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Sample records for regulates nhej repair

  1. ErbB2 regulates NHEJ repair pathway by affecting erbB1-triggered IR-induced Akt activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toulany, Mahmoud; Peter Rodemann, H.

    2009-01-01

    We have already reported that erbBl-PI3K-AKT signaling is an important pathway in regulating radiation sensitivity and DNA double strand break repair of human tumor cells. In the present study using small interfering RNA and pharmacological inhibitors in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines we investigated the role of Aktl on radiation-induced DNA-PKcs activity and DNA-double strand break (DNA-DSB) repair. Likewise, the function of erbB2 as hetrodimerization partner of erbBl in radiation-induced Akt activity and regulation of DNA-dsb repair through DNA-PKcs was evaluated. In A549 and H460 transfected with AKTl-siRNA radiation-induced phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs the key enzyme regulating NHEJ repair pathway was markedly inhibited. In both cell lines downregulation of Aktl led to a significant enhancement of residual DNA-DSB, i.e. impaired DNA-DSB repair. Interestingly, in cells transfected with DNA-PKcs-siRNA a lack of effect of AKTl-siRNA on enhancement of residual DNA-DSBs was observed. This results indicate that Aktl regulates NHEJ repair in a DNA-PKcs dependent manner

  2. Role of XRCC4 phosphorylation by DNA-PK in the regulation of NHEJ repair pathway of DNA double strand break

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Imamichi, Shoji; Fukuchi, Mikoto; Kamdar, Radhika P.; Sicheng, Liu; Wanotayan, Rujira; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the predominant pathway of DNA double strand breaks in higher eukaryotes and is active throughout the cell cycle. NHEJ repair includes many factors as Ku70/86, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4-Ligase IV complex and XLF (also known as Cernunnos). In these factors, DNA-PKcs acts as central regulator in NHEJ repair. It recruited at the DNA damages site after DNA damage and after association with Ku its kinase activity is activated. It phosphorylates many of important NHEJ proteins in vitro including XRCC4, Ku 70/86, Artemis, and even DNA-PKcs but till now, very less studies have been done to know the role and significance of phosphorylation in the NHEJ repair. Studies by other researchers identified various phosphorylation sites in XRCC4 by DNA-PK using mass spectrometry but these phosphorylation sites were shown to be dispensable for DSB repair. In the present investigation, we identified 3 serine and one new threonine phosphorylation sites in XRCC4 protein by DNA-PK. In vivo phosphorylation at these sites was verified by generating phosphorylation specific antibodies and the requirement for DNA-PK therein was verified by using DNA-PK inhibitor and DNA-PK proficient and deficient cell lines in response to radiation and zeocin treatment. We have also found that phosphorylation at these sites showed dose dependency in response to radiation treatment. The two serine and one threonine phosphorylation site is also biological important as their mutation into alanine significantly elevated radiosensitivity as measured by colony formation assay. Neutral comet assay showed delayed kinetics in DSB repair of these mutants. Furthermore, we have found a protein, with putative DSB repair function, which interacts with domain including the phosphorylation sites.These results indicate that these phosphorylation sites would mediate functional link between XRCC4 and DNA-PK. (author)

  3. DNA Repair Network Analysis Reveals Shieldin as a Key Regulator of NHEJ and PARP Inhibitor Sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Rajat; Somyajit, Kumar; Narita, Takeo

    2018-01-01

    Repair of damaged DNA is essential for maintaining genome integrity and for preventing genome-instability-associated diseases, such as cancer. By combining proximity labeling with quantitative mass spectrometry, we generated high-resolution interaction neighborhood maps of the endogenously expres...... and the evolution of antibody CSR in higher vertebrates....

  4. Cadmium delays non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair via inhibition of DNA-PKcs phosphorylation and downregulation of XRCC4 and Ligase IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Weiwei; Gu, Xueyan; Zhang, Xiaoning; Kong, Jinxin [Gansu Key Laboratory of Biomonitoring and Bioremediation for Environmental Pollution, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Ding, Nan [Gansu Key laboratory of Space Radiobiology, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Qi, Yongmei; Zhang, Yingmei [Gansu Key Laboratory of Biomonitoring and Bioremediation for Environmental Pollution, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang, Jufang [Gansu Key laboratory of Space Radiobiology, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Huang, Dejun, E-mail: huangdj@lzu.edu.cn [Gansu Key Laboratory of Biomonitoring and Bioremediation for Environmental Pollution, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Cadmium (Cd) exposure delayed the repair of DNA damage induced by X-ray. • Cd exposure altered the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs on Thr-2609 and Ser-2056 sites. • Cd impaired the formation of XRCC4 and Ligase IV foci, and down-regulated their protein expression. • Zinc mitigated the effects of Cd on DDR by regulating pDNA-PKcs (Thr-2609), XRCC4 and Ligase IV. - Abstract: Although studies have shown that cadmium (Cd) interfered with DNA damage repair (DDR), whether Cd could affect non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair remains elusive. To further understand the effect of Cd on DDR, we used X-ray irradiation of Hela cells as an in vitro model system, along with γH2AX and 53BP1 as markers for DNA damage. Results showed that X-ray significantly increased γH2AX and 53BP1 foci in Hela cells (p < 0.01), all of which are characteristic of accrued DNA damage. The number of foci declined rapidly over time (1–8 h postirradiation), indicating an initiation of NHEJ process. However, the disappearance of γH2AX and 53BP1 foci was remarkably slowed by Cd pretreatment (p < 0.01), suggesting that Cd reduced the efficiency of NHEJ. To further elucidate the mechanisms of Cd toxicity, several markers of NHEJ pathway including Ku70, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4 and Ligase IV were examined. Our data showed that Cd altered the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs, and reduced the expression of both XRCC4 and Ligase IV in irradiated cells. These observations are indicative of the impairment of NHEJ-dependent DNA repair pathways. In addition, zinc (Zn) mitigated the effects of Cd on NHEJ, suggesting that the Cd-induced NHEJ alteration may partly result from the displacement of Zn or from an interference with the normal function of Zn-containing proteins by Cd. Our findings provide a new insight into the toxicity of Cd on NHEJ repair and its underlying mechanisms in human cells.

  5. Domain structure of a NHEJ DNA repair ligase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Robert S; Tonkin, Louise M; Green, Andrew J; Doherty, Aidan J

    2005-08-19

    A prokaryotic non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) system for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), composed of a Ku homodimer (Mt-Ku) and a multidomain multifunctional ATP-dependent DNA ligase (Mt-Lig), has been described recently in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mt-Lig exhibits polymerase and nuclease activity in addition to DNA ligation activity. These functions were ascribed to putative polymerase, nuclease and ligase domains that together constitute a monomeric protein. Here, the separate polymerase, nuclease and ligase domains of Mt-Lig were cloned individually, over-expressed and the soluble proteins purified to homogeneity. The polymerase domain demonstrated DNA-dependent RNA primase activity, catalysing the synthesis of unprimed oligoribonucleotides on single-stranded DNA templates. The polymerase domain can also extend DNA in a template-dependent manner. This activity was eliminated when the catalytic aspartate residues were replaced with alanine. The ligase domain catalysed the sealing of nicked double-stranded DNA designed to mimic a DSB, consistent with the role of Mt-Lig in NHEJ. Deletion of the active-site lysine residue prevented the formation of an adenylated ligase complex and consequently thwarted ligation. The nuclease domain did not function independently as a 3'-5' exonuclease. DNA-binding assays revealed that both the polymerase and ligase domains bind DNA in vitro, the latter with considerably higher affinity. Mt-Ku directly stimulated the polymerase and nuclease activities of Mt-Lig. The polymerase domain bound Mt-Ku in vitro, suggesting it may recruit Mt-Lig to Ku-bound DNA in vivo. Consistent with these data, Mt-Ku stimulated the primer extension activity of the polymerase domain, suggestive of a functional interaction relevant to NHEJ-mediated DSB repair processes.

  6. The indirect effect of radiation reduces the repair fidelity of NHEJ as verified in repair deficient CHO cell lines exposed to different radiation qualities and potassium bromate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajinskis, Ainars; Olsson, Gunilla; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation is mainly dependent on radiation quality, where the indirect action of radiation may contribute to different extent depending on the type of radiation under study. The effect of indirect action of radiation can be investigated by using agents that induce oxidative DNA damage or by applying free radical scavengers. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the indirect effect of radiation for the repair fidelity of non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), homologous recombination repair (HRR) and base excision repair (BER) when DNA damage of different complexity was induced by gamma radiation, alpha particles or from base damages (8-oxo-dG) induced by potassium bromate (KBrO 3 ). CHO cells lines deficient in XRCC3 (HRR) irs1SF, XRCC7 (NHEJ) V3-3 and XRCC1 (BER) EM9 were irradiated in the absence or presence of the free radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The endpoints investigated included rate of cell proliferation by the DRAG assay, clonogenic cell survival and the level of primary DNA damage by the comet assay. The results revealed that the indirect effect of low-LET radiation significantly reduced the repair fidelity of both NHEJ and HRR pathways. For high-LET radiation the indirect effect of radiation also significantly reduced the repair fidelity for the repair deficient cell lines. The results suggest further that the repair fidelity of the error prone NHEJ repair pathway is more impaired by the indirect effect of high-LET radiation relative to the other repair pathways studied. The response to bromate observed for the two DSB repair deficient cell lines strongly support earlier studies that bromate induces complex DNA damages. The significantly reduced repair fidelity of irs1SF and V3-3 suggests that NHEJ as well as HRR are needed for the repair, and that complex DSBs are formed after bromate exposure.

  7. The indirect effect of radiation reduces the repair fidelity of NHEJ as verified in repair deficient CHO cell lines exposed to different radiation qualities and potassium bromate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajinskis, Ainars, E-mail: ainars.bajinskis@gmt.su.se [Centre for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, S-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Olsson, Gunilla; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats [Centre for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, S-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-03-01

    The complexity of DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation is mainly dependent on radiation quality, where the indirect action of radiation may contribute to different extent depending on the type of radiation under study. The effect of indirect action of radiation can be investigated by using agents that induce oxidative DNA damage or by applying free radical scavengers. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the indirect effect of radiation for the repair fidelity of non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), homologous recombination repair (HRR) and base excision repair (BER) when DNA damage of different complexity was induced by gamma radiation, alpha particles or from base damages (8-oxo-dG) induced by potassium bromate (KBrO{sub 3}). CHO cells lines deficient in XRCC3 (HRR) irs1SF, XRCC7 (NHEJ) V3-3 and XRCC1 (BER) EM9 were irradiated in the absence or presence of the free radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The endpoints investigated included rate of cell proliferation by the DRAG assay, clonogenic cell survival and the level of primary DNA damage by the comet assay. The results revealed that the indirect effect of low-LET radiation significantly reduced the repair fidelity of both NHEJ and HRR pathways. For high-LET radiation the indirect effect of radiation also significantly reduced the repair fidelity for the repair deficient cell lines. The results suggest further that the repair fidelity of the error prone NHEJ repair pathway is more impaired by the indirect effect of high-LET radiation relative to the other repair pathways studied. The response to bromate observed for the two DSB repair deficient cell lines strongly support earlier studies that bromate induces complex DNA damages. The significantly reduced repair fidelity of irs1SF and V3-3 suggests that NHEJ as well as HRR are needed for the repair, and that complex DSBs are formed after bromate exposure.

  8. DNA double strand break repair in mammalian cells: role of MRE11 and BLM proteins at the initiation of Non Homologous End Joining (NHEJ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabarz, Anastazja

    2011-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic lesions, which can lead to genetic rearrangements. Two pathways are responsible for repairing these lesions: homologous recombination (HR) and non homologous end joining (NHEJ). In our laboratory, an intrachromosomal substrate has been established in order to measure the efficiency and the fidelity of NHEJ in living cells (Guirouilh-Barbat 2004). This approach led us to identify a KU-independent alternative pathway, which uses micro homologies in the proximity of the junction to accomplish repair - the alternative NHEJ (Guirouilh-Barbat 2004, Guirouilh-Barbat et Rass 2007). The goal of my thesis consisted in identifying and characterising major actors of this pathway. In the absence of KU, alternative NHEJ would be initiated by ssDNA resection of damaged ends. We showed that the nuclease activity of MRE11 is necessary for this mechanism. MRE11 overexpression leads to a two fold stimulation of NHEJ efficiency, while the extinction of MRE11 by siRNA results in a two fold decrease. Our results demonstrate that the proteins RAD50 and CtIP act in the same pathway as MRE11. Moreover, in cells deficient for XRCC4, MIRIN - an inhibitor of the MRN complex - leads to a decrease in repair efficiency, implicating MRE11 in alternative NHEJ. We also showed that MRE11 can act in an ATM-dependent and independent manner (Rass et Grabarz Nat Struct Mol Biol 2009). The initiation of break resection needs to be pursued by a more extensive degradation of DNA, which is accomplished in yeast by the proteins Exo1 and Sgs1/Dna2. In human cells, in vitro studies have recently proposed a similar model of a two-step break resection. We chose to elucidate the role of one of the human homologs of Sgs1 - the RecQ helicase BLM - in the resection process. Our experiments show, that he absence of BLM decreases the efficiency of end joining by NHEJ, accompanied by an increase in error-prone events, especially long-range deletions (≥200 nt). This

  9. The indirect effect of radiation reduces the repair fidelity of NHEJ as verified in repair deficient CHO cell lines exposed to different radiation qualities and potassium bromate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajinskis, Ainars; Olsson, Gunilla; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats

    2012-03-01

    The complexity of DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation is mainly dependent on radiation quality, where the indirect action of radiation may contribute to different extent depending on the type of radiation under study. The effect of indirect action of radiation can be investigated by using agents that induce oxidative DNA damage or by applying free radical scavengers. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the indirect effect of radiation for the repair fidelity of non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), homologous recombination repair (HRR) and base excision repair (BER) when DNA damage of different complexity was induced by gamma radiation, alpha particles or from base damages (8-oxo-dG) induced by potassium bromate (KBrO(3)). CHO cells lines deficient in XRCC3 (HRR) irs1SF, XRCC7 (NHEJ) V3-3 and XRCC1 (BER) EM9 were irradiated in the absence or presence of the free radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The endpoints investigated included rate of cell proliferation by the DRAG assay, clonogenic cell survival and the level of primary DNA damage by the comet assay. The results revealed that the indirect effect of low-LET radiation significantly reduced the repair fidelity of both NHEJ and HRR pathways. For high-LET radiation the indirect effect of radiation also significantly reduced the repair fidelity for the repair deficient cell lines. The results suggest further that the repair fidelity of the error prone NHEJ repair pathway is more impaired by the indirect effect of high-LET radiation relative to the other repair pathways studied. The response to bromate observed for the two DSB repair deficient cell lines strongly support earlier studies that bromate induces complex DNA damages. The significantly reduced repair fidelity of irs1SF and V3-3 suggests that NHEJ as well as HRR are needed for the repair, and that complex DSBs are formed after bromate exposure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. In normal human fibroblasts variation in DSB repair capacity cannot be ascribed to radiation-induced changes in the localisation, expression or activity of major NHEJ proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasten-Pisula, Ulla; Vronskaja, Svetlana; Overgaard, Jens

    2008-01-01

    in the activity of the DNA-PK complex induced upon irradiation. CONCLUSIONS: For normal human fibroblasts, the level or activity of NHEJ proteins measured prior to or after irradiation cannot be used to predict the DSB repair capacity or cellular radiosensitivity. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Mar......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to test whether for normal human fibroblasts the variation in double-strand break (DSB) repair capacity results from radiation-induced differences in localisation, expression or activity of major non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) proteins....... MATERIALS AND METHODS: Experiments were performed with 11 normal human fibroblast strains AF01-11. NHEJ proteins were determined by Western blot and DNA-PK activity by pulldown-assay. RESULTS: The four NHEJ proteins tested (Ku70, Ku80, XRCC4 and DNA-PKcs) were found to be localised almost exclusively...

  11. Deletion of individual Ku subunits in mice causes an NHEJ-independent phenotype potentially by altering apurinic/apyrimidinic site repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.J. Choi (Yong Jun); H. Li (Han); M.Y. Son (Mi Young); X.-H. Wang (Xiao-Hong); J.L. Fornsaglio (Jamie L.); R.W. Sobol (Robert W.); M. Lee (Moonsook); J. Vijg (Jan); S. Imholz (Sandra); M.E.T. Dollé (Martijn); H. van Steeg (Harry); E. Reiling (Erwin); P. Hasty (Paul)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractKu70 and Ku80 form a heterodimer called Ku that forms a holoenzyme with DNA dependent-protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKCS) to repair DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) through the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway. As expected mutating these genes in mice caused a similar DSB

  12. DNA-PK. The major target for wortmannin-mediated radiosensitization by the inhibition of DSB repair via NHEJ pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Mitsumasa; Rao, S.; Tokuno, Osamu; Utsumi, Hiroshi; Takeda, Shunichi

    2003-01-01

    The effect of wortmannin posttreatment was studied in cells derived from different species (hamster, mouse, chicken, and human) with normal and defective DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity, cells with and without the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, and cells lacking other regulatory proteins involved in the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways. Clonogenic assays were used to obtain all results. Wortmannin radiosensitization was observed in Chinese hamster cells (V79-B310H, CHO-K1), mouse mammary carcinoma cells (SR-1), transformed human fibroblast (N2KYSV), chicken B lymphocyte wild-type cells (DT40), and chicken Rad54 knockout cells (Rad54 -/- ). However, mouse mammary carcinoma cells (SX9) with defects in the DNA-PK and chicken DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) knockout cells (DNA-PKcs -/-/- ) failed to exhibit wortmannin radiosensitization. On the other hand, severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse cells (SC3VA2) exposed to wortmannin exhibited significant increases in radiosensitivity, possibly because of some residual function of DNA-PKcs. Moreover, the transformed human cells derived from AT patients (AT2KYSV) and chicken ATM knockout cells (ATM -/- ) showed pronounced wortmannin radiosensitization. These studies demonstrate confirm that the mechanism underlying wortmannin radiosensitization is the inhibition of DNA-PK, but not of ATM, thereby resulting in the inhibition of DSB repair via nonhomologous endjoining (NHEJ). (author)

  13. Effects of expression level of DNA repair-related genes involved in the NHEJ pathway on radiation-induced cognitive impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Liyuan; Chen Liesong; Sun Rui; Ji Shengjun; Ding Yanyan; Wu Jia; Tian Ye

    2013-01-01

    Cranial radiation therapy can induce cognitive decline. Impairments of hippocampal neurogenesis are thought to be a paramountly important mechanism underlying radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction. In the mature nervous system, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are mainly repaired by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathways. It has been demonstrated that NHEJ deficiencies are associated with impaired neurogenesis. In our study, rats were randomly divided into five groups to be irradiated by single doses of 0 (control), 0 (anesthesia control), 2, 10, and 20 Gy, respectively. The cognitive function of the irradiated rats was measured by open field, Morris water maze and passive avoidance tests. Real-time PCR was also used to detect the expression level of DNA DSB repair-related genes involved in the NHEJ pathway, such as XRCC4, XRCC5 and XRCC6, in the hippocampus. The influence of different radiation doses on cognitive function in rats was investigated. From the results of the behavior tests, we found that rats receiving 20 Gy irradiation revealed poorer learning and memory, while no significant loss of learning and memory existed in rats receiving irradiation from 0-10 Gy. The real-time PCR and Western blot results showed no significant difference in the expression level of DNA repair-related genes between the 10 and 20 Gy groups, which may help to explain the behavioral results, id est (i.e.) DNA damage caused by 0-10 Gy exposure was appropriately repaired, however, damage induced by 20 Gy exceeded the body's maximum DSB repair ability. Ionizing radiation-induced cognitive impairments depend on the radiation dose, and more directly on the body's own ability to repair DNA DSBs via the NHEJ pathway. (author)

  14. Backup pathways of NHEJ in cells of higher eukaryotes: Cell cycle dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliakis, George

    2009-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by ionizing radiation (IR) in cells of higher eukaryotes are predominantly repaired by a pathway of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) utilizing Ku, DNA-PKcs, DNA ligase IV, XRCC4 and XLF/Cernunnos (D-NHEJ) as central components. Work carried out in our laboratory and elsewhere shows that when this pathway is chemically or genetically compromised, cells do not shunt DSBs to homologous recombination repair (HRR) but instead use another form of NHEJ operating as a backup (B-NHEJ). Here I review our efforts to characterize this repair pathway and discuss its dependence on the cell cycle as well as on the growth conditions. I present evidence that B-NHEJ utilizes ligase III, PARP-1 and histone H1. When B-NHEJ is examined throughout the cell cycle, significantly higher activity is observed in G2 phase that cannot be attributed to HRR. Furthermore, the activity of B-NHEJ is compromised when cells enter the plateau phase of growth. Together, these observations uncover a repair pathway with unexpected biochemical constitution and interesting cell cycle and growth factor regulation. They generate a framework for investigating the mechanistic basis of HRR contribution to DSB repair.

  15. Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone induces oxidative DNA damage and repair responses: The activations of NHEJ, BER and NER via ATM-p53 signaling axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Hui; Shi, Qiong; Song, Xiufang; Fu, Juanli; Hu, Lihua; Xu, Demei; Su, Chuanyang; Xia, Xiaomin; Song, Erqun; Song, Yang, E-mail: songyangwenrong@hotmail.com

    2015-07-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) quinone induced oxidative DNA damage in HepG2 cells. To promote genomic integrity, DNA damage response (DDR) coordinates cell-cycle transitions, DNA repair and apoptosis. PCB quinone-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis have been documented, however, whether PCB quinone insult induce DNA repair signaling is still unknown. In this study, we identified the activation of DDR and corresponding signaling events in HepG2 cells upon the exposure to a synthetic PCB quinone, PCB29-pQ. Our data illustrated that PCB29-pQ induces the phosphorylation of p53, which was mediated by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein kinase. The observed phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) foci and the elevation of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) indicated that DDR was stimulated by PCB29-pQ treatment. Additionally, we found PCB29-pQ activates non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), base excision repair (BER) and nucleotide excision repair (NER) signalings. However, these repair pathways are not error-free processes and aberrant repair of DNA damage may cause the potential risk of carcinogenesis and mutagenesis. - Highlights: • Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone induces oxidative DNA damage in HepG2 cells. • The elevation of γ-H2AX and 8-OHdG indicates the activation of DNA damage response. • ATM-p53 signaling acts as the DNA damage sensor and effector. • Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone activates NHEJ, BER and NER signalings.

  16. Regulation of homologous recombination repair protein Rad51 by Ku70

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Liqing; Liu Qiang; Wang Yan; Xu Chang; Cao Jia; Fu Yue; Chen Fenghua; Fan Feiyue

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore the regulative effect of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ)protein Ku70 on homologous recombination repair protein Rad51, and to investigate the synergistic mechanism of homologous recombination repair in combination with NHEJ. Methods: Observed Rad51 protein expression after transfect Ku70 small interfering RNA or Ku70 plasmid DNA into tumor cells using Western blot. Results: Expression of Rad51 was obviously reduced after pretreated with Ku70 small interfering RNA. And with the increasing expression of Ku70 protein after transfection of Ku70 plasmid DNA PGCsi3.0-hKu70 into tumor cell lines, the Rad51 protein expression was increased. Conclusion: Ku70 protein has regulating effect on gene expression of Rad51, and it might participate in the collaboration between homologous recombination repair and NHEJ. (authors)

  17. Cdk1 Restrains NHEJ through Phosphorylation of XRCC4-like Factor Xlf1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Hentges

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells use two principal mechanisms for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs: homologous recombination (HR and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ. DSB repair pathway choice is strongly regulated during the cell cycle. Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1 activates HR by phosphorylation of key recombination factors. However, a mechanism for regulating the NHEJ pathway has not been established. Here, we report that Xlf1, a fission yeast XLF ortholog, is a key regulator of NHEJ activity in the cell cycle. We show that Cdk1 phosphorylates residues in the C terminus of Xlf1 over the course of the cell cycle. Mutation of these residues leads to the loss of Cdk1 phosphorylation, resulting in elevated levels of NHEJ repair in vivo. Together, these data establish that Xlf1 phosphorylation by Cdc2Cdk1 provides a molecular mechanism for downregulation of NHEJ in fission yeast and indicates that XLF is a key regulator of end-joining processes in eukaryotic organisms.

  18. The helicase domain of Polθ counteracts RPA to promote alt-NHEJ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos-Gomez, Pedro A; Kent, Tatiana; Deng, Sarah K; McDevitt, Shane; Kashkina, Ekaterina; Hoang, Trung M; Pomerantz, Richard T; Sfeir, Agnel

    2017-12-01

    Mammalian polymerase theta (Polθ) is a multifunctional enzyme that promotes error-prone DNA repair by alternative nonhomologous end joining (alt-NHEJ). Here we present structure-function analyses that reveal that, in addition to the polymerase domain, Polθ-helicase activity plays a central role during double-strand break (DSB) repair. Our results show that the helicase domain promotes chromosomal translocations by alt-NHEJ in mouse embryonic stem cells and also suppresses CRISPR-Cas9- mediated gene targeting by homologous recombination (HR). In vitro assays demonstrate that Polθ-helicase activity facilitates the removal of RPA from resected DSBs to allow their annealing and subsequent joining by alt-NHEJ. Consistent with an antagonistic role for RPA during alt-NHEJ, inhibition of RPA1 enhances end joining and suppresses recombination. Taken together, our results reveal that the balance between HR and alt-NHEJ is controlled by opposing activities of Polθ and RPA, providing further insight into the regulation of repair-pathway choice in mammalian cells.

  19. Deletion of individual Ku subunits in mice causes an NHEJ-independent phenotype potentially by altering apurinic/apyrimidinic site repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Jun Choi

    Full Text Available Ku70 and Ku80 form a heterodimer called Ku that forms a holoenzyme with DNA dependent-protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKCS to repair DNA double strand breaks (DSBs through the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ pathway. As expected mutating these genes in mice caused a similar DSB repair-defective phenotype. However, ku70(-/- cells and ku80(-/- cells also appeared to have a defect in base excision repair (BER. BER corrects base lesions, apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP sites and single stand breaks (SSBs utilizing a variety of proteins including glycosylases, AP endonuclease 1 (APE1 and DNA Polymerase β (Pol β. In addition, deleting Ku70 was not equivalent to deleting Ku80 in cells and mice. Therefore, we hypothesized that free Ku70 (not bound to Ku80 and/or free Ku80 (not bound to Ku70 possessed activity that influenced BER. To further test this hypothesis we performed two general sets of experiments. The first set showed that deleting either Ku70 or Ku80 caused an NHEJ-independent defect. We found ku80(-/- mice had a shorter life span than dna-pkcs(-/- mice demonstrating a phenotype that was greater than deleting the holoenzyme. We also found Ku70-deletion induced a p53 response that reduced the level of small mutations in the brain suggesting defective BER. We further confirmed that Ku80-deletion impaired BER via a mechanism that was not epistatic to Pol β. The second set of experiments showed that free Ku70 and free Ku80 could influence BER. We observed that deletion of either Ku70 or Ku80, but not both, increased sensitivity of cells to CRT0044876 (CRT, an agent that interferes with APE1. In addition, free Ku70 and free Ku80 bound to AP sites and in the case of Ku70 inhibited APE1 activity. These observations support a novel role for free Ku70 and free Ku80 in altering BER.

  20. Deciphering the Role of Alternative Non-Homologous End Joining (Alt-NHEJ) DNA Repair in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    consecutive TTAGGG repeats. To detect rare reads containing fusion junctions, we exploited the novel sequence arrangement created by the ligation of the 39G...journal.pgen.1001005 (2010). 14 van Kregten, M. et al. T-DNA integration in plants results from polymerase-theta-mediated DNA repair. Nat Plants 2

  1. DNA-PK, ATM and ATR collaboratively regulate p53-RPA interaction to facilitate homologous recombination DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, M A; Li, Z; Dangeti, M; Musich, P R; Patrick, S; Roginskaya, M; Cartwright, B; Zou, Y

    2013-05-09

    Homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) are two distinct DNA double-stranded break (DSB) repair pathways. Here, we report that DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), the core component of NHEJ, partnering with DNA-damage checkpoint kinases ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR), regulates HR repair of DSBs. The regulation was accomplished through modulation of the p53 and replication protein A (RPA) interaction. We show that upon DNA damage, p53 and RPA were freed from a p53-RPA complex by simultaneous phosphorylations of RPA at the N-terminus of RPA32 subunit by DNA-PK and of p53 at Ser37 and Ser46 in a Chk1/Chk2-independent manner by ATR and ATM, respectively. Neither the phosphorylation of RPA nor of p53 alone could dissociate p53 and RPA. Furthermore, disruption of the release significantly compromised HR repair of DSBs. Our results reveal a mechanism for the crosstalk between HR repair and NHEJ through the co-regulation of p53-RPA interaction by DNA-PK, ATM and ATR.

  2. Mutations in the NHEJ component XRCC4 cause primordial dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jennie E; van der Burg, Mirjam; IJspeert, Hanna; Carroll, Paula; Wu, Qian; Ochi, Takashi; Leitch, Andrea; Miller, Edward S; Kysela, Boris; Jawad, Alireza; Bottani, Armand; Brancati, Francesco; Cappa, Marco; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Deshpande, Charu; Faqeih, Eissa A; Graham, Gail E; Ranza, Emmanuelle; Blundell, Tom L; Jackson, Andrew P; Stewart, Grant S; Bicknell, Louise S

    2015-03-05

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is a key cellular process ensuring genome integrity. Mutations in several components of the NHEJ pathway have been identified, often associated with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), consistent with the requirement for NHEJ during V(D)J recombination to ensure diversity of the adaptive immune system. In contrast, we have recently found that biallelic mutations in LIG4 are a common cause of microcephalic primordial dwarfism (MPD), a phenotype characterized by prenatal-onset extreme global growth failure. Here we provide definitive molecular genetic evidence supported by biochemical, cellular, and immunological data for mutations in XRCC4, encoding the obligate binding partner of LIG4, causing MPD. We report the identification of biallelic mutations in XRCC4 in five families. Biochemical and cellular studies demonstrate that these alterations substantially decrease XRCC4 protein levels leading to reduced cellular ligase IV activity. Consequently, NHEJ-dependent repair of ionizing-radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks is compromised in XRCC4 cells. Similarly, immunoglobulin junctional diversification is impaired in cells. However, immunoglobulin levels are normal, and individuals lack overt signs of immunodeficiency. Additionally, in contrast to individuals with LIG4 mutations, pancytopenia leading to bone marrow failure has not been observed. Hence, alterations that alter different NHEJ proteins give rise to a phenotypic spectrum, from SCID to extreme growth failure, with deficiencies in certain key components of this repair pathway predominantly exhibiting growth deficits, reflecting differential developmental requirements for NHEJ proteins to support growth and immune maturation. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Structure of a preternary complex involving a prokaryotic NHEJ DNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissett, Nigel C; Martin, Maria J; Pitcher, Robert S; Bianchi, Julie; Juarez, Raquel; Green, Andrew J; Fox, Gavin C; Blanco, Luis; Doherty, Aidan J

    2011-01-21

    In many prokaryotes, a specific DNA primase/polymerase (PolDom) is required for nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Here, we report the crystal structure of a catalytically active conformation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis PolDom, consisting of a polymerase bound to a DNA end with a 3' overhang, two metal ions, and an incoming nucleotide but, significantly, lacking a primer strand. This structure represents a polymerase:DNA complex in a preternary intermediate state. This polymerase complex occurs in solution, stabilizing the enzyme on DNA ends and promoting nucleotide extension of short incoming termini. We also demonstrate that the invariant Arg(220), contained in a conserved loop (loop 2), plays an essential role in catalysis by regulating binding of a second metal ion in the active site. We propose that this NHEJ intermediate facilitates extension reactions involving critically short or noncomplementary DNA ends, thus promoting break repair and minimizing sequence loss during DSB repair. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Double strand break repair: two mechanisms in competition but tightly linked to cell cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delacote, F.

    2002-11-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSB) are highly toxic damage although they can be induced to create genetic diversity. Two distinct pathways can repair DSB: Homologous Recombination (HR) and Non Homologous End Joining (NHEJ). If un- or mis-repaired, this damage can lead to cancer. Thus, it is essential to investigate how these two pathways are regulated for DSB repair. NHEJ inhibition leads to HR DSB repair stimulation. However, this channeling to HR is tightly linked to cell cycle since NHEJ and HR are active in G1/early S and late S/G2, respectively. Our results suggest that G1-unrepaired DSB go through S phase to be repaired by HR in G2. Those results allow a better understanding of DSB repair mechanisms regulation. (author)

  5. Widespread Dependence of Backup NHEJ on Growth State: Ramifications for the Use of DNA-PK Inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Satyendra K.; Wu Wenqi; Zhang Lihua; Klammer, Holger; Wang Minli; Iliakis, George

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The backup pathway of nonhomologous end joining (B-NHEJ) enables cells to process DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) when the DNA-PK-dependent pathway of NHEJ (D-NHEJ) is compromised. Our previous results show marked reduction in the activity of B-NHEJ when LIG4 -/- mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) cease to grow and enter a plateau phase. The dependence of B-NHEJ on growth state is substantially stronger than that of D-NHEJ and points to regulatory mechanisms or processing determinants that require elucidation. Because the different D-NHEJ mutants show phenotypes distinct in their details, it is necessary to characterize the dependence of their DSB repair capacity on growth state and to explore species-specific responses. Methods and Materials: DSB repair was measured in cells of different genetic background from various species using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, or the formation of γ-H2AX foci, at different stages of growth. Results: Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we report a marked reduction of B-NHEJ during the plateau phase of growth in KU and XRCC4, mouse or Chinese hamster, mutants. Notably, this reduction is only marginal in DNA-PKcs-deficient cells. However, reduced B-NHEJ is also observed in repair proficient, plateau-phase cells after treatment with DNA-PK inhibitors. The reduction of B-NHEJ activity in the plateau phase of growth does not derive from the reduced expression of participating proteins, is detectable by γ-H2AX foci analysis, and leads to enhanced cell killing. Conclusions: These results further document the marked dependence on growth state of an essential DSB repair pathway and show the general nature of the effect. Molecular characterization of the mechanism underlying this response will help to optimize the administration of DNA repair inhibitors as adjuvants in radiation therapy.

  6. DNA-binding determinants promoting NHEJ by human Polμ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Maria Jose; Juarez, Raquel; Blanco, Luis

    2012-12-01

    Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), the preferred pathway to repair double-strand breaks (DSBs) in higher eukaryotes, relies on a collection of molecular tools to process the broken ends, including specific DNA polymerases. Among them, Polµ is unique as it can catalyze DNA synthesis upon connection of two non-complementary ends. Here, we demonstrate that this capacity is intrinsic to Polµ, not conferred by other NHEJ factors. To understand the molecular determinants of its specific function in NHEJ, the interaction of human Polµ with DNA has been directly visualized by electromobility shift assay and footprinting assays. Stable interaction with a DNA gap requires the presence of a recessive 5'-P, thus orienting the catalytic domain for primer and nucleotide binding. Accordingly, recognition of the 5'-P is crucial to align the two DNA substrates of the NHEJ reaction. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrates the relevance of three specific residues (Lys(249), Arg(253) and Arg(416)) in stabilizing the primer strand during end synapsis, allowing a range of microhomology-induced distortions beneficial for NHEJ. Moreover, our results suggest that the Polµ BRCT domain, thought to be exclusively involved in interaction with NHEJ core factors, has a direct role in binding the DNA region neighbor to the 5'-P, thus boosting Polµ-mediated NHEJ reactions.

  7. Multiple and variable NHEJ-like genes are involved in resistance to DNA damage in Streptomyces ambofaciens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Hoff

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Non homologous end-joining (NHEJ is a double strand break (DSB repair pathway which does not require any homologous template and can ligate two DNA ends together. The basic bacterial NHEJ machinery involves two partners: the Ku protein, a DNA end binding protein for DSB recognition and the multifunctional LigD protein composed a ligase, a nuclease and a polymerase domain, for end processing and ligation of the broken ends. In silico analyses performed in the 38 sequenced genomes of Streptomyces species revealed the existence of a large panel of NHEJ-like genes. Indeed, ku genes or ligD domain homologues are scattered throughout the genome in multiple copies and can be distinguished in two categories: the core NHEJ gene set constituted of conserved loci and the variable NHEJ gene set constituted of NHEJ-like genes present in only a part of the species. In Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC 23877, not only the deletion of core genes but also that of variable genes led to an increased sensitivity to DNA damage induced by electron beam irradiation. Multiple mutants of ku, ligase or polymerase encoding genes showed an aggravated phenotype compared to single mutants. Biochemical assays revealed the ability of Ku-like proteins to protect and to stimulate ligation of DNA ends. RT-qPCR and GFP fusion experiments suggested that ku-like genes show a growth phase dependent expression profile consistent with their involvement in DNA repair during spores formation and/or germination.

  8. DNA ligase III is involved in a DNA-PK independent pathway of NHEJ in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.; Perrault, A.R.; Qin, W.; Wang, H.; Iliakis, G.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Double strand breaks (DSB) induced by ionizing radiation (IR) and other cytotoxic agents in the genome of higher eukaryotes are thought to be repaired either by homologous recombination repair (HRR), or non-homologous endjoining (NHEJ). We previously reported the operation of two components of NHEJ in vivo: a DNA-PK dependent component that operates with fast kinetics (D-NHEJ), and a DNA-PK independent component that acts as a backup (basic or B-NHEJ) and operates with kinetics an order of magnitude slower. To gain further insight into the mechanisms of B-NHEJ, we investigated DNA endjoining in extracts 180BR, a human cell line deficient in DNA ligase IV, using an in vitro plasmid-based DNA endjoining assay. An anti DNA ligase III antibody inhibited almost completely DNA endjoining activity in these extracts. On the other hand, an anti DNA ligase I antibody had no measurable effect in DNA endjoining activity. Immunodepletion of DNA ligase III from 180BR cell extracts abolished the DNA endjoining activity, which could be restored by addition of purified human DNA ligase IIIb. Full-length DNA ligase III bound to double stranded DNA and stimulated DNA endjoining in both intermolecular and intramolecular ligation. Furthermore, fractionation of HeLa cell extracts demonstrated the presence of an activity stimulating the function of DNA ligase III. Based on these observations we propose that DNA ligase III is the ligase operating in B-NHEJ

  9. Regulation of DNA repair by parkin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, Shyan-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Mutation of parkin is one of the most prevalent causes of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that acts on a variety of substrates, resulting in polyubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome or monoubiquitination and regulation of biological activity. However, the cellular functions of parkin that relate to its pathological involvement in PD are not well understood. Here we show that parkin is essential for optimal repair of DNA damage. Parkin-deficient cells exhibit reduced DNA excision repair that can be restored by transfection of wild-type parkin, but not by transfection of a pathological parkin mutant. Parkin also protects against DNA damage-induced cell death, an activity that is largely lost in the pathological mutant. Moreover, parkin interacts with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a protein that coordinates DNA excision repair. These results suggest that parkin promotes DNA repair and protects against genotoxicity, and implicate DNA damage as a potential pathogenic mechanism in PD.

  10. Regulation of nucleotide excision repair through ubiquitination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Li; Audesh Bhat; Wei Xiao

    2011-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the most versatile DNA-repair pathway in all organisms.While bacteria require only three proteins to complete the incision step of NER,eukaryotes employ about 30 proteins to complete the same step.Here we summarize recent studies demonstrating that ubiquitination,a post-translational modification,plays critical roles in regulating the NER activity either dependent on or independent of ubiquitin-proteolysis.Several NER components have been shown as targets of ubiquitination while others are actively involved in the ubiquitination process.We argue through this analysis that ubiquitination serves to coordinate various steps of NER and meanwhile connect NER with other related pathways to achieve the efficient global DNA-damage response.

  11. PAXX Is an Accessory c-NHEJ Factor that Associates with Ku70 and Has Overlapping Functions with XLF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish K. Tadi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In mammalian cells, classical non-homologous end joining (c-NHEJ is critical for DNA double-strand break repair induced by ionizing radiation and during V(DJ recombination in developing B and T lymphocytes. Recently, PAXX was identified as a c-NHEJ core component. We report here that PAXX-deficient cells exhibit a cellular phenotype uncharacteristic of a deficiency in c-NHEJ core components. PAXX-deficient cells display normal sensitivity to radiomimetic drugs, are proficient in transient V(DJ recombination assays, and do not shift toward higher micro-homology usage in plasmid repair assays. Although PAXX-deficient cells lack c-NHEJ phenotypes, PAXX forms a stable ternary complex with Ku bound to DNA. Formation of this complex involves an interaction with Ku70 and requires a bare DNA extension for stability. Moreover, the relatively weak Ku-dependent stimulation of LIG4/XRCC4 activity by PAXX is unmasked by XLF ablation. Thus, PAXX plays an accessory role during c-NHEJ that is largely overlapped by XLF’s function.

  12. Nuclear translocation contributes to regulation of DNA excision repair activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Nina Østergaard; Andersen, Sofie Dabros; Lützen, Anne

    2009-01-01

    for regulation of nuclear import that is necessary for proper localization of the repair proteins. This review summarizes the current knowledge on nuclear import mechanisms of DNA excision repair proteins and provides a model that categorizes the import by different mechanisms, including classical nuclear import......DNA mutations are circumvented by dedicated specialized excision repair systems, such as the base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mismatch repair (MMR) pathways. Although the individual repair pathways have distinct roles in suppressing changes in the nuclear DNA......, it is evident that proteins from the different DNA repair pathways interact [Y. Wang, D. Cortez, P. Yazdi, N. Neff, S.J. Elledge, J. Qin, BASC, a super complex of BRCA1-associated proteins involved in the recognition and repair of aberrant DNA structures, Genes Dev. 14 (2000) 927-939; M. Christmann, M...

  13. Mycobacterial nonhomologous end joining mediates mutagenic repair of chromosomal double-strand DNA breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanou, Nicolas C; Gao, Feng; Bongiorno, Paola; Ehrt, Sabine; Schnappinger, Dirk; Shuman, Stewart; Glickman, Michael S

    2007-07-01

    Bacterial nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is a recently described DNA repair pathway best characterized in mycobacteria. Bacterial NHEJ proteins LigD and Ku have been analyzed biochemically, and their roles in linear plasmid repair in vivo have been verified genetically; yet the contributions of NHEJ to repair of chromosomal DNA damage are unknown. Here we use an extensive set of NHEJ- and homologous recombination (HR)-deficient Mycobacterium smegmatis strains to probe the importance of HR and NHEJ in repairing diverse types of chromosomal DNA damage. An M. smegmatis Delta recA Delta ku double mutant has no apparent growth defect in vitro. Loss of the NHEJ components Ku and LigD had no effect on sensitivity to UV radiation, methyl methanesulfonate, or quinolone antibiotics. NHEJ deficiency had no effect on sensitivity to ionizing radiation in logarithmic- or early-stationary-phase cells but was required for ionizing radiation resistance in late stationary phase in 7H9 but not LB medium. In addition, NHEJ components were required for repair of I-SceI mediated chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs), and in the absence of HR, the NHEJ pathway rapidly mutates the chromosomal break site. The molecular outcomes of NHEJ-mediated chromosomal DSB repair involve predominantly single-nucleotide insertions at the break site, similar to previous findings using plasmid substrates. These findings demonstrate that prokaryotic NHEJ is specifically required for DSB repair in late stationary phase and can mediate mutagenic repair of homing endonuclease-generated chromosomal DSBs.

  14. Molecular Basis for DNA Double-Strand Break Annealing and Primer Extension by an NHEJ DNA Polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel C. Brissett

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ is one of the major DNA double-strand break (DSB repair pathways. The mechanisms by which breaks are competently brought together and extended during NHEJ is poorly understood. As polymerases extend DNA in a 5′-3′ direction by nucleotide addition to a primer, it is unclear how NHEJ polymerases fill in break termini containing 3′ overhangs that lack a primer strand. Here, we describe, at the molecular level, how prokaryotic NHEJ polymerases configure a primer-template substrate by annealing the 3′ overhanging strands from opposing breaks, forming a gapped intermediate that can be extended in trans. We identify structural elements that facilitate docking of the 3′ ends in the active sites of adjacent polymerases and reveal how the termini act as primers for extension of the annealed break, thus explaining how such DSBs are extended in trans. This study clarifies how polymerases couple break-synapsis to catalysis, providing a molecular mechanism to explain how primer extension is achieved on DNA breaks.

  15. Regulation of DNA Alkylation Damage Repair: Lessons and Therapeutic Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soll, Jennifer M; Sobol, Robert W; Mosammaparast, Nima

    2017-03-01

    Alkylation chemotherapy is one of the most widely used systemic therapies for cancer. While somewhat effective, clinical responses and toxicities of these agents are highly variable. A major contributing factor for this variability is the numerous distinct lesions that are created upon alkylation damage. These adducts activate multiple repair pathways. There is mounting evidence that the individual pathways function cooperatively, suggesting that coordinated regulation of alkylation repair is critical to prevent toxicity. Furthermore, some alkylating agents produce adducts that overlap with newly discovered methylation marks, making it difficult to distinguish between bona fide damaged bases and so-called 'epigenetic' adducts. Here, we discuss new efforts aimed at deciphering the mechanisms that regulate these repair pathways, emphasizing their implications for cancer chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Biochemical Kinetics Model of DSB Repair and GammaH2AX FOCI by Non-homologous End Joining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis, A.; Pluth, Janice M.; Anderson, Jennifer A.; Harper, Jane V.; O'Neill, Peter

    2007-01-01

    We developed a biochemical kinetics approach to describe the repair of double strand breaks (DSB) produced by low LET radiation by modeling molecular events associated with the mechanisms of non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). A system of coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations describes the induction of DSB and activation pathways for major NHEJ components including Ku(sub 70/80), DNA-PK(sub cs), and the Ligase IV-XRCC4 hetero-dimer. The autophosphorylation of DNA-PK(sub cs and subsequent induction of gamma-H2AX foci observed after ionizing radiation exposure were modeled. A two-step model of DNA-PK(sub cs) regulation of repair was developed with the initial step allowing access of other NHEJ components to breaks, and a second step limiting access to Ligase IV-XRCC4. Our model assumes that the transition from the first to second-step depends on DSB complexity, with a much slower-rate for complex DSB. The model faithfully reproduced several experimental data sets, including DSB rejoining as measured by pulsed-field electrophoresis (PFGE), quantification of the induction of gamma-H2AX foci, and live cell imaging of the induction of Ku(sub 70/80). Predictions are made for the behaviors of NHEJ components at low doses and dose-rates, where a steady-state is found at dose-rates of 0.1 Gy/hr or lower.

  17. Hyperactivation of PARP triggers nonhomologous end-joining in repair-deficient mouse fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie R Gassman

    Full Text Available Regulation of poly(ADP-ribose (PAR synthesis and turnover is critical to determining cell fate after genotoxic stress. Hyperactivation of PAR synthesis by poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 occurs when cells deficient in DNA repair are exposed to genotoxic agents; however, the function of this hyperactivation has not been adequately explained. Here, we examine PAR synthesis in mouse fibroblasts deficient in the base excision repair enzyme DNA polymerase β (pol β. The extent and duration of PARP-1 activation was measured after exposure to either the DNA alkylating agent, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS, or to low energy laser-induced DNA damage. There was strong DNA damage-induced hyperactivation of PARP-1 in pol β nullcells, but not in wild-type cells. In the case of MMS treatment, PAR synthesis did not lead to cell death in the pol β null cells, but instead resulted in increased PARylation of the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ protein Ku70 and increased association of Ku70 with PARP-1. Inhibition of the NHEJ factor DNA-PK, under conditions of MMS-induced PARP-1 hyperactivation, enhanced necrotic cell death. These data suggest that PARP-1 hyperactivation is a protective mechanism triggering the classical-NHEJ DNA repair pathway when the primary alkylated base damage repair pathway is compromised.

  18. Dynamic dependence on ATR and ATM for double-strand break repair in human embryonic stem cells and neural descendants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bret R; Golding, Sarah E; Rao, Raj R; Valerie, Kristoffer

    2010-04-02

    The DNA double-strand break (DSB) is the most toxic form of DNA damage. Studies aimed at characterizing DNA repair during development suggest that homologous recombination repair (HRR) is more critical in pluripotent cells compared to differentiated somatic cells in which nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is dominant. We have characterized the DNA damage response (DDR) and quality of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and in vitro-derived neural cells. Resolution of ionizing radiation-induced foci (IRIF) was used as a surrogate for DSB repair. The resolution of gamma-H2AX foci occurred at a slower rate in hESCs compared to neural progenitors (NPs) and astrocytes perhaps reflective of more complex DSB repair in hESCs. In addition, the resolution of RAD51 foci, indicative of active homologous recombination repair (HRR), showed that hESCs as well as NPs have high capacity for HRR, whereas astrocytes do not. Importantly, the ATM kinase was shown to be critical for foci formation in astrocytes, but not in hESCs, suggesting that the DDR is different in these cells. Blocking the ATM kinase in astrocytes not only prevented the formation but also completely disassembled preformed repair foci. The ability of hESCs to form IRIF was abrogated with caffeine and siRNAs targeted against ATR, implicating that hESCs rely on ATR, rather than ATM for regulating DSB repair. This relationship dynamically changed as cells differentiated. Interestingly, while the inhibition of the DNA-PKcs kinase (and presumably non-homologous endjoining [NHEJ]) in astrocytes slowed IRIF resolution it did not in hESCs, suggesting that repair in hESCs does not utilize DNA-PKcs. Altogether, our results show that hESCs have efficient DSB repair that is largely ATR-dependent HRR, whereas astrocytes critically depend on ATM for NHEJ, which, in part, is DNA-PKcs-independent.

  19. Homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining repair pathways in bovine embryos with different developmental competence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrique Barreta, Marcos; Garziera Gasperin, Bernardo; Braga Rissi, Vitor; Cesaro, Matheus Pedrotti de; Ferreira, Rogério; Oliveira, João Francisco de; Gonçalves, Paulo Bayard Dias; Bordignon, Vilceu

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the expression of genes controlling homologous recombination (HR), and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) DNA-repair pathways in bovine embryos of different developmental potential. It also evaluated whether bovine embryos can respond to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced with ultraviolet irradiation by regulating expression of genes involved in HR and NHEJ repair pathways. Embryos with high, intermediate or low developmental competence were selected based on the cleavage time after in vitro insemination and were removed from in vitro culture before (36 h), during (72 h) and after (96 h) the expected period of embryonic genome activation. All studied genes were expressed before, during and after the genome activation period regardless the developmental competence of the embryos. Higher mRNA expression of 53BP1 and RAD52 was found before genome activation in embryos with low developmental competence. Expression of 53BP1, RAD51 and KU70 was downregulated at 72 h and upregulated at 168 h post-insemination in response to DSBs induced by ultraviolet irradiation. In conclusion, important genes controlling HR and NHEJ DNA-repair pathways are expressed in bovine embryos, however genes participating in these pathways are only regulated after the period of embryo genome activation in response to ultraviolet-induced DSBs.

  20. Homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining repair pathways in bovine embryos with different developmental competence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henrique Barreta, Marcos [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitario de Curitibanos, Curitibanos, SC (Brazil); Laboratorio de Biotecnologia e Reproducao Animal-BioRep, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Garziera Gasperin, Bernardo; Braga Rissi, Vitor; Cesaro, Matheus Pedrotti de [Laboratorio de Biotecnologia e Reproducao Animal-BioRep, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Ferreira, Rogerio [Centro de Educacao Superior do Oeste-Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina, Chapeco, SC (Brazil); Oliveira, Joao Francisco de; Goncalves, Paulo Bayard Dias [Laboratorio de Biotecnologia e Reproducao Animal-BioRep, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Bordignon, Vilceu, E-mail: vilceu.bordignon@mcgill.ca [Department of Animal Science, McGill University, Ste-Anne-De-Bellevue, QC (Canada)

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the expression of genes controlling homologous recombination (HR), and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) DNA-repair pathways in bovine embryos of different developmental potential. It also evaluated whether bovine embryos can respond to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced with ultraviolet irradiation by regulating expression of genes involved in HR and NHEJ repair pathways. Embryos with high, intermediate or low developmental competence were selected based on the cleavage time after in vitro insemination and were removed from in vitro culture before (36 h), during (72 h) and after (96 h) the expected period of embryonic genome activation. All studied genes were expressed before, during and after the genome activation period regardless the developmental competence of the embryos. Higher mRNA expression of 53BP1 and RAD52 was found before genome activation in embryos with low developmental competence. Expression of 53BP1, RAD51 and KU70 was downregulated at 72 h and upregulated at 168 h post-insemination in response to DSBs induced by ultraviolet irradiation. In conclusion, important genes controlling HR and NHEJ DNA-repair pathways are expressed in bovine embryos, however genes participating in these pathways are only regulated after the period of embryo genome activation in response to ultraviolet-induced DSBs.

  1. Regulation of DNA repair mechanism in human glioma xenograft cells both in vitro and in vivo in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnala, Shivani; Veeravalli, Krishna Kumar; Chetty, Chandramu; Dinh, Dzung H; Rao, Jasti S

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal form of brain tumor. Efficient DNA repair and anti-apoptotic mechanisms are making glioma treatment difficult. Proteases such as MMP9, cathepsin B and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) are over expressed in gliomas and contribute to enhanced cancer cell proliferation. Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair mechanism plays a major role in double strand break (DSB) repair in mammalian cells. Here we show that silencing MMP9 in combination with uPAR/cathepsin B effects NHEJ repair machinery. Expression of DNA PKcs and Ku70/80 at both mRNA and protein levels in MMP9-uPAR (pMU) and MMP9-cathepsin B (pMC) shRNA-treated glioma xenograft cells were reduced. FACS analysis showed an increase in apoptotic peak and proliferation assays revealed a significant reduction in the cell population in pMU- and pMC-treated cells compared to untreated cells. We hypothesized that reduced NHEJ repair led to DSBs accumulation in pMU- and pMC-treated cells, thereby initiating cell death. This hypothesis was confirmed by reduced Ku70/Ku80 protein binding to DSB, increased comet tail length and elevated γH2AX expression in treated cells compared to control. Immunoprecipitation analysis showed that EGFR-mediated lowered DNA PK activity in treated cells compared to controls. Treatment with pMU and pMC shRNA reduced the expression of DNA PKcs and ATM, and elevated γH2AX levels in xenograft implanted nude mice. Glioma cells exposed to hypoxia and irradiation showed DSB accumulation and apoptosis after pMU and pMC treatments compared to respective controls. Our results suggest that pMU and pMC shRNA reduce glioma proliferation by DSB accumulation and increase apoptosis under normoxia, hypoxia and in combination with irradiation. Considering the radio- and chemo-resistant cancers favored by hypoxia, our study provides important therapeutic potential of MMP9, uPAR and cathepsin B shRNA in the treatment of glioma from clinical stand

  2. Regulation of DNA repair mechanism in human glioma xenograft cells both in vitro and in vivo in nude mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivani Ponnala

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM is the most lethal form of brain tumor. Efficient DNA repair and anti-apoptotic mechanisms are making glioma treatment difficult. Proteases such as MMP9, cathepsin B and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR are over expressed in gliomas and contribute to enhanced cancer cell proliferation. Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ repair mechanism plays a major role in double strand break (DSB repair in mammalian cells.Here we show that silencing MMP9 in combination with uPAR/cathepsin B effects NHEJ repair machinery. Expression of DNA PKcs and Ku70/80 at both mRNA and protein levels in MMP9-uPAR (pMU and MMP9-cathepsin B (pMC shRNA-treated glioma xenograft cells were reduced. FACS analysis showed an increase in apoptotic peak and proliferation assays revealed a significant reduction in the cell population in pMU- and pMC-treated cells compared to untreated cells. We hypothesized that reduced NHEJ repair led to DSBs accumulation in pMU- and pMC-treated cells, thereby initiating cell death. This hypothesis was confirmed by reduced Ku70/Ku80 protein binding to DSB, increased comet tail length and elevated γH2AX expression in treated cells compared to control. Immunoprecipitation analysis showed that EGFR-mediated lowered DNA PK activity in treated cells compared to controls. Treatment with pMU and pMC shRNA reduced the expression of DNA PKcs and ATM, and elevated γH2AX levels in xenograft implanted nude mice. Glioma cells exposed to hypoxia and irradiation showed DSB accumulation and apoptosis after pMU and pMC treatments compared to respective controls.Our results suggest that pMU and pMC shRNA reduce glioma proliferation by DSB accumulation and increase apoptosis under normoxia, hypoxia and in combination with irradiation. Considering the radio- and chemo-resistant cancers favored by hypoxia, our study provides important therapeutic potential of MMP9, uPAR and cathepsin B shRNA in the treatment of glioma from

  3. Acetylation regulates WRN catalytic activities and affects base excision DNA repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muftuoglu, Meltem; Kusumoto, Rika; Speina, Elzbieta

    2008-01-01

    The Werner protein (WRN), defective in the premature aging disorder Werner syndrome, participates in a number of DNA metabolic processes, and we have been interested in the possible regulation of its function in DNA repair by post-translational modifications. Acetylation mediated by histone...... acetyltransferases is of key interest because of its potential importance in aging, DNA repair and transcription....

  4. The Application of NHEJ-CRISPR/Cas9 and Cre-Lox System in the Generation of Bivalent Duck Enteritis Virus Vaccine against Avian Influenza Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengxiang Chang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Duck-targeted vaccines to protect against avian influenza are critically needed to aid in influenza disease control efforts in regions where ducks are endemic for highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI. Duck enteritis virus (DEV is a promising candidate viral vector for development of vaccines targeting ducks, owing to its large genome and narrow host range. The clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR/Cas9 system is a versatile gene-editing tool that has proven beneficial for gene modification and construction of recombinant DNA viral vectored vaccines. Currently, there are two commonly used methods for gene insertion: non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ and homology-directed repair (HDR. Owing to its advantages in efficiency and independence from molecular requirements of the homologous arms, we utilized NHEJ-dependent CRISPR/Cas9 to insert the influenza hemagglutinin (HA antigen expression cassette into the DEV genome. The insert was initially tagged with reporter green fluorescence protein (GFP, and a Cre-Lox system was later used to remove the GFP gene insert. Furthermore, a universal donor plasmid system was established by introducing double bait sequences that were independent of the viral genome. In summary, we provide proof of principle for generating recombinant DEV viral vectored vaccines against the influenza virus using an integrated NHEJ-CRISPR/Cas9 and Cre-Lox system.

  5. Regulation of DNA repair processes in mammalian cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bil'din, V.N.; Sergina, T.B.; Zhestyanikov, V.D.

    1992-01-01

    A study was made of the repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA single-strand breaks (SSB) in proliferating and quiescent mouse Swiss 3T6 cells and in those stimulated from the quiet status by epidermal growth factor in combination with insulin, in the presence of specific inhibitors of DNA polymerase α and β (aphidicolin) and DNA polymerase β (2', 3'-dideoxythjymidine-5'-triphosphate). The repair of DNA SSB induced by X-ray-irradiation (10 Gy) or by γ-ray irradiation (150 Gy) is more sensitive to aphidicolin and mitogen-simulated cells three times stronger than in proliferating cells. The influence of 2', 3'-dideoxythymidine-5'-triphosphate on the rate of DNA SSB repair in cells of all the three types does not differ. Thus, the decrease in DNA repair efficiency in quiescent cells is connected with a decrease in the activity of aphidicolin-sensitive DNA polymerase, apparently DNA polymerase α

  6. 48 CFR 1252.217-80 - Department of Labor Safety and Health Regulations for Ship Repairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Department of Labor Safety and Health Regulations for Ship Repairing. 1252.217-80 Section 1252.217-80 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 1252.217-80...

  7. Distinct DNA repair pathways involving RecA and nonhomologous end joining in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    OpenAIRE

    Korycka-Machala, M; Brzostek, A; Rozalska, S; Rumijowska-Galewicz, A; Dziedzic, R; Bowater, R; Dziadek, J

    2006-01-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis was used to study the relationship between DNA repair processes involving RecA and nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). The effect of gene deletions in recA and/or in two genes involved in NHEJ (ku and ligD) was tested on the ability of bacteria to join breaks in plasmids transformed into them and in their response to chemicals that damage DNA. The results provide in vivo evidence that only NHEJ is required for the repair of noncompatible DNA ends. By contrast, the respon...

  8. Distinct DNA repair pathways involving RecA and nonhomologous end joining in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korycka-Machala, Malgorzata; Brzostek, Anna; Rozalska, Sylwia; Rumijowska-Galewicz, Anna; Dziedzic, Renata; Bowater, Richard; Dziadek, Jaroslaw

    2006-05-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis was used to study the relationship between DNA repair processes involving RecA and nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). The effect of gene deletions in recA and/or in two genes involved in NHEJ (ku and ligD) was tested on the ability of bacteria to join breaks in plasmids transformed into them and in their response to chemicals that damage DNA. The results provide in vivo evidence that only NHEJ is required for the repair of noncompatible DNA ends. By contrast, the response of mycobacteria to mitomycin C preferentially involved a RecA-dependent pathway.

  9. Dynamic regulation of cerebral DNA repair genes by psychological stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, Kristin; Aalling, Nadia; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal genotoxic insults from oxidative stress constitute a putative molecular link between stress and depression on the one hand, and cognitive dysfunction and dementia risk on the other. Oxidative modifications to DNA are repaired by specific enzymes; a process that plays a critical role...... restraint stress (6h/day) or daily handling (controls), and sacrificed after 1, 7 or 21 stress sessions. The mRNA expression of seven genes (Ogg1, Ape1, Ung1, Neil1, Xrcc1, Ercc1, Nudt1) involved in the repair of oxidatively damaged DNA was determined by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction...

  10. Functional Analysis of Homologous Recombination Repair Proteins HerA and NurA in the Thermophile Sulfolobus islandicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Qihong

    A number of DNA lesions are generated in each cell every day, among which double-stranded breaks (DSBs) constitute one of the most detrimental types of DNA damage. DSBs lead to genome instability, cell death, or even tumorigenesis in human, if not repaired timely. Two main pathways are known...... in the S/G2 phase of the cell cycle are preferentially repaired by HRR pathway, while NHEJ is the favorate pathway to repair DSBs in the G1 phase. Bacteria encode multiple pathways for DSB repair, including RecBCD, the primary HR pathway, SbcC-SbcD, and one backup system, RecFOR. In eukaryotes, the HRR...... pathway is mediated by Mre11-Rad50, homologs of bacterial SbcD-SbcC. However, numerous proteins and multiple layers of regulation exist to ensure these repair pathways are accurate and restricted to the appropriate cellular contexts, making many important mechanistic details poorly understood...

  11. KIN17, XPC, DNA-PKCS and XRCC4 proteins in the cellular response to DNA damages. Relations between nucleotide excision repair and non-homologous end joining in a human syn-genic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despras, Emmanuelle

    2006-01-01

    The response to genotoxic stress involves many cellular factors in a complex network of mechanisms that aim to preserve the genetic integrity of the organism. These mechanisms enclose the detection and repair of DNA lesions, the regulation of transcription and replication and, eventually, the setting of cell death. Among the nuclear proteins involved in this response, kin17 proteins are zinc-finger proteins conserved through evolution and activated by ultraviolet (UV) or ionizing radiations (IR). We showed that human kin17 protein (HSAkin17) is found in the cell under a soluble form and a form tightly anchored to nuclear structures. A fraction of HSAkin17 protein is directly associated with chromatin. HSAkin17 protein is recruited to nuclear structures 24 hours after treatment with various agents inducing DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) and/or replication forks blockage. Moreover, the reduction of total HSAkin17 protein level sensitizes RKO cells to IR. We also present evidence for the involvement of HSAkin17 protein in DNA replication. This hypothesis was further confirmed by the biochemical demonstration of its belonging to the replication complex. HSAkin17 protein could link DNA replication and DNA repair, a defect in the HSAkin17 pathway leading to an increased radiosensitivity. In a second part, we studied the interactions between two DNA repair mechanisms: nucleotide excision repair (NER) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). NER repairs a wide variety of lesions inducing a distortion of the DNA double helix including UV-induced pyrimidine dimers. NHEJ allows the repair of DSB by direct joining of DNA ends. We used a syn-genic model for DNA repair defects based on RNA interference developed in the laboratory. Epstein-Barr virus-derived vectors (pEBV) allow long-term expression of siRNA and specific extinction of the targeted gene. The reduction of the expression of genes involved in NER (XPA and XPC) or NHEJ (DNA-PKcs and XRCC4) leads to the expected

  12. Genetic variation in DNA repair gene XRCC7 (G6721T) and susceptibility to breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Meysam; Saadat, Iraj; Omidvari, Shahpour; Saadat, Mostafa

    2012-08-15

    The human XRCC7 is a DNA double-strand break (DSBs) repair gene, involved in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). It is speculated that DNA DSBs repair have an important role during development of breast cancer. The human XRCC7 is a NHEJ DSBs repair gene. Genetic variation G6721T of XRCC7 (rs7003908) is located in the intron 8 of the gene. This polymorphism may regulate splicing and cause mRNA instability. In the present study, we specifically investigated whether common G6721T genetic variant of XRCC7 was associated with an altered risk of breast cancer. The present study included 362 females with breast cancer. Age frequency-matched controls (362 persons) were randomly selected from the healthy female blood donors, according to the age distribution of the cases. Using RFLP-PCR based method, the polymorphism of XRCC7 was determined. The TG (OR=1.20, 95% CI: 0.83-1.74, P=0.320) and TT (OR=1.01, 95% CI: 0.67-1.53, P=0.933) genotypes had no significant effect on risk of breast cancer, in comparison with the GG genotype. Our present findings indicate that the TT and TG genotypes were not associated with an altered breast cancer risk. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Dynamic dependence on ATR and ATM for double-strand break repair in human embryonic stem cells and neural descendants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bret R Adams

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The DNA double-strand break (DSB is the most toxic form of DNA damage. Studies aimed at characterizing DNA repair during development suggest that homologous recombination repair (HRR is more critical in pluripotent cells compared to differentiated somatic cells in which nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ is dominant. We have characterized the DNA damage response (DDR and quality of DNA double-strand break (DSB repair in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs, and in vitro-derived neural cells. Resolution of ionizing radiation-induced foci (IRIF was used as a surrogate for DSB repair. The resolution of gamma-H2AX foci occurred at a slower rate in hESCs compared to neural progenitors (NPs and astrocytes perhaps reflective of more complex DSB repair in hESCs. In addition, the resolution of RAD51 foci, indicative of active homologous recombination repair (HRR, showed that hESCs as well as NPs have high capacity for HRR, whereas astrocytes do not. Importantly, the ATM kinase was shown to be critical for foci formation in astrocytes, but not in hESCs, suggesting that the DDR is different in these cells. Blocking the ATM kinase in astrocytes not only prevented the formation but also completely disassembled preformed repair foci. The ability of hESCs to form IRIF was abrogated with caffeine and siRNAs targeted against ATR, implicating that hESCs rely on ATR, rather than ATM for regulating DSB repair. This relationship dynamically changed as cells differentiated. Interestingly, while the inhibition of the DNA-PKcs kinase (and presumably non-homologous endjoining [NHEJ] in astrocytes slowed IRIF resolution it did not in hESCs, suggesting that repair in hESCs does not utilize DNA-PKcs. Altogether, our results show that hESCs have efficient DSB repair that is largely ATR-dependent HRR, whereas astrocytes critically depend on ATM for NHEJ, which, in part, is DNA-PKcs-independent.

  14. Xrcc1-dependent and Ku-dependent DNA double-strand break repair kinetics in Arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonnel, Cyril; Gallego, Maria E; White, Charles I

    2010-10-01

    Double-strand breakage (DSB) of DNA involves loss of information on the two strands of the DNA fibre and thus cannot be repaired by simple copying of the complementary strand which is possible with single-strand DNA damage. Homologous recombination (HR) can precisely repair DSB using another copy of the genome as template and non-homologous recombination (NHR) permits repair of DSB with little or no dependence on DNA sequence homology. In addition to the well-characterised Ku-dependent non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway, much recent attention has been focused on Ku-independent NHR. The complex interrelationships and regulation of NHR pathways remain poorly understood, even more so in the case of plants, and we present here an analysis of Ku-dependent and Ku-independent repair of DSB in Arabidopsis thaliana. We have characterised an Arabidopsis xrcc1 mutant and developed quantitative analysis of the kinetics of appearance and loss of γ-H2AX foci as a tool to measure DSB repair in dividing root tip cells of γ-irradiated plants in vivo. This approach has permitted determination of DSB repair kinetics in planta following a short pulse of γ-irradiation, establishing the existence of a Ku-independent, Xrcc1-dependent DSB repair pathway. Furthermore, our data show a role for Ku80 during the first minutes post-irradiation and that Xrcc1 also plays such a role, but only in the absence of Ku. The importance of Xrcc1 is, however, clearly visible at later times in the presence of Ku, showing that alternative end-joining plays an important role in DSB repair even in the presence of active NHEJ. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Numt-mediated double-strand break repair mitigates deletions during primate genome evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einat Hazkani-Covo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ is the major mechanism of double-strand break repair (DSBR in mammalian cells. NHEJ has traditionally been inferred from experimental systems involving induced double strand breaks (DSBs. Whether or not the spectrum of repair events observed in experimental NHEJ reflects the repair of natural breaks by NHEJ during chromosomal evolution is an unresolved issue. In primate phylogeny, nuclear DNA sequences of mitochondrial origin, numts, are inserted into naturally occurring chromosomal breaks via NHEJ. Thus, numt integration sites harbor evidence for the mechanisms that act on the genome over evolutionary timescales. We have identified 35 and 55 lineage-specific numts in the human and chimpanzee genomes, respectively, using the rhesus monkey genome as an outgroup. One hundred and fifty two numt-chromosome fusion points were classified based on their repair patterns. Repair involving microhomology and repair leading to nucleotide additions were detected. These repair patterns are within the experimentally determined spectrum of classical NHEJ, suggesting that information from experimental systems is representative of broader genetic loci and end configurations. However, in incompatible DSBR events, small deletions always occur, whereas in 54% of numt integration events examined, no deletions were detected. Numts show a statistically significant reduction in deletion frequency, even in comparison to DSBR involving filler DNA. Therefore, numts show a unique mechanism of integration via NHEJ. Since the deletion frequency during numt insertion is low, native overhangs of chromosome breaks are preserved, allowing us to determine that 24% of the analyzed breaks are cohesive with overhangs of up to 11 bases. These data represent, to the best of our knowledge, the most comprehensive description of the structure of naturally occurring DSBs. We suggest a model in which the sealing of DSBs by numts, and probably by other filler

  16. Steroids Regulate CXCL4 in the Human Endometrium During Menstruation to Enable Efficient Endometrial Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maybin, Jacqueline A; Thiruchelvam, Uma; Madhra, Mayank; Saunders, Philippa T K; Critchley, Hilary O D

    2017-06-01

    Repair of the endometrial surface at menstruation must be efficient to minimize blood loss and optimize reproductive function. The mechanism and regulation of endometrial repair remain undefined. To determine the presence/regulation of CXCL4 in the human endometrium as a putative repair factor at menses. Endometrial tissue was collected throughout the menstrual cycle from healthy women attending the gynecology department. Menstrual blood loss was objectively measured in a subset, and heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) was defined as >80 mL per cycle. Monocytes were isolated from peripheral blood. CXCL4 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein were identified by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. The function/regulation of endometrial CXCL4 was explored by in vitro cell culture. CXCL4 mRNA concentrations were significantly increased during menstruation. Intense staining for CXCL4 was detected in late secretory and menstrual tissue, localized to stromal, epithelial and endothelial cells. Colocalization identified positive staining in CD68+ macrophages. Treatment of human endometrial stromal and endothelial cells (hESCs and HEECs, respectively) with steroids revealed differential regulation of CXCL4. Progesterone withdrawal resulted in significant increases in CXCL4 mRNA and protein in hESCs, whereas cortisol significantly increased CXCL4 in HEECs. In women with HMB, CXCL4 was reduced in endothelial cells during the menstrual phase compared with women with normal menstrual bleeding. Cortisol-exposed macrophages displayed increased chemotaxis toward CXCL4 compared with macrophages incubated with estrogen or progesterone. These data implicate CXCL4 in endometrial repair after menses. Reduced cortisol at the time of menses may contribute to delayed endometrial repair and HMB, in part by mechanisms involving aberrant expression of CXCL4. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society

  17. CRISPR-Cas9 Can Inhibit HIV-1 Replication but NHEJ Repair Facilitates Virus Escape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Gang; Zhao, Na; Berkhout, Ben; Das, Atze T.

    2016-01-01

    Several recent studies demonstrated that the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated endonuclease Cas9 can be used for guide RNA (gRNA)-directed, sequence-specific cleavage of HIV proviral DNA in infected cells. We here demonstrate profound inhibition of HIV-1

  18. Transposon Invasion of the Paramecium Germline Genome Countered by a Domesticated PiggyBac Transposase and the NHEJ Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Emeline; Bischerour, Julien; Marmignon, Antoine; Mathy, Nathalie; Régnier, Vinciane; Bétermier, Mireille

    2012-01-01

    Sequences related to transposons constitute a large fraction of extant genomes, but insertions within coding sequences have generally not been tolerated during evolution. Thanks to their unique nuclear dimorphism and to their original mechanism of programmed DNA elimination from their somatic nucleus (macronucleus), ciliates are emerging model organisms for the study of the impact of transposable elements on genomes. The germline genome of the ciliate Paramecium, located in its micronucleus, contains thousands of short intervening sequences, the IESs, which interrupt 47% of genes. Recent data provided support to the hypothesis that an evolutionary link exists between Paramecium IESs and Tc1/mariner transposons. During development of the macronucleus, IESs are excised precisely thanks to the coordinated action of PiggyMac, a domesticated piggyBac transposase, and of the NHEJ double-strand break repair pathway. A PiggyMac homolog is also required for developmentally programmed DNA elimination in another ciliate, Tetrahymena. Here, we present an overview of the life cycle of these unicellular eukaryotes and of the developmentally programmed genome rearrangements that take place at each sexual cycle. We discuss how ancient domestication of a piggyBac transposase might have allowed Tc1/mariner elements to spread throughout the germline genome of Paramecium, without strong counterselection against insertion within genes. PMID:22888464

  19. Isolation of Chromatin from Dysfunctional Telomeres Reveals an Important Role for Ring1b in NHEJ-Mediated Chromosome Fusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Bartocci

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When telomeres become critically short, DNA damage response factors are recruited at chromosome ends, initiating a cellular response to DNA damage. We performed proteomic isolation of chromatin fragments (PICh in order to define changes in chromatin composition that occur upon onset of acute telomere dysfunction triggered by depletion of the telomere-associated factor TRF2. This unbiased purification of telomere-associated proteins in functional or dysfunctional conditions revealed the dynamic changes in chromatin composition that take place at telomeres upon DNA damage induction. On the basis of our results, we describe a critical role for the polycomb group protein Ring1b in nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ-mediated end-to-end chromosome fusions. We show that cells with reduced levels of Ring1b have a reduced ability to repair uncapped telomeric chromatin. Our data represent an unbiased isolation of chromatin undergoing DNA damage and are a valuable resource to map the changes in chromatin composition in response to DNA damage activation.

  20. Transactivation domain of p53 regulates DNA repair and integrity in human iPS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannappan, Ramaswamy; Mattapally, Saidulu; Wagle, Pooja A; Zhang, Jianyi

    2018-05-18

    The role of p53 transactivation domain (p53-TAD), a multifunctional and dynamic domain, on DNA repair and retaining DNA integrity in human iPS cells has never been studied. p53-TAD was knocked out in iPS cells using CRISPR/Cas9 and was confirmed by DNA sequencing. p53-TAD KO cells were characterized by: accelerated proliferation, decreased population doubling time, and unaltered Bcl2, BBC3, IGF1R, Bax and altered Mdm2, p21, and PIDD transcripts expression. In p53-TAD KO cells p53 regulated DNA repair proteins XPA, DNA polH and DDB2 expression were found to be reduced compared to p53-WT cells. Exposure to low dose of doxorubicin (Doxo) induced similar DNA damage and DNA damage response (DDR) measured by RAD50 and MRE11 expression, Checkpoint kinase 2 activation and γH2A.X recruitment at DNA strand breaks in both the cell groups indicating silencing p53-TAD do not affect DDR mechanism upstream of p53. Following removal of Doxo p53-WT hiPS cells underwent DNA repair, corrected their damaged DNA and restored DNA integrity. Conversely, p53-TAD KO hiPS cells did not undergo complete DNA repair and failed to restore DNA integrity. More importantly continuous culture of p53-TAD KO hiPS cells underwent G2/M cell cycle arrest and expressed cellular senescent marker p16 INK4a . Our data clearly shows that silencing transactivation domain of p53 did not affect DDR but affected the DNA repair process implying the crucial role of p53 transactivation domain in maintaining DNA integrity. Therefore, activating p53-TAD domain using small molecules may promote DNA repair and integrity of cells and prevent senescence.

  1. Double Strand Break Repair, one mechanism can hide another: Alternative non-homologous end joining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rass, E.; Grabarz, A.; Bertrand, P.; Lopez, B.S.

    2012-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks are major cytotoxic lesions encountered by the cells. They can be induced by ionizing radiation or endogenous stress and can lead to genetic instability. Two mechanisms compete for the repair of DNA double strand breaks: homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Homologous recombination requires DNA sequences homology and is initiated by single strand resection. Recently, advances have been made concerning the major steps and proteins involved in resection. NHEJ, in contrast, does not require sequence homology. The existence of a DNA double strand break repair mechanism, independent of KU and ligase IV, the key proteins of the canonical non homologous end joining pathway, has been revealed lately and named alternative non homologous end joining. The hallmarks of this highly mutagenic pathway are deletions at repair junctions and frequent use of distal micro-homologies. This mechanism is also initiated by a single strand resection of the break. The aim of this review is firstly to present recent data on single strand resection, and secondly the alternative NHEJ pathway, including a discussion on the fidelity of NHEJ. Based on current knowledge, canonical NHEJ does not appear as an intrinsically mutagenic mechanism, but in contrast, as a conservative one. The structure of broken DNA ends actually dictates the quality repair of the alternative NHEJ and seems the actual responsible for the mutagenesis attributed beforehand to the canonical NHEJ. The existence of this novel DNA double strand breaks repair mechanism needs to be taken into account in the development of radiosensitizing strategies in order to optimise the efficiency of radiotherapy. (authors)

  2. A cell cycle-dependent regulatory circuit composed of 53BP1-RIF1 and BRCA1-CtIP controls DNA repair pathway choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribano-Díaz, Cristina; Orthwein, Alexandre; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Xing, Mengtan; Young, Jordan T F; Tkáč, Ján; Cook, Michael A; Rosebrock, Adam P; Munro, Meagan; Canny, Marella D; Xu, Dongyi; Durocher, Daniel

    2013-03-07

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway choice is governed by the opposing activities of 53BP1 and BRCA1. 53BP1 stimulates nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), whereas BRCA1 promotes end resection and homologous recombination (HR). Here we show that 53BP1 is an inhibitor of BRCA1 accumulation at DSB sites, specifically in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. ATM-dependent phosphorylation of 53BP1 physically recruits RIF1 to DSB sites, and we identify RIF1 as the critical effector of 53BP1 during DSB repair. Remarkably, RIF1 accumulation at DSB sites is strongly antagonized by BRCA1 and its interacting partner CtIP. Lastly, we show that depletion of RIF1 is able to restore end resection and RAD51 loading in BRCA1-depleted cells. This work therefore identifies a cell cycle-regulated circuit, underpinned by RIF1 and BRCA1, that governs DSB repair pathway choice to ensure that NHEJ dominates in G1 and HR is favored from S phase onward. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A decade of understanding spatio-temporal regulation of DNA repair by the nuclear architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Hicham; Cobb, Jennifer A

    2016-10-01

    The nucleus is a hub for gene expression and is a highly organized entity. The nucleoplasm is heterogeneous, owing to the preferential localization of specific metabolic factors, which lead to the definition of nuclear compartments or bodies. The genome is organized into chromosome territories, as well as heterochromatin and euchromatin domains. Recent observations have indicated that nuclear organization is important for maintaining genomic stability. For example, nuclear organization has been implicated in stabilizing damaged DNA, repair-pathway choice, and in preventing chromosomal rearrangements. Over the past decade, several studies have revealed that dynamic changes in the nuclear architecture are important during double-strand break repair. Stemming from work in yeast, relocation of a damaged site prior to repair appears to be at least partially conserved in multicellular eukaryotes. In this review, we will discuss genome and nucleoplasm architecture, particularly the importance of the nuclear periphery in genome stability. We will also discuss how the site of relocation regulates repair-pathway choice.

  4. A novel small molecule inhibitor of the DNA repair protein Ku70/80.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weterings, Eric; Gallegos, Alfred C; Dominick, Lauren N; Cooke, Laurence S; Bartels, Trace N; Vagner, Josef; Matsunaga, Terry O; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2016-07-01

    Non-Homologous End-Joining (NHEJ) is the predominant pathway for the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in human cells. The NHEJ pathway is frequently upregulated in several solid cancers as a compensatory mechanism for a separate DSB repair defect or for innate genomic instability, making this pathway a powerful target for synthetic lethality approaches. In addition, NHEJ reduces the efficacy of cancer treatment modalities which rely on the introduction of DSBs, like radiation therapy or genotoxic chemotherapy. Consequently, inhibition of the NHEJ pathway can modulate a radiation- or chemo-refractory disease presentation. The Ku70/80 heterodimer protein plays a pivotal role in the NHEJ process. It possesses a ring-shaped structure with high affinity for DSBs and serves as the first responder and central scaffold around which the rest of the repair complex is assembled. Because of this central position, the Ku70/80 dimer is a logical target for the disruption of the entire NHEJ pathway. Surprisingly, specific inhibitors of the Ku70/80 heterodimer are currently not available. We here describe an in silico, pocket-based drug discovery methodology utilizing the crystal structure of the Ku70/80 heterodimer. We identified a novel putative small molecule binding pocket and selected several potential inhibitors by computational screening. Subsequent biological screening resulted in the first identification of a compound with confirmed Ku-inhibitory activity in the low micro-molar range, capable of disrupting the binding of Ku70/80 to DNA substrates and impairing Ku-dependent activation of another NHEJ factor, the DNA-PKCS kinase. Importantly, this compound synergistically sensitized human cell lines to radiation treatment, indicating a clear potential to diminish DSB repair. The chemical scaffold we here describe can be utilized as a lead-generating platform for the design and development of a novel class of anti-cancer agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All

  5. Control of radiation sensitivity of mammalian cells. Regulation of expression of DNA repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kayo; Morita, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    This review describes authors' investigations concerning regulation of expression of DNA repair genes for the purpose of control of radiosensitivity of mammalian cells for cancer radiotherapy. One of their experiments concerns the enhancement of sensitivity to radiation and anti-tumor agents by suppressing the expression of mammalian Rad51 gene which playing a central role in recombination repair against DNA double-strand break, by RNA interference (RNAi). Described are the mode of action of RNAi, mechanism of suppression of Rad51 gene expression by it, enhancing effect in radiosensitivity, stable suppression and enhancement by hairpin RNA and its possible usefulness in cancer therapy. The other concerns the histone H2AX gene, which delivering the repair signal post phosphorylation in chromatin against the double-strand break. Experimental results of suppression of the histone H2AX gene by tet-off system, enhancement of radiosensitivity by the suppression and functional recovery by the gene transfer are described, and the radiosensitivity can be thus artificially controlled by tetracycline in authors' F9 2AX (tet/tet) cells. (N.I.)

  6. Induction and repair of DNA double strand breaks: The increasing spectrum of non-homologous end joining pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mladenov, Emil; Iliakis, George

    2011-01-01

    A defining characteristic of damage induced in the DNA by ionizing radiation (IR) is its clustered character that leads to the formation of complex lesions challenging the cellular repair mechanisms. The most widely investigated such complex lesion is the DNA double strand break (DSB). DSBs undermine chromatin stability and challenge the repair machinery because an intact template strand is lacking to assist restoration of integrity and sequence in the DNA molecule. Therefore, cells have evolved a sophisticated machinery to detect DSBs and coordinate a response on the basis of inputs from various sources. A central function of cellular responses to DSBs is the coordination of DSB repair. Two conceptually different mechanisms can in principle remove DSBs from the genome of cells of higher eukaryotes. Homologous recombination repair (HRR) uses as template a homologous DNA molecule and is therefore error-free; it functions preferentially in the S and G2 phases. Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), on the other hand, simply restores DNA integrity by joining the two ends, is error prone as sequence is only fortuitously preserved and active throughout the cell cycle. The basis of DSB repair pathway choice remains unknown, but cells of higher eukaryotes appear programmed to utilize preferentially NHEJ. Recent work suggests that when the canonical DNA-PK dependent pathway of NHEJ (D-NHEJ), becomes compromised an alternative NHEJ pathway and not HRR substitutes in a quasi-backup function (B-NHEJ). Here, we outline aspects of DSB induction by IR and review the mechanisms of their processing in cells of higher eukaryotes. We place particular emphasis on backup pathways of NHEJ and summarize their increasing significance in various cellular processes, as well as their potential contribution to carcinogenesis.

  7. Epidermal wound repair is regulated by the planar cell polarity signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caddy, Jacinta; Wilanowski, Tomasz; Darido, Charbel; Dworkin, Sebastian; Ting, Stephen B; Zhao, Quan; Rank, Gerhard; Auden, Alana; Srivastava, Seema; Papenfuss, Tony A; Murdoch, Jennifer N; Humbert, Patrick O; Parekh, Vishwas; Boulos, Nidal; Weber, Thomas; Zuo, Jian; Cunningham, John M; Jane, Stephen M

    2010-07-20

    The mammalian PCP pathway regulates diverse developmental processes requiring coordinated cellular movement, including neural tube closure and cochlear stereociliary orientation. Here, we show that epidermal wound repair is regulated by PCP signaling. Mice carrying mutant alleles of PCP genes Vangl2, Celsr1, PTK7, and Scrb1, and the transcription factor Grhl3, interact genetically, exhibiting failed wound healing, neural tube defects, and disordered cochlear polarity. Using phylogenetic analysis, ChIP, and gene expression in Grhl3(-)(/-) mice, we identified RhoGEF19, a homolog of a RhoA activator involved in PCP signaling in Xenopus, as a direct target of GRHL3. Knockdown of Grhl3 or RhoGEF19 in keratinocytes induced defects in actin polymerization, cellular polarity, and wound healing, and re-expression of RhoGEF19 rescued these defects in Grhl3-kd cells. These results define a role for Grhl3 in PCP signaling and broadly implicate this pathway in epidermal repair. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Telomeres and genomic damage repair. Their implication in human pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Maria del R.; Dubner, Diana; Michelin, Severino; Gisone, Pablo; Carosella, Edgardo D.

    2002-01-01

    Telomeres, functional complexed that protect eukaryotic chromosome ends, participate in the regulation of cell proliferation and could play a role in the stabilization of genomic regions in response to genotoxic stress. Their significance in human pathology becomes evident in several diseases sharing genomic instability as a common trait, in which alterations of the telomere metabolism have been demonstrated. Many of them are also associated with hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation and cancer susceptibility. Besides the specific proteins belonging to the telomeric complex, other proteins involved in the DNA repair machinery, such as ATM, BRCA1, BRCA2, PARP/tankyrase system, DNA-PK and RAD50-MRE11-NBS1 complexes, are closely related with the telomere. This suggests that the telomere sequesters DNA repair proteins for its own structure maintenance, with could also be released toward damaged sites in the genomic DNA. This communication describes essential aspects of telomere structure and function and their links with homologous recombination, non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), V(D)J system and mismatch-repair (MMR). Several pathological conditions exhibiting alterations in some of these mechanisms are also considered. The cell response to ionizing radiation and its relationship with the telomeric metabolism is particularly taken into account as a model for studying genotoxicity. (author)

  9. A robust network of double-strand break repair pathways governs genome integrity during C. elegans development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pontier, D.B.; Tijsterman, M.

    2009-01-01

    To preserve genomic integrity, various mechanisms have evolved to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Depending on cell type or cell cycle phase, DSBs can be repaired error-free, by homologous recombination, or with concomitant loss of sequence information, via nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ)

  10. Mitochondrial respiratory modifiers confer survival advantage by facilitating DNA repair in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, Ankit; Khanna, Suchit; Singh, Saurabh; Rai, Yogesh; Soni, Ravi; Kalra, Namita; Dwarakanath, B.S.; Bhatt, Anant Narayan

    2014-01-01

    High rate of aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect), one of the primary hallmarks of cancer cells, acquired during the multistep development of tumors is also responsible for therapeutic resistance. Underlying this hallmark is the compromised respiratory metabolism that contributes to the acquisition of the glycolytic phenotype for sustained ATP production and cell proliferation. Nevertheless, the exact mechanisms underlying the glycolysis-linked radio-resistance in cancer cells remain elusive. In this study, we transiently elevated glycolysis by treating human cell lines (HEK293, BMG-1 and OCT-1) with mitochondrial respiratory modifiers (MRMs) viz. 2,4-dinitrophenol, Photosan-3, and Methylene blue to examine if transient stimulation of glycolysis before irradiation using MRMs is sufficient to confer radioresistance. Treatment with MRMs led to a significant (two-fold) increase in glucose consumption and lactate production together with a robust increase in the protein levels of two key regulators of glucose metabolism, i.e. GLUT-1 and HK-II. MRMs also enhanced the clonogenic survival and facilitated DNA repair by activating both non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) pathways of DNA double strand break repair leading to reduction in radiation-induced cytogenetic damage (micronuclei formation) in these cells. Inhibition of glucose uptake by inhibitors like 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), 3-bromo pyruvate (3-BP) and fasentin under conditions of stimulated glycolysis not only reversed the effect but also sensitized the cells to radiation more profoundly. The inhibition of glycolysis using 2-DG also reduced the levels of Ku 70 (NHEJ) and Rad-51 (HR) proteins. Thus, our results suggest that enhanced glycolysis in cancer cells may confer radio-resistance and offers survival advantage partly by enhancing the repair of DNA damage. (author)

  11. miR-24-mediated down-regulation of H2AX suppresses DNA repair in terminally differentiated blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Ashish; Pan, Yunfeng; Navarro, Francisco; Dykxhoorn, Derek M.; Moreau, Lisa; Meire, Eti; Bentwich, Zvi; Lieberman, Judy; Chowdhury, Dipanjan

    2010-01-01

    Terminally differentiated cells have reduced capacity to repair double strand breaks (DSB), but the molecular mechanism behind this down-regulation is unclear. Here we find that miR-24 is consistently up-regulated during post-mitotic differentiation of hematopoietic cell lines and regulates the histone variant H2AX, a key DSB repair protein that activates cell cycle checkpoint proteins and retains DSB repair factors at DSB foci. The H2AX 3’UTR contains conserved miR-24 binding sites regulated by miR-24. Both H2AX mRNA and protein are substantially reduced during hematopoietic cell terminal differentiation by miR-24 up-regulation both in in vitro differentiated cells and primary human blood cells. miR-24 suppression of H2AX renders cells hypersensitive to γ-irradiation and genotoxic drugs. Antagonizing miR-24 in differentiating cells protects them from DNA damage-induced cell death, while transfecting miR-24 mimics in dividing cells increases chromosomal breaks and unrepaired DNA damage and reduces viability in response to DNA damage. This DNA repair phenotype can be fully rescued by over-expressing miR-24-insensitive H2AX. Therefore, miR-24 up-regulation in post-replicative cells reduces H2AX and thereby renders them highly vulnerable to DNA damage. PMID:19377482

  12. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of nucleotide excision repair genes in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefkofsky, Hailey B. [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Veloso, Artur [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bioinformatics Program, Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ljungman, Mats, E-mail: ljungman@umich.edu [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes DNA helix-distorting lesions induced by UV light and various chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. These lesions efficiently block the elongation of transcription and need to be rapidly removed by transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) to avoid the induction of apoptosis. Twenty-nine genes have been classified to code for proteins participating in nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells. Here we explored the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of these NER genes across 13 human cell lines using Bru-seq and BruChase-seq, respectively. Many NER genes are relatively large in size and therefore will be easily inactivated by UV-induced transcription-blocking lesions. Furthermore, many of these genes produce transcripts that are rather unstable. Thus, these genes are expected to rapidly lose expression leading to a diminished function of NER. One such gene is ERCC6 that codes for the CSB protein critical for TC-NER. Due to its large gene size and high RNA turnover rate, the ERCC6 gene may act as dosimeter of DNA damage so that at high levels of damage, ERCC6 RNA levels would be diminished leading to the loss of CSB expression, inhibition of TC-NER and the promotion of cell death.

  13. Transcriptional and Posttranslational Regulation of Nucleotide Excision Repair: The Guardian of the Genome against Ultraviolet Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Min Park

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV radiation from sunlight represents a constant threat to genome stability by generating modified DNA bases such as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD and pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4 photoproducts (6-4PP. If unrepaired, these lesions can have deleterious effects, including skin cancer. Mammalian cells are able to neutralize UV-induced photolesions through nucleotide excision repair (NER. The NER pathway has multiple components including seven xeroderma pigmentosum (XP proteins (XPA to XPG and numerous auxiliary factors, including ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR protein kinase and RCC1 like domain (RLD and homologous to the E6-AP carboxyl terminus (HECT domain containing E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 2 (HERC2. In this review we highlight recent data on the transcriptional and posttranslational regulation of NER activity.

  14. APE1, the DNA base excision repair protein, regulates the removal of platinum adducts in sensory neuronal cultures by NER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun-Suk; Guo, Chunlu; Thompson, Eric L.; Jiang, Yanlin; Kelley, Mark R.; Vasko, Michael R.; Lee, Suk-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is one of the major side effects of treatment with the anticancer drug, cisplatin. One proposed mechanism for this neurotoxicity is the formation of platinum adducts in sensory neurons that could contribute to DNA damage. Although this damage is largely repaired by nuclear excision repair (NER), our previous findings suggest that augmenting the base excision repair pathway (BER) by overexpressing the repair protein APE1 protects sensory neurons from cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity. The question remains whether APE1 contributes to the ability of the NER pathway to repair platinum-damage in neuronal cells. To examine this, we manipulated APE1 expression in sensory neuronal cultures and measured Pt-removal after exposure to cisplatin. When neuronal cultures were treated with increasing concentrations of cisplatin for two or three hours, there was a concentration-dependent increase in Pt-damage that peaked at four hours and returned to near baseline levels after 24 h. In cultures where APE1 expression was reduced by ∼80% using siRNA directed at APE1, there was a significant inhibition of Pt-removal over eight hours which was reversed by overexpressing APE1 using a lentiviral construct for human wtAPE1. Overexpressing a mutant APE1 (C65 APE1), which only has DNA repair activity, but not its other significant redox-signaling function, mimicked the effects of wtAPE1. Overexpressing DNA repair activity mutant APE1 (226 + 177APE1), with only redox activity was ineffective suggesting it is the DNA repair function of APE1 and not its redox-signaling, that restores the Pt-damage removal. Together, these data provide the first evidence that a critical BER enzyme, APE1, helps regulate the NER pathway in the repair of cisplatin damage in sensory neurons

  15. APE1, the DNA base excision repair protein, regulates the removal of platinum adducts in sensory neuronal cultures by NER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Suk [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Guo, Chunlu; Thompson, Eric L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Jiang, Yanlin [Department of Pediatrics and Herman B Wells Center for Pediatric Research, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Kelley, Mark R. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Department of Pediatrics and Herman B Wells Center for Pediatric Research, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Vasko, Michael R. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Lee, Suk-Hee, E-mail: slee@iu.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Peripheral neuropathy is one of the major side effects of treatment with the anticancer drug, cisplatin. One proposed mechanism for this neurotoxicity is the formation of platinum adducts in sensory neurons that could contribute to DNA damage. Although this damage is largely repaired by nuclear excision repair (NER), our previous findings suggest that augmenting the base excision repair pathway (BER) by overexpressing the repair protein APE1 protects sensory neurons from cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity. The question remains whether APE1 contributes to the ability of the NER pathway to repair platinum-damage in neuronal cells. To examine this, we manipulated APE1 expression in sensory neuronal cultures and measured Pt-removal after exposure to cisplatin. When neuronal cultures were treated with increasing concentrations of cisplatin for two or three hours, there was a concentration-dependent increase in Pt-damage that peaked at four hours and returned to near baseline levels after 24 h. In cultures where APE1 expression was reduced by ∼80% using siRNA directed at APE1, there was a significant inhibition of Pt-removal over eight hours which was reversed by overexpressing APE1 using a lentiviral construct for human wtAPE1. Overexpressing a mutant APE1 (C65 APE1), which only has DNA repair activity, but not its other significant redox-signaling function, mimicked the effects of wtAPE1. Overexpressing DNA repair activity mutant APE1 (226 + 177APE1), with only redox activity was ineffective suggesting it is the DNA repair function of APE1 and not its redox-signaling, that restores the Pt-damage removal. Together, these data provide the first evidence that a critical BER enzyme, APE1, helps regulate the NER pathway in the repair of cisplatin damage in sensory neurons.

  16. SPOC1 modulates DNA repair by regulating key determinants of chromatin compaction and DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mund, Andreas; Schubert, Tobias; Staege, Hannah

    2012-01-01

    -dependent manner. Moreover, SPOC1 localizes at endogenous repair foci, including OPT domains and accumulates at large DSB repair foci characteristic for delayed repair at heterochromatic sites. SPOC1 depletion enhances the kinetics of ionizing radiation-induced foci (IRIF) formation after γ-irradiation (γ-IR), non...

  17. Nrf2 facilitates repair of radiation induced DNA damage through homologous recombination repair pathway in a ROS independent manner in cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, Sundarraj; Pal, Debojyoti; Sandur, Santosh K., E-mail: sskumar@barc.gov.in

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Nrf2 inhibition in A549 cells led to attenuated DNA repair and radiosensitization. • Influence of Nrf2 on DNA repair is not linked to its antioxidant function. • Nrf2 influences DNA repair through homologous recombination (HR) repair pathway. • Many genes involved in HR pathway show ARE sequences in their upstream region. - Abstract: Nrf2 is a redox sensitive transcription factor that is involved in the co-ordinated transcription of genes involved in redox homeostasis. But the role of Nrf2 in DNA repair is not investigated in detail. We have employed A549 and MCF7 cells to study the role of Nrf2 on DNA repair by inhibiting Nrf2 using all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) or by knock down approach prior to radiation exposure (4 Gy). DNA damage and repair analysis was studied by γH2AX foci formation and comet assay. Results suggested that the inhibition of Nrf2 in A549 or MCF7 cells led to significant slowdown in DNA repair as compared to respective radiation controls. The persistence of residual DNA damage even in the presence of free radical scavenger N-acetyl cysteine, suggested that the influence of Nrf2 on DNA repair was not linked to its antioxidant functions. Further, its influence on non-homologous end joining repair pathway was studied by inhibiting both Nrf2 and DNA-PK together. This led to synergistic reduction of survival fraction, indicating that Nrf2 may not be influencing the NHEJ pathway. To investigate the role of homologous recombination repair (HR) pathway, RAD51 foci formation was monitored. There was a significant reduction in the foci formation in cells treated with ATRA or shRNA against Nrf2 as compared to their respective radiation controls. Further, Nrf2 inhibition led to significant reduction in mRNA levels of RAD51. BLAST analysis was also performed on upstream regions of DNA repair genes to identify antioxidant response element and found that many repair genes that are involved in HR pathway may be regulated by Nrf2

  18. Direct Involvement of Retinoblastoma Family Proteins in DNA Repair by Non-homologous End-Joining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Cook

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Deficiencies in DNA double-strand break (DSB repair lead to genetic instability, a recognized cause of cancer initiation and evolution. We report that the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB1 is required for DNA DSB repair by canonical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ. Support of cNHEJ involves a mechanism independent of RB1’s cell-cycle function and depends on its amino terminal domain with which it binds to NHEJ components XRCC5 and XRCC6. Cells with engineered loss of RB family function as well as cancer-derived cells with mutational RB1 loss show substantially reduced levels of cNHEJ. RB1 variants disabled for the interaction with XRCC5 and XRCC6, including a cancer-associated variant, are unable to support cNHEJ despite being able to confer cell-cycle control. Our data identify RB1 loss as a candidate driver of structural genomic instability and a causative factor for cancer somatic heterogeneity and evolution.

  19. Molecular analysis of Ku redox regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shatilla Andrea

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs can occur in response to ionizing radiation (IR, radiomimetic agents and from endogenous DNA-damaging reactive oxygen metabolites. Unrepaired or improperly repaired DSBs are potentially the most lethal form of DNA damage and can result in chromosomal translocations and contribute to the development of cancer. The principal mechanism for the repair of DSBs in humans is non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ. Ku is a key member of the NHEJ pathway and plays an important role in the recognition step when it binds to free DNA termini. Ku then stimulates the assembly and activation of other NHEJ components. DNA binding of Ku is regulated by redox conditions and evidence from our laboratory has demonstrated that Ku undergoes structural changes when oxidized that results in a reduction in DNA binding activity. The C-terminal domain and cysteine 493 of Ku80 were investigated for their contribution to redox regulation of Ku. Results We effectively removed the C-terminal domain of Ku80 generating a truncation mutant and co-expressed this variant with wild type Ku70 in an insect cell system to create a Ku70/80ΔC heterodimer. We also generated two single amino acid variants of Cys493, replacing this amino acid with either an alanine (C493A or a serine (C493S, and over-expressed the variant proteins in SF9 insect cells in complex with wild type Ku70. Neither the truncation nor the amino acid substitutions alters protein expression or stability as determined by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. We show that the C493 mutations do not alter the ability of Ku to bind duplex DNA in vitro under reduced conditions while truncation of the Ku80 C-terminus slightly reduced DNA binding affinity. Diamide oxidation of cysteines was shown to inhibit DNA binding similarly for both the wild-type and all variant proteins. Interestingly, differential DNA binding activity following re-reduction was observed for the Ku70/80

  20. The PCNA-associated protein PARI negatively regulates homologous recombination via the inhibition of DNA repair synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burkovics, Peter; Dome, Lili; Juhasz, Szilvia

    2016-01-01

    to inhibit homologous recombination (HR) events. Here, we describe a biochemical mechanism in which PARI functions as an HR regulator after replication fork stalling and during double-strand break repair. In our reconstituted biochemical system, we show that PARI inhibits DNA repair synthesis during...... recombination events in a PCNA interaction-dependent way but independently of its UvrD-like helicase domain. In accordance, we demonstrate that PARI inhibits HR in vivo, and its knockdown suppresses the UV sensitivity of RAD18-depleted cells. Our data reveal a novel human regulatory mechanism that limits...

  1. Mouse embryonic stem cells, but not somatic cells, predominantly use homologous recombination to repair double-strand DNA breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichy, Elisia D; Pillai, Resmi; Deng, Li; Liang, Li; Tischfield, Jay; Schwemberger, Sandy J; Babcock, George F; Stambrook, Peter J

    2010-11-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells give rise to all cell types of an organism. Since mutations at this embryonic stage would affect all cells and be detrimental to the overall health of an organism, robust mechanisms must exist to ensure that genomic integrity is maintained. To test this proposition, we compared the capacity of murine ES cells to repair DNA double-strand breaks with that of differentiated cells. Of the 2 major pathways that repair double-strand breaks, error-prone nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) predominated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, whereas the high fidelity homologous recombinational repair (HRR) predominated in ES cells. Microhomology-mediated end joining, an emerging repair pathway, persisted at low levels in all cell types examined. The levels of proteins involved in HRR and microhomology-mediated end joining were highly elevated in ES cells compared with mouse embryonic fibroblasts, whereas those for NHEJ were quite variable, with DNA Ligase IV expression low in ES cells. The half-life of DNA Ligase IV protein was also low in ES cells. Attempts to increase the abundance of DNA Ligase IV protein by overexpression or inhibition of its degradation, and thereby elevate NHEJ in ES cells, were unsuccessful. When ES cells were induced to differentiate, however, the level of DNA Ligase IV protein increased, as did the capacity to repair by NHEJ. The data suggest that preferential use of HRR rather than NHEJ may lend ES cells an additional layer of genomic protection and that the limited levels of DNA Ligase IV may account for the low level of NHEJ activity.

  2. Repair pathways for heavy ion-induced complex DNA double strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yajima, Hirohiko; Nakajima, Nakako; Hirakawa, Hirokazu; Murakami, Takeshi; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Fujimori, Akira

    2012-01-01

    DNA double strand break (DSB) induced by ionizing radiation (IR) is a deleterious damage leading to cell death and genome instability if not properly repaired. It is well known that DSB is repaired by two major pathways, non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). It is also known that NHEJ is dominant throughout the cell cycle after X- or gamma-ray irradiation in mammalian cells, Meanwhile, it is thought that heavy-ion radiation (e.g., carbon-ions, iron-ions) gives rise to clustered DNA damages consisting of not only strand breaks but also aberrant bases in the vicinity of DSBs (complex DSBs). Our previous work suggested that the efficiency of NHEJ is diminished for repair of complex DSBs induced by heavy-ion radiation. We thought that this difficulty in NHEJ process associated with heavy ion induced complex DNA damage might be extended to HR process in cells exposed to heavy ions. In order to find out if this notion is true or not, exposed human cells to X-rays and heavy-ions, and studied HR associated processes at the molecular level. Our result indicates that complex DSBs induced by heavy ions effectively evoke DNA end resection activity during the HR process. Together with our results, a relevant recent progress in the field of DNA DSB repair will be discussed. (author)

  3. Protein kinase CK2 localizes to sites of DNA double-strand break regulating the cellular response to DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsen Birgitte B

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK is a nuclear complex composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs and a heterodimeric DNA-targeting subunit Ku. DNA-PK is a major component of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ repair mechanism, which is activated in the presence of DNA double-strand breaks induced by ionizing radiation, reactive oxygen species and radiomimetic drugs. We have recently reported that down-regulation of protein kinase CK2 by siRNA interference results in enhanced cell death specifically in DNA-PKcs-proficient human glioblastoma cells, and this event is accompanied by decreased autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs at S2056 and delayed repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Results In the present study, we show that CK2 co-localizes with phosphorylated histone H2AX to sites of DNA damage and while CK2 gene knockdown is associated with delayed DNA damage repair, its overexpression accelerates this process. We report for the first time evidence that lack of CK2 destabilizes the interaction of DNA-PKcs with DNA and with Ku80 at sites of genetic lesions. Furthermore, we show that CK2 regulates the phosphorylation levels of DNA-PKcs only in response to direct induction of DNA double-strand breaks. Conclusions Taken together, these results strongly indicate that CK2 plays a prominent role in NHEJ by facilitating and/or stabilizing the binding of DNA-PKcs and, possibly other repair proteins, to the DNA ends contributing to efficient DNA damage repair in mammalian cells.

  4. DNA repair: Dynamic defenders against cancer and aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuss, Jill O.; Cooper, Priscilla K.

    2006-04-01

    You probably weren't thinking about your body's cellular DNA repair systems the last time you sat on the beach in the bright sunshine. Fortunately, however, while you were subjecting your DNA to the harmful effects of ultraviolet light, your cells were busy repairing the damage. The idea that our genetic material could be damaged by the sun was not appreciated in the early days of molecular biology. When Watson and Crick discovered the structure of DNA in 1953 [1], it was assumed that DNA is fundamentally stable since it carries the blueprint of life. However, over 50 years of research have revealed that our DNA is under constant assault by sunlight, oxygen, radiation, various chemicals, and even our own cellular processes. Cleverly, evolution has provided our cells with a diverse set of tools to repair the damage that Mother Nature causes. DNA repair processes restore the normal nucleotide sequence and DNA structure of the genome after damage [2]. These responses are highly varied and exquisitely regulated. DNA repair mechanisms are traditionally characterized by the type of damage repaired. A large variety of chemical modifications can alter normal DNA bases and either lead to mutations or block transcription if not repaired, and three distinct pathways exist to remove base damage. Base excision repair (BER) corrects DNA base alterations that do not distort the overall structure of the DNA helix such as bases damaged by oxidation resulting from normal cellular metabolism. While BER removes single damaged bases, nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes short segments of nucleotides (called oligonucleotides) containing damaged bases. NER responds to any alteration that distorts the DNA helix and is the mechanism responsible for repairing bulky base damage caused by carcinogenic chemicals such as benzo [a]pyrene (found in cigarette smoke and automobile exhaust) as well as covalent linkages between adjacent pyrimidine bases resulting from the ultraviolet

  5. Ku80-deleted cells are defective at base excision repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Han; Marple, Teresa; Hasty, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ku80-deleted cells are hypersensitive to ROS and alkylating agents. • Cells deleted for Ku80, but not Ku70 or Lig4, have reduced BER capacity. • OGG1 rescues hypersensitivity to H 2 O 2 and paraquat in Ku80-mutant cells. • Cells deleted for Ku80, but not Lig4, are defective at repairing AP sites. • Cells deleted for Ku80, but not Lig4 or Brca2 exon 27, exhibit increased PAR. - Abstract: Ku80 forms a heterodimer with Ku70, called Ku, that repairs DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) via the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway. As a consequence of deleting NHEJ, Ku80-mutant cells are hypersensitive to agents that cause DNA DSBs like ionizing radiation. Here we show that Ku80 deletion also decreased resistance to ROS and alkylating agents that typically cause base lesions and single-strand breaks (SSBs). This is unusual since base excision repair (BER), not NHEJ, typically repairs these types of lesions. However, we show that deletion of another NHEJ protein, DNA ligase IV (Lig4), did not cause hypersensitivity to these agents. In addition, the ROS and alkylating agents did not induce γ-H2AX foci that are diagnostic of DSBs. Furthermore, deletion of Ku80, but not Lig4 or Ku70, reduced BER capacity. Ku80 deletion also impaired BER at the initial lesion recognition/strand scission step; thus, involvement of a DSB is unlikely. Therefore, our data suggests that Ku80 deletion impairs BER via a mechanism that does not repair DSBs

  6. Ku80-deleted cells are defective at base excision repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Han [The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, The Institute of Biotechnology, The Department of Molecular Medicine, 15355 Lambda Drive, San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States); Tumor Suppression Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid 28029 (Spain); Marple, Teresa [The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, The Institute of Biotechnology, The Department of Molecular Medicine, 15355 Lambda Drive, San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States); Hasty, Paul, E-mail: hastye@uthscsa.edu [The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, The Institute of Biotechnology, The Department of Molecular Medicine, 15355 Lambda Drive, San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States); Tumor Suppression Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid 28029 (Spain)

    2013-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ku80-deleted cells are hypersensitive to ROS and alkylating agents. • Cells deleted for Ku80, but not Ku70 or Lig4, have reduced BER capacity. • OGG1 rescues hypersensitivity to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and paraquat in Ku80-mutant cells. • Cells deleted for Ku80, but not Lig4, are defective at repairing AP sites. • Cells deleted for Ku80, but not Lig4 or Brca2 exon 27, exhibit increased PAR. - Abstract: Ku80 forms a heterodimer with Ku70, called Ku, that repairs DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) via the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway. As a consequence of deleting NHEJ, Ku80-mutant cells are hypersensitive to agents that cause DNA DSBs like ionizing radiation. Here we show that Ku80 deletion also decreased resistance to ROS and alkylating agents that typically cause base lesions and single-strand breaks (SSBs). This is unusual since base excision repair (BER), not NHEJ, typically repairs these types of lesions. However, we show that deletion of another NHEJ protein, DNA ligase IV (Lig4), did not cause hypersensitivity to these agents. In addition, the ROS and alkylating agents did not induce γ-H2AX foci that are diagnostic of DSBs. Furthermore, deletion of Ku80, but not Lig4 or Ku70, reduced BER capacity. Ku80 deletion also impaired BER at the initial lesion recognition/strand scission step; thus, involvement of a DSB is unlikely. Therefore, our data suggests that Ku80 deletion impairs BER via a mechanism that does not repair DSBs.

  7. Nickel induces transcriptional down-regulation of DNA repair pathways in tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Susan E; Scanlon, Christine D; Hegan, Denise C; Sulkowski, Parker L; Glazer, Peter M

    2017-06-01

    The heavy metal nickel is a known carcinogen, and occupational exposure to nickel compounds has been implicated in human lung and nasal cancers. Unlike many other environmental carcinogens, however, nickel does not directly induce DNA mutagenesis, and the mechanism of nickel-related carcinogenesis remains incompletely understood. Cellular nickel exposure leads to signaling pathway activation, transcriptional changes and epigenetic remodeling, processes also impacted by hypoxia, which itself promotes tumor growth without causing direct DNA damage. One of the mechanisms by which hypoxia contributes to tumor growth is the generation of genomic instability via down-regulation of high-fidelity DNA repair pathways. Here, we find that nickel exposure similarly leads to down-regulation of DNA repair proteins involved in homology-dependent DNA double-strand break repair (HDR) and mismatch repair (MMR) in tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic human lung cells. Functionally, nickel induces a defect in HDR capacity, as determined by plasmid-based host cell reactivation assays, persistence of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks and cellular hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation. Mechanistically, we find that nickel, in contrast to the metalloid arsenic, acutely induces transcriptional repression of HDR and MMR genes as part of a global transcriptional pattern similar to that seen with hypoxia. Finally, we find that exposure to low-dose nickel reduces the activity of the MLH1 promoter, but only arsenic leads to long-term MLH1 promoter silencing. Together, our data elucidate novel mechanisms of heavy metal carcinogenesis and contribute to our understanding of the influence of the microenvironment on the regulation of DNA repair pathways. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Histone Variant Regulates DNA Repair via Chromatin Condensation | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Activating the appropriate DNA repair pathway is essential for maintaining the stability of the genome after a break in both strands of DNA. How a pathway is selected, however, is not well understood. Since these double strand breaks (DSBs) occur while DNA is packaged as chromatin, changes in its organization are necessary for repair to take place. Numerous alterations have

  9. p53 regulates the repair of DNA double-strand breaks by both homologous and non-homologous recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willers, H.; Powell, S.N.; Dahm-Daphi, J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: p53 is known to suppress spontaneous homologous recombination (HR), while its role in non-homologous recombination (NHR) remains to be clarified. Here, we sought to determine the influence of p53 on the repair of chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) by HR or NHR using specially designed recombination substrates that integrate into the genome. Isogenic mouse fibroblast pairs with or without expression of exogenous p53 protein were utilized. A reporter plasmid carrying a mutated XGPRT gene was chromosomally integrated and DSBs were generated within the plasmid by the I-SceI endonuclease. Subsequent homology-mediated repair from an episomal donor resulted in XGPRT reconstitution and cellular resistance to a selection antibiotic. Analogously, the repair of chromosomal I-SceI breaks by NHR using another novel reporter plasmid restored XGPRT translation. For p53-null cells, the mean frequency of I-SceI break repair via HR was 5.5 x 10 -4 . The p53-Val135 mutant, which previously has been shown to suppress spontaneous HR by 14-fold employing the same cell system and reporter gene, only caused a 2- to 3-fold suppression of break-induced HR. In contrast, a dramatic effect of p53 on repair via NHR was found. Preliminary sequence analysis indicated that there was at least a 1000-fold reduction of illegitimate repair events resulting in loss of sequence at the break sites. The observed effects were mediated by p53 mutants defective in regulation of the cell-cycle and apoptosis. The main findings were: (1) p53 virtually blocked illegitimate rejoining of chromosomal ends. (2) The suppression of homologous DSB repair was less pronounced than the inhibition of spontaneous HR. We hypothesize that p53 allows to a certain extent error-free homology-dependent repair to proceed, while blocking error-prone NHR. The data support and extent a previous model, in which p53 maintains genomic stability by regulating recombination independently of its transactivation function

  10. Mycobacteria exploit three genetically distinct DNA double-strand break repair pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Richa; Barkan, Daniel; Redelman-Sidi, Gil; Shuman, Stewart; Glickman, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on their DNA repair pathways to resist genomic damage inflicted by the host. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are especially threatening to bacterial viability. DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR) requires nucleases that resect DSB ends and a strand exchange protein that facilitates homology search. RecBCD and RecA perform these functions in Escherichia coli and constitute the major pathway of error-free DSB repair. Mycobacteria, including the human pathogen M. tuberculosis, elaborate an additional error-prone pathway of DSB repair via non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) catalysed by Ku and DNA ligase D (LigD). Little is known about the relative contributions of HR and NHEJ to mycobacterial chromosome repair, the factors that dictate pathway choice, or the existence of additional DSB repair pathways. Here we demonstrate that Mycobacterium smegmatis has three DSB repair pathway options: HR, NHEJ and a novel mechanism of single-strand annealing (SSA). Inactivation of NHEJ or SSA is compensated by elevated HR. We find that mycobacterial RecBCD does not participate in HR or confer resistance to ionizing radiation (IR), but is required for the RecA-independent SSA pathway. In contrast, the mycobacterial helicase-nuclease AdnAB participates in the RecA-dependent HR pathway, and is a major determinant of resistance to IR and oxidative DNA damage. These findings reveal distinctive features of mycobacterial DSB repair, most notably the dedication of the RecBCD and AdnAB helicase-nuclease machines to distinct repair pathways. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Differential radiosensitivity phenotypes of DNA-PKcs mutations affecting NHEJ and HRR systems following irradiation with gamma-rays or very low fluences of alpha particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Fen; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Little, John B; Kato, Takamitsu A; Shih, Hung-Ying; Xie, Xian-Jin; Wilson, Paul F; Brogan, John R; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Chen, David J; Bedford, Joel S; Chen, Benjamin P C

    2014-01-01

    We have examined cell-cycle dependence of chromosomal aberration induction and cell killing after high or low dose-rate γ irradiation in cells bearing DNA-PKcs mutations in the S2056 cluster, the T2609 cluster, or the kinase domain. We also compared sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) production by very low fluences of α-particles in DNA-PKcs mutant cells, and in homologous recombination repair (HRR) mutant cells including Rad51C, Rad51D, and Fancg/xrcc9. Generally, chromosomal aberrations and cell killing by γ-rays were similarly affected by mutations in DNA-PKcs, and these mutant cells were more sensitive in G1 than in S/G2 phase. In G1-irradiated DNA-PKcs mutant cells, both chromosome- and chromatid-type breaks and exchanges were in excess than wild-type cells. For cells irradiated in late S/G2 phase, mutant cells showed very high yields of chromatid breaks compared to wild-type cells. Few exchanges were seen in DNA-PKcs-null, Ku80-null, or DNA-PKcs kinase dead mutants, but exchanges in excess were detected in the S2506 or T2609 cluster mutants. SCE induction by very low doses of α-particles is resulted from bystander effects in cells not traversed by α-particles. SCE seen in wild-type cells was completely abolished in Rad51C- or Rad51D-deficient cells, but near normal in Fancg/xrcc9 cells. In marked contrast, very high levels of SCEs were observed in DNA-PKcs-null, DNA-PKcs kinase-dead and Ku80-null mutants. SCE induction was also abolished in T2609 cluster mutant cells, but was only slightly reduced in the S2056 cluster mutant cells. Since both non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and HRR systems utilize initial DNA lesions as a substrate, these results suggest the possibility of a competitive interference phenomenon operating between NHEJ and at least the Rad51C/D components of HRR; the level of interaction between damaged DNA and a particular DNA-PK component may determine the level of interaction of such DNA with a relevant HRR component.

  12. Synthetic lethality between murine DNA repair factors XLF and DNA-PKcs is rescued by inactivation of Ku70

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xing, Mengtan; Bjørås, Magnar; Daniel, Jeremy A

    2017-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are recognized and repaired by the Classical Non-Homologous End-Joining (C-NHEJ) and Homologous Recombination pathways. C-NHEJ includes the core Ku70 and Ku80 (or Ku86) heterodimer that binds DSBs and thus promotes recruitment of accessory downstream NHEJ factors XLF......, PAXX, DNA-PKcs, Artemis and other core subunits, XRCC4 and DNA Ligase 4 (Lig4). In the absence of core C-NHEJ factors, DNA repair can be performed by Alternative End-Joining, which likely depends on DNA Ligase 1 and DNA Ligase 3. Genetic inactivation of C-NHEJ factors, such as Ku70, Ku80, XLF, PAXX...... with severe apoptosis in the central nervous system. Here, we demonstrate that inactivation of the Ku70 gene rescues the synthetic lethality between XLF and DNA-PKcs, resulting in triple knockout mice that are indistinguishable from Ku70-deficient littermates by size or levels of genomic instability. Moreover...

  13. Environmental Stress Induces Trinucleotide Repeat Mutagenesis in Human Cells by Alt-Nonhomologous End Joining Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Lin, Yunfu; Yotnda, Patricia; Wilson, John H

    2016-07-31

    Multiple pathways modulate the dynamic mutability of trinucleotide repeats (TNRs), which are implicated in neurodegenerative disease and evolution. Recently, we reported that environmental stresses induce TNR mutagenesis via stress responses and rereplication, with more than 50% of mutants carrying deletions or insertions-molecular signatures of DNA double-strand break repair. We now show that knockdown of alt-nonhomologous end joining (alt-NHEJ) components-XRCC1, LIG3, and PARP1-suppresses stress-induced TNR mutagenesis, in contrast to the components of homologous recombination and NHEJ, which have no effect. Thus, alt-NHEJ, which contributes to genetic mutability in cancer cells, also plays a novel role in environmental stress-induced TNR mutagenesis. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Repair of DNA DSB in higher eukaryotes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.; Perrault, A.R.; Takeda, Y.; Iliakis, G.

    2003-01-01

    Cells of higher eukaryotes process within minutes double strand breaks (DSBs) in their genome using a NHEJ apparatus that engages DNA-PKcs, Ku, DNA ligase IV, XRCC4, and other as of yet unidentified factors. Although chemical inhibition, or mutation, in any of these factors delays processing, cells ultimately remove the majority of DNA DSBs using an alternative pathway operating with slower kinetics. This alternative pathway is active in mutants deficient in genes of the RAD52 epistasis group. We proposed, therefore, that it reflects an alternative form of NHEJ that operates as a backup (B-NHEJ) to the DNA-PK- dependent (D-NHEJ) pathway, rather than homology directed repair of DSBs. We studied the role of Ku and DNA-PKcs in the coordination of these pathways using as a model end joining of restriction endonuclease linearized plasmid DNA in whole cell extracts. Efficient error-free endjoining observed in such in-vitro reactions is strongly inhibited by anti-Ku antibodies. The inhibition requires DNA-PKcs, despite that fact that Ku efficiently binds DNA ends in the presence of antibodies, or in the absence of DNA-PKcs. Strong inhibition of DNA endjoining is also mediated by wortmannin, an inhibitor of DNA-PKcs, in the presence but not in the absence of Ku, and this inhibition can be rescued by pre-incubating the reaction with double stranded oligonucleotides. The results are compatible with a role of Ku in directing endjoining to a DNA-PK dependent pathway, mediated by efficient end binding and productive interactions with DNA-PKcs. On the other hand, efficient end joining is observed in extracts of cells lacking DNA-PKcs, as well as in Ku-depleted extracts sugggesting the operation of alternative pathways. Extracts depleted of Ku and DNA-PKcs rejoin blunt ends, as well as homologous ends with 3' or 5' protruding single strands with similar efficiency, but addition of Ku suppresses joining of blunt ends and homologous ends with 3' overhangs. We propose that the

  15. Recombinational DNA repair is regulated by compartmentalization of DNA lesions at the nuclear pore complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Géli, Vincent; Lisby, Michael

    2015-01-01

    and colleagues shows that also physiological threats to genome integrity such as DNA secondary structure-forming triplet repeat sequences relocalize to the NPC during DNA replication. Mutants that fail to reposition the triplet repeat locus to the NPC cause repeat instability. Here, we review the types of DNA...... lesions that relocalize to the NPC, the putative mechanisms of relocalization, and the types of recombinational repair that are stimulated by the NPC, and present a model for NPC-facilitated repair....

  16. Small molecules, inhibitors of DNA-PK, targeting DNA repair and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eDavidson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many current chemotherapies function by damaging genomic DNA in rapidly dividing cells ultimately leading to cell death. This therapeutic approach differentially targets cancer cells that generally display rapid cell division compared to normal tissue cells. However, although these treatments are initially effective in arresting tumor growth and reducing tumor burden, resistance and disease progression eventually occur. A major mechanism underlying this resistance is increased levels of cellular DNA repair. Most cells have complex mechanisms in place to repair DNA damage that occurs due to environmental exposures or normal metabolic processes. These systems, initially overwhelmed when faced with chemotherapy induced DNA damage, become more efficient under constant selective pressure and as a result chemotherapies become less effective. Thus, inhibiting DNA repair pathways using target specific small molecule inhibitors may overcome cellular resistance to DNA damaging chemotherapies. Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ a major mechanism for the repair of double strand breaks (DSB in DNA is regulated in part by the serine/threonine kinase, DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK. The DNA-PK holoenzyme acts as a scaffold protein tethering broken DNA ends and recruiting other repair molecules. It also has enzymatic activity that may be involved in DNA damage signaling. Because of its’ central role in repair of DSBs, DNA-PK has been the focus of a number of small molecule studies. In these studies specific DNA-PK inhibitors have shown efficacy in synergizing chemotherapies in vitro. However, compounds currently known to specifically inhibit DNA-PK are limited by poor pharmacokinetics: these compounds have poor solubility and have high metabolic lability in vivo leading to short serum half-lives. Future improvement in DNA-PK inhibition will likely be achieved by designing new molecules based on the recently reported crystallographic structure of DNA

  17. Deficiency of double-strand DNA break repair does not impair Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence in multiple animal models of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Brook E; Barkan, Daniel; Bongiorno, Paola; Karakousis, Petros C; Glickman, Michael S

    2014-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persistence within its human host requires mechanisms to resist the effector molecules of host immunity, which exert their bactericidal effects through damaging pathogen proteins, membranes, and DNA. Substantial evidence indicates that bacterial pathogens, including M. tuberculosis, require DNA repair systems to repair the DNA damage inflicted by the host during infection, but the role of double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair systems is unclear. Double-strand DNA breaks are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage and must be repaired for chromosome replication to proceed. M. tuberculosis elaborates three genetically distinct DSB repair systems: homologous recombination (HR), nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), and single-strand annealing (SSA). NHEJ, which repairs DSBs in quiescent cells, may be particularly relevant to M. tuberculosis latency. However, very little information is available about the phenotype of DSB repair-deficient M. tuberculosis in animal models of infection. Here we tested M. tuberculosis strains lacking NHEJ (a Δku ΔligD strain), HR (a ΔrecA strain), or both (a ΔrecA Δku strain) in C57BL/6J mice, C3HeB/FeJ mice, guinea pigs, and a mouse hollow-fiber model of infection. We found no difference in bacterial load, histopathology, or host mortality between wild-type and DSB repair mutant strains in any model of infection. These results suggest that the animal models tested do not inflict DSBs on the mycobacterial chromosome, that other repair pathways can compensate for the loss of NHEJ and HR, or that DSB repair is not required for M. tuberculosis pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. DNA repair and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathore, Shakuntla; Joshi, Pankaj Kumar; Gaur, Sudha

    2012-01-01

    DNA repair refers to a collection of processes by which a cell identifies and corrects damage to the DNA molecule that encode it's genome. In human cells, both normal metabolic activities and environmental factors such as UV light and radiation can cause DNA damage, resulting in as many one million individual molecular lesions per day. Many of these lesions cause structural damage to the DNA molecule and can alter or eliminate the cell's ability to transcribe the gene that the affected DNA encodes. Other lesions include potentially harmful mutation in cell's genome which affect the survival of it's daughter cells after it undergoes mitosis. As a consequence, the DNA repair process is constantly active as it responds to damage in the DNA structure. Inherited mutation that affect DNA repair genes are strongly associated with high cancer risks in humans. Hereditary non polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is strongly associated with specific mutation in the DNA mismatch repair pathway. BRCA1, BRCA2 two famous mutation conferring a hugely increased risk of breast cancer on carrier, are both associated with a large number of DNA repair pathway, especially NHEJ and homologous recombination. Cancer therapy procedures such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy work by overwhelming the capacity of the cell to repair DNA damage, resulting in cell death. Cells that are most rapidly dividing most typically cancer cells are preferentially affected. The side effect is that other non-cancerous but rapidly dividing cells such as stem cells in the bone marrow are also affected. Modern cancer treatment attempt to localize the DNA damage to cells and tissue only associated with cancer, either by physical means (concentrating the therapeutic agent in the region of the tumor) or by biochemical means (exploiting a feature unique to cancer cells in the body). (author)

  19. RFWD3-Dependent Ubiquitination of RPA Regulates Repair at Stalled Replication Forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, Andrew E H; Wang, David C; Willis, Nicholas A; Boardman, Alexander P; Hajdu, Ildiko; Adeyemi, Richard O; Lowry, Elizabeth; Gygi, Steven P; Scully, Ralph; Elledge, Stephen J

    2015-10-15

    We have used quantitative proteomics to profile ubiquitination in the DNA damage response (DDR). We demonstrate that RPA, which functions as a protein scaffold in the replication stress response, is multiply ubiquitinated upon replication fork stalling. Ubiquitination of RPA occurs on chromatin, involves sites outside its DNA binding channel, does not cause proteasomal degradation, and increases under conditions of fork collapse, suggesting a role in repair at stalled forks. We demonstrate that the E3 ligase RFWD3 mediates RPA ubiquitination. RFWD3 is necessary for replication fork restart, normal repair kinetics during replication stress, and homologous recombination (HR) at stalled replication forks. Mutational analysis suggests that multisite ubiquitination of the entire RPA complex is responsible for repair at stalled forks. Multisite protein group sumoylation is known to promote HR in yeast. Our findings reveal a similar requirement for multisite protein group ubiquitination during HR at stalled forks in mammalian cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Regulation of DNA double-strand break repair by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwertman, Petra; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic DNA lesions. The swift recognition and faithful repair of such damage is crucial for the maintenance of genomic stability, as well as for cell and organismal fitness. Signalling by ubiquitin, SUMO and other ubiquitin-like modifiers (UBLs...

  1. Role for Artemis nuclease in the repair of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks by alternative end joining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscariello, Mario; Wieloch, Radi; Kurosawa, Aya; Li, Fanghua; Adachi, Noritaka; Mladenov, Emil; Iliakis, George

    2015-07-01

    Exposure of cells to ionizing radiation or radiomimetic drugs generates DNA double-strand breaks that are processed either by homologous recombination repair (HRR), or by canonical, DNA-PKcs-dependent non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ). Chemical or genetic inactivation of factors involved in C-NHEJ or HRR, but also their local failure in repair proficient cells, promotes an alternative, error-prone end-joining pathway that serves as backup (A-EJ). There is evidence for the involvement of Artemis endonuclease, a protein deficient in a human radiosensitivity syndrome associated with severe immunodeficiency (RS-SCID), in the processing of subsets of DSBs by HRR or C-NHEJ. It is thought that within HRR or C-NHEJ Artemis processes DNA termini at complex DSBs. Whether Artemis has a role in A-EJ remains unknown. Here, we analyze using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and specialized reporter assays, DSB repair in wild-type pre-B NALM-6 lymphocytes, as well as in their Artemis(-/-), DNA ligase 4(-/-) (LIG4(-/-)), and LIG4(-/-)/Artemis(-/-) double mutant counterparts, under conditions allowing evaluation of A-EJ. Our results substantiate the suggested roles of Artemis in C-NHEJ and HRR, but also demonstrate a role for the protein in A-EJ that is confirmed in Artemis deficient normal human fibroblasts. We conclude that Artemis is a nuclease participating in DSB repair by all major repair pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. DNA double-strand break repair: a tale of pathway choices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Li; Xingzhi Xu

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid double-strand breaks (DSBs) are cytotoxic lesions that must be repaired either through homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathways.DSB repair is critical for genome integrity,cellular homeostasis and also constitutes the biological foundation for radiotherapy and the majority of chemotherapy.The choice between HR and NHEJ is a complex yet not completely understood process that will entail more future efforts.Herein we review our current understandings about how the choice is made over an antagonizing balance between p53-binding protein 1 and breast cancer 1 in the context of cell cycle stages,downstream effects,and distinct chromosomal histone marks.These exciting areas of research will surely bring more mechanistic insights about DSB repair and be utilized in the clinical settings.

  3. Pathways for double-strand break repair in genetically unstable Z-DNA-forming sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kha, Diem T; Wang, Guliang; Natrajan, Nithya; Harrison, Lynn; Vasquez, Karen M

    2010-05-14

    DNA can adopt many structures that differ from the canonical B-form, and several of these non-canonical DNA structures have been implicated in genetic instability associated with human disease. Earlier, we found that Z-DNA causes DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in mammalian cells that can result in large-scale deletions and rearrangements. In contrast, the same Z-DNA-forming CG repeat in Escherichia coli resulted in only small contractions or expansions within the repeat. This difference in the Z-DNA-induced mutation spectrum between mammals and bacteria might be due to different mechanisms for DSB repair; in mammalian cells, non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is a major DSB repair pathway, while E. coli do not contain this system and typically use homologous recombination (HR) to process DSBs. To test the extent to which the different DSB repair pathways influenced the Z-DNA-induced mutagenesis, we engineered bacterial E.coli strains to express an inducible NHEJ system, to mimic the situation in mammalian cells. Mycobacterium tuberculosis NHEJ proteins Ku and ligase D (LigD) were expressed in E.coli cells in the presence or absence of HR, and the Z-DNA-induced mutations were characterized. We found that the presence of the NHEJ mechanism markedly shifted the mutation spectrum from small deletions/insertions to large-scale deletions (from 2% to 24%). Our results demonstrate that NHEJ plays a role in the generation of Z-DNA-induced large-scale deletions, suggesting that this pathway is associated with DNA structure-induced destabilization of genomes from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Injectable calcium sulfate/mineralized collagen-based bone repair materials with regulable self-setting properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zonggang; Liu, Huanye; Liu, Xi; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2011-12-15

    An injectable and self-setting bone repair materials (nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen/calcium sulfate hemihydrate, nHAC/CSH) was developed in this study. The nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen (nHAC) composite, which is the mineralized fibril by self-assembly of nano-hydrocyapatite and collagen, has the same features as natural bone in both main hierarchical microstructure and composition. It is a bioactive osteoconductor due to its high level of biocompatibility and appropriate degradation rate. However, this material lacks handling characteristics because of its particle or solid-preformed block shape. Herein, calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) was introduced into nHAC to prepare an injectable and self-setting in situ bone repair materials. The morphology of materials was observed using SEM. Most important and interesting of all, calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD), which is not only the reactant of preparing CSH but also the final solidified product of CSH, was introduced into nHAC as setting accelerator to regulate self-setting properties of injectable nHAC/CSH composite, and thus the self-setting time of nHAC/CSH composite can be regulated from more than 100 min to about 30 min and even less than 20 min by adding various amount of setting accelerator. The compressive properties of bone graft substitute after final setting are similar to those of cancellous bone. CSD as an excellent setting accelerator has no significant effect on the mechanical property and degradability of bone repair materials. In vitro biocompatibility and in vivo histology studies demonstrated that the nHAC/CSH composite could provide more adequate stimulus for cell adhesion and proliferation, embodying favorable cell biocompatibility and a strong ability to accelerate bone formation. It can offer a satisfactory biological environment for growing new bone in the implants and for stimulating bone formation. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Guardians of the mycobacterial genome: A review on DNA repair systems in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amandeep

    2017-12-01

    The genomic integrity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is continuously threatened by the harsh survival conditions inside host macrophages, due to immune and antibiotic stresses. Faithful genome maintenance and repair must be accomplished under stress for the bacillus to survive in the host, necessitating a robust DNA repair system. The importance of DNA repair systems in pathogenesis is well established. Previous examination of the M. tuberculosis genome revealed homologues of almost all the major DNA repair systems, i.e. nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair (BER), homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). However, recent developments in the field have pointed to the presence of novel proteins and pathways in mycobacteria. Homologues of archeal mismatch repair proteins were recently reported in mycobacteria, a pathway previously thought to be absent. RecBCD, the major nuclease-helicase enzymes involved in HR in E. coli, were implicated in the single-strand annealing (SSA) pathway. Novel roles of archeo-eukaryotic primase (AEP) polymerases, previously thought to be exclusive to NHEJ, have been reported in BER. Many new proteins with a probable role in DNA repair have also been discovered. It is now realized that the DNA repair systems in M. tuberculosis are highly evolved and have redundant backup mechanisms to mend the damage. This review is an attempt to summarize our current understanding of the DNA repair systems in M. tuberculosis.

  6. Identification of Drugs that Regulate Dermal Stem Cells and Enhance Skin Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Naska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we asked whether we could identify pharmacological agents that enhance endogenous stem cell function to promote skin repair, focusing on skin-derived precursors (SKPs, a dermal precursor cell population. Libraries of compounds already used in humans were screened for their ability to enhance the self-renewal of human and rodent SKPs. We identified and validated five such compounds, and showed that two of them, alprostadil and trimebutine maleate, enhanced the repair of full thickness skin wounds in middle-aged mice. Moreover, SKPs isolated from drug-treated skin displayed long-term increases in self-renewal when cultured in basal growth medium without drugs. Both alprostadil and trimebutine maleate likely mediated increases in SKP self-renewal by moderate hyperactivation of the MEK-ERK pathway. These findings identify candidates for potential clinical use in human skin repair, and provide support for the idea that pharmacological activation of endogenous tissue precursors represents a viable therapeutic strategy.

  7. Repair of steam generator heating tubes by roll-expanded plugs: approach to cover multiple national regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, J.; Ziegler, B.; Schoenheit, N. [AREVA NP Gmbh, Erlangen (Germany); Kostroun, F. [AREVA NP Canada Ltd., Pickering, ON (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    During operation, steam generators in nuclear power plants are subject to degradation mechanisms which have an impact on the component life-time. Most affected are the heating tubes which constitute the barrier of the contaminated primary cycle to the secondary side. Various corrosive attacks may cause wall thinning which requires tube repair. A common repair method is to plug the tubes by roll expanded plugs. This is a fast method, easily applicable and requires less equipment or personnel qualification as needed for weld plugs. After insertion, the plugs act as a pressure boundary from primary to secondary side. Although the function of the roll plug is simple, the different national regulations define the requirements which need to be fulfilled by a roll plug differently. In order to reduce the tooling as well as the plug types to a minimum, an approach according to one common design for different regulations and steam generator types is profitable. It was found, that the regulations according to the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel code in combination with the German Safety Standards of the German Nuclear Safety Standards Commission covers the regulations of the majority of utilities. To develop a roll plug which suits the different regulatory demands, efforts were made to consider all technical and regulatory boundary conditions implied on roll expanded plugs. This covering approach had an impact on the plug design, which was required to be Helium tight after installation and suitable for a 40 year component lifetime also in accident and emergency conditions. To prove the suitability of the plug design a comprehensive testing programme of the mechanical and chemical properties of the designed roll-expanded plug was launched. A summary of the plug design and testing as well as the main test results are described. (author)

  8. Repair of steam generator heating tubes by roll-expanded plugs: approach to cover multiple national regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, J.; Ziegler, B.; Schoenheit, N.; Kostroun, F.

    2012-01-01

    During operation, steam generators in nuclear power plants are subject to degradation mechanisms which have an impact on the component life-time. Most affected are the heating tubes which constitute the barrier of the contaminated primary cycle to the secondary side. Various corrosive attacks may cause wall thinning which requires tube repair. A common repair method is to plug the tubes by roll expanded plugs. This is a fast method, easily applicable and requires less equipment or personnel qualification as needed for weld plugs. After insertion, the plugs act as a pressure boundary from primary to secondary side. Although the function of the roll plug is simple, the different national regulations define the requirements which need to be fulfilled by a roll plug differently. In order to reduce the tooling as well as the plug types to a minimum, an approach according to one common design for different regulations and steam generator types is profitable. It was found, that the regulations according to the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel code in combination with the German Safety Standards of the German Nuclear Safety Standards Commission covers the regulations of the majority of utilities. To develop a roll plug which suits the different regulatory demands, efforts were made to consider all technical and regulatory boundary conditions implied on roll expanded plugs. This covering approach had an impact on the plug design, which was required to be Helium tight after installation and suitable for a 40 year component lifetime also in accident and emergency conditions. To prove the suitability of the plug design a comprehensive testing programme of the mechanical and chemical properties of the designed roll-expanded plug was launched. A summary of the plug design and testing as well as the main test results are described. (author)

  9. Differences in the regulation by poly(ADP-ribose) of repair of DNA damage from alkylating agents and ultraviolet light according to cell type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleaver, J.E.; Bodell, W.J.; Morgan, W.F.; Zelle, B.

    1983-08-10

    Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis by 3-aminobenzamide in various human and hamster cells influenced the responses to DNA damage from methyl methanesulfonate, but not from ultraviolet light. After exposure to methyl methanesulfonate, 3-aminobenzamide increased the strand break frequency in all cell types studied, but only stimulated repair replication in lymphoid and HeLa cells, suggesting these are independent effects. 3-Aminobenzamide also inhibited the pathway for de novo synthesis of DNA purines, suggesting that some of its effects may be due to disturbance of precursor pathways and irrelevant to the role of poly(ADP-ribose) in repair. Previous claims that 3-aminobenzamide stimulates repair synthesis after exposure to UV light are probably artifacts, because the stimulations are only observed in lymphocytes in the presence of a high concentration of hydroxyurea that itself inhibits repair. The initial inhibition of semiconservative DNA synthesis and the excision of the major alkylation products and pyrimidine dimers were unaffected by 3-aminobenzamide. In general poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis appears to be uniquely involved in regulating the ligation stage of repair of alkylation damage but not ultraviolet damage. By regulating the ligation efficiency, poly(ADP-ribosylation) modulates the dynamic balance between incision and ligation, so as to minimize the frequency of DNA breaks. The ligation stage of repair of UV damage appears different and is not regulated by poly(ADP-ribosylation).

  10. NF-κB regulates DNA double-strand break repair in conjunction with BRCA1-CtIP complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volcic, Meta; Karl, Sabine; Baumann, Bernd; Salles, Daniela; Daniel, Peter; Fulda, Simone; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    NF-κB is involved in immune responses, inflammation, oncogenesis, cell proliferation and apoptosis. Even though NF-κB can be activated by DNA damage via Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) signalling, little was known about an involvement in DNA repair. In this work, we dissected distinct DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair mechanisms revealing a stimulatory role of NF-κB in homologous recombination (HR). This effect was independent of chromatin context, cell cycle distribution or cross-talk with p53. It was not mediated by the transcriptional NF-κB targets Bcl2, BAX or Ku70, known for their dual roles in apoptosis and DSB repair. A contribution by Bcl-xL was abrogated when caspases were inhibited. Notably, HR induction by NF-κB required the targets ATM and BRCA2. Additionally, we provide evidence that NF-κB interacts with CtIP-BRCA1 complexes and promotes BRCA1 stabilization, and thereby contributes to HR induction. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed accelerated formation of replication protein A (RPA) and Rad51 foci upon NF-κB activation indicating HR stimulation through DSB resection by the interacting CtIP-BRCA1 complex and Rad51 filament formation. Taken together, these results define multiple NF-κB-dependent mechanisms regulating HR induction, and thereby providing a novel intriguing explanation for both NF-κB-mediated resistance to chemo- and radiotherapies as well as for the sensitization by pharmaceutical intervention of NF-κB activation.

  11. MSH3 mismatch repair protein regulates sensitivity to cytotoxic drugs and a histone deacetylase inhibitor in human colon carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Myung Park

    Full Text Available MSH3 is a DNA mismatch repair (MMR gene that undergoes frequent somatic mutation in colorectal cancers (CRCs with MMR deficiency. MSH3, together with MSH2, forms the MutSβ heteroduplex that interacts with interstrand cross-links induced by drugs such as cisplatin. To date, the impact of MSH3 on chemosensitivity is unknown.We utilized isogenic HCT116 (MLH1-/MSH3- cells where MLH1 is restored by transfer of chromosome 3 (HCT116+ch3 and also MSH3 by chromosome 5 (HCT116+3+5. We generated HCT116+3+5, SW480 (MLH1+/MSH3+ and SW48 (MLH1-/MSH3+ cells with shRNA knockdown of MSH3. Cells were treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, SN-38, oxaliplatin, or the histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor PCI-24781 and cell viability, clonogenic survival, DNA damage and apoptosis were analyzed.MSH3-deficient vs proficient CRC cells showed increased sensitivity to the irinotecan metabolite SN-38 and to oxaliplatin, but not 5-FU, as shown in assays for apoptosis and clonogenic survival. In contrast, suppression of MLH1 attenuated the cytotoxic effect of 5-FU, but did not alter sensitivity to SN-38 or oxaliplatin. The impact of MSH3 knockdown on chemosensitivity to SN-38 and oxaliplatin was maintained independent of MLH1 status. In MSH3-deficient vs proficient cells, SN-38 and oxaliplatin induced higher levels of phosphorylated histone H2AX and Chk2, and similar results were found in MLH1-proficient SW480 cells. MSH3-deficient vs proficient cells showed increased 53BP1 nuclear foci after irradiation, suggesting that MSH3 can regulate DNA double strand break (DSB repair. We then utilized PCI-24781 that interferes with homologous recombination (HR indicated by a reduction in Rad51 expression. The addition of PCI-24781 to oxaliplatin enhanced cytotoxicity to a greater extent compared to either drug alone.MSH3 status can regulate the DNA damage response and extent of apoptosis induced by chemotherapy. The ability of MSH3 to regulate chemosensitivity was independent of MLH1

  12. Reciprocal Regulation between DNA-PKcs and Snail1 Conferring Genomic Instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Haeng Ran; Lee, Hae June; Jin, Yeung Bae; Bae, Sang Woo; Lee, Yun Sil; Kim, Nam Hee; Kim, Hyun Sil; Nam, Hyung Wook; Yook, Jong In

    2010-01-01

    Although the roles of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) involving non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) of DNA repair are well recognized, the biological mechanisms and regulators by which DNA-PKcs regulate genomic instability are not clearly defined. We show herein that DNA-PKcs activity resulting from DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation (IR) phosphorylates Snail1 at serine 100, which results in increased Snail1 expression and its function by inhibition of GSK-3-mediated phosphorylation. Furthermore, Snail1 phosphorylated at serine 100 can reciprocally inhibit kinase activity of DNA-PKcs, resulting in an inhibition to recruit DNA-PKcs or Ku70/80 to a DNA double-strand break site, and ultimately inhibition of DNA repair activity. The impairment of repair activity by a direct interaction between Snail1 and DNA-PKcs increases the resistance to DNA damaging agents, such as IR, and genomic instability. Our findings provide a novel cellular mechanism for induction of genomic instability by reciprocal regulation of DNA-PKcs and Snail1

  13. Cytochrome P450 regulation: the interplay between its heme and apoprotein moieties in synthesis, assembly, repair, and disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Maria Almira; Sinclair, Peter R; De Matteis, Francesco

    2011-02-01

    Heme is vital to our aerobic universe. Heme cellular content is finely tuned through an exquisite control of synthesis and degradation. Heme deficiency is deleterious to cells, whereas excess heme is toxic. Most of the cellular heme serves as the prosthetic moiety of functionally diverse hemoproteins, including cytochromes P450 (P450s). In the liver, P450s are its major consumers, with >50% of hepatic heme committed to their synthesis. Prosthetic heme is the sine qua non of P450 catalytic biotransformation of both endo- and xenobiotics. This well-recognized functional role notwithstanding, heme also regulates P450 protein synthesis, assembly, repair, and disposal. These less well-appreciated aspects are reviewed herein.

  14. Construction and repair of highly ordered 2D covalent networks by chemical equilibrium regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Cui-Zhong; Wang, Dong; Wan, Li-Jun

    2012-03-21

    The construction of well-ordered 2D covalent networks via the dehydration of di-borate aromatic molecules was successfully realized through introducing a small amount of water into a closed reaction system to regulate the chemical equilibrium.

  15. Stripped-down DNA repair in a highly reduced parasite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fast Naomi M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Encephalitozoon cuniculi is a member of a distinctive group of single-celled parasitic eukaryotes called microsporidia, which are closely related to fungi. Some of these organisms, including E. cuniculi, also have uniquely small genomes that are within the prokaryotic range. Thus, E. cuniculi has undergone a massive genome reduction which has resulted in a loss of genes from diverse biological pathways, including those that act in DNA repair. DNA repair is essential to any living cell. A loss of these mechanisms invariably results in accumulation of mutations and/or cell death. Six major pathways of DNA repair in eukaryotes include: non-homologous end joining (NHEJ, homologous recombination repair (HRR, mismatch repair (MMR, nucleotide excision repair (NER, base excision repair (BER and methyltransferase repair. DNA polymerases are also critical players in DNA repair processes. Given the close relationship between microsporidia and fungi, the repair mechanisms present in E. cuniculi were compared to those of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ascertain how the process of genome reduction has affected the DNA repair pathways. Results E. cuniculi lacks 16 (plus another 6 potential absences of the 56 DNA repair genes sought via BLASTP and PSI-BLAST searches. Six of 14 DNA polymerases or polymerase subunits are also absent in E. cuniculi. All of these genes are relatively well conserved within eukaryotes. The absence of genes is not distributed equally among the different repair pathways; some pathways lack only one protein, while there is a striking absence of many proteins that are components of both double strand break repair pathways. All specialized repair polymerases are also absent. Conclusion Given the large number of DNA repair genes that are absent from the double strand break repair pathways, E. cuniculi is a prime candidate for the study of double strand break repair with minimal machinery. Strikingly, all of the

  16. Chitinase-like proteins as regulators of innate immunity and tissue repair: helpful lessons for asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Tara E

    2018-02-19

    Chitinases and chitinase-like proteins (CLPs) belong to the glycoside hydrolase family 18 of proteins. Chitinases are expressed in mammals and lower organisms, facilitate chitin degradation, and hence act as host-defence enzymes. Gene duplication and loss-of-function mutations of enzymatically active chitinases have resulted in the expression of a diverse range of CLPs across different species. CLPs are genes that are increasingly associated with inflammation and tissue remodelling not only in mammals but also across distant species. While the focus has remained on understanding the functions and expression patterns of CLPs during disease in humans, studies in mouse and lower organisms have revealed important and overlapping roles of the CLP family during physiology, host defence and pathology. This review will summarise recent insights into the regulatory functions of CLPs on innate immune pathways and discuss how these effects are not only important for host defence and tissue injury/repair after pathogen invasion, but also how they have extensive implications for pathological processes involved in diseases such as asthma. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  17. DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Zeeland, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    In this chapter a series of DNA repair pathways are discussed which are available to the cell to cope with the problem of DNA damaged by chemical or physical agents. In the case of microorganisms our knowledge about the precise mechanism of each DNA repair pathway and the regulation of it has been improved considerably when mutants deficient in these repair mechanisms became available. In the case of mammalian cells in culture, until recently there were very little repair deficient mutants available, because in almost all mammalian cells in culture at least the diploid number of chromosomes is present. Therefore the frequency of repair deficient mutants in such populations is very low. Nevertheless because replica plating techniques are improving some mutants from Chinese hamsters ovary cells and L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells are now available. In the case of human cells, cultures obtained from patients with certain genetic diseases are available. A number of cells appear to be sensitive to some chemical or physical mutagens. These include cells from patients suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum, Ataxia telangiectasia, Fanconi's anemia, Cockayne's syndrome. However, only in the case of xeroderma pigmentosum cells, has the sensitivity to ultraviolet light been clearly correlated with a deficiency in excision repair of pyrimidine dimers. Furthermore the work with strains obtained from biopsies from man is difficult because these cells generally have low cloning efficiencies and also have a limited lifespan in vitro. It is therefore very important that more repair deficient mutants will become available from established cell lines from human or animal origin

  18. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Regulates Expression of the DNA Damage Repair Gene, Fanconi anemia A, in Pituitary Gonadotroph Cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larder, Rachel; Chang, Lynda; Clinton, Michael; Brown, Pamela

    2007-01-01

    Gonadal function is critically dependant on regulated secretion of the gonadotropin hormones from anterior pituitary gonadotroph cells. Gonadotropin biosynthesis and release is triggered by the binding of hypothalamic GnRH to GnRH receptor expressed on the gonadotroph cell surface. The repertoire of regulatory molecules involved in this process are still being defined. We used the mouse LβT2 gonadotroph cell line, which expresses both gonadotropin hormones, as a model to investigate GnRH regulation of gene expression and differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to identify and isolate hormonally induced changes. This approach identified Fanconi anemia a (Fanca), a gene implicated in DNA damage repair, as a differentially expressed transcript. Mutations in Fanca account for the majority of cases of Fanconi anemia (FA), a recessively inherited disease identified by congenital defects, bone marrow failure, infertility, and cancer susceptibility. We confirmed expression and hormonal regulation of Fanca mRNA by quantitative RT-PCR, which showed that GnRH induced a rapid, transient increase in Fanca mRNA. Fanca protein was also acutely upregulated after GnRH treatment of LβT2 cells. In addition, Fanca gene expression was confined to mature pituitary gonadotrophs and adult mouse pituitary and was not expressed in the immature αT3-1 gonadotroph cell line. Thus, this study extends the expression profile of Fanca into a highly specialized endocrine cell and demonstrates hormonal regulation of expression of the Fanca locus. We suggest that this regulatory mechanism may have a crucial role in the GnRH-response mechanism of mature gonadotrophs and perhaps the etiology of FA. PMID:15128600

  19. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone regulates expression of the DNA damage repair gene, Fanconi anemia A, in pituitary gonadotroph cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larder, Rachel; Chang, Lynda; Clinton, Michael; Brown, Pamela

    2004-09-01

    Gonadal function is critically dependant on regulated secretion of the gonadotropin hormones from anterior pituitary gonadotroph cells. Gonadotropin biosynthesis and release is triggered by the binding of hypothalamic GnRH to GnRH receptor expressed on the gonadotroph cell surface. The repertoire of regulatory molecules involved in this process are still being defined. We used the mouse L beta T2 gonadotroph cell line, which expresses both gonadotropin hormones, as a model to investigate GnRH regulation of gene expression and differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to identify and isolate hormonally induced changes. This approach identified Fanconi anemia a (Fanca), a gene implicated in DNA damage repair, as a differentially expressed transcript. Mutations in Fanca account for the majority of cases of Fanconi anemia (FA), a recessively inherited disease identified by congenital defects, bone marrow failure, infertility, and cancer susceptibility. We confirmed expression and hormonal regulation of Fanca mRNA by quantitative RT-PCR, which showed that GnRH induced a rapid, transient increase in Fanca mRNA. Fanca protein was also acutely upregulated after GnRH treatment of L beta T2 cells. In addition, Fanca gene expression was confined to mature pituitary gonadotrophs and adult mouse pituitary and was not expressed in the immature alpha T3-1 gonadotroph cell line. Thus, this study extends the expression profile of Fanca into a highly specialized endocrine cell and demonstrates hormonal regulation of expression of the Fanca locus. We suggest that this regulatory mechanism may have a crucial role in the GnRH-response mechanism of mature gonadotrophs and perhaps the etiology of FA.

  20. DNA Repair, Redox Regulation and Modulation of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Mediated Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis-Ducey, Carol Dianne

    2009-01-01

    Interaction of estrogen receptor [alpha] (ER[alpha]) with 17[beta]-estradiol (E[subscript 2]) facilitates binding of the receptor to estrogen response elements (EREs) in target genes, which in turn leads to recruitment of coregulatory proteins. To better understand how estrogen-responsive genes are regulated, our laboratory identified a number of…

  1. Cyclic AMP Regulates Bacterial Persistence through Repression of the Oxidative Stress Response and SOS-Dependent DNA Repair in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Quiroz, Roberto C; Silva-Valenzuela, Cecilia; Brewster, Jennifer; Castro-Nallar, Eduardo; Levy, Stuart B; Camilli, Andrew

    2018-01-09

    Bacterial persistence is a transient, nonheritable physiological state that provides tolerance to bactericidal antibiotics. The stringent response, toxin-antitoxin modules, and stochastic processes, among other mechanisms, play roles in this phenomenon. How persistence is regulated is relatively ill defined. Here we show that cyclic AMP, a global regulator of carbon catabolism and other core processes, is a negative regulator of bacterial persistence in uropathogenic Escherichia coli , as measured by survival after exposure to a β-lactam antibiotic. This phenotype is regulated by a set of genes leading to an oxidative stress response and SOS-dependent DNA repair. Thus, persister cells tolerant to cell wall-acting antibiotics must cope with oxidative stress and DNA damage and these processes are regulated by cyclic AMP in uropathogenic E. coli IMPORTANCE Bacterial persister cells are important in relapsing infections in patients treated with antibiotics and also in the emergence of antibiotic resistance. Our results show that in uropathogenic E. coli , the second messenger cyclic AMP negatively regulates persister cell formation, since in its absence much more persister cells form that are tolerant to β-lactams antibiotics. We reveal the mechanism to be decreased levels of reactive oxygen species, specifically hydroxyl radicals, and SOS-dependent DNA repair. Our findings suggest that the oxidative stress response and DNA repair are relevant pathways to target in the design of persister-specific antibiotic compounds. Copyright © 2018 Molina-Quiroz et al.

  2. Different domains of P21Cip1/waf1 regulate DNA replication and DNA repair-associated processes after UV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soria, Gaston; Speroni, Juliana; Podhajcer, Osvaldo L.; Gottifredi, Vanesa; Prives, Carol

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Many genotoxic insults result in p21 up-regulation and p21-dependent cell cycle arrest but UV irradiation triggers p21 proteolysis. The significance of the increased p21 turnover is unclear and might be associated to DNA repair. While the role of p21 in Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) remains controversial, two recent reports explore its effect on Translesion DNA Synthesis (TLS), a process that avoids replication blockage during S phase. The first report shows that p21 degradation is required for efficient PCNA ubiquitination, a post transcriptional modification that is relevant for TLS. The second report demonstrates that p21 (-/-) cells have increased TLS-associated mutagenic rates. Herein we analyze the effect of p21 on different PCNA-driven processes including DNA replication, NER and TLS. Whereas only the CDK binding domain of p21 is required for cell cycle arrest in unstressed cells; neither the CDK- nor the PCNA-binding domains of p21 are able to block early and late steps of NER. Intriguingly, through its PCNA binding domain, p21 inhibited recruitment of the TLS-polymerase, polη to PCNA foci after UV. Moreover, this obstruction correlates with accumulation of γH2AX and increased apoptosis. Taking together, our data emphasizes the link between p21 turnover and efficient TLS. This might also suggest a potential effect of p21 on other activities of polζ, a DNA polymerase with central roles in other biological scenarios such as genetic conversion, homologous recombination and modulation of the cellular response to genotoxic agents [es

  3. Direct and inverted repeats elicit genetic instability by both exploiting and eluding DNA double-strand break repair systems in mycobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina A Wojcik

    Full Text Available Repetitive DNA sequences with the potential to form alternative DNA conformations, such as slipped structures and cruciforms, can induce genetic instability by promoting replication errors and by serving as a substrate for DNA repair proteins, which may lead to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. However, the contribution of each of the DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR, non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ and single-strand annealing (SSA, to this sort of genetic instability is not fully understood. Herein, we assessed the genome-wide distribution of repetitive DNA sequences in the Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Escherichia coli genomes, and determined the types and frequencies of genetic instability induced by direct and inverted repeats, both in the presence and in the absence of HR, NHEJ, and SSA. All three genomes are strongly enriched in direct repeats and modestly enriched in inverted repeats. When using chromosomally integrated constructs in M. smegmatis, direct repeats induced the perfect deletion of their intervening sequences ~1,000-fold above background. Absence of HR further enhanced these perfect deletions, whereas absence of NHEJ or SSA had no influence, suggesting compromised replication fidelity. In contrast, inverted repeats induced perfect deletions only in the absence of SSA. Both direct and inverted repeats stimulated excision of the constructs from the attB integration sites independently of HR, NHEJ, or SSA. With episomal constructs, direct and inverted repeats triggered DNA instability by activating nucleolytic activity, and absence of the DSB repair pathways (in the order NHEJ>HR>SSA exacerbated this instability. Thus, direct and inverted repeats may elicit genetic instability in mycobacteria by 1 directly interfering with replication fidelity, 2 stimulating the three main DSB repair pathways, and 3 enticing L5 site-specific recombination.

  4. Direct and inverted repeats elicit genetic instability by both exploiting and eluding DNA double-strand break repair systems in mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Ewelina A; Brzostek, Anna; Bacolla, Albino; Mackiewicz, Pawel; Vasquez, Karen M; Korycka-Machala, Malgorzata; Jaworski, Adam; Dziadek, Jaroslaw

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive DNA sequences with the potential to form alternative DNA conformations, such as slipped structures and cruciforms, can induce genetic instability by promoting replication errors and by serving as a substrate for DNA repair proteins, which may lead to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). However, the contribution of each of the DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR), non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and single-strand annealing (SSA), to this sort of genetic instability is not fully understood. Herein, we assessed the genome-wide distribution of repetitive DNA sequences in the Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Escherichia coli genomes, and determined the types and frequencies of genetic instability induced by direct and inverted repeats, both in the presence and in the absence of HR, NHEJ, and SSA. All three genomes are strongly enriched in direct repeats and modestly enriched in inverted repeats. When using chromosomally integrated constructs in M. smegmatis, direct repeats induced the perfect deletion of their intervening sequences ~1,000-fold above background. Absence of HR further enhanced these perfect deletions, whereas absence of NHEJ or SSA had no influence, suggesting compromised replication fidelity. In contrast, inverted repeats induced perfect deletions only in the absence of SSA. Both direct and inverted repeats stimulated excision of the constructs from the attB integration sites independently of HR, NHEJ, or SSA. With episomal constructs, direct and inverted repeats triggered DNA instability by activating nucleolytic activity, and absence of the DSB repair pathways (in the order NHEJ>HR>SSA) exacerbated this instability. Thus, direct and inverted repeats may elicit genetic instability in mycobacteria by 1) directly interfering with replication fidelity, 2) stimulating the three main DSB repair pathways, and 3) enticing L5 site-specific recombination.

  5. RIP2: A novel player in the regulation of keratinocyte proliferation and cutaneous wound repair?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Stephanie; Valchanova, Ralitsa S.; Munz, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    We could recently demonstrate an important role of receptor interacting protein 4 (RIP4) in the regulation of keratinocyte differentiation. Now, we analyzed a potential role of the RIP4 homolog RIP2 in keratinocytes. Specifically, we demonstrate here that rip2 expression is induced by scratch-wounding and after the induction of differentiation in these cells. Furthermore, serum growth factors and cytokines can induce rip2, with TNF-α-dependent induction being dependent on p38 MAPK. In addition, we demonstrate that scratch-induced upregulation of rip2 expression is completely blocked by the steroid dexamethasone. Since we also show that RIP2 is an important player in the regulation of keratinocyte proliferation, these data suggest that inhibition of rip2 upregulation after wounding might contribute to the reduced and delayed wound re-epithelialization phenotype seen in glucocorticoid-treated patients.

  6. The Use of Plant Growth Regulators to Improve the Traffic Tolerance and Repair of Overseeded Bermudagrass

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, Christopher Scott

    2007-01-01

    An active football season during the fall acclimation period tests the traffic tolerance of bermudagrass. Exogenous applications of synthetic cytokinins or cytokinin-enhancing plant growth regulators (PGRs), such as trinexapac-ethyl, may improve the traffic tolerance of "Patriot" and "Tifsport" hybrid berudagrasses (Cynodon dactylon var. dactylon x Cynodon transvaalensis). This study was designed to mimic the agronomic practices and traffic stresses experienced at Virginia Tech's Worsham Fiel...

  7. DNA Double Strand Break Response and Limited Repair Capacity in Mouse Elongated Spermatids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad A. Ahmed

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Spermatids are extremely sensitive to genotoxic exposures since during spermiogenesis only error-prone non homologous end joining (NHEJ repair pathways are available. Hence, genomic damage may accumulate in sperm and be transmitted to the zygote. Indirect, delayed DNA fragmentation and lesions associated with apoptotic-like processes have been observed during spermatid elongation, 27 days after irradiation. The proliferating spermatogonia and early meiotic prophase cells have been suggested to retain a memory of a radiation insult leading later to this delayed fragmentation. Here, we used meiotic spread preparations to localize phosphorylate histone H2 variant (γ-H2AX foci marking DNA double strand breaks (DSBs in elongated spermatids. This technique enabled us to determine the background level of DSB foci in elongated spermatids of RAD54/RAD54B double knockout (dko mice, severe combined immunodeficiency SCID mice, and poly adenosine diphosphate (ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1 inhibitor (DPQ-treated mice to compare them with the appropriate wild type controls. The repair kinetics data and the protein expression patterns observed indicate that the conventional NHEJ repair pathway is not available for elongated spermatids to repair the programmed and the IR-induced DSBs, reflecting the limited repair capacity of these cells. However, although elongated spermatids express the proteins of the alternative NHEJ, PARP1-inhibition had no effect on the repair kinetics after IR, suggesting that DNA damage may be passed onto sperm. Finally, our genetic mutant analysis suggests that an incomplete or defective meiotic recombinational repair of Spo11-induced DSBs may lead to a carry-over of the DSB damage or induce a delayed nuclear fragmentation during the sensitive programmed chromatin remodeling occurring in elongated spermatids.

  8. Lung Basal Stem Cells Rapidly Repair DNA Damage Using the Error-Prone Nonhomologous End-Joining Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeden, Clare E.; Chen, Yunshun; Ma, Stephen B.; Hu, Yifang; Ramm, Georg; Sutherland, Kate D.; Smyth, Gordon K.

    2017-01-01

    Lung squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC), the second most common subtype of lung cancer, is strongly associated with tobacco smoking and exhibits genomic instability. The cellular origins and molecular processes that contribute to SqCC formation are largely unexplored. Here we show that human basal stem cells (BSCs) isolated from heavy smokers proliferate extensively, whereas their alveolar progenitor cell counterparts have limited colony-forming capacity. We demonstrate that this difference arises in part because of the ability of BSCs to repair their DNA more efficiently than alveolar cells following ionizing radiation or chemical-induced DNA damage. Analysis of mice harbouring a mutation in the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), a key enzyme in DNA damage repair by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), indicated that BSCs preferentially repair their DNA by this error-prone process. Interestingly, polyploidy, a phenomenon associated with genetically unstable cells, was only observed in the human BSC subset. Expression signature analysis indicated that BSCs are the likely cells of origin of human SqCC and that high levels of NHEJ genes in SqCC are correlated with increasing genomic instability. Hence, our results favour a model in which heavy smoking promotes proliferation of BSCs, and their predilection for error-prone NHEJ could lead to the high mutagenic burden that culminates in SqCC. Targeting DNA repair processes may therefore have a role in the prevention and therapy of SqCC. PMID:28125611

  9. Transient elevation of glycolysis confers radio-resistance by facilitating DNA repair in cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatt, Anant Narayan; Chauhan, Ankit; Khanna, Suchit; Rai, Yogesh; Singh, Saurabh; Soni, Ravi; Kalra, Namita; Dwarakanath, Bilikere S

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells exhibit increased glycolysis for ATP production (the Warburg effect) and macromolecular biosynthesis; it is also linked with therapeutic resistance that is generally associated with compromised respiratory metabolism. Molecular mechanisms underlying radio-resistance linked to elevated glycolysis remain incompletely understood. We stimulated glycolysis using mitochondrial respiratory modifiers (MRMs viz. di-nitro phenol, DNP; Photosan-3, PS3; Methylene blue, MB) in established human cell lines (HEK293, BMG-1 and OCT-1). Glucose utilization and lactate production, levels of glucose transporters and glycolytic enzymes were investigated as indices of glycolysis. Clonogenic survival, DNA repair and cytogenetic damage were studied as parameters of radiation response. MRMs induced the glycolysis by enhancing the levels of two important regulators of glucose metabolism GLUT-1 and HK-II and resulted in 2 fold increase in glucose consumption and lactate production. This increase in glycolysis resulted in resistance against radiation-induced cell death (clonogenic survival) in different cell lines at an absorbed dose of 5 Gy. Inhibition of glucose uptake and glycolysis (using fasentin, 2-deoxy-D-glucose and 3-bromopyruvate) in DNP treated cells failed to increase the clonogenic survival of irradiated cells, suggesting that radio-resistance linked to inhibition of mitochondrial respiration is glycolysis dependent. Elevated glycolysis also facilitated rejoining of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks by activating both non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) pathways of DNA double strand break repair leading to a reduction in radiation-induced cytogenetic damage (micronuclei formation) in these cells. These findings suggest that enhanced glycolysis generally observed in cancer cells may be responsible for the radio-resistance, partly by enhancing the repair of DNA damage

  10. Emerging roles of the nucleolus in regulating the DNA damage response: the noncanonical DNA repair enzyme APE1/Ref-1 as a paradigmatical example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniali, Giulia; Lirussi, Lisa; Poletto, Mattia; Tell, Gianluca

    2014-02-01

    An emerging concept in DNA repair mechanisms is the evidence that some key enzymes, besides their role in the maintenance of genome stability, display also unexpected noncanonical functions associated with RNA metabolism in specific subcellular districts (e.g., nucleoli). During the evolution of these key enzymes, the acquisition of unfolded domains significantly amplified the possibility to interact with different partners and substrates, possibly explaining their phylogenetic gain of functions. After nucleolar stress or DNA damage, many DNA repair proteins can freely relocalize from nucleoli to the nucleoplasm. This process may represent a surveillance mechanism to monitor the synthesis and correct assembly of ribosomal units affecting cell cycle progression or inducing p53-mediated apoptosis or senescence. A paradigm for this kind of regulation is represented by some enzymes of the DNA base excision repair (BER) pathway, such as apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1). In this review, the role of the nucleolus and the noncanonical functions of the APE1 protein are discussed in light of their possible implications in human pathologies. A productive cross-talk between DNA repair enzymes and proteins involved in RNA metabolism seems reasonable as the nucleolus is emerging as a dynamic functional hub that coordinates cell growth arrest and DNA repair mechanisms. These findings will drive further analyses on other BER proteins and might imply that nucleic acid processing enzymes are more versatile than originally thought having evolved DNA-targeted functions after a previous life in the early RNA world.

  11. DNA-PK inhibition causes a low level of H2AX phosphorylation and homologous recombination repair in Medaka (Oryzias latipes) cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urushihara, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Junya; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa; Komatsu, Kenshi; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We investigated the effect of DNA-PK inhibition on DSB repair using fish cells. ► A radiation sensitive mutant RIC1 strain showed a low level of DNA-PK activity. ► DNA-PK dysfunction leads defects in HR repair and DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation. ► DNA-PK dysfunction leads a slight increase in the number of 53BP1 foci after DSBs. ► DNA-PK dysfunction leads an alternative NHEJ that depends on 53BP1. -- Abstract: Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) are known as DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways. It has been reported that DNA-PK, a member of PI3 kinase family, promotes NHEJ and aberrant DNA-PK causes NHEJ deficiency. However, in this study, we demonstrate that a wild-type cell line treated with DNA-PK inhibitor and a mutant cell line with dysfunctional DNA-PK showed decreased HR efficiency in fish cells (Medaka, Oryzias latipes). Previously, we reported that the radiation-sensitive mutant RIC1 strain has a defect in the Histone H2AX phosphorylation after γ-irradiation. Here, we showed that a DNA-PK inhibitor, NU7026, treatment resulted in significant reduction in the number of γH2AX foci after γ-irradiation in wild-type cells, but had no significant effect in RIC1 cells. In addition, RIC1 cells showed significantly lower levels of DNA-PK kinase activity compared with wild-type cells. We investigated NHEJ and HR efficiency after induction of DSBs. Wild-type cells treated with NU7026 and RIC1 cells showed decreased HR efficiency. These results indicated that aberrant DNA-PK causes the reduction in the number of γH2AX foci and HR efficiency in RIC1 cells. We performed phosphorylated DNA-PKcs (Thr2609) and 53BP1 focus assay after γ-irradiation. RIC1 cells showed significant reduction in the number of phosphorylated DNA-PKcs foci and no deference in the number of 53BP1 foci compared with wild-type cells. These results suggest that low level of DNA-PK activity causes aberrant DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation

  12. Non-homologous end joining mediated DNA repair is impaired in the NUP98-HOXD13 mouse model for myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthiyaveetil, Abdul Gafoor; Reilly, Christopher M; Pardee, Timothy S; Caudell, David L

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations typically impair cell differentiation and often require secondary mutations for malignant transformation. However, the role of a primary translocation in the development of collaborating mutations is debatable. To delineate the role of leukemic translocation NUP98-HOXD13 (NHD13) in secondary mutagenesis, DNA break and repair mechanisms in stimulated mouse B lymphocytes expressing NHD13 were analyzed. Our results showed significantly reduced expression of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ)-mediated DNA repair genes, DNA Pkcs, DNA ligase4, and Xrcc4 leading to cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. Our results showed that expression of NHD13 fusion gene resulted in impaired NHEJ-mediated DNA break repair. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Down-regulation of DNA mismatch repair enhances initiation and growth of neuroblastoma and brain tumour multicellular spheroids.

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    Samuel L Collins

    Full Text Available Multicellular tumour spheroid (MCTS cultures are excellent model systems for simulating the development and microenvironmental conditions of in vivo tumour growth. Many documented cell lines can generate differentiated MCTS when cultured in suspension or in a non-adhesive environment. While physiological and biochemical properties of MCTS have been extensively characterized, insight into the events and conditions responsible for initiation of these structures is lacking. MCTS are formed by only a small subpopulation of cells during surface-associated growth but the processes responsible for this differentiation are poorly understood and have not been previously studied experimentally. Analysis of gene expression within spheroids has provided clues but to date it is not known if the observed differences are a cause or consequence of MCTS growth. One mechanism linked to tumourigenesis in a number of cancers is genetic instability arising from impaired DNA mismatch repair (MMR. This study aimed to determine the role of MMR in MCTS initiation and development. Using surface-associated N2a and CHLA-02-ATRT culture systems we have investigated the impact of impaired MMR on MCTS growth. Analysis of the DNA MMR genes MLH1 and PMS2 revealed both to be significantly down-regulated at the mRNA level compared with non-spheroid-forming cells. By using small interfering RNA (siRNA against these genes we show that silencing of MLH1 and PMS2 enhances both MCTS initiation and subsequent expansion. This effect was prolonged over several passages following siRNA transfection. Down-regulation of DNA MMR can contribute to tumour initiation and progression in N2a and CHLA-02-ATRT MCTS models. Studies of surface-associated MCTS differentiation may have broader applications in studying events in the initiation of cancer foci.

  14. Down-regulation of Rad51 activity during meiosis in yeast prevents competition with Dmc1 for repair of double-strand breaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interhomolog recombination plays a critical role in promoting proper meiotic chromosome segregation but a mechanistic understanding of this process is far from complete. In vegetative cells, Rad51 is a highly conserved recombinase that exhibits a preference for repairing double strand breaks (DSBs using sister chromatids, in contrast to the conserved, meiosis-specific recombinase, Dmc1, which preferentially repairs programmed DSBs using homologs. Despite the different preferences for repair templates, both Rad51 and Dmc1 are required for interhomolog recombination during meiosis. This paradox has recently been explained by the finding that Rad51 protein, but not its strand exchange activity, promotes Dmc1 function in budding yeast. Rad51 activity is inhibited in dmc1Δ mutants, where the failure to repair meiotic DSBs triggers the meiotic recombination checkpoint, resulting in prophase arrest. The question remains whether inhibition of Rad51 activity is important during wild-type meiosis, or whether inactivation of Rad51 occurs only as a result of the absence of DMC1 or checkpoint activation. This work shows that strains in which mechanisms that down-regulate Rad51 activity are removed exhibit reduced numbers of interhomolog crossovers and noncrossovers. A hypomorphic mutant, dmc1-T159A, makes less stable presynaptic filaments but is still able to mediate strand exchange and interact with accessory factors. Combining dmc1-T159A with up-regulated Rad51 activity reduces interhomolog recombination and spore viability, while increasing intersister joint molecule formation. These results support the idea that down-regulation of Rad51 activity is important during meiosis to prevent Rad51 from competing with Dmc1 for repair of meiotic DSBs.

  15. Knock-in of large reporter genes in human cells via CRISPR/Cas9-induced homology-dependent and independent DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiangjun; Tan, Chunlai; Wang, Feng; Wang, Yaofeng; Zhou, Rui; Cui, Dexuan; You, Wenxing; Zhao, Hui; Ren, Jianwei; Feng, Bo

    2016-05-19

    CRISPR/Cas9-induced site-specific DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can be repaired by homology-directed repair (HDR) or non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathways. Extensive efforts have been made to knock-in exogenous DNA to a selected genomic locus in human cells; which, however, has focused on HDR-based strategies and was proven inefficient. Here, we report that NHEJ pathway mediates efficient rejoining of genome and plasmids following CRISPR/Cas9-induced DNA DSBs, and promotes high-efficiency DNA integration in various human cell types. With this homology-independent knock-in strategy, integration of a 4.6 kb promoterless ires-eGFP fragment into the GAPDH locus yielded up to 20% GFP+ cells in somatic LO2 cells, and 1.70% GFP+ cells in human embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Quantitative comparison further demonstrated that the NHEJ-based knock-in is more efficient than HDR-mediated gene targeting in all human cell types examined. These data support that CRISPR/Cas9-induced NHEJ provides a valuable new path for efficient genome editing in human ESCs and somatic cells. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. In Vitro Expansion of Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Alters DNA Double Strand Break Repair of Etoposide Induced DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Hare

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are of interest for use in diverse cellular therapies. Ex vivo expansion of MSCs intended for transplantation must result in generation of cells that maintain fidelity of critical functions. Previous investigations have identified genetic and phenotypic alterations of MSCs with in vitro passage, but little is known regarding how culturing influences the ability of MSCs to repair double strand DNA breaks (DSBs, the most severe of DNA lesions. To investigate the response to DSB stress with passage in vitro, primary human MSCs were exposed to etoposide (VP16 at various passages with subsequent evaluation of cellular damage responses and DNA repair. Passage number did not affect susceptibility to VP16 or the incidence and repair kinetics of DSBs. Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ transcripts showed little alteration with VP16 exposure or passage; however, homologous recombination (HR transcripts were reduced following VP16 exposure with this decrease amplified as MSCs were passaged in vitro. Functional evaluations of NHEJ and HR showed that MSCs were unable to activate NHEJ repair following VP16 stress in cells after successive passage. These results indicate that ex vivo expansion of MSCs alters their ability to perform DSB repair, a necessary function for cells intended for transplantation.

  17. In Vitro Expansion of Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Alters DNA Double Strand Break Repair of Etoposide Induced DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Ian; Gencheva, Marieta; Evans, Rebecca; Fortney, James; Piktel, Debbie; Vos, Jeffrey A; Howell, David; Gibson, Laura F

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are of interest for use in diverse cellular therapies. Ex vivo expansion of MSCs intended for transplantation must result in generation of cells that maintain fidelity of critical functions. Previous investigations have identified genetic and phenotypic alterations of MSCs with in vitro passage, but little is known regarding how culturing influences the ability of MSCs to repair double strand DNA breaks (DSBs), the most severe of DNA lesions. To investigate the response to DSB stress with passage in vitro, primary human MSCs were exposed to etoposide (VP16) at various passages with subsequent evaluation of cellular damage responses and DNA repair. Passage number did not affect susceptibility to VP16 or the incidence and repair kinetics of DSBs. Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) transcripts showed little alteration with VP16 exposure or passage; however, homologous recombination (HR) transcripts were reduced following VP16 exposure with this decrease amplified as MSCs were passaged in vitro. Functional evaluations of NHEJ and HR showed that MSCs were unable to activate NHEJ repair following VP16 stress in cells after successive passage. These results indicate that ex vivo expansion of MSCs alters their ability to perform DSB repair, a necessary function for cells intended for transplantation.

  18. Hsp90α regulates ATM and NBN functions in sensing and repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennisi, Rosa; Antoccia, Antonio; Leone, Stefano; Ascenzi, Paolo; di Masi, Alessandra

    2017-08-01

    The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90α) regulates cell proteostasis and mitigates the harmful effects of endogenous and exogenous stressors on the proteome. Indeed, the inhibition of Hsp90α ATPase activity affects the cellular response to ionizing radiation (IR). Although the interplay between Hsp90α and several DNA damage response (DDR) proteins has been reported, its role in the DDR is still unclear. Here, we show that ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated kinase (ATM) and nibrin (NBN), but not 53BP1, RAD50, and MRE11, are Hsp90α clients as the Hsp90α inhibitor 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) induces ATM and NBN polyubiquitination and proteosomal degradation in normal fibroblasts and lymphoblastoid cell lines. Hsp90α-ATM and Hsp90α-NBN complexes are present in unstressed and irradiated cells, allowing the maintenance of ATM and NBN stability that is required for the MRE11/RAD50/NBN complex-dependent ATM activation and the ATM-dependent phosphorylation of both NBN and Hsp90α in response to IR-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Hsp90α forms a complex also with ph-Ser1981-ATM following IR. Upon phosphorylation, NBN dissociates from Hsp90α and translocates at the DSBs, while phThr5/7-Hsp90α is not recruited at the damaged sites. The inhibition of Hsp90α affects nuclear localization of MRE11 and RAD50, impairs DDR signaling (e.g., BRCA1 and CHK2 phosphorylation), and slows down DSBs repair. Hsp90α inhibition does not affect DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity, which possibly phosphorylates Hsp90α and H2AX after IR. Notably, Hsp90α inhibition causes H2AX phosphorylation in proliferating cells, this possibly indicating replication stress events. Overall, present data shed light on the regulatory role of Hsp90α on the DDR, controlling ATM and NBN stability and influencing the DSBs signaling and repair. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  19. Genome engineering with TALENs and ZFNs: repair pathways and donor design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Dana; Beumer, Kelly J

    2014-09-01

    Genome engineering with targetable nucleases depends on cellular pathways of DNA repair after target cleavage. Knowledge of how those pathways work, their requirements and their active factors, can guide experimental design and improve outcomes. While many aspects of both homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) are shared by a broad range of cells and organisms, some features are specific to individual situations. This article reviews the influence of repair mechanisms on the results of gene targeting experiments, with an emphasis on lessons learned from experiments with Drosophila. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. DNA damage repair and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Norio

    2003-01-01

    Tailored treatment is not new in radiotherapy; it has been the major subject for the last 20-30 years. Radiation responses and RBE (relative biological effectiveness) depend on assay systems, endpoints, type of tissues and tumors, radiation quality, dose rate, dose fractionation, physiological and environmental factors etc, Latent times to develop damages also differ among tissues and endpoints depending on doses and radiation quality. Recent progress in clarification of radiation induced cell death, especially of apoptotic cell death, is quite important for understanding radiosensitivity of tumor cure process as well as of tumorigenesis. Apoptotic cell death as well as dormant cells had been unaccounted and missed into a part of reproductive cell death. Another area of major progress has been made in clarifying repair mechanisms of radiation damage, i.e., non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombinational repair (HRR). New approaches and developments such as cDNA or protein micro arrays and so called informatics in addition to basic molecular biological analysis are expected to aid identifying molecules and their roles in signal transduction pathways, which are multi-factorial and interactive each other being involved in radiation responses. (authors)

  1. Role of Cell Cycle Regulation and MLH1, A Key DNA Mismatch Repair Protein, In Adaptive Survival Responses. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Boothman

    1999-08-11

    Due to several interesting findings on both adaptive survival responses (ASRs) and DNA mismatch repair (MMR), this grant was separated into two discrete Specific Aim sets (each with their own discrete hypotheses). The described experiments were simultaneously performed.

  2. A miR-590/Acvr2a/Rad51b Axis Regulates DNA Damage Repair during mESC Proliferation

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    Qidong Liu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells (ESCs enable rapid proliferation that also causes DNA damage. To maintain genomic stabilization during rapid proliferation, ESCs must have an efficient system to repress genotoxic stress. Here, we show that withdrawal of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF, which maintains the self-renewal capability of mouse ESCs (mESCs, significantly inhibits the cell proliferation and DNA damage of mESCs and upregulates the expression of miR-590. miR-590 promotes single-strand break (SSB and double-strand break (DSB damage repair, thus slowing proliferation of mESCs without influencing stemness. miR-590 directly targets Activin receptor type 2a (Acvr2a to mediate Activin signaling. We identified the homologous recombination-mediated repair (HRR gene, Rad51b, as a downstream molecule of the miR-590/Acvr2a pathway regulating the SSB and DSB damage repair and cell cycle. Our study shows that a miR-590/Acvr2a/Rad51b signaling axis ensures the stabilization of mESCs by balancing DNA damage repair and rapid proliferation during self-renewal.

  3. CD133+ cells contribute to radioresistance via altered regulation of DNA repair genes in human lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, Amar; Webb, Bryan; Gerson, Stanton L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Radioresistance in human tumors has been linked in part to a subset of cells termed cancer stem cells (CSCs). The prominin 1 (CD133) cell surface protein is proposed to be a marker enriching for CSCs. We explore the importance of DNA repair in contributing to radioresistance in CD133+ lung cancer cells. Materials and methods: A549 and H1299 lung cancer cell lines were used. Sorted CD133+ cells were exposed to either single 4 Gy or 8 Gy doses and clonogenic survival measured. ϒ-H2AX immunofluorescence and quantitative real time PCR was performed on sorted CD133+ cells both in the absence of IR and after two single 4 Gy doses. Lentiviral shRNA was used to silence repair genes. Results: A549 but not H1299 cells expand their CD133+ population after single 4 Gy exposure, and isolated A549 CD133+ cells demonstrate IR resistance. This resistance corresponded with enhanced repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and upregulated expression of DSB repair genes in A549 cells. Prior IR exposure of two single 4 Gy doses resulted in acquired DNA repair upregulation and improved repair proficiency in both A549 and H1299. Finally Exo1 and Rad51 silencing in A549 cells abrogated the CD133+ IR expansion phenotype and induced IR sensitivity in sorted CD133+ cells. Conclusions: CD133 identifies a population of cells within specific tumor types containing altered expression of DNA repair genes that are inducible upon exposure to chemotherapy. This altered gene expression contributes to enhanced DSB resolution and the radioresistance phenotype of these cells. We also identify DNA repair genes which may serve as promising therapeutic targets to confer radiosensitivity to CSCs

  4. Repair of endogenous and ionizing radiation-induced DNA damages: mechanisms and biological functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiteux, S.

    2002-01-01

    The cellular DNA is continuously exposed to endogenous and exogenous stress. Oxidative stress due to cellular metabolism is the major cause of endogenous DNA damage. On the other hand, ionizing radiation (IR) is an important exogenous stress. Both induce similar DNA damages: damaged bases, abasic sites and strand breakage. Most of these lesions are lethal and/or mutagenic. The survival of the cell is managed by efficient and accurate DNA repair mechanisms that remove lesions before their replication or transcription. DNA repair pathways involved in the removal of IR-induced lesions are briefly described. Base excision repair (BER) is mostly involved in the removal of base damage, abasic sites and single strand breaks. In contrast, DNA double strand breaks are mostly repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). How DNA repair pathways prevent cancer process is also discussed. (author)

  5. Is there health inequity in Europe today? The ‘strange case’ of the application of an European regulation to cartilage repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Beretta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An important regulation, issued by the European Community in 2008, regulates the authorisation and supervision of advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP and subsequent follow up in Europe. This law contains a Hospital Exemption clause, under which some hospitals in some countries can be exempted from the regulations governing ATMPs. The application of this regulation in Europe has resulted in differences in the costs of cell therapy for cartilage injuries in Germany compared with the costs in other European countries and in the U.S. The present paper argues on the real impact of political decisions on the health of citizens, on economy of healthcare systems, and highlights a possible case of inequality among European citizens with respect to cartilage repair procedures.

  6. ZIP4H (TEX11 deficiency in the mouse impairs meiotic double strand break repair and the regulation of crossing over.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie A Adelman

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We have recently shown that hypomorphic Mre11 complex mouse mutants exhibit defects in the repair of meiotic double strand breaks (DSBs. This is associated with perturbation of synaptonemal complex morphogenesis, repair and regulation of crossover formation. To further assess the Mre11 complex's role in meiotic progression, we identified testis-specific NBS1-interacting proteins via two-hybrid screening in yeast. In this screen, Zip4h (Tex11, a male germ cell specific X-linked gene was isolated. Based on sequence and predicted structural similarity to the S. cerevisiae and A. thaliana Zip4 orthologs, ZIP4H appears to be the mammalian ortholog. In S. cerevisiae and A. thaliana, Zip4 is a meiosis-specific protein that regulates the level of meiotic crossovers, thus influencing homologous chromosome segregation in these organisms. As is true for hypomorphic Nbs1 (Nbs1(DeltaB/DeltaB mice, Zip4h(-/Y mutant mice were fertile. Analysis of spermatocytes revealed a delay in meiotic double strand break repair and decreased crossover formation as inferred from DMC1 and MLH1 staining patterns, respectively. Achiasmate chromosomes at the first meiotic division were also observed in Zip4h(-/Y mutants, consistent with the observed reduction in MLH1 focus formation. These results indicate that meiotic functions of Zip4 family members are conserved and support the view that the Mre11 complex and ZIP4H interact functionally during the execution of the meiotic program in mammals.

  7. HHR23A, a human homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad23, regulates xeroderma pigmentosum C protein and is required for nucleotide excision repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Hui-Chuan; Hsieh, Yi-Hsuan; Huang, Yu-Hsin; Shen, Fan-Ching; Tsai, Han-Ni; Tsai, Jui-He; Lai, Yu-Ting; Wang, Yu-Ting; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Huang, Wenya

    2005-01-01

    HHR23A and hHR23B are the human homologs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad23. hHR23B is associated with the nucleotide excision repair (NER) factor xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) protein and is required for global genome repair. The function of hHR23A is not yet clear. In this study, the potential function of the hHR23A protein was investigated using RNA interference techniques. The hHR23A knock-down (KD) construct diminished the RNA level of hHR23A protein by approximately 60%, and it did not interfere with expression of the hHR23B gene. Based on Southwestern immunoblot and host-cell reactivation assays, hHR23A KD cells were found to be deficient in DNA repair activity against the DNA damage caused by UVC irradiation. In these hHR23A KD cells, the XPC gene was not normally induced by UVC irradiation, indicating that the hHR23A protein is involved in NER through regulation of the DNA damage recognition protein XPC. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that hHR23A was associated with a small portion of hHR23B and the majority of p53 protein, indicating that hHR23A regulates the function of XPC by its association with the NER activator p53

  8. ALDH1A1 maintains ovarian cancer stem cell-like properties by altered regulation of cell cycle checkpoint and DNA repair network signaling.

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    Erhong Meng

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH expressing cells have been characterized as possessing stem cell-like properties. We evaluated ALDH+ ovarian cancer stem cell-like properties and their role in platinum resistance. METHODS: Isogenic ovarian cancer cell lines for platinum sensitivity (A2780 and platinum resistant (A2780/CP70 as well as ascites from ovarian cancer patients were analyzed for ALDH+ by flow cytometry to determine its association to platinum resistance, recurrence and survival. A stable shRNA knockdown model for ALDH1A1 was utilized to determine its effect on cancer stem cell-like properties, cell cycle checkpoints, and DNA repair mediators. RESULTS: ALDH status directly correlated to platinum resistance in primary ovarian cancer samples obtained from ascites. Patients with ALDHHIGH displayed significantly lower progression free survival than the patients with ALDHLOW cells (9 vs. 3 months, respectively p<0.01. ALDH1A1-knockdown significantly attenuated clonogenic potential, PARP-1 protein levels, and reversed inherent platinum resistance. ALDH1A1-knockdown resulted in dramatic decrease of KLF4 and p21 protein levels thereby leading to S and G2 phase accumulation of cells. Increases in S and G2 cells demonstrated increased expression of replication stress associated Fanconi Anemia DNA repair proteins (FANCD2, FANCJ and replication checkpoint (pS317 Chk1 were affected. ALDH1A1-knockdown induced DNA damage, evidenced by robust induction of γ-H2AX and BAX mediated apoptosis, with significant increases in BRCA1 expression, suggesting ALDH1A1-dependent regulation of cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair networks in ovarian cancer stem-like cells. CONCLUSION: This data suggests that ovarian cancer cells expressing ALDH1A1 may maintain platinum resistance by altered regulation of cell cycle checkpoint and DNA repair network signaling.

  9. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 with improved proof-reading enhances homology-directed repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato-Inui, Tomoko; Takahashi, Gou; Hsu, Szuyin; Miyaoka, Yuichiro

    2018-05-18

    Genome editing using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) predominantly induces non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), which generates random insertions or deletions, whereas homology-directed repair (HDR), which generates precise recombination products, is useful for wider applications. However, the factors that determine the ratio of HDR to NHEJ products after CRISPR/Cas9 editing remain unclear, and methods by which the proportion of HDR products can be increased have not yet been fully established. We systematically analyzed the HDR and NHEJ products after genome editing using various modified guide RNAs (gRNAs) and Cas9 variants with an enhanced conformational checkpoint to improve the fidelity at endogenous gene loci in HEK293T cells and HeLa cells. We found that these modified gRNAs and Cas9 variants were able to enhance HDR in both single-nucleotide substitutions and a multi-kb DNA fragment insertion. Our results suggest that the original CRISPR/Cas9 system from the bacterial immune system is not necessarily the best option for the induction of HDR in genome editing and indicate that the modulation of the kinetics of conformational checkpoints of Cas9 can optimize the HDR/NHEJ ratio.

  10. Neil3-dependent base excision repair regulates lipid metabolism and prevents atherosclerosis in Apoe-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skarpengland, Tonje; Holm, Sverre; Scheffler, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that oxidative DNA damage accumulates in atherosclerosis. Recently, we showed that a genetic variant in the human DNA repair enzyme NEIL3 was associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction. Here, we explored the role of Neil3/NEIL3 in atherogenesis by both...

  11. The contribution of alu elements to mutagenic DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Maria E; White, Travis B; Streva, Vincent A; DeFreece, Cecily B; Hedges, Dale J; Deininger, Prescott L

    2015-03-01

    Alu elements make up the largest family of human mobile elements, numbering 1.1 million copies and comprising 11% of the human genome. As a consequence of evolution and genetic drift, Alu elements of various sequence divergence exist throughout the human genome. Alu/Alu recombination has been shown to cause approximately 0.5% of new human genetic diseases and contribute to extensive genomic structural variation. To begin understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to these rearrangements in mammalian cells, we constructed Alu/Alu recombination reporter cell lines containing Alu elements ranging in sequence divergence from 0%-30% that allow detection of both Alu/Alu recombination and large non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) deletions that range from 1.0 to 1.9 kb in size. Introduction of as little as 0.7% sequence divergence between Alu elements resulted in a significant reduction in recombination, which indicates even small degrees of sequence divergence reduce the efficiency of homology-directed DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Further reduction in recombination was observed in a sequence divergence-dependent manner for diverged Alu/Alu recombination constructs with up to 10% sequence divergence. With greater levels of sequence divergence (15%-30%), we observed a significant increase in DSB repair due to a shift from Alu/Alu recombination to variable-length NHEJ which removes sequence between the two Alu elements. This increase in NHEJ deletions depends on the presence of Alu sequence homeology (similar but not identical sequences). Analysis of recombination products revealed that Alu/Alu recombination junctions occur more frequently in the first 100 bp of the Alu element within our reporter assay, just as they do in genomic Alu/Alu recombination events. This is the first extensive study characterizing the influence of Alu element sequence divergence on DNA repair, which will inform predictions regarding the effect of Alu element sequence divergence on both

  12. Relative contribution of homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining to DNA double-strand break repair after oxidative stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letavayová, Lucia; Marková, Eva; Hermanská, Katarína; Vlcková, Viera; Vlasáková, Danusa; Chovanec, Miroslav; Brozmanová, Jela

    2006-05-10

    Oxidative damage to DNA seems to be an important factor in developing many human diseases including cancer. It involves base and sugar damage, base-free sites, DNA-protein cross-links and DNA single-strand (SSB) and double-strand (DSB) breaks. Oxidative DSB can be formed in various ways such as their direct induction by the drug or their generation either through attempted and aborted repair of primary DNA lesions or through DNA replication-dependent conversion of SSB. In general, two main pathways are responsible for repairing DSB, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), with both of them being potential candidates for the repair of oxidative DSB. We have examined relative contribution of HR and NHEJ to cellular response after oxidative stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, cell survival, mutagenesis and DSB induction and repair in the rad52, yku70 and rad52 yku70 mutants after hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), menadione (MD) or bleomycin (BLM) exposure were compared to those obtained for the corresponding wild type. We show that MD exposure does not lead to observable DSB induction in yeast, suggesting that the toxic effects of this agent are mediated by other types of DNA damage. Although H(2)O(2) treatment generates some DSB, their yield is relatively low and hence DSB may only partially be responsible for toxicity of H(2)O(2), particularly at high doses of the agent. On the other hand, the basis of the BLM toxicity resides primarily in DSB induction. Both HR and NHEJ act on BLM-induced DSB, although their relative participation in the process is not equal. Based on our results we suggest that the complexity and/or the quality of the BLM-induced DSB might represent an obstacle for the NHEJ pathway.

  13. Decreased cell survival and DNA repair capacity after UVC irradiation in association with down-regulation of GRP78/BiP in human RSa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Ling; Kita, Kazuko; Wano, Chieko; Wu Yuping; Sugaya, Shigeru; Suzuki, Nobuo

    2005-01-01

    In contrast to extensive studies on the roles of molecular chaperones, such as heat shock proteins, there are only a few reports about the roles of GRP78/BiP, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced molecular chaperone, in mammalian cell responses to DNA-damaging stresses. To investigate whether GRP78/BiP is involved in resistance to a DNA-damaging agent, UVC (principally 254 nm in wavelength), we established human cells with down-regulation of GRP78/BiP by transfection of human RSa cells with antisense cDNA for GRP78/BiP. We found that the transfected cells showed higher sensitivity to UVC-induced cell death than control cells transfected with the vector alone. In the antisense-cDNA transfected cells, the removal capacities of the two major types of UVC-damaged DNA (thymine dimers and (6-4) photoproducts) in vivo and DNA synthesis activity of whole cell extracts to repair UVC-irradiated plasmids in vitro were remarkably decreased compared with those in the control cells. Furthermore, the antisense-cDNA transfected cells also showed slightly higher sensitivity to cisplatin-induced cell death than the control cells. Cisplatin-induced DNA damage is primarily repaired by nucleotide excision repair, like UVC-induced DNA damage. The present results suggest that GRP78/BiP plays a protective role against UVC-induced cell death possibly via nucleotide excision repair, at least in the human RSa cells tested

  14. DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, R.

    1978-01-01

    Some topics discussed are as follows: difficulty in extrapolating data from E. coli to mammalian systems; mutations caused by UV-induced changes in DNA; mutants deficient in excision repair; other postreplication mechanisms; kinds of excision repair systems; detection of repair by biochemical or biophysical means; human mutants deficient in repair; mutagenic effects of UV on XP cells; and detection of UV-repair defects among XP individuals

  15. Identification of the DNA repair defects in a case of Dubowitz syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyin Yue

    Full Text Available Dubowitz Syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder with a unique set of clinical features including microcephaly and susceptibility to tumor formation. Although more than 140 cases of Dubowitz syndrome have been reported since 1965, the genetic defects of this disease has not been identified. In this study, we systematically analyzed the DNA damage response and repair capability of fibroblasts established from a Dubowitz Syndrome patient. Dubowitz syndrome fibroblasts are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation, bleomycin, and doxorubicin. However, they have relatively normal sensitivities to mitomycin-C, cisplatin, and camptothecin. Dubowitz syndrome fibroblasts also have normal DNA damage signaling and cell cycle checkpoint activations after DNA damage. These data implicate a defect in repair of DNA double strand break (DSB likely due to defective non-homologous end joining (NHEJ. We further sequenced several genes involved in NHEJ, and identified a pair of novel compound mutations in the DNA Ligase IV gene. Furthermore, expression of wild type DNA ligase IV completely complement the DNA repair defects in Dubowitz syndrome fibroblasts, suggesting that the DNA ligase IV mutation is solely responsible for the DNA repair defects. These data suggests that at least subset of Dubowitz syndrome can be attributed to DNA ligase IV mutations.

  16. FANCD2 Binds CtIP and Regulates DNA-End Resection during DNA Interstrand Crosslink Repair

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    Junya Unno

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Fanconi anemia (FA pathway is critically involved in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells and the suppression of carcinogenesis. A key FA protein, FANCD2, is monoubiquitinated and accumulates in chromatin in response to DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs, where it coordinates DNA repair through mechanisms that are still poorly understood. Here, we report that CtIP protein directly interacts with FANCD2. A region spanning amino acids 166 to 273 of CtIP and monoubiquitination of FANCD2 are both essential for the FANCD2-CtIP interaction and mitomycin C (MMC-induced CtIP foci. Remarkably, both FANCD2 and CtIP are critical for MMC-induced RPA2 hyperphosphorylation, an event that accompanies end resection of double-strand breaks. Collectively, our results reveal a role of monoubiquitinated FANCD2 in end resection that depends on its binding to CtIP during ICL repair.

  17. Down-regulation of DNA mismatch repair proteins in human and murine tumor spheroids: implications for multicellular resistance to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Giulio; Green, Shane K; Bocci, Guido; Man, Shan; Emmenegger, Urban; Ebos, John M L; Weinerman, Adina; Shaked, Yuval; Kerbel, Robert S

    2005-10-01

    Similar to other anticancer agents, intrinsic or acquired resistance to DNA-damaging chemotherapeutics is a major obstacle for cancer therapy. Current strategies aimed at overcoming this problem are mostly based on the premise that tumor cells acquire heritable genetic mutations that contribute to drug resistance. Here, we present evidence for an epigenetic, tumor cell adhesion-mediated, and reversible form of drug resistance that is associated with a reduction of DNA mismatch repair proteins PMS2 and/or MLH1 as well as other members of this DNA repair process. Growth of human breast cancer, human melanoma, and murine EMT-6 breast cancer cell lines as multicellular spheroids in vitro, which is associated with increased resistance to many chemotherapeutic drugs, including alkylating agents, is shown to lead to a reproducible down-regulation of PMS2, MLH1, or, in some cases, both as well as MHS6, MSH3, and MSH2. The observed down-regulation is in part reversible by treatment of tumor spheroids with the DNA-demethylating agent, 5-azacytidine. Thus, treatment of EMT-6 mouse mammary carcinoma spheroids with 5-azacytidine resulted in reduced and/or disrupted cell-cell adhesion, which in turn sensitized tumor spheroids to cisplatin-mediated killing in vitro. Our results suggest that antiadhesive agents might sensitize tumor spheroids to alkylating agents in part by reversing or preventing reduced DNA mismatch repair activity and that the chemosensitization properties of 5-azacytidine may conceivably reflect its role as a potential antiadhesive agent as well as reversal agent for MLH1 gene silencing in human tumors.

  18. Radiation-Induced Upregulation of Gene Expression From Adenoviral Vectors Mediated by DNA Damage Repair and Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nokisalmi, Petri; Rajecki, Maria; Pesonen, Sari; Escutenaire, Sophie; Soliymani, Rabah; Tenhunen, Mikko; Ahtiainen, Laura; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In the present study, we evaluated the combination of replication-deficient adenoviruses and radiotherapy in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the mechanism of radiation-mediated upregulation of adenoviral transgene expression. Methods and Materials: Adenoviral transgene expression (luciferase or green fluorescent protein) was studied with and without radiation in three cell lines: breast cancer M4A4-LM3, prostate cancer PC-3MM2, and lung cancer LNM35/enhanced green fluorescent protein. The effect of the radiation dose, modification of the viral capsid, and five different transgene promoters were studied. The cellular responses were studied using mass spectrometry and immunofluorescence analysis. Double strand break repair was modulated by inhibitors of heat shock protein 90, topoisomerase-I, and DNA protein kinase, and transgene expression was measured. Results: We found that a wide range of radiation doses increased adenoviral transgene expression regardless of the cell line, transgene, promoter, or viral capsid modification. Treatment with adenovirus, radiation, and double strand break repair inhibitors resulted in persistence of double strand breaks and subsequent increases in adenovirus transgene expression. Conclusions: Radiation-induced enhancement of adenoviral transgene expression is linked to DNA damage recognition and repair. Radiation induces a global cellular response that results in increased production of RNA and proteins, including adenoviral transgene products. This study provides a mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with adenoviral gene delivery.

  19. DNA repair protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergbæk, Lotte

    In its 3rd edition, this Methods in Molecular Biology(TM) book covers the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including advanced protocols and standard techniques in the field of DNA repair. Offers expert guidance for DNA repair, recombination, and replication. Current knowledge of the mechanisms...... that regulate DNA repair has grown significantly over the past years with technology advances such as RNA interference, advanced proteomics and microscopy as well as high throughput screens. The third edition of DNA Repair Protocols covers various aspects of the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including...... recent advanced protocols as well as standard techniques used in the field of DNA repair. Both mammalian and non-mammalian model organisms are covered in the book, and many of the techniques can be applied with only minor modifications to other systems than the one described. Written in the highly...

  20. International congress on DNA damage and repair: Book of abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    This document contains the abstracts of 105 papers presented at the Congress. Topics covered include the Escherichia coli nucleotide excision repair system, DNA repair in malignant transformations, defective DNA repair, and gene regulation. (TEM)

  1. International congress on DNA damage and repair: Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This document contains the abstracts of 105 papers presented at the Congress. Topics covered include the Escherichia coli nucleotide excision repair system, DNA repair in malignant transformations, defective DNA repair, and gene regulation

  2. USP22 Induces Cisplatin Resistance in Lung Adenocarcinoma by Regulating γH2AX-Mediated DNA Damage Repair and Ku70/Bax-Mediated Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aman Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy is one of the most important reasons for treatment failure in advanced non-small cell lung cancer, but the underlying mechanism is extremely complex and unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the correlation of ubiquitin-specific peptidase 22 (USP22 with acquired resistance to cisplatin in lung adenocarcinoma. In this study, we found that overexpression of USP22 could lead to cisplatin resistance in A549 cells. USP22 and its downstream proteins γH2AX and Sirt1 levels are upregulated in the cisplatin- resistant A549/CDDP cell line. USP22 enhances DNA damage repair and induce cisplatin resistance by promoting the phosphorylation of histone H2AX via deubiquitinating histone H2A. In addition, USP22 decreases the acetylation of Ku70 by stabilizing Sirt1, thus inhibiting Bax-mediated apoptosis and inducing cisplatin resistance. The cisplatin sensitivity in cisplatin-resistant A549/CDDP cells was restored by USP22 inhibition in vivo and vitro. In summary, our findings reveal the dual mechanism of USP22 involvement in cisplatin resistance that USP22 can regulate γH2AX-mediated DNA damage repair and Ku70/Bax-mediated apoptosis. USP22 is a potential target in cisplatin-resistant lung adenocarcinoma and should be considered in future therapeutic practice.

  3. Studies on the repair of double strand break of DNA and cellular carcinogenesis, and consideration on the concept of extinction of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teraoka, Hirobumi

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the relationship between the repair of double strand break (DSB) of DNA and cellular carcinogenesis mainly on author's investigations, and his recent thought aiming at the extinction of nuclear power. The molecular repairing system is explained about DNA DSB induced by radiation and chemicals. When DSB occurs, nucleosome consisting from 4 core-histones participates to link the broken ends and then repair mechanisms of homologous recombination (HRR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) begin to work. The latter is dominant in mammalians. Thus the genetic defect in these systems of DSB response and repair is a course of disorders such as ataxia telangiectasia (AT) (DSB sensor defect), genetic breast cancer (HRR defect), and radiosensitive-severe combined immunodeficiency (RS-SCID) (NHEJ defect), all of which result in cancer formation. NHEJ repair is known to be error-prone. Against multi-step carcinogenesis where accumulated gene mutations lead to the cancer formation, the author thinks chromosomal instability is one of important carcinogenic causes: the instability can be a trigger of producing cancer stem cells because the cells can be yielded from mouse embryonic stem cells where DSB is shown to participate in the process. Low dose radiation produces a small amount of DSB, to which the repair response is less sensitive at G2/M checkpoint, ultimately leading to genomic instability. Considering effects of the low dose radiation exposure above, and of the internal exposure to 3 H-thymidine beta ray in cells, of indoor Rn participating 16% of lung cancer incidence (Canadian epidemiological data) and so on, together with moral and social responsibility of scientist and technologist, the author says to have attained to the concept of the ''Extinction of Nuclear Power''. (T.T)

  4. A damage-responsive DNA binding protein regulates transcription of the yeast DNA repair gene PHR1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastian, J.; Sancar, G.B.

    1991-01-01

    The PHR1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes the DNA repair enzyme photolyase. Transcription of PHR1 increases in response to treatment of cells with 254-nm radiation and chemical agents that damage DNA. The authors here the identification of a damage-responsive DNA binding protein, termed photolyase regulatory protein (PRP), and its cognate binding site, termed the PHR1 transcription after DNA damage. PRP activity, monitored by electrophoretic-mobility-shift assay, was detected in cells during normal growth but disappeared within 30 min after irradiation. Copper-phenanthroline footprinting of PRP-DNA complexes revealed that PRP protects a 39-base-pair region of PHR1 5' flanking sequence beginning 40 base pairs upstream from the coding sequence. Thus these observations establish that PRP is a damage-responsive repressor of PHR1 transcription

  5. Bioactive Dietary VDR Ligands Regulate Genes Encoding Biomarkers of Skin Repair That Are Associated with Risk for Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitis Karrys

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Treatment with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D improves psoriasis symptoms, possibly by inducing the expression of late cornified envelope (LCE3 genes involved in skin repair. In psoriasis patients, the majority of whom harbor genomic deletion of LCE3B and LCE3C (LCE3C_LCE3B-del, we propose that certain dietary analogues of 1,25D activate the expression of residual LCE3A/LCE3D/LCE3E genes to compensate for the loss of LCE3B/LCE3C in the deletant genotype. Herein, human keratinocytes (HEKn homozygous for LCE3C_LCE3B-del were treated with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and curcumin, two low-affinity, nutrient ligands for the vitamin D receptor (VDR. DHA and curcumin induce the expression of LCE3A/LCE3D/LCE3E mRNAs at concentrations corresponding to their affinity for VDR. Moreover, immunohistochemical quantitation revealed that the treatment of keratinocytes with DHA or curcumin stimulates LCE3 protein expression, while simultaneously opposing the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα-signaled phosphorylation of mitogen activated protein (MAP kinases, p38 and Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK, thereby overcoming inflammation biomarkers elicited by TNFα challenge. Finally, DHA and curcumin modulate two transcription factors relevant to psoriatic inflammation, the activator protein-1 factor Jun B and the nuclear receptor NR4A2/NURR1, that is implicated as a mediator of VDR ligand-triggered gene control. These findings provide insights into the mechanism(s whereby dietary VDR ligands alter inflammatory and barrier functions relevant to skin repair, and may provide a molecular basis for improved treatments for mild/moderate psoriasis.

  6. Pim-3 contributes to radioresistance through regulation of the cell cycle and DNA damage repair in pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiang-Yuan; Wang, Zhen [Cancer Research Institute, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Li, Bei [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Ying-Jian, E-mail: yjzhang111@aliyun.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Li, Ying-Yi, E-mail: liyingyi@fudan.edu.cn [Cancer Research Institute, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2016-04-22

    Resistance of cancer cells to chemoradiotherapy is a major clinical problem in pancreatic cancer treatment. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of cellular resistance and identifying novel targets are essential for improving treatment efficacy for pancreatic cancer patients. Previous studies have demonstrated a significant role for Pim-3 in pancreatic cancer survival against gemcitabine-induced genotoxic stress. Here, we observed that radiation treatment enhanced Pim-3 expression in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Stable overexpression of Pim-3 in pancreatic cancer cells significantly protected cells against radiation treatment by attenuating G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and DNA damage response. Silencing of Pim-3 expression significantly elevated the phosphorylation of histone variant H2AX, a marker of DNA double strand breaks, and decreased the activation of ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase, along with its downstream targets, eventually enhancing the radiosensitivity of human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Hence, we demonstrated a novel function for Pim-3 in human pancreatic cancer cell survival against radiation. Targeting Pim-3 may be a promising way to improve treatment efficacy in combination with radiotherapy in human pancreatic cancer. - Highlights: • This is first study to demonstrate that Pim-3 is endogenously induced by ionizing radiation in pancreatic cancer cells, and Pim-3 overexpression enhanced radioresistance of pancreatic cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. • This is first study to provide evidence that radioresistance induced by Pim-3 is mainly attributed to Pim-3 induces activation of ATM, which subsequently activates checkpoint 1, leading to amplification of DNA repair through cell cycle arrest and DNA repair pathways. • This is first study to indicate that targeting Pim-3 may be a promising strategy to provide better treatment efficacy in combination with radiotherapy in human pancreatic

  7. Pim-3 contributes to radioresistance through regulation of the cell cycle and DNA damage repair in pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xiang-Yuan; Wang, Zhen; Li, Bei; Zhang, Ying-Jian; Li, Ying-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Resistance of cancer cells to chemoradiotherapy is a major clinical problem in pancreatic cancer treatment. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of cellular resistance and identifying novel targets are essential for improving treatment efficacy for pancreatic cancer patients. Previous studies have demonstrated a significant role for Pim-3 in pancreatic cancer survival against gemcitabine-induced genotoxic stress. Here, we observed that radiation treatment enhanced Pim-3 expression in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Stable overexpression of Pim-3 in pancreatic cancer cells significantly protected cells against radiation treatment by attenuating G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and DNA damage response. Silencing of Pim-3 expression significantly elevated the phosphorylation of histone variant H2AX, a marker of DNA double strand breaks, and decreased the activation of ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase, along with its downstream targets, eventually enhancing the radiosensitivity of human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Hence, we demonstrated a novel function for Pim-3 in human pancreatic cancer cell survival against radiation. Targeting Pim-3 may be a promising way to improve treatment efficacy in combination with radiotherapy in human pancreatic cancer. - Highlights: • This is first study to demonstrate that Pim-3 is endogenously induced by ionizing radiation in pancreatic cancer cells, and Pim-3 overexpression enhanced radioresistance of pancreatic cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. • This is first study to provide evidence that radioresistance induced by Pim-3 is mainly attributed to Pim-3 induces activation of ATM, which subsequently activates checkpoint 1, leading to amplification of DNA repair through cell cycle arrest and DNA repair pathways. • This is first study to indicate that targeting Pim-3 may be a promising strategy to provide better treatment efficacy in combination with radiotherapy in human pancreatic

  8. Developments on ASME Code Cases to Risk-Informed Repair/Replacement Activities in Support of Risk-Informed Regulation Initiatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balkey, Kenneth R.; Holston, William C.

    2002-01-01

    ASME Code Case N-658, 'Risk-Informed Safety Classification for Use in Risk-Informed Repair/Replacement Activities' and Code Case N-660, 'Alternative Repair/Replacement Requirements For Items Classified In Accordance With Risk-Informed Processes' are being completed to expand the breadth of risk-informed requirements for pressure-retaining items. This initiative, which is built from prior ASME Section XI risk-informed inservice inspection developments over the past decade, has been undertaken in conjunction with U.S. risk-informed regulation efforts. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is working with the industry on risk informing Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 50 (10CFR50). The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's basic proposal is to allow modification of some of the special treatment requirements of 10CFR50. Their effort is proceeding via an Advanced Notice of Public Rulemaking, March 3, 2000, and an announcement of Availability of Draft Rule Wording, November 29, 2001, to add 10 CFR 50.69, 'Risk-Informed Treatment of Structures, Systems and Components'. A parallel task by the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) to develop a guideline on how to implement the results of the rulemaking is also well underway via NEI 00-04 (Draft Revision B), 'Option 2 Implementation Guideline', May 2001. This paper summarizes the content and status of approval of the proposed ASME Code Cases, including how they relate to the above NRC and NEI efforts. Some initial results from trial application of the Code Cases will also be cited. (authors)

  9. Either non-homologous ends joining or homologous recombination is required to repair double-strand breaks in the genome of macrophage-internalized Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzostek, Anna; Szulc, Izabela; Klink, Magdalena; Brzezinska, Marta; Sulowska, Zofia; Dziadek, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is constantly exposed to a multitude of hostile conditions and is confronted by a variety of potentially DNA-damaging assaults in vivo, primarily from host-generated antimicrobial toxic radicals. Exposure to reactive nitrogen species and/or reactive oxygen species causes different types of DNA damage, including oxidation, depurination, methylation and deamination, that can result in single- or double-strand breaks (DSBs). These breaks affect the integrity of the whole genome and, when left unrepaired, can lead to cell death. Here, we investigated the role of the DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous ends joining (NHEJ), in the survival of Mtb inside macrophages. To this end, we constructed Mtb strains defective for HR (ΔrecA), NHEJ [Δ(ku,ligD)], or both DSB repair systems [Δ(ku,ligD,recA)]. Experiments using these strains revealed that either HR or NHEJ is sufficient for the survival and propagation of tubercle bacilli inside macrophages. Inhibition of nitric oxide or superoxide anion production with L-NIL or apocynin, respectively, enabled the Δ(ku,ligD,recA) mutant strain lacking both systems to survive intracellularly. Complementation of the Δ(ku,ligD,recA) mutant with an intact recA or ku-ligD rescued the ability of Mtb to propagate inside macrophages.

  10. Either non-homologous ends joining or homologous recombination is required to repair double-strand breaks in the genome of macrophage-internalized Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Brzostek

    Full Text Available The intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is constantly exposed to a multitude of hostile conditions and is confronted by a variety of potentially DNA-damaging assaults in vivo, primarily from host-generated antimicrobial toxic radicals. Exposure to reactive nitrogen species and/or reactive oxygen species causes different types of DNA damage, including oxidation, depurination, methylation and deamination, that can result in single- or double-strand breaks (DSBs. These breaks affect the integrity of the whole genome and, when left unrepaired, can lead to cell death. Here, we investigated the role of the DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR and non-homologous ends joining (NHEJ, in the survival of Mtb inside macrophages. To this end, we constructed Mtb strains defective for HR (ΔrecA, NHEJ [Δ(ku,ligD], or both DSB repair systems [Δ(ku,ligD,recA]. Experiments using these strains revealed that either HR or NHEJ is sufficient for the survival and propagation of tubercle bacilli inside macrophages. Inhibition of nitric oxide or superoxide anion production with L-NIL or apocynin, respectively, enabled the Δ(ku,ligD,recA mutant strain lacking both systems to survive intracellularly. Complementation of the Δ(ku,ligD,recA mutant with an intact recA or ku-ligD rescued the ability of Mtb to propagate inside macrophages.

  11. DNA breaks and repair in interstitial telomere sequences: Influence of chromatin structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revaud, D.

    2009-06-01

    Interstitial Telomeric Sequences (ITS) are over-involved in spontaneous and radiationinduced chromosome aberrations in chinese hamster cells. We have performed a study to investigate the origin of their instability, spontaneously or after low doses irradiation. Our results demonstrate that ITS have a particular chromatin structure: short nucleotide repeat length, less compaction of the 30 nm chromatin fiber, presence of G-quadruplex structures. These features would modulate breaks production and would favour the recruitment of alternative DNA repair mechanisms, which are prone to produce chromosome aberrations. These pathways could be at the origin of chromosome aberrations in ITS whereas NHEJ and HR Double Strand Break repair pathways are rather required for a correct repair in these regions. (author)

  12. Involvement of DNA repair in telomere maintenance and chromosomal instability in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayouaz, Ali

    2008-01-01

    Telomeres are a major actor of cell immortalization, precursor of a carcinogenesis process. Thus, it appears that the maintenance of telomeres is crucial in the implementation of carcinogenesis process. Due to their structures and under some conditions, telomeres can be assimilated in some respects to chromosomal breakages. Within this perspective, this research thesis aims at determining under which circumstances telomeres can be taken as targets by DNA repair mechanisms. More precisely, the author addressed the respective contributions of two repair mechanisms (the Non-Homologous End-Joining or NHEJ, and Homologous Recombination or HR) in the maintenance of telomere integrity. The author first discusses knowledge related to the interaction between chromosomal extremities and repair mechanisms. Then, he defines the behaviour of these mechanisms with respect to telomeres. He shows that, in absence of recombination mechanisms, the integrity of telomeres is not affected. Finally, he reports the attempt to determine their respective contributions in telomeric homeostasis [fr

  13. Comparison of initial DNA (Chromosome) damage/repair in cells exposed to heavy ion particles and X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okayasu, Ryuichi; Okada, Maki; Noguchi, Mitsuho; Saito, Shiori; Okabe, Atsushi; Takakura, Kahoru

    2005-01-01

    We have studied cell survival and chromosome damage/repair in normal and non homologous end-joining (NHEJ) deficient human cells exposed to carbon ions (290 MeV/u, ∼70 keV/um), iron ions (500 MeV/u, ∼200 keV/um) and X-rays. In order to examine the effect of heavy ion on double strand break (DSB) repair machinery, the auto-phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs was also investigated. The important discoveries made during this period are: 200 keV/um iron irradiation induced additional molecular damage beyond that 70 keV/um carbon did. Iron irradiation not only caused an inefficient G1 chromosome repair, but also induced non-repairable DSB/chromosome damage. The auto-phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs was significantly affected by high linear energy transfer (LET) irradiation when compared to X-rays. These results indicate NHEJ machinery was markedly disturbed by high LET radiation when compared to low LET radiation. (author)

  14. Society of cardiovascular anesthesiologists: the effect of blood pressure regulation during aortic coarctation repair on brain, kidney, and muscle oxygen saturation measured by near-infrared spectroscopy: a randomized, clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerman, Annelies; Bové, Thierry; François, Katrien; Jacobs, Stefan; Deblaere, Isabel; Wouters, Patrick; de Hert, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we compared the effects of 3 frequently used arterial blood pressure-regulating agents on brain (rScO2), renal (SrO2), and muscle (SmO2) oxygen saturation, during aortic coarctation repair in children. Based on the reported adverse effect of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) on left-sided

  15. The Heterochromatic Barrier to DNA Double Strand Break Repair: How to Get the Entry Visa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron A. Goodarzi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Over recent decades, a deep understanding of pathways that repair DNA double strand breaks (DSB has been gained from biochemical, structural, biophysical and cellular studies. DNA non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ and homologous recombination (HR represent the two major DSB repair pathways, and both processes are now well understood. Recent work has demonstrated that the chromatin environment at a DSB significantly impacts upon DSB repair and that, moreover, dramatic modifications arise in the chromatin surrounding a DSB. Chromatin is broadly divided into open, transcriptionally active, euchromatin (EC and highly compacted, transcriptionally inert, heterochromatin (HC, although these represent extremes of a spectrum. The HC superstructure restricts both DSB repair and damage response signaling. Moreover, DSBs within HC (HC-DSBs are rapidly relocalized to the EC-HC interface. The damage response protein kinase, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM, is required for HC-DSB repair but is dispensable for the relocalization of HC-DSBs. It has been proposed that ATM signaling enhances HC relaxation in the DSB vicinity and that this is a prerequisite for HC-DSB repair. Hence, ATM is essential for repair of HC-DSBs. Here, we discuss how HC impacts upon the response to DSBs and how ATM overcomes the barrier that HC poses to repair.

  16. Inositol hexakisphosphate kinase-1 mediates assembly/disassembly of the CRL4–signalosome complex to regulate DNA repair and cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Feng; Xu, Jing; Khan, A. Basit; Gadalla, Moataz M.; Cha, Jiyoung Y.; Xu, Risheng; Tyagi, Richa; Dang, Yongjun; Chakraborty, Anutosh; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2014-01-01

    Inositol polyphosphates containing an energetic pyrophosphate bond are formed primarily by a family of three inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) kinases (IP6K1–3). The Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) regulate diverse biological processes through substrate ubiquitylation. CRL4, comprising the scaffold Cullin 4A/B, the E2-interacting Roc1/2, and the adaptor protein damage-specific DNA-binding protein 1, is activated by DNA damage. Basal CRL4 activity is inhibited by binding to the COP9 signalosome (CSN). UV radiation and other stressors dissociate the complex, leading to E3 ligase activation, but signaling events that trigger signalosome dissociation from CRL4 have been unclear. In the present study, we show that, under basal conditions, IP6K1 forms a ternary complex with CSN and CRL4 in which IP6K1 and CRL4 are inactive. UV dissociates IP6K1 to generate IP7, which then dissociates CSN–CRL4 to activate CRL4. Thus, IP6K1 is a novel CRL4 subunit that transduces UV signals to mediate disassembly of the CRL4–CSN complex, thereby regulating nucleotide excision repair and cell death. PMID:25349427

  17. Genetic variations in DNA repair genes, radiosensitivity to cancer and susceptibility to acute tissue reactions in radiotherapy-treated cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A.; Voronova, Natalia V.; Chistiakov, Pavel A.

    2008-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a well established carcinogen for human cells. At low doses, radiation exposure mainly results in generation of double strand breaks (DSBs). Radiation-related DSBs could be directly linked to the formation of chromosomal rearrangements as has been proven for radiation-induced thyroid tumors. Repair of DSBs presumably involves two main pathways, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). A number of known inherited syndromes, such as ataxia telangiectasia, ataxia-telangiectasia like-disorder, radiosensitive severe combined immunodeficiency, Nijmegen breakage syndrome, and LIG4 deficiency are associated with increased radiosensitivity and/or cancer risk. Many of them are caused by mutations in DNA repair genes. Recent studies also suggest that variations in the DNA repair capacity in the general population may influence cancer susceptibility. In this paper, we summarize the current status of DNA repair proteins as potential targets for radiation-induced cancer risk. We will focus on genetic alterations in genes involved in HR- and NHEJ-mediated repair of DSBs, which could influence predisposition to radiation-related cancer and thereby explain interindividual differences in radiosensitivity or radioresistance in a general population

  18. Genetic variations in DNA repair genes, radiosensitivity to cancer and susceptibility to acute tissue reactions in radiotherapy-treated cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A. (Dept. of Pathology, Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh (US)); Voronova, Natalia V. (Dept. of Molecular Diagnostics, National Research Center GosNIIgenetika, Moscow (RU)); Chistiakov, Pavel A. (Dept. of Radiology, Cancer Research Center, Moscow (RU))

    2008-06-15

    Ionizing radiation is a well established carcinogen for human cells. At low doses, radiation exposure mainly results in generation of double strand breaks (DSBs). Radiation-related DSBs could be directly linked to the formation of chromosomal rearrangements as has been proven for radiation-induced thyroid tumors. Repair of DSBs presumably involves two main pathways, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). A number of known inherited syndromes, such as ataxia telangiectasia, ataxia-telangiectasia like-disorder, radiosensitive severe combined immunodeficiency, Nijmegen breakage syndrome, and LIG4 deficiency are associated with increased radiosensitivity and/or cancer risk. Many of them are caused by mutations in DNA repair genes. Recent studies also suggest that variations in the DNA repair capacity in the general population may influence cancer susceptibility. In this paper, we summarize the current status of DNA repair proteins as potential targets for radiation-induced cancer risk. We will focus on genetic alterations in genes involved in HR- and NHEJ-mediated repair of DSBs, which could influence predisposition to radiation-related cancer and thereby explain interindividual differences in radiosensitivity or radioresistance in a general population

  19. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Regulates Expression of the DNA Damage Repair Gene, Fanconi anemia A, in Pituitary Gonadotroph Cells1

    OpenAIRE

    Larder, Rachel; Chang, Lynda; Clinton, Michael; Brown, Pamela

    2004-01-01

    Gonadal function is critically dependant on regulated secretion of the gonadotropin hormones from anterior pituitary gonadotroph cells. Gonadotropin biosynthesis and release is triggered by the binding of hypothalamic GnRH to GnRH receptor expressed on the gonadotroph cell surface. The repertoire of regulatory molecules involved in this process are still being defined. We used the mouse LβT2 gonadotroph cell line, which expresses both gonadotropin hormones, as a model to investigate GnRH regu...

  20. Use of Drosophila to study DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, J.B.; Harris, P.V.; Sakaguchi, K.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses Drosophila, the premier metazoan organism for analyzing many fundamental features of eukaryotic gene regulation. The authors present adaptations of several approaches for studying DNA repair to an analysis of repair-defective mutants in Drosophila. A current understanding of Drosophila DNA repair is described

  1. Molecular mechanism of protein assembly on DNA double-strand breaks in the non-homologous end-joining pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Ken-ichi; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Adachi, Noritaka; Akiyama, Hidenori

    2009-01-01

    Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the major repair pathway for DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in mammalian species. Upon DSB induction, a living cell quickly activates the NHEJ pathway comprising of multiple molecular events. However, it has been difficult to analyze the initial phase of DSB responses in living cells, primarily due to technical limitations. Recent advances in real-time imaging and site-directed DSB induction using laser microbeam allow us to monitor the spatiotemporal dynamics of NHEJ factors in the immediate-early phase after DSB induction. These new approaches, together with the use of cell lines deficient in each essential NHEJ factor, provide novel mechanistic insights into DSB recognition and protein assembly on DSBs in the NHEJ pathway. In this review, we provide an overview of recent progresses in the imaging analyses of the NHEJ core factors. These studies strongly suggest that the NHEJ core factors are pre-assembled into a large complex on DSBs prior to the progression of the biochemical reactions in the NHEJ pathway. Instead of the traditional step-by-step assembly model from the static view of NHEJ, a novel model for dynamic protein assembly in the NHEJ pathway is proposed. This new model provides important mechanistic insights into the protein assembly at DSBs and the regulation of DSB repair. (author)

  2. The DNA-dependent protein kinase: a multifunctional protein kinase with roles in DNA double strand break repair and mitosis

    OpenAIRE

    Jette, Nicholas; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and the Ku70/80 heterodimer. Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in elucidating the role of DNA-PK in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major pathway for repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in human cells and recently, additional roles for DNA-PK have been reported. In this review, we will describe the biochemi...

  3. 48 CFR 1371.118 - Changes-ship repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Changes-ship repair. 1371.118 Section 1371.118 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE DEPARTMENT SUPPLEMENTAL REGULATIONS ACQUISITIONS INVOLVING SHIP CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.118 Changes—ship repair. Insert clause...

  4. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in lymphoma patients is associated with a decrease in the double strand break repair capacity of peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, Sandrine; Bhatia, Smita; Chen, Yanjun; Bhatia, Ravi; O'Connor, Timothy R

    2017-01-01

    Patients who undergo autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHCT) for treatment of a relapsed or refractory lymphoma are at risk of developing therapy related- myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia (t-MDS/AML). Part of the risk likely resides in inherent interindividual differences in their DNA repair capacity (DRC), which is thought to influence the effect chemotherapeutic treatments have on the patient's stem cells prior to aHCT. Measuring DRC involves identifying small differences in repair proficiency among individuals. Initially, we investigated the cell model in healthy individuals (primary lymphocytes and/or lymphoblastoid cell lines) that would be appropriate to measure genetically determined DRC using host-cell reactivation assays. We present evidence that interindividual differences in DRC double-strand break repair (by non-homologous end-joining [NHEJ] or single-strand annealing [SSA]) are better preserved in non-induced primary lymphocytes. In contrast, lymphocytes induced to proliferate are required to assay base excision (BER) or nucleotide excision repair (NER). We established that both NHEJ and SSA DRCs in lymphocytes of healthy individuals were inversely correlated with the age of the donor, indicating that DSB repair in lymphocytes is likely not a constant feature but rather something that decreases with age (~0.37% NHEJ DRC/year). To investigate the predictive value of pre-aHCT DRC on outcome in patients, we then applied the optimized assays to the analysis of primary lymphocytes from lymphoma patients and found that individuals who later developed t-MDS/AML (cases) were indistinguishable in their DRC from controls who never developed t-MDS/AML. However, when DRC was investigated shortly after aHCT in the same individuals (21.6 months later on average), aHCT patients (both cases and controls) showed a significant decrease in DSB repair measurements. The average decrease of 6.9% in NHEJ DRC observed among aHCT patients was much higher

  5. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in lymphoma patients is associated with a decrease in the double strand break repair capacity of peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Lacoste

    Full Text Available Patients who undergo autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHCT for treatment of a relapsed or refractory lymphoma are at risk of developing therapy related- myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia (t-MDS/AML. Part of the risk likely resides in inherent interindividual differences in their DNA repair capacity (DRC, which is thought to influence the effect chemotherapeutic treatments have on the patient's stem cells prior to aHCT. Measuring DRC involves identifying small differences in repair proficiency among individuals. Initially, we investigated the cell model in healthy individuals (primary lymphocytes and/or lymphoblastoid cell lines that would be appropriate to measure genetically determined DRC using host-cell reactivation assays. We present evidence that interindividual differences in DRC double-strand break repair (by non-homologous end-joining [NHEJ] or single-strand annealing [SSA] are better preserved in non-induced primary lymphocytes. In contrast, lymphocytes induced to proliferate are required to assay base excision (BER or nucleotide excision repair (NER. We established that both NHEJ and SSA DRCs in lymphocytes of healthy individuals were inversely correlated with the age of the donor, indicating that DSB repair in lymphocytes is likely not a constant feature but rather something that decreases with age (~0.37% NHEJ DRC/year. To investigate the predictive value of pre-aHCT DRC on outcome in patients, we then applied the optimized assays to the analysis of primary lymphocytes from lymphoma patients and found that individuals who later developed t-MDS/AML (cases were indistinguishable in their DRC from controls who never developed t-MDS/AML. However, when DRC was investigated shortly after aHCT in the same individuals (21.6 months later on average, aHCT patients (both cases and controls showed a significant decrease in DSB repair measurements. The average decrease of 6.9% in NHEJ DRC observed among aHCT patients was

  6. A quantitative model of the major pathways for radiation-induced DNA double-strand break repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, O.V.; Krasavin, E.A.; Lyashko, M.S.; Batmunkh, M.; Sweilam, N.H.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a model approach to simulate the major pathways of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in mammalian and human cells. The proposed model shows a possible mechanistic explanation of the basic regularities of DSB processing through the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), homologous recombination (HR), and single-strand annealing (SSA). It reconstructs the time-courses of radiation-induced foci specific to particular repair processes including the major intermediate stages. The model is validated for ionizing radiations of a wide range of linear energy transfer (0.2-236 keV/μm) including a relatively broad spectrum of heavy ions. The appropriate set of reaction rate constants was suggested to satisfy the kinetics of DSB rejoining for the considered types of exposure. The simultaneous assessment of three repair pathways allows one to describe their possible biological relations in response to radiation. With the help of the proposed approach, we reproduce several experimental data sets on γ-H2AX foci remaining in different types of cells including those defective in NHEJ, HR, or SSA functions.

  7. Expression of mismatch repair gene PMS2 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma and regulation by glycogen synthase kinase-3β in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jugao; Lei, Wenbin; Huang, Xiaoming; Li, Pingdong; Chen, Xiaohong; Zhu, Xiaolin; Wen, Weiping; Li, Huabin

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the expression of mismatch repair gene PMS2 in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) tissues and evaluate the effect of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β on PMS2 production in vivo and in vitro. The expression of PMS2 and inactivated phosphorylated GSK-3β(s9) was examined by immunohistochemical staining in 25 NPC tissues and the relation was determined by correlation analysis. The effect of GSK-3β transfection in CNE-2 cells on PMS2 production as well as cell apoptosis and chemosensitization were evaluated using small interference RNA (siRNA), immunoblotting and flow cytometric analysis in vitro. The expression of inactivated phosphorylated GSK-3β(s9) was found to negative correlated with PMS2 in vivo. And transfected GSK-3β was found to be able to enhance PMS2 production, and increase cell apoptosis in CNE-2 cells in combination with cisplatin administration in vitro. Inactivation of GSK-3β might be important for NPC tumorgenesis through negatively regulating PMS2 production, and enhanced PMS2 production by GSK-3β is beneficial for understanding the NPC tumorgenesis and developing potential strategy for future therapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Meningocele repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is surgery to repair birth defects of the spine and spinal membranes. Meningocele and myelomeningocele ... is covered by a sterile dressing. Your child may then be transferred to a neonatal intensive ...

  9. SCAI promotes DNA double-strand break repair in distinct chromosomal contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rebecca Kring; Mund, Andreas; Poulsen, Sara Lund

    2016-01-01

    cell invasion) as a 53BP1-interacting chromatin-associated protein that promotes the functionality of several DSB repair pathways in mammalian cells. SCAI undergoes prominent enrichment at DSB sites through dual mechanisms involving 53BP1-dependent recruitment to DSB-surrounding chromatin and 53BP1...... in repressive chromatin environments. Moreover, we establish an important role of SCAI in meiotic recombination, as SCAI deficiency in mice leads to germ cell loss and subfertility associated with impaired retention of the DMC1 recombinase on meiotic chromosomes. Collectively, our findings uncover SCAI...... as a physiologically important component of both NHEJ- and HR-mediated pathways that potentiates DSB repair efficiency in specific chromatin contexts....

  10. Non-homologous end joining is the responsible pathway for the repair of fludarabine-induced DNA double strand breaks in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos-Nebel, Marcelo de; Larripa, Irene; Gonzalez-Cid, Marcela

    2008-01-01

    Fludarabine (FLU), an analogue of adenosine, interferes with DNA synthesis and inhibits the chain elongation leading to replication arrest and DNA double strand break (DSB) formation. Mammalian cells use two main pathways of DSB repair to maintain genomic stability: homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). The aim of the present work was to evaluate the repair pathways employed in the restoration of DSB formed following replication arrest induced by FLU in mammalian cells. Replication inhibition was induced in human lymphocytes and fibroblasts by FLU. DSB occurred in a dose-dependent manner on early/middle S-phase cells, as detected by γH2AX foci formation. To test whether conservative HR participates in FLU-induced DSB repair, we measured the kinetics of Rad51 nuclear foci formation in human fibroblasts. There was no significant induction of Rad51 foci after FLU treatment. To further confirm these results, we analyzed the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in both human cells. We did not find increased frequencies of SCE after FLU treatment. To assess the participation of NHEJ pathway in the repair of FLU-induced damage, we used two chemical inhibitors of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), vanillin and wortmannin. Human fibroblasts pretreated with DNA-PKcs inhibitors showed increased levels of chromosome breakages and became more sensitive to cell death. An active role of NHEJ pathway was also suggested from the analysis of Chinese hamster cell lines. XR-C1 (DNA-PKcs-deficient) and XR-V15B (Ku80-deficient) cells showed hypersensitivity to FLU as evidenced by the increased frequency of chromosome aberrations, decreased mitotic index and impaired survival rates. In contrast, CL-V4B (Rad51C-deficient) and V-C8 (Brca2-deficient) cell lines displayed a FLU-resistant phenotype. Together, our results suggest a major role for NHEJ repair in the preservation of genome integrity against FLU-induced DSB

  11. Non-homologous end joining is the responsible pathway for the repair of fludarabine-induced DNA double strand breaks in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos-Nebel, Marcelo de [Departamento de Genetica, Instituto de Investigaciones Hematologicas Mariano R. Castex, Academia Nacional de Medicina, Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: mnebel@hematologia.anm.edu.ar; Larripa, Irene; Gonzalez-Cid, Marcela [Departamento de Genetica, Instituto de Investigaciones Hematologicas Mariano R. Castex, Academia Nacional de Medicina, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2008-11-10

    Fludarabine (FLU), an analogue of adenosine, interferes with DNA synthesis and inhibits the chain elongation leading to replication arrest and DNA double strand break (DSB) formation. Mammalian cells use two main pathways of DSB repair to maintain genomic stability: homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). The aim of the present work was to evaluate the repair pathways employed in the restoration of DSB formed following replication arrest induced by FLU in mammalian cells. Replication inhibition was induced in human lymphocytes and fibroblasts by FLU. DSB occurred in a dose-dependent manner on early/middle S-phase cells, as detected by {gamma}H2AX foci formation. To test whether conservative HR participates in FLU-induced DSB repair, we measured the kinetics of Rad51 nuclear foci formation in human fibroblasts. There was no significant induction of Rad51 foci after FLU treatment. To further confirm these results, we analyzed the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in both human cells. We did not find increased frequencies of SCE after FLU treatment. To assess the participation of NHEJ pathway in the repair of FLU-induced damage, we used two chemical inhibitors of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), vanillin and wortmannin. Human fibroblasts pretreated with DNA-PKcs inhibitors showed increased levels of chromosome breakages and became more sensitive to cell death. An active role of NHEJ pathway was also suggested from the analysis of Chinese hamster cell lines. XR-C1 (DNA-PKcs-deficient) and XR-V15B (Ku80-deficient) cells showed hypersensitivity to FLU as evidenced by the increased frequency of chromosome aberrations, decreased mitotic index and impaired survival rates. In contrast, CL-V4B (Rad51C-deficient) and V-C8 (Brca2-deficient) cell lines displayed a FLU-resistant phenotype. Together, our results suggest a major role for NHEJ repair in the preservation of genome integrity against FLU

  12. Role of Cell Cycle Regulation and MLH1, A Key DNA Mismatch Repair Protein, In Adaptive Survival Responses. Final Report; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David A. Boothman

    1999-01-01

    Due to several interesting findings on both adaptive survival responses (ASRs) and DNA mismatch repair (MMR), this grant was separated into two discrete Specific Aim sets (each with their own discrete hypotheses). The described experiments were simultaneously performed

  13. Repair process and a repaired component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, III, Herbert Chidsey; Simpson, Stanley F.

    2018-02-20

    Matrix composite component repair processes are disclosed. The matrix composite repair process includes applying a repair material to a matrix composite component, securing the repair material to the matrix composite component with an external securing mechanism and curing the repair material to bond the repair material to the matrix composite component during the securing by the external securing mechanism. The matrix composite component is selected from the group consisting of a ceramic matrix composite, a polymer matrix composite, and a metal matrix composite. In another embodiment, the repair process includes applying a partially-cured repair material to a matrix composite component, and curing the repair material to bond the repair material to the matrix composite component, an external securing mechanism securing the repair material throughout a curing period, In another embodiment, the external securing mechanism is consumed or decomposed during the repair process.

  14. Motorcycle Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Jim; Bundy, Mike

    This motorcycle repair curriculum guide contains the following ten areas of study: brake systems, clutches, constant mesh transmissions, final drives, suspension, mechanical starting mechanisms, electrical systems, fuel systems, lubrication systems, and overhead camshafts. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction. Each instructional…

  15. Turbine repair process, repaired coating, and repaired turbine component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rupak; Delvaux, John McConnell; Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-11-03

    A turbine repair process, a repaired coating, and a repaired turbine component are disclosed. The turbine repair process includes providing a turbine component having a higher-pressure region and a lower-pressure region, introducing particles into the higher-pressure region, and at least partially repairing an opening between the higher-pressure region and the lower-pressure region with at least one of the particles to form a repaired turbine component. The repaired coating includes a silicon material, a ceramic matrix composite material, and a repaired region having the silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material. The repaired turbine component a ceramic matrix composite layer and a repaired region having silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material.

  16. Enrichment of G2/M cell cycle phase in human pluripotent stem cells enhances HDR-mediated gene repair with customizable endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Diane; Scavuzzo, Marissa A; Chmielowiec, Jolanta; Sharp, Robert; Bajic, Aleksandar; Borowiak, Malgorzata

    2016-02-18

    Efficient gene editing is essential to fully utilize human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) in regenerative medicine. Custom endonuclease-based gene targeting involves two mechanisms of DNA repair: homology directed repair (HDR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). HDR is the preferred mechanism for common applications such knock-in, knock-out or precise mutagenesis, but remains inefficient in hPSCs. Here, we demonstrate that synchronizing synchronizing hPSCs in G2/M with ABT phase increases on-target gene editing, defined as correct targeting cassette integration, 3 to 6 fold. We observed improved efficiency using ZFNs, TALENs, two CRISPR/Cas9, and CRISPR/Cas9 nickase to target five genes in three hPSC lines: three human embryonic stem cell lines, neural progenitors and diabetic iPSCs. neural progenitors and diabetic iPSCs. Reversible synchronization has no effect on pluripotency or differentiation. The increase in on-target gene editing is locus-independent and specific to the cell cycle phase as G2/M phase enriched cells show a 6-fold increase in targeting efficiency compared to cells in G1 phase. Concurrently inhibiting NHEJ with SCR7 does not increase HDR or improve gene targeting efficiency further, indicating that HR is the major DNA repair mechanism after G2/M phase arrest. The approach outlined here makes gene editing in hPSCs a more viable tool for disease modeling, regenerative medicine and cell-based therapies.

  17. The DNA-dependent protein kinase: a multifunctional protein kinase with roles in DNA double strand break repair and mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jette, Nicholas; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and the Ku70/80 heterodimer. Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in elucidating the role of DNA-PK in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major pathway for repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in human cells and recently, additional roles for DNA-PK have been reported. In this review, we will describe the biochemistry, structure and function of DNA-PK, its roles in DNA double strand break repair and its newly described roles in mitosis and other cellular processes. PMID:25550082

  18. Targeting telomerase and DNA repair in human cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash Hande, M.

    2014-01-01

    Telomerase reactivation is essential for telomere maintenance in human cancer cells ensuring indefinite proliferation. Targeting telomere homeostasis has become one of the promising strategies in the therapeutic management of tumours. One major potential drawback, however, is the time lag between telomerase inhibition and critically shortened telomeres triggering cell death, allowing cancer cells to acquire drug resistance. Numerous studies over the last decade have highlighted the role of DNA repair proteins such as Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase-1 (PARP-1), and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) in the maintenance of telomere homoeostasis. Dysfunctional telomeres, resulting from the loss of telomeric DNA repeats or the loss of function of telomere-associated proteins trigger DNA damage responses similar to that observed for double strand breaks. We have been working on unravelling such synthetic lethality in cancer cells and this talk would be on one such recently concluded study that demonstrates that inhibition of DNA repair pathways, i.e., NHEJ pathway and that of telomerase could be an alternative strategy to enhance anti-tumour effects and circumvent the possibility of drug resistance. (author)

  19. GANP regulates the choice of DNA repair pathway by DNA-PKcs interaction in AID-dependent IgV region diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Mohammed Mansour Abbas; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Almofty, Sarah Ameen; Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Shimoda, Mayuko; Sakaguchi, Nobuo

    2014-06-15

    RNA export factor germinal center-associated nuclear protein (GANP) interacts with activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and shepherds it from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and toward the IgV region loci in B cells. In this study, we demonstrate a role for GANP in the repair of AID-initiated DNA damage in chicken DT40 B cells to generate IgV region diversity by gene conversion and somatic hypermutation. GANP plays a positive role in IgV region diversification of DT40 B cells in a nonhomologous end joining-proficient state. DNA-PKcs physically interacts with GANP, and this interaction is dissociated by dsDNA breaks induced by a topoisomerase II inhibitor, etoposide, or AID overexpression. GANP affects the choice of DNA repair mechanism in B cells toward homologous recombination rather than nonhomologous end joining repair. Thus, GANP presumably plays a critical role in protection of the rearranged IgV loci by favoring homologous recombination of the DNA breaks under accelerated AID recruitment. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  20. The Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway Is Regulated by an Interaction between Ubiquitin and the E2-like Fold Domain of FANCL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Jennifer A; Frost, Mark G; Carroll, Eilis; Rowe, Michelle L; Howard, Mark J; Sidhu, Ateesh; Chaugule, Viduth K; Alpi, Arno F; Walden, Helen

    2015-08-21

    The Fanconi Anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway is essential for the recognition and repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICL). Inefficient repair of these ICL can lead to leukemia and bone marrow failure. A critical step in the pathway is the monoubiquitination of FANCD2 by the RING E3 ligase FANCL. FANCL comprises 3 domains, a RING domain that interacts with E2 conjugating enzymes, a central domain required for substrate interaction, and an N-terminal E2-like fold (ELF) domain. The ELF domain is found in all FANCL homologues, yet the function of the domain remains unknown. We report here that the ELF domain of FANCL is required to mediate a non-covalent interaction between FANCL and ubiquitin. The interaction involves the canonical Ile44 patch on ubiquitin, and a functionally conserved patch on FANCL. We show that the interaction is not necessary for the recognition of the core complex, it does not enhance the interaction between FANCL and Ube2T, and is not required for FANCD2 monoubiquitination in vitro. However, we demonstrate that the ELF domain is required to promote efficient DNA damage-induced FANCD2 monoubiquitination in vertebrate cells, suggesting an important function of ubiquitin binding by FANCL in vivo. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Brain aneurysm repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  2. Agrobacterium May Delay Plant Nonhomologous End-Joining DNA Repair via XRCC4 to Favor T-DNA Integration[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaghchhipawala, Zarir E.; Vasudevan, Balaji; Lee, Seonghee; Morsy, Mustafa R.; Mysore, Kirankumar S.

    2012-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a soilborne pathogen that causes crown gall disease in many dicotyledonous plants by transfer of a portion of its tumor-inducing plasmid (T-DNA) into the plant genome. Several plant factors that play a role in Agrobacterium attachment to plant cells and transport of T-DNA to the nucleus have been identified, but the T-DNA integration step during transformation is poorly understood and has been proposed to occur via nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ)–mediated double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair. Here, we report a negative role of X-RAY CROSS COMPLEMENTATION GROUP4 (XRCC4), one of the key proteins required for NHEJ, in Agrobacterium T-DNA integration. Downregulation of XRCC4 in Arabidopsis and Nicotiana benthamiana increased stable transformation due to increased T-DNA integration. Overexpression of XRCC4 in Arabidopsis decreased stable transformation due to decreased T-DNA integration. Interestingly, XRCC4 directly interacted with Agrobacterium protein VirE2 in a yeast two-hybrid system and in planta. VirE2-expressing Arabidopsis plants were more susceptible to the DNA damaging chemical bleomycin and showed increased stable transformation. We hypothesize that VirE2 titrates or excludes active XRCC4 protein available for DSB repair, thus delaying the closure of DSBs in the chromosome, providing greater opportunity for T-DNA to integrate. PMID:23064322

  3. Exonuclease 1 is a critical mediator of survival during DNA double strand break repair in nonquiescent hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Amar; Qing, Yulan; Gerson, Stanton L

    2014-02-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) populations require DNA repair pathways to maintain their long-term survival and reconstitution capabilities, but mediators of these processes are still being elucidated. Exonuclease 1 (Exo1) participates in homologous recombination (HR) and Exo1 loss results in impaired 5' HR end resection. We use cultured Exo1(mut) fibroblasts and bone marrow to demonstrate that loss of Exo1 function results in defective HR in cycling cells. Conversely, in Exo1(mut) mice HR is not required for maintenance of quiescent HSCs at steady state, confirming the steady state HSC reliance on nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Exo1(mut) mice sustained serial repopulation, displayed no defect in competitive repopulation or niche occupancy, and exhibited no increased sensitivity to whole body ionizing radiation. However, when Exo1(mut) HSCs were pushed into cell cycle in vivo with 5-fluorouracil or poly IC, the hematopoietic population became hypersensitive to IR, resulting in HSC defects and animal death. We propose Exo1-mediated HR is dispensable for stem cell function in quiescent HSC, whereas it is essential to HSC response to DNA damage processing after cell cycle entry, and its loss is not compensated by intact NHEJ. In HSCs, the maintenance of stem cell function after DNA damage is dependent on the DNA repair capacity, segregated by active versus quiescent points in cell cycle. © AlphaMed Press.

  4. DNA repair , cell repair and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhestyanikov, V.D.

    1983-01-01

    Data obtained in laboratory of radiation cytology and literature data testifying to a considerable role of DNA repair in cell sensitivity to radiation and chemical DNA-tropic agents have been considered. Data pointing to the probability of contribution of inducible repair of DNA into plant cells sensitivity to X-rays are obtained. Certain violations of DNA repair do not result in the increase of radiosensitivity. It is assumed that in the cases unknown mechanisms of DNA repair operate

  5. Telomeros y reparación de daño genómico: Su implicancia en patología humana Telomeres and genomic damage repair: Their implication in human pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. del R. Perez

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Los telómeros, complejos funcionales que protegen los extremos de los cromosomas eucariotes, participan en la regulación de la proliferación celular y pueden jugar un rol en la estabilización de ciertas regiones del genoma en respuesta a estrés genotóxico. Su relevancia en patología humana se ha puesto de manifiesto en numerosas enfermedades que comparten como rasgo común la inestabilidad genómica, en las que se comprobaron alteraciones del metabolismo telomérico. Muchas de ellas se encuentran asociadas a hipersensibilidad a radiaciones ionizantes y susceptibilidad al cáncer. Además de las proteínas específicas que forman parte del complejo telomérico otras proteínas implicadas en la maquinaria de reparación del ADN tales como ATM, BRCA1, BRCA2, sistema PARP/ tankirasa, complejo DNA-PK, y complejo RAD50- MRE11-NBS1, se encuentran en estrecha asociación con el mismo. Esto sugiere que el telómero secuestra proteínas de reparación para el mantenimiento de su propia estructura, las que podrían asimismo ser liberadas hacia sitios de daño en el ADN genómico. Esta comunicación describe los aspectos más relevantes de la estructura y función de los telómeros y su vinculación con los procesos de recombinación homóloga, recombinación no homóloga (NHEJ, sistema V(DJ y sistemas de reparación de apareamientos erróneos (MMR, considerando ciertas condiciones patológicas que exhiben alteraciones en algunos estos mecanismos. Se aborda en forma particular la respuesta celular a las radiaciones ionizantes y su relación con el metabolismo telomérico como un modelo de estudio de genotoxicidad.Telomeres, functional complexes that protect eukaryotic chromosome ends, participate in the regulation of cell proliferation and could play a role in the stabilization of genomic regions in response to genotoxic stress. Their significance in human pathology becomes evident in several diseases sharing genomic instability as a common trait, in

  6. Autophosphorylation of DNA-PKCS regulates its dynamics at DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Naoya; Weterings, Eric; Yano, Ken-ichi; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Jakob, Burkhard; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Mari, Pierre-Olivier; van Gent, Dik C; Chen, Benjamin P C; Chen, David J

    2007-04-23

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PK(CS)) plays an important role during the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). It is recruited to DNA ends in the early stages of the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) process, which mediates DSB repair. To study DNA-PK(CS) recruitment in vivo, we used a laser system to introduce DSBs in a specified region of the cell nucleus. We show that DNA-PK(CS) accumulates at DSB sites in a Ku80-dependent manner, and that neither the kinase activity nor the phosphorylation status of DNA-PK(CS) influences its initial accumulation. However, impairment of both of these functions results in deficient DSB repair and the maintained presence of DNA-PK(CS) at unrepaired DSBs. The use of photobleaching techniques allowed us to determine that the kinase activity and phosphorylation status of DNA-PK(CS) influence the stability of its binding to DNA ends. We suggest a model in which DNA-PK(CS) phosphorylation/autophosphorylation facilitates NHEJ by destabilizing the interaction of DNA-PK(CS) with the DNA ends.

  7. Trex2 enables spontaneous sister chromatid exchanges without facilitating DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrache, Lavinia C; Hu, Lingchuan; Son, Mi Young; Li, Han; Wesevich, Austin; Scully, Ralph; Stark, Jeremy; Hasty, Paul

    2011-08-01

    Trex2 is a 3' → 5' exonuclease that removes 3'-mismatched sequences in a biochemical assay; however, its biological function remains unclear. To address biology we previously generated trex2(null) mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and expressed in these cells wild-type human TREX2 cDNA (Trex2(hTX2)) or cDNA with a single-amino-acid change in the catalytic domain (Trex2(H188A)) or in the DNA-binding domain (Trex2(R167A)). We found the trex2(null) and Trex2(H188A) cells exhibited spontaneous broken chromosomes and trex2(null) cells exhibited spontaneous chromosomal rearrangements. We also found ectopically expressed human TREX2 was active at the 3' ends of I-SceI-induced chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs). Therefore, we hypothesized Trex2 participates in DNA DSB repair by modifying 3' ends. This may be especially important for ends with damaged nucleotides. Here we present data that are unexpected and prompt a new model. We found Trex2-altered cells (null, H188A, and R167A) were not hypersensitive to camptothecin, a type-1 topoisomerase inhibitor that induces DSBs at replication forks. In addition, Trex2-altered cells were not hypersensitive to γ-radiation, an agent that causes DSBs throughout the cell cycle. This observation held true even in cells compromised for one of the two major DSB repair pathways: homology-directed repair (HDR) or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Trex2 deletion also enhanced repair of an I-SceI-induced DSB by both HDR and NHEJ without affecting pathway choice. Interestingly, however, trex2(null) cells exhibited reduced spontaneous sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) but this was not due to a defect in HDR-mediated crossing over. Therefore, reduced spontaneous SCE could be a manifestation of the same defect that caused spontaneous broken chromosomes and spontaneous chromosomal rearrangements. These unexpected data suggest Trex2 does not enable DSB repair and prompt a new model that posits Trex2 suppresses the formation of broken

  8. DNA Damage, Repair, and Cancer Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgeon, Marc-Olivier; Perry, Nicholas J. S.; Poulogiannis, George

    2018-01-01

    Although there has been a renewed interest in the field of cancer metabolism in the last decade, the link between metabolism and DNA damage/DNA repair in cancer has yet to be appreciably explored. In this review, we examine the evidence connecting DNA damage and repair mechanisms with cell metabolism through three principal links. (1) Regulation of methyl- and acetyl-group donors through different metabolic pathways can impact DNA folding and remodeling, an essential part of accurate double strand break repair. (2) Glutamine, aspartate, and other nutrients are essential for de novo nucleotide synthesis, which dictates the availability of the nucleotide pool, and thereby influences DNA repair and replication. (3) Reactive oxygen species, which can increase oxidative DNA damage and hence the load of the DNA-repair machinery, are regulated through different metabolic pathways. Interestingly, while metabolism affects DNA repair, DNA damage can also induce metabolic rewiring. Activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) triggers an increase in nucleotide synthesis and anabolic glucose metabolism, while also reducing glutamine anaplerosis. Furthermore, mutations in genes involved in the DDR and DNA repair also lead to metabolic rewiring. Links between cancer metabolism and DNA damage/DNA repair are increasingly apparent, yielding opportunities to investigate the mechanistic basis behind potential metabolic vulnerabilities of a substantial fraction of tumors. PMID:29459886

  9. DNA breaks and repair in interstitial telomere sequences: Influence of chromatin structure; Etude des cassures de l'ADN et des mecanismes de reparation dans les sequences telomeriques interstitielles: Influence de la structure chromatinienne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revaud, D.

    2009-06-15

    Interstitial Telomeric Sequences (ITS) are over-involved in spontaneous and radiationinduced chromosome aberrations in chinese hamster cells. We have performed a study to investigate the origin of their instability, spontaneously or after low doses irradiation. Our results demonstrate that ITS have a particular chromatin structure: short nucleotide repeat length, less compaction of the 30 nm chromatin fiber, presence of G-quadruplex structures. These features would modulate breaks production and would favour the recruitment of alternative DNA repair mechanisms, which are prone to produce chromosome aberrations. These pathways could be at the origin of chromosome aberrations in ITS whereas NHEJ and HR Double Strand Break repair pathways are rather required for a correct repair in these regions. (author)

  10. 48 CFR 1352.271-87 - Changes-ship repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Changes-ship repair. 1352.271-87 Section 1352.271-87 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 1352.271-87 Changes—ship repair. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1371.118,...

  11. Rapid road repair vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mara, Leo M.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find an the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was was heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past.

  12. Post-Translational Regulation of Polycystin-2 Protein Expression as a Novel Mechanism of Cholangiocyte Reaction and Repair from Biliary Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirli, Carlo; Villani, Ambra; Mariotti, Valeria; Fabris, Luca; Fiorotto, Romina; Strazzabosco, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Polycystin-2 (PC2 /TRPP2), a member of the transient receptor potential channels (TRP) family, is a non-selective calcium channel. Mutations in PC2/TRPP2 are associated with Polycystic Liver Diseases. PC2-defective cholangiocytes shows increased production of cAMP, PKA-dependent activation of the ERK1/2 pathway, HIF1α-mediated VEGF production, and stimulation of cyst growth and progression. Activation of the ERK/HIF1α/VEGF pathway in cholangiocytes plays a key role during repair from biliary damage. We hypothesized that PC2 levels are modulated during biliary damage/repair, resulting in activation of the ERK/HIF1α/VEGF pathway. Results PC2 protein expression, but not its gene expression, was significantly reduced in mouse livers with biliary damage (Mdr2−/−-KO, bile duct ligation, DDC-treatment). Treatment of colangiocytes with pro-inflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide (NO) donors and ER stressors), increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation, HIF1α transcriptional activity, secretion of VEGF, VEGFR2 phosphorylation and downregulated PC2 protein expression without affecting PC2 gene expression. Expression of Herp and NEK, ubiquitin-like proteins that promote proteosomal PC2 degradation was increased. Pre-treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 restored the expression of PC2 in cells treated with cytokines but not in cells treated with NO donors or with ER stressors. In these conditions, PC2 degradation was instead inhibited by interfering with the autophagy pathway. Treatment of DDC-mice and of Mdr2−/−-mice with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, restored PC2 expression and significantly reduced the ductular reaction, fibrosis and p-ERK1/2. In conclusion, in response to biliary damage, PC2 expression is modulated post-translationally by the proteasome or the autophagy pathways. PC2-dowregulation is associated with activation of ERK1/2 and increase of HIF1α-mediated VEGF secretion. Treatments able to restore PC2 expression and to reduce ductular reaction

  13. Human induced pluripotent cells resemble embryonic stem cells demonstrating enhanced levels of DNA repair and efficacy of nonhomologous end-joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan Jinshui; Robert, Carine [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 655 West Baltimore Street, BRB 7-023A, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Jang, Yoon-Young; Liu Hua; Sharkis, Saul; Baylin, Stephen Bruce [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Baltimore, MD 21231-1000 (United States); Rassool, Feyruz Virgilia, E-mail: frassool@som.umaryland.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 655 West Baltimore Street, BRB 7-023A, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Highlights: {yields} iPSC and hESC demonstrate a similar cell cycle profile, with increased S phase cells and decreased G0/G1. {yields} iPSC and hESC increased ROS and decreased DSBs, compared with differentiated parental cells. {yields} iPSC and hESC demonstrate elevated DSB repair activity, including nonhomologous end-joining, compared with differentiated parental cells. {yields} iPSC however show a partial apoptotic response to DNA damage, compared to hESC. {yields} DNA damage responses may constitute important markers for the efficacy of iPSC reprogramming. - Abstract: To maintain the integrity of the organism, embryonic stem cells (ESC) need to maintain their genomic integrity in response to DNA damage. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most lethal forms of DNA damage and can have disastrous consequences if not repaired correctly, leading to cell death, genomic instability and cancer. How human ESC (hESC) maintain genomic integrity in response to agents that cause DSBs is relatively unclear. Adult somatic cells can be induced to 'dedifferentiate' into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) and reprogram into cells of all three germ layers. Whether iPSC have reprogrammed the DNA damage response is a critical question in regenerative medicine. Here, we show that hESC demonstrate high levels of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) which can contribute to DNA damage and may arise from high levels of metabolic activity. To potentially counter genomic instability caused by DNA damage, we find that hESC employ two strategies: First, these cells have enhanced levels of DNA repair proteins, including those involved in repair of DSBs, and they demonstrate elevated nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) activity and repair efficacy, one of the main pathways for repairing DSBs. Second, they are hypersensitive to DNA damaging agents, as evidenced by a high level of apoptosis upon irradiation. Importantly, iPSC, unlike the parent cells they are derived

  14. Human induced pluripotent cells resemble embryonic stem cells demonstrating enhanced levels of DNA repair and efficacy of nonhomologous end-joining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Jinshui; Robert, Carine; Jang, Yoon-Young; Liu Hua; Sharkis, Saul; Baylin, Stephen Bruce; Rassool, Feyruz Virgilia

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → iPSC and hESC demonstrate a similar cell cycle profile, with increased S phase cells and decreased G0/G1. → iPSC and hESC increased ROS and decreased DSBs, compared with differentiated parental cells. → iPSC and hESC demonstrate elevated DSB repair activity, including nonhomologous end-joining, compared with differentiated parental cells. → iPSC however show a partial apoptotic response to DNA damage, compared to hESC. → DNA damage responses may constitute important markers for the efficacy of iPSC reprogramming. - Abstract: To maintain the integrity of the organism, embryonic stem cells (ESC) need to maintain their genomic integrity in response to DNA damage. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most lethal forms of DNA damage and can have disastrous consequences if not repaired correctly, leading to cell death, genomic instability and cancer. How human ESC (hESC) maintain genomic integrity in response to agents that cause DSBs is relatively unclear. Adult somatic cells can be induced to 'dedifferentiate' into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) and reprogram into cells of all three germ layers. Whether iPSC have reprogrammed the DNA damage response is a critical question in regenerative medicine. Here, we show that hESC demonstrate high levels of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) which can contribute to DNA damage and may arise from high levels of metabolic activity. To potentially counter genomic instability caused by DNA damage, we find that hESC employ two strategies: First, these cells have enhanced levels of DNA repair proteins, including those involved in repair of DSBs, and they demonstrate elevated nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) activity and repair efficacy, one of the main pathways for repairing DSBs. Second, they are hypersensitive to DNA damaging agents, as evidenced by a high level of apoptosis upon irradiation. Importantly, iPSC, unlike the parent cells they are derived from, mimic hESC in their ROS levels

  15. Inhibition of Ku70 acetylation by INHAT subunit SET/TAF-Iβ regulates Ku70-mediated DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kee-Beom; Kim, Dong-Wook; Park, Jin Woo; Jeon, Young-Joo; Kim, Daehwan; Rhee, Sangmyung; Chae, Jung-Il; Seo, Sang-Beom

    2014-07-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can cause either cell death or genomic instability. The Ku heterodimer Ku70/80 is required for the NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining) DNA DSB repair pathway. The INHAT (inhibitor of histone acetyltransferases) complex subunit, SET/TAF-Iβ, can inhibit p300- and PCAF-mediated acetylation of both histone and p53, thereby repressing general transcription and that of p53 target genes. Here, we show that SET/TAF-Iβ interacts with Ku70/80, and that this interaction inhibits CBP- and PCAF-mediated Ku70 acetylation in an INHAT domain-dependent manner. Notably, DNA damage by UV disrupted the interaction between SET/TAF-Iβ and Ku70. Furthermore, we demonstrate that overexpressed SET/TAF-Iβ inhibits recruitment of Ku70/80 to DNA damage sites. We propose that dysregulation of SET/TAF-Iβ expression prevents repair of damaged DNA and also contributes to cellular proliferation. All together, our findings indicate that SET/TAF-Iβ interacts with Ku70/80 in the nucleus and inhibits Ku70 acetylation. Upon DNA damage, SET/TAF-Iβ dissociates from the Ku complex and releases Ku70/Ku80, which are then recruited to DNA DSB sites via the NHEJ DNA repair pathway.

  16. Ku-mediated coupling of DNA cleavage and repair during programmed genome rearrangements in the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Marmignon

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available During somatic differentiation, physiological DNA double-strand breaks (DSB can drive programmed genome rearrangements (PGR, during which DSB repair pathways are mobilized to safeguard genome integrity. Because of their unique nuclear dimorphism, ciliates are powerful unicellular eukaryotic models to study the mechanisms involved in PGR. At each sexual cycle, the germline nucleus is transmitted to the progeny, but the somatic nucleus, essential for gene expression, is destroyed and a new somatic nucleus differentiates from a copy of the germline nucleus. In Paramecium tetraurelia, the development of the somatic nucleus involves massive PGR, including the precise elimination of at least 45,000 germline sequences (Internal Eliminated Sequences, IES. IES excision proceeds through a cut-and-close mechanism: a domesticated transposase, PiggyMac, is essential for DNA cleavage, and DSB repair at excision sites involves the Ligase IV, a specific component of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ pathway. At the genome-wide level, a huge number of programmed DSBs must be repaired during this process to allow the assembly of functional somatic chromosomes. To understand how DNA cleavage and DSB repair are coordinated during PGR, we have focused on Ku, the earliest actor of NHEJ-mediated repair. Two Ku70 and three Ku80 paralogs are encoded in the genome of P. tetraurelia: Ku70a and Ku80c are produced during sexual processes and localize specifically in the developing new somatic nucleus. Using RNA interference, we show that the development-specific Ku70/Ku80c heterodimer is essential for the recovery of a functional somatic nucleus. Strikingly, at the molecular level, PiggyMac-dependent DNA cleavage is abolished at IES boundaries in cells depleted for Ku80c, resulting in IES retention in the somatic genome. PiggyMac and Ku70a/Ku80c co-purify as a complex when overproduced in a heterologous system. We conclude that Ku has been integrated in the Paramecium

  17. Neurons efficiently repair glutamate-induced oxidative DNA damage by a process involving CREB-mediated up-regulation of apurinic endonuclease 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jenq-Lin; Tadokoro, Takashi; Keijzers, Guido

    2010-01-01

    inhibitor (KN-93) blocked the ability of glutamate to induce CREB phosphorylation and APE1 expression. Selective depletion of CREB using RNA interference prevented glutamate-induced up-regulation of APE1. Thus, glutamate receptor stimulation triggers Ca(2+)- and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species...

  18. Collision Repair Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Collision Repair Campaign targets meaningful risk reduction in the Collision Repair source category to reduce air toxic emissions in their communities. The Campaign also helps shops to work towards early compliance with the Auto Body Rule.

  19. Retinal detachment repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medicines Problems breathing You may not recover full vision. ... detachments can be repaired. Failure to repair the retina always results in loss of vision to some degree. After surgery, the quality of ...

  20. Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballereau, P.

    1999-01-01

    The different regulations relative to nuclear energy since the first of January 1999 are given here. Two points deserve to be noticed: the decree of the third august 1999 authorizing the national Agency for the radioactive waste management to install and exploit on the commune of Bures (Meuse) an underground laboratory destined to study the deep geological formations where could be stored the radioactive waste. The second point is about the uranium residues and the waste notion. The judgment of the administrative tribunal of Limoges ( 9. july 1998) forbidding the exploitation of a storage installation of depleted uranium considered as final waste and qualifying it as an industrial waste storage facility has been annulled bu the Court of Appeal. It stipulated that, according to the law number 75663 of the 15. july 1965, no criteria below can be applied to depleted uranium: production residue (possibility of an ulterior enrichment), abandonment of a personal property or simple intention to do it ( future use aimed in the authorization request made in the Prefecture). This judgment has devoted the primacy of the waste notion on this one of final waste. (N.C.)

  1. Distinct kinetics of human DNA ligases I, IIIalpha, IIIbeta, and IV reveal direct DNA sensing ability and differential physiological functions in DNA repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xi; Ballin, Jeff D.; Della-Maria, Julie; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; White, Elizabeth J.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Wilson, Gerald M.

    2009-05-11

    The three human LIG genes encode polypeptides that catalyze phosphodiester bond formation during DNA replication, recombination and repair. While numerous studies have identified protein partners of the human DNA ligases (hLigs), there has been little characterization of the catalytic properties of these enzymes. In this study, we developed and optimized a fluorescence-based DNA ligation assay to characterize the activities of purified hLigs. Although hLigI joins DNA nicks, it has no detectable activity on linear duplex DNA substrates with short, cohesive single-strand ends. By contrast, hLigIII{beta} and the hLigIII{alpha}/XRCC1 and hLigIV/XRCC4 complexes are active on both nicked and linear duplex DNA substrates. Surprisingly, hLigIV/XRCC4, which is a key component of the major non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway, is significantly less active than hLigIII on a linear duplex DNA substrate. Notably, hLigIV/XRCC4 molecules only catalyze a single ligation event in the absence or presence of ATP. The failure to catalyze subsequent ligation events reflects a defect in the enzyme-adenylation step of the next ligation reaction and suggests that, unless there is an in vivo mechanism to reactivate DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 following phosphodiester bond formation, the cellular NHEJ capacity will be determined by the number of adenylated DNA ligaseIV/XRCC4 molecules.

  2. Tritiated water exposure disrupts myofibril structure and induces mis-regulation of eye opacity and DNA repair genes in zebrafish early life stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcanjo, Caroline; Armant, Olivier; Floriani, Magali; Cavalie, Isabelle; Camilleri, Virginie; Simon, Olivier; Orjollet, Daniel; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle; Gagnaire, Béatrice

    2018-04-27

    Tritium ( 3 H) is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen. In the environment, the most common form of tritium is tritiated water (HTO). The present study aimed to identify early biomarkers of HTO contamination through the use of an aquatic model, the zebrafish (Danio rerio). We used the zebrafish embryo-larvae model to investigate the modes of action of HTO exposure at dose rates of 0.4 and 4 mGy/h, dose rates expected to induce deleterious effects on fish. Zebrafish were exposed to HTO from 3 hpf (hours post fertilization) to 96 hpf. The transcriptomic effects were investigated 24 h and 96 h after the beginning of the contamination, using mRNAseq. Results suggested an impact of HTO contamination, regardless of the dose rate, on genes involved in muscle contraction (tnnt2d, tnni2a.4, slc6a1a or atp2a1l) and eye opacity (crygm2d9, crygmxl1, mipb or lim2.3) after 24 h of contamination. Interestingly, an opposite differential expression was highlighted in genes playing a role in muscle contraction and eye opacity in 24 hpf embryos when comparing dose rates, suggesting an onset of DNA protective mechanisms. The expression of h2afx and ddb2 involved in DNA repair was enhanced in response to HTO exposure. The entrainment of circadian clock and the response to H 2 O 2 signalling pathways were enriched at 96 hpf at 0.4 mGy/h and in both stages after 4 mGy/h. Genes involved in ROS scavenging were differentially expressed only after 24 h of exposure for the lowest dose rate, suggesting the onset of early protective mechanisms against oxidative stress. Effects highlighted on muscle at the molecular scale were confirmed at a higher biological scale, as electron microscopy observations revealed sarcomere impairments in 96 hpf larvae for both dose rates. Together with other studies, the present work provides useful data to better understand modes of action of tritium on zebrafish embryos-larvae. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Distinct roles of FANCO/RAD51C in DNA damage signaling and repair: implications for fanconi anemia and breast cancer susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaraju, G.; Somyajit, K.; Subramanya, S.

    2012-01-01

    Unrepaired or misrepaired chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) can cause gross chromosomal rearrangements which eventually can lead to tumorigenesis through inactivation of tumor suppressor genes or activation of oncogenes. There are two major mechanisms of DSB repair: non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). DSBs that are generated during S and G2 phase of the cell are preferentially repaired by sister chromatid recombination (SCR), an HR pathway that utilizes neighboring sister chromatid as a template. Since the copied information is accurate, SCR is potentially an error-free pathway. HR also plays a critical role in the repair of daughter strand gaps (DSGs) that arise as a result of replication fork stalling and facilitates replication fork recovery. Furthermore, in collaboration with nucleotide excision repair and translesion synthesis, HR is involved in the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Thus, HR is important for the maintenance of genome integrity and its dysfunction can lead to various genetic disorders and cancer

  4. Germline Mutations in PALB2, BRCA1, and RAD51C, Which Regulate DNA Recombination Repair, in Patients with Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahasrabudhe, Ruta; Lott, Paul; Bohorquez, Mabel; Toal, Ted; Estrada, Ana P.; Suarez, John J.; Brea-Fernández, Alejandro; Cameselle-Teijeiro, José; Pinto, Carla; Ramos, Irma; Mantilla, Alejandra; Prieto, Rodrigo; Corvalan, Alejandro; Norero, Enrique; Alvarez, Carolina; Tapia, Teresa; Carvallo, Pilar; Gonzalez, Luz M.; Cock-Rada, Alicia; Solano, Angela; Neffa, Florencia; Valle, Adriana Della; Yau, Chris; Soares, Gabriela; Borowsky, Alexander; Hu, Nan; He, Li-Ji; Han, Xiao-You; Taylor, Philip R.; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Torres, Javier; Echeverry, Magdalena; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Carvajal Carmona, Luis G.

    2016-01-01

    Up to 10% of cases of gastric cancer are familial, but so far, only mutations in CDH1 have been associated with gastric cancer risk. To identify genetic variants that affect risk for gastric cancer, we collected blood samples from 28 patients with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) not associated with mutations in CDH1 and performed whole-exome sequence analysis. We then analyzed sequences of candidate genes in 333 independent HDGC and non-HDGC cases. We identified 11 cases with mutations in PALB2, BRCA1, or RAD51C genes, which regulate homologous DNA recombination. We found these mutations in 2 of 31 patients with HDGC (6.5%) and 9 of 331 patients with sporadic gastric cancer (2.8%). Most of these mutations had been previously associated with other types of tumors and partially co-segregated with gastric cancer in our study. Tumors that developed in patients with these mutations had a mutation signature associated with somatic homologous recombination deficiency. Our findings indicate that defects in homologous recombination increase risk for gastric cancer. PMID:28024868

  5. Generation and CRISPR/Cas9 editing of transformed progenitor B cells as a pseudo-physiological system to study DNA repair gene function in V(D)J recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenden Hasse, Hélène; Lescale, Chloé; Bianchi, Joy J; Yu, Wei; Bedora-Faure, Marie; Deriano, Ludovic

    2017-12-01

    Antigen receptor gene assembly is accomplished in developing lymphocytes by the V(D)J recombination reaction, which can be separated into two steps: DNA cleavage by the recombination-activating gene (RAG) nuclease and joining of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) by components of the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway. Deficiencies for NHEJ factors can result in immunodeficiency and a propensity to accumulate genomic instability, thus highlighting the importance of identifying all players in this process and deciphering their functions. Bcl2 transgenic v-Abl kinase-transformed pro-B cells provide a pseudo-physiological cellular system to study V(D)J recombination. Treatment of v-Abl/Bcl2 pro-B cells with the Abl kinase inhibitor Imatinib leads to G1 cell cycle arrest, the rapid induction of Rag1/2 gene expression and V(D)J recombination. In this system, the Bcl2 transgene alleviates Imatinib-induced apoptosis enabling the analysis of induced V(D)J recombination. Although powerful, the use of mouse models carrying the Bcl2 transgene for the generation of v-Abl pro-B cell lines is time and money consuming. Here, we describe a method for generating v-Abl/Bcl2 pro-B cell lines from wild type mice and for performing gene knock-out using episomal CRISPR/Cas9 targeting vectors. Using this approach, we generated distinct NHEJ-deficient pro-B cell lines and quantified V(D)J recombination levels in these cells. Furthermore, this methodology can be adapted to generate pro-B cell lines deficient for any gene suspected to play a role in V(D)J recombination, and more generally DSB repair. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. 'Regular' and 'emergency' repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luchnik, N.V.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments on the combined action of radiation and a DNA inhibitor using Crepis roots and on split-dose irradiation of human lymphocytes lead to the conclusion that there are two types of repair. The 'regular' repair takes place twice in each mitotic cycle and ensures the maintenance of genetic stability. The 'emergency' repair is induced at all stages of the mitotic cycle by high levels of injury. (author)

  7. 49 CFR 224.109 - Inspection, repair, and replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inspection, repair, and replacement. 224.109 Section 224.109 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD..., Inspection, and Maintenance of Retroreflective Material § 224.109 Inspection, repair, and replacement. (a...

  8. Neurogenesis and brain injury: managing a renewable resource for repair

    OpenAIRE

    Hallbergson, Anna F.; Gnatenco, Carmen; Peterson, Daniel A.

    2003-01-01

    The brain shows limited ability to repair itself, but neurogenesis in certain areas of the adult brain suggests that neural stem cells may be used for structural brain repair. It will be necessary to understand how neurogenesis in the adult brain is regulated to develop strategies that harness neural stem cells for therapeutic use.

  9. Altered Hematopoiesis in Mice Lacking DNA Polymerase μ Is Due to Inefficient Double-Strand Break Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Daniel; Escudero, Beatriz; Ligos, José Manuel; Segovia, Jose Carlos; Estrada, Juan Camilo; Terrados, Gloria; Blanco, Luis; Samper, Enrique; Bernad, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Polymerase mu (Polμ) is an error-prone, DNA-directed DNA polymerase that participates in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair. In vivo, Polμ deficiency results in impaired Vκ-Jκ recombination and altered somatic hypermutation and centroblast development. In Polμ−/− mice, hematopoietic development was defective in several peripheral and bone marrow (BM) cell populations, with about a 40% decrease in BM cell number that affected several hematopoietic lineages. Hematopoietic progenitors were reduced both in number and in expansion potential. The observed phenotype correlates with a reduced efficiency in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in hematopoietic tissue. Whole-body γ-irradiation revealed that Polμ also plays a role in DSB repair in non-hematopoietic tissues. Our results show that Polμ function is required for physiological hematopoietic development with an important role in maintaining early progenitor cell homeostasis and genetic stability in hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic tissues. PMID:19229323

  10. Repair kinetics in tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thames, H.D.

    1989-01-01

    Monoexponential repair kinetics is based on the assumption of a single, dose-independent rate of repair of sublethal injury in the target cells for tissue injury after exposure to ionizing radiation. Descriptions of the available data based on this assumption have proved fairly successful for both acutely responding (skin, lip mucosa, gut) and late-responding (lung, spinal cord) normal tissues. There are indications of biphasic exponential repair in both categories, however. Unfortunately, the data usually lack sufficient resolution to permit unambiguous determination of the repair rates. There are also indications that repair kinetics may depend on the size of the dose. The data are conflicting on this account, however, with suggestions of both faster and slower repair after larger doses. Indeed, experiments that have been explicitly designed to test this hypothesis show either no effect (gut, spinal cord), faster repair after higher doses (lung, kidney), or slower repair after higher doses (skin). Monoexponential repair appears to be a fairly accurate description that provides an approximation to a more complicated picture, the elucidation of whose details will, however, require very careful and extensive experimental study. (author). 30 refs.; 1 fig

  11. Suppression of DNA-dependent protein kinase sensitize cells to radiation without affecting DSB repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, Ann-Sofie, E-mail: ann-sofie.gustafsson@bms.uu.se; Abramenkovs, Andris; Stenerlöw, Bo

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • We reduced the level of DNA-PKcs with siRNA and examined cells after γ-irradiation. • Low DNA-PKcs levels lead to radiosensitivity but did not affect repair of DSB. • Low DNA-PKcs levels may block progression of mitosis. • DNA-PKcs role in mitotic progression is independent of its role in DSB repair. • We suggest different mechanisms by which loss of DNA-PKcs function sensitize cells. - Abstract: Efficient and correct repair of DNA double-strand break (DSB) is critical for cell survival. Defects in the DNA repair may lead to cell death, genomic instability and development of cancer. The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is an essential component of the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) which is the major DSB repair pathway in mammalian cells. In the present study, by using siRNA against DNA-PKcs in four human cell lines, we examined how low levels of DNA-PKcs affected cellular response to ionizing radiation. Decrease of DNA-PKcs levels by 80–95%, induced by siRNA treatment, lead to extreme radiosensitivity, similar to that seen in cells completely lacking DNA-PKcs and low levels of DNA-PKcs promoted cell accumulation in G2/M phase after irradiation and blocked progression of mitosis. Surprisingly, low levels of DNA-PKcs did not affect the repair capacity and the removal of 53BP1 or γ-H2AX foci and rejoining of DSB appeared normal. This was in strong contrast to cells completely lacking DNA-PKcs and cells treated with the DNA-PKcs inhibitor NU7441, in which DSB repair were severely compromised. This suggests that there are different mechanisms by which loss of DNA-PKcs functions can sensitize cells to ionizing radiation. Further, foci of phosphorylated DNA-PKcs (T2609 and S2056) co-localized with DSB and this was independent of the amount of DNA-PKcs but foci of DNA-PKcs was only seen in siRNA-treated cells. Our study emphasizes on the critical role of DNA-PKcs for maintaining survival after radiation exposure

  12. Suppression of DNA-dependent protein kinase sensitize cells to radiation without affecting DSB repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, Ann-Sofie; Abramenkovs, Andris; Stenerlöw, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We reduced the level of DNA-PKcs with siRNA and examined cells after γ-irradiation. • Low DNA-PKcs levels lead to radiosensitivity but did not affect repair of DSB. • Low DNA-PKcs levels may block progression of mitosis. • DNA-PKcs role in mitotic progression is independent of its role in DSB repair. • We suggest different mechanisms by which loss of DNA-PKcs function sensitize cells. - Abstract: Efficient and correct repair of DNA double-strand break (DSB) is critical for cell survival. Defects in the DNA repair may lead to cell death, genomic instability and development of cancer. The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is an essential component of the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) which is the major DSB repair pathway in mammalian cells. In the present study, by using siRNA against DNA-PKcs in four human cell lines, we examined how low levels of DNA-PKcs affected cellular response to ionizing radiation. Decrease of DNA-PKcs levels by 80–95%, induced by siRNA treatment, lead to extreme radiosensitivity, similar to that seen in cells completely lacking DNA-PKcs and low levels of DNA-PKcs promoted cell accumulation in G2/M phase after irradiation and blocked progression of mitosis. Surprisingly, low levels of DNA-PKcs did not affect the repair capacity and the removal of 53BP1 or γ-H2AX foci and rejoining of DSB appeared normal. This was in strong contrast to cells completely lacking DNA-PKcs and cells treated with the DNA-PKcs inhibitor NU7441, in which DSB repair were severely compromised. This suggests that there are different mechanisms by which loss of DNA-PKcs functions can sensitize cells to ionizing radiation. Further, foci of phosphorylated DNA-PKcs (T2609 and S2056) co-localized with DSB and this was independent of the amount of DNA-PKcs but foci of DNA-PKcs was only seen in siRNA-treated cells. Our study emphasizes on the critical role of DNA-PKcs for maintaining survival after radiation exposure

  13. DNA repair genes RAD52 and SRS2, a cell wall synthesis regulator gene SMI1, and the membrane sterol synthesis scaffold gene ERG28 are important in efficient Agrobacterium-mediated yeast transformation with chromosomal T-DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmine, Yuta; Satoh, Yukari; Kiyokawa, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Shinji; Moriguchi, Kazuki; Suzuki, Katsunori

    2016-04-02

    Plant pathogenic Agrobacterium strains can transfer T-DNA regions of their Ti plasmids to a broad range of eukaryotic hosts, including fungi, in vitro. In the recent decade, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used as a model host to reveal important host proteins for the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation (AMT). Further investigation is required to understand the fundamental mechanism of AMT, including interaction at the cell surface, to expand the host range, and to develop new tools. In this study, we screened a yeast mutant library for low AMT mutant strains by advantage of a chromosome type T-DNA, which transfer is efficient and independent on integration into host chromosome. By the mutant screening, we identified four mutant strains (srs2Δ, rad52Δ, smi1Δ and erg28Δ), which showed considerably low AMT efficiency. Structural analysis of T-DNA product replicons in AMT colonies of mutants lacking each of the two DNA repair genes, SRS2 and RAD52, suggested that the genes act soon after T-DNA entry for modification of the chromosomal T-DNA to stably maintain them as linear replicons and to circularize certain T-DNA simultaneously. The cell wall synthesis regulator SMI1 might have a role in the cell surface interaction between the donor and recipient cells, but the smi1Δ mutant exhibited pleiotropic effect, i.e. low effector protein transport as well as low AMT for the chromosomal T-DNA, but relatively high AMT for integrative T-DNAs. The ergosterol synthesis regulator/enzyme-scaffold gene ERG28 probably contributes by sensing a congested environment, because growth of erg28Δ strain was unaffected by the presence of donor bacterial cells, while the growth of the wild-type and other mutant yeast strains was suppressed by their presence. RAD52 and the DNA helicase/anti-recombinase gene SRS2 are necessary to form and maintain artificial chromosomes through the AMT of chromosomal T-DNA. A sterol synthesis scaffold gene ERG28 is important in the high

  14. 48 CFR 1371.102 - Method of payment and invoicing instructions for ship repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Method of payment and invoicing instructions for ship repair. 1371.102 Section 1371.102 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE DEPARTMENT SUPPLEMENTAL REGULATIONS ACQUISITIONS INVOLVING SHIP CONSTRUCTION AND SHIP REPAIR Provisions and Clauses 1371.102...

  15. Snowmobile Repair. Teacher Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Stephen S.; Conrad, Rex

    This teacher's guide contains 14 units on snowmobile repair: (1) introduction to snowmobile repair; (2) skis, front suspension, and steering; (3) drive clutch; (4) drive belts; (5) driven clutch; (6) chain drives; (7) jackshafts and axles; (8) rear suspension; (9) tracks; (10) shock absorbers; (11) brakes; (12) engines; (13) ignition and…

  16. DNA repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimyo, Mitsuoki

    1995-01-01

    Fission yeast S. pombe is assumed to be a good model for cloning of human DNA repair genes, because human gene is normally expressed in S. pombe and has a very similar protein sequence to yeast protein. We have tried to elucidate the DNA repair mechanisms of S. pombe as a model system for those of mammals. (J.P.N.)

  17. Low concentrations of antimony impair DNA damage signaling and the repair of radiation-induced DSB in HeLa S3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Barbara; Maser, Elena; Hartwig, Andrea

    2017-12-01

    Antimony is utilized in a large variety of industrial applications, leading to significant environmental and occupational exposure. Mainly based on animal experiments, the IARC and MAK Commission have classified antimony and its inorganic compounds as Group 2B or 2 carcinogens, respectively. However, the underlying mode(s) of action are still largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the impact of non-cytotoxic up to cytotoxic concentrations of SbCl 3 on DNA DSB repair and cell cycle control in HeLa S3 cells. We induced DSB by γ-irradiation and analyzed inhibitory actions of antimony on potential molecular targets of the DSB repair machinery. Antimony disturbed cell cycle control, affecting phosphorylation of Chk1. Furthermore, the repair of DSB was impaired in the presence of antimony, as monitored by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and γH2AX foci formation of cells in G1 and G2 phase. Specifically, BRCA1 and RAD51 were identified as molecular targets. Our results point towards an interference with both non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR), and inhibitory effects may be explained by interactions with critical cysteine groups; this needs to be further investigated. Altogether, the results provide further evidence for the impairment of DNA repair processes as one underlying mechanism in antimony-induced carcinogenicity.

  18. 76 FR 9987 - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Amendments to the Section 608 Leak Repair Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-23

    ... Stratospheric Ozone: Amendments to the Section 608 Leak Repair Requirements AGENCY: Environmental Protection... rule in the December 15, 2010, Federal Register proposing changes to the leak repair regulations...- mail address [email protected] . More information about EPA's leak repair requirements under Section...

  19. MicroRNA-381 Favors Repair of Nerve Injury Through Regulation of the SDF-1/CXCR4 Signaling Pathway via LRRC4 in Acute Cerebral Ischemia after Cerebral Lymphatic Blockage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Min Piao

    2018-04-01

    IL-10, and expression of SDF-1, CXCR4, pERK, Slit2 and VEGF in brain tissues were decreased (those in the CLB + MCAO + AMD3100 group < those in the CLB + MCAO + miR-381 mimic + AMD3100 group. The results in the CLB + MCAO + mimic group were opposite of those in the CLB + MCAO + miR-381 inhibitor and CLB + MCAO + AMD3100 groups. Conclusion: Taken together, we concluded that up-regulation of miR-381 promoted nerve injury repair in acute cerebral ischemia rats after CLB by negatively regulating LRRC4 through activating the SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling pathway.

  20. Effect of Wortmannin on the repair profiles of DNA double-strand breaks in the whole genome and in interstitial telomeric sequences of Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losada, Raquel; Rivero, Maria Teresa; Slijepcevic, Predrag; Goyanes, Vicente; Fernandez, Jose Luis

    2005-01-01

    The DNA breakage detection-fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH) procedure was applied to analyze the effect of Wortmannin (WM) in the rejoining kinetics of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the whole genome and in the long interstitial telomeric repeat sequence (ITRS) blocks from Chinese hamster cell lines. The results indicate that the ITRS blocks from wild-type Chinese hamster cell lines, CHO9 and V79B, exhibit a slower initial rejoining rate of ionizing radiation-induced DSBs than the genome overall. Neither Rad51C nor the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) activities, involved in homologous recombination (HR) and in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathways of DSB repair respectively, influenced the rejoining kinetics within ITRS in contrast to DNA sequences in the whole genome. Nevertheless, DSB removal rate within ITRS was decreased in the absence of Ku86 activity, though at a lower affectation level than in the whole genome, thus homogenizing both rejoining kinetics rates. WM treatment slowed down the DSB rejoining kinetics rate in ITRS, this effect being more pronounced in the whole genome, resulting in a similar pattern to that of the Ku86 deficient cells. In fact, no WM effect was detected in the Ku86 deficient Chinese hamster cells, so probably WM does not add further impairment in DSB rejoining than that resulted as a consequence of absence of Ku activity. The same slowing effect was also observed after treatment of Rad51C and DNA-PKcs defective hamster cells by WM, suggesting that: (1) there is no potentiation of the HR when the NHEJ is impaired by WM, either in the whole genome or in the ITRS, and (2) that this impairment may probably involve more targets than DNA-PKcs. These results suggest that there is an intragenomic heterogeneity in DSB repair, as well as in the effect of WM on this process

  1. Structural aspects of DNA in its replication and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, S.; Pal, B.C.; Foote, R.S.; Bates, R.C.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Snow, E.T.; Wobbe, C.R.; Morse, C.C.; Snyder, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    The research objective of this laboratory is to investigate the structure of DNA, the mechanism of DNA replication and its regulation, and the mechanism and role of repair of the altered DNA in the expression of heritable changes. This research has two broad aims, namely investigation of (a) the regulation of DNA replication in mammals, using parvovirus DNA as a model system and (b) the role of DNA repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis induced by simple alkylating mutagens

  2. Mechanical characterization of composite repairs for fiberglass wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Tanveer Singh

    affects the propagation fracture toughness values of the repair. Repairs conducted on surfaces with partially ground top plies possess higher fracture toughness values than those conducted on surfaces with complete top plies ground off. The three top repair resin candidates were then evaluated against the base repair resin under fatigue loading. The specimen configuration and testing method were chosen so as to be able to test hand layup repairs under tension -- tension cyclic loading. It was observed that all three new repair resins perform better than the base repair resin. The selection of the optimum repair resin was based on results from mode I and fatigue testing. Global manufacturing regulations and standards were also of prime concern. The final new repair resin is being used by the company in all of its plants over the globe. The balance of this work involves study of the effect of mixed mode I -- mode II loading on the strength of repairs conducted on fiber reinforced composite parts using hand lay-up technique. The specimens for this part were similar to those manufactured for mode I testing but with different dimensions and layup. They were made and tested in accordance with ASTM D 6671 (Standard Test Method for Mixed Mode I -- Mode II Interlaminar Fracture Toughness of Unidirectional Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites). Comparison was made between the fracture toughness of the above chosen optimum repair resin and the base repair resin. At least two levels of mode mixture GII/G (Mode II fracture toughness / Mode I and II fracture toughness) were examined. Also, two levels of grinding were considered (complete ply vs. partial ply ground off) in order to establish the influence of varying top-ply grinding depths on the strength of hand layup repairs conducted on fiberglass composite structures. The results of this work have the potential to improve the repair process for current fiberglass wind turbine blades.

  3. DNA Mismatch Repair and Oxidative DNA Damage: Implications for Cancer Biology and Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridge, Gemma; Rashid, Sukaina; Martin, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    Many components of the cell, including lipids, proteins and both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, are vulnerable to deleterious modifications caused by reactive oxygen species. If not repaired, oxidative DNA damage can lead to disease-causing mutations, such as in cancer. Base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair are the two DNA repair pathways believed to orchestrate the removal of oxidative lesions. However, recent findings suggest that the mismatch repair pathway may also be important for the response to oxidative DNA damage. This is particularly relevant in cancer where mismatch repair genes are frequently mutated or epigenetically silenced. In this review we explore how the regulation of oxidative DNA damage by mismatch repair proteins may impact on carcinogenesis. We discuss recent studies that identify potential new treatments for mismatch repair deficient tumours, which exploit this non-canonical role of mismatch repair using synthetic lethal targeting

  4. DNA Mismatch Repair and Oxidative DNA Damage: Implications for Cancer Biology and Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridge, Gemma; Rashid, Sukaina; Martin, Sarah A., E-mail: sarah.martin@qmul.ac.uk [Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-05

    Many components of the cell, including lipids, proteins and both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, are vulnerable to deleterious modifications caused by reactive oxygen species. If not repaired, oxidative DNA damage can lead to disease-causing mutations, such as in cancer. Base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair are the two DNA repair pathways believed to orchestrate the removal of oxidative lesions. However, recent findings suggest that the mismatch repair pathway may also be important for the response to oxidative DNA damage. This is particularly relevant in cancer where mismatch repair genes are frequently mutated or epigenetically silenced. In this review we explore how the regulation of oxidative DNA damage by mismatch repair proteins may impact on carcinogenesis. We discuss recent studies that identify potential new treatments for mismatch repair deficient tumours, which exploit this non-canonical role of mismatch repair using synthetic lethal targeting.

  5. Competition between replicative and translesion polymerases during homologous recombination repair in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Kane

    Full Text Available In metazoans, the mechanism by which DNA is synthesized during homologous recombination repair of double-strand breaks is poorly understood. Specifically, the identities of the polymerase(s that carry out repair synthesis and how they are recruited to repair sites are unclear. Here, we have investigated the roles of several different polymerases during homologous recombination repair in Drosophila melanogaster. Using a gap repair assay, we found that homologous recombination is impaired in Drosophila lacking DNA polymerase zeta and, to a lesser extent, polymerase eta. In addition, the Pol32 protein, part of the polymerase delta complex, is needed for repair requiring extensive synthesis. Loss of Rev1, which interacts with multiple translesion polymerases, results in increased synthesis during gap repair. Together, our findings support a model in which translesion polymerases and the polymerase delta complex compete during homologous recombination repair. In addition, they establish Rev1 as a crucial factor that regulates the extent of repair synthesis.

  6. Repairing fuel for reinsertion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krukshenk, A.

    1986-01-01

    Eqiupment for nuclear reactor fuel assembly repairing produced by Westinghouse and Brawn Bovery companies is described. Repair of failed fuel assemblies replacement of defect fuel elements gives a noticeable economical effect. Thus if the cost of a new fuel assembly is 450-500 thousand dollars, the replacement of one fuel element in it costs approximately 40-60 thousand dollars. In simple cases repairing includes either removal of failed fuel elements from a fuel assembly and its reinsertion with the rest of fuel elements into the reactor core (reactor refueling), or replacement of unfailed fuel elements from one fuel assembly to a new one (fuel assembly overhaul and reconditioning)

  7. DNA Repair Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DNA molecule which makes it ideal for storage and propagation of genetic information. ... of these errors are broadly referred to as DNA repair. DNA can ... changes occur in the human genome per day. ..... nails, frequent physical and mental.

  8. Brain aneurysm repair - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000123.htm Brain aneurysm repair - discharge To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. You had a brain aneurysm . An aneurysm is a weak area in ...

  9. Ventral hernia repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... incarcerated) in the hernia and become impossible to push back in. This is usually painful. The blood supply ... you are lying down or that you cannot push back in. Risks The risks of ventral hernia repair ...

  10. Omphalocele repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100033.htm Omphalocele repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... Go to slide 4 out of 4 Overview Omphalocele is an abdominal wall defect at the base ...

  11. Celebrating DNA's Repair Crew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Thomas A

    2015-12-03

    This year, the Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to Tomas Lindahl, Aziz Sancar, and Paul Modrich for their seminal studies of the mechanisms by which cells from bacteria to man repair DNA damage that is generated by normal cellular metabolism and stress from the environment. These studies beautifully illustrate the remarkable power of DNA repair to influence life from evolution through disease susceptibility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. DNA Repair and Genome Maintenance in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhart, Justin S.; Schroeder, Jeremy W.; Walsh, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: From microbes to multicellular eukaryotic organisms, all cells contain pathways responsible for genome maintenance. DNA replication allows for the faithful duplication of the genome, whereas DNA repair pathways preserve DNA integrity in response to damage originating from endogenous and exogenous sources. The basic pathways important for DNA replication and repair are often conserved throughout biology. In bacteria, high-fidelity repair is balanced with low-fidelity repair and mutagenesis. Such a balance is important for maintaining viability while providing an opportunity for the advantageous selection of mutations when faced with a changing environment. Over the last decade, studies of DNA repair pathways in bacteria have demonstrated considerable differences between Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. Here we review and discuss the DNA repair, genome maintenance, and DNA damage checkpoint pathways of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. We present their molecular mechanisms and compare the functions and regulation of several pathways with known information on other organisms. We also discuss DNA repair during different growth phases and the developmental program of sporulation. In summary, we present a review of the function, regulation, and molecular mechanisms of DNA repair and mutagenesis in Gram-positive bacteria, with a strong emphasis on B. subtilis. PMID:22933559

  13. Individual capacity for DNA repair and maintenance of genomic integrity: a fertile ground for studies in the field of assisted reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radoslava Vazharova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Many factors may affect the chances for successful pregnancy, especially at a later age. Fertility evaluations including genetic analysis are recommended to couples that have not achieved pregnancy within 6–12 months of unprotected intercourse. This review discusses some of the common polymorphisms in genes coding for proteins functioning in DNA damage identification and repair and maintenance of genomic integrity that may affect the chances of success in natural conception as well as in assisted reproduction (AR. Common polymorphisms in genes coding for proteins functioning in DNA damage identification and repair and maintenance of genomic integrity may affect the chances of success in assisted reproduction as well as in natural conception. The effects of carriership of different alleles of key genes of DNA repair may have differential effects in men and women and at different ages, suggesting complex interactions with the mechanisms controlling cell and tissue aging and programmed cell death. Future studies in the field are needed in order to elucidate the genotype–phenotype relationships and to translate the knowledge about individual repair capacity and maintenance of genomic integrity to potential clinical applications. Abbreviations: aCGH: microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization; AR: assisted reproduction; ATM: ataxia-telangiectasia mutated; ATP: adenosine triphosphate; BER: base excision repair; BFE: basic fertility evaluation; DMSO: dimethyl sulfoxide; FSH: follicle-stimulating hormone; GNRHR: gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor; HMG: high-mobility group; ICSI: intracytoplasmic sperm injection; IUI: intrauterine insemination; IVF: in vitro fertilization; LH: luteinizing hormone; LIF: leukaemia inhibitory factor; MTR: methionine synthase; MTRR: methionine synthase reductase; NGS: next-generation sequencing; NER: nucleotide excision repair; NHEJ: non-homologous end joining; PAH: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; PCOS

  14. Wound repair and regeneration: Mechanisms, signaling, and translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eming, Sabine A.; Martin, Paul; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2015-01-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning tissue repair and its failure to heal are still poorly understood, and current therapies are limited. Poor wound healing after trauma, surgery, acute illness, or chronic disease conditions affects millions of people worldwide each year and is the consequence of poorly regulated elements of the healthy tissue repair response, including inflammation, angiogenesis, matrix deposition, and cell recruitment. Failure of one or several of these cellular processes is generally linked to an underlying clinical condition, such as vascular disease, diabetes, or aging, which are all frequently associated with healing pathologies. The search for clinical strategies that might improve the body’s natural repair mechanisms will need to be based on a thorough understanding of the basic biology of repair and regeneration. In this review, we highlight emerging concepts in tissue regeneration and repair, and provide some perspectives on how to translate current knowledge into viable clinical approaches for treating patients with wound-healing pathologies. PMID:25473038

  15. An inverse switch in DNA base excision and strand break repair contributes to melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirta M L Sousa

    Full Text Available Alterations in checkpoint and DNA repair pathways may provide adaptive mechanisms contributing to acquired drug resistance. Here, we investigated the levels of proteins mediating DNA damage signaling and -repair in RPMI8226 multiple myeloma cells and its Melphalan-resistant derivative 8226-LR5. We observed markedly reduced steady-state levels of DNA glycosylases UNG2, NEIL1 and MPG in the resistant cells and cross-resistance to agents inducing their respective DNA base lesions. Conversely, repair of alkali-labile sites was apparently enhanced in the resistant cells, as substantiated by alkaline comet assay, autoribosylation of PARP-1, and increased sensitivity to PARP-1 inhibition by 4-AN or KU58684. Reduced base-excision and enhanced single-strand break repair would both contribute to the observed reduction in genomic alkali-labile sites, which could jeopardize productive processing of the more cytotoxic Melphalan-induced interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICLs. Furthermore, we found a marked upregulation of proteins in the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ pathway of double-strand break (DSB repair, likely contributing to the observed increase in DSB repair kinetics in the resistant cells. Finally, we observed apparent upregulation of ATR-signaling and downregulation of ATM-signaling in the resistant cells. This was accompanied by markedly increased sensitivity towards Melphalan in the presence of ATR-, DNA-PK, or CHK1/2 inhibitors whereas no sensitizing effect was observed subsequent to ATM inhibition, suggesting that replication blocking lesions are primary triggers of the DNA damage response in the Melphalan resistant cells. In conclusion, Melphalan resistance is apparently contributed by modulation of the DNA damage response at multiple levels, including downregulation of specific repair pathways to avoid repair intermediates that could impair efficient processing of cytotoxic ICLs and ICL-induced DSBs. This study has revealed several novel

  16. Radiobiological significance of DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzin, A.M.

    1978-01-01

    A short outline is given on the history of the problem relating to the repair of radiation injuries, specifically its molecular mechanisms. The most urgent problems which currently confront the researchers are noted. This is a further study on the role of DNA repair in post-radiation recovery, search for ways to activate and suppress DNA repair, investigations into the activity balance of various repair enzymes as well as the problem of errors in the structure of repairing DNA. An important role is attached to the investigations of DNA repair in solving a number of practical problems

  17. Recombinational repair: workshop summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard-Flanders, P.

    1983-01-01

    Recombinational repair may or may not be synonymous with postreplication repair. Considerable progress has been made in the study of the relevant enzymes, particularly those from bacteria. In this workshop we focus on the recombination enzyme RecA protein. What structural changes take place in the protein and in DNA during repair. How does homologous pairing take place. How is ATP hydrolysis coupled to the stand exchange reaction and the formation of heteroduplx DNA. Turning to another enzyme needed for certain kinds of bacterial recombination, we will ask whether the purified recB protein and recC protein complement each other and are sufficient for exonuclease V activity. In higher cells, we would like to know whether sister exchanges, which occur in bacteria after uv irradiation, are also seen in animal cells

  18. Meniscal repair devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F A; Herbert, M A

    2000-09-01

    Meniscal repair devices not requiring accessory incisions are attractive. Many factors contribute to their clinical effectiveness including their biomechanical characteristics. This study compared several new meniscal repair devices with standard meniscal suture techniques. Using a porcine model, axis-of-insertion loads were applied to various meniscal sutures and repair devices. A single device or stitch was placed in a created meniscal tear and a load applied. Both loads and modes of failure were recorded. The load-to-failure data show stratification into 4 distinct statistical groups. Group A, 113 N for a double vertical stitch; group B, 80 N for a single vertical stitch; group C, 57 N for the BioStinger, 56 N for a horizontal mattress stitch, and 50 N for the T-Fix stitch; and group D, 33 N for the Meniscus Arrow (inserted by hand or gun), 32 N for the Clearfix screw, 31 N for the SDsorb staple, 30 N for the Mitek meniscal repair system, and 27 N for the Biomet staple. The failure mechanism varied. Sutures broke away from the knot. The Meniscus Arrow and BioStinger pulled through the inner rim with the crossbar intact. The Clearfix screw failed by multiple mechanisms, whereas 1 leg of the SDsorb staple always pulled out of the outer rim. The Mitek device usually failed by pullout from the inner rim. The Biomet staple always broke at the crosshead or just below it. Although the surgeon should be aware of the material properties of the repair technique chosen for a meniscal repair, this information is only an indication of device performance and may not correlate with clinical healing results.

  19. 29 CFR 1926.30 - Shipbuilding and ship repairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Shipbuilding and ship repairing. 1926.30 Section 1926.30 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION General Safety and Health Provisions § 1926.30 Shipbuilding and ship repairin...

  20. Biological radiolesions and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskowski, W.

    1981-01-01

    In 7 chapters, the book answers the following questions: 1) What reactions are induced in biological matter by absorption of radiation energy. 2) In what parts of the cell do the radiation-induced reactions with detectable biological effects occur. 3) In which way are these cell components changed by different qualities of radiation. 4) What are the cell mechanisms by which radiation-induced changes can be repaired. 5) What is the importance of these repair processes for man, his life and evolution. At the end of each chapter, there is a bibliography of relevant publications in this field. (orig./MG) [de

  1. Composite Repair System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — GTL has developed an innovative composite repair methodology known as the Composite Repair System (CRS). In this phase I effort, CRS is being developed for the...

  2. About the Collision Repair Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA developed the Collision Repair Campaign to focus on meaningful risk reduction in the Collision Repair source sector to complement ongoing community air toxics work and attain reductions at a faster rate.

  3. Vesicovaginal Fistula Repair During Pregnancy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vesicovaginal Fistula Repair During Pregnancy: A Case Report ... Abstract. We report a repair of Vesicovaginal fistula during pregnancy that was aimed at preventing another spontaneous ... practices that encourage teenage marriage and girl.

  4. Ship Repair Workflow Cost Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McDevitt, Mike

    2003-01-01

    The effects of intermittent work patterns and funding on the costs of ship repair and maintenance were modeled for the San Diego region in 2002 for Supervisor of Shipbuilding and Repair (SUPSHIP) San Diego...

  5. Social repair of relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahnøe, Kristian Relsted

    2017-01-01

    organisations, friends and family, and communities. These social relations are viewed as the foundation of citizenship as experienced and practised. Focusing on how two dimensions of lived citizenship, namely rights-responsibilities and belonging, are affected by the social repairs, the chapter shows how...

  6. Comprehensive Small Engine Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hires, Bill; And Others

    This curriculum guide contains the basic information needed to repair all two- and four-stroke cycle engines. The curriculum covers four areas, each consisting of one or more units of instruction that include performance objectives, suggested activities for teacher and students, information sheets, assignment sheets, job sheets, visual aids,…

  7. Patent urachus repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools About MedlinePlus Show Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Patent urachus repair - series—Normal anatomy URL of this ...

  8. Patent urachus repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools About MedlinePlus Show Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Patent urachus repair URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ ...

  9. DNA Repair Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thanks to the pioneering research work of Lindahl, Sancar, Modrich and their colleagues, we now have an holistic awareness of how DNA damage occurs and how the damage is rectified in bacteria as well as in higher organisms including human beings. A comprehensive understanding of DNA repair has proven crucial ...

  10. Aircraft Propeller Hub Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muth, Thomas R [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL

    2015-02-13

    The team performed a literature review, conducted residual stress measurements, performed failure analysis, and demonstrated a solid state additive manufacturing repair technique on samples removed from a scrapped propeller hub. The team evaluated multiple options for hub repair that included existing metal buildup technologies that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has already embraced, such as cold spray, high velocity oxy-fuel deposition (HVOF), and plasma spray. In addition the team helped Piedmont Propulsion Systems, LLC (PPS) evaluate three potential solutions that could be deployed at different stages in the life cycle of aluminum alloy hubs, in addition to the conventional spray coating method for repair. For new hubs, a machining practice to prevent fretting with the steel drive shaft was recommended. For hubs that were refurbished with some material remaining above the minimal material condition (MMC), a silver interface applied by an electromagnetic pulse additive manufacturing method was recommended. For hubs that were at or below the MMC, a solid state additive manufacturing technique using ultrasonic welding (UW) of thin layers of 7075 aluminum to the hub interface was recommended. A cladding demonstration using the UW technique achieved mechanical bonding of the layers showing promise as a viable repair method.

  11. Role of DNA repair in repair of cytogenetic damages. Slowly repaired DNA injuries involved in cytogenetic damages repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaichkina, S.I.; Rozanova, O.M.; Aptikaev, G.F.; Ganassi, E.Eh.

    1989-01-01

    Caffeine was used to study the kinetics of cytogenetic damages repair in Chinese hamster fibroblasts. Its half-time (90 min) was shown to correlate with that of repair of slowly repaired DNA damages. The caffeine-induced increase in the number of irreparable DNA damages, attributed to inhibition of double-strand break repair, is in a quantitative correlation with the effect of the cytogenetic damage modification

  12. A lncRNA to repair DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, Jiri; Altmeyer, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as regulators of various biological processes, but to which extent lncRNAs play a role in genome integrity maintenance is not well understood. In this issue of EMBO Reports, Sharma et al [1] identify the DNA damage-induced lncRNA DDSR1 as an integral...... player of the DNA damage response (DDR). DDSR1 has both an early role by modulating repair pathway choices, and a later function when it regulates gene expression. Sharma et al [1] thus uncover a dual role for a hitherto uncharacterized lncRNA during the cellular response to DNA damage....

  13. Cleft lip and palate repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002979.htm Cleft lip and palate repair To use the sharing features on this ... Cheiloplasty; Cleft rhinoplasty; Palatoplasty; Tip rhinoplasty Patient Instructions Cleft lip and palate repair - discharge Images Cleft lip repair - series References ...

  14. DNA repair in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regan, J.D.; Carrier, W.L.; Kusano, I.; Furuno-Fukushi, I.; Dunn, W.C. Jr.; Francis, A.A.; Lee, W.H.

    1982-01-01

    Our primary objective is to elucidate the molecular events in human cells when cellular macromolecules such as DNA are damaged by radiation or chemical agents. We study and characterize (i) the sequence of DNA repair events, (ii) the various modalities of repair, (iii) the genetic inhibition of repair due to mutation, (iv) the physiological inhibition of repair due to mutation, (v) the physiological inhibition of repair due to biochemical inhibitors, and (vi) the genetic basis of repair. Our ultimate goals are to (i) isolate and analyze the repair component of the mutagenic and/or carcinogenic event in human cells, and (ii) elucidate the magnitude and significance of this repair component as it impinges on the practical problems of human irradiation or exposure to actual or potential chemical mutagens and carcinogens. The significance of these studies lies in (i) the ubiquitousness of repair (most organisms, including man, have several complex repair systems), (ii) the belief that mutagenic and carcinogenic events may arise only from residual (nonrepaired) lesions or that error-prone repair systems may be the major induction mechanisms of the mutagenic or carcinogenic event, and (iii) the clear association of repair defects and highly carcinogenic disease states in man [xeroderma pigmentosum (XP)

  15. The journey of DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Natalie

    2015-12-01

    21 years ago, the DNA Repair Enzyme was declared "Molecule of the Year". Today, we are celebrating another "year of repair", with the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry being awarded to Aziz Sancar, Tomas Lindahl and Paul Modrich for their collective work on the different DNA repair pathways.

  16. Repair mechanisms and exposure standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.A.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are discussed; public policy for setting radiation standards; use of linear, nonthreshold theory in setting radiation standards; dose-rate dependence; occupational exposure to radiation; radon inhalation from radium in the soil in the vicinity of the phosphate industry; relation of repair mechanisms for cell survival to cancer induction; application of information on genetic repair to humans and to cancer induction; importance of repair processes in radiation protection standards; corrective factors for repair processes; relation of repair processes to age, sex, and other factors; and population distribution in radiosensitivity

  17. DNA repair deficiency in neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna V.

    2011-01-01

    Deficiency in repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders. Many recent experimental results indicate that the post-mitotic neurons are particularly prone to accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions potentially leading to progressive...... neurodegeneration. Nucleotide excision repair is the cellular pathway responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA damage and deficiency in such repair is found in a number of diseases with neurodegenerative phenotypes, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome. The main pathway for repairing oxidative...... base lesions is base excision repair, and such repair is crucial for neurons given their high rates of oxygen metabolism. Mismatch repair corrects base mispairs generated during replication and evidence indicates that oxidative DNA damage can cause this pathway to expand trinucleotide repeats, thereby...

  18. Handbook of Equipment Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-14

    state of leapin- fn’rw.rd. Tn recent years, many mechanical repair workers often write and ask us to reprint the book. In our consideration, however...ast 4iron 1. .-eat _--OSIS-RTS 5.5 . . 4-5 t4- cast -3.01 -6 ~.0 ’ ɘ.᝱ 5,,:e j?24 2 * 10- 5 aron C l 50 S lcon : Ielt rSSIS-RQTS-s;.4 u a 2.47 5at- .0

  19. Understanding the management and teaching of dental restoration repair: Systematic review and meta-analysis of surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzow, Philipp; Wiegand, Annette; Göstemeyer, Gerd; Schwendicke, Falk

    2018-02-01

    Repair instead of complete replacement is recommended to manage partially defective restorations. It is unclear if and why such treatment is taught at dental schools or practiced by dentists. We aimed to identify barriers and facilitators for repairs using a systematic review and meta- and qualitative analysis. Electronic databases (PubMed, CENTRAL, Embase, PsycINFO) were searched. Quantitative studies reporting on the proportion of (1) dentists stating to perform repairs, (2) dental schools teaching repairs, (3) failed restorations having been repaired were included. We also included qualitative studies on barriers/facilitators for repairs. Random-effects meta-analyses, meta-regression and a thematic analysis using the theoretical domains framework were conducted. 401 articles were assessed and 29, mainly quantitative, studies included. 7228 dentists and 276 dental schools had been surveyed, and treatment data of 30,172 restorations evaluated. The mean (95% CI) proportion of dentists stating to perform repairs was 71.5% (49.7-86.4%). 83.3% (73.6-90.0%) of dental schools taught repairs. 31.3% (26.3-36.7%) of failed restorations had been repaired. More recent studies reported significantly more dentists to repair restorations (p=0.004). Employment in public health practices and being the dentist who placed the original restoration were facilitators for repairs. Amalgam restorations were repaired less often, and financial aspects and regulations came as barriers. While most dentists state to perform repairs and the vast majority of dental schools teach repairs, the proportion of truly repaired restorations was low. A number of interventions to implement repair in dental practice can be deduced from our findings. Partially defective restorations are common in dental practice. While repairs are taught and dentists are aware of the recommendation towards repairs, the actually performed proportion of repairs seems low. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Zinc finger nuclease-mediated precision genome editing of an endogenous gene in hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) using a DNA repair template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Yidong; Patron, Nicola; Kay, Pippa; Wong, Debbie; Buchanan, Margaret; Cao, Ying-Ying; Sawbridge, Tim; Davies, John P; Mason, John; Webb, Steven R; Spangenberg, German; Ainley, William M; Walsh, Terence A; Hayden, Matthew J

    2018-05-07

    Sequence-specific nucleases have been used to engineer targeted genome modifications in various plants. While targeted gene knockouts resulting in loss of function have been reported with relatively high rates of success, targeted gene editing using an exogenously supplied DNA repair template and site-specific transgene integration has been more challenging. Here, we report the first application of zinc finger nuclease (ZFN)-mediated, nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ)-directed editing of a native gene in allohexaploid bread wheat to introduce, via a supplied DNA repair template, a specific single amino acid change into the coding sequence of acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) to confer resistance to imidazolinone herbicides. We recovered edited wheat plants having the targeted amino acid modification in one or more AHAS homoalleles via direct selection for resistance to imazamox, an AHAS-inhibiting imidazolinone herbicide. Using a cotransformation strategy based on chemical selection for an exogenous marker, we achieved a 1.2% recovery rate of edited plants having the desired amino acid change and a 2.9% recovery of plants with targeted mutations at the AHAS locus resulting in a loss-of-function gene knockout. The latter results demonstrate a broadly applicable approach to introduce targeted modifications into native genes for nonselectable traits. All ZFN-mediated changes were faithfully transmitted to the next generation. © 2018 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. ARTEMIS stabilizes the genome and modulates proliferative responses in multipotent mesenchymal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tompkins Kathleen

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unrepaired DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs cause chromosomal rearrangements, loss of genetic information, neoplastic transformation or cell death. The nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ pathway, catalyzing sequence-independent direct rejoining of DSBs, is a crucial mechanism for repairing both stochastically occurring and developmentally programmed DSBs. In lymphocytes, NHEJ is critical for both development and genome stability. NHEJ defects lead to severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID and lymphoid cancer predisposition in both mice and humans. While NHEJ has been thoroughly investigated in lymphocytes, the importance of NHEJ in other cell types, especially with regard to tumor suppression, is less well documented. We previously reported evidence that the NHEJ pathway functions to suppress a range of nonlymphoid tumor types, including various classes of sarcomas, by unknown mechanisms. Results Here we investigate roles for the NHEJ factor ARTEMIS in multipotent mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs, as putative sarcomagenic cells of origin. We demonstrate a key role for ARTEMIS in sarcoma suppression in a sensitized mouse tumor model. In this context, we found that ARTEMIS deficiency led to chromosomal damage but, paradoxically, enhanced resistance and proliferative potential in primary MSCs subjected to various stresses. Gene expression analysis revealed abnormally regulated stress response, cell proliferation, and signal transduction pathways in ARTEMIS-defective MSCs. Finally, we identified candidate regulatory genes that may, in part, mediate a stress-resistant, hyperproliferative phenotype in preneoplastic ARTEMIS-deficient MSCs. Conclusions Our discoveries suggest that Art prevents genome damage and restrains proliferation in MSCs exposed to various stress stimuli. We propose that deficiency leads to a preneoplastic state in primary MSCs and is associated with aberrant proliferative control and cellular stress

  2. Improving Aviation Depot Level Repairable (AVDLR) Inventory and Repair Management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baird, Dennis

    1997-01-01

    .... Additionally, research was conducted to document the management process for determining repair requirements at the Naval Inventory Control Point Philadelphia and how those requirements are accepted...

  3. When is cartilage repair successful?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raudner, M.; Roehrich, S.; Zalaudek, M.; Trattnig, S.; Schreiner, M.M.

    2017-01-01

    Focal cartilage lesions are a cause of long-term disability and morbidity. After cartilage repair, it is crucial to evaluate long-term progression or failure in a reproducible, standardized manner. This article provides an overview of the different cartilage repair procedures and important characteristics to look for in cartilage repair imaging. Specifics and pitfalls are pointed out alongside general aspects. After successful cartilage repair, a complete, but not hypertrophic filling of the defect is the primary criterion of treatment success. The repair tissue should also be completely integrated to the surrounding native cartilage. After some months, the transplants signal should be isointense compared to native cartilage. Complications like osteophytes, subchondral defects, cysts, adhesion and chronic bone marrow edema or joint effusion are common and have to be observed via follow-up. Radiological evaluation and interpretation of postoperative changes should always take the repair method into account. (orig.) [de

  4. Coordination of the Ser2056 and Thr2609 Clusters of DNA-PKcs in Regulating Gamma Rays and Extremely Low Fluencies of Alpha-Particle Irradiation to G0/G1 Phase Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Lin, Yu-Fen; Kato, Takamitsu A; Brogan, John R; Shih, Hung-Ying; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Bedford, Joel S; Chen, Benjamin P C; Little, John B

    2017-02-01

    The catalytic subunit of DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) and its kinase activity are critical for mediation of non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in mammalian cells after gamma-ray irradiation. Additionally, DNA-PKcs phosphorylations at the T2609 cluster and the S2056 cluster also affect DSB repair and cellular sensitivity to gamma radiation. Previously we reported that phosphorylations within these two regions affect not only NHEJ but also homologous recombination repair (HRR) dependent DSB repair. In this study, we further examine phenotypic effects on cells bearing various combinations of mutations within either or both regions. Effects studied included cell killing as well as chromosomal aberration induction after 0.5-8 Gy gamma-ray irradiation delivered to synchronized cells during the G 0 /G 1 phase of the cell cycle. Blocking phosphorylation within the T2609 cluster was most critical regarding sensitization and depended on the number of available phosphorylation sites. It was also especially interesting that only one substitution of alanine in each of the two clusters separately abolished the restoration of wild-type sensitivity by DNA-PKcs. Similar patterns were seen for induction of chromosomal aberrations, reflecting their connection to cell killing. To study possible change in coordination between HRR and NHEJ directed repair in these DNA-PKcs mutant cell lines, we compared the induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) by very low fluencies of alpha particles with mutant cells defective in the HRR pathway that is required for induction of SCEs. Levels of true SCEs induced by very low fluence of alpha-particle irradiation normally seen in wild-type cells were only slightly decreased in the S2056 cluster mutants, but were completely abolished in the T2609 cluster mutants and were indistinguishable from levels seen in HRR deficient cells. Again, a single substitution in the S2056 together with a single

  5. Visualization of DNA double-strand break repair: From molecules to cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krawczyk, Przemek M.; Stap, Jan; Aten, Jacob A.

    2008-01-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) signaling and repair processes are positioned at the crossroad of nuclear pathways that regulate DNA replication, cell division, senescence and apoptosis. Importantly, errors in DSB repair may lead to lethal or potentially tumorigenic chromosome rearrangements.

  6. 49 CFR 1242.35 - Repair and maintenance (account XX-26-41).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repair and maintenance (account XX-26-41). 1242.35 Section 1242.35 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) SURFACE...-Equipment § 1242.35 Repair and maintenance (account XX-26-41). (a) Where the carrier maintains records of...

  7. Cartilage repair by mesenchymal stem cells: Clinical trial update and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Yuk-wai Lee

    2017-04-01

    The translational potential of this article: This review summarises recent MSC-related clinical research that focuses on cartilage repair. We also propose a novel possible translational direction for hyaline cartilage formation and a new paradigm making use of extra-cellular signalling and epigenetic regulation in the application of MSCs for cartilage repair.

  8. Engineered Heart Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, B; Zimmermann, W-H

    2017-08-01

    There is a pressing need for the development of advanced heart failure therapeutics. Current state-of-the-art is protection from neurohumoral overstimulation, which fails to address the underlying cause of heart failure, namely loss of cardiomyocytes. Implantation of stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes via tissue-engineered myocardium is being advanced to realize the remuscularization of the failing heart. Here, we discuss pharmacological challenges pertaining to the clinical translation of tissue-engineered heart repair with a focus on engineered heart muscle (EHM). © 2017 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  9. Fanconi anemia and DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grompe, M; D'Andrea, A

    2001-10-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by defects in at least eight distinct genes FANCA, B, C, D1, D2, E, F and G. The clinical phenotype of all FA complementation groups is similar and is characterized by progressive bone marrow failure, cancer proneness and typical birth defects. The principal cellular phenotype is hypersensitivity to DNA damage, particularly interstrand DNA crosslinks. The FA proteins constitute a multiprotein pathway whose precise biochemical function(s) remain unknown. Five of the FA proteins (FANCA, C, E, F and G) interact in a nuclear complex upstream of FANCD2. FANCB and FANCD1 have not yet been cloned, but it is likely that FANCB is part of the nuclear complex and that FANCD1 acts downstream of FANCD2. The FA nuclear complex regulates the mono-ubiquitination of FANCD2 in response to DNA damage, resulting in targeting of this protein into nuclear foci. These foci also contain BRCA1 and other DNA damage response proteins. In male meiosis, FANCD2 also co-localizes with BRCA1 at synaptonemal complexes. Together, these data suggest that the FA pathway functions primarily as a DNA damage response system, although its exact role (direct involvement in DNA repair versus indirect, facilitating role) has not yet been defined.

  10. Promoting peripheral myelin repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ye; Notterpek, Lucia

    2016-09-01

    Compared to the central nervous system (CNS), peripheral nerves have a remarkable ability to regenerate and remyelinate. This regenerative capacity to a large extent is dependent on and supported by Schwann cells, the myelin-forming glial cells of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). In a variety of paradigms, Schwann cells are critical in the removal of the degenerated tissue, which is followed by remyelination of newly-regenerated axons. This unique plasticity of Schwann cells has been the target of myelin repair strategies in acute injuries and chronic diseases, such as hereditary demyelinating neuropathies. In one approach, the endogenous regenerative capacity of Schwann cells is enhanced through interventions such as exercise, electrical stimulation or pharmacological means. Alternatively, Schwann cells derived from healthy nerves, or engineered from different tissue sources have been transplanted into the PNS to support remyelination. These transplant approaches can then be further enhanced by exercise and/or electrical stimulation, as well as by the inclusion of biomaterial engineered to support glial cell viability and neurite extension. Advances in our basic understanding of peripheral nerve biology, as well as biomaterial engineering, will further improve the functional repair of myelinated peripheral nerves. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mapping of repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, Tadaaki

    1985-01-01

    Chromosome mapping of repair genes involved in U.V. sensitivity is reported. Twenty-three of 25 hybrid cells were resistant to U.V. light. Survival curves of 2 U.V.-resistant cell strains, which possessed mouse chromosomes and human chromosome No.7 - 16, were similar to those of wild strain (L5178Y). On the other hand, survival curves of U.V.-sensitive hybrid cells was analogous to those of Q31. There was a definitive difference in the frequency of inducible chromosome aberrations between U.V. resistant and sensitive mouse-human hybrid cells. U.V.-resistant cell strains possessed the ability of excision repair. Analysis of karyotype in hybrid cells showed that the difference in U.V. sensitivity is dependent upon whether or not human chromosome No.13 is present. Synteny test on esterase D-determining locus confirmed that there is an agreement between the presence of chromosome No.13 and the presence of human esterase D activity. These results led to a conclusion that human genes which compensate recessive character of U.V.-sensitive mutant strain, Q31, with mouse-human hybrid cells are located on the locus of chromosome No.13. (Namekawa, K.)

  12. Multifaceted regulation of V(D)J recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guannan

    V(D)J recombination is responsible for generating an enormous repertoire of immunoglobulins and T cell receptors, therefore it is a centerpiece to the formation of the adaptive immune system. The V(D)J recombination process proceeds through two steps, site-specific cleavage at RSS (Recombination Signal Sequence) site mediated by the RAG recombinase (RAG1/2) and the subsequent imprecise resolution of the DNA ends, which is carried out by the ubiquitous non-homologous end joining pathway (NHEJ). The V(D)J recombination reaction is obliged to be tightly controlled under all circumstances, as it involves generations of DNA double strand breaks, which are considered the most dangerous lesion to a cell. Multifaceted regulatory mechanisms have been evolved to create great diversity of the antigen receptor repertoire while ensuring genome stability. The RAG-mediated cleavage reaction is stringently regulated at both the pre-cleavage stage and the post-cleavage stage. Specifically, RAG1/2 first forms a pre-cleavage complex assembled at the boarder of RSS and coding flank, which ensures the appropriate DNA targeting. Subsequently, this complex initiates site-specific cleavage, generating two types of double stranded DNA breaks, hairpin-ended coding ends (HP-CEs) and blunt signal ends (SEs). After the cleavage, RAG1/2 proteins bind and retain the recombination ends to form post-cleavage complexes (PCC), which collaborates with the NHEJ machinery for appropriate transfer of recombination ends to NHEJ for proper end resolution. However, little is known about the molecular basis of this collaboration, partly attributed to the lack of sensitive assays to reveal the interaction of PCC with HP-CEs. Here, for the first time, by using two complementary fluorescence-based techniques, fluorescence anisotropy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), I managed to monitor the RAG1/2-catalyzed cleavage reaction in real time, from the pre-cleavage to the post-cleavage stages. By

  13. Impaired replication stress response in cells from immunodeficiency patients carrying Cernunnos/XLF mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Schwartz

    Full Text Available Non-Homologous End Joining (NHEJ is one of the two major pathways of DNA Double Strand Breaks (DSBs repair. Mutations in human NHEJ genes can lead to immunodeficiency due to its role in V(DJ recombination in the immune system. In addition, most patients carrying mutations in NHEJ genes display developmental anomalies which are likely the result of a general defect in repair of endogenously induced DSBs such as those arising during normal DNA replication. Cernunnos/XLF is a recently identified NHEJ gene which is mutated in immunodeficiency with microcephaly patients. Here we aimed to investigate whether Cernunnos/XLF mutations disrupt the ability of patient cells to respond to replication stress conditions. Our results demonstrate that Cernunnos/XLF mutated cells and cells downregulated for Cernunnos/XLF have increased sensitivity to conditions which perturb DNA replication. In addition, under replication stress, these cells exhibit impaired DSB repair and increased accumulation of cells in G2/M. Moreover Cernunnos/XLF mutated and down regulated cells display greater chromosomal instability, particularly at fragile sites, under replication stress conditions. These results provide evidence for the role of Cernunnos/XLF in repair of DSBs and maintenance of genomic stability under replication stress conditions. This is the first study of a NHEJ syndrome showing association with impaired cellular response to replication stress conditions. These findings may be related to the clinical features in these patients which are not due to the V(DJ recombination defect. Additionally, in light of the emerging important role of replication stress in the early stages of cancer development, our findings may provide a mechanism for the role of NHEJ in preventing tumorigenesis.

  14. 76 FR 18132 - Interest on Untimely Paid Vessel Repair Duties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    ... related to certain CBP revenue functions. List of Subjects 19 CFR Part 4 Administrative practice and... CFR Parts 4 and 24 [Docket No. USCBP-2008-0085] RIN 1515-AD74 Interest on Untimely Paid Vessel Repair... Federal Regulations (19 CFR) to provide that where an owner or master of a vessel documented under the...

  15. Handbook of adhesive bonded structural repair

    CERN Document Server

    Wegman, Raymond F

    1992-01-01

    Provides repair methods for adhesive bonded and composite structures; identifies suitable materials and equipment for repairs; describes damage evaluation criteria and techniques, and methods of inspection before and after repair.

  16. [Constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongmans, M.C.J.; Gidding, C.E.M.; Loeffen, J.; Wesseling, P.; Mensenkamp, A.; Hoogerbrugge, N.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMR-D) syndrome is characterised by a significantly increased risk for developing cancer in childhood. It arises when both parents have a mutation in the same mismatch repair gene and pass it on to their child. CASE DESCRIPTION: An 8-year-old

  17. Clamp wins pipe repair prize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2001-04-01

    This paper describes the permanent pipeline repair system, developed by Tekmar, which is powered by seawater hydraulics and is easily installed and tested by any workclass remotely operated vehicle (rov). Details are given of the two main components of the system, namely, the diverless high pressure split repair clamp and the rov-operated tool to install it.

  18. Nucleotide excision repair in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, Patrick van

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) is a conserved DNA repair pathway capable of removing a broad spectrum of DNA damage. In human cells a defect in NER leads to the disorder Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model organism to study the mechanism of NER. The

  19. My journey to DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Tomas

    2013-02-01

    I completed my medical studies at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm but have always been devoted to basic research. My longstanding interest is to understand fundamental DNA repair mechanisms in the fields of cancer therapy, inherited human genetic disorders and ancient DNA. I initially measured DNA decay, including rates of base loss and cytosine deamination. I have discovered several important DNA repair proteins and determined their mechanisms of action. The discovery of uracil-DNA glycosylase defined a new category of repair enzymes with each specialized for different types of DNA damage. The base excision repair pathway was first reconstituted with human proteins in my group. Cell-free analysis for mammalian nucleotide excision repair of DNA was also developed in my laboratory. I found multiple distinct DNA ligases in mammalian cells, and led the first genetic and biochemical work on DNA ligases I, III and IV. I discovered the mammalian exonucleases DNase III (TREX1) and IV (FEN1). Interestingly, expression of TREX1 was altered in some human autoimmune diseases. I also showed that the mutagenic DNA adduct O(6)-methylguanine (O(6)mG) is repaired without removing the guanine from DNA, identifying a surprising mechanism by which the methyl group is transferred to a residue in the repair protein itself. A further novel process of DNA repair discovered by my research group is the action of AlkB as an iron-dependent enzyme carrying out oxidative demethylation. Copyright © 2013. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. The journey of DNA repair

    OpenAIRE

    Saini, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    21 years ago, the DNA Repair Enzyme was declared “Molecule of the Year”. Today, we are celebrating another “year of repair”, with the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry being awarded to Aziz Sancar, Tomas Lindahl and Paul Modrich for their collective work on the different DNA repair pathways.

  1. Procedures for maintenance and repairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickel, E.

    1981-01-01

    After a general review of the operation experience in the history of more than 12 operating years, the organization in the plant will be shown with special aspect to quality assurance, capacity of the workshops and connected groups as radiation protection, chemical laboratories etc. The number, time intervals and manpower effort for the repeating tests will be discussed. Reasons and examples for back-fitting activities in the plant are given. Besides special repair and maintenance procedures as repair of the steam generators, in-service inspection of the reactor pressure vessel, repair of a feed-water pipe and repair of the core structure in the pressure vessel, the general system to handle maintenance and repair-work in the KWO-plant will be shown. This includes also the detailed planning of the annual refueling and revision of the plant. (orig./RW)

  2. Galectin-7 is important for normal uterine repair following menstruation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jemma; Yap, Joanne; Gamage, Thillini; Salamonsen, Lois; Dimitriadis, Evdokia; Menkhorst, Ellen

    2014-08-01

    Menstruation involves the shedding of the functional layer of the endometrium in the absence of pregnancy. At sites where tissue shedding is complete, re-epithelialization of the tissue is essential for repair and termination of bleeding. The complement of growth factors that mediate post-menstrual endometrial repair are yet to be completely elucidated. Galectins regulate many cell functions important for post-menstrual repair, such as cell adhesion and migration. Galectin-7 has a well characterized role in re-epithelialization and wound healing. We hypothesized that galectin-7 would be important in re-epithelialization during post-menstrual repair. We aimed to identify endometrial expression of galectin-7 in women undergoing normal endometrial repair and in women with amenorrhoea who do not experience endometrial breakdown and repair, and to determine whether galectin-7 enhances endometrial re-epithelialization in vitro. Galectin-7 immunolocalized to the endometrial luminal and glandular epithelium during the late secretory and menstrual phases, and to decidualized stroma in regions exhibiting tissue breakdown. Immunostaining intensity was significantly reduced in the endometrium of women with amenorrhoea compared with normally cycling woman. ELISA identified galectin-7 in menstrual fluid at significantly elevated levels compared with matched peripheral plasma. Exogenous galectin-7 (2.5 µg/ml) significantly enhanced endometrial epithelial wound repair in vitro; this was abrogated by inhibition of integrin binding. Galectin-7 elevated epithelial expression of extracellular matrix-related molecules likely involved in repair including β-catenin, contactin and TGF-β1. In conclusion, galectin-7 is produced by the premenstrual and menstrual endometrium, where it accumulates in menstrual fluid and likely acts as a paracrine factor to facilitate post-menstrual endometrial re-epithelialization. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  3. Wound repair in Pocillopora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Villalobos, Jenny Carolina; Work, Thierry M.; Calderon-Aguileraa, Luis Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Corals routinely lose tissue due to causes ranging from predation to disease. Tissue healing and regeneration are fundamental to the normal functioning of corals, yet we know little about this process. We described the microscopic morphology of wound repair in Pocillopora damicornis. Tissue was removed by airbrushing fragments from three healthy colonies, and these were monitored daily at the gross and microscopic level for 40 days. Grossly, corals healed by Day 30, but repigmentation was not evident at the end of the study (40 d). On histology, from Day 8 onwards, tissues at the lesion site were microscopically indistinguishable from adjacent normal tissues with evidence of zooxanthellae in gastrodermis. Inflammation was not evident. P. damicornis manifested a unique mode of regeneration involving projections of cell-covered mesoglea from the surface body wall that anastomosed to form gastrovascular canals.

  4. Repairing Nanoparticle Surface Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Emanuele; Kodger, Thomas E; Crisp, Ryan W; Timmerman, Dolf; MacArthur, Katherine E; Heggen, Marc; Schall, Peter

    2017-10-23

    Solar devices based on semiconductor nanoparticles require the use of conductive ligands; however, replacing the native, insulating ligands with conductive metal chalcogenide complexes introduces structural defects within the crystalline nanostructure that act as traps for charge carriers. We utilized atomically thin semiconductor nanoplatelets as a convenient platform for studying, both microscopically and spectroscopically, the development of defects during ligand exchange with the conductive ligands Na 4 SnS 4 and (NH 4 ) 4 Sn 2 S 6 . These defects can be repaired via mild chemical or thermal routes, through the addition of L-type ligands or wet annealing, respectively. This results in a higher-quality, conductive, colloidally stable nanomaterial that may be used as the active film in optoelectronic devices. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  5. Reward optimization of a repairable system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, I.T. [Departamento de Matematicas, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de la Universidad, s/n. 10071 Caceres (Spain)]. E-mail: inmatorres@unex.es; Perez-Ocon, R. [Departamento de Estadistica e Investigacion Operativa, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, Avenida de Severo Ochoa, s/n. 18071 Granada (Spain)]. E-mail: rperezo@ugr.es

    2006-03-15

    This paper analyzes a system subject to repairable and non-repairable failures. Non-repairable failures lead to replacement of the system. Repairable failures, first lead to repair but they lead to replacement after a fixed number of repairs. Operating and repair times follow phase type distributions (PH-distributions) and the pattern of the operating times is modelled by a geometric process. In this context, the problem is to find the optimal number of repairs, which maximizes the long-run average reward per unit time. To this end, the optimal number is determined and it is obtained by efficient numerical procedures.

  6. Reward optimization of a repairable system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, I.T.; Perez-Ocon, R.

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyzes a system subject to repairable and non-repairable failures. Non-repairable failures lead to replacement of the system. Repairable failures, first lead to repair but they lead to replacement after a fixed number of repairs. Operating and repair times follow phase type distributions (PH-distributions) and the pattern of the operating times is modelled by a geometric process. In this context, the problem is to find the optimal number of repairs, which maximizes the long-run average reward per unit time. To this end, the optimal number is determined and it is obtained by efficient numerical procedures

  7. Tissue repair capacity and repair kinetics deduced from multifractionated or continuous irradiation regimens with incomplete repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thames, H.D. Jr.; Peters, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    A model is proposed for cell survival after multiple doses, when the interfraction interval is insufficient for complete Elkind repair. In the limit of ever-increasing number of ever-smaller fractional doses, the model transforms into the accumulation model of survival after continuous irradiation. When adapted to describe tissue responses to isoeffective multifractionated regimens, wherein repair is incomplete, a generalization of the usually linear plot of reciprocal total dose versus dose per fraction is obtained, in which downward curvature is evident. There is an advantage in studying tissue responses to multifractionated regimens with incomplete repair in the interfraction intervals, or continuous exposures at various dose rates since, in addition to determination of repair capacity, there is an estimate of repair kinetics. Results of analyses of previously published data are presented as illustration. Estimated from the response of three acutely responding normal tissues in the mouse (jejunum, colon and bone marrow), repair halftimes ranged from 0.3-0.9 h and values of β/delta were approximately 0.1 Gy -1 . From the response of mouse lung (LD50 for pneumonitis) to multifractionated regimens with incomplete repair, the repair halftime was estimated at 1.5 h and β/delta was 0.27 Gy -1 . In the rat spinal cord β/delta was 0.7 Gy -1 and Tsub(1/2) was 1.5 h. (U.K.)

  8. Residual stress by repair welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Masahito; Toyoda, Masao

    2003-01-01

    Residual stress by repair welds is computed using the thermal elastic-plastic analysis with phase-transformation effect. Coupling phenomena of temperature, microstructure, and stress-strain fields are simulated in the finite-element analysis. Weld bond of a plate butt-welded joint is gouged and then deposited by weld metal in repair process. Heat source is synchronously moved with the deposition of the finite-element as the weld deposition. Microstructure is considered by using CCT diagram and the transformation behavior in the repair weld is also simulated. The effects of initial stress, heat input, and weld length on residual stress distribution are studied from the organic results of numerical analysis. Initial residual stress before repair weld has no influence on the residual stress after repair treatment near weld metal, because the initial stress near weld metal releases due to high temperature of repair weld and then stress by repair weld regenerates. Heat input has an effect for residual stress distribution, for not its magnitude but distribution zone. Weld length should be considered reducing the magnitude of residual stress in the edge of weld bead; short bead induces high tensile residual stress. (author)

  9. Welding in repair of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilous, V.; Kovarik, R.

    1987-01-01

    Specific welding conditions are described in repair of the pressure vessels of nuclear reactors in operation and the effect is pointed out to of neutrons on changes in steel properties. Some of the special regulations are discussed to be observed in welding jobs. The welding methods are briefly described; the half-bead method is most frequently used. It is stressed that the defect must first be identified using a nondestructive method and the stages must be defined of the welding repair of the pressure vessel. (J.B.). 4 figs., 1 tab., 16 refs

  10. Monogenic diseases of DNA repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keijzers, Guido; Bakula, Daniela; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Maintaining the stability of the genome is essential for all organisms, and it is not surprising that damage to DNA has been proposed as an explanation for multiple chronic diseases.1-5 Conserving a pristine genome is therefore of central importance to our health. To overcome the genotoxic stress...... of a growing number of human diseases. Notably, many of these monogenic DNA-repair disorders display features of accelerated aging, supporting the notion that genome maintenance is a key factor for organismal longevity. This review focuses on the physiological consequences of loss of DNA repair, particularly...... in the context of monogenic DNA-repair diseases....

  11. Repairing and Upgrading Your PC

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Repairing and Upgrading Your PC delivers start-to-finish instructions, simple enough for even the most inexperienced PC owner, for troubleshooting, repairing, and upgrading your computer. Written by hardware experts Robert Bruce Thompson and Barbara Fritchman Thompson, this book covers it all: how to troubleshoot a troublesome PC, how to identify which components make sense for an upgrade, and how to tear it all down and put it back together. This book shows how to repair and upgrade all of your PC's essential components.

  12. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.” (a... killing or growth inhibition of repair deficient bacteria in a set of repair proficient and deficient...

  13. Up-regulation of mismatch repair genes MSH6, PMS2 and MLH1 parallels development of genetic instability and is linked to tumor aggressiveness and early PSA recurrence in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczak, Waldemar; Rashed, Semin; Hube-Magg, Claudia; Kluth, Martina; Simon, Ronald; Büscheck, Franziska; Clauditz, Till Sebastian; Grupp, Katharina; Minner, Sarah; Tsourlakis, Maria Christina; Möller-Koop, Christina; Graefen, Markus; Adam, Meike; Haese, Alexander; Wittmer, Corinna; Sauter, Guido; Izbicki, Jakob Robert; Huland, Hartwig; Schlomm, Thorsten; Steurer, Stefan; Krech, Till; Lebok, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is integral to the maintenance of genetic stability. We aimed to evaluate the clinical impact of MMR gene expression in prostate cancer. The MMR genes MSH6, MLH1 and PMS2 were analyzed by immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray containing 11152 prostate cancer specimens. Results were compared with ETS-related gene status and deletions of PTEN, 3p13, 5q21 and 6q15. MSH6, MLH1 and PMS2 expression was detectable in 89.5%, 85.4% and 85.0% of cancers and was particularly strong in cancers with advanced pathological tumor stage (P < 0.0001 each), high Gleason grade (P < 0.0001 each), nodal metastasis (P ≤ 0.0083) and early biochemical recurrence (P < 0.0001). High levels of MMR gene expression paralleled features of genetic instability, such as the number of genomic deletions per cancer; strong expression of all three MMR genes was found in 24%, 29%, 30%, 33% and 42% of cancers with no, one, two, three or four to five deletions (P < 0.0001). The prognostic value of the analyzed MMR genes was largely driven by the subset of cancers lacking ERG fusion (P < 0.0001), while the prognostic impact of MMR gene overexpression was only marginal in ERG-positive cancers. Multivariate analyses suggested an independent prognostic relevance of MMR genes in ERG-negative prostate cancers when compared with prognostic parameters available at the time of initial biopsy. In conclusion, MMR overexpression is common in prostate cancer and is linked to poor outcome as well as features indicating genetic instability. ERG fusion should be analyzed along with MMR gene expression in potential clinical tests. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Innovative repair of subsidence damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, G.G.

    1992-01-01

    In order to improve handling of subsidence damages the Illinois Mine Subsidence Insurance Fund supported the development of novel cost-effective methods of repair. The research in developing the repairs was directed towards the most common and costly damages that had been observed. As a result repair techniques were designed for structurally cracked foundations in the tension zone; structurally cracked foundations in the compression zone; and damaged or undamaged tilted foundations. When appropriate the postulated methods would result in: 1. significant cost savings (over conventional procedures); 2. a structural capacity greater than when the foundation was uncracked; and 3. an aesthetic appeal. All the postulated repair methodologies were laboratory and/or field tested. This paper will summarize the essentials of each technique developed and the test results

  15. Umbilical hernia repair - series (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatment. The indications for umbilical hernia repair include: incarcerated (strangulated) umbilical hernia defects not spontaneously closed by 4 to 5 years of age children under 2 with very large defects unacceptable to ...

  16. Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Richard D.

    2003-01-24

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Mammalian DNA Repair was held at Harbortown Resort, Ventura Beach, CA. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  17. Canadian company innovates dam repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    Successful repair without any downtime, of the Sabana Yegua power and irrigation structure in the western Dominican Republic by Aquatic Sciences Ltd., a St. Catherine, Ontario-based underwater specialist company, is discussed. The structure was damaged by Hurricane George last when when rising water levels damaged a major valve in the control gate chamber. The repair strategy designed by Aquatic Sciences used a remotely operated vehicle with a mechanical arm for minor tasks which placed a specially-made plug into the inlet pipe. The work was completed in one week, saving the utility company a great deal of money by making it possible to make the repairs remotely in the gate chamber without having to drain the tunnel, as would have been necessary had the repair been completed manually. The remotely operated vehicles use a scanning sonar as well as light to find their way. They are particularly well adapted to work underwater under low-visibility conditions

  18. Betonreparationers holdbarhed (Durability of Concrete Repairs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brimnes, Eydbjørn; Dali, Bogi í; Larsen, Erik Stoklund

    1999-01-01

    Concrete repairs on 11 pillars on bridges built in the sixties and repaired 8 to 9 years ago have been examined. Especially the chloride penetration in the repair concrete have been measured. Chloride penetration in the repair concrete is much lower than in the original concrete....

  19. 40 CFR 63.1005 - Leak repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Leak repair. 63.1005 Section 63.1005... Standards for Equipment Leaks-Control Level 1 § 63.1005 Leak repair. (a) Leak repair schedule. The owner or operator shall repair each leak detected no later than 15 calendar days after it is detected, except as...

  20. 40 CFR 63.1024 - Leak repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Leak repair. 63.1024 Section 63.1024... Standards for Equipment Leaks-Control Level 2 Standards § 63.1024 Leak repair. (a) Leak repair schedule. The owner or operator shall repair each leak detected as soon as practical, but not later than 15 calendar...

  1. 40 CFR 65.105 - Leak repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Leak repair. 65.105 Section 65.105... FEDERAL AIR RULE Equipment Leaks § 65.105 Leak repair. (a) Leak repair schedule. The owner or operator shall repair each leak detected as soon as practical but not later than 15 calendar days after it is...

  2. Laparoscopic Repair of Inguinal Hernias

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, Jonathan; Duh, Quan-Yang

    2011-01-01

    For patients with recurrent inguinal hernia, or bilateral inguinal hernia, or for women, laparoscopic repair offers significant advantages over open techniques with regard to recurrence risk, pain, and recovery. For unilateral first-time hernias, either laparoscopic or open repair with mesh can offer excellent results. The major drawback of laparoscopy is that the technique requires a significant number of cases to master. For surgeons in group practice, it makes sense to have one surgeon in ...

  3. Repair Types, Procedures - Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Affordable Combat Aircraft, AGARD - CP -600, 1997. [17] Helbling J, Grover R and Ratwani M. M “Analysis and Structural Test of Composite Reinforcement to...considered suitable for the composite patch repair of aluminum structure. Ductile adhesives such as FM- 73 are preferred over brittle adhesives Repair Types...zone. A proper cure cycle is followed as prescribed by the adhesive manufacturer. For FM- 73 adhesive cure at 2500F (1210C) for 120 minutes is

  4. Laparoscopic repair of postoperative perineal hernia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Perineal hernias are infrequent complications following abdominoperineal operations. Various approaches have been described for repair of perineal hernias including open transabdominal, transperineal or combined abdominoperineal repairs. The use of laparoscopic transabdominal repair of perineal hernias is not well-described. We present a case report demonstrating the benefits of laparoscopic repair of perineal hernia following previous laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection (APR) using a nonabsorbable mesh to repair the defect. We have demonstrated that the use of laparoscopy with repair of the pelvic floor defect using a non absorbable synthetic mesh offers an excellent alternative with many potential advantages over open transabdominal and transperineal repairs.

  5. Overlapping sphincteroplasty and posterior repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Andrea K; Myers, Erinn M; Lippmann, Quinn K; Matthews, Catherine A

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of how to anatomically reconstruct extensive posterior-compartment defects is variable among gynecologists. The objective of this video is to demonstrate an effective technique of overlapping sphincteroplasty and posterior repair. In this video, a scripted storyboard was constructed that outlines the key surgical steps of a comprehensive posterior compartment repair: (1) surgical incision that permits access to posterior compartment and perineal body, (2) dissection of the rectovaginal space up to the level of the cervix, (3) plication of the rectovaginal muscularis, (4) repair of internal and external anal sphincters, and (5) reconstruction of the perineal body. Using a combination of graphic illustrations and live video footage, tips on repair are highlighted. The goals at the end of repair are to: (1) have improved vaginal caliber, (2) increase rectal tone along the entire posterior vaginal wall, (3) have the posterior vaginal wall at a perpendicular plane to the perineal body, (4) reform the hymenal ring, and (5) not have an overly elongated perineal body. This video provides a step-by-step guide on how to perform an overlapping sphincteroplasty and posterior repair.

  6. Scarf Repair of Composite Laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Zonghong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of composite materials, such as carbon-fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP composites, aero-structures has led to an increased need of advanced assembly joining and repair technologies. Adhesive bonded repairs as an alternative to recover full or part of initial strength were investigated. Tests were conducted with the objective of evaluating the effectiveness of techniques used for repairing damage fiber reinforced laminated composites. Failure loads and failure modes were generated and compared with the following parameters: scarf angles, roughness of grind tool and number of external plies. Results showed that scarf angle was the critical parameter and the largest tensile strength was observed with the smallest scarf angle. Besides, the use of external plies at the outer surface could not increase the repairs efficiency for large scarf angle. Preparing the repair surfaces by sanding them with a sander ranging from 60 to 100 grit number had significant effect on the failure load. These results allowed the proposal of design principles for repairing CFRP structures.

  7. Aging and DNA repair capability. [Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tice, R R

    1977-01-01

    A review of the literature on DNA repair processes in relation to aging is presented under the following headings: DNA repair processes; age-related occurrence of unrepaired DNA lesions; DNA repair capability as a function of age; tissue-specific DNA repair capability; acceleration of the aging process by exposure to DNA damaging agents; human genetic syndromes; and longevity and DNA repair processes. (HLW)

  8. The current state of eukaryotic DNA base damage and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Nicholas C; Corbett, Anita H; Doetsch, Paul W

    2015-12-02

    DNA damage is a natural hazard of life. The most common DNA lesions are base, sugar, and single-strand break damage resulting from oxidation, alkylation, deamination, and spontaneous hydrolysis. If left unrepaired, such lesions can become fixed in the genome as permanent mutations. Thus, evolution has led to the creation of several highly conserved, partially redundant pathways to repair or mitigate the effects of DNA base damage. The biochemical mechanisms of these pathways have been well characterized and the impact of this work was recently highlighted by the selection of Tomas Lindahl, Aziz Sancar and Paul Modrich as the recipients of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their seminal work in defining DNA repair pathways. However, how these repair pathways are regulated and interconnected is still being elucidated. This review focuses on the classical base excision repair and strand incision pathways in eukaryotes, considering both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and humans, and extends to some important questions and challenges facing the field of DNA base damage repair. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Differential effect of ionizing radiation on transcription in repair-deficient and repair-proficient mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, G.P.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments were designed to examine in vivo changes in total transcription and in the expression of the c-fos gene following whole-body exposure of mice to JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons. Radiation repair-deficient (wst/wst) and -proficient (wst/., C57BL/6 x C3H F1) mice were exposed to JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons calibrated to deliver a gut dose of 50 cGy. Animals were sacrificed less than 10 or at 60 min postirradiation, and gut tissues were removed for study. Our results revealed that, in repair-proficient mice, an immediate depression (relative to untreated control) in total transcription was evident that continued through 1 h postirradiation. Conversely, radiation-sensitive wst/wst mice displayed doubled transcription levels postirradiation. Expression of c-fos was consistently depressed following radiation exposure in control and wst/wst mice. However, the depression of c-fos mRNA was delayed in wst/wst mice relative to controls. These results demonstrate abnormal regulation of transcription and of c-fos mRNA accumulation in repair-deficient wasted mice following exposure to ionizing radiation. In addition, this work documents rapid total transcriptional depression in normal mice following radiation exposure

  10. Development of antibiotic resistance and up-regulation of the antimutator gene pfpI in mutator Pseudomonas aeruginosa due to inactivation of two DNA oxidative repair genes (mutY, mutM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandsberg, Lotte Frigaard; Macia, Maria D.; Bergmann, Kirsten R.

    2011-01-01

    showed only a fivefold increase, whereas the single mutant PAOMMgm (mutM) showed a nonsignificant increase in MR compared with PAO1 and the single mutants. Mutations in the regulator nfxB leading to hyperexpression of MexCD-OprJ efflux pump were found as the mechanism of resistance to ciprofloxacin....... In this study, we constructed a double mutant in mutY and mutM (PAOMY-Mgm) and characterized the phenotype and the gene expression profile using microarray and RT-PCR. PAOMY-Mgm presented 28-fold increases in MR compared with wild-type reference strain PAO1. In comparison, the PAOMYgm (mutY) single mutant...... in the double mutant. A better fitness of the mutator compared with PAO1 was found in growth competition experiments in the presence of ciprofloxacin at concentrations just below minimal inhibitory concentration. Up-regulation of the antimutator gene pfpI, that has been shown to provide protection to oxidative...

  11. Recombinational DNA repair and human disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Larry H.; Schild, David

    2002-11-30

    We review the genes and proteins related to the homologous recombinational repair (HRR) pathway that are implicated in cancer through either genetic disorders that predispose to cancer through chromosome instability or the occurrence of somatic mutations that contribute to carcinogenesis. Ataxia telangiectasia (AT), Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS), and an ataxia-like disorder (ATLD), are chromosome instability disorders that are defective in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), NBS, and Mre11 genes, respectively. These genes are critical in maintaining cellular resistance to ionizing radiation (IR), which kills largely by the production of double-strand breaks (DSBs). Bloom syndrome involves a defect in the BLM helicase, which seems to play a role in restarting DNA replication forks that are blocked at lesions, thereby promoting chromosome stability. The Werner syndrome gene (WRN) helicase, another member of the RecQ family like BLM, has very recently been found to help mediate homologous recombination. Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically complex chromosomal instability disorder involving seven or more genes, one of which is BRCA2. FA may be at least partially caused by the aberrant production of reactive oxidative species. The breast cancer-associated BRCA1 and BRCA2 proteins are strongly implicated in HRR; BRCA2 associates with Rad51 and appears to regulate its activity. We discuss in detail the phenotypes of the various mutant cell lines and the signaling pathways mediated by the ATM kinase. ATM's phosphorylation targets can be grouped into oxidative stress-mediated transcriptional changes, cell cycle checkpoints, and recombinational repair. We present the DNA damage response pathways by using the DSB as the prototype lesion, whose incorrect repair can initiate and augment karyotypic abnormalities.

  12. Recombinational DNA repair and human disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Larry H.; Schild, David

    2002-01-01

    We review the genes and proteins related to the homologous recombinational repair (HRR) pathway that are implicated in cancer through either genetic disorders that predispose to cancer through chromosome instability or the occurrence of somatic mutations that contribute to carcinogenesis. Ataxia telangiectasia (AT), Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS), and an ataxia-like disorder (ATLD), are chromosome instability disorders that are defective in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), NBS, and Mre11 genes, respectively. These genes are critical in maintaining cellular resistance to ionizing radiation (IR), which kills largely by the production of double-strand breaks (DSBs). Bloom syndrome involves a defect in the BLM helicase, which seems to play a role in restarting DNA replication forks that are blocked at lesions, thereby promoting chromosome stability. The Werner syndrome gene (WRN) helicase, another member of the RecQ family like BLM, has very recently been found to help mediate homologous recombination. Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically complex chromosomal instability disorder involving seven or more genes, one of which is BRCA2. FA may be at least partially caused by the aberrant production of reactive oxidative species. The breast cancer-associated BRCA1 and BRCA2 proteins are strongly implicated in HRR; BRCA2 associates with Rad51 and appears to regulate its activity. We discuss in detail the phenotypes of the various mutant cell lines and the signaling pathways mediated by the ATM kinase. ATM's phosphorylation targets can be grouped into oxidative stress-mediated transcriptional changes, cell cycle checkpoints, and recombinational repair. We present the DNA damage response pathways by using the DSB as the prototype lesion, whose incorrect repair can initiate and augment karyotypic abnormalities

  13. Hsp90: A New Player in DNA Repair?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Pennisi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 is an evolutionary conserved molecular chaperone that, together with Hsp70 and co-chaperones makes up the Hsp90 chaperone machinery, stabilizing and activating more than 200 proteins, involved in protein homeostasis (i.e., proteostasis, transcriptional regulation, chromatin remodeling, and DNA repair. Cells respond to DNA damage by activating complex DNA damage response (DDR pathways that include: (i cell cycle arrest; (ii transcriptional and post-translational activation of a subset of genes, including those associated with DNA repair; and (iii triggering of programmed cell death. The efficacy of the DDR pathways is influenced by the nuclear levels of DNA repair proteins, which are regulated by balancing between protein synthesis and degradation as well as by nuclear import and export. The inability to respond properly to either DNA damage or to DNA repair leads to genetic instability, which in turn may enhance the rate of cancer development. Multiple components of the DNA double strand breaks repair machinery, including BRCA1, BRCA2, CHK1, DNA-PKcs, FANCA, and the MRE11/RAD50/NBN complex, have been described to be client proteins of Hsp90, which acts as a regulator of the diverse DDR pathways. Inhibition of Hsp90 actions leads to the altered localization and stabilization of DDR proteins after DNA damage and may represent a cell-specific and tumor-selective radiosensibilizer. Here, the role of Hsp90-dependent molecular mechanisms involved in cancer onset and in the maintenance of the genome integrity is discussed and highlighted.

  14. 49 CFR 1242.42 - Administration, repair and maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired property, fringe benefits, other casualties and insurance, lease rentals, joint facility rents, other rents, depreciation, joint facility, repairs billed to others... maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired property, fringe benefits, other...

  15. Identification of ‘safe harbor’ loci in indica rice genome by harnessing the property of zinc-finger nucleases to induce DNA damage and repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eCantos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs have proved to be successful tools for targeted genome manipulation in several organisms. Their main property is the induction of double-strand breaks (DSBs at specific sites, which are further repaired through homologous recombination (HR or non-homologous end joining (NHEJ. However, for the appropriate integration of genes at specific chromosomal locations, proper sites for gene integration need to be identified. These regions, hereby named safe harbor loci, must be localized in non-coding regions and possess high gene expression. In the present study, three different ZFN constructs (pZFN1, pZFN2, pZFN3, harboring β-glucuronidase (GUS as a reporter gene, were used to identify safe harbor loci regions on rice chromosomes. The constructs were delivered into IR64 rice by using an improved Agrobacterium-mediated transformation protocol, based on the use of immature embryos. Gene expression was measured by histochemical GUS activity and the flanking regions were determined through thermal-asymmetric interlaced polymerase chain reaction (TAIL PCR. Following sequencing, 28 regions were identified as putative sites for safe integration, but only one was localized in a non-coding region and it also possessed high GUS expression. These findings have significant applicability to create crops with new and valuable traits, since the site can be subsequently used to stably introduce one or more genes in a targeted manner.

  16. Repair and cell cycle response in cells exposed to environmental biohazards. Progress report, February 1, 1976--May 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billen, D.

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: DNA polymerase III dependent repair of x-ray damage in Escherichia coli; regulation of reinsertation of nucleotides by DNA ligase; DNA synthesis in permeabilized CHO cells; measurement of damage to DNA in Bacillus subtilis; repair defect in rec A cells; inactivation of transforming DNA; and mutagenesis of transforming DNA

  17. The Nucleolus: In Genome Maintenance and Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsekrekou, Maria; Stratigi, Kalliopi; Chatzinikolaou, Georgia

    2017-07-01

    The nucleolus is the subnuclear membrane-less organelle where rRNA is transcribed and processed and ribosomal assembly occurs. During the last 20 years, however, the nucleolus has emerged as a multifunctional organelle, regulating processes that go well beyond its traditional role. Moreover, the unique organization of rDNA in tandem arrays and its unusually high transcription rates make it prone to unscheduled DNA recombination events and frequent RNA:DNA hybrids leading to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). If not properly repaired, rDNA damage may contribute to premature disease onset and aging. Deregulation of ribosomal synthesis at any level from transcription and processing to ribosomal subunit assembly elicits a stress response and is also associated with disease onset. Here, we discuss how genome integrity is maintained within nucleoli and how such structures are functionally linked to nuclear DNA damage response and repair giving an emphasis on the newly emerging roles of the nucleolus in mammalian physiology and disease.

  18. Writers, Readers, and Erasers of Histone Ubiquitylation in DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smeenk, Godelieve; Mailand, Niels

    2016-01-01

    accurate lesion repair and restoration of genome integrity. In vertebrate cells, ubiquitin-dependent modifications of histones adjacent to DSBs by RNF8, RNF168, and other ubiquitin ligases have a key role in promoting the assembly of repair protein complexes, serving as direct recruitment platforms...... for a range of genome caretaker proteins and their associated factors. These DNA damage-induced chromatin ubiquitylation marks provide an essential component of a histone code for DSB repair that is controlled by multifaceted regulatory circuits, underscoring its importance for genome stability maintenance....... In this review, we provide a comprehensive account of how DSB-induced histone ubiquitylation is sensed, decoded and modulated by an elaborate array of repair factors and regulators. We discuss how these mechanisms impact DSB repair pathway choice and functionality for optimal protection of genome integrity...

  19. Imaging of cartilage repair procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanghvi, Darshana; Munshi, Mihir; Pardiwala, Dinshaw

    2014-01-01

    The rationale for cartilage repair is to prevent precocious osteoarthritis in untreated focal cartilage injuries in the young and middle-aged population. The gamut of surgical techniques, normal postoperative radiological appearances, and possible complications have been described. An objective method of recording the quality of repair tissue is with the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score. This scoring system evaluates nine parameters that include the extent of defect filling, border zone integration, signal intensity, quality of structure and surface, subchondral bone, subchondral lamina, and records presence or absence of synovitis and adhesions. The five common techniques of cartilage repair currently offered include bone marrow stimulation (microfracture or drilling), mosaicplasty, synthetic resorbable scaffold grafts, osteochondral allograft transplants, and autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). Complications of cartilage repair procedures that may be demonstrated on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) include plug loosening, graft protuberance, graft depression, and collapse in mosaicplasty, graft hypertrophy in ACI, and immune response leading to graft rejection, which is more common with synthetic grafts and cadaveric allografts

  20. Reprogramming Cells for Brain Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randall D. McKinnon

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available At present there are no clinical therapies that can repair traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury or degenerative brain disease. While redundancy and rewiring of surviving circuits can recover some lost function, the brain and spinal column lack sufficient endogenous stem cells to replace lost neurons or their supporting glia. In contrast, pre-clinical studies have demonstrated that exogenous transplants can have remarkable efficacy for brain repair in animal models. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs can provide paracrine factors that repair damage caused by ischemic injury, and oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC grafts give dramatic functional recovery from spinal cord injury. These studies have progressed to clinical trials, including human embryonic stem cell (hESC-derived OPCs for spinal cord repair. However, ESC-derived allografts are less than optimal, and we need to identify a more appropriate donor graft population. The cell reprogramming field has developed the ability to trans-differentiate somatic cells into distinct cell types, a technology that has the potential to generate autologous neurons and glia which address the histocompatibility concerns of allografts and the tumorigenicity concerns of ESC-derived grafts. Further clarifying how cell reprogramming works may lead to more efficient direct reprogram approaches, and possibly in vivo reprogramming, in order to promote brain and spinal cord repair.

  1. DNA repair in PHA stimulated human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catena, C.; Mattoni, A.

    1984-01-01

    Damage an repair of radiation induced DNA strand breaks were measured by alkaline lysis and hydroxyapatite chromatography. PHA stimulated human lymphocytes show that the rejoining process is complete within the first 50 min., afterwords secondary DNA damage and chromatid aberration. DNA repair, in synchronized culture, allows to evaluate individual repair capacity and this in turn can contribute to the discovery of individual who, although they do not demonstrate apparent clinical signs, are carriers of DNA repair deficiency. Being evident that a correlation exists between DNA repair capacity and carcinogenesis, the possibility of evaluating the existent relationship between DNA repair and survival in tumor cells comes therefore into discussion

  2. Role of DNA repair in repair of cytogenetic damages. Contribution of repair of single-strand DNA breaks to cytogenetic damages repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozanova, O.M.; Zaichkina, S.I.; Aptikaev, G.F.; Ganassi, E.Eh.

    1989-01-01

    The comparison was made between the results of the effect of poly(ADP-ribosylation) ingibitors (e.g. nicotinamide and 3-aminobenzamide) and a chromatin proteinase ingibitor, phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride, on the cytogenetic damages repair, by a micronuclear test, and DNA repair in Chinese hamster fibroblasts. The values of the repair half-periods (5-7 min for the cytogenetic damages and 5 min for the rapidly repaired DNA damages) and a similar modyfying effect with regard to radiation cytogenetic damages and kynetics of DNA damages repair were found to be close. This confirms the contribution of repair of DNA single-strand breaks in the initiation of structural damages to chromosomes

  3. Incore inspection and repairing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Arata; Kimura, Motohiko

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a device for inspecting and repairing the inside of a reactor container even if it is narrow, with no trouble by using a swimming-type operation robot. Namely, the device of the present invention conducts inspection and repairing operations for the inside of the reactor by introducing a swimming type operation robot into the reactor container. The swimming-type operation robot comprises a robot main body having a propeller, a balancer operably disposed to the robot main body and an inspection and repairing unit attached detachable to the balancer. In the device of the present invention, since the inspection and preparing unit is attached detachably to the swimming robot, a robot which transports tools is formed as a standard product. As a result, the production cost can be reduced, and the reliability of products can be improved. Appropriate operations can be conducted by using best tools. (I.S.)

  4. Mitochondrial DNA repair and aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandavilli, Bhaskar S.; Santos, Janine H.; Van Houten, Bennett

    2002-01-01

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain plays an important role in energy production in aerobic organisms and is also a significant source of reactive oxygen species that damage DNA, RNA and proteins in the cell. Oxidative damage to the mitochondrial DNA is implicated in various degenerative diseases, cancer and aging. The importance of mitochondrial ROS in age-related degenerative diseases is further strengthened by studies using animal models, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila and yeast. Research in the last several years shows that mitochondrial DNA is more susceptible to various carcinogens and ROS when compared to nuclear DNA. DNA damage in mammalian mitochondria is repaired by base excision repair (BER). Studies have shown that mitochondria contain all the enzymes required for BER. Mitochondrial DNA damage, if not repaired, leads to disruption of electron transport chain and production of more ROS. This vicious cycle of ROS production and mtDNA damage ultimately leads to energy depletion in the cell and apoptosis

  5. Mitochondrial DNA repair and aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandavilli, Bhaskar S.; Santos, Janine H.; Van Houten, Bennett

    2002-11-30

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain plays an important role in energy production in aerobic organisms and is also a significant source of reactive oxygen species that damage DNA, RNA and proteins in the cell. Oxidative damage to the mitochondrial DNA is implicated in various degenerative diseases, cancer and aging. The importance of mitochondrial ROS in age-related degenerative diseases is further strengthened by studies using animal models, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila and yeast. Research in the last several years shows that mitochondrial DNA is more susceptible to various carcinogens and ROS when compared to nuclear DNA. DNA damage in mammalian mitochondria is repaired by base excision repair (BER). Studies have shown that mitochondria contain all the enzymes required for BER. Mitochondrial DNA damage, if not repaired, leads to disruption of electron transport chain and production of more ROS. This vicious cycle of ROS production and mtDNA damage ultimately leads to energy depletion in the cell and apoptosis.

  6. The Seed Repair Response during Germination: Disclosing Correlations between DNA Repair, Antioxidant Response, and Chromatin Remodeling in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pagano

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This work provides novel insights into the effects caused by the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA during Medicago truncatula seed germination, with emphasis on the seed repair response. Seeds treated with H2O and TSA (10 and 20 μM were collected during imbibition (8 h and at the radicle protrusion phase. Biometric data showed delayed germination and impaired seedling growth in TSA-treated samples. Comet assay, performed on radicles at the protrusion phase and 4-days old M. truncatula seedlings, revealed accumulation of DNA strand breaks upon exposure to TSA. Activation of DNA repair toward TSA-mediated genotoxic damage was evidenced by the up-regulation of MtOGG1(8-OXOGUANINE GLYCOSYLASE/LYASE gene involved in the removal of oxidative DNA lesions, MtLIGIV(LIGASE IV gene, a key determinant of seed quality, required for the rejoining of DNA double strand breaks and TDP(TYROSYL-DNA PHOSPHODIESTERASE genes encoding the multipurpose DNA repair enzymes tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterases. Since radical scavenging can prevent DNA damage, the specific antioxidant activity (SAA was measured by DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and Folin-Ciocalteu reagent assays. Fluctuations of SAA were observed in TSA-treated seeds/seedlings concomitant with the up-regulation of antioxidant genes MtSOD(SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE, MtAPX(ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE and MtMT2(TYPE 2 METALLOTHIONEIN. Chromatin remodeling, required to facilitate the access of DNA repair enzymes at the damaged sites, is also part of the multifaceted seed repair response. To address this aspect, still poorly explored in plants, the MtTRRAP(TRANSFORMATION/TRANSACTIVATION DOMAIN-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN gene was analyzed. TRRAP is a transcriptional adaptor, so far characterized only in human cells where it is needed for the recruitment of histone acetyltransferase complexes to chromatin during DNA repair. The MtTRRAP gene and the predicted interacting partners MtHAM2 (HISTONE ACETYLTRANSFERASE OF

  7. 48 CFR 1352.271-71 - Method of payment and invoicing instructions for ship repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Method of payment and invoicing instructions for ship repair. 1352.271-71 Section 1352.271-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 1352.271-71 Method of...

  8. Beyond DNA repair: DNA-PK function in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Goodwin, Jonathan F.; Knudsen, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a pivotal component of the DNA repair machinery that governs the response to DNA damage, serving to maintain genome integrity. However, the DNA-PK kinase component was initially isolated with transcriptional complexes, and recent findings have illuminated the impact of DNA-PK-mediated transcriptional regulation on tumor progression and therapeutic response. DNA-PK expression has also been correlated with poor outcome in selected tumor types, furthe...

  9. Primary unilateral cleft lip repair

    OpenAIRE

    Adenwalla, H. S.; Narayanan, P. V.

    2009-01-01

    The unilateral cleft lip is a complex deformity. Surgical correction has evolved from a straight repair through triangular and quadrilateral repairs to the Rotation Advancement Technique of Millard. The latter is the technique followed at our centre for all unilateral cleft lip patients. We operate on these at five to six months of age, do not use pre-surgical orthodontics, and follow a protocol to produce a notch-free vermillion. This is easy to follow even for trainees. We also perform clos...

  10. Can We Fix This? Parent-Child Repair Processes and Preschoolers' Regulatory Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Christine J; Lunkenheimer, Erika; Albrecht, Erin C; Chen, Deborah

    2016-10-01

    The repair of difficult parent-child interactions is a marker of healthy functioning in infancy, but less is known about repair processes during early childhood. We used dynamic systems methods to investigate dyadic repair in mothers and their 3-year-old children ( N = 96) and its prediction of children's emotion regulation and behavior problems at a four-month follow-up. Mothers and children completed free play and challenging puzzle tasks. Repair was operationalized as the conditional probability of moving into a dyadic adaptive behavior region after individual or dyadic maladaptive behavior (e.g., child noncompliance, parental criticism). Overall, dyads repaired approximately half their maladaptive behaviors. A greater likelihood of repair during the puzzle task predicted better child emotion regulation and fewer behavior problems in preschool. Results suggest dyadic repair is an important process in early childhood and provide further evidence for the connection between parent-child coregulation and children's developing regulatory capacities. Implications for family-based interventions are discussed.

  11. Outreach Materials for the Collision Repair Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Collision Repair Campaign offers outreach materials to help collision repair shops reduce toxic air exposure. Materials include a DVD, poster, training video, and materials in Spanish (materiales del outreach en español).

  12. Intern's Experiences with Episiotomy and its Repair

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    repair is inadequately done, it may leave the woman suffering from perineal pain and other long term conditions with serious impact on the .... The maternity section had an average of ... with the job of performing episiotomy repair necessitating.

  13. Nucleotide excision repair in the test tube.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe eukaryotic nucleotide excision-repair pathway has been reconstituted in vitro, an achievement that should hasten the full enzymological characterization of this highly complex DNA-repair pathway.

  14. Regression Models for Repairable Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 4 (2015), s. 963-972 ISSN 1387-5841 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Reliability analysis * Repair models * Regression Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 0.782, year: 2015 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2015/SI/novak-0450902.pdf

  15. Microwave Oven Repair. Teacher Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smreker, Eugene

    This competency-based curriculum guide for teachers addresses the skills a technician will need to service microwave ovens and to provide customer relations to help retain the customer's confidence in the product and trust in the service company that performs the repair. The guide begins with a task analysis, listing 20 cognitive tasks and 5…

  16. Cloning human DNA repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeggo, P.A.; Carr, A.M.; Lehmann, A.R.

    1994-01-01

    Many human genes involved in the repair of UV damage have been cloned using different procedures and they have been of great value in assisting the understanding of the mechanism of nucleotide excision-repair. Genes involved in repair of ionizing radiation damage have proved more difficult to isolate. Positional cloning has localized the XRCC5 gene to a small region of chromosome 2q33-35, and a series of yeast artificial chromosomes covering this region have been isolated. Very recent work has shown that the XRCC5 gene encodes the 80 kDa subunit of the Ku DNA-binding protein. The Ku80 gene also maps to this region. Studies with fission yeast have shown that radiation sensitivity can result not only from defective DNA repair but also from abnormal cell cycle control following DNA damage. Several genes involved in this 'check-point' control in fission yeast have been isolated and characterized in detail. It is likely that a similar checkpoint control mechanism exists in human cells. (author)

  17. Pure robotic retrocaval ureter repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok k. Hemal

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To demonstrate the feasibility of pure robotic retrocaval ureter repair. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 33 year old female presented with right loin pain and obstruction on intravenous urography with the classical "fish-hook" appearance. She was counseled on the various methods of repair and elected to have a robot assisted repair. The following steps are performed during a pure robotic retrocaval ureter repair. The patient is placed in a modified flank position, pneumoperitoneum created and ports inserted. The colon is mobilized to expose the retroperitoneal structures: inferior vena cava, right gonadal vein, right ureter, and duodenum. The renal pelvis and ureter are mobilized and the renal pelvis transected. The ureter is transposed anterior to the inferior vena cava and a pyelopyelostomy is performed over a JJ stent. RESULTS: This patient was discharged on postoperative day 3. The catheter and drain tube were removed on day 1. Her JJ stent was removed at 6 weeks postoperatively. The postoperative intravenous urography at 3 months confirmed normal drainage of contrast medium. CONCLUSION: Pure robotic retrocaval ureter is a feasible procedure; however, there does not appear to be any great advantage over pure laparoscopy, apart from the ergonomic ease for the surgeon as well the simpler intracorporeal suturing.

  18. Discrete time analysis of a repairable machine

    OpenAIRE

    Alfa, Attahiru Sule; Castro, I. T.

    2002-01-01

    We consider, in discrete time, a single machine system that operates for a period of time represented by a general distribution. This machine is subject to failures during operations and the occurrence of these failures depends on how many times the machine has previously failed. Some failures are repairable and the repair times may or may not depend on the number of times the machine was previously repaired. Repair times also have a general distribution. The operating times...

  19. Molecular biological mechanisms I. DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedl, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Cells of all living systems possess a variety of mechanisms that allow to repair spontaneous and exogeneously induced DNA damage. DNA repair deficiencies may invoke enhanced sensitivity towards DNA-damaging agents such as ionizing radiation. They may also enhance the risk of cancer development, both spontaneously or after induction. This article reviews several DNA repair mechanisms, especially those dealing with DNA double-strand breaks, and describes hereditary diseases associated with DNA repair defects. (orig.) [de

  20. Repair of steam turbines by welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohnstedt, H.J.; Loebert, P.

    1987-01-01

    In some cases, turbine parts can be repaired by welding, even rotating parts such as the shaft or the blades. Practical examples of successful repair work are explained, as for instance: welding of the last web of the turbine wheel of two MD-rotors, repair of erosion damage on turbine blades, of solid-matter erosion on a medium-pressure blading, or welding repair of a high-pressure turbine casing. (DG) [de

  1. Recent advances in DNA repair and recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanejko, L A; Jones, N J

    1998-09-11

    The subjects of the talks at this 1-day DNA Repair Network meeting, held at City University, London on December 15, 1997, encompassed a range of topics and reflected some of the current areas of research in the United Kingdom. Topics included DNA double-strand break repair, V(D)J recombination, DNA ligases, the RecQ family of helicases and Bloom's syndrome, UVB and immunosuppression, the repair of oxidative damage and mismatch repair mechanisms.

  2. 30 CFR 56.6801 - Vehicle repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vehicle repair. 56.6801 Section 56.6801 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Vehicle repair. Vehicles containing explosive material and oxidizers shall not be taken into a repair...

  3. The two faces of plan repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Krogt, R.P.J.; De Weerdt, M.M.

    2004-01-01

    Plan repair has two faces. Alternately, a plan repair method looks like a planning method, or looks like a method that does exactly the opposite, i.e., removing actions from a plan. We propose a general framework for plan repair that shows the relation between these two alternating steps. Any plan

  4. 30 CFR 57.14104 - Tire repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tire repairs. 57.14104 Section 57.14104 Mineral... Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 57.14104 Tire repairs. (a) Before a tire is removed from a vehicle for tire repair, the valve core shall be partially removed to allow for gradual deflation and then...

  5. 30 CFR 56.14104 - Tire repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tire repairs. 56.14104 Section 56.14104 Mineral... Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14104 Tire repairs. (a) Before a tire is removed from a vehicle for tire repair, the valve core shall be partially removed to allow for gradual deflation and then...

  6. Implication of SUMO E3 ligases in nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuge, Maasa; Kaneoka, Hidenori; Masuda, Yusuke; Ito, Hiroki; Miyake, Katsuhide; Iijima, Shinji

    2015-08-01

    Post-translational modifications alter protein function to mediate complex hierarchical regulatory processes that are crucial to eukaryotic cellular function. The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is an important post-translational modification that affects transcriptional regulation, nuclear localization, and the maintenance of genome stability. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a very versatile DNA repair system that is essential for protection against ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The deficiencies in NER function remarkably increase the risk of skin cancer. Recent studies have shown that several NER factors are SUMOylated, which influences repair efficiency. However, how SUMOylation modulates NER has not yet been elucidated. In the present study, we performed RNAi knockdown of SUMO E3 ligases and found that, in addition to PIASy, the polycomb protein Pc2 affected the repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. PIAS1 affected both the removal of 6-4 pyrimidine pyrimidone photoproducts and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, whereas other SUMO E3 ligases did not affect the removal of either UV lesion.

  7. The role of nuclear hormone receptors in cutaneous wound repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Sandra; Zhao, Hengguang; Martin, Paige; Abe, Koichiro; Lisse, Thomas S

    2015-01-01

    The cutaneous wound repair process involves balancing a dynamic series of events ranging from inflammation, oxidative stress, cell migration, proliferation, survival and differentiation. A complex series of secreted trophic factors, cytokines, surface and intracellular proteins are expressed in a temporospatial manner to restore skin integrity after wounding. Impaired initiation, maintenance or termination of the tissue repair processes can lead to perturbed healing, necrosis, fibrosis or even cancer. Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) in the cutaneous environment regulate tissue repair processes such as fibroplasia and angiogenesis. Defects in functional NHRs and their ligands are associated with the clinical phenotypes of chronic non-healing wounds and skin endocrine disorders. The functional relationship between NHRs and skin niche cells such as epidermal keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts is pivotal for successful wound closure and permanent repair. The aim of this review is to delineate the cutaneous effects and cross-talk of various nuclear receptors upon injury towards functional tissue restoration. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. A model for investigating developmental eye repair in Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kha, Cindy X; Son, Philip H; Lauper, Julia; Tseng, Kelly Ai-Sun

    2018-04-01

    Vertebrate eye development is complex and requires early interactions between neuroectoderm and surface ectoderm during embryogenesis. In the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, individual eye tissues such as the retina and lens can undergo regeneration. However, it has been reported that removal of either the specified eye field at the neurula stage or the eye during tadpole stage does not induce replacement. Here we describe a model for investigating Xenopus developmental eye repair. We found that tailbud embryos can readily regrow eyes after surgical removal of over 83% of the specified eye and lens tissues. The regrown eye reached a comparable size to the contralateral control by 5 days and overall animal development was normal. It contained the expected complement of eye cell types (including the pigmented epithelium, retina and lens), and is connected to the brain. Our data also demonstrate that apoptosis, an early mechanism that regulates appendage regeneration, is also required for eye regrowth. Treatment with apoptosis inhibitors (M50054 or NS3694) blocked eye regrowth by inhibiting caspase activation. Together, our findings indicate that frog embryos can undergo successful eye repair after considerable tissue loss and reveals a required role for apoptosis in this process. Furthermore, this Xenopus model allows for rapid comparisons of productive eye repair and developmental pathways. It can also facilitate the molecular dissection of signaling mechanisms necessary for initiating repair. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Aberrant repair and fibrosis development in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann Christopher J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The repair process of damaged tissue involves the coordinated activities of several cell types in response to local and systemic signals. Following acute tissue injury, infiltrating inflammatory cells and resident stem cells orchestrate their activities to restore tissue homeostasis. However, during chronic tissue damage, such as in muscular dystrophies, the inflammatory-cell infiltration and fibroblast activation persists, while the reparative capacity of stem cells (satellite cells is attenuated. Abnormal dystrophic muscle repair and its end stage, fibrosis, represent the final common pathway of virtually all chronic neurodegenerative muscular diseases. As our understanding of the pathogenesis of muscle fibrosis has progressed, it has become evident that the muscle provides a useful model for the regulation of tissue repair by the local microenvironment, showing interplay among muscle-specific stem cells, inflammatory cells, fibroblasts and extracellular matrix components of the mammalian wound-healing response. This article reviews the emerging findings of the mechanisms that underlie normal versus aberrant muscle-tissue repair.

  10. VARIANT FOR CONSTRUCTION, REPAIR OR RECONSTRUCTION OF BUILDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Osipov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the XXI century moral depreciation concept comprises not only deterioration of outside appearance of construction elements in the course of time but accelerated fashion changes in respect of interior design and rapid increase in technical level for residence buildings. For this reason if average rate of building dilapidation in the buildings of series 1–335, 1–335А and 1–464А constructed in Minsk within the period of 1957–1975 and being operated till 2005–2006 has constituted 25–29 % and their moral depreciation has been equal to more than 40 % then rate of the moral depreciation has significantly increased in the XXI century. Such situation requires execution of special investigations. High operating rates of refinancing have led to the necessity for record keeping of initial expenses and repairability levels because selection of building construction, repair or reconstruction variant depends on these parameters. Repairability classification of main elements of residence buildings and premises has been proposed for regulation of such selection procedure. In this case it is recommended to take into account technological effectiveness of repair and technical service, verifiability, accessibility, easy dismountability, substitutability and interchangeability of construction elements and technical devices. The paper presents nomograms that permit to make easier practical calculations on determination of cost-efficient time period for operation of the element prior to its substitution at various refinancing rates and also for comparison of relative initial expenses according to time service. 

  11. Cytogenetic Response to Ionizing Radiation Exposure in Human Fibroblasts with Suppressed Expression of Non-DSB Repair Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Hammond, Dianne; Mehta, Satish K.; Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Pierson, Duane L.; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in double-strand break (DSB) repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been well studied. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of IR inducible genes in radiation-induced chromosome aberrations and micronuclei formation. In the study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. Frequencies of micronuclei (MN) formation and chromosome aberrations were measured to determine the efficiency of cytogenetic repair, and the fraction of bi-nucleated cells in the MN analysis was used as a marker for cell cycle progression. In response to gamma radiation, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of five genes: Ku70 (DSB repair pathway), XPA (nucleotide excision repair pathway), RPA1 (mismatch repair pathway), RAD17 and RBBP8 (cell cycle control). Knocked-down expression of four genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Moreover, decreased XPA, p21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Nine of these eleven genes, whose knock-down expression affected cytogenetic repair, were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate IR

  12. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) and protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) regulate DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) phosphorylation in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pauline; Ye, Ruiqiong; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Neal, Jessica A; De Wever, Veerle; Morrice, Nick A; Meek, Katheryn; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2014-06-25

    The protein kinase activity of the DNA-PKcs (DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit) and its autophosphorylation are critical for DBS (DNA double-strand break) repair via NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining). Recent studies have shown that depletion or inactivation of DNA-PKcs kinase activity also results in mitotic defects. DNA-PKcs is autophosphorylated on Ser2056, Thr2647 and Thr2609 in mitosis and phosphorylated DNA-PKcs localize to centrosomes, mitotic spindles and the midbody. DNA-PKcs also interacts with PP6 (protein phosphatase 6), and PP6 has been shown to dephosphorylate Aurora A kinase in mitosis. Here we report that DNA-PKcs is phosphorylated on Ser3205 and Thr3950 in mitosis. Phosphorylation of Thr3950 is DNA-PK-dependent, whereas phosphorylation of Ser3205 requires PLK1 (polo-like kinase 1). Moreover, PLK1 phosphorylates DNA-PKcs on Ser3205 in vitro and interacts with DNA-PKcs in mitosis. In addition, PP6 dephosphorylates DNA-PKcs at Ser3205 in mitosis and after IR (ionizing radiation). DNA-PKcs also phosphorylates Chk2 on Thr68 in mitosis and both phosphorylation of Chk2 and autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs in mitosis occur in the apparent absence of Ku and DNA damage. Our findings provide mechanistic insight into the roles of DNA-PKcs and PP6 in mitosis and suggest that DNA-PKcs' role in mitosis may be mechanistically distinct from its well-established role in NHEJ.

  13. Is laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair more effective than open repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, O.; Green, A.; Joy, M.; Wong, C.H.; Malik, M

    2011-01-01

    To systematically review randomized controlled trials, (RCT) evidence comparing Lichtenstein to total extraperitoneal (TEP) hernia repair in terms of clinical and cost effectiveness. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at University of Abderdeen, U.K. Methodology: A comprehensive online literature search was undertaken using databases such as MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE and Springerlink. Studies were then short listed according to the selection criteria (RCT with over 100 subject and English language publications from 1995 onwards) and appraised using the SIGN Methodology Checklist. A meta analysis of the data was also performed using RevMan software. Results: Analysis of reported data shows that TEP has less postoperative pain and return to work than Lichtenstein method. Operation time is shown to be longer in the TEP but this difference is shortened with increasing surgeon experience. The meta-analysis of the data on complications shows that there are no significant differences between the two types of procedures. TEP causes more short-term recurrences which are attributed to the learning curve effect. Long term recurrence rates on the other hand show no significant differences. At present TEP is slightly more expensive than Lichtenstein repair. Conclusion: Both TEP and Lichtenstein repair are clinically effective procedures. The choice between them should be made on a case-by-case basis; which depends on the patient's preference and characteristics such as age, work and health status. (author)

  14. Metabolic modulation of mammalian DNA excision repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrader, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    First, ultraviolet light (UVL)- and dimethylsulfate (DMS)-induced excision repair was examined in quiescent and lectin-stimulated bovine lymphocytes. Upon mitogenic stimulation, UVL-induced repair increased by a factor of 2 to 3, and reached this maximum 2 days before the onset of DNA replication. However, DMS-induced repair increased sevenfold in parallel with DNA replication. Repair patch sizes were smaller for DMS-induced damage reflecting patches of 7 nucleotides in quiescent lymphocytes compared to 20 nucleotides induced by UVL. The patch size increased during lymphocyte stimulation until one day prior to the peak of DNA replication when patch sizes of 45 and 35 nucleotides were produced in response to UVL- and DMS-induced damage, respectively. At the peak of DNA replication, the patch sizes were equal for both damaging agents at 34 nucleotides. In the second study, a small amount of repair replication was observed in undamaged quiescent and concanavalin A-stimulated bovine lymphocytes as well as in human T98G glioblastoma cells. Repair incorporation doubled in the presence of hydroxyurea. Thirdly, the enhanced repair replication induced by the poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor, 3-aminobenzamide, (3-AB), could not be correlated either with an increased rate of repair in the presence of 3-AB or with the use of hydroxyurea in the repair protocol. Finally, treatment of unstimulated lymphocytes with hyperthermia was accompanied by decreased repair replication while the repair patches remained constant at 20 nucleotides.

  15. Complex networks under dynamic repair model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaoqi, Fu; Ying, Wang; Kun, Zhao; Yangjun, Gao

    2018-01-01

    Invulnerability is not the only factor of importance when considering complex networks' security. It is also critical to have an effective and reasonable repair strategy. Existing research on network repair is confined to the static model. The dynamic model makes better use of the redundant capacity of repaired nodes and repairs the damaged network more efficiently than the static model; however, the dynamic repair model is complex and polytropic. In this paper, we construct a dynamic repair model and systematically describe the energy-transfer relationships between nodes in the repair process of the failure network. Nodes are divided into three types, corresponding to three structures. We find that the strong coupling structure is responsible for secondary failure of the repaired nodes and propose an algorithm that can select the most suitable targets (nodes or links) to repair the failure network with minimal cost. Two types of repair strategies are identified, with different effects under the two energy-transfer rules. The research results enable a more flexible approach to network repair.

  16. Current Biomechanical Concepts for Rotator Cuff Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    For the past few decades, the repair of rotator cuff tears has evolved significantly with advances in arthroscopy techniques, suture anchors and instrumentation. From the biomechanical perspective, the focus in arthroscopic repair has been on increasing fixation strength and restoration of the footprint contact characteristics to provide early rehabilitation and improve healing. To accomplish these objectives, various repair strategies and construct configurations have been developed for rotator cuff repair with the understanding that many factors contribute to the structural integrity of the repaired construct. These include repaired rotator cuff tendon-footprint motion, increased tendon-footprint contact area and pressure, and tissue quality of tendon and bone. In addition, the healing response may be compromised by intrinsic factors such as decreased vascularity, hypoxia, and fibrocartilaginous changes or aforementioned extrinsic compression factors. Furthermore, it is well documented that torn rotator cuff muscles have a tendency to atrophy and become subject to fatty infiltration which may affect the longevity of the repair. Despite all the aforementioned factors, initial fixation strength is an essential consideration in optimizing rotator cuff repair. Therefore, numerous biomechanical studies have focused on elucidating the strongest devices, knots, and repair configurations to improve contact characteristics for rotator cuff repair. In this review, the biomechanical concepts behind current rotator cuff repair techniques will be reviewed and discussed. PMID:23730471

  17. NAMPT and NAMPT-controlled NAD Metabolism in Vascular Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Li, Wen-Lin; Liu, Jian-Min; Miao, Chao-Yu

    2016-06-01

    Vascular repair plays important roles in postischemic remodeling and rehabilitation in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, such as stroke and myocardial infarction. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), a well-known coenzyme involved in electron transport chain for generation of adenosine triphosphate, has emerged as an important controller regulating various biological signaling pathways. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is the rate-limiting enzyme for NAD biosynthesis in mammals. NAMPT may also act in a nonenzymatic manner, presumably mediated by unknown receptor(s). Rapidly accumulating data in the past decade show that NAMPT and NAMPT-controlled NAD metabolism regulate fundamental biological functions in endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and endothelial progenitor cells. The NAD-consuming proteins, including sirtuins, poly-ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs), and CD38, may contribute to the regulatory effects of NAMPT-NAD axis in these cells and vascular repair. This review discusses the current data regarding NAMPT and NAMPT-controlled NAD metabolism in vascular repair and the clinical potential translational application of NAMPT-related products in treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease.

  18. [Constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongmans, Marjolijn C; Gidding, Corrie E; Loeffen, Jan; Wesseling, Pieter; Mensenkamp, Arjen; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline

    2015-01-01

    Constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMR-D) syndrome is characterised by a significantly increased risk for developing cancer in childhood. It arises when both parents have a mutation in the same mismatch repair gene and pass it on to their child. An 8-year-old girl was diagnosed with CMMR-D syndrome after she developed a brain tumour at the age of 4 and a T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma at the age of 6. She had multiple hyperpigmented skin lesions and died of myelodysplastic syndrome at the age of 11. In children with cancer CMMR-D syndrome can be recognized particularly if there are multiple primary malignancies and skin hyperpigmentations and hypopigmentations. The parents of these children are at high risk for colorectal and endometrial cancer (Lynch syndrome), amongst others.

  19. Mitochondrial base excision repair assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maynard, Scott; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten

    2010-01-01

    The main source of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage is reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during normal cellular metabolism. The main mtDNA lesions generated by ROS are base modifications, such as the ubiquitous 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) lesion; however, base loss and strand breaks may also occur....... Many human diseases are associated with mtDNA mutations and thus maintaining mtDNA integrity is critical. All of these lesions are repaired primarily by the base excision repair (BER) pathway. It is now known that mammalian mitochondria have BER, which, similarly to nuclear BER, is catalyzed by DNA...... glycosylases, AP endonuclease, DNA polymerase (POLgamma in mitochondria) and DNA ligase. This article outlines procedures for measuring oxidative damage formation and BER in mitochondria, including isolation of mitochondria from tissues and cells, protocols for measuring BER enzyme activities, gene...

  20. Repair welding and online radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuding, W.; Grimm, R.; Link, R.; Schroeder, P.; Schroeder, G.

    1990-01-01

    The status of a joint project is reported, which is to develop a computerized testing and welding system for repair work in turbine blades. An X-ray radiographic testing device consisting of microfocus tube, manipulator and image processing system, is modified for this purpose so as to offer a greater number of image points scanned for image processing, and to thus achieve a better resolution for reliable detection of even very small defects. The consistency of the X-ray tube performance, which is a pre-requisite for automation, is to be achieved by a wa tercooled, high-duty tube head. The recording of defect coordinates in the repair zone is done for input into a welding robot to be developed by other partners in the project, so as to allow automated welding work. (orig.) [de

  1. Primary unilateral cleft lip repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenwalla, H S; Narayanan, P V

    2009-10-01

    The unilateral cleft lip is a complex deformity. Surgical correction has evolved from a straight repair through triangular and quadrilateral repairs to the Rotation Advancement Technique of Millard. The latter is the technique followed at our centre for all unilateral cleft lip patients. We operate on these at five to six months of age, do not use pre-surgical orthodontics, and follow a protocol to produce a notch-free vermillion. This is easy to follow even for trainees. We also perform closed alar dissection and extensive primary septoplasty in all these patients. This has improved the overall result and has no long-term deleterious effect on the growth of the nose or of the maxilla. Other refinements have been used for prevention of a high-riding nostril, and correction of the vestibular web.

  2. Primary unilateral cleft lip repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adenwalla H

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The unilateral cleft lip is a complex deformity. Surgical correction has evolved from a straight repair through triangular and quadrilateral repairs to the Rotation Advancement Technique of Millard. The latter is the technique followed at our centre for all unilateral cleft lip patients. We operate on these at five to six months of age, do not use pre-surgical orthodontics, and follow a protocol to produce a notch-free vermillion. This is easy to follow even for trainees. We also perform closed alar dissection and extensive primary septoplasty in all these patients. This has improved the overall result and has no long-term deleterious effect on the growth of the nose or of the maxilla. Other refinements have been used for prevention of a high-riding nostril, and correction of the vestibular web.

  3. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    These antimicrobial peptides are implicated in the resistance of epithelial surfaces to microbial colonisation and have been shown to be upregulated...be equivalent to standard autograft repair in rodent models. Outcomes have now been validated in a large animal (swine) model with 5 cm ulnar nerve...Goals of the Project Task 1– Determine mechanical properties, seal strength and resistance to biodegradation of candidate photochemical nerve wrap

  4. Repair of EL4 leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-03-01

    The reactor shutdown was decided on the 15th of November 1984, because the evolution of the carbon dioxide quantity in the helium blanket of the heavy water. Leaks have been localized on three different channels. Repairs have been made in hard conditions taking into account the reactor state (materials strongly irradiated). The restart has been authorized on the 24th of January 1985 [fr

  5. Mutagenic DNA repair in enterobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedgwick, S.G.; Chao Ho; Woodgate, R.

    1991-01-01

    Sixteen species of enterobacteria have been screened for mutagenic DNA repair activity. In Escherichia coli, mutagenic DNA repair is encoded by the umuDC operon. Synthesis of UmuD and UmuC proteins is induced as part of the SOS response to DNA damage, and after induction, the UmuD protein undergoes an autocatalytic cleavage to produce the carboxy-terminal UmuD' fragment needed for induced mutagenesis. The presence of a similar system in other species was examined by using a combined approach of inducible-mutagenesis assays, cross-reactivity to E. coli UmuD and UmuD' antibodies to test for induction and cleavage of UmuD-like proteins, and hybridization with E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium u mu DNA probes to map umu-like genes. The results indicate a more widespread distribution of mutagenic DNA repair in other species than was previously thought. They also show that umu loci can be more complex in other species than in E. coli. Differences in UV-induced mutability of more than 200-fold were seen between different species of enteric bacteria and even between multiple natural isolates of E. coli, and yet some of the species which display a poorly mutable phenotype still have umu-like genes and proteins. It is suggested that umuDC genes can be curtailed in their mutagenic activities but that they may still participate in some other, unknown process which provides the continued stimulus for their retention

  6. Role of nuclear hexokinase II in DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, S.; Bhatt, A.N.; Dwarakanath, B.S.; Kalaiarasan, P.; Brahmachari, V.

    2012-01-01

    A common signature of many cancer cells is a high glucose catabolic rate primarily due to the over expression of Type II hexokinase (HKII; responsible for the phosphorylation of glucose), generally known as cytosolic and mitochondrial bound enzyme that also suppresses cell death. Although, nuclear localization and transcriptional regulation of HKII has been reported in yeast; we and few others have recently demonstrated its nuclear localization in malignant cell lines. Interestingly, modification of a human glioma cell line (BMG-1) for enhancing glycolysis through mitochondrial respiration (OPMBMG cells) resulted in a higher nuclear localization of HKII as compared to the parental cells with concomitant increase in DNA repair and radio-resistance. Further, the glucose phosphorylation activity of the nuclear HKII was nearly 2 folds higher in the relatively more radioresistant HeLa cells (human cervical cancer cell line) as compared to MRC-5 cells (human normal lung fibroblast cell line). Therefore, we hypothesize that nuclear HKII facilitates DNA repair, in a hither to unknown mechanism, that may partly contribute to the enhanced resistance of highly glycolytic cells to radiation. Sequence alignment studies suggest that the isoenzymes, HKI and HKII share strong homology in the kinase active site, which is also found in few protein kinases. Interestingly HKI has been shown to phosphorylate H2A in-vitro. Further, in-silico protein-protein interaction data suggest that HKII can interact with several DNA repair proteins including ATM. Taken together; available experimental evidences as well as in-silico predictions strongly suggest that HKII may play a role in DNA repair by phosphorylation of certain DNA repair proteins. (author)

  7. Targeting DNA repair with PNKP inhibition sensitizes radioresistant prostate cancer cells to high LET radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Srivastava

    Full Text Available High linear energy transfer (LET radiation or heavy ion such as carbon ion radiation is used as a method for advanced radiotherapy in the treatment of cancer. It has many advantages over the conventional photon based radiotherapy using Co-60 gamma or high energy X-rays from a Linear Accelerator. However, charged particle therapy is very costly. One way to reduce the cost as well as irradiation effects on normal cells is to reduce the dose of radiation by enhancing the radiation sensitivity through the use of a radiomodulator. PNKP (polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase is an enzyme which plays important role in the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ DNA repair pathway. It is expected that inhibition of PNKP activity may enhance the efficacy of the charged particle irradiation in the radioresistant prostate cancer cell line PC-3. To test this hypothesis, we investigated cellular radiosensitivity by clonogenic cell survival assay in PC-3 cells.12Carbon ion beam of62 MeVenergy (equivalent 5.16 MeV/nucleon and with an entrance LET of 287 kev/μm was used for the present study. Apoptotic parameters such as nuclear fragmentation and caspase-3 activity were measured by DAPI staining, nuclear ladder assay and colorimetric caspase-3method. Cell cycle arrest was determined by FACS analysis. Cell death was enhanced when carbon ion irradiation is combined with PNKPi (PNKP inhibitor to treat cells as compared to that seen for PNKPi untreated cells. A low concentration (10μM of PNKPi effectively radiosensitized the PC-3 cells in terms of reduction of dose in achieving the same survival fraction. PC-3 cells underwent significant apoptosis and cell cycle arrest too was enhanced at G2/M phase when carbon ion irradiation was combined with PNKPi treatment. Our findings suggest that combined treatment of carbon ion irradiation and PNKP inhibition could enhance cellular radiosensitivity in a radioresistant prostate cancer cell line PC-3. The synergistic effect of PNKPi

  8. PARP-1: Friend or Foe of DNA Damage and Repair in Tumorigenesis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindall, Amanda F.; Stanley, Jennifer A.; Yang, Eddy S.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species can result in DNA damage within cells and subsequently increase risk for carcinogenesis. This may be averted by repair of DNA damage through the base or nucleotide excision repair (BER/NER) pathways. PARP, a BER protein, is known for its role in DNA-repair. However, multiple lesions can occur within a small range of DNA, known as oxidative clustered DNA lesions (OCDLs), which are difficult to repair and may lead to the more severe DNA double-strand break (DSB). Inefficient DSB repair can then result in increased mutagenesis and neoplastic transformation. OCDLs occur more frequently within a variety of tumor tissues. Interestingly, PARP is highly expressed in several human cancers. Additionally, chronic inflammation may contribute to tumorigenesis through ROS-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, PARP can modulate inflammation through interaction with NFκB and regulating the expression of inflammatory signaling molecules. Thus, the upregulation of PARP may present a double-edged sword. PARP is needed to repair ROS-induced DNA lesions, but PARP expression may lead to increased inflammation via upregulation of NFκB signaling. Here, we discuss the role of PARP in the repair of oxidative damage versus the formation of OCDLs and speculate on the feasibility of PARP inhibition for the treatment and prevention of cancers by exploiting its role in inflammation

  9. PARP-1: Friend or Foe of DNA Damage and Repair in Tumorigenesis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swindall, Amanda F.; Stanley, Jennifer A. [Department of Radiation Oncology Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, 176F HSROC Suite 2232B, 1700 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States); Yang, Eddy S., E-mail: eyang@uab.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, 176F HSROC Suite 2232B, 1700 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States); Department of Cell, Developmental and Integrative Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States)

    2013-07-26

    Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species can result in DNA damage within cells and subsequently increase risk for carcinogenesis. This may be averted by repair of DNA damage through the base or nucleotide excision repair (BER/NER) pathways. PARP, a BER protein, is known for its role in DNA-repair. However, multiple lesions can occur within a small range of DNA, known as oxidative clustered DNA lesions (OCDLs), which are difficult to repair and may lead to the more severe DNA double-strand break (DSB). Inefficient DSB repair can then result in increased mutagenesis and neoplastic transformation. OCDLs occur more frequently within a variety of tumor tissues. Interestingly, PARP is highly expressed in several human cancers. Additionally, chronic inflammation may contribute to tumorigenesis through ROS-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, PARP can modulate inflammation through interaction with NFκB and regulating the expression of inflammatory signaling molecules. Thus, the upregulation of PARP may present a double-edged sword. PARP is needed to repair ROS-induced DNA lesions, but PARP expression may lead to increased inflammation via upregulation of NFκB signaling. Here, we discuss the role of PARP in the repair of oxidative damage versus the formation of OCDLs and speculate on the feasibility of PARP inhibition for the treatment and prevention of cancers by exploiting its role in inflammation.

  10. Familiality of mood repair responses among youth with and without histories of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylsma, Lauren M; Yaroslavsky, Ilya; Rottenberg, Jonathan; Kiss, Enikő; Kapornai, Krisztina; Halas, Kitti; Dochnal, Roberta; Lefkovics, Eszter; Baji, Ildikό; Vetrό, Ágnes; Kovacs, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Affect regulation skills develop in the context of the family environment, wherein youths are influenced by their parents', and possibly their siblings', regulatory responses and styles. Regulatory responses to sadness (mood repair) that exacerbate or prolong dysphoria (maladaptive mood repair) may represent one way in which depression is transmitted within families. We examined self-reported adaptive and maladaptive mood repair responses across cognitive, social and behavioural domains in Hungarian 11- to 19-year-old youth and their parents. Offspring included 214 probands with a history of childhood-onset depressive disorder, 200 never depressed siblings and 161 control peers. Probands reported the most problematic mood repair responses, with siblings reporting more modest differences from controls. Mood repair responses of parents and their offspring, as well as within sib-pairs, were related, although results differed as a function of the regulatory response domain. Results demonstrate familiality of maladaptive and adaptive mood repair responses in multiple samples. These familial associations suggest that relationships with parents and siblings within families may impact the development of affect regulation in youth.

  11. Cycling with BRCA2 from DNA repair to mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyunsook

    2014-01-01

    Genetic integrity in proliferating cells is guaranteed by the harmony of DNA replication, appropriate DNA repair, and segregation of the duplicated genome. Breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA2 is a unique tumor suppressor that is involved in all three processes. Hence, it is critical in genome maintenance. The functions of BRCA2 in DNA repair and homology-directed recombination (HDR) have been reviewed numerous times. Here, I will briefly go through the functions of BRCA2 in HDR and focus on the emerging roles of BRCA2 in telomere homeostasis and mitosis, then discuss how BRCA2 exerts distinct functions in a cell-cycle specific manner in the maintenance of genomic integrity. - Highlights: • BRCA2 is a multifaceted tumor suppressor and is crucial in genetic integrity. • BRCA2 exerts distinct functions in cell cycle-specific manner. • Mitotic kinases regulate diverse functions of BRCA2 in mitosis and cytokinesis

  12. Cycling with BRCA2 from DNA repair to mitosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyunsook, E-mail: HL212@snu.ac.kr

    2014-11-15

    Genetic integrity in proliferating cells is guaranteed by the harmony of DNA replication, appropriate DNA repair, and segregation of the duplicated genome. Breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA2 is a unique tumor suppressor that is involved in all three processes. Hence, it is critical in genome maintenance. The functions of BRCA2 in DNA repair and homology-directed recombination (HDR) have been reviewed numerous times. Here, I will briefly go through the functions of BRCA2 in HDR and focus on the emerging roles of BRCA2 in telomere homeostasis and mitosis, then discuss how BRCA2 exerts distinct functions in a cell-cycle specific manner in the maintenance of genomic integrity. - Highlights: • BRCA2 is a multifaceted tumor suppressor and is crucial in genetic integrity. • BRCA2 exerts distinct functions in cell cycle-specific manner. • Mitotic kinases regulate diverse functions of BRCA2 in mitosis and cytokinesis.

  13. Comparing Biomechanical Properties, Repair Times, and Value of Common Core Flexor Tendon Repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Aakash; Schimoler, Patrick; Miller, Mark C; Kharlamov, Alexander; Merrell, Gregory A; Palmer, Bradley A

    2018-05-01

    The aim of the study was to compare biomechanical strength, repair times, and repair values for zone II core flexor tendon repairs. A total of 75 fresh-frozen human cadaveric flexor tendons were harvested from the index through small finger and randomized into one of 5 repair groups: 4-stranded cross-stitch cruciate (4-0 polyester and 4-0 braided suture), 4-stranded double Pennington (2-0 knotless barbed suture), 4-stranded Pennington (4-0 double-stranded braided suture), and 6-stranded modified Lim-Tsai (4-0 looped braided suture). Repairs were measured in situ and their repair times were measured. Tendons were linearly loaded to failure and multiple biomechanical values were measured. The repair value was calculated based on operating room costs, repair times, and suture costs. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc statistical analysis were used to compare repair data. The braided cruciate was the strongest repair ( P > .05) but the slowest ( P > .05), and the 4-stranded Pennington using double-stranded suture was the fastest ( P > .05) to perform. The total repair value was the highest for braided cruciate ( P > .05) compared with all other repairs. Barbed suture did not outperform any repairs in any categories. The braided cruciate was the strongest of the tested flexor tendon repairs. The 2-mm gapping and maximum load to failure for this repair approached similar historical strength of other 6- and 8-stranded repairs. In this study, suture cost was negligible in the overall repair cost and should be not a determining factor in choosing a repair.

  14. Features of the Organization of Accounting and Tax Accounting and Auditing at Warranty Repairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardus Nataliia Yu.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to study features of the normative and legal support of accounting and tax accounting at providing operations with warranty repairs comprising the secured in legislation right of consumers to obtain from the companies-producers (sellers products (goods and services of proper quality and cases of occurrence of warranty obligations to customers. To achieve the goal, the following tasks have been solved: the regulatory framework for the organization of warranty service (repair from the point of view of the company-seller and reflection of operations associated with warranty repairs in accounting and tax accounting was studied. The article describes the features of the organization of accounting and tax accounting at warranty repairs based on the legislative and normative documents regulating relations that arise in the organization and implementation of economic activity between business entities and between the entities and other participants of relations in the sphere of economic activity.

  15. DNA repair in Mycobacterium tuberculosis revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Vultos, Tiago; Mestre, Olga; Tonjum, Tone; Gicquel, Brigitte

    2009-05-01

    Our understanding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA repair mechanisms is still poor compared with that of other bacterial organisms. However, the publication of the first complete M. tuberculosis genome sequence 10 years ago boosted the study of DNA repair systems in this organism. A first step in the elucidation of M. tuberculosis DNA repair mechanisms was taken by Mizrahi and Andersen, who identified homologs of genes involved in the reversal or repair of DNA damage in Escherichia coli and related organisms. Genes required for nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, recombination, and SOS repair and mutagenesis were identified. Notably, no homologs of genes involved in mismatch repair were identified. Novel characteristics of the M. tuberculosis DNA repair machinery have been found over the last decade, such as nonhomologous end joining, the presence of Mpg, ERCC3 and Hlr - proteins previously presumed to be produced exclusively in mammalian cells - and the recently discovered bifunctional dCTP deaminase:dUTPase. The study of these systems is important to develop therapeutic agents that can counteract M. tuberculosis evolutionary changes and to prevent adaptive events resulting in antibiotic resistance. This review summarizes our current understanding of the M. tuberculosis DNA repair system.

  16. Treatment and Controversies in Paraesophageal Hernia Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Marco eFisichella

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Historically all paraesophageal hernias were repaired surgically, today intervention is reserved for symptomatic paraesophageal hernias. In this review, we describe the indications for repair and explore the controversies in paraesophageal hernia repair, which include a comparison of open to laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair, the necessity of complete sac excision, the routine performance of fundoplication, and the use of mesh for hernia repair.Methods: We searched Pubmed for papers published between 1980 and 2015 using the following keywords: hiatal hernias, paraesophageal hernias, regurgitation, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, aspiration, GERD, endoscopy, manometry, pH monitoring, proton pump inhibitors, anemia, iron deficiency anemia, Nissen fundoplication, sac excision, mesh, mesh repair. Results: Indications for paraesophageal hernia repair have changed, and currently symptomatic paraesophageal hernias are recommended for repair. In addition, it is important not to overlook iron-deficiency anemia and pulmonary complaints, which tend to improve with repair. Current practice favors a laparoscopic approach, complete sac excision, primary crural repair with or without use of mesh, and a routine fundoplication.

  17. Ultrasound determination of rotator cuff tear repairability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Andrew K; Lam, Patrick H; Walton, Judie R; Hackett, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff repair aims to reattach the torn tendon to the greater tuberosity footprint with suture anchors. The present study aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound in predicting rotator cuff tear repairability and to assess which sonographic and pre-operative features are strongest in predicting repairability. Methods The study was a retrospective analysis of measurements made prospectively in a cohort of 373 patients who had ultrasounds of their shoulder and underwent rotator cuff repair. Measurements of rotator cuff tear size and muscle atrophy were made pre-operatively by ultrasound to enable prediction of rotator cuff repairability. Tears were classified following ultrasound as repairable or irreparable, and were correlated with intra-operative repairability. Results Ultrasound assessment of rotator cuff tear repairability has a sensitivity of 86% (p tear size (p tear size ≥4 cm2 or anteroposterior tear length ≥25 mm indicated an irreparable rotator cuff tear. Conclusions Ultrasound assessment is accurate in predicting rotator cuff tear repairability. Tear size or anteroposterior tear length and age were the best predictors of repairability. PMID:27582996

  18. A study of everyday repair: informing interaction design

    OpenAIRE

    Maestri, Leah Adriana

    2012-01-01

    Repair is typically seen in design as the restoration of broken objects to their original state. Repair by non-experts, or everyday repair, can often lead to novel forms of repair resulting in the creative repurposing of objects that are often unforeseen by designers. Using a grounded theory approach, this study describes key aspects of repair including: the techniques non-experts employ for repairing their objects; the motivations that prompt acts of repair; and the outcomes that result fr...

  19. Opposing roles of RNF8/RNF168 and deubiquitinating enzymes in ubiquitination-dependent DNA double-strand break response signaling and DNA-repair pathway choice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Shinichiro

    2016-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligases ring finger protein (RNF) 8 and RNF168 transduce the DNA double-strand break (DSB) response (DDR) signal by ubiquitinating DSB sites. The depletion of RNF8 or RNF168 suppresses the accumulation of DNA-repair regulating factors such as 53BP1 and RAP80 at DSB sites, suggesting roles for RNF8- and RNF168-mediated ubiquitination in DSB repair. This mini-review provides a brief overview of the RNF8- and RNF168-dependent DDR-signaling and DNA-repair pathways. The choice of DNA-repair pathway when RNF8- and RNF168-mediated ubiquitination-dependent DDR signaling is negatively regulated by deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) is reviewed to clarify how the opposing roles of RNF8/RNF168 and DUBs regulate ubiquitination-dependent DDR signaling and the choice of DNA-repair pathway

  20. Influence of repair length on residual stress in the repair weld of a clad plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Wenchun; Xu, X.P.; Gong, J.M.; Tu, S.T.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Residual stress in the repair weld of a stainless steel clad plate is investigated. ► The effect of repair length on residual stress has been studied. ► Large tensile residual stress is generated in the repair weld and heat affected zone. ► With the increase of repair length, transverse stress is decreased. ► Repair length has little effect on longitudinal stress. - Abstract: A 3-D sequential coupling finite element simulation is performed to investigate the temperature field and residual stress in the repair weld of a stainless steel clad plate. The effect of repair length on residual stress has been studied, aiming to provide a reference for repairing the cracked clad plate. The results show that large tensile residual stresses are generated in the repair weld and heat affected zone (HAZ), and then decrease gradually away from the weld and HAZ. The residual stresses through thickness in the clad layer are relative uniform, while they are non-uniform in the base metal. A discontinuous stress distribution is generated across the interface between weld metal and base metal. The repair length has a great effect on transverse stress. With the increase of repair length, the transverse stress is decreased. When the repair length is increased to 14 cm, the peak of transverse stress has been decreased below yield strength, and the transverse stress in the weld and HAZ has also been greatly decreased. But the repair length has little effect on longitudinal stress.

  1. Modeling Non-homologous End Joining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongfeng

    2013-01-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is the dominant DNA double strand break (DSB) repair pathway and involves several NHEJ proteins such as Ku, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4, Ligase IV and so on. Once DSBs are generated, Ku is first recruited to the DNA end, followed by other NHEJ proteins for DNA end processing and ligation. Because of the direct ligation of break ends without the need for a homologous template, NHEJ turns out to be an error-prone but efficient repair pathway. Some mechanisms have been proposed of how the efficiency of NHEJ repair is affected. The type of DNA damage is an important factor of NHEJ repair. For instance, the length of DNA fragment may determine the recruitment efficiency of NHEJ protein such as Ku [1], or the complexity of the DNA breaks [2] is accounted for the choice of NHEJ proteins and subpathway of NHEJ repair. On the other hand, the chromatin structure also plays a role of the accessibility of NHEJ protein to the DNA damage site. In this talk, some mathematical models of NHEJ, that consist of series of biochemical reactions complying with the laws of chemical reaction (e.g. mass action, etc.), will be introduced. By mathematical and numerical analysis and parameter estimation, the models are able to capture the qualitative biological features and show good agreement with experimental data. As conclusions, from the viewpoint of modeling, how the NHEJ proteins are recruited will be first discussed for connection between the classical sequential model [4] and recently proposed two-phase model [5]. Then how the NHEJ repair pathway is affected, by the length of DNA fragment [6], the complexity of DNA damage [7] and the chromatin structure [8], will be addressed

  2. Laparoscopic repair for vesicouterine fistulae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael A. Maioli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: The purpose of this video is to present the laparoscopic repair of a VUF in a 42-year-old woman, with gross hematuria, in the immediate postoperative phase following a cesarean delivery. The obstetric team implemented conservative management, including Foley catheter insertion, for 2 weeks. She subsequently developed intermittent hematuria and cystitis. The urology team was consulted 15 days after cesarean delivery. Cystoscopy indicated an ulcerated lesion in the bladder dome of approximately 1.0cm in size. Hysterosalpingography and a pelvic computed tomography scan indicated a fistula. Materials and Methods: Laparoscopic repair was performed 30 days after the cesarean delivery. The patient was placed in the lithotomy position while also in an extreme Trendelenburg position. Pneumoperitoneum was established using a Veress needle in the midline infra-umbilical region, and a primary 11-mm port was inserted. Another 11-mm port was inserted exactly between the left superior iliac spine and the umbilicus. Two other 5-mm ports were established under laparoscopic guidance in the iliac fossa on both sides. The omental adhesions in the pelvis were carefully released and the peritoneum between the bladder and uterus was incised via cautery. Limited cystotomy was performed, and the specific sites of the fistula and the ureteral meatus were identified; thereafter, the posterior bladder wall was adequately mobilized away from the uterus. The uterine rent was then closed using single 3/0Vicryl sutures and two-layer watertight closure of the urinary bladder was achieved by using 3/0Vicryl sutures. An omental flap was mobilized and inserted between the uterus and the urinary bladder, and was fixed using two 3/0Vicryl sutures, followed by tube drain insertion. Results: The operative time was 140 min, whereas the blood loss was 100ml. The patient was discharged 3 days after surgery, and the catheter was removed 12 days after surgery

  3. Underwater coating repair cuts nuclear maintenance costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, C.O.

    1993-01-01

    This article discusses the cleaning and recoating/repair of condensate tanks or other vessels in a nuclear power plant. The topics of the article include the safety and regulatory need for this system of repair, a description of the work done on the Brown's Ferry MK-1 suppression chamber, coating failure mechanisms, qualitative inspection, quantitative inspection, quantitative inspection results, spot repairs, and economic considerations

  4. PTMC in post-MV repair status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lachikarathman Devegowda

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available MV repair in the rheumatic population is feasible with acceptable long-term results.1 Incidence of mitral stenosis (MS following mitral valve (MV repair for severe rheumatic mitral regurgitation (MR and usefulness of percutaneous transluminal mitral valvuloplasty (PTMC in these patients is not described in literature. We report a case of successful PTMC in severe MS following MV repair for severe rheumatic MR.

  5. Early discharge after external anal sphincter repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Kehlet, H

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to describe an accelerated-stay program for repair of the external anal sphincter. METHODS: Twenty consecutive patients undergoing overlapping repair of the external anal sphincter were included in the study. Effect parameters were length of hospitalization....... CONCLUSION: We have described a safe accelerated-stay program (24 to 48 hours) for overlapping repair of external anal sphincter....

  6. Endogenous DNA Damage and Repair Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Klungland

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Tomas Lindahl completed his medical studies at Karolinska Institute in 1970. Yet, his work has always been dedicated to unraveling fundamental mechanisms of DNA decay and DNA repair. His research is characterized with groundbreaking discoveries on the instability of our genome, the identification of novel DNA repair activities, the characterization of DNA repair pathways, and the association to diseases, throughout his 40 years of scientific career.

  7. Hepatopancreaticobiliary Values after Thoracoabdominal Aneurysm Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Darrell; Coselli, Joseph S.; Johnson, Michael L.; LeMaire, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: After thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) repair, blood tests assessing hepatopancreaticobiliary (HPB) organs commonly have abnormal results. The clinical significance of such abnormalities is difficult to determine because the expected postoperative levels have not been characterized. Therefore, we sought to establish expected trends in HPB laboratory values after TAAA repair. Methods: This 5-year study comprised 155 patients undergoing elective Crawford extent II TAAA repair...

  8. Nonhomologous DNA End Joining in Cell-Free Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal Sharma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Among various DNA damages, double-strand breaks (DSBs are considered as most deleterious, as they may lead to chromosomal rearrangements and cancer when unrepaired. Nonhomologous DNA end joining (NHEJ is one of the major DSB repair pathways in higher organisms. A large number of studies on NHEJ are based on in vitro systems using cell-free extracts. In this paper, we summarize the studies on NHEJ performed by various groups in different cell-free repair systems.

  9. Chromatin dynamics during DSB repair

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Falk, Martin; Lukášová, Emilie; Gabrielová, Barbora; Ondřej, Vladan; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 1773, č. 10 (2007), s. 1534-1545 ISSN 0167-4889 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP204/06/P349; GA ČR(CZ) 1QS500040508; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA1065203; GA MŠk(CZ) 1P05OC084 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : chromatin structure * double- strand breaks (DSB) * DNA repair Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.374, year: 2007

  10. Root justifications for ontology repair

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moodley, K

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Moodley_2011.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 32328 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Moodley_2011.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Root Justi cations... the ontology, based on the no- tion of root justi cations [8, 9]. In Section 5, we discuss the implementation of a Prot eg e3 plugin which demonstrates our approach to ontology repair. In this section we also discuss some experimental results comparing...

  11. Concrete structures protection, repair and rehabilitation

    CERN Document Server

    Woodson, R Dodge

    2009-01-01

    The success of a repair or rehabilitation project depends on the specific plans designed for it. Concrete Structures: Protection, Repair and Rehabilitation provides guidance on evaluating the condition of the concrete in a structure, relating the condition of the concrete to the underlying cause or causes of that condition, selecting an appropriate repair material and method for any deficiency found, and using the selected materials and methods to repair or rehabilitate the structure. Guidance is also provided for engineers focused on maintaining concrete and preparing concrete investigation r

  12. Induced repair and mutagenesis in animal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takimoto, Koichi

    1981-01-01

    Induced repair and mutagenesis of animal cells against UV were studied in contrast with SOS repair of E. coli primarily by the use of viruses. Since UV-enhanced reactivation is a phenomenon similar to UV-reactivation (mutagenesis) and the presence of lesion bypass synthsis has been suggested, UV-enhanced reactivation has several common aspects with SOS reactivation of E. coli. However, correlation is not necessarily noted between increase in the viral survival rate and mutagenesis, nor do protease blockers exert any effect. Therefore, SOS repair of E. coli may have different mechansms from induced repair and mutagenesis in animal cells. (Ueda, J.)

  13. DNA damage and repair in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britt, A.B.

    1996-01-01

    The biological impact of any DNA damaging agent is a combined function of the chemical nature of the induced lesions and the efficiency and accuracy of their repair. Although much has been learned frommicrobes and mammals about both the repair of DNA damage and the biological effects of the persistence of these lesions, much remains to be learned about the mechanism and tissue-specificity of repair in plants. This review focuses on recent work on the induction and repair of DNA damage in higher plants, with special emphasis on UV-induced DNA damage products. (author)

  14. DNA repair in non-mammalian animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitani, Hiroshi

    1984-01-01

    Studies on DNA repair have been performed using microorganisms such as Escherichia coli and cultured human and mammalian cells. However, it is well known that cultured organic cells differ from each other in many respects, although DNA repair is an extremely fundamental function of organisms to protect genetic information from environmental mutagens such as radiation and 0 radicals developing in the living body. To answer the question of how DNA repair is different between the animal species, current studies on DNA repair of cultured vertebrate cells using the methods similar to those in mammalian experiments are reviewed. (Namekawa, K.)

  15. X-ray repair cross complementing protein 1 in base excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanssen-Bauer, Audun; Solvang-Garten, Karin; Akbari, Mansour

    2012-01-01

    X-ray Repair Cross Complementing protein 1 (XRCC1) acts as a scaffolding protein in the converging base excision repair (BER) and single strand break repair (SSBR) pathways. XRCC1 also interacts with itself and rapidly accumulates at sites of DNA damage. XRCC1 can thus mediate the assembly of large...

  16. CrowdAidRepair: A Crowd-Aided Interactive Data Repairing Method

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Jian

    2016-03-25

    Data repairing aims at discovering and correcting erroneous data in databases. Traditional methods relying on predefined quality rules to detect the conflict between data may fail to choose the right way to fix the detected conflict. Recent efforts turn to use the power of crowd in data repairing, but the crowd power has its own drawbacks such as high human intervention cost and inevitable low efficiency. In this paper, we propose a crowd-aided interactive data repairing method which takes the advantages of both rule-based method and crowd-based method. Particularly, we investigate the interaction between crowd-based repairing and rule-based repairing, and show that by doing crowd-based repairing to a small portion of values, we can greatly improve the repairing quality of the rule-based repairing method. Although we prove that the optimal interaction scheme using the least number of values for crowd-based repairing to maximize the imputation recall is not feasible to be achieved, still, our proposed solution identifies an efficient scheme through investigating the inconsistencies and the dependencies between values in the repairing process. Our empirical study on three data collections demonstrates the high repairing quality of CrowdAidRepair, as well as the efficiency of the generated interaction scheme over baselines.

  17. Strategies for osteochondral repair: Focus on scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seog-Jin Seo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Interest in osteochondral repair has been increasing with the growing number of sports-related injuries, accident traumas, and congenital diseases and disorders. Although therapeutic interventions are entering an advanced stage, current surgical procedures are still in their infancy. Unlike other tissues, the osteochondral zone shows a high level of gradient and interfacial tissue organization between bone and cartilage, and thus has unique characteristics related to the ability to resist mechanical compression and restoration. Among the possible therapies, tissue engineering of osteochondral tissues has shown considerable promise where multiple approaches of utilizing cells, scaffolds, and signaling molecules have been pursued. This review focuses particularly on the importance of scaffold design and its role in the success of osteochondral tissue engineering. Biphasic and gradient composition with proper pore configurations are the basic design consideration for scaffolds. Surface modification is an essential technique to improve the scaffold function associated with cell regulation or delivery of signaling molecules. The use of functional scaffolds with a controllable delivery strategy of multiple signaling molecules is also considered a promising therapeutic approach. In this review, we updated the recent advances in scaffolding approaches for osteochondral tissue engineering.

  18. Predictable repair of provisional restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Barry D; Cooper, Jeril R; Lazarchik, David A

    2009-01-01

    The importance of provisional restorations is often downplayed, as they are thought of by some as only "temporaries." As a result, a less-than-ideal provisional is sometimes fabricated, in part because of the additional chair time required to make provisional modifications when using traditional techniques. Additionally, in many dental practices, these provisional restorations are often fabricated by auxillary personnel who may not be as well trained in the fabrication process. Because provisionals play an important role in achieving the desired final functional and esthetic result, a high-quality provisional restoration is essential to fabricating a successful definitive restoration. This article describes a method for efficiently and predictably repairing both methacrylate and bis-acryl provisional restorations using flowable composite resin. By use of this relatively simple technique, provisional restorations can now be modified or repaired in a timely and productive manner to yield an exceptional result. Successful execution of esthetic and restorative dentistry requires attention to detail in every aspect of the case. Fabrication of high-quality provisional restorations can, at times, be challenging and time consuming. The techniques for optimizing resin provisional restorations as described in this paper are pragmatic and will enhance the delivery of dental treatment.

  19. Repairing liner of the reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar H, F.

    2001-07-01

    Due to the corrosion problems of the aluminum coating of the reactor pool, a periodic inspections program by ultrasound to evaluate the advance grade and the corrosion speed was settled down. This inspections have shown the necessity to repair some areas, in those that the slimming is significant, of not making it can arrive to the water escape of the reactor pool. The objective of the repair is to place patches of plates of 1/4 inch aluminum thickness in the areas of the reactor 'liner', in those that it has been detected by ultrasound a smaller thickness or similar to 3 mm. To carry out this the fuels are move (of the core and those that are decaying) to a temporary storage, the structure of the core is confined in a tank that this placed inside the pool of the reactor, a shield is placed in the thermal column and it is completely extracted the water for to leave uncover the 'liner' of the reactor. (Author)

  20. KNEE PROPRIOCEPTION FOLLOWING MENISCAL REPAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brytsko A. A.

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is well known that meniscectomy leads to osteoarthritis of the knee and proprioception impairment. Objective. The aim of this study was to assess retrospectively the joint position sense after meniscal suture and partial medial meniscal resection and to estimate the patients’ satisfaction with knee function. Material and Methods. We evaluated the outcomes of 27 patients after meniscal repair and compared them to those of 24 patients after partial meniscal resection. We estimated the joint position sense at 30°, 45° and 60° of flexion using the Biodex system 4 Pro. All patients were assessed with the IKDC 2000 subjective knee score. Results. A statistically significant worsening in reproducing the injured joint position in comparison to the healthy limb in both groups was observed. These impairments were mostly expressed at 45° and 60° of knee flexion, and were worsening over time in the group of patients who had undergone medial meniscal resection. An average value by the IKDC 2000 scale after 24 months in the meniscorrhaphy group was 76.73 ± 11.17% and 68.93 ± 14.76% after partial medial meniscal resection. Сonclusion. The control over position of the knee is not impaired after meniscal repair. An overall satisfaction with joint function is higher in patients who undergo meniscal suture in comparison to the partial medial meniscal resection group.

  1. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition in tissue repair and fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Rivka C; Pastar, Irena; Ojeh, Nkemcho; Chen, Vivien; Liu, Sophia; Garzon, Karen I; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2016-09-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) describes the global process by which stationary epithelial cells undergo phenotypic changes, including the loss of cell-cell adhesion and apical-basal polarity, and acquire mesenchymal characteristics that confer migratory capacity. EMT and its converse, MET (mesenchymal-epithelial transition), are integral stages of many physiologic processes and, as such, are tightly coordinated by a host of molecular regulators. Converging lines of evidence have identified EMT as a component of cutaneous wound healing, during which otherwise stationary keratinocytes (the resident skin epithelial cells) migrate across the wound bed to restore the epidermal barrier. Moreover, EMT plays a role in the development of scarring and fibrosis, as the matrix-producing myofibroblasts arise from cells of the epithelial lineage in response to injury but are pathologically sustained instead of undergoing MET or apoptosis. In this review, we summarize the role of EMT in physiologic repair and pathologic fibrosis of tissues and organs. We conclude that further investigation into the contribution of EMT to the faulty repair of fibrotic wounds might identify components of EMT signaling as common therapeutic targets for impaired healing in many tissues. Graphical Abstract Model for injury-triggered EMT activation in physiologic wound repair (left) and fibrotic wound healing (right).

  2. A geometric process repair model for a repairable cold standby system with priority in use and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yuanlin; Wang Guanjun

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a deteriorating cold standby repairable system consisting of two dissimilar components and one repairman is studied. For each component, assume that the successive working times form a decreasing geometric process while the consecutive repair times constitute an increasing geometric process, and component 1 has priority in use and repair. Under these assumptions, we consider a replacement policy N based on the number of repairs of component 1 under which the system is replaced when the number of repairs of component 1 reaches N. Our problem is to determine an optimal policy N* such that the average cost rate (i.e. the long-run average cost per unit time) of the system is minimized. The explicit equation of the average cost rate of the system is derived and the corresponding optimal replacement policy N* can be determined analytically or numerically. Finally, a numerical example with Weibull distribution is given to illustrate some theoretical results in this paper.

  3. 41 CFR 101-26.301-2 - Issue of used, repaired, and rehabilitated items in serviceable condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Issue of used, repaired... and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 26-PROCUREMENT SOURCES AND PROGRAM 26.3-Procurement of GSA Stock Items...

  4. 49 CFR 230.20 - Alteration and repair report for steam locomotive boilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... boilers. 230.20 Section 230.20 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... boilers. (a) Alterations. When an alteration is made to a steam locomotive boiler, the steam locomotive... maintained for the life of the boiler. (See appendix B of this part.) (b) Welded and riveted repairs to...

  5. 49 CFR 176.54 - Repairs involving welding, burning, and power-actuated tools and appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-actuated tools and appliances. 176.54 Section 176.54 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to..., burning, and power-actuated tools and appliances. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, repairs or work involving welding or burning, or the use of power-actuated tools or appliances which may...

  6. Repairing method and repairing device of incore structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uraki, Keiichi; Okamura, Hisanobu; Matsumoto, Toshimi

    1998-01-01

    In structures or equipment made of stainless steel, Ni-based alloy or a low alloy steel and undergoing neutron irradiation and causing a crack-like defect in a reactor pressure vessel, a plate is applied to a region where the crack-like detect is caused, and pressure is applied locally to bond the plate by generated resistance. Namely, electric current is supplied to the portion to be bonded while pressurizing to bond it by generated resistance heat. Then the propagation of cracks can be prevented and occurrence of cracks upon repairing can be prevented relative to a structural member undergoing neutron irradiation in the reactor pressure vessel and causing a crack-like defect thereby enabling to provide effects of preventing occurrence of an accident due to stress corrosion cracking of a nuclear power plant and prolonging the integrity of the plant. (N.H.)

  7. RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF FREIGHT CARS REPAIR ORGANIZATION METHODS IN THE DEPOT AND THE WAYS OF THEIR FURTHER DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Myamlin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A critical analysis of existing methods for repair of freight wagons is presented. The conclusion, that with probability nature of repair activities the “classic” type of a “rigid” production line with regulated step in long-term outlook is inexpedient, has been done. The further development of production-line wagon repair activities is seen in the creation of advanced enterprises equipped with multi-object flexible asynchronous systems with high level of mechanization and automation of technologic processes.

  8. Improvement of adhesion performance of mortar-repair interface with inducing crack path into repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Satoh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The most important performance for repair materials is adhesion to the substrate. The authors experimentally find out that high modulus fine aggregates in repair material enhance strength of it as well as the strength of the interface repaired with it, compared to the ordinary repair without fine aggregates. This paper elaborates the mechanisms for that with fractographic observation and FEM analysis based on the results of experiment. Also the authors discuss the ways for enhancing the strength and ductility of the repaired mortar

  9. PCAF/GCN5-Mediated Acetylation of RPA1 Promotes Nucleotide Excision Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meimei Zhao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The RPA complex can integrate multiple stress signals into diverse responses by activating distinct DNA repair pathways. However, it remains unclear how RPA1 elects to activate a specific repair pathway during different types of DNA damage. Here, we report that PCAF/GCN5-mediated K163 acetylation of RPA1 is crucial for nucleotide excision repair (NER but is dispensable for other DNA repair pathways. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that the acetylation of RPA1 is critical for the steady accumulation of XPA at damaged DNA sites and preferentially activates the NER pathway. DNA-PK phosphorylates and activates PCAF upon UV damage and consequently promotes the acetylation of RPA1. Moreover, the acetylation of RPA1 is tightly regulated by HDAC6 and SIRT1. Together, our results demonstrate that the K163 acetylation of RPA1 plays a key role in the repair of UV-induced DNA damage and reveal how the specific RPA1 modification modulates the choice of distinct DNA repair pathways.

  10. Crystal Structures of DNA-Whirly Complexes and Their Role in Arabidopsis Organelle Genome Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappadocia, Laurent; Maréchal, Alexandre; Parent, Jean-Sébastien; Lepage, Étienne; Sygusch, Jurgen; Brisson, Normand (Montreal)

    2010-09-07

    DNA double-strand breaks are highly detrimental to all organisms and need to be quickly and accurately repaired. Although several proteins are known to maintain plastid and mitochondrial genome stability in plants, little is known about the mechanisms of DNA repair in these organelles and the roles of specific proteins. Here, using ciprofloxacin as a DNA damaging agent specific to the organelles, we show that plastids and mitochondria can repair DNA double-strand breaks through an error-prone pathway similar to the microhomology-mediated break-induced replication observed in humans, yeast, and bacteria. This pathway is negatively regulated by the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding proteins from the Whirly family, thus indicating that these proteins could contribute to the accurate repair of plant organelle genomes. To understand the role of Whirly proteins in this process, we solved the crystal structures of several Whirly-DNA complexes. These reveal a nonsequence-specific ssDNA binding mechanism in which DNA is stabilized between domains of adjacent subunits and rendered unavailable for duplex formation and/or protein interactions. Our results suggest a model in which the binding of Whirly proteins to ssDNA would favor accurate repair of DNA double-strand breaks over an error-prone microhomology-mediated break-induced replication repair pathway.

  11. Strengthening, modification and repair techniques’ prioritization for structural integrity control of ageing offshore structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarakoon, Samindi M.K.; Ratnayake, R.M. Chandima

    2015-01-01

    Structural integrity control is vital for existing ageing as well as newly built offshore and onshore structures. Structural integrity control becomes highly sensitive to interventions under a potential loss of structural integrity when it comes to offshore oil and gas production and process facilities. This is mainly due to the inherent constraints present in carrying out engineering work in the offshore atmosphere. It has been further exacerbated by the ageing offshore structures and the necessity of carrying out life extension toward the end of their design service lives. Local and international regulations demand the implementation of appropriate strengthening, modification and repair plans when significant changes in the structural integrity are revealed. In this context, strengthening, modification and repair techniques such as welding, member removal/reduction of loading, mechanical clamping and grouted repairs play a vital role. This manuscript presents an approach for prioritizing the strengthening, modification and repair techniques using a multi-criteria analysis approach. An analytic hierarchy process has been selected for the analysis via an illustrative case. It also provides a comprehensive overview of currently existing; strengthening, modification and repair techniques and their comparative pros and cons. - Highlights: • Structural integrity control (SIC) of ageing and intact offshore structures. • Strengthening, modification and/or repair (SMR) techniques have been explained. • Application of multi-criteria analysis conserving SI has been illustrated. • SMR techniques prioritization and sensitivity analysis has been performed

  12. Characterization of DNA repair phenotypes of Xeroderma pigmentosum cell lines by a paralleled in vitro test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffin, A.L.

    2009-06-01

    DNA is constantly damaged modifying the genetic information for which it encodes. Several cellular mechanisms as the Base Excision Repair (BER) and the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) allow recovering the right DNA sequence. The Xeroderma pigmentosum is a disease characterised by a deficiency in the NER pathway. The aim of this study was to propose an efficient and fast test for the diagnosis of this disease as an alternative to the currently available UDS test. DNA repair activities of XP cell lines were quantified using in vitro miniaturized and paralleled tests in order to establish DNA repair phenotypes of XPA and XPC deficient cells. The main advantage of the tests used in this study is the simultaneous measurement of excision or excision synthesis (ES) of several lesions by only one cellular extract. We showed on one hand that the relative ES of the different lesions depend strongly on the protein concentration of the nuclear extract tested. Working at high protein concentration allowed discriminating the XP phenotype versus the control one, whereas it was impossible under a certain concentration's threshold. On the other hand, while the UVB irradiation of control cells stimulated their repair activities, this effect was not observed in XP cells. This study brings new information on the XPA and XPC protein roles during BER and NER and underlines the complexity of the regulations of DNA repair processes. (author)

  13. Mediator MED23 Links Pigmentation and DNA Repair through the Transcription Factor MITF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Min; Chen, Kun; Yao, Xiao; Xu, Yichi; Yao, Jiaying; Yan, Jun; Shao, Zhen; Wang, Gang

    2017-08-22

    DNA repair is related to many physiological and pathological processes, including pigmentation. Little is known about the role of the transcriptional cofactor Mediator complex in DNA repair and pigmentation. Here, we demonstrate that Mediator MED23 plays an important role in coupling UV-induced DNA repair to pigmentation. The loss of Med23 specifically impairs the pigmentation process in melanocyte-lineage cells and in zebrafish. Med23 deficiency leads to enhanced nucleotide excision repair (NER) and less DNA damage following UV radiation because of the enhanced expression and recruitment of NER factors to chromatin for genomic stability. Integrative analyses of melanoma cells reveal that MED23 controls the expression of a melanocyte master regulator, Mitf, by modulating its distal enhancer activity, leading to opposing effects on pigmentation and DNA repair. Collectively, the Mediator MED23/MITF axis connects DNA repair to pigmentation, thus providing molecular insights into the DNA damage response and skin-related diseases. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Bone Injury and Repair Trigger Central and Peripheral NPY Neuronal Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília J Alves

    Full Text Available Bone repair is a specialized type of wound repair controlled by complex multi-factorial events. The nervous system is recognized as one of the key regulators of bone mass, thereby suggesting a role for neuronal pathways in bone homeostasis. However, in the context of bone injury and repair, little is known on the interplay between the nervous system and bone. Here, we addressed the neuropeptide Y (NPY neuronal arm during the initial stages of bone repair encompassing the inflammatory response and ossification phases in femoral-defect mouse model. Spatial and temporal analysis of transcriptional and protein levels of NPY and its receptors, Y1R and Y2R, reported to be involved in bone homeostasis, was performed in bone, dorsal root ganglia (DRG and hypothalamus after femoral injury. The results showed that NPY system activity is increased in a time- and space-dependent manner during bone repair. Y1R expression was trigged in both bone and DRG throughout the inflammatory phase, while a Y2R response was restricted to the hypothalamus and at a later stage, during the ossification step. Our results provide new insights into the involvement of NPY neuronal pathways in bone repair.

  15. Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair in a Developing Nation: Short ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bilateral hernias, and recurrent hernias), there are data demonstrating an ... no reports of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair from the. Anglophone ... MATERIALS AND METHODS .... inguinal hernia repair has advantages over open repair for.

  16. DNA Repair and Ethnic Differences in Prostate Cancer Risk

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goldman, Radoslav

    2008-01-01

    .... To evaluate this hypothesis we quantify DNA repair capacity in blood cells using comet assay and evaluate how this repair capacity is related to genetic variants in OGG1 and XRCC1 DNA repair genes...

  17. DNA Repair and Ethnic Differences in Prostate Cancer Risk

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goldman, Radoslav

    2007-01-01

    .... To evaluate this hypothesis we quantify DNA repair capacity in blood cells using comet assay and evaluate how this repair capacity is related to genetic variants in OGG1 and XRCC1 DNA repair genes...

  18. DNA Repair and Ethnic Differences in Prostate Cancer Risk

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goldman, Radoslav

    2006-01-01

    .... To evaluate this hypothesis, we quantify DNA repair capacity in blood cells using comet assay and evaluate how this repair capacity is related to genetic variants in OGG1 and XRCC1 DNA repair genes...

  19. DNA repair related to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, W.

    1979-01-01

    The DNA excision repair capacity of peripheral human lymphocytes after radiation therapy has been analyzed. Different forms of application of the radiation during the therapy have been taken into account. No inhibition of repair was found if cells were allowed a certain amount of accomodation to radiation, either by using lower doses or longer application times. (G.G.)

  20. Maintenance and Repair of Concrete Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijen, J.M.J.M.

    1989-01-01

    In 1987 and 1988 a series of articles was published in the Dutchjournal "Cement" about maintenance and repair of concrete structures. The series was written to promote the transfer of know-how concerning maintenance and repair of concrete structures. Use has been made of know-how developed in the

  1. VEHICLE REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE COSTS IN NIGERIA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A standard model was established for the prediction of repair and maintenance costs of vehicles in a non-profit making government parastatal. The model was derived based on data collected over a ten year period from a non-profit making government parastatal, and it predicts repair and maintenance costs as a linear ...

  2. 30 CFR 57.6801 - Vehicle repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vehicle repair. 57.6801 Section 57.6801 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... and Underground § 57.6801 Vehicle repair. Vehicles containing explosive material and oxidizers shall...

  3. Dysphagia in children with repaired oesophageal atresia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppens, C.H.; Engel-Hoek, L. van den; Scharbatke, H.E.; Groot, S.A. de; Draaisma, J.M.T.

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common problem in children with repaired oesophageal atresia (OA). Abnormalities in the oropharyngeal and oesophageal phase have hardly been studied. The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of dysphagia in children with repaired OA and to identify and differentiate oral

  4. Human DNA repair and recombination genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Jones, N.J.

    1988-09-01

    Several genes involved in mammalian DNA repair pathways were identified by complementation analysis and chromosomal mapping based on hybrid cells. Eight complementation groups of rodent mutants defective in the repair of uv radiation damage are now identified. At least seven of these genes are probably essential for repair and at least six of them control the incision step. The many genes required for repair of DNA cross-linking damage show overlap with those involved in the repair of uv damage, but some of these genes appear to be unique for cross-link repair. Two genes residing on human chromosome 19 were cloned from genomic transformants using a cosmid vector, and near full-length cDNA clones of each gene were isolated and sequenced. Gene ERCC2 efficiently corrects the defect in CHO UV5, a nucleotide excision repair mutant. Gene XRCC1 normalizes repair of strand breaks and the excessive sister chromatid exchange in CHO mutant EM9. ERCC2 shows a remarkable /approximately/52% overall homology at both the amino acid and nucleotide levels with the yeast RAD3 gene. Evidence based on mutation induction frequencies suggests that ERCC2, like RAD3, might also be an essential gene for viability. 100 refs., 4 tabs

  5. Tumor relapse present in oncologic nasal repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvez Chavez, Julio Cesar; Sanchez Wals, Lenia; Monzon Fernandez, Abel Nicolas; Morales Tirado, Roxana

    2009-01-01

    Tumor relapse is one of the more fearsome complications of the oncologic course and also to obscure the life prognosis, causing the loss of many reconstructions and of exhausting the repairing surgical possibilities. The aim of this study was to determine the relapse frequency, the repercussion on the repair and the subsequent medical course of patients operated on malign nasal tumors

  6. The Weekend Effect in AAA Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Thomas F X; Li, Chun; Swerdlow, Nicholas J; Liang, Patric; Pothof, Alexander B; Patel, Virendra I; Giles, Kristina A; Malas, Mahmoud B; Schermerhorn, Marc L

    2018-04-18

    Conflicting reports exist regarding whether patients undergoing surgery on the weekend or later in the week experience worse outcomes. We identified patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair in the Vascular Quality Initiative between 2009 and 2017 [n = 38,498; 30,537 endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and 7961 open repair]. We utilized mixed effects logistic regression to compare adjusted rates of perioperative mortality based on the day of repair. Tuesday was the most common day for elective repair (22%), Friday for symptomatic repairs (20%), and ruptured aneurysms were evenly distributed. Patients with ruptured aneurysms experienced similar adjusted mortality whether they underwent repair during the week or on weekends. Transfers of ruptured AAA were more common over the weekend. However, patients transferred on the weekend experienced higher adjusted mortality than those transferred during the week (28% vs 21%, P = 0.02), despite the fact that during the week, transferred patients actually experienced lower adjusted mortality than patients treated at the index hospital (21% vs 31%, P AAA repair. However, patients with ruptured AAA transferred on the weekend experienced higher mortality than those transferred during the week, suggesting a need for improvement in weekend transfer processes.

  7. Self repairing composites for drone air vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dry, Carolyn

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this effort was to demonstrate the feasibility of impact-initiated delivery of repair chemicals through hollow fiber architectures embedded within graphite fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites, representative of advanced drone aircraft component material systems. Self-repairing structures through coupon and elements were demonstrated, and evaluated.

  8. 26 CFR 1.162-4 - Repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the cost of acquisition or production or the gain or loss basis of the taxpayer's plant, equipment, or other property, as the case may be, is not increased by the amount of such expenditures. Repairs in the... incidental repairs which neither materially add to the value of the property nor appreciably prolong its life...

  9. FLEXOR TENDON REPAIR IN THE HAND

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method of Repair. Cases. AGE, SEX ... method is at fault and not the dexterity of the operator or his technique. .... Physio- therapy seldom makes stiff fingers work, but it prevents .... or repaired later by direct suture, graft or transplant. No. of.

  10. Plan Repair as an Extension of Planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Krogt, R.P.J.; De Weerdt, M.M.

    2005-01-01

    In dynamic environments, agents have to deal with changing situations. In these cases, repairing a plan is often more efficient than planning from scratch, but existing planning techniques are more advanced than existing plan repair techniques. Therefore, we propose a straightforward method to

  11. Using repair priorities in systems with redundacies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sleptchenko, A.V.; Adan, I.J.B.F.; Van Houtum, G.-J.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present and analyze a mathematical model for the computation of the system availability for a system of parallel machines with redundancies and repair priorities. Using the presented models, we show that the repair priorities have a strong effect on the performance of the system.

  12. 77 FR 30053 - Repair Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ... pitch controls, governors, pitch change assemblies, pitch locks, mechanical stops, and feathering system... practices, or advances in aircraft technology. These changes would modernize the regulations to keep pace.... Privacy: The FAA will post all comments it receives, without change, to http://www.regulations.gov...

  13. Mutagenesis and repair of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janion, C.; Grzesiuk, E.; Fabisiewicz, A.; Tudek, B.; Ciesla, J.; Graziewicz, M.; Wojcik, A.; Speina, E.

    1998-01-01

    Full text. The discovery that the mfd gene codes for a transcription-coupling repair factor (TRCF) prompted us to re-investigate the MFD (mutation frequency decline) phenomenon in E.coli K-12 strain when mutations were induced by ultraviolet light, halogen light or MMS-treatment. These studies revealed that: (i) the process of MFD involves the proofreading activity of DNA pol III and the mismatch repair system, as well as, TRCF and the UvrABC-excinuclease (ii) a semi-rich plate test may be replaced by a rich liquid medium, (iii) the T-T pyrimidine dimers are the lesions excised with the highest activity, and (iv) overproduction of UmuD(D'C) proteins leads to a great increase in mutant frequency in irradiated and MMS-treated cells. The role of mismatch repair (MR) in MMS-induced mutagenesis is obscured by the fact that the spectra of mutational specificity are different in bacteria proficient and deficient in MR. It has been found that transposons Tn10 (and Tn5) when inserted into chromosomal DNA of E. coli influence the phenotype lowering the survival and frequency of mutations induced by UV or halogen light irradiation. This is connected with a deficiency of UmuD(D') and UmuC proteins. Transformation of bacteria with plasmids bearing the umuD(D')C genes, suppresses the effects of the transposon insertion, a phenomenon which has not been described before. Single-stranded DNA of M13mp18 phage was oxidized in vitro by a hydroxyl radical generating system including hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase/Fe3+/EDTA, and it was found that Fapy-Ade, Fapy-Gua, 8-oxyAde and thymine glycol were the main products formed. Replication of the oxidized template by T7 phage DNA polymerase, Klenow fragment of polymerase I, or polymerase beta from bovine thymus has revealed that oxidized pyrimidines are stronger blockers than oxidized purines for T7 phage and Klenow fragment polymerases and the blocking potency depends on the neighboring bases and on the type of polymerase. Studies of

  14. Saturation of DNA repair in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, F E; Setlow, R B

    1979-01-01

    Excision repair seems to reach a plateau in normal human cells at a 254 nm dose near 20 J/m/sup 2/. We measured excision repair in normal human fibroblasts up to 80 J/m/sup 2/. The four techniques used (unscheduled DNA synthesis, photolysis of BrdUrd incorporated during repair, loss of sites sensitive to a UV endonuclease from Micrococcus luteus, and loss of pyrimidine dimers from DNA) showed little difference between the two doses. Moreover, the loss of endonuclease sites in 24h following two 20 J/m/sup 2/ doses separated by 24h was similar to the loss observed following one dose. Hence, we concluded that the observed plateau in excision repair is real and does not represent some inhibitory process at high doses but a true saturation of one of the rate limiting steps in repair.

  15. On the optimal degree of imperfect repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkelstein, Maxim

    2015-01-01

    A simple cost-wise comparison between the minimal and perfect repair of a system is discussed first using a relevant example. The main focus of this note, however, is on imperfect (general) repair. The best repair for our system in this case is defined as the one that corresponds to the optimal level (extent) of repair actions that minimize the long-run expected cost per unit of time. This complex optimization problem is considered for a specific imperfect repair model (Kijima II), using the developed earlier asymptotic approach to the corresponding virtual age modelling. It is shown that the optimal solution exists when the failure rate of a system tends to infinity as t tends to infinity and the corresponding cost function decreases sufficiently fast. An example illustrating the optimization procedure is considered

  16. Contact Dermatitis In Automobile Repair workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi M P

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Automobile repair workers are at risk of developing skin morbidity including occupational dermatoses because of their exposure to mineral oils, petroleum products and its derivatives and lubricating oil. This cross- sectional study was carried out at Maharashtra State Road Transport Corporation workshops in Nagpur city to investigate prevalence of skin morbidity including contact dermatitis in automobile repair workers. The study included 288 (49.9% automobile repair workers 180 (31.3% workshop office staff and 109 (18.8% divisional office employees. Dermatitis was the commonest skin morbidity in all the study subjects and it was significantly more prevalent in automobile repair workers. Folliculitis was detected in 13.2% of auto â€" repair workers and was not seen in the other two groups. Increasing trend of skin morbidity was correlated with the length of service of employees. Proper protective measures along with suitable washing facilities should be provided

  17. Imperfect repair and lifesaving in heterogeneous populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkelstein, Maxim [Department of Mathematical Statistics, University of the Free State, PO Box 339, 9300 Bloemfontein (South Africa) and Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock (Germany)]. E-mail: FinkelM.SCl@mail.uovs.ac.za

    2007-12-15

    In this theoretical paper we generalize the notion of minimal repair to the heterogeneous case, when the lifetime distribution function can be modeled by continuous or a discrete mixture of distributions. The statistical (black box) minimal repair and the minimal repair based on information just before the failure of an object are considered. The corresponding failure (intensity) rate processes are defined and analyzed. Demographic lifesaving model is also considered: each life is saved (cured) with some probability (or equivalently a proportion of individuals who would have died are now resuscitated and given another chance). Those who are saved experience the statistical minimal repair. Both of these models are based on the Poisson or non-homogeneous Poisson processes of underlying events, which allow for considering heterogeneity. We also consider the new model of imperfect repair in the homogeneous case and present generalizations to the heterogeneous setting.

  18. Stochastic Modelling Of The Repairable System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzejczak Karol

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available All reliability models consisting of random time factors form stochastic processes. In this paper we recall the definitions of the most common point processes which are used for modelling of repairable systems. Particularly this paper presents stochastic processes as examples of reliability systems for the support of the maintenance related decisions. We consider the simplest one-unit system with a negligible repair or replacement time, i.e., the unit is operating and is repaired or replaced at failure, where the time required for repair and replacement is negligible. When the repair or replacement is completed, the unit becomes as good as new and resumes operation. The stochastic modelling of recoverable systems constitutes an excellent method of supporting maintenance related decision-making processes and enables their more rational use.

  19. Male Fertility After Inguinal Hernia Mesh Repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohl, Andreas Pagh; Andresen, Kristoffer; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: To determine whether patients who receive an inguinal hernia repair father the same number of children as the background population. BACKGROUND:: Although the effect of inguinal hernia repair on male fertility has previously been investigated through indirect measures, no previous...... studies have evaluated the final measure of male fertility, which is the number of children fathered by patients. METHODS:: Prospectively collected data on 32,621 male patients between the ages of 18 and 55 years who received 1 or more inguinal hernia repairs during the years 1998 to 2012 were found in 5...... hernia repair using Lichtenstein technique or laparoscopic approach did not father fewer children than expected. Thus, inguinal hernia repair using Lichtenstein or laparoscopic approach did not impair male fertility....

  20. Oxidative DNA damage & repair: An introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadet, Jean; Davies, Kelvin J A

    2017-06-01

    This introductory article should be viewed as a prologue to the Free Radical Biology & Medicine Special Issue devoted to the important topic of Oxidatively Damaged DNA and its Repair. This special issue is dedicated to Professor Tomas Lindahl, co-winner of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his seminal discoveries in the area repair of oxidatively damaged DNA. In the past several years it has become abundantly clear that DNA oxidation is a major consequence of life in an oxygen-rich environment. Concomitantly, survival in the presence of oxygen, with the constant threat of deleterious DNA mutations and deletions, has largely been made possible through the evolution of a vast array of DNA repair enzymes. The articles in this Oxidatively Damaged DNA & Repair special issue detail the reactions by which intracellular DNA is oxidatively damaged, and the enzymatic reactions and pathways by which living organisms survive such assaults by repair processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Repair of DNA in xeroderma pigmentosum conjunctiva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newsome, D.A.; Kraemer, K.H.; Robbins, J.H.

    1975-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is an autosomal recessive disease with tumor formation on sun-exposed areas of the skin and eyes. Cells from most XP patients are deficient in repairing DNA damaged by ultraviolet (uv) light as shown by a reduced rate of tritiated thymidine (3HTdR) incorporation during their DNA repair synthesis. We have studied such repair synthesis in conjunctival cells from an XP patient with a conjunctival epithelioma and from normal cadaver conjunctiva. Cultured conjunctival cells were irradiated with uv light and then incubated with 3HTdR. Autoradiograms were prepared and showed that uv radiation induced a considerably slower rate of DNA repair synthesis in the XP cells than in normal cells. Many of the ocular abnormalities of XP, including tumor formation, may be the result of this defective DNA repair process

  2. RYBP Is a K63-Ubiquitin-Chain-Binding Protein that Inhibits Homologous Recombination Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A.M. Ali

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Ring1-YY1-binding protein (RYBP is a member of the non-canonical polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1, and like other PRC1 members, it is best described as a transcriptional regulator. However, several PRC1 members were recently shown to function in DNA repair. Here, we report that RYBP preferentially binds K63-ubiquitin chains via its Npl4 zinc finger (NZF domain. Since K63-linked ubiquitin chains are assembled at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs, we examined the contribution of RYBP to DSB repair. Surprisingly, we find that RYBP is K48 polyubiquitylated by RNF8 and rapidly removed from chromatin upon DNA damage by the VCP/p97 segregase. High expression of RYBP competitively inhibits recruitment of BRCA1 repair complex to DSBs, reducing DNA end resection and homologous recombination (HR repair. Moreover, breast cancer cell lines expressing high endogenous RYBP levels show increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents and poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibition. These data suggest that RYBP negatively regulates HR repair by competing for K63-ubiquitin chain binding. : Ali et al. find that RYBP binds K63-linked ubiquitin chains and is removed from DNA damage sites. This K63-ubiquitin binding allows RYBP to hinder the recruitment of BRCA1 and Rad51 to DNA double-strand breaks, thus inhibiting homologous recombination repair. Accordingly, cancer cells expressing high RYBP are more sensitive to DNA-damaging therapies. Keywords: DNA damage response, homologous recombination, ubiquitylation, RYBP, polycomb proteins, double-strand break repair, chromatin, histone modification

  3. Laparoscopic repair of large suprapubic hernias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikar, Hasan Ediz; Çetin, Kenan; Eyvaz, Kemal; Kaptanoglu, Levent; Küçük, Hasan Fehmi

    2017-09-01

    Suprapubic hernia is the term to describe ventral hernias located less than 4 cm above the pubic arch in the midline. Hernias with an upper margin above the arcuate line encounter technical difficulties, and the differences in repair methods forced us to define them as large suprapubic hernias. To present our experience with laparoscopic repair of large suprapubic hernias that allows adequate mesh overlap. Nineteen patients with suprapubic incisional hernias who underwent laparoscopic repair between May 2013 and January 2015 were included in the study. Patients with laparoscopic extraperitoneal repair who had a suprapubic hernia with an upper margin below the arcuate line were excluded. Two men and 17 women, with a mean age of 58.2, underwent laparoscopic repair. Most of the incisions were midline vertical (13/68.4%). Twelve (63.1%) of the patients had previous incisional hernia repair (PIHR group); the mean number of previous incisional hernia repair was 1.4. Mean defect size of the PIHR group was higher than in patients without previous repair - 107.3 cm 2 vs. 50.9 cm 2 (p < 0.05). Mean operating time of the PIHR group was higher than in patients without repair - 126 min vs. 77.9 min (p < 0.05). Although all complications occurred in the PIHR group, there was no statistically significant difference. Laparoscopic repair of large suprapubic hernias can be considered as the first option in treatment. The low recurrence rates reported in the literature and the lack of recurrence, as observed in our study, support this view.

  4. Systems Maintenance Automated Repair Tasks (SMART)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, Joseph; Mitchell, Brent; Locklear, Louis; Belson, Martin A.; Al-Shihabi, Mary Jo Y.; King, Nadean; Norena, Elkin; Hardin, Derek

    2010-01-01

    SMART is a uniform automated discrepancy analysis and repair-authoring platform that improves technical accuracy and timely delivery of repair procedures for a given discrepancy (see figure a). SMART will minimize data errors, create uniform repair processes, and enhance the existing knowledge base of engineering repair processes. This innovation is the first tool developed that links the hardware specification requirements with the actual repair methods, sequences, and required equipment. SMART is flexibly designed to be useable by multiple engineering groups requiring decision analysis, and by any work authorization and disposition platform (see figure b). The organizational logic creates the link between specification requirements of the hardware, and specific procedures required to repair discrepancies. The first segment in the SMART process uses a decision analysis tree to define all the permutations between component/ subcomponent/discrepancy/repair on the hardware. The second segment uses a repair matrix to define what the steps and sequences are for any repair defined in the decision tree. This segment also allows for the selection of specific steps from multivariable steps. SMART will also be able to interface with outside databases and to store information from them to be inserted into the repair-procedure document. Some of the steps will be identified as optional, and would only be used based on the location and the current configuration of the hardware. The output from this analysis would be sent to a work authoring system in the form of a predefined sequence of steps containing required actions, tools, parts, materials, certifications, and specific requirements controlling quality, functional requirements, and limitations.

  5. Genomic survey and expression analysis of DNA repair genes in the genus Leptospira.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Pinheiro, Marinalva; Schons-Fonseca, Luciane; da Silva, Josefa B; Domingos, Renan H; Momo, Leonardo Hiroyuki Santos; Simões, Ana Carolina Quirino; Ho, Paulo Lee; da Costa, Renata M A

    2016-04-01

    Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonosis with important economic and public health consequences and is caused by pathogenic leptospires. The genus Leptospira belongs to the order Spirochaetales and comprises saprophytic (L. biflexa), pathogenic (L. interrogans) and host-dependent (L. borgpetersenii) members. Here, we present an in silico search for DNA repair pathways in Leptospira spp. The relevance of such DNA repair pathways was assessed through the identification of mRNA levels of some genes during infection in animal model and after exposition to spleen cells. The search was performed by comparison of available Leptospira spp. genomes in public databases with known DNA repair-related genes. Leptospires exhibit some distinct and unexpected characteristics, for instance the existence of a redundant mechanism for repairing a chemically diverse spectrum of alkylated nucleobases, a new mutS-like gene and a new shorter version of uvrD. Leptospira spp. shares some characteristics from Gram-positive, as the presence of PcrA, two RecQ paralogs and two SSB proteins; the latter is considered a feature shared by naturally competent bacteria. We did not find a significant reduction in the number of DNA repair-related genes in both pathogenic and host-dependent species. Pathogenic leptospires were enriched for genes dedicated to base excision repair and non-homologous end joining. Their evolutionary history reveals a remarkable importance of lateral gene transfer events for the evolution of the genus. Up-regulation of specific DNA repair genes, including components of SOS regulon, during infection in animal model validates the critical role of DNA repair mechanisms for the complex interplay between host/pathogen.

  6. [SOS-repair--60 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavil'gel'skiĭ, G B

    2013-01-01

    This review integrates 60 years of research on SOS-repair and SOS-mutagenesis in procaryotes and eucaryotes, from Jean Weigle experiment in 1953 year (mutagenesis of lambda bacteriophage in UV-irradiated bacteria) to the latest achievements in studying SOS-mutagenesis on all living organisms--Eukarya, Archaea and Bacteria. A key role in establishing of a biochemical basis for SOS-mutagenesis belonges to the finding in 1998-1999 years that specific error-prone DNA polymerases (PolV and others) catalysed translesion synthesis on damaged DNA. This review focuses on recent studies addressing the new models for SOS-induced mutagenesis in Escherichia coli and Home sapiens cells.

  7. Laparoscopic repair of vesicovaginal fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miłosz Wilczyński

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A vesicovaginal fistula is one of the complications that a gynaecologist is bound to face after oncological operations, especially in postmenopausal women. Over the years there have been introduced many techniques of surgical treatment of this entity, including transabdominal and transvaginal approaches.We present a case of a 46-year-old patient who suffered from urinary leakage via the vagina due to the presence of a vesicovaginal fistula that developed after radical abdominal hysterectomy and subsequent radiotherapy. The decision was made to repair it laparoscopically due to retracted, fibrous and scarred tissue in the vaginal apex that precluded a transvaginal approach. A small cystotomy followed by an excision of fistula borders was performed. After six-month follow-up no recurrence of the disease has been noted.We conclude that laparoscopy is an interesting alternative to traditional approaches that provides comparable results.

  8. Vibration in car repair work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, J E; Eklund, L; Kihlberg, S; Ostergren, C E

    1987-03-01

    The main objective of the study was to find efficient hand tools which caused only minor vibration loading. Vibration measurements were carried out under standardised working conditions. The time during which car body repairers in seven companies were exposed to vibration was determined. Chisel hammers, impact wrenches, sanders and saws were the types of tools which generated the highest vibration accelerations. The average daily exposure at the different garages ranged from 22 to 70 min. The risk of vibration injury is currently rated as high. The difference between the highest and lowest levels of vibration was considerable in most tool categories. Therefore the choice of tool has a major impact on the magnitude of vibration exposure. The importance of choosing the right tools and working methods is discussed and a counselling service on vibration is proposed.

  9. Shuttle Repair Tools Automate Vehicle Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Successfully building, flying, and maintaining the space shuttles was an immensely complex job that required a high level of detailed, precise engineering. After each shuttle landed, it entered a maintenance, repair, and overhaul (MRO) phase. Each system was thoroughly checked and tested, and worn or damaged parts replaced, before the shuttle was rolled out for its next mission. During the MRO period, workers needed to record exactly what needed replacing and why, as well as follow precise guidelines and procedures in making their repairs. That meant traceability, and with it lots of paperwork. In 2007, the number of reports generated during electrical system repairs was getting out of hand-placing among the top three systems in terms of paperwork volume. Repair specialists at Kennedy Space Center were unhappy spending so much time at a desk and so little time actually working on the shuttle. "Engineers weren't spending their time doing technical work," says Joseph Schuh, an electrical engineer at Kennedy. "Instead, they were busy with repetitive, time-consuming processes that, while important in their own right, provided a low return on time invested." The strain of such inefficiency was bad enough that slow electrical repairs jeopardized rollout on several occasions. Knowing there had to be a way to streamline operations, Kennedy asked Martin Belson, a project manager with 30 years experience as an aerospace contractor, to co-lead a team in developing software that would reduce the effort required to document shuttle repairs. The result was System Maintenance Automated Repair Tasks (SMART) software. SMART is a tool for aggregating and applying information on every aspect of repairs, from procedures and instructions to a vehicle s troubleshooting history. Drawing on that data, SMART largely automates the processes of generating repair instructions and post-repair paperwork. In the case of the space shuttle, this meant that SMART had 30 years worth of operations

  10. To repair the fault or end the acid reign?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modlin, I M

    1995-01-01

    Despite the vast effort and expense devoted to the elucidation of the cause of esophagogastro-duodenal ulcer disease, relatively minimal progress has been made towards the understanding of causation. Since earliest times, it has been recognized that milk, chalk powder, or charcoal ameliorate the disease process and its symptoms. In addition, the avoidance of acidic or spicy foods provides some relief. Thus ulcer disease has been ascribed to acid or the consequences of hyperacidity. Reams of data and countless meetings have purported to confirm and support this viewpoint. Surprisingly, the co-secretion in the stomach of the powerful proteolytic enzyme pepsin has been virtually ignored as a pathogenetic agent. Marshalling distant antipodean resources, a novel bacteria, H. pylori, was identified as a significant causative agent in ulcer disease. To the amazement of nobody but gastroenterologists, it became apparent that there might be more than one cause for ulcer disease. Subsequently, both corporations and physicians seized the reins of multi-variant antibiotic therapy as a panacea for the third millennium treatment of peptic ulcer disease. Only a brave few have raised the issues of possible abnormalities in intrinsic mucosal function which might generate a locus minoris resistentiae. Defective mucosal repair mechanisms have barely been evaluated, since the regulation of normal mucosal healing is so poorly understood. Nevertheless, consideration of the therapeutic potential of mucosal protection has found support at both an intellectual and a clinical level. The more exciting recent possibility of the local delivery of growth factors which might promote healing has provided a unique opportunity for further therapeutic advance. Indeed in the future the exogenous regulation of mucosal repair may provide a milieu conductive to the resolution of an old but ill-understood problem. It is certainly apparent that processes beyond parietal cell proton secretion are critical

  11. Excess single-stranded DNA inhibits meiotic double-strand break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Johnson

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available During meiosis, self-inflicted DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are created by the protein Spo11 and repaired by homologous recombination leading to gene conversions and crossovers. Crossover formation is vital for the segregation of homologous chromosomes during the first meiotic division and requires the RecA orthologue, Dmc1. We analyzed repair during meiosis of site-specific DSBs created by another nuclease, VMA1-derived endonuclease (VDE, in cells lacking Dmc1 strand-exchange protein. Turnover and resection of the VDE-DSBs was assessed in two different reporter cassettes that can repair using flanking direct repeat sequences, thereby obviating the need for a Dmc1-dependent DNA strand invasion step. Access of the single-strand binding complex replication protein A, which is normally used in all modes of DSB repair, was checked in chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, using antibody against Rfa1. Repair of the VDE-DSBs was severely inhibited in dmc1Delta cells, a defect that was associated with a reduction in the long tract resection required to initiate single-strand annealing between the flanking repeat sequences. Mutants that either reduce Spo11-DSB formation or abolish resection at Spo11-DSBs rescued the repair block. We also found that a replication protein A component, Rfa1, does not accumulate to expected levels at unrepaired single-stranded DNA (ssDNA in dmc1Delta cells. The requirement of Dmc1 for VDE-DSB repair using flanking repeats appears to be caused by the accumulation of large quantities of ssDNA that accumulate at Spo11-DSBs when Dmc1 is absent. We propose that these resected DSBs sequester both resection machinery and ssDNA binding proteins, which in wild-type cells would normally be recycled as Spo11-DSBs repair. The implication is that repair proteins are in limited supply, and this could reflect an underlying mechanism for regulating DSB repair in wild-type cells, providing protection from potentially harmful effects

  12. Analysis for a two-dissimilar-component cold standby repairable system with repair priority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, Kit Nam Francis; Zhang Yuanlin; Lai, Kin Keung

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a cold standby repairable system consisting of two dissimilar components and one repairman is studied. Assume that working time distributions and repair time distributions of the two components are both exponential, and Component 1 has repair priority when both components are broken down. After repair, Component 1 follows a geometric process repair while Component 2 obeys a perfect repair. Under these assumptions, using the perfect repair model, the geometric process repair model and the supplementary variable technique, we not only study some important reliability indices, but also consider a replacement policy T, under which the system is replaced when the working age of Component 1 reaches T. Our problem is to determine an optimal policy T* such that the long-run average loss per unit time (i.e. average loss rate) of the system is minimized. The explicit expression for the average loss rate of the system is derived, and the corresponding optimal replacement policy T* can be found numerically. Finally, a numerical example for replacement policy T is given to illustrate some theoretical results and the model's applicability. - Highlights: → A two-dissimilar-component cold standby system with repair priority is formulated. → The successive up/repair times of Component 1 form a decreasing/increasing geometric process. → Not only some reliability indices but also a replacement policy are studied.

  13. Phenomenology of an inducible mutagenic DNA repair pathway in Escherichia coli: SOS repair hypothesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radman, M.

    1974-01-01

    A hypothesis is proposed according to which E. coli possesses an inducible DNA repair system. This hypothetical repair, which we call SOS repair, is manifested only following damage to DNA, and requires de novo protein synthesis. SOS repair in E. coli requires some known genetic elements: recA + , lex + and probably zab + . Mutagenesis by ultraviolet light is observed only under conditions of functional SOS repair: we therefore suspect that this is a mutation-prone repair. A number of phenomena and experiments is reviewed which at this point can best be interpreted in terms of an inducible mutagenic DNA repair system. Two recently discovered phenomena support the proposed hypothesis: existence of a mutant (tif) which, after a shift to elevated temperature, mimicks the effect of uv irradiation in regard to repair of phage lambda and uv mutagenesis, apparent activation of SOS repair by introduction into the recipient cell of damaged plasmid or Hfr DNA. Several specific predictions based on SOS repair hypothesis are presented in order to stimulate further experimental tests. (U.S.)

  14. Emerging connection between centrosome and DNA repair machinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Mikio; Komatsu, Kenshi

    2009-01-01

    Centrosomes function in proper cell division in animal cells. The centrosome consists of a pair of centrioles and the surrounding pericentriolar matrix (PCM). After cytokinesis, daughter cells each acquire one centrosome, which subsequently duplicates at the G1/S phase in a manner that is dependent upon CDK2/cyclin-E activity. Defects in the regulation of centrosome duplication lead to tumorigenesis through abnormal cell division and resulting inappropriate chromosome segregation. Therefore, maintenance of accurate centrosome number is important for cell fate. Excess number of centrosomes can be induced by several factors including ionizing radiation (IR). Recent studies have shown that several DNA repair proteins localize to the centrosome and are involved in the regulation of centrosome number possibly through cell cycle checkpoints or direct modification of centrosome proteins. Furthermore, it has been reported that the development of microcephaly is likely caused by defective expression of centrosome proteins, such as ASPM, which are also involved in the response to IR. The present review highlights centrosome duplication in association with genotoxic stresses and the regulatory mechanism mediated by DNA repair proteins. (author)

  15. Initial experience of laparoscopic incisional hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razman, J; Shaharin, S; Lukman, M R; Sukumar, N; Jasmi, A Y

    2006-06-01

    Laparoscopic repair of ventral and incisional hernia has become increasingly popular as compared to open repair. The procedure has the advantages of minimal access surgery, reduction of post operative pain and the recurrence rate. A prospective study of laparoscopic incisional hernia repair was performed in our center from August 2002 to April 2004. Eighteen cases (n: 18) were performed during the study period. Fifteen cases (n: 15) had open hernia repair previously. Sixteen patients (n: 16) had successful repair of the hernia with the laparoscopic approach and two cases were converted to open repair. The mean hernia defect size was 156cm2. There was no intraoperative or immediate postoperative complication. The mean operating time was 100 +/- 34 minutes (75 - 180 minutes). The postoperative pain was graded as mild to moderate according to visual analogue score. The mean day of discharge after surgery was two days (1 - 3 days). During follow up, three patients (16.7%) developed seroma at the hernia sac which was resolved with conservative management after three weeks. One (5.6%) patient developed recurrence six months after surgery. In conclusion, laparoscopic repair of incisional hernia particularly recurrent hernia has been shown to be safe and effective in our centre. However, careful patient selection and acquiring the necessary advanced laparoscopic surgical skills coupled with the proper use of equipment are mandatory before embarking on this procedure.

  16. Repair of DNA damage in Deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    The repair of DNA lesions in Deinococcus radiodurans was examined with particular reference to DNA excision repair of ultraviolet light (UV) induced pyrimidine dimers. The characteristics of excision repair via UV endonucleases α and β in vivo varied with respect to (a) the substrate range of the enzymes, (b) the rate of repair of DNA damage (c) the requirement for a protein synthesised in response to DNA damage to attenuate exonuclease action at repairing regions. UV endonuclease α is postulated to incise DNA in a different manner from UV endonuclease β thus defining the method of subsequent repair. Several DNA damage specific endonuclease activities independent of α and β are described. Mutations of the uvsA, uvsF and uvsG genes resulted in an increase in single-strand breaks in response to DNA damage producing uncontrolled DNA degradation. Evidence is presented that these genes have a role in limiting the access of UV endonuclease β to DNA lesions. uvsF and uvsG are also shown to be linked to the mtoA gene. Mutation of uvsH and reo-1 produces further distinct phenotypes which are discussed. An overall model of excision repair of DNA damage in Deinococcus radiodurans is presented. (author)

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trattnig, Siegfried; Winalski, Carl S.; Marlovits, Stephan; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Welsch, Goetz H.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions are a common pathology of the knee joint, and many patients may benefit from cartilage repair surgeries that offer the chance to avoid the development of osteoarthritis or delay its progression. Cartilage repair surgery, no matter the technique, requires a noninvasive, standardized, and high-quality longitudinal method to assess the structure of the repair tissue. This goal is best fulfilled by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The present article provides an overview of the current state of the art of MRI of cartilage repair. In the first 2 sections, preclinical and clinical MRI of cartilage repair tissue are described with a focus on morphological depiction of cartilage and the use of functional (biochemical) MR methodologies for the visualization of the ultrastructure of cartilage repair. In the third section, a short overview is provided on the regulatory issues of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) regarding MR follow-up studies of patients after cartilage repair surgeries. PMID:26069565

  18. High performance repairing of reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskhakov, I.; Ribakov, Y.; Holschemacher, K.; Mueller, T.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Steel fibered high strength concrete is effective for repairing concrete elements. ► Changing fibers’ content, required ductility of the repaired element is achieved. ► Experiments prove previously developed design concepts for two layer beams. -- Abstract: Steel fibered high strength concrete (SFHSC) is an effective material that can be used for repairing concrete elements. Design of normal strength concrete (NSC) elements that should be repaired using SFHSC can be based on general concepts for design of two-layer beams, consisting of SFHSC in the compressed zone and NSC without fibers in the tensile zone. It was previously reported that such elements are effective when their section carries rather large bending moments. Steel fibers, added to high strength concrete, increase its ultimate deformations due to the additional energy dissipation potential contributed by fibers. When changing the fibers’ content, a required ductility level of the repaired element can be achieved. Providing proper ductility is important for design of structures to dynamic loadings. The current study discusses experimental results that form a basis for finding optimal fiber content, yielding the highest Poisson coefficient and ductility of the repaired elements’ sections. Some technological issues as well as distribution of fibers in the cross section of two-layer bending elements are investigated. The experimental results, obtained in the frame of this study, form a basis for general technological provisions, related to repairing of NSC beams and slabs, using SFHSC.

  19. Hepatopancreaticobiliary Values after Thoracoabdominal Aneurysm Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Darrell; Coselli, Joseph S.; Johnson, Michael L.; LeMaire, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: After thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) repair, blood tests assessing hepatopancreaticobiliary (HPB) organs commonly have abnormal results. The clinical significance of such abnormalities is difficult to determine because the expected postoperative levels have not been characterized. Therefore, we sought to establish expected trends in HPB laboratory values after TAAA repair. Methods: This 5-year study comprised 155 patients undergoing elective Crawford extent II TAAA repair. In accordance with a prospective study protocol, all repairs involved left-sided heart bypass, selective visceral perfusion, and cold renal perfusion. Blood levels of aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), total bilirubin, amylase, and lipase were measured before TAAA repair and for 7 days afterward. Ratios between postoperative and baseline levels were compared for each time point with 95% confidence intervals. Results: Temporal patterns for the laboratory values varied greatly. Amylase, lipase, and AST underwent significant early increases before decreasing to preoperative levels. LDH increased immediately and remained significantly elevated, whereas ALT increased more gradually. GGT remained near baseline through postoperative day 4, and then increased to more than twice baseline. Total bilirubin never differed significantly from baseline. After adjusted analysis, the ischemic time predicted the maximum AST, lipase, GGT, and LDH values. Conclusions: Although most HPB laboratory values increase significantly after elective TAAA repair, the temporal trends for different values vary substantially. The ischemic time predicts the maximum AST, lipase, GGT, and LDH levels. These trends should be considered when laboratory values are assessed after TAAA repair. PMID:26798731

  20. Mood repair via attention refocusing or recall of positive autobiographical memories by adolescents with pediatric-onset major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Maria; Yaroslavsky, Ilya; Rottenberg, Jonathan; George, Charles J; Baji, Ildikó; Benák, István; Dochnal, Roberta; Halas, Kitti; Kiss, Enikő; Vetró, Ágnes; Kapornai, Krisztina

    2015-10-01

    Impaired emotion regulation is increasingly recognized as a core feature of depressive disorders. Indeed, currently and previously depressed adults both report greater problems in attenuating sadness (mood repair) in daily life than healthy controls. In contrast, studies of various strategies to attenuate sad affect have mostly found that currently or previously depressed adults and controls were similarly successful at mood repair in the laboratory. But few studies have examined mood repair among depression-prone youths or the effects of trait characteristics on mood repair outcomes in the laboratory. Adolescents, whose first episode of major depressive disorder (MDD) had onset at age 9, on average (probands), and were either in remission or depressed, and control peers, watched a sad film clip. Then, they were instructed to engage in refocusing attention (distraction) or recalling happy memories. Using affect ratings provided by the youths, we tested two developmentally informed hypotheses about whether the subject groups would be similarly able to attenuate sadness via the two mood repair strategies. We also explored if self-reported habitual (trait) mood repair influenced laboratory performance. Contrary to expectations, attention refocusing and recall of happy memories led to comparable mood benefits across subjects. Control adolescents reported significantly greater reductions in sadness than did depressed (Cohen's d = .48) or remitted (Cohen's d = .32) probands, regardless of mood repair strategy, while currently depressed probands remained the saddest after mood repair. Habitual mood repair styles moderated the effects of instructed (state) mood repair in the laboratory. Whether depressed or in remission, adolescents with MDD histories are not as efficient at mood repair in the laboratory as controls. But proband-control group differences in mood repair outcomes were modest in scope, suggesting that the abilities that subserve affect regulation have been

  1. Mood repair via attention refocusing or recall of positive autobiographical memories by adolescents with pediatric onset major depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Maria; Yaroslavsky, Ilya; Rottenberg, Jonathan; George, Charles J.; Baji, Ildikó; Benák, István; Dochnal, Roberta; Halas, Kitti; Kiss, Enikő; Vetró, Ágnes; Kapornai, Krisztina

    2014-01-01

    Background Impaired emotion regulation is increasingly recognized as a core feature of depressive disorders. Indeed, currently and previously depressed adults both report greater problems in attenuating sadness (mood repair) in daily life than healthy controls. In contrast, studies of various strategies to attenuate sad affect have mostly found that currently or previously depressed adults and controls were similarly successful at mood repair in the laboratory. But few studies have examined mood repair among depression-prone youths or the effects of trait characteristics on mood repair outcomes in the laboratory. Methods Adolescents, whose first episode of major depressive disorder (MDD) had onset at age 9, on average (probands), and were either in remission or depressed, and control peers, watched a sad film clip. Then, they were instructed to engage in re-focusing attention (distraction) or recalling happy memories. Using affect ratings provided by the youths, we tested two developmentally informed hypotheses about whether the subject groups would be similarly able to attenuate sadness via the two mood repair strategies. We also explored if self-reported habitual (trait) mood repair influenced laboratory performance. Results Contrary to expectations, attention re-focusing and recall of happy memories led to comparable mood benefits across subjects. Control adolescents reported significantly greater reductions in sadness than did depressed (Cohen’s d=.48) or remitted (Cohen’s d=.32) probands, regardless of mood repair strategy, while currently depressed probands remained the saddest after mood repair. Habitual mood repair styles moderated the effects of instructed (state) mood repair in the laboratory. Conclusions Whether depressed or in remission, adolescents with MDD histories are not as efficient at mood repair in the laboratory as controls. But proband-control group differences in mood repair outcomes were modest in scope, suggesting that the abilities

  2. Radiation damage and its repair in non-sporulating bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moseley, B.E.B.

    1984-01-01

    A review is given of radiation damage and its repair in non-sporulating bacteria. The identification and measurement of radiation damage in the DNA of the bacteria after exposure to ultraviolet radiation and ionizing radiation is described. Measuring the extent of DNA repair and ways of isolating repair mutants are also described. The DNA repair mechanisms for UV-induced damage are discussed including photoreactivation repair, excision repair, post-replication recombination repair and induced error-prone repair. The DNA repair mechanisms for ionizing radiation damage are also discussed including the repair of both single and double-strand breaks. Other aspects discussed include the effects of growth, irradiation medium and recovery medium on survival, DNA repair in humans, the commercial use of UV and ionizing radiations and the future of ionizing irradiation as a food treatment process. (U.K.)

  3. Apical External Root Resorption and Repair in Orthodontic Tooth Movement: Biological Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Liviu; Khammissa, Razia A G; Thomadakis, George; Fourie, Jeanine; Lemmer, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Some degree of external root resorption is a frequent, unpredictable, and unavoidable consequence of orthodontic tooth movement mediated by odontoclasts/cementoclasts originating from circulating precursor cells in the periodontal ligament. Its pathogenesis involves mechanical forces initiating complex interactions between signalling pathways activated by various biological agents. Resorption of cementum is regulated by mechanisms similar to those controlling osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. Following root resorption there is repair by cellular cementum, but factors mediating the transition from resorption to repair are not clear. In this paper we review some of the biological events associated with orthodontically induced external root resorption.

  4. Apical External Root Resorption and Repair in Orthodontic Tooth Movement: Biological Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu Feller

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Some degree of external root resorption is a frequent, unpredictable, and unavoidable consequence of orthodontic tooth movement mediated by odontoclasts/cementoclasts originating from circulating precursor cells in the periodontal ligament. Its pathogenesis involves mechanical forces initiating complex interactions between signalling pathways activated by various biological agents. Resorption of cementum is regulated by mechanisms similar to those controlling osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. Following root resorption there is repair by cellular cementum, but factors mediating the transition from resorption to repair are not clear. In this paper we review some of the biological events associated with orthodontically induced external root resorption.

  5. Diverless pipeline repair system for deep water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinelli, Carlo M. [Eni Gas and Power, Milan (Italy); Fabbri, Sergio; Bachetta, Giuseppe [Saipem/SES, Venice (Italy)

    2009-07-01

    SiRCoS (Sistema Riparazione Condotte Sottomarine) is a diverless pipeline repair system composed of a suite of tools to perform a reliable subsea pipeline repair intervention in deep and ultra deep water which has been on the ground of the long lasting experience of Eni and Saipem in designing, laying and operating deep water pipelines. The key element of SiRCoS is a Connection System comprising two end connectors and a repair spool piece to replace a damaged pipeline section. A Repair Clamp with elastomeric seals is also available for pipe local damages. The Connection System is based on pipe cold forging process, consisting in swaging the pipe inside connectors with suitable profile, by using high pressure seawater. Three swaging operations have to be performed to replace the damaged pipe length. This technology has been developed through extensive theoretical work and laboratory testing, ending in a Type Approval by DNV over pipe sizes ranging from 20 inches to 48 inches OD. A complete SiRCoS system has been realised for the Green Stream pipeline, thoroughly tested in workshop as well as in shallow water and is now ready, in the event of an emergency situation.The key functional requirements for the system are: diverless repair intervention and fully piggability after repair. Eni owns this technology and is now available to other operators under Repair Club arrangement providing stand-by repair services carried out by Saipem Energy Services. The paper gives a description of the main features of the Repair System as well as an insight into the technological developments on pipe cold forging reliability and long term duration evaluation. (author)

  6. Repair-modification of radiodamaged genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volpe, P.; Institute of Experimental Medicine, Rome; Eremenko, T.

    1995-01-01

    It is proposed that through repair-modification, the modified base 5mC may have facilitated the divergent evolution of coding (hypomethylated exon) and uncoding (hypermethylated promoter and intron) sequences in eukaryotic genes. The radioinduced repair patches appearing in regions lacking 5mC are fully reconstructed by excision-repair, whereas those appearing in regions containing 5mC are incompletely reconstructed by this conventional mechanism. Such a second class of repair patches may, however, become fully reconstructed, in the S phase, by repair-modification. In fact, while DNA polymerase β - which is a key enzyme of excision-repair - is active through the whole interphase. DNA methylase - which is responsible for post-synthetic DNA modification - is essentially active in S. Uncoupling of these two enzyme systems, outside S, might explain why in unsynchronised cells repair patches of non-replicating strands are hypomethylated when compared with specific methylation of replicating strands. In other words, excision-repair would always be able to re-establish the primary ATGC language of both damaged unmethylated and methylated regions, while repair-modification would be able to re-establish the modified ATGC(5mC) language of the damaged methylated regions, only in S, but not in G 1 or G 2 . In these two phases, when DNA methylation is inversely correlated with pre-mRNA transcription (as in the case of many tissue-specific genes), such demethylation might induce a silent transcriptional unit to become active. (Author)

  7. DNA excision repair in permeable human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, W.K.; Bodell, W.J.; Cleaver, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    U.v. irradiation of confluent human fibroblasts activated DNA repair, aspects of which were characterized in the cells after they were permeabilized. Incubation of intact cells for 20 min between irradiation and harvesting was necessary to obtain a maximum rate of reparative DNA synthesis. Cells harvested immediately after irradiation before repair was initiated displayed only a small stimulation of DNA synthesis, indicating that permeable cells have a reduced capacity to recognize pyrimidine dimers and activate repair. The distribution of sizes of DNA strands labeled during 10 min of reparative DNA synthesis resembled that of parental DNA. However, during a 60-min incubation of permeable cells at 37 degrees C, parental DNA and DNA labeled by reparative DNA synthesis were both cleaved to smaller sizes. Cleavage also occurred in unirradiated cells, indicating that endogenous nuclease was active during incubation. Repair patches synthesized in permeable cells displayed increased sensitivity to digestion by micrococcal nuclease. However, the change in sensitivity during a chase with unlabeled DNA precursors was small, suggesting that reassembly of nucleosome structure at sites of repair was impaired. To examine whether this deficiency was due to a preponderance of incomplete or unligated repair patches, 3H-labeled (repaired) DNA was purified, then digested with exonuclease III and nuclease S1 to probe for free 3' ends and single-stranded regions. About 85% of the [3H]DNA synthesized during a 10-min pulse resisted digestion, suggesting that a major fraction of the repair patches that were filled were also ligated. U.v. light-activated DNA synthesis in permeable cells, therefore, appears to represent the continuation of reparative gap-filling at sites of excision repair activated within intact cells. Gap-filling and ligation were comparatively efficient processes in permeable cells

  8. BCR/ABL downregulates DNA-PK(CS)-dependent and upregulates backup non-homologous end joining in leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poplawski, Tomasz; Blasiak, Janusz

    2010-06-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination repair (HRR) are the main mechanisms involved in the processing of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in humans. We showed previously that the oncogenic tyrosine kinase BCR/ABL stimulated DSBs repair by HRR. To evaluate the role of BCR/ABL in DSBs repair by NHEJ we examined the ability of leukemic BCR/ABL-expressing cell line BV173 to repair DNA damage induced by two DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors: etoposide and sobuzoxane. DNA lesions induced by sobuzoxane are repaired by a NHEJ pathway which is dependent on the catalytic subunit of protein kinase dependent on DNA (DNA-PK(CS); D-NHEJ), whereas damage evoked by etoposide are repaired by two distinct NHEJ pathways, dependent on or independent of DNA-PK(CS) (backup NHEJ, B-NHEJ). Cells incubated with STI571, a highly specific inhibitor of BCR/ABL, displayed resistance to these agents associated with an accelerated kinetics of DSBs repair, as measured by the neutral comet assay and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. However, in a functional NHEJ assay, cells preincubated with STI571 repaired DSBs induced by a restriction enzyme with a lower efficacy than without the preincubation and addition of wortmannin, a specific inhibitor of DNA-PK(CS), did not change efficacy of the NHEJ reaction. We suggest that BCR/ABL switch on B-NHEJ which is more error-prone then D-NHEJ and in such manner contribute to the increase of the genomic instability of leukemic cells.

  9. [Compressive anterior thoracoplasty (modified Abramson's repair) for pectus carinatum repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez Muñoz, V; Prado Valle, M A; López López, A J; Martínez Suárez, M A; Oviedo Gutiérrez, M; Montalvo Ávalos, C; Fernández García, L

    2014-04-15

    For anterior protruding chest wall deformities treatment, mainly pectus carinatum, pediatric surgeons have been managing either orthotic methods or open surgical repairs. Anterior compressive thoracoplasty (Abramson's technique) has widened the therapeutic options. We describe herein a modification of this technique in the first reported Europen series. From 2010 to 2012, a total of five patients (four male and one female) underwent a modified Abramson's technique to correct pectus carinatum or combined protrusion of the chest at our center. We report the operative technique used for these reconstructions. In all five cases, the operation was completed uneventfully and with excellent results either for the surgical team or the patients. Mean operative time was 190 minutes and hospitalization lasted for three to six days, at the time of analgesic drugs withdrawal. We consider the anterior compresive thorocoplasty (modified Abramson's technique) a safe and feasible method to correct protruding chest deformities, particularly in those patients with stiff chest or lack of compliance, in order to avoid the agressive open procedures.

  10. Equipment for construction and repair of pipework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehrich, H.

    1987-01-01

    More stringent requirements on the integrity of safety-related components in power plants with a view to ensuring the availability of these installations and to rationalizing in-service inspections and repairs have resulted in rapid enhancement of the inspection and repair methods used. Piping systems are increasingly being visually inspected, tested and possibly subjected to remote-control repair from the interior using remotely controlled inspection vehicles. This calls for machines with high levels of reliability which may be operated by means of remote control. Technical developments make it possible nowadays to perform operations that were largely out of the question a decade ago. (orig.) [de

  11. Weld Repair of Thin Aluminum Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuyukian, C. S.; Mitchell, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Weld repairing of thin aluminum sheets now possible, using niobium shield and copper heat sinks. Refractory niobium shield protects aluminum adjacent to hole, while copper heat sinks help conduct heat away from repair site. Technique limits tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding bombardment zone to melt area, leaving surrounding areas around weld unaffected. Used successfully to repair aluminum cold plates on Space Shuttle, Commercial applications, especially in sealing fractures, dents, and holes in thin aluminum face sheets or clad brazing sheet in cold plates, heat exchangers, coolers, and Solar panels. While particularly suited to thin aluminum sheet, this process also used in thicker aluminum material to prevent surface damage near weld area.

  12. Regulating the Regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-26

    The article reports on a challenge to the UK electricity regulator to defend his record by the Coalition for Fair Electricity Regulation (COFFER). The challenge centres on whether the obligation for the regional electric companies (REC) to purchase power from the cheapest source is being enforced. This is related to the wider issue of whether the REC's support of combined-cycle gas turbine (CCGT) is economic. COFFER considers that uneconomic gas-fired power plants are being allowed to displace economic coal-fired stations. Aspects discussed include the background to the dispute and the costs of CCGT and coal fired power generation. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Initial Development of Composite Repair Resins With Low Hazardous Air Pollutant Contents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LaScala, John J; Bingham, Scott; Andrews, Kevin S; Sands, James M; Palmese, Guiseppe R

    2008-01-01

    Unsaturated polyester-based repair resins, such a Bondo, are widely used for automotive repair, marine repair, sporting equipment repair, and household repair of metal, composites, plastics, and wood...

  14. A history of the DNA repair and mutagenesis field: The discovery of base excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Errol C

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the early history of the discovery of an DNA repair pathway designated as base excision repair (BER), since in contrast to the enzyme-catalyzed removal of damaged bases from DNA as nucleotides [called nucleotide excision repair (NER)], BER involves the removal of damaged or inappropriate bases, such as the presence of uracil instead of thymine, from DNA as free bases. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Pulpal progenitors and dentin repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harichane, Y; Hirata, A; Dimitrova-Nakov, S; Granja, I; Goldberg, A; Kellermann, O; Poliard, A

    2011-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are present in the dental pulp. They have been shown to contribute to dentin-like tissue formation in vitro and to participate in bone repair after a mandibular lesion. However, their capacity to contribute efficiently to reparative dentin formation after pulp lesion has never been explored. After pulp exposure, we have identified proliferative cells within 3 zones. In the crown, zone I is near the cavity, and zone II corresponds to the isthmus between the mesial and central pulp. In the root, zone III, near the apex, at a distance from the inflammatory site, contains mitotic stromal cells which may represent a source of progenitor cells. Stem-cell-based strategies are promising treatments for tissue injury in dentistry. Our experiments focused on (1) location of stem cells induced to leave their quiescent state early after pulp injury and (2) implantation of pulp progenitors, a substitute for classic endodontic treatments, paving the way for pulp stem-cell-based therapies.

  16. Method for repairing failed fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakudo, Taketomi.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To repair fuel elements that became failed during burnup in a reactor or during handling. Method: After the surface in the vicinity of a failed part of a fuel element is cleaned, a socket made of a shape-memory alloy having a ring form or a horseshoe form made by cutting a part of the ring form is inserted into the failed position according to the position of the failed fuel element. The shape memory alloy socket remembers a slightly larger inside diameter in its original phase (high-temperature side) than the outside diameter of the cladding tube and also a slightly larger inside diameter of the socket in the martensite phase (low-temperature side) than the outside diameter of the cladding tube, such that the socket can easily be inserted into the failed position. The socket, inserted into the failed part of the cladding tube, is heated by a heating jig. The socket recovers the original phase, and the shape also tends to recover a smaller diameter than the outside diameter of the cladding tube that has been remembered, and accordingly the failed part of the cladding tube is fastened with a great force and the failed part is fully closed with the socket, thus keeping radioactive materials from going out. (Horiuchi, T.)

  17. Radar rainfall image repair techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Wesson

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available There are various quality problems associated with radar rainfall data viewed in images that include ground clutter, beam blocking and anomalous propagation, to name a few. To obtain the best rainfall estimate possible, techniques for removing ground clutter (non-meteorological echoes that influence radar data quality on 2-D radar rainfall image data sets are presented here. These techniques concentrate on repairing the images in both a computationally fast and accurate manner, and are nearest neighbour techniques of two sub-types: Individual Target and Border Tracing. The contaminated data is estimated through Kriging, considered the optimal technique for the spatial interpolation of Gaussian data, where the 'screening effect' that occurs with the Kriging weighting distribution around target points is exploited to ensure computational efficiency. Matrix rank reduction techniques in combination with Singular Value Decomposition (SVD are also suggested for finding an efficient solution to the Kriging Equations which can cope with near singular systems. Rainfall estimation at ground level from radar rainfall volume scan data is of interest and importance in earth bound applications such as hydrology and agriculture. As an extension of the above, Ordinary Kriging is applied to three-dimensional radar rainfall data to estimate rainfall rate at ground level. Keywords: ground clutter, data infilling, Ordinary Kriging, nearest neighbours, Singular Value Decomposition, border tracing, computation time, ground level rainfall estimation

  18. Protection and repair of the ischemic heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koudstaal, S.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis aimed to elucidate and advance strategies for cardioprotection and cardiac repair, translate preclinical findings towards future clinical studies and optimize the translational research process for IHD. So far, many cardioprotective strategies against reperfusion injury could not be

  19. Radiation repair models for clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Roger G

    2018-02-28

    A number of newly emerging clinical techniques involve non-conventional patterns of radiation delivery which require an appreciation of the role played by radiation repair phenomena. This review outlines the main models of radiation repair, focussing on those which are of greatest clinical usefulness and which may be incorporated into biologically effective dose assessments. The need to account for the apparent "slowing-down" of repair rates observed in some normal tissues is also examined, along with a comparison of the relative merits of the formulations which can be used to account for such phenomena. Jack Fowler brought valuable insight to the understanding of radiation repair processes and this article includes reference to his important contributions in this area.

  20. BIDIRECTIONAL FUNCTION OF SHENGHE POWDER ON REPAIR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    Keywords: DNA repair, radiation, glioma, astrocyte, Chinese herbs. Introduction .... Wet transfer was performed for 4 hr at constant voltage (40 V) using polyvinylidene difluoride membrane ..... Mitochondrial survivin inhibits apoptosis and.