, all transactions made on the organised markets and cross-border trading. It ensures that suppliers, traders and producers propose offers that are consistent with their financial and technical constraints. It monitors the implementation of and compliance with regulations giving consumers the right to choose their supplier in a competitive market, and allowing new suppliers to enter the market. This document is the 2007 activity report of CRE. Content: A - Towards a single European energy market: Birth of a single European energy market (Origins of Europe of Energy, Emergence of a European energy policy); Main European Community guiding lines (European governance as regards energy, Guiding principles for the internal energy market); European Community activities (European Commission reports, Electricity and gas Regional Initiatives); Organisation and coordination of European regulators (Joint organisation of European regulators, CRE's relations with European Community institutions); CRE's European activities (Regional integration of gas markets, Regional integration of electricity markets, Operation of the European interconnected electricity grid and security of supply, CRE's other European activities); B - CRE action at national level: Grids/networks and infrastructures (General information, Electricity grids, Regulation of gas networks and infrastructures); Markets (Changes in the regulatory and legislative contexts of electricity and natural gas markets, Electricity markets

  4. Activation and Regulation of DNA-Driven Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The innate immune system provides early defense against infections and also plays a key role in monitoring alterations of homeostasis in the body. DNA is highly immunostimulatory, and recent advances in this field have led to the identification of the innate immune sensors responsible for the recognition of DNA as well as the downstream pathways that are activated. Moreover, information on how cells regulate DNA-driven immune responses to avoid excessive inflammation is now emerging. Finally, several reports have demonstrated how defects in DNA sensing, signaling, and regulation are associated with susceptibility to infections or inflammatory diseases in humans and model organisms. In this review, the current literature on DNA-stimulated innate immune activation is discussed, and important new questions facing this field are proposed. PMID:25926682

  5. Centromeric Transcription Regulates Aurora-B Localization and Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Blower

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Centromeric transcription is widely conserved; however, it is not clear what role centromere transcription plays during mitosis. Here, I find that centromeres are transcribed in Xenopus egg extracts into a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA; cen-RNA that localizes to mitotic centromeres, chromatin, and spindles. cen-RNAs bind to the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC in vitro and in vivo. Blocking transcription or antisense inhibition of cen-RNA leads to a reduction of CPC localization to the inner centromere and misregulation of CPC component Aurora-B activation independently of known centromere recruitment pathways. Additionally, transcription is required for normal bipolar attachment of kinetochores to the mitotic spindle, consistent with a role for cen-RNA in CPC regulation. This work demonstrates that cen-RNAs promote normal kinetochore function through regulation of the localization and activation of the CPC and confirm that lncRNAs are components of the centromere.

  6. Regulation of burstiness by network-driven activation

    CERN Document Server

    García-Pérez, Guillermo; Serrano, M Ángeles

    2014-01-01

    We prove that complex networks of interactions have the capacity to regulate and buffer unpredictable fluctuations in production events. We show that non-bursty network-driven activation dynamics can effectively regulate the level of burstiness in the production of nodes, which can be enhanced or reduced. Burstiness can be induced even when the endogenous inter-event time distribution of nodes' production is non-bursty. We found that hubs tend to be less controllable than low degree nodes, which are more susceptible to the networked regulatory effects. Our results have important implications for the analysis and engineering of bursty activity in a range of systems, from telecommunication networks to transcription and translation of genes into proteins in cells.

  7. Activity of cabazitaxel in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer after treatment with single or dual regimens of novel androgen receptor-targeting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bando, Yukari; Hinata, Nobuyuki; Terakawa, Tomoaki; Furukawa, Junya; Harada, Ken-Ichi; Nakano, Yuzo; Fujisawa, Masato

    2017-08-17

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of cabazitaxel for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) after sequential therapy with docetaxel (DTX) and single or dual regimens of novel androgen receptor-axis-targeted (ARAT) agents. We retrospectively reviewed 84 consecutive patients treated with cabazitaxel at Kobe University Hospital and related hospitals from September 2014 to September 2016. The association of each prognostic parameter with progression-free survival (PFS) was evaluated, including the sequence of therapy. Patients were divided according to their treatment after receiving cabazitaxel as follows: group 1 (after DTX and single regimen of novel ARAT agent) and group 2 (after DTX and dual novel ARAT agents). Median PFS for cabazitaxel treatment was 10.3 months (range 4.5-14.2 months). Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response rates (≥30%) were 46.8 and 46.1% in group 1 and group 2, respectively [p = 0.96, hazard ratio (HR) 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.57-1.80]. PSA response rates (≥50%) were 43.8 and 26.9% in patients of group 1 and group 2, respectively (p = 0.18, HR 1.54, 95% CI 0.78-3.04). Univariate analysis revealed that PFS for cabazitaxel treatment was significantly associated with baseline alkaline phosphatase, bone metastasis, and prior sequential therapy. Multivariate analysis revealed that bone metastasis and prior sequential therapy were independently associated with PFS. Prior sequential therapy with single regimen or dual regimens of novel ARAT agents was independently associated with PFS of patients with mCRPC treated with cabazitaxel. The effect of cabazitaxel after the administration of DTX and single novel ARAT agent was more sustained.

  8. Bifurcation analysis of the regulation of nociceptive neuronal activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dik, O. E.

    2017-11-01

    A model of the membrane of a nociceptive neuron from a rat dorsal ganglion has been used to address the problem of analyzing the regulation of nociceptive signals by 5-hydroxy-γ-pyrone-2-carboxylic acid, which is the active pharmaceutic ingredient of the analgesic Anoceptin. The study has applied bifurcation analysis to report the relationship between the values of model parameters and the type of problem solution before and after the parameters change in response to analgesic modulation.

  9. p53 regulation and activity in mouse embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Solozobova, Valeriya

    2010-01-01

    P53 is a tumour development p53. The aim of this work was to study the regulation of p53 in embryonic stem cells and its activation in response to DNA damage. p53 was found that p53 becomes transcriptionally active in ES cells after DNA damage. Embryonic stem cells contain a relatively high amount of p53 protein and p53 RNA. After differentiation p53 level is rapidly downregulated. The high abundance of p53 in undifferentiated ES cells is a result of enhanced translation.

  10. After the Slippery Slope: Dutch Experiences on Regulating Active Euthanasia

    OpenAIRE

    Boer, Th.A.

    2003-01-01

    “When a country legalizes active euthanasia, it puts itself on a slippery slope from where it may well go further downward.” If true, this is a forceful argument in the battle of those who try to prevent euthanasia from becoming legal. The force of any slippery-slope argument, however, is by definition limited by its reference to future developments which cannot empirically be sustained. Experience in the Netherlands—where a law regulating active euthanasia was accepted in April 2001—may shed...

  11. Androgens and the ageing male

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Anders; Skakkebaek, Niels E

    2002-01-01

    with severe primary or secondary hypogonadism. Thus, androgen substitution therapy is warranted in men with true hypogonadism at all ages. Symptoms experienced by otherwise healthy ageing males are non-specific and vague, although some may be similar to symptoms of hypogonadism. Therefore, the term...... not have an andropause. As large placebo-controlled studies of androgen treatment in elderly males are lacking, proper risk assessment of adverse effects such as prostate cancer following testosterone treatment in elderly males is completely lacking. In the future, testosterone therapy may prove beneficial...... in some elderly males with low-normal testosterone levels. However, at this point in time, widespread use of testosterone in an elderly male population outside controlled clinical trials seems inappropriate....

  12. Regulating the regulator: factors that control levels and activity of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Patricia A; Riddick, David S; Okey, Allan B

    2006-07-28

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) participates in a wide range of critical cellular events in response to endogenous signals or xenobiotic chemicals. Hence, it is important that AHR levels and activity themselves be well controlled in target tissues. The AHR is essentially ubiquitous in its distribution in mammalian tissues. However, levels of the receptor vary widely across different tissues and among different cell types. AHR levels and activity are modulated by exposure to the receptor's own ligands and are influenced by other xenobiotic chemicals. Many different factors impinge on AHR levels and AHR activity. These factors may alter responsiveness of downstream pathways, thereby affecting normal physiologic functions as well as responses to toxic environmental chemicals such as dioxins. Our commentary appraises the current literature on factors that regulate AHR levels/activity and attempts to identify fruitful strategies towards discovery of key pathways by which AHR levels are modulated in response to endogenous signals and in response to xenobiotic chemicals. An extraordinarily large number of agents alter the level or activity of the AHR. We have not yet entered an age of enlightenment sufficient to achieve true understanding of the interplay of mechanisms that regulate AHR expression in space and in time.

  13. Reptides and Proteins Interacting with the Androgen Receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J. van de Wijngaart (Dennis)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAndrogens are important sex steroid hormones. The androgens testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) are essential for normal male sexual differentiation and for the development and maintenance of male reproductive tissues, including the prostate. Androgens mediate their effects by

  14. ABUSE OF ANABOLIC ANDROGENIC STEROIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Abbas Yavari

    2009-01-01

    According to the International Olympic Committee, the abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AASS) is found in over 50% of positive doping tests. AASS abuse is not restricted to the organized sports and widespread use. It remains as an unsolved public-health problem. Lower black market price, easier access to AASS, bodybuilding clubs and internet advertising are factors of this increasingly misuse. There is not real data about the prevalence of AASS abuse in various populations or countries, ...

  15. Differential Mechanisms of Androgen Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    two infertile Finnish men. Fertility and Sterility , 79, Supple3, 2003. Miyake H, Hara I, Eto H.2005 Clinical outcome of maximum androgen blockade...identified in two infertile men (Lund et al 2003). It can be postulated that Q58L could change the conformation of the polyglutamide tract thereby...and PC3- LNCAP AR (C) tumour xenografts. 3 million cells in sterile PBS (1:1 ratio with Matrigel) were implanted s.c. into the flank of SCID mice

  16. Ins and outs of ADF/cofilin activity and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Troys, Marleen; Huyck, Lynn; Leyman, Shirley; Dhaese, Stien; Vandekerkhove, Joël; Ampe, Christophe

    2008-09-01

    The actin-binding proteins of the actin-depolymerisation factor (ADF)/cofilin family were first described more than three decades ago, but research on these proteins still occupies a front role in the actin and cell migration field. Moreover, cofilin activity is implicated in the malignant, invasive properties of cancer cells. The effects of ADF/cofilins on actin dynamics are diverse and their regulation is complex. In stimulated cells, multiple signalling pathways can be initiated resulting in different activation/deactivation switches that control ADF/cofilin activity. The output of this entire regulatory system, in combination with spatial and temporal segregation of the activation mechanisms, underlies the contribution of ADF/cofilins to various cell migration/invasion phenotypes. In this framework, we describe current views on how ADF/cofilins function in migrating and invading cells.

  17. Serum testosterone levels after medical or surgical androgen deprivation: a comprehensive review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Androgens and the androgen receptor play a role in the progression of prostate cancer. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is a mainstay in the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. ADT is expected to reduce serum testosterone levels from a normal level of about 500 to 600 ng/dl (17.3-20.8 nmol) down to castration levels. Traditionally, castration was considered to be achieved if testosterone levels were lowered to a threshold of 50 ng/dl (1.73 nmol/l), a definition determined more by measurement methods derived from the use of old assay methods than by evidence. Serum testosterone levels in three-quarter patients after surgical castration drop to less than 20 ng/dl (0.69 nmol/l). Ineffective suppression of testosterone is currently poorly recognized and may possibly have an effect of prostate cancer mortality. Persistent levels of serum testosterone after castration are mainly derived from adrenal androgens. Furthermore, the arrival of new therapies targeting androgen synthesis and androgen receptor activity has renewed interest on serum testosterone. This review discusses the biosynthetic pathway for androgen synthesis in humans and provides a comprehensive review of serum testosterone levels after surgical or medical castration. This review assesses serum testosterone levels after surgical castration and different pharmacologic castration in patients with prostate cancer under ADT, and ineffective testosterone suppression. The author proposes methods to better lower serum testosterone levels during ADT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification and characterization of androgenic gland specific insulin-like peptide-encoding transcripts in two spiny lobster species: Sagmariasus verreauxi and Jasus edwardsii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Tomer; Fitzgibbon, Quinn; Battaglene, Stephen; Sagi, Amir; Elizur, Abigail

    2015-04-01

    In this study we describe, for the first time in spiny lobsters, the androgenic gland and its putative hormone. The androgenic gland in crustaceans is the key regulator of crustacean masculinity. The transcript encoding the insulin-like androgenic gland specific factor has recently been identified and characterized in a number of decapod crustacean species including commercially important crabs, crayfish, prawns and shrimps. This insulin-like factor has proven to be the androgenic gland masculinizing hormone, and is absent in females. While the androgenic gland and its putative hormone have been identified in all other commercially valuable groups, none had been identified in lobsters. We identified and characterized the androgenic glands of two spiny lobster species (Sagmariasus verreauxi and Jasus edwardsii) and conducted a transcriptomic analysis of the S. verreauxi androgenic gland. Bioinformatics analysis led to the discovery and characterization of the insulin-like androgenic gland specific factors in both species studied. Changes in androgenic gland cell size and quantity between sub-adult and sexually mature males were evident. The transcriptomic database established for the S. verreauxi androgenic gland might enable to elucidate the mechanisms through which the insulin-like factor is secreted, transported to the target cells and how it triggers the physiological effects of sexual differentiation towards maleness and maintenance of the male gonad. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Dissociable Effects on Birdsong of Androgen Signaling in Cortex-Like Brain Regions of Canaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alward, Beau A; Balthazart, Jacques; Ball, Gregory F

    2017-09-06

    The neural basis of how learned vocalizations change during development and in adulthood represents a major challenge facing cognitive neuroscience. This plasticity in the degree to which learned vocalizations can change in both humans and songbirds is linked to the actions of sex steroid hormones during ontogeny but also in adulthood in the context of seasonal changes in birdsong. We investigated the role of steroid hormone signaling in the brain on distinct features of birdsong using adult male canaries (Serinus canaria), which show extensive seasonal vocal plasticity as adults. Specifically, we bilaterally implanted the potent androgen receptor antagonist flutamide in two key brain regions that control birdsong. We show that androgen signaling in the motor cortical-like brain region, the robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA), controls syllable and trill bandwidth stereotypy, while not significantly affecting higher order features of song such syllable-type usage (i.e., how many times each syllable type is used) or syllable sequences. In contrast, androgen signaling in the premotor cortical-like brain region, HVC (proper name), controls song variability by increasing the variability of syllable-type usage and syllable sequences, while having no effect on syllable or trill bandwidth stereotypy. Other aspects of song, such as the duration of trills and the number of syllables per song, were also differentially affected by androgen signaling in HVC versus RA. These results implicate androgens in regulating distinct features of complex motor output in a precise and nonredundant manner.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Vocal plasticity is linked to the actions of sex steroid hormones, but the precise mechanisms are unclear. We investigated this question in adult male canaries (Serinus canaria), which show extensive vocal plasticity throughout their life. We show that androgens in two cortex-like vocal control brain regions regulate distinct aspects of vocal plasticity. For

  20. Regulation of stretch-activated ANP secretion by chloride channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jeong Hee; Bai, Guang Yi; Park, Jae-Hyeong; Yuan, Kuichang; Park, Woo Hyun; Kim, Sung Zoo; Kim, Suhn Hee

    2008-04-01

    This study was aimed to define roles of stretch-activated ion channels (SACs), especially Cl(-) channels, in regulation of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) secretion using isolated perfused beating atria. The volume load was achieved by elevating height of outflow catheter connected to isolated rat atria and the pressure load was achieved by decreasing diameter of outflow catheter. Both methods increased atrial contractility similarly although volume load was different (736microl for volume load vs. 129microl for pressure load). Atrial stretch by volume load markedly increased ECF translocation and ANP secretion but the pressure load slightly increased. The ANP secretion was positively correlated to workload generated by volume or pressure load. Treatment of atria with gadolinium, a blocker for SACs, attenuated the ECF translocation and the ANP secretion induced by volume load. A blocker for Ca2+-activated Cl(-) channel, niflumic acid (NFA), accentuated the ANP secretion induced by volume load whereas a blocker for swelling-activated Cl(-) channel, diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS), attenuated the ANP secretion. The ANP secretion of hypertrophied atria by volume load was markedly reduced and the augmented effect of NFA on volume load-induced ANP secretion was not observed. These results indicate that Cl(-) channels may differently regulate stretch-activated ANP secretion.

  1. RGS10 Negatively Regulates Platelet Activation and Thrombogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole R Hensch

    Full Text Available Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS proteins act as GTPase activating proteins to negatively regulate G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR signaling. Although several RGS proteins including RGS2, RGS16, RGS10, and RGS18 are expressed in human and mouse platelets, the respective unique function(s of each have not been fully delineated. RGS10 is a member of the D/R12 subfamily of RGS proteins and is expressed in microglia, macrophages, megakaryocytes, and platelets. We used a genetic approach to examine the role(s of RGS10 in platelet activation in vitro and hemostasis and thrombosis in vivo. GPCR-induced aggregation, secretion, and integrin activation was much more pronounced in platelets from Rgs10-/- mice relative to wild type (WT. Accordingly, these mice had markedly reduced bleeding times and were more susceptible to vascular injury-associated thrombus formation than control mice. These findings suggest a unique, non-redundant role of RGS10 in modulating the hemostatic and thrombotic functions of platelets in mice. RGS10 thus represents a potential therapeutic target to control platelet activity and/or hypercoagulable states.

  2. The molecular regulation of Janus kinase (JAK) activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babon, Jeffrey J; Lucet, Isabelle S; Murphy, James M; Nicola, Nicos A; Varghese, Leila N

    2014-08-15

    The JAK (Janus kinase) family members serve essential roles as the intracellular signalling effectors of cytokine receptors. This family, comprising JAK1, JAK2, JAK3 and TYK2 (tyrosine kinase 2), was first described more than 20 years ago, but the complexities underlying their activation, regulation and pleiotropic signalling functions are still being explored. Here, we review the current knowledge of their physiological functions and the causative role of activating and inactivating JAK mutations in human diseases, including haemopoietic malignancies, immunodeficiency and inflammatory diseases. At the molecular level, recent studies have greatly advanced our knowledge of the structures and organization of the component FERM (4.1/ezrin/radixin/moesin)-SH2 (Src homology 2), pseudokinase and kinase domains within the JAKs, the mechanism of JAK activation and, in particular, the role of the pseudokinase domain as a suppressor of the adjacent tyrosine kinase domain's catalytic activity. We also review recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of negative regulation exerted by the SH2 domain-containing proteins, SOCS (suppressors of cytokine signalling) proteins and LNK. These recent studies highlight the diversity of regulatory mechanisms utilized by the JAK family to maintain signalling fidelity, and suggest alternative therapeutic strategies to complement existing ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors.

  3. Regulation of transcription and activity of Rhizobium etli glutaminase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Saquero, Alejandro; Calderón-Flores, Arturo; Díaz-Villaseñor, Andrea; Du Pont, Gisela; Durán, Socorro

    2004-08-04

    The present study determines the regulatory mechanisms that operate on Rhizobium etli glutaminase A. glsA gene expression levels were evaluated under several metabolic conditions by fusions of the glsA gene promoter and the transcriptional reporter cassette uidA2-aad. glsA expression was directly correlated to the glutaminase A activity found under the tested growth conditions, reaching its maximum level in the presence of glutamine and during exponential growth phase. Glutamine induces glsA expression. The influence of allosteric metabolites on glutaminase A activity was also determined. The purified enzyme was inhibited by 2-oxoglutarate and pyruvate, whereas oxaloacetate and glyoxylate modulate it positively. Glutaminase A is not inhibited by glutamate and is activated by ammonium. Glutaminase A participates in an ATP-consuming cycle where glutamine is continually degraded and resynthesized by glutamine synthetase (GS). GS and glutaminase A activities appear simultaneously during bacterial growth under different metabolic conditions and their control mechanisms are not reciprocal. Slight overproduction in glutaminase A expression causes a reduction in growth yield and a dramatic decrease in bacterial growth. We propose a model for regulation of glutaminase A, and discuss its contribution to glutamine cycle regulation.

  4. Oxidative Regulation of Large Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiang D.; Daggett, Heather; Hanner, Markus; Garcia, Maria L.; McManus, Owen B.; Brot, Nathan; Weissbach, Herbert; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2001-01-01

    Reactive oxygen/nitrogen species are readily generated in vivo, playing roles in many physiological and pathological conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, by oxidatively modifying various proteins. Previous studies indicate that large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BKCa or Slo) are subject to redox regulation. However, conflicting results exist whether oxidation increases or decreases the channel activity. We used chloramine-T, which preferentially oxidizes methionine, to examine the functional consequences of methionine oxidation in the cloned human Slo (hSlo) channel expressed in mammalian cells. In the virtual absence of Ca2+, the oxidant shifted the steady-state macroscopic conductance to a more negative direction and slowed deactivation. The results obtained suggest that oxidation enhances specific voltage-dependent opening transitions and slows the rate-limiting closing transition. Enhancement of the hSlo activity was partially reversed by the enzyme peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase, suggesting that the upregulation is mediated by methionine oxidation. In contrast, hydrogen peroxide and cysteine-specific reagents, DTNB, MTSEA, and PCMB, decreased the channel activity. Chloramine-T was much less effective when concurrently applied with the K+ channel blocker TEA, which is consistent with the possibility that the target methionine lies within the channel pore. Regulation of the Slo channel by methionine oxidation may represent an important link between cellular electrical excitability and metabolism. PMID:11222629

  5. CAMK2N1 inhibits prostate cancer progression through androgen receptor-dependent signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Guo, Shuiming; Liu, Zhuo; Wu, Licheng; Li, Mingchao; Yang, Jun; Chen, Ruibao; Liu, Xiaming; Xu, Hua; Cai, Shaoxin; Chen, Hui; Li, Weiyong; Xu, Shaohua; Wang, Liang; Hu, Zhiquan; Zhuang, Qianyuan; Wang, Liping; Wu, Kongming; Liu, Jihong; Ye, Zhangqun; Ji, Jun-Yuan; Wang, Chenguang; Chen, Ke

    2014-11-15

    Castration resistance is a major obstacle to hormonal therapy for prostate cancer patients. Although androgen independence of prostate cancer growth is a known contributing factor to endocrine resistance, the mechanism of androgen receptor deregulation in endocrine resistance is still poorly understood. Herein, the CAMK2N1 was shown to contribute to the human prostate cancer cell growth and survival through AR-dependent signaling. Reduced expression of CAMK2N1 was correlated to recurrence-free survival of prostate cancer patients with high levels of AR expression in their tumor. CAMK2N1 and AR signaling form an auto-regulatory negative feedback loop: CAMK2N1 expression was down-regulated by AR activation; while CAMK2N1 inhibited AR expression and transactivation through CAMKII and AKT pathways. Knockdown of CAMK2N1 in prostate cancer cells alleviated Casodex inhibition of cell growth, while re-expression of CAMK2N1 in castration-resistant cells sensitized the cells to Casodex treatment. Taken together, our findings suggest that CAMK2N1 plays a tumor suppressive role and serves as a crucial determinant of the resistance of prostate cancer to endocrine therapies.

  6. SERCA pump activity is physiologically regulated by presenilin and regulates amyloid beta production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Kim N; Demuro, Angelo; Akbari, Yama; Hitt, Brian D; Smith, Ian F; Parker, Ian; LaFerla, Frank M

    2008-06-30

    In addition to disrupting the regulated intramembraneous proteolysis of key substrates, mutations in the presenilins also alter calcium homeostasis, but the mechanism linking presenilins and calcium regulation is unresolved. At rest, cytosolic Ca(2+) is maintained at low levels by pumping Ca(2+) into stores in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) via the sarco ER Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) pumps. We show that SERCA activity is diminished in fibroblasts lacking both PS1 and PS2 genes, despite elevated SERCA2b steady-state levels, and we show that presenilins and SERCA physically interact. Enhancing presenilin levels in Xenopus laevis oocytes accelerates clearance of cytosolic Ca(2+), whereas higher levels of SERCA2b phenocopy PS1 overexpression, accelerating Ca(2+) clearance and exaggerating inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-mediated Ca(2+) liberation. The critical role that SERCA2b plays in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is underscored by our findings that modulating SERCA activity alters amyloid beta production. Our results point to a physiological role for the presenilins in Ca(2+) signaling via regulation of the SERCA pump.

  7. Antithrombin regulates matriptase activity involved in plasmin generation, syndecan shedding, and HGF activation in keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Wen Chen

    Full Text Available Matriptase, a membrane-associated serine protease, plays an essential role in epidermal barrier function through activation of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchored serine protease prostasin. The matriptase-prostasin proteolytic cascade is tightly regulated by hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor (HAI-1 such that matriptase autoactivation and prostasin activation occur simultaneously and are followed immediately by the inhibition of both enzymes by HAI-1. However, the mechanisms whereby matriptase acts on extracellular substrates remain elusive. Here we report that some active matriptase can escape HAI-1 inhibition by being rapidly shed from the cell surface. In the pericellular environment, shed active matriptase is able to activate hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, accelerate plasminogen activation, and shed syndecan 1. The amount of active matriptase shed is inversely correlated with the amount of antithrombin (AT bound to the surface of the keratinocytes. Binding of AT to the surface of keratinocytes is dependent on a functional heparin binding site, Lys-125, and that the N-glycosylation site Asn-135 be unglycosylated. This suggests that β-AT, and not α-AT, is responsible for regulation of pericellular matriptase activity in keratinocytes. Keratinocytes appear to rely on AT to regulate the level of pericellular active matriptase much more than breast and prostate epithelial cells in which AT regulation of matriptase activity occurs at much lower levels than keratinocytes. These results suggest that keratinocytes employ two distinct serine protease inhibitors to control the activation and processing of two different sets of matriptase substrates leading to different biological events: 1 HAI-1 for prostasin activation/inhibition, and 2 AT for the pericellular proteolysis involved in HGF activation, accelerating plasminogen activation, and shedding of syndecans.

  8. Commission for Energy regulation (CRE) - Activity report june 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    CRE is the French commission for energy regulation. CRE's remit is to assist in ensuring the proper operation of the electricity and natural gas markets for the benefit of the end-user. In particular, CRE ensures that the conditions of access to electricity and natural gas transmission and distribution systems do not hinder the development of competition. It monitors, for the electricity and natural gas sectors, all transactions made between suppliers, traders and producers, all transactions made on the organised markets and cross-border trading. It ensures that suppliers, traders and producers propose offers that are consistent with their financial and technical constraints. It monitors the implementation of and compliance with regulations giving consumers the right to choose their supplier in a competitive market, and allowing new suppliers to enter the market. This document is the 2006 activity report of CRE. Content: A - Opening of the electricity and natural gas markets to household consumers on 1 July 2007: CRE at the service of eligible customers (Information for eligible customers, Improved knowledge of non-household customers); Monitoring of the non-discrimination, transparency and independence of system operators (Drafting and distribution of codes of good conduct for system operators, The necessary improvement of system operator independence); Preparing the practical methods of opening: GTE 2007 and GTG 2007 (The necessary simplification of relations between operators and customers, Achieving a greater level of consumer information and protection, The clearly defined stages of the 'customer pathway', Profiling and settlement mechanisms: turning experience feedback from 2004 to good account); Persisting uncertainties and hurdles (The need for a suitable regulatory and legislative platform, Hurdles to the opening of the household market); B - Regulation of the natural gas market: The gas market in the European context (Increasing weight of

  9. Prolactin regulation of oxytocin neurone activity in pregnancy and lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Rachael A; Ladyman, Sharon R; Bouwer, Gregory T; Alyousif, Yousif; Sapsford, Tony J; Scott, Victoria; Kokay, Ilona C; Grattan, David R; Brown, Colin H

    2017-06-01

    During lactation, prolactin promotes milk synthesis and oxytocin stimulates milk ejection. In virgin rats, prolactin inhibits the activity of oxytocin-secreting neurones. We found that prolactin inhibition of oxytocin neurone activity is lost in lactation, and that some oxytocin neurones were excited by prolactin in lactating rats. The change in prolactin regulation of oxytocin neurone activity was not associated with a change in activation of intracellular signalling pathways known to couple to prolactin receptors. The change in prolactin regulation of oxytocin neurone activity in lactation might allow coordinated activation of both populations of neurones when required for successful lactation. Secretion of prolactin for milk synthesis and oxytocin for milk secretion is required for successful lactation. In virgin rats, prolactin inhibits oxytocin neurones but this effect would be counterproductive during lactation when secretion of both hormones is required for synthesis and delivery of milk to the newborn. Hence, we determined the effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) prolactin on oxytocin neurones in urethane-anaesthetised virgin, pregnant and lactating rats. Prolactin (2 μg) consistently inhibited oxytocin neurones in virgin and pregnant rats (by 1.9 ± 0.4 and 1.8 ± 0.5 spikes s -1 , respectively), but not in lactating rats; indeed, prolactin excited six of 27 oxytocin neurones by >1 spike s -1 in lactating rats but excited none in virgin or pregnant rats (χ 2 2  = 7.2, P = 0.03). Vasopressin neurones were unaffected by prolactin (2 μg) in virgin rats but were inhibited by 1.1 ± 0.2 spikes s -1 in lactating rats. Immunohistochemistry showed that i.c.v. prolactin increased oxytocin expression in virgin and lactating rats and increased signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 phosphorylation to a similar extent in oxytocin neurones of virgin and lactating rats. Western blotting showed that i.c.v. prolactin did not affect

  10. Hsp90 regulation of fibroblast activation in pulmonary fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontake, Vishwaraj; Wang, Yunguan; Kasam, Rajesh K.; Sinner, Debora; Reddy, Geereddy B.; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.; McCormack, Francis X.; Jegga, Anil G.; Madala, Satish K.

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a severe fibrotic lung disease associated with fibroblast activation that includes excessive proliferation, tissue invasiveness, myofibroblast transformation, and extracellular matrix (ECM) production. To identify inhibitors that can attenuate fibroblast activation, we queried IPF gene signatures against a library of small-molecule-induced gene-expression profiles and identified Hsp90 inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents that can suppress fibroblast activation in IPF. Although Hsp90 is a molecular chaperone that regulates multiple processes involved in fibroblast activation, it has not been previously proposed as a molecular target in IPF. Here, we found elevated Hsp90 staining in lung biopsies of patients with IPF. Notably, fibroblasts isolated from fibrotic lesions showed heightened Hsp90 ATPase activity compared with normal fibroblasts. 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), a small-molecule inhibitor of Hsp90 ATPase activity, attenuated fibroblast activation and also TGF-β–driven effects on fibroblast to myofibroblast transformation. The loss of the Hsp90AB, but not the Hsp90AA isoform, resulted in reduced fibroblast proliferation, myofibroblast transformation, and ECM production. Finally, in vivo therapy with 17-AAG attenuated progression of established and ongoing fibrosis in a mouse model of pulmonary fibrosis, suggesting that targeting Hsp90 represents an effective strategy for the treatment of fibrotic lung disease. PMID:28239659

  11. Active pre-filters for dc/dc Boost regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Andrés Ramos-Paja

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an active pre-filter to mitigate the current harmonics generated by classical dc/dc Boost regulators, which generate current ripples proportional to the duty cycle. Therefore, high output voltage conditions, i.e., high voltage conversion ratios, produce high current harmonics that must be filtered to avoid damage or source losses. Traditionally, these current components are filtered using electrolytic capacitors, which introduce reliability problems because of their high failure rate. The solution introduced in this paper instead uses a dc/dc converter based on the parallel connection of the Boost canonical cells to filter the current ripples generated by the Boost regulator, improving the system reliability. This solution provides the additional benefits of improving the overall efficiency and the voltage conversion ratio. Finally, the solution is validated with simulations and experimental results.

  12. Epigenetic regulation of hepatic stellate cell activation and liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Taghdouini, Adil; van Grunsven, Leo A

    2016-12-01

    Chronic liver injury to hepatocytes or cholangiocytes, when left unmanaged, leads to the development of liver fibrosis, a condition characterized by the excessive intrahepatic deposition of extracellular matrix proteins. Activated hepatic stellate cells constitute the predominant source of extracellular matrix in fibrotic livers and their transition from a quiescent state during fibrogenesis is associated with important alterations in their transcriptional and epigenetic landscape. Areas covered: We briefly describe the processes involved in hepatic stellate cell activation and discuss our current understanding of alterations in the epigenetic landscape, i.e DNA methylation, histone modifications and the functional role of non-coding RNAs that accompany this key event in the development of chronic liver disease. Expert commentary: Although great progress has been made, our understanding of the epigenetic regulation of hepatic stellate cell activation is limited and, thus far, insufficient to allow the development of epigenetic drugs that can selectively interrupt liver fibrosis.

  13. Regulation of Proteome Maintenance Gene Expression by Activators of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor a (PPARa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa) is activated by a large number of xenobiotic and hypolipidemic compounds called peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC). One agonist of PPARa (WY-14,643) regulates responses in the mouse liver to chemic...

  14. Caveolin-1 regulates shear stress-dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H.; Go, Y. M.; Darji, R.; Choi, J. W.; Lisanti, M. P.; Maland, M. C.; Jo, H.

    2000-01-01

    Fluid shear stress activates a member of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), by mechanisms dependent on cholesterol in the plasma membrane in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Caveolae are microdomains of the plasma membrane that are enriched with cholesterol, caveolin, and signaling molecules. We hypothesized that caveolin-1 regulates shear activation of ERK. Because caveolin-1 is not exposed to the outside, cells were minimally permeabilized by Triton X-100 (0.01%) to deliver a neutralizing, polyclonal caveolin-1 antibody (pCav-1) inside the cells. pCav-1 then bound to caveolin-1 and inhibited shear activation of ERK but not c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase. Epitope mapping studies showed that pCav-1 binds to caveolin-1 at two regions (residues 1-21 and 61-101). When the recombinant proteins containing the epitopes fused to glutathione-S-transferase (GST-Cav(1-21) or GST-Cav(61-101)) were preincubated with pCav-1, only GST-Cav(61-101) reversed the inhibitory effect of the antibody on shear activation of ERK. Other antibodies, including m2234, which binds to caveolin-1 residues 1-21, had no effect on shear activation of ERK. Caveolin-1 residues 61-101 contain the scaffolding and oligomerization domains, suggesting that binding of pCav-1 to these regions likely disrupts the clustering of caveolin-1 or its interaction with signaling molecules involved in the shear-sensitive ERK pathway. We suggest that caveolae-like domains play a critical role in the mechanosensing and/or mechanosignal transduction of the ERK pathway.

  15. Comparison of the Values of Free Testosterone with Free Androgen Index

    OpenAIRE

    1, Mehmet TOSUN; 2, Emin Savaş KILAVIZ; 3, Ahmet Rıza URAS

    2015-01-01

    Background: Testosterone is primarily responsible for the development of male primary and secondary sex characters. However, like many biochemical parameters, biologically active portion of testosterone is the free one. Free androgen index is the ratio of the total testosterone to sex hormone-binding globulin. In this study, we aimed to investigate possibility of using free androgen index instead of the free testosterone when the free testosterone can not be measured routine laboratory. Mater...

  16. Androgen-Sensitized Apoptosis of HPr-1AR Human Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congcong Chen

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor (AR signaling is crucial to the development and homeostasis of the prostate gland, and its dysregulation mediates common prostate pathologies. The mechanisms whereby AR regulates growth suppression and differentiation of luminal epithelial cells in the prostate gland and proliferation of malignant versions of these cells have been investigated in human and rodent adult prostate. However, the cellular stress response of human prostate epithelial cells is not well understood, though it is central to prostate health and pathology. Here, we report that androgen sensitizes HPr-1AR and RWPE-AR human prostate epithelial cells to cell stress agents and apoptotic cell death. Although 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT treatment alone did not induce cell death, co-treatment of HPr-1AR cells with DHT and an apoptosis inducer, such as staurosporine (STS, TNFt, or hydrogen peroxide, synergistically increased cell death in comparison to treatment with each apoptosis inducer by itself. We found that the synergy between DHT and apoptosis inducer led to activation of the intrinsic/mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, which is supported by robust cleavage activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Further, the dramatic depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential that we observed upon co-treatment with DHT and STS is consistent with increased mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP in the pro-apoptotic mechanism. Interestingly, the synergy between DHT and apoptosis inducer was abolished by AR antagonists and inhibitors of transcription and protein synthesis, suggesting that AR mediates pro-apoptotic synergy through transcriptional regulation of MOMP genes. Expression analysis revealed that pro-apoptotic genes (BCL2L11/BIM and AIFM2 were DHT-induced, whereas pro-survival genes (BCL2L1/BCL-XL and MCL1 were DHT-repressed. Hence, we propose that the net effect of these AR-mediated expression changes shifts the balance of BCL2-family proteins

  17. Anogenital distance as a marker of androgen exposure in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thankamony, A; Pasterski, V; Ong, K K; Acerini, C L; Hughes, I A

    2016-07-01

    Abnormal foetal testis development has been proposed to underlie common disorders of the male reproductive system such as cryptorchidism, hypospadias, reduced semen quality and testicular germ cell tumour, which are regarded as components of a 'testicular dysgenesis syndrome'. The increasing trends and geographical variation in their incidence have been suggested to result from in utero exposure to environmental chemicals acting as endocrine disruptors. In rodents, the anogenital distance (AGD), measured from the anus to the base of genital tubercle, is a sensitive biomarker of androgen exposure during a critical embryonic window of testis development. In humans, several epidemiological studies have shown alterations in AGD associated with prenatal exposure to several chemicals with potential endocrine disrupting activity. However, the link between AGD and androgen exposure in humans is not well-defined. This review focuses on the current evidence for such a relationship. As in rodents, a clear gender difference is detected during foetal development of the AGD in humans which is maintained thereafter. Reduced AGD in association with clinically relevant outcomes of potential environmental exposures, such as cryptorchidism or hypospadias, is in keeping with AGD as a marker of foetal testicular function. Furthermore, AGD may reflect variations in prenatal androgen exposure in healthy children as shorter AGD at birth is associated with reduced masculine play behaviour in preschool boys. Several studies provide evidence linking shorter AGD with lower fertility, semen quality and testosterone levels in selected groups of adults attending andrology clinics. Overall, the observational data in humans are consistent with experimental studies in animals and support the use of AGD as a biomarker of foetal androgen exposure. Future studies evaluating AGD in relation to reproductive hormones in both infants and adults, and to gene polymorphisms, will help to further delineate

  18. A randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness of strength training on clinical and muscle cellular outcomes in patients with prostate cancer during androgen deprivation therapy: rationale and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsen Lene

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies indicate that strength training has beneficial effects on clinical health outcomes in prostate cancer patients during androgen deprivation therapy. However, randomized controlled trials are needed to scientifically determine the effectiveness of strength training on the muscle cell level. Furthermore, close examination of the feasibility of a high-load strength training program is warranted. The Physical Exercise and Prostate Cancer (PEPC trial is designed to determine the effectiveness of strength training on clinical and muscle cellular outcomes in non-metastatic prostate cancer patients after high-dose radiotherapy and during ongoing androgen deprivation therapy. Methods/design Patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy for 9-36 months combined with external high-dose radiotherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer are randomized to an exercise intervention group that receives a 16 week high-load strength training program or a control group that is encouraged to maintain their habitual activity level. In both arms, androgen deprivation therapy is continued until the end of the intervention period. Clinical outcomes are body composition (lean body mass, bone mineral density and fat mass measured by Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry, serological outcomes, physical functioning (muscle strength and cardio-respiratory fitness assessed with physical tests and psycho-social functioning (mental health, fatigue and health-related quality of life assessed by questionnaires. Muscle cellular outcomes are a muscle fiber size b regulators of muscle fiber size (number of myonuclei per muscle fiber, number of satellite cells per muscle fiber, number of satellite cells and myonuclei positive for androgen receptors and proteins involved in muscle protein degradation and muscle hypertrophy and c regulators of muscle fiber function such as proteins involved in cellular stress and mitochondrial function. Muscle cellular outcomes

  19. Genomic and non-genomic effects of androgens in the cardiovascular system: clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas-Herald, Angela K; Alves-Lopes, Rheure; Montezano, Augusto C; Ahmed, S Faisal; Touyz, Rhian M

    2017-07-01

    The principle steroidal androgens are testosterone and its metabolite 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which is converted from testosterone by the enzyme 5α-reductase. Through the classic pathway with androgens crossing the plasma membrane and binding to the androgen receptor (AR) or via mechanisms independent of the ligand-dependent transactivation function of nuclear receptors, testosterone induces genomic and non-genomic effects respectively. AR is widely distributed in several tissues, including vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Androgens are essential for many developmental and physiological processes, especially in male reproductive tissues. It is now clear that androgens have multiple actions besides sex differentiation and sexual maturation and that many physiological systems are influenced by androgens, including regulation of cardiovascular function [nitric oxide (NO) release, Ca2+ mobilization, vascular apoptosis, hypertrophy, calcification, senescence and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation]. This review focuses on evidence indicating that interplay between genomic and non-genomic actions of testosterone may influence cardiovascular function. © 2017 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  20. Genomic and non-genomic effects of androgens in the cardiovascular system: clinical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas-Herald, Angela K.; Alves-Lopes, Rheure; Montezano, Augusto C.; Ahmed, S. Faisal

    2017-01-01

    The principle steroidal androgens are testosterone and its metabolite 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which is converted from testosterone by the enzyme 5α-reductase. Through the classic pathway with androgens crossing the plasma membrane and binding to the androgen receptor (AR) or via mechanisms independent of the ligand-dependent transactivation function of nuclear receptors, testosterone induces genomic and non-genomic effects respectively. AR is widely distributed in several tissues, including vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Androgens are essential for many developmental and physiological processes, especially in male reproductive tissues. It is now clear that androgens have multiple actions besides sex differentiation and sexual maturation and that many physiological systems are influenced by androgens, including regulation of cardiovascular function [nitric oxide (NO) release, Ca2+ mobilization, vascular apoptosis, hypertrophy, calcification, senescence and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation]. This review focuses on evidence indicating that interplay between genomic and non-genomic actions of testosterone may influence cardiovascular function. PMID:28645930

  1. Proteomics analyses of prostate cancer cells reveal cellular pathways associated with androgen resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höti, Naseruddin; Shah, Punit; Hu, Yingwei; Yang, Shuang; Zhang, Hui

    2017-03-01

    While significant advances have been made in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer, each year tens of thousands of men still die from prostate cancer in the United States. Thus, greater understanding of cellular pathways and molecular basis of prostate cancer progression in the development of androgen resistance is needed to treat these lethal phenotypes. To dissect the mechanism of androgen resistance, we utilize a proteomics approach to study the development of androgen resistance in LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Our results showed the predominant involvement of metabolic pathways that were elevated in androgen resistance phenotype. We further found the amplification of PI3K/AKT pathway and the overexpression of proteasome proteins while the mitochondrial oxidation phosphorylation was severely hampered in castration-resistant LNCaP-95 cells compared to LNCaP cells. Interestingly, we also found the induction of Dicer, a cytoplasmic endoribonuclease microRNA regulator in the androgen-ablated LNCaP-95 prostate cancer cells. We verified some of these data by orthogonal methods including Western blot analysis and in castrated animal xenograft studies. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing induced expression of proteasome proteins in androgen ablation prostate cancer cells. If validated in clinical studies, the findings will have significant implications in understanding the complexity of biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Escape Mechanisms from Androgen Ablation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    p. 132-138. 7. Han , G., et al., Mutation of the androgen receptor causes oncogenic transformation of the prostate. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 2005. 102...the confor- (1997) 306-360. mational state of the AR may recruit specific TPR- [9] K. Richter, J. Buchner , Hsp90: chaperoning signal transduc-tion...Biol. 42 connection, Trends Biochem. Sci. 22 (1997) 87-92. (1992) 803-812.[19] 2) D.F. 812. S[34] U. Jakob, J. Buchner , Assisting spontaneity: the role

  3. Lysyl oxidase activity regulates oncogenic stress response and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiel, C; Augert, A; Vincent, D F; Gitenay, D; Vindrieux, D; Le Calvé, B; Arfi, V; Lallet-Daher, H; Reynaud, C; Treilleux, I; Bartholin, L; Lelievre, E; Bernard, D

    2013-10-10

    Cellular senescence, a stable proliferation arrest, is induced in response to various stresses. Oncogenic stress-induced senescence (OIS) results in blocked proliferation and constitutes a fail-safe program counteracting tumorigenesis. The events that enable a tumor in a benign senescent state to escape from OIS and become malignant are largely unknown. We show that lysyl oxidase activity contributes to the decision to maintain senescence. Indeed, in human epithelial cell the constitutive expression of the LOX or LOXL2 protein favored OIS escape, whereas inhibition of lysyl oxidase activity was found to stabilize OIS. The relevance of these in vitro observations is supported by in vivo findings: in a transgenic mouse model of aggressive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), increasing lysyl oxidase activity accelerates senescence escape, whereas inhibition of lysyl oxidase activity was found to stabilize senescence, delay tumorigenesis, and increase survival. Mechanistically, we show that lysyl oxidase activity favors the escape of senescence by regulating the focal-adhesion kinase. Altogether, our results demonstrate that lysyl oxidase activity participates in primary tumor growth by directly impacting the senescence stability.

  4. Tissue selectivity and potential clinical applications of trenbolone (17beta-hydroxyestra-4,9,11-trien-3-one): A potent anabolic steroid with reduced androgenic and estrogenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarrow, Joshua F; McCoy, Sean C; Borst, Stephen E

    2010-06-01

    Recently, the development of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) has been suggested as a means of combating the deleterious catabolic effects of hypogonadism, especially in skeletal muscle and bone, without inducing the undesirable androgenic effects (e.g., prostate enlargement and polycythemia) associated with testosterone administration. 17beta-Hydroxyestra-4,9,11-trien-3-one (trenbolone; 17beta-TBOH), a synthetic analog of testosterone, may be capable of inducing SARM-like effects as it binds to androgen receptors (ARs) with approximately three times the affinity of testosterone and has been shown to augment skeletal muscle mass and bone growth and reduce adiposity in a variety of mammalian species. In addition to its direct actions through ARs, 17beta-TBOH may also exert anabolic effects by altering the action of endogenous growth factors or inhibiting the action of glucocorticoids. Compared to testosterone, 17beta-TBOH appears to induce less growth in androgen-sensitive organs which highly express the 5alpha reductase enzyme (e.g., prostate tissue and accessory sex organs). The reduced androgenic effects result from the fact that 17beta-TBOH is metabolized to less potent androgens in vivo; while testosterone undergoes tissue-specific biotransformation to more potent steroids, dihydrotestosterone and 17beta-estradiol, via the 5alpha-reductase and aromatase enzymes, respectively. Thus the metabolism of 17beta-TBOH provides a basis for future research evaluating its safety and efficacy as a means of combating muscle and bone wasting conditions, obesity, and/or androgen insensitivity syndromes in humans, similar to that of other SARMs which are currently in development. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Dynamic regulation of Polycomb group activity during plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, Marian; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2012-11-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) complexes play important roles in phase transitions and cell fate determination in plants and animals, by epigenetically repressing sets of genes that promote either proliferation or differentiation. The continuous differentiation of new organs in plants, such as leaves or flowers, requires a highly dynamic PcG function, which can be induced, modulated, or repressed when necessary. In this review, we discuss the recent advance in understanding PcG function in plants and focus on the diverse molecular mechanisms that have been described to regulate and counteract PcG activity in Arabidopsis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Regulation of dopamine transporter activity by carboxypeptidase E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Heping

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dopamine transporter (DAT plays a critical role in terminating the action of dopamine by rapid reuptake into the presynaptic neuron. Previous studies have revealed that the DAT carboxyl terminus (DAT-CT can directly interact with other cellular proteins and regulate DAT function and trafficking. Results Here, we have identified that carboxypeptidase E (CPE, a prohormone processing exopeptidase and sorting receptor for the regulated secretory pathway, interacts with the DAT-CT and affects DAT function. Mammalian cell lines coexpressing CPE and DAT exhibited increased DAT-mediated dopamine uptake activity compared to cells expressing DAT alone. Moreover, coexpression of an interfering DAT-CT minigene inhibited the effects of CPE on DAT. Functional changes caused by CPE could be attributed to enhanced DAT expression and subsequent increase in DAT cell surface localization, due to decreased DAT degradation. In addition, CPE association could reduce the phosphorylation state of DAT on serine residues, potentially leading to reduced internalization, thus stabilizing plasmalemmal DAT localization. Conclusion Taken together, our results reveal a novel role for CPE in the regulation of DAT trafficking and DAT-mediated DA uptake, which may provide a novel target in the treatment of dopamine-governed diseases such as drug addiction and obesity.

  7. Active Use of the Natural Environment for Emotion Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svein Åge Kjøs Johnsen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Two studies on the use of nature for emotion regulation were conducted. Study 1 (N = 35 ran over two weeks and was an experimental investigation. Participants in the experimental condition were asked to use a picture of nature actively as environmental stimuli for emotion regulation in their everyday life, while two control groups simply looked at a picture of nature or a picture of balloons each evening. A significant effect of the manipulation was found on positive mood, but the effect was complex with an initial increase and then a decrease. There were no findings on negative mood. Study 2 (N = 473 explored the motivational tendency to seek out nature when the participants were happy or sad. A novel concept (expectancy construct was introduced to measure the perception of the emotion regulatory potential of different environments. The classical natural environment was rated highest on emotional potential of all environments tested here. Perceiving a higher emotional potential in nature was related to a higher intention to seek out nature when happy or sad. Personality and mood were also related to these concepts. Higher positive mood was related to the intention to seek out nature when happy. Conscientiousness was related to a more positive perception of nature. The studies support the notion that using nature may be an effective strategy for regulating one’s emotions.

  8. Early androgen exposure and human gender development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Melissa; Constantinescu, Mihaela; Spencer, Debra

    2015-01-01

    During early development, testosterone plays an important role in sexual differentiation of the mammalian brain and has enduring influences on behavior. Testosterone exerts these influences at times when the testes are active, as evidenced by higher concentrations of testosterone in developing male than in developing female animals. This article critically reviews the available evidence regarding influences of testosterone on human gender-related development. In humans, testosterone is elevated in males from about weeks 8 to 24 of gestation and then again during early postnatal development. Individuals exposed to atypical concentrations of testosterone or other androgenic hormones prenatally, for example, because of genetic conditions or because their mothers were prescribed hormones during pregnancy, have been consistently found to show increased male-typical juvenile play behavior, alterations in sexual orientation and gender identity (the sense of self as male or female), and increased tendencies to engage in physically aggressive behavior. Studies of other behavioral outcomes following dramatic androgen abnormality prenatally are either too small in their numbers or too inconsistent in their results, to provide similarly conclusive evidence. Studies relating normal variability in testosterone prenatally to subsequent gender-related behavior have produced largely inconsistent results or have yet to be independently replicated. For studies of prenatal exposures in typically developing individuals, testosterone has been measured in single samples of maternal blood or amniotic fluid. These techniques may not be sufficiently powerful to consistently detect influences of testosterone on behavior, particularly in the relatively small samples that have generally been studied. The postnatal surge in testosterone in male infants, sometimes called mini-puberty, may provide a more accessible opportunity for measuring early androgen exposure during typical development. This

  9. Potential targets in the discovery of new hair growth promoters for androgenic alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ruchy; De-Eknamkul, Wanchai

    2014-07-01

    Androgenic alopecia (AGA) is the major type of scalp hair loss affecting 60 - 70% of the population worldwide. It is caused by two potent androgens, namely testosterone (T) and 5α-dihydrotestosterone (5α-DHT). Till date, only two FDA-approved synthetic drugs, minoxidil and finasteride, are used to cure AGA with only 35 and 48% success, respectively; therefore, a search for new drug based on the mechanism of androgens action is still needed. Relevant literature was reviewed to identify current therapeutic targets and treatments for AGA. The potential targets are classified into three categories: i) 5α-reductase; ii) androgen receptor and iii) growth-factor-producing genes related to hair growth. Relevant assay systems using the right targets are required in order to obtain specific and effective drugs for AGA treatment. It is unlikely that single targeted agents will be sufficient for treating AGA, and therefore, it would be a challenge to obtain compounds with multiple activities.

  10. ROMK1 channel activity is regulated by monoubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dao-Hong; Sterling, Hyacinth; Wang, Zhijian; Babilonia, Elisa; Yang, Baofeng; Dong, Ke; Hebert, Steven C; Giebisch, Gerhard; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2005-03-22

    The ubiquitination of proteins can signal their degradation, modify their activity or target them to specific membranes or cellular organelles. Here, we show that monoubiquitination regulates the plasma membrane abundance and function of the potassium channel, ROMK. Immunoprecipitation of proteins obtained from renal cortex and outer medulla with ROMK antibody revealed that this channel was monoubiquitinated. To determine the ubiquitin binding site on ROMK1, all intracellular lysine (Lys) residues of ROMK1 were individually mutated to arginine (Arg), and a two-electrode voltage clamp was used to measure the ROMK1 channel activity in Xenopus oocytes. ROMK1 channel activity increased from 8.1 to 27.2 microA only when Lys-22 was mutated to Arg. Furthermore, Western blotting failed to detect the ubiquitinated ROMK1 in oocytes injected with R1K22R. Patch-clamp experiments showed that biophysical properties of R1K22R were identical to those of wild-type ROMK1. Although total protein expression levels of GFP-ROMK1 and GFP-R1K22R in oocytes were similar, confocal microscopy showed that the surface fluorescence intensity in oocytes injected with GFP-R1K22R was higher than that of GFP-ROMK1. In addition, biotin labeling of ROMK1 and R1K22R proteins expressed in HEK293 cells showed increased surface expression of the Lys-22 mutant channel. Finally, expression of R1K22R in COS7 cells significantly stimulated the surface expression of ROMK1. We conclude that ROMK1 can be monoubiquitinated and that Lys-22 is an ubiquitin-binding site. Thus, monoubiquitination of ROMK1 regulates channel activity by reducing the surface expression of channel protein. This finding implicates the linking of a single ubiquitin molecule to channels as an important posttranslational regulatory signal.

  11. The regulation of ant colony foraging activity without spatial information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Balaji; Dektar, Katherine N; Gordon, Deborah M

    2012-01-01

    Many dynamical networks, such as the ones that produce the collective behavior of social insects, operate without any central control, instead arising from local interactions among individuals. A well-studied example is the formation of recruitment trails in ant colonies, but many ant species do not use pheromone trails. We present a model of the regulation of foraging by harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex barbatus) colonies. This species forages for scattered seeds that one ant can retrieve on its own, so there is no need for spatial information such as pheromone trails that lead ants to specific locations. Previous work shows that colony foraging activity, the rate at which ants go out to search individually for seeds, is regulated in response to current food availability throughout the colony's foraging area. Ants use the rate of brief antennal contacts inside the nest between foragers returning with food and outgoing foragers available to leave the nest on the next foraging trip. Here we present a feedback-based algorithm that captures the main features of data from field experiments in which the rate of returning foragers was manipulated. The algorithm draws on our finding that the distribution of intervals between successive ants returning to the nest is a Poisson process. We fitted the parameter that estimates the effect of each returning forager on the rate at which outgoing foragers leave the nest. We found that correlations between observed rates of returning foragers and simulated rates of outgoing foragers, using our model, were similar to those in the data. Our simple stochastic model shows how the regulation of ant colony foraging can operate without spatial information, describing a process at the level of individual ants that predicts the overall foraging activity of the colony.

  12. The regulation of ant colony foraging activity without spatial information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Prabhakar

    Full Text Available Many dynamical networks, such as the ones that produce the collective behavior of social insects, operate without any central control, instead arising from local interactions among individuals. A well-studied example is the formation of recruitment trails in ant colonies, but many ant species do not use pheromone trails. We present a model of the regulation of foraging by harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex barbatus colonies. This species forages for scattered seeds that one ant can retrieve on its own, so there is no need for spatial information such as pheromone trails that lead ants to specific locations. Previous work shows that colony foraging activity, the rate at which ants go out to search individually for seeds, is regulated in response to current food availability throughout the colony's foraging area. Ants use the rate of brief antennal contacts inside the nest between foragers returning with food and outgoing foragers available to leave the nest on the next foraging trip. Here we present a feedback-based algorithm that captures the main features of data from field experiments in which the rate of returning foragers was manipulated. The algorithm draws on our finding that the distribution of intervals between successive ants returning to the nest is a Poisson process. We fitted the parameter that estimates the effect of each returning forager on the rate at which outgoing foragers leave the nest. We found that correlations between observed rates of returning foragers and simulated rates of outgoing foragers, using our model, were similar to those in the data. Our simple stochastic model shows how the regulation of ant colony foraging can operate without spatial information, describing a process at the level of individual ants that predicts the overall foraging activity of the colony.

  13. Androgen Receptor Mutations and Polymorphisms in African American Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Koochekpour, Shahriar; Buckles, Erick; Shourideh, Mojgan; Hu, SiYi; Chandra, Dhyan; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Attwood, Kristopher

    2014-01-01

    The Androgen receptor (AR) plays a central role in the normal development of the prostate gland, in prostate carcinogenesis, and in the progression of prostate cancer (PCa) to advanced metastatic disease. African American (AA) men with PCa present with higher tumor volume, more advanced tumor stage, and higher Gleason score. This could be in part related to the AR expression or activity in the prostate tissue of AA men, or to unique mutations or polymorphisms of the AR. In Caucasian Americans...

  14. Androgen receptor overexpression in prostate cancer in type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Zoltán Lutz

    2018-02-01

    Conclusions: We report elevated androgen receptor signaling and activity presumably due to altered insulin/IGF-1 receptors and decreased levels of protective estrogen receptor ligands in prostate cancer in men with diabetes. Our results reveal new insights why these patients have a worse prognosis. These findings provide the basis for future clinical trials to investigate treatment response in patients with prostate cancer and diabetes.

  15. Pterostilbene-isothiocyanate conjugate suppresses growth of prostate cancer cells irrespective of androgen receptor status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Nikhil

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy and anti-hormonal therapies are the most common treatments for non-organ-confined prostate cancer (PCa. However, the effectiveness of these therapies is limited, thus necessitating the development of alternative approaches. The present study focused on analyzing the role of pterostilbene (PTER-isothiocyanate (ITC conjugate--a novel class of hybrid compound synthesized by appending an ITC moiety on PTER backbone--in regulating the functions of androgen receptor (AR, thereby causing apoptosis of PCa cells. The conjugate molecule caused 50% growth inhibition (IC50 at 40 ± 1.12 and 45 ± 1.50 μM in AR positive (LNCaP and negative (PC-3 cells, respectively. The reduced proliferation of PC-3 as well as LNCaP cells by conjugate correlated with accumulation of cells in G2/M phase and induction of caspase dependent apoptosis. Both PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK pathways played an important and differential role in conjugate-induced apoptosis of these PCa cells. While the inhibitor of Akt (A6730 or Akt-specific small interference RNA (siRNA greatly sensitized PC-3 cells to conjugate-induced apoptosis, on the contrary, apoptosis was accelerated by inhibition of ERK (by PD98059 or ERK siRNA in case of LNCaP cells, both ultimately culminating in the expression of cleaved caspase-3 protein. Moreover, anti-androgenic activity of the conjugate was mediated by decreased expression of AR and its co-activators (SRC-1, GRIP-1, thus interfering in their interactions with AR. All these data suggests that conjugate-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis are partly mediated by the down regulation of AR, Akt, and ERK signaling. These observations provide a rationale for devising novel therapeutic approaches for treating PCa by using conjugate alone or in combination with other therapeutics.

  16. Chemical castration and anti-androgens induce differential gene expression in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmusvaara, Saara; Erkkilä, Timo; Urbanucci, Alfonso; Waltering, Kati; Seppälä, Janne; Larjo, Antti; Tuominen, Vilppu J; Isola, Jorma; Kujala, Paula; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Kaipia, Antti; Tammela, Teuvo Lj; Visakorpi, Tapio

    2012-07-01

    Endocrine therapy by castration or anti-androgens is the gold standard treatment for advanced prostate cancer. Although it has been used for decades, the molecular consequences of androgen deprivation are incompletely known and biomarkers of its resistance are lacking. In this study, we studied the molecular mechanisms of hormonal therapy by comparing the effect of bicalutamide (anti-androgen), goserelin (GnRH agonist) and no therapy, followed by radical prostatectomy. For this purpose, 28 men were randomly assigned to treatment groups. Freshly frozen specimens were used for gene expression profiling for all known protein-coding genes. An in silico Bayesian modelling tool was used to assess cancer-specific gene expression from heterogeneous tissue specimens. The expression of 128 genes was > two-fold reduced by the treatments. Only 16% of the altered genes were common in both treatment groups. Of the 128 genes, only 24 were directly androgen-regulated genes, according to re-analysis of previous data on gene expression, androgen receptor-binding sites and histone modifications in prostate cancer cell line models. The tumours containing TMPRSS2-ERG fusion showed higher gene expression of genes related to proliferation compared to the fusion-negative tumours in untreated cases. Interestingly, endocrine therapy reduced the expression of one-half of these genes and thus diminished the differences between the fusion-positive and -negative samples. This study reports the significantly different effects of an anti-androgen and a GnRH agonist on gene expression in prostate cancer cells. TMPRSS2-ERG fusion seems to bring many proliferation-related genes under androgen regulation. Copyright © 2012 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. GARP regulates the bioavailability and activation of TGFβ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Zhu, Jianghai; Dong, Xianchi; Shi, Minlong; Lu, Chafen; Springer, Timothy A

    2012-03-01

    Glycoprotein-A repetitions predominant protein (GARP) associates with latent transforming growth factor-β (proTGFβ) on the surface of T regulatory cells and platelets; however, whether GARP functions in latent TGFβ activation and the structural basis of coassociation remain unknown. We find that Cys-192 and Cys-331 of GARP disulfide link to the TGFβ1 prodomain and that GARP with C192A and C331A mutations can also noncovalently associate with proTGFβ1. Noncovalent association is sufficiently strong for GARP to outcompete latent TGFβ-binding protein for binding to proTGFβ1. Association between GARP and proTGFβ1 prevents the secretion of TGFβ1. Integrin α(V)β(6) and to a lesser extent α(V)β(8) are able to activate TGFβ from the GARP-proTGFβ1 complex. Activation requires the RGD motif of latent TGFβ, disulfide linkage between GARP and latent TGFβ, and membrane association of GARP. Our results show that GARP is a latent TGFβ-binding protein that functions in regulating the bioavailability and activation of TGFβ.

  18. Regulation of protein activity with small-molecule-controlled inteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skretas, Georgios; Wood, David W.

    2005-01-01

    Inteins are the protein analogs of self-splicing RNA introns, as they post-translationally excise themselves from a variety of protein hosts. Intein insertion abolishes, in general, the activity of its host protein, which is subsequently restored upon intein excision. These protein elements therefore have the potential to be used as general molecular “switches” for the control of arbitrary target proteins. Based on rational design, an intein-based protein switch has been constructed whose splicing activity is conditionally triggered in vivo by the presence of thyroid hormone or synthetic analogs. This modified intein was used in Escherichia coli to demonstrate that a number of different proteins can be inactivated by intein insertion and then reactivated by the addition of thyroid hormone via ligand-induced splicing. This conditional activation was also found to occur in a dose-dependent manner. Rational protein engineering was then combined with genetic selection to evolve an additional intein whose activity is controlled by the presence of synthetic estrogen ligands. The ability to regulate protein function post-translationally through the use of ligand-controlled intein splicing will most likely find applications in metabolic engineering, drug discovery and delivery, biosensing, molecular computation, as well as many additional areas of biotechnology. PMID:15632292

  19. Activation of epithelial STAT3 regulates intestinal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufert, Clemens; Pickert, Geethanjali; Zheng, Yan; Wittkopf, Nadine; Warntjen, Moritz; Nikolaev, Alexei; Ouyang, Wenjun; Neurath, Markus F; Becker, Christoph

    2010-02-15

    The intestinal epithelium that lines the mucosal surface along the GI-tract is a key player for the intestinal homeostasis of the healthy individual. In case of a mucosal damage or a barrier defect as seen in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, the balance is disturbed, and translocation of intestinal microbes to the submucosa is facilitated. We recently demonstrated a pivotal role of STAT3 activation in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) for the restoration of the balance at the mucosal surface of the gut in an experimental colitis model. STAT3 was rapidly induced in intestinal epithelial cells upon challenge of mice in both experimental colitis and intestinal wound healing models. STAT3 activation was found to be dispensable in the steady-state conditions but was important for efficient regeneration of the epithelium in response to injury. Here, we extend our previous findings by showing epithelial STAT3 activation in human patients suffering from IBD and provide additional insights how the activation of epithelial STAT3 by IL-22 regulates intestinal homeostasis and mucosal wound healing. We also demonstrate that antibody-mediated neutralization of IL-22 has little impact on the development of experimental colitis in mice, but significantly delays recovery from colitis. Thus, our data suggest that targeting the STAT3 signaling pathway in IEC is a promising therapeutic approach in situations when the intestinal homeostasis is disturbed, e.g., as seen in Crohn's disease or Ulcerative colitis.

  20. Physical Activity Plays an Important Role in Body Weight Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Chaput

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Emerging literature highlights the need to incorporate physical activity into every strategy intended to prevent weight gain as well as to maintain weight loss over time. Furthermore, physical activity should be part of any plan to lose weight. The stimulus of exercise provides valuable metabolic adaptations that improve energy and macronutrient balance regulation. A tight coupling between energy intake and energy expenditure has been documented at high levels of physical exercise, suggesting that exercise may improve appetite control. The regular practice of physical activity has also been reported to reduce the risk of stress-induced weight gain. A more personalized approach is recommended when planning exercise programs in a clinical weight loss setting in order to limit the compensatory changes associated to exercise-induced weight loss. With modern environment promoting overeating and sedentary behavior, there is an urgent need for a concerted action including legislative measures to promote healthy active living in order to curb the current epidemic of chronic diseases.

  1. DMPD: Receptor tyrosine kinases and the regulation of macrophage activation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14726496 Receptor tyrosine kinases and the regulation of macrophage activation. Cor...(.csml) Show Receptor tyrosine kinases and the regulation of macrophage activation. PubmedID 14726496 Title ...Receptor tyrosine kinases and the regulation of macrophage activation. Authors Co

  2. Sigma1 Targeting to Suppress Aberrant Androgen Receptor Signaling in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jeffrey D; Longen, Charles G; Oyer, Halley M; Chen, Nan; Maher, Christina M; Salvino, Joseph M; Kania, Blase; Anderson, Kelsey N; Ostrander, William F; Knudsen, Karen E; Kim, Felix J

    2017-05-01

    Suppression of androgen receptor (AR) activity in prostate cancer by androgen depletion or direct AR antagonist treatment, although initially effective, leads to incurable castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) via compensatory mechanisms including resurgence of AR and AR splice variant (ARV) signaling. Emerging evidence suggests that Sigma1 (also known as sigma-1 receptor) is a unique chaperone or scaffolding protein that contributes to cellular protein homeostasis. We reported previously that some Sigma1-selective small molecules can be used to pharmacologically modulate protein homeostasis pathways. We hypothesized that these Sigma1-mediated responses could be exploited to suppress AR protein levels and activity. Here we demonstrate that treatment with a small-molecule Sigma1 inhibitor prevented 5α- dihydrotestosterone-mediated nuclear translocation of AR and induced proteasomal degradation of AR and ARV, suppressing the transcriptional activity and protein levels of both full-length and splice-variant AR. Consistent with these data, RNAi knockdown of Sigma1 resulted in decreased AR levels and transcriptional activity. Furthermore, Sigma1 physically associated with ARV7 and ARv567es as well as full-length AR. Treatment of mice xenografted with ARV-driven CRPC tumors with a drug-like small-molecule Sigma1 inhibitor significantly inhibited tumor growth associated with elimination of AR and ARV7 in responsive tumors. Together, our data show that Sigma1 modulators can be used to suppress AR/ARV-driven prostate cancer cells via regulation of pharmacologically responsive Sigma1-AR/ARV interactions, both in vitro and in vivoCancer Res; 77(9); 2439-52. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Activation and Regulation of Purinergic P2X Receptor Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coddou, Claudio; Yan, Zonghe; Obsil, Tomas; Huidobro-Toro, J. Pablo

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian ATP-gated nonselective cation channels (P2XRs) can be composed of seven possible subunits, denoted P2X1 to P2X7. Each subunit contains a large ectodomain, two transmembrane domains, and intracellular N and C termini. Functional P2XRs are organized as homomeric and heteromeric trimers. This review focuses on the binding sites involved in the activation (orthosteric) and regulation (allosteric) of P2XRs. The ectodomains contain three ATP binding sites, presumably located between neighboring subunits and formed by highly conserved residues. The detection and coordination of three ATP phosphate residues by positively charged amino acids are likely to play a dominant role in determining agonist potency, whereas an AsnPheArg motif may contribute to binding by coordinating the adenine ring. Nonconserved ectodomain histidines provide the binding sites for trace metals, divalent cations, and protons. The transmembrane domains account not only for the formation of the channel pore but also for the binding of ivermectin (a specific P2X4R allosteric regulator) and alcohols. The N- and C- domains provide the structures that determine the kinetics of receptor desensitization and/or pore dilation and are critical for the regulation of receptor functions by intracellular messengers, kinases, reactive oxygen species and mercury. The recent publication of the crystal structure of the zebrafish P2X4.1R in a closed state provides a major advance in the understanding of this family of receptor channels. We will discuss data obtained from numerous site-directed mutagenesis experiments accumulated during the last 15 years with reference to the crystal structure, allowing a structural interpretation of the molecular basis of orthosteric and allosteric ligand actions. PMID:21737531

  4. Novel Androgen Receptor Coregulator GRHL2 Exerts Both Oncogenic and Antimetastatic Functions in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paltoglou, Steve; Das, Rajdeep; Townley, Scott L; Hickey, Theresa E; Tarulli, Gerard A; Coutinho, Isabel; Fernandes, Rayzel; Hanson, Adrienne R; Denis, Iza; Carroll, Jason S; Dehm, Scott M; Raj, Ganesh V; Plymate, Stephen R; Tilley, Wayne D; Selth, Luke A

    2017-07-01

    Alteration to the expression and activity of androgen receptor (AR) coregulators in prostate cancer is an important mechanism driving disease progression and therapy resistance. Using a novel proteomic technique, we identified a new AR coregulator, the transcription factor Grainyhead-like 2 (GRHL2), and demonstrated its essential role in the oncogenic AR signaling axis. GRHL2 colocalized with AR in prostate tumors and was frequently amplified and upregulated in prostate cancer. Importantly, GRHL2 maintained AR expression in multiple prostate cancer model systems, was required for cell proliferation, enhanced AR's transcriptional activity, and colocated with AR at specific sites on chromatin to regulate genes relevant to disease progression. GRHL2 is itself an AR-regulated gene, creating a positive feedback loop between the two factors. The link between GRHL2 and AR also applied to constitutively active truncated AR variants (ARV), as GRHL2 interacted with and regulated ARVs and vice versa. These oncogenic functions of GRHL2 were counterbalanced by its ability to suppress epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cell invasion. Mechanistic evidence suggested that AR assisted GRHL2 in maintaining the epithelial phenotype. In summary, this study has identified a new AR coregulator with a multifaceted role in prostate cancer, functioning as an enhancer of the oncogenic AR signaling pathway but also as a suppressor of metastasis-related phenotypes. Cancer Res; 77(13); 3417-30. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Neogenin regulates Sonic hedgehog pathway activity during digit patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Mingi; Schachter, Karen A.; Jiang, Guoying; Krauss, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Digit patterning integrates signaling by the Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), FGF and BMP pathways. GLI3, a component of the SHH pathway, is a major regulator of digit number and identity. Neogenin (encoded by Neo1) is a cell surface protein that serves to transduce signals from several ligands, including BMPs, in various developmental contexts. Although neogenin is implicated in BMP signaling, it has not been linked to SHH signaling and its role in digit patterning is unknown. Results We report that Neo1 mutant mice have preaxial polydactyly with low penetrance. Expression of SHH target genes, but not BMP target genes, is altered in Neo1 mutant limb buds. Analysis of mice carrying mutations in both Neo1 and Gli3 reveals that although neogenin plays a role in constraint of digit numbers, suppressing polydactyly, it is also required for the severe polydactyly caused by loss of GLI3. Furthermore, embryo fibroblasts from Neo1 mutant mice are sensitized to SHH pathway activation in vitro. Conclusions Our findings indicate that neogenin regulates SHH signaling in the limb bud to achieve proper digit patterning. PMID:22275192

  6. Vimentin regulates activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Gimena; Rogel, Micah R.; Baker, Margaret A.; Troken, James R.; Urich, Daniela; Morales-Nebreda, Luisa; Sennello, Joseph A.; Kutuzov, Mikhail A.; Sitikov, Albert; Davis, Jennifer M.; Lam, Anna P.; Cheresh, Paul; Kamp, David; Shumaker, Dale K.; Budinger, G. R. Scott; Ridge, Karen M.

    2015-03-01

    Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and subsequent maturation of IL-1β have been implicated in acute lung injury (ALI), resulting in inflammation and fibrosis. We investigated the role of vimentin, a type III intermediate filament, in this process using three well-characterized murine models of ALI known to require NLRP3 inflammasome activation. We demonstrate that central pathophysiologic events in ALI (inflammation, IL-1β levels, endothelial and alveolar epithelial barrier permeability, remodelling and fibrosis) are attenuated in the lungs of Vim-/- mice challenged with LPS, bleomycin and asbestos. Bone marrow chimeric mice lacking vimentin have reduced IL-1β levels and attenuated lung injury and fibrosis following bleomycin exposure. Furthermore, decreased active caspase-1 and IL-1β levels are observed in vitro in Vim-/- and vimentin-knockdown macrophages. Importantly, we show direct protein-protein interaction between NLRP3 and vimentin. This study provides insights into lung inflammation and fibrosis and suggests that vimentin may be a key regulator of the NLRP3 inflammasome.

  7. Thyroid states regulate subcellular glucose phosphorylation activity in male mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Letícia Martins Peçanha

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The thyroid hormones (THs, triiodothyronine (T3 and thyroxine (T4, are very important in organism metabolism and regulate glucose utilization. Hexokinase (HK is responsible for the first step of glycolysis, catalyzing the conversion of glucose to glucose 6-phosphate. HK has been found in different cellular compartments, and new functions have been attributed to this enzyme. The effects of hyperthyroidism on subcellular glucose phosphorylation in mouse tissues were examined. Tissues were removed, subcellular fractions were isolated from eu- and hyperthyroid (T3, 0.25 μg/g, i.p. during 21 days mice and HK activity was assayed. Glucose phosphorylation was increased in the particulate fraction in soleus (312.4% ± 67.1, n = 10, gastrocnemius (369.2% ± 112.4, n = 10 and heart (142.2% ± 13.6, n = 10 muscle in the hyperthyroid group compared to the control group. Hexokinase activity was not affected in brain or liver. No relevant changes were observed in HK activity in the soluble fraction for all tissues investigated. Acute T3 administration (single dose of T3, 1.25 μg/g, i.p. did not modulate HK activity. Interestingly, HK mRNA levels remained unchanged and HK bound to mitochondria was increased by T3 treatment, suggesting a posttranscriptional mechanism. Analysis of the AKT pathway showed a 2.5-fold increase in AKT and GSK3B phosphorylation in the gastrocnemius muscle in the hyperthyroid group compared to the euthyroid group. Taken together, we show for the first time that THs modulate HK activity specifically in particulate fractions and that this action seems to be under the control of the AKT and GSK3B pathways.

  8. Regulation of Akt/PKB activity by P21-activated kinase in cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Kai; Kobayashi, Satoru; Jaffer, Zahara M; Huang, Yuan; Volden, Paul; Chernoff, Jonathan; Liang, Qiangrong

    2008-02-01

    Akt/PKB is a critical regulator of cardiac function and morphology, and its activity is governed by dual phosphorylation at active loop (Thr308) by phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1) and at carboxyl-terminal hydrophobic motif (Ser473) by a putative PDK2. P21-activated kinase-1 (Pak1) is a serine/threonine protein kinase implicated in the regulation of cardiac hypertrophy and contractility and was shown previously to activate Akt through an undefined mechanism. Here we report Pak1 as a potential PDK2 that is essential for Akt activity in cardiomyocytes. Both Pak1 and Akt can be activated by multiple hypertrophic stimuli or growth factors in a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent manner. Pak1 overexpression induces Akt phosphorylation at both Ser473 and Thr308 in cardiomyocytes. Conversely, silencing or inactivating Pak1 gene diminishes Akt phosphorylation in vitro and in vivo. Purified Pak1 can directly phosphorylate Akt only at Ser473, suggesting that Pak1 may be a relevant PDK2 responsible for AKT Ser473 phosphorylation in cardiomyocytes. In addition, Pak1 protects cardiomyocytes from cell death, which is blocked by Akt inhibition. Our results connect two important regulators of cellular physiological functions and provide a potential mechanism for Pak1 signaling in cardiomyocytes.

  9. Saw Palmetto induces growth arrest and apoptosis of androgen-dependent prostate cancer LNCaP cells via inactivation of STAT 3 and androgen receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Ikezoe, Takayuki; Zheng, Zhixing; Taguchi, Hirokuni; Koeffler, H Phillip; Zhu, Wei-Guo

    2007-09-01

    PC-SPES is an eight-herb mixture that has an activity against prostate cancer. Recently, we purified Saw Palmetto (Serenoa repens) from PC-SPES and found that Saw Palmetto induced growth arrest of prostate cancer LNCaP, DU145, and PC3 cells with ED50s of approximately 2.0, 2.6, and 3.3 microl/ml, respectively, as measured by mitochondrial-dependent conversion of the the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Saw Palmetto induced apoptosis of LNCaP cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner as measured by TUNEL assays. Also, Saw Palmetto increased the expression of p21waf1 and p53 protein in LNCaP cells. In addition, we found that Saw Palmetto down-regulated DHT- or IL-6-induced expression of prostate specific antigen in conjunction with down-regulation of the level of androgen receptor in the nucleus as measured by Western blot analysis. Moreover, Saw Palmetto down-regulated the IL-6-induced level of the phosphorylated form of STAT 3 in LNCaP cells. Furthermore, Saw Palmetto inhibited the growth of LNCaP cells present as tumor xenografts in BALB/c nude mice without adverse effect. These results indicate that Saw Palmetto might be useful for the treatment of individuals with prostate cancer.

  10. Androgen receptor expression in human ovarian and uterine tissue of long term androgen-treated transsexual women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Chadha; T.D. Pache; F.J. Huikeshoven (Frans); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAndrogen receptor (AR) modulation in human uteri and ovaries of long term androgen-treated transsexual female patients was investigated. Androgen receptor expression was evaluated immunohistochemically in the ovaries of 11 and the endometria and myometria of six androgen-treated

  11. Cardiotoxic effects of cocaine and anabolic-androgenic steroids in the athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welder, A A; Melchert, R B

    1993-04-01

    Cocaine and anabolic-androgenic steroid abuse have become major drug problems in the United States. Cocaine has been designated as "the drug of greatest national health concern" while as many as 1 million Americans have used or are currently using anabolic-androgenic steroids to promote athletic performance and/or improve physical appearance. Unfavorable cardiovascular events have been linked to both cocaine and anabolic-androgenic steroid abuse in healthy, physically active individuals. Deaths of several United States athletes in 1986 focused attention on the life-threatening cardiovascular consequences of cocaine abuse. Reports of myocardial injury with anabolic-androgenic steroid abuse are anecdotal. Nevertheless, case reports have illustrated the alarming cardiotoxic potential of these steroids in athletes. Anabolic-androgenic steroids were correlated to myocardial infarction in weight lifters and cardiomyopathy in a former professional football player. From the total emergency room episodes where cocaine was mentioned in 1990, approximately 66% of these episodes occurred in young individuals 18-29 years of age. Over 500,000 of the individuals currently taking anabolic-androgenic steroids for nonmedical purposes are high-school children. Because cocaine and anabolic-androgenic steroids are used improperly, more focus needs to be paid to the toxic mechanisms of their adverse effects. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to discuss mechanisms whereby exercise and/or exercise training may alter the cardiovascular responses to these drugs. Furthermore, we would like to illustrate that contrary to the popular belief, acute and chronic abuse of cocaine and anabolic-androgenic steroids have a negative impact on exercise performance.

  12. Abiraterone acetate: oral androgen biosynthesis inhibitor for treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenberg JE

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Yasser Rehman1, Jonathan E Rosenberg21Division of Hospital Medicine, UMass Memorial Healthcare, Worcester, MA, USA; 2Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in men in the US and Europe. The treatment of advanced-stage prostate cancer has been androgen deprivation. Medical castration leads to decreased production of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone by the testes, but adrenal glands and even prostate cancer tissue continue to produce androgens, which eventually leads to continued prostate cancer growth despite castrate level of androgens. This stage is known as castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC, which continues to be a challenge to treat. Addition of androgen antagonists to hormonal deprivation has been successful in lowering the prostate-specific antigen levels further, but has not actually translated into life-prolonging options. The results of several contemporary studies have continued to demonstrate activation of the androgen receptor as being the key factor in the continued growth of prostate cancer. Blockade of androgen production by nongonadal sources has led to clinical benefit in this setting. One such agent is abiraterone acetate, which significantly reduces androgen production by blocking the enzyme, cytochrome P450 17 alpha-hydroxylase (CYP17. This has provided physicians with another treatment option for patients with CRPC. The landscape for prostate cancer treatment has changed with the approval of cabazitaxel, sipuleucel-T and abiraterone. Here we provide an overview of abiraterone acetate, its mechanism of action, and its potential place for therapy in CRPC.Keywords: CRPC, abiraterone, CYP17, inhibitors, androgens, castration resistant prostate cancer

  13. Dual specificity phosphatase 15 regulates Erk activation in Schwann cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Molina, José F; Lopez-Anido, Camila; Ma, Ki H; Zhang, Chongyu; Olson, Tyler; Muth, Katharina N; Weider, Matthias; Svaren, John

    2017-02-01

    Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes are the myelinating cells of the peripheral and central nervous system, respectively. Despite having different myelin components and different transcription factors driving their terminal differentiation there are shared molecular mechanisms between the two. Sox10 is one common transcription factor required for several steps in development of myelinating glia. However, other factors are divergent as Schwann cells need the transcription factor early growth response 2/Krox20 and oligodendrocytes require Myrf. Likewise, some signaling pathways, like the Erk1/2 kinases, are necessary in both cell types for proper myelination. Nonetheless, the molecular mechanisms that control this shared signaling pathway in myelinating cells remain only partially characterized. The hypothesis of this study is that signaling pathways that are similarly regulated in both Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes play central roles in coordinating the differentiation of myelinating glia. To address this hypothesis, we have used genome-wide binding data to identify a relatively small set of genes that are similarly regulated by Sox10 in myelinating glia. We chose one such gene encoding Dual specificity phosphatase 15 (Dusp15) for further analysis in Schwann cell signaling. RNA interference and gene deletion by genome editing in cultured RT4 and primary Schwann cells showed Dusp15 is necessary for full activation of Erk1/2 phosphorylation. In addition, we show that Dusp15 represses expression of several myelin genes, including myelin basic protein. The data shown here support a mechanism by which early growth response 2 activates myelin genes, but also induces a negative feedback loop through Dusp15 to limit over-expression of myelin genes. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  14. Regulation of sucrose metabolism in higher plants: localization and regulation of activity of key enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, H.; Huber, S. C.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Sucrose (Suc) plays a central role in plant growth and development. It is a major end product of photosynthesis and functions as a primary transport sugar and in some cases as a direct or indirect regulator of gene expression. Research during the last 2 decades has identified the pathways involved and which enzymes contribute to the control of flux. Availability of metabolites for Suc synthesis and 'demand' for products of sucrose degradation are important factors, but this review specifically focuses on the biosynthetic enzyme sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS), and the degradative enzymes, sucrose synthase (SuSy), and the invertases. Recent progress has included the cloning of genes encoding these enzymes and the elucidation of posttranslational regulatory mechanisms. Protein phosphorylation is emerging as an important mechanism controlling SPS activity in response to various environmental and endogenous signals. In terms of Suc degradation, invertase-catalyzed hydrolysis generally has been associated with cell expansion, whereas SuSy-catalyzed metabolism has been linked with biosynthetic processes (e.g., cell wall or storage products). Recent results indicate that SuSy may be localized in multiple cellular compartments: (1) as a soluble enzyme in the cytosol (as traditionally assumed); (2) associated with the plasma membrane; and (3) associated with the actin cytoskeleton. Phosphorylation of SuSy has been shown to occur and may be one of the factors controlling localization of the enzyme. The purpose of this review is to summarize some of the recent developments relating to regulation of activity and localization of key enzymes involved in sucrose metabolism in plants.

  15. Impact of androgen deprivation therapy on sexual function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Clarisse R; Mulhall, John P

    2012-01-01

    Many patients with prostate cancer for whom androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is indicated are young and desire to remain sexually active. In such patients, the side effects of androgen therapy on sexual function can be a source of serious reduction in overall quality of life. Providing the appropriate treatment options in this patient population is therefore essential. Nevertheless, treating such patients is challenging and an understanding of the underlying mechanisms of sexual physiology and pathophysiology is crucial to optimal patient care. In this paper, we reviewed what was known regarding the effects of ADT on sexual function in animal models and we also provided a detailed review on the effects of ADT on sexual health in humans and its treatment. PMID:22231298

  16. Splice variants of androgen receptor and prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orazio Caffo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last ten years, two new-generation hormonal drugs and two chemotherapeutic agents have been approved for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Unfortunately, some patients have primary resistance to them and the others eventually develop secondary resistance. It has recently been suggested that the presence of androgen receptor splice variants plays a leading role in the primary and secondary resistance to the new hormonal drugs, whereas their presence seem to have only a partial effect on the activity of the chemotherapeutic agents. The aim of this paper is to review the published data concerning the role of androgen receptor splice variants in prostate cancer biology, and their potential use as biomarkers when making therapeutic decisions.

  17. A comprehensive endocrine description of Kennedy's disease revealing androgen insensitivity linked to CAG repeat length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejager, S; Bry-Gauillard, H; Bruckert, E; Eymard, B; Salachas, F; LeGuern, E; Tardieu, S; Chadarevian, R; Giral, P; Turpin, G

    2002-08-01

    Our study aims to provide a comprehensive view of the endocrine features in Kennedy's disease (KD). Twenty-two men with KD underwent detailed endocrine investigations. Clinical signs of partial androgen resistance were present in more than 80% of the patients, with gynecomastia being the most prominent. Gynecomastia was postpubertal but appeared before muscular weakness in most cases. Thirteen patients had alteration of testicular exocrine function. Hormonal profile of partial androgen resistance was present in 86% of the patients, with an elevated testosterone level in 68%. Androgen insensitivity seems to appear later in life in KD, similar to the development of neurological signs. Although we confirm the previously reported correlation between the CAG repeat length and the early onset of the neurological disease, we describe a significant correlation between repeat length and the age of onset of gynecomastia as well as biological indexes of androgen insensitivity. This is supported by numerous in vitro data correlating variations in the CAG tract with androgen receptor activity; the longer the CAG repeats, the weaker the receptor transactivation. Ours is the first study to show such a clear and prominent pattern of androgen insensitivity in KD. In clinical practice, KD patients are often misdiagnosed as having amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Careful examination of the endocrine component could avoid such a deleterious misdiagnosis.

  18. Effect of isotretinoin on serum levels of precursor and peripherally derived androgens in patients with acne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lookingbill, D P; Demers, L M; Tigelaar, R E; Shalita, A R

    1988-04-01

    Sebaceous glands are stimulated by androgens and can convert them to more active forms. Isotretinoin, however, has a profound inhibitory effect on sebaceous gland size and function. This study evaluated the effect of isotretinoin on serum levels of precursor and tissue-derived androgens. Twenty-four subjects (15 men and nine women) were treated for 20 weeks with 1 mg/kg/d of isotretinoin. Serum samples were obtained at baseline, 8, 16, and 24 weeks, and assayed for precursor androgens--total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (free T), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S); and tissue androgens--dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and its metabolite, 3 alpha-androstanediol glucuronide (3 alpha-diol G). Isotretinoin had no meaningful effects on precursor androgens, except for producing an elevation of free T in women. In contrast, isotretinoin produced depressions in the serum levels of DHT and 3 alpha-diol G in women and in 3 alpha-diol G in men. These decreases are believed to be the result, rather than the cause, of a reduction in the size of the sebaceous glands: The magnitude of the observed decreases may represent the amount of tissue-derived androgens that sebaceous glands normally contribute to the circulating pool.

  19. Sex differences in androgen receptors of the human mamillary bodies are related to endocrine status rather than to sexual orientation or transsexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijver, F P; Fernández-Guasti, A; Fodor, M; Kraan, E M; Swaab, D F

    2001-02-01

    In a previous study we found androgen receptor (AR) sex differences in several regions throughout the human hypothalamus. Generally, men had stronger nuclear AR immunoreactivity (AR-ir) than women. The strongest nuclear labeling was found in the caudal hypothalamus in the mamillary body complex (MBC), which is known to be involved in aspects of cognition and sexual behavior. The present study was carried out to investigate whether the sex difference in AR-ir of the MBC is related to sexual orientation or gender identity (i.e. the feeling of being male or female) or to circulating levels of androgens, as nuclear AR-ir is known to be up-regulated by androgens. Therefore, we studied the MBC in postmortem brain material from the following groups: young heterosexual men, young homosexual men, aged heterosexual castrated and noncastrated men, castrated and noncastrated transsexuals, young heterosexual women, and a young virilized woman. Nuclear AR-ir did not differ significantly between heterosexual and homosexual men, but was significantly stronger than that in women. A female-like pattern of AR-ir (i.e. no to weak nuclear staining) was observed in 26- to 53-yr-old castrated male-to-female transsexuals and in old castrated and noncastrated men, 67--87 yr of age. In analogy with animal studies showing strong activational effects of androgens on nuclear AR-ir, the present data suggest that nuclear AR-ir in the human MBC is dependent on the presence or absence of circulating levels of androgen. The group data were, moreover, supported by the fact that a male-like AR-ir (i.e. intense nuclear AR-ir) was found in a 36-yr-old bisexual noncastrated male-to-female transsexual and in a heterosexual virilized woman, 46 yr of age, with high levels of circulating testosterone. In conclusion, the sexually dimorphic AR-ir in the MBC seemed to be clearly related to circulating levels of androgens and not to sexual orientation or gender identity. The functional implications of these

  20. Enhancement of Intermittent Androgen Ablation Therapy by Finasteride Administration in Animal Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Zhou

    2003-01-01

    .... Intermittent androgen ablation therapy may slow down the development of androgen refractory tumors because intermittent recovery of androgens can induce differentiation of prostatic epithelial cells...

  1. Taxifolin suppresses rat and human testicular androgen biosynthetic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Fei; Tian, Erpo; Wang, Li; Li, Xiaoheng; Zhu, Qiqi; Wang, Yiyan; Zhong, Ying; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2018-03-01

    Taxifolin is a flavonoid. It has been used as a chemopreventive agent and supplement. It may have some beneficial effects to treat prostate cancer by suppressing androgen production in Leydig cells. The objective of the present study was to study the effects of taxifolin on androgen production of rat Leydig cells isolated from immature testis and some rat and human testosterone biosynthetic enzyme activities. Rat Leydig cells were incubated with 100μM taxifolin without (basal) or with 10ng/ml luteinizing hormone (LH), 10mM 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8BR), and steroid enzyme substrates (20μM): 22R-hydroxychloesterol, pregnenolone, progesterone, and androstenedione. The medium concentrations of 5α-androstane-3α, 17β-diol (DIOL) and testosterone were measured. Taxifolin significantly suppressed basal, LH-stimulated, 8BR-stimulated, pregnenolone-mediated, and progesterone-mediated androgen production by Leydig cells. Further study demonstrated that taxifolin inhibited rat 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 17α-hydroxylase/17, 20-lyase with IC 50 values of 14.55±0.013 and 16.75±0.011μM, respectively. Taxifolin also inhibited these two enzyme activities in human testis with IC 50 value of about 100μM. Taxifolin was a competitive inhibitor for these two enzymes when steroid substrates were used. In conclusion, taxifolin may have benefits for the treatment of prostate cancer. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Androgen effects on women's gendered behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udry, J R; Morris, N M; Kovenock, J

    1995-07-01

    Test of the applicability of the hormonal theory of sex-dimorphic behaviour to adult women is achieved in this study by assembling measures of prenatal and adult androgen exposure, and a broad measure of gendered behaviour on a sample of white women aged 27-30. Androgen exposure in the second (and no other) trimester of fetal life, combined with and in interaction with adult androgens, masculineses women's behaviour and explains a substantial proportion of the within-sex variance in women's adult gendered behaviour.

  3. Carry-over of self-regulation for physical activity to self-regulating eating in women with morbid obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annesi, James J; Porter, Kandice J; Johnson, Ping H

    2015-01-01

    Poor outcomes from behavioral treatments of severe obesity have led to a dependence on invasive medical interventions, including surgery for morbidly obese individuals. Improved methods to self-regulate eating will be required to reduce obesity. The use of self-regulation methods for completing physical activity may carry over to increased self-regulation for eating through improved feelings of competence (self-efficacy) and mood. The study recruited women (Meanage = 43 years) with morbid obesity (MeanBMI = 44 kg/m(2)) to participate in 26 weeks of cognitive-behavioral support of physical activity paired with either nutrition education (n = 51) or cognitive-behavioral nutrition (n = 51) methods. Data collected were from 2011 and 2012. Significant improvements in self-regulation for physical activity, self-regulation for eating, overall mood, and self-efficacy for eating, with greater improvement in self-regulation for eating, were observed in the cognitive-behavioral nutrition group. Changes in mood and self-efficacy for eating significantly mediated the relationship between changes in self-regulation for physical activity and self-regulation for eating. When subscales of overall mood and self-efficacy were entered into separate regression equations as mediators, the only significant mediators were vigor, and controlling eating when socially pressured and when increased cues to overeat were present.

  4. Androgen receptor and nutrient signaling pathways coordinate the demand for increased amino acid transport during prostate cancer progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Qian; Bailey, Charles G; Ng, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    L-Type amino acid transporters such as LAT1 and LAT3 mediate the uptake of essential amino acids. Here, we report that prostate cancer cells coordinate the expression of LAT1 and LAT3 to maintain sufficient levels of leucine needed for mTORC1 signaling and cell growth. Inhibiting LAT function...... was sufficient to decrease cell growth and mTORC1 signaling in prostate cancer cells. These cells maintained levels of amino acid influx through androgen receptor-mediated regulation of LAT3 expression and ATF4 regulation of LAT1 expression after amino acid deprivation. These responses remained intact in primary...... prostate cancer, as indicated by high levels of LAT3 in primary disease, and by increased levels of LAT1 after hormone ablation and in metastatic lesions. Taken together, our results show how prostate cancer cells respond to demands for increased essential amino acids by coordinately activating amino acid...

  5. Testosterone suppresses oxidative stress via androgen receptor-independent pathway in murine cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Wu, Saizhu; Ruan, Yunjun; Hong, Lei; Xing, Xiaowen; Lai, Wenyan

    2011-01-01

    Evidence supports that oxidative stress exerts significant effects on the pathogenesis of heart dysfunction. On the other hand, the presence of specific androgen receptor (AR) in mammalian cardiomyocytes implies that androgen plays a physiological role in cardiac function, myocardial injury and the regulation of the redox state in the heart. This study used the testicular feminized (Tfm) and castrated male mice to investigate the effects of testosterone deficiency, physiological testosterone therapy and AR on oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes. Tfm mice have a non-functional AR and reduced circulating testosterone levels. Male littermates and Tfm mice were separated into 5 experimental groups: non-castrated littermate controls, castrated littermates, sham-operated Tfm, testosterone-treated castrated littermates and testosterone-treated sham-operated Tfm mice. Cardiomyocytes that were isolated from the left ventricle were used for determination of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH‑Px) enzyme activities, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Additionally, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion mutations were detected by nested PCR. The SOD and GSH-Px enzyme activities of cardiomyocytes were decreased, and the MDA levels and the proportion of mtDNA mutations were increased in castrated and sham-operated Tfm mice compared to control mice. However, an increase was observed in the activities of SOD and GSH-Px enzyme as well as a decrease in MDA levels and the proportion of mtDNA mutations in the mice that had received testosterone therapy. These changes were statistically similar in castrated and sham-operated Tfm mice after testosterone therapy. In conclusion, it is testosterone deficiency that induces oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes. Physiological testosterone therapy is able to suppress oxidative stress mediated via the AR-independent pathway.

  6. Increased blood pressure and aortic stiffness among abusers of anabolic androgenic steroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jon J; Schou, Morten; Madsen, Per L

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) is prevalent among recreational athletes and adverse effects on blood pressure (BP) and arterial stiffness could be substantial. Testosterone decreases natriuretic peptides which are key components in BP-regulation and may impair BP...

  7. REST mediates androgen receptor actions on gene repression and predicts early recurrence of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Charlotte; Ceder, Jens; Iglesias Gato, Diego

    2014-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a key regulator of prostate tumorgenesis through actions that are not fully understood. We identified the repressor element (RE)-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) as a mediator of AR actions on gene repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that AR binds...

  8. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 regulates microglial motility and phagocytic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeon Hyejin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1 is the primary inhibitor of urokinase type plasminogen activators (uPA and tissue type plasminogen activators (tPA, which mediate fibrinolysis. PAI-1 is also involved in the innate immunity by regulating cell migration and phagocytosis. However, little is known about the role of PAI-1 in the central nervous system. Methods In this study, we identified PAI-1 in the culture medium of mouse mixed glial cells by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Secretion of PAI-1 from glial cultures was detected by ELISA and western blotting analysis. Cell migration was evaluated by in vitro scratch-wound healing assay or Boyden chamber assay and an in vivo stab wound injury model. Phagocytic activity was measured by uptake of zymosan particles. Results The levels of PAI-1 mRNA and protein expression were increased by lipopolysaccharide and interferon-γ stimulation in both microglia and astrocytes. PAI-1 promoted the migration of microglial cells in culture via the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP 1/Janus kinase (JAK/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT1 axis. PAI-1 also increased microglial migration in vivo when injected into mouse brain. PAI-1-mediated microglial migration was independent of protease inhibition, because an R346A mutant of PAI-1 with impaired PA inhibitory activity also promoted microglial migration. Moreover, PAI-1 was able to modulate microglial phagocytic activity. PAI-1 inhibited microglial engulfment of zymosan particles in a vitronectin- and Toll-like receptor 2/6-dependent manner. Conclusion Our results indicate that glia-derived PAI-1 may regulate microglial migration and phagocytosis in an autocrine or paracrine manner. This may have important implications in the regulation of brain microglial activities in health and disease.

  9. ANABOLIC ANDROGENIC STEROIDS AND DEPENDENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IHSAN SARI

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Anabolic androgenic steroids are used for sportive, cosmetic, therapeutic and occupational reasons and there are many side effects reported (George, 2005; Nieminen et al., 1996; O'Sullivan et al., 2000. Prevalence of anabolic steroids’ use also indicates the importance of this topic. Moreover, it is now known that use of anabolic steroids could lead to dependence which could be psychological or/and physiological (Copeland et al., 2000. It isimportant to know about all aspects of anabolic steroids including dependence. Therefore, this study has attempted to give an insight into use of anabolic steroids and dependence. The discussion will focus on prevalence, reasons, and side effects of use and physiological and psychological dependence

  10. ABUSE OF ANABOLIC ANDROGENIC STEROIDS

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    Abbas Yavari

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available According to the International Olympic Committee, the abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AASS is found in over 50% of positive doping tests. AASS abuse is not restricted to the organized sports andwidespread use. It remains as an unsolved public-health problem.Lower black market price, easier access to AASS, bodybuilding clubs and internet advertising are factors of this increasingly misuse. There is not real data about the prevalence of AASS abuse in various populations or countries, because most of athletes or students, due to their prohibition or ethical aspects do not admit to AASS abuse. Often they are aware of the risks of their choice and yet, are eager to put themselves at risk without deeper consideration. The abusers use them to improve their physical fitness and appearance.Present article has been collected to elucidate the risks and adverse effects of AASS and explanation of mechanisms of these events.

  11. FOXO1 Regulates Bacteria-Induced Neutrophil Activity

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    Guangyu Dong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils play an essential role in the innate immune response to microbial infection and are particularly important in clearing bacterial infection. We investigated the role of the transcription factor FOXO1 in the response of neutrophils to bacterial challenge with Porphyromonas gingivalis in vivo and in vitro. In these experiments, the effect of lineage-specific FOXO1 deletion in LyzM.Cre+FOXO1L/L mice was compared with matched littermate controls. FOXO1 deletion negatively affected several critical aspects of neutrophil function in vivo including mobilization of neutrophils from the bone marrow (BM to the vasculature, recruitment of neutrophils to sites of bacterial inoculation, and clearance of bacteria. In vitro FOXO1 regulated neutrophil chemotaxis and bacterial killing. Moreover, bacteria-induced expression of CXCR2 and CD11b, which are essential for several aspects of neutrophil function, was dependent on FOXO1 in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, FOXO1 directly interacted with the promoter regions of CXCR2 and CD11b. Bacteria-induced nuclear localization of FOXO1 was dependent upon toll-like receptor (TLR 2 and/or TLR4 and was significantly reduced by inhibitors of reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide synthase and deacetylases (Sirt1 and histone deacetylases. These studies show for the first time that FOXO1 activation by bacterial challenge is needed to mobilize neutrophils to transit from the BM to peripheral tissues in response to infection as well as for bacterial clearance in vivo. Moreover, FOXO1 regulates neutrophil function that facilitates chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and bacterial killing.

  12. Hyperphosphorylation regulates the activity of SREBP1 during mitosis.

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    Bengoechea-Alonso, Maria T; Punga, Tanel; Ericsson, Johan

    2005-08-16

    The sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) family of transcription factors controls the biosynthesis of cholesterol and other lipids, and lipid synthesis is critical for cell growth and proliferation. We were, therefore, interested in the expression and activity of SREBPs during the cell cycle. We found that the expression of a number of SREBP-responsive promoter-reporter genes were induced in a SREBP-dependent manner in cells arrested in G2/M. In addition, the mature forms of SREBP1a and SREBP1c were hyperphosphorylated in mitotic cells, giving rise to a phosphoepitope recognized by the mitotic protein monoclonal-2 (MPM-2) antibody. In contrast, SREBP2 was not hyperphosphorylated in mitotic cells and was not recognized by the MPM-2 antibody. The MPM-2 epitope was mapped to the C terminus of mature SREBP1, and the mitosis-specific hyperphosphorylation of SREBP1 depended on this domain of the protein. The transcriptional and DNA-binding activity of SREBP1 was enhanced in cells arrested in G2/M, and these effects depended on the C-terminal domain of the protein. In part, these effects could be explained by our observation that mature SREBP1 was stabilized in G2/M. In agreement with these observations, we found that the synthesis of cholesterol was increased in G2/M-arrested cells. Thus, our results demonstrate that the activity of mature SREBP1 is regulated by phosphorylation during the cell cycle, suggesting that SREBP1 may provide a link between lipid synthesis, proliferation, and cell growth.

  13. Internalization of secreted antigen–targeted antibodies by the neonatal Fc receptor for precision imaging of the androgen receptor axis

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    Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Watson, Philip A.; Lee, Sang-Gyu; Ku, Anson T.; Bournazos, Stylianos; Braun, Katharina; Kim, Kwanghee; Sjöström, Kjell; Doran, Michael G.; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Santos, Elmer; Veach, Darren; Turkekul, Mesruh; Casey, Emily; Lewis, Jason S.; Abou, Diane S.; van Voss, Marise R. H.; Scardino, Peter T.; Strand, Sven-Erik; Alpaugh, Mary L.; Scher, Howard I.; Lilja, Hans; Larson, Steven M.; Ulmert, David

    2017-01-01

    Targeting the androgen receptor (AR) pathway prolongs survival in patients with prostate cancer, but resistance rapidly develops. Understanding this resistance is confounded by a lack of noninvasive means to assess AR activity in vivo. We report intracellular accumulation of a secreted antigen-targeted antibody (SATA) that can be used to characterize disease, guide therapy, and monitor response. AR-regulated human kallikrein-related peptidase 2 (free hK2) is a prostate tissue-specific antigen produced in prostate cancer and androgen-stimulated breast cancer cells. Fluorescent and radio conjugates of 11B6, an antibody targeting free hK2, are internalized and noninvasively report AR pathway activity in metastatic and genetically engineered models of cancer development and treatment. Uptake is mediated by a mechanism involving the neonatal Fc receptor. Humanized 11B6, which has undergone toxicological tests in nonhuman primates, has the potential to improve patient management in these cancers. Furthermore, cell-specific SATA uptake may have a broader use for molecularly guided diagnosis and therapy in other cancers. PMID:27903863

  14. 22 CFR 143.2 - To what programs or activities do these regulations apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... what programs or activities do these regulations apply? These regulations apply to each foreign affairs... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false To what programs or activities do these regulations apply? 143.2 Section 143.2 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE CIVIL RIGHTS NONDISCRIMINATION ON...

  15. Regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase by natural and synthetic activators

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    David Grahame Hardie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is a sensor of cellular energy status that is almost universally expressed in eukaryotic cells. While it appears to have evolved in single-celled eukaryotes to regulate energy balance in a cell-autonomous manner, during the evolution of multicellular animals its role has become adapted so that it also regulates energy balance at the whole body level, by responding to hormones that act primarily on the hypothalamus. AMPK monitors energy balance at the cellular level by sensing the ratios of AMP/ATP and ADP/ATP, and recent structural analyses of the AMPK heterotrimer that have provided insight into the complex mechanisms for these effects will be discussed. Given the central importance of energy balance in diseases that are major causes of morbidity or death in humans, such as type 2 diabetes, cancer and inflammatory disorders, there has been a major drive to develop pharmacological activators of AMPK. Many such activators have been described, and the various mechanisms by which these activate AMPK will be discussed. A particularly large class of AMPK activators are natural products of plants derived from traditional herbal medicines. While the mechanism by which most of these activate AMPK has not yet been addressed, I will argue that many of them may be defensive compounds produced by plants to deter infection by pathogens or grazing by insects or herbivores, and that many of them will turn out to be inhibitors of mitochondrial function.

  16. Piperine, a Bioactive Component of Pepper Spice Exerts Therapeutic Effects on Androgen Dependent and Androgen Independent Prostate Cancer Cells.

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    Abhilash Samykutty

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common solid malignancy in men, with 32,000 deaths annually. Piperine, a major alkaloid constituent of black pepper, has previously been reported to have anti-cancer activity in variety of cancer cell lines. The effect of piperine against prostate cancer is not currently known. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the anti-tumor mechanisms of piperine on androgen dependent and androgen independent prostate cancer cells. Here, we show that piperine inhibited the proliferation of LNCaP, PC-3, 22RV1 and DU-145 prostate cancer cells in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, Annexin-V staining demonstrated that piperine treatment induced apoptosis in hormone dependent prostate cancer cells (LNCaP. Using global caspase activation assay, we show that piperine-induced apoptosis resulted in caspase activation in LNCaP and PC-3 cells. Further studies revealed that piperine treatment resulted in the activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of PARP-1 proteins in LNCaP, PC-3 and DU-145 prostate cancer cells. Piperine treatment also disrupted androgen receptor (AR expression in LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Our evaluations further show that there is a significant reduction of Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA levels following piperine treatment in LNCaP cells. NF-kB and STAT-3 transcription factors have previously been shown to play a role in angiogenesis and invasion of prostate cancer cells. Interestingly, treatment of LNCaP, PC-3 and DU-145 prostate cancer cells with piperine resulted in reduced expression of phosphorylated STAT-3 and Nuclear factor-κB (NF-kB transcription factors. These results correlated with the results of Boyden chamber assay, wherein piperine treatment reduced the cell migration of LNCaP and PC-3 cells. Finally, we show that piperine treatment significantly reduced the androgen dependent and androgen independent tumor growth in nude mice model xenotransplanted with prostate cancer cells. Taken together, these

  17. The HSP90 inhibitor 17-PAG effectively inhibits the proliferation and migration of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells

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    Peng, Ruixian; Li, Zhenyu; Lin, Zhiyuan; Wang, Yang; Wang, Wei; Hu, Bo; Wang, Xilong; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yangyun; Zhou, Renyuan; Lu, Chunhua; Shen, Yuemao; Wang, Jifeng; Shi, Guowei

    2015-01-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) ultimately occurs after a period of treatment with androgen deprivation therapy. Furthermore, CRPC patients can only derive limited survival benefits from traditional cytotoxic drugs. HSP90, which is a molecular chaperone, plays a vital role in client protein processing and maintaining the function of cells. HSP90 is usually overexpressed in prostate cancer tissues, which makes it a potential target for managing prostate cancer. Geldanamycin (GA), which was recognized as the first natural HSP90 inhibitor, has demonstrated potent anti-tumor efficacy in large-scale pre-clinical studies, but its application in the clinic is not permitted due to its liver toxicity and unstable physical properties. In this study, we report a new GA derivative, 17-PAG (17-(propynylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin), which demonstrates highly effective anti-tumor activity against androgen-independent prostate cancer cells. Treating cells with 17-PAG dose-dependently suppressed proliferation, reduced colony formation and induced apoptosis of DU-145/C4-2B cells. Moreover, 17-PAG suppressed the migration and invasion of DU-145/C4-2B cells by regulating epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). 17-PAG also downregulated the HSP90 client proteins, including Her2, EGFR, C-Raf, AKT, p-AKT, and CDK4. Animal assays confirmed that 17-PAG shows strong anti-tumor effects with no obvious organ toxicity in DU-145 cell xenografted nude mice. These results provide us with a potential target for treating androgen-independent prostate cancer in a safe and effective manner. PMID:26693070

  18. Prenatal androgen exposure alters girls' responses to information indicating gender-appropriate behaviour.

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    Hines, Melissa; Pasterski, Vickie; Spencer, Debra; Neufeld, Sharon; Patalay, Praveetha; Hindmarsh, Peter C; Hughes, Ieuan A; Acerini, Carlo L

    2016-02-19

    Individual variability in human gender-related behaviour is influenced by many factors, including androgen exposure prenatally, as well as self-socialization and socialization by others postnatally. Many studies have looked at these types of influences in isolation, but little is known about how they work together. Here, we report that girls exposed to high concentrations of androgens prenatally, because they have the genetic condition congenital adrenal hyperplasia, show changes in processes related to self-socialization of gender-related behaviour. Specifically, they are less responsive than other girls to information that particular objects are for girls and they show reduced imitation of female models choosing particular objects. These findings suggest that prenatal androgen exposure may influence subsequent gender-related behaviours, including object (toy) choices, in part by changing processes involved in the self-socialization of gendered behaviour, rather than only by inducing permanent changes in the brain during early development. In addition, the findings suggest that some of the behavioural effects of prenatal androgen exposure might be subject to alteration by postnatal socialization processes. The findings also suggest a previously unknown influence of early androgen exposure on later processes involved in self-socialization of gender-related behaviour, and thus expand understanding of the developmental systems regulating human gender development. © 2016 The Author(s).

  19. Identification of novel androgen receptor target genes in prostate cancer

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    Gerald William L

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The androgen receptor (AR plays critical roles in both androgen-dependent and castrate-resistant prostate cancer (PCa. However, little is known about AR target genes that mediate the receptor's roles in disease progression. Results Using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP Display, we discovered 19 novel loci occupied by the AR in castrate resistant C4-2B PCa cells. Only four of the 19 AR-occupied regions were within 10-kb 5'-flanking regulatory sequences. Three were located up to 4-kb 3' of the nearest gene, eight were intragenic and four were in gene deserts. Whereas the AR occupied the same loci in C4-2B (castrate resistant and LNCaP (androgen-dependent PCa cells, differences between the two cell lines were observed in the response of nearby genes to androgens. Among the genes strongly stimulated by DHT in C4-2B cells – D-dopachrome tautomerase (DDT, Protein kinase C delta (PRKCD, Glutathione S- transferase theta 2 (GSTT2, Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 3 (TRPV3, and Pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 (PYCR1 – most were less strongly or hardly stimulated in LNCaP cells. Another AR target gene, ornithine aminotransferase (OAT, was AR-stimulated in a ligand-independent manner, since it was repressed by AR siRNA knockdown, but not stimulated by DHT. We also present evidence for in vivo AR-mediated regulation of several genes identified by ChIP Display. For example, PRKCD and PYCR1, which may contribute to PCa cell growth and survival, are expressed in PCa biopsies from primary tumors before and after ablation and in metastatic lesions in a manner consistent with AR-mediated stimulation. Conclusion AR genomic occupancy is similar between LNCaP and C4-2B cells and is not biased towards 5' gene flanking sequences. The AR transcriptionally regulates less than half the genes nearby AR-occupied regions, usually but not always, in a ligand-dependent manner. Most are stimulated and a few are

  20. V-1 regulates capping protein activity in vivo.

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    Jung, Goeh; Alexander, Christopher J; Wu, Xufeng S; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Chen, Bi-Chang; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A

    2016-10-25

    Capping Protein (CP) plays a central role in the creation of the Arp2/3-generated branched actin networks comprising lamellipodia and pseudopodia by virtue of its ability to cap the actin filament barbed end, which promotes Arp2/3-dependent filament nucleation and optimal branching. The highly conserved protein V-1/Myotrophin binds CP tightly in vitro to render it incapable of binding the barbed end. Here we addressed the physiological significance of this CP antagonist in Dictyostelium, which expresses a V-1 homolog that we show is very similar biochemically to mouse V-1. Consistent with previous studies of CP knockdown, overexpression of V-1 in Dictyostelium reduced the size of pseudopodia and the cortical content of Arp2/3 and induced the formation of filopodia. Importantly, these effects scaled positively with the degree of V-1 overexpression and were not seen with a V-1 mutant that cannot bind CP. V-1 is present in molar excess over CP, suggesting that it suppresses CP activity in the cytoplasm at steady state. Consistently, cells devoid of V-1, like cells overexpressing CP described previously, exhibited a significant decrease in cellular F-actin content. Moreover, V-1-null cells exhibited pronounced defects in macropinocytosis and chemotactic aggregation that were rescued by V-1, but not by the V-1 mutant. Together, these observations demonstrate that V-1 exerts significant influence in vivo on major actin-based processes via its ability to sequester CP. Finally, we present evidence that V-1's ability to sequester CP is regulated by phosphorylation, suggesting that cells may manipulate the level of active CP to tune their "actin phenotype."

  1. Effect of petroleum ether and ethanol fractions of seeds of Abrus precatorius on androgenic alopecia

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    Sukirti Upadhyay

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Seeds of Abrus precatorius L., Fabaceae, are commonly used as purgative, emetic, aphrodisiac and in nervous disorder in traditional and folk medicines. In present study petroleum ether and ethanolic extracts of A. precatorius seeds are evaluated for reversal of androgen (testosterone by i.m route induced alopecia in male albino wistar rats and compared to topical administration of standard antiandrogenic drug finasteride for 21 days. The results were reflected from visual observation and histological study of several skin sections via various parameters as anagen to telogen ratio and follicle density/mm area of skin surface. The animal of group 1 who were treated with only testosterone became alopecic on visual observation. Animals of Group 2, 3 and 4 who were treated with finasteride, petroleum ether and ethanolic extract of seed respectively topically along with testosterone (i.m did not developed alopecia. To investigate the mechanism of observed activity, in vitro experiments were performed. Inhibition of 5α-reductase activity by extracts and finasteride suggest that they reversed androgen induced alopecia by inhibiting conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (potent androgen responsible for androgenic alopecia. So it may be concluded that petroleum ether and ethanolic extract of A. precatorius seed posses anti androgenic alopecia activity due to inhibition of 5α-reductase enzyme.

  2. Effect of petroleum ether and ethanol fractions of seeds of Abrus precatorius on androgenic alopecia

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    Sukirti Upadhyay

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Seeds of Abrus precatorius L., Fabaceae, are commonly used as purgative, emetic, aphrodisiac and in nervous disorder in traditional and folk medicines. In present study petroleum ether and ethanolic extracts of A. precatorius seeds are evaluated for reversal of androgen (testosterone by i.m route induced alopecia in male albino wistar rats and compared to topical administration of standard antiandrogenic drug finasteride for 21 days. The results were reflected from visual observation and histological study of several skin sections via various parameters as anagen to telogen ratio and follicle density/mm area of skin surface. The animal of group 1 who were treated with only testosterone became alopecic on visual observation. Animals of Group 2, 3 and 4 who were treated with finasteride, petroleum ether and ethanolic extract of seed respectively topically along with testosterone (i.m did not developed alopecia. To investigate the mechanism of observed activity, in vitro experiments were performed. Inhibition of 5α-reductase activity by extracts and finasteride suggest that they reversed androgen induced alopecia by inhibiting conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (potent androgen responsible for androgenic alopecia. So it may be concluded that petroleum ether and ethanolic extract of A. precatorius seed posses anti androgenic alopecia activity due to inhibition of 5α-reductase enzyme.

  3. Distinct mechanisms regulate Lck spatial organization in activated T cells

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    Natasha eKapoor-Kaushik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorylation of the T cell receptor (TCR by the kinase Lck is the first detectable signaling event upon antigen engagement. The distribution of Lck within the plasma membrane, its conformational state, kinase activity and protein interactions all contribute to determine how efficiently Lck phosphorylates the engaged TCR. Here we used cross-correlation raster image spectroscopy (ccRICS and photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM to identify two mechanisms of Lck clustering: an intrinsic mechanism of Lck clustering induced by locking Lck in its open conformation, and an extrinsic mechanism of clustering controlled by the phosphorylation of tyrosine 192, which regulates the affinity of Lck SH2 domain. Both mechanisms of clustering were differently affected by the absence of the kinase Zap70 or the adaptor Lat. We further observed that the adaptor TSAd bound to and promoted the diffusion of Lck when it is phosphorylated on tyrosine 192. Our data suggest that while Lck open conformation drives aggregation and clustering, the spatial organization of Lck is further controlled by signaling events downstream of TCR phosphorylation.

  4. Apical constriction and epithelial invagination are regulated by BMP activity

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    Vijay K. Jidigam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial invagination is a morphological process in which flat cell sheets transform into three-dimensional structures through bending of the tissue. It is accompanied by apical constriction, in which the apical cell surface is reduced in relation to the basal cell surface. Although much is known about the intra-cellular molecular machinery driving apical constriction and epithelial invagination, information of how extra-cellular signals affect these processes remains insufficient. In this study we have established several in vivo assays of placodal invagination to explore whether the external signal BMP regulates processes connected to epithelial invagination. By inhibiting BMP activity in prospective cranial placodes, we provide evidence that BMP signals are required for RhoA and F-actin rearrangements, apical constriction, cell elongation and epithelial invagination. The failure of placode invagination after BMP inhibition appears to be a direct consequence of disrupted apical accumulation of RhoA and F-actin, rather than changes in cell death or proliferation. In addition, our results show that epithelial invagination and acquisition of placode-specific identities are two distinct and separable developmental processes. In summary, our results provide evidence that BMP signals promote epithelial invagination by acting upstream of the intracellular molecular machinery that drives apical constriction and cell elongation.

  5. Apical constriction and epithelial invagination are regulated by BMP activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jidigam, Vijay K; Srinivasan, Raghuraman C; Patthey, Cedric; Gunhaga, Lena

    2015-11-30

    Epithelial invagination is a morphological process in which flat cell sheets transform into three-dimensional structures through bending of the tissue. It is accompanied by apical constriction, in which the apical cell surface is reduced in relation to the basal cell surface. Although much is known about the intra-cellular molecular machinery driving apical constriction and epithelial invagination, information of how extra-cellular signals affect these processes remains insufficient. In this study we have established several in vivo assays of placodal invagination to explore whether the external signal BMP regulates processes connected to epithelial invagination. By inhibiting BMP activity in prospective cranial placodes, we provide evidence that BMP signals are required for RhoA and F-actin rearrangements, apical constriction, cell elongation and epithelial invagination. The failure of placode invagination after BMP inhibition appears to be a direct consequence of disrupted apical accumulation of RhoA and F-actin, rather than changes in cell death or proliferation. In addition, our results show that epithelial invagination and acquisition of placode-specific identities are two distinct and separable developmental processes. In summary, our results provide evidence that BMP signals promote epithelial invagination by acting upstream of the intracellular molecular machinery that drives apical constriction and cell elongation. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Tonic PKA Activity Regulates SK Channel Nanoclustering and Somatodendritic Distribution.

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    Abiraman, Krithika; Sah, Megha; Walikonis, Randall S; Lykotrafitis, George; Tzingounis, Anastasios V

    2016-06-05

    Small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels mediate a potassium conductance in the brain and are involved in synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. SK channels show a distinct subcellular localization that is crucial for their neuronal functions. However, the mechanisms that control this spatial distribution are unknown. We imaged SK channels labeled with fluorophore-tagged apamin and monitored SK channel nanoclustering at the single molecule level by combining atomic force microscopy and toxin (i.e., apamin) pharmacology. Using these two complementary approaches, we found that native SK channel distribution in pyramidal neurons, across the somatodendritic domain, depends on ongoing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) levels, strongly limiting SK channel expression at the pyramidal neuron soma. Furthermore, tonic cAMP-PKA levels also controlled whether SK channels were expressed in nanodomains as single entities or as a group of multiple channels. Our study reveals a new level of regulation of SK channels by cAMP-PKA and suggests that ion channel topography and nanoclustering might be under the control of second messenger cascades. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. German National Galileo Public Regulated Service (PRS) Testing Activities

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    Habrich, Heinz; Söhne, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    The European Global Navigation System (GNSS) Galileo is going to be established in the near future. Currently, four satellites are in place forming the In-Orbit-Testing (IOT) phase. Within the next years, the constellation will be filled. Full Operational Capability (FOC) will be reached 2019. Beside the Open Service (OS) which is comparable to other OS of existing GNSS, e.g., GPS C/A, there is a so-called Public Regulated Service (PRS) included in the IOT satellites already. The PRS will have improved robustness, i.e. robust signals which will be resistant against involuntary interferences, jamming and spoofing. The PRS signal is encrypted and there will be a restricted access to authorized users, e.g. safety and emergency services, authorities with security task, critical infrastructure organizations etc. The access to the PRS which will be controlled through a special key management will be managed and supervised within the European Union (EU) Member States (MS) by national authorities, the Competent PRS Authority (CPA). But a set of Common Minimum Standards (CMS) will define the minimum requirements applicable to each PRS participant. Nevertheless, each MS is responsible for its national key management. This presentation will inform about the testing activities for Galileo PRS in Germany. The coarse concept for the testing is explained, the schedule is outlined. Finally, the paper will formulate some expectations to the Galileo PRS, e.g. for international cooperation.

  8. Kisspeptin Regulation of Neuronal Activity throughout the Central Nervous System

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    Xinhuai Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Kisspeptin signaling at the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neuron is now relatively well characterized and established as being critical for the neural control of fertility. However, kisspeptin fibers and the kisspeptin receptor (KISS1R are detected throughout the brain suggesting that kisspeptin is involved in regulating the activity of multiple neuronal circuits. We provide here a review of kisspeptin actions on neuronal populations throughout the brain including the magnocellular oxytocin and vasopressin neurons, and cells within the arcuate nucleus, hippocampus, and amygdala. The actions of kisspeptin in these brain regions are compared to its effects upon GnRH neurons. Two major themes arise from this analysis. First, it is apparent that kisspeptin signaling through KISS1R at the GnRH neuron is a unique, extremely potent form or neurotransmission whereas kisspeptin actions through KISS1R in other brain regions exhibit neuromodulatory actions typical of other neuropeptides. Second, it is becoming increasingly likely that kisspeptin acts as a neuromodulator not only through KISS1R but also through other RFamide receptors such as the neuropeptide FF receptors (NPFFRs. We suggest likely locations of kisspeptin signaling through NPFFRs but note that only limited tools are presently available for examining kisspeptin cross-signaling within the RFamide family of neuropeptides.

  9. Synaptic activity regulates AMPA receptor trafficking through different recycling pathways

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    Zheng, Ning; Jeyifous, Okunola; Munro, Charlotte; Montgomery, Johanna M; Green, William N

    2015-01-01

    Changes in glutamatergic synaptic strength in brain are dependent on AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPAR) recycling, which is assumed to occur through a single local pathway. In this study, we present evidence that AMPAR recycling occurs through different pathways regulated by synaptic activity. Without synaptic stimulation, most AMPARs recycled in dynamin-independent endosomes containing the GTPase, Arf6. Few AMPARs recycled in dynamin-dependent endosomes labeled by transferrin receptors (TfRs). AMPAR recycling was blocked by alterations in the GTPase, TC10, which co-localized with Arf6 endosomes. TC10 mutants that reduced AMPAR recycling had no effect on increased AMPAR levels with long-term potentiation (LTP) and little effect on decreased AMPAR levels with long-term depression. However, internalized AMPAR levels in TfR-containing recycling endosomes increased after LTP, indicating increased AMPAR recycling through the dynamin-dependent pathway with synaptic plasticity. LTP-induced AMPAR endocytosis is inconsistent with local recycling as a source of increased surface receptors, suggesting AMPARs are trafficked from other sites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06878.001 PMID:25970033

  10. The neural androgen receptor: a therapeutic target for myelin repair in chronic demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Rashad; Ghoumari, Abdel M; Bielecki, Bartosz; Steibel, Jérôme; Boehm, Nelly; Liere, Philippe; Macklin, Wendy B; Kumar, Narender; Habert, René; Mhaouty-Kodja, Sakina; Tronche, François; Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Schumacher, Michael; Ghandour, M Said

    2013-01-01

    Myelin regeneration is a major therapeutic goal in demyelinating diseases, and the failure to remyelinate rapidly has profound consequences for the health of axons and for brain function. However, there is no efficient treatment for stimulating myelin repair, and current therapies are limited to anti-inflammatory agents. Males are less likely to develop multiple sclerosis than females, but often have a more severe disease course and reach disability milestones at an earlier age than females, and these observations have spurred interest in the potential protective effects of androgens. Here, we demonstrate that testosterone treatment efficiently stimulates the formation of new myelin and reverses myelin damage in chronic demyelinated brain lesions, resulting from the long-term administration of cuprizone, which is toxic for oligodendrocytes. In addition to the strong effect of testosterone on myelin repair, the number of activated astrocytes and microglial cells returned to low control levels, indicating a reduction of neuroinflammatory responses. We also identify the neural androgen receptor as a novel therapeutic target for myelin recovery. After the acute demyelination of cerebellar slices in organotypic culture, the remyelinating actions of testosterone could be mimicked by 5α-dihydrotestosterone, a metabolite that is not converted to oestrogens, and blocked by the androgen receptor antagonist flutamide. Testosterone treatment also failed to promote remyelination after chronic cuprizone-induced demyelination in mice with a non-functional androgen receptor. Importantly, testosterone did not stimulate the formation of new myelin sheaths after specific knockout of the androgen receptor in neurons and macroglial cells. Thus, the neural brain androgen receptor is required for the remyelination effect of testosterone, whereas the presence of the receptor in microglia and in peripheral tissues is not sufficient to enhance remyelination. The potent synthetic

  11. c-MYC-Induced Sebaceous Gland Differentiation Is Controlled by an Androgen Receptor/p53 Axis

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    Denny L. Cottle

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the sebaceous gland (SG plays an important role in skin function, the mechanisms regulating SG differentiation and carcinoma formation are poorly understood. We previously reported that c-MYC overexpression stimulates SG differentiation. We now demonstrate roles for the androgen receptor (AR and p53. MYC-induced SG differentiation was reduced in mice lacking a functional AR. High levels of MYC triggered a p53-dependent DNA damage response, leading to accumulation of proliferative SG progenitors and inhibition of AR signaling. Conversely, testosterone treatment or p53 deletion activated AR signaling and restored MYC-induced differentiation. Poorly differentiated human sebaceous carcinomas exhibited high p53 and low AR expression. Thus, the consequences of overactivating MYC in the SG depend on whether AR or p53 is activated, as they form a regulatory axis controlling proliferation and differentiation.

  12. Equol inhibits prostate cancer growth through degradation of androgen receptor by S-phase kinase-associated protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itsumi, Momoe; Shiota, Masaki; Takeuchi, Ario; Kashiwagi, Eiji; Inokuchi, Junichi; Tatsugami, Katsunori; Kajioka, Shunichi; Uchiumi, Takeshi; Naito, Seiji; Eto, Masatoshi; Yokomizo, Akira

    2016-07-01

    Chemopreventive and potential therapeutic effects of soy isoflavones have been shown to be effective in numerous preclinical studies as well as clinical studies in prostate cancer. Although the inhibition of androgen receptor signaling has been supposed as one mechanism underlying their effects, the precise mechanism of androgen receptor inhibition remains unclear. Thus, this study aimed to clarify their mechanism. Among soy isoflavones, equol suppressed androgen receptor as well as prostate-specific antigen expression most potently in androgen-dependent LNCaP cells. However, the inhibitory effect on androgen receptor expression and activity was less prominent in castration-resistant CxR and 22Rv1 cells. Consistently, cell proliferation was suppressed and cellular apoptosis was induced by equol in LNCaP cells, but less so in CxR and 22Rv1 cells. We revealed that the proteasome pathway through S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2) was responsible for androgen receptor suppression. Taken together, soy isoflavones, especially equol, appear to be promising as chemopreventive and therapeutic agents for prostate cancer based on the fact that equol augments Skp2-mediated androgen receptor degradation. Moreover, because Skp2 expression was indicated to be crucial for the effect of soy isoflavones, soy isoflavones may be applicable for precancerous and cancerous prostates. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  13. Adoption Activities on the Internet: A Call for Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roby, Jini L.; White, Holly

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing practice of adoption services on the Internet with varying degrees of regulation, depending on whether it is domestic infant adoption, public foster care adoption, or international adoption. Regulation is particularly lacking in domestic infant adoptions, with Web sites connecting prospective birth and adoptive parents,…

  14. Brain connectivity aberrations in anabolic-androgenic steroid users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars T. Westlye

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustained anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS use has adverse behavioral consequences, including aggression, violence and impulsivity. Candidate mechanisms include disruptions of brain networks with high concentrations of androgen receptors and critically involved in emotional and cognitive regulation. Here, we tested the effects of AAS on resting-state functional brain connectivity in the largest sample of AAS-users to date. We collected resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data from 151 males engaged in heavy resistance strength training. 50 users tested positive for AAS based on the testosterone to epitestosterone (T/E ratio and doping substances in urine. 16 previous users and 59 controls tested negative. We estimated brain network nodes and their time-series using ICA and dual regression and defined connectivity matrices as the between-node partial correlations. In line with the emotional and behavioral consequences of AAS, current users exhibited reduced functional connectivity between key nodes involved in emotional and cognitive regulation, in particular reduced connectivity between the amygdala and default-mode network (DMN and between the dorsal attention network (DAN and a frontal node encompassing the superior and inferior frontal gyri (SFG/IFG and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, with further reductions as a function of dependency, lifetime exposure, and cycle state (on/off.

  15. Targeting a Single Alternative Polyadenylation Site Coordinately Blocks Expression of Androgen Receptor mRNA Splice Variants in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Etten, Jamie L; Nyquist, Michael; Li, Yingming; Yang, Rendong; Ho, Yeung; Johnson, Rachel; Ondigi, Olivia; Voytas, Daniel F; Henzler, Christine; Dehm, Scott M

    2017-10-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of male cancer deaths due to disease progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Androgen receptor (AR) splice variants including AR-V7 function as constitutively active transcription factors in CRPC cells, thereby promoting resistance to AR-targeted therapies. To date, there are no AR variant-specific treatments for CRPC. Here we report that the splicing of AR variants AR-V7 as well as AR-V1 and AR-V9 is regulated coordinately by a single polyadenylation signal in AR intron 3. Blocking this signal with morpholino technology or silencing of the polyadenylation factor CPSF1 caused a splice switch that inhibited expression of AR variants and blocked androgen-independent growth of CRPC cells. Our findings support the development of new therapies targeting the polyadenylation signal in AR intron 3 as a strategy to prevent expression of a broad array of AR variants in CRPC. Cancer Res; 77(19); 5228-35. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Structural features discriminate androgen receptor N/C terminal and coactivator interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askew, Emily B; Minges, John T; Hnat, Andrew T; Wilson, Elizabeth M

    2012-01-30

    Human androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity involves interdomain and coactivator interactions with the agonist-bound AR ligand binding domain (LBD). Structural determinants of the AR NH(2)- and carboxyl-terminal interaction between the AR NH(2)-terminal FXXLF motif and activation function 2 (AF2) in the LBD were shown previously by crystallography. In this report, we provide evidence for a region in AR LBD helix 12 outside the AF2 binding cleft that facilitates interactions with the FXXLF and LXXLL motifs. Mutagenesis of glutamine 902 to alanine in AR LBD helix 12 (Q902A) disrupted AR FXXLF motif binding to AF2, but enhanced coactivator LXXLL motif binding. Functional compensation for defective FXXLF motif binding by AR-Q902A was suggested by the slower dissociation rate of bound androgen. Functional importance of glutamine 902 was indicated by the charged residue germline mutation Q902R that caused partial androgen insensitivity, and a similar somatic mutation Q902K reported in prostate cancer, both of which increased the androgen dissociation rate and decreased AR transcriptional activity. High affinity equilibrium androgen binding was retained by alanine substitution mutations at Tyr-739 in AR LBD helix 5 or Lys-905 in helix 12 structurally adjacent to AF2, whereas transcriptional activity decreased and the androgen dissociation increased. Deleterious effects of these loss of function mutations were rescued by the helix stabilizing AR prostate cancer somatic mutation H874Y. Sequence NH(2)-terminal to the AR FXXLF motif contributed to the AR NH(2)- and carboxyl-terminal interaction based on greater AR-2-30 FXXLF motif peptide binding to the agonist-bound AR LBD than a shorter AR-20-30 FXXLF motif peptide. We conclude that helix 12 residues outside the AF2 binding cleft modulate AR transcriptional activity by providing flexibility to accommodate FXXLF or LXXLL motif binding. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Human minimal androgen insensitivity with normal dihydrotestosterone-binding capacity in cultured genital skin fibroblasts: evidence for an androgen-selective qualitative abnormality of the receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsky, L; Kaufman, M; Killinger, D W; Burko, B; Shatz, D; Volpé, R

    1984-09-01

    We have studied a kindred in which two parts of siblings, maternal first cousins, have a form of "minimal" androgen insensitivity that permits morphogenesis of unambiguous male external genitalia, but interferes with normal virilization at puberty. All four had gynecomastia that required reductive surgery. Apart from this common phenotype, they varied considerably in the temporal and regional aspects of their subvirilization and appreciably in their androgenic responsiveness to pharmacological doses of testosterone. The cultured genital skin fibroblasts from one set of siblings have an androgen-receptor activity with the following properties: (1) a normal maximum-binding capacity (Bmax) with 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), or the synthetic androgen, methyltrienolone (MT; R1881) as ligand; (2) a higher than normal apparent equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for DHT (0.77 nM) but not for MT; and (3) an elevated dissociation rate (k) of DHT-receptor (0.013 min-1, 37 degrees C), but not MT-receptor, complexes within intact cells. In addition, prolonged incubation with MT, but not DHT, augments the specific androgen-binding activity of the mutant cells as much as that of the controls. Normal cells yield lower values of apparent Kd for DHT (0.1-0.3 nM) after 2- than after 0.5-hr incubation (0.3-1.8 nM), and 1-hr values are intermediate. This occurs despite concurrent catabolic consumption of DHT from the medium and is considered to reflect transformation of initial, low-affinity DHT-receptor complexes to subsequent, higher-affinity states by a process that depends on time and initial ligand concentration. The mutant complexes described here can readily attain the highest state of affinity with MT, but have an impeded, variably expressed ability to do so with DHT. These findings suggest that a structural mutation at the X-linked locus that encodes the androgen-receptor protein is responsible for its androgen-selective dysfunction. Synthetic, nonhepatotoxic

  18. Termination of the Activating NK Cell Immunological Synapse Is an Active and Regulated Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netter, Petra; Anft, Moritz; Watzl, Carsten

    2017-10-01

    Cellular cytotoxicity is essential for the elimination of virus-infected and cancerous cells by NK cells. It requires a direct cellular contact through the establishment of an immunological synapse (IS) between the NK cell and the target cell. In this article, we show that not only the establishment of the IS, but also its maintenance is a highly regulated process. Ongoing receptor-proximal signaling events from activating NK cell receptors and actin dynamics were necessary to maintain a stable contact in an energy-dependent fashion, even after the IS was formed successfully. More importantly, the initiation of a contact to a new susceptible target cell resulted in accelerated detachment from an old target cell. We propose that the maintenance of an existing IS is a dynamic and regulated process to allow for effective serial killing of NK cells. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. Cognitive emotion regulation enhances aversive prediction error activity while reducing emotional responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulej Bratec, Satja; Xie, Xiyao; Schmid, Gabriele; Doll, Anselm; Schilbach, Leonhard; Zimmer, Claus; Wohlschläger, Afra; Riedl, Valentin; Sorg, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Cognitive emotion regulation is a powerful way of modulating emotional responses. However, despite the vital role of emotions in learning, it is unknown whether the effect of cognitive emotion regulation also extends to the modulation of learning. Computational models indicate prediction error activity, typically observed in the striatum and ventral tegmental area, as a critical neural mechanism involved in associative learning. We used model-based fMRI during aversive conditioning with and without cognitive emotion regulation to test the hypothesis that emotion regulation would affect prediction error-related neural activity in the striatum and ventral tegmental area, reflecting an emotion regulation-related modulation of learning. Our results show that cognitive emotion regulation reduced emotion-related brain activity, but increased prediction error-related activity in a network involving ventral tegmental area, hippocampus, insula and ventral striatum. While the reduction of response activity was related to behavioral measures of emotion regulation success, the enhancement of prediction error-related neural activity was related to learning performance. Furthermore, functional connectivity between the ventral tegmental area and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, an area involved in regulation, was specifically increased during emotion regulation and likewise related to learning performance. Our data, therefore, provide first-time evidence that beyond reducing emotional responses, cognitive emotion regulation affects learning by enhancing prediction error-related activity, potentially via tegmental dopaminergic pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 15 CFR 922.193 - Prohibited or otherwise regulated activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., seizure or disposition of seized property in connection with enforcement of the Act or any regulations... an emergency threatening life or the environment. (d) The prohibitions in paragraphs (a) (1) through...

  1. Galectin-3 Regulates Myofibroblast Activation and Hepatic Fibrosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neil C. Henderson; Alison C. Mackinnon; Sarah L. Farnworth; Francoise Poirier; Francesco P. Russo; John P. Iredale; Christopher Haslett; Kenneth J. Simpson; Tariq Sethi

    2006-01-01

    .... We demonstrate that Galectin-3 expression is up-regulated in established human fibrotic liver disease and is temporally and spatially related to the induction and resolution of experimental hepatic fibrosis...

  2. Flipped Classroom with Problem Based Activities: Exploring Self-Regulated Learning in a Programming Language Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakiroglu, Ünal; Öztürk, Mücahit

    2017-01-01

    This study intended to explore the development of self-regulation in a flipped classroom setting. Problem based learning activities were carried out in flipped classrooms to promote self-regulation. A total of 30 undergraduate students from Mechatronic department participated in the study. Self-regulation skills were discussed through students'…

  3. Anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, Andrea; Iaquinto, Gaetano; Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    The objectives were to assess the beneficial and harmful effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease.......The objectives were to assess the beneficial and harmful effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease....

  4. Performance of the Androgen Deficiency in Aging Male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    related decline in androgens that naturally accompanies the ageing process.3,4. Androgen deficiency is known to be associated with several adverse consequences including sexual disorders, mood changes (irritability and depression), ...

  5. Performance of the Androgen Deficiency in Aging Male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Performance of the Androgen Deficiency in Aging Male questionnaire for the clinical detection of androgen deficiency in black sub-Saharan African men with Type-2 diabetes mellitus. Theophilus E. Ugwu, Rosemary T. Ikem ...

  6. Three novel and two known androgen receptor gene mutations ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BALACHANDRAN SARANYA

    Three novel and two known androgen receptor gene mutations associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome in sex-reversed XY female patients. BALACHANDRAN SARANYA1, GUNASEKARAN BHAVANI1, BRINDHA ARUMUGAM1,. MEENA JAYASHANKAR2 and SATHIYAVEDU THYAGARAJAN SANTHIYA1∗.

  7. Differential effects of genistein on prostate cancer cells depend on mutational status of the androgen receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer M Mahmoud

    Full Text Available Blocking the androgen receptor (AR activity is the main goal of therapies for advanced prostate cancer (PCa. However, relapse with a more aggressive, hormone refractory PCa arises, which harbors restored AR activity. One mechanism of such reactivation occurs through acquisition of AR mutations that enable its activation by various steroidal and non-steroidal structures. Thus, natural and chemical compounds that contribute to inappropriate (androgen-independent activation of the AR become an area of intensive research. Here, we demonstrate that genistein, a soy phytoestrogen binds to both the wild and the Thr877Ala (T877A mutant types of AR competitively with androgen, nevertheless, it exerts a pleiotropic effect on PCa cell proliferation and AR activity depending on the mutational status of the AR. Genistein inhibited, in a dose-dependent way, cell proliferation and AR nuclear localization and expression in LAPC-4 cells that have wild AR. However, in LNCaP cells that express the T877A mutant AR, genistein induced a biphasic effect where physiological doses (0.5-5 µmol/L stimulated cell growth and increased AR expression and transcriptional activity, and higher doses induced inhibitory effects. Similar biphasic results were achieved in PC-3 cells transfected with AR mutants; T877A, W741C and H874Y. These findings suggest that genistein, at physiological concentrations, potentially act as an agonist and activate the mutant AR that can be present in advanced PCa after androgen ablation therapy.

  8. Androgen therapy and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K-CY McGrath

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available K-CY McGrath1, LS McRobb1,2, AK Heather1,21Heart Research Institute, Camperdown, NSW, Australia; 2Discipline of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Cardiovascular disease (CVD remains the leading cause of death in Western society today. There is a striking gender difference in CVD with men predisposed to earlier onset and more severe disease. Following the recent reevaluation and ongoing debate regarding the estrogen protection hypothesis, and given that androgen use and abuse is increasing in our society, the alternate view that androgens may promote CVD in men is assuming increasing importance. Whether androgens adversely affect CVD in either men or women remains a contentious issue within both the cardiovascular and endocrinological fraternities. This review draws from basic science, animal and clinical studies to outline our current understanding regarding androgen effects on atherosclerosis, the major CVD, and asks where future directions of atherosclerosis-related androgen research may lie.

  9. Nitric oxide regulates neuronal activity via calcium-activated potassium channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ray Zhong

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is an unconventional membrane-permeable messenger molecule that has been shown to play various roles in the nervous system. How NO modulates ion channels to affect neuronal functions is not well understood. In gastropods, NO has been implicated in regulating the feeding motor program. The buccal motoneuron, B19, of the freshwater pond snail Helisoma trivolvis is active during the hyper-retraction phase of the feeding motor program and is located in the vicinity of NO-producing neurons in the buccal ganglion. Here, we asked whether B19 neurons might serve as direct targets of NO signaling. Previous work established NO as a key regulator of growth cone motility and neuronal excitability in another buccal neuron involved in feeding, the B5 neuron. This raised the question whether NO might modulate the electrical activity and neuronal excitability of B19 neurons as well, and if so whether NO acted on the same or a different set of ion channels in both neurons. To study specific responses of NO on B19 neurons and to eliminate indirect effects contributed by other cells, the majority of experiments were performed on single cultured B19 neurons. Addition of NO donors caused a prolonged depolarization of the membrane potential and an increase in neuronal excitability. The effects of NO could mainly be attributed to the inhibition of two types of calcium-activated potassium channels, apamin-sensitive and iberiotoxin-sensitive potassium channels. NO was found to also cause a depolarization in B19 neurons in situ, but only after NO synthase activity in buccal ganglia had been blocked. The results suggest that NO acts as a critical modulator of neuronal excitability in B19 neurons, and that calcium-activated potassium channels may serve as a common target of NO in neurons.

  10. Melatonin Regulates the Synthesis of Steroid Hormones on Male Reproduction: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Yu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is a ubiquitous molecule and exhibits different effects in long-day and short-day breeding animals. Testosterone, the main resource of androgens in the testis, is produced by Leydig cells but regulated mainly by cytokine secreted by Sertoli cells. Melatonin acts as a local modulator of the endocrine activity in Leydig cells. In Sertoli cells, melatonin influences cellular proliferation and energy metabolism and, consequently, can regulate steroidogenesis. These suggest melatonin as a key player in the regulation of steroidogenesis. However, the melatonin-induced regulation of steroid hormones may differ among species, and the literature data indicate that melatonin has important effects on steroidogenesis and male reproduction.

  11. Assessment of the analgesic dipyrone as a possible (anti)androgenic endocrine disruptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passoni, Marcella Tapias; Kristensen, Maja Nørgaard; Morais, Rosana Nogueira; Woitkowiak, Claudia; Boareto, Ana Claudia; da Silva Amaral, Bruna Andreotti; Grechi, Nicole; Dalsenter, Paulo Roberto; Munkboel, Cecilie Hurup; Styrishave, Bjarne; Kristensen, David Møbjerg; Gomes, Caroline; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Martino-Andrade, Anderson Joel

    2017-12-28

    Mild analgesics have been associated with antiandrogenic effects, but there are no such studies on dipyrone, despite its high prevalence of use in many countries. We examined the production of steroid hormones in human H295R cells after exposure to dipyrone and two metabolites, 4-Methylaminoantipyrine (MAA) and 4-Aminoantipyrine (AA), as well as fetal testicular testosterone production in rats following maternal dipyrone exposure. Androgen agonistic/antagonistic effects were examined in vitro for dipyrone and its metabolites in the Yeast Androgen Screen (YAS) assay and in vivo for dipyrone through the Hershberger assay. In vitro we tested dipyrone, MAA, and AA (0.1-1000 μM) while in vivo we used dipyrone (50, 100, 200 mg/kg/day). In the H295R assay, dipyrone, MAA and AA reduced the production of androgens and corticosteroids. Testosterone was reduced at concentrations 4-13 times higher than the maximum plasma concentrations reported in humans for MAA and AA. No effects were observed in the fetal testosterone production assay. In the YAS and Hershberger assays, no androgen agonistic/antagonistic activities were observed. These results indicate that dipyrone and its metabolites do not interact with the androgen receptor, but have the potential to inhibit steroidogenesis, however only at concentrations that are not relevant under normal medical use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Targeting the androgen receptor in triple-negative breast cancer: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina A

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Alain Mina,1 Rachel Yoder,2 Priyanka Sharma1 1Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Westwood, 2University of Kansas Cancer Center, Kansas City, KS, USA Abstract: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is an aggressive subtype associated with frequent recurrence and metastasis. Unlike hormone receptor-positive subtypes, treatment of TNBC is currently limited by the lack of clinically available targeted therapies. Androgen signaling is necessary for normal breast development, and its dysregulation has been implicated in breast tumorigenesis. In recent years, gene expression studies have identified a subset of TNBC that is enriched for androgen receptor (AR signaling. Interference with androgen signaling in TNBC is promising, and AR-inhibiting drugs have shown antitumorigenic activity in preclinical and proof of concept clinical studies. Recent advances in our understanding of androgenic signaling in TNBC, along with the identification of interacting pathways, are allowing development of the next generation of clinical trials with AR inhibitors. As novel AR-targeting agents are developed and evaluated in clinical trials, it is equally important to establish a robust set of biomarkers for identification of TNBC tumors that are most likely to respond to AR inhibition. Keywords: triple-negative breast cancer, androgen signaling, targeted therapy, biomarkers, prognosis 

  13. Miro1 Regulates Activity-Driven Positioning of Mitochondria within Astrocytic Processes Apposed to Synapses to Regulate Intracellular Calcium Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Terri-Leigh; Higgs, Nathalie F.; Sheehan, David F.; Al Awabdh, Sana; López-Doménech, Guillermo; Arancibia-Carcamo, I. Lorena

    2015-01-01

    It is fast emerging that maintaining mitochondrial function is important for regulating astrocyte function, although the specific mechanisms that govern astrocyte mitochondrial trafficking and positioning remain poorly understood. The mitochondrial Rho-GTPase 1 protein (Miro1) regulates mitochondrial trafficking and detachment from the microtubule transport network to control activity-dependent mitochondrial positioning in neurons. However, whether Miro proteins are important for regulating signaling-dependent mitochondrial dynamics in astrocytic processes remains unclear. Using live-cell confocal microscopy of rat organotypic hippocampal slices, we find that enhancing neuronal activity induces transient mitochondrial remodeling in astrocytes, with a concomitant, transient reduction in mitochondrial trafficking, mediated by elevations in intracellular Ca2+. Stimulating neuronal activity also induced mitochondrial confinement within astrocytic processes in close proximity to synapses. Furthermore, we show that the Ca2+-sensing EF-hand domains of Miro1 are important for regulating mitochondrial trafficking in astrocytes and required for activity-driven mitochondrial confinement near synapses. Additionally, activity-dependent mitochondrial positioning by Miro1 reciprocally regulates the levels of intracellular Ca2+ in astrocytic processes. Thus, the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ signaling, dependent on Miro1-mediated mitochondrial positioning, could have important consequences for astrocyte Ca2+ wave propagation, gliotransmission, and ultimately neuronal function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Mitochondria are key cellular organelles that play important roles in providing cellular energy and buffering intracellular calcium ions. The mechanisms that control mitochondrial distribution within the processes of glial cells called astrocytes and the impact this may have on calcium signaling remains unclear. We show that activation of glutamate receptors or increased neuronal

  14. Ventromedial hypothalamic melanocortin receptor activation: regulation of activity energy expenditure and skeletal muscle thermogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavini, Chaitanya K; Jones, William C; Novak, Colleen M

    2016-09-15

    The ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) and the central melanocortin system both play vital roles in regulating energy balance by modulating energy intake and utilization. Recent evidence suggests that activation of the VMH alters skeletal muscle metabolism. We show that intra-VMH melanocortin receptor activation increases energy expenditure and physical activity, switches fuel utilization to fats, and lowers work efficiency such that excess calories are dissipated by skeletal muscle as heat. We also show that intra-VMH melanocortin receptor activation increases sympathetic nervous system outflow to skeletal muscle. Intra-VMH melanocortin receptor activation also induced significant changes in the expression of mediators of energy expenditure in muscle. These results support the role of melanocortin receptors in the VMH in the modulation of skeletal muscle metabolism. The ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) and the brain melanocortin system both play vital roles in increasing energy expenditure (EE) and physical activity, decreasing appetite and modulating sympathetic nervous system (SNS) outflow. Because of recent evidence showing that VMH activation modulates skeletal muscle metabolism, we propose the existence of an axis between the VMH and skeletal muscle, modulated by brain melanocortins, modelled on the brain control of brown adipose tissue. Activation of melanocortin receptors in the VMH of rats using a non-specific agonist melanotan II (MTII), compared to vehicle, increased oxygen consumption and EE and decreased the respiratory exchange ratio. Intra-VMH MTII enhanced activity-related EE even when activity levels were held constant. MTII treatment increased gastrocnemius muscle heat dissipation during controlled activity, as well as in the home cage. Compared to vehicle-treated rats, rats with intra-VMH melanocortin receptor activation had higher skeletal muscle norepinephrine turnover, indicating an increased SNS drive to muscle. Lastly, intra-VMH MTII induced m

  15. Regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase by LKB1 and CaMKK in adipocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gormand, Amélie; Henriksson, Emma; Ström, Kristoffer

    2011-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine kinase that regulates cellular and whole body energy homeostasis. In adipose tissue, activation of AMPK has been demonstrated in response to a variety of extracellular stimuli. However, the upstream kinase that activates AMPK in adipocytes...... of phenformin. In addition, we demonstrate the existence of a Ca(2+) /CaMKK signaling pathway that can also regulate the activity of AMPK in adipocytes....

  16. Dehydroepiandrosterone therapy as female androgen replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, Erin; Guay, André

    2006-04-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is an abundant circulating androgen precursor preferentially produced by the adrenal glands. DHEA has been shown to exert its effects via downstream conversion to sex steroid hormones, neuromodulation, improvement in endothelial cell function, and possibly by acting on a cell membrane-bound receptor. Low levels of circulating DHEA have been demonstrated in women with diminished libido and other symptoms of sexual dysfunction. DHEA deficiency has also been associated with various drugs, and endocrine, nonhormonal, and age-related disorders. DHEA supplementation has been shown to produce beneficial effects in women with adrenal insufficiency. However, DHEA supplementation in healthy euadrenal subjects (including premenopausal and postmenopausal women with androgen insufficiency) is controversial; studies have yielded conflicting results regarding its beneficial effects on sexual function, metabolism, and overall well-being. Further research is needed to better elucidate the efficacy and safety of DHEA supplementation for the treatment of androgen insufficiency in women.

  17. The Volume Activated Potassium Channel KCNK5 is Up-Regulated in Activated Human T Cells, but Volume Regulation is Impaired

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe S. Kirkegaard

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The potential role of the two-pore domain potassium channel KCNK5 (also known as TASK-2 and K2P5.1 in activated T cell physiology has only recently been described. So far KCNK5 has been described to be up-regulated in T cells in multiple sclerosis patients and to be implicated in the volume regulatory mechanism regulatory volume decrease (RVD in T cells. Methods: We investigated the time-dependent expression pattern of KCNK5 in CD3/CD28 activated human T cells using qPCR and Western blotting and its role in RVD using a Coulter Counter. Results: KCNK5 is highly up-regulated in CD3/CD28 activated T cells both at mRNA (after 24 h and protein level (72 and 144 h, but despite this up-regulation the RVD response is inhibited. Furthermore, the swelling-activated Cl- permeability in activated T cells is strongly decreased, and the RVD inhibition is predominantly due to the decreased Cl- permeability. Conclusion: The up-regulated KCNK5 in activated human T cells does not play a volume regulatory role, due to decreased Cl- permeability. We speculate that the KCNK5 up-regulation might play a role in hyperpolarization of the cell membrane leading to increased Ca2+ influx and proliferation of T cells.

  18. Physical Activity, Self-Regulation, and Early Academic Achievement in Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Derek R.; McClelland, Megan M.; Loprinzi, Paul; Trost, Stewart G.

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: The present study investigated whether active play during recess was associated with self-regulation and academic achievement in a prekindergarten sample. A total of 51 children in classes containing approximately half Head Start children were assessed on self-regulation, active play, and early academic achievement. Path…

  19. Self-Regulated Learning and Perceived Health among University Students Participating in Physical Activity Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Ron E.; Altunsöz, Irmak Hürmeriç; Su, Xiaoxia; Xiang, Ping; Demirhan, Giyasettin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore motivational indicators of self-regulated learning (SRL) and the relationship between self-regulation (SR) and perceived health among university students enrolled in physical activity (PA) classes. One hundred thirty-one Turkish students participating in physical education activity classes at two…

  20. 26 CFR 1.145-2 - Application of private activity bond regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of the private business use test and the private security or payment test mean “5 percent” and “net... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Application of private activity bond regulations... Bonds § 1.145-2 Application of private activity bond regulations. (a) In general. Except as provided in...

  1. The State Regulation of Innovation Activity at the Present Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qoqiauri Lamara G.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the necessity of state regulation in the field of development of innovations and technologies at the present stage. The main directions of the state innovation policies in developed countries of the world are studied and analyzed. Special attention is paid to the objectives of the national strategy for development of science and innovations and to searching the ways for fulfilling this strategy. Apart from these specific problems, the work considers the issue of the state regulation and support of further introduction of innovations and increase of the so called “entrepreneurial” role of the state.

  2. Novel Uses for the Anabolic Androgenic Steroids Nandrolone and Oxandrolone in the Management of Male Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Christopher; Kovac, Jason R

    2016-10-01

    There has recently been renewed interest in novel clinical applications of the anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) testosterone and its synthetic derivatives, particularly given with the rising popularity of testosterone supplementation therapy (TST) for the treatment of male hypogonadism. In this manuscript, we provide a brief review of the history of AAS and discuss clinical applications of two of the more well-known AAS: nandrolone and oxandrolone. Both agents exhibit favorable myotrophic/androgenic ratios and have been investigated for effectiveness in numerous disease states. We also provide a brief synopsis of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) and postulate how these orally active, non-aromatizing, tissue-selective agents might be used in contemporary andrology. Currently, the applications of testosterone alternatives in hypogonadism are limited. However, it is tempting to speculate that these agents may one day become accepted as alternatives, or adjuncts, to the treatment of male hypogonadism.

  3. Efficacy of platelet-rich plasma in treatment of androgenic alopecia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Singhal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP has shown remarkable beneficial effects without any major adverse reactions in the treatment of androgenic alopecia. The growth factors in activated autologous PRP induce the proliferation of dermal papilla cells. Objectives: The objective was to investigate the clinical efficacy of PRP in treatment of androgenic alopecia. Materials and Methods: Ten patients were given autologous PRP injections on the affected area of alopecia over a period of 3 months at interval of 2-3 weeks and results were assessed. Results: Three months after the treatment, the patients presented clinical improvement in the hair counts, hair thickness, hair root strength, and overall alopecia. Conclusion: PRP appears to be a cheap, effective, and promising therapy for androgenic alopecia with no major adverse effects.

  4. New Insights into the Androgen-Targeted Therapies and Epigenetic Therapies in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit M. Godbole

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the United States, and it is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in American men. The androgen receptor (AR, a receptor of nuclear family and a transcription factor, is the most important target in this disease. While most efforts in the clinic are currently directed at lowering levels of androgens that activate AR, resistance to androgen deprivation eventually develops. Most prostate cancer deaths are attributable to this castration-resistant form of prostate cancer (CRPC. Recent work has shed light on the importance of epigenetic events including facilitation of AR signaling by histone-modifying enzymes, posttranslational modifications of AR such as sumoylation. Herein, we provide an overview of the structure of human AR and its key structural domains that can be used as targets to develop novel antiandrogens. We also summarize recent findings about the antiandrogens and the epigenetic factors that modulate the action of AR.

  5. Androgen receptor disorder in three brothers with bifid prepenile scrotum and hypospadias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bals-Pratsch, M; Schweikert, H U; Nieschlag, E

    1990-09-01

    Three brothers with congenital transposition of the penis, scrotal hypospadias, bifid scrotum, and bilateral undescended testes are described. Further signs of incomplete virilization, but no gynecomastia were seen. LH and FSH were elevated, whereas testosterone levels were reduced or in the normal range. Serum concentrations of 17-hydroxyprogesterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, androstenedione, 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone and estradiol measured in two affected brothers were in the normal range. Fibroblasts from scrotal skin biopsies performed in two patients showed normal 5 alpha-reductase activity (419 and 214 pmol.(mg protein)-1.h-1; normal greater than 1), whereas androgen receptors had reduced maximal binding capacity (Bmax 4 and 14 fmol.(mg protein)-1; normal greater than 18) and an increased equilibrium dissociation constant (0.7 and 1.26 nmol/l: normal 0.2 +/- 0.08) indicating a quantitative and qualitative androgen receptor defect. These patients represent a further variant of androgen insensitivity.

  6. Targeting androgen-independent pathways: new chances for patients with prostate cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattrini, C; Zanardi, E; Vallome, G; Cavo, A; Cerbone, L; Di Meglio, A; Fabbroni, C; Latocca, M M; Rizzo, F; Messina, C; Rubagotti, A; Barboro, P; Boccardo, F

    2017-10-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the mainstay treatment for advanced prostate cancer (PC). Most patients eventually progress to a condition known as castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), characterized by lack of response to ADT. Although new androgen receptor signaling (ARS) inhibitors and chemotherapeutic agents have been introduced to overcome resistance to ADT, many patients progress because of primary or acquired resistance to these a