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Sample records for regulates dendritic morphology

  1. D1 receptors regulate dendritic morphology in normal and stressed prelimbic cortex.

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    Lin, Grant L; Borders, Candace B; Lundewall, Leslie J; Wellman, Cara L

    2015-01-01

    Both stress and dysfunction of prefrontal cortex are linked to psychological disorders, and structure and function of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) are altered by stress. Chronic restraint stress causes dendritic retraction in the prelimbic region (PL) of mPFC in rats. Dopamine release in mPFC increases during stress, and chronic administration of dopaminergic agonists results in dendritic remodeling. Thus, stress-induced alterations in dopaminergic transmission in PL may contribute to dendritic remodeling. We examined the effects of dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) blockade in PL during daily restraint stress on dendritic morphology in PL. Rats either underwent daily restraint stress (3h/day, 10 days) or remained unstressed. In each group, rats received daily infusions of either the D1R antagonist SCH23390 or vehicle into PL prior to restraint; unstressed and stressed rats that had not undergone surgery were also examined. On the final day of restraint, rats were euthanized and brains were processed for Golgi histology. Pyramidal neurons in PL were reconstructed and dendritic morphology was quantified. Vehicle-infused stressed rats demonstrated dendritic retraction compared to unstressed rats, and D1R blockade in PL prevented this effect. Moreover, in unstressed rats, D1R blockade produced dendritic retraction. These effects were not due to attenuation of the HPA axis response to acute stress: plasma corticosterone levels in a separate group of rats that underwent acute restraint stress with or without D1R blockade were not significantly different. These findings indicate that dopaminergic transmission in mPFC during stress contributes directly to the stress-induced retraction of apical dendrites, while dopamine transmission in the absence of stress is important in maintaining normal dendritic morphology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cux1 and Cux2 regulate dendritic branching, spine morphology and synapses of the upper layer neurons of the cortex

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    Cubelos, Beatriz; Sebastián-Serrano, Alvaro; Beccari, Leonardo; Calcagnotto, Maria Elisa; Cisneros, Elsa; Kim, Seonhee; Dopazo, Ana; Alvarez-Dolado, Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Bovolenta, Paola; Walsh, Christopher A.; Nieto, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Summary Dendrite branching and spine formation determines the function of morphologically distinct and specialized neuronal subclasses. However, little is known about the programs instructing specific branching patterns in vertebrate neurons and whether such programs influence dendritic spines and synapses. Using knockout and knockdown studies combined with morphological, molecular and electrophysiological analysis we show that the homeobox Cux1 and Cux2 are intrinsic and complementary regulators of dendrite branching, spine development and synapse formation in layer II–III neurons of the cerebral cortex. Cux genes control the number and maturation of dendritic spines partly through direct regulation of the expression of Xlr3b and Xlr4b, chromatin remodeling genes previously implicated in cognitive defects. Accordingly, abnormal dendrites and synapses in Cux2−/− mice correlate with reduced synaptic function and defects in working memory. These demonstrate critical roles of Cux in dendritogenesis and highlight novel subclass-specific mechanisms of synapse regulation that contribute to the establishment of cognitive circuits. PMID:20510857

  3. RAB-10 Regulates Dendritic Branching by Balancing Dendritic Transport

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    Taylor, Caitlin A.; Yan, Jing; Howell, Audrey S.; Dong, Xintong; Shen, Kang

    2015-01-01

    The construction of a large dendritic arbor requires robust growth and the precise delivery of membrane and protein cargoes to specific subcellular regions of the developing dendrite. How the microtubule-based vesicular trafficking and sorting systems are regulated to distribute these dendritic development factors throughout the dendrite is not well understood. Here we identify the small GTPase RAB-10 and the exocyst complex as critical regulators of dendrite morphogenesis and patterning in the C. elegans sensory neuron PVD. In rab-10 mutants, PVD dendritic branches are reduced in the posterior region of the cell but are excessive in the distal anterior region of the cell. We also demonstrate that the dendritic branch distribution within PVD depends on the balance between the molecular motors kinesin-1/UNC-116 and dynein, and we propose that RAB-10 regulates dendrite morphology by balancing the activity of these motors to appropriately distribute branching factors, including the transmembrane receptor DMA-1. PMID:26633194

  4. Dendritic Actin Cytoskeleton: Structure, Functions, and Regulations

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    Anja Konietzny

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Actin is a versatile and ubiquitous cytoskeletal protein that plays a major role in both the establishment and the maintenance of neuronal polarity. For a long time, the most prominent roles that were attributed to actin in neurons were the movement of growth cones, polarized cargo sorting at the axon initial segment, and the dynamic plasticity of dendritic spines, since those compartments contain large accumulations of actin filaments (F-actin that can be readily visualized using electron- and fluorescence microscopy. With the development of super-resolution microscopy in the past few years, previously unknown structures of the actin cytoskeleton have been uncovered: a periodic lattice consisting of actin and spectrin seems to pervade not only the whole axon, but also dendrites and even the necks of dendritic spines. Apart from that striking feature, patches of F-actin and deep actin filament bundles have been described along the lengths of neurites. So far, research has been focused on the specific roles of actin in the axon, while it is becoming more and more apparent that in the dendrite, actin is not only confined to dendritic spines, but serves many additional and important functions. In this review, we focus on recent developments regarding the role of actin in dendrite morphology, the regulation of actin dynamics by internal and external factors, and the role of F-actin in dendritic protein trafficking.

  5. Dynein and EFF-1 control dendrite morphology by regulating the localization pattern of SAX-7 in epidermal cells.

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    Zhu, Ting; Liang, Xing; Wang, Xiang-Ming; Shen, Kang

    2017-12-01

    Our previous work showed that the cell adhesion molecule SAX-7 forms an elaborate pattern in Caenorhabditis elegans epidermal cells, which instructs PVD dendrite branching. However, the molecular mechanism forming the SAX-7 pattern in the epidermis is not fully understood. Here, we report that the dynein light intermediate chain DLI-1 and the fusogen EFF-1 are required in epidermal cells to pattern SAX-7. While previous reports suggest that these two molecules act cell-autonomously in the PVD, our results show that the disorganized PVD dendritic arbors in these mutants are due to the abnormal SAX-7 localization patterns in epidermal cells. Three lines of evidence support this notion. First, the epidermal SAX-7 pattern was severely affected in dli-1 and eff-1 mutants. Second, the abnormal SAX-7 pattern was predictive of the ectopic PVD dendrites. Third, expression of DLI-1 or EFF-1 in the epidermis rescued both the SAX-7 pattern and the disorganized PVD dendrite phenotypes, whereas expression of these molecules in the PVD did not. We also show that DLI-1 functions cell-autonomously in the PVD to promote distal branch formation. These results demonstrate the unexpected roles of DLI-1 and EFF-1 in the epidermis in the control of PVD dendrite morphogenesis. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Dendritic spine morphology and dynamics in health and disease

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    Lee S

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Stacey Lee,1 Huaye Zhang,2 Donna J Webb1,3,4 1Department of Biological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, 2Department of Neuroscience and Cell Biology, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ, 3Department of Cancer Biology, 4Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: Dendritic spines are actin-rich structures that form the postsynaptic terminals of excitatory synapses in the brain. The development and plasticity of spines are essential for cognitive processes, such as learning and memory, and defects in their density, morphology, and size underlie a number of neurological disorders. In this review, we discuss the contribution and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in spine formation and plasticity as well as learning and memory. We also highlight the role of key receptors and intracellular signaling pathways in modulating the development and morphology of spines and cognitive function. Moreover, we provide insight into spine/synapse defects associated with several neurological disorders and the molecular mechanisms that underlie these spine defects. Keywords: dendritic spines, synapses, synaptic plasticity, actin cytoskeleton, glutamate receptors, neurological disorders

  7. Organization and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton during dendritic spine morphological remodeling.

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    Chazeau, Anaël; Giannone, Grégory

    2016-08-01

    In the central nervous system, most excitatory post-synapses are small subcellular structures called dendritic spines. Their structure and morphological remodeling are tightly coupled to changes in synaptic transmission. The F-actin cytoskeleton is the main driving force of dendritic spine remodeling and sustains synaptic plasticity. It is therefore essential to understand how changes in synaptic transmission can regulate the organization and dynamics of actin binding proteins (ABPs). In this review, we will provide a detailed description of the organization and dynamics of F-actin and ABPs in dendritic spines and will discuss the current models explaining how the actin cytoskeleton sustains both structural and functional synaptic plasticity.

  8. DIXDC1 Phosphorylation and Control of Dendritic Morphology Are Impaired by Rare Genetic Variants

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    Vickie Kwan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of neural connectivity is essential for brain function, and disruption of this process is associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs. DIX domain containing 1 (DIXDC1 has previously been implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders, but its role in postnatal brain function remains unknown. Using a knockout mouse model, we determined that DIXDC1 is a regulator of excitatory neuron dendrite development and synapse function in the cortex. We discovered that MARK1, previously linked to ASDs, phosphorylates DIXDC1 to regulate dendrite and spine development through modulation of the cytoskeletal network in an isoform-specific manner. Finally, rare missense variants in DIXDC1 were identified in ASD patient cohorts via genetic sequencing. Interestingly, the variants inhibit DIXDC1 isoform 1 phosphorylation, causing impairment to dendrite and spine growth. These data reveal that DIXDC1 is a regulator of cortical dendrite and synaptic development and provide mechanistic insight into morphological defects associated with neurodevelopmental disorders.

  9. Neuronal gain modulability is determined by dendritic morphology: A computational optogenetic study.

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    Jarvis, Sarah; Nikolic, Konstantin; Schultz, Simon R

    2018-03-01

    The mechanisms by which the gain of the neuronal input-output function may be modulated have been the subject of much investigation. However, little is known of the role of dendrites in neuronal gain control. New optogenetic experimental paradigms based on spatial profiles or patterns of light stimulation offer the prospect of elucidating many aspects of single cell function, including the role of dendrites in gain control. We thus developed a model to investigate how competing excitatory and inhibitory input within the dendritic arbor alters neuronal gain, incorporating kinetic models of opsins into our modeling to ensure it is experimentally testable. To investigate how different topologies of the neuronal dendritic tree affect the neuron's input-output characteristics we generate branching geometries which replicate morphological features of most common neurons, but keep the number of branches and overall area of dendrites approximately constant. We found a relationship between a neuron's gain modulability and its dendritic morphology, with neurons with bipolar dendrites with a moderate degree of branching being most receptive to control of the gain of their input-output relationship. The theory was then tested and confirmed on two examples of realistic neurons: 1) layer V pyramidal cells-confirming their role in neural circuits as a regulator of the gain in the circuit in addition to acting as the primary excitatory neurons, and 2) stellate cells. In addition to providing testable predictions and a novel application of dual-opsins, our model suggests that innervation of all dendritic subdomains is required for full gain modulation, revealing the importance of dendritic targeting in the generation of neuronal gain control and the functions that it subserves. Finally, our study also demonstrates that neurophysiological investigations which use direct current injection into the soma and bypass the dendrites may miss some important neuronal functions, such as gain

  10. Regulation of dendrite growth and maintenance by exocytosis

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    Peng, Yun; Lee, Jiae; Rowland, Kimberly; Wen, Yuhui; Hua, Hope; Carlson, Nicole; Lavania, Shweta; Parrish, Jay Z.; Kim, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Dendrites lengthen by several orders of magnitude during neuronal development, but how membrane is allocated in dendrites to facilitate this growth remains unclear. Here, we report that Ras opposite (Rop), the Drosophila ortholog of the key exocytosis regulator Munc18-1 (also known as STXBP1), is an essential factor mediating dendrite growth. Neurons with depleted Rop function exhibit reduced terminal dendrite outgrowth followed by primary dendrite degeneration, suggestive of differential req...

  11. PINK1 regulates mitochondrial trafficking in dendrites of cortical neurons through mitochondrial PKA.

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    Das Banerjee, Tania; Dagda, Raul Y; Dagda, Marisela; Chu, Charleen T; Rice, Monica; Vazquez-Mayorga, Emmanuel; Dagda, Ruben K

    2017-08-01

    Mitochondrial Protein Kinase A (PKA) and PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1), which is linked to Parkinson's disease, are two neuroprotective serine/threonine kinases that regulate dendrite remodeling and mitochondrial function. We have previously shown that PINK1 regulates dendrite morphology by enhancing PKA activity. Here, we show the molecular mechanisms by which PINK1 and PKA in the mitochondrion interact to regulate dendrite remodeling, mitochondrial morphology, content, and trafficking in dendrites. PINK1-deficient cortical neurons exhibit impaired mitochondrial trafficking, reduced mitochondrial content, fragmented mitochondria, and a reduction in dendrite outgrowth compared to wild-type neurons. Transient expression of wild-type, but not a PKA-binding-deficient mutant of the PKA-mitochondrial scaffold dual-specificity A Kinase Anchoring Protein 1 (D-AKAP1), restores mitochondrial trafficking, morphology, and content in dendrites of PINK1-deficient cortical neurons suggesting that recruiting PKA to the mitochondrion reverses mitochondrial pathology in dendrites induced by loss of PINK1. Mechanistically, full-length and cleaved forms of PINK1 increase the binding of the regulatory subunit β of PKA (PKA/RIIβ) to D-AKAP1 to enhance the autocatalytic-mediated phosphorylation of PKA/RIIβ and PKA activity. D-AKAP1/PKA governs mitochondrial trafficking in dendrites via the Miro-2/TRAK2 complex and by increasing the phosphorylation of Miro-2. Our study identifies a new role of D-AKAP1 in regulating mitochondrial trafficking through Miro-2, and supports a model in which PINK1 and mitochondrial PKA participate in a similar neuroprotective signaling pathway to maintain dendrite connectivity. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  12. Regulation of dendrite growth and maintenance by exocytosis

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    Peng, Yun; Lee, Jiae; Rowland, Kimberly; Wen, Yuhui; Hua, Hope; Carlson, Nicole; Lavania, Shweta; Parrish, Jay Z.; Kim, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dendrites lengthen by several orders of magnitude during neuronal development, but how membrane is allocated in dendrites to facilitate this growth remains unclear. Here, we report that Ras opposite (Rop), the Drosophila ortholog of the key exocytosis regulator Munc18-1 (also known as STXBP1), is an essential factor mediating dendrite growth. Neurons with depleted Rop function exhibit reduced terminal dendrite outgrowth followed by primary dendrite degeneration, suggestive of differential requirements for exocytosis in the growth and maintenance of different dendritic compartments. Rop promotes dendrite growth together with the exocyst, an octameric protein complex involved in tethering vesicles to the plasma membrane, with Rop–exocyst complexes and exocytosis predominating in primary dendrites over terminal dendrites. By contrast, membrane-associated proteins readily diffuse from primary dendrites into terminals, but not in the reverse direction, suggesting that diffusion, rather than targeted exocytosis, supplies membranous material for terminal dendritic growth, revealing key differences in the distribution of materials to these expanding dendritic compartments. PMID:26483382

  13. Epigenetic regulation of axon and dendrite growth

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    Ephraim F Trakhtenberg

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuroregenerative therapies for central nervous system (CNS injury, neurodegenerative disease, or stroke require axons of damaged neurons to grow and reinnervate their targets. However, mature mammalian CNS neurons do not regenerate their axons, limiting recovery in these diseases (Yiu and He, 2006. CNS’ regenerative failure may be attributable to the development of an inhibitory CNS environment by glial-associated inhibitory molecules (Yiu and He, 2006, and by various cell-autonomous factors (Sun and He, 2010. Intrinsic axon growth ability also declines developmentally (Li et al., 1995; Goldberg et al., 2002; Bouslama-Oueghlani et al., 2003; Blackmore and Letourneau, 2006 and is dependent on transcription (Moore et al., 2009. Although neurons’ intrinsic capacity for axon growth may depend in part on the panoply of expressed transcription factors (Moore and Goldberg, 2011, epigenetic factors such as the accessibility of DNA and organization of chromatin are required for downstream genes to be transcribed. Thus a potential approach to overcoming regenerative failure focuses on the epigenetic mechanisms regulating regenerative gene expression in the CNS. Here we review molecular mechanisms regulating the epigenetic state of DNA through chromatin modifications, their implications for regulating axon and dendrite growth, and important new directions for this field of study.

  14. VCP and ATL1 regulate endoplasmic reticulum and protein synthesis for dendritic spine formation.

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    Shih, Yu-Tzu; Hsueh, Yi-Ping

    2016-03-17

    Imbalanced protein homeostasis, such as excessive protein synthesis and protein aggregation, is a pathogenic hallmark of a range of neurological disorders. Here, using expression of mutant proteins, a knockdown approach and disease mutation knockin mice, we show that VCP (valosin-containing protein), together with its cofactor P47 and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) morphology regulator ATL1 (Atlastin-1), regulates tubular ER formation and influences the efficiency of protein synthesis to control dendritic spine formation in neurons. Strengthening the significance of protein synthesis in dendritic spinogenesis, the translation blocker cyclohexamide and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin reduce dendritic spine density, while a leucine supplement that increases protein synthesis ameliorates the dendritic spine defects caused by Vcp and Atl1 deficiencies. Because VCP and ATL1 are the causative genes of several neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders, we suggest that impaired ER formation and inefficient protein synthesis are significant in the pathogenesis of multiple neurological disorders.

  15. Dendritic branching of olfactory bulb mitral and tufted cells: regulation by TrkB.

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    Fumiaki Imamura

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Projection neurons of mammalian olfactory bulb (OB, mitral and tufted cells, have dendrites whose morphologies are specifically differentiated for efficient odor information processing. The apical dendrite extends radially and arborizes in single glomerulus where it receives primary input from olfactory sensory neurons that express the same odor receptor. The lateral dendrites extend horizontally in the external plexiform layer and make reciprocal dendrodendritic synapses with granule cells, which moderate mitral/tufted cell activity. The molecular mechanisms regulating dendritic development of mitral/tufted cells is one of the unsolved important problems in the olfactory system. Here, we focused on TrkB receptors to test the hypothesis that neurotrophin-mediate mechanisms contributed to dendritic differentiation of OB mitral/tufted cells.With immunohistochemical analysis, we found that the TrkB neurotrophin receptor is expressed by both apical and lateral dendrites of mitral/tufted cells and that expression is evident during the early postnatal days when these dendrites exhibit their most robust growth and differentiation. To examine the effect of TrkB activation on mitral/tufted cell dendritic development, we cultured OB neurons. When BDNF or NT4 were introduced into the cultures, there was a significant increase in the number of primary neurites and branching points among the mitral/tufted cells. Moreover, BDNF facilitated filopodial extension along the neurites of mitral/tufted cells.In this report, we show for the first time that TrkB activation stimulates the dendritic branching of mitral/tufted cells in developing OB. This suggests that arborization of the apical dendrite in a glomerulus is under the tight regulation of TrkB activation.

  16. Overexpression of cypin alters dendrite morphology, single neuron activity, and network properties via distinct mechanisms

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    Rodríguez, Ana R.; O'Neill, Kate M.; Swiatkowski, Przemyslaw; Patel, Mihir V.; Firestein, Bonnie L.

    2018-02-01

    Objective. This study investigates the effect that overexpression of cytosolic PSD-95 interactor (cypin), a regulator of synaptic PSD-95 protein localization and a core regulator of dendrite branching, exerts on the electrical activity of rat hippocampal neurons and networks. Approach. We cultured rat hippocampal neurons and used lipid-mediated transfection and lentiviral gene transfer to achieve high levels of cypin or cypin mutant (cypinΔPDZ PSD-95 non-binding) expression cellularly and network-wide, respectively. Main results. Our analysis revealed that although overexpression of cypin and cypinΔPDZ increase dendrite numbers and decrease spine density, cypin and cypinΔPDZ distinctly regulate neuronal activity. At the single cell level, cypin promotes decreases in bursting activity while cypinΔPDZ reduces sEPSC frequency and further decreases bursting compared to cypin. At the network level, by using the Fano factor as a measure of spike count variability, cypin overexpression results in an increase in variability of spike count, and this effect is abolished when cypin cannot bind PSD-95. This variability is also dependent on baseline activity levels and on mean spike rate over time. Finally, our spike sorting data show that overexpression of cypin results in a more complex distribution of spike waveforms and that binding to PSD-95 is essential for this complexity. Significance. Our data suggest that dendrite morphology does not play a major role in cypin action on electrical activity.

  17. hamlet, a binary genetic switch between single- and multiple- dendrite neuron morphology.

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    Moore, Adrian W; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung

    2002-08-23

    The dendritic morphology of neurons determines the number and type of inputs they receive. In the Drosophila peripheral nervous system (PNS), the external sensory (ES) neurons have a single nonbranched dendrite, whereas the lineally related multidendritic (MD) neurons have extensively branched dendritic arbors. We report that hamlet is a binary genetic switch between these contrasting morphological types. In hamlet mutants, ES neurons are converted to an MD fate, whereas ectopic hamlet expression in MD precursors results in transformation of MD neurons into ES neurons. Moreover, hamlet expression induced in MD neurons undergoing dendrite outgrowth drastically reduces arbor branching.

  18. Dendritic Cytoskeletal Architecture Is Modulated by Combinatorial Transcriptional Regulation in Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Das, Ravi; Bhattacharjee, Shatabdi; Patel, Atit A; Harris, Jenna M; Bhattacharya, Surajit; Letcher, Jamin M; Clark, Sarah G; Nanda, Sumit; Iyer, Eswar Prasad R; Ascoli, Giorgio A; Cox, Daniel N

    2017-12-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) have emerged as essential cell autonomous mediators of subtype specific dendritogenesis; however, the downstream effectors of these TFs remain largely unknown, as are the cellular events that TFs control to direct morphological change. As dendritic morphology is largely dictated by the organization of the actin and microtubule (MT) cytoskeletons, elucidating TF-mediated cytoskeletal regulatory programs is key to understanding molecular control of diverse dendritic morphologies. Previous studies in Drosophila melanogaster have demonstrated that the conserved TFs Cut and Knot exert combinatorial control over aspects of dendritic cytoskeleton development, promoting actin and MT-based arbor morphology, respectively. To investigate transcriptional targets of Cut and/or Knot regulation, we conducted systematic neurogenomic studies, coupled with in vivo genetic screens utilizing multi-fluor cytoskeletal and membrane marker reporters. These analyses identified a host of putative Cut and/or Knot effector molecules, and a subset of these putative TF targets converge on modulating dendritic cytoskeletal architecture, which are grouped into three major phenotypic categories, based upon neuromorphometric analyses: complexity enhancer, complexity shifter, and complexity suppressor. Complexity enhancer genes normally function to promote higher order dendritic growth and branching with variable effects on MT stabilization and F-actin organization, whereas complexity shifter and complexity suppressor genes normally function in regulating proximal-distal branching distribution or in restricting higher order branching complexity, respectively, with spatially restricted impacts on the dendritic cytoskeleton. Collectively, we implicate novel genes and cellular programs by which TFs distinctly and combinatorially govern dendritogenesis via cytoskeletal modulation. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  19. Barriers in the brain : resolving dendritic spine morphology and compartmentalization

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    Adrian, Max; Kusters, Remy; Wierenga, Corette J; Storm, Cornelis; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Kapitein, Lukas C

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic spines are micron-sized protrusions that harbor the majority of excitatory synapses in the central nervous system. The head of the spine is connected to the dendritic shaft by a 50-400 nm thin membrane tube, called the spine neck, which has been hypothesized to confine biochemical and

  20. A Quantitative Golgi Study of Dendritic Morphology in the Mice Striatal Medium Spiny Neurons

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    Ana Hladnik

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study we have provided a detailed quantitative morphological analysis of medium spiny neurons (MSNs in the mice dorsal striatum and determined the consistency of values among three groups of animals obtained in different set of experiments. Dendritic trees of 162 Golgi Cox (FD Rapid GolgiStain Kit impregnated MSNs from 15 adult C57BL/6 mice were 3-dimensionally reconstructed using Neurolucida software, and parameters of dendritic morphology have been compared among experimental groups. The parameters of length and branching pattern did not show statistically significant difference and were highly consistent among groups. The average neuronal soma surface was between 160 μm2 and 180 μm2, and the cells had 5–6 primary dendrites with close to 40 segments per neuron. Sholl analysis confirmed regular pattern of dendritic branching. The total length of dendrites was around 2100 μm with the average length of individual branching (intermediate segment around 22 μm and for the terminal segment around 100 μm. Even though each experimental group underwent the same strictly defined protocol in tissue preparation and Golgi staining, we found inconsistency in dendritic volume and soma surface. These changes could be methodologically influenced during the Golgi procedure, although without affecting the dendritic length and tree complexity. Since the neuronal activity affects the dendritic thickness, it could not be excluded that observed volume inconsistency was related with functional states of neurons prior to animal sacrifice. Comprehensive analyses of tree complexity and dendritic length provided here could serve as an additional tool for understanding morphological variability in the most numerous neuronal population of the striatum. As reference values they could provide basic ground for comparisons with the results obtained in studies that use various models of genetically modified mice in explaining different pathological conditions that

  1. The Endosome Localized Arf-GAP AGAP1 Modulates Dendritic Spine Morphology Downstream of the Neurodevelopmental Disorder Factor Dysbindin

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    Miranda Arnold

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available AGAP1 is an Arf1 GTPase activating protein that interacts with the vesicle-associated protein complexes adaptor protein 3 (AP-3 and Biogenesis of Lysosome Related Organelles Complex-1 (BLOC-1. Overexpression of AGAP1 in non-neuronal cells results in an accumulation of endosomal cargoes, which suggests a role in endosome-dependent traffic. In addition, AGAP1 is a candidate susceptibility gene for two neurodevelopmental disorders, autism spectrum disorder (ASD and schizophrenia (SZ; yet its localization and function in neurons have not been described. Here, we describe that AGAP1 localizes to axons, dendrites, dendritic spines, and synapses, colocalizing preferentially with markers of early and recycling endosomes. Functional studies reveal overexpression and down-regulation of AGAP1 affects both neuronal endosomal trafficking and dendritic spine morphology, supporting a role for AGAP1 in the recycling endosomal trafficking involved in their morphogenesis. Finally, we determined the sensitivity of AGAP1 expression to mutations in the DTNBP1 gene, which is associated with neurodevelopmental disorder, and found that AGAP1 mRNA and protein levels are selectively reduced in the null allele of the mouse orthologue of DTNBP1. We postulate that endosomal trafficking contributes to the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders affecting dendritic spine morphology, and thus excitatory synapse structure and function.

  2. Primary Dendrite Array Morphology: Observations from Ground-based and Space Station Processed Samples

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    Tewari, Surendra; Rajamure, Ravi; Grugel, Richard; Erdmann, Robert; Poirier, David

    2012-01-01

    Influence of natural convection on primary dendrite array morphology during directional solidification is being investigated under a collaborative European Space Agency-NASA joint research program, "Microstructure Formation in Castings of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions (MICAST)". Two Aluminum-7 wt pct Silicon alloy samples, MICAST6 and MICAST7, were directionally solidified in microgravity on the International Space Station. Terrestrially grown dendritic monocrystal cylindrical samples were remelted and directionally solidified at 18 K/cm (MICAST6) and 28 K/cm (MICAST7). Directional solidification involved a growth speed step increase (MICAST6-from 5 to 50 micron/s) and a speed decrease (MICAST7-from 20 to 10 micron/s). Distribution and morphology of primary dendrites is currently being characterized in these samples, and also in samples solidified on earth under nominally similar thermal gradients and growth speeds. Primary dendrite spacing and trunk diameter measurements from this investigation will be presented.

  3. Denervation-induced homeostatic dendritic plasticity in morphological granule cell models

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    Hermann Cuntz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal death and subsequent denervation of target areas are major consequences of several neurological conditions such asischemia or neurodegeneration (Alzheimer's disease. The denervation-induced axonal loss results in reorganization of the dendritic tree of denervated neurons. The dendritic reorganization has been previously studied using entorhinal cortex lesion (ECL. ECL leads to shortening and loss of dendritic segments in the denervated outer molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. However, the functional importance of these long-term dendritic alterations is not yet understood and their impact on neuronal electrical properties remains unclear. Here we analyzed what happens to the electrotonic structure and excitability of dentate granule cells after lesion-induced alterations of their dendritic morphology, assuming all other parameters remain equal. We performed comparative electrotonic analysis in anatomically and biophysically realistic compartmental models of 3D-reconstructed healthy and denervated granule cells. Using the method of morphological modeling based on optimization principles minimizing the amount of wiring and maximizing synaptic democracy, we built artificial granule cells which replicate morphological features of their real counterparts. Our results show that somatofugal and somatopetal voltage attenuation in the passive cable model are strongly reduced in denervated granule cells. In line with these predictions, the attenuation both of simulated backpropagating action potentials and forward propagating EPSPs was significantly reduced in dendrites of denervated neurons. Intriguingly, the enhancement of action potential backpropagation occurred specifically in the denervated dendritic layers. Furthermore, simulations of synaptic f-I curves revealed a homeostatic increase of excitability in denervated granule cells. In summary, our morphological and compartmental modeling indicates that unless modified by changes of

  4. Dendritic morphology observed in the solid-state precipitation in binary alloys

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    Husain, S.W.; Ahmed, M.S.; Qamar, I. [Dr. A.Q. Khan Research Labs., Rawalpindi (Pakistan)

    1999-06-01

    The precipitation of {gamma}{sub 2} phase in Cu-Al {beta}-phase alloys has been observed to occur in the dendritic morphology. Such morphology is rarely observed in the solid-state transformations. Earlier it was reported that the {gamma} precipitates were formed in the dendritic shape when Cu-Zn {beta}-phase alloys were cooled from high temperature. The characteristics of these two alloy systems have been examined to find the factors promoting the dendritic morphology in the solid-state transformations. Rapid bulk diffusion and fast interfacial reaction kinetics would promote such morphology. The kinetics of atom attachment to the growing interface is expected to be fast when crystallographic similarities exist between the parent phase and the precipitate. The authors have predicted the dendritic morphology in the solid-state precipitation in many binary alloy systems simply based on such crystallographic similarities. These alloys include, in addition to Cu-Al and Cu-Zn, the {beta}-phase alloys in Ag-Li, Ag-Zn, Cu-Ga, Au-Zn, and Ni-Zn systems, {gamma}-phase alloys in Cu-Sn and Ag-Cd systems, and {delta}-phase alloys in Au-Cd system. Of these, the alloys in Ag-Zn, Ni-Zn, Ag-Cd, and Cu-Sn systems were prepared and it was indeed found that the precipitates formed in the dendritic shape.

  5. Self-referential forces are sufficient to explain different dendritic morphologies

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    Heraldo eMemelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic morphology constrains brain activity, as it determines first which neuronal circuits are possible and second which dendritic computations can be performed over a neuron's inputs. It is known that a range of chemical cues can influence the final shape of dendrites during development. Here, we investigate the extent to which self-referential influences, cues generated by the neuron itself, might influence morphology. To this end, we developed a phenomenological model and algorithm to generate virtual morphologies, which are then compared to experimentally reconstructed morphologies. In the model, branching probability follows a Galton-Watson process, while the geometry is determined by "homotypic forces" exerting influence on the direction of random growth in a constrained space. We model three such homotypic forces, namely an inertial force based on membrane stiffness, a soma-oriented tropism, and a force of self avoidance, as directional biases in the growth algorithm. With computer simulations we explored how each bias shapes neuronal morphologies. We show that based on these principles, we can generate realistic morphologies of several distinct neuronal types. We discuss the extent to which homotypic forces might influence real dendritic morphologies, and speculate about the influence of other environmental cues on neuronal shape and circuitry.

  6. Self-referential forces are sufficient to explain different dendritic morphologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memelli, Heraldo; Torben-Nielsen, Benjamin; Kozloski, James

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic morphology constrains brain activity, as it determines first which neuronal circuits are possible and second which dendritic computations can be performed over a neuron's inputs. It is known that a range of chemical cues can influence the final shape of dendrites during development. Here, we investigate the extent to which self-referential influences, cues generated by the neuron itself, might influence morphology. To this end, we developed a phenomenological model and algorithm to generate virtual morphologies, which are then compared to experimentally reconstructed morphologies. In the model, branching probability follows a Galton–Watson process, while the geometry is determined by “homotypic forces” exerting influence on the direction of random growth in a constrained space. We model three such homotypic forces, namely an inertial force based on membrane stiffness, a soma-oriented tropism, and a force of self-avoidance, as directional biases in the growth algorithm. With computer simulations we explored how each bias shapes neuronal morphologies. We show that based on these principles, we can generate realistic morphologies of several distinct neuronal types. We discuss the extent to which homotypic forces might influence real dendritic morphologies, and speculate about the influence of other environmental cues on neuronal shape and circuitry. PMID:23386828

  7. Effect of the dendritic morphology on hot tearing of carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridolfi, M R

    2016-01-01

    Hot tears form during solidification in the brittle region of the dendritic front. Most hot tearing criteria are based on solid and fluid mechanics, being the phenomenon strictly depending on the solid resistance to applied strains and on the liquid capability of filling the void spaces. Modelling both mechanisms implies the precise description of the dendritic morphology. To this scope, the theory of coalescence of the dendritic arms at grain boundaries of Rappaz et al. has been applied, in this work, to the columnar growth of carbon steels by means of a simple mathematical model. Depending on the alloy composition, solid bridging starts at solid fractions down to about 0.8 and up to above 0.995 (very low carbon). The morphology of the brittle region changes drastically with increasing carbon and adding other solutes. In particular, ferritic dendrites, typical of low carbon steels, tend to offer short and wide interdendritic spaces to the surrounding liquid making possible their complete filling, and few solid bridges; peritectic steels show the rise of austenite growing and bridging rapidly in the interdendritic spaces, preventing void formation; austenitic dendrites form long and narrow interdendritic spaces difficult to reach for the liquid and with a lot of solid bridges. Sulphur addition mainly acts in delaying the coalescence end, more markedly in ferritic dendrites. (paper)

  8. Basal Dendritic Morphology of Cortical Pyramidal Neurons in Williams Syndrome: Prefrontal Cortex and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrvoj-Mihic, Branka; Hanson, Kari L; Lew, Caroline H; Stefanacci, Lisa; Jacobs, Bob; Bellugi, Ursula; Semendeferi, Katerina

    2017-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a unique neurodevelopmental disorder with a specific behavioral and cognitive profile, which includes hyperaffiliative behavior, poor social judgment, and lack of social inhibition. Here we examined the morphology of basal dendrites on pyramidal neurons in the cortex of two rare adult subjects with WS. Specifically, we examined two areas in the prefrontal cortex (PFC)-the frontal pole (Brodmann area 10) and the orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann area 11)-and three areas in the motor, sensory, and visual cortex (BA 4, BA 3-1-2, BA 18). The findings suggest that the morphology of basal dendrites on the pyramidal neurons is altered in the cortex of WS, with differences that were layer-specific, more prominent in PFC areas, and displayed an overall pattern of dendritic organization that differentiates WS from other disorders. In particular, and unlike what was expected based on typically developing brains, basal dendrites in the two PFC areas did not display longer and more branched dendrites compared to motor, sensory and visual areas. Moreover, dendritic branching, dendritic length, and the number of dendritic spines differed little within PFC and between the central executive region (BA 10) and BA 11 that is part of the orbitofrontal region involved into emotional processing. In contrast, the relationship between the degree of neuronal branching in supra- versus infra-granular layers was spared in WS. Although this study utilized tissue held in formalin for a prolonged period of time and the number of neurons available for analysis was limited, our findings indicate that WS cortex, similar to that in other neurodevelopmental disorders such as Down syndrome, Rett syndrome, Fragile X, and idiopathic autism, has altered morphology of basal dendrites on pyramidal neurons, which appears more prominent in selected areas of the PFC. Results were examined from developmental perspectives and discussed in the context of other neurodevelopmental disorders

  9. Basal Dendritic Morphology of Cortical Pyramidal Neurons in Williams Syndrome: Prefrontal Cortex and Beyond

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    Branka Hrvoj-Mihic

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Williams syndrome (WS is a unique neurodevelopmental disorder with a specific behavioral and cognitive profile, which includes hyperaffiliative behavior, poor social judgment, and lack of social inhibition. Here we examined the morphology of basal dendrites on pyramidal neurons in the cortex of two rare adult subjects with WS. Specifically, we examined two areas in the prefrontal cortex (PFC—the frontal pole (Brodmann area 10 and the orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann area 11—and three areas in the motor, sensory, and visual cortex (BA 4, BA 3-1-2, BA 18. The findings suggest that the morphology of basal dendrites on the pyramidal neurons is altered in the cortex of WS, with differences that were layer-specific, more prominent in PFC areas, and displayed an overall pattern of dendritic organization that differentiates WS from other disorders. In particular, and unlike what was expected based on typically developing brains, basal dendrites in the two PFC areas did not display longer and more branched dendrites compared to motor, sensory and visual areas. Moreover, dendritic branching, dendritic length, and the number of dendritic spines differed little within PFC and between the central executive region (BA 10 and BA 11 that is part of the orbitofrontal region involved into emotional processing. In contrast, the relationship between the degree of neuronal branching in supra- versus infra-granular layers was spared in WS. Although this study utilized tissue held in formalin for a prolonged period of time and the number of neurons available for analysis was limited, our findings indicate that WS cortex, similar to that in other neurodevelopmental disorders such as Down syndrome, Rett syndrome, Fragile X, and idiopathic autism, has altered morphology of basal dendrites on pyramidal neurons, which appears more prominent in selected areas of the PFC. Results were examined from developmental perspectives and discussed in the context of other

  10. Phosphorylation of CRMP2 by Cdk5 Regulates Dendritic Spine Development of Cortical Neuron in the Mouse Hippocampus

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    Xiaohua Jin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Proper density and morphology of dendritic spines are important for higher brain functions such as learning and memory. However, our knowledge about molecular mechanisms that regulate the development and maintenance of dendritic spines is limited. We recently reported that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 is required for the development and maintenance of dendritic spines of cortical neurons in the mouse brain. Previous in vitro studies have suggested the involvement of Cdk5 substrates in the formation of dendritic spines; however, their role in spine development has not been tested in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that Cdk5 phosphorylates collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2 in the dendritic spines of cultured hippocampal neurons and in vivo in the mouse brain. When we eliminated CRMP2 phosphorylation in CRMP2KI/KI mice, the densities of dendritic spines significantly decreased in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in the mouse brain. These results indicate that phosphorylation of CRMP2 by Cdk5 is important for dendritic spine development in cortical neurons in the mouse hippocampus.

  11. Cranial irradiation alters dendritic spine density and morphology in the hippocampus.

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    Ayanabha Chakraborti

    Full Text Available Therapeutic irradiation of the brain is a common treatment modality for brain tumors, but can lead to impairment of cognitive function. Dendritic spines are sites of excitatory synaptic transmission and changes in spine structure and number are thought to represent a morphological correlate of altered brain functions associated with hippocampal dependent learning and memory. To gain some insight into the temporal and sub region specific cellular changes in the hippocampus following brain irradiation, we investigated the effects of 10 Gy cranial irradiation on dendritic spines in young adult mice. One week or 1 month post irradiation, changes in spine density and morphology in dentate gyrus (DG granule and CA1 pyramidal neurons were quantified using Golgi staining. Our results showed that in the DG, there were significant reductions in spine density at both 1 week (11.9% and 1 month (26.9% after irradiation. In contrast, in the basal dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons, irradiation resulted in a significant reduction (18.7% in spine density only at 1 week post irradiation. Analysis of spine morphology showed that irradiation led to significant decreases in the proportion of mushroom spines at both time points in the DG as well as CA1 basal dendrites. The proportions of stubby spines were significantly increased in both the areas at 1 month post irradiation. Irradiation did not alter spine density in the CA1 apical dendrites, but there were significant changes in the proportion of thin and mushroom spines at both time points post irradiation. Although the mechanisms involved are not clear, these findings are the first to show that brain irradiation of young adult animals leads to alterations in dendritic spine density and morphology in the hippocampus in a time dependent and region specific manner.

  12. Variability of doublecortin-associated dendrite maturation in adult hippocampal neurogenesis is independent of the regulation of precursor cell proliferation

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    Jessberger Sebastian

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the course of adult hippocampal neurogenesis most regulation takes place during the phase of doublecortin (DCX expression, either as pro-proliferative effect on precursor cells or as survival-promoting effect on postmitotic cells. We here obtained quantitative data about the proliferative population and the dynamics of postmitotic dendrite development during the period of DCX expression. The question was, whether any indication could be obtained that the initiation of dendrite development is timely bound to the exit from the cell cycle. Alternatively, the temporal course of morphological maturation might be subject to additional regulatory events. Results We found that (1 20% of the DCX population were precursor cells in cell cycle, whereas more than 70% were postmitotic, (2 the time span until newborn cells had reached the most mature stage associated with DCX expression varied between 3 days and several weeks, (3 positive or negative regulation of precursor cell proliferation did not alter the pattern and dynamics of dendrite development. Dendrite maturation was largely independent of close contacts to astrocytes. Conclusion These data imply that dendrite maturation of immature neurons is initiated at varying times after cell cycle exit, is variable in duration, and is controlled independently of the regulation of precursor cell proliferation. We conclude that in addition to the major regulatory events in cell proliferation and selective survival, additional micro-regulatory events influence the course of adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

  13. Morphological analysis of Drosophila larval peripheral sensory neuron dendrites and axons using genetic mosaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, M Rezaul; Moore, Adrian W

    2011-11-07

    Nervous system development requires the correct specification of neuron position and identity, followed by accurate neuron class-specific dendritic development and axonal wiring. Recently the dendritic arborization (DA) sensory neurons of the Drosophila larval peripheral nervous system (PNS) have become powerful genetic models in which to elucidate both general and class-specific mechanisms of neuron differentiation. There are four main DA neuron classes (I-IV)(1). They are named in order of increasing dendrite arbor complexity, and have class-specific differences in the genetic control of their differentiation(2-10). The DA sensory system is a practical model to investigate the molecular mechanisms behind the control of dendritic morphology(11-13) because: 1) it can take advantage of the powerful genetic tools available in the fruit fly, 2) the DA neuron dendrite arbor spreads out in only 2 dimensions beneath an optically clear larval cuticle making it easy to visualize with high resolution in vivo, 3) the class-specific diversity in dendritic morphology facilitates a comparative analysis to find key elements controlling the formation of simple vs. highly branched dendritic trees, and 4) dendritic arbor stereotypical shapes of different DA neurons facilitate morphometric statistical analyses. DA neuron activity modifies the output of a larval locomotion central pattern generator(14-16). The different DA neuron classes have distinct sensory modalities, and their activation elicits different behavioral responses(14,16-20). Furthermore different classes send axonal projections stereotypically into the Drosophila larval central nervous system in the ventral nerve cord (VNC)(21). These projections terminate with topographic representations of both DA neuron sensory modality and the position in the body wall of the dendritic field(7,22,23). Hence examination of DA axonal projections can be used to elucidate mechanisms underlying topographic mapping(7,22,23), as well as

  14. LMTK1 regulates dendritic formation by regulating movement of Rab11A-positive endosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Tetsuya; Urushibara, Tomoki; Yoshioka, Nozomu; Saito, Taro; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Tomomura, Mineko; Hisanaga, Shin-Ichi

    2014-06-01

    Neurons extend two types of neurites-axons and dendrites-that differ in structure and function. Although it is well understood that the cytoskeleton plays a pivotal role in neurite differentiation and extension, the mechanisms by which membrane components are supplied to growing axons or dendrites is largely unknown. We previously reported that the membrane supply to axons is regulated by lemur kinase 1 (LMTK1) through Rab11A-positive endosomes. Here we investigate the role of LMTK1 in dendrite formation. Down-regulation of LMTK1 increases dendrite growth and branching of cerebral cortical neurons in vitro and in vivo. LMTK1 knockout significantly enhances the prevalence, velocity, and run length of anterograde movement of Rab11A-positive endosomes to levels similar to those expressing constitutively active Rab11A-Q70L. Rab11A-positive endosome dynamics also increases in the cell body and growth cone of LMTK1-deficient neurons. Moreover, a nonphosphorylatable LMTK1 mutant (Ser34Ala, a Cdk5 phosphorylation site) dramatically promotes dendrite growth. Thus LMTK1 negatively controls dendritic formation by regulating Rab11A-positive endosomal trafficking in a Cdk5-dependent manner, indicating the Cdk5-LMTK1-Rab11A pathway as a regulatory mechanism of dendrite development as well as axon outgrowth. © 2014 Takano et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  15. Essential Roles for ARID1B in Dendritic Arborization and Spine Morphology of Developing Pyramidal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ka, Minhan; Chopra, Divyan A.; Dravid, Shashank M.

    2016-01-01

    De novo truncating mutations in ARID1B, a chromatin-remodeling gene, cause Coffin–Siris syndrome, a developmental disorder characterized by intellectual disability and speech impairment; however, how the genetic elimination leads to cognitive dysfunction remains unknown. Thus, we investigated the neural functions of ARID1B during brain development. Here, we show that ARID1B regulates dendritic differentiation in the developing mouse brain. We knocked down ARID1B expression in mouse pyramidal neurons using in utero gene delivery methodologies. ARID1B knockdown suppressed dendritic arborization of cortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons in mice. The abnormal development of dendrites accompanied a decrease in dendritic outgrowth into layer I. Furthermore, knockdown of ARID1B resulted in aberrant dendritic spines and synaptic transmission. Finally, ARID1B deficiency led to altered expression of c-Fos and Arc, and overexpression of these factors rescued abnormal differentiation induced by ARID1B knockdown. Our results demonstrate a novel role for ARID1B in neuronal differentiation and provide new insights into the origin of cognitive dysfunction associated with developmental intellectual disability. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Haploinsufficiency of ARID1B, a component of chromatin remodeling complex, causes intellectual disability. However, the role of ARID1B in brain development is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ARID1B is required for neuronal differentiation in the developing brain, such as in dendritic arborization and synapse formation. Our findings suggest that ARID1B plays a critical role in the establishment of cognitive circuitry by regulating dendritic complexity. Thus, ARID1B deficiency may cause intellectual disability via abnormal brain wiring induced by the defective differentiation of cortical neurons. PMID:26937011

  16. Dendritic surface morphology of palladium hydride produced by electrolytic deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julin, Peng; Bursill, L.A.

    1990-01-01

    Conventional and high-resolution electron microscopic studies of electrolytically-deposited palladium hydride reveal a fascinating variety of surface profile morphologies. The observations provide direct information concerning the surface structure of palladium electrodes and the mechanism of electrolytic deposition of palladium black. Both classical electrochemical mechanisms and recent 'modified diffusion-limited-aggregation' computer simulations are discussed in comparison with the experimental results. 13 refs., 9 figs

  17. Developmental shaping of dendritic arbors in Drosophila relies on tightly regulated intra-neuronal activity of protein kinase A (PKA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copf, Tijana

    2014-09-15

    Dendrites develop morphologies characterized by multiple levels of complexity that involve neuron type specific dendritic length and particular spatial distribution. How this is developmentally regulated and in particular which signaling molecules are crucial in the process is still not understood. Using Drosophila class IV dendritic arborization (da) neurons we test in vivo the effects of cell-autonomous dose-dependent changes in the activity levels of the cAMP-dependent Protein Kinase A (PKA) on the formation of complex dendritic arbors. We find that genetic manipulations of the PKA activity levels affect profoundly the arbor complexity with strongest impact on distal branches. Both decreasing and increasing PKA activity result in a reduced complexity of the arbors, as reflected in decreased dendritic length and number of branching points, suggesting an inverted U-shape response to PKA. The phenotypes are accompanied by changes in organelle distribution: Golgi outposts and early endosomes in distal dendritic branches are reduced in PKA mutants. By using Rab5 dominant negative we find that PKA interacts genetically with the early endosomal pathway. We test if the possible relationship between PKA and organelles may be the result of phosphorylation of the microtubule motor dynein components or Rab5. We find that Drosophila cytoplasmic dynein components are direct PKA phosphorylation targets in vitro, but not in vivo, thus pointing to a different putative in vivo target. Our data argue that tightly controlled dose-dependent intra-neuronal PKA activity levels are critical in determining the dendritic arbor complexity, one of the possible ways being through the regulation of organelle distribution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Phospholipid Homeostasis Regulates Dendrite Morphogenesis in Drosophila Sensory Neurons

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    Shan Meltzer

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Disruptions in lipid homeostasis have been observed in many neurodevelopmental disorders that are associated with dendrite morphogenesis defects. However, the molecular mechanisms of how lipid homeostasis affects dendrite morphogenesis are unclear. We find that easily shocked (eas, which encodes a kinase with a critical role in phospholipid phosphatidylethanolamine (PE synthesis, and two other enzymes in this synthesis pathway are required cell autonomously in sensory neurons for dendrite growth and stability. Furthermore, we show that the level of Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein (SREBP activity is important for dendrite development. SREBP activity increases in eas mutants, and decreasing the level of SREBP and its transcriptional targets in eas mutants largely suppresses the dendrite growth defects. Furthermore, reducing Ca2+ influx in neurons of eas mutants ameliorates the dendrite morphogenesis defects. Our study uncovers a role for EAS kinase and reveals the in vivo function of phospholipid homeostasis in dendrite morphogenesis.

  19. Dendritic Kv3.3 potassium channels in cerebellar purkinje cells regulate generation and spatial dynamics of dendritic Ca2+ spikes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagha, Edward; Manita, Satoshi; Ross, William N; Rudy, Bernardo

    2010-06-01

    Purkinje cell dendrites are excitable structures with intrinsic and synaptic conductances contributing to the generation and propagation of electrical activity. Voltage-gated potassium channel subunit Kv3.3 is expressed in the distal dendrites of Purkinje cells. However, the functional relevance of this dendritic distribution is not understood. Moreover, mutations in Kv3.3 cause movement disorders in mice and cerebellar atrophy and ataxia in humans, emphasizing the importance of understanding the role of these channels. In this study, we explore functional implications of this dendritic channel expression and compare Purkinje cell dendritic excitability in wild-type and Kv3.3 knockout mice. We demonstrate enhanced excitability of Purkinje cell dendrites in Kv3.3 knockout mice, despite normal resting membrane properties. Combined data from local application pharmacology, voltage clamp analysis of ionic currents, and assessment of dendritic Ca(2+) spike threshold in Purkinje cells suggest a role for Kv3.3 channels in opposing Ca(2+) spike initiation. To study the physiological relevance of altered dendritic excitability, we measured [Ca(2+)](i) changes throughout the dendritic tree in response to climbing fiber activation. Ca(2+) signals were specifically enhanced in distal dendrites of Kv3.3 knockout Purkinje cells, suggesting a role for dendritic Kv3.3 channels in regulating propagation of electrical activity and Ca(2+) influx in distal dendrites. These findings characterize unique roles of Kv3.3 channels in dendrites, with implications for synaptic integration, plasticity, and human disease.

  20. Redox regulation of stress signals: possible roles of dendritic stellate TRX producer cells (DST cell types).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yodoi, Junji; Nakamura, Hajime; Masutani, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    Thioredoxin (TRX) is a 12 kDa protein with redox-active dithiol (Cys-Gly-Pro-Cys) in the active site. TRX is induced by a variety of stresses including viral infection and inflammation. The promoter sequences of the TRX gene contain a series of stress-responsive elements including ORE, ARE, XRE, CRE and SP-1. TRX promotes DNA binding of transcription factors such as NF-kappaB, AP-1 and p53. TRX interacts with target proteins modulating the activity of those proteins. We have identified TRX binding protein-2 (TBP-2), which was identical to vitamin D3 up-regulated protein 1 (VDUP1). Potential action of TBP-2/VDUP1 as a redox-sensitive tumor suppressor will be discussed. There is accumulating evidence for the involvement of TRX in the protection against infectious and inflammatory disorders. We will discuss the role of TRX-dependent redox regulation of the host defense mechanism, in particular its relation to the emerging concept of constitutive and/or inducible TRX on special cell types with dendritic and stellate morphology in the immune, endocrine and nervous systems, which we provisionally designate as dendritic stellate TRX producer cells (DST cell types).

  1. A Simulation Study on the Effects of Dendritic Morphology on Layer V Prefontal Pyramidal Cell Firing Behavior

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    Maria ePsarrou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pyramidal cells, the most abundant neurons in neocortex, exhibit significant structural variability across different brain areas and layers in different species. Moreover, in response to a somatic step current, these cells display a range of firing behaviors, the most common being (1 repetitive action potentials (Regular Spiking - RS, and (2 an initial cluster of 2-5 action potentials with short ISIs followed by single spikes (Intrinsic Bursting - IB. A correlation between firing behavior and dendritic morphology has recently been reported. In this work we use computational modeling to investigate quantitatively the effects of the basal dendritic tree morphology on the firing behavior of 112 three-dimensional reconstructions of layer V PFC rat pyramidal cells. Particularly, we focus on how different morphological (diameter, total length, volume and branch number and passive (Mean Electrotonic Path length features of basal dendritic trees shape somatic firing when the spatial distribution of ionic mechanisms in the basal dendritic trees is uniform or non-uniform. Our results suggest that total length, volume and branch number are the best morphological parameters to discriminate the cells as RS or IB, regardless of the distribution of ionic mechanisms in basal trees. The discriminatory power of total length, volume and branch number remains high in the presence of different apical dendrites. These results suggest that morphological variations in the basal dendritic trees of layer V pyramidal neurons in the PFC influence their firing patterns in a predictive manner and may in turn influence the information processing capabilities of these neurons.

  2. Gelidium amansii promotes dendritic spine morphology and synaptogenesis, and modulates NMDA receptor-mediated postsynaptic current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Md Abdul; Mohibbullah, Md; Hong, Yong-Ki; Nam, Joo Hyun; Moon, Il Soo

    2014-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors are essential for the differentiation and maturation of developing neurons as well as providing survival support to the mature neurons. Moreover, therapeutically neurotrophic factors are promising to reconstruct partially damaged neuronal networks in neurodegenerative diseases. In the previous study, we reported that the ethanol extract of an edible marine alga, Gelidium amansii (GAE) had shown promising effects in the development and maturation of both axon and dendrites of hippocampal neurons. Here, we demonstrate that in primary culture of hippocampal neurons (1) GAE promotes a significant increase in the number of filopodia and dendritic spines; (2) promotes synaptogenesis; (3) enhances N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor recruitment; and (4) modulates NMDA-receptor-mediated postsynaptic current. Taken together these findings that GAE might be involved in both morphological and functional maturation of neurons suggest the possibility that GAE may constitute a promising candidate for novel compounds for the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Statistical analysis and data mining of digital reconstructions of dendritic morphologies

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    Sridevi ePolavaram

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal morphology is diverse among animal species, developmental stages, brain regions, and cell types. The geometry of individual neurons also varies substantially even within the same cell class. Moreover, specific histological, imaging, and reconstruction methodologies can differentially affect morphometric measures. The quantitative characterization of neuronal arbors is necessary for in-depth understanding of the structure-function relationship in nervous systems. The large collection of community-contributed digitally reconstructed neurons available at NeuroMorpho.Org constitutes a big data research opportunity for neuroscience discovery beyond the approaches typically pursued in single laboratories. To illustrate these potential and related challenges, we present a database-wide statistical analysis of dendritic arbors enabling the quantification of major morphological similarities and differences across broadly adopted metadata categories. Furthermore, we adopt a complementary unsupervised approach based on clustering and dimensionality reduction to identify the main morphological parameters leading to the most statistically informative structural classification. We find that specific combinations of measures related to branching density, overall size, tortuosity, bifurcation angles, arbor flatness, and topological asymmetry can capture anatomically and functionally relevant features of dendritic trees. The reported results only represent a small fraction of the relationships available for data exploration and hypothesis testing enabled by digital sharing of morphological reconstructions.

  4. Statistical analysis and data mining of digital reconstructions of dendritic morphologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polavaram, Sridevi; Gillette, Todd A; Parekh, Ruchi; Ascoli, Giorgio A

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal morphology is diverse among animal species, developmental stages, brain regions, and cell types. The geometry of individual neurons also varies substantially even within the same cell class. Moreover, specific histological, imaging, and reconstruction methodologies can differentially affect morphometric measures. The quantitative characterization of neuronal arbors is necessary for in-depth understanding of the structure-function relationship in nervous systems. The large collection of community-contributed digitally reconstructed neurons available at NeuroMorpho.Org constitutes a "big data" research opportunity for neuroscience discovery beyond the approaches typically pursued in single laboratories. To illustrate these potential and related challenges, we present a database-wide statistical analysis of dendritic arbors enabling the quantification of major morphological similarities and differences across broadly adopted metadata categories. Furthermore, we adopt a complementary unsupervised approach based on clustering and dimensionality reduction to identify the main morphological parameters leading to the most statistically informative structural classification. We find that specific combinations of measures related to branching density, overall size, tortuosity, bifurcation angles, arbor flatness, and topological asymmetry can capture anatomically and functionally relevant features of dendritic trees. The reported results only represent a small fraction of the relationships available for data exploration and hypothesis testing enabled by sharing of digital morphological reconstructions.

  5. Dendritic cells regulate angiogenesis associated with liver fibrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blois, Sandra M; Piccioni, Flavia; Freitag, Nancy; Tirado-González, Irene; Moschansky, Petra; Lloyd, Rodrigo; Hensel-Wiegel, Karin; Rose, Matthias; Garcia, Mariana G; Alaniz, Laura D; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    During liver fibrogenesis the immune response and angiogenesis process are fine-tuned resulting in activation of hepatic stellate cells that produce an excess of extracellular matrix proteins. Dendritic cells (DC) play a central role modulating the liver immunity and have recently been implicated to favour fibrosis regression; although their ability to influence the development of fibrogenesis is unknown. Therefore, we explored whether the depletion of DC during early stages of liver injury has an impact in the development of fibrogenesis. Using the CD11c.DTR transgenic mice, DC were depleted in two experimental models of fibrosis in vivo. The effect of anti-angiogenic therapy was tested during early stages of liver fibrogenesis. DC depletion accelerates the development of fibrosis and as a consequence, the angiogenesis process is boosted. We observed up-regulation of pro-angiogenic factors together with an enhanced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) bioavailability, mainly evidenced by the decrease of anti-angiogenic VEGF receptor 1 (also known as sFlt-1) levels. Interestingly, fibrogenesis process enhanced the expression of Flt-1 on hepatic DC and administration of sFlt-1 was sufficient to abrogate the acceleration of fibrogenesis upon DC depletion. Thus, DC emerge as novel players during the development of liver fibrosis regulating the angiogenesis process and thereby influencing fibrogenesis.

  6. Kinetic Transition of Crystal Morphology from Nanoparticles to Dendrites during Electron Beam Induced Deposition of Gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeung Hun; Schneider, Nicholas; Bau, Haim; Kodambaka, Suneel; Ross, Frances

    2015-03-01

    We studied the kinetic transition from compact nanoparticle to dendritic morphology during electron beam-induced Au deposition using in situ liquid cell-based transmission electron microcopy. Radiolysis of water by electrons generates radicals and molecular species. Hydrated electrons and hydrogen and hydroxide radicals can act as reducing agents and initiate the reduction of the water-soluble precursor, HAuCl4, resulting in the precipitation of Au as nanostructures. We tracked nucleation, growth, and morphological transition of Au from movies recorded in situ, as a function of irradiated dose and liquid thickness. We identified several distinct regimes that depend on the irradiation time: (1) nucleation; (2) linear volumetric growth; (3) formation of dendritic structures; (4) coalescence and dissolution. A diffusion and reaction model for the radiolytic species and metal ions in the confined geometry of the irradiated volume is used to understand the nucleation sites and morphological transitions. We finally describe how nanoparticles can be made to grow in a stepwise manner by switching the supply of Au ions on and off electrochemically, and discuss possibilities for creating more complex nanostructures. This research was partially funded by the National Science Foundation (DMR-1310639, CMMI-1129722, and CBET-1066573).

  7. miR-132 Regulates Dendritic Spine Structure by Direct Targeting of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasińska, Magdalena; Miłek, Jacek; Cymerman, Iwona A; Łęski, Szymon; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Dziembowska, Magdalena

    2016-09-01

    Mir-132 is a neuronal activity-regulated microRNA that controls the morphology of dendritic spines and neuronal transmission. Similar activities have recently been attributed to matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), an extrasynaptic protease. In the present study, we provide evidence that miR-132 directly regulates MMP-9 mRNA in neurons to modulate synaptic plasticity. With the use of luciferase reporter system, we show that miR-132 binds to the 3'UTR of MMP-9 mRNA to regulate its expression in neurons. The overexpression of miR-132 in neurons reduces the level of endogenous MMP-9 protein secretion. In synaptoneurosomes, metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-induced signaling stimulates the dissociation of miR-132 from polyribosomal fractions and shifts it towards the messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP)-containing fraction. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the overexpression of miR-132 in the cultured hippocampal neurons from Fmr1 KO mice that have increased synaptic MMP-9 level provokes enlargement of the dendritic spine heads, a process previously implicated in enhanced synaptic plasticity. We propose that activity-dependent miR-132 regulates structural plasticity of dendritic spines through matrix metalloproteinase 9.

  8. Alterations to dendritic spine morphology, but not dendrite patterning, of cortical projection neurons in Tc1 and Ts1Rhr mouse models of Down syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matilda A Haas

    Full Text Available Down Syndrome (DS is a highly prevalent developmental disorder, affecting 1/700 births. Intellectual disability, which affects learning and memory, is present in all cases and is reflected by below average IQ. We sought to determine whether defective morphology and connectivity in neurons of the cerebral cortex may underlie the cognitive deficits that have been described in two mouse models of DS, the Tc1 and Ts1Rhr mouse lines. We utilised in utero electroporation to label a cohort of future upper layer projection neurons in the cerebral cortex of developing mouse embryos with GFP, and then examined neuronal positioning and morphology in early adulthood, which revealed no alterations in cortical layer position or morphology in either Tc1 or Ts1Rhr mouse cortex. The number of dendrites, as well as dendrite length and branching was normal in both DS models, compared with wildtype controls. The sites of projection neuron synaptic inputs, dendritic spines, were analysed in Tc1 and Ts1Rhr cortex at three weeks and three months after birth, and significant changes in spine morphology were observed in both mouse lines. Ts1Rhr mice had significantly fewer thin spines at three weeks of age. At three months of age Tc1 mice had significantly fewer mushroom spines--the morphology associated with established synaptic inputs and learning and memory. The decrease in mushroom spines was accompanied by a significant increase in the number of stubby spines. This data suggests that dendritic spine abnormalities may be a more important contributor to cognitive deficits in DS models, rather than overall neuronal architecture defects.

  9. Estrogen levels regulate the subcellular distribution of phosphorylated Akt in hippocampal CA1 dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Znamensky, Vladimir; Akama, Keith T; McEwen, Bruce S; Milner, Teresa A

    2003-03-15

    In addition to genomic pathways, estrogens may regulate gene expression by activating specific signal transduction pathways, such as that involving phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) and the subsequent phosphorylation of Akt (protein kinase B). The Akt pathway regulates various cellular events, including the initiation of protein synthesis. Our previous studies showed that synaptogenesis in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cell dendritic spines is highest when brain estrogen levels are highest. To address the role of Akt in this process, the subcellular distribution of phosphorylated Akt immunoreactivity (pAkt-I) in the hippocampus of female rats across the estrous cycle and male rats was analyzed by light microscopy (LM) and electron microscopy (EM). By LM, the density of pAkt-I in stratum radiatum of CA1 was significantly higher in proestrus rats (or in estrogen-supplemented ovariectomized females) compared with diestrus, estrus, or male rats. By EM, pAkt-I was found throughout the shafts and in select spines of stratum radiatum dendrites. Quantitative ultrastructural analysis identifying pAkt-I with immunogold particles revealed that proestrus rats compared with diestrus, estrus, and male rats contained significantly higher pAkt-I associated with (1) dendritic spines (both cytoplasm and plasmalemma), (2) spine apparati located within 0.1 microm of dendritic spine bases, (3) endoplasmic reticula and polyribosomes in the cytoplasm of dendritic shafts, and (4) the plasmalemma of dendritic shafts. These findings suggest that estrogens may regulate spine formation in CA1 pyramidal neurons via Akt-mediated signaling events.

  10. Adrenergic Modulation Regulates the Dendritic Excitability of Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Labarrera

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The excitability of the apical tuft of layer 5 pyramidal neurons is thought to play a crucial role in behavioral performance and synaptic plasticity. We show that the excitability of the apical tuft is sensitive to adrenergic neuromodulation. Using two-photon dendritic Ca2+ imaging and in vivo whole-cell and extracellular recordings in awake mice, we show that application of the α2A-adrenoceptor agonist guanfacine increases the probability of dendritic Ca2+ events in the tuft and lowers the threshold for dendritic Ca2+ spikes. We further show that these effects are likely to be mediated by the dendritic current Ih. Modulation of Ih in a realistic compartmental model controlled both the generation and magnitude of dendritic calcium spikes in the apical tuft. These findings suggest that adrenergic neuromodulation may affect cognitive processes such as sensory integration, attention, and working memory by regulating the sensitivity of layer 5 pyramidal neurons to top-down inputs. : Labarrera et al. show that noradrenergic neuromodulation can be an effective way to regulate the interaction between different input streams of information processed by an individual neuron. These findings may have important implications for our understanding of how adrenergic neuromodulation affects sensory integration, attention, and working memory. Keywords: cortical layer 5 pyramidal neuron, dendrites, norepinephrine, HCN, Ih, Ca2+ spike, apical tuft, guanfacine, ADHD, somatosensory cortex

  11. Effects of decreased inhibition on synaptic plasticity and dendritic morphology in the juvenile prefrontal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xanthippi Konstantoudaki

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Excitation-inhibition balance is critical for maintaining proper functioning of the cerebral cortex, as evident from electrophysiological and modeling studies, and it is also important for animal behavior (Yizhar et al., 2011. In the cerebral cortex, excitation is provided by glutamate release from pyramidal neurons, while inhibition is provided by GABA release from several types of interneurons. Many neuropsychiatric disorders, such as epilepsy, anxiety, schizophrenia and autism exhibit an imbalance between the excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms of cortical circuits within key brain regions as prefrontal cortex or hippocampus, primarily through dysfunctions in the inhibitory system (Lewis, Volk, & Hashimoto, 2003; Marín, 2012 Given the significant role of GABAergic inhibition in shaping proper function of the cerebral cortex, we used a mouse model of developmentally decreased GABAergic inhibition in order to examine its effects in network properties, namely basal synaptic transmission, synaptic plasticity and dendritic morphology of pyramidal neurons. For our study, we used mice (postnatal day 20-30 in which the Rac1 protein was deleted from Nkx2.1-expressing neurons (Vidaki et al., 2012, (Rac1fl/flNkx2.1 +/cre referred as Rac1 KO mice, and heterozygous (Rac1+/flNkx2.1 +/cre or control (Rac1+/flNkx2.1 +/+ mice. The specific ablation of Rac1 protein from NKx2.1-expressing MGE-derived progenitors leads to a perturbation of their cell cycle exit resulting in decreased number of interneurons in the cortex(Vidaki et al, 2012. We prepared brain slices from the prefrontal cortex and recorded field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs from layer II neurons while stimulating axons in layer II. We find that the evoked fEPSPs are decreased in Rac1 KO mice compared to Rac1 heterozygous or control mice. This could suggest that the decreased GABAergic inhibition causes network alterations that result in reduced glutamatergic function. Furthermore

  12. Interleukin 20 regulates dendritic cell migration and expression of co-stimulatory molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Rikke; Jalilian, Babak; Agger, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is an inflammatory disease characterized by leukocyte skin infiltration. Interestingly, recent works suggest that the migration of dendritic cells (DCs) is abnormal in psoriatic skin. DCs have significant role in regulating the function of T lymphocytes, at least in part...... influenced by the local environment of cytokines. In psoriatic skin lesions the expression of IL-20 is highly up-regulated. It is unclear if this cytokine has any influence on DCs. METHODS: Here, we investigated the influence of IL-20 in monocyte-derived dendritic cell (MDDCs) in vitro. This work addressed...

  13. Algorithms for Hyperspectral Endmember Extraction and Signature Classification with Morphological Dendritic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalz, M.; Ritter, G.

    Accurate multispectral or hyperspectral signature classification is key to the nonimaging detection and recognition of space objects. Additionally, signature classification accuracy depends on accurate spectral endmember determination [1]. Previous approaches to endmember computation and signature classification were based on linear operators or neural networks (NNs) expressed in terms of the algebra (R, +, x) [1,2]. Unfortunately, class separation in these methods tends to be suboptimal, and the number of signatures that can be accurately classified often depends linearly on the number of NN inputs. This can lead to poor endmember distinction, as well as potentially significant classification errors in the presence of noise or densely interleaved signatures. In contrast to traditional CNNs, autoassociative morphological memories (AMM) are a construct similar to Hopfield autoassociatived memories defined on the (R, +, ?,?) lattice algebra [3]. Unlimited storage and perfect recall of noiseless real valued patterns has been proven for AMMs [4]. However, AMMs suffer from sensitivity to specific noise models, that can be characterized as erosive and dilative noise. On the other hand, the prior definition of a set of endmembers corresponds to material spectra lying on vertices of the minimum convex region covering the image data. These vertices can be characterized as morphologically independent patterns. It has further been shown that AMMs can be based on dendritic computation [3,6]. These techniques yield improved accuracy and class segmentation/separation ability in the presence of highly interleaved signature data. In this paper, we present a procedure for endmember determination based on AMM noise sensitivity, which employs morphological dendritic computation. We show that detected endmembers can be exploited by AMM based classification techniques, to achieve accurate signature classification in the presence of noise, closely spaced or interleaved signatures, and

  14. Homer2 deletion alters dendritic spine morphology but not alcohol-associated adaptations in GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors in the nucleus accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie S McGuier

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Repeated exposure to ethanol followed by withdrawal leads to the alterations in glutamatergic signaling and impaired synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens (NAc in both clinical and preclinical models of ethanol exposure. Homer2 is a member of a family of postsynaptic density (PSD scaffolding proteins that functions in part to cluster NMDA signaling complexes in the PSD, and has been shown to be critically important for plasticity in multiple models of drug and alcohol abuse. Here we used Homer2 KO mice and a chronic intermittent intraperitoneal (IP ethanol injection model to investigate a potential role for the protein in ethanol-induced adaptations in dendritic spine morphology and PSD protein expression. While deletion of Homer2 was associated with increased density of long spines on medium spiny neurons of the NAc core of saline treated mice, ethanol exposure had no effect on dendritic spine morphology in either wild-type (WT or Homer2 KO mice. Western blot analysis of tissue samples from the NAc enriched for PSD proteins revealed a main effect of ethanol treatment on the expression of GluN2B, but there was no effect of genotype or treatment on the expression other glutamate receptor subunits or PSD95. These data indicate that the global deletion of Homer2 leads to aberrant regulation of dendritic spine morphology in the NAc core that is associated with an increased density of long, thin spines. Unexpectedly, intermittent IP ethanol did not affect spine morphology in either WT or KO mice. Together these data implicate Homer2 in the formation of long, thin spines and further supports its role in neuronal structure.

  15. Intestinal dendritic cells in the regulation of mucosal immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekiaris, Vasileios; Persson, Emma K.; Agace, William Winston

    2014-01-01

    immune cells within the mucosa must suitably respond to maintain intestinal integrity, while also providing the ability to mount effective immune responses to potential pathogens. Dendritic cells (DCs) are sentinel immune cells that play a central role in the initiation and differentiation of adaptive....... The recognition that dietary nutrients and microbial communities in the intestine influence both mucosal and systemic immune cell development and function as well as immune-mediated disease has led to an explosion of literature in mucosal immunology in recent years and a growing interest in the functionality...

  16. Detection of Dendritic Spines Using Wavelet-Based Conditional Symmetric Analysis and Regularized Morphological Shared-Weight Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuihua Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification and detection of dendritic spines in neuron images are of high interest in diagnosis and treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders (e.g., Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s diseases, and autism. In this paper, we have proposed a novel automatic approach using wavelet-based conditional symmetric analysis and regularized morphological shared-weight neural networks (RMSNN for dendritic spine identification involving the following steps: backbone extraction, localization of dendritic spines, and classification. First, a new algorithm based on wavelet transform and conditional symmetric analysis has been developed to extract backbone and locate the dendrite boundary. Then, the RMSNN has been proposed to classify the spines into three predefined categories (mushroom, thin, and stubby. We have compared our proposed approach against the existing methods. The experimental result demonstrates that the proposed approach can accurately locate the dendrite and accurately classify the spines into three categories with the accuracy of 99.1% for “mushroom” spines, 97.6% for “stubby” spines, and 98.6% for “thin” spines.

  17. Sensory Neuron Fates Are Distinguished by a Transcriptional Switch that Regulates Dendrite Branch Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cody J.; O’Brien, Timothy; Chatzigeorgiou, Marios; Spencer, W. Clay; Feingold-Link, Elana; Husson, Steven J.; Hori, Sayaka; Mitani, Shohei; Gottschalk, Alexander; Schafer, William R.; Miller, David M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Sensory neurons adopt distinct morphologies and functional modalities to mediate responses to specific stimuli. Transcription factors and their downstream effectors orchestrate this outcome but are incompletely defined. Here, we show that different classes of mechanosensory neurons in C. elegans are distinguished by the combined action of the transcription factors MEC-3, AHR-1, and ZAG-1. Low levels of MEC-3 specify the elaborate branching pattern of PVD nociceptors, whereas high MEC-3 is correlated with the simple morphology of AVM and PVM touch neurons. AHR-1 specifies AVM touch neuron fate by elevating MEC-3 while simultaneously blocking expression of nociceptive genes such as the MEC-3 target, the claudin-like membrane protein HPO-30, that promotes the complex dendritic branching pattern of PVD. ZAG-1 exercises a parallel role to prevent PVM from adopting the PVD fate. The conserved dendritic branching function of the Drosophila AHR-1 homolog, Spineless, argues for similar pathways in mammals. PMID:23889932

  18. Multidendritic sensory neurons in the adult Drosophila abdomen: origins, dendritic morphology, and segment- and age-dependent programmed cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugimura Kaoru

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For the establishment of functional neural circuits that support a wide range of animal behaviors, initial circuits formed in early development have to be reorganized. One way to achieve this is local remodeling of the circuitry hardwiring. To genetically investigate the underlying mechanisms of this remodeling, one model system employs a major group of Drosophila multidendritic sensory neurons - the dendritic arborization (da neurons - which exhibit dramatic dendritic pruning and subsequent growth during metamorphosis. The 15 da neurons are identified in each larval abdominal hemisegment and are classified into four categories - classes I to IV - in order of increasing size of their receptive fields and/or arbor complexity at the mature larval stage. Our knowledge regarding the anatomy and developmental basis of adult da neurons is still fragmentary. Results We identified multidendritic neurons in the adult Drosophila abdomen, visualized the dendritic arbors of the individual neurons, and traced the origins of those cells back to the larval stage. There were six da neurons in abdominal hemisegment 3 or 4 (A3/4 of the pharate adult and the adult just after eclosion, five of which were persistent larval da neurons. We quantitatively analyzed dendritic arbors of three of the six adult neurons and examined expression in the pharate adult of key transcription factors that result in the larval class-selective dendritic morphologies. The 'baseline design' of A3/4 in the adult was further modified in a segment-dependent and age-dependent manner. One of our notable findings is that a larval class I neuron, ddaE, completed dendritic remodeling in A2 to A4 and then underwent caspase-dependent cell death within 1 week after eclosion, while homologous neurons in A5 and in more posterior segments degenerated at pupal stages. Another finding is that the dendritic arbor of a class IV neuron, v'ada, was immediately reshaped during post

  19. Histone Deacetylase Rpd3 Regulates Olfactory Projection Neuron Dendrite Targeting via the Transcription Factor Prospero

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tea, Joy S.; Chihara, Takahiro; Luo, Liqun

    2010-01-01

    Compared to the mechanisms of axon guidance, relatively little is known about the transcriptional control of dendrite guidance. The Drosophila olfactory system with its stereotyped organization provides an excellent model to study the transcriptional control of dendrite wiring specificity. Each projection neuron (PN) targets its dendrites to a specific glomerulus in the antennal lobe and its axon stereotypically to higher brain centers. Using a forward genetic screen, we identified a mutation in Rpd3 that disrupts PN targeting specificity. Rpd3 encodes a class I histone deacetylase (HDAC) homologous to mammalian HDAC1 and HDAC2. Rpd3−/− PN dendrites that normally target to a dorsolateral glomerulus mistarget to medial glomeruli in the antennal lobe, and axons exhibit a severe overbranching phenotype. These phenotypes can be rescued by postmitotic expression of Rpd3 but not HDAC3, the only other class I HDAC in Drosophila. Furthermore, disruption of the atypical homeodomain transcription factor Prospero (Pros) yields similar phenotypes, which can be rescued by Pros expression in postmitotic neurons. Strikingly, overexpression of Pros can suppress Rpd3−/− phenotypes. Our study suggests a specific function for the general chromatin remodeling factor Rpd3 in regulating dendrite targeting in neurons, largely through the postmitotic action of the Pros transcription factor. PMID:20660276

  20. Microtubule nucleation and organization in dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delandre, Caroline; Amikura, Reiko; Moore, Adrian W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dendrite branching is an essential process for building complex nervous systems. It determines the number, distribution and integration of inputs into a neuron, and is regulated to create the diverse dendrite arbor branching patterns characteristic of different neuron types. The microtubule cytoskeleton is critical to provide structure and exert force during dendrite branching. It also supports the functional requirements of dendrites, reflected by differential microtubule architectural organization between neuron types, illustrated here for sensory neurons. Both anterograde and retrograde microtubule polymerization occur within growing dendrites, and recent studies indicate that branching is enhanced by anterograde microtubule polymerization events in nascent branches. The polarities of microtubule polymerization events are regulated by the position and orientation of microtubule nucleation events in the dendrite arbor. Golgi outposts are a primary microtubule nucleation center in dendrites and share common nucleation machinery with the centrosome. In addition, pre-existing dendrite microtubules may act as nucleation sites. We discuss how balancing the activities of distinct nucleation machineries within the growing dendrite can alter microtubule polymerization polarity and dendrite branching, and how regulating this balance can generate neuron type-specific morphologies. PMID:27097122

  1. Characterization of dendritic morphology and neurotransmitter phenotype of thoracic descending propriospinal neurons after complete spinal cord transection and GDNF treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lingxiao; Ruan, Yiwen; Chen, Chen; Frye, Christian Corbin; Xiong, Wenhui; Jin, Xiaoming; Jones, Kathryn; Sengelaub, Dale; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI), poor regeneration of damaged axons of the central nervous system (CNS) causes limited functional recovery. This limited spontaneous functional recovery has been attributed, to a large extent, to the plasticity of propriospinal neurons, especially the descending propriospinal neurons (dPSNs). Compared with the supraspinal counterparts, dPSNs have displayed significantly greater regenerative capacity, which can be further enhanced by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). In the present study, we applied a G-mutated rabies virus (G-Rabies) co-expressing green fluorescence protein (GFP) to reveal Golgi-like dendritic morphology of dPSNs. We also investigated the neurotransmitters expressed by dPSNs after labeling with a retrograde tracer Fluoro-Gold (FG). dPSNs were examined in animals with sham injuries or complete spinal transections with or without GDNF treatment. Bilateral injections of G-Rabies and FG were made into the 2nd lumbar (L2) spinal cord at 3 days prior to a spinal cord transection performed at the 11th thoracic level (T11). The lesion gap was filled with Gelfoam containing either saline or GDNF in the injury groups. Four days post-injury, the rats were sacrificed for analysis. For those animals receiving G-rabies injection, the GFP signal in the T7–9 spinal cord was visualized via 2-photon microscopy. Dendritic morphology from stack images was traced and analyzed using a Neurolucida software. We found that dPSNs in sham injured animals had a predominantly dorsal-ventral distribution of dendrites. Transection injury resulted in alterations in the dendritic distribution with dorsal-ventral retraction and lateral-medial extension. Treatment with GDNF significantly increased the terminal dendritic length of dPSNs. The density of spine-like structures was increased after injury, and treatment with GDNF enhanced this effect. For the group receiving FG injections, immunohistochemistry for glutamate, choline

  2. Morphological Characterization of the Action Potential Initiation Segment in GnRH Neuron Dendrites and Axons of Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herde, Michel K; Herbison, Allan E

    2015-11-01

    GnRH neurons are the final output neurons of the hypothalamic network controlling fertility in mammals. In the present study, we used ankyrin G immunohistochemistry and neurobiotin filling of live GnRH neurons in brain slices from GnRH-green fluorescent protein transgenic male mice to examine in detail the location of action potential initiation in GnRH neurons with somata residing at different locations in the basal forebrain. We found that the vast majority of GnRH neurons are bipolar in morphology, elaborating a thick (primary) and thinner (secondary) dendrite from opposite poles of the soma. In addition, an axon-like process arising predominantly from a proximal dendrite was observed in a subpopulation of GnRH neurons. Ankyrin G immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of a single action potential initiation zone ∼27 μm in length primarily in the secondary dendrite of GnRH neurons and located 30 to 140 μm distant from the cell soma, depending on the type of process and location of the cell body. In addition to dendrites, the GnRH neurons with cell bodies located close to hypothalamic circumventricular organs often elaborated ankyrin G-positive axon-like structures. Almost all GnRH neurons (>90%) had their action potential initiation site in a process that initially, or ultimately after a hairpin loop, was coursing in the direction of the median eminence. These studies indicate that action potentials are initiated in different dendritic and axonal compartments of the GnRH neuron in a manner that is dependent partly on the neuroanatomical location of the cell body.

  3. Sex-specific effects of early life stress on social interaction and prefrontal cortex dendritic morphology in young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, M R; Holland, F H; Shansky, R M; Brenhouse, H C

    2016-09-01

    Early life stress has been linked to depression, anxiety, and behavior disorders in adolescence and adulthood. The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is implicated in stress-related psychopathology, is a target for stress hormones, and mediates social behavior. The present study investigated sex differences in early-life stress effects on juvenile social interaction and adolescent mPFC dendritic morphology in rats using a maternal separation (MS) paradigm. Half of the rat pups of each sex were separated from their mother for 4h a day between postnatal days 2 and 21, while the other half remained with their mother in the animal facilities and were exposed to minimal handling. At postnatal day 25 (P25; juvenility), rats underwent a social interaction test with an age and sex matched conspecific. Distance from conspecific, approach and avoidance behaviors, nose-to-nose contacts, and general locomotion were measured. Rats were euthanized at postnatal day 40 (P40; adolescence), and randomly selected infralimbic pyramidal neurons were filled with Lucifer yellow using iontophoretic microinjections, imaged in 3D, and then analyzed for dendritic arborization, spine density, and spine morphology. Early-life stress increased the latency to make nose-to-nose contact at P25 in females but not males. At P40, early-life stress increased infralimbic apical dendritic branch number and length and decreased thin spine density in stressed female rats. These results indicate that MS during the postnatal period influenced juvenile social behavior and mPFC dendritic arborization in a sex-specific manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sphingosine 1-phosphate as a novel immune regulator of dendritic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Although originally described as an intracellular second messenger, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) has recently been shown to be involved in several physiological and pathological functions as an extracellular mediator. S1P receptors are widely expressed and thought to regulate important functions in cell signalling.

  5. Human cytomegalovirus alters localization of MHC class II and dendrite morphology in mature Langerhans cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andrew W; Hertel, Laura; Louie, Ryan K; Burster, Timo; Lacaille, Vashti; Pashine, Achal; Abate, Davide A; Mocarski, Edward S; Mellins, Elizabeth D

    2006-09-15

    Hemopoietic stem cell-derived mature Langerhans-type dendritic cells (LC) are susceptible to productive infection by human CMV (HCMV). To investigate the impact of infection on this cell type, we examined HLA-DR biosynthesis and trafficking in mature LC cultures exposed to HCMV. We found decreased surface HLA-DR levels in viral Ag-positive as well as in Ag-negative mature LC. Inhibition of HLA-DR was independent of expression of unique short US2-US11 region gene products by HCMV. Indeed, exposure to UV-inactivated virus, but not to conditioned medium from infected cells, was sufficient to reduce HLA-DR on mature LC, implicating particle binding/penetration in this effect. Reduced surface levels reflected an altered distribution of HLA-DR because total cellular HLA-DR was not diminished. Accumulation of HLA-DR was not explained by altered cathepsin S activity. Mature, peptide-loaded HLA-DR molecules were retained within cells, as assessed by the proportion of SDS-stable HLA-DR dimers. A block in egress was implicated, as endocytosis of surface HLA-DR was not increased. Immunofluorescence microscopy corroborated the intracellular retention of HLA-DR and revealed markedly fewer HLA-DR-positive dendritic projections in infected mature LC. Unexpectedly, light microscopic analyses showed a dramatic loss of the dendrites themselves and immunofluorescence revealed that cytoskeletal elements crucial for the formation and maintenance of dendrites are disrupted in viral Ag-positive cells. Consistent with these dendrite effects, HCMV-infected mature LC exhibit markedly reduced chemotaxis in response to lymphoid chemokines. Thus, HCMV impedes MHC class II molecule trafficking, dendritic projections, and migration of mature LC. These changes likely contribute to the reduced activation of CD4+ T cells by HCMV-infected mature LC.

  6. Suppressive effects of primed eosinophils on single epicutaneous sensitization through regulation of dermal dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing-Yi; Ta, Yng-Cun; Liu, I-Lin; Chen, Hsi-Wen; Wang, Li-Fang

    2016-07-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional innate immune cells involved in many aspects of innate and adaptive immunity. Epicutaneous sensitization with protein allergen is an important sensitization route for atopic dermatitis. In this study, using a murine single protein-patch model, we show that eosinophils of a primed status accumulate in draining lymph nodes following single epicutaneous sensitization. Further, depletion of eosinophils results in enhancement of the induced Th1/Th2 immune responses, whereas IL-5-induced hypereosinophilia suppresses these responses. Mechanistically, primed eosinophils cause a reduction in the numbers and activation status of dermal dendritic cells in draining lymph nodes. Collectively, these results demonstrate that primed eosinophils exert suppressive effects on single epicutaneous sensitization through regulation of dermal dendritic cells. Thus, these findings highlight the critical roles of eosinophils in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis with important clinical implications for the prevention of allergen sensitization. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Dendritic spine changes in the development of alcohol addiction regulated by α-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Mijakowska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Alcohol has many adverse effects on the brain. Among them are dendritic spine morphology alterations, which are believed to be the basis of alcohol addiction. Autophosphorylation of α-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (αCaMKII has been shown to regulate spine morphology in vitro. Here we show that αCaMKII can also regulate addiction related behaviour and dendritic spine morphology changes caused by alcohol consumption in vivo. Method 12 αCaMKII-autophosphorylation deficient female mice (T286A and 12 wild type littermates were used in the study. T286A strain was created by Giese et al. (1998. Mice were housed and tested in two IntelliCages from NewBehavior (www.newbehavior.com. IntelliCage is an automated learning system. After 95 days of alcohol drinking interrupted by tests for motivation, persistence in alcohol seeking and probability of relapse, mice were ascribed to ‘high’ or ‘low’ drinkers group according to their performance in the tests. Additional criterion was the amount of alcohol consumed during the whole experiment. Result of each test was evaluated separately. 1/3 of the mice that scored highest in each criterion were considered ‘positive’ for this trait. ‘Positive’ animals were given 1 point, negative 0 points. Mice that were positive in at least 2 criteria were ascribed to ‘high’ drinkers (‘+’ group. Remaining mice – to ‘low’ drinkers (‘–‘. This method of behavioral phenotyping, developed by Radwanska and Kaczmarek (2012, is inspired by DSM-IV. Since the results of this evaluation are discrete (i.e. by definition all the animals score between 0 to +4, we developed also a continuous method of addiction rating, which we call ‘addiction index’. The result of the second method is a sum of the standardized (z-score results of the above mentioned tests. We use it to examine the correlations between addiction-like behavior and spine parameters. Control group (12 WT, 8

  8. Activity-Dependent Exocytosis of Lysosomes Regulates the Structural Plasticity of Dendritic Spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padamsey, Zahid; McGuinness, Lindsay; Bardo, Scott J; Reinhart, Marcia; Tong, Rudi; Hedegaard, Anne; Hart, Michael L; Emptage, Nigel J

    2017-01-04

    Lysosomes have traditionally been viewed as degradative organelles, although a growing body of evidence suggests that they can function as Ca 2+ stores. Here we examined the function of these stores in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We found that back-propagating action potentials (bpAPs) could elicit Ca 2+ release from lysosomes in the dendrites. This Ca 2+ release triggered the fusion of lysosomes with the plasma membrane, resulting in the release of Cathepsin B. Cathepsin B increased the activity of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), an enzyme involved in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling and synaptic plasticity. Inhibition of either lysosomal Ca 2+ signaling or Cathepsin B release prevented the maintenance of dendritic spine growth induced by Hebbian activity. This impairment could be rescued by exogenous application of active MMP-9. Our findings suggest that activity-dependent exocytosis of Cathepsin B from lysosomes regulates the long-term structural plasticity of dendritic spines by triggering MMP-9 activation and ECM remodelling. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Npas4 Regulates Mdm2 and thus Dcx in Experience-Dependent Dendritic Spine Development of Newborn Olfactory Bulb Interneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sei-ichi Yoshihara

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Sensory experience regulates the development of various brain structures, including the cortex, hippocampus, and olfactory bulb (OB. Little is known about how sensory experience regulates the dendritic spine development of OB interneurons, such as granule cells (GCs, although it is well studied in mitral/tufted cells. Here, we identify a transcription factor, Npas4, which is expressed in OB GCs immediately after sensory input and is required for dendritic spine formation. Npas4 overexpression in OB GCs increases dendritic spine density, even under sensory deprivation, and rescues reduction of dendrite spine density in the Npas4 knockout OB. Furthermore, loss of Npas4 upregulates expression of the E3-ubiquitin ligase Mdm2, which ubiquitinates a microtubule-associated protein Dcx. This leads to reduction in the dendritic spine density of OB GCs. Together, these findings suggest that Npas4 regulates Mdm2 expression to ubiquitinate and degrade Dcx during dendritic spine development in newborn OB GCs after sensory experience.

  10. Ubiquitination regulates MHC class II-peptide complex retention and degradation in dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Walseng, Even; Furuta, Kazuyuki; Bosch, Berta; Weih, Karis A.; Matsuki, Yohei; Bakke, Oddmund; Ishido, Satoshi; Roche, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    The expression and turnover of MHC class II-peptide complexes (pMHC-II) on the surface of dendritic cells (DCs) is essential for their ability to activate CD4 T cells efficiently. The half-life of surface pMHC-II is significantly greater in activated (mature) DCs than in resting (immature) DCs, but the molecular mechanism leading to this difference remains unknown. We now show that ubiquitination of pMHC-II by the E3 ubiquitin ligase membrane-associated RING-CH 1 (March-I) regulates surface e...

  11. Dendritic multiporphyrin arrays as light-harvesting antennae: effects of generation number and morphology on intramolecular energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Myung-Seok; Aida, Takuzo; Yamazaki, Tomoko; Yamazaki, Iwao

    2002-06-17

    A series of star- and cone-shaped dendritic multiporphyrin arrays, (nPZn)4PFB and (nPZn)1PFB, respectively, that contain energy-donating dendritic zinc porphyrin (PZn) wedges of different numbers (n = 1, 3, and 7) of the PZn units, attached to an energy-accepting free-base porphyrin (PFB) core, were synthesized by a convergent growth approach. For the cone-shaped series ((nPZn)1PFB), the efficiency of energy transfer (phi ENT) from the photoexcited PZn units to the focal PFB core, as evaluated from the fluorescence lifetimes of the PZn units, considerably decreased as the generation number increased: (1PZn)1PFB (86%), (3PZn)1PFB (66%), and (7PZn)1PFB (19%). In sharp contrast, the star-shaped series ((nPZn)4PFB) all showed high phi ENT values: (1PZn)4PFB (87%), (3PZn)4PFB (80%), and (7PZn)4PFB (71%). Energy transfer efficiencies of (3PZn)4-ester-PFB, (1PZn)4-ester-PFB, and (3PZn)1-ester-PFB, whose dendritic PZn wedges are connected by an ester linkage to the PFB core, were almost comparable to those of the corresponding ether-linked versions. Fluorescence depolarization (P) studies showed much lower P values for star-shaped (7PZn)4PFB and (3PZn)4PFB than cone-shaped (7PZn)1PFB and (3PZn)1PFB, respectively, indicating a highly efficient energy migration among the PZn units in the star-shaped series. Such a morphology-assisted photochemical event is probably responsible for the excellent light-harvesting activity of large (7PZn)4PFB molecules.

  12. DMPD: Pivotal role of PGE2 and IL-10 in the cross-regulation of dendritic cell-derivedinflammatory mediators. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l) (.csml) Show Pivotal role of PGE2 and IL-10 in the cross-regulation of dendritic cell-derivedinflammatory mediator...egulation of dendritic cell-derivedinflammatory mediators. Authors Harizi H, Gualde N. Publication Cell Mol ...16978535 Pivotal role of PGE2 and IL-10 in the cross-regulation of dendritic cell-derivedinflammatory mediat...ors. Harizi H, Gualde N. Cell Mol Immunol. 2006 Aug;3(4):271-7. (.png) (.svg) (.htm

  13. Distribution of dendritic cells expressing dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN, CD209): Morphological analysis using a novel Photoshop-aided multiple immunohistochemistry technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Akihiro; Nishikawa, Toshio

    2014-08-01

    The distribution of dendritic cells (DCs) expressing DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN, CD209) and the morphological interaction of DC-SIGN⁺ DCs with other cells, especially B cells, in tonsillar and other lymphoid tissues were investigated by multiple immunohistochemistry (IHC) using the graphics editing program Photoshop, which enabled staining with 4 or more antibodies in formalin-fixed paraffin sections. Images obtained by repetition of conventional IHC using diaminobenzidine color development in a tissue section were processed on Photoshop for multiple staining. DC-SIGN⁺ DCs were present in the area around the lymphoid follicles and formed a DC-SIGN⁺ DC-rich area, and these cells contacted not only T cells, fascin⁺ DCs, and blood vessels but also several subsets of B cells simultaneously, including naïve and memory B cells. DC-SIGN⁺ DCs may play an important role in the regulation of the immune response mediated by not only T cells but also B cells. The multiple IHC method introduced in the present study is a simple and useful method for analyzing details of complex structures. Because this method can be applied to routinely processed paraffin sections with conventional IHC with diaminobenzidine, it can be applied to a wide variety of archival specimens.

  14. Affecting the morphology of silver deposition on carbon nanotube surface: From nanoparticles to dendritic (tree-like) nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forati-Nezhad, Mohsen [Department of Polymer Engineering and Color Technology, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mir Mohamad Sadeghi, Gity, E-mail: gsadeghi@aut.ac.ir [Department of Polymer Engineering and Color Technology, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yaghmaie, Frank [Northern California Nanotechnology Center, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Alimohammadi, Farbod [Young Researchers and Elite Club, South Tehran Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-01-01

    Chemical reduction was used to synthesize silver crystals on the surface of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in the presence of acetone, N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone, and isopropyl alcohol as solvent. DMF and sodium dodecyl sulfate were used as a reducing and a stabilizing agent, respectively. The structure and nature of hybrid MWCNT/silver were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). The presence of silver crystals on the nanotubes was confirmed by XRD. The results show the formation of silver crystals on the MWCNT surface and indicate that the morphology of silver crystals can be control by changing the solvent. The type of solvent is an effective parameter that affects the particle size and morphological transition from nanoparticles to silver trees. - Highlights: • The silver crystals are grown on the CNT surface by chemical reduction method. • The morphology of silver crystals is controlled by changing the solvent. • Silver nanoparticles and dendritic nanostructures on CNT surface are achieved. • Any change in structure and surface defects by synthesis condition is investigated.

  15. Calcitonin gene-related peptide regulates type IV hypersensitivity through dendritic cell functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihisa Mikami

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play essential roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. In addition, mutual regulation of the nervous system and immune system is well studied. One of neuropeptides, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, is a potent regulator in immune responses; in particular, it has anti-inflammatory effects in innate immunity. For instance, a deficiency of the CGRP receptor component RAMP 1 (receptor activity-modifying protein 1 results in higher cytokine production in response to LPS (lipopolysaccharide. On the other hand, how CGRP affects DCs in adaptive immunity is largely unknown. In this study, we show that CGRP suppressed Th1 cell differentiation via inhibition of IL-12 production in DCs using an in vitro co-culture system and an in vivo ovalbumin-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH model. CGRP also down-regulated the expressions of chemokine receptor CCR2 and its ligands CCL2 and CCL12 in DCs. Intriguingly, the frequency of migrating CCR2(+ DCs in draining lymph nodes of RAMP1-deficient mice was higher after DTH immunization. Moreover, these CCR2(+ DCs highly expressed IL-12 and CD80, resulting in more effective induction of Th1 differentiation compared with CCR2(- DCs. These results indicate that CGRP regulates Th1 type reactions by regulating expression of cytokines, chemokines, and chemokine receptors in DCs.

  16. Phase-field simulations of dendrite morphologies and selected evolution of primary {alpha}-Mg phases during the solidification of Mg-rich Mg-Al-based alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Mingyue [Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology, Ministry of Education, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Jing, Tao; Liu, Baicheng [Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology, Ministry of Education, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2009-10-15

    A formulation of solid-liquid interfacial thermodynamic and kinetic anisotropic characteristics for hexagonal close-packed metals is proposed. The two- and three-dimensional dendritic growth of primary Mg in undercooled Mg-Al alloy melts is modeled using the phase-field method, based on a combination of crystallographic lattice symmetry and experimental observations. The morphologies of three-dimensional dendrites are obtained and the calculated results show intricately hierarchical branched structures. The excess free energy of the solution system is based on the Redlich-Kister model.

  17. Phase-field simulations of dendrite morphologies and selected evolution of primary α-Mg phases during the solidification of Mg-rich Mg-Al-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Mingyue; Jing, Tao; Liu, Baicheng

    2009-01-01

    A formulation of solid-liquid interfacial thermodynamic and kinetic anisotropic characteristics for hexagonal close-packed metals is proposed. The two- and three-dimensional dendritic growth of primary Mg in undercooled Mg-Al alloy melts is modeled using the phase-field method, based on a combination of crystallographic lattice symmetry and experimental observations. The morphologies of three-dimensional dendrites are obtained and the calculated results show intricately hierarchical branched structures. The excess free energy of the solution system is based on the Redlich-Kister model.

  18. Effect of temperature gradient and crystallization rate on morphological peculiarities of cellular-dendrite structure in iron-nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kralina, A.A.; Vorontsov, V.B.

    1977-01-01

    Cellular and dendritic structure of Fe-Ni single crystals (31 and 45 wt%Ni) grown according to Bridgeman have been studied by metallography. Growth rates at which the crystallization frontier becomes unstable and splits into cells have been determined for three temperature gradients. The transition from cells to dendrites occurs gradually through the changes in the cells regular structure and formation of secondary and tertiary branches. The dependence of cell diameter and distance between dendrites on crystallization rate and temperature gradient are discussed in terms of the admixture substructures development according to the schedule: cells - cellular dendrites - dendrites

  19. A functional screen implicates microRNA-138-dependent regulation of the depalmitoylation enzyme APT1 in dendritic spine morphogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siegel, Gabriele; Obernosterer, Gregor; Fiore, Roberto; Oehmen, Martin; Bicker, Silvia; Christensen, Mette; Khudayberdiev, Sharof; Leuschner, Philipp F; Busch, Clara J L; Kane, Christina; Hübel, Katja; Dekker, Frank; Hedberg, Christian; Rengarajan, Balamurugan; Drepper, Carsten; Waldmann, Herbert; Kauppinen, Sakari; Greenberg, Michael E; Draguhn, Andreas; Rehmsmeier, Marc; Martinez, Javier; Schratt, Gerhard M; Dekker, Frank

    The microRNA pathway has been implicated in the regulation of synaptic protein synthesis and ultimately in dendritic spine morphogenesis, a phenomenon associated with long-lasting forms of memory. However, the particular microRNAs (miRNAs) involved are largely unknown. Here we identify specific

  20. Regulation of TGFβ in the immune system: an emerging role for integrins and dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, John J; Fenton, Thomas M; Czajkowska, Beata I; Klementowicz, Joanna E; Travis, Mark A

    2012-12-01

    Regulation of an immune response requires complex crosstalk between cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems, via both cell-cell contact and secretion of cytokines. An important cytokine with a broad regulatory role in the immune system is transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). TGF-β is produced by and has effects on many different cells of the immune system, and plays fundamental roles in the regulation of immune responses during homeostasis, infection and disease. Although many cells can produce TGFβ, it is always produced as an inactive complex that must be activated to bind to the TGFβ receptor complex and promote downstream signalling. Thus, regulation of TGFβ activation is a crucial step in controlling TGFβ function. This review will discuss how TGFβ controls diverse immune responses and how TGFβ function is regulated, with a focus on recent work highlighting a critical role for the integrin αvβ8 expressed by dendritic cells in activating TGFβ. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Wnt-5a/Frizzled9 Receptor Signaling through the Gαo-Gβγ Complex Regulates Dendritic Spine Formation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Valerie T.; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Henríquez, Juan Pablo; Lorenzo, Alfredo; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2016-01-01

    Wnt ligands play crucial roles in the development and regulation of synapse structure and function. Specifically, Wnt-5a acts as a secreted growth factor that regulates dendritic spine formation in rodent hippocampal neurons, resulting in postsynaptic development that promotes the clustering of the PSD-95 (postsynaptic density protein 95). Here, we focused on the early events occurring after the interaction between Wnt-5a and its Frizzled receptor at the neuronal cell surface. Additionally, we studied the role of heterotrimeric G proteins in Wnt-5a-dependent synaptic development. We report that FZD9 (Frizzled9), a Wnt receptor related to Williams syndrome, is localized in the postsynaptic region, where it interacts with Wnt-5a. Functionally, FZD9 is required for the Wnt-5a-mediated increase in dendritic spine density. FZD9 forms a precoupled complex with Gαo under basal conditions that dissociates after Wnt-5a stimulation. Accordingly, we found that G protein inhibition abrogates the Wnt-5a-dependent pathway in hippocampal neurons. In particular, the activation of Gαo appears to be a key factor controlling the Wnt-5a-induced dendritic spine density. In addition, we found that Gβγ is required for the Wnt-5a-mediated increase in cytosolic calcium levels and spinogenesis. Our findings reveal that FZD9 and heterotrimeric G proteins regulate Wnt-5a signaling and dendritic spines in cultured hippocampal neurons. PMID:27402827

  2. Molecular regulation of dendritic cell development and function in homeostasis, inflammation, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrisikos, Taylor T; Zhou, Yifan; Slone, Natalie; Babcock, Rachel; Watowich, Stephanie S; Li, Haiyan S

    2018-03-14

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the principal antigen-presenting cells of the immune system and play key roles in controlling immune tolerance and activation. As such, DCs are chief mediators of tumor immunity. DCs can regulate tolerogenic immune responses that facilitate unchecked tumor growth. Importantly, however, DCs also mediate immune-stimulatory activity that restrains tumor progression. For instance, emerging evidence indicates the cDC1 subset has important functions in delivering tumor antigens to lymph nodes and inducing antigen-specific lymphocyte responses to tumors. Moreover, DCs control specific therapeutic responses in cancer including those resulting from immune checkpoint blockade. DC generation and function is influenced profoundly by cytokines, as well as their intracellular signaling proteins including STAT transcription factors. Regardless, our understanding of DC regulation in the cytokine-rich tumor microenvironment is still developing and must be better defined to advance cancer treatment. Here, we review literature focused on the molecular control of DCs, with a particular emphasis on cytokine- and STAT-mediated DC regulation. In addition, we highlight recent studies that delineate the importance of DCs in anti-tumor immunity and immune therapy, with the overall goal of improving knowledge of tumor-associated factors and intrinsic DC signaling cascades that influence DC function in cancer. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. microRNAs in the regulation of dendritic cell functions in inflammation and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Martin; Zernecke, Alma

    2012-08-01

    Atherosclerosis has been established as a chronic inflammatory disease of the vessel wall. Among the mononuclear cell types recruited to the lesions, specialized dendritic cells (DCs) have gained increasing attention, and their secretory products and interactions shape the progression of atherosclerotic plaques. The regulation of DC functions by microRNAs (miRNAs) may thus be of primary importance in disease. We here systematically summarize the biogenesis and functions of miRNAs and provide an overview of miRNAs in DCs, their targets, and potential implications for atherosclerosis, with a particular focus on the best characterized miRNAs in DCs, namely, miR-155 and miR-146. MiRNA functions in DCs range from regulation of lipid uptake to cytokine production and T cell responses with a complex picture emerging, in which miRNAs cooperate or antagonize DC behavior, thereby promoting or counterbalancing inflammatory responses. As miRNAs regulate key functions of DCs known to control atherosclerotic vascular disease, their potential as a therapeutic target holds promise and should be attended to in future research.

  4. Proteomics analysis of dendritic cell activation by contact allergens reveals possible biomarkers regulated by Nrf2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mussotter, Franz, E-mail: franz.mussotter@bfr.bund.de [German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), Department of Chemical and Product Safety, Berlin (Germany); Tomm, Janina Melanie [Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), Department of Molecular Systems Biology, Leipzig (Germany); El Ali, Zeina; Pallardy, Marc; Kerdine-Römer, Saadia [INSERM UMR 996, Univ Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Chátenay-Malabry (France); Götz, Mario [German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), Department of Chemical and Product Safety, Berlin (Germany); Bergen, Martin von [Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), Department of Molecular Systems Biology, Leipzig (Germany); University of Leipzig, Institute of Biochemistry, Leipzig (Germany); Aalborg University, Department of Chemistry and Bioscience, Aalborg (Denmark); Haase, Andrea; Luch, Andreas [German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), Department of Chemical and Product Safety, Berlin (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a widespread disease with high clinical relevance affecting approximately 20% of the general population. Typically, contact allergens are low molecular weight electrophilic compounds which can activate the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway. We performed a proteomics study to reveal possible biomarkers for dendritic cell (DC) activation by contact allergens and to further elucidate the role of Keap1/Nrf2 signaling in this process. We used bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) of wild-type (nrf2{sup +/+}) and Nrf2 knockout (nrf2{sup −/−}) mice and studied their response against the model contact sensitizers 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), cinnamaldehyde (CA) and nickel(II) sulfate by 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) in combination with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, 100 μM) served as irritant control. While treatment with nickel(II) sulfate and SDS had only little effects, CA and DNCB led to significant changes in protein expression. We found 18 and 30 protein spots up-regulated in wild-type cells treated with 50 and 100 μM CA, respectively. For 5 and 10 μM DNCB, 32 and 37 spots were up-regulated, respectively. Almost all of these proteins were not differentially expressed in nrf2{sup −/−} BMDCs, indicating an Nrf2-dependent regulation. Among them proteins were detected which are involved in oxidative stress and heat shock responses, as well as in signal transduction or basic cellular pathways. The applied approach allowed us to differentiate between Nrf2-dependent and Nrf2-independent cellular biomarkers differentially regulated upon allergen-induced DC activation. The data presented might contribute to the further development of suitable in vitro testing methods for chemical-mediated sensitization. - Highlights: • Contact allergens induce proteins involved in DC maturation Nrf2-dependently. • Induction of these proteins points to a functional

  5. Separate transcriptionally regulated pathways specify distinct classes of sister dendrites in a nociceptive neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Barbara M J; Palumbos, Sierra D; Novakovic, Michaela; Shang, Xueying; Sundararajan, Lakshmi; Miller, David M

    2017-12-15

    The dendritic processes of nociceptive neurons transduce external signals into neurochemical cues that alert the organism to potentially damaging stimuli. The receptive field for each sensory neuron is defined by its dendritic arbor, but the mechanisms that shape dendritic architecture are incompletely understood. Using the model nociceptor, the PVD neuron in C. elegans, we determined that two types of PVD lateral branches project along the dorsal/ventral axis to generate the PVD dendritic arbor: (1) Pioneer dendrites that adhere to the epidermis, and (2) Commissural dendrites that fasciculate with circumferential motor neuron processes. Previous reports have shown that the LIM homeodomain transcription factor MEC-3 is required for all higher order PVD branching and that one of its targets, the claudin-like membrane protein HPO-30, preferentially promotes outgrowth of pioneer branches. Here, we show that another MEC-3 target, the conserved TFIIA-like zinc finger transcription factor EGL-46, adopts the alternative role of specifying commissural dendrites. The known EGL-46 binding partner, the TEAD transcription factor EGL-44, is also required for PVD commissural branch outgrowth. Double mutants of hpo-30 and egl-44 show strong enhancement of the lateral branching defect with decreased numbers of both pioneer and commissural dendrites. Thus, HPO-30/Claudin and EGL-46/EGL-44 function downstream of MEC-3 and in parallel acting pathways to direct outgrowth of two distinct classes of PVD dendritic branches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Matrix metalloproteinases regulate the formation of dendritic spine head protrusions during chemically induced long-term potentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna Szepesi

    Full Text Available Dendritic spines are are small membranous protrusions that extend from neuronal dendrites and harbor the majority of excitatory synapses. Increasing evidence has shown that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, a family of extracellularly acting and Zn(2+-dependent endopeptidases, are able to rapidly modulate dendritic spine morphology. Spine head protrusions (SHPs are filopodia-like processes that extend from the dendritic spine head, representing a form of postsynaptic structural remodeling in response to altered neuronal activity. Herein, we show that chemically induced long-term potentiation (cLTP in dissociated hippocampal cultures upregulates MMP-9 activity that controls the formation of SHPs. Blocking of MMPs activity or microtubule dynamics abolishes the emergence of SHPs. In addition, autoactive recombinant MMP-9, promotes the formation of SHPs in organotypic hippocampal slices. Furthermore, spines with SHPs gained postsynaptic α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA receptors upon cLTP and the synaptic delivery of AMPA receptors was controlled by MMPs. The present results strongly imply that MMP-9 is functionally involved in the formation of SHPs and the control of postsynaptic receptor distribution upon cLTP.

  7. Neurotrophin Receptor p75NTR Regulates Immune Function of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Bandoła

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs regulate innate and adaptive immunity. Neurotrophins and their receptors control the function of neuronal tissue. In addition, they have been demonstrated to be part of the immune response but little is known about the effector immune cells involved. We report, for the first time, the expression and immune-regulatory function of the low affinity neurotrophin receptor p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR by the antigen-presenting pDCs, mediated by toll-like receptor (TLR 9 activation and differential phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 3 and 7. The modulation of p75NTR on pDCs significantly influences disease progression of asthma in an ovalbumin-induced mouse model mediated by the TLR9 signaling pathway. p75NTR activation of pDCs from patients with asthma increased allergen-specific T cell proliferation and cytokine secretion in nerve growth factor concentration-dependent manner. Further, p75NTR activation of pDCs delayed the onset of autoimmune diabetes in RIP-CD80GP mice and aggravated graft-versus-host disease in a xenotransplantation model. Thus, p75NTR signaling on pDCs constitutes a new and critical mechanism connecting neurotrophin signaling and immune response regulation with great therapeutic potential for a variety of immune disorders.

  8. Neurotrophin Receptor p75NTR Regulates Immune Function of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandoła, Joanna; Richter, Cornelia; Ryser, Martin; Jamal, Arshad; Ashton, Michelle P; von Bonin, Malte; Kuhn, Matthias; Dorschner, Benjamin; Alexopoulou, Dimitra; Navratiel, Katrin; Roeder, Ingo; Dahl, Andreas; Hedrich, Christian M; Bonifacio, Ezio; Brenner, Sebastian; Thieme, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) regulate innate and adaptive immunity. Neurotrophins and their receptors control the function of neuronal tissue. In addition, they have been demonstrated to be part of the immune response but little is known about the effector immune cells involved. We report, for the first time, the expression and immune-regulatory function of the low affinity neurotrophin receptor p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) by the antigen-presenting pDCs, mediated by toll-like receptor (TLR) 9 activation and differential phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 3 and 7. The modulation of p75NTR on pDCs significantly influences disease progression of asthma in an ovalbumin-induced mouse model mediated by the TLR9 signaling pathway. p75NTR activation of pDCs from patients with asthma increased allergen-specific T cell proliferation and cytokine secretion in nerve growth factor concentration-dependent manner. Further, p75NTR activation of pDCs delayed the onset of autoimmune diabetes in RIP-CD80GP mice and aggravated graft-versus-host disease in a xenotransplantation model. Thus, p75NTR signaling on pDCs constitutes a new and critical mechanism connecting neurotrophin signaling and immune response regulation with great therapeutic potential for a variety of immune disorders.

  9. Chemoresistance of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells is regulated by IL-17A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Olsson Åkefeldt

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells initiate adaptive immune responses, leading either to control cancer by effector T cells or to exacerbate cancer by regulatory T cells that inhibit IFN-γ-mediated Th1-type response. Dendritic cells can also induce Th17-type immunity, mediated by IL-17A. However, the controversial role of this cytokine in cancer requires further investigations. We generated dendritic cells from peripheral blood monocytes to investigate lifespan, phenotype and chemoresistance of dendritic cells, treated with IL-17A with or without IFN-γ. Studying the expression of Bcl-2 family members, we demonstrated that dendritic cells constitutively express one pro-survival Bcl-2 member: MCL1. Immature dendritic cells were CD40(lowHLADR(low CD1a(+ MCL1(+, did not express CD14, CD68 or BCL2A1, and displayed a short 2-day lifespan. IL-17A-treated DC exhibited a semi-mature (CD40(high HLADR(low pre-M2 (CCL22(+ CD206(+ CD163(+ IL1RN(+ IL-10(- CXCL10(- IL-12(- mixed (CD1a(+ CD14+ CD68(+ macrophage-dendritic cell phenotype. They efficiently exerted mannose receptor-mediated endocytosis and did not produce superoxide anions, in the absence of TLR engagement. Interestingly, IL-17A promoted a long-term survival of dendritic cells, beyond 12 days, that correlated to BCL2A1 induction, a pro-survival Bcl-2 family member. BCL2A1 transcription was activated by NF-κB, downstream of IL-17A transduction. Thus, immature dendritic cells only express MCL1, whereas IL-17A-treated dendritic cells concomitantly expressed two pro-survival Bcl-2 family members: MCL1 and BCL2A1. These latter developed chemoresistance to 11 of the 17 chemotherapy agents tested. However, high doses of either vinblastine or cytarabine decreased MCL1 expression and induced dendritic cell death. When IL-17A is produced in vivo, administration of anti-IL-17A biotherapy may impair dendritic cell survival by targeting BCL2A1 expression. Consequently, depending on the effector or regulatory role of dendritic

  10. Eosinophils Regulate Interferon Alpha Production in Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Stimulated with Components of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzeczynska-Moncznik, Joanna; Zabieglo, Katarzyna; Bossowski, Jozef P; Osiecka, Oktawia; Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka; Kapinska-Mrowiecka, Monika; Kwitniewski, Mateusz; Majewski, Pawel; Dubin, Adam; Cichy, Joanna

    2017-03-01

    Eosinophils constitute an important component of helminth immunity and are not only associated with various allergies but are also linked to autoinflammatory disorders, including the skin disease psoriasis. Here we demonstrate the functional relationship between eosinophils and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) as related to skin diseases. We previously showed that pDCs colocalize with neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in psoriatic skin. Here we demonstrate that eosinophils are found in psoriatic skin near neutrophils and NETs, suggesting that pDC responses can be regulated by eosinophils. Eosinophils inhibited pDC function in vitro through a mechanism that did not involve cell contact but depended on soluble factors. In pDCs stimulated by specific NET components, eosinophil-conditioned media attenuated the production of interferon α (IFNα) but did not affect the maturation of pDCs as evidenced by the unaltered expression of the costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86. As pDCs and IFNα play a key role in autoimmune skin inflammation, these data suggest that eosinophils may influence autoinflammatory responses through their impact on the production of IFNα by pDCs.

  11. Unsaturated compounds induce up-regulation of CD86 on dendritic cells in the in vitro sensitization assay LCSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohwein, Thomas Armin; Sonnenburg, Anna; Zuberbier, Torsten; Stahlmann, Ralf; Schreiner, Maximilian

    2016-04-01

    Unsaturated compounds are known to cause false-positive reactions in the local lymph node assay (LLNA) but not in the guinea pig maximization test. We have tested a panel of substances (succinic acid, undecylenic acid, 1-octyn-3-ol, fumaric acid, maleic acid, linoleic acid, oleic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, squalene, and arachidonic acid) in the loose-fit coculture-based sensitization assay (LCSA) to evaluate whether unspecific activation of dendritic cells is a confounder for sensitization testing in vitro. Eight out of 10 tested substances caused significant up-regulation of CD86 on dendritic cells cocultured with keratinocytes and would have been classified as sensitizers; only succinic acid was tested negative, and squalene had to be excluded from data analysis due to poor solubility in cell culture medium. Based on human data, only undecylenic acid can be considered a true sensitizer. The true sensitizing potential of 1-octyn-3-ol is uncertain. Fumaric acid and its isomer maleic acid are not known as sensitizers, but their esters are contact allergens. A group of 18- to 20-carbon chain unsaturated fatty acids (linoleic acid, oleic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, and arachidonic acid) elicited the strongest reaction in vitro. This is possibly due to the formation of pro-inflammatory lipid mediators in the cell culture causing nonspecific activation of dendritic cells. In conclusion, both the LLNA and the LCSA seem to provide false-positive results for unsaturated fatty acids. The inclusion of T cells in dendritic cell-based in vitro sensitization assays may help to eliminate false-positive results due to nonspecific dendritic cell activation. This would lead to more accurate prediction of sensitizers, which is paramount for consumer health protection and occupational safety.

  12. Specific and Novel microRNAs Are Regulated as Response to Fungal Infection in Human Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dix, Andreas; Czakai, Kristin; Leonhardt, Ines; Schäferhoff, Karin; Bonin, Michael; Guthke, Reinhard; Einsele, Hermann; Kurzai, Oliver; Löffler, Jürgen; Linde, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    Within the last two decades, the incidence of invasive fungal infections has been significantly increased. They are characterized by high mortality rates and are often caused by Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus. The increasing number of infections underlines the necessity for additional anti-fungal therapies, which require extended knowledge of gene regulations during fungal infection. MicroRNAs are regulators of important cellular processes, including the immune response. By analyzing their regulation and impact on target genes, novel therapeutic and diagnostic approaches may be developed. Here, we examine the role of microRNAs in human dendritic cells during fungal infection. Dendritic cells represent the bridge between the innate and the adaptive immune systems. Therefore, analysis of gene regulation of dendritic cells is of particular significance. By applying next-generation sequencing of small RNAs, we quantify microRNA expression in monocyte-derived dendritic cells after 6 and 12 h of infection with C. albicans and A. fumigatus as well as treatment with lipopolysaccharides (LPS). We identified 26 microRNAs that are differentially regulated after infection by the fungi or LPS. Three and five of them are specific for fungal infections after 6 and 12 h, respectively. We further validated interactions of miR-132-5p and miR-212-5p with immunological relevant target genes, such as FKBP1B, KLF4, and SPN, on both RNA and protein level. Our results indicate that these microRNAs fine-tune the expression of immune-related target genes during fungal infection. Beyond that, we identified previously undiscovered microRNAs. We validated three novel microRNAs via qRT-PCR. A comparison with known microRNAs revealed possible relations with the miR-378 family and miR-1260a/b for two of them, while the third one features a unique sequence with no resemblance to known microRNAs. In summary, this study analyzes the effect of known microRNAs in dendritic cells during

  13. L-Type Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channels Regulate Synaptic-Activity-Triggered Recycling Endosome Fusion in Neuronal Dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian G. Hiester

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The repertoire and abundance of proteins displayed on the surface of neuronal dendrites are tuned by regulated fusion of recycling endosomes (REs with the dendritic plasma membrane. While this process is critical for neuronal function and plasticity, how synaptic activity drives RE fusion remains unexplored. We demonstrate a multistep fusion mechanism that requires Ca2+ from distinct sources. NMDA receptor Ca2+ initiates RE fusion with the plasma membrane, while L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (L-VGCCs regulate whether fused REs collapse into the membrane or reform without transferring their cargo to the cell surface. Accordingly, NMDA receptor activation triggered AMPA-type glutamate receptor trafficking to the dendritic surface in an L-VGCC-dependent manner. Conversely, potentiating L-VGCCs enhanced AMPA receptor surface expression only when NMDA receptors were also active. Thus L-VGCCs play a role in tuning activity-triggered surface expression of key synaptic proteins by gating the mode of RE fusion.

  14. Combined role of seizure-induced dendritic morphology alterations and spine loss in newborn granule cells with mossy fiber sprouting on the hyperexcitability of a computer model of the dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada, Julian; Garcia-Cairasco, Norberto; Roque, Antonio C

    2014-05-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy strongly affects hippocampal dentate gyrus granule cells morphology. These cells exhibit seizure-induced anatomical alterations including mossy fiber sprouting, changes in the apical and basal dendritic tree and suffer substantial dendritic spine loss. The effect of some of these changes on the hyperexcitability of the dentate gyrus has been widely studied. For example, mossy fiber sprouting increases the excitability of the circuit while dendritic spine loss may have the opposite effect. However, the effect of the interplay of these different morphological alterations on the hyperexcitability of the dentate gyrus is still unknown. Here we adapted an existing computational model of the dentate gyrus by replacing the reduced granule cell models with morphologically detailed models coming from three-dimensional reconstructions of mature cells. The model simulates a network with 10% of the mossy fiber sprouting observed in the pilocarpine (PILO) model of epilepsy. Different fractions of the mature granule cell models were replaced by morphologically reconstructed models of newborn dentate granule cells from animals with PILO-induced Status Epilepticus, which have apical dendritic alterations and spine loss, and control animals, which do not have these alterations. This complex arrangement of cells and processes allowed us to study the combined effect of mossy fiber sprouting, altered apical dendritic tree and dendritic spine loss in newborn granule cells on the excitability of the dentate gyrus model. Our simulations suggest that alterations in the apical dendritic tree and dendritic spine loss in newborn granule cells have opposing effects on the excitability of the dentate gyrus after Status Epilepticus. Apical dendritic alterations potentiate the increase of excitability provoked by mossy fiber sprouting while spine loss curtails this increase.

  15. Adaptive Regulation of Osteopontin Production by Dendritic Cells Through the Bidirectional Interaction With Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Scutera

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs exert immunosuppressive effects on immune cells including dendritic cells (DCs. However, many details of the bidirectional interaction of MSCs with DCs are still unsolved and information on key molecules by which DCs can modulate MSC functions is limited. Here, we report that osteopontin (OPN, a cytokine involved in homeostatic and pathophysiologic responses, is constitutively expressed by DCs and regulated in the DC/MSC cocultures depending on the activation state of MSCs. Resting MSCs promoted OPN production, whereas the production of OPN was suppressed when MSCs were activated by proinflammatory cytokines (i.e., TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β. OPN induction required cell-to-cell contact, mediated at least in part, by β1 integrin (CD29. Conversely, activated MSCs inhibited the release of OPN via the production of soluble factors with a major role played by Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. Accordingly, pretreatment with indomethacin significantly abrogated the MSC-mediated suppression of OPN while the direct addition of exogenous PGE2 inhibited OPN production by DCs. Furthermore, DC-conditioned medium promoted osteogenic differentiation of MSCs with a concomitant inhibition of adipogenesis. These effects were paralleled by the repression of the adipogenic markers PPARγ, adiponectin, and FABP4, and induction of the osteogenic markers alkaline phosphatase, RUNX2, and of the bone-anabolic chemokine CCL5. Notably, blocking OPN activity with RGD peptides or with an antibody against CD29, one of the OPN receptors, prevented the effects of DC-conditioned medium on MSC differentiation and CCL5 induction. Because MSCs have a key role in maintenance of bone marrow (BM hematopoietic stem cell niche through reciprocal regulation with immune cells, we investigated the possible MSC/DC interaction in human BM by immunohistochemistry. Although DCs (CD1c+ are a small percentage of BM cells, we demonstrated colocalization of CD271+ MSCs with

  16. Gal-3 regulates the capacity of dendritic cells to promote NKT-cell-induced liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volarevic, Vladislav; Markovic, Bojana Simovic; Bojic, Sanja; Stojanovic, Maja; Nilsson, Ulf; Leffler, Hakon; Besra, Gurdyal S; Arsenijevic, Nebojsa; Paunovic, Verica; Trajkovic, Vladimir; Lukic, Miodrag L

    2015-02-01

    Galectin-3 (Gal-3), an endogenous lectin, exhibits pro- and anti-inflammatory effects in various disease conditions. In order to explore the role of Gal-3 in NKT-cell-dependent pathology, we induced hepatitis in C57BL/6 WT and Gal-3-deficient mice by using specific ligand for NKT cells: α-galactosylceramide, glycolipid Ag presented by CD1d. The injection of α-galactosylceramide significantly enhanced expression of Gal-3 in liver NKT and dendritic cells (DCs). Genetic deletion or selective inhibition of Gal-3 (induced by Gal-3-inhibitor TD139) abrogated the susceptibility to NKT-cell-dependent hepatitis. Blood levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-12) and their production by liver DCs and NKT cells were also downregulated. Genetic deletion or selective inhibition of Gal-3 alleviated influx of inflammatory CD11c(+) CD11b(+) DCs in the liver and favored tolerogenic phenotype and IL-10 production of liver NKT and DCs. Deletion of Gal-3 attenuated the capacity of DCs to support liver damage in the passive transfer experiments and to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines in vitro. Gal-3-deficient DCs failed to optimally stimulate production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in NKT cells, in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, Gal-3 regulates the capacity of DCs to support NKT-cell-mediated liver injury, playing an important pro-inflammatory role in acute liver injury. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Low dose prenatal ethanol exposure induces anxiety-like behaviour and alters dendritic morphology in the basolateral amygdala of rat offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlie L Cullen

    Full Text Available Prenatal exposure to high levels of alcohol is strongly associated with poor cognitive outcomes particularly in relation to learning and memory. It is also becoming more evident that anxiety disorders and anxiety-like behaviour can be associated with prenatal alcohol exposure. This study used a rat model to determine if prenatal exposure to a relatively small amount of alcohol would result in anxiety-like behaviour and to determine if this was associated with morphological changes in the basolateral amygdala. Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were fed a liquid diet containing either no alcohol (Control or 6% (vol/vol ethanol (EtOH throughout gestation. Male and Female offspring underwent behavioural testing at 8 months (Adult or 15 months (Aged of age. Rats were perfusion fixed and brains were collected at the end of behavioural testing for morphological analysis of pyramidal neuron number and dendritic morphology within the basolateral amygdala. EtOH exposed offspring displayed anxiety-like behaviour in the elevated plus maze, holeboard and emergence tests. Although sexually dimorphic behaviour was apparent, sex did not impact anxiety-like behaviour induced by prenatal alcohol exposure. This increase in anxiety - like behaviour could not be attributed to a change in pyramidal cell number within the BLA but rather was associated with an increase in dendritic spines along the apical dendrite which is indicative of an increase in synaptic connectivity and activity within these neurons. This study is the first to link increases in anxiety like behaviour to structural changes within the basolateral amygdala in a model of prenatal ethanol exposure. In addition, this study has shown that exposure to even a relatively small amount of alcohol during development leads to long term alterations in anxiety-like behaviour.

  18. Collagen I-induced dendritic cells activation is regulated by TNF-α ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-02-04

    Feb 4, 2015 ... tion factor IRF4, when compared to collagen I only treated cells. Collectively, our ... and multiple scelerosis, use of TNF-α inhibitors is an important treatment ..... sclerosis complex 1 in dendritic cell activation of CD4 T cells by.

  19. Plasma hormonal profiles and dendritic spine density and morphology in the hippocampal CA1 stratum radiatum, evidenced by light microscopy, of virgin and postpartum female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusco, Janaína; Wittmann, Raul; de Azevedo, Márcia S; Lucion, Aldo B; Franci, Celso R; Giovenardi, Márcia; Rasia-Filho, Alberto A

    2008-06-27

    Successful reproduction requires that changes in plasma follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin (PRL), oxytocin (OT), estrogen (E(2)) and progesterone (P(4)) occur together with the display of maternal behaviors. Ovarian steroids and environmental stimuli can affect the dendritic spines in the rat hippocampus. Here, studying Wistar rats, it is described: (a) the sequential and concomitant changes in the hormonal profile of females at postpartum days (PP) 4, 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24, comparing to estrous cycle referential values; (b) the dendritic spine density in the stratum radiatum of CA1 (CA1-SR) Golgi-impregnated neurons in virgin females across the estrous cycle and in multiparous age-matched ones; and (c) the proportion of different types of spines in the CA1-SR of virgin and postpartum females, both in diestrus. Plasma levels of gonadotrophins and ovarian hormones remained low along PP while LH increased and PRL decreased near the end of the lactating period. The lowest dendritic spine density was found in virgin females in estrus when compared to diestrus and proestrus phases or to postpartum females in diestrus (p0.4). There were no differences in the proportions of the different spine types in nulliparous and postpartum females (p>0.2). Results suggest that medium layer CA1-SR spines undergo rapid modifications in Wistar females across the estrous cycle (not quite comparable to Sprague-Dawley data or to hormonal substitutive therapy following ovariectomy), but persistent effects of motherhood on dendritic spine density and morphology were not found in this area.

  20. Deficiency of autoimmune regulator impairs the immune tolerance effect of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Feifei; Li, Dongbei; Zhao, Bo; Luo, Yadong; Zhao, Bingjie; Zou, Xueyang; Li, Yi; Yang, Wei

    2018-02-01

    As a transcription factor, autoimmune regulator (Aire) participates in thymic negative selection and maintains immune tolerance mainly by regulating the ectopic expression of tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). Aire is also expressed in dendritic cells (DCs). DCs are professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that affect the differentiation of T cells toward distinct subpopulations and participate in the immune response and tolerance, thereby playing an important role in maintaining homeostasis. To determine the role of Aire in maintaining immune tolerance by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs), in the present study we utilized Aire-knockout mice to examine the changes of maturation status and TRAs expression on BMDCs, additionally investigate the differentiation of CD4 + T cells. The results showed that expression of costimulatory molecule and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecule was increased and expression of various TRAs was decreased in BMDCs from Aire-knockout mice. Aire deficiency reduced the differentiation of naïve CD4 + T cells into type 2T helper (Th2) cells and regulatory T cells (Tregs) but enhanced the differentiation of naïve CD4 + T cells into Th1 cells, Th17 cells, and follicular helper T (Tfh) cells. The results demonstrate that Aire expressed by BMDCs plays an important role in the maintenance of homeostasis by regulating TRA expression and the differentiation of T cell subsets.

  1. MiR-130a regulates neurite outgrowth and dendritic spine density by targeting MeCP2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunjia Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT MicroRNAs (miRNAs are critical for both development and function of the central nervous system. Significant evidence suggests that abnormal expression of miRNAs is associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. MeCP2 protein is an epigenetic regulator repressing or activating gene transcription by binding to methylated DNA. Both loss-of-function and gain-of-function mutations in the MECP2 gene lead to neurodevelopmental disorders such as Rett syndrome, autism and MECP2 duplication syndrome. In this study, we demonstrate that miR-130a inhibits neurite outgrowth and reduces dendritic spine density as well as dendritic complexity. Bioinformatics analyses, cell cultures and biochemical experiments indicate that miR-130a targets MECP2 and down-regulates MeCP2 protein expression. Furthermore, expression of the wild-type MeCP2, but not a loss-of-function mutant, rescues the miR-130a-induced phenotype. Our study uncovers the MECP2 gene as a previous unknown target for miR-130a, supporting that miR-130a may play a role in neurodevelopment by regulating MeCP2. Together with data from other groups, our work suggests that a feedback regulatory mechanism involving both miR-130a and MeCP2 may serve to ensure their appropriate expression and function in neural development.

  2. Conserved RNA-Binding Proteins Required for Dendrite Morphogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans Sensory Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonacci, Simona; Forand, Daniel; Wolf, Margaret; Tyus, Courtney; Barney, Julia; Kellogg, Leah; Simon, Margo A.; Kerr, Genevieve; Wells, Kristen L.; Younes, Serena; Mortimer, Nathan T.; Olesnicky, Eugenia C.; Killian, Darrell J.

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of dendritic branching is critical for sensory reception, cell−cell communication within the nervous system, learning, memory, and behavior. Defects in dendrite morphology are associated with several neurologic disorders; thus, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern dendrite morphogenesis is important. Recent investigations of dendrite morphogenesis have highlighted the importance of gene regulation at the posttranscriptional level. Because RNA-binding proteins mediate many posttranscriptional mechanisms, we decided to investigate the extent to which conserved RNA-binding proteins contribute to dendrite morphogenesis across phyla. Here we identify a core set of RNA-binding proteins that are important for dendrite morphogenesis in the PVD multidendritic sensory neuron in Caenorhabditis elegans. Homologs of each of these genes were previously identified as important in the Drosophila melanogaster dendritic arborization sensory neurons. Our results suggest that RNA processing, mRNA localization, mRNA stability, and translational control are all important mechanisms that contribute to dendrite morphogenesis, and we present a conserved set of RNA-binding proteins that regulate these processes in diverse animal species. Furthermore, homologs of these genes are expressed in the human brain, suggesting that these RNA-binding proteins are candidate regulators of dendrite development in humans. PMID:25673135

  3. The SNARE VAMP7 Regulates Exocytic Trafficking of Interleukin-12 in Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Chiaruttini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-12 (IL-12, produced by dendritic cells in response to activation, is central to pathogen eradication and tumor rejection. The trafficking pathways controlling spatial distribution and intracellular transport of IL-12 vesicles to the cell surface are still unknown. Here, we show that intracellular IL-12 localizes in late endocytic vesicles marked by the SNARE VAMP7. Dendritic cells (DCs from VAMP7-deficient mice are partially impaired in the multidirectional release of IL-12. Upon encounter with antigen-specific T cells, IL-12-containing vesicles rapidly redistribute at the immune synapse and release IL-12 in a process entirely dependent on VAMP7 expression. Consistently, acquisition of effector functions is reduced in T cells stimulated by VAMP7-null DCs. These results provide insights into IL-12 intracellular trafficking pathways and show that VAMP7-mediated release of IL-12 at the immune synapse is a mechanism to transmit innate signals to T cells.

  4. C. elegans bicd-1, homolog of the Drosophila dynein accessory factor Bicaudal D, regulates the branching of PVD sensory neuron dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Chen, Cristina; Bülow, Hannes E; Kaprielian, Zaven

    2011-02-01

    The establishment of cell type-specific dendritic arborization patterns is a key phase in the assembly of neuronal circuitry that facilitates the integration and processing of synaptic and sensory input. Although studies in Drosophila and vertebrate systems have identified a variety of factors that regulate dendrite branch formation, the molecular mechanisms that control this process remain poorly defined. Here, we introduce the use of the Caenorhabditis elegans PVD neurons, a pair of putative nociceptors that elaborate complex dendritic arbors, as a tractable model for conducting high-throughput RNAi screens aimed at identifying key regulators of dendritic branch formation. By carrying out two separate RNAi screens, a small-scale candidate-based screen and a large-scale screen of the ~3000 genes on chromosome IV, we retrieved 11 genes that either promote or suppress the formation of PVD-associated dendrites. We present a detailed functional characterization of one of the genes, bicd-1, which encodes a microtubule-associated protein previously shown to modulate the transport of mRNAs and organelles in a variety of organisms. Specifically, we describe a novel role for bicd-1 in regulating dendrite branch formation and show that bicd-1 is likely to be expressed, and primarily required, in PVD neurons to control dendritic branching. We also present evidence that bicd-1 operates in a conserved pathway with dhc-1 and unc-116, components of the dynein minus-end-directed and kinesin-1 plus-end-directed microtubule-based motor complexes, respectively, and interacts genetically with the repulsive guidance receptor unc-5.

  5. Monomethylfumarate affects polarization of monocyte-derived dendritic cells resulting in down-regulated Th1 lymphocyte responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litjens, Nicolle H R; Rademaker, Mirjam; Ravensbergen, Bep

    2004-01-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris, a type-1 cytokine-mediated chronic skin disease, can be treated successfully with fumaric acid esters (FAE). Beneficial effects of this medication coincided with decreased production of IFN-gamma. Since dendritic cells (DC) regulate the differentiation of T helper (Th) cells......% of that by the respective Th cells cocultured with control DC. IL-4 production by primed, but not naive Th cells cocultured with MMF-DC was decreased as compared to cocultures with control DC. IL-10 production by naive and primed Th cells cocultured with MMF-DC and control DC did not differ. In addition, MMF inhibited LPS......-induced NF-kappaB activation in DC. Together, beneficial effects of FAE in psoriasis involve modulation of DC polarization by MMF such that these cells down-regulate IFN-gamma production by Th cells....

  6. βIII Spectrin Is Necessary for Formation of the Constricted Neck of Dendritic Spines and Regulation of Synaptic Activity in Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimova, Nadia; Korobova, Farida; Stankewich, Michael C; Moberly, Andrew H; Stolz, Donna B; Wang, Junling; Kashina, Anna; Ma, Minghong; Svitkina, Tatyana

    2017-07-05

    dendrites that make synapses with axons of other neurons in the brain. Dendritic spines usually have a mushroom-like shape, which is essential for brain functions, because aberrant spine morphology is associated with many neuropsychiatric disorders. The bulbous head of a mushroom-shaped spine makes the synapse, whereas the narrow neck transmits the incoming signals to the dendrite and supposedly controls the signal propagation. We show that a cytoskeletal protein βIII spectrin plays a key role for the formation of narrow spine necks. In the absence of βIII spectrin, dendritic spines collapse onto dendrites. As a result, synaptic strength exceeds acceptable levels and damages neurons, explaining pathology of human syndromes caused by βIII spectrin mutations. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/376443-18$15.00/0.

  7. From neurodevelopment to neurodegeneration: the interaction of neurofibromin and valosin-containing protein/p97 in regulation of dendritic spine formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh Yi-Ping

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Both Neurofibromatosis type I (NF1 and inclusion body myopathy with Paget's disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD are autosomal dominant genetic disorders. These two diseases are fully penetrant but with high heterogeneity in phenotypes, suggesting the involvement of genetic modifiers in modulating patients' phenotypes. Although NF1 is recognized as a developmental disorder and IBMPFD is associated with degeneration of multiple tissues, a recent study discovered the direct protein interaction between neurofibromin, the protein product of the NF1 gene, and VCP/p97, encoded by the causative gene of IBMPFD. Both NF1 and VCP/p97 are critical for dendritic spine formation, which provides the cellular mechanism explaining the cognitive deficits and dementia found in patients. Moreover, disruption of the interaction between neurofibromin and VCP impairs dendritic spinogenesis. Neurofibromin likely influences multiple downstream pathways to control dendritic spinogenesis. One is to activate the protein kinase A pathway to initiate dendritic spine formation; another is to regulate the synaptic distribution of VCP and control the activity of VCP in dendritic spinogenesis. Since neurofibromin and VCP/p97 also regulate cell growth and bone metabolism, the understanding of neurofibromin and VCP/p97 in neurons may be applied to study of cancer and bone. Statin treatment rescues the spine defects caused by VCP deficiency, suggesting the potential role of statin in clinical treatment for these two diseases.

  8. From neurodevelopment to neurodegeneration: the interaction of neurofibromin and valosin-containing protein/p97 in regulation of dendritic spine formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Yi-Ping

    2012-03-26

    Both Neurofibromatosis type I (NF1) and inclusion body myopathy with Paget's disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD) are autosomal dominant genetic disorders. These two diseases are fully penetrant but with high heterogeneity in phenotypes, suggesting the involvement of genetic modifiers in modulating patients' phenotypes. Although NF1 is recognized as a developmental disorder and IBMPFD is associated with degeneration of multiple tissues, a recent study discovered the direct protein interaction between neurofibromin, the protein product of the NF1 gene, and VCP/p97, encoded by the causative gene of IBMPFD. Both NF1 and VCP/p97 are critical for dendritic spine formation, which provides the cellular mechanism explaining the cognitive deficits and dementia found in patients. Moreover, disruption of the interaction between neurofibromin and VCP impairs dendritic spinogenesis. Neurofibromin likely influences multiple downstream pathways to control dendritic spinogenesis. One is to activate the protein kinase A pathway to initiate dendritic spine formation; another is to regulate the synaptic distribution of VCP and control the activity of VCP in dendritic spinogenesis. Since neurofibromin and VCP/p97 also regulate cell growth and bone metabolism, the understanding of neurofibromin and VCP/p97 in neurons may be applied to study of cancer and bone. Statin treatment rescues the spine defects caused by VCP deficiency, suggesting the potential role of statin in clinical treatment for these two diseases.

  9. Cortical Regulation of Striatal Medium Spiny Neuron Dendritic Remodeling in Parkinsonism: Modulation of Glutamate Release Reverses Dopamine Depletion–Induced Dendritic Spine Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Bonnie G.; Neely, M. Diana; Deutch, Ariel Y.

    2010-01-01

    Striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) receive glutamatergic afferents from the cerebral cortex and dopaminergic inputs from the substantia nigra (SN). Striatal dopamine loss decreases the number of MSN dendritic spines. This loss of spines has been suggested to reflect the removal of tonic dopamine inhibitory control over corticostriatal glutamatergic drive, with increased glutamate release culminating in MSN spine loss. We tested this hypothesis in two ways. We first determined in vivo if dec...

  10. Regulated Assembly of Vacuolar ATPase Is Increased during Cluster Disruption-induced Maturation of Dendritic Cells through a Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase/mTOR-dependent Pathway*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, Rachel; Bond, Sarah; Shainheit, Mara G.; Stadecker, Miguel J.; Forgac, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The vacuolar (H+)-ATPases (V-ATPases) are ATP-driven proton pumps composed of a peripheral V1 domain and a membrane-embedded V0 domain. Regulated assembly of V1 and V0 represents an important regulatory mechanism for controlling V-ATPase activity in vivo. Previous work has shown that V-ATPase assembly increases during maturation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells induced by activation of Toll-like receptors. This increased assembly is essential for antigen processing, which is dependent upon an acidic lysosomal pH. Cluster disruption of dendritic cells induces a semi-mature phenotype associated with immune tolerance. Thus, semi-mature dendritic cells are able to process and present self-peptides to suppress autoimmune responses. We have investigated V-ATPase assembly in bone marrow-derived, murine dendritic cells and observed an increase in assembly following cluster disruption. This increased assembly is not dependent upon new protein synthesis and is associated with an increase in concanamycin A-sensitive proton transport in FITC-loaded lysosomes. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase with wortmannin or mTORC1 with rapamycin effectively inhibits the increased assembly observed upon cluster disruption. These results suggest that the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mTOR pathway is involved in controlling V-ATPase assembly during dendritic cell maturation. PMID:24273170

  11. Regeneration of Drosophila sensory neuron axons and dendrites is regulated by the Akt pathway involving Pten and microRNA bantam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuanquan; Ori-McKenney, Kassandra M.; Zheng, Yi; Han, Chun; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung

    2012-01-01

    Both cell-intrinsic and extrinsic pathways govern axon regeneration, but only a limited number of factors have been identified and it is not clear to what extent axon regeneration is evolutionarily conserved. Whether dendrites also regenerate is unknown. Here we report that, like the axons of mammalian sensory neurons, the axons of certain Drosophila dendritic arborization (da) neurons are capable of substantial regeneration in the periphery but not in the CNS, and activating the Akt pathway enhances axon regeneration in the CNS. Moreover, those da neurons capable of axon regeneration also display dendrite regeneration, which is cell type-specific, developmentally regulated, and associated with microtubule polarity reversal. Dendrite regeneration is restrained via inhibition of the Akt pathway in da neurons by the epithelial cell-derived microRNA bantam but is facilitated by cell-autonomous activation of the Akt pathway. Our study begins to reveal mechanisms for dendrite regeneration, which depends on both extrinsic and intrinsic factors, including the PTEN–Akt pathway that is also important for axon regeneration. We thus established an important new model system—the fly da neuron regeneration model that resembles the mammalian injury model—with which to study and gain novel insights into the regeneration machinery. PMID:22759636

  12. The kinase TBK1 functions in dendritic cells to regulate T cell homeostasis, autoimmunity, and antitumor immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yichuan; Zou, Qiang; Xie, Xiaoping; Liu, Ting; Li, Haiyan S; Jie, Zuliang; Jin, Jin; Hu, Hongbo; Manyam, Ganiraju; Zhang, Li; Cheng, Xuhong; Wang, Hui; Marie, Isabelle; Levy, David E; Watowich, Stephanie S; Sun, Shao-Cong

    2017-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial for mediating immune responses but, when deregulated, also contribute to immunological disorders, such as autoimmunity. The molecular mechanism underlying the function of DCs is incompletely understood. In this study, we have identified TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1), a master innate immune kinase, as an important regulator of DC function. DC-specific deletion of Tbk1 causes T cell activation and autoimmune symptoms and also enhances antitumor immunity in animal models of cancer immunotherapy. The TBK1-deficient DCs have up-regulated expression of co-stimulatory molecules and increased T cell-priming activity. We further demonstrate that TBK1 negatively regulates the induction of a subset of genes by type I interferon receptor (IFNAR). Deletion of IFNAR1 could largely prevent aberrant T cell activation and autoimmunity in DC-conditional Tbk1 knockout mice. These findings identify a DC-specific function of TBK1 in the maintenance of immune homeostasis and tolerance. © 2017 Xiao et al.

  13. Regulation of dendritic cell development by GM-CSF: molecular control and implications for immune homeostasis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Laar, Lianne; Coffer, Paul J; Woltman, Andrea M

    2012-04-12

    Dendritic cells (DCs) represent a small and heterogeneous fraction of the hematopoietic system, specialized in antigen capture, processing, and presentation. The different DC subsets act as sentinels throughout the body and perform a key role in the induction of immunogenic as well as tolerogenic immune responses. Because of their limited lifespan, continuous replenishment of DC is required. Whereas the importance of GM-CSF in regulating DC homeostasis has long been underestimated, this cytokine is currently considered a critical factor for DC development under both steady-state and inflammatory conditions. Regulation of cellular actions by GM-CSF depends on the activation of intracellular signaling modules, including JAK/STAT, MAPK, PI3K, and canonical NF-κB. By directing the activity of transcription factors and other cellular effector proteins, these pathways influence differentiation, survival and/or proliferation of uncommitted hematopoietic progenitors, and DC subset-specific precursors, thereby contributing to specific aspects of DC subset development. The specific intracellular events resulting from GM-CSF-induced signaling provide a molecular explanation for GM-CSF-dependent subset distribution as well as clues to the specific characteristics and functions of GM-CSF-differentiated DCs compared with DCs generated by fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand. This knowledge can be used to identify therapeutic targets to improve GM-CSF-dependent DC-based strategies to regulate immunity.

  14. The Proprioceptive System Regulates Morphologic Restoration of Fractured Bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronen Blecher

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Successful fracture repair requires restoration of bone morphology and mechanical integrity. Recent evidence shows that fractured bones of neonatal mice undergo spontaneous realignment, dubbed “natural reduction.” Here, we show that natural reduction is regulated by the proprioceptive system and improves with age. Comparison among mice of different ages revealed, surprisingly, that 3-month-old mice exhibited more rapid and effective natural reduction than newborns. Fractured bones of null mutants for transcription factor Runx3, lacking functional proprioceptors, failed to realign properly. Blocking Runx3 expression in the peripheral nervous system, but not in limb mesenchyme, recapitulated the null phenotype, as did inactivation of muscles flanking the fracture site. Egr3 knockout mice, which lack muscle spindles but not Golgi tendon organs, displayed a less severe phenotype, suggesting that both receptor types, as well as muscle contraction, are required for this regulatory mechanism. These findings uncover a physiological role for proprioception in non-autonomous regulation of skeletal integrity.

  15. The microRNA bantam regulates a developmental transition in epithelial cells that restricts sensory dendrite growth

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Nan; Soba, Peter; Parker, Edward; Kim, Charles C.; Parrish, Jay Z.

    2014-01-01

    As animals grow, many early born structures grow by cell expansion rather than cell addition; thus growth of distinct structures must be coordinated to maintain proportionality. This phenomenon is particularly widespread in the nervous system, with dendrite arbors of many neurons expanding in concert with their substrate to sustain connectivity and maintain receptive field coverage as animals grow. After rapidly growing to establish body wall coverage, dendrites of Drosophila class IV dendrit...

  16. Positive regulation of plasmacytoid dendritic cell function via Ly49Q recognition of class I MHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Lee-Hwa; Goulet, Marie-Line; Belanger, Simon; Toyama-Sorimachi, Noriko; Fodil-Cornu, Nassima; Vidal, Silvia M.; Troke, Angela D.; McVicar, Daniel W.; Makrigiannis, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are an important source of type I interferon (IFN) during initial immune responses to viral infections. In mice, pDCs are uniquely characterized by high-level expression of Ly49Q, a C-type lectin-like receptor specific for class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Despite having a cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif, Ly49Q was found to enhance pDC function in vitro, as pDC cytokine production in response to the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 9 agonist CpG-oligonucleotide (ODN) could be blocked using soluble monoclonal antibody (mAb) to Ly49Q or H-2Kb. Conversely, CpG-ODN–dependent IFN-α production by pDCs was greatly augmented upon receptor cross-linking using immobilized anti-Ly49Q mAb or recombinant H-2Kb ligand. Accordingly, Ly49Q-deficient pDCs displayed a severely reduced capacity to produce cytokines in response to TLR7 and TLR9 stimulation both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, TLR9-dependent antiviral responses were compromised in Ly49Q-null mice infected with mouse cytomegalovirus. Thus, class I MHC recognition by Ly49Q on pDCs is necessary for optimal activation of innate immune responses in vivo. PMID:19075287

  17. Solo and keratin filaments regulate epithelial tubule morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Ryosuke; Kato, Kagayaki; Fujiwara, Sachiko; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Mizuno, Kensaku

    2018-04-28

    Epithelial tubules, consisting of the epithelial cell sheet with a central lumen, are the basic structure of many organs. Mechanical forces play an important role in epithelial tubulogenesis; however, little is known about the mechanisms controlling the mechanical forces during epithelial tubule morphogenesis. Solo (also known as ARHGEF40) is a RhoA-targeting guanine-nucleotide exchange factor that is involved in mechanical force-induced RhoA activation and stress fiber formation. Solo binds to keratin-8/keratin-18 (K8/K18) filaments, and this interaction plays a crucial role in mechanotransduction. In this study, we examined the roles of Solo and K8/K18 filaments in epithelial tubulogenesis using MDCK cells cultured in 3D collagen gels. Knockdown of either Solo or K18 resulted in rounder tubules with increased lumen size, indicating that Solo and K8/K18 filaments play critical roles in forming the elongated morphology of epithelial tubules. Moreover, knockdown of Solo or K18 decreased the level of diphosphorylated myosin light chain (a marker of contractile force) at the luminal and outer surfaces of tubules, suggesting that Solo and K8/K18 filaments are involved in the generation of the myosin II-mediated contractile force during epithelial tubule morphogenesis. In addition, K18 filaments were normally oriented along the long axis of the tubule, but knockdown of Solo perturbed their orientation. These results suggest that Solo plays crucial roles in forming the elongated morphology of epithelial tubules and in regulating myosin II activity and K18 filament organization during epithelial tubule formation.

  18. Palmitoylation-dependent CDKL5–PSD-95 interaction regulates synaptic targeting of CDKL5 and dendritic spine development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong-Chuan; Li, Dan; Wang, Lu; Lu, Bin; Zheng, Jing; Zhao, Shi-Lin; Zeng, Rong; Xiong, Zhi-Qi

    2013-01-01

    The X-linked gene cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) is mutated in severe neurodevelopmental disorders, including some forms of atypical Rett syndrome, but the function and regulation of CDKL5 protein in neurons remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that CDKL5 binds to the scaffolding protein postsynaptic density (PSD)-95, and that this binding promotes the targeting of CDKL5 to excitatory synapses. Interestingly, this binding is not constitutive, but governed by palmitate cycling on PSD-95. Furthermore, pathogenic mutations that truncate the C-terminal tail of CDKL5 diminish its binding to PSD-95 and synaptic accumulation. Importantly, down-regulation of CDKL5 by RNA interference (RNAi) or interference with the CDKL5–PSD-95 interaction inhibits dendritic spine formation and growth. These results demonstrate a critical role of the palmitoylation-dependent CDKL5–PSD-95 interaction in localizing CDKL5 to synapses for normal spine development and suggest that disruption of this interaction by pathogenic mutations may be implicated in the pathogenesis of CDKL5-related disorders. PMID:23671101

  19. Palmitoylation-dependent CDKL5-PSD-95 interaction regulates synaptic targeting of CDKL5 and dendritic spine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong-Chuan; Li, Dan; Wang, Lu; Lu, Bin; Zheng, Jing; Zhao, Shi-Lin; Zeng, Rong; Xiong, Zhi-Qi

    2013-05-28

    The X-linked gene cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) is mutated in severe neurodevelopmental disorders, including some forms of atypical Rett syndrome, but the function and regulation of CDKL5 protein in neurons remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that CDKL5 binds to the scaffolding protein postsynaptic density (PSD)-95, and that this binding promotes the targeting of CDKL5 to excitatory synapses. Interestingly, this binding is not constitutive, but governed by palmitate cycling on PSD-95. Furthermore, pathogenic mutations that truncate the C-terminal tail of CDKL5 diminish its binding to PSD-95 and synaptic accumulation. Importantly, down-regulation of CDKL5 by RNA interference (RNAi) or interference with the CDKL5-PSD-95 interaction inhibits dendritic spine formation and growth. These results demonstrate a critical role of the palmitoylation-dependent CDKL5-PSD-95 interaction in localizing CDKL5 to synapses for normal spine development and suggest that disruption of this interaction by pathogenic mutations may be implicated in the pathogenesis of CDKL5-related disorders.

  20. TGF-β Signaling in Dopaminergic Neurons Regulates Dendritic Growth, Excitatory-Inhibitory Synaptic Balance, and Reversal Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah X. Luo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Neural circuits involving midbrain dopaminergic (DA neurons regulate reward and goal-directed behaviors. Although local GABAergic input is known to modulate DA circuits, the mechanism that controls excitatory/inhibitory synaptic balance in DA neurons remains unclear. Here, we show that DA neurons use autocrine transforming growth factor β (TGF-β signaling to promote the growth of axons and dendrites. Surprisingly, removing TGF-β type II receptor in DA neurons also disrupts the balance in TGF-β1 expression in DA neurons and neighboring GABAergic neurons, which increases inhibitory input, reduces excitatory synaptic input, and alters phasic firing patterns in DA neurons. Mice lacking TGF-β signaling in DA neurons are hyperactive and exhibit inflexibility in relinquishing learned behaviors and re-establishing new stimulus-reward associations. These results support a role for TGF-β in regulating the delicate balance of excitatory/inhibitory synaptic input in local microcircuits involving DA and GABAergic neurons and its potential contributions to neuropsychiatric disorders.

  1. Donor lung derived myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells differentially regulate T cell proliferation and cytokine production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benson Heather L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Direct allorecognition, i.e., donor lung-derived dendritic cells (DCs stimulating recipient-derived T lymphocytes, is believed to be the key mechanism of lung allograft rejection. Myeloid (cDCs and plasmacytoid (pDCs are believed to have differential effects on T cell activation. However, the roles of each DC type on T cell activation and rejection pathology post lung transplantation are unknown. Methods Using transgenic mice and antibody depletion techniques, either or both cell types were depleted in lungs of donor BALB/c mice (H-2d prior to transplanting into C57BL/6 mice (H-2b, followed by an assessment of rejection pathology, and pDC or cDC-induced proliferation and cytokine production in C57BL/6-derived mediastinal lymph node T cells (CD3+. Results Depleting either DC type had modest effect on rejection pathology and T cell proliferation. In contrast, T cells from mice that received grafts depleted of both DCs did not proliferate and this was associated with significantly reduced acute rejection scores compared to all other groups. cDCs were potent inducers of IFNγ, whereas both cDCs and pDCs induced IL-10. Both cell types had variable effects on IL-17A production. Conclusion Collectively, the data show that direct allorecognition by donor lung pDCs and cDCs have differential effects on T cell proliferation and cytokine production. Depletion of both donor lung cDC and pDC could prevent the severity of acute rejection episodes.

  2. Mucolipin 1 positively regulates TLR7 responses in dendritic cells by facilitating RNA transportation to lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaobing; Saitoh, Shin-Ichiroh; Shibata, Takuma; Tanimura, Natsuko; Fukui, Ryutaro; Miyake, Kensuke

    2015-02-01

    Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and TLR9 sense microbial single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) and ssDNA in endolysosomes. Nucleic acid (NA)-sensing in endolysosomes is thought to be important for avoiding TLR7/9 responses to self-derived NAs. Aberrant self-derived NA transportation to endolysosomes predisposes to autoimmune diseases. To restrict NA-sensing in endolysosomes, TLR7/9 trafficking is tightly controlled by a multiple transmembrane protein Unc93B1. In contrast to TLR7/9 trafficking, little is known about a mechanism underlying NA transportation. We here show that Mucolipin 1 (Mcoln1), a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel gene family, has an important role in ssRNA trafficking into lysosomes. Mcoln1(-/-) dendritic cells (DCs) showed impaired TLR7 responses to ssRNA. A mucolipin agonist specifically enhanced TLR7 responses to ssRNAs. The channel activity of Mcoln1 is activated by a phospholipid phosphatidylinositol (3,5) bisphosphate (PtdIns(3,5)P2), which is generated by a class III lipid kinase PIKfyve. A PIKfyve inhibitor completely inhibited TLR7 responses to ssRNA in DCs. Confocal analyses showed that ssRNA transportation to lysosomes in DCs was impaired by PIKfyve inhibitor as well as by the lack of Mcoln1. Transportation of TLR9 ligands was also impaired by the PIKfyve inhibitor. These results demonstrate that the PtdIns(3,5)P2-Mcoln1 axis has an important role in ssRNA transportation into lysosomes in DCs. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Influence of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator on expression of lipid metabolism-related genes in dendritic cells

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    Quadri Luis EN

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystic fibrosis (CF is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene. Infections of the respiratory tract are a hallmark in CF. The host immune responses in CF are not adequate to eradicate pathogens, such as P. aeruginosa. Dendritic cells (DC are crucial in initiation and regulation of immune responses. Changes in DC function could contribute to abnormal immune responses on multiple levels. The role of DC in CF lung disease remains unknown. Methods This study investigated the expression of CFTR gene in bone marrow-derived DC. We compared the differentiation and maturation profile of DC from CF and wild type (WT mice. We analyzed the gene expression levels in DC from naive CF and WT mice or following P. aeruginosa infection. Results CFTR is expressed in DC with lower level compared to lung tissue. DC from CF mice showed a delayed in the early phase of differentiation. Gene expression analysis in DC generated from naive CF and WT mice revealed decreased expression of Caveolin-1 (Cav1, a membrane lipid raft protein, in the CF DC compared to WT DC. Consistently, protein and activity levels of the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP, a negative regulator of Cav1 expression, were increased in CF DC. Following exposure to P. aeruginosa, expression of 3β-hydroxysterol-Δ7 reductase (Dhcr7 and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 2 (Scd2, two enzymes involved in the lipid metabolism that are also regulated by SREBP, was less decreased in the CF DC compared to WT DC. Conclusion These results suggest that CFTR dysfunction in DC affects factors involved in membrane structure and lipid-metabolism, which may contribute to the abnormal inflammatory and immune response characteristic of CF.

  4. Regulation of TGFβ in the immune system: An emerging role for integrins and dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Worthington, John J.; Fenton, Thomas M.; Czajkowska, Beata I.; Klementowicz, Joanna E.; Travis, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of an immune response requires complex crosstalk between cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems, via both cell?cell contact and secretion of cytokines. An important cytokine with a broad regulatory role in the immune system is transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?). TGF-? is produced by and has effects on many different cells of the immune system, and plays fundamental roles in the regulation of immune responses during homeostasis, infection and disease. Although many cells ...

  5. Notch-ligand expression by NALT dendritic cells regulates mucosal Th1- and Th2-type responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuyama, Yoshiko; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Sekine, Shinichi; Kataoka, Kosuke; Markham, Jonathan D.; Irwin, Allyson R.; Moon, Grace H.; Tokuhara, Yuka; Fujihashi, Keiko; Davydova, Julia; Yamamoto, Masato; Gilbert, Rebekah S.; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Nasal Ad-FL effectively up-regulates APC function by CD11c + DCs in mucosal tissues. ► Nasal Ad-FL induces Notch ligand (L)-expressing CD11c + DCs. ► Notch L-expressing DCs support the induction of Th1- and Th2-type cytokine responses. -- Abstract: Our previous studies showed that an adenovirus (Ad) serotype 5 vector expressing Flt3 ligand (Ad-FL) as nasal adjuvant activates CD11c + dendritic cells (DCs) for the enhancement of antigen (Ag)-specific IgA antibody (Ab) responses. In this study, we examined the molecular mechanism for activation of CD11c + DCs and their roles in induction of Ag-specific Th1- and Th2-cell responses. Ad-FL activated CD11c + DCs expressed increased levels of the Notch ligand (L)-expression and specific mRNA. When CD11c + DCs from various mucosal and systemic lymphoid tissues of mice given nasal OVA plus Ad-FL were cultured with CD4 + T cells isolated from non-immunized OVA TCR-transgenic (OT II) mice, significantly increased levels of T cell proliferative responses were noted. Furthermore, Ad-FL activated DCs induced IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-4 producing CD4 + T cells. Of importance, these APC functions by Ad-FL activated DCs were down-regulated by blocking Notch–Notch-L pathway. These results show that Ad-FL induces CD11c + DCs to the express Notch-ligands and these activated DCs regulate the induction of Ag-specific Th1- and Th2-type cytokine responses.

  6. Dual Role of the Tyrosine Kinase Syk in Regulation of Toll-Like Receptor Signaling in Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells.

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    Besma Aouar

    Full Text Available Crosslinking of regulatory immunoreceptors (RR, such as BDCA-2 (CD303 or ILT7 (CD85g, of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs efficiently suppresses production of type-I interferon (IFN-α/β and other cytokines in response to Toll-like receptor (TLR 7/9 ligands. This cytokine-inhibitory pathway is mediated by spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk associated with the ITAM-containing adapter of RR. Here we demonstrate by pharmacological targeting of Syk that in addition to the negative regulation of TLR7/9 signaling via RR, Syk also positively regulates the TLR7/9 pathway in human pDCs. Novel highly specific Syk inhibitor AB8779 suppressed IFN-α, TNF-α and IL-6 production induced by TLR7/9 agonists in primary pDCs and in the pDC cell line GEN2.2. Triggering of TLR9 or RR signaling induced a differential kinetics of phosphorylation at Y352 and Y525/526 of Syk and a differential sensitivity to AB8779. Consistent with the different roles of Syk in TLR7/9 and RR signaling, a concentration of AB8779 insufficient to block TLR7/9 signaling still released the block of IFN-α production triggered via the RR pathway, including that induced by hepatitis B and C viruses. Thus, pharmacological targeting of Syk partially restored the main pDC function-IFN-α production. Opposing roles of Syk in TLR7/9 and RR pathways may regulate the innate immune response to weaken inflammation reaction.

  7. Notch-ligand expression by NALT dendritic cells regulates mucosal Th1- and Th2-type responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuyama, Yoshiko; Tokuhara, Daisuke [Department of Pediatric Dentistry, The Immunobiology Vaccine Center, The Institute of Oral Health Research, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294-0007 (United States); Division of Mucosal Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Sekine, Shinichi [Department of Preventive Dentistry, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kataoka, Kosuke [Department of Preventive Dentistry, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8504 (Japan); Markham, Jonathan D.; Irwin, Allyson R.; Moon, Grace H.; Tokuhara, Yuka; Fujihashi, Keiko [Department of Pediatric Dentistry, The Immunobiology Vaccine Center, The Institute of Oral Health Research, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294-0007 (United States); Davydova, Julia; Yamamoto, Masato [Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Gilbert, Rebekah S. [Department of Pediatric Dentistry, The Immunobiology Vaccine Center, The Institute of Oral Health Research, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294-0007 (United States); Fujihashi, Kohtaro, E-mail: kohtarof@uab.edu [Department of Pediatric Dentistry, The Immunobiology Vaccine Center, The Institute of Oral Health Research, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294-0007 (United States)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nasal Ad-FL effectively up-regulates APC function by CD11c{sup +} DCs in mucosal tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nasal Ad-FL induces Notch ligand (L)-expressing CD11c{sup +} DCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Notch L-expressing DCs support the induction of Th1- and Th2-type cytokine responses. -- Abstract: Our previous studies showed that an adenovirus (Ad) serotype 5 vector expressing Flt3 ligand (Ad-FL) as nasal adjuvant activates CD11c{sup +} dendritic cells (DCs) for the enhancement of antigen (Ag)-specific IgA antibody (Ab) responses. In this study, we examined the molecular mechanism for activation of CD11c{sup +} DCs and their roles in induction of Ag-specific Th1- and Th2-cell responses. Ad-FL activated CD11c{sup +} DCs expressed increased levels of the Notch ligand (L)-expression and specific mRNA. When CD11c{sup +} DCs from various mucosal and systemic lymphoid tissues of mice given nasal OVA plus Ad-FL were cultured with CD4{sup +} T cells isolated from non-immunized OVA TCR-transgenic (OT II) mice, significantly increased levels of T cell proliferative responses were noted. Furthermore, Ad-FL activated DCs induced IFN-{gamma}, IL-2 and IL-4 producing CD4{sup +} T cells. Of importance, these APC functions by Ad-FL activated DCs were down-regulated by blocking Notch-Notch-L pathway. These results show that Ad-FL induces CD11c{sup +} DCs to the express Notch-ligands and these activated DCs regulate the induction of Ag-specific Th1- and Th2-type cytokine responses.

  8. Conditional ablation of CD205+ conventional dendritic cells impacts the regulation of T-cell immunity and homeostasis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukaya, Tomohiro; Murakami, Ryuichi; Takagi, Hideaki; Sato, Kaori; Sato, Yumiko; Otsuka, Haruna; Ohno, Michiko; Hijikata, Atsushi; Ohara, Osamu; Hikida, Masaki; Malissen, Bernard; Sato, Katsuaki

    2012-07-10

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are composed of multiple subsets that play a dual role in inducing immunity and tolerance. However, it is unclear how CD205(+) conventional DCs (cDCs) control immune responses in vivo. Here we generated knock-in mice with the selective conditional ablation of CD205(+) cDCs. CD205(+) cDCs contributed to antigen-specific priming of CD4(+) T cells under steady-state conditions, whereas they were dispensable for antigen-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses under inflammatory conditions. In contrast, CD205(+) cDCs were required for antigen-specific priming of CD8(+) T cells to generate cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) mediated through cross-presentation. Although CD205(+) cDCs were involved in the thymic generation of CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs), they maintained the homeostasis of CD4(+) Tregs and CD4(+) effector T cells in peripheral and mucosal tissues. On the other hand, CD205(+) cDCs were involved in the inflammation triggered by Toll-like receptor ligand as well as bacterial and viral infections. Upon microbial infections, CD205(+) cDCs contributed to the cross-priming of CD8(+) T cells for generating antimicrobial CTLs to efficiently eliminate pathogens, whereas they suppressed antimicrobial CD4(+) T-cell responses. Thus, these findings reveal a critical role for CD205(+) cDCs in the regulation of T-cell immunity and homeostasis in vivo.

  9. Homeostatic NF-κB Signaling in Steady-State Migratory Dendritic Cells Regulates Immune Homeostasis and Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratin, Myriam; Foray, Chloe; Demaria, Olivier; Habbeddine, Mohamed; Pollet, Emeline; Maurizio, Julien; Verthuy, Christophe; Davanture, Suzel; Azukizawa, Hiroaki; Flores-Langarica, Adriana; Dalod, Marc; Lawrence, Toby

    2015-04-21

    Migratory non-lymphoid tissue dendritic cells (NLT-DCs) transport antigens to lymph nodes (LNs) and are required for protective immune responses in the context of inflammation and to promote tolerance to self-antigens in steady-state. However, the molecular mechanisms that elicit steady-state NLT-DC maturation and migration are unknown. By comparing the transcriptome of NLT-DCs in the skin with their migratory counterparts in draining LNs, we have identified a novel NF-κB-regulated gene network specific to migratory DCs. We show that targeted deletion of IKKβ in DCs, a major activator of NF-κB, prevents NLT-DC accumulation in LNs and compromises regulatory T cell conversion in vivo. This was associated with impaired tolerance and autoimmunity. NF-κB is generally considered the prototypical pro-inflammatory transcription factor, but this study describes a role for NF-κB signaling in DCs for immune homeostasis and tolerance that could have implications in autoimmune diseases and immunity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. β-Glucan Size Controls Dectin-1-Mediated Immune Responses in Human Dendritic Cells by Regulating IL-1β Production

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    Matthew J. Elder

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Dectin-1/CLEC7A is a pattern recognition receptor that recognizes β-1,3 glucans, and its stimulation initiates signaling events characterized by the production of inflammatory cytokines from human dendritic cells (DCs required for antifungal immunity. β-glucans differ greatly in size, structure, and ability to activate effector immune responses from DC; as such, small particulate β-glucans are thought to be poor activators of innate immunity. We show that β-glucan particle size is a critical factor contributing to the secretion of cytokines from human DC; large β-glucan-stimulated DC generate significantly more IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-23 compared to those stimulated with the smaller β-glucans. In marked contrast, the secretion of TSLP and CCL22 were found to be insensitive to β-glucan particle size. Furthermore, we show that the capacity to induce phagocytosis, and the relative IL-1β production determined by β-glucan size, regulates the composition of the cytokine milieu generated from DC. This suggests that β-glucan particle size is critically important in orchestrating the nature of the immune response to fungi.

  11. CD4+ T‐cell activation is differentially modulated by bacteria‐primed dendritic cells, but is generally down‐regulated by n‐3 polyunsaturated fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne Brix; Lund, Pia; Kjær, Tanja

    2010-01-01

    provided by dendritic cells (DCs). Upon interaction with DCs primed by different concentrations and species of gut bacteria, CD4+ T cells were activated according to the type of DC stimulus. The levels of CD80 were found to correlate to the levels of expression of CD28 and to the proliferation of CD4+ T......, thereby affecting and shaping activation of acquired immunity by differential regulation of proliferation and costimulatory molecule expression in CD4+ T cells....

  12. Complement C1q regulates LPS-induced cytokine production in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Masahide; Oritani, Kenji; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu; Ishikawa, Jun; Yoshida, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Isao; Kawamoto, Shinichirou; Ishida, Naoko; Ujiie, Hidetoshi; Masaie, Hiroaki; Botto, Marina; Tomiyama, Yoshiaki; Matsuzawa, Yuji

    2004-01-01

    We show here that C1q suppresses IL-12p40 production in LPS-stimulated murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC). Serum IL-12p40 concentration of C1q-deficient mice was higher than that of wild-type mice after intraperitoneal LPS-injection. Because neither globular head of C1q (gC1q) nor collagen-like region of C1q (cC1q) failed to suppress LPS-induced IL-12p40 production, both gC1q and cC1q, and/or some specialized conformation of native C1q may be required for the inhibition. While C1q did not affect mRNA expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), MD-2, and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), BMDC treated with C1q showed the reduced activity of NF-kappaB and the delayed phosphorylation of p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase after LPS-stimulation. CpG oligodeoxynucleotide-induced IL-12p40 and TNF-alpha production, another MyD88-dependent TLR-mediated signal, was also suppressed by C1q treatment. Therefore, C1q is likely to suppress MyD88-dependent pathway in TLR-mediated signals. In contrast, C1q failed to suppress colony formation of B cells responding to LPS or LPS-induced CD40 and CD86 expression on BMDC in MyD88-deficient mice, indicating that inhibitory effects of C1q on MyD88-independent pathways may be limited. Taken together, C1q may regulate innate and adaptive immune systems via modification of signals mediated by interactions between invading pathogens and TLR.

  13. Regulation of dendritic cell function by insulin/IGF-1/PI3K/Akt signaling through klotho expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Nguyen Thi; Hoang, Nguyen Huy; Nhung, Vu Phuong; Duong, Nguyen Thuy; Ha, Nguyen Hai; Hai, Nong Van

    2017-06-01

    Insulin or insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) promotes the activation of phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling in immune cells including dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent professional antigen-presenting cells for naive T cells. Klotho, an anti-aging protein, participates in the regulation of the PI3K/Akt signaling, thus the Ca 2+ -dependent migration is reduced in klotho-deficient DCs. The present study explored the effects of insulin/IGF-1 on DC function through klotho expression. To this end, the mouse bone marrow cells were isolated and cultured with GM-CSF to attain bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs). Cells were treated with insulin or IGF-1 and followed by stimulating with lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α formation was examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Phagocytosis was analyzed by FITC-dextran uptake assay. The expression of klotho was determined by quantitative PCR, immunoprecipitation and western blotting. As a result, treatment of the cells with insulin/IGF-1 resulted in reducing the klotho expression as well as LPS-stimulated TNF-α release and increasing the FITC-dextran uptake but unaltering reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in BMDCs. The effects were abolished by using pharmacological inhibition of PI3K/Akt with LY294002 and paralleled by transfecting DCs with klotho siRNA. In conclusion, the regulation of klotho sensitive DC function by IGF-1 or insulin is mediated through PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in BMDCs.

  14. Causes and effects of morphological changes of the regulated channel of the river Toplica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đeković Vojislav

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of small torrential watercourses outside the urbanized areas is often based on the so-called field type of regulation. In the selection of this concept, after the regulation works, the new channel is left to the natural process of the morphological formation of the water cross-section taking care not to disturb the general stability of the regulated channel. We present the process of morphological development of the regulated channel of the river Toplica, tributary of the river Kolubara, in the period 1982-2004 i.e. from immediately after the regulation works to the present day.

  15. Functional Impairment of Myeloid Dendritic Cells during Advanced Stage of HIV-1 Infection: Role of Factors Regulating Cytokine Signaling.

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    Meenakshi Sachdeva

    Full Text Available Severely immunocompromised state during advanced stage of HIV-1 infection has been linked to functionally defective antigen presentation by dendritic cells (DCs. The molecular mechanisms behind DC impairment are still obscure. We investigated changes in DC function and association of key regulators of cytokine signaling during different stages of HIV-1 infection and following antiretroviral therapy (ART.Phenotypic and functional characteristics of circulating myeloid DCs (mDCs in 56 ART-naive patients (23 in early and 33 in advanced stage of disease, 36 on ART and 24 healthy controls were evaluated. Sixteen patients were studied longitudinally prior-to and 6 months after the start of ART. For functional studies, monocyte-derived DCs (Mo-DCs were evaluated for endocytosis, allo-stimulation and cytokine secretion. The expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS-1 and other regulators of cytokine signaling was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR.The ability to respond to an antigenic stimulation was severely impaired in patients in advanced HIV-1 disease which showed partial recovery in the treated group. Mo-DCs from patients with advanced HIV-disease remained immature with low allo-stimulation and reduced cytokine secretion even after TLR-4 mediated stimulation ex-vivo. The cells had an increased expression of negative regulatory factors like SOCS-1, SOCS-3, SH2-containing phosphatase (SHP-1 and a reduced expression of positive regulators like Janus kinase (JAK2 and Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB1. A functional recovery after siRNA mediated silencing of SOCS-1 in these mo-DCs confirms the role of negative regulatory factors in functional impairment of these cells.Functionally defective DCs in advanced stage of HIV-1 infection seems to be due to imbalanced state of negative and positive regulatory gene expression. Whether this is a cause or effect of increased viral replication at this stage of disease

  16. A novel CARD containing splice-isoform of CIITA regulates nitric oxide synthesis in dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dachuan; Lim, Sylvia; Chua, Rong Yuan Ray; Shi, Hong; Ng, Mah Lee; Wong, Siew Heng

    2010-03-01

    MHC class II expression is controlled mainly at transcriptional level by class II transactivator (CIITA), which is a non-DNA binding coactivator and serves as a master control factor for MHC class II genes expression. Here, we describe the function of a novel splice-isoform of CIITA, DC-expressed caspase inhibitory isoform of CIITA (or DC-CASPIC), and we show that the expression of DCCASPIC in DC is upregulated upon lipopolysaccharides (LPS) induction. DC-CASPIC localizes to mitochondria, and protein-protein interaction study demonstrates that DC-CASPIC interacts with caspases and inhibits its activity in DC. Consistently, DC-CASPIC suppresses caspases-induced degradation of nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS2) and subsequently promotes the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO). NO is an essential regulatory molecule that modulates the capability of DC in stimulating T cell proliferation/activation in vitro; hence, overexpression of DC-CASPIC in DC enhances this stimulation. Collectively, our findings reveal that DC-CASPIC is a key molecule that regulates caspases activity and NO synthesis in DC.

  17. Juvenile social experience and differential age-related changes in the dendritic morphologies of subareas of the prefrontal cortex in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmler, Brett T; Mychasiuk, Richelle; Nakahashi, Ayuno; Himmler, Stephanie M; Pellis, Sergio M; Kolb, Bryan

    2018-04-01

    Juvenile social interactions have been shown to influence the dendritic complexity of neurons in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). In particular, social play induces pruning of the cells in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), whereas interacting with multiple partners, whether those interactions involve play or not, increases the complexity of cells in the orbital frontal cortex (OFC). Previous studies suggest that these changes differ in their stability during adulthood. In the present study, rats were reared in groups of either four (quads) or two (pairs) and the brains of the rats from each rearing condition were then harvested at 60 days (i.e., shortly after sexual maturity) and 100 days (i.e., fully adult). The rats housed with multiple partners had more complex neurons of the OFC at 60 days and this complexity declined to a comparable level to that of pair housed rats by 100 days. In contrast, the play-induced changes of the mPFC remained similar at both ages. These findings suggest that the changes in the PFC induced by different social experiences in the juvenile period differ in how long they are maintained in adulthood. Differences in the functions regulated by the OFC and the mPFC are considered with regard to these differences in the stability of juvenile-induced neural changes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Preferential control of basal dendritic protrusions by EphB2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Kayser

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The flow of information between neurons in many neural circuits is controlled by a highly specialized site of cell-cell contact known as a synapse. A number of molecules have been identified that are involved in central nervous system synapse development, but knowledge is limited regarding whether these cues direct organization of specific synapse types or on particular regions of individual neurons. Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, and the majority of glutamatergic synapses occur on mushroom-shaped protrusions called dendritic spines. Changes in the morphology of these structures are associated with long-lasting modulation of synaptic strength thought to underlie learning and memory, and can be abnormal in neuropsychiatric disease. Here, we use rat cortical slice cultures to examine how a previously-described synaptogenic molecule, the EphB2 receptor tyrosine kinase, regulates dendritic protrusion morphology in specific regions of the dendritic arbor in cortical pyramidal neurons. We find that alterations in EphB2 signaling can bidirectionally control protrusion length, and knockdown of EphB2 expression levels reduces the number of dendritic spines and filopodia. Expression of wild-type or dominant negative EphB2 reveals that EphB2 preferentially regulates dendritic protrusion structure in basal dendrites. Our findings suggest that EphB2 may act to specify synapse formation in a particular subcellular region of cortical pyramidal neurons.

  19. Clonorchis sinensis adult-derived proteins elicit Th2 immune responses by regulating dendritic cells via mannose receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zhao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis is the most widespread human liver fluke in East Asia including China and Korea. Clonorchiasis as a neglected tropical zoonosis, leads to serious economic and public health burden in China. There are considerable evidences for an etiological relation between chronic clonorchiasis and liver fibrosis in human beings. Liver fibrosis is a highly conserved and over-protected response to hepatic tissue injury. Immune cells including CD4+ T cell as well as dendritic cell (DC, and pro-fibrogenic cytokines like interleukin 4 (IL-4, IL-13 have been identified as vital manipulators in liver fibrogenesis. Our previous studies had a mere glimpse of T helper type 2 (Th2 dominant immune responses as key players in liver fibrosis induced by C. sinensis infection, but little is known about the involved mechanisms in this pathological process.By flow cytometry (FACS, adult-derived total proteins of C. sinensis (CsTPs down-regulated the expression of surface markers CD80, CD86 and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II on lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced DC. ELISA results demonstrated that CsTPs inhibited IL-12p70 release from LPS-treated bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC. IL-10 level increased in a time-dependent manner in LPS-treated BMDCs after incubation with CsTPs. CD4+ T cells incubated with LPS-treated BMDCs plus CsTPs could significantly elevate IL-4 level by ELISA. Meanwhile, elevated expression of pro-fibrogenic mediators including IL-13 and IL-4 were detected in a co-culture system of LPS-activated BMDCs and naive T cells containing CsTPs. In vivo, CsTPs-immunized mice enhanced expression of type 2 cytokines IL-13, IL-10 and IL-4 in both splenocytes and hepatic tissue. Exposure of BMDCs to CsTPs activated expression of mannose receptor (MR but not toll like receptor 2 (TLR2, TLR4, C-type lectin receptor DC-SIGN and Dectin-2 on the cell surface by RT-PCR and FACS. Blockade of MR almost completely

  20. Quantification of dendritic and axonal growth after injury to the auditory system of the adult cricket Gryllus bimaculatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra ePfister

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendrite and axon growth and branching during development are regulated by a complex set of intracellular and external signals. However, the cues that maintain or influence adult neuronal morphology are less well understood. Injury and deafferentation tend to have negative effects on adult nervous systems. An interesting example of injury-induced compensatory growth is seen in the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus. After unilateral loss of an ear in the adult cricket, auditory neurons within the central nervous system sprout to compensate for the injury. Specifically, after being deafferented, ascending neurons (AN-1 and AN-2 send dendrites across the midline of the prothoracic ganglion where they receive input from auditory afferents that project through the contralateral auditory nerve (N5. Deafferentation also triggers contralateral N5 axonal growth. In this study, we quantified AN dendritic and N5 axonal growth at 30 hours, as well as at 3, 5, 7, 14 and 20 days after deafferentation in adult crickets. Significant differences in the rates of dendritic growth between males and females were noted. In females, dendritic growth rates were non-linear; a rapid burst of dendritic extension in the first few days was followed by a plateau reached at 3 days after deafferentation. In males, however, dendritic growth rates were linear, with dendrites growing steadily over time and reaching lengths, on average, twice as long as in females. On the other hand, rates of N5 axonal growth showed no significant sexual dimorphism and were linear. Within each animal, the growth rates of dendrites and axons were not correlated, indicating that independent factors likely influence dendritic and axonal growth in response to injury in this system. Our findings provide a basis for future study of the cellular features that allow differing dendrite and axon growth patterns as well as sexually dimorphic dendritic growth in response to deafferentation.

  1. Regulation of dendritic cell development by GM-CSF: Molecular control and implications for immune homeostasis and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. van de Laar (Lianne); P.J. Coffer (Paul); A.M. Woltman (Andrea)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractDendritic cells (DCs) represent a small and heterogeneous fraction of the hematopoietic system, specialized in antigen capture, processing, and presentation. The different DC subsets act as sentinels throughout the body and perform a key role in the induction of immunogenic as well as

  2. Myostatin-like proteins regulate synaptic function and neuronal morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, Hrvoje; McGourty, Kieran; Steinert, Joern R; Cochemé, Helena M; Adcott, Jennifer; Cabecinha, Melissa; Vincent, Alec; Halff, Els F; Kittler, Josef T; Boucrot, Emmanuel; Partridge, Linda

    2017-07-01

    Growth factors of the TGFβ superfamily play key roles in regulating neuronal and muscle function. Myostatin (or GDF8) and GDF11 are potent negative regulators of skeletal muscle mass. However, expression of myostatin and its cognate receptors in other tissues, including brain and peripheral nerves, suggests a potential wider biological role. Here, we show that Myoglianin (MYO), the Drosophila homolog of myostatin and GDF11, regulates not only body weight and muscle size, but also inhibits neuromuscular synapse strength and composition in a Smad2-dependent manner. Both myostatin and GDF11 affected synapse formation in isolated rat cortical neuron cultures, suggesting an effect on synaptogenesis beyond neuromuscular junctions. We also show that MYO acts in vivo to inhibit synaptic transmission between neurons in the escape response neural circuit of adult flies. Thus, these anti-myogenic proteins act as important inhibitors of synapse function and neuronal growth. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Age-Based Comparison of Human Dendritic Spine Structure Using Complete Three-Dimensional Reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Fernaud-Espinosa, Isabel; Robles, Victor; Yuste, Rafael; DeFelipe, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons are targets of most excitatory synapses in the cerebral cortex. Recent evidence suggests that the morphology of the dendritic spine could determine its synaptic strength and learning rules. However, unfortunately, there are scant data available regarding the detailed morphology of these structures for the human cerebral cortex. In the present study, we analyzed over 8900 individual dendritic spines that were completely 3D reconstructed along the length of apical and basal dendrites of layer III pyramidal neurons in the cingulate cortex of 2 male humans (aged 40 and 85 years old), using intracellular injections of Lucifer Yellow in fixed tissue. We assembled a large, quantitative database, which revealed a major reduction in spine densities in the aged case. Specifically, small and short spines of basal dendrites and long spines of apical dendrites were lost, regardless of the distance from the soma. Given the age difference between the cases, our results suggest selective alterations in spines with aging in humans and indicate that the spine volume and length are regulated by different biological mechanisms. PMID:22710613

  4. Recrystallization phenomena of solution grown paraffin dendrites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, F.F.A.; Hollander, F.; Stasse, O.; van Suchtelen, J.; van Enckevort, W.J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Paraffin crystals were grown from decane solutions using a micro-Bridgman set up for in-situ observation of the morphology at the growth front. It is shown that for large imposed velocities, dendrites are obtained. After dendritic growth, aging or recrystallization processes set in rather quickly,

  5. Dendritic growth forms of borax crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takoo, R.K.; Patel, B.R.; Joshi, M.S.

    1983-01-01

    A variety of dendritic forms of borax grown from solutions by the film formation method is given. The changing growth morphology is followed as a function of concentration and temperature. The initial, intermediate and final growth morphologies are described and discussed. Influence of evaporation rate and supersaturation on the mechanism of growth is assessed. It is suggested that under all crystallization conditions, borax crystals have dendritic form in the initial stages of growth. (author)

  6. Spatial distribution of excitatory synapses on the dendrites of ganglion cells in the mouse retina.

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    Yin-Peng Chen

    Full Text Available Excitatory glutamatergic inputs from bipolar cells affect the physiological properties of ganglion cells in the mammalian retina. The spatial distribution of these excitatory synapses on the dendrites of retinal ganglion cells thus may shape their distinct functions. To visualize the spatial pattern of excitatory glutamatergic input into the ganglion cells in the mouse retina, particle-mediated gene transfer of plasmids expressing postsynaptic density 95-green fluorescent fusion protein (PSD95-GFP was used to label the excitatory synapses. Despite wide variation in the size and morphology of the retinal ganglion cells, the expression of PSD95 puncta was found to follow two general rules. Firstly, the PSD95 puncta are regularly spaced, at 1-2 µm intervals, along the dendrites, whereby the presence of an excitatory synapse creates an exclusion zone that rules out the presence of other glutamatergic synaptic inputs. Secondly, the spatial distribution of PSD95 puncta on the dendrites of diverse retinal ganglion cells are similar in that the number of excitatory synapses appears to be less on primary dendrites and to increase to a plateau on higher branch order dendrites. These observations suggest that synaptogenesis is spatially regulated along the dendritic segments and that the number of synaptic contacts is relatively constant beyond the primary dendrites. Interestingly, we also found that the linear puncta density is slightly higher in large cells than in small cells. This may suggest that retinal ganglion cells with a large dendritic field tend to show an increased connectivity of excitatory synapses that makes up for their reduced dendrite density. Mapping the spatial distribution pattern of the excitatory synapses on retinal ganglion cells thus provides explicit structural information that is essential for our understanding of how excitatory glutamatergic inputs shape neuronal responses.

  7. 1Autoreactive pre-plasma cells break tolerance in the absence of regulation by dendritic cells and macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Mileka R.; Wagner, Nikki J.; Jones, Shannon Z.; Wisz, Amanda B.; Roques, Jose R.; Krum, Kristen N.; Lee, Sang-Ryul; Nickeleit, Volker; Hulbert, Chrys; Thomas, James W.; Gauld, Stephen B.; Vilen, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to induce antibody responses to pathogens while maintaining the quiescence of autoreactive cells is an important aspect of immune tolerance. During activation of Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages (MFs) repress autoantibody production through their secretion of IL-6 and soluble CD40L (sCD40L). These soluble mediators selectively repress B cells chronically exposed to antigen, but not naïve cells, suggesting a means to maintain tolerance during TLR4 ...

  8. The roles of cellular and dendritic microstructural morphologies on the corrosion resistance of Pb-Sb alloys for lead acid battery grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osorio, Wislei R.; Rosa, Daniel M.; Garcia, Amauri [Department of Materials Engineering, State University of Campinas-UNICAMP, PO Box 6122, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2008-01-03

    During the past 20 years, lead acid batteries manufacturers have modified grid manufacturing processes and the chemical composition of the used alloys in order to decrease battery grid weight as well as to reduce the production costs, and to increase the battery life-time cycle and the corrosion resistance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of cellular and dendritic microstructures of two different Pb-Sb alloys on the resultant corrosion behavior. A water-cooled unidirectional solidification system was used to obtain cellular and dendritic structures. Macrostructural and microstructural aspects along the casting have been characterized by optical microscopy and SEM techniques. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization curves were used to analyze the corrosion resistance of samples in a 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution at 25 C. For cellular microstructures the corrosion rate decreases with increasing cell spacing. In contrast, finer dendritic spacings exhibit better corrosion resistance than coarser ones. The microstructural pre-programming may be used as an alternative way to produce Pb alloy components in conventional casting, rolled-expanded, and continuous drum casting with better corrosion resistance. (author)

  9. Prdm8 regulates the morphological transition at multipolar phase during neocortical development.

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    Mayuko Inoue

    Full Text Available Here, we found that the PR domain protein Prdm8 serves as a key regulator of the length of the multipolar phase by controlling the timing of morphological transition. We used a mouse line with expression of Prdm8-mVenus reporter and found that Prdm8 is predominantly expressed in the middle and upper intermediate zone during both the late and terminal multipolar phases. Prdm8 expression was almost coincident with Unc5D expression, a marker for the late multipolar phase, although the expression of Unc5D was found to be gradually down-regulated to the point at which mVenus expression was gradually up-regulated. This expression pattern suggests the possible involvement of Prdm8 in the control of the late and terminal multipolar phases, which controls the timing for morphological transition. To test this hypothesis, we performed gain- and loss-of-function analysis of neocortical development by using in utero electroporation. We found that the knockdown of Prdm8 results in premature change from multipolar to bipolar morphology, whereas the overexpression of Prdm8 maintained the multipolar morphology. Additionally, the postnatal analysis showed that the Prdm8 knockdown stimulated the number of early born neurons, and differentiated neurons located more deeply in the neocortex, however, majority of those cells could not acquire molecular features consistent with laminar location. Furthermore, we found the candidate genes that were predominantly utilized in both the late and terminal multipolar phases, and these candidate genes included those encoding for guidance molecules. In addition, we also found that the expression level of these guidance molecules was inhibited by the introduction of the Prdm8 expression vector. These results indicate that the Prdm8-mediated regulation of morphological changes that normally occur during the late and terminal multipolar phases plays an important role in neocortical development.

  10. Flt3/Flt3L Participates in the Process of Regulating Dendritic Cells and Regulatory T Cells in DSS-Induced Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Wei Mao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The immunoregulation between dendritic cells (DCs and regulatory T cells (T-regs plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis (UC. Recent research showed that Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt3 and Flt3 ligand (Flt3L were involved in the process of DCs regulating T-regs. The DSS-induced colitis model is widely used because of its simplicity and many similarities with human UC. In this study, we observe the disease activity index (DAI and histological scoring, detect the amounts of DCs and T-regs and expression of Flt3/Flt3L, and investigate Flt3/Flt3L participating in the process of DCs regulating T-regs in DSS-induced colitis. Our findings suggest that the reduction of Flt3 and Flt3L expression may possibly induce colonic immunoregulatory imbalance between CD103+MHCII+DCs and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+T-regs in DSS-induced colitis. Flt3/Flt3L participates in the process of regulating DCS and T-regs in the pathogenesis of UC, at least, in the acute stage of this disease.

  11. PKB/SGK-dependent GSK3-phosphorylation in the regulation of LPS-induced Ca2+ increase in mouse dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Antonella; Schmid, Evi; Nurbaeva, Meerim K; Yang, Wenting; Yan, Jing; Bhandaru, Madhuri; Faggio, Caterina; Shumilina, Ekaterina; Lang, Florian

    2013-08-02

    The function of dendritic cells (DCs) is modified by glycogen synthase kinase GSK3 and GSK3 inhibitors have been shown to protect against inflammatory disease. Regulators of GSK3 include the phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) pathway leading to activation of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) and serum and glucocorticoid inducible kinase (SGK) isoforms, which in turn phosphorylate and thus inhibit GSK3. The present study explored, whether PKB/SGK-dependent inhibition of GSK3 contributes to the regulation of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration following stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS). To this end DCs from mutant mice, in which PKB/SGK-dependent GSK3α,β regulation was disrupted by replacement of the serine residues in the respective SGK/PKB-phosphorylation consensus sequence by alanine (gsk3(KI)), were compared to DCs from respective wild type mice (gsk3(WT)). According to Western blotting, GSK3 phosphorylation was indeed absent in gsk3(KI) DCs. According to flow cytometry, expression of antigen-presenting molecule major histocompatibility complex II (MHCII) and costimulatory molecule CD86, was similar in unstimulated and LPS (1μg/ml, 24h)-stimulated gsk3(WT) and gsk3(KI) DCs. Moreover, production of cytokines IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and TNFα was not significantly different in gsk3(KI) and gsk3(WT) DCs. In gsk3(WT) DCs, stimulation with LPS (1μg/ml) within 10min led to transient phosphorylation of GSK3. According to Fura2 fluorescence, LPS (1μg/ml) increased cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, an effect significantly more pronounced in gsk3(KI) DCs than in gsk3(WT) DCs. Conversely, GSK3 inhibitor SB216763 (3-[2,4-Dichlorophenyl]-4-[1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione, 10μM, 30min) significantly blunted the increase of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration following LPS exposure. In conclusion, PKB/SGK-dependent GSK3α,β activity participates in the regulation of Ca(2+) signaling in dendritic cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. 1Autoreactive pre-plasma cells break tolerance in the absence of regulation by dendritic cells and macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Mileka R.; Wagner, Nikki J.; Jones, Shannon Z.; Wisz, Amanda B.; Roques, Jose R.; Krum, Kristen N.; Lee, Sang-Ryul; Nickeleit, Volker; Hulbert, Chrys; Thomas, James W.; Gauld, Stephen B.; Vilen, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to induce antibody responses to pathogens while maintaining the quiescence of autoreactive cells is an important aspect of immune tolerance. During activation of Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages (MFs) repress autoantibody production through their secretion of IL-6 and soluble CD40L (sCD40L). These soluble mediators selectively repress B cells chronically exposed to antigen, but not naïve cells, suggesting a means to maintain tolerance during TLR4 stimulation, yet allow immunity. In this study, we identify TNFα as a third repressive factor, which together with IL-6 and CD40L, account for nearly all the repression conferred by DCs and MFs. Like IL-6 and sCD40L, TNFα did not alter B cell proliferation or survival. Rather, it reduced the number of antibody secreting cells. To address whether the soluble mediators secreted by DCs and MFs functioned in vivo, we generated mice lacking IL-6, CD40L and TNFα. Compared to wildtype mice, these mice showed prolonged anti-nuclear antibody responses following TLR4 stimulation. Further, adoptive transfer of autoreactive B cells into chimeric IL-6-/- × CD40L-/- × TNFα-/- mice showed that pre-plasma cells secreted autoantibodies independent of germinal center formation or extrafollicular foci. These data indicate that in the absence of genetic predisposition to autoimmunity, loss of endogenous IL-6, CD40L, and TNFα promotes autoantibody secretion during TLR4 stimulation. PMID:22675201

  13. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 is an autonomous regulator of the transcriptional changes leading to a tolerogenic dendritic cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Széles, Lajos; Keresztes, Gábor; Töröcsik, Dániel; Balajthy, Zoltán; Krenács, László; Póliska, Szilárd; Steinmeyer, Andreas; Zuegel, Ulrich; Pruenster, Monika; Rot, Antal; Nagy, László

    2009-02-15

    Activation of vitamin D receptor (VDR) by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25-vitD) reprograms dendritic cells (DC) to become tolerogenic. Previous studies suggested that 1,25-vitD could inhibit the changes brought about by differentiation and maturation of DCs. Underpinning the described phenotypic and functional alterations, there must be 1,25-vitD-coordinated transcriptional events. However, this transcriptional program has not been systematically investigated, particularly not in a developmental context. Hence, it has not been explored how 1,25-vitD-regulated genes, particularly the ones bringing about the tolerogenic phenotype, are connected to differentiation. We conducted global gene expression analysis followed by comprehensive quantitative PCR validation to clarify the interrelationship between 1,25-vitD and differentiation-driven gene expression patterns in developing human monocyte-derived and blood myeloid DCs. In this study we show that 1,25-vitD regulates a large set of genes that are not affected by differentiation. Interestingly, several genes, impacted both by the ligand and by differentiation, appear to be regulated by 1,25-vitD independently of the developmental context. We have also characterized the kinetics of generation of 1,25-vitD by using three early and robustly regulated genes, the chemokine CCL22, the inhibitory receptors CD300LF and CYP24A1. We found that monocyte-derived DCs are able to turn on 1,25-vitD sensitive genes in early phases of differentiation if the precursor is present. Our data collectively suggest that exogenous or endogenously generated 1,25-vitD regulates a large set of its targets autonomously and not via inhibition of differentiation and maturation, leading to the previously characterized tolerogenic state.

  14. The ROCK isoforms differentially regulate the morphological characteristics of carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerrell, Rachel J; Leih, Mitchell J; Parekh, Aron

    2017-06-26

    Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) activity drives cell migration via actomyosin contractility. During invasion, individual cancer cells can transition between 2 modes of migration, mesenchymal and amoeboid. Changes in ROCK activity can cause a switch between these migration phenotypes which are defined by distinct morphologies. However, recent studies have shown that the ROCK isoforms are not functionally redundant as previously thought. Therefore, it is unclear whether the ROCK isoforms play different roles in regulating migration phenotypes. Here, we found that ROCK1 and ROCK2 differentially regulate carcinoma cell morphology resulting in intermediate phenotypes that share some mesenchymal and amoeboid characteristics. These findings suggest that the ROCK isoforms play unique roles in the phenotypic plasticity of mesenchymal carcinoma cells which may have therapeutic implications.

  15. Template-free fabrication and morphology regulation of Ag@carbon composite structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenyan, E-mail: zhangwenyan8531@gmail.com [College of Material Engineering, Jinling Institute of Technology, Nanjing (China); Hao, Lingyun; Lin, Qin [College of Material Engineering, Jinling Institute of Technology, Nanjing (China); Lu, Chunhua; Xu, Zhongzi [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Technology University, Nanjing (China); Chen, Xiaoyu [College of Material Engineering, Jinling Institute of Technology, Nanjing (China)

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A simple and low-cost method to prepare Ag@C composite material. • AgNO{sub 3} plays an important role in tuning size and functional groups of products. • HTC reaction time is also a key factor for regulating the Ag@C structure. - Abstract: Ag–carbon composite materials were prepared without any template by hydrothermal carbonization of solvable starch. The composite materials are composed of Ag cores and carbonaceous shell to form a core–shell (Ag@carbon) structure. During the hydrothermal carbonization process, the aromatization and carbonization of solvable starch endowed the Ag@carbon composite structure with abundant aromatic, hydroxyl and carbonyl groups. The AgNO{sub 3} concentration and HTC reaction time are two important factors for regulating the size, morphology and functional groups of the composite material. With the increasing of AgNO{sub 3} concentration, morphologies of the composite material turned from spheres to wires.

  16. Cleavage of Hyaluronan and CD44 Adhesion Molecule Regulate Astrocyte Morphology via Rac1 Signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Konopka

    Full Text Available Communication of cells with their extracellular environment is crucial to fulfill their function in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. The literature data provide evidence that such a communication is also important in case of astrocytes. Mechanisms that contribute to the interaction between astrocytes and extracellular matrix (ECM proteins are still poorly understood. Hyaluronan is the main component of ECM in the brain, where its major receptor protein CD44 is expressed by a subset of astrocytes. Considering the fact that functions of astrocytes are tightly coupled with changes in their morphology (e.g.: glutamate clearance in the synaptic cleft, migration, astrogliosis, we investigated the influence of hyaluronan cleavage by hyaluronidase, knockdown of CD44 by specific shRNA and CD44 overexpression on astrocyte morphology. Our results show that hyaluronidase treatment, as well as knockdown of CD44, in astrocytes result in a "stellate"-like morphology, whereas overexpression of CD44 causes an increase in cell body size and changes the shape of astrocytes into flattened cells. Moreover, as a dynamic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is supposed to be responsible for morphological changes of cells, and this reorganization is controlled by small GTPases of the Rho family, we hypothesized that GTPase Rac1 acts as a downstream effector for hyaluronan and CD44 in astrocytes. We used FRET-based biosensor and a dominant negative mutant of Rac1 to investigate the involvement of Rac1 activity in hyaluronidase- and CD44-dependent morphological changes of astrocytes. Both, hyaluronidase treatment and knockdown of CD44, enhances Rac1 activity while overexpression of CD44 reduces the activity state in astrocytes. Furthermore, morphological changes were blocked by specific inhibition of Rac1 activity. These findings indicate for the first time that regulation of Rac1 activity is responsible for hyaluronidase and CD44-driven morphological

  17. Cleavage of Hyaluronan and CD44 Adhesion Molecule Regulate Astrocyte Morphology via Rac1 Signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopka, Anna; Zeug, Andre; Skupien, Anna; Kaza, Beata; Mueller, Franziska; Chwedorowicz, Agnieszka; Ponimaskin, Evgeni; Wilczynski, Grzegorz M; Dzwonek, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Communication of cells with their extracellular environment is crucial to fulfill their function in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. The literature data provide evidence that such a communication is also important in case of astrocytes. Mechanisms that contribute to the interaction between astrocytes and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins are still poorly understood. Hyaluronan is the main component of ECM in the brain, where its major receptor protein CD44 is expressed by a subset of astrocytes. Considering the fact that functions of astrocytes are tightly coupled with changes in their morphology (e.g.: glutamate clearance in the synaptic cleft, migration, astrogliosis), we investigated the influence of hyaluronan cleavage by hyaluronidase, knockdown of CD44 by specific shRNA and CD44 overexpression on astrocyte morphology. Our results show that hyaluronidase treatment, as well as knockdown of CD44, in astrocytes result in a "stellate"-like morphology, whereas overexpression of CD44 causes an increase in cell body size and changes the shape of astrocytes into flattened cells. Moreover, as a dynamic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is supposed to be responsible for morphological changes of cells, and this reorganization is controlled by small GTPases of the Rho family, we hypothesized that GTPase Rac1 acts as a downstream effector for hyaluronan and CD44 in astrocytes. We used FRET-based biosensor and a dominant negative mutant of Rac1 to investigate the involvement of Rac1 activity in hyaluronidase- and CD44-dependent morphological changes of astrocytes. Both, hyaluronidase treatment and knockdown of CD44, enhances Rac1 activity while overexpression of CD44 reduces the activity state in astrocytes. Furthermore, morphological changes were blocked by specific inhibition of Rac1 activity. These findings indicate for the first time that regulation of Rac1 activity is responsible for hyaluronidase and CD44-driven morphological changes of

  18. Ethylene and the Regulation of Physiological and Morphological Responses to Nutrient Deficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, María José; Romera, Francisco Javier; Lucena, Carlos; Alcántara, Esteban; Pérez-Vicente, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    To cope with nutrient deficiencies, plants develop both morphological and physiological responses. The regulation of these responses is not totally understood, but some hormones and signaling substances have been implicated. It was suggested several years ago that ethylene participates in the regulation of responses to iron and phosphorous deficiency. More recently, its role has been extended to other deficiencies, such as potassium, sulfur, and others. The role of ethylene in so many deficiencies suggests that, to confer specificity to the different responses, it should act through different transduction pathways and/or in conjunction with other signals. In this update, the data supporting a role for ethylene in the regulation of responses to different nutrient deficiencies will be reviewed. In addition, the results suggesting the action of ethylene through different transduction pathways and its interaction with other hormones and signaling substances will be discussed. PMID:26175512

  19. Ablation of CD11c(hi) dendritic cells exacerbates Japanese encephalitis by regulating blood-brain barrier permeability and altering tight junction/adhesion molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Hyoung; Hossain, Ferdaus Mohd Altaf; Patil, Ajit Mahadev; Choi, Jin Young; Kim, Seong Bum; Uyangaa, Erdenebelig; Park, Sang-Youel; Lee, John-Hwa; Kim, Bumseok; Kim, Koanhoi; Eo, Seong Kug

    2016-10-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE), characterized by extensive neuroinflammation following infection with neurotropic JE virus (JEV), is becoming a leading cause of viral encephalitis due to rapid changes in climate and demography. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays an important role in restricting neuroinvasion of peripheral leukocytes and virus, thereby regulating the progression of viral encephalitis. In this study, we explored the role of CD11c(hi) dendritic cells (DCs) in regulating BBB integrity and JE progression using a conditional depletion model of CD11c(hi) DCs. Transient ablation of CD11c(hi) DCs resulted in markedly increased susceptibility to JE progression along with highly increased neuro-invasion of JEV. In addition, exacerbated JE progression in CD11c(hi) DC-ablated hosts was closely associated with increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IFN-β, IL-6, and TNF-α) and CC chemokines (CCL2, CCL3, CXCL2) in the brain. Moreover, our results revealed that the exacerbation of JE progression in CD11c(hi) DC-ablated hosts was correlated with enhanced BBB permeability and reduced expression of tight junction and adhesion molecules (claudin-5, ZO-1, occluding, JAMs). Ultimately, our data conclude that the ablation of CD11c(hi) DCs provided a subsidiary impact on BBB integrity and the expression of tight junction/adhesion molecules, thereby leading to exacerbated JE progression. These findings provide insight into the secondary role of CD11c(hi) DCs in JE progression through regulation of BBB integrity and the expression of tight junction/adhesion molecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. IRF-3, IRF-5, and IRF-7 coordinately regulate the type I IFN response in myeloid dendritic cells downstream of MAVS signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen M Lazear

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the transcription factors IRF-3 and IRF-7 are considered master regulators of type I interferon (IFN induction and IFN stimulated gene (ISG expression, Irf3(-/-×Irf7(-/- double knockout (DKO myeloid dendritic cells (mDC produce relatively normal levels of IFN-β after viral infection. We generated Irf3(-/-×Irf5(-/-×Irf7(-/- triple knockout (TKO mice to test whether IRF-5 was the source of the residual induction of IFN-β and ISGs in mDCs. In pathogenesis studies with two unrelated positive-sense RNA viruses (West Nile virus (WNV and murine norovirus, TKO mice succumbed at rates greater than DKO mice and equal to or approaching those of mice lacking the type I IFN receptor (Ifnar(-/-. In ex vivo studies, after WNV infection or exposure to Toll-like receptor agonists, TKO mDCs failed to produce IFN-β or express ISGs. In contrast, this response was sustained in TKO macrophages following WNV infection. To define IRF-regulated gene signatures, we performed microarray analysis on WNV-infected mDC from wild type (WT, DKO, TKO, or Ifnar(-/- mice, as well as from mice lacking the RIG-I like receptor adaptor protein MAVS. Whereas the gene induction pattern in DKO mDC was similar to WT cells, remarkably, almost no ISG induction was detected in TKO or Mavs(-/- mDC. The relative equivalence of TKO and Mavs(-/- responses suggested that MAVS dominantly regulates ISG induction in mDC. Moreover, we showed that MAVS-dependent induction of ISGs can occur through an IRF-5-dependent yet IRF-3 and IRF-7-independent pathway. Our results establish IRF-3, -5, and -7 as the key transcription factors responsible for mediating the type I IFN and ISG response in mDC during WNV infection and suggest a novel signaling link between MAVS and IRF-5.

  1. A functional screen implicates microRNA-138-dependent regulation of the depalmitoylation enzyme APT1 in dendritic spine morphogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siegel, Gabriele; Obernosterer, Gregor; Fiore, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    of acyl protein thioesterase 1 (APT1), an enzyme regulating the palmitoylation status of proteins that are known to function at the synapse, including the alpha(13) subunits of G proteins (Galpha(13)). RNA-interference-mediated knockdown of APT1 and the expression of membrane-localized Galpha(13) both...... suppress spine enlargement caused by inhibition of miR-138, suggesting that APT1-regulated depalmitoylation of Galpha(13) might be an important downstream event of miR-138 function. Our results uncover a previously unknown miRNA-dependent mechanism in neurons and demonstrate a previously unrecognized...

  2. Chronic intermittent ethanol exposure and withdrawal leads to adaptations in nucleus accumbens core postsynaptic density proteome and dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uys, Joachim D; McGuier, Natalie S; Gass, Justin T; Griffin, William C; Ball, Lauren E; Mulholland, Patrick J

    2016-05-01

    Alcohol use disorder is a chronic relapsing brain disease characterized by the loss of ability to control alcohol (ethanol) intake despite knowledge of detrimental health or personal consequences. Clinical and pre-clinical models provide strong evidence for chronic ethanol-associated alterations in glutamatergic signaling and impaired synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). However, the neural mechanisms that contribute to aberrant glutamatergic signaling in ethanol-dependent individuals in this critical brain structure remain unknown. Using an unbiased proteomic approach, we investigated the effects of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure on neuroadaptations in postsynaptic density (PSD)-enriched proteins in the NAc of ethanol-dependent mice. Compared with controls, CIE exposure significantly changed expression levels of 50 proteins in the PSD-enriched fraction. Systems biology and functional annotation analyses demonstrated that the dysregulated proteins are expressed at tetrapartite synapses and critically regulate cellular morphology. To confirm this latter finding, the density and morphology of dendritic spines were examined in the NAc core of ethanol-dependent mice. We found that CIE exposure and withdrawal differentially altered dendrite diameter and dendritic spine density and morphology. Through the use of quantitative proteomics and functional annotation, these series of experiments demonstrate that ethanol dependence produces neuroadaptations in proteins that modify dendritic spine morphology. In addition, these studies identified novel PSD-related proteins that contribute to the neurobiological mechanisms of ethanol dependence that drive maladaptive structural plasticity of NAc neurons. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  3. HIV-1-infected monocyte-derived dendritic cells do not undergo maturation but can elicit IL-10 production and T cell regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granelli-Piperno, Angela; Golebiowska, Angelika; Trumpfheller, Christine; Siegal, Frederick P.; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2004-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) undergo maturation during virus infection and thereby become potent stimulators of cell-mediated immunity. HIV-1 replicates in immature DCs, but we now find that infection is not accompanied by many components of maturation in either infected cells or uninfected bystanders. The infected cultures do not develop potent stimulating activity for the mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR), and the DCs producing HIV-1 gag p24 do not express CD83 and DC-lysosome-associated membrane protein maturation markers. If different maturation stimuli are applied to DCs infected with HIV-1, the infected cells selectively fail to mature. When DCs from HIV-1-infected patients are infected and cultured with autologous T cells, IL-10 was produced in 6 of 10 patients. These DC-T cell cocultures could suppress another immune response, the MLR. The regulation was partially IL-10-dependent and correlated in extent with the level of IL-10 produced. Suppressor cells only developed from infected patients, rather than healthy controls, and the DCs had to be exposed to live virus rather than HIV-1 gag peptides or protein. These results indicate that HIV-1-infected DCs have two previously unrecognized means to evade immune responses: maturation can be blocked reducing the efficacy of antigen presentation from infected cells, and T cell-dependent suppression can be induced.

  4. Addition of interferon-alpha to a standard maturation cocktail induces CD38 up-regulation and increases dendritic cell function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trepiakas, Redas; Pedersen, Anders Elm; Met, Ozcan

    2009-01-01

    Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) are used as adjuvant cells in cancer immunotherapy and have shown promising results. In order to obtain full functional capacity, these DCs need to be maturated, and the current "gold standard" for this process is maturation with TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6...... a functional relationship between CD38, IFN-alpha and TLR3. Thus, CD38 appear to be a relevant marker for activation by TLR3 or IFN-alpha. Addition of IFN-alpha to the sDC cocktail results in up-regulation of both CD38 and CD83 and improved capacity for induction of autologous T-cell responses despite few...... other changes in DC phenotype and cytokine secretion. Our observations suggest that IFN-alpha could be included in maturation protocols for clinical grade DCs used for immunotherapy against cancer and should be included if DCs are used for CD8+ T-cell stimulation in vitro....

  5. CC chemokine receptor 4 is required for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by regulating GM-CSF and IL-23 production in dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppensieker, Karola; Otte, David-Marian; Schürmann, Britta; Limmer, Andreas; Dresing, Philipp; Drews, Eva; Schumak, Beatrix; Klotz, Luisa; Raasch, Jennifer; Mildner, Alexander; Waisman, Ari; Scheu, Stefanie; Knolle, Percy; Förster, Irmgard; Prinz, Marco; Maier, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Alferink, Judith

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are pivotal for the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, the mechanisms by which they control disease remain to be determined. This study demonstrates that expression of CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4) by DCs is required for EAE induction. CCR4−/− mice presented enhanced resistance to EAE associated with a reduction in IL-23 and GM-CSF expression in the CNS. Restoring CCR4 on myeloid cells in bone marrow chimeras or intracerebral microinjection of CCR4-competent DCs, but not macrophages, restored EAE in CCR4−/− mice, indicating that CCR4+ DCs are cellular mediators of EAE development. Mechanistically, CCR4−/− DCs were less efficient in GM-CSF and IL-23 production and also TH-17 maintenance. Intraspinal IL-23 reconstitution restored EAE in CCR4−/− mice, whereas intracerebral inoculation using IL-23−/− DCs or GM-CSF−/− DCs failed to induce disease. Thus, CCR4-dependent GM-CSF production in DCs required for IL-23 release in these cells is a major component in the development of EAE. Our study identified a unique role for CCR4 in regulating DC function in EAE, harboring therapeutic potential for the treatment of CNS autoimmunity by targeting CCR4 on this specific cell type. PMID:22355103

  6. Mechanical coupling between transsynaptic N-cadherin adhesions and actin flow stabilizes dendritic spines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazeau, Anaël; Garcia, Mikael; Czöndör, Katalin; Perrais, David; Tessier, Béatrice; Giannone, Grégory; Thoumine, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The morphology of neuronal dendritic spines is a critical indicator of synaptic function. It is regulated by several factors, including the intracellular actin/myosin cytoskeleton and transcellular N-cadherin adhesions. To examine the mechanical relationship between these molecular components, we performed quantitative live-imaging experiments in primary hippocampal neurons. We found that actin turnover and structural motility were lower in dendritic spines than in immature filopodia and increased upon expression of a nonadhesive N-cadherin mutant, resulting in an inverse relationship between spine motility and actin enrichment. Furthermore, the pharmacological stimulation of myosin II induced the rearward motion of actin structures in spines, showing that myosin II exerts tension on the actin network. Strikingly, the formation of stable, spine-like structures enriched in actin was induced at contacts between dendritic filopodia and N-cadherin–coated beads or micropatterns. Finally, computer simulations of actin dynamics mimicked various experimental conditions, pointing to the actin flow rate as an important parameter controlling actin enrichment in dendritic spines. Together these data demonstrate that a clutch-like mechanism between N-cadherin adhesions and the actin flow underlies the stabilization of dendritic filopodia into mature spines, a mechanism that may have important implications in synapse initiation, maturation, and plasticity in the developing brain. PMID:25568337

  7. Regulation of PGE2 signaling pathways and TNF-alpha signaling pathways on the function of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and the effects of CP-25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Sheng, Kangliang; Chen, Jingyu; Wu, Yujing; Zhang, Feng; Chang, Yan; Wu, Huaxun; Fu, Jingjing; Zhang, Lingling; Wei, Wei

    2015-12-15

    This study was to investigate PGE2 and TNF-alpha signaling pathway involving in the maturation and activation of bone marrow dendritic cells (DCs) and the effect of CP-25. Bone marrow DCs were isolated and stimulated by PGE2 and TNF-alpha respectively. The markers of maturation and activation expressed on DCs, such as CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, MHC-II, and the ability of antigen uptake of DCs were analyzed by flow cytometry. The proliferation of T cells co-cultured with DCs, the signaling pathways of PGE2-EP4-cAMP and TNF-alpha-TRADD-TRAF2-NF-κB in DCs were analyzed. The results showed that both PGE2 and TNF-alpha up-regulated the expressions of CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, and MHC-II, decreased the antigen uptake of DCs, and DCs stimulated by PGE2 or TNF-alpha could increase T cell proliferation. CP-25 (10(-5), 10(-6), and 10(-7)mol/l) decreased significantly the expressions of CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86 and MHC-II, increased the antigen uptake of DCs, and suppressed T cell proliferation induced by DCs. PGE2 increased the expressions of EP4, NF-κB and down-regulated cAMP level of DCs. TNF-alpha could also up-regulate TNFR1, TRADD, TRAF2, and NF-κB expression of DCs. CP-25 (10(-5), 10(-6), and 10(-7)mol/l) decreased the expressions of EP4 and NF-κB, increased cAMP level in DCs stimulated by PGE2. CP-25 (10(-5), 10(-6), and 10(-7)mol/l) also could down-regulate significantly TNFR1, TRADD, TRAF2, and NF-κB expression in DCs stimulated by TNF-alpha. These results demonstrate that PGE2 and TNF-alpha could enhance DCs functions by mediating PGE2-EP4-cAMP pathway, TNF-alpha-TNFR1-TRADD-TRAF2-NF-κB pathway respectively. CP-25 might inhibit the function of DCs through regulating PGE2-EP4-cAMP and TNF-alpha-TNFR1-TRADD-TRAF2-NF-κB pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Palmitoylation-dependent CDKL5–PSD-95 interaction regulates synaptic targeting of CDKL5 and dendritic spine development

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yong-Chuan; Li, Dan; Wang, Lu; Lu, Bin; Zheng, Jing; Zhao, Shi-Lin; Zeng, Rong; Xiong, Zhi-Qi

    2013-01-01

    The X-linked gene cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) is mutated in severe neurodevelopmental disorders, including some forms of atypical Rett syndrome, but the function and regulation of CDKL5 protein in neurons remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that CDKL5 binds to the scaffolding protein postsynaptic density (PSD)-95, and that this binding promotes the targeting of CDKL5 to excitatory synapses. Interestingly, this binding is not constitutive, but governed by palmitate cycling on PSD...

  9. CD11c(hi) Dendritic Cells Regulate Ly-6C(hi) Monocyte Differentiation to Preserve Immune-privileged CNS in Lethal Neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Hyoung; Choi, Jin Young; Kim, Seong Bum; Uyangaa, Erdenebelig; Patil, Ajit Mahadev; Han, Young Woo; Park, Sang-Youel; Lee, John Hwa; Kim, Koanhoi; Eo, Seong Kug

    2015-12-02

    Although the roles of dendritic cells (DCs) in adaptive defense have been defined well, the contribution of DCs to T cell-independent innate defense and subsequent neuroimmunopathology in immune-privileged CNS upon infection with neurotropic viruses has not been completely defined. Notably, DC roles in regulating innate CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocyte functions during neuroinflammation have not yet been addressed. Using selective ablation of CD11c(hi)PDCA-1(int/lo) DCs without alteration in CD11c(int)PDCA-1(hi) plasmacytoid DC number, we found that CD11c(hi) DCs are essential to control neuroinflammation caused by infection with neurotropic Japanese encephalitis virus, through early and increased infiltration of CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes and higher expression of CC chemokines. More interestingly, selective CD11c(hi) DC ablation provided altered differentiation and function of infiltrated CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes in the CNS through Flt3-L and GM-CSF, which was closely associated with severely enhanced neuroinflammation. Furthermore, CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes generated in CD11c(hi) DC-ablated environment had a deleterious rather than protective role during neuroinflammation, and were more quickly recruited into inflamed CNS, depending on CCR2, thereby exacerbating neuroinflammation via enhanced supply of virus from the periphery. Therefore, our data demonstrate that CD11c(hi) DCs provide a critical and unexpected role to preserve the immune-privileged CNS in lethal neuroinflammation via regulating the differentiation, function, and trafficking of CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes.

  10. Dendritic Spines in Depression: What We Learned from Animal Models

    OpenAIRE

    Qiao, Hui; Li, Ming-Xing; Xu, Chang; Chen, Hui-Bin; An, Shu-Cheng; Ma, Xin-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Depression, a severe psychiatric disorder, has been studied for decades, but the underlying mechanisms still remain largely unknown. Depression is closely associated with alterations in dendritic spine morphology and spine density. Therefore, understanding dendritic spines is vital for uncovering the mechanisms underlying depression. Several chronic stress models, including chronic restraint stress (CRS), chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), and chronic social defeat stress (CSDS), have ...

  11. Human neural progenitors express functional lysophospholipid receptors that regulate cell growth and morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callihan Phillip

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lysophospholipids regulate the morphology and growth of neurons, neural cell lines, and neural progenitors. A stable human neural progenitor cell line is not currently available in which to study the role of lysophospholipids in human neural development. We recently established a stable, adherent human embryonic stem cell-derived neuroepithelial (hES-NEP cell line which recapitulates morphological and phenotypic features of neural progenitor cells isolated from fetal tissue. The goal of this study was to determine if hES-NEP cells express functional lysophospholipid receptors, and if activation of these receptors mediates cellular responses critical for neural development. Results Our results demonstrate that Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA and Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P receptors are functionally expressed in hES-NEP cells and are coupled to multiple cellular signaling pathways. We have shown that transcript levels for S1P1 receptor increased significantly in the transition from embryonic stem cell to hES-NEP. hES-NEP cells express LPA and S1P receptors coupled to Gi/o G-proteins that inhibit adenylyl cyclase and to Gq-like phospholipase C activity. LPA and S1P also induce p44/42 ERK MAP kinase phosphorylation in these cells and stimulate cell proliferation via Gi/o coupled receptors in an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR- and ERK-dependent pathway. In contrast, LPA and S1P stimulate transient cell rounding and aggregation that is independent of EGFR and ERK, but dependent on the Rho effector p160 ROCK. Conclusion Thus, lysophospholipids regulate neural progenitor growth and morphology through distinct mechanisms. These findings establish human ES cell-derived NEP cells as a model system for studying the role of lysophospholipids in neural progenitors.

  12. Neuron Morphology Influences Axon Initial Segment Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulledge, Allan T; Bravo, Jaime J

    2016-01-01

    In most vertebrate neurons, action potentials are initiated in the axon initial segment (AIS), a specialized region of the axon containing a high density of voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels. It has recently been proposed that neurons use plasticity of AIS length and/or location to regulate their intrinsic excitability. Here we quantify the impact of neuron morphology on AIS plasticity using computational models of simplified and realistic somatodendritic morphologies. In small neurons (e.g., dentate granule neurons), excitability was highest when the AIS was of intermediate length and located adjacent to the soma. Conversely, neurons having larger dendritic trees (e.g., pyramidal neurons) were most excitable when the AIS was longer and/or located away from the soma. For any given somatodendritic morphology, increasing dendritic membrane capacitance and/or conductance favored a longer and more distally located AIS. Overall, changes to AIS length, with corresponding changes in total sodium conductance, were far more effective in regulating neuron excitability than were changes in AIS location, while dendritic capacitance had a larger impact on AIS performance than did dendritic conductance. The somatodendritic influence on AIS performance reflects modest soma-to-AIS voltage attenuation combined with neuron size-dependent changes in AIS input resistance, effective membrane time constant, and isolation from somatodendritic capacitance. We conclude that the impact of AIS plasticity on neuron excitability will depend largely on somatodendritic morphology, and that, in some neurons, a shorter or more distally located AIS may promote, rather than limit, action potential generation.

  13. A critical evaluation of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc/Arg3.1 ’s putative role in regulating dendritic plasticity, cognitive processes, and mood in animal models of depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan eLi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder (MDD is primarily conceptualized as a mood disorder but cognitive dysfunction is also prevalent, and may limit the daily function of MDD patients. Current theories on MDD highlight disturbances in dendritic plasticity in its pathophysiology, which could conceivably play a role in the production of both MDD-related mood and cognitive symptoms. This paper attempts to review the accumulated knowledge on the basic biology of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc or Arg3.1, its effects on neural plasticity, and how these may be related to mood or cognitive dysfunction in animal models of MDD. On a cellular level, Arc is found to play an important role in modulating dendritic spine density and remodeling. Arc is also found to have a close, bidirectional relationship with postsynaptic glutamate neurotransmission, since it is stimulated by multiple glutamatergic receptor mechanisms but also modulates α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA receptor internalization. The effects on AMPA receptor trafficking are likely related to Arc’s ability to modulate phenomena such as long-term potentiation, long-term depression, and synaptic scaling, each of which are important for maintaining proper cognitive function. Animal studies of chronic stress models of MDD show suppressed Arc expression in the frontal cortex but elevation in the amygdala. Interestingly, cognitive tasks depending on the frontal cortex are generally impaired by chronic stress, while those depending on the amygdala are enhanced, and antidepressant treatments stimulate cortical Arc expression with a timeline that is reminiscent of the treatment efficacy lag observed in the clinic or in preclinical models. However, pharmacological treatments that stimulate regional Arc expression do not universally improve relevant cognitive functions, and this highlights a need to further refine our understanding of Arc on a subcellular and

  14. Dendritic cells and anergic type I NKT cells play a crucial role in sulfatide-mediated immune regulation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricic, Igor; Halder, Ramesh; Bischof, Felix; Kumar, Vipin

    2014-08-01

    CD1d-restricted NKT cells can be divided into two groups: type I NKT cells use a semi-invariant TCR, whereas type II express a relatively diverse set of TCRs. A major subset of type II NKT cells recognizes myelin-derived sulfatides and is selectively enriched in the CNS tissue during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We have shown that activation of sulfatide-reactive type II NKT cells by sulfatide prevents induction of EAE. In this article, we have addressed the mechanism of regulation, as well as whether a single immunodominant form of synthetic sulfatide can treat ongoing chronic and relapsing EAE in SJL/J mice. We have shown that the activation of sulfatide-reactive type II NKT cells leads to a significant reduction in the frequency and effector function of myelin proteolipid proteins 139-151/I-A(s)-tetramer(+) cells in lymphoid and CNS tissues. In addition, type I NKT cells and dendritic cells (DCs) in the periphery, as well as CNS-resident microglia, are inactivated after sulfatide administration, and mice deficient in type I NKT cells are not protected from disease. Moreover, tolerized DCs from sulfatide-treated animals can adoptively transfer protection into naive mice. Treatment of SJL/J mice with a synthetic cis-tetracosenoyl sulfatide, but not α-galactosylceramide, reverses ongoing chronic and relapsing EAE. Our data highlight a novel immune-regulatory pathway involving NKT subset interactions leading to inactivation of type I NKT cells, DCs, and microglial cells in suppression of autoimmunity. Because CD1 molecules are nonpolymorphic, the sulfatide-mediated immune-regulatory pathway can be targeted for development of non-HLA-dependent therapeutic approaches to T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. Melatonin Inhibits Embryonic Salivary Gland Branching Morphogenesis by Regulating Both Epithelial Cell Adhesion and Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Jiro; Sakai, Manabu; Uchida, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Wataru; Nohara, Kanji; Maruyama, Yusuke; Hattori, Atsuhiko; Sakai, Takayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Many organs, including salivary glands, lung, and kidney, are formed by epithelial branching during embryonic development. Branching morphogenesis occurs via either local outgrowths or the formation of clefts that subdivide epithelia into buds. This process is promoted by various factors, but the mechanism of branching morphogenesis is not fully understood. Here we have defined melatonin as a potential negative regulator or “brake” of branching morphogenesis, shown that the levels of it and its receptors decline when branching morphogenesis begins, and identified the process that it regulates. Melatonin has various physiological functions, including circadian rhythm regulation, free-radical scavenging, and gonadal development. Furthermore, melatonin is present in saliva and may have an important physiological role in the oral cavity. In this study, we found that the melatonin receptor is highly expressed on the acinar epithelium of the embryonic submandibular gland. We also found that exogenous melatonin reduces salivary gland size and inhibits branching morphogenesis. We suggest that this inhibition does not depend on changes in either proliferation or apoptosis, but rather relates to changes in epithelial cell adhesion and morphology. In summary, we have demonstrated a novel function of melatonin in organ formation during embryonic development. PMID:25876057

  16. RAB-10-Dependent Membrane Transport Is Required for Dendrite Arborization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wei; Yadav, Smita; DeVault, Laura; Jan, Yuh Nung; Sherwood, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Formation of elaborately branched dendrites is necessary for the proper input and connectivity of many sensory neurons. Previous studies have revealed that dendritic growth relies heavily on ER-to-Golgi transport, Golgi outposts and endocytic recycling. How new membrane and associated cargo is delivered from the secretory and endosomal compartments to sites of active dendritic growth, however, remains unknown. Using a candidate-based genetic screen in C. elegans, we have identified the small GTPase RAB-10 as a key regulator of membrane trafficking during dendrite morphogenesis. Loss of rab-10 severely reduced proximal dendritic arborization in the multi-dendritic PVD neuron. RAB-10 acts cell-autonomously in the PVD neuron and localizes to the Golgi and early endosomes. Loss of function mutations of the exocyst complex components exoc-8 and sec-8, which regulate tethering, docking and fusion of transport vesicles at the plasma membrane, also caused proximal dendritic arborization defects and led to the accumulation of intracellular RAB-10 vesicles. In rab-10 and exoc-8 mutants, the trans-membrane proteins DMA-1 and HPO-30, which promote PVD dendrite stabilization and branching, no longer localized strongly to the proximal dendritic membranes and instead were sequestered within intracellular vesicles. Together these results suggest a crucial role for the Rab10 GTPase and the exocyst complex in controlling membrane transport from the secretory and/or endosomal compartments that is required for dendritic growth. PMID:26394140

  17. Dendritic cell vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Paul J; Lyerly, H Kim; Clay, Timothy M; Morse, Michael A; Lyerly, H Kim

    2007-05-01

    Dendritic cells are antigen-presenting cells that have been shown to stimulate tumor antigen-specific T cell responses in preclinical studies. Consequently, there has been intense interest in developing dendritic cell based cancer vaccines. A variety of methods for generating dendritic cells, loading them with tumor antigens, and administering them to patients have been described. In recent years, a number of early phase clinical trials have been performed and have demonstrated the safety and feasibility of dendritic cell immunotherapies. A number of these trials have generated valuable preliminary data regarding the clinical and immunologic response to DC-based immunotherapy. The emphasis of dendritic cell immunotherapy research is increasingly shifting toward the development of strategies to increase the potency of dendritic cell vaccine preparations.

  18. Stress-driven lithium dendrite growth mechanism and dendrite mitigation by electroplating on soft substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Zeng, Wei; Hong, Liang; Xu, Wenwen; Yang, Haokai; Wang, Fan; Duan, Huigao; Tang, Ming; Jiang, Hanqing

    2018-03-01

    Problems related to dendrite growth on lithium-metal anodes such as capacity loss and short circuit present major barriers to next-generation high-energy-density batteries. The development of successful lithium dendrite mitigation strategies is impeded by an incomplete understanding of the Li dendrite growth mechanisms, and in particular, Li-plating-induced internal stress in Li metal and its effect on Li growth morphology are not well addressed. Here, we reveal the enabling role of plating residual stress in dendrite formation through depositing Li on soft substrates and a stress-driven dendrite growth model. We show that dendrite growth is mitigated on such soft substrates through surface-wrinkling-induced stress relaxation in the deposited Li film. We demonstrate that this dendrite mitigation mechanism can be utilized synergistically with other existing approaches in the form of three-dimensional soft scaffolds for Li plating, which achieves higher coulombic efficiency and better capacity retention than that for conventional copper substrates.

  19. Familiar Taste Induces Higher Dendritic Levels of Activity-Regulated Cytoskeleton-Associated Protein in the Insular Cortex than a Novel One

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Jean-Pascal; Quiroz, Cesar; Mendoza-Viveros, Lucia; Ramirez-Amaya, Victor; Bermudez-Rattoni, Federico

    2011-01-01

    The immediate early gene (IEG) "Arc" is known to play an important role in synaptic plasticity; its protein is locally translated in the dendrites where it has been involved in several types of plasticity mechanisms. Because of its tight coupling with neuronal activity, "Arc" has been widely used as a tool to tag behaviorally activated networks.…

  20. Synaptic Control of Secretory Trafficking in Dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Hanus

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Localized signaling in neuronal dendrites requires tight spatial control of membrane composition. Upon initial synthesis, nascent secretory cargo in dendrites exits the endoplasmic reticulum (ER from local zones of ER complexity that are spatially coupled to post-ER compartments. Although newly synthesized membrane proteins can be processed locally, the mechanisms that control the spatial range of secretory cargo transport in dendritic segments are unknown. Here, we monitored the dynamics of nascent membrane proteins in dendritic post-ER compartments under regimes of low or increased neuronal activity. In response to activity blockade, post-ER carriers are highly mobile and are transported over long distances. Conversely, increasing synaptic activity dramatically restricts the spatial scale of post-ER trafficking along dendrites. This activity-induced confinement of secretory cargo requires site-specific phosphorylation of the kinesin motor KIF17 by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMK. Thus, the length scales of early secretory trafficking in dendrites are tuned by activity-dependent regulation of microtubule-dependent transport.

  1. Morphological analysis of activity-reduced adult-born neurons in the mouse olfactory bulb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey E Dahlen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Adult born neurons are added to the olfactory bulb (OB throughout life in rodents. While many factors have been identified as regulating the survival and integration of adult-born neurons (ABNs into existing circuitry, the understanding of how these factors affect ABN morphology and connectivity is limited. Here we compare how cell intrinsic (siRNA knock down of voltage gated sodium channels NaV1.1-1.3 and circuit level (naris occlusion reductions in activity affect ABN morphology during integration into the OB. We found that both manipulations reduce the number of dendritic spines (and thus likely the number of reciprocal synaptic connections formed with the surrounding circuitry and inhibited dendritic ramification of ABNs. Further, we identified regions of ABN apical dendrites where the largest and most significant decreases occur following siRNA knock down or naris occlusion. In siRNA knock down cells, reduction of spines is observed in proximal regions of the apical dendrite. This suggests that distal regions of the dendrite may remain active independent of NaV1.1-1.3 channel expression, perhaps facilitated by activation of T-type calcium channels and NMDA receptors. By contrast, circuit level reduction of activity by naris occlusion resulted in a global depression of spine number. Together, these results indicate that ABNs retain the ability to develop their typical overall morphological features regardless of experienced activity, and activity modulates the number and location of formed connections.

  2. New trends in the study of podoplanin as a cell morphological regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Sawa

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Podoplanin is a mucin-type glycoprotein firstly identified in podocytes, which is homologous to the type I alveolar cell specific T1α-2 antigen and to the oncofetal antigen M2A recognized by the D2-40 antibody. Podoplanin possesses a platelet aggregation-stimulating domain causes the platelet aggregation on cancer cells by the binding activity to CLEC-2. Podoplanin also contributes to the formation of membrane-actin structures. The increased podoplanin expression is found in squamous cell carcinomas at the invasive edge. It has been reported that the podoplanin induces an actin cytoskeleton rearrangement dependent on the RhoA GTPase activation to phosphorylate ezrin and facilitates an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT which induces the single cell migration of cancer cells. However, the podoplanin-expressing cancer cells often express E-cadherin and migrate in a collective manner, suggesting that there are podoplanin-induced alternative pathways for the actin cytoskeleton rearrangement independent of the RhoA activation and EMT. The strong expression of podoplanin is present in salivary gland myoepithelial cells, and in enamel epithelia and odontoblasts of the tooth germ for a bell stage. Podoplanin may act as a cell morphological regulator in normal and cancer cells.

  3. DasR is a pleiotropic regulator required for antibiotic production, pigment biosynthesis, and morphological development in Saccharopolyspora erythraea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Cheng-Heng; Xu, Ya; Rigali, Sébastien; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2015-12-01

    The GntR-family transcription regulator, DasR, was previously identified as pleiotropic, controlling the primary amino sugar N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and chitin metabolism in Saccharopolyspora erythraea and Streptomyces coelicolor. Due to the remarkable regulatory impact of DasR on antibiotic production and development in the model strain of S. coelicolor, we here identified and characterized the role of DasR to secondary metabolite production and morphological development in industrial erythromycin-producing S. erythraea. The physiological studies have shown that a constructed deletion of dasR in S. erythraea resulted in antibiotic, pigment, and aerial hyphae production deficit in a nutrient-rich condition. DNA microarray assay, combined with quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR), confirmed these results by showing the downregulation of the genes relating to secondary metabolite production in the dasR null mutant. Notably, electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) showed DasR as being the first identified regulator that directly regulates the pigment biosynthesis rpp gene cluster. In addition, further studies indicated that GlcNAc, the major nutrient signal of DasR-responsed regulation, blocked secondary metabolite production and morphological development. The effects of GlcNAc were shown to be caused by DasR mediation. These findings demonstrated that DasR is an important pleiotropic regulator for both secondary metabolism and morphological development in S. erythraea, providing new insights for the genetic engineering of S. erythraea with increased erythromycin production.

  4. A Novel Forward Genetic Screen for Identifying Mutations Affecting Larval Neuronal Dendrite Development in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Medina, Paul Mark B.; Swick, Lance L.; Andersen, Ryan; Blalock, Zachary; Brenman, Jay E.

    2006-01-01

    Vertebrate and invertebrate dendrites are information-processing compartments that can be found on both central and peripheral neurons. Elucidating the molecular underpinnings of information processing in the nervous system ultimately requires an understanding of the genetic pathways that regulate dendrite formation and maintenance. Despite the importance of dendrite development, few forward genetic approaches have been used to analyze the latest stages of dendrite development, including the ...

  5. Neuron Morphology Influences Axon Initial Segment Plasticity123

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In most vertebrate neurons, action potentials are initiated in the axon initial segment (AIS), a specialized region of the axon containing a high density of voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels. It has recently been proposed that neurons use plasticity of AIS length and/or location to regulate their intrinsic excitability. Here we quantify the impact of neuron morphology on AIS plasticity using computational models of simplified and realistic somatodendritic morphologies. In small neurons (e.g., dentate granule neurons), excitability was highest when the AIS was of intermediate length and located adjacent to the soma. Conversely, neurons having larger dendritic trees (e.g., pyramidal neurons) were most excitable when the AIS was longer and/or located away from the soma. For any given somatodendritic morphology, increasing dendritic membrane capacitance and/or conductance favored a longer and more distally located AIS. Overall, changes to AIS length, with corresponding changes in total sodium conductance, were far more effective in regulating neuron excitability than were changes in AIS location, while dendritic capacitance had a larger impact on AIS performance than did dendritic conductance. The somatodendritic influence on AIS performance reflects modest soma-to-AIS voltage attenuation combined with neuron size-dependent changes in AIS input resistance, effective membrane time constant, and isolation from somatodendritic capacitance. We conclude that the impact of AIS plasticity on neuron excitability will depend largely on somatodendritic morphology, and that, in some neurons, a shorter or more distally located AIS may promote, rather than limit, action potential generation. PMID:27022619

  6. Biphasic synaptic Ca influx arising from compartmentalized electrical signals in dendritic spines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda L Bloodgood

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Excitatory synapses on mammalian principal neurons are typically formed onto dendritic spines, which consist of a bulbous head separated from the parent dendrite by a thin neck. Although activation of voltage-gated channels in the spine and stimulus-evoked constriction of the spine neck can influence synaptic signals, the contribution of electrical filtering by the spine neck to basal synaptic transmission is largely unknown. Here we use spine and dendrite calcium (Ca imaging combined with 2-photon laser photolysis of caged glutamate to assess the impact of electrical filtering imposed by the spine morphology on synaptic Ca transients. We find that in apical spines of CA1 hippocampal neurons, the spine neck creates a barrier to the propagation of current, which causes a voltage drop and results in spatially inhomogeneous activation of voltage-gated Ca channels (VGCCs on a micron length scale. Furthermore, AMPA and NMDA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs and NMDARs, respectively that are colocalized on individual spine heads interact to produce two kinetically and mechanistically distinct phases of synaptically evoked Ca influx. Rapid depolarization of the spine triggers a brief and large Ca current whose amplitude is regulated in a graded manner by the number of open AMPARs and whose duration is terminated by the opening of small conductance Ca-activated potassium (SK channels. A slower phase of Ca influx is independent of AMPAR opening and is determined by the number of open NMDARs and the post-stimulus potential in the spine. Biphasic synaptic Ca influx only occurs when AMPARs and NMDARs are coactive within an individual spine. These results demonstrate that the morphology of dendritic spines endows associated synapses with specialized modes of signaling and permits the graded and independent control of multiple phases of synaptic Ca influx.

  7. Xenopus laevis Retinal Ganglion Cell Dendritic Arbors Develop Independently of Visual Stimulation

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    Barbara Lom

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Newly formed neurons must locate their appropriate target cells and then form synaptic connections with these targets in order to establish a functional nervous system. In the vertebrate retina, retinal ganglion cell (RGC dendrites extend from the cell body and form synapses with nearby amacrine and bipolar cells. RGC axons, however, exit the retina and synapse with the dendrites of midbrain neurons in the optic tectum. We examined how visual stimulation influenced Xenopus RGC dendritic arborization. Neuronal activity is known to be an important factor in shaping dendritic and axonal arborization. Thus, we reared tadpoles in dark and light environments then used rhodamine dextran retrograde labeling to identify RGCs in the retina. When we compared RGC dendritic arbors from tadpoles reared in dark and light environments, we found no morphological differences, suggesting that physiological visual activity did not contribute to the morphological development of Xenopus RGC dendritic arbors.

  8. Activity-dependent trafficking of lysosomes in dendrites and dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Marisa S; Sancho, Laura; Slepak, Natalia; Boassa, Daniela; Deerinck, Thomas J; Ellisman, Mark H; Bloodgood, Brenda L; Patrick, Gentry N

    2017-08-07

    In neurons, lysosomes, which degrade membrane and cytoplasmic components, are thought to primarily reside in somatic and axonal compartments, but there is little understanding of their distribution and function in dendrites. Here, we used conventional and two-photon imaging and electron microscopy to show that lysosomes traffic bidirectionally in dendrites and are present in dendritic spines. We find that lysosome inhibition alters their mobility and also decreases dendritic spine number. Furthermore, perturbing microtubule and actin cytoskeletal dynamics has an inverse relationship on the distribution and motility of lysosomes in dendrites. We also find trafficking of lysosomes is correlated with synaptic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid-type glutamate receptors. Strikingly, lysosomes traffic to dendritic spines in an activity-dependent manner and can be recruited to individual spines in response to local activation. These data indicate the position of lysosomes is regulated by synaptic activity and thus plays an instructive role in the turnover of synaptic membrane proteins. © 2017 Goo et al.

  9. Computer Simulations Support a Morphological Contribution to BDNF Enhancement of Action Potential Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico F Galati

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF regulates both action potential (AP generation and neuron morphology. However, whether BDNF-induced changes in neuron morphology directly impact AP generation is unclear. We quantified BDNF’s effect on cultured cortical neuron morphological parameters and found that BDNF stimulates dendrite growth and addition of dendrites while increasing both excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic inputs in a spatially restricted manner. To gain insight into how these combined changes in neuron structure and synaptic input impact AP generation, we used the morphological parameters we gathered to generate computational models. Simulations suggest that BDNF-induced neuron morphologies generate more APs under a wide variety of conditions. Synapse and dendrite addition have the greatest impact on AP generation. However, subtle alterations in excitatory/inhibitory synapse ratio and strength have a significant impact on AP generation when synaptic activity is low. Consistent with these simulations, BDNF rapidly enhances spontaneous activity in cortical cultures. We propose that BDNF promotes neuron morphologies that are intrinsically more efficient at translating barrages of synaptic activity into APs, which is a previously unexplored aspect of BDNF’s function.

  10. Loss of Dendritic Complexity Precedes Neurodegeneration in a Mouse Model with Disrupted Mitochondrial Distribution in Mature Dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo López-Doménech

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Correct mitochondrial distribution is critical for satisfying local energy demands and calcium buffering requirements and supporting key cellular processes. The mitochondrially targeted proteins Miro1 and Miro2 are important components of the mitochondrial transport machinery, but their specific roles in neuronal development, maintenance, and survival remain poorly understood. Using mouse knockout strategies, we demonstrate that Miro1, as opposed to Miro2, is the primary regulator of mitochondrial transport in both axons and dendrites. Miro1 deletion leads to depletion of mitochondria from distal dendrites but not axons, accompanied by a marked reduction in dendritic complexity. Disrupting postnatal mitochondrial distribution in vivo by deleting Miro1 in mature neurons causes a progressive loss of distal dendrites and compromises neuronal survival. Thus, the local availability of mitochondrial mass is critical for generating and sustaining dendritic arbors, and disruption of mitochondrial distribution in mature neurons is associated with neurodegeneration.

  11. Dendritic excitability modulates dendritic information processing in a purkinje cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coop, Allan D; Cornelis, Hugo; Santamaria, Fidel

    2010-01-01

    Using an electrophysiological compartmental model of a Purkinje cell we quantified the contribution of individual active dendritic currents to processing of synaptic activity from granule cells. We used mutual information as a measure to quantify the information from the total excitatory input current (I(Glu)) encoded in each dendritic current. In this context, each active current was considered an information channel. Our analyses showed that most of the information was encoded by the calcium (I(CaP)) and calcium activated potassium (I(Kc)) currents. Mutual information between I(Glu) and I(CaP) and I(Kc) was sensitive to different levels of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic activity that, at the same time, resulted in the same firing rate at the soma. Since dendritic excitability could be a mechanism to regulate information processing in neurons we quantified the changes in mutual information between I(Glu) and all Purkinje cell currents as a function of the density of dendritic Ca (g(CaP)) and Kca (g(Kc)) conductances. We extended our analysis to determine the window of temporal integration of I(Glu) by I(CaP) and I(Kc) as a function of channel density and synaptic activity. The window of information integration has a stronger dependence on increasing values of g(Kc) than on g(CaP), but at high levels of synaptic stimulation information integration is reduced to a few milliseconds. Overall, our results show that different dendritic conductances differentially encode synaptic activity and that dendritic excitability and the level of synaptic activity regulate the flow of information in dendrites.

  12. ALS/FTLD-linked TDP-43 regulates neurite morphology and cell survival in differentiated neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jeong-Ho; Yu, Tae-Hoon; Ryu, Hyun-Hee; Jun, Mi-Hee; Ban, Byung-Kwan [Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Science and Nanotechnology, Hannam University, Dajeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Deok-Jin [Department of Applied Biology, College of Ecology and Environment, Kyungpook National University, 386, Gajang-dong, Sangju-si, Kyungbuk 742-711 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin-A, E-mail: leeja@hnu.kr [Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Science and Nanotechnology, Hannam University, Dajeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-01

    Tar-DNA binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) has been characterized as a major component of protein aggregates in brains with neurodegenerative diseases such as frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, physiological roles of TDP-43 and early cellular pathogenic effects caused by disease associated mutations in differentiated neurons are still largely unknown. Here, we investigated the physiological roles of TDP-43 and the effects of missense mutations associated with diseases in differentiated cortical neurons. The reduction of TDP-43 by siRNA increased abnormal neurites and decreased cell viability. ALS/FTLD-associated missense mutant proteins (A315T, Q331K, and M337V) were partially mislocalized to the cytosol and neurites when compared to wild-type and showed abnormal neurites similar to those observed in cases of loss of TDP-43. Interestingly, cytosolic expression of wild-type TDP-43 with mutated nuclear localization signals also induced abnormal neurtie morphology and reduction of cell viability. However, there was no significant difference in the effects of cytosolic expression in neuronal morphology and cell toxicity between wild-type and missense mutant proteins. Thus, our results suggest that mislocalization of missense mutant TDP-43 may contribute to loss of TDP-43 function and affect neuronal morphology, probably via dominant negative action before severe neurodegeneration in differentiated cortical neurons. Highlights: • The function of nuclear TDP-43 in neurite morphology in mature neurons. • Partial mislocalization of TDP-43 missense mutants into cytosol from nucleus. • Abnormal neurite morphology caused by missense mutants of TDP-43. • The effect of cytosolic expression of TDP-43 in neurite morphology and in cell survival.

  13. ALS/FTLD-linked TDP-43 regulates neurite morphology and cell survival in differentiated neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jeong-Ho; Yu, Tae-Hoon; Ryu, Hyun-Hee; Jun, Mi-Hee; Ban, Byung-Kwan; Jang, Deok-Jin; Lee, Jin-A

    2013-01-01

    Tar-DNA binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) has been characterized as a major component of protein aggregates in brains with neurodegenerative diseases such as frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, physiological roles of TDP-43 and early cellular pathogenic effects caused by disease associated mutations in differentiated neurons are still largely unknown. Here, we investigated the physiological roles of TDP-43 and the effects of missense mutations associated with diseases in differentiated cortical neurons. The reduction of TDP-43 by siRNA increased abnormal neurites and decreased cell viability. ALS/FTLD-associated missense mutant proteins (A315T, Q331K, and M337V) were partially mislocalized to the cytosol and neurites when compared to wild-type and showed abnormal neurites similar to those observed in cases of loss of TDP-43. Interestingly, cytosolic expression of wild-type TDP-43 with mutated nuclear localization signals also induced abnormal neurtie morphology and reduction of cell viability. However, there was no significant difference in the effects of cytosolic expression in neuronal morphology and cell toxicity between wild-type and missense mutant proteins. Thus, our results suggest that mislocalization of missense mutant TDP-43 may contribute to loss of TDP-43 function and affect neuronal morphology, probably via dominant negative action before severe neurodegeneration in differentiated cortical neurons. Highlights: • The function of nuclear TDP-43 in neurite morphology in mature neurons. • Partial mislocalization of TDP-43 missense mutants into cytosol from nucleus. • Abnormal neurite morphology caused by missense mutants of TDP-43. • The effect of cytosolic expression of TDP-43 in neurite morphology and in cell survival

  14. Dendritic cell neoplasms: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairouz, Sebastien; Hashash, Jana; Kabbara, Wadih; McHayleh, Wassim; Tabbara, Imad A

    2007-10-01

    Dendritic cell neoplasms are rare tumors that are being recognized with increasing frequency. They were previously classified as lymphomas, sarcomas, or histiocytic neoplasms. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies dendritic cell neoplasms into five groups: Langerhans' cell histiocytosis, Langerhans' cell sarcoma, Interdigitating dendritic cell sarcoma/tumor, Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma/tumor, and Dendritic cell sarcoma, not specified otherwise (Jaffe, World Health Organization classification of tumors 2001; 273-289). Recently, Pileri et al. provided a comprehensive immunohistochemical classification of histiocytic and dendritic cell tumors (Pileri et al., Histopathology 2002;59:161-167). In this article, a concise overview regarding the pathological, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of follicular dendritic, interdigitating dendritic, and Langerhans' cell tumors is presented.

  15. Morphological regulation of Aspergillus niger to improve citric acid production by chsC gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaowen; Wu, Hefang; Zhao, Genhai; Li, Zhemin; Wu, Xihua; Liu, Hui; Zheng, Zhiming

    2018-04-02

    The mycelial morphology of Aspergillus niger, a major filamentous fungus used for citric acid production, is important for citric acid synthesis during submerged fermentation. To investigate the involvement of the chitin synthase gene, chsC, in morphogenesis and citric acid production in A. niger, an RNAi system was constructed to silence chsC and the morphological mutants were screened after transformation. The compactness of the mycelial pellets was obviously reduced in the morphological mutants, with lower proportion of dispersed mycelia. These morphological changes have caused a decrease in viscosity and subsequent improvement in oxygen and mass transfer efficiency, which may be conducive for citric acid accumulation. All the transformants exhibited improvements in citric acid production; in particular, chsC-3 showed 42.6% higher production than the original strain in the shake flask. Moreover, the high-yield strain chsC-3 exhibited excellent citric acid production potential in the scale-up process.The citric acid yield and the conversion rate of glucose of chsC-3 were both improved by 3.6%, when compared with that of the original strain in the stirred tank bioreactor.

  16. Characterization of an Lrp/AsnC family regulator SCO3361, controlling actinorhodin production and morphological development in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Li, Jie; Dong, Hong; Chen, Yunfu; Wang, Yansheng; Wu, Hang; Li, Changrun; Weaver, David T; Zhang, Lixin; Zhang, Buchang

    2017-07-01

    Lrp/AsnC family regulators have been found in many bacteria as crucial regulators controlling diverse cellular processes. By genomic alignment, we found that SCO3361, an Lrp/AsnC family protein from Streptomyces coelicolor, shared the highest similarity to the SACE_Lrp from Saccharopolyspora erythraea. Deletion of SCO3361 led to dramatic reduction in actinorhodin (Act) production and delay in aerial mycelium formation and sporulation on solid media. Dissection of the mechanism underlying the function of SCO3361 in Act production revealed that it altered the transcription of the cluster-situated regulator gene actII-ORF4 by directly binding to its promoter. SCO3361 was an auto-regulator and simultaneously activated the transcription of its adjacent divergently transcribed gene SCO3362. SCO3361 affected aerial hyphae formation and sporulation of S. coelicolor by activating the expression of amfC, whiB, and ssgB. Phenylalanine and cysteine were identified as the effector molecules of SCO3361, with phenylalanine reducing the binding affinity, whereas cysteine increasing it. Moreover, interactional regulation between SCO3361 and SACE_Lrp was discovered for binding to each other's target gene promoter in this work. Our findings indicate that SCO3361 functions as a pleiotropic regulator controlling secondary metabolism and morphological development in S. coelicolor.

  17. Neonatal rearing conditions distinctly shape locus coeruleus neuronal activity, dendritic arborization, and sensitivity to corticotrophin-releasing factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinny, Jerome D.; O'Farrell, Eimear; Bingham, Brian C.; Piel, David A.; Valentino, Rita J.; Beck, Sheryl G.

    2010-01-01

    Early life events influence vulnerability to psychiatric illness. This has been modelled in rats and it has been demonstrated that different durations of maternal separation shape adult endocrine and behavioural stress reactivity. One system through which maternal separation may act is the locus coeruleus (LC)–norepinephrine system that regulates emotional arousal. Here we demonstrate that different durations of maternal separation have distinct effects on LC physiology and dendritic morphology. Rat pups were separated from the dam for 15 min/d (HMS-15) or 180 min/d (HMS-180) from post-natal days 2–14. Others were either undisturbed (HMS-0) or were vendor-purchased controls. LC characteristics were compared at age 22–35 d using whole-cell recordings in vitro. Cells were filled with biocytin for morphological analysis. LC neurons of HMS-180 rats were tonically activated compared to HMS-15 and control rats, with firing rates that were 2-fold higher than these groups. Corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) application did not further activate LC neurons of HMS-180 rats but increased LC firing rate in HMS-0 and control rats. LC neurons of HMS-15 rats were resistant to excitation by CRF. Maternal separation also affected LC dendritic morphology. LC dendrites of HMS-15 rats exhibited less branching and decreased total dendritic length, an effect that could decrease the probability of contacting limbic afferents that terminate in the pericoerulear region. This effect may provide a structural basis for an attenuated magnitude of emotional arousal. Together, these results demonstrate long-term consequences of early life events on the LC–norepinephrine system that may shape adult behaviour. PMID:19653930

  18. Brassinosteroids Regulate OFP1, a DLT Interacting Protein, to Modulate Plant Architecture and Grain Morphology in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhua Xiao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Brassinosteroids (BRs regulate important agronomic traits in rice, including plant height, leaf angle, and grain size. However, the underlying mechanisms remain not fully understood. We previously showed that GSK2, the central negative regulator of BR signaling, targets DLT, the GRAS family protein, to regulate BR responses. Here, we identified Ovate Family Protein 1 (OFP1 as a DLT interacting protein. OFP1 was ubiquitously expressed and the protein was localized in both cytoplasm and nucleus. Overexpression of OFP1 led to enlarged leaf angles, reduced plant height, and altered grain shape, largely resembled DLT overexpression plants. Genetic analysis showed that the regulation of plant architecture by OFP1 depends on DLT function. In addition, we found OFP1 was greatly induced by BR treatment, and OsBZR1, the critical transcription factor of BR signaling, was physically associated with the OFP1 promoter. Moreover, we showed that gibberellin synthesis was greatly repressed in OFP1 overexpression plants, suggesting OFP1 participates in the inhibition of plant growth by high BR or elevated BR signaling. Furthermore, we revealed that OFP1 directly interacts with GSK2 kinase, and inhibition of the kinase activity significantly promotes OFP1 protein accumulation in plant. Taken together, we identified OFP1 as an additional regulator of BR responses and revealed how BRs promote OFP1 at both transcription and protein levels to modulate plant architecture and grain morphology in rice.

  19. JNK1 Controls Dendritic Field Size in L2/3 and L5 of the Motor Cortex, Constrains Soma Size and Influences Fine Motor Coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia eKomulainen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Genetic anomalies on the JNK pathway confer susceptibility to autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia and intellectual disability. The mechanism whereby a gain or loss of function in JNK signaling predisposes to these prevalent dendrite disorders, with associated motor dysfunction, remains unclear. Here we find that JNK1 regulates the dendritic field of L2/3 and L5 pyramidal neurons of the mouse motor cortex (M1, the main excitatory pathway controlling voluntary movement. In Jnk1-/- mice, basal dendrite branching of L5 pyramidal neurons is increased in M1, as is cell soma size, whereas in L2/3, dendritic arborization is decreased. We show that JNK1 phosphorylates rat HMW-MAP2 on T1619, T1622 and T1625 (Uniprot P15146 corresponding to mouse T1617, T1620, T1623, to create a binding motif, that is critical for MAP2 interaction with and stabilization of microtubules, and dendrite growth control. Targeted expression in M1 of GFP-HMW-MAP2 that is pseudo-phosphorylated on T1619, T1622 and T1625 increases dendrite complexity in L2/3 indicating that JNK1 phosphorylation of HMW-MAP2 regulates the dendritic field. Consistent with the morphological changes observed in L2/3 and L5, Jnk1-/- mice exhibit deficits in limb placement and motor coordination, while stride length is reduced in older animals. In summary, JNK1 phosphorylates HMW-MAP2 to increase its stabilization of microtubules while at the same time controlling dendritic fields in the main excitatory pathway of M1. Moreover, JNK1 contributes to normal functioning of fine motor coordination. We report for the first time, a quantitative sholl analysis of dendrite architecture, and of motor behavior in Jnk1-/- mice. Our results illustrate the molecular and behavioral consequences of interrupted JNK1 signaling and provide new ground for mechanistic understanding of those prevalent neuropyschiatric disorders where genetic disruption of the JNK pathway is central.

  20. NLRP10 Enhances CD4+ T-Cell-Mediated IFNγ Response via Regulation of Dendritic Cell-Derived IL-12 Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Vacca

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available NLRP10 is a nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor that functions as an intracellular pattern recognition receptor for microbial products. Here, we generated a Nlrp10−/− mouse to delineate the role of NLRP10 in the host immune response and found that Nlrp10−/− dendritic cells (DCs elicited sub-optimal IFNγ production by antigen-specific CD4+ T cells compared to wild-type (WT DCs. In response to T-cell encounter, CD40 ligation or Toll-like receptor 9 stimulation, Nlrp10−/− DCs produced low levels of IL-12, due to a substantial decrease in NF-κB activation. Defective IL-12 production was also evident in vivo and affected IFNγ production by CD4+ T cells. Upon Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb infection, Nlrp10−/− mice displayed diminished T helper 1-cell responses and increased bacterial growth compared to WT mice. These data indicate that NLRP10-mediated IL-12 production by DCs is critical for IFNγ induction in T cells and contributes to promote the host defense against Mtb.

  1. MyD88 Signaling Regulates Steady-State Migration of Intestinal CD103+ Dendritic Cells Independently of TNF-α and the Gut Microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hägerbrand, Karin; Westlund, Jessica; Yrlid, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal homeostasis and induction of systemic tolerance to fed Ags (i.e., oral tolerance) rely on the steady-state migration of smallintestinal lamina propria dendritic cells (DCs) into draining mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). The majority of these migratory DCs express the α integrin chain CD103......, and in this study we demonstrate that the steady-state mobilization of CD103+ DCs into the MLN is in part governed by the IL-1R family/TLR signaling adaptor molecule MyD88. Similar to mice with complete MyD88 deficiency, specific deletion of MyD88 in DCs resulted in a 50–60% reduction in short-term accumulation......, the proportion and phenotypic composition of DCs were similar in mesentericlymph from germ-free and conventionally housed mice. Although TNF-α was required for CD103+ DC migration to the MLN after oral administration of the TLR7 agonist R848, it was not required for the steady-state migration of these cells...

  2. The ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 regulates phosphoantigen release and Vγ9Vδ2 T cell activation by dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castella, Barbara; Kopecka, Joanna; Sciancalepore, Patrizia; Mandili, Giorgia; Foglietta, Myriam; Mitro, Nico; Caruso, Donatella; Novelli, Francesco; Riganti, Chiara; Massaia, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are activated by phosphoantigens, such as isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP), which is generated in the mevalonate pathway of antigen-presenting cells. IPP is released in the extracellular microenvironment via unknown mechanisms. Here we show that the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) mediates extracellular IPP release from dendritic cells (DC) in cooperation with apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and butyrophilin-3A1. IPP concentrations in the supernatants are sufficient to induce Vγ9Vδ2 T cell proliferation after DC mevalonate pathway inhibition with zoledronic acid (ZA). ZA treatment increases ABCA1 and apoA-I expression via IPP-dependent LXRα nuclear translocation and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway inhibition. These results close the mechanistic gap in our understanding of extracellular IPP release from DC and provide a framework to fine-tune Vγ9Vδ2 T cell activation via mevalonate and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway modulation. PMID:28580927

  3. Allogeneic Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Ameliorate Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis by Regulating Self-Reactive T Cell Responses and Dendritic Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Anderson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs have emerged as a promising therapy for autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS. Administration of MSCs to MS patients has proven safe with signs of immunomodulation but their therapeutic efficacy remains low. The aim of the current study has been to further characterize the immunomodulatory mechanisms of adipose tissue-derived MSCs (ASCs in vitro and in vivo using the EAE model of chronic brain inflammation in mice. We found that murine ASCs (mASCs suppress T cell proliferation in vitro via inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and cyclooxygenase- (COX- 1/2 activities. mASCs also prevented the lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced maturation of dendritic cells (DCs in vitro. The addition of the COX-1/2 inhibitor indomethacin, but not the iNOS inhibitor L-NAME, reversed the block in DC maturation implicating prostaglandin (PG E2 in this process. In vivo, early administration of murine and human ASCs (hASCs ameliorated myelin oligodendrocyte protein- (MOG35-55- induced EAE in C57Bl/6 mice. Mechanistic studies showed that mASCs suppressed the function of autoantigen-specific T cells and also decreased the frequency of activated (CD11c+CD40high and CD11c+TNF-α+ DCs in draining lymph nodes (DLNs. In summary, these data suggest that mASCs reduce EAE severity, in part, through the impairment of DC and T cell function.

  4. Modification of dendritic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feria-Velasco, Alfredo; del Angel, Alma Rosa; Gonzalez-Burgos, Ignacio

    2002-01-01

    Since 1890 Ramón y Cajal strongly defended the theory that dendrites and their processes and spines had a function of not just nutrient transport to the cell body, but they had an important conductive role in neural impulse transmission. He extensively discussed and supported this theory in the Volume 1 of his extraordinary book Textura del Sistema Nervioso del Hombre y de los Vertebrados. Also, Don Santiago significantly contributed to a detailed description of the various neural components of the hippocampus and cerebral cortex during development. Extensive investigation has been done in the last Century related to the functional role of these complex brain regions, and their association with learning, memory and some limbic functions. Likewise, the organization and expression of neuropsychological qualities such as memory, exploratory behavior and spatial orientation, among others, depend on the integrity and adequate functional activity of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. It is known that brain serotonin synthesis and release depend directly and proportionally on the availability of its precursor, tryptophan (TRY). By using a chronic TRY restriction model in rats, we studied their place learning ability in correlation with the dendritic spine density of pyramidal neurons in field CA1 of the hippocampus during postnatal development. We have also reported alterations in the maturation pattern of the ability for spontaneous alternation and task performance evaluating short-term memory, as well as adverse effects on the density of dendritic spines of hippocampal CA1 field pyramidal neurons and on the dendritic arborization and the number of dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons from the third layer of the prefrontal cortex using the same model of TRY restriction. The findings obtained in these studies employing a modified Golgi method, can be interpreted as a trans-synaptic plastic response due to understimulation of serotoninergic receptors located in the

  5. Dendrite and spine modifications in autism and related neurodevelopmental disorders in patients and animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica

    2017-04-01

    Dendrites and spines are the main neuronal structures receiving input from other neurons and glial cells. Dendritic and spine number, size, and morphology are some of the crucial factors determining how signals coming from individual synapses are integrated. Much remains to be understood about the characteristics of neuronal dendrites and dendritic spines in autism and related disorders. Although there have been many studies conducted using autism mouse models, few have been carried out using postmortem human tissue from patients. Available animal models of autism include those generated through genetic modifications and those non-genetic models of the disease. Here, we review how dendrite and spine morphology and number is affected in autism and related neurodevelopmental diseases, both in human, and genetic and non-genetic animal models of autism. Overall, data obtained from human and animal models point to a generalized reduction in the size and number, as well as an alteration of the morphology of dendrites; and an increase in spine densities with immature morphology, indicating a general spine immaturity state in autism. Additional human studies on dendrite and spine number and morphology in postmortem tissue are needed to understand the properties of these structures in the cerebral cortex of patients with autism. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 77: 419-437, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. REMOD: a computational tool for remodeling neuronal dendrites

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    Panagiotis Bozelos

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, several modeling studies have indicated that dendritic morphology is a key determinant of how individual neurons acquire a unique signal processing profile. The highly branched dendritic structure that originates from the cell body, explores the surrounding 3D space in a fractal-like manner, until it reaches a certain amount of complexity. Its shape undergoes significant alterations not only in various neuropathological conditions, but in physiological, too. Yet, despite the profound effect that these alterations can have on neuronal function, the causal relationship between structure and function remains largely elusive. The lack of a systematic approach for remodeling neuronal cells and their dendritic trees is a key limitation that contributes to this problem. In this context, we developed a computational tool that allows the remodeling of any type of neurons, given a set of exemplar morphologies. The tool is written in Python and provides a simple GUI that guides the user through various options to manipulate selected neuronal morphologies. It provides the ability to load one or more morphology files (.swc or .hoc and choose specific dendrites to operate one of the following actions: shrink, remove, extend or branch (as shown in Figure 1. The user retains complete control over the extent of each alteration and if a chosen action is not possible due to pre-existing structural constraints, appropriate warnings are produced. Importantly, the tool can also be used to extract morphology statistics for one or multiple morphologies, including features such as the total dendritic length, path length to the root, branch order, diameter tapering, etc. Finally, an experimental utility enables the user to remodel entire dendritic trees based on preloaded statistics from a database of cell-type specific neuronal morphologies. To our knowledge, this is the first tool that allows (a the remodeling of existing –as opposed to the de novo

  7. A Genome-Wide Screen for Dendritically Localized RNAs Identifies Genes Required for Dendrite Morphogenesis

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    Mala Misra

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Localizing messenger RNAs at specific subcellular sites is a conserved mechanism for targeting the synthesis of cytoplasmic proteins to distinct subcellular domains, thereby generating the asymmetric protein distributions necessary for cellular and developmental polarity. However, the full range of transcripts that are asymmetrically distributed in specialized cell types, and the significance of their localization, especially in the nervous system, are not known. We used the EP-MS2 method, which combines EP transposon insertion with the MS2/MCP in vivo fluorescent labeling system, to screen for novel localized transcripts in polarized cells, focusing on the highly branched Drosophila class IV dendritic arborization neurons. Of a total of 541 lines screened, we identified 55 EP-MS2 insertions producing transcripts that were enriched in neuronal processes, particularly in dendrites. The 47 genes identified by these insertions encode molecularly diverse proteins, and are enriched for genes that function in neuronal development and physiology. RNAi-mediated knockdown confirmed roles for many of the candidate genes in dendrite morphogenesis. We propose that the transport of mRNAs encoded by these genes into the dendrites allows their expression to be regulated on a local scale during the dynamic developmental processes of dendrite outgrowth, branching, and/or remodeling.

  8. Phytohormonal regulation of biomass allocation and morphological and physiological traits of leaves in response to environmental changes in Polygonum cuspidatum

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    Daisuke Sugiura

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Plants plastically change their morphological and physiological traits in response to environmental changes, which are accompanied by changes in endogenous levels of phytohormones. Although roles of phytohormones in various aspects of plant growth and development were elucidated, their importance in the regulation of biomass allocation was not fully investigated. This study aimed to determine causal relationships among changes in biomass allocation, morphological and physiological traits, and endogenous levels of phytohormones such as gibberellins (GAs and cytokinins (CKs in response to environmental changes in Polygonum cuspidatum. Seedlings of P. cuspidatum were grown under two light intensities, each at three nitrogen availabilities. The seedlings grown in high light intensity and high nitrogen availability (HH were subjected to three additional treatments: defoliating half of the leaves (Def, transferral to low nitrogen availability (LowN or low light intensity (LowL. Biomass allocation at the whole-plant level, morphological and physiological traits of each leaf, and endogenous levels of phytohormones in each leaf and shoot apex were measured. Age-dependent changes in leaf traits were also investigated. After the treatments, endogenous levels of GAs in the shoot apex and leaves significantly increased in Def, decreased in LowN, and did not change in LowL compared with HH seedlings. Among all of the seedlings, the levels of GAs in the shoot apex and leaves were strongly correlated with biomass allocation ratio between leaves and roots. The levels of GAs in the youngest leaves were highest, while the levels of CKs were almost consistent in each leaf. The levels of CKs were positively correlated with leaf nitrogen content in each leaf, whereas the levels of GAs were negatively correlated with the total non-structural carbohydrate content in each leaf. These results support our hypothesis that GAs and CKs are key regulatory factors that control

  9. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

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    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1997-01-01

    Specific aims include: (1) Application of the bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC); (2) Based on clues from spaceflight: compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients; and (3) Initiate studies on the efficiency of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in animal models of experimental fungal infections.

  10. Dendritic cells in Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma.

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    Bobryshev, Yuri V; Tran, Dinh; Killingsworth, Murray C; Buckland, Michael; Lord, Reginald V N

    2009-01-01

    Like other premalignant conditions that develop in the presence of chronic inflammation, the development and progression of Barrett's esophagus is associated with the development of an immune response, but how this immune response is regulated is poorly understood. A comprehensive literature search failed to find any report of the presence of dendritic cells in Barrett's intestinal metaplasia and esophageal adenocarcinoma and this prompted our study. We used immunohistochemical staining and electron microscopy to examine whether dendritic cells are present in Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical staining with CD83, a specific marker for dendritic cells, was performed on paraffin-embedded sections of Barrett's intestinal metaplasia (IM, n = 12), dysplasia (n = 11) and adenocarcinoma (n = 14). CD83+ cells were identified in the lamina propria surrounding intestinal type glands in Barrett's IM, dysplasia, and cancer tissues. Computerized quantitative analysis showed that the numbers of dendritic cells were significantly higher in cancer tissues. Double immunostaining with CD83, CD20, and CD3, and electron microscopy demonstrated that dendritic cells are present in Barrett's esophagus and form clusters with T cells and B cells directly within the lamina propria. These findings demonstrate that dendritic cells are present in Barrett's tissues, with a significant increase in density in adenocarcinoma compared to benign Barrett's esophagus. Dendritic cells may have a role in the pathogenesis and immunotherapy treatment of Barrett's esophagus and adenocarcinoma.

  11. Sleeping dendrites: fiber-optic measurements of dendritic calcium activity in freely moving and sleeping animals

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    Julie Seibt

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dendrites are the post-synaptic sites of most excitatory and inhibitory synapses in the brain, making them the main location of cortical information processing and synaptic plasticity. Although current hypotheses suggest a central role for sleep in proper cognitive function and brain plasticity, virtually nothing is known about changes in dendritic activity across the sleep-wake cycle and how waking experience modifies this activity. To start addressing these questions, we developed a method that allows long-term recordings of EEGs/EMG combined with in vivo cortical calcium (Ca2+ activity in freely moving and sleeping rats. We measured Ca2+ activity from populations of dendrites of layer (L 5 pyramidal neurons (n = 13 rats that we compared with Ca2+ activity from populations of neurons in L2/3 (n = 11 rats. L5 and L2/3 neurons were labelled using bolus injection of OGB1-AM or GCaMP6 (1. Ca2+ signals were detected using a fiber-optic system (cannula diameter = 400µm, transmitting the changes in fluorescence to a photodiode. Ca2+ fluctuations could then be correlated with ongoing changes in brain oscillatory activity during 5 major brain states: active wake [AW], quiet wake [QW], NREM, REM and NREM-REM transition (or intermediate state, [IS]. Our Ca2+ recordings show large transients in L5 dendrites and L2/3 neurons that oscillate predominantly at frequencies In summary, we show that this technique is successful in monitoring fluctuations in ongoing dendritic Ca2+ activity during natural brain states and allows, in principle, to combine behavioral measurement with imaging from various brain regions (e.g. deep structures in freely behaving animals. Using this method, we show that Ca2+ transients from populations of L2/3 neurons and L5 dendrites are deferentially regulated across the sleep/wake cycle, with dendritic activity being the highest during the IS sleep. Our correlation analysis suggests that specific sleep EEG activity during NREM and IS

  12. The unfolded protein response is required for dendrite morphogenesis

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    Wei, Xing; Howell, Audrey S; Dong, Xintong; Taylor, Caitlin A; Cooper, Roshni C; Zhang, Jianqi; Zou, Wei; Sherwood, David R; Shen, Kang

    2015-01-01

    Precise patterning of dendritic fields is essential for the formation and function of neuronal circuits. During development, dendrites acquire their morphology by exuberant branching. How neurons cope with the increased load of protein production required for this rapid growth is poorly understood. Here we show that the physiological unfolded protein response (UPR) is induced in the highly branched Caenorhabditis elegans sensory neuron PVD during dendrite morphogenesis. Perturbation of the IRE1 arm of the UPR pathway causes loss of dendritic branches, a phenotype that can be rescued by overexpression of the ER chaperone HSP-4 (a homolog of mammalian BiP/ grp78). Surprisingly, a single transmembrane leucine-rich repeat protein, DMA-1, plays a major role in the induction of the UPR and the dendritic phenotype in the UPR mutants. These findings reveal a significant role for the physiological UPR in the maintenance of ER homeostasis during morphogenesis of large dendritic arbors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06963.001 PMID:26052671

  13. Fungal Morphology, Iron Homeostasis, and Lipid Metabolism Regulated by a GATA Transcription Factor in Blastomyces dermatitidis.

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    Amber J Marty

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In response to temperature, Blastomyces dermatitidis converts between yeast and mold forms. Knowledge of the mechanism(s underlying this response to temperature remains limited. In B. dermatitidis, we identified a GATA transcription factor, SREB, important for the transition to mold. Null mutants (SREBΔ fail to fully complete the conversion to mold and cannot properly regulate siderophore biosynthesis. To capture the transcriptional response regulated by SREB early in the phase transition (0-48 hours, gene expression microarrays were used to compare SREB∆ to an isogenic wild type isolate. Analysis of the time course microarray data demonstrated SREB functioned as a transcriptional regulator at 37°C and 22°C. Bioinformatic and biochemical analyses indicated SREB was involved in diverse biological processes including iron homeostasis, biosynthesis of triacylglycerol and ergosterol, and lipid droplet formation. Integration of microarray data, bioinformatics, and chromatin immunoprecipitation identified a subset of genes directly bound and regulated by SREB in vivo in yeast (37°C and during the phase transition to mold (22°C. This included genes involved with siderophore biosynthesis and uptake, iron homeostasis, and genes unrelated to iron assimilation. Functional analysis suggested that lipid droplets were actively metabolized during the phase transition and lipid metabolism may contribute to filamentous growth at 22°C. Chromatin immunoprecipitation, RNA interference, and overexpression analyses suggested that SREB was in a negative regulatory circuit with the bZIP transcription factor encoded by HAPX. Both SREB and HAPX affected morphogenesis at 22°C; however, large changes in transcript abundance by gene deletion for SREB or strong overexpression for HAPX were required to alter the phase transition.

  14. Dendritic thickness: a morphometric parameter to classify mouse retinal ganglion cells

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    L.D. Loopuijt

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available To study the dendritic morphology of retinal ganglion cells in wild-type mice we intracellularly injected these cells with Lucifer yellow in an in vitro preparation of the retina. Subsequently, quantified values of dendritic thickness, number of branching points and level of stratification of 73 Lucifer yellow-filled ganglion cells were analyzed by statistical methods, resulting in a classification into 9 groups. The variables dendritic thickness, number of branching points per cell and level of stratification were independent of each other. Number of branching points and level of stratification were independent of eccentricity, whereas dendritic thickness was positively dependent (r = 0.37 on it. The frequency distribution of dendritic thickness tended to be multimodal, indicating the presence of at least two cell populations composed of neurons with dendritic diameters either smaller or larger than 1.8 µm ("thin" or "thick" dendrites, respectively. Three cells (4.5% were bistratified, having thick dendrites, and the others (95.5% were monostratified. Using k-means cluster analysis, monostratified cells with either thin or thick dendrites were further subdivided according to level of stratification and number of branching points: cells with thin dendrites were divided into 2 groups with outer stratification (0-40% and 2 groups with inner (50-100% stratification, whereas cells with thick dendrites were divided into one group with outer and 3 groups with inner stratification. We postulate, that one group of cells with thin dendrites resembles cat ß-cells, whereas one group of cells with thick dendrites includes cells that resemble cat a-cells.

  15. ER-to-plasma membrane tethering proteins regulate cell signaling and ER morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manford, Andrew G; Stefan, Christopher J; Yuan, Helen L; Macgurn, Jason A; Emr, Scott D

    2012-12-11

    Endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane (ER-PM) junctions are conserved structures defined as regions of the ER that tightly associate with the plasma membrane. However, little is known about the mechanisms that tether these organelles together and why such connections are maintained. Using a quantitative proteomic approach, we identified three families of ER-PM tethering proteins in yeast: Ist2 (related to mammalian TMEM16 ion channels), the tricalbins (Tcb1/2/3, orthologs of the extended synaptotagmins), and Scs2 and Scs22 (vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated proteins). Loss of all six tethering proteins results in the separation of the ER from the PM and the accumulation of cytoplasmic ER. Importantly, we find that phosphoinositide signaling is misregulated at the PM, and the unfolded protein response is constitutively activated in the ER in cells lacking ER-PM tether proteins. These results reveal critical roles for ER-PM contacts in cell signaling, organelle morphology, and ER function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The homeobox BcHOX8 gene in Botrytis cinerea regulates vegetative growth and morphology.

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    Zsuzsanna Antal

    Full Text Available Filamentous growth and the capacity at producing conidia are two critical aspects of most fungal life cycles, including that of many plant or animal pathogens. Here, we report on the identification of a homeobox transcription factor encoding gene that plays a role in these two particular aspects of the development of the phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea. Deletion of the BcHOX8 gene in both the B. cinerea B05-10 and T4 strains causes similar phenotypes, among which a curved, arabesque-like, hyphal growth on hydrophobic surfaces; the mutants were hence named Arabesque. Expression of the BcHOX8 gene is higher in conidia and infection cushions than in developing appressorium or mycelium. In the Arabesque mutants, colony growth rate is reduced and abnormal infection cushions are produced. Asexual reproduction is also affected with abnormal conidiophore being formed, strongly reduced conidia production and dramatic changes in conidial morphology. Finally, the mutation affects the fungus ability to efficiently colonize different host plants. Analysis of the B. cinerea genome shows that BcHOX8 is one member of a nine putative homeobox genes family. Available gene expression data suggest that these genes are functional and sequence comparisons indicate that two of them would be specific to B. cinerea and its close relative Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

  17. Investigating evolutionary conservation of dendritic cell subset identity and functions

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    Thien-Phong eVu Manh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC were initially defined as mononuclear phagocytes with a dendritic morphology and an exquisite efficiency for naïve T cell activation. DC encompass several subsets initially identified by their expression of specific cell surface molecules and later shown to excel in distinct functions and to develop under the instruction of different transcription factors or cytokines. Very few cell surface molecules are expressed in a specific manner on any immune cell type. Hence, to identify cell types, the sole use of a small number of cell surface markers in classical flow cytometry can be deceiving. Moreover, the markers currently used to define mononuclear phagocyte subsets vary depending on the tissue and animal species studied and even between laboratories. This has led to confusion in the definition of DC subset identity and in their attribution of specific functions. There is a strong need to identify a rigorous and consensus way to define mononuclear phagocyte subsets, with precise guidelines potentially applicable throughout tissues and species. We will discuss the advantages, drawbacks and complementarities of different methodologies: cell surface phenotyping, ontogeny, functional characterization and molecular profiling. We will advocate that gene expression profiling is a very rigorous, largely unbiased and accessible method to define the identity of mononuclear phagocyte subsets, which strengthens and refines surface phenotyping. It is uniquely powerful to yield new, experimentally testable, hypotheses on the ontogeny or functions of mononuclear phagocyte subsets, their molecular regulation and their evolutionary conservation. We propose defining cell populations based on a combination of cell surface phenotyping, expression analysis of hallmark genes and robust functional assays, in order to reach a consensus and integrate faster the huge but scattered knowledge accumulated by different laboratories on different cell types

  18. RNAi-Mediated Reverse Genetic Screen Identified Drosophila Chaperones Regulating Eye and Neuromuscular Junction Morphology

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    Sandeep Raut

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of toxic proteins in neurons has been linked with the onset of neurodegenerative diseases, which in many cases are characterized by altered neuronal function and synapse loss. Molecular chaperones help protein folding and the resolubilization of unfolded proteins, thereby reducing the protein aggregation stress. While most of the chaperones are expressed in neurons, their functional relevance remains largely unknown. Here, using bioinformatics analysis, we identified 95 Drosophila chaperones and classified them into seven different classes. Ubiquitous actin5C-Gal4-mediated RNAi knockdown revealed that ∼50% of the chaperones are essential in Drosophila. Knocking down these genes in eyes revealed that ∼30% of the essential chaperones are crucial for eye development. Using neuron-specific knockdown, immunocytochemistry, and robust behavioral assays, we identified a new set of chaperones that play critical roles in the regulation of Drosophila NMJ structural organization. Together, our data present the first classification and comprehensive analysis of Drosophila chaperones. Our screen identified a new set of chaperones that regulate eye and NMJ morphogenesis. The outcome of the screen reported here provides a useful resource for further elucidating the role of individual chaperones in Drosophila eye morphogenesis and synaptic development.

  19. Uptake of donor lymphocytes treated with 8-methoxypsoralen and ultraviolet A light by recipient dendritic cells induces CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and down-regulates cardiac allograft rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, De-Hua; Dou, Li-Ping; Wei, Yu-Xiang; Du, Guo-Sheng; Zou, Yi-Ping; Song, Ji-Yong; Zhu, Zhi-Dong; Cai, Ming; Qian, Ye-Yong; Shi, Bing-Yi

    2010-01-01

    Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) is an effective immunomodulatory therapy and has been demonstrated to be beneficial for graft-vs-host disease and solid-organ allograft rejection. ECP involves reinfusion of a patient's autologous peripheral blood leukocytes treated ex vivo with 8-methoxypsoralen and UVA light radiation (PUVA). Previous studies focused only on ECP treatment of recipient immune cells. Our study is the first to extend the target of ECP treatment to donor immune cells. The results of in vitro co-culture experiments demonstrate uptake of donor PUVA-treated splenic lymphocytes (PUVA-SPs) by recipient immature dendritic cells (DCs). Phagocytosis of donor PUVA-SPs does not stimulate phenotype maturation of recipient DCs. In the same co-culture system, donor PUVA-SPs enhanced production of interleukin-10 and interferon-γ by recipient DCs and impaired the subsequent capability of recipient DCs to stimulate recipient naive T cells. Phagocytosis of donor PUVA-SP (PUVA-SP DCs) by recipient DCs shifted T-cell responses in favor of T helper 2 cells. Infusion of PUVA-SP DCs inhibited cardiac allograft rejection in an antigen-specific manner and induced CD4 + CD25 high Foxp3 + regulatory T cells. In conclusion, PUVA-SP DCs simultaneously deliver the donor antigen and the regulatory signal to the transplant recipient, and thus can be used to develop a novel DC vaccine for negative immune regulation and immune tolerance induction.

  20. Uptake of donor lymphocytes treated with 8-methoxypsoralen and ultraviolet A light by recipient dendritic cells induces CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells and down-regulates cardiac allograft rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, De-Hua [Organ Transplant Center, Chinese PLA 309th Hospital, No. 17A Hei-Shan-Hu Road, Beijing 100091 (China); Dou, Li-Ping [Department of Hematology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, No. 28 Fu-Xing Road, Beijing 100853 (China); Wei, Yu-Xiang; Du, Guo-Sheng; Zou, Yi-Ping; Song, Ji-Yong; Zhu, Zhi-Dong; Cai, Ming; Qian, Ye-Yong [Organ Transplant Center, Chinese PLA 309th Hospital, No. 17A Hei-Shan-Hu Road, Beijing 100091 (China); Shi, Bing-Yi, E-mail: shibingyi@medmail.com.cn [Organ Transplant Center, Chinese PLA 309th Hospital, No. 17A Hei-Shan-Hu Road, Beijing 100091 (China)

    2010-05-14

    Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) is an effective immunomodulatory therapy and has been demonstrated to be beneficial for graft-vs-host disease and solid-organ allograft rejection. ECP involves reinfusion of a patient's autologous peripheral blood leukocytes treated ex vivo with 8-methoxypsoralen and UVA light radiation (PUVA). Previous studies focused only on ECP treatment of recipient immune cells. Our study is the first to extend the target of ECP treatment to donor immune cells. The results of in vitro co-culture experiments demonstrate uptake of donor PUVA-treated splenic lymphocytes (PUVA-SPs) by recipient immature dendritic cells (DCs). Phagocytosis of donor PUVA-SPs does not stimulate phenotype maturation of recipient DCs. In the same co-culture system, donor PUVA-SPs enhanced production of interleukin-10 and interferon-{gamma} by recipient DCs and impaired the subsequent capability of recipient DCs to stimulate recipient naive T cells. Phagocytosis of donor PUVA-SP (PUVA-SP DCs) by recipient DCs shifted T-cell responses in favor of T helper 2 cells. Infusion of PUVA-SP DCs inhibited cardiac allograft rejection in an antigen-specific manner and induced CD4{sup +}CD25{sup high}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells. In conclusion, PUVA-SP DCs simultaneously deliver the donor antigen and the regulatory signal to the transplant recipient, and thus can be used to develop a novel DC vaccine for negative immune regulation and immune tolerance induction.

  1. Hippocampal Dendritic Spines Are Segregated Depending on Their Actin Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Iturza, Nuria; Calvo, María; Benoist, Marion; Esteban, José Antonio; Morales, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are mushroom-shaped protrusions of the postsynaptic membrane. Spines receive the majority of glutamatergic synaptic inputs. Their morphology, dynamics, and density have been related to synaptic plasticity and learning. The main determinant of spine shape is filamentous actin. Using FRAP, we have reexamined the actin dynamics of individual spines from pyramidal hippocampal neurons, both in cultures and in hippocampal organotypic slices. Our results indicate that, in cultures, the actin mobile fraction is independently regulated at the individual spine level, and mobile fraction values do not correlate with either age or distance from the soma. The most significant factor regulating actin mobile fraction was the presence of astrocytes in the culture substrate. Spines from neurons growing in the virtual absence of astrocytes have a more stable actin cytoskeleton, while spines from neurons growing in close contact with astrocytes show a more dynamic cytoskeleton. According to their recovery time, spines were distributed into two populations with slower and faster recovery times, while spines from slice cultures were grouped into one population. Finally, employing fast lineal acquisition protocols, we confirmed the existence of loci with high polymerization rates within the spine.

  2. A Complex Interaction Between Reduced Reelin Expression and Prenatal Organophosphate Exposure Alters Neuronal Cell Morphology

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    Brian R. Mullen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic and environmental factors are both likely to contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders including schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders, and major depressive disorders. Prior studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that the combinatorial effect of two factors—reduced expression of reelin protein and prenatal exposure to the organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos oxon—gives rise to acute biochemical effects and to morphological and behavioral phenotypes in adolescent and young adult mice. In the current study, we examine the consequences of these factors on reelin protein expression and neuronal cell morphology in adult mice. While the cell populations that express reelin in the adult brain appear unchanged in location and distribution, the levels of full length and cleaved reelin protein show persistent reductions following prenatal exposure to chlorpyrifos oxon. Cell positioning and organization in the hippocampus and cerebellum are largely normal in animals with either reduced reelin expression or prenatal exposure to chlorpyrifos oxon, but cellular complexity and dendritic spine organization is altered, with a skewed distribution of immature dendritic spines in adult animals. Paradoxically, combinatorial exposure to both factors appears to generate a rescue of the dendritic spine phenotypes, similar to the mitigation of behavioral and morphological changes observed in our prior study. Together, our observations support an interaction between reelin expression and chlorpyrifos oxon exposure that is not simply additive, suggesting a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors in regulating brain morphology.

  3. ADAM-17 regulates endothelial cell morphology, proliferation, and in vitro angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeoz, Pal; Goeoz, Monika; Baldys, Aleksander; Hoffman, Stanley

    2009-01-01

    Modulation of angiogenesis is a promising approach for treating a wide variety of human diseases including ischemic heart disease and cancer. In this study, we show that ADAM-17 is an important regulator of several key steps during angiogenesis. Knocking down ADAM-17 expression using lentivirus-delivered siRNA in HUVECs inhibited cell proliferation and the ability of cells to form close contact in two-dimensional cultures. Similarly, ADAM-17 depletion inhibited the ability of HUVECs to form capillary-like networks on top of three-dimensional Matrigel as well as in co-culture with fibroblasts within a three-dimensional scaffold. In mechanistic studies, both baseline and VEGF-induced MMP-2 activation and Matrigel invasion were inhibited by ADAM-17 depletion. Based on our findings we propose that ADAM-17 is part of a novel pro-angiogenic pathway leading to MMP-2 activation and vessel formation.

  4. Dendritic protein synthesis in the normal and diseased brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanger, Sharon A.; Bassell, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic activity is a spatially-limited process that requires a precise, yet dynamic, complement of proteins within the synaptic micro-domain. The maintenance and regulation of these synaptic proteins is regulated, in part, by local mRNA translation in dendrites. Protein synthesis within the postsynaptic compartment allows neurons tight spatial and temporal control of synaptic protein expression, which is critical for proper functioning of synapses and neural circuits. In this review, we discuss the identity of proteins synthesized within dendrites, the receptor-mediated mechanisms regulating their synthesis, and the possible roles for these locally synthesized proteins. We also explore how our current understanding of dendritic protein synthesis in the hippocampus can be applied to new brain regions and to understanding the pathological mechanisms underlying varied neurological diseases. PMID:23262237

  5. Urban morphological determinants of temperature regulating ecosystem services in African cities: the case of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavan, Gina; Lindley, Sarah; Kibassa, Deusdedit; Shemdoe, Riziki; Capuano, Paolo; De Paola, Francesco; Renner, Florian; Pauleit, Stephan

    2013-04-01

    Urban green structure provides important regulating ecosystem services, such as temperature and flood regulation, and thus, has the potential to increase the resilience of African cities to climate change. Green structures within urban areas are not only limited to discrete units associated with recreational parks, agricultural areas and open spaces: they also exist within zones which have other primary functions, such as church yards, along transport routes, and within residential areas. Differing characteristics of urban areas can be conceptualised and subsequently mapped through the idea of urban morphology types. Urban morphology types are classifications which combine facets of urban form and function. When mapped, UMT units provide biophysically relevant meso-scale geographical zones which can be used as the basis for understanding climate-related impacts and adaptations. For example, they support the assessment of urban temperature patterns and the temperature regulating services provided by urban green structures. There are some examples of the use of UMTs for assessing regulating ecosystem services in European cities but little similar knowledge is available in an African context. This paper outlines the concept of urban morphology types (UMTs) and how they were applied to African case study cities (Cavan et al., 2012). It then presents the methods used to understand temperature regulating ecosystem services across an example African case study city, including (i) a GIS-based assessment of urban green structures, and (ii) applying an energy balance model to estimate current and future surface temperatures under climate change projections. The assessment is carried out for Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Existing evidence suggests increases in both mean and extreme temperatures in the city. Historical analysis of the number of hot days per year suggests a rise from a maximum of 47 days per year in the period 1961-87 to 72 days per year in 2003-2011 (Giugni et al

  6. Galanin regulates blood glucose level in the zebrafish: a morphological and functional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlasz, P; Jakimiuk, A; Chmielewska-Krzesinska, M; Kasica, N; Nowik, N; Kaleczyc, J

    2016-01-01

    The present study has demonstrated the galaninergic innervation of the endocrine pancreas including sources of the galaninergic nerve fibers, and the influence of galanin receptor agonists on blood glucose level in the zebrafish. For the first time, a very abundant galaninergic innervation of the endocrine pancreas during development is shown, from the second day post-fertilization to adulthood. The fibers originated from ganglia consisting of galanin-IR, non-adrenergic (non-sensory) neurons located rostrally to the pancreatic tissue. The ganglia were found on the dorsal side of the initial part of the anterior intestinal segment, close to the intestinal branch of the vagus nerve. The galanin-IR neurons did not show immunoreactivity for applied antibodies against tyrosine hydroxylase, choline acetyltransferase, and vesicular acetylcholine transporter. Intraperitoneal injections of galanin analog NAX 5055 resulted in a statistically significant increase in the blood glucose level. Injections of another galanin receptor agonist, galnon, also caused a rise in blood glucose level; however, it was not statistically significant. The present findings suggest that, like in mammals, in the zebrafish galanin is involved in the regulation of blood glucose level. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the exact mechanism of the galanin action.

  7. Altered gene regulation and synaptic morphology in Drosophila learning and memory mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhuo; Buhl, Lauren K.; Quinn, William G.; Littleton, J. Troy

    2011-01-01

    Genetic studies in Drosophila have revealed two separable long-term memory pathways defined as anesthesia-resistant memory (ARM) and long-lasting long-term memory (LLTM). ARM is disrupted in radish (rsh) mutants, whereas LLTM requires CREB-dependent protein synthesis. Although the downstream effectors of ARM and LLTM are distinct, pathways leading to these forms of memory may share the cAMP cascade critical for associative learning. Dunce, which encodes a cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase, and rutabaga, which encodes an adenylyl cyclase, both disrupt short-term memory. Amnesiac encodes a pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating peptide homolog and is required for middle-term memory. Here, we demonstrate that the Radish protein localizes to the cytoplasm and nucleus and is a PKA phosphorylation target in vitro. To characterize how these plasticity pathways may manifest at the synaptic level, we assayed synaptic connectivity and performed an expression analysis to detect altered transcriptional networks in rutabaga, dunce, amnesiac, and radish mutants. All four mutants disrupt specific aspects of synaptic connectivity at larval neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Genome-wide DNA microarray analysis revealed ∼375 transcripts that are altered in these mutants, suggesting defects in multiple neuronal signaling pathways. In particular, the transcriptional target Lapsyn, which encodes a leucine-rich repeat cell adhesion protein, localizes to synapses and regulates synaptic growth. This analysis provides insights into the Radish-dependent ARM pathway and novel transcriptional targets that may contribute to memory processing in Drosophila. PMID:21422168

  8. Implantation and growth of dendritic gold nanostructures on graphene derivatives: electrical property tailoring and Raman enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasuja, Kabeer; Berry, Vikas

    2009-08-25

    Interfacing electron-rich metal nanoparticles with graphene derivatives can sensitively regulate the properties of the resultant hybrid with potential applications in metal-doped graphene field-effect transistors (FETs), surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, and catalysis. Here, we show that by controlling the rate of diffusion and catalytic reduction of gold ions on graphene oxide (GO), dendritic "snowflake-shaped" gold nanostructures (SFGNs) can be templated on graphene. The structural features of the SFGNs and their interfacing mechanism with GO were characterized by microscopic analysis and Raman-scattering. We demonstrate that (a) SFGNs grow on GO-surface via diffusion limited aggregation; (b) SFGN's morphology (dendritic to globular), size (diameter of 150-500 nm and a height of 45-55 nm), coverage density, and dispersion stability can be controlled by regulating the chemiophysical forces; (c) SFGNs enhance the Raman signal by 2.5 folds; and (d) SFGNs act as antireduction resist during GO-SFGN's chemical reduction. Further, the SFGNs interfacing with graphene reduces the apparent band gap (from 320 to 173 meV) and the Schottky barrier height (from 126 to 56 meV) of the corresponding FET.

  9. Marginal Iodine Deficiency Affects Dendritic Spine Development by Disturbing the Function of Rac1 Signaling Pathway on Cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Hui; Dong, Jing; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yuan; Yu, Ye; Shan, Zhongyan; Xi, Qi; Teng, Weiping; Chen, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Iodine deficiency (ID)-induced thyroid hormone (TH) insufficient during development leads to impairments of brain function, such as learning and memory. Marginal ID has been defined as subtle insufficiency of TH, characterized as low thyroxine (T 4 ) levels, whether marginal ID potentially had adverse effects on the development of hippocampus and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Thus, in the present study, we established Wistar rat models with ID diet during pregnancy and lactation. The effects of marginal ID on long-term potentiation (LTP) were investigated in the hippocampal CA1 region. To study the development of dendritic spines in pyramidal cells, Golgi-Cox staining was conducted on postnatal day (PN) 7, PN14, PN21, and PN28. The activation of Rac1 signaling pathway, which is essential for dendritic spine development by regulating actin cytoskeleton, was also investigated. Our results showed that marginal ID slightly reduced the field-excitatory postsynaptic potential (f-EPSP) slope and the population spike (PS) amplitude. Besides, the density of dendritic spines during the critical period of rat postnatal development was mildly decreased, and we found no significant change of spine morphology in marginal ID group. We also observed decreased activation of the Rac1 signaling pathway in pups subjected to maternal marginal ID. Our study may support the hypothesis that decreased T 4 induced by marginal ID results in slight impairments of LTP and leads to mild damage of dendritic spine development, which may be due to abnormal regulation of Rac1 signaling pathway on cytoskeleton.

  10. Three regulators of G protein signaling differentially affect mating, morphology and virulence in the smut fungus Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Marino; Wang, Lei; Grognet, Pierre; Lanver, Daniel; Link, Hannes; Kahmann, Regine

    2017-09-01

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins modulate heterotrimeric G protein signaling negatively. To broaden an understanding of the roles of RGS proteins in fungal pathogens, we functionally characterized the three RGS protein-encoding genes (rgs1, rgs2 and rgs3) in the phytopathogenic fungus Ustilago maydis. It was found that RGS proteins played distinct roles in the regulation of development and virulence. rgs1 had a minor role in virulence when deleted in a solopathogenic strain. In crosses, rgs1 was dispensable for mating and filamentation, but was required for teliospore production. Haploid rgs2 mutants were affected in cell morphology, growth, mating and were unable to cause disease symptoms in crosses. However, virulence was unaffected when rgs2 was deleted in a solopathogenic strain, suggesting an exclusive involvement in pre-fusion events. These rgs2 phenotypes are likely connected to elevated intracellular cAMP levels. rgs3 mutants were severely attenuated in mating, in their response to pheromone, virulence and formation of mature teliospores. The mating defect could be traced back to reduced expression of the transcription factor rop1. It was speculated that the distinct roles of the three U. maydis RGS proteins were achieved by direct modulation of the Gα subunit-activated signaling pathways as well as through Gα-independent functions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Influence of growth regulators (IBA, BA on anatomical and morphological changes in bromeliads in in vitro culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Galek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of study were Tillandsia coronata and Guzmania monostachya. The material has been obtained by means of in vitro propagation. The plants were grown for 18 weeks on various kinds of media. Morphological changes were recorded in both species subjected to action of growth regulators. The changes in plant habit were linked with anatomic build. The effect of cytokinin BA upon growth of the stem pith was found, transversely to its axis, through development of numerous meristematic centres and growth and development of adventitious shoots. Leaves of plant grown on media containing cyto-kinin BA were build of a higher number of cell layers of assimilation parenchyma. In plants grown on media with addition of cytokinin the size of stomatal cells was smaller and was accompanied by analogous changes in size of epidermis cells proper. The bushy type of the plants, caused by presence of cytokinin in medium, resulted from the increase of thickness and breadth of leaves and growth of the stem pith, with simultaneous inhibition of cells' elongation. Auxin IBA did not favour the growth of the existing axillary shoots, but stimulated elongation of the stem pith. The stomata of plants of both species grown on media with addition of auxin were bigger. As result of the applied growth regulators a higher frequency of appearance of binucleate cells was found in parenchyma cells of the stem and leaves in both the species studied.

  12. Changes in dendritic architecture: not your "usual suspect" in control of the onset of puberty in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemond, Peter J; O'Boyle, Michael P; Hemond, Zoe; Gay, Vernon L; Suter, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Until the recent past, the search for the underlying drive for the pubertal increase in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) hormone from the GnRH-containing neurons in the hypothalamus was largely focused on extrinsic factors. The most recent evidence however indicates changes in the structure of GnRH neurons themselves may contribute to this fundamental event in development. Based on our studies in males, dendritic architecture is not static from birth until adulthood. Instead, dendrites undergo a dramatic remodeling during the postnatal period which is independent of testosterone and occurs before the pubertal increase in GnRH release. First, the number of dendrites emanating from somata is reduced between infancy and adulthood. Moreover, a dendrite of adult GnRH neurons invariability arises at angle of 180°from the axon as opposed to the extraordinary variability in location during infancy. In fact, in some neurons from infants, no dendrite even resides in the adult location. Thus, there is a spatially selective remodeling of primary dendrites. Secondly, dendrites of GnRH neurons from infants were highly branched prior to assuming the compact morphology of adults. Finally, other morphological aspects of GnRH neurons such as total dendritic length, the numbers of dendrite branches and the lengths of higher order branches were significantly greater in infants than adults, indicating a consolidation of dendritic arbors. Activity in multi-compartment models of GnRH neurons, suggest the impact of structure on neuronal activity is exerted with both active and passive dendrites. Thus, passive properties make a defining contribution to function. Accordingly, changes in morphology alone are likely to have functional consequences for the pattern of activity in GnRH neurons. Our findings suggest structural remodeling of dendrites during the postnatal period likely facilitates repetitive action potentials and thus, GnRH release at the time of puberty.

  13. Stochastic modeling of columnar dendritic grain growth in weld pool of Al-Cu alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Z.B.; Tian, N. [The State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Wei, Y.H. [College of Materials Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); The State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Zhan, X.H.

    2009-04-15

    A multi-scale model is used to simulate columnar dendritic growth in TIG (tungsten inert-gas) weld molten pool of Al-Cu alloy. The grain morphologies at the edge of the weld pool are studied. The simulated results indicate that the average primary dendrite spacing changes during the solidification process in the weld pool because of the complicated thermal field, solute diffusion field and competitive growth. And it is shown that the secondary dendrite arms grow insufficiently in the space between dendrite trunks if the primary dendrite spacing is small. And the phenomenon has been explained by analyzing the influence of the solute accumulation on the constitutional undercooling and undercooling gradient when there are two different opposite solute diffusion fields. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Rapid synthesis of dendritic Pt/Pb nanoparticles and their electrocatalytic performance toward ethanol oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke; Xu, Hui; Yan, Bo; Wang, Jin; Gu, Zhulan; Du, Yukou

    2017-12-01

    This article reports a rapid synthetic method for the preparation of dendritic platinum-lead bimetallic catalysts by using an oil bath for 5 min in the presence of hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) and ascorbic acid (AA). CTAC acts as a shape-direction agent, and AA acts as a reducing agent during the reaction process. A series of physical techniques are used to characterize the morphology, structure and electronic properties of the dendritic Pt/Pb nanoparticles, indicating the Pt/Pb dendrites are porous, highly alloying, and self-supported nanostructures. Various electrochemical techniques were also investigated the catalytic performance of the Pt/Pb catalysts toward the ethanol electrooxidation reaction. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry indicated that the synthesized dendritic Pt/Pb nanoparticles possessed much higher electrocatalytic performance than bulk Pt catalyst. This study may inspire the engineering of dendritic bimetallic catalysts, which are expected to have great potential applications in fuel cells.

  15. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein and Dendritic Local Translation of the Alpha Subunit of the Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase II Messenger RNA Are Required for the Structural Plasticity Underlying Olfactory Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daroles, Laura; Gribaudo, Simona; Doulazmi, Mohamed; Scotto-Lomassese, Sophie; Dubacq, Caroline; Mandairon, Nathalie; Greer, Charles August; Didier, Anne; Trembleau, Alain; Caillé, Isabelle

    2016-07-15

    In the adult brain, structural plasticity allowing gain or loss of synapses remodels circuits to support learning. In fragile X syndrome, the absence of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) leads to defects in plasticity and learning deficits. FMRP is a master regulator of local translation but its implication in learning-induced structural plasticity is unknown. Using an olfactory learning task requiring adult-born olfactory bulb neurons and cell-specific ablation of FMRP, we investigated whether learning shapes adult-born neuron morphology during their synaptic integration and its dependence on FMRP. We used alpha subunit of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (αCaMKII) mutant mice with altered dendritic localization of αCaMKII messenger RNA, as well as a reporter of αCaMKII local translation to investigate the role of this FMRP messenger RNA target in learning-dependent structural plasticity. Learning induces profound changes in dendritic architecture and spine morphology of adult-born neurons that are prevented by ablation of FMRP in adult-born neurons and rescued by an metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonist. Moreover, dendritically translated αCaMKII is necessary for learning and associated structural modifications and learning triggers an FMRP-dependent increase of αCaMKII dendritic translation in adult-born neurons. Our results strongly suggest that FMRP mediates structural plasticity of olfactory bulb adult-born neurons to support olfactory learning through αCaMKII local translation. This reveals a new role for FMRP-regulated dendritic local translation in learning-induced structural plasticity. This might be of clinical relevance for the understanding of critical periods disruption in autism spectrum disorder patients, among which fragile X syndrome is the primary monogenic cause. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The polyketide synthase gene pks4 is essential for sexual development and regulates fruiting body morphology in Sordaria macrospora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Daniel; Nowrousian, Minou

    2014-07-01

    Filamentous ascomycetes have long been known as producers of a variety of secondary metabolites, many of which have toxic effects on other organisms. However, the role of these metabolites in the biology of the fungi that produce them remains in most cases enigmatic. A major group of fungal secondary metabolites are polyketides. They are chemically diverse, but have in common that their chemical scaffolds are synthesized by polyketide synthases (PKSs). In a previous study, we analyzed development-dependent expression of pks genes in the filamentous ascomycete Sordaria macrospora. Here, we show that a deletion mutant of the pks4 gene is sterile, producing only protoperithecia but no mature perithecia, whereas overexpression of pks4 leads to enlarged, malformed fruiting bodies. Thus, correct expression levels of pks4 are essential for wild type-like perithecia formation. The predicted PKS4 protein has a domain structure that is similar to homologs in other fungi, but conserved residues of a methyl transferase domain present in other fungi are mutated in PKS4. Expression of several developmental genes is misregulated in the pks4 mutant. Surprisingly, the development-associated app gene is not downregulated in the mutant, in contrast to all other previously studied mutants with a block at the protoperithecial stage. Our data show that the polyketide synthase gene pks4 is essential for sexual development and plays a role in regulating fruiting body morphology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dendrite Injury Triggers DLK-Independent Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle C. Stone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Axon injury triggers regeneration through activation of a conserved kinase cascade, which includes the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK. Although dendrites are damaged during stroke, traumatic brain injury, and seizure, it is not known whether mature neurons monitor dendrite injury and initiate regeneration. We probed the response to dendrite damage using model Drosophila neurons. Two larval neuron types regrew dendrites in distinct ways after all dendrites were removed. Dendrite regeneration was also triggered by injury in adults. Next, we tested whether dendrite injury was initiated with the same machinery as axon injury. Surprisingly, DLK, JNK, and fos were dispensable for dendrite regeneration. Moreover, this MAP kinase pathway was not activated by injury to dendrites. Thus, neurons respond to dendrite damage and initiate regeneration without using the conserved DLK cascade that triggers axon regeneration.

  18. Electrochemical migration of tin in electronics and microstructure of the dendrites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minzari, Daniel; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2011-01-01

    The macro-, micro-, and nano-scale morphology and structure of tin dendrites, formed by electrochemical migration on a surface mount ceramic chip resistor having electrodes consisting of tin with small amounts of Pb (∼2wt.%) was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electr...... by the dehydration of the hydrated oxide originally formed in solution ex-situ in ambient air.......The macro-, micro-, and nano-scale morphology and structure of tin dendrites, formed by electrochemical migration on a surface mount ceramic chip resistor having electrodes consisting of tin with small amounts of Pb (∼2wt.%) was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron...... microscopy including Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron diffraction. The tin dendrites were formed under 5 or 12V potential bias in 10ppm by weight NaCl electrolyte as a micro-droplet on the resistor during electrochemical migration experiments. The dendrites formed were found to have...

  19. Astrocyte-secreted factors modulate a gradient of primary dendritic arbors in nucleus laminaris of the avian auditory brainstem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Korn

    Full Text Available Neurons in nucleus laminaris (NL receive binaural, tonotopically matched input from nucleus magnocelluaris (NM onto bitufted dendrites that display a gradient of dendritic arbor size. These features improve computation of interaural time differences, which are used to determine the locations of sound sources. The dendritic gradient emerges following a period of significant reorganization at embryonic day 15 (E15, which coincides with the emergence of astrocytes that express glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP in the auditory brainstem. The major changes include a loss of total dendritic length, a systematic loss of primary dendrites along the tonotopic axis, and lengthening of primary dendrites on caudolateral NL neurons. Here we have tested whether astrocyte-derived molecules contribute to these changes in dendritic morphology. We used an organotypic brainstem slice preparation to perform repeated imaging of individual dye-filled NL neurons to determine the effects of astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM on dendritic morphology. We found that treatment with ACM induced a decrease in the number of primary dendrites in a tonotopically graded manner similar to that observed during normal development. Our data introduce a new interaction between astrocytes and neurons in the auditory brainstem and suggest that these astrocytes influence multiple aspects of auditory brainstem maturation.

  20. Electrochemical migration of tin in electronics and microstructure of the dendrites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minzari, Daniel, E-mail: dmin@mek.dtu.d [Section for Materials and Surface Technology, Department for Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg; Jellesen, Morten S.; Moller, Per; Ambat, Rajan [Section for Materials and Surface Technology, Department for Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (Denmark)

    2011-05-15

    Graphical abstract: The electrochemical migration of tin in electronics forms dendritic structures, consisting of a metallic tin core, which is surrounded by oxide layers having various thickness. Display Omitted Research highlights: Electrochemical migration occurs if two conductors are connected by condensed moisture. Metallic ions are dissolved and grow in a dendritic structure that short circuit the electrodes. The dendrite consists of a metallic tin core with oxide layers of various thickness surrounding. Detailed microstructure of dendrites is investigated using electron microscopy. The dendrite microstructure is heterogeneous along the growth direction. - Abstract: The macro-, micro-, and nano-scale morphology and structure of tin dendrites, formed by electrochemical migration on a surface mount ceramic chip resistor having electrodes consisting of tin with small amounts of Pb ({approx}2 wt.%) was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy including Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron diffraction. The tin dendrites were formed under 5 or 12 V potential bias in 10 ppm by weight NaCl electrolyte as a micro-droplet on the resistor during electrochemical migration experiments. The dendrites formed were found to have heterogeneous microstructure along the growth direction, which is attributed to unstable growth conditions inside the micro-volume of electrolyte. Selected area electron diffraction showed that the dendrites are metallic tin having sections of single crystal orientation and lead containing intermetallic particles embedded in the structure. At certain areas, the dendrite structure was found to be surrounded by an oxide crust, which is believed to be due to unstable growth conditions during the dendrite formation. The oxide layer was found to be of nanocrystalline structure, which is expected to be formed by the dehydration of the hydrated oxide originally formed in solution ex-situ in ambient air.

  1. CO2-switchable fluorescence of a dendritic polymer and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chunmei; Lü, Shaoyu; Liu, Mingzhu; Wu, Can; Xiong, Yun

    2015-12-01

    The synthesis and properties of CO2 responsive and fluorescent dendritic polymers, poly(amido amine)/Pluronic F127 (PAMAM/F127), are reported in this paper. The morphologies and sizes of PAMAM/F127 dendritic polymers were investigated by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). PAMAM/F127 dendritic polymers showed unimolecular micelle morphologies at low concentrations, and changed to multimolecular micelles at higher concentrations. Additionally, fluorescence spectra and confocal laser scanning microscopy images showed that PAMAM/F127 dendritic polymers exhibited a fluorescent enhancement response to the presence of CO2. Apart from that, the release behavior of PAMAM/F127 gels under simulated body fluids was investigated by choosing curcumin as the hydrophobic drug. The results indicated that PAMAM/F127 dendritic polymers can be used to improve the solubility of curcumin, and the drug released faster in the presence of CO2. Such CO2 responsive fluorescent dendritic polymers are potentially applicable in cellular imaging or drug controlled release.The synthesis and properties of CO2 responsive and fluorescent dendritic polymers, poly(amido amine)/Pluronic F127 (PAMAM/F127), are reported in this paper. The morphologies and sizes of PAMAM/F127 dendritic polymers were investigated by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). PAMAM/F127 dendritic polymers showed unimolecular micelle morphologies at low concentrations, and changed to multimolecular micelles at higher concentrations. Additionally, fluorescence spectra and confocal laser scanning microscopy images showed that PAMAM/F127 dendritic polymers exhibited a fluorescent enhancement response to the presence of CO2. Apart from that, the release behavior of PAMAM/F127 gels under simulated body fluids was investigated by choosing curcumin as the hydrophobic drug. The results indicated that PAMAM/F127 dendritic polymers can be used to improve the

  2. POMT1-associated walker-warburg syndrome: a disorder of dendritic development of neocortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judas, M; Sedmak, G; Rados, M; Sarnavka, V; Fumić, K; Willer, T; Gross, C; Hehr, U; Strahl, S; Cuk, M; Barić, I

    2009-02-01

    We have analyzed the morphology and dendritic development of neocortical neurons in a 2.5-month-old infant with Walker-Warburg syndrome homozygotic for a novel POMT1 gene mutation, by Golgi methods. We found that pyramidal neurons frequently displayed abnormal (oblique, horizontal, or inverted) orientation. A novel finding of this study is that members of the same population of pyramidal neurons display different stages of development of their dendritic arborizations: some neurons had poorly developed dendrites and thus resembled pyramidal neurons of the late fetal cortex; for some neurons, the level of differentiation corresponded to that in the newborn cortex; finally, some neurons had quite elaborate dendritic trees as expected for the cortex of 2.5-month-old infant. In addition, apical dendrites of many pyramidal neurons were conspiciously bent to one side, irrespective to the general orientation of the pyramidal neuron. These findings suggest that Walker-Warburg lissencephaly is characterized by two hitherto unnoticed pathogenetic changes in the cerebral cortex: (a) heterochronic decoupling of dendritic maturation within the same neuronal population (with some members significantly lagging behind the normal maturational schedule) and (b) anisotropically distorted shaping of dendritic trees, probably caused by patchy displacement of molecular guidance cues for dendrites in the malformed cortex. Copyright Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart New York.

  3. Circulating dendritic cells in pediatric patients with nephrotic syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Dendritic cells (DCs) represent one of the most extensively studied topics in immunology, because of their central role in the induction and regulation of adaptive immunity, and because of their therapeutic potential for manipulating immune responses. Objectives: To evaluate circulating DC levels in pediatric ...

  4. Incorrect dosage of IQSEC2, a known intellectual disability and epilepsy gene, disrupts dendritic spine morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinze, S J; Jackson, M R; Lie, S; Jolly, L; Field, M; Barry, S C; Harvey, R J; Shoubridge, C

    2017-01-01

    There is considerable genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity associated with intellectual disability (ID), specific learning disabilities, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism and epilepsy. The intelligence quotient (IQ) motif and SEC7 domain containing protein 2 gene (IQSEC2) is located on the X-chromosome and harbors mutations that contribute to non-syndromic ID with and without early-onset seizure phenotypes in both sexes. Although IQ and Sec7 domain mutations lead to partial loss of IQSEC2 enzymatic activity, the in vivo pathogenesis resulting from these mutations is not known. Here we reveal that IQSEC2 has a key role in dendritic spine morphology. Partial loss-of-function mutations were modeled using a lentiviral short hairpin RNA (shRNA) approach, which achieved a 57% knockdown of Iqsec2 expression in primary hippocampal cell cultures from mice. Investigating gross morphological parameters after 8 days of in vitro culture (8DIV) identified a 32% reduction in primary axon length, in contrast to a 27% and 31% increase in the number and complexity of dendrites protruding from the cell body, respectively. This increase in dendritic complexity and spread was carried through dendritic spine development, with a 34% increase in the number of protrusions per dendritic segment compared with controls at 15DIV. Although the number of dendritic spines had normalized by 21DIV, a reduction was noted in the number of immature spines. In contrast, when modeling increased dosage, overexpression of wild-type IQSEC2 led to neurons with shorter axons that were more compact and displayed simpler dendritic branching. Disturbances to dendritic morphology due to knockdown of Iqsec2 were recapitulated in neurons from Iqsec2 knockout mice generated in our laboratory using CRISPR/Cas9 technology. These observations provide evidence of dosage sensitivity for IQSEC2, which normally escapes X-inactivation in females, and links these disturbances in expression to alterations in

  5. Immunomodulatory effects of aqueous and organic fractions from Petiveria alliacea on human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santander, Sandra Paola; Hernández, John Fredy; Barreto, Claudia Cifuentes; Cifuentes B, Claudia; Masayuki, Aoki; M, Aoki; Moins-Teisserenc, Hélène; H, Moins-Teisserenc; Fiorentino, Susana

    2012-01-01

    Petiveria alliacea is a plant traditionally known for its anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor activities; however, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of its immunomodulatory properties are still unknown. Dendritic cells (DC) promote adaptive immune response by activating T lymphocytes, inducing an effector response or tolerance depending on the DC differentiation level. Herein, we evaluated the immunomodulatory activity of aqueous and organic plant fractions from P. alliacea using human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. The phenotype, cytokine secretion and gene expression were estimated after treatment with the plant fractions. We found that P. alliacea aqueous fraction induced morphological changes and co-stimulatory expression of CD86, indicating partial DC maturation. In addition, pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, and TNF-α were secreted. The fraction also increased NF-κB gene expression while down-regulating TGFβ gene expression. These results suggest that the aqueous fraction can induce partial DC activation, a situation that can be relevant in tolerance induction. It is important to state that the organic fraction by itself does not show any immunomodulatory activity. This study provides evidence for possible immunomodulatory activity of P. alliacea extracts which has been used in traditional medicine in Colombia.

  6. Geometry sensing by dendritic cells dictates spatial organization and PGE(2)-induced dissolution of podosomes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dries, K. van den; Helden, S.F.G. van; Riet, J.T. te; Diez-Ahedo, R.; Manzo, C.; Oud, M.M.; Leeuwen, F.N. van; Brock, R.E.; Garcia-Parajo, M.F.; Cambi, A.; Figdor, C.G.

    2012-01-01

    Assembly and disassembly of adhesion structures such as focal adhesions (FAs) and podosomes regulate cell adhesion and differentiation. On antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs), acquisition of a migratory and immunostimulatory phenotype depends on podosome dissolution by prostaglandin E(2)

  7. Morphological response of the saltmarsh habitats of the Guadiana estuary due to flow regulation and sea-level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, D. M. R.; Boski, T.

    2016-12-01

    In the context of rapid sea-level rise in the 21st century, the reduction of fluvial sediment supply due to the regulation of river discharge represents a major challenge for the management of estuarine ecosystems. Therefore, the present study aims to assess the cumulative impacts of the reduction of river discharge and projected sea-level rise on the morphological evolution of the Guadiana estuary during the 21st century. The assessment was based on a set of analytical solutions to simplified equations of tidal wave propagation in shallow waters and empirical knowledge of the system. As methods applied to estimate environmental flows do not take into consideration the fluvial discharge required to maintain saltmarsh habitats and the impact of sea-level rise, simulations were carried out for ten cases in terms of base river flow and sea-level rise so as to understand their sensitivity on the deepening of saltmarsh platforms. Results suggest saltmarsh habitats may not be affected severely in response to lower limit scenarios of sea-level rise and sedimentation. A similar behaviour can be expected even due to the upper limit scenarios until 2050, but with a significant submergence afterwards. In the case of the upper limit scenarios under scrutiny, there was a net erosion of sediment from the estuary. Multiplications of amplitudes of the base flow function by factors 1.5, 2, and 5 result in reduction of the estimated net eroded sediment volume by 25, 40, and 80%, respectively, with respect to the net eroded volume for observed river discharge. The results also indicate that defining the minimum environmental flow as a percentage of dry season flow (as done presently) should be updated to include the full spectrum of natural flows, incorporating temporal variability to better anticipate scenarios of sea-level rise during this century. As permanent submergence of intertidal habitats can be significant after 2050, due to the projected 79 cm rise of sea-level by the year

  8. Effect of regulated deficit irrigation on the morphology, physiology, carbon allocation and nonstructural carbohydrates of three Kentucky bluegrasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J. R.; Ma, L.; Liu, Y. K.; Liu, T. J.; Lu, J. N.; Wang, D. N.

    2015-01-01

    Regulated deficit irrigation (RDI) has been assessed in a wide number of field and fruit crops. However, few are the studies dealing with turfgrass. This study was conducted to investigate the morphology, physiology and carbon metabolic responses to regulated deficit irrigation for three Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) cultivars. Three Kentucky bluegrass cultivars were grown in PVC (polyvinyl chloride) tubes in a greenhouse and subjected to three soil water treatments in a growth chamber: 1) full irrigation; 2) drought stress, 21 days without water after full irrigation; and 3) drought recovery, stressed plants were re-watered for an additional 21 d. The present study indicated that drought resulted in a decline in turf quality (TQ), leaf relative water content (RWC), and photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm) and an increase in electrolyte leakage (EL) for the cultivars. The turf quality, RWC, and Fv/Fm of the three Kentucky bluegrass cultivars increased with re-watering. The allocation of /sup 14/ C increased in the roots of these cultivars during the initial phase of drought stress, where a /sup 14/ C distribution shift from the roots to the stem and leaves appeared with further drought stress. Moreover, there was a significant accumulation of total nonstructural carbohydrates (TNC) in the leaves and stem. The TNC content in the leaves, stem, and roots did not completely return to the control levels following 21 d of re-watering, which was consistent with the recovery of TQ, RWC, Fv/Fm, and EL. In addition, during the re-watering treatment, the reduction in the TNC content may be due to increases in the demand or usage as a result of a rapid recovery in the growth and physiological activities as shown by increased TQ, RWC, and Fv/Fm and decreased EL. Our results suggested that the changes in the carbon allocation model and the accumulation and storage of TNC, as well as the changes in TQ, RWC, Fv/Fm, and EL, for the three cultivars are an adaptive reaction to

  9. Responsive linear-dendritic block copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Eva; Piñol, Milagros; Oriol, Luis

    2014-06-01

    The combination of dendritic and linear polymeric structures in the same macromolecule opens up new possibilities for the design of block copolymers and for applications of functional polymers that have self-assembly properties. There are three main strategies for the synthesis of linear-dendritic block copolymers (LDBCs) and, in particular, the emergence of click chemistry has made the coupling of preformed blocks one of the most efficient ways of obtaining libraries of LDBCs. In these materials, the periphery of the dendron can be precisely functionalised to obtain functional LDBCs with self-assembly properties of interest in different technological areas. The incorporation of stimuli-responsive moieties gives rise to smart materials that are generally processed as self-assemblies of amphiphilic LDBCs with a morphology that can be controlled by an external stimulus. Particular emphasis is placed on light-responsive LDBCs. Furthermore, a brief review of the biomedical or materials science applications of LDBCs is presented. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Equine dendritic cells generated with horse serum have enhanced functionality in comparison to dendritic cells generated with fetal bovine serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Anja; Everett, Helen; Hamza, Eman; Garbani, Mattia; Gerber, Vinzenz; Marti, Eliane; Steinbach, Falko

    2016-11-15

    Dendritic cells are professional antigen-presenting cells that play an essential role in the initiation and modulation of T cell responses. They have been studied widely for their potential clinical applications, but for clinical use to be successful, alternatives to xenogeneic substances like fetal bovine serum (FBS) in cell culture need to be found. Protocols for the generation of dendritic cells ex vivo from monocytes are well established for several species, including horses. Currently, the gold standard protocol for generating dendritic cells from monocytes across various species relies upon a combination of GM-CSF and IL-4 added to cell culture medium which is supplemented with FBS. The aim of this study was to substitute FBS with heterologous horse serum. For this purpose, equine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (eqMoDC) were generated in the presence of horse serum or FBS and analysed for the effect on morphology, phenotype and immunological properties. Changes in the expression of phenotypic markers (CD14, CD86, CD206) were assessed during dendritic cell maturation by flow cytometry. To obtain a more complete picture of the eqMoDC differentiation and assess possible differences between FBS- and horse serum-driven cultures, a transcriptomic microarray analysis was performed. Lastly, immature eqMoDC were primed with a primary antigen (ovalbumin) or a recall antigen (tetanus toxoid) and, after maturation, were co-cultured with freshly isolated autologous CD5 + T lymphocytes to assess their T cell stimulatory capacity. The microarray analysis demonstrated that eqMoDC generated with horse serum were indistinguishable from those generated with FBS. However, eqMoDC incubated with horse serum-supplemented medium exhibited a more characteristic dendritic cell morphology during differentiation from monocytes. A significant increase in cell viability was also observed in eqMoDC cultured with horse serum. Furthermore, eqMoDC generated in the presence of horse serum

  11. Derp1-modified dendritic cells attenuate allergic inflammation by regulating the development of T helper type1(Th1)/Th2 cells and regulatory T cells in a murine model of allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shaoqing; Han, Bing; Liu, Shuangxi; Wang, Hong; Zhuang, Wenjie; Huang, Yu; Zhang, Ruxin

    2017-10-01

    The CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + regulatory T cells (Tregs) are known to regulate Th2-induced allergic rhinitis (AR). In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of Derp1-modified dendritic cells (DCs) in AR immunotherapy. Derp1 was synthesized and transfected into DCs to generate Derp1-modified DCs. Phenotypes of Derp1-modified DCs were analyzed with flow cytometry using antibodies against DC markers CD11c, CD11b, CD59, CD103 and Toll-like receptor 1(TLR1). Four groups of subject mice were formed; the controls were treated with immature DCs, while the AR mice models were sensitized with Derp1(AR) and treated with DCs(DC-AR) or Derp1-modified DCs (Derp1DC-AR). The frequency of sneezing and scratching, eosinophil cell count, and Th1/Th2 ratio in the spleen were measured for all groups. The percentage of CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + Tregs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was measured using flow cytometry; serum IgE, IgG1, and histamine were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; expression levels of transcription factors T-bet, GATA3, Foxp3+ and IL-10 were analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot used in analyzed expression of Foxp3+ and IL-10 in nasal mucosa. Treatment with Derp1-modified DCs ameliorated the allergic response. The Derp1DC-AR group had significantly lower eosinophil cell count and the IgE, IgG1, and histamine levels than the AR and DC-AR groups, and higher mRNA levels of Th1 transcription factors T-bet, IL-10 and Foxp3 in nasal mucosa than DC-AR mice, but Th2 transcription factors GATA3 mRNA expression level has the opposite results. Furthermore, the Th1/Th2 ratio and percentage of CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + Tregs was significantly lower in the AR group (pTh1/Th2, showing an immunotherapeutic effect against AR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Towards deep learning with segregated dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerguiev, Jordan; Lillicrap, Timothy P; Richards, Blake A

    2017-12-05

    Deep learning has led to significant advances in artificial intelligence, in part, by adopting strategies motivated by neurophysiology. However, it is unclear whether deep learning could occur in the real brain. Here, we show that a deep learning algorithm that utilizes multi-compartment neurons might help us to understand how the neocortex optimizes cost functions. Like neocortical pyramidal neurons, neurons in our model receive sensory information and higher-order feedback in electrotonically segregated compartments. Thanks to this segregation, neurons in different layers of the network can coordinate synaptic weight updates. As a result, the network learns to categorize images better than a single layer network. Furthermore, we show that our algorithm takes advantage of multilayer architectures to identify useful higher-order representations-the hallmark of deep learning. This work demonstrates that deep learning can be achieved using segregated dendritic compartments, which may help to explain the morphology of neocortical pyramidal neurons.

  13. Functional Identification of Dendritic Cells in the Teleost Model, Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassity, Elizabeth; Clark, Theodore G.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells are specialized antigen presenting cells that bridge innate and adaptive immunity in mammals. This link between the ancient innate immune system and the more evolutionarily recent adaptive immune system is of particular interest in fish, the oldest vertebrates to have both innate and adaptive immunity. It is unknown whether dendritic cells co-evolved with the adaptive response, or if the connection between innate and adaptive immunity relied on a fundamentally different cell type early in evolution. We approached this question using the teleost model organism, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), with the aim of identifying dendritic cells based on their ability to stimulate naïve T cells. Adapting mammalian protocols for the generation of dendritic cells, we established a method of culturing highly motile, non-adherent cells from trout hematopoietic tissue that had irregular membrane processes and expressed surface MHCII. When side-by-side mixed leukocyte reactions were performed, these cells stimulated greater proliferation than B cells or macrophages, demonstrating their specialized ability to present antigen and therefore their functional homology to mammalian dendritic cells. Trout dendritic cells were then further analyzed to determine if they exhibited other features of mammalian dendritic cells. Trout dendritic cells were found to have many of the hallmarks of mammalian DCs including tree-like morphology, the expression of dendritic cell markers, the ability to phagocytose small particles, activation by toll-like receptor-ligands, and the ability to migrate in vivo. As in mammals, trout dendritic cells could be isolated directly from the spleen, or larger numbers could be derived from hematopoietic tissue and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. PMID:22427987

  14. Effect of Plant Growth Regulators and Cold on Improvement of Morphological Characteristics of Cineraria (Pericallis × hybrida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazem Bashiri

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The climate of every region does not let to have year-round production of crops. Use of plant growth regulators allows to produce the flowers out of season and improve their quality and yield. Gibberellin is one of the plant growth regulators which can substitute cold requirement of plants, while cytokinin is another plant growth regulator to stimulate floral initials. Paclobutrazol is a triazole compound that inhibits gibberellin synthesis. Cineraria (Pericallis × hybrida as a prominent flowering pot plant has a growing demand during the spring festivals especially Nowrouz, which needs further improvement of quality and yield. In this regard a study was designed to examine the morphological characteristics of cineraria using gibberellin, cytokinin, paclobutrazol and cold. Materials and Methods: Seeds of cineraria (Pericallis × hybrida cv. Satellite( were sown in plug trays at the research greenhouse of college of agriculture, Shiraz University. A study was carried out with a completely randomized design and five replications. Control plants were transferred to incubators at eight leaves stage to receive six weeks of cold. Spraying treatments consisted of control (water, 100 mg/L gibberellin at three times (before cold, middle of cold and after cold, combinations of cold and/or gibberellin (100, 200 mg/L with benzyl adenine (150, 300 mg/L and/or paclobutrazol (250, 500 mg/L. In order to better understand the effects of paclobutrazol, its treatments were applied two weeks after gibberellin treatments. Data analysis was done by SAS 9.1 software and means were compared by LSD at 5 percent probability level. Results and Discussions: Gibberellin can be used as a replacement for cold. The maximum acceleration of full flowering (32 days and the greatest delay of full bloom (14 days were observed in 100 mg/L gibberellin + 250 mg/L paclobutrazol and 200 mg/L gibberellin + 300 mg/L benzyl adenine, respectively. These results were

  15. Coding and decoding with dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoutsi, Athanasia; Kastellakis, George; Psarrou, Maria; Anastasakis, Stelios; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2014-02-01

    Since the discovery of complex, voltage dependent mechanisms in the dendrites of multiple neuron types, great effort has been devoted in search of a direct link between dendritic properties and specific neuronal functions. Over the last few years, new experimental techniques have allowed the visualization and probing of dendritic anatomy, plasticity and integrative schemes with unprecedented detail. This vast amount of information has caused a paradigm shift in the study of memory, one of the most important pursuits in Neuroscience, and calls for the development of novel theories and models that will unify the available data according to some basic principles. Traditional models of memory considered neural cells as the fundamental processing units in the brain. Recent studies however are proposing new theories in which memory is not only formed by modifying the synaptic connections between neurons, but also by modifications of intrinsic and anatomical dendritic properties as well as fine tuning of the wiring diagram. In this review paper we present previous studies along with recent findings from our group that support a key role of dendrites in information processing, including the encoding and decoding of new memories, both at the single cell and the network level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dendritic Spines in Depression: What We Learned from Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Depression, a severe psychiatric disorder, has been studied for decades, but the underlying mechanisms still remain largely unknown. Depression is closely associated with alterations in dendritic spine morphology and spine density. Therefore, understanding dendritic spines is vital for uncovering the mechanisms underlying depression. Several chronic stress models, including chronic restraint stress (CRS, chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS, and chronic social defeat stress (CSDS, have been used to recapitulate depression-like behaviors in rodents and study the underlying mechanisms. In comparison with CRS, CUMS overcomes the stress habituation and has been widely used to model depression-like behaviors. CSDS is one of the most frequently used models for depression, but it is limited to the study of male mice. Generally, chronic stress causes dendritic atrophy and spine loss in the neurons of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Meanwhile, neurons of the amygdala and nucleus accumbens exhibit an increase in spine density. These alterations induced by chronic stress are often accompanied by depression-like behaviors. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. This review summarizes our current understanding of the chronic stress-induced remodeling of dendritic spines in the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala, and nucleus accumbens and also discusses the putative underlying mechanisms.

  17. Thermally induced morphological transition of silver fractals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey; Kébaili, Nouari

    2014-01-01

    We present both experimental and theoretical study of thermally induced morphological transition of silver nanofractals. Experimentally, those nanofractals formed from deposition and diffusion of preformed silver clusters on cleaved graphite surfaces exhibit dendritic morphologies that are highly...... sensitive to any perturbation, particularly caused by temperature. We analyze and characterize the morphological transition both in time and temperature using the recently developed Monte Carlo simulation approach for the description of nanofractal dynamics and compare the obtained results...

  18. [Peripheral facial nerve lesion induced long-term dendritic retraction in pyramidal cortico-facial neurons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrego, Diana; Múnera, Alejandro; Troncoso, Julieta

    2011-01-01

    Little evidence is available concerning the morphological modifications of motor cortex neurons associated with peripheral nerve injuries, and the consequences of those injuries on post lesion functional recovery. Dendritic branching of cortico-facial neurons was characterized with respect to the effects of irreversible facial nerve injury. Twenty-four adult male rats were distributed into four groups: sham (no lesion surgery), and dendritic assessment at 1, 3 and 5 weeks post surgery. Eighteen lesion animals underwent surgical transection of the mandibular and buccal branches of the facial nerve. Dendritic branching was examined by contralateral primary motor cortex slices stained with the Golgi-Cox technique. Layer V pyramidal (cortico-facial) neurons from sham and injured animals were reconstructed and their dendritic branching was compared using Sholl analysis. Animals with facial nerve lesions displayed persistent vibrissal paralysis throughout the five week observation period. Compared with control animal neurons, cortico-facial pyramidal neurons of surgically injured animals displayed shrinkage of their dendritic branches at statistically significant levels. This shrinkage persisted for at least five weeks after facial nerve injury. Irreversible facial motoneuron axonal damage induced persistent dendritic arborization shrinkage in contralateral cortico-facial neurons. This morphological reorganization may be the physiological basis of functional sequelae observed in peripheral facial palsy patients.

  19. Divergent Effects of Dendritic Cells on Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    role of dendritic cells in pancreatitis. Dendritic cells are professional antigen presenting cells which initiate innate and adaptive immune... Lymphoid -tissue-specific homing of bone- marrow-derived dendritic cells . Blood. 113:6638–6647. http://dx.doi .org/10.1182/blood-2009-02-204321 Dapito...Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0313 TITLE: Divergent Effects of Dendritic Cells on Pancreatitis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. George Miller

  20. An inverse approach for elucidating dendritic function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Torben-Nielsen

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We outline an inverse approach for investigating dendritic function-structure relationships by optimizing dendritic trees for a-priori chosen computational functions. The inverse approach can be applied in two different ways. First, we can use it as a `hypothesis generator' in which we optimize dendrites for a function of general interest. The optimization yields an artificial dendrite that is subsequently compared to real neurons. This comparison potentially allows us to propose hypotheses about the function of real neurons. In this way, we investigated dendrites that optimally perform input-order detection. Second, we can use it as a `function confirmation' by optimizing dendrites for functions hypothesized to be performed by classes of neurons. If the optimized, artificial, dendrites resemble the dendrites of real neurons the artificial dendrites corroborate the hypothesized function of the real neuron. Moreover, properties of the artificial dendrites can lead to predictions about yet unmeasured properties. In this way, we investigated wide-field motion integration performed by the VS cells of the fly visual system. In outlining the inverse approach and two applications, we also elaborate on the nature of dendritic function. We furthermore discuss the role of optimality in assigning functions to dendrites and point out interesting future directions.

  1. Thermo-solutal growth of an anisotropic dendrite with six-fold symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, D. V.; Galenko, P. K.

    2018-03-01

    A stable growth of dendritic crystal with the six-fold crystalline anisotropy is analyzed in a binary nonisothermal mixture. A selection criterion representing a relationship between the dendrite tip velocity and its tip diameter is derived on the basis of morphological stability analysis and solvability theory. A complete set of nonlinear equations, consisting of the selection criterion and undercooling balance condition, which determines implicit dependencies of the dendrite tip velocity and tip diameter as functions of the total undercooling, is formulated. Exact analytical solutions of these nonlinear equations are found in a parametric form. Asymptotic solutions describing the crystal growth at small Péclet numbers are determined. Theoretical predictions are compared with experimental data obtained for ice dendrites growing in binary water-ethylenglycol solutions as well as in pure water.

  2. Interfacial wave theory for dendritic structure of a growing needle crystal. I - Local instability mechanism. II - Wave-emission mechanism at the turning point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian-Jun

    1989-01-01

    The complicated dendritic structure of a growing needle crystal is studied on the basis of global interfacial wave theory. The local dispersion relation for normal modes is derived in a paraboloidal coordinate system using the multiple-variable-expansion method. It is shown that the global solution in a dendrite growth process incorporates the morphological instability factor and the traveling wave factor.

  3. Reduced hippocampal dendritic spine density and BDNF expression following acute postnatal exposure to di(2-ethylhexyl phthalate in male Long Evans rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Smith

    Full Text Available Early developmental exposure to di(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP has been linked to a variety of neurodevelopmental changes, particularly in rodents. The primary goal of this work was to establish whether acute postnatal exposure to a low dose of DEHP would alter hippocampal dendritic morphology and BDNF and caspase-3 mRNA expression in male and female Long Evans rats. Treatment with DEHP in male rats led to a reduction in spine density on basal and apical dendrites of neurons in the CA3 dorsal hippocampal region compared to vehicle-treated male controls. Dorsal hippocampal BDNF mRNA expression was also down-regulated in male rats exposed to DEHP. No differences in hippocampal spine density or BDNF mRNA expression were observed in female rats treated with DEHP compared to controls. DEHP treatment did not affect hippocampal caspase-3 mRNA expression in male or female rats. These results suggest a gender-specific vulnerability to early developmental DEHP exposure in male rats whereby postnatal DEHP exposure may interfere with normal synaptogenesis and connectivity in the hippocampus. Decreased expression of BDNF mRNA may represent a molecular mechanism underlying the reduction in dendritic spine density observed in hippocampal CA3 neurons. These findings provide initial evidence for a link between developmental exposure to DEHP, reduced levels of BDNF and hippocampal atrophy in male rats.

  4. Spatially restricted actin-regulatory signaling contributes to synapse morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Daniel A.; Cahill, Michael E.; Tulisiak, Christopher T.; Geinisman, Yuri; Penzes, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton in dendritic spines is organized into microdomains, but how signaling molecules that regulate actin are spatially governed is incompletely understood. Here we examine how the localization of the RacGEF kalirin-7, a well-characterized regulator of actin in spines, varies as a function of postsynaptic density (PSD) area and spine volume. Using serial section electron microscopy (EM), we find that extrasynaptic, but not synaptic, expression of kalirin-7 varies directly with synapse size and spine volume. Moreover, we find that overall expression levels of kalirin-7 differ in spines bearing perforated and non-perforated synapses, due primarily to extrasynaptic pools of kalirin-7 expression in the former. Overall, our findings indicate that kalirin-7 is differentially compartmentalized in spines as a function of both synapse morphology and spine size. PMID:22458534

  5. Geranylgeranyltransferase I is essential for dendritic development of cerebellar Purkinje cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Kong-Yan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During cerebellar development, Purkinje cells (PCs form the most elaborate dendritic trees among neurons in the brain, but the mechanism regulating PC arborization remains largely unknown. Geranylgeranyltransferase I (GGT is a prenyltransferase that is responsible for lipid modification of several signaling proteins, such as Rho family small GTPase Rac1, which has been shown to be involved in neuronal morphogenesis. Here we show that GGT plays an important role in dendritic development of PCs. Results We found that GGT was abundantly expressed in the developing rat cerebellum, in particular molecular layer (ML, the region enriched with PC dendrites. Inhibition or down-regulation of GGT using small interference RNA (siRNA inhibited dendritic development of PCs. In contrast, up-regulation of GGT promoted dendritic arborization of PCs. Furthermore, neuronal depolarization induced by high K+ or treatment with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF promoted membrane association of Rac1 and dendritic development of PCs in cultured cerebellar slices. The effect of BDNF or high K+ was inhibited by inhibition or down-regulation of GGT. Conclusion Our results indicate that GGT plays an important role in Purkinje cell development, and suggest a novel role of GGT in neuronal morphogenesis in vivo.

  6. Modulation of Dendritic Cell Responses by Parasites: A Common Strategy to Survive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César A. Terrazas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic infections are one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in our planet and the immune responses triggered by these organisms are critical to determine their outcome. Dendritic cells are key elements for the development of immunity against parasites; they control the responses required to eliminate these pathogens while maintaining host homeostasis. However, there is evidence showing that parasites can influence and regulate dendritic cell function in order to promote a more permissive environment for their survival. In this review we will focus on the strategies protozoan and helminth parasites have developed to interfere with dendritic cell activities as well as in the possible mechanisms involved.

  7. Dendritic Zinc Growth in Acid Electrolyte: Effect of the pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengoa, Leandro N.; Pary, Paola; Seré, Pablo R.; Conconi, M. Susana; Egli, Walter A.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, dendritic growth at the edges of electrogalvanized steel strip has been studied using a specially designed rotating washer electrode which simulates the fluid dynamic conditions and the current density distribution at the steel strip edge found in a production line. The effect of electrolyte pH and current density on dendritic growth in an acidic zinc plating bath (ZnSO4 and H2SO4) was addressed. The temperature was kept constant at 60 °C. Solution pH was adjusted to 1, 2 or 3 using different amounts of H2SO4. In addition, the influence of temperature on the pH of the solution was determined. The current density was set at 40 or 60 A/dm2, similar to that used in the industry. Deposits were characterized using SEM and XRD. The results showed that pH strongly affects dendrites shape, length and texture. Furthermore, the morphology of dendrites at the washer edge and of deposits on the flat portion of the washer changed considerably as solution pH was increased from 1 to 3. It was found that the morphology of dendrites at the washer edge stems from the morphology of the deposit on its flat portion, which in turn determines their shape.

  8. Tumour tissue microenvironment can inhibit dendritic cell maturation in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Michielsen, Adriana J

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators in the tumour microenvironment promote tumour growth, vascular development and enable evasion of anti-tumour immune responses, by disabling infiltrating dendritic cells. However, the constituents of the tumour microenvironment that directly influence dendritic cell maturation and function are not well characterised. Our aim was to identify tumour-associated inflammatory mediators which influence the function of dendritic cells. Tumour conditioned media obtained from cultured colorectal tumour explant tissue contained high levels of the chemokines CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5 in addition to VEGF. Pre-treatment of monocyte derived dendritic cells with this tumour conditioned media inhibited the up-regulation of CD86, CD83, CD54 and HLA-DR in response to LPS, enhancing IL-10 while reducing IL-12p70 secretion. We examined if specific individual components of the tumour conditioned media (CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5) could modulate dendritic cell maturation or cytokine secretion in response to LPS. VEGF was also assessed as it has a suppressive effect on dendritic cell maturation. Pre-treatment of immature dendritic cells with VEGF inhibited LPS induced upregulation of CD80 and CD54, while CXCL1 inhibited HLA-DR. Interestingly, treatment of dendritic cells with CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5 or VEGF significantly suppressed their ability to secrete IL-12p70 in response to LPS. In addition, dendritic cells treated with a combination of CXCL1 and VEGF secreted less IL-12p70 in response to LPS compared to pre-treatment with either cytokine alone. In conclusion, tumour conditioned media strongly influences dendritic cell maturation and function.

  9. Neutrophils, dendritic cells and Toxoplasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denkers, Eric Y; Butcher, Barbara A; Del Rio, Laura; Bennouna, Soumaya

    2004-03-09

    Toxoplasma gondii rapidly elicits strong Type 1 cytokine-based immunity. The necessity for this response is well illustrated by the example of IFN-gamma and IL-12 gene knockout mice that rapidly succumb to the effects of acute infection. The parasite itself is skilled at sparking complex interactions in the innate immune system that lead to protective immunity. Neutrophils are one of the first cell types to arrive at the site of infection, and the cells release several proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in response to Toxoplasma. Dendritic cells are an important source of IL-12 during infection with T. gondii and other microbial pathogens, and they are also specialized for high-level antigen presentation to T lymphocytes. Tachyzoites express at least two types of molecules that trigger innate immune cell cytokine production. One of these involves Toll-like receptor/MyD88 pathways common to many microbial pathogens. The second pathway is less conventional and involves molecular mimicry between a parasite cyclophilin and host CC chemokine receptor 5-binding ligands. Neutrophils, dendritic cells and Toxoplasma work together to elicit the immune response required for host survival. Cytokine and chemokine cross-talk between parasite-triggered neutrophils and dendritic cells results in recruitment, maturation and activation of the latter. Neutrophil-empowered dendritic cells possess properties expected of highly potent antigen presenting cells that drive T helper 1 generation.

  10. Advanced dendritic web growth development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    A program to develop the technology of the silicon dendritic web ribbon growth process is examined. The effort is being concentrated on the area rate and quality requirements necessary to meet the JPL/DOE goals for terrestrial PV applications. Closed loop web growth system development and stress reduction for high area rate growth is considered.

  11. Developmental changes of morphology in the basolateral complex of the rabbit amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagalska-Majewska, Hanna; Luczyńska, Anna; Wójcik, Sławomir; Dziewiatkowski, Jerzy; Kurlapska, Renata; Moryś, Janusz

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to follow topographical and morphological changes in the development of the amygdaloid basolateral complex (BLC) in the rabbit. The material consists of 35 brains of New Zealand rabbits of both sexes, divided into 7 age groups (P2-P90). In cresyl violet preparations BLC is already well visible on P2 and is composed of the lateral (divided into dorsolateral and ventromedial divisions), basolateral and homogenous basomedial nuclei. On about the 7th postnatal day it is possible to divide the basomedial nucleus (BM) into dorsal (Bmd) and ventral (BMv) divisions. The topography and subdivisions set on P7 are maintained in further periods of life. The morphology of neurons (shape, dendrites, staining) changes significantly until P21 in all BLC nuclei. Our results indicate that BLC achieves morphological maturity relatively late, which is probably connected with a long creation of emotional memory and regulation of emotional behaviour.

  12. Distribution and function of HCN channels in the apical dendritic tuft of neocortical pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnett, Mark T; Magee, Jeffrey C; Williams, Stephen R

    2015-01-21

    The apical tuft is the most remote area of the dendritic tree of neocortical pyramidal neurons. Despite its distal location, the apical dendritic tuft of layer 5 pyramidal neurons receives substantial excitatory synaptic drive and actively processes corticocortical input during behavior. The properties of the voltage-activated ion channels that regulate synaptic integration in tuft dendrites have, however, not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we use electrophysiological and optical approaches to examine the subcellular distribution and function of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated nonselective cation (HCN) channels in rat layer 5B pyramidal neurons. Outside-out patch recordings demonstrated that the amplitude and properties of ensemble HCN channel activity were uniform in patches excised from distal apical dendritic trunk and tuft sites. Simultaneous apical dendritic tuft and trunk whole-cell current-clamp recordings revealed that the pharmacological blockade of HCN channels decreased voltage compartmentalization and enhanced the generation and spread of apical dendritic tuft and trunk regenerative activity. Furthermore, multisite two-photon glutamate uncaging demonstrated that HCN channels control the amplitude and duration of synaptically evoked regenerative activity in the distal apical dendritic tuft. In contrast, at proximal apical dendritic trunk and somatic recording sites, the blockade of HCN channels decreased excitability. Dynamic-clamp experiments revealed that these compartment-specific actions of HCN channels were heavily influenced by the local and distributed impact of the high density of HCN channels in the distal apical dendritic arbor. The properties and subcellular distribution pattern of HCN channels are therefore tuned to regulate the interaction between integration compartments in layer 5B pyramidal neurons. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/351024-14$15.00/0.

  13. Inference of RhoGAP/GTPase regulation using single-cell morphological data from a combinatorial RNAi screen

    OpenAIRE

    Nir, Oaz; Bakal, Chris; Perrimon, Norbert; Berger, Bonnie

    2010-01-01

    Biological networks are highly complex systems, consisting largely of enzymes that act as molecular switches to activate/inhibit downstream targets via post-translational modification. Computational techniques have been developed to perform signaling network inference using some high-throughput data sources, such as those generated from transcriptional and proteomic studies, but comparable methods have not been developed to use high-content morphological data, which are emerging principally f...

  14. Prospective Clinical Testing of Regulatory Dendritic Cells in Organ Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Thomson, Angus W.; Zahorchak, Alan F.; Ezzelarab, Mohamed B.; Butterfield, Lisa H.; Lakkis, Fadi G.; Metes, Diana M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are rare, professional antigen-presenting cells with ability to induce or regulate alloimmune responses. Regulatory DC (DCreg) with potential to down-modulate acute and chronic inflammatory conditions that occur in organ transplantation can be generated in vitro under a variety of conditions. Here, we provide a rationale for evaluation of DCreg therapy in clinical organ transplantation with the goal of promoting sustained, donor-specific hyporesponsiveness, while lowering...

  15. Strings on a Violin: Location Dependence of Frequency Tuning in Active Dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anindita; Rathour, Rahul K; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2017-01-01

    Strings on a violin are tuned to generate distinct sound frequencies in a manner that is firmly dependent on finger location along the fingerboard. Sound frequencies emerging from different violins could be very different based on their architecture, the nature of strings and their tuning. Analogously, active neuronal dendrites, dendrites endowed with active channel conductances, are tuned to distinct input frequencies in a manner that is dependent on the dendritic location of the synaptic inputs. Further, disparate channel expression profiles and differences in morphological characteristics could result in dendrites on different neurons of the same subtype tuned to distinct frequency ranges. Alternately, similar location-dependence along dendritic structures could be achieved through disparate combinations of channel profiles and morphological characteristics, leading to degeneracy in active dendritic spectral tuning. Akin to strings on a violin being tuned to different frequencies than those on a viola or a cello, different neuronal subtypes exhibit distinct channel profiles and disparate morphological characteristics endowing each neuronal subtype with unique location-dependent frequency selectivity. Finally, similar to the tunability of musical instruments to elicit distinct location-dependent sounds, neuronal frequency selectivity and its location-dependence are tunable through activity-dependent plasticity of ion channels and morphology. In this morceau, we explore the origins of neuronal frequency selectivity, and survey the literature on the mechanisms behind the emergence of location-dependence in distinct forms of frequency tuning. As a coda to this composition, we present some future directions for this exciting convergence of biophysical mechanisms that endow a neuron with frequency multiplexing capabilities.

  16. Effects of polysaccharides from Pholiota nameko on maturation of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiping; Liu, Lizeng; Tao, Yongqing; Zhao, Pei; Wang, Fengling; Huai, Lihua; Zhi, Dexian; Liu, Jiangmei; Li, Guoliang; Dang, Chunlan; Xu, Yufeng

    2014-02-01

    This paper studied some structure characters of the Pholiota nameko polysaccharides (PNPS-1), including morphology under SEM and AFM, also the effects of PNPS-1 on the maturation of bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDCs) via concrete changes both inside and outside BMDCs. These impacts on BMDCs were assessed with use of inverted phase contrast microscope for morphology, flow cytometry for key surface molecules, mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) for allogeneic T cells proliferation, and bio-assay and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for cytokine production. We found that PNPS-1 could inhibit phenotypic maturation as evidenced by decreasing expression of CD11c, CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, and I-A/I-E. Functional maturation inhibition was further confirmed by decreased naive T cell stimulatory activity of BMDCs. Finally, PNPS-1 also stimulated production of more cytokine IL-10 and less IL-12 and TNF-α. These data indicated that PNPS-1 could markedly inhibit the maturation of BMDCs and had potential significant down-regulation immunity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The small GTPase Rab5 homologue Ypt5 regulates cell morphology, sexual development, ion-stress response and vacuolar formation in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukamoto, Yuta; Katayama, Chisako [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Shinohara, Miki; Shinohara, Akira [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Maekawa, Shohei [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Miyamoto, Masaaki, E-mail: miya@kobe-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Center for Supports to Research and Education Activities, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Multiple functions of Rab5 GTPase in fission yeast were found. •Roles of Rab5 in fission yeast were discussed. •Relation between Rab5 and actin cytoskeleton were discussed. -- Abstract: Inner-membrane transport is critical to cell function. Rab family GTPases play an important role in vesicle transport. In mammalian cells, Rab5 is reported to be involved in the regulation of endosome formation, phagocytosis and chromosome alignment. Here, we examined the role of the fission yeast Rab5 homologue Ypt5 using a point mutant allele. Mutant cells displayed abnormal cell morphology, mating, sporulation, endocytosis, vacuole fusion and responses to ion stress. Our data strongly suggest that fission yeast Rab5 is involved in the regulation of various types of cellular functions.

  18. The small GTPase Rab5 homologue Ypt5 regulates cell morphology, sexual development, ion-stress response and vacuolar formation in fission yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Yuta; Katayama, Chisako; Shinohara, Miki; Shinohara, Akira; Maekawa, Shohei; Miyamoto, Masaaki

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Multiple functions of Rab5 GTPase in fission yeast were found. •Roles of Rab5 in fission yeast were discussed. •Relation between Rab5 and actin cytoskeleton were discussed. -- Abstract: Inner-membrane transport is critical to cell function. Rab family GTPases play an important role in vesicle transport. In mammalian cells, Rab5 is reported to be involved in the regulation of endosome formation, phagocytosis and chromosome alignment. Here, we examined the role of the fission yeast Rab5 homologue Ypt5 using a point mutant allele. Mutant cells displayed abnormal cell morphology, mating, sporulation, endocytosis, vacuole fusion and responses to ion stress. Our data strongly suggest that fission yeast Rab5 is involved in the regulation of various types of cellular functions

  19. REMOD: a tool for analyzing and remodeling the dendritic architecture of neural cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis eBozelos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic morphology is a key determinant of how individual neurons acquire a unique signal processing profile. The highly branched dendritic structure that originates from the cell body, explores the surrounding 3D space in a fractal-like manner, until it reaches a certain amount of complexity. Its shape undergoes significant alterations under various physiological or neuropathological conditions. Yet, despite the profound effect that these alterations can have on neuronal function, the causal relationship between the two remains largely elusive. The lack of a systematic approach for remodeling neural cells and their dendritic trees is a key limitation that contributes to this problem. Such causal relationships can be inferred via the use of large-scale neuronal models whereby the anatomical plasticity of neurons is accounted for, in order to enhance their biological relevance and hence their predictive performance. To facilitate this effort, we developed a computational tool named REMOD that allows the structural remodeling of any type of virtual neuron. REMOD is written in Python and can be accessed through a dedicated web interface that guides the user through various options to manipulate selected neuronal morphologies. REMOD can also be used to extract meaningful morphology statistics for one or multiple reconstructions, including features such as sholl analysis, total dendritic length and area, path length to the soma, centrifugal branch order, diameter tapering and more. As such, the tool can be used both for the analysis and/or the remodeling of neuronal morphologies of any type.

  20. Effect of Temperature and Fluid Flow on Dendrite Growth During Solidification of Al-3 Wt Pct Cu Alloy by the Two-Dimensional Cellular Automaton Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Cheng; Wei, Yanhong; Liu, Renpei; Yu, Fengyi

    2017-12-01

    A two-dimensional cellular automaton-finite volume model was developed to simulate dendrite growth of Al-3 wt pct Cu alloy during solidification to investigate the effect of temperature and fluid flow on dendrite morphology, solute concentration distribution, and dendrite growth velocity. Different calculation conditions that may influence the results of the simulation, including temperature and flow, were considered. The model was also employed to study the effect of different undercoolings, applied temperature fields, and forced flow velocities on solute segregation and dendrite growth. The initial temperature and fluid flow have a significant impact on the dendrite morphologies and solute profiles during solidification. The release of energy is operated with solidification and results in the increase of temperature. A larger undercooling leads to larger solute concentration near the solid/liquid interface and solute concentration gradient at the same time-step. Solute concentration in the solid region tends to increase with the increase of undercooling. Four vortexes appear under the condition when natural flow exists: the two on the right of the dendrite rotate clockwise, and those on the left of the dendrite rotate counterclockwise. With the increase of forced flow velocity, the rejected solute in the upstream region becomes easier to be washed away and enriched in the downstream region, resulting in acceleration of the growth of the dendrite in the upstream and inhibiting the downstream dendrite growth. The dendrite perpendicular to fluid flow shows a coarser morphology in the upstream region than that of the downstream. Almost no secondary dendrite appears during the calculation process.

  1. Phase field modeling of dendritic coarsening during isothermal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yutuo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic coarsening in Al-2mol%Si alloy during isothermal solidification at 880K was investigated by phase field modeling. Three coarsening mechanisms operate in the alloy: (a melting of small dendrite arms; (b coalescence of dendrites near the tips leading to the entrapment of liquid droplets; (c smoothing of dendrites. Dendrite melting is found to be dominant in the stage of dendritic growth, whereas coalescence of dendrites and smoothing of dendrites are dominant during isothermal holding. The simulated results provide a better understanding of dendrite coarsening during isothermal solidification.

  2. Platinum nanoparticles decorated dendrite-like gold nanostructure on glassy carbon electrodes for enhancing electrocatalysis performance to glucose oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Hongmei [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, No. 368 Youyi Avenue, Wuchang, Wuhan 430062 (China); Chang, Gang, E-mail: changgang@hubu.edu.cn [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, No. 368 Youyi Avenue, Wuchang, Wuhan 430062 (China); Lei, Ming [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); He, Hanping [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineer, Hubei University, Youyi Road 368, Wuchang, Wuhan, Hubei 430062 (China); Liu, Xiong; Shu, Honghui; Xia, Tiantian; Su, Jie [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, No. 368 Youyi Avenue, Wuchang, Wuhan 430062 (China); He, Yunbin, E-mail: ybhe@hubu.edu.cn [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, No. 368 Youyi Avenue, Wuchang, Wuhan 430062 (China)

    2016-10-30

    Highlights: • Pt/DGNs/GC composites were obtained via a clean and facile method without any templates, surfactants, or stabilizers. • Controlling chemical reduction deposition time, the amount of platinum nanoparticles on Au surface could be regulated, which further tuned electrocatalytic properties toward glucose oxidation. • The obtained Pt/DGNs/GC composites with high electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) show superior electrocatalytic activity to glucose. • The sensor based on Pt/DGNs/GC exhibited excellent sensitivity, selectivity and stability for nonenzymatic glucose detection. - Abstract: Platinum nanoparticles decorated dendrite-like gold nanostructure, bimetal composite materials on glassy carbon electrode (Pt/DGNs/GC) for enhancing electrocatalysis to glucose oxidation was designed and successfully fabricated by a facile two-step deposition method without any templates, surfactants, or stabilizers. Dendrite-like gold nanostructure was firstly deposited on the GC electrode via the potentiostatic method, and then platinum nanoparticles were decorated on the surface of gold substrate through chemical reduction deposition. X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were applied to characterize the evolution of morphology and structure of the as-prepared Pt/DGNs/GC. Based on electrochemical measurements such as cyclic voltammetry, linear voltammetry and chronoamperometry, Pt/DGNs/GC exhibited significantly enhanced electrocatalytic performance to glucose oxidation compared those of pure dendrite-like Au nanoparticles in our previous report. Controlling chemical reduction deposition time, the amount of platinum nanoparticles on Au surface could be regulated, which further tuned electrocatalytic properties toward glucose oxidation. The dendrite-like gold surface partially covered by platinum nanoparticles dramatically enhanced the electrocatalytic performance for the

  3. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator is correlated closely with sperm progressive motility and normal morphology in healthy and fertile men with normal sperm parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, L-Y; Shan, J-J; Tong, X-M; Zhu, H-Y; Yang, L-Y; Zheng, Q; Luo, Y; Shi, Q-X; Zhang, S-Y

    2014-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) has been demonstrated to be expressed in mature spermatozoa and correlated with sperm quality. Sperm CFTR expression in fertile men is higher than that in infertile men suffering from teratospermia, asthenoteratospermia, asthenospermia and oligospermia, but it is unknown whether CFTR is correlated with sperm parameters when sperm parameters are normal. In this study, 282 healthy and fertile men with normal semen parameters were classified into three age groups, group (I): age group of 20-29 years (98 cases, 27.1 ± 6.2), group (II): age group of 30-39 years (142 cases, 33.7 ± 2.6) and group (III): age group of more than or equal to 40 years (42 cases, 44.1 ± 4.6). Sperm concentration, total count and progressive motility were analysed by computer-assisted sperm analysis. Sperm morphology was analysed by modified Papanicolaou staining. Sperm CFTR expression was conducted by indirect immunofluorescence staining. There was a significant positive correlation (P sperm progressive motility (r = 0.221) and normal morphology (r = 0.202), but there were no correlations between sperm CFTR expression and semen volume, sperm concentration, sperm total count as well as male age (P > 0.05). Our findings show that CFTR expression is associated with sperm progressive motility and normal morphology in healthy and fertile men with normal sperm parameters, but not associated with the number of spermatozoa and male age. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. APC/β-catenin-rich complexes at membrane protrusions regulate mammary tumor cell migration and mesenchymal morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odenwald, Matthew A; Prosperi, Jenifer R; Goss, Kathleen H

    2013-01-01

    The APC tumor suppressor is mutated or downregulated in many tumor types, and is prominently localized to punctate clusters at protrusion tips in migratory cells, such as in astrocytes where it has been implicated in directed cell motility. Although APC loss is considered an initiating event in colorectal cancer, for example, it is less clear what role APC plays in tumor cell motility and whether loss of APC might be an important promoter of tumor progression in addition to initiation. The localization of APC and β-catenin was analyzed in multiple cell lines, including non-transformed epithelial lines treated with a proteasome inhibitor or TGFβ to induce an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), as well as several breast cancer lines, by immunofluorescence. APC expression was knocked down in 4T07 mammary tumor cells using lentiviral-mediated delivery of APC-specific short-hairpin (sh) RNAs, and assessed using quantitative (q) reverse-transcriptase (RT)-PCR and western blotting. Tumor cell motility was analyzed by performing wound-filling assays, and morphology via immunofluorescence (IF) and phase-contrast microscopy. Additionally, proliferation was measured using BrdU incorporation, and TCF reporter assays were performed to determine β-catenin/TCF-mediated transcriptional activity. APC/β-catenin-rich complexes were observed at protrusion ends of migratory epithelial cells treated with a proteasome inhibitor or when EMT has been induced and in tumor cells with a mesenchymal, spindle-like morphology. 4T07 tumor cells with reduced APC levels were significantly less motile and had a more rounded morphology; yet, they did not differ significantly in proliferation or β-catenin/TCF transcriptional activity. Furthermore, we found that APC/β-catenin-rich complexes at protrusion ends were dependent upon an intact microtubule cytoskeleton. These findings indicate that membrane protrusions with APC/β-catenin-containing puncta control the migratory potential and

  5. APC/β-catenin-rich complexes at membrane protrusions regulate mammary tumor cell migration and mesenchymal morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The APC tumor suppressor is mutated or downregulated in many tumor types, and is prominently localized to punctate clusters at protrusion tips in migratory cells, such as in astrocytes where it has been implicated in directed cell motility. Although APC loss is considered an initiating event in colorectal cancer, for example, it is less clear what role APC plays in tumor cell motility and whether loss of APC might be an important promoter of tumor progression in addition to initiation. Methods The localization of APC and β-catenin was analyzed in multiple cell lines, including non-transformed epithelial lines treated with a proteasome inhibitor or TGFβ to induce an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), as well as several breast cancer lines, by immunofluorescence. APC expression was knocked down in 4T07 mammary tumor cells using lentiviral-mediated delivery of APC-specific short-hairpin (sh) RNAs, and assessed using quantitative (q) reverse-transcriptase (RT)-PCR and western blotting. Tumor cell motility was analyzed by performing wound-filling assays, and morphology via immunofluorescence (IF) and phase-contrast microscopy. Additionally, proliferation was measured using BrdU incorporation, and TCF reporter assays were performed to determine β-catenin/TCF-mediated transcriptional activity. Results APC/β-catenin-rich complexes were observed at protrusion ends of migratory epithelial cells treated with a proteasome inhibitor or when EMT has been induced and in tumor cells with a mesenchymal, spindle-like morphology. 4T07 tumor cells with reduced APC levels were significantly less motile and had a more rounded morphology; yet, they did not differ significantly in proliferation or β-catenin/TCF transcriptional activity. Furthermore, we found that APC/β-catenin-rich complexes at protrusion ends were dependent upon an intact microtubule cytoskeleton. Conclusions These findings indicate that membrane protrusions with APC/β-catenin-containing puncta

  6. Actin-Dependent Alterations of Dendritic Spine Morphology in Shankopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasnuva Sarowar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Shank proteins (Shank1, Shank2, and Shank3 act as scaffolding molecules in the postsynaptic density of many excitatory neurons. Mutations in SHANK genes, in particular SHANK2 and SHANK3, lead to autism spectrum disorders (ASD in both human and mouse models. Shank3 proteins are made of several domains—the Shank/ProSAP N-terminal (SPN domain, ankyrin repeats, SH3 domain, PDZ domain, a proline-rich region, and the sterile alpha motif (SAM domain. Via various binding partners of these domains, Shank3 is able to bind and interact with a wide range of proteins including modulators of small GTPases such as RICH2, a RhoGAP protein, and βPIX, a RhoGEF protein for Rac1 and Cdc42, actin binding proteins and actin modulators. Dysregulation of all isoforms of Shank proteins, but especially Shank3, leads to alterations in spine morphogenesis, shape, and activity of the synapse via altering actin dynamics. Therefore, here, we highlight the role of Shank proteins as modulators of small GTPases and, ultimately, actin dynamics, as found in multiple in vitro and in vivo models. The failure to mediate this regulatory role might present a shared mechanism in the pathophysiology of autism-associated mutations, which leads to dysregulation of spine morphogenesis and synaptic signaling.

  7. Thermosolutal convection during dendritic solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, J. C.; Nandapurkar, P.; Poirier, D. R.; Felicelli, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for directional solidification of a binary alloy including a dendritic region underlying an all-liquid region. It is assumed initially that there exists a nonconvecting state with planar isotherms and isoconcentrates solidifying at a constant velocity. The stability of this system has been analyzed and nonlinear calculations are performed that show the effect of convection in the solidification process when the system is unstable. Results of calculations for various cases defined by the initial temperature gradient at the dendrite tips and varying strength of the gravitational field are presented for systems involving lead-tin alloys. The results show that the systems are stable for a gravitational constant of 0.0001 g(0) and that convection can be suppressed by appropriate choice of the container's size for higher values of the gravitational constant. It is also concluded that for the lead-tin systems considered, convection in the mushy zone is not significant below the upper 20 percent of the dendritic zone, if al all.

  8. PDE2A2 regulates mitochondria morphology and apoptotic cell death via local modulation of cAMP/PKA signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterisi, Stefania; Lobo, Miguel J; Livie, Craig; Castle, John C; Weinberger, Michael; Baillie, George; Surdo, Nicoletta C; Musheshe, Nshunge; Stangherlin, Alessandra; Gottlieb, Eyal; Maizels, Rory; Bortolozzi, Mario; Micaroni, Massimo; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2017-05-02

    cAMP/PKA signalling is compartmentalised with tight spatial and temporal control of signal propagation underpinning specificity of response. The cAMP-degrading enzymes, phosphodiesterases (PDEs), localise to specific subcellular domains within which they control local cAMP levels and are key regulators of signal compartmentalisation. Several components of the cAMP/PKA cascade are located to different mitochondrial sub-compartments, suggesting the presence of multiple cAMP/PKA signalling domains within the organelle. The function and regulation of these domains remain largely unknown. Here, we describe a novel cAMP/PKA signalling domain localised at mitochondrial membranes and regulated by PDE2A2. Using pharmacological and genetic approaches combined with real-time FRET imaging and high resolution microscopy, we demonstrate that in rat cardiac myocytes and other cell types mitochondrial PDE2A2 regulates local cAMP levels and PKA-dependent phosphorylation of Drp1. We further demonstrate that inhibition of PDE2A, by enhancing the hormone-dependent cAMP response locally, affects mitochondria dynamics and protects from apoptotic cell death.

  9. Dendritic cells in chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuckovic, S; Fearnley, D B; Gunningham, S; Spearing, R L; Patton, W N; Hart, D N

    1999-06-01

    Blood dendritic cells (DC) differentiate in vitro via two separate pathways: either directly from blood DC precursors (DCp) or from CD14+ monocytes. In chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia (CMML) abnormal bone marrow precursors contribute to blood monocyte development but DC development has not been studied previously. Monocytes comprised 60% of blood MNC in 15 CMML patients studied, compared with 20% in 16 age-matched controls. The increase in blood monocytes was accompanied by a reciprocal decrease in mean blood DC percentage (from 0.42% of MNC in normal individuals to 0.16% of MNC in CMML patients). Absolute blood DC numbers showed a minimal (non-significant) reduction from 9.8 x 10(6)/l in normal individuals to 7.5 x 10(6)/l in CMML patients. The CD14(low) WCD16+ monocyte subpopulation was not found in CMML patients. After culture in GM-CSF/IL-4, CMML CD14+ monocytes acquired the phenotype of immature monocyte derived DC (Mo-DC) with similar yields to normal blood Mo-DC generation. Addition of TNF-alpha or LPS induced both normal and CMML Mo-DC to express prominent dendritic processes, the CMRF44+ and CD83+ antigens and high levels of HLA-DR, CD80 and CD86. Treatment either with TNF-alpha or LPS increased the allostimulatory activity of normal Mo-DC, but had little effect on the allostimulatory activity of CMML Mo-DC, perhaps reflecting the underlying neoplastic changes in monocyte precursors. We conclude that the blood DC numbers are relatively unaffected in CMML, suggesting discrete regulation of monocyte and DC production.

  10. Orientations of dendritic growth during solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Nyung

    2017-03-01

    Dendrites are crystalline forms which grow far from the limit of stability of the plane front and adopt an orientation which is as close as possible to the heat flux direction. Dendritic growth orientations for cubic metals, bct Sn, and hcp Zn, can be controlled by thermal conductivity, Young's modulus, and surface energy. The control factors have been elaborated. Since the dendrite is a single crystal, its properties such as thermal conductivity that influences the heat flux direction, the minimum Young's modulus direction that influences the strain energy minimization, and the minimum surface energy plane that influences the crystal/liquid interface energy minimization have been proved to control the dendritic growth direction. The dendritic growth directions of cubic metals are determined by the minimum Young's modulus direction and/or axis direction of symmetry of the minimum crystal surface energy plane. The dendritic growth direction of bct Sn is determined by its maximum thermal conductivity direction and the minimum surface energy plane normal direction. The primary dendritic growth direction of hcp Zn is determined by its maximum thermal conductivity direction and the minimum surface energy plane normal direction and the secondary dendrite arm direction of hcp Zn is normal to the primary dendritic growth direction.

  11. Morphological and genetic characterization of group I Clostridium botulinum type B strain 111 and the transcriptional regulator spoIIID gene knockout mutant in sporulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosomi, Koji; Kuwana, Ritsuko; Takamatsu, Hiromu; Kohda, Tomoko; Kozaki, Shunji; Mukamoto, Masafumi

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a heat-resistant spore-forming bacterium that causes the serious paralytic illness botulism. Heat-resistant spores may cause food sanitation hazards and sporulation plays a central role in the survival of C. botulinum. We observed morphological changes and investigated the role of the transcriptional regulator SpoIIID in the sporulation of C. botulinum type B strain 111 in order to elucidate the molecular mechanism in C. botulinum. C. botulinum type B formed heat-resistant spores through successive morphological changes corresponding to those of Bacillus subtilis, a spore-forming model organism. An analysis of the spoIIID gene knockout mutant revealed that the transcriptional regulator SpoIIID contributed to heat-resistant spore formation by C. botulinum type B and activated the transcription of the sigK gene later during sporulation. Transcription of the spoIIID gene, which differed from that in B. subtilis and Clostridium difficile, was observed in the sigE gene knockout mutant of C. botulinum type B. An analysis of the sigF gene knockout mutant showed that the sporulation-specific sigma factor SigF was essential for transcription of the spoIIID gene in C. botulinum type B. These results suggest that the regulation of sporulation in C. botulinum is not similar to that in B. subtilis and other clostridia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Dendritic cell maturation: functional specialization through signaling specificity and transcriptional programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalod, Marc; Chelbi, Rabie; Malissen, Bernard; Lawrence, Toby

    2014-05-16

    Dendritic cells (DC) are key regulators of both protective immune responses and tolerance to self-antigens. Soon after their discovery in lymphoid tissues by Steinman and Cohn, as cells with the unique ability to prime naïve antigen-specific T cells, it was realized that DC can exist in at least two distinctive states characterized by morphological, phenotypic and functional changes-this led to the description of DC maturation. It is now well appreciated that there are several subsets of DC in both lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues of mammals, and these cells show remarkable functional specialization and specificity in their roles in tolerance and immunity. This review will focus on the specific characteristics of DC subsets and how their functional specialization may be regulated by distinctive gene expression programs and signaling responses in both steady-state and in the context of inflammation. In particular, we will highlight the common and distinctive genes and signaling pathways that are associated with the functional maturation of DC subsets. © 2014 The Authors.

  13. Dendritic cell fate is determined by BCL11A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Gregory C.; Dekker, Joseph D.; Wang, Yui-Hsi; Lee, Bum-Kyu; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Lin, Jian; Wall, Jason K.; Lee, Baeck-Seung; Staudt, Louis M.; Liu, Yong-Jun; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Tucker, Haley O.

    2014-01-01

    The plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) is vital to the coordinated action of innate and adaptive immunity. pDC development has not been unequivocally traced, nor has its transcriptional regulatory network been fully clarified. Here we confirm an essential requirement for the BCL11A transcription factor in fetal pDC development, and demonstrate this lineage-specific requirement in the adult organism. Furthermore, we identify BCL11A gene targets and provide a molecular mechanism for its action in pDC commitment. Embryonic germ-line deletion of Bcl11a revealed an absolute cellular, molecular, and functional absence of pDCs in fetal mice. In adults, deletion of Bcl11a in hematopoietic stem cells resulted in perturbed yet continued generation of progenitors, loss of downstream pDC and B-cell lineages, and persisting myeloid, conventional dendritic, and T-cell lineages. Challenge with virus resulted in a marked reduction of antiviral response in conditionally deleted adults. Genome-wide analyses of BCL11A DNA binding and expression revealed that BCL11A regulates transcription of E2-2 and other pDC differentiation modulators, including ID2 and MTG16. Our results identify BCL11A as an essential, lineage-specific factor that regulates pDC development, supporting a model wherein differentiation into pDCs represents a primed “default” pathway for common dendritic cell progenitors. PMID:24591644

  14. CD1d-restricted IFN-γ-secreting NKT cells promote immune complex-induced acute lung injury by regulating macrophage-inflammatory protein-1α production and activation of macrophages and dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Hyung; Chung, Doo Hyun

    2011-02-01

    Immune complex-induced acute lung injury (IC-ALI) has been implicated in various pulmonary disease states. However, the role of NKT cells in IC-ALI remains unknown. Therefore, we explored NKT cell functions in IC-ALI using chicken egg albumin and anti-chicken egg albumin IgG. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of CD1d(-/-) and Jα18(-/-) mice contained few Ly6G(+)CD11b(+) granulocytes, whereas levels in B6 mice were greater and were increased further by α-galactosyl ceramide. IFN-γ and MIP-1α production in the lungs was greater in B6 than CD1d(-/-) mice. Adoptive transfer of wild type (WT) but not IFN-γ-, MIP-1α-, or FcγR-deficient NKT cells into CD1d(-/-) mice caused recruitment of inflammatory cells to the lungs. Moreover, adoptive transfer of IFN-γR-deficient NKT cells enhanced MIP-1α production and cell recruitment in the lungs of CD1d(-/-) or CD1d(-/-)IFN-γ(-/-) mice, but to a lesser extent than WT NKT cells. This suggests that IFN-γ-producing NKT cells enhance MIP-1α production in both an autocrine and a paracrine manner. IFN-γ-deficient NKT cells induced less IL-1β and TNF-α production by alveolar macrophages and dendritic cells in CD1d(-/-) mice than did WT NKT cells. Taken together, these data suggest that CD1d-restricted IFN-γ-producing NKT cells promote IC-ALI by producing MIP-1α and enhancing proinflammatory cytokine production by alveolar macrophages and dendritic cells.

  15. p16 expression in follicular dendritic cell sarcoma: a potential mimicker of human papillomavirus-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lingxin; Yang, Chen; Lewis, James S; El-Mofty, Samir K; Chernock, Rebecca D

    2017-08-01

    Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm that most commonly occurs in cervical lymph nodes. It has histologic and clinical overlap with the much more common p16-positive human papillomavirus (HPV)-related squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, which characteristically has nonkeratinizing morphology and often presents as an isolated neck mass. Not surprisingly, follicular dendritic cell sarcomas are commonly misdiagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry is helpful in separating the 2 entities. Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma expresses dendritic markers such as CD21 and CD23 and is almost always cytokeratin negative. However, in many cases of HPV-related oropharyngeal carcinoma, only p16 immunohistochemistry as a prognostic and surrogate marker for HPV is performed. p16 expression in follicular dendritic cell sarcoma has not been characterized. Here, we investigate the expression of p16 in follicular dendritic cell sarcoma and correlate it with retinoblastoma protein expression. A pilot study of dendritic marker expression in HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma was also performed. We found that 4 of 8 sarcomas expressed p16 with strong and diffuse staining in 2 cases. In 2 of the 4 cases, p16 expression corresponded to loss of retinoblastoma protein expression. Dendritic marker expression (CD21 and CD23) was not found in HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas. As such, positive p16 immunohistochemistry cannot be used as supportive evidence for the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma as strong and diffuse p16 expression may also occur in follicular dendritic cell sarcoma. Cytokeratins and dendritic markers are critical in separating the two tumor types. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fasting and Systemic Insulin Signaling Regulate Phosphorylation of Brain Proteins That Modulate Cell Morphology and Link to Neurological Disorders*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Quan, Chao; Toth, Rachel; Campbell, David G.; MacKintosh, Carol; Wang, Hong Yu; Chen, Shuai

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is strongly associated with cognitive decline, but the molecular reasons are unknown. We found that fasting and peripheral insulin promote phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, respectively, of specific residues on brain proteins including cytoskeletal regulators such as slit-robo GTPase-activating protein 3 (srGAP3) and microtubule affinity-regulating protein kinases (MARKs), in which deficiency or dysregulation is linked to neurological disorders. Fasting activates protein kinase A (PKA) but not PKB/Akt signaling in the brain, and PKA can phosphorylate the purified srGAP3. The phosphorylation of srGAP3 and MARKs were increased when PKA signaling was activated in primary neurons. Knockdown of PKA decreased the phosphorylation of srGAP3. Furthermore, WAVE1, a protein kinase A-anchoring protein, formed a complex with srGAP3 and PKA in the brain of fasted mice to facilitate the phosphorylation of srGAP3 by PKA. Although brain cells have insulin receptors, our findings are inconsistent with the down-regulation of phosphorylation of target proteins being mediated by insulin signaling within the brain. Rather, our findings infer that systemic insulin, through a yet unknown mechanism, inhibits PKA or protein kinase(s) with similar specificity and/or activates an unknown phosphatase in the brain. Ser858 of srGAP3 was identified as a key regulatory residue in which phosphorylation by PKA enhanced the GAP activity of srGAP3 toward its substrate, Rac1, in cells, thereby inhibiting the action of this GTPase in cytoskeletal regulation. Our findings reveal novel mechanisms linking peripheral insulin sensitivity with cytoskeletal remodeling in neurons, which may help to explain the association of diabetes with neurological disorders such as Alzheimer disease. PMID:26499801

  17. Fasting and Systemic Insulin Signaling Regulate Phosphorylation of Brain Proteins That Modulate Cell Morphology and Link to Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Quan, Chao; Toth, Rachel; Campbell, David G; MacKintosh, Carol; Wang, Hong Yu; Chen, Shuai

    2015-12-11

    Diabetes is strongly associated with cognitive decline, but the molecular reasons are unknown. We found that fasting and peripheral insulin promote phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, respectively, of specific residues on brain proteins including cytoskeletal regulators such as slit-robo GTPase-activating protein 3 (srGAP3) and microtubule affinity-regulating protein kinases (MARKs), in which deficiency or dysregulation is linked to neurological disorders. Fasting activates protein kinase A (PKA) but not PKB/Akt signaling in the brain, and PKA can phosphorylate the purified srGAP3. The phosphorylation of srGAP3 and MARKs were increased when PKA signaling was activated in primary neurons. Knockdown of PKA decreased the phosphorylation of srGAP3. Furthermore, WAVE1, a protein kinase A-anchoring protein, formed a complex with srGAP3 and PKA in the brain of fasted mice to facilitate the phosphorylation of srGAP3 by PKA. Although brain cells have insulin receptors, our findings are inconsistent with the down-regulation of phosphorylation of target proteins being mediated by insulin signaling within the brain. Rather, our findings infer that systemic insulin, through a yet unknown mechanism, inhibits PKA or protein kinase(s) with similar specificity and/or activates an unknown phosphatase in the brain. Ser(858) of srGAP3 was identified as a key regulatory residue in which phosphorylation by PKA enhanced the GAP activity of srGAP3 toward its substrate, Rac1, in cells, thereby inhibiting the action of this GTPase in cytoskeletal regulation. Our findings reveal novel mechanisms linking peripheral insulin sensitivity with cytoskeletal remodeling in neurons, which may help to explain the association of diabetes with neurological disorders such as Alzheimer disease. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. GSK3α and GSK3β Phosphorylate Arc and Regulate its Degradation

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    Agata Gozdz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The selective and neuronal activity-dependent degradation of synaptic proteins appears to be crucial for long-term synaptic plasticity. One such protein is activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc, which regulates the synaptic content of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPAR, excitatory synapse strength and dendritic spine morphology. The levels of Arc protein are tightly regulated, and its removal occurs via proteasome-mediated degradation that requires prior ubiquitination. Glycogen synthase kinases α and β (GSK3α, GSKβ; collectively named GSK3α/β are serine-threonine kinases with abundant expression in the central nervous system. Both GSK3 isozymes are tonically active under basal conditions, but their activity is regulated by intra- and extracellular factors, intimately involved in neuronal activity. Similar to Arc, GSK3α and GSK3β contribute to synaptic plasticity and the structural plasticity of dendritic spines. The present study identified Arc as a GSK3α/β substrate and showed that GSKβ promotes Arc degradation under conditions that induce de novo Arc synthesis. We also found that GSK3α/β inhibition potentiated spine head thinning that was caused by the prolonged stimulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR. Furthermore, overexpression of Arc mutants that were resistant to GSK3β-mediated phosphorylation or ubiquitination resulted in a stronger reduction of dendritic spine width than wildtype Arc overexpression. Thus, GSK3β terminates Arc expression and limits its effect on dendritic spine morphology. Taken together, the results identify GSK3α/β-catalyzed Arc phosphorylation and degradation as a novel mechanism for controlling the duration of Arc expression and function.

  19. Overexpression of FurA in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 reveals new targets for this regulator involved in photosynthesis, iron uptake and cellular morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Andrés; Bes, M Teresa; Barja, François; Peleato, M Luisa; Fillat, María F

    2010-11-01

    Previous genomic analyses of the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 have identified three ferric uptake regulator (Fur) homologs with low sequence identities and probably different functions in the cell. FurA is a constitutive protein that shares the highest homology with Fur from heterotrophic bacteria and appears to be essential for in vitro growth. In this study, we have analysed the effects of FurA overexpression on the Anabaena sp. phenotype and investigated which of the observed alterations were directly operated by FurA. Overexpression of the regulator led to changes in cellular morphology, resulting in shorter filaments with rounded cells of different sizes. The furA-overexpressing strain showed a slower photoautotrophic growth and a marked decrease in the oxygen evolution rate. Overexpression of the regulator also decreased both catalase and superoxide dismutase activities, but did not lead to an increase in the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species. By combining phenotypic studies, reverse transcription-PCR analyses and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we identified three novel direct targets of FurA, including genes encoding a siderophore outer membrane transporter (schT), bacterial actins (mreBCD) and the PSII reaction center protein D1 (psbA). The affinity of FurA for these novel targets was markedly affected by the absence of divalent metal ions, confirming previous evidence of a critical role for the metal co-repressor in the function of the regulator in vivo. The results unravel new cellular processes modulated by FurA, supporting its role as a global transcriptional regulator in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

  20. Extrinsic morphology of graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Teng

    2011-01-01

    Graphene is intrinsically non-flat and corrugates randomly. Since the corrugating physics of atomically thin graphene is strongly tied to its electronics properties, randomly corrugating morphology of graphene poses a significant challenge to its application in nanoelectronic devices for which precise (digital) control is the key. Recent studies revealed that the morphology of substrate-supported graphene is regulated by the graphene–substrate interaction, thus is distinct from the random intrinsic morphology of freestanding graphene. The regulated extrinsic morphology of graphene sheds light on new pathways to fine tune the properties of graphene. To guide further research to explore these fertile opportunities, this paper reviews recent progress on modeling and experimental studies of the extrinsic morphology of graphene under a wide range of external regulation, including two-dimensional and one-dimensional substrate surface features and one-dimensional and zero-dimensional nanoscale scaffolds (e.g. nanowires and nanoparticles)

  1. Spindle-F Is the Central Mediator of Ik2 Kinase-Dependent Dendrite Pruning in Drosophila Sensory Neurons.

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    Tzu Lin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available During development, certain Drosophila sensory neurons undergo dendrite pruning that selectively eliminates their dendrites but leaves the axons intact. How these neurons regulate pruning activity in the dendrites remains unknown. Here, we identify a coiled-coil protein Spindle-F (Spn-F that is required for dendrite pruning in Drosophila sensory neurons. Spn-F acts downstream of IKK-related kinase Ik2 in the same pathway for dendrite pruning. Spn-F exhibits a punctate pattern in larval neurons, whereas these Spn-F puncta become redistributed in pupal neurons, a step that is essential for dendrite pruning. The redistribution of Spn-F from puncta in pupal neurons requires the phosphorylation of Spn-F by Ik2 kinase to decrease Spn-F self-association, and depends on the function of microtubule motor dynein complex. Spn-F is a key component to link Ik2 kinase to dynein motor complex, and the formation of Ik2/Spn-F/dynein complex is critical for Spn-F redistribution and for dendrite pruning. Our findings reveal a novel regulatory mechanism for dendrite pruning achieved by temporal activation of Ik2 kinase and dynein-mediated redistribution of Ik2/Spn-F complex in neurons.

  2. Phytophthora capsici homologue of the cell cycle regulator SDA1 is required for sporangial morphology, mycelial growth and plant infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chunyuan; Yang, Xiaoyan; Lv, Rongfei; Li, Zhuang; Ding, Xiaomeng; Tyler, Brett M; Zhang, Xiuguo

    2016-04-01

    SDA1 encodes a highly conserved protein that is widely distributed in eukaryotic organisms. SDA1 is essential for cell cycle progression and organization of the actin cytoskeleton in yeasts and humans. In this study, we identified a Phytophthora capsici orthologue of yeast SDA1, named PcSDA1. In P. capsici, PcSDA1 is strongly expressed in three asexual developmental states (mycelium, sporangia and germinating cysts), as well as late in infection. Silencing or overexpression of PcSDA1 in P. capsici transformants affected the growth of hyphae and sporangiophores, sporangial development, cyst germination and zoospore release. Phalloidin staining confirmed that PcSDA1 is required for organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Moreover, 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining and PcSDA1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions revealed that PcSDA1 is involved in the regulation of nuclear distribution in hyphae and sporangia. Both silenced and overexpression transformants showed severely diminished virulence. Thus, our results suggest that PcSDA1 plays a similar role in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and nuclear division in this filamentous organism as in non-filamentous yeasts and human cells. © 2015 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Effects of active conductance distribution over dendrites on the synaptic integration in an identified nonspiking interneuron.

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    Akira Takashima

    Full Text Available The synaptic integration in individual central neuron is critically affected by how active conductances are distributed over dendrites. It has been well known that the dendrites of central neurons are richly endowed with voltage- and ligand-regulated ion conductances. Nonspiking interneurons (NSIs, almost exclusively characteristic to arthropod central nervous systems, do not generate action potentials and hence lack voltage-regulated sodium channels, yet having a variety of voltage-regulated potassium conductances on their dendritic membrane including the one similar to the delayed-rectifier type potassium conductance. It remains unknown, however, how the active conductances are distributed over dendrites and how the synaptic integration is affected by those conductances in NSIs and other invertebrate neurons where the cell body is not included in the signal pathway from input synapses to output sites. In the present study, we quantitatively investigated the functional significance of active conductance distribution pattern in the spatio-temporal spread of synaptic potentials over dendrites of an identified NSI in the crayfish central nervous system by computer simulation. We systematically changed the distribution pattern of active conductances in the neuron's multicompartment model and examined how the synaptic potential waveform was affected by each distribution pattern. It was revealed that specific patterns of nonuniform distribution of potassium conductances were consistent, while other patterns were not, with the waveform of compound synaptic potentials recorded physiologically in the major input-output pathway of the cell, suggesting that the possibility of nonuniform distribution of potassium conductances over the dendrite cannot be excluded as well as the possibility of uniform distribution. Local synaptic circuits involving input and output synapses on the same branch or on the same side were found to be potentially affected under

  4. The influence of phospho-tau on dendritic spines of cortical pyramidal neurons in patients with Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino-Serrais, Paula; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Kastanauskaite, Asta; Rábano, Alberto; Avila, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    The dendritic spines on pyramidal cells represent the main postsynaptic elements of cortical excitatory synapses and they are fundamental structures in memory, learning and cognition. In the present study, we used intracellular injections of Lucifer yellow in fixed tissue to analyse over 19 500 dendritic spines that were completely reconstructed in three dimensions along the length of the basal dendrites of pyramidal neurons in the parahippocampal cortex and CA1 of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Following intracellular injection, sections were immunostained for anti-Lucifer yellow and with tau monoclonal antibodies AT8 and PHF-1, which recognize tau phosphorylated at Ser202/Thr205 and at Ser396/404, respectively. We observed that the diffuse accumulation of phospho-tau in a putative pre-tangle state did not induce changes in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons, whereas the presence of tau aggregates forming intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles was associated with progressive alteration of dendritic spines (loss of dendritic spines and changes in their morphology) and dendrite atrophy, depending on the degree of tangle development. Thus, the presence of phospho-tau in neurons does not necessarily mean that they suffer severe and irreversible effects as thought previously but rather, the characteristic cognitive impairment in Alzheimer’s disease is likely to depend on the relative number of neurons that have well developed tangles. PMID:23715095

  5. Active Dendrites and Differential Distribution of Calcium Channels Enable Functional Compartmentalization of Golgi Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Stephanie; Hull, Court; Regehr, Wade G

    2015-11-25

    Interneurons are essential to controlling excitability, timing, and synaptic integration in neuronal networks. Golgi cells (GoCs) serve these roles at the input layer of the cerebellar cortex by releasing GABA to inhibit granule cells (grcs). GoCs are excited by mossy fibers (MFs) and grcs and provide feedforward and feedback inhibition to grcs. Here we investigate two important aspects of GoC physiology: the properties of GoC dendrites and the role of calcium signaling in regulating GoC spontaneous activity. Although GoC dendrites are extensive, previous studies concluded they are devoid of voltage-gated ion channels. Hence, the current view holds that somatic voltage signals decay passively within GoC dendrites, and grc synapses onto distal dendrites are not amplified and are therefore ineffective at firing GoCs because of strong passive attenuation. Using whole-cell recording and calcium imaging in rat slices, we find that dendritic voltage-gated sodium channels allow somatic action potentials to activate voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) along the entire dendritic length, with R-type and T-type VGCCs preferentially located distally. We show that R- and T-type VGCCs located in the dendrites can boost distal synaptic inputs and promote burst firing. Active dendrites are thus critical to the regulation of GoC activity, and consequently, to the processing of input to the cerebellar cortex. In contrast, we find that N-type channels are preferentially located near the soma, and control the frequency and pattern of spontaneous firing through their close association with calcium-activated potassium (KCa) channels. Thus, VGCC types are differentially distributed and serve specialized functions within GoCs. Interneurons are essential to neural processing because they modulate excitability, timing, and synaptic integration within circuits. At the input layer of the cerebellar cortex, a single type of interneuron, the Golgi cell (GoC), carries these functions. The

  6. Golgi Outpost Synthesis Impaired by Toxic Polyglutamine Proteins Contributes to Dendritic Pathology in Neurons

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    Chang Geon Chung

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Dendrite aberration is a common feature of neurodegenerative diseases caused by protein toxicity, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely elusive. Here, we show that nuclear polyglutamine (polyQ toxicity resulted in defective terminal dendrite elongation accompanied by a loss of Golgi outposts (GOPs and a decreased supply of plasma membrane (PM in Drosophila class IV dendritic arborization (da (C4 da neurons. mRNA sequencing revealed that genes downregulated by polyQ proteins included many secretory pathway-related genes, including COPII genes regulating GOP synthesis. Transcription factor enrichment analysis identified CREB3L1/CrebA, which regulates COPII gene expression. CrebA overexpression in C4 da neurons restores the dysregulation of COPII genes, GOP synthesis, and PM supply. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-PCR revealed that CrebA expression is regulated by CREB-binding protein (CBP, which is sequestered by polyQ proteins. Furthermore, co-overexpression of CrebA and Rac1 synergistically restores the polyQ-induced dendrite pathology. Collectively, our results suggest that GOPs impaired by polyQ proteins contribute to dendrite pathology through the CBP-CrebA-COPII pathway.

  7. Campylobacter jejuni CsrA complements an Escherichia coli csrA mutation for the regulation of biofilm formation, motility and cellular morphology but not glycogen accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Although Campylobacter jejuni is consistently ranked as one of the leading causes of bacterial diarrhea worldwide, the mechanisms by which C. jejuni causes disease and how they are regulated have yet to be clearly defined. The global regulator, CsrA, has been well characterized in several bacterial genera and is known to regulate a number of independent pathways via a post transcriptional mechanism, but remains relatively uncharacterized in the genus Campylobacter. Previously, we reported data illustrating the requirement for CsrA in several virulence related phenotypes of C. jejuni strain 81–176, indicating that the Csr pathway is important for Campylobacter pathogenesis. Results We compared the Escherichia coli and C. jejuni orthologs of CsrA and characterized the ability of the C. jejuni CsrA protein to functionally complement an E. coli csrA mutant. Phylogenetic comparison of E. coli CsrA to orthologs from several pathogenic bacteria demonstrated variability in C. jejuni CsrA relative to the known RNA binding domains of E. coli CsrA and in several amino acids reported to be involved in E. coli CsrA-mediated gene regulation. When expressed in an E. coli csrA mutant, C. jejuni CsrA succeeded in recovering defects in motility, biofilm formation, and cellular morphology; however, it failed to return excess glycogen accumulation to wild type levels. Conclusions These findings suggest that C. jejuni CsrA is capable of efficiently binding some E. coli CsrA binding sites, but not others, and provide insight into the biochemistry of C. jejuni CsrA. PMID:23051923

  8. Vertical solidification of dendritic binary alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, J. C.; Felicelli, S.; Poirier, D. R.

    1991-01-01

    Three numerical techniques are employed to analyze the influence of thermosolutal convection on defect formation in directionally solidified (DS) alloys. The finite-element models are based on the Boussinesq approximation and include the plane-front model and two plane-front models incorporating special dendritic regions. In the second model the dendritic region has a time-independent volume fraction of liquid, and in the last model the dendritic region evolves as local conditions dictate. The finite-element models permit the description of nonlinear thermosolutal convection by treating the dendritic regions as porous media with variable porosities. The models are applied to lead-tin alloys including DS alloys, and severe segregation phenomena such as freckles and channels are found to develop in the DS alloys. The present calculations and the permeability functions selected are shown to predict behavior in the dendritic regions that qualitatively matches that observed experimentally.

  9. Nutrient-dependent increased dendritic arborization of somatosensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kaori; Furumizo, Yuki; Usui, Tadao; Hattori, Yukako; Uemura, Tadashi

    2017-01-01

    Suboptimal nutrition imposes developmental constraints on infant animals, which marshal adaptive responses to eventually become mature adults. Such responses are mounted at multiple levels from systemic to cellular. At the cellular level, the underlying mechanisms of cell proliferation control have been intensively studied. However, less is known about how growth of postmitotic and morphologically complex cells, such as neurons, is controlled by nutritional status. We address this question using Class I and Class IV dendritic arborization neurons in Drosophila larvae. Class IV neurons have been shown to sense nociceptive thermal, mechanical and light stimuli, whereas Class I neurons are proprioceptors. We reared larvae on diets with different protein and carbohydrate content throughout larval stages and examined how morphologies of Class I or Class IV neurons were affected. Dendritic arbors of Class IV neurons became more complex when larvae were reared on a low-yeast diet, which contains lower amounts of amino acids and other ingredients, compared to a high-yeast diet. In contrast, such low-yeast-dependent hyperarborization was not seen in Class I neurons. The physiological and metabolic implications of the hyperarborization phenotype are discussed in relation to a recent hypothesis that Class IV neurons sense protein-deficient stress and to our characterization of how the dietary yeast contents impacted larval metabolism. © 2016 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Synthesis of Dendritic Silver Nanoparticles and Their Applications as SERS Substrates

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    Jinshan Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The silver nanoparticles are synthesized by electrodeposition in ultradilute Ag+ concentration electrolyte under high overpotential. The as prepared Ag nanoparticles, with the sizes ranging from 20 to 30 nm, are arrayed orderly and formed dendritic morphology. The formation of this special dendritic nanoparticle structure can be contributed to the relatively high growth rate and the preferential growth directions along 111 due to the high overpotential, as well as the relative small number of Ag+ ions arriving at the Ag crystal surface per unit time due to the ultradilute Ag+ concentration. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS experiments reveal that the as-prepared dendritic Ag nanoparticles possess high SERS properties and can be used as a candidate substrate for practical SERS applications to detect the Rhodamine 6G molecules.

  11. Facile synthesis of dendritic gold nanostructures with hyperbranched architectures and their electrocatalytic activity toward ethanol oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianshe; Han, Xinyi; Wang, Dawei; Liu, Dong; You, Tianyan

    2013-09-25

    Gold dendritic nanostructures with hyperbranched architectures were synthesized by the galvanic replacement reaction between nickel wire and HAuCl4 in aqueous solution. The study revealed that the morphology of the obtained nanostructures strongly depended on experimental parameters such as the HAuCl4 solution concentration, reaction temperature, and time, as well as stirring or not. According to the investigation of the growth process, it was proposed that gold nanoparticles with rough surfaces were first deposited on the nickel substrate and that subsequent growth preferentially occurred on the preformed gold nanoparticles, finally leading to the formation of hyperbranched gold dendrites via a self-organization process under nonequilibrium conditions. The electrochemical experiment results demonstrated that the as-obtained gold dendrites exhibited high catalytic activity toward ethanol electrooxidation in alkaline solution, indicating that this nanomaterial may be a potential catalyst for direct ethanol fuel cells.

  12. Impact of immersion oils and mounting media on the confocal imaging of dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Brittni M; Mermelstein, Paul G; Meisel, Robert L

    2015-03-15

    Structural plasticity, such as changes in dendritic spine morphology and density, reflect changes in synaptic connectivity and circuitry. Procedural variables used in different methods for labeling dendritic spines have been quantitatively evaluated for their impact on the ability to resolve individual spines in confocal microscopic analyses. In contrast, there have been discussions, though no quantitative analyses, of the potential effects of choosing specific mounting media and immersion oils on dendritic spine resolution. Here we provide quantitative data measuring the impact of these variables on resolving dendritic spines in 3D confocal analyses. Medium spiny neurons from the rat striatum and nucleus accumbens are used as examples. Both choice of mounting media and immersion oil affected the visualization of dendritic spines, with choosing the appropriate immersion oil as being more imperative. These biologic data are supported by quantitative measures of the 3D diffraction pattern (i.e. point spread function) of a point source of light under the same mounting medium and immersion oil combinations. Although not a new method, this manuscript provides quantitative data demonstrating that different mounting media and immersion oils can impact the ability to resolve dendritic spines. These findings highlight the importance of reporting which mounting medium and immersion oil are used in preparations for confocal analyses, especially when comparing published results from different laboratories. Collectively, these data suggest that choosing the appropriate immersion oil and mounting media is critical for obtaining the best resolution, and consequently more accurate measures of dendritic spine densities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Silver Flakes and Silver Dendrites for Hybrid Electrically Conductive Adhesives with Enhanced Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongru; Li, Zhuo; Tian, Xun; Yan, Shaocun; Li, Zhe; Guo, Xuhong; Ma, Yanqing; Ma, Lei

    2018-03-01

    Silver dendrites were prepared by a facile replacement reaction between silver nitrate and zinc microparticles of 20 μm in size. The influence of reactant molar ratio, reaction solution volume, silver nitrate concentration, and reaction time on the morphology of dendrites was investigated systematically. It was found that uniform tree-like silver structures are synthesized under the optimal conditions. Their structure can be described as a trunk, symmetrical branches, and leaves, which length scales of 5-10, 1-2 μm, and 100-300 nm, respectively. All features were systematically characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM, and x-ray powder diffraction. A hybrid fillers system using silver flakes and dendrites as electrically conductive adhesives (ECAs) exhibited excellent overall performance. This good conductivity can be attributed mainly to the synergy between the silver microflakes (5-20 μm sized irregular sheet structures) and dendrites, allowing more conductive pathways to be formed between the fillers. In order to further optimize the overall electrical conductivity, various mixtures of silver microflakes and silver dendrites were tested in ECAs, with results indicating that the highest conductivity was shown when the amounts of silver microflakes, silver dendrites and the polymer matrix were 69.4 wt.% (20.82 vol.%), 0.6 wt.% (0.18 vol.%), and 30.0 wt.% (79.00 vol.%), respectively. The corresponding mass ratio of silver flakes to silver dendrites was 347:3. The resistivity of ECAs reached as low as 1.7 × 10-4 Ω cm.

  14. Moderate traumatic brain injury causes acute dendritic and synaptic degeneration in the hippocampal dentate gyrus.

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    Xiang Gao

    Full Text Available Hippocampal injury-associated learning and memory deficits are frequent hallmarks of brain trauma and are the most enduring and devastating consequences following traumatic brain injury (TBI. Several reports, including our recent paper, showed that TBI brought on by a moderate level of controlled cortical impact (CCI induces immature newborn neuron death in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. In contrast, the majority of mature neurons are spared. Less research has been focused on these spared neurons, which may also be injured or compromised by TBI. Here we examined the dendrite morphologies, dendritic spines, and synaptic structures using a genetic approach in combination with immunohistochemistry and Golgi staining. We found that although most of the mature granular neurons were spared following TBI at a moderate level of impact, they exhibited dramatic dendritic beading and fragmentation, decreased number of dendritic branches, and a lower density of dendritic spines, particularly the mushroom-shaped mature spines. Further studies showed that the density of synapses in the molecular layer of the hippocampal dentate gyrus was significantly reduced. The electrophysiological activity of neurons was impaired as well. These results indicate that TBI not only induces cell death in immature granular neurons, it also causes significant dendritic and synaptic degeneration in pathohistology. TBI also impairs the function of the spared mature granular neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. These observations point to a potential anatomic substrate to explain, in part, the development of posttraumatic memory deficits. They also indicate that dendritic damage in the hippocampal dentate gyrus may serve as a therapeutic target following TBI.

  15. Response of morphological and physiological growth attributes to foliar application of plant growth regulators in gladiolus 'white prosperity'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajjad, Y.; Jaskani, M. J.; Qasim, M.

    2014-01-01

    Gladiolus is very popular among ornamental bulbous plants mainly used as cut flower and greatly demanded in the world floral market. Production of inferior quality spikes is one of the major hurdles for their export. The research was conducted under Faisalabad conditions to evaluate the use of plant growth regulators in order to improve the vegetative, floral and physiological attributes. Gladiolus plants were sprayed thrice with different concentrations (0.1, 0.4, 0.7 and 1mM) of gibberellic acid, benzylaminopurine and salicylic acid at three leaf stage, five leaf stage and slipping stage. Foliar application of 1mM gibberellic acid increased the plant height (122.14cm), spike length (58.41cm), florets spike-1 (13.49), corm diameter (4.43cm), corm weight (25.34g) and total cormel weight (20.45g) compared to benzylaminopurine and salicylic acid. Gibberellic acid at 1mM concentration also increased the total chlorophyll content to 7.72mg/g, total carotenoids (1.61mg/g), total soluble sugars (3.68mg/g) followed by application of benzylaminopurine. Salicylic acid application at 1mM concentration decreased the number of days to flower (64.93) compared to 76.12 days in non treated plants. (author)

  16. Fear extinction deficits following acute stress associate with increased spine density and dendritic retraction in basolateral amygdala neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroun, Mouna; Ioannides, Pericles J; Bergman, Krista L; Kavushansky, Alexandra; Holmes, Andrew; Wellman, Cara L

    2013-08-01

    Stress-sensitive psychopathologies such as post-traumatic stress disorder are characterized by deficits in fear extinction and dysfunction of corticolimbic circuits mediating extinction. Chronic stress facilitates fear conditioning, impairs extinction, and produces dendritic proliferation in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), a critical site of plasticity for extinction. Acute stress impairs extinction, alters plasticity in the medial prefrontal cortex-to-BLA circuit, and causes dendritic retraction in the medial prefrontal cortex. Here, we examined extinction learning and basolateral amygdala pyramidal neuron morphology in adult male rats following a single elevated platform stress. Acute stress impaired extinction acquisition and memory, and produced dendritic retraction and increased mushroom spine density in basolateral amygdala neurons in the right hemisphere. Unexpectedly, irrespective of stress, rats that underwent fear and extinction testing showed basolateral amygdala dendritic retraction and altered spine density relative to non-conditioned rats, particularly in the left hemisphere. Thus, extinction deficits produced by acute stress are associated with increased spine density and dendritic retraction in basolateral amygdala pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, the finding that conditioning and extinction as such was sufficient to alter basolateral amygdala morphology and spine density illustrates the sensitivity of basolateral amygdala morphology to behavioral manipulation. These findings may have implications for elucidating the role of the amygdala in the pathophysiology of stress-related disorders. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  17. Fear extinction deficits following acute stress associate with increased spine density and dendritic retraction in basolateral amygdala neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroun, Mouna; Ioannides, Pericles J.; Bergman, Krista L.; Kavushansky, Alexandra; Holmes, Andrew; Wellman, Cara L.

    2013-01-01

    Stress-sensitive psychopathologies such as post-traumatic stress disorder are characterized by deficits in fear extinction and dysfunction of corticolimbic circuits mediating extinction. Chronic stress facilitates fear conditioning, impairs extinction, and produces dendritic proliferation in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), a critical site of plasticity for extinction. Acute stress impairs extinction, alters plasticity in the medial prefrontal cortex-to-BLA circuit, and causes dendritic retraction in the medial prefrontal cortex. Here, we examined extinction learning and basolateral amygdala pyramidal neuron morphology in adult male rats following a single elevated platform stress. Acute stress impaired extinction acquisition and memory, and produced dendritic retraction and increased mushroom spine density in basolateral amygdala neurons in the right hemisphere. Unexpectedly, irrespective of stress, rats that underwent fear and extinction testing showed basolateral amygdala dendritic retraction and altered spine density relative to non-conditioned rats, particularly in the left hemisphere. Thus, extinction deficits produced by acute stress are associated with increased spine density and dendritic retraction in basolateral amygdala pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, the finding that conditioning and extinction as such was sufficient to alter basolateral amygdala morphology and spine density illustrates the sensitivity of basolateral amygdala morphology to behavioral manipulation. These findings may have implications for elucidating the role of the amygdala in the pathophysiology of stress-related disorders. PMID:23714419

  18. Electrodeposition of Au/Ag bimetallic dendrites assisted by Faradaic AC-electroosmosis flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Jianlong; Li, Pengwei; Sang, Shengbo, E-mail: sbsang@tyut.edu.cn; Zhang, Wendong, E-mail: wdzhang@tyut.edu.cn; Li, Gang; Hu, Jie [Micro and Nano-system Research Centre, College of Information Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, 030024, Taiyuan (China); Zhou, Zhaoying, E-mail: zhouzy@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Yang, Xing; Dong, Hualai [MEMS Laboratory, Department of Precision Instruments, Tsinghua University, 100084, Beijing (China)

    2014-03-15

    Au/Ag bimetallic dendrites were synthesized successfully from the corresponding aqueous solution via the AC electrodeposition method. Both of the morphologies and compositions could be tuned by the electrolyte concentration and AC frequency. The prepared bimetallic dendrites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV–vis spectroscopy. The underlying dendrite growth mechanism was then proposed in the context of the Directed Electrochemical Nanowires Assembly (DENA) models. Owing to the unscreened voltage dropping in the electrolyte bulk, electromigration dominates the species flux process, and cations tend to accumulate in areas with strong electric field intensity, such as electrode edges. Moreover, Faradaic AC-electro-osmosis (ACEO) flow could increase the effective diffusion layer thickness in these areas during the electrochemical reaction, and leads to dendrite growth. Further Micro-Raman observations illustrated that the Au/Ag bimetallic dendrites exhibited pronounced surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity, using 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MP) as model molecules.

  19. Electrodeposition of Au/Ag bimetallic dendrites assisted by Faradaic AC-electroosmosis flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianlong Ji

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Au/Ag bimetallic dendrites were synthesized successfully from the corresponding aqueous solution via the AC electrodeposition method. Both of the morphologies and compositions could be tuned by the electrolyte concentration and AC frequency. The prepared bimetallic dendrites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and UV–vis spectroscopy. The underlying dendrite growth mechanism was then proposed in the context of the Directed Electrochemical Nanowires Assembly (DENA models. Owing to the unscreened voltage dropping in the electrolyte bulk, electromigration dominates the species flux process, and cations tend to accumulate in areas with strong electric field intensity, such as electrode edges. Moreover, Faradaic AC-electro-osmosis (ACEO flow could increase the effective diffusion layer thickness in these areas during the electrochemical reaction, and leads to dendrite growth. Further Micro-Raman observations illustrated that the Au/Ag bimetallic dendrites exhibited pronounced surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS activity, using 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MP as model molecules.

  20. Development of non-dendritic microstructures in AA6061 cast billets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X.-D.; Chadwick, T.A.; Bryant, J.D. [Reynolds Metals Co., Chester, VA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Non-dendritic structures have been shown to have many advantages over conventional, dendritic structures in castable aluminum alloys. Examples include high structural integrity, reduced porosity, excellent formability and enhanced near net-shape forming capability. Non-dendritic materials are characterized by an equiaxed, globularized grain structure. Previous work has focused on the application of these structures in traditional casting alloys such as A356 and A357, and on the processing of these alloys during semi-solid forming and squeeze casting. There is considerably less information on the impact of non-dendritic microstructures upon solid state deformation, and the use of such microstructures in the processing of traditional wrought aluminum alloys. In this paper, we will present our recent work in casting non-dendritic AA6061 alloy using different techniques, and discuss the effects of cast structure on deformation behavior during solid state processing at elevated temperatures. Cast microstructures were modified during direct chill casting using three different methods: magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) agitation, mechanical stirring, and high loadings of grain refiner. A detailed microstructure characterization will be presented and discussed in terms of structural integrity, grain morphology, and their effects on deformation in the solid state. (orig.)

  1. Crosstalk between T lymphocytes and dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hivroz, Claire; Chemin, Karine; Tourret, Marie; Bohineust, Armelle

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) with the unique property of inducing priming and differentiation of naïve CD4+ and CD8+ T cells into helper and cytotoxic effectors. Their efficiency is due to their unique ability to process antigen, express costimulatory molecules, secrete cytokines, and migrate to tissues or lymphoid organs to prime T cells. DCs also play an important role in T-cell peripheral tolerance. There is ample evidence that the DC ability to present antigens is regulated by CD4+ helper T cells. Indeed, interactions between surface receptors and ligands expressed respectively by T cells and DCs, as well as T-cell-derived cytokines modify DC functions. This T-cell-induced modification of DCs has been called "education" or "licensing." This intimate crosstalk between DCs and T lymphocytes is key in establishing appropriate adaptive immune responses. It requires cognate interactions between T lymphocytes and DCs, which are organized in time and space by structures called immunological synapses. Here we discuss the particular aspects of immunological synapses formed between T cells and DCs and the role these organized interactions have in T-cell-DC crosstalk.

  2. Orientation selection of equiaxed dendritic growth by three-dimensional cellular automaton model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Lei [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Lin Xin, E-mail: xlin@nwpu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Wang Meng; Huang Weidong [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2012-07-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) cellular automata (CA) model is developed to simulate the equiaxed dendritic growth of pure substance. In order to reduce the mesh induced anisotropy by CA capture rules, a limited neighbor solid fraction (LNSF) method is presented. It is shown that the LNSF method reduced the mesh induced anisotropy based on the simulated morphologies for isotropic interface free energy. An expansion description using two interface free energy anisotropy parameters ({epsilon}{sub 1}, {epsilon}{sub 2}) is used in the present 3-D CA model. It is illustrated by present 3-D CA model that the positive {epsilon}{sub 1} favors the dendritic growth with the Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 100 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket preferred directions, and negative {epsilon}{sub 2} favors dendritic growth with the Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 110 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket preferred directions, which has a good agreement with the prediction of the spherical plot of the inverse of the interfacial stiffness. The dendritic growths with the orientation selection between Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 100 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket and Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 110 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket are also discussed using the different {epsilon}{sub 1} with {epsilon}{sub 2}=-0.02. It is found that the simulated morphologies by present CA model are as expected from the minimum stiffness criterion.

  3. MET receptor tyrosine kinase controls dendritic complexity, spine morphogenesis, and glutamatergic synapse maturation in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Shenfeng; Lu, Zhongming; Levitt, Pat

    2014-12-03

    The MET receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), implicated in risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and in functional and structural circuit integrity in humans, is a temporally and spatially regulated receptor enriched in dorsal pallial-derived structures during mouse forebrain development. Here we report that loss or gain of function of MET in vitro or in vivo leads to changes, opposite in nature, in dendritic complexity, spine morphogenesis, and the timing of glutamatergic synapse maturation onto hippocampus CA1 neurons. Consistent with the morphological and biochemical changes, deletion of Met in mutant mice results in precocious maturation of excitatory synapse, as indicated by a reduction of the proportion of silent synapses, a faster GluN2A subunit switch, and an enhanced acquisition of AMPA receptors at synaptic sites. Thus, MET-mediated signaling appears to serve as a mechanism for controlling the timing of neuronal growth and functional maturation. These studies suggest that mistimed maturation of glutamatergic synapses leads to the aberrant neural circuits that may be associated with ASD risk. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3416166-14$15.00/0.

  4. Slice cultures of the imprinting-relevant forebrain area MNH of the domestic chick: quantitative characterization of neuronal morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, H; Braun, K

    1995-05-26

    The persistence of morphological features of neurons in slice cultures of the imprinting-relevant forebrain area MNH (mediorostral neostriatum and hyperstriatum ventrale) of the domestic chick was analysed at 7, 14, 21 and 28 days in vitro. After having been explanted and kept in culture the neurons in vitro have larger soma areas, longer and more extensively branched dendritic trees and lower spine frequencies compared to the neurons in vivo. During the analyzed culturing period, the parameters soma area, total and mean dendritic length, number of dendrites, number of dendritic nodes per dendrite and per neuron as well as the spine densities in different dendritic segments showed no significant differences between early and late periods. Highly correlated in every age group were the total dendritic length and the number of dendritic nodes per neuron, indicating regular ramification during dendritic growth. Since these morphological parameters remain stable during the first 4 weeks in vitro, this culture system may provide a suitable model to investigate experimentally induced morphological changes.

  5. Different roles of the small GTPases Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoG in CALEB/NGC-induced dendritic tree complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Jana; Franke, Kristin; Frick, Manfred; Schumacher, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Rho GTPases play prominent roles in the regulation of cytoskeletal reorganization. Many aspects have been elaborated concerning the individual functions of Rho GTPases in distinct signaling pathways leading to cytoskeletal rearrangements. However, major questions have yet to be answered regarding the integration and the signaling hierarchy of different Rho GTPases in regulating the cytoskeleton in fundamental physiological events like neuronal process differentiation. Here, we investigate the roles of the small GTPases Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoG in defining dendritic tree complexity stimulated by the transmembrane epidermal growth factor family member CALEB/NGC. Combining gain-of-function and loss-of-function analysis in primary hippocampal neurons, we find that Rac1 is essential for CALEB/NGC-mediated dendritic branching. Cdc42 reduces the complexity of dendritic trees. Interestingly, we identify the palmitoylated isoform of Cdc42 to adversely affect dendritic outgrowth and dendritic branching, whereas the prenylated Cdc42 isoform does not. In contrast to Rac1, CALEB/NGC and Cdc42 are not directly interconnected in regulating dendritic tree complexity. Unlike Rac1, the Rac1-related GTPase RhoG reduces the complexity of dendritic trees by acting upstream of CALEB/NGC. Mechanistically, CALEB/NGC activates Rac1, and RhoG reduces the amount of CALEB/NGC that is located at the right site for Rac1 activation at the cell membrane. Thus, Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoG perform very specific and non-redundant functions at different levels of hierarchy in regulating dendritic tree complexity induced by CALEB/NGC. Rho GTPases play a prominent role in dendritic branching. CALEB/NGC is a transmembrane member of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family that mediates dendritic branching, dependent on Rac1. CALEB/NGC stimulates Rac1 activity. RhoG inhibits CALEB/NGC-mediated dendritic branching by decreasing the amount of CALEB/NGC at the plasma membrane. Palmitoylated, but not prenylated form

  6. Regulatory dendritic cell therapy: from rodents to clinical application

    OpenAIRE

    Raïch-Regué, Dalia; Glancy, Megan; Thomson, Angus W.

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are highly-specialized, bone marrow-derived antigen-presenting cells that induce or regulate innate and adaptive immunity. Regulatory or “tolerogenic” DC play a crucial role in maintaining self tolerance in the healthy steady-state. These regulatory innate immune cells subvert naïve or memory T cell responses by various mechanisms. Regulatory DC (DCreg) also exhibit the ability to induce or restore T cell tolerance in many animal models of autoimmune disease or transplant...

  7. ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation were essential for MGF E peptide regulating cell morphology and mobility but not proangiogenic capacity of BMSCs under severe hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Yongqiang; Yang, Li; Lv, Yonggang

    2018-04-01

    Severe hypoxia inhibits the adhesion and mobility of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and limits their application in bone tissue engineering. In this study, CoCl 2 was used to simulate severe hypoxia and the effects of mechano-growth factor (MGF) E peptide on the morphology, adhesion, migration, and proangiogenic capacity of BMSCs under hypoxia were measured. It was demonstrated that severe hypoxia (500-μM CoCl 2 ) significantly caused cell contraction and reduced cell area, roundness, adhesion, and migration of BMSCs. RhoA and ROCK1 expression levels were upregulated by severe hypoxia, but p-RhoA and mobility-relevant protein (integrin β1, p-FAK and fibronectin) expression levels in BMSCs were inhibited. Fortunately, MGF E peptide could restore all abovementioned indexes except RhoA expression. MEK-ERK1/2 pathway was involved in MGF E peptide regulating cell morphological changes, mobility, and relevant proteins (except p-FAK). PI3K-Akt pathway was involved in MGF E peptide regulating cell area, mobility, and relevant proteins. Besides, severe hypoxia upregulated vascular endothelial growth factor α expression but was harmful for proangiogenic capacity of BMSCs. Our study suggested that MGF E peptide might be helpful for the clinical application of tissue engineering strategy in bone defect repair. Sever hypoxia impairs bone defect repair with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). This study proved that mechano-growth factor E (MGF E) peptide could improve the severe hypoxia-induced cell contraction and decline of cell adhesion and migration of BMSCs. Besides, MGF E peptide weakened the effects of severe hypoxia on the cytoskeleton arrangement- and mobility-relevant protein expression levels in BMSCs. The underlying molecular mechanism was also verified. Finally, it was confirmed that MGF E peptide showed an adverse effect on the expression level of vascular endothelial growth factor α in BMSCs under severe hypoxia but could

  8. Memory CD8+ T cells protect dendritic cells from CTL killing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watchmaker, Payal B.; Urban, Julie A.; Berk, Erik; Nakamura, Yutaro; Mailliard, Robbie B.; Watkins, Simon C.; van Ham, S. Marieke; Kalinski, Pawel

    2008-01-01

    CD8(+) T cells have been shown to be capable of either suppressing or promoting immune responses. To reconcile these contrasting regulatory functions, we compared the ability of human effector and memory CD8(+) T cells to regulate survival and functions of dendritic cells (DC). We report that, in

  9. Single Ih channels in pyramidal neuron dendrites: properties, distribution, and impact on action potential output

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kole, Maarten H. P.; Hallermann, Stefan; Stuart, Greg J.

    2006-01-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih) plays an important role in regulating neuronal excitability, yet its native single-channel properties in the brain are essentially unknown. Here we use variance-mean analysis to study the properties of single Ih channels in the apical dendrites of

  10. Cdc42-dependent actin dynamics controls maturation and secretory activity of dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, Anna M; Stutte, Susanne; Hogl, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Cell division cycle 42 (Cdc42) is a member of the Rho guanosine triphosphatase family and has pivotal functions in actin organization, cell migration, and proliferation. To further study the molecular mechanisms of dendritic cell (DC) regulation by Cdc42, we used Cdc42-deficient DCs. Cdc42 defici...

  11. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PTPRS Is an Inhibitory Receptor on Human and Murine Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunin, A.; Sisirak, V.; Ghosh, H.S.; Grajkowska, L.T.; Hou, Z.E.; Miron, M.; Yang, C.; Ceribelli, M.; Uetani, N.; Chaperot, L.; Plumas, J.; Hendriks, W.J.; Tremblay, M.L.; Hacker, H.; Staudt, L.M.; Green, P.H.; Bhagat, G.; Reizis, B.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are primary producers of type I interferon (IFN) in response to viruses. The IFN-producing capacity of pDCs is regulated by specific inhibitory receptors, yet none of the known receptors are conserved in evolution. We report that within the human immune system,

  12. Dendritic ion channelopathy in acquired epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poolos, Nicholas P.; Johnston, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Summary Ion channel dysfunction or “channelopathy” is a proven cause of epilepsy in the relatively uncommon genetic epilepsies with Mendelian inheritance. But numerous examples of acquired channelopathy in experimental animal models of epilepsy following brain injury have also been demonstrated. Our understanding of channelopathy has grown due to advances in electrophysiology techniques that have allowed the study of ion channels in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons in cortex and hippocampus. The apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons comprise the vast majority of neuronal surface membrane area, and thus the majority of the neuronal ion channel population. Investigation of dendritic ion channels has demonstrated remarkable plasticity in ion channel localization and biophysical properties in epilepsy, many of which produce hyperexcitability and may contribute to the development and maintenance of the epileptic state. Here we review recent advances in dendritic physiology and cell biology, and their relevance to epilepsy. PMID:23216577

  13. Sequence learning in differentially activated dendrites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert

    2003-01-01

    . It is proposed that the neural machinery required in such a learning/retrieval mechanism could involve the NMDA receptor, in conjunction with the ability of dendrites to maintain differentially activated regions. In particular, it is suggested that such a parcellation of the dendrite allows the neuron......Differentially activated areas of a dendrite permit the existence of zones with distinct rates of synaptic modification, and such areas can be individually accessed using a reference signal which localizes synaptic plasticity and memory trace retrieval to certain subregions of the dendrite...... to participate in multiple sequences, which can be learned without suffering from the 'wash-out' of synaptic efficacy associated with superimposition of training patterns. This is a biologically plausible solution to the stability-plasticity dilemma of learning in neural networks....

  14. Novel synthesis of core-shell Au-Pt dendritic nanoparticles supported on carbon black for enhanced methanol electro-oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ribing; Xia, Tiantian; Zhu, Ruizhi; Liu, Zhihua; Guo, Jinming; Chang, Gang; Zhang, Zaoli; Liu, Xiong; He, Yunbin

    2018-03-01

    Core-shell Au-Pt dendritic nanoparticles (Au-Pt NPs) has been synthesized via a facile seed-mediated growth method, in which dendritic Pt nanoparticles as shell grow on the surface of gold nanocores by using ascorbic acid (AA) as "green" reducing reagents. The morphologies and compositions of the as-prepared nanocomposites with core-shell structure are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Electrochemical experiments, including cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA) are performed to investigate the electrocatalytic properties of the Au-Pt NPs loaded carbon black composites (Au-Pt NPs/V) towards methanol oxidation in an alkaline solution. It is found that the reduction time of AA could regulate the thickness and amount of Pt on the Au nanocores, which significantly affect catalytic activity of the Au-Pt NPs/V toward methanol oxidation. Au-Pt NPs/V with optimum reduction time 4 h exhibit 2.3-times higher electrocatalytic activity than that of a commercial catalyst (Pt/carbon black) and an excellent CO tolerance toward methanol oxidation. This behavior is attributed to large active electrochemical area of the bimetallic nanocomposites and the change in the electronic structure of Pt when Au surface modified with fewer Pt nanoparticles.

  15. The effects of varying concentrations of growth regulators benzyladenine and naphthalene acetic acid and gamma irradiation on the gross plantlet morphology of Garcinia mangostana L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonsol, Ma. Fatima Nona M.; Lasiste, Jade Marie Edenvirg F.; Quinio, Ma. Franchesca S.

    2004-02-01

    Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L.) is regarded as one of the best flavored fruits in the world. Though this fruit yields high income and has great potential as an export, productivity in the Philippines is still limited due to its slow and difficult conventional propagation. To increase the plants' productivity, growth regulators can be added, the seeds can be exposed to irradiation to cause genetic mutations, and micropropagation techniques can be used. This study seeks to determine the effects of these three variables on the general morphological characteristics of the plantlets grown both in vitro and in vivo. The first set of mangosteen seeds was inoculated and grown in Murashige and Skoog (MS) basal culture medium with different treatment combinations of growth regulators, naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) and benzyladenine (BA). Treatment concentrations ranged from 0 parts per million (ppm) to 6 ppm. The treatment that best induced stem, leaf and root formation, and produced plantlets with long stems and roots was MS with 6 ppm NAA combined with 6 ppm BA. A second set of seeds was then exposed to varying levels of gamma radiation and propagated in vivo and in vitro. For in vivo, it was observed that the length of stem of the plantlet decreases with increasing radiation dose; length of leaves of the mangosteen plantlets was best noted in seeds exposed to 10 Gy gamma rays. In in vitro, the two treatment concentrations that best helped seeds to develop callus, which were 0 ppm BA with 4 pmm NAA and 4 ppm BA with 6 ppm NAA, were added to MS basal medium. Seeds exposed to 5 Gy and grown in basal medium with 0 ppm BA and 4 ppm NAA were observed to have developed the most callus. (Author)

  16. Con-nectin axons and dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Gerard M J

    2006-07-03

    Unlike adherens junctions, synapses are asymmetric connections, usually between axons and dendrites, that rely on various cell adhesion molecules for structural stability and function. Two cell types of adhesion molecules found at adherens junctions, cadherins and nectins, are thought to mediate homophilic interaction between neighboring cells. In this issue, Togashi et al. (see p. 141) demonstrate that the differential localization of two heterophilic interacting nectins mediates the selective attraction of axons and dendrites in cooperation with cadherins.

  17. Co-operative suppression of inflammatory responses in human dendritic cells by plant proanthocyanidins and products from the parasitic nematode Trichuris suis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Andrew R; Klaver, Elsenoor J; Laan, Lisa C

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between dendritic cells (DCs) and environmental, dietary and pathogen antigens play a key role in immune homeostasis and regulation of inflammation. Dietary polyphenols such as proanthocyanidins (PAC) may reduce inflammation, and we therefore hypothesized that PAC may suppress lipopo...

  18. Preparation of dendritic Ag/Au bimetallic nanostructures and their application in surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Zao; Chen Shanjun; Chen Yan; Luo Jiangshan; Wu Weidong; Yi Yougen; Tang Yongjian

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic Ag/Au bimetallic nanostructures have been synthesized via a multi-stage galvanic replacement reaction of Ag dendrites in a chlorauric acid (HAuCl 4 ) solution at room temperature. After five stages of replacement reaction, one obtains structures with protruding nanocubes; these will mature into many porous structures with a few Ag atoms that are left over dendrites. The morphological and compositional changes which evolved with reaction stages were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, UV–visible spectroscopy, selected area electron diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The replacement of Ag with Au was confirmed. A formation mechanism involving the original development of Ag dendrites into porous structures with the growth of Au nanocubes on this underlying structure as the number of reaction stages is proposed. This was confirmed by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The dendritic Ag/Au bimetallic nanostructures could be used as efficient SERS active substrates. It was found that the SERS enhancement ability was dependent on the stage of galvanic replacement reaction. - Highlights: ► Dendritic Ag/Au bimetallic nanostructures have been synthesized. ► Protruding cubic nanostructures obtained after 5 stages mature into porous structures. ► SERS results allow confirm the proposed formation mechanism. ► The nanostructures could be used as efficient SERS active substrates.

  19. F42. CHONDROTIN-6 SULFATE CLUSTERS: ASSOCIATION OF SYNAPTIC DOMAINS AND REGULATION OF SYNAPTIC PLASTICITY DURING FEAR LEARNING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelini, Gabriele; Berciu, Cristina; Pilobello, Kanoelani; Peter, Durning; Rachel, Jenkins; Kahn, Moazzzam; Ramikie, Teniel; Subramanian, Siva; Ressler, Kerry; Pantazopoulos, Charalampos; Berretta, Sabina

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background Emerging evidence from our group and others has brought the brain extracellular matrix (ECM) to the forefront of investigations on brain disorders. Our group has shown that organized perisynaptic ECM aggregates, i.e. perineuronal nets (PNNs) are decreased in several brain regions in people with schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD). PNNs were detected by their expression of specific chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), main components of the ECM, thought to play a key role in synaptic regulation during development and adulthood. Our studies have also shown that glial cells expressing CSPGs are altered in these disorders, suggesting a link between glial cell and PNN abnormalities. Finally, we have recently shown that novel CSPG structures, bearing a distinct CS-6 sulfation pattern and named CS-6 glial clusters, are decreased in the amygdala of people with SZ and BD. The morphology and function of CS-6 glial clusters is not currently known, but evidence from rodents and on the role of CSPGs in regulating synaptic functions strongly suggest that they may affect synaptic plasticity. We tested this hypothesis using a combination of human postmortem and rodent brain studies. Methods High Resolution electron microscopy was used to investigate the ultrastructural organization of CS-6 glia clusters. A transgenic mouse model expressing green fluorescent protein in a subset of excitatory pyramidal neurons was used to investigate dendritic spines association with CS-6 glia clusters. Mice were exposed to a single session of auditory fear conditioning for a total of 15 minutes. Animals were euthanized 4 hours after behavioral test. Multiplex immunocytochemistry was used to visualize CS-6 clusters. Results In human tissue, we show that CS-6 glia clusters are widespread in several brain regions, including the amygdala, entorhinal cortex, thalamus and hippocampus. Ultrastructural results show that CS-6 glia clusters are formed by CS-6 accumulations

  20. Transformation of Leaf-like Zinc Dendrite in Oxidation and Reduction Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Akiyoshi; Murayama, Haruno; Fukuda, Katsutoshi; Yamane, Tomokazu; Arai, Hajime; Hirai, Toshiro; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Yamaki, Jun-ichi; Ogumi, Zempachi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Leaf-like zinc dendrites change to leaf-like residual oxides at high oxidation current density (10 mA cm −2 ) whereas it completely dissolves at low oxidation current density (1 mA cm −2 ). • Leaf-like residual oxide products is transformed to zinc deposits with particulate morphology, resulting in good rechargeability. • The residual zinc oxide provides sufficient zincate on its reduction, preventing the diffusion-limited condition that causes leaf-like dendrite formation. - Abstract: Zinc is a promising negative electrode material for aqueous battery systems whereas it shows insufficient rechargeability for use in secondary batteries. It has been reported that leaf-like dendrite deposits are often the origin of cell-failure, however, their nature and behavior on discharge (oxidation) - charge (reduction) cycling have been only poorly understood. Here we investigate the transformation of the leaf-like zinc dendrites using ex-situ scanning electron microscopy, X-ray computational tomography and in-situ X-ray diffraction. It is shown that the leaf-like zinc dendrites obtained under diffusion-limited conditions are nearly completely dissolved at a low oxidation current density of 1 mA cm −2 and cause re-evolution of the zinc dendrites. Oxidation at a high current density of 10 mA cm −2 leads to the formation of leaf-like zinc oxide residual products that result in particulate zinc deposits in the following reduction process, enabling good rechargeability. The reaction behavior of this oxide residue is detailed and discussed for the development of long-life zinc electrodes

  1. Action potential-independent and pharmacologically unique vesicular serotonin release from dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Lesley A.; Cavolo, Samantha L.; Commons, Kathryn G.; Levitan, Edwin S.

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin released within the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) induces feedback inhibition of serotonin neuron activity and consequently regulates mood-controlling serotonin release throughout the forebrain. Serotonin packaged in vesicles is released in response to action potentials by the serotonin neuron soma and terminals, but the potential for release by dendrites is unknown. Here three-photon (3P) microscopy imaging of endogenous serotonin in living rat brain slice, immunofluorescence and immuno-gold electron microscopy detection of VMAT2 (vesicular monoamine transporter 2) establish the presence of vesicular serotonin within DR dendrites. Furthermore, activation of glutamate receptors is shown to induce vesicular serotonin release from dendrites. However, unlike release from the soma and terminals, dendritic serotonin release is independent of action potentials, relies on L-type Ca2+ channels, is induced preferentially by NMDA, and displays distinct sensitivity to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant fluoxetine. The unique control of dendritic serotonin release has important implications for DR physiology and the antidepressant action of SSRIs, dihydropyridines and NMDA receptor antagonists. PMID:23136413

  2. Dendritic cell-based immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Takuya; Clay, Timothy M; Woo, Christopher Y; Morse, Michael A; Lyerly, H Kim

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a crucial role in the induction of antigen-specific T-cell responses, and therefore their use for the active immunotherapy of malignancies has been studied with considerable interest. More than a decade has passed since the publication of the first clinical data of DC-based vaccines, and through this and subsequent studies, a number of important developmental insights have been gleaned. These include the ideal source and type of DCs, the discovery of novel antigens and methods of loading DCs, the role of DC maturation, and the most efficient route of immunization. The generation of immune responses against tumor antigens after DC immunization has been demonstrated, and favorable clinical responses have been reported in some patients; however, it is difficult to pool the results as a whole, and thus the body of data remains inconclusive, in part because of varying DC preparation and vaccination protocols, the use of different forms of antigens, and, most importantly, a lack of rigorous criteria for defining clinical responses. As such, the standardization of clinical and immunologic criteria utilized, as well as DC preparations employed, will allow for the comparison of results across multiple clinical studies and is required in order for future trials to measure the true value and role of this treatment modality. In addition, issues regarding the optimal dose and clinical setting for the application of DC vaccines remain to be resolved, and recent clinical studies have been designed to begin to address these questions.

  3. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor mediates estradiol-induced dendritic spine formation in hippocampal neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Diane D.; Cole, Nelson B.; Segal, Menahem

    1998-01-01

    Dendritic spines are of major importance in information processing and memory formation in central neurons. Estradiol has been shown to induce an increase of dendritic spine density on hippocampal neurons in vivo and in vitro. The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) recently has been implicated in neuronal maturation, plasticity, and regulation of GABAergic interneurons. We now demonstrate that estradiol down-regulates BDNF in cultured hippocampal neurons to 40% of control values within 24 hr of exposure. This, in turn, decreases inhibition and increases excitatory tone in pyramidal neurons, leading to a 2-fold increase in dendritic spine density. Exogenous BDNF blocks the effects of estradiol on spine formation, and BDNF depletion with a selective antisense oligonucleotide mimics the effects of estradiol. Addition of BDNF antibodies also increases spine density, and diazepam, which facilitates GABAergic neurotransmission, blocks estradiol-induced spine formation. These observations demonstrate a functional link between estradiol, BDNF as a potent regulator of GABAergic interneurons, and activity-dependent formation of dendritic spines in hippocampal neurons. PMID:9736750

  4. The Multiple Faces of Prostaglandin E2 G-Protein Coupled Receptor Signaling during the Dendritic Cell Life Cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Keijzer, Sandra; Meddens, Marjolein B.M.; Torensma, Ruurd; Cambi, A.

    2013-01-01

    Many processes regulating immune responses are initiated by G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and report biochemical changes in the microenvironment. Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells and crucial for the regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. The lipid

  5. A Septin-Dependent Diffusion Barrier at Dendritic Spine Necks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helge Ewers

    Full Text Available Excitatory glutamatergic synapses at dendritic spines exchange and modulate their receptor content via lateral membrane diffusion. Several studies have shown that the thin spine neck impedes the access of membrane and solute molecules to the spine head. However, it is unclear whether the spine neck geometry alone restricts access to dendritic spines or if a physical barrier to the diffusion of molecules exists. Here, we investigated whether a complex of septin cytoskeletal GTPases localized at the base of the spine neck regulates diffusion across the spine neck. We found that, during development, a marker of the septin complex, Septin7 (Sept7, becomes localized to the spine neck where it forms a stable structure underneath the plasma membrane. We show that diffusion of receptors and bulk membrane, but not cytoplasmic proteins, is slower in spines bearing Sept7 at their neck. Finally, when Sept7 expression was suppressed by RNA interference, membrane molecules explored larger membrane areas. Our findings indicate that Sept7 regulates membrane protein access to spines.

  6. The Early Dendritic Cell Signaling Induced by Virulent Francisella tularensis Strain Occurs in Phases and Involves the Activation of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinases (ERKs) and p38 In the Later Stage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fabrik, I.; Link, M.; Putzova, D.; Plzakova, L.; Lubovska, Zuzana; Philimonenko, Vlada; Pavkova, I.; Řehulka, P.; Krocová, Z.; Hozák, Pavel; Santic, M.; Stulík, J.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2018), s. 95-108 ISSN 1535-9476 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : factor-alpha production * live vaccine strain * phosphorylation sites * negative regulator * innate immunity * lvs infection * pathway * identification * reveals * mapk Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 6.540, year: 2016

  7. SclR, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, regulates hyphal morphology and promotes sclerotial formation in Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Feng Jie; Takahashi, Tadashi; Matsushima, Ken-ichiro; Hara, Seiichi; Shinohara, Yasutomo; Maruyama, Jun-ichi; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko; Koyama, Yasuji

    2011-07-01

    Most known basic-region helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins belong to a superfamily of transcription factors often involved in the control of growth and differentiation. Therefore, inappropriate expression of genes encoding bHLH proteins is frequently associated with developmental dysfunction. In our previously reported study, a novel bHLH protein-encoding gene (AO090011000215) of Aspergillus oryzae was identified. The gene-disrupted strain was found to produce dense conidia, but sparse sclerotia, relative to the parent strain. Here, to further analyze its function, we generated an overexpressing strain using the A. oryzae amyB gene promoter. Genetic overexpression led to a large number of initial hyphal aggregations and then the formation of mature sclerotia; it was therefore designated sclR (sclerotium regulator). At the same time, the sclR-overexpressing strain also displayed both delayed and decreased conidiation. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that the aerial hyphae of the sclR-overexpressing strain were extremely branched and intertwined with each other. In the generation of the SclR-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression strain, the SclR-EGFP protein fusion was conditionally detected in the nuclei. In addition, the loss of sclR function led to rapid protein degradation and cell lysis in dextrin-polypeptone-yeast extract liquid medium. Taken together, these observations indicate that SclR plays an important role in hyphal morphology, asexual conidiospore formation, and the promotion of sclerotial production, even retaining normal cell function, at least in submerged liquid culture.

  8. The Complete Reconfiguration of Dendritic Gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paneru, Govind; Flanders, Bret

    2014-03-01

    Reconfigurability-by-design is an important strategy in modern materials science, as materials with this capability could potentially be used to confer hydrophobic, lipophobic, or anti-corrosive character to substrates in a regenerative manner. The present work extends the directed electrochemical nanowire assembly (DENA) methodology, which is a technique that employs alternating voltages to grow single crystalline metallic nanowires and nano-dendrites from simple salt solutions, to enable the complete dissolution of macroscopic arrays of metallic dendrites following their growth. Our main finding is that structural reconfiguration of dendritic gold is induced by changes in the MHz-level frequencies of voltages that are applied to the dendrites. Cyclic voltammetry and micro-Raman spectroscopy have been used to show that dendritic gold grows and dissolves by the same chemical mechanisms as bulk gold. Hence, the redox chemistry that occurs at the crystal-solution interface is no different than the established electrochemistry of gold. What differs in this process and allows for reconfiguration to occur is the diffusive behavior of the gold chloride molecules in the solution adjacent to the interface. We will present a simple model that captures the physics of this behavior.

  9. Fatherhood contributes to increased hippocampal spine density and anxiety regulation in California mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasper, Erica R; Hyer, Molly M; Katakam, Jhansi; Harper, Robyn; Ameri, Cyrus; Wolz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Parenting alters the hippocampus, an area of the brain that undergoes significant experience-induced plasticity and contributes to emotional regulation. While the relationship between maternal care and hippocampal neuroplasticity has been characterized, the extent to which fatherhood alters the structure and function of the hippocampus is far less understood. Here, we investigated to what extent fatherhood altered anxiety regulation and dendritic morphology of the hippocampus using the highly paternal California mouse (Peromyscus californicus). Fathers spent significantly more time on the open arms of the elevated plus maze, compared to non-fathers. Total distance traveled in the EPM was not changed by paternal experience, which suggests that the increased time spent on the open arms of the maze indicates decreased anxiety-like behavior. Fatherhood also increased dendritic spine density of granule cells in the dentate gyrus and basal dendrites of pyramidal cells in area CA1 of the hippocampus. These findings parallel those observed in maternal rodents, suggesting that the hippocampus of fathers and mothers respond similarly to offspring.

  10. In Vivo Study of Dynamics and Stability of Dendritic Spines on Olfactory Bulb Interneurons in Xenopus laevis Tadpoles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Bin Huang

    Full Text Available Dendritic spines undergo continuous remodeling during development of the nervous system. Their stability is essential for maintaining a functional neuronal circuit. Spine dynamics and stability of cortical excitatory pyramidal neurons have been explored extensively in mammalian animal models. However, little is known about spiny interneurons in non-mammalian vertebrate models. In the present study, neuronal morphology was visualized by single-cell electroporation. Spiny neurons were surveyed in the Xenopus tadpole brain and observed to be widely distributed in the olfactory bulb and telencephalon. DsRed- or PSD95-GFP-expressing spiny interneurons in the olfactory bulb were selected for in vivo time-lapse imaging. Dendritic protrusions were classified as filopodia, thin, stubby, or mushroom spines based on morphology. Dendritic spines on the interneurons were highly dynamic, especially the filopodia and thin spines. The stubby and mushroom spines were relatively more stable, although their stability significantly decreased with longer observation intervals. The 4 spine types exhibited diverse preferences during morphological transitions from one spine type to others. Sensory deprivation induced by severing the olfactory nerve to block the input of mitral/tufted cells had no significant effects on interneuron spine stability. Hence, a new model was established in Xenopus laevis tadpoles to explore dendritic spine dynamics in vivo.

  11. Low concentrations of ketamine initiate dendritic atrophy of differentiated GABAergic neurons in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vutskits, Laszlo; Gascon, Eduardo; Potter, Gael; Tassonyi, Edomer; Kiss, Jozsef Z.

    2007-01-01

    Administration of subanesthetic concentrations of ketamine, a noncompetitive antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) type of glutamate receptors, is a widely accepted therapeutic modality in perioperative and chronic pain management. Although extensive clinical use has demonstrated its safety, recent human histopathological observations as well as laboratory data suggest that ketamine can exert adverse effects on central nervous system neurons. To further investigate this issue, the present study was designed to evaluate the effects of ketamine on the survival and dendritic arbor architecture of differentiated γ-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) interneurons in vitro. We show that short-term exposure of cultures to ketamine at concentrations of ≥20 μg/ml leads to a significant cell loss of differentiated cells and that non-cell death-inducing concentrations of ketamine (10 μg/ml) can still initiate long-term alterations of dendritic arbor in differentiated neurons, including dendritic retraction and branching point elimination. Most importantly, we also demonstrate that chronic (>24 h) administration of ketamine at concentrations as low as 0.01 μg/ml can interfere with the maintenance of dendritic arbor architecture. These results raise the possibility that chronic exposure to low, subanesthetic concentrations of ketamine, while not affecting cell survival, could still impair neuronal morphology and thus might lead to dysfunctions of neural networks

  12. Dendrites of cerebellar granule cells correctly recognize their target axons for synaptogenesis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shoko; Takeichi, Masatoshi

    2009-08-04

    Neural circuits are generated by precisely ordered synaptic connections among neurons, and this process is thought to rely on the ability of neurons to recognize specific partners. However, it is also known that neurons promiscuously form synapses with nonspecific partners, in particular when cultured in vitro, causing controversies about neural recognition mechanisms. Here we reexamined whether neurons can or cannot select particular partners in vitro. In the cerebellum, granule cell (GC) dendrites form synaptic connections specifically with mossy fibers, but not with climbing fibers. We cocultured GC neurons with pontine or inferior olivary axons, the major sources for mossy and climbing fibers, respectively, as well as with hippocampal axons as a control. The GC neurons formed synapses with pontine axons predominantly at the distal ends of their dendrites, reproducing the characteristic morphology of their synapses observed in vivo, whereas they failed to do so when combined with other axons. In the latter case, synaptic proteins could accumulate between axons and dendrites, but these synapses were randomly distributed throughout the contact sites, and also their synaptic vesicle recycling was anomalous. These observations suggest that GC dendrites can select their authentic partners for synaptogenesis even in vitro, forming the synapses with a GC-specific nature only with them.

  13. Synthesis and growth mechanism of Zn0.5Cd0.5S nanohexagon dendrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen; Fang, Pengfei; Wang, Shaojie

    2014-12-01

    Hierarchical Zn0.5Cd0.5S nanohexagon dendrites were synthesized by a one-step hydrothermal method. The Zn0.5Cd0.5S nanohexagon dendrites were made up of nanohexagons with a side length of about 90 nm. The nanohexagons were regularly arranged forming as embranchments which were parallel to each other along certain hexagonal directions. Furthermore, these embranchments made up primary trunks shaping as dendrites. The growth mechanism of Zn0.5Cd0.5S nanohexagon dendrites was proposed in which molecular soft template and lowest energy principle played key roles. By adjusting the composition of the reactants, a series of ZnxCd1-xS solid solutions could be obtained. The morphology of the synthesized ZnxCd1-xS depended much on the x value. The UV-vis spectra absorb edges of the ZnxCd1-xS samples continuously shifted indicating the changes of the band gap.

  14. Dendritic Ni(Cu)-polypyrrole hybrid films for a pseudo-capacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bit Na; Chun, Woo Won; Qian, Aniu; Lee, So Jeong; Chung, Chan-Hwa

    2015-11-28

    Dendritic Ni(Cu)-polypyrrole hybrid films are fabricated for a pseudo-capacitor in a unique morphology using two simple methods: electro-deposition and electrochemical de-alloying. Three-dimensional structures of porous dendrites are prepared by electro-deposition within the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) at a high cathodic potential; the high-surface-area structure provides sufficient redox reactions between the electrodes and the electrolyte. The dependence of the active-layer thickness on the super-capacitor performance is also investigated, and the 60 μm-thick Ni(Cu)PPy hybrid electrode presents the highest performance of 659.52 F g(-1) at the scan rate of 5 mV s(-1). In the thicker layers, the specific capacitance became smaller due to the diffusion limitation of the ions in an electrolyte. The polypyrrole-hybridization on the porous dendritic Ni(Cu) electrode provides superior specific capacitance and excellent cycling stability due to the improvement in electric conductivity by the addition of conducting polypyrrole in the matrices of the dendritic nano-porous Ni(Cu) layer and the synergistic effect of composite materials.

  15. Oriented Markov random field based dendritic spine segmentation for fluorescence microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jie; Zhou, Xiaobo; Miller, Eric L; Alvarez, Veronica A; Sabatini, Bernardo L; Wong, Stephen T C

    2010-10-01

    Dendritic spines have been shown to be closely related to various functional properties of the neuron. Usually dendritic spines are manually labeled to analyze their morphological changes, which is very time-consuming and susceptible to operator bias, even with the assistance of computers. To deal with these issues, several methods have been recently proposed to automatically detect and measure the dendritic spines with little human interaction. However, problems such as degraded detection performance for images with larger pixel size (e.g. 0.125 μm/pixel instead of 0.08 μm/pixel) still exist in these methods. Moreover, the shapes of detected spines are also distorted. For example, the "necks" of some spines are missed. Here we present an oriented Markov random field (OMRF) based algorithm which improves spine detection as well as their geometric characterization. We begin with the identification of a region of interest (ROI) containing all the dendrites and spines to be analyzed. For this purpose, we introduce an adaptive procedure for identifying the image background. Next, the OMRF model is discussed within a statistical framework and the segmentation is solved as a maximum a posteriori estimation (MAP) problem, whose optimal solution is found by a knowledge-guided iterative conditional mode (KICM) algorithm. Compared with the existing algorithms, the proposed algorithm not only provides a more accurate representation of the spine shape, but also improves the detection performance by more than 50% with regard to reducing both the misses and false detection.

  16. Lithium dendrite and solid electrolyte interphase investigation using OsO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zier, Martin; Scheiba, Frieder; Oswald, Steffen; Thomas, Jürgen; Goers, Dietrich; Scherer, Torsten; Klose, Markus; Ehrenberg, Helmut; Eckert, Jürgen

    2014-11-01

    Osmium tetroxide (OsO4) staining, commonly used to enhance scattering contrast in electron microscopy of biologic tissue and polymer blends, has been adopted for studies of graphite anodes in lithium-ion batteries. OsO4 shows a coordinated reaction with components of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) and lithium dendrites, thereby increasing material contrast for scanning electron microscopy investigations. Utilizing the high affinity of lithium metal to react with osmium tetroxide it was possible to localize even small lithium deposits on graphite electrodes. In spite of their reaction with the OsO4 fume, the lithium dendrite morphology remains almost untouched by the staining procedure, offering information on the dendrite growth process. Correlating the quantity of osmium detected with the amount of residual ("dead") lithium of a discharged electrode, it was possible to obtain a practical measure for lithium plating and stripping efficiencies. EDX mappings allowed for a localization of electrochemically stripped lithium dendrites by their residual stained SEI shells. Cross sections, prepared by focused ion beam (FIB) of cycled graphite electrodes treated with OsO4, revealed important information about deposition and distribution of metallic lithium and the electrolyte reduction layer across the electrode.

  17. Isoflurane reversibly destabilizes hippocampal dendritic spines by an actin-dependent mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimcy Platholi

    Full Text Available General anesthetics produce a reversible coma-like state through modulation of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission. Recent evidence suggests that anesthetic exposure can also lead to sustained cognitive dysfunction. However, the subcellular effects of anesthetics on the structure of established synapses are not known. We investigated effects of the widely used volatile anesthetic isoflurane on the structural stability of hippocampal dendritic spines, a postsynaptic structure critical to excitatory synaptic transmission in learning and memory. Exposure to clinical concentrations of isoflurane induced rapid and non-uniform shrinkage and loss of dendritic spines in mature cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Spine shrinkage was associated with a reduction in spine F-actin concentration. Spine loss was prevented by either jasplakinolide or cytochalasin D, drugs that prevent F-actin disassembly. Isoflurane-induced spine shrinkage and loss were reversible upon isoflurane elimination. Thus, isoflurane destabilizes spine F-actin, resulting in changes to dendritic spine morphology and number. These findings support an actin-based mechanism for isoflurane-induced alterations of synaptic structure in the hippocampus. These reversible alterations in dendritic spine structure have important implications for acute anesthetic effects on excitatory synaptic transmission and synaptic stability in the hippocampus, a locus for anesthetic-induced amnesia, and have important implications for anesthetic effects on synaptic plasticity.

  18. A bifunctional electrolyte additive for separator wetting and dendrite suppression in lithium metal batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Hao; Xie, Yong; Xiang, Hongfa; Shi, Pengcheng; Liang, Xin; Xu, Wu

    2018-04-01

    Reformulation of electrolyte systems and improvement of separator wettability are vital to electrochemical performances of rechargeable lithium (Li) metal batteries, especially for suppressing Li dendrites. In this work we report a bifunctional electrolyte additive that improves separator wettability and suppresses Li dendrite growth in LMBs. A triblock polyether (Pluronic P123) was introduced as an additive into a commonly used carbonate-based electrolyte. It was found that addition of 0.2~1% (by weight) P123 into the electrolyte could effectively enhance the wettability of polyethylene separator. More importantly, the adsorption of P123 on Li metal surface can act as an artificial solid electrolyte interphase layer and contribute to suppress the growth of Li dendrites. A smooth and dendritic-free morphology can be achieved in the electrolyte with 0.2% P123. The Li||Li symmetric cells with the 0.2% P123 containing electrolyte exhibit a relatively stable cycling stability at high current densities of 1.0 and 3.0 mA cm-2.

  19. Increased signaling by the autism-related Engrailed-2 protein enhances dendritic branching and spine density, alters synaptic structural matching, and exaggerates protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Asma; Lebrun, Solène; Carpentier, Gilles; Zunino, Giulia; Chantepie, Sandrine; Maïza, Auriane; Bozzi, Yuri; Desnos, Claire; Darchen, François; Stettler, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Engrailed 1 (En1) and 2 (En2) code for closely related homeoproteins acting as transcription factors and as signaling molecules that contribute to midbrain and hindbrain patterning, to development and maintenance of monoaminergic pathways, and to retinotectal wiring. En2 has been suggested to be an autism susceptibility gene and individuals with autism display an overexpression of this homeogene but the mechanisms remain unclear. We addressed in the present study the effect of exogenously added En2 on the morphology of hippocampal cells that normally express only low levels of Engrailed proteins. By means of RT-qPCR, we confirmed that En1 and En2 were expressed at low levels in hippocampus and hippocampal neurons, and observed a pronounced decrease in En2 expression at birth and during the first postnatal week, a period characterized by intense synaptogenesis. To address a putative effect of Engrailed in dendritogenesis or synaptogenesis, we added recombinant En1 or En2 proteins to hippocampal cell cultures. Both En1 and En2 treatment increased the complexity of the dendritic tree of glutamatergic neurons, but only En2 increased that of GABAergic cells. En1 increased the density of dendritic spines both in vitro and in vivo. En2 had similar but less pronounced effect on spine density. The number of mature synapses remained unchanged upon En1 treatment but was reduced by En2 treatment, as well as the area of post-synaptic densities. Finally, both En1 and En2 elevated mTORC1 activity and protein synthesis in hippocampal cells, suggesting that some effects of Engrailed proteins may require mRNA translation. Our results indicate that Engrailed proteins can play, even at low concentrations, an active role in the morphogenesis of hippocampal cells. Further, they emphasize the over-regulation of GABA cell morphology and the vulnerability of excitatory synapses in a pathological context of En2 overexpression.

  20. Increased signaling by the autism-related Engrailed-2 protein enhances dendritic branching and spine density, alters synaptic structural matching, and exaggerates protein synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Soltani

    Full Text Available Engrailed 1 (En1 and 2 (En2 code for closely related homeoproteins acting as transcription factors and as signaling molecules that contribute to midbrain and hindbrain patterning, to development and maintenance of monoaminergic pathways, and to retinotectal wiring. En2 has been suggested to be an autism susceptibility gene and individuals with autism display an overexpression of this homeogene but the mechanisms remain unclear. We addressed in the present study the effect of exogenously added En2 on the morphology of hippocampal cells that normally express only low levels of Engrailed proteins. By means of RT-qPCR, we confirmed that En1 and En2 were expressed at low levels in hippocampus and hippocampal neurons, and observed a pronounced decrease in En2 expression at birth and during the first postnatal week, a period characterized by intense synaptogenesis. To address a putative effect of Engrailed in dendritogenesis or synaptogenesis, we added recombinant En1 or En2 proteins to hippocampal cell cultures. Both En1 and En2 treatment increased the complexity of the dendritic tree of glutamatergic neurons, but only En2 increased that of GABAergic cells. En1 increased the density of dendritic spines both in vitro and in vivo. En2 had similar but less pronounced effect on spine density. The number of mature synapses remained unchanged upon En1 treatment but was reduced by En2 treatment, as well as the area of post-synaptic densities. Finally, both En1 and En2 elevated mTORC1 activity and protein synthesis in hippocampal cells, suggesting that some effects of Engrailed proteins may require mRNA translation. Our results indicate that Engrailed proteins can play, even at low concentrations, an active role in the morphogenesis of hippocampal cells. Further, they emphasize the over-regulation of GABA cell morphology and the vulnerability of excitatory synapses in a pathological context of En2 overexpression.

  1. Dendritic calcium channels and their activation by synaptic signals in auditory coincidence detector neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmer, Trillium; Kuo, Sidney P; Bender, Kevin J; Apostolides, Pierre F; Trussell, Laurence O

    2009-08-01

    The avian nucleus laminaris (NL) encodes the azimuthal location of low-frequency sound sources by detecting the coincidence of binaural signals. Accurate coincidence detection requires precise developmental regulation of the lengths of the fine, bitufted dendrites that characterize neurons in NL. Such regulation has been suggested to be driven by local, synaptically mediated, dendritic signals such as Ca(2+). We examined Ca(2+) signaling through patch clamp and ion imaging experiments in slices containing nucleus laminaris from embryonic chicks. Voltage-clamp recordings of neurons located in the NL showed the presence of large Ca(2+) currents of two types, a low voltage-activated, fast inactivating Ni(2+) sensitive channel resembling mammalian T-type channels, and a high voltage-activated, slowly inactivating Cd(2+) sensitive channel. Two-photon Ca(2+) imaging showed that both channel types were concentrated on dendrites, even at their distal tips. Single action potentials triggered synaptically or by somatic current injection immediately elevated Ca(2+) throughout the entire cell. Ca(2+) signals triggered by subthreshold synaptic activity were highly localized. Thus when electrical activity is suprathreshold, Ca(2+) channels ensure that Ca(2+) rises in all dendrites, even those that are synaptically inactive.

  2. Motor learning induces plastic changes in Purkinje cell dendritic spines in the rat cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Tapia, D; González-Ramírez, M M; Vázquez-Hernández, N; González-Burgos, I

    2017-12-14

    The paramedian lobule of the cerebellum is involved in learning to correctly perform motor skills through practice. Dendritic spines are dynamic structures that regulate excitatory synaptic stimulation. We studied plastic changes occurring in the dendritic spines of Purkinje cells from the paramedian lobule of rats during motor learning. Adult male rats were trained over a 6-day period using an acrobatic motor learning paradigm; the density and type of dendritic spines were determined every day during the study period using a modified version of the Golgi method. The learning curve reflected a considerable decrease in the number of errors made by rats as the training period progressed. We observed more dendritic spines on days 2 and 6, particularly more thin spines on days 1, 3, and 6, fewer mushroom spines on day 3, fewer stubby spines on day 1, and more thick spines on days 4 and 6. The initial stage of motor learning may be associated with fast processing of the underlying synaptic information combined with an apparent "silencing" of memory consolidation processes, based on the regulation of the neuronal excitability. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Cellular Automaton Study of Hydrogen Porosity Evolution Coupled with Dendrite Growth During Solidification in the Molten Pool of Al-Cu Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Cheng; Wei, Yanhong; Yu, Fengyi; Liu, Xiangbo; She, Lvbo

    2017-09-01

    Welding porosity defects significantly reduce the mechanical properties of welded joints. In this paper, the hydrogen porosity evolution coupled with dendrite growth during solidification in the molten pool of Al-4.0 wt pct Cu alloy was modeled and simulated. Three phases, including a liquid phase, a solid phase, and a gas phase, were considered in this model. The growth of dendrites and hydrogen gas pores was reproduced using a cellular automaton (CA) approach. The diffusion of solute and hydrogen was calculated using the finite difference method (FDM). Columnar and equiaxed dendrite growth with porosity evolution were simulated. Competitive growth between different dendrites and porosities was observed. Dendrite morphology was influenced by porosity formation near dendrites. After solidification, when the porosities were surrounded by dendrites, they could not escape from the liquid, and they made pores that existed in the welded joints. With the increase in the cooling rate, the average diameter of porosities decreased, and the average number of porosities increased. The average diameter of porosities and the number of porosities in the simulation results had the same trend as the experimental results.

  4. Facile preparation of dendritic Ag-Pd bimetallic nanostructures on the surface of Cu foil for application as a SERS-substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi Zao [College of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Tan Xiulan; Niu Gao [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Xu Xibin [College of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Li Xibo; Ye Xin; Luo Jiangshan; Luo Binchi; Wu Weidong; Tang Yongjian [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yi Yougen, E-mail: yougenyi@mail.csu.edu.cn [College of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2012-05-01

    Dendritic Ag-Pd bimetallic nanostructures have been synthesized on the surface of Cu foil via a multi-stage galvanic replacement reaction (MGRR) of Ag dendrites in a Na{sub 2}PdCl{sub 4} solution. After five stages of replacement reaction, one obtained structures with protruding Ag-Pd flakes; these will mature into many porous structures with a few Ag atoms that are left over dendrites. The dendritic Ag-Pd bimetallic nanostructures were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The morphology of the products strongly depended on the stage of galvanic replacement reaction and reaction temperature. The morphology and composition-dependent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of the as-synthesized Ag-Pd bimetallic nanostructures were investigated. The effectiveness of these dendritic Ag-Pd bimetallic nanostructures on the surface of Cu foil as substrates toward SERS detection was evaluated by using rhodamine 6G (R6G) as a probe molecule. The results indicate that as-synthesized dendritic Ag-Pd bimetallic nanostructures are good candidates for SERS spectroscopy.

  5. Scanning Ultrasound (SUS Causes No Changes to Neuronal Excitability and Prevents Age-Related Reductions in Hippocampal CA1 Dendritic Structure in Wild-Type Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert John Hatch

    Full Text Available Scanning ultrasound (SUS is a noninvasive approach that has recently been shown to ameliorate histopathological changes and restore memory functions in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model. Although no overt neuronal damage was reported, the short- and long-term effects of SUS on neuronal excitability and dendritic tree morphology had not been investigated. To address this, we performed patch-clamp recordings from hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in wild-type mice 2 and 24 hours after a single SUS treatment, and one week and 3 months after six weekly SUS treatments, including sham treatments as controls. In both treatment regimes, no changes in CA1 neuronal excitability were observed in SUS-treated neurons when compared to sham-treated neurons at any time-point. For the multiple treatment groups, we also determined the dendritic morphology and spine densities of the neurons from which we had recorded. The apical trees of sham-treated neurons were reduced at the 3 month time-point when compared to one week; however, surprisingly, no longitudinal change was detected in the apical dendritic trees of SUS-treated neurons. In contrast, the length and complexity of the basal dendritic trees were not affected by SUS treatment at either time-point. The apical dendritic spine densities were reduced, independent of the treatment group, at 3 months compared to one week. Collectively, these data suggest that ultrasound can be employed to prevent an age-associated loss of dendritic structure without impairing neuronal excitability.

  6. Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons’ Dendritic Remodeling and Increased Microglial Density in Primary Motor Cortex in a Murine Model of Facial Paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Urrego

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work was aimed at characterizing structural changes in primary motor cortex layer 5 pyramidal neurons and their relationship with microglial density induced by facial nerve lesion using a murine facial paralysis model. Adult transgenic mice, expressing green fluorescent protein in microglia and yellow fluorescent protein in projecting neurons, were submitted to either unilateral section of the facial nerve or sham surgery. Injured animals were sacrificed either 1 or 3weeks after surgery. Two-photon excitation microscopy was then used for evaluating both layer 5 pyramidal neurons and microglia in vibrissal primary motor cortex (vM1. It was found that facial nerve lesion induced long-lasting changes in the dendritic morphology of vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons and in their surrounding microglia. Dendritic arborization of the pyramidal cells underwent overall shrinkage. Apical dendrites suffered transient shortening while basal dendrites displayed sustained shortening. Moreover, dendrites suffered transient spine pruning. Significantly higher microglial cell density was found surrounding vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons after facial nerve lesion with morphological bias towards the activated phenotype. These results suggest that facial nerve lesions elicit active dendrite remodeling due to pyramidal neuron and microglia interaction, which could be the pathophysiological underpinning of some neuropathic motor sequelae in humans.

  7. Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons' Dendritic Remodeling and Increased Microglial Density in Primary Motor Cortex in a Murine Model of Facial Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrego, Diana; Troncoso, Julieta; Múnera, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    This work was aimed at characterizing structural changes in primary motor cortex layer 5 pyramidal neurons and their relationship with microglial density induced by facial nerve lesion using a murine facial paralysis model. Adult transgenic mice, expressing green fluorescent protein in microglia and yellow fluorescent protein in projecting neurons, were submitted to either unilateral section of the facial nerve or sham surgery. Injured animals were sacrificed either 1 or 3weeks after surgery. Two-photon excitation microscopy was then used for evaluating both layer 5 pyramidal neurons and microglia in vibrissal primary motor cortex (vM1). It was found that facial nerve lesion induced long-lasting changes in the dendritic morphology of vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons and in their surrounding microglia. Dendritic arborization of the pyramidal cells underwent overall shrinkage. Apical dendrites suffered transient shortening while basal dendrites displayed sustained shortening. Moreover, dendrites suffered transient spine pruning. Significantly higher microglial cell density was found surrounding vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons after facial nerve lesion with morphological bias towards the activated phenotype. These results suggest that facial nerve lesions elicit active dendrite remodeling due to pyramidal neuron and microglia interaction, which could be the pathophysiological underpinning of some neuropathic motor sequelae in humans. PMID:26064916

  8. Apparatus for growing a dendritic web

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, C.S.; Mchugh, J.P.; Piotrowski, P.A.; Skutch, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    A melt system including a susceptor-crucible assembly having improved gradient control when melt replenishment is used during dendritic web growth. The improvement lies in the formation of a thermal barrier in the base of the receptor which is in the form of a vertical slot in the region of the susceptor underlying the crucible at the location of a compartmental separator dividing the crucible into a growth compartment and a melt replenishment compartment. The result achieved is a step change in temperature gradient in the melt thereby providing a more uniform temperature in the growth compartment from which the dendritic web is drawn

  9. Dendrite tungsten liquation in molybdenum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantor, M.M.; Ageeva, E.N.; Kolotinskij, V.N.

    1992-01-01

    A study was made on primary crystallization structure of ingots of Mo-W-B system alloys with electron microscopy were used to establish, that cells and cellular dendrites were the main elements of primary crystallization structure. Method of local X-ray spectral analysis enabled to establish, that intracrystallite liquation at cellular growth developed more intensively, as compared to the case of cellular dendrite formation. Change of boron content in alloys didn't practically affect the degree of development of intracrystallite W liquation in Mo

  10. Context-aware modeling of neuronal morphologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eTorben-Nielsen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal morphologies are pivotal for brain functioning: physical overlap between dendrites and axons constrain the circuit topology, and the precise shape and composition of dendrites determine the integration of inputs to produce an output signal. At the same time, morphologies are highly diverse and variant. The variance, presumably, originates from neurons developing in a densely packed brain substrate where they interact (e.g., repulsion or attraction with other actors in this substrate. However, when studying neurons their context is never part of the analysis and they are treated as if they existed in isolation.Here we argue that to fully understand neuronal morphology and its variance it is important to consider neurons in relation to each other and to other actors in the surrounding brain substrate, i.e., their context. We propose a context-aware computational framework, NeuroMaC, in which large numbers of neurons can be grown simultaneously according to growth rules expressed in terms of interactions between the developing neuron and the surrounding brain substrate.As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that by using NeuroMaC we can generate accurate virtual morphologies of distinct classes both in isolation and as part of neuronal forests. Accuracy is validated against population statistics of experimentally reconstructed morphologies. We show that context-aware generation of neurons can explain characteristics of variation. Indeed, plausible variation is an inherent property of the morphologies generated by context-aware rules. We speculate about the applicability of this framework to investigate morphologies and circuits, to classify healthy and pathological morphologies, and to generate large quantities of morphologies for large-scale modeling.

  11. Transient potentials in dendritic systems of arbitrary geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butz, E G; Cowan, J D

    1974-09-01

    A simple graphical calculus is developed that generates analytic solutions for membrane potential transforms at any point on the dendritic tree of neurons with arbitrary dendritic geometries, in response to synaptic "current" inputs. Such solutions permit the computation of transients in neurons with arbitrary geometry and may facilitate analysis of the role of dendrites in such cells.

  12. Twinned feathery grains and related morphologies in aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, S. [Compagnie de Produits Chimiques et Electrometallurgiques Pechiney, Centre de Recherches de Voreppe, 38 (France); Lab. de Metallurgie Physique, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Rappaz, M. [Lab. de Metallurgie Physique, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2000-07-01

    Al-Cu, Al-Mg and Al-Si alloys without grain refiner addition have been directionally solidified under well-controlled thermal and convection conditions. For relatively high solidification rates, several changes in the dendrite growth morphology were observed. One of the most common structure that may appear under such conditions is called ''feathery grains'' : it was demonstrated recently that this lamellar structure is constituted of left angle 110 right angle dendrites whose trunks are cut through by {l_brace}111{r_brace} twin planes. These grains undergo a selection mechanism which is similar to that occurring for regular left angle 100 right angle dendritic grains. The transition between left angle 100 right angle and left angle 110 right angle dendrite forms is progressive and morphologies that develop arms in both type of crystallographic directions can be observed. Moreover, in the case of a 5182 Al-Mg alloy, regular left angle 110 right angle dendrites, without twins, could also be obtained. This dendritic growth along left angle 110 right angle crystallographic directions is supposed to be due to a change in the anisotropy of certain properties of the alloy, such as the solid/liquid interfacial energy and/or the atom attachment kinetics. The possibility of growth along other directions than the usual left angle 100 right angle was further demonstrated by the observation of dendrites developing in an Al-Cu-Mg solidified in a Bridgman device. In this case, left angle 112 right angle trunks form and progressively change their growth direction, thus showing curved shapes. (orig.)

  13. Facile synthesis of hollow dendritic Ag/Pt alloy nanoparticles for enhanced methanol oxidation efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Ning; Wang, Ke; Shan, Xinyao; Bai, Qiang; Wang, Lina; Xiao, Hailian; Liu, Manhong; Colvin, Vicki L; Yu, William W

    2017-11-14

    Hollow dendritic Ag/Pt alloy nanoparticles were synthesized by a double template method: Ag nanoparticles as the hard template to obtain hollow spheres by a galvanic replacement reaction between PtCl 6 2- and metallic Ag and surfactant micelles (Brij58) as the soft template to generate porous dendrites. The formation of a Ag/Pt alloy phase was confirmed by XRD and HRTEM. Elemental mapping and line scanning revealed the formation of the hollow architecture. We studied the effects of the Ag/Pt ratio, surfactant and reaction temperature on the morphology. In addition, we explored the formation process of hollow dendritic Ag/Pt nanoparticles by tracking the morphologies of the nanostructures formed at different stages. In order to improve the electrocatalytic property, we controlled the size of the nanoparticles and the thickness of the shell by adjusting the amount of the precursor. We found that these Ag/Pt alloy nanoparticles exhibited high activity (440 mA mg -1 ) and stability as an electrocatalyst for catalyzing methanol oxidation.

  14. Molecular signatures of maturing dendritic cells: implications for testing the quality of dendritic cell therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs are often produced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and interleukin-4 (IL-4 stimulation of monocytes. To improve the effectiveness of DC adoptive immune cancer therapy, many different agents have been used to mature DCs. We analyzed the kinetics of DC maturation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS and interferon-γ (IFN-γ induction in order to characterize the usefulness of mature DCs (mDCs for immune therapy and to identify biomarkers for assessing the quality of mDCs. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected from 6 healthy subjects by apheresis, monocytes were isolated by elutriation, and immature DCs (iDCs were produced by 3 days of culture with GM-CSF and IL-4. The iDCs were sampled after 4, 8 and 24 hours in culture with LPS and IFN-γ and were then assessed by flow cytometry, ELISA, and global gene and microRNA (miRNA expression analysis. Results After 24 hours of LPS and IFN-γ stimulation, DC surface expression of CD80, CD83, CD86, and HLA Class II antigens were up-regulated. Th1 attractant genes such as CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11 and CCL5 were up-regulated during maturation but not Treg attractants such as CCL22 and CXCL12. The expression of classical mDC biomarker genes CD83, CCR7, CCL5, CCL8, SOD2, MT2A, OASL, GBP1 and HES4 were up-regulated throughout maturation while MTIB, MTIE, MTIG, MTIH, GADD45A and LAMP3 were only up-regulated late in maturation. The expression of miR-155 was up-regulated 8-fold in mDCs. Conclusion DCs, matured with LPS and IFN-γ, were characterized by increased levels of Th1 attractants as opposed to Treg attractants and may be particularly effective for adoptive immune cancer therapy.

  15. Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballereau, P.

    1999-01-01

    The different regulations relative to nuclear energy since the first of January 1999 are given here. Two points deserve to be noticed: the decree of the third august 1999 authorizing the national Agency for the radioactive waste management to install and exploit on the commune of Bures (Meuse) an underground laboratory destined to study the deep geological formations where could be stored the radioactive waste. The second point is about the uranium residues and the waste notion. The judgment of the administrative tribunal of Limoges ( 9. july 1998) forbidding the exploitation of a storage installation of depleted uranium considered as final waste and qualifying it as an industrial waste storage facility has been annulled bu the Court of Appeal. It stipulated that, according to the law number 75663 of the 15. july 1965, no criteria below can be applied to depleted uranium: production residue (possibility of an ulterior enrichment), abandonment of a personal property or simple intention to do it ( future use aimed in the authorization request made in the Prefecture). This judgment has devoted the primacy of the waste notion on this one of final waste. (N.C.)

  16. Early increase and late decrease of purkinje cell dendritic spine density in prion-infected organotypic mouse cerebellar cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campeau, Jody L; Wu, Gengshu; Bell, John R; Rasmussen, Jay; Sim, Valerie L

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases are infectious neurodegenerative diseases associated with the accumulation of protease-resistant prion protein, neuronal loss, spongiform change and astrogliosis. In the mouse model, the loss of dendritic spines is one of the earliest pathological changes observed in vivo, occurring 4-5 weeks after the first detection of protease-resistant prion protein in the brain. While there are cell culture models of prion infection, most do not recapitulate the neuropathology seen in vivo. Only the recently developed prion organotypic slice culture assay has been reported to undergo neuronal loss and the development of some aspects of prion pathology, namely small vacuolar degeneration and tubulovesicular bodies. Given the rapid replication of prions in this system, with protease-resistant prion protein detectable by 21 days, we investigated whether the dendritic spine loss and altered dendritic morphology seen in prion disease might also develop within the lifetime of this culture system. Indeed, six weeks after first detection of protease-resistant prion protein in tga20 mouse cerebellar slice cultures infected with RML prion strain, we found a statistically significant loss of Purkinje cell dendritic spines and altered dendritic morphology in infected cultures, analogous to that seen in vivo. In addition, we found a transient but statistically significant increase in Purkinje cell dendritic spine density during infection, at the time when protease-resistant prion protein was first detectable in culture. Our findings support the use of this slice culture system as one which recapitulates prion disease pathology and one which may facilitate study of the earliest stages of prion disease pathogenesis.

  17. Electrochromism and photocatalysis in dendrite structured Ti:WO3 thin films grown by sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karuppasamy, A., E-mail: karuppasamy@psnacet.edu.in

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Dendrite structured Ti doped WO{sub 3} (WTO) thin films are grown by co-sputtering. • Sputtering condition influences structure and surface morphology of WTO films. • Titanium doping and annealing lead to dendritic surface structures in WTO films. • Structural, optical, electrochromic and photocatalytic properties of WTO films. • Enhanced electrochromism and photocatalysis in dendrite structured WTO thin films. - Abstract: Titanium doped tungsten oxide (Ti:WO{sub 3}) thin films with dendrite surface structures were grown by co-sputtering titanium and tungsten in Ar + O{sub 2} atmosphere. Ti:WO{sub 3} thin films were deposited at oxygen flow rates corresponding to pressures in the range 1.0 × 10{sup −3}–5.0 × 10{sup −3} mbar. Argon flow rate and sputtering power densities for titanium (2 W/cm{sup 2}) and tungsten (3 W/cm{sup 2}) were kept constant. Ti:WO{sub 3} films deposited at an oxygen pressure of 5 × 10{sup −3} mbar are found to be better electrochromic and photocatalytic. They have high optical modulation (80% at λ = 550 nm), coloration efficiency (60 cm{sup 2}/C at λ = 550 nm), electron/ion storage and removal capacity (Qc: −22.01 mC/cm{sup 2}, Qa: 17.72 mC/cm{sup 2}), reversibility (80%) and methylene blue decomposition rate (−1.38 μmol/l d). The combined effects of titanium doping, dendrite surface structures and porosity leads to significant enhancement in the electrochromic and photocatalytic properties of Ti:WO{sub 3} films.

  18. Electrochromism and photocatalysis in dendrite structured Ti:WO3 thin films grown by sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karuppasamy, A.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Dendrite structured Ti doped WO 3 (WTO) thin films are grown by co-sputtering. • Sputtering condition influences structure and surface morphology of WTO films. • Titanium doping and annealing lead to dendritic surface structures in WTO films. • Structural, optical, electrochromic and photocatalytic properties of WTO films. • Enhanced electrochromism and photocatalysis in dendrite structured WTO thin films. - Abstract: Titanium doped tungsten oxide (Ti:WO 3 ) thin films with dendrite surface structures were grown by co-sputtering titanium and tungsten in Ar + O 2 atmosphere. Ti:WO 3 thin films were deposited at oxygen flow rates corresponding to pressures in the range 1.0 × 10 −3 –5.0 × 10 −3 mbar. Argon flow rate and sputtering power densities for titanium (2 W/cm 2 ) and tungsten (3 W/cm 2 ) were kept constant. Ti:WO 3 films deposited at an oxygen pressure of 5 × 10 −3 mbar are found to be better electrochromic and photocatalytic. They have high optical modulation (80% at λ = 550 nm), coloration efficiency (60 cm 2 /C at λ = 550 nm), electron/ion storage and removal capacity (Qc: −22.01 mC/cm 2 , Qa: 17.72 mC/cm 2 ), reversibility (80%) and methylene blue decomposition rate (−1.38 μmol/l d). The combined effects of titanium doping, dendrite surface structures and porosity leads to significant enhancement in the electrochromic and photocatalytic properties of Ti:WO 3 films.

  19. The actin-binding protein capulet genetically interacts with the microtubule motor kinesin to maintain neuronal dendrite homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M B Medina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neurons require precise cytoskeletal regulation within neurites, containing microtubule tracks for cargo transport in axons and dendrites or within synapses containing organized actin. Due to the unique architecture and specialized function of neurons, neurons are particularly susceptible to perturbation of the cytoskeleton. Numerous actin-binding proteins help maintain proper cytoskeletal regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: From a Drosophila forward genetic screen, we identified a mutation in capulet--encoding a conserved actin-binding protein--that causes abnormal aggregates of actin within dendrites. Through interaction studies, we demonstrate that simultaneous genetic inactivation of capulet and kinesin heavy chain, a microtubule motor protein, produces elongate cofilin-actin rods within dendrites but not axons. These rods resemble actin-rich structures induced in both mammalian neurodegenerative and Drosophila Alzheimer's models, but have not previously been identified by loss of function mutations in vivo. We further demonstrate that mitochondria, which are transported by Kinesin, have impaired distribution along dendrites in a capulet mutant. While Capulet and Cofilin may biochemically cooperate in certain circumstances, in neuronal dendrites they genetically antagonize each other. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study is the first molecularly defined loss of function demonstration of actin-cofilin rods in vivo. This study suggests that simultaneous, seemingly minor perturbations in neuronal dendrites can synergize producing severe abnormalities affecting actin, microtubules and mitochondria/energy availability in dendrites. Additionally, as >90% of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's cases are sporadic this study suggests mechanisms by which multiple mutations together may contribute to neurodegeneration instead of reliance on single mutations to produce disease.

  20. Peptides and proteins in dendritic assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baal, van I.

    2007-01-01

    Multiple, simultaneous interactions are often used in biology to enhance the affinity and specificity of binding, an effect referred to as multivalency. This multivalency can be mimicked by anchoring multiple peptides and proteins onto synthetic dendritic scaffolds. The aim of this research was to

  1. Targeting nanoparticles to dendritic cells for immunotherapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruz, L.J.; Tacken, P.J.; Rueda, F.; Domingo, J.C.; Albericio, F.; Figdor, C.G.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key players in the initiation of adaptive immune responses and are currently exploited in immunotherapy for treatment of cancer and infectious diseases. Development of targeted nanodelivery systems carrying vaccine components, including antigens and adjuvants, to DCs in

  2. Antigen dynamics of follicular dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesters, B.A.

    2015-01-01

    Stromal-derived follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are a major depot for antigen that are essential for formation of germinal centers, the site where memory and effector B cells differentiate and high-affinity antibody production takes place. Historically, FDCs have been characterized as ‘accessory’

  3. Dendritic cells: biology of the skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toebak, M.J.; Gibbs, S.; Bruynzeel, D.P.; Scheper, R.J.; Rustemeyer, T.

    2009-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis results from a T-cell-mediated, delayed-type hypersensitivity immune response induced by allergens. Skin dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in the initiation of allergic skin responses. Following encounter with an allergen, DCs become activated and undergo

  4. Thermosolutal convection and macrosegregation in dendritic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, David R.; Heinrich, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    A mathematical model of solidification, that simulates the formation of channel segregates or freckles, is presented. The model simulates the entire solidification process, starting with the initial melt to the solidified cast, and the resulting segregation is predicted. Emphasis is given to the initial transient, when the dendritic zone begins to develop and the conditions for the possible nucleation of channels are established. The mechanisms that lead to the creation and eventual growth or termination of channels are explained in detail and illustrated by several numerical examples. A finite element model is used for the simulations. It uses a single system of equations to deal with the all-liquid region, the dendritic region, and the all-solid region. The dendritic region is treated as an anisotropic porous medium. The algorithm uses the bilinear isoparametric element, with a penalty function approximation and a Petrov-Galerkin formulation. The major task was to develop the solidification model. In addition, other tasks that were performed in conjunction with the modeling of dendritic solidification are briefly described.

  5. Dendritic cells in peripheral tolerance and immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Monika; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells capable of influencing immunity exist as functionally distinct subsets, T cell-tolerizing and T cell-immunizing subsets. The present paper reviews how these subsets of DCs develop, differentiate and function in vivo and in vitro at the cellular and molecular level. In particular...

  6. Dendritic cells modified by vitamin D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ayako Wakatsuki; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Zocca, Mai-Britt

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen-presenting cells of the immune system, express nuclear receptors for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (VD3) and they are one of its main targets. In the presence of VD3, DCs differentiate into a phenotype that resembles semimature DCs, with reduced T cell ...

  7. Randomly oriented twin domains in electrodeposited silver dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović Evica R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver dendrites were prepared by electrochemical deposition. The structures of Ag dendrites, the type of twins and their distribution were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Z-contrast high angle annular dark field transmission electron microscopy (HAADF, and crystallografically sensitive orientation imaging microscopy (OIM. The results revealed that silver dendrites are characterized by the presence of randomly distributed 180° rotational twin domains. The broad surface of dendrites was of the {111} type. Growth directions of the main dendrite stem and all branches were of type. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172054

  8. Generation of blood-derived dendritic cells in dogs with oral malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catchpole, B; Stell, A J; Dobson, J M

    2002-01-01

    Advances in treatment of human melanoma indicate that immunotherapy, particularly dendritic cell (DC) immunization, may prove useful. The aim of this study was to investigate whether blood-derived DCs could be generated from canine melanoma patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from three such dogs and cultured with recombinant canine granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), canine interleukin 4 and human Flt3-ligand for 7 days. The resulting cells demonstrated a typical dendritic morphology, and were enriched for cells expressing CD1a, CD11c and MHC II by flow cytometric analysis. Thus, canine blood-derived DCs can be generated in vitro and DC immunization should be feasible in dogs. Copyright Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  9. Bergmann glia and the recognition molecule CHL1 organize GABAergic axons and direct innervation of Purkinje cell dendrites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Ango

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The geometric and subcellular organization of axon arbors distributes and regulates electrical signaling in neurons and networks, but the underlying mechanisms have remained elusive. In rodent cerebellar cortex, stellate interneurons elaborate characteristic axon arbors that selectively innervate Purkinje cell dendrites and likely regulate dendritic integration. We used GFP BAC transgenic reporter mice to examine the cellular processes and molecular mechanisms underlying the development of stellate cell axons and their innervation pattern. We show that stellate axons are organized and guided towards Purkinje cell dendrites by an intermediate scaffold of Bergmann glial (BG fibers. The L1 family immunoglobulin protein Close Homologue of L1 (CHL1 is localized to apical BG fibers and stellate cells during the development of stellate axon arbors. In the absence of CHL1, stellate axons deviate from BG fibers and show aberrant branching and orientation. Furthermore, synapse formation between aberrant stellate axons and Purkinje dendrites is reduced and cannot be maintained, leading to progressive atrophy of axon terminals. These results establish BG fibers as a guiding scaffold and CHL1 a molecular signal in the organization of stellate axon arbors and in directing their dendritic innervation.

  10. Theoretical modeling of cellular and dendritic solidification microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Younggil

    In this dissertation, we use three-dimensional (3D) phase-field (PF) modeling to investigate (i) 3D solid-liquid interface dynamics observed in microgravity experiments, and (ii) array patterns in a thin-sample geometry. In addition, using the two-dimensional (2D) dendritic-needle-network (DNN) model, we explore (iii) secondary sidebranching dynamics. Recently, solidification experiments are carried out in the DSI (Directional Solidification Insert) of the DECLIC (Device for the study of Critical LIquids and Crystallization) facility aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Thus, the directional solidification experiments are achieved under limited convective currents, and the experimental observations reveal unique dynamics of 3D microstructure in a purely diffusive growth regime. In this directional solidification setup, a temperature field between heat sources could evolve due to two main factors: (i) heat transfer within an adiabatic zone and (ii) latent heat rejection at the interface. These two thermal effects are phenomenologically characterized using a time-dependent thermal shift. In addition, we could quantitatively account for these thermal factors using a numerical calculation of the evolution of temperature field. We introduce these phenomenological and quantitative thermal representations into the PF model. The performed simulations using different thermal descriptions are compared to the experimental measurements from the initial planar interface dynamics to the final spacing selection. The DECLIC-DSI experimental observations exhibit complex grain boundary (GB) dynamics between large grains with a small misorientation. In the observations, several large grains with a small misorientation with respect to the temperature gradient are formed during solidification. Specifically, at a convergent GB, a localized group of misoriented cells penetrates into a nearby grain, which yields the morphological instability of grain boundaries. Remarkably, while

  11. Fast generation of dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvistborg, P; Bøgh, Marie; Pedersen, A W

    2009-01-01

    we have developed fast DC protocol by comparing two different fast DC protocols with SDDC. DC were evaluated by FACS analysis, and the optimal profile was considered: CD14(low), CD80(high), CD83(high), CD86(high), CCR7(high), HLA class I and II(high). FACS profiles were used as the selection criteria...... together with yield and morphology. Two fast DC protocols fulfilled these criteria and were selected for functional analysis. Our results demonstrate that DC generated within 5days or 48h are comparable with SDDC both phenotypically and functionally. However, we found that 48h DC were more susceptible than...... SDDC to the IL-10 inducing stimulus of TLR ligands (R848 and LPS). Thus to determine the clinical relevance of fast DC protocols in cancer settings, small phase I trials should be conducted monitoring regulatory T cells carefully....

  12. Morphology, classification, and distribution of the projection neurons in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus of the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changying Ling

    Full Text Available The morphology of confirmed projection neurons in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN of the rat was examined by filling these cells retrogradely with biotinylated dextran amine (BDA injected into the visual cortex. BDA-labeled projection neurons varied widely in the shape and size of their cell somas, with mean cross-sectional areas ranging from 60-340 µm(2. Labeled projection neurons supported 7-55 dendrites that spanned up to 300 µm in length and formed dendritic arbors with cross-sectional areas of up to 7.0 × 10(4 µm(2. Primary dendrites emerged from cell somas in three broad patterns. In some dLGN projection neurons, primary dendrites arise from the cell soma at two poles spaced approximately 180° apart. In other projection neurons, dendrites emerge principally from one side of the cell soma, while in a third group of projection neurons primary dendrites emerge from the entire perimeter of the cell soma. Based on these three distinct patterns in the distribution of primary dendrites from cell somas, we have grouped dLGN projection neurons into three classes: bipolar cells, basket cells and radial cells, respectively. The appendages seen on dendrites also can be grouped into three classes according to differences in their structure. Short "tufted" appendages arise mainly from the distal branches of dendrites; "spine-like" appendages, fine stalks with ovoid heads, typically are seen along the middle segments of dendrites; and "grape-like" appendages, short stalks that terminate in a cluster of ovoid bulbs, appear most often along the proximal segments of secondary dendrites of neurons with medium or large cell somas. While morphologically diverse dLGN projection neurons are intermingled uniformly throughout the nucleus, the caudal pole of the dLGN contains more small projection neurons of all classes than the rostral pole.

  13. Dendritic cell targeted liposomes–protamine–DNA complexes mediated by synthetic mannosylated cholestrol as a potential carrier for DNA vaccine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Pan; Chen Simu; Jiang Yuhong; Jiang Jiayu; Zhang Zhirong; Sun Xun

    2013-01-01

    To construct mannosylated liposomes/protamine/DNA (LPD) carriers for DNA vaccine targeting to dendritic cells (DCs), a mannosylated cholesterol derivative (Man-C6-Chol) was synthesized via simple ester linkage and amide bonds. Then, the Man-C6-Chol was applied to LPD formulation as a synthetic ligand. The physicochemical properties of mannosylated LPD (Man-LPD) were first evaluated, including the size and zeta potential, morphology and the ability to protect DNA against DNase I degradation. Man-LPD showed a small size with a stable viral-like structure. In comparison to non-mannose liposomes/LPD (Man-free liposomes/LPD), mannosylated liposomes/LPD (Man-liposomes/Man-LPD) exhibited higher efficiency in both intracellular uptake (2.3-fold) and transfection (4.5-fold) in vitro. Subsequent MTT assays indicated that the LPD carriers had low toxicity on the tested cells. Afterwards, the investigation into the maturation activation on primary bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) showed that both Man-LPD and Man-free LPD induced remarkable up-regulation of CD80, CD86 and CD40 on BMDCs. Inspired by these studies, we can conclude that the synthetic mannosylated LPD targeting to DCs was a potential carrier for DNA vaccine. (paper)

  14. Morphological demosaicking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Shuxue

    2009-02-01

    Bayer patterns, in which a single value of red, green or blue is available for each pixel, are widely used in digital color cameras. The reconstruction of the full color image is often referred to as demosaicking. This paper introduced a new approach - morphological demosaicking. The approach is based on strong edge directionality selection and interpolation, followed by morphological operations to refine edge directionality selection and reduce color aliasing. Finally performance evaluation and examples of color artifacts reduction are shown.

  15. An essential role for neuregulin-4 in the growth and elaboration of developing neocortical pyramidal dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramo, Blanca; Wyatt, Sean; Davies, Alun M

    2018-04-01

    Neuregulins, with the exception of neuregulin-4 (NRG4), have been shown to be extensively involved in many aspects of neural development and function and are implicated in several neurological disorders, including schizophrenia, depression and bipolar disorder. Here we provide the first evidence that NRG4 has a crucial function in the developing brain. We show that both the apical and basal dendrites of neocortical pyramidal neurons are markedly stunted in Nrg4 -/- neonates in vivo compared with Nrg4 +/+ littermates. Neocortical pyramidal neurons cultured from Nrg4 -/- embryos had significantly shorter and less branched neurites than those cultured from Nrg4 +/+ littermates. Recombinant NRG4 rescued the stunted phenotype of embryonic neocortical pyramidal neurons cultured from Nrg4 -/- mice. The majority of cultured wild type embryonic cortical pyramidal neurons co-expressed NRG4 and its receptor ErbB4. The difference between neocortical pyramidal dendrites of Nrg4 -/- and Nrg4 +/+ mice was less pronounced, though still significant, in juvenile mice. However, by adult stages, the pyramidal dendrite arbors of Nrg4 -/- and Nrg4 +/+ mice were similar, suggesting that compensatory changes in Nrg4 -/- mice occur with age. Our findings show that NRG4 is a major novel regulator of dendritic arborisation in the developing cerebral cortex and suggest that it exerts its effects by an autocrine/paracrine mechanism. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Living in the branches: population dynamics and ecological processes in dendritic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, E.H.C.; Lowe, W.H.; Fagan, W.F.

    2007-01-01

    Spatial structure regulates and modifies processes at several levels of ecological organization (e.g. individual/genetic, population and community) and is thus a key component of complex systems, where knowledge at a small scale can be insufficient for understanding system behaviour at a larger scale. Recent syntheses outline potential applications of network theory to ecological systems, but do not address the implications of physical structure for network dynamics. There is a specific need to examine how dendritic habitat structure, such as that found in stream, hedgerow and cave networks, influences ecological processes. Although dendritic networks are one type of ecological network, they are distinguished by two fundamental characteristics: (1) both the branches and the nodes serve as habitat, and (2) the specific spatial arrangement and hierarchical organization of these elements interacts with a species' movement behaviour to alter patterns of population distribution and abundance, and community interactions. Here, we summarize existing theory relating to ecological dynamics in dendritic networks, review empirical studies examining the population- and community-level consequences of these networks, and suggest future research integrating spatial pattern and processes in dendritic systems.

  17. Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France); Fardel, Olivier [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France); Pôle Biologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Rennes, 2 rue Henri Le Guilloux, 35033 Rennes (France); Vernhet, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.vernhet@univ-rennes1.fr [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France)

    2013-01-15

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the antileukemic trivalent inorganic arsenic prevents the development of severe pro-inflammatory diseases mediated by excessive Th1 and Th17 cell responses. Differentiation of Th1 and Th17 subsets is mainly regulated by interleukins (ILs) secreted from dendritic cells (DCs) and the ability of inorganic arsenic to impair interferon-γ and IL-17 secretion by interfering with the physiology of DCs is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that high concentrations of sodium arsenite (As(III), 1–2 μM) clinically achievable in plasma of arsenic-treated patients, block differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytes into immature DCs (iDCs) by inducing their necrosis. Differentiation of monocytes in the presence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) (0.1 to 0.5 μM) only slightly impacts endocytotic activity of iDCs or expression of co-stimulatory molecules in cells activated with lipopolysaccharide. However, this differentiation in the presence of As(III) strongly represses secretion of IL-12p70 and IL-23, two major regulators of Th1 and Th17 activities, from iDCs stimulated with different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in metalloid-free medium. Such As(III)-exposed DCs also exhibit reduced mRNA levels of IL12A and/or IL12B genes when activated with TLR agonists. Finally, differentiation of monocytes with non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) subsequently reduces the ability of activated DCs to stimulate the release of interferon-γ and IL-17 from Th cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that clinically relevant concentrations of inorganic arsenic markedly impair in vitro differentiation and functions of DCs, which may contribute to the putative beneficial effects of the metalloid towards inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Highlights: ► Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells (DCs) ► Arsenite (> 1 μM) blocks differentiation of dendritic cells by

  18. Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie; Fardel, Olivier; Vernhet, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the antileukemic trivalent inorganic arsenic prevents the development of severe pro-inflammatory diseases mediated by excessive Th1 and Th17 cell responses. Differentiation of Th1 and Th17 subsets is mainly regulated by interleukins (ILs) secreted from dendritic cells (DCs) and the ability of inorganic arsenic to impair interferon-γ and IL-17 secretion by interfering with the physiology of DCs is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that high concentrations of sodium arsenite (As(III), 1–2 μM) clinically achievable in plasma of arsenic-treated patients, block differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytes into immature DCs (iDCs) by inducing their necrosis. Differentiation of monocytes in the presence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) (0.1 to 0.5 μM) only slightly impacts endocytotic activity of iDCs or expression of co-stimulatory molecules in cells activated with lipopolysaccharide. However, this differentiation in the presence of As(III) strongly represses secretion of IL-12p70 and IL-23, two major regulators of Th1 and Th17 activities, from iDCs stimulated with different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in metalloid-free medium. Such As(III)-exposed DCs also exhibit reduced mRNA levels of IL12A and/or IL12B genes when activated with TLR agonists. Finally, differentiation of monocytes with non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) subsequently reduces the ability of activated DCs to stimulate the release of interferon-γ and IL-17 from Th cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that clinically relevant concentrations of inorganic arsenic markedly impair in vitro differentiation and functions of DCs, which may contribute to the putative beneficial effects of the metalloid towards inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Highlights: ► Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells (DCs) ► Arsenite (> 1 μM) blocks differentiation of dendritic cells by

  19. Prospective clinical testing of regulatory dendritic cells (DCreg) in organ transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    ANGUS W THOMSON; ALAN F ZAHORCHAK; Mohamed B. Ezzelarab; Lisa H. Butterfield; Fadi G. Lakkis; Diana M Metes

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are rare, professional antigen-presenting cells with ability to induce or regulate alloimmune responses. Regulatory DC (DCreg) with potential to down-modulate acute and chronic inflammatory conditions that occur in organ transplantation can be generated in vitro under a variety of conditions. Here, we provide a rationale for evaluation of DCreg therapy in clinical organ transplantation with the goal of promoting sustained, donor-specific hyporesponsiveness, while lowering...

  20. Effector and regulatory dendritic cells display distinct patterns of miRNA expression

    OpenAIRE

    Lombardi, Vincent; Luce, Sonia; Moussu, H?l?ne; Morizur, Lise; Gueguen, Claire; Neukirch, Catherine; Chollet?Martin, Sylvie; Mascarell, Laurent; Aubier, Michel; Baron?Bodo, V?ronique; Moingeon, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction MicroRNAs (miRNAs) contribute to the regulation of dendritic cell (DC) polarization, thereby influencing the balance of adaptive immune responses. Herein, we studied the expression of miRNAs in polarized DCs and analyzed whether expression of these miRNAs could be associated with allergic rhinitis and allergen immunotherapy (AIT) outcome. Method Using specific culture conditions, we differentiated immature human monocyte?derived DCs into DC1, DC2, and DCreg subsets (supp...

  1. The Histone H3K27 Demethylase UTX Regulates Synaptic Plasticity and Cognitive Behaviors in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang-Bin Tang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Histone demethylase UTX mediates removal of repressive trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3 to establish a mechanistic switch to activate large sets of genes. Mutation of Utx has recently been shown to be associated with Kabuki syndrome, a rare congenital anomaly syndrome with dementia. However, its biological function in the brain is largely unknown. Here, we observe that deletion of Utx results in increased anxiety-like behaviors and impaired spatial learning and memory in mice. Loss of Utx in the hippocampus leads to reduced long-term potentiation and amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic current, aberrant dendrite development and defective synapse formation. Transcriptional profiling reveals that Utx regulates a subset of genes that are involved in the regulation of dendritic morphology, synaptic transmission, and cognition. Specifically, Utx deletion disrupts expression of neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 5B (Htr5b. Restoration of Htr5b expression in newborn hippocampal neurons rescues the defects of neuronal morphology by Utx ablation. Therefore, we provide evidence that Utx plays a critical role in modulating synaptic transmission and cognitive behaviors. Utx cKO mouse models like ours provide a valuable means to study the underlying mechanisms of the etiology of Kabuki syndrome.

  2. GM-CSF Controls Nonlymphoid Tissue Dendritic Cell Homeostasis but Is Dispensable for the Differentiation of Inflammatory Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greter, Melanie; Helft, Julie; Chow, Andrew; Hashimoto, Daigo; Mortha, Arthur; Agudo-Cantero, Judith; Bogunovic, Milena; Gautier, Emmanuel L.; Miller, Jennifer; Leboeuf, Marylene; Lu, Geming; Aloman, Costica; Brown, Brian D.; Pollard, Jeffrey W.; Xiong, Huabao; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Chipuk, Jerry E.; Frenette, Paul S.; Merad, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY GM-CSF (Csf-2) is a critical cytokine for the in vitro generation of dendritic cells (DCs) and is thought to control the development of inflammatory DCs and resident CD103+ DCs in some tissues. Here we showed that in contrast to the current understanding, Csf-2 receptor acts in the steady state to promote the survival and homeostasis of nonlymphoid tissue-resident CD103+ and CD11b+ DCs. Absence of Csf-2 receptor on lung DCs abrogated the induction of CD8+ T cell immunity after immunization with particulate antigens. In contrast, Csf-2 receptor was dispensable for the differentiation and innate function of inflammatory DCs during acute injuries. Instead, inflammatory DCs required Csf-1 receptor for their development. Thus, Csf-2 is important in vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell immunity through the regulation of nonlymphoid tissue DC homeostasis rather than control of inflammatory DCs in vivo. PMID:22749353

  3. Polyaniline nanotubes and their dendrites doped with different naphthalene sulfonic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhiming; Wei Zhixiang; Zhang Lijuan; Wan Meixiang

    2005-01-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) nanotubes (130-250 nm in average diameter) doped with α-naphthalene sulfonic acid (α-NSA), β-naphthalene sulfonic acid (β-NSA) and 1,5-naphthalene disulfonic acid were synthesized via a self-assembly process. It was found that the formation yield, morphology (hollow or solid), size, crystalline and electrical properties of the nanostructures are affected by the position and number of -SO 3 H groups attached to the naphthalene ring of NSA as well as the synthesis conditions. Moreover, these nanotubes aggregate to form a dendritic morphology when the polymerization is performed at a static state. The micelles composed of dopant or dopant/anilinium cations might act in a template-like fashion in forming self-assembled PANI nanotubes, which was further confirmed by X-ray diffraction measurements, while the aggregated morphology of the nanotubes might result from polymer chain interactions including π-π interactions, hydrogen and ionic bonds

  4. Dendritic cell-associated immune inflammation of cardiac mucosa: a possible factor in the formation of Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobryshev, Yuri V; Tran, Dinh; Killingsworth, Murray C; Buckland, Michael; Lord, Reginald V N

    2009-03-01

    The development of Barrett's esophagus is poorly understood, but it has been suggested that cardiac mucosa is a precursor of intestinal type metaplasia and that inflammation of cardiac mucosa may play a role in the formation of Barrett's esophagus. The present study was undertaken to examine the presence and distribution of immune-inflammatory cells in cardiac mucosa, specifically focusing on dendritic cells because of their importance as regulators of immune reactions. Endoscopic biopsy specimens were obtained from 12 patients with cardiac mucosa without Barrett's esophagus or adenocarcinoma and from 21 patients with Barrett's esophagus without dysplasia (intestinal metaplasia). According to histology, in nine of the 21 specimens with Barrett's esophagus, areas of mucosa composed of cardiac type epithelium-lined glands were present as well. Immunohistochemical staining and electron microscopy were used to examine immune-inflammatory cells in paraffin-embedded sections. Immune-inflammatory cells, including T cells, B cells, dendritic cells, macrophages, and mast cells, were present in the connective tissue matrix that surrounded cardiac type epithelium-lined glands in all patients with cardiac mucosa. Clustering of dendritic cells with each other and with lymphocytes and the intrusion of dendritic cells between glandular mucus cells were observed. In the Barrett's esophagus specimens that contained cardiac type glands, computerized CD83 expression quantitation revealed that there were more dendritic cells in cardiac mucosa than in intestinal metaplasia. Immune-inflammatory infiltrates containing dendritic cells are consistently present in cardiac mucosa. The finding of a larger number of dendritic cells in areas of cardiac mucosa in Barrett's esophagus biopsies suggests that the immune inflammation of cardiac mucosa might play a role in modifying the local tissue environment to promote the development of specialized intestinal type metaplasia.

  5. The Proprotein Convertase KPC-1/Furin Controls Branching and Self-avoidance of Sensory Dendrites in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bülow, Hannes E.

    2014-01-01

    Animals sample their environment through sensory neurons with often elaborately branched endings named dendritic arbors. In a genetic screen for genes involved in the development of the highly arborized somatosensory PVD neuron in C. elegans, we have identified mutations in kpc-1, which encodes the homolog of the proprotein convertase furin. We show that kpc-1/furin is necessary to promote the formation of higher order dendritic branches in PVD and to ensure self-avoidance of sister branches, but is likely not required during maintenance of dendritic arbors. A reporter for kpc-1/furin is expressed in neurons (including PVD) and kpc-1/furin can function cell-autonomously in PVD neurons to control patterning of dendritic arbors. Moreover, we show that kpc-1/furin also regulates the development of other neurons in all major neuronal classes in C. elegans, including aspects of branching and extension of neurites as well as cell positioning. Our data suggest that these developmental functions require proteolytic activity of KPC-1/furin. Recently, the skin-derived MNR-1/menorin and the neural cell adhesion molecule SAX-7/L1CAM have been shown to act as a tripartite complex with the leucine rich transmembrane receptor DMA-1 on PVD mechanosensory to orchestrate the patterning of dendritic branches. Genetic analyses show that kpc-1/furin functions in a pathway with MNR-1/menorin, SAX-7/L1CAM and DMA-1 to control dendritic branch formation and extension of PVD neurons. We propose that KPC-1/furin acts in concert with the ‘menorin’ pathway to control branching and growth of somatosensory dendrites in PVD. PMID:25232734

  6. Evaluating Local Primary Dendrite Arm Spacing Characterization Techniques Using Synthetic Directionally Solidified Dendritic Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschopp, Mark A.; Miller, Jonathan D.; Oppedal, Andrew L.; Solanki, Kiran N.

    2015-10-01

    Microstructure characterization continues to play an important bridge to understanding why particular processing routes or parameters affect the properties of materials. This statement certainly holds true in the case of directionally solidified dendritic microstructures, where characterizing the primary dendrite arm spacing is vital to developing the process-structure-property relationships that can lead to the design and optimization of processing routes for defined properties. In this work, four series of simulations were used to examine the capability of a few Voronoi-based techniques to capture local microstructure statistics (primary dendrite arm spacing and coordination number) in controlled (synthetically generated) microstructures. These simulations used both cubic and hexagonal microstructures with varying degrees of disorder (noise) to study the effects of length scale, base microstructure, microstructure variability, and technique parameters on the local PDAS distribution, local coordination number distribution, bulk PDAS, and bulk coordination number. The Voronoi tesselation technique with a polygon-side-length criterion correctly characterized the known synthetic microstructures. By systematically studying the different techniques for quantifying local primary dendrite arm spacings, we have evaluated their capability to capture this important microstructure feature in different dendritic microstructures, which can be an important step for experimentally correlating with both processing and properties in single crystal nickel-based superalloys.

  7. Sensitivity of Dendritic Cells to Microenvironment Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Maria Motta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are antigen-presenting cells capable of either activating the immune response or inducing and maintaining immune tolerance. They do this by integrating stimuli from the environment and changing their functional status as a result of plasticity. The modifications suffered by these cells have consequences in the way the organism may respond. In the present work two opposing situations known to affect dendritic cells are analyzed: tumor growth, leading to a microenvironment that favors the induction of a tolerogenic profile, and organ transplantation, which leads to a proinflammatory profile. Lessons learned from these situations may help to understand the mechanisms of modulation resulting not only from the above circumstances, but also from other pathologies.

  8. Human platelet lysate is a successful alternative serum supplement for propagation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Švajger, Urban

    2017-04-01

    Clinical protocols for dendritic cell (DC) generation from monocytes require the use of animal serum-free supplements. Serum-free media can also require up to 1% of serum supplementation. In addition, recommendations based on the 3Rs (Refinement, Reduction, Replacement) principle also recommend the use of non-animal sera in in vitro studies. The aim of this study was to explore the potential use of platelet lysate (PL) for generation of optimally differentiated DCs from monocytes. Cells were isolated from buffy coats from healthy volunteers using immunomagnetic selection. DCs were differentiated in RPMI1640 supplemented with either 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), 10% AB serum or 10% PL with the addition of granulocyte monocyte colony stimulating factor and interleukin-4. Generated DCs were assessed for their morphology, viability, endocytotic capacity, surface phenotype (immature, mature and tolerogenic DCs) and activation of important signaling pathways. DC function was evaluated on the basis of their allostimulatory capacity, cytokine profile and ability to induce different T-helper subsets. DCs generated with PL displayed normal viability, morphology and endocytotic capacity. Their differentiation and maturation phenotype was comparable to FBS-cultured DCs. They showed functional plasticity and up-regulated tolerogenic markers in response to their environment. PL-cultured mature DCs displayed unhindered allostimulatory potential and the capacity to induce Th1 responses. The use of PL allowed for activation of crucial signaling proteins associated with DC differentiation and maturation. This study demonstrates for the first time that human PL represents a successful alternative to FBS in differentiation of DCs from monocytes. DCs display the major phenotypic and functional characteristics compared with existing culture protocols. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Curcuma treatment prevents cognitive deficit and alteration of neuronal morphology in the limbic system of aging rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Blanca; Vázquez-Roque, Rubén A; Gnecco, Dino; Enríquez, Raúl G; Floran, Benjamin; Díaz, Alfonso; Flores, Gonzalo

    2017-03-01

    Curcuma is a natural compound that has shown neuroprotective properties, and has been reported to prevent aging and improve memory. While the mechanism(s) underlying these effects are unclear, they may be related to increases in neural plasticity. Morphological changes have been reported in neuronal dendrites in the limbic system in animals and elderly humans with cognitive impairment. In this regard, there is a need to use alternative therapies that delay the onset of morphologies and behavioral characteristics of aging. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of curcuma on cognitive processes and dendritic morphology of neurons in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), the CA1 and CA3 regions of the dorsal hippocampus, the dentate gyrus, and the basolateral amygdala (BLA) of aged rats. 18-month-old rats were administered curcuma (100 mg/kg) daily for 60 days. After treatment, recognition memory was assessed using the novel object recognition test. Curcuma-treated rats showed a significant increase in the exploration quotient. Dendritic morphology was assessed by Golgi-Cox staining and followed by Sholl analysis. Curcuma-treated rats showed a significant increase in dendritic spine density and dendritic length in pyramidal neurons of the PFC, the CA1 and CA3, and the BLA. The preservation of dendritic morphology was positively correlated with cognitive improvements. Our results suggest that curcuma induces modification of dendritic morphology in the aforementioned regions. These changes may explain how curcuma slows the aging process that has already begun in these animals, preventing deterioration in neuronal morphology of the limbic system and recognition memory. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Early effects of 16O radiation on neuronal morphology and cognition in a murine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Hannah; Alexander, Tyler C.; Groves, Thomas; Kiffer, Frederico; Wang, Jing; Price, Elvin; Boerma, Marjan; Allen, Antiño R.

    2018-05-01

    Astronauts exposed to high linear energy transfer radiation may experience cognitive injury. The pathogenesis of this injury is unknown but may involve glutamate receptors or modifications to dendritic structure and/or dendritic spine density and morphology. Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, where it acts on ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors located at the presynaptic terminal and in the postsynaptic membrane at synapses in the hippocampus. Dendritic spines are sites of excitatory synaptic transmission, and changes in spine structure and dendrite morphology are thought to be morphological correlates of altered brain function associated with hippocampal-dependent learning and memory. The aim of the current study is to assess whether behavior, glutamate receptor gene expression, and dendritic structure in the hippocampus are altered in mice after early exposure to 16O radiation in mice. Two weeks post-irradiation, animals were tested for hippocampus-dependent cognitive performance in the Y-maze. During Y-maze testing, mice exposed to 0.1 Gy and 0.25 Gy radiation failed to distinguish the novel arm, spending approximately the same amount of time in all 3 arms during the retention trial. Exposure to 16O significantly reduced the expression of Nr1 and GluR1 in the hippocampus and modulated spine morphology in the dentate gyrus and cornu Ammon 1 within the hippocampus. The present data provide evidence that 16O radiation has early deleterious effects on mature neurons that are associated with hippocampal learning and memory.

  11. Tailoring Graphene Morphology and Orientation on Cu(100), Cu(110), and Cu(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobberger, Robert; Arnold, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Graphene CVD on Cu is phenomenologically complex, yielding diverse crystal morphologies, such as lobes, dendrites, stars, and hexagons, of various orientations. We present a comprehensive study of the evolution of these morphologies as a function of Cu surface orientation, pressure, H2:CH4, and nucleation density. Growth was studied on ultra-smooth, epitaxial Cu films inside Cu enclosures to minimize factors that normally complicate growth. With low H2:CH4, Mullins-Sekerka instabilities propagate to form dendrites, indicating transport limited growth. In LPCVD, the dendrites extend hundreds of microns in the 100, 111, and 110 directions on Cu(100), (110), and (111) and are perturbed by twin boundaries. In APCVD, multiple preferred dendrite orientations exist. With increasing H2:CH4, the dendritic nature of growth is suppressed. In LPCVD, square, rectangle, and hexagon crystals form on Cu(100), (110) and (111), reflecting the Cu crystallography. In APCVD, the morphology becomes hexagonal on each surface. If given ample time, every growth regime yields high-quality monolayers with D:G Raman ratio rationally tailor the graphene crystal morphology and orientation.

  12. The Role of Actin Cytoskeleton in Dendritic Spines in the Maintenance of Long-Term Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sreetama; Lamprecht, Raphael

    2018-01-01

    Evidence indicates that long-term memory formation involves alterations in synaptic efficacy produced by modifications in neural transmission and morphology. However, it is not clear how such alterations induced by learning, that encode memory, are maintained over long period of time to preserve long-term memory. This is especially intriguing as the half-life of most of the proteins that underlie such changes is usually in the range of hours to days and these proteins may change their location over time. In this review we describe studies that indicate the involvement of dendritic spines in memory formation and its maintenance. These studies show that learning leads to changes in the number and morphology of spines. Disruption in spines morphology or manipulations that lead to alteration in their number after consolidation are associated with impairment in memory maintenance. We further ask how changes in dendritic spines morphology, induced by learning and reputed to encode memory, are maintained to preserve long-term memory. We propose a mechanism, based on studies described in the review, whereby the actin cytoskeleton and its regulatory proteins involved in the initial alteration in spine morphology induced by learning are also essential for spine structural stabilization that maintains long-term memory. In this model glutamate receptors and other synaptic receptors activation during learning leads to the creation of new actin cytoskeletal scaffold leading to changes in spines morphology and memory formation. This new actin cytoskeletal scaffold is preserved beyond actin and its regulatory proteins turnover and dynamics by active stabilization of the level and activity of actin regulatory proteins within these memory spines.

  13. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, Matthew

    2009-03-01

    The growth of dendrites is governed by the interplay between two simple and familiar processes---the irreversible diffusion of energy, and the reversible work done in the formation of new surface area. To advance our understanding of these processes, NASA sponsored a project that flew on the Space Shuttle Columbia is 1994, 1996, and 1997 to record and analyze benchmark data in an apparent-microgravity ``laboratory.'' In this laboratory, energy transfer by gravity driven convection was essentially eliminated and one could test independently, for the first time, both components of dendritic growth theory. The analysis of this data shows that although the diffusion of energy can be properly accounted for, the results from interfacial physics appear to be in disagreement and alternate models should receive increased attention. Unfortunately, currently and for the foreseeable future, there is no access or financial support to develop and conduct additional experiments of this type. However, the benchmark data of 35mm photonegatives, video, and all supporting instrument data are now available at the IDGE Archive at the College of the Holy Cross. This data may still have considerable relevance to researchers working specifically with dendritic growth, and more generally those working in the synthesis, growth & processing of materials, multiscale computational modeling, pattern formation, and systems far from equilibrium.

  14. BDNF pro-peptide regulates dendritic spines via caspase-3

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, J; Ji, Y; Ding, Y; Jiang, W; Sun, Y; Lu, B; Nagappan, G

    2016-01-01

    The precursor of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (proBDNF) is enzymatically cleaved, by either intracellular (furin/PC1) or extracellular proteases (tPA/plasmin/MMP), to generate mature BDNF (mBDNF) and its pro-peptide (BDNF pro-peptide). Little is known about the function of BDNF pro-peptide. We have developed an antibody that specifically detects cleaved BDNF pro-peptide, but not proBDNF or mBDNF. Neuronal depolarization elicited a marked increase in extracellular BDNF pro-peptide,...

  15. Ginseng Berry Extract Promotes Maturation of Mouse Dendritic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    Full Text Available Ginseng extract has been shown to possess certain anti-virus, anti-tumor and immune-activating effects. However, the immunostimulatory effect of ginseng berry extract (GB has been less well characterized. In this study, we investigated the effect of GB on the activation of mouse dendritic cells (DCs in vitro and in vivo. GB treatment induced up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules in bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs. Interestingly, GB induced a higher degree of co-stimulatory molecule up-regulation than ginseng root extract (GR at the same concentrations. Moreover, in vivo administration of GB promoted up-regulation of CD86, MHC class I and MHC class II and production of IL-6, IL-12 and TNF-α in spleen DCs. GB also promoted the generation of Th1 and Tc1 cells. Furthermore, Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4 and myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MyD88 signaling pathway were essential for DC activation induced by GB. In addition, GB strongly prompted the proliferation of ovalbumin (OVA-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. Finally, GB induced DC activation in tumor-bearing mice and the combination of OVA and GB treatment inhibited B16-OVA tumor cell growth in C57BL/6 mice. These results demonstrate that GB is a novel tumor therapeutic vaccine adjuvant by promoting DC and T cell activation.

  16. Chemokines: a new dendritic cell signal for T cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph A Thaiss

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are the main inducers and regulators of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses against viruses and tumors. One checkpoint to avoid misguided CTL activation, which might damage healthy cells of the body, is the necessity for multiple activation signals, involving both antigenic as well as additional signals that reflect the presence of pathogens. DCs provide both signals when activated by ligands of pattern recognition receptors and licensed by helper lymphocytes. Recently, it has been established that such T cell licensing can be facilitated by CD4+ T helper cells (classical licensing or by NKT cells (alternative licensing. Licensing regulates the DC/CTL cross-talk at multiple layers. Direct recruitment of CTLs through chemokines released by licensed DCs has recently emerged as a common theme and has a crucial impact on the efficiency of CTL responses. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of DC licensing for cross-priming and implications for the temporal and spatial regulation underlying this process. Future vaccination strategies will benefit from a deeper insight into the mechanisms that govern CTL activation.

  17. Molecular identity of dendritic voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorincz, Andrea; Nusser, Zoltan

    2010-05-14

    Active invasion of the dendritic tree by action potentials (APs) generated in the axon is essential for associative synaptic plasticity and neuronal ensemble formation. In cortical pyramidal cells (PCs), this AP back-propagation is supported by dendritic voltage-gated Na+ (Nav) channels, whose molecular identity is unknown. Using a highly sensitive electron microscopic immunogold technique, we revealed the presence of the Nav1.6 subunit in hippocampal CA1 PC proximal and distal dendrites. Here, the subunit density is lower by a factor of 35 to 80 than that found in axon initial segments. A gradual decrease in Nav1.6 density along the proximodistal axis of the dendritic tree was also detected without any labeling in dendritic spines. Our results reveal the characteristic subcellular distribution of the Nav1.6 subunit, identifying this molecule as a key substrate enabling dendritic excitability.

  18. Recruitment of Staufen2 Enhances Dendritic Localization of an Intron-Containing CaMKIIα mRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Ortiz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of mRNA localization is a conserved cellular process observed in many types of cells and organisms. Asymmetrical mRNA distribution plays a particularly important role in the nervous system, where local translation of localized mRNA represents a key mechanism in synaptic plasticity. CaMKIIα is a very abundant mRNA detected in neurites, consistent with its crucial role at glutamatergic synapses. Here, we report the presence of CaMKIIα mRNA isoforms that contain intron i16 in dendrites, RNA granules, and synaptoneurosomes from primary neurons and brain. This subpopulation of unspliced mRNA preferentially localizes to distal dendrites in a synaptic-activity-dependent manner. Staufen2, a well-established marker of RNA transport in dendrites, interacts with intron i16 sequences and enhances its distal dendritic localization, pointing to the existence of intron-mediated mechanisms in the molecular pathways that modulate dendritic transport and localization of synaptic mRNAs.

  19. Early-stage reduction of the dendritic complexity in basolateral amygdala of a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Congdi; Long, Ben; Hu, Yarong; Yuan, Jing; Gong, Hui; Li, Xiangning

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a representative age-related neurodegenerative disease that could result in loss of memory and cognitive deficiency. However, the precise onset time of Alzheimer's disease affecting neuronal circuits and the mechanisms underlying the changes are not clearly known. To address the neuroanatomical changes during the early pathologic developing process, we acquired the neuronal morphological characterization of AD in APP/PS1 double-transgenic mice using the Micro-Optical Sectioning Tomography system. We reconstructed the neurons in 3D datasets with a resolution of 0.32 × 0.32 × 1 μm and used the Sholl method to analyze the anatomical characterization of the dendritic branches. The results showed that, similar to the progressive change in amyloid plaques, the number of dendritic branches were significantly decreased in 9-month-old mice. In addition, a distinct reduction of dendritic complexity occurred in third and fourth-order dendritic branches of 9-month-old mice, while no significant changes were identified in these parameters in 6-month-old mice. At the branch-level, the density distribution of dendritic arbors in the radial direction decreased in the range of 40–90 μm from the neuron soma in 6-month-old mice. These changes in the dendritic complexity suggest that these reductions contribute to the progressive cognitive impairment seen in APP/PS1 mice. This work may yield insights into the early changes in dendritic abnormality and its relevance to dysfunctional mechanisms of learning, memory and emotion in Alzheimer's disease. - Highlights: • Neuron-level, reduction of dendritic complexity in BLA of 9-month-old AD mice. • Specific range of branch decrease in density of 6-month-old AD mice. • 3D imaging with high resolution will provide insights into brain aging.

  20. Dendrite-Free Sodium-Metal Anodes for High-Energy Sodium-Metal Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bing; Li, Peng; Zhang, Jinqiang; Wang, Dan; Munroe, Paul; Wang, Chengyin; Notten, Peter H L; Wang, Guoxiu

    2018-05-31

    Sodium (Na) metal is one of the most promising electrode materials for next-generation low-cost rechargeable batteries. However, the challenges caused by dendrite growth on Na metal anodes restrict practical applications of rechargeable Na metal batteries. Herein, a nitrogen and sulfur co-doped carbon nanotube (NSCNT) paper is used as the interlayer to control Na nucleation behavior and suppress the Na dendrite growth. The N- and S-containing functional groups on the carbon nanotubes induce the NSCNTs to be highly "sodiophilic," which can guide the initial Na nucleation and direct Na to distribute uniformly on the NSCNT paper. As a result, the Na-metal-based anode (Na/NSCNT anode) exhibits a dendrite-free morphology during repeated Na plating and striping and excellent cycling stability. As a proof of concept, it is also demonstrated that the electrochemical performance of sodium-oxygen (Na-O 2 ) batteries using the Na/NSCNT anodes show significantly improved cycling performances compared with Na-O 2 batteries with bare Na metal anodes. This work opens a new avenue for the development of next-generation high-energy-density sodium-metal batteries. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Golgi-type I and Golgi-type II neurons in the ventral anterior thalamic nucleus of the adult human: morphological features and quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hussain Bani Hani, Saleh M; El-Dwairi, Qasim A; Bataineh, Ziad M; Al-Haidari, Mohammad S; Al-Alami, Jamil

    2008-05-01

    The morphological and quantitative features of neurons in the adult human ventral anterior thalamic nucleus were studied in Golgi preparations. Two neuronal types were found and their quantitative features were studied. Golgi-type I neurons were medium to large cells with dense dendritic trees and dendritic protrusions and short hair-like appendages. They have somatic mean diameter of 30.8 microm (+/-9.4, n = 85). They have an average 100.3 dendritic branches, 48.97 dendritic branching points, and 58.85 dendritic tips. The mean diameters of their primary, secondary, and tertiary dendrites were 3.1 microm (+/-1, n = 80), 1.85 microm (+/-0.8, n = 145), and 1.5 microm (+/-0.4, n = 160), respectively. Golgi-type II neurons were small to medium cells with few sparsely branching dendrites and dendritic stalked appendages with or without terminal swellings. They have somatic mean diameters of 22.2 microm (+/-5.8, n = 120). They have an average 33.76 dendritic branches, 16.49 dendritic branching points, and 21.97 dendritic tips. The mean diameters of their primary, secondary, and tertiary dendrites were 1.6 microm (+/-0.86, n = 70), 1.15 microm (+/-0.55, n = 118), and 1 microm (+/-0.70, n = 95), respectively. These quantitative data may form the basis for further quantitative studies involving aging or some degenerative diseases that may affect cell bodies and/or dendritic trees of the Golgi-type I and/or Golgi-type II thalamic neurons.

  2. Cannabinoid mitigation of neuronal morphological change important to development and learning: insight from a zebra finch model of psychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderstrom, Ken; Gilbert, Marcoita T

    2013-03-19

    Normal CNS development proceeds through late-postnatal stages of adolescent development. The activity-dependence of this development underscores the significance of CNS-active drug exposure prior to completion of brain maturation. Exogenous modulation of signaling important in regulating normal development is of particular concern. This mini-review presents a summary of the accumulated behavioral, physiological and biochemical evidence supporting such a key regulatory role for endocannabinoid signaling during late-postnatal CNS development. Our focus is on the data obtained using a unique zebra finch model of developmental psychopharmacology. This animal has allowed investigation of neuronal morphological effects essential to establishment and maintenance of neural circuitry, including processes related to synaptogenesis and dendritic spine dynamics. Altered neurophysiology that follows exogenous cannabinoid exposure during adolescent development has the potential to persistently alter cognition, learning and memory. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A Loss-of-Function Screen for Phosphatases that Regulate Neurite Outgrowth Identifies PTPN12 as a Negative Regulator of TrkB Tyrosine Phosphorylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambjørn, Malene; Dubreuil, Véronique; Miozzo, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in function of the neurotrophin BDNF are associated with neurodegeneration, cognitive decline, and psychiatric disorders. BDNF promotes axonal outgrowth and branching, regulates dendritic tree morphology and is important for axonal regeneration after injury, responses that largely....... This approach identified phosphatases from diverse families, which either positively or negatively modulate BDNF-TrkB-mediated neurite outgrowth, and most of which have little or no previously established function related to NT signaling. "Classical" protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) accounted for 13......% of the candidate regulatory phosphatases. The top classical PTP identified as a negative regulator of BDNF-TrkB-mediated neurite outgrowth was PTPN12 (also called PTP-PEST). Validation and follow-up studies showed that endogenous PTPN12 antagonizes tyrosine phosphorylation of TrkB itself, and the downstream...

  4. Spatial distribution of Na+-K+-ATPase in dendritic spines dissected by nanoscale superresolution STED microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondar Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Na+,K+-ATPase plays an important role for ion homeostasis in virtually all mammalian cells, including neurons. Despite this, there is as yet little known about the isoform specific distribution in neurons. Results With help of superresolving stimulated emission depletion microscopy the spatial distribution of Na+,K+-ATPase in dendritic spines of cultured striatum neurons have been dissected. The found compartmentalized distribution provides a strong evidence for the confinement of neuronal Na+,K+-ATPase (α3 isoform in the postsynaptic region of the spine. Conclusions A compartmentalized distribution may have implications for the generation of local sodium gradients within the spine and for the structural and functional interaction between the sodium pump and other synaptic proteins. Superresolution microscopy has thus opened up a new perspective to elucidate the nature of the physiological function, regulation and signaling role of Na+,K+-ATPase from its topological distribution in dendritic spines.

  5. C. elegans STRADalpha and SAD cooperatively regulate neuronal polarity and synaptic organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joanne S M; Hung, Wesley; Narbonne, Patrick; Roy, Richard; Zhen, Mei

    2010-01-01

    Neurons are polarized cells with morphologically and functionally distinct axons and dendrites. The SAD kinases are crucial for establishing the axon-dendrite identity across species. Previous studies suggest that a tumour suppressor kinase, LKB1, in the presence of a pseudokinase, STRADalpha, initiates axonal differentiation and growth through activating the SAD kinases in vertebrate neurons. STRADalpha was implicated in the localization, stabilization and activation of LKB1 in various cell culture studies. Its in vivo functions, however, have not been examined. In our present study, we analyzed the neuronal phenotypes of the first loss-of-function mutants for STRADalpha and examined their genetic interactions with LKB1 and SAD in C. elegans. Unexpectedly, only the C. elegans STRADalpha, STRD-1, functions exclusively through the SAD kinase, SAD-1, to regulate neuronal polarity and synaptic organization. Moreover, STRD-1 tightly associates with SAD-1 to coordinate its synaptic localizations. By contrast, the C. elegans LKB1, PAR-4, also functions in an additional genetic pathway independently of SAD-1 and STRD-1 to regulate neuronal polarity. We propose that STRD-1 establishes neuronal polarity and organizes synaptic proteins in a complex with the SAD-1 kinase. Our findings suggest that instead of a single, linear genetic pathway, STRADalpha and LKB1 regulate neuronal development through multiple effectors that are shared in some cellular contexts but distinct in others.

  6. Activation of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 Impairs the Dendritic Arborization of Newborn Neurons in the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus through the AMPK and Akt Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujing Tian

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurite growth is an important process for the adult hippocampal neurogenesis which is regulated by a specific range of the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4 is a calcium-permeable channel and activation of it causes an increase in [Ca2+]i. We recently reported that TRPV4 activation promotes the proliferation of stem cells in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG. The present study aimed to examine the effect of TRPV4 activation on the dendrite morphology of newborn neurons in the adult hippocampal DG. Here, we report that intracerebroventricular injection of the TRPV4 agonist GSK1016790A for 5 days (GSK1016790A-injected mice reduced the number of doublecortin immunopositive (DCX+ cells and DCX+ fibers in the hippocampal DG, showing the impaired dendritic arborization of newborn neurons. The phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK protein level increased from 30 min to 2 h, and then decreased from 1 to 5 days after GSK1016790A injection. The phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-Akt protein level decreased from 30 min to 5 days after GSK1016790A injection; this decrease was markedly attenuated by the AMPK antagonist compound C (CC, but not by the AMPK agonist AICAR. Moreover, the phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR and p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6k protein levels were decreased by GSK1016790A; these changes were sensitive to 740 Y-P and CC. The phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β at Y216 was increased by GSK1016790A, and this change was accompanied by increased phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2 and collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP-2. These changes were markedly blocked by 740 Y-P and CC. Finally, GSK1016790A-induced decrease of DCX+ cells and DCX+ fibers was markedly attenuated by 740 Y-P and CC, but was unaffected by AICAR. We conclude that TRPV4 activation impairs the dendritic arborization of newborn

  7. START-GAP3/DLC3 is a GAP for RhoA and Cdc42 and is localized in focal adhesions regulating cell morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Katsuhisa; Kiyota, Minoru; Seike, Junichi; Deki, Yuko; Yagisawa, Hitoshi

    2007-01-01

    In the human genome there are three genes encoding RhoGAPs that contain the START (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR)-related lipid transfer)-domain. START-GAP3/DLC3 is a tumor suppressor gene similar to two other human START-GAPs known as DLC1 or DLC2. Although expression of START-GAP3/DLC3 inhibits the proliferation of cancer cells, its molecular function is not well understood. In this study we carried out biochemical characterization of START-GAP3/DLC3, and explored the effects of its expression on cell morphology and intracellular localization. We found that START-GAP3/DLC3 serves as a stimulator of PLCδ1 and as a GAP for both RhoA and Cdc42 in vitro. Moreover, we found that the GAP activity is responsible for morphological changes. The intracellular localization of endogenous START-GAP3/DLC3 was explored by immunocytochemistry and was revealed in focal adhesions. These results indicate that START-GAP3/DLC3 has characteristics similar to other START-GAPs and the START-GAP family seems to share common characteristics

  8. Reproductive experience modified dendritic spines on cortical pyramidal neurons to enhance sensory perception and spatial learning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jeng-Rung; Lim, Seh Hong; Chung, Sin-Cun; Lee, Yee-Fun; Wang, Yueh-Jan; Tseng, Guo-Fang; Wang, Tsyr-Jiuan

    2017-01-27

    Behavioral adaptations during motherhood are aimed at increasing reproductive success. Alterations of hormones during motherhood could trigger brain morphological changes to underlie behavioral alterations. Here we investigated whether motherhood changes a rat's sensory perception and spatial memory in conjunction with cortical neuronal structural changes. Female rats of different statuses, including virgin, pregnant, lactating, and primiparous rats were studied. Behavioral test showed that the lactating rats were most sensitive to heat, while rats with motherhood and reproduction experience outperformed virgin rats in a water maze task. By intracellular dye injection and computer-assisted 3-dimensional reconstruction, the dendritic arbors and spines of the layer III and V pyramidal neurons of the somatosensory cortex and CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons were revealed for closer analysis. The results showed that motherhood and reproductive experience increased dendritic spines but not arbors or the lengths of the layer III and V pyramidal neurons of the somatosensory cortex and CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons. In addition, lactating rats had a higher incidence of spines than pregnant or primiparous rats. The increase of dendritic spines was coupled with increased expression of the glutamatergic postsynaptic marker protein (PSD-95), especially in lactating rats. On the basis of the present results, it is concluded that motherhood enhanced rat sensory perception and spatial memory and was accompanied by increases in dendritic spines on output neurons of the somatosensory cortex and CA1 hippocampus. The effect was sustained for at least 6 weeks after the weaning of the pups.

  9. Chronic Stress Reduces Nectin-1 mRNA Levels and Disrupts Dendritic Spine Plasticity in the Adult Mouse Perirhinal Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Gong

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In adulthood, chronic exposure to stressful experiences disrupts synaptic plasticity and cognitive function. Previous studies have shown that perirhinal cortex-dependent object recognition memory is impaired by chronic stress. However, the stress effects on molecular expression and structural plasticity in the perirhinal cortex remain unclear. In this study, we applied the chronic social defeat stress (CSDS paradigm and measured the mRNA levels of nectin-1, nectin-3 and neurexin-1, three synaptic cell adhesion molecules (CAMs implicated in the adverse stress effects, in the perirhinal cortex of wild-type (WT and conditional forebrain corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 conditional knockout (CRHR1-CKO mice. Chronic stress reduced perirhinal nectin-1 mRNA levels in WT but not CRHR1-CKO mice. In conditional forebrain corticotropin-releasing hormone conditional overexpression (CRH-COE mice, perirhinal nectin-1 mRNA levels were also reduced, indicating that chronic stress modulates nectin-1 expression through the CRH-CRHR1 system. Moreover, chronic stress altered dendritic spine morphology in the main apical dendrites and reduced spine density in the oblique apical dendrites of perirhinal layer V pyramidal neurons. Our data suggest that chronic stress disrupts cell adhesion and dendritic spine plasticity in perirhinal neurons, which may contribute to stress-induced impairments of perirhinal cortex-dependent memory.

  10. Quantitative analysis of basal dendritic tree of layer III pyramidal neurons in different areas of adult human frontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeba, Martina; Jovanov-Milosević, Natasa; Petanjek, Zdravko

    2008-01-01

    Large long projecting (cortico-cortical) layer IIIc pyramidal neurons were recently disclosed to be in the basis of cognitive processing in primates. Therefore, we quantitatively examined the basal dendritic morphology of these neurons by using rapid Golgi and Golgi Cox impregnation methods among three distinct Brodmann areas (BA) of an adult human frontal cortex: the primary motor BA4 and the associative magnopyramidal BA9 from left hemisphere and the Broca's speech BA45 from both hemispheres. There was no statistically significant difference in basal dendritic length or complexity, as dendritic spine number or their density between analyzed BA's. In addition, we analyzed each of these BA's immunocytochemically for distribution of SMI-32, a marker of largest long distance projecting neurons. Within layer IIIc, the highest density of SMI-32 immunopositive pyramidal neurons was observed in associative BA9, while in primary BA4 they were sparse. Taken together, these data suggest that an increase in the complexity of cortico-cortical network within human frontal areas of different functional order may be principally based on the increase in density of large, SMI-32 immunopositive layer IIIc neurons, rather than by further increase in complexity of their dendritic tree and synaptic network.

  11. CTLA-4 blockade during dendritic cell based booster vaccination influences dendritic cell survival and CTL expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders E; Ronchese, Franca

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells and critical for the priming of CD8+ T cells. Therefore the use of these cells as adjuvant cells has been tested in a large number of experimental and clinical vaccination studies, in particular cancer vaccine studies. A number of protocols...

  12. Nanofibrous nonwovens based on dendritic-linear-dendritic poly(ethylene glycol) hybrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kikionis, Stefanos; Ioannou, Efstathia; Andren, Oliver C.J.

    2017-01-01

    unsuccessful. Nevertheless, when these DLD hybrids were blended with an array of different biodegradable polymers as entanglement enhancers, nanofibrous nonwovens were successfully prepared by electrospinning. The pseudogeneration degree of the DLDs, the nature of the co-electrospun polymer and the solvent...... nanofibers. Such dendritic nanofibrous scaffolds can be promising materials for biomedical applications due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, multifunctionality, and advanced structural architecture....

  13. Fine structure of synapses on dendritic spines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eFrotscher

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Camillo Golgi’s Reazione Nera led to the discovery of dendritic spines, small appendages originating from dendritic shafts. With the advent of electron microscopy (EM they were identified as sites of synaptic contact. Later it was found that changes in synaptic strength were associated with changes in the shape of dendritic spines. While live-cell imaging was advantageous in monitoring the time course of such changes in spine structure, EM is still the best method for the simultaneous visualization of all cellular components, including actual synaptic contacts, at high resolution. Immunogold labeling for EM reveals the precise localization of molecules in relation to synaptic structures. Previous EM studies of spines and synapses were performed in tissue subjected to aldehyde fixation and dehydration in ethanol, which is associated with protein denaturation and tissue shrinkage. It has remained an issue to what extent fine structural details are preserved when subjecting the tissue to these procedures. In the present review, we report recent studies on the fine structure of spines and synapses using high-pressure freezing (HPF, which avoids protein denaturation by aldehydes and results in an excellent preservation of ultrastructural detail. In these studies, HPF was used to monitor subtle fine-structural changes in spine shape associated with chemically induced long-term potentiation (cLTP at identified hippocampal mossy fiber synapses. Changes in spine shape result from reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. We report that cLTP was associated with decreased immunogold labeling for phosphorylated cofilin (p-cofilin, an actin-depolymerizing protein. Phosphorylation of cofilin renders it unable to depolymerize F-actin, which stabilizes the actin cytoskeleton. Decreased levels of p-cofilin, in turn, suggest increased actin turnover, possibly underlying the changes in spine shape associated with cLTP. The findings reviewed here establish HPF as

  14. Regulatory dendritic cell therapy: from rodents to clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raïch-Regué, Dalia; Glancy, Megan; Thomson, Angus W

    2014-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are highly-specialized, bone marrow-derived antigen-presenting cells that induce or regulate innate and adaptive immunity. Regulatory or "tolerogenic" DC play a crucial role in maintaining self tolerance in the healthy steady-state. These regulatory innate immune cells subvert naïve or memory T cell responses by various mechanisms. Regulatory DC (DCreg) also exhibit the ability to induce or restore T cell tolerance in many animal models of autoimmune disease or transplant rejection. There is also evidence that adoptive transfer of DCreg can regulate T cell responses in non-human primates and humans. Important insights gained from in vitro studies and animal models have led recently to the development of clinical grade human DCreg, with potential to treat autoimmune disease or enhance transplant survival while reducing patient dependency on immunosuppressive drugs. Phase I trials have been conducted in type-1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis, with results that emphasize the feasibility and safety of DCreg therapy. This mini-review will outline how observations made using animal models have been translated into human use, and discuss the challenges faced in further developing this form of regulatory immune cell therapy in the fields of autoimmunity and transplantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Dendritic cells during Epstein Barr virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eMunz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Epstein Barr virus (EBV causes persistent infection in more than 90% of the human adult population and is associated with 2% of all tumors in humans. This -herpesvirus infects primarily human B and epithelial cells, but has been reported to be sensed by dendritic cells (DCs during primary infection. These activated DCs are thought to contribute to innate restriction of EBV infection and initiate EBV specific adaptive immune responses via cross-priming. The respective evidence and their potential importance for EBV specific vaccine development will be discussed in this review.

  16. Gliadin fragments promote migration of dendritic cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chládková, Barbara; Kamanová, Jana; Palová-Jelínková, Lenka; Cinová, Jana; Šebo, Peter; Tučková, Ludmila

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2011), 938-948 ISSN 1582-1838 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/07/0414; GA ČR GD310/08/H077; GA ČR GA310/08/0447; GA AV ČR IAA500200801; GA AV ČR IAA500200914 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : celiac disease * gliadin * dendritic cell Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 4.125, year: 2011

  17. Unique morphological changes in plant pathogenic phytoplasma-infected petunia flowers are related to transcriptional regulation of floral homeotic genes in an organ-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himeno, Misako; Neriya, Yutaro; Minato, Nami; Miura, Chihiro; Sugawara, Kyoko; Ishii, Yoshiko; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Kakizawa, Shigeyuki; Oshima, Kenro; Namba, Shigetou

    2011-09-01

    Abnormal flowers are often induced by infection of certain plant pathogens, e.g. phytoplasma, but the molecular mechanisms underlying these malformations have remained poorly understood. Here, we show that infection with OY-W phytoplasma (Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris, onion yellows phytoplasma strain, line OY-W) affects the expression of the floral homeotic genes of petunia plants in an organ-specific manner. Upon infection with OY-W phytoplasma, floral morphological changes, including conversion to leaf-like structures, were observed in sepals, petals and pistils, but not in stamens. As the expression levels of homeotic genes differ greatly between floral organs, we examined the expression levels of homeotic genes in each floral organ infected by OY-W phytoplasma, compared with healthy plants. The expression levels of several homeotic genes required for organ development, such as PFG, PhGLO1 and FBP7, were significantly downregulated by the phytoplasma infection in floral organs, except the stamens, suggesting that the unique morphological changes caused by the phytoplasma infection might result from the significant decrease in expression of some crucial homeotic genes. Moreover, the expression levels of TER, ALF and DOT genes, which are known to participate in floral meristem identity, were significantly downregulated in the phytoplasma-infected petunia meristems, implying that phytoplasma would affect an upstream signaling pathway of floral meristem identity. Our results suggest that phytoplasma infection may have complex effects on floral development, resulting in the unique phenotypes that were clearly distinct from the mutant flower phenotypes produced by the knock-out or the overexpression of certain homeotic genes. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Dendrites Enable a Robust Mechanism for Neuronal Stimulus Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazé, Romain D; Jarvis, Sarah; Foust, Amanda J; Schultz, Simon R

    2017-09-01

    Hearing, vision, touch: underlying all of these senses is stimulus selectivity, a robust information processing operation in which cortical neurons respond more to some stimuli than to others. Previous models assume that these neurons receive the highest weighted input from an ensemble encoding the preferred stimulus, but dendrites enable other possibilities. Nonlinear dendritic processing can produce stimulus selectivity based on the spatial distribution of synapses, even if the total preferred stimulus weight does not exceed that of nonpreferred stimuli. Using a multi-subunit nonlinear model, we demonstrate that stimulus selectivity can arise from the spatial distribution of synapses. We propose this as a general mechanism for information processing by neurons possessing dendritic trees. Moreover, we show that this implementation of stimulus selectivity increases the neuron's robustness to synaptic and dendritic failure. Importantly, our model can maintain stimulus selectivity for a larger range of loss of synapses or dendrites than an equivalent linear model. We then use a layer 2/3 biophysical neuron model to show that our implementation is consistent with two recent experimental observations: (1) one can observe a mixture of selectivities in dendrites that can differ from the somatic selectivity, and (2) hyperpolarization can broaden somatic tuning without affecting dendritic tuning. Our model predicts that an initially nonselective neuron can become selective when depolarized. In addition to motivating new experiments, the model's increased robustness to synapses and dendrites loss provides a starting point for fault-resistant neuromorphic chip development.

  19. Modelling dendritic ecological networks in space: An integrated network perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erin E. Peterson; Jay M. Ver Hoef; Dan J. Isaak; Jeffrey A. Falke; Marie-Josee Fortin; Chris E. Jordan; Kristina McNyset; Pascal Monestiez; Aaron S. Ruesch; Aritra Sengupta; Nicholas Som; E. Ashley Steel; David M. Theobald; Christian E. Torgersen; Seth J. Wenger

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic ecological networks (DENs) are a unique form of ecological networks that exhibit a dendritic network topology (e.g. stream and cave networks or plant architecture). DENs have a dual spatial representation; as points within the network and as points in geographical space. Consequently, some analytical methods used to quantify relationships in other types of...

  20. Mitochondrial morphology and cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Sang-Bing; Hausenloy, Derek J.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic and are able to interchange their morphology between elongated interconnected mitochondrial networks and a fragmented disconnected arrangement by the processes of mitochondrial fusion and fission, respectively. Changes in mitochondrial morphology are regulated by the mitochondrial fusion proteins (mitofusins 1 and 2, and optic atrophy 1) and the mitochondrial fission proteins (dynamin-related peptide 1 and mitochondrial fission protein 1) and have been implicated in a...

  1. Immune monitoring using mRNA-transfected dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Troels Holz; Svane, Inge Marie; Met, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are known to be the most potent antigen presenting cell in the immune system and are used as cellular adjuvants in therapeutic anticancer vaccines using various tumor-associated antigens or their derivatives. One way of loading antigen into the dendritic cells is by m......RNA electroporation, ensuring presentation of antigen through major histocompatibility complex I and potentially activating T cells, enabling them to kill the tumor cells. Despite extensive research in the field, only one dendritic cell-based vaccine has been approved. There is therefore a great need to elucidate...... and understand the immunological impact of dendritic cell vaccination in order to improve clinical benefit. In this chapter, we describe a method for performing immune monitoring using peripheral blood mononuclear cells and autologous dendritic cells transfected with tumor-associated antigen-encoding mRNA....

  2. Letrozole Potentiates Mitochondrial and Dendritic Spine Impairments Induced by β Amyloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K.-Y. Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reduced estrogens, either through aging or postsurgery breast cancer treatment with the oral nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor letrozole, are linked with declined cognitive abilities. However, a direct link between letrozole and neuronal deficits induced by pathogenic insults associated with aging such as beta amyloid (Aβ1–42 has not been established. The objective of this study was to determine if letrozole aggravates synaptic deficits concurrent with Aβ1–42 insult. We examined the effects of letrozole and oligomeric Aβ1–42 treatment in dissociated and organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. Changes in glial cell morphology, neuronal mitochondria, and synaptic structures upon letrozole treatment were monitored by confocal microscopy, as they were shown to be affected by Aβ1–42 oligomers. Oligomeric Aβ1–42 or letrozole alone caused decreases in mitochondrial volume, dendritic spine density, synaptophysin (synaptic marker, and the postsynaptic protein, synaptopodin. Here, we demonstrated that mitochondrial and synaptic structural deficits were exacerbated when letrozole therapy was combined with Aβ1–42 treatment. Our novel findings suggest that letrozole may increase neuronal susceptibility to pathological insults, such as oligomeric Aβ1–42 in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. These changes in dendritic spine number, synaptic protein expression, and mitochondrial morphology may, in part, explain the increased prevalence of cognitive decline associated with aromatase inhibitor use.

  3. Analyzing dendritic growth in a population of immature neurons in the adult dentate gyrus using laminar quantification of disjointed dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shira eRosenzweig

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, new granule neurons are continuously produced throughout adult life. A prerequisite for the successful synaptic integration of these neurons is the sprouting and extension of dendrites into the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. Thus, studies aimed at investigating the developmental stages of adult neurogenesis often use dendritic growth as an important indicator of neuronal health and maturity. Based on the known topography of the dentate gyrus, characterized by distinct laminar arrangement of granule neurons and their extensions, we have developed a new method for analysis of dendritic growth in immature adult-born granule neurons. The method is comprised of laminar quantification of cell bodies, primary, secondary and tertiary dendrites separately and independently from each other. In contrast to most existing methods, laminar quantification of dendrites does not require the use of exogenous markers and does not involve arbitrary selection of individual neurons. The new method relies on immonuhistochemical detection of endogenous markers such as doublecortin to perform a comprehensive analysis of a sub-population of immature neurons. Disjointed, orphan dendrites that often appear in the thin histological sections are taken into account. Using several experimental groups of rats and mice, we demonstrate here the suitable techniques for quantifying neurons and dendrites, and explain how the ratios between the quantified values can be used in a comparative analysis to indicate variations in dendritic growth and complexity.

  4. Time-dependent regulation of morphological changes and cartilage differentiation markers in the mouse pubic symphysis during pregnancy and postpartum recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelucci, Bianca Gazieri; Consonni, Sílvio Roberto; Rosa, Viviane Souza; Sensiate, Lucimara Aparecida; Delatti, Paula Cristina Rugno; Alvares, Lúcia Elvira; Joazeiro, Paulo Pinto

    2018-01-01

    Animal models commonly serve as a bridge between in vitro experiments and clinical applications; however, few physiological processes in adult animals are sufficient to serve as proof-of-concept models for cartilage regeneration. Intriguingly, some rodents, such as young adult mice, undergo physiological connective tissue modifications to birth canal elements such as the pubic symphysis during pregnancy; therefore, we investigated whether the differential expression of cartilage differentiation markers is associated with cartilaginous tissue morphological modifications during these changes. Our results showed that osteochondral progenitor cells expressing Runx2, Sox9, Col2a1 and Dcx at the non-pregnant pubic symphysis proliferated and differentiated throughout pregnancy, giving rise to a complex osteoligamentous junction that attached the interpubic ligament to the pubic bones until labour occurred. After delivery, the recovery of pubic symphysis cartilaginous tissues was improved by the time-dependent expression of these chondrocytic lineage markers at the osteoligamentous junction. This process potentially recapitulates embryologic chondrocytic differentiation to successfully recover hyaline cartilaginous pads at 10 days postpartum. Therefore, we propose that this physiological phenomenon represents a proof-of-concept model for investigating the mechanisms involved in cartilage restoration in adult animals.

  5. The Gαo Activator Mastoparan-7 Promotes Dendritic Spine Formation in Hippocampal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie T. Ramírez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mastoparan-7 (Mas-7, an analogue of the peptide mastoparan, which is derived from wasp venom, is a direct activator of Pertussis toxin- (PTX- sensitive G proteins. Mas-7 produces several biological effects in different cell types; however, little is known about how Mas-7 influences mature hippocampal neurons. We examined the specific role of Mas-7 in the development of dendritic spines, the sites of excitatory synaptic contact that are crucial for synaptic plasticity. We report here that exposure of hippocampal neurons to a low dose of Mas-7 increases dendritic spine density and spine head width in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, Mas-7 enhances postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95 clustering in neurites and activates Gαo signaling, increasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. To define the role of signaling intermediates, we measured the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase C (PKC, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, and calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα after Mas-7 treatment and determined that CaMKII activation is necessary for the Mas-7-dependent increase in dendritic spine density. Our results demonstrate a critical role for Gαo subunit signaling in the regulation of synapse formation.

  6. Transcriptional Changes during Naturally Acquired Zika Virus Infection Render Dendritic Cells Highly Conducive to Viral Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoming; Hua, Stephane; Chen, Hsiao-Rong; Ouyang, Zhengyu; Einkauf, Kevin; Tse, Samantha; Ard, Kevin; Ciaranello, Andrea; Yawetz, Sigal; Sax, Paul; Rosenberg, Eric S; Lichterfeld, Mathias; Yu, Xu G

    2017-12-19

    Although dendritic cells are among the human cell population best equipped for cell-intrinsic antiviral immune defense, they seem highly susceptible to infection with the Zika virus (ZIKV). Using highly purified myeloid dendritic cells isolated from individuals with naturally acquired acute infection, we here show that ZIKV induces profound perturbations of transcriptional signatures relative to healthy donors. Interestingly, we noted a remarkable downregulation of antiviral interferon-stimulated genes and innate immune sensors, suggesting that ZIKV can actively suppress interferon-dependent immune responses. In contrast, several host factors known to support ZIKV infection were strongly upregulated during natural ZIKV infection; these transcripts included AXL, the main entry receptor for ZIKV; SOCS3, a negative regulator of ISG expression; and IDO-1, a recognized inducer of regulatory T cell responses. Thus, during in vivo infection, ZIKV can transform the transcriptome of dendritic cells in favor of the virus to render these cells highly conducive to ZIKV infection. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. In vivo dendritic cell depletion reduces breeding efficiency, affecting implantation and early placental development in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krey, Gesa; Frank, Pierre; Shaikly, Valerie; Barrientos, Gabriela; Cordo-Russo, Rosalia; Ringel, Frauke; Moschansky, Petra; Chernukhin, Igor V; Metodiev, Metodi; Fernández, Nelson; Klapp, Burghard F; Arck, Petra C; Blois, Sandra M

    2008-09-01

    Implantation of mammalian embryos into their mother's uterus ensures optimal nourishment and protection throughout development. Complex molecular interactions characterize the implantation process, and an optimal synchronization of the components of this embryo-maternal dialogue is crucial for a successful reproductive outcome. In the present study, we investigated the role of dendritic cells (DC) during implantation process using a transgenic mouse system (DTRtg) that allows transient depletion of CD11c+ cells in vivo through administration of diphtheria toxin. We observed that DC depletion impairs the implantation process, resulting in a reduced breeding efficiency. Furthermore, the maturity of uterine natural killer cells at dendritic cell knockout (DCKO) implantation sites was affected as well; as demonstrated by decreased perforin expression and reduced numbers of periodic-acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive cells. This was accompanied by disarrangements in decidual vascular development. In the present study, we were also able to identify a novel DC-dependent protein, phosphatidylinositol transfer protein beta (PITPbeta), involved in implantation and trophoblast development using a proteomic approach. Indeed, DCKO mice exhibited substantial anomalies in placental development, including hypocellularity of the spongiotrophoblast and labyrinthine layers and reduced numbers of trophoblast giant cells. Giant cells also down-regulated their expression of two characteristic markers of trophoblast differentiation, placental lactogen 1 and proliferin. In view of these findings, dendritic cells emerge as possible modulators in the orchestration of events leading to the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy.

  8. Midkine inhibits inducible regulatory T cell differentiation by suppressing the development of tolerogenic dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonobe, Yoshifumi; Li, Hua; Jin, Shijie; Kishida, Satoshi; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Mizuno, Tetsuya; Suzumura, Akio

    2012-03-15

    Midkine (MK), a heparin-binding growth factor, reportedly contributes to inflammatory diseases, including Crohn's disease and rheumatoid arthritis. We previously showed that MK aggravates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) by decreasing regulatory CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells (Tregs), a population that regulates the development of autoimmune responses, although the precise mechanism remains uncertain. In this article, we show that MK produced in inflammatory conditions suppresses the development of tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCregs), which drive the development of inducible Treg. MK suppressed DCreg-mediated expansion of the CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg population. DCregs expressed significantly higher levels of CD45RB and produced significantly less IL-12 compared with conventional dendritic cells. However, MK downregulated CD45RB expression and induced IL-12 production by reducing phosphorylated STAT3 levels via src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase-2 in DCreg. Inhibiting MK activity with anti-MK RNA aptamers, which bind to the targeted protein to suppress the function of the protein, increased the numbers of CD11c(low)CD45RB(+) dendritic cells and Tregs in the draining lymph nodes and suppressed the severity of EAE, an animal model of multiple sclerosis. Our results also demonstrated that MK was produced by inflammatory cells, in particular, CD4(+) T cells under inflammatory conditions. Taken together, these results suggest that MK aggravates EAE by suppressing DCreg development, thereby impairing the Treg population. Thus, MK is a promising therapeutic target for various autoimmune diseases.

  9. In search of a periodic table of the neurons: Axonal-dendritic circuitry as the organizing principle: Patterns of axons and dendrites within distinct anatomical parcels provide the blueprint for circuit-based neuronal classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascoli, Giorgio A; Wheeler, Diek W

    2016-10-01

    No one knows yet how to organize, in a simple yet predictive form, the knowledge concerning the anatomical, biophysical, and molecular properties of neurons that are accumulating in thousands of publications every year. The situation is not dissimilar to the state of Chemistry prior to Mendeleev's tabulation of the elements. We propose that the patterns of presence or absence of axons and dendrites within known anatomical parcels may serve as the key principle to define neuron types. Just as the positions of the elements in the periodic table indicate their potential to combine into molecules, axonal and dendritic distributions provide the blueprint for network connectivity. Furthermore, among the features commonly employed to describe neurons, morphology is considerably robust to experimental conditions. At the same time, this core classification scheme is suitable for aggregating biochemical, physiological, and synaptic information. © 2016 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Morphological adaptation of sheep's rumen epithelium to high-grain diet entails alteration in the expression of genes involved in cell cycle regulation, cell proliferation and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Wang, Yue; Liu, Junhua; Zhu, Weiyun; Mao, Shengyong

    2018-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize changes in the relative mRNA expression of candidate genes and proteins involved in cell cycle regulation, cell proliferation and apoptosis in the ruminal epithelium (RE) of sheep during high-grain (HG) diet adaptation. Twenty sheep were assigned to four groups with five animals each. These animals were assigned to different periods of HG diet (containing 40% forage and 60% concentrate mix) feeding. The HG groups received an HG diet for 7 (G7, n  = 5), 14 (G14, n  = 5) and 28 d (G28, n  = 5), respectively. In contrast, the control group (CON, n  = 5) was fed the forage-based diet for 28 d. The results showed that HG feeding linearly decreased ( P  genes IGFBP-2 ( P  = 0.034) and IGFBP 5 ( P  gene Caspase 8 decreased (quadratic, P  = 0.012), while Bad mRNA expression tended to decrease (cubic, P  = 0.053) after HG feeding. These results demonstrated sequential changes in rumen papillae size, cell cycle regulation and the genes involved in proliferation and apoptosis as time elapsed in feeding a high-grain diet to sheep.

  11. Visual deprivation alters dendritic bundle architecture in layer 4 of rat visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbott, P L; Stewart, M G

    2012-04-05

    The effect of visual deprivation followed by light exposure on the tangential organisation of dendritic bundles passing through layer 4 of the rat visual cortex was studied quantitatively in the light microscope. Four groups of animals were investigated: (I) rats reared in an environment illuminated normally--group 52 dL; (II) rats reared in the dark until 21 days postnatum (DPN) and subsequently light exposed for 31 days-group 21/31; (III) rats dark reared until 52 DPN and then subsequently light exposed for 3 days--group 3 dL; and (IV) rats totally dark reared until 52 DPN--group 52 DPN. Each group contained five animals. Semithin 0.5-1-μm thick resin-embedded sections were collected from tangential sampling levels through the middle of layer 4 in area 17 and stained with Toluidine Blue. These sections were used to quantitatively analyse the composition and distribution of dendritic clusters in the tangential plane. The key result of this study indicates a significant reduction in the mean number of medium- and small-sized dendritic profiles (diameter less than 2 μm) contributing to clusters in layer 4 of groups 3 dL and 52 dD compared with group 21/31. No differences were detected in the mean number of large-sized dendritic profiles composing a bundle in these experimental groups. Moreover, the mean number of clusters and their tangential distribution in layer 4 did not vary significantly between all four groups. Finally, the clustering parameters were not significantly different between groups 21/31 and the normally reared group 52 dL. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that extended periods of dark rearing followed by light exposure can alter the morphological composition of dendritic bundles in thalamorecipient layer 4 of rat visual cortex. Because these changes occur in the primary region of thalamocortical input, they may underlie specific alterations in the processing of visual information both cortically and subcortically during periods of

  12. Dendritic and axonic fields of Purkinje cells in developing and X-irradiated rat cerebellum. A comparative study using intracellular staining with horseradish peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crepel, F.; Delhaye-Bouchaud, N.; Dupont, J.L.; Sotelo, C.

    1980-01-01

    Intracellular staining of cerebellar Purkinje cells with horseradish peroxidase was achieved in normal developing rats (8-13 days old), in normal adult rats and in adult rats in which the cerebellum had been degranulated by X-ray treatment. The mono- and multiple innervation of Purkinje cells by climbing fibres was electrophysiologically determined and correlated with their dendritic pattern and axonal field. In immature rats, considerable variations in dendritic arborization were observed between cells at the same age, according to their position in the vermis. In adult X-irradiated animals, a large variety of dendritic shapes was found, confirming previous anatomical data, but no obvious correlation was found between the morphology of the dendrites of Purkinje cells and their synaptic investment by climbing fibres. As regards the axonal field, the adult branching pattern of recurrent axon collaterals was almost established by postnatal day 8, except for some cells which exhibited richer recurrent collaterals. On the other hand, in X-irradiated animals, profuse plexuses were the rule and they originated either from one collateral stem, or from several collaterals, also independently of the number of afferent climbing fibres. The existence of these enlarged recurrent collateral plexuses can be explained by the persistence of an immature stage, and certainly also by the collateral sprouting following the largely impaired innervation of the terminal field during development. These results emphasize the role of the cellular interactions that occur during Purkinje cell growth in the formation of both its axonal and dendritic fields. (author)

  13. Dendritic and axonic fields of Purkinje cells in developing and X-irradiated rat cerebellum. A comparative study using intracellular staining with horseradish peroxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crepel, F; Delhaye-Bouchaud, N; Dupont, J L [Paris-5 Univ., 75 (France); Sotelo, C [Hopital Foch, 92 - Suresnes (France). Centre Medico-Chirurgical

    1980-01-01

    Intracellular staining of cerebellar Purkinje cells with horseradish peroxidase was achieved in normal developing rats (8-13 days old), in normal adult rats and in adult rats in which the cerebellum had been degranulated by X-ray treatment. The mono- and multiple innervation of Purkinje cells by climbing fibres was electrophysiologically determined and correlated with their dendritic pattern and axonal field. In immature rats, considerable variations in dendritic arborization were observed between cells at the same age, according to their position in the vermis. In adult X-irradiated animals, a large variety of dendritic shapes was found, confirming previous anatomical data, but no obvious correlation was found between the morphology of the dendrites of Purkinje cells and their synaptic investment by climbing fibres. As regards the axonal field, the adult branching pattern of recurrent axon collaterals was almost established by postnatal day 8, except for some cells which exhibited richer recurrent collaterals. On the other hand, in X-irradiated animals, profuse plexuses were the rule and they originated either from one collateral stem, or from several collaterals, also independently of the number of afferent climbing fibres. The existence of these enlarged recurrent collateral plexuses can be explained by the persistence of an immature stage, and certainly also by the collateral sprouting following the largely impaired innervation of the terminal field during development. These results emphasize the role of the cellular interactions that occur during Purkinje cell growth in the formation of both its axonal and dendritic fields.

  14. Regulation of the Deposition Morphology of Inkjet-Printed Crystalline Materials via Polydopamine Functional Coatings for Highly Uniform and Electrically Conductive Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liang; Ma, Siyuan; Pei, Yunheng; Xiong, Xiao; Sivakumar, Preeth; Singler, Timothy J

    2016-08-24

    We report a method to achieve highly uniform inkjet-printed silver nitrate (AgNO3) and a reactive silver precursor patterns on rigid and flexible substrates functionalized with polydopamine (PDA) coatings. The printed AgNO3 patterns on PDA-coated substrates (glass and polyethylene terephthalate (PET)) exhibit a narrow thickness distribution ranging between 0.9 and 1 μm in the line transverse direction and uniform deposition profiles in the line axial direction. The deposited reactive silver precursor patterns on PDA-functionalized substrates also show "dome-shaped" morphology without "edge-thickened" structure due to "coffee-stain" effect. We posit that the highly uniform functional ink deposits formed on PDA-coated substrates are attributable to the strong binding interaction between the abundant catecholamine moieties at the PDA surface and the metallic silver cations (Ag(+) or Ag(NH3)(2+)) in the solutal inks. During printing of the ink rivulet and solvent evaporation, the substrate-liquid ink (S-L) interface is enriched with the silver-based cations and a solidification at the S/L interface is induced. The preferential solidification initiated at the S-L interface is further verified by the in situ visualization of the dynamic solidification process during solvent evaporation, and results suggest an enhanced crystal nucleation and growth localized at the S-L interface on PDA functionalized substrates. This interfacial interaction mediates solute transport in the liquid phase, resulting in the controlled enrichment of solute at the S-L interface and mitigated solute precipitation in both the contact line region and the liquid ink-vapor (L-V) interface due to evaporation. This mediated transport contributes to the final uniform solid deposition for both types of ink systems. This technique provides a complementary strategy for achieving highly uniform inkjet-printed crystalline structures, and can serve as an innovative foundation for high-precision additive

  15. In search of a periodic table of the neurons: Axonal-dendritic circuitry as the organizing principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascoli, Giorgio A.; Wheeler, Diek W.

    2016-01-01

    Summary No one knows yet how to organize, in a simple yet predictive form, the knowledge concerning the anatomical, biophysical, and molecular properties of neurons that are accumulating in thousands of publications every year. The situation is not dissimilar to the state of Chemistry prior to Mendeleev’s tabulation of the elements. We propose that the patterns of presence or absence of axons and dendrites within known anatomical parcels may serve as the key principle to define neuron types. Just as the positions of the elements in the Periodic Table indicate their potential to combine into molecules, axonal and dendritic distributions provide the blueprint for network connectivity. Furthermore, among the features commonly employed to describe neurons, morphology is considerably robust to experimental conditions. At the same time, this core classification scheme is suitable for aggregating biochemical, physiological, and synaptic information. PMID:27516119

  16. Mathematical foundations of the dendritic growth models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villacorta, José A; Castro, Jorge; Negredo, Pilar; Avendaño, Carlos

    2007-11-01

    At present two growth models describe successfully the distribution of size and topological complexity in populations of dendritic trees with considerable accuracy and simplicity, the BE model (Van Pelt et al. in J. Comp. Neurol. 387:325-340, 1997) and the S model (Van Pelt and Verwer in Bull. Math. Biol. 48:197-211, 1986). This paper discusses the mathematical basis of these models and analyzes quantitatively the relationship between the BE model and the S model assumed in the literature by developing a new explicit equation describing the BES model (a dendritic growth model integrating the features of both preceding models; Van Pelt et al. in J. Comp. Neurol. 387:325-340, 1997). In numerous studies it is implicitly presupposed that the S model is conditionally linked to the BE model (Granato and Van Pelt in Brain Res. Dev. Brain Res. 142:223-227, 2003; Uylings and Van Pelt in Network 13:397-414, 2002; Van Pelt, Dityatev and Uylings in J. Comp. Neurol. 387:325-340, 1997; Van Pelt and Schierwagen in Math. Biosci. 188:147-155, 2004; Van Pelt and Uylings in Network. 13:261-281, 2002; Van Pelt, Van Ooyen and Uylings in Modeling Dendritic Geometry and the Development of Nerve Connections, pp 179, 2000). In this paper we prove the non-exactness of this assumption, quantify involved errors and determine the conditions under which the BE and S models can be separately used instead of the BES model, which is more exact but considerably more difficult to apply. This study leads to a novel expression describing the BE model in an analytical closed form, much more efficient than the traditional iterative equation (Van Pelt et al. in J. Comp. Neurol. 387:325-340, 1997) in many neuronal classes. Finally we propose a ne